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Sample records for engineered three-dimensional lung

  1. Engineering three-dimensional macroporous hydroxyethyl methacrylate-alginate-gelatin cryogel for growth and proliferation of lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepti; Zo, Sun Mi; Kumar, Ashok; Han, Sung Soo

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) growth of cell is of particular interest in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Scaffolds used for this purpose are often tailor-made to mimic the microenvironment and the extracellular matrix of the tissue with defined role such as to provide appropriate structural, chemical, and mechanical support. The aim of the study was to design the macroporous matrix with potential in the field of tissue engineering especially for lung muscle regeneration. Blend of hydroxyethyl methacrylate-alginate-gelatin (HAG) cryogel scaffold was synthesized using cryogelation technique and this polymer material combination is being reported first time. The rheology study showed the elastic property of the material in wet state with no variation in storage modulus (G'), loss modulus (G″), and phase angle upon temperature variation. The microcomputer tomography (micro-CT) analysis confirmed the homogenous polymer structure with average pore diameter of 84 μm. Scaffold synthesized using polymer combinations which is mixture of polysaccharide (alginate) and protein (gelatin) provides supportive environment for human lung epithelial cell proliferation confirmed by cytoskeletal stain phalloidin and nuclei staining 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole checked for over three weeks. The in vivo biocompatibility was further performed which showed integration of scaffold to the surrounding tissue with ability to recruit cells. However, at first week, small amount of infiltrating mast cells were found which subsequently diminished in following weeks. Immunohistochemistry for dendritic cells confirmed in vivo biocompatible nature of the HAG scaffold. The mechanical strength, stiffness, elastic measurements, in vivo compatibility, and in vitro lung cell proliferation show the potentiality of HAG materials for lung tissue engineering.

  2. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Lung Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H.; Deatly, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human lung epithelio-mesenchymal tissue-like assemblies (3D hLEM TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infection with the virus. Therefore, we assert TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host s immune system.

  3. Three-Dimensional Engineered High Fidelity Normal Human Lung Tissue-Like Assemblies (TLA) as Targets for Human Respiratory Virus Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; Deatly, A. M.; Suderman, M. T.; Lin, Y.-H.; Chen, W.; Gupta, C. K.; Randolph, V. B.; Udem, S. A.

    2003-01-01

    Unlike traditional two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures, three-dimensional (3D) tissue-like assemblies (TLA) (Goodwin et aI, 1992, 1993, 2000 and Nickerson et aI. , 2001,2002) offer high organ fidelity with the potential to emulate the infective dynamics of viruses and bacteria in vivo. Thus, utilizing NASA micro gravity Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology, in vitro human broncho-epithelial (HBE) TLAs were engineered to mimic in vivo tissue for study of human respiratory viruses. These 3D HBE TLAs were propagated from a human broncho-tracheal cell line with a mesenchymal component (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and either an adult human broncho-epithelial cell (BEAS-2B) or human neonatal epithelial cell (16HBE140-) as the overlying element. Resulting TLAs share several characteristic features with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including tight junctions, desmosomes and cilia (SEM, TEM). The presence of epithelium and specific lung epithelium markers furthers the contention that these HBE cells differentiate into TLAs paralleling in vivo tissues. A time course of infection of these 3D HBE TLAs with human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) wild type A2 strain, indicates that virus replication and virus budding are supported and manifested by increasing virus titer and detection of membrane-bound F and G glycoproteins. Infected 3D HBE TLAs remain intact for up to 12 days compared to infected 2D cultures that are destroyed in 2-3 days. Infected cells show an increased vacuolation and cellular destruction (by transmission electron microscopy) by day 9; whereas, uninfected cells remain robust and morphologically intact. Therefore, the 3D HBE TLAs mimic aspects of human respiratory epithelium providing a unique opportunity to analyze, for the first time, simulated in vivo viral infection independent of host immune response.

  4. [A three dimensional fractal simulation of the lung bronchial tree].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiuyi; Tan, Xiaoping; Pei, Juemin

    2004-06-01

    The lungs are naturally irregular and asymmetrical organ in anatomy. The conducting bronchial trees in the lungs display complex self-similar structure. We have established the host mesh coordinates of the right lung on the basis of the anatomical data from the literature. A three-dimensional fractal model of the conducting airways was set up by calculating the coordinates of the mass centers of the divided blocks, searching the branch direction and determining branch lengths with the use of the drawing tool OpenGL. Specific data of the lengths at various grades, branching angles, and capillary diameters were obtained. As a result, the computed data were identical with those of the existing statistical data. The fractal covering dimensionality obtained in the computation of this model was 2.19, which is very close to the ideal dimensionality, 2.17, from the literature. The present model has laid the foundation for further research of the gas diffusion and transfer performance in the lungs using the fractal concept, and furthermore, it helps to save the computer memories and fastening the graphic transfer.

  5. Heat engine in the three-dimensional spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Jie-Xiong; Liang, Feng; Li, Gu-Qiang

    2017-03-01

    We define a kind of heat engine via three-dimensional charged BTZ black holes. This case is quite subtle and needs to be more careful. The heat flow along the isochores does not equal to zero since the specific heat C V ≠ 0 and this point completely differs from the cases discussed before whose isochores and adiabats are identical. So one cannot simply apply the paradigm in the former literatures. However, if one introduces a new thermodynamic parameter associated with the renormalization length scale, the above problem can be solved. We obtain the analytical efficiency expression of the three-dimensional charged BTZ black hole heat engine for two different schemes. Moreover, we double check with the exact formula. Our result presents the first specific example for the sound correctness of the exact efficiency formula. We argue that the three-dimensional charged BTZ black hole can be viewed as a toy model for further investigation of holographic heat engine. Furthermore, we compare our result with that of the Carnot cycle and extend the former result to three-dimensional spacetime. In this sense, the result in this paper would be complementary to those obtained in four-dimensional spacetime or ever higher. Last but not the least, the heat engine efficiency discussed in this paper may serve as a criterion to discriminate the two thermodynamic approaches introduced in ref. [29] and our result seems to support the approach which introduces a new thermodynamic parameter R = r 0 .

  6. Three-dimensional bioprinting in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guifang; Cui, Xiaofeng

    2016-02-01

    With the advances of stem cell research, development of intelligent biomaterials and three-dimensional biofabrication strategies, highly mimicked tissue or organs can be engineered. Among all the biofabrication approaches, bioprinting based on inkjet printing technology has the promises to deliver and create biomimicked tissue with high throughput, digital control, and the capacity of single cell manipulation. Therefore, this enabling technology has great potential in regenerative medicine and translational applications. The most current advances in organ and tissue bioprinting based on the thermal inkjet printing technology are described in this review, including vasculature, muscle, cartilage, and bone. In addition, the benign side effect of bioprinting to the printed mammalian cells can be utilized for gene or drug delivery, which can be achieved conveniently during precise cell placement for tissue construction. With layer-by-layer assembly, three-dimensional tissues with complex structures can be printed using converted medical images. Therefore, bioprinting based on thermal inkjet is so far the most optimal solution to engineer vascular system to the thick and complex tissues. Collectively, bioprinting has great potential and broad applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The future advances of bioprinting include the integration of different printing mechanisms to engineer biphasic or triphasic tissues with optimized scaffolds and further understanding of stem cell biology.

  7. A Review of Three-Dimensional Printing in Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Sears, Nick A; Seshadri, Dhruv R; Dhavalikar, Prachi S; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in three-dimensional (3D) printing technologies have led to a rapid expansion of applications from the creation of anatomical training models for complex surgical procedures to the printing of tissue engineering constructs. In addition to achieving the macroscale geometry of organs and tissues, a print layer thickness as small as 20 μm allows for reproduction of the microarchitectures of bone and other tissues. Techniques with even higher precision are currently being investigated to enable reproduction of smaller tissue features such as hepatic lobules. Current research in tissue engineering focuses on the development of compatible methods (printers) and materials (bioinks) that are capable of producing biomimetic scaffolds. In this review, an overview of current 3D printing techniques used in tissue engineering is provided with an emphasis on the printing mechanism and the resultant scaffold characteristics. Current practical challenges and technical limitations are emphasized and future trends of bioprinting are discussed.

  8. Engineering three-dimensional cell mechanical microenvironment with hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guoyou; Wang, Lin; Wang, Shuqi; Han, Yulong; Wu, Jinhui; Zhang, Qiancheng; Xu, Feng; Lu, Tian Jian

    2012-12-01

    Cell mechanical microenvironment (CMM) significantly affects cell behaviors such as spreading, migration, proliferation and differentiation. However, most studies on cell response to mechanical stimulation are based on two-dimensional (2D) planar substrates, which cannot mimic native three-dimensional (3D) CMM. Accumulating evidence has shown that there is a significant difference in cell behavior in 2D and 3D microenvironments. Among the materials used for engineering 3D CMM, hydrogels have gained increasing attention due to their tunable properties (e.g. chemical and mechanical properties). In this paper, we provide an overview of recent advances in engineering hydrogel-based 3D CMM. Effects of mechanical cues (e.g. hydrogel stiffness and externally induced stress/strain in hydrogels) on cell behaviors are described. A variety of approaches to load mechanical stimuli in 3D hydrogel-based constructs are also discussed.

  9. Utilizing stem cells for three-dimensional neural tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Cho, Yongku; Li, Xue-Jun; Khademhosseini, Ali; Tasoglu, Savas

    2016-05-26

    Three-dimensional neural tissue engineering has made great strides in developing neural disease models and replacement tissues for patients. However, the need for biomimetic tissue models and effective patient therapies remains unmet. The recent push to expand 2D neural tissue engineering into the third dimension shows great potential to advance the field. Another area which has much to offer to neural tissue engineering is stem cell research. Stem cells are well known for their self-renewal and differentiation potential and have been shown to give rise to tissues with structural and functional properties mimicking natural organs. Application of these capabilities to 3D neural tissue engineering may be highly useful for basic research on neural tissue structure and function, engineering disease models, designing tissues for drug development, and generating replacement tissues with a patient's genetic makeup. Here, we discuss the vast potential, as well as the current challenges, unique to integration of 3D fabrication strategies and stem cells into neural tissue engineering. We also present some of the most significant recent achievements, including nerve guidance conduits to facilitate better healing of nerve injuries, functional 3D biomimetic neural tissue models, physiologically relevant disease models for research purposes, and rapid and effective screening of potential drugs.

  10. Structural engineering of three-dimensional phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delpero, Tommaso; Schoenwald, Stefan; Zemp, Armin; Bergamini, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    Artificially-structured materials are attracting the research interest of a growing community of scientists for the possibility to develop novel materials with advantageous properties that arise from the ability to tailor the propagation of elastic waves, and thus energy, through them. In this work, we propose a three-dimensional phononic crystal whose unit cell has been engineered to obtain a strong wave-attenuation band in the middle of the acoustic frequency range. The combination of its acoustic properties with the dimensions of the unit cell and its static mechanical properties makes it an interesting material for possibly several applications in civil and mechanical engineering, for instance as the core of an acoustically insulating sandwich panel. A sample of this crystal has been manufactured and experimentally tested with respect to its acoustic transmissibility. The performance of the phononic crystal core is remarkable both in terms of amplitude reduction in the transmissibility and width of the attenuation band. A parametric study has been finally conducted on selected geometrical parameters of the unit cell and on their effect on the macroscopic properties of the crystal. This work represents an application-oriented example of how the macroscopic properties of an artificially-structured material can be designed, according to specific needs, by a conventional engineering of its unit cell.

  11. Three-Dimensional Analysis and Modeling of a Wankel Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.; Willis, E. A.

    1991-01-01

    A new computer code, AGNI-3D, has been developed for the modeling of combustion, spray, and flow properties in a stratified-charge rotary engine (SCRE). The mathematical and numerical details of the new code are described by the first author in a separate NASA publication. The solution procedure is based on an Eulerian-Lagrangian approach where the unsteady, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations for a perfect gas-mixture with variable properties are solved in generalized, Eulerian coordinates on a moving grid by making use of an implicit finite-volume, Steger-Warming flux vector splitting scheme. The liquid-phase equations are solved in Lagrangian coordinates. The engine configuration studied was similar to existing rotary engine flow-visualization and hot-firing test rigs. The results of limited test cases indicate a good degree of qualitative agreement between the predicted and measured pressures. It is conjectured that the impulsive nature of the torque generated by the observed pressure nonuniformity may be one of the mechanisms responsible for the excessive wear of the timing gears observed during the early stages of the rotary combustion engine (RCE) development. It was identified that the turbulence intensities near top-dead-center were dominated by the compression process and only slightly influenced by the intake and exhaust processes. Slow mixing resulting from small turbulence intensities within the rotor pocket and also from a lack of formation of any significant recirculation regions within the rotor pocket were identified as the major factors leading to incomplete combustion. Detailed flowfield results during exhaust and intake, fuel injection, fuel vaporization, combustion, mixing and expansion processes are also presented. The numerical procedure is very efficient as it takes 7 to 10 CPU hours on a CRAY Y-MP for one entire engine cycle when the computations are performed over a 31 x16 x 20 grid.

  12. Porous Three-Dimensional Carbon Nanotube Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lalwani, Gaurav; Gopalan, Anu; D’Agati, Michael; Sankaran, Jeyantt Srinivas; Judex, Stefan; Qin, Yi-Xian; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2015-01-01

    Assembly of carbon nanomaterials into three-dimensional (3D) architectures is necessary to harness their unique physiochemical properties for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Herein, we report the fabrication and comprehensive cytocompatibility assessment of 3D chemically crosslinked macro-sized (5–8 mm height and 4–6 mm diameter) porous carbon nanotube (CNT) scaffolds. Scaffolds prepared via radical initiated thermal crosslinking of single- or multi- walled CNTs (SWCNTs and MWCNTs) possess high porosity (>80%), and nano-, micro- and macro-scale interconnected pores. MC3T3 pre-osteoblast cells on MWCNT and SWCNT scaffolds showed good cell viability comparable to poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) scaffolds after 5 days. Confocal live cell and immunofluorescence imaging showed that MC3T3 cells were metabolically active and could attach, proliferate and infiltrate MWCNT and SWCNT scaffolds. SEM imaging corroborated cell attachment and spreading and suggested that cell morphology is governed by scaffold surface roughness. MC3T3 cells were elongated on scaffolds with high surface roughness (MWCNTs) and rounded on scaffolds with low surface roughness (SWCNTs). The surface roughness of scaffolds may be exploited to control cellular morphology, and in turn govern cell fate. These results indicate that crosslinked MWCNTs and SWCNTs scaffolds are cytocompatible, and open avenues towards development of multifunctional all-carbon scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. PMID:25788440

  13. Three-dimensional volume analysis of vasculature in engineered tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YousefHussien, Mohammed; Garvin, Kelley; Dalecki, Diane; Saber, Eli; Helguera, María.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional textural and volumetric image analysis holds great potential in understanding the image data produced by multi-photon microscopy. In this paper, an algorithm that quantitatively analyzes the texture and the morphology of vasculature in engineered tissues is proposed. The investigated 3D artificial tissues consist of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC) embedded in collagen exposed to two regimes of ultrasound standing wave fields under different pressure conditions. Textural features were evaluated using the normalized Gray-Scale Cooccurrence Matrix (GLCM) combined with Gray-Level Run Length Matrix (GLRLM) analysis. To minimize error resulting from any possible volume rotation and to provide a comprehensive textural analysis, an averaged version of nine GLCM and GLRLM orientations is used. To evaluate volumetric features, an automatic threshold using the gray level mean value is utilized. Results show that our analysis is able to differentiate among the exposed samples, due to morphological changes induced by the standing wave fields. Furthermore, we demonstrate that providing more textural parameters than what is currently being reported in the literature, enhances the quantitative understanding of the heterogeneity of artificial tissues.

  14. Tissue Engineering Applications of Three-Dimensional Bioprinting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Yangde

    2015-07-01

    Recent advances in tissue engineering have adapted the additive manufacturing technology, also known as three-dimensional printing, which is used in several industrial applications, for the fabrication of bioscaffolds and viable tissue and/or organs to overcome the limitations of other in vitro conventional methods. 3D bioprinting technology has gained enormous attention as it enabled 3D printing of a multitude of biocompatible materials, different types of cells and other supporting growth factors into complex functional living tissues in a 3D format. A major advantage of this technology is its ability for simultaneously 3D printing various cell types in defined spatial locations, which makes this technology applicable to regenerative medicine to meet the need for suitable for transplantation suitable organs and tissues. 3D bioprinting is yet to successfully overcome the many challenges related to building 3D structures that closely resemble native organs and tissues, which are complex structures with defined microarchitecture and a variety of cell types in a confined area. An integrated approach with a combination of technologies from the fields of engineering, biomaterials science, cell biology, physics, and medicine is required to address these complexities. Meeting this challenge is being made possible by directing the 3D bioprinting to manufacture biomimetic-shaped 3D structures, using organ/tissue images, obtained from magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography, and employing computer-aided design and manufacturing technologies. Applications of 3D bioprinting include the generation of multilayered skin, bone, vascular grafts, heart valves, etc. The current 3D bioprinting technologies need to be improved with respect to the mechanical strength and integrity in the manufactured constructs as the presently used biomaterials are not of optimal viscosity. A better understanding of the tissue/organ microenvironment, which consists of multiple types of

  15. SFTA3, a novel protein of the lung: three-dimensional structure, characterisation and immune activation.

    PubMed

    Schicht, Martin; Rausch, Felix; Finotto, Susetta; Mathews, Martina; Mattil, Anja; Schubert, Melanie; Koch, Beate; Traxdorf, Maximilian; Bohr, Christopher; Worlitzsch, Dieter; Brandt, Wolfgang; Garreis, Fabian; Sel, Saadettin; Paulsen, Friedrich; Bräuer, Lars

    2014-08-01

    The lung constantly interacts with numerous pathogens. Thus, complex local immune defence mechanisms are essential to recognise and dispose of these intruders. This work describes the detection, characterisation and three-dimensional structure of a novel protein of the lung (surfactant-associated protein 3 (SFTA3/SP-H)) with putative immunological features. Bioinformatics, biochemical and immunological methods were combined to elucidate the structure and function of SFTA3. The tissue-specific detection and characterisation was performed by using electron microscopy as well as fluorescence imaging. Three-dimensional structure generation and analysis led to the development of specific antibodies and, as a consequence, to the localisation of a novel protein in human lung under consideration of cystic fibrosis, asthma and sepsis. In vitro experiments revealed that lipopolysaccharide induces expression of SFTA3 in the human lung alveolar type II cell line A549. By contrast, the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-23 inhibit expression of SFTA3 in A549. Sequence- and structure-based prediction analysis indicated that the novel protein is likely to belong to the family of lung surfactant proteins. The results suggest that SFTA3 is an immunoregulatory protein of the lung with relevant protective functions during inflammation at the mucosal sites.

  16. Three-dimensional display of the heart, aorta, lungs, and airway using CT

    SciTech Connect

    Fram, E.K.; Godwin, J.D.; Putman, C.E.

    1982-12-01

    In previous studies of human anatomy, three-dimensional display of CT data has required laborious manual boundary tracking, except for high-contrast structures such as the spine. Automated boundary tracking techniques have been extended so that they can function well for both high-contrast and soft-tissue interfaces. These methods have been applied to the in vivo study of human lungs, heart, aorta, and larynx in this paper.

  17. Three-dimensional histopathology of lung cancer with multimodality image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ryk, Jessica; Weydert, Jamie; Christensen, Gary; Thiesse, Jacqueline; Namati, Eman; Reinhardt, Joseph; Hoffman, Eric; McLennan, Geoffrey

    2007-03-01

    Identifying the three-dimensional content of non-small cell lung cancer tumors is a vital step in the pursuit of understanding cancer growth, development and response to treatment. The majority of non-small cell lung cancer tumors are histologically heterogeneous, and consist of the malignant tumor cells, necrotic tumor cells, fibroblastic stromal tissue, and inflammation. Geometric and tissue density heterogeneity are utilized in computed tomography (CT) representations of lung tumors for distinguishing between malignant and benign nodules. However, the correlation between radiolographical heterogeneity and corresponding histological content has been limited. In this study, a multimodality dataset of human lung cancer is established, enabling the direct comparison between histologically identified tissue content and micro-CT representation. Registration of these two datasets is achieved through the incorporation of a large scale, serial microscopy dataset. This dataset serves as the basis for the rigid and non-rigid registrations required to align the radiological and histological data. The resulting comprehensive, three-dimensional dataset includes radio-density, color and cellular content of a given lung tumor. Using the registered datasets, neural network classification is applied to determine a statistical separation between cancerous and non-cancerous tumor regions in micro-CT.

  18. Engineering of electromagnetic interactions in three-dimensional plasmonic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artar, Alp

    Field of nanoplasmonics study the interaction of light with nanoscale metallic structures and it possesses the great potential of being the key element in future, highly integrated, on-chip nanophotonic devices. Several major breakthroughs have been demonstrated in the past decade regarding the utilization of plasmonics for purposes ranging from optical nanoantennas to enhanced biochemical sensing platforms. So far, studies are generally focused on two-dimensional (2D) arrangement of plasmonic nanostructures. However, engineering of materials in three dimensions (3D) by integrating different kinds of plasmonic resonances in multi-layers, offers additional degrees of freedom in our design space, resulting in remarkable effects. This thesis research investigates the outcomes of the tailoring of electromagnetic interactions between multiple plasmonic structures in three-dimensions. We are mainly focused on a coherence phenomenon termed as Fano resonance. Fano resonances are generally studied in atomic physics, which occur due to an interference between multiple excitation pathways where a discrete resonant state is coupled to a broad continuum. Fano resonances are inherently linked to an atomic physics concept termed as Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT). Recently, a plasmonic analogue of the EIT effect was proposed and drew great attention. Plasmon Induced Transparency (PIT) enables one to mimic the extremely dispersive spectral characteristics of EIT, on-chip and without any stringent requirements. In the first two parts of this work, we show that by a precise engineering of the near-field interactions of plasmonic elements, PIT effect can be carried simultaneously to multiple spectral domains. This effect has many potential applications ranging from enhanced non-linearities to novel optical communication systems. In the third part, we investigate a multi-spectral Fano resonant plasmonic structure's non-linear response by embedding a nanoscale Kerr

  19. Engineered three-dimensional multicellular culture model to ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Tissue fusion during early mammalian development requires crosstalk between multiple cell types. For example, paracrine signaling between palatal epithelial cells and palatal mesenchyme mediates the fusion of opposing palatal shelves during embryonic development. Fusion events in developmental processes including heart development, neural tube closure, and palatal fusion are dependent on epithelial-mesenchymal interactions (EMIs) and specific signaling pathways that have been elucidated largely using gene knockout mouse models. A broad analysis of literature using ToxRefDB identified 63 ToxCast chemicals associated with cleft palate in animal models. However, the influence of these and other putative teratogens on human palatal fusion has not been examined in depth due to the lack of in vitro models incorporating EMIs between human cell types. We sought to engineer the stratified mesenchymal and epithelial structure of the developing palate in vitro using spheroid culture of human Wharton’s Jelly mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). hMSC spheroids exhibited uniform size over time (175 ± 21 µm mean diameter) that was proportional to starting cell density. Further, hMSCs in spheroid culture exhibited increased alkaline phosphatase activity and increased expression of bglap and runx2 after 7 days of culture in osteo-induction medium, which suggests that spheroid culture together with osteo-induction medium supports osteogenic differentiation. We developed a novel pro

  20. Three-dimensional scaffolds of acellular human and porcine lungs for high throughput studies of lung disease and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Darcy E.; Bonenfant, Nicholas R.; Sokocevic, Dino; DeSarno, Michael; Borg, Zachary; Parsons, Charles; Brooks, Elice M.; Platz, Joseph; Khalpey, Zain; Hoganson, David M.; Deng, Bin; Lam, Ying Wai; Oldinski, Rachael A.; Ashikaga, Takamaru; Weiss, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Acellular scaffolds from complex whole organs such as lung are being increasingly studied for ex vivo organ generation and for in vitro studies of cell-extracellular matrix interactions. We have established effective methods for efficient de- and recellularization of large animal and human lungs including techniques which allow multiple small segments (∼1–3cm3) to be excised that retain 3-dimensional lung structure. Coupled with the use of a synthetic pleural coating, cells can be selectively physiologically inoculated via preserved vascular and airway conduits. Inoculated segments can be further sliced for high throughput studies. Further, we demonstrate thermography as a powerful noninvasive technique for monitoring perfusion decellularization and for evaluating preservation of vascular and airway networks following human and porcine lung decellularization. Collectively, these techniques are a significant step forward as they allow high throughput in vitro studies from a single lung or lobe in a more biologically relevant, three-dimensional acellular scaffold. PMID:24411675

  1. Development of a Three-Dimensional Bioengineering Technology to Generate Lung Tissue for Personalized Disease Modeling.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Dan C; Alva-Ornelas, Jackelyn A; Sucre, Jennifer M S; Vijayaraj, Preethi; Durra, Abdo; Richardson, Wade; Jonas, Steven J; Paul, Manash K; Karumbayaram, Saravanan; Dunn, Bruce; Gomperts, Brigitte N

    2017-02-01

    Stem cell technologies, especially patient-specific, induced stem cell pluripotency and directed differentiation, hold great promise for changing the landscape of medical therapies. Proper exploitation of these methods may lead to personalized organ transplants, but to regenerate organs, it is necessary to develop methods for assembling differentiated cells into functional, organ-level tissues. The generation of three-dimensional human tissue models also holds potential for medical advances in disease modeling, as full organ functionality may not be necessary to recapitulate disease pathophysiology. This is specifically true of lung diseases where animal models often do not recapitulate human disease. Here, we present a method for the generation of self-assembled human lung tissue and its potential for disease modeling and drug discovery for lung diseases characterized by progressive and irreversible scarring such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Tissue formation occurs because of the overlapping processes of cellular adhesion to multiple alveolar sac templates, bioreactor rotation, and cellular contraction. Addition of transforming growth factor-β1 to single cell-type mesenchymal organoids resulted in morphologic scarring typical of that seen in IPF but not in two-dimensional IPF fibroblast cultures. Furthermore, this lung organoid may be modified to contain multiple lung cell types assembled into the correct anatomical location, thereby allowing cell-cell contact and recapitulating the lung microenvironment. Our bottom-up approach for synthesizing patient-specific lung tissue in a scalable system allows for the development of relevant human lung disease models with the potential for high throughput drug screening to identify targeted therapies. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:622-633.

  2. Development of a Three-Dimensional Bioengineering Technology to Generate Lung Tissue for Personalized Disease Modeling.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Dan C; Alva-Ornelas, Jackelyn A; Sucre, Jennifer M S; Vijayaraj, Preethi; Durra, Abdo; Richardson, Wade; Jonas, Steven J; Paul, Manash K; Karumbayaram, Saravanan; Dunn, Bruce; Gomperts, Brigitte N

    2016-09-15

    : Stem cell technologies, especially patient-specific, induced stem cell pluripotency and directed differentiation, hold great promise for changing the landscape of medical therapies. Proper exploitation of these methods may lead to personalized organ transplants, but to regenerate organs, it is necessary to develop methods for assembling differentiated cells into functional, organ-level tissues. The generation of three-dimensional human tissue models also holds potential for medical advances in disease modeling, as full organ functionality may not be necessary to recapitulate disease pathophysiology. This is specifically true of lung diseases where animal models often do not recapitulate human disease. Here, we present a method for the generation of self-assembled human lung tissue and its potential for disease modeling and drug discovery for lung diseases characterized by progressive and irreversible scarring such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Tissue formation occurs because of the overlapping processes of cellular adhesion to multiple alveolar sac templates, bioreactor rotation, and cellular contraction. Addition of transforming growth factor-β1 to single cell-type mesenchymal organoids resulted in morphologic scarring typical of that seen in IPF but not in two-dimensional IPF fibroblast cultures. Furthermore, this lung organoid may be modified to contain multiple lung cell types assembled into the correct anatomical location, thereby allowing cell-cell contact and recapitulating the lung microenvironment. Our bottom-up approach for synthesizing patient-specific lung tissue in a scalable system allows for the development of relevant human lung disease models with the potential for high throughput drug screening to identify targeted therapies.

  3. Development and proof-of-concept of three-dimensional lung histology volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Lindsay; Alabousi, Mostafa; Wheatley, Andrew; Aladl, Usaf; Slipetz, Deborah; Hogg, James C.; Fenster, Aaron; Parraga, Grace

    2012-03-01

    Most medical imaging is inherently three-dimensional (3D) but for validation of pathological findings, histopathology is commonly used and typically histopathology images are acquired as twodimensional slices with quantitative analysis performed in a single dimension. Histopathology is invasive, labour-intensive, and the analysis cannot be performed in real time, yet it remains the gold standard for the pathological diagnosis and validation of clinical or radiological diagnoses of disease. A major goal worldwide is to improve medical imaging resolution, sensitivity and specificity to better guide therapy and biopsy and to one day delay or replace biopsy. A key limitation however is the lack of tools to directly compare 3D macroscopic imaging acquired in patients with histopathology findings, typically provided in a single dimension (1D) or in two dimensions (2D). To directly address this, we developed methods for 2D histology slice visualization/registration to generate 3D volumes and quantified tissue components in the 3D volume for direct comparison to volumetric micro-CT and clinical CT. We used the elastase-instilled mouse emphysema lung model to evaluate our methods with murine lungs sectioned (5 μm thickness/10 μm gap) and digitized with 2μm in-plane resolution. 3D volumes were generated for wildtype and elastase mouse lung sections after semi-automated registration of all tissue slices. The 1D mean linear intercept (Lm) for wildtype (WT) (47.1 μm +/- 9.8 μm) and elastase mouse lung (64.5 μm +/- 14.0 μm) was significantly different (p<.001). We also generated 3D measurements based on tissue and airspace morphometry from the 3D volumes and all of these were significantly different (p<.0001) when comparing elastase and WT mouse lung. The ratio of the airspace-to-lung volume for the entire lung volume was also significantly and strongly correlated with Lm.

  4. Calculations and Expectations: How Engineering Students Describe Three-Dimensional Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller-Young, Janice E.

    2013-01-01

    The premise of student-centered teaching is to respond to the ways in which students engage with the context and content of their learning, and therefore the purpose of this study was to find out how students visualize three-dimensional statics problems from two-dimensional diagrams early in a first-year engineering course. Think-alouds were…

  5. Three-dimensional simultaneous optical coherence tomography and confocal fluorescence microscopy for investigation of lung tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Maria; Cimalla, Peter; Meissner, Sven; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.; Koch, Edmund

    2012-07-01

    Although several strategies exist for a minimal-invasive treatment of patients with lung failure, the mortality rate of acute respiratory distress syndrome still reaches 30% at minimum. This striking number indicates the necessity of understanding lung dynamics on an alveolar level. To investigate the dynamical behavior on a microscale, we used three-dimensional geometrical and functional imaging to observe tissue parameters including alveolar size and length of embedded elastic fibers during ventilation. We established a combined optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal fluorescence microscopy system that is able to monitor the distension of alveolar tissue and elastin fibers simultaneously within three dimensions. The OCT system can laterally resolve a 4.9 μm line pair feature and has an approximately 11 μm full-width-half-maximum axial resolution in air. confocal fluorescence microscopy visualizes molecular properties of the tissue with a resolution of 0.75 μm (laterally), and 5.9 μm (axially) via fluorescence detection of the dye sulforhodamine B specifically binding to elastin. For system evaluation, we used a mouse model in situ to perform lung distension by application of different constant pressure values within the physiological regime. Our method enables the investigation of alveolar dynamics by helping to reveal basic processes emerging during artificial ventilation and breathing.

  6. Three-Dimensional Volumetric Analysis of Irradiated Lung With Adjuvant Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Teh, Amy Yuen Meei; Park, Eileen J.H.; Shen Liang; Chung, Hans T.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the dose-volume histogram data of irradiated lung in adjuvant breast radiotherapy (ABR) using a three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT)-guided planning technique; and to investigate the relationship between lung dose-volume data and traditionally used two-dimensional (2D) parameters, as well as their correlation with the incidence of steroid-requiring radiation pneumonitis (SRRP). Methods and Materials: Patients beginning ABR between January 2005 and February 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients included were women aged >=18 years with ductal carcinoma in situ or Stage I-III invasive carcinoma, who received radiotherapy using a 3D-CT technique to the breast or chest wall (two-field radiotherapy [2FRT]) with or without supraclavicular irradiation (three-field radiotherapy [3FRT]), to 50 Gy in 25 fractions. A 10-Gy tumor-bed boost was allowed. Lung dose-volume histogram parameters (V{sub 10}, V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, V{sub 40}), 2D parameters (central lung depth [CLD], maximum lung depth [MLD], and lung length [LL]), and incidence of SRRP were reported. Results: A total of 89 patients met the inclusion criteria: 51 had 2FRT, and 38 had 3FRT. With 2FRT, mean ipsilateral V{sub 10}, V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, V{sub 40} and CLD, MLD, LL were 20%, 14%, 11%, and 8% and 2.0 cm, 2.1 cm, and 14.6 cm, respectively, with strong correlation between CLD and ipsilateral V{sub 10-V40} (R{sup 2} = 0.73-0.83, p < 0.0005). With 3FRT, mean ipsilateral V{sub 10}, V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, and V{sub 40} were 30%, 22%, 17%, and 11%, but its correlation with 2D parameters was poor. With a median follow-up of 14.5 months, 1 case of SRRP was identified. Conclusions: With only 1 case of SRRP observed, our study is limited in its ability to provide definitive guidance, but it does provide a starting point for acceptable lung irradiation during ABR. Further prospective studies are warranted.

  7. Differential diagnosis of lung carcinoma with three-dimensional quantitative molecular vibrational imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Liang; Hammoudi, Ahmad A.; Li, Fuhai; Thrall, Michael J.; Cagle, Philip T.; Chen, Yuanxin; Yang, Jian; Xia, Xiaofeng; Fan, Yubo; Massoud, Yehia; Wang, Zhiyong; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2012-06-01

    The advent of molecularly targeted therapies requires effective identification of the various cell types of non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC). Currently, cell type diagnosis is performed using small biopsies or cytology specimens that are often insufficient for molecular testing after morphologic analysis. Thus, the ability to rapidly recognize different cancer cell types, with minimal tissue consumption, would accelerate diagnosis and preserve tissue samples for subsequent molecular testing in targeted therapy. We report a label-free molecular vibrational imaging framework enabling three-dimensional (3-D) image acquisition and quantitative analysis of cellular structures for identification of NSCLC cell types. This diagnostic imaging system employs superpixel-based 3-D nuclear segmentation for extracting such disease-related features as nuclear shape, volume, and cell-cell distance. These features are used to characterize cancer cell types using machine learning. Using fresh unstained tissue samples derived from cell lines grown in a mouse model, the platform showed greater than 97% accuracy for diagnosis of NSCLC cell types within a few minutes. As an adjunct to subsequent histology tests, our novel system would allow fast delineation of cancer cell types with minimum tissue consumption, potentially facilitating on-the-spot diagnosis, while preserving specimens for additional tests. Furthermore, 3-D measurements of cellular structure permit evaluation closer to the native state of cells, creating an alternative to traditional 2-D histology specimen evaluation, potentially increasing accuracy in diagnosing cell type of lung carcinomas.

  8. Engineering functional two- and three-dimensional liver systems in vivo using hepatic tissue sheets.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kazuo; Yokoyama, Takashi; Yamato, Masayuki; Kuge, Hiroyuki; Kanehiro, Hiromichi; Tsutsumi, Masahiro; Amanuma, Toshihiro; Iwata, Hiroo; Yang, Joseph; Okano, Teruo; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2007-07-01

    Hepatic tissue engineering using primary hepatocytes has been considered a valuable new therapeutic modality for several classes of liver diseases. Recent progress in the development of clinically feasible liver tissue engineering approaches, however, has been hampered mainly by insufficient cell-to-cell contact of the engrafted hepatocytes. We developed a method to engineer a uniformly continuous sheet of hepatic tissue using isolated primary hepatocytes cultured on temperature-responsive surfaces. Sheets of hepatic tissue transplanted into the subcutaneous space resulted in efficient engraftment to the surrounding cells, with the formation of two-dimensional hepatic tissues that stably persisted for longer than 200 d. The engineered hepatic tissues also showed several characteristics of liver-specific functionality. Additionally, when the hepatic tissue sheets were layered in vivo, three-dimensional miniature liver systems having persistent survivability could be also engineered. This technology for liver tissue engineering is simple, minimally invasive and free of potentially immunogenic biodegradable scaffolds.

  9. MO-C-17A-08: Evaluation of Lung Deformation Using Three Dimensional Strain Maps

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, T; Huang, Q; Miller, W; Zhong, X; Yin, F; Cai, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a systematic approach to generate three dimensional (3D) strain maps of lung using the displacement vector field (DVF) during the respiratory deformation, and to demonstrate its application in evaluating deformable image registration (DIR). Methods: A DVF based strain tensor at each voxel of interest (VOI) was calculated from the relative displacements between the VOI and each of the six nearest neighbors. The maximum and minimum stretches of a VOI can be determined by the principal strains (E{sub 1}, E{sub 2} and E{sub 3}), which are the eigenvalues and the corresponding strain tensors. Two healthy volunteers enrolled in this study under IRB-approved protocol, each was scanned using 3D Hyperpolarized He-3 tagging-MRI and 3D proton-MRI with TrueFISP sequence at the endof- inhalation (EOI) and the end-of-exhalation (EOE) phases. 3D DVFs of tagging- and proton-MRI were obtained by the direct measurements of the tagging grid trajectory and by the DIR method implemented in commercial software. Results: 3D strain maps were successfully generated for all DVFs. The principal strain E1s were calculated as 0.43±0.05 and 0.17±0.25 for tagging-MRI and proton-MRI, respectively. The large values of E{sub 1} indicate the predominant lung motion in the superior-inferior (SI) direction. Given that the DVFs from the tagging images are considered as the ground truth, the discrepancies in the DIR-based strain maps suggest the inaccuracy of the DIR algorithm. In the E{sub 1} maps of tagging-MRI for subject 1, the fissures were distinguishable by the larger values (0.49±0.02) from the adjacent tissues (0.41±0.03) due to the larger relative displacement between the lung lobes. Conclusion: We have successfully developed a methodology to generate DVF-based 3D strain maps of lung. It can potentially enable us to better understand the pulmonary biomechanics and to evaluate and improve the DIR algorithms for the lung deformation. We are currently studying more

  10. Three-dimensional positioning and control of colloidal objects utilizing engineered liquid crystalline defect networks.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, H; Asakura, K; Fukuda, J; Ozaki, M

    2015-05-21

    Topological defects in liquid crystals not only affect the optical and rheological properties of the host, but can also act as scaffolds in which to trap nano or micro-sized colloidal objects. The creation of complex defect shapes, however, often involves confining the liquid crystals in curved geometries or adds complex-shaped colloidal objects, which are unsuitable for device applications. Using topologically patterned substrates, here we demonstrate the controlled generation of three-dimensional defect lines with non-trivial shapes and even chirality, in a flat slab of nematic liquid crystal. By using the defect lines as templates and the electric response of the liquid crystals, colloidal superstructures are constructed, which can be reversibly reconfigured at a voltage as low as 1.3 V. Three-dimensional engineering of the defect shapes in liquid crystals is potentially useful in the fabrication of self-healing composites and in stabilizing artificial frustrated phases.

  11. Techniques for fabrication and construction of three-dimensional scaffolds for tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tingli; Li, Yuhui; Chen, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional biomimetic scaffolds have widespread applications in biomedical tissue engineering because of their nanoscaled architecture, eg, nanofibers and nanopores, similar to the native extracellular matrix. In the conventional “top-down” approach, cells are seeded onto a biocompatible and biodegradable scaffold, in which cells are expected to populate in the scaffold and create their own extracellular matrix. The top-down approach based on these scaffolds has successfully engineered thin tissues, including skin, bladder, and cartilage in vitro. However, it is still a challenge to fabricate complex and functional tissues (eg, liver and kidney) due to the lack of vascularization systems and limited diffusion properties of these large biomimetic scaffolds. The emerging “bottom-up” method may hold great potential to address these challenges, and focuses on fabricating microscale tissue building blocks with a specific microarchitecture and assembling these units to engineer larger tissue constructs from the bottom up. In this review, state-of-the-art methods for fabrication of three-dimensional biomimetic scaffolds are presented, and their advantages and drawbacks are discussed. The bottom-up methods used to assemble microscale building blocks (eg, microscale hydrogels) for tissue engineering are also reviewed. Finally, perspectives on future development of the bottom-up approach for tissue engineering are addressed. PMID:23345979

  12. Techniques for fabrication and construction of three-dimensional scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tingli; Li, Yuhui; Chen, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional biomimetic scaffolds have widespread applications in biomedical tissue engineering because of their nanoscaled architecture, eg, nanofibers and nanopores, similar to the native extracellular matrix. In the conventional "top-down" approach, cells are seeded onto a biocompatible and biodegradable scaffold, in which cells are expected to populate in the scaffold and create their own extracellular matrix. The top-down approach based on these scaffolds has successfully engineered thin tissues, including skin, bladder, and cartilage in vitro. However, it is still a challenge to fabricate complex and functional tissues (eg, liver and kidney) due to the lack of vascularization systems and limited diffusion properties of these large biomimetic scaffolds. The emerging "bottom-up" method may hold great potential to address these challenges, and focuses on fabricating microscale tissue building blocks with a specific microarchitecture and assembling these units to engineer larger tissue constructs from the bottom up. In this review, state-of-the-art methods for fabrication of three-dimensional biomimetic scaffolds are presented, and their advantages and drawbacks are discussed. The bottom-up methods used to assemble microscale building blocks (eg, microscale hydrogels) for tissue engineering are also reviewed. Finally, perspectives on future development of the bottom-up approach for tissue engineering are addressed.

  13. Solvent-free fabrication of three dimensionally aligned polycaprolactone microfibers for engineering of anisotropic tissues.

    PubMed

    An, Jia; Chua, Chee Kai; Leong, Kah Fai; Chen, Chih-Hao; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2012-10-01

    Fabrication of aligned microfiber scaffolds is critical in successful engineering of anisotropic tissues such as tendon, ligaments and nerves. Conventionally, aligned microfiber scaffolds are two dimensional and predominantly fabricated by electrospinning which is solvent dependent. In this paper, we report a novel technique, named microfiber melt drawing, to fabricate a bundle of three dimensionally aligned polycaprolactone microfibers without using any organic solvent. This technique is simple yet effective. It has been demonstrated that polycaprolactone microfibers of 10 μm fiber diameter can be directly drawn from a 2 mm orifice. Orifice diameter, temperature and take-up speed significantly influence the final linear density and fiber diameter of the microfibers. Mechanical test suggests that mechanical properties such as stiffness and breaking force of microfiber bundles can be easily adjusted by the number of fibers. In vitro study shows that these microfibers are able to support the proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts over 7 days. In vivo result of Achilles tendon repair in a rabbit model shows that the microfibers were highly infiltrated by tendon tissue as early as in 1 month, besides, the repaired tendon have a well-aligned tissue structure under the guidance of aligned microfibers. However whether these three dimensionally aligned microfibers can induce three dimensionally aligned cells remains inconclusive.

  14. Bone tissue engineering therapeutics: controlled drug delivery in three-dimensional scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Mouriño, Viviana; Boccaccini, Aldo R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an extensive overview of published studies on the development and applications of three-dimensional bone tissue engineering (TE) scaffolds with potential capability for the controlled delivery of therapeutic drugs. Typical drugs considered include gentamicin and other antibiotics generally used to combat osteomyelitis, as well as anti-inflammatory drugs and bisphosphonates, but delivery of growth factors is not covered in this review. In each case reviewed, special attention has been given to the technology used for controlling the release of the loaded drugs. The possibility of designing multifunctional three-dimensional bone TE scaffolds for the emerging field of bone TE therapeutics is discussed. A detailed summary of drugs included in three-dimensional scaffolds and the several approaches developed to combine bioceramics with various polymeric biomaterials in composites for drug-delivery systems is included. The main results presented in the literature are discussed and the remaining challenges in the field are summarized with suggestions for future research directions. PMID:19864265

  15. Rapid casting of patterned vascular networks for perfusable engineered three-dimensional tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jordan S.; Stevens, Kelly R.; Yang, Michael T.; Baker, Brendon M.; Nguyen, Duc-Huy T.; Cohen, Daniel M.; Toro, Esteban; Chen, Alice A.; Galie, Peter A.; Yu, Xiang; Chaturvedi, Ritika; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2012-09-01

    In the absence of perfusable vascular networks, three-dimensional (3D) engineered tissues densely populated with cells quickly develop a necrotic core. Yet the lack of a general approach to rapidly construct such networks remains a major challenge for 3D tissue culture. Here, we printed rigid 3D filament networks of carbohydrate glass, and used them as a cytocompatible sacrificial template in engineered tissues containing living cells to generate cylindrical networks that could be lined with endothelial cells and perfused with blood under high-pressure pulsatile flow. Because this simple vascular casting approach allows independent control of network geometry, endothelialization and extravascular tissue, it is compatible with a wide variety of cell types, synthetic and natural extracellular matrices, and crosslinking strategies. We also demonstrated that the perfused vascular channels sustained the metabolic function of primary rat hepatocytes in engineered tissue constructs that otherwise exhibited suppressed function in their core.

  16. Rapid casting of patterned vascular networks for perfusable engineered three-dimensional tissues.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jordan S; Stevens, Kelly R; Yang, Michael T; Baker, Brendon M; Nguyen, Duc-Huy T; Cohen, Daniel M; Toro, Esteban; Chen, Alice A; Galie, Peter A; Yu, Xiang; Chaturvedi, Ritika; Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Chen, Christopher S

    2012-09-01

    In the absence of perfusable vascular networks, three-dimensional (3D) engineered tissues densely populated with cells quickly develop a necrotic core. Yet the lack of a general approach to rapidly construct such networks remains a major challenge for 3D tissue culture. Here, we printed rigid 3D filament networks of carbohydrate glass, and used them as a cytocompatible sacrificial template in engineered tissues containing living cells to generate cylindrical networks that could be lined with endothelial cells and perfused with blood under high-pressure pulsatile flow. Because this simple vascular casting approach allows independent control of network geometry, endothelialization and extravascular tissue, it is compatible with a wide variety of cell types, synthetic and natural extracellular matrices, and crosslinking strategies. We also demonstrated that the perfused vascular channels sustained the metabolic function of primary rat hepatocytes in engineered tissue constructs that otherwise exhibited suppressed function in their core.

  17. [Research Progress of Collagen-based Three-dimensional Porous Scaffolds Used in Skin Tissue Engineering].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Tang, Qiwei; Zhou, Aimei; Yang, Shulin

    2015-08-01

    Collagen is a kind of natural biomedical material and collagen based three-dimensional porous scaffolds have been widely used in skin tissue engineering. However, these scaffolds do not meet the requirements for artificial skin substitutes in terms of their poor mechanical properties, short supply, and rejection in the bodies. All of these factors limit their further application in skin tissue engineering. A variety of methods have been chosen to meliorate the situation, such as cross linking and blending other substance for improving mechanical properties. The highly biomimetic scaffolds either in structure or in function can be prepared through culturing cells and loading growth factors. To avoid the drawbacks of unsafety attributing to animals, investigators have fixed their eyes on the recombinant collagen. This paper reviews the the progress of research and application of collagen-based 3-dimensional porous scaffolds in skin tissue engineering.

  18. Characterization of human lung cancer-associated fibroblasts in three-dimensional in vitro co-culture model

    SciTech Connect

    Horie, Masafumi; Saito, Akira; Mikami, Yu; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Nakajima, Jun; Kohyama, Tadashi; Nagase, Takahide

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We established three patient-paired sets of CAFs and NFs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs and NFs were analyzed using three-dimensional co-culture experiments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs clearly enhanced collagen gel contraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs showed higher {alpha}-SMA expression than NFs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs were implicated in invasion and differentiation of lung cancer cells. -- Abstract: Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Stromal cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play crucial roles in carcinogenesis, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis of non-small cell lung carcinoma, and targeting of CAFs could be a novel strategy for cancer treatment. However, the characteristics of human CAFs still remain to be better defined. In this study, we established patient-matched CAFs and normal fibroblasts (NFs), from tumoral and non-tumoral portions of resected lung tissue from lung cancer patients. CAFs showed higher {alpha}-smooth muscle actin ({alpha}-SMA) expression than NFs, and CAFs clearly enhanced collagen gel contraction. Furthermore, we employed three-dimensional co-culture assay with A549 lung cancer cells, where CAFs were more potent in inducing collagen gel contraction. Hematoxylin and eosin staining of co-cultured collagen gel revealed that CAFs had the potential to increase invasion of A549 cells compared to NFs. These observations provide evidence that lung CAFs have the tumor-promoting capacity distinct from NFs.

  19. Excitation propagation in three-dimensional engineered hearts using decellularized extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Haruyo; Lee, Jong-Kook; Yoshida, Akira; Yokoyama, Teruki; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Miwa, Keiko; Naito, Atsuhiko T; Oka, Toru; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Nakai, Junichi; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Sawa, Yoshiki; Sakata, Yasushi; Komuro, Issei

    2014-09-01

    Engineering of three-dimensional (3D) cardiac tissues using decellularized extracellular matrix could be a new technique to create an "organ-like" structure of the heart. To engineer artificial hearts functionally comparable to native hearts, however, much remain to be solved including stable excitation-propagation. To elucidate the points, we examined conduction properties of engineered tissues. We repopulated the decellularized hearts with neonatal rat cardiac cells and then, we observed excitation-propagation of spontaneous beatings using high resolution cameras. We also conducted immunofluorescence staining to examine morphological aspects. Live tissue imaging revealed that GFP-labeled-isolated cardiac cells were migrated into interstitial spaces through extravasation from coronary arteries. Engineered hearts repopulated with Ca(2+)-indicating protein (GCaMP2)-expressing cardiac cells were subjected to optical imaging experiments. Although the engineered hearts generally showed well-organized stable excitation-propagation, the hearts also demonstrated arrhythmogenic propensity such as disorganized propagation. Immunofluorescence study revealed randomly-mixed alignment of cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. The recellularized hearts also showed disarray of cardiomyocytes and markedly decreased expression of connexin43. In conclusion, we successfully demonstrated that the recellularized hearts showed dynamic excitation-propagation as a "whole organ". Our strategy could provide prerequisite information to construct a 3D-engineered heart, functionally comparable to the native heart.

  20. Production of three-dimensional tissue-engineered cartilage through mutual fusion of chondrocyte pellets.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, K; Fujihara, Y; Mori, Y; Asawa, Y; Kanazawa, S; Nishizawa, S; Misawa, M; Numano, T; Inoue, H; Sakamoto, T; Watanabe, M; Komura, M; Takato, T

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the mutual fusion of chondrocyte pellets was promoted in order to produce large-sized tissue-engineered cartilage with a three-dimensional (3D) shape. Five pellets of human auricular chondrocytes were first prepared, which were then incubated in an agarose mold. After 3 weeks of culture in matrix production-promoting medium under 5.78g/cm(2) compression, the tissue-engineered cartilage showed a sufficient mechanical strength. To confirm the usefulness of these methods, a transplantation experiment was performed using beagles. Tissue-engineered cartilage prepared with 50 pellets of beagle chondrocytes was transplanted subcutaneously into the cell-donor dog for 2 months. The tissue-engineered cartilage of the beagles maintained a rod-like shape, even after harvest. Histology showed fair cartilage regeneration. Furthermore, 20 pellets were made and placed on a beta-tricalcium phosphate prism, and this was then incubated within the agarose mold for 3 weeks. The construct was transplanted into a bone/cartilage defect in the cell-donor beagle. After 2 months, bone and cartilage regeneration was identified on micro-computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. This approach involving the fusion of small pellets into a large structure enabled the production of 3D tissue-engineered cartilage that was close to physiological cartilage tissue in property, without conventional polyper scaffolds.

  1. Three-dimensional modeling of diesel engine intake flow, combustion and emissions-II

    SciTech Connect

    Reitz, R.D.; Rutland, C.J.

    1993-09-01

    A three-dimensional computer code, KIVA, is being modified to include state-of-the-art submodels for diesel engine flow and combustion. Improved and/or new submodels which have already been implemented and previously reported are: Wall heat transfer with unsteadiness and compressibility, laminar-turbulent characteristic time combustion with unburned HC and Zeldo`vich NO{sub x}, and spray/wall impingement with rebounding and sliding drops. Progress on the implementation of improved spray drop drag and drop breakup models, the formulation and testing of a multistep kinetics ignition model and preliminary soot modeling results are described in this report. In addition, the use of a block structured version of KIVA to model the intake flow process is described. A grid generation scheme has been developed for modeling realistic (complex) engine geometries, and computations have been made of intake flow in the ports and combustion chamber of a two-intake-valve engine. The research also involves the use of the code to assess the effects of subprocesses on diesel engine performance. The accuracy of the predictions is being tested by comparisons with engine experiments. To date, comparisons have been made with measured engine cylinder pressure, temperature and heat flux data, and the model results are in good agreement with the experiments. Work is in progress that will allow validation of in-cylinder flow and soot formation predictions. An engine test facility is described that is being used to provide the needed validation data. Test results have been obtained showing the effect of injection rate and split injections on engine performance and emissions.

  2. Three-dimensional modeling of diesel engine intake flow, combustion and emissions-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reitz, R. D.; Rutland, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    A three-dimensional computer code, KIVA, is being modified to include state-of-the-art submodels for diesel engine flow and combustion. Improved and/or new submodels which have already been implemented and previously reported are: wall heat transfer with unsteadiness and compressibility, laminar-turbulent characteristic time combustion with unburned HC and Zeldo'vich NO(x), and spray/wall impingement with rebounding and sliding drops. Progress on the implementation of improved spray drop drag and drop breakup models, the formulation and testing of a multistep kinetics ignition model, and preliminary soot modeling results are described. In addition, the use of a block structured version of KIVA to model the intake flow process is described. A grid generation scheme was developed for modeling realistic (complex) engine geometries, and computations were made of intake flow in the ports and combustion chamber of a two-intake-value engine. The research also involves the use of the code to assess the effects of subprocesses on diesel engine performance. The accuracy of the predictions is being tested by comparisons with engine experiments. To date, comparisons were made with measured engine cylinder pressure, temperature and heat flux data, and the model results are in good agreement with the experiments. Work is in progress that will allow validation of in-cylinder flow and soot formation predictions. An engine test facility is described that is being used to provide the needed validation data. Test results were obtained showing the effect of injection rate and split injections on engine performance and emissions.

  3. Online monitoring of mechanical properties of three-dimensional tissue engineered constructs for quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinwald, Yvonne; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.; Yang, Ying; Baba Ismail, Yanny M.; El Haj, Alicia J.

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical preconditioning and mechanical properties of tissue engineered constructs are essential for their capability to regenerate damaged tissues. To online monitor the mechanical properties a hydrostatic pressure bioreactor was coupled with optical coherence tomography into a new image modality termed hydrostatic pressure optical coherence elastography (HP-OCE). HP-OCE was utilised to assess the properties of three-dimensional (3D) tissue constructs while being physically stimulated within the hydrostatic force bioreactor. Hydrogels have been infiltrated into porous rapid prototyped or salt-leached scaffolds to mimic heterogeneous mechanical properties of cell-seeded constructs. Variations of mechanical properties in the solid scaffolds and agarose gels with different gel concentrations as well as the presences of cells have been clearly delineated by HP-OCE. Results indicate that HP-OCE allows contactless real-time non-invasive monitoring of the mechanical properties of tissue constructs and the effect of physical stimulation on cellular activities.

  4. A Review of the Responses of Two- and Three-Dimensional Engineered Tissues to Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Hronik-Tupaj, Marie

    2012-01-01

    The application of external biophysical signals is one approach to tissue engineering that is explored less often than more traditional additions of exogenous biochemical and chemical factors to direct cell and tissue outcomes. The study of bioelectromagnetism and the field of electrotherapeutics have evolved over the years, and we review biocompatible electric stimulation devices and their successful application to tissue growth. Specifically, information on capacitively coupled alternating current, inductively coupled alternating current, and direct current devices is described. Cell and tissue responses from the application of these devices, including two- and three-dimensional in vitro studies and in vivo studies, are reviewed with regard to cell proliferation, adhesion, differentiation, morphology, and migration and tissue function. The current understanding of cellular mechanisms related to electric stimulation is detailed. The advantages of electric stimulation are compared with those pf other techniques, and areas in which electric fields are used as an adjuvant therapy for healing and regeneration are discussed. PMID:22046979

  5. A review of the responses of two- and three-dimensional engineered tissues to electric fields.

    PubMed

    Hronik-Tupaj, Marie; Kaplan, David L

    2012-06-01

    The application of external biophysical signals is one approach to tissue engineering that is explored less often than more traditional additions of exogenous biochemical and chemical factors to direct cell and tissue outcomes. The study of bioelectromagnetism and the field of electrotherapeutics have evolved over the years, and we review biocompatible electric stimulation devices and their successful application to tissue growth. Specifically, information on capacitively coupled alternating current, inductively coupled alternating current, and direct current devices is described. Cell and tissue responses from the application of these devices, including two- and three-dimensional in vitro studies and in vivo studies, are reviewed with regard to cell proliferation, adhesion, differentiation, morphology, and migration and tissue function. The current understanding of cellular mechanisms related to electric stimulation is detailed. The advantages of electric stimulation are compared with those pf other techniques, and areas in which electric fields are used as an adjuvant therapy for healing and regeneration are discussed.

  6. Modeling dynamic reciprocity: Engineering three-dimensional culture models of breast architecture, function, and neoplastic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2010-01-01

    In order to understand why cancer develops as well as predict the outcome of pharmacological treatments, we need to model the structure and function of organs in culture so that our experimental manipulations occur under physiological contexts. This review traces the history of the development of a prototypic example, the three-dimensional (3D) model of the mammary gland acinus. We briefly describe the considerable information available on both normal mammary gland function and breast cancer generated by the current model and present future challenges that will require an increase in its complexity. We propose the need for engineered tissues that faithfully recapitulate their native structures to allow a greater understanding of tissue function, dysfunction, and potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:15963732

  7. Mechanical stretching for tissue engineering: two-dimensional and three-dimensional constructs.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Brandon D; Park, Jae-Hong; Kwon, Il Keun; Lim, Jung Yul

    2012-08-01

    Mechanical cell stretching may be an attractive strategy for the tissue engineering of mechanically functional tissues. It has been demonstrated that cell growth and differentiation can be guided by cell stretch with minimal help from soluble factors and engineered tissues that are mechanically stretched in bioreactors may have superior organization, functionality, and strength compared with unstretched counterparts. This review explores recent studies on cell stretching in both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) setups focusing on the applications of stretch stimulation as a tool for controlling cell orientation, growth, gene expression, lineage commitment, and differentiation and for achieving successful tissue engineering of mechanically functional tissues, including cardiac, muscle, vasculature, ligament, tendon, bone, and so on. Custom stretching devices and lab-specific mechanical bioreactors are described with a discussion on capabilities and limitations. While stretch mechanotransduction pathways have been examined using 2D stretch, studying such pathways in physiologically relevant 3D environments may be required to understand how cells direct tissue development under stretch. Cell stretch study using 3D milieus may also help to develop tissue-specific stretch regimens optimized with biochemical feedback, which once developed will provide optimal tissue engineering protocols.

  8. Mechanical Stretching for Tissue Engineering: Two-Dimensional and Three-Dimensional Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Riehl, Brandon D.; Park, Jae-Hong; Kwon, Il Keun

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical cell stretching may be an attractive strategy for the tissue engineering of mechanically functional tissues. It has been demonstrated that cell growth and differentiation can be guided by cell stretch with minimal help from soluble factors and engineered tissues that are mechanically stretched in bioreactors may have superior organization, functionality, and strength compared with unstretched counterparts. This review explores recent studies on cell stretching in both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) setups focusing on the applications of stretch stimulation as a tool for controlling cell orientation, growth, gene expression, lineage commitment, and differentiation and for achieving successful tissue engineering of mechanically functional tissues, including cardiac, muscle, vasculature, ligament, tendon, bone, and so on. Custom stretching devices and lab-specific mechanical bioreactors are described with a discussion on capabilities and limitations. While stretch mechanotransduction pathways have been examined using 2D stretch, studying such pathways in physiologically relevant 3D environments may be required to understand how cells direct tissue development under stretch. Cell stretch study using 3D milieus may also help to develop tissue-specific stretch regimens optimized with biochemical feedback, which once developed will provide optimal tissue engineering protocols. PMID:22335794

  9. Three-dimensional modeling of diesel engine intake flow, combustion and emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reitz, R. D.; Rutland, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    A three-dimensional computer code (KIVA) is being modified to include state-of-the-art submodels for diesel engine flow and combustion: spray atomization, drop breakup/coalescence, multi-component fuel vaporization, spray/wall interaction, ignition and combustion, wall heat transfer, unburned HC and NOx formation, soot and radiation, and the intake flow process. Improved and/or new submodels which were completed are: wall heat transfer with unsteadiness and compressibility, laminar-turbulent characteristic time combustion with unburned HC and Zeldo'vich NOx, and spray/wall impingement with rebounding and sliding drops. Results to date show that adding the effects of unsteadiness and compressibility improves the accuracy of heat transfer predictions; spray drop rebound can occur from walls at low impingement velocities (e.g., in cold-starting); larger spray drops are formed at the nozzle due to the influence of vaporization on the atomization process; a laminar-and-turbulent characteristic time combustion model has the flexibility to match measured engine combustion data over a wide range of operating conditions; and finally, the characteristic time combustion model can also be extended to allow predictions of ignition. The accuracy of the predictions is being assessed by comparisons with available measurements. Additional supporting experiments are also described briefly. To date, comparisons with measured engine cylinder pressure and heat flux data were made for homogeneous charge, spark-ignited and compression-ignited engines. The model results are in good agreement with the experiments.

  10. Hybrid Tissue Engineering Scaffolds by Combination of Three-Dimensional Printing and Cell Photoencapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Markovic, Marica; Van Hoorick, Jasper; Hölzl, Katja; Tromayer, Maximilian; Gruber, Peter; Nürnberger, Sylvia; Dubruel, Peter; Van Vlierberghe, Sandra; Liska, Robert; Ovsianikov, Aleksandr

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing offers versatile possibilities for adapting the structural parameters of tissue engineering scaffolds. However, it is also essential to develop procedures allowing efficient cell seeding independent of scaffold geometry and pore size. The aim of this study was to establish a method for seeding the scaffolds using photopolymerizable cell-laden hydrogels. The latter facilitates convenient preparation, and handling of cell suspension, while distributing the hydrogel precursor throughout the pores, before it is cross-linked with light. In addition, encapsulation of living cells within hydrogels can produce constructs with high initial cell loading and intimate cell-matrix contact, similar to that of the natural extra-cellular matrix (ECM). Three dimensional scaffolds were produced from poly(lactic) acid (PLA) by means of fused deposition modeling. A solution of methacrylamide-modified gelatin (Gel-MOD) in cell culture medium containing photoinitiator Li-TPO-L was used as a hydrogel precursor. Being an enzymatically degradable derivative of natural collagen, gelatin-based matrices are biomimetic and potentially support the process of cell-induced remodeling. Preosteoblast cells MC3T3-E1 at a density of 10 × 106 cells per 1 mL were used for testing the seeding procedure and cell proliferation studies. Obtained results indicate that produced constructs support cell survival and proliferation over extended duration of our experiment. The established two-step approach for scaffold seeding with the cells is simple, rapid, and is shown to be highly reproducible. Furthermore, it enables precise control of the initial cell density, while yielding their uniform distribution throughout the scaffold. Such hybrid tissue engineering constructs merge the advantages of rigid 3D printed constructs with the soft hydrogel matrix, potentially mimicking the process of ECM remodeling. PMID:26858826

  11. Transient Three-Dimensional Analysis of Nozzle Side Load in Regeneratively Cooled Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See

    2005-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical investigations on the start-up side load physics for a regeneratively cooled, high-aspect-ratio nozzle were performed. The objectives of this study are to identify the three-dimensional side load physics and to compute the associated aerodynamic side load using an anchored computational methodology. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation, and a transient inlet condition based on an engine system simulation. Computations were performed for both the adiabatic and cooled walls in order to understand the effect of boundary conditions. Finite-rate chemistry was used throughout the study so that combustion effect is always included. The results show that three types of shock evolution are responsible for side loads: generation of combustion wave; transitions among free-shock separation, restricted-shock separation, and simultaneous free-shock and restricted shock separations; along with oscillation of shocks across the lip. Wall boundary conditions drastically affect the computed side load physics: the adiabatic nozzle prefers free-shock separation while the cooled nozzle favors restricted-shock separation, resulting in higher peak side load for the cooled nozzle than that of the adiabatic nozzle. By comparing the computed physics with those of test observations, it is concluded that cooled wall is a more realistic boundary condition, and the oscillation of the restricted-shock separation flow pattern across the lip along with its associated tangential shock motion are the dominant side load physics for a regeneratively cooled, high aspect-ratio rocket engine.

