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Sample records for engine thrust chamber

  1. Rocket Engine Thrust Chamber Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelius, Charles S. (Inventor); Counts, Richard H. (Inventor); Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Lackey, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Peters, Warren (Inventor); Shadoan, Michael (Inventor); Sparks, David L. (Inventor); Lawrence, Timothy W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A thrust chamber assembly for liquid fueled rocket engines and the method of making it wherein a two-piece mandrel having the configuration of an assembly having a combustion chamber portion connected to a nozzle portion through a throat portion is wrapped with a silica tape saturated with a phenolic resin, the tape extending along the mandrel and covering the combustion chamber portion of the mandrel to the throat portion. The width of the tape is positioned at an angle of 30 to 50 deg. to the axis of the mandrel such that one edge of the tape contacts the mandrel while the other edge is spaced from the mandrel. The phenolic in the tape is cured and the end of the wrap is machined to provide a frusto-conical surface extending at an angle of 15 to 30 deg. with respect to the axis of the mandrel for starting a second wrap on the mandrel to cover the throat portion. The remainder of the mandrel is wrapped with a third silica tape having its width positioned at a angle of 5 to 20 deg. from the axis of the mandrel. The resin in the third tape is cured and the assembly is machined to provide a smooth outer surface. The entire assembly is then wrapped with a tow of graphite fibers wetted with an epoxy resin and, after the epoxy resin is cured, the graphite is machined to final dimensions.

  2. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauckert, R. P.; Yost, M. C.; Tobin, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted on the regenerative cooled thrust chamber of the space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine. The conditions for the tests and the durations obtained are presented. The tests demonstrated thrust chamber operation over the nominal ranges of chamber pressure mixture ratio. Variations in auxiliary film coolant flowrate were also demonstrated. High pressure tests were conducted to demonstrate the thrust chamber operation at conditions approaching the design chamber pressure for the derivative space tug application.

  3. A Regeneratively-Cooled Thrust Chamber for the Fastrac Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Kendall; Sparks, Dave; Woodcock, Gordon; Jim Turner (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This document consists of presentation slides about the development of the regeneratively cooled thrust chamber for the Fastrac engine. The Fastrac engine was originally developed to demonstrate low cost design and fabrication methods. It was intended to be used in an expendable booster. The regen thrust chamber enables a more cost efficient test program. Using the low cost design and fabrication methodology designed for the 12K regeneratively cooled chamber, the contractor designed, developed and fabricated a regeneratively cooled thrust chamber for the Fastrac engine.

  4. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senneff, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of potential reusable thrust chamber concepts is studied. Propellant condidates were examined and analytically combined with potential cooling schemes. A data base of engine data which would assist in a configuration selection was produced. The data base verification was performed by the demonstration of a thrust chamber of a selected coolant scheme design. A full scale insulated columbium thrust chamber was used for propellant coolant configurations. Combustion stability of the injectors and a reduced size thrust chamber were experimentally verified as proof of concept demonstrations of the design and study results.

  5. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senneff, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    Reusable thrust chamber and injector concepts were evaluated for the space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine (OME). Parametric engine calculations were carried out by computer program for N2O4/amine, LOX/amine and LOX/hydrocarbon propellant combinations for engines incorporating regenerative cooled and insulated columbium thrust chambers. The calculation methods are described including the fuel vortex film cooling method of combustion gas temperature control, and performance prediction. A method of acceptance of a regeneratively cooled heat rejection reduction using a silicone oil additive was also demonstrated by heated tube heat transfer testing. Regeneratively cooled thrust chamber operation was also demonstrated where the injector was characterized for the OME application with a channel wall regenerative thrust chamber. Bomb stability testing of the demonstration chambers/injectors demonstrated recovery for the nominal design of acoustic cavities. Cavity geometry changes were also evaluated to assess their damping margin. Performance and combustion stability was demonstrated of the originally developed 10 inch diameter combustion pattern operating in an 8 inch diameter thrust chamber.

  6. A Regeneratively Cooled Thrust Chamber For The Fastrac Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Kendall K.; Sparks, Dave; Woodcock, Gordon

    2000-01-01

    Abstract This paper presents the development of a low-cost, regeneratively-cooled thrust chamber for the Fastrac engine. The chamber was fabricated using hydraformed copper tubing to form the coolant jacket and wrapped with a fiber reinforced polymer composite Material to form a structural jacket. The thrust chamber design and fabrication approach was based upon Space America. Inc.'s 12,000 lb regeneratively-cooled LOX/kerosene rocket engine. Fabrication of regeneratively cooled thrust chambers by tubewall construction dates back to the early US ballistic missile programs. The most significant innovations in this design was the development of a low-cost process for fabrication from copper tubing (nickel alloy was the usual practice) and use of graphite composite overwrap as the pressure containment, which yields an easily fabricated, lightweight pressure jacket around the copper tubes A regeneratively-cooled reusable thrust chamber can benefit the Fastrac engine program by allowing more efficient (cost and scheduler testing). A proof-of-concept test article has been fabricated and will he tested at Marshall Space Flight Center in the late Summer or Fall of 2000.

  7. Numerical simulation of variable thrust engine combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tsung L.; Chiang, Wei-Tang; Jang, Shyh-Dihng

    1992-07-01

    Numerical computations have been conducted for the combustion and fluid-dynamic processes of a variable thrust engine's combustion chamber at the choking condition for two different power levels. The engine in question is to be used by an orbital-maneuvering vehicle. Physical submodels are used in order to account for the two-phase interaction between bipropellant droplet flows and gas-phase flow; nozzle throat conditions are determined by both mass-conservation and thermodynamic relations. In view of the results obtained, the conventional association between fineness of fuel spray and the maximization of combustor efficiency requires reassessment.

  8. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauckert, R. P.; Tobin, R. D.

    1975-01-01

    Analyses and preliminary designs of candidate OME propellant combinations and corresponding engine designs were conducted and evaluated in terms of performance, operating limits, program cost, risk, inherent life and maintainability. For the Rocketdyne recommended and NASA approved propellant combination and cooling concept (NTO/MMH regeneratively cooled engine), a demonstration thrust chamber was designed, fabricated, and experimentally evaluated to define operating characteristics and limits. Alternate fuel (50-50) operating characteristics were also investigated with the demonstration chamber. Adverse operating effects on regenerative cooled operation were evaluated using subscale electrically heated tubes and channels. An investigation of like doublet element characteristics using subscale tests was performed. Full scale 8- and 10-inch diameter like-doublet injectors for the OME were designed, fabricated, and tested. Injector stability was evaluated analytically and experimentally.

  9. Experiments on heat transfer in a cryogenic engine thrust chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugathan, N.; Srinivasan, K.; Srinivasa Murthy, S.

    1993-04-01

    Tests are conducted on a cryogenic engine using liquid oxygen as oxidizer and gaseous hydrogen as fuel with water as a coolant. The coolant flow passage of the thrust chamber is of milled channel configuration. Measured heat transfer results compare well with those predicted by a thermal analysis using the standard Bartz correlation and the Hess and Kunz correlation for hot gas side and coolant side heat transfer coefficients, respectively. This confirms the conclusions of a recent theoretical study by the authors in which a comparison of various heat transfer correlations was made.

  10. Space transportation booster engine thrust chamber technology, large scale injector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the Large Scale Injector (LSI) program was to deliver a 21 inch diameter, 600,000 lbf thrust class injector to NASA/MSFC for hot fire testing. The hot fire test program would demonstrate the feasibility and integrity of the full scale injector, including combustion stability, chamber wall compatibility (thermal management), and injector performance. The 21 inch diameter injector was delivered in September of 1991.

  11. Improved Rhenium Thrust Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, John Scott

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-cooled bipropellant thrust chambers are being considered for ascent/ descent engines and reaction control systems on various NASA missions and spacecraft, such as the Mars Sample Return and Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). Currently, iridium (Ir)-lined rhenium (Re) combustion chambers are the state of the art for in-space engines. NASA's Advanced Materials Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) engine, a 150-lbf Ir-Re chamber produced by Plasma Processes and Aerojet Rocketdyne, recently set a hydrazine specific impulse record of 333.5 seconds. To withstand the high loads during terrestrial launch, Re chambers with improved mechanical properties are needed. Recent electrochemical forming (EL-Form"TM") results have shown considerable promise for improving Re's mechanical properties by producing a multilayered deposit composed of a tailored microstructure (i.e., Engineered Re). The Engineered Re processing techniques were optimized, and detailed characterization and mechanical properties tests were performed. The most promising techniques were selected and used to produce an Engineered Re AMBR-sized combustion chamber for testing at Aerojet Rocketdyne.

  12. Potential Applications of the Ceramic Thrust Chamber Technology for Future Transpiration Cooled Rocket Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbertz, Armin; Ortelt, Markus; Müller, Ilja; Hald, Hermann

    The long-term development of ceramic rocket engine thrust chambers at the German Aerospace Center(DLR) currently leads to designs of self-sustaining, transpiration-cooled, fiber-reinforced ceramic rocket engine chamber structures.This paper discusses characteristic issues and potential benefits introduced by this technology. Achievable benefits are the reduction of weight and manufacturing cost, as well as an increased reliability and higher lifetime due to thermal cycle stability.Experiments with porous Ceramic Matrix Composite(CMC) materials for rocket engine chamber walls have been conducted at the DLR since the end of the 1990s.This paper discusses the current status of DLR's ceramic thrust chamber technology and potential applications for high thrust engines.The manufacturing process and the design concept are explained.The impact of variations of engine parameters(chamber pressure and diam-eter)on the required coolant mass flow are discussed.Due to favorable scaling effects a high thrust application utilizes all benefits of the discussed technology, while avoiding the most significant performance drawbacks.

  13. Status on the Verification of Combustion Stability for the J-2X Engine Thrust Chamber Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casiano, Matthew; Hinerman, Tim; Kenny, R. Jeremy; Hulka, Jim; Barnett, Greg; Dodd, Fred; Martin, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Development is underway of the J -2X engine, a liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen rocket engine for use on the Space Launch System. The Engine E10001 began hot fire testing in June 2011 and testing will continue with subsequent engines. The J -2X engine main combustion chamber contains both acoustic cavities and baffles. These stability aids are intended to dampen the acoustics in the main combustion chamber. Verification of the engine thrust chamber stability is determined primarily by examining experimental data using a dynamic stability rating technique; however, additional requirements were included to guard against any spontaneous instability or rough combustion. Startup and shutdown chug oscillations are also characterized for this engine. This paper details the stability requirements and verification including low and high frequency dynamics, a discussion on sensor selection and sensor port dynamics, and the process developed to assess combustion stability. A status on the stability results is also provided and discussed.

  14. Thrust chamber life prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasper, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    The reusable life of the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) is influenced by the cyclic life of the regeneratively liquid cooled main combustion chamber (MCC). During an operational duty cycle the MCC liner is subjected to a large transient thermal gradient that imparts a high thermal cyclic strain to the liner hot gas wall. Life predictions of such chambers have usually been based on low cycle fatigue (LCF) evaluations. Hot-fire testing, however, has shown significant mid-channel wall deformation and thinning during accrued cyclic testing. This phenomenon is termed cyclic creep and appears to be significantly accelerated at elevated temperatures. An analytical method that models the cyclic creep phenomenon and its application to thrust chamber life prediction is presented. The chamber finite element geometry is updated periodically to account for accrued wall thinning and distortion. Failure is based on the tensile instability failure criterion. Cyclic life results for several chamber life enhancing coolant channel designs are compared to the typically used LCF analysis that neglects cyclic creep. The results show that the usable cyclic creep life is approximately 30 to 50% of the commonly used LCF life.

  15. Multiphysics Analysis of a Solid-Core Nuclear Thermal Engine Thrust Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Canabal, Francisco; Cheng, Gary; Chen, Yen-Sen

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop an efficient and accurate thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for a hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine thrust chamber. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics methodology. Formulations for heat transfer in solids and porous media were implemented and anchored. A two-pronged approach was employed in this effort: A detailed thermo-fluid analysis on a multi-channel flow element for mid-section corrosion investigation; and a global modeling of the thrust chamber to understand the effect of hydrogen dissociation and recombination on heat transfer and thrust performance. The formulations and preliminary results on both aspects are presented.

  16. Development of Improved Rhenium Coatings for Fluorine Engine Thrust Chambers. [hydrazine-fluorine rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, K. J.; Yurkewycz, R.; Harada, Y.; Daniels, I.

    1981-01-01

    Coating trials were undertaken to evaluate the application of rhenium to carbon-carbon composite sheet by plasma spraying. Optimum spray parameters and coating thickness were identified for production of coatings free from continuous defects and with adequate adherence to the substrate. A tungsten underlayer was not beneficial and possibly detracted from coating integrity. Stress calculations indicated that the proposed operating cycle of the rocket engine would not cause spalling of the rhenium coating. Calculations indicated that permeation of gases through the coating would not be significant during the expected life of the thrust chamber. The feasibility of applying rhenium coatings by laser melting was also studied. Poor wetting of the composite surface by the liquid rhenium precluded production of uniform coatings. Borate/carborate fluxes did not improve wetting characteristics.

  17. Technology developments for thrust chambers of future launch vehicle liquid rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immich, H.; Alting, J.; Kretschmer, J.; Preclik, D.

    2003-08-01

    In this paper an overview of recent technology developments for thrust chambers of future launch vehicle liquid rocket engines at Astrium, Space Infrastructure Division (SI), is shown. The main technology. developments shown in this paper are: Technologies Technologies for enhanced heat transfer to the coolant for expander cycle engines Advanced injector head technologies Advanced combustion chamber manufacturing technologies. The main technologies for enhanced heat transfer investigated by subscale chamber hot-firing tests are: Increase of chamber length Hot gas side ribs in the chamber Artificially increased surface roughness. The developments for advanced injector head technologies were focused on the design of a new modular subscale chamber injector head. This injector head allows for an easy exchange of different injection elements: By this, cost effective hot-fire tests with different injection element concepts can be performed. The developments for advanced combustion chamber manufacturing technologies are based on subscale chamber tests with a new design of the Astrium subscale chamber. The subscale chamber has been modified by introduction of a segmented cooled cylindrical section which gives the possibility to test different manufacturing concepts for cooled chamber technologies by exchanging the individual segments. The main technology efforts versus advanced manufacturing technologies shown in this paper are: Soldering techniques Thermal barrier coatings for increased chamber life. A new technology effort is dedicated especially to LOX/Hydrocarbon propellant combinations. Recent hot fire tests on the subscale chamber with Kerosene and Methane as fuel have already been performed. A comprehensive engine system trade-off between the both propellant combinations (Kerosene vs. Methane) is presently under preparation.

  18. Prediction of engine performance and wall erosion due to film cooling for the 'fast track' ablative thrust chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.

    1994-01-01

    Efforts have been made at the Propulsion Laboratory (MSFC) to design and develop new liquid rocket engines for small-class launch vehicles. Emphasis of the efforts is to reduce the engine development time with the use of conventional designs while meeting engine reliability criteria. Consequently, the engine cost should be reduced. A demonstrative ablative thrust chamber, called 'fast-track', has been built. To support the design of the 'fast-track' thrust chamber, predictions of the wall temperature and ablation erosion rate of the 'fast-track' thrust chamber have been performed using the computational fluid dynamics program REFLEQS (Reactive Flow Equation Solver). The analysis is intended to assess the amount of fuel to be used for film cooling so that the erosion rate of the chamber ablation does not exceed its allowable limit. In addition, the thrust chamber performance loss due to an increase of the film cooling is examined.

  19. Multiphysics Computational Analysis of a Solid-Core Nuclear Thermal Engine Thrust Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Canabal, Francisco; Cheng, Gary; Chen, Yen-Sen

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop an efficient and accurate computational heat transfer methodology to predict thermal, fluid, and hydrogen environments for a hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine - the Small Engine. In addition, the effects of power profile and hydrogen conversion on heat transfer efficiency and thrust performance were also investigated. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based, all speeds, chemically reacting, computational fluid dynamics platform, while formulations of conjugate heat transfer were implemented to describe the heat transfer from solid to hydrogen inside the solid-core reactor. The computational domain covers the entire thrust chamber so that the afore-mentioned heat transfer effects impact the thrust performance directly. The result shows that the computed core-exit gas temperature, specific impulse, and core pressure drop agree well with those of design data for the Small Engine. Finite-rate chemistry is very important in predicting the proper energy balance as naturally occurring hydrogen decomposition is endothermic. Locally strong hydrogen conversion associated with centralized power profile gives poor heat transfer efficiency and lower thrust performance. On the other hand, uniform hydrogen conversion associated with a more uniform radial power profile achieves higher heat transfer efficiency, and higher thrust performance.

  20. Space shuttle maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program. Task 11: Low Epsilon stability test plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauckert, R. P.

    1974-01-01

    The performance and heat transfer characteristics of a doublet element type injector for the space shuttle orbiter maneuvering engine thrust chamber were investigated. Ths stability characteristics were evaluated over a range of chamber pressures and mixture ratios. The specific objectives of the test were: (1) to determine whether stability has been influenced by injection of boundary layer coolant across the cavity entrance, (2) if the injector is stable, to determine the minimum cavity area required to maintain stability, and (3) if the injector is unstable, to determine the effects of entrance geometry and increased area on stability.

  1. Thrust chamber performance using Navier-Stokes solution. [space shuttle main engine viscous nozzle calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, J. S.; Freeman, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The viscous, axisymmetric flow in the thrust chamber of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) was computed on the CRAY 205 computer using the general interpolants method (GIM) code. Results show that the Navier-Stokes codes can be used for these flows to study trends and viscous effects as well as determine flow patterns; but further research and development is needed before they can be used as production tools for nozzle performance calculations. The GIM formulation, numerical scheme, and computer code are described. The actual SSME nozzle computation showing grid points, flow contours, and flow parameter plots is discussed. The computer system and run times/costs are detailed.

  2. Development of a simplified procedure for rocket engine thrust chamber life prediction with creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badlani, M. L.; Porowski, J. S.; Odonnell, W. J.; Peterson, D. B.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical method for predicting engine thrust chamber life is developed. The method accounts for high pressure differentials and time-dependent creep effects both of which are significant in limiting the useful life of the shuttle main engine thrust chamber. The hot-gas-wall ligaments connecting adjacent cooling channels ribs and separating the coolant flow from the combustion gas are subjected to a high pressure induced primary stress superimposed on an alternating cyclic thermal strain field. The pressure load combined with strain-controlled cycling produces creep ratcheting and consequent bulging and thinning of these ligaments. This mechanism of creep-enhanced ratcheting is analyzed for determining the hot-gas-wall deformation and accumulated strain. Results are confirmed by inelastic finite element analysis. Fatigue and creep rupture damage as well as plastic tensile instability are evaluated as potential failure modes. It is demonstrated for the NARloy Z cases analyzed that when pressure differentials across the ligament are high, creep rupture damage is often the primary failure mode for the cycle times considered.

  3. LOX-Hydrocarbon Rocket Engines and Thrust Chamber Technologies for Future Launch Vehicle Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeseler, Dietrich; Mäding, Chris

    2002-01-01

    Recent investigations into the use of hydrocarbon fuels for launcher propulsion and in-orbit propulsion show the potential to satisfy the market's performance and cost requirements. The main expected advantages compared to current cryogenic and storable propellants are reduced handling effort and reduced safety precautions. Large liquid boosters or first stages for expendable and reusable vehicles are seen today as major application areas. Engine and stage concepts have been compared assuming various possible propellant combinations with hydrocarbon fuels. The expected characteristics like performance, dry mass, and development status are compared. Both expendable as well as reusable vehicle stages were considered. Investigations aiming at identifying the optimum hydrocarbon propellant in view of thrust chamber performance and engine system have been performed. System studies were performed to conclude on propellant selection, the propulsion system configuration, and the most economic engine cycle for the considered applications. The chamber cooling was assessed for envisaged chamber operational conditions in view of cooling limitations by propellant dissociation and coking. Since 1993 injector and combustion chamber technologies for the applications of different hydrocarbon propellant combinations are investigated by Astrium Space Infrastructure. The operation with hydrocarbon propellants was already demonstrated with an existing Aestus engine in cooperation with Boeing Propulsion and Power. Test have been performed with a subscale combustion chamber with the selected propellants LOX-methane and LOX-kerosene to confirm operation feasibility, cooling, and performance in a cooperation of Astrium with Chemieautomatics Design Bureau in Russia. Several injection concepts have been studied to allow a comparison and down-selection for future application. A continuation of this program is currently under preparation.

  4. Aerospike thrust chamber program. [cumulative damage and maintenance of structural members in hydrogen oxygen engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J., Jr.; Cobb, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    An existing, but damaged, 25,000-pound thrust, flightweight, oxygen/hydrogen aerospike rocket thrust chamber was disassembled and partially repaired. A description is presented of the aerospike chamber configuration and of the damage it had suffered. Techniques for aerospike thrust chamber repair were developed, and are described, covering repair procedures for lightweight tubular nozzles, titanium thrust structures, and copper channel combustors. Effort was terminated prior to completion of the repairs and conduct of a planned hot fire test program when it was found that the copper alloy walls of many of the thrust chamber's 24 combustors had been degraded in strength and ductility during the initial fabrication of the thrust chamber. The degradation is discussed and traced to a reaction between oxygen and/or oxides diffused into the copper alloy during fabrication processes and the hydrogen utilized as a brazing furnace atmosphere during the initial assembly operation on many of the combustors. The effects of the H2/O2 reaction within the copper alloy are described.

  5. A hydrogen-oxygen rocket engine coolant passage design program (RECOP) for fluid-cooled thrust chambers and nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsik, Thomas M.

    1994-01-01

    The design of coolant passages in regeneratively cooled thrust chambers is critical to the operation and safety of a rocket engine system. Designing a coolant passage is a complex thermal and hydraulic problem requiring an accurate understanding of the heat transfer between the combustion gas and the coolant. Every major rocket engine company has invested in the development of thrust chamber computer design and analysis tools; two examples are Rocketdyne's REGEN code and Aerojet's ELES program. In an effort to augment current design capabilities for government and industry, the NASA Lewis Research Center is developing a computer model to design coolant passages for advanced regeneratively cooled thrust chambers. The RECOP code incorporates state-of-the-art correlations, numerical techniques and design methods, certainly minimum requirements for generating optimum designs of future space chemical engines. A preliminary version of the RECOP model was recently completed and code validation work is in progress. This paper introduces major features of RECOP and compares the analysis to design points for the first test case engine; the Pratt & Whitney RL10A-3-3A thrust chamber.

  6. Lightweight Chambers for Thrust Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, Sandra K.; Lee, Jonathan; Holmes, Richard; Zimmerman, Frank; Effinger, Mike; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has successfully applied new materials and fabrication techniques to create actively cooled thrust chambers that operate 200-400 degrees hotter and weigh 50% lighter than conventional designs. In some vehicles, thrust assemblies account for as much as 20% of the engine weight. So, reducing the weight of these components and increasing their operating range will benefit many engines and vehicle designs, including Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) concepts. Obviously, copper and steel alloys have been used successfully for many years in the chamber components of thrust assemblies. Yet, by replacing the steel alloys with Polymer Matrix Composite (PMC) and/or Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) materials, design weights can be drastically reduced. In addition, replacing the traditional copper alloys with a Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) or an advanced copper alloy (Cu-8Cr-4Nb, also known as GRCop-84) significantly increases allowable operating temperatures. Several small MMC and PMC demonstration chambers have recently been fabricated with promising results. Each of these designs included GRCop-84 for the cooled chamber liner. These units successfully verified that designs over 50% lighter are feasible. New fabrication processes, including advanced casting technology and a low cost vacuum plasma spray (VPS) process, were also demonstrated with these units. Hot-fire testing at MSFC is currently being conducted on the chambers to verify increased operating temperatures available with the GRCop-84 liner. Unique CMC chamber liners were also successfully fabricated and prepared for hot-fire testing. Yet, early results indicate these CMC liners need significantly more development in order to use them in required chamber designs. Based on the successful efforts with the MMC and PMC concepts, two full size "lightweight" chambers are currently being designed and fabricated for hot

  7. Lightweight Chambers for Thrust Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, Sandra K.; Lee, Jonathan; Holmes, Richard; Zimmerman, Frank; Effinger, Mike; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has successfully applied new materials and fabrication techniques to create actively cooled thrust chambers that operate 200-400 degrees hotter and weigh 50% lighter than conventional designs. In some vehicles, thrust assemblies account for as much as 20% of the engine weight. So, reducing the weight of these components and increasing their operating range will benefit many engines and vehicle designs, including Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) concepts. Obviously, copper and steel alloys have been used successfully for many years in the chamber components of thrust assemblies. Yet, by replacing the steel alloys with Polymer Matrix Composite (PMC) and/or Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) materials, design weights can be drastically reduced. In addition, replacing the traditional copper alloys with a Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) or an advanced copper alloy (Cu-8Cr-4Nb, also known as GRCop-84) significantly increases allowable operating temperatures. Several small MMC and PMC demonstration chambers have recently been fabricated with promising results. Each of these designs included GRCop-84 for the cooled chamber liner. These units successfully verified that designs over 50% lighter are feasible. New fabrication processes, including advanced casting technology and a low cost vacuum plasma spray (VPS) process, were also demonstrated with these units. Hot-fire testing at MSFC is currently being conducted on the chambers to verify increased operating temperatures available with the GRCop-84 liner. Unique CMC chamber liners were also successfully fabricated and prepared for hot-fire testing. Yet, early results indicate these CMC liners need significantly more development in order to use them in required chamber designs. Based on the successful efforts with the MMC and PMC concepts, two full size "lightweight" chambers are currently being designed and fabricated for hot

  8. Tubular copper thrust chamber design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, A. I.; Galler, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    The use of copper tubular thrust chambers is particularly important in high performance expander cycle space engines. Tubular chambers have more surface area than flat wall chambers, and this extra surface area provides enhanced heat transfer for additional energy to power the cycle. This paper was divided into two sections: (1) a thermal analysis and sensitivity study; and (2) a preliminary design of a selected thrust chamber configuration. The thermal analysis consisted of a statistical optimization to determine the optimum tube geometry, tube booking, thrust chamber geometry, and cooling routing to achieve the maximum upper limit chamber pressure for a 25,000 pound thrust engine. The preliminary design effort produced a layout drawing of a tubular thrust chamber that is three inches shorter than the Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) milled channel chamber but is predicted to provide a five percent increase in heat transfer. Testing this chamber in the AETB would confirm the inherent advantages of tubular chamber construction and heat transfer.

  9. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine, reusable thrust chamber program. Task 6: Data dump hot fuel element investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurick, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation of reusable thrust chambers for the space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine was conducted. Tests were conducted using subscale injector hot-fire procedures for the injector configurations designed for a regenerative cooled engine. The effect of operating conditions and fuel temperature on combustion chamber performance was determined. Specific objectives of the evaluation were to examine the optimum like-doublet element geometry for operation at conditions consistent with a fuel regeneratively cooled engine (hot fuel, 200 to 250 F) and the sensitivity of the triplet injector element to hot fuels.

  10. Lightweight Chambers for Thrust Cell Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, Sandy; Effinger, Mike; Holmes, Dick; Lee, Jonathan; Jaskowiak, Martha; Turner, Jim E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This is a viewgraph presentation which reviews the progress in the development of lightweight chambers for thrust cell applications. The objective of the program is to reduce thrust assembly weights to create lighter engines which will allow for an increase in the payload. Using new composite materials and fabrication technologies the team has constructed 7 different thrust cell demonstration units. The materials used in the demonstration units are reviewed.

  11. Thrust chamber material technology program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrus, J. S.; Bordeau, R. G.

    1989-03-01

    This report covers work performed at Pratt & Whitney on development of copper-based materials for long-life, reusable, regeneratively cooled rocket engine thrust chambers. The program approached the goal of enhanced cyclic life through the application of rapid solidification to alloy development, to introduce fine dispersions to strengthen and stabilize the alloys at elevated temperatures. After screening of alloy systems, copper-based alloys containing Cr, Co, Hf, Ag, Ti, and Zr were processed by rapid-solidification atomization in bulk quantities. Those bulk alloys showing the most promise were characterized by tensile testing, thermal conductivity testing, and elevated-temperature, low-cycle fatigue (LFC) testing. Characterization indicated that Cu- 1.1 percent Hf exhibited the greatest potential as an improved-life thrust chamber material, exhibiting LCF life about four times that of NASA-Z. Other alloys (Cu- 0.6 percent Zr, and Cu- 0.6 percent Zr- 1.0 percent Cr) exhibited promise for use in this application, but needed more development work to balance properties.

  12. Thrust chamber material technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrus, J. S.; Bordeau, R. G.

    1989-01-01

    This report covers work performed at Pratt & Whitney on development of copper-based materials for long-life, reusable, regeneratively cooled rocket engine thrust chambers. The program approached the goal of enhanced cyclic life through the application of rapid solidification to alloy development, to introduce fine dispersions to strengthen and stabilize the alloys at elevated temperatures. After screening of alloy systems, copper-based alloys containing Cr, Co, Hf, Ag, Ti, and Zr were processed by rapid-solidification atomization in bulk quantities. Those bulk alloys showing the most promise were characterized by tensile testing, thermal conductivity testing, and elevated-temperature, low-cycle fatigue (LFC) testing. Characterization indicated that Cu- 1.1 percent Hf exhibited the greatest potential as an improved-life thrust chamber material, exhibiting LCF life about four times that of NASA-Z. Other alloys (Cu- 0.6 percent Zr, and Cu- 0.6 percent Zr- 1.0 percent Cr) exhibited promise for use in this application, but needed more development work to balance properties.

  13. Test plan pressure fed thrust chamber technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Glenn

    1990-01-01

    Aerojet is developing the technology for the design of a reliable, low cost, efficient, and lightweight LOX/RP-1 pressure fed engine. This technology program is a direct result of Aerojet's liquid rocket booster (LRB) study and previous NASA studies that identified liquid engines using high bulk density hydrocarbon fuels as very attractive for a space transportation system (STS). Previous large thrust LOX/RP-1 engine development programs were characterized by costly development problems due to combustion instability damage. The combustion stability solution was typically obtained through trial and error methods of minimizing instability damage by degrading engine performance. The approach to this program was to utilize existing and newly developed combustion analysis models and design methodology to create a thrust chamber design with features having the potential of producing reliable and efficient operation. This process resulted in an engine design with a unique high thrust-per-element OFO triplet injector utilizing a low cost modular approach. Cost efficient ablative materials are baselined for the injector face and chamber. Technology demonstration will be accomplished through a hot fire test program using appropriately sized subscale hardware. This subscale testing will provide a data base to supplement the current industry data bank and to anchor and validate the applied analysis models and design methodology. Once anchored and validated, these analysis models and design methodology can be applied with greatly increased confidence to design and characterize a large scale pressure fed LOX/RP-1 thrust chamber. The objective of this test program is to generate a data base that can be used to anchor and validate existing analysis models and design methodologies and to provide early concept demonstration of a low cost, efficient LOX/RP-1 thrust chamber. Test conditions and hardware instrumentation were defined to provide data sufficient to characterize combustion

  14. Multiphysics Nuclear Thermal Rocket Thrust Chamber Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this effort is t o develop an efficient and accurate thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical thrust chamber design and analysis. The current task scope is to perform multidimensional, multiphysics analysis of thrust performance and heat transfer analysis for a hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine including thrust chamber and nozzle. The multiphysics aspects of the model include: real fluid dynamics, chemical reactivity, turbulent flow, and conjugate heat transfer. The model will be designed to identify thermal, fluid, and hydrogen environments in all flow paths and materials. This model would then be used to perform non- nuclear reproduction of the flow element failures demonstrated in the Rover/NERVA testing, investigate performance of specific configurations and assess potential issues and enhancements. A two-pronged approach will be employed in this effort: a detailed analysis of a multi-channel, flow-element, and global modeling of the entire thrust chamber assembly with a porosity modeling technique. It is expected that the detailed analysis of a single flow element would provide detailed fluid, thermal, and hydrogen environments for stress analysis, while the global thrust chamber assembly analysis would promote understanding of the effects of hydrogen dissociation and heat transfer on thrust performance. These modeling activities will be validated as much as possible by testing performed by other related efforts.

  15. Advanced tube-bundle rocket thrust chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazaroff, John M.; Pavli, Albert J.

    1990-01-01

    An advanced rocket thrust chamber for future space application is described along with an improved method of fabrication. Potential benefits of the concept are improved cyclic life, reusability, and performance. Performance improvements are anticipated because of the enhanced heat transfer into the coolant which will enable higher chamber pressure in expander cycle engines. Cyclic life, reusability and reliability improvements are anticipated because of the enhanced structural compliance inherent in the construction. The method of construction involves the forming of the combustion chamber with a tube-bundle of high conductivity copper or copper alloy tubes, and the bonding of these tubes by an electroforming operation. Further, the method of fabrication reduces chamber complexity by incorporating manifolds, jackets, and structural stiffeners while having the potential for thrust chamber cost and weight reduction.

  16. Advanced tube-bundle rocket thrust chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazaroff, John M.; Pavli, Albert J.

    1990-01-01

    An advanced rocket thrust chamber for future space application is described along with an improved method of fabrication. Potential benefits of the concept are improved cyclic life, reusability, and performance. Performance improvements are anticipated because of the enhanced heat transfer into the coolant which will enable higher chamber pressure in expander cycle engines. Cyclic life, reusability and reliability improvements are anticipated because of the enhanced structural compliance inherent in the construction. The method of construction involves the forming of the combustion chamber with a tube-bundle of high conductivity copper or copper alloy tubes, and the bonding of these tubes by an electroforming operation. Further, the method of fabrication reduces chamber complexity by incorporating manifolds, jackets, and structural stiffeners while having the potential for thrust chamber cost and weight reduction.

  17. Combustion Stability Verification for the Thrust Chamber Assembly of J-2X Developmental Engines 10001, 10002, and 10003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, C. J.; Hulka, J. R.; Casiano, M. J.; Kenny, R. J.; Hinerman, T. D.; Scholten, N.

    2015-01-01

    The J-2X engine, a liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen propellant rocket engine available for future use on the upper stage of the Space Launch System vehicle, has completed testing of three developmental engines at NASA Stennis Space Center. Twenty-one tests of engine E10001 were conducted from June 2011 through September 2012, thirteen tests of the engine E10002 were conducted from February 2013 through September 2013, and twelve tests of engine E10003 were conducted from November 2013 to April 2014. Verification of combustion stability of the thrust chamber assembly was conducted by perturbing each of the three developmental engines. The primary mechanism for combustion stability verification was examining the response caused by an artificial perturbation (bomb) in the main combustion chamber, i.e., dynamic combustion stability rating. No dynamic instabilities were observed in the TCA, although a few conditions were not bombed. Additional requirements, included to guard against spontaneous instability or rough combustion, were also investigated. Under certain conditions, discrete responses were observed in the dynamic pressure data. The discrete responses were of low amplitude and posed minimal risk to safe engine operability. Rough combustion analyses showed that all three engines met requirements for broad-banded frequency oscillations. Start and shutdown transient chug oscillations were also examined to assess the overall stability characteristics, with no major issues observed.

  18. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber: Adverse operating conditions test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    Test hardware, facilities, and procedures are described along with results of electrically heated tube and channel tests conducted to determine adverse operating condition limits for convectively cooled chambers typical of Space Shuttle Orbit Manuevering Engine designs. Hot-start tests were conducted with corrosion resistant steel and nickel tubes with both monomethylhydrazine and 50-50 coolants. Helium ingestion, in both bubble and froth form, was studied in tubular test sections. Helium bubble ingestion and burn-out limits in rectangular channels were also investigated.

  19. Space shuttle maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program. Task 11: Low epsilon stability test report data dump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauckert, R. P.

    1974-01-01

    The stability characteristics of the like-doublet injector were defined over the range of OME chamber pressures and mixture ratios. This was accomplished by bomb testing the injector and cavity configurations in solid wall thrust chamber hardware typical of a flight contour with fuel heated to regenerative chamber outlet temperatures. It was found that stability in the 2600-2800 Hz region depends upon injector hydraulics and on chamber acoustics.

  20. Heat pipe technology for advanced rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.

    1971-01-01

    The application of heat pipe technology to the design of rocket engine thrust chambers is discussed. Subjects presented are: (1) evaporator wick development, (2) specific heat pipe designs and test results, (3) injector design, fabrication, and cold flow testing, and (4) preliminary thrust chamber design.

  1. Lightweight Chambers for Thrust Cell Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, S.; Effinger, M.; Holmes, R.; Lee, J.; Jaskowiak, M.

    2000-01-01

    Traditional metals like steel and copper alloys have been used for many years to fabricate injector and chamber components of thruster assemblies. While the materials perform well, reducing engine weights would help existing and future vehicles gain performance and payload capability. It may now be possible to reduce current thruster weights up to 50% by applying composite materials. In this task, these materials are being applied to an existing thrust cell design to demonstrate new fabrication processes and potential weight savings. Two ceramic matrix composite (CMC) designs, three polymer matrix composite (PMC) designs, and two metal matrix composite (MMC) designs are being fabricated as small chamber demonstration units. In addition, a new alloy of copper, chrome, and niobium (Cu-8Cr-4Nb) is being investigated for thrust chamber liners since it offers higher strength and increased cycle life over traditional alloys. This new alloy is being used for the liner in each MMC and PMC demonstration unit. During June-August of 2000, hot-fire testing of each unit is planned to validate designs in an oxygen/hydrogen environment at chamber pressures around 850 psi. Although the weight savings using CMC materials is expected to be high, they have proven to be much harder to incorporate into chamber designs based on current fabrication efforts. However, the PMC & MMC concepts using the Cu-8Cr-4Nb liner are nearly complete and ready for testing. Additional efforts intend to use the PMC & MMC materials to fabricate a full size thrust chamber (60K lb(sub f) thrust class). The fabrication of this full size unit is expected to be complete by October 2000, followed by hot-fire testing in November-December 2000.

  2. MPD thrust chamber flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-08-01

    Flow within the thrust chamber of a Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) arcjet is examined experimentally and modeled with a 2-D magnetohydrodynamic code. Two quasi-steady MPD thrusters are considered under the same input conditions of current (21 kA) and total mass flow rate (0.006 kg/s, argon + 1.5 percent hydrogen). The arcjets have the same basic design, consisting of a central cathode, 3.8 cm diameter and 5 cm long, separated from a coaxial anode of equal length by a uniform gap of 2.3 cm. Two different mass injection arrangements are used (100 percent at mid-radius, and 50 percent at the cathode base, with the remainder at mid-radius). A new spectroscopic analysis procedure is developed that allows distributions of radial speed, heavy particle temperature and turbulent speed to be extracted from chordal measurements of light emission by the two species in the plasma flow. Good qualitative (and reasonable quantitative) agreement exists with distributions calculated by the MHD code, indicating that flow within the thrust chamber expands from an electromagnetically pumped plasma base (vs a pumped jet off the cathode tip). The significant variation of internal flow dynamics with mass injector arrangement implies the need for extensive experimentally validated code modeling in order to evaluate the potential performance of MPD thrusters.

  3. Thermal Hydraulics Design and Analysis Methodology for a Solid-Core Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engine Thrust Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Canabal, Francisco; Chen, Yen-Sen; Cheng, Gary; Ito, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion is a leading candidate for in-space propulsion for human Mars missions. This chapter describes a thermal hydraulics design and analysis methodology developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, in support of the nuclear thermal propulsion development effort. The objective of this campaign is to bridge the design methods in the Rover/NERVA era, with a modern computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer methodology, to predict thermal, fluid, and hydrogen environments of a hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine the Small Engine, designed in the 1960s. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based, all speeds, chemically reacting, computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer platform, while formulations of flow and heat transfer through porous and solid media were implemented to describe those of hydrogen flow channels inside the solid24 core. Design analyses of a single flow element and the entire solid-core thrust chamber of the Small Engine were performed and the results are presented herein

  4. Application of Chaboche Model in Rocket Thrust Chamber Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asraff, Ahmedul Kabir; Suresh Babu, Sheela; Babu, Aneena; Eapen, Reeba

    2017-06-01

    Liquid Propellant Rocket Engines are commonly used in space technology. Thrust chamber is one of the most important subsystems of a rocket engine. The thrust chamber generates propulsive thrust force for flight of the rocket by ejection of combustion products at supersonic speeds. Often double walled construction is employed for these chambers. The thrust chamber investigated here has its hot inner wall fabricated out of a high thermal conductive material like copper alloy and outer wall made of stainless steel. Inner wall is subjected to high thermal and pressure loads during operation of engine due to which it will be in the plastic regime. Main reasons for the failure of such chambers are fatigue in the plastic range (called as low cycle fatigue since the number of cycles to failure will be low in plastic range), creep and thermal ratcheting. Elasto plastic material models are required to simulate the above effects through a cyclic stress analysis. This paper gives the details of cyclic stress analysis carried out for the thrust chamber using different plasticity model combinations available in ANSYS (Version 15) FE code. The best model among the above is applied in the cyclic stress analysis of two dimensional (plane strain and axisymmetric) and three dimensional finite element models of thrust chamber. Cyclic life of the chamber is calculated from stress-strain graph obtained from above analyses.

  5. Application of Chaboche Model in Rocket Thrust Chamber Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asraff, Ahmedul Kabir; Suresh Babu, Sheela; Babu, Aneena; Eapen, Reeba

    2015-12-01

    Liquid Propellant Rocket Engines are commonly used in space technology. Thrust chamber is one of the most important subsystems of a rocket engine. The thrust chamber generates propulsive thrust force for flight of the rocket by ejection of combustion products at supersonic speeds. Often double walled construction is employed for these chambers. The thrust chamber investigated here has its hot inner wall fabricated out of a high thermal conductive material like copper alloy and outer wall made of stainless steel. Inner wall is subjected to high thermal and pressure loads during operation of engine due to which it will be in the plastic regime. Main reasons for the failure of such chambers are fatigue in the plastic range (called as low cycle fatigue since the number of cycles to failure will be low in plastic range), creep and thermal ratcheting. Elasto plastic material models are required to simulate the above effects through a cyclic stress analysis. This paper gives the details of cyclic stress analysis carried out for the thrust chamber using different plasticity model combinations available in ANSYS (Version 15) FE code. The best model among the above is applied in the cyclic stress analysis of two dimensional (plane strain and axisymmetric) and three dimensional finite element models of thrust chamber. Cyclic life of the chamber is calculated from stress-strain graph obtained from above analyses.

  6. Low-thrust chemical rocket engine study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoji, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical study evaluating thrust chamber cooling engine cycles and preliminary engine design for low thrust chemical rocket engines for orbit transfer vehicles is described. Oxygen/hydrogen, oxygen/methane, and oxygen/RP-1 engines with thrust levels from 444.8 N to 13345 N, and chamber pressures from 13.8 N/sq cm to 689.5 N/sq cm were evaluated. The physical and thermodynamic properties of the propellant theoretical performance data, and transport properties are documented. The thrust chamber cooling limits for regenerative/radiation and film/radiation cooling are defined and parametric heat transfer data presented. A conceptual evaluation of a number of engine cycles was performed and a 2224.1 N oxygen/hydrogen engine cycle configuration and a 2224.1 N oxygen/methane configuration chosen for preliminary engine design. Updated parametric engine data, engine design drawings, and an assessment of technology required are presented.

  7. Advanced hydrogen/oxygen thrust chamber design analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoji, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The results are reported of the advanced hydrogen/oxygen thrust chamber design analysis program. The primary objectives of this program were to: (1) provide an in-depth analytical investigation to develop thrust chamber cooling and fatigue life limitations of an advanced, high pressure, high performance H2/O2 engine design of 20,000-pounds (88960.0 N) thrust; and (2) integrate the existing heat transfer analysis, thermal fatigue and stress aspects for advanced chambers into a comprehensive computer program. Thrust chamber designs and analyses were performed to evaluate various combustor materials, coolant passage configurations (tubes and channels), and cooling circuits to define the nominal 1900 psia (1.31 x 10 to the 7th power N/sq m) chamber pressure, 300-cycle life thrust chamber. The cycle life capability of the selected configuration was then determined for three duty cycles. Also the influence of cycle life and chamber pressure on thrust chamber design was investigated by varying in cycle life requirements at the nominal chamber pressure and by varying the chamber pressure at the nominal cycle life requirement.

  8. Combustion Chamber Fluid Dynamics and Hypergolic Gel Propellant Chemistry Simulations for Selectable Thrust Rocket Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    analysis indicates that there are represent finite-rate (nonequilibrium) chemical kinetics, 14 major products of combustion: 02, N 2 , C0 2 , CO, H2, multi...smaller than that for Engine No. 1. ( UDMH ) by NO2. These reactions hypothesized to be Figures 6 and 7 show contours of OH mass fraction rate limiting...phase reaction of UDMH and NO2 indicate that the first Table 1. Condensed-phase property and Isp estimates step is the abstraction of an H atom from a

  9. Thrust chamber thermal barrier coating techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quentmeyer, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    Methods for applying thermal barrier coatings to the hot-gas side wall of rocket thrust chambers in order to significantly reduce the heat transfer in high heat flux regions was the focus of technology efforts for many years. This paper describes a successful technique developed by the Lewis Research Center that starts with the coating of a mandrel and then builds the thrust chamber around it by electroforming appropriate materials. This results in a smooth coating with exceptional adherence, demonstrated in hot fire rig tests. The low cycle fatigue life of chambers with coatings applied in this manner was increased dramatically compared to uncoated chambers.

  10. Thrust chamber thermal barrier coating techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quentmeyer, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    Methods for applying thermal barrier coatings to the hot-gas side wall of rocket thrust chambers in order to significantly reduce the heat transfer in high heat flux regions has been the focus of technology efforts for many years. A successful technique developed by NASA-Lewis that starts with the coating on a mandrel and then builds the thrust chamber around it by electroforming appropriate materials is described. This results in a smooth coating with exceptional adherence, as was demonstrated in hot fire rig tests. The low cycle fatigue life of chambers with coatings applied in this manner was increased dramatically compared to uncoated chambers.

  11. Rocket thrust chamber thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quentmeyer, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Subscale rocket thrust chamber tests were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and durability of thin yttria stabilized zirconium oxide coatings applied to the thrust chamber hot-gas side wall. The fabrication consisted of arc plasma spraying the ceramic coating and bond coat onto a mandrell and then electrodepositing the copper thrust chamber wall around the coating. Chambers were fabricated with coatings .008, and .005 and .003 inches thick. The chambers were thermally cycled at a chamber pressure of 600 psia using oxygen-hydrogen as propellants and liquid hydrogen as the coolant. The thicker coatings tended to delaminate, early in the cyclic testing, down to a uniform sublayer which remained well adhered during the remaining cycles. Two chambers with .003 inch coatings were subjected to 1500 thermal cycles with no coating loss in the throat region, which represents a tenfold increase in life over identical chambers having no coatings. An analysis is presented which shows that the heat lost to the coolant due to the coating, in a rocket thrust chamber design having a coating only in the throat region, can be recovered by adding only one inch to the combustion chamber length.

  12. Multiphysics Thrust Chamber Modeling for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Cheng, Gary; Chen, Yen-Sen

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop an efficient and accurate thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for a solid-core, nuclear thermal engine thrust chamber. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation. A two-pronged approach is employed in this effort: A detailed thermo-fluid analysis on a multi-channel flow element for mid-section corrosion investigation; and a global modeling of the thrust chamber to understand the effect of heat transfer on thrust performance. Preliminary results on both aspects are presented.

  13. Cooling of rocket thrust chambers with liquid oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Elizabeth S.; Schlumberger, Julie A.

    1990-01-01

    Rocket engines using high pressure liquid oxygen (LOX) and kerosene (RP-1) as the propellants have been considered for future launch vehicle propulsion. Generally, in regeneratively cooled engines, the fuel is used to cool the combustion chamber. However, hydrocarbons such as RP-1 are limited in their cooling capability at high temperatures and pressures. Therefore, LOX is being considered as an alternative coolant. However, there has been concern as to the effect on the integrity of the chamber liner if oxygen leaks into the combustion zone through fatigue cracks that may develop between the cooling passages and the hot-gas side wall. To address this concern, an investigation was previously conducted with simulated fatigue cracks upstream of the thrust chamber throat. When these chambers were tested, an unexpected melting in the throat region developed which was not in line with the simulated fatigue cracks. The current experimental program was conducted in order to determine the cause for the failure in the earlier thrust chambers and to further investigate the effects of cracks in the thrust chamber liner upstream of the throat. The thrust chambers were tested at oxygen-to-fuel mixture ratios from 1.5 to 2.86 at a nominal chamber pressure of 8.6 MPa. As a result of the test series, the reason for the failure occurring in the earlier work was determined to be injector anomalies. The LOX leaking through the simulated fatigue cracks did not affect the integrity of the chambers.

  14. Performance of a transpiration-regenerative cooled rocket thrust chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valler, H. W.

    1979-01-01

    The analysis, design, fabrication, and testing of a liquid rocket engine thrust chamber which is gas transpiration cooled in the high heat flux convergent portion of the chamber and water jacket cooled (simulated regenerative) in the barrel and divergent sections of the chamber are described. The engine burns LOX-hydrogen propellants at a chamber pressure of 600 psia. Various transpiration coolant flow rates were tested with resultant local hot gas wall temperatures in the 800 F to 1400 F range. The feasibility of transpiration cooling with hydrogen and helium, and the use of photo-etched copper platelets for heat transfer and coolant metering was successfully demonstrated.

  15. Development of sputtered techniques for thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullaly, J. R.; Hecht, R. J.; Schmid, T. E.; Torrey, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques and materials were developed and evaluated for the fabrication and coating of advanced, long life, regeneratively cooled thrust chambers. Materials were analyzed as fillers for sputter application of OFHC copper as a closeout layer to channeled inner structures; of the materials evaluated, aluminum was found to provide the highest bond strength and to be the most desirable for chamber fabrication. The structures and properties were investigated of thick sputtered OFHC copper, 0.15 Zr-Cu, Al2O3,-Cu, and SiC-Cu. Layered structures of OFHC copper and 0.15 Zr-Cu were investigated as means of improving chamber inner wall fatigue life. The evaluation of sputtered Ti-5Al-2.5Sn, NASA IIb-11, aluminum and Al2O3-Al alloys as high strength chamber outer jackets was performed. Techniques for refurbishing degraded thrust chambers with OFHC copper and coating thrust chambers with protective ZrO2 and graded ZrO2-copper thermal barrier coatings were developed.

  16. Viscoplastic analysis of an experimental cylindrical thrust chamber liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, Vinod K.; Arnold, Steven M.

    1991-01-01

    A viscoplastic stress-strain analysis of an experimental cylindrical thrust chamber is presented. A viscoelastic constitutive model incorporating a single internal state variable that represents kinematic hardening was employed to investigate whether such a viscoplastic model could predict the experimentally observed behavior of the thrust chamber. Two types of loading cycles were considered: a short cycle of 3.5 sec. duration that corresponded to the experiments, and an extended loading cycle of 485.1 sec. duration that is typical of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) operating cycle. The analysis qualitatively replicated the deformation behavior of the component as observed in experiments designed to simulate SSME operating conditions. The analysis also showed that the mode and location in the component may depend on the loading cycle. The results indicate that using viscoplastic models for structural analysis can lead to a more realistic life assessment of thrust chambers.

  17. Low thrust monopropellant engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuenzly, J. D. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    The engine has a conventional body and nozzle configuration. The monopropellant fuel is fed into the thruster with dual injection tubes via an injector shell with dual spray jets. The spray jets are positioned generally opposed to each other. A heater screen pack combination thermally decomposes the fuel after injection into the combustion chamber of the thruster.

  18. High temperature thrust chamber for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chazen, Melvin L. (Inventor); Mueller, Thomas J. (Inventor); Kruse, William D. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature thrust chamber for spacecraft (20) is provided herein. The high temperature thrust chamber comprises a hollow body member (12) having an outer surface and an internal surface (16) defining the high temperature chamber (10). The body member (12) is made substantially of rhenium. An alloy (18) consisting of iridium and at least alloying metal selected of the group consisting of rhodium, platinum and palladium is deposited on at least a portion of the internal surface (16) of the body member (12). The iridium and the alloying metal are electrodeposited onto the body member (12). A HIP cycle is performed upon the body member (12) to cause the coating of iridium and the alloying metal to form the alloy (18) which protects the body member (12) from oxidation.

  19. Thrust expansion engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zovko, Carl T.

    1993-03-01

    Break-up activity of water by injection of hot propellant gas into channels of a thrust expansion engine is suppressed to prevent rapid cooling of the gas utilizing one or more methods including injection of a secondary inflow of the propellant gas and/or the water under lower pressures into the channels, injection of a viscosity enhancer and/or surfactant into the inflow stream of the water, and restricting outflow of the water from the channels by means of convergent nozzles.

  20. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber. Task 13: Subscale helium ingestion and two dimensional heating test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    Descriptions are given of the test hardware, facility, procedures, and results of electrically heated tube, channel and panel tests conducted to determine effects of helium ingestion, two dimensional conduction, and plugged coolant channels on operating limits of convectively cooled chambers typical of space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine designs. Helium ingestion in froth form, was studied in tubular and rectangular single channel test sections. Plugged channel simulation was investigated in a three channel panel. Burn-out limits (transition of film boiling) were studied in both single channel and panel test sections to determine 2-D conduction effects as compared to tubular test results.

  1. CFD Code Survey for Thrust Chamber Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Klaus W.

    1990-01-01

    In the quest fo find analytical reference codes, responses from a questionnaire are presented which portray the current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program status and capability at various organizations, characterizing liquid rocket thrust chamber flow fields. Sample cases are identified to examine the ability, operational condition, and accuracy of the codes. To select the best suited programs for accelerated improvements, evaluation criteria are being proposed.

  2. Development of sputtered techniques for thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullaly, J. R.; Allard, P. A.

    1979-01-01

    The 0.152 cm thick sputtered and copper deposits were electron beam welded to wrought copper. Tensile specimens were machined from the weld assemblies and tested at room temperature. Tensile strength approached the strength of wrought material. Elongations up to 25% were measured. Sputtered aluminum was used to fill 0.157 cm wide by 0.127 cm deep grooves in thrust chamber spool piece liners. The liners were closed out by sputtering copper from post and hollow cathodes.

  3. Three dimensional thermal analysis of rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naraghi, M. H. N.; Armstrong, E. S.

    1988-01-01

    A numerical model for the three dimensional thermal analysis of rocket thrust chambers and nozzles has been developed. The input to the model consists of the composition of the fuel/oxidant mixture and flow rates, chamber pressure, coolant entrance temperature and pressure, dimensions of the engine, materials and the number of nodes in different parts of the engine. The model allows for temperature variation in three dimensions: axial, radial and circumferential directions and by implementing an iterative scheme, it provides nodal temperature distribution, rates of heat transfer, hot gas and coolant thermal and transport properties.

  4. SSME thrust chamber modeling with Navier Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekwas, A. J.; Edwards, J.; Gross, K.

