Science.gov

Sample records for engineered materials abstracts

  1. Recyclable automobiles. (Latest citations from Engineered Materials abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology and characteristics of non-metal, recyclable components used in automobiles. Existing polymer, plastic, and composite technology and materials are discussed. The citations also examine design and development of new recyclable materials that are durable. Design features and constraints are included. Some citations address future trends leading to the 100 percent recyclable automobile. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  2. Ceramics in engine components. (Latest citations from Engineered Materials abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the application of ceramics in automotive and aerospace engine components. Mechanical properties are reviewed. The citations examine techniques for joining dissimilar materials, advantages and problems associated with substitutions of ceramics in lieu of metals, and types and methods of ceramic coatings.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  3. Mechanical Engineering Department technical abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-07-01

    The Mechanical Engineering Department publishes abstracts twice a year to inform readers of the broad range of technical activities in the Department, and to promote an exchange of ideas. Details of the work covered by an abstract may be obtained by contacting the author(s). General information about the current role and activities of each of the Department's seven divisions precedes the technical abstracts. Further information about a division's work may be obtained from the division leader, whose name is given at the end of each divisional summary. The Department's seven divisions are as follows: Nuclear Test Engineering Division, Nuclear Explosives Engineering Division, Weapons Engineering Division, Energy Systems Engineering Division, Engineering Sciences Division, Magnetic Fusion Engineering Division and Materials Fabrication Division.

  4. Wear resistance of composite materials. (Latest citations from Engineered Materials abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning wear resistance of composite materials. References discuss polymer, ceramic and metal composites. Tribological testing and failure analyses are included. (Contains a minimum of 200 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  5. Mechanical Engineering Department technical abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Denney, R.M.

    1982-07-01

    The Mechanical Engineering Department publishes listings of technical abstracts twice a year to inform readers of the broad range of technical activities in the Department, and to promote an exchange of ideas. Details of the work covered by an abstract may be obtained by contacting the author(s). Overall information about current activities of each of the Department's seven divisions precedes the technical abstracts.

  6. Silicon carbide whisker composites. (Latest citations from Engineered Materials abstracts). NewSearch

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the manufacture and applications of silicon carbide whisker reinforced composites. Citations discuss the preparation of whiskers and the processing of composites containing the whiskers. Applications include aerospace engines, automotive components, engine components, and surgical implants. Physical properties such as bending strength, crack propagation, creep, fracture toughness, and stress strain curves are covered. Ceramic matrix, metal matrix, and carbon-carbon composites are examined. (Contains a minimum of 248 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  7. Silicon carbide whisker composites. (Latest citations from Engineered Materials abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the manufacture and applications of silicon carbide whisker reinforced composites. Citations discuss the preparation of whiskers and the processing of composites containing the whiskers. Applications include aerospace engines, automotive components, engine components, and surgical implants. Physical properties such as bending strength, crack propagation, creep, fracture toughness, and stress strain curves are covered. Ceramic matrix, metal matrix, and carbon-carbon composites are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  8. Technical abstracts: Mechanical engineering, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Broesius, J.Y.

    1991-03-01

    This document is a compilation of the published, unclassified abstracts produced by mechanical engineers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during the calendar year 1990. Many abstracts summarize work completed and published in report form. These are UCRL-JC series documents, which include the full text of articles to be published in journals and of papers to be presented at meetings, and UCID reports, which are informal documents. Not all UCIDs contain abstracts: short summaries were generated when abstracts were not included. Technical Abstracts also provides descriptions of those documents assigned to the UCRL-MI (miscellaneous) category. These are generally viewgraphs or photographs presented at meetings. An author index is provided at the back of this volume for cross referencing.

  9. Thesaurus of engineered materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This book is published jointly by ASM International and the Institute of Metals in London. It contains the vocabulary for classification, processing, and properties of polymers, ceramics, and composites. Over 500 main terms are included, together with cross-reference terms and a list of index terms. The book is the basis for the terminology used in the recently introduced Engineered Materials Abstracts.

  10. ABSTRACTS: Seventh annual conference on fossil energy materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    Objective of the Advanced Research and Technology Development materials program is to conduct R and D on materials for fossil energy applications (coal processing, coal liquefaction, gasification, heat engines and recovery, combustion systems, fuel cells). Research is aimed at better understanding of materials in fossil energy environments and development of new materials for improvement of plant operations and reliability. Abstracts are given of 37 papers on ceramics/composites, intermetallics (iron aluminides, etc.), and advanced austenitics. (DLC)

  11. ABSTRACTS: Seventh annual conference on fossil energy materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Objective of the Advanced Research and Technology Development materials program is to conduct R and D on materials for fossil energy applications (coal processing, coal liquefaction, gasification, heat engines and recovery, combustion systems, fuel cells). Research is aimed at better understanding of materials in fossil energy environments and development of new materials for improvement of plant operations and reliability. Abstracts are given of 37 papers on ceramics/composites, intermetallics (iron aluminides, etc.), and advanced austenitics. (DLC)

  12. Abstracts of Energy Materials for College Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messenger, Roger A.; And Others

    This guide provides citations and abstracts for 250 energy-related resources which can be used to incorporate energy education into the structure of existing college courses. In addition to citing books, articles, unpublished papers, films, and videotapes, the resource guide cites sets of class notes and course outlines that have been filed with…

  13. Abstracts of Energy Materials for College Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messenger, Roger A.; And Others

    This guide provides citations and abstracts for 250 energy-related resources which can be used to incorporate energy education into the structure of existing college courses. In addition to citing books, articles, unpublished papers, films, and videotapes, the resource guide cites sets of class notes and course outlines that have been filed with…

  14. Engineering living functional materials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Allen Y; Zhong, Chao; Lu, Timothy K

    2015-01-16

    Natural materials, such as bone, integrate living cells composed of organic molecules together with inorganic components. This enables combinations of functionalities, such as mechanical strength and the ability to regenerate and remodel, which are not present in existing synthetic materials. Taking a cue from nature, we propose that engineered 'living functional materials' and 'living materials synthesis platforms' that incorporate both living systems and inorganic components could transform the performance and the manufacturing of materials. As a proof-of-concept, we recently demonstrated that synthetic gene circuits in Escherichia coli enabled biofilms to be both a functional material in its own right and a materials-synthesis platform. To demonstrate the former, we engineered E. coli biofilms into a chemical-inducer-responsive electrical switch. To demonstrate the latter, we engineered E. coli biofilms to dynamically organize biotic-abiotic materials across multiple length scales, template gold nanorods, gold nanowires, and metal/semiconductor heterostructures, and synthesize semiconductor nanoparticles (Chen, A. Y. et al. (2014) Synthesis and patterning of tunable multiscale materials with engineered cells. Nat. Mater. 13, 515-523.). Thus, tools from synthetic biology, such as those for artificial gene regulation, can be used to engineer the spatiotemporal characteristics of living systems and to interface living systems with inorganic materials. Such hybrids can possess novel properties enabled by living cells while retaining desirable functionalities of inorganic systems. These systems, as living functional materials and as living materials foundries, would provide a radically different paradigm of materials performance and synthesis-materials possessing multifunctional, self-healing, adaptable, and evolvable properties that are created and organized in a distributed, bottom-up, autonomously assembled, and environmentally sustainable manner.

  15. Engineering Living Functional Materials

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Natural materials, such as bone, integrate living cells composed of organic molecules together with inorganic components. This enables combinations of functionalities, such as mechanical strength and the ability to regenerate and remodel, which are not present in existing synthetic materials. Taking a cue from nature, we propose that engineered ‘living functional materials’ and ‘living materials synthesis platforms’ that incorporate both living systems and inorganic components could transform the performance and the manufacturing of materials. As a proof-of-concept, we recently demonstrated that synthetic gene circuits in Escherichia coli enabled biofilms to be both a functional material in its own right and a materials-synthesis platform. To demonstrate the former, we engineered E. coli biofilms into a chemical-inducer-responsive electrical switch. To demonstrate the latter, we engineered E. coli biofilms to dynamically organize biotic-abiotic materials across multiple length scales, template gold nanorods, gold nanowires, and metal/semiconductor heterostructures, and synthesize semiconductor nanoparticles (Chen, A. Y. et al. (2014) Synthesis and patterning of tunable multiscale materials with engineered cells. Nat. Mater.13, 515–523.). Thus, tools from synthetic biology, such as those for artificial gene regulation, can be used to engineer the spatiotemporal characteristics of living systems and to interface living systems with inorganic materials. Such hybrids can possess novel properties enabled by living cells while retaining desirable functionalities of inorganic systems. These systems, as living functional materials and as living materials foundries, would provide a radically different paradigm of materials performance and synthesis–materials possessing multifunctional, self-healing, adaptable, and evolvable properties that are created and organized in a distributed, bottom-up, autonomously assembled, and environmentally sustainable manner. PMID

  16. Materials science and engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.R.

    1997-02-01

    During FY-96, work within the Materials Science and Engineering Thrust Area was focused on material modeling. Our motivation for this work is to develop the capability to study the structural response of materials as well as material processing. These capabilities have been applied to a broad range of problems, in support of many programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These studies are described in (1) Strength and Fracture Toughness of Material Interfaces; (2) Damage Evolution in Fiber Composite Materials; (3) Flashlamp Envelope Optical Properties and Failure Analysis; (4) Synthesis and Processing of Nanocrystalline Hydroxyapatite; and (5) Room Temperature Creep Compliance of Bulk Kel-E.

  17. Abstraction and Concreteness in the Everyday Mathematics of Structural Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gainsburg, Julie

    The everyday mathematics processes of structural engineers were studied and analyzed in terms of abstraction. A main purpose of the study was to explore the degree to which the notion of a gap between school and everyday mathematics holds when the scope of practices considered "everyday" is extended. J. Lave (1988) promoted a methodology…

  18. Materials science and engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D R

    1998-01-01

    During FY-97, work within the Materials Science and Engineering thrust area was focused on material modeling. Their motivation for this work is to develop the capability to study the structural response of materials as well as materials processing. These capabilities have been applied to a broad range of problems, which support many programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Recent examples of structural response problems studied include material fracture (such as interface failure), damage in laser optics, the response of weapons components (such as high explosives) and the failure of composite materials. For materials processing, typical problems studied include metal forming, laser processing, casting, and heat treating. To improve our ability to model material behavior, much of the work involves developing new material models and failure models, as well as applying the codes to new problems. Most investigations involve experimental studies to gather basic information on material response and to validate codes or material models. Projects are inherently multi-disciplinary, involving several investigators with expertise in materials and mechanics. The thrust area studies for FY-97 are described in the following three articles: (1) Evolution of Anisotropic Yield Behavior; (2) Modeling of She Localization in Materials; and (3) Modeling of Casting Microstructures and Defects.

  19. Why engineer porous materials?

    PubMed

    Kelly, A

    2006-01-15

    A number of specific examples are briefly given for the use of pores in engineering materials: a porous ceramic to produce minimum thermal conduction; thin skeleton walls in silicon to produce photoluminescence; low dielectric constant materials. The desirable nature of the pores in fuel cell electrodes and sieves is described. Further examples are given in orthopaedics, prosthetic scaffolds and sound deadening and impact resistance materials. An attempt is made to describe the desirable pore size, whether open or closed, and the useful volume fraction. This short review does not deal with flexible foams.

  20. Abstracts of Review Articles and Educational Materials in Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physiology Teacher, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Contained are 99 abstracts of review articles, texts, books, manuals, learning programs, and audiovisual material used in teaching physiology. Specific fields include cell physiology, circulation, comparative physiology, development and aging, endocrinology and metabolism, environmental and exercise physiology, gastrointestinal physiology, muscle…

  1. Abstracts of Review Articles and Educational Materials in Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physiology Teacher, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Contained are 99 abstracts of review articles, texts, books, manuals, learning programs, and audiovisual material used in teaching physiology. Specific fields include cell physiology, circulation, comparative physiology, development and aging, endocrinology and metabolism, environmental and exercise physiology, gastrointestinal physiology, muscle…

  2. (abstract) Unidirectional Carbon/Carbon for Ion Engine Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. Kyle

    1995-01-01

    Conventional ion engine optical grids are made from hydroformed molybdenum. Carbon/carbon has been utilized in place of molybdenum because of its lower sputter yield, which contributes a greatly increased engine life, and for its low cte, which allows more efficient engine operation. The requirements for this material are that it must have high stiffness, very tight dimensional tolerances, and can be optimized for an hexagonal hole pattern with a very high open area friction. The carbon/carbon for this application was fabricated from unidirectional tape prepreg, using pitch fiber, and was processed to a very high temperature. The use of unidirectional tape allowed for a sufficient number of plies to be used to generate a balanced three directional layup within the thickness constraints of the material, as well as providing strength and stiffness over that normally seen with fabric based carbon/carbons.

  3. Inorganic polymer engineering materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M.L.

    1993-06-01

    Phosphazene-based, inorganic-polymer composites have been produced and evaluated as potential engineering materials. The thermal, chemical, and mechanical properties of several different composites made from one polymer formulation have been measured. Measured properties are very good, and the composites show excellent promise for structural applications in harsh environments. Chopped fiberglass, mineral, cellulose, and woodflour filled composites were tested. Chopped fiberglass filled composites showed the best overall properties. The phosphazene composites are very hard and rigid. They have low dielectric constants and typical linear thermal expansion coefficients for polymers. In most cases, the phosphazene materials performed as well or better than analogous, commercially available, filled phenolic composites. After 3 to 5 weeks of exposure, both the phosphazene and phenolics were degraded to aqueous bases and acids. The glass filled phosphazene samples were least affected.

  4. Material science and Condensed matter Physics. 8th International Conference. Abstracts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulyuk, L. L.; Paladi, Florentin; Canter, Valeriu; Nikorich, Valentina; Filippova, Irina

    2016-08-01

    The book includes the abstracts of the communications presented at the 8th International Conference on Materials Science and Condensed Matter Physics (MSCMP 2016), a traditional biennial meeting organized by the Institute of Applied Physics of the Academy of Sciences of Moldova (IAP).A total of 346 abstracts has been included in the book. The Conference programm included plenary lectures, topical keynote lectures, contributed oral and poster presentations distributed into 7 sections: * Condensed Matter Theory; * Advanced Bulk Materials; * Design and Structural Characterization of Materials; * Solid State Nanophysics and Nanotechnology; * Energy Conversion and Storage. Solid State Devices; * Surface Engineering and Applied Electrochemistry; * Digital and Optical holography: Materials and Methods. The abstracts are arranged according to the sections mentioned above. The Abstracts book includes a table of matters at the beginning of the book and an index of authors at the finish of the book.

  5. Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Biology Teacher, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Included are over 50 abstracts of papers being presented at the 1977 National Association of Biology Teachers Convention. Included in each abstract are the title, author, and summary of the paper. Topics include photographic techniques environmental studies, and biological instruction. (MA)

  6. Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsegian, V. L., Ed.

    1972-01-01

    Includes summaries of six articles dealing with engineering education, population management, blood sampling, international pollution control, environmental quality index, and scientific phases in political science. (CC)

  7. Sessions with Associated Abstracts by Day: Teaching Materials and Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physiologist, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presented are abstracts of five papers on teaching materials/methods presented at the 35th annual meeting of the American Physiological Society. Topic areas include expert system used as a teacher/consultant in hemostasis problems, computer assisted testing, and excitation/conduction properties of membranes as illustrated by the compound action…

  8. Sessions with Associated Abstracts by Day: Teaching Materials and Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physiologist, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presented are abstracts of five papers on teaching materials/methods presented at the 35th annual meeting of the American Physiological Society. Topic areas include expert system used as a teacher/consultant in hemostasis problems, computer assisted testing, and excitation/conduction properties of membranes as illustrated by the compound action…

  9. Materials Engineering by Ameloblasts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Enamel is unique. It is the only epithelial-derived mineralized tissue in mammals and has a distinct micro- and nanostructure with nanofibrous apatite crystals as building blocks. It is synthesized by a highly specialized cell, the ameloblast, which secretes matrix proteins with little homology to any other known amino acid sequence, but which is composed of a primary structure that makes it competent to self-assemble and control apatite crystal growth at the nanometer scale. The end-product of ameloblast activity is a marvel of structural engineering: a material optimized to provide the tooth with maximum biting force, withstanding millions of cycles of loads without catastrophic failure, while also protecting the dental pulp from bacterial attack. This review attempts to bring into context the mechanical behavior of enamel with the developmental process of amelogenesis and structural development, since they are linked to tissue function, and the importance of controlling calcium phosphate mineralization at the nanometer scale. The origins of apatite nanofibers, the development of a stiffness gradient, and the biological processes responsible for the synthesis of a hard and fracture-resistant dental tissue are discussed with reference to the evolution of enamel from a fibrous composite to a complex, tough, and damage-tolerant coating on dentin. PMID:25800708

  10. Materials engineering of hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiser, Patrick Franklin

    I. Design and performance of biodegradable crosslinkers based on alpha-hydroxy acids. There is a need for biodegradable hydrogels that deteriorate at defined rates under physiological conditions and which contain components that are readily synthesized and easily incorporated into hydrogel networks. This need was addressed through the synthesis of a series of novel crosslinkers composed of alpha-hydroxy esters were incorporated into polymer networks with free-radical polymerization. The hydrogel networks were shown to undergo swelling and degradation at physiological pH between 5 and 50 days. A model relating the swelling and the crosslink density was used to obtain a rate constant for the change in the network crosslink density. Homologous model compounds to crosslinkers were synthesized and their degradation kinetics were measured by NMR. II. Microgel synthesis. Reactive microgels are a new class of polymer molecules that are synthesized through precipitation polymerization. The first systematic study detailing the effect the solvent has on the size of the resultant microgel particle is described. The particle size was found to be inversely proportional to the solubility parameter difference between the solvent and the polymer. Chemical modifications to the current reactive monomers used in this polymerization resulted in an improved polymer product. This allowed the synthesis of a of the reactive group, which displayed a lack of chain transfer and intramolecular cyclization. The properties of pH response and zeta-potential of these materials are described. III. Design of a synthetic mimic of the secretory granule. Hormones are secreted by specialized cells in response to biological signals. These cells contain condensed secretory granules composed of a poly-anionic polymer matrix encapsulated within a lipid membrane. The condensed matrix functions as a storage and triggered release vehicle for the stable encapsulation of a variety of hormones. A multi

  11. Wear of engineering materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, J.A.

    1998-12-31

    Nearly 60 papers discuss fundamental and applied research in the areas of wear, erosion and wear-corrosion of materials. Focus is on ceramics, ceramic and polymer-matrix composites, and coatings; the effect of sliding wear and wear-corrosion of materials in manufacturing processes, automobiles and bearings; and wear and erosion of materials used in fossil-fuel power plants, minerals processing and heavy manufacturing.

  12. Materials Science and Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.R.

    1993-03-01

    Five papers are included: processing/characterization of laminated metal composites, casting process modeling, characterizing the failure of composite materials, fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy for cure monitoring of advanced polymer composites, and modeling superplastic materials. The papers are processed separately for the data base.

  13. Abstracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-09-01

    Measuring cosmological parameters with GRBs: status and perspectives New interpretation of the Amati relation The SED Machine - a dedicated transient spectrograph PTF10iue - evidence for an internal engine in a unique Type Ic SN Direct evidence for the collapsar model of long gamma-ray bursts On pair instability supernovae and gamma-ray bursts Pan-STARRS1 observations of ultraluminous SNe The influence of rotation on the critical neutrino luminosity in core-collapse supernovae General relativistic magnetospheres of slowly rotating and oscillating neutron stars Host galaxies of short GRBs GRB 100418A: a bridge between GRB-associated hypernovae and SNe Two super-luminous SNe at z ~ 1.5 from the SNLS Prospects for very-high-energy gamma-ray bursts with the Cherenkov Telescope Array The dynamics and radiation of relativistic flows from massive stars The search for light echoes from the supernova explosion of 1181 AD The proto-magnetar model for gamma-ray bursts Stellar black holes at the dawn of the universe MAXI J0158-744: the discovery of a supersoft X-ray transient Wide-band spectra of magnetar burst emission Dust formation and evolution in envelope-stripped core-collapse supernovae The host galaxies of dark gamma-ray bursts Keck observations of 150 GRB host galaxies Search for properties of GRBs at large redshift The early emission from SNe Spectral properties of SN shock breakout MAXI observation of GRBs and short X-ray transients A three-dimensional view of SN 1987A using light echo spectroscopy X-ray study of the southern extension of the SNR Puppis A All-sky survey of short X-ray transients by MAXI GSC Development of the CALET gamma-ray burst monitor (CGBM)

  14. Materials science and engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, T.M.

    1995-10-01

    The science-based stockpile stewardship program emphasizes a better understanding of how complex components function through advanced computer calculations. Many of the problem areas are in the behavior of materials making up the equipment. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) can contribute to solving these problems by providing diagnostic tools to examine parts noninvasively and by providing the experimental tools to understand material behavior in terms of both the atomic structure and the microstructure. Advanced computer codes need experimental information on material behavior in response to stress, temperature, and pressure as input, and they need benchmarking experiments to test the model predictions for the finished part.

  15. Materials engineering data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The various types of materials related data that exist at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and compiled into databases which could be accessed by all the NASA centers and by other contractors, are presented.

  16. Engineered monodisperse mesoporous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, R.S.; Small, J.H.; Lagasse, R.R.; Schroeder, J.L.; Jamison, G.M.

    1997-08-01

    Porous materials technology has developed products with a wide variety of pore sizes ranging from 1 angstrom to 100`s of microns and beyond. Beyond 15{angstrom} it becomes difficult to obtain well ordered, monodisperse pores. In this report the authors describe efforts in making novel porous material having monodisperse, controllable pore sizes spanning the mesoporous range (20--500 {angstrom}). They set forth to achieve this by using unique properties associated with block copolymers--two linear homopolymers attached at their ends. Block copolymers phase separate into monodisperse mesophases. They desired to selectively remove one of the phases and leave the other behind, giving the uniform monodisperse pores. To try to achieve this the authors used ring-opening metathesis polymerization to make the block copolymers. They synthesized a wide variety of monomers and surveyed their polymers by TGA, with the idea that one phase could be made thermally labile while the other phase would be thermally stable. In the precipitated and sol-gel processed materials, they determined by porosimetry measurements that micropores, mesopores, and macropores were created. In the film processed sample there was not much porosity present. They moved to a new system that required much lower thermal treatments to thermally remove over 90% of the labile phase. Film casting followed by thermal treatment and solvent extraction produced the desired monodisperse materials (based solely on SEM results). Modeling using Density Functional Theory was also incorporated into this project. The modeling was able to predict accurately the domain size and spacing vs. molecular weight for a model system, as well as accurate interfacial thicknesses.

  17. Bioinspired engineering of thermal materials.

    PubMed

    Tao, Peng; Shang, Wen; Song, Chengyi; Shen, Qingchen; Zhang, Fangyu; Luo, Zhen; Yi, Nan; Zhang, Di; Deng, Tao

    2015-01-21

    In the development of next-generation materials with enhanced thermal properties, biological systems in nature provide many examples that have exceptional structural designs and unparalleled performance in their thermal or nonthermal functions. Bioinspired engineering thus offers great promise in the synthesis and fabrication of thermal materials that are difficult to engineer through conventional approaches. In this review, recent progress in the emerging area of bioinspired advanced materials for thermal science and technology is summarized. State-of-the-art developments of bioinspired thermal-management materials, including materials for efficient thermal insulation and heat transfer, and bioinspired materials for thermal/infrared detection, are highlighted. The dynamic balance of bioinspiration and practical engineering, the correlation of inspiration approaches with the targeted applications, and the coexistence of molecule-based inspiration and structure-based inspiration are discussed in the overview of the development. The long-term outlook and short-term focus of this critical area of advanced materials engineering are also presented. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Compendium of Abstracts on Statistical Applications in Geotechnical Engineering.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    basaltic rocks of central and South - East Slovakia 1880 Lachapelle Empirical determination of the gravity anomaly covariance function in mountainous areas...literature search is part of CIIS Work Unit No. 31755 on Probabilistic Methods in Engineering Geology . This work unit is part of the Rock Research Program in...research in the application of probabilistic and statistical methods to soil mechanics, rock mechanics, and engineering geology problems have grown markedly

  19. Biomimetic Materials for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Peter X

    2008-01-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine is an exciting research area that aims at regenerative alternatives to harvested tissues for transplantation. Biomaterials play a pivotal role as scaffolds to provide three-dimensional templates and synthetic extracellular-matrix environments for tissue regeneration. It is often beneficial for the scaffolds to mimic certain advantageous characteristics of the natural extracellular matrix, or developmental or would healing programs. This article reviews current biomimetic materials approaches in tissue engineering. These include synthesis to achieve certain compositions or properties similar to those of the extracellular matrix, novel processing technologies to achieve structural features mimicking the extracellular matrix on various levels, approaches to emulate cell-extracellular matrix interactions, and biologic delivery strategies to recapitulate a signaling cascade or developmental/would-healing program. The article also provides examples of enhanced cellular/tissue functions and regenerative outcomes, demonstrating the excitement and significance of the biomimetic materials for tissue engineering and regeneration. PMID:18045729

  20. Biomimetic materials for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ma, Peter X

    2008-01-14

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine is an exciting research area that aims at regenerative alternatives to harvested tissues for transplantation. Biomaterials play a pivotal role as scaffolds to provide three-dimensional templates and synthetic extracellular matrix environments for tissue regeneration. It is often beneficial for the scaffolds to mimic certain advantageous characteristics of the natural extracellular matrix, or developmental or wound healing programs. This article reviews current biomimetic materials approaches in tissue engineering. These include synthesis to achieve certain compositions or properties similar to those of the extracellular matrix, novel processing technologies to achieve structural features mimicking the extracellular matrix on various levels, approaches to emulate cell-extracellular matrix interactions, and biologic delivery strategies to recapitulate a signaling cascade or developmental/wound healing program. The article also provides examples of enhanced cellular/tissue functions and regenerative outcomes, demonstrating the excitement and significance of the biomimetic materials for tissue engineering and regeneration.

  1. Towards Clean Diesel Engines. Second Symposium. Book of Abstracts.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-06

    Louvain, B H. Barths , N. Peters Institut für Technische Mechanik RWTH, Aachen, D Diesel Combustion Study by Optical Diagnostics B. M. Vaglieco...Chemical Modeling of Pollutant Formation in DI-Diesel Engines H. Barths , N. Peters Institut für Technische Mechanik, RWTH Aachen Flamelet modeling...34, SAE Paper 952357, 1995. [2] Pitsch, H., Barths , H., P., Peters, N.: "Three- Dimensional Modeling of NOx and Soot Forma- tion in DI-Diesel

  2. Selected abstracts on engineering geology and related subjects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Britt, Severine Hansenne

    1951-01-01

    Interlayered sand, silt, and clay of middle Eocene to late Paleocene age in east-central Georgia form the Gordon aquifer system which ranges in thickness from about 20 to 180 ft. Estimated transmissivities range from 620 to 13,000 sq ft/day. During 1980, approximately 24 million gpd (gallons per day) was withdrawn from the Gordon aquifer system, of which about 70% was used for irrigation. Water levels in the aquifer throughout the study area generally showed little change during 1934-68; however, during 1969-81, local declines as great as 33 ft have occurred in areas of increased irrigation or large scale municipal and industrial pumping. The Gordon aquifer system is recharged by precipitation in the outcrop area and in interstream drainage divides in and near the outcrop area, and by leakage through adjacent confining units. Discharge from the aquifer occurs predominantly as flow into streams or as leakage into underlying and overlying units. Water from the Gordon aquifer system is generally a calcium bicarbonate type that ranges from soft to hard, and in most areas has constituent concentrations that are within the Georgia Environmental Protection Division recommended drinking water standards. (Author 's abstract)

  3. Materials technology assessment for stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.; Watson, G. K.; Johnston, J. R.; Croft, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    A materials technology assessment of high temperature components in the improved (metal) and advanced (ceramic) Stirling engines was undertaken to evaluate the current state-of-the-art of metals and ceramics, identify materials research and development required to support the development of automotive Stirling engines, and to recommend materials technology programs to assure material readiness concurrent with engine system development programs. The most critical component for each engine is identified and some of the material problem areas are discussed.

  4. Thin films for material engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasa, Kiyotaka

    2016-07-01

    Thin films are defined as two-dimensional materials formed by condensing one by one atomic/molecular/ionic species of matter in contrast to bulk three-dimensional sintered ceramics. They are grown through atomic collisional chemical reaction on a substrate surface. Thin film growth processes are fascinating for developing innovative exotic materials. On the basis of my long research on sputtering deposition, this paper firstly describes the kinetic energy effect of sputtered adatoms on thin film growth and discusses on a possibility of room-temperature growth of cubic diamond crystallites and the perovskite thin films of binary compound PbTiO3. Secondly, high-performance sputtered ferroelectric thin films with extraordinary excellent crystallinity compatible with MBE deposited thin films are described in relation to a possible application for thin-film MEMS. Finally, the present thin-film technologies are discussed in terms of a future material science and engineering.

  5. Phase transformations in engineering materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bourke, M.A.M.; Lawson, A.C.; Dunand, D.C.; Priesmeyer, H.G.

    1996-06-01

    Phase transformations in engineering materials are inevitably related to mechanical behavior and are often precursors to residual stress and distortion. Neutron scattering in general is a valuable tool for studying their effects, and pulsed neutrons are of special value, because of the inherently comprehensive crystallographic coverage they provide in each measurement. At the Manuel Lujan neutron scattering center several different research programs have addressed the relationships between phase transformation/mechanical behavior and residual strains. Three disparate examples are presented; (1) stress induced transformation in a NiTi shape memory alloy, (2) cryogenically induced transformation in a quenched 5180 steel, and (3) time resolved evolution of strain induced martensite in 304 stainless steel. In each case a brief description of the principle result will be discussed in the context of using neutrons for the measurement.

  6. Abstracts of AF Materials Laboratory Reports. January 1973 - December 1973

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-07-01

    substituted polymers with aryl ether , ketone and sulfone units in the backbone has been studied. The best resins seem to have come from simple...exposed to hostile environments such as heat aging plus salt spray, humid aging , humid aging and elevated temperature cycling, and fatigue...unclassified results of materials and process and radome characterization effort. Environmental exposure including thermal aging resulted in significant

  7. Band engineering of thermoelectric materials.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yanzhong; Wang, Heng; Snyder, G J

    2012-12-04

    Lead chalcogenides have long been used for space-based and thermoelectric remote power generation applications, but recent discoveries have revealed a much greater potential for these materials. This renaissance of interest combined with the need for increased energy efficiency has led to active consideration of thermoelectrics for practical waste heat recovery systems-such as the conversion of car exhaust heat into electricity. The simple high symmetry NaCl-type cubic structure, leads to several properties desirable for thermoelectricity, such as high valley degeneracy for high electrical conductivity and phonon anharmonicity for low thermal conductivity. The rich capabilities for both band structure and microstructure engineering enable a variety of approaches for achieving high thermoelectric performance in lead chalcogenides. This Review focuses on manipulation of the electronic and atomic structural features which makes up the thermoelectric quality factor. While these strategies are well demonstrated in lead chalcogenides, the principles used are equally applicable to most good thermoelectric materials that could enable improvement of thermoelectric devices from niche applications into the mainstream of energy technologies.

  8. Abstracts of Instructional and Research Materials in Vocational and Technical Education. Volume 8, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.

    The publication is presented with the purpose of providing educators easy access to current materials relevant to vocational-technical instruction and research. A new format is used; starting with this volume, the abstracts, subject and author indexes are now combined. Within the abstract section instructional materials are followed by research…

  9. Engineering Two-dimensional Materials Surface Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chih-Jen

    2016-11-30

    This account reviews our recent research activities and achievements in the field of two-dimensional (2D) materials surface chemistry. 2D materials are atomically thin, so that carriers are less-restricted to move in the in-plane direction, whereas the out-of-plain motion is quantum-confined. Semiconductor quantum wells and graphene are two well-known examples. Applications of 2D materials in optoelectronics, surface modification, and complex materials must overcome engineering challenges associated with understanding and engineering surface chemistry of 2D materials, which essentially bridge multiscale physical phenomena. In my research group, we understand and engineer broad aspects of chemistry and physics at nanomaterials surfaces for advancing nanomaterials-based technologies. The three main topics covered in this account are as follows: i) colloidal synthesis of stacking-controlled 2D materials, ii) wetting properties of 2D materials, and iii) engineering electronic transport at 2D materials-semiconductor interfaces.

  10. Application of Advanced Materials in Petroleum Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Gufan; Di, Weina; Wang, Minsheng

    With the background of increasing requirements on the petroleum engineering technology from more high demanding exploration targets, global oil companies and oil service companies are making more efforts on both R&D and application of new petroleum engineering technology. Advanced materials always have a decisive role in the functionality of a new product. Technology transplantation has become the important means of innovation in oil and gas industry. Here, we mainly discuss the properties and scope of application of several advanced materials. Based on the material requirements in petroleum engineering, we provide several candidates for downhole electronics protection, drilling fluid additives, downhole tools, etc. Based on the analysis of petroleum engineering technology characteristics, this paper made analysis and research on such advanced materials as new insulation materials, functional gradient materials, self-healing polymers, and introduced their application prospect in petroleum engineering in terms of specific characteristics.

  11. Composite Material Application to Liquid Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judd, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The substitution of reinforced plastic composite (RPC) materials for metal was studied. The major objectives were to: (1) determine the extent to which composite materials can be beneficially used in liquid rocket engines; (2) identify additional technology requirements; and (3) determine those areas which have the greatest potential for return. Weight savings, fabrication costs, performance, life, and maintainability factors were considered. Two baseline designs, representative of Earth to orbit and orbit to orbit engine systems, were selected. Weight savings are found to be possible for selected components with the substitution of materials for metal. Various technology needs are identified before RPC material can be used in rocket engine applications.

  12. Graphene-based materials for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su Ryon; Li, Yi-Chen; Jang, Hae Lin; Khoshakhlagh, Parastoo; Akbari, Mohsen; Nasajpour, Amir; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Tamayol, Ali; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-10-01

    Graphene and its chemical derivatives have been a pivotal new class of nanomaterials and a model system for quantum behavior. The material's excellent electrical conductivity, biocompatibility, surface area and thermal properties are of much interest to the scientific community. Two-dimensional graphene materials have been widely used in various biomedical research areas such as bioelectronics, imaging, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. In this review, we will highlight the recent applications of graphene-based materials in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In particular, we will discuss the application of graphene-based materials in cardiac, neural, bone, cartilage, skeletal muscle, and skin/adipose tissue engineering. We will also discuss the potential risk factors of graphene-based materials in tissue engineering. In conclusion, we will outline the opportunities in the usage of graphene-based materials for clinical applications. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Systems metabolic engineering for chemicals and materials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Wook; Kim, Tae Yong; Jang, Yu-Sin; Choi, Sol; Lee, Sang Yup

    2011-08-01

    Metabolic engineering has contributed significantly to the enhanced production of various value-added and commodity chemicals and materials from renewable resources in the past two decades. Recently, metabolic engineering has been upgraded to the systems level (thus, systems metabolic engineering) by the integrated use of global technologies of systems biology, fine design capabilities of synthetic biology, and rational-random mutagenesis through evolutionary engineering. By systems metabolic engineering, production of natural and unnatural chemicals and materials can be better optimized in a multiplexed way on a genome scale, with reduced time and effort. Here, we review the recent trends in systems metabolic engineering for the production of chemicals and materials by presenting general strategies and showcasing representative examples.

  14. Abstracts of Instructional and Research Materials in Vocational and Technical Education. Vol. 7, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.

    The publication is presented with the purpose of providing educators easy access to current materials relevant to vocational-technical instruction and research. The document has three major sections: Instructional Materials, Research Materials, and Projects in Progress. The first two sections have three subsections: abstracts, subject index, and…

  15. Abstracts of Instructional and Research Materials in Vocational and Technical Education Volume 7, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.

    The publication is presented with the purpose of providing educators easy access to current materials relevant to vocational-technical instruction and research. The document has three major sections: Instructional Materials, Research Materials, and Projects in Progress. The first two sections have three subsections: abstracts, subject index, and…

  16. Abstracts of Instructional and Research Materials in Vocational and Technical Education. Volume 8, Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.

    The publication is presented with the purpose of providing educators easy access to current materials relevant to vocational-technical instruction and research. In the abstract section instructional materials (30 items) are followed by research materials (168 items) with the subject and author indexes providing access to both categories. The…

  17. Abstracts of Instructional and Research Materials in Vocational and Technical Education. Volume 8, Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.

    The publication is presented with the purpose of providing educators easy access to current materials relevant to vocational-technical instruction and research. In the abstract section instructional materials (75 items) are followed by research materials (75 items) with the subject and author indexes providing access to both categories. The…

  18. Abstracts of Instructional and Research Materials in Vocational and Technical Education. Volume 8, Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.

    The publication is presented with the purpose of providing educators easy access to current materials relevant to vocational-technical instruction and research. In the abstract section instructional materials (97 items) are followed by research materials (103 items) with the subject and author indexes providing access to both categories. The…

  19. Wood handbook : wood as an engineering material.

    Treesearch

    Forest Products Laboratory

    1999-01-01

    Summarizes information on wood as an engineering material. Presents properties of wood and wood-based products of particular concern to the architect and engineer. Includes discussion of designing with wood and wood-based products along with some pertinent uses.

  20. Wood handbook : wood as an engineering material

    Treesearch

    Robert J. Ross; Forest Products Laboratory. USDA Forest Service.

    2010-01-01

    Summarizes information on wood as an engineering material. Presents properties of wood and wood-based products of particular concern to the architect and engineer. Includes discussion of designing with wood and wood-based products along with some pertinent uses.

  1. Home Economics Education Instructional Materials from "Abstracts of Instructional and Research Materials in Vocational and Technical Education," 1972-1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyes, Erma D., Comp.

    Over 700 resumes of instructional materials for home economics education, which have appeared in "Abstracts of Instructional and Research Materials in Vocational and Technical Education" (AIM/ARM) between 1972 and 1975, are included in this compilation. (The first edition of the series, containing resumes from 1967 through 1971, is available in…

  2. Advanced aircraft engine materials trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Gray, H. R.; Levine, S. R.; Signorelli, R.

    1981-01-01

    Recent activities of the Lewis Research Center are reviewed which are directed toward developing materials for rotating hot section components for aircraft gas turbines. Turbine blade materials activities are directed at increasing metal temperatures approximately 100 C compared to current directionally solidified alloys by use of oxide dispersion strengthening or tungsten alloy wire reinforcement of nickel or iron base superalloys. The application of thermal barrier coatings offers a promise of increasing gas temperatures an additional 100 C with current cooling technology. For turbine disk alloys, activities are directed toward reducing the cost of turbine disks by 50 percent through near net shape fabrication of prealloyed powders as well as towards improved performance. In addition, advanced alloy concepts and fabrication methods for dual alloy disks are being studied as having potential for improving the life of future high performance disks and reducing the amount of strategic materials required in these components.

  3. Engineering Tough Materials: Biomimetic Eggshell

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-30

    larger-­‐scale  production  of  eggshell-­‐like  organic-­‐ inorganic   composite  materials.       Report Documentation Page Form...production of eggshell-?????like organic-????? inorganic composite materials. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...mineral  compounds  in  nature.    Biomaterials  are  almost  always  the   outcome  of  an  organic-­‐ inorganic

  4. Electronic materials testing in commercial aircraft engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Dieter

    A device for the electronic testing of materials used in commercial aircraft engines is described. The instrument can be used for ferromagnetic, ferrimagnetic, and nonferromagnetic metallic materials, and it functions either optically or acoustically. The design of the device is described and technical data are given. The device operates under the principle of controlled self-inductivity. Its mode of operation is described.

  5. Engineering porous materials for fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Brandon, N P; Brett, D J

    2006-01-15

    Porous materials play an important role in fuel cell engineering. For example, they are used to support delicate electrolyte membranes, where mechanical integrity and effective diffusivity to fuel gases is critical; they are used as gas diffusion layers, where electronic conductivity and permeability to both gas and water is critical; and they are used to construct fuel cell electrodes, where an optimum combination of ionic conductivity, electronic conductivity, porosity and catalyst distribution is critical. The paper will discuss these characteristics, and introduce the materials and processing methods used to engineer porous materials within two of the leading fuel cell variants, the solid oxide fuel cell and the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell.

  6. USSR and Eastern Europe Scientific Abstracts, Electronics and Electrical Engineering, No. 43.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-11-16

    The optical scheme, the cinematic scheme, the electronic part of the MSU-M and MSU-S, and the structure are described. Photographs...the materials. Figures 8; reference: 1 Russian. - 81 - Electron-Ion Units; Emission USSR UDC 527.533.2.001.5 KINETIC ELECTRON EMISSION WHEN...State University imeni N. I. Lobachevskiy [Abstract] Expressions are derived which describe the kinetics of processes occurring in the

  7. Materials, Processes, and Environmental Engineering Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Margo M.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is given to the Materials, Processes, and Environmental Engineering Network (MPEEN), which was developed as a central holding facility for materials testing information generated by the Materials and Processes Laboratory of NASA-Marshall. It contains information from other NASA centers and outside agencies, and also includes the NASA Environmental Information System (NEIS) and Failure Analysis Information System (FAIS) data. The data base is NEIS, which is accessible through MPEEN. Environmental concerns are addressed regarding materials identified by the NASA Operational Environment Team (NOET) to be hazardous to the environment. The data base also contains the usage and performance characteristics of these materials.

  8. Materials, Processes, and Environmental Engineering Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Margo M.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is given to the Materials, Processes, and Environmental Engineering Network (MPEEN), which was developed as a central holding facility for materials testing information generated by the Materials and Processes Laboratory of NASA-Marshall. It contains information from other NASA centers and outside agencies, and also includes the NASA Environmental Information System (NEIS) and Failure Analysis Information System (FAIS) data. The data base is NEIS, which is accessible through MPEEN. Environmental concerns are addressed regarding materials identified by the NASA Operational Environment Team (NOET) to be hazardous to the environment. The data base also contains the usage and performance characteristics of these materials.

  9. Carbon Nanotube Composites: Strongest Engineering Material Ever?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayeaux, Brian; Nikolaev, Pavel; Proft, William; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of the carbon nanotube project at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to fabricate structural materials with a much higher strength-to-weight ratio than any engineered material today, Single-wall nanotubes present extraordinary mechanical properties along with new challenges for materials processing. Our project includes nanotube production, characterization, purification, and incorporation into applications studies. Now is the time to move from studying individual nanotubes to applications work. Current research at JSC focuses on structural polymeric materials to attempt to lower the weight of spacecraft necessary for interplanetary missions. These nanoscale fibers present unique new challenges to composites engineers. Preliminary studies show good nanotube dispersion and wetting by the epoxy materials. Results of tensile strength tests will also be reported. Other applications of nanotubes are also of interest for energy storage, gas storage, nanoelectronics, field emission, and biomedical uses.

  10. Carbon Nanotube Composites: Strongest Engineering Material Ever?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayeaux, Brian; Nikolaev, Pavel; Proft, William; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of the carbon nanotube project at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to fabricate structural materials with a much higher strength-to-weight ratio than any engineered material today, Single-wall nanotubes present extraordinary mechanical properties along with new challenges for materials processing. Our project includes nanotube production, characterization, purification, and incorporation into applications studies. Now is the time to move from studying individual nanotubes to applications work. Current research at JSC focuses on structural polymeric materials to attempt to lower the weight of spacecraft necessary for interplanetary missions. These nanoscale fibers present unique new challenges to composites engineers. Preliminary studies show good nanotube dispersion and wetting by the epoxy materials. Results of tensile strength tests will also be reported. Other applications of nanotubes are also of interest for energy storage, gas storage, nanoelectronics, field emission, and biomedical uses.

  11. Abstracts: Eighth Annual Conference on Fossil Energy Materials. Fossil Energy Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    Abstracts are presented for about 40 papers. The Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials program is an integrated materials research activity of the fossil energy coal program, whose objective is to conduct R and D for all advanced coal conversion and utilization technologies. The program is aimed at understanding materials behavior in coal system environments and the development of new materials for improving plant operations and reliability. A generic approach is used for addressing multiple coal technologies; for example, the hot-gas particulate filter development is applicable to pressurized fluidized bed combustion, integrated coal gasification combined-cycle, coal combustion, and indirectly fired combined-cycle systems.

  12. Status and prognosis for alternative engine materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Joseph R.; Nathal, Michael V.

    1988-01-01

    The current state of research and development of new materials for advanced aircraft engines is reviewed. The advantages and disadvantages of intermetallic compounds and refractory metals as replacements for today's nickel-base alloys are discussed along with some results of research directed at overcoming some of the problems which restrict their application. It is concluded that continuous fiber reinforced intermetallic matrix composites offer one of the best chances for success. However, major technical barriers still exist, especially in the development of suitable fibers. The introduction of these materials into aircraft engines is expected to take in excess of 5 to 10 years.

  13. Library of Advanced Materials for Engineering : LAME.

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerand, Daniel Carl; Scherzinger, William Mark

    2007-08-01

    Constitutive modeling is an important aspect of computational solid mechanics. Sandia National Laboratories has always had a considerable effort in the development of constitutive models for complex material behavior. However, for this development to be of use the models need to be implemented in our solid mechanics application codes. In support of this important role, the Library of Advanced Materials for Engineering (LAME) has been developed in Engineering Sciences. The library allows for simple implementation of constitutive models by model developers and access to these models by application codes. The library is written in C++ and has a very simple object oriented programming structure. This report summarizes the current status of LAME.