  12. Open-source three-dimensional printing of biodegradable polymer scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Trachtenberg, Jordan E; Mountziaris, Paschalia M; Miller, Jordan S; Wettergreen, Matthew; Kasper, Fred K; Mikos, Antonios G

    2014-12-01

    The fabrication of scaffolds for tissue engineering requires elements of customization depending on the application and is often limited due to the flexibility of the processing technique. This investigation seeks to address this obstacle by utilizing an open-source three-dimensional printing (3DP) system that allows vast customizability and facilitates reproduction of experiments. The effects of processing parameters on printed poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds with uniform and gradient pore architectures have been characterized with respect to fiber and pore morphology and mechanical properties. The results demonstrate the ability to tailor the fiber diameter, pore size, and porosity through modification of pressure, printing speed, and programmed fiber spacing. A model was also used to predict the compressive mechanical properties of uniform and gradient scaffolds, and it was found that modulus and yield strength declined with increasing porosity. The use of open-source 3DP technologies for printing tissue-engineering scaffolds provides a flexible system that can be readily modified at a low cost and is supported by community documentation. In this manner, the 3DP system is more accessible to the scientific community, which further facilitates the translation of these technologies toward successful tissue-engineering strategies.

  13. Structural and material approaches to bone tissue engineering in powder-based three-dimensional printing.

    PubMed

    Butscher, A; Bohner, M; Hofmann, S; Gauckler, L; Müller, R

    2011-03-01

    This article reviews the current state of knowledge concerning the use of powder-based three-dimensional printing (3DP) for the synthesis of bone tissue engineering scaffolds. 3DP is a solid free-form fabrication (SFF) technique building up complex open porous 3D structures layer by layer (a bottom-up approach). In contrast to traditional fabrication techniques generally subtracting material step by step (a top-down approach), SFF approaches allow nearly unlimited designs and a large variety of materials to be used for scaffold engineering. Today's state of the art materials, as well as the mechanical and structural requirements for bone scaffolds, are summarized and discussed in relation to the technical feasibility of their use in 3DP. Advances in the field of 3DP are presented and compared with other SFF methods. Existing strategies on material and design control of scaffolds are reviewed. Finally, the possibilities and limiting factors are addressed and potential strategies to improve 3DP for scaffold engineering are proposed.

  14. Tissue engineering of autologous cartilage grafts in three-dimensional in vitro macroaggregate culture system.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Andreas; Dennis, James E; Aigner, Joachim; Coticchia, James; Arnold, James; Berghaus, Alexander; Kastenbauer, Ernst R; Caplan, Arnold I

    2004-01-01

    In the field of tissue engineering, techniques have been described to generate cartilage tissue with isolated chondrocytes and bioresorbable or nonbioresorbable biomaterials serving as three-dimensional cell carriers. In spite of successful cartilage engineering, problems of uneven degradation of biomaterial, and unforeseeable cell-biomaterial interactions remain. This study represents a novel technique to engineer cartilage by an in vitro macroaggregate culture system without the use of biomaterials. Human nasoseptal or auricular chondrocytes were enzymatically isolated and amplified in conventional monolayer culture before the cells were seeded into a cell culture insert with a track-etched membrane and cultured in vitro for 3 weeks. The new cartilage formed within the in vitro macroaggregates was analyzed by histology (toluidine blue, von Kossa-safranin O staining), and immunohistochemistry (collagen types I, II, V, VI, and X and elastin). The total glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of native and engineered auricular as well as nasal cartilage was assayed colorimetrically in a safranin O assay. The biomechanical properties of engineered cartilage were determined by biphasic indentation assay. After 3 weeks of in vitro culture, nasoseptal and auricular chondrocytes synthesized new cartilage with the typical appearance of hyaline nasal cartilage and elastic auricular cartilage. Immunohistochemical staining of cartilage samples showed a characteristic pattern of staining for collagen antibodies that varied in location and intensity. In all samples, intense staining for cartilage-specific collagen types I, II, and X was observed. By the use of von Kossa-safranin O staining a few positive patches-a possible sign of beginning mineralization within the engineered cartilages-were detected. The unique pattern for nasoseptal cartilage is intense staining for type V collagen, whereas auricular cartilage is only weakly positive for collagen types V and VI. Engineered nasal

  15. Morphological and functional characteristics of three-dimensional engineered bone-ligament-bone constructs following implantation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jinjin; Goble, Kristen; Smietana, Michael; Kostrominova, Tatiana; Larkin, Lisa; Arruda, Ellen M

    2009-10-01

    The incidence of ligament injury has recently been estimated at 400,000/year. The preferred treatment is reconstruction using an allograft, but outcomes are limited by donor availability, biomechanical incompatibility, and immune rejection. The creation of an engineered ligament in vitro solely from patient bone marrow stromal cells (has the potential to greatly enhance outcomes in knee reconstructions. Our laboratory has developed a scaffoldless method to engineer three-dimensional (3D) ligament and bone constructs from rat bone marrow stem cells in vitro. Coculture of these two engineered constructs results in a 3D bone-ligament-bone (BLB) construct with viable entheses, which was successfully used for medial collateral ligament (MCL) replacement in a rat model. 1 month and 2 month implantations were applied to the engineered BLBs. Implantation of 3D BLBs in a MCL replacement application demonstrated that our in vitro engineered tissues grew and remodeled quickly in vivo to an advanced phenotype and partially restored function of the knee. The explanted 3D BLB ligament region stained positively for type I collagen and elastin and was well vascularized after 1 and 2 months in vivo. Tangent moduli of the ligament portion of the 3D BLB 1 month explants increased by a factor of 2.4 over in vitro controls, to a value equivalent to those observed in 14-day-old neonatal rat MCLs. The 3D BLB 1 month explants also exhibited a functionally graded response that closely matched native MCL inhomogeneity, indicating the constructs functionally adapted in vivo.

  16. Three dimensional multi-cellular muscle-like tissue engineering in perfusion-based bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Cerino, Giulia; Gaudiello, Emanuele; Grussenmeyer, Thomas; Melly, Ludovic; Massai, Diana; Banfi, Andrea; Martin, Ivan; Eckstein, Friedrich; Grapow, Martin; Marsano, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Conventional tissue engineering strategies often rely on the use of a single progenitor cell source to engineer in vitro biological models; however, multi-cellular environments can better resemble the complexity of native tissues. Previous described co-culture models used skeletal myoblasts, as parenchymal cell source, and mesenchymal or endothelial cells, as stromal component. Here, we propose instead the use of adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular fraction cells, which include both mesenchymal and endothelial cells, to better resemble the native stroma. Percentage of serum supplementation is one of the crucial parameters to steer skeletal myoblasts toward either proliferation (20%) or differentiation (5%) in two-dimensional culture conditions. On the contrary, three-dimensional (3D) skeletal myoblast culture often simply adopts the serum content used in monolayer, without taking into account the new cell environment. When considering 3D cultures of mm-thick engineered tissues, homogeneous and sufficient oxygen supply is paramount to avoid formation of necrotic cores. Perfusion-based bioreactor culture can significantly improve the oxygen access to the cells, enhancing the viability and the contractility of the engineered tissues. In this study, we first investigated the influence of different serum supplementations on the skeletal myoblast ability to proliferate and differentiate during 3D perfusion-based culture. We tested percentages of serum promoting monolayer skeletal myoblast-proliferation (20%) and differentiation (5%) and suitable for stromal cell culture (10%) with a view to identify the most suitable condition for the subsequent co-culture. The 10% serum medium composition resulted in the highest number of mature myotubes and construct functionality. Co-culture with stromal vascular fraction cells at 10% serum also supported the skeletal myoblast differentiation and maturation, hence providing a functional engineered 3D muscle model that resembles

  17. Customized biomimetic scaffolds created by indirect three-dimensional printing for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Yeon; Choi, Bogyu; Wu, Benjamin; Lee, Min

    2013-12-01

    Three-dimensional printing (3DP) is a rapid prototyping technique that can create complex 3D structures by inkjet printing of a liquid binder onto powder biomaterials for tissue engineering scaffolds. Direct fabrication of scaffolds from 3DP, however, imposes a limitation on material choices by manufacturing processes. In this study, we report an indirect 3DP approach wherein a positive replica of desired shapes was printed using gelatin particles, and the final scaffold was directly produced from the printed mold. To create patient-specific scaffolds that match precisely to a patient's external contours, we integrated our indirect 3DP technique with imaging technologies and successfully created custom scaffolds mimicking human mandibular condyle using polycaprolactone and chitosan for potential osteochondral tissue engineering. To test the ability of the technique to precisely control the internal morphology of the scaffolds, we created orthogonal interconnected channels within the scaffolds using computer-aided-design models. Because very few biomaterials are truly osteoinductive, we modified inert 3D printed materials with bioactive apatite coating. The feasibility of these scaffolds to support cell growth was investigated using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC). The BMSCs showed good viability in the scaffolds, and the apatite coating further enhanced cellular spreading and proliferation. This technique may be valuable for complex scaffold fabrication.

  18. Three-dimensional electrospun silk-fibroin nanofiber for skin tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Park, Ye Ri; Ju, Hyung Woo; Lee, Jung Min; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Lee, Ok Joo; Moon, Bo Mi; Park, Hyun Jung; Jeong, Ju Yeon; Yeon, Yeung Kyu; Park, Chan Hum

    2016-12-01

    Tissue-engineered skin substitutes may offer an effective therapeutic option for the treatment of patients with skin damages. In this study, a novel three-dimensional (3D) scaffold composed of electrospun silk fibroin (SF) nanofiber was fabricated using electrospinning with the addition of NaCl crystals. It has well known that the electrospun SF nanofibers were excellent scaffold for tissue. However, it is generally difficult for cells to infiltrate the electrospun silk fibroin due to its small pore size. To resolve this problem, we dropped the NaCl crystals above the rotating collector, which become incorporated into the nanofibers. Three methods (freeze-drying, salt-leaching, and electrospinning with NaCl) for fabrication of SF scaffolds were compared to the difference of their characteristics using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), mechanical strength, porosity, swelling abilities, and cell proliferation. Additionally, using air-liquid culture system, keratinocytes were co-cultured with fibroblasts in each type of SF scaffolds to construct an artificial bilayer skin in vitro. In our experimental results, histologic findings in only electrospun SF scaffolds showed more proliferation of fibroblasts in deep layer and more differentiation of keratinocytes in superficial layer. The present study suggests that 3D electrospun SF scaffolds might be a suitable for skin tissue engineering.

  19. Customized biomimetic scaffolds created by indirect three-dimensional printing for tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Yeon; Choi, Bogyu; Wu, Benjamin; Lee, Min

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional printing (3DP) is a rapid prototyping (RP) technique that can create complex 3D structures by inkjet printing of a liquid binder onto powder biomaterials for tissue engineering scaffolds. Direct fabrication of scaffolds from 3DP, however, imposes a limitation on material choices by manufacturing processes. In this study, we report an indirect 3DP approach wherein a positive replica of desired shapes was printed using gelatin particles, and the final scaffold was directly produced from the printed mold. To create patient-specific scaffolds that match precisely to a patient’s external contours, we integrated our indirect 3DP technique with imaging technologies and successfully created custom scaffolds mimicking human mandibular condyle using polycaprolactone (PCL) and chitosan (CH) for potential osteochondral tissue engineering. To test the ability of the technique to precisely control the internal morphology of the scaffolds, we created orthogonal interconnected channels within the scaffolds using computer-aided-design (CAD) models. Because very few biomaterials are truly osteoinductive, we modified inert 3D printed materials with bioactive apatite coating. The feasibility of these scaffolds to support cell growth was investigated using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC). The BMSCs showed good viability in the scaffolds, and the apatite-coating further enhanced cellular spreading and proliferation. This technique may be valuable for complex scaffold fabrication. PMID:24060622

  20. Engineered three-dimensional rabbit oral epithelial–mesenchymal–muscular hybrid sheets

    PubMed Central

    Yamane, Shigeki; Higa, Kazunari; Umezawa, Takashi; Serikawa, Masamitsu; Shimazaki, Jun; Abe, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative muscles are required for swallowing and mastication, and are important for functional recovery from diseases involving oral muscular defects. Therefore, we generated three-layer hybrid sheets, similar to oral mucosal structures containing submucosal muscles, using rabbit oral mucosa epithelial, mesenchymal, and myoblastic progenitor cells, and examined the structural proteins. Each cell type was obtained from rabbit oral mucosa using enzymatic digestion. Isolated mesenchymal and myoblastic cells were multi-differentiated into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes or myotubes. Isolated epithelial cells were cultured on collagen gels containing isolated mesenchymal cells for 2 weeks, and these epithelial–mesenchymal cell sheets were laminated onto myoblastic cell sheets. The engineered hybrid sheets were multi-stratified in the epithelial and myoblastic layers in a time-dependent manner, expressing intermediate cytoskeletal filament proteins of epithelium and muscle. Hybrid sheets also expressed extracellular matrix basement membrane proteins. Immature cell markers for epithelial and myoblastic cells were observed continuously in hybrid sheet cultures. We established engineered three-dimensional rabbit oral mucosa hybrid sheets containing each immature cell type in vitro. PMID:27341388

  1. Three-Dimensional Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering Applications: Role of Porosity and Pore Size

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Qiu Li

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering applications commonly encompass the use of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds to provide a suitable microenvironment for the incorporation of cells or growth factors to regenerate damaged tissues or organs. These scaffolds serve to mimic the actual in vivo microenvironment where cells interact and behave according to the mechanical cues obtained from the surrounding 3D environment. Hence, the material properties of the scaffolds are vital in determining cellular response and fate. These 3D scaffolds are generally highly porous with interconnected pore networks to facilitate nutrient and oxygen diffusion and waste removal. This review focuses on the various fabrication techniques (e.g., conventional and rapid prototyping methods) that have been employed to fabricate 3D scaffolds of different pore sizes and porosity. The different pore size and porosity measurement methods will also be discussed. Scaffolds with graded porosity have also been studied for their ability to better represent the actual in vivo situation where cells are exposed to layers of different tissues with varying properties. In addition, the ability of pore size and porosity of scaffolds to direct cellular responses and alter the mechanical properties of scaffolds will be reviewed, followed by a look at nature's own scaffold, the extracellular matrix. Overall, the limitations of current scaffold fabrication approaches for tissue engineering applications and some novel and promising alternatives will be highlighted. PMID:23672709

  2. Three-dimensional pattern formation of magnetically labeled microgel beads for biological tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, H.; Inoue, H.; Nakamura, M.

    2009-03-01

    We commenced basic research on the three-dimensional (3D) pattern formation of microgel beads for applications in biological tissue engineering. In this new technique, microgel beads are premagnetized by doping them with magnetic nanoparticles. Living cells will be included in the beads for actual use. If a nonuniform magnetic field is applied to a solution containing these magnetized beads, the beads will align, contact, and form a 3D structure. The structure is controlled by the seed pattern of the magnetic particles plugged in a substrate and the profile of the magnetic field distribution. We constructed tubes, which imitate blood vessels, for demonstration using gel beads whose diameters are of the order of several tens of micrometers. The diameter of the demonstrated tube was less than 0.5 mm and its length was 6.6 mm, although living cells were not included in the beads. Numerical calculations by using the discrete element method were conducted to confirm the formation of the tube and to predict the effect of centrifugal force, which will be applied to fill cells in the space between magnetically patterned beads. Although this unique technology is in the nascent stage, this 3D pattern formation technique by the control of the magnetic field has potential to be one of the effective engineering technologies for manufacturing 3D patterned biological tissues in the future.

  3. Three-dimensional impedance engineering for mixed-signal system-on-chip applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Kyuchul

    A novel approach for three-dimensional substrate impedance engineering of p-/p+ epi substrate is proposed for mixed-signal integrated circuit applications. This technology requires minimum intrusion to conventional Si CMOS processing, but offers astounding improvements with regard to RF crosstalk via substrate and RF passive device performance. The engineered substrate consists of conducting as well as semi-insulating regions strategically placed three-dimensionally throughout the volume of the substrate. The p-/p+ epi substrate is used to prevent latch-up at tight design rules in high performance digital CMOS. Metal vias are fabricated from the front side using electroless plating method for Faraday cage isolation structure as well as "true ground" contacts. A self-limiting micro-PS formation process is employed to allow the insertion of semi-insulating regions from the backside of the wafer and RIE etch to remove p- layer is performed from the front side completely eliminating any parasitic pathways for crosstalk. The crosstalk isolation methods in this study are based on the principle of RF noise shielding in addition to insulating. Both the suppression of crosstalk by the metal vias and micro-PS trench isolation are so significant that the crosstalk goes down to the noise floor of the conventional measurement instruments. The use of micro-PS layer effectively can reduce the parasitic substrate effect. These reductions result in higher Q and fr of inductors on micro-PS region. Inductors located on micro-PS are subjected to a much less stringent set of constraints than that on bulk Si substrates, allowing for much higher inductance without severe sacrifice in Q and fr, and much higher Q for with reasonable inductance and fr. The bond pad structure using micro-PS can significantly reduce the parasitic bond pad capacitance and increases the crosstalk isolation characteristic. Reducing the parasitic pad capacitance by using micro-PS results in high bond pad resonant

  4. Three-Dimensional Bioprinting for Regenerative Dentistry and Craniofacial Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Obregon, F; Vaquette, C; Ivanovski, S; Hutmacher, D W; Bertassoni, L E

    2015-09-01

    Craniofacial tissues are organized with complex 3-dimensional (3D) architectures. Mimicking such 3D complexity and the multicellular interactions naturally occurring in craniofacial structures represents one of the greatest challenges in regenerative dentistry. Three-dimensional bioprinting of tissues and biological structures has been proposed as a promising alternative to address some of these key challenges. It enables precise manufacture of various biomaterials with complex 3D architectures, while being compatible with multiple cell sources and being customizable to patient-specific needs. This review describes different 3D bioprinting methods and summarizes how different classes of biomaterials (polymer hydrogels, ceramics, composites, and cell aggregates) may be used for 3D biomanufacturing of scaffolds, as well as craniofacial tissue analogs. While the fabrication of scaffolds upon which cells attach, migrate, and proliferate is already in use, printing of all the components that form a tissue (living cells and matrix materials together) to produce tissue constructs is still in its early stages. In summary, this review seeks to highlight some of the key advantages of 3D bioprinting technology for the regeneration of craniofacial structures. Additionally, it stimulates progress on the development of strategies that will promote the translation of craniofacial tissue engineering from the laboratory bench to the chair side.

  5. Printability of calcium phosphate powders for three-dimensional printing of tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Butscher, Andre; Bohner, Marc; Roth, Christian; Ernstberger, Annika; Heuberger, Roman; Doebelin, Nicola; von Rohr, Philipp Rudolf; Müller, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional printing (3DP) is a versatile method to produce scaffolds for tissue engineering. In 3DP the solid is created by the reaction of a liquid selectively sprayed onto a powder bed. Despite the importance of the powder properties, there has to date been a relatively poor understanding of the relation between the powder properties and the printing outcome. This article aims at improving this understanding by looking at the link between key powder parameters (particle size, flowability, roughness, wettability) and printing accuracy. These powder parameters are determined as key factors with a predictive value for the final 3DP outcome. Promising results can be expected for mean particle size in the range of 20-35 μm, compaction rate in the range of 1.3-1.4, flowability in the range of 5-7 and powder bed surface roughness of 10-25 μm. Finally, possible steps and strategies in pushing the physical limits concerning improved quality in 3DP are addressed and discussed.

  6. Rapid fabrication system for three-dimensional tissues using cell sheet engineering and centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Akiyuki; Haraguchi, Yuji; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okano, Teruo

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissues can be reconstructed by cell sheet technology, and various clinical researches using these constructed tissues have already been initiated to regenerate damaged tissues. While 3D tissues can be easily fabricated by layering cell sheets, the attachment period for cell adhesion between a cell sheet and a culture dish, or double-layered cell sheets normally takes 20-30 min. This study proposed a more rapid fabrication system for bioengineered tissue using cell sheet technology and centrifugation. A C2C12 mouse myoblast sheet harvested from a temperature-responsive culture dish will attach tightly to a culture dish or another cell sheet at 37°C after a 20 min-incubation. However, the same cell sheet centrifuged (12-34 × g) for 3 min also attached tightly to a dish or another cell sheet at 37°C after only a 3 min-incubation. The manipulation time was reduced by approximately two-thirds by centrifugation. The rapid attachments were also cross-sectionally confirmed by optical coherence tomography. These rapidly constructed cell sheet-tissues using centrifugation showed active cell metabolism, cell viability, and very high production of vascular endothelial growth factor, like those prepared by the conventional method; indicating complete cell sheet-attachment without any cell damage. This new system will be a powerful tool in the fields of cell sheet-based tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, and accelerate the use of cell sheets in clinical applications.

  7. Engineering of microscale three-dimensional pancreatic islet models in vitro and their biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bin; Wang, Lin; Han, Shuang; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Zhang, Xiaohui; Xu, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Diabetes now is the most common chronic disease in the world inducing heavy burden for the people's health. Based on this, diabetes research such as islet function has become a hot topic in medical institutes of the world. Today, in medical institutes, the conventional experiment platform in vitro is monolayer cell culture. However, with the development of micro- and nano-technologies, several microengineering methods have been developed to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) islet models in vitro which can better mimic the islet of pancreases in vivo. These in vitro islet models have shown better cell function than monolayer cells, indicating their great potential as better experimental platforms to elucidate islet behaviors under both physiological and pathological conditions, such as the molecular mechanisms of diabetes and clinical islet transplantation. In this review, we present the state-of-the-art advances in the microengineering methods for fabricating microscale islet models in vitro. We hope this will help researchers to better understand the progress in the engineering 3D islet models and their biomedical applications such as drug screening and islet transplantation.

  8. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Broncho-epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H

    2006-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human broncho-epithelial (HBE) tissue-like assemblies (3D HBE TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and parainfluenza virus type 3 (wtPIV3 JS) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infections with both viruses. Therefore, TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host's immune system.

  9. Thermal compression and characterization of three-dimensional nonwoven PET matrices as tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Ma, T; Yang, S T; Kniss, D A

    2001-03-01

    Nonwoven fibrous matrices have been widely used as scaffolds in tissue engineering, and modification of microstructure of these matrices is needed to organize cells in three-dimensional space with spatially balanced proliferation and differentiation required for functional tissue development. The method of thermal compression of nonwoven polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fabrics was developed and key parameters of temperature, pressure, and compression duration were evaluated in this study. The permanent deformation was obtained at elevated temperature under pressure and the viscoelastic compressional behaviors were observed, characterized by a distinct apparent modulus change in glass transition temperature region. A liquid extrusion method was further employed to analyze both pore size and its distribution for matrices with porosity ranging from 84 to 93%. It is also found that a more uniformly distributed pore size was resulted from thermal compression and the isotropic nature of nonwoven fabrics was preserved because of the proportional reduction of the pore by compression. The thermally compressed fabric matrices with two different pore sizes (15 and 20 microm in pore radius) were used to culture human trophoblast ED27 and NIH 3T3 cells. It was found that cells cultured in the different pore-size PET matrices had different cell spatial organization and proliferation rates. The smaller pores in the matrix allowed cells to spread better and proliferate faster, while cells in the larger pores tended to form large aggregates and had lower proliferation rate. The thermal compression technique also can be applied to other synthetic fibrous matrices including biodegradable polymers used in tissue engineering to modify the microstructure according to their viscoelastic properties.

  10. Construction of three-dimensional vascularized cardiac tissue with cell sheet engineering.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okano, Teruo

    2015-05-10

    Construction of three-dimensional (3D) tissues with pre-isolated cells is a promising achievement for novel medicine and drug-discovery research. Our laboratory constructs 3D tissues with an innovative and unique method for layering multiple cell sheets. Cell sheets maintain a high-efficiently regenerating function, because of the higher cell density and higher transplantation efficiency, compared to other cell-delivery methods. Cell sheets have already been applied in clinical applications for regenerative medicine in treating patients with various diseases. Therefore, in our search to develop a more efficient treatment with cell sheets, we are constructing 3D tissues by layering cell sheets. Native animal tissues and organs have an abundance of capillaries to supply oxygen and nutrients, and to remove waste molecules. In our investigation of vascularized cardiac cell sheets, we have found that endothelial cells within cell sheets spontaneously form blood vessel networks as in vivo capillaries. To construct even thicker 3D tissues by layering multiple cell sheets, it is critical to have a medium or blood flow within the vascular networks of the cell sheets. Therefore, to perfuse medium or blood in the cell sheet vascular network to maintain the viability of all cells, we developed two types of vascular beds; (1) a femoral muscle-based vascular bed, and (2) a synthetic collagen gel-based vascular bed. Both vascular beds successfully provide the critical flow of culture medium, which allows 12-layer cell sheets to survive. Such bioreactor systems, when combined with cell sheet engineering techniques, have produced functional vascularized 3D tissues. Here we explain and discuss the various processes to obtain vascular networks by properly connecting cell sheets and the engineering of 3D tissues.

  11. Tissue optical clearing, three-dimensional imaging, and computer morphometry in whole mouse lungs and human airways.

    PubMed

    Scott, Gregory D; Blum, Emily D; Fryer, Allison D; Jacoby, David B

    2014-07-01

    In whole adult mouse lung, full identification of airway nerves (or other cellular/subcellular objects) has not been possible due to patchy distribution and micron-scale size. Here we describe a method using tissue clearing to acquire the first complete image of three-dimensional (3D) innervation in the lung. We then created a method to pair analysis of nerve (or any other colabeled epitope) images with identification of 3D tissue compartments and airway morphometry by using fluorescent casting and morphometry software (which we designed and are making available as open-source). We then tested our method to quantify a sparse heterogeneous nerve population by examining visceral pleural nerves. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of our method in human tissue to image full thickness innervation in irregular 3D tissue compartments and to quantify sparse objects (intrinsic airway ganglia). Overall, this method can uniquely pair the advantages of whole tissue imaging and cellular/subcellular fluorescence microscopy.

  12. Effects of lung disease on the three-dimensional structure and air flow pattern in the human airway tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Moortele, Tristan; Nemes, Andras; Wendt, Christine; Coletti, Filippo

    2016-11-01

    The morphological features of the airway tree directly affect the air flow features during breathing, which determines the gas exchange and inhaled particle transport. Lung disease, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) in this study, affects the structural features of the lungs, which in turn negatively affects the air flow through the airways. Here bronchial tree air volume geometries are segmented from Computed Tomography (CT) scans of healthy and diseased subjects. Geometrical analysis of the airway centerlines and corresponding cross-sectional areas provide insight into the specific effects of COPD on the airway structure. These geometries are also used to 3D print anatomically accurate, patient specific flow models. Three-component, three-dimensional velocity fields within these models are acquired using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The three-dimensional flow fields provide insight into the change in flow patterns and features. Additionally, particle trajectories are determined using the velocity fields, to identify the fate of therapeutic and harmful inhaled aerosols. Correlation between disease-specific and patient-specific anatomical features with dysfunctional airflow patterns can be achieved by combining geometrical and flow analysis.

  13. Three-dimensional printing of porous ceramic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Hermann; Rieder, Wolfgang; Irsen, Stephan; Leukers, Barbara; Tille, Carsten

    2005-08-01

    This article reports a new process chain for custom-made three-dimensional (3D) porous ceramic scaffolds for bone replacement with fully interconnected channel network for the repair of osseous defects from trauma or disease. Rapid prototyping and especially 3D printing is well suited to generate complex-shaped porous ceramic matrices directly from powder materials. Anatomical information obtained from a patient can be used to design the implant for a target defect. In the 3D printing technique, a box filled with ceramic powder is printed with a polymer-based binder solution layer by layer. Powder is bonded in wetted regions. Unglued powder can be removed and a ceramic green body remains. We use a modified hydroxyapatite (HA) powder for the fabrication of 3D printed scaffolds due to the safety of HA as biocompatible implantable material and efficacy for bone regeneration. The printed ceramic green bodies are consolidated at a temperature of 1250 degrees C in a high temperature furnace in ambient air. The polymeric binder is pyrolysed during sintering. The resulting scaffolds can be used in tissue engineering of bone implants using patient-derived cells that are seeded onto the scaffolds. This article describes the process chain, beginning from data preparation to 3D printing tests and finally sintering of the scaffold. Prototypes were successfully manufactured and characterized. It was demonstrated that it is possible to manufacture parts with inner channels with a dimension down to 450 microm and wall structures with a thickness down to 330 microm. The mechanical strength of dense test parts is up to 22 MPa.

  14. Irreparable complex DNA double-strand breaks induce chromosome breakage in organotypic three-dimensional human lung epithelial cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Hu, Burong; Delgado, Oliver; Ding, Liang-Hao; Story, Michael D.; Minna, John D.; Shay, Jerry W.; Chen, David J.

    2011-01-01

    DNA damage and consequent mutations initiate the multistep carcinogenic process. Differentiated cells have a reduced capacity to repair DNA lesions, but the biological impact of unrepaired DNA lesions in differentiated lung epithelial cells is unclear. Here, we used a novel organotypic human lung three-dimensional (3D) model to investigate the biological significance of unrepaired DNA lesions in differentiated lung epithelial cells. We showed, consistent with existing notions that the kinetics of loss of simple double-strand breaks (DSBs) were significantly reduced in organotypic 3D culture compared to kinetics of repair in two-dimensional (2D) culture. Strikingly, we found that, unlike simple DSBs, a majority of complex DNA lesions were irreparable in organotypic 3D culture. Levels of expression of multiple DNA damage repair pathway genes were significantly reduced in the organotypic 3D culture compared with those in 2D culture providing molecular evidence for the defective DNA damage repair in organotypic culture. Further, when differentiated cells with unrepaired DNA lesions re-entered the cell cycle, they manifested a spectrum of gross-chromosomal aberrations in mitosis. Our data suggest that downregulation of multiple DNA repair pathway genes in differentiated cells renders them vulnerable to DSBs, promoting genome instability that may lead to carcinogenesis. PMID:21421565

  15. Analytical three-dimensional neutron transport benchmarks for verification of nuclear engineering codes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapol, B.D.; Kornreich, D.E.

    1997-07-01

    Because of the requirement of accountability and quality control in the scientific world, a demand for high-quality analytical benchmark calculations has arisen in the neutron transport community. The intent of these benchmarks is to provide a numerical standard to which production neutron transport codes may be compared in order to verify proper operation. The overall investigation as modified in the second year renewal application includes the following three primary tasks. Task 1 on two dimensional neutron transport is divided into (a) single medium searchlight problem (SLP) and (b) two-adjacent half-space SLP. Task 2 on three-dimensional neutron transport covers (a) point source in arbitrary geometry, (b) single medium SLP, and (c) two-adjacent half-space SLP. Task 3 on code verification, includes deterministic and probabilistic codes. The primary aim of the proposed investigation was to provide a suite of comprehensive two- and three-dimensional analytical benchmarks for neutron transport theory applications. This objective has been achieved. The suite of benchmarks in infinite media and the three-dimensional SLP are a relatively comprehensive set of one-group benchmarks for isotropically scattering media. Because of time and resource limitations, the extensions of the benchmarks to include multi-group and anisotropic scattering are not included here. Presently, however, enormous advances in the solution for the planar Green`s function in an anisotropically scattering medium have been made and will eventually be implemented in the two- and three-dimensional solutions considered under this grant. Of particular note in this work are the numerical results for the three-dimensional SLP, which have never before been presented. The results presented were made possible only because of the tremendous advances in computing power that have occurred during the past decade.

  16. Three-dimensional accurate detection of lung emphysema in rats using ultra-short and zero echo time MRI.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Andrea; Tibiletti, Marta; Kjørstad, Åsmund; Birk, Gerald; Schad, Lothar R; Stierstorfer, Birgit; Rasche, Volker; Stiller, Detlef

    2015-11-01

    Emphysema is a life-threatening pathology that causes irreversible destruction of alveolar walls. In vivo imaging techniques play a fundamental role in the early non-invasive pre-clinical and clinical detection and longitudinal follow-up of this pathology. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the feasibility of using high resolution radial three-dimensional (3D) zero echo time (ZTE) and 3D ultra-short echo time (UTE) MRI to accurately detect lung pathomorphological changes in a rodent model of emphysema.Porcine pancreas elastase (PPE) was intratracheally administered to the rats to produce the emphysematous changes. 3D ZTE MRI, low and high definition 3D UTE MRI and micro-computed tomography images were acquired 4 weeks after the PPE challenge. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were measured in PPE-treated and control rats. T2* values were computed from low definition 3D UTE MRI. Histomorphometric measurements were made after euthanizing the animals. Both ZTE and UTE MR images showed a significant decrease in the SNR measured in PPE-treated lungs compared with controls, due to the pathomorphological changes taking place in the challenged lungs. A significant decrease in T2* values in PPE-challenged animals compared with controls was measured using UTE MRI. Histomorphometric measurements showed a significant increase in the mean linear intercept in PPE-treated lungs. UTE yielded significantly higher SNR compared with ZTE (14% and 30% higher in PPE-treated and non-PPE-treated lungs, respectively).This study showed that optimized 3D radial UTE and ZTE MRI can provide lung images of excellent quality, with high isotropic spatial resolution (400 µm) and SNR in parenchymal tissue (>25) and negligible motion artifacts in freely breathing animals. These techniques were shown to be useful non-invasive instruments to accurately and reliably detect the pathomorphological alterations taking place in emphysematous lungs, without incurring the risks of cumulative radiation

  17. Respiratory impedance is correlated with morphological changes in the lungs on three-dimensional CT in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Karayama, Masato; Inui, Naoki; Mori, Kazutaka; Kono, Masato; Hozumi, Hironao; Suzuki, Yuzo; Furuhashi, Kazuki; Hashimoto, Dai; Enomoto, Noriyuki; Fujisawa, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Yutaro; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2017-01-01

    The forced oscillation technique provides information concerning respiratory impedance, which comprises resistance and reactance of the respiratory system. However, its relationship with morphological changes of the lungs in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remains unclear. Respiratory impedance and spirometric data were evaluated in 98 patients with COPD and 49 reference subjects. Wall thickness (WT) and airway intraluminal area (Ai) of third- to sixth-generation bronchi, and percentage low-attenuation area with less than −950 HU (%LAA) of lungs were measured using three-dimensional computed tomography. COPD patients had higher respiratory impedance, decreased Ai, and increased %LAA compared with reference subjects. Indices of respiratory resistance and reactance and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) were correlated with Ai, and the association between percent predicted FEV1 and Ai was predominant in distal bronchi. The difference in respiratory resistance between 5 Hz and 20 Hz (R5–R20) and FEV1/forced vital capacity ratio (FEV1/FVC) were correlated with WT. The %LAA was correlated with the FEV1/FVC ratio and respiratory reactance. Airway function measurements with the forced oscillation technique provide complementary information to spirometry in COPD. PMID:28176815

  18. Postoperative Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer: Improvement in Locoregional Control Using Three-Dimensional Compared With Two-Dimensional Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Masson-Cote, Laurence; Couture, Christian; Fortin, Andre; Dagnault, Anne

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To determine whether lung cancer patients treated with three-dimensional (3D) postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) have more favorable outcomes than those treated with two-dimensional (2D) PORT. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the charts of 153 lung cancer patients who underwent PORT with curative intent at our center between 1995 and 2007. The patients were grouped according to the RT technique; 66 patients were in the 2D group and 87 in the 3D group. The outcomes included locoregional control, survival, and secondary effects. All patients were treated using a linear accelerator at a total dose of approximately 50 Gy and 2 Gy/fraction. A few patients (21%) also received chemotherapy. Most tumors were in the advanced stage, either Stage II (30%) or Stage III (65%). The main clinical indications for PORT were positive resection margins (23%) and Stage pN2 (52%) and pN1 (22%). The patient characteristics were comparable in both groups. Results: Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the 3D technique significantly improved the locoregional control rate at 5 years compared with the 2D technique (81% vs. 56%, p = .007 [Cox]). The 2D technique was associated with a more than twofold increased risk of locoregional recurrence (hazard ratio, 2.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-5.5; p = .006). The overall survival rate did not differ at 5 years (38% vs. 20%, p = .3 [Cox]). The toxicities were also similar and acceptable in both groups. Conclusion: The 3D technique for conformal PORT for lung cancer improved the locoregional control rates of patients compared with the 2D technique.

  19. Comparisons of computed and measured three-dimensional velocity fields in a motored two-stroke engine

    SciTech Connect

    Amsden, A.A.; O'Rourke, P.J.; Butler, T.D. ); Meintjes, K.; Fansler, T.D. )

    1991-01-01

    Computer simulations are compared with measurements of the three-dimensional, unsteady scavenging flows of a motored two-stroke engine. Laser Doppler velocimetry measurements were made on a modified Suzuki DT-85 ported engine. Calculations were performed using KIVA-3, a computer program that efficiently solves the intake and exhaust port flows along with those in the cylinder. Measured and computed cylinder pressures and velocities are compared. Pressures agree well over the cycle as do the velocities at the intake ports. In-cylinder velocities differ in detail, but the tumbling motion in the cylinder is well replicated in vertical plane passing through the cylinder axis. 20 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Three dimensional graphene scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering and in-situ electrical recording.

    PubMed

    Ameri, S K; Singh, P K; D'Angelo, R; Stoppel, W; Black, L; Sonkusale, S R

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a three-dimensional graphene foam made of few layers of CVD grown graphene as a scaffold for growing cardiac cells and recording their electrical activity. Our results show that graphene foam not only provides an excellent extra-cellular matrix (ECM) for the culture of such electrogenic cells but also enables recording of its extracellular electrical activity in-situ. Recording is possible due to graphene's excellent conductivity. In this paper, we present our results on the fabrication of the graphene scaffold and initial studies on the culture of cardiac cell lines such as HL-1 and recording of their real-time electrical activity.

  1. Transient Three-Dimensional Analysis of Side Load in Liquid Rocket Engine Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See

    2004-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical investigations on the nozzle start-up side load physics were performed. The objective of this study is to identify the three-dimensional side load physics and to compute the associated aerodynamic side load using an anchored computational methodology. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, and pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation, and a simulated inlet condition based on a system calculation. Finite-rate chemistry was used throughout the study so that combustion effect is always included, and the effect of wall cooling on side load physics is studied. The side load physics captured include the afterburning wave, transition from free- shock to restricted-shock separation, and lip Lambda shock oscillation. With the adiabatic nozzle, free-shock separation reappears after the transition from free-shock separation to restricted-shock separation, and the subsequent flow pattern of the simultaneous free-shock and restricted-shock separations creates a very asymmetric Mach disk flow. With the cooled nozzle, the more symmetric restricted-shock separation persisted throughout the start-up transient after the transition, leading to an overall lower side load than that of the adiabatic nozzle. The tepee structures corresponding to the maximum side load were addressed.

  2. Three-Dimensional Ground Glass Opacity Ratio in CT Images Can Predict Tumor Invasiveness of Stage IA Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Woo Sik; Hong, Sae Rom; Lee, Jin Gu; Lee, Jae Seok; Jung, Hee Suk; Kim, Dae Joon; Chung, Kyung Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the relationship between various parameters, including volumetric parameters, and tumor invasiveness according to the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC)/American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) classification. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 99 patients with completely resected stage IA lung adenocarcinoma. The correlation between several parameters [one-dimensional ground glass opacity (1D GGO) ratio, two-dimensional (2D) GGO ratio, three-dimensional (3D) GGO ratio, 1D solid size, 2D solid size, and 3D solid size] and tumor invasiveness according to IASLC/ATS/ERS classification was investigated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Adenocarcinoma in situ and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma were referred to as noninvasive adenocarcinoma. Results The areas under the curve (AUC) to predict invasive adenocarcinoma for the 1D, 2D, and 3D GGO ratios were 0.962, 0.967, and 0.971, respectively. The optimal cut-off values for the 1D, 2D, and 3D GGO ratios were 38%, 62%, and 74%, respectively. The AUC values for 1D, 2D, and 3D solid sizes to predict invasive adenocarcinoma were 0.933, 0.944, and 0.903, respectively. The optimal cut-off values for 1D, 2D, and 3D solid sizes were 1.2 cm, 1.5 cm2, and 0.7 cm3, respectively. The difference in the ROC curves for 3D GGO ratio and 3D solid size was significant (p=0.01). Conclusion Computed tomography image-related parameters based on GGO were well correlated with and predictive of invasiveness according to IASLC/ATS/ERS classification. 3D GGO ratio was more strongly correlated with pathologic invasiveness than 3D solid size. PMID:27401643

  3. Three-dimensional transient numerical simulation for intake process in the engine intake port-valve-cylinder system.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ma-Ji; Chen, Guo-Hua; Ma, Yuan-Hao

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a KIVA-3 code based numerical model for three-dimensional transient intake flow in the intake port-valve-cylinder system of internal combustion engine using body-fitted technique, which can be used in numerical study on internal combustion engine with vertical and inclined valves, and has higher calculation precision. A numerical simulation (on the intake process of a two-valve engine with a semi-sphere combustion chamber and a radial intake port) is provided for analysis of the velocity field and pressure field of different plane at different crank angles. The results revealed the formation of the tumble motion, the evolution of flow field parameters and the variation of tumble ratios as important information for the design of engine intake system.

  4. Three-dimensional anode engineering for the direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, A.; Oloman, C. W.; Gyenge, E. L.

    Catalyzed graphite felt three-dimensional anodes were investigated in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) operated with sulfuric acid supporting electrolyte. With a conventional serpentine channel flow field the preferred anode thickness was 100 μm, while a novel flow-by anode showed the best performance with a thickness of 200-300 μm. The effects of altering the methanol concentration, anolyte flow rate and operating temperature on the fuel cell superficial power density were studied by full (2 3 + 1) factorial experiments on a cell with anode area of 5 cm 2 and excess oxidant O 2 at 200 kPa(abs). For operation in the flow-by mode with 2 M methanol at 2 cm 3 min -1 and 353 K the peak power density was 2380 W m -2 with a PtRuMo anode catalyst, while a PtRu catalyst yielded 2240 W m -2 under the same conditions.

  5. Thoracic Temporal Subtraction Three Dimensional Computed Tomography (3D-CT): Screening for Vertebral Metastases of Primary Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Iwano, Shingo; Ito, Rintaro; Umakoshi, Hiroyasu; Karino, Takatoshi; Inoue, Tsutomu; Li, Yuanzhong; Naganawa, Shinji

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We developed an original, computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) software that subtracts the initial thoracic vertebral three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) image from the follow-up 3D-CT image. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of this CAD software during screening for vertebral metastases on follow-up CT images of primary lung cancer patients. Materials and Methods The interpretation experiment included 30 sets of follow-up CT scans in primary lung cancer patients and was performed by two readers (readers A and B), who each had 2.5 years’ experience reading CT images. In 395 vertebrae from C6 to L3, 46 vertebral metastases were identified as follows: osteolytic metastases (n = 17), osteoblastic metastases (n = 14), combined osteolytic and osteoblastic metastases (n = 6), and pathological fractures (n = 9). Thirty-six lesions were in the anterior component (vertebral body), and 10 lesions were in the posterior component (vertebral arch, transverse process, and spinous process). The area under the curve (AUC) by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis and the sensitivity and specificity for detecting vertebral metastases were compared with and without CAD for each observer. Results Reader A detected 47 abnormalities on CT images without CAD, and 33 of them were true-positive metastatic lesions. Using CAD, reader A detected 57 abnormalities, and 38 were true positives. The sensitivity increased from 0.717 to 0.826, and on ROC curve analysis, AUC with CAD was significantly higher than that without CAD (0.849 vs. 0.902, p = 0.021). Reader B detected 40 abnormalities on CT images without CAD, and 36 of them were true-positive metastatic lesions. Using CAD, reader B detected 44 abnormalities, and 39 were true positives. The sensitivity increased from 0.783 to 0.848, and AUC with CAD was nonsignificantly higher than that without CAD (0.889 vs. 0.910, p = 0.341). Both readers detected more osteolytic and osteoblastic

  6. Fabrication of a SFF-based three-dimensional scaffold using a precision deposition system in tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong Young; Park, Eui Kyun; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Shin, Jung-Woog; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2008-05-01

    Recent developments in tissue-engineering techniques allow physicians to treat a range of previously untreatable conditions. In the development of such techniques, scaffolds with a controllable pore size and porosity have been manufactured using solid free-form fabrication methods to investigate cell interaction effects such as cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we describe the fabrication of scaffolds from two types of biodegradable materials using a precision deposition system that we developed. The precision deposition system uses technology that enables the manufacture of three-dimensional (3D) microstructures. The fabrication of 3D tissue-engineering scaffolds using the precision deposition system required the combination of several technologies, including motion control, thermal control, pneumatic control and CAD/CAM software. Through the fabrication and cell interaction analysis of two kinds of scaffolds using polycaprolactone and poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid, feasibility of application to the tissue engineering of the developed SFF-based precision deposition system is demonstrated.

  7. Three-dimensional core-shell hybrid solar cells via controlled in situ materials engineering.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Giacomo; Wang, Yue; Wong, Ping-Show; Lech, Andrew; Hung, Chung-Hong; Shapiro, Joshua; Prikhodko, Sergey; El-Kady, Maher; Kaner, Richard B; Huffaker, Diana L

    2012-07-11

    Three-dimensional core-shell organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells with tunable properties are demonstrated via electropolymerization. Air-stable poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) shells with controlled thicknesses are rapidly coated onto periodic GaAs nanopillar arrays conformally, preserving the vertical 3D structure. The properties of the organic layer can be readily tuned in situ, allowing for (1) the lowering of the highest occupied molecular orbital level (|ΔE| ∼ 0.28 eV), leading to the increase of open-circuit voltage (V(OC)), and (2) an improvement in PEDOT conductivity that results in enhanced short-circuit current densities (J(SC)). The incorporation of various anionic dopants in the polymer during the coating process also enables the tailoring of the polymer/semiconductor interface transport properties. Systematic tuning of the device properties results in a J(SC) of 13.6 mA cm(-2), V(OC) of 0.63 V, peak external quantum efficiency of 58.5%, leading to a power conversion efficiencies of 4.11%.

  8. Engineering three-dimensional topological insulators in Rashba-type spin-orbit coupled heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Das, Tanmoy; Balatsky, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    Topological insulators represent a new class of quantum phase defined by invariant symmetries and spin-orbit coupling that guarantees metallic Dirac excitations at its surface. The discoveries of these states have sparked the hope of realizing non-trivial excitations and novel effects such as a magnetoelectric effect and topological Majorana excitations. Here we develop a theoretical formalism to show that a three-dimensional topological insulator can be designed artificially via stacking bilayers of two-dimensional Fermi gases with opposite Rashba-type spin-orbit coupling on adjacent layers, and with interlayer quantum tunneling. We demonstrate that in the stack of bilayers grown along a (001)-direction, a non-trivial topological phase transition occurs above a critical number of Rashba bilayers. In the topological phase, we find the formation of a single spin-polarized Dirac cone at the -point. This approach offers an accessible way to design artificial topological insulators in a set up that takes full advantage of the atomic layer deposition approach. This design principle is tunable and also allows us to bypass limitations imposed by bulk crystal geometry. PMID:23739724

  9. Developing High-Frequency Quantitative Ultrasound Techniques to Characterize Three-Dimensional Engineered Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado, Karla Patricia E.

    Tissue engineering holds great promise for the repair or replacement of native tissues and organs. Further advancements in the fabrication of functional engineered tissues are partly dependent on developing new and improved technologies to monitor the properties of engineered tissues volumetrically, quantitatively, noninvasively, and nondestructively over time. Currently, engineered tissues are evaluated during fabrication using histology, biochemical assays, and direct mechanical tests. However, these techniques destroy tissue samples and, therefore, lack the capability for real-time, longitudinal monitoring. The research reported in this thesis developed nondestructive, noninvasive approaches to characterize the structural, biological, and mechanical properties of 3-D engineered tissues using high-frequency quantitative ultrasound and elastography technologies. A quantitative ultrasound technique, using a system-independent parameter known as the integrated backscatter coefficient (IBC), was employed to visualize and quantify structural properties of engineered tissues. Specifically, the IBC was demonstrated to estimate cell concentration and quantitatively detect differences in the microstructure of 3-D collagen hydrogels. Additionally, the feasibility of an ultrasound elastography technique called Single Tracking Location Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (STL-ARFI) imaging was demonstrated for estimating the shear moduli of 3-D engineered tissues. High-frequency ultrasound techniques can be easily integrated into sterile environments necessary for tissue engineering. Furthermore, these high-frequency quantitative ultrasound techniques can enable noninvasive, volumetric characterization of the structural, biological, and mechanical properties of engineered tissues during fabrication and post-implantation.

  10. A Versatile Method for Fabricating Tissue Engineering Scaffolds with a Three-Dimensional Channel for Prevasculature Networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Li-Jun; Hu, Qing-Xi

    2016-09-28

    Despite considerable advances in tissue engineering over the past two decades, solutions to some crucial problems remain elusive. Vascularization is one of the most important factors that greatly influence the function of scaffolds. Many research studies have focused on the construction of a vascular-like network with prevascularization structure. Sacrificial materials are widely used to build perfusable vascular-like architectures, but most of these fabricated scaffolds only have a 2D plane-connected network. The fabrication of three-dimensional perfusable branched networks remains an urgent issue. In this work, we developed a novel sacrificial molding technique for fabricating biocompatible scaffolds with a three-dimensional perfusable branched network. Here, 3D-printed poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) filament was used as the sacrificial material. The fused PVA was deposited on the surface of a cylinder to create the 3D branched solid network. Gelatin was used to embed the solid network. Then, the PVA mold was dissolved after curing the hydrogel. The obtained architecture shows good perfusability. Cell experiment results indicated that human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) successfully attached to the surface of the branched channel and maintained high viability after a few days in culture. In order to prevent deformation of the channel, paraffin was coated on the surface of the printed structure, and hydroxyapatite (HA) was added to gelatin. In conclusion, we demonstrate a novel strategy toward the engineering of prevasculature thick tissues through the integration of the fused PVA filament deposit. This approach has great potential in solving the issue of three-dimensional perfusable branched networks and opens the way to clinical applications.

  11. Designing a three-dimensional expanded polytetrafluoroethylene-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffold for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hung-Jen; Chen, Chiang Sang; Lee, I-Chi; Wang, Jyh-Horng; Young, Tai-Horng

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to design a three-dimensional expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE)-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffold for tissue engineering. To test the feasibility of this composite scaffold, a series of two-dimensional culture experiments were performed to investigate the behavior of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) cells on the ePTFE and PLGA membranes. It was found PLGA provided a cell-favorable substrate for cell adhesion, migration, and growth, indicating PLGA is an ACL cell-conductive material. Conversely, poor adhesion and proliferation of ACL cells were observed on the ePTFE, even on the collagen-coated ePTFE. Therefore, the scaffold was not fabricated by coating PLGA on the ePTFE surface because it is difficult to coat anything on the extremely hydrophobic ePTFE surface. Instead, the ePTFE embedded in the PLGA matrix was prepared by immersing ePTFE scrim yarns into the PLGA solution, and then precipitating PLGA to form a three-dimensional construction with porous morphology. The role of ePTFE is regarded as a reinforcing constituent to improve the mechanical strength of porous PLGA matrix to provide early repair strength for tissue healing. However, porous PLGA matrix acts as a supportive environment for allowing cell adhesion, migration, and growth to guide the repair and regeneration of ligament tissue. To test this assumption, a preliminary animal experiment of rabbit ACL wound healing with this three-dimensional ePTFE-PLGA scaffold was performed. These results are very encouraging because such a new scaffold made of ePTFE scrim yarns embedded in PLGA may serve as ACL prostheses in the ligament tissue engineering.

  12. Engineering skeletal myoblasts: roles of three-dimensional culture and electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Pedrotty, Dawn M; Koh, Jennifer; Davis, Bryce H; Taylor, Doris A; Wolf, Patrick; Niklason, Laura E

    2005-04-01

    Immature skeletal muscle cells, or myoblasts, have been used in cellular cardiomyoplasty in attempts to regenerate cardiac muscle tissue by injection of cells into damaged myocardium. In some studies, muscle tissue within myoblast implant sites may be morphologically similar to cardiac muscle. We hypothesized that identifiable aspects of the cardiac milieu may contribute to growth and development of implanted myoblasts in vivo. To test this hypothesis, we designed a novel in vitro system to mimic some aspects of the electrical and biochemical environment of native myocardium. This system enabled us to separate the three-dimensional (3-D) electrical and biochemical signals that may be involved in myoblast proliferation and plasticity. Myoblasts were grown on 3-D polyglycolic acid mesh scaffolds under control conditions, in the presence of cardiac-like electrical current fluxes, or in the presence of culture medium that had been conditioned by mature cardiomyocytes. Cardiac-like electrical current fluxes caused increased myoblast number in 3-D culture, as determined by DNA assay. The increase in cell number was due to increased cellular proliferation and not differences in apoptosis, as determined by proliferating cell nuclear antigen and TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling. Cardiomyocyte-conditioned medium also significantly increased myoblast proliferation. Expression of transcription factors governing differentiation along skeletal or cardiac lineages was evaluated by immunoblotting. Although these assays are qualitative, no changes in differentiation state along skeletal or cardiac lineages were observed in response to electrical current fluxes. Furthermore, from these experiments, conditioned medium did not appear to alter the differentiation state of skeletal myoblasts. Hence, cardiac milieu appears to stimulate proliferation but does not affect differentiation of skeletal myoblasts.

  13. Three-dimensional polycaprolactone-hydroxyapatite scaffolds combined with bone marrow cells for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bo; Yao, Qingqiang; Guo, Yang; Mao, Fengyong; Liu, Shuai; Xu, Yan; Wang, Liming

    2015-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the chondrogenic potential of three-dimensional polycaprolactone-hydroxyapatite (PCL-HA) scaffolds loaded with bone marrow cells in vitro and the effect of PCL-HA scaffolds on osteochondral repair in vivo. Here, bone marrow was added to the prepared PCL-HA scaffolds and cultured in chondrogenic medium for 10 weeks. Osteochondral defects were created in the trochlear groove of 29 knees in 17 New Zealand white rabbits, which were then divided into four groups that underwent: implantation of PCL-HA scaffolds (left knee, n = 17; Group 1), microfracture (right knee, n = 6; Group 2), autologous osteochondral transplantation (right knee, n = 6; Group 3), and no treatment (right knee, n = 5; Control). Extracellular matrix produced by bone marrow cells covered the surface and filled the pores of PCL-HA scaffolds after 10 weeks in culture. Moreover, many cell-laden cartilage lacunae were observed, and cartilage matrix was concentrated in the PCL-HA scaffolds. After a 12-week repair period, Group 1 showed excellent vertical and lateral integration with host bone, but incomplete cartilage regeneration and matrix accumulation. An uneven surface of regenerated cartilage and reduced distribution of cartilage matrix were observed in Group 2. In addition, abnormal bone growth and unstable integration between repaired and host tissues were detected. For Group 3, the integration between transplanted and host cartilage was interrupted. Our findings indicate that the PCL-HA scaffolds loaded with bone marrow cells improved chondrogenesis in vitro and implantation of PCL-HA scaffolds for osteochondral repairenhanced integration with host bone. However, cartilage regeneration remained unsatisfactory. The addition of trophic factors or the use of precultured cell-PCL-HA constructs for accelerated osteochondral repair requires further investigation.

  14. Whole-organ tissue engineering: decellularization and recellularization of three-dimensional matrix liver scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Sabetkish, Shabnam; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Sabetkish, Nastaran; Khorramirouz, Reza; Akbarzadeh, Aram; Seyedian, Sanam Ladi; Pasalar, Parvin; Orangian, Saghar; Beigi, Reza Seyyed Hossein; Aryan, Zahra; Akbari, Hesam; Tavangar, Seyyed Mohammad

    2015-04-01

    To report the results of whole liver decellularization by two different methods. To present the results of grafting rat and sheep decellularized liver matrix (DLM) into the normal rat liver and compare natural cell seeding process in homo/xenograft of DLM. To compare the results of in vitro whole liver recellularization with rats' neonatal green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive hepatic cells with outcomes of in vivo recellularization process. Whole liver of 8 rats and 4 sheep were resected and cannulated via the hepatic vein and perfused with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) or Triton + SDS. Several examinations were performed to compare the efficacy of these two decellularization procedures. In vivo recellularization of sheep and rat DLMs was performed following transplantation of multiple pieces of both scaffolds in the subhepatic area of four rats. To compare the efficacy of different scaffolds in autologous cell seeding, biopsies of homograft and xenograft were assessed 8 weeks postoperatively. Whole DLMs of 4 rats were also recellularized in vitro by perfusion of rat's fetal GFP-positive hepatic cells with pulsatile bioreactor. Histological evaluation and enzymatic assay were performed for both in vivo and in vitro recellularized samples. The results of this study demonstrated that the triton method was a promising decellularization approach for preserving the three-dimensional structure of liver. In vitro recellularized DLMs were more similar to natural ones compared with in vivo recellularized livers. However, homografts showed better characteristics with more organized structure compared with xenografts. In vitro recellularization of liver scaffolds with autologous cells represents an attractive prospective for regeneration of liver as one of the most compound organs. In vivo cell seeding on the scaffold of the same species may have more satisfactory outcomes when compared with the results of xenotransplantation. This study theoretically may pave the road for

  15. Chemical functionalization of surfaces for building three-dimensional engineered biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Marco E.; Mansur, Alexandra A. P.; Mansur, Herman S.

    2013-06-01

    This study presents a new approach for developing biosensors based on enzymatic systems with designed three-dimensional structures. Silica glass slides were chemically functionalized at surfaces by reacting with organosilanes, 3-mercaptopropyltriethoxysilane (MPTES), and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), using sol-gel process at room temperature. The functionalization of the supports was characterized by contact angle measurements and FTIR spectroscopy. The first enzyme layer was covalently immobilized to the support by a bi-functional linker (glutaraldehyde). The second enzyme layer was deposited using the protein conjugation method based on the high affinity "avidin-biotin" interactions. Each enzyme was biotinylated before being added to the nanostructured system and avidin was used as the binder between consecutive enzyme layers. The biochemical response was assayed at all stages to certify that the enzymatic bioactivity was retained throughout the entire layer-by-layer (LBL) process. The model of building 3D-enzymatic systems was evaluated using the enzymatic structure with glucose oxidase (GOx) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). It was verified that the amino-modified support presented the highest bioactivity response compared to the other chemical functionalities. Moreover, the bienzyme nanostructure demonstrated relevant biochemical activity upon injecting the glucose substrate into the system. Finally, as a proof of concept, the bienzyme systems were assayed using real samples of regular and sugar-free soft drinks where they effectively behaved as structured biosensor for glucose with the built-in 3D hybrid architecture. Based on the results, it can be foreseen the development of promising new nanomaterials for several analytical applications such as monitoring the quality of food and beverages for nutrition purposes.

  16. Three-Dimensional Lung Tumor Microenvironment Modulates Therapeutic Compound Responsiveness In Vitro – Implication for Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Ekert, Jason E.; Johnson, Kjell; Strake, Brandy; Pardinas, Jose; Jarantow, Stephen; Perkinson, Robert; Colter, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture is gaining acceptance in response to the need for cellular models that better mimic physiologic tissues. Spheroids are one such 3D model where clusters of cells will undergo self-assembly to form viable, 3D tumor-like structures. However, to date little is known about how spheroid biology compares to that of the more traditional and widely utilized 2D monolayer cultures. Therefore, the goal of this study was to characterize the phenotypic and functional differences between lung tumor cells grown as 2D monolayer cultures, versus cells grown as 3D spheroids. Eight lung tumor cell lines, displaying varying levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and cMET protein expression, were used to develop a 3D spheroid cell culture model using low attachment U-bottom plates. The 3D spheroids were compared with cells grown in monolayer for 1) EGFR and cMET receptor expression, as determined by flow cytometry, 2) EGFR and cMET phosphorylation by MSD assay, and 3) cell proliferation in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). In addition, drug responsiveness to EGFR and cMET inhibitors (Erlotinib, Crizotinib, Cetuximab [Erbitux] and Onartuzumab [MetMab]) was evaluated by measuring the extent of cell proliferation and migration. Data showed that EGFR and cMET expression is reduced at day four of untreated spheroid culture compared to monolayer. Basal phosphorylation of EGFR and cMET was higher in spheroids compared to monolayer cultures. Spheroids showed reduced EGFR and cMET phosphorylation when stimulated with ligand compared to 2D cultures. Spheroids showed an altered cell proliferation response to HGF, as well as to EGFR and cMET inhibitors, compared to monolayer cultures. Finally, spheroid cultures showed exceptional utility in a cell migration assay. Overall, the 3D spheroid culture changed the cellular response to drugs and growth factors and may more accurately mimic the natural tumor

  17. Three-dimensional lung tumor microenvironment modulates therapeutic compound responsiveness in vitro--implication for drug development.

    PubMed

    Ekert, Jason E; Johnson, Kjell; Strake, Brandy; Pardinas, Jose; Jarantow, Stephen; Perkinson, Robert; Colter, David C

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture is gaining acceptance in response to the need for cellular models that better mimic physiologic tissues. Spheroids are one such 3D model where clusters of cells will undergo self-assembly to form viable, 3D tumor-like structures. However, to date little is known about how spheroid biology compares to that of the more traditional and widely utilized 2D monolayer cultures. Therefore, the goal of this study was to characterize the phenotypic and functional differences between lung tumor cells grown as 2D monolayer cultures, versus cells grown as 3D spheroids. Eight lung tumor cell lines, displaying varying levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and cMET protein expression, were used to develop a 3D spheroid cell culture model using low attachment U-bottom plates. The 3D spheroids were compared with cells grown in monolayer for 1) EGFR and cMET receptor expression, as determined by flow cytometry, 2) EGFR and cMET phosphorylation by MSD assay, and 3) cell proliferation in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). In addition, drug responsiveness to EGFR and cMET inhibitors (Erlotinib, Crizotinib, Cetuximab [Erbitux] and Onartuzumab [MetMab]) was evaluated by measuring the extent of cell proliferation and migration. Data showed that EGFR and cMET expression is reduced at day four of untreated spheroid culture compared to monolayer. Basal phosphorylation of EGFR and cMET was higher in spheroids compared to monolayer cultures. Spheroids showed reduced EGFR and cMET phosphorylation when stimulated with ligand compared to 2D cultures. Spheroids showed an altered cell proliferation response to HGF, as well as to EGFR and cMET inhibitors, compared to monolayer cultures. Finally, spheroid cultures showed exceptional utility in a cell migration assay. Overall, the 3D spheroid culture changed the cellular response to drugs and growth factors and may more accurately mimic the natural tumor

  18. Biomimetics of the Extracellular Matrix: An Integrated Three-Dimensional Fiber-Hydrogel Composite for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Coburn, Jeannine; Gibson, Matt; Bandalini, Pierre Alain; Laird, Christopher; Mao, Hai-Quan; Moroni, Lorenzo; Seliktar, Dror

    2012-01-01

    The native extracellular matrix (ECM) consists of an integrated fibrous protein network and proteoglycan-based ground (hydrogel) substance. We designed a novel electrospinning technique to engineer a three dimensional fiber-hydrogel composite that mimics the native ECM structure, is injectable, and has practical macroscale dimensions for clinically relevant tissue defects. In a model system of articular cartilage tissue engineering, the fiber-hydrogel composites enhanced the biological response of adult stem cells, with dynamic mechanical stimulation resulting in near native levels of extracellular matrix. This technology platform was expanded through structural and biochemical modification of the fibers including hydrophilic fibers containing chondroitin sulfate, a significant component of endogenous tissues, and hydrophobic fibers containing ECM microparticles. PMID:22287978

  19. Microporous membrane-based liver tissue engineering for the reconstruction of three-dimensional functional liver tissues in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Junichi; Tanishita, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    To meet the increasing demand for liver tissue engineering, various three-dimensional (3D) liver cell culture techniques have been developed. Nevertheless, conventional liver cell culture techniques involving the suspending cells in extracellular matrix (ECM) components and the seeding of cells into 3D biodegradable scaffolds have an intrinsic shortcoming, low cell-scaffold ratios. We have developed a microporous membrane-based liver cell culture technique. Cell behaviors and tissue organization can be controlled by membrane geometry, and cell-dense thick tissues can be reconstructed by layering cells cultured on biodegradable microporous membranes. Applications extend from liver parenchymal cell monoculture to multi-cell type cultures for the reconstruction of 3D functional liver tissue. This review focuses on the expanding role for microporous membranes in liver tissue engineering, primarily from our research.