    1986-01-01

    The capability of predicting two-dimensional, compressible and reacting flow in the combustion chamber and nozzle of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) is demonstrated. A nonorthogonal body fitted coordinate system has been used to represent the combustor and nozzle geometry. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved for the entire thrust chamber with the k-epsilon turbulence model accounting for compressibility and large pressure gradients effects. Results of the computational test cases reveal all expected features of the transonic nozzle flows including location of sonic line, internal shock and boundary layer build-up. Calculated performance parameters such as thrust, flow rate, and specific impulse are also in reasonble agreement with available data. The results show promising potential of solving full Navier-Stokes equations with heat transfer and two-phase combustion in truly comprehensive modeling of rocket engines.

  5. Task 12 data dump (phase 2) OME integrated thrust chamber test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, R. D.; Pauckert, R. P.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics and performance of the orbit maneuvering engine for the space shuttle are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the regeneratively cooled thrust chamber of the engine. Tests were conducted to determine engine operating parameters during the start, shutdown, and restart. Characteristics of the integrated thrust chamber and the performance and thermal conditions for blowdown operation without supplementary boundary layer cooling were investigated. The results of the test program are presented.

  6. MPD (magnetoplasmadynamic) thrust chamber flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1987-09-01

    Performance characteristics of Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) arcjets depend on proper matching of electromagnetic and fluid mechanical constraints within the thrust chamber. Experimental measurements of internal flow conditions during MPD arcjet operation are needed to guide development of flow models and to assess the validity of theoretical predictions. Efforts are continuing in a corporative effort to apply an array of diagnostic techniques including time-, space-, and spectrally-resolved photography to examine MPD arcjet internal flows. Experimental elucidation of the internal flow structure is used to develop predictive models for optimal geometries and operating parameters. Probes have been used to map the current and voltage distributions within uniform height and flared annular channels. This work is concerned with the effect of thruster channel variations on the current conduction regions of the MPD internal flow. Other aspects of the internal flow structure that have been modeled involve the transition of the input mass flow from neutral gas to electrically-conducting plasma. Scale sizes for the transition region were estimated in terms of the electrical and thermodynamic properties of the propellant gas (e.g., argon). These estimates indicate that the electrical conductivity of the flow can be established in distances that are small compared to the characteristic dimension for current conduction near the entrance to the arcjet thrust chamber.

  7. Rocket thrust chamber thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batakis, A. P.; Vogan, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    A research program was conducted to generate data and develop analytical techniques to predict the performance and reliability of ceramic thermal barrier coatings in high heat flux environments. A finite element model was used to analyze the thermomechanical behavior of coating systems in rocket thrust chambers. Candidate coating systems (using a copper substrate, NiCrAlY bond coat and ZrO2.8Y2O3 ceramic overcoat) were selected for detailed study based on photomicrographic evaluations of experimental test specimens. The effects of plasma spray application parameters on the material properties of these coatings were measured and the effects on coating performance evaluated using the finite element model. Coating design curves which define acceptable operating envelopes for seleted coating systems were constructed based on temperature and strain limitations. Spray gun power levels was found to have the most significant effect on coating structure. Three coating systems were selected for study using different power levels. Thermal conductivity, strain tolerance, density, and residual stress were measured for these coatings. Analyses indicated that extremely thin coatings ( 0.02 mm) are required to accommodate the high heat flux of a rocket thrust chamber and ensure structural integrity.

  8. SSME thrust chamber simulation using Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekwas, A. J.; Singhal, A. K.; Tam, L. T.

    1984-01-01

    The capability of the PHOENICS fluid dynamics code in predicting two-dimensional, compressible, and reacting flow in the combustion chamber and nozzle of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) was evaluated. A non-orthogonal body fitted coordinate system was used to represent the nozzle geometry. The Navier-Stokes equations were solved for the entire nozzle with a turbulence model. The wall boundary conditions were calculated based on the wall functions which account for pressure gradients. Results of the demonstration test case reveal all expected features of the transonic nozzle flows. Of particular interest are the locations of normal and barrel shocks, and regions of highest temperature gradients. Calculated performance (global) parameters such as thrust chamber flow rate, thrust, and specific impulse are also in good agreement with available data.

  9. Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) for high heat flux thrust chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Christopher M.

    The last 30 years materials engineers have been under continual pressure to develop materials with a greater temperature potential or to produce configurations that can be effectively cooled or otherwise protected at elevated temperature conditions. Turbines and thrust chambers produce some of the harshest service conditions for materials which lead to the challenges engineers face in order to increase the efficiencies of current technologies due to the energy crisis that the world is facing. The key tasks for the future of gas turbines are to increase overall efficiencies to meet energy demands of a growing world population and reduce the harmful emissions to protect the environment. Airfoils or blades tend to be the limiting factor when it comes to the performance of the turbine because of their complex design making them difficult to cool as well as limitations of their thermal properties. Key tasks for space transportation it to lower costs while increasing operational efficiency and reliability of our space launchers. The important factor to take into consideration is the rocket nozzle design. The design of the rocket nozzle or thrust chamber has to take into account many constraints including external loads, heat transfer, transients, and the fluid dynamics of expanded hot gases. Turbine engines can have increased efficiencies if the inlet temperature for combustion is higher, increased compressor capacity and lighter weight materials. In order to push for higher temperatures, engineers need to come up with a way to compensate for increased temperatures because material systems that are being used are either at or near their useful properties limit. Before thermal barrier coatings were applied to hot-section components, material alloy systems were able to withstand the service conditions necessary. But, with the increased demand for performance, higher temperatures and pressures have become too much for those alloy systems. Controlled chemistry of hot

  10. Space shuttle maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program. Task 11: Stability analyses and acoustic model testing data dump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberg, C. L.

    1974-01-01

    The combustion stability characteristics of engines applicable to the Space Shuttle Orbit Maneuvering System and the adequacy of acoustic cavities as a means of assuring stability in these engines were investigated. The study comprised full-scale stability rating tests, bench-scale acoustic model tests and analysis. Two series of stability rating tests were made. Acoustic model tests were made to determine the resonance characteristics and effects of acoustic cavities. Analytical studies were done to aid design of the cavity configurations to be tested and, also, to aid evaluation of the effectiveness of acoustic cavities from available test results.

  11. Computer Tomography Analysis of Fastrac Composite Thrust Chamber Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beshears, Ronald D.

    2000-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) inspection has been integrated into the production process for NASA's Fastrac composite thrust chamber assemblies (TCAs). CT has been proven to be uniquely qualified to detect the known critical flaw for these nozzles, liner cracks that are adjacent to debonds between the liner and overwrap. CT is also being used as a process monitoring tool through analysis of low density indications in the nozzle overwraps. 3d reconstruction of CT images to produce models of flawed areas is being used to give program engineers better insight into the location and nature of nozzle flaws.

  12. Thrust stand for low-thrust liquid pulsed rocket engines.

    PubMed

    Xing, Qin; Zhang, Jun; Qian, Min; Jia, Zhen-yuan; Sun, Bao-yuan

    2010-09-01

    A thrust stand is developed for measuring the pulsed thrust generated by low-thrust liquid pulsed rocket engines. It mainly consists of a thrust dynamometer, a base frame, a connecting frame, and a data acquisition and processing system. The thrust dynamometer assembled with shear mode piezoelectric quartz sensors is developed as the core component of the thrust stand. It adopts integral shell structure. The sensors are inserted into unique double-elastic-half-ring grooves with an interference fit. The thrust is transferred to the sensors by means of static friction forces of fitting surfaces. The sensors could produce an amount of charges which are proportional to the thrust to be measured. The thrust stand is calibrated both statically and dynamically. The in situ static calibration is performed using a standard force sensor. The dynamic calibration is carried out using pendulum-typed steel ball impact technique. Typical thrust pulse is simulated by a trapezoidal impulse force. The results show that the thrust stand has a sensitivity of 25.832 mV/N, a linearity error of 0.24% FSO, and a repeatability error of 0.23% FSO. The first natural frequency of the thrust stand is 1245 Hz. The thrust stand can accurately measure thrust waveform of each firing, which is used for fine control of on-orbit vehicles in the thrust range of 5-20 N with pulse frequency of 50 Hz.

  13. Fabrication of GRCop-84 Rocket Thrust Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, William S.; Ellis, David L.

    2005-01-01

    GRCop-84, a copper alloy, Cu-8 at% Cr-4 at% Nb developed at NASA Glenn Research Center for regeneratively cooled rocket engine liners has excellent combinations of elevated temperature strength, creep resistance, thermal conductivity and low cycle fatigue. GRCop-84 is produced from prealloyed atomized powder and has been fabricated into plate, sheet and tube forms as well as near net shapes. Fabrication processes to produce demonstration rocket combustion chambers will be presented and includes powder production, extruding, rolling, forming, friction stir welding, and metal spinning. GRCop-84 has excellent workability and can be readily fabricated into complex components using conventional powder and wrought metallurgy processes. Rolling was examined in detail for process sensitivity at various levels of total reduction, rolling speed and rolling temperature representing extremes of commercial processing conditions. Results indicate that process conditions can range over reasonable levels without any negative impact to properties.

  14. Fabrication of GRCop-84 Rocket Thrust Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, William; Ellis, David

    2006-01-01

    GRCop-84, a copper alloy, Cu-8 at% Cr-4 at% Nb developed at NASA Glenn Research Center for regenerative1y cooled rocket engine liners has excellent combinations of elevated temperature strength, creep resistance, thermal conductivity and low cycle fatigue. GRCop-84 is produced from pre-alloyed atomized powder and has been fabricated into plate, sheet and tube forms as well as near net shapes. Fabrication processes to produce demonstration rocket combustion chambers will be presented and includes powder production, extruding, rolling, forming, friction stir welding, and metal spinning. GRCop-84 has excellent workability and can be readily fabricated into complex components using conventional powder and wrought metallurgy processes. Rolling was examined in detail for process sensitivity at various levels of total reduction, rolling speed and rolling temperature representing extremes of commercial processing conditions. Results indicate that process conditions can range over reasonable levels without any negative impact to properties.

  15. OMV/VTE variable thrust engine analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosillere, Louis; Litchford, Ron; Jeng, San-Mou

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to develop a predictive CFD based analytical tool for the variable thrust engine (VTE) in the orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV). This objective is being accomplished within the framework of the Los Alamos KIVA computer code for chemically reactive flows with sprays. For the OMV application, the main structure of KIVA is to be retained while reformulating many of the phenomenological submodels, enhancing some of the numerics, and adding more features. The analytical model consists of the general conservation equations for two phase reactive flows and of submodels for turbulence, chemical reactions, and bipropellant sprays. Tailoring this model to the OMV engine brings about the added complexities of combustion and flow processes that occur in a liquid hypergolic propellant rocket chamber. This report exposes the foundation upon which the analytical tool is being constructed and developed. Results from a cursory computational exercise involving the simulation of the flow and combustion processes in a hypothetical N2H4/N2O4 rocket engine thrust chamber is presented and discussed.

  16. OMV/VTE variable thrust engine analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosillere, L.; Litchford, R.; Jeng, S. M.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to develop a predictive CFD based analytical tool for the Variable Thrust Engine (VTE) in the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV). This objective is being accomplished within the framework of the Los Alamos KIVA computer code for chemically reactive flows with sprays. For the OMV application, the main structure of KIVA is to be retained while reformulating many of the phenomenological submodels, enhancing some of the numerics, and adding more features. The analytical model consists of the general conservation equations for two-phase reactive flows and of submodels for turbulence, chemical reactions, and bipropellant sprays. Tailoring this model to the OMV engine brings about the added complexities of combustion and flow processes that occur in a liquid hypergolic propellant rocket chamber. This report exposes the foundation upon which the analytical tool is being constructed and developed. Results from a cursory computational exercise involving the simulation of the flow and combustion processes in a hypothetical N2H4/N204 rocket engine thrust chamber is presented and discussed.

  17. Test program to provide confidence in liquid oxygen cooling of hydrocarbon fueled rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Elizabeth S.

    1986-01-01

    In previous tests of liquid oxygen cooling of hydrocarbon fueled rocket engines, small oxygen leaks developed at the throat of the thrust chamber and film cooled the hot gas side of the chamber wall without resulting in catastrophic failure. However, more testing is necessary to demonstrate that a catastropic failure would not occur if cracks developed further upstream between the injector and the throat, where the boundary layer has not been established. Since under normal conditions cracks are expected to form in the throat region of the thrust chamber, cracks must be initiated artificially in order to control their location. Several methods of crack initiation are discussed here.

  18. Test program to provide confidence in liquid oxygen cooling of hydrocarbon fueled rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Elizabeth S.

    1986-01-01

    In previous tests of liquid oxygen cooling of hydrocarbon fueled rocket engines, small oxygen leaks developed at the throat of the thrust chamber and film cooled the hot gas side of the chamber wall without resulting in catastrophic failure. However, more testing is necessary to demonstrate that a catastropic failure would not occur if cracks developed further upstream between the injector and the throat, where the boundary layer has not been established. Since under normal conditions cracks are expected to form in the throat region of the thrust chamber, cracks must be initiated artificially in order to control their location. Several methods of crack initiation are discussed here.

  19. Experimental investigation of combustor effects on rocket thrust chamber performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A design and experimental program to develop special instrumentation systems, design engine hardware, and conduct tests using LOX/GH2 propellants in which the propellant flow stratification was controlled is described. The mixture ratio was varied from 4.6 to 6 overall. The mixture ratios in the core and outer zone were varied from 3.5 to 6 and 5 to 8, respectively. The range in boundary layer coolant was from 0 to 10 percent of the fuel. The nominal chamber pressure and thrust were 225 psia and 7000 pounds, respectively. Pressure and heat flux profiles as well as gas sampling of the exhaust products were obtained. Specific impulse efficiencies of approximately 94 percent and characteristic velocity efficiencies of approximately 97 percent were obtained during the experiments.

  20. Theoretical Performance of Hydrogen-Oxygen Rocket Thrust Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sievers, Gilbert K.; Tomazic, William A.; Kinney, George R.

    1961-01-01

    Data are presented for liquid-hydrogen-liquid-oxygen thrust chambers at chamber pressures from 15 to 1200 pounds per square inch absolute, area ratios to approximately 300, and percent fuel from about 8 to 34 for both equilibrium and frozen composition during expansion. Specific impulse in vacuum, specific impulse, combustion-chamber temperature, nozzle-exit temperature, characteristic velocity, and the ratio of chamber-to-nozzle-exit pressure are included. The data are presented in convenient graphical forms to allow quick calculation of theoretical nozzle performance with over- or underexpansion, flow separation, and introduction of the propellants at various initial conditions or heat loss from the combustion chamber.

  1. Fabrication of liquid-rocket thrust chambers by electroforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duscha, R. A.; Kazaroff, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Electroforming has proven to be an excellent fabrication method for building liquid rocket regeneratively cooled thrust chambers. NASA sponsored technology programs have investigated both common and advanced methods. Using common procedures, several cooled spool pieces and thrust chambers have been made and successfully tested. The designs were made possible through the versatility of the electroforming procedure, which is not limited to simple geometric shapes. An advanced method of electroforming was used to produce a wire-wrapped, composite, pressure-loaded electroformed structure, which greatly increased the strength of the structure while still retaining the advantages of electroforming.

  2. Space station auxiliary thrust chamber technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senneff, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    A program to design, fabricate, and test a 50 lb sub f (222 N) thruster was undertaken to demonstrate the applicability of the reverse flow concept as an item of auxillary propulsion for the Space Station. The thruster was to operate at a mixture ratio (O/F) of 4, be capable of operating for 2 million lb sub f-seconds (8.896 million N-seconds) impulse with a chamber pressure of 75 psia (52N/sq cm) and a nozzle area ratio of 40. A successful demonstration of an (0/F) of 4 thruster, was followed by the design objective of operating at (O/F) of 8. The demonstration of this thruster resulted in the order of and additional (O/F) of 8 thruster chamber under the present NAS 3-24883 contract. The effort to fabricate and test the second (0/F) of 8 thruster is documented.

  3. Design verification test matrix development for the STME thrust chamber assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, Carol E.; Elam, Sandra K.; Sparks, David L.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the results of the test matrix development for design verification at the component level for the National Launch System (NLS) space transportation main engine (STME) thrust chamber assembly (TCA) components including the following: injector, combustion chamber, and nozzle. A systematic approach was used in the development of the minimum recommended TCA matrix resulting in a minimum number of hardware units and a minimum number of hot fire tests.

  4. Modular multi-engine thrust control assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, S.

    1986-02-04

    This patent describes a modular thrust control lever assembly for controling forward/reverse thrust generated by an aircraft engine. It includes an electric/electronic engine thrust control system, an inhibit mechanism for preventing inadverent or premature establishment of at least one of forward and reverse engine thrust. It consists of a (a) housing; (b) a control lever assembly pivotally mounted within the housing for fore and aft pivotal movement in a single vertical plane; (c) movable inhibit mechanism normally mounted in the path of movement of the laterally projecting roller on the control lever assembly between at least one of the maximum thrust limit positions of the assembly and the adjacent intermediate idle thrust position; (d) a electric/electronic engine thrust control system including an mechanism for reconfiguring the thrust controls of the engine upon movement of the thrust control lever assembly to the adjacent intermediate idle thrust position; (e) a mechanism responsive to the output signal for shifting the inhibit mechanism out of the path of movement of the control lever assembly.

  5. Thrust augmentation nozzle (TAN) concept for rocket engine booster applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forde, Scott; Bulman, Mel; Neill, Todd

    2006-07-01

    Aerojet used the patented thrust augmented nozzle (TAN) concept to validate a unique means of increasing sea-level thrust in a liquid rocket booster engine. We have used knowledge gained from hypersonic Scramjet research to inject propellants into the supersonic region of the rocket engine nozzle to significantly increase sea-level thrust without significantly impacting specific impulse. The TAN concept overcomes conventional engine limitations by injecting propellants and combusting in an annular region in the divergent section of the nozzle. This injection of propellants at moderate pressures allows for obtaining high thrust at takeoff without overexpansion thrust losses. The main chamber is operated at a constant pressure while maintaining a constant head rise and flow rate of the main propellant pumps. Recent hot-fire tests have validated the design approach and thrust augmentation ratios. Calculations of nozzle performance and wall pressures were made using computational fluid dynamics analyses with and without thrust augmentation flow, resulting in good agreement between calculated and measured quantities including augmentation thrust. This paper describes the TAN concept, the test setup, test results, and calculation results.

  6. Space station auxiliary thrust chamber technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senneff, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A program to design, fabricate and test a 50 lb sub f (222 N) thruster was undertaken (Contract NAS 3-24656) to demonstrate the applicability of the reverse flow concept as an item of auxiliary propulsion for the space station. The thruster was to operate at a mixture ratio (O/F) of 4, be capable of operating for 2 million lb sub f- seconds (8.896 million N-seconds) impulse with a chamber pressure of 75 psia (52 N/square cm) and a nozzle area ratio of 40. Superimposed was also the objective of operating with a strainless steel spherical combustion chamber, which limited the wall temperature to 1700 F (1200 K), an objective specific impulse of 400 lb sub f sec/lbm (3923 N-seconds/Kg), and a demonstration of 500,000 lb sub f-seconds (2,224,000 N-seconds) of impulse. The demonstration of these objectives required a number of design iterations which eventually culminated in a very successful 1000 second demonstration, almost immediately followed by a changed program objective imposed to redesign and demonstrate at a mixture ratio (O/F) of 8. This change was made and more then 250,000 lb sub f seconds (1,112,000 N-seconds) of impulse was successfully demonstrated at a mixture ratio of 8. This document contains a description of the effort conducted during the program to design and demonstrate the thrusters involved.

  7. Measuring Model Rocket Engine Thrust Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penn, Kim; Slaton, William V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a method and setup to quickly and easily measure a model rocket engine's thrust curve using a computer data logger and force probe. Horst describes using Vernier's LabPro and force probe to measure the rocket engine's thrust curve; however, the method of attaching the rocket to the force probe is not discussed. We show how a…

  8. Measuring Model Rocket Engine Thrust Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penn, Kim; Slaton, William V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a method and setup to quickly and easily measure a model rocket engine's thrust curve using a computer data logger and force probe. Horst describes using Vernier's LabPro and force probe to measure the rocket engine's thrust curve; however, the method of attaching the rocket to the force probe is not discussed. We show how a…

  9. Investigation of electroforming techniques. [fabrication of regeneratively cooled thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    Copper and nickel electroforming was examined for the purpose of establishing the necessary processes and procedures for repeatable, successful fabrication of the outer structures of regeneratively cooled thrust chambers. The selection of electrolytes for copper and nickel deposition is described. The development studies performed to refine and complete the processes necessary for successful chamber shell fabrication and the testing employed to verify the applicability of the processes and procedures to small scale hardware are described. Specifications were developed to afford a guideline for the electroforming of high quality outer shells on regeneratively cooled thrust chamber liners. Test results indicated repeatable mechanical properties could be produced in copper deposits from the copper sulfate electrolyte with periodic current reversal and in nickel deposits from the sulfamate solution. Use of inert, removable channel fillers and the conductivizing of such is described. Techniques (verified by test) which produce high integrity bonds to copper and copper alloy liners are discussed.

  10. Cooling of High Pressure Rocket Thrust Chambers with Liquid Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, H. G.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental program using hydrogen and oxygen as the propellants and supercritical liquid oxygen (LOX) as the coolant was conducted at 4.14 and 8.274 MN/square meters (600 and 1200 psia) chamber pressure. Data on the following are presented: the effect of LOX leaking into the combustion region through small cracks in the chamber wall; and verification of the supercritical oxygen heat transfer correlation developed from heated tube experiments; A total of four thrust chambers with throat diameters of 0.066 m were tested. Of these, three were cyclically tested to 4.14 MN/square meters (600 psia) chamber pressure until a crack developed. One had 23 additional hot cycles accumulated with no apparent metal burning or distress. The fourth chamber was operated at 8.274 MN/square meters (1200 psia) pressure to obtain steady state heat transfer data. Wall temperature measurements confirmed the heat transfer correlation.

  11. Pressure fed thrust chamber technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Glenn M.

    1992-01-01

    This is the final report for the Pressure Fed Technology Program. It details the design, fabrication and testing of subscale hardware which successfully characterized LOX/RP combustion for a low cost pressure fed design. The innovative modular injector design is described in detail as well as hot-fire test results which showed excellent performance. The program summary identifies critical LOX/RP design issues that have been resolved by this testing, and details the low risk development requirements for a low cost engine for future Expendable Launch Vehicles (ELVi).

  12. Pressure fed thrust chamber technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Glen M.

    1992-01-01

    This is the final report for the Pressure Fed Technology Program. It details the design, fabrication, and testing of subscale hardware which successfully characterized Liquid Oxygen Rocket Propulsion (LOX/RP) combustion for low cost pressure fed design. The innovative modular injector design is described in detail as well as hot-fire test results which showed excellent performance. The program summary identifies critical LOX/RP design issues that have been resolved in this testing, and details the low risk development requirements for low cost engines for future Expandable Launch Vehicles (ELV).

  13. Oxygen/Alcohol Dual Thrust RCS Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angstadt, Tara; Hurlbert, Eric

    1999-01-01

    A non-toxic dual thrust RCS engine offers significant operational, safety, and performance advantages to the space shuttle and the next generation RLVs. In this concept, a single engine produces two thrust levels of 25 and 870 lbf. The low thrust level is provided by the spark torch igniter, which, with the addition of 2 extra valves, can also be made to function as a vernier. A dual thrust RCS engine allows 38 verniers to be packaged more efficiently on a vehicle. These 38 vemiers improve translation and reduce cross coupling, thereby providing more pure roll, pitch, and yaw maneuvers of the vehicle. Compared to the 6 vemiers currently on the shuttle, the 38 dual thrust engines would be 25 to 40% more efficient for the same maneuvers and attitude control. The vernier thrust level also reduces plume impingement and contamination concerns. Redundancy is also improved, thereby improving mission success reliability. Oxygen and ethanol are benign propellants which do not create explosive reaction products or contamination, as compared to hypergolic propellants. These characteristics make dual-thrust engines simpler to implement on a non-toxic reaction control system. Tests at WSTF in August 1999 demonstrated a dual-thrust concept that is successful with oxygen and ethanol. Over a variety of inlet pressures and mixture ratios at 22:1 area ratio, the engine produced between 230 and 297 sec Isp, and thrust levels from 8 lbf. to 50 lbf. This paper describes the benefits of dual-thrust engines and the recent results from tests at WSTF.

  14. Nonlinear structural analysis of cylindrical thrust chambers using viscoplastic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, Vinod K.

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of a viscoplastic stress-strain analysis of a cylindrical thrust chamber used in experiments that were designed to simulate the SSME operating conditions. The inelastic strain was calculated by using a viscoplastic model, and a quasi-three-dimensional structural analysis was performed by using a finite element program MARC. The temperatures and pressures were calculated by using the loading cycles of experiments, and these temperatures and pressures were used in the computations. The deformed shape of the component was predicted after the end of each loading cycle. The predicted shape qualitatively replicated the deformed shape of the component as observed in experiments. The results indicate that the use of viscoplastic models for structural analysis may lead to more realistic life assessments of experimental thrust chambers.

  15. A graphite-lined regeneratively cooled thrust chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubbs, V. R.

    1972-01-01

    Design concepts, based on use of graphite as a thermal barrier for regeneratively cooled FLOX-methane thrust chambers, have been screened and concepts selected for detailed thermodynamic, stress, and fabrication analyses. A single design employing AGCarb-101, a fibrous graphite composite material, for a thermal barrier liner and an electroformed nickel structure with integral coolant passages was selected for fabrication and testing. The fabrication processes and the test results are described and illustrated.

  16. Structural analysis of cylindrical thrust chambers, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, M. L.

    1981-01-01

    A system of three computer programs is described for use in conjunction with the BOPAGE finite element program. The programs are demonstrated by analyzing cumulative plastic deformation in a regeneratively cooled rocket thrust chamber. The codes provide the capability to predict geometric and material nonlinear behavior of cyclically loaded structures without performing a cycle-by-cycle analysis over the life of the structure. The program set consists of a BOPACE restart tape reader routine, and extrapolation program and a plot package.

  17. Test program to provide confidence in liquid oxygen cooling of hydrocarbon fueled rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, E. S.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental program has been planned at the NASA Lewis Research Center to build confidence in the feasibility of liquid oxygen cooling for hydrocarbon fueled rocket engines. Although liquid oxygen cooling has previously been incorporated in test hardware, more runtime is necessary to gain confidence in this concept. In the previous tests, small oxygen leaks developed at the throat of the thrust chamber and film cooled the hot-gas side of the chamber wall without resulting in catastrophic failure. However, more testing is necessary to demonstrate that a catastrophic failure would not occur if cracks developed further upstream between the injector and the throat, where the boundary layer has not been established. Since under normal conditions cracks are expected to form in the throat region of the thrust chamber, cracks must be initiated artificially in order to control their location. Several methods of crack initiation are discussed in this report. Four thrust chambers, three with cracks and one without, should be tested. The axial location of the cracks should be varied parametrically. Each chamber should be instrumented to determine the effects of the cracks, as well as the overall performance and durability of the chambers.

  18. Development of a Lightweight Thrust Chamber Assembly Utilizing In-Situ Reinforced Silicon Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvander, J.; Wherley, B.; Claflin, S.

    1999-06-01

    The paper describes the status of the Light Weight Thrust Chamber Assembly (LWTCA) program currently underway at Boeing Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power, under contract with the US Air Force Research Laboratory. The goal of the program is to demonstrate technology which will lead to a 40% reduction in weight (including the nozzle), a 50% reduction in cost, a 75% reduction in part count and a 3% increase in specific impulse on a full scale, 400 klbf thrust LOX/hydrogen booster engine. The demonstration will be performed through the use of manufacturing technology demonstrator hardware and 60 klbf thrust hot-fire tests. The primary means to achieving these goals is by using in-situ reinforced silicon nitride for structural components. Silicon nitride is an advanced ceramic material that has high specific strength and fracture toughness, and can be cast to near- net part shape. Tests to validate the material properties of in-situ reinforced silicon nitride are discussed, along with the resulting changes to traditional thrust chamber design as a result of the improved properties. The progress towards manufacturing and hot-fire testing a thrust chamber assembly from the material is also described.

  19. Development of an Integrated Rocket Thrust Chamber Assembly Analysis and Design Toolkit (TCAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhangi, S.; Beck, J.; Darian, A.; Haung, Y.; Liang, P.; Jensen, R.; Sindir, M.

    2000-01-01

    There are many individual computational tools and methods used to analyze and design components of a rocket engine thrust chamber assembly (TCA) 11,21. To analyze and design a thrust chamber assembly these tools are usually used in sequence while communication of information between these tools is usually done manually. Each component of a TCA is usually designed and optimized individually with limited considerations on system optimized design. This approach is often iterative and can be prone to error. Also at present, expert knowledge of each tool is required. The objective of this software development effort is to select, integrate and automate the best tools into an easy-to-use computational package, the Thrust Chamber Analysis Toolkit (TCAT). This tool will provide a seamless process to analyze and design all or individual components of a thrust chamber assembly. This paper describes the current status of the MAT software development. The selected component codes and their capabilities are briefly described. User and module interfaces and integration status are presented. MAT pre- and post-processing added options are presented and overall MAT capabilities are demonstrated with the results of sample cases. Ongoing and planned model validation efforts are also described. Finally, the MAT future plan options are discussed.

  20. Liquid Oxygen Cooling of Hydrocarbon Fueled Rocket Thrust Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Elizabeth S.

    1989-01-01

    Rocket engines using liquid oxygen (LOX) and hydrocarbon fuel as the propellants are being given serious consideration for future launch vehicle propulsion. Normally, the fuel is used to regeneratively cool the combustion chamber. However, hydrocarbons such as RP-1 are limited in their cooling capability. Another possibility for the coolant is the liquid oxygen. Combustion chambers previously tested with LOX and RP-1 as propellants and LOX as the collant demonstrated the feasibility of using liquid oxygen as a coolant up to a chamber pressure of 13.8 MPa (2000 psia). However, there was concern as to the effect on the integrity of the chamber liner if oxygen leaks into the combustion zone through fatigue cracks that may develop between the cooling passages and the hot gas side wall. In order to study this effect, chambers were fabricated with slots machined upstream of the throat between the cooling passage wall and the hot gas side wall to simulate cracks. The chambers were tested at a nominal chamber pressure of 8.6 MPa (1247 psia) over a range of mixture ratios from 1.9 to 3.1 using liquid oxygen as the coolant. The results of the testing showed that the leaking LOX did not have a deleterious effect on the chambers in the region of the slots. However, there was unexplained melting in the throat region of both chambers, but not in line with the slots.

  1. Numerical analysis of bipropellant combustion in liquid thrust chambers by an Eulerian-Eulerian approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dang, A. L.; Navaz, H. K.; Rangel, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The liquid thrust chambers performance (LTCP) code is used for parametric studies of flow and combustion in liquid rocket engines. Multiphase flow equations are solved in an Eulerian-Eulerian framework, and multistep finite rate chemistry is incorporated. The discretization scheme is fully implicit and is based on the total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme, which is accurate, robust, very efficient and capable of handling steep gradients and stiff chemistry. Effects of injection velocity and chamber size have been considered, and the effect of group combustion on the evaporation rate has been studied for a dense spray.

  2. Cyclic hot firing results of tungsten-wire-reinforced, copper-lined thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazaroff, John M.; Jankovsky, Robert S.

    1990-01-01

    An advanced thrust liner material for potential long life reusable rocket engines is described. This liner material was produced with the intent of improving the reusable life of high pressure thrust chambers by strengthening the chamber in the hoop direction, thus avoiding the longitudinal cracking due to low cycle fatigue that is observed in conventional homogeneous copper chambers, but yet not reducing the high thermal conductivity that is essential when operating with high heat fluxes. The liner material produced was a tungsten wire reinforced copper composite. Incorporating this composite into two hydrogen-oxygen test rocket chambers was done so that its performance as a reusable liner material could be evaluated. Testing results showed that both chambers failed prematurely, but the crack sites were perpendicular to the normal direction of cracking indicating a degree of success in containing the tremendous thermal strain associated with high temperature rocket engines. The failures, in all cases, were associated with drilled instrumentation ports and no other damages or deformations were found elsewhere in the composite liners.

  3. Measuring Model Rocket Engine Thrust Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penn, Kim; Slaton, William V.

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes a method and setup to quickly and easily measure a model rocket engine's thrust curve using a computer data logger and force probe. Horst describes using Vernier's LabPro2 and force probe to measure the rocket engine's thrust curve; however, the method of attaching the rocket to the force probe is not discussed. We show how a simple engine holder can be constructed and used with Vernier's LabPro and force probe to record data that students can use to compare to sample data from the rocket manufacturer or the National Association of Rocketry's3 engine certification sheets, calculate total impulse, and make predictions for model rocket launches. PASCO markets a rocket engine test bracket4 that mounts to its PASPORT force sensor for similar measurements. The engine holder described here is very economical, and all the parts can be obtained from a local hardware store or home center.

  4. Low-thrust chemical rocket engine study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellish, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Engine data and information are presented to perform system studies on cargo orbit-transfer vehicles which would deliver large space structures to geosynchronous equatorial orbit. Low-thrust engine performance, weight, and envelope parametric data were established, preliminary design information was generated, and technologies for liquid rocket engines were identified. Two major engine design drivers were considered in the study: cooling and engine cycle options. Both film-cooled and regeneratively cooled engines were evaluated. The propellant combinations studied were hydrogen/oxygen, methane/oxygen, and kerosene/oxygen.

  5. Study of Daedalus Interstellar Spacecraft Reaction Chamber and Thrust Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, S. K.; Benaroya, H.

    Project Daedalus was the 1978 trade study that proved the feasibility of space travel utilizing fusion-based propulsion (Inertial Confinement Fusion). This paper analyzes some of the key structural aspects of the Daedalus spacecraft, in particular, the reaction chamber and thrust structure that is integral to the Daedalus spacecraft, which supports the loads resulting from the fusion reactions. First, the reaction chamber is studied computationally in terms of static loading and vibrational characteristics utilizing the finite element method. Next, a proposed bracing system is integrated into the reaction chamber and the effects are studied. Lastly, the field coils with their supporting truss structure are added to the assembly. Concepts are introduced for actuators and course-correction mechanisms that ensure the spacecraft maintains the required trajectory to rendezvous with the target system. Present-day materials and manufacturing considerations are explored based on the assumptions made in the Daedalus study. Testing, qualification, and assembly of the spacecraft are also discussed. This paper is a summary of the first author's Master's Thesis at Rutgers University.

  6. Integrated Thrust Vectored Engine Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    erformances operationnelles des aeronefs militaires, des vehicules terrestres et des vehicules maritimes] To order the complete compilation report...throttling "* Autonomous Engine Configuration Side forces demand to define nozzle vectoring "* Simple Interface FADEC -> FCS " Minimum Interaction FCS

  7. Reverse Core Engine with Thrust Reverser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suciu, Gabriel L. (Inventor); Chandler, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An engine system has a gas generator, a bi-fi wall surrounding at least a portion of the gas generator, a casing surrounding a fan, and the casing having first and second thrust reverser doors which in a deployed position abut each other and the bi-fi wall.

  8. Development of Aluminum Composites for a Rocket Engine's Lightweight Thrust Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.; Elam, Sandy; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Aerospike liquid fueled rocket engine for the X-33 aerospace vehicle consists of several thrust cells, which can comprise as much as 25% of the engine weight. The interior wall of the thrust cell chamber is exposed to high temperature combustion products and must be cooled by using liquid hydrogen. Ultimately, reducing engine weight would increase vehicle performance and allow heavier payload capabilities. Currently, the thrust cell's structural jacket and manifolds are made of stainless steel 347, which can potentially be replaced by a lighter material such as an Aluminum (Al) Metal Matrix Composites (MMC). Up to 50% weight reduction can be expected for each of the thrust cell chambers using particulate SiC reinforced Al MMC. Currently, several Al MMC thrust cell structural jackets have been produced, using cost-effective processes such as gravity casting and plasma spray deposition, to demonstrate MMC technology readiness for NASA's advanced propulsion systems.

  9. Development of Aluminum Composites for a Rocket Engine's Lightweight Thrust Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.; Elam, Sandy; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Aerospike liquid fueled rocket engine for the X-33 aerospace vehicle consists of several thrust cells, which can comprise as much as 25% of the engine weight. The interior wall of the thrust cell chamber is exposed to high temperature combustion products and must be cooled by using liquid hydrogen. Ultimately, reducing engine weight would increase vehicle performance and allow heavier payload capabilities. Currently, the thrust cell's structural jacket and manifolds are made of stainless steel 347, which can potentially be replaced by a lighter material such as an Aluminum (Al) Metal Matrix Composites (MMC). Up to 50% weight reduction can be expected for each of the thrust cell chambers using particulate SiC reinforced Al MMC. Currently, several Al MMC thrust cell structural jackets have been produced, using cost-effective processes such as gravity casting and plasma spray deposition, to demonstrate MMC technology readiness for NASA's advanced propulsion systems.

  10. Turbulence modelling of flow fields in thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.

    1993-01-01

    Following the consensus of a workshop in Turbulence Modelling for Liquid Rocket Thrust Chambers, the current effort was undertaken to study the effects of second-order closure on the predictions of thermochemical flow fields. To reduce the instability and computational intensity of the full second-order Reynolds Stress Model, an Algebraic Stress Model (ASM) coupled with a two-layer near wall treatment was developed. Various test problems, including the compressible boundary layer with adiabatic and cooled walls, recirculating flows, swirling flows, and the entire SSME nozzle flow were studied to assess the performance of the current model. Detailed calculations for the SSME exit wall flow around the nozzle manifold were executed. As to the overall flow predictions, the ASM removes another assumption for appropriate comparison with experimental data to account for the non-isotropic turbulence effects.

  11. Real-time seam tracking for rocket thrust chamber manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, D.J.; Novak, J.L.; Starr, G.P.; Maslakowski, J.E.

    1993-11-01

    A sensor-based control approach for real-time seam tracking of rocket thrust chamber assemblies has been developed to enable automation of a braze paste dispensing process. This approach utilizes a non-contact Multi-Axis Seam Tracking (MAST) sensor to track the seams. Thee MAST sensor measures capacitance variations between the sensor and the workpiece and produces four varying voltages which are read directly into the robot controller. A PID control algorithm which runs at the application program level has been designed based upon a simple dynamic model of the combined robot and sensor plant. The control algorithm acts on the incoming sensor signals in real-time to guide the robot motion along the seam path. Experiments demonstrate that seams can be tracked at 100 mm/sec within the accuracy required for braze paste dispensing.

  12. Turbulence modelling of flow fields in thrust chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.

    1993-02-01

    Following the consensus of a workshop in Turbulence Modelling for Liquid Rocket Thrust Chambers, the current effort was undertaken to study the effects of second-order closure on the predictions of thermochemical flow fields. To reduce the instability and computational intensity of the full second-order Reynolds Stress Model, an Algebraic Stress Model (ASM) coupled with a two-layer near wall treatment was developed. Various test problems, including the compressible boundary layer with adiabatic and cooled walls, recirculating flows, swirling flows, and the entire SSME nozzle flow were studied to assess the performance of the current model. Detailed calculations for the SSME exit wall flow around the nozzle manifold were executed. As to the overall flow predictions, the ASM removes another assumption for appropriate comparison with experimental data to account for the non-isotropic turbulence effects.

  13. Electronics Engineering Department Thrust Area report FY'84

    SciTech Connect

    Minichino, C.; Phelps, P.L.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes the work of the Electronics Engineering Department Thrust Areas for FY'84: diagnostics and microelectronic engineering; signal and control engineering; microwave and pulsed power engineering; computer-aided engineering; engineering modeling and simulation; and systems engineering. For each Thrust Area, an overview and a description of the goals and achievements of each project is provided.

  14. VPS Process for Copper Components in Thrust Chamber Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, Sandra; Holmes, Richard; Hickman, Robert; McKechnie, Tim; Thom, George

    2005-01-01

    For several years, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been working with Plasma Processes, Inc., (PPI) to fabricate thrust chamber liners with GRCop-84. Using the vacuum plasma spray (VPS) process, chamber liners of a variety of shapes and sizes have been created. Each has been formed as a functional gradient material (FGM) that creates a unique protective layer of NiCrAlY on the GRCop-84 liner s hot wall surface. Hot-fire testing was successfully conducted on a subscale unit to demonstrate the liner's durability and performance. Similar VPS technology has also been applied to create functional gradient coatings (FGC) on copper injector faceplates. Protective layers of NiCrAlY and zirconia were applied to both coaxial and impinging faceplate designs. Hot-fire testing is planned for these coated injectors in April 2005. The resulting material systems for both copper alloy components allows them to operate at higher temperatures with improved durability and operating margins.

  15. Experimental fatigue life investigation of cylindrical thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quentmeyer, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-two cylindrical test sections of a cylindrical rocket thrust chamber were fabricated and 21 of them were cycled to failure to explore the failure mechanisms, determine the effects of wall temperature on cyclic life, and to rank the material life characteristics for comparison with results from isothermal tests of 12 alloys at 538 C. Cylinder liners were fabricated from OFHC copper, Amzirc, and NAR1loy-Z. Tests were conducted at a chamber pressure of 4.14 MW/sq m using hydrogen-oxygen propellants at an oxidant-fuel ratio of 6.0, which resulted in an average throat heat flux of 54 MW/sq m. The cylinders were cooled with liquid hydrogen at an average rate of 0.91 Kg/sec. All failures were characterized by a thinning of the cooling channel wall at the centerline and eventual failure by tensile rupture. Cyclic life rankings of the materials based on temperature do not agree with published rankings based on uniaxial, isothermal strain tests.

  16. VPS Process for Copper Components in Thrust Chamber Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, Sandra; Holmes, Richard; Hickman, Robert; McKechnie, Tim; Thom, George

    2005-01-01

    For several years, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been working with Plasma Processes, Inc., (PPI) to fabricate thrust chamber liners with GRCop-84. Using the vacuum plasma spray (VPS) process, chamber liners of a variety of shapes and sizes have been created. Each has been formed as a functional gradient material (FGM) that creates a unique protective layer of NiCrAlY on the GRCop-84 liner s hot wall surface. Hot-fire testing was successfully conducted on a subscale unit to demonstrate the liner's durability and performance. Similar VPS technology has also been applied to create functional gradient coatings (FGC) on copper injector faceplates. Protective layers of NiCrAlY and zirconia were applied to both coaxial and impinging faceplate designs. Hot-fire testing is planned for these coated injectors in April 2005. The resulting material systems for both copper alloy components allows them to operate at higher temperatures with improved durability and operating margins.

  17. Composite Nozzle/Thrust Chambers Analyzed for Low-Cost Boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.

    1999-01-01

    The Low Cost Booster Technology Program is an initiative to minimize the cost of future liquid engines by using advanced materials and innovative designs, and by reducing engine complexity. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center s 60K FASTRAC Engine is one example where these design philosophies have been put into practice. This engine burns a liquid kerosene/oxygen mixture. It uses a one-piece, polymer composite thrust chamber/nozzle that is constructed of a tape-wrapped silica phenolic liner, a metallic injector interface ring, and a filament-wound epoxy overwrap. A cooperative effort between NASA Lewis Research Center s Structures Division and Marshall is underway to perform a finite element analysis of the FASTRAC chamber/nozzle under all the loading and environmental conditions that it will experience during its lifetime. The chamber/nozzle is a complex composite structure. Of its three different materials, the two composite components have distinctly different fiber architectures and, consequently, require separate material model descriptions. Since the liner is tape wrapped, it is orthotropic in the nozzle global coordinates; and since the overwrap is filament wound, it is treated as a monoclinic material. Furthermore, the wind angle on the overwrap varies continuously along the length of the chamber/nozzle.

  18. Thrust reverser for high bypass turbofan engine

    SciTech Connect

    Matta, R.K.; Bhutiani, P.K.

    1990-05-08

    This patent describes a thrust reverser for a gas turbine engine of the type which includes an outer wall spaced from the center body of a core engine to define a bypass duct therebetween. The thrust reverser comprising: circumferentially displaced blocker doors, each of the doors being movable between a normal position generally aligned with the outer wall and a thrust reversing position extending transversely of the bypass duct for blocking the exhaust of air through the bypass duct and directing the air through an opening in the outer wall for thrust reversal; each of the blocker doors being of lightweight construction and including a pit in the inner surface thereof in the normal position; means for covering the pit during normal flow of air through the bypass duct to reduce the pressure drop in the bypass duct and to reduce noise. The covering means including a pit cover hingedly mounted at one end thereof on the blocker door and means of biasing the pit cover away from the blocker door to a position providing smooth flow of air through the bypass duct during normal operation.

  19. Test apparatus for measuring jet engine thrust

    SciTech Connect

    Laskody, J.R.

    1988-12-06

    This patent describes an apparatus for simultaneously measuring variables to calculate total thrust generated from a turbofan jet engine having a lengthwise axis and which is characterized by (1) a section for generating drive gases, (2) a fan section which rotates about the lengthwise axis in response to the drive gases and which includes (i) exterior blades which rotate with the fan section for generating a propelling force, and (ii) an outer cowling, and (3) an outlet section for exhausting the drive gases to the atmosphere to provide a further propelling force, the apparatus comprising: a. a cradle for supporting the engine; b. means for suspending the cradle from a support structure so as to permit movement of the cradle in the lengthwise direction; c. means for measuring a forward force generated by the drive gases which are exhausted to the atmosphere for calculating the nozzle gas thrust, the measuring means including load cell means which are connected between the support structure and the cradle; d. dynamometer means including a rotatable portion, for measuring a torque generated by the engine fan section for calculating the thrust output of the fan section; and e. drive gear means for connecting the dynamometer means to the engine fan section, the drive gear means including belt means which are removably connected to the fan section and to the rotatable portion of the dynamometer means so as to transmit a rotational force between the fan section and the dynamometer means.

  20. Simplified procedures for correlation of experimentally measured and predicted thrust chamber performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    Thrust chamber performance is evaluated in terms of an analytical model incorporating all the loss processes that occur in a real rocket motor. The important loss processes in the real thrust chamber were identified, and a methodology and recommended procedure for predicting real thrust chamber vacuum specific impulse were developed. Simplified equations for the calculation of vacuum specific impulse are developed to relate the delivered performance (both vacuum specific impulse and characteristic velocity) to the ideal performance as degraded by the losses corresponding to a specified list of loss processes. These simplified equations enable the various performance loss components, and the corresponding efficiencies, to be quantified separately (except that interaction effects are arbitrarily assigned in the process). The loss and efficiency expressions presented can be used to evaluate experimentally measured thrust chamber performance, to direct development effort into the areas most likely to yield improvements in performance, and as a basis to predict performance of related thrust chamber configurations.

  1. RS-88 Pad Abort Demonstrator Thrust Chamber Assembly Testing at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Rebecca A.; Sanders, Timothy M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper documents the effort conducted to collect hot-tire dynamic and acoustics environments data during 50,000-lb thrust lox-ethanol hot-fire rocket testing at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in November-December 2003. This test program was conducted during development testing of the Boeing Rocketdyne RS-88 development engine thrust chamber assembly (TCA) in support of the Orbital Space Plane (OSP) Crew Escape System Propulsion (CESP) Program Pad Abort Demonstrator (PAD). In addition to numerous internal TCA and nozzle measurements, induced acoustics environments data were also collected. Provided here is an overview of test parameters, a discussion of the measurements, test facility systems and test operations, and a quality assessment of the data collected during this test program.

  2. Development of a simplified procedure for thrust chamber life prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porowski, J. S.; Badlani, M.; Kasrale, B.; Odonnell, W. J.; Peterson, D.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical design procedure for predicting thrust chamber life considering cyclically induced thinning and bulging of the hot gas wall is developed. The hot gas wall, composed of ligaments connecting adjacent cooling channel ribs and separating the coolant flow from the combustion gas, is subjected to pressure loading and severe thermal cycling. Thermal transients during start up and shut down cause plastic straining through the ligaments. The primary bending stress superimposed on the alternate in-plane cyclic straining causes incremental bulging of the ligaments during each firing cycle. This basic mechanism of plastic ratcheting is analyzed and a method developed for determining ligament deformation and strain. The method uses a yield surface for combined bending and membrane loading to determine the incremental permanent deflection and pregressive thinning near the center of the ligaments which cause the geometry of the ligaments to change as the incremental strains accumulate. Fatigue and tensile instability are affected by these local geometry changes. Both are analyzed and a failure criterion developed.

  3. STE thrust chamber technology: Main injector technology program and nozzle Advanced Development Program (ADP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the STME Main Injector Program was to enhance the technology base for the large-scale main injector-combustor system of oxygen-hydrogen booster engines in the areas of combustion efficiency, chamber heating rates, and combustion stability. The initial task of the Main Injector Program, focused on analysis and theoretical predictions using existing models, was complemented by the design, fabrication, and test at MSFC of a subscale calorimetric, 40,000-pound thrust class, axisymmetric thrust chamber operating at approximately 2,250 psi and a 7:1 expansion ratio. Test results were used to further define combustion stability bounds, combustion efficiency, and heating rates using a large injector scale similar to the Pratt & Whitney (P&W) STME main injector design configuration including the tangential entry swirl coaxial injection elements. The subscale combustion data was used to verify and refine analytical modeling simulation and extend the database range to guide the design of the large-scale system main injector. The subscale injector design incorporated fuel and oxidizer flow area control features which could be varied; this allowed testing of several design points so that the STME conditions could be bracketed. The subscale injector design also incorporated high-reliability and low-cost fabrication techniques such as a one-piece electrical discharged machined (EDMed) interpropellant plate. Both subscale and large-scale injectors incorporated outer row injector elements with scarfed tip features to allow evaluation of reduced heating rates to the combustion chamber.

  4. STE thrust chamber technology: Main injector technology program and nozzle Advanced Development Program (ADP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of the STME Main Injector Program was to enhance the technology base for the large-scale main injector-combustor system of oxygen-hydrogen booster engines in the areas of combustion efficiency, chamber heating rates, and combustion stability. The initial task of the Main Injector Program, focused on analysis and theoretical predictions using existing models, was complemented by the design, fabrication, and test at MSFC of a subscale calorimetric, 40,000-pound thrust class, axisymmetric thrust chamber operating at approximately 2,250 psi and a 7:1 expansion ratio. Test results were used to further define combustion stability bounds, combustion efficiency, and heating rates using a large injector scale similar to the Pratt & Whitney (P&W) STME main injector design configuration including the tangential entry swirl coaxial injection elements. The subscale combustion data was used to verify and refine analytical modeling simulation and extend the database range to guide the design of the large-scale system main injector. The subscale injector design incorporated fuel and oxidizer flow area control features which could be varied; this allowed testing of several design points so that the STME conditions could be bracketed. The subscale injector design also incorporated high-reliability and low-cost fabrication techniques such as a one-piece electrical discharged machined (EDMed) interpropellant plate. Both subscale and large-scale injectors incorporated outer row injector elements with scarfed tip features to allow evaluation of reduced heating rates to the combustion chamber.

  5. Reverse thrust performance of the QCSEE variable pitch turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanich, N. E.; Reemsnyder, D. C.; Blodmer, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    Results of steady state reverse and forward to reverse thrust transient performance tests are presented. The original quiet, clean, short haul, experimental engine four segment variable fan nozzle was retested in reverse and compared with a continuous, 30 deg half angle conical exlet. Data indicated that the significantly more stable, higher pressure recovery flow with the fixed 30 deg exlet resulted in lower engine vibrations, lower fan blade stress, and approximately a 20 percent improvement in reverse thrust. Objective reverse thrust of 35 percent of takeoff thrust was reached. Thrust response of less than 1.5 sec was achieved for the approach and the takeoff to reverse thrust transients.

  6. Development of sputtered techniques for thrust chambers, task 1. [evaluation of filler materials for regeneratively cooled thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullaly, J. R.; Schmid, T. E.; Hecht, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Filler materials proposed for use in the sputter fabrication regeneratively cooled thrust chambers were evaluated. Low melting castable alloys, CERROBEND. CERROCAST, and CERROTRU, slurry applied SERMETEL 481 and flame-sprayed aluminum were investigated as filler materials. Sputter deposition from a cylindrical cathode inverted magnestron was used to apply an OFHC copper closeout layer to filled OFHC copper ribbed-wall cylindrical substrates. The sputtered closeout layer structure was evaluated with respect to filler material contamination, predeposition machining and finishing operations, and deposition parameters. The application of aluminum by flame-spraying resulted in excessiver filler porosity. Though the outgassing from this porosity was found to be detrimental to the closeout layer structure, bond strengths in excess of 10,500 psi were achieved. Removal of the aluminum from the grooves was readily accomplished by leaching in a 7.0 molar solution of sodium hydroxide at 353 K. Of the other filler materials evaluated, CERROTRU was found to be the most suitable material with respect to completely filling the ribbed-wall cylinders and vacuum system compatibility. However, bond contamination resulted in low closeout layer bond strength with the CERROTRU filler. CERROBEND, CERROCAST, and SERMETEL 481 were found to be unacceptable as filler materials.

  7. MHD thrust vectoring of a rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaune, Julien; Packan, Denis; Tholin, Fabien; Chemartin, Laurent; Stillace, Thierry; Masson, Frederic

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the possibility to use MagnetoHydroDynamics (MHD) to vectorize the thrust of a solid propellant rocket engine exhaust is investigated. Using a magnetic field for vectoring offers a mass gain and a reusability advantage compared to standard gimbaled, elastomer-joint systems. Analytical and numerical models were used to evaluate the flow deviation with a 1 Tesla magnetic field inside the nozzle. The fluid flow in the resistive MHD approximation is calculated using the KRONOS code from ONERA, coupling the hypersonic CFD platform CEDRE and the electrical code SATURNE from EDF. A critical parameter of these simulations is the electrical conductivity, which was evaluated using a set of equilibrium calculations with 25 species. Two models were used: local thermodynamic equilibrium and frozen flow. In both cases, chlorine captures a large fraction of free electrons, limiting the electrical conductivity to a value inadequate for thrust vectoring applications. However, when using chlorine-free propergols with 1% in mass of alkali, an MHD thrust vectoring of several degrees was obtained.

  8. Aircraft Engine Thrust Estimator Design Based on GSA-LSSVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Hanlin; Zhang, Tianhong

    2017-08-01

    In view of the necessity of highly precise and reliable thrust estimator to achieve direct thrust control of aircraft engine, based on support vector regression (SVR), as well as least square support vector machine (LSSVM) and a new optimization algorithm - gravitational search algorithm (GSA), by performing integrated modelling and parameter optimization, a GSA-LSSVM-based thrust estimator design solution is proposed. The results show that compared to particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm, GSA can find unknown optimization parameter better and enables the model developed with better prediction and generalization ability. The model can better predict aircraft engine thrust and thus fulfills the need of direct thrust control of aircraft engine.

  9. Fabrication of Composite Combustion Chamber/Nozzle for Fastrac Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, T.; Beshears, R.; Burlingame, S.; Peters, W.; Prince, M.; Suits, M.; Tillery, S.; Burns, L.; Kovach, M.; Roberts, K.