  14. Engineering DNA-based functional materials.

    PubMed

    Roh, Young Hoon; Ruiz, Roanna C H; Peng, Songming; Lee, Jong Bum; Luo, Dan

    2011-12-01

    While DNA is a genetic material, it is also an inherently polymeric material made from repeating units called nucleotides. Although DNA's biological functions have been studied for decades, the polymeric features of DNA have not been extensively exploited until recently. In this tutorial review, we focus on two aspects of using DNA as a polymeric material: (1) the engineering methods, and (2) the potential real-world applications. More specifically, various strategies for constructing DNA-based building blocks and materials are introduced based on DNA topologies, which include linear, branched/dendritic, and networked. Different applications in nanotechnology, medicine, and biotechnology are further reviewed.

  15. Architecture engineering of supercapacitor electrode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kunfeng; Li, Gong; Xue, Dongfeng

    2016-02-01

    The biggest challenge for today’s supercapacitor systems readily possessing high power density is their low energy density. Their electrode materials with controllable structure, specific surface area, electronic conductivity, and oxidation state, have long been highlighted. Architecture engineering of functional electrode materials toward powerful supercapacitor systems is becoming a big fashion in the community. The construction of ion-accessible tunnel structures can microscopically increase the specific capacitance and materials utilization; stiff 3D structures with high specific surface area can macroscopically assure high specific capacitance. Many exciting findings in electrode materials mainly focus on the construction of ice-folded graphene paper, in situ functionalized graphene, in situ crystallizing colloidal ionic particles and polymorphic metal oxides. This feature paper highlights some recent architecture engineering strategies toward high-energy supercapacitor electrode systems, including electric double-layer capacitance (EDLC) and pseudocapacitance.

  16. [PROGRESS IN BIOLOGICAL TISSUE ENGINEERING SCAFFOLD MATERIALS].

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaojuan; Xi, Tingfei; Zheng, Yufeng

    2014-06-01

    To analyze the progress in biological tissue engineering scaffold materials and the clinical application, as well as product development status. Based on extensive investigation in the status of research and application of biological tissue engineering scaffold materials, a comprehensive analysis was made. Meanwhile, a detailed analysis of research and product development was presented. Considerable progress has been achieved in research, products transformation, clinical application, and supervision of biological scaffold for tissue engineering. New directions, new technology, and new products are constantly emerging. With the continuous progress of science and technology and continuous improvement of life sciences theory, the new direction and new focus still need to be continuously adjusted in order to meet the clinical needs. From the aspect of industrial transformation feasibility, acellular scaffolds and extracellular matrix are the most promising new growth of both research and product development in this field.

  17. Preparing technicians for engineering materials technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, James A.; Metzloff, Carlton H.

    1990-01-01

    A long held principle is that for every engineer and scientist there is a need for ten technicians to maximize the efficiency of the technology team for meeting needs of industry and government. Developing an adequate supply of technicians to meet the requirements of the materials related industry will be a challenge and difficult to accomplish. A variety of agencies feel the need and wish to support development of engineering materials technology programs. In a joint effort among Battelle Laboratories, the Department of Energy (DOE) and Northwest College and University Association for Science (NORCUS), the development of an engineering materials technology program for vocational programs and community colleges for the Pacific Northwest Region was recently completed. This effort has implications for a national model. The model Associate of Applied Science degree in Engineering Materials Technology shown provides a general structure. It purposely has course titles which need delimiting while also including a core of courses necessary to develop cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills with the underlining principles of math, science and technology so students have job entry skills, and so that students can learn about and adapt to evolving technology.

  18. Development of K-12 Engineering Outreach Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, William

    2003-01-01

    Six modules were created that can be used in K-12 classes to introduce students to what engineers can do at NASA.The purpose of this project was to create outreach materials for the classroom. To make it appealing to students, many color NASA photographs are used to illustrate NASA applications.Student experiments are described that can be performed to illustrate topics.

  19. Technical Work Plan for: Near Field Environment: Engineered System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Schreiber

    2006-12-08

    This technical work plan (TWP) describes work activities to be performed by the Near-Field Environment Team. The objective of the work scope covered by this TWP is to generate Revision 03 of EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction, referred to herein as the radionuclide transport abstraction (RTA) report. The RTA report is being revised primarily to address condition reports (CRs), to address issues identified by the Independent Validation Review Team (IVRT), to address the potential impact of transport, aging, and disposal (TAD) canister design on transport models, and to ensure integration with other models that are closely associated with the RTA report and being developed or revised in other analysis/model reports in response to IVRT comments. The RTA report will be developed in accordance with the most current version of LP-SIII.10Q-BSC and will reflect current administrative procedures (LP-3.15Q-BSC, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''; LP-SIII.2Q-BSC, ''Qualification of Unqualified Data''; etc.), and will develop related Document Input Reference System (DIRS) reports and data qualifications as applicable in accordance with prevailing procedures. The RTA report consists of three models: the engineered barrier system (EBS) flow model, the EBS transport model, and the EBS-unsaturated zone (UZ) interface model. The flux-splitting submodel in the EBS flow model will change, so the EBS flow model will be validated again. The EBS transport model and validation of the model will be substantially revised in Revision 03 of the RTA report, which is the main subject of this TWP. The EBS-UZ interface model may be changed in Revision 03 of the RTA report due to changes in the conceptualization of the UZ transport abstraction model (a particle tracker transport model based on the discrete fracture transfer function will be used instead of the dual-continuum transport model previously used). Validation of the EBS-UZ interface model will be revised to be consistent with

  20. Materials for engineering vascularized adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yu-Chieh; Cheng, Ming-Huei; Uriel, Shiri; Brey, Eric M

    2011-05-01

    Loss of adipose tissue can occur due to congenital and acquired lipoatrophies, trauma, tumor resection, and chronic disease. Clinically, it is difficult to regenerate or reconstruct adipose tissue. The extensive microvsacular network present in adipose, and the sensitivity of adipocytes to hypoxia, hinder the success of typical tissue transfer procedures. Materials that promote the formation of vascularized adipose tissue may offer alternatives to current clinical treatment options. A number of synthetic and natural biomaterials common in tissue engineering have been investigated as scaffolds for adipose regeneration. While these materials have shown some promise they do not account for the unique extracellular microenvironment of adipose. Adipose derived hydrogels more closely approximate the physical and chemical microenvironment of adipose tissue, promote preadipocyte differentiation and vessel assembly in vitro, and stimulate vascularized adipose formation in vivo. The combination of these materials with techniques that promote rapid and stable vascularization could lead to new techniques for engineering stable, vascularized adipose tissue for clinical application. In this review we discuss materials used for adipose tissue engineering and strategies for vascularization of these scaffolds. Materials that promote formation of vascularized adipose tissue have the potential to serve as alternatives or supplements to existing treatment options, for adipose defects or deficiencies resulting from chronic disease, lipoatrophies, trauma, and tumor resection. Copyright © 2009 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Supplement XII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracted/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and educational…

  2. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Supplement X.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracted/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and educational…

  3. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Supplement XI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracted/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and educational…

  4. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS). A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Supplement XVII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracted/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and educational…

  5. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials, Supplement XVIII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracted/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and educational…

  6. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS). A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Supplement XV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracted/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and educational…

  7. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Supplement VIII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials; related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracted/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and…

  8. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS). A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Supplement XVI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracted/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and educational…

  9. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Supplement IX.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracted/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and educational…

  10. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Supplement VIII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials; related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracted/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and…

  11. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS). A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Supplement XIII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracted/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and educational…

  12. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS). A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Supplement XV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracted/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and educational…

  13. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Supplement XII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracted/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and educational…

  14. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS). A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Supplement XVII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracted/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and educational…

  15. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Supplement X.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracted/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and educational…

  16. Chemical hieroglyphs: abstract depiction of complex void space topology of nanoporous materials.

    PubMed

    Theisen, Kevin; Smit, Berend; Haranczyk, Maciej

    2010-04-26

    In general, most porous materials are so complex that structural information cannot be easily observed with 3D visualization tools. To address this problem, we have developed a special abstract 2D representation to depict all important topological features and geometrical parameters. Our approach involves reducing these structures based on symmetry and perceived building blocks to a compressed, graph representation that allows for quick structure analysis, classification, and comparison.

  17. Materials, processes, and environmental engineering network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Margo M.

    1993-01-01

    The Materials, Processes, and Environmental Engineering Network (MPEEN) was developed as a central holding facility for materials testing information generated by the Materials and Processes Laboratory. It contains information from other NASA centers and outside agencies, and also includes the NASA Environmental Information System (NEIS) and Failure Analysis Information System (FAIS) data. Environmental replacement materials information is a newly developed focus of MPEEN. This database is the NASA Environmental Information System, NEIS, which is accessible through MPEEN. Environmental concerns are addressed regarding materials identified by the NASA Operational Environment Team, NOET, to be hazardous to the environment. An environmental replacement technology database is contained within NEIS. Environmental concerns about materials are identified by NOET, and control or replacement strategies are formed. This database also contains the usage and performance characteristics of these hazardous materials. In addition to addressing environmental concerns, MPEEN contains one of the largest materials databases in the world. Over 600 users access this network on a daily basis. There is information available on failure analysis, metals and nonmetals testing, materials properties, standard and commercial parts, foreign alloy cross-reference, Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) data, and Materials and Processes Selection List data.

  18. Materials, processes, and environmental engineering network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Margo M.

    1993-01-01

    The Materials, Processes, and Environmental Engineering Network (MPEEN) was developed as a central holding facility for materials testing information generated by the Materials and Processes Laboratory. It contains information from other NASA centers and outside agencies, and also includes the NASA Environmental Information System (NEIS) and Failure Analysis Information System (FAIS) data. Environmental replacement materials information is a newly developed focus of MPEEN. This database is the NASA Environmental Information System, NEIS, which is accessible through MPEEN. Environmental concerns are addressed regarding materials identified by the NASA Operational Environment Team, NOET, to be hazardous to the environment. An environmental replacement technology database is contained within NEIS. Environmental concerns about materials are identified by NOET, and control or replacement strategies are formed. This database also contains the usage and performance characteristics of these hazardous materials. In addition to addressing environmental concerns, MPEEN contains one of the largest materials databases in the world. Over 600 users access this network on a daily basis. There is information available on failure analysis, metals and nonmetals testing, materials properties, standard and commercial parts, foreign alloy cross-reference, Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) data, and Materials and Processes Selection List data.

  19. Tailored Materials for High Efficiency CIDI Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, G.J.; Jana, S.

    2012-03-30

    The overall goal of the project, Tailored Materials for High Efficiency Compression Ignition Direct Injection (CIDI) Engines, is to enable the implementation of new combustion strategies, such as homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), that have the potential to significantly increase the energy efficiency of current diesel engines and decrease fuel consumption and environmental emissions. These strategies, however, are increasing the demands on conventional engine materials, either from increases in peak cylinder pressure (PCP) or from increases in the temperature of operation. The specific objective of this project is to investigate the application of a new material processing technology, friction stir processing (FSP), to improve the thermal and mechanical properties of engine components. The concept is to modify the surfaces of conventional, low-cost engine materials. The project focused primarily on FSP in aluminum materials that are compositional analogs to the typical piston and head alloys seen in small- to mid-sized CIDI engines. Investigations have been primarily of two types over the duration of this project: (1) FSP of a cast hypoeutectic Al-Si-Mg (A356/357) alloy with no introduction of any new components, and (2) FSP of Al-Cu-Ni alloys (Alloy 339) by physically stirring-in various quantities of carbon nanotubes/nanofibers or carbon fibers. Experimental work to date on aluminum systems has shown significant increases in fatigue lifetime and stress-level performance in aluminum-silicon alloys using friction processing alone, but work to demonstrate the addition of carbon nanotubes and fibers into aluminum substrates has shown mixed results due primarily to the difficulty in achieving porosity-free, homogeneous distributions of the particulate. A limited effort to understand the effects of FSP on steel materials was also undertaken during the course of this project. Processed regions were created in high-strength, low-alloyed steels up to 0.5 in

  20. The materials used in bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tereshchenko, V. P.; Kirilova, I. A.; Sadovoy, M. A.; Larionov, P. M.

    2015-11-01

    Bone tissue engineering looking for an alternative solution to the problem of skeletal injuries. The method is based on the creation of tissue engineered bone tissue equivalent with stem cells, osteogenic factors, and scaffolds - the carriers of these cells. For production of tissue engineered bone equivalent is advisable to create scaffolds similar in composition to natural extracellular matrix of the bone. This will provide optimal conditions for the cells, and produce favorable physico-mechanical properties of the final construction. This review article gives an analysis of the most promising materials for the manufacture of cell scaffolds. Biodegradable synthetic polymers are the basis for the scaffold, but it alone cannot provide adequate physical and mechanical properties of the construction, and favorable conditions for the cells. Addition of natural polymers improves the strength characteristics and bioactivity of constructions. Of the inorganic compounds, to create cell scaffolds the most widely used calcium phosphates, which give the structure adequate stiffness and significantly increase its osteoinductive capacity. Signaling molecules do not affect the physico-mechanical properties of the scaffold, but beneficial effect is on the processes of adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of cells. Biodegradation of the materials will help to fulfill the main task of bone tissue engineering - the ability to replace synthetic construct by natural tissues that will restore the original anatomical integrity of the bone.

  1. The materials used in bone tissue engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Tereshchenko, V. P. Kirilova, I. A.; Sadovoy, M. A.; Larionov, P. M.

    2015-11-17

    Bone tissue engineering looking for an alternative solution to the problem of skeletal injuries. The method is based on the creation of tissue engineered bone tissue equivalent with stem cells, osteogenic factors, and scaffolds - the carriers of these cells. For production of tissue engineered bone equivalent is advisable to create scaffolds similar in composition to natural extracellular matrix of the bone. This will provide optimal conditions for the cells, and produce favorable physico-mechanical properties of the final construction. This review article gives an analysis of the most promising materials for the manufacture of cell scaffolds. Biodegradable synthetic polymers are the basis for the scaffold, but it alone cannot provide adequate physical and mechanical properties of the construction, and favorable conditions for the cells. Addition of natural polymers improves the strength characteristics and bioactivity of constructions. Of the inorganic compounds, to create cell scaffolds the most widely used calcium phosphates, which give the structure adequate stiffness and significantly increase its osteoinductive capacity. Signaling molecules do not affect the physico-mechanical properties of the scaffold, but beneficial effect is on the processes of adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of cells. Biodegradation of the materials will help to fulfill the main task of bone tissue engineering - the ability to replace synthetic construct by natural tissues that will restore the original anatomical integrity of the bone.

  2. Aqueous processing in materials science and engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooiman, Michael B.; Sole, Kathryn C.

    1994-06-01

    Reviews of aqueous processing in JOM have traditionally focused on hydrometallurgical process routes. This article, however, addresses the application of aqueous processing in materials engineering and presents some promising developments that employ aqueous-based routes for the manufacture of high-tech components and specialty products. Such applications include producing metallic and ceramic powders; etching; surface modification by electroplating and electroless plating; manufacturing jewelry and intricate components by electroforming; and producing advanced ceramics, composites, and nanophase materials by sol-gel and biomimetic processing.

  3. Materials for a Stirling engine heater head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, J. E.; Lehmann, G. A.; Emigh, S. G.

    1990-01-01

    Work done on the 25-kW advanced Stirling conversion system (ASCS) terrestrial solar program in establishing criteria and selecting materials for the engine heater head and heater tubes is described. Various mechanisms contributing to incompatibility between materials are identified and discussed. Large thermal gradients, coupled with requirements for long life (60,000 h at temperature) and a large number of heatup and cooldown cycles (20,000) drive the design from a structural standpoint. The pressurized cylinder is checked for creep rupture, localized yielding, reverse plasticity, creep and fatigue damage, and creep ratcheting, in addition to the basic requirements for bust and proof pressure. In general, creep rupture and creep and fatigue interaction are the dominant factors in the design. A wide range of materials for the heater head and tubes was evaluated. Factors involved in the assessment were strength and effect on engine efficiency, reliability, and cost. A preliminary selection of Inconel 713LC for the heater head is based on acceptable structural properties but driven mainly by low cost. The criteria for failure, the structural analysis, and the material characteristics with basis for selection are discussed.

  4. Geochemical engineering and materials program plan

    SciTech Connect

    1982-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) was designated as lead agency in discharging the overall legislative mandate for federal R&D to assist the private sector in developing appropriate technology for exploiting geothermal energy resources. The Geochemical Engineering and Materials (GEM) Program was conceived, as part of DOE'S overall strategy, to address specific and plant-wide problems and uncertainties in the use of materials and in geochemical engineering. This program assists industry in the conduct of long-term,high-risk R&D needed to overcome the significant technical and economic GEM-related obstacles faced by developers and potential developers of this alternative energy source. The program focuses on: (1) Increasing the knowledge about the properties of materials and their performance under geothermal energy system conditions; (2) Developing and utilizing more reliable and/or cost-effective materials than previously available; and (3) Developing a greater understanding of and control over geochemical processes during fluid production and transport, energy conversion, and waste management. As a stand-alone program and as support to other DOE geothermal technology development programs, the GEM Program contributes to the feasibility of designing and operating efficient, reliable, and safe fluid handling and energy conversion systems.

  5. OMAE 1994. Volume 3: Materials Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, M.M.; Toyoda, Masao; Lui, S.; Dos Santos, J.F.; Kocak, M.; Patterson, E.A.; Berge, S.

    1994-12-31

    The International Symposium on Offshore and Arctic Materials Technology of the OMAE Conference continues to serve as a major forum for researchers, engineers, manufacturers, and fabricators to share recent advances, discuss problems, and identify challenges associated with materials application in the offshore industry. This volume discusses recent advances in several areas that are important for offshore and arctic development and operations with emphasis on fatigue and fracture control, weld metal and HAZ properties, underwater welding, elastomers and composites, and recent advances in high strength steel and welding technology. Additional materials papers are presented in the proceedings on Reliability (Volume 2) and the proceedings on Pipeline (Volume 5). Forty nine papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  6. Sliding seal materials for adiabatic engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lankford, J.

    1985-01-01

    The sliding friction coefficients and wear rates of promising carbide, oxide, and nitride materials were measured under temperature, environmental, velocity, loading conditions that are representative of the adiabatic engine environment. In order to provide guidance needed to improve materials for this application, the program stressed fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved in friction and wear. Microhardness tests were performed on the candidate materials at elevated temperatures, and in atmospheres relevant to the piston seal application, and optical and electron microscopy were used to elucidate the micromechanisms of wear following wear testing. X-ray spectroscopy was used to evaluate interface/environment interactions which seemed to be important in the friction and wear process. Electrical effects in the friction and wear processes were explored in order to evaluate the potential usefulness of such effects in modifying the friction and wear rates in service. However, this factor was found to be of negligible significance in controlling friction and wear.

  7. Creep rupture behavior of Stirling engine materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, R. H.; Scheuerman, C. M.; Stephens, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The automotive Stirling engine, being investigated jointly by the Department of Energy and NASA Lewis as an alternate to the internal combustion engine, uses high-pressure hydrogen as the working fluid. The long-term effects of hydrogen on the high temperature strength properties of materials is relatively unknown. This is especially true for the newly developed low-cost iron base alloy NASAUT 4G-A1. This iron-base alloy when tested in air has creep-rupture strengths in the directionally solidified condition comparable to the cobalt base alloy HS-31. The equiaxed (investment cast) NASAUT 4G-A1 has superior creep-rupture to the equiaxed iron-base alloy XF-818 both in air and 15 MPa hydrogen.

  8. Nondestructive ultrasonic characterization of engineering materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, K.

    1985-01-01

    The development of an ultrasonic method for the nondestructive characterization of mechanical properties of engineering material is described. The method utilizes the nonlinearity parameter measurement which describes the anharmonic behavior of the solid through measurements of amplitudes of the fundamental and of the generated second harmonic ultrasonic waves. The nonlinearity parameter is also directly related to the acoustoelastic constant of the solid which can be determined by measuring the linear dependence of ultrasonic velocity on stress. A major advantage of measurements of the nonlinearity parameter over that of the acoustoelastic constant is that it may be determined without the application of stress on the material, which makes it more applicable for in-service nondestructive characterization. The relationships between the nonlinearity parameter of second-harmonic generation and the percentage of solid solution phase in engineering materials such as heat treatable aluminum alloys was established. The acoustoelastic constants are measured on these alloys for comparison and confirmation. A linear relationship between the nonlinearity parameter and the volume fraction of second phase precipitates in the alloys is indicated.

  9. Cells and materials for liver tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-Sheng; Harn, Horng-Jyh; Hsieh, Dean-Kuo; Wen, Tung-Chou; Subeq, Yi-Maun; Sun, Li-Yi; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Chiou, Tzyy-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Liver transplantation is currently the most efficacious treatment for end-stage liver diseases. However, one main problem with liver transplantation is the limited number of donor organs that are available. Therefore, liver tissue engineering based on cell transplantation that combines materials to mimic the liver is under investigation with the goal of restoring normal liver functions. Tissue engineering aims to mimic the interactions among cells with a scaffold. Particular materials or a matrix serve as a scaffold and provide a three-dimensional environment for cell proliferation and interaction. Moreover, the scaffold plays a role in regulating cell maturation and function via these interactions. In cultures of hepatic lineage cells, regulation of cell proliferation and specific function using biocompatible synthetic, biodegradable bioderived matrices, protein-coated materials, surface-modified nanofibers, and decellularized biomatrix has been demonstrated. Furthermore, beneficial effects of addition of growth factor cocktails to a flow bioreactor or coculture system on cell viability and function have been observed. In addition, a system for growing stem cells, liver progenitor cells, and primary hepatocytes for transplantation into animal models was developed, which produces hepatic lineage cells that are functional and that show long-term proliferation following transplantation. The major limitation of cells proliferated with matrix-based transplantation systems is the high initial cell loss and dysfunction, which may be due to the absence of blood flow and the changes in nutrients. Thus, the development of vascular-like scaffold structures, the formation of functional bile ducts, and the maintenance of complex metabolic functions remain as major problems in hepatic tissue engineering and will need to be addressed to enable further advances toward clinical applications.

  10. Engineering Data for New Aerospace Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    Inconel 718 S160 140 __ _ i- 0 l- 10 20 40 60 80 10 𔄀: Ti-6~d-4V ncoe 7780109 4 0 C355 2’ 0 A35 A35n701 _____ 0 ) 0 200 400 600 800 1000 Temperature, F...AD-A098 520 BATTELLE COLUMBUS LABS OH F/B 11/6 ENGINEERING DATA FOR NEW AEROSPACE MATERIALS.(U)JUL 80 0 DEEL F33615śB-C-504O UNCLASSIFIED AFWAL-TR...80-4103 NL IlEmlllllllllu EIIIIIEIIEIIEE IIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIu EEEEEIIIIIIIIE 11 . 0 2. IIiM W211 111. M~ 36 IIILJL .4 il6 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION

  11. Joining of materials with engineered interlayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Challenger, Kenneth D.; Cordea, Tom; Sengupta, Samit; Wampler, Scott

    1991-01-01

    A reliable method to join a variety of different materials is developed which uses engineered coatings to produce strong bonds by solid-state techniques at low temperatures (300-400 C). The strong bonds are capable of accommodating the strains created between Si and most substrates due to differences in thermal expansion coefficients. The approach encompasses two phases: noble metal compliant interlayers and functionally gradient interlayer bonding. Preliminary results are presented and the Ag interlayer bonds are microstructurally characterized confirming that the planar magnetron sputtered coatings/bonds are fully dense and metallurgically sound.

  12. Cavitation wear resistance of engine bearing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rac, Aleksandar

    1994-04-01

    The resistance to cavitation erosion of aluminum alloy, and cast and sinte-red lead-bronze, materials which are most frequently used for engine bearings, has been evaluated. The tests were carried out in motor oil at a temperature of 80 C, using a magnetostrictive vibratory tester (20 kHz). The results showed that the cavitation erosion resistance was the greatest in cast lead-bronze. On the contrary, sintered lead-bronze, though of the same chemical composition, had the greatest erosion rate. Additionally, the investigation of the overlay plated bearings showed the overlay was nonresistive to this type of wear.

  13. Engineering Cellular Photocomposite Materials Using Convective Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Jessica S.; Flickinger, Michael C.; Velev, Orlin D.

    2013-01-01

    Fabricating industrial-scale photoreactive composite materials containing living cells, requires a deposition strategy that unifies colloid science and cell biology. Convective assembly can rapidly deposit suspended particles, including whole cells and waterborne latex polymer particles into thin (<10 µm thick), organized films with engineered adhesion, composition, thickness, and particle packing. These highly ordered composites can stabilize the diverse functions of photosynthetic cells for use as biophotoabsorbers, as artificial leaves for hydrogen or oxygen evolution, carbon dioxide assimilation, and add self-cleaning capabilities for releasing or digesting surface contaminants. This paper reviews the non-biological convective assembly literature, with an emphasis on how the method can be modified to deposit living cells starting from a batch process to its current state as a continuous process capable of fabricating larger multi-layer biocomposite coatings from diverse particle suspensions. Further development of this method will help solve the challenges of engineering multi-layered cellular photocomposite materials with high reactivity, stability, and robustness by clarifying how process, substrate, and particle parameters affect coating microstructure. We also describe how these methods can be used to selectively immobilize photosynthetic cells to create biomimetic leaves and compare these biocomposite coatings to other cellular encapsulation systems. PMID:28809244

  14. Advances in Integrated Computational Materials Engineering "ICME"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Jürgen

    The methods of Integrated Computational Materials Engineering that were developed and successfully applied for Aluminium have been constantly improved. The main aspects and recent advances of integrated material and process modeling are simulations of material properties like strength and forming properties and for the specific microstructure evolution during processing (rolling, extrusion, annealing) under the influence of material constitution and process variations through the production process down to the final application. Examples are discussed for the through-process simulation of microstructures and related properties of Aluminium sheet, including DC ingot casting, pre-heating and homogenization, hot and cold rolling, final annealing. New results are included of simulation solution annealing and age hardening of 6xxx alloys for automotive applications. Physically based quantitative descriptions and computer assisted evaluation methods are new ICME methods of integrating new simulation tools also for customer applications, like heat affected zones in welding of age hardening alloys. The aspects of estimating the effect of specific elements due to growing recycling volumes requested also for high end Aluminium products are also discussed, being of special interest in the Aluminium producing industries.

  15. Dynamic Behavior of Engineered Lattice Materials

    PubMed Central

    Hawreliak, J. A.; Lind, J.; Maddox, B.; Barham, M.; Messner, M.; Barton, N.; Jensen, B. J.; Kumar, M.

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is enabling the fabrication of materials with engineered lattice structures at the micron scale. These mesoscopic structures fall between the length scale associated with the organization of atoms and the scale at which macroscopic structures are constructed. Dynamic compression experiments were performed to study the emergence of behavior owing to the lattice periodicity in AM materials on length scales that approach a single unit cell. For the lattice structures, both bend and stretch dominated, elastic deflection of the structure was observed ahead of the compaction of the lattice, while no elastic deformation was observed to precede the compaction in a stochastic, random structure. The material showed lattice characteristics in the elastic response of the material, while the compaction was consistent with a model for compression of porous media. The experimental observations made on arrays of 4 × 4 × 6 lattice unit cells show excellent agreement with elastic wave velocity calculations for an infinite periodic lattice, as determined by Bloch wave analysis, and finite element simulations. PMID:27321697

  16. Utilization of lunar materials and expertise for large scale operations in space: Abstracts. [lunar bases and space industrialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, D. R. (Editor)

    1976-01-01

    The practicality of exploiting the moon, not only as a source of materials for large habitable structures at Lagrangian points, but also as a base for colonization is discussed in abstracts of papers presented at a special session on lunar utilization. Questions and answers which followed each presentation are included after the appropriate abstract. Author and subject indexes are provided.

  17. OMAE 1993: Proceedings. Volume 3, Part B: Materials engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, M.M.; Webster, S.E.; Haswell, J.V.; Patterson, E.A.; Haagensen, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    This conference proceedings is one of five volumes dealing with offshore engineering and arctic engineering. This volume is the second part of two volumes dealing with materials engineering. Specific papers deal with welding materials and joint strength; underwater and hyperbaric welding; performance of various composite materials; fatigue and crack growth behavior; stress intensity factors; and inspection procedures for offshore structures. Papers also include information on repair, fracture control, and sealing materials.

  18. Engineering biomimetic materials for islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ethan Y; Kronenfeld, Joshua P; Stabler, Cherie L

    2015-01-01

    A closed-loop system that provides both the sensing of glucose and the appropriate dosage of insulin could dramatically improve treatment options for insulin-dependent diabetics. The intrahepatic implantation of allogeneic islets has the potential to provide this intimate control, by transplanting the very cells that have this inherent sensing and secretion capacity. Limiting islet transplantation, however, is the significant loss and dysfunction of islets following implantation, due to the poor engraftment environment and significant immunological attack. In this review, we outline approaches that seek to address these challenges via engineering biomimetic materials. These materials can serve to mimic natural processes that work toward improving engraftment, minimizing inflammation, and directing immunological responses. Biomimetic materials can serve to house cells, recapitulate native microenvironments, release therapeutic agents in a physiological manner, and/or present agents to direct cells towards desired responses. By integrating these approaches, superior platforms capable of improving long-term engraftment and acceptance of transplanted islets are on the horizon.

  19. Gender Equity in Materials Science and Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Angus Rockett

    2008-12-01

    At the request of the University Materials Council, a national workshop was convened to examine 'Gender Equity Issues in Materials Science and Engineering.' The workshop considered causes of the historic underrepresentation of women in materials science and engineering (MSE), with a goal of developing strategies to increase the gender diversity of the discipline in universities and national laboratories. Specific workshop objectives were to examine efforts to level the playing field, understand implicit biases, develop methods to minimize bias in all aspects of training and employment, and create the means to implement a broadly inclusive, family-friendly work environment in MSE departments. Held May 18-20, 2008, at the Conference Center at the University of Maryland, the workshop included heads and chairs of university MSE departments and representatives of the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy (DOE-BES), and the national laboratories. The following recommendations are made based on the outcomes of the discussions at the workshop. Many or all of these apply equally well to universities and national laboratories and should be considered in context of industrial environments as well. First, there should be a follow-up process by which the University Materials Council (UMC) reviews the status of women in the field of MSE on a periodic basis and determines what additional changes should be made to accelerate progress in gender equity. Second, all departments should strengthen documentation and enforcement of departmental procedures such that hiring, promotion, compensation, and tenure decisions are more transparent, that the reasons why a candidate was not selected or promoted are clear, and that faculty are less able to apply their biases to personnel decisions. Third, all departments should strengthen mentoring of junior faculty. Fourth, all departments must raise awareness of gender biases and work to

  20. Engineering light outcoupling in 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Lien, Der-Hsien; Kang, Jeong Seuk; Amani, Matin; Chen, Kevin; Tosun, Mahmut; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Roy, Tania; Eggleston, Michael S; Wu, Ming C; Dubey, Madan; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau; Javey, Ali

    2015-02-11

    When light is incident on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), it engages in multiple reflections within underlying substrates, producing interferences that lead to enhancement or attenuation of the incoming and outgoing strength of light. Here, we report a simple method to engineer the light outcoupling in semiconducting TMDCs by modulating their dielectric surroundings. We show that by modulating the thicknesses of underlying substrates and capping layers, the interference caused by substrate can significantly enhance the light absorption and emission of WSe2, resulting in a ∼11 times increase in Raman signal and a ∼30 times increase in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of WSe2. On the basis of the interference model, we also propose a strategy to control the photonic and optoelectronic properties of thin-layer WSe2. This work demonstrates the utilization of outcoupling engineering in 2D materials and offers a new route toward the realization of novel optoelectronic devices, such as 2D LEDs and solar cells.

  1. Use of ceramics in engine components. (Latest citations from ceramic abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning manufacturing processes, testing, design, and stress analysis of ceramic engine parts and coatings. Topics include slip casting, reaction sintering, hot isostatic pressing, injection molding, and plasma spraying processes. The citations also consider advantages of using ceramic engine components in automotive, military, and aircraft applications. (Contains a minimum of 116 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  2. Use of ceramics in engine components. (Latest citations from Ceramic Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning manufacturing processes, testing, design, and stress analysis of ceramic engine parts and coatings. Topics include slip casting, reaction sintering, hot isostatic pressing, injection molding, and plasma spraying processes. The citations also consider advantages of using ceramic engine components in automotive, military, and aircraft applications. (Contains a minimum of 116 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  3. Jet engine applications for materials with nanometer-scale dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, J. W., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of advanced military and commercial gas turbine engines is often linked to advances in materials technology. High performance gas turbine engines being developed require major material advances in strength, toughness, reduced density and improved temperature capability. The emerging technology of nanostructured materials has enormous potential for producing materials with significant improvements in these properties. Extraordinary properties demonstrated in the laboratory include material strengths approaching theoretical limit, ceramics that demonstrate ductility and toughness, and materials with ultra-high hardness. Nanostructured materials and coatings have the potential for meeting future gas turbine engine requirements for improved performance, reduced weight and lower fuel consumption.

  4. Jet engine applications for materials with nanometer-scale dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, J. W., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of advanced military and commercial gas turbine engines is often linked to advances in materials technology. High performance gas turbine engines being developed require major material advances in strength, toughness, reduced density and improved temperature capability. The emerging technology of nanostructured materials has enormous potential for producing materials with significant improvements in these properties. Extraordinary properties demonstrated in the laboratory include material strengths approaching theoretical limit, ceramics that demonstrate ductility and toughness, and materials with ultra-high hardness. Nanostructured materials and coatings have the potential for meeting future gas turbine engine requirements for improved performance, reduced weight and lower fuel consumption.

  5. Jet engine applications for materials with nanometer-scale dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, J. W., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of advanced military and commercial gas turbine engines is often linked to advances in materials technology. High performance gas turbine engines being developed require major material advances in strength, toughness, reduced density and improved temperature capability. The emerging technology of nanostructured materials has enormous potential for producing materials with significant improvements in these properties. Extraordinary properties demonstrated in the laboratory include material strengths approaching theoretical limit, ceramics that demonstrate ductility and toughness, and material with ultra-high hardness. Nanostructured materials and coatings have the potential for meeting future gas turbine engine requirements for improved performance, reduced weight and lower fuel consumption.

  6. Hot corrosion of ceramic engine materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Dennis S.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Smialek, James L.

    1988-01-01

    A number of commercially available SiC and Si3N4 materials were exposed to 1000 C in a high velocity, pressurized burner rig as a simulation of a turbine engine environment. Sodium impurities added to the burner flame resulted in molten Na2SO4 deposition, attack of the SiC and Si4N4 and formation of substantial Na2O-x(SiO2) corrosion product. Room temperature strength of the materials decreased. This was a result of the formation of corrosion pits in SiC, and grain boundary dissolution and pitting in Si3N4. Corrosion regimes for such Si-based ceramics have been predicted using thermodynamics and verified in rig tests of SiO2 coupons. Protective mullite coatings are being investigated as a solution to the corrosion problem for SiC and Si3N4. Limited corrosion occurred to cordierite (Mg2Al4Si5O18) but some cracking of the substrate occurred.

  7. Use of ceramics in engine components. (Latest citations from Ceramic abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning manufacturing processes, testing, design, and stress analysis of ceramic engine parts and coatings. Topics include slip casting, reaction sintering, hot isostatic pressing, injection molding, and plasma spraying processes. The citations also consider advantages of using ceramic engine components in automotive, military, and aircraft applications. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  8. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Supplement V.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Presented are abstracts and indexes to selected materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction. In addition, some materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation are included. Also included are procedures to illustrate how instructors and curriculum developers in the water quality…

  9. Uncertainty Management in Urban Water Engineering Adaptation to Climate Change - abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current water resource planning and engineering assume a stationary climate, in which the observed historical water flow rate and water quality variations are often used to define the technical basis. When the non-stationarity is considered, however, climate change projection co...

  10. Uncertainty Management in Urban Water Engineering Adaptation to Climate Change - abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current water resource planning and engineering assume a stationary climate, in which the observed historical water flow rate and water quality variations are often used to define the technical basis. When the non-stationarity is considered, however, climate change projection co...

  11. Materials & Engineering: Propelling Innovation MRS Bulletin Special Issue Session

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Gopal

    2016-05-06

    Materials enable engineering; and, engineering in turn depends on materials to transform design concepts and equations into physical entities. This relationship continues to grow with expanding societal demand for new products and processes. MRS Bulletin, a publication of the Materials Research Society (MRS) and Cambridge University Press, planned a special issue for December 2015 on Materials and Engineering: Propelling Innovation. This special issue of MRS Bulletin captured the unique relationship between materials and engineering, which are closely intertwined. A special half day session at the 2015 MRS Fall Meeting in Boston captured this discussion through presentations by high level experts followed by a panel discussion on what it takes to translate materials discoveries into products to benefit society. The Special Session included presentations by experts who are practitioners in materials as well as engineering applications, followed by a panel discussion. Participants discussed state-of-the-art in materials applications in engineering, as well as how engineering needs have pushed materials developments, as also reflected in the 20 or so articles published in the special issue of MRS Bulletin. As expected, the discussions spanned the broad spectrum of materials and provided very strong interdisciplinary interactions and discussions by participants and presenters.

  12. Durability Challenges for Next Generation of Gas Turbine Engine Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive fuel burn and carbon dioxide emission reduction goals for future gas turbine engines will require higher overall pressure ratio, and a significant increase in turbine inlet temperature. These goals can be achieved by increasing temperature capability of turbine engine hot section materials and decreasing weight of fan section of the engine. NASA is currently developing several advanced hot section materials for increasing temperature capability of future gas turbine engines. The materials of interest include ceramic matrix composites with 1482 - 1648 C temperature capability, advanced disk alloys with 815 C capability, and low conductivity thermal barrier coatings with erosion resistance. The presentation will provide an overview of durability challenges with emphasis on the environmental factors affecting durability for the next generation of gas turbine engine materials. The environmental factors include gaseous atmosphere in gas turbine engines, molten salt and glass deposits from airborne contaminants, impact from foreign object damage, and erosion from ingestion of small particles.

  13. Lifetime Lubricated Engines Using Triboreactive Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    polyglycol blend as crank case oil. An unlubricated internal combustion engine is of interest, because it will be more compact in its basic...wear debris/particles [34] (piston group, valve guide and cam). The enormous improvement of the internal combustion engine is due mainly to the many...AG For life-time lubrication [43], DaimlerChrysler investigates „Lubricious Oxides“ (LO) as coatings for tribosystems of internal combustion engines

  14. Integrated computational materials engineering: Tools, simulations and new applications

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, Jonathan D.

    2016-03-30

    Here, Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) is a relatively new methodology full of tremendous potential to revolutionize how science, engineering and manufacturing work together. ICME was motivated by the desire to derive greater understanding throughout each portion of the development life cycle of materials, while simultaneously reducing the time between discovery to implementation [1,2].

  15. Integrated computational materials engineering: Tools, simulations and new applications

    DOE PAGES

    Madison, Jonathan D.

    2016-03-30

    Here, Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) is a relatively new methodology full of tremendous potential to revolutionize how science, engineering and manufacturing work together. ICME was motivated by the desire to derive greater understanding throughout each portion of the development life cycle of materials, while simultaneously reducing the time between discovery to implementation [1,2].

  16. Reciprocating seals: Lubrication and wear resistance. (Latest citations from Fluidex (Fluid Engineering Abstracts) database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning theoretical and practical analyses of reciprocating seal wear and lubrication. Topics include behavior, friction coefficient, cylinder wear, lubrication film thickness, friction forces, design innovations, lubricating oil viscosity, and wear modeling relative to reciprocating seal frictional wear and lifetime optimization. Applications in piston ring lubrication, internal combustion engines, and vehicle suspension systems are considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. [Research progress of scaffold materials in skeletal muscle tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Huang, Weiyi; Liao, Hua

    2010-11-01

    To review the current researches of scaffold materials for skeletal muscle tissue engineering, to predict the development trend of scaffold materials in skeletal muscle tissue engineering in future. The related literature on skeletal muscle tissue engineering, involving categories and properties of scaffold materials, preparative technique and biocompatibility, was summarized and analyzed. Various scaffold materials were used in skeletal muscle tissue engineering, including inorganic biomaterials, biodegradable polymers, natural biomaterial, and biomedical composites. According to different needs of the research, various scaffolds were prepared due to different biomaterials, preparative techniques, and surface modifications. The development trend and perspective of skeletal muscle tissue engineering are the use of composite materials, and the preparation of composite scaffolds and surface modification according to the specific functions of scaffolds.

  18. Electrospinning of functional materials for biomedicine and tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inozemtseva, O. A.; Salkovskiy, Y. E.; Severyukhina, A. N.; Vidyasheva, I. V.; Petrova, N. V.; Metwally, H. A.; Stetciura, I. Y.; Gorin, D. A.

    2015-03-01

    Published data on nanostructured materials prepared by electrospinning are analyzed and generalized. Particular attention is devoted to the design and properties of nanocomposite fibrous materials and methods for modification and functionalization of fibre surface. The prospects for the application of non-woven materials for biotissue engineering and for the development of smart materials are considered. The bibliography includes 330 references.

  19. NASA Glenn Research Center UEET (Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology) Program: Agenda and Abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manthey, Lri

    2001-01-01

    Topics discussed include: UEET Overview; Technology Benefits; Emissions Overview; P&W Low Emissions Combustor Development; GE Low Emissions Combustor Development; Rolls-Royce Low Emissions Combustor Development; Honeywell Low Emissions Combustor Development; NASA Multipoint LDI Development; Stanford Activities In Concepts for Advanced Gas Turbine Combustors; Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of Gas Turbine Combustion; NASA National Combustion Code Simulations; Materials Overview; Thermal Barrier Coatings for Airfoil Applications; Disk Alloy Development; Turbine Blade Alloy; Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Materials Development; Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Materials Characterization; Environmental Barrier Coatings (EBC) for Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Materials; Ceramic Matrix Composite Vane Rig Testing and Design; Ultra-High Temperature Ceramic (UHTC) Development; Lightweight Structures; NPARC Alliance; Technology Transfer and Commercialization; and Turbomachinery Overview; etc.

  20. Thermal cyclic durability testing of ceramic materials for turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    The thermal cyclic durability of commercial ceramic materials for turbine engines was under evaluation since 1978. Ceramic materials are exposed to cyclic diesel-fired burner exhaust at either 1204 or 1371 C (2200 or 2500 F) for up to 3500 hours. The test conditions are selected to simulate the environment experienced by the hot flow path components in an automotive gas turbine engine. The silicon nitride and silicon carbide materials tested are the same ceramic materials currently used on the AGT100 and AGT101 ceramic turbine engine program.

  1. Thermal cyclic durability testing of ceramic materials for turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    The thermal cyclic durability of commercial ceramic materials for turbine engines was under evaluation since 1978. Ceramic materials are exposed to cyclic diesel-fired burner exhaust at either 1204 or 1371 C (2200 or 2500 F) for up to 3500 hours. The test conditions are selected to simulate the environment experienced by the hot flow path components in an automotive gas turbine engine. The silicon nitride and silicon carbide materials tested are the same ceramic materials currently used on the AGT100 and AGT101 ceramic turbine engine program.

  2. Materials Selection in Gas Turbine Engine Design and the Role of Low Thermal Expansion Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagow, Benjamin W.

    2016-11-01

    Materials selection criteria in gas turbine engine design are reviewed, and several design challenges are introduced where selection of low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) materials can help improve engine performance and operability. This is followed by a review of the types of low CTE materials that are suitable for gas turbine engine applications, and discussion of their advantages and disadvantages. The primary limitation of low CTE materials is their maximum use temperature; if higher temperature materials could be developed, this could result in novel turbine system designs for gas turbine engines.

  3. Facet‐Engineered Surface and Interface Design of Photocatalytic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; Li, Zhengquan

    2016-01-01

    The facet‐engineered surface and interface design for photocatalytic materials has been proven as a versatile approach to enhance their photocatalytic performance. This review article encompasses some recent advances in the facet engineering that has been performed to control the surface of mono‐component semiconductor systems and to design the surface and interface structures of multi‐component heterostructures toward photocatalytic applications. The review begins with some key points which should receive attention in the facet engineering on photocatalytic materials. We then discuss the synthetic approaches to achieve the facet control associated with the surface and interface design. In the following section, the facet‐engineered surface design on mono‐component photocatalytic materials is introduced, which forms a basis for the discussion on more complex systems. Subsequently, we elucidate the facet‐engineered surface and interface design of multi‐component photocatalytic materials. Finally, the existing challenges and future prospects are discussed. PMID:28105398

  4. Facet-Engineered Surface and Interface Design of Photocatalytic Materials.

    PubMed

    Bai, Song; Wang, Lili; Li, Zhengquan; Xiong, Yujie

    2017-01-01

    The facet-engineered surface and interface design for photocatalytic materials has been proven as a versatile approach to enhance their photocatalytic performance. This review article encompasses some recent advances in the facet engineering that has been performed to control the surface of mono-component semiconductor systems and to design the surface and interface structures of multi-component heterostructures toward photocatalytic applications. The review begins with some key points which should receive attention in the facet engineering on photocatalytic materials. We then discuss the synthetic approaches to achieve the facet control associated with the surface and interface design. In the following section, the facet-engineered surface design on mono-component photocatalytic materials is introduced, which forms a basis for the discussion on more complex systems. Subsequently, we elucidate the facet-engineered surface and interface design of multi-component photocatalytic materials. Finally, the existing challenges and future prospects are discussed.

  5. Composite material application for liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heubner, S. W.

    1982-01-01

    With increasing emphasis on improving engine thrust-to-weight ratios to provide improved payload capabilities, weight reductions achievable by the use of composites have become attractive. Of primary significance is the weight reduction offered by composites, although high temperature properties and cost reduction were also considered. The potential for application of composites to components of Earth-to-orbit hydrocarbon engines and orbit-to-orbit LOX/H2 engines was assessed. The components most likely to benefit from the application of composites were identified, as were the critical technology areas where developed would be required. Recommendations were made and a program outlined for the design, fabrication, and demonstration of specific engine components.

