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Sample records for engineered three-dimensional lung

  1. Engineering three-dimensional macroporous hydroxyethyl methacrylate-alginate-gelatin cryogel for growth and proliferation of lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepti; Zo, Sun Mi; Kumar, Ashok; Han, Sung Soo

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) growth of cell is of particular interest in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Scaffolds used for this purpose are often tailor-made to mimic the microenvironment and the extracellular matrix of the tissue with defined role such as to provide appropriate structural, chemical, and mechanical support. The aim of the study was to design the macroporous matrix with potential in the field of tissue engineering especially for lung muscle regeneration. Blend of hydroxyethyl methacrylate-alginate-gelatin (HAG) cryogel scaffold was synthesized using cryogelation technique and this polymer material combination is being reported first time. The rheology study showed the elastic property of the material in wet state with no variation in storage modulus (G'), loss modulus (G″), and phase angle upon temperature variation. The microcomputer tomography (micro-CT) analysis confirmed the homogenous polymer structure with average pore diameter of 84 μm. Scaffold synthesized using polymer combinations which is mixture of polysaccharide (alginate) and protein (gelatin) provides supportive environment for human lung epithelial cell proliferation confirmed by cytoskeletal stain phalloidin and nuclei staining 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole checked for over three weeks. The in vivo biocompatibility was further performed which showed integration of scaffold to the surrounding tissue with ability to recruit cells. However, at first week, small amount of infiltrating mast cells were found which subsequently diminished in following weeks. Immunohistochemistry for dendritic cells confirmed in vivo biocompatible nature of the HAG scaffold. The mechanical strength, stiffness, elastic measurements, in vivo compatibility, and in vitro lung cell proliferation show the potentiality of HAG materials for lung tissue engineering.

  2. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Lung Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H.; Deatly, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human lung epithelio-mesenchymal tissue-like assemblies (3D hLEM TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infection with the virus. Therefore, we assert TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host s immune system.

  3. Three-Dimensional Engineered High Fidelity Normal Human Lung Tissue-Like Assemblies (TLA) as Targets for Human Respiratory Virus Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; Deatly, A. M.; Suderman, M. T.; Lin, Y.-H.; Chen, W.; Gupta, C. K.; Randolph, V. B.; Udem, S. A.

    2003-01-01

    Unlike traditional two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures, three-dimensional (3D) tissue-like assemblies (TLA) (Goodwin et aI, 1992, 1993, 2000 and Nickerson et aI. , 2001,2002) offer high organ fidelity with the potential to emulate the infective dynamics of viruses and bacteria in vivo. Thus, utilizing NASA micro gravity Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology, in vitro human broncho-epithelial (HBE) TLAs were engineered to mimic in vivo tissue for study of human respiratory viruses. These 3D HBE TLAs were propagated from a human broncho-tracheal cell line with a mesenchymal component (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and either an adult human broncho-epithelial cell (BEAS-2B) or human neonatal epithelial cell (16HBE140-) as the overlying element. Resulting TLAs share several characteristic features with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including tight junctions, desmosomes and cilia (SEM, TEM). The presence of epithelium and specific lung epithelium markers furthers the contention that these HBE cells differentiate into TLAs paralleling in vivo tissues. A time course of infection of these 3D HBE TLAs with human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) wild type A2 strain, indicates that virus replication and virus budding are supported and manifested by increasing virus titer and detection of membrane-bound F and G glycoproteins. Infected 3D HBE TLAs remain intact for up to 12 days compared to infected 2D cultures that are destroyed in 2-3 days. Infected cells show an increased vacuolation and cellular destruction (by transmission electron microscopy) by day 9; whereas, uninfected cells remain robust and morphologically intact. Therefore, the 3D HBE TLAs mimic aspects of human respiratory epithelium providing a unique opportunity to analyze, for the first time, simulated in vivo viral infection independent of host immune response.

  4. Heat engine in the three-dimensional spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Jie-Xiong; Liang, Feng; Li, Gu-Qiang

    2017-03-01

    We define a kind of heat engine via three-dimensional charged BTZ black holes. This case is quite subtle and needs to be more careful. The heat flow along the isochores does not equal to zero since the specific heat C V ≠ 0 and this point completely differs from the cases discussed before whose isochores and adiabats are identical. So one cannot simply apply the paradigm in the former literatures. However, if one introduces a new thermodynamic parameter associated with the renormalization length scale, the above problem can be solved. We obtain the analytical efficiency expression of the three-dimensional charged BTZ black hole heat engine for two different schemes. Moreover, we double check with the exact formula. Our result presents the first specific example for the sound correctness of the exact efficiency formula. We argue that the three-dimensional charged BTZ black hole can be viewed as a toy model for further investigation of holographic heat engine. Furthermore, we compare our result with that of the Carnot cycle and extend the former result to three-dimensional spacetime. In this sense, the result in this paper would be complementary to those obtained in four-dimensional spacetime or ever higher. Last but not the least, the heat engine efficiency discussed in this paper may serve as a criterion to discriminate the two thermodynamic approaches introduced in ref. [29] and our result seems to support the approach which introduces a new thermodynamic parameter R = r 0 .

  5. [A three dimensional fractal simulation of the lung bronchial tree].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiuyi; Tan, Xiaoping; Pei, Juemin

    2004-06-01

    The lungs are naturally irregular and asymmetrical organ in anatomy. The conducting bronchial trees in the lungs display complex self-similar structure. We have established the host mesh coordinates of the right lung on the basis of the anatomical data from the literature. A three-dimensional fractal model of the conducting airways was set up by calculating the coordinates of the mass centers of the divided blocks, searching the branch direction and determining branch lengths with the use of the drawing tool OpenGL. Specific data of the lengths at various grades, branching angles, and capillary diameters were obtained. As a result, the computed data were identical with those of the existing statistical data. The fractal covering dimensionality obtained in the computation of this model was 2.19, which is very close to the ideal dimensionality, 2.17, from the literature. The present model has laid the foundation for further research of the gas diffusion and transfer performance in the lungs using the fractal concept, and furthermore, it helps to save the computer memories and fastening the graphic transfer.

  6. Three-dimensional bioprinting in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guifang; Cui, Xiaofeng

    2016-02-01

    With the advances of stem cell research, development of intelligent biomaterials and three-dimensional biofabrication strategies, highly mimicked tissue or organs can be engineered. Among all the biofabrication approaches, bioprinting based on inkjet printing technology has the promises to deliver and create biomimicked tissue with high throughput, digital control, and the capacity of single cell manipulation. Therefore, this enabling technology has great potential in regenerative medicine and translational applications. The most current advances in organ and tissue bioprinting based on the thermal inkjet printing technology are described in this review, including vasculature, muscle, cartilage, and bone. In addition, the benign side effect of bioprinting to the printed mammalian cells can be utilized for gene or drug delivery, which can be achieved conveniently during precise cell placement for tissue construction. With layer-by-layer assembly, three-dimensional tissues with complex structures can be printed using converted medical images. Therefore, bioprinting based on thermal inkjet is so far the most optimal solution to engineer vascular system to the thick and complex tissues. Collectively, bioprinting has great potential and broad applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The future advances of bioprinting include the integration of different printing mechanisms to engineer biphasic or triphasic tissues with optimized scaffolds and further understanding of stem cell biology.

  7. A Review of Three-Dimensional Printing in Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Sears, Nick A; Seshadri, Dhruv R; Dhavalikar, Prachi S; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in three-dimensional (3D) printing technologies have led to a rapid expansion of applications from the creation of anatomical training models for complex surgical procedures to the printing of tissue engineering constructs. In addition to achieving the macroscale geometry of organs and tissues, a print layer thickness as small as 20 μm allows for reproduction of the microarchitectures of bone and other tissues. Techniques with even higher precision are currently being investigated to enable reproduction of smaller tissue features such as hepatic lobules. Current research in tissue engineering focuses on the development of compatible methods (printers) and materials (bioinks) that are capable of producing biomimetic scaffolds. In this review, an overview of current 3D printing techniques used in tissue engineering is provided with an emphasis on the printing mechanism and the resultant scaffold characteristics. Current practical challenges and technical limitations are emphasized and future trends of bioprinting are discussed.

  8. Engineering three-dimensional cell mechanical microenvironment with hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guoyou; Wang, Lin; Wang, Shuqi; Han, Yulong; Wu, Jinhui; Zhang, Qiancheng; Xu, Feng; Lu, Tian Jian

    2012-12-01

    Cell mechanical microenvironment (CMM) significantly affects cell behaviors such as spreading, migration, proliferation and differentiation. However, most studies on cell response to mechanical stimulation are based on two-dimensional (2D) planar substrates, which cannot mimic native three-dimensional (3D) CMM. Accumulating evidence has shown that there is a significant difference in cell behavior in 2D and 3D microenvironments. Among the materials used for engineering 3D CMM, hydrogels have gained increasing attention due to their tunable properties (e.g. chemical and mechanical properties). In this paper, we provide an overview of recent advances in engineering hydrogel-based 3D CMM. Effects of mechanical cues (e.g. hydrogel stiffness and externally induced stress/strain in hydrogels) on cell behaviors are described. A variety of approaches to load mechanical stimuli in 3D hydrogel-based constructs are also discussed.

  9. Utilizing stem cells for three-dimensional neural tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Cho, Yongku; Li, Xue-Jun; Khademhosseini, Ali; Tasoglu, Savas

    2016-05-26

    Three-dimensional neural tissue engineering has made great strides in developing neural disease models and replacement tissues for patients. However, the need for biomimetic tissue models and effective patient therapies remains unmet. The recent push to expand 2D neural tissue engineering into the third dimension shows great potential to advance the field. Another area which has much to offer to neural tissue engineering is stem cell research. Stem cells are well known for their self-renewal and differentiation potential and have been shown to give rise to tissues with structural and functional properties mimicking natural organs. Application of these capabilities to 3D neural tissue engineering may be highly useful for basic research on neural tissue structure and function, engineering disease models, designing tissues for drug development, and generating replacement tissues with a patient's genetic makeup. Here, we discuss the vast potential, as well as the current challenges, unique to integration of 3D fabrication strategies and stem cells into neural tissue engineering. We also present some of the most significant recent achievements, including nerve guidance conduits to facilitate better healing of nerve injuries, functional 3D biomimetic neural tissue models, physiologically relevant disease models for research purposes, and rapid and effective screening of potential drugs.

  10. Structural engineering of three-dimensional phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delpero, Tommaso; Schoenwald, Stefan; Zemp, Armin; Bergamini, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    Artificially-structured materials are attracting the research interest of a growing community of scientists for the possibility to develop novel materials with advantageous properties that arise from the ability to tailor the propagation of elastic waves, and thus energy, through them. In this work, we propose a three-dimensional phononic crystal whose unit cell has been engineered to obtain a strong wave-attenuation band in the middle of the acoustic frequency range. The combination of its acoustic properties with the dimensions of the unit cell and its static mechanical properties makes it an interesting material for possibly several applications in civil and mechanical engineering, for instance as the core of an acoustically insulating sandwich panel. A sample of this crystal has been manufactured and experimentally tested with respect to its acoustic transmissibility. The performance of the phononic crystal core is remarkable both in terms of amplitude reduction in the transmissibility and width of the attenuation band. A parametric study has been finally conducted on selected geometrical parameters of the unit cell and on their effect on the macroscopic properties of the crystal. This work represents an application-oriented example of how the macroscopic properties of an artificially-structured material can be designed, according to specific needs, by a conventional engineering of its unit cell.

  11. Three-Dimensional Analysis and Modeling of a Wankel Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.; Willis, E. A.

    1991-01-01

    A new computer code, AGNI-3D, has been developed for the modeling of combustion, spray, and flow properties in a stratified-charge rotary engine (SCRE). The mathematical and numerical details of the new code are described by the first author in a separate NASA publication. The solution procedure is based on an Eulerian-Lagrangian approach where the unsteady, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations for a perfect gas-mixture with variable properties are solved in generalized, Eulerian coordinates on a moving grid by making use of an implicit finite-volume, Steger-Warming flux vector splitting scheme. The liquid-phase equations are solved in Lagrangian coordinates. The engine configuration studied was similar to existing rotary engine flow-visualization and hot-firing test rigs. The results of limited test cases indicate a good degree of qualitative agreement between the predicted and measured pressures. It is conjectured that the impulsive nature of the torque generated by the observed pressure nonuniformity may be one of the mechanisms responsible for the excessive wear of the timing gears observed during the early stages of the rotary combustion engine (RCE) development. It was identified that the turbulence intensities near top-dead-center were dominated by the compression process and only slightly influenced by the intake and exhaust processes. Slow mixing resulting from small turbulence intensities within the rotor pocket and also from a lack of formation of any significant recirculation regions within the rotor pocket were identified as the major factors leading to incomplete combustion. Detailed flowfield results during exhaust and intake, fuel injection, fuel vaporization, combustion, mixing and expansion processes are also presented. The numerical procedure is very efficient as it takes 7 to 10 CPU hours on a CRAY Y-MP for one entire engine cycle when the computations are performed over a 31 x16 x 20 grid.

  12. Porous Three-Dimensional Carbon Nanotube Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lalwani, Gaurav; Gopalan, Anu; D’Agati, Michael; Sankaran, Jeyantt Srinivas; Judex, Stefan; Qin, Yi-Xian; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2015-01-01

    Assembly of carbon nanomaterials into three-dimensional (3D) architectures is necessary to harness their unique physiochemical properties for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Herein, we report the fabrication and comprehensive cytocompatibility assessment of 3D chemically crosslinked macro-sized (5–8 mm height and 4–6 mm diameter) porous carbon nanotube (CNT) scaffolds. Scaffolds prepared via radical initiated thermal crosslinking of single- or multi- walled CNTs (SWCNTs and MWCNTs) possess high porosity (>80%), and nano-, micro- and macro-scale interconnected pores. MC3T3 pre-osteoblast cells on MWCNT and SWCNT scaffolds showed good cell viability comparable to poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) scaffolds after 5 days. Confocal live cell and immunofluorescence imaging showed that MC3T3 cells were metabolically active and could attach, proliferate and infiltrate MWCNT and SWCNT scaffolds. SEM imaging corroborated cell attachment and spreading and suggested that cell morphology is governed by scaffold surface roughness. MC3T3 cells were elongated on scaffolds with high surface roughness (MWCNTs) and rounded on scaffolds with low surface roughness (SWCNTs). The surface roughness of scaffolds may be exploited to control cellular morphology, and in turn govern cell fate. These results indicate that crosslinked MWCNTs and SWCNTs scaffolds are cytocompatible, and open avenues towards development of multifunctional all-carbon scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. PMID:25788440

  13. Three-dimensional volume analysis of vasculature in engineered tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YousefHussien, Mohammed; Garvin, Kelley; Dalecki, Diane; Saber, Eli; Helguera, María.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional textural and volumetric image analysis holds great potential in understanding the image data produced by multi-photon microscopy. In this paper, an algorithm that quantitatively analyzes the texture and the morphology of vasculature in engineered tissues is proposed. The investigated 3D artificial tissues consist of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC) embedded in collagen exposed to two regimes of ultrasound standing wave fields under different pressure conditions. Textural features were evaluated using the normalized Gray-Scale Cooccurrence Matrix (GLCM) combined with Gray-Level Run Length Matrix (GLRLM) analysis. To minimize error resulting from any possible volume rotation and to provide a comprehensive textural analysis, an averaged version of nine GLCM and GLRLM orientations is used. To evaluate volumetric features, an automatic threshold using the gray level mean value is utilized. Results show that our analysis is able to differentiate among the exposed samples, due to morphological changes induced by the standing wave fields. Furthermore, we demonstrate that providing more textural parameters than what is currently being reported in the literature, enhances the quantitative understanding of the heterogeneity of artificial tissues.

  14. Tissue Engineering Applications of Three-Dimensional Bioprinting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Yangde

    2015-07-01

    Recent advances in tissue engineering have adapted the additive manufacturing technology, also known as three-dimensional printing, which is used in several industrial applications, for the fabrication of bioscaffolds and viable tissue and/or organs to overcome the limitations of other in vitro conventional methods. 3D bioprinting technology has gained enormous attention as it enabled 3D printing of a multitude of biocompatible materials, different types of cells and other supporting growth factors into complex functional living tissues in a 3D format. A major advantage of this technology is its ability for simultaneously 3D printing various cell types in defined spatial locations, which makes this technology applicable to regenerative medicine to meet the need for suitable for transplantation suitable organs and tissues. 3D bioprinting is yet to successfully overcome the many challenges related to building 3D structures that closely resemble native organs and tissues, which are complex structures with defined microarchitecture and a variety of cell types in a confined area. An integrated approach with a combination of technologies from the fields of engineering, biomaterials science, cell biology, physics, and medicine is required to address these complexities. Meeting this challenge is being made possible by directing the 3D bioprinting to manufacture biomimetic-shaped 3D structures, using organ/tissue images, obtained from magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography, and employing computer-aided design and manufacturing technologies. Applications of 3D bioprinting include the generation of multilayered skin, bone, vascular grafts, heart valves, etc. The current 3D bioprinting technologies need to be improved with respect to the mechanical strength and integrity in the manufactured constructs as the presently used biomaterials are not of optimal viscosity. A better understanding of the tissue/organ microenvironment, which consists of multiple types of

  15. Three-dimensional magnetic engineering: The programs magnus and epilog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Mingwu; Pissanetzky, Sergio

    1988-10-01

    We present the post-processor EPILOG for the well established finite element program MAGNUS for three-dimensional magnetic engineering. MAGNUS solves problems of magnetostatics with nonlinear magnetic materials, permanent magnets and electric currents, for any 3-D geometry. The two-scalar-potentials formulation of magnetostatics used by MAGNUS combines numerical accuracy and computational efficiency, and is considered state of the art. The well known program KUBIK is used as a pre-processor to describe the geometry and finite element mesh. KUBIK is highly interactive and allows the user to effectively control all geometric details. The needs of magnetic engineers, however, go far beyond the simple availability of a mathematical solution. Once the solution has been obtained by MAGNUS in the form of a continuous magnetic scalar potential function defined at every point in the solution domain, those needs are met by EPILOG. EPILOG is command operated. Commands are independent of each other and can be used in any order, or not used at all. The purpose of each command is to use the solution for the calculation of a derived quantity or the production of a plot or table. The following derived quantities can be obtained: the magnetic energy in specific regions, the magnetic force on specified conductors in space, the magnetic torque on specified conductors, the magnetic flux across a given surface in space, the inductance of a circuit, and a variety of line integrals for specified lines in space. A useful facility is the automatic calculation of harmonic multipoles averaged along the beam direction for accelerator magnets, essential for end analysis and the integral effect of the magnetic field on the beam. Graphical facilities include color plots of the shapes of the conductors, the geometry, field lines and surfaces of constant magnetic scalar potential in specified regions of space. EPILOG produces a device independent graphical metafile, which can be seen on any device

  16. Development of a three-dimensional model of lung cancer using cultured transformed lung cells.

    PubMed

    Vertrees, Roger A; McCarthy, Maureen; Solley, Travis; Popov, Vselovod L; Roaten, John; Pauley, Matthew; Wen, Xiaodong; Goodwin, Thomas J

    2009-02-01

    Despite great strides in understanding cancer biology, the role cellular differentiation and three-dimensional (3-D) structural organization play in metastasis and malignancy remains unclear. Development of 3-D cultures may ultimately provide a model facilitating discovery and interpretation of more relevant information for the expression and role of antibodies in lung cellular pathobiology. The purpose was to develop traditional monolayer (ML) and 3-D cultures of a known transformed metastatic lung cell line and then determine similarities and differences between cultures in terms of differentiation, molecular marker expression and metastasis. A transformed lung cell line (BZR-T33) was initially transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) in ML culture. Nude mice were inoculated with BZR-T33 and observed for metastasis. BZR-T33 was grown as ML and 3-D cultures under identical conditions. Immunohistochemical comparison for degree of antibody expression between cultures and control tissue were studied. Electron microscopy (EM) for identification of ultra structures was done and compared between cultures. A 3-D co-culture containing GFP-transformed cells over an immortalized lung-cell line was developed. The GFP-transfected cell line formed tumors and metastasized in mice. EM identified significant mitochondrial and granular endoplasmic reticular pathology in ML not seen in 3-D. Degree of differentiation shows ultra structures and antibody expressions were more representative of control tissue in 3-D than ML. The co-culture experiment in 3-D demonstrates the ability of transformed cells to penetrate the sub-layer of immortalized cells. Development of 3-D cultures will provide a new and powerful tool to study lung biology and pathobiology.

  17. Three-dimensional modeling and application in geological exploration engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jianya; Cheng, Penggen; Wang, Yandong

    2004-05-01

    Taking geological exploration engineering as the topic of our research, we presented a hybrid data model integrating vector and raster data, and proposed a sub-model; i.e., a quasi tri-prism volume (QTPV) model. Based on QTPV, the concept model, logical model and data structure were designed in detail. Modeling, model cutting and partition algorithms on QTPV are proposed. The modeling features of QTPV have been discussed. The QTPV model is more efficient than 3D FDS and TEN in terms of partition, storage volume, modeling ability, and application in geological exploration engineering (GEE). A 3DgeoMV system prototype has been developed based on the proposed QTPV model. A case study has been conducted by using the real borehole sample data from a GEE area in China's Inner Mongolia China. The application shows that the QTPV has the ability to model real 3D in GEE.

  18. SFTA3, a novel protein of the lung: three-dimensional structure, characterisation and immune activation.

    PubMed

    Schicht, Martin; Rausch, Felix; Finotto, Susetta; Mathews, Martina; Mattil, Anja; Schubert, Melanie; Koch, Beate; Traxdorf, Maximilian; Bohr, Christopher; Worlitzsch, Dieter; Brandt, Wolfgang; Garreis, Fabian; Sel, Saadettin; Paulsen, Friedrich; Bräuer, Lars

    2014-08-01

    The lung constantly interacts with numerous pathogens. Thus, complex local immune defence mechanisms are essential to recognise and dispose of these intruders. This work describes the detection, characterisation and three-dimensional structure of a novel protein of the lung (surfactant-associated protein 3 (SFTA3/SP-H)) with putative immunological features. Bioinformatics, biochemical and immunological methods were combined to elucidate the structure and function of SFTA3. The tissue-specific detection and characterisation was performed by using electron microscopy as well as fluorescence imaging. Three-dimensional structure generation and analysis led to the development of specific antibodies and, as a consequence, to the localisation of a novel protein in human lung under consideration of cystic fibrosis, asthma and sepsis. In vitro experiments revealed that lipopolysaccharide induces expression of SFTA3 in the human lung alveolar type II cell line A549. By contrast, the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-23 inhibit expression of SFTA3 in A549. Sequence- and structure-based prediction analysis indicated that the novel protein is likely to belong to the family of lung surfactant proteins. The results suggest that SFTA3 is an immunoregulatory protein of the lung with relevant protective functions during inflammation at the mucosal sites.

  19. Three-dimensional display of the heart, aorta, lungs, and airway using CT

    SciTech Connect

    Fram, E.K.; Godwin, J.D.; Putman, C.E.

    1982-12-01

    In previous studies of human anatomy, three-dimensional display of CT data has required laborious manual boundary tracking, except for high-contrast structures such as the spine. Automated boundary tracking techniques have been extended so that they can function well for both high-contrast and soft-tissue interfaces. These methods have been applied to the in vivo study of human lungs, heart, aorta, and larynx in this paper.

  20. Engineering of electromagnetic interactions in three-dimensional plasmonic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artar, Alp

    Field of nanoplasmonics study the interaction of light with nanoscale metallic structures and it possesses the great potential of being the key element in future, highly integrated, on-chip nanophotonic devices. Several major breakthroughs have been demonstrated in the past decade regarding the utilization of plasmonics for purposes ranging from optical nanoantennas to enhanced biochemical sensing platforms. So far, studies are generally focused on two-dimensional (2D) arrangement of plasmonic nanostructures. However, engineering of materials in three dimensions (3D) by integrating different kinds of plasmonic resonances in multi-layers, offers additional degrees of freedom in our design space, resulting in remarkable effects. This thesis research investigates the outcomes of the tailoring of electromagnetic interactions between multiple plasmonic structures in three-dimensions. We are mainly focused on a coherence phenomenon termed as Fano resonance. Fano resonances are generally studied in atomic physics, which occur due to an interference between multiple excitation pathways where a discrete resonant state is coupled to a broad continuum. Fano resonances are inherently linked to an atomic physics concept termed as Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT). Recently, a plasmonic analogue of the EIT effect was proposed and drew great attention. Plasmon Induced Transparency (PIT) enables one to mimic the extremely dispersive spectral characteristics of EIT, on-chip and without any stringent requirements. In the first two parts of this work, we show that by a precise engineering of the near-field interactions of plasmonic elements, PIT effect can be carried simultaneously to multiple spectral domains. This effect has many potential applications ranging from enhanced non-linearities to novel optical communication systems. In the third part, we investigate a multi-spectral Fano resonant plasmonic structure's non-linear response by embedding a nanoscale Kerr

  1. Three-dimensional reconstituted extracellular matrix scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Karthikeyan; Leck, Kwong-Joo; Gao, Shujun; Wan, Andrew C A

    2009-09-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a rich meshwork of proteins and proteoglycans. Besides assuming a cell adhesive and structural support role, the ECM also helps to sequester and present growth factors to cells. ECM derived from tissues has been used as biological scaffolds for tissue engineering. In contrast, it has been difficult to employ ECM derived from cell lines as scaffolds due to its lack of form and structure. We have developed a mild, aqueous-based method for incorporating cell line derived ECM into biological scaffolds based on polyelectrolyte complexation, using the example of ECM from MC-3T3, a mouse preosteoblast cell line. A DNase step was incorporated in the ECM isolation procedure to further purify it of genetic material. Immunohistochemistry of fibers incorporated with MC-3T3 ECM reveal the presence of the ECM components, collagen type I, collagen type IV, fibronectin and heparan sulfate, on their surface. Reconstituted ECM scaffolds retained the cell-adhesion characteristics of the ECM, as demonstrated by 'reseeding' the ECM-secreting cell on the scaffolds. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were seeded onto the fibrous scaffolds incorporated with MC-3T3 ECM, and implanted subcutaneously into SCID mice. After 4 weeks of implantation, histological evidence showed that the hMSC seeded ECM scaffolds had induced bone formation at the ectopic site.

  2. Engineered three-dimensional multicellular culture model to ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Tissue fusion during early mammalian development requires crosstalk between multiple cell types. For example, paracrine signaling between palatal epithelial cells and palatal mesenchyme mediates the fusion of opposing palatal shelves during embryonic development. Fusion events in developmental processes including heart development, neural tube closure, and palatal fusion are dependent on epithelial-mesenchymal interactions (EMIs) and specific signaling pathways that have been elucidated largely using gene knockout mouse models. A broad analysis of literature using ToxRefDB identified 63 ToxCast chemicals associated with cleft palate in animal models. However, the influence of these and other putative teratogens on human palatal fusion has not been examined in depth due to the lack of in vitro models incorporating EMIs between human cell types. We sought to engineer the stratified mesenchymal and epithelial structure of the developing palate in vitro using spheroid culture of human Wharton’s Jelly mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). hMSC spheroids exhibited uniform size over time (175 ± 21 µm mean diameter) that was proportional to starting cell density. Further, hMSCs in spheroid culture exhibited increased alkaline phosphatase activity and increased expression of bglap and runx2 after 7 days of culture in osteo-induction medium, which suggests that spheroid culture together with osteo-induction medium supports osteogenic differentiation. We developed a novel pro

  3. Three-dimensional histopathology of lung cancer with multimodality image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ryk, Jessica; Weydert, Jamie; Christensen, Gary; Thiesse, Jacqueline; Namati, Eman; Reinhardt, Joseph; Hoffman, Eric; McLennan, Geoffrey

    2007-03-01

    Identifying the three-dimensional content of non-small cell lung cancer tumors is a vital step in the pursuit of understanding cancer growth, development and response to treatment. The majority of non-small cell lung cancer tumors are histologically heterogeneous, and consist of the malignant tumor cells, necrotic tumor cells, fibroblastic stromal tissue, and inflammation. Geometric and tissue density heterogeneity are utilized in computed tomography (CT) representations of lung tumors for distinguishing between malignant and benign nodules. However, the correlation between radiolographical heterogeneity and corresponding histological content has been limited. In this study, a multimodality dataset of human lung cancer is established, enabling the direct comparison between histologically identified tissue content and micro-CT representation. Registration of these two datasets is achieved through the incorporation of a large scale, serial microscopy dataset. This dataset serves as the basis for the rigid and non-rigid registrations required to align the radiological and histological data. The resulting comprehensive, three-dimensional dataset includes radio-density, color and cellular content of a given lung tumor. Using the registered datasets, neural network classification is applied to determine a statistical separation between cancerous and non-cancerous tumor regions in micro-CT.

  4. Tissue engineering of human nasal alar cartilage precisely by using three-dimensional printing.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yihao; Fan, Fei; Kang, Ning; Wang, Sheng; You, Jianjun; Wang, Huan; Zhang, Bo

    2015-02-01

    Tissue engineering strategies hold promise for the restoration of damaged cartilage. However, the results of most studies report irregularly shaped beads of cartilage, which are not precise enough. Thus, a precise shape of cartilage graft must be taken into consideration. The goal of this study was to develop a simple method of creating a precisely predetermined nasal alar shape with the aid of three-dimensional printing. Lower lateral cartilage from cadavers was observed and scanned by computed tomography. Molds of the lower lateral cartilage were achieved by using three-dimensional printing. Human nasal cartilage was obtained and chondrocytes were harvested. Then, the mixture of cells and poly(glycolic acid)/poly-L-lactic acid was cultured in vitro and implanted into the subcutaneous tissue of nude mice. After subcutaneous implantation, the length and width of the samples were measured, and the results were not statistically significantly different from the native lower lateral cartilage (p > 0.05). Their thickness was measured and the results were statistically different from the native lower lateral cartilage (p < 0.05). Histologic examination of the engineered constructs revealed that both the cell and tissue morphologic features of engineered cartilage were similar to those of native lower lateral cartilage. The biomechanical properties of the engineered cartilage exceeded those of native cartilage. This study demonstrates that three-dimensional printing-aided tissue engineering can achieve precise three-dimensional shapes of human nasal alar cartilage. To our knowledge, this is the first reported creation of a precise nasal alar cartilage with a tissue-engineering strategy and three-dimensional printing technique.

  5. Calculations and Expectations: How Engineering Students Describe Three-Dimensional Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller-Young, Janice E.

    2013-01-01

    The premise of student-centered teaching is to respond to the ways in which students engage with the context and content of their learning, and therefore the purpose of this study was to find out how students visualize three-dimensional statics problems from two-dimensional diagrams early in a first-year engineering course. Think-alouds were…

  6. Three-dimensional scaffolds of acellular human and porcine lungs for high throughput studies of lung disease and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Darcy E.; Bonenfant, Nicholas R.; Sokocevic, Dino; DeSarno, Michael; Borg, Zachary; Parsons, Charles; Brooks, Elice M.; Platz, Joseph; Khalpey, Zain; Hoganson, David M.; Deng, Bin; Lam, Ying Wai; Oldinski, Rachael A.; Ashikaga, Takamaru; Weiss, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Acellular scaffolds from complex whole organs such as lung are being increasingly studied for ex vivo organ generation and for in vitro studies of cell-extracellular matrix interactions. We have established effective methods for efficient de- and recellularization of large animal and human lungs including techniques which allow multiple small segments (∼1–3cm3) to be excised that retain 3-dimensional lung structure. Coupled with the use of a synthetic pleural coating, cells can be selectively physiologically inoculated via preserved vascular and airway conduits. Inoculated segments can be further sliced for high throughput studies. Further, we demonstrate thermography as a powerful noninvasive technique for monitoring perfusion decellularization and for evaluating preservation of vascular and airway networks following human and porcine lung decellularization. Collectively, these techniques are a significant step forward as they allow high throughput in vitro studies from a single lung or lobe in a more biologically relevant, three-dimensional acellular scaffold. PMID:24411675

  7. Development of a Three-Dimensional Bioengineering Technology to Generate Lung Tissue for Personalized Disease Modeling.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Dan C; Alva-Ornelas, Jackelyn A; Sucre, Jennifer M S; Vijayaraj, Preethi; Durra, Abdo; Richardson, Wade; Jonas, Steven J; Paul, Manash K; Karumbayaram, Saravanan; Dunn, Bruce; Gomperts, Brigitte N

    2017-02-01

    Stem cell technologies, especially patient-specific, induced stem cell pluripotency and directed differentiation, hold great promise for changing the landscape of medical therapies. Proper exploitation of these methods may lead to personalized organ transplants, but to regenerate organs, it is necessary to develop methods for assembling differentiated cells into functional, organ-level tissues. The generation of three-dimensional human tissue models also holds potential for medical advances in disease modeling, as full organ functionality may not be necessary to recapitulate disease pathophysiology. This is specifically true of lung diseases where animal models often do not recapitulate human disease. Here, we present a method for the generation of self-assembled human lung tissue and its potential for disease modeling and drug discovery for lung diseases characterized by progressive and irreversible scarring such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Tissue formation occurs because of the overlapping processes of cellular adhesion to multiple alveolar sac templates, bioreactor rotation, and cellular contraction. Addition of transforming growth factor-β1 to single cell-type mesenchymal organoids resulted in morphologic scarring typical of that seen in IPF but not in two-dimensional IPF fibroblast cultures. Furthermore, this lung organoid may be modified to contain multiple lung cell types assembled into the correct anatomical location, thereby allowing cell-cell contact and recapitulating the lung microenvironment. Our bottom-up approach for synthesizing patient-specific lung tissue in a scalable system allows for the development of relevant human lung disease models with the potential for high throughput drug screening to identify targeted therapies. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:622-633.

  8. Development of a Three-Dimensional Bioengineering Technology to Generate Lung Tissue for Personalized Disease Modeling.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Dan C; Alva-Ornelas, Jackelyn A; Sucre, Jennifer M S; Vijayaraj, Preethi; Durra, Abdo; Richardson, Wade; Jonas, Steven J; Paul, Manash K; Karumbayaram, Saravanan; Dunn, Bruce; Gomperts, Brigitte N

    2016-09-15

    : Stem cell technologies, especially patient-specific, induced stem cell pluripotency and directed differentiation, hold great promise for changing the landscape of medical therapies. Proper exploitation of these methods may lead to personalized organ transplants, but to regenerate organs, it is necessary to develop methods for assembling differentiated cells into functional, organ-level tissues. The generation of three-dimensional human tissue models also holds potential for medical advances in disease modeling, as full organ functionality may not be necessary to recapitulate disease pathophysiology. This is specifically true of lung diseases where animal models often do not recapitulate human disease. Here, we present a method for the generation of self-assembled human lung tissue and its potential for disease modeling and drug discovery for lung diseases characterized by progressive and irreversible scarring such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Tissue formation occurs because of the overlapping processes of cellular adhesion to multiple alveolar sac templates, bioreactor rotation, and cellular contraction. Addition of transforming growth factor-β1 to single cell-type mesenchymal organoids resulted in morphologic scarring typical of that seen in IPF but not in two-dimensional IPF fibroblast cultures. Furthermore, this lung organoid may be modified to contain multiple lung cell types assembled into the correct anatomical location, thereby allowing cell-cell contact and recapitulating the lung microenvironment. Our bottom-up approach for synthesizing patient-specific lung tissue in a scalable system allows for the development of relevant human lung disease models with the potential for high throughput drug screening to identify targeted therapies.

  9. Development and proof-of-concept of three-dimensional lung histology volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Lindsay; Alabousi, Mostafa; Wheatley, Andrew; Aladl, Usaf; Slipetz, Deborah; Hogg, James C.; Fenster, Aaron; Parraga, Grace

    2012-03-01

    Most medical imaging is inherently three-dimensional (3D) but for validation of pathological findings, histopathology is commonly used and typically histopathology images are acquired as twodimensional slices with quantitative analysis performed in a single dimension. Histopathology is invasive, labour-intensive, and the analysis cannot be performed in real time, yet it remains the gold standard for the pathological diagnosis and validation of clinical or radiological diagnoses of disease. A major goal worldwide is to improve medical imaging resolution, sensitivity and specificity to better guide therapy and biopsy and to one day delay or replace biopsy. A key limitation however is the lack of tools to directly compare 3D macroscopic imaging acquired in patients with histopathology findings, typically provided in a single dimension (1D) or in two dimensions (2D). To directly address this, we developed methods for 2D histology slice visualization/registration to generate 3D volumes and quantified tissue components in the 3D volume for direct comparison to volumetric micro-CT and clinical CT. We used the elastase-instilled mouse emphysema lung model to evaluate our methods with murine lungs sectioned (5 μm thickness/10 μm gap) and digitized with 2μm in-plane resolution. 3D volumes were generated for wildtype and elastase mouse lung sections after semi-automated registration of all tissue slices. The 1D mean linear intercept (Lm) for wildtype (WT) (47.1 μm +/- 9.8 μm) and elastase mouse lung (64.5 μm +/- 14.0 μm) was significantly different (p<.001). We also generated 3D measurements based on tissue and airspace morphometry from the 3D volumes and all of these were significantly different (p<.0001) when comparing elastase and WT mouse lung. The ratio of the airspace-to-lung volume for the entire lung volume was also significantly and strongly correlated with Lm.

  10. Three-dimensional simultaneous optical coherence tomography and confocal fluorescence microscopy for investigation of lung tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Maria; Cimalla, Peter; Meissner, Sven; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.; Koch, Edmund

    2012-07-01

    Although several strategies exist for a minimal-invasive treatment of patients with lung failure, the mortality rate of acute respiratory distress syndrome still reaches 30% at minimum. This striking number indicates the necessity of understanding lung dynamics on an alveolar level. To investigate the dynamical behavior on a microscale, we used three-dimensional geometrical and functional imaging to observe tissue parameters including alveolar size and length of embedded elastic fibers during ventilation. We established a combined optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal fluorescence microscopy system that is able to monitor the distension of alveolar tissue and elastin fibers simultaneously within three dimensions. The OCT system can laterally resolve a 4.9 μm line pair feature and has an approximately 11 μm full-width-half-maximum axial resolution in air. confocal fluorescence microscopy visualizes molecular properties of the tissue with a resolution of 0.75 μm (laterally), and 5.9 μm (axially) via fluorescence detection of the dye sulforhodamine B specifically binding to elastin. For system evaluation, we used a mouse model in situ to perform lung distension by application of different constant pressure values within the physiological regime. Our method enables the investigation of alveolar dynamics by helping to reveal basic processes emerging during artificial ventilation and breathing.

  11. Engineering functional two- and three-dimensional liver systems in vivo using hepatic tissue sheets.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kazuo; Yokoyama, Takashi; Yamato, Masayuki; Kuge, Hiroyuki; Kanehiro, Hiromichi; Tsutsumi, Masahiro; Amanuma, Toshihiro; Iwata, Hiroo; Yang, Joseph; Okano, Teruo; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2007-07-01

    Hepatic tissue engineering using primary hepatocytes has been considered a valuable new therapeutic modality for several classes of liver diseases. Recent progress in the development of clinically feasible liver tissue engineering approaches, however, has been hampered mainly by insufficient cell-to-cell contact of the engrafted hepatocytes. We developed a method to engineer a uniformly continuous sheet of hepatic tissue using isolated primary hepatocytes cultured on temperature-responsive surfaces. Sheets of hepatic tissue transplanted into the subcutaneous space resulted in efficient engraftment to the surrounding cells, with the formation of two-dimensional hepatic tissues that stably persisted for longer than 200 d. The engineered hepatic tissues also showed several characteristics of liver-specific functionality. Additionally, when the hepatic tissue sheets were layered in vivo, three-dimensional miniature liver systems having persistent survivability could be also engineered. This technology for liver tissue engineering is simple, minimally invasive and free of potentially immunogenic biodegradable scaffolds.

  12. Three-Dimensional Volumetric Analysis of Irradiated Lung With Adjuvant Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Teh, Amy Yuen Meei; Park, Eileen J.H.; Shen Liang; Chung, Hans T.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the dose-volume histogram data of irradiated lung in adjuvant breast radiotherapy (ABR) using a three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT)-guided planning technique; and to investigate the relationship between lung dose-volume data and traditionally used two-dimensional (2D) parameters, as well as their correlation with the incidence of steroid-requiring radiation pneumonitis (SRRP). Methods and Materials: Patients beginning ABR between January 2005 and February 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients included were women aged >=18 years with ductal carcinoma in situ or Stage I-III invasive carcinoma, who received radiotherapy using a 3D-CT technique to the breast or chest wall (two-field radiotherapy [2FRT]) with or without supraclavicular irradiation (three-field radiotherapy [3FRT]), to 50 Gy in 25 fractions. A 10-Gy tumor-bed boost was allowed. Lung dose-volume histogram parameters (V{sub 10}, V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, V{sub 40}), 2D parameters (central lung depth [CLD], maximum lung depth [MLD], and lung length [LL]), and incidence of SRRP were reported. Results: A total of 89 patients met the inclusion criteria: 51 had 2FRT, and 38 had 3FRT. With 2FRT, mean ipsilateral V{sub 10}, V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, V{sub 40} and CLD, MLD, LL were 20%, 14%, 11%, and 8% and 2.0 cm, 2.1 cm, and 14.6 cm, respectively, with strong correlation between CLD and ipsilateral V{sub 10-V40} (R{sup 2} = 0.73-0.83, p < 0.0005). With 3FRT, mean ipsilateral V{sub 10}, V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, and V{sub 40} were 30%, 22%, 17%, and 11%, but its correlation with 2D parameters was poor. With a median follow-up of 14.5 months, 1 case of SRRP was identified. Conclusions: With only 1 case of SRRP observed, our study is limited in its ability to provide definitive guidance, but it does provide a starting point for acceptable lung irradiation during ABR. Further prospective studies are warranted.

  13. Differential diagnosis of lung carcinoma with three-dimensional quantitative molecular vibrational imaging.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liang; Hammoudi, Ahmad A; Li, Fuhai; Thrall, Michael J; Cagle, Philip T; Chen, Yuanxin; Yang, Jian; Xia, Xiaofeng; Fan, Yubo; Massoud, Yehia; Wang, Zhiyong; Wong, Stephen T C

    2012-06-01

    The advent of molecularly targeted therapies requires effective identification of the various cell types of non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC). Currently, cell type diagnosis is performed using small biopsies or cytology specimens that are often insufficient for molecular testing after morphologic analysis. Thus, the ability to rapidly recognize different cancer cell types, with minimal tissue consumption, would accelerate diagnosis and preserve tissue samples for subsequent molecular testing in targeted therapy. We report a label-free molecular vibrational imaging framework enabling three-dimensional (3-D) image acquisition and quantitative analysis of cellular structures for identification of NSCLC cell types. This diagnostic imaging system employs superpixel-based 3-D nuclear segmentation for extracting such disease-related features as nuclear shape, volume, and cell-cell distance. These features are used to characterize cancer cell types using machine learning. Using fresh unstained tissue samples derived from cell lines grown in a mouse model, the platform showed greater than 97% accuracy for diagnosis of NSCLC cell types within a few minutes. As an adjunct to subsequent histology tests, our novel system would allow fast delineation of cancer cell types with minimum tissue consumption, potentially facilitating on-the-spot diagnosis, while preserving specimens for additional tests. Furthermore, 3-D measurements of cellular structure permit evaluation closer to the native state of cells, creating an alternative to traditional 2-D histology specimen evaluation, potentially increasing accuracy in diagnosing cell type of lung carcinomas.

  14. Differential diagnosis of lung carcinoma with three-dimensional quantitative molecular vibrational imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Liang; Hammoudi, Ahmad A.; Li, Fuhai; Thrall, Michael J.; Cagle, Philip T.; Chen, Yuanxin; Yang, Jian; Xia, Xiaofeng; Fan, Yubo; Massoud, Yehia; Wang, Zhiyong; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2012-06-01

    The advent of molecularly targeted therapies requires effective identification of the various cell types of non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC). Currently, cell type diagnosis is performed using small biopsies or cytology specimens that are often insufficient for molecular testing after morphologic analysis. Thus, the ability to rapidly recognize different cancer cell types, with minimal tissue consumption, would accelerate diagnosis and preserve tissue samples for subsequent molecular testing in targeted therapy. We report a label-free molecular vibrational imaging framework enabling three-dimensional (3-D) image acquisition and quantitative analysis of cellular structures for identification of NSCLC cell types. This diagnostic imaging system employs superpixel-based 3-D nuclear segmentation for extracting such disease-related features as nuclear shape, volume, and cell-cell distance. These features are used to characterize cancer cell types using machine learning. Using fresh unstained tissue samples derived from cell lines grown in a mouse model, the platform showed greater than 97% accuracy for diagnosis of NSCLC cell types within a few minutes. As an adjunct to subsequent histology tests, our novel system would allow fast delineation of cancer cell types with minimum tissue consumption, potentially facilitating on-the-spot diagnosis, while preserving specimens for additional tests. Furthermore, 3-D measurements of cellular structure permit evaluation closer to the native state of cells, creating an alternative to traditional 2-D histology specimen evaluation, potentially increasing accuracy in diagnosing cell type of lung carcinomas.

  15. Three-dimensional positioning and control of colloidal objects utilizing engineered liquid crystalline defect networks

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, H.; Asakura, K.; Fukuda, J.; Ozaki, M.

    2015-01-01

    Topological defects in liquid crystals not only affect the optical and rheological properties of the host, but can also act as scaffolds in which to trap nano or micro-sized colloidal objects. The creation of complex defect shapes, however, often involves confining the liquid crystals in curved geometries or adds complex-shaped colloidal objects, which are unsuitable for device applications. Using topologically patterned substrates, here we demonstrate the controlled generation of three-dimensional defect lines with non-trivial shapes and even chirality, in a flat slab of nematic liquid crystal. By using the defect lines as templates and the electric response of the liquid crystals, colloidal superstructures are constructed, which can be reversibly reconfigured at a voltage as low as 1.3 V. Three-dimensional engineering of the defect shapes in liquid crystals is potentially useful in the fabrication of self-healing composites and in stabilizing artificial frustrated phases. PMID:25994837

  16. Three-dimensional positioning and control of colloidal objects utilizing engineered liquid crystalline defect networks.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, H; Asakura, K; Fukuda, J; Ozaki, M

    2015-05-21

    Topological defects in liquid crystals not only affect the optical and rheological properties of the host, but can also act as scaffolds in which to trap nano or micro-sized colloidal objects. The creation of complex defect shapes, however, often involves confining the liquid crystals in curved geometries or adds complex-shaped colloidal objects, which are unsuitable for device applications. Using topologically patterned substrates, here we demonstrate the controlled generation of three-dimensional defect lines with non-trivial shapes and even chirality, in a flat slab of nematic liquid crystal. By using the defect lines as templates and the electric response of the liquid crystals, colloidal superstructures are constructed, which can be reversibly reconfigured at a voltage as low as 1.3 V. Three-dimensional engineering of the defect shapes in liquid crystals is potentially useful in the fabrication of self-healing composites and in stabilizing artificial frustrated phases.

  17. Techniques for fabrication and construction of three-dimensional scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tingli; Li, Yuhui; Chen, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional biomimetic scaffolds have widespread applications in biomedical tissue engineering because of their nanoscaled architecture, eg, nanofibers and nanopores, similar to the native extracellular matrix. In the conventional "top-down" approach, cells are seeded onto a biocompatible and biodegradable scaffold, in which cells are expected to populate in the scaffold and create their own extracellular matrix. The top-down approach based on these scaffolds has successfully engineered thin tissues, including skin, bladder, and cartilage in vitro. However, it is still a challenge to fabricate complex and functional tissues (eg, liver and kidney) due to the lack of vascularization systems and limited diffusion properties of these large biomimetic scaffolds. The emerging "bottom-up" method may hold great potential to address these challenges, and focuses on fabricating microscale tissue building blocks with a specific microarchitecture and assembling these units to engineer larger tissue constructs from the bottom up. In this review, state-of-the-art methods for fabrication of three-dimensional biomimetic scaffolds are presented, and their advantages and drawbacks are discussed. The bottom-up methods used to assemble microscale building blocks (eg, microscale hydrogels) for tissue engineering are also reviewed. Finally, perspectives on future development of the bottom-up approach for tissue engineering are addressed.

  18. Techniques for fabrication and construction of three-dimensional scaffolds for tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tingli; Li, Yuhui; Chen, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional biomimetic scaffolds have widespread applications in biomedical tissue engineering because of their nanoscaled architecture, eg, nanofibers and nanopores, similar to the native extracellular matrix. In the conventional “top-down” approach, cells are seeded onto a biocompatible and biodegradable scaffold, in which cells are expected to populate in the scaffold and create their own extracellular matrix. The top-down approach based on these scaffolds has successfully engineered thin tissues, including skin, bladder, and cartilage in vitro. However, it is still a challenge to fabricate complex and functional tissues (eg, liver and kidney) due to the lack of vascularization systems and limited diffusion properties of these large biomimetic scaffolds. The emerging “bottom-up” method may hold great potential to address these challenges, and focuses on fabricating microscale tissue building blocks with a specific microarchitecture and assembling these units to engineer larger tissue constructs from the bottom up. In this review, state-of-the-art methods for fabrication of three-dimensional biomimetic scaffolds are presented, and their advantages and drawbacks are discussed. The bottom-up methods used to assemble microscale building blocks (eg, microscale hydrogels) for tissue engineering are also reviewed. Finally, perspectives on future development of the bottom-up approach for tissue engineering are addressed. PMID:23345979

  19. Three-dimensional conformal reirradiation for locoregionally recurrent lung cancer previously treated with radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Huh, Gil Ja; Jang, Seong Soon; Park, Suk Young; Seo, Jae Hyuk; Cho, Eun Youn; Park, Ji Chan; Yang, Young Jun

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of reirradiation using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in symptomatic patients with locoregionally recurrent lung cancer. Between 2005 and 2012, 15 patients with locoregionally recurrent lung cancer were retreated with 3D-CRT after previously receiving thoracic radiotherapy. The median interval between the initial irradiation and reirradiation was 12 months (range, five to 41 months). The median initial radiotherapy dose was 63 Gy (range, 45-70 Gy), and reirradiation doses ranged from 25.2 to 45.2 Gy (median, 36 Gy), with daily fractions of 1.8-4 Gy (median, 2 Gy). After reirradiation, 80% of the patients experienced resolved or diminished symptoms for one or more of their symptoms, with an 83% improvement in a total of 24 symptoms. The overall tumor response rate to reirradiation was 46.7%, with progressive disease occurring in only one patient. The median overall survival (OS) time was 11 months (range, one to 27 months), and the one-year OS rate was 47%. The progression-free survival time ranged from one to 10 months (median, five months). In univariate analysis, the use of combined chemotherapy and a higher reirradiation dose showed a trend toward improved survival after reirradiation. Treatment-induced toxicity included grade 2 radiation pneumonitis in only one patient, and there were no other complications, such as radiation esophagitis or myelopathy. Reirradiation using 3D-CRT with moderate doses for locoregionally recurrent lung cancer can provide palliative benefits without severe complications to the majority of selected patients with symptoms as a result of a regrowing tumor.

  20. Three-dimensional scaffolds of acellular human and porcine lungs for high throughput studies of lung disease and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Darcy E; Bonenfant, Nicholas R; Sokocevic, Dino; DeSarno, Michael J; Borg, Zachary D; Parsons, Charles S; Brooks, Elice M; Platz, Joseph J; Khalpey, Zain I; Hoganson, David M; Deng, Bin; Lam, Ying W; Oldinski, Rachael A; Ashikaga, Takamaru; Weiss, Daniel J

    2014-03-01

    Acellular scaffolds from complex whole organs such as lung are being increasingly studied for ex vivo organ generation and for in vitro studies of cell-extracellular matrix interactions. We have established effective methods for efficient de and recellularization of large animal and human lungs including techniques which allow multiple small segments (∼ 1-3 cm(3)) to be excised that retain 3-dimensional lung structure. Coupled with the use of a synthetic pleural coating, cells can be selectively physiologically inoculated via preserved vascular and airway conduits. Inoculated segments can be further sliced for high throughput studies. Further, we demonstrate thermography as a powerful noninvasive technique for monitoring perfusion decellularization and for evaluating preservation of vascular and airway networks following human and porcine lung decellularization. Collectively, these techniques are a significant step forward as they allow high throughput in vitro studies from a single lung or lobe in a more biologically relevant, three-dimensional acellular scaffold. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. MO-C-17A-08: Evaluation of Lung Deformation Using Three Dimensional Strain Maps

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, T; Huang, Q; Miller, W; Zhong, X; Yin, F; Cai, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a systematic approach to generate three dimensional (3D) strain maps of lung using the displacement vector field (DVF) during the respiratory deformation, and to demonstrate its application in evaluating deformable image registration (DIR). Methods: A DVF based strain tensor at each voxel of interest (VOI) was calculated from the relative displacements between the VOI and each of the six nearest neighbors. The maximum and minimum stretches of a VOI can be determined by the principal strains (E{sub 1}, E{sub 2} and E{sub 3}), which are the eigenvalues and the corresponding strain tensors. Two healthy volunteers enrolled in this study under IRB-approved protocol, each was scanned using 3D Hyperpolarized He-3 tagging-MRI and 3D proton-MRI with TrueFISP sequence at the endof- inhalation (EOI) and the end-of-exhalation (EOE) phases. 3D DVFs of tagging- and proton-MRI were obtained by the direct measurements of the tagging grid trajectory and by the DIR method implemented in commercial software. Results: 3D strain maps were successfully generated for all DVFs. The principal strain E1s were calculated as 0.43±0.05 and 0.17±0.25 for tagging-MRI and proton-MRI, respectively. The large values of E{sub 1} indicate the predominant lung motion in the superior-inferior (SI) direction. Given that the DVFs from the tagging images are considered as the ground truth, the discrepancies in the DIR-based strain maps suggest the inaccuracy of the DIR algorithm. In the E{sub 1} maps of tagging-MRI for subject 1, the fissures were distinguishable by the larger values (0.49±0.02) from the adjacent tissues (0.41±0.03) due to the larger relative displacement between the lung lobes. Conclusion: We have successfully developed a methodology to generate DVF-based 3D strain maps of lung. It can potentially enable us to better understand the pulmonary biomechanics and to evaluate and improve the DIR algorithms for the lung deformation. We are currently studying more

  2. Bone tissue engineering therapeutics: controlled drug delivery in three-dimensional scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Mouriño, Viviana; Boccaccini, Aldo R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an extensive overview of published studies on the development and applications of three-dimensional bone tissue engineering (TE) scaffolds with potential capability for the controlled delivery of therapeutic drugs. Typical drugs considered include gentamicin and other antibiotics generally used to combat osteomyelitis, as well as anti-inflammatory drugs and bisphosphonates, but delivery of growth factors is not covered in this review. In each case reviewed, special attention has been given to the technology used for controlling the release of the loaded drugs. The possibility of designing multifunctional three-dimensional bone TE scaffolds for the emerging field of bone TE therapeutics is discussed. A detailed summary of drugs included in three-dimensional scaffolds and the several approaches developed to combine bioceramics with various polymeric biomaterials in composites for drug-delivery systems is included. The main results presented in the literature are discussed and the remaining challenges in the field are summarized with suggestions for future research directions. PMID:19864265

  3. Solvent-free fabrication of three dimensionally aligned polycaprolactone microfibers for engineering of anisotropic tissues.

    PubMed

    An, Jia; Chua, Chee Kai; Leong, Kah Fai; Chen, Chih-Hao; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2012-10-01

    Fabrication of aligned microfiber scaffolds is critical in successful engineering of anisotropic tissues such as tendon, ligaments and nerves. Conventionally, aligned microfiber scaffolds are two dimensional and predominantly fabricated by electrospinning which is solvent dependent. In this paper, we report a novel technique, named microfiber melt drawing, to fabricate a bundle of three dimensionally aligned polycaprolactone microfibers without using any organic solvent. This technique is simple yet effective. It has been demonstrated that polycaprolactone microfibers of 10 μm fiber diameter can be directly drawn from a 2 mm orifice. Orifice diameter, temperature and take-up speed significantly influence the final linear density and fiber diameter of the microfibers. Mechanical test suggests that mechanical properties such as stiffness and breaking force of microfiber bundles can be easily adjusted by the number of fibers. In vitro study shows that these microfibers are able to support the proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts over 7 days. In vivo result of Achilles tendon repair in a rabbit model shows that the microfibers were highly infiltrated by tendon tissue as early as in 1 month, besides, the repaired tendon have a well-aligned tissue structure under the guidance of aligned microfibers. However whether these three dimensionally aligned microfibers can induce three dimensionally aligned cells remains inconclusive.

  4. Validation of targets and drug candidates in an engineered three-dimensional cardiac tissue model.

    PubMed

    Navé, Barbara T; Becker, Michael; Roenicke, Volker; Henkel, Thomas

    2002-04-01

    High-throughput target discovery confronts the biopharmaceutical industry with a plethora of target candidates. The validation of these candidates in disease-specific animal models often lacks the required throughput. Here, we discuss perspectives and limitations of a novel engineered three-dimensional cardiac tissue, which enables the influence of gene and drug intervention to be monitored on a cellular and molecular level under physiological conditions in sufficient throughput. The model is an extremely helpful filter to prioritize multiple development candidates before moving a project into large animal models with higher predictivity.

  5. Application of an Engineering Inviscid-Boundary Layer Method to Slender Three-Dimensional Vehicle Forebodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    An engineering inviscid-boundary layer method has been modified for application to slender three-dimensional (3-D) forebodies which are characteristic of transatmospheric vehicles. An improved shock description in the nose region has been added to the inviscid technique which allows the calculation of a wider range of body geometries. The modified engineering method is applied to the perfect gas solution over a slender 3-D configuration at angle of attack. The method predicts surface pressures and laminar heating rates on the windward side of the vehicle that compare favorably with numerical solutions of the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. These improvements extend the 3-D capabilities of the engineering method and significantly increase its design applications.

  6. Application of an engineering inviscid-boundary layer method to slender three-dimensional vehicle forebodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    An engineering inviscid-boundary layer method has been modified for application to slender three-dimensional (3-D) forebodies which are characteristic of transatmospheric vehicles. An improved shock description in the nose region has been added to the inviscid technique which allows the calculation of a wider range of body geometries. The modified engineering method is applied to the perfect gas solution over a slender 3-D configuration at angle of attack. The method predicts surface pressures and laminar heating rates on the windward side of the vehicle that compare favorably with numerical solutions of the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. These improvements extend the 3-D capabilities of the engineering method and significantly increase its design applications.

  7. [Research Progress of Collagen-based Three-dimensional Porous Scaffolds Used in Skin Tissue Engineering].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Tang, Qiwei; Zhou, Aimei; Yang, Shulin

    2015-08-01

    Collagen is a kind of natural biomedical material and collagen based three-dimensional porous scaffolds have been widely used in skin tissue engineering. However, these scaffolds do not meet the requirements for artificial skin substitutes in terms of their poor mechanical properties, short supply, and rejection in the bodies. All of these factors limit their further application in skin tissue engineering. A variety of methods have been chosen to meliorate the situation, such as cross linking and blending other substance for improving mechanical properties. The highly biomimetic scaffolds either in structure or in function can be prepared through culturing cells and loading growth factors. To avoid the drawbacks of unsafety attributing to animals, investigators have fixed their eyes on the recombinant collagen. This paper reviews the the progress of research and application of collagen-based 3-dimensional porous scaffolds in skin tissue engineering.

  8. Rapid casting of patterned vascular networks for perfusable engineered three-dimensional tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jordan S.; Stevens, Kelly R.; Yang, Michael T.; Baker, Brendon M.; Nguyen, Duc-Huy T.; Cohen, Daniel M.; Toro, Esteban; Chen, Alice A.; Galie, Peter A.; Yu, Xiang; Chaturvedi, Ritika; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2012-09-01

    In the absence of perfusable vascular networks, three-dimensional (3D) engineered tissues densely populated with cells quickly develop a necrotic core. Yet the lack of a general approach to rapidly construct such networks remains a major challenge for 3D tissue culture. Here, we printed rigid 3D filament networks of carbohydrate glass, and used them as a cytocompatible sacrificial template in engineered tissues containing living cells to generate cylindrical networks that could be lined with endothelial cells and perfused with blood under high-pressure pulsatile flow. Because this simple vascular casting approach allows independent control of network geometry, endothelialization and extravascular tissue, it is compatible with a wide variety of cell types, synthetic and natural extracellular matrices, and crosslinking strategies. We also demonstrated that the perfused vascular channels sustained the metabolic function of primary rat hepatocytes in engineered tissue constructs that otherwise exhibited suppressed function in their core.

  9. Rapid casting of patterned vascular networks for perfusable engineered three-dimensional tissues.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jordan S; Stevens, Kelly R; Yang, Michael T; Baker, Brendon M; Nguyen, Duc-Huy T; Cohen, Daniel M; Toro, Esteban; Chen, Alice A; Galie, Peter A; Yu, Xiang; Chaturvedi, Ritika; Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Chen, Christopher S

    2012-09-01

    In the absence of perfusable vascular networks, three-dimensional (3D) engineered tissues densely populated with cells quickly develop a necrotic core. Yet the lack of a general approach to rapidly construct such networks remains a major challenge for 3D tissue culture. Here, we printed rigid 3D filament networks of carbohydrate glass, and used them as a cytocompatible sacrificial template in engineered tissues containing living cells to generate cylindrical networks that could be lined with endothelial cells and perfused with blood under high-pressure pulsatile flow. Because this simple vascular casting approach allows independent control of network geometry, endothelialization and extravascular tissue, it is compatible with a wide variety of cell types, synthetic and natural extracellular matrices, and crosslinking strategies. We also demonstrated that the perfused vascular channels sustained the metabolic function of primary rat hepatocytes in engineered tissue constructs that otherwise exhibited suppressed function in their core.

  10. Two- and Three-Dimensional All-Carbon Nanomaterial Assemblies for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Lalwani, Gaurav; Patel, Sunny C; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2016-06-01

    Carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene have gained significant interest in the fields of materials science, electronics and biomedicine due to their interesting physiochemical properties. Typically these carbon nanomaterials have been dispersed in polymeric matrices at low concentrations to improve the functional properties of nanocomposites employed as two-dimensional (2D) substrates or three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. There has been a growing interest in the assembly of these nanomaterials into 2D and 3D architectures without the use of polymeric matrices, surfactants or binders. In this article, we review recent advances in the development of 2D or 3D all-carbon assemblies using carbon nanotubes or graphene as nanoscale building-block biomaterials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications.

  11. Three-dimensional reconstruction of biological objects using a graphics engine.

    PubMed

    Winslow, J L; Bjerknes, M; Cheng, H

    1987-12-01

    A common problem in the study of biological material is the determination of three-dimensional structure from serial sections. The large number of sections required to obtain sufficient internal detail of a structure results in enormous processing requirements. These requirements can now be satisfied by current graphics engine technology in combination with image-digitizing hardware. The previously onerous tasks of manipulating and displaying 3D objects become routine with this combination of technologies. We report a computer-assisted reconstruction system on a graphics engine-based workstation. The system accepts images from any video source and includes a utility for aligning adjacent video images. Also available is an editor for geometric object entry and editing. More novel in our approach is the use of video interiors in 3D displays in addition to contours and tiled surfaces. Video interiors is a form of display in which digitized pixels interior to objects are revealed by cutaway blocks.

  12. Engineering three-dimensional cardiac microtissues for potential drug screening applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Huang, G; Sha, B; Wang, S; Han, Y L; Wu, J; Li, Y; Du, Y; Lu, T J; Xu, F

    2014-01-01

    Heart disease is one of the major global health issues. Despite rapid advances in cardiac tissue engineering, limited successful strategies have been achieved to cure cardiovascular diseases. This situation is mainly due to poor understanding of the mechanism of diverse heart diseases and unavailability of effective in vitro heart tissue models for cardiovascular drug screening. With the development of microengineering technologies, three-dimensional (3D) cardiac microtissue (CMT) models, mimicking 3D architectural microenvironment of native heart tissues, have been developed. The engineered 3D CMT models hold greater potential to be used for assessing effective drugs candidates than traditional two-dimensional cardiomyocyte culture models. This review discusses the development of 3D CMT models and highlights their potential applications for high-throughput screening of cardiovascular drug candidates.

  13. Excitation propagation in three-dimensional engineered hearts using decellularized extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Haruyo; Lee, Jong-Kook; Yoshida, Akira; Yokoyama, Teruki; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Miwa, Keiko; Naito, Atsuhiko T; Oka, Toru; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Nakai, Junichi; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Sawa, Yoshiki; Sakata, Yasushi; Komuro, Issei

    2014-09-01

    Engineering of three-dimensional (3D) cardiac tissues using decellularized extracellular matrix could be a new technique to create an "organ-like" structure of the heart. To engineer artificial hearts functionally comparable to native hearts, however, much remain to be solved including stable excitation-propagation. To elucidate the points, we examined conduction properties of engineered tissues. We repopulated the decellularized hearts with neonatal rat cardiac cells and then, we observed excitation-propagation of spontaneous beatings using high resolution cameras. We also conducted immunofluorescence staining to examine morphological aspects. Live tissue imaging revealed that GFP-labeled-isolated cardiac cells were migrated into interstitial spaces through extravasation from coronary arteries. Engineered hearts repopulated with Ca(2+)-indicating protein (GCaMP2)-expressing cardiac cells were subjected to optical imaging experiments. Although the engineered hearts generally showed well-organized stable excitation-propagation, the hearts also demonstrated arrhythmogenic propensity such as disorganized propagation. Immunofluorescence study revealed randomly-mixed alignment of cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. The recellularized hearts also showed disarray of cardiomyocytes and markedly decreased expression of connexin43. In conclusion, we successfully demonstrated that the recellularized hearts showed dynamic excitation-propagation as a "whole organ". Our strategy could provide prerequisite information to construct a 3D-engineered heart, functionally comparable to the native heart. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. In vitro two-dimensional and three-dimensional tenocyte culture for tendon tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yiwei; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Yaonan; Carr, Andrew J; Zhu, Liwei; Xia, Zhidao; Sabokbar, Afsie

    2016-03-01

    In order to examine the differentiation potential of the tenocytes expanded in our defined culture medium (reported previously) and the effect of sequential combination of the two culture conditions on human tenocytes, a two-dimensional and three-dimensional experimental approach was used. Human tenocytes were sequentially exposed to 1% fetal bovine serum (FBS) + 50 ng/ml platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGFBB ) + 50 ng/ml basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) for the first 14 days (expansion phase) followed by a further 14-day culture in the presence of 10 ng/ml transforming growth factor β-3 plus 50 ng/ml insulin-like growth factor 1, but in the absence of serum (differentiation phase). The results showed that by sequential treatment of human tenocytes maintaining a long-term two-dimensional tenocyte culture in vitro for up to 28 days was possible. These findings were further verified using a three-dimensional scaffold (Bombyx silk) whereby the tendon-like constructs formed resembled macroscopically and microscopically the constructs formed in 10% FBS supplemented culture media and the human hamstring tendon. These findings were further substantiated using haematoxylin and eosin staining, scanning electron microscopy and by immunohistochemical detection of type I collagen. In addition, the mechanical properties of the three-dimensional constructs were determined to be significantly superior to that of the natural human hamstring tendon. This is the first report to demonstrate a possible approach in expanding and differentiating human tenocytes for tendon tissue engineering. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. The Use of Optical Clearing and Multiphoton Microscopy for Investigation of Three-Dimensional Tissue-Engineered Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Calle, Elizabeth A.; Vesuna, Sam; Dimitrievska, Sashka; Zhou, Kevin; Huang, Angela; Zhao, Liping; Niklason, Laura E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in three-dimensional (3D) tissue engineering have concomitantly generated a need for new methods to visualize and assess the tissue. In particular, methods for imaging intact volumes of whole tissue, rather than a single plane, are required. Herein, we describe the use of multiphoton microscopy, combined with optical clearing, to noninvasively probe decellularized lung extracellular matrix scaffolds and decellularized, tissue-engineered blood vessels. We also evaluate recellularized lung tissue scaffolds. In addition to nondestructive imaging of tissue volumes greater than 4 mm3, the lung tissue can be visualized using three distinct signals, combined or singly, that allow for simple separation of cells and different components of the extracellular matrix. Because the 3D volumes are not reconstructions, they do not require registration algorithms to generate digital volumes, and maintenance of isotropic resolution is not required when acquiring stacks of images. Once a virtual volume of tissue is generated, structures that have innate 3D features, such as the lumens of vessels and airways, are easily animated and explored in all dimensions. In blood vessels, individual collagen fibers can be visualized at the micron scale and their alignment assessed at various depths through the tissue, potentially providing some nondestructive measure of vessel integrity and mechanics. Finally, both the lungs and vessels assayed here were optically cleared, imaged, and visualized in a matter of hours, such that the added benefits of these techniques can be achieved with little more hassle or processing time than that associated with traditional histological methods. PMID:24251630

  16. Production of three-dimensional tissue-engineered cartilage through mutual fusion of chondrocyte pellets.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, K; Fujihara, Y; Mori, Y; Asawa, Y; Kanazawa, S; Nishizawa, S; Misawa, M; Numano, T; Inoue, H; Sakamoto, T; Watanabe, M; Komura, M; Takato, T

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the mutual fusion of chondrocyte pellets was promoted in order to produce large-sized tissue-engineered cartilage with a three-dimensional (3D) shape. Five pellets of human auricular chondrocytes were first prepared, which were then incubated in an agarose mold. After 3 weeks of culture in matrix production-promoting medium under 5.78g/cm(2) compression, the tissue-engineered cartilage showed a sufficient mechanical strength. To confirm the usefulness of these methods, a transplantation experiment was performed using beagles. Tissue-engineered cartilage prepared with 50 pellets of beagle chondrocytes was transplanted subcutaneously into the cell-donor dog for 2 months. The tissue-engineered cartilage of the beagles maintained a rod-like shape, even after harvest. Histology showed fair cartilage regeneration. Furthermore, 20 pellets were made and placed on a beta-tricalcium phosphate prism, and this was then incubated within the agarose mold for 3 weeks. The construct was transplanted into a bone/cartilage defect in the cell-donor beagle. After 2 months, bone and cartilage regeneration was identified on micro-computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. This approach involving the fusion of small pellets into a large structure enabled the production of 3D tissue-engineered cartilage that was close to physiological cartilage tissue in property, without conventional polyper scaffolds.