  20. Adipose tissue engineering in three-dimensional levitation tissue culture system based on magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Daquinag, Alexes C; Souza, Glauco R; Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2013-05-01

    White adipose tissue (WAT) is becoming widely used in regenerative medicine/cell therapy applications, and its physiological and pathological importance is increasingly appreciated. WAT is a complex organ composed of differentiated adipocytes, stromal mesenchymal progenitors known as adipose stromal cells (ASC), as well as endothelial vascular cells and infiltrating leukocytes. Two-dimensional (2D) culture that has been typically used for studying adipose cells does not adequately recapitulate WAT complexity. Improved methods for reconstruction of functional WAT ex vivo are instrumental for understanding of physiological interactions between the composing cell populations. Here, we used a three-dimensional (3D) levitation tissue culture system based on magnetic nanoparticle assembly to model WAT development and growth in organoids termed adipospheres. We show that 3T3-L1 preadipocytes remain viable in spheroids for a long period of time, while in 2D culture, they lose adherence and die after reaching confluence. Upon adipogenesis induction in 3T3-L1 adipospheres, cells efficiently formed large lipid droplets typical of white adipocytes in vivo, while only smaller lipid droplet formation is achievable in 2D. Adiposphere-based coculture of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes with murine endothelial bEND.3 cells led to a vascular-like network assembly concomitantly with lipogenesis in perivascular cells. Adipocyte-depleted stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of mouse WAT cultured in 3D underwent assembly into organoids with vascular-like structures containing luminal endothelial and perivascular stromal cell layers. Adipospheres made from primary WAT cells displayed robust proliferation and complex hierarchical organization reflected by a matricellular gradient incorporating ASC, endothelial cells, and leukocytes, while ASC quickly outgrew other cell types in adherent culture. Upon adipogenesis induction, adipospheres derived from the SVF displayed more efficient lipid droplet

  1. Computational experience with a three-dimensional rotary engine combustion model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.; Willis, E. A.

    1990-01-01

    A new computer code was developed to analyze the chemically reactive flow and spray combustion processes occurring inside a stratified-charge rotary engine. Mathematical and numerical details of the new code were recently described by the present authors. The results are presented of limited, initial computational trials as a first step in a long-term assessment/validation process. The engine configuration studied was chosen to approximate existing rotary engine flow visualization and hot firing test rigs. Typical results include: (1) pressure and temperature histories, (2) torque generated by the nonuniform pressure distribution within the chamber, (3) energy release rates, and (4) various flow-related phenomena. These are discussed and compared with other predictions reported in the literature. The adequacy or need for improvement in the spray/combustion models and the need for incorporating an appropriate turbulence model are also discussed.

  2. Design of composite scaffolds and three-dimensional shape analysis for tissue-engineered ear

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes, Thomas M.; Bassett, Erik K.; Tseng, Alan; Kimura, Anya; Roscioli, Nick; Randolph, Mark A.; Vacanti, Joseph P.; Hadlock, Theresa A.; Gupta, Rajiv; Pomerantseva, Irina; Sundback, Cathryn A.

    2013-01-01

    Engineered cartilage is a promising option for auricular reconstruction. We have previously demonstrated that a titanium wire framework within a composite collagen ear-shaped scaffold helped to maintain the gross dimensions of the engineered ear after implantation, resisting the deformation forces encountered during neocartilage maturation and wound healing. The ear geometry was redesigned to achieve a more accurate aesthetic result when implanted subcutaneously in a nude rat model. A non-invasive method was developed to assess size and shape changes of the engineered ear in three dimensions. Computer models of the titanium framework were obtained from CT scans before and after implantation. Several parameters were measured including the overall length, width and depth, the minimum intrahelical distance and overall curvature values for each beam section within the framework. Local curvature values were measured to gain understanding of the bending forces experienced by the framework structure in situ. Length and width changed by less than 2%, whereas the depth decreased by approximately 8% and the minimum intrahelical distance changed by approximately 12%. Overall curvature changes identified regions most susceptible to deformation. Eighty-nine per cent of local curvature measurements experienced a bending moment less than 50 µN-m owing to deformation forces during implantation. These quantitative shape analysis results have identified opportunities to improve shape fidelity of engineered ear constructs. PMID:23904585

  3. Design of composite scaffolds and three-dimensional shape analysis for tissue-engineered ear.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Thomas M; Bassett, Erik K; Tseng, Alan; Kimura, Anya; Roscioli, Nick; Randolph, Mark A; Vacanti, Joseph P; Hadlock, Theresa A; Gupta, Rajiv; Pomerantseva, Irina; Sundback, Cathryn A

    2013-10-06

    Engineered cartilage is a promising option for auricular reconstruction. We have previously demonstrated that a titanium wire framework within a composite collagen ear-shaped scaffold helped to maintain the gross dimensions of the engineered ear after implantation, resisting the deformation forces encountered during neocartilage maturation and wound healing. The ear geometry was redesigned to achieve a more accurate aesthetic result when implanted subcutaneously in a nude rat model. A non-invasive method was developed to assess size and shape changes of the engineered ear in three dimensions. Computer models of the titanium framework were obtained from CT scans before and after implantation. Several parameters were measured including the overall length, width and depth, the minimum intrahelical distance and overall curvature values for each beam section within the framework. Local curvature values were measured to gain understanding of the bending forces experienced by the framework structure in situ. Length and width changed by less than 2%, whereas the depth decreased by approximately 8% and the minimum intrahelical distance changed by approximately 12%. Overall curvature changes identified regions most susceptible to deformation. Eighty-nine per cent of local curvature measurements experienced a bending moment less than 50 µN-m owing to deformation forces during implantation. These quantitative shape analysis results have identified opportunities to improve shape fidelity of engineered ear constructs.

  4. Electrospun ultrafine fibrous wheat glutenin scaffolds with three-dimensionally random organization and water stability for soft tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Xu, Helan; Cai, Shaobo; Sellers, Alexander; Yang, Yiqi

    2014-08-20

    Wheat glutenin, the highly crosslinked protein from wheat, was electrospun into scaffolds with ultrafine fibers oriented randomly and evenly in three dimensions to simulate native extracellular matrices of soft tissues. The scaffolds were intrinsically water-stable without using any external crosslinkers and could support proliferation and differentiation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells for soft tissue engineering. Regeneration of soft tissue favored water-stable fibrous protein scaffolds with three-dimensional arrangement and large volumes, which could be difficult to obtain via electrospinning. Wheat glutenin is an intrinsically water-stable protein due to the 2% cysteine in its amino acid composition. In this research, the disulfide crosslinks in wheat glutenin were cleaved while the backbones were preserved. The treated wheat glutenin was dissolved in aqueous solvent with an anionic surfactant and then electrospun into bulky scaffolds composed of ultrafine fibers oriented randomly in three dimensions. The scaffolds could maintain their fibrous structures after incubated in PBS for up to 35 days. In vitro study indicated that the three-dimensional wheat glutenin scaffolds well supported uniform distribution and adipogenic differentiation of adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells.

  5. A three-dimensional engineered tumour for spatial snapshot analysis of cell metabolism and phenotype in hypoxic gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodenhizer, Darren; Gaude, Edoardo; Cojocari, Dan; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Frezza, Christian; Wouters, Bradly G.; McGuigan, Alison P.

    2016-02-01

    The profound metabolic reprogramming that occurs in cancer cells has been investigated primarily in two-dimensional cell cultures, which fail to recapitulate spatial aspects of cell-to-cell interactions as well as tissue gradients present in three-dimensional tumours. Here, we describe an engineered model to assemble three-dimensional tumours by rolling a scaffold-tumour composite strip. By unrolling the strip, the model can be rapidly disassembled for snapshot analysis, allowing spatial mapping of cell metabolism in concert with cell phenotype. We also show that the establishment of oxygen gradients within samples that are shaped by oxygen-dependent signalling pathways, as well as the consequential variations in cell growth, response to hypoxic gradients extending from normoxia to severe hypoxia, and therapy responsiveness, are consistent with those of tumours in vivo. Moreover, by using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we mapped cellular metabolism and identified spatially defined metabolic signatures of cancer cells to reveal both known and novel metabolic responses to hypoxia.

  6. A biomimetic three-dimensional woven composite scaffold for functional tissue engineering of cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutos, Franklin T.; Freed, Lisa E.; Guilak, Farshid

    2007-02-01

    Tissue engineering seeks to repair or regenerate tissues through combinations of implanted cells, biomaterial scaffolds and biologically active molecules. The rapid restoration of tissue biomechanical function remains an important challenge, emphasizing the need to replicate structural and mechanical properties using novel scaffold designs. Here we present a microscale 3D weaving technique to generate anisotropic 3D woven structures as the basis for novel composite scaffolds that are consolidated with a chondrocyte-hydrogel mixture into cartilage tissue constructs. Composite scaffolds show mechanical properties of the same order of magnitude as values for native articular cartilage, as measured by compressive, tensile and shear testing. Moreover, our findings showed that porous composite scaffolds could be engineered with initial properties that reproduce the anisotropy, viscoelasticity and tension-compression nonlinearity of native articular cartilage. Such scaffolds uniquely combine the potential for load-bearing immediately after implantation in vivo with biological support for cell-based tissue regeneration without requiring cultivation in vitro.

  7. Three-dimensional Simulations of Long Duration Gamma-ray Burst Jets: Timescales from Variable Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Cámara, D.; Lazzati, Davide; Morsony, Brian J.

    2016-08-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves are characterized by marked variability, each showing unique properties. The origin of this variability, at least for a fraction of long GRBs, may be the result of an unsteady central engine. It is thus important to study the effects that an episodic central engine has on the jet propagation and, eventually, on the prompt emission within the collapsar scenario. Thus, in this study we follow the interaction of pulsed outflows with their progenitor stars with hydrodynamic numerical simulations in both two and three dimensions. We show that the propagation of unsteady jets is affected by the interaction with the progenitor material well after the break-out time, especially for jets with long quiescent times comparable to or larger than a second. We also show that this interaction can lead to an asymmetric behavior in which pulse durations and quiescent periods are systematically different. After the pulsed jets drill through the progenitor and the interstellar medium, we find that, on average, the quiescent epochs last longer than the pulses (even in simulations with symmetrical active and quiescent engine times). This could explain the asymmetry detected in the light curves of long quiescent time GRBs.

  8. Laser fabrication of three-dimensional CAD scaffolds from photosensitive gelatin for applications in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ovsianikov, Aleksandr; Deiwick, Andrea; Van Vlierberghe, Sandra; Dubruel, Peter; Möller, Lena; Dräger, Gerald; Chichkov, Boris

    2011-04-11

    In the present work, 3D CAD scaffolds for tissue engineering applications were developed starting from methacrylamide-modified gelatin (GelMOD) using two-photon polymerization (2PP). The scaffolds were cross-linked employing the biocompatible photoinitiator Irgacure 2959. Because gelatin is derived from collagen (i.e., the main constituent of the ECM), the developed materials mimic the cellular microenvironment from a chemical point of view. In addition, by applying the 2PP technique, structural properties of the cellular microenvironment can also be mimicked. Furthermore, in vitro degradation assays indicated that the enzymatic degradation capability of gelatin is preserved for the methacrylamide-modified derivative. An in depth morphological analysis of the 2PP-fabricated scaffolds demonstrated that the parameters of the CAD model are reproduced with great precision, including the ridge-like surface topography on the order of 1.5 μm. The developed scaffolds showed an excellent stability in culture medium. In a final part of the present work, the suitability of the developed scaffolds for tissue engineering applications was verified. The results indicated that the applied materials are suitable to support porcine mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and subsequent proliferation. Upon applying osteogenic stimulation, the seeded cells differentiated into the anticipated lineage. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis showed the induced calcification of the scaffolds. The results clearly indicate that 2PP is capable of manufacturing precisely constructed 3D tissue engineering scaffolds using photosensitive polymers as starting material.

  9. Urinary bladder smooth muscle engineered from adipose stem cells and a three dimensional synthetic composite.

    PubMed

    Jack, Gregory S; Zhang, Rong; Lee, Min; Xu, Yuhan; Wu, Ben M; Rodríguez, Larissa V

    2009-07-01

    Human adipose stem cells were cultured in smooth muscle inductive media and seeded into synthetic bladder composites to tissue engineer bladder smooth muscle. 85:15 Poly-lactic-glycolic acid bladder dome composites were cast using an electropulled microfiber luminal surface combined with an outer porous sponge. Cell-seeded bladders expressed smooth muscle actin, myosin heavy chain, calponinin, and caldesmon via RT-PCR and immunoflourescence. Nude rats (n=45) underwent removal of half their bladder and repair using: (i) augmentation with the adipose stem cell-seeded composites, (ii) augmentation with a matched acellular composite, or (iii) suture closure. Animals were followed for 12 weeks post-implantation and bladders were explanted serially. Results showed that bladder capacity and compliance were maintained in the cell-seeded group throughout the 12 weeks, but deteriorated in the acellular scaffold group sequentially with time. Control animals repaired with sutures regained their baseline bladder capacities by week 12, demonstrating a long-term limitation of this model. Histological analysis of explanted materials demonstrated viable adipose stem cells and increasing smooth muscle mass in the cell-seeded scaffolds with time. Tissue bath stimulation demonstrated smooth muscle contraction of the seeded implants but not the acellular implants after 12 weeks in vivo. Our study demonstrates the feasibility and short term physical properties of bladder tissue engineered from adipose stem cells.

  10. Multifunctional hybrid three-dimensionally woven scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Moutos, Franklin T; Estes, Bradley T; Guilak, Farshid

    2010-11-10

    The successful replacement of large-scale cartilage defects or osteoarthritic lesions using tissue-engineering approaches will likely require composite biomaterial scaffolds that have biomimetic mechanical properties and can provide cell-instructive cues to control the growth and differentiation of embedded stem or progenitor cells. This study describes a novel method of constructing multifunctional scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering that can provide both mechanical support and biological stimulation to seeded progenitor cells. 3-D woven PCL scaffolds were infiltrated with a slurry of homogenized CDM of porcine origin, seeded with human ASCs, and cultured for up to 42 d under standard growth conditions. These constructs were compared to scaffolds derived solely from CDM as well as 3-D woven PCL fabric without CDM. While all scaffolds promoted a chondrogenic phenotype of the ASCs, CDM scaffolds showed low compressive and shear moduli and contracted significantly during culture. Fiber-reinforced CDM scaffolds and 3-D woven PCL scaffolds maintained their mechanical properties throughout the culture period, while supporting the accumulation of a cartilaginous extracellular matrix. These findings show that fiber-reinforced hybrid scaffolds can be produced with biomimetic mechanical properties as well as the ability to promote ASC differentiation and chondrogenesis in vitro.

  11. Direct E-jet printing of three-dimensional fibrous scaffold for tendon tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Wang, Zuyong; Ying Hsi Fuh, Jerry; San Wong, Yoke; Wang, Wilson; San Thian, Eng

    2017-04-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) offers a promising strategy to restore diseased tendon tissue. However, a suitable scaffold for tendon TE has not been achieved with current fabrication techniques. Herein, we report the development of a novel electrohydrodynamic jet printing (E-jetting) for engineering 3D tendon scaffold with high porosity and orientated micrometer-size fibers. The E-jetted scaffold comprised tubular multilayered micrometer-size fibrous bundles, with interconnected spacing and geometric anisotropy along the longitudinal direction of the scaffold. Fiber diameter, stacking pattern, and interfiber distance have been observed to affect the structural stability of the scaffold, of which the enhanced mechanical strength can be obtained for scaffolds with thick fibers as the supporting layer. Human tenocytes showed a significant increase in cellular metabolism on the E-jetted scaffolds as compared to that on conventional electrospun scaffolds (2.7-, 2.8-, and 3.1-fold increase for 150, 300, and 600 µm interfiber distance, respectively; p < 0.05). Furthermore, the scaffolds provided structural support for human tenocytes to align with controlled orientation along the longitudinal direction of the scaffold, and promoted the expression of collagen type I. For the first time, E-jetting has been explored as a novel scaffolding approach for tendon TE, and offers a 3D fibrous scaffold to promote organized tissue reconstruction for potential tendon healing. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 616-627, 2017.

  12. Three dimensional simulation of nucleate boiling heat and mass transfer in cooling passages of internal combustion engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdipour, R.; Baniamerian, Z.; Delauré, Y.

    2016-05-01

    An accurate knowledge of heat transfer and temperature distribution in vehicle engines is essential to have a good management of heat transfer performance in combustion engines. This may be achieved by numerical simulation of flow through the engine cooling passages; but the task becomes particularly challenging when boiling occurs. Neglecting two phase flow processes in the simulation would however result in significant inaccuracy in the predictions. In this study a three dimensional numerical model is proposed using Fluent 6.3 to simulate heat transfer of fluid flowing through channels of conventional size. Results of the present theoretical and numerical model are then compared with some empirical results. For high fluid flow velocities, departure between experimental and numerical results is about 9 %, while for lower velocity conditions, the model inaccuracy increases to 18 %. One of the outstanding capabilities of the present model, beside its ability to simulate two phase fluid flow and heat transfer in three dimensions, is the prediction of the location of bubble formation and condensation which can be a key issue in the evaluation of the engine performance and thermal stresses.

  13. Three-dimensional imaging technologies: a priority for the advancement of tissue engineering and a challenge for the imaging community.

    PubMed

    Teodori, Laura; Crupi, Annunziata; Costa, Alessandra; Diaspro, Alberto; Melzer, Susanne; Tarnok, Attila

    2017-01-01

    Tissue engineering/regenerative medicine (TERM) is an interdisciplinary field that applies the principle of engineering and life sciences to restore/replace damaged tissues/organs with in vitro artificially-created ones. Research on TERM quickly moves forward. Today newest technologies and discoveries, such as 3D-/bio-printing, allow in vitro fabrication of ex-novo made tissues/organs, opening the door to wide and probably never-ending application possibilities, from organ transplant to drug discovery, high content screening and replacement of laboratory animals. Imaging techniques are fundamental tools for the characterization of tissue engineering (TE) products at any stage, from biomaterial/scaffold to construct/organ analysis. Indeed, tissue engineers need versatile imaging methods capable of monitoring not only morphological but also functional and molecular features, allowing three-dimensional (3D) and time-lapse in vivo analysis, in a non-destructive, quantitative, multidimensional analysis of TE constructs, to analyze their pre-implantation quality assessment and their fate after implantation. This review focuses on the newest developments in imaging technologies and applications in the context of requirements of the different steps of the TERM field, describing strengths and weaknesses of the current imaging approaches.

  14. Rapid Engineering of Three-Dimensional, Multicellular Tissues With Polymeric Scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Jordan, Jacqueline; Fraga, Denise N.

    2007-01-01

    A process has been developed for the rapid tissue engineering of multicellular-tissue-equivalent assemblies by the controlled enzymatic degradation of polymeric beads in a low-fluid-shear bioreactor. In this process, the porous polymeric beads serve as temporary scaffolds to support the assemblies of cells in a tissuelike 3D configuration during the critical initial growth phases of attachment of anchorage-dependent cells, aggregation of the cells, and formation of a 3D extracellular matrix. Once the cells are assembled into a 3D array and enmeshed in a structural supportive 3D extracellular matrix (ECM), the polymeric scaffolds can be degraded in the low-fluid-shear environment of the NASA-designed bioreactor. The natural 3D tissuelike assembly, devoid of any artificial support structure, is maintained in the low-shear bioreactor environment by the newly formed natural cellular/ECM. The elimination of the artificial scaffold allows normal tissue structure and function.

  15. Analysis of rotary engine combustion processes based on unsteady, three-dimensional computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.; Willis, E. A.

    1989-01-01

    A new computer code was developed for predicting the turbulent, and chemically reacting flows with sprays occurring inside of a stratified charge rotary engine. The solution procedure is based on an Eulerian Lagrangian approach where the unsteady, 3-D Navier-Stokes equations for a perfect gas mixture with variable properties are solved in generalized, Eulerian coordinates on a moving grid by making use of an implicit finite volume, Steger-Warming flux vector splitting scheme, and the liquid phase equations are solved in Lagrangian coordinates. Both the details of the numerical algorithm and the finite difference predictions of the combustor flow field during the opening of exhaust and/or intake, and also during fuel vaporization and combustion, are presented.

  16. Bio-Pick, Place, and Perfuse: A New Instrument for Three-Dimensional Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Blakely, Andrew M.; Manning, Kali L.; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2015-01-01

    A grand challenge of tissue engineering is the fabrication of large constructs with a high density of living cells. By adapting the principles of pick-and-place machines used in the high-speed assembly of electronics, we have developed an innovative instrument, the Bio-Pick, Place, and Perfuse (Bio-P3), which picks up large complex multicellular building parts, transports them to a build area, and precisely places the parts at desired locations while perfusing the parts. These assembled parts subsequently fuse to form a larger contiguous tissue construct. Multicellular microtissues were formed by seeding cells into nonadhesive micro-molds, wherein cells self-assembled scaffold-free parts in the shape of spheroids, toroids, and honeycombs. After removal from the molds, the parts were gripped, transported (using an x, y, z controller), and released using the Bio-P3 with little to no effect on cell viability or part structure. As many as 16 toroids were stacked over a 170 μm diameter post where they fused over the course of 48 h to form a single tissue. Larger honeycomb parts were also gripped and stacked onto a build head that, like the gripper head, provided fluid suction to hold and perfuse the parts during assembly. Scaffold-free building parts help to address several of the engineering and biological challenges to large tissue biofabrication, and the Bio-P3 described in this article is a novel instrument for the controlled gripping, placing, stacking, and perfusing of living building parts for solid organ fabrication. PMID:25530515

  17. Three-dimensional computer-aided human factors engineering analysis of a grafting robot.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Y C; Chen, S; Wu, G J; Lin, Y H

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this research was to conduct a human factors engineering analysis of a grafting robot design using computer-aided 3D simulation technology. A prototype tubing-type grafting robot for fruits and vegetables was the subject of a series of case studies. To facilitate the incorporation of human models into the operating environment of the grafting robot, I-DEAS graphic software was applied to establish individual models of the grafting robot in line with Jack ergonomic analysis. Six human models (95th percentile, 50th percentile, and 5th percentile by height for both males and females) were employed to simulate the operating conditions and working postures in a real operating environment. The lower back and upper limb stresses of the operators were analyzed using the lower back analysis (LBA) and rapid upper limb assessment (RULA) functions in Jack. The experimental results showed that if a leg space is introduced under the robot, the operator can sit closer to the robot, which reduces the operator's level of lower back and upper limbs stress. The proper environmental layout for Taiwanese operators for minimum levels of lower back and upper limb stress are to set the grafting operation at 23.2 cm away from the operator at a height of 85 cm and with 45 cm between the rootstock and scion units.

  18. Engineering of Three-Dimensional Microenvironments to Promote Contractile Behavior in Primary Intestinal Organoids

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Kelley S.; Dewi, Ruby; Kuo, Calvin J.; Heilshorn, Sarah C.

    2014-01-01

    intestinal organoid functionality. As peristaltic contractility is a crucial requirement for normal digestive tract function, this achievement of reproducible organoid contraction marks a pivotal advancement towards engineering physiologically functional replacement tissue constructs. PMID:24343706

  19. Three Dimensional Collagen Scaffold Promotes Intrinsic Vascularisation for Tissue Engineering Applications.

    PubMed

    Chan, Elsa C; Kuo, Shyh-Ming; Kong, Anne M; Morrison, Wayne A; Dusting, Gregory J; Mitchell, Geraldine M; Lim, Shiang Y; Liu, Guei-Sheung

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a porous 3-dimensional collagen scaffold material that supports capillary formation in vitro, and promotes vascularization when implanted in vivo. Collagen scaffolds were synthesized from type I bovine collagen and have a uniform pore size of 80 μm. In vitro, scaffolds seeded with primary human microvascular endothelial cells suspended in human fibrin gel formed CD31 positive capillary-like structures with clear lumens. In vivo, after subcutaneous implantation in mice, cell-free collagen scaffolds were vascularized by host neovessels, whilst a gradual degradation of the scaffold material occurred over 8 weeks. Collagen scaffolds, impregnated with human fibrinogen gel, were implanted subcutaneously inside a chamber enclosing the femoral vessels in rats. Angiogenic sprouts from the femoral vessels invaded throughout the scaffolds and these degraded completely after 4 weeks. Vascular volume of the resulting constructs was greater than the vascular volume of constructs from chambers implanted with fibrinogen gel alone (42.7±5.0 μL in collagen scaffold vs 22.5±2.3 μL in fibrinogen gel alone; p<0.05, n = 7). In the same model, collagen scaffolds seeded with human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) produced greater increases in vascular volume than did cell-free collagen scaffolds (42.9±4.0 μL in collagen scaffold with human ASCs vs 25.7±1.9 μL in collagen scaffold alone; p<0.05, n = 4). In summary, these collagen scaffolds are biocompatible and could be used to grow more robust vascularized tissue engineering grafts with improved the survival of implanted cells. Such scaffolds could also be used as an assay model for studies on angiogenesis, 3-dimensional cell culture, and delivery of growth factors and cells in vivo.

  20. Engineering of three-dimensional microenvironments to promote contractile behavior in primary intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    DiMarco, Rebecca L; Su, James; Yan, Kelley S; Dewi, Ruby; Kuo, Calvin J; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2014-02-01

    organoid functionality. As peristaltic contractility is a crucial requirement for normal digestive tract function, this achievement of reproducible organoid contraction marks a pivotal advancement towards engineering physiologically functional replacement tissue constructs.

  1. Experimental study on the construction of small three-dimensional tissue engineered grafts of electrospun poly-ε-caprolactone.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guang-Chang; Gu, Yong-Quan; Geng, Xue; Feng, Zeng-Guo; Zhang, Shu-Wen; Ye, Lin; Wang, Zhong-Gao

    2015-02-01

    Studies on three-dimensional tissue engineered graft (3DTEG) have attracted great interest among researchers as they present a means to meet the pressing clinical demand for tissue engineering scaffolds. To explore the feasibility of 3DTEG, high porosity poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) was obtained via the co-electrospinning of polyethylene glycol and PCL, and used to construct small-diameter poly-ε-caprolactone-lysine (PCL-LYS-H) scaffolds, whereby heparin was anchored to the scaffold surface by lysine groups. A variety of small-diameter 3DTEG models were constructed with different PCL layers and the mechanical properties of the resulting constructs were evaluated in order to select the best model for 3DTEGs. Bone marrow mononuclear cells were induced and differentiated to endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs). A 3DTEG (labeled '10-4%') was successfully produced by the dynamic co-culture of ECs on the PCL-LYS-H scaffolds and SMCs on PCL. The fluorescently labeled cells on the 3DTEG were subsequently observed by laser confocal microscopy, which showed that the ECs and SMCs were embedded in the 3DTEG. Nitric oxide and endothelial nitric oxide synthase assays showed that the ECs behaved normally in the 3DTEG. This study consequently provides a new thread to produce small-diameter tissue engineered grafts, with excellent mechanical properties, that are perfusable to vasculature and functional cells.

  2. Preparation, characterization, and evaluation of genipin crosslinked chitosan/gelatin three-dimensional scaffolds for liver tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Wang, Qiang-Song; Yan, Kuo; Qi, Yun; Wang, Gui-Fang; Cui, Yuan-Lu

    2016-08-01

    In liver tissue engineering, scaffolds with porous structure desgined to supply nutrient and oxygen exchange for three-dimensional (3-D) cells culture, and maintain liver functions. Meanwhile, genipin, as a natural crosslinker, is widely used to crosslink biomaterials in tissue engineering, with lower cytotoxicity and better biocompatibility. In present study, chitosan/gelatin 3-D scaffolds crosslinked by genipin, glutaraldehyde or 1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-3-ethyl-carbodimide hydrochloride (EDC) were prepared and characterized by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The biocompatibility of chitosan/gelatin scaffolds corsslinked with different crosslinkers was investigated by cell viability, morphology and liver specific functions. The result showed that the 1% and 2% genipin crosslinked chitosan/gelatin scaffolds possess ideal porosity. The genipin crosslinked 3-D scaffolds possessed the best biocompatibility than that of the others, and maintained liver specific functions when HepG2 cells seeded on scaffolds. The cellular morphology of HepG2 cells seeded on scaffolds showed that cells could penetrate into the scaffolds and proliferate significantly. Therefore, genipin crosslinked chitosan/gelatin scaffolds could be a promising biomaterial used in liver tissue engineering. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1863-1870, 2016.

  3. Three-dimensional porous scaffolds at the crossroads of tissue engineering and cell-based gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Coutu, Daniel L; Yousefi, Azizeh-Mitra; Galipeau, Jacques

    2009-10-15

    In the last 20 years, more than 1,500 gene therapy clinical trials have been approved worldwide targeting a variety of indications, from inherited monogenic diseases to acquired conditions such as cancer, cardiovascular and infectious diseases. However, concerns about the safety and efficacy of gene therapy pharmaceuticals justify the development of alternative strategies to ensure the clinical translation of this still promising field. In particular, ex vivo gene therapy strategies using autologous adult stem cells coupled to three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds show great promises in preclinical studies. Developments in the fields of biomaterial sciences and tissue engineering have already helped understanding how we can harness to regenerative potential of many cell types to create artificial tissues and organs and vastly improve the engraftment of ex vivo manipulated adult stem cells. In this article, we will review the current state of the art in tissue engineering by exploring the various types of clinically available biomaterials and the methods used to process them into complex 3D scaffolds. We will then review how these technologies are applied in cell-based gene therapy and identify novel avenues of research that may benefit patients in the near future.

  4. Middle ear mucosal regeneration with three-dimensionally tissue-engineered autologous middle ear cell sheets in rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Yuichiro; Murakami, Daisuke; Yamato, Masayuki; Hama, Takanori; Yamamoto, Kazuhisa; Kojima, Hiromi; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Okano, Teruo

    2016-03-01

    The likelihood of recurrent retraction and adhesion of newly formed tympanic membrane is high when middle ear mucosa is extensively lost during cholesteatoma and adhesive otitis media surgery. If rapid postoperative regeneration of the mucosa on the exposed bone surface can be achieved, prevention of recurrent eardrum adhesion and cholesteatoma formation, for which there has been no definitive treatment, can be expected. Suture-less transplantation of tissue-engineered mucosal cell sheets was examined immediately after the operation of otitis media surgery in order to quickly regenerate middle ear mucosa lost during surgery in a rabbit model. Transplantable middle ear mucosal cell sheets with a three-dimensional tissue architecture very similar to native middle ear mucosa were fabricated from middle ear mucosal tissue fragments obtained in an autologous manner from middle ear bulla on temperature-responsive culture surfaces. Immediately after the mucosa was resected from middle ear bone bulla inner cavity, mucosal cell sheets were grafted at the resected site. Both bone hyperplasia and granulation tissue formation were inhibited and early mucosal regeneration was observed in the cell sheet-grafted group, compared with the control group in which only mucosal removal was carried out and the bone surface exposed. This result indicates that tissue engineered mucosal cell sheets would be useful to minimize complications after the surgical operation on otitis media and future clinical application is expected.

  5. Fabrication of three-dimensional porous scaffold based on collagen fiber and bioglass for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Long, Teng; Yang, Jun; Shi, Shan-Shan; Guo, Ya-Ping; Ke, Qin-Fei; Zhu, Zhen-An

    2015-10-01

    An ideal scaffold for bone tissue engineering should have interconnected porous structure, good biocompatibility, and mechanical properties well-matched with natural bones. Collagen is the key component in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of natural bones, and plays an important role in bone regeneration. The biological activity of collagen has promoted it to be an advantageous biomaterial for bone tissue engineering; however, the mechanical properties of these scaffolds are insufficient and the porous structures are not stable in the wet state. An effective strategy to solve this problem is to fabricate a hybrid scaffold of biologically derived and synthetic material, which have the necessary bioactivity and mechanical stability needed for bone synthesis. In this work, a three-dimensional macroporous bone scaffold based on collagen (CO) fiber and bioglass (BG) is fabricated by a slurry-dipping technique, and its relevant mechanical and biological properties are evaluated. The CO/BG scaffold is interconnected with a porosity of 81 ± 4.6% and pore size of 40-200 μm. Compared with CO scaffold, water absorption value of CO/BG scaffold decreases greatly from 889% to 52%, which significantly alleviates the swelling behavior of collagen and improves the stability of scaffold structure. The CO/BG scaffold has a compression strength of 5.8 ± 1.6 MPa and an elastic modulus of 0.35 ± 0.01 Gpa, which are well-matched with the mechanical properties of trabecular bones. In vitro cell assays demonstrate that the CO/BG scaffold has good biocompatibility to facilitate the spreading and proliferation of human bone marrow stromal cells. Hence, the CO/BG scaffold is promising for bone tissue engineering application.

  6. Y chromosome detection of three-dimensional tissue-engineered skeletal muscle constructs in a syngeneic rat animal model.

    PubMed

    Beier, J P; Kneser, U; Stern-Sträter, J; Stark, G B; Bach, A D

    2004-01-01

    Surgical reconstruction of muscle tissue lost by trauma or tumor ablation is limited by the lack of availability of functional native tissue substitution. Moreover, so far most inherited or acquired muscle diseases are lacking sufficient treatment, because only few alternatives exist to provide functional restoration of lost muscle tissues. Engineering those tissues and transplantation into sites of dysfunction may be an alternative approach and may allow replacement of such damaged or failing skeletal muscle tissues. Techniques attempting reconstruction of some human tissues and organs (tissue engineering) have been introduced into clinical practice recently. One major problem that previous transplantation studies were facing is the ability of detection of transplanted cells after integration. Using the Y chromosome in situ hybridization technique in a syngeneic rat model allows transplantation of cell constructs orthotopically, without manipulation of the cells, with no rejection or immunosuppression being implied, but providing a nondilutable genetic marker to identify transplanted cells. The purpose of our study was to create functional skeletal muscle tissue in vivo using the transplantation of primary myoblasts precultivated within a three-dimensional (3D) fibrin matrix and to determine the fate of the transplanted cells using the Y chromosome detection technique. 3D myoblast cultures were established derived from male donor rats and after 7 days of cultivation we performed an orthotopic transplantation of 3D cell constructs into a created muscle defect within the gracilis muscle of syngeneic female rats. Anti-desmin immunostaining and Y chromosome in situ hybridization indicated the survival and integration of transplanted male myoblasts into the female recipient animal, thus demonstrating the feasibility of this approach in tissue engineering and the research of cell transplantation in general.

  7. In vitro evaluation of three-dimensional single-walled carbon nanotube composites for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashim; Main, Benjamin J; Taylor, Brittany L; Gupta, Manu; Whitworth, Craig A; Cady, Craig; Freeman, Joseph W; El-Amin, Saadiq F

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop three-dimensional single-walled carbon nanotube composites (SWCNT/PLAGA) using 10-mg single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) for bone regeneration and to determine the mechanical strength of the composites, and to evaluate the interaction of MC3T3-E1 cells via cell adhesion, growth, survival, proliferation, and gene expression. PLAGA (polylactic-co-glycolic acid) and SWCNT/PLAGA microspheres and composites were fabricated, characterized, and mechanical testing was performed. MC3T3-E1 cells were seeded and cell adhesion/morphology, growth/survival, proliferation, and gene expression analysis were performed to evaluate biocompatibility. Imaging studies demonstrated microspheres with uniform shape and smooth surfaces, and uniform incorporation of SWCNT into PLAGA matrix. The microspheres bonded in a random packing manner while maintaining spacing, thus resembling trabeculae of cancellous bone. Addition of SWCNT led to greater compressive modulus and ultimate compressive strength. Imaging studies revealed that MC3T3-E1 cells adhered, grew/survived, and exhibited normal, nonstressed morphology on the composites. SWCNT/PLAGA composites exhibited higher cell proliferation rate and gene expression compared with PLAGA. These results demonstrate the potential of SWCNT/PLAGA composites for musculoskeletal regeneration, for bone tissue engineering, and are promising for orthopedic applications as they possess the combined effect of increased mechanical strength, cell proliferation, and gene expression.

  8. Volumetric Analysis of Alveolar Bone Defect Using Three-Dimensional-Printed Models Versus Computer-Aided Engineering.

    PubMed

    Du, Fengzhou; Li, Binghang; Yin, Ningbei; Cao, Yilin; Wang, Yongqian

    2017-03-01

    Knowing the volume of a graft is essential in repairing alveolar bone defects. This study investigates the 2 advanced preoperative volume measurement methods: three-dimensional (3D) printing and computer-aided engineering (CAE). Ten unilateral alveolar cleft patients were enrolled in this study. Their computed tomographic data were sent to 3D printing and CAE software. A simulated graft was used on the 3D-printed model, and the graft volume was measured by water displacement. The volume calculated by CAE software used mirror-reverses technique. The authors compared the actual volumes of the simulated grafts with the CAE software-derived volumes. The average volume of the simulated bone grafts by 3D-printed models was 1.52 mL, higher than the mean volume of 1.47 calculated by CAE software. The difference between the 2 volumes was from -0.18 to 0.42 mL. The paired Student t test showed no statistically significant difference between the volumes derived from the 2 methods. This study demonstrated that the mirror-reversed technique by CAE software is as accurate as the simulated operation on 3D-printed models in unilateral alveolar cleft patients. These findings further validate the use of 3D printing and CAE technique in alveolar defect repairing.

  9. Lateral condylar prominence, post corrective osteotomy of cubitus varus: a study using three-dimensional reverse engineering technique.

    PubMed

    Mahaisavariya, Banchong; Sithiseriprateep, Kriskrai; Chantarapanich, Nattapon; Vatanapatimakul, Natapoom

    2014-09-01

    Lateral condylar prominence is a common problem after corrective osteotomy of the cubitus varus, which is believed to result from unequal opposing cut surfaces of lateral-based wedge osteotomy using a medial hinge. This study investigated this issue using a 3-dimensional CT data set consisting of images of the deformed elbow and the normal elbow of a patient with cubitus varus deformity who was scheduled for corrective osteotomy A CT scan was performed with 3mm slice thickness and a reconstruction was done with 1mm interpolated slice thickness on both the left and right humerus. The CT-data set was then manipulated using reverse engineering software. Three-dimensional models of both the deformed and normal humeri were studied. Several locations or levels of medial hinge placement, each with 4-degree-tilt wedge osteotomy cut options, were then virtually performed and evaluated. The degree of correction was determined from the varus angle plus the normal carrying angle of the normal side. From the study, it was found that the degree of lateral condylar prominence is directly proportional to the distance of placement of the medial hinge above the joint. Differences in the lengths of the osteotomy surfaces have no effect on condylar prominence; only the step-off phenomenon affects condylar prominence. According to our findings, placement of the medial hinge close to the joint with a 10-degree distal osteotomy cut just above the olecranon fossa will result in optimal minimization of condylar prominence or the step-off phenomenon.

  10. Development of Liver Decellularized Extracellular Matrix Bioink for Three-Dimensional Cell Printing-Based Liver Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyungseok; Han, Wonil; Kim, Hyeonji; Ha, Dong-Heon; Jang, Jinah; Kim, Byoung Soo; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2017-04-10

    The liver is an important organ and plays major roles in the human body. Because of the lack of liver donors after liver failure and drug-induced liver injury, much research has focused on developing liver alternatives and liver in vitro models for transplantation and drug screening. Although numerous studies have been conducted, these systems cannot faithfully mimic the complexity of the liver. Recently, three-dimensional (3D) cell printing technology has emerged as one of a number of innovative technologies that may help to overcome this limitation. However, a great deal of work in developing biomaterials optimized for 3D cell printing-based liver tissue engineering remains. Therefore, in this work, we developed a liver decellularized extracellular matrix (dECM) bioink for 3D cell printing applications and evaluated its characteristics. The liver dECM bioink retained the major ECM components of the liver while cellular components were effectively removed and further exhibited suitable and adjustable properties for 3D cell printing. We further studied printing parameters with the liver dECM bioink to verify the versatility and fidelity of the printing process. Stem cell differentiation and HepG2 cell functions in the liver dECM bioink in comparison to those of commercial collagen bioink were also evaluated, and the liver dECM bioink was found to induce stem cell differentiation and enhance HepG2 cell function. Consequently, the results demonstrate that the proposed liver dECM bioink is a promising bioink candidate for 3D cell printing-based liver tissue engineering.

  11. Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship study on anti-cancer activity of 3,4-dihydroquinazoline derivatives against human lung cancer A549 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sehyeon; Choi, Min Ji; Kim, Minju; Lee, Sunhoe; Lee, Jinsung; Lee, Seok Joon; Cho, Haelim; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Lee, Jae Yeol

    2015-03-01

    A series of 3,4-dihydroquinazoline derivatives with anti-cancer activities against human lung cancer A549 cells were subjected to three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies using the comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) approaches. The most potent compound, 1 was used to align the molecules. As a result, the best prediction was obtained with CoMSIA combined the steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic, hydrogen bond donor, and hydrogen bond acceptor fields (q2 = 0.720, r2 = 0.897). This model was validated by an external test set of 6 compounds giving satisfactory predictive r2 value of 0.923 as well as the scrambling stability test. This model would guide the design of potent 3,4-dihydroquinazoline derivatives as anti-cancer agent for the treatment of human lung cancer.

  12. Development of three-dimensional lung multicellular spheroids in air- and liquid-interface culture for the evaluation of anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Meenach, Samantha A; Tsoras, Alexandra N; McGarry, Ronald C; Mansour, Heidi M; Hilt, J Zach; Anderson, Kimberly W

    2016-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) lung multicellular spheroids (MCS) in liquid-covered culture (LCC) and air-interface culture (AIC) conditions have both been developed for the evaluation of aerosol anticancer therapeutics in solution and aerosols, respectively. The MCS were formed by seeding lung cancer cells on top of collagen where they formed spheroids due to the prevalence of cell-to-cell interactions. LCC MCS were exposed to paclitaxel (PTX) in media whereas AIC MCS were exposed to dry powder PEGylated phospholipid aerosol microparticles containing paclitaxel. The difference in viability for 2D versus 3D culture for both LCC and AIC was evaluated along with the effects of the particles on lung epithelium via transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) measurements. For LCC and AIC conditions, the 3D spheroids were more resistant to treatment with higher IC50 values for A549 and H358 cell lines. TEER results initially indicated a decrease in resistance upon drug or particle exposure, however, these values increased over the course of several days indicating the ability of the cells to recover. Overall, these studies offer a comprehensive in vitro evaluation of aerosol particles used in the treatment of lung cancer while introducing a new method for culturing lung cancer MCS in both LCC and AIC conditions.

  13. Three-dimensional nanometer scale analyses of precipitate structures and local compositions in titanium aluminide engineering alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstl, Stephan S. A.

    Titanium aluminide (TiAl) alloys are among the fastest developing class of materials for use in high temperature structural applications. Their low density and high strength make them excellent candidates for both engine and airframe applications. Creep properties of TiAl alloys, however, have been a limiting factor in applying the material to a larger commercial market. In this research, nanometer scale compositional and structural analyses of several TiAl alloys, ranging from model Ti-Al-C ternary alloys to putative commercial alloys with 10 components are investigated utilizing three dimensional atom probe (3DAP) and transmission electron microscopies. Nanometer sized borides, silicides, and carbide precipitates are involved in strengthening TiAl alloys, however, chemical partitioning measurements reveal oxygen concentrations up to 14 at. % within the precipitate phases, resulting in the realization of oxycarbide formation contributing to the precipitation strengthening of TiAl alloys. The local compositions of lamellar microstructures and a variety of precipitates in the TiAl system, including boride, silicide, binary carbides, and intermetallic carbides are investigated. Chemical partitioning of the microalloying elements between the alpha2/gamma lamellar phases, and the precipitate/gamma-matrix phases are determined. Both W and Hf have been shown to exhibit a near interfacial excess of 0.26 and 0.35 atoms nm-2 respectively within ca. 7 nm of lamellar interfaces in a complex TiAl alloy. In the case of needle-shaped perovskite Ti3AlC carbide precipitates, periodic domain boundaries are observed 5.3+/-0.8 nm apart along their growth axis parallel to the TiAl[001] crystallographic direction with concomitant composition variations after 24 hrs. at 800°C.

  14. X-ray computed microtomography of three-dimensional microcracks and self-healing in engineered cementitious composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shuai; Li, Mo

    2015-01-01

    Concrete cracking and deterioration can potentially be addressed by innovative self-healing cementitious materials, which can autogenously regain transport properties and mechanical characteristics after the damage self-healing process. For the development of such materials, it is crucial, but challenging, to precisely characterize the extent and quality of self-healing due to a variety of factors. This study adopted x-ray computed microtomography (μCT) to derive three-dimensional morphological data on microcracks before and after healing in engineered cementitious composite (ECC). Scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy were also used to morphologically and chemically analyze the healing products. This work showed that the evolution of the microcrack 3D structure due to self-healing in cementitious materials can be directly and quantitatively characterized by μCT. A detailed description of the μCT image analysis method applied to ECC self-healing was presented. The results revealed that the self-healing extent and rate strongly depended on initial surface crack width, with smaller crack width favoring fast and robust self-healing. We also found that the self-healing mechanism in cementitious materials is dependent on crack depth. The region of a crack close to the surface (from 0 to around 50-150 μm below the surface) can be sealed quickly with crystalline precipitates. However, at greater depths the healing process inside the crack takes a significantly longer time to occur, with healing products more likely resulting from continued hydration and pozzolanic reactions. Finally, the μCT method was compared with other self-healing characterization methods, with discussions on its importance in generating new scientific knowledge for the development of robust self-healing cementitious materials.

  15. High-dose-rate Three-dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy Combined with Active Breathing Control for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Early-stage Non-small-cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruozheng; Yin, Yong; Qin, Yonghui; Yu, Jinming

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of using high-dose-rate three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with active breathing control (ABC) for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Eight patients with early-stage NSCLC underwent CT scans under standard free-breathing (FB) and moderately deep inspiration breath-hold (mDIBH) with ABC. Two high-dose-rate 3D-CRT plans (1000 Mu/min) were designed based on the CT scans with FB and mDIBH. The maximal dose (D1%), minimal dose (D99%), conformity index (CI), and homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV), and dose-volume indices of the organs at risk between each plan were compared. The mean PTV volume decreased from 158.04 cm(3) with FB to 76.90 cm(3) with mDIBH (p < 0.05). When mDIBH was used, increases in the affected lung volume (by 47%), contralateral lung volume (by 55%), and total lung volume (by 50%) were observed compared to FB (p < 0.05). The V5-V40 of the affected lung (Vx represented the percentage volume of organs receiving at least the x Gy), V5-V40 and the mean dose for the total lung, V5-V40 and mean dose of the chest wall, and the maximum dose of the spinal cord were less for mDIBH than FB (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in CI, HI, D1%, or D99% for the PTV between the plans. In conclusion, high-dose-rate 3D-CRT combined with ABC reduced the radiation dose to the lungs and chest wall without affecting the dose distribution in SBRT of early-stage NSCLC patients.

  16. Three-dimensional Printing and 3D Slicer: Powerful Tools in Understanding and Treating Structural Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Cheng, George Z; San Jose Estepar, Raul; Folch, Erik; Onieva, Jorge; Gangadharan, Sidhu; Majid, Adnan

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in the three-dimensional (3D) printing industry have enabled clinicians to explore the use of 3D printing in preprocedural planning, biomedical tissue modeling, and direct implantable device manufacturing. Despite the increased adoption of rapid prototyping and additive manufacturing techniques in the health-care field, many physicians lack the technical skill set to use this exciting and useful technology. Additionally, the growth in the 3D printing sector brings an ever-increasing number of 3D printers and printable materials. Therefore, it is important for clinicians to keep abreast of this rapidly developing field in order to benefit. In this Ahead of the Curve, we review the history of 3D printing from its inception to the most recent biomedical applications. Additionally, we will address some of the major barriers to wider adoption of the technology in the medical field. Finally, we will provide an initial guide to 3D modeling and printing by demonstrating how to design a personalized airway prosthesis via 3D Slicer. We hope this information will reduce the barriers to use and increase clinician participation in the 3D printing health-care sector.

  17. Three-dimensional lithostratigraphic model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada: A framework for fluid transport modeling and engineering design

    SciTech Connect

    Buesch, D.C.; Spengler, R.W.; Nelson, J.E.; Dickerson, R.P.

    1993-12-31

    A three-dimensional lithostratigraphic model of the central block of Yucca MounEain. Nevada, illustrates how some activities can serve both site characterization and dcsign and construction of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). Site-characterization activities supported bv this model include characterizing the three-dimensional geometry of lithologic units and faults, and providing boundary conditions for geostatistical models and site-scale fluid flow modeling. The model supports the conceptual design as construction efforts for the proposed ramps of the ESF and potential high-level nuclear waste repository.

  18. Three Dimensional Dirac Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaheer, Saad

    2014-03-01

    Dirac points on the Fermi surface of two dimensional graphene are responsible for its unique electronic behavior. One can ask whether any three dimensional materials support similar pseudorelativistic physics in their bulk electronic spectra. This possibility has been investigated theoretically and is now supported by two successful experimental demonstrations reported during the last year. In this talk, I will summarize the various ways in which Dirac semimetals can be realized in three dimensions with primary focus on a specific theory developed on the basis of representations of crystal spacegroups. A three dimensional Dirac (Weyl) semimetal can appear in the presence (absence) of inversion symmetry by tuning parameters to the phase boundary separating a bulk insulating and a topological insulating phase. More generally, we find that specific rules governing crystal symmetry representations of electrons with spin lead to robust Dirac points at high symmetry points in the Brillouin zone. Combining these rules with microscopic considerations identifies six candidate Dirac semimetals. Another method towards engineering Dirac semimetals involves combining crystal symmetry and band inversion. Several candidate materials have been proposed utilizing this mechanism and one of the candidates has been successfully demonstrated as a Dirac semimetal in two independent experiments. Work carried out in collaboration with: Julia A. Steinberg, Steve M. Young, J.C.Y. Teo, C.L. Kane, E.J. Mele and Andrew M. Rappe.

  19. Three-dimensional measurement of alveolar airspace volumes in normal and emphysematous lungs using micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Hamakawa, Hiroshi; Majumdar, Arnab; Allen, Philip G; Suki, Béla

    2009-08-01

    In pulmonary emphysema, the alveolar structure progressively breaks down via a three-dimensional (3D) process that leads to airspace enlargement. The characterization of such structural changes has, however, been based on measurements from two-dimensional (2D) tissue sections or estimates of 3D structure from 2D measurements. In this study, we developed a novel silver staining method for visualizing tissue structure in 3D using micro-computed tomographic (CT) imaging, which showed that at 30 cmH20 fixing pressure, the mean alveolar airspace volume increased from 0.12 nl in normal mice to 0.44 nl and 2.14 nl in emphysematous mice, respectively, at 7 and 14 days following elastase-induced injury. We also assessed tissue structure in 2D using laser scanning confocal microscopy. The mean of the equivalent diameters of the alveolar airspaces was lower in 2D compared with 3D, while its variance was higher in 2D than in 3D in all groups. However, statistical comparisons of alveolar airspace size from normal and emphysematous mice yielded similar results in 2D and 3D: compared with control, both the mean and variance of the equivalent diameters increased by 7 days after treatment. These indexes further increased from day 7 to day 14 following treatment. During the first 7 days following treatment, the relative change in SD increased at a much faster rate compared with the relative change in mean equivalent diameter. We conclude that quantifying heterogeneity in structure can provide new insight into the pathogenesis or progression of emphysema that is enhanced by improved sensitivity using 3D measurements.

  20. A Bayesian approach for three-dimensional markerless tumor tracking using kV imaging during lung radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Caillet, Vincent; Dunbar, Michelle; Keall, Paul J.; Booth, Jeremy T.; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Haddad, Carol; Eade, Thomas; Feain, Ilana

    2017-04-01

    The ability to monitor tumor motion without implanted markers can potentially enable broad access to more accurate and precise lung radiotherapy. A major challenge is that kilovoltage (kV) imaging based methods are rarely able to continuously track the tumor due to the inferior tumor visibility on 2D kV images. Another challenge is the estimation of 3D tumor position based on only 2D imaging information. The aim of this work is to address both challenges by proposing a Bayesian approach for markerless tumor tracking for the first time. The proposed approach adopts the framework of the extended Kalman filter, which combines a prediction and measurement steps to make the optimal tumor position update. For each imaging frame, the tumor position is first predicted by a respiratory-correlated model. The 2D tumor position on the kV image is then measured by template matching. Finally, the prediction and 2D measurement are combined based on the 3D distribution of tumor positions in the past 10 s and the estimated uncertainty of template matching. To investigate the clinical feasibility of the proposed method, a total of 13 lung cancer patient datasets were used for retrospective validation, including 11 cone-beam CT scan pairs and two stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy cases. The ground truths for tumor motion were generated from the the 3D trajectories of implanted markers or beacons. The mean, standard deviation, and 95th percentile of the 3D tracking error were found to range from 1.6–2.9 mm, 0.6–1.5 mm, and 2.6–5.8 mm, respectively. Markerless tumor tracking always resulted in smaller errors compared to the standard of care. The improvement was the most pronounced in the superior–inferior (SI) direction, with up to 9.5 mm reduction in the 95th-percentile SI error for patients with  >10 mm 5th-to-95th percentile SI tumor motion. The percentage of errors with 3D magnitude  <5 mm was 96.5% for markerless tumor tracking and 84.1% for the

  1. Three-dimensional reconstruction and display of the heart, lungs and circulation by multiplanar X-ray scanning videodensitometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robb, R. A.; Ritman, E. L.; Wood, E. H.

    1975-01-01

    A device was developed which makes possible the dynamic reconstruction of the heart and lungs within the intact thorax of a living dog or human and which can record approximately 30 multiplanar X-ray images of the thorax practically instantaneously, and at frequent enough intervals of time and with sufficient density and spatial resolution to capture and resolve the most rapid changes in cardiac structural detail throughout each cardiac cycle. It can be installed in a clinical diagnostic setting as well as in a research environment and its construction and application for determination and display in real-time modes of cross sections of the functioning thorax and its contents of living animals and man is technologically feasible.

  2. Diagnosis of solitary lung nodules using the local form of Ripley's K function applied to three-dimensional CT data.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Erick Corrêa; Silva, Aristófanes Corrêa; de Paiva, Anselmo Cardoso; Nunes, Rodolfo Acatauassú; Gattass, Marcelo

    2008-06-01

    This paper analyzes the application of Ripley's K function to characterize lung nodules as malignant or benign in computerized tomography images. The proposed characterization method is based on a selection of measures from Ripley's K function to discriminate between benign and malignant nodules, using stepwise discriminant analysis. Based on the selected measures, a linear discriminant analysis procedure is performed once again in order to predict the classification of each nodule. To evaluate the ability of these features to discriminate the nodules, a set of tests was carried out using a sample of 39 pulmonary nodules, 29 benign and 10 malignant. A leave-one-out procedure was used to provide a less biased estimate of the linear discriminator's performance. The best setting of the analyzed function in the tested sample presented 70.0% of sensitivity but with 100.0% of specificity and 92.3% of accuracy. Thus, preliminary results of this approach are very promising regarding its contribution to the diagnosis of pulmonary nodules, but it still needs to be tested with larger series and associated to other quantitative imaging methods in order to improve global performance.

  3. Effects of docetaxel plus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy on microvessel density and apoptosis expression in local advanced squamous non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhai, X J; Cheng, H R; Long, H L; Mao, W K; Cao, L; Xiao, B R; Li, R Q

    2015-05-22

    We examined the effects of weekly single-agent docetaxel plus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) on apoptotic index (AI) and microvessel density (MVD) in local advanced non-small-cell lung squamous cancer patients and analyzed the correlation of MVD, AI, and 50% tumor shrinkage time (T0.5) The molecular mechanism of docetaxel radiosensitization was investigated. Sixty untreated patients with stage IIIA or IIIB lung squamous cancer were enrolled and randomly divided into two groups: observation (N = 30; 3D-CRT + docetaxel + adjuvant chemotherapy) and control (N = 30; 3D-CRT + adjuvant chemotherapy). From day 1 radiotherapy, the observation group received intravenous docetaxel (36 mg/m(2)) once weekly for 6 weeks. Post-radiotherapy, chemotherapy of docetaxel combined with cisplatin lasted 4-6 cycles in both groups. Before radiotherapy and within 24 h after radiotherapy (20 Gy), bronchoscopic biopsy was performed twice at the same site. To analyze the MVD of tumor specimens with immunohistochemical staining . The AI of lung cancer cells was assessed with TUNEL assay, T0.5 values were calculated. The observation group had significantly lower MVD than the control group (P < 0.05). AI significantly increased before and after treatment in the observation group compared with the control group (P < 0.05). The decreased MVD values negatively correlated with T0.5 values (r = -0.624, P < 0.05), whereas the increased AI values did not correlate with the T0.5 values. Docetaxel radiosensitization may occur by decrease in MVD and increase in AI values. Weekly single-agent docetaxel plus 3D-CRT can improve prognosis and quality of life in local advanced non-small-cell lung squamous cancer patients.

  4. Predictors of Acute Esophagitis in Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Nuria Algara, Manuel; Foro, Palmira; Lacruz, Marti; Reig, Anna; Membrive, Ismael; Lozano, Joan; Lopez, Jose Luis; Quera, Jaime; Fernandez-Velilla, Enric; Sanz, Xavier

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the risk factors for acute esophagitis (AET) in lung cancer patients treated with concurrent 3D-CRT and chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Data from 100 patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy with a mean dose of 62.05 {+-} 4.64 Gy were prospectively evaluated. Esophageal toxicity was graded according to criteria of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. The following dosimetric parameters were analyzed: length and volume of esophagus in treatment field, percentage of esophagus volume treated to {>=}10, {>=}20, {>=}30, {>=}35, {>=}40, {>=}45, {>=}50, {>=}55, and {>=}60 Gy, and the maximum (D{sub max}) and mean doses (D{sub mean}) delivered to the esophagus. Also, we developed an esophagitis index (EI) to account the esophagitis grades over treatment time. Results: A total of 59 patients developed AET (Grade 1, 26 patients; Grade 2, 29 patients; and Grade 3, 4 patients). V50 was associated with AET duration (p = 0.017), AET Grade 1 duration (p = 0.016), maximum analgesia (p = 0.019), esophagitis index score (p = 0.024), and AET Grade {>=}1 (p = 0.058). If V50 is <30% there is a 47.3% risk of AET Grade {>=}1, which increases to 73.3% if V50 is {>=}30% (p = 0.008). The predictive abilities of models (sensitivity and specificity) were calculated by receiver operating characteristic curves. Conclusions: According to the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the 30% of esophageal volume receiving {>=}50 Gy was the most statistically significant factor associated with AET Grade {>=}1 and maximum analgesia (A{sub max}). There was an association with AET Grade {>=}2 but it did not achieve statistical significance (p = 0.076)

  5. Antimicrobial efficacy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation in a three-dimensional lung epithelial model and the influence of fetal bovine serum

    PubMed Central

    Crabbé, Aurélie; Liu, Yulong; Matthijs, Nele; Rigole, Petra; De La Fuente-Nùñez, César; Davis, Richard; Ledesma, Maria A.; Sarker, Shameema; Van Houdt, Rob; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Coenye, Tom; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2017-01-01

    In vitro models that mimic in vivo host-pathogen interactions are needed to evaluate candidate drugs that inhibit bacterial virulence traits. We established a new approach to study Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm susceptibility on biotic surfaces, using a three-dimensional (3-D) lung epithelial cell model. P. aeruginosa formed antibiotic resistant biofilms on 3-D cells without affecting cell viability. The biofilm-inhibitory activity of antibiotics and/or the anti-biofilm peptide DJK-5 were evaluated on 3-D cells compared to a plastic surface, in medium with and without fetal bovine serum (FBS). In both media, aminoglycosides were more efficacious in the 3-D cell model. In serum-free medium, most antibiotics (except polymyxins) showed enhanced efficacy when 3-D cells were present. In medium with FBS, colistin was less efficacious in the 3-D cell model. DJK-5 exerted potent inhibition of P. aeruginosa association with both substrates, only in serum-free medium. DJK-5 showed stronger inhibitory activity against P. aeruginosa associated with plastic compared to 3-D cells. The combined addition of tobramycin and DJK-5 exhibited more potent ability to inhibit P. aeruginosa association with both substrates. In conclusion, lung epithelial cells influence the efficacy of most antimicrobials against P. aeruginosa biofilm formation, which in turn depends on the presence or absence of FBS. PMID:28256611

  6. Radiological and Clinical Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy: A Matched Analysis of Three-Dimensional Conformal and Volumetric-modulated Arc Therapy Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, David A.; Senan, Suresh; Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.; Vincent, Andrew; Lagerwaard, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Lung fibrosis is common after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumors, but the influence of treatment technique on rates of clinical and radiological pneumonitis is not well described. After implementing volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) for SBRT, we scored the early pulmonary changes seen with arc and conventional three-dimensional SBRT (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-five SBRT patients treated with RA were matched 1:2 with 50 SBRT patients treated with 3D-CRT. Dose fractionations were based on a risk-adapted strategy. Clinical pneumonitis was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Acute radiological changes 3 months posttreatment were scored by three blinded observers. Relationships among treatment type, baseline factors, and outcomes were assessed using Spearman's correlation, Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel tests, and logistic regression. Results: The RA and 3D-CRT groups were well matched. Forty-three patients (57%) had radiological pneumonitis 3 months after treatment. Twenty-eight patients (37%) had computed tomography (CT) findings of patchy or diffuse consolidation, and 15 patients (20%) had ground-glass opacities only. Clinical pneumonitis was uncommon, and no differences were seen between 3D-CRT vs. RA patients in rates of grade 2/3 clinical pneumonitis (6% vs. 4%, respectively; p = 0.99), moderate/severe radiological changes (24% vs. 36%, respectively, p = 0.28), or patterns of CT changes (p = 0.47). Radiological severity scores were associated with larger planning target volumes (p = 0.09) and extended fractionation (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Radiological changes after lung SBRT are common with both approaches, but no differences in early clinical or radiological findings were observed after RA. Longer follow-up will be required to exclude late changes.

  7. Three dimensional strained semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Voss, Lars; Conway, Adam; Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Leao, Cedric Rocha; Shao, Qinghui

    2016-11-08

    In one embodiment, an apparatus includes a three dimensional structure comprising a semiconductor material, and at least one thin film in contact with at least one exterior surface of the three dimensional structure for inducing a strain in the structure, the thin film being characterized as providing at least one of: an induced strain of at least 0.05%, and an induced strain in at least 5% of a volume of the three dimensional structure. In another embodiment, a method includes forming a three dimensional structure comprising a semiconductor material, and depositing at least one thin film on at least one surface of the three dimensional structure for inducing a strain in the structure, the thin film being characterized as providing at least one of: an induced strain of at least 0.05%, and an induced strain in at least 5% of a volume of the structure.

  8. Three-dimensional micro computed tomography analysis of the lung vasculature and differential adipose proteomics in the Sugen/hypoxia rat model of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Verdelis, Kostas; Passineau, Michael J.; Faight, Erin M.; Zourelias, Lee; Wu, Changgong; Chong, Rong; Benza, Raymond L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disease characterized by significant vascular remodeling. The obesity epidemic has produced great interest in the relationship between small visceral adipose tissue depots producing localized inflammatory conditions, which may link metabolism, innate immunity, and vascular remodeling. This study used novel micro computed tomography (microCT) three-dimensional modeling to investigate the degree of remodeling of the lung vasculature and differential proteomics to determine small visceral adipose dysfunction in rats with severe PAH. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a subcutaneous injection of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor blocker (Sugen 5416) with subsequent hypoxia exposure for 3 weeks (SU/hyp). At 12 weeks after hypoxia, microCT analysis showed a decrease in the ratio of vascular to total tissue volume within the SU/hyp group (mean ± standard deviation: 0.27 ± 0.066; P = 0.02) with increased vascular separation (0.37 ± 0.062 mm; P = 0.02) when compared with the control (0.34 ± 0.084 and 0.30 ± 0.072 mm). Differential proteomics detected an up-regulation of complement protein 3 (C3; SU/hyp∶control ratio = 2.86) and the adipose tissue–specific fatty acid binding protein-4 (FABP4, 2.66) in the heart adipose of the SU/hyp. Significant remodeling of the lung vasculature validates the efficacy of the SU/hyp rat for modeling human PAH. The upregulation of C3 and FABP4 within the heart adipose implicates small visceral adipose dysfunction. C3 has been associated with vascular stiffness, and FABP4 suppresses peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor, which is a major regulator of adipose function and known to be downregulated in PAH. These findings reveal that small visceral adipose tissue within the SU/hyp model provides mechanistic links for vascular remodeling and adipose dysfunction in the pathophysiology of PAH. PMID:28090302

  9. Engineering strategies to recapitulate epithelial morphogenesis within synthetic three-dimensional extracellular matrix with tunable mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnikova, Y. A.; Jorgens, D. M.; Spirio, L.; Auer, M.; Sarang-Sieminski, A. L.; Weaver, V. M.

    2011-04-01

    The mechanical properties (e.g. stiffness) of the extracellular matrix (ECM) influence cell fate and tissue morphogenesis and contribute to disease progression. Nevertheless, our understanding of the mechanisms by which ECM rigidity modulates cell behavior and fate remains rudimentary. To address this issue, a number of two and three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel systems have been used to explore the effects of the mechanical properties of the ECM on cell behavior. Unfortunately, many of these systems have limited application because fiber architecture, adhesiveness and/or pore size often change in parallel when gel elasticity is varied. Here we describe the use of ECM-adsorbed, synthetic, self-assembling peptide (SAP) gels that are able to recapitulate normal epithelial acini morphogenesis and gene expression in a 3D context. By exploiting the range of viscoelasticity attainable with these SAP gels, and their ability to recreate native-like ECM fibril topology with minimal variability in ligand density and pore size, we were able to reconstitute normal and tumor-like phenotypes and gene expression patterns in nonmalignant mammary epithelial cells. Accordingly, this SAP hydrogel system presents the first tunable system capable of independently assessing the interplay between ECM stiffness and multi-cellular epithelial phenotype in a 3D context. Originally submitted for the special focus issue on physical oncology.