  6. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Engineering Education, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Includes abstracts of papers presented at the 80th Annual Conference of the American Society for Engineering Education. The broad areas include aerospace, affiliate and associate member council, agricultural engineering, biomedical engineering, continuing engineering studies, chemical engineering, civil engineering, computers, cooperative…

  7. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Engineering Education, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Includes abstracts of papers presented at the 80th Annual Conference of the American Society for Engineering Education. The broad areas include aerospace, affiliate and associate member council, agricultural engineering, biomedical engineering, continuing engineering studies, chemical engineering, civil engineering, computers, cooperative…

  8. [Strategies to choose scaffold materials for tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Gao, Qingdong; Zhu, Xulong; Xiang, Junxi; Lü, Yi; Li, Jianhui

    2016-02-01

    Current therapies of organ failure or a wide range of tissue defect are often not ideal. Transplantation is the only effective way for long time survival. But it is hard to meet huge patients demands because of donor shortage, immune rejection and other problems. Tissue engineering could be a potential option. Choosing a suitable scaffold material is an essential part of it. According to different sources, tissue engineering scaffold materials could be divided into three types which are natural and its modified materials, artificial and composite ones. The purpose of tissue engineering scaffold is to repair the tissues or organs damage, so could reach the ideal recovery in its function and structure aspect. Therefore, tissue engineering scaffold should even be as close as much to the original tissue or organs in function and structure. We call it "organic scaffold" and this strategy might be the drastic perfect substitute for the tissues or organs in concern. Optimized organization with each kind scaffold materials could make up for biomimetic structure and function of the tissue or organs. Scaffold material surface modification, optimized preparation procedure and cytosine sustained-release microsphere addition should be considered together. This strategy is expected to open new perspectives for tissue engineering. Multidisciplinary approach including material science, molecular biology, and engineering might find the most ideal tissue engineering scaffold. Using the strategy of drawing on each other strength and optimized organization with each kind scaffold material to prepare a multifunctional biomimetic tissue engineering scaffold might be a good method for choosing tissue engineering scaffold materials. Our research group had differentiated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into bile canaliculi like cells. We prepared poly(L-lactic acid)/poly(ε-caprolactone) biliary stent. The scaffold's internal played a part in the long-term release of cytokines which

  9. Bioenvironmental Engineering Guide for Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-31

    and recovery settings based on the recommendations of the following technical reports: Assessing Worker Exposures During Composite Material Repair...materials is on the rise, as shown by the Air Force sponsored project to fly in 2009 an experimental military cargo aircraft composed of primarily composite...materials [1]. Aircraft are not the only items with composite materials. The Air Force is also planning on using fiber-reinforced composite

  10. Polysaccharide-based materials for cartilage tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, J T; Reis, R L

    2011-06-01

    Tissue engineering was proposed approximately 15 years ago as an alternative and innovative way to address tissue regeneration problems. During the development of this field, researchers have proposed a variety of ways of looking into the regeneration and engineering of tissues, using different types of materials coupled with a wide range of cells and bioactive agents. This trilogy is commonly considered the basis of a tissue-engineering strategy, meaning by this the use of a support material, cells and bioactive agents. Different researchers have been adding to these basic approaches other parameters able to improve the functionality of the tissue-engineered construct, such as specific mechanical environments and conditioned gaseous atmospheres, among others. Nowadays, tissue-engineering principles have been applied, with different degrees of success, to almost every tissue lacking efficient regeneration ability and the knowledge and intellectual property produced since then has experienced an immense growth. Materials for regenerating tissues, namely cartilage, have also been continuously increasing and most of the theoretical requirements for a tissue engineering support have been addressed by a single material or a mixture of materials. Due to their intrinsic features, polysaccharides are interesting for cartilage tissue-engineering approaches and as a result their exploitation for this purpose has been increasing. The present paper intends to provide an overview of some of the most relevant polysaccharides used in cartilage tissue-engineering research. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. The Role of Engineering Design in Materials Science and Engineering Curricula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Emily

    2008-03-01

    Undergraduate materials engineering curricula diverge from materials science curricula in two important ways. An underlying requirement is to prepare the graduates for industrial positions, so they need a good grounding in processing and statistical methods, as well as a strong set of hands-on skills in materials characterization and metrology. The other distinguishing feature of an engineering education is the focus on design rather than research. In the case of materials science and engineering, the design deliverable is often a process design, a materials selection, or a failure analysis. Some of the features of education for design include the exercise of thinking about the customer's needs, functional requirements of the product, the cost of production, and the broader context of the design project in society. These ideas can be integrated or at least introduced early in the curriculum and in many different types of courses. Materials Science and Engineering programs have the dual requirement of educating both future scientists and future engineers. Graduating baccalaureate students need to be ready for engineering practice, yet many also are being readied for graduate study and research. One aspect of this ambiguity is that research and design activities are not always as clearly differentiated as they are in other engineering programs. How can one undergraduate curriculum be successful at both? One key distinguishing element in engineering practice is engineering design. Design activities occur in many aspects of the profession and may be practiced by both scientists and engineers; however it is engineering curricula, not science curricula, that tend to explicitly focus on developing the skills and methods of design practice in students. Accredited programs within colleges of engineering are required to emphasize engineering practice and design, while still providing the necessary conceptual development of the underlying science. Current practices and

  12. Advanced materials research for long-haul aircraft turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signorelli, R. A.; Blankenship, C. P.

    1978-01-01

    The status of research efforts to apply low to intermediate temperature composite materials and advanced high temperature materials to engine components is reviewed. Emerging materials technologies and their potential benefits to aircraft gas turbines were emphasized. The problems were identified, and the general state of the technology for near term use was assessed.

  13. Genetically Engineered Materials for Biofuels Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Agrivida, Inc., is an agricultural biotechnology company developing industrial crop feedstocks for the fuel and chemical industries. Agrivida's crops have improved processing traits that enable efficient, low cost conversion of the crops' cellulosic components into fermentable sugars. Currently, pretreatment and enzymatic conversion of the major cell wall components, cellulose and hemicellulose, into fermentable sugars is the most expensive processing step that prevents widespread adoption of biomass in biofuels processes. To lower production costs we are consolidating pretreatment and enzyme production within the crop. In this strategy, transgenic plants express engineered cell wall degrading enzymes in an inactive form, which can be reactivated after harvest. We have engineered protein elements that disrupt enzyme activity during normal plant growth. Upon exposure to specific processing conditions, the engineered enzymes are converted into their active forms. This mechanism significantly lowers pretreatment costs and enzyme loadings (>75% reduction) below those currently available to the industry.

  14. Injectable biodegradable materials for orthopedic tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Temenoff, J S; Mikos, A G

    2000-12-01

    The large number of orthopedic procedures performed each year, including many performed arthroscopically, have led to great interest in injectable biodegradable materials for regeneration of bone and cartilage. A variety of materials have been developed for these applications, including ceramics, naturally derived substances and synthetic polymers. These materials demonstrate overall biocompatibility and appropriate mechanical properties, as well as promote tissue formation, thus providing an important step towards minimally invasive orthopedic procedures. This review provides a comparison of these materials based on mechanical properties, biocompatibility and regeneration efficacy. Advantages and disadvantages of each material are explained and design criteria for injectable biodegradable systems are provided.

  15. Abstracts, 19th Annual Meeting Society of Engineering Science, Inc. October 27, 28, & 29, 1982.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    sufficlent to detendie all six elastic conate of anisetrepic uIcepelar material. The wave.ezperimsmts weveal its afcromsphl ic igree of twseism, if soy...stiff multi- axial compression cell has been designed to allow 30.5cm (12 ins.) cube specimens to be loaded in compression, Figure 1. The principal...schematically. The specimen is 30.5cm (12 ins.) cub and has a 3.81cm (1.5 ins.) cylindrical hole drilled through its center. The cube faces are loaded by

  16. Engineering Materials and Machine Design Courses in ET Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodsky, Stanley M.

    1987-01-01

    Reports on a study designed to determine the current status of courses in engineering materials and their relationship to machine design and design project courses in mechanical engineering technology programs. Includes discussions of two recommendations of the study that were endorsed by a national conference. (TW)

  17. Biomimetic engineering of cellulose-based materials.

    PubMed

    Teeri, Tuula T; Brumer, Harry; Daniel, Geoff; Gatenholm, Paul

    2007-07-01

    Biomimetics is a field of science that investigates biological structures and processes for their use as models for the development of artificial systems. Biomimetic approaches have considerable potential in the development of new high-performance materials with low environmental impact. The cell walls of different plant species represent complex and highly sophisticated composite materials that can provide inspiration on how to design and fabricate lightweight materials with unique properties. Such materials can provide environmentally compatible solutions in advanced packaging, electronic devices, vehicles and sports equipment. This review gives an overview of the structures and interactions in natural plant cell walls and describes the first attempts towards mimicking them to develop novel biomaterials.

  18. Material removal processes: Engineering mechanics consideration

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    In the material removal process called machining, a layer of material of constant thickness is removed from the workpiece by a wedge-shaped tool that travels parallel to the workpiece at a preselected depth. Even though the speed of relative movement between workpiece and tool is low (typical 1--10 M/S), the strain-rates in the workpiece near the tool can be high, on the order of 10[sup 4]-10[sup 5] s[sup [minus]1]. When machining brittle materials or unlubricated ductile materials at low speed, the removed metal (or chip) will be discontinuous and made up of small fractured segments. On the other hand, when machining ductile material under lubricated conditions, the removed material forms a continuous coil. In this case, we can represent the material removal process as a steady-state process. In this presentation, we will restrict ourselves to orthogonal machining where the cutting edge is perpendicular to the relative motion-a situation also approximated by other material removal processes such as planing and broaching, and turning on a lathe.

  19. Material removal processes: Engineering mechanics consideration

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.A.

    1993-04-01

    In the material removal process called machining, a layer of material of constant thickness is removed from the workpiece by a wedge-shaped tool that travels parallel to the workpiece at a preselected depth. Even though the speed of relative movement between workpiece and tool is low (typical 1--10 M/S), the strain-rates in the workpiece near the tool can be high, on the order of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} s{sup {minus}1}. When machining brittle materials or unlubricated ductile materials at low speed, the removed metal (or chip) will be discontinuous and made up of small fractured segments. On the other hand, when machining ductile material under lubricated conditions, the removed material forms a continuous coil. In this case, we can represent the material removal process as a steady-state process. In this presentation, we will restrict ourselves to orthogonal machining where the cutting edge is perpendicular to the relative motion-a situation also approximated by other material removal processes such as planing and broaching, and turning on a lathe.

  20. Mesoscale Engineering of Nanocomposite Nonlinear Optical Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Afonso, C.N.; Feldman, L.C.; Gonella, F.; Haglund, R.F.; Luepke, G.; Magruder, R.H.; Mazzoldi, P.; Osborne, D.H.; Solis, J.; Zuhr, R.A.

    1999-11-01

    Complex nonlinear optical materials comprising elemental, compound or alloy quantum dots embedded in appropriate dielectric or semiconducting hosts may be suitable for deployment in photonic devices. Ion implantation, ion exchange followed by ion implantation, and pulsed laser deposition have ail been used to synthesize these materials. However, the correlation between the parameters of energetic-beam synthesis and the nonlinear optical properties is still very rudimentary when one starts to ask what is happening at nanoscale dimensions. Systems integration of complex nonlinear optical materials requires that the mesoscale materials science be well understood within the context of device structures. We discuss the effects of beam energy and energy density on quantum-dot size and spatial distribution, thermal conductivity, quantum-dot composition, crystallinity and defects - and, in turn, on the third-order optical susceptibility of the composite material. Examples from recent work in our laboratories are used to illustrate these effects.

  1. Materials science and engineering in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoller, L. K.

    1980-01-01

    The influences of gravitational forces on processes used in the preparation of materials employed in earth-based applications are addressed and the benefits which may be derived from the microgravity environment of space in improving on such constraints are considered. Attention is given to the fact that Materials Processing in Space is directed toward the utilization of the unique space environment as a tool to establish a scientific characterization of materials processes for technological exploitation in the public benefit. In the context of enhancement to earth-based technology or implementation of space-based processes for specialized, low volume, high value materials, the thrust of the Materials Processing in Space program is surveyed.

  2. Engineering and Design: Composite Materials for Civil Engineering Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-03-31

    conditions which can be a source of weakness. One method of producing FRP composites is by a technique known as pultrusion , a process much like extsusion...In the pultrusion process, the FRP materials are pulled through dies while the matrix is being cured and is in a moidable condition. These dies can be...Custom geometry. The length and geometry of a given pultruded cross section can be custom designed as well. The pultrusion process lends itself to

  3. Classroom Demonstrations in Materials Science/Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschhorn, J. S.; And Others

    Examples are given of demonstrations used at the University of Wisconsin in a materials science course for nontechnical students. Topics include crystal models, thermal properties, light, and corrosion. (MLH)

  4. Updated candidate list for engineered barrier materials

    SciTech Connect

    McCright, R.D.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes candidate materials to be evaluated over the next several years during advanced design phases for the waste package to be used for the underground disposal of high-level radioactive wastes at the Yucca Mountain facility.

  5. Granular crystals: Nonlinear dynamics meets materials engineering

    DOE PAGES

    Porter, Mason A.; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G.; Daraio, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    In this article, the freedom to choose the size, stiffness, and spatial distribution of macroscopic particles in a lattice makes granular crystals easily tailored building blocks for shock-absorbing materials, sound-focusing devices, acoustic switches, and other exotica.

  6. Prints for precision engineering research lathe (Engineering Materials)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    The precision engineering research lathe (PERL) is a small two-axis, ultra-high-precision turning machine used for turning very small contoured parts. Housed in a laminar-flow enclosure for temperature control, called a clean air envelope, PERL is maintained at a constant 68 degrees F (plus or minus 1 degree). The size of the lathe is minimized to reduce sensitivity to temperature variations. This, combined with internal water cooling of the spindle motor, the only major heat source on the machine, permits the use of air-shower temperature control. (This approach is a departure from previous designs for larger machines where liquid shower systems are used.) Major design features include the use of a T-configuration, hydrostatic oil slides, capstan slide drives, air-bearing spindles, and laser interferometer position feedback. The following features are particularly noteworthy: (1) to obtain the required accuracy and friction characteristics, the two linear slides are supported by 10-cm-travel hydrostatic bearings developed at LLNL; (2) to minimize backlash and friction, capstan drives are used to provide the slide motions; and (3) to obtain the best surface finish possible, asynchronous (nonrepeatable) spindle motion is minimized by driving the spindle directly with a brushless dc torque motor. PERL operates in single-axis mode. Using facing cuts on copper with a diamond tool, surface finishes of 7.5 nm peak-to-valley (1.5 nm rms) have been achieved.

  7. Applications and Degradation of Proteins Used as Tissue Engineering Materials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua-Jie; Di, Ling; Ren, Qiu-Shi; Wang, Jin-Ye

    2009-01-01

    This article provides an up-to-date review on the applications of natural polymers, i.e., proteins, as materials for tissue engineering. Proteins are one of the important candidates for tissue engineering materials based on their superior biocompatibility, biodegradation, bioresorbability, and so on. However, their inferior mechanical properties limit their broad application. Currently-available proteins for application in tissue engineering or drug delivery systems, such as fibrin, collagen, zein, silk fibroin, keratin, casein and albumin, and the biodegradation of tissue-engineered substitutes based on proteins are presented. Techniques of scaffold fabrication are also mentioned. Problems and future possibilities for development of protein-based tissue-engineered substitutes are also introduced in this review.

  8. [Research progress of myocardial tissue engineering scaffold materials].

    PubMed

    Fang, Yibing; Liao, Bin

    2011-03-01

    To review the current status and problems in the developing scaffolds for the myocardial tissue engineering application. The literature concerning the myocardial tissue engineering scaffold in recent years was reviewed extensively and summarized. As one of three elements for tissue engineering, a proper scaffold is very important for the proliferation and differentiation of the seeding cells. The naturally derived and synthetic extracellular matrix (ECM) materials aim to closely resemble the in vivo microenvironment by acting as an active component of the developing tissue construct in myocardial tissue engineering. With the advent and continuous refinement of cell removal techniques, a new class of native ECM has emerged with some striking advantages. Through using the principle of composite scaffold, computers and other high-technology nano-polymer technology, surface modification of traditional biological materials in myocardial tissue engineering are expected to provide ideal myocardial scaffolds.

  9. Improving sun-dried apricots (Prunus armeniaca) with photo-selective dryer cabinet materials (abstract)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Photo-selective materials have previously been studied for their effects on the pre-harvest quality of horticultural crops, but little work has been done on potential post-harvest effects. Thus, the aim of this work was to characterize the effects of 5 different photo-selective acrylic materials (u...

  10. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials, Supplement XX (1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracted/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and educational…

  11. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials, Supplement 29, 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracted/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and educational…

  12. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials, Supplement 24 (l985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracted/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and educational…

  13. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials, Supplement 26, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracted/indexed materials include all levels of governmental, private concerns, and…

  14. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials, Supplement 27, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracted/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and educational…

  15. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials, Supplement 21 (1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracted/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and educational…

  16. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Includes May 1979 edition and Supplements 1-15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracts/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and educational…

  17. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials, Supplement 25 (1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to hazardous wastes and public participation. Sources of abstracted/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and educational…

  18. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials, Supplement 23 (1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracted/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and educational…

  19. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials, Supplement XIX (1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracted/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and educational…

  20. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials, Supplement 22 (1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracted/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and educational…

  1. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials, Supplement 28, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and nonprint materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracted/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and educational…

  2. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials, Supplement 21 (1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracted/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and educational…

  3. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Includes May 1979 edition and Supplements 1-15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction, as well as materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Sources of abstracts/indexed materials include all levels of government, private concerns, and educational…

  4. Advanced High-Temperature Engine Materials Technology Progresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the Advanced High Temperature Engine Materials Technology Program (HITEMP) at the NASA Lewis Research Center is to generate technology for advanced materials and structural analysis that will increase fuel economy, improve reliability, extend life, and reduce operating costs for 21st century civil propulsion systems. The primary focus is on fan and compressor materials (polymer-matrix composites - PMC's), compressor and turbine materials (superalloys, and metal-matrix and intermetallic-matrix composites - MMC's and IMC's), and turbine materials (ceramic-matrix composites - CMC's). These advanced materials are being developed in-house by Lewis researchers and on grants and contracts.

  5. (abstract) Oblique Insonification Ultrasonic NDE of Composite Materials for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.; Lih, S. S.; Mal, A. K.

    1997-01-01

    In recent years, a great deal of research has been exerted to developing NDE methods for the characterization of the material properties of composites as well as other space structural materials. The need for information about such parameters as the elastic properties, density, and thickness are critical to the safe design and operation of such structural materials. Ultrasonics using immersion methods has played an important role in these efforts due to its capability, cost effectiveness, and ease of use. The authors designed a series of ultrasonic oblique insonification experiments in order to develop a practical field applicable NDE method for space structures.

  6. (abstract) Oblique Insonification Ultrasonic NDE of Composite Materials for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.; Lih, S. S.; Mal, A. K.

    1997-01-01

    In recent years, a great deal of research has been exerted to developing NDE methods for the characterization of the material properties of composites as well as other space structural materials. The need for information about such parameters as the elastic properties, density, and thickness are critical to the safe design and operation of such structural materials. Ultrasonics using immersion methods has played an important role in these efforts due to its capability, cost effectiveness, and ease of use. The authors designed a series of ultrasonic oblique insonification experiments in order to develop a practical field applicable NDE method for space structures.

  7. Magnetic and electrical control of engineered materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schuller, Ivan K.; de La Venta Granda, Jose; Wang, Siming; Ramirez, Gabriel; Erekhinskiy, Mikhail; Sharoni, Amos

    2016-08-16

    Methods, systems, and devices are disclosed for controlling the magnetic and electrical properties of materials. In one aspect, a multi-layer structure includes a first layer comprising a ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic material, and a second layer positioned within the multi-layer structure such that a first surface of the first layer is in direct physical contact with a second surface of the second layer. The second layer includes a material that undergoes structural phase transitions and metal-insulator transitions upon experiencing a change in temperature. One or both of the first and second layers are structured to allow a structural phase change associated with the second layer cause a change magnetic properties of the first layer.

  8. Evaluation and ranking of candidate ceramic wafer engine seal materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.

    1991-01-01

    Modern engineered ceramics offer high temperature capabilities not found in even the best superalloy metals. The high temperature properties of several selected ceramics including aluminum oxide, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride are reviewed as they apply to hypersonic engine seal design. A ranking procedure is employed to objectively differentiate among four different monolithic ceramic materials considered, including: a cold-pressed and sintered aluminum oxide; a sintered alpha-phase silicon carbide; a hot-isostatically pressed silicon nitride; and a cold-pressed and sintered silicon nitride. This procedure is used to narrow the wide range of potential ceramics considered to an acceptable number for future detailed and costly analyses and tests. The materials are numerically scored according to their high temperature flexural strength; high temperature thermal conductivity; resistance to crack growth; resistance to high heating rates; fracture toughness; Weibull modulus; and finally according to their resistance to leakage flow, where materials having coefficients of thermal expansion closely matching the engine panel material resist leakage flow best. The cold-pressed and sintered material (Kyocera SN-251) ranked the highest in the overall ranking especially when implemented in engine panels made of low expansion rate materials being considered for the engine, including Incoloy and titanium alloys.

  9. Automotive Engine Maintenance and Repair, 8-1. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps, Washington, DC.

    These military-developed curriculum materials consist of six individualized lessons dealing with automotive engine maintenance and repair. Covered in the individual volumes are basic engine construction and operation, engine and engine components design, engine malfunction diagnosis and remedy, engine disassembly, engine repair, and engine repair…

  10. Combined space environment on spacecraft engineering materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.; Kosten, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Spacecraft structures and surface materials exposed to the space environment for extended periods, up to thirty years, have increased potential for damage from long term exposure to the combined space environment including solar ultraviolet radiation, electrons, and protons and orbiting space debris. The space environment in which the Space Station Freedom and other space platforms will orbit is truly a hostile environment. For example, the currently estimated integral fluence for electrons above 1 Mev at 2000 nautical miles is above 2 x 10(exp 10) electrons/cm(sup 2)/day and the proton integral fluence is above 1 x 10(exp 9) protons/cm(sup 2)/day. At the 200 - 400 nautical miles, which is more representative of the altitude which will provide the environment for the Space Station, each of these fluences will be proportionately less; however, the data indicates that the radiation environment will obviously have an effect on structural materials exposed to the environment for long durations. The effects of ultraviolet radiation, particularly in the vacuum ultraviolet (less than 200 nm wavelength) is more difficult to characterize at this time. Very little data is available in the literature which can be used for determining the life cycle of a material placed in space for extended durations of time. In order to obtain critical data for planning and designing of spacecraft systems, use of a small vacuum system at the Environmental Effects Facility at MSFC, which can be used for these purposes was used. A special effort was made to build up this capability during the course of this research effort and perform a variety of experiments on materials proposed for the Space Station. A description of the apparatus and the procedure devised to process potential spacecraft materials is included.

  11. Biological issues in materials science and engineering: Interdisciplinarity and the bio-materials paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murr, L. E.

    2006-07-01

    Biological systems and processes have had, and continue to have, important implications and applications in materials extraction, processing, and performance. This paper illustrates some interdisciplinary, biological issues in materials science and engineering. These include metal extraction involving bacterial catalysis, galvanic couples, bacterial-assisted corrosion and degradation of materials, biosorption and bioremediation of toxic and other heavy metals, metal and material implants and prostheses and related dental and medical biomaterials developments and applications, nanomaterials health benefits and toxicity issue, and biomimetics and biologically inspired materials developments. These and other examples provide compelling evidence and arguments for emphasizing biological sicences in materials science and engineering curricula and the implementation of a bio-materials paradigm to facilitate the emergence of innovative interdisciplinarity involving the biological sciences and materials sciences and engineering.

  12. Computational materials science aided design of glass ceramics and crystal properties (abstract only).

    PubMed

    Mannstadt, Wolfgang

    2008-02-13

    Today's high tech materials have in many cases highly specialized properties and designed functionalities. Materials parameters like high temperature stability, high stiffness and certain optical properties have to be optimized and in many cases an adaptation to given processes is necessary. Many materials are compounds or layered structures. Thus, surface and interface properties need to be considered as well. At the same time to some extent just a few atomic layers sometimes determine the properties of the material, as is well known in semiconductor and other thin film technologies. Therefore, a detailed understanding of the materials properties at the atomic scale becomes more and more important. In addition many high tech materials have to be of high purity or selective dopant concentrations have to be adjusted to fulfill the desired functionality. Modern materials developments successfully use computational materials science to achieve that goal. Improved software tools and continuously growing computational power allow us to predict macroscopic properties of materials on the basis of microscopic/atomic ab initio simulation approaches. At Schott, special materials, in particular glasses and glass ceramics, are produced for a variety of applications. For a glass ceramic all the above mentioned difficulties for materials development arise. The properties of a glass ceramic are determined by the interplay of crystalline phases embedded in an amorphous glass matrix. For materials development the understanding of crystal structures and their properties, surfaces and interface phenomena, and amorphous systems are necessary, likewise. Each by itself is already a challenging problem. Many crystal phases that are grown within the glass matrix do not exist as single crystals or are difficult to grow in reasonable amounts for experimental investigations. The only way to obtain the properties of these crystalline phases is through 'ab initio' simulations in the computer

  13. Materials Processes (MP) Engineering Internship Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsik, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    This poster illustrates my major and minor projects worked on during my entire time interning at KSC in the Materials Science Branch. My major projects consist of three Failure Analyses, a research project on Magnesium Alloys, and the manufacturing and mechanical testing of the Advanced Plant Habitat. My three Failure Analyses are Umbilical Testing Ground Plates, Lithium Ion Battery Locking Spring Blade, and a Liquid Oxygen Poppet.

  14. Heterogenous Material Integration and Band Engineering With Type II Superlattice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-26

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0333 HETEROGENOUS MATERIAL INTEGRATION AND BAND ENGINEERING WITH TYPE II SUPERLATTICE Sanjay Krishna UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO...REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 04/15/2010-10/14/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE "Heterogenous Material ...well as lowered size, weight, power and cost. However, despite extensive efforts on T2SL material growth, detector passivation, and fabrication, T2SL

  15. Synthesis and physical properties of RNi2B2C and related materials (invited) (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cava, R. J.

    1996-04-01

    Copper oxides have dominated superconductivity research since 1987. The interplay between superconductivity and magnetism lies at the center of the controversy concerning the appropriate microscopic model for their superconductivity. We have recently been exploring a broad new family of materials which represent the first true quaternary intermetallic superconductors. Although their superconducting Tc's are not competitive with the copper oxides, several of the members of the family have Tc's equivalent to the highest Tc's ever reported for intermetallic compounds. The materials are especially surprising in that they are not based on niobium alloys, but rather are based on the borides of nickel, palladium, and platinum. The presence of square planes of the normally magnetic transition metals nickel and palladium suggests that magnetism might play some role in the superconducting mechanism. There are experimental results on both sides of the magnetic/conventional mechanism question, and although at this time the community is leaning largely toward a conventional mechanism, this should still be considered an open question. The presence of superconductivity for some of the magnetic rare earth analogs results in interesting phenomena, especially in the case of HoNi2B2C where the magnetic transition on the Ho sublattice is very close to the superconducting Tc. This talk will serve as an introduction to the chemistry, structure, and basic physical properties of these new materials, and will draw on the results of other groups, as well to present a summary view of these materials.

  16. PREFACE: 2013 International Conference on Manufacturing, Optimization, Industrial and Material Engineering (MOIME 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumban Gaol, Ford; Rizwan Hussain, Raja; Pandiangan, Tumpal; Desai, Amit

    2013-06-01

    Banner The 2013 International Conference on Manufacturing, Optimization, Industrial and Material Engineering (MOIME 2013), was held at the Grand Royal Panghegar Hotel, Bandung, Indonesia, from 9-10 March 2013. The MOIME 2013 conference brought together researchers, engineers and scientists in the field from around the world. MOIME 2013 aimed to promote interaction between the theoretical, experimental, and applied communities, so that a high level exchange was achieved in new and emerging areas within Material Engineering, Industrial Engineering and all areas that related to Optimization. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to all in the Technical Program Committee who reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting Conference Program as well as the invited and plenary speakers. This year, we received 103 papers and after rigorous review, 45 papers were accepted. The participants came from 16 countries. There were six Plenary and Invited Speakers. It is an honour to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) and we deeply thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high-grade contribution. Finally, we would like to thank the conference chairmen, the members of the steering committee, the organizing committee, the organizing secretariat and the conference sponsors for the financial support that contributed to the success of MOIME 2013. The Editors of the MOIME 2013 Dr Ford Lumban Gaol Dr Raja Rizwan Hussain Tumpal Pandiangan Dr Amit Desai The PDF contains the abstracts from the plenary and invited articles and the workshop.

  17. Crystal-Field Engineering of Solid-State Laser Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Brian; Bartram, Ralph H.

    2005-08-01

    This book examines the underlying science and design of laser materials. It emphasizes the principles of crystal-field engineering and discusses the basic physical concepts that determine laser gain and nonlinear frequency conversion in optical crystals. Henderson and Bartram develop the predictive capabilities of crystal-field engineering to show how modification of the symmetry and composition of optical centers can improve laser performance. They also discuss applications of the principles of crystal-field engineering to a variety of optical crystals in relation to the performances of laser devices. This book will be of considerable interest to physical, chemical and material scientists and to engineers involved in the science and technology of solid state lasers.

  18. Crystal-Field Engineering of Solid-State Laser Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Brian; Bartram, Ralph H.

    2000-07-01

    This book examines the underlying science and design of laser materials. It emphasizes the principles of crystal-field engineering and discusses the basic physical concepts that determine laser gain and nonlinear frequency conversion in optical crystals. Henderson and Bartram develop the predictive capabilities of crystal-field engineering to show how modification of the symmetry and composition of optical centers can improve laser performance. They also discuss applications of the principles of crystal-field engineering to a variety of optical crystals in relation to the performances of laser devices. This book will be of considerable interest to physical, chemical and material scientists and to engineers involved in the science and technology of solid state lasers.

  19. Eighth workshop on crystalline silicon solar cell materials and processes: Extended abstracts and papers

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    The theme of this workshop is Supporting the Transition to World Class Manufacturing. This workshop provides a forum for an informal exchange of information between researchers in the photovoltaic and non-photovoltaic fields on various aspects of impurities and defects in silicon, their dynamics during device processing, and their application in defect engineering. This interaction helps establish a knowledge base that can be used for improving device fabrication processes to enhance solar-cell performance and reduce cell costs. It also provides an excellent opportunity for researchers from industry and universities to recognize mutual needs for future joint research. The workshop format features invited review presentations, panel discussions, and two poster sessions. The poster sessions create an opportunity for both university and industrial researchers to present their latest results and provide a natural forum for extended discussions and technical exchanges.

  20. Material Engineering for Phase Change Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, David M.

    As semiconductor devices continue to scale downward, and portable consumer electronics become more prevalent there is a need to develop memory technology that will scale with devices and use less energy, while maintaining performance. One of the leading prototypical memories that is being investigated is phase change memory. Phase change memory (PCM) is a non-volatile memory composed of 1 transistor and 1 resistor. The resistive structure includes a memory material alloy which can change between amorphous and crystalline states repeatedly using current/voltage pulses of different lengths and magnitudes. The most widely studied PCM materials are chalcogenides - Germanium-Antimony-Tellerium (GST) with Ge2Sb2Te3 and Germanium-Tellerium (GeTe) being some of the most popular stochiometries. As these cells are scaled downward, the current/voltage needed to switch these materials becomes comparable to the voltage needed to sense the cell's state. The International Roadmap for Semiconductors aims to raise the threshold field of these devices from 66.6 V/mum to be at least 375 V/mum for the year 2024. These cells are also prone to resistance drift between states, leading to bit corruption and memory loss. Phase change material properties are known to influence PCM device performance such as crystallization temperature having an effect on data retention and litetime, while resistivity values in the amorphous and crystalline phases have an effect on the current/voltage needed to write/erase the cell. Addition of dopants is also known to modify the phase change material parameters. The materials G2S2T5, GeTe, with dopants - nitrogen, silicon, titanium, and aluminum oxide and undoped Gallium-Antimonide (GaSb) are studied for these desired characteristics. Thin films of these compositions are deposited via physical vapor deposition at IBM Watson Research Center. Crystallization temperatures are investigated using time resolved x-ray diffraction at Brookhaven National Laboratory

  1. Mechanical Constitutive Models for Engineering Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-09-01

    peruendicular to the yield surface at point C. Drucker - Prager material 138. The Von Mises yield condition was modified by Drucker and Prager12 to include the...Substituting Equation 500 mu2 il @ / I // I oli IC’ Figure 19. Drucker - Prager yield surface in principal stress space ! ! into Equation 469 we obtain the...following stress-strain relationship associated with the Drucker - Prager yield function dS- WdE / iG G d~ de +21 ij 2G 9K ij + + G x ( f e1ij) (501) From

  2. From Templated Nucleation to Functional Materials Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang Yang

    2007-06-01

    Templated nucleation is considered theoretically and experimentally in terms of a so-called interface correlation factor f(m,R'). The quantitative experimental evidence of pre and pro nucleation dynamic processes was presented. Based on the f(m,R') function, the "zero sized" effect of foreign particles allowing us to achieve homogeneous like nucleation was identified for the first time. Based on the principles of templated nucleation, the architecture of new functional materials can be achieved at the micro/nano scales.

  3. Gelatin-Based Materials in Ocular Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Rose, James B; Pacelli, Settimio; Haj, Alicia J El; Dua, Harminder S; Hopkinson, Andrew; White, Lisa J; Rose, Felicity R A J

    2014-04-17

    Gelatin has been used for many years in pharmaceutical formulation, cell culture and tissue engineering on account of its excellent biocompatibility, ease of processing and availability at low cost. Over the last decade gelatin has been extensively evaluated for numerous ocular applications serving as cell-sheet carriers, bio-adhesives and bio-artificial grafts. These different applications naturally have diverse physical, chemical and biological requirements and this has prompted research into the modification of gelatin and its derivatives. The crosslinking of gelatin alone or in combination with natural or synthetic biopolymers has produced a variety of scaffolds that could be suitable for ocular applications. This review focuses on methods to crosslink gelatin-based materials and how the resulting materials have been applied in ocular tissue engineering. Critical discussion of recent innovations in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine will highlight future opportunities for gelatin-based materials in ophthalmology.

  4. Engine Materials Compatibility with Alternate Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Jeffery K; Pawel, Steven J; Wilson, Dane F

    2013-05-01

    The compatibility of aluminum and aluminum alloys with synthetic fuel blends comprised of ethanol and reference fuel C (a 50/50 mix of toluene and iso-octane) was examined as a function of water content and temperature. Commercially pure wrought aluminum and several cast aluminum alloys were observed to be similarly susceptible to substantial corrosion in dry (< 50 ppm water) ethanol. Corrosion rates of all the aluminum materials examined were accelerated by increased temperature and ethanol content in the fuel mixture, but inhibited by increased water content. Pretreatments designed to stabilize passive films on aluminum increased the incubation time for onset of corrosion, suggesting film stability is a significant factor in the mechanism of corrosion.

  5. Engine Materials Compatability with Alternative Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steve; Moore, D.

    2013-04-05

    The compatibility of aluminum and aluminum alloys with synthetic fuel blends comprised of ethanol and reference fuel C (a 50/50 mix of toluene and iso-octane) was examined as a function of water content and temperature. Commercially pure wrought aluminum and several cast aluminum alloys were observed to be similarly susceptible to substantial corrosion in dry (< 50 ppm water) ethanol. Corrosion rates of all the aluminum materials examined were accelerated by increased temperature and ethanol content in the fuel mixture, but inhibited by increased water content. Pretreatments designed to stabilize passive films on aluminum increased the incubation time for onset of corrosion, suggesting film stability is a significant factor in the mechanism of corrosion.

  6. Sliding seal materials for low heat rejection engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaty, Kevin; Lankford, James; Vinyard, Shannon

    1989-01-01

    Sliding friction coefficients and wear rates of promising piston seal materials were measured under temperature, environmental, velocity, and loading conditions that are representative of the low heat rejection (LHR) diesel engine environment. These materials included carbides, oxides, and nitrides. In addition, silicon nitride and partially stablized zirconia disks (cylinder liners) were ion-implanted with TiNi, Ni, Co, and Cr, and subsequently run against carbide pins (piston rings), with the objective of producing reduced friction via solid lubrication at elevated temperature. Friction and wear measurements were obtained using pin-on-disk laboratory experiments and a unique engine friction test rig. Unmodified ceramic sliding couples were characterized at all temperatures by friction coefficients of 0.24 and above during the pin-on-disk tests. The coefficient at 800 C in an oxidizing environment was reduced to below 0.1, for certain material combination, by the ion-implantation of TiNi or Co. This beneficial effect was found to derive from the lubricious Ti, Ni, and Co oxides. Similar results were demonstrated on the engine friction test rig at lower temperatures. The structural integrity and feasibility of engine application with the most promising material combination were demonstrated during a 30-hour single-cylinder, direct-injection diesel engine test.

  7. Trafficking of nuclear materials from the former Soviet Union news abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, S A; Lawson, T M

    1999-08-31

    This report was generated to provide a background for understanding the type and variety of smuggling incidents that have been reported. As discussed in the Site Prioritization report, smuggling cases provide insight into the activities of what has been called ''amateur smuggling'', that is, smugglers who do not belong to a professional smuggling gang. In many instances, the law enforcement officials giving the press release are not familiar with nuclear materials, and give incorrect identification. The other portions of the information, such as number of individuals involved, places, and modes of operation are likely to be more correct.

  8. Auto-ignition of hydrazine by engineering materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, J. H.; Riehl, W. A.

    1978-01-01

    Hydrazine, being a monopropellant, can explode and/or detonate in contact with some materials. This has been generally recognized and minimized by testing the compatibility of engineering materials with hydrazine at ambient temperature. Very limited tests have been done at elevated temperatures. To assess the potential hazard of hydrazine leakage into a propulsion compartment (boattail), autoignition characteristics of hydrazine were tested on 18 engineering materials and coatings at temperatures of 120 C to over 330 C. Furthermore, since hydrazine can decompose violently in nitrogen or helium, common purging cannot assure safety. Therefore tests were also made in nitrogen. Detonations occurred on contact with five materials in air. Similar tests in nitrogen did not lead to ignition.

  9. Density functional calculations on structural materials for nuclear energy applications and functional materials for photovoltaic energy applications (abstract only).

    PubMed

    Domain, C; Olsson, P; Becquart, C S; Legris, A; Guillemoles, J F

    2008-02-13

    Ab initio density functional theory calculations are carried out in order to predict the evolution of structural materials under aggressive working conditions such as cases with exposure to corrosion and irradiation, as well as to predict and investigate the properties of functional materials for photovoltaic energy applications. Structural metallic materials used in nuclear facilities are subjected to irradiation which induces the creation of large amounts of point defects. These defects interact with each other as well as with the different elements constituting the alloys, which leads to modifications of the microstructure and the mechanical properties. VASP (Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package) has been used to determine the properties of point defect clusters and also those of extended defects such as dislocations. The resulting quantities, such as interaction energies and migration energies, are used in larger scale simulation methods in order to build predictive tools. For photovoltaic energy applications, ab initio calculations are used in order to search for new semiconductors and possible element substitutions for existing ones in order to improve their efficiency.

  10. 2014 International Conference on Manufacturing, Optimization, Industrial and Material Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumban Gaol, Ford; Webb, Jeff; Ding, Jun

    2014-06-01

    The 2nd International Conference on Manufacturing, Optimization, Industrial and Material Engineering 2014 (MOIME 2014), was held at the Grand Mercure Harmoni, Opal Room 3rd Floor, Jakarta, Indonesia, during 29-30 March 2014. The MOIME 2014 conference is designed to bring together researchers, engineers and scientists in the domain of interest from around the world. MOIME 2014 is placed on promoting interaction between the theoretical, experimental, and applied communities, so that a high level exchange is achieved in new and emerging areas within Material Engineering, Industrial Engineering and all areas that relate to Optimization. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to all in the Technical Program Committee who have reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting Conference Program as well as the invited and plenary speakers. This year, we received 97 papers and after rigorous review, 24 papers were accepted. The participants come from 7 countries. There are 4 (four) parallel session and 2 Invited Speakers and one workshop. It is an honour to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) and we deeply thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high-grade contributions. Finally, we would like to thank the conference chairmen, the members of the steering committee, the organizing committee, the organizing secretariat and the financial support from the conference sponsors that allowed the success of MOIME 2014. The Editors of the MOIME 2014 Proceedings Editors Dr Ford Lumban Gaol Jeff Webb, PhD Professor Jun Ding, PhD

  11. Anisotropic Materials for Skeletal-Muscle-Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Jana, Soumen; Levengood, Sheeny K Lan; Zhang, Miqin

    2016-12-01

    Repair of damaged skeletal-muscle tissue is limited by the regenerative capacity of the native tissue. Current clinical approaches are not optimal for the treatment of large volumetric skeletal-muscle loss. As an alternative, tissue engineering represents a promising approach for the functional restoration of damaged muscle tissue. A typical tissue-engineering process involves the design and fabrication of a scaffold that closely mimics the native skeletal-muscle extracellular matrix (ECM), allowing organization of cells into a physiologically relevant 3D architecture. In particular, anisotropic materials that mimic the morphology of the native skeletal-muscle ECM, can be fabricated using various biocompatible materials to guide cell alignment, elongation, proliferation, and differentiation into myotubes. Here, an overview of fundamental concepts associated with muscle-tissue engineering and the current status of muscle-tissue-engineering approaches is provided. Recent advances in the development of anisotropic scaffolds with micro- or nanoscale features are reviewed, and how scaffold topographical, mechanical, and biochemical cues correlate to observed cellular function and phenotype development is examined. Finally, some recent developments in both the design and utility of anisotropic materials in skeletal-muscle-tissue engineering are highlighted, along with their potential impact on future research and clinical applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. A multipurpose scanning apparatus for automatic analyses of soft magnetic materials and circuits (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönhuber, P.; Pfützner, H.

    1991-04-01

    Proper techniques for simultaneous evaluation of both global properties of magnetic circuits and local magnetic parameters of single grains or domains are an important prerequisite for optimal application and future improvement of ferromagnetic materials. The paper presents a test equipment designed to accommodate magnetic circuits up to outer dimensions of about 1 m×1 m×0.5 m. The box is thermally isolated for most sensitive thermistor applications such as local loss measurements. By means of a stepper-motor-driven sensing head which can pick up one or more sensors simultaneously, the scanning resolution and area can be freely chosen in a wide range from minimum scanning width of 10 μm to a maximum area of about 0.9 m×0.9 m. Geometrically highly resolving Hall sensors have been prepared for normal stray field analysis, thus visualizing local domain configurations.1 Tangential Hall sensors and differential field plates can be mounted for field measurements during magnetization process. Optionally, all sensors can be coupled with thermistors for local loss measurements. Reference elements in bridge connection ensure results considerably free from ambient disturbances. The apparatus is fully automated by a PC controlling scanning procedures as well as data acquisition and managing to storage disks and graphic devices.

  13. (abstract) A Mobile Robot for Remote Response to Incidents Involving Hazardous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Richard V.

    1994-01-01

    This paper will report the status of the Emergency Response Robotics project, a teleoperated mobile robot system being developed at JPL for use by the JPL Fire Department/HAZMAT Team. The project, which began in 1991, has been focused on developing a robotic vehicle which can be quickly deployed by HAZMAT Team personnel for first entry into an incident site. The primary goals of the system are to gain access to the site, locate and identify the hazard, and aid in its mitigation. The involvement of JPL Fire Department/HAZMAT Team personnel has been critical in guiding the design and evaluation of the system. A unique feature of the current robot, called HAZBOT III, is its special design for operation in combustible environments. This includes the use of all solid state electronics, brushless motors, and internal pressurization. Demonstration and testing of the system with HAZMAT Team personnel has shown that teleoperated robots, such as HAZBOT III, can successfully gain access to incident sites locating and identifying hazardous material spills. Work is continuing to enable more complex missions through the addition of appropriate sensor technology and enhancement of the operator interface.

  14. Synthesis Properties and Electron Spin Resonance Properties of Titanic Materials (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jung Min; Lee, Jun; Kim, Tak Hee; Sun, Min Ho; Jang, Young Bae; Cho, Sung June

    2009-04-01

    Titanic materials were synthesized by hydrothermal method of TiO2 anatase in 10M LiOH, 10M NaOH, and 14M KOH at 130° C for 30 hours. Alkaline media were removed from the synthesized products using 0.1N HCl aqueous solution. The as-prepared samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller isotherm, and electron spin resonance. Different shapes of synthesized products were observed through the typical electron microscope and indicated that the formation of the different morphologies depends on the treatment conditions of highly alkaline media. Many micropores were observed in the cubic or octahedral type of TiO2 samples through the typical electron microscope and Langmuir adsorption-desorption isotherm of liquid nitrogen at 77° K. Electron spin resonance studies have also been carried out to verify the existence of paramagnetic sites such as oxygen vacancies on the titania samples. The effect of alkali metal ions on the morphologies and physicochemical properties of nanoscale titania are discussed.

  15. (abstract) A Mobile Robot for Remote Response to Incidents Involving Hazardous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Richard V.