  17. Characterization of human lung cancer-associated fibroblasts in three-dimensional in vitro co-culture model

    SciTech Connect

    Horie, Masafumi; Saito, Akira; Mikami, Yu; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Nakajima, Jun; Kohyama, Tadashi; Nagase, Takahide

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We established three patient-paired sets of CAFs and NFs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs and NFs were analyzed using three-dimensional co-culture experiments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs clearly enhanced collagen gel contraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs showed higher {alpha}-SMA expression than NFs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs were implicated in invasion and differentiation of lung cancer cells. -- Abstract: Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Stromal cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play crucial roles in carcinogenesis, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis of non-small cell lung carcinoma, and targeting of CAFs could be a novel strategy for cancer treatment. However, the characteristics of human CAFs still remain to be better defined. In this study, we established patient-matched CAFs and normal fibroblasts (NFs), from tumoral and non-tumoral portions of resected lung tissue from lung cancer patients. CAFs showed higher {alpha}-smooth muscle actin ({alpha}-SMA) expression than NFs, and CAFs clearly enhanced collagen gel contraction. Furthermore, we employed three-dimensional co-culture assay with A549 lung cancer cells, where CAFs were more potent in inducing collagen gel contraction. Hematoxylin and eosin staining of co-cultured collagen gel revealed that CAFs had the potential to increase invasion of A549 cells compared to NFs. These observations provide evidence that lung CAFs have the tumor-promoting capacity distinct from NFs.

  18. Three-dimensional analysis of pulmonary nodules by MSCT with Advanced Lung Analysis (ALA1) software.

    PubMed

    Volterrani, L; Mazzei, M A; Scialpi, M; Carcano, M; Carbone, S F; Ricci, V; Guazzi, G; Lupattelli, L

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the reproducibility of the three-dimensional (3D) Advanced Lung Analysis software (3D-ALA, GE Healthcare) in the estimation of pulmonary nodule volume. We retrospectively reviewed the unenhanced multislice CT scans (Lightspeed Pro 16 GE) of 77 patients with a solitary pulmonary nodule (n=71) or metastatic pulmonary disease (n=6). A total of 103 pulmonary nodules (19 well-circumscribed, 45 juxtavascular and 39 juxtapleural) were analysed grouped into five classes based on diameter: <5 mm, 10 nodules (9.7%); >or=5 to <10 mm, 25 nodules (24.2%); >or=10 mm to <15 mm, 41 nodules (39.8%); >or=5 to <18 mm, 14 nodules (13.6% ); >or=8 to <30 mm, 13 nodules (12.62%). The following acquisition parameters were used: slice thickness 0.625 mm, reconstruction interval 0.4 mm, pitch 0.562:1, 140 kV, 300 mAs, field of view 13 cm, bone kernel. For each of the 103 nodules three, 3D volume measurements were obtained by the 3D-ALA software. The reproducibility of nodule segmentation was evaluated according to a visual score (1=optimal, >or=95%; 2=fair, 90-95%; 3=poor,

  19. Three-dimensional modeling of diesel engine intake flow, combustion and emissions-II

    SciTech Connect

    Reitz, R.D.; Rutland, C.J.

    1993-09-01

    A three-dimensional computer code, KIVA, is being modified to include state-of-the-art submodels for diesel engine flow and combustion. Improved and/or new submodels which have already been implemented and previously reported are: Wall heat transfer with unsteadiness and compressibility, laminar-turbulent characteristic time combustion with unburned HC and Zeldo`vich NO{sub x}, and spray/wall impingement with rebounding and sliding drops. Progress on the implementation of improved spray drop drag and drop breakup models, the formulation and testing of a multistep kinetics ignition model and preliminary soot modeling results are described in this report. In addition, the use of a block structured version of KIVA to model the intake flow process is described. A grid generation scheme has been developed for modeling realistic (complex) engine geometries, and computations have been made of intake flow in the ports and combustion chamber of a two-intake-valve engine. The research also involves the use of the code to assess the effects of subprocesses on diesel engine performance. The accuracy of the predictions is being tested by comparisons with engine experiments. To date, comparisons have been made with measured engine cylinder pressure, temperature and heat flux data, and the model results are in good agreement with the experiments. Work is in progress that will allow validation of in-cylinder flow and soot formation predictions. An engine test facility is described that is being used to provide the needed validation data. Test results have been obtained showing the effect of injection rate and split injections on engine performance and emissions.

  20. Three-dimensional modeling of diesel engine intake flow, combustion and emissions-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reitz, R. D.; Rutland, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    A three-dimensional computer code, KIVA, is being modified to include state-of-the-art submodels for diesel engine flow and combustion. Improved and/or new submodels which have already been implemented and previously reported are: wall heat transfer with unsteadiness and compressibility, laminar-turbulent characteristic time combustion with unburned HC and Zeldo'vich NO(x), and spray/wall impingement with rebounding and sliding drops. Progress on the implementation of improved spray drop drag and drop breakup models, the formulation and testing of a multistep kinetics ignition model, and preliminary soot modeling results are described. In addition, the use of a block structured version of KIVA to model the intake flow process is described. A grid generation scheme was developed for modeling realistic (complex) engine geometries, and computations were made of intake flow in the ports and combustion chamber of a two-intake-value engine. The research also involves the use of the code to assess the effects of subprocesses on diesel engine performance. The accuracy of the predictions is being tested by comparisons with engine experiments. To date, comparisons were made with measured engine cylinder pressure, temperature and heat flux data, and the model results are in good agreement with the experiments. Work is in progress that will allow validation of in-cylinder flow and soot formation predictions. An engine test facility is described that is being used to provide the needed validation data. Test results were obtained showing the effect of injection rate and split injections on engine performance and emissions.

  1. Modeling dynamic reciprocity: Engineering three-dimensional culture models of breast architecture, function, and neoplastic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2010-01-01

    In order to understand why cancer develops as well as predict the outcome of pharmacological treatments, we need to model the structure and function of organs in culture so that our experimental manipulations occur under physiological contexts. This review traces the history of the development of a prototypic example, the three-dimensional (3D) model of the mammary gland acinus. We briefly describe the considerable information available on both normal mammary gland function and breast cancer generated by the current model and present future challenges that will require an increase in its complexity. We propose the need for engineered tissues that faithfully recapitulate their native structures to allow a greater understanding of tissue function, dysfunction, and potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:15963732

  2. A review of the responses of two- and three-dimensional engineered tissues to electric fields.

    PubMed

    Hronik-Tupaj, Marie; Kaplan, David L

    2012-06-01

    The application of external biophysical signals is one approach to tissue engineering that is explored less often than more traditional additions of exogenous biochemical and chemical factors to direct cell and tissue outcomes. The study of bioelectromagnetism and the field of electrotherapeutics have evolved over the years, and we review biocompatible electric stimulation devices and their successful application to tissue growth. Specifically, information on capacitively coupled alternating current, inductively coupled alternating current, and direct current devices is described. Cell and tissue responses from the application of these devices, including two- and three-dimensional in vitro studies and in vivo studies, are reviewed with regard to cell proliferation, adhesion, differentiation, morphology, and migration and tissue function. The current understanding of cellular mechanisms related to electric stimulation is detailed. The advantages of electric stimulation are compared with those pf other techniques, and areas in which electric fields are used as an adjuvant therapy for healing and regeneration are discussed.

  3. Online monitoring of mechanical properties of three-dimensional tissue engineered constructs for quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinwald, Yvonne; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.; Yang, Ying; Baba Ismail, Yanny M.; El Haj, Alicia J.

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical preconditioning and mechanical properties of tissue engineered constructs are essential for their capability to regenerate damaged tissues. To online monitor the mechanical properties a hydrostatic pressure bioreactor was coupled with optical coherence tomography into a new image modality termed hydrostatic pressure optical coherence elastography (HP-OCE). HP-OCE was utilised to assess the properties of three-dimensional (3D) tissue constructs while being physically stimulated within the hydrostatic force bioreactor. Hydrogels have been infiltrated into porous rapid prototyped or salt-leached scaffolds to mimic heterogeneous mechanical properties of cell-seeded constructs. Variations of mechanical properties in the solid scaffolds and agarose gels with different gel concentrations as well as the presences of cells have been clearly delineated by HP-OCE. Results indicate that HP-OCE allows contactless real-time non-invasive monitoring of the mechanical properties of tissue constructs and the effect of physical stimulation on cellular activities.

  4. [RESEARCH PROGRESS OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL PRINTING POROUS SCAFFOLDS FOR BONE TISSUE ENGINEERING].

    PubMed

    Wu, Tianqi; Yang, Chunxi

    2016-04-01

    To summarize the research progress of several three-dimensional (3-D)-printing scaffold materials in bone tissue engineering. The recent domestic and international articles about 3-D printing scaffold materials were reviewed and summarized. Compared with conventional manufacturing methods, 3-D printing has distinctive advantages, such as enhancing the controllability of the structure and increasing the productivity. In addition to the traditional metal and ceramic scaffolds, 3-D printing scaffolds carrying seeding cells and tissue factors as well as scaffolds filling particular drugs for special need have been paid more and more attention. The development of 3-D printing porous scaffolds have revealed new perspectives in bone repairing. But it is still at the initial stage, more basic and clinical researches are still needed.

  5. A Review of the Responses of Two- and Three-Dimensional Engineered Tissues to Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Hronik-Tupaj, Marie

    2012-01-01

    The application of external biophysical signals is one approach to tissue engineering that is explored less often than more traditional additions of exogenous biochemical and chemical factors to direct cell and tissue outcomes. The study of bioelectromagnetism and the field of electrotherapeutics have evolved over the years, and we review biocompatible electric stimulation devices and their successful application to tissue growth. Specifically, information on capacitively coupled alternating current, inductively coupled alternating current, and direct current devices is described. Cell and tissue responses from the application of these devices, including two- and three-dimensional in vitro studies and in vivo studies, are reviewed with regard to cell proliferation, adhesion, differentiation, morphology, and migration and tissue function. The current understanding of cellular mechanisms related to electric stimulation is detailed. The advantages of electric stimulation are compared with those pf other techniques, and areas in which electric fields are used as an adjuvant therapy for healing and regeneration are discussed. PMID:22046979

  6. Mechanical stretching for tissue engineering: two-dimensional and three-dimensional constructs.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Brandon D; Park, Jae-Hong; Kwon, Il Keun; Lim, Jung Yul

    2012-08-01

    Mechanical cell stretching may be an attractive strategy for the tissue engineering of mechanically functional tissues. It has been demonstrated that cell growth and differentiation can be guided by cell stretch with minimal help from soluble factors and engineered tissues that are mechanically stretched in bioreactors may have superior organization, functionality, and strength compared with unstretched counterparts. This review explores recent studies on cell stretching in both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) setups focusing on the applications of stretch stimulation as a tool for controlling cell orientation, growth, gene expression, lineage commitment, and differentiation and for achieving successful tissue engineering of mechanically functional tissues, including cardiac, muscle, vasculature, ligament, tendon, bone, and so on. Custom stretching devices and lab-specific mechanical bioreactors are described with a discussion on capabilities and limitations. While stretch mechanotransduction pathways have been examined using 2D stretch, studying such pathways in physiologically relevant 3D environments may be required to understand how cells direct tissue development under stretch. Cell stretch study using 3D milieus may also help to develop tissue-specific stretch regimens optimized with biochemical feedback, which once developed will provide optimal tissue engineering protocols.

  7. Three-dimensional modeling of diesel engine intake flow, combustion and emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reitz, R. D.; Rutland, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    A three-dimensional computer code (KIVA) is being modified to include state-of-the-art submodels for diesel engine flow and combustion: spray atomization, drop breakup/coalescence, multi-component fuel vaporization, spray/wall interaction, ignition and combustion, wall heat transfer, unburned HC and NOx formation, soot and radiation, and the intake flow process. Improved and/or new submodels which were completed are: wall heat transfer with unsteadiness and compressibility, laminar-turbulent characteristic time combustion with unburned HC and Zeldo'vich NOx, and spray/wall impingement with rebounding and sliding drops. Results to date show that adding the effects of unsteadiness and compressibility improves the accuracy of heat transfer predictions; spray drop rebound can occur from walls at low impingement velocities (e.g., in cold-starting); larger spray drops are formed at the nozzle due to the influence of vaporization on the atomization process; a laminar-and-turbulent characteristic time combustion model has the flexibility to match measured engine combustion data over a wide range of operating conditions; and finally, the characteristic time combustion model can also be extended to allow predictions of ignition. The accuracy of the predictions is being assessed by comparisons with available measurements. Additional supporting experiments are also described briefly. To date, comparisons with measured engine cylinder pressure and heat flux data were made for homogeneous charge, spark-ignited and compression-ignited engines. The model results are in good agreement with the experiments.

  8. Mechanical Stretching for Tissue Engineering: Two-Dimensional and Three-Dimensional Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Riehl, Brandon D.; Park, Jae-Hong; Kwon, Il Keun

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical cell stretching may be an attractive strategy for the tissue engineering of mechanically functional tissues. It has been demonstrated that cell growth and differentiation can be guided by cell stretch with minimal help from soluble factors and engineered tissues that are mechanically stretched in bioreactors may have superior organization, functionality, and strength compared with unstretched counterparts. This review explores recent studies on cell stretching in both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) setups focusing on the applications of stretch stimulation as a tool for controlling cell orientation, growth, gene expression, lineage commitment, and differentiation and for achieving successful tissue engineering of mechanically functional tissues, including cardiac, muscle, vasculature, ligament, tendon, bone, and so on. Custom stretching devices and lab-specific mechanical bioreactors are described with a discussion on capabilities and limitations. While stretch mechanotransduction pathways have been examined using 2D stretch, studying such pathways in physiologically relevant 3D environments may be required to understand how cells direct tissue development under stretch. Cell stretch study using 3D milieus may also help to develop tissue-specific stretch regimens optimized with biochemical feedback, which once developed will provide optimal tissue engineering protocols. PMID:22335794

  9. Hybrid Tissue Engineering Scaffolds by Combination of Three-Dimensional Printing and Cell Photoencapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Markovic, Marica; Van Hoorick, Jasper; Hölzl, Katja; Tromayer, Maximilian; Gruber, Peter; Nürnberger, Sylvia; Dubruel, Peter; Van Vlierberghe, Sandra; Liska, Robert; Ovsianikov, Aleksandr

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing offers versatile possibilities for adapting the structural parameters of tissue engineering scaffolds. However, it is also essential to develop procedures allowing efficient cell seeding independent of scaffold geometry and pore size. The aim of this study was to establish a method for seeding the scaffolds using photopolymerizable cell-laden hydrogels. The latter facilitates convenient preparation, and handling of cell suspension, while distributing the hydrogel precursor throughout the pores, before it is cross-linked with light. In addition, encapsulation of living cells within hydrogels can produce constructs with high initial cell loading and intimate cell-matrix contact, similar to that of the natural extra-cellular matrix (ECM). Three dimensional scaffolds were produced from poly(lactic) acid (PLA) by means of fused deposition modeling. A solution of methacrylamide-modified gelatin (Gel-MOD) in cell culture medium containing photoinitiator Li-TPO-L was used as a hydrogel precursor. Being an enzymatically degradable derivative of natural collagen, gelatin-based matrices are biomimetic and potentially support the process of cell-induced remodeling. Preosteoblast cells MC3T3-E1 at a density of 10 × 106 cells per 1 mL were used for testing the seeding procedure and cell proliferation studies. Obtained results indicate that produced constructs support cell survival and proliferation over extended duration of our experiment. The established two-step approach for scaffold seeding with the cells is simple, rapid, and is shown to be highly reproducible. Furthermore, it enables precise control of the initial cell density, while yielding their uniform distribution throughout the scaffold. Such hybrid tissue engineering constructs merge the advantages of rigid 3D printed constructs with the soft hydrogel matrix, potentially mimicking the process of ECM remodeling. PMID:26858826

  10. Transient Three-Dimensional Analysis of Nozzle Side Load in Regeneratively Cooled Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See

    2005-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical investigations on the start-up side load physics for a regeneratively cooled, high-aspect-ratio nozzle were performed. The objectives of this study are to identify the three-dimensional side load physics and to compute the associated aerodynamic side load using an anchored computational methodology. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation, and a transient inlet condition based on an engine system simulation. Computations were performed for both the adiabatic and cooled walls in order to understand the effect of boundary conditions. Finite-rate chemistry was used throughout the study so that combustion effect is always included. The results show that three types of shock evolution are responsible for side loads: generation of combustion wave; transitions among free-shock separation, restricted-shock separation, and simultaneous free-shock and restricted shock separations; along with oscillation of shocks across the lip. Wall boundary conditions drastically affect the computed side load physics: the adiabatic nozzle prefers free-shock separation while the cooled nozzle favors restricted-shock separation, resulting in higher peak side load for the cooled nozzle than that of the adiabatic nozzle. By comparing the computed physics with those of test observations, it is concluded that cooled wall is a more realistic boundary condition, and the oscillation of the restricted-shock separation flow pattern across the lip along with its associated tangential shock motion are the dominant side load physics for a regeneratively cooled, high aspect-ratio rocket engine.

  11. Tissue engineering of autologous cartilage grafts in three-dimensional in vitro macroaggregate culture system.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Andreas; Dennis, James E; Aigner, Joachim; Coticchia, James; Arnold, James; Berghaus, Alexander; Kastenbauer, Ernst R; Caplan, Arnold I

    2004-01-01

    In the field of tissue engineering, techniques have been described to generate cartilage tissue with isolated chondrocytes and bioresorbable or nonbioresorbable biomaterials serving as three-dimensional cell carriers. In spite of successful cartilage engineering, problems of uneven degradation of biomaterial, and unforeseeable cell-biomaterial interactions remain. This study represents a novel technique to engineer cartilage by an in vitro macroaggregate culture system without the use of biomaterials. Human nasoseptal or auricular chondrocytes were enzymatically isolated and amplified in conventional monolayer culture before the cells were seeded into a cell culture insert with a track-etched membrane and cultured in vitro for 3 weeks. The new cartilage formed within the in vitro macroaggregates was analyzed by histology (toluidine blue, von Kossa-safranin O staining), and immunohistochemistry (collagen types I, II, V, VI, and X and elastin). The total glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of native and engineered auricular as well as nasal cartilage was assayed colorimetrically in a safranin O assay. The biomechanical properties of engineered cartilage were determined by biphasic indentation assay. After 3 weeks of in vitro culture, nasoseptal and auricular chondrocytes synthesized new cartilage with the typical appearance of hyaline nasal cartilage and elastic auricular cartilage. Immunohistochemical staining of cartilage samples showed a characteristic pattern of staining for collagen antibodies that varied in location and intensity. In all samples, intense staining for cartilage-specific collagen types I, II, and X was observed. By the use of von Kossa-safranin O staining a few positive patches-a possible sign of beginning mineralization within the engineered cartilages-were detected. The unique pattern for nasoseptal cartilage is intense staining for type V collagen, whereas auricular cartilage is only weakly positive for collagen types V and VI. Engineered nasal

  12. Structural and material approaches to bone tissue engineering in powder-based three-dimensional printing.

    PubMed

    Butscher, A; Bohner, M; Hofmann, S; Gauckler, L; Müller, R

    2011-03-01

    This article reviews the current state of knowledge concerning the use of powder-based three-dimensional printing (3DP) for the synthesis of bone tissue engineering scaffolds. 3DP is a solid free-form fabrication (SFF) technique building up complex open porous 3D structures layer by layer (a bottom-up approach). In contrast to traditional fabrication techniques generally subtracting material step by step (a top-down approach), SFF approaches allow nearly unlimited designs and a large variety of materials to be used for scaffold engineering. Today's state of the art materials, as well as the mechanical and structural requirements for bone scaffolds, are summarized and discussed in relation to the technical feasibility of their use in 3DP. Advances in the field of 3DP are presented and compared with other SFF methods. Existing strategies on material and design control of scaffolds are reviewed. Finally, the possibilities and limiting factors are addressed and potential strategies to improve 3DP for scaffold engineering are proposed.

  13. Open-source three-dimensional printing of biodegradable polymer scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Trachtenberg, Jordan E; Mountziaris, Paschalia M; Miller, Jordan S; Wettergreen, Matthew; Kasper, Fred K; Mikos, Antonios G

    2014-12-01

    The fabrication of scaffolds for tissue engineering requires elements of customization depending on the application and is often limited due to the flexibility of the processing technique. This investigation seeks to address this obstacle by utilizing an open-source three-dimensional printing (3DP) system that allows vast customizability and facilitates reproduction of experiments. The effects of processing parameters on printed poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds with uniform and gradient pore architectures have been characterized with respect to fiber and pore morphology and mechanical properties. The results demonstrate the ability to tailor the fiber diameter, pore size, and porosity through modification of pressure, printing speed, and programmed fiber spacing. A model was also used to predict the compressive mechanical properties of uniform and gradient scaffolds, and it was found that modulus and yield strength declined with increasing porosity. The use of open-source 3DP technologies for printing tissue-engineering scaffolds provides a flexible system that can be readily modified at a low cost and is supported by community documentation. In this manner, the 3DP system is more accessible to the scientific community, which further facilitates the translation of these technologies toward successful tissue-engineering strategies.

  14. Quantification of Cardiomyocyte Alignment from Three-Dimensional (3D) Confocal Microscopy of Engineered Tissue.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, William J; Yuan, Fangping; Nakane, Takeichiro; Masumoto, Hidetoshi; Dwenger, Marc; Ye, Fei; Tinney, Joseph P; Keller, Bradley B

    2017-08-01

    Biological tissues have complex, three-dimensional (3D) organizations of cells and matrix factors that provide the architecture necessary to meet morphogenic and functional demands. Disordered cell alignment is associated with congenital heart disease, cardiomyopathy, and neurodegenerative diseases and repairing or replacing these tissues using engineered constructs may improve regenerative capacity. However, optimizing cell alignment within engineered tissues requires quantitative 3D data on cell orientations and both efficient and validated processing algorithms. We developed an automated method to measure local 3D orientations based on structure tensor analysis and incorporated an adaptive subregion size to account for multiple scales. Our method calculates the statistical concentration parameter, κ, to quantify alignment, as well as the traditional orientational order parameter. We validated our method using synthetic images and accurately measured principal axis and concentration. We then applied our method to confocal stacks of cleared, whole-mount engineered cardiac tissues generated from human-induced pluripotent stem cells or embryonic chick cardiac cells and quantified cardiomyocyte alignment. We found significant differences in alignment based on cellular composition and tissue geometry. These results from our synthetic images and confocal data demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of our method to measure alignment in 3D tissues.

  15. Three dimensional multi-cellular muscle-like tissue engineering in perfusion-based bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Cerino, Giulia; Gaudiello, Emanuele; Grussenmeyer, Thomas; Melly, Ludovic; Massai, Diana; Banfi, Andrea; Martin, Ivan; Eckstein, Friedrich; Grapow, Martin; Marsano, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Conventional tissue engineering strategies often rely on the use of a single progenitor cell source to engineer in vitro biological models; however, multi-cellular environments can better resemble the complexity of native tissues. Previous described co-culture models used skeletal myoblasts, as parenchymal cell source, and mesenchymal or endothelial cells, as stromal component. Here, we propose instead the use of adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular fraction cells, which include both mesenchymal and endothelial cells, to better resemble the native stroma. Percentage of serum supplementation is one of the crucial parameters to steer skeletal myoblasts toward either proliferation (20%) or differentiation (5%) in two-dimensional culture conditions. On the contrary, three-dimensional (3D) skeletal myoblast culture often simply adopts the serum content used in monolayer, without taking into account the new cell environment. When considering 3D cultures of mm-thick engineered tissues, homogeneous and sufficient oxygen supply is paramount to avoid formation of necrotic cores. Perfusion-based bioreactor culture can significantly improve the oxygen access to the cells, enhancing the viability and the contractility of the engineered tissues. In this study, we first investigated the influence of different serum supplementations on the skeletal myoblast ability to proliferate and differentiate during 3D perfusion-based culture. We tested percentages of serum promoting monolayer skeletal myoblast-proliferation (20%) and differentiation (5%) and suitable for stromal cell culture (10%) with a view to identify the most suitable condition for the subsequent co-culture. The 10% serum medium composition resulted in the highest number of mature myotubes and construct functionality. Co-culture with stromal vascular fraction cells at 10% serum also supported the skeletal myoblast differentiation and maturation, hence providing a functional engineered 3D muscle model that resembles

  16. Morphological and functional characteristics of three-dimensional engineered bone-ligament-bone constructs following implantation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jinjin; Goble, Kristen; Smietana, Michael; Kostrominova, Tatiana; Larkin, Lisa; Arruda, Ellen M

    2009-10-01

    The incidence of ligament injury has recently been estimated at 400,000/year. The preferred treatment is reconstruction using an allograft, but outcomes are limited by donor availability, biomechanical incompatibility, and immune rejection. The creation of an engineered ligament in vitro solely from patient bone marrow stromal cells (has the potential to greatly enhance outcomes in knee reconstructions. Our laboratory has developed a scaffoldless method to engineer three-dimensional (3D) ligament and bone constructs from rat bone marrow stem cells in vitro. Coculture of these two engineered constructs results in a 3D bone-ligament-bone (BLB) construct with viable entheses, which was successfully used for medial collateral ligament (MCL) replacement in a rat model. 1 month and 2 month implantations were applied to the engineered BLBs. Implantation of 3D BLBs in a MCL replacement application demonstrated that our in vitro engineered tissues grew and remodeled quickly in vivo to an advanced phenotype and partially restored function of the knee. The explanted 3D BLB ligament region stained positively for type I collagen and elastin and was well vascularized after 1 and 2 months in vivo. Tangent moduli of the ligament portion of the 3D BLB 1 month explants increased by a factor of 2.4 over in vitro controls, to a value equivalent to those observed in 14-day-old neonatal rat MCLs. The 3D BLB 1 month explants also exhibited a functionally graded response that closely matched native MCL inhomogeneity, indicating the constructs functionally adapted in vivo.

  17. Three-Dimensional Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering Applications: Role of Porosity and Pore Size

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Qiu Li

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering applications commonly encompass the use of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds to provide a suitable microenvironment for the incorporation of cells or growth factors to regenerate damaged tissues or organs. These scaffolds serve to mimic the actual in vivo microenvironment where cells interact and behave according to the mechanical cues obtained from the surrounding 3D environment. Hence, the material properties of the scaffolds are vital in determining cellular response and fate. These 3D scaffolds are generally highly porous with interconnected pore networks to facilitate nutrient and oxygen diffusion and waste removal. This review focuses on the various fabrication techniques (e.g., conventional and rapid prototyping methods) that have been employed to fabricate 3D scaffolds of different pore sizes and porosity. The different pore size and porosity measurement methods will also be discussed. Scaffolds with graded porosity have also been studied for their ability to better represent the actual in vivo situation where cells are exposed to layers of different tissues with varying properties. In addition, the ability of pore size and porosity of scaffolds to direct cellular responses and alter the mechanical properties of scaffolds will be reviewed, followed by a look at nature's own scaffold, the extracellular matrix. Overall, the limitations of current scaffold fabrication approaches for tissue engineering applications and some novel and promising alternatives will be highlighted. PMID:23672709

  18. Three-dimensional pattern formation of magnetically labeled microgel beads for biological tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, H.; Inoue, H.; Nakamura, M.

    2009-03-01

    We commenced basic research on the three-dimensional (3D) pattern formation of microgel beads for applications in biological tissue engineering. In this new technique, microgel beads are premagnetized by doping them with magnetic nanoparticles. Living cells will be included in the beads for actual use. If a nonuniform magnetic field is applied to a solution containing these magnetized beads, the beads will align, contact, and form a 3D structure. The structure is controlled by the seed pattern of the magnetic particles plugged in a substrate and the profile of the magnetic field distribution. We constructed tubes, which imitate blood vessels, for demonstration using gel beads whose diameters are of the order of several tens of micrometers. The diameter of the demonstrated tube was less than 0.5 mm and its length was 6.6 mm, although living cells were not included in the beads. Numerical calculations by using the discrete element method were conducted to confirm the formation of the tube and to predict the effect of centrifugal force, which will be applied to fill cells in the space between magnetically patterned beads. Although this unique technology is in the nascent stage, this 3D pattern formation technique by the control of the magnetic field has potential to be one of the effective engineering technologies for manufacturing 3D patterned biological tissues in the future.

  19. Novel biodegradable three-dimensional macroporous scaffold using aligned electrospun nanofibrous yarns for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Cai, You-Zhi; Zhang, Guo-Rong; Wang, Lin-Lin; Jiang, Yang-Zi; Ouyang, Hong-Wei; Zou, Xiao-Hui

    2012-05-01

    This study aimed to develop a practical three-dimensional (3D) macroporous scaffold from aligned electrospun nanofibrous yarns for bone tissue engineering. A novel 3D unwoven macroporous nanofibrous (MNF) scaffold was manufactured with electrospun poly(L-lactic acid) and polycaprolactone (w/w 9:1) nanofibers through sequential yarns manufacture and honeycombing process at 65°C. The efficacy of 3D MNF scaffold for bone formation were evaluated using human embryonic stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hESC-MSCs) differentiation model and rabbit tibia bone defect model. In vitro, more cell proliferation and cell ingrowth were observed in 3D MNF scaffold. Moreover, calcium deposit was obviously detected in vitro differentiation of hESC-MSCs. In vivo, histology and X-ray showed that 3D MNF scaffold treated bone defect had fine 3D bony tissue formation around the scaffold as well as inside the scaffold at 3 weeks and 6 weeks. This study demonstrated that 3D MNF scaffold provides a structural support for hESC-MSCs growth and guides bone formation suggesting that this novel strategy successfully makes use of electrospun fibers for bone tissue engineering, which may help realize the clinical translation of electrospun nanofibers for regenerative medicine in future.

  20. Engineered three-dimensional rabbit oral epithelial–mesenchymal–muscular hybrid sheets

    PubMed Central

    Yamane, Shigeki; Higa, Kazunari; Umezawa, Takashi; Serikawa, Masamitsu; Shimazaki, Jun; Abe, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative muscles are required for swallowing and mastication, and are important for functional recovery from diseases involving oral muscular defects. Therefore, we generated three-layer hybrid sheets, similar to oral mucosal structures containing submucosal muscles, using rabbit oral mucosa epithelial, mesenchymal, and myoblastic progenitor cells, and examined the structural proteins. Each cell type was obtained from rabbit oral mucosa using enzymatic digestion. Isolated mesenchymal and myoblastic cells were multi-differentiated into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes or myotubes. Isolated epithelial cells were cultured on collagen gels containing isolated mesenchymal cells for 2 weeks, and these epithelial–mesenchymal cell sheets were laminated onto myoblastic cell sheets. The engineered hybrid sheets were multi-stratified in the epithelial and myoblastic layers in a time-dependent manner, expressing intermediate cytoskeletal filament proteins of epithelium and muscle. Hybrid sheets also expressed extracellular matrix basement membrane proteins. Immature cell markers for epithelial and myoblastic cells were observed continuously in hybrid sheet cultures. We established engineered three-dimensional rabbit oral mucosa hybrid sheets containing each immature cell type in vitro. PMID:27341388

  1. Customized biomimetic scaffolds created by indirect three-dimensional printing for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Yeon; Choi, Bogyu; Wu, Benjamin; Lee, Min

    2013-12-01

    Three-dimensional printing (3DP) is a rapid prototyping technique that can create complex 3D structures by inkjet printing of a liquid binder onto powder biomaterials for tissue engineering scaffolds. Direct fabrication of scaffolds from 3DP, however, imposes a limitation on material choices by manufacturing processes. In this study, we report an indirect 3DP approach wherein a positive replica of desired shapes was printed using gelatin particles, and the final scaffold was directly produced from the printed mold. To create patient-specific scaffolds that match precisely to a patient's external contours, we integrated our indirect 3DP technique with imaging technologies and successfully created custom scaffolds mimicking human mandibular condyle using polycaprolactone and chitosan for potential osteochondral tissue engineering. To test the ability of the technique to precisely control the internal morphology of the scaffolds, we created orthogonal interconnected channels within the scaffolds using computer-aided-design models. Because very few biomaterials are truly osteoinductive, we modified inert 3D printed materials with bioactive apatite coating. The feasibility of these scaffolds to support cell growth was investigated using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC). The BMSCs showed good viability in the scaffolds, and the apatite coating further enhanced cellular spreading and proliferation. This technique may be valuable for complex scaffold fabrication.

  2. Customized biomimetic scaffolds created by indirect three-dimensional printing for tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Yeon; Choi, Bogyu; Wu, Benjamin; Lee, Min

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional printing (3DP) is a rapid prototyping (RP) technique that can create complex 3D structures by inkjet printing of a liquid binder onto powder biomaterials for tissue engineering scaffolds. Direct fabrication of scaffolds from 3DP, however, imposes a limitation on material choices by manufacturing processes. In this study, we report an indirect 3DP approach wherein a positive replica of desired shapes was printed using gelatin particles, and the final scaffold was directly produced from the printed mold. To create patient-specific scaffolds that match precisely to a patient’s external contours, we integrated our indirect 3DP technique with imaging technologies and successfully created custom scaffolds mimicking human mandibular condyle using polycaprolactone (PCL) and chitosan (CH) for potential osteochondral tissue engineering. To test the ability of the technique to precisely control the internal morphology of the scaffolds, we created orthogonal interconnected channels within the scaffolds using computer-aided-design (CAD) models. Because very few biomaterials are truly osteoinductive, we modified inert 3D printed materials with bioactive apatite coating. The feasibility of these scaffolds to support cell growth was investigated using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC). The BMSCs showed good viability in the scaffolds, and the apatite-coating further enhanced cellular spreading and proliferation. This technique may be valuable for complex scaffold fabrication. PMID:24060622

  3. Three-dimensional electrospun silk-fibroin nanofiber for skin tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Park, Ye Ri; Ju, Hyung Woo; Lee, Jung Min; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Lee, Ok Joo; Moon, Bo Mi; Park, Hyun Jung; Jeong, Ju Yeon; Yeon, Yeung Kyu; Park, Chan Hum

    2016-12-01

    Tissue-engineered skin substitutes may offer an effective therapeutic option for the treatment of patients with skin damages. In this study, a novel three-dimensional (3D) scaffold composed of electrospun silk fibroin (SF) nanofiber was fabricated using electrospinning with the addition of NaCl crystals. It has well known that the electrospun SF nanofibers were excellent scaffold for tissue. However, it is generally difficult for cells to infiltrate the electrospun silk fibroin due to its small pore size. To resolve this problem, we dropped the NaCl crystals above the rotating collector, which become incorporated into the nanofibers. Three methods (freeze-drying, salt-leaching, and electrospinning with NaCl) for fabrication of SF scaffolds were compared to the difference of their characteristics using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), mechanical strength, porosity, swelling abilities, and cell proliferation. Additionally, using air-liquid culture system, keratinocytes were co-cultured with fibroblasts in each type of SF scaffolds to construct an artificial bilayer skin in vitro. In our experimental results, histologic findings in only electrospun SF scaffolds showed more proliferation of fibroblasts in deep layer and more differentiation of keratinocytes in superficial layer. The present study suggests that 3D electrospun SF scaffolds might be a suitable for skin tissue engineering.

  4. Three-dimensional impedance engineering for mixed-signal system-on-chip applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Kyuchul

    A novel approach for three-dimensional substrate impedance engineering of p-/p+ epi substrate is proposed for mixed-signal integrated circuit applications. This technology requires minimum intrusion to conventional Si CMOS processing, but offers astounding improvements with regard to RF crosstalk via substrate and RF passive device performance. The engineered substrate consists of conducting as well as semi-insulating regions strategically placed three-dimensionally throughout the volume of the substrate. The p-/p+ epi substrate is used to prevent latch-up at tight design rules in high performance digital CMOS. Metal vias are fabricated from the front side using electroless plating method for Faraday cage isolation structure as well as "true ground" contacts. A self-limiting micro-PS formation process is employed to allow the insertion of semi-insulating regions from the backside of the wafer and RIE etch to remove p- layer is performed from the front side completely eliminating any parasitic pathways for crosstalk. The crosstalk isolation methods in this study are based on the principle of RF noise shielding in addition to insulating. Both the suppression of crosstalk by the metal vias and micro-PS trench isolation are so significant that the crosstalk goes down to the noise floor of the conventional measurement instruments. The use of micro-PS layer effectively can reduce the parasitic substrate effect. These reductions result in higher Q and fr of inductors on micro-PS region. Inductors located on micro-PS are subjected to a much less stringent set of constraints than that on bulk Si substrates, allowing for much higher inductance without severe sacrifice in Q and fr, and much higher Q for with reasonable inductance and fr. The bond pad structure using micro-PS can significantly reduce the parasitic bond pad capacitance and increases the crosstalk isolation characteristic. Reducing the parasitic pad capacitance by using micro-PS results in high bond pad resonant

  5. Development of an Acellular Tumor Extracellular Matrix as a Three-Dimensional Scaffold for Tumor Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Gang; Lei, Guang-Yan; Liu, Jia; Gao, Wei; Hu, Ye-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Tumor engineering is defined as the construction of three-dimensional (3D) tumors in vitro with tissue engineering approaches. The present 3D scaffolds for tumor engineering have several limitations in terms of structure and function. To get an ideal 3D scaffold for tumor culture, A549 human pulmonary adenocarcinoma cells were implanted into immunodeficient mice to establish xenotransplatation models. Tumors were retrieved at 30-day implantation and sliced into sheets. They were subsequently decellularized by four procedures. Two decellularization methods, Tris-Trypsin-Triton multi-step treatment and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) treatment, achieved complete cellular removal and thus were chosen for evaluation of histological and biochemical properties. Native tumor tissues were used as controls. Human breast cancer MCF-7 cells were cultured onto the two 3D scaffolds for further cell growth and growth factor secretion investigations, with the two-dimensional (2D) culture and cells cultured onto the Matrigel scaffolds used as controls. Results showed that Tris-Trypsin-Triton multi-step treated tumor sheets had well-preserved extracellular matrix structures and components. Their porosity was increased but elastic modulus was decreased compared with the native tumor samples. They supported MCF-7 cell repopulation and proliferation, as well as expression of growth factors. When cultured within the Tris-Trypsin-Triton treated scaffold, A549 cells and human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (SW-480) had similar behaviors to MCF-7 cells, but human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells (KYSE-510) had a relatively slow cell repopulation rate. This study provides evidence that Tris-Trypsin-Triton treated acellular tumor extracellular matrices are promising 3D scaffolds with ideal spatial arrangement, biomechanical properties and biocompatibility for improved modeling of 3D tumor microenvironments. PMID:25072252

  6. Three-Dimensional Characterization of Tissue-Engineered Constructs by Contrast-Enhanced Nanofocus Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Papantoniou, Ioannis; Sonnaert, Maarten; Geris, Liesbet; Luyten, Frank P.; Kerckhofs, Greet

    2014-01-01

    To successfully implement tissue-engineered (TE) constructs as part of a clinical therapy, it is necessary to develop quality control tools that will ensure accurate and consistent TE construct release specifications. Hence, advanced methods to monitor TE construct properties need to be further developed. In this study, we showed proof of concept for contrast-enhanced nanofocus computed tomography (CE-nano-CT) as a whole-construct imaging technique with a noninvasive potential that enables three-dimensional (3D) visualization and quantification of in vitro engineered extracellular matrix (ECM) in TE constructs. In particular, we performed a 3D qualitative and quantitative structural and spatial assessment of the in vitro engineered ECM, formed during static and perfusion bioreactor cell culture in 3D TE scaffolds, using two contrast agents, namely, Hexabrix® and phosphotungstic acid (PTA). To evaluate the potential of CE-nano-CT, a comparison was made to standardly used techniques such as Live/Dead viability/cytotoxicity, Picrosirius Red staining, and to net dry weight measurements of the TE constructs. When using Hexabrix as the contrast agent, the ECM volume fitted linearly with the net dry ECM weight independent from the flow rate used, thus suggesting that it stains most of the ECM. When using PTA as the contrast agent, comparing to net weight measurements showed that PTA only stains a part of the ECM. This was attributed to the binding specificity of this contrast agent. In addition, the PTA-stained CE-nano-CT data showed pronounced distinction between flow conditions when compared to Hexabrix, indicating culture-specific structural ECM differences. This novel type of information can contribute to optimize bioreactor culture conditions and potentially critical quality characteristics of TE constructs such as ECM quantity and homogeneity, facilitating the gradual transformation of TE constructs in well-characterized TE products. PMID:23800097

  7. Rapid fabrication system for three-dimensional tissues using cell sheet engineering and centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Akiyuki; Haraguchi, Yuji; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okano, Teruo

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissues can be reconstructed by cell sheet technology, and various clinical researches using these constructed tissues have already been initiated to regenerate damaged tissues. While 3D tissues can be easily fabricated by layering cell sheets, the attachment period for cell adhesion between a cell sheet and a culture dish, or double-layered cell sheets normally takes 20-30 min. This study proposed a more rapid fabrication system for bioengineered tissue using cell sheet technology and centrifugation. A C2C12 mouse myoblast sheet harvested from a temperature-responsive culture dish will attach tightly to a culture dish or another cell sheet at 37°C after a 20 min-incubation. However, the same cell sheet centrifuged (12-34 × g) for 3 min also attached tightly to a dish or another cell sheet at 37°C after only a 3 min-incubation. The manipulation time was reduced by approximately two-thirds by centrifugation. The rapid attachments were also cross-sectionally confirmed by optical coherence tomography. These rapidly constructed cell sheet-tissues using centrifugation showed active cell metabolism, cell viability, and very high production of vascular endothelial growth factor, like those prepared by the conventional method; indicating complete cell sheet-attachment without any cell damage. This new system will be a powerful tool in the fields of cell sheet-based tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, and accelerate the use of cell sheets in clinical applications.

  8. Engineering of microscale three-dimensional pancreatic islet models in vitro and their biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bin; Wang, Lin; Han, Shuang; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Zhang, Xiaohui; Xu, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Diabetes now is the most common chronic disease in the world inducing heavy burden for the people's health. Based on this, diabetes research such as islet function has become a hot topic in medical institutes of the world. Today, in medical institutes, the conventional experiment platform in vitro is monolayer cell culture. However, with the development of micro- and nano-technologies, several microengineering methods have been developed to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) islet models in vitro which can better mimic the islet of pancreases in vivo. These in vitro islet models have shown better cell function than monolayer cells, indicating their great potential as better experimental platforms to elucidate islet behaviors under both physiological and pathological conditions, such as the molecular mechanisms of diabetes and clinical islet transplantation. In this review, we present the state-of-the-art advances in the microengineering methods for fabricating microscale islet models in vitro. We hope this will help researchers to better understand the progress in the engineering 3D islet models and their biomedical applications such as drug screening and islet transplantation.

  9. Particle path tracking method in two- and three-dimensional continuously rotating detonation engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Rui; Wu, Dan; Liu, Yan; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2014-12-01

    The particle path tracking method is proposed and used in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations of continuously rotating detonation engines (CRDEs). This method is used to analyze the combustion and expansion processes of the fresh particles, and the thermodynamic cycle process of CRDE. In a 3D CRDE flow field, as the radius of the annulus increases, the no-injection area proportion increases, the non-detonation proportion decreases, and the detonation height decreases. The flow field parameters on the 3D mid annulus are different from in the 2D flow field under the same chamber size. The non-detonation proportion in the 3D flow field is less than in the 2D flow field. In the 2D and 3D CRDE, the paths of the flow particles have only a small fluctuation in the circumferential direction. The numerical thermodynamic cycle processes are qualitatively consistent with the three ideal cycle models, and they are right in between the ideal F—J cycle and ideal ZND cycle. The net mechanical work and thermal efficiency are slightly smaller in the 2D simulation than in the 3D simulation. In the 3D CRDE, as the radius of the annulus increases, the net mechanical work is almost constant, and the thermal efficiency increases. The numerical thermal efficiencies are larger than F—J cycle, and much smaller than ZND cycle.

  10. Three-Dimensional Bioprinting for Regenerative Dentistry and Craniofacial Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Obregon, F; Vaquette, C; Ivanovski, S; Hutmacher, D W; Bertassoni, L E

    2015-09-01

    Craniofacial tissues are organized with complex 3-dimensional (3D) architectures. Mimicking such 3D complexity and the multicellular interactions naturally occurring in craniofacial structures represents one of the greatest challenges in regenerative dentistry. Three-dimensional bioprinting of tissues and biological structures has been proposed as a promising alternative to address some of these key challenges. It enables precise manufacture of various biomaterials with complex 3D architectures, while being compatible with multiple cell sources and being customizable to patient-specific needs. This review describes different 3D bioprinting methods and summarizes how different classes of biomaterials (polymer hydrogels, ceramics, composites, and cell aggregates) may be used for 3D biomanufacturing of scaffolds, as well as craniofacial tissue analogs. While the fabrication of scaffolds upon which cells attach, migrate, and proliferate is already in use, printing of all the components that form a tissue (living cells and matrix materials together) to produce tissue constructs is still in its early stages. In summary, this review seeks to highlight some of the key advantages of 3D bioprinting technology for the regeneration of craniofacial structures. Additionally, it stimulates progress on the development of strategies that will promote the translation of craniofacial tissue engineering from the laboratory bench to the chair side.

  11. Tissue-engineered tracheal reconstruction using three-dimensionally printed artificial tracheal graft: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jae Won; Park, Su A; Park, Ju-Kyeong; Choi, Jae Won; Kim, Yoo-Suk; Shin, Yoo Seob; Kim, Chul-Ho

    2014-06-01

    Three-dimensional printing has come into the spotlight in the realm of tissue engineering. We intended to evaluate the plausibility of 3D-printed (3DP) scaffold coated with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seeded in fibrin for the repair of partial tracheal defects. MSCs from rabbit bone marrow were expanded and cultured. A half-pipe-shaped 3DP polycaprolactone scaffold was coated with the MSCs seeded in fibrin. The half-pipe tracheal graft was implanted on a 10 × 10-mm artificial tracheal defect in four rabbits. Four and eight weeks after the operation, the reconstructed sites were evaluated bronchoscopically, radiologically, histologically, and functionally. None of the four rabbits showed any sign of respiratory distress. Endoscopic examination and computed tomography showed successful reconstruction of trachea without any collapse or blockage. The replaced tracheas were completely covered with regenerated respiratory mucosa. Histologic analysis showed that the implanted 3DP tracheal grafts were successfully integrated with the adjacent trachea without disruption or granulation tissue formation. Neo-cartilage formation inside the implanted graft was sufficient to maintain the patency of the reconstructed trachea. Scanning electron microscope examination confirmed the regeneration of the cilia, and beating frequency of regenerated cilia was not different from those of the normal adjacent mucosa. The shape and function of reconstructed trachea using 3DP scaffold coated with MSCs seeded in fibrin were restored successfully without any graft rejection. Copyright © 2014 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Printability of calcium phosphate powders for three-dimensional printing of tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Butscher, Andre; Bohner, Marc; Roth, Christian; Ernstberger, Annika; Heuberger, Roman; Doebelin, Nicola; von Rohr, Philipp Rudolf; Müller, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional printing (3DP) is a versatile method to produce scaffolds for tissue engineering. In 3DP the solid is created by the reaction of a liquid selectively sprayed onto a powder bed. Despite the importance of the powder properties, there has to date been a relatively poor understanding of the relation between the powder properties and the printing outcome. This article aims at improving this understanding by looking at the link between key powder parameters (particle size, flowability, roughness, wettability) and printing accuracy. These powder parameters are determined as key factors with a predictive value for the final 3DP outcome. Promising results can be expected for mean particle size in the range of 20-35 μm, compaction rate in the range of 1.3-1.4, flowability in the range of 5-7 and powder bed surface roughness of 10-25 μm. Finally, possible steps and strategies in pushing the physical limits concerning improved quality in 3DP are addressed and discussed.

  13. Functional and Biomimetic Materials for Engineering of the Three-Dimensional Cell Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guoyou; Li, Fei; Zhao, Xin; Ma, Yufei; Li, Yuhui; Lin, Min; Jin, Guorui; Lu, Tian Jian; Genin, Guy M; Xu, Feng

    2017-10-09

    The cell microenvironment has emerged as a key determinant of cell behavior and function in development, physiology, and pathophysiology. The extracellular matrix (ECM) within the cell microenvironment serves not only as a structural foundation for cells but also as a source of three-dimensional (3D) biochemical and biophysical cues that trigger and regulate cell behaviors. Increasing evidence suggests that the 3D character of the microenvironment is required for development of many critical cell responses observed in vivo, fueling a surge in the development of functional and biomimetic materials for engineering the 3D cell microenvironment. Progress in the design of such materials has improved control of cell behaviors in 3D and advanced the fields of tissue regeneration, in vitro tissue models, large-scale cell differentiation, immunotherapy, and gene therapy. However, the field is still in its infancy, and discoveries about the nature of cell-microenvironment interactions continue to overturn much early progress in the field. Key challenges continue to be dissecting the roles of chemistry, structure, mechanics, and electrophysiology in the cell microenvironment, and understanding and harnessing the roles of periodicity and drift in these factors. This review encapsulates where recent advances appear to leave the ever-shifting state of the art, and it highlights areas in which substantial potential and uncertainty remain.

  14. Femtosecond laser nano/microfabrication via three-dimensional focal field engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Liu, Lipu; Yang, Dong; Zhang, Qian; Yang, Hong; Gong, Qihuang

    2017-02-01

    In the conventional femtosecond laser direct writing with a Gaussian beam, the focus is an ellipsoid with the long axis along the beam propagation direction, resulting in the ellipsoidal fabricated dot. Due to the simple shape of the dot, complex three-dimensional (3D) nano/microstructures should be written dot by dot by the focus scanning, which is usually time-consuming. Therefore, a rapid nano/microfabrication technique is becoming highly desired to achieve arbitrary 3D nano/microstructures. By 2D phase modulation of the Gaussian beam, multi-focuses were generated for the direct writing of several same nano/microstructures simultaneously to save fabrication time, and donut and other 2D intensity distributions were produced for the single exposure fabrication of 2D microstructures. Here, we demonstrate the single-exposure two-photon polymerization of a 3D microstructure via the 3D focal field engineering by using the 2D phase-only spatial light modulation. With a single exposure, a whole 3D microstructure like a double-helix is polymerized simultaneously, whose configuration is controlled by the designed 3D focal intensity distribution. In addition, a longitudinal circular intensity distribution is generated for the multi-photon inscription of a depressed cladding waveguide inside glass with single scan transverse writing.

  15. Construction of three-dimensional vascularized cardiac tissue with cell sheet engineering.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okano, Teruo

    2015-05-10

    Construction of three-dimensional (3D) tissues with pre-isolated cells is a promising achievement for novel medicine and drug-discovery research. Our laboratory constructs 3D tissues with an innovative and unique method for layering multiple cell sheets. Cell sheets maintain a high-efficiently regenerating function, because of the higher cell density and higher transplantation efficiency, compared to other cell-delivery methods. Cell sheets have already been applied in clinical applications for regenerative medicine in treating patients with various diseases. Therefore, in our search to develop a more efficient treatment with cell sheets, we are constructing 3D tissues by layering cell sheets. Native animal tissues and organs have an abundance of capillaries to supply oxygen and nutrients, and to remove waste molecules. In our investigation of vascularized cardiac cell sheets, we have found that endothelial cells within cell sheets spontaneously form blood vessel networks as in vivo capillaries. To construct even thicker 3D tissues by layering multiple cell sheets, it is critical to have a medium or blood flow within the vascular networks of the cell sheets. Therefore, to perfuse medium or blood in the cell sheet vascular network to maintain the viability of all cells, we developed two types of vascular beds; (1) a femoral muscle-based vascular bed, and (2) a synthetic collagen gel-based vascular bed. Both vascular beds successfully provide the critical flow of culture medium, which allows 12-layer cell sheets to survive. Such bioreactor systems, when combined with cell sheet engineering techniques, have produced functional vascularized 3D tissues. Here we explain and discuss the various processes to obtain vascular networks by properly connecting cell sheets and the engineering of 3D tissues.

  16. Thermal compression and characterization of three-dimensional nonwoven PET matrices as tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Ma, T; Yang, S T; Kniss, D A

    2001-03-01

    Nonwoven fibrous matrices have been widely used as scaffolds in tissue engineering, and modification of microstructure of these matrices is needed to organize cells in three-dimensional space with spatially balanced proliferation and differentiation required for functional tissue development. The method of thermal compression of nonwoven polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fabrics was developed and key parameters of temperature, pressure, and compression duration were evaluated in this study. The permanent deformation was obtained at elevated temperature under pressure and the viscoelastic compressional behaviors were observed, characterized by a distinct apparent modulus change in glass transition temperature region. A liquid extrusion method was further employed to analyze both pore size and its distribution for matrices with porosity ranging from 84 to 93%. It is also found that a more uniformly distributed pore size was resulted from thermal compression and the isotropic nature of nonwoven fabrics was preserved because of the proportional reduction of the pore by compression. The thermally compressed fabric matrices with two different pore sizes (15 and 20 microm in pore radius) were used to culture human trophoblast ED27 and NIH 3T3 cells. It was found that cells cultured in the different pore-size PET matrices had different cell spatial organization and proliferation rates. The smaller pores in the matrix allowed cells to spread better and proliferate faster, while cells in the larger pores tended to form large aggregates and had lower proliferation rate. The thermal compression technique also can be applied to other synthetic fibrous matrices including biodegradable polymers used in tissue engineering to modify the microstructure according to their viscoelastic properties.

  17. Moisture based three-dimensional printing of calcium phosphate structures for scaffold engineering.

    PubMed

    Butscher, A; Bohner, M; Doebelin, N; Galea, L; Loeffel, O; Müller, R

    2013-02-01

    Powder based three-dimensional printing (3DP) allows great versatility in material and geometry. These characteristics make 3DP an interesting method for the production of tissue engineering scaffolds. However, 3DP has major limitations, such as limited resolution and accuracy, hence preventing the widespread application of this method within scaffold engineering [corrected].In order to reduce these limitations deeper understanding of the complex interactions between powder, binder and roller during 3DP is needed. In the past a lot of effort has been invested to optimize the powder properties for 3DP for a certain layer thickness. Using a powder optimized for an 88 μm layer thickness, this study systematically quantifies the surface roughness and geometrical accuracy in printed specimens and assesses their variation upon changes of different critical parameters such as the moisture application time (0, 5, 10 and 20s), layer thickness (44 and 88 μm) and the number of specimens printed per batch (6 and 12). A best surface roughness value of 25 μm was measured with a moisture application time (using a custom made moisture application device mounted on a linear stage carrying the print head) of 5s and a layer thickness of 44 μm. Geometrical accuracy was generally higher for the 88 μm thick layer, due to a less critical powder bed stability. Moisture application enabled 3DP of a 44 μm thick layer and improved the accuracy even for a powder initially optimized for 88 μm. Moreover, recycling of the humidified powder was not only possible but, in terms of reactivity, even beneficial. In conclusion, moisture-based 3DP is a promising approach for high resolution 3DP of scaffolds. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Broncho-epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H

    2006-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human broncho-epithelial (HBE) tissue-like assemblies (3D HBE TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and parainfluenza virus type 3 (wtPIV3 JS) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infections with both viruses. Therefore, TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host's immune system.

  19. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Broncho-epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H

    2006-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human broncho-epithelial (HBE) tissue-like assemblies (3D HBE TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and parainfluenza virus type 3 (wtPIV3 JS) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infections with both viruses. Therefore, TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host's immune system.

  20. Does Three-Dimensional External Beam Partial Breast Irradiation Spare Lung Tissue Compared With Standard Whole Breast Irradiation?

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Anudh K.; Vallow, Laura A. Gale, Ashley A.; Buskirk, Steven J.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To determine whether three-dimensional conformal partial breast irradiation (3D-PBI) spares lung tissue compared with whole breast irradiation (WBI) and to include the biologically equivalent dose (BED) to account for differences in fractionation. Methods and Materials: Radiotherapy treatment plans were devised for WBI and 3D-PBI for 25 consecutive patients randomized on the NSABP B-39/RTOG 0413 protocol at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida. WBI plans were for 50 Gy in 25 fractions, and 3D-PBI plans were for 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. Volume of ipsilateral lung receiving 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 Gy was recorded for each plan. The linear quadratic equation was used to calculate the corresponding dose delivered in 10 fractions and volume of ipsilateral lung receiving these doses was recorded for PBI plans. Ipsilateral mean lung dose was recorded for each plan and converted to BED. Results: There was a significant decrease in volume of lung receiving 20 Gy with PBI (median, 4.4% vs. 7.5%; p < 0.001), which remained after correction for fractionation (median, 5.6% vs. 7.5%; p = 0.02). Mean lung dose was lower for PBI (median, 3.46 Gy vs. 4.57 Gy; p = 0.005), although this difference lost significance after conversion to BED (median, 3.86 Gy{sub 3} vs 4.85 Gy{sub 3}, p = 0.07). PBI plans exposed more lung to 2.5 and 5 Gy. Conclusions: 3D-PBI exposes greater volumes of lung tissue to low doses of radiation and spares the amount of lung receiving higher doses when compared with WBI.

  1. Three-dimensional printing of porous ceramic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Hermann; Rieder, Wolfgang; Irsen, Stephan; Leukers, Barbara; Tille, Carsten

    2005-08-01

    This article reports a new process chain for custom-made three-dimensional (3D) porous ceramic scaffolds for bone replacement with fully interconnected channel network for the repair of osseous defects from trauma or disease. Rapid prototyping and especially 3D printing is well suited to generate complex-shaped porous ceramic matrices directly from powder materials. Anatomical information obtained from a patient can be used to design the implant for a target defect. In the 3D printing technique, a box filled with ceramic powder is printed with a polymer-based binder solution layer by layer. Powder is bonded in wetted regions. Unglued powder can be removed and a ceramic green body remains. We use a modified hydroxyapatite (HA) powder for the fabrication of 3D printed scaffolds due to the safety of HA as biocompatible implantable material and efficacy for bone regeneration. The printed ceramic green bodies are consolidated at a temperature of 1250 degrees C in a high temperature furnace in ambient air. The polymeric binder is pyrolysed during sintering. The resulting scaffolds can be used in tissue engineering of bone implants using patient-derived cells that are seeded onto the scaffolds. This article describes the process chain, beginning from data preparation to 3D printing tests and finally sintering of the scaffold. Prototypes were successfully manufactured and characterized. It was demonstrated that it is possible to manufacture parts with inner channels with a dimension down to 450 microm and wall structures with a thickness down to 330 microm. The mechanical strength of dense test parts is up to 22 MPa. Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The effect of simulated microgravity by three-dimensional clinostat on bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Masataka; Ohgushi, Hajime; Tamai, Noriyuki; Osuga, Koichi; Uemura, Masaru; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Myoui, Akira

    2005-01-01

    Evidence suggests that mechanical stress, including gravity, is associated with osteoblast differentiation and function. To examine effects of microgravity on bone tissue engineering, we used a three-dimensional (3D) clinostat manufactured by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (Kobe, Japan). A 3D clinostat is a device that generates multidirectional G force. By controlled rotation on two axes, it cancels the cumulative gravity vector at the center of the device. We cultured rat marrow mesenchymal cells (MMCs) in the pores of interconnected porous calcium hydroxyapatite (IP-CHA) for 2 weeks in the presence of dexamethasone using the 3D clinostat (clinostat group). MMCs cultured using the 3D clinostat exhibited a 40% decrease in alkaline phosphatase activity (a marker of osteoblastic differentiation), compared with control static cultures (control group). SEM analysis revealed that although there was no difference between the two groups in number or distribution of cells in the pores, the clinostat group exhibited less extensive extracellular matrix formation than the control group. Cultured IP-CHA/MMC composites were then implanted into subcutaneous sites of syngeneic rats and harvested 8 weeks after implantation. All implants showed bone formation inside the pores, as indicated by decalcified histological sections and microfocus computed tomography. However, the volume of newly formed bone was significantly lower for the clinostat group than for the control group, especially in the superficial pores close to the implant surface. These results indicate that new bone formation in culture was inhibited by use of the 3D clinostat, and that this inhibition was mainly due to suppression of osteoblastic differentiation of MMCs.

  3. Tissue optical clearing, three-dimensional imaging, and computer morphometry in whole mouse lungs and human airways.

    PubMed

    Scott, Gregory D; Blum, Emily D; Fryer, Allison D; Jacoby, David B

    2014-07-01

    In whole adult mouse lung, full identification of airway nerves (or other cellular/subcellular objects) has not been possible due to patchy distribution and micron-scale size. Here we describe a method using tissue clearing to acquire the first complete image of three-dimensional (3D) innervation in the lung. We then created a method to pair analysis of nerve (or any other colabeled epitope) images with identification of 3D tissue compartments and airway morphometry by using fluorescent casting and morphometry software (which we designed and are making available as open-source). We then tested our method to quantify a sparse heterogeneous nerve population by examining visceral pleural nerves. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of our method in human tissue to image full thickness innervation in irregular 3D tissue compartments and to quantify sparse objects (intrinsic airway ganglia). Overall, this method can uniquely pair the advantages of whole tissue imaging and cellular/subcellular fluorescence microscopy.

  4. Effects of lung disease on the three-dimensional structure and air flow pattern in the human airway tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Moortele, Tristan; Nemes, Andras; Wendt, Christine; Coletti, Filippo

    2016-11-01

    The morphological features of the airway tree directly affect the air flow features during breathing, which determines the gas exchange and inhaled particle transport. Lung disease, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) in this study, affects the structural features of the lungs, which in turn negatively affects the air flow through the airways. Here bronchial tree air volume geometries are segmented from Computed Tomography (CT) scans of healthy and diseased subjects. Geometrical analysis of the airway centerlines and corresponding cross-sectional areas provide insight into the specific effects of COPD on the airway structure. These geometries are also used to 3D print anatomically accurate, patient specific flow models. Three-component, three-dimensional velocity fields within these models are acquired using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The three-dimensional flow fields provide insight into the change in flow patterns and features. Additionally, particle trajectories are determined using the velocity fields, to identify the fate of therapeutic and harmful inhaled aerosols. Correlation between disease-specific and patient-specific anatomical features with dysfunctional airflow patterns can be achieved by combining geometrical and flow analysis.

  5. The feasibility of three-dimensional displays of the thorax for preoperative planning in the surgical treatment of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yaoping; Malthaner, Richard A

    2007-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) displays of anatomic structures have become feasible for preoperative planning in some surgical procedures. There have been no reports, however, on the use of 3D displays for surgical treatment of lung cancer. We hypothesized that 3D displays of the thorax are useful for preoperative planning for lung cancer. Based on virtual reality technologies, we rendered 3D displays of the thorax from two-dimensional (2D) computed tomographic (CT) images of six anonymous patients, some of whom underwent surgical removal of lung cancer. For determining the resectability of lung cancer, we tested 17 participants with varying degrees of surgical skills to view 3D displays and read 2D CT images of these thoracic cavities in a randomized order. We measured their performance in terms of the accuracy of predicted resectability, the confidence of their prediction, planning time used, and workload experienced. The results demonstrated that viewing 3D displays of thoracic cavities has significant advantages over reading 2D CT images in determining the resectability of lung cancer: increasing the accuracy of predicted resectability by about 20%, enhancing the confidence of the prediction by about 20%, decreasing planning time by about 30%, and reducing workload by about 50%. All participants preferred viewing 3D displays to reading 2D CT images for preoperative planning. Junior residents found 3D displays of thoraces more useful than senior residents. It is feasible to use 3D displays of the thorax for preoperative planning in treating lung cancer. Using 3D displays in surgical treatment of lung cancer has potential benefits, once the technique is perfected.

  6. Synchrotron tomographic images from human lung adenocarcinoma: Three-dimensional reconstruction and histologic correlations.

    PubMed

    Yi, Eunjue; Han, Sung-Mi; Chang, Ji-Eun; Kim, Hong-Tae; Kim, Jong-Ki; Seo, Seung-Jun; Chung, Jin-Haeng; Jheon, Sanghoon

    2017-07-21

    High-resolution tomographic images using synchrotron X-rays are expected to provide detailed reflection of microstructures, thereby allowing for the examination of histologic structures without destruction of the specimen. This study aims to evaluate the synchrotron tomographic images of mixed ground-glass opacity excised on 5-mm sections in comparison to pathologic examination. The Institutional Review Board of our institute approved this retrospective study, and written informed consent was obtained from each patient whose lung tissue would be used. Obtained lung cancer specimens were brought to the multiple Wiggler 6C beam line at the Pohang Light Source (PLS-II) in Korea, and phase contrast X-ray images were obtained in November 2016. The X-ray emanated from a bending magnet of the electron storage ring with electron energy of 3 GeV, and a typical beam current was 320 mA. Reconstructed tomographic images were compared with images from histologic slides obtained from the same samples. Pulmonary microstructures including terminal bronchioles, alveolar sacs, and vasculature were identified with phase contrast X-ray images. Images from normal lung tissue and mixed ground-glass opacity were clearly distinguishable. Hyperplasia of the interalveolar septum and dysplasia of microstructure were clearly identified. The imaging findings correlated well with hematoxylin-eosin stained specimens. Tomographic images using synchrotron radiation have the potential for clinical applications. With refinement, this technique may become a diagnostic tool for detection of lung cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Three-Dimensional Quantitative Micromorphology of Pre- and Post-Implanted Engineered Heart Valve Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Chad E.; Mikulis, Brandon T.; Gottlieb, Danielle; Gerneke, Dane; LeGrice, Ian; Padera, Robert F.; Mayer, John E.; Schoen, Frederick J.; Sacks, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    There is a significant gap in our knowledge of engineered heart valve tissue (EHVT) development regarding detailed three-dimensional (3D) tissue formation and remodeling from the point of in vitro culturing to full in vivo function. As a step toward understanding the complexities of EHVT formation and remodeling, a novel serial confocal microscopy technique was employed to obtain 3D micro-structural information of pre-implant (PRI) and post-implant for 12 weeks (POI) EHVT fabricated from PGA: PLLA scaffolds and seeded with ovine bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Custom scaffold fiber tracking software was developed to quantify scaffold fiber architectural features such as length, tortuosity, and minimum scaffold fiber–fiber separation distance and scaffold fiber orientation was quantified utilizing a 3D fabric tensor. In addition, collagen and cellular density of ovine pulmonary valve leaflet tissue were also analyzed for baseline comparisons. Results indicated that in the unseeded state, scaffold fibers formed a continuous, oriented network. In the PRI state, the scaffold showed some fragmentation with a scaffold volume fraction of 7.79%. In the POI specimen, the scaffold became highly fragmented, forming a randomly distributed short fibrous network (volume fraction of 2.03%) within a contiguous, dense collagenous matrix. Both PGA and PLLA scaffold fibers were observed in the PRI and POI specimens. Collagen density remained similar in both PRI and POI specimens (74.2 and 71.5%, respectively), though the distributions in the transmural direction appeared slightly more homogenous in the POI specimen. Finally, to guide future 2D histological studies for large-scale studies (since acquisition of high-resolution volumetric data is not practical for all specimens), we investigated changes in relevant collagen and scaffold metrics (collagen density and scaffold fiber orientation) with varying section spacing. It was found that a sectioning spacing up to 25

  8. Pulmonary function of individual lung lobes after complex living-donor lobar lung transplantation using inspiratory and expiratory three-dimensional computed tomographic volumetry

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fengshi; Fujinaga, Takuji; Bando, Toru; Date, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    A combination of inspiratory and expiratory three-dimensional computed tomographic volumetry provides useful information on pulmonary function and lung volume. We previously reported an early outcome of a patient undergoing living-donor lobar lung transplantation with sparing of the bilateral native upper lobes. Long-term follow-up on such patients had not been reported, and therefore we herein, for the first time, reported the 2-year follow-up of the previously reported case. According to the inspiratory and expiratory three-dimensional computed tomographic volumetric data, we demonstrated that transplanted lower lobe grafts had been working efficiently and spared bilateral native upper lobes had not provided any adverse effects. PMID:22945847

  9. Analytical three-dimensional neutron transport benchmarks for verification of nuclear engineering codes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapol, B.D.; Kornreich, D.E.

    1997-07-01

    Because of the requirement of accountability and quality control in the scientific world, a demand for high-quality analytical benchmark calculations has arisen in the neutron transport community. The intent of these benchmarks is to provide a numerical standard to which production neutron transport codes may be compared in order to verify proper operation. The overall investigation as modified in the second year renewal application includes the following three primary tasks. Task 1 on two dimensional neutron transport is divided into (a) single medium searchlight problem (SLP) and (b) two-adjacent half-space SLP. Task 2 on three-dimensional neutron transport covers (a) point source in arbitrary geometry, (b) single medium SLP, and (c) two-adjacent half-space SLP. Task 3 on code verification, includes deterministic and probabilistic codes. The primary aim of the proposed investigation was to provide a suite of comprehensive two- and three-dimensional analytical benchmarks for neutron transport theory applications. This objective has been achieved. The suite of benchmarks in infinite media and the three-dimensional SLP are a relatively comprehensive set of one-group benchmarks for isotropically scattering media. Because of time and resource limitations, the extensions of the benchmarks to include multi-group and anisotropic scattering are not included here. Presently, however, enormous advances in the solution for the planar Green`s function in an anisotropically scattering medium have been made and will eventually be implemented in the two- and three-dimensional solutions considered under this grant. Of particular note in this work are the numerical results for the three-dimensional SLP, which have never before been presented. The results presented were made possible only because of the tremendous advances in computing power that have occurred during the past decade.