  10. Prediction of the micro-fluid dynamic environment imposed to three-dimensional engineered cell systems in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Boschetti, Federica; Raimondi, Manuela Teresa; Migliavacca, Francesco; Dubini, Gabriele

    2006-01-01

    Bioreactors allowing culture medium perfusion overcome diffusion limitations associated with static culturing and provide flow-mediated mechanical stimuli. The hydrodynamic stress imposed to cells will depend not only on the culture medium flow rate, but also on the scaffold three-dimensional (3D) micro-architecture. We developed a CFD model of the flow of culture medium through a 3D scaffold of homogeneous geometry, with the aim of predicting the shear stress acting on cells as a function of parameters that can be controlled during the scaffold fabrication process, such as the scaffold porosity and the pore size, and during the cell culture, such as the medium flow rate and the diameter of the perfused scaffold section. We built three groups of models corresponding to three pore sizes: 50, 100 and 150 microm. Each group was made of four models corresponding to 59%, 65%, 77%, and 89% porosity. A commercial finite-element code was used to set up and solve the problem and to analyze the results. The mode value of shear stress varied between 2 and 5 mPa, and was obtained for a circular scaffold of 15.5 mm diameter, perfused by a flow rate of 0.5 ml/min. The simulations showed that the pore size is a variable strongly influencing the predicted shear stress level, whereas the porosity is a variable strongly affecting the statistical distribution of the shear stresses, but not their magnitude. Our results provide a basis for the completion of more exhaustive quantitative studies to further assess the relationship between perfusion, at known micro-fluid dynamic conditions, and tissue growth in vitro.

  11. Robot based three-dimensional welding for jet engine blade repair and rapid prototyping of small components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thukaram, Santosh Kumar

    Aero engines are made up of a large number of blades which are subject to wear and damage. They are expensive and must be repaired wherever possible. Engines also have small components which are required in small numbers that need to be developed rapidly. The first part of this research work focuses on developing a robust automated blade repair method using robotic welding. Optimal weld parameters were developed for build-up of edges having different thicknesses. Samples with varying Current and varying travel speed were produced and their micro hardness values were compared. Blade profiles were welded upon. The second part involves a methodology for producing small components using rapid prototyping (RP) techniques. This part involves use of 3D robotic welding for layered manufacturing. Tensile samples produced using the metal RP method were tested and results were found to be well above the minimum cast specifications for the given material.

  12. Laser-guided direct writing for three-dimensional tissue engineering: Analysis and application of radiation forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahmias, Yaakov Koby

    Tissue Engineering aims for the creation of functional tissues or organs using a combination of biomaterials and living cells. Artificial tissues can be implanted in patients to restore tissue function that was lost due to trauma, disease, or genetic disorder. Tissue equivalents may also be used to screen the effects of drugs and toxins, reducing the use of animals in research. One of the principle limitations to the size of engineered tissue is oxygen and nutrient transport. Lacking their own vascular bed, cells embedded in the engineered tissue will consume all available oxygen within hours while out branching blood vessels will take days to vascularize the implanted tissue. Establishing capillaries within the tissue prior to implantation can potentially eliminate this limitation. One approach to establishing capillaries within the tissue is to directly write endothelial cells with micrometer accuracy as it is being built. The patterned endothelial cells will then self-assemble into vascular structures within the engineering tissue. The cell patterning technique known as laser-guided direct writing can confine multiple cells in a laser beam and deposit them as a steady stream on any non-absorbing surface with micrometer scale accuracy. By applying the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory for light scattering on laser-guided direct writing we were able to accurately predict the behavior of with various cells and particles in the focused laser. In addition, two dimensionless parameters were identified for general radiation-force based system design. Using laser-guided direct writing we were able to direct the assembly of endothelial vascular structures with micrometer accuracy in two and three dimensions. The patterned vascular structures provided the backbone for subsequent in vitro liver morphogenesis. Our studies show that hepatocytes migrate toward and adhere to endothelial vascular structures in response to endothelial-secreted hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Our

  13. Thermoresponsive Nanofabricated Substratum for the Engineering of Three-Dimensional Tissues with Layer-by-Layer Architectural Control

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Current tissue engineering methods lack the ability to properly recreate scaffold-free, cell-dense tissues with physiological structures. Recent studies have shown that the use of nanoscale cues allows for precise control over large-area 2D tissue structures without restricting cell growth or cell density. In this study, we developed a simple and versatile platform combining a thermoresponsive nanofabricated substratum (TNFS) incorporating nanotopographical cues and the gel casting method for the fabrication of scaffold-free 3D tissues. Our TNFS allows for the structural control of aligned cell monolayers which can be spontaneously detached via a change in culture temperature. Utilizing our gel casting method, viable, aligned cell sheets can be transferred without loss of anisotropy or stacked with control over individual layer orientations. Transferred cell sheets and individual cell layers within multilayered tissues robustly retain structural anisotropy, allowing for the fabrication of scaffold-free, 3D tissues with hierarchical control of overall tissue structure. PMID:24628277

  14. Feasibility of silica-hybridized collagen hydrogels as three-dimensional cell matrices for hard tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hye-Sun; Lee, Eun-Jung; Seo, Seog-Jin; Knowles, Jonathan C; Kim, Hae-Won

    2015-09-01

    Exploiting hydrogels for the cultivation of stem cells, aiming to provide them with physico-chemical cues suitable for osteogenesis, is a critical demand for bone engineering. Here, we developed hybrid compositions of collagen and silica into hydrogels via a simple sol-gel process. The physico-chemical and mechanical properties, degradation behavior, and bone-bioactivity were characterized in-depth; furthermore, the in vitro mesenchymal stem cell growth and osteogenic differentiation behaviors within the 3D hybrid gel matrices were communicated for the first time. The hydrolyzed and condensed silica phase enabled chemical links with the collagen fibrils to form networked hybrid gels. The hybrid gels showed improved chemical stability and greater resistance to enzymatic degradation. The in vitro apatite-forming ability was enhanced by the hybrid composition. The viscoelastic mechanical properties of the hybrid gels were significantly improved in terms of the deformation resistance to an applied load and the modulus values under a dynamic oscillation. Mesenchymal stem cells adhered well to the hybrid networks and proliferated actively with substantial cytoskeletal extensions within the gel matrices. Of note, the hybrid gels substantially reduced the cell-mediated gel contraction behaviors, possibly due to the stiffer networks and higher resistance to cell-mediated degradation. Furthermore, the osteogenic differentiation of cells, including the expression of bone-associated genes and protein, was significantly upregulated within the hybrid gel matrices. Together with the physico-chemical and mechanical properties, the cellular behaviors observed within 3D gel matrices, being different from the previous approaches reported on 2D substrates, provide new information on the feasibility and usefulness of the silica-collagen system for stem cell culture and tissue engineering of hard tissues.

  15. Preparation, characterization and in vitro biological study of biomimetic three-dimensional gelatin-montmorillonite/cellulose scaffold for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Haroun, Ahmed A; Gamal-Eldeen, Amira; Harding, David R K

    2009-12-01

    This work focused on studying the effect of blending gelatin (Gel) with Cellulose (Cel), in the presence of montmorillonite (MMT), on the swelling behavior, in vitro degradation and surface morphology. Additionally, the effect of the prepared biocomposites on the characteristics of the human osteosarcoma cells (Saos-2), including proliferation, scaffold/cells interactions, apoptosis and their potential of the cells to induce osteogenesis and differentiation was evaluated. The crosslinked biocomposites with glutaraldehyde (GA) or N,N-methylene-bisacrylamide (MBA) was prepared via an intercalation process and freeze-drying technique. Properties including SEM morphology, X-ray diffraction characterization and in vitro biodegradation were investigated. The successful generation of 3-D biomimetic porous scaffolds incorporating Saos-2 cells indicated their potential for de novo bone formation that exploits cell-matrix interactions. In vitro studies revealed that the scaffolds containing 12 and 6% MMT crosslinked by 5 and 0.5% GA seem to be the two most efficient and effective biodegradable scaffolds, which promoted Saos-2 cells proliferation, migration, expansion, adhesion, penetration, spreading, and differentiation, respectively. MMT improved cytocompatibility between the osteoblasts and the biocomposite. In vitro analysis indicated good biocompatibility of the scaffold and presents the scaffold as a new potential candidate as suitable biohybrid material for tissue engineering.

  16. On the use of a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver for rocket engine pump impeller design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wei-Chung; Prueger, George H.; Chan, Daniel C.; Eastland, Anthony H.

    1992-01-01

    A 3D Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes Solver and a Fast Grid Generator (FGG), developed specially for centrifugal impeller design, were incorporated into the pump impeller design process. The impeller performance from the CFD analysis was compared to one-dimensional prediction. Both analyses showed good agreement of the impeller hydraulic efficiency, 94.5 percent, but with an 8 percent discrepancy of Euler head prediction. The impeller blade angle, discharge hub to shroud width, axial length and blade stacking were systematically changed to achieve an optimum impeller design. Impeller overall efficiency, loss distribution, hub-to-tip flow angle distortion and blade-to-blade flow angle change are among those criteria used to evaluate impeller performance. Two grid sizes, one with 10 K grid points and one with 80 K grid points were used to evaluate grid dependency issues. The effects of grid resolution on the accuracy and turnaround time are discussed. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that CFD can be effectively used for design and optimization of rocket engine pump components.

  17. Three-Dimensional Human Cardiac Tissue Engineered by Centrifugation of Stacked Cell Sheets and Cross-Sectional Observation of Its Synchronous Beatings by Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Akiyuki; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Kobayashi, Mari; Iwana, Shin-ichi; Kabetani, Yasuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissues are engineered by stacking cell sheets, and these tissues have been applied in clinical regenerative therapies. The optimal fabrication technique of 3D human tissues and the real-time observation system for these tissues are important in tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, cardiac physiology, and the safety testing of candidate chemicals. In this study, for aiming the clinical application, 3D human cardiac tissues were rapidly fabricated by human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cardiac cell sheets with centrifugation, and the structures and beatings in the cardiac tissues were observed cross-sectionally and noninvasively by two optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems. The fabrication time was reduced to approximately one-quarter by centrifugation. The cross-sectional observation showed that multilayered cardiac cell sheets adhered tightly just after centrifugation. Additionally, the cross-sectional transmissions of beatings within multilayered human cardiac tissues were clearly detected by OCT. The observation showed the synchronous beatings of the thicker 3D human cardiac tissues, which were fabricated rapidly by cell sheet technology and centrifugation. The rapid tissue-fabrication technique and OCT technology will show a powerful potential in cardiac tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug discovery research. PMID:28326324

  18. The Use of Total Human Bone Marrow Fraction in a Direct Three-Dimensional Expansion Approach for Bone Tissue Engineering Applications: Focus on Angiogenesis and Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Hugo; Catros, Sylvain; Siadous, Robin; Derkaoui, Sidi-Mohammed; Bareille, Reine; Letourneur, Didier; Amédée, Joëlle

    2015-01-01

    Current approaches in bone tissue engineering have shown limited success, mostly owing to insufficient vascularization of the construct. A common approach consists of co-culture of endothelial cells and osteoblastic cells. This strategy uses cells from different sources and differentiation states, thus increasing the complexity upstream of a clinical application. The source of reparative cells is paramount for the success of bone tissue engineering applications. In this context, stem cells obtained from human bone marrow hold much promise. Here, we analyzed the potential of human whole bone marrow cells directly expanded in a three-dimensional (3D) polymer matrix and focused on the further characterization of this heterogeneous population and on their ability to promote angiogenesis and osteogenesis, both in vitro and in vivo, in a subcutaneous model. Cellular aggregates were formed within 24 h and over the 12-day culture period expressed endothelial and bone-specific markers and a specific junctional protein. Ectopic implantation of the tissue-engineered constructs revealed osteoid tissue and vessel formation both at the periphery and within the implant. This work sheds light on the potential clinical use of human whole bone marrow for bone regeneration strategies, focusing on a simplified approach to develop a direct 3D culture without two-dimensional isolation or expansion. PMID:25333855

  19. Enhancing neuronal growth from human endometrial stem cells derived neuron-like cells in three-dimensional fibrin gel for nerve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Navaei-Nigjeh, Mona; Amoabedini, Ghasem; Noroozi, Abbas; Azami, Mahmoud; Asmani, Mohammad N; Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh; Saberi, Hooshang; Ai, Armin; Ai, Jafar

    2014-08-01

    Nerve tissue engineering (NTE) is one of the most promising methods to restore central nerve systems in human health care. Three-dimensional (3D) distribution and growth of cells within the porous scaffold composed of nanofibers are of clinical significance for NTE. In this study, an attempt was made to develop and characterize the use of fibrin gel and human endometrial stem cells (hEnSCs)-derived neuron-like cells simultaneously to support cell behavior especially neuron outgrowth. The structural and mechanical characteristics of fibrin gel scaffold were examined with SEM and rheometer. Also, hEnSCs-derived neuron-like cells were cultured in fibrin gel and were subsequently analyzed with immunofluorescent staining against neuronal markers. In parallel, the survival and growth rates of the cells were determined by MTT assay and neurite extension. At the end, cell-matrix interactions were investigated with SEM and TEM micrographs. Mechanical properties of fabricated scaffold were studied and results indicated appropriate choice of material, SEM and TEM showed excellent integration of cells with nanofibers regarding the relation between cells and fibrin gel. Immunofluorescent staining of fibrin gel after 6 days of cell seeding and culture demonstrated well expanded and incorporated network of neurons. In addition, viability, proliferation, and neuronal growth of seeded cells were analyzed at days 1, 3, and 6. Comparing those results with 2D culture of seeded cells showed positive effect of 3D culture. Taken together, the results suggest that fibrin can provide a suitable, three-dimensional scaffold for neuronal survival and outgrowth for regeneration of the central nervous system.

  20. Three-dimensional metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Burckel, David Bruce

    2012-06-12

    A fabrication method is capable of creating canonical metamaterial structures arrayed in a three-dimensional geometry. The method uses a membrane suspended over a cavity with predefined pattern as a directional evaporation mask. Metallic and/or dielectric material can be evaporated at high vacuum through the patterned membrane to deposit resonator structures on the interior walls of the cavity, thereby providing a unit cell of micron-scale dimension. The method can produce volumetric metamaterial structures comprising layers of such unit cells of resonator structures.

  1. Three dimensional quantum chromodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, G.; Rajeev, S. G.; Yang, Z.

    1992-02-01

    The subject of this talk is the study of the low energy behavior of three (2+1) dimensional Quantum Chromodynamics. We show the existence of a phase where parity is unbroken and the flavor group U(2n) is broken into a subgroup U(n)×U(n). We derive the low energy effective action for the theory and show that it has solitonic excitations with Fermi statistic, to be identified with the three dimensional ``baryon''. Finally, we study the current algebra for this effective action and we find a co-homologically nontrivial generalization of Kac-Moody algebras to three dimension.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Mass Transfer and Three-Dimensional Fabrication of Tissue-Engineered Cartilages Based on Chitosan/Gelatin Hybrid Hydrogel Scaffold in a Rotating Bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanxia; Song, Kedong; Jiang, Siyu; Chen, Jinglian; Tang, Lingzhi; Li, Siyuan; Fan, Jiangli; Wang, Yiwei; Zhao, Jiaquan; Liu, Tianqing

    2017-01-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering is believed to provide effective cartilage repair post-injuries or diseases. Biomedical materials play a key role in achieving successful culture and fabrication of cartilage. The physical properties of a chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffold make it an ideal cartilage biomimetic material. In this study, a chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel was chosen to fabricate a tissue-engineered cartilage in vitro by inoculating human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) at both dynamic and traditional static culture conditions. A bioreactor that provides a dynamic culture condition has received greater applications in tissue engineering due to its optimal mass transfer efficiency and its ability to simulate an equivalent physical environment compared to human body. In this study, prior to cell-scaffold fabrication experiment, mathematical simulations were confirmed with a mass transfer of glucose and TGF-β2 both in rotating wall vessel bioreactor (RWVB) and static culture conditions in early stage of culture via computational fluid dynamic (CFD) method. To further investigate the feasibility of the mass transfer efficiency of the bioreactor, this RWVB was adopted to fabricate three-dimensional cell-hydrogel cartilage constructs in a dynamic environment. The results showed that the mass transfer efficiency of RWVB was faster in achieving a final equilibrium compared to culture in static culture conditions. ADSCs culturing in RWVB expanded three times more compared to that in static condition over 10 days. Induced cell cultivation in a dynamic RWVB showed extensive expression of extracellular matrix, while the cell distribution was found much more uniformly distributing with full infiltration of extracellular matrix inside the porous scaffold. The increased mass transfer efficiency of glucose and TGF-β2 from RWVB promoted cellular proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of ADSCs inside chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffolds. The

  3. Postinfarction Functional Recovery Driven by a Three-Dimensional Engineered Fibrin Patch Composed of Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roura, Santiago; Soler-Botija, Carolina; Bagó, Juli R.; Llucià-Valldeperas, Aida; Férnandez, Marco A.; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Prat-Vidal, Cristina; Perea-Gil, Isaac; Blanco, Jerónimo

    2015-01-01

    Considerable research has been dedicated to restoring myocardial cell slippage and limiting ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). We examined the ability of a three-dimensional (3D) engineered fibrin patch filled with human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCBMSCs) to induce recovery of cardiac function after MI. The UCBMSCs were modified to coexpress luciferase and fluorescent protein reporters, mixed with fibrin, and applied as an adhesive, viable construct (fibrin-cell patch) over the infarcted myocardium in mice (MI-UCBMSC group). The patch adhered well to the heart. Noninvasive bioluminescence imaging demonstrated early proliferation and differentiation of UCBMSCs within the construct in the postinfarct mice in the MI-UCBMSC group. The implanted cells also participated in the formation of new, functional microvasculature that connected the fibrin-cell patch to both the subjacent myocardial tissue and the host circulatory system. As revealed by echocardiography, the left ventricular ejection fraction and fractional shortening at sacrifice were improved in MI-UCBMSC mice and were markedly reduced in mice treated with fibrin alone and untreated postinfarction controls. In conclusion, a 3D engineered fibrin patch composed of UCBMSCs attenuated infarct-derived cardiac dysfunction when transplanted locally over a myocardial wound. Significance Ischemic heart failure (HF) is the end stage of many cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction. The only definitive treatment for HF is cardiac transplant, which is hampered by limited number of heart donors and graft rejection. In recent times, cellular cardiomyoplasty has been expected to repair infarcted myocardium by implantation of different sources of stem or progenitor cells. However, low cell survival and myocardial implantation rates have motivated the emergence of novel approaches with the objective of generating graftable cell-based implants. Here, the potential

  4. Fabrication of Inverted Colloidal Crystal Poly(ethylene glycol) Scaffold: A Three-dimensional Cell Culture Platform for Liver Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Shirahama, Hitomi; Kumar, Supriya K; Jeon, Won-Yong; Kim, Myung Hee; Lee, Jae Ho; Ng, Soon Seng; Tabaei, Seyed R; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-08-27

    The ability to maintain hepatocyte function in vitro, for the purpose of testing xenobiotics' cytotoxicity, studying virus infection and developing drugs targeted at the liver, requires a platform in which cells receive proper biochemical and mechanical cues. Recent liver tissue engineering systems have employed three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds composed of synthetic or natural hydrogels, given their high water retention and their ability to provide the mechanical stimuli needed by the cells. There has been growing interest in the inverted colloidal crystal (ICC) scaffold, a recent development, which allows high spatial organization, homotypic and heterotypic cell interaction, as well as cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction. Herein, we describe a protocol to fabricate the ICC scaffold using poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) and the particle leaching method. Briefly, a lattice is made from microsphere particles, after which a pre-polymer solution is added, properly polymerized, and the particles are then removed, or leached, using an organic solvent (e.g., tetrahydrofuran). The dissolution of the lattice results in a highly porous scaffold with controlled pore sizes and interconnectivities that allow media to reach cells more easily. This unique structure allows high surface area for the cells to adhere to as well as easy communication between pores, and the ability to coat the PEGDA ICC scaffold with proteins also shows a marked effect on cell performance. We analyze the morphology of the scaffold as well as the hepatocarcinoma cell (Huh-7.5) behavior in terms of viability and function to explore the effect of ICC structure and ECM coatings. Overall, this paper provides a detailed protocol of an emerging scaffold that has wide applications in tissue engineering, especially liver tissue engineering.

  5. Liver extracellular matrix providing dual functions of two-dimensional substrate coating and three-dimensional injectable hydrogel platform for liver tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Seung; Shin, Jisoo; Park, Hae-Min; Kim, Yun-Gon; Kim, Byung-Gee; Oh, Jong-Won; Cho, Seung-Woo

    2014-01-13

    Decellularization of tissues or organs can provide an efficient strategy for preparing functional scaffolds for tissue engineering. Microstructures of native extracellular matrices and their biochemical compositions can be retained in the decellularized matrices, providing tissue-specific microenvironments for efficient tissue regeneration. Here, we report the versatility of liver extracellular matrix (LEM) that can be used for two-dimensional (2D) coating and three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel platforms for culture and transplantation of primary hepatocytes. Collagen type I (Col I) has typically been used for hepatocyte culture and transplantation. In this study, LEM was compared with Col I in terms of biophysical and mechanical characteristics and biological performance for enhancing cell viability, differentiation, and hepatic functions. Surface properties of LEM coating and mechanical properties and gelation kinetics of LEM hydrogel could be manipulated by adjusting the LEM concentration. In addition, LEM hydrogel exhibited improved elastic properties, rapid gelation, and volume maintenance compared to Col I hydrogel. LEM coating significantly improved hepatocyte functions such as albumin secretion and urea synthesis. More interestingly, LEM coating upregulated hepatic gene expression of human adipose-derived stem cells, indicating enhanced hepatic differentiation of these stem cells. The viability and hepatic functions of primary hepatocytes were also significantly improved in LEM hydrogel compared to Col I hydrogel both in vitro and in vivo. Albumin and hepatocyte transcription factor expression was upregulated in hepatocytes transplanted in LEM hydrogels. In conclusion, LEM can provide functional biomaterial platforms for diverse applications in liver tissue engineering by promoting survival and maturation of hepatocytes and hepatic commitment of stem cells. This study demonstrates the feasibility of decellularized matrix for both 2D coating and 3D hydrogel in

  6. Three dimensional interactive display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) interactive display and method of forming the same, includes a transparent capaciflector (TC) camera formed on a transparent shield layer on the screen surface. A first dielectric layer is formed on the shield layer. A first wire layer is formed on the first dielectric layer. A second dielectric layer is formed on the first wire layer. A second wire layer is formed on the second dielectric layer. Wires on the first wire layer and second wire layer are grouped into groups of parallel wires with a turnaround at one end of each group and a sensor pad at the opposite end. An operational amplifier is connected to each of the sensor pads and the shield pad biases the pads and receives a signal from connected sensor pads in response to intrusion of a probe. The signal is proportional to probe location with respect to the monitor screen.

  7. Three dimensional visualization of engineered bone and soft tissue by combined x-ray micro-diffraction and phase contrast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cedola, Alessia; Campi, Gaetano; Pelliccia, Daniele; Bukreeva, Inna; Fratini, Michela; Burghammer, Manfred; Rigon, Luigi; Arfelli, Fulvia; Chen, Rong Chang; Dreossi, Diego; Sodini, Nicola; Mohammadi, Sara; Tromba, Giuliana; Cancedda, Ranieri; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena

    2014-01-01

    Computed x-ray phase contrast micro-tomography is the most valuable tool for a three dimensional (3D) and non destructive analysis of the tissue engineered bone morphology. We used a Talbot interferometer installed at SYRMEP beamline of the ELETTRA synchrotron (Trieste, Italy) for a precise 3D reconstruction of both bone and soft connective tissue, regenerated in vivo within a porous scaffold. For the first time the x-ray tomographic reconstructions have been combined with x-ray scanning micro-diffraction measurement on the same sample, in order to give an exhaustive identification of the different tissues participating to the biomineralization process. As a result, we were able to investigate in detail the different densities in the tissues, distinguishing the 3D organization of the amorphous calcium phosphate from the collagen matrix. Our experimental approach allows for a deeper understanding of the role of collagen matrix in the organic-mineral transition, which is a crucial issue for the development of new bio-inspired composites.

  8. A three-dimensional multiporous fibrous scaffold fabricated with regenerated spider silk protein/poly(l-lactic acid) for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiaozhen; Sun, Chengjun

    2015-02-01

    An axially aligned three-dimensional (3-D) fibrous scaffold was fabricated with regenerated spider silk protein (RSSP)/poly (l-lactic acid) (PLLA) through electrospinning and post treatment. The morphology, mechanical and degradation properties of the scaffold were controlled through the weight ratio of RSSP to PLLA, the thickness of the scaffold and the treatment time. The scaffold with a weight ratio of 2:3 (RSSP:PLLA) had a nanoleaves-on-nanofibers hierarchical nanostructure; the length and thickness of the nanoleaves were about 400 and 30 nm, respectively. The holes of the scaffolds ranged from hundreds of nanometers to several microns. The scaffold showed an ideal mechanical property that it was stiff when dry, but became soft once hydrated in the culture medium. Its degradation rate was very slow in the first 2 months, and then accelerated in the following 2 months. The pH values of the degradation mediums of all the samples remained in the range of 7.40-7.12 during degradation for 6 months. It had good biocompatibility with PC 12 cells. The aligned hierarchical nanostructure could guide the directions of the axon extension. This scaffold has a potential application in Tissue Engineering and controlled release. This study provides a method to produce synthetic or natural biodegradable polymer scaffold with tailored morphology, mechanical, and degradation properties.

  9. The myocardial regenerative potential of three-dimensional engineered cardiac tissues composed of multiple human iPS cell-derived cardiovascular cell lineages

    PubMed Central

    Masumoto, Hidetoshi; Nakane, Takeichiro; Tinney, Joseph P.; Yuan, Fangping; Ye, Fei; Kowalski, William J.; Minakata, Kenji; Sakata, Ryuzo; Yamashita, Jun K.; Keller, Bradley B.

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are a robust source for cardiac regenerative therapy due to their potential to support autologous and allogeneic transplant paradigms. The in vitro generation of three-dimensional myocardial tissue constructs using biomaterials as an implantable hiPSC-derived myocardium provides a path to realize sustainable myocardial regeneration. We generated engineered cardiac tissues (ECTs) from three cellular compositions of cardiomyocytes (CMs), endothelial cells (ECs), and vascular mural cells (MCs) differentiated from hiPSCs. We then determined the impact of cell composition on ECT structural and functional properties. In vitro force measurement showed that CM+EC+MC ECTs possessed preferential electromechanical properties versus ECTs without vascular cells indicating that incorporation of vascular cells augmented tissue maturation and function. The inclusion of MCs facilitated more mature CM sarcomeric structure, preferential alignment, and activated multiple tissue maturation pathways. The CM+EC+MC ECTs implanted onto infarcted, immune tolerant rat hearts engrafted, displayed both host and graft-derived vasculature, and ameliorated myocardial dysfunction. Thus, a composition of CMs and multiple vascular lineages derived from hiPSCs and incorporated into ECTs promotes functional maturation and demonstrates myocardial replacement and perfusion relevant for clinical translation. PMID:27435115

  10. Tissue engineering of cementum/periodontal-ligament complex using a novel three-dimensional pellet cultivation system for human periodontal ligament stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenhua; Jin, Fang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Ma, Dandan; Han, Chun; Huo, Na; Wang, Yinxiong; Zhang, Yunfei; Lin, Zhu; Jin, Yan

    2009-12-01

    Limitations of conventional regeneration modalities underscore the necessity of recapitulating development for periodontal tissue engineering. In this study, we proposed a novel three-dimensional pellet cultivation system for periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) to recreate the biological microenvironment similar to those of a regenerative milieu. Monodispersed human PDLSCs were cultured in medium with ascorbic acid and conditioned medium from developing apical tooth germ cells and were subsequently harvested from culture plate as a contiguous cell sheet with abundant extracellular matrix. The detached cell-matrix membrane spontaneously contracted to produce a single-cell pellet. The PDLSCs embedded within this cell-matrix complex exhibited several phenotypic characteristics of cementoblast lineages, as indicated by upregulated alkaline phosphatase activity, accelerated mineralization, and the expression of bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin genes. When this PDLSC pellets were transplanted into immunocompromised mice, a regular aligned cementum/PDL-like complex was formed. These results suggest that the combination of apical tooth germ cell-conditioned medium and endogenous extracellular matrix could maximally mimic the microenvironment of root/periodontal tissue development and enhance the reconstruction of physiological architecture of a cementum/PDL-like complex in a tissue-mimicking way; on the other hand, such PDLSC pellet may also be a promising alternative to promote periodontal defect repair for future clinical applications.

  11. Three dimensional visualization of engineered bone and soft tissue by combined x-ray micro-diffraction and phase contrast tomography.

    PubMed

    Cedola, Alessia; Campi, Gaetano; Pelliccia, Daniele; Bukreeva, Inna; Fratini, Michela; Burghammer, Manfred; Rigon, Luigi; Arfelli, Fulvia; Chang Chen, Rong; Dreossi, Diego; Sodini, Nicola; Mohammadi, Sara; Tromba, Giuliana; Cancedda, Ranieri; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena

    2014-01-06

    Computed x-ray phase contrast micro-tomography is the most valuable tool for a three dimensional (3D) and non destructive analysis of the tissue engineered bone morphology. We used a Talbot interferometer installed at SYRMEP beamline of the ELETTRA synchrotron (Trieste, Italy) for a precise 3D reconstruction of both bone and soft connective tissue, regenerated in vivo within a porous scaffold. For the first time the x-ray tomographic reconstructions have been combined with x-ray scanning micro-diffraction measurement on the same sample, in order to give an exhaustive identification of the different tissues participating to the biomineralization process. As a result, we were able to investigate in detail the different densities in the tissues, distinguishing the 3D organization of the amorphous calcium phosphate from the collagen matrix. Our experimental approach allows for a deeper understanding of the role of collagen matrix in the organic-mineral transition, which is a crucial issue for the development of new bio-inspired composites.

  12. Three-Dimensional Complex Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, E. Dale

    1988-01-01

    Report presents new theory of analytic functions of three-dimensional complex variables. While three-dimensional system subject to more limitations and more difficult to use than the two-dimensional system, useful in analysis of three-dimensional fluid flows, electrostatic potentials, and other phenomena involving harmonic functions.

  13. Synthesis of and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of a novel TGF-β1-SF-CS three-dimensional scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Shuang; Xu, Da-Peng; Liu, Zi-Mei; Du, Yang; Wang, Xu-Kai

    2016-01-01

    The role of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in normal human fracture healing has been previously demonstrated. The objective of the present study was to examine the biocompatibility of TGF-β1-silk fibroin-chitosan (TGF-β1-SF-CS) three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds in order to construct an ideal scaffold for bone tissue engineering. We added TGF-β1 directly to the SF-CS scaffold to construct a 3D scaffold for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, and performed evaluations to determine whether it may have potential applications as a growth factor delivery device. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were seeded on the TGF-β1-SF-CS scaffolds and the silk fibroin-chitosan (SF-CS) scaffolds. On the TGF-β1-SF-CS and the SF-CS scaffolds, the cell adhesion rate increased in a time-dependent manner. Using a Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay and analyzing the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression proved that TGF-β1 significantly enhanced the growth and proliferation of BMSCs on the SF-CS scaffolds in a time-dependent manner. To examine the in vivo biocompatibility and osteogenesis of the TGF-β1-SF-CS scaffolds, the TGF-β1-SF-CS scaffolds and the SF-CS scaffolds were implanted in rabbit mandibles and studied histologically and microradiographically. The 3D computed tomography (CT) scan and histological examinations of the samples showed that the TGF-β1-SF-CS scaffolds exhibited good biocompatibility and extensive osteoconductivity with the host bone after 8 weeks. Moreover, the introduction of TGF-β1 to the SF-CS scaffolds markedly enhanced the efficiency of new bone formation, and this was confirmed using bone mineral density (BMD) and biomechanical evaluation, particularly at 8 weeks after implantation. We demonstrated that the TGF-β1-SF-CS scaffolds possessed as good biocompatibility and osteogenesis as the hybrid ones. Taken together, these findings indicate that the TGF-β1-SF-CS scaffolds fulfilled the basic requirements of bone

  14. Biocompatible Silk Noil-Based Three-Dimensional Carded-Needled Nonwoven Scaffolds Guide the Engineering of Novel Skin Connective Tissue.

    PubMed

    Chiarini, Anna; Freddi, Giuliano; Liu, Daisong; Armato, Ubaldo; Dal Prà, Ilaria

    2016-08-01

    Retracting hypertrophic scars resulting from healed burn wounds heavily impact on the patients' life quality. Biomaterial scaffolds guiding burned-out skin regeneration could suppress or lessen scar retraction. Here we report a novel silk noil-based three-dimensional (3D) nonwoven scaffold produced by carding and needling with no formic acid exposure, which might improve burn healing. Once wetted, it displays human skin-like physical features and a high biocompatibility. Human keratinocyte-like cervical carcinoma C4-I cells seeded onto the carded-needled nonwovens in vitro quickly adhered to them, grew, and actively metabolized glutamine releasing lactate. As on plastic, they released no proinflammatory IL-1β, although secreting tumor necrosis factor-alpha, an inducer of the autocrine mitogen amphiregulin in such cells. Once grafted into interscapular subcutaneous tissue of mice, carded-needled nonwovens guided the afresh assembly of a connective tissue enveloping the fibroin microfibers and filling the interposed voids within 3 months. Fibroblasts and a few poly- or mononucleated macrophages populated the engineered tissue. Besides, its extracellular matrix contained thin sparse collagen fibrils and a newly formed vascular network whose endothelin-1-expressing endothelial cells grew first on the fibroin microfibrils and later expanded into the intervening matrix. Remarkably, no infiltrates of inflammatory leukocytes and no packed collagen fibers bundles among fibroin microfibers, no fibrous capsules at the grafts periphery, and hence no foreign body response was obtained at the end of 3 months of observation. Therefore, we posit that silk noil-based 3D carded-needled nonwoven scaffolds are tools for translational medicine studies as they could guide connective tissue regeneration at deep burn wounds averting scar retraction with good functional results.

  15. Optical projection tomography can be used to investigate spatial distribution of chondrocytes in three-dimensional biomaterial scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Järvinen, Elina; Muhonen, Virpi; Haaparanta, Anne-Marie; Kellomäki, Minna; Kiviranta, Ilkka

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterial scaffolds have been used in autologous chondrocyte implantation to facilitate the repair of large lesions and to advance the formation of articular cartilage [Exp. Biol. Med. (Maywood) 237(1) (2012), 10-17]. Biomaterial scaffolds are usually three-dimensional (3-D) porous structures consisting of biodegradable materials to support articular cartilage formation. Adequate porosity of the scaffold is necessary for uniform cell distribution and cell attachment, and the density of the cells in the scaffold should be appropriate for cartilage formation [Cartilage 3(2) (2012), 108-117]. There have been only a restricted number of studies on the spatial distribution of cells in scaffolds, and on the role of this to cartilage formation [J. Biotechnol. 129 (2007), 516-531; Biotechnol. Progr. 14 (1998), 193-202; Biotechnol. Bioeng. 84 (2003), 205-214]. This may be due to the limited availability of appropriate visualization methods. Acquiring 3-D images throughout the scaffold by histology or confocal methods are not applicable to all types of scaffolds, and moreover, they are time consuming, laborious and thus not very feasible for a large scale analysis. To make the visualization of the spatial distribution of the cells easier in biomaterial scaffolds we have applied optical projection tomography (OPT). OPT microscope produces high-resolution 3-D images of both fluorescent and non-fluorescent specimens [Science 296(5567) (2002), 541-545]. Here we demonstrate that the OPT method can be used for the evaluation and visualization of the cell seeding method, spatial distribution and density of cells in biomaterial scaffolds and thus establish the OPT as a valid tool for analysis of cell distribution in cartilage tissue engineering samples.

  16. Three dimensional Dirac semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaheer, Saad

    We extend the physics of graphene to three dimensional systems by showing that Dirac points can exist on the Fermi surface of realistic materials in three dimensions. Many of the exotic electronic properties of graphene can be ascribed to the pseudorelativistic behavior of its charge carriers due to two dimensional Dirac points on the Fermi surface. We show that certain nonsymmorphic spacegroups exhibit Dirac points among the irreducible representations of the appropriate little group at high symmetry points on the surface of the Brillouin zone. We provide a list of all Brillouin zone momenta in the 230 spacegroups that can host Dirac points. We describe microscopic considerations necessary to design materials in one of the candidate spacegroups such that the Dirac point appears at the Fermi energy without any additional non-Dirac-like Fermi pockets. We use density functional theory based methods to propose six new Dirac semimetals: BiO 2 and SbO2 in the beta-cristobalite lattice (spacegroup 227), and BiCaSiO4, BiMgSiO4, BiAlInO 4, and BiZnSiO4 in the distorted spinels lattice (spacegroup 74). Additionally we derive effective Dirac Hamiltonians given group representative operators as well as tight binding models incorporating spin-orbit coupling. Finally we study the Fermi surface of zincblende (spacegroup 216) HgTe which is effectively point-like at Gamma in the Brillouin zone and exhibits accidental degeneracies along a threefold rotation axis. Whereas compressive strain gaps the band structure into a topological insulator, tensile strain shifts the accidental degeneracies away from Gamma and enlarges the Fermi surface. States on the Fermi surface exhibit nontrivial spin texture marked by winding of spins around the threefold rotation axis and by spin vortices indicating a change in the winding number. This is confirmed by microscopic calculations performed in tensile strained HgTe and Hg0.5Zn 0.5 Te as well as k.p theory. We conclude with a summary of recent

  17. Heat transfer in gas turbine engines and three-dimensional flows; Proceedings of the Symposium, ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, Nov. 27-Dec. 2, 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elovic, E.; O'Brien, J. E.; Pepper, D. W.

    The present conference on heat transfer characteristics of gas turbines and three-dimensional flows discusses velocity-temperature fluctuation correlations at the flow stagnation flow of a circular cylinder in turbulent flow, heat transfer across turbulent boundary layers with pressure gradients, the effect of jet grid turbulence on boundary layer heat transfer, and heat transfer characteristics predictions for discrete-hole film cooling. Also discussed are local heat transfer in internally cooled turbine airfoil leading edges, secondary flows in vane cascades and curved ducts, three-dimensional numerical modeling in gas turbine coal combustor design, numerical and experimental results for tube-fin heat exchanger airflow and heating characteristics, and the computation of external hypersonic three-dimensional flow field and heat transfer characteristics.

  18. Three-Dimensional Structure and Disposition of the Air Conducting and Gas Exchange Conduits of the Avian Lung: The Domestic Duck (Cairina moschata)

    PubMed Central

    Makanya, A. N.; Kavoi, B. M.; Djonov, V.

    2014-01-01

    The anatomy of the domestic duck lung was studied macroscopically, by casting and by light, transmission, and scanning electron microscopy. The lung had four categories of secondary bronchi (SB), namely, the medioventral (MV, 4-5), laterodorsal (LD, 6–10), lateroventral (LV, 2–4), and posterior secondary bronchi (PO, 36–44). The neopulmonic parabronchi formed an intricate feltwork on the ventral third of the lung and inosculated those from the other SB. The lung parenchyma was organized into cylindrical parabronchi separated by thin septa containing blood vessels. Atria were shallow and well-fortified by epithelial ridges reinforced by smooth muscle bundles and gave rise to 2–6 elongate infundibulae. Air capillaries arose either directly from the atria or from infundibulae and were tubular or globular in shape with thin interconnecting branches. The newly described spatial disposition of the conducting air conduits closely resembles that of the chicken. This remarkable similarity between the categories, numbers, and 3D arrangement of the SB in the duck and chicken points to a convergence in function-oriented design. To illuminate airflow dynamics in the avian lung, precise directions of airflow in the various categories of SB and parabronchi need to be characterized. PMID:25938110

  19. Three-Dimensional Shallow Water Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-30

    13-1-0026 entitled "Three- Dimensional Shallow Water Acoustics," Principal Investigator Dr. Ying-Tsong Lin. Sincerely, ;l1,J-Ju1𔃻 ~{hjM1...30/03/2016 01/01/2013-12/31/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBERS Three-Dimensional Shallow Water Acoustics 5b, GRANT NUMBER N0001 4-13-1... Water Acoustics Dr. Ying-Tsong Lin Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543

  20. Identification of stable reference genes for gene expression analysis of three-dimensional cultivated human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Rauh, Juliane; Jacobi, Angela; Stiehler, Maik

    2015-02-01

    The principles of tissue engineering (TE) are widely used for bone regeneration concepts. Three-dimensional (3D) cultivation of autologous human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) on porous scaffolds is the basic prerequisite to generate newly formed bone tissue. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is a specific and sensitive analytical tool for the measurement of mRNA-levels in cells or tissues. For an accurate quantification of gene expression levels, stably expressed reference genes (RGs) are essential to obtain reliable results. Since the 3D environment can affect a cell's morphology, proliferation, and gene expression profile compared with two-dimensional (2D) cultivation, there is a need to identify robust RGs for the quantification of gene expression. So far, this issue has not been adequately investigated. The aim of this study was to identify the most stably expressed RGs for gene expression analysis of 3D-cultivated human bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs). For this, we analyzed the gene expression levels of n=31 RGs in 3D-cultivated human BM-MSCs from six different donors compared with conventional 2D cultivation using qRT-PCR. MSCs isolated from bone marrow aspirates were cultivated on human cancellous bone cube scaffolds for 14 days. Osteogenic differentiation was assessed by cell-specific alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and expression of osteogenic marker genes. Expression levels of potential reference and target genes were quantified using commercially available TaqMan(®) assays. mRNA expression stability of RGs was determined by calculating the coefficient of variation (CV) and using the algorithms of geNorm and NormFinder. Using both algorithms, we identified TATA box binding protein (TBP), transferrin receptor (p90, CD71) (TFRC), and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT1) as the most stably expressed RGs in 3D-cultivated BM-MSCs. Notably, genes that are routinely used as RGs, for example, beta actin

  1. Three-dimensional echocardiographic technology.

    PubMed

    Salgo, Ivan S

    2007-05-01

    This article addresses the current state of the art of technology in three-dimensional echocardiography as it applies to transducer design, beam forming, display, and quantification. Because three-dimensional echocardiography encompasses many technical and clinical areas, this article reviews its strengths and limitations and concludes with an analysis of what to use when.

  2. Three Dimensional Printing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-30

    next. EPRI funded. Medical Applications; Therics , Inc. Princeton, NJ • Drug delivery devices. • Scaffolds for tissue engineering. • Direct printing...e r a t u r e ( C ) Conformal Cooling Condition T ime [se c] Tem p erature [degC] si mul ati on d ata experi men tal dat a 25 20 15 10 5 0 300 60...100 200 300 400 500 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Strain (%) S t r e s s ( M P a ) Infiltrated Skeleton Cast Ingot Inf before heat treat Inf before heat treat

  3. Three dimensional magnetic abacus memory

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, ShiLei; Zhang, JingYan; Baker, Alexander A.; Wang, ShouGuo; Yu, GuangHua; Hesjedal, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Stacking nonvolatile memory cells into a three-dimensional matrix represents a powerful solution for the future of magnetic memory. However, it is technologically challenging to access the data in the storage medium if large numbers of bits are stacked on top of each other. Here we introduce a new type of multilevel, nonvolatile magnetic memory concept, the magnetic abacus. Instead of storing information in individual magnetic layers, thereby having to read out each magnetic layer separately, the magnetic abacus adopts a new encoding scheme. It is inspired by the idea of second quantisation, dealing with the memory state of the entire stack simultaneously. Direct read operations are implemented by measuring the artificially engineered ‘quantised' Hall voltage, each representing a count of the spin-up and spin-down layers in the stack. This new memory system further allows for both flexible scaling of the system and fast communication among cells. The magnetic abacus provides a promising approach for future nonvolatile 3D magnetic random access memory. PMID:25146338

  4. NF-{kappa}B signaling is activated and confers resistance to apoptosis in three-dimensionally cultured EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sakuma, Yuji; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Nakamura, Yoshiyasu; Yoshihara, Mitsuyo; Matsukuma, Shoichi; Koizume, Shiro; Miyagi, Yohei

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGFR-mutant cells in 3D culture resist EGFR inhibition compared with suspended cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Degradation of I{kappa}B and activation of NF-{kappa}B are observed in 3D-cultured cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibiting NF-{kappa}B enhances the efficacy of the EGFR inhibitor in 3D-cultured cells. -- Abstract: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cells in suspension undergo apoptosis to a greater extent than adherent cells in a monolayer when EGFR autophosphorylation is inhibited by EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). This suggests that cell adhesion to a culture dish may activate an anti-apoptotic signaling pathway other than the EGFR pathway. Since the microenvironment of cells cultured in a monolayer are substantially different to that of cells existing in three-dimension (3D) in vivo, we assessed whether two EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cell lines, HCC827 and H1975, were more resistant to EGFR TKI-induced apoptosis when cultured in a 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) as compared with in suspension. The ECM-adherent EGFR-mutant cells in 3D were significantly less sensitive to treatment with WZ4002, an EGFR TKI, than the suspended cells. Further, a marked degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, the inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B, was observed only in the 3D-cultured cells, leading to an increase in the activation of NF-{kappa}B. Moreover, the inhibition of NF-{kappa}B with pharmacological inhibitors enhanced EGFR TKI-induced apoptosis in 3D-cultured EGFR-mutant cells. These results suggest that inhibition of NF-{kappa}B signaling would render ECM-adherent EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cells in vivo more susceptible to EGFR TKI-induced cell death.

  5. Three dimensional fabrication at small size scales

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Timothy G.; Zarafshar, Aasiyeh M.; Gracias, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the fact that we live in a three-dimensional (3D) world and macroscale engineering is 3D, conventional sub-mm scale engineering is inherently two-dimensional (2D). New fabrication and patterning strategies are needed to enable truly three-dimensionally-engineered structures at small size scales. Here, we review strategies that have been developed over the last two decades that seek to enable such millimeter to nanoscale 3D fabrication and patterning. A focus of this review is the strategy of self-assembly, specifically in a biologically inspired, more deterministic form known as self-folding. Self-folding methods can leverage the strengths of lithography to enable the construction of precisely patterned 3D structures and “smart” components. This self-assembling approach is compared with other 3D fabrication paradigms, and its advantages and disadvantages are discussed. PMID:20349446

  6. Strategies for Whole Lung Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Calle, Elizabeth A.; Ghaedi, Mahboobe; Sundaram, Sumati; Sivarapatna, Amogh; Tseng, Michelle K.

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated the feasibility of using decellularized lung extracellular matrix scaffolds to support the engineering of functional lung tissue in vitro. Rendered acellular through the use of detergents and other reagents, the scaffolds are mounted in organ-specific bioreactors where cells in the scaffold are provided with nutrients and appropriate mechanical stimuli such as ventilation and perfusion. Though initial studies are encouraging, a great deal remains to be done to advance the field and transition from rodent lungs to whole human tissue engineered lungs. To do so, a variety of hurdles must be overcome. In particular, a reliable source of human-sized scaffolds, as well as a method of terminal sterilization of scaffolds, must be identified. Continued research in lung cell and developmental biology will hopefully help identify the number and types of cells that will be required to regenerate functional lung tissue. Finally, bioreactor designs must be improved in order to provide more precise ventilation stimuli and vascular perfusion in order to avoid injury to or death of the cells cultivated within the scaffold. Ultimately, the success of efforts to engineer a functional lung in vitro will critically depend on the ability to create a fully endothelialized vascular network that provides sufficient barrier function and alveolar-capillary surface area to exchange gas at rates compatible with healthy lung function. PMID:24691527

  7. Chemical and structural stability of zirconium-based metal-organic frameworks with large three-dimensional pores by linker engineering.

    PubMed

    Kalidindi, Suresh B; Nayak, Sanjit; Briggs, Michael E; Jansat, Susanna; Katsoulidis, Alexandros P; Miller, Gary J; Warren, John E; Antypov, Dmytro; Corà, Furio; Slater, Ben; Prestly, Mark R; Martí-Gastaldo, Carlos; Rosseinsky, Matthew J

    2015-01-02

    The synthesis of metal-organic frameworks with large three-dimensional channels that are permanently porous and chemically stable offers new opportunities in areas such as catalysis and separation. Two linkers (L1=4,4',4'',4'''-([1,1'-biphenyl]-3,3',5,5'-tetrayltetrakis(ethyne-2,1-diyl)) tetrabenzoic acid, L2=4,4',4'',4'''-(pyrene-1,3,6,8-tetrayltetrakis(ethyne-2,1-diyl))tetrabenzoic acid) were used that have equivalent connectivity and dimensions but quite distinct torsional flexibility. With these, a solid solution material, [Zr6 O4 (OH)4 (L1)2.6 (L2)0.4 ]⋅(solvent)x , was formed that has three-dimensional crystalline permanent porosity with a surface area of over 4000 m(2)  g(-1) that persists after immersion in water. These properties are not accessible for the isostructural phases made from the separate single linkers.

  8. Three-Dimensional (3D) Distribution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-11

    witnessed by ongoing efforts in both Afghanistan and Iraq , must turn distribution challenges into opportunities by mastering Three-Dimensional (3D...sustainment. 5 Joint Logistics Functions •Supply •Services •Maintenance •Transportation • Health Service Support •General Engineering Joint Personnel...Maintenance •Transportation • Health Service Support •Explosive Ordinance Disposal •Human Resource Support •Legal Support •Religious Support •Financial

  9. Bioreactor Development for Lung Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Much recent interest in lung bioengineering by pulmonary investigators, industry and the organ transplant field has seen a rapid growth of bioreactor development ranging from the microfluidic scale to the human-sized whole lung systems. A comprehension of the findings from these models is needed to provide the basis for further bioreactor development. Objective The goal was to comprehensively review the current state of bioreactor development for the lung. Methods A search using PubMed was done for published, peer-reviewed papers using the keywords “lung” AND “bioreactor” or “bioengineering” or “tissue engineering” or “ex vivo perfusion”. Main Results Many new bioreactors ranging from the microfluidic scale to the human-sized whole lung systems have been developed by both academic and commercial entities. Microfluidic, lung-mimic and lung slice cultures have the advantages of cost-efficiency and high throughput analyses ideal for pharmaceutical and toxicity studies. Perfused/ventilated rodent whole lung systems can be adapted for mid-throughput studies of lung stem/progenitor cell development, cell behavior, understanding and treating lung injury and for preliminary work that can be translated to human lung bioengineering. Human-sized ex vivo whole lung bioreactors incorporating perfusion and ventilation are amenable to automation and have been used for whole lung decellularization and recellularization. Clinical scale ex vivo lung perfusion systems have been developed for lung preservation and reconditioning and are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Conclusions Significant advances in bioreactors for lung engineering have been made at both the microfluidic and the macro scale. The most advanced are closed systems that incorporate pressure-controlled perfusion and ventilation and are amenable to automation. Ex vivo lung perfusion systems have advanced to clinical trials for lung preservation and reconditioning. The biggest

  10. Three-dimensional marginal separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duck, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    The three dimensional marginal separation of a boundary layer along a line of symmetry is considered. The key equation governing the displacement function is derived, and found to be a nonlinear integral equation in two space variables. This is solved iteratively using a pseudo-spectral approach, based partly in double Fourier space, and partly in physical space. Qualitatively, the results are similar to previously reported two dimensional results (which are also computed to test the accuracy of the numerical scheme); however quantitatively the three dimensional results are much different.

  11. Three-dimensional stellarator codes

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, P. R.

    2002-01-01

    Three-dimensional computer codes have been used to develop quasisymmetric stellarators with modular coils that are promising candidates for a magnetic fusion reactor. The mathematics of plasma confinement raises serious questions about the numerical calculations. Convergence studies have been performed to assess the best configurations. Comparisons with recent data from large stellarator experiments serve to validate the theory. PMID:12140367

  12. Three dimensional colorimetric assay assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Charych, D.; Reichart, A.

    2000-06-27

    A direct assay is described using novel three-dimensional polymeric assemblies which change from a blue to red color when exposed to an analyte, in one case a flu virus. The assemblies are typically in the form of liposomes which can be maintained in a suspension, and show great intensity in their color changes. Their method of production is also described.

  13. Three dimensional colorimetric assay assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah; Reichart, Anke

    2000-01-01

    A direct assay is described using novel three-dimensional polymeric assemblies which change from a blue to red color when exposed to an analyte, in one case a flu virus. The assemblies are typically in the form of liposomes which can be maintained in a suspension, and show great intensity in their color changes. Their method of production is also described.

  14. Creating Three-Dimensional Scenes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumpe, Norm

    2005-01-01

    Persistence of Vision Raytracer (POV-Ray), a free computer program for creating photo-realistic, three-dimensional scenes and a link for Mathematica users interested in generating POV-Ray files from within Mathematica, is discussed. POV-Ray has great potential in secondary mathematics classrooms and helps in strengthening students' visualization…

  15. Three-Dimensional Lissajous Figures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Mura, John M.

    1989-01-01

    Described is a mechanically driven device for generating three-dimensional harmonic space figures with different frequencies and phase angles on the X, Y, and Z axes. Discussed are apparatus, viewing stereo pairs, equations of motion, and using space figures in classroom. (YP)

  16. Formation of three-dimensional cell/polymer constructs for bone tissue engineering in a spinner flask and a rotating wall vessel bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Sikavitsas, Vassilios I; Bancroft, Gregory N; Mikos, Antonios G

    2002-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the cell culture conditions of three-dimensional polymer scaffolds seeded with rat marrow stromal cells (MSCs) cultured in different bioreactors concerning the ability of these cells to proliferate, differentiate towards the osteoblastic lineage, and generate mineralized extracellular matrix. MSCs harvested from male Sprague-Dawley rats were culture expanded, seeded on three-dimensional porous 75:25 poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) biodegradable scaffolds, and cultured for 21 days under static conditions or in two model bioreactors (a spinner flask and a rotating wall vessel) that enhance mixing of the media and provide better nutrient transport to the seeded cells. The spinner flask culture demonstrated a 60% enhanced proliferation at the end of the first week when compared to static culture. On day 14, all cell/polymer constructs exhibited their maximum alkaline phosphatase activity (AP). Cell/polymer constructs cultured in the spinner flask had 2.4 times higher AP activity than constructs cultured under static conditions on day 14. The total osteocalcin (OC) secretion in the spinner flask culture was 3.5 times higher than the static culture, with a peak OC secretion occurring on day 18. No considerable AP activity and OC secretion were detected in the rotating wall vessel culture throughout the 21-day culture period. The spinner flask culture had the highest calcium content at day 14. On day 21, the calcium deposition in the spinner flask culture was 6.6 times higher than the static cultured constructs and over 30 times higher than the rotating wall vessel culture. Histological sections showed concentration of cells and mineralization at the exterior of the foams at day 21. This phenomenon may arise from the potential existence of nutrient concentration gradients at the interior of the scaffolds. The better mixing provided in the spinner flask, external to the outer surface of the scaffolds, may explain the

  17. Formation of three-dimensional cell/polymer constructs for bone tissue engineering in a spinner flask and a rotating wall vessel bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikavitsas, Vassilios I.; Bancroft, Gregory N.; Mikos, Antonios G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the cell culture conditions of three-dimensional polymer scaffolds seeded with rat marrow stromal cells (MSCs) cultured in different bioreactors concerning the ability of these cells to proliferate, differentiate towards the osteoblastic lineage, and generate mineralized extracellular matrix. MSCs harvested from male Sprague-Dawley rats were culture expanded, seeded on three-dimensional porous 75:25 poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) biodegradable scaffolds, and cultured for 21 days under static conditions or in two model bioreactors (a spinner flask and a rotating wall vessel) that enhance mixing of the media and provide better nutrient transport to the seeded cells. The spinner flask culture demonstrated a 60% enhanced proliferation at the end of the first week when compared to static culture. On day 14, all cell/polymer constructs exhibited their maximum alkaline phosphatase activity (AP). Cell/polymer constructs cultured in the spinner flask had 2.4 times higher AP activity than constructs cultured under static conditions on day 14. The total osteocalcin (OC) secretion in the spinner flask culture was 3.5 times higher than the static culture, with a peak OC secretion occurring on day 18. No considerable AP activity and OC secretion were detected in the rotating wall vessel culture throughout the 21-day culture period. The spinner flask culture had the highest calcium content at day 14. On day 21, the calcium deposition in the spinner flask culture was 6.6 times higher than the static cultured constructs and over 30 times higher than the rotating wall vessel culture. Histological sections showed concentration of cells and mineralization at the exterior of the foams at day 21. This phenomenon may arise from the potential existence of nutrient concentration gradients at the interior of the scaffolds. The better mixing provided in the spinner flask, external to the outer surface of the scaffolds, may explain the

  18. Bioprinting of a mechanically enhanced three-dimensional dual cell-laden construct for osteochondral tissue engineering using a multi-head tissue/organ building system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Jin-Hyung; Lee, Jung-Seob; Kim, Jong Young; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to build a mechanically enhanced three-dimensional (3D) bioprinted construct containing two different cell types for osteochondral tissue regeneration. Recently, the production of 3D cell-laden structures using various scaffold-free cell printing technologies has opened up new possibilities. However, ideal 3D complex tissues or organs have not yet been printed because gel-state hydrogels have been used as the principal material and are unable to maintain the desired 3D structure due to their poor mechanical strength. In this study, thermoplastic biomaterial polycaprolactone (PCL), which shows relatively high mechanical properties as compared with hydrogel, was used as a framework for enhancing the mechanical stability of the bioprinted construct. Two different alginate solutions were then infused into the previously prepared framework consisting of PCL to create the 3D construct for osteochondral printing. For this work, a multi-head tissue/organ building system (MtoBS), which was particularly designed to dispense thermoplastic biomaterial and hydrogel having completely different rheology properties, was newly developed and used to bioprint osteochondral tissue. It was confirmed that the line width, position and volume control of PCL and alginate solutions were adjustable in the MtoBS. Most importantly, dual cell-laden 3D constructs consisting of osteoblasts and chondrocytes were successfully fabricated. Further, the separately dispensed osteoblasts and chondrocytes not only retained their initial position and viability, but also proliferated up to 7 days after being dispensed.

  19. A new technique for studying directional cell migration in a hydrogel-based three-dimensional matrix for tissue engineering model systems.

    PubMed

    Topman, Gil; Shoham, Naama; Sharabani-Yosef, Orna; Lin, Feng-Huei; Gefen, Amit

    2013-08-01

    Cell migration has a key role in biological processes, e.g. malignancy, wound healing, immune response and morphogenesis. Studying migration and factors that influence it is beneficial, e.g. for developing drugs to suppress metastasis, heal wounds faster or enhance the response to infection. Though the majority of the literature describes two-dimensional (2D) migration studies in culture dishes, a more realistic approach is to study migration in three-dimensional (3D) constructs. However, simple-to-implement, straight-forward standardized quantitative techniques for analysis of migration rates of cell colonies in 3D are still required in the field. Here, we describe a new model system for quantifying directional migration of colonies in a hyaluronic acid (oxi-HA) and adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) hydrogel-based 3D matrix. We further demonstrate that our previously reported image processing technique for measuring migration in 2D (Topman et al., 2011, 2012) is extendable for analyzing the rates of migration of cells that directionally migrate in the hydrogel and are fluorescently stained with a 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) nuclear stain. Together, the present experimental setup and image processing algorithm provide a standard test bench for measuring migration rates in a fully automated, robust assay which is useful for high-throughput screening in large-scale drug evaluations, where effects on migration in a 3D matrix are sought.

  20. Three-Dimensional Imaging. Chapter 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelso, R. M.; Delo, C.

    1999-01-01

    This chapter is concerned with three-dimensional imaging of fluid flows. Although relatively young, this field of research has already yielded an enormous range of techniques. These vary widely in cost and complexity, with the cheapest light sheet systems being within the budgets of most laboratories, and the most expensive Magnetic Resonance Imaging systems available to a select few. Taking the view that the most likely systems to be developed are those using light sheets, the authors will relate their knowledge and experience of such systems. Other systems will be described briefly and references provided. Flows are inherently three-dimensional in structure; even those generated around nominally 2-D surface geometry. It is becoming increasingly apparent to scientists and engineers that the three-dimensionalities, both large and small scale, are important in terms of overall flow structure and species, momentum, and energy transport. Furthermore, we are accustomed to seeing the world in three dimensions, so it is natural that we should wish to view, measure and interpret flows in three-dimensions. Unfortunately, 3-D images do not lend themselves to convenient presentation on the printed page, and this task is one of the challenges facing us.

  1. Three-dimensional perspective visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussey, Kevin

    1991-01-01

    It was demonstrated that image processing computer graphic techniques can provide an effective means of physiographic analysis of remotely sensed regions through the use of three-dimensional perspective rendering. THe methods used to simulate and animate three-dimensional surfaces from two-dimensional imagery and digital elevation models are explained. A brief historic look at JPL's efforts in this field and several examples of animations, illustrating the evolution of these techniques from 1985, are shown. JPL's current research in this area is discussed along with examples of technology transfer and potential commercial application. The software is part of the VICAR (Video Image Communication and Retrieval) image processing system which was developed at the Multimission Image Processing Laboratory of JPL.

  2. A comparison of two- and three-dimensional imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Ernest; Rosselot, Donald; Aull, Mark; Balapa, Manohar

    2006-10-01

    Three dimensional visual recognition and measurement are important in many machine vision applications. In some cases, a stationary camera base is used and a three-dimensional model will permit the measurement of depth information from a scene. One important special case is stereo vision for human visualization or measurements. In cases in which the camera base is also in motion, a seven dimensional model may be used. Such is the case for navigation of an autonomous mobile robot. The purpose of this paper is to provide a computational view and introduction of three methods to three-dimensional vision. Models are presented for each situation and example computations and images are presented. The significance of this work is that it shows that various methods based on three-dimensional vision may be used for solving two and three dimensional vision problems. We hope this work will be slightly iconoclastic but also inspirational by encouraging further research in optical engineering.

  3. The clinical effects of low-dose splenic irradiation combined with chest three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy on patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongsheng; Qu, Yong; Shang, Qingjun; Yan, Chao; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Xiang; Liang, Donghai; Jiang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to explore the clinical effects of low-dose splenic irradiation on locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods Thirty-eight patients with stage III NSCLC were randomly divided into a control group and a combined treatment group. The control group only received chest three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, while the combined treatment group received low-dose splenic irradiation followed by chest three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy after 6 hours. T lymphocyte subsets of the blood cells were tested before, during, and after treatment once a week. The side effects induced by radiation were observed, and a follow-up was done to observe the survival statistics. Results The ratio differences in CD4+ cells, CD8+ cells, and CD4+/CD8+ before and after treatment were not statistically significant (P>0.05) in both the groups. The immune indexes were also not statistically significant (P>0.05) before and after radiotherapy in the combined treatment group. However, the numbers of CD4+ cells and CD4+/CD8+ ratios before radiotherapy were higher than after radiotherapy in the control group. There were no differences in the incidence of radiation toxicities between the two groups; however, the incidence of grade III or IV radiation toxicities was lower, and the dose at which the radiation toxicities appeared was higher in the combined treatment group. The total response rate was 63.16% (12/19) in the combined treatment group vs 42.11% (8/19) in the control group. The median 2-year progression-free survival (15 months in the combined treatment group vs 10 months in the control group) was statistically significant (P<0.05). The median 2-year overall survival (17.1 months in the combined treatment group vs 15.8 months in the control group) was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion Low-dose radiation can alleviate the radiation toxicities, improve the short-term efficacy of radiotherapy, and improve

  4. Three-dimensional map construction.

    PubMed

    Jenks, G F; Brown, D A

    1966-11-18

    Three-dimensional maps are useful tools which have been neglected for some time. They shouldbe more commonly used, and familiarity with the techniques discussed in this article should dispel any qualms anyone might ve about needing artistic talent to nstruct them. The saving in time esulting from the use of an anamorphoser provides a further incentive. The anamorphoser transformations discussed above were all prepared by using straight slits, oriented at right angles to each other and placed so that all planes of the elements were parallel to each other. It is possible to vary these conditions in an infinite number of ways and thereby produce nonparallel tranceformations. Some of these variations are illustrated in Fig. 10. All the illustrations in Fig. 10 are transformations of the planimetric weather map shown in Fig. 8A. The variations used for the maps of Fig. 10 are as follows. (A) All planes parallel, with a curved rear slit; (B) all planes parallel, with curved slits front and rear; ( C) all planes parallel, with S-shaped rear slit; (D) all planes parallel, with an undulating rear slit; (E) all planes parallel, with curved front and undulating rear slit; (F) plane of the original rotated on the horizontal axis-both slits curved; (G) plane of the original rotated on thevertical axis- both slits curved; (H) plane of the original rotated on the horizontal axis -both slits straight. These are only a few of the many transformations which can be made with an anamorphoser, butthey do point toward some interesting possibilities. For example, it appears that maps based onone projection might be altered to satisfy the coordinates of a completely different projection. Note, for example, the change of parallels from concave to convex curves (Figs. 8A and 10A) and the change from converging meridians to diverging meridians (Figs. 8A and l0G). Similarly, the grids of maps B, F, and H of Fig. 10 approximate projections which are quite different from the original. Other

  5. Effects of implantation of three-dimensional engineered bone tissue with a vascular-like structure on repair of bone defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Masanori; Matsumoto, Rena; Dong, Jian; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2012-12-01

    Previously, to create an implantable bone tissue associated with blood vessels, we co-cultured rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with MSC-derived endothelial cells (ECs) within a porous polylactic acid-based scaffold utilizing a rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor. Here, this engineered tissue was orthotopically implanted into defects made in femurs of immunodeficient rats, and histological analysis were carried out to examine the repair of the damage and the formation of bone around the implant. The bone defects were better repaired in the implanted group than control group after 3 weeks. The results indicate that the engineered bone could repair bone defects.