    1994-01-01

    This paper will report the status of the Emergency Response Robotics project, a teleoperated mobile robot system being developed at JPL for use by the JPL Fire Department/HAZMAT Team. The project, which began in 1991, has been focused on developing a robotic vehicle which can be quickly deployed by HAZMAT Team personnel for first entry into an incident site. The primary goals of the system are to gain access to the site, locate and identify the hazard, and aid in its mitigation. The involvement of JPL Fire Department/HAZMAT Team personnel has been critical in guiding the design and evaluation of the system. A unique feature of the current robot, called HAZBOT III, is its special design for operation in combustible environments. This includes the use of all solid state electronics, brushless motors, and internal pressurization. Demonstration and testing of the system with HAZMAT Team personnel has shown that teleoperated robots, such as HAZBOT III, can successfully gain access to incident sites locating and identifying hazardous material spills. Work is continuing to enable more complex missions through the addition of appropriate sensor technology and enhancement of the operator interface.

  16. Rocket engine heat transfer and material technology for commercial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiltabiddle, J.; Campbell, J.

    1974-01-01

    Liquid fueled rocket engine combustion, heat transfer, and material technology have been utilized in the design and development of compact combustion and heat exchange equipment intended for application in the commercial field. An initial application of the concepts to the design of a compact steam generator to be utilized by electrical utilities for the production of peaking power is described.

  17. Rocket engine heat transfer and material technology for commercial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiltabiddle, J.; Campbell, J.

    1974-01-01

    Liquid fueled rocket engine combustion, heat transfer, and material technology have been utilized in the design and development of compact combustion and heat exchange equipment intended for application in the commercial field. An initial application of the concepts to the design of a compact steam generator to be utilized by electrical utilities for the production of peaking power is described.

  18. Information Support for Using Open Learning Materials within Engineering Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Stephen M.; Davies, D. T.

    1987-01-01

    Reviewed are some current trends in engineering education in the UK, particularly those toward open and distance learning. A case study is provided that shows a recent move to develop relevant and up-to-date course materials in the area of Advanced Manufacturing Technology for undergraduates through collaboration between academic and library…

  19. Selecting and using materials for a nuclear rocket engine reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanin, Anatolii G.; Fedik, Ivan I.

    2011-03-01

    This paper provides a historical account of how the nuclear rocket engine reactor was created and discusses the problem of selecting materials for a gas environment at a temperature of up to 3100 K and energy release of 30 MW per liter.

  20. Information Support for Using Open Learning Materials within Engineering Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Stephen M.; Davies, D. T.

    1987-01-01

    Reviewed are some current trends in engineering education in the UK, particularly those toward open and distance learning. A case study is provided that shows a recent move to develop relevant and up-to-date course materials in the area of Advanced Manufacturing Technology for undergraduates through collaboration between academic and library…

  1. Product Manager Combat Engineering and Material Handling Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-16

    Asphalt Mixing Plant  Skid Steer Loader Type 2 & 3  EMM Water Distributor  Hasty Road Repair  Soil Density Tester  Vibratory Plate Compactor...Engineer/Material Handling Equipment  Eng Rapid Airfield Cont Capability IV  Bituminous Paving Machine  Type 2 Heavy ATEC  Water Well Drill Rig

  2. Using biological inspiration to engineer functional nanostructured materials.

    PubMed

    Wendell, David W; Patti, Jordan; Montemagno, Carlo D

    2006-11-01

    Humans have always looked to nature for design inspiration, and material design on the molecular level is no different. Here we explore how this idea applies to nanoscale biomimicry, specifically examining both recent advances and our own work on engineering lipid and polymer membrane systems with cellular processes.

  3. Simulating MEMS Chevron Actuator for Strain Engineering 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vutukuru, Mounika; Christopher, Jason; Bishop, David; Swan, Anna

    2D materials pose an exciting paradigm shift in the world of electronics. These crystalline materials have demonstrated high electric and thermal conductivities and tensile strength, showing great potential as the new building blocks of basic electronic circuits. However, strain engineering 2D materials for novel devices remains a difficult experimental feat. We propose the integration of 2D materials with MEMS devices to investigate the strain dependence on material properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity, refractive index, mechanical elasticity, and band gap. MEMS Chevron actuators, provides the most accessible framework to study strain in 2D materials due to their high output force displacements for low input power. Here, we simulate Chevron actuators on COMSOL to optimize actuator design parameters and accurately capture the behavior of the devices while under the external force of a 2D material. Through stationary state analysis, we analyze the response of the device through IV characteristics, displacement and temperature curves. We conclude that the simulation precisely models the real-world device through experimental confirmation, proving that the integration of 2D materials with MEMS is a viable option for constructing novel strain engineered devices. The authors acknowledge support from NSF DMR1411008.

  4. 3D Printing Optical Engine for Controlling Material Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Chin; Chang, Kuang-Po; Wu, Ping-Han; Wu, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Ching-Chih; Chuang, Chuan-Sheng; Lin, De-Yau; Liu, Sung-Ho; Horng, Ji-Bin; Tsau, Fang-Hei

    Controlling the cooling rate of alloy during melting and resolidification is the most commonly used method for varying the material microstructure and consequently the resuling property. However, the cooling rate of a selective laser melting (SLM) production is restricted by a preset optimal parameter of a good dense product. The head room for locally manipulating material property in a process is marginal. In this study, we invent an Optical Engine for locally controlling material microstructure in a SLM process. It develops an invovative method to control and adjust thermal history of the solidification process to gain desired material microstucture and consequently drastically improving the quality. Process parameters selected locally for specific materials requirement according to designed characteristics by using thermal dynamic principles of solidification process. It utilize a technique of complex laser beam shape of adaptive irradiation profile to permit local control of material characteristics as desired. This technology could be useful for industrial application of medical implant, aerospace and automobile industries.

  5. Materials for advanced rocket engine turbopump turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    A study program was conducted to identify those materials that will provide the greatest benefits as turbine blades for advanced liquid propellant rocket engine turbines and to prepare technology plans for the development of those materials for use in the 1990 through 1995 period. The candidate materials were selected from six classes of materials: single-crystal (SC) superalloys, oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) superalloys, rapid solidification processed (RSP) superalloys, directionally solidified eutectic (DSE) superalloys, fiber-reinforced superalloy (FRS) composites, and ceramics. Properties of materials from the six classes were compiled and evaluated and property improvements were projected approximately 5 years into the future for advanced versions of materials in each of the six classes.

  6. Materials for engine applications above 3000 deg F: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, N.J.; Dicarlo, J.A.; Jacobson, N.S.; Levine, S.R.; Nesbitt, J.A.; Probst, H.B.; Sanders, W.A.; Stearns, C.A.

    1987-10-01

    Materials for future generations of aeropropulsion systems will be required to perform at ever-increasing temperatures and have properties superior to the current state of the art. Improved engine efficiency can reduce specific fuel consumption and thus increase range and reduce operating costs. The ultimate payoff gain is expected to come when materials are developed which can perform without cooling at gas temperatures to 2200 C (4000 F). An overview is presented of materials for applications above 1650 C (3000 F), some pertinent physical property data, and the rationale used: (1) to arrive at recommendations of material systems that qualify for further investigation, and (2) to develop a proposed plan of research. From an analysis of available thermochemical data it was included that such materials systems must be composed of oxide ceramics. The required structural integrity will be achieved by developing these materials into fiber-reinforced ceramic composites.

  7. Materials for engine applications above 3000 deg F: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Nancy J.; Dicarlo, James A.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Levine, Stanley R.; Nesbitt, James A.; Probst, Hubert B.; Sanders, William A.; Stearns, Carl A.

    1987-01-01

    Materials for future generations of aeropropulsion systems will be required to perform at ever-increasing temperatures and have properties superior to the current state of the art. Improved engine efficiency can reduce specific fuel consumption and thus increase range and reduce operating costs. The ultimate payoff gain is expected to come when materials are developed which can perform without cooling at gas temperatures to 2200 C (4000 F). An overview is presented of materials for applications above 1650 C (3000 F), some pertinent physical property data, and the rationale used: (1) to arrive at recommendations of material systems that qualify for further investigation, and (2) to develop a proposed plan of research. From an analysis of available thermochemical data it was included that such materials systems must be composed of oxide ceramics. The required structural integrity will be achieved by developing these materials into fiber-reinforced ceramic composites.

  8. Biomineralization of Engineered Spider Silk Protein-Based Composite Materials for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Hardy, John G; Torres-Rendon, Jose Guillermo; Leal-Egaña, Aldo; Walther, Andreas; Schlaad, Helmut; Cölfen, Helmut; Scheibel, Thomas R

    2016-07-11

    Materials based on biodegradable polyesters, such as poly(butylene terephthalate) (PBT) or poly(butylene terephthalate-co-poly(alkylene glycol) terephthalate) (PBTAT), have potential application as pro-regenerative scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Herein, the preparation of films composed of PBT or PBTAT and an engineered spider silk protein, (eADF4(C16)), that displays multiple carboxylic acid moieties capable of binding calcium ions and facilitating their biomineralization with calcium carbonate or calcium phosphate is reported. Human mesenchymal stem cells cultured on films mineralized with calcium phosphate show enhanced levels of alkaline phosphatase activity suggesting that such composites have potential use for bone tissue engineering.

  9. NASA's high-temperature engine materials program for civil aeronautics

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, H.R.; Ginty, C.A. )

    1992-05-01

    This paper discusses the Advanced High Temperature Engine Materials Technology Program (HTEMP) of NASA which is directed toward enabling the development of 22st-centruy civil aeronautics propulsion systems by generating he technology necessary for revolutionary advances in structural materials and analysis. Major consideration is being given to propulsion systems that are: Friendly to the environment in terms of minimized pollution and noise; Economical with regard to reduced fuel consumption per passenger mile, lower direct operating costs, longer life, and improved system reliability. To achieve such advances, developments in high-temperature materials are considered key.

  10. Ordered mesoporous materials based on interfacial assembly and engineering.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Yue, Qin; Deng, Yonghui; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2013-10-04

    Ordered mesoporous materials have inspired prominent research interest due to their unique properties and functionalities and potential applications in adsorption, separation, catalysis, sensors, drug delivery, energy conversion and storage, and so on. Thanks to continuous efforts over the past two decades, great achievements have been made in the synthesis and structural characterization of mesoporous materials. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in preparing ordered mesoporous materials from the viewpoint of interfacial assembly and engineering. Five interfacial assembly and synthesis are comprehensively highlighted, including liquid-solid interfacial assembly, gas-liquid interfacial assembly, liquid-liquid interfacial assembly, gas-solid interfacial synthesis, and solid-solid interfacial synthesis, basics about their synthesis pathways, princples and interface engineering strategies. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Unique material requirements in the Space Shuttle Main Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, D. L.; Shoemaker, M. C.; Bashir, S.

    1983-01-01

    Components operating in staged-combustion cycle liquid fuel rocket engines such as the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSMEs) are subjected to severe temperature changes during start/stop transients, together with extremely high pressures, corrosive gases, high fluid velocities, demanding weight-control criteria, etc. Attention is given to the selection and application of metallic and nonmetallic materials for high temperature resistance, cryogenic properties, and hydrogen and oxygen compatibility. The materials in question include polyimides, Kel-F, Armalon, and Teflon among plastics, and gold and copper platings, weld-overlays and heat treatment modifications among metals and metallic processing techniques. The polymeric materials are oxygen-resistant, and the metallic ones hydrogen-resistant.

  12. Unique material requirements in the Space Shuttle Main Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, D. L.; Shoemaker, M. C.; Bashir, S.

    1983-01-01

    Components operating in staged-combustion cycle liquid fuel rocket engines such as the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSMEs) are subjected to severe temperature changes during start/stop transients, together with extremely high pressures, corrosive gases, high fluid velocities, demanding weight-control criteria, etc. Attention is given to the selection and application of metallic and nonmetallic materials for high temperature resistance, cryogenic properties, and hydrogen and oxygen compatibility. The materials in question include polyimides, Kel-F, Armalon, and Teflon among plastics, and gold and copper platings, weld-overlays and heat treatment modifications among metals and metallic processing techniques. The polymeric materials are oxygen-resistant, and the metallic ones hydrogen-resistant.

  13. Designing ECM-mimetic materials using protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lei; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2014-04-01

    The natural extracellular matrix (ECM), with its multitude of evolved cell-instructive and cell-responsive properties, provides inspiration and guidelines for the design of engineered biomaterials. One strategy to create ECM-mimetic materials is the modular design of protein-based engineered ECM (eECM) scaffolds. This modular design strategy involves combining multiple protein domains with different functionalities into a single, modular polymer sequence, resulting in a multifunctional matrix with independent tunability of the individual domain functions. These eECMs often enable decoupled control over multiple material properties for fundamental studies of cell-matrix interactions. In addition, since the eECMs are frequently composed entirely of bioresorbable amino acids, these matrices have immense clinical potential for a variety of regenerative medicine applications. This brief review demonstrates how fundamental knowledge gained from structure-function studies of native proteins can be exploited in the design of novel protein-engineered biomaterials. While the field of protein-engineered biomaterials has existed for over 20years, the community is only now beginning to fully explore the diversity of functional peptide modules that can be incorporated into these materials. We have chosen to highlight recent examples that either (i) demonstrate exemplary use as matrices with cell-instructive and cell-responsive properties or (ii) demonstrate outstanding creativity in terms of novel molecular-level design and macro-level functionality. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Electrospun materials for affinity-based engineering and drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sill, T. J.; von Recum, H. A.

    2015-10-01

    Electrospinning is a process which can quickly and cheaply create materials of high surface to volume and aspect ratios from many materials, however in application toward drug delivery this can be a strong disadvantage as well. Diffusion of drug is proportional to the thickness of that device. In moving from macro to micro to nano-sized electrospun materials drug release rates change to profiles that are too fast to be therapeutically beneficial. In this work we use molecular interactions to further control the rate of release beyond that capable of diffusion alone. To do this we create materials with molecular pockets, which can "hold" therapeutic drugs through a reversible interaction such as a host/guest complexation. Through these complexes we show we are able to impact delivery of drug from electrospun materials, and also apply them in tissue engineering for the reversible presentation of biomolecules on a fiber surface.

  15. Engineering the shape and structure of materials by fractal cut

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yigil; Shin, Joong-Ho; Costa, Avelino; Kim, Tae Ann; Kunin, Valentin; Li, Ju; Lee, Su Yeon; Yang, Shu; Han, Heung Nam; Choi, In-Suk; Srolovitz, David J.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the transformation of a sheet of material into a wide range of desired shapes and patterns by introducing a set of simple cuts in a multilevel hierarchy with different motifs. Each choice of hierarchical cut motif and cut level allows the material to expand into a unique structure with a unique set of properties. We can reverse-engineer the desired expanded geometries to find the requisite cut pattern to produce it without changing the physical properties of the initial material. The concept was experimentally realized and applied to create an electrode that expands to >800% the original area with only very minor stretching of the underlying material. The generality of our approach greatly expands the design space for materials so that they can be tuned for diverse applications. PMID:25422433

  16. Design Exploration of Engineered Materials, Products, and Associated Manufacturing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Rishabh; Kulkarni, Nagesh H.; Gautham, B. P.; Singh, Amarendra K.; Mistree, Farrokh; Allen, Janet K.; Panchal, Jitesh H.

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years, ICME-related research has been directed towards the study of multi-scale materials design. However, relatively little has been reported on model-based methods that are of relevance to industry for the realization of engineered materials, products, and associated industrial manufacturing processes. Computational models used in the realization of engineered materials and products are fraught with uncertainty, have different levels of fidelity, are incomplete and are even likely to be inaccurate. In light of this, we adopt a robust design strategy that facilitates the exploration of the solution space thereby providing decision support to a design engineer. In this paper, we describe a foundational construct embodied in our method for design exploration, namely, the compromise Decision Support Problem. We introduce a problem that we are using to establish the efficacy of our method. It involves the integrated design of steel and gears, traversing the chain of steel making, mill production, and evolution of the material during these processes, and linking this to the mechanical design and manufacture of the gear. We provide an overview of our method to determine the operating set points for the ladle, tundish and caster operations necessary to manufacture steel of a desired set of properties. Finally, we highlight the efficacy of our method.

  17. Innovative Mechanical Engineering Technologies, Equipment and Materials-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilnaz Izailovich, Fayrushin; Nail Faikovich, Kashapov; Mahmut Mashutovich, Ganiev

    2014-12-01

    In the period from 25 to 27 September 2013 the city of Kazan hosted the International Scientific Conference "Innovative mechanical engineering technologies, equipment and materials - 2013" (IRTC "IMETEM - 2013"). The conference was held on the grounds of "Kazanskaya Yarmarka" (Kazan). The conference plenary meeting was held with the participation of the Republic of Tatarstan, breakout sessions, forum "Improving the competitiveness and efficiency of engineering enterprises in the WTO" and a number of round tables. Traditionally, the event was followed by the 13th International specialized exhibition "Engineering. Metalworking. Kazan ", in which were presented the development of innovative enterprises in the interests of the Russian Federation of Industry of Republic of Tatarstan, to support the "Foundation for Assistance to Small Innovative Enterprises in Science and Technology" and the 8th specialized exhibition "TechnoWelding". Kashapov Nail, D.Sc., professor (Kazan Federal University)

  18. Nanostructured materials for applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering*

    PubMed Central

    GOLDBERG, MICHAEL; LANGER, ROBERT; JIA, XINQIAO

    2010-01-01

    Research in the areas of drug delivery and tissue engineering has witnessed tremendous progress in recent years due to their unlimited potential to improve human health. Meanwhile, the development of nanotechnology provides opportunities to characterize, manipulate and organize matter systematically at the nanometer scale. Biomaterials with nano-scale organizations have been used as controlled release reservoirs for drug delivery and artificial matrices for tissue engineering. Drug-delivery systems can be synthesized with controlled composition, shape, size and morphology. Their surface properties can be manipulated to increase solubility, immunocompatibility and cellular uptake. The limitations of current drug delivery systems include suboptimal bioavailability, limited effective targeting and potential cytotoxicity. Promising and versatile nano-scale drug-delivery systems include nanoparticles, nanocapsules, nanotubes, nanogels and dendrimers. They can be used to deliver both small-molecule drugs and various classes of biomacromolecules, such as peptides, proteins, plasmid DNA and synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides. Whereas traditional tissue-engineering scaffolds were based on hydrolytically degradable macroporous materials, current approaches emphasize the control over cell behaviors and tissue formation by nano-scale topography that closely mimics the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). The understanding that the natural ECM is a multifunctional nanocomposite motivated researchers to develop nanofibrous scaffolds through electrospinning or self-assembly. Nanocomposites containing nanocrystals have been shown to elicit active bone growth. Drug delivery and tissue engineering are closely related fields. In fact, tissue engineering can be viewed as a special case of drug delivery where the goal is to accomplish controlled delivery of mammalian cells. Controlled release of therapeutic factors in turn will enhance the efficacy of tissue engineering. From a materials

  19. Advanced High-Temperature Engine Materials Technology Progresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the Advanced High Temperature Engine Materials Technology Program (HITEMP) is to generate technology for advanced materials and structural analysis that will increase fuel economy, improve reliability, extend life, and reduce operating costs for 21st century civil propulsion systems. The primary focus is on fan and compressor materials (polymer-matrix composites--PMC's), compressor and turbine materials (superalloys, and metal-matrix and intermetallic-matrix composites--MMC's and IMC's) and turbine materials (ceramic-matrix composites--CMC's). These advanced materials are being developed by in-house researchers and on grants and contracts. NASA considers this program to be a focused materials and structures research effort that builds on our base research programs and supports component-development projects. HITEMP is coordinated with the Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Program and the Department of Defense/NASA Integrated High-Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) Program. Advanced materials and structures technologies from HITEMP may be used in these future applications. Recent technical accomplishments have not only improved the state-of-the-art but have wideranging applications to industry. A high-temperature thin-film strain gage was developed to measure both dynamic and static strain up to 1100 C (2000 F). The gage's unique feature is that it is minimally intrusive. This technology, which received a 1995 R&D 100 Award, has been transferred to AlliedSignal Engines, General Electric Company, and Ford Motor Company. Analytical models developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center were used to study Textron Specialty Materials' manufacturing process for titanium-matrix composite rings. Implementation of our recommendations on tooling and processing conditions resulted in the production of defect free rings. In the Lincoln Composites/AlliedSignal/Lewis cooperative program, a composite compressor case is being manufactured with a Lewis

  20. Mechanical Engineering Department technical review

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, R.B.; Abrahamson, L.; Denney, R.M.; Dubois, B.E

    1982-01-01

    Technical achievements and publication abstracts related to research in the following Divisions of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are reported in this biannual review: Nuclear Fuel Engineering; Nuclear Explosives Engineering; Weapons Engineering; Energy Systems Engineering; Engineering Sciences; Magnetic Fusion Engineering; and Material Fabrication. (LCL)

  1. Polymeric Materials for Tissue Engineering of Arterial Substitutes

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Swathi; Qu, Zheng; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the United States. The limited availability of healthy autologous vessels for bypass grafting procedures has led to the fabrication of prosthetic vascular conduits. Synthetic polymeric materials, while providing the appropriate mechanical strength, lack the compliance and biocompatibility that bioresorbable and naturally occurring protein polymers offer. Vascular tissue engineering approaches have emerged in order to meet the challenges of designing a vascular graft with long-term patency. In vitro culture techniques that have been explored with vascular cell seeding of polymeric scaffolds and the use of bioactive polymers for in situ arterial regeneration have yielded promising results. This review describes the development of polymeric materials in various tissue engineering strategies for the improvement in the mechanical and biological performance of an arterial substitute. PMID:19426609

  2. Thermal Characterization of Nanostructures and Advanced Engineered Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Vivek Kumar

    Continuous downscaling of Si complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology and progress in high-power electronics demand more efficient heat removal techniques to handle the increasing power density and rising temperature of hot spots. For this reason, it is important to investigate thermal properties of materials at nanometer scale and identify materials with the extremely large or extremely low thermal conductivity for applications as heat spreaders or heat insulators in the next generation of integrated circuits. The thin films used in microelectronic and photonic devices need to have high thermal conductivity in order to transfer the dissipated power to heat sinks more effectively. On the other hand, thermoelectric devices call for materials or structures with low thermal conductivity because the performance of thermoelectric devices is determined by the figure of merit Z=S2sigma/K, where S is the Seebeck coefficient, K and sigma are the thermal and electrical conductivity, respectively. Nanostructured superlattices can have drastically reduced thermal conductivity as compared to their bulk counterparts making them promising candidates for high-efficiency thermoelectric materials. Other applications calling for thin films with low thermal conductivity value are high-temperature coatings for engines. Thus, materials with both high thermal conductivity and low thermal conductivity are technologically important. The increasing temperature of the hot spots in state-of-the-art chips stimulates the search for innovative methods for heat removal. One promising approach is to incorporate materials, which have high thermal conductivity into the chip design. Two suitable candidates for such applications are diamond and graphene. Another approach is to integrate the high-efficiency thermoelectric elements for on-spot cooling. In addition, there is strong motivation for improved thermal interface materials (TIMs) for heat transfer from the heat-generating chip

  3. Seminars of Applied Physics, Materials Physics and Biomedical Engineering, 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katila, T.; Hautala, M.

    1989-05-01

    The seminars of Applied Physics, Materials Physics and Biomedical Engineering were arranged in 1989 as one common seminar. This report consists of the talks prepared by students as partial fulfillment of their M.Sc. degrees. Topics include: (1) High temperature superconductors; (2) Solid state surface analysis methods; (3) Dispersion in Poiseuille flow; (4) Identification of the ion channel types (Medical applications); (5) Hyperthermia; (6) Resolving of tone frequencies in the vertebrate ear; and (7) Noninvasive electromagnetic location (Medical applications).

  4. Design of radiation tolerant materials via interface engineering.

    PubMed

    Han, Weizhong; Demkowicz, Michael J; Mara, Nathan A; Fu, Engang; Sinha, Subhasis; Rollett, Anthony D; Wang, Yongqiang; Carpenter, John S; Beyerlein, Irene J; Misra, Amit

    2013-12-23

    A novel interface engineering strategy is proposed to simultaneously achieve superior irradiation tolerance, high strength, and high thermal stability in bulk nanolayered composites of a model face-centered-cubic (Cu)/body-centered-cubic (Nb) system. By synthesizing bulk nanolayered Cu-Nb composites containing interfaces with controlled sink efficiencies, a novel material is designed in which nearly all irradiation-induced defects are annihilated.

  5. Annual Quality Assurance Conference Abstracts by Barbara Marshik

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    25th Annual Quality Assurance Conference. Abstracts: Material and Process Conditions for Successful Use of Extractive Sampling Techniques and Certification Methods Errors in the Analysis of NMHC and VOCs in CNG-Based Engine Emissions by Barbara Marshik

  6. Grain boundary engineering for structure materials of nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Allen, Todd R.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2013-03-29

    Grain boundary engineering (GBE), primarily implemented by thermomechanical processing, is an effective and economical method of enhancing the properties of polycrystalline materials. Among the factors affecting grain boundary character distribution, literature data showed definitive effect of grain size and texture. GBE is more effective for austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys compared to other structural materials of nuclear reactors, such as refractory metals, ferritic and ferritic–martensitic steels, and Zr alloys. Furthermore, GBE has shown beneficial effects on improving the strength, creep strength, and resistance to stress corrosion cracking and oxidation of austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys.

  7. Production Engineering for Growth of Synthetic Calcite Polarizer Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-08-01

    AD-A008 043 PRODUCTION ENGINEERING FOR GROWTH OF SYNTHETIC CALCITE POLARIZER MATERIAL Roger F. Belt, et al Litton Systems...Production Bngin««ring for Growth of Synthetic Calcit « Polarizer Material I. RCCIPItNT’tCATALOO NUMMN i. T.vpc or ncpoMT • rtmoo covtnto Final Report...VOKOt (CanlliMit en »xift •id« II ntffrt Kid Idtnlllr br block iwmbmr) Crystal Growth Hydrothermal Growth Calcite Polarizers 30. AtSTHACT

  8. Carbon-based nanomaterials: multifunctional materials for biomedical engineering.

    PubMed

    Cha, Chaenyung; Shin, Su Ryon; Annabi, Nasim; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-04-23

    Functional carbon-based nanomaterials (CBNs) have become important due to their unique combinations of chemical and physical properties (i.e., thermal and electrical conductivity, high mechanical strength, and optical properties), and extensive research efforts are being made to utilize these materials for various industrial applications, such as high-strength materials and electronics. These advantageous properties of CBNs are also actively investigated in several areas of biomedical engineering. This Perspective highlights different types of carbon-based nanomaterials currently used in biomedical applications.

  9. Orbit transfer rocket engine technology program: Oxygen materials compatibility testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenman, Leonard

    1989-01-01

    Particle impact and frictional heating tests of metals in high pressure oxygen, are conducted in support of the design of an advanced rocket engine oxygen turbopump. Materials having a wide range of thermodynamic properties including heat of combustion and thermal diffusivity were compared in their resistance to ignition and sustained burning. Copper, nickel and their alloys were found superior to iron based and stainless steel alloys. Some materials became more difficult to ignite as oxygen pressure was increased from 7 to 21 MPa (1000 to 3000 psia).

  10. OMAE 1993: Volume 3, Part A -- Materials engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, M.M.; Toyoda, Masao; Liu, S.; Dos Santos, J.F.; Kocak, M.; Williams, J.

    1993-12-31

    The International Symposium on Offshore and Arctic Materials Technology of the OMAE Conference continues to serve as a major forum for researchers, engineers, manufacturers, and fabricators to share recent advances, discuss problems, and identify challenges associated with materials application in the offshore industry. Part A of the 1993 OMAE Materials Symposium features more than forty papers that discuss recent advances in several areas that are important for offshore and arctic development and operations. These areas include weld metal and HAZ properties, recent advances in high strength steel and welding technology, underwater and hyperbaric welding, application of composite materials, and performance of elastomers. Forty six papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  11. Tuning Surface Properties of Low Dimensional Materials via Strain Engineering.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengchun; Liu, Fuzhu; Wu, Chao; Yang, Sen

    2016-08-01

    The promising and versatile applications of low dimensional materials are largely due to their surface properties, which along with their underlying electronic structures have been well studied. However, these materials may not be directly useful for applications requiring properties other than their natal ones. In recent years, strain has been shown to be an additionally useful handle to tune the physical and chemical properties of materials by changing their geometric and electronic structures. The strategies for producing strain are summarized. Then, the electronic structure of quasi-two dimensional layered non-metallic materials (e.g., graphene, MX2, BP, Ge nanosheets) under strain are discussed. Later, the strain effects on catalytic properties of metal-catalyst loaded with strain are focused on. Both experimental and computational perspectives for dealing with strained systems are covered. Finally, an outlook on engineering surface properties utilizing strain is provided. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Diterpenoid Biopolymers: New Directions for Renewable Materials Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Hillwig, Matthew L.; Mann, Francis M.; Peters, Reuben J.

    2010-01-01

    Most types of ambers are naturally occurring, relatively hard, durable resinite polymers derived from the exudates of trees. This resource has been coveted for thousands of years due to its numerous useful properties in industrial processes, beauty, and purported medicinal properties. Labdane diterpenoid based ambers represent the most abundant and important resinites on earth. These resinites are a dwindling, non-renewable natural resource, so a new source of such materials needs to be established. Recent advances in sequencing technologies and biochemical engineering are rapidly accelerating the rate of identifying and assigning function to genes involved in terpenoid biosynthesis, as well as producing industrial-scale quantities of desired small-molecules in bacteria and yeast. This has provided new tools for engineering metabolic pathways capable of producing diterpenoid monomers that will enable the production of custom-tailored resinite-like polymers. Furthermore, this biosynthetic toolbox is continuously expanding, providing new possibilities for renewing dwindling stocks of naturally occurring resinite materials and engineering new materials for future applications. PMID:20857504

  13. Diterpenoid biopolymers: new directions for renewable materials engineering.

    PubMed

    Hillwig, Matthew L; Mann, Francis M; Peters, Reuben J

    2011-02-01

    Most types of ambers are naturally occurring, relatively hard, durable resinite polymers derived from the exudates of trees. This resource has been coveted for thousands of years due to its numerous useful properties in industrial processes, beauty, and purported medicinal properties. Labdane diterpenoid-based ambers represent the most abundant and important resinites on earth. These resinites are a dwindling nonrenewable natural resource, so a new source of such materials needs to be established. Recent advances in sequencing technologies and biochemical engineering are rapidly accelerating the rate of identifying and assigning function to genes involved in terpenoid biosynthesis, as well as producing industrial-scale quantities of desired small-molecules in bacteria and yeast. This has provided new tools for engineering metabolic pathways capable of producing diterpenoid monomers that will enable the production of custom-tailored resinite-like polymers. Furthermore, this biosynthetic toolbox is continuously expanding, providing new possibilities for renewing dwindling stocks of naturally occurring resinite materials and engineering new materials for future applications. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Materials characterization using acoustic nonlinearity parameters and harmonic generation - Engineering materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.

    1990-01-01

    The paper reviews nonlinear bulk compressional wave acoustic measurement systems and the applications of measurements from such systems to engineering materials. Preliminary measurements indicate that it is possible to determine percent second phase precipitates in aluminum alloys, while other measurements show promise in the determination of properties related to the fatigue states of metals. It is also shown that harmonic generation can be used for the study of crack opening loads in compact tension specimens, which in turn gives useful information about the fatigue properties of various engineering materials.

  15. Materials characterization using acoustic nonlinearity parameters and harmonic generation - Engineering materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.

    1990-01-01

    The paper reviews nonlinear bulk compressional wave acoustic measurement systems and the applications of measurements from such systems to engineering materials. Preliminary measurements indicate that it is possible to determine percent second phase precipitates in aluminum alloys, while other measurements show promise in the determination of properties related to the fatigue states of metals. It is also shown that harmonic generation can be used for the study of crack opening loads in compact tension specimens, which in turn gives useful information about the fatigue properties of various engineering materials.

  16. 16th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells and Modules: Materials and Processes; Program, Extended Abstracts, and Papers

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B. L.

    2006-08-01

    The National Center for Photovoltaics sponsored the 16th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells and Modules: Materials and Processes held August 6-9, 2006 in Denver, Colorado. The workshop addressed the fundamental properties of PV-Si, new solar cell designs, and advanced solar cell processing techniques. It provided a forum for an informal exchange of technical and scientific information between international researchers in the photovoltaic and relevant non-photovoltaic fields. The Workshop Theme was: "Getting more (Watts) for Less ($i)". A combination of oral presentations by invited speakers, poster sessions, and discussion sessions reviewed recent advances in crystal growth, new cell structures, new processes and process characterization techniques, and cell fabrication approaches suitable for future manufacturing demands. The special sessions included: Feedstock Issues: Si Refining and Purification; Metal-impurity Engineering; Thin Film Si; and Diagnostic Techniques.

  17. Molecularly Engineered Energy Materials, an Energy Frontier Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Ozolins, Vidvuds

    2016-09-28

    Molecularly Engineered Energy Materials (MEEM) was established as an interdisciplinary cutting-edge UCLA-based research center uniquely equipped to attack the challenge of rationally designing, synthesizing and testing revolutionary new energy materials. Our mission was to achieve transformational improvements in the performance of materials via controlling the nano-and mesoscale structure using selectively designed, earth-abundant, inexpensive molecular building blocks. MEEM has focused on materials that are inherently abundant, can be easily assembled from intelligently designed building blocks (molecules, nanoparticles), and have the potential to deliver transformative economic benefits in comparison with the current crystalline-and polycrystalline-based energy technologies. MEEM addressed basic science issues related to the fundamental mechanisms of carrier generation, energy conversion, as well as transport and storage of charge and mass in tunable, architectonically complex materials. Fundamental understanding of these processes will enable rational design, efficient synthesis and effective deployment of novel three-dimensional material architectures for energy applications. Three interrelated research directions were initially identified where these novel architectures hold great promise for high-reward research: solar energy generation, electrochemical energy storage, and materials for CO2 capture. Of these, the first two remained throughout the project performance period, while carbon capture was been phased out in consultation and with approval from BES program manager.

  18. Creep fatigue life prediction for engine hot section materials (isotropic)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, V.

    1983-01-01

    The activities performed during the first year of the NASA HOST Program, Creep Fatigue Life Prediction for Engine Hot Section Materials (Isotropic), being conducted by Pratt & Whitney Aircraft are summarized. The program is a 5 year, two part effort aimed at improving the high temperature crack initiation prediction technology for gas turbine hot section components. Significant results of the program produced thus far are discussed. Cast B1900 + Hf and wrought IN 718 were selected as the base and alternate materials, respectively. A single heat of B1900 + Hf was obtained and test specimens fabricated. The material was characterized with respect to grain size, gamma prime size, carbide distribution, and dislocation density. Monotonic tensile and creep testing has shown engineering properties within anticipated scatter for this material. Examination of the tensile tests has shown a transition from inhomogeneous planar slip within the grains at lower temperatures to more homogeneous matrix deformation. Examination of the creep tests has shown a transgranular failure mode at 1400 F and an intergranular failure mode at 1600 F and 1800 F.

  19. Engineering considerations for the recovery of cesium from geologic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, C.

    1993-05-18

    Sorption coefficients for cesium in a variety of media have been compiled from a search of the open literature. The sorption coefficient, or K{sub d}, is a description of a dissolved substance`s tendency to attach to a solid substrate. The compilation of K{sub d}S reported here for cesium demonstrate that this element readily sorbs onto-geological material. As a result of this sorption, the mass transport of cesium in the environment will be retarded. This retarded mass transport, characterized by the retardation factor, can be expected to be significant when compared to water velocities through porous-sorbing medium, such as geologic materials. K{sub d}S for cesium are in the range of 100 m{ell}/g up to 10,000 m{ell}/g. K{sub d}S are also an important parameter in the design of engineered systems for the purpose of recovering cesium from soils. The engineering design is based on a material-balance description of the extraction process. The information presented in this report provides a basis to predict the movement of cesium through geologic materials and also to design and predict the performance of extraction processes such as soil washing.

  20. Engineering considerations for the recovery of cesium from geologic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, C.

    1993-05-18

    Sorption coefficients for cesium in a variety of media have been compiled from a search of the open literature. The sorption coefficient, or K[sub d], is a description of a dissolved substance's tendency to attach to a solid substrate. The compilation of K[sub d]S reported here for cesium demonstrate that this element readily sorbs onto-geological material. As a result of this sorption, the mass transport of cesium in the environment will be retarded. This retarded mass transport, characterized by the retardation factor, can be expected to be significant when compared to water velocities through porous-sorbing medium, such as geologic materials. K[sub d]S for cesium are in the range of 100 m[ell]/g up to 10,000 m[ell]/g. K[sub d]S are also an important parameter in the design of engineered systems for the purpose of recovering cesium from soils. The engineering design is based on a material-balance description of the extraction process. The information presented in this report provides a basis to predict the movement of cesium through geologic materials and also to design and predict the performance of extraction processes such as soil washing.

  1. Sliding Seal Materials for Adiabatic Engines, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lankford, J.; Wei, W.

    1986-01-01

    An essential task in the development of the heavy-duty adiabatic diesel engine is identification and improvements of reliable, low-friction piston seal materials. In the present study, the sliding friction coefficients and wear rates of promising carbide, oxide, and nitride materials were measured under temperature, environmental, velocity, and loading conditions that are representative of the adiabatic engine environment. In addition, silicon nitride and partially stabilized zirconia disks were ion implanted with TiNi, Ni, Co, and Cr, and subsequently run against carbide pins, with the objective of producing reduced friction via solid lubrication at elevated temperature. In order to provide guidance needed to improve materials for this application, the program stressed fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved in friction and wear. Electron microscopy was used to elucidate the micromechanisms of wear following wear testing, and Auger electron spectroscopy was used to evaluate interface/environment interactions which seemed to be important in the friction and wear process. Unmodified ceramic sliding couples were characterized at all temperatures by friction coefficients of 0.24 and above. The coefficient at 800 C in an oxidizing environment was reduced to below 0.1, for certain material combinations, by the ion implanation of TiNi or Co. This beneficial effect was found to derive from lubricious Ti, Ni, and Co oxides.

  2. 46 CFR 31.30-1 - Marine engineering regulations and material specifications-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Marine engineering regulations and material... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Marine Engineering § 31.30-1 Marine engineering regulations and material..., of subchapter F (Marine Engineering) of this chapter, whenever applicable, except as such regulations...

  3. 46 CFR 31.30-1 - Marine engineering regulations and material specifications-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Marine engineering regulations and material... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Marine Engineering § 31.30-1 Marine engineering regulations and material..., of subchapter F (Marine Engineering) of this chapter, whenever applicable, except as such regulations...

  4. 46 CFR 31.30-1 - Marine engineering regulations and material specifications-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marine engineering regulations and material... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Marine Engineering § 31.30-1 Marine engineering regulations and material..., of subchapter F (Marine Engineering) of this chapter, whenever applicable, except as such regulations...

  5. 46 CFR 31.30-1 - Marine engineering regulations and material specifications-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Marine engineering regulations and material... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Marine Engineering § 31.30-1 Marine engineering regulations and material..., of subchapter F (Marine Engineering) of this chapter, whenever applicable, except as such regulations...

  6. 46 CFR 31.30-1 - Marine engineering regulations and material specifications-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Marine engineering regulations and material... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Marine Engineering § 31.30-1 Marine engineering regulations and material..., of subchapter F (Marine Engineering) of this chapter, whenever applicable, except as such regulations...

  7. Materials 88: Materials and Engineering Design Held in London, England, on 9-13 May 1988

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    Journal Jan /Feb 1987. the solution in producing graduates as "materials engineers" who will possess the dual attitudes of (9) C. Edeleanu, 29th SAMPE...which we need in a world of ever-increasing complexity and speed. (12) W.J. Plumbridge, Metals and Materials, Jan . 1988, 4, 1, 31. 1.7 Diition of function...Krajcinovic 1984, Lemaitre and Chaboche load carrying capacity in solids has long 1985, Bazant 1986, Murakami 1987, been recognized, as found in

  8. Stem cell homing-based tissue engineering using bioactive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yinxian; Sun, Binbin; Yi, Chengqing; Mo, Xiumei

    2017-06-01

    Tissue engineering focuses on repairing tissue and restoring tissue functions by employing three elements: scaffolds, cells and biochemical signals. In tissue engineering, bioactive material scaffolds have been used to cure tissue and organ defects with stem cell-based therapies being one of the best documented approaches. In the review, different biomaterials which are used in several methods to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds were explained and show good properties (biocompatibility, biodegradability, and mechanical properties etc.) for cell migration and infiltration. Stem cell homing is a recruitment process for inducing the migration of the systemically transplanted cells, or host cells, to defect sites. The mechanisms and modes of stem cell homing-based tissue engineering can be divided into two types depending on the source of the stem cells: endogenous and exogenous. Exogenous stem cell-based bioactive scaffolds have the challenge of long-term culturing in vitro and for endogenous stem cells the biochemical signal homing recruitment mechanism is not clear yet. Although the stem cell homing-based bioactive scaffolds are attractive candidates for tissue defect therapies, based on in vitro studies and animal tests, there is still a long way before clinical application.

  9. Evaluation of scaffold materials for tooth tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Takayuki; Itaya, Toshimitsu; Usami, Kazutada; Ando, Yusuke; Sakurai, Hiroya; Honda, Masaki J; Ueda, Minoru; Kagami, Hideaki

    2010-09-01

    Recently, the possibility of tooth tissue engineering has been reported. Although there are a number of available materials, information about scaffolds for tooth tissue engineering is still limited. To improve the manageability of tooth tissue engineering, the effect of scaffolds on in vivo tooth regeneration was evaluated. Collagen and fibrin were selected for this study based on the biocompatibility to dental papilla-derived cells and the results were compared with those of polyglycolic acid (PGA) fiber and beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) porous block, which are commonly used for tooth, dentin and bone tissue engineering. Isolated porcine tooth germ-derived cells were seeded onto one of those scaffolds and transplanted to the back of nude mice. Tooth bud-like structures were observed more frequently in collagen and fibrin gels than on PGA or beta-TCP, while the amount of hard tissue formation was less. The results showed that collagen and fibrin gel support the initial regeneration process of tooth buds possibly due to their ability to support the growth of epithelial and mesenchymal cells. On the other hand, maturation of tooth buds was difficult in fibrin and collagen gels, which may require other factors. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Materials characterization center workshop on corrosion of engineered barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, M.D.; Zima, G.E.; Jones, R.H.; Westerman, R.E.

    1981-03-01

    A workshop on corrosion test procedures for materials to be used as barriers in nuclear waste repositories was conducted August 19 and 20, 1980, at the Battelle Seattle Research Center. The purpose of the meeting was to obtain guidance for the Materials Characterization Center in preparing test procedures to be approved by the Materials Review Board. The workshop identified test procedures that address failure modes of uniform corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, stress corrosion, and hydrogen effects that can cause delayed failures. The principal areas that will require further consideration beyond current engineering practices involve the analyses of pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion, especially with respect to quantitative predictions of the lifetime of barriers. Special techniques involving accelerated corrosion testing for uniform attack will require development.

  11. Synthesis and patterning of tunable multiscale materials with engineered cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Allen Y.; Deng, Zhengtao; Billings, Amanda N.; Seker, Urartu O.S.; Lu, Michelle Y.; Citorik, Robert J.; Zakeri, Bijan; Lu, Timothy K.

    2014-01-01

    Many natural biological systems - such as biofilms, shells and skeletal tissues - are able to assemble multifunctional and environmentally responsive multiscale assemblies of living and non-living components. Here, by using inducible genetic circuits and cellular communication circuits to regulate Escherichia coli curli amyloid production, we show that E. coli cells can organize self-assembling amyloid fibrils across multiple length scales, producing amyloid-based materials that are either externally controllable or undergo autonomous patterning. We also interfaced curli fibrils with inorganic materials, such as gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and quantum dots (QDs), and used these capabilities to create an environmentally responsive biofilm-based electrical switch, produce gold nanowires and nanorods, co-localize AuNPs with CdTe/CdS QDs to modulate QD fluorescence lifetimes, and nucleate the formation of fluorescent ZnS QDs. This work lays a foundation for synthesizing, patterning, and controlling functional composite materials with engineered cells. PMID:24658114

  12. Structural integrity of engineering composite materials: a cracking good yarn.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Peter W R; Soutis, Costas

    2016-07-13

    Predicting precisely where a crack will develop in a material under stress and exactly when in time catastrophic fracture of the component will occur is one the oldest unsolved mysteries in the design and building of large-scale engineering structures. Where human life depends upon engineering ingenuity, the burden of testing to prove a 'fracture safe design' is immense. Fitness considerations for long-life implementation of large composite structures include understanding phenomena such as impact, fatigue, creep and stress corrosion cracking that affect reliability, life expectancy and durability of structure. Structural integrity analysis treats the design, the materials used, and figures out how best components and parts can be joined, and takes service duty into account. However, there are conflicting aims in the complete design process of designing simultaneously for high efficiency and safety assurance throughout an economically viable lifetime with an acceptable level of risk. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  13. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Supplement III (1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Columbus, OH.

    Presented are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction. Also included are procedures to illustrate how instructors and curriculum developers in the water quality control field can locate instructional materials to meet very general or highly specific…

  14. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Supplement IV (1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Columbus, OH.

    Presented are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education. Also included are procedures to illustrate how instructors and curriculum developers in the water quality control field can locate instructional materials to meet very general or highly specific requirements in…

  15. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Supplement VI (1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Columbus, OH.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction as well as some materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Also included are procedures to illustrate how instructors and curriculum developers in the water quality control field can…

  16. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Supplement I (1979-80).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Columbus, OH.

    Presented are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction. Also included are procedures to illustrate how instructors and curriculum developers in the water quality control field can locate instructional materials to meet very general or highly specific…

  17. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Supplement II (1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Columbus, OH.