  10. Comparative profiling of miRNA expression of lung adenocarcinoma cells in two-dimensional and three-dimensional cultures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cui; Nguyen, Hong T.; Zhuang, Yan; Lin, Zhen; Flemington, Erik K.; Zhuo, Ying; Kantrow, Stephen P.; Morris, Gilbert F.; Sullivan, Deborah E.; Shan, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional organotypic culture using reconstituted basement membrane matrix (rBM 3-D) is an invaluable tool to characterize morphogenesis of epithelial cells and to elucidate the tumor-modulating actions of extracellular matrix. microRNAs (miRNA) are a novel class of tumor modulating genes. A substantial amount of investigation of miRNAs in cancer is carried out using monolayer 2-D culture on plastic substratum, which lacks a consideration of the matrix-mediated regulation of miRNAs. In the current study we compared the expression of miRNAs in rBM 3-D and 2-D cultures of two lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. Our findings revealed a profound difference in miRNA profiles between 2-D and rBM 3-D cultures of lung adenocarcinoma cells. The rBM 3-D culture-specific miRNA profile was highlighted with higher expression of the tumor suppressive miRNAs (i.e., miR-200 family) and lower expression of the oncogenic miRNAs (i.e., miR-17~92 cluster and miR-21) than that of 2-D culture. Moreover, the expression pattern of miR-17, miR-21, and miR-200a in rBM 3-D culture correlated with the expression of their targets and acinar morphogenesis, a differentiation behavior of lung epithelial cells in rBM 3-D culture. Over-expression of miR-21 suppressed its target PTEN and disrupted acinar morphogenesis. In summary, we provide the first miRNA profile of lung adenocarcinoma cells in rBM 3-D culture with respect to acinar morphogenesis. These results indicate that rBM 3-D culture is essential to a comprehensive understanding of the miRNA biology in lung epithelial cells pertinent to lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:23036707

  11. Electrotaxis of lung cancer cells in ordered three-dimensional scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yung-Shin; Peng, Shih-Wei; Lin, Keng-Hui; Cheng, Ji-Yen

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report a new method to incorporate 3D scaffold with electrotaxis measurement in the microfluidic device. The electrotactic response of lung cancer cells in the 3D foam scaffolds which resemble the in vivo pulmonary alveoli may give more insight on cellular behaviors in vivo. The 3D scaffold consists of ordered arrays of uniform spherical pores in gelatin. We found that cell morphology in the 3D scaffold was different from that in 2D substrate. Next, we applied a direct current electric field (EF) of 338 mV/mm through the scaffold for the study of cells’ migration within. We measured the migration directedness and speed of different lung cancer cell lines, CL1-0, CL1-5, and A549, and compared with those examined in 2D gelatin-coated and bare substrates. The migration direction is the same for all conditions but there are clear differences in cell morphology, directedness, and migration speed under EF. Our results demonstrate cell migration under EF is different in 2D and 3D environments and possibly due to different cell morphology and/or substrate stiffness. PMID:22288000

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging-three-dimensional printing technology fabricates customized scaffolds for brain tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Fu, Feng; Qin, Zhe; Xu, Chao; Chen, Xu-Yi; Li, Rui-Xin; Wang, Li-Na; Peng, Ding-Wei; Sun, Hong-Tao; Tu, Yue; Chen, Chong; Zhang, Sai; Zhao, Ming-Liang; Li, Xiao-Hong

    2017-04-01

    Conventional fabrication methods lack the ability to control both macro- and micro-structures of generated scaffolds. Three-dimensional printing is a solid free-form fabrication method that provides novel ways to create customized scaffolds with high precision and accuracy. In this study, an electrically controlled cortical impactor was used to induce randomized brain tissue defects. The overall shape of scaffolds was designed using rat-specific anatomical data obtained from magnetic resonance imaging, and the internal structure was created by computer-aided design. As the result of limitations arising from insufficient resolution of the manufacturing process, we magnified the size of the cavity model prototype five-fold to successfully fabricate customized collagen-chitosan scaffolds using three-dimensional printing. Results demonstrated that scaffolds have three-dimensional porous structures, high porosity, highly specific surface areas, pore connectivity and good internal characteristics. Neural stem cells co-cultured with scaffolds showed good viability, indicating good biocompatibility and biodegradability. This technique may be a promising new strategy for regenerating complex damaged brain tissues, and helps pave the way toward personalized medicine.

  13. Irreparable complex DNA double-strand breaks induce chromosome breakage in organotypic three-dimensional human lung epithelial cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Hu, Burong; Delgado, Oliver; Ding, Liang-Hao; Story, Michael D.; Minna, John D.; Shay, Jerry W.; Chen, David J.

    2011-01-01

    DNA damage and consequent mutations initiate the multistep carcinogenic process. Differentiated cells have a reduced capacity to repair DNA lesions, but the biological impact of unrepaired DNA lesions in differentiated lung epithelial cells is unclear. Here, we used a novel organotypic human lung three-dimensional (3D) model to investigate the biological significance of unrepaired DNA lesions in differentiated lung epithelial cells. We showed, consistent with existing notions that the kinetics of loss of simple double-strand breaks (DSBs) were significantly reduced in organotypic 3D culture compared to kinetics of repair in two-dimensional (2D) culture. Strikingly, we found that, unlike simple DSBs, a majority of complex DNA lesions were irreparable in organotypic 3D culture. Levels of expression of multiple DNA damage repair pathway genes were significantly reduced in the organotypic 3D culture compared with those in 2D culture providing molecular evidence for the defective DNA damage repair in organotypic culture. Further, when differentiated cells with unrepaired DNA lesions re-entered the cell cycle, they manifested a spectrum of gross-chromosomal aberrations in mitosis. Our data suggest that downregulation of multiple DNA repair pathway genes in differentiated cells renders them vulnerable to DSBs, promoting genome instability that may lead to carcinogenesis. PMID:21421565

  14. Comparisons of computed and measured three-dimensional velocity fields in a motored two-stroke engine

    SciTech Connect

    Amsden, A.A.; O'Rourke, P.J.; Butler, T.D. ); Meintjes, K.; Fansler, T.D. )

    1991-01-01

    Computer simulations are compared with measurements of the three-dimensional, unsteady scavenging flows of a motored two-stroke engine. Laser Doppler velocimetry measurements were made on a modified Suzuki DT-85 ported engine. Calculations were performed using KIVA-3, a computer program that efficiently solves the intake and exhaust port flows along with those in the cylinder. Measured and computed cylinder pressures and velocities are compared. Pressures agree well over the cycle as do the velocities at the intake ports. In-cylinder velocities differ in detail, but the tumbling motion in the cylinder is well replicated in vertical plane passing through the cylinder axis. 20 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Three dimensional graphene scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering and in-situ electrical recording.

    PubMed

    Ameri, S K; Singh, P K; D'Angelo, R; Stoppel, W; Black, L; Sonkusale, S R

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a three-dimensional graphene foam made of few layers of CVD grown graphene as a scaffold for growing cardiac cells and recording their electrical activity. Our results show that graphene foam not only provides an excellent extra-cellular matrix (ECM) for the culture of such electrogenic cells but also enables recording of its extracellular electrical activity in-situ. Recording is possible due to graphene's excellent conductivity. In this paper, we present our results on the fabrication of the graphene scaffold and initial studies on the culture of cardiac cell lines such as HL-1 and recording of their real-time electrical activity.

  16. Three-dimensional accurate detection of lung emphysema in rats using ultra-short and zero echo time MRI.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Andrea; Tibiletti, Marta; Kjørstad, Åsmund; Birk, Gerald; Schad, Lothar R; Stierstorfer, Birgit; Rasche, Volker; Stiller, Detlef

    2015-11-01

    Emphysema is a life-threatening pathology that causes irreversible destruction of alveolar walls. In vivo imaging techniques play a fundamental role in the early non-invasive pre-clinical and clinical detection and longitudinal follow-up of this pathology. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the feasibility of using high resolution radial three-dimensional (3D) zero echo time (ZTE) and 3D ultra-short echo time (UTE) MRI to accurately detect lung pathomorphological changes in a rodent model of emphysema.Porcine pancreas elastase (PPE) was intratracheally administered to the rats to produce the emphysematous changes. 3D ZTE MRI, low and high definition 3D UTE MRI and micro-computed tomography images were acquired 4 weeks after the PPE challenge. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were measured in PPE-treated and control rats. T2* values were computed from low definition 3D UTE MRI. Histomorphometric measurements were made after euthanizing the animals. Both ZTE and UTE MR images showed a significant decrease in the SNR measured in PPE-treated lungs compared with controls, due to the pathomorphological changes taking place in the challenged lungs. A significant decrease in T2* values in PPE-challenged animals compared with controls was measured using UTE MRI. Histomorphometric measurements showed a significant increase in the mean linear intercept in PPE-treated lungs. UTE yielded significantly higher SNR compared with ZTE (14% and 30% higher in PPE-treated and non-PPE-treated lungs, respectively).This study showed that optimized 3D radial UTE and ZTE MRI can provide lung images of excellent quality, with high isotropic spatial resolution (400 µm) and SNR in parenchymal tissue (>25) and negligible motion artifacts in freely breathing animals. These techniques were shown to be useful non-invasive instruments to accurately and reliably detect the pathomorphological alterations taking place in emphysematous lungs, without incurring the risks of cumulative radiation

  17. Transient Three-Dimensional Analysis of Side Load in Liquid Rocket Engine Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See

    2004-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical investigations on the nozzle start-up side load physics were performed. The objective of this study is to identify the three-dimensional side load physics and to compute the associated aerodynamic side load using an anchored computational methodology. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, and pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation, and a simulated inlet condition based on a system calculation. Finite-rate chemistry was used throughout the study so that combustion effect is always included, and the effect of wall cooling on side load physics is studied. The side load physics captured include the afterburning wave, transition from free- shock to restricted-shock separation, and lip Lambda shock oscillation. With the adiabatic nozzle, free-shock separation reappears after the transition from free-shock separation to restricted-shock separation, and the subsequent flow pattern of the simultaneous free-shock and restricted-shock separations creates a very asymmetric Mach disk flow. With the cooled nozzle, the more symmetric restricted-shock separation persisted throughout the start-up transient after the transition, leading to an overall lower side load than that of the adiabatic nozzle. The tepee structures corresponding to the maximum side load were addressed.

  18. Respiratory impedance is correlated with morphological changes in the lungs on three-dimensional CT in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Karayama, Masato; Inui, Naoki; Mori, Kazutaka; Kono, Masato; Hozumi, Hironao; Suzuki, Yuzo; Furuhashi, Kazuki; Hashimoto, Dai; Enomoto, Noriyuki; Fujisawa, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Yutaro; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2017-01-01

    The forced oscillation technique provides information concerning respiratory impedance, which comprises resistance and reactance of the respiratory system. However, its relationship with morphological changes of the lungs in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remains unclear. Respiratory impedance and spirometric data were evaluated in 98 patients with COPD and 49 reference subjects. Wall thickness (WT) and airway intraluminal area (Ai) of third- to sixth-generation bronchi, and percentage low-attenuation area with less than −950 HU (%LAA) of lungs were measured using three-dimensional computed tomography. COPD patients had higher respiratory impedance, decreased Ai, and increased %LAA compared with reference subjects. Indices of respiratory resistance and reactance and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) were correlated with Ai, and the association between percent predicted FEV1 and Ai was predominant in distal bronchi. The difference in respiratory resistance between 5 Hz and 20 Hz (R5–R20) and FEV1/forced vital capacity ratio (FEV1/FVC) were correlated with WT. The %LAA was correlated with the FEV1/FVC ratio and respiratory reactance. Airway function measurements with the forced oscillation technique provide complementary information to spirometry in COPD. PMID:28176815

  19. Tissue Optical Clearing, Three-Dimensional Imaging, and Computer Morphometry in Whole Mouse Lungs and Human Airways

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Gregory D.; Blum, Emily D.; Fryer, Allison D.

    2014-01-01

    In whole adult mouse lung, full identification of airway nerves (or other cellular/subcellular objects) has not been possible due to patchy distribution and micron-scale size. Here we describe a method using tissue clearing to acquire the first complete image of three-dimensional (3D) innervation in the lung. We then created a method to pair analysis of nerve (or any other colabeled epitope) images with identification of 3D tissue compartments and airway morphometry by using fluorescent casting and morphometry software (which we designed and are making available as open-source). We then tested our method to quantify a sparse heterogeneous nerve population by examining visceral pleural nerves. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of our method in human tissue to image full thickness innervation in irregular 3D tissue compartments and to quantify sparse objects (intrinsic airway ganglia). Overall, this method can uniquely pair the advantages of whole tissue imaging and cellular/subcellular fluorescence microscopy. PMID:24471696

  20. Three-dimensional transient numerical simulation for intake process in the engine intake port-valve-cylinder system.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ma-Ji; Chen, Guo-Hua; Ma, Yuan-Hao

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a KIVA-3 code based numerical model for three-dimensional transient intake flow in the intake port-valve-cylinder system of internal combustion engine using body-fitted technique, which can be used in numerical study on internal combustion engine with vertical and inclined valves, and has higher calculation precision. A numerical simulation (on the intake process of a two-valve engine with a semi-sphere combustion chamber and a radial intake port) is provided for analysis of the velocity field and pressure field of different plane at different crank angles. The results revealed the formation of the tumble motion, the evolution of flow field parameters and the variation of tumble ratios as important information for the design of engine intake system.

  1. Postoperative radiotherapy for lung cancer: improvement in locoregional control using three-dimensional compared with two-dimensional technique.

    PubMed

    Masson-Côté, Laurence; Couture, Christian; Fortin, André; Dagnault, Anne

    2011-07-01

    To determine whether lung cancer patients treated with three-dimensional (3D) postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) have more favorable outcomes than those treated with two-dimensional (2D) PORT. We retrospectively analyzed the charts of 153 lung cancer patients who underwent PORT with curative intent at our center between 1995 and 2007. The patients were grouped according to the RT technique; 66 patients were in the 2D group and 87 in the 3D group. The outcomes included locoregional control, survival, and secondary effects. All patients were treated using a linear accelerator at a total dose of approximately 50 Gy and 2 Gy/fraction. A few patients (21%) also received chemotherapy. Most tumors were in the advanced stage, either Stage II (30%) or Stage III (65%). The main clinical indications for PORT were positive resection margins (23%) and Stage pN2 (52%) and pN1 (22%). The patient characteristics were comparable in both groups. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the 3D technique significantly improved the locoregional control rate at 5 years compared with the 2D technique (81% vs. 56%, p = .007 [Cox]). The 2D technique was associated with a more than twofold increased risk of locoregional recurrence (hazard ratio, 2.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-5.5; p = .006). The overall survival rate did not differ at 5 years (38% vs. 20%, p = .3 [Cox]). The toxicities were also similar and acceptable in both groups. The 3D technique for conformal PORT for lung cancer improved the locoregional control rates of patients compared with the 2D technique. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Postoperative Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer: Improvement in Locoregional Control Using Three-Dimensional Compared With Two-Dimensional Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Masson-Cote, Laurence; Couture, Christian; Fortin, Andre; Dagnault, Anne

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To determine whether lung cancer patients treated with three-dimensional (3D) postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) have more favorable outcomes than those treated with two-dimensional (2D) PORT. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the charts of 153 lung cancer patients who underwent PORT with curative intent at our center between 1995 and 2007. The patients were grouped according to the RT technique; 66 patients were in the 2D group and 87 in the 3D group. The outcomes included locoregional control, survival, and secondary effects. All patients were treated using a linear accelerator at a total dose of approximately 50 Gy and 2 Gy/fraction. A few patients (21%) also received chemotherapy. Most tumors were in the advanced stage, either Stage II (30%) or Stage III (65%). The main clinical indications for PORT were positive resection margins (23%) and Stage pN2 (52%) and pN1 (22%). The patient characteristics were comparable in both groups. Results: Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the 3D technique significantly improved the locoregional control rate at 5 years compared with the 2D technique (81% vs. 56%, p = .007 [Cox]). The 2D technique was associated with a more than twofold increased risk of locoregional recurrence (hazard ratio, 2.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-5.5; p = .006). The overall survival rate did not differ at 5 years (38% vs. 20%, p = .3 [Cox]). The toxicities were also similar and acceptable in both groups. Conclusion: The 3D technique for conformal PORT for lung cancer improved the locoregional control rates of patients compared with the 2D technique.

  3. Three-dimensional anode engineering for the direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, A.; Oloman, C. W.; Gyenge, E. L.

    Catalyzed graphite felt three-dimensional anodes were investigated in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) operated with sulfuric acid supporting electrolyte. With a conventional serpentine channel flow field the preferred anode thickness was 100 μm, while a novel flow-by anode showed the best performance with a thickness of 200-300 μm. The effects of altering the methanol concentration, anolyte flow rate and operating temperature on the fuel cell superficial power density were studied by full (2 3 + 1) factorial experiments on a cell with anode area of 5 cm 2 and excess oxidant O 2 at 200 kPa(abs). For operation in the flow-by mode with 2 M methanol at 2 cm 3 min -1 and 353 K the peak power density was 2380 W m -2 with a PtRuMo anode catalyst, while a PtRu catalyst yielded 2240 W m -2 under the same conditions.

  4. Fabrication of a SFF-based three-dimensional scaffold using a precision deposition system in tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong Young; Park, Eui Kyun; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Shin, Jung-Woog; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2008-05-01

    Recent developments in tissue-engineering techniques allow physicians to treat a range of previously untreatable conditions. In the development of such techniques, scaffolds with a controllable pore size and porosity have been manufactured using solid free-form fabrication methods to investigate cell interaction effects such as cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we describe the fabrication of scaffolds from two types of biodegradable materials using a precision deposition system that we developed. The precision deposition system uses technology that enables the manufacture of three-dimensional (3D) microstructures. The fabrication of 3D tissue-engineering scaffolds using the precision deposition system required the combination of several technologies, including motion control, thermal control, pneumatic control and CAD/CAM software. Through the fabrication and cell interaction analysis of two kinds of scaffolds using polycaprolactone and poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid, feasibility of application to the tissue engineering of the developed SFF-based precision deposition system is demonstrated.

  5. Three-dimensional core-shell hybrid solar cells via controlled in situ materials engineering.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Giacomo; Wang, Yue; Wong, Ping-Show; Lech, Andrew; Hung, Chung-Hong; Shapiro, Joshua; Prikhodko, Sergey; El-Kady, Maher; Kaner, Richard B; Huffaker, Diana L

    2012-07-11

    Three-dimensional core-shell organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells with tunable properties are demonstrated via electropolymerization. Air-stable poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) shells with controlled thicknesses are rapidly coated onto periodic GaAs nanopillar arrays conformally, preserving the vertical 3D structure. The properties of the organic layer can be readily tuned in situ, allowing for (1) the lowering of the highest occupied molecular orbital level (|ΔE| ∼ 0.28 eV), leading to the increase of open-circuit voltage (V(OC)), and (2) an improvement in PEDOT conductivity that results in enhanced short-circuit current densities (J(SC)). The incorporation of various anionic dopants in the polymer during the coating process also enables the tailoring of the polymer/semiconductor interface transport properties. Systematic tuning of the device properties results in a J(SC) of 13.6 mA cm(-2), V(OC) of 0.63 V, peak external quantum efficiency of 58.5%, leading to a power conversion efficiencies of 4.11%.

  6. Engineering three-dimensional topological insulators in Rashba-type spin-orbit coupled heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Das, Tanmoy; Balatsky, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    Topological insulators represent a new class of quantum phase defined by invariant symmetries and spin-orbit coupling that guarantees metallic Dirac excitations at its surface. The discoveries of these states have sparked the hope of realizing non-trivial excitations and novel effects such as a magnetoelectric effect and topological Majorana excitations. Here we develop a theoretical formalism to show that a three-dimensional topological insulator can be designed artificially via stacking bilayers of two-dimensional Fermi gases with opposite Rashba-type spin-orbit coupling on adjacent layers, and with interlayer quantum tunneling. We demonstrate that in the stack of bilayers grown along a (001)-direction, a non-trivial topological phase transition occurs above a critical number of Rashba bilayers. In the topological phase, we find the formation of a single spin-polarized Dirac cone at the -point. This approach offers an accessible way to design artificial topological insulators in a set up that takes full advantage of the atomic layer deposition approach. This design principle is tunable and also allows us to bypass limitations imposed by bulk crystal geometry. PMID:23739724

  7. Engineering three-dimensional topological insulators in Rashba-type spin-orbit coupled heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Das, Tanmoy; Balatsky, A V

    2013-01-01

    Topological insulators represent a new class of quantum phase defined by invariant symmetries and spin-orbit coupling that guarantees metallic Dirac excitations at its surface. The discoveries of these states have sparked the hope of realizing non-trivial excitations and novel effects such as a magnetoelectric effect and topological Majorana excitations. Here we develop a theoretical formalism to show that a three-dimensional topological insulator can be designed artificially via stacking bilayers of two-dimensional Fermi gases with opposite Rashba-type spin-orbit coupling on adjacent layers, and with interlayer quantum tunneling. We demonstrate that in the stack of bilayers grown along a (001)-direction, a non-trivial topological phase transition occurs above a critical number of Rashba bilayers. In the topological phase, we find the formation of a single spin-polarized Dirac cone at the -point. This approach offers an accessible way to design artificial topological insulators in a set up that takes full advantage of the atomic layer deposition approach. This design principle is tunable and also allows us to bypass limitations imposed by bulk crystal geometry.

  8. Developing High-Frequency Quantitative Ultrasound Techniques to Characterize Three-Dimensional Engineered Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado, Karla Patricia E.

    Tissue engineering holds great promise for the repair or replacement of native tissues and organs. Further advancements in the fabrication of functional engineered tissues are partly dependent on developing new and improved technologies to monitor the properties of engineered tissues volumetrically, quantitatively, noninvasively, and nondestructively over time. Currently, engineered tissues are evaluated during fabrication using histology, biochemical assays, and direct mechanical tests. However, these techniques destroy tissue samples and, therefore, lack the capability for real-time, longitudinal monitoring. The research reported in this thesis developed nondestructive, noninvasive approaches to characterize the structural, biological, and mechanical properties of 3-D engineered tissues using high-frequency quantitative ultrasound and elastography technologies. A quantitative ultrasound technique, using a system-independent parameter known as the integrated backscatter coefficient (IBC), was employed to visualize and quantify structural properties of engineered tissues. Specifically, the IBC was demonstrated to estimate cell concentration and quantitatively detect differences in the microstructure of 3-D collagen hydrogels. Additionally, the feasibility of an ultrasound elastography technique called Single Tracking Location Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (STL-ARFI) imaging was demonstrated for estimating the shear moduli of 3-D engineered tissues. High-frequency ultrasound techniques can be easily integrated into sterile environments necessary for tissue engineering. Furthermore, these high-frequency quantitative ultrasound techniques can enable noninvasive, volumetric characterization of the structural, biological, and mechanical properties of engineered tissues during fabrication and post-implantation.

  9. [Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for locoregionally recurrent non-small cell lung cancer after initial radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-jie; Wang, Lü-hua; Lü, Ji-ma; Zhao, Lu-jun; Xiao, Ze-fen; Zhang, Hong-xing; Feng, Qin-fu; Zhang, Zhong; Yin, Wei-bo

    2006-03-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, therapeutic effects and normal tissue complications of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) for locoregionally recurrent non-small cell lung cancer after initial radiotherapy. Between August 1999 and August 2003, 27 such patients were treated with 3DCRT after initial radiotherapy. This series consisted of 25 men and 2 women with a median age of 64 years. Radiotherapy was delivered at 2 Gy per fraction, 5 fractions per week, to a median dose of 50 Gy. Treatment results and normal tissue complications were assessed with WHO and RTOG/EORTC criteria. Based upon a median follow-up time of 20.6 months, 25 patients (92.6%) completed the planned 3DCRT treatment. Their clinical symptom relief rate was 79.1%, and the response rate was 59.3% with a complete remission rate of 14.8% (4/27), partial remission rate of 44.4% (12/27). The overall 1- and 2-year survival (OS) rates were 73.8% and 25.4% with a median survival time (MST) of 20 months. The 1- and 2-year local progression free survival (LPFS) rates were both 88.8%. Grade 2 and grade 3 acute radiation pneumonitis developed in 7.4% (2/27) and 11.1% (3/27). Grade 2 late radiation pneumonitis developed in 11.1% (3/27). 3DCRT is feasible and advisable for locoregionally recurrent non-small-cell lung cancer, giving a good immediate tumor response and acceptable normal tissue complications.

  10. Three-Dimensional Ground Glass Opacity Ratio in CT Images Can Predict Tumor Invasiveness of Stage IA Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Woo Sik; Hong, Sae Rom; Lee, Jin Gu; Lee, Jae Seok; Jung, Hee Suk; Kim, Dae Joon; Chung, Kyung Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the relationship between various parameters, including volumetric parameters, and tumor invasiveness according to the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC)/American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) classification. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 99 patients with completely resected stage IA lung adenocarcinoma. The correlation between several parameters [one-dimensional ground glass opacity (1D GGO) ratio, two-dimensional (2D) GGO ratio, three-dimensional (3D) GGO ratio, 1D solid size, 2D solid size, and 3D solid size] and tumor invasiveness according to IASLC/ATS/ERS classification was investigated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Adenocarcinoma in situ and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma were referred to as noninvasive adenocarcinoma. Results The areas under the curve (AUC) to predict invasive adenocarcinoma for the 1D, 2D, and 3D GGO ratios were 0.962, 0.967, and 0.971, respectively. The optimal cut-off values for the 1D, 2D, and 3D GGO ratios were 38%, 62%, and 74%, respectively. The AUC values for 1D, 2D, and 3D solid sizes to predict invasive adenocarcinoma were 0.933, 0.944, and 0.903, respectively. The optimal cut-off values for 1D, 2D, and 3D solid sizes were 1.2 cm, 1.5 cm2, and 0.7 cm3, respectively. The difference in the ROC curves for 3D GGO ratio and 3D solid size was significant (p=0.01). Conclusion Computed tomography image-related parameters based on GGO were well correlated with and predictive of invasiveness according to IASLC/ATS/ERS classification. 3D GGO ratio was more strongly correlated with pathologic invasiveness than 3D solid size. PMID:27401643

  11. Designing a three-dimensional expanded polytetrafluoroethylene-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffold for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hung-Jen; Chen, Chiang Sang; Lee, I-Chi; Wang, Jyh-Horng; Young, Tai-Horng

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to design a three-dimensional expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE)-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffold for tissue engineering. To test the feasibility of this composite scaffold, a series of two-dimensional culture experiments were performed to investigate the behavior of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) cells on the ePTFE and PLGA membranes. It was found PLGA provided a cell-favorable substrate for cell adhesion, migration, and growth, indicating PLGA is an ACL cell-conductive material. Conversely, poor adhesion and proliferation of ACL cells were observed on the ePTFE, even on the collagen-coated ePTFE. Therefore, the scaffold was not fabricated by coating PLGA on the ePTFE surface because it is difficult to coat anything on the extremely hydrophobic ePTFE surface. Instead, the ePTFE embedded in the PLGA matrix was prepared by immersing ePTFE scrim yarns into the PLGA solution, and then precipitating PLGA to form a three-dimensional construction with porous morphology. The role of ePTFE is regarded as a reinforcing constituent to improve the mechanical strength of porous PLGA matrix to provide early repair strength for tissue healing. However, porous PLGA matrix acts as a supportive environment for allowing cell adhesion, migration, and growth to guide the repair and regeneration of ligament tissue. To test this assumption, a preliminary animal experiment of rabbit ACL wound healing with this three-dimensional ePTFE-PLGA scaffold was performed. These results are very encouraging because such a new scaffold made of ePTFE scrim yarns embedded in PLGA may serve as ACL prostheses in the ligament tissue engineering.

  12. A Versatile Method for Fabricating Tissue Engineering Scaffolds with a Three-Dimensional Channel for Prevasculature Networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Li-Jun; Hu, Qing-Xi

    2016-09-28

    Despite considerable advances in tissue engineering over the past two decades, solutions to some crucial problems remain elusive. Vascularization is one of the most important factors that greatly influence the function of scaffolds. Many research studies have focused on the construction of a vascular-like network with prevascularization structure. Sacrificial materials are widely used to build perfusable vascular-like architectures, but most of these fabricated scaffolds only have a 2D plane-connected network. The fabrication of three-dimensional perfusable branched networks remains an urgent issue. In this work, we developed a novel sacrificial molding technique for fabricating biocompatible scaffolds with a three-dimensional perfusable branched network. Here, 3D-printed poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) filament was used as the sacrificial material. The fused PVA was deposited on the surface of a cylinder to create the 3D branched solid network. Gelatin was used to embed the solid network. Then, the PVA mold was dissolved after curing the hydrogel. The obtained architecture shows good perfusability. Cell experiment results indicated that human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) successfully attached to the surface of the branched channel and maintained high viability after a few days in culture. In order to prevent deformation of the channel, paraffin was coated on the surface of the printed structure, and hydroxyapatite (HA) was added to gelatin. In conclusion, we demonstrate a novel strategy toward the engineering of prevasculature thick tissues through the integration of the fused PVA filament deposit. This approach has great potential in solving the issue of three-dimensional perfusable branched networks and opens the way to clinical applications.

  13. Modifying three-dimensional scaffolds from novel nanocomposite materials using dissolvable porogen particles for use in liver tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Barry; Seldon, Clare; Davidson, Brian; Seifalian, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although hepatocytes have a remarkable regenerative power, the rapidity of acute liver failure makes liver transplantation the only definitive treatment. Attempts to incorporate engineered three-dimensional liver tissue in bioartificial liver devices or in implantable tissue constructs, to treat or bridge patients to self-recovery, were met with many challenges, amongst which is to find suitable polymeric matrices. We studied the feasibility of utilising nanocomposite polymers in three-dimensional scaffolds for hepatocytes. Materials and methods: Hepatocytes (HepG2) were seeded on a flat sheet and in three-dimensional scaffolds made of a nanocomposite polymer (Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane [POSS]-modified polycaprolactone urea urethane) alone as well as with porogen particles, i.e. glucose, sodium bicarbonate and sodium chloride. The scaffold architecture, cell attachment and morphology were studied with scanning electron microscopy, and we assessed cell viability and functionality. Results: Cell attachment to the scaffolds was demonstrated. The scaffold made with glucose particles as porogen showed a narrower range of pore size with higher porosity and better inter-pore communications and seemed to encourage near normal cell morphology. There was a steady increase of albumin secretion throughout the experiment while the control (monolayer cell culture) showed a steep decrease after day 7. At the end of the experiment, there was no significant difference in viability and functionality between the scaffolds and the control. Conclusion: In this initial study, porogen particles were used to modify the scaffolds produced from the novel polymer. Although there was no significance against the control in functionality and viability, the demonstrable attachment on scanning electron microscopy suggest potential roles for this polymer and in particular for scaffolds made with glucose particles in liver tissue engineering. PMID:22532408

  14. Modifying three-dimensional scaffolds from novel nanocomposite materials using dissolvable porogen particles for use in liver tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Adwan, Hussamuddin; Fuller, Barry; Seldon, Clare; Davidson, Brian; Seifalian, Alexander

    2013-08-01

    Although hepatocytes have a remarkable regenerative power, the rapidity of acute liver failure makes liver transplantation the only definitive treatment. Attempts to incorporate engineered three-dimensional liver tissue in bioartificial liver devices or in implantable tissue constructs, to treat or bridge patients to self-recovery, were met with many challenges, amongst which is to find suitable polymeric matrices. We studied the feasibility of utilising nanocomposite polymers in three-dimensional scaffolds for hepatocytes. Hepatocytes (HepG2) were seeded on a flat sheet and in three-dimensional scaffolds made of a nanocomposite polymer (Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane [POSS]-modified polycaprolactone urea urethane) alone as well as with porogen particles, i.e. glucose, sodium bicarbonate and sodium chloride. The scaffold architecture, cell attachment and morphology were studied with scanning electron microscopy, and we assessed cell viability and functionality. Cell attachment to the scaffolds was demonstrated. The scaffold made with glucose particles as porogen showed a narrower range of pore size with higher porosity and better inter-pore communications and seemed to encourage near normal cell morphology. There was a steady increase of albumin secretion throughout the experiment while the control (monolayer cell culture) showed a steep decrease after day 7. At the end of the experiment, there was no significant difference in viability and functionality between the scaffolds and the control. In this initial study, porogen particles were used to modify the scaffolds produced from the novel polymer. Although there was no significance against the control in functionality and viability, the demonstrable attachment on scanning electron microscopy suggest potential roles for this polymer and in particular for scaffolds made with glucose particles in liver tissue engineering.

  15. Three-dimensional structures of three engineered cellulose-binding domains of cellobiohydrolase I from Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed Central

    Mattinen, M. L.; Kontteli, M.; Kerovuo, J.; Linder, M.; Annila, A.; Lindeberg, G.; Reinikainen, T.; Drakenberg, T.

    1997-01-01

    Three-dimensional solution structures for three engineered, synthetic CBDs (Y5A, Y31A, and Y32A) of cellobiohydrolase I (CBHI) from Trichoderma reesei were studied with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. According to CD measurements the antiparallel beta-sheet structure of the CBD fold was preserved in all engineered peptides. The three-dimensional NMR-based structures of Y31A and Y32A revealed only small local changes due to mutations in the flat face of CBD, which is expected to bind to crystalline cellulose. Therefore, the structural roles of Y31 and Y32 are minor, but their functional importance is obvious because these mutants do not bind strongly to cellulose. In the case of Y5A, the disruption of the structural framework at the N-terminus and the complete loss of binding affinity implies that Y5 has both structural and functional significance. The number of aromatic residues and their precise spatial arrangement in the flat face of the type I CBD fold appears to be critical for specific binding. A model for the CBD binding in which the three aligned aromatic rings stack onto every other glucose ring of the cellulose polymer is discussed. PMID:9041630

  16. Whole-organ tissue engineering: decellularization and recellularization of three-dimensional matrix liver scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Sabetkish, Shabnam; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Sabetkish, Nastaran; Khorramirouz, Reza; Akbarzadeh, Aram; Seyedian, Sanam Ladi; Pasalar, Parvin; Orangian, Saghar; Beigi, Reza Seyyed Hossein; Aryan, Zahra; Akbari, Hesam; Tavangar, Seyyed Mohammad

    2015-04-01

    To report the results of whole liver decellularization by two different methods. To present the results of grafting rat and sheep decellularized liver matrix (DLM) into the normal rat liver and compare natural cell seeding process in homo/xenograft of DLM. To compare the results of in vitro whole liver recellularization with rats' neonatal green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive hepatic cells with outcomes of in vivo recellularization process. Whole liver of 8 rats and 4 sheep were resected and cannulated via the hepatic vein and perfused with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) or Triton + SDS. Several examinations were performed to compare the efficacy of these two decellularization procedures. In vivo recellularization of sheep and rat DLMs was performed following transplantation of multiple pieces of both scaffolds in the subhepatic area of four rats. To compare the efficacy of different scaffolds in autologous cell seeding, biopsies of homograft and xenograft were assessed 8 weeks postoperatively. Whole DLMs of 4 rats were also recellularized in vitro by perfusion of rat's fetal GFP-positive hepatic cells with pulsatile bioreactor. Histological evaluation and enzymatic assay were performed for both in vivo and in vitro recellularized samples. The results of this study demonstrated that the triton method was a promising decellularization approach for preserving the three-dimensional structure of liver. In vitro recellularized DLMs were more similar to natural ones compared with in vivo recellularized livers. However, homografts showed better characteristics with more organized structure compared with xenografts. In vitro recellularization of liver scaffolds with autologous cells represents an attractive prospective for regeneration of liver as one of the most compound organs. In vivo cell seeding on the scaffold of the same species may have more satisfactory outcomes when compared with the results of xenotransplantation. This study theoretically may pave the road for

  17. Engineering skeletal myoblasts: roles of three-dimensional culture and electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Pedrotty, Dawn M; Koh, Jennifer; Davis, Bryce H; Taylor, Doris A; Wolf, Patrick; Niklason, Laura E

    2005-04-01

    Immature skeletal muscle cells, or myoblasts, have been used in cellular cardiomyoplasty in attempts to regenerate cardiac muscle tissue by injection of cells into damaged myocardium. In some studies, muscle tissue within myoblast implant sites may be morphologically similar to cardiac muscle. We hypothesized that identifiable aspects of the cardiac milieu may contribute to growth and development of implanted myoblasts in vivo. To test this hypothesis, we designed a novel in vitro system to mimic some aspects of the electrical and biochemical environment of native myocardium. This system enabled us to separate the three-dimensional (3-D) electrical and biochemical signals that may be involved in myoblast proliferation and plasticity. Myoblasts were grown on 3-D polyglycolic acid mesh scaffolds under control conditions, in the presence of cardiac-like electrical current fluxes, or in the presence of culture medium that had been conditioned by mature cardiomyocytes. Cardiac-like electrical current fluxes caused increased myoblast number in 3-D culture, as determined by DNA assay. The increase in cell number was due to increased cellular proliferation and not differences in apoptosis, as determined by proliferating cell nuclear antigen and TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling. Cardiomyocyte-conditioned medium also significantly increased myoblast proliferation. Expression of transcription factors governing differentiation along skeletal or cardiac lineages was evaluated by immunoblotting. Although these assays are qualitative, no changes in differentiation state along skeletal or cardiac lineages were observed in response to electrical current fluxes. Furthermore, from these experiments, conditioned medium did not appear to alter the differentiation state of skeletal myoblasts. Hence, cardiac milieu appears to stimulate proliferation but does not affect differentiation of skeletal myoblasts.

  18. Three-dimensional polycaprolactone-hydroxyapatite scaffolds combined with bone marrow cells for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bo; Yao, Qingqiang; Guo, Yang; Mao, Fengyong; Liu, Shuai; Xu, Yan; Wang, Liming

    2015-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the chondrogenic potential of three-dimensional polycaprolactone-hydroxyapatite (PCL-HA) scaffolds loaded with bone marrow cells in vitro and the effect of PCL-HA scaffolds on osteochondral repair in vivo. Here, bone marrow was added to the prepared PCL-HA scaffolds and cultured in chondrogenic medium for 10 weeks. Osteochondral defects were created in the trochlear groove of 29 knees in 17 New Zealand white rabbits, which were then divided into four groups that underwent: implantation of PCL-HA scaffolds (left knee, n = 17; Group 1), microfracture (right knee, n = 6; Group 2), autologous osteochondral transplantation (right knee, n = 6; Group 3), and no treatment (right knee, n = 5; Control). Extracellular matrix produced by bone marrow cells covered the surface and filled the pores of PCL-HA scaffolds after 10 weeks in culture. Moreover, many cell-laden cartilage lacunae were observed, and cartilage matrix was concentrated in the PCL-HA scaffolds. After a 12-week repair period, Group 1 showed excellent vertical and lateral integration with host bone, but incomplete cartilage regeneration and matrix accumulation. An uneven surface of regenerated cartilage and reduced distribution of cartilage matrix were observed in Group 2. In addition, abnormal bone growth and unstable integration between repaired and host tissues were detected. For Group 3, the integration between transplanted and host cartilage was interrupted. Our findings indicate that the PCL-HA scaffolds loaded with bone marrow cells improved chondrogenesis in vitro and implantation of PCL-HA scaffolds for osteochondral repairenhanced integration with host bone. However, cartilage regeneration remained unsatisfactory. The addition of trophic factors or the use of precultured cell-PCL-HA constructs for accelerated osteochondral repair requires further investigation.

  19. Chemical functionalization of surfaces for building three-dimensional engineered biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Marco E.; Mansur, Alexandra A. P.; Mansur, Herman S.

    2013-06-01

    This study presents a new approach for developing biosensors based on enzymatic systems with designed three-dimensional structures. Silica glass slides were chemically functionalized at surfaces by reacting with organosilanes, 3-mercaptopropyltriethoxysilane (MPTES), and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), using sol-gel process at room temperature. The functionalization of the supports was characterized by contact angle measurements and FTIR spectroscopy. The first enzyme layer was covalently immobilized to the support by a bi-functional linker (glutaraldehyde). The second enzyme layer was deposited using the protein conjugation method based on the high affinity "avidin-biotin" interactions. Each enzyme was biotinylated before being added to the nanostructured system and avidin was used as the binder between consecutive enzyme layers. The biochemical response was assayed at all stages to certify that the enzymatic bioactivity was retained throughout the entire layer-by-layer (LBL) process. The model of building 3D-enzymatic systems was evaluated using the enzymatic structure with glucose oxidase (GOx) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). It was verified that the amino-modified support presented the highest bioactivity response compared to the other chemical functionalities. Moreover, the bienzyme nanostructure demonstrated relevant biochemical activity upon injecting the glucose substrate into the system. Finally, as a proof of concept, the bienzyme systems were assayed using real samples of regular and sugar-free soft drinks where they effectively behaved as structured biosensor for glucose with the built-in 3D hybrid architecture. Based on the results, it can be foreseen the development of promising new nanomaterials for several analytical applications such as monitoring the quality of food and beverages for nutrition purposes.

  20. Thoracic Temporal Subtraction Three Dimensional Computed Tomography (3D-CT): Screening for Vertebral Metastases of Primary Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Iwano, Shingo; Ito, Rintaro; Umakoshi, Hiroyasu; Karino, Takatoshi; Inoue, Tsutomu; Li, Yuanzhong; Naganawa, Shinji

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We developed an original, computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) software that subtracts the initial thoracic vertebral three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) image from the follow-up 3D-CT image. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of this CAD software during screening for vertebral metastases on follow-up CT images of primary lung cancer patients. Materials and Methods The interpretation experiment included 30 sets of follow-up CT scans in primary lung cancer patients and was performed by two readers (readers A and B), who each had 2.5 years’ experience reading CT images. In 395 vertebrae from C6 to L3, 46 vertebral metastases were identified as follows: osteolytic metastases (n = 17), osteoblastic metastases (n = 14), combined osteolytic and osteoblastic metastases (n = 6), and pathological fractures (n = 9). Thirty-six lesions were in the anterior component (vertebral body), and 10 lesions were in the posterior component (vertebral arch, transverse process, and spinous process). The area under the curve (AUC) by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis and the sensitivity and specificity for detecting vertebral metastases were compared with and without CAD for each observer. Results Reader A detected 47 abnormalities on CT images without CAD, and 33 of them were true-positive metastatic lesions. Using CAD, reader A detected 57 abnormalities, and 38 were true positives. The sensitivity increased from 0.717 to 0.826, and on ROC curve analysis, AUC with CAD was significantly higher than that without CAD (0.849 vs. 0.902, p = 0.021). Reader B detected 40 abnormalities on CT images without CAD, and 36 of them were true-positive metastatic lesions. Using CAD, reader B detected 44 abnormalities, and 39 were true positives. The sensitivity increased from 0.783 to 0.848, and AUC with CAD was nonsignificantly higher than that without CAD (0.889 vs. 0.910, p = 0.341). Both readers detected more osteolytic and osteoblastic

  1. Microporous membrane-based liver tissue engineering for the reconstruction of three-dimensional functional liver tissues in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Junichi; Tanishita, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    To meet the increasing demand for liver tissue engineering, various three-dimensional (3D) liver cell culture techniques have been developed. Nevertheless, conventional liver cell culture techniques involving the suspending cells in extracellular matrix (ECM) components and the seeding of cells into 3D biodegradable scaffolds have an intrinsic shortcoming, low cell-scaffold ratios. We have developed a microporous membrane-based liver cell culture technique. Cell behaviors and tissue organization can be controlled by membrane geometry, and cell-dense thick tissues can be reconstructed by layering cells cultured on biodegradable microporous membranes. Applications extend from liver parenchymal cell monoculture to multi-cell type cultures for the reconstruction of 3D functional liver tissue. This review focuses on the expanding role for microporous membranes in liver tissue engineering, primarily from our research.

  2. [RESEARCH PROGRESS OF ADIPOSE-DERIVED STEM CELLS COMPOUND WITH THREE DIMENSIONAL PRINTING SCAFFOLD FOR ENGINEERED TISSUE].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi; Tian, Xiaohong; Bai, Shuling

    2016-03-01

    To review the research progress of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) compound with three dimensional (3D) printing scaffold in tissue engineering of fat, bone, cartilage, blood vessel, hepatocyte, and so on. The recently published literature about ADSCs compound with 3D printing scaffold in tissue engineering at home and abroad was reviewed, analyzed, and summarized. A large number of basic researches showed that ADSCs could differentiate into a variety of tissues on 3D printing scaffold and involve in tissue repair and regeneration. But there is still a long way between the basic theory and the clinical practice at the early stages of development. It can effectively improve and restore the structure and function of the damaged tissue and organ to use ADSCs and 3D printing scaffold.

  3. Biomimetics of the Extracellular Matrix: An Integrated Three-Dimensional Fiber-Hydrogel Composite for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Coburn, Jeannine; Gibson, Matt; Bandalini, Pierre Alain; Laird, Christopher; Mao, Hai-Quan; Moroni, Lorenzo; Seliktar, Dror

    2012-01-01

    The native extracellular matrix (ECM) consists of an integrated fibrous protein network and proteoglycan-based ground (hydrogel) substance. We designed a novel electrospinning technique to engineer a three dimensional fiber-hydrogel composite that mimics the native ECM structure, is injectable, and has practical macroscale dimensions for clinically relevant tissue defects. In a model system of articular cartilage tissue engineering, the fiber-hydrogel composites enhanced the biological response of adult stem cells, with dynamic mechanical stimulation resulting in near native levels of extracellular matrix. This technology platform was expanded through structural and biochemical modification of the fibers including hydrophilic fibers containing chondroitin sulfate, a significant component of endogenous tissues, and hydrophobic fibers containing ECM microparticles. PMID:22287978

  4. Adipose Tissue Engineering in Three-Dimensional Levitation Tissue Culture System Based on Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Daquinag, Alexes C.; Souza, Glauco R.

    2013-01-01

    White adipose tissue (WAT) is becoming widely used in regenerative medicine/cell therapy applications, and its physiological and pathological importance is increasingly appreciated. WAT is a complex organ composed of differentiated adipocytes, stromal mesenchymal progenitors known as adipose stromal cells (ASC), as well as endothelial vascular cells and infiltrating leukocytes. Two-dimensional (2D) culture that has been typically used for studying adipose cells does not adequately recapitulate WAT complexity. Improved methods for reconstruction of functional WAT ex vivo are instrumental for understanding of physiological interactions between the composing cell populations. Here, we used a three-dimensional (3D) levitation tissue culture system based on magnetic nanoparticle assembly to model WAT development and growth in organoids termed adipospheres. We show that 3T3-L1 preadipocytes remain viable in spheroids for a long period of time, while in 2D culture, they lose adherence and die after reaching confluence. Upon adipogenesis induction in 3T3-L1 adipospheres, cells efficiently formed large lipid droplets typical of white adipocytes in vivo, while only smaller lipid droplet formation is achievable in 2D. Adiposphere-based coculture of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes with murine endothelial bEND.3 cells led to a vascular-like network assembly concomitantly with lipogenesis in perivascular cells. Adipocyte-depleted stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of mouse WAT cultured in 3D underwent assembly into organoids with vascular-like structures containing luminal endothelial and perivascular stromal cell layers. Adipospheres made from primary WAT cells displayed robust proliferation and complex hierarchical organization reflected by a matricellular gradient incorporating ASC, endothelial cells, and leukocytes, while ASC quickly outgrew other cell types in adherent culture. Upon adipogenesis induction, adipospheres derived from the SVF displayed more efficient lipid droplet

  5. Adipose tissue engineering in three-dimensional levitation tissue culture system based on magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Daquinag, Alexes C; Souza, Glauco R; Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2013-05-01

    White adipose tissue (WAT) is becoming widely used in regenerative medicine/cell therapy applications, and its physiological and pathological importance is increasingly appreciated. WAT is a complex organ composed of differentiated adipocytes, stromal mesenchymal progenitors known as adipose stromal cells (ASC), as well as endothelial vascular cells and infiltrating leukocytes. Two-dimensional (2D) culture that has been typically used for studying adipose cells does not adequately recapitulate WAT complexity. Improved methods for reconstruction of functional WAT ex vivo are instrumental for understanding of physiological interactions between the composing cell populations. Here, we used a three-dimensional (3D) levitation tissue culture system based on magnetic nanoparticle assembly to model WAT development and growth in organoids termed adipospheres. We show that 3T3-L1 preadipocytes remain viable in spheroids for a long period of time, while in 2D culture, they lose adherence and die after reaching confluence. Upon adipogenesis induction in 3T3-L1 adipospheres, cells efficiently formed large lipid droplets typical of white adipocytes in vivo, while only smaller lipid droplet formation is achievable in 2D. Adiposphere-based coculture of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes with murine endothelial bEND.3 cells led to a vascular-like network assembly concomitantly with lipogenesis in perivascular cells. Adipocyte-depleted stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of mouse WAT cultured in 3D underwent assembly into organoids with vascular-like structures containing luminal endothelial and perivascular stromal cell layers. Adipospheres made from primary WAT cells displayed robust proliferation and complex hierarchical organization reflected by a matricellular gradient incorporating ASC, endothelial cells, and leukocytes, while ASC quickly outgrew other cell types in adherent culture. Upon adipogenesis induction, adipospheres derived from the SVF displayed more efficient lipid droplet

  6. Spinal intraoperative three-dimensional navigation: correlation between clinical and absolute engineering accuracy.

    PubMed

    Guha, Daipayan; Jakubovic, Raphael; Gupta, Shaurya; Alotaibi, Naif M; Cadotte, David; da Costa, Leodante B; George, Rajeesh; Heyn, Chris; Howard, Peter; Kapadia, Anish; Klostranec, Jesse M; Phan, Nicolas; Tan, Gamaliel; Mainprize, Todd G; Yee, Albert; Yang, Victor X D

    2017-04-01

    Spinal intraoperative computer-assisted navigation (CAN) may guide pedicle screw placement. Computer-assisted navigation techniques have been reported to reduce pedicle screw breach rates across all spinal levels. However, definitions of screw breach vary widely across studies, if reported at all. The absolute quantitative error of spinal navigation systems is theoretically a more precise and generalizable metric of navigation accuracy. It has also been computed variably and reported in less than a quarter of clinical studies of CAN-guided pedicle screw accuracy. This study aimed to characterize the correlation between clinical pedicle screw accuracy, based on postoperative imaging, and absolute quantitative navigation accuracy. This is a retrospective review of a prospectively collected cohort. We recruited 30 patients undergoing first-time posterior cervical-thoracic-lumbar-sacral instrumented fusion±decompression, guided by intraoperative three-dimensional CAN. Clinical or radiographic screw accuracy (Heary and 2 mm classifications) and absolute quantitative navigation accuracy (translational and angular error in axial and sagittal planes). We reviewed a prospectively collected series of 209 pedicle screws placed with CAN guidance. Each screw was graded clinically by multiple independent raters using the Heary and 2 mm classifications. Clinical grades were dichotomized per convention. The absolute accuracy of each screw was quantified by the translational and angular error in each of the axial and sagittal planes. Acceptable screw accuracy was achieved for significantly fewer screws based on 2 mm grade versus Heary grade (92.6% vs. 95.1%, p=.036), particularly in the lumbar spine. Inter-rater agreement was good for the Heary classification and moderate for the 2 mm grade, significantly greater among radiologists than surgeon raters. Mean absolute translational-angular accuracies were 1.75 mm-3.13° and 1.20 mm-3.64° in the axial and sagittal planes

  7. Optical coherence tomography of cell dynamics in three-dimensional engineered tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boppart, Stephen A.; Tan, Wei; Ko, Han-Jo; Vinegoni, Claudio

    2005-08-01

    Cell-based engineered tissue models have been increasingly useful in the field of tissue engineering, in in vitro drug screening systems, and in complex cell biology studies. While techniques for engineering tissue models have advanced, there have been few imaging technique capable of assessing the complex 3-D cell behaviors in real-time and at the depths that comprise thick tissues. Understanding cell behavior requires advanced imaging tools to progress from characterizing 2-D cell cultures to complex, highly-scattering, thick 3-D tissue constructs. In this study, we demonstrate that it is possible to use OCT to non-destructively evaluate dynamic cell behavior and function in a quantitative fashion in four dimensions (3-D space plus time). Dynamic processes including cell migration, proliferation, apoptosis, necrosis, and mechanical restructuring are observed during engineering tissue development. With high penetration depth and increased spatial and temporal resolution in 3-D space, OCT will be a useful tool for improving our understanding of cell dynamics in situ and in real-time, for elucidating the complex biological interactions, and for directing our designs toward functional and biomimetic engineered tissues.

  8. Computational experience with a three-dimensional rotary engine combustion model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.; Willis, E. A.

    1990-01-01

    A new computer code was developed to analyze the chemically reactive flow and spray combustion processes occurring inside a stratified-charge rotary engine. Mathematical and numerical details of the new code were recently described by the present authors. The results are presented of limited, initial computational trials as a first step in a long-term assessment/validation process. The engine configuration studied was chosen to approximate existing rotary engine flow visualization and hot firing test rigs. Typical results include: (1) pressure and temperature histories, (2) torque generated by the nonuniform pressure distribution within the chamber, (3) energy release rates, and (4) various flow-related phenomena. These are discussed and compared with other predictions reported in the literature. The adequacy or need for improvement in the spray/combustion models and the need for incorporating an appropriate turbulence model are also discussed.

  9. Design of composite scaffolds and three-dimensional shape analysis for tissue-engineered ear

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes, Thomas M.; Bassett, Erik K.; Tseng, Alan; Kimura, Anya; Roscioli, Nick; Randolph, Mark A.; Vacanti, Joseph P.; Hadlock, Theresa A.; Gupta, Rajiv; Pomerantseva, Irina; Sundback, Cathryn A.

    2013-01-01

    Engineered cartilage is a promising option for auricular reconstruction. We have previously demonstrated that a titanium wire framework within a composite collagen ear-shaped scaffold helped to maintain the gross dimensions of the engineered ear after implantation, resisting the deformation forces encountered during neocartilage maturation and wound healing. The ear geometry was redesigned to achieve a more accurate aesthetic result when implanted subcutaneously in a nude rat model. A non-invasive method was developed to assess size and shape changes of the engineered ear in three dimensions. Computer models of the titanium framework were obtained from CT scans before and after implantation. Several parameters were measured including the overall length, width and depth, the minimum intrahelical distance and overall curvature values for each beam section within the framework. Local curvature values were measured to gain understanding of the bending forces experienced by the framework structure in situ. Length and width changed by less than 2%, whereas the depth decreased by approximately 8% and the minimum intrahelical distance changed by approximately 12%. Overall curvature changes identified regions most susceptible to deformation. Eighty-nine per cent of local curvature measurements experienced a bending moment less than 50 µN-m owing to deformation forces during implantation. These quantitative shape analysis results have identified opportunities to improve shape fidelity of engineered ear constructs. PMID:23904585

  10. Design of composite scaffolds and three-dimensional shape analysis for tissue-engineered ear.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Thomas M; Bassett, Erik K; Tseng, Alan; Kimura, Anya; Roscioli, Nick; Randolph, Mark A; Vacanti, Joseph P; Hadlock, Theresa A; Gupta, Rajiv; Pomerantseva, Irina; Sundback, Cathryn A

    2013-10-06

    Engineered cartilage is a promising option for auricular reconstruction. We have previously demonstrated that a titanium wire framework within a composite collagen ear-shaped scaffold helped to maintain the gross dimensions of the engineered ear after implantation, resisting the deformation forces encountered during neocartilage maturation and wound healing. The ear geometry was redesigned to achieve a more accurate aesthetic result when implanted subcutaneously in a nude rat model. A non-invasive method was developed to assess size and shape changes of the engineered ear in three dimensions. Computer models of the titanium framework were obtained from CT scans before and after implantation. Several parameters were measured including the overall length, width and depth, the minimum intrahelical distance and overall curvature values for each beam section within the framework. Local curvature values were measured to gain understanding of the bending forces experienced by the framework structure in situ. Length and width changed by less than 2%, whereas the depth decreased by approximately 8% and the minimum intrahelical distance changed by approximately 12%. Overall curvature changes identified regions most susceptible to deformation. Eighty-nine per cent of local curvature measurements experienced a bending moment less than 50 µN-m owing to deformation forces during implantation. These quantitative shape analysis results have identified opportunities to improve shape fidelity of engineered ear constructs.

  11. Electrospun ultrafine fibrous wheat glutenin scaffolds with three-dimensionally random organization and water stability for soft tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Xu, Helan; Cai, Shaobo; Sellers, Alexander; Yang, Yiqi

    2014-08-20

    Wheat glutenin, the highly crosslinked protein from wheat, was electrospun into scaffolds with ultrafine fibers oriented randomly and evenly in three dimensions to simulate native extracellular matrices of soft tissues. The scaffolds were intrinsically water-stable without using any external crosslinkers and could support proliferation and differentiation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells for soft tissue engineering. Regeneration of soft tissue favored water-stable fibrous protein scaffolds with three-dimensional arrangement and large volumes, which could be difficult to obtain via electrospinning. Wheat glutenin is an intrinsically water-stable protein due to the 2% cysteine in its amino acid composition. In this research, the disulfide crosslinks in wheat glutenin were cleaved while the backbones were preserved. The treated wheat glutenin was dissolved in aqueous solvent with an anionic surfactant and then electrospun into bulky scaffolds composed of ultrafine fibers oriented randomly in three dimensions. The scaffolds could maintain their fibrous structures after incubated in PBS for up to 35 days. In vitro study indicated that the three-dimensional wheat glutenin scaffolds well supported uniform distribution and adipogenic differentiation of adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A three-dimensional engineered tumour for spatial snapshot analysis of cell metabolism and phenotype in hypoxic gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodenhizer, Darren; Gaude, Edoardo; Cojocari, Dan; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Frezza, Christian; Wouters, Bradly G.; McGuigan, Alison P.

    2016-02-01

    The profound metabolic reprogramming that occurs in cancer cells has been investigated primarily in two-dimensional cell cultures, which fail to recapitulate spatial aspects of cell-to-cell interactions as well as tissue gradients present in three-dimensional tumours. Here, we describe an engineered model to assemble three-dimensional tumours by rolling a scaffold-tumour composite strip. By unrolling the strip, the model can be rapidly disassembled for snapshot analysis, allowing spatial mapping of cell metabolism in concert with cell phenotype. We also show that the establishment of oxygen gradients within samples that are shaped by oxygen-dependent signalling pathways, as well as the consequential variations in cell growth, response to hypoxic gradients extending from normoxia to severe hypoxia, and therapy responsiveness, are consistent with those of tumours in vivo. Moreover, by using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we mapped cellular metabolism and identified spatially defined metabolic signatures of cancer cells to reveal both known and novel metabolic responses to hypoxia.

  13. Thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-g-methylcellulose hydrogel as a three-dimensional extracellular matrix for cartilage-engineered applications.

    PubMed

    Sá-Lima, Helena; Tuzlakoglu, Kadriye; Mano, João F; Reis, Rui L

    2011-09-15

    Recent advances in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine fields can offer alternative solutions to the existing techniques for cartilage repair. In this context, a variety of materials has been proposed, and the injectable hydrogels are among the most promising alternatives. The aim of this work is to explore the ability of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-g-methylcellulose (PNIPAAm-g-MC) thermoreversible hydrogel as a three-dimensional support for cell encapsulation toward the regeneration of articular cartilage through a tissue engineering approach. The PNIPAAm-g-MC copolymer was effectively obtained using ammonium-persulfate and N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine as initiator as confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and (1) H NMR results. The copolymer showed to be temperature responsive, becoming a gel at temperatures above its lower critical solution temperature (~ 32 °C) while turning into a liquid below it. Results obtained from the MTS test showed that extracts of the hydrogel were clearly noncytotoxic to L929 fibroblast cells. ATDC5 cells, a murine chondrogenic cell line, were used as the in vitro model for this study; they were encapsulated at high cell density within the hydrogel and cultured for up to 28 days. PNIPAAm-g-MC did not affect the cell viability and proliferation, as indicated by both MTS and DNA assays. The results also revealed an increase in synthesis of glycosoaminoglycans within culture time measured by the dimethylmethylene blue quantification assay. These results suggest the viability of using PNIPAAm-g-MC thermoresponsive hydrogel as a three-dimensional scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering using minimal-invasive strategies. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A biomimetic three-dimensional woven composite scaffold for functional tissue engineering of cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutos, Franklin T.; Freed, Lisa E.; Guilak, Farshid

    2007-02-01

    Tissue engineering seeks to repair or regenerate tissues through combinations of implanted cells, biomaterial scaffolds and biologically active molecules. The rapid restoration of tissue biomechanical function remains an important challenge, emphasizing the need to replicate structural and mechanical properties using novel scaffold designs. Here we present a microscale 3D weaving technique to generate anisotropic 3D woven structures as the basis for novel composite scaffolds that are consolidated with a chondrocyte-hydrogel mixture into cartilage tissue constructs. Composite scaffolds show mechanical properties of the same order of magnitude as values for native articular cartilage, as measured by compressive, tensile and shear testing. Moreover, our findings showed that porous composite scaffolds could be engineered with initial properties that reproduce the anisotropy, viscoelasticity and tension-compression nonlinearity of native articular cartilage. Such scaffolds uniquely combine the potential for load-bearing immediately after implantation in vivo with biological support for cell-based tissue regeneration without requiring cultivation in vitro.

  15. Optical coherence tomography of cell dynamics in three-dimensional engineered tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Wei; Desai, Tejal A.; Leckband, Deborah; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2005-03-01

    Cell-based engineered tissue models have been increasingly useful in the field of tissue engineering, in in vitro drug screening systems, and in complex cell biology studies. While techniques for engineering tissue models have advanced, there have been few imaging technique capable of assessing the complex 3-D cell behaviors in real-time and at the depths that comprise thick tissues. Understanding cell behavior requires advanced imaging tools to progress from characterizing 2-D cell cultures to complex, highly-scattering, thick 3-D tissue constructs. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging biomedical imaging technique that can perform cellular-resolution imaging in situ and in real-time. OCT, which uses near-infrared laser light, provides deep-tissue imaging up to several millimeters within highly-scattering tissue, thus permitting visualization of changes at depths previously unattainable. In this study, we demonstrate that it is possible to use OCT to evaluate dynamic cell behavior and function in a quantitative fashion in four dimensions (3-D space plus time). We investigated and characterized cell dynamics and processes in deep tissue models, such as cell de-adhesion, cell proliferation, cell chemotaxis migration, cell necrosis, and cell apoptosis. This optical imaging technique was developed and utilized in order to gain new insights into how chemical microenvironments influence cellular functions and dynamics in multi-dimensional models. In addition, by detecting the changes in cell dynamics, effective chemical concentration could be estimated. With high penetration depth and increased spatial and temporal resolution in 3-D space, OCT will be a useful tool for improving our understanding of cell dynamics in situ and in real-time, for elucidating the complex biological interactions, and for directing our designs toward functional and biomimetic engineered tissues.

  16. Laser-guided direct writing for three-dimensional tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Nahmias, Yaakov; Schwartz, Robert E; Verfaillie, Catherine M; Odde, David J

    2005-10-20

    One of the principal limitations to the size of an engineered tissue is oxygen and nutrient transport. Lacking a vascular bed, cells embedded in an engineered tissue will consume all available oxygen within hours while out branching blood vessels will take days to vascularize the implanted tissue. One possible solution is to directly write vascular structures within the engineered tissue prior to implantation, reconstructing the tissue according to its native architecture. The cell patterning technique, laser-guided direct writing (LGDW), can pattern multiple cells types with micrometer resolution on arbitrary surfaces, including biological gels. Here we show that LGDW can pattern human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in two- and three-dimensions with micrometer accuracy. By patterning HUVEC on Matrigel, we can direct their self-assembly into vascular structures along the desired pattern. Finally, co-culturing the vascular structures with hepatocytes resulted in an aggregated tubular structure similar in organization to a hepatic sinusoid. This capability can facilitate studies of tissue architecture at the single cell level, and of heterotypic interactions underlying processes such as liver and pancreas morphogenesis, differentiation, and angiogenesis. Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Three-dimensional Simulations of Long Duration Gamma-ray Burst Jets: Timescales from Variable Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Cámara, D.; Lazzati, Davide; Morsony, Brian J.

    2016-08-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves are characterized by marked variability, each showing unique properties. The origin of this variability, at least for a fraction of long GRBs, may be the result of an unsteady central engine. It is thus important to study the effects that an episodic central engine has on the jet propagation and, eventually, on the prompt emission within the collapsar scenario. Thus, in this study we follow the interaction of pulsed outflows with their progenitor stars with hydrodynamic numerical simulations in both two and three dimensions. We show that the propagation of unsteady jets is affected by the interaction with the progenitor material well after the break-out time, especially for jets with long quiescent times comparable to or larger than a second. We also show that this interaction can lead to an asymmetric behavior in which pulse durations and quiescent periods are systematically different. After the pulsed jets drill through the progenitor and the interstellar medium, we find that, on average, the quiescent epochs last longer than the pulses (even in simulations with symmetrical active and quiescent engine times). This could explain the asymmetry detected in the light curves of long quiescent time GRBs.

  18. Laser fabrication of three-dimensional CAD scaffolds from photosensitive gelatin for applications in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ovsianikov, Aleksandr; Deiwick, Andrea; Van Vlierberghe, Sandra; Dubruel, Peter; Möller, Lena; Dräger, Gerald; Chichkov, Boris

    2011-04-11

    In the present work, 3D CAD scaffolds for tissue engineering applications were developed starting from methacrylamide-modified gelatin (GelMOD) using two-photon polymerization (2PP). The scaffolds were cross-linked employing the biocompatible photoinitiator Irgacure 2959. Because gelatin is derived from collagen (i.e., the main constituent of the ECM), the developed materials mimic the cellular microenvironment from a chemical point of view. In addition, by applying the 2PP technique, structural properties of the cellular microenvironment can also be mimicked. Furthermore, in vitro degradation assays indicated that the enzymatic degradation capability of gelatin is preserved for the methacrylamide-modified derivative. An in depth morphological analysis of the 2PP-fabricated scaffolds demonstrated that the parameters of the CAD model are reproduced with great precision, including the ridge-like surface topography on the order of 1.5 μm. The developed scaffolds showed an excellent stability in culture medium. In a final part of the present work, the suitability of the developed scaffolds for tissue engineering applications was verified. The results indicated that the applied materials are suitable to support porcine mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and subsequent proliferation. Upon applying osteogenic stimulation, the seeded cells differentiated into the anticipated lineage. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis showed the induced calcification of the scaffolds. The results clearly indicate that 2PP is capable of manufacturing precisely constructed 3D tissue engineering scaffolds using photosensitive polymers as starting material.

  19. Three-Dimensional Lung Tumor Microenvironment Modulates Therapeutic Compound Responsiveness In Vitro – Implication for Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Ekert, Jason E.; Johnson, Kjell; Strake, Brandy; Pardinas, Jose; Jarantow, Stephen; Perkinson, Robert; Colter, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture is gaining acceptance in response to the need for cellular models that better mimic physiologic tissues. Spheroids are one such 3D model where clusters of cells will undergo self-assembly to form viable, 3D tumor-like structures. However, to date little is known about how spheroid biology compares to that of the more traditional and widely utilized 2D monolayer cultures. Therefore, the goal of this study was to characterize the phenotypic and functional differences between lung tumor cells grown as 2D monolayer cultures, versus cells grown as 3D spheroids. Eight lung tumor cell lines, displaying varying levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and cMET protein expression, were used to develop a 3D spheroid cell culture model using low attachment U-bottom plates. The 3D spheroids were compared with cells grown in monolayer for 1) EGFR and cMET receptor expression, as determined by flow cytometry, 2) EGFR and cMET phosphorylation by MSD assay, and 3) cell proliferation in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). In addition, drug responsiveness to EGFR and cMET inhibitors (Erlotinib, Crizotinib, Cetuximab [Erbitux] and Onartuzumab [MetMab]) was evaluated by measuring the extent of cell proliferation and migration. Data showed that EGFR and cMET expression is reduced at day four of untreated spheroid culture compared to monolayer. Basal phosphorylation of EGFR and cMET was higher in spheroids compared to monolayer cultures. Spheroids showed reduced EGFR and cMET phosphorylation when stimulated with ligand compared to 2D cultures. Spheroids showed an altered cell proliferation response to HGF, as well as to EGFR and cMET inhibitors, compared to monolayer cultures. Finally, spheroid cultures showed exceptional utility in a cell migration assay. Overall, the 3D spheroid culture changed the cellular response to drugs and growth factors and may more accurately mimic the natural tumor

  20. Three-dimensional lung tumor microenvironment modulates therapeutic compound responsiveness in vitro--implication for drug development.