  6. Quasicrystalline three-dimensional foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, S. J.; Graner, F.; Mosseri, R.; Sadoc, J.-F.

    2017-03-01

    We present a numerical study of quasiperiodic foams, in which the bubbles are generated as duals of quasiperiodic Frank–Kasper phases. These foams are investigated as potential candidates to the celebrated Kelvin problem for the partition of three-dimensional space with equal volume bubbles and minimal surface area. Interestingly, one of the computed structures falls close to (but still slightly above) the best known Weaire–Phelan periodic candidate. In addition we find a correlation between the normalized bubble surface area and the root mean squared deviation of the number of faces, giving an additional clue to understanding the main geometrical ingredients driving the Kelvin problem.

  7. Three-dimensional dynamic fabrication of engineered cartilage based on chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffold in a spinner flask with a special designed steel frame.

    PubMed

    Song, Kedong; Li, Liying; Li, Wenfang; Zhu, Yanxia; Jiao, Zeren; Lim, Mayasari; Fang, Meiyun; Shi, Fangxin; Wang, Ling; Liu, Tianqing

    2015-10-01

    Cartilage transplantation using in vitro tissue engineered cartilage is considered a promising treatment for articular cartilage defects. In this study, we assessed the advantages of adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) combined with chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffolds, which acted as a cartilage biomimetic scaffold, to fabricate a tissue engineered cartilage dynamically in vitro and compared this with traditional static culture. Physical properties of the hydrogel scaffolds were evaluated and ADSCs were inoculated into the hydrogel at a density of 1×10(7) cells/mL and cultured in a spinner flask with a special designed steel framework and feed with chondrogenic inductive media for two weeks. The results showed that the average pore size, porosity, swelling rate and elasticity modulus of hybrid scaffolds with good biocompatibility were 118.25±19.51 μm, 82.60±2.34%, 361.28±0.47% and 61.2±0.16 kPa, respectively. ADSCs grew well in chitosan/gelatin hybrid scaffold and successfully differentiated into chondrocytes, showing that the scaffolds were suitable for tissue engineering applications in cartilage regeneration. Induced cells cultivated in a dynamic spinner flask with a special designed steel frame expressed more proteoglycans and the cell distribution was much more uniform with the scaffold being filled mostly with extracellular matrix produced by cells. A spinner flask with framework promoted proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of ADSCs within chitosan/gelatin hybrid scaffolds and accelerated dynamic fabrication of cell-hydrogel constructs, which could be a selective and good method to construct tissue engineered cartilage in vitro.

  8. Three-dimensional vortex methods

    SciTech Connect

    Greengard, C.A.

    1984-08-01

    Three-dimensional vortex methods for the computation of incompressible fluid flow are presented from a unified point of view. Reformulations of the filament method and of the method of Beale and Majda show them to be very similar algorithms; in both of them, the vorticity is evaluated by a discretization of the spatial derivative of the flow map. The fact that the filament method, the one which is most often used in practice, can be formulated as a version of the Beale and Majda algorithm in a curved coordinate system is used to give a convergence theorem for the filament method. The method of Anderson is also discussed, in which vorticity is evaluated by the exact differentiation of the approximate velocity field. It is shown that, in the inviscid version of this algorithm, each approximate vector of vorticity remains tangent to a material curve moving with the computed flow, with magnitude proportional to the stretching of this vortex line. This remains true even when time discretization is taken into account. It is explained that the expanding core vortex method converges to a system of equations different from the Navier-Stokes equations. Computations with the filament method of the inviscid interaction of two vortex rings are reported, both with single filaments in each ring and with a fully three-dimensional discretization of vorticity. The dependence on parameters is discussed, and convergence of the computed solutions is observed. 36 references, 4 figures.

  9. Effects of chitosan-coated fibers as a scaffold for three-dimensional cultures of rabbit fibroblasts for ligament tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Sarukawa, Junichiro; Takahashi, Masaaki; Abe, Masashi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Tokura, Seiichi; Furuike, Tetsuya; Tamura, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Material selection in tissue-engineering scaffolds is one of the primary factors defining cellular response and matrix formation. In this study, we fabricated chitosan-coated poly(lactic acid) (PLA) fiber scaffolds to test our hypothesis that PLA fibers coated with chitosan highly promoted cell supporting properties compared to those without chitosan. Both PLA fibers (PLA group) and chitosan-coated PLA fibers (PLA-chitosan group) were fabricated for this study. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) fibroblasts were isolated from Japanese white rabbits and cultured on scaffolds consisting of each type of fiber. The effects of cell adhesivity, proliferation, and synthesis of the extracellular matrix (ECM) for each fiber were analyzed by cell counting, hydroxyproline assay, scanning electron microscopy and quantitative RT-PCR. Cell adhesivity, proliferation, hydroxyproline content and the expression of type-I collagen mRNA were significantly higher in the PLA-chitosan group than in the PLA group. Scanning electron microscopic observation showed that fibroblasts proliferated with a high level of ECM synthesis around the cells. Chitosan coating improved ACL fibroblast adhesion and proliferation, and had a positive effect on matrix production. Thus, the advantages of chitosan-coated PLA fibers show them to be a suitable biomaterial for ACL tissue-engineering scaffolds.

  10. Three-dimensional printing physiology laboratory technology

    PubMed Central

    Sulkin, Matthew S.; Widder, Emily; Shao, Connie; Holzem, Katherine M.; Gloschat, Christopher; Gutbrod, Sarah R.

    2013-01-01

    Since its inception in 19th-century Germany, the physiology laboratory has been a complex and expensive research enterprise involving experts in various fields of science and engineering. Physiology research has been critically dependent on cutting-edge technological support of mechanical, electrical, optical, and more recently computer engineers. Evolution of modern experimental equipment is constrained by lack of direct communication between the physiological community and industry producing this equipment. Fortunately, recent advances in open source technologies, including three-dimensional printing, open source hardware and software, present an exciting opportunity to bring the design and development of research instrumentation to the end user, i.e., life scientists. Here we provide an overview on how to develop customized, cost-effective experimental equipment for physiology laboratories. PMID:24043254

  11. Three-dimensional printing physiology laboratory technology.

    PubMed

    Sulkin, Matthew S; Widder, Emily; Shao, Connie; Holzem, Katherine M; Gloschat, Christopher; Gutbrod, Sarah R; Efimov, Igor R

    2013-12-01

    Since its inception in 19th-century Germany, the physiology laboratory has been a complex and expensive research enterprise involving experts in various fields of science and engineering. Physiology research has been critically dependent on cutting-edge technological support of mechanical, electrical, optical, and more recently computer engineers. Evolution of modern experimental equipment is constrained by lack of direct communication between the physiological community and industry producing this equipment. Fortunately, recent advances in open source technologies, including three-dimensional printing, open source hardware and software, present an exciting opportunity to bring the design and development of research instrumentation to the end user, i.e., life scientists. Here we provide an overview on how to develop customized, cost-effective experimental equipment for physiology laboratories.

  12. Three-dimensional display technologies.

    PubMed

    Geng, Jason

    2013-01-01

    The physical world around us is three-dimensional (3D), yet traditional display devices can show only two-dimensional (2D) flat images that lack depth (i.e., the third dimension) information. This fundamental restriction greatly limits our ability to perceive and to understand the complexity of real-world objects. Nearly 50% of the capability of the human brain is devoted to processing visual information [Human Anatomy & Physiology (Pearson, 2012)]. Flat images and 2D displays do not harness the brain's power effectively. With rapid advances in the electronics, optics, laser, and photonics fields, true 3D display technologies are making their way into the marketplace. 3D movies, 3D TV, 3D mobile devices, and 3D games have increasingly demanded true 3D display with no eyeglasses (autostereoscopic). Therefore, it would be very beneficial to readers of this journal to have a systematic review of state-of-the-art 3D display technologies.

  13. Three-dimensional coil inductor

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Malba, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    A three-dimensional coil inductor is disclosed. The inductor includes a substrate; a set of lower electrically conductive traces positioned on the substrate; a core placed over the lower traces; a set of side electrically conductive traces laid on the core and the lower traces; and a set of upper electrically conductive traces attached to the side traces so as to form the inductor. Fabrication of the inductor includes the steps of forming a set of lower traces on a substrate; positioning a core over the lower traces; forming a set of side traces on the core; connecting the side traces to the lower traces; forming a set of upper traces on the core; and connecting the upper traces to the side traces so as to form a coil structure.

  14. Three-dimensional aromatic networks.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Shinji; Iwanaga, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) networks consisting of aromatic units and linkers are reviewed from various aspects. To understand principles for the construction of such compounds, we generalize the roles of building units, the synthetic approaches, and the classification of networks. As fundamental compounds, cyclophanes with large aromatic units and aromatic macrocycles with linear acetylene linkers are highlighted in terms of transannular interactions between aromatic units, conformational preference, and resolution of chiral derivatives. Polycyclic cage compounds are constructed from building units by linkages via covalent bonds, metal-coordination bonds, or hydrogen bonds. Large cage networks often include a wide range of guest species in their cavity to afford novel inclusion compounds. Topological isomers consisting of two or more macrocycles are formed by cyclization of preorganized species. Some complicated topological networks are constructed by self-assembly of simple building units.

  15. Three-dimensional vortex methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greengard, C. A.

    1984-08-01

    Reformulations of the filament method and of the method of Beale and Majda show them to be very similar algorithms. The method of Anderson in which vorticity is evaluated by the exact differentiation of the approximate velocity field is discussed. It is shown that, in the inviscid version of this algorithm, each approximate vector of vorticity remains tangent to a material curve moving with the computed flow, with magnitude proportional to the stretching of this vortex line. It is explained that the expanding core vortex method converges to a system of equations different from the Navier-Stokes equations. Computations with the filament method of the inviscid interaction of two vortex rings are reported, both with single filaments in each ring and with a fully three-dimensional discretization of vorticity. The dependence on parameters is discussed, and convergence of the computed solutions is observed.

  16. Fresh and Frozen Tissue-Engineered Three-Dimensional Bone–Ligament–Bone Constructs for Sheep Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair Following a 2-Year Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, Vasudevan; Wojtys, Edward M.; Wellik, Deneen M.; Arruda, Ellen M.; Larkin, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) often require surgical reconstruction utilizing tendon grafts to restore knee function and stability. Some current graft options for ACL repair are associated with poor long-term outcomes. Our laboratory has fabricated tissue-engineered bone–ligament–bone (BLB) constructs that demonstrate native ligament regeneration and advancement toward native ACL mechanical properties in a sheep ACL reconstruction model. Prior work has shown that freezing BLBs as a method of preservation resulted in similar outcomes compared with fresh BLBs after 6-month implantation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term efficacy of fresh and frozen BLBs. We hypothesized that both fresh and frozen BLBs would show continued regeneration of structural and functional properties toward those of native ACL after a 2-year implantation. Following removal of the native ACL, fresh (n = 2) and frozen (n = 2) BLBs were implanted arthroscopically. After 2 years of recovery, sheep were euthanized and both the experimental and contralateral hindlimbs were removed and radiographs were performed. Explanted knees were initially evaluated for joint laxity and were then further dissected for uniaxial tensile testing of the isolated ACL or BLB. Following mechanical testing, explanted contralateral ACL (C-ACL) and BLBs were harvested for histology. Two years post-ACL reconstruction, fresh and frozen BLBs exhibited similar morphological and biomechanical properties as well as more advanced regeneration compared with our 6-month recovery study. These data indicate that an additional 1.5-year regeneration period allows the BLB to continue ligament regeneration in vivo. In addition, freezing the BLBs is a viable option for the preservation of the graft after fabrication. PMID:27843707

  17. Biochemical and biophysical analyses of tissue-engineered bone obtained from three-dimensional culture of a subset of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Federico; Falini, Giuseppe; Spelat, Renza; D'Aurizio, Federica; Puppato, Elisa; Pandolfi, Maura; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Cesselli, Daniela; Beltrami, Carlo Alberto; Impiombato, Francesco Saverio Ambesi; Curcio, Francesco

    2010-12-01

    Grafts of tissue-engineered bone represent a promising alternative in the treatment of large and small bone defects. Current approaches are often badly tolerated by patients because of invasiveness, ethical problems, culture, and possibility of infection. Autologous grafts have been indicated as a solution to such problems. Because of tissue availability, many have proposed the use of cultured cells derived from bone marrow expanded in culture and induced to differentiate in bone tissue. Data reported in the literature show that it is possible to produce tissue substitutes in vitro indeed, but results are not always concordant regarding the in vitro produced bone quality. In the present work, we investigated bone formation in aggregates of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells induced to differentiate in bone. After osteoinduction we characterized the mineral matrix produced using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray powder diffraction. Cells were obtained from bone marrow, subjected to immunodepletion for CD3, CD11b, CD14, CD16, CD19, CD56, CD66b, and glycophorin A using RosetteSep and cultured in a new formulation of medium for four passages and then were allowed to form spontaneous aggregates. At the end of proliferation before aggregation, cells were analyzed by fluorescent activated cell sorting (FACS) for markers routinely used to characterize expanded mesenchymal stem cells and were found to be remarkably homogeneous for CD29 (99% ± 1%), CD73 (99% ± 1%), CD90 (95% ± 4%), CD105 (96% ± 4%), and CD133 (0% ± 1%) expression. Our results show that not only aggregated cells express the major markers of osteogenic differentiation, such as osteocalcin, osteonectin, osteopontin, and bone sialoprotein, but also the inorganic matrix is made of an apatite structurally and morphologically similar to native bone even without a scaffold.

  18. Numerical simulation of fluid field and in vitro three-dimensional fabrication of tissue-engineered bones in a rotating bioreactor and in vivo implantation for repairing segmental bone defects.

    PubMed

    Song, Kedong; Wang, Hai; Zhang, Bowen; Lim, Mayasari; Liu, Yingchao; Liu, Tianqing

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, two-dimensional flow field simulation was conducted to determine shear stresses and velocity profiles for bone tissue engineering in a rotating wall vessel bioreactor (RWVB). In addition, in vitro three-dimensional fabrication of tissue-engineered bones was carried out in optimized bioreactor conditions, and in vivo implantation using fabricated bones was performed for segmental bone defects of Zelanian rabbits. The distribution of dynamic pressure, total pressure, shear stress, and velocity within the culture chamber was calculated for different scaffold locations. According to the simulation results, the dynamic pressure, velocity, and shear stress around the surface of cell-scaffold construction periodically changed at different locations of the RWVB, which could result in periodical stress stimulation for fabricated tissue constructs. However, overall shear stresses were relatively low, and the fluid velocities were uniform in the bioreactor. Our in vitro experiments showed that the number of cells cultured in the RWVB was five times higher than those cultured in a T-flask. The tissue-engineered bones grew very well in the RWVB. This study demonstrates that stress stimulation in an RWVB can be beneficial for cell/bio-derived bone constructs fabricated in an RWVB, with an application for repairing segmental bone defects.

  19. Nanowired three-dimensional cardiac patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvir, Tal; Timko, Brian P.; Brigham, Mark D.; Naik, Shreesh R.; Karajanagi, Sandeep S.; Levy, Oren; Jin, Hongwei; Parker, Kevin K.; Langer, Robert; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2011-11-01

    Engineered cardiac patches for treating damaged heart tissues after a heart attack are normally produced by seeding heart cells within three-dimensional porous biomaterial scaffolds. These biomaterials, which are usually made of either biological polymers such as alginate or synthetic polymers such as poly(lactic acid) (PLA), help cells organize into functioning tissues, but poor conductivity of these materials limits the ability of the patch to contract strongly as a unit. Here, we show that incorporating gold nanowires within alginate scaffolds can bridge the electrically resistant pore walls of alginate and improve electrical communication between adjacent cardiac cells. Tissues grown on these composite matrices were thicker and better aligned than those grown on pristine alginate and when electrically stimulated, the cells in these tissues contracted synchronously. Furthermore, higher levels of the proteins involved in muscle contraction and electrical coupling are detected in the composite matrices. It is expected that the integration of conducting nanowires within three-dimensional scaffolds may improve the therapeutic value of current cardiac patches.

  20. Three-dimensional colloidal lithography.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Hironori; Poteet, Austen; Zhang, Xu A; Chang, Chih-Hao

    2017-03-24

    Light interactions with colloidal particles can generate a variety of complex three-dimensional (3D) intensity patterns, which can be utilized for nanolithography. The study of particle-light interactions can add more types of intensity patterns by manipulating key factors. Here we investigate a novel 3D nanolithography technique using colloidal particles under two-beam coherent illuminations. The fabricated 3D nanostructures are hollow, nested within periodic structures, and possess multiple chamber geometry. The effects of incident angles and particle size on the fabricated nanostructures were examined. The relative phase shift between particle position and interference pattern is identified as another significant parameter influencing the resultant nanostructures. A numerical model has been developed to show the evolution of nanostructure geometry with phase shifts, and experimental studies confirm the simulation results. Through the introduction of single colloidal particles, the fabrication capability of Lloyd's mirror interference can now be extended to fabrication of 3D nanostructure with complex shell geometry. The fabricated hollow nanostructures with grating background could find potential applications in the area of photonics, drug delivery, and nanofluidics.

  1. Three-dimensional laser microvision.

    PubMed

    Shimotahira, H; Iizuka, K; Chu, S C; Wah, C; Costen, F; Yoshikuni, Y

    2001-04-10

    A three-dimensional (3-D) optical imaging system offering high resolution in all three dimensions, requiring minimum manipulation and capable of real-time operation, is presented. The system derives its capabilities from use of the superstructure grating laser source in the implementation of a laser step frequency radar for depth information acquisition. A synthetic aperture radar technique was also used to further enhance its lateral resolution as well as extend the depth of focus. High-speed operation was made possible by a dual computer system consisting of a host and a remote microcomputer supported by a dual-channel Small Computer System Interface parallel data transfer system. The system is capable of operating near real time. The 3-D display of a tunneling diode, a microwave integrated circuit, and a see-through image taken by the system operating near real time are included. The depth resolution is 40 mum; lateral resolution with a synthetic aperture approach is a fraction of a micrometer and that without it is approximately 10 mum.

  2. Three-Dimensional Laser Microvision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimotahira, Hiroshi; Iizuka, Keigo; Chu, Sun-Chun; Wah, Christopher; Costen, Furnie; Yoshikuni, Yuzo

    2001-04-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) optical imaging system offering high resolution in all three dimensions, requiring minimum manipulation and capable of real-time operation, is presented. The system derives its capabilities from use of the superstructure grating laser source in the implementation of a laser step frequency radar for depth information acquisition. A synthetic aperture radar technique was also used to further enhance its lateral resolution as well as extend the depth of focus. High-speed operation was made possible by a dual computer system consisting of a host and a remote microcomputer supported by a dual-channel Small Computer System Interface parallel data transfer system. The system is capable of operating near real time. The 3-D display of a tunneling diode, a microwave integrated circuit, and a see-through image taken by the system operating near real time are included. The depth resolution is 40 m; lateral resolution with a synthetic aperture approach is a fraction of a micrometer and that without it is approximately 10 m.

  3. Three-dimensional colloidal lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Hironori; Poteet, Austen; Zhang, Xu A.; Chang, Chih-Hao

    2017-03-01

    Light interactions with colloidal particles can generate a variety of complex three-dimensional (3D) intensity patterns, which can be utilized for nanolithography. The study of particle–light interactions can add more types of intensity patterns by manipulating key factors. Here we investigate a novel 3D nanolithography technique using colloidal particles under two-beam coherent illuminations. The fabricated 3D nanostructures are hollow, nested within periodic structures, and possess multiple chamber geometry. The effects of incident angles and particle size on the fabricated nanostructures were examined. The relative phase shift between particle position and interference pattern is identified as another significant parameter influencing the resultant nanostructures. A numerical model has been developed to show the evolution of nanostructure geometry with phase shifts, and experimental studies confirm the simulation results. Through the introduction of single colloidal particles, the fabrication capability of Lloyd’s mirror interference can now be extended to fabrication of 3D nanostructure with complex shell geometry. The fabricated hollow nanostructures with grating background could find potential applications in the area of photonics, drug delivery, and nanofluidics.

  4. Three-dimensional display technologies

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Jason

    2014-01-01

    The physical world around us is three-dimensional (3D), yet traditional display devices can show only two-dimensional (2D) flat images that lack depth (i.e., the third dimension) information. This fundamental restriction greatly limits our ability to perceive and to understand the complexity of real-world objects. Nearly 50% of the capability of the human brain is devoted to processing visual information [Human Anatomy & Physiology (Pearson, 2012)]. Flat images and 2D displays do not harness the brain’s power effectively. With rapid advances in the electronics, optics, laser, and photonics fields, true 3D display technologies are making their way into the marketplace. 3D movies, 3D TV, 3D mobile devices, and 3D games have increasingly demanded true 3D display with no eyeglasses (autostereoscopic). Therefore, it would be very beneficial to readers of this journal to have a systematic review of state-of-the-art 3D display technologies. PMID:25530827

  5. Three dimensional identification card and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Changhe; Wang, Shaoqing; Li, Chao; Li, Hao; Liu, Zhao

    2016-10-01

    Three dimensional Identification Card, with its three-dimensional personal image displayed and stored for personal identification, is supposed be the advanced version of the present two-dimensional identification card in the future [1]. Three dimensional Identification Card means that there are three-dimensional optical techniques are used, the personal image on ID card is displayed to be three-dimensional, so we can see three dimensional personal face. The ID card also stores the three-dimensional face information in its inside electronics chip, which might be recorded by using two-channel cameras, and it can be displayed in computer as three-dimensional images for personal identification. Three-dimensional ID card might be one interesting direction to update the present two-dimensional card in the future. Three-dimension ID card might be widely used in airport custom, entrance of hotel, school, university, as passport for on-line banking, registration of on-line game, etc...

  6. High three dimensional thermoelectric performance from low dimensional bands

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, David J; Chen, Xin; Parker, David S

    2013-01-01

    Reduced dimensionality has long been regarded as an important strategy for increasing thermoelectric performance, for example in superlattices and other engineered structures. Here we point out and illustrate by examples that three dimensional bulk materials can be made to behave as if they were two dimensional from the point of view of thermoelectric performance. Implications for the discovery of new practical thermoelectrics are discussed.

  7. Three-dimensional fiber-deposited PEOT/PBT copolymer scaffolds for tissue engineering: influence of porosity, molecular network mesh size, and swelling in aqueous media on dynamic mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Moroni, L; de Wijn, J R; van Blitterswijk, C A

    2005-12-15

    Among novel scaffold fabrication techniques, 3D fiber deposition (3DF) has recently emerged as a means to fabricate well-defined and custom-made scaffolds for tissue regeneration, with 100% interconnected pores. The mechanical behavior of these constructs is dependent not only on different three-dimensional architectural and geometric features, but also on the intrinsic chemical properties of the material used. These affect the mechanics of the solid material and eventually of 3D porous constructs derived from them. For instance, poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)-poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT) block copolymers are known to have mechanical properties, depending on the PEOT/PBT weight ratio in block form and on the molecular weight of the initial poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) blocks. These differences are enhanced even more by their different swelling properties in aqueous media. Therefore, this article examines the influence of copolymer compositions in terms of their swelling on dynamic mechanical properties of solid material and porous 3DF scaffolds. The molecular weight of the starting PEG blocks used in the copolymer synthesis varied from 300 to 1000 g/mol. The PEOT/PBT weight ratio in the blocks used varied from 55/45 to 80/20. This corresponded to an increase of the swelling ratio Q from 1.06 to 2.46, and of the mesh size xi from approximately 9 Angstrom to approximately 47 Angstrom. With increased swelling, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) revealed a decrease in elastic response and an increase of viscoelasticity. Thus, by coupling structural and chemical characteristics, the viscoelastic properties of PEOT/PBT 3DF scaffolds may be fine tuned to achieve mechanical requirements for a variety of engineered tissues. Ultimately, the combination of 3DF and DMA may be useful to validate the hypothesis that mimicking the biomechanical behavior of a specific tissue for its optimal replacement is an important issue for at least some tissue-engineering

  8. Three-Dimensional Laminar Separation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    chosen points. Colored dyes were supplied by small flexible hoses which were fed and controlled by hypodermic needles . A novel method was introduced in...the present studies. Thin hypodermic needles were mounted on the skin of the body, allowing the dyes to be released at the edge of the boundary layer...prised the authors and certainly deserves to be communicated with the engineering community . 2 Approximate methods are available, as for example

  9. Microperiodic structures: direct writing of three-dimensional webs.

    PubMed

    Gratson, Gregory M; Xu, Mingjie; Lewis, Jennifer A

    2004-03-25

    Applications are emerging that require the creation of fine-scale structures in three dimensions--examples include scaffolds for tissue engineering, micro-fluidic devices and photonic materials that control light propagation over a range of frequencies. But writing methods such as dip-pen nanolithography and ink-jet printing are either confined to two dimensions or beset by wetting and spreading problems. Here we use concentrated polyelectrolyte inks to write three-dimensional microperiodic structures directly without using masks. Our technique enables us to write arbitrary three-dimensional patterns whose features are nearly two orders of magnitude smaller than those attained with other multilayer printing techniques.

  10. Applications of three-dimensionally scanned models in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Cha, B K; Choi, J I; Jost-Brinkmann, P G; Jeong, Y M

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical applications of the three-dimensional reverse engineering technologies for the analysis of orthodontic models. The measuring accuracy and the process of the 3D model scanning technique were evaluated with respect to linear, surface and volumetric parameters. Orthodontically induced dentoalveolar changes, which have been traditionally evaluated by cephalometric analysis, were assessed by the registration function of Rapidform 2002, a 3D-reverse modeling software in scanned maxillary casts. Three-dimensional digital models are valuable alternatives to conventional casts for model analysis and also yield information which could previously be gathered only by cephalometric superimposition.

  11. Hydrofocusing Bioreactor for Three-Dimensional Cell Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Spaulding, Glenn F.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Flechsig, Scott; Jones, Leslie; Soehnge, Holly

    2003-01-01

    The hydrodynamic focusing bioreactor (HFB) is a bioreactor system designed for three-dimensional cell culture and tissue-engineering investigations on orbiting spacecraft and in laboratories on Earth. The HFB offers a unique hydrofocusing capability that enables the creation of a low-shear culture environment simultaneously with the "herding" of suspended cells, tissue assemblies, and air bubbles. Under development for use in the Biotechnology Facility on the International Space Station, the HFB has successfully grown large three-dimensional, tissuelike assemblies from anchorage-dependent cells and grown suspension hybridoma cells to high densities. The HFB, based on the principle of hydrodynamic focusing, provides the capability to control the movement of air bubbles and removes them from the bioreactor without degrading the low-shear culture environment or the suspended three-dimensional tissue assemblies. The HFB also provides unparalleled control over the locations of cells and tissues within its bioreactor vessel during operation and sampling.

  12. Three-Dimensional Boundary Layers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    sketched in figure 1 . The model design is des- • cribed in more detail in reference 2. At measuring station 1 the turbulent boundary layer is very...layer methods are increasingly important as their use for design purposes increases. Specific recommendations for future work include the following. 1 ...MEMBERS M. 1 ’Ing. G&n C.Cap~lier Prof. Dr. Jr. J.L. van Ingen Directeur de l’A~rodynamique Department of Aerospace B.P. 72 Engineering% ONERA Delf

  13. Three Dimensional Illustrating--Three-Dimensional Vision and Deception of Sensibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szállassy, Noémi; Gánóczy, Anita; Kriska, György

    2009-01-01

    The wide-spread digital photography and computer use gave the opportunity for everyone to make three-dimensional pictures and to make them public. The new opportunities with three-dimensional techniques give chance for the birth of new artistic photographs. We present in detail the biological roots of three-dimensional visualization, the phenomena…

  14. Three-dimensional Printing in the Intestine.

    PubMed

    Wengerter, Brian C; Emre, Gulus; Park, Jea Young; Geibel, John

    2016-08-01

    Intestinal transplantation remains a life-saving option for patients with severe intestinal failure. With the advent of advanced tissue engineering techniques, great strides have been made toward manufacturing replacement tissues and organs, including the intestine, which aim to avoid transplant-related complications. The current paradigm is to seed a biocompatible support material (scaffold) with a desired cell population to generate viable replacement tissue. Although this technique has now been extended by the three-dimensional (3D) printing of geometrically complex scaffolds, the overall approach is hindered by relatively slow turnover and negative effects of residual scaffold material, which affects final clinical outcome. Methods recently developed for scaffold-free 3D bioprinting may overcome such obstacles and should allow for rapid manufacture and deployment of "bioprinted organs." Much work remains before 3D bioprinted tissues can enter clinical use. In this brief review we examine the present state and future perspectives of this nascent technology before full clinical implementation.

  15. FRET Imaging in Three-dimensional Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Taboas, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful tool for examining cell biology in real-time. Studies utilizing FRET commonly employ two-dimensional (2D) culture, which does not mimic the three-dimensional (3D) cellular microenvironment. A method to perform quenched emission FRET imaging using conventional widefield epifluorescence microscopy of cells within a 3D hydrogel environment is presented. Here an analysis method for ratiometric FRET probes that yields linear ratios over the probe activation range is described. Measurement of intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels is demonstrated in chondrocytes under forskolin stimulation using a probe for EPAC1 activation (ICUE1) and the ability to detect differences in cAMP signaling dependent on hydrogel material type, herein a photocrosslinking hydrogel (PC-gel, polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate) and a thermoresponsive hydrogel (TR-gel). Compared with 2D FRET methods, this method requires little additional work. Laboratories already utilizing FRET imaging in 2D can easily adopt this method to perform cellular studies in a 3D microenvironment. It can further be applied to high throughput drug screening in engineered 3D microtissues. Additionally, it is compatible with other forms of FRET imaging, such as anisotropy measurement and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), and with advanced microscopy platforms using confocal, pulsed, or modulated illumination. PMID:27500354

  16. Three Dimensional Primary Hepatocyte Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoffe, Boris

    1998-01-01

    Our results demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of culturing PHH in microgravity bioreactors that exceeded the longest period obtained using other methods. Within the first week of culture, isolated hepatocytes started to form aggregates, which continuously increased in size (up to 1 cm) and macroscopically appeared as a multidimensional tissue-like assembly. To improve oxygenation and nutrition within the spheroids we performed experiments with the biodegradable nonwoven fiber-based polymers made from PolyGlycolic Acid (PGA). It has been shown that PGA scaffolds stimulate isolated cells to regenerate tissue with defined sizes and shapes and are currently being studied for various tissue-engineering applications. Our data demonstrated that culturing hepatocytes in the presence of PGA scaffolds resulted in more efficient cell assembly and formations of larger cell spheroids (up to 3 cm in length, see figure). The histology of cell aggregates cultured with PGA showed polymer fibers with attached hepatocytes. We initiated experiments to co-culture primary human hepatocytes with human microvascular endothelial cells in the bioreactor. The presence of endothelial cells in co-cultures were established by immunohistochemistry using anti-CD34 monoclonal Ab. Our preliminary data demonstrated that cultures of purified hepatocytes with human microvascular endothelial cells exhibited better growth and expressed higher levels of albumin MRNA for a longer period of time than cultures of ppfified, primary human hepatocytes cultured alone. We also evaluated microsomal deethylation activity of hepatocytes cultured in the presence of endothelial cells.In summary, we have established liver cell culture, which mimicked the structure and function of the parent tissue.

  17. Primary and Secondary Three Dimensional Microbatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirigliano, Nicolas

    Today's MEMS devices are limited more so by the batteries that supply their power than the fabrication methods used to build them. Thick battery electrodes are capable of providing adequate energy, but long and tortuous diffusion pathways lead to low power capabilities. On the other hand, thin film batteries can operate at significant current densities but require large surface areas to supply practical energy. This dilemma can be solved by either developing new high capacity materials or by engineering new battery designs that decouple power and energy. Three dimensional batteries redesign traditional configurations to create nonplanar interfaces between battery components. This can be done by introducing hierarchical structures into the electrode shape. Designs such as these provide a maximum surface area over which chemical reactions can occur. Furthermore, by maintaining small feature sizes, ion diffusion and electronic transport distances can remain minimal. Manipulating these properties ensures fast kinetics that are required for high power situations. Energy density is maximized by layering material in the vertical direction, thus ensuring a minimal footprint area. Three dimensional carbon electrodes are fabricated using basic MEMS techniques. A silicon mold is anisotropically etched to produce channels of a predetermined diameter. The channels are then filled using an infiltration technique with electrode slurry. Once dried, the mold is attached to a current collector and etched using a XeF2 process. Electrodes of varying feature sizes have been fabricated using this method with aspect ratios ranging from 3.5:1 to 7:1. 3D carbon electrodes are shown to obtain capacities over 8 mAh/cm2 at 0.1 mA/cm2, or nearly 700% higher than planar carbon electrodes. When assembled with a planar cathode, the battery cell produced an average discharge capacity of 40 J/cm 2 at a current density of 0.2 mA/cm2. This places the energy density values slightly less than thick

  18. Three-dimensional velocity measurements using LDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchhave, Preben

    The design requirements for and development of an LDA that measures the three components of the fluid velocity vector are described. The problems encountered in LDA measurements in highly turbulent flows, multivariate response, velocity bias, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and dynamic range, are discussed. The use of the fringe and/or the reference beam methods to measure the three velocity components, and the use of color, frequency shift, and polarization to separate three velocity projections are examined. Consideration is given to the coordinate transformation, the presentation of three-dimensional LDA data, and the possibility of three-dimensional bias correction. Procedures for conducting three-dimensional LDA measurements are proposed.

  19. Three Dimensional Optic Tissue Culture and Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OConnor, Kim C. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Aten, Laurie A. (Inventor); Francis, Karen M. (Inventor); Caldwell, Delmar R. (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey L. (Inventor); Fitzgerald, Wendy S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A process for artificially producing three-dimensional optic tissue has been developed. The optic cells are cultured in a bioireactor at low shear conditions. The tissue forms as normal, functional tissue grows with tissue organization and extracellular matrix formation.

  20. Three dimensional optic tissue culture and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey L. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Francis, Karen M. (Inventor); Cardwell, Delmar R. (Inventor); Oconnor, Kim (Inventor); Fitzgerald, Wendy S. (Inventor); Aten, Laurie A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A process for artificially producing three-dimensional optic tissue has been developed. The optic cells are cultured in a bioreactor at low shear conditions. The tissue forms normal, functional tissue organization and extracellular matrix.

  1. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Interfacial Phenomena Using Confocal Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, Ian C.

    Surfactants play an integral role in numerous functions ranging from stabilizing the emulsion in a favorite salad dressing to organizing the cellular components that make life possible. We are interested in lung surfactant, which is a mixture of lipids and proteins essential for normal respiration because it modulates the surface tension of the air-liquid interface of the thin fluid lining in the lungs. Through this surface tension modulation, lung surfactant ensures effortless lung expansion and prevents lung collapse during exhalation, thereby effecting proper oxygenation of the bloodstream. The function of lung surfactant, as well as numerous interfacial lipid systems, is not solely dictated by the behavior of materials confined to the two-dimensional interface. Rather, the distributions of materials in the liquid subphase also greatly influence the performance of interfacial films of lung surfactant. Therefore, to better understand the behavior of lung surfactant and other interfacial lipid systems, we require a three-dimensional characterization technique. In this dissertation, we have developed a novel confocal microscopy methodology for investigating the interfacial phenomena of surfactants at the air-liquid interface of a Langmuir trough. Confocal microscopy provides the excellent combination of in situ, fast, three-dimensional visualization of multiple components of the lung surfactant system that other characterization techniques lack. We detail the solutions to the numerous challenges encountered when imaging a dynamic air-liquid interface with a high-resolution technique like confocal microscopy. We then use confocal microscopy to elucidate the distinct mechanisms by which a polyelectrolyte (chitosan) and nonadsorbing polymer (polyethylene glycol) restore the function of lung surfactant under inhibitory conditions mimicking the effects of lung trauma. Beyond this physiological model, we also investigate several one- and two-component interfacial films

  2. The three-dimensional Event-Driven Graphics Environment (3D-EDGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Jeffrey; Hahn, Roger; Schwartz, David M.

    1993-01-01

    Stanford Telecom developed the Three-Dimensional Event-Driven Graphics Environment (3D-EDGE) for NASA GSFC's (GSFC) Communications Link Analysis and Simulation System (CLASS). 3D-EDGE consists of a library of object-oriented subroutines which allow engineers with little or no computer graphics experience to programmatically manipulate, render, animate, and access complex three-dimensional objects.

  3. Three-dimensional separation and reattachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peake, D. J.; Tobak, M.

    1982-01-01

    The separation of three dimensional turbulent boundary layers from the lee of flight vehicles at high angles of attack is investigated. The separation results in dominant, large scale, coiled vortex motions that pass along the body in the general direction of the free stream. In all cases of three dimensional flow separation and reattachment, the assumption of continuous vector fields of skin friction lines and external flow streamlines, coupled with simple laws of topology, provides a flow grammar whose elemental constituents are the singular points: the nodes, spiral nodes (foci), and saddles. The phenomenon of three dimensional separation may be construed as either a local or a global event, depending on whether the skin friction line that becomes a line of separation originates at a node or a saddle point.

  4. Topology of three-dimensional separated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobak, M.; Peake, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Based on the hypothesis that patterns of skin-friction lines and external streamlines reflect the properties of continuous vector fields, topology rules define a small number of singular points (nodes, saddle points, and foci) that characterize the patterns on the surface and on particular projections of the flow (e.g., the crossflow plane). The restricted number of singular points and the rules that they obey are considered as an organizing principle whose finite number of elements can be combined in various ways to connect together the properties common to all steady three dimensional viscous flows. Introduction of a distinction between local and global properties of the flow resolves an ambiguity in the proper definition of a three dimensional separated flow. Adoption of the notions of topological structure, structural stability, and bifurcation provides a framework to describe how three dimensional separated flows originate and succeed each other as the relevant parameters of the problem are varied.

  5. Three-dimensional separation and reattachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peake, D. J.; Tobak, M.

    1982-01-01

    The separation of three dimensional turbulent boundary layers from the lee of flight vehicles at high angles of attack is investigated. The separation results in dominant, large scale, coiled vortex motions that pass along the body in the general direction of the free stream. In all cases of three dimensional flow separation and reattachment, the assumption of continuous vector fields of skin friction lines and external flow streamlines, coupled with simple laws of topology, provides a flow grammar whose elemental constituents are the singular points: the nodes, spiral nodes (foci), and saddles. The phenomenon of three dimensional separation may be constrained as either a local or a global event, depending on whether the skin friction line that becomes a line of separation originates at a node or a saddle point.

  6. Vision in our three-dimensional world

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Many aspects of our perceptual experience are dominated by the fact that our two eyes point forward. Whilst the location of our eyes leaves the environment behind our head inaccessible to vision, co-ordinated use of our two eyes gives us direct access to the three-dimensional structure of the scene in front of us, through the mechanism of stereoscopic vision. Scientific understanding of the different brain regions involved in stereoscopic vision and three-dimensional spatial cognition is changing rapidly, with consequent influences on fields as diverse as clinical practice in ophthalmology and the technology of virtual reality devices. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Vision in our three-dimensional world’. PMID:27269595

  7. Three-dimensional magnetic bubble memory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor); Katti, Romney R. (Inventor); Wu, Jiin-Chuan (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A compact memory uses magnetic bubble technology for providing data storage. A three-dimensional arrangement, in the form of stacks of magnetic bubble layers, is used to achieve high volumetric storage density. Output tracks are used within each layer to allow data to be accessed uniquely and unambiguously. Storage can be achieved using either current access or field access magnetic bubble technology. Optical sensing via the Faraday effect is used to detect data. Optical sensing facilitates the accessing of data from within the three-dimensional package and lends itself to parallel operation for supporting high data rates and vector and parallel processing.

  8. Three-dimensional displays and stereo vision.

    PubMed

    Westheimer, Gerald

    2011-08-07

    Procedures for three-dimensional image reconstruction that are based on the optical and neural apparatus of human stereoscopic vision have to be designed to work in conjunction with it. The principal methods of implementing stereo displays are described. Properties of the human visual system are outlined as they relate to depth discrimination capabilities and achieving optimal performance in stereo tasks. The concept of depth rendition is introduced to define the change in the parameters of three-dimensional configurations for cases in which the physical disposition of the stereo camera with respect to the viewed object differs from that of the observer's eyes.

  9. Fabrication of three dimensional microstructure fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ying; Ma, Jie; Chen, Zhe; Lu, Huihui; Zhong, Yongchun

    2015-05-01

    A method of fabricating three dimensional (3D) microstructured fiber is presented. Polystyrene (PS) microspheres were coated around the surface of a micro-fiber through isothermal heating evaporation induced self-assembly method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image shows that the colloidal crystal has continuous, uniform, and well-ordered face-centered cubic (FCC) structure, with [111] crystallographic direction normal to the surface of micro-fiber. This micro-fiber with three-dimensional photonic crystals structure is very useful in the applications of micro-fiber sensors or filters.

  10. Three-dimensional stochastic vortex flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, R.; Pulvirenti, M.

    1989-08-01

    It is well known that the dynamics of point vortices approximate, under suitable limits, the two-dimensional Euler flow for an ideal fluid. To find particle models for three-dimensional flows is a more intricate problem. A stochastic version of the algorithm introduced by Beale amd Maida (1982) for simulating the behavior of a three-dimensional Euler flow is introduced here, and convergence to the Navier-Stokes (NS) flow in R exp 3 is shown. The result is based on a stochastic Lagrangian picture of the NS equations.

  11. Three-dimensional optical holography using a plasmonic metasurface

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lingling; Chen, Xianzhong; Mühlenbernd, Holger; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Shumei; Bai, Benfeng; Tan, Qiaofeng; Jin, Guofan; Cheah, Kok-Wai; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Li, Jensen; Zentgraf, Thomas; Zhang, Shuang

    2013-01-01

    Benefitting from the flexibility in engineering their optical response, metamaterials have been used to achieve control over the propagation of light to an unprecedented level, leading to highly unconventional and versatile optical functionalities compared with their natural counterparts. Recently, the emerging field of metasurfaces, which consist of a monolayer of photonic artificial atoms, has offered attractive functionalities for shaping wave fronts of light by introducing an abrupt interfacial phase discontinuity. Here we realize three-dimensional holography by using metasurfaces made of subwavelength metallic nanorods with spatially varying orientations. The phase discontinuity takes place when the helicity of incident circularly polarized light is reversed. As the phase can be continuously controlled in each subwavelength unit cell by the rod orientation, metasurfaces represent a new route towards high-resolution on-axis three-dimensional holograms with a wide field of view. In addition, the undesired effect of multiple diffraction orders usually accompanying holography is eliminated.

  12. Three-dimensional tissue culture based on magnetic cell levitation.

    PubMed

    Souza, Glauco R; Molina, Jennifer R; Raphael, Robert M; Ozawa, Michael G; Stark, Daniel J; Levin, Carly S; Bronk, Lawrence F; Ananta, Jeyarama S; Mandelin, Jami; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Bankson, James A; Gelovani, Juri G; Killian, T C; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2010-04-01

    Cell culture is an essential tool in drug discovery, tissue engineering and stem cell research. Conventional tissue culture produces two-dimensional cell growth with gene expression, signalling and morphology that can be different from those found in vivo, and this compromises its clinical relevance. Here, we report a three-dimensional tissue culture based on magnetic levitation of cells in the presence of a hydrogel consisting of gold, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and filamentous bacteriophage. By spatially controlling the magnetic field, the geometry of the cell mass can be manipulated, and multicellular clustering of different cell types in co-culture can be achieved. Magnetically levitated human glioblastoma cells showed similar protein expression profiles to those observed in human tumour xenografts. Taken together, these results indicate that levitated three-dimensional culture with magnetized phage-based hydrogels more closely recapitulates in vivo protein expression and may be more feasible for long-term multicellular studies.

  13. Three-dimensional patterning methods and related devices

    DOEpatents

    Putnam, Morgan C.; Kelzenberg, Michael D.; Atwater, Harry A.; Boettcher, Shannon W.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Spurgeon, Joshua M.; Turner-Evans, Daniel B.; Warren, Emily L.

    2016-12-27

    Three-dimensional patterning methods of a three-dimensional microstructure, such as a semiconductor wire array, are described, in conjunction with etching and/or deposition steps to pattern the three-dimensional microstructure.

  14. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Particle Tracks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julian, Glenn M.

    1993-01-01

    Suggests ways to bring home to the introductory physics student some of the excitement of recent discoveries in particle physics. Describes particle detectors and encourages the use of the Standard Model along with real images of particle tracks to determine three-dimensional views of tracks. (MVL)

  15. Three Dimensional Display Of Meteorological Scientific Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotch, Stanley L.

    1988-01-01

    Even a cursory reading of any daily newspaper shows that we are in the midst of a dramatic revolution in computer graphics. Virtually every day some new piece of hardware or software is announced, adding to the tools available to the working scientist. Three dimensional graphics form a significant part of this revolution having become virtually commonplace in advertising and on television.

  16. Three-dimensional chiral photonic superlattices.

    PubMed

    Thiel, M; Fischer, H; von Freymann, G; Wegener, M

    2010-01-15

    We investigate three-dimensional photonic superlattices composed of polymeric helices in various spatial checkerboard-like arrangements. Depending on the relative phase shift and handedness of the chiral building blocks, different circular-dichroism resonances appear or are suppressed. Samples corresponding to four different configurations are fabricated by direct laser writing. The measured optical transmittance spectra are in good agreement with numerical calculations.

  17. Three-dimensional colorimetric assay assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah; Reichert, Anke

    2001-01-01

    A direct assay is described using novel three-dimensional polymeric assemblies which change from a blue to red color when exposed to an analyte, in one case a flue virus. The assemblies are typically in the form of liposomes which can be maintained in a suspension, and show great intensity in their color changes. Their method of production is also described.

  18. Three-dimensional rf structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.K.; Browman, M.J.; Weiland, T.

    1988-01-01

    The calculation of three-dimensional rf structures is rapidly approaching adolescence, after having been in its infancy for the last four years. This paper will show the kinds of calculations that are currently being performed in the frequency domain and is a companion paper to one in which time-domain calculations are described. 13 refs., 14 figs.

  19. Three-dimensional RF structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, R. K.; Browman, M. J.; Weiland, T.

    1989-04-01

    The calculation of three-dimensional rf structures is rapidly approaching adolescence, after having been in its infancy for the last four years. This paper will show the kinds of calculations that are currently being performed in the frequency domain and is a companion paper to one in which time-domain calculations are described.

  20. Three dimensional reconnection in astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spicer, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical issues related to three-dimensional reconnection and its application to the space and astrophysical environment are reviewed. Consideration is given to the meaning of reconnection in three dimensions, the way in which periodic and nonperiodic magnetic topologies alter the physics of reconnections, and the effects of chaotic magnetic fields on the reconnection process.

  1. [Three Dimensional Display in Nuclear Medicine].

    PubMed

    Teraoka, Satomi; Souma, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Imaging techniques to obtain a tomographic image in nuclear medicine such as PET and SPECT are widely used. It is necessary to interpreting all of the tomographic images obtained in order to accurately evaluate the individual lesion, whereas three dimensional display is often useful in order to overview and evaluate the feature of the entire lesion or disease such as the position, size and abnormal pattern. In Japan, the use of three dimensional image analysis workstation with an application of the co-registration and image fusion between the functional images such as PET or SPECT and anatomical images such as CT or MRI has been generalized. In addition, multimodality imaging system such as a PET/CT and SPECT/CT has been widespread. Therefore, it is expected to improve the diagnostic accuracy using three dimensionally image fusion to functional images with poor anatomical information. In this commentary, as an example of a three dimensional display that are commonly used in nuclear medicine examination in Japan, brain regions, cardiac region and bone and tumor region will be introduced separately.

  2. Growing Three-Dimensional Cocultures Of Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, David A.; Goodwin, Thomas J.

    1995-01-01

    Laboratory process provides environmental conditions favoring simultaneous growth of cocultures of mammalian cells of more than one type. Cultures become three-dimensional tissuelike assemblies serving as organoid models of differentiation of cells. Process used, for example, to study growth of human colon cancers, starting from mixtures of normal colonic fibroblasts and partially differentiated colon adenocarcinoma cells.

  3. Three-Dimensional Pointers for Stereoscopic Projection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayman, H. J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Because class size often limits student opportunity to handle individual models, teachers use stereoscopic projections to demonstrate structural features. Describes three-dimensional pointers for use with different projection systems so teachers can indicate a particular atom or bond to entire classes, avoiding the perspective problems inherent in…

  4. Three-Dimensional Printing Surgical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Michelle F.; Butler, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Three-dimensional printing, a technology used for decades in the industrial field, gains a lot of attention in the medical field for its potential benefits. With advancement of desktop printers, this technology is accessible and a lot of research is going on in the medical field. Objective: To evaluate its application in surgical field, which may include but not limited to surgical planning, surgical education, implants, and prosthesis, which are the focus of this review. Methods: Research was conducted by searching PubMed, Web of science, and other reliable sources. We included original articles and excluded articles based on animals, those more than 10 years old, and those not in English. These articles were evaluated, and relevant studies were included in this review. Discussion: Three-dimensional printing shows a potential benefit in surgical application. Printed implants were used in patient in a few cases and show successful results; however, longer follow-up and more trials are needed. Surgical and medical education is believed to be more efficient with this technology than the current practice. Printed surgical instrument and surgical planning are also believed to improve with three-dimensional printing. Conclusion: Three-dimensional printing can be a very powerful tool in the near future, which can aid the medical field that is facing a lot of challenges and obstacles. However, despite the reported results, further research on larger samples and analytical measurements should be conducted to ensure this technology's impact on the practice. PMID:26301002

  5. Three-dimensional implicit lambda methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Napolitano, M.; Dadone, A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper derives the three dimensional lambda-formulation equations for a general orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system and provides various block-explicit and block-implicit methods for solving them, numerically. Three model problems, characterized by subsonic, supersonic and transonic flow conditions, are used to assess the reliability and compare the efficiency of the proposed methods.

  6. Interactive dynamic three-dimensional scene for the ground-based three-dimensional display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Peining; Sang, Xinzhu; Guo, Nan; Chen, Duo; Yan, Binbin; Wang, Kuiru; Dou, Wenhua; Xiao, Liquan

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) displays provides valuable tools for many fields, such as scientific experiment, education, information transmission, medical imaging and physical simulation. Ground based 360° 3D display with dynamic and controllable scene can find some special applications, such as design and construction of buildings, aeronautics, military sand table and so on. It can be utilized to evaluate and visualize the dynamic scene of the battlefield, surgical operation and the 3D canvas of art. In order to achieve the ground based 3D display, the public focus plane should be parallel to the camera's imaging planes, and optical axes should be offset to the center of public focus plane in both vertical and horizontal directions. Virtual cameras are used to display 3D dynamic scene with Unity 3D engine. Parameters of virtual cameras for capturing scene are designed and analyzed, and locations of virtual cameras are determined by the observer's eye positions in the observing space world. An interactive dynamic 3D scene for ground based 360° 3D display is demonstrated, which provides high-immersion 3D visualization.

  7. Three-dimensional bio-printing.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qi; Hao, Jie; Lu, YangJie; Wang, Liu; Wallace, Gordon G; Zhou, Qi

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing technology has been widely used in various manufacturing operations including automotive, defence and space industries. 3D printing has the advantages of personalization, flexibility and high resolution, and is therefore becoming increasingly visible in the high-tech fields. Three-dimensional bio-printing technology also holds promise for future use in medical applications. At present 3D bio-printing is mainly used for simulating and reconstructing some hard tissues or for preparing drug-delivery systems in the medical area. The fabrication of 3D structures with living cells and bioactive moieties spatially distributed throughout will be realisable. Fabrication of complex tissues and organs is still at the exploratory stage. This review summarize the development of 3D bio-printing and its potential in medical applications, as well as discussing the current challenges faced by 3D bio-printing.

  8. Real time three dimensional sensing system

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Steven J.

    1996-01-01

    The invention is a three dimensional sensing system which utilizes two flexibly located cameras for receiving and recording visual information with respect to a sensed object illuminated by a series of light planes. Each pixel of each image is converted to a digital word and the words are grouped into stripes, each stripe comprising contiguous pixels. One pixel of each stripe in one image is selected and an epi-polar line of that point is drawn in the other image. The three dimensional coordinate of each selected point is determined by determining the point on said epi-polar line which also lies on a stripe in the second image and which is closest to a known light plane.

  9. Real time three dimensional sensing system

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, S.J.

    1996-12-31

    The invention is a three dimensional sensing system which utilizes two flexibly located cameras for receiving and recording visual information with respect to a sensed object illuminated by a series of light planes. Each pixel of each image is converted to a digital word and the words are grouped into stripes, each stripe comprising contiguous pixels. One pixel of each stripe in one image is selected and an epi-polar line of that point is drawn in the other image. The three dimensional coordinate of each selected point is determined by determining the point on said epi-polar line which also lies on a stripe in the second image and which is closest to a known light plane. 7 figs.

  10. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome. PMID:25279337

  11. Bootstrapping the Three Dimensional Supersymmetric Ising Model.

    PubMed

    Bobev, Nikolay; El-Showk, Sheer; Mazáč, Dalimil; Paulos, Miguel F

    2015-07-31

    We implement the conformal bootstrap program for three dimensional conformal field theories with N=2 supersymmetry and find universal constraints on the spectrum of operator dimensions in these theories. By studying the bounds on the dimension of the first scalar appearing in the operator product expansion of a chiral and an antichiral primary, we find a kink at the expected location of the critical three dimensional N=2 Wess-Zumino model, which can be thought of as a supersymmetric analog of the critical Ising model. Focusing on this kink, we determine, to high accuracy, the low-lying spectrum of operator dimensions of the theory, as well as the stress-tensor two-point function. We find that the latter is in an excellent agreement with an exact computation.

  12. Three-dimensional effects on airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevallier, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of boundary layer flows along the walls of wind tunnels were studied to validate the transfer of two dimensional calculations to three dimensional transonic flowfield calculations. Results from trials in various wind tunnels were examind to determine the effects of the wall boundary flow on the control surfaces of an airfoil. Models sliding along a groove in the wall of a channel at sub- and transonic speeds were examined, with the finding that with either nonuniformities in the groove, or even if the channel walls are uniform, the lateral boundary layer can cause variations in the central flow region or alter the onset of shock at the transition point. Models for the effects in both turbulence and in the absence of turbulence are formulated, and it is noted that the characteristics of individual wind tunnels must be studied to quantify any existing three dimensional effects.

  13. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Mao, Teresa; Neelakantan, Prasanna

    2014-09-01

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome.

  14. Three-dimensional metallic boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shunhong; Wang, Qian; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Jena, Puru

    2013-12-04

    Boron nitride (BN) and carbon are chemical analogues of each other and share similar structures such as one-dimensional nanotubes, two-dimensional nanosheets characterized by sp(2) bonding, and three-dimensional diamond structures characterized by sp(3) bonding. However, unlike carbon which can be metallic in one, two, and three dimensions, BN is an insulator, irrespective of its structure and dimensionality. On the basis of state-of-the-art theoretical calculations, we propose a tetragonal phase of BN which is both dynamically stable and metallic. Analysis of its band structure, density of states, and electron localization function confirms the origin of the metallic behavior to be due to the delocalized B 2p electrons. The metallicity exhibited in the studied three-dimensional BN structures can lead to materials beyond conventional ceramics as well as to materials with potential for applications in electronic devices.

  15. Analysis of three-dimensional transonic compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourgeade, A.

    1984-01-01

    A method for computing the three-dimensional transonic flow around the blades of a compressor or of a propeller is given. The method is based on the use of the velocity potential, on the hypothesis that the flow is inviscid, irrotational and isentropic. The equation of the potential is solved in a transformed space such that the surface of the blade is mapped into a plane where the periodicity is implicit. This equation is in a nonconservative form and is solved with the help of a finite difference method using artificial time. A computer code is provided and some sample results are given in order to demonstrate the influence of three-dimensional effects and the blade's rotation.

  16. Three dimensional contact/impact methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    The simulation of three-dimensional interface mechanics between reactor components and structures during static contact or dynamic impact is necessary to realistically evaluate their structural integrity to off-normal loads. In our studies of postulated core energy release events, we have found that significant structure-structure interactions occur in some reactor vessel head closure designs and that fluid-structure interactions occur within the reactor vessel. Other examples in which three-dimensional interface mechanics play an important role are: (1) impact response of shipping casks containing spent fuel, (2) whipping pipe impact on reinforced concrete panels or pipe-to-pipe impact after a pipe break, (3) aircraft crash on secondary containment structures, (4) missiles generated by turbine failures or tornados, and (5) drops of heavy components due to lifting accidents. The above is a partial list of reactor safety problems that require adequate treatment of interface mechanics and are discussed in this paper.

  17. Three Dimensional Particle Tracking in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megson, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Superfluid helium is a macroscopic quantum state which exhibits exotic physical properties, such as flow without friction and ballistic heat transport. Superfluid flow is irrotational except about line-like topological phase defects with quantized circulation, known as quatized vortices. The presence of these vortices and their dynamics is the dominating factor of turbulence in superfluid flows. One commonly studied regime of superfluid turbulence is thermal counterflow, where a local heat flux drives the formation and growth of a tangle of vortices. This talk will present experimental studies of counterflow turbulence performed using a multi-camera three-dimensional imaging apparatus with micron-sized ice tracer particles as well as fluorescent nanoparticles. In particular, we will discuss the measurement of three-dimensional velocties and their autocorrelations. Additionally, we are developing new techniques for optical studies of bulk superfluid helium, with particular focus on characterizing tracer particles and particle dispersal mechanisms. Funding from NSF DMR-1407472.

  18. Three-dimensional adjustment of trilateration data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sung, L.-Y.; Jackson, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    The three-dimensional locations of the monuments in the USGS Hollister trilateration network were adjusted to fit line length observations observed in 1977, using a Bayesian approach, and incorporating prior elevation estimates as data in the adjustment procedure. No significant discrepancies in the measured line lengths were found, but significant elevation adjustments (up to 1.85 m) were needed to fit the length data.

  19. Three-Dimensional Printing in Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Eltorai, Adam E M; Nguyen, Eric; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is emerging as a clinically promising technology for rapid prototyping of surgically implantable products. With this commercially available technology, computed tomography or magnetic resonance images can be used to create graspable objects from 3D reconstructed images. Models can enhance patients' understanding of their pathology and surgeon preoperative planning. Customized implants and casts can be made to match an individual's anatomy. This review outlines 3D printing, its current applications in orthopedics, and promising future directions.

  20. Mineralized Three-Dimensional Bone Constructs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Mark S. F. (Inventor); Sundaresan, Alamelu (Inventor); Pellis, Neal R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present disclosure provides ex vivo-derived mineralized three-dimensional bone constructs. The bone constructs are obtained by culturing osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors under randomized gravity vector conditions. Preferably, the randomized gravity vector conditions are obtained using a low shear stress rotating bioreactor, such as a High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) culture system. The bone constructs of the disclosure have utility in physiological studies of bone formation and bone function, in drug discovery, and in orthopedics.

  1. Mineralized three-dimensional bone constructs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Mark S. F. (Inventor); Sundaresan, Alamelu (Inventor); Pellis, Neal R. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present disclosure provides ex vivo-derived mineralized three-dimensional bone constructs. The bone constructs are obtained by culturing osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors under randomized gravity vector conditions. Preferably, the randomized gravity vector conditions are obtained using a low shear stress rotating bioreactor, such as a High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) culture system. The bone constructs of the disclosure have utility in physiological studies of bone formation and bone function, in drug discovery, and in orthopedics.

  2. Real Imagery as a Three Dimensional Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    under two categories--stereoscopic and autostereoscopic displays. The difference between these two displays is that autostereoscopic displays do not...require the use of special viewing glasses whereas stereoscopic displays do. In order to place a minimum incumbrance on the viewer, the autostereoscopic ...fooled into believing that the scene is three dimensional. This is accomplished even though the second view that normally comes with an autostereoscopic

  3. Three-dimensional ballistocardiography in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scano, A.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment is described the aim of which is to record a three dimensional ballistocardiogram under the condition of weightlessness and to compare it with tracings recorded on the same subject on the ground as a means of clarifying the meaning of ballistocardiogram waves in different physiological and perphaps pathological conditions. Another purpose is to investigate cardiovascular and possibly fluid adaptations to weightlessness from data collected almost simultaneously on the same subjects during the other cardiovascular during the other cardiovascular and metabolic experiments.

  4. Three-dimensional simulation of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuruvila, G.; Salas, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The integral form of the complete, unsteady, compressible, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations in the conservation form, cast in generalized coordinate system, are solved, numerically, to simulate the vortex breakdown phenomenon. The inviscid fluxes are discretized using Roe's upwind-biased flux-difference splitting scheme and the viscous fluxes are discretized using central differencing. Time integration is performed using a backward Euler ADI (alternating direction implicit) scheme. A full approximation multigrid is used to accelerate the convergence to steady state.

  5. Three-dimensional display of document set

    DOEpatents

    Lantrip, David B.; Pennock, Kelly A.; Pottier, Marc C.; Schur, Anne; Thomas, James J.; Wise, James A.

    2006-09-26

    A method for spatializing text content for enhanced visual browsing and analysis. The invention is applied to large text document corpora such as digital libraries, regulations and procedures, archived reports, and the like. The text content from these sources may e transformed to a spatial representation that preserves informational characteristics from the documents. The three-dimensional representation may then be visually browsed and analyzed in ways that avoid language processing and that reduce the analysts' effort.

  6. Three-dimensional display of document set

    DOEpatents

    Lantrip, David B [Oxnard, CA; Pennock, Kelly A [Richland, WA; Pottier, Marc C [Richland, WA; Schur, Anne [Richland, WA; Thomas, James J [Richland, WA; Wise, James A [Richland, WA

    2001-10-02

    A method for spatializing text content for enhanced visual browsing and analysis. The invention is applied to large text document corpora such as digital libraries, regulations and procedures, archived reports, and the like. The text content from these sources may be transformed to a spatial representation that preserves informational characteristics from the documents. The three-dimensional representation may then be visually browsed and analyzed in ways that avoid language processing and that reduce the analysts' effort.

  7. Three-dimensional display of document set

    DOEpatents

    Lantrip, David B.; Pennock, Kelly A.; Pottier, Marc C.; Schur, Anne; Thomas, James J.; Wise, James A.; York, Jeremy

    2009-06-30

    A method for spatializing text content for enhanced visual browsing and analysis. The invention is applied to large text document corpora such as digital libraries, regulations and procedures, archived reports, and the like. The text content from these sources may be transformed to a spatial representation that preserves informational characteristics from the documents. The three-dimensional representation may then be visually browsed and analyzed in ways that avoid language processing and that reduce the analysts' effort.

  8. Three-Dimensional Dispaly Of Document Set

    DOEpatents

    Lantrip, David B.; Pennock, Kelly A.; Pottier, Marc C.; Schur, Anne; Thomas, James J.; Wise, James A.

    2003-06-24

    A method for spatializing text content for enhanced visual browsing and analysis. The invention is applied to large text document corpora such as digital libraries, regulations and procedures, archived reports, and the like. The text content from these sources may be transformed to a spatial representation that preserves informational characteristics from the documents. The three-dimensional representation may then be visually browsed and analyzed in ways that avoid language processing and that reduce the analysts' effort.

  9. Three Dimensional Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-12-01

    to upsample the projection data in order to get sufficient image quality. Working within these memory constraints, three-dimensional images were... metallic film on the windscreen in order to block reflections from the cockpit. Photographs and scale drawings of the model are shown in Figures 11 and...as well as spurious responses in the final image. Theoretically, sufficient resolution should have been available without upsampling the original data

  10. Method and apparatus for three dimensional braiding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A machine for three-dimensional braiding of fibers is provided in which carrier members travel on a curved, segmented and movable braiding surface. The carrier members are capable of independent, self-propelled motion along the braiding surface. Carrier member position on the braiding surface is controlled and monitored by computer. Also disclosed is a yarn take-up device capable of maintaining tension in the braiding fiber.