    Presented are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction. Also included are procedures to illustrate how instructors and curriculum developers in the water quality control field can locate instructional materials to meet very general or highly specific…

  18. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Supplement VI (1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Columbus, OH.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction as well as some materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Also included are procedures to illustrate how instructors and curriculum developers in the water quality control field can…

  19. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials, Supplement 30, 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    The Environmental Quality Instructional Resources Center acquires, reviews, indexes, and announces both print (books, modules, units, etc.) and non-print (films, slides, video tapes, etc.) materials related to water quality and water resources education and instruction. This publication contains abstracts and indexes to selected materials related…

  20. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Supplement VII (1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    Compiled are abstracts and indexes to selected materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction as well as some materials related to pesticides, hazardous wastes, and public participation. Also included are procedures to illustrate how instructors and curriculum developers in the water quality control field can…

  1. Material-based engineering strategies for cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Marion, Mieke H van; Bax, Noortje A M; Spreeuwel, Ariane C C van; van der Schaft, Daisy W J; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tissue is composed of muscle and non-muscle cells, surrounded by extracellular matrix (ECM) and spatially organized into a complex three-dimensional (3D) architecture to allow for coordinated contraction and electrical pulse propagation. Despite emerging evidence for cardiomyocyte turnover in mammalian hearts, the regenerative capacity of human cardiac tissue is insufficient to recover from damage, e.g. resulting from myocardial infarction (MI). Instead, the heart 'repairs' lost or injured tissue by ongoing synthesis and remodeling of scar tissue. Conventional therapies and timely (stem) cell delivery to the injured tissue markedly improve short-term function and remodeling, but do not attenuate later stage adverse remodeling, leading to functional deterioration and eventually failure of the heart. Material-based therapies have been successfully used to mechanically support and constrain the post-MI failing heart, preventing it from further remodeling and dilation. When designed to deliver the right microenvironment for endogenous or exogenous cells, as well as the mechanical and topological cues to guide neo-tissue formation, material-based therapies may even reverse remodeling and boost cardiac regeneration. This paper reviews the up-to-date status of material-based cardiac regeneration with special emphasis on 1) the use of bare biomaterials to deliver passive constraints that unload the heart, 2) the use of materials and cells to create engineered cardiac constructs for replacement, support, or regeneration of damaged myocardium, and 3) the development of bio-inspired and bioactive materials that aim to enhance the endogenous regenerative capacity of the heart. As the therapies should function in the infarcted heart, the damaged host environment and engineered in vitro test systems that mimic this environment, are reviewed as well.

  2. Impact of materials engineering on edge placement error (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Regina; Mitra, Uday; Zhang, Ying

    2017-04-01

    Transistor scaling has transitioned from wavelength scaling to multi-patterning techniques, due to the resolution limits of immersion of immersion lithography. Deposition and etch have enabled scaling in the by means of SADP and SAQP. Spacer based patterning enables extremely small linewidths, sufficient for several future generations of transistors. However, aligning layers in Z-direction, as well as aligning cut and via patterning layers, is becoming a road-block due to global and local feature variation and fidelity. This presentation will highlight the impact of deposition and etch on this feature alignment (EPE) and illustrate potential paths toward lowering EPE using material engineering.

  3. Novel Engineered Refractory Materials for Advanced Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, Steven; Eapen, Jacob; Maria, Jon-Paul; Weber, William

    2016-03-14

    This report summarizes the results of DOE-NEUP grant 10-853. The project spanned 48 months (36 months under the original grant plus a 12 month no cost extension). The overarching goal of this work was to fabricate and characterize refractory materials engineered at the atomic scale with emphasis on their tolerance to accumulated radiation damage. With an emphasis on nano-scale structure, this work included atomic scale simulation to study the underlying mechanisms for modified radiation tolerance at these atomic scales.

  4. Gender and engineering aptitude: Is the color of science, technology, engineering, and math materials related to children's performance?

    PubMed

    Mulvey, Kelly Lynn; Miller, Bridget; Rizzardi, Victoria

    2017-08-01

    To investigate gender stereotypes, demonstrated engineering aptitude, and attitudes, children (N=105) solved an engineering problem using either pastel-colored or primary-colored materials. Participants also evaluated the acceptability of denial of access to engineering materials based on gender and counter-stereotypic preferences (i.e., a boy who prefers pastel-colored materials). Whereas material color was not related to differences in female participants' performance, younger boys assigned to pastel materials demonstrated lower engineering aptitude than did other participants. In addition, results documented age- and gender-related differences; younger participants, and sometimes boys, exhibited less flexibility regarding gender stereotypes than did older and female participants. The findings suggest that attempts to enhance STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) engagement or performance through the color of STEM materials may have unintended consequences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Novel hybrid materials for preparation of bone tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Lewandowska-Łańcucka, Joanna; Fiejdasz, Sylwia; Rodzik, Łucja; Łatkiewicz, Anna; Nowakowska, Maria

    2015-09-01

    The organic-inorganic hybrid systems based on biopolymer hydrogels with dispersed silica nanoparticles were obtained and characterized in terms of their physicochemical properties, cytocompatibility and bioactivity. The hybrid materials were prepared in a form of collagen and collagen-chitosan sols to which the silica nanoparticles of two different sizes were incorporated. The ability of these materials to undergo in situ gelation under physiological temperature was assessed by microviscosity and gelation time determination based on steady-state fluorescence anisotropy measurements. The effect of silica nanoparticles addition on the physicochemical properties (surface wettability, swellability) of hybrid materials was analyzed and compared with those characteristic for pristine collagen and collagen-chitosan hydrogels. Biological studies indicate that surface wettability determined in terms of contact angle for all of the hybrids prepared is optimal and thus can provide satisfactory adhesion of fibroblasts. Cytotoxicity test results showed high metabolic activity of mouse as well as human fibroblast cell lines cultured on hybrid materials. The composition of hybrids was optimized in terms of concentration of silica nanoparticles. The effect of silica on the formation of bone-like mineral structures on exposition to simulated body fluid was determined. SEM images revealed mineral phase formation not only at the surfaces but also in the whole volumes of all hybrid materials developed suggesting their usefulness for bone tissue engineering. EDS and FTIR analyses indicated that these mineral phases consist of apatite-like structures.

  6. A new approach to grain boundary engineering for nanocrystalline materials

    PubMed Central

    Tsurekawa, Sadahiro; Watanabe, Tadao

    2016-01-01

    A new approach to grain boundary engineering (GBE) for high performance nanocrystalline materials, especially those produced by electrodeposition and sputtering, is discussed on the basis of some important findings from recently available results on GBE for nanocrystalline materials. In order to optimize their utility, the beneficial effects of grain boundary microstructures have been seriously considered according to the almost established approach to GBE. This approach has been increasingly recognized for the development of high performance nanocrystalline materials with an extremely high density of grain boundaries and triple junctions. The effectiveness of precisely controlled grain boundary microstructures (quantitatively characterized by the grain boundary character distribution (GBCD) and grain boundary connectivity associated with triple junctions) has been revealed for recent achievements in the enhancement of grain boundary strengthening, hardness, and the control of segregation-induced intergranular brittleness and intergranular fatigue fracture in electrodeposited nickel and nickel alloys with initial submicrometer-grained structure. A new approach to GBE based on fractal analysis of grain boundary connectivity is proposed to produce high performance nanocrystalline or submicrometer-grained materials with desirable mechanical properties such as enhanced fracture resistance. Finally, the potential power of GBE is demonstrated for high performance functional materials like gold thin films through precise control of electrical resistance based on the fractal analysis of the grain boundary microstructure. PMID:28144533

  7. Monolithic integration of microelectronics and photonics using molecularly engineered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubacki, Ronald M.

    2005-03-01

    The monolithic integration of CMOS microelectronics with photonics is inevitable and benefits both technologies. Photonic integration to microelectronics provides such solutions as overcoming microprocessor communication roadblocks through the use of optical interconnection. Microelectronic integration can provide benefits to photonic structures by optimizing electronic signals generated by photonic biosensors for example. Photonic integration must complement, build on, and enhance the existing state of CMOS microelectronic technology. Photonic approaches that ignore the realities of CMOS architectures (such as power and thermal limitations), provide little benefit to the CMOS device performance, are incompatible with CMOS silicon manufacturing processes, or are incapable of achieving levels of long term reliability already well demonstrated by microelectronic devices, give little reason for photonic/microelectronic integration. Practical implementation of photonics on chip, monolithically with CMOS type microelectronic devices, remains in the laboratory. This work presents architectures to integrate photonics and microelectronics that address CMOS fabrication realities, increase performance of both the electronic and optical functions, and retain current levels of reliability. Fabricating these structures with the limited CMOS material set and/or typical photonic materials requires materials to be molecularly engineered to provide required properties. Materials have been investigated that enable economic fabrication of photonic structures for monolithic integration. Low loss self assembled silicon nanocomposite VIPIR waveguide structures are combined with long term stable non-linear poled polymers for fabrication of electro-optic active devices. Materials are fabricated using low temperature plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD).

  8. Enabling propulsion materials for high-speed civil transport engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Joseph R.; Herbell, Thomas P.

    1992-01-01

    NASA Headquarters and LeRC have advocated an Enabling Propulsion Materials Program (EPM) to begin in FY-92. The High Speed Research Phase 1 program which began in FY-90 has focused on the environmental acceptability of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Studies by industry, including Boeing, McDonnell Douglas, GE Aircraft Engines, and Pratt & Whitney Aircraft, and in-house studies by NASA concluded that NO(x) emissions and airport noise reduction can only be economically achieved by revolutionary advancements in materials technologies. This is especially true of materials for the propulsion system where the combustor is the key to maintaining low emissions, and the exhaust nozzle is the key to reducing airport noise to an acceptable level. Both of these components will rely on high temperature composite materials that can withstand the conditions imposed by commercial aircraft operations. The proposed EPM program will operate in conjunction with the HSR Phase 1 Program and the planned HSR Phase 2 program slated to start in FY-93. Components and subcomponents developed from advanced materials will be evaluated in the HSR Phase 2 Program.

  9. A new approach to grain boundary engineering for nanocrystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shigeaki; Tsurekawa, Sadahiro; Watanabe, Tadao

    2016-01-01

    A new approach to grain boundary engineering (GBE) for high performance nanocrystalline materials, especially those produced by electrodeposition and sputtering, is discussed on the basis of some important findings from recently available results on GBE for nanocrystalline materials. In order to optimize their utility, the beneficial effects of grain boundary microstructures have been seriously considered according to the almost established approach to GBE. This approach has been increasingly recognized for the development of high performance nanocrystalline materials with an extremely high density of grain boundaries and triple junctions. The effectiveness of precisely controlled grain boundary microstructures (quantitatively characterized by the grain boundary character distribution (GBCD) and grain boundary connectivity associated with triple junctions) has been revealed for recent achievements in the enhancement of grain boundary strengthening, hardness, and the control of segregation-induced intergranular brittleness and intergranular fatigue fracture in electrodeposited nickel and nickel alloys with initial submicrometer-grained structure. A new approach to GBE based on fractal analysis of grain boundary connectivity is proposed to produce high performance nanocrystalline or submicrometer-grained materials with desirable mechanical properties such as enhanced fracture resistance. Finally, the potential power of GBE is demonstrated for high performance functional materials like gold thin films through precise control of electrical resistance based on the fractal analysis of the grain boundary microstructure.

  10. Quantitative Ultrasonic Evaluation of Mechanical Properties of Engineering Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1978-01-01

    Progress in the application of ultrasonic techniques to nondestructive measurement of mechanical strength of engineering materials is reviewed. A dormant concept in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is invoked. The availability of ultrasonic methods that can be applied to actual parts to assess their potential susceptibility to failure under design conditions is discussed. It was shown that ultrasonic methods yield measurements of elastic moduli, microstructure, hardness, fracture toughness, tensile strength, yield strength, and shear strength for a wide range of materials (including many types of metals, ceramics, and fiber composites). It was also indicated that although most of these methods were shown feasible in laboratory studies, more work is needed before they can be used on actual parts in processing, assembly, inspection, and maintenance lines.

  11. Quantitative ultrasonic evaluation of mechanical properties of engineering materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1978-01-01

    Current progress in the application of ultrasonic techniques to nondestructive measurement of mechanical strength properties of engineering materials is reviewed. Even where conventional NDE techniques have shown that a part is free of overt defects, advanced NDE techniques should be available to confirm the material properties assumed in the part's design. There are many instances where metallic, composite, or ceramic parts may be free of critical defects while still being susceptible to failure under design loads due to inadequate or degraded mechanical strength. This must be considered in any failure prevention scheme that relies on fracture analysis. This review will discuss the availability of ultrasonic methods that can be applied to actual parts to assess their potential susceptibility to failure under design conditions.

  12. Comparison of seal materials for use in Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundholm, G.

    1983-01-01

    In a dry, reciprocating sliding test, rods of 12 different surface materials rubbed against a glass filled PTFE gas seal. To simulate operation in a Stirling engine a gas (N2) pressure of 1 MPa differential pressure was applied across the seal. Gas leakage rates, rods surface temperatures, changes in the surface finish of the rod, surface hardness of the rod and wear rate of the seals were measured. The rod surface materials that produced the least seal were: plasma sprayed molybdenum (75 Mo 18 Ni 4 Cr), gas nitrided steel, and plasma sprayed aluminum oxide (94 Al2O3 6 TiO2). In contrast to almost all other mating surfaces, the surface roughness of the rods coated with Mo did not decrease during wear. This property is very important for the formation of a PTFE transfer film on the mating surface. The presence of a stable transfer film gives a low PTFE wear rate.

  13. Quantitative ultrasonic evaluation of mechanical properties of engineering materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1978-01-01

    Current progress in the application of ultrasonic techniques to nondestructive measurement of mechanical strength properties of engineering materials is reviewed. Even where conventional NDE techniques have shown that a part is free of overt defects, advanced NDE techniques should be available to confirm the material properties assumed in the part's design. There are many instances where metallic, composite, or ceramic parts may be free of critical defects while still being susceptible to failure under design loads due to inadequate or degraded mechanical strength. This must be considered in any failure prevention scheme that relies on fracture analysis. This review will discuss the availability of ultrasonic methods that can be applied to actual parts to assess their potential susceptibility to failure under design conditions.

  14. On Inverting the Heat Flow with Engineering Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Li

    2016-02-01

    Transformation thermodynamics enriches our understanding of heat flow and makes it possible to manipulate the heat flow at will, like shielding, concentrating and inverting. The inverting of heat flow is the extreme one, which has not been studied specifically yet. In this study we firstly inverted the heat flow by transformation thermodynamics and provided the formula for the transformed thermal conductivity. Finite element simulations were conducted to realize the steady and non-steady inverting of heat flow, based on the eccentric-semi-ring structures with natural materials. To do the inverting of heat flow, a simple "L"-shape conductive structure was proposed and verified with an infrared camera. It is concluded that inverting heat flow can be done by both complex engineering materials and some simple structures.

  15. A study of the use of abstract types for the representation of engineering units in integration and test applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Charles S.

    1986-01-01

    Physical quantities using various units of measurement can be well represented in Ada by the use of abstract types. Computation involving these quantities (electric potential, mass, volume) can also automatically invoke the computation and checking of some of the implicitly associable attributes of measurements. Quantities can be held internally in SI units, transparently to the user, with automatic conversion. Through dimensional analysis, the type of the derived quantity resulting from a computation is known, thereby allowing dynamic checks of the equations used. The impact of the possible implementation of these techniques in integration and test applications is discussed. The overhead of computing and transporting measurement attributes is weighed against the advantages gained by their use. The construction of a run time interpreter using physical quantities in equations can be aided by the dynamic equation checks provided by dimensional analysis. The effects of high levels of abstraction on the generation and maintenance of software used in integration and test applications are also discussed.

  16. Structural integrity of engineering composite materials: a cracking good yarn

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, Peter W. R.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting precisely where a crack will develop in a material under stress and exactly when in time catastrophic fracture of the component will occur is one the oldest unsolved mysteries in the design and building of large-scale engineering structures. Where human life depends upon engineering ingenuity, the burden of testing to prove a ‘fracture safe design’ is immense. Fitness considerations for long-life implementation of large composite structures include understanding phenomena such as impact, fatigue, creep and stress corrosion cracking that affect reliability, life expectancy and durability of structure. Structural integrity analysis treats the design, the materials used, and figures out how best components and parts can be joined, and takes service duty into account. However, there are conflicting aims in the complete design process of designing simultaneously for high efficiency and safety assurance throughout an economically viable lifetime with an acceptable level of risk. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials’. PMID:27242293

  17. Silicates in orthopedics and bone tissue engineering materials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xianfeng; Zhang, Nianli; Mankoci, Steven; Sahai, Nita

    2017-07-01

    Following the success of silicate-based glasses as bioactive materials, silicates are believed to play important roles in promoting bone formation and have therefore been considered to provide a hydroxyapatite (HAP) surface layer capable of binding to bone as well as potentially being a pro-osteoinductive factor. Natural silicate minerals and silicate-substituted HAPs are also being actively investigated as orthopaedic bone and dental biomaterials for application in tissue engineering. However, the mechanisms for the proposed roles of silicate in these materials have not been fully understood and are controversial. Here, we review the potential roles of silicate for bone tissue engineering applications and recent breakthroughs in identifying the cellular-level molecular mechanisms for the osteoinductivity of silica. The goal of this article is to inspire new ideas for the rational design of third-generation cell-and gene-affecting biomaterials. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 2090-2102, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Abstracts of the Finalists of the International Science and Engineering Fair (39th, Knoxville, Tennessee, May 8-14, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Service, Inc., Washington, DC.

    A science and engineering fair is a competition based on the quality of projects done by students, the results of which are reported through exhibits and oral presentations at the fair. Fairs operate on a step basis. Students who win in small, local fairs, move to a city fair, then to a regional fair, and may be chosen to represent that fair in…

  19. Abstracts of the Finalists of the International Science and Engineering Fair (35th, Columbus, Ohio, May 8-13, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Service, Inc., Washington, DC.

    A science and engineering fair is a competition based on the quality of projects done by students, the results of which are reported through exhibits and oral presentations at the fair. Fairs operate on a step basis. Students who win in small fairs such as a local fair, move to a city fair, then to a regional fair, and may be chosen to represent…

  20. Abstracts of the Finalists of the International Science and Engineering Fair (35th, Columbus, Ohio, May 8-13, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Service, Inc., Washington, DC.

    A science and engineering fair is a competition based on the quality of projects done by students, the results of which are reported through exhibits and oral presentations at the fair. Fairs operate on a step basis. Students who win in small fairs such as a local fair, move to a city fair, then to a regional fair, and may be chosen to represent…

  1. Abstracts of the Finalists of the International Science and Engineering Fair (39th, Knoxville, Tennessee, May 8-14, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Service, Inc., Washington, DC.

    A science and engineering fair is a competition based on the quality of projects done by students, the results of which are reported through exhibits and oral presentations at the fair. Fairs operate on a step basis. Students who win in small, local fairs, move to a city fair, then to a regional fair, and may be chosen to represent that fair in…

  2. Engineering Cell Instructive Materials To Control Cell Fate and Functions through Material Cues and Surface Patterning.

    PubMed

    Ventre, Maurizio; Netti, Paolo A

    2016-06-22

    Mastering the interaction between cells and extracellular environment is a fundamental prerequisite in order to engineer functional biomaterial interfaces able to instruct cells with specific commands. Such advanced biomaterials might find relevant application in prosthesis design, tissue engineering, diagnostics and stem cell biology. Because of the highly complex, dynamic, and multifaceted context, a thorough understanding of the cell-material crosstalk has not been achieved yet; however, a variety of material features including biological cues, topography, and mechanical properties have been proved to impact the strength and the nature of the cell-material interaction, eventually affecting cell fate and functions. Although the nature of these three signals may appear very different, they are equated by their participation in the same material-cytoskeleton crosstalk pathway as they regulate cell adhesion events. In this work we present recent and relevant findings on the material-induced cell responses, with a particular emphasis on how the presentation of biochemical/biophysical signals modulates cell behavior. Finally, we summarize and discuss the literature data to draw out unifying elements concerning cell recognition of and reaction to signals displayed by material surfaces.

  3. Integrated Realization of Engineered Materials and Products: A Foundational Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Janet K.; Mistree, Farrokh; Panchal, Jitesh; Gautham, B. P.; Singh, Amarendra; Reddy, Sreedhar; Kulkarni, Nagesh; Kumar, Prabhash

    In the last several years, considerable ICME related research has been directed towards the study of multiscale materials design. However, relatively little effort has gone into the study of the integrated design of engineered materials and products. In this paper, we describe a foundational problem that is being used to validate and demonstrate the ICME construct and enable design approaches and a computational platform. The foundational problem involves the integrated design of steel and gears, traversing across the chain of steel making, mill production, component fabrication and performance testing tracking the evolution of the material during these processes and linking this to the mechanical design of the component. The design approaches are focused on addressing the following key challenges in the integrated design of products and materials: uncertainty management, complexity management, and holistic verification and validation. The management of uncertainty and complexity is critical to understanding the relationship between computational costs and the value of the resulting information in the design decision making process.

  4. Engineering water repellency in granular materials for ground applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourenco, Sergio; Saulick, Yunesh; Zheng, Shuang; Kang, Hengyi; Liu, Deyun; Lin, Hongjie

    2017-04-01

    Synthetic water repellent granular materials are a novel technology for constructing water-tight barriers and fills that is both inexpensive and reliant on an abundant local resource - soils. Our research is verifying its stability, so that perceived risks to practical implementation are identified and alleviated. Current ground stabilization measures are intrusive and use concrete, steel, and glass fibres as reinforcement elements (e.g. soil nails), so more sustainable approaches that require fewer raw materials are strongly recommended. Synthetic water repellent granular materials, with persistent water repellency, have been tested for water harvesting and proposed as landfill and slope covers. By chemically, physically and biologically adjusting the magnitude of water repellency, they offer the unique advantage of controlling water infiltration and allow their deployment as semi-permeable or impermeable materials. Other advantages include (1) volumetric stability, (2) high air permeability and low water permeability, (3) suitability for flexible applications (permanent and temporary usage), (4) improved adhesion aggregate-bitumen in pavements. Application areas include hydraulic barriers (e.g. for engineered slopes and waste containment), pavements and other waterproofing systems. Chemical treatments to achieve water repellency include the use of waxes, oils and silicone polymers which affect the soil particles at sub-millimetric scales. To date, our research has been aimed at demonstrating their use as slope covers and establishing the chemical compounds that develop high and stable water repellency. Future work will determine the durability of the water repellent coatings and the mechanics and modelling of processes in such soils.

  5. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engineering Education, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Presents the abstracts of 158 papers presented at the American Society for Engineering Education's annual conference at Knoxville, Tennessee, June 14-17, 1976. Included are engineering topics covering education, aerospace, agriculture, biomedicine, chemistry, computers, electricity, acoustics, environment, mechanics, and women. (SL)

  6. Abstracts and parameter index database for reports pertaining to the unsaturated zone and surface water-ground water interactions at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomsburg, G.; Finnie, J.; Horn, D.; King, B.; Liou, J.

    1993-05-01

    This report is a product generated by faculty at the University of Idaho in support of research and development projects on Unsaturated Zone Contamination and Transport Processes, and on Surface Water-Groundwater Interactions and Regional Groundwater Flow at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These projects are managed by the State of Idaho`s INEL Oversight Program under a grant from the US Department of Energy. In particular, this report meets project objectives to produce a site-wide summary of hydrological information based on a literature search and review of field, laboratory and modeling studies at INEL, including a cross-referenced index to site-specific physical, chemical, mineralogic, geologic and hydrologic parameters determined from these studies. This report includes abstracts of 149 reports with hydrological information. For reports which focus on hydrological issues, the abstracts are taken directly from those reports; for reports dealing with a variety of issues beside hydrology, the abstracts were generated by the University of Idaho authors concentrating on hydrology-related issues. Each abstract is followed by a ``Data`` section which identifies types of technical information included in a given report, such as information on parameters or chemistry, mineralogy, stream flows, water levels. The ``Data`` section does not include actual values or data.

  7. A Bibliography with Abstracts of U. S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station Publications Related to Vehicle Mobility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-01

    terrain profiles with various levels of roughness. The terrain profiles were genetated by computer programs that constructed and shaped sequences of...SPONSORING MLITARY ACTIVITY Society of Automotive Engineering Con- Chief of Engineeri ., DA gress and Exposition, Detroit, Michigani Wah n o,. C 20315...soil type and other narphologic.1I, genetic , and physical-chemicnl characteristics of the soils. KLTWOADS: Geaý rayrs; Laboratory tests; Remote

  8. Engineering Poly(ethylene glycol) Materials to Promote Cardiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Amanda Walker

    Heart failure is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and the current costs of treatment put a significant economic burden on our societies. After an infarction, fibrotic tissue begins to form as part of the heart failure cascade. Current options to slow this process include a wide range of pharmaceutical agents, and ultimately the patient may require a heart transplant. Innovative treatment approaches are needed to bring down costs and improve quality of life. The possibility of regenerating or replacing damaged tissue with healthy cardiomyocytes is generating considerable excitement, but there are still many obstacles to overcome. First, while cell injections into the myocardium have demonstrated slight improvements in cardiac function, the actual engraftment of transplanted cells is very low. It is anticipated that improving engraftment will boost outcomes. Second, cellular differentiation and reprogramming protocols have not yet produced cells that are identical to adult cardiomyocytes, and immunogenicity continues to be a problem despite the advent of autologously derived induced pluripotent stem cells. This dissertation will explore biomaterials approaches to addressing these two obstacles. Tissue engineering scaffolds may improve cell engraftment by providing bioactive factors, preventing cell anoikis, and reducing cell washout by blood flow. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is often used as a coating to reduce implant rejection because it is highly resistant to protein adsorption. Because fibrosis of a material in contact with the myocardium could cause arrhythmias, PEG materials are highly relevant for cardiac tissue engineering applications. In Chapter 2, we describe a novel method for crosslinking PEG microspheres around cells to form a scaffold for tissue engineering. We then demonstrate that HL-1 cardiomyocyte viability and phenotype are retained throughout the fabrication process and during the first 7 weeks of culture. In the third chapter of the

  9. Biofunctionalization of materials for implants using engineered peptides.

    PubMed

    Khatayevich, Dmitriy; Gungormus, Mustafa; Yazici, Hilal; So, Christopher; Cetinel, Sibel; Ma, Hong; Jen, Alex; Tamerler, Candan; Sarikaya, Mehmet

    2010-12-01

    Uncontrolled interactions between synthetic materials and human tissues are a major concern for implants and tissue engineering. The most successful approaches to circumvent this issue involve the modification of the implant or scaffold surfaces with various functional molecules, such as anti-fouling polymers or cell growth factors. To date, such techniques have relied on surface immobilization methods that are often applicable only to a limited range of materials and require the presence of specific functional groups, synthetic pathways or biologically hostile environments. In this study we have used peptide motifs that have been selected to bind to gold, platinum, glass and titanium to modify surfaces with poly(ethylene glycol) anti-fouling polymer and the integrin-binding RGD sequence. The peptides have several advantages over conventional molecular immobilization techniques; they require no biologically hostile environments to bind, are specific to their substrates and could be adapted to carry various active entities. We successfully imparted cell-resistant properties to gold and platinum surfaces using gold- and platinum-binding peptides, respectively, in conjunction with PEG. We also induced a several-fold increase in the number and spreading of fibroblast cells on glass and titanium surfaces using quartz and titanium-binding peptides in conjunction with the integrin ligand RGD. The results presented here indicate that control over the extent of cell-material interactions can be achieved by relatively simple and biocompatible surface modification procedures using inorganic binding peptides as linker molecules.

  10. Engineering a new material for hot gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.; Doraiswamy, L.K.; Constant, K.

    2000-03-01

    The engineering development of a promising sorbent for desulfurizing hot coal gas was initiated and preliminary results are presented. The sorbent is calcium-based and is designed to be regenerated and reused repeatedly. It is prepared by pelletizing powdered limestone in a rotating drum pelletizer followed by the application of a coating which becomes a strong, porous shell upon further treatment. The resulting spherical pellets combine the high reactivity of lime with the strength of an inert protective shell. Preliminary work indicates that a satisfactory shell material is comprised of a mixture of ultrafine alumina powder, somewhat coarser alumina particles, and pulverized limestone which upon heating to 1,373 K (1,100 C) becomes a coherent solid through the mechanism of particle sintering. Several batches of core-in-shell pellets were prepared and tested with encouraging results.

  11. Material considerations for the fusion engineering device (FED) pump limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, J. R.; Cramer, B. A.; Davisson, J. P.; Mantz, H. C.

    A mechanical pump limiter is provided in the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) to establish the plasma edge, to exhaust plasma particles, to handle a significant fraction of the plasma heat load, and to protect the first wall from large particle and energy fluxes. Various protective surface materials were evaluated for applicability to the limiter. Bare metal and armor tile design concepts were considered. The protective surface concept selected for the baseline FED limiter consists of graphite tiles brazed to a water cooled copper substrate. Graphite and copper were selected because of their resistance to damage at high heat fluxes, the low atomic number of graphite and the potential for reliable brazing of copper and graphite.

  12. Multifunctional, flexible electronic systems based on engineered nanostructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Hyunhyub; Kapadia, Rehan; Takei, Kuniharu; Takahashi, Toshitake; Zhang, Xiaobo; Javey, Ali

    2012-08-01

    The development of flexible electronic systems has been extensively researched in recent years, with the goal of expanding the potential scope and market of modern electronic devices in the areas of computation, communications, displays, sensing and energy. Uniquely, the use of soft polymeric substrates enables the incorporation of advanced features beyond mechanical bendability and stretchability. In this paper, we describe several functionalities which can be achieved using engineered nanostructured materials. In particular, reversible binding, self-cleaning, antireflective and shape-reconfigurable properties are introduced for the realization of multifunctional, flexible electronic devices. Examples of flexible systems capable of spatial mapping and/or responding to external stimuli are also presented as a new class of user-interactive devices.

  13. Advanced Material Developments with Laser Engineered Net Shaping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn A.; Cooper, Ken; McGill, Preston; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS(Trademark)) process is a new technology to fabricate three-dimensional metallic components directly from CAD solid models. It directly fabricates metal hardware by injecting the metal powder of choice into the focal point of a 700W Nd:Yag laser as it traces the perimeter and fills of a part. The Rapid Prototype Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center is currently operating a OPTOMEC 750 LENS machine in evaluation experiments involving integration of this technology into various manufacturing processes associated with aerospace applications. This paper will cover our research finding about properties of samples created from Inconel 718 & SS316 using this process versus the same materials in cast & wrought conditions.

  14. Determinants of cell-material crosstalk at the interface: towards engineering of cell instructive materials.

    PubMed

    Ventre, Maurizio; Causa, Filippo; Netti, Paolo A

    2012-09-07

    The development of novel biomaterials able to control cell activities and direct their fate is warranted for engineering functional biological tissues, advanced cell culture systems, single-cell diagnosis as well as for cell sorting and differentiation. It is well established that crosstalk at the cell-material interface occurs and this has a profound influence on cell behaviour. However, the complete deciphering of the cell-material communication code is still far away. A variety of material surface properties have been reported to affect the strength and the nature of the cell-material interactions, including biological cues, topography and mechanical properties. Novel experimental evidence bears out the hypothesis that these three different signals participate in the same material-cytoskeleton crosstalk pathway via adhesion plaque formation dynamics. In this review, we present the relevant findings on material-induced cell response along with the description of cell behaviour when exposed to arrays of signals-biochemical, topographical and mechanical. Finally, with the aid of literature data, we attempt to draw unifying elements of the material-cytoskeleton-cell fate chain.

  15. Synthesis and Engineering Materials Properties of Fluid Phase Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Young Joon; Westman, Matthew P.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Chun, Jaehun; Ronnebro, Ewa

    2015-09-01

    Among candidates for chemical hydrogen storage in PEM fuel cell automotive applications, ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3) is considered to be one of the most promising materials due to its high practical hydrogen content of 14-16 wt%. This material is selected as a surrogate chemical for a hydrogen storage system. For easier transition to the existing infrastructure, a fluid phase hydrogen storage material is very attractive and thus, we investigated the engineering materials properties of AB in liquid carriers for a chemical hydrogen storage slurry system. Slurries composed of AB and high temperature liquids were prepared by mechanical milling and sonication in order to obtain stable and fluidic properties. Volumetric gas burette system was adopted to observe the kinetics of the H2 release reactions of the AB slurry and neat AB. Viscometry and microscopy were employed to further characterize slurries engineering properties. Using a tip-sonication method we have produced AB/silicone fluid slurries at solid loadings up to 40wt% (6.5wt% H2) with viscosities less than 500cP at 25°C.

  16. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources materials. Supplement 31, 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

    The Environmental Quality Instructional Resources Center in Columbus, Ohio, acquires, reviews, indexes, and announces both print (books, modules, units, etc.) and non-print (films, slides, video tapes, etc.) materials related to water quality and water resources education and instruction. This publication contains abstracts and indexes to selected…

  17. Microfiche Collection Of Clearinghouse Documents Reported In Abstracts Of Research and Related Materials In Vocational and Technical Education (ARM), Summer 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.

    Documents announced with VT numbers only in the Summer 1969 issue (VT 009 006) of "Abstracts of Research and Related Materials in Vocational and Technical Education" (ARM), are included in this microfiche set. Microfiche availability for these documents is shown on the ARM resume as MF AVAILABLE IN VT-ERIC SET. The microfiche set is arranged in…

  18. Microfiche Collection of Clearinghouse Documents Reported in Abstracts of Research and Related Materials in Vocational and Technical Education (ARM), Summer 1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.

    Documents announced with VT numbers only in the Summer 1970 issue (VT 011 509) of "Abstracts of Research and Related Materials in Vocational and Technical Education" (ARM) are included in this microfiche set. Microfiche availability for these documents is shown on the ARM resume as MF AVAILABLE IN VT-ERIC SET. The microfiche set is arranged in the…

  19. EHDA Spraying: A Multi-Material Nano-Engineering Route.

    PubMed

    Haj-Ahmad, Rita; Rasekh, Manoochehr; Nazari, Kazem; Li, Yongyang; Fu, Yike; Li, Binbin; Zhang, Qiuhong; Xia, Zhen; Liu, Heng; Gu, Tongxu; Wang, Gang; Kucuk, Israfil; Khan, Hashim; Arshad, Muhammad S; Li, Xiang; Ahmad, Zeeshan

    2015-01-01

    Electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) enabling platform technologies have gathered significant momentum over the last two decades. Utilisation of the underpinning jetting process in tandem with desired materials (including polymers, ceramics, metals and even naturally occurring compounds such as peptides, DNA and cells) provides the basis for novel engineered therapies. Through EHDA processes, the generation of a variety of nano-meter and micro-meter scaled structures with control on surface and encapsulation features is attainable in a single step. While a host of adaptable EHDA techniques have evolved (e.g. printing and template patterning), there are two main processes that continue to dominate: electrospraying (ESy) and electrospinning (ESp). Although ESp has drawn considerable researcher interest for nanofibre applications, ESy is an important and timely process for nano- and micro-particle fabrication. Thus, an appropriate evaluation of ESy is vital. This short review focuses on key developments in the ESy field in relation to nanotechnologies with potential healthcare applications using metals, polymers and ceramics. An insight into the process of particle formation (during EHDA spraying or ESy), process parameters and materials specifications, is provided. Emerging biomedical and other healthcare research through nanotechnologies are highlighted.

  20. Organometallic chemistry meets crystal engineering to give responsive crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Bacchi, A; Pelagatti, P

    2016-01-25

    Dynamically porous crystalline materials have been obtained by engineering organometallic molecules. This feature article deals with organometallic wheel-and-axle compounds, molecules with two relatively bulky groups (wheels) connected by a linear spacer. The wheels are represented by half-sandwich Ru(ii) moieties, while the spacer can be covalent or supramolecular in character. Covalent spacers are obtained using divergent bidentate ligands connecting two [(arene)RuX2] groups. Supramolecular spacers are instead obtained by exploiting the dimerization of COOH or C(O)NH2 groups appended to N-based ligands. A careful choice of ligand functional groups and X ligands leads to the isolation of crystalline materials with remarkable host-guest properties, evidenced by the possibility of reversibly capturing/releasing volatile guests through heterogenous solid-gas reactions. Structural correlations between the crystalline arrangement of the apohost and the host-guest compounds allow us to envisage the structural path followed by the system during the exchange processes.

  1. Engineering tumor cell targeting in nanoscale amyloidal materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unzueta, Ugutz; Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Virtudes Céspedes, María; Saccardo, Paolo; Cortés, Francisco; Rueda, Fabián; Garcia-Fruitós, Elena; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Mangues, Ramon; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial inclusion bodies are non-toxic, mechanically stable and functional protein amyloids within the nanoscale size range that are able to naturally penetrate into mammalian cells, where they deliver the embedded protein in a functional form. The potential use of inclusion bodies in protein delivery or protein replacement therapies is strongly impaired by the absence of specificity in cell binding and penetration, thus preventing targeting. To address this issue, we have here explored whether the genetic fusion of two tumor-homing peptides, the CXCR4 ligands R9 and T22, to an inclusion body-forming green fluorescent protein (GFP), would keep the interaction potential and the functionality of the fused peptides and then confer CXCR4 specificity in cell binding and further uptake of the materials. The fusion proteins have been well produced in Escherichia coli in their full-length form, keeping the potential for fluorescence emission of the partner GFP. By using specific inhibitors of CXCR4 binding, we have demonstrated that the engineered protein particles are able to penetrate CXCR4+ cells, in a receptor-mediated way, without toxicity or visible cytopathic effects, proving the availability of the peptide ligands on the surface of inclusion bodies. Since no further modification is required upon their purification, the biological production of genetically targeted inclusion bodies opens a plethora of cost-effective possibilities in the tissue-specific intracellular transfer of functional proteins through the use of structurally and functionally tailored soft materials.

  2. Creep fatigue life prediction for engine hot section materials (isotropic)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, V.

    1983-01-01

    The Hot Section Technology (HOST) program, creep fatigue life prediction for engine hot section materials (isotropic), is reviewed. The program is aimed at improving the high temperature crack initiation life prediction technology for gas turbine hot section components. Significant results include: (1) cast B1900 and wrought IN 718 selected as the base and alternative materials respectively; (2) fatigue test specimens indicated that measurable surface cracks appear early in the specimen lives, i.e., 15% of total life at 871 C and 50% of life at 538 c; (3) observed crack initiation sites are all surface initiated and are associated with either grain boundary carbides or local porosity, transgrannular cracking is observed at the initiation site for all conditions tested; and (4) an initial evaluation of two life prediction models, representative of macroscopic (Coffin-Mason) and more microscopic (damage rate) approaches, was conducted using limited data generated at 871 C and 538 C. It is found that the microscopic approach provides a more accurate regression of the data used to determine crack initiation model constants, but overpredicts the effect of strain rate on crack initiation life for the conditions tested.

  3. Thermal-mechanical fatigue crack growth in aircraft engine materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Yi

    1993-08-01

    This thesis summarizes the major technical achievements obtained as a part of a collaborative research and development project between Ecole Polytechnique and Pratt & Whitney Canada. These achievements include: (1) a thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF) testing rig which is capable of studying the fatigue behaviors of gas turbine materials under simultaneous changes of temperatures and strains or stress; (2) an advanced alternative current potential drop (ACPD) measurement system which is capable of performing on-line monitoring of fatigue crack initiation and growth in specimen testing under isothermal and TMF conditions; (3) fatigue crack initiation and short crack growth data for the titanium specimens designed with notch features associated with bolt holes of compressor discs; (4) thermal-mechanical fatigue crack growth data for two titanium alloys being used in PWC engine components, which explained the material fatigue behavior encountered in full-scale component testing; (5) a complete fractographic analysis for the tested specimens which enhanced the understanding of the fatigue crack growth mechanisms and helped to establish an analytical crack growth model; and (6) application of the ACPD fatigue crack monitoring technique to single tooth firtree specimen (STFT) LCF testing of PWA 1480 single crystal alloy. Finally, a comprehensive discussion concerning the results pertaining to this research project is presented.

  4. Engineering tumor cell targeting in nanoscale amyloidal materials.

    PubMed

    Unzueta, Ugutz; Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Céspedes, María Virtudes; Saccardo, Paolo; Cortés, Francisco; Rueda, Fabián; Garcia-Fruitós, Elena; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Mangues, Ramon; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio

    2017-01-06

    Bacterial inclusion bodies are non-toxic, mechanically stable and functional protein amyloids within the nanoscale size range that are able to naturally penetrate into mammalian cells, where they deliver the embedded protein in a functional form. The potential use of inclusion bodies in protein delivery or protein replacement therapies is strongly impaired by the absence of specificity in cell binding and penetration, thus preventing targeting. To address this issue, we have here explored whether the genetic fusion of two tumor-homing peptides, the CXCR4 ligands R9 and T22, to an inclusion body-forming green fluorescent protein (GFP), would keep the interaction potential and the functionality of the fused peptides and then confer CXCR4 specificity in cell binding and further uptake of the materials. The fusion proteins have been well produced in Escherichia coli in their full-length form, keeping the potential for fluorescence emission of the partner GFP. By using specific inhibitors of CXCR4 binding, we have demonstrated that the engineered protein particles are able to penetrate CXCR4(+) cells, in a receptor-mediated way, without toxicity or visible cytopathic effects, proving the availability of the peptide ligands on the surface of inclusion bodies. Since no further modification is required upon their purification, the biological production of genetically targeted inclusion bodies opens a plethora of cost-effective possibilities in the tissue-specific intracellular transfer of functional proteins through the use of structurally and functionally tailored soft materials.

  5. Cost/benefit studies of advanced materials technologies for future aircraft turbine engines: Materials for advanced turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, M.; Wilbers, L.

    1982-01-01

    Cost benefit studies were conducted on six advanced materials and processes technologies applicable to commercial engines planned for production in the 1985 to 1990 time frame. These technologies consisted of thermal barrier coatings for combustor and high pressure turbine airfoils, directionally solidified eutectic high pressure turbine blades, (both cast and fabricated), and mixers, tail cones, and piping made of titanium-aluminum alloys. A fabricated titanium fan blisk, an advanced turbine disk alloy with improved low cycle fatigue life, and a long-life high pressure turbine blade abrasive tip and ceramic shroud system were also analyzed. Technologies showing considerable promise as to benefits, low development costs, and high probability of success were thermal barrier coating, directionally solidified eutectic turbine blades, and abrasive-tip blades/ceramic-shroud turbine systems.

  6. Polyacylurethanes as Novel Degradable Cell Carrier Materials for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Jovanovic, Danijela; Roukes, Frans V.; Löber, Andrea; Engels, Gerwin E.; van Oeveren, Willem; van Seijen, Xavier J. Gallego; van Luyn, Marja J.A.; Harmsen, Martin C.; Schouten, Arend Jan

    2011-01-01

    Polycaprolactone (PCL) polyester and segmented aliphatic polyester urethanes based on PCL soft segment have been thoroughly investigated as biodegradable scaffolds for tissue engineering. Although proven beneficial as long term implants, these materials degrade very slowly and are therefore not suitable in applications in which scaffold support is needed for a shorter time. A recently developed class of polyacylurethanes (PAUs) is expected to fulfill such requirements. Our aim was to assess in vitro the degradation of PAUs and evaluate their suitability as temporary scaffold materials to support soft tissue repair. With both a mass loss of 2.5–3.0% and a decrease in molar mass of approx. 35% over a period of 80 days, PAUs were shown to degrade via both bulk and surface erosion mechanisms. Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectroscopy was successfully applied to study the extent of PAUs microphase separation during in vitro degradation. The microphase separated morphology of PAU1000 (molar mass of the oligocaprolactone soft segment = 1000 g/mol) provided this polymer with mechano-physical characteristics that would render it a suitable material for constructs and devices. PAU1000 exhibited excellent haemocompatibility in vitro. In addition, PAU1000 supported both adhesion and proliferation of vascular endothelial cells and this could be further enhanced by pre-coating of PAU1000 with fibronectin (Fn). The contact angle of PAU1000 decreased both with in vitro degradation and by incubation in biological fluids. In endothelial cell culture medium the contact angle reached 60°, which is optimal for cell adhesion. Taken together, these results support the application of PAU1000 in the field of soft tissue repair as a temporary degradable scaffold. PMID:28824103

  7. Technical Abstracts, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Kotowski, M.

    1989-05-01

    This document is a compilation of the abstracts from unclassified documents published by Mechanical Engineering at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during the calendar year 1988. Many abstracts summarize work completed and published in report form. These are UCRL-90,000 and 100,000 series documents, which include the full text of articles to be published in journals and of papers to be presented at meetings, and UCID reports, which are informal documents. Not all UCIDs contain abstracts: short summaries were generated when abstracts were not included. Technical Abstracts also provides brief descriptions of those documents assigned to the MISC (miscellaneous) category. These are generally viewgraphs or photographs presented at meetings. The abstracts cover the broad range of technologies within Mechanical Engineering and are grouped by the principal author's division. An eighth category is devoted to abstracts presented at the CUBE symposium sponsored jointly by LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia Laboratories. Within these areas, abstracts are listed numerically. An author index and title index are provided at the back of the book for cross referencing. The publications listed may be obtained by contacting LLNL's TID library or the National Technical Information Service, US Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161. Further information may be obtained by contacting the author directly or the persons listed in the introduction of each subject area.

  8. Photon absorption potential coefficient as a tool for materials engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akande, Raphael Oluwole; Oyewande, Emmanuel Oluwole

    2016-09-01

    the material is able to absorb more than that the photon source could provide, at this point. These resulting effects might be of immense materials engineering applications.