    2001-01-01

    The Fastrac Engine developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center for the X-34 vehicle began as a low cost engine development program for a small booster system. One of the key components to reducing the engine cost was the development of an inexpensive combustion chamber/nozzle. Fabrication of a regeneratively cooled thrust chamber and nozzle was considered too expensive and time consuming. In looking for an alternate design concept, the Space Shuttle's Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Project provided an extensive background with ablative composite materials in a combustion environment. An integral combustion chamber/nozzle was designed and fabricated with a silica/phenolic ablative liner and a carbon/epoxy structural overwrap. This paper describes the fabrication process and developmental hurdles overcome for the Fastrac engine one-piece composite combustion chamber/nozzle.

  10. Fabrication of Composite Combustion Chamber/Nozzle for Fastrac Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawerence, T.; Beshears, R.; Burlingame, S.; Peters, W.; Prince, M.; Suits, M.; Tillery, S.; Burns, L.; Kovach, M.; Roberts, K.; hide

    2000-01-01

    The Fastrac Engine developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center for the X-34 vehicle began as a low cost engine development program for a small booster system. One of the key components to reducing the engine cost was the development of an inexpensive combustion chamber/nozzle. Fabrication of a regeneratively cooled thrust chamber and nozzle was considered too expensive and time consuming. In looking for an alternate design concept, the Space Shuttle's Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Project provided an extensive background with ablative composite materials in a combustion environment. An integral combustion chamber/nozzle was designed and fabricated with a silica/phenolic ablative liner and a carbon/epoxy structural overwrap. This paper describes the fabrication process and developmental hurdles overcome for the Fastrac engine one-piece composite combustion chamber/nozzle.

  11. Experimental investigation of combustor effects on rocket thrust chamber performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurick, W. H.; Hines, W. S.

    1973-01-01

    The results are reported of a program to develop special instrumentation systems and engine hardware, conduct tests using LOX/GH2 propellants wherein radial mixtures ratio stratification was controlled, and subsequently compare the results of four selected tests with the predictions of the JANNAF performance-prediction computer programs. During the experiments, the overall propellant mixture ratio was varied from 4.4 to 6.6, while the mixture ratios in the core and outer zone were varied from 5.7 to 8.8 and from 3.7 to 7.2, respectively. A nominal 10 percent of the total fuel flow was used as boundary layer collant in a majority of the firings. Nominal chamber pressure was either 225 or 250 psia, with nozzle expansion ratios of either 25:1 or 4:1. Measurements of the axial chamber pressure and wall heat flux profiles, together with samples of the exhaust gas, were obtained. The corrected experimental specific impulse and characteristic exhaust velocity efficiencies were approximately 97.5 and 98.5 percent, respectively.

  12. Tank 12 data dump OME integrated thrust chamber test report, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauckert, R. P.; Tobin, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    The test program conducted to characterize the steady state stability, thermal, and performance characteristics of the integrated thrust chamber assembly, as well as limited tests to investigate transient characteristics are described.

  13. The NASA Constellation University Institutes Project: Thrust Chamber Assembly Virtual Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, P. Kevin; Rybak, Jeffry A.; Hulka, James R.; Jones, Gregg W.; Nesman, Tomas; West, Jeffrey S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper documents key aspects of the Constellation University Institutes Project (CUIP) Thrust Chamber Assembly (TCA) Virtual Institute (VI). Specifically, the paper details the TCA VI organizational and functional aspects relative to providing support for Constellation Systems. The TCA VI vision is put forth and discussed in detail. The vision provides the objective and approach for improving thrust chamber assembly design methodologies by replacing the current empirical tools with verified and validated CFD codes. The vision also sets out ignition, performance, thermal environments and combustion stability as focus areas where application of these improved tools is required. Flow physics and a study of the Space Shuttle Main Engine development program are used to conclude that the injector is the key to robust TCA design. Requirements are set out in terms of fidelity, robustness and demonstrated accuracy of the design tool. Lack of demonstrated accuracy is noted as the most significant obstacle to realizing the potential of CFD to be widely used as an injector design tool. A hierarchical decomposition process is outlined to facilitate the validation process. A simulation readiness level tool used to gauge progress toward the goal is described. Finally, there is a description of the current efforts in each focus area. The background of each focus area is discussed. The state of the art in each focus area is noted along with the TCA VI research focus in the area. Brief highlights of work in the area are also included.

  14. Coupled heat transfer analysis of thrust chambers with recessed shear coaxial injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jiawen; Sun, Bing

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the effects of recessed lengths on combustion performance and heat loads in LOX/methane thrust chambers with shear coaxial injectors, a coupled numerical methodology is developed to solve the combustion and heat transfer in thrust chambers with regenerative cooling. In this methodology, the transcritical turbulent combustion is modeled by a validated non-adiabatic flamelet model considering real-fluid properties; turbulent flows within the thrust chamber and cooling channels are computed by a pressure-based coupled algorithm. The validation indicates that the prediction with detailed chemistry mechanism and the Chung method confirms quantitatively to literature experimental data. The results reveal that the recess causes an increase of wall heat flux in the whole thrust chamber and makes the heat flux peak in the combustion chamber moves downstream. Furthermore, both the heat flux peaks in the combustion chamber and nozzle increase first and then decrease as recessed lengths increase. Meanwhile, chamber pressure, hot-gas temperature, and the averaging heat flux of the combustion chamber wall are positively correlated with recessed lengths. However, the heat loads are more sensitive to the recessed lengths than chamber pressure and hot-gas temperature. Much attention should be paid to the protection of chamber wall.

  15. Reverse thrust performance of the QCSEE variable pitch turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanich, N. E.; Reemsnyder, D. C.; Bloomer, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    Results of steady-state reverse and forward-to-reverse thrust transient performance tests are presented. The original QCSEE 4-segment variable fan nozzle was retested in reverse and compared with a continuous, 30-deg half-angle conical exlet. Data indicated that the significantly more stable, higher pressure recovery flow with the fixed 30-deg exlet resulted in lower engine vibrations, lower fan blade stress and approximately a 20% improvement in reverse thrust. Objective reverse thrust of 35% of takeoff thrust was reached. Thrust response of less than 1.5 sec was achieved for the approach and the takeoff-to-reverse thrust transients.

  16. Some effects of thermal-cycle-induced deformation in rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannum, N. P.; Price, R. G., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The deformation process observed in the hot gas side wall of rocket combustion chambers was investigaged for three different liner materials. Five thrust chambers were cycled to failure by using hydrogen and oxygen as propellants at a chamber pressure of 4.14 MN/cu m. The deformation was observed nondestructively at midlife points and destructively after failure occurred. The cyclic life results are presented with an accompanying discussion about the problems of life prediction associated with the types of failures encountered in the present work. Data indicating the deformation of the thrust chamber liner as cycles are accumulated are presented for each of the test thrust chambers. From these deformation data and observation of the failure sites it is evident that modeling the failure process as classic low cycle thermal fatigue is inadequate as a life prediction method.

  17. Evaluation of Vortex Chamber Concepts for Liquid Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu Phuoc; Knuth, Williams; Michaels, Scott; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Rocket-based combined-cycle engines (RBBC) being considered at NASA for future generation launch vehicles feature clusters of small rocket thrusters as part of the engine components. Depending on specific RBBC concepts, these thrusters may be operated at various operating conditions including power level and/or propellant mixture ratio variations. To pursue technology developments for future launch vehicles, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is examining vortex chamber concepts for the subject cycle engine application. Past studies indicated that the vortex chamber schemes potentially have a number of advantages over conventional chamber methods. Due to the nature of the vortex flow, relatively cooler propellant streams tend to flow along the chamber wall. Hence, the thruster chamber can be operated without the need of any cooling techniques. This vortex flow also creates strong turbulence, which promotes the propellant mixing process. Consequently, the subject chamber concepts not only offer the system simplicity but they also would enhance the combustion performance. The test results showed that the chamber performance was markedly high even at a low chamber length-to- diameter ratio (L/D). This incentive can be translated to a convenience in the thrust chamber packaging.

  18. A numerical model for coupling between atomization and spray dynamics in liquid rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giridharan, M. G.; Lee, J. G.; Krishnan, A.; Przekwas, A. J.; Gross, Klaus

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a novel method of coupling the atomization and spray combustion processes encountered in coaxial injection elements of liquid rocket engine thrust chambers. This method is based on the Jet-Embedding technique in which the liquid jet core equations and the gas phase equations are solved separately. The liquid and gas phase solutions, however, are coupled through the boundary conditions at the interface between the phases. The computational grid for the gas phase calculations are adapted to the shape of the liquid jet core. The axial variation of droplet sizes are calculated using a stability analysis appropriate for the atomization regime of liquid jet breakup. The predictions of this method have been validated with experimental data on low speed water jets. Using this method, calculations are performed for the SSME fuel preburner single injector flow field. The results obtained are in good agreement with the predictions of the volume-of-fluid method.

  19. Acoustically shielded exhaust system for high thrust jet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, John P. (Inventor); Lee, Robert (Inventor); Majjigi, Rudramuni K. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A flade exhaust nozzle for a high thrust jet engine is configured to form an acoustic shield around the core engine exhaust flowstream while supplementing engine thrust during all flight conditions, particularly during takeoff. The flade airflow is converted from an annular 360.degree. flowstream to an arcuate flowstream extending around the lower half of the core engine exhaust flowstream so as to suppress exhaust noise directed at the surrounding community.

  20. Proven, long-life hydrogen/oxygen thrust chambers for space station propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, G. P.; Price, H. G.

    1986-01-01

    The development of the manned space station has necessitated the development of technology related to an onboard auxiliary propulsion system (APS) required to provide for various space station attitude control, orbit positioning, and docking maneuvers. A key component of this onboard APS is the thrust chamber design. To develop the required thrust chamber technology to support the Space Station Program, the NASA Lewis Research Center has sponsored development programs under contracts with Aerojet TechSystems Company and with Bell Aerospace Textron Division of Textron, Inc. During the NASA Lewis sponsored program with Aerojet TechSystems, a 25 lb sub f hydrogen/oxygen thruster has been developed and proven as a viable candidate to meet the needs of the Space Station Program. Likewise, during the development program with Bell Aerospace, a 50 lb sub f hydrogen/oxygen Thrust Chamber has been developed and has demonstrated reliable, long-life expectancy at anticipated space station operating conditions. Both these thrust chambers were based on design criteria developed in previous thruster programs and successfully verified in experimental test programs. Extensive thermal analyses and models were used to design the thrusters to achieve total impulse goals of 2 x 10 to the 6th power lb sub f-sec. Test data for each thruster will be compared to the analytical predictions for the performance and heat transfer characteristics. Also, the results of thrust chamber life verification tests will be presented.

  1. Proven, long-life hydrogen/oxygen thrust chambers for space station propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, G. Paul; Price, Harold G.

    1986-01-01

    A 25 lb sub f hydrogen/oxygen thruster has been developed and proven as a viable candidate to meet the needs of the Space Station Program. Likewise, a 50 lb sub f hydrogen/oxygen thrust chamber has been developed and has demonstrated reliable, long-life expectancy at anticipated Space Station operating conditions. Both these thrust chambers were based on design criteria developed in previous thruster programs. Extensive thermal analysis and models were used to design the thrusters to achieve total impulse goals of 2 million lb sub f sec. Test data from each thruster are compared to the analytical predictions for the performance and heat transfer characteristics. Also, the results of thrust chamber life verification tests are presented.

  2. CFD Analysis of Spray Combustion and Radiation in OMV Thrust Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giridharan, M. G.; Krishnan, A.; Przekwas, A. J.; Gross, K.

    1993-01-01

    The Variable Thrust Engine (VTE), developed by TRW, for the Orbit Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) uses a hypergolic propellant combination of Monomethyl Hydrazine (MMH) and Nitrogen Tetroxide (NTO) as fuel and oxidizer, respectively. The propellants are pressure fed into the combustion chamber through a single pintle injection element. The performance of this engine is dependent on the pintle geometry and a number of complex physical phenomena and their mutual interactions. The most important among these are (1) atomization of the liquid jets into fine droplets; (2) the motion of these droplets in the gas field; (3) vaporization of the droplets (4) turbulent mixing of the fuel and oxidizer; and (5) hypergolic reaction between MMH and NTO. Each of the above phenomena by itself poses a considerable challenge to the technical community. In a reactive flow field of the kind occurring inside the VTE, the mutual interactions between these physical processes tend to further complicate the analysis. The objective of this work is to develop a comprehensive mathematical modeling methodology to analyze the flow field within the VTE. Using this model, the effect of flow parameters on various physical processes such as atomization, spray dynamics, combustion, and radiation is studied. This information can then be used to optimize design parameters and thus improve the performance of the engine. The REFLEQS CFD Code is used for solving the fluid dynamic equations. The spray dynamics is modeled using the Eulerian-Lagrangian approach. The discrete ordinate method with 12 ordinate directions is used to predict the radiative heat transfer in the OMV combustion chamber, nozzle, and the heat shield. The hypergolic reaction between MMH and NTO is predicted using an equilibrium chemistry model with 13 species. The results indicate that mixing and combustion is very sensitive to the droplet size. Smaller droplets evaporate faster than bigger droplets, leading to a well mixed zone in the

  3. Thrust Chamber Modeling Using Navier-Stokes Equations: Code Documentation and Listings. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daley, P. L.; Owens, S. F.

    1988-01-01

    A copy of the PHOENICS input files and FORTRAN code developed for the modeling of thrust chambers is given. These copies are contained in the Appendices. The listings are contained in Appendices A through E. Appendix A describes the input statements relevant to thrust chamber modeling as well as the FORTRAN code developed for the Satellite program. Appendix B describes the FORTRAN code developed for the Ground program. Appendices C through E contain copies of the Q1 (input) file, the Satellite program, and the Ground program respectively.

  4. Multi-Zone Liquid Thrust Chamber Performance Code with Domain Decomposition for Parallel Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navaz, Homayun K.

    2002-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has considerably evolved in the last decade. There are many computer programs that can perform computations on viscous internal or external flows with chemical reactions. CFD has become a commonly used tool in the design and analysis of gas turbines, ramjet combustors, turbo-machinery, inlet ducts, rocket engines, jet interaction, missile, and ramjet nozzles. One of the problems of interest to NASA has always been the performance prediction for rocket and air-breathing engines. Due to the complexity of flow in these engines it is necessary to resolve the flowfield into a fine mesh to capture quantities like turbulence and heat transfer. However, calculation on a high-resolution grid is associated with a prohibitively increasing computational time that can downgrade the value of the CFD for practical engineering calculations. The Liquid Thrust Chamber Performance (LTCP) code was developed for NASA/MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) to perform liquid rocket engine performance calculations. This code is a 2D/axisymmetric full Navier-Stokes (NS) solver with fully coupled finite rate chemistry and Eulerian treatment of liquid fuel and/or oxidizer droplets. One of the advantages of this code has been the resemblance of its input file to the JANNAF (Joint Army Navy NASA Air Force Interagency Propulsion Committee) standard TDK code, and its automatic grid generation for JANNAF defined combustion chamber wall geometry. These options minimize the learning effort for TDK users, and make the code a good candidate for performing engineering calculations. Although the LTCP code was developed for liquid rocket engines, it is a general-purpose code and has been used for solving many engineering problems. However, the single zone formulation of the LTCP has limited the code to be applicable to problems with complex geometry. Furthermore, the computational time becomes prohibitively large for high-resolution problems with chemistry, two

  5. Multi-Zone Liquid Thrust Chamber Performance Code with Domain Decomposition for Parallel Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navaz, Homayun K.

    2002-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has considerably evolved in the last decade. There are many computer programs that can perform computations on viscous internal or external flows with chemical reactions. CFD has become a commonly used tool in the design and analysis of gas turbines, ramjet combustors, turbo-machinery, inlet ducts, rocket engines, jet interaction, missile, and ramjet nozzles. One of the problems of interest to NASA has always been the performance prediction for rocket and air-breathing engines. Due to the complexity of flow in these engines it is necessary to resolve the flowfield into a fine mesh to capture quantities like turbulence and heat transfer. However, calculation on a high-resolution grid is associated with a prohibitively increasing computational time that can downgrade the value of the CFD for practical engineering calculations. The Liquid Thrust Chamber Performance (LTCP) code was developed for NASA/MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) to perform liquid rocket engine performance calculations. This code is a 2D/axisymmetric full Navier-Stokes (NS) solver with fully coupled finite rate chemistry and Eulerian treatment of liquid fuel and/or oxidizer droplets. One of the advantages of this code has been the resemblance of its input file to the JANNAF (Joint Army Navy NASA Air Force Interagency Propulsion Committee) standard TDK code, and its automatic grid generation for JANNAF defined combustion chamber wall geometry. These options minimize the learning effort for TDK users, and make the code a good candidate for performing engineering calculations. Although the LTCP code was developed for liquid rocket engines, it is a general-purpose code and has been used for solving many engineering problems. However, the single zone formulation of the LTCP has limited the code to be applicable to problems with complex geometry. Furthermore, the computational time becomes prohibitively large for high-resolution problems with chemistry, two

  6. Towards an optimal concept for numerical codes simulating thrust chamber processes in high pressure chemical propulsion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schley, Clive-Axel; Hagemann, Gerald; Krülle, Gerd

    1996-02-01

    Modelling aspects for rocket engines, where propellants are burned at high pressures to achieve a maximum of performance, are discussed. Concentrating on combustion chamber and expansion nozzle, critical flow phenomena are identified. Physical models for these phenomena with regard to numerical simulations are presented. Different numerical procedures are analyzed concerning their advantages and disadvantages being applied for cryogenic high performance thrust chamber simulations. The application of some of these models is shown exemplary for a 3D multi-injector combustion chamber and the flowfield computation of a plug nozzle concept to present capabilities, limitations and prospects of CFD in this area. Finally, remarks on verification of numerical schemes with regard to the individual physical, chemical and numerical models are given.

  7. Test Results for a Non-toxic, Dual Thrust Reaction Control Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Philip J.; Veith, Eric M.; Turpin, Alicia A.

    2005-01-01

    A non-toxic, dual thrust reaction control engine (RCE) was successfully tested over a broad range of operating conditions at the Aerojet Sacramento facility. The RCE utilized LOX/Ethanol propellants; and was tested in steady state and pulsing modes at 25-lbf thrust (vernier) and at 870-lbf thrust (primary). Steady state vernier tests vaned chamber pressure (Pc) from 0.78 to 5.96 psia, and mixture ratio (MR) from 0.73 to 1.82, while primary steady state tests vaned Pc from 103 to 179 psia and MR from 1.33 to 1.76. Pulsing tests explored EPW from 0.080 to 10 seconds and DC from 5 to 50 percent at both thrust levels. Vernier testing accumulated a total of 6,670 seconds of firing time, and 7,215 pulses, and primary testing accumulated a total of 2,060 seconds of firing time and 3,646 pulses.

  8. Unsteady thrust measurement techniques for pulse detonation engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Dibesh Dhoj

    Thrust is a critical performance parameter and its correct determination is necessary to characterize an engine. Many conventional thrust measurement techniques prevail. However, further developments are required for correct measurement of thrust in the case of a pulse detonation engine (PDE), since the entire thrust generation process is intermittent. The significant effect of system dynamics in the form of inertial forces, stress wave propagation and reflections initiated in the structure due to detonations and pulse-to-pulse interaction in a fast operating PDE further complicate the thrust measurement process. These complications call for a further, detailed study of the unsteady thrust characteristics. A general approach was first developed to recover actual thrust from the measured thrust generated by the PDE. The developed approach consisted of two steps. The first step incorporated a deconvolution procedure using a pre-established system transfer function and measured input to reconstruct the output yielding the deconvolved thrust. The second step accounted for inertial forces through an acceleration compensation procedure. These two steps allowed the actual thrust to be determined. A small scale PDE operating at 10 and 20 Hz with varied filling fractions and mixture equivalence ratios was used for the experimental application of the general approach. The analytical study of gas dynamics in the PDE while in operation and the measured pressure histories at the exit of the engine allowed the generated thrust during a cycle to be determined semi-empirically. The thrust values determined semi-empirically were compared against the experimental results. A dynamical model of the PDE was created for the study of the unsteady thrust characteristics using finite element analysis. The results from finite element analysis were compared against semi-empirical and experimental results. In addition, finite element analysis also facilitated to numerically determine the

  9. Engineering Research, Development and Technology, FY95: Thrust area report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the knowledge base, process technologies, specialized equipment, tools and facilities to support current and future LLNL programs. Engineering`s efforts are guided by a strategy that results in dual benefit: first, in support of Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence; and second, in enhancing the nation`s economic competitiveness through their collaboration with US industry in pursuit of the most cost-effective engineering solutions to LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) identify key technologies relevant to LLNL programs where they can establish unique competencies, and (2) conduct high-quality research and development to enhance their capabilities and establish themselves as the world leaders in these technologies. To focus Engineering`s efforts, technology thrust areas are identified and technical leaders are selected for each area. The thrust areas are comprised of integrated engineering activities, staffed by personnel from the nine electronics and mechanical engineering divisions, and from other LLNL organizations. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes Engineering`s activities for fiscal year 1995. The report provides timely summaries of objectives methods, and key results from eight thrust areas: computational electronics and electromagnetics; computational mechanics; microtechnology; manufacturing technology; materials science and engineering; power conversion technologies; nondestructive evaluation; and information engineering.

  10. Fluid thrust control system. [for liquid propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, W. L.; Jansen, H. B.; Lehmann, E. N. (Inventor)

    1968-01-01

    A pure fluid thrust control system is described for a pump-fed, regeneratively cooled liquid propellant rocket engine. A proportional fluid amplifier and a bistable fluid amplifier control overshoot in the starting of the engine and take it to a predetermined thrust. An ejector type pump is provided in the line between the liquid hydrogen rocket nozzle heat exchanger and the turbine driving the fuel pump to aid in bringing the fluid at this point back into the regular system when it is not bypassed. The thrust control system is intended to function in environments too severe for mechanical controls.

  11. Thrust Performance Evaluation of a Turbofan Engine Based on Exergetic Approach and Thrust Management in Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalcin, Enver

    2017-05-01

    The environmental parameters such as temperature and air pressure which are changing depending on altitudes are effective on thrust and fuel consumption of aircraft engines. In flights with long routes, thrust management function in airplane information system has a structure that ensures altitude and performance management. This study focused on thrust changes throughout all flight were examined by taking into consideration their energy and exergy performances for fuel consumption of an aircraft engine used in flight with long route were taken as reference. The energetic and exergetic performance evaluations were made under the various altitude conditions. The thrust changes for different altitude conditions were obtained to be at 86.53 % in descending direction and at 142.58 % in ascending direction while the energy and exergy efficiency changes for the referenced engine were found to be at 80.77 % and 84.45 %, respectively. The results revealed here can be helpful to manage thrust and reduce fuel consumption, but engine performance will be in accordance with operation requirements.

  12. New method of making advanced tube-bundle rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazaroff, John M.; Pavli, Albert J.; Malone, Glenn A.

    1990-01-01

    An improved method of fabrication rocket chambers for future space applications is described. Included are fabrication demonstrator and test chambers produced by this method. This concept offers the promise of improved cyclic life, reusability, and performance. The performance is improved because of the enhanced enthalpy extraction. The improved cyclic life, reusability, and reliability is improved because of the structural compliance inherent in the construction. The method of construction involves the forming of the combustion chamber by a tube-bundle of high conductivity copper or copper alloy tubes and the bonding of these tubes by a unique electroforming operation. Furthermore, the method of fabrication reduces chamber complexity by incorporating manifolds, and structural stiffeners while having the potential for thrust chamber cost and weight reduction.

  13. Thrust Area Report, Engineering Research, Development and Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Langland, R. T.

    1997-02-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the knowledge base, process technologies, specialized equipment, tools and facilities to support current and future LLNL programs. Engineering`s efforts are guided by a strategy that results in dual benefit: first, in support of Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence; and second, in enhancing the nation`s economic competitiveness through our collaboration with U.S. industry in pursuit of the most cost- effective engineering solutions to LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) identify key technologies relevant to LLNL programs where we can establish unique competencies, and (2) conduct high-quality research and development to enhance our capabilities and establish ourselves as the world leaders in these technologies. To focus Engineering`s efforts technology {ital thrust areas} are identified and technical leaders are selected for each area. The thrust areas are comprised of integrated engineering activities, staffed by personnel from the nine electronics and mechanical engineering divisions, and from other LLNL organizations. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes Engineering`s activities for fiscal year 1996. The report provides timely summaries of objectives, methods, and key results from eight thrust areas: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Microtechnology; Manufacturing Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Power Conversion Technologies; Nondestructive Evaluation; and Information Engineering. Readers desiring more information are encouraged to contact the individual thrust area leaders or authors. 198 refs., 206 figs., 16 tabs.

  14. Cyclic fatigue analysis of rocket thrust chambers. Volume 1: OFHC copper chamber low cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element elasto-plastic strain analysis was performed for the throat section of a regeneratively cooled rocket combustion chamber. The analysis employed the RETSCP finite element computer program. The analysis included thermal and pressure loads, and the effects of temperature dependent material properties, to determine the strain range corresponding to the chamber operating cycle. The analysis was performed for chamber configuration and operating conditions corresponding to a hydrogen-oxygen combustion chamber which was fatigue tested to failure. The computed strain range at typical chamber operating conditions was used in conjunction with oxygen-free, high-conductivity (OHFC) copper isothermal fatigue test data to predict chamber low-cycle fatigue life.

  15. Direct measurement of the impulse in a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Maeno, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Mori, Yoshitaka; Sunahara, Atsushi

    2011-08-15

    An experiment is conducted to measure an impulse for demonstrating a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket. The impulse is produced by the interaction between plasma and magnetic field. In the experiment, the system consists of plasma and neodymium permanent magnets. The plasma is created by a single-beam laser aiming at a polystyrene spherical target. The impulse is 1.5 to 2.2 {mu}Ns by means of a pendulum thrust stand, when the laser energy is 0.7 J. Without magnetic field, the measured impulse is found to be zero. These results indicate that the system for generating impulse is working.

  16. Effect of low-stiffness closeout overwrap on rocket thrust-chamber life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasper, H. J.; Nota-Donato, J. J.

    1979-01-01

    Three rocket thrust chambers with copper liners and a thrust level of 20.9 kN were cyclically test fired to failure. Two of the liners were made from oxygen free, high conductivity (OFHC) copper and from annealed Amzirc. The milled coolant channels were closed out with a thin copper closeout over which a fiberglass composite was wrapped to provide hoop strength only. Experimental data are presented, along with the results of a preliminary analysis that was performed before fabrication to evaluate the life extending potential of a thin copper closeout with a fiberglass overwrap.

  17. Examination of various turbulence models for application in liquid rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    There is a large variety of turbulence models available. These models include direct numerical simulation, large eddy simulation, Reynolds stress/flux model, zero equation model, one equation model, two equation k-epsilon model, multiple-scale model, etc. Each turbulence model contains different physical assumptions and requirements. The natures of turbulence are randomness, irregularity, diffusivity and dissipation. The capabilities of the turbulence models, including physical strength, weakness, limitations, as well as numerical and computational considerations, are reviewed. Recommendations are made for the potential application of a turbulence model in thrust chamber and performance prediction programs. The full Reynolds stress model is recommended. In a workshop, specifically called for the assessment of turbulence models for applications in liquid rocket thrust chambers, most of the experts present were also in favor of the recommendation of the Reynolds stress model.

  18. Liquid oxygen cooling of high pressure LOX/hydrocarbon rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, H. G.; Masters, P. A.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental program using liquid oxygen (LOX) and RP-1 as the propellants and supercritical LOX as the coolant was conducted at 4.14, 8.27, and 13.79 MN/sq m (600, 1200, and 2000 psia) chamber pressure. The objectives of this program were to evaluate the cooling characteristics of LOX with the LOX/RP-1 propellants, the buildup of the soot on the hot-gas-side chamber wall, and the effect of an internal LOX leak on the structural integrity of the combustor. Five thrust chambers with throat diameters of 6.6 cm (2.5 in.) were tested successfully. The first three were tested at 4.14 MN/sq m (600 psia) chamber pressure over a mixture ratio range of 2.25 to 2.92. One of these three was tested for over 22 cyclic tests after the first through crack from the coolant channel to the combustion zone was observed with no apparent metal burning or distress. The fourth chamber was tested at 8.27 MN/sq m (1200 psia) chamber pressure over a mixture range of 1.93 to 2.98. The fourth and fifth chambers were tested at 13.79 MN/sq m (2000 psia) chamber pressure over a mixture ratio range of 1.79 to 2.68.

  19. Thrust Augmentation Measurements for a Pulse Detonation Engine Driven Ejector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pal, S.; Santoro, Robert J.; Shehadeh, R.; Saretto, S.; Lee, S.-Y.

    2005-01-01

    Thrust augmentation results of an ongoing study of pulse detonation engine driven ejectors are presented and discussed. The experiments were conducted using a pulse detonation engine (PDE) setup with various ejector configurations. The PDE used in these experiments utilizes ethylene (C2H4) as the fuel, and an equi-molar mixture of oxygen and nitrogen as the oxidizer at an equivalence ratio of one. High fidelity thrust measurements were made using an integrated spring damper system. The baseline thrust of the PDE engine was first measured and agrees with experimental and modeling results found in the literature. Thrust augmentation measurements were then made for constant diameter ejectors. The parameter space for the study included ejector length, PDE tube exit to ejector tube inlet overlap distance, and straight versus rounded ejector inlets. The relationship between the thrust augmentation results and various physical phenomena is described. To further understand the flow dynamics, shadow graph images of the exiting shock wave front from the PDE were also made. For the studied parameter space, the results showed a maximum augmentation of 40%. Further increase in augmentation is possible if the geometry of the ejector is tailored, a topic currently studied by numerous groups in the field.

  20. Orbital transfer vehicle 3000 LBF thrust chamber assembly hot fire test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Hayden, Warren R.

    1988-01-01

    The Aerojet Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) Thrust Chamber Assembly (TCA) concept consists of a hydrogen cooled chamber, and annular injector, and an oxygen cooled centerbody. The hot fire testing of a heat sink version of the chamber with only the throat section using hydrogen cooling is documented. Hydraulic performance of the injector and cooled throat were verified by water flow testing prior to TCA assembly. The cooled throat was proof tested to 3000 psia to verify the integrity of the codeposited EF nickel-cobalt closeout. The first set of hot fire tests were conducted with a heat sink throat to obtain heat flux information. After demonstration of acceptable heat fluxes, the heat sink throat was replaced with the LH2 cooled throat section. Fourteen tests were conducted with a heat sink chamber and throat at chamber pressures of 85 to 359 psia. The injector face was modified at this time to add more face coolant flow. Ten tests were then conducted at chamber pressures of 197 to 620 psia. Actual heat fluxes at the higher chamber pressure range were 23 percent higher than the average of 10 Btu/in 2 predicted.

  1. Variation of pitching moment with engine thrust for a twin-engine commercial jet aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanks, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    Flight tests were made to determine the effect of engine net thrust on airplane pitching moment for a twin-engine commercial jet transport in the approach, climbout and descent, and cruise configurations. The results indicate that for all the conditions analyzed, the pitching moment due to thrust is somewhat higher than that estimated from the product of net thrust and its moment arm (perpendicular distance from thrust axis to the airplane center of gravity). The differences are attributed to additional moments produced by nacelle normal force, jet-induced downwash, and interaction between wing flow and engine nacelle flow.

  2. REAR DETAIL OF RIGHT ENGINE AND WING. THRUST REVERSER REMAINS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REAR DETAIL OF RIGHT ENGINE AND WING. THRUST REVERSER REMAINS OPEN. MECHANICS JONI BAINE (R) AND BILL THEODORE(L) OPEN FLAP CARRIAGE ACCESS WITH AN IMPACT GUN. THEY WILL CHECK TRANSMISSION FLUID AND OIL THE JACK SCREW. AT FAR LEFT UTILITY MECHANICS BEGIN BODY POLISHING. - Greater Buffalo International Airport, Maintenance Hangar, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  3. Design and Fabrication of Oxygen/RP-2 Multi-Element Oxidizer-Rich Staged Combustion Thrust Chamber Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, C. P.; Medina, C. R.; Protz, C. S.; Kenny, R. J.; Kelly, G. W.; Casiano, M. J.; Hulka, J. R.; Richardson, B. R.

    2016-01-01

    As part of the Combustion Stability Tool Development project funded by the Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center was contracted to assemble and hot-fire test a multi-element integrated test article demonstrating combustion characteristics of an oxygen/hydrocarbon propellant oxidizer-rich staged-combustion engine thrust chamber. Such a test article simulates flow through the main injectors of oxygen/kerosene oxidizer-rich staged combustion engines such as the Russian RD-180 or NK-33 engines, or future U.S.-built engine systems such as the Aerojet-Rocketdyne AR-1 engine or the Hydrocarbon Boost program demonstration engine. On the current project, several configurations of new main injectors were considered for the thrust chamber assembly of the integrated test article. All the injector elements were of the gas-centered swirl coaxial type, similar to those used on the Russian oxidizer-rich staged-combustion rocket engines. In such elements, oxidizer-rich combustion products from the preburner/turbine exhaust flow through a straight tube, and fuel exiting from the combustion chamber and nozzle regenerative cooling circuits is injected near the exit of the oxidizer tube through tangentially oriented orifices that impart a swirl motion such that the fuel flows along the wall of the oxidizer tube in a thin film. In some elements there is an orifice at the inlet to the oxidizer tube, and in some elements there is a sleeve or "shield" inside the oxidizer tube where the fuel enters. In the current project, several variations of element geometries were created, including element size (i.e., number of elements or pattern density), the distance from the exit of the sleeve to the injector face, the width of the gap between the oxidizer tube inner wall and the outer wall of the sleeve, and excluding the sleeve entirely. This paper discusses the design rationale for each of these element variations, including hydraulic, structural

  4. Non-Toxic Dual Thrust Reaction Control Engine Development for On-Orbit APS Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Philip J.; Veith, Eric M.

    2003-01-01

    A non-toxic dual thrust proof-of-concept demonstration engine was successfully tested at the Aerojet Sacramento facility under a technology contract sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The goals of the NASA MSFC contract (NAS8-01109) were to develop and expand the technical maturity of a non-toxic, on-orbit auxiliary propulsion system (APS) thruster under the Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program. The demonstration engine utilized the existing Kistler K-1 870 lbf LOX/Ethanol orbital maneuvering engine ( O m ) coupled with some special test equipment (STE) that enabled engine operation at 870 lbf in the primary mode and 25 lbf in the vernier mode. Ambient testing in primary mode varied mixture ratio (MR) from 1.28 to 1.71 and chamber pressure (P(c) from 110 to 181 psia, and evaluated electrical pulse widths (EPW) of 0.080, 0.100 and 0.250 seconds. Altitude testing in vernier mode explored igniter and thruster pulsing characteristics, long duration steady state operation (greater than 420 sec) and the impact of varying the percent fuel film cooling on vernier performance and chamber thermal response at low PC (4 psia). Data produced from the testing provided calibration of the performance and thermal models used in the design of the next version of the dual thrust Reaction Control Engine (RCE).

  5. Engineering research, development and technology. Thrust area report, FY93

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the technical staff, tools, and facilities needed to support current and future LLNL programs. The efforts are guided by a dual-benefit research and development strategy that supports Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence and economic competitiveness through partnerships with U.S. industry. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes the activities for the fiscal year 1993. The report provides timely summaries of objectives, methods, and results from nine thrust areas for this fiscal year: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Diagnostics and Microelectronics; Fabrication Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Power Conversion Technologies; Nondestructive Evaluation; Remote Sensing, Imaging, and Signal Engineering; and Emerging Technologies. Separate abstracts were prepared for 47 papers in this report.

  6. High Thrust-to-Power Annular Engine Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael; Thomas, Robert; Crofton, Mark; Young, Jason A.; Foster, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Gridded ion engines have the highest efficiency and total impulse of any mature electric propulsion technology, and have been successfully implemented for primary propulsion in both geocentric and heliocentric environments with excellent ground-in-space correlation of performance. However, they have not been optimized to maximize thrust-to-power, an important parameter for Earth orbit transfer applications. This publication discusses technology development work intended to maximize this parameter. These activities include investigating the capabilities of a non-conventional design approach, the annular engine, which has the potential of exceeding the thrust-to-power of other EP technologies. This publication discusses the status of this work, including the fabrication and initial tests of a large-area annular engine. This work is being conducted in collaboration among NASA Glenn Research Center, The Aerospace Corporation, and the University of Michigan.

  7. High Thrust-to-Power Annular Engine Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Thomas, Robert E.; Crofton, Mark W.; Young, Jason A.; Foster, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Gridded ion engines have the highest efficiency and total impulse of any mature electric propulsion technology, and have been successfully implemented for primary propulsion in both geocentric and heliocentric environments with excellent ground/in-space correlation of performance. However, they have not been optimized to maximize thrust-to-power, an important parameter for Earth orbit transfer applications. This publication discusses technology development work intended to maximize this parameter. These activities include investigating the capabilities of a non-conventional design approach, the annular engine, which has the potential of exceeding the thrust-to-power of other EP technologies. This publication discusses the status of this work, including the fabrication and initial tests of a large-area annular engine. This work is being conducted in collaboration among NASA Glenn Research Center, The Aerospace Corporation, and the University of Michigan.

  8. Thrust Augmentation Measurements Using a Pulse Detonation Engine Ejector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, Robert J.; Pal, Sibtosh

    2005-01-01

    Results of an experimental effort on pulse detonation driven ejectors are presented and discussed. The experiments were conducted using a pulse detonation engine (PDE)/ejector setup that was specifically designed for the study and operated at frequencies up to 50 Hz. The results of various experiments designed to probe different aspects of the PDE/ejector setup are reported. The baseline PDE was operated using ethylene (C2H4) as the fuel and an oxygen/nitrogen O2 + N2) mixture at an equivalence ratio of one. The PDE only experiments included propellant mixture characterization using a laser absorption technique, high fidelity thrust measurements using an integrated spring-damper system, and shadowgraph imaging of the detonation/shock wave structure emanating from the tube. The baseline PDE thrust measurement results at each desired frequency agree with experimental and modeling results reported in the literature. These PDE setup results were then used as a basis for quantifying thrust augmentation for various PDE/ejector setups with constant diameter ejector tubes and various ejector lengths, the radius of curvature for the ejector inlets and various detonation tube/ejector tube overlap distances. For the studied experimental matrix, the results showed a maximum thrust augmentation of 106% at an operational frequency of 30 Hz. The thrust augmentation results are complemented by shadowgraph imaging of the flowfield in the ejector tube inlet area and high frequency pressure transducer measurements along the length of the ejector tube.

  9. Performance of 4600-pound-thrust centrifugal-flow-type turbojet engine with water-alcohol injection at inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasser, Philip W

    1950-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of injecting a water-alcohol mixture of 2:1 at the compressor inlet of a centrifugal-flow type turbojet engine was conducted in an altitude test chamber at static sea-level conditions and at an altitude of 20,000 feet with a flight Mach number of 0.78 with an engine operating at rated speed. The net thrust was augmented by 0.16 for both flight conditions with a ratio of injected liquid to air flow of 0.05. Further increases in the liquid-air ratio did not give comparable increases in thrust.

  10. Low-Thrust Bipropellant Engine Technology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    Engine MON-X Propellant Blend N204 + NO (% By Weight) MR Mixture Ratio = O/F Ratio By Weight ms (msec) Millisecond NO Nitric Oxide (additive to N2O4) NDT ...draulic stroke X plus the required seat preload. The magnitude of the armature rotation is governed by the geometry of the torque motor (see Figure 1...h .- .. , ... . . .o,..k 7 : ,: __ Where S - Hydraulic Stroke 6 - Flapper "wind up" X -1/2- (.00o) + .003 UOU Therefore 0 . : .0082 hadians 41

  11. Development of sputtered techniques for thrust chambers. [coolant passage closing by triode sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullaly, J. R.; Hecht, R. J.; Broch, J. W.; Allard, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    Procedures for closing out coolant passages in regeneratively cooled thrust chambers by triode sputtering, using post and hollow Cu-0.15 percent Zr cathodes are described. The effects of aluminum composite filler materials, substrate preparation, sputter cleaning, substrate bias current density and system geometry on closeout layer bond strength and structure are evaluated. High strength closeout layers were sputtered over aluminum fillers. The tensile strength and microstructure of continuously sputtered Cu-0.15 percent Zr deposits were determined. These continuous sputtered deposits were as thick as 0.75 cm. Tensile strengths were consistently twice as great as the strength of the material in wrought form.

  12. Compact and High Thrust Air Turbo Ram Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Hiroaki; Kitahara, Kazuki; Inukai, Yasuo

    The Air Turbo Ramjet (ATR) is a combined cycle engine which performs like a turbojet engine at subsonic speeds and a ramjet at supersonic speeds and therefore the ATR is an attractive propulsion system for the wide operation range (e.g. Mach 0 to Mach 4). The ATR can provide a higher specific impulse than a solid fuel rocket engine and a higher thrust per frontal area than a turbojet engine. The major ATR components are the inlet, fan (compressor), turbine, gas generator, combustor and exhaust nozzle. In the ATR, the turbine drive gas is generated by a decomposed liquid or solid fuel gas generator. In order to carry heavier payloads and to attain shorter flight time, the compact and high thrust engine is required. In this study, the ram combustor with the double-staged flameholders and the fan with tandem blade were introduced to shorten the engine length and to increase the fan pressure ratio, respectively. Furthermore, the engine testing was carried out on sea level static condition to confirm the engine component integration technologies for the ATR propulsion system.

  13. Characterization and wall compatibility testing of a 40K pound thrust class swirl-coaxial injector and calorimeter combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, E. L.; Rozelle, R.; Borgel, P. J.

    1991-01-01

    Subscale injector-combustor tests under the NASA Space Transportation Engine Thrust Chamber Technology program measured characteristic velocity (c-asterisk) efficiencies and wall heat fluxes for the pressure range 1710 psia to 2360 psia and for the overall O2/H2 mixture ratio range 5.5 to 6.4. Tests involving radially-uniform mixture ratio profiles produced c-asterisk efficiencies above 99 percent; nonuniform profiles associated with wall durability-enhancement schemes resulted in lower efficiencies. Though all three wall protection methods proved successful at reducing wall heat flux, scarfing of the outer-row, swirl-coaxial injection elements was the technique which resulted in the least debit in c-asterisk per unit reduction in heat flux.

  14. Characterization and wall compatibility testing of a 40K pound thrust class swirl-coaxial injector and calorimeter combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, E. L.; Rozelle, R.; Borgel, P. J.

    1991-01-01

    Subscale injector-combustor tests under the NASA Space Transportation Engine Thrust Chamber Technology program measured characteristic velocity (c-asterisk) efficiencies and wall heat fluxes for the pressure range 1710 psia to 2360 psia and for the overall O2/H2 mixture ratio range 5.5 to 6.4. Tests involving radially-uniform mixture ratio profiles produced c-asterisk efficiencies above 99 percent; nonuniform profiles associated with wall durability-enhancement schemes resulted in lower efficiencies. Though all three wall protection methods proved successful at reducing wall heat flux, scarfing of the outer-row, swirl-coaxial injection elements was the technique which resulted in the least debit in c-asterisk per unit reduction in heat flux.

  15. 14 CFR 23.934 - Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust reverser systems tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 23.934 Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust reverser systems tests. Thrust reverser systems of turbojet or turbofan engines must meet the requirements of § 33.97 of this...

  16. 14 CFR 23.934 - Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust reverser systems tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 23.934 Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust reverser systems tests. Thrust reverser systems of turbojet or turbofan engines must meet the requirements of § 33.97 of this...

  17. 14 CFR 23.934 - Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust reverser systems tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 23.934 Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust reverser systems tests. Thrust reverser systems of turbojet or turbofan engines must meet the requirements of § 33.97 of this...

  18. 14 CFR 23.934 - Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust reverser systems tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 23.934 Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust reverser systems tests. Thrust reverser systems of turbojet or turbofan engines must meet the requirements of § 33.97 of this...

  19. 14 CFR 23.934 - Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust reverser systems tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 23.934 Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust reverser systems tests. Thrust reverser systems of turbojet or turbofan engines must meet the requirements of § 33.97 of this...

  20. 14 CFR 25.934 - Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests. 25.934 Section 25.934 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests. Thrust reversers installed on turbojet engines must meet...

  1. 14 CFR 25.934 - Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests. 25.934 Section 25.934 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests. Thrust reversers installed on turbojet engines must meet...

  2. 14 CFR 25.934 - Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests. 25.934 Section 25.934 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests. Thrust reversers installed on turbojet engines must meet...

  3. 14 CFR 25.934 - Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests. 25.934 Section 25.934 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests. Thrust reversers installed on turbojet engines must meet...

  4. 14 CFR 25.934 - Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests. 25.934 Section 25.934 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests. Thrust reversers installed on turbojet engines must meet...

  5. Investigation of the effect of ceramic coatings on rocket thrust chamber life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quentmeyer, R. J.; Kasper, H. J.; Kazaroff, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Cylindrical rocket thrust chamber cylinders were coated with a 0.203 mm (0.008 in.) layer of zirconium oxide using a process that employed electrodeposition of metal to a spray coated mandrel. The cylinders were cyclically tested using hydrogen oxygen propellants at a nominal chamber pressure of 4.14 MN/sq m (600 psia) to show the effect of the coating on life. Both cylinders failed prematurely due to causes unrelated to the coatings. Post destructive analysis showed no cooling passage wall deformation. Where erosion of the coating occurred, the coating thickness stabilized at 0.061 mm (0.0024 in.) within 80 cycles and remained well adhered throughout the tests.

  6. Jet-Engine Exhaust Nozzle With Thrust-Directing Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.

    1996-01-01

    Convergent/divergent jet-engine exhaust nozzle has cruciform divergent passage containing flaps that move to deflect flow of exhaust in either or both planes perpendicular to main fore-and-aft axis of undeflected flow. Prototype of thrust-vector-control nozzles installed in advanced, high-performance airplanes to provide large pitching (usually, vertical) and yawing (usually, horizontal) attitude-control forces independent of attitude-control forces produced by usual aerodynamic control surfaces.

  7. Jet-Engine Exhaust Nozzle With Thrust-Directing Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.

    1996-01-01

    Convergent/divergent jet-engine exhaust nozzle has cruciform divergent passage containing flaps that move to deflect flow of exhaust in either or both planes perpendicular to main fore-and-aft axis of undeflected flow. Prototype of thrust-vector-control nozzles installed in advanced, high-performance airplanes to provide large pitching (usually, vertical) and yawing (usually, horizontal) attitude-control forces independent of attitude-control forces produced by usual aerodynamic control surfaces.

  8. Evaluation of Impinging Stream Vortex Chamber Concepts for Liquid Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Bullard, Brad; Kopicz, Charles; Michaels, Scott

    2002-01-01

    To pursue technology developments for future launch vehicles, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is examining vortex chamber concepts for liquid rocket engine applications. Past studies indicated that the vortex chamber schemes potentially have a number of advantages over conventional chamber methods. Due to the nature of the vortex flow, relatively cooler propellant streams tend to flow along the chamber wall. Hence, the thruster chamber can be operated without the need of any cooling techniques. This vortex flow also creates strong turbulence, which promotes the propellant mixing process. Consequently, the subject chamber concepts not only offer system simplicity, but also enhance the combustion performance. Test results have shown that chamber performance is markedly high even at a low chamber length-to-diameter ratio (LD). This incentive can be translated to a convenience in the thrust chamber packaging. Variations of the vortex chamber concepts have been introduced in the past few decades. These investigations include an ongoing work at Orbital Technologies Corporation (ORBITEC). By injecting the oxidizer tangentially at the chamber convergence and fuel axially at the chamber head end, Knuth et al. were able to keep the wall relatively cold. A recent investigation of the low L/D vortex chamber concept for gel propellants was conducted by Michaels. He used both triplet (two oxidizer orifices and one fuel orifice) and unlike impinging schemes to inject propellants tangentially along the chamber wall. Michaels called the subject injection scheme an Impinging Stream Vortex Chamber (ISVC). His preliminary tests showed that high performance, with an Isp efficiency of 9295, can be obtained. MSFC and the U. S. Army are jointly investigating an application of the ISVC concept for the cryogenic oxygen/hydrocarbon propellant system. This vortex chamber concept is currently tested with gel propellants at AMCOM at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. A version of this concept

  9. Evaluation of Impinging Stream Vortex Chamber Concepts for Liquid Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Bullard, Brad; Kopicz, Charles; Michaels, Scott

    2002-01-01

    To pursue technology developments for future launch vehicles, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is examining vortex chamber concepts for liquid rocket engine applications. Past studies indicated that the vortex chamber schemes potentially have a number of advantages over conventional chamber methods. Due to the nature of the vortex flow, relatively cooler propellant streams tend to flow along the chamber wall. Hence, the thruster chamber can be operated without the need of any cooling techniques. This vortex flow also creates strong turbulence, which promotes the propellant mixing process. Consequently, the subject chamber concepts not only offer system simplicity, but also enhance the combustion performance. Test results have shown that chamber performance is markedly high even at a low chamber length-to-diameter ratio (LD). This incentive can be translated to a convenience in the thrust chamber packaging. Variations of the vortex chamber concepts have been introduced in the past few decades. These investigations include an ongoing work at Orbital Technologies Corporation (ORBITEC). By injecting the oxidizer tangentially at the chamber convergence and fuel axially at the chamber head end, Knuth et al. were able to keep the wall relatively cold. A recent investigation of the low L/D vortex chamber concept for gel propellants was conducted by Michaels. He used both triplet (two oxidizer orifices and one fuel orifice) and unlike impinging schemes to inject propellants tangentially along the chamber wall. Michaels called the subject injection scheme an Impinging Stream Vortex Chamber (ISVC). His preliminary tests showed that high performance, with an Isp efficiency of 9295, can be obtained. MSFC and the U. S. Army are jointly investigating an application of the ISVC concept for the cryogenic oxygen/hydrocarbon propellant system. This vortex chamber concept is currently tested with gel propellants at AMCOM at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. A version of this concept

  10. A simplified gross thrust computing technique for an afterburning turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamer, M. J.; Kurtenbach, F. J.

    1978-01-01

    A simplified gross thrust computing technique extended to the F100-PW-100 afterburning turbofan engine is described. The technique uses measured total and static pressures in the engine tailpipe and ambient static pressure to compute gross thrust. Empirically evaluated calibration factors account for three-dimensional effects, the effects of friction and mass transfer, and the effects of simplifying assumptions for solving the equations. Instrumentation requirements and the sensitivity of computed thrust to transducer errors are presented. NASA altitude facility tests on F100 engines (computed thrust versus measured thrust) are presented, and calibration factors obtained on one engine are shown to be applicable to the second engine by comparing the computed gross thrust. It is concluded that this thrust method is potentially suitable for flight test application and engine maintenance on production engines with a minimum amount of instrumentation.

  11. Investigation on Novel Methods to Increase Specific Thrust in Pulse Detonation Engines via Imploding Detonations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    NOVEL METHODS TO INCREASE SPECIFIC THRUST IN PULSE DETONATION ENGINES VIA IMPLODING DETONATIONS by Ivan Chin Kian Ho December 2009 Thesis...Increase Specific Thrust in Pulse Detonation Engines via Imploding Detonations 6. AUTHOR(S) Ivan Chin Kian Ho 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING...long run distance for transition to detonation, thus, potentially affecting specific thrust . Novel methods via imploding detonations were

  12. 14 CFR 33.8 - Selection of engine power and thrust ratings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ratings. 33.8 Section 33.8 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... thrust ratings. (a) Requested engine power and thrust ratings must be selected by the applicant. (b) Each selected rating must be for the lowest power or thrust that all engines of the same type may be expected to...

  13. Chamber construction for internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Leydorf, G.F. Jr.; Pulick, M.A.

    1987-10-13

    A method is described of assembling an internal combustion engine, comprising: (a) defining a three piece construction to define the combustion chambers, camshaft case, water jacket, and crankshaft case of the internal combustion engine. The three pieces consist of a cast metal monoblock defining combustion chambers aligned along a central plane. The monoblock contains wear resistant surfaces comprising cylinder bores, valve seats and valve guides, a pair of cast metal complementary clamshell housing sections having margins mateable along the central plane and effective to support and envelope the monoblock in spaced relationship therein to define a water jacket chamber about the combustion chambers. The sections each contain peripheral grooves in the margins about the water jacket perimeter for reception of means to seal the chamber and to join the sections together in a fixed relationship; (b) laying one of the clamshell housing sections in a horizontal position so that the margins of the mating plane is in a horizontal position; (c) inserting functional subassemblies into and onto the monoblock. The subassemblies comprise the camshaft, cam followers, springs and valve trains to constitute a valve train, piston, sealing members, and connecting rod assembly, and a crankshaft assembly; (d) laying the monoblock containing the subassemblies into the horizontally prone clamshell section in a manner so that the facing surfaces on the monoblock oppose the grooves in the margins; (e) interposing sealing means into the groove of the one section; and (f) placing the other clamshell section over and onto the first clamshell section to close the construction in such a manner that the groove and lip surface between the monoblock and second clamshell section are opposing each other; the closed sections then being fixedly joined to complete the engine construction.

  14. A simplified design procedure for life prediction of rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porowski, J. S.; Odonnell, W. J.; Badlani, M. L.; Kasraie, B.; Kasper, H. J.

    1982-01-01

    An analytical procedure for predicting thrust chamber life is developed. The hot-gas-wall ligaments separating the coolant and combustion gas are subjected to pressure loading and severe thermal cycling. The resulting stresses interact during plastic straining causing incremental bulging of the ligaments during each firing cycle. This mechanism of plastic ratcheting is analyzed and a method using a yield surface for combined bending and membrane loading developed for determining the incremental permanent deflection and progressive thinning near the center of the ligaments. Fatigue and tensile instability are analyzed as possible failure modes. Results of the simplified analyses compare favorably with available experimental data and finite element analysis results for OFHC (Oxygen Free High Conductivity) copper. They are also in reasonably good agreement with experimental data for NARloy Z, a copper-zirconium-silver alloy developed by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International.

  15. Numerical Simulations of Single Flow Element in a Nuclear Thermal Thrust Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Gary; Ito, Yasushi; Ross, Doug; Chen, Yen-Sen; Wang, Ten-See

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop an efficient and accurate computational methodology to predict both detailed and global thermo-fluid environments of a single now element in a hypothetical solid-core nuclear thermal thrust chamber assembly, Several numerical and multi-physics thermo-fluid models, such as chemical reactions, turbulence, conjugate heat transfer, porosity, and power generation, were incorporated into an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics solver. The numerical simulations of a single now element provide a detailed thermo-fluid environment for thermal stress estimation and insight for possible occurrence of mid-section corrosion. In addition, detailed conjugate heat transfer simulations were employed to develop the porosity models for efficient pressure drop and thermal load calculations.

  16. Development of an algebraic stress/two-layer model for calculating thrust chamber flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. P.; Shang, H. M.; Huang, J.

