Science.gov

Sample records for engineering safety note

  1. Mechanical engineering note - safety analysis of molten uranium/water interaction in the uranium foundry furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Gourdin, W H; Sze, J

    1999-08-19

    This Engineering Note describes the development of the accident criteria used the basis for the design of the uranium foundry vacuum vessel. The results of this analysis provide input into other safety notes that investigate how well the uranium containment boundary will maintain its integrity during the design basis accident. The preventative measures that have been designed into the system to minimize the potential to produce a flammable gas mixture are described. The system response is designed for consistency with applicable sections of the LLNL Health and Safety Manual, as well as the Mechanical engineering Safety Design Standards.

  2. Space engine safety system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, William A.; Meyer, Claudia M.

    1991-01-01

    A rocket engine safety system is designed to initiate control procedures which will minimize damage to the engine and vehicle or test stand in the event of an engine failure. This report describes the features and the implementation issues associated with rocket engine safety systems. Specific concerns of safety systems applied to a space-based engine and long duration space missions are discussed. Examples of safety system features and architectures are given from recent safety monitoring investigations conducted for the Space Shuttle Main Engine and for future liquid rocket engines. Also, a general design and implementation process for rocket engine safety systems is presented.

  3. Space engine safety system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, William A.; Meyer, Claudia M.

    1991-01-01

    A rocket engine safety system was designed to initiate control procedures to minimize damage to the engine or vehicle or test stand in the event of an engine failure. The features and the implementation issues associated with rocket engine safety systems are discussed, as well as the specific concerns of safety systems applied to a space-based engine and long duration space missions. Examples of safety system features and architectures are given, based on recent safety monitoring investigations conducted for the Space Shuttle Main Engine and for future liquid rocket engines. Also, the general design and implementation process for rocket engine safety systems is presented.

  4. Space engine safety system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, William A.; Meyer, Claudia M.

    1991-01-01

    A rocket engine safety system is designed to initiate control procedures which will minimize damage to the engine and vehicle or test stand in the event of an engine failure. This report describes the features and the implementation issues associated with rocket engine safety systems. Specific concerns of safety systems applied to a space-based engine and long duration space missions are discussed. Examples of safety system features and architectures are given from recent safety monitoring investigations conducted for the Space Shuttle Main Engine and for future liquid rocket engines. Also, a general design and implementation process for rocket engine safety systems is presented.

  5. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    SciTech Connect

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein's mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

  6. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    SciTech Connect

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein`s mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

  7. Environmental, safety, and health engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Woodside, G.; Kocurek, D.

    1997-12-31

    A complete guide to environmental, safety, and health engineering, including an overview of EPA and OSHA regulations; principles of environmental engineering, including pollution prevention, waste and wastewater treatment and disposal, environmental statistics, air emissions and abatement engineering, and hazardous waste storage and containment; principles of safety engineering, including safety management, equipment safety, fire and life safety, process and system safety, confined space safety, and construction safety; and principles of industrial hygiene/occupational health engineering including chemical hazard assessment, personal protective equipment, industrial ventilation, ionizing and nonionizing radiation, noise, and ergonomics.

  8. System safety engineering analysis handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ijams, T. E.

    1972-01-01

    The basic requirements and guidelines for the preparation of System Safety Engineering Analysis are presented. The philosophy of System Safety and the various analytic methods available to the engineering profession are discussed. A text-book description of each of the methods is included.

  9. Some Notes on Gasoline-Engine Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricardo, H R

    1927-01-01

    Experiments were carried out using a special engine with small glass windows and a stroboscope to record various aspects of engine performance. Valve position, supercharging, and torque recoil were all investigated with this experimental apparatus.

  10. Professional Issues in System Safety Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermid, John; Thomas, Martyn; Redmill, Felix

    For many years the profession of system safety engineering has been emerging. This paper argues that the time has now come when it requires recognition, a voice, proper governance and leadership. System safety engineering is an amalgam of many disciplines, in particular, software engineering, safety engineering and management, and systems engineering, and this paper shows that system safety engineering must address the most difficult aspects of all of these. But professional matters extend beyond merely technical considerations, and the paper concludes by showing why there is the need for a new professional body.

  11. Space transportation main engine reliability and safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, Jan C.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs are used to illustrate the reliability engineering and aerospace safety of the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME). A technology developed is called Total Quality Management (TQM). The goal is to develop a robust design. Reducing process variability produces a product with improved reliability and safety. Some engine system design characteristics are identified which improves reliability.

  12. Safety: System Safety Engineering and Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Review system safety status and issues during each milestone decision review ( MDR ) of new or improved Army Acquisition Executive (AAE)-managed systems...under research, development, or modification. (3) Review system safety status and issues during each MDR of new or improved DISC4-managed systems. (4) Act...for acceptance in all MDR packages and forward to the appropriate decision level. Institute risk management procedures as described in appendix B and

  13. Engine performance with a hydrogenated safety fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schey, Oscar W; Young, Alfred W

    1933-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation to determine the engine performance obtained with a hydrogenated safety fuel developed to eliminate fire hazard. The tests were made on a single-cylinder universal test engine at compression ratios of 5.0, 5.5, and 6.0. Most of the tests were made with a fuel-injection system, although one set of runs was made with a carburetor when using gasoline to establish comparative performance. The tests show that the b.m.e.p. obtained with safety fuel when using a fuel-injection system is slightly higher than that obtained with gasoline when using a carburetor, although the fuel consumption with safety fuel is higher. When the fuel-injection system is used with each fuel and with normal engine temperatures the b.m.e.p. with safety fuel is from 2 to 4 percent lower than with gasoline and the fuel consumption about 25 to 30 percent higher. However, a few tests at an engine coolant temperature of 250 F have shown a specific fuel consumption approximating that obtained with gasoline with only a slight reduction in power. The idling of the test engine was satisfactory with the safety fuel. Starting was difficult with a cold engine but could be readily accomplished when the jacket water was hot. It is believed that the use of the safety fuel would practically eliminate crash fires.

  14. System safety in Stirling engine development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankaitis, H.

    1981-01-01

    The DOE/NASA Stirling Engine Project Office has required that contractors make safety considerations an integral part of all phases of the Stirling engine development program. As an integral part of each engine design subtask, analyses are evolved to determine possible modes of failure. The accepted system safety analysis techniques (Fault Tree, FMEA, Hazards Analysis, etc.) are applied in various degrees of extent at the system, subsystem and component levels. The primary objectives are to identify critical failure areas, to enable removal of susceptibility to such failures or their effects from the system and to minimize risk.

  15. Engineering Safety-Related Requirements for Software-Intensive Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    Requirements Specialty Engineering Subsystem Requirements Stakeholder ( Business ) Requirements Engineering Safety-Related Requirements for Software-Intensive...Requirements Software Requirements Hardware Requirements Stakeholder ( Business ) Requirements Engineering Safety-Related Requirements for Software-Intensive

  16. Patient safety trilogy: perspectives from clinical engineering.

    PubMed

    Gieras, Izabella; Sherman, Paul; Minsent, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the role a clinical engineering or healthcare technology management (HTM) department can play in promoting patient safety from three different perspectives: a community hospital, a national government health system, and an academic medical center. After a general overview, Izabella Gieras from Huntington Hospital in Pasadena, CA, leads off by examining the growing role of human factors in healthcare technology, and describing how her facility uses clinical simulations in medical equipment evaluations. A section by Paul Sherman follows, examining patient safety initiatives from the perspective of the Veterans Health Administration with a focus on hazard alerts and recalls. Dennis Minsent from Oregon Health & Science University writes about patient safety from an academic healthcare perspective, and details how clinical engineers can engage in multidisciplinary safety opportunities.