  9. Abstract and keywords.

    PubMed

    Peh, W C G; Ng, K H

    2008-09-01

    The abstract of a scientific paper represents a concise, accurate and factual mini-version of the paper contents. Abstract format may vary according to the individual journal. For original articles, a structured abstract usually consists of the following headings: aims (or objectives), materials and methods, results and conclusion. A few keywords that capture the main topics of the paper help indexing in the medical literature.

  10. Natural Kenaf Fiber Reinforced Composites as Engineered Structural Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittenber, David B.

    theory, finite element method, and Castigliano's method in unidirectional tension and compression, but are less accurate for the more bond-dependent flexural and shear properties. With the acknowledged NFRP matrix bonding issues, the over-prediction of these theoretical models indicates that the flexural stiffness of the kenaf composite may be increased by up to 40% if a better bond between the fiber and matrix can be obtained. The sustainability of NFRPs was examined from two perspectives: environmental and socioeconomic. While the kenaf fibers themselves possess excellent sustainability characteristics, costing less while possessing a lesser environmental impact than the glass fibers, the vinyl ester resin used in the composites is environmentally hazardous and inflated the cost and embodied energy of the composite SIPs. Consistent throughout all the designs was a correlation between the respective costs of the raw materials and the respective environmental impacts. The socioeconomic study looked at the sustainability of natural fiber reinforced composite materials as housing materials in developing countries. A literature study on the country of Bangladesh, where the fibers in this study were grown, showed that the jute and kenaf market would benefit from the introduction of a value-added product like natural fiber composites. The high rate of homeless and inadequately housed in Bangladesh, as well as in the US and throughout the rest of the world, could be somewhat alleviated if a new, affordable, and durable material were introduced. While this study found that natural fiber composites possess sufficient mechanical properties to be adopted as primary structural members, the two major remaining hurdles needing to be overcome before natural fiber composites can be adopted as housing materials are the cost and sustainability of the resin system and the moisture resistance/durability of the fibers. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  11. CASTING DEFECT MODELING IN AN INTEGRATED COMPUTATIONAL MATERIALS ENGINEERING APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2015-01-01

    To accelerate the introduction of new cast alloys, the simultaneous modeling and simulation of multiphysical phenomena needs to be considered in the design and optimization of mechanical properties of cast components. The required models related to casting defects, such as microporosity and hot tears, are reviewed. Three aluminum alloys are considered A356, 356 and 319. The data on calculated solidification shrinkage is presented and its effects on microporosity levels discussed. Examples are given for predicting microporosity defects and microstructure distribution for a plate casting. Models to predict fatigue life and yield stress are briefly highlighted here for the sake of completion and to illustrate how the length scales of the microstructure features as well as porosity defects are taken into account for modeling the mechanical properties. Thus, the data on casting defects, including microstructure features, is crucial for evaluating the final performance-related properties of the component. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This work was performed under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Nemak Inc., and Chrysler Co. for the project "High Performance Cast Aluminum Alloys for Next Generation Passenger Vehicle Engines. The author would also like to thank Amit Shyam for reviewing the paper and Andres Rodriguez of Nemak Inc. Research sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office, as part of the Propulsion Materials Program under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle, LLC. Part of this research was conducted through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Temperature Materials Laboratory User Program, which is sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program.

  12. Advanced bearing materials for cryogenic aerospace engine turbopump requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, G.; Bhat, B. N.

    1986-01-01

    The properties of eleven alloys were investigated to select an improved bearing material for the High Pressure Oxygen Turbo Pump which delivers liquid oxygen to the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The alloys, selected through detailed literature analysis, X 405, MRC-2001, T440V, 14-4/6V, D-5, V-M Pyromet 350, Stellite 3, FerroTic CS-40, Tribaloy 800, WD-65, and CBS-600. The alloys were tested in hardness, corrosion resistance, wear resistance, fatigue resistance, and fracture toughness tests, and their performance was compared with the baseline 440C test alloy. As a result, five alloys were eliminated, leaving the remaining six (X 405, MRC-2001, T440V, 14-4/6V, D-5, and WD-65 to be evaluated in the next phase of NASA tests which will include fracture toughness, rolling contact fatigue, wear resistance, and corrosion resistance. From these, three alloys will be selected, which will be made into ninety bearings for subsequent testing.

  13. Engineered clay-shredded tyre mixtures as barrier materials

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Tabbaa, A.; Aravinthan, T.

    1997-12-31

    An engineered clay consisting of kaolin and bentonite was mixed with shredded tyre in various weight percentages and examined for use as a constituent in a landfill liner. The clay-tyre mixtures properties in terms of compaction, unconfined compressive strength, permeability to water and paraffin, leachability, stress-strain behaviour, free swell behaviour and swelling pressure were investigated. The results show that the dry density and strength reduced with the addition of tyre and also with increased tyre content but that good interaction was developed between the clay and tyre. The strain at failure increased showing reinforcing effect of the tyre. The permeability to paraffin was considerably reduced compared to that to water due to the presence of the tyre which caused high swelling pressures to develop. The leachability results indicate initial high concentrations leaching out of the soil-tyre mixtures which will be subjected to dilution in the environment. This work adds evidence to the potential advantages of using soil-tyre mixtures as a landfill liner material.

  14. National Educators' Workshop. Update 92: Standard Experiments in Engineering Materials Science and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, James E. (Compiler); Jacobs, James A. (Compiler); Craig, Douglas F. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    This document contains a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the workshop. The experiments related to the nature and properties of engineering materials and provided information to assist in teaching about materials in the education community.

  15. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education. Engine Principles, 8-3. Edition 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This individualized, self-paced course for independent study in engine principles has been adapted from military curriculum materials for vocational education use. The course provides the student with basic information on engine principles including different kinds of combustion engines, lubrication systems, and cooling systems. It is organized…

  16. CRC materials science and engineering handbook. Third edition

    SciTech Connect

    Shackelford, J.F.; Alexander, W.

    1999-01-01

    This definitive reference is organized in an easy-to-follow format based on materials properties. It features new and existing data verified through major professional societies in the materials fields, such as ASM International and the American Ceramic Society. The third edition has been significantly expanded, most notably by the addition of new tabular material for a wide range of nonferrous alloys and various materials. The contents include: Structure of materials; Composition of materials; Phase diagram sources; Thermodynamic and kinetic data; Thermal properties of materials; Mechanical properties of materials; Electrical properties of materials; Optical properties of materials; Chemical properties of materials.

  17. Solar thermal drying of apricots: Effect of spectrally-selective cabinet materials on drying rate and quality metrics (abstract)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Solar thermal (ST) drying is currently not in widespread commercial use due to concerns about slow drying rates and poor product quality. ST dryer cabinets could be constructed from spectrally-selective materials (materials which transmit only certain sunlight wavelength bands), but these types of ...

  18. Selected Bibliography and Abstracts of Educational Materials in Pakistan, Vol. 9, No. 2, Period Covered April-June 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saad, Geti, Comp.

    This annotated bibliography lists 101 entries of selected educational materials published in Pakistan during the period April through June 1975. Pakistani journals, newspapers, and government publications provide the source of the materials. They are organized into 28 categories: administration, organization, and financing of education; adult…

  19. Selected Bibliography and Abstracts of Educational Materials in Pakistan, Volume 9, Number 4: Period Covered, October-December 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saad, Geti, Comp.

    Contained in this annotated bibliography are 100 references to selected educational materials published in Pakistan during the period October through December, 1975. Pakistani journals, newspapers, and government publications provide the source of the materials. They are organized into 26 categories: administration, organization and financing of…

  20. Selected Bibliography and Abstracts of Educational Materials in Pakistan, Volume 9, Number 4: Period Covered, October-December 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saad, Geti, Comp.

    Contained in this annotated bibliography are 100 references to selected educational materials published in Pakistan during the period October through December, 1975. Pakistani journals, newspapers, and government publications provide the source of the materials. They are organized into 26 categories: administration, organization and financing of…

  1. Selected Bibliography and Abstracts of Educational Materials in Pakistan, Vol. 9, No. 2, Period Covered April-June 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saad, Geti, Comp.

    This annotated bibliography lists 101 entries of selected educational materials published in Pakistan during the period April through June 1975. Pakistani journals, newspapers, and government publications provide the source of the materials. They are organized into 28 categories: administration, organization, and financing of education; adult…

  2. Materials and structural aspects of advanced gas-turbine helicopter engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Acurio, J.

    1979-01-01

    The key to improved helicopter gas turbine engine performance lies in the development of advanced materials and advanced structural and design concepts. The modification of the low temperature components of helicopter engines (such as the inlet particle separator), the introduction of composites for use in the engine front frame, the development of advanced materials with increased use-temperature capability for the engine hot section, can result in improved performance and/or decreased engine maintenance cost. A major emphasis in helicopter engine design is the ability to design to meet a required lifetime. This, in turn, requires that the interrelated aspects of higher operating temperatures and pressures, cooling concepts, and environmental protection schemes be integrated into component design. The major material advances, coatings, and design life-prediction techniques pertinent to helicopter engines are reviewed; the current state-of-the-art is identified; and when appropriate, progress, problems, and future directions are assessed.

  3. Living in a Materials World: Materials Science Engineering Professional Development for K-12 Educators

    SciTech Connect

    Anne Seifert; Louis Nadelson

    2011-06-01

    Advances in materials science are fundamental to technological developments and have broad societal impacs. For example, a cellular phone is composed of a polymer case, liquid crystal displays, LEDs, silicon chips, Ni-Cd batteries, resistors, capacitors, speakers, microphones all of which have required advances in materials science to be compacted into a phone which is typically smaller than a deck of cards. Like many technological developments, cellular phones have become a ubiquitous part of society, and yet most people know little about the materials science associated with their manufacture. The probable condition of constrained knowledge of materials science was the motivation for developing and offering a 20 hour fourday course called 'Living in a Materials World.' In addition, materials science provides a connection between our every day experiences and the work of scientists and engineers. The course was offered as part of a larger K-12 teacher professional development project and was a component of a week-long summer institute designed specifically for upper elementary and middle school teachers which included 20 hour content strands, and 12 hours of plenary sessions, planning, and collaborative sharing. The focus of the institute was on enhancing teacher content knowledge in STEM, their capacity for teaching using inquiry, their comfort and positive attitudes toward teaching STEM, their knowledge of how people learn, and strategies for integrating STEM throughout the curriculum. In addition to the summer institute the participating teachers were provided with a kit of about $300 worth of materials and equipment to use to implement the content they learned in their classrooms. As part of this professional development project the participants were required to design and implement 5 lesson plans with their students this fall and report on the results, as part of the continuing education course associated with the project. 'Living in a Materials World' was

  4. FWP executive summaries: basic energy sciences materials sciences and engineering program (SNL/NM).

    SciTech Connect

    Samara, George A.; Simmons, Jerry A.

    2006-07-01

    This report presents an Executive Summary of the various elements of the Materials Sciences and Engineering Program which is funded by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. A general programmatic overview is also presented.

  5. Materials advances required to reduce energy consumption through the application of heavy duty diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, J.W.

    1984-09-01

    Several key materials advances are required to reduce energy consumption through application of heavy duty diesel engines. Heavy duty diesel engines are viewed as effecting energy use both directly through fuel consumption, and indirectly through their durability with large energy expenditures required to replace worn-out engines. Materials advances that would improve fuel consumption include materials related to hot gas-path insulation, and materials related to design advances (other than insulation). Most design advances that are focused on fuel consumption or other performance factors also directly influence durability through materials properties. Several major engine components and many conventional (and advanced) materials are examined. If materials development is integrated with design and manufacturing advances, then fuel economy higher than 0.28 BSFC (50 pct thermal efficiency), and durability beyond 750,000 miles may be achievable.

  6. The formation of students’ engineering thinking as a way to create new techniques, technologies, materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmanshin, Iskander; Gilmanshina, Suriya

    2016-06-01

    Engineering thinking is regarded as the quality of the person, which is stimulating the human need for the creation of new techniques, technologies and materials. Applications in the study of competence approach allows us to consider a professional thinking as one of the core competencies required for successful engineer innovations in mechanical engineering. The author's definition of professional engineering thinking is presented. The ways of its formation at students of technical fields enrolled in university courses are illustrated

  7. Abstract Constructions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietropola, Anne

    1998-01-01

    Describes a lesson designed to culminate a year of eighth-grade art classes in which students explore elements of design and space by creating 3-D abstract constructions. Outlines the process of using foam board and markers to create various shapes and optical effects. (DSK)

  8. Abstract Planters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnham, Barrie

    2001-01-01

    Describes an art project where students create slab planters that are functional clay objects. Discusses how the students prepare their drawings for the planter and how to create the planter. Explains that the subject matter is depicted in a progression from reality to abstraction. (CMK)

  9. Research Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plotnik, Eric

    2001-01-01

    Presents six research abstracts from the ERIC (Educational Resources Information Center) database. Topics include: effectiveness of distance versus traditional on-campus education; improved attribution recall from diversification of environmental context during computer-based instruction; qualitative analysis of situated Web-based learning;…

  10. Research Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plotnick, Eric

    2001-01-01

    Presents research abstracts from the ERIC Clearinghouse on Information and Technology. Topics include: classroom communication apprehension and distance education; outcomes of a distance-delivered science course; the NASA/Kennedy Space Center Virtual Science Mentor program; survey of traditional and distance learning higher education members;…

  11. Research Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plotnik, Eric

    2001-01-01

    Presents six research abstracts from the ERIC (Educational Resources Information Center) database. Topics include: effectiveness of distance versus traditional on-campus education; improved attribution recall from diversification of environmental context during computer-based instruction; qualitative analysis of situated Web-based learning;…

  12. Potential inert matrix materials: Materials synthesis and evaluation of in-service engineering parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peng

    Containing no fertile materials, inert matrix fuel (IMF) has been introduced as a potential transmutation solution for the increasing inventory of both weapon grade and reactor grade plutonium (Pu). In the present work, the MgO-pyrochlore (Nd2Zr2O7) composites and spinel magnesium stannate (Mg2SnO4) were selected as potential inert matrix (IM) materials. A comprehensive investigation was conducted on evaluation of the engineering parameters of the potential IM materials. The MgO-Nd2Zr2O7 composites and Mg 2SnO4 were fabricated through conventional solid state processing. The crystal structure and microstructure of the synthesized composites and Mg2SnO4 were studied. The irradiation tolerance of the potential IM materials was first assessed. The resistance of Mg2SnO 4 against irradiation induced amorphization was assessed experimentally using in situ TEM technique. The critical amorphization doses for Mg2SnO4 irradiated by 1 MeV Kr2+ ions were determined to be 5.5 dpa at 50 K and 11.0 dpa at 150 K, respectively. The obtained results were compared with other spinels especially MgAl 2O4, and the radiation tolerance of spinels were discussed. The next evaluation was water corrosion resistance of the potential IM materials. Homogeneous MgO-Nd2Zr2O7 composites exhibited an improved hydrothermal corrosion resistance than inhomogeneous composites and pure MgO. Even though spinel Mg2SnO4 was not stable in water at 300°C and saturation pressure, the corrosion was limited only to the surface, and the volume and mass changes were less than 1 % after 720 h corrosion. Feasibility of aqueous reprocessing was evaluated by studying the dissolution behavior of the potential IM materials in acidic solutions, with an emphasis on nitric acid. Dissolution of the MgO-Nd2Zr2O 7 composites in HNO3 resulted in a selective dissolution of MgO. Mechanical agitation such as magnetic bar stirring was necessary to achieve a completed dissolution of MgO and disintegration of porous Nd 2Zr2O7

  13. Alternative-engine-fuels demonstration and materials test

    SciTech Connect

    Thimsen, D.

    1981-01-01

    A portable demonstration was constructed to measure peak power and specific fuel consumption of a gasoline engine burning gasoline and ethanol, and a diesel engine burning No. 2 diesel and sunflower oil. The demonstrations were given at farm field days. Several metals were subjected to wet ethanol fuels to measure corrosion.

  14. Crystal-Field Engineering of Solid-State Laser Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Brian; Bartram, Ralph H.

    2005-08-01

    Preface; 1. An introduction to lasers; 2. Symmetry considerations; 3. Optical crystals: their structures, colours and growth; 4. Energy levels of ions in crystals; 5. Spectra of ions in crystals; 6. Radiationless transitions; 7. Energy transfer and excited state absorption; 8. Covalency; 9. Engineering the crystal field; 10. The crystal field engineered.

  15. Global Abstracts.

    PubMed

    Weber, Ellen J

    2017-10-01

    Editor's note: EMJ has partnered with the journals of multiple international emergency medicine societies to share from each a highlighted research study, as selected by their editors. This edition will feature an abstract from each publication. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Selected Bibliography and Abstracts of Educational Materials in Pakistan. Volume 6, Number 1, 1972. Period Covered January-March 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saad, Geti, Comp.

    The annotated bibliography lists 111 entries of selected educational materials from Pakistan covering the period from January through March 1972. Entries are listed alphabetically by author under the following thirty-one categories; 1) administrative, organization and financing of education; 2) agricultural education; 3) childhood education; 4)…

  17. Engineered Plants Make Potential Precursor to Raw Material for Plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Shanklin, John

    2010-11-02

    In a first step toward achieving industrial-scale green production, scientists from BNL and collaborators at Dow AgroSciences report engineering a plant that produces industrially relevant levels of chemicals that could potentially be used to make plastics.

  18. Engineered Plants Make Potential Precursor to Raw Material for Plastics

    ScienceCinema

    Shanklin, John

    2016-10-19

    In a first step toward achieving industrial-scale green production, scientists from BNL and collaborators at Dow AgroSciences report engineering a plant that produces industrially relevant levels of chemicals that could potentially be used to make plastics.

  19. Strategies for Biopolymer Engineering of PHB-Like Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-16

    Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA. 02139 Submitted by Dr. Anthony J. Sinskey Dr. Oliver P . Peoples Dr. ChoKyun Rha...1989). In order to use the capacity of P . oleovorans for polymerizing longer chain length (D)-hydroxyacyl-CoA substrates in the design and engineering of...6.4kb EcoR1 restriction fragment of P . oleovarans chromosomal DNA and the complete nucleotide sequence was determined. Figure 2 illustrates the

  20. Advanced high temperature materials for the energy efficient automotive Stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, R. H.; Stephens, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    The Stirling Engine is under investigated jointly by the Department of Energy and NASA Lewis as an alternative to the internal combustion engine for automotive applications. The Stirling Engine is an external combustion engine that offers the advantage of high fuel economy, low emissions, low noise, and low vibrations compared to current internal combustion automotive engines. The most critical component from a materials viewpoint is the heater head consisting of the cylinders, heating tubes, and regenerator housing. Materials requirements for the heater head include compatibility with hydrogen, resistance to hydrogen permeation, high temperature oxidation/corrosion resistance and high temperature creep-rupture and fatigue properties. A continuing supporting materials research and technology program has identified the wrought alloys CG-27 and 12RN72 and the cast alloys XF-818 and NASAUT 4G-A1 as candidate replacements for the cobalt containing alloys used in current prototype engines. Based on the materials research program in support of the automotive Stirling engine it is concluded that manufacture of the engine is feasible from low cost iron-base alloys rather than the cobalt alloys rather than the cobalt alloys used in prototype engines. This paper will present results of research that led to this conclusion.

  1. Recent Advances in Biohybrid Materials for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Ying; Li, Xing; Wang, Shenqi

    2016-07-01

    Biohybrid materials play an important role in tissue engineering, artificial organs and regenerative medicine due to their regulation of cell function through specific cell-matrix interactions involving integrins, mostly those of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts, and ligands on the matrix surface, which have become current research focus. In this paper, recent progress of biohybrid materials, mainly including main types of biohybrid materials, rapid prototype (RP) technique for construction of 3D biohybrid materials, was reviewed in detail; moreover, their applications in tissue engineering, artificial organs and regenerative medicine were also reviewed in detail. At last, we address the challenges biohybrid materials may face.

  2. Building stem cell niches from the molecule up through engineered peptide materials

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, Kyle J.; Heilshorn, Sarah C.

    2013-01-01

    The native stem cell niche is a dynamic and complex microenvironment. Recapitulating this niche is a critical focus within the fields of stem cell biology, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine and requires the development of well-defined, tunable materials. Recent biomaterial design strategies seek to create engineered matrices that interact with cells at the molecular scale and allow on-demand, cell-triggered matrix modifications. Peptide and protein engineering can accomplish these goals through the molecular-level design of bioinductive and bioresponsive materials. This brief review focuses on engineered peptide and protein materials suitable for use as in vitro neural stem cell niche mimics and in vivo central nervous system repair. A key hallmark of these materials is the immense design freedom to specify the exact amino acid sequence leading to multi-functional bulk materials with tunable properties. These advanced materials are engineered using rational design strategies to recapitulate key aspects of the native neural stem cell niche. The resulting materials often combine the advantages of biological matrices with the engineering control of synthetic polymers. Future design strategies are expected to endow these materials with multiple layers of bi-directional feedback between the cell and the matrix, which will lead to more advanced mimics of the highly dynamic neural stem cell niche. PMID:22322073

  3. 15th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells and Modules: Materials and Processes; Extended Abstracts and Papers

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B. L.

    2005-11-01

    The National Center for Photovoltaics sponsored the 15th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells & Modules: Materials and Processes, held in Vail, CO, August 7-10, 2005. This meeting provided a forum for an informal exchange of technical and scientific information between international researchers in the photovoltaic and relevant non-photovoltaic fields. The workshop addressed the fundamental properties of PV silicon, new solar cell designs, and advanced solar cell processing techniques. A combination of oral presentations by invited speakers, poster sessions, and discussion sessions reviewed recent advances in crystal growth, new cell designs, new processes and process characterization techniques, and cell fabrication approaches suitable for future manufacturing demands. The theme of this year's meeting was 'Providing the Scientific Basis for Industrial Success.' Specific sessions during the workshop included: Advances in crystal growth and material issues; Impurities and defects in Si; Advanced processing; High-efficiency Si solar cells; Thin Si solar cells; and Cell design for efficiency and reliability module operation. The topic for the Rump Session was ''Si Feedstock: The Show Stopper'' and featured a panel discussion by representatives from various PV companies.

  4. Elementary Students' Learning of Materials Science Practices through Instruction Based on Engineering Design Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendell, Kristen Bethke; Lee, Hee-Sun

    2010-01-01

    Materials science, which entails the practices of selecting, testing, and characterizing materials, is an important discipline within the study of matter. This paper examines how third grade students' materials science performance changes over the course of instruction based on an engineering design challenge. We conducted a case study of nine…

  5. Fundamentals of Composite Materials for Undergraduate Engineering--A Filmed Presentation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busching, Herbert W.

    Curricula in undergraduate engineering have not adequately reflected present usage and knowledge of composite materials (types of rock and organic matter in which structurally dissimilar materials are combined). Wide usage of composites is expected to increase the importance of this class of materials and the need for more substantive exposure to…

  6. Elementary Students' Learning of Materials Science Practices through Instruction Based on Engineering Design Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendell, Kristen Bethke; Lee, Hee-Sun

    2010-01-01

    Materials science, which entails the practices of selecting, testing, and characterizing materials, is an important discipline within the study of matter. This paper examines how third grade students' materials science performance changes over the course of instruction based on an engineering design challenge. We conducted a case study of nine…

  7. Materials science and tissue engineering: repairing the heart.

    PubMed

    Radisic, Milica; Christman, Karen L

    2013-08-01

    Heart failure after a myocardial infarction continues to be a leading killer in the Western world. Currently, there are no therapies that effectively prevent or reverse the cardiac damage and negative left ventricular remodeling process that follows a myocardial infarction. Because the heart has limited regenerative capacity, there has been considerable effort to develop new therapies that could repair and regenerate the myocardium. Although cell transplantation alone was initially studied, more recently, tissue engineering strategies using biomaterial scaffolds have been explored. In this review, we cover the different approaches to engineering the myocardium, including cardiac patches, which are in vitro-engineered constructs of functional myocardium, and injectable scaffolds, which can either encourage endogenous repair and regeneration or act as vehicles to support the delivery of cells and other therapeutics. Copyright © 2013 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Materials Science and Tissue Engineering: Repairing the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Radisic, Milica; Christman, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure following a myocardial infarction continues to be a leading killer in the western world. Currently there are no therapies that effectively prevent or reverse the cardiac damage and negative left ventricular remodeling process that follows a myocardial infarction. Since the heart has limited regenerative capacity, there has been significant effort to develop new therapies that could repair and regenerate the myocardium. While cell transplantation alone was initially studied, more recently tissue engineering strategies using biomaterial scaffolds have been explored. In this review, we cover the different approaches to engineer the myocardium. These include cardiac patches, which are in vitro engineered constructs of functional myocardium, as well as injectable scaffolds that can either encourage endogenous repair and regeneration, or act as vehicles to support delivery of cells and other therapeutics. PMID:23910415

  9. Biological and structural characterization of a naturally inspired material engineered from elastin as a candidate for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Vassalli, Massimo; Sbrana, Francesca; Laurita, Alessandro; Papi, Massimiliano; Bloise, Nora; Visai, Livia; Bochicchio, Brigida

    2013-12-23

    The adoption of a biomimetic approach in the design and fabrication of innovative materials for biomedical applications is encountering a growing interest. In particular, new molecules are being engineered on the basis of proteins present in the extracellular matrix, such as fibronectin, collagen, or elastin. Following this approach scientists expect to be able not only to obtain materials with tailored mechanical properties but also to elicit specific biological responses inherited by the mimicked tissue. In the present work, a novel peptide, engineered starting from the sequence encoded by exon 28 of human tropoelastin, was characterized from a chemical, physical, and biological point of view. The obtained molecule was observed to aggregate at high temperatures, forming a material able to induce a biological effect similar to what elastin does in the physiological context. This material seems to be a good candidate to play a relevant role in future biomedical applications with special reference to vascular surgery.

  10. Symmetry in strain engineering of nanomembranes: making new strained materials.

    PubMed

    Paskiewicz, Deborah M; Scott, Shelley A; Savage, Donald E; Celler, George K; Lagally, Max G

    2011-07-26

    Strain in a material changes the lattice constant and thereby creates a material with new properties relative to the unstrained, but chemically identical, material. The ability to alter the strain (its magnitude, direction, extent, periodicity, symmetry, and nature) allows tunability of these new properties. A recent development, crystalline nanomembranes, offers a powerful platform for using and tuning strain to create materials that have unique properties, not achievable in bulk materials or with conventional processes. Nanomembranes, because of their thinness, enable elastic strain sharing, a process that introduces large amounts of strain and unique strain distributions in single-crystal materials, without exposing the material to the formation of extended defects. We provide here prescriptions for making new strained materials using crystal symmetry as the driver: we calculate the strain distributions in flat nanomembranes for two-fold and four-fold elastically symmetric materials. We show that we can controllably tune the amount of strain and the asymmetry of the strain distribution in elastically isotropic and anisotropic materials uniformly over large areas. We perform the experimental demonstration with a trilayer Si(110)/Si((1-x))Ge(x)(110)/Si(110) nanomembrane: an elastically two-fold symmetric system in which we can transfer strain that is biaxially isotropic. We are thus able to make uniformly strained materials that cannot be made any other way.

  11. Algerian Abstract

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Algerian Abstract - April 8th, 1985 Description: What look like pale yellow paint streaks slashing through a mosaic of mottled colors are ridges of wind-blown sand that make up Erg Iguidi, an area of ever-shifting sand dunes extending from Algeria into Mauritania in northwestern Africa. Erg Iguidi is one of several Saharan ergs, or sand seas, where individual dunes often surpass 500 meters-nearly a third of a mile-in both width and height. Credit: USGS/NASA/Landsat 5 To learn more about the Landsat satellite go to: landsat.gsfc.nasa.gov/ NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  12. Self-healing behaviour in man-made engineering materials: bioinspired but taking into account their intrinsic character.

    PubMed

    van der Zwaag, S; van Dijk, N H; Jonkers, H M; Mookhoek, S D; Sloof, W G

    2009-05-13

    Man-made engineering materials generally demonstrate excellent mechanical properties, which often far exceed those of natural materials. However, all such engineering materials lack the ability of self-healing, i.e. the ability to remove or neutralize microcracks without (much) intentional human interaction. This inability is the unintentional consequence of the damage prevention paradigm underlying all current engineering material optimization strategies. The damage management paradigm observed in nature can be reproduced successfully in man-made engineering materials, provided the intrinsic character of the various types of engineering materials is taken into account.

  13. Engineering artificial machines from designable DNA materials for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Qi, Hao; Huang, Guoyou; Han, Yulong; Zhang, Xiaohui; Li, Yuhui; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Lu, Tian Jian; Xu, Feng; Wang, Lin

    2015-06-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) emerges as building bricks for the fabrication of nanostructure with complete artificial architecture and geometry. The amazing ability of DNA in building two- and three-dimensional structures raises the possibility of developing smart nanomachines with versatile controllability for various applications. Here, we overviewed the recent progresses in engineering DNA machines for specific bioengineering and biomedical applications.

  14. Engineering Artificial Machines from Designable DNA Materials for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guoyou; Han, Yulong; Zhang, Xiaohui; Li, Yuhui; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Lu, Tian Jian; Xu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) emerges as building bricks for the fabrication of nanostructure with complete artificial architecture and geometry. The amazing ability of DNA in building two- and three-dimensional structures raises the possibility of developing smart nanomachines with versatile controllability for various applications. Here, we overviewed the recent progresses in engineering DNA machines for specific bioengineering and biomedical applications. PMID:25547514

  15. Nanoscale tissue engineering: spatial control over cell-materials interactions.

    PubMed

    Wheeldon, Ian; Farhadi, Arash; Bick, Alexander G; Jabbari, Esmaiel; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2011-05-27

    Cells interact with the surrounding environment by making tens to hundreds of thousands of nanoscale interactions with extracellular signals and features. The goal of nanoscale tissue engineering is to harness these interactions through nanoscale biomaterials engineering in order to study and direct cellular behavior. Here, we review two- and three-dimensional (2- and 3D) nanoscale tissue engineering technologies, and provide a holistic overview of the field. Techniques that can control the average spacing and clustering of cell adhesion ligands are well established and have been highly successful in describing cell adhesion and migration in 2D. Extension of these engineering tools to 3D biomaterials has created many new hydrogel and nanofiber scaffold technologies that are being used to design in vitro experiments with more physiologically relevant conditions. Researchers are beginning to study complex cell functions in 3D. However, there is a need for biomaterials systems that provide fine control over the nanoscale presentation of bioactive ligands in 3D. Additionally, there is a need for 2- and 3D techniques that can control the nanoscale presentation of multiple bioactive ligands and that can control the temporal changes in the cellular microenvironment.

  16. An inert-gas furnace for neutron scattering measurements of internal stresses in engineering materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, R.; Paradowska, A. M.; Chowdhury, M. A. H.; Goodway, C. M.; Done, R.; Kirichek, O.; Oliver, E. C.

    2012-04-01

    The ENGIN-X beamline is a dedicated engineering science facility at ISIS optimized for the measurement of strain, and thus stress, deep within crystalline materials using the atomic lattice planes as an atomic ‘strain gauge’. Internal stresses in materials have a considerable effect on material properties including fatigue resistance, fracture toughness and strength. The growing interest in properties of materials at high temperatures may be attributed to the dynamic development in technologies where materials are exposed to a high-temperature environment for example in the aerospace industry or fission and fusion nuclear reactors. This article describes in detail the design and construction of a furnace for neutron scattering measurements of internal stress in engineering materials under mechanical load and in elevated temperature environments, designed to permit a range of gases to provide a non-oxidizing atmosphere for hot samples.

  17. Abstracts and research accomplishments of university coal research projects

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The Principal Investigators of the grants supported by the University Coal Research Program were requested to submit abstracts and highlight accomplishments of their projects in time for distribution at a grantees conference. This book is a compilation of the material received in response to the request. Abstracts discuss the following area: coal science, coal surface science, reaction chemistry, advanced process concepts, engineering fundamentals and thermodynamics, environmental science.

  18. The Usability of a Commercial Game Physics Engine to Develop Physics Educational Materials: An Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Colin B.

    2008-01-01

    Commercial computer games contain "physics engine" components, responsible for providing realistic interactions among game objects. The question naturally arises of whether these engines can be used to develop educational materials for high school and university physics education. To answer this question, the author's group recently conducted a…

  19. The Usability of a Commercial Game Physics Engine to Develop Physics Educational Materials: An Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Colin B.

    2008-01-01

    Commercial computer games contain "physics engine" components, responsible for providing realistic interactions among game objects. The question naturally arises of whether these engines can be used to develop educational materials for high school and university physics education. To answer this question, the author's group recently conducted a…

  20. Biodegradable Materials for Bone Repair and Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Zeeshan; Najeeb, Shariq; Khurshid, Zohaib; Verma, Vivek; Rashid, Haroon; Glogauer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses and summarizes the recent developments and advances in the use of biodegradable materials for bone repair purposes. The choice between using degradable and non-degradable devices for orthopedic and maxillofacial applications must be carefully weighed. Traditional biodegradable devices for osteosynthesis have been successful in low or mild load bearing applications. However, continuing research and recent developments in the field of material science has resulted in development of biomaterials with improved strength and mechanical properties. For this purpose, biodegradable materials, including polymers, ceramics and magnesium alloys have attracted much attention for osteologic repair and applications. The next generation of biodegradable materials would benefit from recent knowledge gained regarding cell material interactions, with better control of interfacing between the material and the surrounding bone tissue. The next generations of biodegradable materials for bone repair and regeneration applications require better control of interfacing between the material and the surrounding bone tissue. Also, the mechanical properties and degradation/resorption profiles of these materials require further improvement to broaden their use and achieve better clinical results. PMID:28793533

  1. Biodegradable Materials for Bone Repair and Tissue Engineering Applications.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Zeeshan; Najeeb, Shariq; Khurshid, Zohaib; Verma, Vivek; Rashid, Haroon; Glogauer, Michael

    2015-08-31

    This review discusses and summarizes the recent developments and advances in the use of biodegradable materials for bone repair purposes. The choice between using degradable and non-degradable devices for orthopedic and maxillofacial applications must be carefully weighed. Traditional biodegradable devices for osteosynthesis have been successful in low or mild load bearing applications. However, continuing research and recent developments in the field of material science has resulted in development of biomaterials with improved strength and mechanical properties. For this purpose, biodegradable materials, including polymers, ceramics and magnesium alloys have attracted much attention for osteologic repair and applications. The next generation of biodegradable materials would benefit from recent knowledge gained regarding cell material interactions, with better control of interfacing between the material and the surrounding bone tissue. The next generations of biodegradable materials for bone repair and regeneration applications require better control of interfacing between the material and the surrounding bone tissue. Also, the mechanical properties and degradation/resorption profiles of these materials require further improvement to broaden their use and achieve better clinical results.

  2. Symposium on Nano- and Micro-Scale Mechanics of Engineering Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-30

    04-30-2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Symposium on Nano - and Micro -scale Mechanics of Engineering N00014-06-1-0900 Materials 5b...mechanical characterization at the nano - and micro -scales. The basic venue of the symposium is on a mixture of keynote addresses and short lectures given by...Rev. 8/98) Final Report Symposium on Nano - and Micro -scale Mechanics of Engineering Materials Principal Investigator: Prof Yu-Lin Shen (Point of

  3. Materials for Advanced Turbine Engines. Volume 1; Power Metallurgy Rene 95 Rotating Turbine Engine Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfouts, W. R.; Shamblen, C. E.; Mosier, J. S.; Peebles, R. E.; Gorsler, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt was made to improve methods for producing powder metallurgy aircraft gas turbine engine parts from the nickel base superalloy known as Rene 95. The parts produced were the high pressure turbine aft shaft for the CF6-50 engine and the stages 5 through 9 compressor disk forgings for the CFM56/F101 engines. A 50% cost reduction was achieved as compared to conventional cast and wrought processing practices. An integrated effort involving several powder producers and a major forging source were included.

  4. Overview of the NIST Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    mechanical routes to weakened products were identified in polybenzoxazole (Zylon) fibers . [This work included testing on materials which had failed...to characterize the processing, structure, mechanics and long-term reliability of high performance polymeric fibers used for ballistic protection...Apparatus, modified for fiber testing •Measurement techniques and instrumentation for characterizing next generation hybrid materials which

  5. Materials technology assessment for a 1050 K Stirling Space Engine design

    SciTech Connect

    Scheuermann, C.M.; Dreshfield, R.L.; Gaydosh, D.J.; Kiser, J.D.; MacKay, R.A.; McDanels, D.L.; Petrasek, D.W.; Vannucci, R.D.; Bowles, K.J.; Watson, G.K.

    1988-10-01

    An assessment of materials technology and proposed materials selection was made for the 1050 K (superalloy) Stirling Space Engine design. The objectives of this assessment were to evaluate previously proposed materials selections, evaluate the current state-of-the-art materials, propose potential alternate materials selections and identify research and development efforts needed to provide materials that can meet the stringent system requirements. This assessment generally reaffirmed the choices made by the contractor; however, in many cases alternative choices were described and suggestions for needed materials and fabrication research and development were made.

  6. Materials technology assessment for a 1050 K Stirling space engine design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuermann, Coulson M.; Dreshfield, Robert L.; Gaydosh, Darrell J.; Kiser, James D.; Mackay, Rebecca A.; Mcdaniels, David L.; Petrasek, Donald W.; Vannucci, Raymond D.; Bowles, Kenneth J.; Watson, Gordon K.

    1988-01-01

    An assessment of materials technology and proposed materials selection was made for the 1050 K (superalloy) Stirling Space Engine design. The objectives of this assessment were to evaluate previously proposed materials selections, evaluate the current state-of-the-art materials, propose potential alternate materials selections and identify research and development efforts needed to provide materials that can meet the stringent system requirements. This assessment generally reaffirmed the choices made by the contractor. However, in many cases alternative choices were described and suggestions for needed materials and fabrication research and development were made.

  7. Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering: An Integrated Approach, 2nd Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callister, William D., Jr.

    2004-04-01

    This Second Edition of Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering continues to take an integrated approach to the topic organization. One specific structure, characteristic, or property type at a time is discussed for all three basic material types--metals, ceramics, and polymeric materials. This order of presentation allows for early introduction of non-metals and supports the engineer's role of choosing a material based on its characteristics. New copies of this text include a CD at no additional charge. The CD is an integral part of the text package and features animated software modules and the last five text chapters in .pdf format.

  8. NDE of advanced turbine engine components and materials by computed tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yancey, R. N.; Baaklini, George Y.; Klima, Stanley J.

    1991-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an X-ray technique that provides quantitative 3D density information of materials and components and can accurately detail spatial distributions of cracks, voids, and density variations. CT scans of ceramic materials, composites, and engine components were taken and the resulting images will be discussed. Scans were taken with two CT systems with different spatial resolution capabilities. The scans showed internal damage, density variations, and geometrical arrangement of various features in the materials and components. It was concluded that CT can play an important role in the characterization of advanced turbine engine materials and components. Future applications of this technology will be outlined.

  9. NDE of advanced turbine engine components and materials by computed tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yancey, R. N.; Baaklini, George Y.; Klima, Stanley J.

    1991-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an X-ray technique that provides quantitative 3D density information of materials and components and can accurately detail spatial distributions of cracks, voids, and density variations. CT scans of ceramic materials, composites, and engine components were taken and the resulting images will be discussed. Scans were taken with two CT systems with different spatial resolution capabilities. The scans showed internal damage, density variations, and geometrical arrangement of various features in the materials and components. It was concluded that CT can play an important role in the characterization of advanced turbine engine materials and components. Future applications of this technology will be outlined.

  10. Designing high-performance layered thermoelectric materials through orbital engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiawei; Song, Lirong; Madsen, Georg K. H.; Fischer, Karl F. F.; Zhang, Wenqing; Shi, Xun; Iversen, Bo B.

    2016-03-01

    Thermoelectric technology, which possesses potential application in recycling industrial waste heat as energy, calls for novel high-performance materials. The systematic exploration of novel thermoelectric materials with excellent electronic transport properties is severely hindered by limited insight into the underlying bonding orbitals of atomic structures. Here we propose a simple yet successful strategy to discover and design high-performance layered thermoelectric materials through minimizing the crystal field splitting energy of orbitals to realize high orbital degeneracy. The approach naturally leads to design maps for optimizing the thermoelectric power factor through forming solid solutions and biaxial strain. Using this approach, we predict a series of potential thermoelectric candidates from layered CaAl2Si2-type Zintl compounds. Several of them contain nontoxic, low-cost and earth-abundant elements. Moreover, the approach can be extended to several other non-cubic materials, thereby substantially accelerating the screening and design of new thermoelectric materials.

  11. Designing high-performance layered thermoelectric materials through orbital engineering

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiawei; Song, Lirong; Madsen, Georg K. H.; Fischer, Karl F. F.; Zhang, Wenqing; Shi, Xun; Iversen, Bo B.

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric technology, which possesses potential application in recycling industrial waste heat as energy, calls for novel high-performance materials. The systematic exploration of novel thermoelectric materials with excellent electronic transport properties is severely hindered by limited insight into the underlying bonding orbitals of atomic structures. Here we propose a simple yet successful strategy to discover and design high-performance layered thermoelectric materials through minimizing the crystal field splitting energy of orbitals to realize high orbital degeneracy. The approach naturally leads to design maps for optimizing the thermoelectric power factor through forming solid solutions and biaxial strain. Using this approach, we predict a series of potential thermoelectric candidates from layered CaAl2Si2-type Zintl compounds. Several of them contain nontoxic, low-cost and earth-abundant elements. Moreover, the approach can be extended to several other non-cubic materials, thereby substantially accelerating the screening and design of new thermoelectric materials. PMID:26948043

  12. Designing high-performance layered thermoelectric materials through orbital engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiawei; Song, Lirong; Madsen, Georg K H; Fischer, Karl F F; Zhang, Wenqing; Shi, Xun; Iversen, Bo B

    2016-03-07

    Thermoelectric technology, which possesses potential application in recycling industrial waste heat as energy, calls for novel high-performance materials. The systematic exploration of novel thermoelectric materials with excellent electronic transport properties is severely hindered by limited insight into the underlying bonding orbitals of atomic structures. Here we propose a simple yet successful strategy to discover and design high-performance layered thermoelectric materials through minimizing the crystal field splitting energy of orbitals to realize high orbital degeneracy. The approach naturally leads to design maps for optimizing the thermoelectric power factor through forming solid solutions and biaxial strain. Using this approach, we predict a series of potential thermoelectric candidates from layered CaAl2Si2-type Zintl compounds. Several of them contain nontoxic, low-cost and earth-abundant elements. Moreover, the approach can be extended to several other non-cubic materials, thereby substantially accelerating the screening and design of new thermoelectric materials.

  13. Engine cyclic durability by analysis and material testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.; Halford, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of calculating turbine engine component durability is addressed. Nonlinear, finite-element structural analyses, cyclic constitutive behavior models, and an advanced creep-fatigue life prediction method called strainrange partitioning were assessed for their applicability to the solution of durability problems in hot-section components of gas turbine engines. Three different component or subcomponent geometries are examined: a stress concentration in a turbine disk; a louver lip of a half-scale combustor liner; and a squealer tip of a first-stage high-pressure turbine blade. Cyclic structural analyses were performed for all three problems. The computed strain-temperature histories at the critical locations of the combustor linear and turbine blade components were imposed on smooth specimens in uniaxial, strain-controlled, thermomechanical fatigue tests of evaluate the structural and life analysis methods.

  14. OMAE 1995 -- Proceedings of the 14. international conference on offshore mechanics and arctic engineering. Volume 3: Materials engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, M.M.; Toyoda, Masao; Liu, S.; Santos, J.F. dos; Kocak, M.; Patterson, E.A.; Berge, S.; Stacey, A.

    1995-12-31

    This conference proceedings represents volume 3 of a 6 volume set of proceedings dealing primarily with offshore oil and gas technologies. These proceedings are restricted to papers dealing with materials as it relates to fatigue, strength calculations, fracture control and assessment, weld improvement and repair, metal properties and performance testing, and underwater welding and repair. Separate abstracts for 62 papers contained in this conference proceedings have been prepared.

  15. Bin-scale tests dry test bin assembly [Engineering Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This report consists of engineering drawings of the following areas of the WIPP facility: dry test bin assembly; internal bin manifold modified design; dry test bin details; humid bin RCB lid; SWB lid modification for RCB lid assembly and details; TRUPACT II standard waste box assembly; waste handling building 411 ground floor slab-sump plans and sections; and waste handling floor building 411 ground floor slab plan.

  16. LM1500 Engine Marinization Contract. Phase III. Materials and Processes Development for Phase III Engine Components.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The purpose of this report is to briefly document the principal difficulties encountered and the solutions which were effected in the course of manufacturing the modified Phase III test engine hardware. (Author)

  17. Seismic Consequence Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    M. Gross

    2004-10-25

    The primary purpose of this model report is to develop abstractions for the response of engineered barrier system (EBS) components to seismic hazards at a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and to define the methodology for using these abstractions in a seismic scenario class for the Total System Performance Assessment - License Application (TSPA-LA). A secondary purpose of this model report is to provide information for criticality studies related to seismic hazards. The seismic hazards addressed herein are vibratory ground motion, fault displacement, and rockfall due to ground motion. The EBS components are the drip shield, the waste package, and the fuel cladding. The requirements for development of the abstractions and the associated algorithms for the seismic scenario class are defined in ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling of Drift Degradation, Waste Package and Drip Shield Vibratory Motion and Seismic Consequences'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171520]). The development of these abstractions will provide a more complete representation of flow into and transport from the EBS under disruptive events. The results from this development will also address portions of integrated subissue ENG2, Mechanical Disruption of Engineered Barriers, including the acceptance criteria for this subissue defined in Section 2.2.1.3.2.3 of the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]).