    1993-07-01

    Following the consensus of a workshop in Turbulence Modeling for Liquid Rocket Thrust Chambers, the current effort was undertaken to study the effects of second-order closure on the predictions of thermochemical flow fields. To reduce the instability and computational intensity of the full second-order Reynolds Stress Model, an Algebraic Stress Model (ASM) coupled with a two-layer near wall treatment was developed. Various test problems, including the compressible boundary layer with adiabatic and cooled walls, recirculating flows, swirling flows and the entire SSME nozzle flow were studied to assess the performance of the current model. Detailed calculations for the SSME exit wall flow around the nozzle manifold were executed. As to the overall flow predictions, the ASM removes another assumption for appropriate comparison with experimental data, to account for the non-isotropic turbulence effects.

  17. Development of an algebraic stress/two-layer model for calculating thrust chamber flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Shang, H. M.; Huang, J.

    1993-01-01

    Following the consensus of a workshop in Turbulence Modeling for Liquid Rocket Thrust Chambers, the current effort was undertaken to study the effects of second-order closure on the predictions of thermochemical flow fields. To reduce the instability and computational intensity of the full second-order Reynolds Stress Model, an Algebraic Stress Model (ASM) coupled with a two-layer near wall treatment was developed. Various test problems, including the compressible boundary layer with adiabatic and cooled walls, recirculating flows, swirling flows and the entire SSME nozzle flow were studied to assess the performance of the current model. Detailed calculations for the SSME exit wall flow around the nozzle manifold were executed. As to the overall flow predictions, the ASM removes another assumption for appropriate comparison with experimental data, to account for the non-isotropic turbulence effects.

  18. 14 CFR 33.8 - Selection of engine power and thrust ratings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... selected rating must be for the lowest power or thrust that all engines of the same type may be expected to... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Selection of engine power and thrust... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES General § 33.8 Selection of engine power and...

  19. 14 CFR 33.8 - Selection of engine power and thrust ratings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... selected rating must be for the lowest power or thrust that all engines of the same type may be expected to... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Selection of engine power and thrust... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES General § 33.8 Selection of engine power and...

  20. Evaluation of an Outer Loop Retrofit Architecture for Intelligent Turbofan Engine Thrust Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Sowers, T. Shane

    2006-01-01

    The thrust control capability of a retrofit architecture for intelligent turbofan engine control and diagnostics is evaluated. The focus of the study is on the portion of the hierarchical architecture that performs thrust estimation and outer loop thrust control. The inner loop controls fan speed so the outer loop automatically adjusts the engine's fan speed command to maintain thrust at the desired level, based on pilot input, even as the engine deteriorates with use. The thrust estimation accuracy is assessed under nominal and deteriorated conditions at multiple operating points, and the closed loop thrust control performance is studied, all in a complex real-time nonlinear turbofan engine simulation test bed. The estimation capability, thrust response, and robustness to uncertainty in the form of engine degradation are evaluated.

  1. Thrust Augmentation Measurements Using a Pulse Detonation Engine Ejector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, Robert J.; Pal, Sibtosh

    2003-01-01

    The present NASA GRC-funded three-year research project is focused on studying PDE driven ejectors applicable to a hybrid Pulse Detonation/Turbofan Engine. The objective of the study is to characterize the PDE-ejector thrust augmentation. A PDE-ejector system has been designed to provide critical experimental data for assessing the performance enhancements possible with this technology. Completed tasks include demonstration of a thrust stand for measuring average thrust for detonation tube multi-cycle operation, and design of a 72-in.-long, 2.25-in.-diameter (ID) detonation tube and modular ejector assembly. This assembly will allow testing of both straight and contoured ejector geometries. Initial ejectors that have been fabricated are 72-in.-long-constant-diameter tubes (4-, 5-, and 6-in.-diameter) instrumented with high-frequency pressure transducers. The assembly has been designed such that the detonation tube exit can be positioned at various locations within the ejector tube. PDE-ejector system experiments with gaseous ethylene/ nitrogen/oxygen propellants will commence in the very near future. The program benefits from collaborations with Prof. Merkle of University of Tennessee whose PDE-ejector analysis helps guide the experiments. The present research effort will increase the TRL of PDE-ejectors from its current level of 2 to a level of 3.

  2. Design and analysis report for the RL10-2B breadboard low thrust engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. R.; Foust, R. R.; Galler, D. E.; Kanic, P. G.; Kmiec, T. D.; Limerick, C. D.; Peckham, R. J.; Swartwout, T.

    1984-01-01

    The breadboard low thrust RL10-2B engine is described. A summary of the analysis and design effort to define the multimode thrust concept applicable to the requirements for the upper stage vehicles is provided. Baseline requirements were established for operation of the RL10-2B engine under the following conditions: (1) tank head idle at low propellant tank pressures without vehicle propellant conditioning or settling thrust; (2) pumped idle at a ten percent thrust level for low G deployment and/or vehicle tank pressurization; and (3) full thrust (15,000 lb.). Several variations of the engine configuration were investigated and results of the analyses are included.

  3. Development of a 12-Thrust Chamber Kerosene /Oxygen Primary Rocket Sub-System for an Early (1964) Air-Augmented Rocket Ground-Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pryor, D.; Hyde, E. H.; Escher, W. J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Airbreathing/Rocket combined-cycle, and specifically rocket-based combined- cycle (RBCC), propulsion systems, typically employ an internal engine flow-path installed primary rocket subsystem. To achieve acceptably short mixing lengths in effecting the "air augmentation" process, a large rocket-exhaust/air interfacial mixing surface is needed. This leads, in some engine design concepts, to a "cluster" of small rocket units, suitably arrayed in the flowpath. To support an early (1964) subscale ground-test of a specific RBCC concept, such a 12-rocket cluster was developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The small primary rockets used in the cluster assembly were modified versions of an existing small kerosene/oxygen water-cooled rocket engine unit routinely tested at MSFC. Following individual thrust-chamber tests and overall subsystem qualification testing, the cluster assembly was installed at the U. S. Air Force's Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) for RBCC systems testing. (The results of the special air-augmented rocket testing are not covered here.) While this project was eventually successfully completed, a number of hardware integration problems were met, leading to catastrophic thrust chamber failures. The principal "lessons learned" in conducting this early primary rocket subsystem experimental effort are documented here as a basic knowledge-base contribution for the benefit of today's RBCC research and development community.

  4. Development of a 12-Thrust Chamber Kerosene /Oxygen Primary Rocket Sub-System for an Early (1964) Air-Augmented Rocket Ground-Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pryor, D.; Hyde, E. H.; Escher, W. J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Airbreathing/Rocket combined-cycle, and specifically rocket-based combined- cycle (RBCC), propulsion systems, typically employ an internal engine flow-path installed primary rocket subsystem. To achieve acceptably short mixing lengths in effecting the "air augmentation" process, a large rocket-exhaust/air interfacial mixing surface is needed. This leads, in some engine design concepts, to a "cluster" of small rocket units, suitably arrayed in the flowpath. To support an early (1964) subscale ground-test of a specific RBCC concept, such a 12-rocket cluster was developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The small primary rockets used in the cluster assembly were modified versions of an existing small kerosene/oxygen water-cooled rocket engine unit routinely tested at MSFC. Following individual thrust-chamber tests and overall subsystem qualification testing, the cluster assembly was installed at the U. S. Air Force's Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) for RBCC systems testing. (The results of the special air-augmented rocket testing are not covered here.) While this project was eventually successfully completed, a number of hardware integration problems were met, leading to catastrophic thrust chamber failures. The principal "lessons learned" in conducting this early primary rocket subsystem experimental effort are documented here as a basic knowledge-base contribution for the benefit of today's RBCC research and development community.

  5. Evaluation of various thrust calculation techniques on an F404 engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Ronald J.

    1990-01-01

    In support of performance testing of the X-29A aircraft at the NASA-Ames, various thrust calculation techniques were developed and evaluated for use on the F404-GE-400 engine. The engine was thrust calibrated at NASA-Lewis. Results from these tests were used to correct the manufacturer's in-flight thrust program to more accurately calculate thrust for the specific test engine. Data from these tests were also used to develop an independent, simplified thrust calculation technique for real-time thrust calculation. Comparisons were also made to thrust values predicted by the engine specification model. Results indicate uninstalled gross thrust accuracies on the order of 1 to 4 percent for the various in-flight thrust methods. The various thrust calculations are described and their usage, uncertainty, and measured accuracies are explained. In addition, the advantages of a real-time thrust algorithm for flight test use and the importance of an accurate thrust calculation to the aircraft performance analysis are described. Finally, actual data obtained from flight test are presented.

  6. Evaluation of Impinging Stream Vortex Chamber Concepts for Liquid Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Bullard, Brad; Kopicz, Charles; Michaels, Scott; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To pursue technology developments for future launch vehicles, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is examining vortex chamber concepts for liquid rocket engine applications. Past studies indicated that the vortex chamber schemes potentially have a number of advantages over conventional chamber methods. Due to the nature of the vortex flow, relatively cooler propellant streams tend to flow along the chamber wall. Hence, the thruster chamber can be operated without the need of any cooling techniques. This vortex flow also creates strong turbulence, which promotes the propellant mixing process. Consequently, the subject chamber concepts not only offer the system simplicity, but they also would enhance the combustion performance. The test results showed that the chamber performance was markedly high even at a low chamber length-to-diameter ratio (L/D). This incentive can be translated to a convenience in the thrust chamber packaging. Variations of the vortex chamber concepts have been introduced in the past few decades. These investigations include an ongoing work at Orbital Technologies Corporation (ORBITEC). By injecting the oxidizer tangentially at the chamber convergence and fuel axially at the chamber head end, Knuth et al. were able to keep the wall relatively cold. A recent investigation of the low L/D vortex chamber concept for gel propellants was conducted by Michaels. He used both triplet (two oxidizer and one fuel orifices) and unlike impinging schemes to inject propellants tangentially along the chamber wall. Michaels called the subject injection scheme as Impinging Stream Vortex Chamber (ISVC). His preliminary tests showed that high performance, with an Isp efficiency of 92%, can be obtained. MSFC and the U.S. Army are jointly investigating an application of the ISVC concept for the cryogenic oxygen/hydrocarbon propellant system. This vortex chamber concept is currently tested with gel propellants at AMCOM at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. A version of

  7. Evaluation of Impinging Stream Vortex Chamber Concepts for Liquid Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Bullard, Brad; Kopicz, Charles; Michaels, Scott; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To pursue technology developments for future launch vehicles, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is examining vortex chamber concepts for liquid rocket engine applications. Past studies indicated that the vortex chamber schemes potentially have a number of advantages over conventional chamber methods. Due to the nature of the vortex flow, relatively cooler propellant streams tend to flow along the chamber wall. Hence, the thruster chamber can be operated without the need of any cooling techniques. This vortex flow also creates strong turbulence, which promotes the propellant mixing process. Consequently, the subject chamber concepts not only offer the system simplicity, but they also would enhance the combustion performance. The test results showed that the chamber performance was markedly high even at a low chamber length-to-diameter ratio (L/D). This incentive can be translated to a convenience in the thrust chamber packaging. Variations of the vortex chamber concepts have been introduced in the past few decades. These investigations include an ongoing work at Orbital Technologies Corporation (ORBITEC). By injecting the oxidizer tangentially at the chamber convergence and fuel axially at the chamber head end, Knuth et al. were able to keep the wall relatively cold. A recent investigation of the low L/D vortex chamber concept for gel propellants was conducted by Michaels. He used both triplet (two oxidizer and one fuel orifices) and unlike impinging schemes to inject propellants tangentially along the chamber wall. Michaels called the subject injection scheme as Impinging Stream Vortex Chamber (ISVC). His preliminary tests showed that high performance, with an Isp efficiency of 92%, can be obtained. MSFC and the U.S. Army are jointly investigating an application of the ISVC concept for the cryogenic oxygen/hydrocarbon propellant system. This vortex chamber concept is currently tested with gel propellants at AMCOM at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. A version of

  8. Rocket engine thrust chamber heat transfer calculation and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, H.

    1974-01-01

    A parametric study of the heat transfer rate along the wall of a rocket nozzle is presented. The influences of different parameters; laminar and turbulent Lewis number, mixture ratio, initial wall temperature distribution, and eddy viscosity, were considered. The numerical evaluation of these influences on heat transfer rate was done by using three different compressible, reacting laminar and turbulent boundary layer computer programs; MABL (Mass Addition Boundary Layer Program), MABL-KE (MABL program is modified to include turbulent kinetic energy equation), and BLIMP (Boundary Layer Integral Matrix Procedure). This study also provided an excellent opportunity to evaluate the efficiencies of these three computer programs and to suggest one of them for future computational purposes.

  9. Validation of High Aspect Ratio Cooling in a 89 kN (20,000 lb(sub f)) Thrust Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadel, Mary F.; Meyer, Michael L.

    1996-01-01

    In order to validate the benefits of high aspect ratio cooling channels in a large scale rocket combustion chamber, a high pressure, 89 kN (20,000 lbf) thrust, contoured combustion chamber was tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center Rocket Engine Test Facility. The combustion chamber was tested at chamber pressures from 5.5 to 11.0 MPa (800-1600 psia). The propellants were gaseous hydrogen and liquid oxygen at a nominal mixture ratio of six, and liquid hydrogen was used as the coolant. The combustion chamber was extensively instrumented with 30 backside skin thermocouples, 9 coolant channel rib thermocouples, and 10 coolant channel pressure taps. A total of 29 thermal cycles, each with one second of steady state combustion, were completed on the chamber. For 25 thermal cycles, the coolant mass flow rate was equal to the fuel mass flow rate. During the remaining four thermal cycles, the coolant mass flow rate was progressively reduced by 5, 6, 11, and 20 percent. Computer analysis agreed with coolant channel rib thermocouples within an average of 9 percent and with coolant channel pressure drops within an average of 20 percent. Hot-gas-side wall temperatures of the chamber showed up to 25 percent reduction, in the throat region, over that of a conventionally cooled combustion chamber. Reducing coolant mass flow yielded a reduction of up to 27 percent of the coolant pressure drop from that of a full flow case, while still maintaining up to a 13 percent reduction in a hot-gas-side wall temperature from that of a conventionally cooled combustion chamber.

  10. Development and Hotfire Testing of Additively Manufactured Copper Combustion Chambers for Liquid Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R.; Greene, Sandy; Protz, Chris

    2017-01-01

    NASA and industry partners are working towards fabrication process development to reduce costs and schedules associated with manufacturing liquid rocket engine components with the goal of reducing overall mission costs. One such technique being evaluated is powder-bed fusion or selective laser melting (SLM), commonly referred to as additive manufacturing (AM). The NASA Low Cost Upper Stage Propulsion (LCUSP) program was designed to develop processes and material characterization for GRCop-84 (a NASA Glenn Research Center-developed copper, chrome, niobium alloy) commensurate with powder bed AM, evaluate bimetallic deposition, and complete testing of a full scale combustion chamber. As part of this development, the process has been transferred to industry partners to enable a long-term supply chain of monolithic copper combustion chambers. To advance the processes further and allow for optimization with multiple materials, NASA is also investigating the feasibility of bimetallic AM chambers. In addition to the LCUSP program, NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has completed a series of development programs and hot-fire tests to demonstrate SLM GRCop-84 and other AM techniques. MSFC’s efforts include a 4,000 pounds-force thrust liquid oxygen/methane (LOX/CH4) combustion chamber. Small thrust chambers for 1,200 pounds-force LOX/hydrogen (H2) applications have also been designed and fabricated with SLM GRCop-84. Similar chambers have also completed development with an Inconel 625 jacket bonded to the GRCop-84 material, evaluating direct metal deposition (DMD) laser- and arc-based techniques. The same technologies for these lower thrust applications are being applied to 25,000-35,000 pounds-force main combustion chamber (MCC) designs. This paper describes the design, development, manufacturing and testing of these numerous combustion chambers, and the associated lessons learned throughout their design and development processes.

  11. Computational analysis of Variable Thrust Engine (VTE) performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giridharan, M. G.; Krishnan, A.; Przekwas, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    The Variable Thrust Engine (VTE) of the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) uses a hypergolic propellant combination of Monomethyl Hydrazine (MMH) and Nitrogen Tetroxide (NTO) as fuel and oxidizer, respectively. The performance of the VTE depends on a number of complex interacting phenomena such as atomization, spray dynamics, vaporization, turbulent mixing, convective/radiative heat transfer, and hypergolic combustion. This study involved the development of a comprehensive numerical methodology to facilitate detailed analysis of the VTE. An existing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code was extensively modified to include the following models: a two-liquid, two-phase Eulerian-Lagrangian spray model; a chemical equilibrium model; and a discrete ordinate radiation heat transfer model. The modified code was used to conduct a series of simulations to assess the effects of various physical phenomena and boundary conditions on the VTE performance. The details of the models and the results of the simulations are presented.

  12. Computational analysis of Variable Thrust Engine (VTE) performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giridharan, M. G.; Krishnan, A.; Przekwas, A. J.

    1993-02-01

    The Variable Thrust Engine (VTE) of the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) uses a hypergolic propellant combination of Monomethyl Hydrazine (MMH) and Nitrogen Tetroxide (NTO) as fuel and oxidizer, respectively. The performance of the VTE depends on a number of complex interacting phenomena such as atomization, spray dynamics, vaporization, turbulent mixing, convective/radiative heat transfer, and hypergolic combustion. This study involved the development of a comprehensive numerical methodology to facilitate detailed analysis of the VTE. An existing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code was extensively modified to include the following models: a two-liquid, two-phase Eulerian-Lagrangian spray model; a chemical equilibrium model; and a discrete ordinate radiation heat transfer model. The modified code was used to conduct a series of simulations to assess the effects of various physical phenomena and boundary conditions on the VTE performance. The details of the models and the results of the simulations are presented.

  13. Development of an Efficient CFD Model for Nuclear Thermal Thrust Chamber Assembly Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Gary; Ito, Yasushi; Ross, Doug; Chen, Yen-Sen; Wang, Ten-See

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop an efficient and accurate computational methodology to predict both detailed thermo-fluid environments and global characteristics of the internal ballistics for a hypothetical solid-core nuclear thermal thrust chamber assembly (NTTCA). Several numerical and multi-physics thermo-fluid models, such as real fluid, chemically reacting, turbulence, conjugate heat transfer, porosity, and power generation, were incorporated into an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics solver as the underlying computational methodology. The numerical simulations of detailed thermo-fluid environment of a single flow element provide a mechanism to estimate the thermal stress and possible occurrence of the mid-section corrosion of the solid core. In addition, the numerical results of the detailed simulation were employed to fine tune the porosity model mimic the pressure drop and thermal load of the coolant flow through a single flow element. The use of the tuned porosity model enables an efficient simulation of the entire NTTCA system, and evaluating its performance during the design cycle.

  14. Low-thrust chemical propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoji, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Results from investigations leading to the definition of low thrust chemical engine concepts are described. From the thrust chamber cooling analyses, regenerative/radiation-cooled LO2/H2 thrust chambers offered the largest thrust and chamber pressure operational envelope primarily due to the superior cooling capability of hydrogen and its low critical pressure. Regenerative/radiation-cooled LO2/CH4 offered the next largest operational envelope. The maximum chamber pressure for film/radiation-cooling was significantly lower than for regenerative/radiation-cooling. As in regeneration-cooling, LO2/H2 thrust chambers achieved the highest maximum chamber pressure, LO2/CH4 film/radiation-cooling was found not feasible and LO2/RP-1 film/radiation-cooling was extremely limited. In the engine cycle/configuration evaluation, the engine cycle matrix was defined through the incorporation of the heat transfer results. Engine cycle limits were established with the fuel-cell power cycle achieving the highest chamber pressure; however, the fuel cell system weights were excessive. The staged combustion cycle achieved the next highest chamber pressure but the preburner operational feasibility was in question.

  15. Conventionally cast and forged copper alloy for high-heat-flux thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazaroff, John M.; Repas, George A.

    1987-01-01

    The combustion chamber liner of the space shuttle main engine is made of NARloy-Z, a copper-silver-zirconium alloy. This alloy was produced by vacuum melting and vacuum centrifugal casting; a production method that is currently now available. Using conventional melting, casting, and forging methods, NASA has produced an alloy of the same composition called NASA-Z. This report compares the composition, microstructure, tensile properties, low-cycle fatigue life, and hot-firing life of these two materials. The results show that the materials have similar characteristics.

  16. Demonstrated survivability of a high temperature optical fiber cable on a 1500 pound thrust rocket chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovie, Amy L.

    1992-01-01

    A demonstration of the ability of an existing optical fiber cable to survive the harsh environment of a rocket engine was performed at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The intent of this demonstration was to prove the feasibility of applying fiber optic technology to rocket engine instrumentation systems. Extreme thermal transient tests were achieved by wrapping a high temperature optical fiber, which was cablized for mechanical robustness, around the combustion chamber outside wall of a 1500 lb Hydrogen-Oxygen rocket engine. Additionally, the fiber was wrapped around coolant inlet pipes which were subject to near liquid hydrogen temperatures. Light from an LED was sent through the multimode fiber, and output power was monitored as a function of time while the engine was fired. The fiber showed no mechanical damage after 419 firings during which it was subject to transients from 30 K to 350 K, and total exposure time to near liquid hydrogen temperatures in excess of 990 seconds. These extreme temperatures did cause attenuation greater than 3 dB, but the signal was fully recovered at room temperature. This experiment demonstrates that commercially available optical fiber cables can survive the environment seen by a typical rocket engine instrumentation system, and disclose a temperature-dependent attenuation observed during exposure to near liquid hydrogen temperatures.

  17. Very Low Thrust Gaseous Oxygen-hydrogen Rocket Engine Ignition Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, Roy A.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental program was performed to determine the minimum energy per spark for reliable and repeatable ignition of gaseous oxygen (GO2) and gaseous hydrogen (GH2) in very low thrust 0.44 to 2.22-N (0.10 to 0.50-lb sub f) rocket engines or spacecraft and satellite attitude control systems (ACS) application. Initially, the testing was conducted at ambient conditions, with the results subsequently verified under vacuum conditions. An experimental breadboard electrical exciter that delivered 0.2 to 0.3 mj per spark was developed and demonstrated by repeated ignitions of a 2.22-N (0.50-lb sub f) thruster in a vacuum chamber with test durations up to 30 min.

  18. The 7.5K lbf thrust engine preliminary design for Orbit Transfer Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, Warren R.; Sabiers, Ralph; Schneider, Judy

    1994-01-01

    This document summarizes the preliminary design of the Aerojet version of the Orbit Transfer Vehicle main engine. The concept of a 7500 lbf thrust LO2/GH2 engine using the dual expander cycle for optimum efficiency is validated through power balance and thermal calculations. The engine is capable of 10:1 throttling from a nominal 2000 psia to a 200 psia chamber pressure. Reservations are detailed on the feasibility of a tank head start, but the design incorporates low speed turbopumps to mitigate the problem. The mechanically separate high speed turbopumps use hydrostatic bearings to meet engine life requirements, and operate at sub-critical speed for better throttling ability. All components were successfully packaged in the restricted envelope set by the clearances for the extendible/retractable nozzle. Gimbal design uses an innovative primary and engine out gimbal system to meet the +/- 20 deg gimbal requirement. The hydrogen regenerator and LOX/GH2 heat exchanger uses the Aerojet platelet structures approach for a highly compact component design. The extendible/retractable nozzle assembly uses an electric motor driven jack-screw design and a one segment carbon-carbon or silicide coated columbium nozzle with an area ratio, when extended, of 1430:1. A reliability analysis and risk assessment concludes the report.

  19. Graphical method for predicting life of a rocket thrust chamber with half-hard zirconium-copper liner and electroformed nickel closeout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasper, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    A method for estimating the life of a regeneratively cooled rocket thrust chamber was developed and is based on the hot-gas wall temperature and the temperature difference between the hot-gas wall and the outside surface of the closeout. This method permits a quick estimate of the life of a thrust chamber when design changes or test-cycle variations are considered. Strain range and life are presented graphically as functions of these temperature parameters for a typical high-performance rocket thrust chamber with a half-hard zirconium-copper liner and an electroformed nickel closeout.

  20. Centaur engine gimbal friction characteristics under simulated thrust load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askew, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation was performed to determine the friction characteristics of the engine gimbal system of the Centaur upper stage rocket. Because the Centaur requires low-gain autopilots in order to meet all stability requirements for some configurations, control performance (response to transients and limit-cycle amplitudes) depends highly on these friction characteristics. Forces required to rotate the Centaur engine gimbal system were measured under a simulated thrust load of 66,723 N (15,000 lb) and in an altitude/thermal environment. A series of tests was performed at three test conditions; ambient temperature and pressure, ambient temperature and vacuum, and cryogenic temperature and vacuum. Gimbal rotation was controlled, and tests were performed in which rotation amplitude and frequency were varied by using triangular and sinusoidal waveforms. Test data revealed an elastic characteristic of the gimbal, independent of the input signal, which was evident prior to true gimbal sliding. The torque required to initiate gimbal sliding was found to decrease when both pressure and temperature decreased. Results from the low amplitude and low frequency data are currently being used in mathematically modeling the gimbal friction characteristics for Centaur autopilot performance studies.

  1. Orbital transfer rocket engine technology 7.5K-LB thrust rocket engine preliminary design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, T. J.; Roschak, E.

    1993-01-01

    A preliminary design of an advanced LOX/LH2 expander cycle rocket engine producing 7,500 lbf thrust for Orbital Transfer vehicle missions was completed. Engine system, component and turbomachinery analysis at both on design and off design conditions were completed. The preliminary design analysis results showed engine requirements and performance goals were met. Computer models are described and model outputs are presented. Engine system assembly layouts, component layouts and valve and control system analysis are presented. Major design technologies were identified and remaining issues and concerns were listed.

  2. Thrust stand evaluation of engine performance improvement algorithms in an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conners, Timothy R.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation is underway to determine the benefits of a new propulsion system optimization algorithm in an F-15 airplane. The performance seeking control (PSC) algorithm optimizes the quasi-steady-state performance of an F100 derivative turbofan engine for several modes of operation. The PSC algorithm uses an onboard software engine model that calculates thrust, stall margin, and other unmeasured variables for use in the optimization. As part of the PSC test program, the F-15 aircraft was operated on a horizontal thrust stand. Thrust was measured with highly accurate load cells. The measured thrust was compared to onboard model estimates and to results from posttest performance programs. Thrust changes using the various PSC modes were recorded. Those results were compared to benefits using the less complex highly integrated digital electronic control (HIDEC) algorithm. The PSC maximum thrust mode increased intermediate power thrust by 10 percent. The PSC engine model did very well at estimating measured thrust and closely followed the transients during optimization. Quantitative results from the evaluation of the algorithms and performance calculation models are included with emphasis on measured thrust results. The report presents a description of the PSC system and a discussion of factors affecting the accuracy of the thrust stand load measurements.

  3. NASA Teams With Army in Vortex Combustion Chamber Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This photograph depicts one of over thirty tests conducted on the Vortex Combustion Chamber Engine at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) test stand 115, a joint effort between NASA's MSFC and the U.S. Army AMCOM of Redstone Arsenal. The engine tests were conducted to evaluate an irnovative, 'self-cooled', vortex combustion chamber, which relies on tangentially injected propellants from the chamber wall producing centrifugal forces that keep the relatively cold liquid propellants near the wall.

  4. Investigation of Thrust Augmentation of a 1600-pound Thrust Centrifugal-flow-type Turbojet Engine by Injection of Refrigerants at Compressor Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William L.; Dowman, Harry W.

    1947-01-01

    Investigations were conducted to determine effectiveness of refrigerants in increasing thrust of turbojet engines. Mixtures of water an alcohol were injected for a range of total flows up to 2.2 lb/sec. Kerosene was injected into inlets covering a range of injected flows up to approximately 30% of normal engine fuel flow. Injection of 2.0 lb/sec of water alone produced an increase in thrust of 35.8% of rate engine conditions and kerosene produced a negligible increase in thrust. Carbon dioxide increased thrust 23.5 percent.

  5. Thrust Measurements for a Pulse Detonation Engine Driven Ejector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, Robert J.; Pak, Sibtosh; Shehadeh, R.; Saretto, S. R.; Lee, S.-Y.

    2005-01-01

    Results of an experimental effort on pulse detonation driven ejectors aimed at probing different aspects of PDE ejector processes, are presented and discussed. The PDE was operated using ethylene as the fuel and an equimolar oxygen/nitrogen mixture as the oxidizer at an equivalence ratio of one. The thrust measurements for the PDE alone are in excellent agreement with experimental and modeling results reported in the literature and serve as a Baseline for the ejector studies. These thrust measurements were then used as a basis for quantifying thrust augmentation for various PDE/ejector setups using constant diameter ejector tubes and various detonation tube/ejector tube overlap distances. The results show that for the geometries studied here, a maximum thrust augmentation of 24% is achieved. The thrust augmentation results are complemented by shadowgraph imaging of the flowfield in the ejector tube inlet area and high frequency pressure transducer measurements along the length of the ejector tube.

  6. Dynamics of high-bypass-engine thrust reversal using a variable-pitch fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, J. W.; Sagerser, D. R.; Stakolich, E. G.

    1977-01-01

    The test program demonstrated that successful and rapid forward-to reverse-thrust transients can be performed without any significant engine operational limitations for fan blade pitch changes through either feather pitch or flat pitch. For through-feather-pitch operation with a flight inlet, fan stall problems were encountered, and a fan blade overshoot technique was used to establish reverse thrust.

  7. Engineering verification of the biomass production chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, R. P.; Knott, W. M., III; Sager, J. C.; Jones, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    The requirements for life support systems, both biological and physical-chemical, for long-term human attended space missions are under serious study throughout NASA. The KSC 'breadboard' project has focused on biomass production using higher plants for atmospheric regeneration and food production in a special biomass production chamber. This chamber is designed to provide information on food crop growth rate, contaminants in the chamber that alter plant growth requirements for atmospheric regeneration, carbon dioxide consumption, oxygen production, and water utilization. The shape and size, mass, and energy requirements in relation to the overall integrity of the biomass production chamber are under constant study.

  8. Numerical Analysis of Magnetic Thrust Chamber System for Laser Fusion Rocket Considering the Creation Process of Laser-Produced Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeno, Akihiro; Kajimura, Yoshihiro; Sunahara, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Naoji; Yasunaga, Masato; Hinaga, Tomoyuki; Hanaya, Tomonari; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Mori, Yoshitaka; Nakashima, Hideki

    The plasma behavior in a magnetic thrust chamber system for a laser fusion rocket is numerically simulated using a three-dimensional (3D) hybrid particle-in-cell (PIC) code and a one-dimensional (1D) radiation hydrodynamic code. The magnetic thrust chamber and an applied magnetic field with a suitable geometry generate an impulse from the interaction between the diamagnetic current in the laser-produced plasma and the magnetic field generated by a magnetic coil. A 1D radiation hydrodynamics code is used to compute the hydrodynamic evolution of a radiating plasma heated by laser beams or external radiation sources. By combining this code and a 3D hybrid PIC code, a series of numerical simulations are performed to investigate high-energy laser injection onto a fuel target and the ablated plasma behavior of the system. A thrust energy of 0.37 J and an impulse bit of 31.6 μNs are obtained for an incident laser energy of 4.0 J. This impulse bit could mostly be generated by interactions between a slowly expanding plasma (expansion velocity of ~20 km/s) and a magnetic field. To optimize this system, it is important to reduce the expansion velocity of the laser-produced plasma.

  9. Exoskeletal Engine Concept: Feasibility Studies for Medium and Small Thrust Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halliwell, Ian

    2001-01-01

    The exoskeletal engine concept is one in which the shafts and disks are eliminated and are replaced by rotating casings that support the blades in spanwise compression. Omission of the shafts and disks leads to an open channel at the engine centerline. This has immense potential for reduced jet noise and for the accomodation of an alternative form of thruster for use in a combined cycle. The use of ceramic composite materials has the potential for significantly reduced weight as well as higher working temperatures without cooling air. The exoskeletal configuration is also a natural stepping-stone to complete counter-rotating turbomachinery. Ultimately this will lead to reductions in weight, length, parts count and improved efficiency. The feasibility studies are in three parts. Part I-Systems and Component Requirements addressed the mechanical aspects of components from a functionality perspective. This effort laid the groundwork for preliminary design studies. Although important, it is not felt to be particularly original, and has therefore not been included in the current overview. Part 2-Preliminary Design Studies turned to some of the cycle and performance issues inherent in an exoskeletal configuration and some initial attempts at preliminary design of turbomachinery were described. Twin-spoon and single-spool 25.800-lbf-thrust turbofans were used as reference vehicles in a mid-size commercial subsonic category in addition to a single-spool 5,000-lbf-thrust turbofan that represented a general aviation application. The exoskeletal engine, with its open centerline, has tremendous potential for noise suppression and some preliminary analysis was done which began to quantify the benefits. Part 3-Additional Preliminary Design Studies revisited the design of single-spool 25,800-lbf-thrust turbofan configurations, but in addition to the original FPR = 1.6 and BPR = 5.1 reference engine, two additional configurations used FPR = 2.4 and BPR = 3.0 and FPR = 3.2 and BPR

  10. Exoskeletal Engine Concept: Feasibility Studies for Medium and Small Thrust Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halliwell, Ian

    2001-01-01

    The exoskeletal engine concept is one in which the shafts and disks are eliminated and are replaced by rotating casings that support the blades in spanwise compression. Omission of the shafts and disks leads to an open channel at the engine centerline. This has immense potential for reduced jet noise and for the accommodation of an alternative form of thruster for use in a combined cycle. The use of ceramic composite materials has the potential for significantly reduced weight as well as higher working temperatures without cooling air. The exoskeletal configuration is also a natural stepping-stone to complete counter-rotating turbomachinery. Ultimately this will lead to reductions in weight, length, parts count and improved efficiency. The feasibility studies are in three parts. Part 1: Systems and Component Requirements addressed the mechanical aspects of components from a functionality perspective. This effort laid the groundwork for preliminary design studies. Although important, it is not felt to be particularly original, and has therefore not been included in the current overview. Part 2: Preliminary Design Studies turned to some of the cycle and performance issues inherent in an exoskeletal configuration and some initial attempts at preliminary design of turbomachinery were described. Twin-spoon and single-spool 25,800-lbf-thrust turbofans were used as reference vehicles in a mid-size commercial subsonic category in addition to a single-spool 5,000-lbf-thrust turbofan that represented a general aviation application. The exoskeletal engine, with its open centerline, has tremendous potential for noise suppression and some preliminary analysis was done which began to quantify the benefits. Part 3: Additional Preliminary Design Studies revisited the design of single-spool 25,800-lbf-thrust turbofan configurations, but in addition to the original FPR = 1.6 and BPR = 5.1 reference engine. two additional configurations used FPR = 2.4 and BPR = 3.0 and FPR = 3.2 and

  11. Liquid Engine Design: Effect of Chamber Dimensions on Specific Impulse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoggard, Lindsay; Leahy, Joe

    2009-01-01

    Which assumption of combustion chemistry - frozen or equilibrium - should be used in the prediction of liquid rocket engine performance calculations? Can a correlation be developed for this? A literature search using the LaSSe tool, an online repository of old rocket data and reports, was completed. Test results of NTO/Aerozine-50 and Lox/LH2 subscale and full-scale injector and combustion chamber test results were found and studied for this task. NASA code, Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA) was used to predict engine performance using both chemistry assumptions, defined here. Frozen- composition remains frozen during expansion through the nozzle. Equilibrium- instantaneous chemical equilibrium during nozzle expansion. Chamber parameters were varied to understand what dimensions drive chamber C* and Isp. Contraction Ratio is the ratio of the nozzle throat area to the area of the chamber. L is the length of the chamber. Characteristic chamber length, L*, is the length that the chamber would be if it were a straight tube and had no converging nozzle. Goal: Develop a qualitative and quantitative correlation for performance parameters - Specific Impulse (Isp) and Characteristic Velocity (C*) - as a function of one or more chamber dimensions - Contraction Ratio (CR), Chamber Length (L ) and/or Characteristic Chamber Length (L*). Determine if chamber dimensions can be correlated to frozen or equilibrium chemistry.

  12. Potential applications of skip SMV with thrust engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weilin; Savvaris, Al

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigates the potential applications of Space Maneuver Vehicles (SMV) with skip trajectory. Due to soaring space operations over the past decades, the risk of space debris has considerably increased such as collision risks with space asset, human property on ground and even aviation. Many active debris removal methods have been investigated and in this paper, a debris remediation method is first proposed based on skip SMV. The key point is to perform controlled re-entry. These vehicles are expected to achieve a trans-atmospheric maneuver with thrust engine. If debris is released at altitude below 80 km, debris could be captured by the atmosphere drag force and re-entry interface prediction accuracy is improved. Moreover if the debris is released in a cargo at a much lower altitude, this technique protects high value space asset from break up by the atmosphere and improves landing accuracy. To demonstrate the feasibility of this concept, the present paper presents the simulation results for two specific mission profiles: (1) descent to predetermined altitude; (2) descent to predetermined point (altitude, longitude and latitude). The evolutionary collocation method is adopted for skip trajectory optimization due to its global optimality and high-accuracy. This method is actually a two-step optimization approach based on the heuristic algorithm and the collocation method. The optimal-control problem is transformed into a nonlinear programming problem (NLP) which can be efficiently and accurately solved by the sequential quadratic programming (SQP) procedure. However, such a method is sensitive to initial values. To reduce the sensitivity problem, genetic algorithm (GA) is adopted to refine the grids and provide near optimum initial values. By comparing the simulation data from different scenarios, it is found that skip SMV is feasible in active debris removal and the evolutionary collocation method gives a truthful re-entry trajectory that satisfies the

  13. Measurement effects on the calculation of in-flight thrust for an F404 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conners, Timothy R.

    1989-01-01

    A study was performed that investigates parameter measurement effects on calculated in-flight thrust for the General Electric F404-GE-400 afterburning turbofan engine which powered the X-29A forward-swept wing research aircraft. Net-thrust uncertainty and influence coefficients were calculated and are presented. Six flight conditions were analyzed at five engine power settings each. Results were obtained using the mass flow-temperature and area-pressure thrust calculation methods, both based on the commonly used gas generator technique. Thrust uncertainty was determined using a common procedure based on the use of measurement uncertainty and influence coefficients. The effects of data nonlinearity on the uncertainty calculation procedure were studied and results are presented. The advantages and disadvantages of using this particular uncertainty procedure are discussed. A brief description of the thrust-calculation technique along with the uncertainty calculation procedure is included.

  14. Method and apparatus for rapid thrust increases in a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornett, J. E.; Corley, R. C.; Fraley, T. O.; Saunders, A. A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Upon a landing approach, the normal compressor stator schedule of a fan speed controlled turbofan engine is temporarily varied to substantially close the stators to thereby increase the fuel flow and compressor speed in order to maintain fan speed and thrust. This running of the compressor at an off-design speed substantially reduces the time required to subsequently advance the engine speed to the takeoff thrust level by advancing the throttle and opening the compressor stators.

  15. Liquid rocket engine fluid-cooled combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A monograph on the design and development of fluid cooled combustion chambers for liquid propellant rocket engines is presented. The subjects discussed are (1) regenerative cooling, (2) transpiration cooling, (3) film cooling, (4) structural analysis, (5) chamber reinforcement, and (6) operational problems.

  16. Experimental and theoretical investigation of fatigue life in reusable rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannum, N. P.; Kasper, H. J.; Pavli, A. J.

    1976-01-01

    During a test program to investigate low-cycle thermal fatigue, 13 rocket combustion chambers were fabricated and cyclically test fired to failure. Six oxygen-free, high-conductivity (OFHC) copper and seven Amzirc chambers were tested. The failures in the OFHC copper chambers were not typical fatigue failures but are described as creep rupture enhanced by ratcheting. The coolant channels bulged toward the chamber centerline, resulting in progressive thinning of the wall during each cycle. The failures in the Amzirc alloy chambers were caused by low-cycle thermal fatigue. The zirconium in this alloy was not evenly distributed in the chamber materials. The life that was achieved was nominally the same as would have been predicted from OFHC copper isothermal test data.

  17. Tests of a D vented thrust deflecting nozzle behind a simulated turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, T. L.

    1982-01-01

    A D vented thrust deflecting nozzle applicable to subsonic V/STOL aircraft was tested behind a simulated turbofan engine in the verticle thrust stand. Nozzle thrust, fan operating characteristics, nozzle entrance conditions, and static pressures were measured. Nozzle performance was measured for variations in exit area and thrust deflection angle. Six core nozzle configurations, the effect of core exit axial location, mismatched core and fan stream nozzle pressure ratios, and yaw vane presence were evaluated. Core nozzle configuration affected performance at normal and engine out operating conditions. Highest vectored nozzle performance resulted for a given exit area when core and fan stream pressure were equal. Its is concluded that high nozzle performance can be maintained at both normal and engine out conditions through control of the nozzle entrance Mach number with a variable exit area.

  18. F-18 HARV on ground during engine run showing thrust vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The exhaust plume from the left engine of NASA's F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) is deflected upward by the paddle-like vanes of the aircraft's thrust vectoring system during an early morning 'hot loads' ground test of the system at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The thrust vectoring system was used to enhance maneuverability and control in flight regimes where conventional controls are ineffective. During the tests Feb. 15-22 1991, the thrust vectoring vanes were tested with both engines running and individually, and validated the structural loads and thermal profiles on the three vanes surrounding each engine. The tests paved the way for later thrust vectoring aircraft. Data from the NASA high angle of attack program is producing technical data to validate computer codes and wind tunnel research about airflow phenomena at high angles of attack and is expected to lead to better maneuverability in future high performance aircraft and make them safer.

  19. Engineering Research and Development and Technology thrust area report FY92

    SciTech Connect

    Langland, R.T.; Minichino, C.

    1993-03-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the technical staff and the technology needed to support current and future LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) to identify key technologies and (2) to conduct high-quality work to enhance our capabilities in these key technologies. To help focus our efforts, we identify technology thrust areas and select technical leaders for each area. The thrust areas are integrated engineering activities and, rather than being based on individual disciplines, they are staffed by personnel from Electronics Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and other LLNL organizations, as appropriate. The thrust area leaders are expected to establish strong links to LLNL program leaders and to industry; to use outside and inside experts to review the quality and direction of the work; to use university contacts to supplement and complement their efforts; and to be certain that we are not duplicating the work of others. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes activities conducted within the Program for the fiscal year 1992. Its intent is to provide timely summaries of objectives, theories, methods, and results. The nine thrust areas for this fiscal year are: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Diagnostics and Microelectronics; Emerging Technologies; Fabrication Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Microwave and Pulsed Power; Nondestructive Evaluation; and Remote Sensing and Imaging, and Signal Engineering.

  20. TJ-jet chamber of gasoline engine

    SciTech Connect

    Youjun, L.; Xiujing, S.; Yinlong, L.; Shixiong, W.; Jieping, L.

    1988-08-09

    A cylinder head assembly is described for an internal combustion engine having at least one piston mounted for reciprocation within a cylinder space defined in an engine block, the cylinder space having a clearance space.

  1. Development Status of High-Thrust Density Electrostatic Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Haag, Thomas W.; Foster, John E.; Young, Jason A.; Crofton, Mark W.

    2017-01-01

    Ion thruster technology offers the highest performance and efficiency of any mature electric propulsion thruster. It has by far the highest demonstrated total impulse of any technology option, demonstrated at input power levels appropriate for primary propulsion. It has also been successfully implemented for primary propulsion in both geocentric and heliocentric environments, with excellent ground/in-space correlation of both its performance and life. Based on these attributes there is compelling reasoning to continue the development of this technology: it is a leading candidate for high power applications; and it provides risk reduction for as-yet unproven alternatives. As such it is important that the operational limitations of ion thruster technology be critically examined and in particular for its application to primary propulsion its capabilities relative to thrust the density and thrust-to-power ratio be understood. This publication briefly addresses some of the considerations relative to achieving high thrust density and maximizing thrust-to-power ratio with ion thruster technology, and discusses the status of development work in this area being executed under a collaborative effort among NASA Glenn Research Center, the Aerospace Corporation, and the University of Michigan.

  2. Performance of Several Combustion Chambers Designed for Aircraft Oil Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joachim, William F; Kemper, Carlton

    1928-01-01

    Several investigations have been made on single-cylinder test engines to determine the performance characteristics of four types of combustion chambers designed for aircraft oil engines. Two of the combustion chambers studied were bulb-type precombustion chambers, the connecting orifice of one having been designed to produce high turbulence by tangential air flow in both the precombustion chamber and the cylinder. The other two were integral combustion chambers, one being dome-shaped and the other pent-roof shaped. The injection systems used included cam and eccentric driven fuel pumps, and diaphragm and spring-loaded fuel-injection valves. A diaphragm type maximum cylinder pressure indicator was used in part of these investigations with which the cylinder pressures were controlled to definite valves. The performance of the engines when equipped with each of the combustion chambers is discussed. The best performance for the tests reported was obtained with a bulb-type combustion chamber designed to give a high degree of turbulence within the bulb and cylinder. (author)

  3. Net thrust calculation sensitivity of an afterburning turbofan engine to variations in input parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, D. L.; Ray, R. J.; Walton, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    The calculated value of net thrust of an aircraft powered by a General Electric F404-GE-400 afterburning turbofan engine was evaluated for its sensitivity to various input parameters. The effects of a 1.0-percent change in each input parameter on the calculated value of net thrust with two calculation methods are compared. This paper presents the results of these comparisons and also gives the estimated accuracy of the overall net thrust calculation as determined from the influence coefficients and estimated parameter measurement accuracies.

  4. A Layman's Guide to Thrust Engine Development for Super/Hyper Sonic Flight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiesse, James L.

    The intention of this paper is to discuss the advances in thrust engines from the initial development of the J58/SR-71 (JT11D-20) of the U.S. Air Force's SR-71 Blackbird to the development of the RAM and SCRAM engines necessary to propel the new generations of high-flying super-speed aircraft. Engineering complexities suggest that the engines and…

  5. A Layman's Guide to Thrust Engine Development for Super/Hyper Sonic Flight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiesse, James L.

    The intention of this paper is to discuss the advances in thrust engines from the initial development of the J58/SR-71 (JT11D-20) of the U.S. Air Force's SR-71 Blackbird to the development of the RAM and SCRAM engines necessary to propel the new generations of high-flying super-speed aircraft. Engineering complexities suggest that the engines and…

  6. Effect of forward velocity and crosswind on the reverse-thrust performance of a variable-pitch fan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reemsnyder, D. C.; Sagerser, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    A full-size variable-pitch fan engine was tested in the Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel to determine the effect of forward velocity and crosswind on reverse-thrust performance. Two flight-type inlet configurations were tested, and a flared fan nozzle was installed as an inlet for reverse-thrust operation. Steady-state reverse-thrust performance was obtained up to 54 m/s (105 knots). An abrupt decrease in reverse thrust occurred at about 30 m/s (60 knots). Reverse thrust was established following forward-to-reverse thrust transients both statically and with forward velocities only up to 30 m/s.

  7. Ducted combustion chamber for direct injection engines and method

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Charles

    2015-03-03

    An internal combustion engine includes an engine block having a cylinder bore and a cylinder head having a flame deck surface disposed at one end of the cylinder bore. A piston connected to a rotatable crankshaft and configured to reciprocate within the cylinder bore has a piston crown portion facing the flame deck surface such that a combustion chamber is defined within the cylinder bore and between the piston crown and the flame deck surface. A fuel injector having a nozzle tip disposed in fluid communication with the combustion chamber has at least one nozzle opening configured to inject a fuel jet into the combustion chamber along a fuel jet centerline. At least one duct defined in the combustion chamber between the piston crown and the flame deck surface has a generally rectangular cross section and extends in a radial direction relative to the cylinder bore substantially along the fuel jet centerline.

  8. 14 CFR 23.1155 - Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller... COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1155 Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime. For turbine engine installations, each...

  9. 14 CFR 23.1155 - Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller... COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1155 Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime. For turbine engine installations, each...

  10. 14 CFR 23.1155 - Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller... COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1155 Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime. For turbine engine installations, each...

  11. 14 CFR 23.1155 - Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller... COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1155 Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime. For turbine engine installations,...

  12. 14 CFR 23.1155 - Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller... COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1155 Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime. For turbine engine installations,...

  13. Structurally compliant rocket engine combustion chamber: Experimental and analytical validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Arya, Vinod K.; Kazaroff, John M.; Halford, Gary R.

    1994-01-01

    A new, structurally compliant rocket engine combustion chamber design has been validated through analysis and experiment. Subscale, tubular channel chambers have been cyclically tested and analytically evaluated. Cyclic lives were determined to have a potential for 1000 percent increase over those of rectangular channel designs, the current state of the art. Greater structural compliance in the circumferential direction gave rise to lower thermal strains during hot firing, resulting in lower thermal strain ratcheting and longer predicted fatigue lives. Thermal, structural, and durability analyses of the combustion chamber design, involving cyclic temperatures, strains, and low-cycle fatigue lives, have corroborated the experimental observations.

  14. Fluid-structure interaction analysis applied to thermal barrier coated cooled rocket thrust chambers with subsequent local investigation of delamination phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowollik, D. S. C.; Horst, P.; Haupt, M. C.

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate numerically thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems applied to realistic rocket thrust chamber conditions. A global full parametric three-dimensional (3D) modeling approach for cooled rocket thrust chambers is presented to be able to simulate the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) phenomena involved. In a subsequent analysis step, realistic mechanical and thermal boundary conditions are extracted from critical design regions of the global model and applied to a local finite element model (FEM) to analyze possible TBC delaminations by means of a Fracture Mechanics (FM) approach.

  15. High-speed engine/component performance assessment using exergy and thrust-based methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggins, D. W.

    1996-01-01

    This investigation summarizes a comparative study of two high-speed engine performance assessment techniques based on energy (available work) and thrust-potential (thrust availability). Simple flow-fields utilizing Rayleigh heat addition and one-dimensional flow with friction are used to demonstrate the fundamental inability of conventional energy techniques to predict engine component performance, aid in component design, or accurately assess flow losses. The use of the thrust-based method on these same examples demonstrates its ability to yield useful information in all these categories. Energy and thrust are related and discussed from the stand-point of their fundamental thermodynamic and fluid dynamic definitions in order to explain the differences in information obtained using the two methods. The conventional definition of energy is shown to include work which is inherently unavailable to an aerospace Brayton engine. An engine-based energy is then developed which accurately accounts for this inherently unavailable work; performance parameters based on this quantity are then shown to yield design and loss information equivalent to the thrust-based method.

  16. Aeroelastic response of an aircraft wing with mounted engine subjected to time-dependent thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazidi, A.; Kalantari, H.; Fazelzadeh, S. A.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, the aeroelastic response of a wing containing an engine subjected to different types of time-dependent thrust excitations is presented. In order to precisely consider the spanwise and chordwise locations of the engine and the time-dependent follower force in governing equations, derived through Lagrange's method, the generalized function theory is used. Unsteady aerodynamic lift and moment in the time domain are considered in terms of Wagner's function. Numerical simulations of the aeroelastic response to different types of time-dependent thrust excitation and comparisons with the previously published results are supplied. Effects of the engine mass and location and also the type of time-dependent thrust on the wing aeroelastic response are studied and pertinent conclusions are outlined.

  17. Development of sputtering process to deposit stoichiometric zirconia coatings for the inside wall of regeneratively cooled rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busch, R.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings of yttria stabilized zirconia and zirconia-ceria mixtures were deposited by RF reactive sputtering. Coatings were 1-2 mils thick, and were deposited on copper cylinders intended to simulate the inner wall of a regeneratively cooled thrust chamber. Coating stoichiometry and adherence were investigated as functions of deposition parameters. Modest deposition rates (approximately 0.15 mil/hr) and subambient sustrate temperatures (-80 C) resulted in nearly stoichiometric coatings which remained adherent through thermal cycles between -196 and 400 C. Coatings deposited at higher rates or substrates temperatures exhibited greater oxygen deficiences, while coatings deposited at lower temperatures were not adherent. Substrate bias resulted in structural changes in the coating and high krypton contents; no clear effect on stoichiometry was observed.

  18. Static internal performance of a single-engine onaxisymmetric-nozzle vaned-thrust-reverser design with thrust modulation capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leavitt, L. D.; Burley, J. R., II

    1985-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted at wind-off conditions in the stati-test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The tests were conducted on a single-engine reverser configuration with partial and full reverse-thrust modulation capabilities. The reverser design had four ports with equal areas. These ports were angled outboard 30 deg from the vertical impart of a splay angle to the reverse exhaust flow. This splaying of reverser flow was intended to prevent impingement of exhaust flow on empennage surfaces and to help avoid inlet reingestion of exhaust gas when the reverser is integrated into an actual airplane configuration. External vane boxes were located directly over each of the four ports to provide variation of reverser efflux angle from 140 deg to 26 deg (measured forward from the horizontal reference axis). The reverser model was tested with both a butterfly-type inner door and an internal slider door to provide area control for each individual port. In addition, main nozzle throat area and vector angle were varied to examine various methods of modulating thrust levels. Other model variables included vane box configuration (four or six vanes per box), orientation of external vane boxes with respect to internal port walls (splay angle shims), and vane box sideplates. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2.0 approximately 7.0.

  19. High Thermal Conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond Composite Combustion Chamber Liner For Advanced Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Ellis, David; Singh, Jogender

    2014-01-01

    Advanced high thermal conductivity materials research conducted at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) with state of the art combustion chamber liner material NARloy-Z showed that its thermal conductivity can be increased significantly by adding diamond particles and sintering it at high temperatures. For instance, NARloy-Z containing 40 vol. percent diamond particles, sintered at 975C to full density by using the Field assisted Sintering Technology (FAST) showed 69 percent higher thermal conductivity than baseline NARloy-Z. Furthermore, NARloy-Z-40vol. percent D is 30 percent lighter than NARloy-Z and hence the density normalized thermal conductivity is 140 percent better. These attributes will improve the performance and life of the advanced rocket engines significantly. By one estimate, increased thermal conductivity will directly translate into increased turbopump power up to 2X and increased chamber pressure for improved thrust and ISP, resulting in an expected 20 percent improvement in engine performance. Follow on research is now being conducted to demonstrate the benefits of this high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-D composite for combustion chamber liner applications in advanced rocket engines. The work consists of a) Optimizing the chemistry and heat treatment for NARloy-Z-D composite, b) Developing design properties (thermal and mechanical) for the optimized NARloy-Z-D, c) Fabrication of net shape subscale combustion chamber liner, and d) Hot fire testing of the liner for performance. FAST is used for consolidating and sintering NARlo-Z-D. The subscale cylindrical liner with built in channels for coolant flow is also fabricated near net shape using the FAST process. The liner will be assembled into a test rig and hot fire tested in the MSFC test facility to determine performance. This paper describes the development of this novel high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-D composite material, and the advanced net shape technology to fabricate the combustion

  20. Cyclic fatigue analysis of rocket thrust chambers. Volume 2: Attitude control thruster high cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    A finite element stress analysis was performed for the film cooled throat section of an attitude control thruster. The anlaysis employed the RETSCP finite element computer program. The analysis included thermal and pressure loads, and the effects of temperature dependent material properties, to determine the strain range corresponding to the thruster operating cycle. The configuration and operating conditions considered, correspond to a flightweight integrated thruster assembly which was thrust pulse tested. The computed strain range was used in conjuction with Haynes 188 Universal Slopes minimum life data to predict throat section fatigue life. The computed number of cycles to failure was greater than the number of pulses to which the thruster was experimentally subjected without failure.