    PubMed

    Ekert, Jason E; Johnson, Kjell; Strake, Brandy; Pardinas, Jose; Jarantow, Stephen; Perkinson, Robert; Colter, David C

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture is gaining acceptance in response to the need for cellular models that better mimic physiologic tissues. Spheroids are one such 3D model where clusters of cells will undergo self-assembly to form viable, 3D tumor-like structures. However, to date little is known about how spheroid biology compares to that of the more traditional and widely utilized 2D monolayer cultures. Therefore, the goal of this study was to characterize the phenotypic and functional differences between lung tumor cells grown as 2D monolayer cultures, versus cells grown as 3D spheroids. Eight lung tumor cell lines, displaying varying levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and cMET protein expression, were used to develop a 3D spheroid cell culture model using low attachment U-bottom plates. The 3D spheroids were compared with cells grown in monolayer for 1) EGFR and cMET receptor expression, as determined by flow cytometry, 2) EGFR and cMET phosphorylation by MSD assay, and 3) cell proliferation in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). In addition, drug responsiveness to EGFR and cMET inhibitors (Erlotinib, Crizotinib, Cetuximab [Erbitux] and Onartuzumab [MetMab]) was evaluated by measuring the extent of cell proliferation and migration. Data showed that EGFR and cMET expression is reduced at day four of untreated spheroid culture compared to monolayer. Basal phosphorylation of EGFR and cMET was higher in spheroids compared to monolayer cultures. Spheroids showed reduced EGFR and cMET phosphorylation when stimulated with ligand compared to 2D cultures. Spheroids showed an altered cell proliferation response to HGF, as well as to EGFR and cMET inhibitors, compared to monolayer cultures. Finally, spheroid cultures showed exceptional utility in a cell migration assay. Overall, the 3D spheroid culture changed the cellular response to drugs and growth factors and may more accurately mimic the natural tumor

  1. Engineering of oriented myocardium on three-dimensional micropatterned collagen-chitosan hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Loraine L Y; Janic, Katarina; Radisic, Milica

    2012-04-30

    Surface topography and electrical field stimulation are important guidance cues that aid the organization and contractility of cardiomyocytes in vivo. We report here on the use of these biomimetic cues in vitro to engineer an implantable contractile cardiac tissue. Photocrosslinkable collagen-chitosan hydrogels with microgrooves of 10 µm, 20 µm and 100 µm in width were fabricated using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) molds. The hydrogels were seeded with cardiomyocytes, placed into a bioreactor array with the microgrooves aligned with the electrical field lines, and stimulated with biphasic square pulses at 1 Hz and 2.5 V/cm. At Day 6, cardiomyocytes were aligned in the direction of the microgrooves. When cultivated without electrical stimulation, the excitation threshold of engineered cardiac tissues using micropatterned hydrogels was significantly lower than using smooth hydrogels, thus showing the importance of cell alignment to cardiac function. The success rate of achieving beating constructs was higher with the application of electrical stimulation. In addition, formation of dense contractile cardiac organoids was observed in groups with both biomimetic cues. The cultivation of cardiomyocytes on hydrogels with 10 µm grooves yielded 100% beating tissues with or without electrical stimulation, thus suggesting a smaller groove width is necessary for cells to communicate and form proper gap junctions. However, electrical field stimulation further increased cell density and enhanced tissue morphology which may be essential for the integration of the tissue construct to the native heart tissue upon implantation. The biodegradability of the hydrogel substrate allows for the rapid translation of the engineered, oriented cardiac tissue to clinical applications.

  2. A highly organized three-dimensional alginate scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering prepared by microfluidic technology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen-Chie; Yang, Kai-Chiang; Lin, Keng-Hui; Liu, Hwa-Chang; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2011-10-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative disease and frequently involves the knee, hip and phalangeal joints. Current treatments used in small cartilage defects including multiple drilling, abrasion arthroplasty, mosaicplasty, and autogenous chondrocyte transplantation, however, there are problems needed to be solved. The standard treatment for severe osteoarthritis is total joint arthroplasty. The disadvantages of this surgery are the possibility of implant loosening. Therefore, tissue engineering for cartilage regeneration has become a promising topic. We have developed a new method to produce a highly organized single polymer (alginate) scaffold using microfluidic device. Scanning electron microscope and confocal fluoroscope examinations showed that the scaffold has a regular interconnected porous structure in the scale of 250 μm and high porosity. The scaffold is effective in chondrocyte culture; the cell viability test (WST-1 assay), cell toxicity (lactate dehydrogenase assay), cell survival rate, extracellular matrix production (glycosaminoglycans contents), cell proliferation (DNA quantification), and gene expression (real-time PCR) all revealed good results for chondrocyte culture. The chondrocytes can maintain normal phenotypes, highly express aggrecan and type II collagen, and secrete a great deal of extracellular matrix when seeded in the alginate scaffold. This study demonstrated that a highly organized alginate scaffold can be prepared with an economical microfluidic device, and this scaffold is effective in cartilage tissue engineering. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Direct E-jet printing of three-dimensional fibrous scaffold for tendon tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Wang, Zuyong; Ying Hsi Fuh, Jerry; San Wong, Yoke; Wang, Wilson; San Thian, Eng

    2017-04-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) offers a promising strategy to restore diseased tendon tissue. However, a suitable scaffold for tendon TE has not been achieved with current fabrication techniques. Herein, we report the development of a novel electrohydrodynamic jet printing (E-jetting) for engineering 3D tendon scaffold with high porosity and orientated micrometer-size fibers. The E-jetted scaffold comprised tubular multilayered micrometer-size fibrous bundles, with interconnected spacing and geometric anisotropy along the longitudinal direction of the scaffold. Fiber diameter, stacking pattern, and interfiber distance have been observed to affect the structural stability of the scaffold, of which the enhanced mechanical strength can be obtained for scaffolds with thick fibers as the supporting layer. Human tenocytes showed a significant increase in cellular metabolism on the E-jetted scaffolds as compared to that on conventional electrospun scaffolds (2.7-, 2.8-, and 3.1-fold increase for 150, 300, and 600 µm interfiber distance, respectively; p < 0.05). Furthermore, the scaffolds provided structural support for human tenocytes to align with controlled orientation along the longitudinal direction of the scaffold, and promoted the expression of collagen type I. For the first time, E-jetting has been explored as a novel scaffolding approach for tendon TE, and offers a 3D fibrous scaffold to promote organized tissue reconstruction for potential tendon healing. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 616-627, 2017.

  4. Multifunctional hybrid three-dimensionally woven scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Moutos, Franklin T; Estes, Bradley T; Guilak, Farshid

    2010-11-10

    The successful replacement of large-scale cartilage defects or osteoarthritic lesions using tissue-engineering approaches will likely require composite biomaterial scaffolds that have biomimetic mechanical properties and can provide cell-instructive cues to control the growth and differentiation of embedded stem or progenitor cells. This study describes a novel method of constructing multifunctional scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering that can provide both mechanical support and biological stimulation to seeded progenitor cells. 3-D woven PCL scaffolds were infiltrated with a slurry of homogenized CDM of porcine origin, seeded with human ASCs, and cultured for up to 42 d under standard growth conditions. These constructs were compared to scaffolds derived solely from CDM as well as 3-D woven PCL fabric without CDM. While all scaffolds promoted a chondrogenic phenotype of the ASCs, CDM scaffolds showed low compressive and shear moduli and contracted significantly during culture. Fiber-reinforced CDM scaffolds and 3-D woven PCL scaffolds maintained their mechanical properties throughout the culture period, while supporting the accumulation of a cartilaginous extracellular matrix. These findings show that fiber-reinforced hybrid scaffolds can be produced with biomimetic mechanical properties as well as the ability to promote ASC differentiation and chondrogenesis in vitro.

  5. Urinary bladder smooth muscle engineered from adipose stem cells and a three dimensional synthetic composite.

    PubMed

    Jack, Gregory S; Zhang, Rong; Lee, Min; Xu, Yuhan; Wu, Ben M; Rodríguez, Larissa V

    2009-07-01

    Human adipose stem cells were cultured in smooth muscle inductive media and seeded into synthetic bladder composites to tissue engineer bladder smooth muscle. 85:15 Poly-lactic-glycolic acid bladder dome composites were cast using an electropulled microfiber luminal surface combined with an outer porous sponge. Cell-seeded bladders expressed smooth muscle actin, myosin heavy chain, calponinin, and caldesmon via RT-PCR and immunoflourescence. Nude rats (n=45) underwent removal of half their bladder and repair using: (i) augmentation with the adipose stem cell-seeded composites, (ii) augmentation with a matched acellular composite, or (iii) suture closure. Animals were followed for 12 weeks post-implantation and bladders were explanted serially. Results showed that bladder capacity and compliance were maintained in the cell-seeded group throughout the 12 weeks, but deteriorated in the acellular scaffold group sequentially with time. Control animals repaired with sutures regained their baseline bladder capacities by week 12, demonstrating a long-term limitation of this model. Histological analysis of explanted materials demonstrated viable adipose stem cells and increasing smooth muscle mass in the cell-seeded scaffolds with time. Tissue bath stimulation demonstrated smooth muscle contraction of the seeded implants but not the acellular implants after 12 weeks in vivo. Our study demonstrates the feasibility and short term physical properties of bladder tissue engineered from adipose stem cells.

  6. Urinary Bladder Smooth Muscle Engineered from Adipose Stem Cells and a Three Dimensional Synthetic Composite

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Gregory S.; Zhang, Rong; Lee, Min; Xu, Yuhan; Wu, Ben; Rodríguez, Larissa V.

    2009-01-01

    Human adipose stem cells were cultured in smooth muscle inductive media and seeded into synthetic bladder composites to tissue engineer bladder smooth muscle. 85:15 poly-lactic-glycolic acid bladder dome composites were cast using an electropulled microfiber luminal surface combined with an outer porous sponge. Cell seeded bladders expressed smooth muscle actin, myosin heavy chain, calponinin, and caldesmon via RT-PCR and immunoflourescence. Nude rats (n=45) underwent removal of half their bladder and repair using: (i) augmentation with the adipose stem cell seeded composites, (ii) augmentation with a matched acellular composite, or (iii) suture closure. Animals were followed for 12 weeks post-implantation and bladders were explanted serially. Results showed that bladder capacity and compliance were maintained in the cell seeded group throughout the 12 weeks, but deteriorated in the acellular scaffold group sequentially with time. Control animals repaired with sutures regained their baseline bladder capacities by week 12, demonstrating a long term limitation of this model. Histological analysis of explanted materials demonstrated viable adipose stem cells and increasing smooth muscle mass in the cell seeded scaffolds with time. Tissue bath stimulation demonstrated smooth muscle contraction of the seeded implants but not the acellular implants after 12 weeks in vivo. Our study demonstrates the feasibility and short term physical properties of bladder tissue engineered from adipose stem cells. PMID:19345408

  7. Three dimensional simulation of nucleate boiling heat and mass transfer in cooling passages of internal combustion engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdipour, R.; Baniamerian, Z.; Delauré, Y.

    2016-05-01

    An accurate knowledge of heat transfer and temperature distribution in vehicle engines is essential to have a good management of heat transfer performance in combustion engines. This may be achieved by numerical simulation of flow through the engine cooling passages; but the task becomes particularly challenging when boiling occurs. Neglecting two phase flow processes in the simulation would however result in significant inaccuracy in the predictions. In this study a three dimensional numerical model is proposed using Fluent 6.3 to simulate heat transfer of fluid flowing through channels of conventional size. Results of the present theoretical and numerical model are then compared with some empirical results. For high fluid flow velocities, departure between experimental and numerical results is about 9 %, while for lower velocity conditions, the model inaccuracy increases to 18 %. One of the outstanding capabilities of the present model, beside its ability to simulate two phase fluid flow and heat transfer in three dimensions, is the prediction of the location of bubble formation and condensation which can be a key issue in the evaluation of the engine performance and thermal stresses.

  8. Three-dimensional imaging technologies: a priority for the advancement of tissue engineering and a challenge for the imaging community.

    PubMed

    Teodori, Laura; Crupi, Annunziata; Costa, Alessandra; Diaspro, Alberto; Melzer, Susanne; Tarnok, Attila

    2017-01-01

    Tissue engineering/regenerative medicine (TERM) is an interdisciplinary field that applies the principle of engineering and life sciences to restore/replace damaged tissues/organs with in vitro artificially-created ones. Research on TERM quickly moves forward. Today newest technologies and discoveries, such as 3D-/bio-printing, allow in vitro fabrication of ex-novo made tissues/organs, opening the door to wide and probably never-ending application possibilities, from organ transplant to drug discovery, high content screening and replacement of laboratory animals. Imaging techniques are fundamental tools for the characterization of tissue engineering (TE) products at any stage, from biomaterial/scaffold to construct/organ analysis. Indeed, tissue engineers need versatile imaging methods capable of monitoring not only morphological but also functional and molecular features, allowing three-dimensional (3D) and time-lapse in vivo analysis, in a non-destructive, quantitative, multidimensional analysis of TE constructs, to analyze their pre-implantation quality assessment and their fate after implantation. This review focuses on the newest developments in imaging technologies and applications in the context of requirements of the different steps of the TERM field, describing strengths and weaknesses of the current imaging approaches.

  9. Three-dimensional visualization of morphology and ventilation procedure (air flow and diffusion) of a subdivision of the acinus using synchrotron radiation microtomography of the human lung specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kenji; Ikura, Hirohiko; Ikezoe, Junpei; Nagareda, Tomofumi; Yagi, Naoto; Umetani, Keiji; Imai, Yutaka

    2004-04-01

    We have previously reported a synchrotron radiation (SR) microtomography system constructed at the bending magnet beamline at the SPring-8. This system has been applied to the lungs obtained at autopsy and inflated and fixed by Heitzman"s method. Normal lung and lung specimens with two different types of pathologic processes (fibrosis and emphysema) were included. Serial SR microtomographic images were stacked to yield the isotropic volumetric data with high-resolution (12 μm3 in voxel size). Within the air spaces of a subdivision of the acinus, each voxel is segmented three-dimensionally using a region growing algorithm ("rolling ball algorithm"). For each voxel within the segmented air spaces, two types of voxel coding have been performed: single-seeded (SS) coding and boundary-seeded (BS) coding, in which the minimum distance from an initial point as the only seed point and all object boundary voxels as a seed set were calculated and assigned as the code values to each voxel, respectively. With these two codes, combinations of surface rendering and volume rendering techniques were applied to visualize three-dimensional morphology of a subdivision of the acinus. Furthermore, sequentially filling process of air into a subdivision of the acinus was simulated under several conditions to visualize the ventilation procedure (air flow and diffusion). A subdivision of the acinus was reconstructed three-dimensionally, demonstrating the normal architecture of the human lung. Significant differences in appearance of ventilation procedure were observed between normal and two pathologic processes due to the alteration of the lung architecture. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the microstructure of a subdivision of the acinus and visualization of the ventilation procedure (air flow and diffusion) with SR microtomography would offer a new approach to study the morphology, physiology, and pathophysiology of the human respiratory system.

  10. Rapid Engineering of Three-Dimensional, Multicellular Tissues With Polymeric Scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Jordan, Jacqueline; Fraga, Denise N.

    2007-01-01

    A process has been developed for the rapid tissue engineering of multicellular-tissue-equivalent assemblies by the controlled enzymatic degradation of polymeric beads in a low-fluid-shear bioreactor. In this process, the porous polymeric beads serve as temporary scaffolds to support the assemblies of cells in a tissuelike 3D configuration during the critical initial growth phases of attachment of anchorage-dependent cells, aggregation of the cells, and formation of a 3D extracellular matrix. Once the cells are assembled into a 3D array and enmeshed in a structural supportive 3D extracellular matrix (ECM), the polymeric scaffolds can be degraded in the low-fluid-shear environment of the NASA-designed bioreactor. The natural 3D tissuelike assembly, devoid of any artificial support structure, is maintained in the low-shear bioreactor environment by the newly formed natural cellular/ECM. The elimination of the artificial scaffold allows normal tissue structure and function.

  11. Analysis of rotary engine combustion processes based on unsteady, three-dimensional computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.; Willis, E. A.

    1989-01-01

    A new computer code was developed for predicting the turbulent, and chemically reacting flows with sprays occurring inside of a stratified charge rotary engine. The solution procedure is based on an Eulerian Lagrangian approach where the unsteady, 3-D Navier-Stokes equations for a perfect gas mixture with variable properties are solved in generalized, Eulerian coordinates on a moving grid by making use of an implicit finite volume, Steger-Warming flux vector splitting scheme, and the liquid phase equations are solved in Lagrangian coordinates. Both the details of the numerical algorithm and the finite difference predictions of the combustor flow field during the opening of exhaust and/or intake, and also during fuel vaporization and combustion, are presented.

  12. Bio-Pick, Place, and Perfuse: A New Instrument for Three-Dimensional Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Blakely, Andrew M.; Manning, Kali L.; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2015-01-01

    A grand challenge of tissue engineering is the fabrication of large constructs with a high density of living cells. By adapting the principles of pick-and-place machines used in the high-speed assembly of electronics, we have developed an innovative instrument, the Bio-Pick, Place, and Perfuse (Bio-P3), which picks up large complex multicellular building parts, transports them to a build area, and precisely places the parts at desired locations while perfusing the parts. These assembled parts subsequently fuse to form a larger contiguous tissue construct. Multicellular microtissues were formed by seeding cells into nonadhesive micro-molds, wherein cells self-assembled scaffold-free parts in the shape of spheroids, toroids, and honeycombs. After removal from the molds, the parts were gripped, transported (using an x, y, z controller), and released using the Bio-P3 with little to no effect on cell viability or part structure. As many as 16 toroids were stacked over a 170 μm diameter post where they fused over the course of 48 h to form a single tissue. Larger honeycomb parts were also gripped and stacked onto a build head that, like the gripper head, provided fluid suction to hold and perfuse the parts during assembly. Scaffold-free building parts help to address several of the engineering and biological challenges to large tissue biofabrication, and the Bio-P3 described in this article is a novel instrument for the controlled gripping, placing, stacking, and perfusing of living building parts for solid organ fabrication. PMID:25530515

  13. Three-dimensional computer-aided human factors engineering analysis of a grafting robot.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Y C; Chen, S; Wu, G J; Lin, Y H

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this research was to conduct a human factors engineering analysis of a grafting robot design using computer-aided 3D simulation technology. A prototype tubing-type grafting robot for fruits and vegetables was the subject of a series of case studies. To facilitate the incorporation of human models into the operating environment of the grafting robot, I-DEAS graphic software was applied to establish individual models of the grafting robot in line with Jack ergonomic analysis. Six human models (95th percentile, 50th percentile, and 5th percentile by height for both males and females) were employed to simulate the operating conditions and working postures in a real operating environment. The lower back and upper limb stresses of the operators were analyzed using the lower back analysis (LBA) and rapid upper limb assessment (RULA) functions in Jack. The experimental results showed that if a leg space is introduced under the robot, the operator can sit closer to the robot, which reduces the operator's level of lower back and upper limbs stress. The proper environmental layout for Taiwanese operators for minimum levels of lower back and upper limb stress are to set the grafting operation at 23.2 cm away from the operator at a height of 85 cm and with 45 cm between the rootstock and scion units.

  14. ADFNE: Open source software for discrete fracture network engineering, two and three dimensional applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadakar Alghalandis, Younes

    2017-05-01

    Rapidly growing topic, the discrete fracture network engineering (DFNE), has already attracted many talents from diverse disciplines in academia and industry around the world to challenge difficult problems related to mining, geothermal, civil, oil and gas, water and many other projects. Although, there are few commercial software capable of providing some useful functionalities fundamental for DFNE, their costs, closed code (black box) distributions and hence limited programmability and tractability encouraged us to respond to this rising demand with a new solution. This paper introduces an open source comprehensive software package for stochastic modeling of fracture networks in two- and three-dimension in discrete formulation. Functionalities included are geometric modeling (e.g., complex polygonal fracture faces, and utilizing directional statistics), simulations, characterizations (e.g., intersection, clustering and connectivity analyses) and applications (e.g., fluid flow). The package is completely written in Matlab scripting language. Significant efforts have been made to bring maximum flexibility to the functions in order to solve problems in both two- and three-dimensions in an easy and united way that is suitable for beginners, advanced and experienced users.

  15. Engineering of Three-Dimensional Microenvironments to Promote Contractile Behavior in Primary Intestinal Organoids

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Kelley S.; Dewi, Ruby; Kuo, Calvin J.; Heilshorn, Sarah C.

    2014-01-01

    intestinal organoid functionality. As peristaltic contractility is a crucial requirement for normal digestive tract function, this achievement of reproducible organoid contraction marks a pivotal advancement towards engineering physiologically functional replacement tissue constructs. PMID:24343706

  16. Three Dimensional Collagen Scaffold Promotes Intrinsic Vascularisation for Tissue Engineering Applications.

    PubMed

    Chan, Elsa C; Kuo, Shyh-Ming; Kong, Anne M; Morrison, Wayne A; Dusting, Gregory J; Mitchell, Geraldine M; Lim, Shiang Y; Liu, Guei-Sheung

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a porous 3-dimensional collagen scaffold material that supports capillary formation in vitro, and promotes vascularization when implanted in vivo. Collagen scaffolds were synthesized from type I bovine collagen and have a uniform pore size of 80 μm. In vitro, scaffolds seeded with primary human microvascular endothelial cells suspended in human fibrin gel formed CD31 positive capillary-like structures with clear lumens. In vivo, after subcutaneous implantation in mice, cell-free collagen scaffolds were vascularized by host neovessels, whilst a gradual degradation of the scaffold material occurred over 8 weeks. Collagen scaffolds, impregnated with human fibrinogen gel, were implanted subcutaneously inside a chamber enclosing the femoral vessels in rats. Angiogenic sprouts from the femoral vessels invaded throughout the scaffolds and these degraded completely after 4 weeks. Vascular volume of the resulting constructs was greater than the vascular volume of constructs from chambers implanted with fibrinogen gel alone (42.7±5.0 μL in collagen scaffold vs 22.5±2.3 μL in fibrinogen gel alone; p<0.05, n = 7). In the same model, collagen scaffolds seeded with human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) produced greater increases in vascular volume than did cell-free collagen scaffolds (42.9±4.0 μL in collagen scaffold with human ASCs vs 25.7±1.9 μL in collagen scaffold alone; p<0.05, n = 4). In summary, these collagen scaffolds are biocompatible and could be used to grow more robust vascularized tissue engineering grafts with improved the survival of implanted cells. Such scaffolds could also be used as an assay model for studies on angiogenesis, 3-dimensional cell culture, and delivery of growth factors and cells in vivo.

  17. Engineering of three-dimensional microenvironments to promote contractile behavior in primary intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    DiMarco, Rebecca L; Su, James; Yan, Kelley S; Dewi, Ruby; Kuo, Calvin J; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2014-02-01

    organoid functionality. As peristaltic contractility is a crucial requirement for normal digestive tract function, this achievement of reproducible organoid contraction marks a pivotal advancement towards engineering physiologically functional replacement tissue constructs.

  18. Preparation, characterization, and evaluation of genipin crosslinked chitosan/gelatin three-dimensional scaffolds for liver tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Wang, Qiang-Song; Yan, Kuo; Qi, Yun; Wang, Gui-Fang; Cui, Yuan-Lu

    2016-08-01

    In liver tissue engineering, scaffolds with porous structure desgined to supply nutrient and oxygen exchange for three-dimensional (3-D) cells culture, and maintain liver functions. Meanwhile, genipin, as a natural crosslinker, is widely used to crosslink biomaterials in tissue engineering, with lower cytotoxicity and better biocompatibility. In present study, chitosan/gelatin 3-D scaffolds crosslinked by genipin, glutaraldehyde or 1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-3-ethyl-carbodimide hydrochloride (EDC) were prepared and characterized by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The biocompatibility of chitosan/gelatin scaffolds corsslinked with different crosslinkers was investigated by cell viability, morphology and liver specific functions. The result showed that the 1% and 2% genipin crosslinked chitosan/gelatin scaffolds possess ideal porosity. The genipin crosslinked 3-D scaffolds possessed the best biocompatibility than that of the others, and maintained liver specific functions when HepG2 cells seeded on scaffolds. The cellular morphology of HepG2 cells seeded on scaffolds showed that cells could penetrate into the scaffolds and proliferate significantly. Therefore, genipin crosslinked chitosan/gelatin scaffolds could be a promising biomaterial used in liver tissue engineering. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1863-1870, 2016.

  19. Experimental study on the construction of small three-dimensional tissue engineered grafts of electrospun poly-ε-caprolactone.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guang-Chang; Gu, Yong-Quan; Geng, Xue; Feng, Zeng-Guo; Zhang, Shu-Wen; Ye, Lin; Wang, Zhong-Gao

    2015-02-01

    Studies on three-dimensional tissue engineered graft (3DTEG) have attracted great interest among researchers as they present a means to meet the pressing clinical demand for tissue engineering scaffolds. To explore the feasibility of 3DTEG, high porosity poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) was obtained via the co-electrospinning of polyethylene glycol and PCL, and used to construct small-diameter poly-ε-caprolactone-lysine (PCL-LYS-H) scaffolds, whereby heparin was anchored to the scaffold surface by lysine groups. A variety of small-diameter 3DTEG models were constructed with different PCL layers and the mechanical properties of the resulting constructs were evaluated in order to select the best model for 3DTEGs. Bone marrow mononuclear cells were induced and differentiated to endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs). A 3DTEG (labeled '10-4%') was successfully produced by the dynamic co-culture of ECs on the PCL-LYS-H scaffolds and SMCs on PCL. The fluorescently labeled cells on the 3DTEG were subsequently observed by laser confocal microscopy, which showed that the ECs and SMCs were embedded in the 3DTEG. Nitric oxide and endothelial nitric oxide synthase assays showed that the ECs behaved normally in the 3DTEG. This study consequently provides a new thread to produce small-diameter tissue engineered grafts, with excellent mechanical properties, that are perfusable to vasculature and functional cells.

  20. Collagen density gradient on three-dimensional printed poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds for interface tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    D'Amora, Ugo; D'Este, Matteo; Eglin, David; Safari, Fatemeh; Sprecher, Christoph M; Gloria, Antonio; De Santis, Roberto; Alini, Mauro; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2017-05-09

    The ability to engineer scaffolds that resemble the transition between tissues would be beneficial to improve repair of complex organs, but has yet to be achieved. In order to mimic tissue organization, such constructs should present continuous gradients of geometry, stiffness and biochemical composition. Although the introduction of rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing techniques allows deposition of heterogeneous layers and shape control, the creation of surface chemical gradients has not been explored on three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds obtained through fused deposition modelling technique. Thus, the goal of this study was to introduce a gradient functionalization method in which a poly(ε-caprolactone) surface was first aminolysed and subsequently covered with collagen via carbodiimide reaction. The 2D constructs were characterized for their amine and collagen contents, wettability, surface topography and biofunctionality. Finally, chemical gradients were created in 3D printed scaffolds with controlled geometry and porosity. The combination of additive manufacturing and surface modification is a viable tool for the fabrication of 3D constructs with controlled structural and chemical gradients. These constructs can be employed for mimicking continuous tissue gradients for interface tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Design and characterization of microcapsules-integrated collagen matrixes as multifunctional three-dimensional scaffolds for soft tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Del Mercato, Loretta L; Passione, Laura Gioia; Izzo, Daniela; Rinaldi, Rosaria; Sannino, Alessandro; Gervaso, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds based on collagen are promising candidates for soft tissue engineering applications. The addition of stimuli-responsive carriers (nano- and microparticles) in the current approaches to tissue reconstruction and repair brings about novel challenges in the design and conception of carrier-integrated polymer scaffolds. In this study, a facile method was developed to functionalize 3D collagen porous scaffolds with biodegradable multilayer microcapsules. The effects of the capsule charge as well as the influence of the functionalization methods on the binding efficiency to the scaffolds were studied. It was found that the binding of cationic microcapsules was higher than that of anionic ones, and application of vacuum during scaffolds functionalization significantly hindered the attachment of the microcapsules to the collagen matrix. The physical properties of microcapsules-integrated scaffolds were compared to pristine scaffolds. The modified scaffolds showed swelling ratios, weight losses and mechanical properties similar to those of unmodified scaffolds. Finally, in vitro diffusional tests proved that the collagen scaffolds could stably retain the microcapsules over long incubation time in Tris-HCl buffer at 37°C without undergoing morphological changes, thus confirming their suitability for tissue engineering applications. The obtained results indicate that by tuning the charge of the microcapsules and by varying the fabrication conditions, collagen scaffolds patterned with high or low number of microcapsules can be obtained, and that the microcapsules-integrated scaffolds fully retain their original physical properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Three-dimensional CaP/gelatin lattice scaffolds with integrated osteoinductive surface topographies for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Danish; Smith, Carol-Anne; Dalby, Matthew J; Meek, R M Dominic; Lin, Sien; Li, Gang; Su, Bo

    2015-01-06

    Surface topography is known to influence stem cells and has been widely used as physical stimuli to modulate cellular behaviour including adhesion, proliferation and differentiation on 2D surfaces. Integration of well-defined surface topography into three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds for tissue engineering would be useful to direct the cell fate for intended applications. Technical challenges are remaining as how to fabricate such 3D scaffolds with controlled surface topography from a range of biodegradable and biocompatible materials. In this paper, a novel fabrication process using computer numerically controlled machining and lamination is reported to make 3D calcium phosphate/gelatin composite scaffolds with integrated surface micropatterns that are introduced by embossing prior to machining. Geometric analysis shows that this method is versatile and can be used to make a wide range of lattices with porosities that meet the basic requirements for bone tissue engineering. Both in vitro and in vivo studies show that micropatterned composite scaffolds with surfaces comprising 40 μm pits and 50 μm grooves were optimal for improved osteogenesis. The results have demonstrated the potential of a novel fabrication process for producing cell-instructive scaffolds with designed surface topographies to induce specific tissue regeneration.

  3. Three-dimensional porous scaffolds at the crossroads of tissue engineering and cell-based gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Coutu, Daniel L; Yousefi, Azizeh-Mitra; Galipeau, Jacques

    2009-10-15

    In the last 20 years, more than 1,500 gene therapy clinical trials have been approved worldwide targeting a variety of indications, from inherited monogenic diseases to acquired conditions such as cancer, cardiovascular and infectious diseases. However, concerns about the safety and efficacy of gene therapy pharmaceuticals justify the development of alternative strategies to ensure the clinical translation of this still promising field. In particular, ex vivo gene therapy strategies using autologous adult stem cells coupled to three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds show great promises in preclinical studies. Developments in the fields of biomaterial sciences and tissue engineering have already helped understanding how we can harness to regenerative potential of many cell types to create artificial tissues and organs and vastly improve the engraftment of ex vivo manipulated adult stem cells. In this article, we will review the current state of the art in tissue engineering by exploring the various types of clinically available biomaterials and the methods used to process them into complex 3D scaffolds. We will then review how these technologies are applied in cell-based gene therapy and identify novel avenues of research that may benefit patients in the near future. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Middle ear mucosal regeneration with three-dimensionally tissue-engineered autologous middle ear cell sheets in rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Yuichiro; Murakami, Daisuke; Yamato, Masayuki; Hama, Takanori; Yamamoto, Kazuhisa; Kojima, Hiromi; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Okano, Teruo

    2016-03-01

    The likelihood of recurrent retraction and adhesion of newly formed tympanic membrane is high when middle ear mucosa is extensively lost during cholesteatoma and adhesive otitis media surgery. If rapid postoperative regeneration of the mucosa on the exposed bone surface can be achieved, prevention of recurrent eardrum adhesion and cholesteatoma formation, for which there has been no definitive treatment, can be expected. Suture-less transplantation of tissue-engineered mucosal cell sheets was examined immediately after the operation of otitis media surgery in order to quickly regenerate middle ear mucosa lost during surgery in a rabbit model. Transplantable middle ear mucosal cell sheets with a three-dimensional tissue architecture very similar to native middle ear mucosa were fabricated from middle ear mucosal tissue fragments obtained in an autologous manner from middle ear bulla on temperature-responsive culture surfaces. Immediately after the mucosa was resected from middle ear bone bulla inner cavity, mucosal cell sheets were grafted at the resected site. Both bone hyperplasia and granulation tissue formation were inhibited and early mucosal regeneration was observed in the cell sheet-grafted group, compared with the control group in which only mucosal removal was carried out and the bone surface exposed. This result indicates that tissue engineered mucosal cell sheets would be useful to minimize complications after the surgical operation on otitis media and future clinical application is expected.

  5. Fabrication of three-dimensional porous scaffold based on collagen fiber and bioglass for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Long, Teng; Yang, Jun; Shi, Shan-Shan; Guo, Ya-Ping; Ke, Qin-Fei; Zhu, Zhen-An

    2015-10-01

    An ideal scaffold for bone tissue engineering should have interconnected porous structure, good biocompatibility, and mechanical properties well-matched with natural bones. Collagen is the key component in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of natural bones, and plays an important role in bone regeneration. The biological activity of collagen has promoted it to be an advantageous biomaterial for bone tissue engineering; however, the mechanical properties of these scaffolds are insufficient and the porous structures are not stable in the wet state. An effective strategy to solve this problem is to fabricate a hybrid scaffold of biologically derived and synthetic material, which have the necessary bioactivity and mechanical stability needed for bone synthesis. In this work, a three-dimensional macroporous bone scaffold based on collagen (CO) fiber and bioglass (BG) is fabricated by a slurry-dipping technique, and its relevant mechanical and biological properties are evaluated. The CO/BG scaffold is interconnected with a porosity of 81 ± 4.6% and pore size of 40-200 μm. Compared with CO scaffold, water absorption value of CO/BG scaffold decreases greatly from 889% to 52%, which significantly alleviates the swelling behavior of collagen and improves the stability of scaffold structure. The CO/BG scaffold has a compression strength of 5.8 ± 1.6 MPa and an elastic modulus of 0.35 ± 0.01 Gpa, which are well-matched with the mechanical properties of trabecular bones. In vitro cell assays demonstrate that the CO/BG scaffold has good biocompatibility to facilitate the spreading and proliferation of human bone marrow stromal cells. Hence, the CO/BG scaffold is promising for bone tissue engineering application.

  6. Y chromosome detection of three-dimensional tissue-engineered skeletal muscle constructs in a syngeneic rat animal model.

    PubMed

    Beier, J P; Kneser, U; Stern-Sträter, J; Stark, G B; Bach, A D

    2004-01-01

    Surgical reconstruction of muscle tissue lost by trauma or tumor ablation is limited by the lack of availability of functional native tissue substitution. Moreover, so far most inherited or acquired muscle diseases are lacking sufficient treatment, because only few alternatives exist to provide functional restoration of lost muscle tissues. Engineering those tissues and transplantation into sites of dysfunction may be an alternative approach and may allow replacement of such damaged or failing skeletal muscle tissues. Techniques attempting reconstruction of some human tissues and organs (tissue engineering) have been introduced into clinical practice recently. One major problem that previous transplantation studies were facing is the ability of detection of transplanted cells after integration. Using the Y chromosome in situ hybridization technique in a syngeneic rat model allows transplantation of cell constructs orthotopically, without manipulation of the cells, with no rejection or immunosuppression being implied, but providing a nondilutable genetic marker to identify transplanted cells. The purpose of our study was to create functional skeletal muscle tissue in vivo using the transplantation of primary myoblasts precultivated within a three-dimensional (3D) fibrin matrix and to determine the fate of the transplanted cells using the Y chromosome detection technique. 3D myoblast cultures were established derived from male donor rats and after 7 days of cultivation we performed an orthotopic transplantation of 3D cell constructs into a created muscle defect within the gracilis muscle of syngeneic female rats. Anti-desmin immunostaining and Y chromosome in situ hybridization indicated the survival and integration of transplanted male myoblasts into the female recipient animal, thus demonstrating the feasibility of this approach in tissue engineering and the research of cell transplantation in general.

  7. Rotating three-dimensional dynamic culture of adult human bone marrow-derived cells for tissue engineering of hyaline cartilage.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shinsuke; Mishima, Hajime; Ishii, Tomoo; Akaogi, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Tomokazu; Ohyabu, Yoshimi; Chang, Fei; Ochiai, Naoyuki; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2009-04-01

    The method of constructing cartilage tissue from bone marrow-derived cells in vitro is considered a valuable technique for hyaline cartilage regenerative medicine. Using a rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor developed in a NASA space experiment, we attempted to efficiently construct hyaline cartilage tissue from human bone marrow-derived cells without using a scaffold. Bone marrow aspirates were obtained from the iliac crest of nine patients during orthopedic operation. After their proliferation in monolayer culture, the adherent cells were cultured in the RWV bioreactor with chondrogenic medium for 2 weeks. Cells from the same source were cultured in pellet culture as controls. Histological and immunohistological evaluations (collagen type I and II) and quantification of glycosaminoglycan were performed on formed tissues and compared. The engineered constructs obtained using the RWV bioreactor showed strong features of hyaline cartilage in terms of their morphology as determined by histological and immunohistological evaluations. The glycosaminoglycan contents per microg DNA of the tissues were 10.01 +/- 3.49 microg/microg DNA in the case of the RWV bioreactor and 6.27 +/- 3.41 microg/microg DNA in the case of the pellet culture, and their difference was significant. The RWV bioreactor could provide an excellent environment for three-dimensional cartilage tissue architecture that can promote the chondrogenic differentiation of adult human bone marrow-derived cells.

  8. Volumetric Analysis of Alveolar Bone Defect Using Three-Dimensional-Printed Models Versus Computer-Aided Engineering.

    PubMed

    Du, Fengzhou; Li, Binghang; Yin, Ningbei; Cao, Yilin; Wang, Yongqian

    2017-03-01

    Knowing the volume of a graft is essential in repairing alveolar bone defects. This study investigates the 2 advanced preoperative volume measurement methods: three-dimensional (3D) printing and computer-aided engineering (CAE). Ten unilateral alveolar cleft patients were enrolled in this study. Their computed tomographic data were sent to 3D printing and CAE software. A simulated graft was used on the 3D-printed model, and the graft volume was measured by water displacement. The volume calculated by CAE software used mirror-reverses technique. The authors compared the actual volumes of the simulated grafts with the CAE software-derived volumes. The average volume of the simulated bone grafts by 3D-printed models was 1.52 mL, higher than the mean volume of 1.47 calculated by CAE software. The difference between the 2 volumes was from -0.18 to 0.42 mL. The paired Student t test showed no statistically significant difference between the volumes derived from the 2 methods. This study demonstrated that the mirror-reversed technique by CAE software is as accurate as the simulated operation on 3D-printed models in unilateral alveolar cleft patients. These findings further validate the use of 3D printing and CAE technique in alveolar defect repairing.

  9. Lateral condylar prominence, post corrective osteotomy of cubitus varus: a study using three-dimensional reverse engineering technique.

    PubMed

    Mahaisavariya, Banchong; Sithiseriprateep, Kriskrai; Chantarapanich, Nattapon; Vatanapatimakul, Natapoom

    2014-09-01

    Lateral condylar prominence is a common problem after corrective osteotomy of the cubitus varus, which is believed to result from unequal opposing cut surfaces of lateral-based wedge osteotomy using a medial hinge. This study investigated this issue using a 3-dimensional CT data set consisting of images of the deformed elbow and the normal elbow of a patient with cubitus varus deformity who was scheduled for corrective osteotomy A CT scan was performed with 3mm slice thickness and a reconstruction was done with 1mm interpolated slice thickness on both the left and right humerus. The CT-data set was then manipulated using reverse engineering software. Three-dimensional models of both the deformed and normal humeri were studied. Several locations or levels of medial hinge placement, each with 4-degree-tilt wedge osteotomy cut options, were then virtually performed and evaluated. The degree of correction was determined from the varus angle plus the normal carrying angle of the normal side. From the study, it was found that the degree of lateral condylar prominence is directly proportional to the distance of placement of the medial hinge above the joint. Differences in the lengths of the osteotomy surfaces have no effect on condylar prominence; only the step-off phenomenon affects condylar prominence. According to our findings, placement of the medial hinge close to the joint with a 10-degree distal osteotomy cut just above the olecranon fossa will result in optimal minimization of condylar prominence or the step-off phenomenon.

  10. In vitro evaluation of three-dimensional single-walled carbon nanotube composites for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashim; Main, Benjamin J; Taylor, Brittany L; Gupta, Manu; Whitworth, Craig A; Cady, Craig; Freeman, Joseph W; El-Amin, Saadiq F

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop three-dimensional single-walled carbon nanotube composites (SWCNT/PLAGA) using 10-mg single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) for bone regeneration and to determine the mechanical strength of the composites, and to evaluate the interaction of MC3T3-E1 cells via cell adhesion, growth, survival, proliferation, and gene expression. PLAGA (polylactic-co-glycolic acid) and SWCNT/PLAGA microspheres and composites were fabricated, characterized, and mechanical testing was performed. MC3T3-E1 cells were seeded and cell adhesion/morphology, growth/survival, proliferation, and gene expression analysis were performed to evaluate biocompatibility. Imaging studies demonstrated microspheres with uniform shape and smooth surfaces, and uniform incorporation of SWCNT into PLAGA matrix. The microspheres bonded in a random packing manner while maintaining spacing, thus resembling trabeculae of cancellous bone. Addition of SWCNT led to greater compressive modulus and ultimate compressive strength. Imaging studies revealed that MC3T3-E1 cells adhered, grew/survived, and exhibited normal, nonstressed morphology on the composites. SWCNT/PLAGA composites exhibited higher cell proliferation rate and gene expression compared with PLAGA. These results demonstrate the potential of SWCNT/PLAGA composites for musculoskeletal regeneration, for bone tissue engineering, and are promising for orthopedic applications as they possess the combined effect of increased mechanical strength, cell proliferation, and gene expression.

  11. Development of Liver Decellularized Extracellular Matrix Bioink for Three-Dimensional Cell Printing-Based Liver Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyungseok; Han, Wonil; Kim, Hyeonji; Ha, Dong-Heon; Jang, Jinah; Kim, Byoung Soo; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2017-04-10

    The liver is an important organ and plays major roles in the human body. Because of the lack of liver donors after liver failure and drug-induced liver injury, much research has focused on developing liver alternatives and liver in vitro models for transplantation and drug screening. Although numerous studies have been conducted, these systems cannot faithfully mimic the complexity of the liver. Recently, three-dimensional (3D) cell printing technology has emerged as one of a number of innovative technologies that may help to overcome this limitation. However, a great deal of work in developing biomaterials optimized for 3D cell printing-based liver tissue engineering remains. Therefore, in this work, we developed a liver decellularized extracellular matrix (dECM) bioink for 3D cell printing applications and evaluated its characteristics. The liver dECM bioink retained the major ECM components of the liver while cellular components were effectively removed and further exhibited suitable and adjustable properties for 3D cell printing. We further studied printing parameters with the liver dECM bioink to verify the versatility and fidelity of the printing process. Stem cell differentiation and HepG2 cell functions in the liver dECM bioink in comparison to those of commercial collagen bioink were also evaluated, and the liver dECM bioink was found to induce stem cell differentiation and enhance HepG2 cell function. Consequently, the results demonstrate that the proposed liver dECM bioink is a promising bioink candidate for 3D cell printing-based liver tissue engineering.

  12. Three-dimensional nanometer scale analyses of precipitate structures and local compositions in titanium aluminide engineering alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstl, Stephan S. A.

    Titanium aluminide (TiAl) alloys are among the fastest developing class of materials for use in high temperature structural applications. Their low density and high strength make them excellent candidates for both engine and airframe applications. Creep properties of TiAl alloys, however, have been a limiting factor in applying the material to a larger commercial market. In this research, nanometer scale compositional and structural analyses of several TiAl alloys, ranging from model Ti-Al-C ternary alloys to putative commercial alloys with 10 components are investigated utilizing three dimensional atom probe (3DAP) and transmission electron microscopies. Nanometer sized borides, silicides, and carbide precipitates are involved in strengthening TiAl alloys, however, chemical partitioning measurements reveal oxygen concentrations up to 14 at. % within the precipitate phases, resulting in the realization of oxycarbide formation contributing to the precipitation strengthening of TiAl alloys. The local compositions of lamellar microstructures and a variety of precipitates in the TiAl system, including boride, silicide, binary carbides, and intermetallic carbides are investigated. Chemical partitioning of the microalloying elements between the alpha2/gamma lamellar phases, and the precipitate/gamma-matrix phases are determined. Both W and Hf have been shown to exhibit a near interfacial excess of 0.26 and 0.35 atoms nm-2 respectively within ca. 7 nm of lamellar interfaces in a complex TiAl alloy. In the case of needle-shaped perovskite Ti3AlC carbide precipitates, periodic domain boundaries are observed 5.3+/-0.8 nm apart along their growth axis parallel to the TiAl[001] crystallographic direction with concomitant composition variations after 24 hrs. at 800°C.

  13. X-ray computed microtomography of three-dimensional microcracks and self-healing in engineered cementitious composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shuai; Li, Mo

    2015-01-01

    Concrete cracking and deterioration can potentially be addressed by innovative self-healing cementitious materials, which can autogenously regain transport properties and mechanical characteristics after the damage self-healing process. For the development of such materials, it is crucial, but challenging, to precisely characterize the extent and quality of self-healing due to a variety of factors. This study adopted x-ray computed microtomography (μCT) to derive three-dimensional morphological data on microcracks before and after healing in engineered cementitious composite (ECC). Scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy were also used to morphologically and chemically analyze the healing products. This work showed that the evolution of the microcrack 3D structure due to self-healing in cementitious materials can be directly and quantitatively characterized by μCT. A detailed description of the μCT image analysis method applied to ECC self-healing was presented. The results revealed that the self-healing extent and rate strongly depended on initial surface crack width, with smaller crack width favoring fast and robust self-healing. We also found that the self-healing mechanism in cementitious materials is dependent on crack depth. The region of a crack close to the surface (from 0 to around 50-150 μm below the surface) can be sealed quickly with crystalline precipitates. However, at greater depths the healing process inside the crack takes a significantly longer time to occur, with healing products more likely resulting from continued hydration and pozzolanic reactions. Finally, the μCT method was compared with other self-healing characterization methods, with discussions on its importance in generating new scientific knowledge for the development of robust self-healing cementitious materials.

  14. Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship study on anti-cancer activity of 3,4-dihydroquinazoline derivatives against human lung cancer A549 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sehyeon; Choi, Min Ji; Kim, Minju; Lee, Sunhoe; Lee, Jinsung; Lee, Seok Joon; Cho, Haelim; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Lee, Jae Yeol

    2015-03-01

    A series of 3,4-dihydroquinazoline derivatives with anti-cancer activities against human lung cancer A549 cells were subjected to three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies using the comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) approaches. The most potent compound, 1 was used to align the molecules. As a result, the best prediction was obtained with CoMSIA combined the steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic, hydrogen bond donor, and hydrogen bond acceptor fields (q2 = 0.720, r2 = 0.897). This model was validated by an external test set of 6 compounds giving satisfactory predictive r2 value of 0.923 as well as the scrambling stability test. This model would guide the design of potent 3,4-dihydroquinazoline derivatives as anti-cancer agent for the treatment of human lung cancer.

  15. Three-dimensional lithostratigraphic model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada: A framework for fluid transport modeling and engineering design

    SciTech Connect

    Buesch, D.C.; Spengler, R.W.; Nelson, J.E.; Dickerson, R.P.

    1993-12-31

    A three-dimensional lithostratigraphic model of the central block of Yucca MounEain. Nevada, illustrates how some activities can serve both site characterization and dcsign and construction of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). Site-characterization activities supported bv this model include characterizing the three-dimensional geometry of lithologic units and faults, and providing boundary conditions for geostatistical models and site-scale fluid flow modeling. The model supports the conceptual design as construction efforts for the proposed ramps of the ESF and potential high-level nuclear waste repository.

  16. Viscous Three-Dimensional Simulation of Flow in an Axial Low Pressure Compressor at Engine Icing Operating Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, David L.; Ameri, Ali A.; Veres, Joe; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2017-01-01

    Viscous three-dimensional simulations of the Honeywell ALF502R-5 low pressure compressor (sometimes called a booster) using the NASA Glenn code GlennHT have been carried out. A total of ten simulations were produced. Five operating points are investigated, with each point run with two different wall thermal conditions. These operating points are at, or near, points where engine icing has been determined to be likely. In the future, the results of this study will be used for further analysis such as predicting collection efficiency of ice particles and ice growth rates at various locations in the compressor. A mixing plane boundary condition is used between each blade row, resulting in convergence to steady state within each blade row. The k-omega turbulence model of Wilcox, combined with viscous grid spacing near the wall on the order of one, is used to resolve the turbulent boundary layers. For each of the operating points, heat transfer coefficients are generated on the blades and walls. The heat transfer coefficients are produced by running the operating point with two different wall thermal conditions and then solving simultaneously for the heat transfer coefficient and adiabatic wall temperature at each point. Average Nusselt numbers are calculated for the most relevant surfaces. The values are seen to scale with Reynolds number to approximately a power of 0.7. Additionally, images of surface distribution of Nusselt number are presented. Qualitative comparison between the five operating points show that there is relatively little change in the character of the distribution. The dominant observed effect is that of an overall scaling, which is expected due to Reynolds number differences. One interesting aspect about the Nusselt number distribution is observed on the casing (outer diameter) downstream of the exit guide vanes (EGVs). The Nusselt number is relatively high between the pairs of EGVs, with two lower troughs downstream of each EGV trailing edge. This

  17. Anatomically Inspired Three-dimensional Micro-tissue Engineered Neural Networks for Nervous System Reconstruction, Modulation, and Modeling.

    PubMed

    Struzyna, Laura A; Adewole, Dayo O; Gordián-Vélez, Wisberty J; Grovola, Michael R; Burrell, Justin C; Katiyar, Kritika S; Petrov, Dmitriy; Harris, James P; Cullen, D Kacy

    2017-05-31

    Functional recovery rarely occurs following injury or disease-induced degeneration within the central nervous system (CNS) due to the inhibitory environment and the limited capacity for neurogenesis. We are developing a strategy to simultaneously address neuronal and axonal pathway loss within the damaged CNS. This manuscript presents the fabrication protocol for micro-tissue engineered neural networks (micro-TENNs), implantable constructs consisting of neurons and aligned axonal tracts spanning the extracellular matrix (ECM) lumen of a preformed hydrogel cylinder hundreds of microns in diameter that may extend centimeters in length. Neuronal aggregates are delimited to the extremes of the three-dimensional encasement and are spanned by axonal projections. Micro-TENNs are uniquely poised as a strategy for CNS reconstruction, emulating aspects of brain connectome cytoarchitecture and potentially providing means for network replacement. The neuronal aggregates may synapse with host tissue to form new functional relays to restore and/or modulate missing or damaged circuitry. These constructs may also act as pro-regenerative "living scaffolds" capable of exploiting developmental mechanisms for cell migration and axonal pathfinding, providing synergistic structural and soluble cues based on the state of regeneration. Micro-TENNs are fabricated by pouring liquid hydrogel into a cylindrical mold containing a longitudinally centered needle. Once the hydrogel has gelled, the needle is removed, leaving a hollow micro-column. An ECM solution is added to the lumen to provide an environment suitable for neuronal adhesion and axonal outgrowth. Dissociated neurons are mechanically aggregated for precise seeding within one or both ends of the micro-column. This methodology reliably produces self-contained miniature constructs with long-projecting axonal tracts that may recapitulate features of brain neuroanatomy. Synaptic immunolabeling and genetically encoded calcium

  18. Three Dimensional Dirac Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaheer, Saad

    2014-03-01

    Dirac points on the Fermi surface of two dimensional graphene are responsible for its unique electronic behavior. One can ask whether any three dimensional materials support similar pseudorelativistic physics in their bulk electronic spectra. This possibility has been investigated theoretically and is now supported by two successful experimental demonstrations reported during the last year. In this talk, I will summarize the various ways in which Dirac semimetals can be realized in three dimensions with primary focus on a specific theory developed on the basis of representations of crystal spacegroups. A three dimensional Dirac (Weyl) semimetal can appear in the presence (absence) of inversion symmetry by tuning parameters to the phase boundary separating a bulk insulating and a topological insulating phase. More generally, we find that specific rules governing crystal symmetry representations of electrons with spin lead to robust Dirac points at high symmetry points in the Brillouin zone. Combining these rules with microscopic considerations identifies six candidate Dirac semimetals. Another method towards engineering Dirac semimetals involves combining crystal symmetry and band inversion. Several candidate materials have been proposed utilizing this mechanism and one of the candidates has been successfully demonstrated as a Dirac semimetal in two independent experiments. Work carried out in collaboration with: Julia A. Steinberg, Steve M. Young, J.C.Y. Teo, C.L. Kane, E.J. Mele and Andrew M. Rappe.

  19. Three-dimensional Printing and 3D Slicer: Powerful Tools in Understanding and Treating Structural Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Cheng, George Z; San Jose Estepar, Raul; Folch, Erik; Onieva, Jorge; Gangadharan, Sidhu; Majid, Adnan

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in the three-dimensional (3D) printing industry have enabled clinicians to explore the use of 3D printing in preprocedural planning, biomedical tissue modeling, and direct implantable device manufacturing. Despite the increased adoption of rapid prototyping and additive manufacturing techniques in the health-care field, many physicians lack the technical skill set to use this exciting and useful technology. Additionally, the growth in the 3D printing sector brings an ever-increasing number of 3D printers and printable materials. Therefore, it is important for clinicians to keep abreast of this rapidly developing field in order to benefit. In this Ahead of the Curve, we review the history of 3D printing from its inception to the most recent biomedical applications. Additionally, we will address some of the major barriers to wider adoption of the technology in the medical field. Finally, we will provide an initial guide to 3D modeling and printing by demonstrating how to design a personalized airway prosthesis via 3D Slicer. We hope this information will reduce the barriers to use and increase clinician participation in the 3D printing health-care sector. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. High-dose-rate Three-dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy Combined with Active Breathing Control for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Early-stage Non-small-cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruozheng; Yin, Yong; Qin, Yonghui; Yu, Jinming

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of using high-dose-rate three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with active breathing control (ABC) for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Eight patients with early-stage NSCLC underwent CT scans under standard free-breathing (FB) and moderately deep inspiration breath-hold (mDIBH) with ABC. Two high-dose-rate 3D-CRT plans (1000 Mu/min) were designed based on the CT scans with FB and mDIBH. The maximal dose (D1%), minimal dose (D99%), conformity index (CI), and homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV), and dose-volume indices of the organs at risk between each plan were compared. The mean PTV volume decreased from 158.04 cm(3) with FB to 76.90 cm(3) with mDIBH (p < 0.05). When mDIBH was used, increases in the affected lung volume (by 47%), contralateral lung volume (by 55%), and total lung volume (by 50%) were observed compared to FB (p < 0.05). The V5-V40 of the affected lung (Vx represented the percentage volume of organs receiving at least the x Gy), V5-V40 and the mean dose for the total lung, V5-V40 and mean dose of the chest wall, and the maximum dose of the spinal cord were less for mDIBH than FB (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in CI, HI, D1%, or D99% for the PTV between the plans. In conclusion, high-dose-rate 3D-CRT combined with ABC reduced the radiation dose to the lungs and chest wall without affecting the dose distribution in SBRT of early-stage NSCLC patients.

  1. Three-dimensional measurement of alveolar airspace volumes in normal and emphysematous lungs using micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Hamakawa, Hiroshi; Majumdar, Arnab; Allen, Philip G; Suki, Béla

    2009-08-01

    In pulmonary emphysema, the alveolar structure progressively breaks down via a three-dimensional (3D) process that leads to airspace enlargement. The characterization of such structural changes has, however, been based on measurements from two-dimensional (2D) tissue sections or estimates of 3D structure from 2D measurements. In this study, we developed a novel silver staining method for visualizing tissue structure in 3D using micro-computed tomographic (CT) imaging, which showed that at 30 cmH20 fixing pressure, the mean alveolar airspace volume increased from 0.12 nl in normal mice to 0.44 nl and 2.14 nl in emphysematous mice, respectively, at 7 and 14 days following elastase-induced injury. We also assessed tissue structure in 2D using laser scanning confocal microscopy. The mean of the equivalent diameters of the alveolar airspaces was lower in 2D compared with 3D, while its variance was higher in 2D than in 3D in all groups. However, statistical comparisons of alveolar airspace size from normal and emphysematous mice yielded similar results in 2D and 3D: compared with control, both the mean and variance of the equivalent diameters increased by 7 days after treatment. These indexes further increased from day 7 to day 14 following treatment. During the first 7 days following treatment, the relative change in SD increased at a much faster rate compared with the relative change in mean equivalent diameter. We conclude that quantifying heterogeneity in structure can provide new insight into the pathogenesis or progression of emphysema that is enhanced by improved sensitivity using 3D measurements.

  2. The first rib hypoplasia and the aberrant pulmonary artery branch detected by three-dimensional computed tomography in a surgical case with apical lung cancer, a case report.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Yasoo; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Naruke, Masao; Hashizume, Toshinori; Kaseda, Shizuka; Nemoto, Etsuo

    2017-01-11

    The complete resection is one of the most crucial requirements to achieve favorable outcomes in oncologic surgery. The apex of the lung is surrounded complicatedly by the clavicle, the first rib, the subclavian artery and vein, and the brachial plexus. Therefore, the image information especially about the infiltration of adjacent anatomic structures, facilitates the surgery in the apical lung cancer. A 70-year-old man presented at our hospital with a computed tomography (CT) scan showing a tumor at the left lung apex that infiltrated the chest wall. Two anatomical anomalies were found, which were the first rib hypoplasia and the aberrant pulmonary artery branch. The three-dimensional (3D) CT enhanced with using bolus tracking method, simultaneously revealed that the subclavian vessels existed between the clavicle and the second rib, and the left lingual pulmonary artery and the ventrobasal pulmonary artery diverged from the left main pulmonary artery as the first branch. We diagnosed the tumor as a primary lung squamous cell carcinoma that infiltrated the second rib, because sputum cytology suggested squamous cell carcinoma. Left lung upper lobectomy with lymph node dissection and chest wall resection (the second and third ribs) were performed with caution for the anatomical anomalies. The pathological diagnosis was pleomorphic carcinoma (5.0 × 3.0 × 1.9 cm) that invaded the second costal bone, and the pathological stage was confirmed to be pT3N0M0. Pathologically curative resection was accomplished. The patient was discharged from the hospital on 10 days after surgery. The 3D-CT precisely detected the anomalous structure consisted with the clavicle, the second rib, the subclavian artery and vein, the aberrant pulmonary artery branch. In the present case with the apical lung cancer, the evaluation of the anatomical structure via 3D-CT facilitated to achieve a pathological complete resection.

  3. Changes in Pulmonary Function After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, or Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez Guerra, Jose L.; Gomez, Daniel R.; Zhuang Yan; Levy, Lawrence B.; Eapen, George; Liu, Hongmei; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the extent of change in pulmonary function over time after definitive radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with modern techniques and to identify predictors of changes in pulmonary function according to patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Patients and Methods: We analyzed 250 patients who had received {>=}60 Gy radio(chemo)therapy for primary NSCLC in 1998-2010 and had undergone pulmonary function tests before and within 1 year after treatment. Ninety-three patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 97 with intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and 60 with proton beam therapy. Postradiation pulmonary function test values were evaluated among individual patients compared with the same patient's preradiation value at the following time intervals: 0-4 (T1), 5-8 (T2), and 9-12 (T3) months. Results: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) was reduced in the majority of patients along the three time periods after radiation, whereas the forced expiratory volume in 1 s per unit of vital capacity (FEV1/VC) showed an increase and decrease after radiation in a similar percentage of patients. There were baseline differences (stage, radiotherapy dose, concurrent chemotherapy) among the radiation technology groups. On multivariate analysis, the following features were associated with larger posttreatment declines in DLCO: pretreatment DLCO, gross tumor volume, lung and heart dosimetric data, and total radiation dose. Only pretreatment DLCO was associated with larger posttreatment declines in FEV1/VC. Conclusions: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide is reduced in the majority of patients after radiotherapy with modern techniques. Multiple factors, including gross tumor volume, preradiation lung function, and dosimetric parameters, are associated with the DLCO decline. Prospective studies are needed to better understand whether new radiation technology, such as proton beam therapy or

  4. Three-dimensional laser micro- and nano-structuring of acrylated poly(ethylene glycol) materials and evaluation of their cytoxicity for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Ovsianikov, A; Malinauskas, M; Schlie, S; Chichkov, B; Gittard, S; Narayan, R; Löbler, M; Sternberg, K; Schmitz, K-P; Haverich, A

    2011-03-01

    The natural cell environment is characterized by complex three-dimensional structures, which contain features at multiple length scales. Many in vitro studies of cell behavior in three dimensions rely on the availability of artificial scaffolds with controlled three-dimensional topologies. In this paper, we demonstrate fabrication of three-dimensional scaffolds for tissue engineering out of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGda) materials by means of two-photon polymerization (2PP). This laser nanostructuring approach offers unique possibilities for rapid manufacturing of three-dimensional structures with arbitrary geometries. The spatial resolution dependence on the applied irradiation parameters is investigated for two PEGda formulations, which are characterized by molecular weights of 302 and 742. We demonstrate that minimum feature sizes of 200nm are obtained in both materials. In addition, an extensive study of the cytotoxicity of the material formulations with respect to photoinitiator type and photoinitiator concentration is undertaken. Aqueous extracts from photopolymerized PEGda samples indicate the presence of water-soluble molecules, which are toxic to fibroblasts. It is shown that sample aging in aqueous medium reduces the cytotoxicity of these extracts; this mechanism provides a route for biomedical applications of structures generated by 2PP microfabrication and photopolymerization technologies in general. Finally, a fully biocompatible combination of PEGda and a photoinitiator is identified. Fabrication of reproducible scaffold structures is very important for systematic investigation of cellular processes in three dimensions and for better understanding of in vitro tissue formation. The results of this work suggest that 2PP may be used to polymerize poly(ethylene glycol)-based materials into three-dimensional structures with well-defined geometries that mimic the physical and biological properties of native cell environments. Copyright © 2010

  5. A Bayesian approach for three-dimensional markerless tumor tracking using kV imaging during lung radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Caillet, Vincent; Dunbar, Michelle; Keall, Paul J.; Booth, Jeremy T.; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Haddad, Carol; Eade, Thomas; Feain, Ilana

    2017-04-01

    The ability to monitor tumor motion without implanted markers can potentially enable broad access to more accurate and precise lung radiotherapy. A major challenge is that kilovoltage (kV) imaging based methods are rarely able to continuously track the tumor due to the inferior tumor visibility on 2D kV images. Another challenge is the estimation of 3D tumor position based on only 2D imaging information. The aim of this work is to address both challenges by proposing a Bayesian approach for markerless tumor tracking for the first time. The proposed approach adopts the framework of the extended Kalman filter, which combines a prediction and measurement steps to make the optimal tumor position update. For each imaging frame, the tumor position is first predicted by a respiratory-correlated model. The 2D tumor position on the kV image is then measured by template matching. Finally, the prediction and 2D measurement are combined based on the 3D distribution of tumor positions in the past 10 s and the estimated uncertainty of template matching. To investigate the clinical feasibility of the proposed method, a total of 13 lung cancer patient datasets were used for retrospective validation, including 11 cone-beam CT scan pairs and two stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy cases. The ground truths for tumor motion were generated from the the 3D trajectories of implanted markers or beacons. The mean, standard deviation, and 95th percentile of the 3D tracking error were found to range from 1.6–2.9 mm, 0.6–1.5 mm, and 2.6–5.8 mm, respectively. Markerless tumor tracking always resulted in smaller errors compared to the standard of care. The improvement was the most pronounced in the superior–inferior (SI) direction, with up to 9.5 mm reduction in the 95th-percentile SI error for patients with  >10 mm 5th-to-95th percentile SI tumor motion. The percentage of errors with 3D magnitude  <5 mm was 96.5% for markerless tumor tracking and 84.1% for the

  6. Three-dimensional reconstruction and display of the heart, lungs and circulation by multiplanar X-ray scanning videodensitometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robb, R. A.; Ritman, E. L.; Wood, E. H.

    1975-01-01

    A device was developed which makes possible the dynamic reconstruction of the heart and lungs within the intact thorax of a living dog or human and which can record approximately 30 multiplanar X-ray images of the thorax practically instantaneously, and at frequent enough intervals of time and with sufficient density and spatial resolution to capture and resolve the most rapid changes in cardiac structural detail throughout each cardiac cycle. It can be installed in a clinical diagnostic setting as well as in a research environment and its construction and application for determination and display in real-time modes of cross sections of the functioning thorax and its contents of living animals and man is technologically feasible.

  7. Three-dimensional reconstruction and display of the heart, lungs and circulation by multiplanar X-ray scanning videodensitometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robb, R. A.; Ritman, E. L.; Wood, E. H.

    1975-01-01

    A device was developed which makes possible the dynamic reconstruction of the heart and lungs within the intact thorax of a living dog or human and which can record approximately 30 multiplanar X-ray images of the thorax practically instantaneously, and at frequent enough intervals of time and with sufficient density and spatial resolution to capture and resolve the most rapid changes in cardiac structural detail throughout each cardiac cycle. It can be installed in a clinical diagnostic setting as well as in a research environment and its construction and application for determination and display in real-time modes of cross sections of the functioning thorax and its contents of living animals and man is technologically feasible.

  8. Three-dimensional lung tumor segmentation from x-ray computed tomography using sparse field active models.

    PubMed

    Awad, Joseph; Owrangi, Amir; Villemaire, Lauren; O'Riordan, Elaine; Parraga, Grace; Fenster, Aaron

    2012-02-01

    Manual segmentation of lung tumors is observer dependent and time-consuming but an important component of radiology and radiation oncology workflow. The objective of this study was to generate an automated lung tumor measurement tool for segmentation of pulmonary metastatic tumors from x-ray computed tomography (CT) images to improve reproducibility and decrease the time required to segment tumor boundaries. The authors developed an automated lung tumor segmentation algorithm for volumetric image analysis of chest CT images using shape constrained Otsu multithresholding (SCOMT) and sparse field active surface (SFAS) algorithms. The observer was required to select the tumor center and the SCOMT algorithm subsequently created an initial surface that was deformed using level set SFAS to minimize the total energy consisting of mean separation, edge, partial volume, rolling, distribution, background, shape, volume, smoothness, and curvature energies. The proposed segmentation algorithm was compared to manual segmentation whereby 21 tumors were evaluated using one-dimensional (1D) response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST), two-dimensional (2D) World Health Organization (WHO), and 3D volume measurements. Linear regression goodness-of-fit measures (r(2) = 0.63, p < 0.0001; r(2) = 0.87, p < 0.0001; and r(2) = 0.96, p < 0.0001), and Pearson correlation coefficients (r = 0.79, p < 0.0001; r = 0.93, p < 0.0001; and r = 0.98, p < 0.0001) for 1D, 2D, and 3D measurements, respectively, showed significant correlations between manual and algorithm results. Intra-observer intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) demonstrated high reproducibility for algorithm (0.989-0.995, 0.996-0.997, and 0.999-0.999) and manual measurements (0.975-0.993, 0.985-0.993, and 0.980-0.992) for 1D, 2D, and 3D measurements, respectively. The intra-observer coefficient of variation (CV%) was low for algorithm (3.09%-4.67%, 4.85%-5.84%, and 5

  9. Diagnosis of solitary lung nodules using the local form of Ripley's K function applied to three-dimensional CT data.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Erick Corrêa; Silva, Aristófanes Corrêa; de Paiva, Anselmo Cardoso; Nunes, Rodolfo Acatauassú; Gattass, Marcelo

    2008-06-01

    This paper analyzes the application of Ripley's K function to characterize lung nodules as malignant or benign in computerized tomography images. The proposed characterization method is based on a selection of measures from Ripley's K function to discriminate between benign and malignant nodules, using stepwise discriminant analysis. Based on the selected measures, a linear discriminant analysis procedure is performed once again in order to predict the classification of each nodule. To evaluate the ability of these features to discriminate the nodules, a set of tests was carried out using a sample of 39 pulmonary nodules, 29 benign and 10 malignant. A leave-one-out procedure was used to provide a less biased estimate of the linear discriminator's performance. The best setting of the analyzed function in the tested sample presented 70.0% of sensitivity but with 100.0% of specificity and 92.3% of accuracy. Thus, preliminary results of this approach are very promising regarding its contribution to the diagnosis of pulmonary nodules, but it still needs to be tested with larger series and associated to other quantitative imaging methods in order to improve global performance.

  10. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for locoregionally recurrent lung carcinoma after external beam irradiation: a prospective phase I-II clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kai-Liang; Jiang, Guo-Liang; Qian, Hao; Wang, Li-Juan; Yang, Huan-Jun; Fu, Xiao-Long; Zhao, Shen

    2003-12-01

    To observe in a clinical trial the feasibility, tolerance, and efficacy of reirradiation by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for locoregionally recurrent lung carcinoma after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Between June 1999 and March 2001, 23 lung carcinoma patients with locoregional recurrence after EBRT were enrolled in this study. Of the 23 patients, 21 were men and 2 were women (median age 68 years, range 43-79). At the first course of RT, 9 patients had squamous cell carcinoma, 7 adenocarcinoma, and 7 small cell carcinoma. The interval between the first course of RT and recurrence varied from 6 to 42 months (median 13). The median dose of the first course of RT was 66 Gy (range 30-78). Reirradiation was carried out using 3D-CRT and only covered the radiographic lesions. The median dose of reirradiation was 51 Gy (range 46-60), which was delivered by a conventionally fractionated schedule (i.e., 1.8-2.0 Gy/fraction, 5 fractions/wk). The toxicity was assessed according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. The median follow-up time was 15 months (range 2-37). Acute radiation esophagitis occurred in 9% of patients (Grade 1-2). Acute radiation pneumonitis developed in 22% of patients (Grade 1-2). No cases of acute Grade 3 or greater toxicity had been recorded at last follow-up. Pulmonary fibrosis was observed in 26% of patients (Grade 2-3); no other severe late complications have been observed. The 1- and 2-year survival rate was 59% and 21%, respectively. The locoregional progression-free rate at 1 and 2 years was 51% and 42%, respectively. Reirradiation using 3D-CRT was tolerated by this group of recurrent lung carcinoma patients without severe complications. The 2-year outcome was encouraging. Reirradiation with 3D-CRT can be considered an option for the management of locoregionally recurrent lung carcinoma.