  18. Turning statistical physics models into materials design engines.

    PubMed

    Miskin, Marc Z; Khaira, Gurdaman; de Pablo, Juan J; Jaeger, Heinrich M

    2016-01-05

    Despite the success statistical physics has enjoyed at predicting the properties of materials for given parameters, the inverse problem, identifying which material parameters produce given, desired properties, is only beginning to be addressed. Recently, several methods have emerged across disciplines that draw upon optimization and simulation to create computer programs that tailor material responses to specified behaviors. However, so far the methods developed either involve black-box techniques, in which the optimizer operates without explicit knowledge of the material's configuration space, or require carefully tuned algorithms with applicability limited to a narrow subclass of materials. Here we introduce a formalism that can generate optimizers automatically by extending statistical mechanics into the realm of design. The strength of this approach lies in its capability to transform statistical models that describe materials into optimizers to tailor them. By comparing against standard black-box optimization methods, we demonstrate how optimizers generated by this formalism can be faster and more effective, while remaining straightforward to implement. The scope of our approach includes possibilities for solving a variety of complex optimization and design problems concerning materials both in and out of equilibrium.

  19. Turning statistical physics models into materials design engines

    SciTech Connect

    Miskin, Marc Z.; Khaira, Gurdaman; de Pablo, Juan J.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2015-12-18

    Despite the success statistical physics has enjoyed at predicting the properties of materials for given parameters, the inverse problem, identifying which material parameters produce given, desired properties, is only beginning to be addressed. Recently, several methods have emerged across disciplines that draw upon optimization and simulation to create computer programs that tailor material responses to specified behaviors. However, so far the methods developed either involve black-box techniques, in which the optimizer operates without explicit knowledge of the material's configuration space, or require carefully tuned algorithms with applicability limited to a narrow subclass of materials. Here we introduce a formalism that can generate optimizers automatically by extending statistical mechanics into the realm of design. The strength of this approach lies in its capability to transform statistical models that describe materials into optimizers to tailor them. By comparing against standard black-box optimization methods, we demonstrate how optimizers generated by this formalism can be faster and more effective, while remaining straightforward to implement. The scope of our approach includes possibilities for solving a variety of complex optimization and design problems concerning materials both in and out of equilibrium.

  20. Review of progress in quantitative NDE. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    Abstracts of 386 papers and plenary presentations are included. The plenary sessions related to the national technology initiative. The other sessions covered the following NDE topics: corrosion, electromagnetic arrays, elastic wave scattering and backscattering/noise, civil structures, material properties, holography, shearography, UT wave propagation, eddy currents, coatings, signal processing, radiography, computed tomography, EM imaging, adhesive bonds, NMR, laser ultrasonics, composites, thermal, magnetic measurements, nonlinear acoustics, interface modeling and characterization, UT transducers, new techniques, joined materials, probes and systems, fatigue cracks and fracture, imaging and sizing, NDE in engineering and process control, acoustics of cracks, and sensors. An author index is included. (DLC)

  1. The Further Development of Heat-Resistant Materials for Aircraft Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollenrath, Franz

    1946-01-01

    The present report deals with the problems involved in the greater utilization and development of aircraft engine materials, and specifically; piston materials, cylinder heads, exhaust valves, and exhaust gas turbine blading. The blades of the exhaust gas turbine are likely to be the highest stressed components of modern power plants from a thermal-mechanical and chemical standpoint, even though the requirements on exhaust valves of engines with gasoline injection are in general no less stringent. For the fire plate in Diesel engines the specifications for mechanical strength and design are not so stringent, and the question of heat resistance, which under these circumstances is easier obtainable, predominates.

  2. Advanced Engineering Materials: Products from Super Stuff. Resources in Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, James A.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the development of "smart" or advanced materials such as ceramics, metals, composites, and polymers. Provides a design brief, a student learning activity with outcomes, quiz, and resources. (SK)

  3. Advanced Engineering Materials: Products from Super Stuff. Resources in Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, James A.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the development of "smart" or advanced materials such as ceramics, metals, composites, and polymers. Provides a design brief, a student learning activity with outcomes, quiz, and resources. (SK)

  4. Tissue engineering scaffold material of porous nanohydroxyapatite/polyamide 66.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qian; Lu, Hongyan; Zhang, Jingchao; Lu, Guoyu; Deng, Zhennan; Mo, Anchun

    2010-05-13

    The aim of the study was to investigate a porous nanohydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 (n-HA/PA66) scaffold material that was implanted into muscle and tibiae of 16 New Zealand white rabbits to evaluate the biocompatibility and osteogenesis and osteoinductivity of the materials in vivo. The samples were harvested at 2, 4, 12 and 26 weeks respectively, and subjected to histological analysis. At 2 weeks, the experiment showed that osteogenesis was detected in porous n-HA/PA66 composite and the density of new bone formation was similar to the surrounding host bone at 12 weeks. The study indicated that three-dimensional pore structures could facilitate cell adhesion, differentiation and proliferation, and help with fibrovascular and nerve colonization. In conclusion, porous n-HA/PA66 scaffold material could be a good candidate as a bone substitute material used in clinics due to its excellent histocompatibility, osteoconductivity and osteoinductivity.

  5. Materials Science and Engineering: An Introduction, 7th Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callister, William D., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Now in its seventh edition, this accessible book provides readers with clear and concise discussions of key concepts while also incorporating familiar terminology. The author treats the important properties of the three primary types of materials (metals, ceramics, and polymers) and composites, as well as the relationships that exist between the structural elements of materials and their properties. Throughout, the emphasis is placed on mechanical behavior and failure, including techniques that are employed to improve performance.

  6. Investigation of low cost material processes for liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyentat, Thinh; Kawashige, Chester M.; Scala, James G.; Horn, Ronald M.

    1993-01-01

    The development of low cost material processes is essential to the achievement of economical liquid rocket propulsion systems in the next century. This paper will present the results of the evaluation of some promising material processes including powder metallurgy, vacuum plasma spray, metal spray forming, and bulge forming. The physical and mechanical test results from the samples and subscale hardware fabricated from high strength copper alloys and superalloys will be discussed.

  7. Investigation of low cost material processes for liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyentat, Thinh; Kawashige, Chester M.; Scala, James G.; Horn, Ronald M.

    1993-01-01

    The development of low cost material processes is essential to the achievement of economical liquid rocket propulsion systems in the next century. This paper will present the results of the evaluation of some promising material processes including powder metallurgy, vacuum plasma spray, metal spray forming, and bulge forming. The physical and mechanical test results from the samples and subscale hardware fabricated from high strength copper alloys and superalloys will be discussed.

  8. Surface engineering of glazing materials and structures using plasma processes

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Monteiro, Othon R.

    2003-04-10

    A variety of coatings is commercially produced on a very large scale, including transparent conducting oxides and multi-layer silver-based low-emissivity and solar control coatings. A very brief review of materials and manufacturing process is presented and illustrated by ultrathin silver films and chevron copper films. Understanding the close relation between manufacturing processes and bulk and surface properties of materials is crucial for film growth and self-assembly processes.

  9. Effect of Surface Impulsive Thermal Loads on Fatigue Behavior of Constant Volume Propulsion Engine Combustor Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Fox, Dennis S.; Miller, Robert A.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    2004-01-01

    The development of advanced high performance constant-volume-combustion-cycle engines (CVCCE) requires robust design of the engine components that are capable of enduring harsh combustion environments under high frequency thermal and mechanical fatigue conditions. In this study, a simulated engine test rig has been established to evaluate thermal fatigue behavior of a candidate engine combustor material, Haynes 188, under superimposed CO2 laser surface impulsive thermal loads (30 to 100 Hz) in conjunction with the mechanical fatigue loads (10 Hz). The mechanical high cycle fatigue (HCF) testing of some laser pre-exposed specimens has also been conducted under a frequency of 100 Hz to determine the laser surface damage effect. The test results have indicated that material surface oxidation and creep-enhanced fatigue is an important mechanism for the surface crack initiation and propagation under the simulated CVCCE engine conditions.

  10. Turning statistical physics models into materials design engines

    PubMed Central

    Miskin, Marc Z.; Khaira, Gurdaman; de Pablo, Juan J.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the success statistical physics has enjoyed at predicting the properties of materials for given parameters, the inverse problem, identifying which material parameters produce given, desired properties, is only beginning to be addressed. Recently, several methods have emerged across disciplines that draw upon optimization and simulation to create computer programs that tailor material responses to specified behaviors. However, so far the methods developed either involve black-box techniques, in which the optimizer operates without explicit knowledge of the material’s configuration space, or require carefully tuned algorithms with applicability limited to a narrow subclass of materials. Here we introduce a formalism that can generate optimizers automatically by extending statistical mechanics into the realm of design. The strength of this approach lies in its capability to transform statistical models that describe materials into optimizers to tailor them. By comparing against standard black-box optimization methods, we demonstrate how optimizers generated by this formalism can be faster and more effective, while remaining straightforward to implement. The scope of our approach includes possibilities for solving a variety of complex optimization and design problems concerning materials both in and out of equilibrium. PMID:26684770

  11. Engineering the Interface Between Inorganic Materials and Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, David

    2014-05-31

    To further optimize cell function in hybrid “living materials”, it would be advantageous to render mammalian cells responsive to novel “orthogonal” cues, i.e. signals they would not ordinarily respond to but that can be engineered to feed into defined intracellular signaling pathways. We recently developed an optogenetic method, based on A. thaliana Cry2, for rapid and reversible protein oligomerization in response to blue light. We also demonstrated the ability to use this method to channel the light input into several defined signaling pathways, work that will enhance communication between inorganic devices and living systems.

  12. Evaluation of some candidate materials for automobile thermal reactors in engine-dynamometer screening tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldrieve, R. E.

    1971-01-01

    Fourteen materials were evaluated in engine screening tests on full-size thermal reactors for automobile engine pollution control systems. Cyclic test-stand engine operation provided 2 hours at 1040 C and a 20-minute air-cool to 70 C each test cycle. Each reactor material was exposed to 83 cycles in 200 hours of engine testing. On the basis of resistance to oxidation and distortion, the best materials included two ferritic iron alloys (Ge 1541 and Armco 18S/R), several commercial oxidation-resistant coatings on AlSl 651 (19-9 DL), and possibly uncoated AISI 310. The best commercial coatings were Cr-Al, Ni-Cr, and a glass ceramic.

  13. Using Synthetic Biology to Engineer Living Cells That Interface with Programmable Materials.

    PubMed

    Heyde, Keith C; Scott, Felicia Y; Paek, Sung-Ho; Zhang, Ruihua; Ruder, Warren C

    2017-03-09

    We have developed an abiotic-biotic interface that allows engineered cells to control the material properties of a functionalized surface. This system is made by creating two modules: a synthetically engineered strain of E. coli cells and a functionalized material interface. Within this paper, we detail a protocol for genetically engineering selected behaviors within a strain of E. coli using molecular cloning strategies. Once developed, this strain produces elevated levels of biotin when exposed to a chemical inducer. Additionally, we detail protocols for creating two different functionalized surfaces, each of which is able to respond to cell-synthesized biotin. Taken together, we present a methodology for creating a linked, abiotic-biotic system that allows engineered cells to control material composition and assembly on nonliving substrates.

  14. Material experiments: Environment and engineering institutions in the early American republic.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ann

    2009-01-01

    In nineteenth-century America, strength of materials, an engineering science, focused on empirical research that yielded practical tools about how to predict the behavior of a wide variety of materials engineers might encounter as they built the nation's infrastructure. This orientation toward "cookbook formulae" that could accommodate many different kinds of timber, stone, mortar, metals, and so on was specifically tailored for the American context, where engineers were peripatetic, materials diverse, and labor in short supply. But these methods also reflected deeper beliefs about the specialness of the landscape and the providential site of the American political experiment. As such, engineers' appreciation of natural bounty both emerged from and contributed to larger values about exceptionalism and the practical character of Americans.

  15. Poster Session- Extended Abstracts

    Treesearch

    Jack D. Alexander III; Jean Findley; Brenda K. Kury; Jan L. Beyers; Douglas S. Cram; Terrell T. Baker; Jon C. Boren; Carl Edminster; Sue A. Ferguson; Steven McKay; David Nagel; Trent Piepho; Miriam Rorig; Casey Anderson; Jeanne Hoadley; Paulette L. Ford; Mark C. Andersen; Ed L. Fredrickson; Joe Truett; Gary W. Roemer; Brenda K. Kury; Jennifer Vollmer; Christine L. May; Danny C. Lee; James P. Menakis; Robert E. Keane; Zhi-Liang Zhu; Carol Miller; Brett Davis; Katharine Gray; Ken Mix; William P. Kuvlesky Jr.; D. Lynn Drawe; Marcia G. Narog; Roger D. Ottmar; Robert E. Vihnanek; Clinton S. Wright; Timothy E. Paysen; Burton K. Pendleton; Rosemary L. Pendleton; Carleton S. White; John Rogan; Doug Stow; Janet Franklin; Jennifer Miller; Lisa Levien; Chris Fischer; Emma Underwood; Robert Klinger; Peggy Moore; Clinton S. Wright

    2008-01-01

    Titles found within Poster Session-Extended Abstracts include:Assessment of emergency fire rehabilitation of four fires from the 2000 fire season on the Vale, Oregon, BLM district: review of the density sampling materials and methods: p. 329 Growth of regreen, seeded for erosion control, in the...

  16. Conference Abstracts: AEDS '84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, William E.

    1985-01-01

    The Association of Educational Data Systems (AEDS) conference included 102 presentations. Abstracts of seven of these presentations are provided. Topic areas considered include LOGO, teaching probability through a computer game, writing effective computer assisted instructional materials, computer literacy, research on instructional…

  17. High temperature solid lubricant materials for heavy duty and advanced heat engines

    SciTech Connect

    DellaCorte, C.; Wood, J.C.

    1994-10-01

    Advanced engine designs incorporate higher mechanical and thermal loading to achieve efficiency improvements. This approach often leads to higher operating temperatures of critical sliding elements (e.g. piston ring/cylinder wall contacts and valve guides) which compromise the use of conventional and even advanced synthetic liquid lubricants. For these applications solid lubricants must be considered. Several novel solid lubricant composites and coatings designated PS/PM200 have been employed to dry and marginally oil lubricated contacts in advanced heat engines. These applications include cylinder kits of heavy duty diesels, and high temperature sterling engines, sidewall seals of rotary engines and various exhaust valve and exhaust component applications. The following paper describes the tribological and thermophysical properties of these tribomaterials and reviews the results of applying them to engine applications. Other potential tribological materials and applications are also discussed with particular emphasis to heavy duty and advanced heat engines.

  18. High Temperature Solid Lubricant Materials for Heavy Duty and Advanced Heat Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, C.; Wood, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced engine designs incorporate higher mechanical and thermal loading to achieve efficiency improvements. This approach often leads to higher operating temperatures of critical sliding elements (e.g. piston ring/cylinder wall contacts and valve guides) which compromise the use of conventional and even advanced synthetic liquid lubricants. For these applications solid lubricants must be considered. Several novel solid lubricant composites and coatings designated PS/PM200 have been employed to dry and marginally oil lubricated contacts in advanced heat engines. These applications include cylinder kits of heavy duty diesels, and high temperature Stirling engines, sidewall seals of rotary engines, and various exhaust valve and exhaust component applications. This paper describes the tribological and thermophysical properties of these tribomaterials and reviews the results of applying them to engine applications. Other potential tribological materials and applications are also discussed with particular emphasis on heavy duty and advanced heat engines.

  19. Engineering carbon materials from the hydrothermal carbonization process of biomass.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Wang, Kan; Wu, Liheng; Yu, Shu-Hong; Antonietti, Markus; Titirici, Maria-Magdalena

    2010-02-16

    Energy shortage, environmental crisis, and developing customer demands have driven people to find facile, low-cost, environmentally friendly, and nontoxic routes to produce novel functional materials that can be commercialized in the near future. Amongst various techniques, the hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) process of biomass (either of isolated carbohydrates or crude plants) is a promising candidate for the synthesis of novel carbon-based materials with a wide variety of potential applications. In this Review, we will discuss various synthetic routes towards such novel carbon-based materials or composites via the HTC process of biomass. Furthermore, factors that influence the carbonization process will be analyzed and the special chemical/physical properties of the final products will be discussed. Despite the lack of a clear mechanism, these novel carbonaceous materials have already shown promising applications in many fields such as carbon fixation, water purification, fuel cell catalysis, energy storage, CO(2) sequestration, bioimaging, drug delivery, and gas sensors. Some of the most promising examples will also be discussed here, demonstrating that the HTC process can rationally design a rich family of carbonaceous and hybrid functional carbon materials with important applications in a sustainable fashion.

  20. Electroactive 3D materials for cardiac tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelmi, Amy; Zhang, Jiabin; Cieslar-Pobuda, Artur; Ljunngren, Monika K.; Los, Marek Jan; Rafat, Mehrdad; Jager, Edwin W. H.

    2015-04-01

    By-pass surgery and heart transplantation are traditionally used to restore the heart's functionality after a myocardial Infarction (MI or heart attack) that results in scar tissue formation and impaired cardiac function. However, both procedures are associated with serious post-surgical complications. Therefore, new strategies to help re-establish heart functionality are necessary. Tissue engineering and stem cell therapy are the promising approaches that are being explored for the treatment of MI. The stem cell niche is extremely important for the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells and tissue regeneration. For the introduction of stem cells into the host tissue an artificial carrier such as a scaffold is preferred as direct injection of stem cells has resulted in fast stem cell death. Such scaffold will provide the proper microenvironment that can be altered electronically to provide temporal stimulation to the cells. We have developed an electroactive polymer (EAP) scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering. The EAP scaffold mimics the extracellular matrix and provides a 3D microenvironment that can be easily tuned during fabrication, such as controllable fibre dimensions, alignment, and coating. In addition, the scaffold can provide electrical and electromechanical stimulation to the stem cells which are important external stimuli to stem cell differentiation. We tested the initial biocompatibility of these scaffolds using cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs), and continued onto more sensitive induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS). We present the fabrication and characterisation of these electroactive fibres as well as the response of increasingly sensitive cell types to the scaffolds.

  1. Nanostructured materials from hydroxyethyl cellulose for skin tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zulkifli, Farah Hanani; Hussain, Fathima Shahitha Jahir; Rasad, Mohammad Syaiful Bahari Abdull; Mohd Yusoff, Mashitah

    2014-12-19

    In this study, a novel fibrous membrane of hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC)/poly(vinyl alcohol) blend was successfully fabricated by electrospinning technique and characterized. The concentration of HEC (5%) with PVA (15%) was optimized, blended in different ratios (30-50%) and electrospun to get smooth nanofibers. Nanofibrous membranes were made water insoluble by chemically cross-linking by glutaraldehyde and used as scaffolds for the skin tissue engineering. The microstructure, morphology, mechanical and thermal properties of the blended HEC/PVA nanofibrous scaffolds were characterized by scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning colorimetry, universal testing machine and thermogravimetric analysis. Cytotoxicity studies on these nanofibrous scaffolds were carried out using human melanoma cells by the MTT assays. The cells were able to attach and spread in the nanofibrous scaffolds as shown by the SEM images. These preliminary results show that these nanofibrous scaffolds that supports cell adhesion and proliferation is promising for skin tissue engineering. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of resilin-based materials for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Renner, Julie N; Cherry, Kevin M; Su, Renay S-C; Liu, Julie C

    2012-11-12

    Modular proteins have emerged as powerful tools in tissue engineering because both the mechanical and biochemical properties can be precisely controlled through amino acid sequence. Resilin is an attractive candidate for use in modular proteins because it is well-known for having low stiffness, high fatigue lifetime, and high resilience. However, no studies have been conducted to assess resilin's compressive properties, cytocompatibility with clinically relevant cells, or effect on cell spreading. We designed a modular protein containing repeating sequences of a motif derived from Anopheles gambiae and cell-binding domains derived from fibronectin. Rapid cross-linking with tris(hydroxymethyl)phosphine was observed. The hydrogels had a complex modulus of 22 ± 1 kPa and yield strain of 63%. The elastic modulus in compression, or unconfined compressive modulus, was 2.4 ± 0.2 MPa, which is on the same order as human cartilage. A LIVE/DEAD assay demonstrated that human mesenchymal stem cells cultured on the resilin-based protein had a viability of 95% after three days. A cell-spreading assay revealed that the cells interacted with the fibronectin-derived domain in a sequence-specific manner and resulted in a mean cell area ~1.4-fold larger than when cells were seeded on a sequence-scrambled negative control protein. These results demonstrate that our resilin-based biomaterial is a promising biomaterial for cartilage tissue engineering.

  3. Emerging Concepts for Synthesis of Thermally Engineered Materials and Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    by low vacuum environment Up to 100 µm/min many other alloys Plasma-assisted DVD combines four process technology components • high-density...Aerospace, Inc. www.ergaerospace.com • Materials: Al, Cu, Ni alloys • Cell sizes: 5, 10, 20, 40 ppi • Relative density 0.04 < p* < 0.15 When this material...Multi-pump vacuum system high to low vacuum (10-5 – 0.5 mbar) non-reactive carrier gas (0 – 20 slm) reactive carrier gas (O2, N2, etc.) • Hollow

  4. National Educators' Workshop: Update 95. Standard Experiments in Engineering Materials Science and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, James E. (Compiler); Jacobs, James A.; Karnitz, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    This document contains a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the National Educators' Workshop: Update 95. The experiments related to the nature and properties of engineering materials and provided information to assist in teaching about materials in the education community.

  5. National Educators' Workshop: Update 1994. Standard experiments in engineering materials science and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, James E. (Compiler); Jacobs, James A. (Compiler); Fraker, Anna C. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    This document contains a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the National Educators' Workshop: Update 94. The experiments relate to the nature and properties of engineering materials and provide information to assist in teaching about materials in the education community.

  6. National Educators' Workshop: Update 1993. Standard Experiments in Engineering Materials Science and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, James E. (Compiler); Jacobs, James A. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    This document contains a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the National Educators' Workshop: Update 93 held at the NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, on November 3-5, 1993. The experiments related to the nature and properties of engineering materials and provided information to assist in teaching about materials in the education community.

  7. National Educators' Workshop: Update 1988. Standard Experiments in Engineering Materials Science and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, James E. (Compiler); Jacobs, James A. (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    Presented here is a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the National Educators' Workshop: Update 88, held May 10 to 12, 1988 at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersberg, Maryland. The experiments related to the nature and properties of engineering materials and provided information to assist in teaching about materials in the education community.

  8. Development of a Support Environment for First Year Students Taking Materials Science/Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laoui, Tahar; O'Donoghue, John

    2008-01-01

    This paper is based on the experience acquired in teaching materials science/engineering to first year university students. It has been observed that students struggle with some of the fundamental materials concepts addressed in the module/course. This applies to delivered lectures but extends to the incorporation of tutorial sessions provided…

  9. Development of a Support Environment for First Year Students Taking Materials Science/Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laoui, Tahar; O'Donoghue, John

    2008-01-01

    This paper is based on the experience acquired in teaching materials science/engineering to first year university students. It has been observed that students struggle with some of the fundamental materials concepts addressed in the module/course. This applies to delivered lectures but extends to the incorporation of tutorial sessions provided…

  10. National Educators' Workshop: Update 1997. Standard Experiments in Engineering Materials, Science, and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, James E. (Compiler); Freeman, Ginger L. (Compiler); Jacobs, James A. (Compiler); Miller, Alan G. (Compiler); Smith, Brian W. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    This document contains a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the National Educators' Workshop: Update 97, held at Boeing Commercial Airplane Group, Seattle, Washington, on November 2-5, 1997. The experiments related to the nature and properties of engineering materials and provided information to assist in teaching about materials in the education community.

  11. National Educators' Workshop: Update 1991. Standard Experiments in Engineering Materials Science and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, James E. (Compiler); Jacobs, James A. (Compiler); Stiegler, James O. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    Given here is a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the National Educators' Workshop: Update 91, held at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on November 12-14, 1991. The experiments related to the nature and properties of engineering materials and provided information to assist in teaching about materials in the education community.

  12. Field-assisted sintering of effective materials for alternative power engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulat, L. P.; Novotel'nova, A. V.; Osvenskii, V. B.; Sorokin, A. I.; Pshenai-Severin, D. A.; Tukmakova, A. S.; Yerezhep, D.

    2017-07-01

    The process of field-assisted sintering of nanostructured thermoelectrics for the formation of effective materials for alternative power engineering has been numerically simulated. Functionally graded thermoelectrics and segmented thermoelement branches have been sintered in a temperature-gradient field. Modified die tooling elements are proposed that allow the desired thermal conditions to be created for the sintering of inhomogeneous effective materials.

  13. A Tutorial Design Process Applied to an Introductory Materials Engineering Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblatt, Rebecca; Heckler, Andrew F.; Flores, Katharine

    2013-01-01

    We apply a "tutorial design process", which has proven to be successful for a number of physics topics, to design curricular materials or "tutorials" aimed at improving student understanding of important concepts in a university-level introductory materials science and engineering course. The process involves the identification…

  14. National Educators' Workshop: Update 1989 Standard Experiments in Engineering Materials Science and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, James E. (Compiler); Jacobs, James A. (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    Presented here is a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the National Educators' Workshop: Update 89, held October 17 to 19, 1989 at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, Virginia. The experiments related to the nature and properties of engineering materials and provided information to assist in teaching about materials in the education community.

  15. Next Generation Engineered Materials for Ultra Supercritical Steam Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas Arrell

    2006-05-31

    To reduce the effect of global warming on our climate, the levels of CO{sub 2} emissions should be reduced. One way to do this is to increase the efficiency of electricity production from fossil fuels. This will in turn reduce the amount of CO{sub 2} emissions for a given power output. Using US practice for efficiency calculations, then a move from a typical US plant running at 37% efficiency to a 760 C /38.5 MPa (1400 F/5580 psi) plant running at 48% efficiency would reduce CO2 emissions by 170kg/MW.hr or 25%. This report presents a literature review and roadmap for the materials development required to produce a 760 C (1400 F) / 38.5MPa (5580 psi) steam turbine without use of cooling steam to reduce the material temperature. The report reviews the materials solutions available for operation in components exposed to temperatures in the range of 600 to 760 C, i.e. above the current range of operating conditions for today's turbines. A roadmap of the timescale and approximate cost for carrying out the required development is also included. The nano-structured austenitic alloy CF8C+ was investigated during the program, and the mechanical behavior of this alloy is presented and discussed as an illustration of the potential benefits available from nano-control of the material structure.

  16. ENGINEERING A NEW MATERIAL FOR HOT GAS CLEANUP

    SciTech Connect

    T.D. Wheelock; L.K. Doraiswamy; K.P. Constant

    2003-09-01

    The overall purpose of this project was to develop a superior, regenerable, calcium-based sorbent for desulfurizing hot coal gas with the sorbent being in the form of small pellets made with a layered structure such that each pellet consists of a highly reactive lime core enclosed within a porous protective shell of strong but relatively inert material. The sorbent can be very useful for hot gas cleanup in advanced power generation systems where problems have been encountered with presently available materials. An economical method of preparing the desired material was demonstrated with a laboratory-scale revolving drum pelletizer. Core-in-shell pellets were produced by first pelletizing powdered limestone or other calcium-bearing material to make the pellet cores, and then the cores were coated with a mixture of powdered alumina and limestone to make the shells. The core-in-shell pellets were subsequently calcined at 1373 K (1100 C) to sinter the shell material and convert CaCO{sub 3} to CaO. The resulting product was shown to be highly reactive and a very good sorbent for H{sub 2}S at temperatures in the range of 1113 to 1193 K (840 to 920 C) which corresponds well with the outlet temperatures of some coal gasifiers. The product was also shown to be both strong and attrition resistant, and that it can be regenerated by a cyclic oxidation and reduction process. A preliminary evaluation of the material showed that while it was capable of withstanding repeated sulfidation and regeneration, the reactivity of the sorbent tended to decline with usage due to CaO sintering. Also it was found that the compressive strength of the shell material depends on the relative proportions of alumina and limestone as well as their particle size distributions. Therefore, an extensive study of formulation and preparation conditions was conducted to improve the performance of both the core and shell materials. It was subsequently determined that MgO tends to stabilize the high

  17. Capacitance modeling of gate material engineered cylindrical/surrounded gate MOSFETs for sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Jay Hind Kumar; Pratap, Yogesh; Haldar, Subhasis; Gupta, R. S.; Gupta, Mridula

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents charge based analytical drain current and capacitance model of material engineered Cylindrical/Surrounded Gate (CGT/SGT) MOSFET with nanogap cavity region for sensor applications. Material engineered i.e. dual material gate provides improvement in Short Channel Effects (SCEs) and cylindrical shape nanogap cavity region is used for sensing of biomolecule strength. The material engineered CGT/SGT MOSFET sensor electrically detect the targeted biomolecules of different strength by change in drain current and gate capacitance. Analysis has been carried out by using unified charge control based model derived from Poisson's equation. It is shown that sensitivity of changing biomolecules strength is more in gate capacitance than the drain current. The results so obtained are in good agreement with the 3D simulated data which validate the model.

  18. Effect of JP-8 Fuel on Material-Handling Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    ir ’ TABLE 8, and a photograph of the engine is shown in Fig. 4. The injection system uses a Bosch four-barrel and plunger in-line pump, and Bosch...iidoII uhla00 AA *OW aW301"@ 31 U C2 0 u-. ccI [3010 00 0 0E O LLLJ ir ’) 01 C22 R C! OD l/040 00 04 0 In- Ic. In~ q C! q 0 4u V 40 a * C J4-d/0 AN 00013 N...Nun indu ASJU3 0 0 a 0 C C22 00 1.0 C’.40 o 0o CD C3 40 C480 0. cgC 00 D of . 0 cb~ b 0 I IR In dý ! -i 0 0 1, C 0 w a----------- 04 - VI1 L *A\\f.q

  19. Hydro trash rack rake built by Riegel Textile (Engineering Materials)

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, B.N.

    1981-11-05

    The Fries, Virginia plant of the Riegel Textile Corporation of Ware Shoals, South Carolina, found it necessary to install a trash rack rake for proper operation of their hydro plant. They put the job out for bid, but when they received bids above budget they decided to build their own rack rake. Mr. Sanford Byrd, plant engineer, put together a design that included use of standard off-the-shelf items and readily available structural steel components. The rake was built by the Fries maintenance personnel for only $50,000. The unit operates hydraulically and runs on a set of tracks placed on the intake canal wall. This unit can be adapted to most low-head hydro projects. The information furnished in this package will allow you to build your own trash rack rake.

  20. Integrating electron microscopy into nanoscience and materials engineering programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormia, Robert D.; Oye, Michael M.; Nguyen, Anh; Skiver, David; Shi, Meng; Torres, Yessica

    2014-10-01

    Preparing an effective workforce in high technology is the goal of both academic and industry training, and has been the engine that drives innovation and product development in the United States for over a century. During the last 50 years, technician training has comprised a combination of two-year academic programs, internships and apprentice training, and extensive On-the-Job Training (OJT). Recently, and especially in Silicon Valley, technicians have four-year college degrees, as well as relevant hands-on training. Characterization in general, and microscopy in particular, is an essential tool in process development, manufacturing and QA/QC, and failure analysis. Training for a broad range of skills and practice is challenging, especially for community colleges. Workforce studies (SRI/Boeing) suggest that even four year colleges often do not provide the relevant training and experience in laboratory skills, especially design of experiments and analysis of data. Companies in high-tech further report difficulty in finding skilled labor, especially with industry specific experience. Foothill College, in partnership with UCSC, SJSU, and NASA-Ames, has developed a microscopy training program embedded in a research laboratory, itself a partnership between university and government, providing hands-on experience in advanced instrumentation, experimental design and problem solving, with real-world context from small business innovators, in an environment called `the collaboratory'. The program builds on AFM-SEM training at Foothill, and provides affordable training in FE-SEM and TEM through a cost recovery model. In addition to instrument and engineering training, the collaboratory also supports academic and personal growth through a multiplayer social network of students, faculty, researchers, and innovators.

  1. Advanced Materials Development Program: Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines program plan, 1983--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The purpose of the Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines (CTAHE) Project is the development of an industrial technology base capable of providing reliable and cost-effective high temperature ceramic components for application in advanced heat engines. There is a deliberate emphasis on industrial'' in the purpose statement. The project is intended to support the US ceramic and engine industries by providing the needed ceramic materials technology. The heat engine programs have goals of component development and proof-of-concept. The CTAHE Project is aimed at developing generic basic ceramic technology and does not involve specific engine designs and components. The materials research and development efforts in the CTAHE Project are focused on the needs and general requirements of the advanced gas turbine and low heat rejection diesel engines. The CTAHE Project supports the DOE Office of Transportation Systems' heat engine programs, Advanced Turbine Technology Applications (ATTAP) and Heavy Duty Transport (HDT) by providing the basic technology required for development of reliable and cost-effective ceramic components. The heat engine programs provide the iterative component design, fabrication, and test development logic. 103 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  2. Results in Developing an Engineering Degree Program in Safeguards and Security of Nuclear Materials at Moscow Engineering Physics Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Kryuchkov, Eduard F.; Geraskin, Nikolay I.; Killinger, Mark H.; Goodey, Kent O.; Butler, Gilbert W.; Duncan, Cristen L.

    2007-07-01

    The world’s first master’s degree program in nuclear safeguards and security, established at Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI), has now graduated nine classes of students. Most of the graduates have gone on to work at government agencies, research organizations, or obtain their PhD. In order to meet the demand for safeguards and security specialists at nuclear facilities, MEPhI established a 5½ year engineering degree program that provides more hands-on training desired by facilities. In February 2004, the first students began their studies in the new discipline Nuclear Material Safeguards and Nonproliferation. This class, as well as other subsequent classes, included students who started the program in their third year of studies, as the first 2½ years consists of general engineering curriculum. Fourteen students made up the first graduating class, receiving their engineering degrees in February 2007. The topics addressed in this paper include specific features of the program caused by peculiarities of Russian education legislation and government quality control of academic education. This paper summarizes the main joint actions undertaken by MEPhI and the US National Laboratories in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy, to develop the engineering degree program. Also discussed are the program’s specific training requirements, student internships, and job placement. The paper concludes with recommendations from a recent international seminar on nonproliferation education and training.

  3. All-optical band engineering of gapped Dirac materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibis, O. V.; Dini, K.; Iorsh, I. V.; Shelykh, I. A.

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that the interaction of electrons in gapped Dirac materials (gapped graphene and transition-metal dichalchogenide monolayers) with a strong off-resonant electromagnetic field (dressing field) substantially renormalizes the band gaps and the spin-orbit splitting. Moreover, the renormalized electronic parameters drastically depend on the field polarization. Namely, a linearly polarized dressing field always decreases the band gap (and, particularly, can turn the gap into zero), whereas a circularly polarized field breaks the equivalence of valleys in different points of the Brillouin zone and can both increase and decrease corresponding band gaps. As a consequence, the dressing field can serve as an effective tool to control spin and valley properties of the materials and be potentially exploited in optoelectronic applications.

  4. Assembly of surface engineered nanoparticles for functional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xi

    Nanoparticles are regarded as exciting new building blocks for functional materials due to their fascinating physical properties because of the nano-confinement. Organizing nanoparticles into ordered hierarchical structures are highly desired for constructing novel optical and electrical artificial materials that are different from their isolated state or thermodynamics random ensembles. My research integrates the surface chemistry of nanoparticles, interfacial assembly and lithography techniques to construct nanoparticle based functional structures. We designed and synthesized tailor-made ligands for gold, semiconductor and magnetic nanoparticle, to modulate the assembly process and collective properties of the assembled structures, by controlling the key parameters such as particle-interface interaction, dielectric environments and inter-particle coupling etc. Top-down technologies such as micro contact printing, photolithography and nanoimprint lithography are used to guide the assembly into arbitrarily predesigned structures for potential device applications.

  5. Engineering half-Heusler thermoelectric materials using Zintl chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeier, Wolfgang G.; Schmitt, Jennifer; Hautier, Geoffroy; Aydemir, Umut; Gibbs, Zachary M.; Felser, Claudia; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2016-06-01

    Half-Heusler compounds based on XNiSn and XCoSb (X = Ti, Zr or Hf) have rapidly become important thermoelectric materials for converting waste heat into electricity. In this Review, we provide an overview on the electronic properties of half-Heusler compounds in an attempt to understand their basic structural chemistry and physical properties, and to guide their further development. Half-Heusler compounds can exhibit semiconducting transport behaviour even though they are described as ‘intermetallic’ compounds. Therefore, it is most useful to consider these systems as rigid-band semiconductors within the framework of Zintl (or valence-precise) compounds. These considerations aid our understanding of their properties, such as the bandgap and low hole mobility because of interstitial Ni defects in XNiSn. Understanding the structural and bonding characteristics, including the presence of defects, will help to develop different strategies to improve and design better half-Heusler thermoelectric materials.

  6. Engineering Ferroic and Multiferroic Materials for Active Cooling Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-11

    also demonstrated. KEYWORDS: CVD graphene , ferroelectrics, PbZr0.2Ti0.8O3, polarization reversal, interface The rich two-dimensional physics in a...Research Laboratory Central Facilities, University of Illinois. Author contributions R.X. and L.W.M. designed the experiments ; L.W.M. supervised the project...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The objectives of this program are to design , synthesize, and characterize multiferroic materials and heterostructures and

  7. Advanced Civil Engineering Materials Based on Inorganic Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-29

    to evaluate cement chemistries more suitable for macrodefect- free cement materials. Therefore, the thrust of this work is oriented to the chemistry...uses conventional cement in advanced applications. Generically, such materiais are called macrodefect- free cements (MDF cements). MDF cements develop... aggregate particles, to the water-to-solids ratio, to the rheology, which is related to the degree of dispersion of the solids originally present, and to the

  8. Engineering Materials for Very High Temperatures: An ONRL Workshop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-29

    but cost-effective processing and reliability are equally important. Among the ceramic materials discussed, silicon nitride-based ceramics allow use at...ceramics (with nonsintering addi- terested in systems which perform as required, and that tives) cheaper methods of processing of systems need to be de...Carlsson was concerned with ceramic forming high volume fraction processes . Slip casting methods are excellent though not useful in the presence of long

  9. Property Screening and Evaluation of Ceramic Turbine Engine Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    doped with 1% MgO, 8% Y2 03, and 15% Y20 3 ) were of lower strength than the Norton NC-132 and NCX- 34 materials, Slow crick growth was in evidence...T.L. Francis and R.L. Coble, "Creep of Polycrystalline Silicon Carbide," Jour. Amer. Ceram. Soc., 51(2) pp. 115-6 (1968). 44. P.L. Farnsworth and R.L

  10. Study of the space environmental effects on spacecraft engineering materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, Susan K.; Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.

    1995-01-01

    The issue of the effects of the space environment on spacecraft needs to be understood for the long term exposure of structures in space. In order to better understand the effect of these hostile phenomena on spacecraft, several types of studies are worth performing in order to simulate at some level the effect of the environment. For example the effect of protons and electrons impacting structural materials are easily simulated through experiments using the Van de Graff and Pelletron accelerators currently housed at MSFC. Proton fluxes with energies of 700 KeV - 2.5 MeV can be generated and used to impinge on sample targets to determine the effects of the particles. Also the Environmental Effects Facility at MSFC has the capability to generate electron beams with energies from 700 KeV to 2.5 MeV. These facilities will be used in this research to simulate space environmental effects from energetic particles. Ultraviolet radiation, particularly less than 400 nm wavelength, is less well characterized at this time. The Environmental Effects Facility has a vacuum system dedicated to studying the effects of ultraviolet radiation on specific surface materials. This particular system was assembled in a previous study in order to perform a variety of experiments on materials proposed for the Space Station. That system has continued to function as planned and has been used in carrying out portions of the proposed study.

  11. Some aspects of applying nanostructured materials in air filtration, water filtration and electrical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmer, Dusan; Vincent, Ivo; Lovecka, Lenka; Kazda, Tomas; Giurg, Adam; Skorvan, Ondrej

    2017-05-01

    Nanostructures prepared from nanofibres and nanostructured composites prepared from nanofibres and fillers are gradually becoming increasingly demanded materials for applications in various industrial branches connected with catalysis, environment protection (air filtration, waste water treatment, sound absorption), in biological engineering, electronics (battery separators, electrode materials), etc. Selected applications of these materials prepared in the company SPUR a.s. are summed up in the following presentation.

  12. Mission and spacecraft support functions of the Materials Engineering Branch: A space oriented technology resource

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, A.; Staugaitis, C. L.

    1974-01-01

    The capabilities of the Materials Engineering Branch (MEB) of the Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, are surveyed. The specific functions of spacecraft materials review, materials processing and information dissemination, and laboratory support, are outlined in the Activity Report. Further detail is provided by case histories of laboratory satellite support and equipment. Project support statistics are shown, and complete listings of MEB publications, patents, and tech briefs are included. MEB staff, and their respective discipline areas and spacecraft liaison associations, are listed.

  13. Materials with engineered mesoporosity for programmed mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Dara V.

    Transport in nanostructured materials is of great interest for scientists in various fields, including molecular sequestration, catalysis, artificial photosynthesis and energy storage. This thesis will present work on the transport of molecular and ionic species in mesoporous materials (materials with pore sizes between 2 and 50 nm). Initially, discussion will focus on the synthesis of mesoporous ZnS nanorattles and the size selected mass transport of small molecules through the mesopores. Discussion will then shift of exploration of cation exchange and electroless plating of metals to alter the mesoporous hollow sphere (MHS) materials and properties. The focus of discussion will then shift to the transport of ions into and out of a hierarchically structured gold electrode. Finally, a model gamma-bactiophage was developed to study the electromigration of charged molecules into and out of a confined geometry. A catalytically active biomolecular species was encapsulated within the central cavity of ZnS MHS. Both the activity of the encapsulated enzyme and the size-selective transport through the wall of the MHS were verified through the use of a common fluorogen, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium azide. Additionally, the protection of the enzyme was shown through size-selected blocking of a protease. The mesoporous hollow sphere system introduces size-selectivity to catalyzed chemical reactions; future work may include variations in pore sizes, and pore wall chemical functionalization. The pore size in ZnS mesoporous hollow spheres is controlled between 2.5 and 4.1 nm through swelling of the lyotropic liquid crystal template. The incorporation of a swelling agent is shown to linearly vary the hexagonal lyotropic liquid crystalline phase, which templates the mesopores, while allowing the high fidelity synthesis of mesoporous hollow spheres. Fluorescnently labeled ssDNA was utilized as a probe to explore the change in mesopore permeability afforded by the swollen template

  14. Understanding the Role of Academic Language on Conceptual Understanding in an Introductory Materials Science and Engineering Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Jacquelyn

    Students may use the technical engineering terms without knowing what these words mean. This creates a language barrier in engineering that influences student learning. Previous research has been conducted to characterize the difference between colloquial and scientific language. Since this research had not yet been applied explicitly to engineering, conclusions from the area of science education were used instead. Various researchers outlined strategies for helping students acquire scientific language. However, few examined and quantified the relationship it had on student learning. A systemic functional linguistics framework was adopted for this dissertation which is a framework that has not previously been used in engineering education research. This study investigated how engineering language proficiency influenced conceptual understanding of introductory materials science and engineering concepts. To answer the research questions about engineering language proficiency, a convenience sample of forty-one undergraduate students in an introductory materials science and engineering course was used. All data collected was integrated with the course. Measures included the Materials Concept Inventory, a written engineering design task, and group observations. Both systemic functional linguistics and mental models frameworks were utilized to interpret data and guide analysis. A series of regression analyses were conducted to determine if engineering language proficiency predicts group engineering term use, if conceptual understanding predicts group engineering term use, and if conceptual understanding predicts engineering language proficiency. Engineering academic language proficiency was found to be strongly linked to conceptual understanding in the context of introductory materials engineering courses. As the semester progressed, this relationship became even stronger. The more engineering concepts students are expected to learn, the more important it is that they

  15. Calculation of thermal conductivity for new materials used in intake systems of internal combustion engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birtok-Bǎneasǎ, Corneliu; RaÅ£iu, Sorin Aurel; HepuÅ£, Teodor

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a method for reduce thermal losses in the intake system of an internal combustion engine, whit improvement of airflow and thermal protection. The method consists in insulating the intake with a new kind of material. The present paper focuses on calculation of thermal conductivity for a new material developed by the authors, using the heat flux plate method. This experimental method consists in placing the sample of the new material in a calorimetric chamber and heating from underside. As the heat flux which passes through the sample material is constant and knowing the values of the temperatures for the both sides of sample, the sample material thermal conductivity is determined.