  17. Improving Safety through Human Factors Engineering.

    PubMed

    Siewert, Bettina; Hochman, Mary G

    2015-10-01

    Human factors engineering (HFE) focuses on the design and analysis of interactive systems that involve people, technical equipment, and work environment. HFE is informed by knowledge of human characteristics. It complements existing patient safety efforts by specifically taking into consideration that, as humans, frontline staff will inevitably make mistakes. Therefore, the systems with which they interact should be designed for the anticipation and mitigation of human errors. The goal of HFE is to optimize the interaction of humans with their work environment and technical equipment to maximize safety and efficiency. Special safeguards include usability testing, standardization of processes, and use of checklists and forcing functions. However, the effectiveness of the safety program and resiliency of the organization depend on timely reporting of all safety events independent of patient harm, including perceived potential risks, bad outcomes that occur even when proper protocols have been followed, and episodes of "improvisation" when formal guidelines are found not to exist. Therefore, an institution must adopt a robust culture of safety, where the focus is shifted from blaming individuals for errors to preventing future errors, and where barriers to speaking up-including barriers introduced by steep authority gradients-are minimized. This requires creation of formal guidelines to address safety concerns, establishment of unified teams with open communication and shared responsibility for patient safety, and education of managers and senior physicians to perceive the reporting of safety concerns as a benefit rather than a threat. © RSNA, 2015.

  18. Lecture notes for introduction to nuclear engineering 101

    SciTech Connect

    Fullwood, R.; Cadwell, J.

    1992-03-01

    The lecture notes for introductory nuclear engineering are provided for Department of Energy personnel that are recent graduates, transfers from non-nuclear industries, and people with minimum engineering training. The material assumes a knowledge of algebra and elementary calculus. These notes support and supplement a three-hour lecture. The reader is led into the subject from the familiar macroscopic world to the microscopic world of atoms and the parts of atoms called elementary particles. Only a passing reference is made to the very extensive world of quarks and tansitory particles to concentrate on those associated with radioactivity and fission. The Einsteinian truth of mass-energy equivalence provides an understanding of the forces binding a nucleus with a resulting mass defect that results in fusion at one end of the mass spectrum and fission at the other. Exercises are provided in calculating the energy released in isotopic transformation, reading and understanding the chart of the nuclides. The periodic table is reviewed to appreciate that the noble elements are produced by quantum mechanical shell closings. Radioactive decay is calculated as well as nuclear penetration and shielding. The geometric attenuation of radiation is studied for personal protection; the use of shielding materials for radiation protection is presented along with the buildup factor that renders the shielding less effective than might be supposed. The process of fission is presented along with the fission products and energies produced by fission. The requirements for producing a sustained chain reactor are discussed. The lecture ends with discussions of how radiation and dose is measured and how dose is converted to measures of the damage of radiation to our bodies.

  19. Human factors engineering and patient safety

    PubMed Central

    Gosbee, J

    2002-01-01

    

 The case study and analyses presented here illustrate the crucial role of human factors engineering (HFE) in patient safety. HFE is a framework for efficient and constructive thinking which includes methods and tools to help healthcare teams perform patient safety analyses, such as root cause analyses. The literature on HFE over several decades contains theories and applied studies to help to solve difficult patient safety problems and design issues. A case study is presented which illustrates the vulnerabilities of human factors design in a transport monitor. The subsequent analysis highlights how to move beyond the more obvious contributing factors like training to design problems and the establishment of informal norms. General advice is offered to address these issues and design issues specific to this case are discussed. PMID:12468696

  20. Lecture Notes for Introduction to Safety and Health

    SciTech Connect

    Biele, Frank

    1992-03-01

    This lecture specifically addresses the Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) program for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor employees at government-owned contractor-operated (GOCO) facilities. In an overview, safety and health is defined and the driving forces behind the implementation of a strong program are examined. An examination of how OSHA standards were created, as well as the complexities of the DOE-prescribed Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) program. The program makes the listener aware that more than three different agencies and five industrial societies combine to make up the Act, and the focus is directed on areas identified by DOE as requiring training.

  1. Lecture notes for introduction to safety and health

    SciTech Connect

    Biele, F.

    1992-03-01

    This lecture specifically addresses the Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) program for the US Department of Energy (DOE) contractor employees at government-owned contractor-operated (GOCO) facilities. In an overview, safety and health is defined and the driving forces behind the implementation of a strong program are examined. An examination of how ASIA standards were created, as well as the complexities of the DOE-prescribed Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) program. The program makes the listener aware that more than three different agencies and five industrial societies combine to make up the Act, and the focus is directed on areas identified by DOE as requiring training.

  2. Lecture Notes on Criticality Safety Validation Using MCNP & Whisper

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Forrest B.; Rising, Michael Evan; Alwin, Jennifer Louise

    2016-03-11

    Training classes for nuclear criticality safety, MCNP documentation. The need for, and problems surrounding, validation of computer codes and data area considered first. Then some background for MCNP & Whisper is given--best practices for Monte Carlo criticality calculations, neutron spectra, S(α,β) thermal neutron scattering data, nuclear data sensitivities, covariance data, and correlation coefficients. Whisper is computational software designed to assist the nuclear criticality safety analyst with validation studies with the Monte Carlo radiation transport package MCNP. Whisper's methodology (benchmark selection – Ck's, weights; extreme value theory – bias, bias uncertainty; MOS for nuclear data uncertainty – GLLS) and usage are discussed.

  3. Curriculum: Integrating Health and Safety Into Engineering Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talty, John T.

    1985-01-01

    National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health instituted a project in 1980 to encourage engineering educators to focus on occupational safety and health issues in engineering curricula. Progress to date is outlined, considering specific results in curriculum development, engineering society interaction, and formation of a teaching…

  4. Highway Safety Program Manual: Volume 13: Traffic Engineering Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    Volume 13 of the 19-volume Highway Safety Program Manual (which provides guidance to State and local governments on preferred highway safety practices) focuses on traffic engineering services. The introduction outlines the purposes and objectives of Highway Safety Program Standard 13 and the Highway Safety Program Manual. Program development and…

  5. Health impact and safety of engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Teow, Yiwei; Asharani, P V; Hande, M Prakash; Valiyaveettil, Suresh

    2011-07-07

    Many engineered nanomaterials (NMs) are being synthesized and explored for potential use in consumer and medical products. Already, nanoparticles (NPs) of titanium dioxide (TiO(2)), zinc oxide (ZnO), silver (Ag) and other metals or their oxides are present in commercial products such as sunscreens, cosmetics, wound dressings, surgical tools, detergents, automotive paints and tires. More recent and advanced FDA-approved use of NMs includes quantum dots (QDs) in live cell imaging, zirconium oxides in bone replacement and prosthetic devices and nanocarriers in drug delivery. The benefits from nanotechnology are aplenty, comprising antimicrobial activities, scratch- and water-resistance, long-lasting shine, improved processor speeds and better display resolution, to name a few. While developers of these products often focus on the exciting beneficial aspects of their products, safety and toxicity issues are often not discussed in detail. Long-term effects such as chronic exposure and environmental pollution are even less documented. Along with widespread manufacture and use of NMs, concerns for occupational hazards, proper handling, disposal, storage, shipping and clean up are expected to rise. This review focus on the possible biological impact of engineered NPs, serving as a reminder that nanomaterials can become a double-edged sword if not properly handled.

  6. Noted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunberg, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    Considering how much attention people lavish on the technologies of writing--scroll, codex, print, screen--it's striking how little they pay to the technologies for digesting and regurgitating it. One way or another, there's no sector of the modern world that is not saturated with note-taking--the bureaucracy, the liberal professions, the…

  7. Noted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunberg, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    Considering how much attention people lavish on the technologies of writing--scroll, codex, print, screen--it's striking how little they pay to the technologies for digesting and regurgitating it. One way or another, there's no sector of the modern world that is not saturated with note-taking--the bureaucracy, the liberal professions, the…

  8. Note on evaluating safety performance of road infrastructure to motivate safety competition.

    PubMed

    Han, Sangjin

    2016-01-01

    Road infrastructures are usually developed and maintained by governments or public sectors. There is no competitor in the market of their jurisdiction. This monopolic feature discourages road authorities from improving the level of safety with proactive motivation. This study suggests how to apply a principle of competition for roads, in particular by means of performance evaluation. It first discusses why road infrastructure has been slow in safety oriented development and management in respect of its business model. Then it suggests some practical ways of how to promote road safety between road authorities, particularly by evaluating safety performance of road infrastructure. These are summarized as decision of safety performance indicators, classification of spatial boundaries, data collection, evaluation, and reporting. Some consideration points are also discussed to make safety performance evaluation on road infrastructure lead to better road safety management.

  9. System safety education focused on industrial engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, W. L.; Morris, R. S.

    1971-01-01

    An educational program, designed to train students with the specific skills needed to become safety specialists, is described. The discussion concentrates on application, selection, and utilization of various system safety analytical approaches. Emphasis is also placed on the management of a system safety program, its relationship with other disciplines, and new developments and applications of system safety techniques.