  11. Predictors of Acute Esophagitis in Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Nuria Algara, Manuel; Foro, Palmira; Lacruz, Marti; Reig, Anna; Membrive, Ismael; Lozano, Joan; Lopez, Jose Luis; Quera, Jaime; Fernandez-Velilla, Enric; Sanz, Xavier

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the risk factors for acute esophagitis (AET) in lung cancer patients treated with concurrent 3D-CRT and chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Data from 100 patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy with a mean dose of 62.05 {+-} 4.64 Gy were prospectively evaluated. Esophageal toxicity was graded according to criteria of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. The following dosimetric parameters were analyzed: length and volume of esophagus in treatment field, percentage of esophagus volume treated to {>=}10, {>=}20, {>=}30, {>=}35, {>=}40, {>=}45, {>=}50, {>=}55, and {>=}60 Gy, and the maximum (D{sub max}) and mean doses (D{sub mean}) delivered to the esophagus. Also, we developed an esophagitis index (EI) to account the esophagitis grades over treatment time. Results: A total of 59 patients developed AET (Grade 1, 26 patients; Grade 2, 29 patients; and Grade 3, 4 patients). V50 was associated with AET duration (p = 0.017), AET Grade 1 duration (p = 0.016), maximum analgesia (p = 0.019), esophagitis index score (p = 0.024), and AET Grade {>=}1 (p = 0.058). If V50 is <30% there is a 47.3% risk of AET Grade {>=}1, which increases to 73.3% if V50 is {>=}30% (p = 0.008). The predictive abilities of models (sensitivity and specificity) were calculated by receiver operating characteristic curves. Conclusions: According to the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the 30% of esophageal volume receiving {>=}50 Gy was the most statistically significant factor associated with AET Grade {>=}1 and maximum analgesia (A{sub max}). There was an association with AET Grade {>=}2 but it did not achieve statistical significance (p = 0.076)

  12. Antimicrobial efficacy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation in a three-dimensional lung epithelial model and the influence of fetal bovine serum

    PubMed Central

    Crabbé, Aurélie; Liu, Yulong; Matthijs, Nele; Rigole, Petra; De La Fuente-Nùñez, César; Davis, Richard; Ledesma, Maria A.; Sarker, Shameema; Van Houdt, Rob; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Coenye, Tom; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2017-01-01

    In vitro models that mimic in vivo host-pathogen interactions are needed to evaluate candidate drugs that inhibit bacterial virulence traits. We established a new approach to study Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm susceptibility on biotic surfaces, using a three-dimensional (3-D) lung epithelial cell model. P. aeruginosa formed antibiotic resistant biofilms on 3-D cells without affecting cell viability. The biofilm-inhibitory activity of antibiotics and/or the anti-biofilm peptide DJK-5 were evaluated on 3-D cells compared to a plastic surface, in medium with and without fetal bovine serum (FBS). In both media, aminoglycosides were more efficacious in the 3-D cell model. In serum-free medium, most antibiotics (except polymyxins) showed enhanced efficacy when 3-D cells were present. In medium with FBS, colistin was less efficacious in the 3-D cell model. DJK-5 exerted potent inhibition of P. aeruginosa association with both substrates, only in serum-free medium. DJK-5 showed stronger inhibitory activity against P. aeruginosa associated with plastic compared to 3-D cells. The combined addition of tobramycin and DJK-5 exhibited more potent ability to inhibit P. aeruginosa association with both substrates. In conclusion, lung epithelial cells influence the efficacy of most antimicrobials against P. aeruginosa biofilm formation, which in turn depends on the presence or absence of FBS. PMID:28256611

  13. Antimicrobial efficacy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation in a three-dimensional lung epithelial model and the influence of fetal bovine serum.

    PubMed

    Crabbé, Aurélie; Liu, Yulong; Matthijs, Nele; Rigole, Petra; De La Fuente-Nùñez, César; Davis, Richard; Ledesma, Maria A; Sarker, Shameema; Van Houdt, Rob; Hancock, Robert E W; Coenye, Tom; Nickerson, Cheryl A

    2017-03-03

    In vitro models that mimic in vivo host-pathogen interactions are needed to evaluate candidate drugs that inhibit bacterial virulence traits. We established a new approach to study Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm susceptibility on biotic surfaces, using a three-dimensional (3-D) lung epithelial cell model. P. aeruginosa formed antibiotic resistant biofilms on 3-D cells without affecting cell viability. The biofilm-inhibitory activity of antibiotics and/or the anti-biofilm peptide DJK-5 were evaluated on 3-D cells compared to a plastic surface, in medium with and without fetal bovine serum (FBS). In both media, aminoglycosides were more efficacious in the 3-D cell model. In serum-free medium, most antibiotics (except polymyxins) showed enhanced efficacy when 3-D cells were present. In medium with FBS, colistin was less efficacious in the 3-D cell model. DJK-5 exerted potent inhibition of P. aeruginosa association with both substrates, only in serum-free medium. DJK-5 showed stronger inhibitory activity against P. aeruginosa associated with plastic compared to 3-D cells. The combined addition of tobramycin and DJK-5 exhibited more potent ability to inhibit P. aeruginosa association with both substrates. In conclusion, lung epithelial cells influence the efficacy of most antimicrobials against P. aeruginosa biofilm formation, which in turn depends on the presence or absence of FBS.

  14. Rapid acquisition of helium-3 and proton three-dimensional image sets of the human lung in a single breath-hold using compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    Qing, Kun; Altes, Talissa A; Tustison, Nicholas J; Feng, Xue; Chen, Xiao; Mata, Jaime F; Miller, G Wilson; de Lange, Eduard E; Tobias, William A; Cates, Gordon D; Brookeman, James R; Mugler, John P

    2015-10-01

    To develop and validate a method for acquiring helium-3 ((3) He) and proton ((1) H) three-dimensional (3D) image sets of the human lung with isotropic spatial resolution within a 10-s breath-hold by using compressed sensing (CS) acceleration, and to assess the fidelity of undersampled images compared with fully sampled images. The undersampling scheme for CS acceleration was optimized and tested using (3) He ventilation data. Rapid 3D acquisition of both (3) He and (1) H data during one breath-hold was then implemented, based on a balanced steady-state free-precession pulse sequence, by random undersampling of k-space with reconstruction by means of minimizing the L1 norm and total variance. CS-reconstruction fidelity was evaluated quantitatively by comparing fully sampled and retrospectively undersampled image sets. Helium-3 and (1) H 3D image sets of the lung with isotropic 3.9-mm resolution were acquired during a single breath-hold in 12 s and 8 s using acceleration factors of 2 and 3, respectively. Comparison of fully sampled and retrospectively undersampled (3) He and (1) H images yielded mean absolute errors <10% and structural similarity indices >0.9. By randomly undersampling k-space and using CS reconstruction, high-quality (3) He and (1) H 3D image sets with isotropic 3.9-mm resolution can be acquired within an 8-s breath-hold. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Three dimensional strained semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Voss, Lars; Conway, Adam; Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Leao, Cedric Rocha; Shao, Qinghui

    2016-11-08

    In one embodiment, an apparatus includes a three dimensional structure comprising a semiconductor material, and at least one thin film in contact with at least one exterior surface of the three dimensional structure for inducing a strain in the structure, the thin film being characterized as providing at least one of: an induced strain of at least 0.05%, and an induced strain in at least 5% of a volume of the three dimensional structure. In another embodiment, a method includes forming a three dimensional structure comprising a semiconductor material, and depositing at least one thin film on at least one surface of the three dimensional structure for inducing a strain in the structure, the thin film being characterized as providing at least one of: an induced strain of at least 0.05%, and an induced strain in at least 5% of a volume of the structure.

  16. Generation of realistic virtual nodules based on three-dimensional spatial resolution in lung computed tomography: A pilot phantom study.

    PubMed

    Narita, Akihiro; Ohkubo, Masaki; Murao, Kohei; Matsumoto, Toru; Wada, Shinichi

    2017-08-04

    The aim of this feasibility study using phantoms was to propose a novel method for obtaining computer-generated realistic virtual nodules in lung computed tomography (CT). In the proposed methodology, pulmonary nodule images obtained with a CT scanner are deconvolved with the point spread function (PSF) in the scan plane and slice sensitivity profile (SSP) measured for the scanner; the resultant images are referred to as nodule-like object functions. Next, by convolving the nodule-like object function with the PSF and SSP of another (target) scanner, the virtual nodule can be generated so that it has the characteristics of the spatial resolution of the target scanner. To validate the methodology, the authors applied physical nodules of 5-, 7- and 10-mm-diameter (uniform spheres) included in a commercial CT test phantom. The nodule-like object functions were calculated from the sphere images obtained with two scanners (Scanner A and Scanner B); these functions were referred to as nodule-like object functions A and B, respectively. From these, virtual nodules were generated based on the spatial resolution of another scanner (Scanner C). By investigating the agreement of the virtual nodules generated from the nodule-like object functions A and B, the equivalence of the nodule-like object functions obtained from different scanners could be assessed. In addition, these virtual nodules were compared with the real (true) sphere images obtained with Scanner C. As a practical validation, five types of laboratory-made physical nodules with various complicated shapes and heterogeneous densities, similar to real lesions, were used. The nodule-like object functions were calculated from the images of these laboratory-made nodules obtained with Scanner A. From them, virtual nodules were generated based on the spatial resolution of Scanner C and compared with the real images of laboratory-made nodules obtained with Scanner C. Good agreement of the virtual nodules generated from

  17. Radiological and Clinical Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy: A Matched Analysis of Three-Dimensional Conformal and Volumetric-modulated Arc Therapy Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, David A.; Senan, Suresh; Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.; Vincent, Andrew; Lagerwaard, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Lung fibrosis is common after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumors, but the influence of treatment technique on rates of clinical and radiological pneumonitis is not well described. After implementing volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) for SBRT, we scored the early pulmonary changes seen with arc and conventional three-dimensional SBRT (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-five SBRT patients treated with RA were matched 1:2 with 50 SBRT patients treated with 3D-CRT. Dose fractionations were based on a risk-adapted strategy. Clinical pneumonitis was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Acute radiological changes 3 months posttreatment were scored by three blinded observers. Relationships among treatment type, baseline factors, and outcomes were assessed using Spearman's correlation, Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel tests, and logistic regression. Results: The RA and 3D-CRT groups were well matched. Forty-three patients (57%) had radiological pneumonitis 3 months after treatment. Twenty-eight patients (37%) had computed tomography (CT) findings of patchy or diffuse consolidation, and 15 patients (20%) had ground-glass opacities only. Clinical pneumonitis was uncommon, and no differences were seen between 3D-CRT vs. RA patients in rates of grade 2/3 clinical pneumonitis (6% vs. 4%, respectively; p = 0.99), moderate/severe radiological changes (24% vs. 36%, respectively, p = 0.28), or patterns of CT changes (p = 0.47). Radiological severity scores were associated with larger planning target volumes (p = 0.09) and extended fractionation (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Radiological changes after lung SBRT are common with both approaches, but no differences in early clinical or radiological findings were observed after RA. Longer follow-up will be required to exclude late changes.

  18. Engineering strategies to recapitulate epithelial morphogenesis within synthetic three-dimensional extracellular matrix with tunable mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnikova, Y. A.; Jorgens, D. M.; Spirio, L.; Auer, M.; Sarang-Sieminski, A. L.; Weaver, V. M.

    2011-04-01

    The mechanical properties (e.g. stiffness) of the extracellular matrix (ECM) influence cell fate and tissue morphogenesis and contribute to disease progression. Nevertheless, our understanding of the mechanisms by which ECM rigidity modulates cell behavior and fate remains rudimentary. To address this issue, a number of two and three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel systems have been used to explore the effects of the mechanical properties of the ECM on cell behavior. Unfortunately, many of these systems have limited application because fiber architecture, adhesiveness and/or pore size often change in parallel when gel elasticity is varied. Here we describe the use of ECM-adsorbed, synthetic, self-assembling peptide (SAP) gels that are able to recapitulate normal epithelial acini morphogenesis and gene expression in a 3D context. By exploiting the range of viscoelasticity attainable with these SAP gels, and their ability to recreate native-like ECM fibril topology with minimal variability in ligand density and pore size, we were able to reconstitute normal and tumor-like phenotypes and gene expression patterns in nonmalignant mammary epithelial cells. Accordingly, this SAP hydrogel system presents the first tunable system capable of independently assessing the interplay between ECM stiffness and multi-cellular epithelial phenotype in a 3D context. Originally submitted for the special focus issue on physical oncology.

  19. An engineering method for interactive inviscid-boundary layers in three-dimensional hypersonic flows. Ph.D. Thesis - North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher J.

    1992-01-01

    An engineering method has been developed that couples an approximate three dimensional inviscid technique with the axisymmetric analog and a set of approximate convective heating equations. The displacement effect on the boundary layer on the outer inviscid flow is calculated and included as a boundary condition in the inviscid technique. This accounts for the viscous interaction present at lower Reynolds numbers. The method is applied to blunted axisymmetric and three dimensional elliptic cones at angle of attack for the laminar hypersonic flow of a perfect gas. The method is applied to turbulent and equilibrium-air conditions. The present technique predicts surface heating rates, pressures, and shock shapes that compare favorably with experimental (ground-test and flight) data and numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes and viscous shock-layer equations. In addition, the inclusion of viscous interaction significantly improves results obtained at lower Reynolds numbers. The new technique represents a major improvement over current engineering aerothermal methods with only a modest increase in computational effort.

  20. Prediction of the micro-fluid dynamic environment imposed to three-dimensional engineered cell systems in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Boschetti, Federica; Raimondi, Manuela Teresa; Migliavacca, Francesco; Dubini, Gabriele

    2006-01-01

    Bioreactors allowing culture medium perfusion overcome diffusion limitations associated with static culturing and provide flow-mediated mechanical stimuli. The hydrodynamic stress imposed to cells will depend not only on the culture medium flow rate, but also on the scaffold three-dimensional (3D) micro-architecture. We developed a CFD model of the flow of culture medium through a 3D scaffold of homogeneous geometry, with the aim of predicting the shear stress acting on cells as a function of parameters that can be controlled during the scaffold fabrication process, such as the scaffold porosity and the pore size, and during the cell culture, such as the medium flow rate and the diameter of the perfused scaffold section. We built three groups of models corresponding to three pore sizes: 50, 100 and 150 microm. Each group was made of four models corresponding to 59%, 65%, 77%, and 89% porosity. A commercial finite-element code was used to set up and solve the problem and to analyze the results. The mode value of shear stress varied between 2 and 5 mPa, and was obtained for a circular scaffold of 15.5 mm diameter, perfused by a flow rate of 0.5 ml/min. The simulations showed that the pore size is a variable strongly influencing the predicted shear stress level, whereas the porosity is a variable strongly affecting the statistical distribution of the shear stresses, but not their magnitude. Our results provide a basis for the completion of more exhaustive quantitative studies to further assess the relationship between perfusion, at known micro-fluid dynamic conditions, and tissue growth in vitro.

  1. Three-dimensional micro computed tomography analysis of the lung vasculature and differential adipose proteomics in the Sugen/hypoxia rat model of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Verdelis, Kostas; Passineau, Michael J.; Faight, Erin M.; Zourelias, Lee; Wu, Changgong; Chong, Rong; Benza, Raymond L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disease characterized by significant vascular remodeling. The obesity epidemic has produced great interest in the relationship between small visceral adipose tissue depots producing localized inflammatory conditions, which may link metabolism, innate immunity, and vascular remodeling. This study used novel micro computed tomography (microCT) three-dimensional modeling to investigate the degree of remodeling of the lung vasculature and differential proteomics to determine small visceral adipose dysfunction in rats with severe PAH. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a subcutaneous injection of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor blocker (Sugen 5416) with subsequent hypoxia exposure for 3 weeks (SU/hyp). At 12 weeks after hypoxia, microCT analysis showed a decrease in the ratio of vascular to total tissue volume within the SU/hyp group (mean ± standard deviation: 0.27 ± 0.066; P = 0.02) with increased vascular separation (0.37 ± 0.062 mm; P = 0.02) when compared with the control (0.34 ± 0.084 and 0.30 ± 0.072 mm). Differential proteomics detected an up-regulation of complement protein 3 (C3; SU/hyp∶control ratio = 2.86) and the adipose tissue–specific fatty acid binding protein-4 (FABP4, 2.66) in the heart adipose of the SU/hyp. Significant remodeling of the lung vasculature validates the efficacy of the SU/hyp rat for modeling human PAH. The upregulation of C3 and FABP4 within the heart adipose implicates small visceral adipose dysfunction. C3 has been associated with vascular stiffness, and FABP4 suppresses peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor, which is a major regulator of adipose function and known to be downregulated in PAH. These findings reveal that small visceral adipose tissue within the SU/hyp model provides mechanistic links for vascular remodeling and adipose dysfunction in the pathophysiology of PAH. PMID:28090302

  2. Three-dimensional plotting is a versatile rapid prototyping method for the customized manufacturing of complex scaffolds and tissue engineering constructs.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongxiang; Akkineni, Ashwini Rahul; Gelinsky, Michael

    2014-03-01

    To review recent literature on three-dimensional (3-D) plotting as a rapid prototyping method for the manufacturing of patient specific biomaterial scaffolds and tissue engineering constructs. Literature review and description of own recent work. In contrast to many other rapid prototyping technologies which can be used only for the processing of distinct materials, 3-D plotting can be utilized for all pasty biomaterials and therefore opens up many new options for the manufacturing of bi- or multiphasic scaffolds or even tissue engineering constructs, containing e. g. living cells. 3-D plotting is a rapid prototyping technology of growing importance which provides flexibility concerning choice of material and allows integration of sensitive biological components.

  3. Robot based three-dimensional welding for jet engine blade repair and rapid prototyping of small components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thukaram, Santosh Kumar

    Aero engines are made up of a large number of blades which are subject to wear and damage. They are expensive and must be repaired wherever possible. Engines also have small components which are required in small numbers that need to be developed rapidly. The first part of this research work focuses on developing a robust automated blade repair method using robotic welding. Optimal weld parameters were developed for build-up of edges having different thicknesses. Samples with varying Current and varying travel speed were produced and their micro hardness values were compared. Blade profiles were welded upon. The second part involves a methodology for producing small components using rapid prototyping (RP) techniques. This part involves use of 3D robotic welding for layered manufacturing. Tensile samples produced using the metal RP method were tested and results were found to be well above the minimum cast specifications for the given material.

  4. Patient outcomes of monotherapy with hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for stage T2 or T3 non-small cell lung cancer: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Masakuni; Maebayashi, Toshiya; Aizawa, Takuya; Ishibashi, Naoya; Fukushima, Shoko; Abe, Osamu; Saito, Tsutomu

    2016-01-19

    Hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) is a treatment option for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are medically unable to tolerate surgery and who are not amenable to treatment with stereotactic body radiotherapy. This study assessed the efficacy and safety of 3D-CRT as a monotherapy in patients with localized stage T2 or T3 NSCLC. This retrospective study consisted of 29 patients (20 males) aged 56-89 years (median, 76 years) with histologically confirmed NSCLC who underwent 3D-CRT between 2005 and 2014. The median duration of patient observation was 17.0 months (range, 1.0-64.0 months). Complete and partial responses occurred in 13.8 and 44.8 % of patients, respectively, and the overall response rate was 58.2 %. Meanwhile, the 1- and 3-year survival rates were 65.8 and 33.8 %, respectively. In T2 NSCLC, the median survival time (MST) was 12 months, and the 1- and 3-year survival rates were 62.4 and 21.4 %, respectively. In T3 NSCLC, the MST was 17 months, and the 1- and 3-year survival rates were 72.9 and 48.6 %, respectively. Severe toxicities (Common Terminology Criteria Grade 3) were not observed. The mean biologically effective dose required to improve local control exceeded 80 Gy (range, 67.2-96.0 Gy). These findings support a role for 3D-CRT as a treatment option for patients who refuse or could not tolerate surgical therapy with early-stage NSCLC. Although this was a small, retrospective study, it may form the basis for future, larger controlled studies on 3D-CRT as a monotherapy for NSCLC.

  5. Risk factors for acute esophagitis in non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Xiong; Liu, H. Helen . E-mail: hliu@mdanderson.org; Tucker, Susan L.; Liao Zhongxing; Hu Chaosu; Mohan, Radhe; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the risk factors for acute esophagitis (AE) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy (CCT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: Clinical data were retrospectively analyzed for 215 NSCLC patients treated with CCT and 3D-CRT during 2000-2003, 127 of whom also had induction chemotherapy (ICT). Carboplatin and paclitaxel were the most commonly used agents for both ICT and CCT. The median prescription dose of radiotherapy was 63.5 Gy in 35 fractions. AE was graded during each treatment week and 1-month follow-up visits. The factors related to clinical and disease characteristics, CCT and 3D-CRT treatments, and treatment planning were reviewed and analyzed for their association with Grade {>=}3 AE using univariate and multivariate logistic tests. Results: The rate of any grade AE was 93.0% and of Grade {>=}3 was 20.5%. Univariate analyses showed that none of the clinical factors was significantly associated with Grade {>=}3 AE. However, the mean radiation dose to the esophagus, the absolute esophageal volume treated above 15 Gy (aV15) through aV45 Gy, and the relative esophagus volume treated above 10 Gy (rV10) through rV45 Gy were significant risk factors for Grade {>=}3 AE. Only rV20 was retained as the single risk factor in multivariate analyses. Conclusions: The risk of AE in the NSCLC patients treated with CCT and 3D-CRT was primarily determined by dosimetric factors. These factors should be carefully considered during treatment planning to minimize the incidence of AE.

  6. Laser-guided direct writing for three-dimensional tissue engineering: Analysis and application of radiation forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahmias, Yaakov Koby

    Tissue Engineering aims for the creation of functional tissues or organs using a combination of biomaterials and living cells. Artificial tissues can be implanted in patients to restore tissue function that was lost due to trauma, disease, or genetic disorder. Tissue equivalents may also be used to screen the effects of drugs and toxins, reducing the use of animals in research. One of the principle limitations to the size of engineered tissue is oxygen and nutrient transport. Lacking their own vascular bed, cells embedded in the engineered tissue will consume all available oxygen within hours while out branching blood vessels will take days to vascularize the implanted tissue. Establishing capillaries within the tissue prior to implantation can potentially eliminate this limitation. One approach to establishing capillaries within the tissue is to directly write endothelial cells with micrometer accuracy as it is being built. The patterned endothelial cells will then self-assemble into vascular structures within the engineering tissue. The cell patterning technique known as laser-guided direct writing can confine multiple cells in a laser beam and deposit them as a steady stream on any non-absorbing surface with micrometer scale accuracy. By applying the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory for light scattering on laser-guided direct writing we were able to accurately predict the behavior of with various cells and particles in the focused laser. In addition, two dimensionless parameters were identified for general radiation-force based system design. Using laser-guided direct writing we were able to direct the assembly of endothelial vascular structures with micrometer accuracy in two and three dimensions. The patterned vascular structures provided the backbone for subsequent in vitro liver morphogenesis. Our studies show that hepatocytes migrate toward and adhere to endothelial vascular structures in response to endothelial-secreted hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Our

  7. Thermoresponsive Nanofabricated Substratum for the Engineering of Three-Dimensional Tissues with Layer-by-Layer Architectural Control

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Current tissue engineering methods lack the ability to properly recreate scaffold-free, cell-dense tissues with physiological structures. Recent studies have shown that the use of nanoscale cues allows for precise control over large-area 2D tissue structures without restricting cell growth or cell density. In this study, we developed a simple and versatile platform combining a thermoresponsive nanofabricated substratum (TNFS) incorporating nanotopographical cues and the gel casting method for the fabrication of scaffold-free 3D tissues. Our TNFS allows for the structural control of aligned cell monolayers which can be spontaneously detached via a change in culture temperature. Utilizing our gel casting method, viable, aligned cell sheets can be transferred without loss of anisotropy or stacked with control over individual layer orientations. Transferred cell sheets and individual cell layers within multilayered tissues robustly retain structural anisotropy, allowing for the fabrication of scaffold-free, 3D tissues with hierarchical control of overall tissue structure. PMID:24628277

  8. Thermoresponsive nanofabricated substratum for the engineering of three-dimensional tissues with layer-by-layer architectural control.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Alex; Trosper, Nicole E; Yang, Hee Seok; Kim, Jinsung; Tsui, Jonathan H; Frankel, Samuel D; Murry, Charles E; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2014-05-27

    Current tissue engineering methods lack the ability to properly recreate scaffold-free, cell-dense tissues with physiological structures. Recent studies have shown that the use of nanoscale cues allows for precise control over large-area 2D tissue structures without restricting cell growth or cell density. In this study, we developed a simple and versatile platform combining a thermoresponsive nanofabricated substratum (TNFS) incorporating nanotopographical cues and the gel casting method for the fabrication of scaffold-free 3D tissues. Our TNFS allows for the structural control of aligned cell monolayers which can be spontaneously detached via a change in culture temperature. Utilizing our gel casting method, viable, aligned cell sheets can be transferred without loss of anisotropy or stacked with control over individual layer orientations. Transferred cell sheets and individual cell layers within multilayered tissues robustly retain structural anisotropy, allowing for the fabrication of scaffold-free, 3D tissues with hierarchical control of overall tissue structure.

  9. [Experimental study on tissue engineered cartilage complex three-dimensional nano-scaffold with collagen type II and hyaluronic acid in vitro].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zelong; Chen, Zhu; Liu, Kang; Bai, Yiguang; Jiang, Ting; Feng, Daxiong; Feng, Gang

    2013-10-01

    To explore the possibility of constructing tissue engineered cartilage complex three-dimensional nano-scaffold with collagen type II and hyaluronic acid (HA) by electrospinning. The three-dimensional porous nano-scaffolds were prepared by electrospinning techniques with collagen type II and HA (8 : 1, W : W), which was dissolved in mixed solvent of 3-trifluoroethanol and water (1 : 1, V : V). The morphology were observed by light microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM). And the porosity, water absorption rate, contact angle, and degradation rate were detected. Chondrocytes were harvested from 1-week-old Japanese white rabbit, which was disgested by 0.25% trypsin 30 minutes and 1% collagenase overlight. The passage 2 chondrocytes were seeded on the nano-scaffold. The cell adhesion and proliferation were evaluated by cell counting kit 8 (CCK-8). The cell-scaffold composites were cultured for 2 weeks in vitro, and the biological morphology and extracelluar matrix (ECM) secretion were observed by histological analysis. The optimal electrospinning condition of nano-scaffold was 10% electrospinning solution concentration, 10 cm receiver distance, 5 mL/h spinning injection speed. The scaffold had uniform diameter and good porosity through the light microscope and SEM. The diameter was 300-600 nm, and the porosity was 89.5% +/- 25.0%. The contact angle was (35.6 +/- 3.4) degrees, and the water absorption was 1 120% +/- 34% at 24 hours, which indicated excellent hydrophilicity. The degradation rate was 42.24% +/- 1.51% at 48 days. CCK-8 results showed that the adhesive rate of cells with scaffold was 169.14% +/- 11.26% at 12 hours, and the cell survival rate was 126.03% +/- 4.54% at 7 days. The histological and immunohistochemical staining results showed that the chondrocytes could grow well on the scaffold and secreted ECM. And the similar cartilage lacuma structure could be found at 2 weeks after co-culture, which suggested that hyaline cartilage formed. The

  10. Feasibility of silica-hybridized collagen hydrogels as three-dimensional cell matrices for hard tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hye-Sun; Lee, Eun-Jung; Seo, Seog-Jin; Knowles, Jonathan C; Kim, Hae-Won

    2015-09-01

    Exploiting hydrogels for the cultivation of stem cells, aiming to provide them with physico-chemical cues suitable for osteogenesis, is a critical demand for bone engineering. Here, we developed hybrid compositions of collagen and silica into hydrogels via a simple sol-gel process. The physico-chemical and mechanical properties, degradation behavior, and bone-bioactivity were characterized in-depth; furthermore, the in vitro mesenchymal stem cell growth and osteogenic differentiation behaviors within the 3D hybrid gel matrices were communicated for the first time. The hydrolyzed and condensed silica phase enabled chemical links with the collagen fibrils to form networked hybrid gels. The hybrid gels showed improved chemical stability and greater resistance to enzymatic degradation. The in vitro apatite-forming ability was enhanced by the hybrid composition. The viscoelastic mechanical properties of the hybrid gels were significantly improved in terms of the deformation resistance to an applied load and the modulus values under a dynamic oscillation. Mesenchymal stem cells adhered well to the hybrid networks and proliferated actively with substantial cytoskeletal extensions within the gel matrices. Of note, the hybrid gels substantially reduced the cell-mediated gel contraction behaviors, possibly due to the stiffer networks and higher resistance to cell-mediated degradation. Furthermore, the osteogenic differentiation of cells, including the expression of bone-associated genes and protein, was significantly upregulated within the hybrid gel matrices. Together with the physico-chemical and mechanical properties, the cellular behaviors observed within 3D gel matrices, being different from the previous approaches reported on 2D substrates, provide new information on the feasibility and usefulness of the silica-collagen system for stem cell culture and tissue engineering of hard tissues.

  11. On the use of a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver for rocket engine pump impeller design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wei-Chung; Prueger, George H.; Chan, Daniel C.; Eastland, Anthony H.

    1992-01-01

    A 3D Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes Solver and a Fast Grid Generator (FGG), developed specially for centrifugal impeller design, were incorporated into the pump impeller design process. The impeller performance from the CFD analysis was compared to one-dimensional prediction. Both analyses showed good agreement of the impeller hydraulic efficiency, 94.5 percent, but with an 8 percent discrepancy of Euler head prediction. The impeller blade angle, discharge hub to shroud width, axial length and blade stacking were systematically changed to achieve an optimum impeller design. Impeller overall efficiency, loss distribution, hub-to-tip flow angle distortion and blade-to-blade flow angle change are among those criteria used to evaluate impeller performance. Two grid sizes, one with 10 K grid points and one with 80 K grid points were used to evaluate grid dependency issues. The effects of grid resolution on the accuracy and turnaround time are discussed. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that CFD can be effectively used for design and optimization of rocket engine pump components.

  12. Three-Dimensional, Soft Neotissue Arrays as High Throughput Platforms for the Interrogation of Engineered Tissue Environments

    PubMed Central

    Floren, Michael; Tan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Local signals from tissue-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironments, including matrix adhesive ligand, mechanical elasticity and micro-scale geometry, are known to instruct a variety of stem cell differentiation processes. Likewise, these signals converge to provide multifaceted, mechanochemical cues for highly-specific tissue morphogenesis or regeneration. Despite accumulated knowledge about the individual and combined roles of various mechanochemical ECM signals in stem cell activities on 2-dimensional matrices, the understandings of morphogenetic or regenerative 3-dimenstional tissue microenvironments remain very limited. To that end, we established high-throughput platforms based on soft, fibrous matrices with various combinatorial ECM proteins meanwhile highly-tunable in elasticity and 3-dimensional geometry. To demonstrate the utility of our platform, we evaluated 64 unique combinations of 6 ECM proteins (collagen I, collagen III, collagen IV, laminin, fibronectin, and elastin) on the adhesion, spreading and fate commitment of mesenchymal stem cell (MSCs) under two substrate stiffness (4.6 kPa, 20 kPa). Using this technique, we identified several neotissue microenvironments supporting MSC adhesion, spreading and differentiation toward early vascular lineages. Manipulation of the matrix properties, such as elasticity and geometry, in concert with ECM proteins will permit the investigation of multiple and distinct MSC environments. This paper demonstrates the practical application of high through-put technology to facilitate the screening of a variety of engineered microenvironments with the aim to instruct stem cell differentiation. PMID:25956850

  13. Three-Dimensional Human Cardiac Tissue Engineered by Centrifugation of Stacked Cell Sheets and Cross-Sectional Observation of Its Synchronous Beatings by Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Akiyuki; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Kobayashi, Mari; Iwana, Shin-ichi; Kabetani, Yasuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissues are engineered by stacking cell sheets, and these tissues have been applied in clinical regenerative therapies. The optimal fabrication technique of 3D human tissues and the real-time observation system for these tissues are important in tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, cardiac physiology, and the safety testing of candidate chemicals. In this study, for aiming the clinical application, 3D human cardiac tissues were rapidly fabricated by human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cardiac cell sheets with centrifugation, and the structures and beatings in the cardiac tissues were observed cross-sectionally and noninvasively by two optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems. The fabrication time was reduced to approximately one-quarter by centrifugation. The cross-sectional observation showed that multilayered cardiac cell sheets adhered tightly just after centrifugation. Additionally, the cross-sectional transmissions of beatings within multilayered human cardiac tissues were clearly detected by OCT. The observation showed the synchronous beatings of the thicker 3D human cardiac tissues, which were fabricated rapidly by cell sheet technology and centrifugation. The rapid tissue-fabrication technique and OCT technology will show a powerful potential in cardiac tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug discovery research. PMID:28326324

  14. The Use of Total Human Bone Marrow Fraction in a Direct Three-Dimensional Expansion Approach for Bone Tissue Engineering Applications: Focus on Angiogenesis and Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Hugo; Catros, Sylvain; Siadous, Robin; Derkaoui, Sidi-Mohammed; Bareille, Reine; Letourneur, Didier; Amédée, Joëlle

    2015-01-01

    Current approaches in bone tissue engineering have shown limited success, mostly owing to insufficient vascularization of the construct. A common approach consists of co-culture of endothelial cells and osteoblastic cells. This strategy uses cells from different sources and differentiation states, thus increasing the complexity upstream of a clinical application. The source of reparative cells is paramount for the success of bone tissue engineering applications. In this context, stem cells obtained from human bone marrow hold much promise. Here, we analyzed the potential of human whole bone marrow cells directly expanded in a three-dimensional (3D) polymer matrix and focused on the further characterization of this heterogeneous population and on their ability to promote angiogenesis and osteogenesis, both in vitro and in vivo, in a subcutaneous model. Cellular aggregates were formed within 24 h and over the 12-day culture period expressed endothelial and bone-specific markers and a specific junctional protein. Ectopic implantation of the tissue-engineered constructs revealed osteoid tissue and vessel formation both at the periphery and within the implant. This work sheds light on the potential clinical use of human whole bone marrow for bone regeneration strategies, focusing on a simplified approach to develop a direct 3D culture without two-dimensional isolation or expansion. PMID:25333855

  15. Enhancing neuronal growth from human endometrial stem cells derived neuron-like cells in three-dimensional fibrin gel for nerve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Navaei-Nigjeh, Mona; Amoabedini, Ghasem; Noroozi, Abbas; Azami, Mahmoud; Asmani, Mohammad N; Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh; Saberi, Hooshang; Ai, Armin; Ai, Jafar

    2014-08-01

    Nerve tissue engineering (NTE) is one of the most promising methods to restore central nerve systems in human health care. Three-dimensional (3D) distribution and growth of cells within the porous scaffold composed of nanofibers are of clinical significance for NTE. In this study, an attempt was made to develop and characterize the use of fibrin gel and human endometrial stem cells (hEnSCs)-derived neuron-like cells simultaneously to support cell behavior especially neuron outgrowth. The structural and mechanical characteristics of fibrin gel scaffold were examined with SEM and rheometer. Also, hEnSCs-derived neuron-like cells were cultured in fibrin gel and were subsequently analyzed with immunofluorescent staining against neuronal markers. In parallel, the survival and growth rates of the cells were determined by MTT assay and neurite extension. At the end, cell-matrix interactions were investigated with SEM and TEM micrographs. Mechanical properties of fabricated scaffold were studied and results indicated appropriate choice of material, SEM and TEM showed excellent integration of cells with nanofibers regarding the relation between cells and fibrin gel. Immunofluorescent staining of fibrin gel after 6 days of cell seeding and culture demonstrated well expanded and incorporated network of neurons. In addition, viability, proliferation, and neuronal growth of seeded cells were analyzed at days 1, 3, and 6. Comparing those results with 2D culture of seeded cells showed positive effect of 3D culture. Taken together, the results suggest that fibrin can provide a suitable, three-dimensional scaffold for neuronal survival and outgrowth for regeneration of the central nervous system.

  16. Comparison of outcomes for patients with medically inoperable Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer treated with two-dimensional vs. three-dimensional radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, L. Christine; Komaki, Ritsuko . E-mail: rkomaki@mdanderson.org; Allen, Pamela; Guerrero, Thomas; Mohan, Radhe; Cox, James D.

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: This retrospective analysis was performed to assess the outcomes of three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy and two-dimensional (2D) planning. Methods and Materials: Between 1978 and 2003, 200 patients with Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were treated with radiotherapy alone at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. Eighty-five patients were treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy. For the 3D group, median age, radiation dose, and follow-up was 73 (range, 50-92), 66 Gy (range, 45-90.3 Gy), and 19 months (range, 3-77 months), respectively; and for the 2D group, 69 (range, 44-88), 64 Gy (range, 20-74 Gy), 20 months (range, 1-173 months), respectively. Overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), disease-free survival (DFS), locoregional control (LRC), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) rates were analyzed. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in patient and tumor characteristics between 2D and 3D groups, except the 3D patients were older (p = 0.006). The OS, DSS, and LRC rates were significantly higher in patients who were treated by 3D conformal radiotherapy. Two- and 5-year OS for the 3D group were 68% and 36%, respectively, and 47% and 10% in the 2D group (p = 0.001). DSS at 2 and 5 years for the 3D group were 83% and 68%, respectively, vs. 62% and 29% in the 2D group (p < 0.001). LRC rates at 2 and 5 years for patients in the 3D group were 77% and 70% and 53% and 34% in the 2D group (p < 0.001). On univariate analysis elective, nodal irradiation was associated with decreased OS, DSS, and LRC. On multivariate analysis, 3D conformal radiotherapy was associated with increased OS and DSS. Male sex, age {>=}70, weight loss {>=}5%, and tumor size {>=}4 cm were associated with decreased OS and DSS. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that 3D conformal radiotherapy improves outcomes in patients with medically inoperable Stage I NSCLC compared with 2D treatment and is an acceptable treatment for this group of

  17. Fabrication of electrospun poly(L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone)/collagen nanoyarn network as a novel, three-dimensional, macroporous, aligned scaffold for tendon tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuan; Wu, Jinglei; Wang, Haoming; Li, Hanqin; Di, Ning; Song, Lei; Li, Sontao; Li, Dianwei; Xiang, Yang; Liu, Wei; Mo, Xiumei; Zhou, Qiang

    2013-12-01

    Tissue engineering techniques using novel scaffolding materials offer potential alternatives for managing tendon disorders. An ideal tendon tissue engineered scaffold should mimic the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) of the native tendon. Here, we propose a novel electrospun nanoyarn network that is morphologically and structurally similar to the ECM of native tendon tissues. The nanoyarn, random nanofiber, and aligned nanofiber scaffolds of a synthetic biodegradable polymer, poly(L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) [P(LLA-CL)], and natural collagen I complex were fabricated using electrospinning. These scaffolds were characterized in terms of fiber morphology, pore size, porosity, and chemical and mechanical properties for the purpose of culturing tendon cells (TCs) for tendon tissue engineering. The results indicated a fiber diameter of 632 ± 81 nm for the random nanofiber scaffold, 643 ± 97 nm for the aligned nanofiber scaffold, and 641 ± 68 nm for the nanoyarn scaffold. The yarn in the nanoyarn scaffold was twisted by many nanofibers similar to the structure and inherent nanoscale organization of tendons, indicating an increase in the diameter of 9.51 ± 3.62 μm. The nanoyarn scaffold also contained 3D aligned microstructures with large interconnected pores and high porosity. Fourier transform infrared analyses revealed the presence of collagen in the three scaffolds. The mechanical properties of the sample scaffolds indicated that the scaffolds had desirable mechanical properties for tissue regeneration. Further, the results revealed that TC proliferation and infiltration, and the expression of tendon-related ECM genes, were significantly enhanced on the nanoyarn scaffold compared with that on the random nanofiber and aligned nanofiber scaffolds. This study demonstrates that electrospun P(LLA-CL)/collagen nanoyarn is a novel, 3D, macroporous, aligned scaffold that has potential application in tendon tissue engineering.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Mass Transfer and Three-Dimensional Fabrication of Tissue-Engineered Cartilages Based on Chitosan/Gelatin Hybrid Hydrogel Scaffold in a Rotating Bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanxia; Song, Kedong; Jiang, Siyu; Chen, Jinglian; Tang, Lingzhi; Li, Siyuan; Fan, Jiangli; Wang, Yiwei; Zhao, Jiaquan; Liu, Tianqing

    2017-01-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering is believed to provide effective cartilage repair post-injuries or diseases. Biomedical materials play a key role in achieving successful culture and fabrication of cartilage. The physical properties of a chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffold make it an ideal cartilage biomimetic material. In this study, a chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel was chosen to fabricate a tissue-engineered cartilage in vitro by inoculating human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) at both dynamic and traditional static culture conditions. A bioreactor that provides a dynamic culture condition has received greater applications in tissue engineering due to its optimal mass transfer efficiency and its ability to simulate an equivalent physical environment compared to human body. In this study, prior to cell-scaffold fabrication experiment, mathematical simulations were confirmed with a mass transfer of glucose and TGF-β2 both in rotating wall vessel bioreactor (RWVB) and static culture conditions in early stage of culture via computational fluid dynamic (CFD) method. To further investigate the feasibility of the mass transfer efficiency of the bioreactor, this RWVB was adopted to fabricate three-dimensional cell-hydrogel cartilage constructs in a dynamic environment. The results showed that the mass transfer efficiency of RWVB was faster in achieving a final equilibrium compared to culture in static culture conditions. ADSCs culturing in RWVB expanded three times more compared to that in static condition over 10 days. Induced cell cultivation in a dynamic RWVB showed extensive expression of extracellular matrix, while the cell distribution was found much more uniformly distributing with full infiltration of extracellular matrix inside the porous scaffold. The increased mass transfer efficiency of glucose and TGF-β2 from RWVB promoted cellular proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of ADSCs inside chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffolds. The

  19. Microlaser-based three-dimensional display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Eric B.; Bergstedt, Robert; Hargis, David E.; Higley, Paul D.

    1999-08-01

    Three dimensional (3D) displays are critical for viewing complex multi-dimensional information and for viewing representations of the three dimensional real world. A teaming arrangement between Laser Power Corporation (LPC) and Specialty Devices, Inc. (SDI) has led to the feasibility demonstration of a directly-viewed three dimensional volumetric display. LPC has developed red, green, and blue (RGB) diode pumped solid state microlaser display technology for use as a high resolution, high brightness display engine for the three dimensional display. Concurrently, SDI has developed a unique technology for viewing high resolution three dimensional volumetric images without external viewing aids (eye wear). When coupled to LPC's display engine, the resultant all solid state three dimensional display presets a true, physical three dimensionality which is directly viewable from all angles by multiple viewers without additional viewing equipment (eye wear). The resultant volumetric display will further enable applications such as the 'virtual sandbox,' visualization of radar and sonar data, air traffic control, remote surgery and diagnostics, and CAD workstations.

  20. Developing a methodology for three-dimensional correlation of PET–CT images and whole-mount histopathology in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dahele, M.; Hwang, D.; Peressotti, C.; Sun, L.; Kusano, M.; Okhai, S.; Darling, G.; Yaffe, M.; Caldwell, C.; Mah, K.; Hornby, J.; Ehrlich, L.; Raphael, S.; Tsao, M.; Behzadi, A.; Weigensberg, C.; Ung, Y.C.

    2008-01-01

    Background Understanding the three-dimensional (3D) volumetric relationship between imaging and functional or histopathologic heterogeneity of tumours is a key concept in the development of image-guided radiotherapy. Our aim was to develop a methodologic framework to enable the reconstruction of resected lung specimens containing non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc), to register the result in 3D with diagnostic imaging, and to import the reconstruction into a radiation treatment planning system. Methods and Results We recruited 12 patients for an investigation of radiology–pathology correlation (rpc) in nsclc. Before resection, imaging by positron emission tomography (pet) or computed tomography (ct) was obtained. Resected specimens were formalin-fixed for 1–24 hours before sectioning at 3-mm to 10-mm intervals. To try to retain the original shape, we embedded the specimens in agar before sectioning. Consecutive sections were laid out for photography and manually adjusted to maintain shape. Following embedding, the tissue blocks underwent whole-mount sectioning (4-μm sections) and staining with hematoxylin and eosin. Large histopathology slides were used to whole-mount entire sections for digitization. The correct sequence was maintained to assist in subsequent reconstruction. Using Photoshop (Adobe Systems Incorporated, San Jose, CA, U.S.A.), contours were placed on the photographic images to represent the external borders of the section and the extent of macroscopic disease. Sections were stacked in sequence and manually oriented in Photoshop. The macroscopic tumour contours were then transferred to MATLAB (The Mathworks, Natick, MA, U.S.A.) and stacked, producing 3D surface renderings of the resected specimen and embedded gross tumour. To evaluate the microscopic extent of disease, customized “tile-based” and commercial confocal panoramic laser scanning (TISSUEscope: Biomedical Photometrics, Waterloo, ON) systems were used to generate digital images of

  1. Three-dimensional nanomagnetism

    DOE PAGES

    Fernandez-Pacheco, Amalio; Streubel, Robert; Fruchart, Olivier; ...

    2017-06-09

    Magnetic nanostructures are being developed for use in many aspects of our daily life, spanning areas such as data storage, sensing and biomedicine. Whereas patterned nanomagnets are traditionally two-dimensional planar structures, recent work is expanding nanomagnetism into three dimensions; a move triggered by the advance of unconventional synthesis methods and the discovery of new magnetic effects. In three-dimensional nanomagnets more complex magnetic configurations become possible, many with unprecedented properties. Here we review the creation of these structures and their implications for the emergence of new physics, the development of instrumentation and computational methods, and exploitation in numerous applications.

  2. Three dimensional quantum chromodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, G.; Rajeev, S. G.; Yang, Z.

    1992-02-01

    The subject of this talk is the study of the low energy behavior of three (2+1) dimensional Quantum Chromodynamics. We show the existence of a phase where parity is unbroken and the flavor group U(2n) is broken into a subgroup U(n)×U(n). We derive the low energy effective action for the theory and show that it has solitonic excitations with Fermi statistic, to be identified with the three dimensional ``baryon''. Finally, we study the current algebra for this effective action and we find a co-homologically nontrivial generalization of Kac-Moody algebras to three dimension.

  3. Three-dimensional metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Burckel, David Bruce

    2012-06-12

    A fabrication method is capable of creating canonical metamaterial structures arrayed in a three-dimensional geometry. The method uses a membrane suspended over a cavity with predefined pattern as a directional evaporation mask. Metallic and/or dielectric material can be evaporated at high vacuum through the patterned membrane to deposit resonator structures on the interior walls of the cavity, thereby providing a unit cell of micron-scale dimension. The method can produce volumetric metamaterial structures comprising layers of such unit cells of resonator structures.

  4. Three-dimensional nanomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Pacheco, Amalio; Streubel, Robert; Fruchart, Olivier; Hertel, Riccardo; Fischer, Peter; Cowburn, Russell P.

    2017-06-01

    Magnetic nanostructures are being developed for use in many aspects of our daily life, spanning areas such as data storage, sensing and biomedicine. Whereas patterned nanomagnets are traditionally two-dimensional planar structures, recent work is expanding nanomagnetism into three dimensions; a move triggered by the advance of unconventional synthesis methods and the discovery of new magnetic effects. In three-dimensional nanomagnets more complex magnetic configurations become possible, many with unprecedented properties. Here we review the creation of these structures and their implications for the emergence of new physics, the development of instrumentation and computational methods, and exploitation in numerous applications.

  5. Fabrication of Inverted Colloidal Crystal Poly(ethylene glycol) Scaffold: A Three-dimensional Cell Culture Platform for Liver Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Shirahama, Hitomi; Kumar, Supriya K; Jeon, Won-Yong; Kim, Myung Hee; Lee, Jae Ho; Ng, Soon Seng; Tabaei, Seyed R; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-08-27

    The ability to maintain hepatocyte function in vitro, for the purpose of testing xenobiotics' cytotoxicity, studying virus infection and developing drugs targeted at the liver, requires a platform in which cells receive proper biochemical and mechanical cues. Recent liver tissue engineering systems have employed three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds composed of synthetic or natural hydrogels, given their high water retention and their ability to provide the mechanical stimuli needed by the cells. There has been growing interest in the inverted colloidal crystal (ICC) scaffold, a recent development, which allows high spatial organization, homotypic and heterotypic cell interaction, as well as cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction. Herein, we describe a protocol to fabricate the ICC scaffold using poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) and the particle leaching method. Briefly, a lattice is made from microsphere particles, after which a pre-polymer solution is added, properly polymerized, and the particles are then removed, or leached, using an organic solvent (e.g., tetrahydrofuran). The dissolution of the lattice results in a highly porous scaffold with controlled pore sizes and interconnectivities that allow media to reach cells more easily. This unique structure allows high surface area for the cells to adhere to as well as easy communication between pores, and the ability to coat the PEGDA ICC scaffold with proteins also shows a marked effect on cell performance. We analyze the morphology of the scaffold as well as the hepatocarcinoma cell (Huh-7.5) behavior in terms of viability and function to explore the effect of ICC structure and ECM coatings. Overall, this paper provides a detailed protocol of an emerging scaffold that has wide applications in tissue engineering, especially liver tissue engineering.

  6. Liver extracellular matrix providing dual functions of two-dimensional substrate coating and three-dimensional injectable hydrogel platform for liver tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Seung; Shin, Jisoo; Park, Hae-Min; Kim, Yun-Gon; Kim, Byung-Gee; Oh, Jong-Won; Cho, Seung-Woo

    2014-01-13

    Decellularization of tissues or organs can provide an efficient strategy for preparing functional scaffolds for tissue engineering. Microstructures of native extracellular matrices and their biochemical compositions can be retained in the decellularized matrices, providing tissue-specific microenvironments for efficient tissue regeneration. Here, we report the versatility of liver extracellular matrix (LEM) that can be used for two-dimensional (2D) coating and three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel platforms for culture and transplantation of primary hepatocytes. Collagen type I (Col I) has typically been used for hepatocyte culture and transplantation. In this study, LEM was compared with Col I in terms of biophysical and mechanical characteristics and biological performance for enhancing cell viability, differentiation, and hepatic functions. Surface properties of LEM coating and mechanical properties and gelation kinetics of LEM hydrogel could be manipulated by adjusting the LEM concentration. In addition, LEM hydrogel exhibited improved elastic properties, rapid gelation, and volume maintenance compared to Col I hydrogel. LEM coating significantly improved hepatocyte functions such as albumin secretion and urea synthesis. More interestingly, LEM coating upregulated hepatic gene expression of human adipose-derived stem cells, indicating enhanced hepatic differentiation of these stem cells. The viability and hepatic functions of primary hepatocytes were also significantly improved in LEM hydrogel compared to Col I hydrogel both in vitro and in vivo. Albumin and hepatocyte transcription factor expression was upregulated in hepatocytes transplanted in LEM hydrogels. In conclusion, LEM can provide functional biomaterial platforms for diverse applications in liver tissue engineering by promoting survival and maturation of hepatocytes and hepatic commitment of stem cells. This study demonstrates the feasibility of decellularized matrix for both 2D coating and 3D hydrogel in

  7. Postinfarction Functional Recovery Driven by a Three-Dimensional Engineered Fibrin Patch Composed of Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roura, Santiago; Soler-Botija, Carolina; Bagó, Juli R.; Llucià-Valldeperas, Aida; Férnandez, Marco A.; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Prat-Vidal, Cristina; Perea-Gil, Isaac; Blanco, Jerónimo

    2015-01-01

    Considerable research has been dedicated to restoring myocardial cell slippage and limiting ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). We examined the ability of a three-dimensional (3D) engineered fibrin patch filled with human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCBMSCs) to induce recovery of cardiac function after MI. The UCBMSCs were modified to coexpress luciferase and fluorescent protein reporters, mixed with fibrin, and applied as an adhesive, viable construct (fibrin-cell patch) over the infarcted myocardium in mice (MI-UCBMSC group). The patch adhered well to the heart. Noninvasive bioluminescence imaging demonstrated early proliferation and differentiation of UCBMSCs within the construct in the postinfarct mice in the MI-UCBMSC group. The implanted cells also participated in the formation of new, functional microvasculature that connected the fibrin-cell patch to both the subjacent myocardial tissue and the host circulatory system. As revealed by echocardiography, the left ventricular ejection fraction and fractional shortening at sacrifice were improved in MI-UCBMSC mice and were markedly reduced in mice treated with fibrin alone and untreated postinfarction controls. In conclusion, a 3D engineered fibrin patch composed of UCBMSCs attenuated infarct-derived cardiac dysfunction when transplanted locally over a myocardial wound. Significance Ischemic heart failure (HF) is the end stage of many cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction. The only definitive treatment for HF is cardiac transplant, which is hampered by limited number of heart donors and graft rejection. In recent times, cellular cardiomyoplasty has been expected to repair infarcted myocardium by implantation of different sources of stem or progenitor cells. However, low cell survival and myocardial implantation rates have motivated the emergence of novel approaches with the objective of generating graftable cell-based implants. Here, the potential

  8. Tissue engineering of cementum/periodontal-ligament complex using a novel three-dimensional pellet cultivation system for human periodontal ligament stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenhua; Jin, Fang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Ma, Dandan; Han, Chun; Huo, Na; Wang, Yinxiong; Zhang, Yunfei; Lin, Zhu; Jin, Yan

    2009-12-01

    Limitations of conventional regeneration modalities underscore the necessity of recapitulating development for periodontal tissue engineering. In this study, we proposed a novel three-dimensional pellet cultivation system for periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) to recreate the biological microenvironment similar to those of a regenerative milieu. Monodispersed human PDLSCs were cultured in medium with ascorbic acid and conditioned medium from developing apical tooth germ cells and were subsequently harvested from culture plate as a contiguous cell sheet with abundant extracellular matrix. The detached cell-matrix membrane spontaneously contracted to produce a single-cell pellet. The PDLSCs embedded within this cell-matrix complex exhibited several phenotypic characteristics of cementoblast lineages, as indicated by upregulated alkaline phosphatase activity, accelerated mineralization, and the expression of bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin genes. When this PDLSC pellets were transplanted into immunocompromised mice, a regular aligned cementum/PDL-like complex was formed. These results suggest that the combination of apical tooth germ cell-conditioned medium and endogenous extracellular matrix could maximally mimic the microenvironment of root/periodontal tissue development and enhance the reconstruction of physiological architecture of a cementum/PDL-like complex in a tissue-mimicking way; on the other hand, such PDLSC pellet may also be a promising alternative to promote periodontal defect repair for future clinical applications.

  9. Three dimensional visualization of engineered bone and soft tissue by combined x-ray micro-diffraction and phase contrast tomography.

    PubMed

    Cedola, Alessia; Campi, Gaetano; Pelliccia, Daniele; Bukreeva, Inna; Fratini, Michela; Burghammer, Manfred; Rigon, Luigi; Arfelli, Fulvia; Chang Chen, Rong; Dreossi, Diego; Sodini, Nicola; Mohammadi, Sara; Tromba, Giuliana; Cancedda, Ranieri; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena

    2014-01-06

    Computed x-ray phase contrast micro-tomography is the most valuable tool for a three dimensional (3D) and non destructive analysis of the tissue engineered bone morphology. We used a Talbot interferometer installed at SYRMEP beamline of the ELETTRA synchrotron (Trieste, Italy) for a precise 3D reconstruction of both bone and soft connective tissue, regenerated in vivo within a porous scaffold. For the first time the x-ray tomographic reconstructions have been combined with x-ray scanning micro-diffraction measurement on the same sample, in order to give an exhaustive identification of the different tissues participating to the biomineralization process. As a result, we were able to investigate in detail the different densities in the tissues, distinguishing the 3D organization of the amorphous calcium phosphate from the collagen matrix. Our experimental approach allows for a deeper understanding of the role of collagen matrix in the organic-mineral transition, which is a crucial issue for the development of new bio-inspired composites.

  10. A three-dimensional multiporous fibrous scaffold fabricated with regenerated spider silk protein/poly(l-lactic acid) for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiaozhen; Sun, Chengjun

    2015-02-01

    An axially aligned three-dimensional (3-D) fibrous scaffold was fabricated with regenerated spider silk protein (RSSP)/poly (l-lactic acid) (PLLA) through electrospinning and post treatment. The morphology, mechanical and degradation properties of the scaffold were controlled through the weight ratio of RSSP to PLLA, the thickness of the scaffold and the treatment time. The scaffold with a weight ratio of 2:3 (RSSP:PLLA) had a nanoleaves-on-nanofibers hierarchical nanostructure; the length and thickness of the nanoleaves were about 400 and 30 nm, respectively. The holes of the scaffolds ranged from hundreds of nanometers to several microns. The scaffold showed an ideal mechanical property that it was stiff when dry, but became soft once hydrated in the culture medium. Its degradation rate was very slow in the first 2 months, and then accelerated in the following 2 months. The pH values of the degradation mediums of all the samples remained in the range of 7.40-7.12 during degradation for 6 months. It had good biocompatibility with PC 12 cells. The aligned hierarchical nanostructure could guide the directions of the axon extension. This scaffold has a potential application in Tissue Engineering and controlled release. This study provides a method to produce synthetic or natural biodegradable polymer scaffold with tailored morphology, mechanical, and degradation properties.

  11. Extracellular matrix expression of human tenocytes in three-dimensional air-liquid and PLGA cultures compared with tendon tissue: implications for tendon tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Christiane; John, Thilo; Endres, Michaela; Rosen, Christian; Kaps, Christian; Kohl, Benjamin; Sittinger, Michael; Ertel, Wolfgang; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2010-09-01

    Tenocyte transplantation may prove to be an approach to support healing of tendon defects. Cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts within three-dimensional (3D) cultures may prevent tenocyte dedifferentiation observed in monolayer (2D) culture. The present study compares both neotissue formation and tenocyte extracellular matrix (ECM) expression in 2D and 3D cultures directly with that of native tendon, in order to determine optimal conditions for tendon tissue engineering. Primary human tenocytes were embedded in poly[lactic-co-glycolic-acid] (PLGA)-scaffolds and high-density cultures. Neotissue formation was examined by hematoxyline-eosine (H&E) and immunofluorescence staining. Gene expression of ECM proteins and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was compared at days 0 (2D), 14, and 28 in 3D cultures and tendon. Histomorphology of 3D culture showed tendon-like tissue as tenocyte cell nuclei became more elongated and ECM accumulated. Type I collagen gene expression was higher in 2D culture than in tendon and decreased in 4-week-old 3D cultures, whereas type III collagen was only elevated in high-density culture compared with tendon. Decorin and COMP were reduced in 2D and increased in 3D culture almost to ex vivo level. These results suggest that the 3D high-density or biodegradable scaffolds cultures encourage the differentiation of expanded monolayer tenocytes in vitro to tendon-like tissue. (c) 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Three dimensional visualization of engineered bone and soft tissue by combined x-ray micro-diffraction and phase contrast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cedola, Alessia; Campi, Gaetano; Pelliccia, Daniele; Bukreeva, Inna; Fratini, Michela; Burghammer, Manfred; Rigon, Luigi; Arfelli, Fulvia; Chen, Rong Chang; Dreossi, Diego; Sodini, Nicola; Mohammadi, Sara; Tromba, Giuliana; Cancedda, Ranieri; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena

    2014-01-01

    Computed x-ray phase contrast micro-tomography is the most valuable tool for a three dimensional (3D) and non destructive analysis of the tissue engineered bone morphology. We used a Talbot interferometer installed at SYRMEP beamline of the ELETTRA synchrotron (Trieste, Italy) for a precise 3D reconstruction of both bone and soft connective tissue, regenerated in vivo within a porous scaffold. For the first time the x-ray tomographic reconstructions have been combined with x-ray scanning micro-diffraction measurement on the same sample, in order to give an exhaustive identification of the different tissues participating to the biomineralization process. As a result, we were able to investigate in detail the different densities in the tissues, distinguishing the 3D organization of the amorphous calcium phosphate from the collagen matrix. Our experimental approach allows for a deeper understanding of the role of collagen matrix in the organic-mineral transition, which is a crucial issue for the development of new bio-inspired composites.

  13. Three dimensional interactive display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) interactive display and method of forming the same, includes a transparent capaciflector (TC) camera formed on a transparent shield layer on the screen surface. A first dielectric layer is formed on the shield layer. A first wire layer is formed on the first dielectric layer. A second dielectric layer is formed on the first wire layer. A second wire layer is formed on the second dielectric layer. Wires on the first wire layer and second wire layer are grouped into groups of parallel wires with a turnaround at one end of each group and a sensor pad at the opposite end. An operational amplifier is connected to each of the sensor pads and the shield pad biases the pads and receives a signal from connected sensor pads in response to intrusion of a probe. The signal is proportional to probe location with respect to the monitor screen.

  14. Three-dimensional plotting of a cell-laden alginate/methylcellulose blend: towards biofabrication of tissue engineering constructs with clinically relevant dimensions.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Kathleen; Placht, Anna-Maria; Paul, Birgit; Brüggemeier, Sophie; Gelinsky, Michael; Lode, Anja

    2015-07-22

    Biofabrication of tissue engineering constructs with tailored architecture and organized cell placement using rapid prototyping technologies is a major research focus in the field of regenerative therapies. This study describes a novel alginate-based material suitable for both cell embedding and fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) structures with predefined geometry by 3D plotting. The favourable printing properties of the material were achieved by using a simple strategy: addition of methylcellulose (MC) to a 3% alginate solution resulted in a strongly enhanced viscosity, which enabled accurate and easy deposition without high technical efforts. After scaffold plotting, the alginate chains were crosslinked with Ca(2+) ; MC did not contribute to the gelation and was released from the scaffolds during the following cultivation. The resulting constructs are characterized by high elasticity and stability, as well as an enhanced microporosity caused by the transient presence of MC. The suitability of the alginate/MC blend for cell embedding was evaluated by direct incorporation of mesenchymal stem cells during scaffold fabrication. The embedded cells showed high viability after 3 weeks of cultivation, which was similar to those of cells within pure alginate scaffolds which served as control. Maintenance of the differentiation potential of embedded cells, as an important requirement for the generation of functional tissue engineering constructs, was proven for adipogenic differentiation as a model for soft tissue formation. In conclusion, the temporary integration of MC in to a low-concentrated alginate solution allowed the generation of scaffolds with dimensions in the range of centimetres without loss of the positive properties of low-concentrated alginate hydrogels with regard to cell embedding. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Three-Dimensional Complex Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, E. Dale

    1988-01-01

    Report presents new theory of analytic functions of three-dimensional complex variables. While three-dimensional system subject to more limitations and more difficult to use than the two-dimensional system, useful in analysis of three-dimensional fluid flows, electrostatic potentials, and other phenomena involving harmonic functions.

  16. Synthesis of and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of a novel TGF-β1-SF-CS three-dimensional scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tong, Shuang; Xu, Da-Peng; Liu, Zi-Mei; Du, Yang; Wang, Xu-Kai

    2016-08-01

    The role of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in normal human fracture healing has been previously demonstrated. The objective of the present study was to examine the biocompatibility of TGF-β1-silk fibroin-chitosan (TGF-β1-SF-CS) three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds in order to construct an ideal scaffold for bone tissue engineering. We added TGF-β1 directly to the SF-CS scaffold to construct a 3D scaffold for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, and performed evaluations to determine whether it may have potential applications as a growth factor delivery device. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were seeded on the TGF-β1-SF-CS scaffolds and the silk fibroin-chitosan (SF-CS) scaffolds. On the TGF-β1‑SF-CS and the SF-CS scaffolds, the cell adhesion rate increased in a time‑dependent manner. Using a Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay and analyzing the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression proved that TGF-β1 significantly enhanced the growth and proliferation of BMSCs on the SF-CS scaffolds in a time-dependent manner. To examine the in vivo biocompatibility and osteogenesis of the TGF-β1‑SF-CS scaffolds, the TGF-β1-SF-CS scaffolds and the SF-CS scaffolds were implanted in rabbit mandibles and studied histologically and microradiographically. The 3D computed tomography (CT) scan and histological examinations of the samples showed that the TGF-β1-SF-CS scaffolds exhibited good biocompatibility and extensive osteoconductivity with the host bone after 8 weeks. Moreover, the introduction of TGF-β1 to the SF-CS scaffolds markedly enhanced the efficiency of new bone formation, and this was confirmed using bone mineral density (BMD) and biomechanical evaluation, particularly at 8 weeks after implantation. We demonstrated that the TGF-β1‑SF-CS scaffolds possessed as good biocompatibility and osteogenesis as the hybrid ones. Taken together, these findings indicate that the TGF-β1-SF-CS scaffolds fulfilled the basic

  17. Synthesis of and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of a novel TGF-β1-SF-CS three-dimensional scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Shuang; Xu, Da-Peng; Liu, Zi-Mei; Du, Yang; Wang, Xu-Kai

    2016-01-01

    The role of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in normal human fracture healing has been previously demonstrated. The objective of the present study was to examine the biocompatibility of TGF-β1-silk fibroin-chitosan (TGF-β1-SF-CS) three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds in order to construct an ideal scaffold for bone tissue engineering. We added TGF-β1 directly to the SF-CS scaffold to construct a 3D scaffold for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, and performed evaluations to determine whether it may have potential applications as a growth factor delivery device. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were seeded on the TGF-β1-SF-CS scaffolds and the silk fibroin-chitosan (SF-CS) scaffolds. On the TGF-β1-SF-CS and the SF-CS scaffolds, the cell adhesion rate increased in a time-dependent manner. Using a Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay and analyzing the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression proved that TGF-β1 significantly enhanced the growth and proliferation of BMSCs on the SF-CS scaffolds in a time-dependent manner. To examine the in vivo biocompatibility and osteogenesis of the TGF-β1-SF-CS scaffolds, the TGF-β1-SF-CS scaffolds and the SF-CS scaffolds were implanted in rabbit mandibles and studied histologically and microradiographically. The 3D computed tomography (CT) scan and histological examinations of the samples showed that the TGF-β1-SF-CS scaffolds exhibited good biocompatibility and extensive osteoconductivity with the host bone after 8 weeks. Moreover, the introduction of TGF-β1 to the SF-CS scaffolds markedly enhanced the efficiency of new bone formation, and this was confirmed using bone mineral density (BMD) and biomechanical evaluation, particularly at 8 weeks after implantation. We demonstrated that the TGF-β1-SF-CS scaffolds possessed as good biocompatibility and osteogenesis as the hybrid ones. Taken together, these findings indicate that the TGF-β1-SF-CS scaffolds fulfilled the basic requirements of bone

  18. The volume of lung parenchyma as a function of age: a review of 1050 normal CT scans of the chest with three-dimensional volumetric reconstruction of the pulmonary system.

    PubMed

    Gollogly, Sohrab; Smith, John T; White, Spencer K; Firth, Sean; White, Keith

    2004-09-15

    An Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective review of 3400 sequential CT scans of the thorax obtained at a single institution over a 3-year period from 2000 to 2003 was performed. We determined values for the volume of the right lung, left lung, and total lung volume and plot these data as a function of age and sex. To our knowledge, no normative data on CT determined lung volume as a function of age have been published. All examinations with a report of a normal CT scan of the chest (1050 examinations) were identified. The volume of lung parenchyma in each normal examination was determined by performing a three-dimensional reconstruction of the pulmonary system. Predicted increases in pulmonary volume with age for the third to 97th percentiles of male and female children were calculated. Normal values for the volume of lung parenchyma as a function of age and sex increase the clinical utility of a standard CT scan of the thorax in evaluating children with complex spinal deformities. They are a useful adjunct to pulmonary function testing. These data can be used in the pre- and postoperative evaluation of patients who are at risk of thoracic insufficiency syndrome, particularly in patients younger than 5 years of age, when standard pulmonary function testing cannot be accomplished. The effects of nonoperative treatment, early spinal fusion, and new techniques for the fusionless management of spinal deformity on lung volume can be quantified and compared to normal values.

  19. Surface biofunctionalization of three-dimensional porous poly(lactic acid) scaffold using chitosan/OGP coating for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Sen; Ye, Jianhua; Cui, Zhixiang; Si, Junhui; Wang, Qianting; Wang, Xiaofeng; Peng, Kaiping; Chen, Wenzhe

    2017-08-01

    As one of the stimulators on bone formation, osteogenic growth peptide (OGP) improves both proliferation and differentiation of the bone cells in vitro and in vivo. The aim of this work was the preparation of three dimensional porous poly(lactic acid) (PLA) scaffold with high porosity from PLA-dioxane-water ternary system with the use of vacuum-assisted solvent casting, phase separation, solvent extraction and particle leaching methods. Then, by surface coating of PLA scaffold with chitosan (CS)/OGP solution, biofunctionalization of PLA scaffold had been completed for application in bone regeneration. The effects of frozen temperature (-20, -50, -80°C) and PLA solution concentration (10, 12, 14wt%) on the microstructure, water absorption, porosity, hydrophilicity, mechanical properties, and biocompatibility of PLA and CS/OGP/PLA scaffold were investigated. Results showed that both PLA and CS/OGP/PLA scaffolds have an interconnected network structure and a porosity of up to 96.1% and 91.5%, respectively. The CS/OGP/PLA scaffold exhibited better hydrophilicity and mechanical properties than that of uncoated PLA scaffold. Moreover, the results of cell culture test showed that CS/OGP coating could stimulate the proliferation and growth of osteoblast cells on CS/OGP/PLA scaffold. These finding suggested that the surface biofunctionalization by CS/OGP coating layer could be an effective method on enhancing cell adhesion to synthetic polymer-based scaffolds in tissue engineering application and the developed porous CS/OGP/PLA scaffold should be considered as alternative biomaterials for bone regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Bladder muscular wall regeneration with autologous adipose mesenchymal stem cells on three-dimensional collagen-based tissue-engineered prepuce and biocompatible nanofibrillar scaffold.