  16. PREFACE: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering - Materials: Proceedings of the International Cryogenic Materials Conference (ICMC) 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittel, Peter; Sumption, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The 2015 joint Cryogenic Engineering and International Cryogenic Materials Conferences were held from June 28 through July 2 at the JW Marriott Starr Pass Resort & Spa in Tucson, Arizona. As at past conferences, the international scope of these meetings was strongly maintained with 26 countries being represented by 561 attendees who gathered to enjoy the joint technical programs, industrial exhibits, special events, and natural beauty of the surrounding Sonoran Desert. The program for the joint conferences included a total of 363 presentations in the plenary, oral, and poster sessions. Four plenary talks gave in-depth discussions of the readiness of bulk superconductors for applications, the role of cryogenics in the development of the hydrogen bomb and vice versa, superconducting turboelectric aircraft propulsion and UPS's uses and plans for LNG fuel. Contributed papers covered a wide range of topics including large-scale and small-scale cryogenics, advances in superconductors and their applications. In total, 234 papers were submitted for publication of which 224 are published in these proceedings. The CEC/ICMC Cryo Industrial Expo displayed the products and services of 38 industrial exhibitors and provided a congenial venue for a reception and refreshments throughout the week as well as the conference poster sessions. Spectacular panoramic views of Saguaro National Park, the Sonoran Desert and the night time lights of Tucson set the stage for a memorable week in the American Southwest. Conference participants enjoyed scenic hikes and bike rides, exploring Old Town Tucson, hot and spicy southwestern cuisine, a nighttime lightning display and a hailstorm. Conference Chairs for 2015 were Peter Kittel, Consultant, for CEC and Michael Sumption from The Ohio State University, Materials Science Department for ICMC. Program Chairs were Jonathan Demko from the LeTourneau University for CEC and Timothy Haugan from AFRL/RQQM for ICMC, assisted by the CEC Program Vice Chair

  17. Literature Abstracts.

    PubMed

    S, P; S, A; H, A; M, J D; S, A; Foods, A; S, A; M, J D; S, A; Pharmaceuticals, B; Foods, A

    1971-05-01

    1. General Principles: 'Application of the Statistical Theory of Rubber Elasticity to the Effect of Heat on Wheat Gluten', by R. Bale and H. G. Muller. 1. General Principles: 'Processing of Non-Newtonian Foods', by S. D. Holdworth (Fruit and Veg. Preserv. Res. Assoc., Chipping Camden, Glos., England), Process Biochem. 4 (10) (October, 1969), 15-21, 33. 1. General Principles: 'A Quick Method of Measuring the Surface Texture of Aggregate', by D. F. Orchid and W. O. Yondell (School of Highway Eng., Univ. of South Wales, Rendwick, N. S. W.), paper presented at the Australian Road Res. Board's 1970 Biennial Conf. 1. General Principles: 'The Deformation and Fracture Behaviour of the Binder in Bituminous Road Surfacing Materials under Traffic Loading', by E. J. Dickinson and H. P. Witt (Australian Road Research Board, 60 Denmark Street, Kew. Vic. 3101, Aust.), paper presented at the Australian Road Research Board, 1970 Biennial Conference. 2. Instrumentation and Methodology: 'Design and Evaluation of a Pressure Attachment for a Rotational Rheometer', by K. R. M. Vora, L. L. Augsburger, and R. F. Shangraw (Dept. of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, U. S. A.), J. Pharm. Sci. 59 (1970), 1012-16. 2. Instrumentation and Methodology: 'Materials for Standardizing the FMC Tenderometer', by L. M. Staley (Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, B. C., Canada), Can. Inst. Food Technol. J. 3 (1970), 116-117. 2. Instrumentation and Methodology: 'An Electronic Recording Viscometer for Food Products', by P. W. Voisey and J. M. deMan (Eng. Res. Service, Res. Branch, Canada Dept. of Agr., Ottawa and Univ. of Guelph, Guelph, Canada), Can. Inst. Food Technol. J. 3 (1970), 130-135. 2. Instrumentation and Methodology: 'Test Cells for Objective Textural Measurements', by P. W. Voisey (Eng. Res. Service, Res. Branch, Canada Dept. of Agr., Ottawa), Can. Inst. Food Technol. J. 3 (1970), 93-102. 3. Objdve Measurements: 'An Empirical Equation Describing

  18. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    R. Schreiner

    2001-06-27

    The purpose of this work is to develop the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, as directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a). This abstraction is the conceptual model that will be used to determine the rate of release of radionuclides from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ) in the total system performance assessment-license application (TSPA-LA). In particular, this model will be used to quantify the time-dependent radionuclide releases from a failed waste package (WP) and their subsequent transport through the EBS to the emplacement drift wall/UZ interface. The development of this conceptual model will allow Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department to provide a more detailed and complete EBS flow and transport abstraction. The results from this conceptual model will allow PA0 to address portions of the key technical issues (KTIs) presented in three NRC Issue Resolution Status Reports (IRSRs): (1) the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (ENFE), Revision 2 (NRC 1999a), (2) the Container Life and Source Term (CLST), Revision 2 (NRC 1999b), and (3) the Thermal Effects on Flow (TEF), Revision 1 (NRC 1998). The conceptual model for flow and transport in the EBS will be referred to as the ''EBS RT Abstraction'' in this analysis/modeling report (AMR). The scope of this abstraction and report is limited to flow and transport processes. More specifically, this AMR does not discuss elements of the TSPA-SR and TSPA-LA that relate to the EBS but are discussed in other AMRs. These elements include corrosion processes, radionuclide solubility limits, waste form dissolution rates and concentrations of colloidal particles that are generally represented as boundary conditions or input parameters for the EBS RT Abstraction. In effect, this AMR provides the algorithms for transporting radionuclides using the flow geometry and radionuclide concentrations determined by other

  19. Engineered Materials for Cesium and Strontium Storage Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sean M. McDeavitt

    2010-04-14

    Closing the nuclear fuel cycle requires reprocessing spent fuel to recover the long-lived components that still have useful energy content while immobilizing the remnant waste fission products in stable forms. At the genesis of this project, next generation spent fuel reprocessing methods were being developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative. One of these processes was focused on solvent extraction schemes to isolate cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) from spent nuclear fuel. Isolating these isotopes for short-term decay storage eases the design requirements for long-term repository disposal; a significant amount of the radiation and decay heat in fission product waste comes from Cs-137 and Sr-90. For the purposes of this project, the Fission Product Extraction (FPEX) process is being considered to be the baseline extraction method. The objective of this project was to evaluate the nature and behavior of candidate materials for cesium and strontium immobilization; this will include assessments with minor additions of yttrium, barium, and rubidium in these materials. More specifically, the proposed research achieved the following objectives (as stated in the original proposal): (1) Synthesize simulated storage ceramics for Cs and Sr using an existing labscale steam reformer at Purdue University. The simulated storage materials will include aluminosilicates, zirconates and other stable ceramics with the potential for high Cs and Sr loading. (2) Characterize the immobilization performance, phase structure, thermal properties and stability of the simulated storage ceramics. The ceramic products will be stable oxide powders and will be characterized to quantify their leach resistance, phase structure, and thermophysical properties. The research progressed in two stages. First, a steam reforming process was used to generate candidate Cs/Sr storage materials for characterization. This portion of the research was carried out at Purdue

  20. Nanoscale engineering materials by supercritical fluid and atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Qing

    With the development of material science and technology, modification of substrates, which have random geometry and high aspect ratio three dimensional (3D) complex structures, with desired functional, reactive and stable coatings becomes important and challenging. The ability to fabricate mono- or multi-layers of functional materials with precisely controlled dimensions, finely tuned composition and molecular structures, attracts significant interests in materials science and is the key to construct such devices and structures at nano- and micro-scale with desired properties. In this study, supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) has been studied as an alternative route for modifying substrates due to the unique gas-like (low viscosity, high diffusivity and zero surface tension) and liquid-like properties (high density). (1) The reaction kinetics of metal oxides thin film deposition from pyrolysis of metal organics in scCO2 was studied in detail. This method was demonstrated as a powerful technique to coat oxides, including Al2O3, Ga2O3 and others, into 3D high aspect ratio complex structure of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) forest. (2) The low temperature scCO 2 based hydrogenolysis process was developed as a useful way to functionalize aligned CNTs forest with dense Nickel nanoparticles. On the second part of this work, atomic layer deposition (ALD)/molecular layer deposition (MLD), as a vapor phase, stepwise and self-limiting vacuum based deposition process, was demonstrated as a powerful way to form highly conformal and uniform film onto substrates, even into highly complex 3D complex structures. In this study, (4) Metal oxide ALD is applied onto 3D electrospun polymer microfiber mats template to illustrate an effective and robust strategy to fabricate long and uniform metal oxide microtubes with precisely controllable wall thickness. Designer tubes of various sizes and different materials were demonstrated by using this method. (5) By further extending this technique

  1. Materials Science and Engineering-1989 Publications (Naval Research Laboratory)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-29

    Antamanide J.H. Konnert, P. D’Antonio, J.M. Cowley, and Analog. Crystal Structure of A. Higgs , H-J. Ou Perhydrosymmetric antamanide, Ultramicroscopy, 30, 371...Paired Boson Superconductor" Molecular Beam Epitaxy" W. Jin, S.D. Mahanti, A.K. Rajagopal A. Christou, N. Flevaris, A. Georgakilas, Solid State...33(3), 347-358 Si(100)" "Neutron Scattering from Fermion and S.M. Prokes, W.F. Tseng, A- Christou Boson Superconductors" Materials Research Society

  2. Study of the space environmental effects on spacecraft engineering materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, Susan K.; Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.

    1995-01-01

    The space environment in which the Space Station Freedom and other space platforms will orbit is truly a hostile environment. For example, the current estimates of the integral fluence for electrons above 1 Mev at 2000 nautical miles is above 2 x 10(exp 10) electrons/sq cm/day. and the proton integral fluence is above 1 x 109 protons/sq cm/day. At the 200 - 400 nautical miles, which is more representative of the altitude which will provide the environment for the Space Station, each of these fluences will be proportionately less; however, the data indicates that the radiation environment will obviously have an effect on structural materials exposed to the environment for long durations. The effects of this combined environment is the issue which needs to be understood for the long term exposure of structures in space. In order to better understand the effect of these hostile phenomena on spacecraft, several types of studies are worth performing in order to simulate at some level the effect of the environment. For example the effect of protons and electrons impacting structural materials are easily simulated through experiments using the Van de Graff and Pelletron accelerators currently housed in the Environmental Effects Facility at MSFC. Proton fluxes with energies of 700 Kev-2.5 Mev can be generated and used to impinge on sample targets to determine the effects of the particles. Also the Environmental Effects Facility has the capability to generate electron beams with energies from 700 Kev to 2.5 Mev. These facilities will be used in this research to simulate space environmental effects from energetic particles. Ultraviolet radiation, particularly in the ultraviolet (less than 400 nm wavelength) is less well characterized at this time. The Environmental Effects Facility has a vacuum system dedicated to studying the effects of ultraviolet radiation on specific surface materials. This particular system was assembled in a previous study (NAS8-38609) in order to

  3. ECUT energy data reference series: high-temperature materials for advanced heat engines

    SciTech Connect

    Abarcar, R.B.; Hane, G.J.; Johnson, D.R.

    1984-07-01

    Information that describes the use of high-temperature materials in advanced heat engines for ground transportation applications is summarized. Applications discussed are: automobiles, light trucks, and medium and heavy trucks. The information provided on each of these modes includes descriptions of the average conversion efficiency of the engine, the capital stock, the amount of energy used, and the activity level as measured in ton-miles.

  4. Technology Transfer Opportunities for the Construction Engineering Community: Materials and Diagnostics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-27

    34 .. CC .0 clj 0 C.C. -" C 4)4) 0 C.27 ROOF BLISTER VALVE Charles Korhonen U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory Annually, the Army...7122 (within Illinois). REFERENCES 1. A. Kumar, E. C. Segan, and J. Bukowski , "Ceramic Coated Anodes for Cathodic Protection," Materials Performance...Chief of Engineers. References: (Available from the author) 1. "Roof Moisture Surveys: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow," by Wayne Tobiasson and Charles

  5. Ab initio calculations for industrial materials engineering: successes and challenges.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Erich; Najafabadi, Reza; Young, George A; Ballard, Jake D; Angeliu, Thomas M; Vollmer, James; Chambers, James J; Niimi, Hiroaki; Shaw, Judy B; Freeman, Clive; Christensen, Mikael; Wolf, Walter; Saxe, Paul

    2010-09-29

    Computational materials science based on ab initio calculations has become an important partner to experiment. This is demonstrated here for the effect of impurities and alloying elements on the strength of a Zr twist grain boundary, the dissociative adsorption and diffusion of iodine on a zirconium surface, the diffusion of oxygen atoms in a Ni twist grain boundary and in bulk Ni, and the dependence of the work function of a TiN-HfO(2) junction on the replacement of N by O atoms. In all of these cases, computations provide atomic-scale understanding as well as quantitative materials property data of value to industrial research and development. There are two key challenges in applying ab initio calculations, namely a higher accuracy in the electronic energy and the efficient exploration of large parts of the configurational space. While progress in these areas is fueled by advances in computer hardware, innovative theoretical concepts combined with systematic large-scale computations will be needed to realize the full potential of ab initio calculations for industrial applications.

  6. Creep fatigue life prediction for engine hot section materials (isotropic)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, Vito; Nissley, David; Lin, Li-Sen Jim

    1985-01-01

    The first two years of a two-phase program aimed at improving the high temperature crack initiation life prediction technology for gas turbine hot section components are discussed. In Phase 1 (baseline) effort, low cycle fatigue (LCF) models, using a data base generated for a cast nickel base gas turbine hot section alloy (B1900+Hf), were evaluated for their ability to predict the crack initiation life for relevant creep-fatigue loading conditions and to define data required for determination of model constants. The variables included strain range and rate, mean strain, strain hold times and temperature. None of the models predicted all of the life trends within reasonable data requirements. A Cycle Damage Accumulation (CDA) was therefore developed which follows an exhaustion of material ductility approach. Material ductility is estimated based on observed similarities of deformation structure between fatigue, tensile and creep tests. The cycle damage function is based on total strain range, maximum stress and stress amplitude and includes both time independent and time dependent components. The CDA model accurately predicts all of the trends in creep-fatigue life with loading conditions. In addition, all of the CDA model constants are determinable from rapid cycle, fully reversed fatigue tests and monotonic tensile and/or creep data.

  7. Engineering Low Dimensional Materials with van der Waals Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chenhao

    Two-dimensional van der Waals materials grow into a hot and big field in condensed matter physics in the past decade. One particularly intriguing thing is the possibility to stack different layers together as one wish, like playing a Lego game, which can create artificial structures that do not exist in nature. These new structures can enable rich new physics from interlayer interaction: The interaction is strong, because in low-dimension materials electrons are exposed to the interface and are susceptible to other layers; and the screening of interaction is less prominent. The consequence is rich, not only from the extensive list of two-dimensional materials available nowadays, but also from the freedom of interlayer configuration, such as displacement and twist angle, which creates a gigantic parameter space to play with. On the other hand, however, the huge parameter space sometimes can make it challenging to describe consistently with a single picture. For example, the large periodicity or even incommensurability in van der Waals systems creates difficulty in using periodic boundary condition. Worse still, the huge superlattice unit cell and overwhelming computational efforts involved to some extent prevent the establishment of a simple physical picture to understand the evolution of system properties in the parameter space of interlayer configuration. In the first part of the dissertation, I will focus on classification of the huge parameter space into subspaces, and introduce suitable theoretical approaches for each subspace. For each approach, I will discuss its validity, limitation, general solution, as well as a specific example of application demonstrating how one can obtain the most important effects of interlayer interaction with little computation efforts. Combining all the approaches introduced will provide an analytic solution to cover majority of the parameter space, which will be very helpful in understanding the intuitive physical picture behind

  8. Youth Studies Abstracts. Vol. 4 No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youth Studies Abstracts, 1985

    1985-01-01

    This volume contains 169 abstracts of documents dealing with youth and educational programs for youth. Included in the volume are 97 abstracts of documents dealing with social and educational developments; 56 abstracts of program reports, reviews, and evaluations; and 16 abstracts of program materials. Abstracts are grouped according to the…

  9. Critical materials: a reason for sustainable education of industrial designers and engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Andreas R.; Bakker, Conny; Peck, David

    2013-08-01

    Developed economies have become highly dependent on a range of technology metals with names such as neodymium and terbium. Stakeholders have warned of the impending scarcity of these critical materials. Difficulties in materials supply can affect the high-tech industries as well as the success of sustainable innovation strategies that are based on sophisticated technology. Industrial designers and engineers should therefore increase their awareness of the limits in availability of critical materials. In this paper, it is argued that materials' criticality can give a fresh impetus to the higher education of industrial design engineers. It is important to train future professionals to apply a systems perspective to the process of technology innovation, enabling them to thrive under circumstances of constrained material choices. The conclusions outline ideas on how to weave the topic into existing educational programmes of future technology developers.

  10. Genetic materials at the gene engineering division, RIKEN BioResource Center.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Kazunari K; Murata, Takehide; Pan, Jianzhi; Nakade, Koji; Kishikawa, Shotaro; Ugai, Hideyo; Kimura, Makoto; Kujime, Yukari; Hirose, Megumi; Masuzaki, Satoko; Yamasaki, Takahito; Kurihara, Chitose; Okubo, Masato; Nakano, Yuri; Kusa, Yuka; Yoshikawa, Akiko; Inabe, Kumiko; Ueno, Kazuko; Obata, Yuichi

    2010-01-01

    Genetic materials are one of the most important and fundamental research resources for studying biological phenomena. Scientific need for genetic materials has been increasing and will never cease. Ever since it was established as RIKEN DNA Bank in 1987, the Gene Engineering Division of RIKEN BioResource Center (BRC) has been engaged in the collection, maintenance, storage, propagation, quality control, and distribution of genetic resources developed mainly by the Japanese research community. When RIKEN BRC was inaugurated in 2001, RIKEN DNA Bank was incorporated as one of its six Divisions, the Gene Engineering Division. The Gene Engineering Division was selected as a core facility for the genetic resources of mammalian and microbe origin by the National BioResource Project (NBRP) of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT), Japan in 2002. With support from the scientific community, the Division now holds over 3 million clones of genetic materials for distribution. The genetic resources include cloned DNAs, gene libraries (e.g., cDNA and genomic DNA cloned into phage, cosmid, BAC, phosmid, and YAC), vectors, hosts, recombinant viruses, and ordered library sets derived from animal cells, including human and mouse cells, microorganisms, and viruses. Recently genetic materials produced by a few MEXT national research projects were transferred to the Gene Engineering Division for further dissemination. The Gene Engineering Division performs rigorous quality control of reproducibility, restriction enzyme mapping and nucleotide sequences of clones to ensure the reproducibility of in vivo and in vitro experiments. Users can easily access our genetic materials through the internet and obtain the DNA resources for a minimal fee. Not only the materials, but also information of features and technology related to the materials are provided via the web site of RIKEN BRC. Training courses are also given to transfer the technology for handling

  11. Environmental Degradation of Materials for Nuclear Waste Repositories Engineered Barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B

    2006-12-24

    Several countries are considering geological repositories for the storage of nuclear waste. Most of the environments for these repositories will be reducing in nature, except for the repository in the US, which is going to be oxidizing. For the reducing repositories, alloys such as carbon steel, copper, stainless steels and titanium are being evaluated. For the repository in the US, some of the most corrosion resistant commercially available alloys are being investigated. This paper presents a summary of the behavior of the different materials under consideration for the repositories and the current understanding of the degradation modes of the proposed alloys in ground water environments from the point of view of general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking.

  12. Domain engineering of physical vapor deposited two-dimensional materials

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Tarek; Wang, Baoming; Pulavarthy, Raghu; Haque, M. A.; Muratore, Christopher; Glavin, Nicholas; Roy, Ajit K.; Voevodin, Andrey A.

    2014-11-24

    Physical vapor deposited two-dimensional (2D) materials span larger areas compared to exfoliated flakes, but suffer from very small grain or domain sizes. In this letter, we fabricate freestanding molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) and amorphous boron nitride (BN) specimens to expose both surfaces. We performed in situ heating in a transmission electron microscope to observe the domain restructuring in real time. The freestanding MoS{sub 2} specimens showed up to 100× increase in domain size, while the amorphous BN transformed in to polycrystalline hexagonal BN (h-BN) at temperatures around 600 °C much lower than the 850–1000 °C range cited in the literature.

  13. Combinatorial microfluidic droplet engineering for biomimetic material synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bawazer, Lukmaan A.; McNally, Ciara S.; Empson, Christopher J.; Marchant, William J.; Comyn, Tim P.; Niu, Xize; Cho, Soongwon; McPherson, Michael J.; Binks, Bernard P.; deMello, Andrew; Meldrum, Fiona C.

    2016-01-01

    Although droplet-based systems are used in a wide range of technologies, opportunities for systematically customizing their interface chemistries remain relatively unexplored. This article describes a new microfluidic strategy for rapidly tailoring emulsion droplet compositions and properties. The approach uses a simple platform for screening arrays of droplet-based microfluidic devices and couples this with combinatorial selection of the droplet compositions. Through the application of genetic algorithms over multiple screening rounds, droplets with target properties can be rapidly generated. The potential of this method is demonstrated by creating droplets with enhanced stability, where this is achieved by selecting carrier fluid chemistries that promote titanium dioxide formation at the droplet interfaces. The interface is a mixture of amorphous and crystalline phases, and the resulting composite droplets are biocompatible, supporting in vitro protein expression in their interiors. This general strategy will find widespread application in advancing emulsion properties for use in chemistry, biology, materials, and medicine. PMID:27730209

  14. Engineering Topological Many-Body Materials in Microwave Cavity Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Brandon M.; Ma, Ruichao; Owens, Clai; Schuster, David I.; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    We present a scalable architecture for the exploration of interacting topological phases of photons in arrays of microwave cavities, using established techniques from cavity and circuit quantum electrodynamics. A time-reversal symmetry-breaking (nonreciprocal) flux is induced by coupling the microwave cavities to ferrites, allowing for the production of a variety of topological band structures including the α =1 /4 Hofstadter model. To induce photon-photon interactions, the cavities are coupled to superconducting qubits; we find these interactions are sufficient to stabilize a ν =1 /2 bosonic Laughlin puddle. Exact diagonalization studies demonstrate that this architecture is robust to experimentally achievable levels of disorder. These advances provide an exciting opportunity to employ the quantum circuit toolkit for the exploration of strongly interacting topological materials.

  15. Integrated Computational Materials Engineering for Magnesium in Automotive Body Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, John E.; Liu, Baicheng; Boyle, Kevin P.; Hector, Lou; McCune, Robert

    This paper provides an overview and progress report for an international collaborative project which aims to develop an ICME infrastructure for magnesium for use in automotive body applications. Quantitative processing-micro structure-property relationships are being developed for extruded Mg alloys, sheet-formed Mg alloys and high pressure die cast Mg alloys. These relationships are captured in computational models which are then linked with manufacturing process simulation and used to provide constitutive models for component performance analysis. The long term goal is to capture this information in efficient computational models and in a web-centered knowledge base. The work is being conducted at leading universities, national labs and industrial research facilities in the US, China and Canada. This project is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Automotive Materials Partnership (USAMP), Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) and Natural Resources Canada (NRCan).

  16. Challenges in microstructural metrology for advanced engineered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingard, K. P.; Roebuck, B.; Quested, P.; Bennett, E. G.

    2010-04-01

    Measurement of microstructural parameters is essential for both controlling and modelling properties of and production processes for advanced materials. In the past decade new techniques such as electron backscatter diffraction have enabled a considerable increase in the amount of data and degree of detail in microstructural measurements of, for example, the extent of recrystallization in a metal deformed at high temperatures. However, the many parameters involved and automated nature of the methods can lead to artefacts and bias in calculated values, and increased resolution will lead to disagreement with more conventional methods. Examples are given of the range of microstructural measurements possible by new techniques and how different results can be obtained from the same underlying data. The need is stressed for interlaboratory comparisons to enable underpinning data to be derived on the validity, repeatability and reproducibility of measurements of key microstructural parameters.

  17. Shape memory alloys: New materials for future engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornbogen, E.

    1988-01-01

    Shape memory is a new material property. An alloy which experiences relative severe plastic deformation resumes its original shape again after heating by 10 to 100 C. Besides simple shape memory, in similar alloys there is the second effect where the change in shape is caused exclusively by little temperature change. In pseudo-elasticity, the alloy exhibits a rubber-like behavior, i.e., large, reversible deformation at little change in tension. Beta Cu and beta NiTi alloys have been used in practice. The probability is that soon alloys based on Fe will become available. Recently increasing applications for this alloy were found in various areas of technology, even medical technology. A review with 24 references is given, including properties, production, applications and fundamental principles of the shape memory effect.

  18. Application of acoustic emission to flaw detection in engineering materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moslehy, F. A.

    1990-01-01

    Monitoring of structures under operating loads to provide an early warning of possible failure to locate flaws in test specimens subjected to uniaxial tensile loading is presented. Test specimens used are mild steel prismatic bars with small holes at different locations. When the test specimen is loaded, acoustic emission data are automatically collected by two acoustic transducers located at opposite sides of the hole and processed by an acoustic emission analyzer. The processed information yields the difference in arrival times at the transducers, which uniquely determines the flaw location. By using this technique, flaws were located to within 8 percent of their true location. The use of acoustic emission in linear location to locate a flaw in a material is demonstrated. It is concluded that this one-dimensional application could be extended to the general flaw location problem through triangulation.

  19. Engineering fluorogen activating proteins into self-assembling materials.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Matthew J; Liu, Wen; Szent-Gyorgyi, Christopher; Wen, Yi; Drennen, Zachary; Waggoner, Alan S; Meng, Wilson S

    2013-05-15

    We present herein characteristics of a conjugate in which dL5, a fluorogen activating protein (FAP), and AEAEAKAK, an amphiphilic peptide, are combined to form a solid-phase fluorescence detection platform. The FAP dL5 is a covalently linked dimer of two identical light chain variable fragments which activates the fluorescence of the fluorogen malachite green (MG). The amphiphilic peptide of sequence AEAEAKAK is a building block of stimuli-responsive materials that undergoes sol-gel phase transition at high ionic strengths. We hypothesize that the novel bifunctional protein containing both the FAP and the amphiphile, termed dL5_EAK coassembles with the self-assembling peptide [AEAEAKAK]2 (EAK16-II) to form an insoluble membrane composite whereby the fluorescence enhancement function of the FAP domain remains intact. Denaturing polyacrylamide electrophoresis indicated that greater than 78% of dL5_EAK incorporates into the EAK16-II membrane. Conversely, less than 32% of dL5 without the EAK sequence associates with the insoluble fraction of EAK16-II in buffers. Membranes containing dL5_EAK and EAK16-II exhibited at least 4-fold higher fluorescence intensity compared to mixtures containing dL5 and EAK16-II. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of particulates, presumably FAPs, scattered on the membrane fibrils. The evidence suggests a system of materials that can be developed into in situ forming local sensors by immobilizing dL5 into coacervate, on which MG can be detected. It is envisioned that dL5 membranes can be established in diseased locales to monitor infiltration and migration of inflammatory cells marked with antibodies conjugated to MG.

  20. Engineering Fluorogen Activating Proteins into Self-Assembling Materials

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Matthew J.; Liu, Wen; Szent-Gyorgyi, Christopher; Wen, Yi; Drennen, Zachary; Waggoner, Alan S.; Meng, Wilson S.

    2013-01-01

    We present herein characteristics of a conjugate in which dL5, a fluorogen-activating protein (FAP) and AEAEAKAK, an amphiphilic peptide are combined to form a solid-phase fluorescence-detection platform. The FAP dL5 is a covalently linked dimer of two identical light chain variable fragments which activates the fluorescence of the fluorogen malachite green (MG). The amphiphilic peptide of sequence AEAEAKAK is a building block of stimuli-responsive materials that undergoes sol-gel phase transition at high ionic strengths. We hypothesize that the novel bi-functional protein containing both the FAP and the amphiphile, termed dL5_EAK, co-assembles with the self-assembling peptide [AEAEAKAK]2 (EAK16-II) to form an insoluble membrane composite whereby the fluorescence enhancement function of the FAP domain remains intact. Denaturing polyacrylamide electrophoresis indicated that greater than 78% of dL5_EAK incorporates into the EAK16-II membrane. Conversely, less than 32% of dL5 without the EAK sequence associates with the insoluble fraction of EAK16-II in buffers. Membranes containing dL5_EAK and EAK16-II exhibited at least 4-fold higher fluorescence intensity compared to mixtures containing dL5 and EAK16-II. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of particulates, presumably FAPs, scattering on the membrane fibrils. The evidence suggests a system of materials that can be developed into in situ-forming local sensors by immobilizing dL5 into coacervate, on which MG can be detected. It is envisioned that dL5 membranes can be established in diseased locales to monitor infiltration and migration of inflammatory cells marked with antibodies conjugated to MG. PMID:23573960

  1. Cost/benefit analysis of advanced materials technologies for future aircraft turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, G. E.

    1980-01-01

    The materials technologies studied included thermal barrier coatings for turbine airfoils, turbine disks, cases, turbine vanes and engine and nacelle composite materials. The cost/benefit of each technology was determined in terms of Relative Value defined as change in return on investment times probability of success divided by development cost. A recommended final ranking of technologies was based primarily on consideration of Relative Values with secondary consideration given to changes in other economic parameters. Technologies showing the most promising cost/benefits were thermal barrier coated temperature nacelle/engine system composites.

  2. Glycopolymer functionalization of engineered spider silk protein-based materials for improved cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Hardy, John G; Pfaff, André; Leal-Egaña, Aldo; Müller, Axel H E; Scheibel, Thomas R

    2014-07-01

    Silk protein-based materials are promising biomaterials for application as tissue scaffolds, due to their processability, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. The preparation of films composed of an engineered spider silk protein (eADF4(C16)) and their functionalization with glycopolymers are described. The glycopolymers bind proteins found in the extracellular matrix, providing a biomimetic coating on the films that improves cell adhesion to the surfaces of engineered spider silk films. Such silk-based materials have potential as coatings for degradable implantable devices. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Molecular Engineering of Functional Materials for Energy and Opto-Electronic Applications.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Domanski, Konrad; Konrad, Domanski; Aghazada, Sadig; Rakstys, Kasparas; Paek, Sanghyun; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja

    2015-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the dedicated research directions of the Group for Molecular Engineering of Functional Materials (GMF). This includes molecular engineering aspects of sensitizers constructed from ruthenium complexes, organic molecules, porphyrins and phthalocyanines. Manipulation of organometal trihalide perovskites, and charge transporting materials for high performance perovskite solar cells and photo-detectors are also described. Controlling phosphorescence color, and quantum yields in iridium complexes by tailoring ligands for organic light emitting diodes are demonstrated. Efficient reduction of CO(2) to CO using molecular catalyst on a protected Cu(2)O photocathode, and cost-effective water-splitting cell using a high efficiency perovskite solar cell are presented.

  4. Study of the costs and benefits of composite materials in advanced turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinhagen, C. A.; Stotler, C. L.; Neitzel, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    Composite component designs were developed for a number of applicable engine parts and functions. The cost and weight of each detail component was determined and its effect on the total engine cost to the aircraft manufacturer was ascertained. The economic benefits of engine or nacelle composite or eutectic turbine alloy substitutions was then calculated. Two time periods of engine certification were considered for this investigation, namely 1979 and 1985. Two methods of applying composites to these engines were employed. The first method just considered replacing an existing metal part with a composite part with no other change to the engine. The other method involved major engine redesign so that more efficient composite designs could be employed. Utilization of polymeric composites wherever payoffs were available indicated that a total improvement in Direct Operating Cost (DOC) of 2.82 to 4.64 percent, depending on the engine considered, could be attained. In addition, the percent fuel saving ranged from 1.91 to 3.53 percent. The advantages of using advanced materials in the turbine are more difficult to quantify but could go as high as an improvement in DOC of 2.33 percent and a fuel savings of 2.62 percent. Typically, based on a fleet of one hundred aircraft, a percent savings in DOC represents a savings of four million dollars per year and a percent of fuel savings equals 23,000 cu m (7,000,000 gallons) per year.

  5. Advanced radiation techniques for inspection of diesel engine combustion chamber materials components. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-09

    Heavy duty truck engines must meet stringent life cycle cost and regulatory requirements. Meeting these requirements has resulted in convergence on 4-stroke 6-in-line, turbocharged, and after-cooled engines with direct-injection combustion systems. These engines provide much higher efficiencies (42%, fuel consumption 200 g/kW-hr) than automotive engines (31%, fuel consumption 270 g/kW-hr), but at higher initial cost. Significant near-term diesel engine improvements are necessary and are spurred by continuing competitive, Middle - East oil problems and Congressional legislation. As a result of these trends and pressures, Caterpillar has been actively pursuing a low-fuel consumption engine research program with emphasis on product quality through process control and product inspection. The goal of this project is to combine the nondestructive evaluation and computational resources and expertise available at LLNL with the diesel engine and manufacturing expertise of the Caterpillar Corporation to develop in-process monitoring and inspection techniques for diesel engine combustion chamber components and materials. Early development of these techniques will assure the optimization of the manufacturing process by design/inspection interface. The transition from the development stage to the manufacturing stage requires a both a thorough understanding of the processes and a way of verifying conformance to process standards. NDE is one of the essential tools in accomplishing both elements and in this project will be integrated with Caterpillar`s technological and manufacturing expertise to accomplish the project goals.

  6. A thermodynamic approach to obtain materials properties for engineering applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Y. Austin

    1993-01-01

    With the ever increases in the capabilities of computers for numerical computations, we are on the verge of using these tools to model manufacturing processes for improving the efficiency of these processes as well as the quality of the products. One such process is casting for the production of metals. However, in order to model metal casting processes in a meaningful way it is essential to have the basic properties of these materials in their molten state, solid state as well as in the mixed state of solid and liquid. Some of the properties needed may be considered as intrinsic such as the density, heat capacity or enthalpy of freezing of a pure metal, while others are not. For instance, the enthalpy of solidification of an alloy is not a defined thermodynamic quantity. Its value depends on the micro-segregation of the phases during the course of solidification. The objective of the present study is to present a thermodynamic approach to obtain some of the intrinsic properties and combining thermodynamics with kinetic models to estimate such quantities as the enthalpy of solidification of an alloy.

  7. Structural and Machine Design Using Piezoceramic Materials: A Guide for Structural Design Engineers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inman, Daniel J.; Cudney, Harley H.

    2000-01-01

    Using piezoceramic materials is one way the design engineer can create structures which have an ability to both sense and respond to their environment. Piezoceramic materials can be used to create structural sensors and structural actuators. Because piezoceramic materials have transduction as a material property, their sensing or actuation functions are a result of what happens to the material. This is different than discrete devices we might attach to the structure. For example, attaching an accelerometer to a structure will yield an electrical signal proportional to the acceleration at the attachment point on the structure. Using a electromagnetic shaker as an actuator will create an applied force at the attachment point. Active material elements in a structural design are not easily modeled as providing transduction at a point, but rather they change the physics of the structure in the areas where they are used. Hence, a designer must not think of adding discrete devices to a structure to obtain an effect, but rather must design a structural system which accounts for the physical principles of all the elements in the structure. The purpose of this manual is to provide practicing engineers the information necessary to incorporate piezoelectric materials in structural design and machine design. First, we will review the solid-state physics of piezoelectric materials. Then we will discuss the physical characteristics of the electrical-active material-structural system. We will present the elements of this system which must be considered as part of the design task for a structural engineer. We will cover simple modeling techniques and review the features and capabilities of commercial design tools that are available. We will then cover practical how-to elements of working with piezoceramic materials. We will review sources of piezoceramic materials and built-up devices, and their characteristics. Finally, we will provide two design examples using piezoceramic

  8. Graduate Student Program in Materials and Engineering Research and Development for Future Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Spentzouris, Linda

    2016-07-07

    The objective of the proposal was to develop graduate student training in materials and engineering research relevant to the development of particle accelerators. Many components used in today's accelerators or storage rings are at the limit of performance. The path forward in many cases requires the development of new materials or fabrication techniques, or a novel engineering approach. Often, accelerator-based laboratories find it difficult to get top-level engineers or materials experts with the motivation to work on these problems. The three years of funding provided by this grant was used to support development of accelerator components through a multidisciplinary approach that cut across the disciplinary boundaries of accelerator physics, materials science, and surface chemistry. The following results were achieved: (1) significant scientific results on fabrication of novel photocathodes, (2) application of surface science and superconducting materials expertise to accelerator problems through faculty involvement, (3) development of instrumentation for fabrication and characterization of materials for accelerator components, (4) student involvement with problems at the interface of material science and accelerator physics.

  9. Is graphene a promising nano-material for promoting surface modification of implants or scaffold materials in bone tissue engineering?

    PubMed

    Gu, Ming; Liu, Yunsong; Chen, Tong; Du, Feng; Zhao, Xianghui; Xiong, Chunyang; Zhou, Yongsheng

    2014-10-01

    Bone tissue engineering promises to restore bone defects that are caused by severe trauma, congenital malformations, tumors, and nonunion fractures. How to effectively promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or seed cells has become a hot topic in this field. Many researchers are studying the ways of conferring a pro-osteodifferentiation or osteoinductive capability on implants or scaffold materials, where osteogenesis of seed cells is promoted. Graphene (G) provides a new kind of coating material that may confer the pro-osteodifferentiation capability on implants and scaffold materials by surface modification. Here, we review recent studies on the effects of graphene on surface modifications of implants or scaffold materials. The ability of graphene to improve the mechanical and biological properties of implants or scaffold materials, such as nitinol and carbon nanotubes, and its ability to promote the adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs or osteoblasts have been demonstrated in several studies. Most previous studies were performed in vitro, but further studies will explore the mechanisms of graphene's effects on bone regeneration, its in vivo biocompatibility, its ability to promote osteodifferentiation, and its potential applications in bone tissue engineering.

  10. Is Graphene a Promising Nano-Material for Promoting Surface Modification of Implants or Scaffold Materials in Bone Tissue Engineering?

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ming; Liu, Yunsong; Chen, Tong; Du, Feng; Zhao, Xianghui; Xiong, Chunyang

    2014-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering promises to restore bone defects that are caused by severe trauma, congenital malformations, tumors, and nonunion fractures. How to effectively promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or seed cells has become a hot topic in this field. Many researchers are studying the ways of conferring a pro-osteodifferentiation or osteoinductive capability on implants or scaffold materials, where osteogenesis of seed cells is promoted. Graphene (G) provides a new kind of coating material that may confer the pro-osteodifferentiation capability on implants and scaffold materials by surface modification. Here, we review recent studies on the effects of graphene on surface modifications of implants or scaffold materials. The ability of graphene to improve the mechanical and biological properties of implants or scaffold materials, such as nitinol and carbon nanotubes, and its ability to promote the adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs or osteoblasts have been demonstrated in several studies. Most previous studies were performed in vitro, but further studies will explore the mechanisms of graphene's effects on bone regeneration, its in vivo biocompatibility, its ability to promote osteodifferentiation, and its potential applications in bone tissue engineering. PMID:24447041

  11. Using nonlinear optimization methods to reverse engineer liner material properties from EFP tests

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M.J.; Baker, E.L.

    1995-02-27

    The utility of variable metric nonlinear optimization methods for reverse engineering liner material constitutive modeling parameters is described. We use an effective new code created by coupling the nonlinear optimization code NLQPEB with the DYNA2D finite element hydrocode. The optimization code determines the ``best`` set of liner material properties by running DYNA2D in a loop, varying the liner model constitutive parameters, and minimizing the difference between the EFP profiles of the calculation and experiment. The results of four different EFP warhead tests with the same copper liner material are used to determine material parameters for the Steinberg-Guinan, Johnson-Cook, & Armstrong-Zerilli models. In a companion paper we describe the successful application of this methodology to the forward engineering of liner contours to achieve desired EFP shapes. The methodology of utilizing a coupled optimization/finite element code provides a significant improvement in warhead designs and the warhead design process.

  12. PREFACE: 3rd International Conference on Manufacturing, Optimization, Industrial and Material Engineering (MOIME 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumban Gaol, Ford; Webb, Jeff; Ding, Jun

    2015-05-01

    The 3rd International Conference on Manufacturing, Optimization, Industrial and Material Engineering (MOIME 2015) was held at the Sheraton Kuta, Bali, Indonesia, from 28 - 29 March 2015. The MOIME 2015 conference is aimed to bring together researchers, engineers and scientists in the domain of interest from around the world. MOIME 2015 is placed on promoting interaction between the theoretical, experimental, and applied communities, so that a high level exchange is achieved in new and emerging areas within Material Engineering, Industrial Engineering and all areas that relate to Optimization. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to all in the Technical Program Committee who have reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting Conference Program, as well as the invited and plenary speakers. This year, we received 99 papers and after rigorous review, 24 papers were accepted. The participants come from eight countries. There were four parallel sessions and two invited speakers. It is an honour to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) and we deeply thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high-grade contributions. Finally, we would like to thank the conference chairmen, the members of the steering committee, the organizing committee, the organizing secretariat and the financial support from the conference sponsors that allowed the success of MOIME 2015. The Editors of the MOIME 2015 Proceedings Dr. Ford Lumban Gaol Jeff Webb, Ph.D Prof. Jun DING, Ph.D

  13. Architecture and engineering of a supramolecular functional material by manipulating the nanostructure of fiber network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing-Liang; Liu, Xiang-Yang

    2005-09-01

    Three-dimensional fiber networks were created from an organogel system consisting mainly of elongated fibrils by using a nonionic surfactant as an additive. The presence of the surfactant molecules manipulates the network structure by enhancing the mismatch nucleation on the growing fiber tips. Both the fiber network structure and the rheological properties of the material can be finely tuned by changing the surfactant concentration, which provides a robust approach to the engineering of supramolecular soft functional materials.

  14. Elementary Students' Learning of Materials Science Practices Through Instruction Based on Engineering Design Tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendell, Kristen Bethke; Lee, Hee-Sun

    2010-12-01

    Materials science, which entails the practices of selecting, testing, and characterizing materials, is an important discipline within the study of matter. This paper examines how third grade students' materials science performance changes over the course of instruction based on an engineering design challenge. We conducted a case study of nine students who participated in engineering design-based science instruction with the goal of constructing a stable, quiet, thermally comfortable model house. The learning outcome of materials science practices was assessed by clinical interviews conducted before and after the instruction, and the learning process was assessed by students' workbooks completed during the instruction. The interviews included two materials selection tasks for designing a sturdy stepstool and an insulated pet habitat. Results indicate that: (1) students significantly improved on both materials selection tasks, (2) their gains were significantly positively associated with the degree of completion of their workbooks, and (3) students who were highly engaged with the workbook's reflective record-keeping tasks showed the greatest improvement on the interviews. These findings suggest the important role workbooks can play in facilitating elementary students' learning of science through authentic activity such as engineering design.

  15. New Frontiers AO: Advanced Materials Bi-propellant Rocket (AMBR) Engine Information Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Larry C.

    2008-01-01

    The Advanced Material Bi-propellant Rocket (AMBR) engine is a high performance (I(sub sp)), higher thrust, radiation cooled, storable bi-propellant space engine of the same physical envelope as the High Performance Apogee Thruster (HiPAT(TradeMark)). To provide further information about the AMBR engine, this document provides details on performance, development, mission implementation, key spacecraft integration considerations, project participants and approach, contact information, system specifications, and a list of references. The In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) project team at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) leads the technology development of the AMBR engine. Their NASA partners were Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Aerojet leads the industrial partners selected competitively for the technology development via the NASA Research Announcement (NRA) process.

  16. PREFACE: International Scientific and Technical Conference ''Innovative Mechanical Engineering Technologies, Equipment and Materials-2014''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nail, K.

    2015-06-01

    In the period from 3 to 5 December 2014 the city of Kazan hosted the International Scientific Conference ''Innovative mechanical engineering technologies, equipment and materials - 2014'' (ISC ''vIMETEM - 2014''). The event was followed by the 14th International specialized exhibition ''Engineering. Metalworking. Kazan'' The main objective of the annual conference was for participants to discuss scientific and technical achievements in the design and manufacture of engineering products, the expansion of cooperation between scientific organizations and enterprises of machine-building complex and the definition of perspective ways of creation and development of new techniques, technologies and materials. The conference ''IMETEM'' was devoted to the 90th anniversary of Fayzrahman Salahovich Yunusov, who made a great contribution in the field of aviation technology. Kashapov Nail, D.Sc., professor (Kazan Federal University)

  17. Magnetic Nanoparticles: Material Engineering and Emerging Applications in Lithography and Biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yuping; Wen, Tianlong; Samia, Anna Cristina S.; Khandhar, Amit; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-01-01

    We present an interdisciplinary overview of material engineering and emerging applications of iron oxide nanoparticles. We discuss material engineering of nanoparticles in the broadest sense, emphasizing size and shape control, large-area self-assembly, composite/hybrid structures, and surface engineering. This is followed by a discussion of several non-traditional, emerging applications of iron oxide nanoparticles, including nanoparticle lithography, magnetic particle imaging, magnetic guided drug delivery, and positive contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. We conclude with a succinct discussion of the pharmacokinetics pathways of iron oxide nanoparticles in the human body –– an important and required practical consideration for any in vivo biomedical application, followed by a brief outlook of the field. PMID:26586919

  18. Progress on materials and scaffold fabrications applied to esophageal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qiuxiang; Shi, Peina; Gao, Mongna; Yu, Xuechan; Liu, Yuxin; Luo, Ling; Zhu, Yabin

    2013-05-01

    The mortality rate from esophageal disease like atresia, carcinoma, tracheoesophageal fistula, etc. is increasing rapidly all over the world. Traditional therapies such as surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy have been met with very limited success resulting in reduced survival rate and quality of patients' life. Tissue-engineered esophagus, a novel substitute possessing structure and function similar to native tissue, is believed to be an effective therapy and a promising replacement in the future. However, research on esophageal tissue engineering is still at an early stage. Considerable research has been focused on developing ideal scaffolds with optimal materials and methods of fabrication. This article gives a review of materials and scaffold fabrications currently applied in esophageal tissue engineering research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education. Soils Engineering 3-1. Edition 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This individualized, self-paced course for independent study in soils engineering was adapted from military curriculum materials for use in vocational education. The course is designed to acquaint students with various soil types and their characteristics using various procedures, tests, and recording forms. Some of these duties are determining…

  20. Exploring Careers in Science and Engineering. Resource Materials for Teachers. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC.

    The Science Careers Program consists of 12 activities aimed at increasing the career relevance of science education for all students in grades 4 through 9, while at the same time particularly encouraging female and minority students to consider careers in science and engineering. This set of resource materials is available to help teachers in…