  10. (NESC) NASA Engineering and Safety Center Orion Heat Shield Carr

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-29

    (NESC) NASA Engineering and Safety Center Orion Heat Shield Carrier Structure: Titanium Orthogrid heat shield sub-component dynamic test article : person in the photo Jim Jeans (Background: Mike Kirsch, James Ainsworth)

  11. Safety engineering in handling fuels and lubricants in civil aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protoereiskii, Aleksandr Stepanovich

    The book is concerned with methods of improving working conditions, work hygiene, safety engineering, and fire and explosion prevention during the storage and handling of petroleum products at fuel and lubricant storage facilities. The discussion covers methods of protection against static and atmospheric discharges, lightning protection, safety engineering in fuel and lubricant laboratories, and methods of fire prevention and fire extinction. Attention is also given to methods for administering first aid in case of accidents and poisoning.

  12. Safety-I, Safety-II and Resilience Engineering.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Mary; Deutsch, Ellen S

    2015-12-01

    In the quest to continually improve the health care delivered to patients, it is important to understand "what went wrong," also known as Safety-I, when there are undesired outcomes, but it is also important to understand, and optimize "what went right," also known as Safety-II. The difference between Safety-I and Safety-II are philosophical as well as pragmatic. Improving health care delivery involves understanding that health care delivery is a complex adaptive system; components of that system impact, and are impacted by, the actions of other components of the system. Challenges to optimal care include regular, irregular and unexampled threats. This article addresses the dangers of brittleness and miscalibration, as well as the value of adaptive capacity and margin. These qualities can, respectively, detract from or contribute to the emergence of organizational resilience. Resilience is characterized by the ability to monitor, react, anticipate, and learn. Finally, this article celebrates the importance of humans, who make use of system capabilities and proactively mitigate the effects of system limitations to contribute to successful outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Patient Safety: The Role of Human Factors and Systems Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Carayon, Pascale; Wood, Kenneth E.

    2011-01-01

    Patient safety is a global challenge that requires knowledge and skills in multiple areas, including human factors and systems engineering. In this chapter, numerous conceptual approaches and methods for analyzing, preventing and mitigating medical errors are described. Given the complexity of healthcare work systems and processes, we emphasize the need for increasing partnerships between the health sciences and human factors and systems engineering to improve patient safety. Those partnerships will be able to develop and implement the system redesigns that are necessary to improve healthcare work systems and processes for patient safety. PMID:20543237

  14. Patient safety - the role of human factors and systems engineering.

    PubMed

    Carayon, Pascale; Wood, Kenneth E

    2010-01-01

    Patient safety is a global challenge that requires knowledge and skills in multiple areas, including human factors and systems engineering. In this chapter, numerous conceptual approaches and methods for analyzing, preventing and mitigating medical errors are described. Given the complexity of healthcare work systems and processes, we emphasize the need for increasing partnerships between the health sciences and human factors and systems engineering to improve patient safety. Those partnerships will be able to develop and implement the system redesigns that are necessary to improve healthcare work systems and processes for patient safety.

  15. View forward, starboard engine room, compartment C1; note RPM indicator ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View forward, starboard engine room, compartment C-1; note RPM indicator at top right of photograph, bilge drain manifold at lower right; worm gear at left is probably part of a hydraulic reversing gear. (057) - USS Olympia, Penn's Landing, 211 South Columbus Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  16. Product Engineering Class in the Software Safety Risk Taxonomy for Building Safety-Critical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Janice; Victor, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    When software safety requirements are imposed on legacy safety-critical systems, retrospective safety cases need to be formulated as part of recertifying the systems for further use and risks must be documented and managed to give confidence for reusing the systems. The SEJ Software Development Risk Taxonomy [4] focuses on general software development issues. It does not, however, cover all the safety risks. The Software Safety Risk Taxonomy [8] was developed which provides a construct for eliciting and categorizing software safety risks in a straightforward manner. In this paper, we present extended work on the taxonomy for safety that incorporates the additional issues inherent in the development and maintenance of safety-critical systems with software. An instrument called a Software Safety Risk Taxonomy Based Questionnaire (TBQ) is generated containing questions addressing each safety attribute in the Software Safety Risk Taxonomy. Software safety risks are surfaced using the new TBQ and then analyzed. In this paper we give the definitions for the specialized Product Engineering Class within the Software Safety Risk Taxonomy. At the end of the paper, we present the tool known as the 'Legacy Systems Risk Database Tool' that is used to collect and analyze the data required to show traceability to a particular safety standard

  17. Safety Outcomes of NOTES Cholecystectomy Versus Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Cheng; Ling, Yan; Ma, Chi; Ma, Xiaochun; Fan, Wei; Niu, Weibo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) is an endoscopic technique whereby surgical interventions can be performed with a flexible endoscope passed through a natural orifice (mouth, vulva, urethra, anus) then through a transluminal opening of the stomach, vagina, bladder, or colon. Although in the early stage of research and development, NOTES has been clinically applied across the globe, above all the transvaginal cholecystectomy is among the most frequently performed procedures. In the existing 2 types of transvaginal routes, the hybrid NOTES cholecystectomy (NC) is more likely to be accepted. However, there has been controversy regarding the safety outcomes of hybrid NC in comparison with classical laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). The primary objective of this meta-analysis is to compare the characteristics between NC and classical LC. Materials and Methods: A meta-analysis of eligible studies comparing NC with classical LC was performed to evaluate the safety outcomes including wound complications, other postoperative complications and intraoperative conversion between the 2 groups. Results: Pooling 3 randomized controlled trials (n=157) and 7 nonrandomized trial (n=593) demonstrated that the rates of wound complications and other postoperative complications in NC group did not significantly differ from those of classical LC group [wound complications: ratio difference (RD)=−0.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) −0.04to 0.01, P=0.23; other postoperative complication: RD=−0.01; 95% CI, −0.03 to 0.02; P=0.6]. The intraoperative conversion rate in NC groups was higher than that of LC groups (RD=0.03; 95% CI, 0.01-0.06; P=0.02). Conclusions: There is no significate difference between the safety of NC and laparoscope cholecystectomy. NC is associated with a higher rate of intraoperative conversion when compared with LC. It is worthy of further promotion and validation in clinical settings. PMID:27557339

  18. Safety and maintenance engineering: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A compilation is presented for the dissemination of information on technological developments which have potential utility outside the aerospace and nuclear communities. Safety of personnel engaged in the handling of hazardous materials and equipment, protection of equipment from fire, high wind, or careless handling by personnel, and techniques for the maintenance of operating equipment are reported.

  19. Requirements Engineering for Software Integrity and Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveson, Nancy G.

    2002-01-01

    Requirements flaws are the most common cause of errors and software-related accidents in operational software. Most aerospace firms list requirements as one of their most important outstanding software development problems and all of the recent, NASA spacecraft losses related to software (including the highly publicized Mars Program failures) can be traced to requirements flaws. In light of these facts, it is surprising that relatively little research is devoted to requirements in contrast with other software engineering topics. The research proposed built on our previous work. including both criteria for determining whether a requirements specification is acceptably complete and a new approach to structuring system specifications called Intent Specifications. This grant was to fund basic research on how these ideas could be extended to leverage innovative approaches to the problems of (1) reducing the impact of changing requirements, (2) finding requirements specification flaws early through formal and informal analysis, and (3) avoiding common flaws entirely through appropriate requirements specification language design.

  20. Rasmussen's legacy: A paradigm change in engineering for safety.

    PubMed

    Leveson, Nancy G

    2017-03-01

    This paper describes three applications of Rasmussen's idea to systems engineering practice. The first is the application of the abstraction hierarchy to engineering specifications, particularly requirements specification. The second is the use of Rasmussen's ideas in safety modeling and analysis to create a new, more powerful type of accident causation model that extends traditional models to better handle human-operated, software-intensive, sociotechnical systems. Because this new model has a formal, mathematical foundation built on systems theory (as was Rasmussen's original model), new modeling and analysis tools become possible. The third application is to engineering hazard analysis. Engineers have traditionally either omitted human from consideration in system hazard analysis or have treated them rather superficially, for example, that they behave randomly. Applying Rasmussen's model of human error to a powerful new hazard analysis technique allows human behavior to be included in engineering hazard analysis.