    PubMed

    Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Tourchi, Ali; Mousavian, Amir-Abbas; Rouhi, Leila; Tavangar, Seyyed Mohammad; Sabetkish, Nastaran

    2014-12-01

    Tissue-engineered prepuce scaffold (TEPS) is a collagen-rich matrix with marvelous mechanical properties, promoting in vivo and in vitro tissue regeneration. In this study, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) were used to seed TEPS for bladder wall regeneration. Its potential in comparison with other materials such as polyglycolic acid (PGA) and nanofibrous scaffolds were evaluated. Rat ADMSCs were cultured and seeded into prepared TEPS. A synthetic matrix of electrospun nanofibrous polyamide was also prepared. Sprague Dawley rats (n=32) underwent bladder wall regeneration using (a) TEPS, (b) TEPS+PGA, (c) TEPS+nanofibrous scaffold, and (d) ADMSC-seeded TEPS, between bladder mucosa and seromuscular layer. Animals were followed for 30 and 90 days post implantation for evaluation of bladder wall regeneration by determining CD31/34 and SMC α-actin. Cystometric evaluation was also performed in all groups and in four separate rats as sham controls 3 months postoperatively. Histopathological analysis showed well-organized muscular wall generation in ADMSC-seeded TEPS and TEPS+three-dimensional (3D) nanofibrous scaffold without significant fibrosis after 90 days, while mild to severe fibrosis was detected in groups receiving TEPS and TEPS+PGA. Immunohistochemistry staining revealed the maintenance of CD34+, CD31+, and α-SMA in ADMSC-seeded TEPS and TEPS+3D nanofibrous scaffold with significantly higher density of CD34+ and CD31+ progenitor cells in ADMSC-seeded TEPS and TEPS+3D nanofibrous scaffold, respectively. This work has crucial functional and clinical implications, as it demonstrates the feasibility of ADMSC-seeded TEPS in enhancing the properties of TEPS in terms of bladder wall regeneration. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Biocompatible Silk Noil-Based Three-Dimensional Carded-Needled Nonwoven Scaffolds Guide the Engineering of Novel Skin Connective Tissue.

    PubMed

    Chiarini, Anna; Freddi, Giuliano; Liu, Daisong; Armato, Ubaldo; Dal Prà, Ilaria

    2016-08-01

    Retracting hypertrophic scars resulting from healed burn wounds heavily impact on the patients' life quality. Biomaterial scaffolds guiding burned-out skin regeneration could suppress or lessen scar retraction. Here we report a novel silk noil-based three-dimensional (3D) nonwoven scaffold produced by carding and needling with no formic acid exposure, which might improve burn healing. Once wetted, it displays human skin-like physical features and a high biocompatibility. Human keratinocyte-like cervical carcinoma C4-I cells seeded onto the carded-needled nonwovens in vitro quickly adhered to them, grew, and actively metabolized glutamine releasing lactate. As on plastic, they released no proinflammatory IL-1β, although secreting tumor necrosis factor-alpha, an inducer of the autocrine mitogen amphiregulin in such cells. Once grafted into interscapular subcutaneous tissue of mice, carded-needled nonwovens guided the afresh assembly of a connective tissue enveloping the fibroin microfibers and filling the interposed voids within 3 months. Fibroblasts and a few poly- or mononucleated macrophages populated the engineered tissue. Besides, its extracellular matrix contained thin sparse collagen fibrils and a newly formed vascular network whose endothelin-1-expressing endothelial cells grew first on the fibroin microfibrils and later expanded into the intervening matrix. Remarkably, no infiltrates of inflammatory leukocytes and no packed collagen fibers bundles among fibroin microfibers, no fibrous capsules at the grafts periphery, and hence no foreign body response was obtained at the end of 3 months of observation. Therefore, we posit that silk noil-based 3D carded-needled nonwoven scaffolds are tools for translational medicine studies as they could guide connective tissue regeneration at deep burn wounds averting scar retraction with good functional results.

  2. Optical projection tomography can be used to investigate spatial distribution of chondrocytes in three-dimensional biomaterial scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Järvinen, Elina; Muhonen, Virpi; Haaparanta, Anne-Marie; Kellomäki, Minna; Kiviranta, Ilkka

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterial scaffolds have been used in autologous chondrocyte implantation to facilitate the repair of large lesions and to advance the formation of articular cartilage [Exp. Biol. Med. (Maywood) 237(1) (2012), 10-17]. Biomaterial scaffolds are usually three-dimensional (3-D) porous structures consisting of biodegradable materials to support articular cartilage formation. Adequate porosity of the scaffold is necessary for uniform cell distribution and cell attachment, and the density of the cells in the scaffold should be appropriate for cartilage formation [Cartilage 3(2) (2012), 108-117]. There have been only a restricted number of studies on the spatial distribution of cells in scaffolds, and on the role of this to cartilage formation [J. Biotechnol. 129 (2007), 516-531; Biotechnol. Progr. 14 (1998), 193-202; Biotechnol. Bioeng. 84 (2003), 205-214]. This may be due to the limited availability of appropriate visualization methods. Acquiring 3-D images throughout the scaffold by histology or confocal methods are not applicable to all types of scaffolds, and moreover, they are time consuming, laborious and thus not very feasible for a large scale analysis. To make the visualization of the spatial distribution of the cells easier in biomaterial scaffolds we have applied optical projection tomography (OPT). OPT microscope produces high-resolution 3-D images of both fluorescent and non-fluorescent specimens [Science 296(5567) (2002), 541-545]. Here we demonstrate that the OPT method can be used for the evaluation and visualization of the cell seeding method, spatial distribution and density of cells in biomaterial scaffolds and thus establish the OPT as a valid tool for analysis of cell distribution in cartilage tissue engineering samples.

  3. Noninvasive Real-Time Monitoring by AlamarBlue® During In Vitro Culture of Three-Dimensional Tissue-Engineered Bone Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaohua; Holsbeeks, Inge; Impens, Saartje; Sonnaert, Maarten; Bloemen, Veerle; Luyten, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering (TE) aims to develop reproducible and predictive three-dimensional (3D) TE constructs, defined as cell-seeded scaffolds produced by a controlled in vitro process, to heal or replace damaged and nonfunctional bone. To control and assure the quality of the bone TE constructs, a prerequisite for regulatory authorization, there is a need to develop noninvasive analysis techniques to evaluate TE constructs and to monitor their behavior in real time during in vitro culturing. Most analysis techniques, however, are limited to destructive end-point analyses. This study investigates the use of the nontoxic alamarBlue® (AB) reagent, which is an indicator for metabolic cell activity, for monitoring the cellularity of 3D TE constructs in vitro as part of a bioreactor culturing processes. Within the field of TE, bioreactors have a huge potential in the translation of TE concepts to the clinic. Hence, the use of the AB reagent was evaluated not only in static cultures, but also in dynamic cultures in a perfusion bioreactor setup. Hereto, the AB assay was successfully integrated in the bioreactor-driven TE construct culture process in a noninvasive way. The obtained results indicate a linear correlation between the overall metabolic activity and the total DNA content of a scaffold upon seeding as well as during the initial stages of cell proliferation. This makes the AB reagent a powerful tool to follow-up bone TE constructs in real-time during static as well as dynamic 3D cultures. Hence, the AB reagent can be successfully used to monitor and predict cell confluence in a growing 3D TE construct. PMID:23327780

  4. Heat transfer in gas turbine engines and three-dimensional flows; Proceedings of the Symposium, ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, Nov. 27-Dec. 2, 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elovic, E.; O'Brien, J. E.; Pepper, D. W.

    The present conference on heat transfer characteristics of gas turbines and three-dimensional flows discusses velocity-temperature fluctuation correlations at the flow stagnation flow of a circular cylinder in turbulent flow, heat transfer across turbulent boundary layers with pressure gradients, the effect of jet grid turbulence on boundary layer heat transfer, and heat transfer characteristics predictions for discrete-hole film cooling. Also discussed are local heat transfer in internally cooled turbine airfoil leading edges, secondary flows in vane cascades and curved ducts, three-dimensional numerical modeling in gas turbine coal combustor design, numerical and experimental results for tube-fin heat exchanger airflow and heating characteristics, and the computation of external hypersonic three-dimensional flow field and heat transfer characteristics.

  5. Three dimensional Dirac semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaheer, Saad

    We extend the physics of graphene to three dimensional systems by showing that Dirac points can exist on the Fermi surface of realistic materials in three dimensions. Many of the exotic electronic properties of graphene can be ascribed to the pseudorelativistic behavior of its charge carriers due to two dimensional Dirac points on the Fermi surface. We show that certain nonsymmorphic spacegroups exhibit Dirac points among the irreducible representations of the appropriate little group at high symmetry points on the surface of the Brillouin zone. We provide a list of all Brillouin zone momenta in the 230 spacegroups that can host Dirac points. We describe microscopic considerations necessary to design materials in one of the candidate spacegroups such that the Dirac point appears at the Fermi energy without any additional non-Dirac-like Fermi pockets. We use density functional theory based methods to propose six new Dirac semimetals: BiO 2 and SbO2 in the beta-cristobalite lattice (spacegroup 227), and BiCaSiO4, BiMgSiO4, BiAlInO 4, and BiZnSiO4 in the distorted spinels lattice (spacegroup 74). Additionally we derive effective Dirac Hamiltonians given group representative operators as well as tight binding models incorporating spin-orbit coupling. Finally we study the Fermi surface of zincblende (spacegroup 216) HgTe which is effectively point-like at Gamma in the Brillouin zone and exhibits accidental degeneracies along a threefold rotation axis. Whereas compressive strain gaps the band structure into a topological insulator, tensile strain shifts the accidental degeneracies away from Gamma and enlarges the Fermi surface. States on the Fermi surface exhibit nontrivial spin texture marked by winding of spins around the threefold rotation axis and by spin vortices indicating a change in the winding number. This is confirmed by microscopic calculations performed in tensile strained HgTe and Hg0.5Zn 0.5 Te as well as k.p theory. We conclude with a summary of recent

  6. Identification of stable reference genes for gene expression analysis of three-dimensional cultivated human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Rauh, Juliane; Jacobi, Angela; Stiehler, Maik

    2015-02-01

    The principles of tissue engineering (TE) are widely used for bone regeneration concepts. Three-dimensional (3D) cultivation of autologous human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) on porous scaffolds is the basic prerequisite to generate newly formed bone tissue. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is a specific and sensitive analytical tool for the measurement of mRNA-levels in cells or tissues. For an accurate quantification of gene expression levels, stably expressed reference genes (RGs) are essential to obtain reliable results. Since the 3D environment can affect a cell's morphology, proliferation, and gene expression profile compared with two-dimensional (2D) cultivation, there is a need to identify robust RGs for the quantification of gene expression. So far, this issue has not been adequately investigated. The aim of this study was to identify the most stably expressed RGs for gene expression analysis of 3D-cultivated human bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs). For this, we analyzed the gene expression levels of n=31 RGs in 3D-cultivated human BM-MSCs from six different donors compared with conventional 2D cultivation using qRT-PCR. MSCs isolated from bone marrow aspirates were cultivated on human cancellous bone cube scaffolds for 14 days. Osteogenic differentiation was assessed by cell-specific alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and expression of osteogenic marker genes. Expression levels of potential reference and target genes were quantified using commercially available TaqMan(®) assays. mRNA expression stability of RGs was determined by calculating the coefficient of variation (CV) and using the algorithms of geNorm and NormFinder. Using both algorithms, we identified TATA box binding protein (TBP), transferrin receptor (p90, CD71) (TFRC), and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT1) as the most stably expressed RGs in 3D-cultivated BM-MSCs. Notably, genes that are routinely used as RGs, for example, beta actin

  7. [CYTOCOMPATIBILITY AND PREPARATION OF BONE TISSUE ENGINEERING SCAFFOLD BY COMBINING LOW TEMPERATURE THREE DIMENSIONAL PRINTING AND VACUUM FREEZE-DRYING TECHNIQUES].

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Zhang, Zhenhui; Zheng, Chengcheng; Zhao, Bin; Sun, Kai; Nian, Zhenghao; Zhang, Xizheng; Li, Ruixin; Li, Hui

    2016-03-01

    To study the preparation and cytocompatibility of bone tissue engineering scaffolds by combining low temperature three dimensional (3D) printing and vacuum freeze-drying techniques. Collagen (COL) and silk fibroin (SF) were manufactured from fresh bovine tendon and silkworm silk. SolidWorks2014 was adopted to design bone tissue engineering scaffold models with the size of 9 mm x 9 mm x 3 mm and pore diameter of 500 μm. According to the behavior of composite materials that low temperature 3D printing equipment required, COL, SF, and nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) at a ratio of 9 : 3 : 2 and low temperature 3D printing in combination with vacuum freeze-drying techniques were accepted to build COL/SF/nHA composite scaffolds. Gross observation and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were applied to observe the morphology and surface structures of composite scaffolds. Meanwhile, compression displacement, compression stress, and elasticity modulus were measured by mechanics machine to analyze mechanical properties of composite scaffolds. The growth and proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells were evaluated using SEM, inverted microscope, and MTT assay after cultured for 1, 7, 14, and 21 days on the composite scaffolds. The RT-PCR and Western blot techniques were adopted to detect the gene and protein expressions of COL I, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and osteocalcin (OCN) in MC3T3-E1 cells after 21 days. COL/SF/nHA composite scaffolds were successfully prepared by low temperature 3D printing technology and vacuum freeze-drying techniques; the SEM results showed that the bionic bone scaffolds were 3D polyporous structures with macropores and micropores. The mechanical performance showed that the elasticity modulus was (344.783 07 ± 40.728 55) kPa; compression displacement was (0.958 41 ± 0.000 84) mm; and compression stress was (0.062 15 ± 0.007 15) MPa. The results of inverted microscope, SEM, and MTT method showed that a large number of cells adhered to the surface with full

  8. Three Dimensional Fire Extinguishant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    IIIII docu111e111. •r ( ( G. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION J. Walker, Chief, Fire Technology Branch, HQ AFESC/RDCF Tyndall AFB FL 32043, Telephone: 904/283...6283, AUTOVON 970-6283. Request copies of publication from NTIS. JOSEPH L. WALKER Chief, Fire Technology Branch LAWRENCE D. HOKANSON, Lt Col, USAF...publication . JOSEPH L. WALKER Chief, Fire Technology Branch LAWRENCE D. HOKANSON, Lt Col, USAF Director of Engineering & S ervices Laboratory

  9. Three-Dimensional Structure and Disposition of the Air Conducting and Gas Exchange Conduits of the Avian Lung: The Domestic Duck (Cairina moschata)

    PubMed Central

    Makanya, A. N.; Kavoi, B. M.; Djonov, V.

    2014-01-01

    The anatomy of the domestic duck lung was studied macroscopically, by casting and by light, transmission, and scanning electron microscopy. The lung had four categories of secondary bronchi (SB), namely, the medioventral (MV, 4-5), laterodorsal (LD, 6–10), lateroventral (LV, 2–4), and posterior secondary bronchi (PO, 36–44). The neopulmonic parabronchi formed an intricate feltwork on the ventral third of the lung and inosculated those from the other SB. The lung parenchyma was organized into cylindrical parabronchi separated by thin septa containing blood vessels. Atria were shallow and well-fortified by epithelial ridges reinforced by smooth muscle bundles and gave rise to 2–6 elongate infundibulae. Air capillaries arose either directly from the atria or from infundibulae and were tubular or globular in shape with thin interconnecting branches. The newly described spatial disposition of the conducting air conduits closely resembles that of the chicken. This remarkable similarity between the categories, numbers, and 3D arrangement of the SB in the duck and chicken points to a convergence in function-oriented design. To illuminate airflow dynamics in the avian lung, precise directions of airflow in the various categories of SB and parabronchi need to be characterized. PMID:25938110

  10. Three Dimensional Printing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-30

    next. EPRI funded. Medical Applications; Therics , Inc. Princeton, NJ • Drug delivery devices. • Scaffolds for tissue engineering. • Direct printing...e r a t u r e ( C ) Conformal Cooling Condition T ime [se c] Tem p erature [degC] si mul ati on d ata experi men tal dat a 25 20 15 10 5 0 300 60...100 200 300 400 500 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Strain (%) S t r e s s ( M P a ) Infiltrated Skeleton Cast Ingot Inf before heat treat Inf before heat treat

  11. Three-dimensional ultrasound scanning.

    PubMed

    Fenster, Aaron; Parraga, Grace; Bax, Jeff

    2011-08-06

    The past two decades have witnessed developments of new imaging techniques that provide three-dimensional images about the interior of the human body in a manner never before available. Ultrasound (US) imaging is an important cost-effective technique used routinely in the management of a number of diseases. However, two-dimensional viewing of three-dimensional anatomy, using conventional two-dimensional US, limits our ability to quantify and visualize the anatomy and guide therapy, because multiple two-dimensional images must be integrated mentally. This practice is inefficient, and may lead to variability and incorrect diagnoses. Investigators and companies have addressed these limitations by developing three-dimensional US techniques. Thus, in this paper, we review the various techniques that are in current use in three-dimensional US imaging systems, with a particular emphasis placed on the geometric accuracy of the generation of three-dimensional images. The principles involved in three-dimensional US imaging are then illustrated with a diagnostic and an interventional application: (i) three-dimensional carotid US imaging for quantification and monitoring of carotid atherosclerosis and (ii) three-dimensional US-guided prostate biopsy.

  12. Three-dimensional echocardiographic technology.

    PubMed

    Salgo, Ivan S

    2007-05-01

    This article addresses the current state of the art of technology in three-dimensional echocardiography as it applies to transducer design, beam forming, display, and quantification. Because three-dimensional echocardiography encompasses many technical and clinical areas, this article reviews its strengths and limitations and concludes with an analysis of what to use when.

  13. Three-Dimensional Photo Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vieth, Ken

    2006-01-01

    People influence lives in many ways. Through the author's desire to encourage high school students to reflect on the influential people in their lives, he developed this three-dimensional project in which they create a celebratory three-dimensional structure that shares their impressions of themselves and those who have influenced them. This…

  14. Three-dimensional ultrasound scanning

    PubMed Central

    Fenster, Aaron; Parraga, Grace; Bax, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed developments of new imaging techniques that provide three-dimensional images about the interior of the human body in a manner never before available. Ultrasound (US) imaging is an important cost-effective technique used routinely in the management of a number of diseases. However, two-dimensional viewing of three-dimensional anatomy, using conventional two-dimensional US, limits our ability to quantify and visualize the anatomy and guide therapy, because multiple two-dimensional images must be integrated mentally. This practice is inefficient, and may lead to variability and incorrect diagnoses. Investigators and companies have addressed these limitations by developing three-dimensional US techniques. Thus, in this paper, we review the various techniques that are in current use in three-dimensional US imaging systems, with a particular emphasis placed on the geometric accuracy of the generation of three-dimensional images. The principles involved in three-dimensional US imaging are then illustrated with a diagnostic and an interventional application: (i) three-dimensional carotid US imaging for quantification and monitoring of carotid atherosclerosis and (ii) three-dimensional US-guided prostate biopsy. PMID:22866228

  15. Three dimensional magnetic abacus memory

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, ShiLei; Zhang, JingYan; Baker, Alexander A.; Wang, ShouGuo; Yu, GuangHua; Hesjedal, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Stacking nonvolatile memory cells into a three-dimensional matrix represents a powerful solution for the future of magnetic memory. However, it is technologically challenging to access the data in the storage medium if large numbers of bits are stacked on top of each other. Here we introduce a new type of multilevel, nonvolatile magnetic memory concept, the magnetic abacus. Instead of storing information in individual magnetic layers, thereby having to read out each magnetic layer separately, the magnetic abacus adopts a new encoding scheme. It is inspired by the idea of second quantisation, dealing with the memory state of the entire stack simultaneously. Direct read operations are implemented by measuring the artificially engineered ‘quantised' Hall voltage, each representing a count of the spin-up and spin-down layers in the stack. This new memory system further allows for both flexible scaling of the system and fast communication among cells. The magnetic abacus provides a promising approach for future nonvolatile 3D magnetic random access memory. PMID:25146338

  16. Three dimensional fabrication at small size scales

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Timothy G.; Zarafshar, Aasiyeh M.; Gracias, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the fact that we live in a three-dimensional (3D) world and macroscale engineering is 3D, conventional sub-mm scale engineering is inherently two-dimensional (2D). New fabrication and patterning strategies are needed to enable truly three-dimensionally-engineered structures at small size scales. Here, we review strategies that have been developed over the last two decades that seek to enable such millimeter to nanoscale 3D fabrication and patterning. A focus of this review is the strategy of self-assembly, specifically in a biologically inspired, more deterministic form known as self-folding. Self-folding methods can leverage the strengths of lithography to enable the construction of precisely patterned 3D structures and “smart” components. This self-assembling approach is compared with other 3D fabrication paradigms, and its advantages and disadvantages are discussed. PMID:20349446

  17. Palate Lung Nasal Clone (PLUNC), a Novel Protein of the Tear Film: Three-Dimensional Structure, Immune Activation, and Involvement in Dry Eye Disease (DED).

    PubMed

    Schicht, Martin; Rausch, Felix; Beron, Martin; Jacobi, Christina; Garreis, Fabian; Hartjen, Nadine; Beileke, Stephanie; Kruse, Friedrich; Bräuer, Lars; Paulsen, Friedrich

    2015-11-01

    Palate Lung Nasal Clone (PLUNC) is a hydrophobic protein belonging to the family of surfactant proteins that is involved in fluid balance regulation of the lung. Moreover, it is known to directly act against gram-negative bacteria. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible expression and antimicrobial role of PLUNC at the healthy ocular surface and in tears of patients suffering from dry eye disease (DED). Bioinformatics and biochemical and immunologic methods were combined to elucidate the structure and function of PLUNC at the ocular surface. Tissue-specific localization was performed by using immunohistochemistry. The PLUNC levels in tear samples from non-Sjögren's DED patients with moderate dry eye suffering either from hyperevaporation or tear deficiency were analyzed by ELISA and compared with tears from healthy volunteers. Palate Lung Nasal Clone is expressed under healthy conditions at the ocular surface and secreted into the tear film. Protein modeling studies and molecular dynamics simulations performed indicated surface activity of PLUNC. In vitro experiments revealed that proinflammatory cytokines and bacterial supernatants have only a slight effect on the expression of PLUNC in HCE and HCjE cell lines. In tears from DED patients, the PLUNC concentration is significantly increased (7-fold in evaporative dry eye tears and 17-fold in tears from patients with tear deficiency) compared with healthy subjects. The results show that PLUNC is a protein of the tear film and suggest that it plays a role in fluid balance and surface tension regulation at the ocular surface.

  18. NF-{kappa}B signaling is activated and confers resistance to apoptosis in three-dimensionally cultured EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sakuma, Yuji; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Nakamura, Yoshiyasu; Yoshihara, Mitsuyo; Matsukuma, Shoichi; Koizume, Shiro; Miyagi, Yohei

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGFR-mutant cells in 3D culture resist EGFR inhibition compared with suspended cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Degradation of I{kappa}B and activation of NF-{kappa}B are observed in 3D-cultured cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibiting NF-{kappa}B enhances the efficacy of the EGFR inhibitor in 3D-cultured cells. -- Abstract: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cells in suspension undergo apoptosis to a greater extent than adherent cells in a monolayer when EGFR autophosphorylation is inhibited by EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). This suggests that cell adhesion to a culture dish may activate an anti-apoptotic signaling pathway other than the EGFR pathway. Since the microenvironment of cells cultured in a monolayer are substantially different to that of cells existing in three-dimension (3D) in vivo, we assessed whether two EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cell lines, HCC827 and H1975, were more resistant to EGFR TKI-induced apoptosis when cultured in a 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) as compared with in suspension. The ECM-adherent EGFR-mutant cells in 3D were significantly less sensitive to treatment with WZ4002, an EGFR TKI, than the suspended cells. Further, a marked degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, the inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B, was observed only in the 3D-cultured cells, leading to an increase in the activation of NF-{kappa}B. Moreover, the inhibition of NF-{kappa}B with pharmacological inhibitors enhanced EGFR TKI-induced apoptosis in 3D-cultured EGFR-mutant cells. These results suggest that inhibition of NF-{kappa}B signaling would render ECM-adherent EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cells in vivo more susceptible to EGFR TKI-induced cell death.

  19. Three-dimensional serial section computer reconstruction of the arrangement of the structural components of the parabronchus of the Ostrich, Struthio camelus lung.

    PubMed

    Maina, John N; Woodward, Jeremy D

    2009-11-01

    The Ostrich, Struthio camelus is the largest extant bird. The arrangement of the airway and the vascular components of the parabronchus of its lung were investigated by 3D serial section reconstruction. Modestly developed atrial muscles, shallow atria, paucity of infundibulae with preponderant origination of the air capillaries (ACs) from the atria and lack of interparabronchial septa, structural features that epitomize lungs of most highly derived metabolically active volant birds were observed. Intertwined very closely, the ACs and the blood capillaries (BCs) are not straight, blind-ended tubules that run in contact, counter and parallel to each other as has been claimed and/or modeled. Crosscurrent (perpendicular = orthogonal) orientation between the centripetal (inward) flow of the venous blood (VB) from the periphery of the parabronchus and the flow of air in the parabronchial lumen occur. Also, a countercurrent-like arrangement between the ACs which convey air centrifugally (outwards = radially) and the BCs that transport venous blood centripetally (inwards) was identified. The VB is conveyed to the parabronchus by the interparabronchial arteries and delivered to the exchange tissue by the intraparabronchial arterioles: it is then arterialized at the infinitely many points where the ACs and the BCs contact. Functionally, the crosscurrent arrangement grants a multicapillary serial arterialization arrangement which extends the time that the respiratory media, air and blood, are exposed to each other. The contribution that the countercurrent-like arrangement makes to the gas exchange process remains obscure.

  20. Strategies for Whole Lung Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Calle, Elizabeth A.; Ghaedi, Mahboobe; Sundaram, Sumati; Sivarapatna, Amogh; Tseng, Michelle K.

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated the feasibility of using decellularized lung extracellular matrix scaffolds to support the engineering of functional lung tissue in vitro. Rendered acellular through the use of detergents and other reagents, the scaffolds are mounted in organ-specific bioreactors where cells in the scaffold are provided with nutrients and appropriate mechanical stimuli such as ventilation and perfusion. Though initial studies are encouraging, a great deal remains to be done to advance the field and transition from rodent lungs to whole human tissue engineered lungs. To do so, a variety of hurdles must be overcome. In particular, a reliable source of human-sized scaffolds, as well as a method of terminal sterilization of scaffolds, must be identified. Continued research in lung cell and developmental biology will hopefully help identify the number and types of cells that will be required to regenerate functional lung tissue. Finally, bioreactor designs must be improved in order to provide more precise ventilation stimuli and vascular perfusion in order to avoid injury to or death of the cells cultivated within the scaffold. Ultimately, the success of efforts to engineer a functional lung in vitro will critically depend on the ability to create a fully endothelialized vascular network that provides sufficient barrier function and alveolar-capillary surface area to exchange gas at rates compatible with healthy lung function. PMID:24691527

  1. Chemical and structural stability of zirconium-based metal-organic frameworks with large three-dimensional pores by linker engineering.

    PubMed

    Kalidindi, Suresh B; Nayak, Sanjit; Briggs, Michael E; Jansat, Susanna; Katsoulidis, Alexandros P; Miller, Gary J; Warren, John E; Antypov, Dmytro; Corà, Furio; Slater, Ben; Prestly, Mark R; Martí-Gastaldo, Carlos; Rosseinsky, Matthew J

    2015-01-02

    The synthesis of metal-organic frameworks with large three-dimensional channels that are permanently porous and chemically stable offers new opportunities in areas such as catalysis and separation. Two linkers (L1=4,4',4'',4'''-([1,1'-biphenyl]-3,3',5,5'-tetrayltetrakis(ethyne-2,1-diyl)) tetrabenzoic acid, L2=4,4',4'',4'''-(pyrene-1,3,6,8-tetrayltetrakis(ethyne-2,1-diyl))tetrabenzoic acid) were used that have equivalent connectivity and dimensions but quite distinct torsional flexibility. With these, a solid solution material, [Zr6 O4 (OH)4 (L1)2.6 (L2)0.4 ]⋅(solvent)x , was formed that has three-dimensional crystalline permanent porosity with a surface area of over 4000 m(2)  g(-1) that persists after immersion in water. These properties are not accessible for the isostructural phases made from the separate single linkers.

  2. High-dose accelerated hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (at 3 Gy/fraction) with concurrent vinorelbine and carboplatin chemotherapy in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Increasing the radiotherapy dose can result in improved local control for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and can thereby improve survival. Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy can expose tumors to a high dose of radiation in a short period of time, but the optimal treatment regimen remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing high-dose accelerated hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (at 3 Gy/fraction) with concurrent vinorelbine (NVB) and carboplatin (CBP) chemotherapy for the treatment of local advanced NSCLC. Methods Untreated patients with unresectable stage IIIA/IIIB NSCLC or patients with a recurrence of NSCLC received accelerated hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The total dose was greater than or equal to 60 Gy. The accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy was conducted once daily at 3 Gy/fraction with 5 fractions per week, and the radiotherapy was completed in 5 weeks. In addition to radiotherapy, the patients also received at least 1 cycle of a concurrent two-drug chemotherapy regimen of NVB and CBP. Results A total of 26 patients (19 previously untreated cases and 7 cases of recurrent disease) received 60Gy-75Gy radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy. All of the patients underwent evaluations for toxicity and preliminary therapeutic efficacy. There were no treatment-related deaths within the entire patient group. The major acute adverse reactions were radiation esophagitis (88.5%) and radiation pneumonitis (42.3%). The percentages of grade III acute radiation esophagitis and grade III radiation pneumonitis were 15.4% and 7.7%, respectively. Hematological toxicities were common and did not significantly affect the implementation of chemoradiotherapy after supportive treatment. Two patients received high dose of 75 Gy had grade III late esophageal toxicity, and none had grade IV and above. Grade III and above late lung toxicity did not occur

  3. High-dose accelerated hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (at 3 Gy/fraction) with concurrent vinorelbine and carboplatin chemotherapy in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue-E; Lin, Qiang; Meng, Fan-Jie; Chen, Xue-Ji; Ren, Xiao-Cang; Cao, Bin; Wang, Na; Zong, Jie; Peng, Yu; Ku, Ya-Jun; Chen, Yan

    2013-08-11

    Increasing the radiotherapy dose can result in improved local control for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and can thereby improve survival. Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy can expose tumors to a high dose of radiation in a short period of time, but the optimal treatment regimen remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing high-dose accelerated hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (at 3 Gy/fraction) with concurrent vinorelbine (NVB) and carboplatin (CBP) chemotherapy for the treatment of local advanced NSCLC. Untreated patients with unresectable stage IIIA/IIIB NSCLC or patients with a recurrence of NSCLC received accelerated hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The total dose was greater than or equal to 60 Gy. The accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy was conducted once daily at 3 Gy/fraction with 5 fractions per week, and the radiotherapy was completed in 5 weeks. In addition to radiotherapy, the patients also received at least 1 cycle of a concurrent two-drug chemotherapy regimen of NVB and CBP. A total of 26 patients (19 previously untreated cases and 7 cases of recurrent disease) received 60Gy-75Gy radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy. All of the patients underwent evaluations for toxicity and preliminary therapeutic efficacy. There were no treatment-related deaths within the entire patient group. The major acute adverse reactions were radiation esophagitis (88.5%) and radiation pneumonitis (42.3%). The percentages of grade III acute radiation esophagitis and grade III radiation pneumonitis were 15.4% and 7.7%, respectively. Hematological toxicities were common and did not significantly affect the implementation of chemoradiotherapy after supportive treatment. Two patients received high dose of 75 Gy had grade III late esophageal toxicity, and none had grade IV and above. Grade III and above late lung toxicity did not occur. High-dose accelerated

  4. Three-Dimensional (3D) Distribution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-11

    witnessed by ongoing efforts in both Afghanistan and Iraq , must turn distribution challenges into opportunities by mastering Three-Dimensional (3D...sustainment. 5 Joint Logistics Functions •Supply •Services •Maintenance •Transportation • Health Service Support •General Engineering Joint Personnel...Maintenance •Transportation • Health Service Support •Explosive Ordinance Disposal •Human Resource Support •Legal Support •Religious Support •Financial

  5. Three-dimensional marginal separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duck, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    The three dimensional marginal separation of a boundary layer along a line of symmetry is considered. The key equation governing the displacement function is derived, and found to be a nonlinear integral equation in two space variables. This is solved iteratively using a pseudo-spectral approach, based partly in double Fourier space, and partly in physical space. Qualitatively, the results are similar to previously reported two dimensional results (which are also computed to test the accuracy of the numerical scheme); however quantitatively the three dimensional results are much different.

  6. Bioreactor Development for Lung Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Much recent interest in lung bioengineering by pulmonary investigators, industry and the organ transplant field has seen a rapid growth of bioreactor development ranging from the microfluidic scale to the human-sized whole lung systems. A comprehension of the findings from these models is needed to provide the basis for further bioreactor development. Objective The goal was to comprehensively review the current state of bioreactor development for the lung. Methods A search using PubMed was done for published, peer-reviewed papers using the keywords “lung” AND “bioreactor” or “bioengineering” or “tissue engineering” or “ex vivo perfusion”. Main Results Many new bioreactors ranging from the microfluidic scale to the human-sized whole lung systems have been developed by both academic and commercial entities. Microfluidic, lung-mimic and lung slice cultures have the advantages of cost-efficiency and high throughput analyses ideal for pharmaceutical and toxicity studies. Perfused/ventilated rodent whole lung systems can be adapted for mid-throughput studies of lung stem/progenitor cell development, cell behavior, understanding and treating lung injury and for preliminary work that can be translated to human lung bioengineering. Human-sized ex vivo whole lung bioreactors incorporating perfusion and ventilation are amenable to automation and have been used for whole lung decellularization and recellularization. Clinical scale ex vivo lung perfusion systems have been developed for lung preservation and reconditioning and are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Conclusions Significant advances in bioreactors for lung engineering have been made at both the microfluidic and the macro scale. The most advanced are closed systems that incorporate pressure-controlled perfusion and ventilation and are amenable to automation. Ex vivo lung perfusion systems have advanced to clinical trials for lung preservation and reconditioning. The biggest

  7. Dose Escalation of Gemcitabine Is Possible With Concurrent Chest Three-Dimensional Rather Than Two-Dimensional Radiotherapy: A Phase I Trial in Patients With Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zinner, Ralph G. Cox, James D.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Pisters, Katherine M.W.; Herbst, Roy S.; Kies, Merril; Hong, Waun K.; Fossella, Frank V.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine in a Phase I study the maximum tolerated dose of weekly gemcitabine concurrent with radiotherapy in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as the relationship between the volume of the esophagus irradiated and severe esophagitis. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with Stage III NSCLC received gemcitabine initially at 150 mg/m{sup 2}/wk over 7 weeks concurrently with chest radiotherapy to 63 Gy in 34 fractions. The first 9 patients underwent treatment with two-dimensional (2D) radiotherapy; the remaining 12 patients, with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and target volume reduced to clinically apparent disease. Consolidation was 4 cycles of gemcitabine at 1000 mg/m{sup 2}/wk and cisplatin 60 mg/m{sup 2}. Results: In the 2D group, the dose-limiting toxicity, Grade 3 esophagitis, occurred in 3 of 6 patients in the 150-mg/m{sup 2}/wk cohort and 2 of 3 patients in the 125-mg/m{sup 2}/wk cohort. No cases of Grade 3 esophagitis occurred at these doses in the 3D group. At gemcitabine 190 mg/m{sup 2}/wk, 2 of 6 patients in the 3D cohort had Grade 3 esophagitis. The mean percentages of esophagus irradiated to 60 Gy were 68% in the 2D cohort and 18% in the 3D cohort. Conclusions: We could not escalate the dose of gemcitabine with concurrent radiotherapy when using 2D planning because of severe acute esophagitis. However, we could escalate the dose of gemcitabine to 190 mg/m{sup 2}/wk when using 3D planning. The Phase II dose is 150 mg/m{sup 2}/wk. Three-dimensional CRT permitted the use of higher doses of gemcitabine.

  8. Formation of three-dimensional cell/polymer constructs for bone tissue engineering in a spinner flask and a rotating wall vessel bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikavitsas, Vassilios I.; Bancroft, Gregory N.; Mikos, Antonios G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the cell culture conditions of three-dimensional polymer scaffolds seeded with rat marrow stromal cells (MSCs) cultured in different bioreactors concerning the ability of these cells to proliferate, differentiate towards the osteoblastic lineage, and generate mineralized extracellular matrix. MSCs harvested from male Sprague-Dawley rats were culture expanded, seeded on three-dimensional porous 75:25 poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) biodegradable scaffolds, and cultured for 21 days under static conditions or in two model bioreactors (a spinner flask and a rotating wall vessel) that enhance mixing of the media and provide better nutrient transport to the seeded cells. The spinner flask culture demonstrated a 60% enhanced proliferation at the end of the first week when compared to static culture. On day 14, all cell/polymer constructs exhibited their maximum alkaline phosphatase activity (AP). Cell/polymer constructs cultured in the spinner flask had 2.4 times higher AP activity than constructs cultured under static conditions on day 14. The total osteocalcin (OC) secretion in the spinner flask culture was 3.5 times higher than the static culture, with a peak OC secretion occurring on day 18. No considerable AP activity and OC secretion were detected in the rotating wall vessel culture throughout the 21-day culture period. The spinner flask culture had the highest calcium content at day 14. On day 21, the calcium deposition in the spinner flask culture was 6.6 times higher than the static cultured constructs and over 30 times higher than the rotating wall vessel culture. Histological sections showed concentration of cells and mineralization at the exterior of the foams at day 21. This phenomenon may arise from the potential existence of nutrient concentration gradients at the interior of the scaffolds. The better mixing provided in the spinner flask, external to the outer surface of the scaffolds, may explain the

  9. Formation of three-dimensional cell/polymer constructs for bone tissue engineering in a spinner flask and a rotating wall vessel bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Sikavitsas, Vassilios I; Bancroft, Gregory N; Mikos, Antonios G

    2002-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the cell culture conditions of three-dimensional polymer scaffolds seeded with rat marrow stromal cells (MSCs) cultured in different bioreactors concerning the ability of these cells to proliferate, differentiate towards the osteoblastic lineage, and generate mineralized extracellular matrix. MSCs harvested from male Sprague-Dawley rats were culture expanded, seeded on three-dimensional porous 75:25 poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) biodegradable scaffolds, and cultured for 21 days under static conditions or in two model bioreactors (a spinner flask and a rotating wall vessel) that enhance mixing of the media and provide better nutrient transport to the seeded cells. The spinner flask culture demonstrated a 60% enhanced proliferation at the end of the first week when compared to static culture. On day 14, all cell/polymer constructs exhibited their maximum alkaline phosphatase activity (AP). Cell/polymer constructs cultured in the spinner flask had 2.4 times higher AP activity than constructs cultured under static conditions on day 14. The total osteocalcin (OC) secretion in the spinner flask culture was 3.5 times higher than the static culture, with a peak OC secretion occurring on day 18. No considerable AP activity and OC secretion were detected in the rotating wall vessel culture throughout the 21-day culture period. The spinner flask culture had the highest calcium content at day 14. On day 21, the calcium deposition in the spinner flask culture was 6.6 times higher than the static cultured constructs and over 30 times higher than the rotating wall vessel culture. Histological sections showed concentration of cells and mineralization at the exterior of the foams at day 21. This phenomenon may arise from the potential existence of nutrient concentration gradients at the interior of the scaffolds. The better mixing provided in the spinner flask, external to the outer surface of the scaffolds, may explain the

  10. Formation of three-dimensional cell/polymer constructs for bone tissue engineering in a spinner flask and a rotating wall vessel bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikavitsas, Vassilios I.; Bancroft, Gregory N.; Mikos, Antonios G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the cell culture conditions of three-dimensional polymer scaffolds seeded with rat marrow stromal cells (MSCs) cultured in different bioreactors concerning the ability of these cells to proliferate, differentiate towards the osteoblastic lineage, and generate mineralized extracellular matrix. MSCs harvested from male Sprague-Dawley rats were culture expanded, seeded on three-dimensional porous 75:25 poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) biodegradable scaffolds, and cultured for 21 days under static conditions or in two model bioreactors (a spinner flask and a rotating wall vessel) that enhance mixing of the media and provide better nutrient transport to the seeded cells. The spinner flask culture demonstrated a 60% enhanced proliferation at the end of the first week when compared to static culture. On day 14, all cell/polymer constructs exhibited their maximum alkaline phosphatase activity (AP). Cell/polymer constructs cultured in the spinner flask had 2.4 times higher AP activity than constructs cultured under static conditions on day 14. The total osteocalcin (OC) secretion in the spinner flask culture was 3.5 times higher than the static culture, with a peak OC secretion occurring on day 18. No considerable AP activity and OC secretion were detected in the rotating wall vessel culture throughout the 21-day culture period. The spinner flask culture had the highest calcium content at day 14. On day 21, the calcium deposition in the spinner flask culture was 6.6 times higher than the static cultured constructs and over 30 times higher than the rotating wall vessel culture. Histological sections showed concentration of cells and mineralization at the exterior of the foams at day 21. This phenomenon may arise from the potential existence of nutrient concentration gradients at the interior of the scaffolds. The better mixing provided in the spinner flask, external to the outer surface of the scaffolds, may explain the

  11. Three dimensional colorimetric assay assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Charych, D.; Reichart, A.

    2000-06-27

    A direct assay is described using novel three-dimensional polymeric assemblies which change from a blue to red color when exposed to an analyte, in one case a flu virus. The assemblies are typically in the form of liposomes which can be maintained in a suspension, and show great intensity in their color changes. Their method of production is also described.

  12. Three dimensional colorimetric assay assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah; Reichart, Anke

    2000-01-01

    A direct assay is described using novel three-dimensional polymeric assemblies which change from a blue to red color when exposed to an analyte, in one case a flu virus. The assemblies are typically in the form of liposomes which can be maintained in a suspension, and show great intensity in their color changes. Their method of production is also described.

  13. Three-Dimensional Lissajous Figures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Mura, John M.

    1989-01-01

    Described is a mechanically driven device for generating three-dimensional harmonic space figures with different frequencies and phase angles on the X, Y, and Z axes. Discussed are apparatus, viewing stereo pairs, equations of motion, and using space figures in classroom. (YP)

  14. Three-dimensional stellarator codes

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, P. R.

    2002-01-01

    Three-dimensional computer codes have been used to develop quasisymmetric stellarators with modular coils that are promising candidates for a magnetic fusion reactor. The mathematics of plasma confinement raises serious questions about the numerical calculations. Convergence studies have been performed to assess the best configurations. Comparisons with recent data from large stellarator experiments serve to validate the theory. PMID:12140367

  15. Creating Three-Dimensional Scenes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumpe, Norm

    2005-01-01

    Persistence of Vision Raytracer (POV-Ray), a free computer program for creating photo-realistic, three-dimensional scenes and a link for Mathematica users interested in generating POV-Ray files from within Mathematica, is discussed. POV-Ray has great potential in secondary mathematics classrooms and helps in strengthening students' visualization…

  16. Three-Dimensional Lissajous Figures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Mura, John M.

    1989-01-01

    Described is a mechanically driven device for generating three-dimensional harmonic space figures with different frequencies and phase angles on the X, Y, and Z axes. Discussed are apparatus, viewing stereo pairs, equations of motion, and using space figures in classroom. (YP)

  17. Creating Three-Dimensional Scenes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumpe, Norm

    2005-01-01

    Persistence of Vision Raytracer (POV-Ray), a free computer program for creating photo-realistic, three-dimensional scenes and a link for Mathematica users interested in generating POV-Ray files from within Mathematica, is discussed. POV-Ray has great potential in secondary mathematics classrooms and helps in strengthening students' visualization…

  18. A new technique for studying directional cell migration in a hydrogel-based three-dimensional matrix for tissue engineering model systems.

    PubMed

    Topman, Gil; Shoham, Naama; Sharabani-Yosef, Orna; Lin, Feng-Huei; Gefen, Amit

    2013-08-01

    Cell migration has a key role in biological processes, e.g. malignancy, wound healing, immune response and morphogenesis. Studying migration and factors that influence it is beneficial, e.g. for developing drugs to suppress metastasis, heal wounds faster or enhance the response to infection. Though the majority of the literature describes two-dimensional (2D) migration studies in culture dishes, a more realistic approach is to study migration in three-dimensional (3D) constructs. However, simple-to-implement, straight-forward standardized quantitative techniques for analysis of migration rates of cell colonies in 3D are still required in the field. Here, we describe a new model system for quantifying directional migration of colonies in a hyaluronic acid (oxi-HA) and adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) hydrogel-based 3D matrix. We further demonstrate that our previously reported image processing technique for measuring migration in 2D (Topman et al., 2011, 2012) is extendable for analyzing the rates of migration of cells that directionally migrate in the hydrogel and are fluorescently stained with a 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) nuclear stain. Together, the present experimental setup and image processing algorithm provide a standard test bench for measuring migration rates in a fully automated, robust assay which is useful for high-throughput screening in large-scale drug evaluations, where effects on migration in a 3D matrix are sought.

  19. Bioprinting of a mechanically enhanced three-dimensional dual cell-laden construct for osteochondral tissue engineering using a multi-head tissue/organ building system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Jin-Hyung; Lee, Jung-Seob; Kim, Jong Young; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to build a mechanically enhanced three-dimensional (3D) bioprinted construct containing two different cell types for osteochondral tissue regeneration. Recently, the production of 3D cell-laden structures using various scaffold-free cell printing technologies has opened up new possibilities. However, ideal 3D complex tissues or organs have not yet been printed because gel-state hydrogels have been used as the principal material and are unable to maintain the desired 3D structure due to their poor mechanical strength. In this study, thermoplastic biomaterial polycaprolactone (PCL), which shows relatively high mechanical properties as compared with hydrogel, was used as a framework for enhancing the mechanical stability of the bioprinted construct. Two different alginate solutions were then infused into the previously prepared framework consisting of PCL to create the 3D construct for osteochondral printing. For this work, a multi-head tissue/organ building system (MtoBS), which was particularly designed to dispense thermoplastic biomaterial and hydrogel having completely different rheology properties, was newly developed and used to bioprint osteochondral tissue. It was confirmed that the line width, position and volume control of PCL and alginate solutions were adjustable in the MtoBS. Most importantly, dual cell-laden 3D constructs consisting of osteoblasts and chondrocytes were successfully fabricated. Further, the separately dispensed osteoblasts and chondrocytes not only retained their initial position and viability, but also proliferated up to 7 days after being dispensed.

  20. Bone tissue engineering using novel interconnected porous hydroxyapatite ceramics combined with marrow mesenchymal cells: quantitative and three-dimensional image analysis.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Masataka; Myoui, Akira; Ohgushi, Hajime; Ikeuchi, Masako; Tamai, Noriyuki; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2004-01-01

    We developed fully opened interconnected porous calcium hydroxyapatite ceramics having two different pore sizes. One has pores with an average size of 150 microm in diameter, an average 40-microm interconnecting pore diameter, and 75% porosity (HA150). The other has pores with an average size of 300 microm in diameter, an average 60-100-microm interconnecting pore diameter, and 75% porosity (HA300). Because of its smaller pore diameter, HA150 has greater mechanical strength than that of HA300. These ceramics were combined with rat marrow mesenchymal cells and cultured for 2 weeks in the presence of dexamethasone. The cultured ceramics were then implanted into subcutaneous sites in syngeneic rats and harvested 2-8 weeks after implantation. All the implants showed bone formation inside the pore areas as evidenced by decalcified histological sections and microcomputed tomography images, which enabled three-dimensional analysis of the newly formed bone and calculation of the bone volume in the implants. The bone volume increased over time. At 8 weeks after implantation, extensive bone volume was detected not only in the surface pore areas but also in the center pore areas of the implants. A high degree of alkaline phosphatase activity with a peak at 2 weeks and a high level of osteocalcin with a gradual increase over time were detected in the implants. The levels of these biochemical parameters were higher in HA150 than in HA300. The results indicate that a combination of HA150 and mesenchymal cells could be used as an excellent bone graft substitute because of its mechanical properties and capability of inducing bone formation.

  1. Three-Dimensional Imaging. Chapter 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelso, R. M.; Delo, C.

    1999-01-01

    This chapter is concerned with three-dimensional imaging of fluid flows. Although relatively young, this field of research has already yielded an enormous range of techniques. These vary widely in cost and complexity, with the cheapest light sheet systems being within the budgets of most laboratories, and the most expensive Magnetic Resonance Imaging systems available to a select few. Taking the view that the most likely systems to be developed are those using light sheets, the authors will relate their knowledge and experience of such systems. Other systems will be described briefly and references provided. Flows are inherently three-dimensional in structure; even those generated around nominally 2-D surface geometry. It is becoming increasingly apparent to scientists and engineers that the three-dimensionalities, both large and small scale, are important in terms of overall flow structure and species, momentum, and energy transport. Furthermore, we are accustomed to seeing the world in three dimensions, so it is natural that we should wish to view, measure and interpret flows in three-dimensions. Unfortunately, 3-D images do not lend themselves to convenient presentation on the printed page, and this task is one of the challenges facing us.

  2. Three-Dimensional Imaging. Chapter 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelso, R. M.; Delo, C.

    1999-01-01

    This chapter is concerned with three-dimensional imaging of fluid flows. Although relatively young, this field of research has already yielded an enormous range of techniques. These vary widely in cost and complexity, with the cheapest light sheet systems being within the budgets of most laboratories, and the most expensive Magnetic Resonance Imaging systems available to a select few. Taking the view that the most likely systems to be developed are those using light sheets, the authors will relate their knowledge and experience of such systems. Other systems will be described briefly and references provided. Flows are inherently three-dimensional in structure; even those generated around nominally 2-D surface geometry. It is becoming increasingly apparent to scientists and engineers that the three-dimensionalities, both large and small scale, are important in terms of overall flow structure and species, momentum, and energy transport. Furthermore, we are accustomed to seeing the world in three dimensions, so it is natural that we should wish to view, measure and interpret flows in three-dimensions. Unfortunately, 3-D images do not lend themselves to convenient presentation on the printed page, and this task is one of the challenges facing us.

  3. Three-dimensional perspective visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussey, Kevin

    1991-01-01

    It was demonstrated that image processing computer graphic techniques can provide an effective means of physiographic analysis of remotely sensed regions through the use of three-dimensional perspective rendering. THe methods used to simulate and animate three-dimensional surfaces from two-dimensional imagery and digital elevation models are explained. A brief historic look at JPL's efforts in this field and several examples of animations, illustrating the evolution of these techniques from 1985, are shown. JPL's current research in this area is discussed along with examples of technology transfer and potential commercial application. The software is part of the VICAR (Video Image Communication and Retrieval) image processing system which was developed at the Multimission Image Processing Laboratory of JPL.

  4. A comparison of two- and three-dimensional imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Ernest; Rosselot, Donald; Aull, Mark; Balapa, Manohar

    2006-10-01

    Three dimensional visual recognition and measurement are important in many machine vision applications. In some cases, a stationary camera base is used and a three-dimensional model will permit the measurement of depth information from a scene. One important special case is stereo vision for human visualization or measurements. In cases in which the camera base is also in motion, a seven dimensional model may be used. Such is the case for navigation of an autonomous mobile robot. The purpose of this paper is to provide a computational view and introduction of three methods to three-dimensional vision. Models are presented for each situation and example computations and images are presented. The significance of this work is that it shows that various methods based on three-dimensional vision may be used for solving two and three dimensional vision problems. We hope this work will be slightly iconoclastic but also inspirational by encouraging further research in optical engineering.

  5. Facial three-dimensional morphometry.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Poggio, C E; Serrao, G

    1996-01-01

    Three-dimensional facial morphometry was investigated in a sample of 40 men and 40 women, with a new noninvasive computerized method. Subjects ranged in age between 19 and 32 years, had sound dentitions, and no craniocervical disorders. For each subject, 16 cutaneous facial landmarks were automatically collected by a system consisting of two infrared camera coupled device (CCD) cameras, real time hardware for the recognition of markers, and software for the three-dimensional reconstruction of landmarks' x, y, z coordinates. From these landmarks, 15 linear and 10 angular measurements, and four linear distance ratios were computed and averaged for sex. For all angular values, both samples showed a narrow variability and no significant gender differences were demonstrated. Conversely, all the linear measurements were significantly higher in men than in women. The highest intersample variability was observed for the measurements of facial height (prevalent vertical dimension), and the lowest for the measurements of facial depth (prevalent horizontal dimension). The proportions of upper and lower face height relative to the anterior face height showed a significant sex difference. Mean values were in good agreement with literature data collected with traditional methods. The described method allowed the direct and noninvasive calculation of three-dimensional linear and angular measurements that would be usefully applied in clinics as a supplement to the classic x-ray cephalometric analyses.

  6. Phase I Study of Concurrent High-Dose Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy With Chemotherapy Using Cisplatin and Vinorelbine for Unresectable Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine, Ikuo; Sumi, Minako; Ito, Yoshinori; Horinouchi, Hidehito; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru; Kunitoh, Hideo; Ohe, Yuichiro; Kubota, Kaoru; Tamura, Tomohide

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose in concurrent three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with chemotherapy for unresectable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: Eligible patients with unresectable Stage III NSCLC, age {>=}20 years, performance status 0-1, percent of volume of normal lung receiving 20 GY or more (V{sub 20}) {<=}30% received three to four cycles of cisplatin (80 mg/m{sup 2} Day 1) and vinorelbine (20 mg/m{sup 2} Days 1 and 8) repeated every 4 weeks. The doses of 3D-CRT were 66 Gy, 72 Gy, and 78 Gy at dose levels 1 to 3, respectively. Results: Of the 17, 16, and 24 patients assessed for eligibility, 13 (76%), 12 (75%), and 6 (25%) were enrolled at dose levels 1 to 3, respectively. The main reasons for exclusion were V{sub 20} >30% (n = 10) and overdose to the esophagus (n = 8) and brachial plexus (n = 2). There were 26 men and 5 women, with a median age of 60 years (range, 41-75). The full planned dose of radiotherapy could be administered to all the patients. Grade 3-4 neutropenia and febrile neutropenia were noted in 24 (77%) and 5 (16%) of the 31 patients, respectively. Grade 4 infection, Grade 3 esophagitis, and Grade 3 pulmonary toxicity were noted in 1 patient, 2 patients, and 1 patient, respectively. The dose-limiting toxicity was noted in 17% of the patients at each dose level. The median survival and 3-year and 4-year survival rates were 41.9 months, 72.3%, and 49.2%, respectively. Conclusions: 72 Gy was the maximum dose that could be achieved in most patients, given the predetermined normal tissue constraints.

  7. Effects of implantation of three-dimensional engineered bone tissue with a vascular-like structure on repair of bone defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Masanori; Matsumoto, Rena; Dong, Jian; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2012-12-01

    Previously, to create an implantable bone tissue associated with blood vessels, we co-cultured rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with MSC-derived endothelial cells (ECs) within a porous polylactic acid-based scaffold utilizing a rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor. Here, this engineered tissue was orthotopically implanted into defects made in femurs of immunodeficient rats, and histological analysis were carried out to examine the repair of the damage and the formation of bone around the implant. The bone defects were better repaired in the implanted group than control group after 3 weeks. The results indicate that the engineered bone could repair bone defects.

  8. Three-dimensional map construction.

    PubMed

    Jenks, G F; Brown, D A

    1966-11-18

    Three-dimensional maps are useful tools which have been neglected for some time. They shouldbe more commonly used, and familiarity with the techniques discussed in this article should dispel any qualms anyone might ve about needing artistic talent to nstruct them. The saving in time esulting from the use of an anamorphoser provides a further incentive. The anamorphoser transformations discussed above were all prepared by using straight slits, oriented at right angles to each other and placed so that all planes of the elements were parallel to each other. It is possible to vary these conditions in an infinite number of ways and thereby produce nonparallel tranceformations. Some of these variations are illustrated in Fig. 10. All the illustrations in Fig. 10 are transformations of the planimetric weather map shown in Fig. 8A. The variations used for the maps of Fig. 10 are as follows. (A) All planes parallel, with a curved rear slit; (B) all planes parallel, with curved slits front and rear; ( C) all planes parallel, with S-shaped rear slit; (D) all planes parallel, with an undulating rear slit; (E) all planes parallel, with curved front and undulating rear slit; (F) plane of the original rotated on the horizontal axis-both slits curved; (G) plane of the original rotated on thevertical axis- both slits curved; (H) plane of the original rotated on the horizontal axis -both slits straight. These are only a few of the many transformations which can be made with an anamorphoser, butthey do point toward some interesting possibilities. For example, it appears that maps based onone projection might be altered to satisfy the coordinates of a completely different projection. Note, for example, the change of parallels from concave to convex curves (Figs. 8A and 10A) and the change from converging meridians to diverging meridians (Figs. 8A and l0G). Similarly, the grids of maps B, F, and H of Fig. 10 approximate projections which are quite different from the original. Other

  9. Emergency housing systems from three-dimensional engineered fiberboard : temporary building systems for lightweight, portable, easy-to-assemble, reusable, recyclable, and biodegradable structures

    Treesearch

    Jerrold E. Winandy; John F. Hunt; Christopher Turk; James R. Anderson

    2006-01-01

    Following natural disasters (such as hurricanes, tornados, or tsunamis), when civilians become displaced, or when military troops are deployed overseas, temporary housing is often a critical need. The USDA Forest Products Laboratory recently developed a lightweight, transportable, reusable, and recyclable biocomposite building material—threedimensional engineered...

  10. The clinical effects of low-dose splenic irradiation combined with chest three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy on patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongsheng; Qu, Yong; Shang, Qingjun; Yan, Chao; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Xiang; Liang, Donghai; Jiang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to explore the clinical effects of low-dose splenic irradiation on locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods Thirty-eight patients with stage III NSCLC were randomly divided into a control group and a combined treatment group. The control group only received chest three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, while the combined treatment group received low-dose splenic irradiation followed by chest three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy after 6 hours. T lymphocyte subsets of the blood cells were tested before, during, and after treatment once a week. The side effects induced by radiation were observed, and a follow-up was done to observe the survival statistics. Results The ratio differences in CD4+ cells, CD8+ cells, and CD4+/CD8+ before and after treatment were not statistically significant (P>0.05) in both the groups. The immune indexes were also not statistically significant (P>0.05) before and after radiotherapy in the combined treatment group. However, the numbers of CD4+ cells and CD4+/CD8+ ratios before radiotherapy were higher than after radiotherapy in the control group. There were no differences in the incidence of radiation toxicities between the two groups; however, the incidence of grade III or IV radiation toxicities was lower, and the dose at which the radiation toxicities appeared was higher in the combined treatment group. The total response rate was 63.16% (12/19) in the combined treatment group vs 42.11% (8/19) in the control group. The median 2-year progression-free survival (15 months in the combined treatment group vs 10 months in the control group) was statistically significant (P<0.05). The median 2-year overall survival (17.1 months in the combined treatment group vs 15.8 months in the control group) was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion Low-dose radiation can alleviate the radiation toxicities, improve the short-term efficacy of radiotherapy, and improve

  11. Three-dimensional dynamic fabrication of engineered cartilage based on chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffold in a spinner flask with a special designed steel frame.

    PubMed

    Song, Kedong; Li, Liying; Li, Wenfang; Zhu, Yanxia; Jiao, Zeren; Lim, Mayasari; Fang, Meiyun; Shi, Fangxin; Wang, Ling; Liu, Tianqing

    2015-10-01

    Cartilage transplantation using in vitro tissue engineered cartilage is considered a promising treatment for articular cartilage defects. In this study, we assessed the advantages of adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) combined with chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffolds, which acted as a cartilage biomimetic scaffold, to fabricate a tissue engineered cartilage dynamically in vitro and compared this with traditional static culture. Physical properties of the hydrogel scaffolds were evaluated and ADSCs were inoculated into the hydrogel at a density of 1×10(7) cells/mL and cultured in a spinner flask with a special designed steel framework and feed with chondrogenic inductive media for two weeks. The results showed that the average pore size, porosity, swelling rate and elasticity modulus of hybrid scaffolds with good biocompatibility were 118.25±19.51 μm, 82.60±2.34%, 361.28±0.47% and 61.2±0.16 kPa, respectively. ADSCs grew well in chitosan/gelatin hybrid scaffold and successfully differentiated into chondrocytes, showing that the scaffolds were suitable for tissue engineering applications in cartilage regeneration. Induced cells cultivated in a dynamic spinner flask with a special designed steel frame expressed more proteoglycans and the cell distribution was much more uniform with the scaffold being filled mostly with extracellular matrix produced by cells. A spinner flask with framework promoted proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of ADSCs within chitosan/gelatin hybrid scaffolds and accelerated dynamic fabrication of cell-hydrogel constructs, which could be a selective and good method to construct tissue engineered cartilage in vitro.

  12. [Advances in the research of three-dimensional skin printing].

    PubMed

    Sheng, J J; Liu, G C; Li, H H; Zhu, S H

    2017-01-20

    As a new technology, three-dimensional printing possesses the characteristics of high precision and strong controllability, which has become a new technology and can be used in tissue engineering. Currently, using three-dimensional printing to build artificial skin has made certain achievement, and experiments in vitro have confirmed that the three-dimensional printing has the possibilities to build artificial skin whose structure and function are close to those of nature skin. However, the technology is not yet very mature and there are still some problems need to be solved, such as the recreation of the cutaneous appendages and the degradation and absorption of the extracellular matrix.

  13. Quasicrystalline three-dimensional foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, S. J.; Graner, F.; Mosseri, R.; Sadoc, J.-F.

    2017-03-01

    We present a numerical study of quasiperiodic foams, in which the bubbles are generated as duals of quasiperiodic Frank–Kasper phases. These foams are investigated as potential candidates to the celebrated Kelvin problem for the partition of three-dimensional space with equal volume bubbles and minimal surface area. Interestingly, one of the computed structures falls close to (but still slightly above) the best known Weaire–Phelan periodic candidate. In addition we find a correlation between the normalized bubble surface area and the root mean squared deviation of the number of faces, giving an additional clue to understanding the main geometrical ingredients driving the Kelvin problem.

  14. Three-dimensional light bullets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minardi, S.; Eilenberger, F.; Kartashov, Y. V.; Szameit, A.; Röpke, U.; Kobelke, J.; Schuster, K.; Bartelt, H.; Nolte, S.; Torner, L.; Lederer, F.; Tünnermann, A.; Pertsch, T.

    2012-02-01

    Three dimensional Light Bullets (3D-LBs) are the most symmetric solitary waves, being nonlinear optical wavepackets propagating without diffraction nor dispersion. Since their theoretical prediction, 3D-LB's have constituted a challenge in nonlinear science, due to the impossibility to avoid catastrophic collapse in conventional homogeneous nonlinear media. We have recently observed stable 3D-LBs in media with periodically modulated transverse refractive index profile. We found that higher order linear and nonlinear effects force the 3D-LBs to evolve along their propagation path and eventually decay. The evolution and decay mechanism entails spatiotemporal effects, which under certain conditions, leads to superluminally propagating wavepackets.

  15. Effects of chitosan-coated fibers as a scaffold for three-dimensional cultures of rabbit fibroblasts for ligament tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Sarukawa, Junichiro; Takahashi, Masaaki; Abe, Masashi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Tokura, Seiichi; Furuike, Tetsuya; Tamura, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Material selection in tissue-engineering scaffolds is one of the primary factors defining cellular response and matrix formation. In this study, we fabricated chitosan-coated poly(lactic acid) (PLA) fiber scaffolds to test our hypothesis that PLA fibers coated with chitosan highly promoted cell supporting properties compared to those without chitosan. Both PLA fibers (PLA group) and chitosan-coated PLA fibers (PLA-chitosan group) were fabricated for this study. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) fibroblasts were isolated from Japanese white rabbits and cultured on scaffolds consisting of each type of fiber. The effects of cell adhesivity, proliferation, and synthesis of the extracellular matrix (ECM) for each fiber were analyzed by cell counting, hydroxyproline assay, scanning electron microscopy and quantitative RT-PCR. Cell adhesivity, proliferation, hydroxyproline content and the expression of type-I collagen mRNA were significantly higher in the PLA-chitosan group than in the PLA group. Scanning electron microscopic observation showed that fibroblasts proliferated with a high level of ECM synthesis around the cells. Chitosan coating improved ACL fibroblast adhesion and proliferation, and had a positive effect on matrix production. Thus, the advantages of chitosan-coated PLA fibers show them to be a suitable biomaterial for ACL tissue-engineering scaffolds.

  16. Three-dimensional vortex methods

    SciTech Connect

    Greengard, C.A.

    1984-08-01

    Three-dimensional vortex methods for the computation of incompressible fluid flow are presented from a unified point of view. Reformulations of the filament method and of the method of Beale and Majda show them to be very similar algorithms; in both of them, the vorticity is evaluated by a discretization of the spatial derivative of the flow map. The fact that the filament method, the one which is most often used in practice, can be formulated as a version of the Beale and Majda algorithm in a curved coordinate system is used to give a convergence theorem for the filament method. The method of Anderson is also discussed, in which vorticity is evaluated by the exact differentiation of the approximate velocity field. It is shown that, in the inviscid version of this algorithm, each approximate vector of vorticity remains tangent to a material curve moving with the computed flow, with magnitude proportional to the stretching of this vortex line. This remains true even when time discretization is taken into account. It is explained that the expanding core vortex method converges to a system of equations different from the Navier-Stokes equations. Computations with the filament method of the inviscid interaction of two vortex rings are reported, both with single filaments in each ring and with a fully three-dimensional discretization of vorticity. The dependence on parameters is discussed, and convergence of the computed solutions is observed. 36 references, 4 figures.

  17. Predictors of High-grade Esophagitis After Definitive Three-dimensional Conformal Therapy, Intensity-modulated Radiation Therapy, or Proton Beam Therapy for Non-small cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Daniel R.; Tucker, Susan L.; Martel, Mary K.; Mohan, Radhe; Balter, Peter A.; Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis; Liu Hongmei; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing

    2012-11-15

    Introduction: We analyzed the ability of various patient- and treatment-related factors to predict radiation-induced esophagitis (RE) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), or proton beam therapy (PBT). Methods and Materials: Patients were treated for NSCLC with 3D-CRT, IMRT, or PBT at MD Anderson from 2000 to 2008 and had full dose-volume histogram (DVH) data available. The endpoint was severe (grade {>=}3) RE. The Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model was used to analyze RE as a function of the fractional esophageal DVH, with clinical variables included as dose-modifying factors. Results: Overall, 652 patients were included: 405 patients were treated with 3D-CRT, 139 with IMRT, and 108 with PBT; corresponding rates of grade {>=}3 RE were 8%, 28%, and 6%, respectively, with a median time to onset of 42 days (range, 11-93 days). A fit of the fractional DVH LKB model demonstrated that the fractional effective dose was significantly different (P=.046) than 1 (fractional mean dose) indicating that high doses to small volumes are more predictive than mean esophageal dose. The model fit was better for 3D-CRT and PBT than for IMRT. Including receipt of concurrent chemotherapy as a dose-modifying factor significantly improved the LKB model (P=.005), and the model was further improved by including a variable representing treatment with >30 fractions. Examining individual types of chemotherapy agents revealed a trend toward receipt of concurrent taxanes and increased risk of RE (P=.105). Conclusions: Fractional dose (dose rate) and number of fractions (total dose) distinctly affect the risk of severe RE, estimated using the LKB model, and concurrent chemotherapy improves the model fit. This risk of severe RE is underestimated by this model in patients receiving IMRT.

  18. A Phase II Study of Synchronous Three-Dimensional Conformal Boost to the Gross Tumor Volume for Patients With Unresectable Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Results of Korean Radiation Oncology Group 0301 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Kwan Ho Ahn, Sung Ja; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Kim, Kyu-Sik; Kim, Young-Chul; Moon, Sung Ho; Han, Ji-Youn; Kim, Heung Tae; Koom, Woong Sub; Lee, Jin Soo

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the efficacy of synchronous three-dimensional (3D) conformal boost to the gross tumor volume (GTV) in concurrent chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligibility included unresectable Stage III NSCLC with no pleural effusion, no supraclavicular nodal metastases, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score of 0-1. Forty-nine patients with pathologically proven NSCLC were enrolled. Eighteen patients had Stage IIIA and 31 had Stage IIIB. By using 3D conformal radiotherapy (RT) techniques, a dose of 1.8 Gy was delivered to the planning target volume with a synchronous boost of 0.6 Gy to the GTV, with a total dose of 60 Gy to the GTV and 45 Gy to the planning target volume in 25 fractions during 5 weeks. All patients received weekly chemotherapy consisting of paclitaxel and carboplatin during RT. Results: With a median follow-up of 36.8 months (range, 29.0-45.5 months) for surviving patients, median survival was 28.1 months. One-, 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 77%, 56.4%, and 43.8%, respectively. Corresponding local progression-free survival rates were 71.2%, 53.7%, and 53.7%. Compliance was 90% for RT and 88% for chemotherapy. Acute esophagitis of Grade 2 or higher occurred in 29 patients. Two patients with T4 lesions died of massive bleeding and hemoptysis during treatment (Grade 5). Overall late toxicity was acceptable. Conclusions: Based on the favorable outcome with acceptable toxicity, the acceleration scheme using 3D conformal GTV boost in this trial is warranted to compare with conventional fractionation in a Phase III trial.