  11. Method and apparatus for three dimensional braiding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A machine for three-dimensional braiding of fibers is provided in which carrier members travel on a curved, segmented and movable braiding surface. The carrier members are capable of independent, self-propelled motion along the braiding surface. Carrier member position on the braiding surface is controlled and monitored by computer. Also disclosed is a yarn take-up device capable of maintaining tension in the braiding fiber.

  12. Three-dimensional motor schema based navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, Ronald C.

    1989-01-01

    Reactive schema-based navigation is possible in space domains by extending the methods developed for ground-based navigation found within the Autonomous Robot Architecture (AuRA). Reformulation of two dimensional motor schemas for three dimensional applications is a straightforward process. The manifold advantages of schema-based control persist, including modular development, amenability to distributed processing, and responsiveness to environmental sensing. Simulation results show the feasibility of this methodology for space docking operations in a cluttered work area.

  13. Lossless compression for three-dimensional images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaoli; Pearlman, William A.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate and compare the performance of several three-dimensional (3D) embedded wavelet algorithms on lossless 3D image compression. The algorithms are Asymmetric Tree Three-Dimensional Set Partitioning In Hierarchical Trees (AT-3DSPIHT), Three-Dimensional Set Partitioned Embedded bloCK (3D-SPECK), Three-Dimensional Context-Based Embedded Zerotrees of Wavelet coefficients (3D-CB-EZW), and JPEG2000 Part II for multi-component images. Two kinds of images are investigated in our study -- 8-bit CT and MR medical images and 16-bit AVIRIS hyperspectral images. First, the performances by using different size of coding units are compared. It shows that increasing the size of coding unit improves the performance somewhat. Second, the performances by using different integer wavelet transforms are compared for AT-3DSPIHT, 3D-SPECK and 3D-CB-EZW. None of the considered filters always performs the best for all data sets and algorithms. At last, we compare the different lossless compression algorithms by applying integer wavelet transform on the entire image volumes. For 8-bit medical image volumes, AT-3DSPIHT performs the best almost all the time, achieving average of 12% decreases in file size compared with JPEG2000 multi-component, the second performer. For 16-bit hyperspectral images, AT-3DSPIHT always performs the best, yielding average 5.8% and 8.9% decreases in file size compared with 3D-SPECK and JPEG2000 multi-component, respectively. Two 2D compression algorithms, JPEG2000 and UNIX zip, are also included for reference, and all 3D algorithms perform much better than 2D algorithms.

  14. Three-dimensional magnetic field annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, M.; Allen, H. R.; Grundy, R. E.

    1993-11-01

    We present a family of three-dimensional nonlinear solutions for magnetic field annihilation in a current sheet, including the effects of resistivity and viscosity. The different members of the family are characterized by the imposed vorticity of the flow that brings the field lines together. Since in a three- dimensional flow the vorticity can be increased by the stretching of vortex lines (an effect that is absent in two dimensions), we find some striking differences to our previous two-dimensional analysis. In both the two-dimensional and three-dimensional analyses, above a certain critical imposed vorticity omegacrit, the flow breaks up into cells with current sheet is completely altered. In the two-dimensional analysis, omegacrit is a steeply increasing function of the viscous Reynolds number R, whereas in the three-dimensional case, it quickly asymptotes to only omegacrit = 2v0/L where v0 and L are the characteristic velocity and length scale of the flow, respectively. The width of the current sheet, which depends on the speed at which field lines are carried into it, also responds differently to an increase in R. In two dimensions, the current sheet narrows for all vorticities, but three dimensions, it narrows when the imposed vorticity is negative and widens when it is positive. Also we find that the current density within the current sheet varies as the nature of the flow is changed, rather than being constant as in the the two-dimensional case. Finally, we find that there is a minimum value of the plasma beta betamin below which the plasma pressure is negative. For the nonsheared (neutral current sheet) case, betamin increases rapidly with the magnetic Reynolds number Rm such that this type of annihilation is only possible for a high-beta plasma. For a sheared magnetic field, however, betamin is much lower, making this type of annihilation more relevant to the sonar corona.

  15. Three-Dimensional Shallow Water Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Three-Dimensional Shallow Water Acoustics Dr. Ying...model to predict acoustic fluctuations and derive sound pressure sensitivity kernels due to 3-D sound speed perturbation in the water column. The...numerical method to be utilized is a tangent linear solution to predict acoustic fluctuations due to 3-D sound speed perturbation in the water column. This

  16. Multiparallel Three-Dimensional Optical Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Lam K.; Price, Jeffrey H.; Kellner, Albert L.; Bravo-Zanoquera, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Multiparallel three-dimensional optical microscopy is a method of forming an approximate three-dimensional image of a microscope sample as a collection of images from different depths through the sample. The imaging apparatus includes a single microscope plus an assembly of beam splitters and mirrors that divide the output of the microscope into multiple channels. An imaging array of photodetectors in each channel is located at a different distance along the optical path from the microscope, corresponding to a focal plane at a different depth within the sample. The optical path leading to each photodetector array also includes lenses to compensate for the variation of magnification with distance so that the images ultimately formed on all the photodetector arrays are of the same magnification. The use of optical components common to multiple channels in a simple geometry makes it possible to obtain high light-transmission efficiency with an optically and mechanically simple assembly. In addition, because images can be read out simultaneously from all the photodetector arrays, the apparatus can support three-dimensional imaging at a high scanning rate.

  17. Three-dimensional printing of the retina

    PubMed Central

    Lorber, Barbara; Hsiao, Wen-Kai; Martin, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Biological three-dimensional printing has received a lot of media attention over recent years with advances made in printing cellular structures, including skin and heart tissue for transplantation. Although limitations exist in creating functioning organs with this method, the hope has been raised that creating a functional retina to cure blindness is within reach. The present review provides an update on the advances made toward this goal. Recent findings It has recently been shown that two types of retinal cells, retinal ganglion cells and glial cells, can be successfully printed using a piezoelectric inkjet printer. Importantly, the cells remained viable and did not change certain phenotypic features as a result of the printing process. In addition, recent advances in the creation of complex and viable three-dimensional cellular structures have been made. Summary Some first promising steps toward the creation of a functional retina have been taken. It now needs to be investigated whether recent findings can be extended to other cells of the retina, including those derived from human tissue, and if a complex and viable retinal structure can be created through three-dimensional printing. PMID:27045545

  18. Reconfigurable, braced, three-dimensional DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Russell P; Heilemann, Mike; Doose, Sören; Erben, Christoph M; Kapanidis, Achillefs N; Turberfield, Andrew J

    2008-02-01

    DNA nanotechnology makes use of the exquisite self-recognition of DNA in order to build on a molecular scale. Although static structures may find applications in structural biology and computer science, many applications in nanomedicine and nanorobotics require the additional capacity for controlled three-dimensional movement. DNA architectures can span three dimensions and DNA devices are capable of movement, but active control of well-defined three-dimensional structures has not been achieved. We demonstrate the operation of reconfigurable DNA tetrahedra whose shapes change precisely and reversibly in response to specific molecular signals. Shape changes are confirmed by gel electrophoresis and by bulk and single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer measurements. DNA tetrahedra are natural building blocks for three-dimensional construction; they may be synthesized rapidly with high yield of a single stereoisomer, and their triangulated architecture conveys structural stability. The introduction of shape-changing structural modules opens new avenues for the manipulation of matter on the nanometre scale.

  19. Three-Dimensional Audio Client Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2005-01-01

    The Three-Dimensional Audio Client Library (3DAudio library) is a group of software routines written to facilitate development of both stand-alone (audio only) and immersive virtual-reality application programs that utilize three-dimensional audio displays. The library is intended to enable the development of three-dimensional audio client application programs by use of a code base common to multiple audio server computers. The 3DAudio library calls vendor-specific audio client libraries and currently supports the AuSIM Gold-Server and Lake Huron audio servers. 3DAudio library routines contain common functions for (1) initiation and termination of a client/audio server session, (2) configuration-file input, (3) positioning functions, (4) coordinate transformations, (5) audio transport functions, (6) rendering functions, (7) debugging functions, and (8) event-list-sequencing functions. The 3DAudio software is written in the C++ programming language and currently operates under the Linux, IRIX, and Windows operating systems.

  20. Three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets

    PubMed Central

    Melenka, Garrett W; Nobes, David S; Major, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    Braces are used by orthodontists to correct the misalignment of teeth in the mouth. Archwire rotation is a particular procedure used to correct tooth inclination. Wire rotation can result in deformation to the orthodontic brackets, and an orthodontic torque simulator has been designed to examine this wire–bracket interaction. An optical technique has been employed to measure the deformation due to size and geometric constraints of the orthodontic brackets. Images of orthodontic brackets are collected using a stereo microscope and two charge-coupled device cameras, and deformation of orthodontic brackets is measured using a three-dimensional digital image correlation technique. The three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets will be evaluated. The repeatability of the three-dimensional digital image correlation measurement method was evaluated by performing 30 archwire rotation tests using the same bracket and archwire. Finally, five Damon 3MX and five In-Ovation R self-ligating brackets will be compared using this technique to demonstrate the effect of archwire rotation on bracket design. PMID:23762201

  1. Volumetric Three-Dimensional Display Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundell, Barry G.; Schwarz, Adam J.

    2000-03-01

    A comprehensive study of approaches to three-dimensional visualization by volumetric display systems This groundbreaking volume provides an unbiased and in-depth discussion on a broad range of volumetric three-dimensional display systems. It examines the history, development, design, and future of these displays, and considers their potential for application to key areas in which visualization plays a major role. Drawing substantially on material that was previously unpublished or available only in patent form, the authors establish the first comprehensive technical and mathematical formalization of the field, and examine a number of different volumetric architectures. System level design strategies are presented, from which proposals for the next generation of high-definition predictable volumetric systems are developed. To ensure that researchers will benefit from work already completed, they provide: * Descriptions of several recent volumetric display systems prepared from material supplied by the teams that created them * An abstract volumetric display system design paradigm * An historical summary of 90 years of development in volumetric display system technology * An assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of many of the systems proposed to date * A unified presentation of the underlying principles of volumetric display systems * A comprehensive bibliography Beautifully supplemented with 17 color plates that illustrate volumetric images and prototype displays, Volumetric Three-Dimensional Display Systems is an indispensable resource for professionals in imaging systems development, scientific visualization, medical imaging, computer graphics, aerospace, military planning, and CAD/CAE.

  2. Design of three-dimensional scramjet inlets for hypersonic propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, J. M.; Weidner, E. H.

    1986-01-01

    The paper outlines an approach to the design of three-dimensional inlets for scramjet engines. The basis of the techniques used is the method of streamline tracing through an inviscid axisymmetric flow field. A technique is described for making a smooth change of cross-section shape from rectangular to circular. A feature is the considerable use of computer-graphics to provide a 'user-oriented' procedure which can produce promising design configurations for subsequent analysis with CFD codes. An example is given to demonstrate the capabilities of the design techniques.

  3. Three-dimensional stereo by photometric ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, L.B.; Angelopoulou, E.

    1994-11-01

    We present a methodology for corresponding a dense set of points on an object surface from photometric values for three-dimensional stereo computation of depth. The methodology utilizes multiple stereo pairs of images, with each stereo pair being taken of the identical scene but under different illumination. With just two stereo pairs of images taken under two different illumination conditions, a stereo pair of ratio images can be produced, one for the ratio of left-hand images and one for the ratio of right-hand images. We demonstrate how the photometric ratios composing these images can be used for accurate correspondence of object points. Object points having the same photometric ratio with respect to two different illumination conditions constitute a well-defined equivalence class of physical constraints defined by local surface orientation relative to illumination conditions. We formally show that for diffuse reflection the photometric ratio is invariant to varying camera characteristics, surface albedo, and viewpoint and that therefore the same photometric ratio in both images of a stereo pair implies the same equivalence class of physical constraints. The correspondence of photometric ratios along epipolar lines in a stereo pair of images under different illumination conditions is a correspondence of equivalent physical constraints, and the determination of depth from stereo can be performed. Whereas illumination planning is required, our photometric-based stereo methodology does not require knowledge of illumination conditions in the actual computation of three-dimensional depth and is applicable to perspective views. This technique extends the stereo determination of three-dimensional depth to smooth featureless surfaces without the use of precisely calibrated lighting. We demonstrate experimental depth maps from a dense set of points on smooth objects of known ground-truth shape, determined to within 1% depth accuracy.

  4. Three-dimensional flow about penguin wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noca, Flavio; Sudki, Bassem; Lauria, Michel

    2012-11-01

    Penguins, contrary to airborne birds, do not need to compensate for gravity. Yet, the kinematics of their wings is highly three-dimensional and seems exceedingly complex for plain swimming. Is such kinematics the result of an evolutionary optimization or is it just a forced adaptation of an airborne flying apparatus to underwater swimming? Some answers will be provided based on flow dynamics around robotic penguin wings. Updates will also be presented on the development of a novel robotic arm intended to simulate penguin swimming and enable novel propulsion devices.

  5. Three-dimensional ultrasonic colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleap, Mihai; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2016-05-01

    Colloidal assembly represents a powerful method for the fabrication of functional materials. In this article, we describe how acoustic radiation forces can guide the assembly of colloidal particles into structures that serve as microscopic elements in novel acoustic metadevices or act as phononic crystals. Using a simple three-dimensional orthogonal system, we show that a diversity of colloidal structures with orthorhombic symmetry can be assembled with megahertz-frequency (MHz) standing pressure waves. These structures allow rapid tuning of acoustic properties and provide a new platform for dynamic metamaterial applications.

  6. Electrode With Porous Three-Dimensional Support

    DOEpatents

    Bernard, Patrick; Dauchier, Jean-Michel; Simonneau, Olivier

    1999-07-27

    Electrode including a paste containing particles of electrochemically active material and a conductive support consisting of a three-dimensional porous material comprising strands delimiting contiguous pores communicating via passages, characterized in that the average width L in .mu.m of said passages is related to the average diameter .O slashed. in .mu.m of said particles by the following equation, in which W and Y are dimensionless coefficients: wherein W=0.16 Y=1.69 X=202.4 .mu.m and Z=80 .mu.m

  7. Three-dimensional simulations of burning thermals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspden, Andy; Bell, John; Woosley, Stan

    2010-11-01

    Flame ignition in type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) leads to isolated bubbles of burning buoyant fluid. As a bubble rises due to gravity, it becomes deformed by shear instabilities and transitions to a turbulent buoyant vortex ring. Morton, Taylor and Turner (1956) introduced the entrainment assumption, which can be applied to inert thermals. In this study, we use the entrainment assumption, suitably modified to account for burning, to predict the late-time asymptotic behaviour of these turbulent buoyant vortex rings in SNe Ia. The theory is validated against three- dimensional simulations with adaptive mesh refinement at effective resolutions up to 4096^3.

  8. Three-dimensional relativistic electromagnetic subcycle solitons.

    PubMed

    Esirkepov, Timur; Nishihara, Katsunobu; Bulanov, Sergei V; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2002-12-30

    Three-dimensional (3D) relativistic electromagnetic subcycle solitons were observed in 3D particle-in-cell simulations of an intense short-laser-pulse propagation in an underdense plasma. Their structure resembles that of an oscillating electric dipole with a poloidal electric field and a toroidal magnetic field that oscillate in phase with the electron density with frequency below the Langmuir frequency. On the ion time scale, the soliton undergoes a Coulomb explosion of its core, resulting in ion acceleration, and then evolves into a slowly expanding quasineutral cavity.

  9. High resolution three-dimensional doping profiler

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    A semiconductor doping profiler provides a Schottky contact at one surface and an ohmic contact at the other. While the two contacts are coupled to a power source, thereby establishing an electrical bias in the semiconductor, a localized light source illuminates the semiconductor to induce a photocurrent. The photocurrent changes in accordance with the doping characteristics of the semiconductor in the illuminated region. By changing the voltage of the power source the depth of the depletion layer can be varied to provide a three dimensional view of the local properties of the semiconductor.

  10. Three-dimensional head anthropometric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enciso, Reyes; Shaw, Alex M.; Neumann, Ulrich; Mah, James

    2003-05-01

    Currently, two-dimensional photographs are most commonly used to facilitate visualization, assessment and treatment of facial abnormalities in craniofacial care but are subject to errors because of perspective, projection, lack metric and 3-dimensional information. One can find in the literature a variety of methods to generate 3-dimensional facial images such as laser scans, stereo-photogrammetry, infrared imaging and even CT however each of these methods contain inherent limitations and as such no systems are in common clinical use. In this paper we will focus on development of indirect 3-dimensional landmark location and measurement of facial soft-tissue with light-based techniques. In this paper we will statistically evaluate and validate a current three-dimensional image-based face modeling technique using a plaster head model. We will also develop computer graphics tools for indirect anthropometric measurements in a three-dimensional head model (or polygonal mesh) including linear distances currently used in anthropometry. The measurements will be tested against a validated 3-dimensional digitizer (MicroScribe 3DX).

  11. Three-dimensional television: a broadcaster's perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, S. J. E.; Armstrong, M.; Salmon, R. A.

    2009-02-01

    The recent resurgence of interest in the stereoscopic cinema and the increasing availability to the consumer of stereoscopic televisions and computer displays are leading broadcasters to consider, once again, the feasibility of stereoscopic broadcasting. High Definition Television is now widely deployed, and the R&D departments of broadcasters and consumer electronics manufacturers are starting to plan future enhancements to the experience of television. Improving the perception of depth via stereoscopy is a strong candidate technology. In this paper we will consider the challenges associated with the production, transmission and display of different forms of "three-dimensional" television. We will explore options available to a broadcaster wishing to start a 3D service using the technologies available at the present time, and consider how they could be improved to enable many more television programmes to be recorded and transmitted in a 3D-compatible form, paying particular attention to scenarios such as live broadcasting, where the workflows developed for the stereoscopic cinema are inapplicable. We will also consider the opportunities available for broadcasters to reach audiences with "three-dimensional" content via other media in the near future: for example, distributing content via the existing stereoscopic cinema network, or over the Internet to owners of stereoscopic computer displays.

  12. Two component-three dimensional catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Schwartz, Michael; White, James H.; Sammells, Anthony F.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to catalytic reactor membranes having a gas-impermeable membrane for transport of oxygen anions. The membrane has an oxidation surface and a reduction surface. The membrane is coated on its oxidation surface with an adherent catalyst layer and is optionally coated on its reduction surface with a catalyst that promotes reduction of an oxygen-containing species (e.g., O.sub.2, NO.sub.2, SO.sub.2, etc.) to generate oxygen anions on the membrane. The reactor has an oxidation zone and a reduction zone separated by the membrane. A component of an oxygen containing gas in the reduction zone is reduced at the membrane and a reduced species in a reactant gas in the oxidation zone of the reactor is oxidized. The reactor optionally contains a three-dimensional catalyst in the oxidation zone. The adherent catalyst layer and the three-dimensional catalyst are selected to promote a desired oxidation reaction, particularly a partial oxidation of a hydrocarbon.

  13. In-lab three-dimensional printing

    PubMed Central

    Partridge, Roland; Conlisk, Noel; Davies, Jamie A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of the microscope in 1590 by Zacharias Janssenby and Hans Lippershey gave the world a new way of visualizing details of morphogenesis and development. More recent improvements in this technology including confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical projection tomography (OPT) have enhanced the quality of the resultant image. These technologies also allow a representation to be made of a developing tissue’s three-dimensional (3-D) form. With all these techniques however, the image is delivered on a flat two-dimensional (2-D) screen. 3-D printing represents an exciting potential to reproduce the image not simply on a flat screen, but in a physical, palpable three-dimensional structure. Here we explore the scope that this holds for exploring and interacting with the structure of a developing organ in an entirely novel way. As well as being useful for visualization, 3-D printers are capable of rapidly and cost-effectively producing custom-made structures for use within the laboratory. We here describe the advantages of producing hardware for a tissue culture system using an inexpensive in-lab printer. PMID:22652907

  14. Three dimensional force balance of asymmetric droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Cho, Kun; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-11-01

    An equilibrium contact angle of a droplet is determined by a horizontal force balance among vapor, liquid, and solid, which is known as Young's law. Conventional wetting law is valid only for axis-symmetric droplets, whereas real droplets are often asymmetric. Here we show that three-dimensional geometry must be considered for a force balance for asymmetric droplets. By visualizing asymmetric droplets placed on a free-standing membrane in air with X-ray microscopy, we are able to identify that force balances in one side and in other side control pinning behaviors during evaporation of droplets. We find that X-ray microscopy is powerful for realizing the three-dimensional force balance, which would be essential in interpretation and manipulation of wetting, spreading, and drying dynamics for asymmetric droplets. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2016R1D1A1B01007133).

  15. Three-dimensional turbopump flowfield analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, O. P.; Belford, K. A.; Ni, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop a flow prediction method applicable to rocket turbopumps. The complex nature of a flowfield in turbopumps is described and examples of flowfields are discussed to illustrate that physics based models and analytical calculation procedures based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are needed to develop reliable design procedures for turbopumps. A CFD code developed at NASA ARC was used as the base code. The turbulence model and boundary conditions in the base code were modified, respectively, to: (1) compute transitional flows and account for extra rates of strain, e.g., rotation; and (2) compute surface heat transfer coefficients and allow computation through multistage turbomachines. Benchmark quality data from two and three-dimensional cascades were used to verify the code. The predictive capabilities of the present CFD code were demonstrated by computing the flow through a radial impeller and a multistage axial flow turbine. Results of the program indicate that the present code operated in a two-dimensional mode is a cost effective alternative to full three-dimensional calculations, and that it permits realistic predictions of unsteady loadings and losses for multistage machines.

  16. Three-dimensional terahertz wave imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X-C

    2004-02-15

    Pulsed terahertz (THz) wave sensing and imaging is a coherent measurement technology. Like radar, based on the phase and amplitude of the THz pulse at each frequency, THz waves provide temporal and spectroscopic information that allows us to develop various three-dimensional (3D) terahertz tomographic imaging modalities. The 3D THz tomographic imaging methods we investigated include THz time-of-flight tomography, THz computed tomography (CT) and THz binary lens tomography. THz time-of-flight uses the THz pulses as a probe beam to temporally mark the target, and then constructs a 3D image of the target using the THz waves scattered by the target. THz CT is based on geometrical optics and inspired from X-ray CT. THz binary lens tomography uses the frequency-dependent focal-length property of binary lenses to obtain tomographic images of an object. Three-dimensional THz imaging has potential in such applications as non-destructive inspection. The interaction between a coherent THz pulse and an object provides rich information about the object under study; therefore, 3D THz imaging can be used to inspect or characterize dielectric and semiconductor objects. For example, 3D THz imaging has been used to detect and identify the defects inside a Space Shuttle insulation tile.

  17. Three-dimensional singular points in aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Aynur

    1988-01-01

    When three-dimensional separation occurs on a body immersed in a flow governed by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, the geometrical surfaces formed by the three vector fields (velocity, vorticity and the skin-friction) and a scalar field (pressure) become interrelated through topological maps containing their respective singular points and extremal points. A mathematically consistent description of these singular points becomes inevitable when we want to study the geometry of the separation. A separated stream surface requires, for example, the existence of a saddle-type singular point on the skin-friction surface. This singular point is actually, in the proper language of mathematics, a saddle of index two. The index is a measure of the dimension of the outset (set leaving the singular point). Hence, when a saddle of index two is specified, a two dimensional surface that becomes separated from the osculating plane of the saddle is implied. The three-dimensional singular point is interpreted mathematically and the most common aerodynamical singular points are discussed through this perspective.

  18. Three dimensional quantum geometry and deformed symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, E.; Mourad, J.; Noui, K.

    2009-05-01

    We study a three dimensional noncommutative space emerging in the context of three dimensional Euclidean quantum gravity. Our starting point is the assumption that the isometry group is deformed to the Drinfeld double D(SU(2)). We generalize to the deformed case the construction of E3 as the quotient of its isometry group ISU(2) by SU(2). We show that the algebra of functions on E3 becomes the noncommutative algebra of SU(2) distributions, C(SU(2))∗, endowed with the convolution product. This construction gives the action of ISU(2) on the algebra and allows the determination of plane waves and coordinate functions. In particular, we show the following: (i) plane waves have bounded momenta; (ii) to a given momentum are associated several SU(2) elements leading to an effective description of ϕ ɛC(SU(2))∗ in terms of several physical scalar fields on E3; (iii) their product leads to a deformed addition rule of momenta consistent with the bound on the spectrum. We generalize to the noncommutative setting the "local" action for a scalar field. Finally, we obtain, using harmonic analysis, another useful description of the algebra as the direct sum of the algebra of matrices. The algebra of matrices inherits the action of ISU(2): rotations leave the order of the matrices invariant, whereas translations change the order in a way we explicitly determine.

  19. Three-dimensional broadband omnidirectional acoustic ground cloak.

    PubMed

    Zigoneanu, Lucian; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-04-01

    The control of sound propagation and reflection has always been the goal of engineers involved in the design of acoustic systems. A recent design approach based on coordinate transformations, which is applicable to many physical systems, together with the development of a new class of engineered materials called metamaterials, has opened the road to the unconstrained control of sound. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by this methodology are complex and challenging to obtain experimentally, even using metamaterial design approaches. Not surprisingly, experimental demonstration of devices obtained using transformation acoustics is difficult, and has been implemented only in two-dimensional configurations. Here, we demonstrate the design and experimental characterization of an almost perfect three-dimensional, broadband, and, most importantly, omnidirectional acoustic device that renders a region of space three wavelengths in diameter invisible to sound.

  20. Using nature's platform to engineer bio-artificial lungs.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Sarah E; Ott, Harald C

    2015-03-01

    Native lung extracellular matrix can be isolated from cadaveric organs via perfusion decellularization and provides a novel scaffold material for lung engineering. Based on this platform, several proof-of-principle studies have demonstrated the feasibility of whole organ recellularization and culture in rodent models and have helped us better understand the numerous challenges in up-scaling to clinically relevant tissues. Standardized protocols to generate whole lung scaffolds of porcine and human scale have been reported, but our understanding of the remaining extracellular matrix components and their properties is incomplete. Effective recellularization will require the isolation and in vitro expansion of clinically relevant cell sources, either from primary or stem cell-derived populations, and techniques to effectively deliver these populations throughout the lung scaffold. Ultimately, only tightly controlled recapitulation of tissue development and repair in vitro will enable us to mature lung grafts to function before implantation. Although substantial progress has been made, we are only beginning to grasp the complexity of this exciting new technology.

  1. Three-dimensional context regulation of metastasis.

    PubMed

    Erler, Janine T; Weaver, Valerie M

    2009-01-01

    Tumor progression ensues within a three-dimensional microenvironment that consists of cellular and non-cellular components. The extracellular matrix (ECM) and hypoxia are two non-cellular components that potently influence metastasis. ECM remodeling and collagen cross-linking stiffen the tissue stroma to promote transformation, tumor growth, motility and invasion, enhance cancer cell survival, enable metastatic dissemination, and facilitate the establishment of tumor cells at distant sites. Matrix degradation can additionally promote malignant progression and metastasis. Tumor hypoxia is functionally linked to altered stromal-epithelial interactions. Hypoxia additionally induces the expression of pro-migratory, survival and invasion genes, and up-regulates expression of ECM components and modifying enzymes, to enhance tumor progression and metastasis. Synergistic interactions between matrix remodeling and tumor hypoxia influence common mechanisms that maximize tumor progression and cooperate to drive metastasis. Thus, clarifying the molecular pathways by which ECM remodeling and tumor hypoxia intersect to promote tumor progression should identify novel therapeutic targets.

  2. AAOGlimpse: Three-dimensional Data Viewer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shortridge, Keith

    2011-10-01

    AAOGlimpse is an experimental display program that uses OpenGL to display FITS data (and even JPEG images) as 3D surfaces that can be rotated and viewed from different angles, all in real-time. It is WCS-compliant and designed to handle three-dimensional data. Each plane in a data cube is surfaced in the same way, and the program allows the user to travel through a cube by 'peeling off' successive planes, or to look into a cube by suppressing the display of data below a given cutoff value. It can blink images and can superimpose images and contour maps from different sources using their world coordinate data. A limited socket interface allows communication with other programs.

  3. Versatile three-dimensional cryogenic micropositioning device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, J.; Böhm, A.; Primke, M.; Wyder, P.

    1996-01-01

    A simple design for a mechanically driven three-dimensional cryogenic micropositioner is presented. The design is based on a parallelogram structure constructed from leaf springs and wires. Actuation is achieved by the elastic deformation of the parallelogram by screws. Positions within a volume of roughly (2 mm)3 are attainable. The precision and reproducibility of positioning are in the μm-range. The deviations from linearity are smaller than 10% for the whole working range and the deviation from orthogonality is smaller than 3°. Calibration measurements performed on a Cu-mesh with a lattice constant of 60 μm are presented. In an experiment investigating the ballistic transport of carriers in the semimetal Bi, two such devices are used. The first one is used as a scanning unit for an optical fiber and the second one is used as micropositioner for a Cu point contact.

  4. Three-dimensional cultured glioma cell lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); Marley, Garry M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Three-dimensional glioma spheroids were produced in vitro with size and histological differentiation previously unattained. The spheroids were grown in liquid media suspension in a Johnson Space Center (JSC) Rotating Wall Bioreactor without using support matrices such as microcarrier beads. Spheroid volumes of greater than 3.5 cu mm and diameters of 2.5 mm were achieved with a viable external layer or rim of proliferating cells, a transitional layer beneath the external layer with histological differentiation, and a degenerative central region with a hypoxic necrotic core. Cell debris was evident in the degenerative central region. The necrotics centers of some of the spheroids had hyaline droplets. Granular bodies were detected predominantly in the necrotic center.

  5. Multiscale modeling of three-dimensional genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Wolynes, Peter

    The genome, the blueprint of life, contains nearly all the information needed to build and maintain an entire organism. A comprehensive understanding of the genome is of paramount interest to human health and will advance progress in many areas, including life sciences, medicine, and biotechnology. The overarching goal of my research is to understand the structure-dynamics-function relationships of the human genome. In this talk, I will be presenting our efforts in moving towards that goal, with a particular emphasis on studying the three-dimensional organization, the structure of the genome with multi-scale approaches. Specifically, I will discuss the reconstruction of genome structures at both interphase and metaphase by making use of data from chromosome conformation capture experiments. Computationally modeling of chromatin fiber at atomistic level from first principles will also be presented as our effort for studying the genome structure from bottom up.

  6. Three-dimensional elastic lidar winds

    SciTech Connect

    Buttler, W.T.

    1996-07-01

    Maximum cross-correlation techniques have been used with satellite data to estimate winds and sea surface velocities for several years. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently using a variation of the basic maximum cross-correlation technique, coupled with a deterministic application of a vector median filter, to measure transverse winds as a function of range and altitude from incoherent elastic backscatter lidar data taken throughout large volumes within the atmospheric boundary layer. Hourly representations of three- dimensional wind fields, derived from elastic lidar data taken during an air-quality study performed in a region of complex terrain near Sunland Park, New Mexico, are presented and compared with results from an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved laser doppler velocimeter. The wind fields showed persistent large scale eddies as well as general terrain following winds in the Rio Grande valley.

  7. Automatic three-dimensional underground mine mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, D.F.; Vandapel, N.

    2006-01-15

    For several years, our research group has been developing methods for automated modeling of three-dimensional environments. In September 2002, we were given the opportunity to demonstrate our mapping capability in an underground coal mine. The opportunity arose as a result of the Quecreek mine accident, in which an inaccurate map caused miners to breach an abandoned, water-filled mine, trapping them for several days. Our field test illustrates the feasibility and potential of high-resolution 3D mapping of an underground coal mine using a cart-mounted 3D laser scanner In this paper we present our experimental setup, the automatic 3D modeling method used, and the results of the field test.

  8. Volumetric techniques: three-dimensional midface modeling

    PubMed Central

    Pierzchała, Ewa; Placek, Waldemar

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a complex process caused by many factors. The most important factors include exposure to UV radiation, smoking, facial muscle movement, gravity, loss and displacement of fat and bone resorption. As a symptom of aging, face loses elasticity, volume and cheerful look. While changing face proportions, the dominant part of a face is its bottom instead of the mid part. The use of three-dimensional face modelling techniques, particularly the mid-face – tear through and cheeks, restores the skin firmness, volume and healthy look. For this purpose the hyaluronic acid is used, calcium hydroxyapatite, and L-polylactic acid fillers. Volumetric techniques require precision and proper selection of the filling agent to give a sense of satisfaction to both the patient and the doctor. PMID:25610354

  9. Volumetric techniques: three-dimensional midface modeling.

    PubMed

    Macierzyńska, Arleta; Pierzchała, Ewa; Placek, Waldemar

    2014-12-01

    Aging is a complex process caused by many factors. The most important factors include exposure to UV radiation, smoking, facial muscle movement, gravity, loss and displacement of fat and bone resorption. As a symptom of aging, face loses elasticity, volume and cheerful look. While changing face proportions, the dominant part of a face is its bottom instead of the mid part. The use of three-dimensional face modelling techniques, particularly the mid-face - tear through and cheeks, restores the skin firmness, volume and healthy look. For this purpose the hyaluronic acid is used, calcium hydroxyapatite, and L-polylactic acid fillers. Volumetric techniques require precision and proper selection of the filling agent to give a sense of satisfaction to both the patient and the doctor.

  10. Quantum interferometry with three-dimensional geometry.

    PubMed

    Spagnolo, Nicolò; Aparo, Lorenzo; Vitelli, Chiara; Crespi, Andrea; Ramponi, Roberta; Osellame, Roberto; Mataloni, Paolo; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Quantum interferometry uses quantum resources to improve phase estimation with respect to classical methods. Here we propose and theoretically investigate a new quantum interferometric scheme based on three-dimensional waveguide devices. These can be implemented by femtosecond laser waveguide writing, recently adopted for quantum applications. In particular, multiarm interferometers include "tritter" and "quarter" as basic elements, corresponding to the generalization of a beam splitter to a 3- and 4-port splitter, respectively. By injecting Fock states in the input ports of such interferometers, fringe patterns characterized by nonclassical visibilities are expected. This enables outperforming the quantum Fisher information obtained with classical fields in phase estimation. We also discuss the possibility of achieving the simultaneous estimation of more than one optical phase. This approach is expected to open new perspectives to quantum enhanced sensing and metrology performed in integrated photonics.

  11. Quantum interferometry with three-dimensional geometry

    PubMed Central

    Spagnolo, Nicolò; Aparo, Lorenzo; Vitelli, Chiara; Crespi, Andrea; Ramponi, Roberta; Osellame, Roberto; Mataloni, Paolo; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Quantum interferometry uses quantum resources to improve phase estimation with respect to classical methods. Here we propose and theoretically investigate a new quantum interferometric scheme based on three-dimensional waveguide devices. These can be implemented by femtosecond laser waveguide writing, recently adopted for quantum applications. In particular, multiarm interferometers include “tritter” and “quarter” as basic elements, corresponding to the generalization of a beam splitter to a 3- and 4-port splitter, respectively. By injecting Fock states in the input ports of such interferometers, fringe patterns characterized by nonclassical visibilities are expected. This enables outperforming the quantum Fisher information obtained with classical fields in phase estimation. We also discuss the possibility of achieving the simultaneous estimation of more than one optical phase. This approach is expected to open new perspectives to quantum enhanced sensing and metrology performed in integrated photonics. PMID:23181189

  12. Scaffolding for Three-Dimensional Embryonic Vasculogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraehenbuehl, Thomas P.; Aday, Sezin; Ferreira, Lino S.

    Biomaterial scaffolds have great potential to support efficient vascular differentiation of embryonic stem cells. Vascular cell fate-specific biochemical and biophysical cues have been identified and incorporated into three-dimensional (3D) biomaterials to efficiently direct embryonic vasculogenesis. The resulting vascular-like tissue can be used for regenerative medicine applications, further elucidation of biophysical and biochemical cues governing vasculogenesis, and drug discovery. In this chapter, we give an overview on the following: (1) developmental cues for directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into vascular cells, (2) 3D vascular differentiation in embryoid bodies (EBs), (3) preparation of 3D scaffolds for the vascular differentiation of hESCs, and (4) the most significant studies combining scaffolding and hESCs for development of vascular-like tissue.

  13. Three-Dimensional Gear Crack Propagation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Sane, Ashok D.; Drago, Raymond J.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    Three-dimensional crack growth simulation was performed on a split-tooth gear design using boundary element modeling and linear elastic fracture mechanics. Initial cracks in the fillet of the teeth produced stress intensity factors of greater magnitude (and thus, greater crack growth rates) than those in the root or groove areas of the teeth. Crack growth simulation was performed on a case study to evaluate crack propagation paths. Tooth fracture was predicted from the crack growth simulation for an initial crack in the tooth fillet region. Tooth loads on the uncracked mesh of the split-tooth design were up to five times greater than those on the cracked mesh if equal deflections of the cracked and uncracked teeth were considered. Predicted crack shapes as well as crack propagation life are presented based on calculated stress intensity factors, mixed-mode crack propagation trajectory theories, and fatigue crack growth theories.

  14. The Three-Dimensional EIT Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, B. J.; Biesecker, D. A.; Gilbert, H. R.; Lawrence, G. R.; Ofman, L.; Wu, S. T.; Warmuth, A.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An EIT wave is an impulsive disturbance which has been observed in the EUV, Soft X-ray and white light corona, with corresponding observations in the chromosphere. The effects of these disturbances can be observed across the entire solar disk of the Sun, and throughout the inner heliosphere as well. However, the picture is not complete; observations alone do not establish a complete understanding of the nature of this three-dimensional phenomenon. A number of associated phenomena have been documented, though in most cases causality has not determined. Additionally, it is unclear which factors govern the impulse's ability to affect regions of the corona and heliosphere. We discuss the various observations and the models which provided links between the associated phenomena.

  15. Three-dimensional hologram display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintz, Frederick (Inventor); Chao, Tien-Hsin (Inventor); Bryant, Nevin (Inventor); Tsou, Peter (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a three-dimensional (3D) hologram display system. The 3D hologram display system includes a projector device for projecting an image upon a display medium to form a 3D hologram. The 3D hologram is formed such that a viewer can view the holographic image from multiple angles up to 360 degrees. Multiple display media are described, namely a spinning diffusive screen, a circular diffuser screen, and an aerogel. The spinning diffusive screen utilizes spatial light modulators to control the image such that the 3D image is displayed on the rotating screen in a time-multiplexing manner. The circular diffuser screen includes multiple, simultaneously-operated projectors to project the image onto the circular diffuser screen from a plurality of locations, thereby forming the 3D image. The aerogel can use the projection device described as applicable to either the spinning diffusive screen or the circular diffuser screen.

  16. Magneto Transport in Three Dimensional Carbon Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Timir; Wang, Lei; Jaroszynski, Jan; Yin, Ming; Alameri, Dheyaa

    Electrical properties of self-assembled three dimensional nanostructures are interesting topic. Here we report temperature dependence of magneto transport in such carbon nanostructures with periodic spherical voids. Specimens with different void diameters in the temperature range from 200 mK to 20 K were studied. Above 2 K, magnetoresistance, MR = [R(B) - R(0)] / R(0), crosses over from quadratic to a linear dependence with the increase of magnetic field [Wang et al., APL 2015; DOI:10.1063/1.4926606]. We observe MR to be non-saturating even up to 18 Tesla. Furthermore, MR demonstrates universality because all experimental data can be collapsed on to a single curve, as a universal function of B/T. Below 2 K, magnetoresistance saturates with increasing field. Quantum Hall like steps are also observed in this low temperature regime. Remarkably, MR of our sample displays orientation independence, an attractive feature for technological applications.

  17. Three dimensional carbon-nanotube polymers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhisheng; Xu, Bo; Wang, Li-Min; Zhou, Xiang-Feng; He, Julong; Liu, Zhongyuan; Wang, Hui-Tian; Tian, Yongjun

    2011-09-27

    Eight fascinating sp(2)- and sp(3)-hybridized carbon allotropes have been uncovered using a newly developed ab initio particle-swarm optimization methodology for crystal structure prediction. These crystalline allotropes can be viewed respectively as three-dimensional (3D) polymers of (4,0), (5,0), (7,0), (8,0), (9,0), (3,3), (4,4), and (6,6) carbon nanotubes, termed 3D-(n, 0) or 3D-(n, n) carbons. The ground-state energy calculations show that the carbons all have lower energies than C(60) fullerene, and some are energetically more stable than the van der Waals packing configurations of their nanotube parents. Owing to their unique configurations, they have distinctive electronic properties, high Young's moduli, high tensile strength, ultrahigh hardness, good ductility, and low density, and may be potentially applied to a variety of needs.

  18. Three-Dimensional Reflectance Traction Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher A. R.; Groves, Nicholas Scott; Sun, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Cells in three-dimensional (3D) environments exhibit very different biochemical and biophysical phenotypes compared to the behavior of cells in two-dimensional (2D) environments. As an important biomechanical measurement, 2D traction force microscopy can not be directly extended into 3D cases. In order to quantitatively characterize the contraction field, we have developed 3D reflectance traction microscopy which combines confocal reflection imaging and partial volume correlation postprocessing. We have measured the deformation field of collagen gel under controlled mechanical stress. We have also characterized the deformation field generated by invasive breast cancer cells of different morphologies in 3D collagen matrix. In contrast to employ dispersed tracing particles or fluorescently-tagged matrix proteins, our methods provide a label-free, computationally effective strategy to study the cell mechanics in native 3D extracellular matrix. PMID:27304456

  19. Three-dimensional image contrast using biospeckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinho, Robson Pierangeli; Braga, Roberto A., Jr.

    2010-09-01

    The biospeckle laser (BSL) has been applied in many areas of knowledge and a variety of approaches has been presented to address the best results in biological and non-biological samples, in fast or slow activities, or else in defined flow of materials or in random activities. The methodologies accounted in the literature consider the apparatus used in the image assembling and the way the collected data is processed. The image processing steps presents in turn a variety of procedures with first or second order statistics analysis, and as well with different sizes of data collected. One way to access the biospeckle in defined flow, such as in capillary blood flow in alive animals, was the adoption of the image contrast technique which uses only one image from the illuminated sample. That approach presents some problems related to the resolution of the image, which is reduced during the image contrast processing. In order to help the visualization of the low resolution image formed by the contrast technique, this work presents the three-dimensional procedure as a reliable alternative to enhance the final image. The work based on a parallel processing, with the generation of a virtual map of amplitudes, and maintaining the quasi-online characteristic of the contrast technique. Therefore, it was possible to generate in the same display the observed material, the image contrast result and in addiction the three-dimensional image with adjustable options of rotation. The platform also offers to the user the possibility to access the 3D image offline.

  20. Fabrication of three-dimensional micro-nanofiber structures by a novel solution blow spinning device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Feng; Fang, Feiyu; Zeng, Jun; Wang, Zhifeng; Ou, Weijun; Chen, Xindu; Wu, Peixuan; Wang, Han; Zhang, Lin

    2017-02-01

    The fabrication of three-dimensional scaffolds has attracted more attention in tissue engineering. The purpose of this study is to explore a new method for the fabrication of three-dimensional micro-nanofiber structures by combining solution blow spinning and rotating collector. In this study, we successfully fabricated fibers with a minimum diameter of 200 nm and a three-dimensional structure with a maximum porosity of 89.9%. At the same time, the influence of various parameters such as the solvent volatility, the shape of the collector, the feed rate of the solution and the applied gas pressure were studied. It is found that solvent volatility has large effect on the formation of the three-dimensional shape of the structure. The shape of the collector affects the porosity and fiber distribution of the three-dimensional structure. The fiber diameter and fiber uniformity can be controlled by adjusting the solution feed rate and the applied gas pressure. It is feasible to fabricate high-quality three-dimensional micro-nanofiber structure by this new method, which has great potential in tissue engineering.

  1. Untethered micro-robotic coding of three-dimensional material composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasoglu, S.; Diller, E.; Guven, S.; Sitti, M.; Demirci, U.

    2014-01-01

    Complex functional materials with three-dimensional micro- or nano-scale dynamic compositional features are prevalent in nature. However, the generation of three-dimensional functional materials composed of both soft and rigid microstructures, each programmed by shape and composition, is still an unsolved challenge. Here we describe a method to code complex materials in three-dimensions with tunable structural, morphological and chemical features using an untethered magnetic micro-robot remotely controlled by magnetic fields. This strategy allows the micro-robot to be introduced to arbitrary microfluidic environments for remote two- and three-dimensional manipulation. We demonstrate the coding of soft hydrogels, rigid copper bars, polystyrene beads and silicon chiplets into three-dimensional heterogeneous structures. We also use coded microstructures for bottom-up tissue engineering by generating cell-encapsulating constructs.

  2. Untethered micro-robotic coding of three-dimensional material composition.

    PubMed

    Tasoglu, S; Diller, E; Guven, S; Sitti, M; Demirci, U

    2014-01-01

    Complex functional materials with three-dimensional micro- or nano-scale dynamic compositional features are prevalent in nature. However, the generation of three-dimensional functional materials composed of both soft and rigid microstructures, each programmed by shape and composition, is still an unsolved challenge. Here we describe a method to code complex materials in three-dimensions with tunable structural, morphological and chemical features using an untethered magnetic micro-robot remotely controlled by magnetic fields. This strategy allows the micro-robot to be introduced to arbitrary microfluidic environments for remote two- and three-dimensional manipulation. We demonstrate the coding of soft hydrogels, rigid copper bars, polystyrene beads and silicon chiplets into three-dimensional heterogeneous structures. We also use coded microstructures for bottom-up tissue engineering by generating cell-encapsulating constructs.

  3. Tailoring thermal conductivity via three-dimensional porous alumina.

    PubMed

    Abad, Begoña; Maiz, Jon; Ruiz-Clavijo, Alejandra; Caballero-Calero, Olga; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2016-12-09

    Three-dimensional anodic alumina templates (3D-AAO) are an astonishing framework with open highly ordered three-dimensional skeleton structures. Since these templates are architecturally different from conventional solids or porous templates, they teem with opportunities for engineering thermal properties. By establishing the mechanisms of heat transfer in these frameworks, we aim to create materials with tailored thermal properties. The effective thermal conductivity of an empty 3D-AAO membrane was measured. As the effective medium theory was not valid to extract the skeletal thermal conductivity of 3D-AAO, a simple 3D thermal conduction model was developed, based on a mixed series and parallel thermal resistor circuit, giving a skeletal thermal conductivity value of approximately 1.25 W·m(-1)·K(-1), which matches the value of the ordinary AAO membranes prepared from the same acid solution. The effect of different filler materials as well as the variation of the number of transversal nanochannels and the length of the 3D-AAO membrane in the effective thermal conductivity of the composite was studied. Finally, the thermal conductivity of two 3D-AAO membranes filled with cobalt and bismuth telluride was also measured, which was in good agreement with the thermal model predictions. Therefore, this work proved this structure as a powerful approach to tailor thermal properties.

  4. Tailoring thermal conductivity via three-dimensional porous alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abad, Begoña; Maiz, Jon; Ruiz-Clavijo, Alejandra; Caballero-Calero, Olga; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional anodic alumina templates (3D-AAO) are an astonishing framework with open highly ordered three-dimensional skeleton structures. Since these templates are architecturally different from conventional solids or porous templates, they teem with opportunities for engineering thermal properties. By establishing the mechanisms of heat transfer in these frameworks, we aim to create materials with tailored thermal properties. The effective thermal conductivity of an empty 3D-AAO membrane was measured. As the effective medium theory was not valid to extract the skeletal thermal conductivity of 3D-AAO, a simple 3D thermal conduction model was developed, based on a mixed series and parallel thermal resistor circuit, giving a skeletal thermal conductivity value of approximately 1.25 W·m‑1·K‑1, which matches the value of the ordinary AAO membranes prepared from the same acid solution. The effect of different filler materials as well as the variation of the number of transversal nanochannels and the length of the 3D-AAO membrane in the effective thermal conductivity of the composite was studied. Finally, the thermal conductivity of two 3D-AAO membranes filled with cobalt and bismuth telluride was also measured, which was in good agreement with the thermal model predictions. Therefore, this work proved this structure as a powerful approach to tailor thermal properties.

  5. Three-dimensional dental cast analyzing system using laser scanning.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, T; Motohashi, N; Tominaga, R; Iwata, K

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce the outline of our newly developed three-dimensional dental cast analyzing system with laser scanning, and its preliminary clinical applications. The system is composed of a measuring device with a slit-ray laser projector and two sets of coupled charged devised video cameras, an image processing unit, a 16-bit personal computer as a controller, and an engineering workstation as a post processor. The dental cast is projected and scanned with a slit-ray laser beam. The raster coordinates of the target are determined with an image processor. Triangulation is applied to determine the location of each point. Generation of three-dimensional graphics of the dental cast takes approximately 40 minutes. About 90,000 sets of X, Y, Z coordinates are stored in the main memory of the microcomputer. The measurement error is less than 0.05 mm. Besides the conventional linear and angular measurements of the dental cast, we are also able to demonstrate the size of the palatal surface area and the volume of the oral cavity. The advantage of this system is that it facilitates the otherwise complicated and time-consuming mock surgery necessary for treatment planning in orthognathic surgery.

  6. Tailoring thermal conductivity via three-dimensional porous alumina

    PubMed Central

    Abad, Begoña; Maiz, Jon; Ruiz-Clavijo, Alejandra; Caballero-Calero, Olga; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional anodic alumina templates (3D-AAO) are an astonishing framework with open highly ordered three-dimensional skeleton structures. Since these templates are architecturally different from conventional solids or porous templates, they teem with opportunities for engineering thermal properties. By establishing the mechanisms of heat transfer in these frameworks, we aim to create materials with tailored thermal properties. The effective thermal conductivity of an empty 3D-AAO membrane was measured. As the effective medium theory was not valid to extract the skeletal thermal conductivity of 3D-AAO, a simple 3D thermal conduction model was developed, based on a mixed series and parallel thermal resistor circuit, giving a skeletal thermal conductivity value of approximately 1.25 W·m−1·K−1, which matches the value of the ordinary AAO membranes prepared from the same acid solution. The effect of different filler materials as well as the variation of the number of transversal nanochannels and the length of the 3D-AAO membrane in the effective thermal conductivity of the composite was studied. Finally, the thermal conductivity of two 3D-AAO membranes filled with cobalt and bismuth telluride was also measured, which was in good agreement with the thermal model predictions. Therefore, this work proved this structure as a powerful approach to tailor thermal properties. PMID:27934930

  7. Development of Three-Dimensional DRAGON Grid Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Yao; Kiou, Meng-Sing; Civinskas, Kestutis C.

    1999-01-01

    For a typical three dimensional flow in a practical engineering device, the time spent in grid generation can take 70 percent of the total analysis effort, resulting in a serious bottleneck in the design/analysis cycle. The present research attempts to develop a procedure that can considerably reduce the grid generation effort. The DRAGON grid, as a hybrid grid, is created by means of a Direct Replacement of Arbitrary Grid Overlapping by Nonstructured grid. The DRAGON grid scheme is an adaptation to the Chimera thinking. The Chimera grid is a composite structured grid, composing a set of overlapped structured grids, which are independently generated and body-fitted. The grid is of high quality and amenable for efficient solution schemes. However, the interpolation used in the overlapped region between grids introduces error, especially when a sharp-gradient region is encountered. The DRAGON grid scheme is capable of completely eliminating the interpolation and preserving the conservation property. It maximizes the advantages of the Chimera scheme and adapts the strengths of the unstructured and while at the same time keeping its weaknesses minimal. In the present paper, we describe the progress towards extending the DRAGON grid technology into three dimensions. Essential and programming aspects of the extension, and new challenges for the three-dimensional cases, are addressed.

  8. The Effect of Flattening Filter Free on Three-dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy (3D-CRT), Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) Plans for Metastatic Brain Tumors from Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Li-Wan; Lai, You-Qun; Lin, Qin; Ha, Hui-Ming; Fu, Li-Rong

    2015-07-01

    Flattening filter free (FFF) may affect outcome measures of radiotherapy. The objective of this study is to compare the dosimetric parameters in three types of radiotherapy plans, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), with or without the flattening filter (FF), developed for the treatment of metastatic brain tumors from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). From July 2013 to October 2013, 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT treatment plans were designed using 6 MV and 10 MV, with and without FF, for 10 patients with brain metastasis from NSCLC. The evaluation of the treatment plans included homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), monitor units (MU), mean dose (Dmean), treatment time, and the influence of FFF on volumes. There was no difference in CI or HI between FFF and FF models with 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT plans. At 6 MV, a lower Dmean was seen in the FFF model of 3D-CRT and in the VMAT plan at 10 MV. In the IMRT 6 MV, IMRT 10 MV, and VMAT 10 MV plans, higher MUs were seen in the FFF models. FFF treatments are similar in quality to FF plans, generally lead to more monitor units, and are associated with shorter treatment times. FFF plans ranked by the order of superiority in terms of a time advantage are VMAT, 3D-CRT, and IMRT.

  9. Three-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Haworth, D.C.; O'Rourke, P.J.; Ranganathan, R.

    1998-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is one discipline falling under the broad heading of computer-aided engineering (CAE). CAE, together with computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM), comprise a mathematical-based approach to engineering product and process design, analysis and fabrication. In this overview of CFD for the design engineer, our purposes are three-fold: (1) to define the scope of CFD and motivate its utility for engineering, (2) to provide a basic technical foundation for CFD, and (3) to convey how CFD is incorporated into engineering product and process design.

  10. Nanoscale three-dimensional single particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, Aurélie; Lamb, Don C.

    2011-11-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) in biological systems is a quickly growing field. Many new technologies are being developed providing new tracking capabilities, which also lead to higher demands and expectations for SPT. Following a single biomolecule as it performs its function provides quantitative mechanistic information that cannot be obtained in classical ensemble methods. From the 3D trajectory, information is available over the diffusional behavior of the particle and precise position information can also be used to elucidate interactions of the tracked particle with its surroundings. Thus, three-dimensional (3D) SPT is a very valuable tool for investigating cellular processes. This review presents recent progress in 3D SPT, from image-based techniques toward more sophisticated feedback approaches. We focus mainly on the feedback technique known as orbital tracking. We present here a modified version of the original orbital tracking in which the intensities from two z-planes are simultaneously measured allowing a concomitant wide-field imaging. The system can track single particles with a precision down to 5 nm in the x-y plane and 7 nm in the axial direction. The capabilities of the system are demonstrated using single virus tracing to follow the infection pathway of Prototype Foamy Virus in living cells.Single particle tracking (SPT) in biological systems is a quickly growing field. Many new technologies are being developed providing new tracking capabilities, which also lead to higher demands and expectations for SPT. Following a single biomolecule as it performs its function provides quantitative mechanistic information that cannot be obtained in classical ensemble methods. From the 3D trajectory, information is available over the diffusional behavior of the particle and precise position information can also be used to elucidate interactions of the tracked particle with its surroundings. Thus, three-dimensional (3D) SPT is a very valuable tool for

  11. Three-dimensional simulations of fracture dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starchenko, Vitaliy; Marra, Cameron J.; Ladd, Anthony J. C.

    2016-09-01

    Numerical studies of fracture dissolution are frequently based on two-dimensional models, where the fracture geometry is represented by an aperture field h(x,y). However, it is known that such models can break down when the spatial variations in aperture are rapid or large in amplitude; for example, in a rough fracture or when instabilities in the dissolution front develop into pronounced channels (or wormholes). Here we report a finite-volume implementation of a three-dimensional reactive transport model using the OpenFOAM® toolkit. Extensions to the OpenFOAM source code have been developed which displace and then relax the mesh in response to variations in the surface concentration; up to 100-fold increases in fracture aperture are possible without remeshing. Our code has simulated field-scale fractures with physical dimensions of about 10 m. We report simulations of smooth fractures, with small, well-controlled perturbations in fracture aperture introduced at the inlet. This allows for systematic convergence studies and for detailed comparisons with results from a two-dimensional model. Initially, the fracture aperture develops similarly in both models, but as local inhomogeneities develop the results start to diverge. We investigate numerically the onset of instabilities in the dissolution of fractures with small random variations in the initial aperture field. Our results show that elliptical cross sections, which are characteristic of karstic conduits, can develop very rapidly, on time scales of 10-20 years in calcite rocks.

  12. Tip selection in three-dimensional dendrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, M. R.; Tanveer, S.

    2004-11-01

    Dendrites are well-known to have a fully three-dimensional structure, often with four equally-spaced fins emanating from the steady parabolic tip, the pattern for which has now a good theoretical foundation.(McFadden, Coriell & Sekerka, J. Crys. Growth) 208 (2000) The four fins are of course related to four-fold crystalline anisotropy of quite small magnitude. We follow Tanveer(Tanveer, S. Phys. Rev. A) 40 (1989) in carefully exploring the matching of the inner solution in the neighborhood of the singularity nearest the real line to the small-surface-energy regular perturbation expansion, in order to obtain the (selected) tip radius and the amplitude of the fin. We consider the case for which the anisotropy parameter, α, is much larger than a dimensionless capillary length to the 4/7 power. We confirm what was already found in a slightly different parameter range(Ben Amar & Brener, Phys. Rev. Lett.) 71 (1993)--that the inner equation is essentially that of the two-dimensional case, with azimuthally-dependent parameters. We compare our results with those of Ben Amar & Brener.

  13. Three dimensional characterization and archiving system

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, R.L.; Clark, R.; Gallman, P.

    1996-04-01

    The Three Dimensional Characterization and Archiving System (3D-ICAS) is being developed as a remote system to perform rapid in situ analysis of hazardous organics and radionuclide contamination on structural materials. Coleman Research and its subcontractors, Thermedics Detection, Inc. (TD) and the University of Idaho (UI) are in the second phase of a three phase program to develop 3D-ICAS to support Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) operations. Accurate physical characterization of surfaces and the radioactive and organic is a critical D and D task. Surface characterization includes identification of potentially dangerous inorganic materials, such as asbestos and transite. Real-time remotely operable characterization instrumentation will significantly advance the analysis capabilities beyond those currently employed. Chemical analysis is a primary area where the characterization process will be improved. The 3D-ICAS system robotically conveys a multisensor probe near the surfaces to be inspected. The sensor position and orientation are monitored and controlled using coherent laser radar (CLR) tracking. The CLR also provides 3D facility maps which establish a 3D world view within which the robotic sensor system can operate.

  14. Three-dimensional context regulation of metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Erler, Janine T.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2009-01-01

    Tumor progression ensues within a three-dimensional microenvironment that consists of cellular and non-cellular components. The extracellular matrix (ECM) and hypoxia are two non-cellular components that potently influence metastasis. ECM remodeling and collagen cross-linking stiffen the tissue stroma to promote transformation, tumor growth, motility and invasion, enhance cancer cell survival, enable metastatic dissemination, and facilitate the establishment of tumor cells at distant sites. Matrix degradation can additionally promote malignant progression and metastasis. Tumor hypoxia is functionally linked to altered stromal-epithelial interactions. Hypoxia additionally induces the expression of pro-migratory, survival and invasion genes, and up-regulates expression of ECM components and modifying enzymes, to enhance tumor progression and metastasis. Synergistic interactions between matrix remodeling and tumor hypoxia influence common mechanisms that maximize tumor progression and cooperate to drive metastasis. Thus, clarifying the molecular pathways by which ECM remodeling and tumor hypoxia intersect to promote tumor progression should identify novel therapeutic targets. PMID:18814043

  15. Magnetophotonic response of three-dimensional opals.

    PubMed

    Caicedo, José Manuel; Pascu, Oana; López-García, Martín; Canalejas, Víctor; Blanco, Alvaro; López, Cefe; Fontcuberta, Josep; Roig, Anna; Herranz, Gervasi

    2011-04-26

    Three-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals (3D-MPCs) are being postulated as appropriate platforms to tailor the magneto-optical spectral response of magnetic materials and to incorporate this functionality in a new generation of optical devices. By infiltrating self-assembled inverse opal structures with monodisperse nickel nanoparticles we have fabricated 3D-MPCs that show a sizable enhancement of the magneto-optical signal at frequencies around the stop-band edges of the photonic crystals. We have established a proper methodology to disentangle the intrinsic magneto-optical spectra from the nonmagnetic optical activity of the 3D-MPCs. The results of the optical and magneto-optical characterization are consistent with a homogeneous magnetic infiltration of the opal structure that gives rise to both a red-shift of the optical bandgap and a modification of the magneto-optical spectral response due to photonic bandgap effects. The results of our investigation demonstrate the potential of 3D-MPCs fabricated following the approach outlined here and offer opportunities to adapt the magneto-optical spectral response at optical frequencies by appropriate design of the opal structure or magnetic field strength.

  16. A three-dimensional human walking model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q. S.; Qin, J. W.; Law, S. S.

    2015-11-01

    A three-dimensional human bipedal walking model with compliant legs is presented in this paper. The legs are modeled with time-variant dampers, and the model is able to characterize the gait pattern of an individual using a minimal set of parameters. Feedback control, for both the forward and lateral movements, is implemented to regulate the walking performance of the pedestrian. The model provides an improvement over classic invert pendulum models. Numerical studies were undertaken to investigate the effects of leg stiffness and attack angle. Simulation results show that when walking at a given speed, increasing the leg stiffness with a constant attack angle results in a longer step length, a higher step frequency, a faster walking speed and an increase in both the peak vertical and lateral ground reaction forces. Increasing the attack angle with a constant leg stiffness results in a higher step frequency, a decrease in the step length, an increase in the total energy of the system and a decrease in both the peak vertical and lateral ground reaction forces.

  17. Three-dimensional planning in craniomaxillofacial surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Palau, Josep; Prieto-Gundin, Alejandra; Cazalla, Asteria Albert; Serrano, Miguel Bejarano; Fructuoso, Gemma Garcia; Ferrandis, Francisco Parri; Baró, Alejandro Rivera

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Three-dimensional (3D) planning in oral and maxillofacial surgery has become a standard in the planification of a variety of conditions such as dental implants and orthognathic surgery. By using custom-made cutting and positioning guides, the virtual surgery is exported to the operating room, increasing precision and improving results. Materials and Methods: We present our experience in the treatment of craniofacial deformities with 3D planning. Software to plan the different procedures has been selected for each case, depending on the procedure (Nobel Clinician, Kodak 3DS, Simplant O&O, Dolphin 3D, Timeus, Mimics and 3-Matic). The treatment protocol is exposed step by step from virtual planning, design, and printing of the cutting and positioning guides to patients’ outcomes. Conclusions: 3D planning reduces the surgical time and allows predicting possible difficulties and complications. On the other hand, it increases preoperative planning time and needs a learning curve. The only drawback is the cost of the procedure. At present, the additional preoperative work can be justified because of surgical time reduction and more predictable results. In the future, the cost and time investment will be reduced. 3D planning is here to stay. It is already a fact in craniofacial surgery and the investment is completely justified by the risk reduction and precise results. PMID:28299272

  18. Three-dimensional Diffusive Strip Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Ruiz, Daniel; Meunier, Patrice; Duchemin, Laurent; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2016-11-01

    The Diffusive Strip Method (DSM) is a near-exact numerical method developed for mixing computations at large Péclet number in two-dimensions. The method consists in following stretched material lines to compute a-posteriori the resulting scalar field is extended here to three-dimensional flows, following surfaces. We describe its 3D peculiarities, and show how it applies to a simple Taylor-Couette configuration with non-rotating boundary conditions at the top end, bottom and outer cylinder. This flow produces an elaborate, although controlled, steady 3D flow which relies on the Ekman pumping arising from the rotation of the inner cylinder is both studied experimentally, and numerically modeled. A recurrent two-cells structure appears formed by stream tubes shaped as nested tori. A scalar blob in the flow experiences a Lagrangian oscillating dynamics with stretchings and compressions, driving the mixing process, and yielding both rapidly-mixed and nearly pure-diffusive regions. A triangulated-surface method is developed to calculate the blob elongation and scalar concentration PDFs through a single variable computation along the advected blob surface, capturing the rich evolution observed in the experiments.

  19. Lattice theory of three-dimensional cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esterling, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of the stability of a three-dimensional crack is analyzed within a lattice-statics approximation. The consequence of introducing a jog into the crack face as well as the effects of various nonlinear-force laws are studied. The phenomenon of lattice trapping (upper and lower bounds on the applied stress for an equilibrium crack of given length) is again obtained. It is possible to obtain some physical insight into which aspects of the force law are critical for crack stability. In particular, the inadequacy of a thermodynamic approach - which relates the critical stress to a surface energy corresponding to the area under the cohesive-force-vs-displacement curve - is demonstrated. Surface energy is a global property of the cohesive-force law. Crack stability is sensitive to much more refined aspects of the cohesive-force law. Crack healing is sensitive to the long-range portion of the cohesive force. Crack expansion is sensitive to the position of the maximum in the cohesive-force relation.

  20. Three-dimensional landing zone ladar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, James; Goodrich, Shawn; Burns, H. N.