  1. Image processing for safety assessment in civil engineering.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Belen; Pomares, Juan C; Irles, Ramon; Espinosa, Julian; Mas, David

    2013-06-20

    Behavior analysis of construction safety systems is of fundamental importance to avoid accidental injuries. Traditionally, measurements of dynamic actions in civil engineering have been done through accelerometers, but high-speed cameras and image processing techniques can play an important role in this area. Here, we propose using morphological image filtering and Hough transform on high-speed video sequence as tools for dynamic measurements on that field. The presented method is applied to obtain the trajectory and acceleration of a cylindrical ballast falling from a building and trapped by a thread net. Results show that safety recommendations given in construction codes can be potentially dangerous for workers.

  2. Engineered nanoparticles: Revisiting safety concerns in light of ethno medicine.

    PubMed

    Palkhiwala, Suhani; Bakshi, Sonal R

    2014-01-01

    The nanoparticles are a miracle invention of the century that has opened novel avenues of applications in various fields. The safety aspect of exposure to nanoparticles for humans, plants, animals, soil micro-flora, and ecosystem at large has been questioned. The safety concern can be addressed by laboratory studies to assess the actual risk and recommend exposure limits and related regulation. There is also a suggestion for considering the nanoparticle form of conventional compounds as a new chemical and subject it to safety assessment in line with the chemical regulatory agencies. In the light of the current scenario of popularity and safety concerns regarding nanoparticles, the use of ancient metal based forms like, Bhasma is revisited in the present article. The current approach of green synthesis of nanoparticles is compared with the Ayurveda Rasayana Shastra guidelines of Bhasma preparation and modern preparation of engineered nanoparticles. Since the benefits of nanotechnology are undeniable, and safety concerns are also not ungrounded, there is a pressing need to revisit the ways nanoparticles are manufactured, and to carry out safety assessment by the techniques specially adapted for this novel compound.

  3. Engineered nanoparticles: Revisiting safety concerns in light of ethno medicine

    PubMed Central

    Palkhiwala, Suhani; Bakshi, Sonal R.

    2014-01-01

    The nanoparticles are a miracle invention of the century that has opened novel avenues of applications in various fields. The safety aspect of exposure to nanoparticles for humans, plants, animals, soil micro-flora, and ecosystem at large has been questioned. The safety concern can be addressed by laboratory studies to assess the actual risk and recommend exposure limits and related regulation. There is also a suggestion for considering the nanoparticle form of conventional compounds as a new chemical and subject it to safety assessment in line with the chemical regulatory agencies. In the light of the current scenario of popularity and safety concerns regarding nanoparticles, the use of ancient metal based forms like, Bhasma is revisited in the present article. The current approach of green synthesis of nanoparticles is compared with the Ayurveda Rasayana Shastra guidelines of Bhasma preparation and modern preparation of engineered nanoparticles. Since the benefits of nanotechnology are undeniable, and safety concerns are also not ungrounded, there is a pressing need to revisit the ways nanoparticles are manufactured, and to carry out safety assessment by the techniques specially adapted for this novel compound. PMID:26664232

  4. Improving safety of aircraft engines: a consortium approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasche, Lisa J. H.

    1996-11-01

    With over seven million departures per year, air transportation has become not a luxury, but a standard mode of transportation for the United States. A critical aspect of modern air transport is the jet engine, a complex engineered component that has enabled the rapid travel to which we have all become accustomed. One of the enabling technologies for safe air travel is nondestructive evaluation, or NDE, which includes various inspection techniques used to assess the health or integrity of a structure, component, or material. The Engine Titanium Consortium (ETC) was established in 1993 to respond to recommendations made by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Titanium Rotating Components Review Team (TRCRT) for improvements in inspection of engine titanium. Several recent accomplishments of the ETC are detailed in this paper. The objective of the Engine Titanium Consortium is to provide the FAAand the manufacturers with reliable and costeffective new methods and/or improvements in mature methods for detecting cracks, inclusions, and imperfections in titanium. The consortium consists of a team of researchers from academia and industry-namely, Iowa State University, Allied Signal Propulsion Engines, General Electric Aircraft Engines, and Pratt & Whitney Engines-who work together to develop program priorities, organize a program plan, conduct the research, and implement the solutions. The true advantage of the consortium approach is that it brings together the research talents of academia and the engineering talents of industry to tackle a technology-base problem. In bringing industrial competitors together, the consortium ensures that the research results, which have safety implications and result from FAA funds, are shared and become part of the public domain.

  5. Engineering thinking in emergency situations: A new nuclear safety concept.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, Franck; Travadel, Sébastien

    2014-11-01

    The lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident have focused on preventive measures designed to protect nuclear reactors, and crisis management plans. Although there is still no end in sight to the accident that occurred on March 11, 2011, how engineers have handled the aftermath offers new insight into the capacity of organizations to adapt in situations that far exceed the scope of safety standards based on probabilistic risk assessment and on the comprehensive identification of disaster scenarios. Ongoing crises in which conventional resources are lacking, but societal expectations are high, call for "engineering thinking in emergency situations." This is a new concept that emphasizes adaptability and resilience within organizations-such as the ability to create temporary new organizational structures; to quickly switch from a normal state to an innovative mode; and to integrate a social dimension into engineering activities. In the future, nuclear safety oversight authorities should assess the ability of plant operators to create and implement effective engineering strategies on the fly, and should require that operators demonstrate the capability for resilience in the aftermath of an accident.

  6. Engineering thinking in emergency situations: A new nuclear safety concept

    PubMed Central

    Guarnieri, Franck; Travadel, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    The lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident have focused on preventive measures designed to protect nuclear reactors, and crisis management plans. Although there is still no end in sight to the accident that occurred on March 11, 2011, how engineers have handled the aftermath offers new insight into the capacity of organizations to adapt in situations that far exceed the scope of safety standards based on probabilistic risk assessment and on the comprehensive identification of disaster scenarios. Ongoing crises in which conventional resources are lacking, but societal expectations are high, call for “engineering thinking in emergency situations.” This is a new concept that emphasizes adaptability and resilience within organizations—such as the ability to create temporary new organizational structures; to quickly switch from a normal state to an innovative mode; and to integrate a social dimension into engineering activities. In the future, nuclear safety oversight authorities should assess the ability of plant operators to create and implement effective engineering strategies on the fly, and should require that operators demonstrate the capability for resilience in the aftermath of an accident. PMID:25419015

  7. NASA Engineering and Safety Center NDE Super Problem Resolution Team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosser, W. H.

    2007-03-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) is an independent organization, which was charted in the wake of the Space Shuttle Columbia accident to serve as an Agency-wide technical resource focused on engineering excellence. The objective of the NESC is to improve safety by performing in-depth independent engineering assessments, testing, and analysis to uncover technical vulnerabilities and to determine appropriate preventative and corrective actions for problems, trends or issues within NASA's programs, projects and institutions. Critical to the NESC are teams of experts in a number of core disciplines including nondestructive evaluation (NDE). These teams, designated Super Problem Resolution Teams (SPRTs), draw upon the best engineering expertise from across the Agency and include partnerships with other government agencies, national laboratories, universities and industry. The NESC NDE SPRT provides a ready resource of NDE technical expertise to support NESC Independent Technical Assessments and Investigations. The purpose of this session will be to provide an overview of the NESC and the NDE SPRT along with a few examples of NDE related problems that the team has addressed for NASA Programs. It is hoped that this session will be of interest to the general NDE community and will foster contacts with additional NDE experts that might provide future support to the NASA NESC NDE SPRT.

  8. Design of 3D simulation engine for oilfield safety training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hua-Ming; Kang, Bao-Sheng

    2015-03-01

    Aiming at the demand for rapid custom development of 3D simulation system for oilfield safety training, this paper designs and implements a 3D simulation engine based on script-driven method, multi-layer structure, pre-defined entity objects and high-level tools such as scene editor, script editor, program loader. A scripting language been defined to control the system's progress, events and operating results. Training teacher can use this engine to edit 3D virtual scenes, set the properties of entity objects, define the logic script of task, and produce a 3D simulation training system without any skills of programming. Through expanding entity class, this engine can be quickly applied to other virtual training areas.