  19. Three-dimensional printing physiology laboratory technology

    PubMed Central

    Sulkin, Matthew S.; Widder, Emily; Shao, Connie; Holzem, Katherine M.; Gloschat, Christopher; Gutbrod, Sarah R.

    2013-01-01

    Since its inception in 19th-century Germany, the physiology laboratory has been a complex and expensive research enterprise involving experts in various fields of science and engineering. Physiology research has been critically dependent on cutting-edge technological support of mechanical, electrical, optical, and more recently computer engineers. Evolution of modern experimental equipment is constrained by lack of direct communication between the physiological community and industry producing this equipment. Fortunately, recent advances in open source technologies, including three-dimensional printing, open source hardware and software, present an exciting opportunity to bring the design and development of research instrumentation to the end user, i.e., life scientists. Here we provide an overview on how to develop customized, cost-effective experimental equipment for physiology laboratories. PMID:24043254

  20. Three-dimensional printing physiology laboratory technology.

    PubMed

    Sulkin, Matthew S; Widder, Emily; Shao, Connie; Holzem, Katherine M; Gloschat, Christopher; Gutbrod, Sarah R; Efimov, Igor R

    2013-12-01

    Since its inception in 19th-century Germany, the physiology laboratory has been a complex and expensive research enterprise involving experts in various fields of science and engineering. Physiology research has been critically dependent on cutting-edge technological support of mechanical, electrical, optical, and more recently computer engineers. Evolution of modern experimental equipment is constrained by lack of direct communication between the physiological community and industry producing this equipment. Fortunately, recent advances in open source technologies, including three-dimensional printing, open source hardware and software, present an exciting opportunity to bring the design and development of research instrumentation to the end user, i.e., life scientists. Here we provide an overview on how to develop customized, cost-effective experimental equipment for physiology laboratories.

  1. Fresh and Frozen Tissue-Engineered Three-Dimensional Bone–Ligament–Bone Constructs for Sheep Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair Following a 2-Year Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, Vasudevan; Wojtys, Edward M.; Wellik, Deneen M.; Arruda, Ellen M.; Larkin, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) often require surgical reconstruction utilizing tendon grafts to restore knee function and stability. Some current graft options for ACL repair are associated with poor long-term outcomes. Our laboratory has fabricated tissue-engineered bone–ligament–bone (BLB) constructs that demonstrate native ligament regeneration and advancement toward native ACL mechanical properties in a sheep ACL reconstruction model. Prior work has shown that freezing BLBs as a method of preservation resulted in similar outcomes compared with fresh BLBs after 6-month implantation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term efficacy of fresh and frozen BLBs. We hypothesized that both fresh and frozen BLBs would show continued regeneration of structural and functional properties toward those of native ACL after a 2-year implantation. Following removal of the native ACL, fresh (n = 2) and frozen (n = 2) BLBs were implanted arthroscopically. After 2 years of recovery, sheep were euthanized and both the experimental and contralateral hindlimbs were removed and radiographs were performed. Explanted knees were initially evaluated for joint laxity and were then further dissected for uniaxial tensile testing of the isolated ACL or BLB. Following mechanical testing, explanted contralateral ACL (C-ACL) and BLBs were harvested for histology. Two years post-ACL reconstruction, fresh and frozen BLBs exhibited similar morphological and biomechanical properties as well as more advanced regeneration compared with our 6-month recovery study. These data indicate that an additional 1.5-year regeneration period allows the BLB to continue ligament regeneration in vivo. In addition, freezing the BLBs is a viable option for the preservation of the graft after fabrication. PMID:27843707

  2. Biochemical and biophysical analyses of tissue-engineered bone obtained from three-dimensional culture of a subset of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Federico; Falini, Giuseppe; Spelat, Renza; D'Aurizio, Federica; Puppato, Elisa; Pandolfi, Maura; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Cesselli, Daniela; Beltrami, Carlo Alberto; Impiombato, Francesco Saverio Ambesi; Curcio, Francesco

    2010-12-01

    Grafts of tissue-engineered bone represent a promising alternative in the treatment of large and small bone defects. Current approaches are often badly tolerated by patients because of invasiveness, ethical problems, culture, and possibility of infection. Autologous grafts have been indicated as a solution to such problems. Because of tissue availability, many have proposed the use of cultured cells derived from bone marrow expanded in culture and induced to differentiate in bone tissue. Data reported in the literature show that it is possible to produce tissue substitutes in vitro indeed, but results are not always concordant regarding the in vitro produced bone quality. In the present work, we investigated bone formation in aggregates of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells induced to differentiate in bone. After osteoinduction we characterized the mineral matrix produced using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray powder diffraction. Cells were obtained from bone marrow, subjected to immunodepletion for CD3, CD11b, CD14, CD16, CD19, CD56, CD66b, and glycophorin A using RosetteSep and cultured in a new formulation of medium for four passages and then were allowed to form spontaneous aggregates. At the end of proliferation before aggregation, cells were analyzed by fluorescent activated cell sorting (FACS) for markers routinely used to characterize expanded mesenchymal stem cells and were found to be remarkably homogeneous for CD29 (99% ± 1%), CD73 (99% ± 1%), CD90 (95% ± 4%), CD105 (96% ± 4%), and CD133 (0% ± 1%) expression. Our results show that not only aggregated cells express the major markers of osteogenic differentiation, such as osteocalcin, osteonectin, osteopontin, and bone sialoprotein, but also the inorganic matrix is made of an apatite structurally and morphologically similar to native bone even without a scaffold.

  3. Three-dimensional aromatic networks.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Shinji; Iwanaga, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) networks consisting of aromatic units and linkers are reviewed from various aspects. To understand principles for the construction of such compounds, we generalize the roles of building units, the synthetic approaches, and the classification of networks. As fundamental compounds, cyclophanes with large aromatic units and aromatic macrocycles with linear acetylene linkers are highlighted in terms of transannular interactions between aromatic units, conformational preference, and resolution of chiral derivatives. Polycyclic cage compounds are constructed from building units by linkages via covalent bonds, metal-coordination bonds, or hydrogen bonds. Large cage networks often include a wide range of guest species in their cavity to afford novel inclusion compounds. Topological isomers consisting of two or more macrocycles are formed by cyclization of preorganized species. Some complicated topological networks are constructed by self-assembly of simple building units.

  4. Three-dimensional display technologies.

    PubMed

    Geng, Jason

    2013-01-01

    The physical world around us is three-dimensional (3D), yet traditional display devices can show only two-dimensional (2D) flat images that lack depth (i.e., the third dimension) information. This fundamental restriction greatly limits our ability to perceive and to understand the complexity of real-world objects. Nearly 50% of the capability of the human brain is devoted to processing visual information [Human Anatomy & Physiology (Pearson, 2012)]. Flat images and 2D displays do not harness the brain's power effectively. With rapid advances in the electronics, optics, laser, and photonics fields, true 3D display technologies are making their way into the marketplace. 3D movies, 3D TV, 3D mobile devices, and 3D games have increasingly demanded true 3D display with no eyeglasses (autostereoscopic). Therefore, it would be very beneficial to readers of this journal to have a systematic review of state-of-the-art 3D display technologies.

  5. Three-dimensional coil inductor

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Malba, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    A three-dimensional coil inductor is disclosed. The inductor includes a substrate; a set of lower electrically conductive traces positioned on the substrate; a core placed over the lower traces; a set of side electrically conductive traces laid on the core and the lower traces; and a set of upper electrically conductive traces attached to the side traces so as to form the inductor. Fabrication of the inductor includes the steps of forming a set of lower traces on a substrate; positioning a core over the lower traces; forming a set of side traces on the core; connecting the side traces to the lower traces; forming a set of upper traces on the core; and connecting the upper traces to the side traces so as to form a coil structure.

  6. Three-dimensional vortex methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greengard, C. A.

    1984-08-01

    Reformulations of the filament method and of the method of Beale and Majda show them to be very similar algorithms. The method of Anderson in which vorticity is evaluated by the exact differentiation of the approximate velocity field is discussed. It is shown that, in the inviscid version of this algorithm, each approximate vector of vorticity remains tangent to a material curve moving with the computed flow, with magnitude proportional to the stretching of this vortex line. It is explained that the expanding core vortex method converges to a system of equations different from the Navier-Stokes equations. Computations with the filament method of the inviscid interaction of two vortex rings are reported, both with single filaments in each ring and with a fully three-dimensional discretization of vorticity. The dependence on parameters is discussed, and convergence of the computed solutions is observed.

  7. Three-Dimensional Problems of Thermoviscoplasticity: Focus on Ukrainian Research (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, Yu. N.; Savchenko, V. G.

    2016-05-01

    Methods and results of studying the three-dimensional viscoplastic stress-strain state of engineering structures under thermomechanical loading are presented. The following classes of thermoviscoelastic problems are considered: axisymmetric problems, nonaxisymmetric problems for bodies of revolution, three-dimensional problems for arbitrarily shaped bodies, three-dimensional problems for isotropic and anisotropic bodies of revolution

  8. Numerical simulation of fluid field and in vitro three-dimensional fabrication of tissue-engineered bones in a rotating bioreactor and in vivo implantation for repairing segmental bone defects.

    PubMed

    Song, Kedong; Wang, Hai; Zhang, Bowen; Lim, Mayasari; Liu, Yingchao; Liu, Tianqing

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, two-dimensional flow field simulation was conducted to determine shear stresses and velocity profiles for bone tissue engineering in a rotating wall vessel bioreactor (RWVB). In addition, in vitro three-dimensional fabrication of tissue-engineered bones was carried out in optimized bioreactor conditions, and in vivo implantation using fabricated bones was performed for segmental bone defects of Zelanian rabbits. The distribution of dynamic pressure, total pressure, shear stress, and velocity within the culture chamber was calculated for different scaffold locations. According to the simulation results, the dynamic pressure, velocity, and shear stress around the surface of cell-scaffold construction periodically changed at different locations of the RWVB, which could result in periodical stress stimulation for fabricated tissue constructs. However, overall shear stresses were relatively low, and the fluid velocities were uniform in the bioreactor. Our in vitro experiments showed that the number of cells cultured in the RWVB was five times higher than those cultured in a T-flask. The tissue-engineered bones grew very well in the RWVB. This study demonstrates that stress stimulation in an RWVB can be beneficial for cell/bio-derived bone constructs fabricated in an RWVB, with an application for repairing segmental bone defects.

  9. Differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage tissue engineering: Individual and synergetic effects of three-dimensional environment and mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Panadero, J A; Lanceros-Mendez, S; Ribelles, J L Gomez

    2016-03-01

    . The authors propose broader studies implementing new high-throughput techniques for mechanical characterization of tissue engineering constructs and the inclusion of fatigue analysis as support methodology to more exhaustive mechanical characterization. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Nanowired three-dimensional cardiac patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvir, Tal; Timko, Brian P.; Brigham, Mark D.; Naik, Shreesh R.; Karajanagi, Sandeep S.; Levy, Oren; Jin, Hongwei; Parker, Kevin K.; Langer, Robert; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2011-11-01

    Engineered cardiac patches for treating damaged heart tissues after a heart attack are normally produced by seeding heart cells within three-dimensional porous biomaterial scaffolds. These biomaterials, which are usually made of either biological polymers such as alginate or synthetic polymers such as poly(lactic acid) (PLA), help cells organize into functioning tissues, but poor conductivity of these materials limits the ability of the patch to contract strongly as a unit. Here, we show that incorporating gold nanowires within alginate scaffolds can bridge the electrically resistant pore walls of alginate and improve electrical communication between adjacent cardiac cells. Tissues grown on these composite matrices were thicker and better aligned than those grown on pristine alginate and when electrically stimulated, the cells in these tissues contracted synchronously. Furthermore, higher levels of the proteins involved in muscle contraction and electrical coupling are detected in the composite matrices. It is expected that the integration of conducting nanowires within three-dimensional scaffolds may improve the therapeutic value of current cardiac patches.

  11. Three-dimensional colloidal lithography.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Hironori; Poteet, Austen; Zhang, Xu A; Chang, Chih-Hao

    2017-03-24

    Light interactions with colloidal particles can generate a variety of complex three-dimensional (3D) intensity patterns, which can be utilized for nanolithography. The study of particle-light interactions can add more types of intensity patterns by manipulating key factors. Here we investigate a novel 3D nanolithography technique using colloidal particles under two-beam coherent illuminations. The fabricated 3D nanostructures are hollow, nested within periodic structures, and possess multiple chamber geometry. The effects of incident angles and particle size on the fabricated nanostructures were examined. The relative phase shift between particle position and interference pattern is identified as another significant parameter influencing the resultant nanostructures. A numerical model has been developed to show the evolution of nanostructure geometry with phase shifts, and experimental studies confirm the simulation results. Through the introduction of single colloidal particles, the fabrication capability of Lloyd's mirror interference can now be extended to fabrication of 3D nanostructure with complex shell geometry. The fabricated hollow nanostructures with grating background could find potential applications in the area of photonics, drug delivery, and nanofluidics.

  12. Three-dimensional colloidal lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Hironori; Poteet, Austen; Zhang, Xu A.; Chang, Chih-Hao

    2017-03-01

    Light interactions with colloidal particles can generate a variety of complex three-dimensional (3D) intensity patterns, which can be utilized for nanolithography. The study of particle-light interactions can add more types of intensity patterns by manipulating key factors. Here we investigate a novel 3D nanolithography technique using colloidal particles under two-beam coherent illuminations. The fabricated 3D nanostructures are hollow, nested within periodic structures, and possess multiple chamber geometry. The effects of incident angles and particle size on the fabricated nanostructures were examined. The relative phase shift between particle position and interference pattern is identified as another significant parameter influencing the resultant nanostructures. A numerical model has been developed to show the evolution of nanostructure geometry with phase shifts, and experimental studies confirm the simulation results. Through the introduction of single colloidal particles, the fabrication capability of Lloyd’s mirror interference can now be extended to fabrication of 3D nanostructure with complex shell geometry. The fabricated hollow nanostructures with grating background could find potential applications in the area of photonics, drug delivery, and nanofluidics.

  13. Three-dimensional display technologies

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Jason

    2014-01-01

    The physical world around us is three-dimensional (3D), yet traditional display devices can show only two-dimensional (2D) flat images that lack depth (i.e., the third dimension) information. This fundamental restriction greatly limits our ability to perceive and to understand the complexity of real-world objects. Nearly 50% of the capability of the human brain is devoted to processing visual information [Human Anatomy & Physiology (Pearson, 2012)]. Flat images and 2D displays do not harness the brain’s power effectively. With rapid advances in the electronics, optics, laser, and photonics fields, true 3D display technologies are making their way into the marketplace. 3D movies, 3D TV, 3D mobile devices, and 3D games have increasingly demanded true 3D display with no eyeglasses (autostereoscopic). Therefore, it would be very beneficial to readers of this journal to have a systematic review of state-of-the-art 3D display technologies. PMID:25530827

  14. Three-dimensional laser microvision.

    PubMed

    Shimotahira, H; Iizuka, K; Chu, S C; Wah, C; Costen, F; Yoshikuni, Y

    2001-04-10

    A three-dimensional (3-D) optical imaging system offering high resolution in all three dimensions, requiring minimum manipulation and capable of real-time operation, is presented. The system derives its capabilities from use of the superstructure grating laser source in the implementation of a laser step frequency radar for depth information acquisition. A synthetic aperture radar technique was also used to further enhance its lateral resolution as well as extend the depth of focus. High-speed operation was made possible by a dual computer system consisting of a host and a remote microcomputer supported by a dual-channel Small Computer System Interface parallel data transfer system. The system is capable of operating near real time. The 3-D display of a tunneling diode, a microwave integrated circuit, and a see-through image taken by the system operating near real time are included. The depth resolution is 40 mum; lateral resolution with a synthetic aperture approach is a fraction of a micrometer and that without it is approximately 10 mum.

  15. Three-Dimensional Laser Microvision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimotahira, Hiroshi; Iizuka, Keigo; Chu, Sun-Chun; Wah, Christopher; Costen, Furnie; Yoshikuni, Yuzo

    2001-04-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) optical imaging system offering high resolution in all three dimensions, requiring minimum manipulation and capable of real-time operation, is presented. The system derives its capabilities from use of the superstructure grating laser source in the implementation of a laser step frequency radar for depth information acquisition. A synthetic aperture radar technique was also used to further enhance its lateral resolution as well as extend the depth of focus. High-speed operation was made possible by a dual computer system consisting of a host and a remote microcomputer supported by a dual-channel Small Computer System Interface parallel data transfer system. The system is capable of operating near real time. The 3-D display of a tunneling diode, a microwave integrated circuit, and a see-through image taken by the system operating near real time are included. The depth resolution is 40 m; lateral resolution with a synthetic aperture approach is a fraction of a micrometer and that without it is approximately 10 m.

  16. SU-F-P-18: Development of the Technical Training System for Patient Set-Up Considering Rotational Correction in the Virtual Environment Using Three-Dimensional Computer Graphic Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Imura, K; Fujibuchi, T; Hirata, H; Kaneko, K; Hamada, E

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Patient set-up skills in radiotherapy treatment room have a great influence on treatment effect for image guided radiotherapy. In this study, we have developed the training system for improving practical set-up skills considering rotational correction in the virtual environment away from the pressure of actual treatment room by using three-dimensional computer graphic (3DCG) engine. Methods: The treatment room for external beam radiotherapy was reproduced in the virtual environment by using 3DCG engine (Unity). The viewpoints to perform patient set-up in the virtual treatment room were arranged in both sides of the virtual operable treatment couch to assume actual performance by two clinical staffs. The position errors to mechanical isocenter considering alignment between skin marker and laser on the virtual patient model were displayed by utilizing numerical values expressed in SI units and the directions of arrow marks. The rotational errors calculated with a point on the virtual body axis as the center of each rotation axis for the virtual environment were corrected by adjusting rotational position of the body phantom wound the belt with gyroscope preparing on table in a real space. These rotational errors were evaluated by describing vector outer product operations and trigonometric functions in the script for patient set-up technique. Results: The viewpoints in the virtual environment allowed individual user to visually recognize the position discrepancy to mechanical isocenter until eliminating the positional errors of several millimeters. The rotational errors between the two points calculated with the center point could be efficiently corrected to display the minimum technique mathematically by utilizing the script. Conclusion: By utilizing the script to correct the rotational errors as well as accurate positional recognition for patient set-up technique, the training system developed for improving patient set-up skills enabled individual user to

  17. Three-dimensional fiber-deposited PEOT/PBT copolymer scaffolds for tissue engineering: influence of porosity, molecular network mesh size, and swelling in aqueous media on dynamic mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Moroni, L; de Wijn, J R; van Blitterswijk, C A

    2005-12-15

    Among novel scaffold fabrication techniques, 3D fiber deposition (3DF) has recently emerged as a means to fabricate well-defined and custom-made scaffolds for tissue regeneration, with 100% interconnected pores. The mechanical behavior of these constructs is dependent not only on different three-dimensional architectural and geometric features, but also on the intrinsic chemical properties of the material used. These affect the mechanics of the solid material and eventually of 3D porous constructs derived from them. For instance, poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)-poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT) block copolymers are known to have mechanical properties, depending on the PEOT/PBT weight ratio in block form and on the molecular weight of the initial poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) blocks. These differences are enhanced even more by their different swelling properties in aqueous media. Therefore, this article examines the influence of copolymer compositions in terms of their swelling on dynamic mechanical properties of solid material and porous 3DF scaffolds. The molecular weight of the starting PEG blocks used in the copolymer synthesis varied from 300 to 1000 g/mol. The PEOT/PBT weight ratio in the blocks used varied from 55/45 to 80/20. This corresponded to an increase of the swelling ratio Q from 1.06 to 2.46, and of the mesh size xi from approximately 9 Angstrom to approximately 47 Angstrom. With increased swelling, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) revealed a decrease in elastic response and an increase of viscoelasticity. Thus, by coupling structural and chemical characteristics, the viscoelastic properties of PEOT/PBT 3DF scaffolds may be fine tuned to achieve mechanical requirements for a variety of engineered tissues. Ultimately, the combination of 3DF and DMA may be useful to validate the hypothesis that mimicking the biomechanical behavior of a specific tissue for its optimal replacement is an important issue for at least some tissue-engineering

  18. [Three-dimensional printing and oral medicine].

    PubMed

    Hu, M

    2017-04-09

    After 30 years of development, three-dimensional printing technology has made great progress, and the model and surgical guide have been clinically applied. The three-dimensional printing of titanium and other metal prosthesis and dental crown after adequate research will be applied clinically, and three-dimensional bioprinting and related biological materials need further study. Three-dimensional printing provides opportunities for the development of oral medicine, which will change the way of clinical work, teaching and research. The dentists should integrate multi-disciplinary knowledge and understand the essence of new technology to meet the challenges of the era of digital medicine.

  19. Three dimensional identification card and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Changhe; Wang, Shaoqing; Li, Chao; Li, Hao; Liu, Zhao

    2016-10-01

    Three dimensional Identification Card, with its three-dimensional personal image displayed and stored for personal identification, is supposed be the advanced version of the present two-dimensional identification card in the future [1]. Three dimensional Identification Card means that there are three-dimensional optical techniques are used, the personal image on ID card is displayed to be three-dimensional, so we can see three dimensional personal face. The ID card also stores the three-dimensional face information in its inside electronics chip, which might be recorded by using two-channel cameras, and it can be displayed in computer as three-dimensional images for personal identification. Three-dimensional ID card might be one interesting direction to update the present two-dimensional card in the future. Three-dimension ID card might be widely used in airport custom, entrance of hotel, school, university, as passport for on-line banking, registration of on-line game, etc...

  20. Three dimensional geometric modeling of processing-tomatoes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Characterizing tomato geometries with different shapes and sizes would facilitate the design of tomato processing equipments and promote computer-based engineering simulations. This research sought to develop a three-dimensional geometric model that can describe the morphological attributes of proce...

  1. Three-dimensional Stress Analysis Using the Boundary Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. B.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    The boundary element method is to be extended (as part of the NASA Inelastic Analysis Methods program) to the three-dimensional stress analysis of gas turbine engine hot section components. The analytical basis of the method (as developed in elasticity) is outlined, its numerical implementation is summarized, and the approaches to be followed in extending the method to include inelastic material response indicated.

  2. The Numerical Computation of Three-Dimensional Turbulent Boundary Layers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    begin by saying what an honour and a pleasure it is for me t," this review lecture. To some extent my pleasure is enhanced by a sense of deja vu as...A.J. Baker Finite element solution theory tor three-dimensional boundary flows. Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, Vol.4, pp.367-386

  3. High three dimensional thermoelectric performance from low dimensional bands

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, David J; Chen, Xin; Parker, David S

    2013-01-01

    Reduced dimensionality has long been regarded as an important strategy for increasing thermoelectric performance, for example in superlattices and other engineered structures. Here we point out and illustrate by examples that three dimensional bulk materials can be made to behave as if they were two dimensional from the point of view of thermoelectric performance. Implications for the discovery of new practical thermoelectrics are discussed.

  4. Three-Dimensional Laminar Separation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    chosen points. Colored dyes were supplied by small flexible hoses which were fed and controlled by hypodermic needles . A novel method was introduced in...the present studies. Thin hypodermic needles were mounted on the skin of the body, allowing the dyes to be released at the edge of the boundary layer...prised the authors and certainly deserves to be communicated with the engineering community . 2 Approximate methods are available, as for example

  5. Microperiodic structures: direct writing of three-dimensional webs.

    PubMed

    Gratson, Gregory M; Xu, Mingjie; Lewis, Jennifer A

    2004-03-25

    Applications are emerging that require the creation of fine-scale structures in three dimensions--examples include scaffolds for tissue engineering, micro-fluidic devices and photonic materials that control light propagation over a range of frequencies. But writing methods such as dip-pen nanolithography and ink-jet printing are either confined to two dimensions or beset by wetting and spreading problems. Here we use concentrated polyelectrolyte inks to write three-dimensional microperiodic structures directly without using masks. Our technique enables us to write arbitrary three-dimensional patterns whose features are nearly two orders of magnitude smaller than those attained with other multilayer printing techniques.

  6. Applications of three-dimensionally scanned models in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Cha, B K; Choi, J I; Jost-Brinkmann, P G; Jeong, Y M

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical applications of the three-dimensional reverse engineering technologies for the analysis of orthodontic models. The measuring accuracy and the process of the 3D model scanning technique were evaluated with respect to linear, surface and volumetric parameters. Orthodontically induced dentoalveolar changes, which have been traditionally evaluated by cephalometric analysis, were assessed by the registration function of Rapidform 2002, a 3D-reverse modeling software in scanned maxillary casts. Three-dimensional digital models are valuable alternatives to conventional casts for model analysis and also yield information which could previously be gathered only by cephalometric superimposition.

  7. Three-Dimensional Boundary Layers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    sketched in figure 1 . The model design is des- • cribed in more detail in reference 2. At measuring station 1 the turbulent boundary layer is very...layer methods are increasingly important as their use for design purposes increases. Specific recommendations for future work include the following. 1 ...MEMBERS M. 1 ’Ing. G&n C.Cap~lier Prof. Dr. Jr. J.L. van Ingen Directeur de l’A~rodynamique Department of Aerospace B.P. 72 Engineering% ONERA Delf

  8. Three-dimensional gravity and string ghosts

    SciTech Connect

    Carlip, S. ); Kogan, I.I. )

    1991-12-23

    It is known that much of the structure of string theory can be derived from three-dimensional topological field theory and gravity. We show here that, at least for simple topologies, the string diffeomorphism ghosts can also be explained in terms of three-dimensional physics.

  9. Hydrofocusing Bioreactor for Three-Dimensional Cell Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Spaulding, Glenn F.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Flechsig, Scott; Jones, Leslie; Soehnge, Holly

    2003-01-01

    The hydrodynamic focusing bioreactor (HFB) is a bioreactor system designed for three-dimensional cell culture and tissue-engineering investigations on orbiting spacecraft and in laboratories on Earth. The HFB offers a unique hydrofocusing capability that enables the creation of a low-shear culture environment simultaneously with the "herding" of suspended cells, tissue assemblies, and air bubbles. Under development for use in the Biotechnology Facility on the International Space Station, the HFB has successfully grown large three-dimensional, tissuelike assemblies from anchorage-dependent cells and grown suspension hybridoma cells to high densities. The HFB, based on the principle of hydrodynamic focusing, provides the capability to control the movement of air bubbles and removes them from the bioreactor without degrading the low-shear culture environment or the suspended three-dimensional tissue assemblies. The HFB also provides unparalleled control over the locations of cells and tissues within its bioreactor vessel during operation and sampling.

  10. A plastic surgery application in evolution: three-dimensional printing.

    PubMed

    Gerstle, Theodore L; Ibrahim, Ahmed M S; Kim, Peter S; Lee, Bernard T; Lin, Samuel J

    2014-02-01

    Three-dimensional printing represents an evolving technology still in its infancy. Currently, individuals and small business entities have the ability to manufacture physical objects from digital renderings, computer-aided design, and open source files. Design modifications and improvements in extrusion methods have made this technology much more affordable. This article explores the potential uses of three-dimensional printing in plastic surgery. A review was performed detailing the known uses of three-dimensional printing in medicine. The potential applications of three-dimensional printing in plastic surgery are discussed. Various applications for three-dimensional printing technology have emerged in medicine, including printing organs, printing body parts, bio-printing, and computer-aided tissue engineering. In plastic surgery, these tools offer various prospective applications for surgical planning, resident education, and the development of custom prosthetics. Numerous applications exist in medicine, including the printing of devices, implants, tissue replacements, and even whole organs. Plastic surgeons may likely find this technology indispensable in surgical planning, education, and prosthetic device design and development in the near future.

  11. FRET Imaging in Three-dimensional Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Taboas, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful tool for examining cell biology in real-time. Studies utilizing FRET commonly employ two-dimensional (2D) culture, which does not mimic the three-dimensional (3D) cellular microenvironment. A method to perform quenched emission FRET imaging using conventional widefield epifluorescence microscopy of cells within a 3D hydrogel environment is presented. Here an analysis method for ratiometric FRET probes that yields linear ratios over the probe activation range is described. Measurement of intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels is demonstrated in chondrocytes under forskolin stimulation using a probe for EPAC1 activation (ICUE1) and the ability to detect differences in cAMP signaling dependent on hydrogel material type, herein a photocrosslinking hydrogel (PC-gel, polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate) and a thermoresponsive hydrogel (TR-gel). Compared with 2D FRET methods, this method requires little additional work. Laboratories already utilizing FRET imaging in 2D can easily adopt this method to perform cellular studies in a 3D microenvironment. It can further be applied to high throughput drug screening in engineered 3D microtissues. Additionally, it is compatible with other forms of FRET imaging, such as anisotropy measurement and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), and with advanced microscopy platforms using confocal, pulsed, or modulated illumination. PMID:27500354

  12. Three-dimensional Printing in the Intestine.

    PubMed

    Wengerter, Brian C; Emre, Gulus; Park, Jea Young; Geibel, John

    2016-08-01

    Intestinal transplantation remains a life-saving option for patients with severe intestinal failure. With the advent of advanced tissue engineering techniques, great strides have been made toward manufacturing replacement tissues and organs, including the intestine, which aim to avoid transplant-related complications. The current paradigm is to seed a biocompatible support material (scaffold) with a desired cell population to generate viable replacement tissue. Although this technique has now been extended by the three-dimensional (3D) printing of geometrically complex scaffolds, the overall approach is hindered by relatively slow turnover and negative effects of residual scaffold material, which affects final clinical outcome. Methods recently developed for scaffold-free 3D bioprinting may overcome such obstacles and should allow for rapid manufacture and deployment of "bioprinted organs." Much work remains before 3D bioprinted tissues can enter clinical use. In this brief review we examine the present state and future perspectives of this nascent technology before full clinical implementation. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Three Dimensional Illustrating--Three-Dimensional Vision and Deception of Sensibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szállassy, Noémi; Gánóczy, Anita; Kriska, György

    2009-01-01

    The wide-spread digital photography and computer use gave the opportunity for everyone to make three-dimensional pictures and to make them public. The new opportunities with three-dimensional techniques give chance for the birth of new artistic photographs. We present in detail the biological roots of three-dimensional visualization, the phenomena…

  14. Three Dimensional Primary Hepatocyte Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoffe, Boris

    1998-01-01

    Our results demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of culturing PHH in microgravity bioreactors that exceeded the longest period obtained using other methods. Within the first week of culture, isolated hepatocytes started to form aggregates, which continuously increased in size (up to 1 cm) and macroscopically appeared as a multidimensional tissue-like assembly. To improve oxygenation and nutrition within the spheroids we performed experiments with the biodegradable nonwoven fiber-based polymers made from PolyGlycolic Acid (PGA). It has been shown that PGA scaffolds stimulate isolated cells to regenerate tissue with defined sizes and shapes and are currently being studied for various tissue-engineering applications. Our data demonstrated that culturing hepatocytes in the presence of PGA scaffolds resulted in more efficient cell assembly and formations of larger cell spheroids (up to 3 cm in length, see figure). The histology of cell aggregates cultured with PGA showed polymer fibers with attached hepatocytes. We initiated experiments to co-culture primary human hepatocytes with human microvascular endothelial cells in the bioreactor. The presence of endothelial cells in co-cultures were established by immunohistochemistry using anti-CD34 monoclonal Ab. Our preliminary data demonstrated that cultures of purified hepatocytes with human microvascular endothelial cells exhibited better growth and expressed higher levels of albumin MRNA for a longer period of time than cultures of ppfified, primary human hepatocytes cultured alone. We also evaluated microsomal deethylation activity of hepatocytes cultured in the presence of endothelial cells.In summary, we have established liver cell culture, which mimicked the structure and function of the parent tissue.

  15. Primary and Secondary Three Dimensional Microbatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirigliano, Nicolas

    Today's MEMS devices are limited more so by the batteries that supply their power than the fabrication methods used to build them. Thick battery electrodes are capable of providing adequate energy, but long and tortuous diffusion pathways lead to low power capabilities. On the other hand, thin film batteries can operate at significant current densities but require large surface areas to supply practical energy. This dilemma can be solved by either developing new high capacity materials or by engineering new battery designs that decouple power and energy. Three dimensional batteries redesign traditional configurations to create nonplanar interfaces between battery components. This can be done by introducing hierarchical structures into the electrode shape. Designs such as these provide a maximum surface area over which chemical reactions can occur. Furthermore, by maintaining small feature sizes, ion diffusion and electronic transport distances can remain minimal. Manipulating these properties ensures fast kinetics that are required for high power situations. Energy density is maximized by layering material in the vertical direction, thus ensuring a minimal footprint area. Three dimensional carbon electrodes are fabricated using basic MEMS techniques. A silicon mold is anisotropically etched to produce channels of a predetermined diameter. The channels are then filled using an infiltration technique with electrode slurry. Once dried, the mold is attached to a current collector and etched using a XeF2 process. Electrodes of varying feature sizes have been fabricated using this method with aspect ratios ranging from 3.5:1 to 7:1. 3D carbon electrodes are shown to obtain capacities over 8 mAh/cm2 at 0.1 mA/cm2, or nearly 700% higher than planar carbon electrodes. When assembled with a planar cathode, the battery cell produced an average discharge capacity of 40 J/cm 2 at a current density of 0.2 mA/cm2. This places the energy density values slightly less than thick

  16. Development of three-dimensional nanoengineered architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Naomi

    2003-10-01

    Nanostructured arrays with feature sizes <100 nm are desirable for a wide variety of applications in the fields of optics and electronics. One limitation of traditional lithographic methods is that such small feature sizes are difficult to cost-effectively pattern at high throughputs. Consequently, it is very important to develop novel strategies for rapidly fabricating three-dimensional nanostructured arrays. True engineering of nanoscale architectures also requires the ability to control the material composition and the structural arrangement which, until now, has been limited. This thesis demonstrates two new high-throughput methods of three-dimensional nanostructured synthesis. These techniques yield large-area, array-type nanostructures with 2D and 3D periodicities, with feature sizes <100 nm. Specifically, 2D periodic air-hole arrays and 3D periodic ferroelectric inverse opal films are fabricated. In the first part of the thesis, 2D periodic, nanoporous arrays were fabricated for the first time using conventional, broad-beam ion implantation of heavy ions through self-organized, nanochannel alumina (NCA) templates. The significant features of this technique are that minimum feature sizes of ˜40 nm are achievable in a parallel process over a large area (˜cm 2) using a non-material specific process, with successful nanoscale patterning achieved in both single crystal InP and SrTiO3. In addition, this work represents the first study of the selective etch character of amorphous SrTiO3. The nanoengineering of complex profiles, including membrane structures, is also demonstrated using this novel technique. In the second part of the thesis, the first fabrication of 3D periodic, ferroelectric, BaTiO3 inverse opals, and a simple, adjustable process for the fabrication of large, high-quality, inverse opal ferroelectric films are reported. Highly ordered, ferroelectric, Pb-doped Ba0.7Sr 0.3TiO3 (BST) inverse opal films were fabricated by spin-coating a sol

  17. Three-dimensional laser window formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhoff, Vincent G.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has developed and implemented a unique process for forming flawless three-dimensional laser windows. These windows represent a major part of specialized, nonintrusive laser data acquisition systems used in a variety of compressor and turbine research test facilities. This report discusses in detail the aspects of three-dimensional laser window formation. It focuses on the unique methodology and the peculiarities associated with the formation of these windows. Included in this discussion are the design criteria, bonding mediums, and evaluation testing for three-dimensional laser windows.

  18. Three-dimensional velocity measurements using LDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchhave, Preben

    The design requirements for and development of an LDA that measures the three components of the fluid velocity vector are described. The problems encountered in LDA measurements in highly turbulent flows, multivariate response, velocity bias, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and dynamic range, are discussed. The use of the fringe and/or the reference beam methods to measure the three velocity components, and the use of color, frequency shift, and polarization to separate three velocity projections are examined. Consideration is given to the coordinate transformation, the presentation of three-dimensional LDA data, and the possibility of three-dimensional bias correction. Procedures for conducting three-dimensional LDA measurements are proposed.

  19. A three-dimensional model of vasculogenesis.

    PubMed

    Valarmathi, Mani T; Davis, Jeffrey M; Yost, Michael J; Goodwin, Richard L; Potts, Jay D

    2009-02-01

    Postnatal bone marrow contains various subpopulations of resident and circulating stem cells (HSCs, BMSCs/MSCs) and progenitor cells (MAPCs, EPCs) that are capable of differentiating into one or more of the cellular components of the vascular bed in vitro as well as contribute to postnatal neo-vascularization in vivo. When rat BMSCs were seeded onto a three-dimensional (3-D) tubular scaffold engineered from topographically aligned type I collagen fibers and cultured either in vasculogenic or non-vasculogenic media for 7, 14, 21 or 28 days, the maturation and co-differentiation into endothelial and/or smooth muscle cell lineages were observed. Phenotypic induction of these substrate-grown cells was assayed at transcript level by real-time PCR and at protein level by confocal microscopy. In the present study, the observed upregulation of transcripts coding for vascular phenotypic markers is reminiscent of an in vivo expression pattern. Immunolocalization of vasculogenic lineage-associated markers revealed typical expression patterns of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. These endothelial cells exhibited high metabolism of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. In addition to the induced monolayers of endothelial cells, the presence of numerous microvascular capillary-like structures was observed throughout the construct. At the level of scanning electron microscopy, smooth-walled cylindrical tube-like structures with smooth muscle cells and/or pericytes attached to its surface were elucidated. Our 3-D culture system not only induces the maturation and differentiation of BMSCs into vascular cell lineages but also supports microvessel morphogenesis. Thus, this unique in vitro model provides an excellent platform to study the temporal and spatial regulation of postnatal de novo vasculogenesis, as well as attack the lingering limit in developing engineered tissues, that is perfusion.

  20. Three Dimensional Optic Tissue Culture and Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OConnor, Kim C. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Aten, Laurie A. (Inventor); Francis, Karen M. (Inventor); Caldwell, Delmar R. (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey L. (Inventor); Fitzgerald, Wendy S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A process for artificially producing three-dimensional optic tissue has been developed. The optic cells are cultured in a bioireactor at low shear conditions. The tissue forms as normal, functional tissue grows with tissue organization and extracellular matrix formation.

  1. Three dimensional optic tissue culture and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey L. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Francis, Karen M. (Inventor); Cardwell, Delmar R. (Inventor); Oconnor, Kim (Inventor); Fitzgerald, Wendy S. (Inventor); Aten, Laurie A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A process for artificially producing three-dimensional optic tissue has been developed. The optic cells are cultured in a bioreactor at low shear conditions. The tissue forms normal, functional tissue organization and extracellular matrix.

  2. Device fabrication: Three-dimensional printed electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Jennifer A.; Ahn, Bok Y.

    2015-02-01

    Can three-dimensional printing enable the mass customization of electronic devices? A study that exploits this method to create light-emitting diodes based on 'quantum dots' provides a step towards this goal.

  3. Three-dimensional printing of surgical anatomy.

    PubMed

    Powers, Mary K; Lee, Benjamin R; Silberstein, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Over the past decade, three-dimensional printing for the medical field has been expanding rapidly throughout all of medicine. This manuscript reviews the current and potential applications for three-dimensional printing, including education, presurgical planning, surgical simulation, bioprinting, and printed surgical equipment. Three-dimensional printing has proved most relevant in the fields of craniofacial, plastic, orthopedics, and especially, urologic surgery. This review focuses on several examples of how three-dimensional printing can be utilized, with emphasis on renal models for renal cell carcinoma, ureteral stents, and staghorn calculus. From an education standpoint, both patients and residents can benefit from the use of three-dimensional printed models, and even skilled surgeons report better understanding of complex procedures by using printed models. Three-dimensional printing in the field of medicine is growing quickly, and will soon be incorporated into the way residents are taught and patients are educated. For surgical simulation in a variety of disease processes, this will be particularly useful for urologic surgery.

  4. The three-dimensional Event-Driven Graphics Environment (3D-EDGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Jeffrey; Hahn, Roger; Schwartz, David M.

    1993-01-01

    Stanford Telecom developed the Three-Dimensional Event-Driven Graphics Environment (3D-EDGE) for NASA GSFC's (GSFC) Communications Link Analysis and Simulation System (CLASS). 3D-EDGE consists of a library of object-oriented subroutines which allow engineers with little or no computer graphics experience to programmatically manipulate, render, animate, and access complex three-dimensional objects.

  5. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Interfacial Phenomena Using Confocal Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, Ian C.

    Surfactants play an integral role in numerous functions ranging from stabilizing the emulsion in a favorite salad dressing to organizing the cellular components that make life possible. We are interested in lung surfactant, which is a mixture of lipids and proteins essential for normal respiration because it modulates the surface tension of the air-liquid interface of the thin fluid lining in the lungs. Through this surface tension modulation, lung surfactant ensures effortless lung expansion and prevents lung collapse during exhalation, thereby effecting proper oxygenation of the bloodstream. The function of lung surfactant, as well as numerous interfacial lipid systems, is not solely dictated by the behavior of materials confined to the two-dimensional interface. Rather, the distributions of materials in the liquid subphase also greatly influence the performance of interfacial films of lung surfactant. Therefore, to better understand the behavior of lung surfactant and other interfacial lipid systems, we require a three-dimensional characterization technique. In this dissertation, we have developed a novel confocal microscopy methodology for investigating the interfacial phenomena of surfactants at the air-liquid interface of a Langmuir trough. Confocal microscopy provides the excellent combination of in situ, fast, three-dimensional visualization of multiple components of the lung surfactant system that other characterization techniques lack. We detail the solutions to the numerous challenges encountered when imaging a dynamic air-liquid interface with a high-resolution technique like confocal microscopy. We then use confocal microscopy to elucidate the distinct mechanisms by which a polyelectrolyte (chitosan) and nonadsorbing polymer (polyethylene glycol) restore the function of lung surfactant under inhibitory conditions mimicking the effects of lung trauma. Beyond this physiological model, we also investigate several one- and two-component interfacial films

  6. Modeling the lung: Design and development of tissue engineered macro- and micro-physiologic lung models for research use.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Joan E; Niles, Jean A; Vega, Stephanie P; Argueta, Lissenya B; Eastaway, Adriene; Cortiella, Joaquin

    2014-09-01

    Respiratory tract specific cell populations, or tissue engineered in vitro grown human lung, have the potential to be used as research tools to mimic physiology, toxicology, pathology, as well as infectious diseases responses of cells or tissues. Studies related to respiratory tract pathogenesis or drug toxicity testing in the past made use of basic systems where single cell populations were exposed to test agents followed by evaluations of simple cellular responses. Although these simple single-cell-type systems provided good basic information related to cellular responses, much more can be learned from cells grown in fabricated microenvironments which mimic in vivo conditions in specialized microfabricated chambers or by human tissue engineered three-dimensional (3D) models which allow for more natural interactions between cells. Recent advances in microengineering technology, microfluidics, and tissue engineering have provided a new approach to the development of 2D and 3D cell culture models which enable production of more robust human in vitro respiratory tract models. Complex models containing multiple cell phenotypes also provide a more reasonable approximation of what occurs in vivo without the confounding elements in the dynamic in vivo environment. The goal of engineering good 3D human models is the formation of physiologically functional respiratory tissue surrogates which can be used as pathogenesis models or in the case of 2D screening systems for drug therapy evaluation as well as human toxicity testing. We hope that this manuscript will serve as a guide for development of future respiratory tract model systems as well as a review of conventional models. © 2014 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  7. Three-dimensional separation and reattachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peake, D. J.; Tobak, M.

    1982-01-01

    The separation of three dimensional turbulent boundary layers from the lee of flight vehicles at high angles of attack is investigated. The separation results in dominant, large scale, coiled vortex motions that pass along the body in the general direction of the free stream. In all cases of three dimensional flow separation and reattachment, the assumption of continuous vector fields of skin friction lines and external flow streamlines, coupled with simple laws of topology, provides a flow grammar whose elemental constituents are the singular points: the nodes, spiral nodes (foci), and saddles. The phenomenon of three dimensional separation may be construed as either a local or a global event, depending on whether the skin friction line that becomes a line of separation originates at a node or a saddle point.

  8. Topology of three-dimensional separated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobak, M.; Peake, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Based on the hypothesis that patterns of skin-friction lines and external streamlines reflect the properties of continuous vector fields, topology rules define a small number of singular points (nodes, saddle points, and foci) that characterize the patterns on the surface and on particular projections of the flow (e.g., the crossflow plane). The restricted number of singular points and the rules that they obey are considered as an organizing principle whose finite number of elements can be combined in various ways to connect together the properties common to all steady three dimensional viscous flows. Introduction of a distinction between local and global properties of the flow resolves an ambiguity in the proper definition of a three dimensional separated flow. Adoption of the notions of topological structure, structural stability, and bifurcation provides a framework to describe how three dimensional separated flows originate and succeed each other as the relevant parameters of the problem are varied.

  9. Three-dimensional separation and reattachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peake, D. J.; Tobak, M.

    1982-01-01

    The separation of three dimensional turbulent boundary layers from the lee of flight vehicles at high angles of attack is investigated. The separation results in dominant, large scale, coiled vortex motions that pass along the body in the general direction of the free stream. In all cases of three dimensional flow separation and reattachment, the assumption of continuous vector fields of skin friction lines and external flow streamlines, coupled with simple laws of topology, provides a flow grammar whose elemental constituents are the singular points: the nodes, spiral nodes (foci), and saddles. The phenomenon of three dimensional separation may be constrained as either a local or a global event, depending on whether the skin friction line that becomes a line of separation originates at a node or a saddle point.

  10. Vision in our three-dimensional world.

    PubMed

    Parker, Andrew J

    2016-06-19

    Many aspects of our perceptual experience are dominated by the fact that our two eyes point forward. Whilst the location of our eyes leaves the environment behind our head inaccessible to vision, co-ordinated use of our two eyes gives us direct access to the three-dimensional structure of the scene in front of us, through the mechanism of stereoscopic vision. Scientific understanding of the different brain regions involved in stereoscopic vision and three-dimensional spatial cognition is changing rapidly, with consequent influences on fields as diverse as clinical practice in ophthalmology and the technology of virtual reality devices.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in our three-dimensional world'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  11. Vision in our three-dimensional world

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Many aspects of our perceptual experience are dominated by the fact that our two eyes point forward. Whilst the location of our eyes leaves the environment behind our head inaccessible to vision, co-ordinated use of our two eyes gives us direct access to the three-dimensional structure of the scene in front of us, through the mechanism of stereoscopic vision. Scientific understanding of the different brain regions involved in stereoscopic vision and three-dimensional spatial cognition is changing rapidly, with consequent influences on fields as diverse as clinical practice in ophthalmology and the technology of virtual reality devices. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Vision in our three-dimensional world’. PMID:27269595

  12. Three dimensional boundary conditions in supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudman, S.; Marconi, F.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the flow pattern at a solid surface in three dimensional supersonic flow is presented. The additional information necessary to overcome the nonuniqueness associated with the body tangency condition in three dimensions was developed. The analysis is based on the fact that three dimensional waves propagate locally exactly as they do in axisymmetric flow when viewed in the osculating plane to the streamline. The supersonic flow over an infinite swept corner is examined by both the classical solution and the three dimensional solution in the osculating plane and the results are shown to be identical. A simple numerical algorithm is proposed which accounts for the three wave surfaces that interact at a solid boundary.

  13. Three-dimensional stability of vortex arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, A. C.; Saffman, P. G.

    1982-12-01

    The stability to three-dimensional disturbances of three classical steady vortex configurations in an incompressible inviscid fluid is studied in the limit of small vortex cross-sectional area and long axial disturbance wavelength. The configurations examined are the single infinite vortex row, the Karman vortex street of staggered vortices and the symmetric vortex street. It is shown that the single row is most unstable to a two-dimensional disturbance, while the Karman vortex street is most unstable to a three-dimensional disturbance over a significant range of street spacing ratios. The symmetric vortex street is found to be most unstable to three-dimensional or two-dimensional symmetric disturbances depending on the spacing ratio of the street. Short remarks are made concerning the relevance of the calculations to the observed instabilities in free shear layer, wake and boundary-layer type flows.

  14. Fabrication of three dimensional microstructure fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ying; Ma, Jie; Chen, Zhe; Lu, Huihui; Zhong, Yongchun

    2015-05-01

    A method of fabricating three dimensional (3D) microstructured fiber is presented. Polystyrene (PS) microspheres were coated around the surface of a micro-fiber through isothermal heating evaporation induced self-assembly method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image shows that the colloidal crystal has continuous, uniform, and well-ordered face-centered cubic (FCC) structure, with [111] crystallographic direction normal to the surface of micro-fiber. This micro-fiber with three-dimensional photonic crystals structure is very useful in the applications of micro-fiber sensors or filters.

  15. Three-dimensional topological insulators and bosonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelli, Andrea; Randellini, Enrico; Sisti, Jacopo

    2017-05-01

    Massless excitations at the surface of three-dimensional time-reversal invariant topological insulators possess both fermionic and bosonic descriptions, originating from band theory and hydrodynamic BF theory, respectively. We analyze the corresponding field theories of the Dirac fermion and compactified boson and compute their partition functions on the three-dimensional torus geometry. We then find some non-dynamic exact properties of bosonization in (2+1) dimensions, regarding fermion parity and spin sectors. Using these results, we extend the Fu-Kane-Mele stability argument to fractional topological insulators in three dimensions.

  16. Three-dimensional displays and stereo vision.

    PubMed

    Westheimer, Gerald

    2011-08-07

    Procedures for three-dimensional image reconstruction that are based on the optical and neural apparatus of human stereoscopic vision have to be designed to work in conjunction with it. The principal methods of implementing stereo displays are described. Properties of the human visual system are outlined as they relate to depth discrimination capabilities and achieving optimal performance in stereo tasks. The concept of depth rendition is introduced to define the change in the parameters of three-dimensional configurations for cases in which the physical disposition of the stereo camera with respect to the viewed object differs from that of the observer's eyes.

  17. Three-dimensional crack closure behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Grandt, A. F., Jr.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A crack closure measurement technique involving fatigue striations was used to produce a three-dimensional crack opening load profile for 2024-T351 aluminum alloy. The crack opening load profile, determined through the specimen thickness, was compared with crack opening load measurements made with strain gages and displacement gages. The results of this study indicate that a significant three-dimensional variation in crack closure behavior occurs in the alloy examined. An understanding of this phehomenon is important in understanding crack growth behavior, predicting crack shape changes, and interpreting 'standard' crack closure measurement techniques.

  18. Three-dimensional stochastic vortex flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, R.; Pulvirenti, M.

    1989-08-01

    It is well known that the dynamics of point vortices approximate, under suitable limits, the two-dimensional Euler flow for an ideal fluid. To find particle models for three-dimensional flows is a more intricate problem. A stochastic version of the algorithm introduced by Beale amd Maida (1982) for simulating the behavior of a three-dimensional Euler flow is introduced here, and convergence to the Navier-Stokes (NS) flow in R exp 3 is shown. The result is based on a stochastic Lagrangian picture of the NS equations.

  19. Three-dimensional magnetic bubble memory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor); Katti, Romney R. (Inventor); Wu, Jiin-Chuan (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A compact memory uses magnetic bubble technology for providing data storage. A three-dimensional arrangement, in the form of stacks of magnetic bubble layers, is used to achieve high volumetric storage density. Output tracks are used within each layer to allow data to be accessed uniquely and unambiguously. Storage can be achieved using either current access or field access magnetic bubble technology. Optical sensing via the Faraday effect is used to detect data. Optical sensing facilitates the accessing of data from within the three-dimensional package and lends itself to parallel operation for supporting high data rates and vector and parallel processing.

  20. Diesel engine exhaust and lung cancer: an unproven association.

    PubMed Central

    Muscat, J E; Wynder, E L

    1995-01-01

    The risk of lung cancer associated with diesel exhaust has been calculated from 14 case-control or cohort studies. We evaluated the findings from these studies to determine whether there is sufficient evidence to implicate diesel exhaust as a human lung carcinogen. Four studies found increased risks associated with long-term exposure, although two of the four studies were based on the same cohort of railroad workers. Six studies were inconclusive due to missing information on smoking habits, internal inconsistencies, or inadequate characterization of diesel exposure. Four studies found no statistically significant associations. It can be concluded that short-term exposure to diesel engine exhaust (< 20 years) does not have a causative role in human lung cancer. There is statistical but not causal evidence that long-term exposure to diesel exhaust (> 20 years) increases the risk of lung cancer for locomotive engineers, brakemen, and diesel engine mechanics. There is inconsistent evidence on the effects of long-term exposure to diesel exhaust in the trucking industry. There is no evidence for a joint effect of diesel exhaust and cigarette smoking on lung cancer risk. Using common criteria for determining causal associations, the epidemiologic evidence is insufficient to establish diesel engine exhaust as a human lung carcinogen. Images p812-a PMID:7498093

  1. The application of three-dimensional photoelasticity to impact problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kostin, I.C.; Fedorov, A.V.

    1995-12-31

    A method is proposed for the solution of three-dimensional dynamic problems in geometrically complex structural configurations under impact. The methodology developed employs the generation of photoelastically observable stress wave propagation in a birefringent material applied to the external surfaces of a structure. This work demonstrated the extension of this technique to impact loading. Problems of practical engineering application, such as the gluing of birefringent material to test models were examined experimentally. Pulsed magnetic fields generated by capacitor discharge were employed on typical complex engineering models to demonstrate that the methodology is adequate for solving practical impact problems.

  2. Three dimensional thermal analysis of rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naraghi, M. H. N.; Armstrong, E. S.

    1988-01-01

    A numerical model for the three dimensional thermal analysis of rocket thrust chambers and nozzles has been developed. The input to the model consists of the composition of the fuel/oxidant mixture and flow rates, chamber pressure, coolant entrance temperature and pressure, dimensions of the engine, materials and the number of nodes in different parts of the engine. The model allows for temperature variation in three dimensions: axial, radial and circumferential directions and by implementing an iterative scheme, it provides nodal temperature distribution, rates of heat transfer, hot gas and coolant thermal and transport properties.

  3. Three-dimensional tissue culture based on magnetic cell levitation.

    PubMed

    Souza, Glauco R; Molina, Jennifer R; Raphael, Robert M; Ozawa, Michael G; Stark, Daniel J; Levin, Carly S; Bronk, Lawrence F; Ananta, Jeyarama S; Mandelin, Jami; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Bankson, James A; Gelovani, Juri G; Killian, T C; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2010-04-01

    Cell culture is an essential tool in drug discovery, tissue engineering and stem cell research. Conventional tissue culture produces two-dimensional cell growth with gene expression, signalling and morphology that can be different from those found in vivo, and this compromises its clinical relevance. Here, we report a three-dimensional tissue culture based on magnetic levitation of cells in the presence of a hydrogel consisting of gold, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and filamentous bacteriophage. By spatially controlling the magnetic field, the geometry of the cell mass can be manipulated, and multicellular clustering of different cell types in co-culture can be achieved. Magnetically levitated human glioblastoma cells showed similar protein expression profiles to those observed in human tumour xenografts. Taken together, these results indicate that levitated three-dimensional culture with magnetized phage-based hydrogels more closely recapitulates in vivo protein expression and may be more feasible for long-term multicellular studies.

  4. Three-dimensional optical holography using a plasmonic metasurface

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lingling; Chen, Xianzhong; Mühlenbernd, Holger; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Shumei; Bai, Benfeng; Tan, Qiaofeng; Jin, Guofan; Cheah, Kok-Wai; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Li, Jensen; Zentgraf, Thomas; Zhang, Shuang

    2013-01-01

    Benefitting from the flexibility in engineering their optical response, metamaterials have been used to achieve control over the propagation of light to an unprecedented level, leading to highly unconventional and versatile optical functionalities compared with their natural counterparts. Recently, the emerging field of metasurfaces, which consist of a monolayer of photonic artificial atoms, has offered attractive functionalities for shaping wave fronts of light by introducing an abrupt interfacial phase discontinuity. Here we realize three-dimensional holography by using metasurfaces made of subwavelength metallic nanorods with spatially varying orientations. The phase discontinuity takes place when the helicity of incident circularly polarized light is reversed. As the phase can be continuously controlled in each subwavelength unit cell by the rod orientation, metasurfaces represent a new route towards high-resolution on-axis three-dimensional holograms with a wide field of view. In addition, the undesired effect of multiple diffraction orders usually accompanying holography is eliminated.

  5. Three-dimensional tissue culture based on magnetic cell levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Glauco R.; Molina, Jennifer R.; Raphael, Robert M.; Ozawa, Michael G.; Stark, Daniel J.; Levin, Carly S.; Bronk, Lawrence F.; Ananta, Jeyarama S.; Mandelin, Jami; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Bankson, James A.; Gelovani, Juri G.; Killian, T. C.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2010-04-01

    Cell culture is an essential tool in drug discovery, tissue engineering and stem cell research. Conventional tissue culture produces two-dimensional cell growth with gene expression, signalling and morphology that can be different from those found in vivo, and this compromises its clinical relevance. Here, we report a three-dimensional tissue culture based on magnetic levitation of cells in the presence of a hydrogel consisting of gold, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and filamentous bacteriophage. By spatially controlling the magnetic field, the geometry of the cell mass can be manipulated, and multicellular clustering of different cell types in co-culture can be achieved. Magnetically levitated human glioblastoma cells showed similar protein expression profiles to those observed in human tumour xenografts. Taken together, these results indicate that levitated three-dimensional culture with magnetized phage-based hydrogels more closely recapitulates in vivo protein expression and may be more feasible for long-term multicellular studies.

  6. Three-dimensional chiral photonic superlattices.

    PubMed

    Thiel, M; Fischer, H; von Freymann, G; Wegener, M

    2010-01-15

    We investigate three-dimensional photonic superlattices composed of polymeric helices in various spatial checkerboard-like arrangements. Depending on the relative phase shift and handedness of the chiral building blocks, different circular-dichroism resonances appear or are suppressed. Samples corresponding to four different configurations are fabricated by direct laser writing. The measured optical transmittance spectra are in good agreement with numerical calculations.

  7. Three-dimensional RF structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, R. K.; Browman, M. J.; Weiland, T.

    1989-04-01

    The calculation of three-dimensional rf structures is rapidly approaching adolescence, after having been in its infancy for the last four years. This paper will show the kinds of calculations that are currently being performed in the frequency domain and is a companion paper to one in which time-domain calculations are described.

  8. Three-dimensional rf structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.K.; Browman, M.J.; Weiland, T.

    1988-01-01

    The calculation of three-dimensional rf structures is rapidly approaching adolescence, after having been in its infancy for the last four years. This paper will show the kinds of calculations that are currently being performed in the frequency domain and is a companion paper to one in which time-domain calculations are described. 13 refs., 14 figs.

  9. Growing Three-Dimensional Cocultures Of Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, David A.; Goodwin, Thomas J.

    1995-01-01

    Laboratory process provides environmental conditions favoring simultaneous growth of cocultures of mammalian cells of more than one type. Cultures become three-dimensional tissuelike assemblies serving as organoid models of differentiation of cells. Process used, for example, to study growth of human colon cancers, starting from mixtures of normal colonic fibroblasts and partially differentiated colon adenocarcinoma cells.

  10. Spectral tomography of three-dimensional objects

    SciTech Connect

    Bulygin, F.V.; Levin, G.G.

    1995-12-01

    Spectral tomography is a new field in optical tomography concerned with studies of the internal space-spectral structure of polychromatic objects. In this paper, methods for obtaining projections spectral structure of three-dimensional objects and algorithms for its reconstruction are proposed and described. The results of the spectral-tomography reconstruction of the object structure are presented. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Three-Dimensional Printing Surgical Applications.

    PubMed

    AlAli, Ahmad B; Griffin, Michelle F; Butler, Peter E

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional printing, a technology used for decades in the industrial field, gains a lot of attention in the medical field for its potential benefits. With advancement of desktop printers, this technology is accessible and a lot of research is going on in the medical field. To evaluate its application in surgical field, which may include but not limited to surgical planning, surgical education, implants, and prosthesis, which are the focus of this review. Research was conducted by searching PubMed, Web of science, and other reliable sources. We included original articles and excluded articles based on animals, those more than 10 years old, and those not in English. These articles were evaluated, and relevant studies were included in this review. Three-dimensional printing shows a potential benefit in surgical application. Printed implants were used in patient in a few cases and show successful results; however, longer follow-up and more trials are needed. Surgical and medical education is believed to be more efficient with this technology than the current practice. Printed surgical instrument and surgical planning are also believed to improve with three-dimensional printing. Three-dimensional printing can be a very powerful tool in the near future, which can aid the medical field that is facing a lot of challenges and obstacles. However, despite the reported results, further research on larger samples and analytical measurements should be conducted to ensure this technology's impact on the practice.

  12. Three dimensional reconnection in astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spicer, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical issues related to three-dimensional reconnection and its application to the space and astrophysical environment are reviewed. Consideration is given to the meaning of reconnection in three dimensions, the way in which periodic and nonperiodic magnetic topologies alter the physics of reconnections, and the effects of chaotic magnetic fields on the reconnection process.

  13. [Three Dimensional Display in Nuclear Medicine].

    PubMed

    Teraoka, Satomi; Souma, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Imaging techniques to obtain a tomographic image in nuclear medicine such as PET and SPECT are widely used. It is necessary to interpreting all of the tomographic images obtained in order to accurately evaluate the individual lesion, whereas three dimensional display is often useful in order to overview and evaluate the feature of the entire lesion or disease such as the position, size and abnormal pattern. In Japan, the use of three dimensional image analysis workstation with an application of the co-registration and image fusion between the functional images such as PET or SPECT and anatomical images such as CT or MRI has been generalized. In addition, multimodality imaging system such as a PET/CT and SPECT/CT has been widespread. Therefore, it is expected to improve the diagnostic accuracy using three dimensionally image fusion to functional images with poor anatomical information. In this commentary, as an example of a three dimensional display that are commonly used in nuclear medicine examination in Japan, brain regions, cardiac region and bone and tumor region will be introduced separately.

  14. Three Dimensional Display Of Meteorological Scientific Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotch, Stanley L.

    1988-01-01

    Even a cursory reading of any daily newspaper shows that we are in the midst of a dramatic revolution in computer graphics. Virtually every day some new piece of hardware or software is announced, adding to the tools available to the working scientist. Three dimensional graphics form a significant part of this revolution having become virtually commonplace in advertising and on television.

  15. Three-dimensional colorimetric assay assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah; Reichert, Anke

    2001-01-01

    A direct assay is described using novel three-dimensional polymeric assemblies which change from a blue to red color when exposed to an analyte, in one case a flue virus. The assemblies are typically in the form of liposomes which can be maintained in a suspension, and show great intensity in their color changes. Their method of production is also described.

  16. Three-Dimensional Pointers for Stereoscopic Projection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayman, H. J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Because class size often limits student opportunity to handle individual models, teachers use stereoscopic projections to demonstrate structural features. Describes three-dimensional pointers for use with different projection systems so teachers can indicate a particular atom or bond to entire classes, avoiding the perspective problems inherent in…

  17. Growing Three-Dimensional Cocultures Of Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, David A.; Goodwin, Thomas J.

    1995-01-01

    Laboratory process provides environmental conditions favoring simultaneous growth of cocultures of mammalian cells of more than one type. Cultures become three-dimensional tissuelike assemblies serving as organoid models of differentiation of cells. Process used, for example, to study growth of human colon cancers, starting from mixtures of normal colonic fibroblasts and partially differentiated colon adenocarcinoma cells.

  18. Three-dimensional implicit lambda methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Napolitano, M.; Dadone, A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper derives the three dimensional lambda-formulation equations for a general orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system and provides various block-explicit and block-implicit methods for solving them, numerically. Three model problems, characterized by subsonic, supersonic and transonic flow conditions, are used to assess the reliability and compare the efficiency of the proposed methods.

  19. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Particle Tracks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julian, Glenn M.

    1993-01-01

    Suggests ways to bring home to the introductory physics student some of the excitement of recent discoveries in particle physics. Describes particle detectors and encourages the use of the Standard Model along with real images of particle tracks to determine three-dimensional views of tracks. (MVL)

  20. Three-Dimensional Printing Surgical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Michelle F.; Butler, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Three-dimensional printing, a technology used for decades in the industrial field, gains a lot of attention in the medical field for its potential benefits. With advancement of desktop printers, this technology is accessible and a lot of research is going on in the medical field. Objective: To evaluate its application in surgical field, which may include but not limited to surgical planning, surgical education, implants, and prosthesis, which are the focus of this review. Methods: Research was conducted by searching PubMed, Web of science, and other reliable sources. We included original articles and excluded articles based on animals, those more than 10 years old, and those not in English. These articles were evaluated, and relevant studies were included in this review. Discussion: Three-dimensional printing shows a potential benefit in surgical application. Printed implants were used in patient in a few cases and show successful results; however, longer follow-up and more trials are needed. Surgical and medical education is believed to be more efficient with this technology than the current practice. Printed surgical instrument and surgical planning are also believed to improve with three-dimensional printing. Conclusion: Three-dimensional printing can be a very powerful tool in the near future, which can aid the medical field that is facing a lot of challenges and obstacles. However, despite the reported results, further research on larger samples and analytical measurements should be conducted to ensure this technology's impact on the practice. PMID:26301002

  1. Three-dimensional patterning methods and related devices

    SciTech Connect

    Putnam, Morgan C.; Kelzenberg, Michael D.; Atwater, Harry A.; Boettcher, Shannon W.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Spurgeon, Joshua M.; Turner-Evans, Daniel B.; Warren, Emily L.

    2016-12-27

    Three-dimensional patterning methods of a three-dimensional microstructure, such as a semiconductor wire array, are described, in conjunction with etching and/or deposition steps to pattern the three-dimensional microstructure.

  2. Use of frozen stress in extracting stress intensity factor distributions in three dimensional cracked body problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.

    1992-01-01

    The adaptation of the frozen stress photoelastic method to the determination of the distribution of stress intensity factors in three dimensional problems is briefly reviewed. The method is then applied to several engineering problems of practical significance.

  3. Primary Analysis of the Phase II Component of a Phase I/II Dose Intensification Study Using Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Patients With Inoperable Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer: RTOG 0117

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Bae, Kyounghwa; Graham, Mary V.; Byhardt, Roger; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Fowler, Jack; Purdy, James A.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Gore, Elizabeth; Choy, Hak

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Phase I of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0117 determined that 74 Gy was the maximum-tolerated dose with concurrent weekly carboplatin/paclitaxel chemotherapy for inoperable non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Phase II results are reported here. Patients and Methods Patients with unresectable stages I-III NSCLC were eligible. Chemotherapy consisted of weekly paclitaxel at 50 mg/m2 and carboplatin at area under the curve 2 mg/m2. The radiation dose was 74 Gy given in 37 fractions. Radiation therapy volumes included those of the gross tumor and involved nodes. The volume of lung at or exceeding 20 Gy (V20) was mandated to be ≤ 30%. Results Of the combined phase I/II enrollment, a total of 55 patients received 74 Gy, of whom 53 were evaluable. The median follow-up was 19.3 months (range, 0.9 to 57.9 months) for all patients and 25.4 months (range, 13.1 to 57.9 months) for those still alive. The median survival for all patients was 25.9 months. The percentage surviving at least 12 months was 75.5% (95% CI, 65.7% to 85.2%). The median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) times for stage III patients (n = 44) were 21.6 months and 10.8 months, respectively. OS and PFS rates at 12 months were 72.7% and 50.0%, respectively. Twelve patients experienced grade ≥ 3 lung toxicity (two patients had grade 5 lung toxicity). Conclusion The median survival time and OS rate at 12 months for this regimen are encouraging. These results serve as projection expectations for the high-dose radiation arms of the current RTOG 0617 phase III intergroup trial. PMID:20368547

  4. Interactive dynamic three-dimensional scene for the ground-based three-dimensional display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Peining; Sang, Xinzhu; Guo, Nan; Chen, Duo; Yan, Binbin; Wang, Kuiru; Dou, Wenhua; Xiao, Liquan

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) displays provides valuable tools for many fields, such as scientific experiment, education, information transmission, medical imaging and physical simulation. Ground based 360° 3D display with dynamic and controllable scene can find some special applications, such as design and construction of buildings, aeronautics, military sand table and so on. It can be utilized to evaluate and visualize the dynamic scene of the battlefield, surgical operation and the 3D canvas of art. In order to achieve the ground based 3D display, the public focus plane should be parallel to the camera's imaging planes, and optical axes should be offset to the center of public focus plane in both vertical and horizontal directions. Virtual cameras are used to display 3D dynamic scene with Unity 3D engine. Parameters of virtual cameras for capturing scene are designed and analyzed, and locations of virtual cameras are determined by the observer's eye positions in the observing space world. An interactive dynamic 3D scene for ground based 360° 3D display is demonstrated, which provides high-immersion 3D visualization.

  5. Three Dimensional Particle Tracking in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megson, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Superfluid helium is a macroscopic quantum state which exhibits exotic physical properties, such as flow without friction and ballistic heat transport. Superfluid flow is irrotational except about line-like topological phase defects with quantized circulation, known as quatized vortices. The presence of these vortices and their dynamics is the dominating factor of turbulence in superfluid flows. One commonly studied regime of superfluid turbulence is thermal counterflow, where a local heat flux drives the formation and growth of a tangle of vortices. This talk will present experimental studies of counterflow turbulence performed using a multi-camera three-dimensional imaging apparatus with micron-sized ice tracer particles as well as fluorescent nanoparticles. In particular, we will discuss the measurement of three-dimensional velocties and their autocorrelations. Additionally, we are developing new techniques for optical studies of bulk superfluid helium, with particular focus on characterizing tracer particles and particle dispersal mechanisms. Funding from NSF DMR-1407472.