    2016-05-01

    Three-Dimensional Landing Zone (3D-LZ) refers to a series of Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) programs to develop high-resolution, imaging ladar to address helicopter approach and landing in degraded visual environments with emphasis on brownout; cable warning and obstacle avoidance; and controlled flight into terrain. Initial efforts adapted ladar systems built for munition seekers, and success led to a the 3D-LZ Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) , a 27-month program to develop and demonstrate a ladar subsystem that could be housed with the AN/AAQ-29 FLIR turret flown on US Air Force Combat Search and Rescue (CSAR) HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopters. Following the JCTD flight demonstration, further development focused on reducing size, weight, and power while continuing to refine the real-time geo-referencing, dust rejection, obstacle and cable avoidance, and Helicopter Terrain Awareness and Warning (HTAWS) capability demonstrated under the JCTD. This paper summarizes significant ladar technology development milestones to date, individual LADAR technologies within 3D-LZ, and results of the flight testing.

  1. PLOT3D- DRAWING THREE DIMENSIONAL SURFACES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canright, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is a package of programs to draw three-dimensional surfaces of the form z = f(x,y). The function f and the boundary values for x and y are the input to PLOT3D. The surface thus defined may be drawn after arbitrary rotations. However, it is designed to draw only functions in rectangular coordinates expressed explicitly in the above form. It cannot, for example, draw a sphere. Output is by off-line incremental plotter or online microfilm recorder. This package, unlike other packages, will plot any function of the form z = f(x,y) and portrays continuous and bounded functions of two independent variables. With curve fitting; however, it can draw experimental data and pictures which cannot be expressed in the above form. The method used is division into a uniform rectangular grid of the given x and y ranges. The values of the supplied function at the grid points (x, y) are calculated and stored; this defines the surface. The surface is portrayed by connecting successive (y,z) points with straight-line segments for each x value on the grid and, in turn, connecting successive (x,z) points for each fixed y value on the grid. These lines are then projected by parallel projection onto the fixed yz-plane for plotting. This program has been implemented on the IBM 360/67 with on-line CDC microfilm recorder.

  2. Three-dimensional laser velocimeter simultaneity detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, James L. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A three-dimensional laser Doppler velocimeter has laser optics for a first channel positioned to create a probe volume in space, and laser optics and for second and third channels, respectively, positioned to create entirely overlapping probe volumes in space. The probe volumes and overlap partially in space. The photodetector is positioned to receive light scattered by a particle present in the probe volume, while photodetectors and are positioned to receive light scattered by a particle present in the probe volume. The photodetector for the first channel is directly connected to provide a first channel analog signal to frequency measuring circuits. The first channel is therefore a primary channel for the system. Photodetectors and are respectively connected through a second channel analog signal attenuator to frequency measuring circuits and through a third channel analog signal attenuator to frequency measuring circuits. The second and third channels are secondary channels, with the second and third channels analog signal attenuators and controlled by the first channel measurement burst signal on line. The second and third channels analog signal attenuators and attenuate the second and third channels analog signals only when the measurement burst signal is false.

  3. Three dimensional, multi-chip module

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Petersen, R.W.

    1992-12-31

    The present invention relates to integrated circuit packaging technology, and particularly to three dimensional packages involving high density stacks of integrated circuits. A plurality of multi-chip modules are stacked and bonded around the perimeter by sold-bump bonds to adjacent modules on, for instance, three sides of the perimeter. The fourth side can be used for coolant distribution, for more interconnect structures, or other features, depending on particular design considerations of the chip set. The multi-chip modules comprise a circuit board, having a planarized interconnect structure formed on a first major surface, and integrated circuit chips bonded to the planarized interconnect surface. Around the periphery of each circuit board, long, narrow ``dummy chips`` are bonded to the finished circuit board to form a perimeter wall. The wall is higher than any of the chips on the circuit board, so that the flat back surface of the board above will only touch the perimeter wall. Module-to-module interconnect is laser-patterned on the sides of the boards and over the perimeter wall in the same way and at the same time that chip to board interconnect may be laser-patterned.

  4. Three dimensional characterization and archiving system

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, R.L.; Clark, R.; Gallman, P.

    1995-10-01

    The Three Dimensional Characterization and Archiving System (3D-ICAS) is being developed as a remote system to perform rapid in situ analysis of hazardous organics and radionuclide contamination on structural materials. Coleman Research and its subcontractors, Thermedics Detection, Inc. (TD) and the University of Idaho (UI) are in the second phase of a three phase program to develop 3D-ICAS to support Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) operations. Accurate physical characterization of surfaces and the radioactive and organic is a critical D&D task. Surface characterization includes identification of potentially dangerous inorganic materials, such as asbestos and transite. The 3D-ICAS system robotically conveys a multisensor probe near the surface to be inspected. The sensor position and orientation are monitored and controlled by Coherent laser radar (CLR) tracking. The ICAS fills the need for high speed automated organic analysis by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry sensors, and also by radionuclide sensors which combines alpha, beta, and gamma counting.

  5. Three-dimensional modelling of Venus photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenbach, Aurélien; Lefèvre, Franck; Lebonnois, Sébastien; Määttänen, Anni; Bekki, Slimane

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a new code of the Venus atmospheric chemistry based on our photochemical model already in use for Mars (e.g., Lefèvre et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2004). For Venus, the code also includes a parameterized treatment of cloud microphysics that computes the composition of sulphuric acid droplets and their number density based on a given droplet size distribution in altitude. We coupled this photochemical-microphysical package to the LMD general circulation model of Venus (Lebonnois et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2010) with a sedimentation module recently added. We will describe preliminary results obtained with this first three-dimensional model of the Venus photochemistry. The space and time distribution of key chemical species as well as the modelled clouds characteristics will be detailed and compared to observations performed from Venus Express and from the Earth (e.g. Knollenberg and Hunten, J. Geophys. Res., 1980 ; Wilquet et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2009 ; Sandor et al., Icarus, 2012).

  6. Three-Dimensional Modelling of Venus Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenbach, A.; Lefèvre, F.; Lebonnois, S.; Maattanen, A. E.; Bekki, S.

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a new code of the Venus atmospheric chemistry based on our photochemical model already in use for Mars (e.g., Lefèvre et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2004). For Venus, the code also includes a parameterized treatment of cloud microphysics that computes the composition of sulphuric acid droplets and their number density based on a given droplet size distribution in altitude and latitude. We coupled this photochemical-microphysical package to the LMD general circulation model of Venus (Lebonnois et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2010) with a sedimentation module that takes into account the parametrized droplet size distribution. We will describe the results obtained with this first three-dimensional model of the Venus photochemistry. The space and time distribution of key chemical species as well as the modelled clouds characteristics will be detailed and compared to observations performed from Venus Express and from the Earth (e.g. Knollenberg and Hunten, J. Geophys. Res., 1980 ; Wilquet et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2009 ; Sandor et al., Icarus, 2012 ; Mahieux et al., PSS, 2014 ; Marcq et al., 2015, PSS).

  7. Three-dimensional modeling of tsunami waves

    SciTech Connect

    Mader, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    Two- and three-dimensional, time-dependent, nonlinear, incompressible, viscous flow calculations of realistic models of tsunami wave formation and run up have been performed using the Los Alamos-developed SOLA-3D code. The results of the SOLA calculations are compared with shallow-water, long-wave calculations for the same problems using the SWAN code. Tsunami wave formation by a continental slope subsidence has been examined using the two numerical models. The SOLA waves were slower than the SWAN waves and the interaction with the shoreline was more complicated for the SOLA waves. In the SOLA calculation, the first wave was generated by the cavity being filled along the shoreline close to the source of motion. The second wave was generated by the cavity being filled from the deep water end. The two waves interacted along the shoreline resulting in the second wave being the largest wave with a velocity greater than the first wave. The second wave overtook the first wave at later times and greater distances from the source. In the SWAN calculation, the second wave was smaller than the first wave. 6 refs.

  8. Three-dimensional visualization for large models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Michael W.

    2001-09-01

    High-resolution (0.3-1 m) digital-elevation data is widely available from commercial sources. Whereas the production of two-dimensional (2D) mapping products from such data is standard practice, the visualization of such three-dimensional (3D) data has been problematic. The basis for this problem is the same as that for the large-model problem in computer graphics-- large amounts of geometry are difficult for current rendering algorithms and hardware. This paper describes a cost-effective solution to this problem that has two parts. First is the employment of the latest in cost-effective 3D chips and video boards that have recently emerged. The second part is the employment of quad-tree data structures for efficient data storage and retrieval during rendering. The result is the capability for real-time display of large (over tens of millions of samples) digital elevation models on modest PC-based systems. This paper shows several demonstrations of this approach using airborne lidar data. The implication of this work is a paradigm shift for geo-spatial information systems--3D data can now be as easy to use as 2D data.

  9. Three Dimensional Characterization of the Mundrabilla Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, Donald C.; Engel, H. Peter; Carpenter, P. K.

    2003-01-01

    The differentiated meteorite, Mundrabilla, exhibits a rare structure of primary kamacite/taenite, and at least 25 volume % of sulfide (troilite and daubreelite). The structure has been investigated in three dimensions using the technique of gamma-ray computed tomography (CT) with a radioactive (60)Co isotope as the source of the flux. Using CT, a 50 kg slab with dimensions 12.6 x 8.2 x approx. 70 cm has been sectioned at 1 mm intervals over 50 cm length, and the three dimensional structure is at present being evaluated. These data revealed, in addition to the metallic and troilite-rich phases, the presence and distribution of graphite-rich cones (up to 5 cm long), and small (1-2 mm), low density particles. The graphite cones are readily visible on the surfaces of many of the sections of Mundrabilla, while the smaller phases have a density (determined from CT) of approximately 2.9 g/cc, and are assumed to be silicate inclusions. CT spatial resolution is not adequate to elucidate the shapes of these particles. One can only state that they show no directionality and are equiaxed.

  10. Two and three dimensional magnetotelluric inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, J.

    1993-01-01

    Electrical conductivity depends on properties such as the presence of ionic fluids in interconnected pores that are difficult to sense with other remote sensing techniques. Thus improved imaging of underground electrical structure has wide practical importance in exploring for groundwater, mineral and geothermal resources, and in assessing the diffusion of fluids in oil fields and waste sites. Because the electromagnetic inverse problem is fundamentally multi-dimensional, most imaging algorithms saturate available computer power long before they can deal with the complete data set. We have developed an algorithm to directly invert large multi-dimensional data sets that is orders of magnitude faster than competing methods. We have proven that a two-dimensional (2D) version of the algorithm is highly effective for real data and have made substantial progress towards a three-dimensional (3D) version. We are proposing to cure identified shortcomings and substantially expand the utility of the existing 2D program, overcome identified difficulties with extending our method to three-dimensions (3D) and embark on an investigation of related EM imaging techniques which may have the potential for even further increasing resolution.

  11. Three-Dimensional Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutin, Mikhail; Wang, Xu-Ming; Gutin, Olga

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an advanced method of noninvasive infrared imaging of tissues in depth. Heretofore, commercial OCT systems for 3D imaging have been designed principally for external ophthalmological examination. As explained below, such systems have been based on a one-dimensional OCT principle, and in the operation of such a system, 3D imaging is accomplished partly by means of a combination of electronic scanning along the optical (Z) axis and mechanical scanning along the two axes (X and Y) orthogonal to the optical axis. In 3D OCT, 3D imaging involves a form of electronic scanning (without mechanical scanning) along all three axes. Consequently, the need for mechanical adjustment is minimal and the mechanism used to position the OCT probe can be correspondingly more compact. A 3D OCT system also includes a probe of improved design and utilizes advanced signal- processing techniques. Improvements in performance over prior OCT systems include finer resolution, greater speed, and greater depth of field.

  12. Globographic visualisation of three dimensional joint angles.

    PubMed

    Baker, Richard

    2011-07-07

    Three different methods for describing three dimensional joint angles are commonly used in biomechanics. The joint coordinate system and Cardan/Euler angles are conceptually quite different but are known to represent the same underlying mathematics. More recently the globographic method has been suggested as an alternative and this has proved particularly attractive for the shoulder joint. All three methods can be implemented in a number of ways leading to a choice of angle definitions. Very recently Rab has demonstrated that the globographic method is equivalent to one implementation of the joint coordinate system. This paper presents a rigorous analysis of the three different methods and proves their mathematical equivalence. The well known sequence dependence of Cardan/Euler is presented as equivalent to configuration dependence of the joint coordinate system and orientation dependence of globographic angles. The precise definition of different angle sets can be easily visualised using the globographic method using analogues of longitude, latitude and surface bearings with which most users will already be familiar. The method implicitly requires one axis of the moving segment to be identified as its principal axis and this can be extremely useful in helping define the most appropriate angle set to describe the orientation of any particular joint. Using this technique different angle sets are considered to be most appropriate for different joints and examples of this for the hip, knee, ankle, pelvis and axial skeleton are outlined.

  13. Three dimensional imaging with randomly distributed sensors.

    PubMed

    DaneshPanah, Mehdi; Javidi, Bahram; Watson, Edward A

    2008-04-28

    As a promising three dimensional passive imaging modality, Integral Imaging (II) has been investigated widely within the research community. In virtually all of such investigations, there is an implicit assumption that the collection of elemental images lie on a simple geometric surface (e.g. flat, concave, etc), also known as pickup surface. In this paper, we present a generalized framework for 3D II with arbitrary pickup surface geometry and randomly distributed sensor configuration. In particular, we will study the case of Synthetic Aperture Integral Imaging (SAII) with random location of cameras in space, while all cameras have parallel optical axes but different distances from the 3D scene. We assume that the sensors are randomly distributed in 3D volume of pick up space. For 3D reconstruction, a finite number of sensors with known coordinates are randomly selected from within this volume. The mathematical framework for 3D scene reconstruction is developed based on an affine transform representation of imaging under geometrical optics regime. We demonstrate the feasibility of the methods proposed here by experimental results. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3D imaging using randomly distributed sensors.

  14. Generation of three-dimensional medical thermograms.

    PubMed

    Chan, F H; So, A T; Lam, F K

    1996-01-01

    To visualise non-invasively human organs in their true form and shape has intrigued mankind for centuries. Three-dimensional (3D) imaging is one recent development that has brought us closer to fulfilling the age-old quest of non-invasive visualisation so that diagnoses by doctors can be efficiently enhanced. Nowadays, 3D CT and MRI images have been very popular. Thermography is an important medical imaging technique that displays the temperature distribution on the surface of a human organ and it has been proved to be significant in offering a unique physiological reflection of pathology that may confirm or enhance the anatomic findings of other diagnostic imaging modalities. It is the only imaging modality that can evaluate pain whereas plain radiographs, CT and MRI, etc. can only depict structural anatomic abnormalities that may not always coincide with patients' clinical complaints. It is against this background that 3D thermograms have been developed. A set of comprehensive calibration procedures for the 3-camera system have been designed based on different models for the optical and infrared cameras. The accuracy of the results is high enough to produce 3D thermograms that can be used to correlate with the 3D images from other medical imaging modalities. One important achievement of the system is that the resultant 3D images are absolutely dimensioned and hence, it is particularly favourable for fully autonomous applications with robots. The system can also provide an overall picture of both the structural abnormalities and nervous responses of patients.

  15. Three dimensional characterization and archiving system

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, R.L.; Clark, R.; Gallman, P.

    1995-12-01

    The Three Dimensional Characterization and Archiving System (3D-ICAS) is being developed as a remote system to perform rapid in situ analysis of hazardous organics and radionuclide contamination on structural materials. Coleman Research and its subcontractors, Thermedics Detection, Inc. (TD) and the University of Idaho (UI) are in the second phase of a three phase program to develop 3D-ICAS to support Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) operations. Accurate physical characterization of surfaces and the radioactive and organic is a critical D&D task. Surface characterization includes identification of potentially dangerous inorganic materials, such as asbestos and transite. Real-time remotely operable characterization instrumentation will significantly advance the analysis capabilities beyond those currently employed. Chemical analysis is a primary area where the characterization process will be improved. Chemical analysis plays a vital role throughout the process of decontamination. Before clean-up operations can begin the site must be characterized with respect to the type and concentration of contaminants, and detailed site mapping must clarify areas of both high and low risk. During remediation activities chemical analysis provides a means to measure progress and to adjust clean-up strategy. Once the clean-up process has been completed the results of chemical analysis will verify that the site is in compliance with federal and local regulations.

  16. Three-dimensional charge coupled device

    DOEpatents

    Conder, Alan D.; Young, Bruce K. F.

    1999-01-01

    A monolithic three dimensional charged coupled device (3D-CCD) which utilizes the entire bulk of the semiconductor for charge generation, storage, and transfer. The 3D-CCD provides a vast improvement of current CCD architectures that use only the surface of the semiconductor substrate. The 3D-CCD is capable of developing a strong E-field throughout the depth of the semiconductor by using deep (buried) parallel (bulk) electrodes in the substrate material. Using backside illumination, the 3D-CCD architecture enables a single device to image photon energies from the visible, to the ultra-violet and soft x-ray, and out to higher energy x-rays of 30 keV and beyond. The buried or bulk electrodes are electrically connected to the surface electrodes, and an E-field parallel to the surface is established with the pixel in which the bulk electrodes are located. This E-field attracts charge to the bulk electrodes independent of depth and confines it within the pixel in which it is generated. Charge diffusion is greatly reduced because the E-field is strong due to the proximity of the bulk electrodes.

  17. Three-Dimensional Imaging of Viral Infections.

    PubMed

    Risco, Cristina; de Castro, Isabel Fernández; Sanz-Sánchez, Laura; Narayan, Kedar; Grandinetti, Giovanna; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2014-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging technologies are beginning to have significant impact in the field of virology, as they are helping us understand how viruses take control of cells. In this article we review several methodologies for 3D imaging of cells and show how these technologies are contributing to the study of viral infections and the characterization of specialized structures formed in virus-infected cells. We include 3D reconstruction by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using serial sections, electron tomography, and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM). We summarize from these methods selected contributions to our understanding of viral entry, replication, morphogenesis, egress and propagation, and changes in the spatial architecture of virus-infected cells. In combination with live-cell imaging, correlative microscopy, and new techniques for molecular mapping in situ, the availability of these methods for 3D imaging is expected to provide deeper insights into understanding the structural and dynamic aspects of viral infection.

  18. Three-dimensional cell culture models for investigating human viruses.

    PubMed

    He, Bing; Chen, Guomin; Zeng, Yi

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture models are physiologically relevant, as they provide reproducible results, experimental flexibility and can be adapted for high-throughput experiments. Moreover, these models bridge the gap between traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures and animal models. 3D culture systems have significantly advanced basic cell science and tissue engineering, especially in the fields of cell biology and physiology, stem cell research, regenerative medicine, cancer research, drug discovery, and gene and protein expression studies. In addition, 3D models can provide unique insight into bacteriology, virology, parasitology and host-pathogen interactions. This review summarizes and analyzes recent progress in human virological research with 3D cell culture models. We discuss viral growth, replication, proliferation, infection, virus-host interactions and antiviral drugs in 3D culture models.

  19. Three-Dimensional Genome Organization and Function in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Yuri B.; Cavalli, Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how the metazoan genome is used during development and cell differentiation is one of the major challenges in the postgenomic era. Early studies in Drosophila suggested that three-dimensional (3D) chromosome organization plays important regulatory roles in this process and recent technological advances started to reveal connections at the molecular level. Here we will consider general features of the architectural organization of the Drosophila genome, providing historical perspective and insights from recent work. We will compare the linear and spatial segmentation of the fly genome and focus on the two key regulators of genome architecture: insulator components and Polycomb group proteins. With its unique set of genetic tools and a compact, well annotated genome, Drosophila is poised to remain a model system of choice for rapid progress in understanding principles of genome organization and to serve as a proving ground for development of 3D genome-engineering techniques. PMID:28049701

  20. UTILIZATION OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL INFORMATION IN ROAD CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Satoshi

    In this research targeting road construction projects, schemes were investigated for utilizing three-dimensional (3D) data distributed in accordance with ISO (Internatio nal Organization for Standardization) and produced by 3D computer-aided design (CAD) software based on the concept of product data models. First, existing literature was classified by work stage as the context for utilizing 3D data. Next, the establishment of standards for exchanging 3D data, revising relevant systems, constructing road data models, realizing work process models, developing 3D CAD engines, and providing 3D data utilization environments are discussed, both as measures that should be undertaken and as future research topics for promoting the utilization of 3D data. Finally, the potential for utilizing 3D data in road construction projects by local government is examined, and the items to be implemented for this purpose are summarized.

  1. Three-Dimensional Frame Buffers For Interactive Analysis Of Three-Dimensional Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Gregory M.

    1986-02-01

    Two-dimensional data such as photos, x-rays, various types of satellite images, sonar, radar, seismic plots, etc., in many cases must be analyzed using frame buffers for purposes of medical diagnoses, crop estimates, mineral exploration, and so forth. In many cases the same types of sensors used to gather such samples in two dimensions can gather 3D data for even more effective analysis. Just as 2D arrays of data can be analyzed using frame buffers, three-dimensional data can be analyzed using SOLIDS-BUFFER memories. Image processors deal with samples from two-dimensional arrays and are based on frame buffers. The SOLIDS PROCESSOR system deals with samples from a three-dimensional volume, or solid, and is based on a 3D frame buffer. This paper focuses upon the SOLIDS-BUFFER system as used in the INSIGHT SOLIDS-PROCESSOR system from Phoenix Data Systems.

  2. RADIAL STELLAR PULSATION AND THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONVECTION. IV. FULL AMPLITUDE THREE-DIMENSIONAL SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Geroux, Christopher M.; Deupree, Robert G.

    2015-02-10

    Three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of full amplitude RR Lyrae stars have been computed for several models across the instability strip. The three-dimensional nature of the calculations allows convection to be treated without reference to a phenomenological approach such as the local mixing length theory. Specifically, the time-dependent interaction of large-scale eddies and radial pulsation is controlled by conservation laws, while the effects of smaller convective eddies are simulated by an eddy viscosity model. The light amplitudes for these calculations are quite similar to those of our previous two-dimensional calculations in the middle of the instability strip, but somewhat lower near the red edge, the fundamental blue edge, and for the one first overtone model we computed. The time-dependent interaction between the radial pulsation and the convective energy transport is essentially the same in three dimensions as it is in two dimensions. There are some differences between the light curves of the two- and three-dimensional simulations, particularly during decreasing light. Reasons for the differences, both numerical and physical, are explored.

  3. Three-Dimensional Ocean Noise Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    tf^NOG^^ WOODS HOLE OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTION Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department, Senior Scientist February 27, 2015 Dr. Kyle...Office (WHOI) ONR REG Boston N62879 -J Defense Technical Information Center Naval Research Laboratory MS#12 • Woods Hole, MA 02543 USA...Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02542 *now at: Department of Oceanography

  4. Three-dimensional ring current decay model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Moore, Thomas E.; Kozyra, Janet U.; Ho, George C.; Hamilton, Douglas C.

    1995-01-01

    This work is an extension of a previous ring current decay model. In the previous work, a two-dimensional kinetic model was constructed to study the temporal variations of the equatorially mirroring ring current ions, considering charge exchange and Coulomb drag losses along drift paths in a magnetic dipole field. In this work, particles with arbitrary pitch angle are considered. By bounce averaging the kinetic equation of the phase space density, information along magnetic field lines can be inferred from the equator. The three-dimensional model is used to simulate the recovery phase of a model great magnetic storm, similar to that which occurred in early February 1986. The initial distribution of ring current ions (at the minimum Dst) is extrapolated to all local times from AMPTE/CCE spacecraft observations on the dawnside and duskside of the inner magnetosphere spanning the L value range L = 2.25 to 6.75. Observations by AMPTE/CCE of ring current distributions over subsequent orbits during the storm recovery phase are compared to model outputs. In general, the calculated ion fluxes are consistent with observations, except for H(+) fluxes at tens of keV, which are always overestimated. A newly invented visualization idea, designated as a chromogram, is used to display the spatial and energy dependence of the ring current ion differential flux. Important features of storm time ring current, such as day-night asymmetry during injection and drift hole on the dayside at low energies (less than 10 keV), are manifested in the chromogram representation. The pitch angle distribution is well fit by the function, J(sub o)(1 + Ay(sup n)), where y is sine of the equatorial pitch angle. The evolution of the index n is a combined effect of charge exchange loss and particle drift. At low energies (less than 30 keV), both drift dispersion and charge exchange are important in determining n.

  5. Remote Dynamic Three-Dimensional Scene Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, You; Liu, Qiong; Ji, Rongrong; Gao, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Remote dynamic three-dimensional (3D) scene reconstruction renders the motion structure of a 3D scene remotely by means of both the color video and the corresponding depth maps. It has shown a great potential for telepresence applications like remote monitoring and remote medical imaging. Under this circumstance, video-rate and high resolution are two crucial characteristics for building a good depth map, which however mutually contradict during the depth sensor capturing. Therefore, recent works prefer to only transmit the high-resolution color video to the terminal side, and subsequently the scene depth is reconstructed by estimating the motion vectors from the video, typically using the propagation based methods towards a video-rate depth reconstruction. However, in most of the remote transmission systems, only the compressed color video stream is available. As a result, color video restored from the streams has quality losses, and thus the extracted motion vectors are inaccurate for depth reconstruction. In this paper, we propose a precise and robust scheme for dynamic 3D scene reconstruction by using the compressed color video stream and their inaccurate motion vectors. Our method rectifies the inaccurate motion vectors by analyzing and compensating their quality losses, motion vector absence in spatial prediction, and dislocation in near-boundary region. This rectification ensures the depth maps can be compensated in both video-rate and high resolution at the terminal side towards reducing the system consumption on both the compression and transmission. Our experiments validate that the proposed scheme is robust for depth map and dynamic scene reconstruction on long propagation distance, even with high compression ratio, outperforming the benchmark approaches with at least 3.3950 dB quality gains for remote applications. PMID:23667417

  6. Three-dimensional Spontaneous Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresnyak, Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is best known from observations of the Sun where it causes solar flares. Observations estimate the reconnection rate as a small, but non-negligible fraction of the Alfvén speed, so-called fast reconnection. Until recently, the prevailing pictures of reconnection were either of resistivity or plasma microscopic effects, which was contradictory to the observed rates. Alternative pictures were either of reconnection due to the stochasticity of magnetic field lines in turbulence or the tearing instability of the thin current sheet. In this paper we simulate long-term three-dimensional nonlinear evolution of a thin, planar current sheet subject to a fast oblique tearing instability using direct numerical simulations of resistive-viscous magnetohydrodynamics. The late-time evolution resembles generic turbulence with a ‑5/3 power spectrum and scale-dependent anisotropy, so we conclude that the tearing-driven reconnection becomes turbulent reconnection. The turbulence is local in scale, so microscopic diffusivity should not affect large-scale quantities. This is confirmed by convergence of the reconnection rate toward ∼ 0.015{v}{{A}} with increasing Lundquist number. In this spontaneous reconnection, with mean field and without driving, the dissipation rate per unit area also converges to ∼ 0.006ρ {v}{{A}}3, and the dimensionless constants 0.015 and 0.006 are governed only by self-driven nonlinear dynamics of the sheared magnetic field. Remarkably, this also means that a thin current sheet has a universal fluid resistance depending only on its length to width ratio and to {v}{{A}}/c.

  7. Three-dimensional topological insulator based nanospaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudel, Hari P.; Apalkov, Vadym; Stockman, Mark I.

    2016-04-01

    After the discovery of the spaser (surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation), first proposed by Bergman and Stockman in 2003, it has become possible to deliver optical energy beyond the diffraction limit and generate an intense source of an optical field. The spaser is a nanoplasmonic counterpart of a laser. One of the major advantages of the spaser is its size: A spaser is a truly nanoscopic device whose size can be made smaller than the skin depth of a material to a size as small as the nonlocality radius (˜1 nm). Recently, an electrically pumped graphene based nanospaser has been proposed that operates in the midinfrared region and utilizes a nanopatch of graphene as a source of plasmons and a quantum-well cascade as its gain medium. Here we propose an optically pumped nanospaser based on three-dimensional topological insulator (3D TI) materials, such as Bi2Se3 , that operates at an energy close to the bulk band-gap energy ˜0.3 eV and uses the surface as a source for plasmons and its bulk as a gain medium. Population inversion is obtained in the bulk and the radiative energy of the exciton recombination is transferred to the surface plasmons of the same material to stimulate spasing action. This is truly a nanoscale spaser as it utilizes the same material for dual purposes. We show theoretically the possibility of achieving spasing with a 3D TI. As the spaser operates in the midinfrared spectral region, it can be a useful device for a number of applications, such as nanoscopy, nanolithography, nanospectroscopy, and semiclassical information processing.

  8. [Three-dimensional reconstruction of heart valves].

    PubMed

    Flachskampf, F A; Kühl, H; Franke, A; Frielingsdorf, J; Klues, H; Krebs, W; Hanrath, P

    1995-08-01

    The reconstruction of three-dimensional data sets from two-dimensional echocardiographic images offers several fundamental advantages: 1. more complete data than present in the few standard 2D-view; 2. off-line generation of any desired plane, cut, or perspective after the data set has been acquired; 3. access to quantitative parameters like surface areas (e.g., of valve leaflets or portions of leaflets), volumes, and others, without geometric assumptions. The mitral valve has been the focus of several studies using various techniques of reconstruction of transthoracic or transesophageal images. These studies have shown the mitral annulus to be a non-planar, "saddle-shaped" structure, with an average distance of highest to lowest points of 14 mm in normals. This recognition of mitral annular non-planarity has led to a more stringent echocardiographic definition of mitral valve prolapse. Further studies have shown systolic shrinkage of mitral annular area by about 30% and systolic apico-basal translation of the annulus by approximately 1 cm in normals. In patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, the annulus is flattened, and both cyclic change in annular area and apico-basal translation are significantly reduced. 3D-studies of the left ventricular outflow tract in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy allow measurement of outflow tract and leaflet surface areas and dynamic spatial visualization of systolic anterior motion of the anterior mitral leaflet. Automated techniques to reconstruct the full grey value data set from a high number of parallel or rotational transesophageal planes allow impressive visualization of normal and diseased mitral and aortic valves or valve prostheses, with special emphasis on generating "surgical" views and perspectives, which cannot be obtained by conventional tomographic imaging.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. The three-dimensional matrix -- An evolution in project management

    SciTech Connect

    Glidewell, D.

    1996-09-01

    In the Functional Department Dimension, functional departments such as project management, design, and construction would be maintained to maximize consistency among project teams, evenly allocate training opportunities, and facilitate the crossfeeding of lessons learned and innovative ideas. Functional departments were also determined to be the surest way of complying uniformly with all project control systems required by the Department of Energy (Sandia`s primary external customer). The Technical Discipline dimension was maintained to enhance communication within the technical disciplines, such as electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, civil engineering, etc., and to evenly allocate technical training opportunities, reduce technical obsolescence, and enhance design standards. The third dimension, the Project Dimension, represents the next step in the project management evolution at Sandia, and together with Functional Department and Technical Discipline Dimensions constitutes the three-dimensional matrix. It is this Project Dimension that will be explored thoroughly in this paper, including a discussion of the specific roles and responsibilities of both management and the project team.

  10. Three-dimensional optofluidic device for isolating microbes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keloth, A.; Paterson, L.; Markx, G. H.; Kar, A. K.

    2015-03-01

    Development of efficient methods for isolation and manipulation of microorganisms is essential to study unidentified and yet-to-be cultured microbes originating from a variety of environments. The discovery of novel microbes and their products have the potential to contribute to the development of new medicines and other industrially important bioactive compounds. In this paper we describe the design, fabrication and validation of an optofluidic device capable of redirecting microbes within a flow using optical forces. The device holds promise to enable the high throughput isolation of single microbes for downstream culture and analysis. Optofluidic devices are widely used in clinical research, cell biology and biomedical engineering as they are capable of performing analytical functions such as controlled transportation, compact and rapid processing of nanolitres to millilitres of clinical or biological samples. We have designed and fabricated a three dimensional optofluidic device to control and manipulate microorganisms within a microfluidic channel. The device was fabricated in fused silica by ultrafast laser inscription (ULI) followed by selective chemical etching. The unique three-dimensional capability of ULI is utilized to integrate microfluidic channels and waveguides within the same substrate. The main microfluidic channel in the device constitutes the path of the sample. Optical waveguides are fabricated at right angles to the main microfluidic channel. The potential of the optical scattering force to control and manipulate microorganisms is discussed in this paper. A 980 nm continuous wave (CW) laser source, coupled to the waveguide, is used to exert radiation pressure on the particle and particle migrations at different flow velocities are recorded. As a first demonstration, device functionality is validated using fluorescent microbeads and initial trials with microalgae are presented.

  11. Three-dimensional carbon nanotube based photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flicker, Jack

    2011-12-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells with a three dimensional (3D) morphology are an exciting new research thrust with promise to create cheaper, more efficient solar cells. This work introduces a new type of 3D PV device based on carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays. These arrays are paired with the thin film heterojunction, CdTe/CdS, to form a complete 3D carbon nanotube PV device (3DCNTPV). Marriage of a complicated 3D structure with production methods traditionally used for planar CdTe solar cell is challenging. This work examines the problems associated with processing these types of cells and systematically alters production methods of the semiconductor layers and electrodes to increase the short circuit current (Isc), eliminate parasitic shunts, and increase the open circuit voltage (Voc). The main benefit of 3D solar cell is the ability to utilize multiple photon interactions with the solar cell surface. The three dimensionality allows photons to interact multiple times with the photoactive material, which increases the absorption and the overall power output over what is possible with a two dimensional (2D) morphology. To quantify the increased power output arising from these multiple photon interactions, a new absorption efficiency term, eta3D, is introduced. The theoretical basis behind this new term and how it relates to the absorption efficiency of a planar cell, eta 2D, is derived. A unique model for the average number of multiple photon impingements, Gamma, is proposed based on three categories of 3D morphology: an infinite trench, an enclosed box, and an array of towers. The derivation of eta3D and Gamma for these 3D PV devices gives a complete picture of the enhanced power output over 2D cells based on CNT array height, pitch, radius, and shape. This theory is validated by monte carlo simulations and experiment. This new type of 3D PV devices has been shown to work experimentally. The first 3DCNTPV cells created posses Isc values of 0.085 to 17.872mA/cm2 and Voc values

  12. Numerical investigations in three-dimensional internal flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, William C.

    1991-01-01

    The present study is a preliminary investigation into the behavior of the flow within a 28 degree total geometric turning angle hypothetical Mach 10 inlet as calculated with the full three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. Comparison between the two-dimensional and three-dimensional solutions have been made. The overall compression is not significantly different between the two-dimensional and center plane three dimensional solutions. Approximately one-half to two-thirds of the inlet flow at the exit of the inlet behave nominally two-dimensionally. On the other hand, flow field non-uniformities in the three-dimensional solution indicate the potential significance of the sidewall boundary layer flows ingested into the inlet. The tailoring of the geometry at the inlet shoulder and on the cowl obtained in the two-dimensional parametric design study have also proved to be effective at controlling the boundary layer behavior in the three-dimensional code. The three-dimensional inlet solution remained started indicating that the two-dimensional design had a sufficient margin to allow for three-dimensional flow field effects. Although confidence is being gained in the use of SCRAM3D (three-dimensional full Navier-Stokes code) as applied to similar flow fields, the actual effects of the three-dimensional flow fields associated with sidewalls and wind tunnel installations can require verification with ground-based experiments.

  13. Three-dimensional electrical impedance tomography: a topology optimization approach.

    PubMed

    Mello, Luís Augusto Motta; de Lima, Cícero Ribeiro; Amato, Marcelo Britto Passos; Lima, Raul Gonzalez; Silva, Emílio Carlos Nelli

    2008-02-01

    Electrical impedance tomography is a technique to estimate the impedance distribution within a domain, based on measurements on its boundary. In other words, given the mathematical model of the domain, its geometry and boundary conditions, a nonlinear inverse problem of estimating the electric impedance distribution can be solved. Several impedance estimation algorithms have been proposed to solve this problem. In this paper, we present a three-dimensional algorithm, based on the topology optimization method, as an alternative. A sequence of linear programming problems, allowing for constraints, is solved utilizing this method. In each iteration, the finite element method provides the electric potential field within the model of the domain. An electrode model is also proposed (thus, increasing the accuracy of the finite element results). The algorithm is tested using numerically simulated data and also experimental data, and absolute resistivity values are obtained. These results, corresponding to phantoms with two different conductive materials, exhibit relatively well-defined boundaries between them, and show that this is a practical and potentially useful technique to be applied to monitor lung aeration, including the possibility of imaging a pneumothorax.

  14. Three-dimensional ballistocardiography and respiratory motion in sustained microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. K.; Verhaeghe, S.; Padeken, D.; Hamacher, H.; Paiva, M.; West, J. B. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We measured the three-dimensional ballistocardiogram (BCG) in a free-floating subject in sustained microgravity during spaceflight to test the usefulness of such measurements for future non-invasive monitoring of cardiac function, and to examine the effects of respiratory movement on the BCG in three axes. METHODS: Acceleration was measured using a three-axis accelerometer fastened to the lumbar region of the subject while simultaneous recordings of ECG, and respiratory motion via impedance plethysmography were also made. Data were recorded during a 146-s period of inactivity on the part of the subject during which time there was no contact with the spacecraft. RESULTS: Total body motion due to respiratory activity was consistent with that calculated from the known action of the diaphragm and conservation of momentum. The accelerations due to cardiac activity, ensemble averaged over the R-R interval, were greatest along the head-to-foot axis. Maximum amplitude of the HIJK complex of the BCG generated by ventricular ejection was greatest in the head to foot axis (approximately 70 x 10(-3) m x s(-2)), but there were also substantial accelerations along the dorsoventral axis of up to 43 10(-3) m x s(-2), that are not measured interrestrial two-dimensional studies. The amplitude of the BCG was strongly affected by lung volume, with accelerations being reduced 50 to 70% between end-inspiration and end-expiration. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest a greatly reduced transmission of the cardiac motion to the body at end-expiration (FRC) than at higher lung volumes. The BCG might be further developed as a non-invasive means of monitoring parameters such as stroke volume in microgravity.

  15. Approximate Method of Calculating Heating Rates at General Three-Dimensional Stagnation Points During Atmospheric Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, H. H., II

    1982-01-01

    An approximate method for calculating heating rates at general three dimensional stagnation points is presented. The application of the method for making stagnation point heating calculations during atmospheric entry is described. Comparisons with results from boundary layer calculations indicate that the method should provide an accurate method for engineering type design and analysis applications.

  16. Real-time application of advanced three-dimensional graphic techniques for research aircraft simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Steven B.

    1990-01-01

    Visual aids are valuable assets to engineers for design, demonstration, and evaluation. Discussed here are a variety of advanced three-dimensional graphic techniques used to enhance the displays of test aircraft dynamics. The new software's capabilities are examined and possible future uses are considered.

  17. Quantifying nerve architecture in murine and human airways using three-dimensional computational mapping.

    PubMed

    Scott, Gregory D; Fryer, Allison D; Jacoby, David B

    2013-01-01

    The quantitative histological analysis of airway innervation using tissue sections is challenging because of the sparse and patchy distribution of nerves. Here we demonstrate a method using a computational approach to measure airway nerve architecture that will allow for more complete nerve quantification and the measurement of structural peripheral neuroplasticity in lung development and disease. We demonstrate how our computer analysis outperforms manual scoring in quantifying three-dimensional nerve branchpoints and lengths. In murine lungs, we detected airway epithelial nerves that have not been previously identified because of their patchy distribution, and we quantified their three-dimensional morphology using our computer mapping approach. Furthermore, we show the utility of this approach in bronchoscopic forceps biopsies of human airways, as well as the esophagus, colon, and skin.

  18. Three-Dimensional Gear Crack Propagation Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.

    1999-01-01

    Gears used in current helicopters and turboprops are designed for light weight, high margins of safety, and high reliability. However, unexpected gear failures may occur even with adequate tooth design. To design an extremely safe system, the designer must ask and address the question, "What happens when a failure occurs?" With gear-tooth bending fatigue, tooth or rim fractures may occur. A crack that propagates through a rim will be catastrophic, leading to disengagement of the rotor or propeller, loss of an aircraft, and possible fatalities. This failure mode should be avoided. A crack that propagates through a tooth may or may not be catastrophic, depending on the design and operating conditions. Also, early warning of this failure mode may be possible because of advances in modern diagnostic systems. One concept proposed to address bending fatigue fracture from a safety aspect is a splittooth gear design. The prime objective of this design would be to control crack propagation in a desired direction such that at least half of the tooth would remain operational should a bending failure occur. A study at the NASA Lewis Research Center analytically validated the crack-propagation failsafe characteristics of a split-tooth gear. It used a specially developed three-dimensional crack analysis program that was based on boundary element modeling and principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics. Crack shapes as well as the crack-propagation life were predicted on the basis of the calculated stress intensity factors, mixed-mode crack-propagation trajectory theories, and fatigue crack-growth theories. The preceding figures show the effect of the location of initial cracks on crack propagation. Initial cracks in the fillet of the teeth produced stress intensity factors of greater magnitude (and thus, greater crack growth rates) than those in the root or groove areas of the teeth. Crack growth was simulated in a case study to evaluate crack-propagation paths. Tooth

  19. Advanced Three-Dimensional Display System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Jason

    2005-01-01

    A desktop-scale, computer-controlled display system, initially developed for NASA and now known as the VolumeViewer(TradeMark), generates three-dimensional (3D) images of 3D objects in a display volume. This system differs fundamentally from stereoscopic and holographic display systems: The images generated by this system are truly 3D in that they can be viewed from almost any angle, without the aid of special eyeglasses. It is possible to walk around the system while gazing at its display volume to see a displayed object from a changing perspective, and multiple observers standing at different positions around the display can view the object simultaneously from their individual perspectives, as though the displayed object were a real 3D object. At the time of writing this article, only partial information on the design and principle of operation of the system was available. It is known that the system includes a high-speed, silicon-backplane, ferroelectric-liquid-crystal spatial light modulator (SLM), multiple high-power lasers for projecting images in multiple colors, a rotating helix that serves as a moving screen for displaying voxels [volume cells or volume elements, in analogy to pixels (picture cells or picture elements) in two-dimensional (2D) images], and a host computer. The rotating helix and its motor drive are the only moving parts. Under control by the host computer, a stream of 2D image patterns is generated on the SLM and projected through optics onto the surface of the rotating helix. The system utilizes a parallel pixel/voxel-addressing scheme: All the pixels of the 2D pattern on the SLM are addressed simultaneously by laser beams. This parallel addressing scheme overcomes the difficulty of achieving both high resolution and a high frame rate in a raster scanning or serial addressing scheme. It has been reported that the structure of the system is simple and easy to build, that the optical design and alignment are not difficult, and that the

  20. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view to the southeast, from between the cloud layers and over the north center of the region. The tall white clouds in the lower cloud deck are probably much like large terrestrial thunderclouds. They may be regions where atmospheric water powers vertical convection over large horizontal distances.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity at 727 nm divided by that at 756 nm. This model is overly simplistic, but is based on

  1. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view to the northeast, from between the cloud layers and above the streaks in the lower cloud leading towards the hotspot. The upper haze layer has some features that match the lower cloud, such as the bright streak in the foreground of the frame. These are probably thick clouds that span several tens of vertical kilometers.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity at 727 nm divided by that at 756 nm. This model is overly

  2. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view to the west, from between the cloud layers and over the patchy white clouds to the east of the hotspot. This is probably an area where moist convection is occurring over large horizontal distances, similar to the atmosphere over the equatorial ocean on Earth. The clouds are high and thick, and are observed to change rapidly over short time scales.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity at 727 nm divided by that at 756

  3. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view from the southwest looking northeast, from an altitude just above the high haze layer. The streaks in the lower cloud leading towards the hotspot are visible. The upper haze layer is mostly flat, with notable small peaks that can be matched with features in the lower cloud. In reality, these areas may represent a continuous vertical cloud column.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity at 727 nm divided by that at 756

  4. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view to the northeast, from between the cloud layers and above the streaks in the lower cloud leading towards the hotspot. The hotspot is clearly visible as a deep blue feature. The cloud streaks end near the hotspot, consistent with the idea that clouds traveling along these streak lines descend and evaporate as they approach the hotspot. The upper haze layer is slightly bowed upwards above the hotspot.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional

  5. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view from above and to the south of the visualized area, showing the entire model. The entire region is overlain by a thin, transparent haze. In places the haze is high and thick, especially to the east (to the right of) the hotspot.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity at 727 nm divided by that at 756 nm. This model is overly simplistic, but is based on more sophisticated studies of Jupiter's cloud structure. The upper

  6. Three-dimensional inkjet biofabrication based on designed images.

    PubMed

    Arai, Kenichi; Iwanaga, Shintaroh; Toda, Hideki; Genci, Capi; Nishiyama, Yuichi; Nakamura, Makoto

    2011-09-01

    Tissue engineering has been developed with the ultimate aim of manufacturing human organs, but success has been limited to only thin tissues and tissues with no significant structures. In order to construct more complicated tissues, we have developed a three-dimensional (3D) fabrication technology in which 3D structures are directly built up by layer-by-layer printing with living cells and several tissue components. We developed a custom-made inkjet printer specially designed for this purpose. Recently, this printer was improved, and the on-demand printing mode was developed and installed to fabricate further complicated structures. As a result of this version, 3D layer-by-layer printing based on complicated image data has become possible, and several 2D and 3D structures with more complexity than before were successfully fabricated. The effectiveness of the on-demand printing mode in the fabrication of complicated 3D tissue structures was confirmed. As complicated 3D structures are essential for biofunctional tissues, inkjet 3D biofabrication has great potential for engineering complicated bio-functional tissues.

  7. Wicking Enhancement in Three-Dimensional Hierarchical Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiting; Zhao, Junjie; Bagal, Abhijeet; Dandley, Erinn C; Oldham, Christopher J; Fang, Tiegang; Parsons, Gregory N; Chang, Chih-Hao

    2016-08-16

    Wicking, the absorption of liquid into narrow spaces without the assistance of external forces, has drawn much attention due to its potential applications in many engineering fields. Increasing surface roughness using micro/nanostructures can improve capillary action to enhance wicking. However, reducing the structure length scale can also result in significant viscous forces to impede wicking. In this work, we demonstrate enhanced wicking dynamics by using nanostructures with three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical features to increase the surface area while mitigating the obstruction of liquid flow. The proposed structures were engineered using a combination of interference lithography and hydrothermal synthesis of ZnO nanowires, where structures at two length scales were independently designed to control wicking behavior. The fabricated hierarchical 3D structures were tested for water and ethanol wicking properties, demonstrating improved wicking dynamics with intermediate nanowire lengths. The experimental data agree with the derived fluid model based on the balance of capillary and vicious forces. The hierarchical wicking structures can be potentially used in applications in water harvesting surfaces, microfluidics, and integrated heat exchangers.

  8. The effect of geometry on three-dimensional tissue growth

    PubMed Central

    Rumpler, Monika; Woesz, Alexander; Dunlop, John W.C; van Dongen, Joost T; Fratzl, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Tissue formation is determined by uncountable biochemical signals between cells; in addition, physical parameters have been shown to exhibit significant effects on the level of the single cell. Beyond the cell, however, there is still no quantitative understanding of how geometry affects tissue growth, which is of much significance for bone healing and tissue engineering. In this paper, it is shown that the local growth rate of tissue formed by osteoblasts is strongly influenced by the geometrical features of channels in an artificial three-dimensional matrix. Curvature-driven effects and mechanical forces within the tissue may explain the growth patterns as demonstrated by numerical simulation and confocal laser scanning microscopy. This implies that cells within the tissue surface are able to sense and react to radii of curvature much larger than the size of the cells themselves. This has important implications towards the understanding of bone remodelling and defect healing as well as towards scaffold design in bone tissue engineering. PMID:18348957

  9. Three-Dimensional Dynamic Loading of Sand

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    Borg 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 2303 L.C. Chhabildas 5e. TASK NUMBER DW 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 97 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAMES AND ADDRESSES...Marquette University, Dept of Mechanical Engineering 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 1515 W. Wisconsin Blvd Milwaukee, WI 53233 Air...selecting the right constitutive relations; in this wor k several were investigated, however onl y one is presented here: a tabular EOS ( sesame table) with

  10. Three-dimensional predictions of reactive turbulent recirculating flow of a cylindrical MHD type combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. J.

    1990-01-01

    A computational procedure is employed to predict the axisymmetric reactive turbulent recirculating flow-field within a cylindrical MHD combustor. The procedure used in the analysis is an extended version of the three-dimensional Combustor Performance Program developed at the Garrett Turbine Engine Company. The separated flow created by four liquid fuel nozzles and 148 oxidizer holes passing through an injector plate is examined. Numerical results for flow, heat/mass transfer and combustion are presented to describe these complex three-dimensional interactions. The detailed analysis achieved by the numerical model is useful for evaluating combustor performance and in the interpretation of laboratory test data.

  11. Three-Dimensional Shallow Water Adaptive Hydraulics (ADH-SW3): Turbulence Closure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    ER D C/ CH L CR -1 5- 1 Three-Dimensional Shallow Water Adaptive Hydraulics (ADH-SW3): Turbulence Closure Co as ta l a nd H yd ra ul ic...military engineering, geospatial sciences, water resources, and environmental sciences for the Army, the Department of Defense, civilian agencies, and our...library at http://acwc.sdp.sirsi.net/client/default. ERDC/CHL CR-15-1 June 2015 Three-Dimensional Shallow Water Adaptive Hydraulics (ADH-SW3

  12. Santiago Ramón y Cajal and three-dimensional cinema.

    PubMed

    Santarén, Juan Fernández

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I present and comment on two unpublished letters written by the Spanish engineer Carlos Mendizábal Brunet to Santiago Ramón y Cajal informing him of the development of a new device for three-dimensional cinema and asking for his approval. Fortunately, the answers given by Cajal to these two letters have also been preserved, and they reveal his interest in three-dimensional cinema; in the letters, he reported that he himself had designed a prototype capable of creating on a screen a feeling of 3-D relief, a subject about which he was always passionate.

  13. Direct Human Cartilage Repair Using Three-Dimensional Bioprinting Technology

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiaofeng; Breitenkamp, Kurt; Finn, M.G.; Lotz, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Current cartilage tissue engineering strategies cannot as yet fabricate new tissue that is indistinguishable from native cartilage with respect to zonal organization, extracellular matrix composition, and mechanical properties. Integration of implants with surrounding native tissues is crucial for long-term stability and enhanced functionality. In this study, we developed a bioprinting system with simultaneous photopolymerization capable for three-dimensional (3D) cartilage tissue engineering. Poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) with human chondrocytes were printed to repair defects in osteochondral plugs (3D biopaper) in layer-by-layer assembly. Compressive modulus of printed PEGDMA was 395.73±80.40 kPa, which was close to the range of the properties of native human articular cartilage. Printed human chondrocytes maintained the initially deposited positions due to simultaneous photopolymerization of surrounded biomaterial scaffold, which is ideal in precise cell distribution for anatomic cartilage engineering. Viability of printed human chondrocytes increased 26% in simultaneous polymerization than polymerized after printing. Printed cartilage implant attached firmly with surrounding tissue and greater proteoglycan deposition was observed at the interface of implant and native cartilage in Safranin-O staining. This is consistent with the enhanced interface failure strength during the culture assessed by push-out testing. Printed cartilage in 3D biopaper had elevated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content comparing to that without biopaper when normalized to DNA. These observations were consistent with gene expression results. This study indicates the importance of direct cartilage repair and promising anatomic cartilage engineering using 3D bioprinting technology. PMID:22394017

  14. Pathogen Propagation in Cultured Three-Dimensional Tissue Mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for propagating a pathogen in a three-dimensional tissue mass cultured at microgravity conditions in a culture vessel containing culture media and a culture matrix is provided. The three-dimensional tissue mass is inoculated with a pathogen and pathogen replication in the cells of the tissue mass achieved.

  15. Three-dimensional imaging of the myocardium with isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinger, T. F.

    1975-01-01

    Three methods of imaging the three-dimensional distribution of isotopes in the myocardium are discussed. Three-dimensional imaging was examined using multiple Anger-camera views. Longitudinal tomographic images with compensation for blurring were studied. Transverse-section reconstruction using coincidence detection of annihilation gammas from positron emitting isotopes was investigated.

  16. Pathogen propagation in cultured three-dimensional tissue mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for propagating a pathogen in a three-dimensional tissue mass cultured at microgravity conditions in a culture vessel containing culture media and a culture matrix is provided. The three-dimensional tissue mass is inoculated with a pathogen and pathogen replication in the cells of the tissue mass achieved.

  17. Computer-Generated, Three-Dimensional Character Animation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Baerle, Susan Lynn

    This master's thesis begins by discussing the differences between 3-D computer animation of solid three-dimensional, or monolithic, objects, and the animation of characters, i.e., collections of movable parts with soft pliable surfaces. Principles from two-dimensional character animation that can be transferred to three-dimensional character…

  18. Scanning holographic microscopy of three-dimensional fluorescent specimens

    PubMed Central

    Indebetouw, Guy; Zhong, Wenwei

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the three-dimensional reconstructions of fluorescent biological specimens using scanning holographic microscopy. Three-dimensional reconstructions with transverse resolution below about 1 μm of transmission and fluorescence emission images are presented and analyzed. The limitations of the method are discussed. PMID:16783434

  19. Using three-dimensional spacetime diagrams in special relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dray, Tevian

    2013-08-01

    We provide three examples of the use of geometric reasoning with three-dimensional spacetime diagrams, rather than algebraic manipulations using three-dimensional Lorentz transformations, to analyze problems in special relativity. The examples are the "rising manhole" paradox, the "moving spotlight" problem, and Einstein's light-clock derivation of time dilation.

  20. A GPU-based calculation using the three-dimensional FDTD method for electromagnetic field analysis.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Soichi

    2010-01-01

    Numerical simulations with the numerical human model using the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method have recently been performed frequently in a number of fields in biomedical engineering. However, the FDTD calculation runs too slowly. We focus, therefore, on general purpose programming on the graphics processing unit (GPGPU). The three-dimensional FDTD method was implemented on the GPU using Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). In this study, we used the NVIDIA Tesla C1060 as a GPGPU board. The performance of the GPU is evaluated in comparison with the performance of a conventional CPU and a vector supercomputer. The results indicate that three-dimensional FDTD calculations using a GPU can significantly reduce run time in comparison with that using a conventional CPU, even a native GPU implementation of the three-dimensional FDTD method, while the GPU/CPU speed ratio varies with the calculation domain and thread block size.

  1. On the attenuation of sound by three-dimensionally segmented acoustic liners in a rectangular duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, W.

    1979-01-01

    Axial segmentation of acoustically absorbing liners in rectangular, circular or annual duct configurations is a very useful concept for obtaining higher noise attenuation with respect to the bandwidth of absorption as well as the maximum attenuation. As a consequence, advanced liner concepts are proposed which induce a modal energy transfer in both cross-sectional directions to further reduce the noise radiated from turbofan engines. However, these advanced liner concepts require three-dimensional geometries which are difficult to treat theoretically. A very simple three-dimensional problem is investigated analytically. The results show a strong dependence on the positioning of the liner for some incident source modes while the effect of three-dimensional segmentation appears to be negligible over the frequency range considered.

  2. Radiative transfer for a three-dimensional raining cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haferman, J. L.; Krajewski, W. F.; Smith, T. F.; Sanchez, A.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite-sensor-based microwave brightness temperatures for a three-dimensional raining cloud over a reflecting surface are computed by using a radiative transfer model based on the discrete-ordinates solution procedure. The three-dimensional model applied to a plane layer is validated by comparison with results from a one-dimensional model that is available in the literature. Results examining the effects of cloud height, rainfall rate, surface reflectance, rainfall footprint area, and satellite viewing position on one- and three-dimensional brightness temperature calculations are reported. The numerical experiments indicate that, under certain conditions, three-dimensional effects are significant in the analysis of satellite-sensor-based rainfall retrieval algorithms. The results point to the need to consider carefully three-dimensional effects as well as surface reflectance effects when interpreting satellite-measured radiation data.

  3. Characterizing College Science Assessments: The Three-Dimensional Learning Assessment Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Sonia M.; Matz, Rebecca L.; Posey, Lynmarie A.; Carmel, Justin H.; Caballero, Marcos D.; Fata-Hartley, Cori L.; Ebert-May, Diane; Jardeleza, Sarah E.; Cooper, Melanie M.

    2016-01-01

    Many calls to improve science education in college and university settings have focused on improving instructor pedagogy. Meanwhile, science education at the K-12 level is undergoing significant changes as a result of the emphasis on scientific and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas. This framework of “three-dimensional learning” is based on the literature about how people learn science and how we can help students put their knowledge to use. Recently, similar changes are underway in higher education by incorporating three-dimensional learning into college science courses. As these transformations move forward, it will become important to assess three-dimensional learning both to align assessments with the learning environment, and to assess the extent of the transformations. In this paper we introduce the Three-Dimensional Learning Assessment Protocol (3D-LAP), which is designed to characterize and support the development of assessment tasks in biology, chemistry, and physics that align with transformation efforts. We describe the development process used by our interdisciplinary team, discuss the validity and reliability of the protocol, and provide evidence that the protocol can distinguish between assessments that have the potential to elicit evidence of three-dimensional learning and those that do not. PMID:27606671

  4. Characterizing College Science Assessments: The Three-Dimensional Learning Assessment Protocol.

    PubMed

    Laverty, James T; Underwood, Sonia M; Matz, Rebecca L; Posey, Lynmarie A; Carmel, Justin H; Caballero, Marcos D; Fata-Hartley, Cori L; Ebert-May, Diane; Jardeleza, Sarah E; Cooper, Melanie M

    2016-01-01

    Many calls to improve science education in college and university settings have focused on improving instructor pedagogy. Meanwhile, science education at the K-12 level is undergoing significant changes as a result of the emphasis on scientific and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas. This framework of "three-dimensional learning" is based on the literature about how people learn science and how we can help students put their knowledge to use. Recently, similar changes are underway in higher education by incorporating three-dimensional learning into college science courses. As these transformations move forward, it will become important to assess three-dimensional learning both to align assessments with the learning environment, and to assess the extent of the transformations. In this paper we introduce the Three-Dimensional Learning Assessment Protocol (3D-LAP), which is designed to characterize and support the development of assessment tasks in biology, chemistry, and physics that align with transformation efforts. We describe the development process used by our interdisciplinary team, discuss the validity and reliability of the protocol, and provide evidence that the protocol can distinguish between assessments that have the potential to elicit evidence of three-dimensional learning and those that do not.

  5. Nonlinear characteristics analysis of vortex-induced vibration for a three-dimensional flexible tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhipeng; Jiang, Naibin; Zang, Fenggang; Zhang, Yixiong; Huang, Xuan; Wu, Wanjun

    2016-05-01

    Vortex-induced vibration of a three-dimensional flexible tube is one of the key problems to be considered in many engineering situations. This paper aims to investigate the nonlinear dynamic behaviors and response characteristics of a three-dimensional tube under turbulent flow. The three-dimensional unsteady, viscous, incompressible Navier-Stokes equation and LES turbulence model are solved with the finite volume approach, and the dynamic equilibrium equations are discretized by the finite element theory. A three-dimensional fully coupled numerical model for vortex-induced vibration of flexible tube is proposed. The model realized the fluid-structure interaction with solving the fluid flow and the structure vibration simultaneously. Based on this model, Response regimes, trajectory, phase difference, fluid force coefficient and vortex shedding frequency are obtained. The nonlinear phenomena of lock-in, phase-switch are captured successfully. Meanwhile, the limit cycle, bifurcation of lift coefficient and displacement are analyzed using phase portrait and Poincare section. The results reveal that, a quasi-upper branch occurs in the present fluid-flexible tube coupling system with high mass-damping and low mass ratio. There is no bifurcation of lift coefficient and lateral displacement occurred in the three-dimensional flexible tube submitted to uniform turbulent flow.

  6. Virtual three-dimensional blackboard: three-dimensional finger tracking with a single camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Andrew; Hassan-Shafique, Khurram; Shah, Mubarak; da Vitoria Lobo, N.

    2004-01-01

    We present a method for three-dimensional (3D) tracking of a human finger from a monocular sequence of images. To recover the third dimension from the two-dimensional images, we use the fact that the motion of the human arm is highly constrained owing to the dependencies between elbow and forearm and the physical constraints on joint angles. We use these anthropometric constraints to derive a 3D trajectory of a gesticulating arm. The system is fully automated and does not require human intervention. The system presented can be used as a visualization tool, as a user-input interface, or as part of some gesture-analysis system in which 3D information is important.

  7. Three dimensional spatial separation of cells in response to microtopography.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Alexandre; Tremblay, Dominique; Hadjiantoniou, Sebastian; Bukoreshtliev, Nickolay V; Rogowski, Jacob L; Godin, Michel; Pelling, Andrew E

    2013-11-01

    Cellular organization, migration and proliferation in three-dimensions play a critical role in numerous physiological and pathological processes. Nano- and micro-fabrication approaches have demonstrated that nano- and micro-scale topographies of the cellular microenvironment directly impact organization, migration and proliferation. In this study, we investigated these dynamics of two cell types (NIH3T3 fibroblast and MDCK epithelial cells) in response to microscale grooves whose dimensions exceed typical cell sizes. Our results demonstrate that fibroblasts display a clear preference for proliferating along groove ridges whereas epithelial cells preferentially proliferate in the grooves. Importantly, these cell-type dependent behaviours were also maintained when in co-culture. We show that it is possible to spatially separate a mixed suspension of two cell types by allowing them to migrate and proliferate on a substrate with engineered microtopographies. This ability may have important implications for investigating the mechanisms that facilitate cellular topographic sensing. Moreover, our results may provide insights towards the controlled development of complex three-dimensional multi-cellular constructs.

  8. Three Dimensional CFD Analysis of the GTX Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, C. J., Jr.; Bond, R. B.; Edwards, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    The annular combustor geometry of a combined-cycle engine has been analyzed with three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics. Both subsonic combustion and supersonic combustion flowfields have been simulated. The subsonic combustion analysis was executed in conjunction with a direct-connect test rig. Two cold-flow and one hot-flow results are presented. The simulations compare favorably with the test data for the two cold flow calculations; the hot-flow data was not yet available. The hot-flow simulation indicates that the conventional ejector-ramjet cycle would not provide adequate mixing at the conditions tested. The supersonic combustion ramjet flowfield was simulated with frozen chemistry model. A five-parameter test matrix was specified, according to statistical design-of-experiments theory. Twenty-seven separate simulations were used to assemble surrogate models for combustor mixing efficiency and total pressure recovery. ScramJet injector design parameters (injector angle, location, and fuel split) as well as mission variables (total fuel massflow and freestream Mach number) were included in the analysis. A promising injector design has been identified that provides good mixing characteristics with low total pressure losses. The surrogate models can be used to develop performance maps of different injector designs. Several complex three-way variable interactions appear within the dataset that are not adequately resolved with the current statistical analysis.

  9. Three Dimensional CFD Analysis of the GTX Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, C. J., Jr.; Bond, R. B.; Edwards, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    The annular combustor geometry of a combined-cycle engine has been analyzed with three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics. Both subsonic combustion and supersonic combustion flowfields have been simulated. The subsonic combustion analysis was executed in conjunction with a direct-connect test rig. Two cold-flow and one hot-flow results are presented. The simulations compare favorably with the test data for the two cold flow calculations; the hot-flow data was not yet available. The hot-flow simulation Indicates that the conventional ejector-ramjet cycle would not provide adequate mixing at the conditions tested. The supersonic combustion ramjet flowfield was simulated with frozen chemistry model. A five-parameter test matrix was specified, according to statistical design-of-experiments theory. Twenty-seven separate simulations were used to assemble surrogate models for combustor mixing efficiency and total pressure recovery. Scramjet injector design parameters (injector angle, location, and fuel split) as well as mission variables (total fuel mass flow and freestream Mach number) were included in the analysis. A promising injector design has been identified that provides good mixing characteristics with low total pressure losses. The surrogate models can be used to develop performance maps of different injector designs. Several complex three-way variable interactions appear within the dataset that are not adequately resolved with the current statistical analysis.

  10. Turbulent Flows Over Three-Dimensional Shark Skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boomsma, Aaron; Wen, Li; Lauder, George; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2012-11-01

    Shark skin is covered with thousands of small tooth-like structures called denticles. It has long been hypothesized that denticles act as riblets do in a turbulent boundary layer and help reduce friction drag and enhance shark swimming efficiency. We employ the Curvilinear Immersed Boundary (CURVIB) method (Ge and Sotiropoulos, J. Comp. Physics, 2008) to carry out high-resolution large eddy simulations of turbulent flow past a series of anatomically realistic shark denticles mounted on a flat plate. The denticle shapes used in our simulations were obtained by scanning Mako Short Fin shark skin with micro-CT. The computed results are analyzed to elucidate the three-dimensional structure of the flow past the denticles and identify possible drag reduction mechanics. Drag measurements obtained in a laboratory flume for various denticle spacings and arrangements are also reported and analyzed in tandem with the LES results to explore similarities between shark skin and engineered riblets. Computational Resources were provided by the University of Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  11. Large Scale Three-dimensional Magnetohydrodynamics Simulations of Protostellar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Kai; Staff, J. E.; Niebergal, B. P.; Pudritz, R. E.; Ouyed, R.