  1. Development and Hot-fire Testing of Additively Manufactured Copper Combustion Chambers for Liquid Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R.; Greene, Sandy Elam; Protz, Christopher S.; Ellis, David L.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Locci, Ivan E.

    2017-01-01

    NASA and industry partners are working towards fabrication process development to reduce costs and schedules associated with manufacturing liquid rocket engine components with the goal of reducing overall mission costs. One such technique being evaluated is powder-bed fusion or selective laser melting (SLM), commonly referred to as additive manufacturing (AM). The NASA Low Cost Upper Stage Propulsion (LCUSP) program was designed to develop processes and material characterization for GRCop-84 (a NASA Glenn Research Center-developed copper, chrome, niobium alloy) commensurate with powder-bed AM, evaluate bimetallic deposition, and complete testing of a full scale combustion chamber. As part of this development, the process has been transferred to industry partners to enable a long-term supply chain of monolithic copper combustion chambers. To advance the processes further and allow for optimization with multiple materials, NASA is also investigating the feasibility of bimetallic AM chambers. In addition to the LCUSP program, NASA has completed a series of development programs and hot-fire tests to demonstrate SLM GRCop-84 and other AM techniques. NASA's efforts include a 4K lbf thrust liquid oxygen/methane (LOX/CH4) combustion chamber and subscale thrust chambers for 1.2K lbf LOX/hydrogen (H2) applications that have been designed and fabricated with SLM GRCop-84. The same technologies for these lower thrust applications are being applied to 25-35K lbf main combustion chamber (MCC) designs. This paper describes the design, development, manufacturing and testing of these numerous combustion chambers, and the associated lessons learned throughout their design and development processes.

  2. Studies of Operating Frequency Effects On Ejector-based Thrust Augmentation in a Pulse Detonation Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landry, K.

    2005-01-01

    Studies were performed in order to characterize the thrust augmentation potential of an ejector in a Pulse Detonation Engine application. A 49-mm diameter tube of 0.914-m length was constructed with one open end and one closed end. Ethylene, oxygen, and nitrogen were introduced into the tube at the closed end through the implementation of a fast mixing injector. The tube was completely filled with a stoichiometric mixture containing a one to one molar ratio of nitrogen to oxygen. Ethylene was selected as the fuel due to its detonation sensitivity and the molar ratio of the oxidizer was chosen for heat transfer purposes. Detonations were initiated in the tube through the use of a spark ignition system. The PDE was operated in a multi-cycle mode at frequencies ranging from 20-Hz to 50-Hz. Baseline thrust measurements with no ejector present were performed while operating the engine at various frequencies and compared to theoretical estimates. The baseline values were observed to agree with the theoretical model at low operating frequencies and proved to be increasingly lower than the predicted values as the operating frequency was increased. The baseline thrust measurements were observed to agree within 15 percent of the model for all operating frequencies. A straight 152-mm diameter ejector was installed and thrust augmentation percentages were measured. The length of the ejector was varied while the overlap percentage (percent of the ejector length which overlapped the tube) was maintained at 25 percent for all tests. In addition, the effect of ejector inlet geometry was investigated by comparing results with a straight inlet to those of a 38-mm inlet diameter. The thrust augmentation of the straight inlet ejector proved to be independent of engine operating frequency, augmenting thrust by 40 percent for the 0.914-m length ejector. In contrast, the rounded lip ejector of the same length seemed to be highly dependent on the engine operating frequency. An optimum

  3. Studies of Operating Frequency Effects On Ejector-based Thrust Augmentation in a Pulse Detonation Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landry, K.

    2005-01-01

    Studies were performed in order to characterize the thrust augmentation potential of an ejector in a Pulse Detonation Engine application. A 49-mm diameter tube of 0.914-m length was constructed with one open end and one closed end. Ethylene, oxygen, and nitrogen were introduced into the tube at the closed end through the implementation of a fast mixing injector. The tube was completely filled with a stoichiometric mixture containing a one to one molar ratio of nitrogen to oxygen. Ethylene was selected as the fuel due to its detonation sensitivity and the molar ratio of the oxidizer was chosen for heat transfer purposes. Detonations were initiated in the tube through the use of a spark ignition system. The PDE was operated in a multi-cycle mode at frequencies ranging from 20-Hz to 50-Hz. Baseline thrust measurements with no ejector present were performed while operating the engine at various frequencies and compared to theoretical estimates. The baseline values were observed to agree with the theoretical model at low operating frequencies and proved to be increasingly lower than the predicted values as the operating frequency was increased. The baseline thrust measurements were observed to agree within 15 percent of the model for all operating frequencies. A straight 152-mm diameter ejector was installed and thrust augmentation percentages were measured. The length of the ejector was varied while the overlap percentage (percent of the ejector length which overlapped the tube) was maintained at 25 percent for all tests. In addition, the effect of ejector inlet geometry was investigated by comparing results with a straight inlet to those of a 38-mm inlet diameter. The thrust augmentation of the straight inlet ejector proved to be independent of engine operating frequency, augmenting thrust by 40 percent for the 0.914-m length ejector. In contrast, the rounded lip ejector of the same length seemed to be highly dependent on the engine operating frequency. An optimum

  4. Effects of bleed air extraction on thrust levels on the F404-GE-400 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuhas, Andrew J.; Ray, Ronald J.

    1992-01-01

    A ground test was performed to determine the effects of compressor bleed flow extraction on the performance of F404-GE-400 afterburning turbofan engines. The two engines were installed in the F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility. A specialized bleed ducting system was installed onto the aircraft to control and measure engine bleed airflow while the aircraft was tied down to a thrust measuring stand. The test was conducted on each engine and at various power settings. The bleed air extraction levels analyzed included flow rates above the manufacturer's maximum specification limit. The measured relationship between thrust and bleed flow extraction was shown to be essentially linear at all power settings with an increase in bleed flow causing a corresponding decrease in thrust. A comparison with the F404-GE-400 steady-state engine simulation showed the estimation to be within +/- 1 percent of measured thrust losses for large increases in bleed flow rate.

  5. Effects of bleed air extraction of thrust levels on the F404-GE-400 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuhas, Andrew J.; Ray, Ronald J.

    1992-01-01

    A ground test was performed to determine the effects of compressor bleed flow extraction on the performance of F404-GE-400 afterburning turbofan engines. The two engines were installed in the F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility. A specialized bleed ducting system was installed onto the aircraft to control and measure engine bleed airflow while the aircraft was tied down to a thrust measuring stand. The test was conducted on each engine and at various power settings. The bleed air extraction levels analyzed included flow rates above the manufacturer's maximum specification limit. The measured relationship between thrust and bleed flow extraction was shown to be essentially linear at all power settings with an increase in bleed flow causing a corresponding decrease in thrust. A comparison with the F404-GE-400 steady-state engine simulation showed the estimation to be within +/- 1 percent of measured thrust losses for large increases is bleed flow rate.

  6. Flow Visualization of Thrust-Vectoring Lightcraft Engines with ˜1μs Pulsed TEA CO2 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenoyer, D. A.; Salvador, I. I.; Notaro, S. N.; Myrabo, L. N.

    2011-11-01

    The thrust-vectoring performance of four laser propulsion engine geometries were visualized using a twin Lumonics K922M pulsed TEA CO2 laser system, with a Cordin® high speed digital camera and Schlieren photography. Airbreathing mode engines were used to explore engine thrust-vectoring behavior, as a function of: a) laser beam lateral offset from the engine axis of symmetry; b) laser pulse duration (˜50 ns spike with selectable 1.5 or 2.5 μs tail, depending upon laser gas mixture); and c) engine geometry (Lightcraft Type ♯150, ♯200, ♯250, and parabolic bell). The resulting Schlieren images visually prove thrust vectoring if the exhaust plume is responsible for the beam-riding phenomenon. Parabolic bell engines demonstrate very little thrust vectoring ability, even at the large offsets nominal for beam-riding and thrust-vectoring in other geometries.

  7. The 727 airplane target thrust reverser static performance model test for refanned JT8D engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, C. T. P.; Atkey, E. N.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a scale model static performance test of target thrust reverser configurations for the Pratt and Whitney Aircraft JT8D-100 series engine are presented. The objective of the test was to select a series of suitable candidate reverser configurations for the subsequent airplane model wind tunnel ingestion and flight controls tests. Test results indicate that adequate reverse thrust performance with compatible engine airflow match is achievable for the selected configurations. Tapering of the lips results in loss of performance and only minimal flow directivity. Door pressure surveys were conducted on a selected number of lip and fence configurations to obtain data to support the design of the thrust reverser system.

  8. Internal combustion engine squish jet combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.L.

    1986-02-25

    This patent describes a internal combustion engine block having a piston and cylinder head, one of which has: (a) a substantially cylindrical bowl opening into the face thereof; (b) a pair of squish jet passages having respective inlets communicating with the face thereof, and respective, transversely spaced, outlets directed substantially tangentially into the bowl, the outlet of a first one of the pair being directed upwardly, and the outlet of second one of the pair being directed downwardly from a position above the outlet of the first one, so that a counter-rotating, bilevel swirl can be produced in the bowl by the squish jet outlets.

  9. The Quiescent-Chamber Type Compression-Ignition Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, H H

    1937-01-01

    Report presents the results of performance tests of a single-cylinder 4-stroke-cycle compression-ignition engine having a vertical disk form of combustion chamber without air flow. The number, size, and direction of the orifices of the fuel-injection nozzles used were independently varied. A table and graphs are presented showing the performance of the engine with different nozzles; results of tests at different compression ratios, boost pressures, and coolant temperatures are also included.

  10. Using Engine Thrust for Emergency Flight Control: MD-11 and B-747 Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Maine, Trindel A.; Burken, John J.; Bull, John

    1998-01-01

    With modern digital control systems, using engine thrust for emergency flight control to supplement or replace failed aircraft normal flight controls has become a practical consideration. The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has developed a propulsion-controlled aircraft (PCA) system in which computer-controlled engine thrust provides emergency flight control. An F-15 and an MD-11 airplane have been landed without using any flight control surfaces. Preliminary studies have also been conducted that show that engines on only one wing can provide some flight control capability if the lateral center of gravity can be shifted toward the side of the airplane that has the operating engine(s). Simulator tests of several airplanes with no flight control surfaces operating and all engines out on the left wing have all shown positive control capability within the available range of lateral center-of-gravity offset. Propulsion-controlled aircraft systems that can operate without modifications to engine control systems, thus allowing PCA technology to be installed on less capable airplanes or at low cost, are also desirable. Further studies have examined simplified 'PCA Lite' and 'PCA Ultralite' concepts in which thrust control is provided by existing systems such as auto-throttles or a combination of existing systems and manual pilot control.

  11. State-space analysis of the dynamic characteristics of a variable thrust liquid propellant rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Lin

    This paper states the application of state-space method to the analysis of the dynamic characteristics of a variable thrust liquid propellant rocket engine and presents a set of state equations for describing the dynamic process of the engine. An efficient numerical method for solving these system equations is developed. The theoretical solutions agree well with the experimental data. The analysis leads to the following conclusion: the set coefficient of the pulse width, the working frequency of the solenoid valves and the deviation of the critical working points of these valves are important parameters for determining the dynamic response time and the control precision of this engine. The methods developed in this paper may be used effectively in the analysis of dynamic characteristics of variable thrust liquid propellant rocket engines.

  12. Fast-burn combustion chamber design for natural gas engines

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.L.; Blaszczyk, J.

    1998-01-01

    The work presented in this paper compares the performance and emissions of the UBC Squish-Jet fast-burn combustion chamber with a baseline bowl-in-piston (BIP) chamber. It was found that the increased turbulence generated in the fastburn combustion chambers resulted in 5 to 10% faster burning of the air-fuel mixture compared to a conventional BIP chamber. The faster burning was particularly noticeable when operating with lean air-fuel mixtures. The study was conducted at a 1.7 mm clearance height and 10.2:1 compression ratio. Measurements were made over a range of air-fuel ratios from stoichiometric to the lean limit. At each operating point all engine performance parameters, and emissions of nitrogen oxides, unburned hydrocarbons, and carbon monoxide were recorded. At selected operating points a record of cylinder pressure was obtained and analyzed off-line to determine mass-burn rate in the combustion chamber. Two piston designs were tested at wide-open throttle conditions and 2000 rpm to determine the influence of piston geometry on the performance and emissions parameters. The UBC squish-jet combustion chamber design demonstrates significantly better performance parameters and lower emission levels than the conventional BIP design. Mass-burn fraction calculations showed a significant reduction in the time to burn the first 10% of the charge, which takes approximately half of the time to burn from 10 to 90% of the charge.

  13. Turbine engine altitude chamber and flight testing with liquid hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, E. W.

    1979-01-01

    In the late fifties the Lewis Research Center evaluated experimentally the use of hydrogen using three different turbojet engines in altitude test chambers. One of these engines was later flown experimentally using liquid hydrogen fuel. This paper is a brief overview of the significant aspects of this exploratory research and gives a few implications of the results to modern turbine engines. A subsequent contract dealing with a positive displacement pump operating on liquid hydrogen is discussed and some aspects of liquid hydrogen propellant systems, reflected by rocket booster experience are treated briefly. Areas requiring further research and technology effort are delineated.

  14. A technology data base for the design of 500 to 5000-lb thrust class liquid rocket engines utilizing hydrogen and oxygen as propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenman, L.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the results of experimental evaluations of candidate designs for igniters, injectors, and propellant-cooled thrust chambers applicable to restartable high-performance, high-reliability upper-stage engines and to pulsing-type reaction control engines (RCE). Injection element types best suited for liquid, gas, and liquid/gas phase propellant supply are identified. The resulting interactions between element type, combustion efficiency, and chamber wall heating are compared. The distinction between thrust chamber design requirements for upper stage vs RCE applications as measured by cycle life requirements is translated into design configurations consisting of all-film-cooled, all-regeneratively-cooled, and composites of the two cooling approaches. The validity of the design approaches is confirmed by data from engine durability testing involving over 90,000 starts and 9,000 thermal cycles on RCE-type designs and multiple long-duration burns (up to 2,000 sec) on regeneratively cooled upper-stage designs.

  15. Navier-Stokes analysis of a very-high-bypass-ratio turbofan engine in reverse thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jeffrey J.

    1987-06-01

    An algorithm based upon MacCormack's implicit line Gauss-Seidel Navier-Stokes scheme has been modified to model the flowfield in very-high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines under reverse-thrust conditions. It is assumed that reverse thrust is to be achieved through fan blade pitch changes. The physics at the fan blade is modeled using an actuator disk to simulate the fan pumping characteristics. The algorithm, including boundary conditions, is described, and three different flowfields are presented as illustrations of possible results.

  16. A three-dimensional turbulent heat transfer analysis for advanced tubular rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacynski, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    Heat transfer was analyzed in the throat region of a plug and spool rocket engine for both smooth and corrugated walls. A three-dimensional, Navier-Stokes code was used for the analysis. The turbulence model in the code was modified to handle turbulence suppression in the crevice region of the corrugated wall. The overall heat transfer at the throat for the corrugated wall was 34 percent higher than it was for the smooth wall for comparable rocket flow conditions.

  17. A computer model for liquid jet atomization in rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giridharan, M. G.; Lee, J. G.; Krishnan, A.; Yang, H. Q.; Ibrahim, E.; Chuech, S.; Przekwas, A. J.

    1991-12-01

    The process of atomization has been used as an efficient means of burning liquid fuels in rocket engines, gas turbine engines, internal combustion engines, and industrial furnaces. Despite its widespread application, this complex hydrodynamic phenomenon has not been well understood, and predictive models for this process are still in their infancy. The difficulty in simulating the atomization process arises from the relatively large number of parameters that influence it, including the details of the injector geometry, liquid and gas turbulence, and the operating conditions. In this study, numerical models are developed from first principles, to quantify factors influencing atomization. For example, the surface wave dynamics theory is used for modeling the primary atomization and the droplet energy conservation principle is applied for modeling the secondary atomization. The use of empirical correlations has been minimized by shifting the analyses to fundamental levels. During applications of these models, parametric studies are performed to understand and correlate the influence of relevant parameters on the atomization process. The predictions of these models are compared with existing experimental data. The main tasks of this study were the following: development of a primary atomization model; development of a secondary atomization model; development of a model for impinging jets; development of a model for swirling jets; and coupling of the primary atomization model with a CFD code.

  18. MEMS CLOSED CHAMBER HEAT ENGINE AND ELECTRIC GENERATOR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A heat engine, preferably combined with an electric generator, and advantageously implemented using micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) technologies as an array of one or more individual heat engine/generators. The heat engine is based on a closed chamber containing a motive medium, preferably a gas; means for alternately enabling and disabling transfer of thermal energy from a heat source to the motive medium; and at least one movable side of the chamber that moves in response to thermally-induced expansion and contraction of the motive medium, thereby converting thermal energy to oscillating movement. The electrical generator is combined with the heat engine to utilize movement of the movable side to convert mechanical work to electrical energy, preferably using electrostatic interaction in a generator capacitor. Preferably at least one heat transfer side of the chamber is placed alternately into and out of contact with the heat source by a motion capacitor, thereby alternately enabling and disabling conductive transfer of heat to the motive medium.

  19. Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Aceves, S; Anklam, T; Badders, D; Cook, A W; DeMuth, J; Divol, L; El-Dasher, B; Farmer, J C; Flowers, D; Fratoni, M; ONeil, R G; Heltemes, T; Kane, J; Kramer, K J; Kramer, R; Lafuente, A; Loosmore, G A; Morris, K R; Moses, G A; Olson, B; Pantano, C; Reyes, S; Rhodes, M; Roe, K; Sawicki, R; Scott, H; Spaeth, M; Tabak, M; Wilks, S

    2010-11-30

    The Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) concept is being designed to operate as either a pure fusion or hybrid fusion-fission system. The present work focuses on the pure fusion option. A key component of a LIFE engine is the fusion chamber subsystem. It must absorb the fusion energy, produce fusion fuel to replace that burned in previous targets, and enable both target and laser beam transport to the ignition point. The chamber system also must mitigate target emissions, including ions, x-rays and neutrons and reset itself to enable operation at 10-15 Hz. Finally, the chamber must offer a high level of availability, which implies both a reasonable lifetime and the ability to rapidly replace damaged components. An integrated design that meets all of these requirements is described herein.

  20. A Three-Dimensional Turbulent Heat Transfer Analysis for Advanced Tubular Rocket Thrust Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacynski, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    Heat transfer was analyzed in the throat region of a plug and spool rocket engine for both smooth and corrugated walls. A three-dimensional, Navier-Strokes code was used for the analysis. The turbulence model in the code was modified to handle turbulence suppression in the crevice region of the corrugated wall. Circumferential variations in the wall heat transfer was predicted for the corrugated wall. The overall heat transfer at the throat of the corrugated wall was 34 percent higher than it was for the smooth wall for comparable rocket flow conditions.

  1. A numerical model for atomization-spray coupling in liquid rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giridharan, M. G.; Krishnan, Anantha; Lee, J. J.; Przekwas, A. J.; Gross, K.

    1992-01-01

    The physical process of atomization is an important consideration in the stable operation of liquid rocket engines. Many spray combustion computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes do not include an atomization sub-model but assume arbitrary drop size distributions, drop initial locations, and velocities. A method of coupling an atomization model with the spray model in a REFLEQS CFD code is presented. This method is based on a jet-embedding technique in which the equations governing the liquid jet core are solved separately using the surrounding gas phase conditions. The droplet initial conditions are calculated using a stability analysis appropriate for the atomization regime of liquid jet break-up.

  2. Independent wheel suspension system using thrust bearing constant velocity universal drive joints as suspension members to minimize wheel chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Krude, W.

    1986-12-30

    An independent wheel suspension system is described for a vehicle having an engine adapted to provide a driving torque, a chassis, vehicle support means for resiliently supporting the chassis for displacement relative to a driving surface, and a wheel assembly for each wheel having a vertical center plane through the center thereof and a wheel axis substantially perpendicular to the vertical center plane. The wheel assembly has a chamber angle relative to the vertical center plane adapted to undergo a change of chamber as the wheel assembly undergoes movement relative to the vertical center plane. The independent wheel suspension system comprises: differential means comprising a differential housing, a differential input at an engine end of the differential housing adapted to be coupled to the engine so as to receive the driving torque therefrom about a differential input axis. The differential housing has a pair of lateral sides on opposite sides of the differential input axis, each lateral side having a differential output axis therethrough. The differential means is adapted to redirect the driving torque from the differential input axis to the differential output axis and is supported by the vehicle support means to position the differential input axis substantially perpendicular to the wheel axis.

  3. Performance and Stability Analyses of Rocket Thrust Chambers with Oxygen/Methane Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, James R.; Jones, Gregg W.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid rocket engines using oxygen and methane propellants are being considered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for future in-space vehicles. This propellant combination has not been previously used in flight-qualified engine systems developed by NASA, so limited test data and analysis results are available at this stage of early development. As part of activities for the Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project funded under the Exploration Technology Development Program, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been evaluating capability to model combustion performance and stability for oxygen and methane propellants. This activity has been proceeding for about two years and this paper is a summary of results to date. Hot-fire test results of oxygen/methane propellant rocket engine combustion devices for the modeling investigations have come from several sources, including multi-element injector tests with gaseous methane from the 1980s, single element tests with gaseous methane funded through the Constellation University Institutes Program, and multi-element injector tests with both gaseous and liquid methane conducted at the NASA MSFC funded by PCAD. For the latter, test results of both impinging and coaxial element injectors using liquid oxygen and liquid methane propellants are included. Configurations were modeled with two one-dimensional liquid rocket combustion analysis codes, the Rocket Combustor Interactive Design and Analysis code and the Coaxial Injector Combustion Model. Special effort was focused on how these codes can be used to model combustion and performance with oxygen/methane propellants a priori, and what anchoring or calibrating features need to be applied, improved or developed in the future. Low frequency combustion instability (chug) occurred, with frequencies ranging from 150 to 250 Hz, with several multi-element injectors with liquid/liquid propellants, and was modeled using

  4. Consideration of real gas effects and condensation in a spray-combustion rocket-thrust-chamber design tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, M.; Kniesner, B.; Knab, O.

    2011-10-01

    For the prediction of hot gas side heat transfer in rocket thrust chambers, Astrium Space Transportation (ST) uses the second generation multiphase Navier-Stokes solver Rocflam-II. To account for real-gas and condensation effects, pressure-dependent and even multiphase fluid data are included in the chemistry tables used by the code. Thus, the changing fluid properties near the two-phase region as well as transformation from gaseous to liquid and even solid state are reflected properly. Heat flux measurements for a dedicated subscale test campaign with strongly cooled walls show a clearly increasing heat load as soon as the combustion gases condense at the wall, due to the released latent heat of condensation. Corresponding coupled Rocflam-II/CFX simulations show a good quantitative agreement in heat flux for load cases with and without condensation, showing the ability of the code to correctly simulate flows in the real-gas and even inside the two-phase region.

  5. A simple dynamic engine model for use in a real-time aircraft simulation with thrust vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Steven A.

    1990-01-01

    A simple dynamic engine model was developed for use in thrust vectoring control law development and real-time aircraft simulation. Engine dynamics were simulated using a throttle rate limiter and low-pass filter. This paper includes a description of a method to account for axial thrust loss resulting from thrust vectoring and the development of the simple dynamic engine model and its incorporation into the F-18 high alpha research vehicle (HARV) thrust vectoring simulation. The simple dynamic engine model was evaluated at Mach 0.2, 35,000-ft altitude and at Mach 0.7, 35,000-ft altitude. The simple dynamic engine model is within 3 percent of the steady state response, and within 25 percent of the transient response of the complete nonlinear dynamic engine model.

  6. Method of fabricating a rocket engine combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R. (Inventor); Mckechnie, Timothy N. (Inventor); Power, Christopher A. (Inventor); Daniel, Ronald L., Jr. (Inventor); Saxelby, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for making a combustion chamber for a rocket engine wherein a copper alloy in particle form is injected into a stream of heated carrier gas in plasma form which is then projected onto the inner surface of a hollow metal jacket having the configuration of a rocket engine combustion chamber is described. The particles are in the plasma stream for a sufficient length of time to heat the particles to a temperature such that the particles will flatten and adhere to previously deposited particles but will not spatter or vaporize. After a layer is formed, cooling channels are cut in the layer, then the channels are filled with a temporary filler and another layer of particles is deposited.

  7. Tissue Engineering by Intrinsic Vascularization in an In Vivo Tissue Engineering Chamber.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Weiqing; Marre, Diego; Mitchell, Geraldine M; Morrison, Wayne A; Lim, Shiang Y

    2016-05-30

    In reconstructive surgery, there is a clinical need for an alternative to the current methods of autologous reconstruction which are complex, costly and trade one defect for another. Tissue engineering holds the promise to address this increasing demand. However, most tissue engineering strategies fail to generate stable and functional tissue substitutes because of poor vascularization. This paper focuses on an in vivo tissue engineering chamber model of intrinsic vascularization where a perfused artery and a vein either as an arteriovenous loop or a flow-through pedicle configuration is directed inside a protected hollow chamber. In this chamber-based system angiogenic sprouting occurs from the arteriovenous vessels and this system attracts ischemic and inflammatory driven endogenous cell migration which gradually fills the chamber space with fibro-vascular tissue. Exogenous cell/matrix implantation at the time of chamber construction enhances cell survival and determines specificity of the engineered tissues which develop. Our studies have shown that this chamber model can successfully generate different tissues such as fat, cardiac muscle, liver and others. However, modifications and refinements are required to ensure target tissue formation is consistent and reproducible. This article describes a standardized protocol for the fabrication of two different vascularized tissue engineering chamber models in vivo.

  8. Main Chamber Injectors for Advanced Hydrocarbon Booster Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Matthew R.; Bazarov, Vladimir G.; Anderson, William E.

    2003-01-01

    Achieving the highest possible specific impulse has long been a key driver for space launch systems. Recently, more importance has been placed on the need for increased reliability and streamlined launch operations. These general factors along with more specific mission requirements have provided a new focus that is centered on the oxidizer rich staged combustion (ORSC) cycle. Despite a history of use in Russia that extends back to the 1960's, a proven design methodology for ORSC cycle engines does not exist in the West. This lack of design expertise extends to the main chamber injector, a critical subcomponent that largely determines the engine performance and main chamber life. The goals of the effort described here are to establish an empirical knowledge base to provide a fundamental understanding of main chamber injectors and for verification of an injector design methodology for the ORSC cycle. The design of a baseline injector element, derived from information on Russian engines in the open literature, is presented. The baseline injector comprises a gaseous oxidizer core flow and an annular swirling fuel flow. Sets of equations describing the steady-state and the dynamic characteristics of the injector are presented; these equations, which form the basis of the design analysis methodology, will be verified in tests later this year. On-going cold flow studies, using nitrogen and water as simulants, are described which indicate highly atomized and symmetric sprays.

  9. NASA Engineers Test Combustion Chamber to Advance 3-D Printed Rocket Engine Design

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-08

    A series of test firings like this one in late August brought a group of engineers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, a big step closer to their goal of a 100-percent 3-D printed rocket engine, said Andrew Hanks, test lead for the additively manufactured demonstration engine project. The main combustion chamber, fuel turbopump, fuel injector, valves and other components used in the tests were of the team's new design, and all major engine components except the main combustion chamber were 3-D printed. (NASA/MSFC)

  10. Implementation of the Orbital Maneuvering Systems Engine and Thrust Vector Control for the European Service Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millard, Jon

    2014-01-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) has entered into a partnership with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to develop and provide the Service Module (SM) for the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Program. The European Service Module (ESM) will provide main engine thrust by utilizing the Space Shuttle Program Orbital Maneuvering System Engine (OMS-E). Thrust Vector Control (TVC) of the OMS-E will be provided by the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) TVC, also used during the Space Shuttle Program. NASA will be providing the OMS-E and OMS TVC to ESA as Government Furnished Equipment (GFE) to integrate into the ESM. This presentation will describe the OMS-E and OMS TVC and discuss the implementation of the hardware for the ESM.

  11. Altitude-Test-Chamber Investigation of Mcdonnell Afterburner on J34 Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reller, John O.; Dowman, Harry W.

    1949-01-01

    An altitude-test-chamber investigation was conducted to determine the operational and performance characteristics of a McDonnell afterburner with a fixed-area exhaust nozzle on a J34 engine. At rated engine speed, the altitude limit, as determined by combustion blow-out, occurred as a band of unstable operation of about 6000-foot altitude in width with minimum altitude limits from 31,000 feet at a simulated flight Mach number of 0.40 to about 45,500 feet at a simulated flight Mach number of 1.00. Considerable difficulty was experienced in attempting to establish or maintain balanced-cycle engine operation at altitudes above 36,000 feet. The fuel-air ratio for balanced-cycle operation and lean blowout of the afterburner, the augmented-thrust ratio, the total specific fuel consumption, and the afterburner combustion efficiency for balanced-cycle operation are summarized in a table. Satisfactory afterburner ignition was obtained over a range of flight Mach Numbers from 0.32 to 0.60 at altitudes from 10,000 to 30,000 and engine speeds from 10,000 to 12,500 rpm.

  12. Residual Fuel Expulsion from a Simulated 50,000 Pound Thrust Liquid-Propellant Rocket Engine Having a Continuous Rocket-Type Igniter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messing, Wesley E.

    1959-01-01

    Tests have been conducted to determine the starting characteristics of a 50,000-pound-thrust rocket engine with the conditions of a quantity of fuel lying dormant in the simulated main thrust chamber. Ignition was provided by a smaller rocket firing rearwardly along the center line. Both alcohol-water and anhydrous ammonia were used as the residual fuel. The igniter successfully expelled the maximum amount of residual fuel (3 1/2 gal) in 2.9 seconds when the igniter.was equipped with a sonic discharge nozzle operating at propellant flow rates of 3 pounds per second. Lesser amounts of residual fuel required correspondingly lower expulsion times. When the igniter was equipped with a supersonic exhaust nozzle operating at a flow of 4 pounds per second, a slightly less effective expulsion rate was encountered.

  13. Combustion chamber deposit effects on engine HC emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Haidar, H.A.; Heywood, J.B.; Hochgreb, S.

    1996-10-01

    Combustion chamber deposits were accumulated on a 1.9-1,4-cylinder, DOHC Saturn engine for periods of 100, 50, and 25 hours, using a gasoline with an additive, which kept the intake valves and ports virtually deposit-free. The engine`s hydrocarbon emissions were continuously measured during the deposit build-up process, at the beginning of the deposit build-up, and after the engine disassembly and cleanup. The deposit thickness on top of the pistons and cylinder heads was measured with an eddy-current probe. The combustion chamber deposits (CCDs) increased hydrocarbon emissions by about 14%. The hydrocarbon emissions increased rapidly in the first 15 hours and reached a steady-state after about 25 hours. In addition, a possible mechanism by which CCDs could lead to additional HC emissions, is presented. Some of the fuel escapes the annual combustion process by being adsorbed on the surface of the CCD pores during the intake, compression, and combustion processes, and then desorbed during the exhaust process. The model predictions are consistent with the measured increases in hydrocarbon emissions.

  14. Emergency Multiengine Aircraft System for Lateral Control Using Differential Thrust Control of Wing Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J. (Inventor); Burcham, Frank W., Jr. (Inventor); Bull, John (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Development of an emergency flight control system is disclosed for lateral control using only differential engine thrust modulation of multiengine aircraft is currently underway. The multiengine has at least two engines laterally displaced to the left and right from the axis of the aircraft. In response to a heading angle command psi(sub c) is to be tracked. By continually sensing the heading angle psi of the aircraft and computing a heading error signal psi(sub e) as a function of the difference between the heading angle command psi(sub c) and the sensed heading angle psi, a track control signal is developed with compensation as a function of sensed bank angle phi. Bank angle rate phi, or roll rate p, yaw rate tau, and true velocity produce an aircraft thrust control signal ATC(sub psi(L,R)). The thrust control signal is differentially applied to the left and right engines, with equal amplitude and opposite sign, such that a negative sign is applied to the control signal on the side of the aircraft. A turn is required to reduce the error signal until the heading feedback reduces the error to zero.

  15. Thrust-reverser flow investigation on a twin-engine transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, Gregory M.; Quinto, P. Frank

    1988-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the NASA Langley 14 x 22 foot Subsonic Tunnel to study the effects of engine thrust reversing on an aft-mounted twin-engine transport and to develop effective testing techniques. Testing was done over a fixed and a moving-belt ground plane and over a pressure instrumented ground board. Free-stream dynamic pressure was set at values up to 12.2 psf, which corresponded to a maximum Reynolds number based on the mean aerodynamic chord of 765,000. The thrust reversers examined included cascade, target and four-door configurations. The investigation focused on the range of free-stream velocities and engine thrust-reverser flow rates that would be typical for landing ground-roll conditions. Flow visualization techniques were investigated, and the use of water or smoke injected into the reverser flow proved effective to determine the forward progression of the reversed flow and reingestion limits. When testing over a moving-belt ground plane, as opposed to a fixed ground plane, forward penetration of the reversed flow was reduced. The use of a pressure-instrumented ground board enabled reversed flow ground velocities to be obtained, and it provided a means by which to identify the reversed flow impingement point on the ground.

  16. Fabrication of High Thermal Conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond Composite Combustion Chamber Liner for Advanced Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Greene, Sandra E.; Singh, Jogender

    2016-01-01

    NARloy-Z alloy (Cu-3 percent, Ag-0.5 percent, Zr) is a state of the art alloy currently used for fabricating rocket engine combustion chamber liners. Research conducted at NASA-MSFC and Penn State – Applied Research Laboratory has shown that thermal conductivity of NARloy-Z can be increased significantly by adding diamonds to form a composite (NARloy-Z-D). NARloy-Z-D is also lighter than NARloy-Z. These attributes make this advanced composite material an ideal candidate for fabricating combustion chamber liner for an advanced rocket engine. Increased thermal conductivity will directly translate into increased turbopump power and increased chamber pressure for improved thrust and specific impulse. This paper describes the process development for fabricating a subscale high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-D combustion chamber liner using Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST). The FAST process uses a mixture of NARloy-Z and diamond powders which is sintered under pressure at elevated temperatures. Several challenges were encountered, i.e., segregation of diamonds, machining the super hard NARloy-Z-D composite, net shape fabrication and nondestructive examination. The paper describes how these challenges were addressed. Diamonds coated with copper (CuD) appear to give the best results. A near net shape subscale combustion chamber liner is being fabricated by diffusion bonding cylindrical rings of NARloy-Z-CuD using the FAST process.

  17. Study on development of ejector of Bubble Jet Engine (BJE) - measurement of thrust -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, B.; Nakashima, K.; Shigematsu, T.; Morishita, K.

    2009-02-01

    The AUV (Autonomous Under-water Vehicle), which is used for the present seabed investigations, has obtained the thrust with the screw driven by the battery. However, it has a disadvantage because of its size and cost. Therefore, this research is carried out to propose the Bubble Jet Engine (BJE) as an alternative propulsion device. It can directly transform combustion energy into kinetic energy, so it is expected that BJE can also rise the level of propulsion efficiency. This research aims at measuring exhaled mass flow rate and thrust to design ejectors, which become the core of BJE, and exploring practical possibility of BJE. Vertical type gas-water ejector experimental apparatus for measuring water entrainment was employed in order to understand the characteristics of operation conditions, such as inlet distance, air pressure of nozzle, diameter of nozzle, and so on. In addition, experiments for measuring the thrust in the condition of ejector were executed with horizontal type apparatus in water. However, the influence of the ejector to improve thrust can't have been recognized with high-pressure air at room temperature yet.

  18. Study of ejector geometry on thrust augmentation for pulse detonation engine ejector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehadeh, Ra'fat

    Pulse detonation engine (PDE) technology is a novel form of propulsion that offers the potential of high efficiency combustion with reduced hardware complexity. Although the primary interest of the research in the pulse detonation engine field is directed towards overcoming the problems associated with operating a pure PDE system, there are other worthy options to be considered for these engines. The PDE driven ejector concept is one such option where the system would be part of a hybrid PD/Turbofan engine. This system offers the promise of replacing the high-pressure turbine sections of the core of a high bypass turbofan engine. The purpose of the current research is to investigate the thrust augmentation capabilities of a PDE driven ejector and provide experimental data that would assist in understanding the behavior of such a system. The major potential advantages of the PDE-ejector include reduced costs due to the reduced engine weight, along with improved specific fuel consumption and specific power inherent in the incorporation of a PDE component. To achieve the goal of this research, the thrust augmentation of a PDE driven ejector was characterized for a set of configurations. Two separate PDE's were utilized in this study. The first PDE was capable of operating at a constant frequency of 10 Hz de to flow rate limitations, and another PDE built to have an operational frequency range of 10 Hz-70 Hz to test the effect of operational frequency on PDE-ejector systems. Optical diagnostics were employed at specific positions of interest to understand the physical behavior of the flow. Baseline experimental results helped define and understand the operational characteristics of the PDE's utilized in this study. Thrust measurements were then made for PDE driven ejector configurations. The parameters that were independently changed were the inlet geometry of a constant diameter ejector, as well as the overlap distance between the PDE tube exit and ejector tube inlet

  19. Comparison of the rocket engines efficiency in the case of low thrust orbit-to-orbit transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiforenko, Boris M.; Pasechnik, Zoya V.; Vasil'ev, Igor Yu.

    2007-05-01

    The main task of this paper is to compare two types of low thrust rocket engines: constant thrust vs. variable-thrust engines. We will be concerned with efficiency, where efficiency is evaluated in the case of the orbit-to-orbit transfer with maximum payload mass in the central Newtonian gravity field. The launch mass of the space vehicle is supposed to be fixed. The traditional solution is the decomposition of the problem into parametric and dynamical parts. The corresponding variational problems differ for two rocket thruster types under consideration. We propose change of variables, which makes it possible to reduce averaged equations of optimal motion of a spacecraft with the mentioned engines to the unified form. Using this unified form comparison of the performance of constant- and variable-thrust engines is conducted.

  20. Flight evaluation of a simplified gross thrust calculation technique using an F100 turbofan engine in an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtenbach, F. J.; Burcham, F. W., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A simplified gross thrust calculation technique was evaluated in flight tests on an F-15 aircraft using prototype F100-PW-100 engines. The technique relies on afterburner duct pressure measurements and empirical corrections to an ideal one-dimensional analysis to determine thrust. In-flight gross thrust calculated by the simplified method is compared to gross thrust calculated by the engine manufacturer's gas generator model. The evaluation was conducted at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 1.5 and at altitudes from 6000 meters to 13,700 meters. The flight evaluation shows that the simplified gross thrust method and the gas generator method agreed within plus or minus 3 percent. The discrepancies between the data generally fell within an uncertainty band derived from instrumentation errors and recording system resolution.

  1. Particle based plasma simulation for an ion engine discharge chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalingam, Sudhakar

    Design of the next generation of ion engines can benefit from detailed computer simulations of the plasma in the discharge chamber. In this work a complete particle based approach has been taken to model the discharge chamber plasma. This is the first time that simplifying continuum assumptions on the particle motion have not been made in a discharge chamber model. Because of the long mean free paths of the particles in the discharge chamber continuum models are questionable. The PIC-MCC model developed in this work tracks following particles: neutrals, singly charged ions, doubly charged ions, secondary electrons, and primary electrons. The trajectories of these particles are determined using the Newton-Lorentz's equation of motion including the effects of magnetic and electric fields. Particle collisions are determined using an MCC statistical technique. A large number of collision processes and particle wall interactions are included in the model. The magnetic fields produced by the permanent magnets are determined using Maxwell's equations. The electric fields are determined using an approximate input electric field coupled with a dynamic determination of the electric fields caused by the charged particles. In this work inclusion of the dynamic electric field calculation is made possible by using an inflated plasma permittivity value in the Poisson solver. This allows dynamic electric field calculation with minimal computational requirements in terms of both computer memory and run time. In addition, a number of other numerical procedures such as parallel processing have been implemented to shorten the computational time. The primary results are those modeling the discharge chamber of NASA's NSTAR ion engine at its full operating power. Convergence of numerical results such as total number of particles inside the discharge chamber, average energy of the plasma particles, discharge current, beam current and beam efficiency are obtained. Steady state results for

  2. Analysis of gas turbine engines using water and oxygen injection to achieve high Mach numbers and high thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henneberry, Hugh M.; Snyder, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of gas turbine engines using water and oxygen injection to enhance performance by increasing Mach number capability and by increasing thrust is described. The liquids are injected, either separately or together, into the subsonic diffuser ahead of the engine compressor. A turbojet engine and a mixed-flow turbofan engine (MFTF) are examined, and in pursuit of maximum thrust, both engines are fitted with afterburners. The results indicate that water injection alone can extend the performance envelope of both engine types by one and one-half Mach numbers at which point water-air ratios reach 17 or 18 percent and liquid specific impulse is reduced to some 390 to 470 seconds, a level about equal to the impulse of a high energy rocket engine. The envelope can be further extended, but only with increasing sacrifices in liquid specific impulse. Oxygen-airflow ratios as high as 15 percent were investigated for increasing thrust. Using 15 percent oxygen in combination with water injection at high supersonic Mach numbers resulted in thrust augmentation as high as 76 percent without any significant decrease in liquid specific impulse. The stoichiometric afterburner exit temperature increased with increasing oxygen flow, reaching 4822 deg R in the turbojet engine at a Mach number of 3.5. At the transonic Mach number of 0.95 where no water injection is needed, an oxygen-air ratio of 15 percent increased thrust by some 55 percent in both engines, along with a decrease in liquid specific impulse of 62 percent. Afterburner temperature was approximately 4700 deg R at this high thrust condition. Water and/or oxygen injection are simple and straightforward strategies to improve engine performance and they will add little to engine weight. However, if large Mach number and thrust increases are required, liquid flows become significant, so that operation at these conditions will necessarily be of short duration.

  3. Blue Origin Tests BE-3 Engine

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Blue Origin successfully fires the thrust chamber assembly for its new 100,000 pound thrust BE-3 liquid oxygen, liquid hydrogen rocket engine. As part of the company's Reusable Booster System (RBS)...

  4. NACA Conference on Turbojet-Engine Thrust Augmentation Research: A Compilation of the Papers Presented by NACA Staff Members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1948-01-01

    The conference on Turbojet-Engine Thrust-Augmentation Research was organized by the NACA to present in summarized form the results of the latest experimental and analytical investigations conducted at the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory on methods of augmenting the thrust of turbojet engines. The technical discussions are reproduced herewith in the same form in which they were presented. The original presentation in this record are considered as complementary to, rather than substitutes for, the committee's system of complete and formal reports.

  5. Methods for determining the internal thrust of scramjet engine modules from experimental data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voland, Randall T.

    1990-01-01

    Methods for calculating zero-fuel internal drag of scramjet engine modules from experimental measurements are presented. These methods include two control-volume approaches, and a pressure and skin-friction integration. The three calculation techniques are applied to experimental data taken during tests of a version of the NASA parametric scramjet. The methods agree to within seven percent of the mean value of zero-fuel internal drag even though several simplifying assumptions are made in the analysis. The mean zero-fuel internal drag coefficient for this particular engine is calculated to be 0.150. The zero-fuel internal drag coefficient when combined with the change in engine axial force with and without fuel defines the internal thrust of an engine.

  6. Methods for determining the internal thrust of scramjet engine modules from experimental data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voland, Randall T.

    1990-01-01

    Methods for calculating zero-fuel internal drag of scramjet engine modules from experimental measurements are presented. These methods include two control-volume approaches, and a pressure and skin-friction integration. The three calculation techniques are applied to experimental data taken during tests of a version of the NASA parametric scramjet. The methods agree to within seven percent of the mean value of zero-fuel internal drag even though several simplifying assumptions are made in the analysis. The mean zero-fuel internal drag coefficient for this particular engine is calculated to be 0.150. The zero-fuel internal drag coefficient when combined with the change in engine axial force with and without fuel defines the internal thrust of an engine.

  7. Thrust performance of a variable-geometry, divergent exhaust nozzle on a turbojet engine at altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straight, D. M.; Collom, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    A variable geometry, low aspect ratio, nonaxisymmetric, two dimensional, convergent-divergent exhaust nozzle was tested at simulated altitude on a turbojet engine to obtain baseline axial, dry thrust performance over wide ranges of operating nozzle pressure ratios, throat areas, and internal expansion area ratios. The thrust data showed good agreement with theory and scale model test results after the data were corrected for seal leakage and coolant losses. Wall static pressure profile data were also obtained and compared with one dimensional theory and scale model data. The pressure data indicate greater three dimensional flow effects in the full scale tests than with models. The leakage and coolant penalties were substantial, and the method to determine them is included.

  8. Real-time in-flight thrust calculation on a digital electronic engine control-equipped F100 engine in an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R. J.; Myers, L. P.

    1984-01-01

    Computer algorithms which calculate in-flight engine and aircraft performance real-time are discussed. The first step was completed with the implementation of a real-time thrust calculation program on a digital electronic engine control (DEEC) equiped F100 engine in an F-15 aircraft. The in-flight thrust modifications that allow calculations to be performed in real-time, to compare results to predictions, are presented.

  9. An Optimal Orthogonal Decomposition Method for Kalman Filter-Based Turbofan Engine Thrust Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.

    2007-01-01

    A new linear point design technique is presented for the determination of tuning parameters that enable the optimal estimation of unmeasured engine outputs, such as thrust. The engine's performance is affected by its level of degradation, generally described in terms of unmeasurable health parameters related to each major engine component. Accurate thrust reconstruction depends on knowledge of these health parameters, but there are usually too few sensors to be able to estimate their values. In this new technique, a set of tuning parameters is determined that accounts for degradation by representing the overall effect of the larger set of health parameters as closely as possible in a least squares sense. The technique takes advantage of the properties of the singular value decomposition of a matrix to generate a tuning parameter vector of low enough dimension that it can be estimated by a Kalman filter. A concise design procedure to generate a tuning vector that specifically takes into account the variables of interest is presented. An example demonstrates the tuning parameters ability to facilitate matching of both measured and unmeasured engine outputs, as well as state variables. Additional properties of the formulation are shown to lend themselves well to diagnostics.

  10. An Optimal Orthogonal Decomposition Method for Kalman Filter-Based Turbofan Engine Thrust Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.

    2007-01-01

    A new linear point design technique is presented for the determination of tuning parameters that enable the optimal estimation of unmeasured engine outputs, such as thrust. The engine s performance is affected by its level of degradation, generally described in terms of unmeasurable health parameters related to each major engine component. Accurate thrust reconstruction depends on knowledge of these health parameters, but there are usually too few sensors to be able to estimate their values. In this new technique, a set of tuning parameters is determined that accounts for degradation by representing the overall effect of the larger set of health parameters as closely as possible in a least-squares sense. The technique takes advantage of the properties of the singular value decomposition of a matrix to generate a tuning parameter vector of low enough dimension that it can be estimated by a Kalman filter. A concise design procedure to generate a tuning vector that specifically takes into account the variables of interest is presented. An example demonstrates the tuning parameters ability to facilitate matching of both measured and unmeasured engine outputs, as well as state variables. Additional properties of the formulation are shown to lend themselves well to diagnostics.

  11. An Optimal Orthogonal Decomposition Method for Kalman Filter-Based Turbofan Engine Thrust Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.

    2005-01-01

    A new linear point design technique is presented for the determination of tuning parameters that enable the optimal estimation of unmeasured engine outputs such as thrust. The engine s performance is affected by its level of degradation, generally described in terms of unmeasurable health parameters related to each major engine component. Accurate thrust reconstruction depends upon knowledge of these health parameters, but there are usually too few sensors to be able to estimate their values. In this new technique, a set of tuning parameters is determined which accounts for degradation by representing the overall effect of the larger set of health parameters as closely as possible in a least squares sense. The technique takes advantage of the properties of the singular value decomposition of a matrix to generate a tuning parameter vector of low enough dimension that it can be estimated by a Kalman filter. A concise design procedure to generate a tuning vector that specifically takes into account the variables of interest is presented. An example demonstrates the tuning parameters ability to facilitate matching of both measured and unmeasured engine outputs, as well as state variables. Additional properties of the formulation are shown to lend themselves well to diagnostics.

  12. An Optimal Orthogonal Decomposition Method for Kalman Filter-Based Turbofan Engine Thrust Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.

    2007-01-01

    A new linear point design technique is presented for the determination of tuning parameters that enable the optimal estimation of unmeasured engine outputs, such as thrust. The engine s performance is affected by its level of degradation, generally described in terms of unmeasurable health parameters related to each major engine component. Accurate thrust reconstruction depends on knowledge of these health parameters, but there are usually too few sensors to be able to estimate their values. In this new technique, a set of tuning parameters is determined that accounts for degradation by representing the overall effect of the larger set of health parameters as closely as possible in a least-squares sense. The technique takes advantage of the properties of the singular value decomposition of a matrix to generate a tuning parameter vector of low enough dimension that it can be estimated by a Kalman filter. A concise design procedure to generate a tuning vector that specifically takes into account the variables of interest is presented. An example demonstrates the tuning parameters ability to facilitate matching of both measured and unmeasured engine outputs, as well as state variables. Additional properties of the formulation are shown to lend themselves well to diagnostics.

  13. An Optimal Orthogonal Decomposition Method for Kalman Filter-Based Turbofan Engine Thrust Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.

    2007-01-01

    A new linear point design technique is presented for the determination of tuning parameters that enable the optimal estimation of unmeasured engine outputs, such as thrust. The engine's performance is affected by its level of degradation, generally described in terms of unmeasurable health parameters related to each major engine component. Accurate thrust reconstruction depends on knowledge of these health parameters, but there are usually too few sensors to be able to estimate their values. In this new technique, a set of tuning parameters is determined that accounts for degradation by representing the overall effect of the larger set of health parameters as closely as possible in a least squares sense. The technique takes advantage of the properties of the singular value decomposition of a matrix to generate a tuning parameter vector of low enough dimension that it can be estimated by a Kalman filter. A concise design procedure to generate a tuning vector that specifically takes into account the variables of interest is presented. An example demonstrates the tuning parameters ability to facilitate matching of both measured and unmeasured engine outputs, as well as state variables. Additional properties of the formulation are shown to lend themselves well to diagnostics.

  14. Investigations of combustion in ''squish'' chamber spark ignition engines

    SciTech Connect

    James, E.H.

    1984-02-01

    Seemingly inexplicable and intractable observations relating to flame travel time behaviour in 'squish' chambered, spark ignition (S.I.) engines are resolved using a computer model of the combustion process coupled with hot wire anemometry techniques for flow velocity measurements under 'motored' conditions. ''Reverse squish'' is shown to be present during the early part of the expansion stroke and, under certain conditions, this radically reduces combustion intervals in the engine through augmenting the expansion velocity component of flame speed. Mass burning rates are not correspondingly increased however indicating that there is no automatic correlation between flame speeds and turbulence intensities. Computer modelling of the combustion process is shown to provide much more detail than can be obtained from experiments. This technique is used to explain the relative insensitivity of flame travel times part-way across the chamber to compression ratio variation and turbulence level. The pressure dependency of laminar burning velocity as recommended by Mattavi et al is shown to be highly important in this context as also are the increased expansion velocities at the lower compression ratios. A mechanism is suggested whereby overall flame travel times at the end of combustion finally decrease with compression ratio increase to comply with normally observed trends.

  15. The Effect of Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Energy Bypass on Specific Thrust for a Supersonic Turbojet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benyo, Theresa L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the preliminary results of a thermodynamic cycle analysis of a supersonic turbojet engine with a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy bypass system that explores a wide range of MHD enthalpy extraction parameters. Through the analysis described here, it is shown that applying a magnetic field to a flow path in the Mach 2.0 to 3.5 range can increase the specific thrust of the turbojet engine up to as much as 420 N/(kg/s) provided that the magnitude of the magnetic field is in the range of 1 to 5 Tesla. The MHD energy bypass can also increase the operating Mach number range for a supersonic turbojet engine into the hypersonic flight regime. In this case, the Mach number range is shown to be extended to Mach 7.0.

  16. Up the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) Scale to Demonstrate a Robust, Long Life, Liquid Rocket Engine Combustion Chamber, or...Up the Downstairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard; Elam, Sandra; McKechnie, Timothy; Power, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Advanced vacuum plasma spray (VPS) technology, utilized to successfully apply thermal barrier coatings to space shuttle main engine turbine blades, was further refined as a functional gradient material (FGM) process for space furnace cartridge experiments at 1600 C and for robust, long life combustion chambers for liquid rocket engines. A VPS/FGM 5K (5,000 lb. thrust) thruster has undergone 220 hot firing tests, in pristine condition, showing no wear, blanching or cooling channel cracks. Most recently, this technology has been applied to a 40K thruster, with scale up planned for a 194K Ares I, J-2X engine.

  17. The thrust generated by a T6 ion engine hollow cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessini, Paolo; Coletti, Michele; Gabriel, Stephen B.

    2014-09-01

    The thrust produced by a T6 ion engine main discharge hollow cathode was characterized using different propellants with a target-based measurement system, for discharge current values of 5-25 A and a wide range of mass flow rates. The calculated values of specific impulse are far in excess of those that could be attributed to the heating of a gas to thermal equilibrium with the walls, as in a resistojet. This would suggest an operation mechanism more similar to that of an arcjet. The main scaling parameter for the specific impulse appears to be the discharge power per unit mass flow rate (specific power).

  18. Formation of Vortex Structures in the Prenozzle Space of an Engine with a Vectorable Thrust Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, K. N.; Emel'yanov, V. N.; Denisikhin, S. V.

    2016-05-01

    A numerical simulation of the hydrodynamic effects arising in the process of work of the vectorable thrust nozzle of a solid-propellant rocket engine has been performed. The fields of the flows of combustion products in the channel of a charge, the prenozzle space, and the nozzle unit were calculated for different angles of vectoring of the nozzle. The distributions of the gasdynamic parameters of the flow of combustion products in the prenozzle space, corresponding to their efflux from the cylindrical and star-shaped channels of charges, were compared. The formation of a vortex flow in the neighborhood of the back cover of the nozzle was considered.

  19. A simple dynamic engine model for use in a real-time aircraft simulation with thrust vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Steven A.

    1990-01-01

    A simple dynamic engine model was developed at the NASA Ames Research Center, Dryden Flight Research Facility, for use in thrust vectoring control law development and real-time aircraft simulation. The simple dynamic engine model of the F404-GE-400 engine (General Electric, Lynn, Massachusetts) operates within the aircraft simulator. It was developed using tabular data generated from a complete nonlinear dynamic engine model supplied by the manufacturer. Engine dynamics were simulated using a throttle rate limiter and low-pass filter. Included is a description of a method to account for axial thrust loss resulting from thrust vectoring. In addition, the development of the simple dynamic engine model and its incorporation into the F-18 high alpha research vehicle (HARV) thrust vectoring simulation. The simple dynamic engine model was evaluated at Mach 0.2, 35,000 ft altitude and at Mach 0.7, 35,000 ft altitude. The simple dynamic engine model is within 3 percent of the steady state response, and within 25 percent of the transient response of the complete nonlinear dynamic engine model.