  9. Assessment of commercial NLP engines for medication information extraction from dictated clinical notes.

    PubMed

    Jagannathan, V; Mullett, Charles J; Arbogast, James G; Halbritter, Kevin A; Yellapragada, Deepthi; Regulapati, Sushmitha; Bandaru, Pavani

    2009-04-01

    We assessed the current state of commercial natural language processing (NLP) engines for their ability to extract medication information from textual clinical documents. Two thousand de-identified discharge summaries and family practice notes were submitted to four commercial NLP engines with the request to extract all medication information. The four sets of returned results were combined to create a comparison standard which was validated against a manual, physician-derived gold standard created from a subset of 100 reports. Once validated, the individual vendor results for medication names, strengths, route, and frequency were compared against this automated standard with precision, recall, and F measures calculated. Compared with the manual, physician-derived gold standard, the automated standard was successful at accurately capturing medication names (F measure=93.2%), but performed less well with strength (85.3%) and route (80.3%), and relatively poorly with dosing frequency (48.3%). Moderate variability was seen in the strengths of the four vendors. The vendors performed better with the structured discharge summaries than with the clinic notes in an analysis comparing the two document types. Although automated extraction may serve as the foundation for a manual review process, it is not ready to automate medication lists without human intervention.

  10. Engineering tissue alternatives to animals: applying tissue engineering to basic research and safety testing.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Anthony; Brown, Robert; Shakesheff, Kevin

    2009-07-01

    The focus for the rapid progress in the field of tissue engineering has been the clinical potential of the technology to repair, replace, maintain or enhance the function of a particular tissue or organ. However, tissue engineering has much wider applicability in basic research and safety testing, which is often not recognized owing to the clinical focus of tissue engineers. Using examples from a recent National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council symposium, which brought together tissue engineers and scientists from other research communities, this review highlights the potential of tissue engineering to provide scientifically robust alternatives to animals to address basic research questions and improve drug and chemical development in the pharmaceutical and chemical industries.

  11. Safety of engineered allergen-specific immunotherapy vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Valenta, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of the review is to summarize and comment on recent developments regarding the safety of engineered immunotherapy vaccines. Recent findings In the last 2 years, several studies were published in which allergy vaccines were developed on the basis of chemical modification of natural allergen extracts, the engineering of allergen molecules by recombinant DNA technology and synthetic peptide chemistry, allergen genes, new application routes and conjugation with immune modulatory molecules. Several studies exemplified the general applicability of hypoallergenic vaccines on the basis of recombinant fusion proteins consisting of nonallergenic allergen-derived peptides fused to allergen-unrelated carrier molecules. These vaccines are engineered to reduce both, immunoglobulin E (IgE) as well as allergen-specific T cell epitopes in the vaccines, and thus should provoke less IgE and T-cell-mediated side-effects. They are made to induce allergen-specific IgG antibodies against the IgE-binding sites of allergens with the T-cell help of the carrier molecule. Summary Several interesting examples of allergy vaccines with potentially increased safety profiles have been published. The concept of fusion proteins consisting of allergen-derived hypoallergenic peptides fused to allergen-unrelated proteins that seems to be broadly applicable for a variety of allergens appears to be of particular interest because it promises not only to reduce side-effects but also to increase efficacy and convenience of allergy vaccines. PMID:22885888

  12. Quantitative Evaluation of the Effect on System Safety Engineer Training Course for the Aerospace Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekita, Ryuichi; Yamada, Shu

    The system safety has been being applied in Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) ‧s launch vehicle and satellite development projects. The engineering state of system safety has some room for improvement. Therefore, JAXA is continuously working for system safety improvement. The system safety engineer training course is the top priority for the improvement. This paper represents the practical training evaluation way using Kirkpatrick‧s 4-level approach and the actual results in JAXA system safety engineer training course. Also this paper represents the importance of the engineer training evaluation as a part of PDCA cycle in the industry field.

  13. Systematic analysis of the safety and benefits of transvaginal hybrid-NOTES cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Bulian, Dirk R; Knuth, Jurgen; Lehmann, Kai S; Sauerwald, Axel; Heiss, Markus M

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate transvaginal hybrid-NOTES cholecystectomy (TVC) during its clinical establishment and compare it with the traditional laparoscopic technique (LC). METHODS: The specific problems and benefits of TVC were reviewed using a registry analysis, a comparative cohort study and a randomized clinical trial. At first, feasibility, safety and specific complications of the TVC were analyzed based on the first 488 data sets of the German NOTES Registry (GNR). Hereafter, we compared the early postoperative results of our first 50 TVC-patients with those of 50 female LC-patients matched by age, BMI and ASA classification. The same cohort was contacted an average of two years later to evaluate long-term results concerning pain and satisfaction with the aesthetic results and the overall postoperative results as well as sexual intercourse by means of two domains of the German version of the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI-d). Consequently, we performed a randomized clinical trial comparing 20 TVC-patients with 20 needlescopic/3-trocar cholecystectomies (NC) also concerning the early postoperative results as well as pain, satisfaction and quality of life by means of the Eypasch Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index (GIQLI) in the later course. Finally, we discussed the results in accordance with other published studies. RESULTS: The complication (3.5%) and conversion rates (4.1%) for TVC were low in the GNR and comparable to those of the LC. Access related intraoperative complications included injuries to the bladder (n = 4; 0.8%) and bowel (n = 3; 0.6%). The study cohort revealed less postoperative pain after TVC comparing to the LC-patients on the day of surgery (NRS, 1.5/10 vs 3.1/10, P = 0.003), in the morning (NRS, 1.9/10 vs 2.8/10, P = 0.047) and in the evening (NRS, 1.1/10 vs 1.8/10, P = 0.025) of postoperative day (POD) one. The randomized clinical trial consistently found less cumulative pain until POD 2 (NRS, 8/40 vs 14/40, P = 0.043), as well as until

  14. Engineering and Safety Partnership Enhances Safety of the Space Shuttle Program (SSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duarte, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    Project Management must use the risk assessment documents (RADs) as tools to support their decision making process. Therefore, these documents have to be initiated, developed, and evolved parallel to the life of the project. Technical preparation and safety compliance of these documents require a great deal of resources. Updating these documents after-the-fact not only requires substantial increase in resources - Project Cost -, but this task is also not useful and perhaps an unnecessary expense. Hazard Reports (HRs), Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEAs), Critical Item Lists (CILs), Risk Management process are, among others, within this category. A positive action resulting from a strong partnership between interested parties is one way to get these documents and related processes and requirements, released and updated in useful time. The Space Shuttle Program (SSP) at the Marshall Space Flight Center has implemented a process which is having positive results and gaining acceptance within the Agency. A hybrid Panel, with equal interest and responsibilities for the two larger organizations, Safety and Engineering, is the focal point of this process. Called the Marshall Safety and Engineering Review Panel (MSERP), its charter (Space Shuttle Program Directive 110 F, April 15, 2005), and its Operating Control Plan emphasizes the technical and safety responsibilities over the program risk documents: HRs; FMEA/CILs; Engineering Changes; anomalies/problem resolutions and corrective action implementations, and trend analysis. The MSERP has undertaken its responsibilities with objectivity, assertiveness, dedication, has operated with focus, and has shown significant results and promising perspectives. The MSERP has been deeply involved in propulsion systems and integration, real time technical issues and other relevant reviews, since its conception. These activities have transformed the propulsion MSERP in a truly participative and value added panel, making a

  15. Assuring consumer safety without animals: Applications for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Westmoreland, Carl; Holmes, Anthony M

    2009-04-01

    Humans are exposed to a variety of chemicals in their everyday lives through interactions with the environment and through the use of consumer products. It is a basic requirement that these products are tested to assure they are safe under normal and reasonably foreseeable conditions of use. Within the European Union, the majority of tests used for generating toxicological data rely on animals. However recent changes in legislation (e.g., 7(th) amendment of the Cosmetics Directive and REACH) are driving researchers to develop and adopt non-animal alternative methods with which to assure human safety. Great strides have been made to this effect, but what other opportunities/technologies exist that could expedite this? Tissue engineering has increasing scope to contribute to replacing animals with scientifically robust alternatives in basic research and safety testing, but is this application of the technology being fully exploited? This review highlights how the consumer products industry is applying tissue engineering to ensure chemicals are safe for human use without using animals, and identifies areas for future development and application of the technology.

  16. Relevance and safety of telomerase for human tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Rebecca Y.; Blum, Juliana L.; Hearn, Bevin; Lebow, Benjamin; Niklason, Laura E.