    2007-05-01

    High resolution spectra of protostellar jets obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) during the past few years, especially those near the jet base, have made it possible for a direct comparison with jet simulation results. Using Zeus-MP code, we extend our three-dimensional time-dependent calculations of such jets launched from the surface of Keplerian accretion disks to physical scales that are probed by the HST observations. We produce velocity channel maps and other diagnostics of our jet simulations that can be directly compared with the observations. In particular, the observations of jet rotation and velocity structure on these larger scales (50 AU) can be used to constrain the physics of the disk wind at its source, including information about the magnetic field configuration on the disk as well as the mass loading of the jet by the underlying accretion disk. Our approach will ultimately allow the observations to put strong constraints on the nature of the central engine. This work is supported by a grant from NSERC. K.C. acknowledges support from a CITA National Fellowship.

  12. A Three-Dimensional Receiver Operator Characteristic Surface Diagnostic Metric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Donald L.

    2011-01-01

    Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves are commonly applied as metrics for quantifying the performance of binary fault detection systems. An ROC curve provides a visual representation of a detection system s True Positive Rate versus False Positive Rate sensitivity as the detection threshold is varied. The area under the curve provides a measure of fault detection performance independent of the applied detection threshold. While the standard ROC curve is well suited for quantifying binary fault detection performance, it is not suitable for quantifying the classification performance of multi-fault classification problems. Furthermore, it does not provide a measure of diagnostic latency. To address these shortcomings, a novel three-dimensional receiver operator characteristic (3D ROC) surface metric has been developed. This is done by generating and applying two separate curves: the standard ROC curve reflecting fault detection performance, and a second curve reflecting fault classification performance. A third dimension, diagnostic latency, is added giving rise to 3D ROC surfaces. Applying numerical integration techniques, the volumes under and between the surfaces are calculated to produce metrics of the diagnostic system s detection and classification performance. This paper will describe the 3D ROC surface metric in detail, and present an example of its application for quantifying the performance of aircraft engine gas path diagnostic methods. Metric limitations and potential enhancements are also discussed

  13. Three-dimensional aerodynamic shape optimization using discrete sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgreen, Gregory W.

    1995-01-01

    An aerodynamic shape optimization procedure based on discrete sensitivity analysis is extended to treat three-dimensional geometries. The function of sensitivity analysis is to directly couple computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with numerical optimization techniques, which facilitates the construction of efficient direct-design methods. The development of a practical three-dimensional design procedures entails many challenges, such as: (1) the demand for significant efficiency improvements over current design methods; (2) a general and flexible three-dimensional surface representation; and (3) the efficient solution of very large systems of linear algebraic equations. It is demonstrated that each of these challenges is overcome by: (1) employing fully implicit (Newton) methods for the CFD analyses; (2) adopting a Bezier-Bernstein polynomial parameterization of two- and three-dimensional surfaces; and (3) using preconditioned conjugate gradient-like linear system solvers. Whereas each of these extensions independently yields an improvement in computational efficiency, the combined effect of implementing all the extensions simultaneously results in a significant factor of 50 decrease in computational time and a factor of eight reduction in memory over the most efficient design strategies in current use. The new aerodynamic shape optimization procedure is demonstrated in the design of both two- and three-dimensional inviscid aerodynamic problems including a two-dimensional supersonic internal/external nozzle, two-dimensional transonic airfoils (resulting in supercritical shapes), three-dimensional transport wings, and three-dimensional supersonic delta wings. Each design application results in realistic and useful optimized shapes.

  14. Lung stress, strain, and energy load: engineering concepts to understand the mechanism of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI).

    PubMed

    Nieman, Gary F; Satalin, Joshua; Andrews, Penny; Habashi, Nader M; Gatto, Louis A

    2016-12-01

    It was recently shown that acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) mortality has not been reduced in over 15 years and remains ~40 %, even with protective low tidal volume (LVt) ventilation. Thus, there is a critical need to develop novel ventilation strategies that will protect the lung and reduce ARDS mortality. Protti et al. have begun to analyze the impact of mechanical ventilation on lung tissue using engineering methods in normal pigs ventilated for 54 h. They used these methods to assess the impact of a mechanical breath on dynamic and static global lung strain and energy load. Strain is the change in lung volume in response to an applied stress (i.e., Tidal Volume-Vt). This study has yielded a number of exciting new concepts including the following: (1) Individual mechanical breath parameters (e.g., Vt or Plateau Pressure) are not directly correlated with VILI but rather any combination of parameters that subject the lung to excessive dynamic strain and energy/power load will cause VILI; (2) all strain is not equal; dynamic strain resulting in a dynamic energy load (i.e., kinetic energy) is more damaging to lung tissue than static strain and energy load (i.e., potential energy); and (3) a critical consideration is not just the size of the Vt but the size of the lung that is being ventilated by this Vt. This key concept merits attention since our current protective ventilation strategies are fixated on the priority of keeping the Vt low. If the lung is fully inflated, a large Vt is not necessarily injurious. In conclusion, using engineering concepts to analyze the impact of the mechanical breath on the lung is a novel new approach to investigate VILI mechanisms and to help design the optimally protective breath. Data generated using these methods have challenged some of the current dogma surrounding the mechanisms of VILI and of the components in the mechanical breath necessary for lung protection.

  15. Assessment of body volume using three-dimensional photonic scanning.

    PubMed

    Wells, J C; Douros, I; Fuller, N J; Elia, M; Dekker, L

    2000-05-01

    Measurement of body volume (BV) can be used to estimate body composition using two- or multicomponent models. The traditional approach, underwater weighing (UWW), is awkward and unsuitable for many subjects. A newer alternative, whole body air displacement plethysmography (ADP), is less demanding but still unsuitable for young children, who may not remain still during the measurement. We have, therefore, considered whether a novel approach, three-dimensional photonic scanning, is a viable alternative. Duplicate measurements of body volume were obtained in 22 adults (11 of each sex; mean [SD] BMI, 21.8 [2.5] kg/m2) by UWW, ADP, and a Hamamatsu Bodyline Scanner (HBS) (Hamamatsu, Japan). Subjects wore a tight-fitting swimming costume for all three measurements, which were performed within one day of each other. Scans lasted 10 seconds, with the subject standing in a predefined position. The body surface skin was reconstructed using a B-spline-fitting model. In UWW, lung volume (LV) was measured simultaneously with underwater weight. In ADP and HBS, LV was predicted from weight and height. Results were compared using correlation and Bland and Altman analysis. Correlation analysis indicated that the scanner successfully ranked subjects in terms of BV. However, Bland and Altman analysis demonstrated that, relative to both UWW and ADP, HBS measured BV without bias but with limits of agreement between individuals of > 2 liters, equivalent to approximately 20% fat. Scan precision was 0.57 liter, or 4.1% fat. Although HBS cannot yet measure BV with sufficient accuracy to predict fatness, much of the error is probably due to difficulties in standardizing LV during the scan. Simultaneous measurement of LV with volume by HBS is expected to improve limits of agreement substantially. Occlusion is also an important source of error. The method offers many advantages over alternative techniques, because the measurement is brief, noninvasive, and suitable for repeat measurements.

  16. Transport of molecular fluids through three-dimensional porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Pierre; Pazdniakou, Aliaksei

    2014-05-01

    The main purpose of this study is to extend the analysis which has been made for the double layer theory (summarized by [1]) to situations where the distance between the solid walls is of the order of several molecular diameters. This is of a large interest from a scientific viewpoint and for various engineering applications. The intermolecular forces and their influence on fluid structure and dynamics can be taken into account by using the mesoscopic scale models based on the Boltzmann equation [2]. The numerical methods derived from these models are less demanding in computational resources than conventional molecular dynamics methods and therefore long time evolution of large samples can be considered. Three types of fluid particles are considered, namely the anions, the cations and the solvent. They possess a finite diameter which should be at least a few lattice units. The collision frequency between particles is increased by the pair correlation function for hard spheres. The lattice Boltzmann model is built in three dimensions with 19 velocities; it involves two relaxation times. The particle distribution functions are discretized over a basis of Hermite polynomial tensors. Electric forces are included and a Poisson equation is simultaneously solved by a successive over-relaxation method. The numerical algorithm is detailed; it is devised in order to be able to address any three-dimensional porous media. It involves the determination of the densities of each particle species, of the overall density and of the equilibrium distribution function. Then, the electric forces are determined. Collision operators are applied as well as the boundary conditions. Finally, the propagation step is performed and the algorithm starts a new loop. The influence of parameters can be illustrated by systematic calculations in a plane Poiseuille configuration. The drastic influence of the ratio between the channel width and the particle sizes on the local densities and the

  17. Static stability of a three-dimensional space truss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaker, John F.

    1995-05-01

    and two-dimensional failure models of the system and its important components. From knowledge gained through preliminary analyses a foundation is developed for three-dimensional analyses of the FASTMast structure. The three-dimensional finite element (FE) analysis presented here involves a FASTMast system one-tenth the size of the actual flight unit. Although this study does not yield failure analysis results that apply directly to the flight article, it does establish a method by which the full-scale mast can be evaluated.

  18. Numerical Modeling of Three-Dimensional Confined Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greywall, M. S.

    1981-01-01

    A three dimensional confined flow model is presented. The flow field is computed by calculating velocity and enthalpy along a set of streamlines. The finite difference equations are obtained by applying conservation principles to streamtubes constructed around the chosen streamlines. With appropriate substitutions for the body force terms, the approach computes three dimensional magnetohydrodynamic channel flows. A listing of a computer code, based on this approach is presented in FORTRAN IV language. The code computes three dimensional compressible viscous flow through a rectangular duct, with the duct cross section specified along the axis.

  19. Three-dimensional particle imaging by wavefront sensing.

    PubMed

    Towers, Catherine E; Towers, David P; Campbell, Heather I; Zhang, Sijiong; Greenaway, Alan H

    2006-05-01

    We present two methods for three-dimensional particle metrology from a single two-dimensional view. The techniques are based on wavefront sensing where the three-dimensional location of a particle is encoded into a single image plane. The first technique is based on multiplanar imaging, and the second produces three-dimensional location information via anamorphic distortion of the recorded images. Preliminary results show that an uncertainty of 8 microm in depth can be obtained for low-particle density over a thin plane, and an uncertainty of 30 microm for higher particle density over a 10 mm deep volume.

  20. More About The Farley Three-Dimensional Braider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    Farley three-dimensional braider, undergoing development, is machine for automatic fabrication of three-dimensional braided structures. Incorporates yarns into structure at arbitrary braid angles to produce complicated shape. Braiding surface includes movable braiding segments containing pivot points, along which yarn carriers travel during braiding process. Yarn carrier travels along sequence of pivot points as braiding segments move. Combined motions position yarns for braiding onto preform. Intended for use in making fiber preforms for fiber/matrix composite parts, such as multiblade propellers. Machine also described in "Farley Three-Dimensional Braiding Machine" (LAR-13911).

  1. Three-dimensional reconstructions of solid surfaces using conventional microscopes.

    PubMed

    Ficker, Tomáš; Martišek, Dalibor

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional digital replicas of solid surfaces are subject of interest of different branches of science and technology. The present paper in its introductory parts brings an overview of the various microscopic reconstructive techniques based on optical sectioning. The main attention is devoted to conventional reconstruction methods and especially to that one employing the Fourier transform. The three-dimensional replicas of this special reconstructive frequency method are compared graphically and numerically with the three-dimensional replicas of the confocal method. Based on the comparative study it has been concluded that the quality of the conventional replicas of surfaces possessing textures of intermediate height irregularities is acceptable and almost comparable with the quality of confocal replicas. This study is relevant both for identifying a convenient technique that provides good qualities of three-dimensional replicas and for selecting the hardware whose price is affordable even for small research groups studying rougher surface textures.

  2. Direct Linear Transformation Method for Three-Dimensional Cinematography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Robert

    1978-01-01

    The ability of Direct Linear Transformation Method for three-dimensional cinematography to locate points in space was shown to meet the accuracy requirements associated with research on human movement. (JD)

  3. Three-dimensional Simulation of Backward Raman Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    A.A. Balakin; G.M. Fraiman; N.J. Fisch

    2005-11-12

    Three-dimensional (3-D) simulations for the Backward Raman Amplification (BRA) are presented. The images illustrate the effects of pump depletion, pulse diffraction, non-homogeneous plasma density, and plasma ionization.

  4. Improving Students' Sense of Three-Dimensional Shapes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeson, Neville J.

    1994-01-01

    Describes activities to be used with fifth and sixth graders to improve students' spatial sense with respect to three-dimensional shapes. Includes the use of cubes, triangular prisms, tetrahedrons, and square pyramids. (MKR)

  5. Analysis and validation of carbohydrate three-dimensional structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lütteke, Thomas

    2009-02-01

    The article summarizes the information that is gained from and the errors that are found in carbohydrate structures in the Protein Data Bank. Validation tools that can locate these errors are described. Knowledge of the three-dimensional structures of the carbohydrate molecules is indispensable for a full understanding of the molecular processes in which carbohydrates are involved, such as protein glycosylation or protein–carbohydrate interactions. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is a valuable resource for three-dimensional structural information on glycoproteins and protein–carbohydrate complexes. Unfortunately, many carbohydrate moieties in the PDB contain inconsistencies or errors. This article gives an overview of the information that can be obtained from individual PDB entries and from statistical analyses of sets of three-dimensional structures, of typical problems that arise during the analysis of carbohydrate three-dimensional structures and of the validation tools that are currently available to scientists to evaluate the quality of these structures.

  6. A fusion algorithm for building three-dimensional maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vokhmintsev, A.; Makovetskii, A.; Kober, V.; Sochenkov, I.; Kuznetsov, V.

    2015-09-01

    Recently various algorithms for building of three-dimensional maps of indoor environments have been proposed. In this work we use a Kinect camera that captures RGB images along with depth information for building three-dimensional dense maps of indoor environments. Commonly mapping systems consist of three components; that is, first, spatial alignment of consecutive data frames; second, detection of loop-closures, and finally, globally consistent alignment of the data sequence. It is known that three-dimensional point clouds are well suited for frame-to-frame alignment and for three-dimensional dense reconstruction without the use of valuable visual RGB information. A new fusion algorithm combining visual features and depth information for loop-closure detection followed by pose optimization to build global consistent maps is proposed. The performance of the proposed system in real indoor environments is presented and discussed.

  7. Construction of Three Dimensional Solutions for the Maxwell Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yefet, A.; Turkel, E.

    1998-01-01

    We consider numerical solutions for the three dimensional time dependent Maxwell equations. We construct a fourth order accurate compact implicit scheme and compare it to the Yee scheme for free space in a box.

  8. Three-dimensional pattern transfer and nanolithography: modified soft molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. S.; Park, Joonhyung; Lee, Hong H.

    2002-08-01

    One-step transfer of molded three-dimensional polymer structures into underlying substrate is reported. The one-step transfer is made possible by a molding technique presented here in the form of modified soft molding. Formation of a desired three-dimensional structure in a polymer film by this method, followed by one-step reactive ion etching, is utilized for the transfer. The technique is also shown to be effective in transferring sub-100-nm features.

  9. Uniform Deterministic Discrete Method for three dimensional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ben-Wen; Tao, Wen-Quan; Nie, Yu-Hong

    1997-06-01

    For radiative direct exchange areas in three dimensional system, the Uniform Deterministic Discrete Method (UDDM) was adopted. The spherical surface dividing method for sending area element and the regular icosahedron for sending volume element can meet with the direct exchange area computation of any kind of zone pairs. The numerical examples of direct exchange area in three dimensional system with nonhomogeneous attenuation coefficients indicated that the UDDM can give very high numerical accuracy.

  10. Three-dimensional study of the multi-cavity FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnagopal, S.; Kumar, V.

    1995-12-31

    The Multi-Cavity Free-Electron Laser has been proposed earlier, as a new configuration to obtain short, intense pulses of radiation, the key idea being to pre-bunch the electron beam in a number of very short cavities. Those studies were one-dimensional. Here we use three-dimensional simulations to study the viability of this concept when three-dimensional effects are included, particularly with regard to the transverse modes of the optical beam.

  11. Nonlinear wave interaction problems in the three-dimensional case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curró, C.; Manganaro, N.; Pavlov, M. V.

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional nonlinear wave interactions have been analytically described. The procedure under interest can be applied to three-dimensional quasilinear systems of first order, whose hydrodynamic reductions are homogeneous semi-Hamiltonian hydrodynamic type systems (i.e. possess diagonal form and infinitely many conservation laws). The interaction of N waves was studied. In particular we prove that they behave like simple waves and they distort after the collision region. The amount of the distortion can be analytically computed.

  12. Effect of three-dimensionality on compressible mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Papamoschou, D. )

    1992-02-01

    Existing experimental data and hypotheses on the growth rates of compressible and incompressible turbulent shear layers are used to estimate the effect of three-dimensionality in the turbulent mixing enhancement in compressible shear flows that is critically important to the efficiency of scramjet powerplants. The general trend is found to be a decrease in growth rate with increasing three-dimensionality, excepting only the restricted regime, where the growth-rate increase is modest. 9 refs.

  13. Initialization and Simulation of Three-Dimensional Aircraft Wake Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, Robert L.; Zheng, Z. C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper studies the effects of axial velocity profiles on vortex decay, in order to properly initialize and simulate three-dimensional wake vortex flow. Analytical relationships are obtained based on a single vortex model and computational simulations are performed for a rather practical vortex wake, which show that the single vortex analytical relations can still be applicable at certain streamwise sections of three-dimensional wake vortices.

  14. Emission of particulate matter from a desktop three-dimensional (3D) printer.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jinghai; LeBouf, Ryan F; Duling, Matthew G; Nurkiewicz, Timothy; Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Virji, M Abbas; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B

    2016-01-01

    Desktop three-dimensional (3D) printers are becoming commonplace in business offices, public libraries, university labs and classrooms, and even private homes; however, these settings are generally not designed for exposure control. Prior experience with a variety of office equipment devices such as laser printers that emit ultrafine particles (UFP) suggests the need to characterize 3D printer emissions to enable reliable risk assessment. The aim of this study was to examine factors that influence particulate emissions from 3D printers and characterize their physical properties to inform risk assessment. Emissions were evaluated in a 0.5-m(3) chamber and in a small room (32.7 m(3)) using real-time instrumentation to measure particle number, size distribution, mass, and surface area. Factors evaluated included filament composition and color, as well as the manufacturer-provided printer emissions control technologies while printing an object. Filament type significantly influenced emissions, with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) emitting larger particles than polylactic acid (PLA), which may have been the result of agglomeration. Geometric mean particle sizes and total particle (TP) number and mass emissions differed significantly among colors of a given filament type. Use of a cover on the printer reduced TP emissions by a factor of 2. Lung deposition calculations indicated a threefold higher PLA particle deposition in alveoli compared to ABS. Desktop 3D printers emit high levels of UFP, which are released into indoor environments where adequate ventilation may not be present to control emissions. Emissions in nonindustrial settings need to be reduced through the use of a hierarchy of controls, beginning with device design, followed by engineering controls (ventilation) and administrative controls such as choice of filament composition and color.

  15. Emission of particulate matter from a desktop three-dimensional (3D) printer

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jinghai; LeBouf, Ryan F.; Duling, Matthew G.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy; Chen, Bean T.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Virji, M. Abbas; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Desktop three-dimensional (3D) printers are becoming commonplace in business offices, public libraries, university labs and classrooms, and even private homes; however, these settings are generally not designed for exposure control. Prior experience with a variety of office equipment devices such as laser printers that emit ultrafine particles (UFP) suggests the need to characterize 3D printer emissions to enable reliable risk assessment. The aim of this study was to examine factors that influence particulate emissions from 3D printers and characterize their physical properties to inform risk assessment. Emissions were evaluated in a 0.5-m3 chamber and in a small room (32.7 m3) using real-time instrumentation to measure particle number, size distribution, mass, and surface area. Factors evaluated included filament composition and color, as well as the manufacturer-provided printer emissions control technologies while printing an object. Filament type significantly influenced emissions, with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) emitting larger particles than polylactic acid (PLA), which may have been the result of agglomeration. Geometric mean particle sizes and total particle (TP) number and mass emissions differed significantly among colors of a given filament type. Use of a cover on the printer reduced TP emissions by a factor of 2. Lung deposition calculations indicated a threefold higher PLA particle deposition in alveoli compared to ABS. Desktop 3D printers emit high levels of UFP, which are released into indoor environments where adequate ventilation may not be present to control emissions. Emissions in nonindustrial settings need to be reduced through the use of a hierarchy of controls, beginning with device design, followed by engineering controls (ventilation) and administrative controls such as choice of filament composition and color. PMID:27196745

  16. A three-dimensional microvascular gas exchange unit for carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Du T; Leho, Y T; Esser-Kahn, Aaron P

    2012-04-07

    For the capture of CO(2) from mixed gas streams, materials for increased gas exchange are necessary. Efficient gas exchange systems already exist in the form of vascularized lung-tissue. Herein we report a fabrication technique for the synthesis of three-dimensional microvascular gas exchange units capable of removing CO(2) from flowing gas created using the recently reported Vaporization of a Sacrificial Component (VaSC) technique. We demonstrate the spatiotemporal pattern of CO(2) reactivity in the microvascular gas exchange unit using colorimetric, pH sensitive dyes. Control over three-dimensional placement of channels is shown to increase capture efficiencies. A computational finite element model validates and explains the experimental observations.

  17. Ordered three-dimensional interconnected nanoarchitectures in anodic porous alumina

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Jaime; Martín-González, Marisol; Fernández, Jose Francisco; Caballero-Calero, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional nanostructures combine properties of nanoscale materials with the advantages of being macro-sized pieces when the time comes to manipulate, measure their properties, or make a device. However, the amount of compounds with the ability to self-organize in ordered three-dimensional nanostructures is limited. Therefore, template-based fabrication strategies become the key approach towards three-dimensional nanostructures. Here we report the simple fabrication of a template based on anodic aluminum oxide, having a well-defined, ordered, tunable, homogeneous 3D nanotubular network in the sub 100 nm range. The three-dimensional templates are then employed to achieve three-dimensional, ordered nanowire-networks in Bi2Te3 and polystyrene. Lastly, we demonstrate the photonic crystal behavior of both the template and the polystyrene three-dimensional nanostructure. Our approach may establish the foundations for future high-throughput, cheap, photonic materials and devices made of simple commodity plastics, metals, and semiconductors. PMID:25342247

  18. Integrated Aeromechanics with Three-Dimensional Solid-Multibody Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, Anubhav; Johnson, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    A full three-dimensional finite element-multibody structural dynamic solver is coupled to a three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver for the prediction of integrated aeromechanical stresses and strains on a rotor blade in forward flight. The objective is to lay the foundations of all major pieces of an integrated three-dimensional rotor dynamic analysis - from model construction to aeromechanical solution to stress/strain calculation. The primary focus is on the aeromechanical solution. Two types of three-dimensional CFD/CSD interfaces are constructed for this purpose with an emphasis on resolving errors from geometry mis-match so that initial-stage approximate structural geometries can also be effectively analyzed. A three-dimensional structural model is constructed as an approximation to a UH-60A-like fully articulated rotor. The aerodynamic model is identical to the UH-60A rotor. For preliminary validation measurements from a UH-60A high speed flight is used where CFD coupling is essential to capture the advancing side tip transonic effects. The key conclusion is that an integrated aeromechanical analysis is indeed possible with three-dimensional structural dynamics but requires a careful description of its geometry and discretization of its parts.

  19. Clinic application of tissue engineered bronchus for lung cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruijun; Chen, Xiaoke; Wu, Jingxiang; Pan, Yinggen; Lu, Shun; Weder, Walter; Luo, Qingquan

    2017-01-01

    Background Delayed revascularization process and substitute infection remain to be key challenges in tissue engineered (TE) airway reconstruction. We propose an “in-vivo bioreactor” design, defined as an implanted TE substitutes perfused with an intra-scaffold medium flow created by an extracorporeal portable pump system for in situ organ regeneration. The perfusate keeps pre-seeded cells alive before revascularization. Meanwhile the antibiotic inside the perfusate controls topical infection. Methods A stage IIIA squamous lung cancer patient received a 5-cm TE airway substitute, bridging left basal segment bronchus to carina, with the in-vivo bioreactor design to avoid left pneumonectomy. Continuous intra-scaffold Ringer’s-gentamicin perfusion lasted for 1 month, together with orthotopic peripheral total nucleated cells (TNCs) injection twice a week. Results The patient recovered uneventfully. Bronchoscopy follow-up confirmed complete revascularization and reepithelialization four months postoperatively. Perfusate waste test demonstrated various revascularization growth factors secreted by TNCs. The patient received two cycles of chemotherapy and 30 Gy radiotherapy thereafter without complications related to the TE substitute. Conclusions In-vivo bioreactor design combines the traditionally separated in vitro 3D cell-scaffold culture system and the in vivo regenerative processes associated with TE substitutes, while treating the recipients as bioreactors for their own TE prostheses. This design can be applied clinically. We also proved for the first time that TE airway substitute is able to tolerate chemo-radiotherapy and suitable to be used in cancer treatment. PMID:28203403

  20. Development Report on the Idaho National Laboratory Sitewide Three-Dimensional Aquifer Model

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas R. Wood; Catherine M. Helm-Clark; Hai Huang; Swen Magnuson; Travis McLing; Brennon Orr; Michael J. Rohe; Mitchell A. Plummer; Robert Podgorney; Erik Whitmore; Michael S. Roddy

    2007-09-01

    A sub-regional scale, three-dimensional flow model of the Snake River Plain Aquifer was developed to support remediation decisions for Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10 08 at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. This model has been calibrated primarily to water levels and secondarily to groundwater velocities interpreted from stable isotope disequilibrium studies and the movement of anthropogenic contaminants in the aquifer from facilities at the INL. The three-dimensional flow model described in this report is one step in the process of constructing a fully three-dimensional groundwater flow and contaminant transport model as prescribed in the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Operable Unit 10-08 Sitewide Groundwater Model Work Plan. An updated three-dimensional hydrogeologic conceptual model is presented along with the geologic basis for the conceptual model. Sediment-dominated three-dimensional volumes were used to represent the geology and constrain groundwater flow as part of the conceptual model. Hydrological, geochemical, and geological data were summarized and evaluated to infer aquifer behavior. A primary observation from development and evaluation of the conceptual model was that relative to flow on a regional scale, the aquifer can be treated with steady-state conditions. Boundary conditions developed for the three-dimensional flow model are presented along with inverse simulations that estimate parameterization of hydraulic conductivity. Inverse simulations were performed using the pilot-point method to estimate permeability distributions. Thermal modeling at the regional aquifer scale and at the sub-regional scale using the inverted permeabilities is presented to corroborate the results of the flow model. The results from the flow model show good agreement with simulated and observed water levels almost always within 1 meter. Simulated velocities show generally good agreement with some discrepancies in an interpreted low

  1. Three-Dimensional Transgenic Cell Models to Quantify Space Genotoxic Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, S.; Wu, H.; Pingerelli, P.; Glickman, B.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we describe a three-dimensional, multicellular tissue-equivalent model, produced in NASA-designed, rotating wall bioreactors using mammalian cells engineered for genomic containment of mUltiple copies of defined target genes for genotoxic assessment. The Rat 2(lambda) fibroblasts (Stratagene, Inc.) were genetically engineered to contain high-density target genes for mutagenesis. Stable three-dimensional, multicellular spheroids were formed when human mammary epithelial cells and Rat 2(lambda) fibroblasts were cocultured on Cytodex 3 Beads in a rotating wall bioreactor. The utility of this spheroidal model for genotoxic assessment was indicated by a linear dose response curve and by results of gene sequence analysis of mutant clones from 400micron diameter spheroids following low-dose, high-energy, neon radiation exposure

  2. Electron tomography, three-dimensional Fourier analysis and colour prediction of a three-dimensional amorphous biophotonic nanostructure

    PubMed Central

    Shawkey, Matthew D.; Saranathan, Vinodkumar; Pálsdóttir, Hildur; Crum, John; Ellisman, Mark H.; Auer, Manfred; Prum, Richard O.

    2009-01-01

    Organismal colour can be created by selective absorption of light by pigments or light scattering by photonic nanostructures. Photonic nanostructures may vary in refractive index over one, two or three dimensions and may be periodic over large spatial scales or amorphous with short-range order. Theoretical optical analysis of three-dimensional amorphous nanostructures has been challenging because these structures are difficult to describe accurately from conventional two-dimensional electron microscopy alone. Intermediate voltage electron microscopy (IVEM) with tomographic reconstruction adds three-dimensional data by using a high-power electron beam to penetrate and image sections of material sufficiently thick to contain a significant portion of the structure. Here, we use IVEM tomography to characterize a non-iridescent, three-dimensional biophotonic nanostructure: the spongy medullary layer from eastern bluebird Sialia sialis feather barbs. Tomography and three-dimensional Fourier analysis reveal that it is an amorphous, interconnected bicontinuous matrix that is appropriately ordered at local spatial scales in all three dimensions to coherently scatter light. The predicted reflectance spectra from the three-dimensional Fourier analysis are more precise than those predicted by previous two-dimensional Fourier analysis of transmission electron microscopy sections. These results highlight the usefulness, and obstacles, of tomography in the description and analysis of three-dimensional photonic structures. PMID:19158016

  3. Psychophysical Evaluation of Three-Dimensional Auditory Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wightman, Frederic L. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the process made during the first year of a three-year Cooperative Research Agreement (CRA NCC2-542). The CRA proposed a program of applied of psychophysical research designed to determine the requirements and limitations of three-dimensional (3-D) auditory display systems. These displays present synthesized stimuli to a pilot or virtual workstation operator that evoke auditory images at predetermined positions in space. The images can be either stationary or moving. In previous years. we completed a number of studies that provided data on listeners' abilities to localize stationary sound sources with 3-D displays. The current focus is on the use of 3-D displays in 'natural' listening conditions, which include listeners' head movements, moving sources, multiple sources and 'echoic' sources. The results of our research on two of these topics, the role of head movements and the role of echoes and reflections, were reported in the most recent Semi-Annual Pro-ress Report (Appendix A). In the period since the last Progress Report we have been studying a third topic, the localizability of moving sources. The results of this research are described. The fidelity of a virtual auditory display is critically dependent on precise measurement of the listener''s Head-Related Transfer Functions (HRTFs), which are used to produce the virtual auditory images. We continue to explore methods for improving our HRTF measurement technique. During this reporting period we compared HRTFs measured using our standard open-canal probe tube technique and HRTFs measured with the closed-canal insert microphones from the Crystal River Engineering Snapshot system.

  4. Femtosecond laser three-dimensional micro- and nanofabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Koji; Cheng, Ya

    2014-12-01

    The rapid development of the femtosecond laser has revolutionized materials processing due to its unique characteristics of ultrashort pulse width and extremely high peak intensity. The short pulse width suppresses the formation of a heat-affected zone, which is vital for ultrahigh precision fabrication, whereas the high peak intensity allows nonlinear interactions such as multiphoton absorption and tunneling ionization to be induced in transparent materials, which provides versatility in terms of the materials that can be processed. More interestingly, irradiation with tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses inside transparent materials makes three-dimensional (3D) micro- and nanofabrication available due to efficient confinement of the nonlinear interactions within the focal volume. Additive manufacturing (stereolithography) based on multiphoton absorption (two-photon polymerization) enables the fabrication of 3D polymer micro- and nanostructures for photonic devices, micro- and nanomachines, and microfluidic devices, and has applications for biomedical and tissue engineering. Subtractive manufacturing based on internal modification and fabrication can realize the direct fabrication of 3D microfluidics, micromechanics, microelectronics, and photonic microcomponents in glass. These microcomponents can be easily integrated in a single glass microchip by a simple procedure using a femtosecond laser to realize more functional microdevices, such as optofluidics and integrated photonic microdevices. The highly localized multiphoton absorption of a tightly focused femtosecond laser in glass can also induce strong absorption only at the interface of two closely stacked glass substrates. Consequently, glass bonding can be performed based on fusion welding with femtosecond laser irradiation, which provides the potential for applications in electronics, optics, microelectromechanical systems, medical devices, microfluidic devices, and small satellites. This review paper

  5. Three-dimensional surface anthropometry: Applications to the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Peter R. M.; Rioux, Marc

    1997-09-01

    Anthropometry is the study of the measurement of the human body. By tradition this has been carried out taking the measurements from body surface landmarks, such as circumferences and breadths, using simple instruments like tape measures and calipers. Three-dimensional (3D) surface anthropometry enables us to extend the study to 3D geometry and morphology of mainly external human body tissues. It includes the acquisition, indexing, transmission, archiving, retrieval, interrogation and analysis of body size, shape, and surface together with their variability throughout growth and development to adulthood. While 3D surface anthropometry surveying is relatively new, anthropometric surveying using traditional tools, such as calipers and tape measures, is not. Recorded studies of the human form date back to ancient times. Since at least the 17th century 1 investigators have made attempts to measure the human body for physical properties such as weight, size, and centre of mass. Martin documented 'standard' body measurement methods in a handbook in 1928. 2 This paper reviews the past and current literature devoted to the applications of 3D anthropometry because true 3D scanning of the complete human body is fast becoming a reality. We attempt to take readers through different forms of technology which deal with simple forms of projected light to the more complex advanced forms of laser and video technology giving low and/or high resolution 3D data. Information is also given about image capture of size and shape of the whole as well as most component parts of the human body. In particular, the review describes with explanations a multitude of applications, for example, medical, product design, human engineering, anthropometry and ergonomics etc.

  6. Femtosecond laser three-dimensional micro- and nanofabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Sugioka, Koji; Cheng, Ya

    2014-12-15

    The rapid development of the femtosecond laser has revolutionized materials processing due to its unique characteristics of ultrashort pulse width and extremely high peak intensity. The short pulse width suppresses the formation of a heat-affected zone, which is vital for ultrahigh precision fabrication, whereas the high peak intensity allows nonlinear interactions such as multiphoton absorption and tunneling ionization to be induced in transparent materials, which provides versatility in terms of the materials that can be processed. More interestingly, irradiation with tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses inside transparent materials makes three-dimensional (3D) micro- and nanofabrication available due to efficient confinement of the nonlinear interactions within the focal volume. Additive manufacturing (stereolithography) based on multiphoton absorption (two-photon polymerization) enables the fabrication of 3D polymer micro- and nanostructures for photonic devices, micro- and nanomachines, and microfluidic devices, and has applications for biomedical and tissue engineering. Subtractive manufacturing based on internal modification and fabrication can realize the direct fabrication of 3D microfluidics, micromechanics, microelectronics, and photonic microcomponents in glass. These microcomponents can be easily integrated in a single glass microchip by a simple procedure using a femtosecond laser to realize more functional microdevices, such as optofluidics and integrated photonic microdevices. The highly localized multiphoton absorption of a tightly focused femtosecond laser in glass can also induce strong absorption only at the interface of two closely stacked glass substrates. Consequently, glass bonding can be performed based on fusion welding with femtosecond laser irradiation, which provides the potential for applications in electronics, optics, microelectromechanical systems, medical devices, microfluidic devices, and small satellites. This review paper

  7. Three-Dimensional Multilayered Fibrous Constructs for Wound Healing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Tiago C.; Castleberry, Steven; Rego, Ana M. B.

    2015-01-01

    Electrospun materials are promising scaffolds due to their light-weight, high surface-area and low-cost fabrication, however, such scaffolds are commonly obtained as ultrathin two-dimensional non-woven meshes, lacking on topographical specificity and surface side-dependent properties. Herein, it is reported the production of three-dimensional fibrous materials with an asymmetrical inner structure and engineered surfaces. The manufactured constructs evidence fibrous-based microsized conical protrusions [length: (9.5 ± 2.9)×102 μm; width: (3.8 ± 0.8)×102 μm] at their top side, with a median peak density of 73 peaks.cm−2, while their bottom side resembles to a non-woven mesh commonly observed in the fabrication of two-dimensional electrospun materials. Regarding their thickness (3.7 ± 0.1 mm) and asymmetric fibrous inner architecture, such materials avoid external liquid absorption while promoting internal liquid uptake. Nevertheless, such constructs also observed the high porosity (89.9%) and surface area (1.44 m2.g−1) characteristic of traditional electrospun mats. Spray layer-by-layer assembly is used to effectively coat the structurally complex materials, allowing to complementary tailor features such water vapor transmission, swelling ratio and bioactive agent release. Tested as wound dressings, the novel constructs are capable of withstanding (11.0 ± 0.3)×104 kg.m−2 even after 14 days of hydration, while actively promote wound healing (90 ± 0.5 % of wound closure within 48 hours) although avoiding cell adhesion on the dressings for a painless removal. PMID:26584183

  8. Three-dimensional optical metamaterial with a negative refractive index.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Jason; Zhang, Shuang; Zentgraf, Thomas; Ulin-Avila, Erick; Genov, Dentcho A; Bartal, Guy; Zhang, Xiang

    2008-09-18

    Metamaterials are artificially engineered structures that have properties, such as a negative refractive index, not attainable with naturally occurring materials. Negative-index metamaterials (NIMs) were first demonstrated for microwave frequencies, but it has been challenging to design NIMs for optical frequencies and they have so far been limited to optically thin samples because of significant fabrication challenges and strong energy dissipation in metals. Such thin structures are analogous to a monolayer of atoms, making it difficult to assign bulk properties such as the index of refraction. Negative refraction of surface plasmons was recently demonstrated but was confined to a two-dimensional waveguide. Three-dimensional (3D) optical metamaterials have come into focus recently, including the realization of negative refraction by using layered semiconductor metamaterials and a 3D magnetic metamaterial in the infrared frequencies; however, neither of these had a negative index of refraction. Here we report a 3D optical metamaterial having negative refractive index with a very high figure of merit of 3.5 (that is, low loss). This metamaterial is made of cascaded 'fishnet' structures, with a negative index existing over a broad spectral range. Moreover, it can readily be probed from free space, making it functional for optical devices. We construct a prism made of this optical NIM to demonstrate negative refractive index at optical frequencies, resulting unambiguously from the negative phase evolution of the wave propagating inside the metamaterial. Bulk optical metamaterials open up prospects for studies of 3D optical effects and applications associated with NIMs and zero-index materials such as reversed Doppler effect, superlenses, optical tunnelling devices, compact resonators and highly directional sources.

  9. A three-dimensional turbulent heat transfer analysis for advanced tubular rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacynski, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    Heat transfer was analyzed in the throat region of a plug and spool rocket engine for both smooth and corrugated walls. A three-dimensional, Navier-Stokes code was used for the analysis. The turbulence model in the code was modified to handle turbulence suppression in the crevice region of the corrugated wall. The overall heat transfer at the throat for the corrugated wall was 34 percent higher than it was for the smooth wall for comparable rocket flow conditions.

  10. Improved three-dimensional Fourier domain optical coherence tomography by index matching in alveolar structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, Sven; Knels, Lilla; Koch, Edmund

    2009-11-01

    Three-dimensional Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (3-D FDOCT) is used to demonstrate that perfusion fixation with a mixture of glutaraldehyde and paraformaldehyde does not alter the geometry of subpleural lung parenchyma in isolated and perfused rabbit lungs. This is confirmed by simultaneous imaging of lung parenchyma with intravital microscopy. To eliminate the diffraction index interfaces between alveolar pockets and walls, we fill the fixed lungs with ethanol by perfusing with gradually increasing concentrations. This bottom-up filling process leaves no remaining air bubbles in the alveolar structures, thus drastically improving the resolution and penetration depth of 3-D FDOCT imaging. We observe an approximately 18% increase in alveolar area after ethanol filling, likely due in large part to elimination of the air/tissue interfaces. 3-D OCT datasets acquired from ethanol-filled lungs allow segmentation of the ethanol-filled structures, which were formerly air-filled, and 3-D reconstruction of larger areas of subpleural alveolar structures. Our innovative process of filling the lungs with ethanol postperfusion fixation thus enables more accurate quantification of alveolar geometries, a critical component of modeling lung function.

  11. Highly moldable electrospun clay-like fluffy nanofibers for three-dimensional scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Lee, Slgirim; Cho, Sunghwan; Kim, Minhee; Jin, Gyuhyung; Jeong, Unyong; Jang, Jae-Hyung

    2014-01-22

    The development of three-dimensional polymeric systems capable of mimicking the extracellular matrix is critical for advancing tissue engineering. To achieve these objectives, three-dimensional fibrous scaffolds with "clay"-like properties were successfully developed by coaxially electrospinning polystyrene (PS) and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and selective leaching. As PS is known to be nonbiodegradable and vulnerable to mechanical stress, PS layers present at the outer surface were removed using a "selective leaching" process. The fibrous PCL scaffolds that remained after the leaching step exhibited highly advantageous characteristics as a tissue engineering scaffold, including moldability (i.e., clay-like), flexibility, and three-dimensional structure (i.e., cotton-like). More so, the "clay-like" PCL fibrous scaffolds could be shaped into any desired form, and the microenvironment within the clay scaffolds was highly favorable for cell expansion both in vitro and in vivo. These "electrospun-clay" scaffolds overcome the current limitations of conventional electrospun, sheet-like scaffolds, which are structurally inflexible. Therefore, this work extends the scope of electrospun fibrous scaffolds toward a variety of tissue engineering applications.

  12. A moving observer in a three-dimensional world

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    For many tasks such as retrieving a previously viewed object, an observer must form a representation of the world at one location and use it at another. A world-based three-dimensional reconstruction of the scene built up from visual information would fulfil this requirement, something computer vision now achieves with great speed and accuracy. However, I argue that it is neither easy nor necessary for the brain to do this. I discuss biologically plausible alternatives, including the possibility of avoiding three-dimensional coordinate frames such as ego-centric and world-based representations. For example, the distance, slant and local shape of surfaces dictate the propensity of visual features to move in the image with respect to one another as the observer's perspective changes (through movement or binocular viewing). Such propensities can be stored without the need for three-dimensional reference frames. The problem of representing a stable scene in the face of continual head and eye movements is an appropriate starting place for understanding the goal of three-dimensional vision, more so, I argue, than the case of a static binocular observer. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Vision in our three-dimensional world’. PMID:27269608

  13. Biodynamic profiling of three-dimensional tissue growth techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Merrill, Dan; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional tissue culture presents a more biologically relevant environment in which to perform drug development than conventional two-dimensional cell culture. However, obtaining high-content information from inside three dimensional tissue has presented an obstacle to rapid adoption of 3D tissue culture for pharmaceutical applications. Biodynamic imaging is a high-content three-dimensional optical imaging technology based on low-coherence interferometry and digital holography that uses intracellular dynamics as high-content image contrast. In this paper, we use biodynamic imaging to compare pharmaceutical responses to Taxol of three-dimensional multicellular spheroids grown by three different growth techniques: rotating bioreactor, hanging-drop and plate-grown spheroids. The three growth techniques have systematic variations among tissue cohesiveness and intracellular activity and consequently display different pharmacodynamics under identical drug dose conditions. The in vitro tissue cultures are also compared to ex vivo living biopsies. These results demonstrate that three-dimensional tissue cultures are not equivalent, and that drug-response studies must take into account the growth method.

  14. Visualization techniques for improved orientation in three-dimensional echocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Ivo; de Simone, Raffaele; Hastenteufel, Mark; Mottl-Link, Sibylle; Meinzer, Hans-Peter

    2002-05-01

    Repair of a defect heart valve is of great advantage for the patient in comparison to replacement with a prosthesis. The applicability and the success of heart valve repair can be improved by an exact diagnosis of the valve's pathological modification. The best way for imaging heart valve insufficiencies is echocardiography, since it is fast, relatively cheap, can be used intraoperatively and provides information about morphology as well as blood flow. Three-dimensional echocardiography has been proven to be superior to conventional echocardiographic techniques. Although the overall structures are much better displayed by three-dimensional visualization methods, it is sometimes difficult to comprehend the orientation of the scene, since anatomical landmarks like the aortic outflow tract may be hidden by other structures. Also, such anatomical landmarks often are only partly contained in the acquired data set so that they are clearly visible in a few slices only, making them difficult to find in a three-dimensional visualization. The knowledge of the absolute orientation is of essential value for the surgeon to mentally transfer the preoperatively acquired data to the intraoperative situs. Therefore, it is desirable to have additional hints for orientation in the three-dimensional scene. We present methods that enable better and easier orientation and therefore improve the usability of three-dimensional echocardiography.

  15. A case-control study of lung cancer at a foundry and two engine plants.

    PubMed

    Austin, H; Delzell, E; Lally, C; Rotimi, C; Oestenstad, K

    1997-04-01

    A nested case-control study of lung cancer was conducted among workers at an iron foundry and two engine manufacturing plants whose lung cancer mortality rates were slightly higher than expected. The study included 231 lung cancer cases and 408 controls for whom complete work histories were obtained. There was no association between usual plant of employment and lung cancer mortality. The odds ratio for persons employed for 20 or more years in the foundry compared with persons employed in the engine plants was 0.90 (95% confidence interval: 0.55, 1.5). Long-term employment as an engine plant worker was associated with odds ratios slightly, but not statistically significantly, below unity. In the foundry, only usual employment in the material handling departmental group and any employment in the quality control departmental group were statistically significantly directly related to lung cancer risk. However, the number of subjects so employed was small and there was no dose-response relation between length of employment in these departmental groups and lung cancer risk. Cases were less frequently employed than were controls in engine plant machining and assembly jobs and departments. It is concluded that employment in this facility was either unrelated, or only weakly related, to lung cancer risk.

  16. Three-Dimensional (3D) Additive Construction: Printing with Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsoras, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) printing is a new and booming topic in many realms of research and engineering technology. When it comes to space science and aerospace engineering, it can be useful in numerous ways. As humans travel deeper into space and farther from Earth, sending large quantities of needed supplies from Earth for a mission becomes astronomically expensive and less plausible. In order to reach further to new places, In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), a project that pushes for technologies to use materials already present in the destination's environment, is necessary. By using materials already available in space such as regolith from the Moon, Mars, or an asteroid's surface, fewer materials need to be brought into space on a launched vehicle. This allows a vehicle to be filled with more necessary supplies for a deep space mission that may not be found in space, like food and fuel. This project's main objective was to develop a 3D printer that uses regolith to "print" large structures, such as a dome, to be used as a heat shield upon a vehicle's reentry into the atmosphere or even a habitat. 3D printing is a growing technology that uses many different methods to mix, heat, and mold a material into a specific shape. In order to heat the regolith enough to stick together into a solid shape, it must be sintered at each layer of material that is laid. Sintering is a process that heats and compresses a powdered material until it fuses into a solid, which requires a lot of energy input. As an alternative, a polymer can be mixed with the regolith before or as it is sent to the 3D printer head to be placed in the specific shape. The addition of the polymer, which melts and binds at much lower temperatures than sintering temperatures, greatly decreases the required heating temperature and energy input. The main task of the project was to identify a functional material for the printer. The first step was to find a miscible. polymer/solvent solution. This solution

  17. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Delivery in a Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Du, Shisuo; Lockamy, Virginia; Zhou, Lin; Xue, Christine; LeBlanc, Justin; Glenn, Shonna; Shukla, Gaurav; Yu, Yan; Dicker, Adam P.; Leeper, Dennis B.; Lu, You; Lu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To implement clinical stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) using a small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) in a genetically engineered mouse model of lung cancer. Methods and Materials A murine model of multinodular Kras-driven spontaneous lung tumors was used for this study. High-resolution cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging was used to identify and target peripheral tumor nodules, whereas off-target lung nodules in the contralateral lung were used as a nonirradiated control. CBCT imaging helps localize tumors, facilitate high-precision irradiation, and monitor tumor growth. SBRT planning, prescription dose, and dose limits to normal tissue followed the guidelines set by RTOG protocols. Pathologic changes in the irradiated tumors were investigated using immunohistochemistry. Results The image guided radiation delivery using the SARRP system effectively localized and treated lung cancer with precision in a genetically engineered mouse model of lung cancer. Immunohistochemical data confirmed the precise delivery of SBRT to the targeted lung nodules. The 60 Gy delivered in 3 weekly fractions markedly reduced the proliferation index, Ki-67, and increased apoptosis per staining for cleaved caspase-3 in irradiated lung nodules. Conclusions It is feasible to use the SARRP platform to perform dosimetric planning and delivery of SBRT in mice with lung cancer. This allows for preclinical studies that provide a rationale for clinical trials involving SBRT, especially when combined with immunotherapeutics. PMID:27681749

  18. Radiation hardness of three-dimensional polycrystalline diamond detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lagomarsino, Stefano Sciortino, Silvio; Bellini, Marco; Corsi, Chiara; Cindro, Vladimir; Kanxheri, Keida; Servoli, Leonello; Morozzi, Arianna; Passeri, Daniele; Schmidt, Christian J.

    2015-05-11

    The three-dimensional concept in particle detection is based on the fabrication of columnar electrodes perpendicular to the surface of a solid state radiation sensor. It permits to improve the radiation resistance characteristics of a material by lowering the necessary bias voltage and shortening the charge carrier path inside the material. If applied to a long-recognized exceptionally radiation-hard material like diamond, this concept promises to pave the way to the realization of detectors of unprecedented performances. We fabricated conventional and three-dimensional polycrystalline diamond detectors, and tested them before and after neutron damage up to 1.2 ×10{sup 16 }cm{sup −2}, 1 MeV-equivalent neutron fluence. We found that the signal collected by the three-dimensional detectors is up to three times higher than that of the conventional planar ones, at the highest neutron damage ever experimented.

  19. Ray tracing a three dimensional scene using a grid

    DOEpatents

    Wald, Ingo; Ize, Santiago; Parker, Steven G; Knoll, Aaron

    2013-02-26

    Ray tracing a three-dimensional scene using a grid. One example embodiment is a method for ray tracing a three-dimensional scene using a grid. In this example method, the three-dimensional scene is made up of objects that are spatially partitioned into a plurality of cells that make up the grid. The method includes a first act of computing a bounding frustum of a packet of rays, and a second act of traversing the grid slice by slice along a major traversal axis. Each slice traversal includes a first act of determining one or more cells in the slice that are overlapped by the frustum and a second act of testing the rays in the packet for intersection with any objects at least partially bounded by the one or more cells overlapped by the frustum.

  20. Shape memory polymers: three-dimensional isotropic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogun, Olaniyi; Mo, Changki

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive three-dimensional isotropic numerical simulation for a thermo-mechanical constitutive model of shape memory polymers (SMPs). In order to predict the thermo-mechanical behavior of SMPs, a one-dimensional rheological thermo-mechanical constitutive model is adopted, translated into a three-dimensional form and a time discrete form of the three-dimensional model is then presented. Numerical simulation of this model was developed using the UMAT subroutine capabilities of the finite element software ABAQUS. Evolution of the analysis was conducted by making use of the backward difference scheme, which was applied to all quantities within the model, including the material properties. A comparison of the numerical simulation results was carried out with the available experimental data. Numerical simulation results clearly exhibit the thermo-mechanical properties of the material which include shape fixity, shape recovery, and recovery stress. Finally, a prediction for the transverse and shear directions of the material is presented.

  1. Three-dimensional diamagnetic particle deflection in ferrofluid microchannel flows.

    PubMed

    Liang, Litao; Zhu, Junjie; Xuan, Xiangchun

    2011-09-01

    Magnetic field-induced particle manipulation is a promising technique for biomicrofluidics applications. It is simple, cheap, and also free of fluid heating issues that accompany other common electric, acoustic, and optical methods. This work presents a fundamental study of diamagnetic particle motion in ferrofluid flows through a rectangular microchannel with a nearby permanent magnet. Due to their negligible magnetization relative to the ferrofluid, diamagnetic particles experience negative magnetophoresis and are repelled away from the magnet. The result is a three-dimensionally focused particle stream flowing near the bottom outer corner of the microchannel that is the farthest to the center of the magnet and hence has the smallest magnetic field. The effects of the particle's relative position to the magnet, particle size, ferrofluid flow rate, and concentration on this three-dimensional diamagnetic particle deflection are systematically studied. The obtained experimental results agree quantitatively with the predictions of a three-dimensional analytical model.

  2. Antimicrobial-finished textile three-dimensional structures.

    PubMed

    Heide, M; Möhring, U; Hänsel, R; Stoll, M; Wollina, U; Heinig, B

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the possibilities of antimicrobial finishing of three-dimensional spacer fabrics and its applications, and gives information about the different effects. A research project of the Textilforschungsinstitut Thüringen-Vogtland Greiz is presented in which medical shoe insoles, based on specially manufactured three-dimensional spacer fabrics, made of permanently effective antimicrobial yarns were used for interesting and functional textile products. Furthermore, work of the research institute Forschungsinstitut für Leder und Kunststoffbahnen Freiberg is presented which describes the silver-coating process and application of textile materials using antimicrobial substances. The chemical and mechanical stability is investigated, and proof of the effectiveness is supplied. The results show that in the three-dimensional spacer fabrics both - antimicrobial yarn materials and thin silver films with antimicrobial substances - can achieve an antimicrobial effect, even in low quantities.

  3. Time of Closest Approach in Three-Dimensional Airspace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, Cesar A.; Narkawicz, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    In air traffic management, the aircraft separation requirement is defined by a minimum horizontal distance and a minimum vertical distance that the aircraft have to maintain. Since this requirement defines a cylinder around each aircraft rather than a sphere, the three-dimensional Euclidean distance does not provide an appropriate basis for the definition of time of closest approach. For instance, conflicting aircraft are not necessarily in loss of separation at the time of closest three-dimensional Euclidean distance. This paper proposes a definition of time of closest approach that characterizes conflicts in a three-dimensional airspace. The proposed time is defined as the time that minimizes a distance metric called cylindrical norm. An algorithm that computes the time of closest approach between two aircraft is provided and the formal verification of its main properties is reported.

  4. Coupled particle dispersion by three-dimensional vortex structures

    SciTech Connect

    Troutt, T.R.; Chung, J.N.; Crowe, C.T.

    1996-12-31

    The primary objective of this research program is to obtain understanding concerning the role of three-dimensional vortex structures in the dispersion of particles and droplets in free shear flows. This research program builds on previous studies which focused on the nature of particle dispersion in large scale quasi two-dimensional vortex structures. This investigation employs time dependent experimental and numerical techniques to provide information concerning the particulate dispersion produced by three dimensional vortex structures in free shear layers. The free shear flows investigated include modified plane mixing layers, and modified plane wakes. The modifications to these flows involve slight perturbations to the initiation boundary conditions such that three-dimensional vortex structures are rapidly generated by the experimental and numerical flow fields. Recent results support the importance of these vortex structures in the particle dispersion process.

  5. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of falling liquid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pain, Christopher; Xie, Zhihua; Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Salinas, Pablo; Matar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    Falling liquid films down an inclined or vertical surface have rich wave dynamics, often occurring in many industrial applications, such as condensers, evaporators and chemical reactors. There are some numerical studies for falling liquid films, however most of them have focused on two-dimensional falling films or three-dimensional falling films in a periodic domain. The objective of this study is to investigate flow dynamics of fully developed three-dimensional falling films using the Navier-Stokes equations coupled with interface capturing approach. An adaptive unstructured mesh modelling framework is employed here to study this problem, which can modify and adapt unstructured meshes to better represent the underlying physics of multiphase problems and reduce computational effort without sacrificing accuracy. Numerical examples of two-dimensional and three-dimensional falling films in a long domain with different flow conditions are presented and discussed. EPSRC UK Programme Grant MEMPHIS (EP/K003976/1).

  6. Three-dimensional convective alveolar flow induced by rhythmic breathing motion of the pulmonary acinus.

    PubMed

    Sznitman, Josué; Heimsch, Fabian; Heimsch, Thomas; Rusch, Daniel; Rösgen, Thomas

    2007-10-01

    Low Reynolds number flows (Re<1) in the human pulmonary acinus are often difficult to assess due to the submillimeter dimensions and accessibility of the region. In the present computational study, we simulated three-dimensional alveolar flows in an alveolated duct at each generation of the pulmonary acinar tree using recent morphometric data. Rhythmic lung expansion and contraction motion was modeled using moving wall boundary conditions to simulate realistic sedentary tidal breathing. The resulting alveolar flow patterns are largely time independent and governed by the ratio of the alveolar to ductal flow rates, Qa/Qd. This ratio depends uniquely on geometrical configuration such that alveolar flow patterns may be entirely determined by the location of the alveoli along the acinar tree. Although flows within alveoli travel very slowly relative to those in acinar ducts, 0.021%three-dimensional nature of the flow and confirm findings from earlier three-dimensional simulations. Such patterns are largely determined by the interplay between recirculation in the cavity induced by ductal shear flow over the alveolar opening and radial flows induced by wall displacement. Furthermore, alveolar flow patterns under rhythmic wall motion contrast sharply with results obtained in a rigid alveolus, further confirming the importance of including inherent wall motion to understand realistic acinar flow phenomena. The present findings may give further insight into the role of convective alveolar flows in determining aerosol kinematics and deposition in the pulmonary acinus.

  7. Three-dimensional analysis of partially open butterfly valve flows

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.; Kim, R.H.

    1996-09-01

    A numerical simulation of butterfly valve flows is a useful technique to investigate the physical phenomena of the flow field. A three-dimensional numerical analysis was carried out on incompressible fluid flows in a butterfly valve by using FLUENT, which solves difference equations. Characteristics of the butterfly valve flows at different valve disk angles with a uniform incoming velocity were investigated. Comparisons of FLUENT results with other results, i.e., experimental results, were made to determine the accuracy of the employed method. Results of the three-dimensional analysis may be useful in the valve design.

  8. Three-dimensional ultrasonography in hepatobiliary and pancreatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Sackmann, M; Pauletzki, J; Zwiebel, F M; Holl, J

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional reconstruction of ultrasonographic images was used to visualize hepatobiliary and pancreatic lesions and stones, and to measure gallbladder emptying. The initial experience shows that these reconstructions may be of some help in the identification of the extension of tumors and the invasion into surrounding tissues. Stones and stone fragments in the pancreas and in the gallbladder as well as the wall of the gallbladder were visualized well. If further studies will reveal a benefit for the patient, three-dimensional ultrasonography may be added to the noninvasive methods used in the diagnosis of several hepatobiliary and pancreatic diseases.

  9. Three-Dimensional Prints with Pinned Cylindrical Lens Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Shin; Shimizu, Keishi

    2013-09-01

    An application of pinned cylindrical lens arrays (CLAs) reported in Opt. Rev. 19 (2012) 287 to three-dimensional prints is presented for the first time. This lens fabrication method features the easy control of the pitch and radius of curvature of the lens arrays by taking advantage of the pinning effect that the partition walls created on a polymeric substrate by scratching with a cutter blade prevent the ultraviolet curable polymer dispensed between the walls from spreading. It is demonstrated in this paper that a three-dimensional print was realized successfully with the pinned CLA fabricated with our method.

  10. Bootstrapping Critical Ising Model on Three Dimensional Real Projective Space.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yu

    2016-04-08

    Given conformal data on a flat Euclidean space, we use crosscap conformal bootstrap equations to numerically solve the Lee-Yang model as well as the critical Ising model on a three dimensional real projective space. We check the rapid convergence of our bootstrap program in two dimensions from the exact solutions available. Based on the comparison, we estimate that our systematic error on the numerically solved one-point functions of the critical Ising model on a three dimensional real projective space is less than 1%. Our method opens up a novel way to solve conformal field theories on nontrivial geometries.

  11. Simulation of Three-Dimensional Positive Photoresist Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barouch, E.; Bradie, B.; Babu, S. V.

    1989-12-01

    The least-action dissolution algorithm (LEAD) is applied to simulate three-dimensional positive photoresist images on reflective substrates. This algorithm avoids the ambiguities of the string algorithm and its modifications by utilizing the local validity of the eikonal description of the underlying diffusion equation to describe developer penetration with a moving boundary. The electric field and the concentration of the photoactive compound (PAC) within the photoresist film in the presence of standing waves in three dimensions are obtained from the numerically efficient WKB procedure proposed recently. The PAC concentration profile is combined with the LEAD algorithm to simulate a three dimensional one micron diameter contact hole in a single layer resist.

  12. Structure of turbulence in three-dimensional boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, Chelakara S.

    1993-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the three dimensional turbulent boundary layer concepts and of the currently available experimental information for their turbulence modeling. It is found that more reliable turbulence data, especially of the Reynolds stress transport terms, is needed to improve the existing modeling capabilities. An experiment is proposed to study the three dimensional boundary layer formed by a 'sink flow' in a fully developed two dimensional turbulent boundary layer. Also, the mean and turbulence field measurement procedure using a three component laser Doppler velocimeter is described.

  13. Three Dimensional Imaging with Multiple Wavelength Speckle Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Cannon, Bret D.; Schiffern, John T.; Mendoza, Albert

    2014-05-28

    We present the design, modeling, construction, and results of a three-dimensional imager based upon multiple-wavelength speckle interferometry. A surface under test is illuminated with tunable laser light in a Michelson interferometer configuration while a speckled image is acquired at each laser frequency step. The resulting hypercube is Fourier transformed in the frequency dimension and the beat frequencies that result map the relative offsets of surface features. Synthetic wavelengths resulting from the laser tuning can probe features ranging from 18 microns to hundreds of millimeters. Three dimensional images will be presented along with modeling results.

  14. Three-dimensional external flow computations using prismatic grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahashi, Kazuhiro

    1992-12-01

    A new approach to compute external viscous flows around three dimensional configurations is proposed. A prismatic grid is used where the three dimensional surface is covered by triangles similar to the unstructured grid. The direction away from the body surface is structured so as to achieve efficient and accurate computations for high Reynolds number viscous flows. The prismatic grid is generated by a newly developed marching-type procedure in which grid spacings are controlled by a variational method. The capability of the method is demonstrated by applying it to a viscous flow computation around a complete aircraft configuration.

  15. A system of three-dimensional complex variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, E. Dale

    1986-01-01

    Some results of a new theory of multidimensional complex variables are reported, including analytic functions of a three-dimensional (3-D) complex variable. Three-dimensional complex numbers are defined, including vector properties and rules of multiplication. The necessary conditions for a function of a 3-D variable to be analytic are given and shown to be analogous to the 2-D Cauchy-Riemann equations. A simple example also demonstrates the analogy between the newly defined 3-D complex velocity and 3-D complex potential and the corresponding ordinary complex velocity and complex potential in two dimensions.

  16. Three-dimensional standing waves in a microwave oven

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamol, S.; Limsuwan, P.; Onreabroy, W.

    2010-05-01

    A microwave oven operating at a frequency of 2.45 GHz was designed for demonstrating three-dimensional standing waves. The three-dimensional standing wave patterns formed on cobalt chloride paper placed at the center of the oven chamber were examined. The images on the cobalt chloride paper corresponding to antinodes of the standing waves were recorded by a digital camera after turning on the microwave oven. The results show that the numbers of antinodes of the standing waves in each plane agree with those of the theoretical calculation of the electric field distribution in the oven chamber.

  17. Novel multipole Wien filter as three-dimensional spin manipulator

    SciTech Connect

    Yasue, T. Suzuki, M.; Koshikawa, T.; Tsuno, K.; Goto, S.; Arai, Y.

    2014-04-15

    Spin polarized electron beam is often used in material characterizations which relates to magnetism as well as in the high energy particle physics. The manipulation of the spin polarization toward the arbitrary direction is indispensable in such studies. In the present work, a novel multipole Wien filter is proposed as the three-dimensional spin manipulator, and a prototype 8-pole Wien filter is developed. It is applied to spin polarized low energy electron microscopy, and the variation of the magnetic contrast with managing the spin polarization is evaluated. It is confirmed that the novel multipole Wien filter can manipulate the spin polarization three-dimensionally.

  18. Three-dimensional structural analysis using interactive graphics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biffle, J.; Sumlin, H. A.

    1975-01-01

    The application of computer interactive graphics to three-dimensional structural analysis was described, with emphasis on the following aspects: (1) structural analysis, and (2) generation and checking of input data and examination of the large volume of output data (stresses, displacements, velocities, accelerations). Handling of three-dimensional input processing with a special MESH3D computer program was explained. Similarly, a special code PLTZ may be used to perform all the needed tasks for output processing from a finite element code. Examples were illustrated.

  19. A class of auxetic three-dimensional lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabras, Luigi; Brun, Michele

    2016-06-01

    We propose a class of auxetic three-dimensional lattice structures. The elastic microstructure can be designed to have an omnidirectional Poisson's ratio arbitrarily close to the stability limit of -1. The cubic behaviour of the periodic system has been fully characterized; the minimum and maximum Poisson's ratio and the associated principal directions are given as a function of the microstructural parameters. The initial microstructure is then modified into a body-centred cubic system that can achieve Poisson's ratio lower than -1 and that can also behave as an isotropic three-dimensional auxetic structure.

  20. Three-dimensional boron particle loaded thermal neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Conway, Adam M.; Graff, Robert T.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Reinhardt, Catherine; Voss, Lars F.; Cheung, Chin Li; Heineck, Daniel

    2014-09-09

    Three-dimensional boron particle loaded thermal neutron detectors utilize neutron sensitive conversion materials in the form of nano-powders and micro-sized particles, as opposed to thin films, suspensions, paraffin, etc. More specifically, methods to infiltrate, intersperse and embed the neutron nano-powders to form two-dimensional and/or three-dimensional charge sensitive platforms are specified. The use of nano-powders enables conformal contact with the entire charge-collecting structure regardless of its shape or configuration.