  20. Variable thrust cartridge

    DOEpatents

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    2000-11-07

    The present invention is a variable thrust cartridge comprising a water-molten aluminum reaction chamber from which a slug is propelled. The cartridge comprises a firing system that initiates a controlled explosion from the reaction chamber. The explosive force provides a thrust to a slug, preferably contained within the cartridge.

  1. Modular flow chamber for engineering bone marrow architecture and function.

    PubMed

    Di Buduo, Christian A; Soprano, Paolo M; Tozzi, Lorenzo; Marconi, Stefania; Auricchio, Ferdinando; Kaplan, David L; Balduini, Alessandra

    2017-11-01

    The bone marrow is a soft, spongy, gelatinous tissue found in the hollow cavities of flat and long bones that support hematopoiesis in order to maintain the physiologic turnover of all blood cells. Silk fibroin, derived from Bombyx mori silkworm cocoons, is a promising biomaterial for bone marrow engineering, because of its tunable architecture and mechanical properties, the capacity of incorporating labile compounds without loss of bioactivity and demonstrated ability to support blood cell formation. In this study, we developed a bone marrow scaffold consisting of a modular flow chamber made of polydimethylsiloxane, holding a silk sponge, prepared with salt leaching methods and functionalized with extracellular matrix components. The silk sponge was able to support efficient platelet formation when megakaryocytes were seeded in the system. Perfusion of the chamber allowed the recovery of functional platelets based on multiple activation tests. Further, inhibition of AKT signaling molecule, which has been shown to be crucial in regulating physiologic platelet formation, significantly reduced the number of collected platelets, suggesting the applicability of this tissue model for evaluation of the effects of bone marrow exposure to compounds that may affect platelet formation. In conclusion, we have bioengineered a novel modular system that, along with multi-porous silk sponges, can provide a useful technology for reproducing a simplified bone marrow scaffold for blood cell production ex vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Hot-gas-side heat transfer with and without film cooling on a simulated nuclear rocket thrust chamber using H2-O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quentmeyer, R. J.; Schacht, R. L.; Jones, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    Heat-transfer coefficients were obtained on a thrust chamber which simulated the geometry of the NERVA nuclear rocket. The tests were performed with and without peripheral film cooling over a chamber pressure range of 1.05 million to 5.84 million newtons per square meter (153 to 847 psia). With no film cooling, the overall axial variation in the value of the correlation coefficient C of the equation (Stanton)* (Prandtl)* to the 0.7ths power = C(Reynolds)* to the -0.2ths power, where * indicates the reference enthalpy condition, was reduced 66 percent when the local diameter in the Reynolds number was replaced by the axial distance from the injector face. The average peak values of C were reduced 25 percent with 2 and 3.75 percent cooling and 50 percent with 7.5 percent cooling.

  3. Evaluation of a simplified gross thrust calculation method for a J85-21 afterburning turbojet engine in an altitude facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baer-Riedhart, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    A simplified gross thrust calculation method was evaluated on its ability to predict the gross thrust of a modified J85-21 engine. The method used tailpipe pressure data and ambient pressure data to predict the gross thrust. The method's algorithm is based on a one-dimensional analysis of the flow in the afterburner and nozzle. The test results showed that the method was notably accurate over the engine operating envelope using the altitude facility measured thrust for comparison. A summary of these results, the simplified gross thrust method and requirements, and the test techniques used are discussed in this paper.

  4. Heat transfer in rocket engine combustion chambers and nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, P. G.; Cheng, G. C.; Farmer, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    Complexities of liquid rocket engine heat transfer which involve the injector faceplate and regeneratively and film cooled walls are being investigated by computational analysis. A conjugate heat transfer analysis will be used to describe localized heating phenomena associated with particular injector configurations and coolant channels and film coolant dumps. These components are being analyzed, and the analyses verified with appropriate test data. Finally, the component analyses will be synthesized into an overall flowfield/heat transfer model. The FDNS code is being used to make the component analyses. Particular attention is being given to the representation of the thermodynamic properties of the fluid streams and to the method of combining the detailed models to represent overall heating. Unit flow models of specific coaxial injector elements have been developed and will be described. Since test data from the NLS development program are not available, new validation heat transfer data have been sought. Suitable data were obtained from a Rocketdyne test program on a model hydrocarbon/oxygen engine. Simulations of these test data will be presented. Recent interest in the hybrid motor have established the need for analyses of ablating solid fuels in the combustion chamber. Analysis of a simplified hybrid motor will also be presented.

  5. Heat transfer in rocket engine combustion chambers and nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, P. G.; Cheng, G. C.; Farmer, R. C.

    1993-07-01

    Complexities of liquid rocket engine heat transfer which involve the injector faceplate and regeneratively and film cooled walls are being investigated by computational analysis. A conjugate heat transfer analysis will be used to describe localized heating phenomena associated with particular injector configurations and coolant channels and film coolant dumps. These components are being analyzed, and the analyses verified with appropriate test data. Finally, the component analyses will be synthesized into an overall flowfield/heat transfer model. The FDNS code is being used to make the component analyses. Particular attention is being given to the representation of the thermodynamic properties of the fluid streams and to the method of combining the detailed models to represent overall heating. Unit flow models of specific coaxial injector elements have been developed and will be described. Since test data from the NLS development program are not available, new validation heat transfer data have been sought. Suitable data were obtained from a Rocketdyne test program on a model hydrocarbon/oxygen engine. Simulations of these test data will be presented. Recent interest in the hybrid motor have established the need for analyses of ablating solid fuels in the combustion chamber. Analysis of a simplified hybrid motor will also be presented.

  6. Emergency Flight Control Using Only Engine Thrust and Lateral Center-of-Gravity Offset: A First Look

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Burken, John; Maine, Trindel A.; Bull, John

    1997-01-01

    Normally, the damage that results in a total loss of the primary flight controls of a jet transport airplane, including all engines on one side, would be catastrophic. In response, NASA Dryden has conceived an emergency flight control system that uses only the thrust of a wing-mounted engine along with a lateral center-of-gravity (CGY) offset from fuel transfer. Initial analysis and simulation studies indicate that such a system works, and recent high-fidelity simulation tests on the MD-11 and B-747 suggest that the system provides enough control for a survivable landing. This paper discusses principles of flight control using only a wing engine thrust and CGY offset, along with the amount of CGY offset capability of some transport airplanes. The paper also presents simulation results of the throttle-only control capability and closed-loop control of ground track using computer-controlled thrust.

  7. Fabrication of High Thermal Conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond Composite Combustion Chamber Liner for Advanced Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Greene, Sandra E.; Singh, Jogender

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the process development for fabricating a high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond composite (NARloy-Z-D) combustion chamber liner for application in advanced rocket engines. The fabrication process is challenging and this paper presents some details of these challenges and approaches used to address them. Prior research conducted at NASA-MSFC and Penn State had shown that NARloy-Z-40%D composite material has significantly higher thermal conductivity than the state of the art NARloy-Z alloy. Furthermore, NARloy-Z-40 %D is much lighter than NARloy-Z. These attributes help to improve the performance of the advanced rocket engines. Increased thermal conductivity will directly translate into increased turbopump power, increased chamber pressure for improved thrust and specific impulse. Early work on NARloy-Z-D composites used the Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST, Ref. 1, 2) for fabricating discs. NARloy-Z-D composites containing 10, 20 and 40vol% of high thermal conductivity diamond powder were investigated. Thermal conductivity (TC) data. TC increased with increasing diamond content and showed 50% improvement over pure copper at 40vol% diamond. This composition was selected for fabricating the combustion chamber liner using the FAST technique.

  8. Last ion engine thrust puts ESA's SMART-1 on the right track for its Moon encounter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-10-01

    SMART-1, on its way to the Moon, has now covered more than 80 million kilometres. Its journey started on 27 September 2003, when the spacecraft was launched on board an Ariane 5 rocket from Europe’s spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. Since then, it has been spiralling in progressively larger orbits around Earth, to eventually be captured by the lunar gravity and enter into orbit around the Moon in November this year. The SMART-1 mission was designed to pursue two main objectives. The first is purely technological: to demonstrate and test a number of space techniques to be applied to future interplanetary exploration missions. The second goal is scientific, mainly dedicated to lunar science. It is the technology demonstration goal, in particular the first European flight test of a solar-powered ion engine as a spacecraft’s main propulsion system, that gave shape to the peculiar route and duration (13 months) of the SMART-1 journey to the Moon. The long spiralling orbit around Earth, which is bringing the spacecraft closer and closer to the Moon, is needed for the ion engine to function and be tested over a distance comparable to that a spacecraft would travel during a possible interplanetary trip. The SMART-1 mission is also testing the response of a spacecraft propelled by such an engine during gravity-assisted manoeuvres. These are techniques currently used on interplanetary journeys, which make use of the gravitational pull of celestial objects (e.g. planets) for the spacecraft to gain acceleration and reach its final target while saving fuel. In SMART-1’s case, the Moon’s gravitational pull has been exploited in three “lunar resonance” manoeuvres. The first two successfully took place in August and September 2004. The last resonance manoeuvre was on 12 October, during the last major ion engine thrust, which lasted nearly five days, from 10 to 14 October. Thanks to this final thrust, SMART-1 will make two more orbits around Earth without any further

  9. Airflow and thrust calibration of an F100 engine, S/N P680059, at selected flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biesiadny, T. J.; Lee, D.; Rodriguez, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    An airflow and thrust calibration of an F100 engine, S/N P680059, was conducted to study airframe propulsion system integration losses in turbofan-powered high-performance aircraft. The tests were conducted with and without thrust augmentation for a variety of simulated flight conditions with emphasis on the transonic regime. The resulting corrected airflow data generalized into one curve with corrected fan speed while corrected gross thrust increased as simulated flight conditions increased. Overall agreement between measured data and computed results was 1 percent for corrected airflow and -1 1/2 percent for gross thrust. The results of an uncertainty analysis are presented for both parameters at each simulated flight condition.

  10. Engineering analyses of large precision cathode strip chambers for GEM

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, J.A.; Belser, F.C.; Pratuch, S.M.; Wuest, C.R.; Mitselmakher, G.; Gordeev, A.; Johnson, C.V. |; Polychronakos, V.A.; Golutvin, I.A.

    1993-10-21

    Structural analyses of large precision cathode strip chambers performed up to the date of this publication are documented. Mechanical property data for typical chamber materials are included. This information, originally intended to be an appendix to the {open_quotes}CSC Structural Design Bible,{close_quotes} is presented as a guide for future designers of large chambers.

  11. Transpiring Cooling of a Scram-Jet Engine Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Song, Kyo D.; Ries,Heidi

    1997-01-01

    The peak cold-wall heating rate generated in a combustion chamber of a scram-jet engine can exceed 2000 Btu/sq ft sec (approx. 2344 W/sq cm). Therefore, a very effective heat dissipation mechanism is required to sustain such a high heating load. This research focused on the transpiration cooling mechanism that appears to be a promising approach to remove a large amount of heat from the engine wall. The transpiration cooling mechanism has two aspects. First, initial computations suggest that there is a reduction, as much as 75%, in the heat flux incident on the combustion chamber wall due to the transpirant modifying the combustor boundary layer. Secondly, the heat reaching the combustor wall is removed from the structure in a very effective manner by the transpirant. It is the second of these two mechanisms that is investigated experimentally in the subject paper. A transpiration cooling experiment using a radiant heating method, that provided a heat flux as high as 200 Btu/sq ft sec ( approx. 234 W/sq cm) on the surface of a specimen, was performed. The experiment utilized an arc-lamp facility (60-kW radiant power output) to provide a uniform heat flux to a test specimen. For safety reasons, helium gas was used as the transpirant in the experiments. The specimens were 1.9-cm diameter sintered, powdered-stainless-steel tubes of various porosities and a 2.54cm square tube with perforated multi-layered walls. A 15-cm portion of each specimen was heated. The cooling effectivenes and efficiencies by transpiration for each specimen were obtained using the experimental results. During the testing, various test specimens displayed a choking phenomenon in which the transpirant flow was limited as the heat flux was increased. The paper includes a preliminary analysis of the transpiration cooling mechanism and a scaling conversion study that translates the results from helium tests into the case when a hydrogen medium is used.

  12. Liquid rocket engine self-cooled combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Self-cooled combustion chambers are chambers in which the chamber wall temperature is controlled by methods other than fluid flow within the chamber wall supplied from an external source. In such chambers, adiabatic wall temperature may be controlled by use of upstream fluid components such as the injector or a film-coolant ring, or by internal flow of self-contained materials; e.g. pyrolysis gas flow in charring ablators, and the flow of infiltrated liquid metals in porous matrices. Five types of self-cooled chambers are considered in this monograph. The name identifying the chamber is indicative of the method (mechanism) by which the chamber is cooled, as follows: ablative; radiation cooled; internally regenerative (Interegen); heat sink; adiabatic wall. Except for the Interegen and heat sink concepts, each chamber type is discussed separately. A separate and final section of the monograph deals with heat transfer to the chamber wall and treats Stanton number evaluation, film cooling, and film-coolant injection techniques, since these subjects are common to all chamber types. Techniques for analysis of gas film cooling and liquid film cooling are presented.

  13. Refinement of Tissue-Engineering Chamber Implantation in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Medved, Fabian; Haas, Robert; Bösch, Cedric; Pronk, Roderick F; Fischborn, Till; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard; Weitgasser, Laurenz

    2017-04-01

    Rodent in vivo models that successfully generate new adipose, muscle, or vascular tissue in a tissue-engineering chamber (TEC) has advanced in the last decade. In this article, technical refinements in these operative foreign body implantations have been described to improve the execution of animal models in a way so that they can reduce wastage of time and resources. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were studied and randomly divided into two equal sized groups. In each group, a different operative procedure was used for implanting the TEC. Twenty animals were operated with diagonal incisions in the groin region, followed by staples for wound closure after TEC implantation. The remaining 20 animals received longitudinal incisions in the abdominal region followed by wound closure with ongoing intradermal nonresorbable sutures and skin glue. The outcome of both procedures with regard to complications, animal growth, and experimental failure was compared. Statistical analysis was performed using the nonparametric chi-squared (χ(2)) test. Significant difference in wound dehiscence was recorded in Group I as compared to Group II (p = 0.0001). Consequently, 55% of the experiments had to be aborted in Group I and the animals were removed from the experiment. On the contrary, in Group II, all the animals could be kept. Median longitudinal incisions and thorough wound closure with ongoing intradermal nonresorbable sutures, followed by application of skin glue, are strongly recommended to prevent surgical site complications, such as wound dehiscence, animal harm, and failure of the individual experiment.

  14. Advanced Development Program for a 625 lbf thrust engine for Ares First Stage Roll Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Matt; Chenevert, Blake; Brewster, Gerry; Frei, Tom; Bullard, Brad; Fuller, Ray

    2009-01-01

    NASA's new Ares Launch Vehicle will require twelve thrusters to provide roll control of the vehicle during the first stage firing. All twelve roll control thrusters will be located at the inter-stage segment that separates the solid rocket booster first stage from the second stage. NASA selected a mono propellant hydrazine solution and as a result awarded Aerojet-General a contract in 2007 for an advanced development program for an MR-80- series 625 Ibf vacuum thrust monopropellant hydrazine thruster. This thruster has heritage dating back to the 1976 Viking Landers and most recently for the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory. Prior to the Ares application, the MR-80-series thrusters had been equipped with throttle valves and not typically operated in pulse mode. The primary objective of the advanced development program was to increase the technology readiness level and retire major technical risks for the future flight qualification test program. Aerojet built on their heritage MR-80 rocket engine designs to achieve the design and performance requirements. Significant improvements to cost and lead-time were achieved by applying Design for Manufacturing and Assembly (DFMA) principles. AerojetGeneral has completed Preliminary and Critical Design Reviews, followed by two successful rocket engine development test programs. The test programs included qualification random vibration and firing lite that significantly exceed the flight qualification requirements. This paper discusses the advanced development program and the demonstrated capability of the MR-80C engine. Y;

  15. Advanced Development Program for a 625 lbf thrust engine for Ares First Stage Roll Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Matt; Chenevert, Blake; Brewster, Gerry; Frei, Tom; Bullard, Brad; Fuller, Ray

    2009-01-01

    NASA's new Ares Launch Vehicle will require twelve thrusters to provide roll control of the vehicle during the first stage firing. All twelve roll control thrusters will be located at the inter-stage segment that separates the solid rocket booster first stage from the second stage. NASA selected a mono propellant hydrazine solution and as a result awarded Aerojet-General a contract in 2007 for an advanced development program for an MR-80- series 625 Ibf vacuum thrust monopropellant hydrazine thruster. This thruster has heritage dating back to the 1976 Viking Landers and most recently for the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory. Prior to the Ares application, the MR-80-series thrusters had been equipped with throttle valves and not typically operated in pulse mode. The primary objective of the advanced development program was to increase the technology readiness level and retire major technical risks for the future flight qualification test program. Aerojet built on their heritage MR-80 rocket engine designs to achieve the design and performance requirements. Significant improvements to cost and lead-time were achieved by applying Design for Manufacturing and Assembly (DFMA) principles. AerojetGeneral has completed Preliminary and Critical Design Reviews, followed by two successful rocket engine development test programs. The test programs included qualification random vibration and firing lite that significantly exceed the flight qualification requirements. This paper discusses the advanced development program and the demonstrated capability of the MR-80C engine. Y;

  16. Feedback control for counterflow thrust vectoring with a turbine engine: Experiment design and robust control design and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dores, Delfim Zambujo Das

    2005-11-01

    Engineering research over the last few years has successfully demonstrated the potential of thrust vector control using counterflow at conditions up to Mach 2. Flow configurations that include the pitch vectoring of rectangular jets and multi-axis vector control in diamond and axisymmetric nozzle geometries have been studied. Although bistable (on-off) fluid-based control has been around for some time, the present counterflow thrust vector control is unique because proportional and continuous jet response can be achieved in the absence of moving parts, while avoiding jet attachment, which renders most fluidic approaches unacceptable for aircraft and missile control applications. However, before this study, research had been limited to open-loop studies of counterflow thrust vectoring. For practical implementation it was vital that the counterflow scheme be used in conjunction with feedback control. Hence, the focus of this research was to develop and experimentally demonstrate a feedback control design methodology for counterflow thrust vectoring. This research focused on 2-D (pitch) thrust vectoring and addresses four key modeling issues. The first issue is to determine the measured variable to be commanded since the thrust vector angle is not measurable in real time. The second related issue is to determine the static mapping from the thrust vector angle to this measured variable. The third issue is to determine the dynamic relationship between the measured variable and the thrust vector angle. The fourth issue is to develop dynamic models with uncertainty characterizations. The final and main goal was the design and implementation of robust controllers that yield closed-loop systems with fast response times, and avoid overshoot in order to aid in the avoidance of attachment. These controllers should be simple and easy to implement in real applications. Hence, PID design has been chosen. Robust control design is accomplished by using ℓ1 control theory in

  17. Design handbook for gaseous fuel engine injectors and combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calhoon, D. F.; Ito, I.; Kors, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    Results of investigation of injection, mixing, and combustion processes using gaseous fuels and oxidizers have been summarized in handbook presenting succinct design procedures for injectors and methods for estimating combustion efficiency, chamber heat flux and stability characteristics. Handbook presents two approaches to injector and combustion chamber design: empirical and analytical.

  18. An inventory of particle and gaseous emissions from large aircraft thrust engine operations at an airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaheri, M.; Johnson, G. R.; Morawska, L.

    2011-07-01

    Published particle number emission factors for aircraft operations remain very sparse and so far such emissions have not been included in the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) databases. This work addresses this gap in knowledge by utilizing recent progress in the quantification of aircraft particle emissions. Annual emissions of particle number (PN), particle mass (PM 2.5) and NO x throughout the aircraft landing and takeoff (LTO) cycles and ground running procedures (GRP) are presented for aircraft using Brisbane Airport BNE (domestic and international). The aircraft are grouped according to an airframe based classification system. The resulting data are then used to develop an emissions inventory for large aircraft thrust engine operations on the ground, during LTO cycles and GRP, at the Airport. Annual PN, PM 2.5 and NO x emissions from large aircraft operations during LTO cycles and GRP at BNE were 1.98 × 10 24 yr -1, 1.35 × 10 4 kg yr -1 and 8.13 × 10 5 kg yr -1, respectively. Results showed that LTO cycles contribute more than 97% of these annual emissions at BNE in comparison to GRP related emissions. Analysis of the LTO cycle contribution to the daily emissions showed that the contribution of the climbout mode is considerably higher than for other individual LTO operational modes. Emissions during aircraft departures were significantly higher than those during arrival operations, due to the higher aircraft engine emission rates during takeoff and climbout.

  19. Micro thrust and heat generator

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, E.J.

    1998-11-17

    A micro thrust and heat generator have a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator`s ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachining techniques (LIGA). 30 figs.

  20. Micro thrust and heat generator

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.

    1998-01-01

    A micro thrust and heat generator has a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator's ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachining techniques (LIGA).

  1. Advanced Methods for Aircraft Engine Thrust and Noise Benefits: Nozzle-Inlet Flow Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Morris H.; Gilinsky, Mikhail M.

    2001-01-01

    Three connected sub-projects were conducted under reported project. Partially, these sub-projects are directed to solving the problems conducted by the HU/FM&AL under two other NASA grants. The fundamental idea uniting these projects is to use untraditional 3D corrugated nozzle designs and additional methods for exhaust jet noise reduction without essential thrust lost and even with thrust augmentation. Such additional approaches are: (1) to add some solid, fluid, or gas mass at discrete locations to the main supersonic gas stream to minimize the negative influence of strong shock waves forming in propulsion systems; this mass addition may be accompanied by heat addition to the main stream as a result of the fuel combustion or by cooling of this stream as a result of the liquid mass evaporation and boiling; (2) to use porous or permeable nozzles and additional shells at the nozzle exit for preliminary cooling of exhaust hot jet and pressure compensation for non-design conditions (so-called continuous ejector with small mass flow rate; and (3) to propose and analyze new effective methods fuel injection into flow stream in air-breathing engines. Note that all these problems were formulated based on detailed descriptions of the main experimental facts observed at NASA Glenn Research Center. Basically, the HU/FM&AL Team has been involved in joint research with the purpose of finding theoretical explanations for experimental facts and the creation of the accurate numerical simulation technique and prediction theory for solutions for current problems in propulsion systems solved by NASA and Navy agencies. The research is focused on a wide regime of problems in the propulsion field as well as in experimental testing and theoretical and numerical simulation analysis for advanced aircraft and rocket engines. The F&AL Team uses analytical methods, numerical simulations, and possible experimental tests at the Hampton University campus. We will present some management activity

  2. Hydrogen film cooling of a small hydrogen-oxygen thrust chamber and its effect on erosion rates of various ablative materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannum, N.; Roberts, W. E.; Russell, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine what arrangement of film-coolant-injection orifices should be used to decrease the erosion rates of small, high temperature, high pressure ablative thrust chambers without incurring a large penalty in combustion performance. All of the film cooling was supplied through holes in a ring between the outer row of injector elements and the chamber wall. The best arrangement, which had twice the number of holes as there were outer row injection elements, was also the simplest. The performance penalties, presented as a reduction in characteristic exhaust velocity efficiency, were 0.8 and 2.8 percentage points for the 10 and 20 percent cooling flows, respectively, The best film-coolant injector was then used to obtain erosion rates for 19 ablative materials. The throat erosion rate was reduced by a factor of 2.5 with a 10 percent coolant flow. Only the more expensive silica phenolic materials had low enough erosion rates to be considered for use in the nozzle throat. However, some of the cheaper materials might qualify for use in other areas of small nozzles with large throat diameters where the higher erosion rates are more acceptable.

  3. Advanced Methods for Aircraft Engine Thrust and Noise Benefits: Nozzle-Inlet Flow Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Morris H., III; Gilinsky, Mikhail M.

    2004-01-01

    In this project on the first stage (2000-Ol), we continued to develop the previous joint research between the Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics Laboratory (FM&AL) at Hampton University (HU) and the Jet Noise Team (JNT) at the NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC). At the second stage (2001-03), FM&AL team concentrated its efforts on solving of problems of interest to Glenn Research Center (NASA GRC), especially in the field of propulsion system enhancement. The NASA GRC R&D Directorate and LaRC Hyper-X Program specialists in a hypersonic technology jointly with the FM&AL staff conducted research on a wide region of problems in the propulsion field as well as in experimental testing and theoretical and numerical simulation analyses for advanced aircraft and rocket engines. The last year the Hampton University School of Engineering & Technology was awarded the NASA grant, for creation of the Aeropropulsion Center, and the FM&AL is a key team of the project fulfillment responsible for research in Aeropropulsion and Acoustics (Pillar I). This work is supported by joint research between the NASA GRC/ FM&AL and the Institute of Mechanics at Moscow State University (IMMSU) in Russia under a CRDF grant. The main areas of current scientific interest of the FM&AL include an investigation of the proposed and patented advanced methods for aircraft engine thrust and noise benefits. This is the main subject of our other projects, of which one is presented. The last year we concentrated our efforts to analyze three main problems: (a) new effective methods fuel injection into the flow stream in air-breathing engines; (b) new re-circulation method for mixing, heat transfer and combustion enhancement in propulsion systems and domestic industry application; (c) covexity flow The research is focused on a wide regime of problems in the propulsion field as well as in experimental testing and theoretical and numerical simulation analyses for advanced aircraft and rocket engines (see, for

  4. Altitude-chamber performance of British Rolls-Royce Nene II engine III : 18.00-inch-diameter jet nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grey, Ralph E; Brightwell, Virginia L; Barson, Zelmar; NACA

    1950-01-01

    An altitude-chamber investigation of British Rolls-Royce Nene II turbojet engine was conducted over range of altitudes from sea level to 65,000 feet and ram pressure ratios from 1.10 to 3.50, using an 18.00-inch-diameter jet nozzle. The 18.00-inch-diameter jet nozzle gave slightly lower values of net-thrust specific fuel consumption than either the 18.41- or the standard 18.75-inch-diameter jet nozzles at high flight speeds. At low flight speeds, the 18.41-inch-diameter jet nozzle gave the lowest value of net-thrust specific fuel consumption.

  5. Prediction of the Thrust Performance and the Flowfield of Liquid Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T.-S.

    1990-01-01

    In an effort to improve the current solutions in the design and analysis of liquid propulsive engines, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model capable of calculating the reacting flows from the combustion chamber, through the nozzle to the external plume, was developed. The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) fired at sea level, was investigated as a sample case. The CFD model, FDNS, is a pressure based, non-staggered grid, viscous/inviscid, ideal gas/real gas, reactive code. An adaptive upwinding differencing scheme is employed for the spatial discretization. The upwind scheme is based on fourth order central differencing with fourth order damping for smooth regions, and second order central differencing with second order damping for shock capturing. It is equipped with a CHMQGM equilibrium chemistry algorithm and a PARASOL finite rate chemistry algorithm using the point implicit method. The computed flow results and performance compared well with those of other standard codes and engine hot fire test data. In addition, the transient nozzle flowfield calculation was also performed to demonstrate the ability of FDNS in capturing the flow separation during the startup process.

  6. Control of geostationary spacecraft in orbital plane using a low thrust engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmin, Vadim V.; Chetverikov, Alexey S.

    2017-01-01

    The control algorithm for the parameters of the geostationary spacecraft orbit was developed using low-thrust engine. We consider only flat parameters determining the geostationary spacecraft's position in the orbit plane, namely, orbital period, eccentricity and longitude point of standing. The terminal control problem of geostationary spacecraft has been stated. It is assumed that the corrective maneuver is implemented by creating a small transversal acceleration using electric low-thruster. There is a developed discrete model of the geostationary spacecraft motion in the orbit plane under the influence of small transversal acceleration. The solution of this problem involving the use of the traditional dynamic programming method based on the use of Bellman equation is difficult to obtain, because the discrete model of geostationary spacecraft motion is a nonlinear system of equations. Therefore, the paper proposes approximate scheme for solving the problem based on the three-step algorithm of terminal control of the orbital period, eccentricity and longitude point of standing. The solution of the plane problem of the terminal control has been obtained in the analytical form. Analytical expressions for the cost estimate of characteristic speed of corrective maneuver have been obtained. When modeling the motion of a geostationary spacecraft under the influence of a small transversal acceleration the algorithm has showed high accuracy of solving the terminal control problem.

  7. Aircraft Control Using Engine Thrust: A History of Learning TOC Real-Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Jennifer H.; Batteas, Frank; Fullerton, Gordon

    2006-01-01

    A history of learning the operation of Throttles Only Control (TOC) to control an aircraft in real time using engine thrust is shown. The topics include: 1) Past TOC Accidents/Incidents; 2) 1972: DC-10 American Airlines; 3) May 1974: USAF B-52H; 4) April 1975: USAF C-5A; 5) April 1975: USAF C-5A; 6) 1981: USAF B-52G; 7) August 1985: JAL 123 B-747; 8) JAL 123 Survivor Story; 9) JAL 123 Investigation Findings; 10) July 1989: UAL 232 DC-10; 11) UAL 232 DC-10; 12) Eastwind 517 B-737; 13) November 2003: DHL A-300; 14) Historically, TOC has saved lives; 15) Automated Throttles-Only Control; 16) PCA Project; 17) Propulsion-Controlled Aircraft; 18) MD-11 PCA System and Flight Test Envelope; 19) MD-11 Simulation, PCA ILS-Soupled Landing Dispersion; 20) Throttles-Only Pitch and Roll Control Power; 21) PCA in Commercial Fleet; 22) Fall 2005: PCAR Project; 23) PCAR Background - TOC; and 24) PCAR Background - TOC.

  8. Conceptual Engine System Design for NERVA derived 66.7KN and 111.2KN Thrust Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    SciTech Connect

    Fittje, James E.; Buehrle, Robert J.

    2006-01-20

    The Nuclear Thermal Rocket concept is being evaluated as an advanced propulsion concept for missions to the moon and Mars. A tremendous effort was undertaken during the 1960's and 1970's to develop and test NERVA derived Nuclear Thermal Rockets in the 111.2 KN to 1112 KN pound thrust class. NASA GRC is leveraging this past NTR investment in their vehicle concepts and mission analysis studies, and has been evaluating NERVA derived engines in the 66.7 KN to the 111.2 KN thrust range. The liquid hydrogen propellant feed system, including the turbopumps, is an essential component of the overall operation of this system. The NASA GRC team is evaluating numerous propellant feed system designs with both single and twin turbopumps. The Nuclear Engine System Simulation code is being exercised to analyze thermodynamic cycle points for these selected concepts. This paper will present propellant feed system concepts and the corresponding thermodynamic cycle points for 66.7 KN and 111.2 KN thrust NTR engine systems. A pump out condition for a twin turbopump concept will also be evaluated, and the NESS code will be assessed against the Small Nuclear Rocket Engine preliminary thermodynamic data.

  9. Conceptual Engine System Design for NERVA derived 66.7KN and 111.2KN Thrust Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fittje, James E.; Buehrle, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    The Nuclear Thermal Rocket concept is being evaluated as an advanced propulsion concept for missions to the moon and Mars. A tremendous effort was undertaken during the 1960's and 1970's to develop and test NERVA derived Nuclear Thermal Rockets in the 111.2 KN to 1112 KN pound thrust class. NASA GRC is leveraging this past NTR investment in their vehicle concepts and mission analysis studies, and has been evaluating NERVA derived engines in the 66.7 KN to the 111.2 KN thrust range. The liquid hydrogen propellant feed system, including the turbopumps, is an essential component of the overall operation of this system. The NASA GRC team is evaluating numerous propellant feed system designs with both single and twin turbopumps. The Nuclear Engine System Simulation code is being exercised to analyze thermodynamic cycle points for these selected concepts. This paper will present propellant feed system concepts and the corresponding thermodynamic cycle points for 66.7 KN and 111.2 KN thrust NTR engine systems. A pump out condition for a twin turbopump concept will also be evaluated, and the NESS code will be assessed against the Small Nuclear Rocket Engine preliminary thermodynamic data.

  10. Analysis of jet-propulsion-engine combustion-chamber pressure losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkel, I Irving; Shames, Harold

    1947-01-01

    The development and the use of a chart for estimating the pressure losses in jet-engine combustion chambers are described. By means of the chart, the pressure losses due to fluid friction and to momentum changes in the air flow accompanying combustion can be separately evaluated. The pressure-loss chart is based on the assumption that the pressure losses in the actual combustion chamber can be matched by those of an equivalent combustion chamber of constant cross-sectional area. The concept of the equivalent combustion chamber serves as a convenient basis for comparing the pressure-loss characteristics of combustion chambers of a variety of designs. The over-all pressure losses computed from the pressure-loss chart are within 7 percent of the experimental values for the three types of combustion chambers considered herein.

  11. Evaluation of a simplified gross thrust calculation technique using two prototype F100 turbofan engines in an altitude facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtenbach, F. J.

    1979-01-01

    The technique which relies on afterburner duct pressure measurements and empirical corrections to an ideal one dimensional flow analysis to determine thrust is presented. A comparison of the calculated and facility measured thrust values is reported. The simplified model with the engine manufacturer's gas generator model are compared. The evaluation was conducted over a range of Mach numbers from 0.80 to 2.00 and at altitudes from 4020 meters to 15,240 meters. The effects of variations in inlet total temperature from standard day conditions were explored. Engine conditions were varied from those normally scheduled for flight. The technique was found to be accurate to a twice standard deviation of 2.89 percent, with accuracy a strong function of afterburner duct pressure difference.

  12. Optical Power Source Derived from Engine Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An optical power source is disclosed that collects the spectra of the light emissions created in a combustion chamber to provide its optical output signals that serve the needs of optical networks. The light spectra is collected by a collection ring serving as an optical waveguide.

  13. Effect of thrust on the aeroelastic instability of a composite swept wing with two engines in subsonic compressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouz-Abadi, R. D.; Askarian, A. R.; Zarifian, P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate aeroelastic stability boundary of subsonic wings under the effect of thrust of two engines. The wing structure is modeled as a tapered composite box-beam. Moreover, an indicial function based model is used to calculate the unsteady lift and moment distribution along the wing span in subsonic compressible flow. The two jet engines mounted on the wing are modeled as concentrated masses and the effect of thrust of each engine is applied as a follower force. Using Hamilton's principle along with Galerkin's method, the governing equations of motion are derived, then the obtained equations are solved in frequency domain using the K-method and the aeroelastic instability conditions are determined. The flutter analysis results of four example wings are compared with the experimental and analytical results in the literature and good agreements are achieved which validate the present model. Furthermore, based on several case studies on a reference wing, some attempts are performed to analyze the effect of thrust on the stability margin of the wing and some conclusions are outlined.

  14. Advanced Methods for Aircraft Engine Thrust and Noise Benefits: Nozzle-Inlet Flow Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilinsky, Mikhail; Morgan, Morris H.; Povitsky, Alex; Schkolnikov, Natalia; Njoroge, Norman; Coston, Calvin; Blankson, Isaiah M.

    2001-01-01

    The Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics Laboratory at Hampton University (HU/FM&AL) jointly with the NASA Glenn Research Center has conducted four connected subprojects under the reporting project. Basically, the HU/FM&AL Team has been involved in joint research with the purpose of theoretical explanation of experimental facts and creation of accurate numerical simulation techniques and prediction theory for solution of current problems in propulsion systems of interest to the NAVY and NASA agencies. This work is also supported by joint research between the NASA GRC and the Institute of Mechanics at Moscow State University (IM/MSU) in Russia under a CRDF grant. The research is focused on a wide regime of problems in the propulsion field as well as in experimental testing and theoretical and numerical simulation analyses for advanced aircraft and rocket engines. The FM&AL Team uses analytical methods, numerical simulations and possible experimental tests at the Hampton University campus. The fundamental idea uniting these subprojects is to use nontraditional 3D corrugated and composite nozzle and inlet designs and additional methods for exhaust jet noise reduction without essential thrust loss and even with thrust augmentation. These subprojects are: (1) Aeroperformance and acoustics of Bluebell-shaped and Telescope-shaped designs; (2) An analysis of sharp-edged nozzle exit designs for effective fuel injection into the flow stream in air-breathing engines: triangular-round, diamond-round and other nozzles; (3) Measurement technique improvement for the HU Low Speed Wind Tunnel; a new course in the field of aerodynamics, teaching and training of HU students; experimental tests of Mobius-shaped screws: research and training; (4) Supersonic inlet shape optimization. The main outcomes during this reporting period are: (l) Publications: The AIAA Paper #00-3170 was presented at the 36th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference, 17-19 June, 2000, Huntsville, AL. The AIAA

  15. Advanced Methods for Aircraft Engine Thrust and Noise Benefits: Nozzle-Inlet Flow Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilinsky, Mikhail; Morgan, Morris H.; Povitsky, Alex; Schkolnikov, Natalia; Njoroge, Norman; Coston, Calvin; Blankson, Isaiah M.

    2001-01-01

    The Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics Laboratory at Hampton University (HU/FM&AL) jointly with the NASA Glenn Research Center has conducted four connected subprojects under the reporting project. Basically, the HU/FM&AL Team has been involved in joint research with the purpose of theoretical explanation of experimental facts and creation of accurate numerical simulation techniques and prediction theory for solution of current problems in propulsion systems of interest to the NAVY and NASA agencies. This work is also supported by joint research between the NASA GRC and the Institute of Mechanics at Moscow State University (IM/MSU) in Russia under a CRDF grant. The research is focused on a wide regime of problems in the propulsion field as well as in experimental testing and theoretical and numerical simulation analyses for advanced aircraft and rocket engines. The FM&AL Team uses analytical methods, numerical simulations and possible experimental tests at the Hampton University campus. The fundamental idea uniting these subprojects is to use nontraditional 3D corrugated and composite nozzle and inlet designs and additional methods for exhaust jet noise reduction without essential thrust loss and even with thrust augmentation. These subprojects are: (1) Aeroperformance and acoustics of Bluebell-shaped and Telescope-shaped designs; (2) An analysis of sharp-edged nozzle exit designs for effective fuel injection into the flow stream in air-breathing engines: triangular-round, diamond-round and other nozzles; (3) Measurement technique improvement for the HU Low Speed Wind Tunnel; a new course in the field of aerodynamics, teaching and training of HU students; experimental tests of Mobius-shaped screws: research and training; (4) Supersonic inlet shape optimization. The main outcomes during this reporting period are: (l) Publications: The AIAA Paper #00-3170 was presented at the 36th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference, 17-19 June, 2000, Huntsville, AL. The AIAA

  16. Aircraft Thrust/Power Management can Save Defense Fuel, Reduce Engine Maintenance Costs, and Improve Readiness.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-29

    reduce maintenance costs. Iii’ (See p. 8.) - I The services also lack effective thrust/power coPv management programs. Thrust/power management...variances to determine the causes and take corrective action if warranted. 14 The Navy established a research and development activity at the Naval Air...stated that while funding is avail- able to conduct research , implementation of the most costly ideas must compete with other priorities for limited

  17. Charged particle measurements on a 30-CM diameter mercury ion engine thrust beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.; Komatsu, G. K.; Hoffmaster, D. K.; Kemp, R. F.

    1974-01-01

    Measurements of both thrust ions and charge exchange ions were made in the beam of a 30 centimeter diameter electron bombardment mercury ion thruster. A qualitative model is presented which describes magnitudes of charge exchange ion formation and motions of these ions in the weak electric field structure of the neutralized thrust beam plasma. Areas of agreement and discrepancy between observed and modeled charge exchange properties are discussed.

  18. Liquid-hydrogen rocket engine development at Aerojet, 1944 - 1950

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, G. H.; Gordon, R.; Coplen, H. L.; James, G. S.

    1977-01-01

    This program demonstrated the feasibility of virtually all the components in present-day, high-energy, liquid-rocket engines. Transpiration and film-cooled thrust chambers were successfully operated. The first liquid-hydrogen tests of the coaxial injector was conducted and the first pump to successfully produce high pressures in pumping liquid hydrogen was tested. A 1,000-lb-thrust gaseous propellant and a 3,000-lb-thrust liquid-propellant thrust chamber were operated satisfactorily. Also, the first tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of jet overexpansion and separation on performance of rocket thrust chambers with hydrogen-oxygen propellants.

  19. Self-synthesized extracellular matrix contributes to mature adipose tissue regeneration in a tissue engineering chamber.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Weiqing; Chang, Qiang; Xiao, Xiaolian; Dong, Ziqing; Zeng, Zhaowei; Gao, Jianhua; Lu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The development of an engineered adipose tissue substitute capable of supporting reliable, predictable, and complete fat tissue regeneration would be of value in plastic and reconstructive surgery. For adipogenesis, a tissue engineering chamber provides an optimized microenvironment that is both efficacious and reproducible; however, for reasons that remain unclear, tissues regenerated in a tissue engineering chamber consist mostly of connective rather than adipose tissue. Here, we describe a chamber-based system for improving the yield of mature adipose tissue and discuss the potential mechanism of adipogenesis in tissue-chamber models. Adipose tissue flaps with independent vascular pedicles placed in chambers were implanted into rabbits. Adipose volume increased significantly during the observation period (week 1, 2, 3, 4, 16). Histomorphometry revealed mature adipose tissue with signs of adipose tissue remolding. The induced engineered constructs showed high-level expression of adipogenic (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ), chemotactic (stromal cell-derived factor 1a), and inflammatory (interleukin 1 and 6) genes. In our system, the extracellular matrix may have served as a scaffold for cell migration and proliferation, allowing mature adipose tissue to be obtained in a chamber microenvironment without the need for an exogenous scaffold. Our results provide new insights into key elements involved in the early development of adipose tissue regeneration.

  20. Development and test of combustion chamber for Stirling engine heated by natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tie; Song, Xiange; Gui, Xiaohong; Tang, Dawei; Li, Zhigang; Cao, Wenyu

    2014-04-01

    The combustion chamber is an important component for the Stirling engine heated by natural gas. In the paper, we develop a combustion chamber for the Stirling engine which aims to generate 3˜5 kWe electric power. The combustion chamber includes three main components: combustion module, heat exchange cavity and thermal head. Its feature is that the structure can divide "combustion" process and "heat transfer" process into two apparent individual steps and make them happen one by one. Since natural gas can mix with air fully before burning, the combustion process can be easily completed without the second wind. The flame can avoid contacting the thermal head of Stirling engine, and the temperature fields can be easily controlled. The designed combustion chamber is manufactured and its performance is tested by an experiment which includes two steps. The experimental result of the first step proves that the mixture of air and natural gas can be easily ignited and the flame burns stably. In the second step of experiment, the combustion heat flux can reach 20 kW, and the energy utilization efficiency of thermal head has exceeded 0.5. These test results show that the thermal performance of combustion chamber has reached the design goal. The designed combustion chamber can be applied to a real Stirling engine heated by natural gas which is to generate 3˜5 kWe electric power.

  1. Convert Ten Foot Environmental Test Chamber into an Ion Engine Test Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanVelzer, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The 10 Foot Space Simulator at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory has been used for the last 40 years to test numerous spacecraft, including the Ranger series, several Mariner class, among many others and finally, the Spirit and Opportunity Mars Rovers. The request was made to convert this facility to an Ion Engine test facility, with a possible long term life test. The Ion engine was to propel the Prometheus spacecraft to Jupiter's moons. This paper discusses the challenges that were met, both from a procedural and physical standpoint. The converted facility must operate unattended, support a 30 Kw Ion Engine, operate economically, and be easily converted back to former operation as a spacecraft test facility.

  2. Convert Ten Foot Environmental Test Chamber into an Ion Engine Test Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanVelzer, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The 10 Foot Space Simulator at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory has been used for the last 40 years to test numerous spacecraft, including the Ranger series, several Mariner class, among many others and finally, the Spirit and Opportunity Mars Rovers. The request was made to convert this facility to an Ion Engine test facility, with a possible long term life test. The Ion engine was to propel the Prometheus spacecraft to Jupiter's moons. This paper discusses the challenges that were met, both from a procedural and physical standpoint. The converted facility must operate unattended, support a 30 Kw Ion Engine, operate economically, and be easily converted back to former operation as a spacecraft test facility.

  3. Aerodynamics of thrust vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, J. B.; Lan, C. Edward

    1989-01-01

    Thrust vectoring as a means to enhance maneuverability and aerodynamic performane of a tactical aircraft is discussed. This concept usually involves the installation of a multifunction nozzle. With the nozzle, the engine thrust can be changed in direction without changing the attitude of the aircraft. Change in the direction of thrust induces a significant change in the aerodynamic forces on the aircraft. Therefore, this device can be used for lift-augmenting as well as stability and control purposes. When the thrust is deflected in the longitudinal direction, the lift force and the pitching stability can be manipulated, while the yawing stability can be controlled by directing the thrust in the lateral direction.

  4. Analysis of reacting flowfields in low-thrust rocket engines and plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Jonathan Mitchell

    The mixing and combustion processes in small gaseous hydrogen-oxygen thrusters and plumes are studied by means of a computational model developed as a general purpose analytic procedure for solving low speed, reacting, internal flowfields. The model includes the full Navier-Stokes equations coupled with species diffusion equations for a hydrogen-oxygen reaction kinetics system as well as the option to use either the k-Epsilon or q-Omega low Reynolds number, two-equation turbulence models. Solution of the governing equations is accomplished by a finite-volume formulation with central-difference spatial discretizations and an explicit, four-stage, Runge Kutta time-integration procedure. The Runge-Kutta scheme appears to provide efficient convergence when applied to the calculation of turbulent, reacting flowfields in these small thrusters. Appropriate boundary conditions are developed to properly model propellant mass flowrates and regenerative wall cooling. The computational method is validated against measured engine performance parameters on a global level, as well as experimentally obtained exit plane and plume flowfield properties on a local level. The model does an excellent job of predicting the measured performance trends of an auxiliary thruster as a function of O/F ratio, although the performance levels are consistently underpredicted by approximately 4 percent. These differences arise because the extent to which the wall coolant layer and combustion gases mix and react is underpredicted. Predictions of velocity components, temperature and species number densities in the near-field plume regions of several low-thrust engines show reasonable agreement with experimental data obtained by two separate laser diagnostic techniques. Discrepancies between the predictions and measurements are primarily due to three-dimensional mixing processes which are not accounted for in the analysis. Both comparisons with experiment and the evident reason for errors in absolute

  5. Characterization of Low-Frequency Combustion Stability of the Fastrac Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocker, Marvin; Jones, Preston (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to measure the combustion performance of the Fastrac engine thrust chamber. During mainstage, the thrust chamber exhibited no large-amplitude chamber pressure oscillations that could be identified as low-frequency combustion instability or 'chug'. However, during start-up and shutdown, the thrust chamber very briefly exhibited large-amplitude chamber pressure oscillations that were identified as chug. These instabilities during start-up and shutdown were regarded as benign due to their brevity. Linear models of the thrust chamber and the propellant feed systems were formulated for both the thrust chamber component tests and the flight engine tests. These linear models determined the frequency and decay rate of chamber pressure oscillations given the design and operating conditions of the thrust chamber and feed system. The frequency of chamber pressure oscillations determined from the model closely matched the frequency of low-amplitude, low-frequency chamber pressure oscillations exhibited in some of the later thrust chamber mainstage tests. The decay rate of the chamber pressure oscillations determined from the models indicated that these low-frequency oscillations were stable. Likewise, the decay rate, determined from the model of the flight engine tests indicated that the low-frequency chamber pressure oscillations would be stable.

  6. Investigation of Ignition and Combustion Processes of Diesel Engines Operating with Turbulence and Air-storage Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Hans

    1938-01-01

    The flame photographs obtained with combustion-chamber models of engines operating respectively, with turbulence chamber and air-storage chambers or cells, provide an insight into the air and fuel movements that take place before and during combustion in the combustion chamber. The relation between air velocity, start of injection, and time of combustion was determined for the combustion process employing a turbulence chamber.

  7. Dynamic control of SRB thrust tailoff for separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, W. W.

    1976-01-01

    The use of the difference in chamber pressure between solid rocket booster engines as a controlling signal to the flight control system during booster thrust tailoff was examined. In addition, the control capability of the Generalized Attitude Control System (GACS) was compared to that of the baseline. Results indicate that the difference in chamber pressure signal provided essentially no improvement. However, the GACS is considerably better than the baseline in controlling during tailoff disturbances.

  8. Semi-active engine mount design using auxiliary magneto-rheological fluid compliance chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, H.; Arzanpour, S.; Golnaraghi, M. F.; Parameswaran, A. M.

    2011-03-01

    Engine mounts are used in the automotive industry to isolate engine and chassis by reducing the noise and vibration imposed from one to the other. This paper describes modelling, simulation and design of a semi-active engine mount that is designed specifically to address the complicated vibration pattern of variable displacement engines (VDE). The ideal isolation for VDE requires the stiffness to be switchable upon cylinder activation/deactivation operating modes. In order to have a modular design, the same hydraulic engine mount components are maintained and a novel auxiliary magneto-rheological (MR) fluid chamber is developed and retrofitted inside the pumping chamber. The new compliance chamber is a controllable pressure regulator, which can effectively alter the dynamic performance of the mount. Switching between different modes happens by turning the electrical current to the MR chamber magnetic coil on and off. A model has been developed for the passive hydraulic mount and then it is extended to include the MR auxiliary chamber as well. A proof-of-concept prototype of the design has been fabricated which validates the mathematical model. The results demonstrate unique capability of the developed semi-active mount to be used for VDE application.

  9. Development and Flight Test of an Emergency Flight Control System Using Only Engine Thrust on an MD-11 Transport Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Burken, John J.; Maine, Trindel A.; Fullerton, C. Gordon

    1997-01-01

    An emergency flight control system that uses only engine thrust, called the propulsion-controlled aircraft (PCA) system, was developed and flight tested on an MD-11 airplane. The PCA system is a thrust-only control system, which augments pilot flightpath and track commands with aircraft feedback parameters to control engine thrust. The PCA system was implemented on the MD-11 airplane using only software modifications to existing computers. Results of a 25-hr flight test show that the PCA system can be used to fly to an airport and safely land a transport airplane with an inoperative flight control system. In up-and-away operation, the PCA system served as an acceptable autopilot capable of extended flight over a range of speeds, altitudes, and configurations. PCA approaches, go-arounds, and three landings without the use of any normal flight controls were demonstrated, including ILS-coupled hands-off landings. PCA operation was used to recover from an upset condition. The PCA system was also tested at altitude with all three hydraulic systems turned off. This paper reviews the principles of throttles-only flight control, a history of accidents or incidents in which some or all flight controls were lost, the MD-11 airplane and its systems, PCA system development, operation, flight testing, and pilot comments.

  10. An experimental setup for the study of the steady air flow in a diesel engine chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Joaquín; José Vega, Emilio; Castilla, Alejandro; Marcos, Alberto; María Montanero, José; Barrio, Raúl

    2012-04-01

    We present an experimental setup for studying the steady air flow in a diesel engine chamber. An engine block containing the inlet manifold was placed on a test bench. A steady air stream crossed the inlet manifold and entered a glass chamber driven by a fan. A PIV system was set up around the bench to measure the in-chamber flow. An air spray gun was used as seed generator to producing sub-millimeter droplets, easily dragged by the air stream. Images of the in-flow chamber were acquired in the course of the experiments, and processed to measure the velocity field. The pressure drop driven the air current and the mass flow rate were also measured.

  11. Integrated Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, J F; Kramer, K J; Abbott, R P; Morris, K R; DeMuth, J; Divol, L; El-Dasher, B; Lafuente, A; Loosmore, G; Reyes, S; Moses, G A; Fratoni, M; Flowers, D; Aceves, S; Rhodes, M; Kane, J; Scott, H; Kramer, R; Pantano, C; Scullard, C; Sawicki, R; Wilks, S; Mehl, M

    2010-12-07

    The Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) concept is being designed to operate as either a pure fusion or hybrid fusion-fission system. A key component of a LIFE engine is the fusion chamber subsystem. The present work details the chamber design for the pure fusion option. The fusion chamber consists of the first wall and blanket. This integrated system must absorb the fusion energy, produce fusion fuel to replace that burned in previous targets, and enable both target and laser beam transport to the ignition point. The chamber system also must mitigate target emissions, including ions, x-rays and neutrons and reset itself to enable operation at 10-15 Hz. Finally, the chamber must offer a high level of availability, which implies both a reasonable lifetime and the ability to rapidly replace damaged components. An integrated LIFE design that meets all of these requirements is described herein.

  12. Biopropellant Engine Plume Contamination Program. Volume 1. Chamber Measurements. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    vacuum cryogenic chamber (Aerospace Chamber 10V) at AEDC. Gaseous helium and liquid helium cryopanels provided a blank-off pressure DD FORM I JAN...Plate ........................................... 91 32. Transmission of A TR Plate Exposed to 88 sec of Engine Operation ............... 92 33. Liquid ...solid, liquid or electric, is of considerable concern to the spacecraft design community. This concern is attributed to the development of more

  13. NASA Orbit Transfer Rocket Engine Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The advanced expander cycle engine with a 15,000 lb thrust level and a 6:1 mixture ratio and optimized performance was used as the baseline for a design study of the hydrogen/oxgyen propulsion system for the orbit transfer vehicle. The critical components of this engine are the thrust chamber, the turbomachinery, the extendible nozzle system, and the engine throttling system. Turbomachinery technology is examined for gears, bearing, seals, and rapid solidification rate turbopump shafts. Continuous throttling concepts are discussed. Components of the OTV engine described include the thrust chamber/nozzle assembly design, nozzles, the hydrogen regenerator, the gaseous oxygen heat exchanger, turbopumps, and the engine control valves.

  14. Polycaprolactone nanofibrous mesh reduces foreign body reaction and induces adipose flap expansion in tissue engineering chamber

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Lin; He, Yunfan; Chang, Qiang; Xie, Gan; Zhan, Weiqing; Wang, Xuecen; Zhou, Tao; Xing, Malcolm; Lu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering chamber technique can be used to generate engineered adipose tissue, showing the potential for the reconstruction of soft tissue defects. However, the consequent foreign body reaction induced by the exogenous chamber implantation causes thick capsule formation on the surface of the adipose flap following capsule contracture, which may limit the internal tissue expansion. The nanotopographical property and architecture of nanofibrous scaffold may serve as a promising method for minimizing the foreign body reaction. Accordingly, electrospinning porous polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibrous mesh, a biocompatible synthetic polymer, was attached to the internal surface of the chamber for the reducing local foreign body reaction. Adipose flap volume, level of inflammation, collagen quantification, capsule thickness, and adipose tissue-specific gene expression in chamber after implantation were evaluated at different time points. The in vivo study revealed that the engineered adipose flaps in the PCL group had a structure similar to that in the controls and normal adipose tissue structure but with a larger flap volume. Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and transforming growth factor-β expression decreased significantly in the PCL group compared with the control. Moreover, the control group had much more collagen deposition and thicker capsule than that observed in the PCL group. These results indicate that the unique nanotopographical effect of electrospinning PCL nanofiber can reduce foreign body reaction in a tissue engineering chamber, which maybe a promising new method for generating a larger volume of mature, vascularized, and stable adipose tissue. PMID:27980405

  15. Retention of Sputtered Molybdenum on Ion Engine Discharge Chamber Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Dever, Joyce A.; Power, John L.