  6. Three-dimensional trabecular alignment model.

    PubMed

    Bono, Eric S; Smolinski, Patrick; Casagranda, Al; Xu, Junde

    2003-04-01

    Trabecular alignment theory has been used to quantify Wolff's Law of bone remodeling. A three-dimensional finite element scheme was developed to analyze the bone remodeling phenomenon. The mathematical model proposed by Mullender et al. and later modified by Smith et al. was adopted to simulate the surface-based trabecular resorption and formation processes. Enhancements incorporated into the previous model include: mapping into three-dimensions, controlling the remodeling signal's passage through marrow, controlling the finite distance the signal may pass through the bone matrix, and including non-bone material in the finite element model. After the model is explained and thoroughly studied, three-dimensional implant surface geometries are simulated.

  7. Analysis of three-dimensional transonic compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourgeade, A.

    1984-01-01

    A method for computing the three-dimensional transonic flow around the blades of a compressor or of a propeller is given. The method is based on the use of the velocity potential, on the hypothesis that the flow is inviscid, irrotational and isentropic. The equation of the potential is solved in a transformed space such that the surface of the blade is mapped into a plane where the periodicity is implicit. This equation is in a nonconservative form and is solved with the help of a finite difference method using artificial time. A computer code is provided and some sample results are given in order to demonstrate the influence of three-dimensional effects and the blade's rotation.

  8. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Mao, Teresa; Neelakantan, Prasanna

    2014-09-01

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome.

  9. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome. PMID:25279337

  10. Arching in three-dimensional clogging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Török, János; Lévay, Sára; Szabó, Balázs; Somfai, Ellák; Wegner, Sandra; Stannarius, Ralf; Börzsönyi, Tamás

    2017-06-01

    Arching in dry granular material is a long established concept, however it remains still an open question how three-dimensional orifices clog. We investigate by means of numerical simulations and experimental data how the outflow creates a blocked configuration of particles. We define the concave surface of the clogged dome by two independent methods (geometric and density based). The average shape of the cupola for spheres is almost a hemisphere but individual samples have large holes in the structure indicating a blocked state composed of two-dimensional force chains rather than three-dimensional objects. The force chain structure justifies this assumption. For long particles the clogged configurations display large variations, and in certain cases the empty region reaches a height of 5 hole diameters. These structures involve vertical walls consisting of horizontally placed stable stacking of particles.

  11. Three-dimensional effects on airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevallier, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of boundary layer flows along the walls of wind tunnels were studied to validate the transfer of two dimensional calculations to three dimensional transonic flowfield calculations. Results from trials in various wind tunnels were examind to determine the effects of the wall boundary flow on the control surfaces of an airfoil. Models sliding along a groove in the wall of a channel at sub- and transonic speeds were examined, with the finding that with either nonuniformities in the groove, or even if the channel walls are uniform, the lateral boundary layer can cause variations in the central flow region or alter the onset of shock at the transition point. Models for the effects in both turbulence and in the absence of turbulence are formulated, and it is noted that the characteristics of individual wind tunnels must be studied to quantify any existing three dimensional effects.

  12. Three dimensional digital imaging of environmental data

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, R.L.; Eddy, C.A.

    1991-06-14

    The Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of the Savannah River Laboratory has recently acquired the computer hardware (Silicon Graphics Personal Iris Workstations) and software (Dynamic Graphics, Interactive Surface and Volume Modeling) to perform three dimensional analysis of hydrogeologic data. Three dimensional digital imaging of environmental data is a powerful technique that can be used to incorporate field, analytical, and modeling results from geologic, hydrologic, ecologic, and chemical studies into a comprehensive model for visualization and interpretation. This report covers the contamination of four different sites of the Savannah River Plant. Each section of this report has a computer graphic display of the concentration of contamination in the groundwater and/or sediments of each site.

  13. Real time three dimensional sensing system

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Steven J.

    1996-01-01

    The invention is a three dimensional sensing system which utilizes two flexibly located cameras for receiving and recording visual information with respect to a sensed object illuminated by a series of light planes. Each pixel of each image is converted to a digital word and the words are grouped into stripes, each stripe comprising contiguous pixels. One pixel of each stripe in one image is selected and an epi-polar line of that point is drawn in the other image. The three dimensional coordinate of each selected point is determined by determining the point on said epi-polar line which also lies on a stripe in the second image and which is closest to a known light plane.

  14. Real time three dimensional sensing system

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, S.J.

    1996-12-31

    The invention is a three dimensional sensing system which utilizes two flexibly located cameras for receiving and recording visual information with respect to a sensed object illuminated by a series of light planes. Each pixel of each image is converted to a digital word and the words are grouped into stripes, each stripe comprising contiguous pixels. One pixel of each stripe in one image is selected and an epi-polar line of that point is drawn in the other image. The three dimensional coordinate of each selected point is determined by determining the point on said epi-polar line which also lies on a stripe in the second image and which is closest to a known light plane. 7 figs.

  15. Bootstrapping the Three Dimensional Supersymmetric Ising Model.

    PubMed

    Bobev, Nikolay; El-Showk, Sheer; Mazáč, Dalimil; Paulos, Miguel F

    2015-07-31

    We implement the conformal bootstrap program for three dimensional conformal field theories with N=2 supersymmetry and find universal constraints on the spectrum of operator dimensions in these theories. By studying the bounds on the dimension of the first scalar appearing in the operator product expansion of a chiral and an antichiral primary, we find a kink at the expected location of the critical three dimensional N=2 Wess-Zumino model, which can be thought of as a supersymmetric analog of the critical Ising model. Focusing on this kink, we determine, to high accuracy, the low-lying spectrum of operator dimensions of the theory, as well as the stress-tensor two-point function. We find that the latter is in an excellent agreement with an exact computation.

  16. Simulation of complex three-dimensional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diewert, G. S.; Rothmund, H. J.; Nakahashi, K.

    1985-01-01

    The concept of splitting is used extensively to simulate complex three dimensional flows on modern computer architectures. Used in all aspects, from initial grid generation to the determination of the final converged solution, splitting is used to enhance code vectorization, to permit solution driven grid adaption and grid enrichment, to permit the use of concurrent processing, and to enhance data flow through hierarchal memory systems. Three examples are used to illustrate these concepts to complex three dimensional flow fields: (1) interactive flow over a bump; (2) supersonic flow past a blunt based conical afterbody at incidence to a free stream and containing a centered propulsive jet; and (3) supersonic flow past a sharp leading edge delta wing at incidence to the free stream.

  17. Three dimensional contact/impact methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    The simulation of three-dimensional interface mechanics between reactor components and structures during static contact or dynamic impact is necessary to realistically evaluate their structural integrity to off-normal loads. In our studies of postulated core energy release events, we have found that significant structure-structure interactions occur in some reactor vessel head closure designs and that fluid-structure interactions occur within the reactor vessel. Other examples in which three-dimensional interface mechanics play an important role are: (1) impact response of shipping casks containing spent fuel, (2) whipping pipe impact on reinforced concrete panels or pipe-to-pipe impact after a pipe break, (3) aircraft crash on secondary containment structures, (4) missiles generated by turbine failures or tornados, and (5) drops of heavy components due to lifting accidents. The above is a partial list of reactor safety problems that require adequate treatment of interface mechanics and are discussed in this paper.

  18. Three-dimensional bio-printing.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qi; Hao, Jie; Lu, YangJie; Wang, Liu; Wallace, Gordon G; Zhou, Qi

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing technology has been widely used in various manufacturing operations including automotive, defence and space industries. 3D printing has the advantages of personalization, flexibility and high resolution, and is therefore becoming increasingly visible in the high-tech fields. Three-dimensional bio-printing technology also holds promise for future use in medical applications. At present 3D bio-printing is mainly used for simulating and reconstructing some hard tissues or for preparing drug-delivery systems in the medical area. The fabrication of 3D structures with living cells and bioactive moieties spatially distributed throughout will be realisable. Fabrication of complex tissues and organs is still at the exploratory stage. This review summarize the development of 3D bio-printing and its potential in medical applications, as well as discussing the current challenges faced by 3D bio-printing.

  19. Three-dimensional metallic boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shunhong; Wang, Qian; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Jena, Puru

    2013-12-04

    Boron nitride (BN) and carbon are chemical analogues of each other and share similar structures such as one-dimensional nanotubes, two-dimensional nanosheets characterized by sp(2) bonding, and three-dimensional diamond structures characterized by sp(3) bonding. However, unlike carbon which can be metallic in one, two, and three dimensions, BN is an insulator, irrespective of its structure and dimensionality. On the basis of state-of-the-art theoretical calculations, we propose a tetragonal phase of BN which is both dynamically stable and metallic. Analysis of its band structure, density of states, and electron localization function confirms the origin of the metallic behavior to be due to the delocalized B 2p electrons. The metallicity exhibited in the studied three-dimensional BN structures can lead to materials beyond conventional ceramics as well as to materials with potential for applications in electronic devices.

  20. Three-dimensional magnetic field annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, M.; Allen, H. R.; Grundy, R. E.

    1993-11-01

    We present a family of three-dimensional nonlinear solutions for magnetic field annihilation in a current sheet, including the effects of resistivity and viscosity. The different members of the family are characterized by the imposed vorticity of the flow that brings the field lines together. Since in a three- dimensional flow the vorticity can be increased by the stretching of vortex lines (an effect that is absent in two dimensions), we find some striking differences to our previous two-dimensional analysis. In both the two-dimensional and three-dimensional analyses, above a certain critical imposed vorticity omegacrit, the flow breaks up into cells with current sheet is completely altered. In the two-dimensional analysis, omegacrit is a steeply increasing function of the viscous Reynolds number R, whereas in the three-dimensional case, it quickly asymptotes to only omegacrit = 2v0/L where v0 and L are the characteristic velocity and length scale of the flow, respectively. The width of the current sheet, which depends on the speed at which field lines are carried into it, also responds differently to an increase in R. In two dimensions, the current sheet narrows for all vorticities, but three dimensions, it narrows when the imposed vorticity is negative and widens when it is positive. Also we find that the current density within the current sheet varies as the nature of the flow is changed, rather than being constant as in the the two-dimensional case. Finally, we find that there is a minimum value of the plasma beta betamin below which the plasma pressure is negative. For the nonsheared (neutral current sheet) case, betamin increases rapidly with the magnetic Reynolds number Rm such that this type of annihilation is only possible for a high-beta plasma. For a sheared magnetic field, however, betamin is much lower, making this type of annihilation more relevant to the sonar corona.

  1. Three-dimensional display of document set

    DOEpatents

    Lantrip, David B [Oxnard, CA; Pennock, Kelly A [Richland, WA; Pottier, Marc C [Richland, WA; Schur, Anne [Richland, WA; Thomas, James J [Richland, WA; Wise, James A [Richland, WA; York, Jeremy [Bothell, WA

    2009-06-30

    A method for spatializing text content for enhanced visual browsing and analysis. The invention is applied to large text document corpora such as digital libraries, regulations and procedures, archived reports, and the like. The text content from these sources may be transformed to a spatial representation that preserves informational characteristics from the documents. The three-dimensional representation may then be visually browsed and analyzed in ways that avoid language processing and that reduce the analysts' effort.

  2. Three-dimensional display of document set

    DOEpatents

    Lantrip, David B.; Pennock, Kelly A.; Pottier, Marc C.; Schur, Anne; Thomas, James J.; Wise, James A.

    2006-09-26

    A method for spatializing text content for enhanced visual browsing and analysis. The invention is applied to large text document corpora such as digital libraries, regulations and procedures, archived reports, and the like. The text content from these sources may e transformed to a spatial representation that preserves informational characteristics from the documents. The three-dimensional representation may then be visually browsed and analyzed in ways that avoid language processing and that reduce the analysts' effort.

  3. Three-Dimensional Dispaly Of Document Set

    DOEpatents

    Lantrip, David B.; Pennock, Kelly A.; Pottier, Marc C.; Schur, Anne; Thomas, James J.; Wise, James A.

    2003-06-24

    A method for spatializing text content for enhanced visual browsing and analysis. The invention is applied to large text document corpora such as digital libraries, regulations and procedures, archived reports, and the like. The text content from these sources may be transformed to a spatial representation that preserves informational characteristics from the documents. The three-dimensional representation may then be visually browsed and analyzed in ways that avoid language processing and that reduce the analysts' effort.

  4. Three-dimensional display of document set

    DOEpatents

    Lantrip, David B [Oxnard, CA; Pennock, Kelly A [Richland, WA; Pottier, Marc C [Richland, WA; Schur, Anne [Richland, WA; Thomas, James J [Richland, WA; Wise, James A [Richland, WA

    2001-10-02

    A method for spatializing text content for enhanced visual browsing and analysis. The invention is applied to large text document corpora such as digital libraries, regulations and procedures, archived reports, and the like. The text content from these sources may be transformed to a spatial representation that preserves informational characteristics from the documents. The three-dimensional representation may then be visually browsed and analyzed in ways that avoid language processing and that reduce the analysts' effort.

  5. Method and apparatus for three dimensional braiding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A machine for three-dimensional braiding of fibers is provided in which carrier members travel on a curved, segmented and movable braiding surface. The carrier members are capable of independent, self-propelled motion along the braiding surface. Carrier member position on the braiding surface is controlled and monitored by computer. Also disclosed is a yarn take-up device capable of maintaining tension in the braiding fiber.

  6. Method and apparatus for three dimensional braiding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A machine for three-dimensional braiding of fibers is provided in which carrier members travel on a curved, segmented and movable braiding surface. The carrier members are capable of independent, self-propelled motion along the braiding surface. Carrier member position on the braiding surface is controlled and monitored by computer. Also disclosed is a yarn take-up device capable of maintaining tension in the braiding fiber.

  7. Three dimensional boundary layers in internal flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodonyi, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical study of the effects of viscous-inviscid interactions in three-dimensional duct flows is presented. In particular interacting flows for which the oncoming flow is not fully-developed were considered. In this case there is a thin boundary layer still present upstream of the surface distortion, as opposed to the fully-developed pipe flow situation wherein the flow is viscous across the cross section.

  8. Three-dimensional accelerating electromagnetic waves.

    PubMed

    Bandres, Miguel A; Alonso, Miguel A; Kaminer, Ido; Segev, Mordechai

    2013-06-17

    We present a general theory of three-dimensional non-paraxial spatially-accelerating waves of the Maxwell equations. These waves constitute a two-dimensional structure exhibiting shape-invariant propagation along semicircular trajectories. We provide classification and characterization of possible shapes of such beams, expressed through the angular spectra of parabolic, oblate and prolate spheroidal fields. Our results facilitate the design of accelerating beams with novel structures, broadening scope and potential applications of accelerating beams.

  9. Three Dimensional Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-12-01

    to upsample the projection data in order to get sufficient image quality. Working within these memory constraints, three-dimensional images were... metallic film on the windscreen in order to block reflections from the cockpit. Photographs and scale drawings of the model are shown in Figures 11 and...as well as spurious responses in the final image. Theoretically, sufficient resolution should have been available without upsampling the original data

  10. Three-dimensional simulation of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuruvila, G.; Salas, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The integral form of the complete, unsteady, compressible, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations in the conservation form, cast in generalized coordinate system, are solved, numerically, to simulate the vortex breakdown phenomenon. The inviscid fluxes are discretized using Roe's upwind-biased flux-difference splitting scheme and the viscous fluxes are discretized using central differencing. Time integration is performed using a backward Euler ADI (alternating direction implicit) scheme. A full approximation multigrid is used to accelerate the convergence to steady state.

  11. Three-Dimensional Shallow Water Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    sound can occur and produce significant three-dimensional (3-D) sound propagation effects. The long-term goals of this project are targeted on...efficient and accurate 3D acoustics models for studying underwater sound propagation in complex ocean environments. The ultimate scientific...objective is to study the underlying physics of the 3-D sound propagation effects caused jointly by physical oceanographic processes and geological features

  12. Lossless compression for three-dimensional images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaoli; Pearlman, William A.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate and compare the performance of several three-dimensional (3D) embedded wavelet algorithms on lossless 3D image compression. The algorithms are Asymmetric Tree Three-Dimensional Set Partitioning In Hierarchical Trees (AT-3DSPIHT), Three-Dimensional Set Partitioned Embedded bloCK (3D-SPECK), Three-Dimensional Context-Based Embedded Zerotrees of Wavelet coefficients (3D-CB-EZW), and JPEG2000 Part II for multi-component images. Two kinds of images are investigated in our study -- 8-bit CT and MR medical images and 16-bit AVIRIS hyperspectral images. First, the performances by using different size of coding units are compared. It shows that increasing the size of coding unit improves the performance somewhat. Second, the performances by using different integer wavelet transforms are compared for AT-3DSPIHT, 3D-SPECK and 3D-CB-EZW. None of the considered filters always performs the best for all data sets and algorithms. At last, we compare the different lossless compression algorithms by applying integer wavelet transform on the entire image volumes. For 8-bit medical image volumes, AT-3DSPIHT performs the best almost all the time, achieving average of 12% decreases in file size compared with JPEG2000 multi-component, the second performer. For 16-bit hyperspectral images, AT-3DSPIHT always performs the best, yielding average 5.8% and 8.9% decreases in file size compared with 3D-SPECK and JPEG2000 multi-component, respectively. Two 2D compression algorithms, JPEG2000 and UNIX zip, are also included for reference, and all 3D algorithms perform much better than 2D algorithms.

  13. Mineralized Three-Dimensional Bone Constructs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Mark S. F. (Inventor); Sundaresan, Alamelu (Inventor); Pellis, Neal R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present disclosure provides ex vivo-derived mineralized three-dimensional bone constructs. The bone constructs are obtained by culturing osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors under randomized gravity vector conditions. Preferably, the randomized gravity vector conditions are obtained using a low shear stress rotating bioreactor, such as a High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) culture system. The bone constructs of the disclosure have utility in physiological studies of bone formation and bone function, in drug discovery, and in orthopedics.

  14. Three-Dimensional Ocean Noise Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    particular attention paid to the case of Gaussian canyon . The solution to the three-dimensional wave equation in Cartesian co-ordinates can be written...in terms of a modal decomposition, carried out in the vertical and across- canyon horizontal directions. Work Completed 1. Nx2D and 3D Noise PE...azimuth in the Hudson Canyon [Figure 2). Additionally, the PE-reciprocity noise model was used to estimate the size, speed and distance from the

  15. Three-dimensional motor schema based navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, Ronald C.

    1989-01-01

    Reactive schema-based navigation is possible in space domains by extending the methods developed for ground-based navigation found within the Autonomous Robot Architecture (AuRA). Reformulation of two dimensional motor schemas for three dimensional applications is a straightforward process. The manifold advantages of schema-based control persist, including modular development, amenability to distributed processing, and responsiveness to environmental sensing. Simulation results show the feasibility of this methodology for space docking operations in a cluttered work area.

  16. Three-dimensional ballistocardiography in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scano, A.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment is described the aim of which is to record a three dimensional ballistocardiogram under the condition of weightlessness and to compare it with tracings recorded on the same subject on the ground as a means of clarifying the meaning of ballistocardiogram waves in different physiological and perphaps pathological conditions. Another purpose is to investigate cardiovascular and possibly fluid adaptations to weightlessness from data collected almost simultaneously on the same subjects during the other cardiovascular during the other cardiovascular and metabolic experiments.

  17. Three-dimensional adjustment of trilateration data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sung, L.-Y.; Jackson, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    The three-dimensional locations of the monuments in the USGS Hollister trilateration network were adjusted to fit line length observations observed in 1977, using a Bayesian approach, and incorporating prior elevation estimates as data in the adjustment procedure. No significant discrepancies in the measured line lengths were found, but significant elevation adjustments (up to 1.85 m) were needed to fit the length data.

  18. Three-Dimensional Printing in Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Eltorai, Adam E M; Nguyen, Eric; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is emerging as a clinically promising technology for rapid prototyping of surgically implantable products. With this commercially available technology, computed tomography or magnetic resonance images can be used to create graspable objects from 3D reconstructed images. Models can enhance patients' understanding of their pathology and surgeon preoperative planning. Customized implants and casts can be made to match an individual's anatomy. This review outlines 3D printing, its current applications in orthopedics, and promising future directions.

  19. Real Imagery as a Three Dimensional Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    under two categories--stereoscopic and autostereoscopic displays. The difference between these two displays is that autostereoscopic displays do not...require the use of special viewing glasses whereas stereoscopic displays do. In order to place a minimum incumbrance on the viewer, the autostereoscopic ...fooled into believing that the scene is three dimensional. This is accomplished even though the second view that normally comes with an autostereoscopic

  20. Mineralized three-dimensional bone constructs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Mark S. F. (Inventor); Sundaresan, Alamelu (Inventor); Pellis, Neal R. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present disclosure provides ex vivo-derived mineralized three-dimensional bone constructs. The bone constructs are obtained by culturing osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors under randomized gravity vector conditions. Preferably, the randomized gravity vector conditions are obtained using a low shear stress rotating bioreactor, such as a High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) culture system. The bone constructs of the disclosure have utility in physiological studies of bone formation and bone function, in drug discovery, and in orthopedics.

  1. Multiparallel Three-Dimensional Optical Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Lam K.; Price, Jeffrey H.; Kellner, Albert L.; Bravo-Zanoquera, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Multiparallel three-dimensional optical microscopy is a method of forming an approximate three-dimensional image of a microscope sample as a collection of images from different depths through the sample. The imaging apparatus includes a single microscope plus an assembly of beam splitters and mirrors that divide the output of the microscope into multiple channels. An imaging array of photodetectors in each channel is located at a different distance along the optical path from the microscope, corresponding to a focal plane at a different depth within the sample. The optical path leading to each photodetector array also includes lenses to compensate for the variation of magnification with distance so that the images ultimately formed on all the photodetector arrays are of the same magnification. The use of optical components common to multiple channels in a simple geometry makes it possible to obtain high light-transmission efficiency with an optically and mechanically simple assembly. In addition, because images can be read out simultaneously from all the photodetector arrays, the apparatus can support three-dimensional imaging at a high scanning rate.

  2. Three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets

    PubMed Central

    Melenka, Garrett W; Nobes, David S; Major, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    Braces are used by orthodontists to correct the misalignment of teeth in the mouth. Archwire rotation is a particular procedure used to correct tooth inclination. Wire rotation can result in deformation to the orthodontic brackets, and an orthodontic torque simulator has been designed to examine this wire–bracket interaction. An optical technique has been employed to measure the deformation due to size and geometric constraints of the orthodontic brackets. Images of orthodontic brackets are collected using a stereo microscope and two charge-coupled device cameras, and deformation of orthodontic brackets is measured using a three-dimensional digital image correlation technique. The three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets will be evaluated. The repeatability of the three-dimensional digital image correlation measurement method was evaluated by performing 30 archwire rotation tests using the same bracket and archwire. Finally, five Damon 3MX and five In-Ovation R self-ligating brackets will be compared using this technique to demonstrate the effect of archwire rotation on bracket design. PMID:23762201

  3. Three-dimensional printing of the retina

    PubMed Central

    Lorber, Barbara; Hsiao, Wen-Kai; Martin, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Biological three-dimensional printing has received a lot of media attention over recent years with advances made in printing cellular structures, including skin and heart tissue for transplantation. Although limitations exist in creating functioning organs with this method, the hope has been raised that creating a functional retina to cure blindness is within reach. The present review provides an update on the advances made toward this goal. Recent findings It has recently been shown that two types of retinal cells, retinal ganglion cells and glial cells, can be successfully printed using a piezoelectric inkjet printer. Importantly, the cells remained viable and did not change certain phenotypic features as a result of the printing process. In addition, recent advances in the creation of complex and viable three-dimensional cellular structures have been made. Summary Some first promising steps toward the creation of a functional retina have been taken. It now needs to be investigated whether recent findings can be extended to other cells of the retina, including those derived from human tissue, and if a complex and viable retinal structure can be created through three-dimensional printing. PMID:27045545

  4. Three-dimensional printing of the retina.

    PubMed

    Lorber, Barbara; Hsiao, Wen-Kai; Martin, Keith R

    2016-05-01

    Biological three-dimensional printing has received a lot of media attention over recent years with advances made in printing cellular structures, including skin and heart tissue for transplantation. Although limitations exist in creating functioning organs with this method, the hope has been raised that creating a functional retina to cure blindness is within reach. The present review provides an update on the advances made toward this goal. It has recently been shown that two types of retinal cells, retinal ganglion cells and glial cells, can be successfully printed using a piezoelectric inkjet printer. Importantly, the cells remained viable and did not change certain phenotypic features as a result of the printing process. In addition, recent advances in the creation of complex and viable three-dimensional cellular structures have been made. Some first promising steps toward the creation of a functional retina have been taken. It now needs to be investigated whether recent findings can be extended to other cells of the retina, including those derived from human tissue, and if a complex and viable retinal structure can be created through three-dimensional printing.

  5. Three-Dimensional Audio Client Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2005-01-01

    The Three-Dimensional Audio Client Library (3DAudio library) is a group of software routines written to facilitate development of both stand-alone (audio only) and immersive virtual-reality application programs that utilize three-dimensional audio displays. The library is intended to enable the development of three-dimensional audio client application programs by use of a code base common to multiple audio server computers. The 3DAudio library calls vendor-specific audio client libraries and currently supports the AuSIM Gold-Server and Lake Huron audio servers. 3DAudio library routines contain common functions for (1) initiation and termination of a client/audio server session, (2) configuration-file input, (3) positioning functions, (4) coordinate transformations, (5) audio transport functions, (6) rendering functions, (7) debugging functions, and (8) event-list-sequencing functions. The 3DAudio software is written in the C++ programming language and currently operates under the Linux, IRIX, and Windows operating systems.

  6. Reconfigurable, braced, three-dimensional DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Russell P; Heilemann, Mike; Doose, Sören; Erben, Christoph M; Kapanidis, Achillefs N; Turberfield, Andrew J

    2008-02-01

    DNA nanotechnology makes use of the exquisite self-recognition of DNA in order to build on a molecular scale. Although static structures may find applications in structural biology and computer science, many applications in nanomedicine and nanorobotics require the additional capacity for controlled three-dimensional movement. DNA architectures can span three dimensions and DNA devices are capable of movement, but active control of well-defined three-dimensional structures has not been achieved. We demonstrate the operation of reconfigurable DNA tetrahedra whose shapes change precisely and reversibly in response to specific molecular signals. Shape changes are confirmed by gel electrophoresis and by bulk and single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer measurements. DNA tetrahedra are natural building blocks for three-dimensional construction; they may be synthesized rapidly with high yield of a single stereoisomer, and their triangulated architecture conveys structural stability. The introduction of shape-changing structural modules opens new avenues for the manipulation of matter on the nanometre scale.

  7. Teaching and Assessing Three-Dimensional M

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, Robert C., Jr.; Booth, Deborah; Sirochman, Rudy; Richardson, Jane; Richardson, David

    2002-05-01

    Structural concepts such as the exact arrangement of a protein in three dimensions are crucial to almost every aspect of biology and chemistry, yet most of us have not been educated in three-dimensional literacy and all of us need a great deal of help in order to perceive and to communicate structural information successfully. It is in the undergraduate biochemistry course where students learn most concepts of molecular structure pertinent to living systems. We are addressing the issue of three-dimensional structural literacy by having undergraduate students construct kinemages, which are plain text scripts derived from Protein Data Bank coordinate files that can be viewed with the program MAGE. These annotated, interactive, three-dimensional illustrations are designed to develop a molecular story and allow exploration in the world of that story. In the process, students become familiar with the structure-based scientific literature and the Protein Data Bank. Our assessment to date has shown that students perceive kinemage authorship to be more helpful in understanding protein structure than simply viewing prepared kinemages. In addition, students perceived kinemage authorship as being beneficial to their career and a significant motivation to learn biochemistry.

  8. Volumetric Three-Dimensional Display Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundell, Barry G.; Schwarz, Adam J.

    2000-03-01

    A comprehensive study of approaches to three-dimensional visualization by volumetric display systems This groundbreaking volume provides an unbiased and in-depth discussion on a broad range of volumetric three-dimensional display systems. It examines the history, development, design, and future of these displays, and considers their potential for application to key areas in which visualization plays a major role. Drawing substantially on material that was previously unpublished or available only in patent form, the authors establish the first comprehensive technical and mathematical formalization of the field, and examine a number of different volumetric architectures. System level design strategies are presented, from which proposals for the next generation of high-definition predictable volumetric systems are developed. To ensure that researchers will benefit from work already completed, they provide: * Descriptions of several recent volumetric display systems prepared from material supplied by the teams that created them * An abstract volumetric display system design paradigm * An historical summary of 90 years of development in volumetric display system technology * An assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of many of the systems proposed to date * A unified presentation of the underlying principles of volumetric display systems * A comprehensive bibliography Beautifully supplemented with 17 color plates that illustrate volumetric images and prototype displays, Volumetric Three-Dimensional Display Systems is an indispensable resource for professionals in imaging systems development, scientific visualization, medical imaging, computer graphics, aerospace, military planning, and CAD/CAE.

  9. Integrating three-dimensional printing and nanotechnology for musculoskeletal regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowicki, Margaret; Castro, Nathan J.; Rao, Raj; Plesniak, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2017-09-01

    The field of tissue engineering is advancing steadily, partly due to advancements in rapid prototyping technology. Even with increasing focus, successful complex tissue regeneration of vascularized bone, cartilage and the osteochondral interface remains largely illusive. This review examines current three-dimensional printing techniques and their application towards bone, cartilage and osteochondral regeneration. The importance of, and benefit to, nanomaterial integration is also highlighted with recent published examples. Early-stage successes and challenges of recent studies are discussed, with an outlook to future research in the related areas.

  10. Integrating three-dimensional printing and nanotechnology for musculoskeletal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Margaret; Castro, Nathan J; Rao, Raj; Plesniak, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2017-09-20

    The field of tissue engineering is advancing steadily, partly due to advancements in rapid prototyping technology. Even with increasing focus, successful complex tissue regeneration of vascularized bone, cartilage and the osteochondral interface remains largely illusive. This review examines current three-dimensional printing techniques and their application towards bone, cartilage and osteochondral regeneration. The importance of, and benefit to, nanomaterial integration is also highlighted with recent published examples. Early-stage successes and challenges of recent studies are discussed, with an outlook to future research in the related areas.

  11. Three-Dimensional Propagation and Scattering Around a Conical Seamount

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    while below the top of Keriit Seamount , a stronger shadow zone appcars behind the seanoumit bY the 3D model than by the Nx2D model. The uniform step-size...from which we see that a shadow zone forms behind the Kermit Seamount . 185 T-69Mss,c LMS (dB) C SNAP J= 257. C SNAP 0F 7 1 1T,---Oo dWh 14050 00 W 10...Science 1930 and Engineering DOCTORAL DISSERTATION Three-Dimensional Propagation and Scattering Around a Conical Seamount by Wenyu Luo June 2007

  12. Integrating three-dimensional printing and nanotechnology for musculoskeletal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Nowicki, Margaret; Castro, Nathan J; Rao, Raj; Plesniak, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2017-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering is advancing steadily, partly due to advancements in rapid prototyping technology. Even with increasing focus, successful complex tissue regeneration of vascularized bone, cartilage and the osteochondral interface remains largely illusive. This review examines current three-dimensional printing techniques and their application towards bone, cartilage and osteochondral regeneration. The importance of, and benefit to, nanomaterial integration is also highlighted with recent published examples. Early-stage successes and challenges of recent studies are discussed, with an outlook to future research in the related areas. PMID:28762957

  13. Design of three-dimensional scramjet inlets for hypersonic propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, J. M.; Weidner, E. H.

    1986-01-01

    The paper outlines an approach to the design of three-dimensional inlets for scramjet engines. The basis of the techniques used is the method of streamline tracing through an inviscid axisymmetric flow field. A technique is described for making a smooth change of cross-section shape from rectangular to circular. A feature is the considerable use of computer-graphics to provide a 'user-oriented' procedure which can produce promising design configurations for subsequent analysis with CFD codes. An example is given to demonstrate the capabilities of the design techniques.

  14. Three-dimensional stereo by photometric ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, L.B.; Angelopoulou, E.

    1994-11-01

    We present a methodology for corresponding a dense set of points on an object surface from photometric values for three-dimensional stereo computation of depth. The methodology utilizes multiple stereo pairs of images, with each stereo pair being taken of the identical scene but under different illumination. With just two stereo pairs of images taken under two different illumination conditions, a stereo pair of ratio images can be produced, one for the ratio of left-hand images and one for the ratio of right-hand images. We demonstrate how the photometric ratios composing these images can be used for accurate correspondence of object points. Object points having the same photometric ratio with respect to two different illumination conditions constitute a well-defined equivalence class of physical constraints defined by local surface orientation relative to illumination conditions. We formally show that for diffuse reflection the photometric ratio is invariant to varying camera characteristics, surface albedo, and viewpoint and that therefore the same photometric ratio in both images of a stereo pair implies the same equivalence class of physical constraints. The correspondence of photometric ratios along epipolar lines in a stereo pair of images under different illumination conditions is a correspondence of equivalent physical constraints, and the determination of depth from stereo can be performed. Whereas illumination planning is required, our photometric-based stereo methodology does not require knowledge of illumination conditions in the actual computation of three-dimensional depth and is applicable to perspective views. This technique extends the stereo determination of three-dimensional depth to smooth featureless surfaces without the use of precisely calibrated lighting. We demonstrate experimental depth maps from a dense set of points on smooth objects of known ground-truth shape, determined to within 1% depth accuracy.

  15. Three-dimensional relativistic electromagnetic subcycle solitons.

    PubMed

    Esirkepov, Timur; Nishihara, Katsunobu; Bulanov, Sergei V; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2002-12-30

    Three-dimensional (3D) relativistic electromagnetic subcycle solitons were observed in 3D particle-in-cell simulations of an intense short-laser-pulse propagation in an underdense plasma. Their structure resembles that of an oscillating electric dipole with a poloidal electric field and a toroidal magnetic field that oscillate in phase with the electron density with frequency below the Langmuir frequency. On the ion time scale, the soliton undergoes a Coulomb explosion of its core, resulting in ion acceleration, and then evolves into a slowly expanding quasineutral cavity.

  16. Three-dimensional echocardiography in valve disease

    PubMed Central

    COLOMBO, CHIARA; TAMBORINI, GLORIA; PEPI, MAURO; ALIMENTO, MARINA; FIORENTINI, CESARE

    2007-01-01

    This review covers the role of three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography in the diagnosis of heart valve disease. Several factors have contributed to the evolution of this technique, which is currently a simple and routine method: rapid evolution in probe and computer technologies, demonstration that 3D data sets allowed more complete and accurate evaluation of cardiac structures, emerging clinical experience indicating the strong potential particularly in valve diseases, volume and function of the two ventricle measurements and several other fields. This report will review current and future applications of 3D echocardiography in mitral, aortic and tricuspid valve diseases underlying both qualitative (morphologic) and quantitative advantages of this technique. PMID:21977273

  17. Three-dimensional echocardiography in valve disease.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Chiara; Tamborini, Gloria; Pepi, Mauro; Alimento, Marina; Fiorentini, Cesare

    2007-01-01

    This review covers the role of three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography in the diagnosis of heart valve disease. Several factors have contributed to the evolution of this technique, which is currently a simple and routine method: rapid evolution in probe and computer technologies, demonstration that 3D data sets allowed more complete and accurate evaluation of cardiac structures, emerging clinical experience indicating the strong potential particularly in valve diseases, volume and function of the two ventricle measurements and several other fields. This report will review current and future applications of 3D echocardiography in mitral, aortic and tricuspid valve diseases underlying both qualitative (morphologic) and quantitative advantages of this technique.

  18. The Three-Dimensional Structure of Mimivirus

    PubMed Central

    Klose, Thomas; Kuznetsov, Yurii G.; Xiao, Chuan; Sun, Siyang; McPherson, Alexander; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    Mimivirus, the prototypic member of the new family of Mimiviridae, is the largest virus known to date. Progress has been made recently in determining the three-dimensional structure of the 0.75-μm diameter virion using cryo-electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. These showed that the virus is composed of an outer layer of dense fibers surrounding an icosahedrally shaped capsid and an internal membrane sac enveloping the genomic material of the virus. Additionally, a unique starfish-like structure at one of the fivefold vertices, required by the virus for infecting its host, has been defined in more detail. PMID:20551678

  19. Electrode With Porous Three-Dimensional Support

    DOEpatents

    Bernard, Patrick; Dauchier, Jean-Michel; Simonneau, Olivier

    1999-07-27

    Electrode including a paste containing particles of electrochemically active material and a conductive support consisting of a three-dimensional porous material comprising strands delimiting contiguous pores communicating via passages, characterized in that the average width L in .mu.m of said passages is related to the average diameter .O slashed. in .mu.m of said particles by the following equation, in which W and Y are dimensionless coefficients: wherein W=0.16 Y=1.69 X=202.4 .mu.m and Z=80 .mu.m

  20. Three-dimensional ultrasonic colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleap, Mihai; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2016-05-01

    Colloidal assembly represents a powerful method for the fabrication of functional materials. In this article, we describe how acoustic radiation forces can guide the assembly of colloidal particles into structures that serve as microscopic elements in novel acoustic metadevices or act as phononic crystals. Using a simple three-dimensional orthogonal system, we show that a diversity of colloidal structures with orthorhombic symmetry can be assembled with megahertz-frequency (MHz) standing pressure waves. These structures allow rapid tuning of acoustic properties and provide a new platform for dynamic metamaterial applications.

  1. Three-dimensional flow about penguin wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noca, Flavio; Sudki, Bassem; Lauria, Michel

    2012-11-01

    Penguins, contrary to airborne birds, do not need to compensate for gravity. Yet, the kinematics of their wings is highly three-dimensional and seems exceedingly complex for plain swimming. Is such kinematics the result of an evolutionary optimization or is it just a forced adaptation of an airborne flying apparatus to underwater swimming? Some answers will be provided based on flow dynamics around robotic penguin wings. Updates will also be presented on the development of a novel robotic arm intended to simulate penguin swimming and enable novel propulsion devices.

  2. Sculptra: the new three-dimensional filler.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Richard N

    2006-10-01

    Sculptra, the synthetic injectable poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA), is a revolutionary three-dimensional filler lasting 18 to 24 months. This unique volumizing agent is best used to globally restore volume to the lower two thirds of the face in patients who have lipoatrophy. Sculptra is a biocompatible, biodegradable, and nonimmunogenic derivative of the alpha-hydroxy-acid family. The size and the slow degradation kinetics of PLLA microparticles act as a stimulus for collagen production, providing lasting volume enhancement in lipoatrophy patients.

  3. High resolution three-dimensional doping profiler

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    A semiconductor doping profiler provides a Schottky contact at one surface and an ohmic contact at the other. While the two contacts are coupled to a power source, thereby establishing an electrical bias in the semiconductor, a localized light source illuminates the semiconductor to induce a photocurrent. The photocurrent changes in accordance with the doping characteristics of the semiconductor in the illuminated region. By changing the voltage of the power source the depth of the depletion layer can be varied to provide a three dimensional view of the local properties of the semiconductor.

  4. Three-dimensional simulations of burning thermals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspden, Andy; Bell, John; Woosley, Stan

    2010-11-01

    Flame ignition in type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) leads to isolated bubbles of burning buoyant fluid. As a bubble rises due to gravity, it becomes deformed by shear instabilities and transitions to a turbulent buoyant vortex ring. Morton, Taylor and Turner (1956) introduced the entrainment assumption, which can be applied to inert thermals. In this study, we use the entrainment assumption, suitably modified to account for burning, to predict the late-time asymptotic behaviour of these turbulent buoyant vortex rings in SNe Ia. The theory is validated against three- dimensional simulations with adaptive mesh refinement at effective resolutions up to 4096^3.

  5. [Oxidative damage of gasoline engine exhausts to rat lung tissues].

    PubMed

    Che, Wang-Jun; Wang, Ling; Luo, Qing-Ying; Wu, Mei; Zhang, Zun-Zhen

    2009-01-01

    To study the effects of extracts of condensate, particulates and semivolatile organic compounds from gasoline engine exhaust on DNA damage, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 (OGG1) expression, and changes of ultra-structures in lungs of rats. Organic extracts of gasoline engine exhaust (GEE) was intratrachealy instilled into rat lungs at 0, 5.6, 16.7, and 50.0 L/kg body weight, respectively, once a week for a month. The single DNA strand break was measured by comet assay. The OGG1 was determined using immunohistochemistry method. The ultrastructure of lung cells was observed with electronic microscope. The rates of tailed cells detected by the comet assay increased significantly when the rats were exposed to 16.7 and 50.0 L/kg of GEE compared with those exposed to solvent only (P < 0.05). However, the tail length did not differ significantly between the groups. Similarly, exposure to 16.7 and 50.0 L/kg of GEE led to increased OGG1 significantly. Significant changes of mitochondria in type I and II alveolar cells as well as respiratory bronchiole epithelial cells were observed, which included decrease of numbers, pyknosis and swelling. Gasoline engine exhausts induce single DNA strand break, increase OGG1 expression, decrease numbers of mitochondria, and destroy ultrastructures of mitochondria in various lung cells of rats.

  6. Design of three-dimensional imaging system based on SFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongfei; Chen, Xin; Rao, Peng

    2016-03-01

    For the prospects of three-dimensional reconstruction technology based on structure from motion in engineering application, a high-resolution and visible band imaging system has been designed and implemented. It consists of a 5k × 5k CMOS focal plane array detector made by the ON-SEMI company, an optical system and an electronics system designed by ourselves. The electronics system takes FPGA as the control and drive processor chip and is divided into three parts: a power management module, a detector module and an image processing module, capable of finishing image compression and transmission. A sequence of images for the target of long distance away is obtained from the imaging system and the images after cropping and segmentation, aiming at reducing calculation and excluding some points irrelevant with the target during reconstruction process, are took as input of structure from motion. Seeds from the match points expand from sparse points to dense points and the initial model of reconstruction target is achieved. The experiment results show that the imaging system meet the requirement of three-dimensional reconstruction in engineering application and a new novel imaging system design of graded resolution based on bionics is proposed.

  7. In-lab three-dimensional printing

    PubMed Central

    Partridge, Roland; Conlisk, Noel; Davies, Jamie A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of the microscope in 1590 by Zacharias Janssenby and Hans Lippershey gave the world a new way of visualizing details of morphogenesis and development. More recent improvements in this technology including confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical projection tomography (OPT) have enhanced the quality of the resultant image. These technologies also allow a representation to be made of a developing tissue’s three-dimensional (3-D) form. With all these techniques however, the image is delivered on a flat two-dimensional (2-D) screen. 3-D printing represents an exciting potential to reproduce the image not simply on a flat screen, but in a physical, palpable three-dimensional structure. Here we explore the scope that this holds for exploring and interacting with the structure of a developing organ in an entirely novel way. As well as being useful for visualization, 3-D printers are capable of rapidly and cost-effectively producing custom-made structures for use within the laboratory. We here describe the advantages of producing hardware for a tissue culture system using an inexpensive in-lab printer. PMID:22652907

  8. Three dimensional quantum geometry and deformed symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, E.; Mourad, J.; Noui, K.

    2009-05-01

    We study a three dimensional noncommutative space emerging in the context of three dimensional Euclidean quantum gravity. Our starting point is the assumption that the isometry group is deformed to the Drinfeld double D(SU(2)). We generalize to the deformed case the construction of E3 as the quotient of its isometry group ISU(2) by SU(2). We show that the algebra of functions on E3 becomes the noncommutative algebra of SU(2) distributions, C(SU(2))∗, endowed with the convolution product. This construction gives the action of ISU(2) on the algebra and allows the determination of plane waves and coordinate functions. In particular, we show the following: (i) plane waves have bounded momenta; (ii) to a given momentum are associated several SU(2) elements leading to an effective description of ϕ ɛC(SU(2))∗ in terms of several physical scalar fields on E3; (iii) their product leads to a deformed addition rule of momenta consistent with the bound on the spectrum. We generalize to the noncommutative setting the "local" action for a scalar field. Finally, we obtain, using harmonic analysis, another useful description of the algebra as the direct sum of the algebra of matrices. The algebra of matrices inherits the action of ISU(2): rotations leave the order of the matrices invariant, whereas translations change the order in a way we explicitly determine.

  9. Three-dimensional image signals: processing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiopu, Paul; Manea, Adrian; Craciun, Anca-Ileana; Craciun, Alexandru

    2010-11-01

    Over the years extensive studies have been carried out to apply coherent optics methods in real-time processing, communications and transmission image. This is especially true when a large amount of information needs to be processed, e.g., in high-resolution imaging. The recent progress in data-processing networks and communication systems has considerably increased the capacity of information exchange. We describe the results of literature investigation research of processing methods for the signals of the three-dimensional images. All commercially available 3D technologies today are based on stereoscopic viewing. 3D technology was once the exclusive domain of skilled computer-graphics developers with high-end machines and software. The images capture from the advanced 3D digital camera can be displayed onto screen of the 3D digital viewer with/ without special glasses. For this is needed considerable processing power and memory to create and render the complex mix of colors, textures, and virtual lighting and perspective necessary to make figures appear three-dimensional. Also, using a standard digital camera and a technique called phase-shift interferometry we can capture "digital holograms." These are holograms that can be stored on computer and transmitted over conventional networks. We present some research methods to process "digital holograms" for the Internet transmission and results.

  10. Three-dimensional terahertz wave imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X-C

    2004-02-15

    Pulsed terahertz (THz) wave sensing and imaging is a coherent measurement technology. Like radar, based on the phase and amplitude of the THz pulse at each frequency, THz waves provide temporal and spectroscopic information that allows us to develop various three-dimensional (3D) terahertz tomographic imaging modalities. The 3D THz tomographic imaging methods we investigated include THz time-of-flight tomography, THz computed tomography (CT) and THz binary lens tomography. THz time-of-flight uses the THz pulses as a probe beam to temporally mark the target, and then constructs a 3D image of the target using the THz waves scattered by the target. THz CT is based on geometrical optics and inspired from X-ray CT. THz binary lens tomography uses the frequency-dependent focal-length property of binary lenses to obtain tomographic images of an object. Three-dimensional THz imaging has potential in such applications as non-destructive inspection. The interaction between a coherent THz pulse and an object provides rich information about the object under study; therefore, 3D THz imaging can be used to inspect or characterize dielectric and semiconductor objects. For example, 3D THz imaging has been used to detect and identify the defects inside a Space Shuttle insulation tile.

  11. Three-dimensional turbopump flowfield analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, O. P.; Belford, K. A.; Ni, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop a flow prediction method applicable to rocket turbopumps. The complex nature of a flowfield in turbopumps is described and examples of flowfields are discussed to illustrate that physics based models and analytical calculation procedures based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are needed to develop reliable design procedures for turbopumps. A CFD code developed at NASA ARC was used as the base code. The turbulence model and boundary conditions in the base code were modified, respectively, to: (1) compute transitional flows and account for extra rates of strain, e.g., rotation; and (2) compute surface heat transfer coefficients and allow computation through multistage turbomachines. Benchmark quality data from two and three-dimensional cascades were used to verify the code. The predictive capabilities of the present CFD code were demonstrated by computing the flow through a radial impeller and a multistage axial flow turbine. Results of the program indicate that the present code operated in a two-dimensional mode is a cost effective alternative to full three-dimensional calculations, and that it permits realistic predictions of unsteady loadings and losses for multistage machines.

  12. Three-dimensional singular points in aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Aynur

    1988-01-01

    When three-dimensional separation occurs on a body immersed in a flow governed by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, the geometrical surfaces formed by the three vector fields (velocity, vorticity and the skin-friction) and a scalar field (pressure) become interrelated through topological maps containing their respective singular points and extremal points. A mathematically consistent description of these singular points becomes inevitable when we want to study the geometry of the separation. A separated stream surface requires, for example, the existence of a saddle-type singular point on the skin-friction surface. This singular point is actually, in the proper language of mathematics, a saddle of index two. The index is a measure of the dimension of the outset (set leaving the singular point). Hence, when a saddle of index two is specified, a two dimensional surface that becomes separated from the osculating plane of the saddle is implied. The three-dimensional singular point is interpreted mathematically and the most common aerodynamical singular points are discussed through this perspective.

  13. Three-dimensional head anthropometric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enciso, Reyes; Shaw, Alex M.; Neumann, Ulrich; Mah, James

    2003-05-01

    Currently, two-dimensional photographs are most commonly used to facilitate visualization, assessment and treatment of facial abnormalities in craniofacial care but are subject to errors because of perspective, projection, lack metric and 3-dimensional information. One can find in the literature a variety of methods to generate 3-dimensional facial images such as laser scans, stereo-photogrammetry, infrared imaging and even CT however each of these methods contain inherent limitations and as such no systems are in common clinical use. In this paper we will focus on development of indirect 3-dimensional landmark location and measurement of facial soft-tissue with light-based techniques. In this paper we will statistically evaluate and validate a current three-dimensional image-based face modeling technique using a plaster head model. We will also develop computer graphics tools for indirect anthropometric measurements in a three-dimensional head model (or polygonal mesh) including linear distances currently used in anthropometry. The measurements will be tested against a validated 3-dimensional digitizer (MicroScribe 3DX).

  14. Three-dimensional fluorescence lifetime tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Godavarty, Anuradha; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Eppstein, Margaret J.

    2005-04-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence tomography using molecularly targeted lifetime-sensitive, fluorescent contrast agents have applications for early-stage cancer diagnostics. Yet, although the measurement of fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is extensively used in microscopy and spectroscopy applications, demonstration of fluorescence lifetime tomography for medical imaging is limited to two-dimensional studies. Herein, the feasibility of three-dimensional fluorescence-lifetime tomography on clinically relevant phantom volumes is established, using (i) a gain-modulated intensified charge coupled device (CCD) and modulated laser diode imaging system, (ii) two fluorescent contrast agents, e.g., Indocyanine green and 3-3'-Diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide differing in their fluorescence lifetime by 0.62 ns, and (iii) a two stage approximate extended Kalman filter reconstruction algorithm. Fluorescence measurements of phase and amplitude were acquired on the phantom surface under different target to background fluorescence absorption (70:1, 100:1) and fluorescence lifetime (1:1, 2.1:1) contrasts at target depths of 1.4-2 cm. The Bayesian tomography algorithm was employed to obtain three-dimensional images of lifetime and absorption owing to the fluorophores.

  15. Long pathlength, three-dimensional absorbance microchip.

    PubMed

    Collins, Greg E; Lu, Qin; Pereira, Nicholas; Wu, Peter

    2007-04-15

    A long pathlength, three-dimensional U-type flow cell was microfabricated and evaluated for improved absorbance detection on a glass microdevice. A small diameter hole (75mum) was laser etched in a thin glass substrate whose thickness (100mum) defined much of the pathlength of the cell. This substrate was thermally bonded and sandwiched between two different glass substrates. The top substrate contained a typical injection cross and separation microchannel. Projecting out of the plane of the separation device was a 126mum pathlength flow cell as defined by the laser etched hole and the attached microchannels. The flow cell was connected to a microchannel on the bottom substrate that led to a waste reservoir. The planar, flat windows on the top and bottom of this device made light introduction and collection a simple matter using a light emitting diode (LED) and microscope objective. The experimentally obtained detection limit for rhodamine B was determined to be 0.95muM, which is nearly identical to the theoretical limit calculated by Beer's Law. A separation of three fluorescent dyes was performed, and direct comparisons were made between the transmittance changes through the narrow pathlength separation microchannel and the adjacent long pathlength, three-dimensional U-type flow cell.

  16. Two component-three dimensional catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Schwartz, Michael; White, James H.; Sammells, Anthony F.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to catalytic reactor membranes having a gas-impermeable membrane for transport of oxygen anions. The membrane has an oxidation surface and a reduction surface. The membrane is coated on its oxidation surface with an adherent catalyst layer and is optionally coated on its reduction surface with a catalyst that promotes reduction of an oxygen-containing species (e.g., O.sub.2, NO.sub.2, SO.sub.2, etc.) to generate oxygen anions on the membrane. The reactor has an oxidation zone and a reduction zone separated by the membrane. A component of an oxygen containing gas in the reduction zone is reduced at the membrane and a reduced species in a reactant gas in the oxidation zone of the reactor is oxidized. The reactor optionally contains a three-dimensional catalyst in the oxidation zone. The adherent catalyst layer and the three-dimensional catalyst are selected to promote a desired oxidation reaction, particularly a partial oxidation of a hydrocarbon.

  17. Three dimensional force balance of asymmetric droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Cho, Kun; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-11-01

    An equilibrium contact angle of a droplet is determined by a horizontal force balance among vapor, liquid, and solid, which is known as Young's law. Conventional wetting law is valid only for axis-symmetric droplets, whereas real droplets are often asymmetric. Here we show that three-dimensional geometry must be considered for a force balance for asymmetric droplets. By visualizing asymmetric droplets placed on a free-standing membrane in air with X-ray microscopy, we are able to identify that force balances in one side and in other side control pinning behaviors during evaporation of droplets. We find that X-ray microscopy is powerful for realizing the three-dimensional force balance, which would be essential in interpretation and manipulation of wetting, spreading, and drying dynamics for asymmetric droplets. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2016R1D1A1B01007133).

  18. Three-dimensional television: a broadcaster's perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, S. J. E.; Armstrong, M.; Salmon, R. A.

    2009-02-01

    The recent resurgence of interest in the stereoscopic cinema and the increasing availability to the consumer of stereoscopic televisions and computer displays are leading broadcasters to consider, once again, the feasibility of stereoscopic broadcasting. High Definition Television is now widely deployed, and the R&D departments of broadcasters and consumer electronics manufacturers are starting to plan future enhancements to the experience of television. Improving the perception of depth via stereoscopy is a strong candidate technology. In this paper we will consider the challenges associated with the production, transmission and display of different forms of "three-dimensional" television. We will explore options available to a broadcaster wishing to start a 3D service using the technologies available at the present time, and consider how they could be improved to enable many more television programmes to be recorded and transmitted in a 3D-compatible form, paying particular attention to scenarios such as live broadcasting, where the workflows developed for the stereoscopic cinema are inapplicable. We will also consider the opportunities available for broadcasters to reach audiences with "three-dimensional" content via other media in the near future: for example, distributing content via the existing stereoscopic cinema network, or over the Internet to owners of stereoscopic computer displays.

  19. Three-dimensional broadband omnidirectional acoustic ground cloak.

    PubMed

    Zigoneanu, Lucian; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-04-01

    The control of sound propagation and reflection has always been the goal of engineers involved in the design of acoustic systems. A recent design approach based on coordinate transformations, which is applicable to many physical systems, together with the development of a new class of engineered materials called metamaterials, has opened the road to the unconstrained control of sound. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by this methodology are complex and challenging to obtain experimentally, even using metamaterial design approaches. Not surprisingly, experimental demonstration of devices obtained using transformation acoustics is difficult, and has been implemented only in two-dimensional configurations. Here, we demonstrate the design and experimental characterization of an almost perfect three-dimensional, broadband, and, most importantly, omnidirectional acoustic device that renders a region of space three wavelengths in diameter invisible to sound.

  20. Magneto Transport in Three Dimensional Carbon Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Timir; Wang, Lei; Jaroszynski, Jan; Yin, Ming; Alameri, Dheyaa

    Electrical properties of self-assembled three dimensional nanostructures are interesting topic. Here we report temperature dependence of magneto transport in such carbon nanostructures with periodic spherical voids. Specimens with different void diameters in the temperature range from 200 mK to 20 K were studied. Above 2 K, magnetoresistance, MR = [R(B) - R(0)] / R(0), crosses over from quadratic to a linear dependence with the increase of magnetic field [Wang et al., APL 2015; DOI:10.1063/1.4926606]. We observe MR to be non-saturating even up to 18 Tesla. Furthermore, MR demonstrates universality because all experimental data can be collapsed on to a single curve, as a universal function of B/T. Below 2 K, magnetoresistance saturates with increasing field. Quantum Hall like steps are also observed in this low temperature regime. Remarkably, MR of our sample displays orientation independence, an attractive feature for technological applications.

  1. Three-dimensional hologram display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintz, Frederick (Inventor); Chao, Tien-Hsin (Inventor); Bryant, Nevin (Inventor); Tsou, Peter (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a three-dimensional (3D) hologram display system. The 3D hologram display system includes a projector device for projecting an image upon a display medium to form a 3D hologram. The 3D hologram is formed such that a viewer can view the holographic image from multiple angles up to 360 degrees. Multiple display media are described, namely a spinning diffusive screen, a circular diffuser screen, and an aerogel. The spinning diffusive screen utilizes spatial light modulators to control the image such that the 3D image is displayed on the rotating screen in a time-multiplexing manner. The circular diffuser screen includes multiple, simultaneously-operated projectors to project the image onto the circular diffuser screen from a plurality of locations, thereby forming the 3D image. The aerogel can use the projection device described as applicable to either the spinning diffusive screen or the circular diffuser screen.

  2. Three-dimensional elastic lidar winds

    SciTech Connect

    Buttler, W.T.

    1996-07-01

    Maximum cross-correlation techniques have been used with satellite data to estimate winds and sea surface velocities for several years. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently using a variation of the basic maximum cross-correlation technique, coupled with a deterministic application of a vector median filter, to measure transverse winds as a function of range and altitude from incoherent elastic backscatter lidar data taken throughout large volumes within the atmospheric boundary layer. Hourly representations of three- dimensional wind fields, derived from elastic lidar data taken during an air-quality study performed in a region of complex terrain near Sunland Park, New Mexico, are presented and compared with results from an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved laser doppler velocimeter. The wind fields showed persistent large scale eddies as well as general terrain following winds in the Rio Grande valley.

  3. Quantum interferometry with three-dimensional geometry

    PubMed Central

    Spagnolo, Nicolò; Aparo, Lorenzo; Vitelli, Chiara; Crespi, Andrea; Ramponi, Roberta; Osellame, Roberto; Mataloni, Paolo; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Quantum interferometry uses quantum resources to improve phase estimation with respect to classical methods. Here we propose and theoretically investigate a new quantum interferometric scheme based on three-dimensional waveguide devices. These can be implemented by femtosecond laser waveguide writing, recently adopted for quantum applications. In particular, multiarm interferometers include “tritter” and “quarter” as basic elements, corresponding to the generalization of a beam splitter to a 3- and 4-port splitter, respectively. By injecting Fock states in the input ports of such interferometers, fringe patterns characterized by nonclassical visibilities are expected. This enables outperforming the quantum Fisher information obtained with classical fields in phase estimation. We also discuss the possibility of achieving the simultaneous estimation of more than one optical phase. This approach is expected to open new perspectives to quantum enhanced sensing and metrology performed in integrated photonics. PMID:23181189

  4. Quantum interferometry with three-dimensional geometry.

    PubMed

    Spagnolo, Nicolò; Aparo, Lorenzo; Vitelli, Chiara; Crespi, Andrea; Ramponi, Roberta; Osellame, Roberto; Mataloni, Paolo; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Quantum interferometry uses quantum resources to improve phase estimation with respect to classical methods. Here we propose and theoretically investigate a new quantum interferometric scheme based on three-dimensional waveguide devices. These can be implemented by femtosecond laser waveguide writing, recently adopted for quantum applications. In particular, multiarm interferometers include "tritter" and "quarter" as basic elements, corresponding to the generalization of a beam splitter to a 3- and 4-port splitter, respectively. By injecting Fock states in the input ports of such interferometers, fringe patterns characterized by nonclassical visibilities are expected. This enables outperforming the quantum Fisher information obtained with classical fields in phase estimation. We also discuss the possibility of achieving the simultaneous estimation of more than one optical phase. This approach is expected to open new perspectives to quantum enhanced sensing and metrology performed in integrated photonics.

  5. Towards microscale electrohydrodynamic three-dimensional printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiankang; Xu, Fangyuan; Cao, Yi; Liu, Yaxiong; Li, Dichen

    2016-02-01

    It is challenging for the existing three-dimensional (3D) printing techniques to fabricate high-resolution 3D microstructures with low costs and high efficiency. In this work we present a solvent-based electrohydrodynamic 3D printing technique that allows fabrication of microscale structures like single walls, crossed walls, lattice and concentric circles. Process parameters were optimized to deposit tiny 3D patterns with a wall width smaller than 10 μm and a high aspect ratio of about 60. Tight bonding among neighbour layers could be achieved with a smooth lateral surface. In comparison with the existing microscale 3D printing techniques, the presented method is low-cost, highly efficient and applicable to multiple polymers. It is envisioned that this simple microscale 3D printing strategy might provide an alternative and innovative way for application in MEMS, biosensor and flexible electronics.

  6. Three dimensional polymer waveguide using hybrid lithography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanran; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Minghui; Chen, Changming; Wang, Xibin; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Daming; Yi, Yunji

    2015-10-01

    A three dimensional polymer waveguide with taper structure was demonstrated and fabricated by a reliable and effective hybrid lithography. The hybrid lithography consists of lithography to fabricate a polymer waveguide and gray scale lithography to fabricate a polymer taper structure. Laser ablation and shadow aluminum evaporation were designed for gray scale lithography. The length of the gray scale region ranging from 20 to 400 μm could be controlled by the laser power, the ablation speed, and the aluminum thickness. The slope angle was determined by the length of the gray scale region and the thickness of the photoresist. The waveguide taper structure could be transferred to the lower layer by the etching method. The taper structure can be used for integration of the waveguide with different dimensions.

  7. Three-Dimensional Gear Crack Propagation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Sane, Ashok D.; Drago, Raymond J.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    Three-dimensional crack growth simulation was performed on a split-tooth gear design using boundary element modeling and linear elastic fracture mechanics. Initial cracks in the fillet of the teeth produced stress intensity factors of greater magnitude (and thus, greater crack growth rates) than those in the root or groove areas of the teeth. Crack growth simulation was performed on a case study to evaluate crack propagation paths. Tooth fracture was predicted from the crack growth simulation for an initial crack in the tooth fillet region. Tooth loads on the uncracked mesh of the split-tooth design were up to five times greater than those on the cracked mesh if equal deflections of the cracked and uncracked teeth were considered. Predicted crack shapes as well as crack propagation life are presented based on calculated stress intensity factors, mixed-mode crack propagation trajectory theories, and fatigue crack growth theories.

  8. Three-dimensional modular electronic interconnection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolotin, Gary S. (Inventor); Cardone, John (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A three-dimensional connection system uses a plurality of printed wiring boards with connectors completely around the printed wiring boards, and connected by an elastomeric interface connector. The device includes internal space to allow room for circuitry. The device is formed by stacking an electronics module, an elastomeric interface board on the electronics module such that the interface board's exterior makes electrical connection with the connectors around the perimeter of the interface board, but the internal portion is open to allow room for the electrical devices on the printed wiring board. A plurality of these devices are stacked between a top stiffener and a bottom device, and held into place by alignment elements.

  9. Three-dimensional tori and Arnold tongues.

    PubMed

    Sekikawa, Munehisa; Inaba, Naohiko; Kamiyama, Kyohei; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2014-03-01

    This study analyzes an Arnold resonance web, which includes complicated quasi-periodic bifurcations, by conducting a Lyapunov analysis for a coupled delayed logistic map. The map can exhibit a two-dimensional invariant torus (IT), which corresponds to a three-dimensional torus in vector fields. Numerous one-dimensional invariant closed curves (ICCs), which correspond to two-dimensional tori in vector fields, exist in a very complicated but reasonable manner inside an IT-generating region. Periodic solutions emerge at the intersections of two different thin ICC-generating regions, which we call ICC-Arnold tongues, because all three independent-frequency components of the IT become rational at the intersections. Additionally, we observe a significant bifurcation structure where conventional Arnold tongues transit to ICC-Arnold tongues through a Neimark-Sacker bifurcation in the neighborhood of a quasi-periodic Hopf bifurcation (or a quasi-periodic Neimark-Sacker bifurcation) boundary.

  10. The Three-Dimensional EIT Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, B. J.; Biesecker, D. A.; Gilbert, H. R.; Lawrence, G. R.; Ofman, L.; Wu, S. T.; Warmuth, A.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An EIT wave is an impulsive disturbance which has been observed in the EUV, Soft X-ray and white light corona, with corresponding observations in the chromosphere. The effects of these disturbances can be observed across the entire solar disk of the Sun, and throughout the inner heliosphere as well. However, the picture is not complete; observations alone do not establish a complete understanding of the nature of this three-dimensional phenomenon. A number of associated phenomena have been documented, though in most cases causality has not determined. Additionally, it is unclear which factors govern the impulse's ability to affect regions of the corona and heliosphere. We discuss the various observations and the models which provided links between the associated phenomena.

  11. Simplification of three-dimensional density maps.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Vijay; Edelsbrunner, Herbert

    2004-01-01

    We consider scientific data sets that describe density functions over three-dimensional geometric domains. Such data sets are often large and coarsened representations are needed for visualization and analysis. Assuming a tetrahedral mesh representation, we construct such representations with a simplification algorithm that combines three goals: the approximation of the function, the preservation of the mesh topology, and the improvement of the mesh quality. The third goal is achieved with a novel extension of the well-known quadric error metric. We perform a number of computational experiments to understand the effect of mesh quality improvement on the density map approximation. In addition, we study the effect of geometric simplification on the topological features of the function by monitoring its critical points.

  12. THE THREE DIMENSIONAL THERMAL HYDRAULIC CODE BAGIRA.

    SciTech Connect

    KALINICHENKO,S.D.; KOHUT,P.; KROSHILIN,A.E.; KROSHILIN,V.E.; SMIRNOV,A.V.

    2003-05-04

    BAGIRA - a thermal-hydraulic program complex was primarily developed for using it in nuclear power plant simulator models, but is also used as a best-estimate analytical tool for modeling two-phase mixture flows. The code models allow consideration of phase transients and the treatment of the hydrodynamic behavior of boiling and pressurized water reactor circuits. It provides the capability to explicitly model three-dimensional flow regimes in various regions of the primary and secondary circuits such as, the mixing regions, circular downcomer, pressurizer, reactor core, main primary loops, the steam generators, the separator-reheaters. In addition, it is coupled to a severe-accident module allowing the analysis of core degradation and fuel damage behavior. Section II will present the theoretical basis for development and selected results are presented in Section III. The primary use for the code complex is to realistically model reactor core behavior in power plant simulators providing enhanced training tools for plant operators.

  13. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction Of Ultrasound Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalouche, Robert C.; Bickmore, Dan; Tessler, Franklin N.; Mankovich, Nicholas J.; Huang, H. K.; Kangarloo, Hooshang

    1989-05-01

    We have established a three-dimensional (3-D) imaging facility for reconstruction of serial two-dimensional (2-D) ultrasound images. In the facility, contiguous 2-D images are captured directly at the clinical site from the real-time video signals of a Labsonics serial ultrasound imager. The images are digitized and stored on an IBM PC. They are then transferred over an Ethernet communication network to the Image Processing Laboratory. Finally, the serial images are reformatted and the 3-D images are reconstructed on a Pixar image computer. The reconstruction method involves grey level remapping, slice interpolation, tissue classification, surface enhancement, illumination, projection, and display. We have demonstrated that 3-D ultra-sound images can be created which bring out features difficult to discern in 2-D ultrasound images.

  14. Scaffolding for Three-Dimensional Embryonic Vasculogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraehenbuehl, Thomas P.; Aday, Sezin; Ferreira, Lino S.

    Biomaterial scaffolds have great potential to support efficient vascular differentiation of embryonic stem cells. Vascular cell fate-specific biochemical and biophysical cues have been identified and incorporated into three-dimensional (3D) biomaterials to efficiently direct embryonic vasculogenesis. The resulting vascular-like tissue can be used for regenerative medicine applications, further elucidation of biophysical and biochemical cues governing vasculogenesis, and drug discovery. In this chapter, we give an overview on the following: (1) developmental cues for directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into vascular cells, (2) 3D vascular differentiation in embryoid bodies (EBs), (3) preparation of 3D scaffolds for the vascular differentiation of hESCs, and (4) the most significant studies combining scaffolding and hESCs for development of vascular-like tissue.

  15. Versatile three-dimensional cryogenic micropositioning device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, J.; Böhm, A.; Primke, M.; Wyder, P.

    1996-01-01

    A simple design for a mechanically driven three-dimensional cryogenic micropositioner is presented. The design is based on a parallelogram structure constructed from leaf springs and wires. Actuation is achieved by the elastic deformation of the parallelogram by screws. Positions within a volume of roughly (2 mm)3 are attainable. The precision and reproducibility of positioning are in the μm-range. The deviations from linearity are smaller than 10% for the whole working range and the deviation from orthogonality is smaller than 3°. Calibration measurements performed on a Cu-mesh with a lattice constant of 60 μm are presented. In an experiment investigating the ballistic transport of carriers in the semimetal Bi, two such devices are used. The first one is used as a scanning unit for an optical fiber and the second one is used as micropositioner for a Cu point contact.

  16. Multiscale modeling of three-dimensional genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Wolynes, Peter

    The genome, the blueprint of life, contains nearly all the information needed to build and maintain an entire organism. A comprehensive understanding of the genome is of paramount interest to human health and will advance progress in many areas, including life sciences, medicine, and biotechnology. The overarching goal of my research is to understand the structure-dynamics-function relationships of the human genome. In this talk, I will be presenting our efforts in moving towards that goal, with a particular emphasis on studying the three-dimensional organization, the structure of the genome with multi-scale approaches. Specifically, I will discuss the reconstruction of genome structures at both interphase and metaphase by making use of data from chromosome conformation capture experiments. Computationally modeling of chromatin fiber at atomistic level from first principles will also be presented as our effort for studying the genome structure from bottom up.

  17. Automatic three-dimensional underground mine mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, D.F.; Vandapel, N.

    2006-01-15

    For several years, our research group has been developing methods for automated modeling of three-dimensional environments. In September 2002, we were given the opportunity to demonstrate our mapping capability in an underground coal mine. The opportunity arose as a result of the Quecreek mine accident, in which an inaccurate map caused miners to breach an abandoned, water-filled min