    2006-01-01

    Tissue engineering holds the promise of replacing damaged or diseased tissues and organs. The use of autologous donor cells is often not feasible because of the limited replicative lifespan of cells, particularly those derived from elderly patients. Proliferative arrest can be overcome by the ectopic expression of telomerase via human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene transfection. To study the efficacy and safety of this potentially valuable technology, we used differentiated vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) and vascular tissue engineering as a model system. Although we previously demonstrated that vessels engineered with telomerase-expressing SMC had improved mechanics over those grown with control cells, it is critical to assess the phenotypic impact of telomerase expression in donor cells, because telomerase up-regulation is observed in >95% of human malignancies. To study the impact of telomerase in tissue engineering, expression of hTERT was retrovirally induced in SMC from eight elderly patients and one young donor. In hTERT SMC, significant lifespan extension beyond that of control was achieved without population doubling time acceleration. Karyotype changes were seen in both control and hTERT SMC but were not clonal nor representative of cancerous change. hTERT cells also failed to show evidence of neoplastic transformation in functional assays of tumorigenicity. In addition, the impact of donor age on cellular behavior, particularly the synthetic capability of SMC, was not affected by hTERT expression. Hence, this tissue engineering model system highlights the impact of donor age on cellular synthetic function that appears to be independent of lifespan extension by hTERT. PMID:16477025

  17. Engineered nanomaterials: toward effective safety management in research laboratories.

    PubMed

    Groso, Amela; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Hofmann, Heinrich; Meyer, Thierry

    2016-03-15

    It is still unknown which types of nanomaterials and associated doses represent an actual danger to humans and environment. Meanwhile, there is consensus on applying the precautionary principle to these novel materials until more information is available. To deal with the rapid evolution of research, including the fast turnover of collaborators, a user-friendly and easy-to-apply risk assessment tool offering adequate preventive and protective measures has to be provided. Based on new information concerning the hazards of engineered nanomaterials, we improved a previously developed risk assessment tool by following a simple scheme to gain in efficiency. In the first step, using a logical decision tree, one of the three hazard levels, from H1 to H3, is assigned to the nanomaterial. Using a combination of decision trees and matrices, the second step links the hazard with the emission and exposure potential to assign one of the three nanorisk levels (Nano 3 highest risk; Nano 1 lowest risk) to the activity. These operations are repeated at each process step, leading to the laboratory classification. The third step provides detailed preventive and protective measures for the determined level of nanorisk. We developed an adapted simple and intuitive method for nanomaterial risk management in research laboratories. It allows classifying the nanoactivities into three levels, additionally proposing concrete preventive and protective measures and associated actions. This method is a valuable tool for all the participants in nanomaterial safety. The users experience an essential learning opportunity and increase their safety awareness. Laboratory managers have a reliable tool to obtain an overview of the operations involving nanomaterials in their laboratories; this is essential, as they are responsible for the employee safety, but are sometimes unaware of the works performed. Bringing this risk to a three-band scale (like other types of risks such as biological, radiation

  18. Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Discusses safety issues in science, including: allergic reactions to peanuts used in experiments; explosions in lead/acid batteries; and inspection of pressure vessels, such as pressure cookers or model steam engines. (MKR)

  19. Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Discusses safety issues in science, including: allergic reactions to peanuts used in experiments; explosions in lead/acid batteries; and inspection of pressure vessels, such as pressure cookers or model steam engines. (MKR)

  20. Integrating Safety and Mission Assurance into Systems Engineering Modeling Practices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckman, Sean; Darpel, Scott

    2015-01-01

    During the early development of products, flight, or experimental hardware, emphasis is often given to the identification of technical requirements, utilizing such tools as use case and activity diagrams. Designers and project teams focus on understanding physical and performance demands and challenges. It is typically only later, during the evaluation of preliminary designs that a first pass, if performed, is made to determine the process, safety, and mission quality assurance requirements. Evaluation early in the life cycle, though, can yield requirements that force a fundamental change in design. This paper discusses an alternate paradigm for using the concepts of use case or activity diagrams to identify safety hazard and mission quality assurance risks and concerns using the same systems engineering modeling tools being used to identify technical requirements. It contains two examples of how this process might be used in the development of a space flight experiment, and the design of a Human Powered Pizza Delivery Vehicle, along with the potential benefits to decrease development time, and provide stronger budget estimates.

  1. Development of requirements on safety cases of machine industry products for power engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronson, K. E.; Brezgin, V. I.; Brodov, Yu. M.; Gorodnova, N. V.; Kultyshev, A. Yu.; Tolmachev, V. V.; Shablova, E. G.

    2016-12-01

    This article considers security assurance for power engineering machinery in the design and production phases. The Federal Law "On Technical Regulation" and the Customs Union Technical Regulations "On Safety of Machinery and Equipment" are analyzed in the legal, technical, and economic aspect with regard to power engineering machine industry products. From the legal standpoint, it is noted that the practical enforcement of most norms of the Law "On Technical Regulation" makes it necessary to adopt subordinate statutory instruments currently unavailable; moreover, the current level of adoption of technical regulations leaves much to be desired. The intensive integration processes observed in the Eurasian Region in recent years have made it a more pressing task to harmonize the laws of the region's countries, including their technical regulation framework. The technical aspect of analyzing the technical regulation of the Customs Union has been appraised by the IDEF0 functional modeling method. The object of research is a steam turbine plant produced at the turbine works. When developing the described model, we considered the elaboration of safety case (SC) requirements from the standpoint of the chief designer of the turbine works as the person generally responsible for the elaboration of the SC document. The economic context relies on risk analysis and appraisal methods. In their respect, these are determined by the purposes and objectives of analysis, complexity of considered objects, availability of required data, and expertise of specialists hired to conduct the analysis. The article proposes the description of all sources of hazard and scenarios of their actualization in all production phases of machinery life cycle for safety assurance purposes. The detection of risks and hazards allows forming the list of unwanted events. It describes the sources of hazard, various risk factors, conditions for their rise and development, tentative risk appraisals, and

  2. Self-Regulated Learning Strategies of Engineering College Students While Learning Electric Circuit Concepts with Enhanced Guided Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawanto, Oenardi; Santoso, Harry

    2013-01-01

    The current study evaluated engineering college students' self-regulated learning (SRL) strategies while learning electric circuit concepts using enhanced guided notes (EGN). Our goal was to describe how students exercise SRL strategies and how their grade performance changes after using EGN. Two research questions guided the study: (1) To what…

  3. Survey of Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering: Fall 1992. Technical Notes and Data Summaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huckenpohler, J. G.

    This publication describes the characteristics of a database developed from a Fall 1992 survey of graduate students and post-doctorates in science and engineering. The survey universe included 333 doctorate-granting institutions and 275 master's-granting institutions. Section 1 offers general notes on data limitations and availability and a…

  4. Krypton-85 hydrofracture engineering feasibility and safety evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Peretz, F.J.; Muller, M.E.; Pan, P.Y.

    1981-07-01

    Engineering studies have been made to determine the hazards associated with the disposal of /sup 85/Kr using the hydrofracture process. To assess the hazards, an effort has been made to identify the equipment required to entrain and dissolve the noble gas into the grout stream at hydrofracture pressure (up to 350 bar). Off-the-shelf or slightly modified equipment has been identified for safe and effective compression and gas-grout mixing. Each monthly injection disposes of 1.6 x 10/sup 6/ Ci of /sup 85/Kr. By connecting only one gas cylinder to the injection system at a time, the maximum amount of krypton likely to be released as a result of equipment failure is limited to 128,000 Ci. An evaluation by Los Alamos Technical Associates shows that releasing this amount of gas in less than one hour under worst-case meteorological conditions through a 30-m stack would result in a whole-body dose of 170 millirem at a distance of 1 km from the facility. A krypton collection and recovery system can further reduce this dose to 17 millirem; increasing the distance to the site boundary to 3 km can also reduce the dose by a factor of ten. Lung and skin dose estimates are 1.6 and 120 times the whole-body dose, respectively. These are all worst-case values; releases under more typical conditions would result in a significantly lower dose. No insurmountable safety or engineering problems have been identified.