    2001-01-01

    Grit-blasted anode surfaces are commonly used in ion engines to ensure adherence of sputtered coatings. Next generation ion engines will require higher power levels, longer operating times, and thus there will likely be thicker sputtered coatings on their anode surfaces than observed to date on 2.3 kW-class xenon ion engines. The thickness of coatings on the anode of a 10 kW, 40-centimeter diameter thruster, for example, may be 22 micrometers or more after extended operation. Grit-blasted wire mesh, titanium, and aluminum coupons were coated with molybdenum at accelerated rates to establish coating stability after the deposition process and after thermal cycling tests. These accelerated deposition rates are roughly three orders of magnitude more rapid than the rates at which the screen grid is sputtered in a 2.3 kW-class, 30-centimeter diameter ion engine. Using both RF and DC sputtering processes, the molybdenum coating thicknesses ranged from 8 to 130 micrometers, and deposition rates from 1.8 micrometers per hour to 5.1 micrometers per hour. In all cases, the molybdenum coatings were stable after the deposition process, and there was no evidence of spalling of the coatings after 20 cycles from about -60 to +320 C. The stable, 130 micrometer molybdenum coating on wire mesh is 26 times thicker than the thickest coating found on the anode of a 2.3 kW, xenon ion engine that was tested for 8200 hr. Additionally, this coating on wire mesh coupon is estimated to be a factor of greater than 4 thicker than one would expect to obtain on the anode of the next generation ion engine which may have xenon throughputs as high as 550 kg.

  16. Combustion-chamber Performance Characteristics of a Python Turbine-propeller Engine Investigated in Altitude Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Carl E

    1951-01-01

    Combustion-chamber performance characteristics of a Python turbine-propeller engine were determined from investigation of a complete engine over a range of engine speeds and shaft horsepowers at simulated altitudes. Results indicated the effect of engine operating conditions and altitude on combustion efficiency and combustion-chamber total pressure losses. Performance of this vaporizing type combustion chamber was also compared with several atomizing type combustion chambers. Over the range of test conditions investigated, combustion efficiency varied from approximately 0.95 to 0.99.

  17. Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of a 3000-Pound-Thrust Axial-Flow Turbojet Engine. 6; Analysis of Effects of Inlet Pressure Losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Newell D.; Palasics, John

    1948-01-01

    The losses in the inlet air ducts, the diffusers, and the de-icing equipment associated with turbojet engine installations cause a reduction in the total pressure at the inlet of the engine and result in reduced thrust and increased specific fuel consumption. An analytical evaluation of the effects of inlet losses on the net thrust and the fuel economy of a 3000-pound-thrust axial flow turbojet engine with a two-stage turbine is presented. The analysis is based on engine performance characteristics that were determined from experiments in the NACA Cleveland altitude wind tunnel. The experimental investigation did not include tests in which inlet losses were systematically varied, but the effects of these losses can be accurately estimated from the experimentally determined performance characteristics of the engine.

  18. Design, analysis, and control of large transport aircraft utilizing engine thrust as a backup system for the primary flight controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerren, Donna S.

    1993-01-01

    A review of accidents that involved the loss of hydraulic flight control systems serves as an introduction to this project. In each of the accidents--involving transport aircraft such as the DC-10, the C-5A, the L-1011, and the Boeing 747--the flight crew attempted to control the aircraft by means of thrust control. Although these incidents had tragic endings, in the absence of control power due to primary control system failure, control power generated by selective application of engine thrust has proven to be a viable alternative. NASA Dryden has demonstrated the feasibility of controlling an aircraft during level flight, approach, and landing conditions using an augmented throttles-only control system. This system has been successfully flown in the flight test simulator for the B-720 passenger transport and the F-15 air superiority fighter and in actual flight tests for the F-15 aircraft. The Douglas Aircraft Company is developing a similar system for the MD-11 aircraft. The project's ultimate goal is to provide data for the development of thrust control systems for mega-transports (600+ passengers).

  19. Thrust-induced effects on subsonic longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a vectored-engine-over-wing configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinto, P. F.; Paulson, J. W., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 4 by 7 Meter Tunnel of the thrust induced effects on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a vectored-engine-over-wing fighter aircraft. The investigation was conducted at Mach numbers from 0.14 to 0.17 over an angle-of-attack range from -2 deg to 26 deg. The major model variables were the spanwise blowing nozzle sweep angle and main nozzle vector angle along with trailing edge, flap deflections. The overall thrust coefficient (main and spanwise nozzles) was varied from 0 (jet off) to 2.0. The results indicate that the thrust-induced effects from the main nozzle alone were small and mainly due to boundary-layer control affecting a small area behind the nozzle. When the spanwise blowing nozzles were included, the induced effects were larger than the main nozzle alone and were due to both boundary layer control and induced circulation lift. No leading edge vortex effects were evident.

  20. Rotating and positive-displacement pumps for low-thrust rocket engines. Volume 2: Fabrication and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csomor, A.

    1974-01-01

    Rotating and positive displacement pumps of various types were studied for pumping liquid fluorine for low thrust high performance rocket engines. Included in the analysis were: centrifugal, pitot, Barske, Tesla, drag, gear, vane, axial piston, radial piston, diaphragm and helirotor pump concepts. The centrifugal and gear pumps were carried through detail design and fabrication. After preliminary testing in Freon 12, the centrifugal pump was selected for further testing and development. It was tested in Freon 12 to obtain the hydrodynamic performance. Tests were also conducted in liquid fluorine to demonstrate chemical compatibility.

  1. Evaluation of Impinging Stream Vortex Chamber Concepts for Liquid Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu; Kopicz, Charles; Bullard, Brad; Michaels, Scott

    2003-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the U. S. Army are jointly investigating vortex chamber concepts for cryogenic oxygen/hydrocarbon fuel rocket engine applications. One concept, the Impinging Stream Vortex Chamber Concept (ISVC), has been tested with gel propellants at AMCOM at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. A version of this concept for the liquid oxygen (LOX)/hydrocarbon fuel (RP-1) propellant system is derived from the one for the gel propellant. An unlike impinging injector is employed to deliver the propellants to the chamber. MSFC has also designed two alternative injection schemes, called the chasing injectors, associated with this vortex chamber concept. In these injection techniques, both propellant jets and their impingement point are in the same chamber cross-sectional plane. One injector has a similar orifice size with the original unlike impinging injector. The second chasing injector has small injection orifices. The team has achieved their objectives of demonstrating the self-cooled chamber wall benefits of ISVC and of providing the test data for validating computational fluids dynamics (CFD) models. These models, in turn, will be used to design the optimum vortex chambers in the future.

  2. Thrust Chamber Material Technology Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    Ag (Cr, CuH, As) Cu-TI-SI (TIsi,) Cu Hf-Ag (CUHf. A#) Cu-Zr-si WINS1, Cu-TIf-Ag ( CuTi , Ag) ou-Y-Sl (YSI,) Cu-TI-Hf ( CuTI , CuSHI) Lo.wMkematch Compowrd...strain locations were determined using a three. dimensional (3.D) elastic -plastio MARC analysis. MARC is a general purpose finite element analysis... elastic -plastic analysis. Stress-strain behavior was approximated using o piecewise linear (tangent stiffness) approach. An initial elastic solution was

  3. Heat transfer in rocket engine combustion chambers and nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, P. G.; Chen, Y. S.; Farmer, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    The complexities of liquid rocket engine heat transfer which involve the injector faceplate and regeneratively and film cooled walls are being investigated by computational analysis. A conjugate heat transfer analysis will be used to describe localized heating phenomena associated with particular injector configurations and coolant channels and film coolant dumps. These components are being analyzed, and the analysis verified with appropriate test data. Finally, the component analysis will be synthesized into an overall flowfield/heat transfer model. The FDNS code is being used to make the component analyses. Particular attention is being given to the representation of the thermodynamic properties of the fluid streams and to the method of combining the detailed models to represent overall heating. Unit flow models of specific coaxial injector elements have been developed and will be described. Film cooling simulations of film coolant flows typical of the subscale Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) being experimentally studied by Pratt and Whitney have been made, and these results will be presented. Other film coolant experiments have also been simulated to verify the CFD heat transfer model being developed. The status of the study and its relevance as a new design tool are covered. Information is given in viewgraph form.

  4. Effects of an in-flight thrust reverser on the stability and control characteristics of a single-engine fighter airplane model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, C. E.; Maiden, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    The changes in thrust minus drag performance as well as longitudinal and directional stability and control characteristics of a single-engine jet aircraft attributable to an in-flight thrust reverser of the blocker-deflector door type were investigated in a 16-foot transonic wind tunnel. The longitudinal and directional stability data are presented. Test conditions simulated landing approach conditions as well as high speed maneuvering such as may be required for combat or steep descent from high altitude.

  5. Effect of Target-type Thrust Reverser on Transonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Single-engine Fighter Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swihert, John M

    1958-01-01

    A brief investigation of a target-type thrust reverser on a single-engine fighter model has been conducted in the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel at Mach numbers from 0.20 to 1.05.At Mach numbers of 0.80, 0.92, and 1.05, a hydrogen peroxide turbojet-engine simulator was operated with the thrust reverser extended. The angle of attack was varied from 0 degrees to 5 degrees at these Mach numbers. The Reynolds number of the free stream, based on the mean aerodynamic chord, was about 5 x 10(6). It was estimated that reversed jet operations separated the model boundary-layer flow over the upper surface of the horizontal tail and upper part of the afterbody. This resulted in a positive pitch increment due to reversed jet operation. Jet-on operation also tended to stabilize the severe lateral oscillations which occurred with the reverser extended and the jet off. It appeared that these jet-off oscillations were the result of an alternating separation and reattachment of the flow on the rearmost portions of the fuselage afterbody.

  6. Thrust Augmentation of a Turbojet Engine at Simulated Flight Conditions by Introduction of a Water-Alcohol Mixture into the Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Useller, James W.; Auble, Carmon M.; Harvey, Ray W., Sr.

    1952-01-01

    An investigation was conducted at simulated high-altitude flight conditions to evaluate the use of compressor evaporative cooling as a means of turbojet-engine thrust augmentation. Comparison of the performance of the engine with water-alcohol injection at the compressor inlet, at the sixth stage of the compressor, and at the sixth and ninth stages was made. From consideration of the thrust increases achieved, the interstage injection of the coolant was considered more desirable preferred over the combined sixth- and ninth-stage injection because of its relative simplicity. A maximum augmented net-thrust ratio of 1.106 and a maximum augmented jet-thrust ratio of 1.062 were obtained at an augmented liquid ratio of 2.98 and an engine-inlet temperature of 80 F. At lower inlet temperatures (-40 to 40 F), the maximum augmented net-thrust ratios ranged from 1.040 to 1.076 and the maximum augmented jet-thrust ratios ranged from 1.027 to 1.048, depending upon the inlet temperature. The relatively small increase in performance at the lower inlet-air temperatures can be partially attributed to the inadequate evaporation of the water-alcohol mixture, but the more significant limitation was believed to be caused by the negative influence of the liquid coolant on engine- component performance. In general, it is concluded that the effectiveness of the injection of a coolant into the compressor as a means of thrust augmentation is considerably influenced by the design characteristics of the components of the engine being used.

  7. Advances in tissue engineering; a novel technology making use of an in vivo vascularized chamber.

    PubMed

    Debels, H

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative therapies aim to repair or replace damaged tissues. Clinical applications may vary from organ replacement, to breast reconstruction or limb regeneration. In growing 3-dimensional tissue constructs, access to a nourishing vascular network is essential. In rats, an arteriovenous loop was surgically established from the femoral vessels and positioned inside a perforated chamber in the groin. Chambers were filled with 2 ml Adipogel, a novel acellular tissue engineering gel -containing growth factors and polymers. Constructs were harvested at 6 and 12 weeks (n=6) and assessed for volume and histological content. The chambers filled with tissue to about half of their content. Histological assessment showed growth of different tissue types within the chamber; not only had a vascular network grown throughout the construct by 12 weeks, adipose, muscular and connective tissue was abundantly present as well. The grown tissue-types seemed to resemble surrounding groin tissue. This in vivo study makes use of a novel technology for tissue generation. In a surgically established vascularized chamber, spontaneous tissue growth within an acellular gel was achieved. Most likely, stem cells residing in adjacent tissues were driven to the chamber to form new tissue. With this technology, hope rises for a variety of novel patient-tailored therapies, such as organ regeneration or soft tissue repair. In all of these strategies, the surgeon is playing an essential role. Copyright© Acta Chirurgica Belgica.

  8. Design of a prototype Advanced Main Combustion Chamber for the Space Shuttle Main Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackey, J. D.; Myers, W. N.

    1992-07-01

    Development of a prototype advanced main combustion chamber is underway at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The Advanced Main Combustion Chamber (AMCC) project is being approached utilizing a 'concurrent engineering' concept where groups from materials, manufacturing, stress, quality, and design are involved from the initiation of the project. The AMCC design has been tailored to be compatible with the investment casting process. Jacket, inlet/outlet manifolds, inlet/outlet neck coolant flow splitters, support ribs, actuator lugs, and engine controller mounting bracket will all be a part of the one-piece AMCC casting. Casting of the AMCC in a one-piece configuration necessitated a method of forming a liner in its structural jacket. A method of vacuum plasma spraying the liner is being developed. In 1994, the AMCC will be hot-fired on the Technology Test Bed Space Shuttle Main Engine.

  9. Combustion Dynamics and Stability Modeling of a Liquid Oxygen/RP-2 Oxygen-Rich Staged Combustion Preburner and Thrust Chamber Assembly with Gas-Centered Swirl Coaxial Injector Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casiano, M. J.; Kenny, R. J.; Protz, C. S.; Garcia, C. P.; Simpson, S. P.; Elmore, J. L.; Fischbach, S. R.; Giacomoni, C. B.; Hulka, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Combustion Stability Tool Development (CSTD) project, funded by the Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center, began in March 2015 supporting a renewed interest in the development of a liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon, oxygen-rich combustion engine. The project encompasses the design, assembly, and hot-fire testing of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center 40-klbf Integrated Test Rig (MITR). The test rig models a staged-combustion configuration by combining an oxygen-rich preburner (ORPB), to generate hot gas, with a thrust chamber assembly (TCA) using gas-centered swirl coaxial injector elements. There are five separately designed interchangeable injectors in the TCA that each contain 19- or 27- injector elements. A companion paper in this JANNAF conference describes the design characteristics, rationale, and fabrication issues for all the injectors. The data acquired from a heavily instrumented rig encompasses several injectors, several operating points, and stability bomb tests. Another companion paper in this JANNAF conference describes this test program in detail. In this paper, dynamic data from the hot-fire testing is characterized and used to identify the responses in the ORPB and TCA. A brief review of damping metrics are discussed and applied as a measure of stability margin for damped acoustic modes. Chug and longitudinal combustion stability models and predictions are described which includes new dynamic models for compressible flow through an orifice and a modification to incorporate a third feed line for inclusion of the fuel-film coolant. Flow-acoustics finite element modeling is used to investigate the anticipated TCA acoustics, the effects of injector element length on stability margin, and the potential use of an ORPB orifice trip ring for improving longitudinal stability margin.

  10. Micro thrust and heat generator

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    The present invention relates generally to micromachines such as microengines or micromotors. More specifically, the invention is directed to a micro rocket which functions as a source of heat and thrust, and utilizes chemical energy to drive or power micromechanical apparatuses. The invention is adaptable to applications involving defense, bio-medical, manufacturing, consumer product, aviation, automotive, computer, inspection, and safety systems. A micro thrust and heat generator has a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator`s ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachine techniques (LIGA).

  11. Wind tunnel test of model target thrust reversers for the Pratt and Whitney aircraft JT8D-100 series engines installed on a 727-200 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambly, D.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a low speed wind tunnel test of 0.046 scale model target thrust reversers installed on a 727-200 model airplane are presented. The full airplane model was mounted on a force balance, except for the nacelles and thrust reversers, which were independently mounted and isolated from it. The installation had the capability of simulating the inlet airflows and of supplying the correct proportions of primary and secondary air to the nozzles. The objectives of the test were to assess the compatibility of the thrust reversers target door design with the engine and airplane. The following measurements were made: hot gas ingestion at the nacelle inlets; model lift, drag, and pitching moment; hot gas impingement on the airplane structure; and qualitative assessment of the rudder effectiveness. The major parameters controlling hot gas ingestion were found to be thrust reverser orientation, engine power setting, and the lip height of the bottom thrust reverser doors on the side nacelles. The thrust reversers tended to increase the model lift, decrease the drag, and decrease the pitching moment.

  12. Lateral dampers for thrust bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibner, D. H.; Szafir, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The development of lateral damping schemes for thrust bearings was examined, ranking their applicability to various engine classes, selecting the best concept for each engine class and performing an in-depth evaluation. Five major engine classes were considered: large transport, military, small general aviation, turboshaft, and non-manrated. Damper concepts developed for evaluation were: curved beam, constrained and unconstrained elastomer, hybrid boost bearing, hydraulic thrust piston, conical squeeze film, and rolling element thrust face.

  13. Computational Study of Primary Electrons in the Cusp Region of an Ion Engine's Discharge Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stueber, Thomas J. (Technical Monitor); Deshpande, Shirin S.; Mahalingam, Sudhakar; Menart, James A.

    2004-01-01

    In this work a computer code called PRIMA is used to study the motion of primary electrons in the magnetic cusp region of the discharge chamber of an ion engine. Even though the amount of wall area covered by the cusps is very small, the cusp regions are important because prior computational analyses have indicated that most primary electrons leave the discharge chamber through the cusps. The analysis presented here focuses on the cusp region only. The affects of the shape and size of the cusp region on primary electron travel are studied as well as the angle and location at which the electron enters the cusp region. These affects are quantified using the confinement length and the number density distributions of the primary electrons. In addition to these results comparisons of the results from PRIMA are made to experimental results for a cylindrical discharge chamber with two magnetic rings. These comparisons indicate the validity of the computer code called PRIMA.

  14. Low-thrust Isp sensitivity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenman, L.

    1982-01-01

    A comparison of the cooling requirements and attainable specific impulse performance of engines in the 445 to 4448N thrust class utilizing LOX/RP-1, LOX/Hydrogen and LOX/Methane propellants is presented. The unique design requirements for the regenerative cooling of low-thrust engines operating at high pressures (up to 6894 kPa) were explored analytically by comparing single cooling with the fuel and the oxidizer, and dual cooling with both the fuel and the oxidizer. The effects of coolant channel geometry, chamber length, and contraction ratio on the ability to provide proper cooling were evaluated, as was the resulting specific impulse. The results show that larger contraction ratios and smaller channels are highly desirable for certain propellant combinations.

  15. Design issues for lunar in situ aluminum/oxygen propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael L.

    1992-01-01

    Design issues for lunar ascent and lunar descent rocket engines fueled by aluminum/oxygen propellant produced in situ at the lunar surface were evaluated. Key issues are discussed which impact the design of these rockets: aluminum combustion, throat erosion, and thrust chamber cooling. Four engine concepts are presented, and the impact of combustion performance, throat erosion and thrust chamber cooling on overall engine design are discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of each engine concept are presented.

  16. Rapid prototype fabrication processes for high-performance thrust cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, K.; Chwiedor, T.; Diab, J.; Williams, R.

    1994-01-01

    The Thrust Cell Technologies Program (Air Force Phillips Laboratory Contract No. F04611-92-C-0050) is currently being performed by Rocketdyne to demonstrate advanced materials and fabrication technologies which can be utilized to produce low-cost, high-performance thrust cells for launch and space transportation rocket engines. Under Phase 2 of the Thrust Cell Technologies Program (TCTP), rapid prototyping and investment casting techniques are being employed to fabricate a 12,000-lbf thrust class combustion chamber for delivery and hot-fire testing at Phillips Lab. The integrated process of investment casting directly from rapid prototype patterns dramatically reduces design-to-delivery cycle time, and greatly enhances design flexibility over conventionally processed cast or machined parts.

  17. Comparison of theoretical and experimental thrust performance of a 1030:1 area ratio rocket nozzle at a chamber pressure of 2413 kN/m2 (350 psia)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Tamara A.; Pavli, Albert J.; Kacynski, Kenneth J.

    1987-01-01

    The joint Army. Navy, NASA. Air Force (JANNAF) rocket engine peformnace prediction procedure is based on the use of various reference computer programs. One of the reference programs for nozzle analysis is the Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) Program. The purpose of this report is to calibrate the JANNAF procedure incorporated into the December l984 version of the TDK program for the high-area-ratio rocket engine regime. The calibration was accomplished by modeling the performance of a 1030:1 rocket nozzle tested at NASA Lewis Research Center. A detailed description of the experimental test conditions and TDK input parameters is given. The results show that the computer code predicts delivered vacuum specific impulse to within 0.12 to 1.9 percent of the experimental data. Vacuum thrust coefficient predictions were within + or - 1.3 percent of experimental results. Predictions of wall static pressure were within approximately + or - 5 percent of the measured values. An experimental value for inviscid thrust was obtained for the nozzle extension between area ratios of 427.5 and 1030 by using an integration of the measured wall static pressures. Subtracting the measured thrust gain produced by the nozzle between area ratios of 427.5 and 1030 from the inviscid thrust gain yielded experimental drag decrements of 10.85 and 27.00 N (2.44 and 6.07 lb) for mixture ratios of 3.04 and 4.29, respectively. These values correspond to 0.45 and 1.11 percent of the total vacuum thrust. At a mixture ratio of 4.29, the TDK predicted drag decrement was 16.59 N (3.73 lb), or 0.71 percent of the predicted total vacuum thrust.

  18. Heat transfer in rocket engine combustion chambers and regeneratively cooled nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A conjugate heat transfer computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to describe regenerative cooling in the main combustion chamber and nozzle and in the injector faceplate region for a launch vehicle class liquid rocket engine was developed. An injector model for sprays which treats the fluid as a variable density, single-phase media was formulated, incorporated into a version of the FDNS code, and used to simulate the injector flow typical of that in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Various chamber related heat transfer analyses were made to verify the predictive capability of the conjugate heat transfer analysis provided by the FDNS code. The density based version of the FDNS code with the real fluid property models developed was successful in predicting the streamtube combustion of individual injector elements.

  19. Experimental Investigation on Heating Kerosene Using Thrust Tube Waste Heat of Pulse Detonation Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiqiao; Yan, Yu; Mu, Yang; Zheng, Longxi; Chen, Le

    2013-12-01

    Performance of liquid hydrocarbon fueled pulse detonation engines are hindered by the time required to evaporate liquid fuel droplets within the mixture. Efforts such as heating the liquid fuel before introduced into the engine were made to overcome this problem. The engine wall suffered high temperature of gaseous detonative products, which is harmful to the engine. Therefore the waste heat of PDE engine wall was used here to heat the liquid kerosene of the engine by using two concentric heat-exchangers with helical slot inside mounted at the tail of the pulse detonation engine. The pulse detonation engine (PDE) used here are 110 mm in inner diameter and 1700 mm in length and liquid kerosene and gaseous air were used as fuel and oxidizer respectively. Heating liquid kerosene was found effective in enhancing the engine performance, which was helpful for deflagration to detonation transition process. It was found that the waste heat could elevate the kerosene temperature effectively and the wall temperature could also be decreased obviously.

  20. Thrust rollers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A thrust roller bearing system comprising an inner rotating member, an outer rotating member and multiple rollers coupling the inner rotating member with outer rotating member. The inner and outer rotating members include thrust lips to enable the rollers to act as thrust rollers. The rollers contact inner and outer rotating members at bearing contact points along a contact line. Consequently, the radial/tilt and thrust forces move synchronously and simultaneously to create a bearing action with no slipping.

  1. Activated macrophages as key mediators of capsule formation on adipose constructs in tissue engineering chamber models.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Weiqing; Lu, Feng

    2017-04-01

    In plastic and reconstructive field, it would be much beneficial to fabricate an engineered adipose tissue substitute allowing reliable and complete fat tissue regeneration. Tissue engineering chamber (TEC) holds the promise to optimize an adipogenic configuration that is efficacious as well as reproducible. A frequently occurring complication involves the adipose tissue flap encapsulation and, effectively, its shielding, by a thick fibrous membrane, which hinders development into the proliferative stage. The reason for the deposition of the collagen capsule remains unclear. Numerous studies have highlighted that macrophages play a key role in adipogenesis in a TEC model using a silicone chamber enclosing the fat flap with a superficial epigastric pedicle. As a verification of the role of macrophages in capsule formation, we propose the inhibition of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) synthesis by macrophage populations in the local microenvironment by administrating tranilast into the TEC. We hypothesize that upon reduction of TGF-β1 levels, capsule formation and inhibition of new adipose tissue development will decrease. Furthermore, we propose that a tissue engineering chamber model in which macrophages are closely related to both neo-adipogenesis and capsule formation.

  2. Corrosion prevention in copper combustion chamber liners of liquid oxygen/methane booster engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, S. D.; Gage, M. L.

    1990-01-01

    The use of a protective gold coating for preventing the corrosion of copper combustion chamber liners in liquid oxygen/methane booster engines is discussed with reference to experimental results. Gold-plated and unplated copper alloy specimens were tested in a carbothermal test facility providing realistic simulations of booster engine cooling channel conditions, such as temperature, pressure, flow velocity, and heat flux. Metallographic examinations of the unplated specimens showed severe corrosion as a result of the reaction with the sulfur-containing contaminant in the fuel. In contrast, gold-plated specimens showed no corrosion under similar operating conditions.

  3. Corrosion prevention in copper combustion chamber liners of liquid oxygen/methane booster engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, S. D.; Gage, M. L.

    1990-01-01

    The use of a protective gold coating for preventing the corrosion of copper combustion chamber liners in liquid oxygen/methane booster engines is discussed with reference to experimental results. Gold-plated and unplated copper alloy specimens were tested in a carbothermal test facility providing realistic simulations of booster engine cooling channel conditions, such as temperature, pressure, flow velocity, and heat flux. Metallographic examinations of the unplated specimens showed severe corrosion as a result of the reaction with the sulfur-containing contaminant in the fuel. In contrast, gold-plated specimens showed no corrosion under similar operating conditions.

  4. Comparative evaluation of gas-turbine engine combustion chamber starting and stalling characteristics for mechanical and air-injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyatlov, I. N.

    1983-01-01

    The effectiveness of propellant atomization with and without air injection in the combustion chamber nozzle of a gas turbine engine is studied. Test show that the startup and burning performance of these combustion chambers can be improved by using an injection during the mechanical propellant atomization process. It is shown that the operational range of combustion chambers can be extended to poorer propellant mixtures by combined air injection mechanical atomization of the propellant.

  5. Altitude-chamber Performance of British Roll-royce Nene II Engine IV : Effect of Operational Variables on Temperature Distribution at Combustion-chamber Outlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntley, Sidney C

    1950-01-01

    Temperature surveys were made at the combustion-chamber outlets of a British Rolls-Royce Nene II engine. The highest mean nozzle-vane and mean gas temperatures were found to occur at a radius approximately 75% of the nozzle-vane length from the inner ring of the nozzle-vane assembly. Variations in engine speed, jet-nozzle area, simulated altitude, and simulated flight speed altered the temperature level but did not materially affect the pattern of radial temperature distribution.

  6. Advanced radiation techniques for inspection of diesel engine combustion chamber materials components. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-09

    Heavy duty truck engines must meet stringent life cycle cost and regulatory requirements. Meeting these requirements has resulted in convergence on 4-stroke 6-in-line, turbocharged, and after-cooled engines with direct-injection combustion systems. These engines provide much higher efficiencies (42%, fuel consumption 200 g/kW-hr) than automotive engines (31%, fuel consumption 270 g/kW-hr), but at higher initial cost. Significant near-term diesel engine improvements are necessary and are spurred by continuing competitive, Middle - East oil problems and Congressional legislation. As a result of these trends and pressures, Caterpillar has been actively pursuing a low-fuel consumption engine research program with emphasis on product quality through process control and product inspection. The goal of this project is to combine the nondestructive evaluation and computational resources and expertise available at LLNL with the diesel engine and manufacturing expertise of the Caterpillar Corporation to develop in-process monitoring and inspection techniques for diesel engine combustion chamber components and materials. Early development of these techniques will assure the optimization of the manufacturing process by design/inspection interface. The transition from the development stage to the manufacturing stage requires a both a thorough understanding of the processes and a way of verifying conformance to process standards. NDE is one of the essential tools in accomplishing both elements and in this project will be integrated with Caterpillar`s technological and manufacturing expertise to accomplish the project goals.

  7. Experimental and Numerical Research of a Novel Combustion Chamber for Small Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuma, J.; Kubata, J.; Betak, V.; Hybl, R.

    2013-04-01

    New combustion chamber concept (based on burner JETIS-JET Induced Swirl) for small gas turbine engine (up to 200kW) is presented in this article. The combustion chamber concept is based on the flame stabilization by the generated swirl swirl generated by two opposite tangentially arranged jet tubes in the intermediate zone, this arrangement replaces air swirler, which is very complicated and expensive part in the scope of small gas turbines with annular combustion chamber. The mixing primary jets are oriented partially opposite to the main exhaust gasses flow, this enhances hot product recirculation and fuel-air mixing necessary for low NOx production and flame stability. To evaluate the designed concept a JETIS burner demonstrator (methane fuel) was manufactured and atmospheric experimental measurements of CO, NOx for various fuel nozzles and jet tubes the configuration were done. Results of these experiments and comparison with CFD simulation are presented here. Practical application of the new chamber concept in small gas turbine liquid fuel combustor was evaluated (verified) on 3 nozzles planar combustor sector test rig at atmospheric conditions results of the experiment and numerical simulation are also presented.

  8. Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of a 4000-Pound-Thrust Axial-Flow Turbojet Engine. 3; Performance Characteristics with the High-Flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, William A.; Golladay, Richard L.

    1948-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted to determine the performance of a 4000-pound-thrust axial-flow turbojet engine with a high flow compressor. Pressure altitudes included 5000 to 40000 feet with ram pressure ratios from 1.00 to 1.82. Altitudes included 20000 to 40000 feet and ram pressure ratios from 1.09 to 1.75. A comparison is made between engine performance with high flow and low flow compressors.

  9. Predicted performance of an integrated modular engine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binder, Michael; Felder, James L.

    1993-01-01

    Space vehicle propulsion systems are traditionally comprised of a cluster of discrete engines, each with its own set of turbopumps, valves, and a thrust chamber. The Integrated Modular Engine (IME) concept proposes a vehicle propulsion system comprised of multiple turbopumps, valves, and thrust chambers which are all interconnected. The IME concept has potential advantages in fault-tolerance, weight, and operational efficiency compared with the traditional clustered engine configuration. The purpose of this study is to examine the steady-state performance of an IME system with various components removed to simulate fault conditions. An IME configuration for a hydrogen/oxygen expander cycle propulsion system with four sets of turbopumps and eight thrust chambers has been modeled using the Rocket Engine Transient Simulator (ROCETS) program. The nominal steady-state performance is simulated, as well as turbopump thrust chamber and duct failures. The impact of component failures on system performance is discussed in the context of the system's fault tolerant capabilities.

  10. Predicted performance of an Integrated Modular Engine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binder, Michael; Felder, James L.

    1993-01-01

    Space vehicle propulsion systems are traditionally comprised of a cluster of discrete engines, each with its own set of turbopumps, valves, and a thrust chamber. The Integrated Modular Engine (IME) concept proposes a vehicle propulsion system comprised of multiple turbopumps, valves, and thrust chambers which are all interconnected. The IME concept has potential advantages in fault-tolerance, weight, and operational efficiency compared with the traditional clustered engine configuration. The purpose of this study is to examine the steady-state performance of an IME system with various components removed to simulate fault conditions. An IME configuration for a hydrogen/oxygen expander cycle propulsion system with four sets of turbopumps and eight thrust chambers has been modeled using the Rocket Engine Transient Simulator program. The nominal steady-state performance is simulated, as well as turbopump, thrust chamber, and duct failures. The impact of component failures on system performance is discussed in the context of the system's fault tolerant capabilities.

  11. Predicted performance of an Integrated Modular Engine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binder, Michael; Felder, James L.

    1993-01-01

    Space vehicle propulsion systems are traditionally comprised of a cluster of discrete engines, each with its own set of turbopumps, valves, and a thrust chamber. The Integrated Modular Engine (IME) concept proposes a vehicle propulsion system comprised of multiple turbopumps, valves, and thrust chambers which are all interconnected. The IME concept has potential advantages in fault-tolerance, weight, and operational efficiency compared with the traditional clustered engine configuration. The purpose of this study is to examine the steady-state performance of an IME system with various components removed to simulate fault conditions. An IME configuration for a hydrogen/oxygen expander cycle propulsion system with four sets of turbopumps and eight thrust chambers has been modeled using the Rocket Engine Transient Simulator program. The nominal steady-state performance is simulated, as well as turbopump, thrust chamber, and duct failures. The impact of component failures on system performance is discussed in the context of the system's fault tolerant capabilities.

  12. Maximum thrust mode evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Nobbs, Steven G.

    1995-01-01

    Measured reductions in acceleration times which resulted from the application of the F-15 performance seeking control (PSC) maximum thrust mode during the dual-engine test phase is presented as a function of power setting and flight condition. Data were collected at altitudes of 30,000 and 45,000 feet at military and maximum afterburning power settings. The time savings for the supersonic acceleration is less than at subsonic Mach numbers because of the increased modeling and control complexity. In addition, the propulsion system was designed to be optimized at the mid supersonic Mach number range. Recall that even though the engine is at maximum afterburner, PSC does not trim the afterburner for the maximum thrust mode. Subsonically at military power, time to accelerate from Mach 0.6 to 0.95 was cut by between 6 and 8 percent with a single engine application of PSC, and over 14 percent when both engines were optimized. At maximum afterburner, the level of thrust increases were similar in magnitude to the military power results, but because of higher thrust levels at maximum afterburner and higher aircraft drag at supersonic Mach numbers the percentage thrust increase and time to accelerate was less than for the supersonic accelerations. Savings in time to accelerate supersonically at maximum afterburner ranged from 4 to 7 percent. In general, the maximum thrust mode has performed well, demonstrating significant thrust increases at military and maximum afterburner power. Increases of up to 15 percent at typical combat-type flight conditions were identified. Thrust increases of this magnitude could be useful in a combat situation.

  13. High turbulence combustion chamber for turbocharged lean burn gaseous fueled engine

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, R.S.

    1988-12-27

    This patent describes a gaseous fueled engine having at least a cylinder with an fuel/air intake and combustion product exhaust to be used in a cylinder head having a flat lower surface enclosing one end of the cylinder, and a piston with a flat top piston head slidably received in the cylinder. The improvement consists of: a. an ignition device extending from the flat lower surface of the cylinder head in the center of the cylinder, and b. a baffleless combustion chamber eccentrically located in the head of the piston with respect to the piston axis such that ignition of the fuel/air mixture by the ignition device occurs within but on the outer periphery of the combustion chamber.

  14. Thrust Measurement of a Split-Path, Valveless Pulse Detonation Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    A SPLIT-PATH, VALVELESS PULSE DETONATION ENGINE by Brady J. Bartosh December 2007 Thesis Advisor: Christopher M. Brophy Second ...Bartosh Approved by: Christopher M. Brophy Thesis Advisor Knox T. Millsaps Second Reader Anthony J. Healey Chairman, Department...15 Figure 5. Variation of Properties through a ZND Detonation Wave (From Ref. 2) .......16 Figure 6. Smoke -foiled Record and

  15. Rotary engine developments at Curtiss-Wright over the past 20 years and review of general aviation engine potential. [with direct chamber injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C.

    1978-01-01

    The development of the rotary engine as a viable power plant capable of wide application is reviewed. Research results on the stratified charge engine with direct chamber injection are included. Emission control, reduced fuel consumption, and low noise level are among the factors discussed in terms of using the rotary engine in general aviation aircraft.

  16. An experimental investigation of thrust vectoring two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles installed in a twin-engine fighter model at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, Francis J.; Mason, Mary L.; Leavitt, Laurence D.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine thrust vectoring capability of subscale 2-D convergent-divergent exhaust nozzles installed on a twin engine general research fighter model. Pitch thrust vectoring was accomplished by downward rotation of nozzle upper and lower flaps. The effects of nozzle sidewall cutback were studied for both unvectored and pitch vectored nozzles. A single cutback sidewall was employed for yaw thrust vectoring. This investigation was conducted at Mach numbers ranging from 0 to 1.20 and at angles of attack from -2 to 35 deg. High pressure air was used to simulate jet exhaust and provide values of nozzle pressure ratio up to 9.

  17. Tests and analysis of a vented D thrust deflecting nozzle on a turbofan engine. [conducted at the outdoor aerodynamic research facility of the Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roseberg, E. W.

    1982-01-01

    The objectives were to: obtain nozzle performance characteristics in and out of ground effects; demonstrate the compatibility of the nozzle with a turbofan engine; obtain pressure and temperature distributions on the surface of the D vented nozzle; and establish a correlation of the nozzle performance between small scale and large scale models. The test nozzle was a boilerplate model of the MCAIR D vented nozzle configured for operation with a General Electric YTF-34-F5 turbofan engine. The nozzle was configured to provide: a thrust vectoring range of 0 to 115 deg; a yaw vectoring range of 0 to 10 deg; variable nozzle area control; and variable spacing between the core exit and nozzle entrance station. Compatibility between the YTF-34-T5 turbofan engine and the D vented nozzle was demonstrated. Velocity coefficients of 0.96 and greater were obtained for 90 deg of thrust vectoring. The nozzle walls remained cool during all test conditions.

  18. Advanced Methods for Acoustic and Thrust Benefits for Aircraft Engine Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Morris H., III; Gilinsky, Mikhail M.

    2000-01-01

    The Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics Laboratory (FM&AL) was established At Hampton University in June of 1996. In addition, the FM&AL jointly conducted research with the Central AeroHydrodynamics Institute (TsAGI, Moscow) in Russia under a 2.5 year Civilian Research and Development Foundation (CRDF). The goals of the FM&AL programs are two fold: 1) to improve the working efficiency of the FM&AL team in generating new innovative ideas and in conducting research in the field of fluid dynamics and acoustics, basically for improvement of supersonic and subsonic aircraft engines, and 2) to attract promising minority students to this research and training and, in cooperation with other HU departments, to teach them basic knowledge in Aerodynamics, Gas Dynamics, and Theoretical and Experimental Methods in Aeroacoustics and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The research at the FM&AL supports reduction schemes associated with the emission of engine pollutants for commercial aircraft and concepts for reduction of observables for military aircraft. These research endeavors relate to the goals of the NASA Strategic Enterprise in Aeronautics concerning the development of environmentally acceptable aircraft. It is in this precise area, where the US aircraft industry, academia, and Government are in great need of trained professionals and which is a high priority goal of the Minority University Research and Education (MUREP) Program, that the HU FM&AL can make its most important contribution. This project already benefits NASA and HU because: First, the innovation, testing, and further development of new techniques for advanced propulsion systems are necessary for the successful attainment of the NASA Long Term Goals in Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology (ASTT) including Global Civil Aviation, Revolutionary Technology Leaps, Access to Space, R&D Services, and the economic competitiveness of the US Aircraft Industry in the 2 1 st century. Secondly, the joint

  19. Noise of model target type thrust reversers for engine-over-the-wing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. R.; Gutierrez, O. A.

    1974-01-01

    The present work reports on experiments concerning the noise generated by V-gutter and semicylindrical target reversers with circular and short-aspect-ratio slot nozzles having equivalent diameters of about 5 cm. At subsonic jet velocities of interest for engine-over-the-wing (OTW) powered-lift aircraft, the reversers were noisier than the nozzles alone and had a more uniform directional distribution and more high-frequency noise. Reverser shape was more important than nozzle shape in determining the reverser noise characteristics. An estimate is made of perceived noise level along the 152-m sideline for a hypothetical OTW powered-lift airplane.

  20. Noise of model target type thrust reversers for engine-over-the-wing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. R.; Gutierrez, O. A.

    1974-01-01

    The present work reports on experiments concerning the noise generated by V-gutter and semicylindrical target reversers with circular and short-aspect-ratio slot nozzles having equivalent diameters of about 5 cm. At subsonic jet velocities of interest for engine-over-the-wing (OTW) powered-lift aircraft, the reversers were noisier than the nozzles alone and had a more uniform directional distribution and more high-frequency noise. Reverser shape was more important than nozzle shape in determining the reverser noise characteristics. An estimate is made of perceived noise level along the 152-m sideline for a hypothetical OTW powered-lift airplane.

  1. Advanced Methods for Aircraft Engine Thrust and Noise Benefits: Nozzle-Inlet Flow Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Morris H.; Gilinsky, Mikhail; Patel, Kaushal; Coston, Calvin; Blankson, Isaiah M.

    2003-01-01

    The research is focused on a wide regime of problems in the propulsion field as well as in experimental testing and theoretical and numerical simulation analyses for advanced aircraft and rocket engines. Results obtained are based on analytical methods, numerical simulations and experimental tests at the NASA LaRC and Hampton University computer complexes and experimental facilities. The main objective of this research is injection, mixing and combustion enhancement in propulsion systems. The sub-projects in the reporting period are: (A) Aero-performance and acoustics of Telescope-shaped designs. The work included a pylon set application for SCRAMJET. (B) An analysis of sharp-edged nozzle exit designs for effective fuel injection into the flow stream in air-breathing engines: triangular-round and diamond-round nozzles. (C) Measurement technique improvements for the HU Low Speed Wind Tunnel (HU LSWT) including an automatic data acquisition system and a two component (drag-lift) balance system. In addition, a course in the field of aerodynamics was developed for the teaching and training of HU students.

  2. Advanced Methods for Aircraft Engine Thrust and Noise Benefits: Nozzle-Inlet Flow Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Morris H.; Gilinsky, Mikhail; Patel, Kaushal; Coston, Calvin; Blankson, Isaiah M.

    2003-01-01

    The research is focused on a wide regime of problems in the propulsion field as well as in experimental testing and theoretical and numerical simulation analyses for advanced aircraft and rocket engines. Results obtained are based on analytical methods, numerical simulations and experimental tests at the NASA LaRC and Hampton University computer complexes and experimental facilities. The main objective of this research is injection, mixing and combustion enhancement in propulsion systems. The sub-projects in the reporting period are: (A) Aero-performance and acoustics of Telescope-shaped designs. The work included a pylon set application for SCRAMJET. (B) An analysis of sharp-edged nozzle exit designs for effective fuel injection into the flow stream in air-breathing engines: triangular-round and diamond-round nozzles. (C) Measurement technique improvements for the HU Low Speed Wind Tunnel (HU LSWT) including an automatic data acquisition system and a two component (drag-lift) balance system. In addition, a course in the field of aerodynamics was developed for the teaching and training of HU students.

  3. Noise of model target type thrust reversers for engine-over-the-wing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. R.; Gutierrez, O. A.

    1974-01-01

    The results of experiments on the noise generated by V-gutter and semicylindrical target reversers with circular and short-aspect-ratio slot nozzles having diameters of about 5 cm are presented. The experiments were conducted with cold-flow jets at velocities from 190-290 m/sec. The reversers at subsonic jet velocities had a more uniform noise distribution and higher frequency than the nozzles alone. The reverser shape was shown to be more important than the nozzle shape in determining the noise characteristics. The maximum sideline pressure level varied with the sixth power of the jet velocity, and the data were correlated for angles along the sideline. An estimate of the noise level along the 152 m sideline for an engine-over-the-wing powered-lift airplane was made.

  4. Analysis of the flow field generated near an aircraft engine operating in reverse thrust. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledwith, W. A., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A computer solution is developed to the exhaust gas reingestion problem for aircraft operating in the reverse thrust mode on a crosswind-free runway. The computer program determines the location of the inlet flow pattern, whether the exhaust efflux lies within the inlet flow pattern or not, and if so, the approximate time before the reversed flow reaches the engine inlet. The program is written so that the user is free to select discrete runway speeds or to study the entire aircraft deceleration process for both the far field and cross-ingestion problems. While developed with STOL applications in mind, the solution is equally applicable to conventional designs. The inlet and reversed jet flow fields involved in the problem are assumed to be noninteracting. The nacelle model used in determining the inlet flow field is generated using an iterative solution to the Neuman problem from potential flow theory while the reversed jet flow field is adapted using an empirical correlation from the literature. Sample results obtained using the program are included.

  5. Correlation of knocking characteristics of fuels in an engine having a hemispherical combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Biermann, Arnold E

    1940-01-01

    Data are presented to show the effects of inlet-air pressure, inlet-air temperature, and compression ratio on the maximum permissible performance obtained with having a hemispherical-dome combustion chamber. The five aircraft-engine fuels used have octane numbers varying from 90 to 100 plus 2 ml of tetraethyl lead per gallon. The data were obtained on a 5 1/4-inch by 4 3/4-inch liquid-cooled engine operating at 2,500 r.p.m. The compression ratio was varied from 6.0 to 8.9. The inlet-air temperature was varied from 110 to 310 F. For each set of conditions, the inlet-air pressure was increased until audible knock occurred and then reduced 2 inches of mercury before data were recorded. The results for each fuel can be correlated by plotting the calculated end-gas density factor against the calculated end-gas temperature. Measurements of spark-plugs, cutting off the switch to one spark plug lowered the electrode temperature of that plug from a value of 1,365 F to a value of 957 F. The results indicate that the surface temperatures of combustion-chamber areas which become new sources of ignition markedly increase after ignition.

  6. Advanced Methods for Aircraft Engine Thrust and Noise Benefits: Nozzle-Inlet Flow Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilinsky, Mikhail; Morgan, Morris H.; Hardin, Jay C.; Mosiane, Lotlamoreng; Kaushal, Patel; Blankson, Isaiah M.

    2000-01-01

    In this project, we continue to develop the previous joint research between the Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics Laboratory (FM&AL) at Hampton University (HU) and the Jet Noise Team (JNT) at the NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC). The FM&AL was established at Hampton University in June of 1996 and has conducted research under two NASA grants: NAG-1-1835 (1996-99), and NAG-1-1936 (1997-00). In addition, the FM&AL has jointly conducted research with the Central AeroHydrodynamics Institute (TsAGI, Moscow) in Russia under a Civilian Research and Development Foundation (CRDF) grant #RE2-136 (1996-99). The goals of the FM&AL programs are twofold: (1) to improve the working efficiency of the FM&AUs team in generating new innovative ideas and in conducting research in the field of fluid dynamics and acoustics, basically for improvement of supersonic and subsonic aircraft engines, and (2) to attract promising minority students to this research and training and, in cooperation with other HU departments, to teach them basic knowledge in Aerodynamics, Gas Dynamics, and Theoretical and Experimental Methods in Aeroacoustics and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The research at the HU FM&AL supports reduction schemes associated with the emission of engine pollutants for commercial aircraft and concepts for reduction of observables for military aircraft. These research endeavors relate to the goals of the NASA Strategic Enterprise in Aeronautics concerning the development of environmentally acceptable aircraft. It is in this precise area, where the US aircraft industry, academia, and Government are in great need of trained professionals and which is a high priority goal of the Minority University Research and Education (MUREP) Program, that the HU FM&AL can make its most important contribution. The main achievements for the reporting period in the development of concepts for noise reduction and improvement in efficiency for jet exhaust nozzles and inlets for aircraft engines

  7. Advanced Methods for Aircraft Engine Thrust and Noise Benefits: Nozzle-Inlet Flow Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilinsky, Mikhail; Morgan, Morris H.; Hardin, Jay C.; Mosiane, Lotlamoreng; Kaushal, Patel; Blankson, Isaiah M.

    2000-01-01

    In this project, we continue to develop the previous joint research between the Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics Laboratory (FM&AL) at Hampton University (HU) and the Jet Noise Team (JNT) at the NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC). The FM&AL was established at Hampton University in June of 1996 and has conducted research under two NASA grants: NAG-1-1835 (1996-99), and NAG-1-1936 (1997-00). In addition, the FM&AL has jointly conducted research with the Central AeroHydrodynamics Institute (TsAGI, Moscow) in Russia under a Civilian Research and Development Foundation (CRDF) grant #RE2-136 (1996-99). The goals of the FM&AL programs are twofold: (1) to improve the working efficiency of the FM&AUs team in generating new innovative ideas and in conducting research in the field of fluid dynamics and acoustics, basically for improvement of supersonic and subsonic aircraft engines, and (2) to attract promising minority students to this research and training and, in cooperation with other HU departments, to teach them basic knowledge in Aerodynamics, Gas Dynamics, and Theoretical and Experimental Methods in Aeroacoustics and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The research at the HU FM&AL supports reduction schemes associated with the emission of engine pollutants for commercial aircraft and concepts for reduction of observables for military aircraft. These research endeavors relate to the goals of the NASA Strategic Enterprise in Aeronautics concerning the development of environmentally acceptable aircraft. It is in this precise area, where the US aircraft industry, academia, and Government are in great need of trained professionals and which is a high priority goal of the Minority University Research and Education (MUREP) Program, that the HU FM&AL can make its most important contribution. The main achievements for the reporting period in the development of concepts for noise reduction and improvement in efficiency for jet exhaust nozzles and inlets for aircraft engines

  8. Low thrust vehicle concept study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Low thrust chemical (hydrogen-oxygen) propulsion systems configured specifically for low acceleration orbit transfer of large space systems were defined. Results indicate that it is cost effective and least risk to combine the OTV and stowed spacecraft in a single 65 K Shuttle. The study shows that the engine for an optimized low thrust stage (1) does not require very low thrust; (2) 1-3 K thrust range appears optimum; (3) thrust transient is not a concern; (4) throttling probably not worthwhile; and (5) multiple thrusters complicate OTV/LSS design and aggravate LSS loads. Regarding the optimum vehicle for low acceleration missions, the single shuttle launch (LSS and expendable OTV) is most cost effective and least risky. Multiple shuttles increase diameter 20%. The space based radar structure short OTV (which maximizes space available for packaged LSS) favors use of torus tank. Propellant tank pressures/vapor residuals are little affected by engine thrust level or number of burns.

  9. Fly in Atmosphere by Drag Force - Easy Thrust Generation Aircraft Engine Based Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre Celestin, Mwizerwa

    2013-11-01

    This paper aims to present to the science community another way to fly in atmosphere, a way which is much more cheaper, efficient, safe and easy. Over the years scientists have been trying to find a way to built the vertically taking off vehicles but there have been no satisfactory success(what have been found was very expensive), Even aircrafts we know now need very sophisticated and expensive engines and not efficient enough. This way of flying may help our governments to spend less money on technologies and will help people to travel at very low prices so that, it may be a solution to the crisis which the world faces nowadays. In other words, it is my proposal to the next generation technologies we was looking for for years because everything can fly from the car to the trucks, the spaceships and even the hotels maybe constructed and fly as we construct the ships which sail in the oceans. My way of flying will have many applications in all the aspect of travel as it is going to be explained.

  10. Uncertainty of in-flight thrust determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernethy, Robert B.; Adams, Gary R.; Steurer, John W.; Ascough, John C.; Baer-Riedhart, Jennifer L.; Balkcom, George H.; Biesiadny, Thomas

    1986-01-01

    Methods for estimating the measurement error or uncertainty of in-flight thrust determination in aircraft employing conventional turbofan/turbojet engines are reviewed. While the term 'in-flight thrust determination' is used synonymously with 'in-flight thrust measurement', in-flight thrust is not directly measured but is determined or calculated using mathematical modeling relationships between in-flight thrust and various direct measurements of physical quantities. The in-flight thrust determination process incorporates both ground testing and flight testing. The present text is divided into the following categories: measurement uncertainty methodoogy and in-flight thrust measurent processes.

  11. Uncertainty of in-flight thrust determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernethy, Robert B.; Adams, Gary R.; Steurer, John W.; Ascough, John C.; Baer-Riedhart, Jennifer L.; Balkcom, George H.; Biesiadny, Thomas

    1986-01-01

    Methods for estimating the measurement error or uncertainty of in-flight thrust determination in aircraft employing conventional turbofan/turbojet engines are reviewed. While the term 'in-flight thrust determination' is used synonymously with 'in-flight thrust measurement', in-flight thrust is not directly measured but is determined or calculated using mathematical modeling relationships between in-flight thrust and various direct measurements of physical quantities. The in-flight thrust determination process incorporates both ground testing and flight testing. The present text is divided into the following categories: measurement uncertainty methodoogy and in-flight thrust measurent processes.

  12. Orbital transfer vehicle engine technology: Baffled injector design, fabrication, and verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    New technologies for space-based, reusable, throttleable, cryogenic orbit transfer propulsion are being evaluated. Supporting tasks for the design of a dual expander cycle engine thrust chamber design are documented. The purpose of the studies was to research the materials used in the thrust chamber design, the supporting fabrication methods necessary to complete the design, and the modification of the injector element for optimum injector/chamber compatibility.

  13. AXISYMMETRIC, THROTTLEABLE NON-GIMBALLED ROCKET ENGINE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sackheim, Robert L. (Inventor); Hutt, John J. (Inventor); Anderson, William E. (Inventor); Dressler, Gordon A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A rocket engine assembly is provided for a vertically launched rocket vehicle. A rocket engine housing of the assembly includes two or more combustion chambers each including an outlet end defining a sonic throat area. A propellant supply for the combustion chambers includes a throttling injector, associated with each of the combustion chambers and located opposite to sonic throat area, which injects the propellant into the associated combustion chamber. A modulator, which may form part of the injector, and which is controlled by a controller, modulates the flow rate of the propellant to the combustion chambers so that the chambers provide a vectorable net thrust. An expansion nozzle or body located downstream of the throat area provides expansion of the combustion gases produced by the combustion chambers so as to increase the net thrust.

  14. Creation of a Large Adipose Tissue Construct in Humans Using a Tissue-engineering Chamber: A Step Forward in the Clinical Application of Soft Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Wayne A; Marre, Diego; Grinsell, Damien; Batty, Andrew; Trost, Nicholas; O'Connor, Andrea J

    2016-04-01

    Tissue engineering is currently exploring new and exciting avenues for the repair of soft tissue and organ defects. Adipose tissue engineering using the tissue engineering chamber (TEC) model has yielded promising results in animals; however, to date, there have been no reports on the use of this device in humans. Five female post mastectomy patients ranging from 35 to 49years old were recruited and a pedicled thoracodorsal artery perforator fat flap ranging from 6 to 50ml was harvested, transposed onto the chest wall and covered by an acrylic perforated dome-shaped chamber ranging from 140 to 350cm(3). Magnetic resonance evaluation was performed at three and six months after chamber implantation. Chambers were removed at six months and samples were obtained for histological analysis. In one patient, newly formed tissue to a volume of 210ml was generated inside the chamber. One patient was unable to complete the trial and the other three failed to develop significant enlargement of the original fat flap, which, at the time of chamber explantation, was encased in a thick fibrous capsule. Our study provides evidence that generation of large well-vascularized tissue engineered constructs using the TEC is feasible in humans.

  15. Effects of high combustion chamber pressure on rocket noise environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. P.

    1972-01-01

    The acoustical environment for a high combustion chamber pressure engine was examined in detail, using both conventional and advanced theoretical analysis. The influence of elevated chamber pressure on the rocket noise environment was established, based on increase in exit velocity and flame temperature, and changes in basic engine dimensions. Compared to large rocket engines, the overall sound power level is found to be 1.5 dB higher, if the thrust is the same. The peak Strouhal number shifted about one octave lower to a value near 0.01. Data on apparent sound source location and directivity patterns are also presented.

  16. Significance of chamber pressure to complex multi-phase physics in jet engine fuel injection processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahms, Rainer; Oefelein, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Injection processes in jet engines at chamber pressures in excess of the thermodynamic critical pressure of the liquid fuel are not well understood. Under some conditions, a distinct two-phase interface may not exist anymore which eliminates the presence of classical spray atomization phenomena. A comprehensive model for jet engine fuel injections is derived to quantify the conditions under which the interfacial dynamics transition to diffusion-dominated mixing processes without surface tension. At certain conditions, the model shows two-phase interfaces with substantially increased thicknesses and distinctively reduced mean free paths in comparison to ambient pressure conditions. Then, the underlying assumptions of a distinct two-phase interface do not apply anymore and the interface along with its surface tension is shown to deteriorate as it broadens substantially. As a consequence of this physical complexity, the conceptual view of spray atomization and evaporation as an appropriate model for jet engine injection processes is, contrary to conventional wisdom, questionable at certain operating conditions. Instead, a Large Eddy Simulation using a dense-fluid approximation is applied which takes the complex thermo-physics of real-fluid behavior into account.

  17. A simulation evaluation of a four-engine jet transport using engine thrust modulation for flightpath control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilyard, Glenn B.; Conley, Joseph L.; Le, Jeanette; Burcham, Frank W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The use of throttle control laws to provide adequate flying qualities for flightpath control in the event of a total loss of conventional flight control surface use was evaluated. The results are based on a simulation evaluation by transport research pilots of a B-720 transport with visual display. Throttle augmentation control laws can provide flightpath control capable of landing a transport-type aircraft with up to moderate levels of turbulence. The throttle augmentation mode dramatically improves the pilots' ability to control flightpath for the approach and landing flight condition using only throttle modulation. For light turbulence, the average Cooper-Harper pilot rating improved from unacceptable to acceptable (a pilot rating improvement of 4.5) in going from manual to augmented control. The low frequency response characteristics of the engines require a considerably different piloting technique. The various techniques used by the pilots resulted in considerable scatter in the data. Many pilots readily adapted to a good piloting technique while some has difficulty. The research demonstrates a new and viable approach to providing an independent means of redundancy or increasing the redundancy capability of transport aircraft flightpath control.

  18. A simulation evaluation of a four-engine jet transport using engine thrust modulation for flightpath control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilyard, Glenn B.; Conley, Joseph L.; Le, Jeanette; Burcham, Frank W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The use of throttle control laws to provide adequate flying qualities for flight path control in the event of a total loss of conventional flight control surface use was evaluated. The results are based on a simulation evaluation by transport research pilots of a B-720 transport with visual display. Throttle augmentation control laws can provide flight path control capable of landing a transport-type aircraft with up to moderate levels of turbulence. The throttle augmentation mode dramatically improves the pilots' ability to control flight path for the approach and landing flight condition using only throttle modulation. For light turbulence, the average Cooper-Harper pilot rating improved from unacceptable to acceptable (a pilot rating improvement of 4.5) in going from manual to augmented control. The low frequency response characteristics of the engines require a considerably different piloting technique. The various techniques used by the pilot resulted in considerable scatter in data. Many pilots readily adapted to a good piloting technique while some had difficulty. A new viable approach is shown to provide independent means of redundancy of transport aircraft flight path control.

  19. Design, analysis, and control of a large transport aircraft utilizing selective engine thrust as a backup system for the primary flight control. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerren, Donna S.

    1995-01-01

    A study has been conducted to determine the capability to control a very large transport airplane with engine thrust. This study consisted of the design of an 800-passenger airplane with a range of 5000 nautical miles design and evaluation of a flight control system, and design and piloted simulation evaluation of a thrust-only backup flight control system. Location of the four wing-mounted engines was varied to optimize the propulsive control capability, and the time constant of the engine response was studied. The goal was to provide level 1 flying qualities. The engine location and engine time constant did not have a large effect on the control capability. The airplane design did meet level 1 flying qualities based on frequencies, damping ratios, and time constants in the longitudinal and lateral-directional modes. Project pilots consistently rated the flying qualities as either level 1 or level 2 based on Cooper-Harper ratings. However, because of the limited control forces and moments, the airplane design fell short of meeting the time required to achieve a 30 deg bank and the time required to respond a control input.

  20. Performance of a Compression-ignition Engine with a Precombustion Chamber Having High-Velocity Air Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanogle, J A; Moore, C S

    1931-01-01

    Presented here are the results of performance tests made with a single-cylinder, four stroke cycle, compression-ignition engine. These tests were made on a precombustion chamber type of cylinder head designed to have air velocity and tangential air flow in both the chamber and cylinder. The performance was investigated for variable load and engine speed, type of fuel spray, valve opening pressure, injection period and, for the spherical chamber, position of the injection spray relative to the air flow. The pressure variations between the pear-shaped precombustion chamber and the cylinder for motoring and full load conditions were determined with a Farnboro electric indicator. The combustion chamber designs tested gave good mixing of a single compact fuel spray with the air, but did not control the ensuing combustion sufficiently. Relative to each other, the velocity of air flow was too high, the spray dispersion by injection too great, and the metering effect of the cylinder head passage insufficient. The correct relation of these factors is of the utmost importance for engine performance.

  1. Influence of variable thrust parameters on swirl injector fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenny, Robert J.

    Current swirl injector design methodologies do not consider elevated chamber pressure and less than design mass flow rate operation found in variable thrust liquid rocket engines. The objective of this work is to study the effects of elevated chamber pressure and off-design mass flow rate operation on swirl injector fluid mechanics. Using a high pressure chamber, water flowed through a swirl injector at various combinations of elevated chamber pressure and reduced mass flow rate. The optically-accessible swirl injector allowed for determination of the film thickness profile down the swirl injector nozzle section. High speed video and digital stills showed significant increases in the film thickness profile at high chamber pressure and low mass flow rate operation. At prescribed combinations of chamber pressure and mass flow rate, a jump was noted in the film thickness profile. This jump was assumed related to a vortex breakdown phenomenon. Measured injector discharge coefficient values showed different trends with increasing chamber pressure at low mass flow rate operation as opposed to near-design mass flow rate operation. Downstream spray angles showed classic changes in morphology as the mass flow rate was decreased below the design value. Increasing chamber pressure worked to decrease the spray angle at any injection mass flow rate. A new set of fundamental relations linking swirl injector design parameters to injector geometry and flow conditions were derived. Impacts of the research findings to the swirl injector design process were assessed.

  2. Low-thrust rocket trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Keaton, P.W.

    1986-01-01

    The development of low-thrust propulsion systems to complement chemical propulsion systems will greatly enhance the evolution of future space programs. Two advantages of low-thrust rockets are stressed: first, in a strong gravitational field, such as occurs near the Earth, freighter missions with low-thrust engines require one-tenth as much propellant as do chemical engines. Second, in a weak gravitational field, such as occurs in the region between Venus and Mars, low-thrust rockets are faster than chemical rockets with comparable propellant mass. The purpose here is to address the physics of low-thrust trajectories and to interpret the results with two simple models. Analytic analyses are used where possible - otherwise, the results of numerical calculations are presented in graphs. The author has attempted to make this a self-contained report. 57 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Low-thrust rocket trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Keaton, P.W.

    1987-03-01

    The development of low-thrust propulsion systems to complement chemical propulsion systems will greatly enhance the evolution of future space programs. Two advantages of low-thrust rockets are stressed: first, in a strong gravitational field, such as occurs near the Earth, freighter missions with low-thrust engines require one-tenth as much propellant as do chemical engines. Second, in a weak gravitational field, such as occurs in the region between Venus and Mars, low-thrust rockets are faster than chemical rockets with comparable propellant mass. The purpose here is to address the physics of low-thrust trajectories and to interpret the results with two simple models. Analytic analyses are used where possible - otherwise, the results of numerical calculations are presented in graphs. The author has attempted to make this a self-contained report.

  4. Test Stand at the Rocket Engine Test Facility

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-02-21

    The thrust stand in the Rocket Engine Test Facility at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The Rocket Engine Test Facility was constructed in the mid-1950s to expand upon the smaller test cells built a decade before at the Rocket Laboratory. The $2.5-million Rocket Engine Test Facility could test larger hydrogen-fluorine and hydrogen-oxygen rocket thrust chambers with thrust levels up to 20,000 pounds. Test Stand A, seen in this photograph, was designed to fire vertically mounted rocket engines downward. The exhaust passed through an exhaust gas scrubber and muffler before being vented into the atmosphere. Lewis researchers in the early 1970s used the Rocket Engine Test Facility to perform basic research that could be utilized by designers of the Space Shuttle Main Engines. A new electronic ignition system and timer were installed at the facility for these tests. Lewis researchers demonstrated the benefits of ceramic thermal coatings for the engine’s thrust chamber and determined the optimal composite material for the coatings. They compared the thermal-coated thrust chamber to traditional unlined high-temperature thrust chambers. There were more than 17,000 different configurations tested on this stand between 1973 and 1976. The Rocket Engine Test Facility was later designated a National Historic Landmark for its role in the development of liquid hydrogen as a propellant.

  5. Development and application of noninvasive technology for study of combustion in a combustion chamber of gas turbine engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inozemtsev, A. A.; Sazhenkov, A. N.; Tsatiashvili, V. V.; Abramchuk, T. V.; Shipigusev, V. A.; Andreeva, T. P.; Gumerov, A. R.; Ilyin, A. N.; Gubaidullin, I. T.

    2015-05-01

    The paper formulates the issue of development of experimental base with noninvasive optical-electronic tools for control of combustion in a combustion chamber of gas turbine engine. The design and specifications of a pilot sample of optronic system are explained; this noninvasive system was created in the framework of project of development of main critical technologies for designing of aviation gas turbine engine PD-14. The testbench run data are presented.

  6. Advanced engine study program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, A. I.; Galler, D. E.; Denman, T. F.; Shied, R. A.; Black, J. R.; Fierstein, A. R.; Clark, G. L.; Branstrom, B. R.

    1993-01-01

    A design and analysis study was conducted to provide advanced engine descriptions and parametric data for space transfer vehicles. The study was based on an advanced oxygen/hydrogen engine in the 7,500 to 50,000 lbf thrust range. Emphasis was placed on defining requirements for high-performance engines capable of achieving reliable and versatile operation in a space environment. Four variations on the expander cycle were compared, and the advantages and disadvantages of each were assessed. Parametric weight, envelope, and performance data were generated over a range of 7,500 to 50,000 lb thrust and a wide range of chamber pressure and nozzle expansion ratio.

  7. Self-oscillations of an unstable fuel combustion in the combustion chamber of a liquid-propellant rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotsulenko, V. V.; Gotsulenko, V. N.

    2013-01-01

    The form of the self-oscillations of a vibrating combustion of a fuel in the combustion chamber of a liquidpropellant rocket engine, caused by the fuel-combustion lag and the heat release, was determined. The character of change in these self-oscillations with increase in the time of the fuel-combustion lag was investigated.

  8. Linear Test Bed. Volume 2: Test Bed No. 2. [linear aerospike test bed for thrust vector control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Test bed No. 2 consists of 10 combustors welded in banks of 5 to 2 symmetrical tubular nozzle assemblies, an upper stationary thrust frame, a lower thrust frame which can be hinged, a power package, a triaxial combustion wave ignition system, a pneumatic control system, pneumatically actuated propellant valves, a purge and drain system, and an electrical control system. The power package consists of the Mark 29-F fuel turbopump, the Mark 29-0 oxidizer turbopump, a gas generator assembly, and propellant ducting. The system, designated as a linear aerospike system, was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept and to explore technology related to thrust vector control, thrust vector optimization, improved sequencing and control, and advanced ignition systems. The propellants are liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen. The system was designed to operate at 1200-psia chamber pressure at an engine mixture ratio of 5.5. With 10 combustors, the sea level thrust is 95,000 pounds.

  9. Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of a 4000-Pound-Thrust Axial-Flow Turbojet Engine. Part 1; Performance and Windmilling Drag Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, William A.

    1948-01-01

    The results of altitude-wind-tunnel tests conducted to determine the performance of an axial-flow-type 4000.pound-thrust turboJet engine for a range of pressure altitudes from 5000 to 40,000 feet and ram pressure ratios from 1.02 to 1.86 are presented and the experimental and analytical methods employed are discussed. By means of suitable generalizing factors applied to the measured performance data, curves were obtained from which the engine performance at any altitude for a given ram pressure ratio can be estimated. The data presented include the windmilling drag characteristics of the turbojet engine for the ranges of altitudes and ram pressure ratios covered by the performance data.

  10. Possible role of mechanical force in regulating regeneration of the vascularized fat flap inside a tissue engineering chamber.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yuan; Yuan, Yi; Lu, Feng; Gao, Jianhua

    2015-12-01

    In plastic and reconstructive surgery, adipose tissue is widely used as effective filler for tissue defects. Strategies for treating soft tissue deficiency, which include free adipose tissue grafts, use of hyaluronic acid, collagen injections, and implantation of synthetic materials, have several clinical limitations. With the aim of overcoming these limitations, researchers have recently utilized tissue engineering chambers to produce large volumes of engineered vascularized fat tissue. However, the process of growing fat tissue in a chamber is still relatively limited, and can result in unpredictable or dissatisfactory final tissue volumes. Therefore, detailed understanding of the process is both necessary and urgent. Many studies have shown that mechanical force can change the function of cells via mechanotransduction. Here, we hypothesized that, besides the inflammatory response, one of the key factors to control the regeneration of vascularized fat flap inside a tissue engineering chamber might be the balance of mechanical forces. To test our hypothesis, we intend to change the balance of forces by means of measures in order to make the equilibrium point in favor of the direction of regeneration. If those measures proved to be feasible, they could be applied in clinical practice to engineer vascularized adipose tissue of predictable size and shape, which would in turn help in the advancement of tissue engineering.

  11. The effect of insulated combustion chamber surfaces on direct-injected diesel engine performance, emissions, and combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Daniel W.; Vinyard, Shannon; Keribar, Rifat

    1988-01-01

    The combustion chamber of a single-cylinder, direct-injected diesel engine was insulated with ceramic coatings to determine the effect of low heat rejection (LHR) operation on engine performance, emissions, and combustion. In comparison to the baseline cooled engine, the LHR engine had lower thermal efficiency, with higher smoke, particulate, and full load carbon monoxide emissions. The unburned hydrocarbon emissions were reduced across the load range. The nitrous oxide emissions increased at some part-load conditions and were reduced slightly at full loads. The poor LHR engine performance was attributed to degraded combustion characterized by less premixed burning, lower heat release rates, and longer combustion duration compared to the baseline cooled engine.

  12. Rotating and positive-displacement pumps for low-thrust rocket engines. Volume 1: Pump Evaluation and design. [of centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macgregor, C.; Csomor, A.

    1974-01-01

    Rotating and positive displacement pumps of various types were studied for pumping liquid fluorine for low-thrust, high-performance rocket engines. Included in the analysis were: centrifugal, pitot, Barske, Tesla, drag, gear, vane, axial piston, radial piston, diaphragm, and helirotor pump concepts. The centrifugal pump and the gear pump were selected and these were carried through detailed design and fabrication. Mechanical difficulties were encountered with the gear pump during the preliminary tests in Freon-12. Further testing and development was therefore limited to the centrifugal pump. Tests on the centrifugal pump were conducted in Freon-12 to determine the hydrodynamic performance and in liquid fluorine to demonstrate chemical compatibility.

  13. Computational Model Tracking Primary Electrons, Secondary Electrons, and Ions in the Discharge Chamber of an Ion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahalingam, Sudhakar; Menart, James A.

    2005-01-01

    Computational modeling of the plasma located in the discharge chamber of an ion engine is an important activity so that the development and design of the next generation of ion engines may be enhanced. In this work a computational tool called XOOPIC is used to model the primary electrons, secondary electrons, and ions inside the discharge chamber. The details of this computational tool are discussed in this paper. Preliminary results from XOOPIC are presented. The results presented include particle number density distributions for the primary electrons, the secondary electrons, and the ions. In addition the total number of a particular particle in the discharge chamber as a function of time, electric potential maps and magnetic field maps are presented. A primary electron number density plot from PRIMA is given in this paper so that the results of XOOPIC can be compared to it. PRIMA is a computer code that the present investigators have used in much of their previous work that provides results that compare well to experimental results. PRIMA only models the primary electrons in the discharge chamber. Modeling ions and secondary electrons, as well as the primary electrons, will greatly increase our ability to predict different characteristics of the plasma discharge used in an ion engine.

  14. Feasibility study on oil droplet flow investigations inside aero engine bearing chambers -- PDPA techniques in combination with numerical approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Glahn, A.; Kurreck, M.; Willmann, M.; Wittig, S.

    1996-10-01

    The present paper deals with oil droplet flow phenomena in aero engine bearing chambers. An experimental investigation of droplet sizes and velocities utilizing a Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) has been performed for the first time in bearing chamber atmospheres under real engine conditions. Influences of high rotational speeds are discussed for individual droplet size classes. Although this is an important contribution to a better understanding of the droplet flow impact on secondary air/oil system performance, an analysis of the droplet flow behavior requires an incorporation of numerical methods because detailed measurements as performed here suffer from both strong spatial limitations with respect to the optical accessibility in real engine applications and constraints due to the extremely time-consuming nature of an experimental flow field analysis. Therefore, further analysis is based on numerical methods. Droplets characterized within the experiments are exposed to the flow field of the gaseous phase predicted by use of the well-known CFD code EPOS. The droplet trajectories and velocities are calculated within a Lagrangian frame of reference by forward numerical integration of the particle momentum equation. This paper has been initiated rather to show a successful method of bearing chamber droplet flow analysis by a combination of droplet sizing techniques and numerical approaches than to present field values as a function of all operating parameters. However, a first insight into the complex droplet flow phenomena is given and specific problems in bearing chamber heat transfer are related to the droplet flow.

  15. Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of a 4000-Pound-Thrust Axial-Flow Turbojet Engine. II - Operational Characteristics. II; Operational Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, William A.

    1948-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Cleveland altitude wind tunnel to determine the operational characteristics of an axial flow-type turbojet engine with a 4000-pound-thrust rating over a range of pressure altitudes from 5,000 to 50,OOO feet, ram pressure ratios from 1.00 to 1.86, and temperatures from 60 deg to -50 deg F. The low-flow (standard) compressor with which the engine was originally equipped was replaced by a high-flow compressor for part of the investigation. The effects of altitude and airspeed on such operating characteristics as operating range, stability of combustion, acceleration, starting, operation of fuel-control systems, and bearing cooling were investigated. With the low-flow compressor, the engine could be operated at full speed without serious burner unbalance at altitudes up to 50,000 feet. Increasing the altitude and airspeed greatly reduced the operable speed range of the engine by raising the minimum operating speed of the engine. In several runs with the high-flow compressor the maximum engine speed was limited to less than 7600 rpm by combustion blow-out, high tail-pipe temperatures, and compressor stall. Acceleration of the engine was relatively slow and the time required for acceleration increased with altitude. At maximum engine speed a sudden reduction in jet-nozzle area resulted in an immediate increase in thrust. The engine started normally and easily below 20,000 feet with each configuration. The use of a high-voltage ignition system made possible starts at a pressure altitude of 40,000 feet; but on these starts the tail-pipe temperatures were very high, a great deal of fuel burned in and behind the tail-pipe, and acceleration was very slow. Operation of the engine was similar with both fuel regulators except that the modified fuel regulator restricted the fuel flow in such a manner that the acceleration above 6000 rpm was very slow. The bearings did not cool properly at high altitudes and high engine speeds with a low

  16. Orbit transfer vehicle advanced expander cycle engine point design study. Volume 2: Study results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diem, H. G.

    1980-01-01

    The design characteristics of the baseline engine configuration of the advanced expander cycle engine are described. Several aspects of engine optimization are considered which directly impact the design of the baseline thrust chamber. Four major areas of the power cycle optimization are emphasized: main turbine arrangement; cycle engine source; high pressure pump design; and boost pump drive.

  17. Modelling Testing and Design Considerations of a GOX-GCH4 Igniter for a Hyprob-SSBB Single Igniter Thrust Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, F.

    This paper discusses design, test results and preliminary numerical rebuilding of the GOX-GCH4 igniter for a subscale experimental "breadboard" (SSBB) LOX/Methane rocket engine in the framework of the HYPROB-BREAD project. The igniter architecture takes into account different literature efforts and has been selected with the objective of achieving good performance with low cost. CFD, FEM and system simulations have been performed in order to demonstrate the validity of the design. The main results from the first experimental campaign as well as a preliminary numerical rebuilding analysis are shown.

  18. Elimination of rocket engine asymmetric loads during tests at sea level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. R.

    1966-01-01

    Secondary injection concept eliminates asymmetric loads and may increase thrust rocket engine loads during sea level tests. The concept uses either a tubular manifold with evenly spaced injection ports or secondary fluid injected at the turbine exhaust inlet to the thrust chamber.

  19. THRUST BEARING

    DOEpatents

    Heller, P.R.

    1958-09-16

    A thrust bearing suitable for use with a rotor or blower that is to rotate about a vertical axis is descrihed. A centrifagal jack is provided so thnt the device may opernte on one hearing at starting and lower speeds, and transfer the load to another bearing at higher speeds. A low viscosity fluid is used to lubricate the higher speed operation bearing, in connection with broad hearing -surfaces, the ability to withstand great loads, and a relatively high friction loss, as contraated to the lower speed operatio;n bearing which will withstand only light thrust loads but is sufficiently frictionfree to avoid bearing seizure during slow speed or startup operation. An axially aligned shaft pin provides the bearing surface for low rotational speeds, but at higher speed, weights operating against spring tension withdraw nthe shaft pin into the bearing proper and the rotor shaft comes in contact with the large bearing surfaces.

  20. $c(*) $ c ∗ -Efficiency evaluation of transpiration cooled ceramic combustion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbertz, Armin; Ortelt, Markus; Müller, Ilja; Hald, Hermann

    2014-06-01

    Achievable benefits of the transpiration cooled ceramic thrust chamber are the reduction of weight and manufacturing cost, as well as an increased reliability and higher lifetime due to thermal cycle stability. The transpiration cooling principle however reduces the engine performance. In order to evaluate the performance losses a c^*-analysis is performed. Due to the transpiration cooling the characteristic velocity decreases with increasing coolant ratio. The goal of the chamber development is therefore to minimize the required coolant mass flow. The paper discusses the test specimen set up for the ceramic thrust chamber tests. Chamber operating parameters are listed. The paper discusses the impact of transpiration cooling on the calculated c^* efficiency. The evaluation is based on test results with the ceramic combustion chamber conducted in four separate test campaigns between 2008 and 2012.

  1. Weak Thrusts

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-07-09

    One active region at the edge of the Sun pushed out about ten thrusts of plasma in just over a day long period (July 9-10, 2016). All of them, propelled by magnetic forces, quickly withdrew back into the active region. The images were taken in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. Movies are also available at the Photojournal. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20883

  2. Thrust and Propulsive Efficiency from an Instructive Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    In a typical engineering or physics curriculum, the momentum equation is used for the determination of jet engine thrust. Even a simple thrust analysis requires a heavy emphasis on mathematics that can cause students and engineers to lose a physical perspective on thrust. This article provides for this physical understanding using only static…

  3. Thrust and Propulsive Efficiency from an Instructive Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    In a typical engineering or physics curriculum, the momentum equation is used for the determination of jet engine thrust. Even a simple thrust analysis requires a heavy emphasis on mathematics that can cause students and engineers to lose a physical perspective on thrust. This article provides for this physical understanding using only static…

  4. Expansion and hepatocytic differentiation of liver progenitor cells in vivo using a vascularized tissue engineering chamber in mice.

    PubMed

    Forster, Natasha; Palmer, Jason A; Yeoh, George; Ong, Wei-Chen; Mitchell, Geraldine M; Slavin, John; Tirnitz-Parker, Janina; Morrison, Wayne A

    2011-03-01

    Current cell-based treatment alternatives to organ transplantation for liver failure remain unsatisfactory. Hepatocytes have a strong tendency to dedifferentiate and apoptose when isolated and maintained in culture. In contrast, liver progenitor cells (LPCs) are robust, easy to culture and have been shown to replace damaged hepatocytes in liver disease. In this study we investigate whether isolated LPCs can survive and differentiate toward mature hepatocytes in vivo when implanted into a heterotopic mouse tissue engineering chamber model. Healthy Balb/c mice and those put on a choline-deficient ethionin-supplemented diet to induce chronic liver disease were implanted with a tissue engineering chamber based on the epigastric flow through pedicle model, containing either 1 × 10(6) LPCs suspended in Matrigel, or LPC-spheroids produced by preculture for 1 week in Matrigel. Four weeks after implantation the chamber contents were harvested. In all four groups, progenitor cells persisted in large numbers to 4 weeks and demonstrated evidence of considerable proliferation judged by Ki67-positive cells. Periodic acid Schiff staining demonstrated differentiation of some cells into mature hepatocytes. Constructs grown from LPC-spheroids demonstrated considerably greater LPC survival than those from LPCs that were grown as monolayers and implanted as dissociated cells. The combined use of LPC spheroids and the vascularized chamber model could be the basis for a viable alternative to current treatments for chronic liver failure.

  5. Design the Cost Approach in Trade-Off's for Structural Components, Illustrated on the Baseline Selection of the Engine Thrust Frame of Ariane 5 ESC-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appolloni, L.; Juhls, A.; Rieck, U.

    2002-01-01

    Designing for value is one of the very actual upcoming methods for design optimization, which broke into the domain of aerospace engineering in the late 90's. In the frame of designing for value two main design philosophies exist: Design For Cost and Design To Cost. Design To Cost is the iterative redesign of a project until the content of the project meets a given budget. Designing For Cost is the conscious use of engineering process technology to reduce life cycle cost while satisfying, and hopefully exceeding, customer demands. The key to understanding cost, and hence to reducing cost, is the ability to measure cost accurately and to allocate it appropriately to products. Only then can intelligent decisions be made. Therefore the necessity of new methods as "Design For Value" or "Design For Competitiveness", set up with a generally multidisciplinary approach to find an optimized technical solution driven by many parameters, depending on the mission scenario and the customer/market needs. Very often three, but not more than five parametric drivers are sufficient. The more variable exist, the higher is in fact the risk to find just a sub-optimized local and not the global optimum, and the less robust is the found solution against change of input parameters. When the main parameters for optimization have been identified, the system engineer has to communicate them to all design engineers, who shall take care of these assessment variables during the entire design and decision process. The design process which has taken to the definition of the feasible structural concepts for the Engine Thrust Frame of the Ariane 5 Upper Cryogenic Stage ESC-B follows these most actual design philosophy methodologies, and combines a design for cost approach, to a design to cost optimization loop. Ariane 5 is the first member of a family of heavy-lift launchers. It aims to evolve into a family of launchers that responds to the space transportation challenges of the 21st century. New

  6. Anode supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cells operating in exhaust gases of thermal engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briault, Pauline; Rieu, Mathilde; Laucournet, Richard; Morel, Bertrand; Viricelle, Jean-Paul

    2014-12-01

    This project deals with the development and the electrochemical characterization of anode supported single chamber SOFC in a simulated environment of thermal engine exhaust gas. In the present work, a gas mixture representative of exhaust conditions is selected. It is composed of hydrocarbons (HC: propane and propene), oxygen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, hydrogen and water. Only oxygen content is varied leading to different gas mixtures characterized by three ratios R = HC/O2. Concerning the cell components, a cermet made of nickel and an electrolyte material, Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 (CGO) is used as anode and two cathode materials, La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF) and Pr2NiO4+δ (PNO), are evaluated. The prepared cells are investigated in the various gas mixtures for temperatures ranging from 450 °C to 600 °C. Ni-CGO/CGO/LSCF-CGO cell has delivered a maximum power density of 15 mW cm-2 at 500 °C with R = HC/O2 = 0.21, while lower power densities are obtained for the other ratios, R = 0.44 and R = 0.67. Afterwards, LSCF and PNO cathode materials are compared and LSCF is found to deliver the highest power densities. Finally, by improving the electrolyte microstructure, some cells presenting a maximum power density of 25 mW cm-2 at 550 °C are produced. Moreover, up to 17% of initial HC are eliminated in the gas mixture.

  7. The Evaluation of High Temperature Adhesive Bonding Processes for Rocket Engine Combustion Chamber Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCray, Daniel; Smith, Jeffrey; Rice, Brian; Blohowiak, Kay; Anderson, Robert; Shin, E. Eugene; McCorkle, Linda; Sutter, James

    2003-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center is currently evaluating the possibility of using high- temperature polymer matrix composites to reinforce the combustion chamber of a rocket engine. One potential design utilizes a honeycomb structure composed of a PMR-II- 50/M40J 4HS composite facesheet and titanium honeycomb core to reinforce a stainless steel shell. In order to properly fabricate this structure, adhesive bond PMR-II-50 composite. Proper prebond surface preparation is critical in order to obtain an acceptable adhesive bond. Improperly treated surfaces will exhibit decreased bond strength and durability, especially in metallic bonds where interface are susceptible to degradation due to heat and moisture. Most treatments for titanium and stainless steel alloys require the use of strong chemicals to etch and clean the surface. This processes are difficult to perform due to limited processing facilities as well as safety and environmental risks and they do not consistently yield optimum bond durability. Boeing Phantom Works previously developed sol-gel surface preparations for titanium alloys using a PETI-5 based polyimide adhesive. In support of part of NASA Glenn Research Center, UDRI and Boeing Phantom Works evaluated variations of this high temperature sol-gel surface preparation, primer type, and primer cure conditions on the adhesion performance of titanium and stainless steel using Cytec FM 680-1 polyimide adhesive. It was also found that a modified cure cycle of the FM 680-1 adhesive, i.e., 4 hrs at 370 F in vacuum + post cure, significantly increased the adhesion strength compared to the manufacturer's suggested cure cycle. In addition, the surface preparation of the PMR-II-50 composite was evaluated in terms of surface cleanness and roughness. This presentation will discuss the results of strength and durability testing conducted on titanium, stainless steel, and PMR-II-50 composite adherends to evaluate possible bonding processes.

  8. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Thrust reversers. 33.97 Section 33.97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.97 Thrust reversers. (a) If...

  9. Modified RS2101 rocket engine study program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The purpose of the program is to perform design studies and analyses to determine the effects of incorporating a 60:1 expansion area ratio nozzle extension, extended firing time, and modified operating conditions and environments on the MM'71 rocket engine assembly. An injector-to-thrust chamber seal study was conducted to define potential solutions for leakage past this joint. The results and recommendations evolving from the engine thermal analyses, the injector-to-thrust chamber seal studies, and the nozzle extension joint stress analyses are presented.

  10. Constructal approach to bio-engineering: the ocular anterior chamber temperature

    PubMed Central

    Lucia, Umberto; Grisolia, Giulia; Dolcino, Daniela; Astori, Maria Rosa; Massa, Eugenio; Ponzetto, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyse the pressure inside the eyes anterior chamber, namedintraocular pressure (IOP), in relation to the biomechanical properties of corneas. The approach used was based on the constructal law, recently introduced in vision analysis. Results were expressed as the relation between the temperature of the ocular anterior chamber and the biomechanical properties of the cornea. The IOP, the elastic properties of the cornea, and the related refractive properties of the eye were demonstrated to be dependent on the temperature of the ocular anterior chamber. These results could lead to new perspectives for experimental analysis of the IOP in relation to the properties of the cornea. PMID:27492652

  11. Constructal approach to bio-engineering: the ocular anterior chamber temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucia, Umberto; Grisolia, Giulia; Dolcino, Daniela; Astori, Maria Rosa; Massa, Eugenio; Ponzetto, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to analyse the pressure inside the eyes anterior chamber, namedintraocular pressure (IOP), in relation to the biomechanical properties of corneas. The approach used was based on the constructal law, recently introduced in vision analysis. Results were expressed as the relation between the temperature of the ocular anterior chamber and the biomechanical properties of the cornea. The IOP, the elastic properties of the cornea, and the related refractive properties of the eye were demonstrated to be dependent on the temperature of the ocular anterior chamber. These results could lead to new perspectives for experimental analysis of the IOP in relation to the properties of the cornea.

  12. Airbreathing Pulse Detonation Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.; Yungster, Shaye

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents performance results for pulse detonation engines taking into account the effects of dissociation and recombination. The amount of sensible heat recovered through recombination in the PDE chamber and exhaust process was found to be significant. These results have an impact on the specific thrust, impulse and fuel consumption of the PDE.

  13. Airbreathing Pulse Detonation Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.; Yungster, Shaye

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents performance results for pulse detonation engines (PDE) taking into account the effects of dissociation and recombination. The amount of sensible heat recovered through recombination in the PDE chamber and exhaust process was found to be significant. These results have an impact on the specific thrust, impulse and fuel consumption of the PDE.

  14. Airbreathing Pulse Detonation Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.; Yungster, Shaye

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents performance results for pulse detonation engines taking into account the effects of dissociation and recombination. The amount of sensible heat recovered through recombination in the PDE chamber and exhaust process was found to be significant. These results have an impact on the specific thrust, impulse and fuel consumption of the PDE.

  15. Enhanced liver progenitor cell survival and differentiation in vivo by spheroid implantation in a vascularized tissue engineering chamber.

    PubMed

    Yap, Kiryu K; Dingle, Aaron M; Palmer, Jason A; Dhillon, Raminder S; Lokmic, Zerina; Penington, Anthony J; Yeoh, George C; Morrison, Wayne A; Mitchell, Geraldine M

    2013-05-01

    Liver tissue engineering is hampered by poor implanted cell survival due to inadequate vascularization and cell-cell/cell-matrix interactions. Here, we use liver progenitor cell (LPC) spheroids to enhance cell-cell/cell-matrix interactions, with implantation into an angiogenic in vivo mouse chamber. Spheroids were generated in vitro in methylcellulose medium. Day 2 spheroids were optimal for implantation (22,407 +/-645 cells/spheroid), demonstrating maximal proliferation (Ki67 immunolabeling) and minimal apoptosis (caspase-3 immunolabelling). In vivo chambers established bilaterally on epigastric vessels of immunodeficient mice were implanted with equivalent numbers of LPCs as a cell suspension (200,000 cells), or spheroids (9 spheroids). At day 14, a trend of increased LPC survival was observed in spheroid-implanted chambers [pan-cytokeratin (panCK+) cells, p = 0.38, 2.4 fold increase)], with significantly increased differentiation [cytokeratin 18 (CK18+) cells, p < 0.002, 5.1 fold increase)] compared to cell suspension-implanted chambers. At day 45, both measures were significantly increased in spheroid-implanted chambers (panCK, p < 0.006, 16 fold increase) (CK18, p < 0.019, 6 fold increase). Hepatic acini/plates of CK18 + cells expressed hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-α and β-catenin, indicating ongoing hepatic differentiation. Spheroid cell-delivery significantly increased LPC survival and differentiation compared to conventional cell suspensions. This LPC spheroid/vascularized chamber model has clinical potential to generate three-dimensional vascularized liver tissue for liver replacement.

  16. Breadboard RL10-2B low-thrust operating mode (second iteration) test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanic, Paul G.; Kaldor, Raymond B.; Watkins, Pia M.

    1988-01-01

    Cryogenic rocket engines requiring a cooling process to thermally condition the engine to operating temperature can be made more efficient if cooling propellants can be burned. Tank head idle and pumped idle modes can be used to burn propellants employed for cooling, thereby providing useful thrust. Such idle modes required the use of a heat exchanger to vaporize oxygen prior to injection into the combustion chamber. During December 1988, Pratt and Whitney conducted a series of engine hot firing demonstrating the operation of two new, previously untested oxidizer heat exchanger designs. The program was a second iteration of previous low thrust testing conducted in 1984, during which a first-generation heat exchanger design was used. Although operation was demonstrated at tank head idle and pumped idle, the engine experienced instability when propellants could not be supplied to the heat exchanger at design conditions.

  17. Interference effects of thrust reversing on horizontal tail effectiveness of twin-engine fighter aircraft at Mach numbers from 0.15 to 0.90

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, F. J.; Mason, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16 foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the interference effects of thrust reversing on horizontal tail effectiveness of a twin engine, general research fighter model at approach and in-flight speeds. Twin vertical tails at three longitudinal locations were tested at a cant angle of 0 deg. One configuration was also tested at a cant angle of 20 deg. Two nonaxisymmetric nozzle reverser concepts were studied. Test data were obtained at Mach numbers of 0.15, 0.60, and 0.90 and at angles of attack from -3 to 9 deg. Nozzle pressure ratios varied from jet off to 7.0, depending upon Mach number. At landing approach speed (Mach number 0.15), thrust reverser operation usually resulted in large variations (up to 70% increase) in horizontal tail effectiveness as nozzle pressure ratio was varied at zero angle of attack or as angle of attack was varied at constant nozzle pressure ratio. There was always a decrease in effectiveness at Mach numbers of 0.60 and 0.90 as a result of reverser operation.

  18. Stability testing of a modified Space Shuttle Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, H.; Hutt, J.; Nesman, T.

    1991-01-01

    The testing of the combustion stability characteristics of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) 0208 is described in terms of augmenting the technology base for large O/H thrust-chamber assemblies. The throat area is increased by 12 percent over that of the flight SSMEs, and the thrust chamber assembly does not include stability aids. Acoustic modes in the chamber are excited by means of rapid pressure generators employed in the start-transient through mainstage operations. Stability characteristics are determined by damp times which are facilitated by high-frequency instrumentation measuring oscillations and locating stable operating regions. All vibration modes are damped to within the requirements for a chamber mode set forth by the Chemical Propulsion Information Agency. No sustained chamber acoustic oscillations are exhibited in engine 0208's combustion chamber configuration in spite of the absence of baffles and acoustic cavities.

  19. A 50 cm diameter annular ion engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, Graeme; Brophy, John R.

    1989-01-01

    An ion engine design is presented which uses an annular geometry as a means of achieving large engine diameters and hence, high thrust levels. Preliminary results are discussed for discharge-only operation of a 50-cm-diameter annular ion engine. Measured operating parameters presented include discharge current and voltage characteristics, discharge chamber ion current distribution, engine body temperatures, plasma flatness parameter effects and total integrated grid ion current.

  20. Acoustic tuning of gas liquid scheme injectors for acoustic damping in a combustion chamber of a liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Chae Hoon; Park, I.-Sun; Kim, Seong-Ku; Jip Kim, Hong

    2007-07-01

    In a combustion chamber of a liquid rocket engine, acoustic fine-tuning of gas-liquid scheme injectors is studied numerically for acoustic stability by adopting a linear acoustic analysis. Injector length and blockage ratio at gas inlet are adjusted for fine-tuning. First, acoustic behavior in the combustor with a single injector is investigated and acoustic-damping effect of the injector is evaluated for cold condition by the quantitative parameter of damping factor as a function of injector length. From the numerical results, it is found that the injector can play a significant role in acoustic damping when it is tuned finely. The optimum tuning-length of the injector to maximize the damping capacity corresponds to half of a full wavelength of the first longitudinal overtone mode traveling in the injector with the acoustic frequency intended for damping in the chamber. In baffled chamber, the optimum lengths of the injector are calculated as a function of baffle length for both cold and hot conditions. Next, in the combustor with numerous resonators, peculiar acoustic coupling between a combustion chamber and injectors is observed. As the injector length approaches a half-wavelength, the new injector-coupled acoustic mode shows up and thereby, the acoustic-damping effect of the tuned injectors is appreciably degraded. And, damping factor maintains a near-constant value with blockage ratio and then, decreases rapidly. Blockage ratio affects also acoustic damping and should be considered for acoustic tuning.

  1. Transferring the exudate in the tissue engineering chamber as a trigger to incubate large amount adipose tissue in remote area.

    PubMed

    Lei, Chen; Dong, Ziqing; Wan, Jinlin; Xiao, Xiaolian; Lu, Feng; Wang, Biao

    2017-10-03

    Tissue engineering chamber (TEC) is a technique that could incubate up to 16 folds volume increase of a fat flap. But the mechanism in the silicone chamber was still unknown. The function of exudate in the chamber was noticed recently. We developed a special model called fluid drainage model (FDM) that consisted of a traditional TEC on the back and paired fat flaps without a chamber in the groins. Then we used a silicon tube to dynamically transfer the exudate from dorsal TEC to one of the paired inguinal fat flap while the other inguinal fat flap with a sham tube was set as control. At week 4, the volume of drainage group reached 8.7 ± 2.3 ml, 576±152% to its original volume while the growth ratio of control group was only 130±39%. Similar volume change and histological change were observed within fat flap from TEC model and drainage group. The exudate in the TEC is a heterogeneous cocktail contains cytokines as well as cells. Intriguingly, transferred exudate in the TEC model sustain the ability to incubate large amount of adipose tissue remotely. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Low-thrust vehicles concept studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ketchum, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    Low thrust chemical (hydrogen-oxygen) propulsion systems configured specifically for low acceleration orbit transfer of large space systems were studied in order to provide the required additional data to better compare new, low thrust chemical propulsion systems with other propulsion approaches such as advanced electric systems. Study results indicate that it is cost-effective and least risk to combine the low thrust OTV and stowed spacecraft in a single 65 K shuttle. Mission analysis indicates that there are 25 such missions, starting in 1987. Multiple shuttles (LSS in one, OTV in another) result in a 20% increase in LSS (SBR) diameter over single shuttle launches. Synthesis and optimization of the LSS characteristics and OTV capability resulted in determination of the optimum thrust-to-weight and thrust level. For the space based radar with radial truss arms (center thrust application), the optimum thrust-to-weight (maximum) is 0.1, giving a thrust of 2000 lb. For the annular truss (edge-on thrust application) the structure is not as sensitive, and thrust of 1000 lb appears optimum. For the geoplatform, optimum T/W is .15 (3000 lb thrust). The effects of LSS structure material, weight distribution, and unit area density were evaluated, as were the OTV engine thrust transient and number of burns.

  3. Performance and Thrust-to-Weight Optimization of the Dual-Expander Aerospike Nozzle Upper Stage Rocket Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    Copper (C17000 TH04) Oxygen-Free Copper (C10100 1180 Temper) Cobalt (Forged Electrolytic) INCONEL ® 718 (Annealed & Aged) Compatible with O2 / Useable...for chamber cooling jacket, structural jacket, and O2 plumbing INCONEL ® 625 (Annealed) Aluminum 7075 T6 Not compatible with O2 or H2 / Useable for... INCONEL 718 Copper Table 9 Impact of material strength on T/W Worst Material Selection Best Material Selection Yield Strength Ultimate

  4. 7.5K 1bf Thrust Engine Preliminary Design for Orbit Transfer Vehicle. Task D.5

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    Carbon Radiation Section Materials 172 TABLE 3.4.7-3 OTV ENGINE EXTENDIBLE NOZZLE RADIATION COOLED MATERIAL OPTIONS Metals: Columbium Alloys C103 and...Position 3.4.7-7 OTV Engine Extendible Nozzle Radiation View Factors 182 vs Position 3.4.7-8 OTV Engine Extendible Nozzle Wall Temperature ( C103 ) 183 vs...Surface Recession 189 for System Life (20 Hour) 3.4.7-11 OTV Engine Extendible Nozzle Fused Slurry Coating 190 Selected for Columbium 3.4.7-12 Preliminary

  5. Rocket engine development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Kathleen N.

    1993-04-01

    The paper discusses the National Launch System Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) development program, which is a joint USAF/NASA project to produce a heavy-lift launch vehicle at a cost significantly below that of current systems and which incorporates efforts by three member companies. The STME project is organized into seven product development teams (systems engineering and integration, engine system, thrust chamber assembly, fuel turbopump assembly, oxidizer turbopump assembly, control system, and engine hardware), each led by one of the three member companies along with a NASA deputy. Most teams are assigned several components, each having a product-oriented concurrent engineering team involving all relevant disciplines.

  6. Space Station Auxiliary Thrust Chamber Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    pro - vided the basis for the current thruster design, namely a proven spark torch igniter. This igniter concept utilized two-stage ignition, as shown... pro - vided a substantial foundation upon which to evaluate the thruster operation and to establish the key design parameters affecting thruster...O4uSIKAL £fDEP!AnIsN[8 O. U1VIT6hh1 U1K TI TNTPAS. z1 I6. A419 SPANK PLUS CO.. It MORE SYKIET. C.r AUBURN. $I1 vYOa 4. LNALTI~t AS stOWs. F.a.tY NJA

  7. Space Station auxiliary thrust chamber technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Philip J.

    1990-01-01

    The objective was to establish a technical data base to support future development of GO2/GH2 flight thrusters for a Space Station Auxiliary Propulsion System. Specific issues of concern were thruster performance and cycle life. To address these issues, NASA funded Aerojet to design, fabricate, and altitude test two 25-lbf GO2/GH2 thrusters. The first thruster was designed to operate at a nominal mixture ratio (O/F) of 4.0 and expansion area ratio (epsilon) of 100:1. It was tested over a range of O/F from 2.0 to 8.0, achieving a range of specific impulse (Isp) from 440 to 310 lbf-sec/Ibm. The second thruster was optimized for a nominal O/F of 8.0 at a lower nozzle expansion area ratio, epsilon, of 30:1. This second thruster was tested over an O/F range of 3.0 to 9.5, achieving an Isp range of 416 to 3323 lbf-sec/Ibm, respectively. At O/F = 8.0, the Isp was 360 lbf-sec/Ibm, as predicted.

  8. Tubular Copper Thrust Chamber Design Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    11043 . SPEED (I) 13041. MEAN 0IA (IN) S.11 S SPEED SM2. EFF AEA (lee) 2.7S HEAD (FT) 24z. UIC (ACTUAL) 0.333 DIA. (IN) 2.73 MAX TIP SE 273. TIP SPEED...CRPM1 11043 . SPEED ( 41 11043 . MEAN DIA (IN) S.11 S SPED 3026. EFF AREA (11421 3.06 HEAD (PT) 242. U/C (ACTUAL) 0.553 DIA. (IN) 2.73 AX TIP SPED 273...EFFICIONCY (T/T) 0.348 EFFICIENCY 0.704 EFFICIENCY CT/S) 0.203 HORIEPOWER 26. SPEED (RPM) 1 43. SPEED (RPM) 11043 . MEAN DIA (IN) 5.03 S SPEED 3026

  9. MPD (Magnetoplasmadynamic) Thrust Chamber Flow Dynamics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-29

    magnetoplasmadynamic, arcjet 𔄃 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number)I h The performance characteristics of MPD arcjets ...conditions during MPD arcjet operation are needed to guide development of flow models and to assess the validity of theoretical predictions. Efforts...techniques including time-, space-, and spectrally-resolved photography, to examine MPD arcjet internal flows. Experimental elucidation of the internal I

  10. Laser Transmission Measurements of Soot Extinction Coefficients in the Exhaust Plume of the X-34 60k-lb Thrust Fastrac Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, C. C.; Eskridge, R. H.; Lee, M. H.

    2000-01-01

    A four-channel laser transmissometer has been used to probe the soot content of the exhaust plume of the X-34 60k-lb thrust Fastrac rocket engine at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. The transmission measurements were made at an axial location about equal 1.65 nozzle diameters from the exit plane and are interpreted in terms of homogeneous radial zones to yield extinction coefficients from 0.5-8.4 per meter. The corresponding soot mass density, spatially averaged over the plume cross section, is, for Rayleigh particles, approximately equal to 0.7 micrograms/cubic cm and alternative particle distributions are briefly considered. Absolute plume radiance at the laser wavelength (515 nm) is estimated from the data at approximately equal to 2.200 K equivalent blackbody temperature, and temporal correlations in emission from several spatial locations are noted.

  11. Laser Transmission Measurements of Soot Extinction Coefficients in the Exhaust Plume of the X-34 60K-lb Thrust Fastrac Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, C. C.; Eskridge, R. H.; Lee, M. H.

    2000-01-01

    A four-channel laser transmissometer has been used to probe the soot content of the exhaust plume of the X-34 60k-lb thrust Fastrac rocket engine at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. The transmission measurements were made at an axial location approximately equal 1.65 nozzle diameters from the exit plane and are interpreted in terms of homogeneous radial zones to yield extinction coefficients from 0.5-8.4 per meter. The corresponding soot mass density, spatially averaged over the plume cross section, is, for Rayleigh particles, approximately equal 0.7 microgram/cc, and alternative particle distributions are briefly considered. Absolute plume radiance at the laser wavelength (515 nm) is estimated from the data at approximately equal 2,200 K equivalent blackbody temperature, and temporal correlations in emission from several spatial locations are noted.

  12. Analysis of thrust augmentation of turbojet engines by water injection at compressor inlet including charts for calculating compression processes with water injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, E Clinton; Trout, Arthur M

    1951-01-01

    A psychrometric chart having total pressure (sum of partial pressures of air and water vapor) as a variable, a Mollier diagram for air saturated with water vapor, and charts showing the thermodynamic properties of various air-water vapor and exhaust gas-water vapor mixtures are presented as aids in calculating the thrust augmentation of a turbojet engine resulting from the injection of water at the compressor inlet. Curves are presented that show the theoretical performance of the augmentation method for various amounts of water injected and the effects of varying flight Mach number, altitude, ambient-air temperature, ambient relative humidity, compressor pressure ratio, and inlet-diffuser efficiency. Numerical examples, illustrating the use of the psychrometric chart and the Mollier diagram in calculating both compressor-inlet and compressor-outlet conditions when water is injected at the compressor inlet, are presented.

  13. 14 CFR 33.79 - Fuel burning thrust augmentor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fuel burning thrust augmentor. 33.79... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.79 Fuel burning thrust augmentor. Each fuel burning thrust augmentor, including the nozzle, must— (a) Provide cutoff...

  14. 14 CFR 33.79 - Fuel burning thrust augmentor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fuel burning thrust augmentor. 33.79... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.79 Fuel burning thrust augmentor. Each fuel burning thrust augmentor, including the nozzle, must— (a) Provide cutoff...

  15. 14 CFR 33.79 - Fuel burning thrust augmentor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel burning thrust augmentor. 33.79... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.79 Fuel burning thrust augmentor. Each fuel burning thrust augmentor, including the nozzle, must— (a) Provide cutoff...

  16. Nonlinear behavior of acoustic waves in combustion chambers. I, II. [stability in solid propellant rocket engine and T burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culick, F. E. C.

    1976-01-01

    The general problem of the nonlinear growth and limiting amplitude of acoustic waves in a combustion chamber is treated in three parts: (1) the general conservation equations are expanded in two small parameters, and then combined to yield a nonlinear inhomogeneous wave equation, (2) the unsteady pressure and velocity fields are expressed as a synthesis of the normal modes of the chamber, but with unknown time-varying amplitudes, and (3) the system of nonlinear equations is treated by the method of averaging to produce a set of coupled nonlinear first order differential equations for the amplitudes and phases of the modes. This approximate analysis is applied to the investigation of the unstable motions in a solid propellant rocket engine and in a T burner.

  17. Nonlinear behavior of acoustic waves in combustion chambers. I, II. [stability in solid propellant rocket engine and T burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culick, F. E. C.

    1976-01-01

    The general problem of the nonlinear growth and limiting amplitude of acoustic waves in a combustion chamber is treated in three parts: (1) the general conservation equations are expanded in two small parameters, and then combined to yield a nonlinear inhomogeneous wave equation, (2) the unsteady pressure and velocity fields are expressed as a synthesis of the normal modes of the chamber, but with unknown time-varying amplitudes, and (3) the system of nonlinear equations is treated by the method of averaging to produce a set of coupled nonlinear first order differential equations for the amplitudes and phases of the modes. This approximate analysis is applied to the investigation of the unstable motions in a solid propellant rocket engine and in a T burner.

  18. Development of eddy current testing system for inspection of combustion chambers of liquid rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, D. F.; Zhang, Y. Z.; Shiwa, M.; Moriya, S.

    2013-01-01

    An eddy current testing (ECT) system using a high sensitive anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensor was developed. In this system, a 20 turn circular coil with a diameter of 3 mm was used to produce the excitation field. A high sensitivity AMR sensor was used to measure the magnetic field produced by the induced eddy currents. A specimen made of copper alloy was prepared to simulate the combustion chamber of liquid rocket. Scanning was realized by rotating the chamber with a motor. To reduce the influence of liftoff variance during scanning, a dual frequency excitation method was used. The experimental results proved that ECT system with an AMR sensor could be used to check liquid rocket combustion chamber.

  19. Development of eddy current testing system for inspection of combustion chambers of liquid rocket engines.

    PubMed

    He, D F; Zhang, Y Z; Shiwa, M; Moriya, S

    2013-01-01

    An eddy current testing (ECT) system using a high sensitive anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensor was developed. In this system, a 20 turn circular coil with a diameter of 3 mm was used to produce the excitation field. A high sensitivity AMR sensor was used to measure the magnetic field produced by the induced eddy currents. A specimen made of copper alloy was prepared to simulate the combustion chamber of liquid rocket. Scanning was realized by rotating the chamber with a motor. To reduce the influence of liftoff variance during scanning, a dual frequency excitation method was used. The experimental results proved that ECT system with an AMR sensor could be used to check liquid rocket combustion chamber.

  20. Design and evaluation of thrust vectored nozzles using a multicomponent thrust stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Thomas W.; Blattner, Ernest W.; Stagner, Robert E.; Contreras, Juanita; Lencioni, Dennis; Mcintosh, Greg

    1990-01-01

    Future aircraft with the capability of short takeoff and landing, and improved maneuverability especially in the post-stall flight regime will incorporate exhaust nozzles which can be thrust vectored. In order to conduct thrust vector research in the Mechanical Engineering Department at Cal Poly, a program was planned with two objectives; design and construct a multicomponent thrust stand for the specific purpose of measuring nozzle thrust vectors; and to provide quality low moisture air to the thrust stand for cold flow nozzle tests. The design and fabrication of the six-component thrust stand was completed. Detailed evaluation tests of the thrust stand will continue upon the receipt of one signal conditioning option (-702) for the Fluke Data Acquisition System. Preliminary design of thrust nozzles with air supply plenums were completed. The air supply was analyzed with regard to head loss. Initial flow visualization tests were conducted using dual water jets.