  5. Image-Directed Fine-needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid with Safety-engineered Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Sibbitt, Randy R. Palmer, Dennis J.; Sibbitt, Wilmer L. Bankhurst, Arthur D.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to integrate safety-engineered devices into outpatient fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy of the thyroid in an interventional radiology practice. Materials and Methods: The practice center is a tertiary referral center for image-directed FNA thyroid biopsies in difficult patients referred by the primary care physician, endocrinologist, or otolaryngologist. As a departmental quality of care and safety improvement program, we instituted integration of safety devices into our thyroid biopsy procedures and determined the effect on outcome (procedural pain, diagnostic biopsies, inadequate samples, complications, needlesticks to operator, and physician satisfaction) before institution of safety devices (54 patients) and after institution of safety device implementation (56 patients). Safety devices included a patient safety technology-the mechanical aspirating syringe (reciprocating procedure device), and a health care worker safety technology (antineedlestick safety needle). Results: FNA of thyroid could be readily performed with the safety devices. Safety-engineered devices resulted in a 49% reduction in procedural pain scores (P < 0.0001), a 56% reduction in significant pain (P < 0.002), a 21% increase in operator satisfaction (P < 0.0001), and a 5% increase in diagnostic specimens (P = 0.5). No needlesticks to health care workers or patient injuries occurred during the study. Conclusions: Safety-engineered devices to improve both patient and health care worker safety can be successfully integrated into diagnostic FNA of the thyroid while maintaining outcomes and improving safety.

  6. System safety engineering in the development of advanced surface transportation vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnzen, H. E.

    1971-01-01

    Applications of system safety engineering to the development of advanced surface transportation vehicles are described. As a pertinent example, the paper describes a safety engineering efforts tailored to the particular design and test requirements of the Tracked Air Cushion Research Vehicle (TACRV). The test results obtained from this unique research vehicle provide significant design data directly applicable to the development of future tracked air cushion vehicles that will carry passengers in comfort and safety at speeds up to 300 miles per hour.

  7. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presents 12 chemistry notes for British secondary school teachers. Some of these notes are: (1) a simple device for testing pH-meters; (2) portable fume cupboard safety screen; and (3) Mass spectroscopy-analysis of a mass peak. (HM)

  8. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presents 12 chemistry notes for British secondary school teachers. Some of these notes are: (1) a simple device for testing pH-meters; (2) portable fume cupboard safety screen; and (3) Mass spectroscopy-analysis of a mass peak. (HM)

  9. Variations on the "Whoosh" Bottle Alcohol Explosion Demonstration Including Safety Notes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortman, John J.; Rush, Andrea C.; Stamper, Jennifer E.

    1999-08-01

    The explosion or burning of methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, and isopropanol in large small-necked bottles when ignited with a match has been studied with respect to the nature of the alcohol, temperature, concentration dilutions with water, oxygen concentration, plastic versus glass bottles, and salts added for color. The various effects are explained in terms of vapor pressures. Safety guidelines are emphasized.

  10. NASA aviation safety program: Aircraft Engine Health Management Data Mining Tools roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Simon, Donald L.; Meyer, Claudia; DePold, Hans; Curtiss, J. R.; Winston, Howard; Wang, Yao; Statler, Irv; Gawdiak, Yuri

    2000-04-01

    Aircraft Engine Health Management Data Mining Tools is a project led by NASA Glenn Research Center in support of the NASA Aviation Safety Program's Aviation System Monitoring and Modeling Thrust. The objective of the Glenn-led effort is to develop enhanced aircraft engine health management prognostic and diagnostic methods through the application of data mining technologies to operational data and maintenance records. This will lead to the improved safety of air transportation, optimized scheduling of engine maintenance, and optimization of engine usage. This paper presents a roadmap for achieving these goals.

  11. D-Zero Central Calorimeter Pressure Vessel and Vacuum Vessel Safety Notes

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; Luther, R.; /Fermilab

    1990-10-25

    The relief valve and relief piping capacity was calculated to be 908 sefm air. This exceeds all relieving conditions. The vessel also has a rupture disc with a 2640 scfm air stamped capacity. In order to significantly decrease the amount of time required to fill the cryostats, it is desired to raise the setpoint of the 'operating' relief valve on the argon storage dewar to 20 psig from its existing 16 psig setting. This additional pressure increases the flow to the cryostats and will overwhelm the relief capacity if the temperature of the modules within these vessels is warm enough. Using some conservative assumptions and simple calculations within this note, the maximum average temperature that the modules within each cryostat can be at prior to filling from the storage dewar with liquid argon is at least 290 K. The average temperature of the module mass for any of the three cryostats can be as high as 290 K prior to filling that particular cryostat. This should not be confused with the average temperature of a single type or location which is useful in protecting the modules-not necessarily the vessel itself. A few modules of each type and at different elevations should be used in an average which would account for the different weights of each module. Note that at 290 K, the actual flow of argon through the relief valve and the rupture disk was under the maximum theoretical flows for each relief device. This means that the bulk temperature could actually have been raised to flow argon through the reliefs at their maximum capacity. Therefore, the temperature of 290 K is a conservative value for the calculated flow rate of 12.3 gpm. Safeguards in addition to and used in conjunction with operating procedures shall be implemented in such a way so that the above temperature limitation is not exceeded and such that it is exclusive of the programmable logic controller (PLC). One suggestion is using a toggle switch for each cryostat mounted in the PLC I/O box which

  12. Practice-based evidence: profiling the safety of cilostazol by text-mining of clinical notes.

    PubMed

    Leeper, Nicholas J; Bauer-Mehren, Anna; Iyer, Srinivasan V; Lependu, Paea; Olson, Cliff; Shah, Nigam H

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a growing problem with few available therapies. Cilostazol is the only FDA-approved medication with a class I indication for intermittent claudication, but carries a black box warning due to concerns for increased cardiovascular mortality. To assess the validity of this black box warning, we employed a novel text-analytics pipeline to quantify the adverse events associated with Cilostazol use in a clinical setting, including patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). We analyzed the electronic medical records of 1.8 million subjects from the Stanford clinical data warehouse spanning 18 years using a novel text-mining/statistical analytics pipeline. We identified 232 PAD patients taking Cilostazol and created a control group of 1,160 PAD patients not taking this drug using 1:5 propensity-score matching. Over a mean follow up of 4.2 years, we observed no association between Cilostazol use and any major adverse cardiovascular event including stroke (OR = 1.13, CI [0.82, 1.55]), myocardial infarction (OR = 1.00, CI [0.71, 1.39]), or death (OR = 0.86, CI [0.63, 1.18]). Cilostazol was not associated with an increase in any arrhythmic complication. We also identified a subset of CHF patients who were prescribed Cilostazol despite its black box warning, and found that it did not increase mortality in this high-risk group of patients. This proof of principle study shows the potential of text-analytics to mine clinical data warehouses to uncover 'natural experiments' such as the use of Cilostazol in CHF patients. We envision this method will have broad applications for examining difficult to test clinical hypotheses and to aid in post-marketing drug safety surveillance. Moreover, our observations argue for a prospective study to examine the validity of a drug safety warning that may be unnecessarily limiting the use of an efficacious therapy.

  13. A note on the security of IS-RFID, an inpatient medication safety.

    PubMed

    Safkhani, Masoumeh; Bagheri, Nasour; Naderi, Majid

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the security level of a comprehensive RFID solution to enhance inpatient medication safety, named IS-RFID, which has been recently proposed by Peris-Lopez et al. We analyses the security of the protocol against the known attacks in the context. The main target of this paper is to determine whether the new protocol provides the confidentiality property, which is expected to be provided by such a protocol. It was found that IS-RFID has critical weaknesses. The presented security investigations show that a passive adversary can retrieve secret parameters of patient's tag in cost of O(2(16)) off-line PRNG evaluations. Given the tag's secret parameters, any security claims are ruined. In this paper we presented an efficient passive secret disclosure attack which retrieves the main secret parameters related to the patient which shows that IS-RFID may put the patient safety on risk. The proposed attacking technique is in light of two vulnerabilities of the protocol: (1) the short length of the used PRNG, which is urged by the target technology, EPC C1 Gen2 ; (2) the message-generating mechanism utilizing PRNG was not carefully scrutinized. While the later point can be fixed by careful designing of the transferred messages between the protocol's party, the earlier point, i.e., the short length of the available PRNG for EPC C1 Gen2 tags, is a limitation which is forced by the technology. In addition, over the last years, schemes based solely on using simple operations or short PRNG (such as IS-RFID) have been shown to offer very low or no security at all. Recent advances in lightweight ciphers, such as PRESENT or Grain , seem a much more appropriate solution rather than relying on short PRNGs. However, such solutions breaks the EPC C1 Gen2 compatibility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Report to NASA Committee on Aircraft Operating Problems Relative to Aviation Safety Engineering and Research Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The following report highlights some of the work accomplished by the Aviation Safety Engineering and Research Division of the Flight Safety Foundations since the last report to the NASA Committee on Aircraft Operating Problems on 22 May 1963. The information presented is in summary form. Additional details may be provided upon request of the reports themselves may be obtained from AvSER.

  15. Safety leadership in the teaching laboratories of electrical and electronic engineering departments at Taiwanese Universities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsung-Chih

    2008-01-01

    Safety has always been one of the principal goals in teaching laboratories. Laboratories cannot serve their educational purpose when accidents occur. The leadership of department heads has a major impact on laboratory safety, so this study discusses the factors affecting safety leadership in teaching laboratories. This study uses a mail survey to explore the perceived safety leadership in electrical and electronic engineering departments at Taiwanese universities. An exploratory factor analysis shows that there are three main components of safety leadership, as measured on a safety leadership scale: safety controlling, safety coaching, and safety caring. The descriptive statistics also reveals that among faculty, the perception of department heads' safety leadership is in general positive. A two-way MANOVA shows that there are interaction effects on safety leadership between university size and instructor age; there are also interaction effects between presence of a safety committee and faculty gender and faculty age. It is therefore necessary to assess organizational factors when determining whether individual factors are the cause of differing perceptions among faculty members. The author also presents advice on improving safety leadership for department heads at small universities and at universities without safety committees.

  16. Practice-Based Evidence: Profiling the Safety of Cilostazol by Text-Mining of Clinical Notes

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Srinivasan V.; LePendu, Paea; Olson, Cliff; Shah, Nigam H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a growing problem with few available therapies. Cilostazol is the only FDA-approved medication with a class I indication for intermittent claudication, but carries a black box warning due to concerns for increased cardiovascular mortality. To assess the validity of this black box warning, we employed a novel text-analytics pipeline to quantify the adverse events associated with Cilostazol use in a clinical setting, including patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). Methods and Results We analyzed the electronic medical records of 1.8 million subjects from the Stanford clinical data warehouse spanning 18 years using a novel text-mining/statistical analytics pipeline. We identified 232 PAD patients taking Cilostazol and created a control group of 1,160 PAD patients not taking this drug using 1∶5 propensity-score matching. Over a mean follow up of 4.2 years, we observed no association between Cilostazol use and any major adverse cardiovascular event including stroke (OR = 1.13, CI [0.82, 1.55]), myocardial infarction (OR = 1.00, CI [0.71, 1.39]), or death (OR = 0.86, CI [0.63, 1.18]). Cilostazol was not associated with an increase in any arrhythmic complication. We also identified a subset of CHF patients who were prescribed Cilostazol despite its black box warning, and found that it did not increase mortality in this high-risk group of patients. Conclusions This proof of principle study shows the potential of text-analytics to mine clinical data warehouses to uncover ‘natural experiments’ such as the use of Cilostazol in CHF patients. We envision this method will have broad applications for examining difficult to test clinical hypotheses and to aid in post-marketing drug safety surveillance. Moreover, our observations argue for a prospective study to examine the validity of a drug safety warning that may be unnecessarily limiting the use of an efficacious therapy. PMID:23717437

  17. Field Safety Notes in Product Problems of Medical Devices for Use in Pulmonology.

    PubMed

    Hannig, Jürgen; Siekmeier, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    The current European system for medical devices is governed by three EC directives: the Medical Device Directive 93/42/EEC, the In-Vitro Diagnostic Directive 98/79/EC and the Active Implantable Medical Device Directive 90/385/EEC and regulates marketing and post-market surveillance of medical devices in the European Economic Area. In cases of incidents and field safety corrective actions (FSCA) manufacturers have to inform the responsible Competent Authority, which is the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM) and the public by field safety notices (FSN). In this study we analyzed FSN of medical devices exclusively serving for diagnostics or treatment in pulmonology (e.g. nebulizers, oxygen concentrators, pulse oximeters, lung function analyzers, and non-active devices for treatment). FSCA and FSN publicized by BfArM in 2005-2013 were analyzed in respect to the MEDDEV 2.12-1 rev 8. In total 41 FSCA were publicized for the included products. German and English FSN were found in 36/35 cases, respectively. FSN were clearly characterized as FSN in 22/20 cases and declaration of the type of action was found in 27/26 cases, respectively. Product names were provided in all cases. Lot numbers or other information for product characterization were available in 7/8 and 26/24 cases, respectively. Detailed information regarding FSCA and product malfunction were found in 27/33 and 36/35 cases, respectively. Information on product related risks with previous use of the affected product was provided in 24/23 cases. In 34/34 cases manufacturers provided information to mitigate product related risks. Requests to pass FSN to persons needing awareness were found in 10/14 cases. Contact data were provided in 30/30 cases. Confirmation that the Competent Authority was informed was found in 12/14 cases and in 19/18 cases a customer confirmation was included. The obtained data suggest that there is an increasing annual number of FSCA and most FSN fulfill the criteria of

  18. Engineer Ethics Education that Treated Safety Problem to Promote Development of General Human Competence and Independent Engineer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotta, Genji

    The human race came to expect the engineer‧s international activity by an international extension of the risk. The engineer should provide with “Overall ability” and “Independent ability” to answer the demand of the society. The engineer ethics education is effective to the acquisition of the ability that the society demands. Because the engineer ethics education teaches the engineer to develop “Ethics action as the individual” to “Ethics activity as the enterprise” . In the point of development of the comprehensive capacity, it can be said that the engineer ethics education is training that supports the action power that accomplishes the social responsibility. However, it is easy to make the engineer ethics education a polite fiction. Then, we propose to take the safety problem to the ethics education for the prevention of making to the polite fiction of the education.

  19. Conservation of Life as a Unifying Theme for Process Safety in Chemical Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, James A.; Davis, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the use of "conservation of life" as a concept and unifying theme for increasing awareness, application, and integration of process safety in chemical engineering education. Students need to think of conservation of mass, conservation of energy, and conservation of life as equally important in engineering design and analysis.…

  20. Conservation of Life as a Unifying Theme for Process Safety in Chemical Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, James A.; Davis, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the use of "conservation of life" as a concept and unifying theme for increasing awareness, application, and integration of process safety in chemical engineering education. Students need to think of conservation of mass, conservation of energy, and conservation of life as equally important in engineering design and analysis.…

  1. Human factors and systems engineering approach to patient safety for radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rivera, A Joy; Karsh, Ben-Tzion

    2008-01-01

    The traditional approach to solving patient safety problems in healthcare is to blame the last person to touch the patient. But since the publication of To Err is Human, the call has been instead to use human factors and systems engineering methods and principles to solve patient safety problems. However, an understanding of the human factors and systems engineering is lacking, and confusion remains about what it means to apply their principles. This paper provides a primer on them and their applications to patient safety.

  2. Application of software engineering to development of reactor-safety codes

    SciTech Connect

    Wilburn, N P; Niccoli, L G

    1980-11-01

    As a result of the drastically increasing cost of software and the lack of an engineering approach, the technology of Software Engineering is being developed. Software Engineering provides an answer to the increasing cost of developing and maintaining software. It has been applied extensively in the business and aerospace communities and is just now being applied to the development of scientific software and, in particular, to the development of reactor safety codes at HEDL.

  3. Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Facilities and Safety Information Document [NOTE: Volume I, Chapter 1

    SciTech Connect

    March, F.; Guerrero, J.V.; Johns, W.H.; Schetnan, R.; Bayliss, L.S.; Kuzio, K.A.; White, B.B.

    1999-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) began in 1945 as the ''Z'' Division of what was then Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory on Oxnard Field, which was owned by the Air Technical Service Command, as a base of operations to store materials and house personnel. Oxnard Field was transferred to the U.S. Engineers, Manhattan District, on July 21, 1945, who converted several wood frame structures to serve functions that were transferred from Los Alamos. Development of the SNL/New Mexico (SNL/NM) site began in 1946 and 1947 with construction of the first four buildings in what is now Tech Area I. Construction of another 14 permanent buildings in Tech Area I began in 1948. SNL constructed a high-explosive assembly area in Tech Area II, a half mile south of Tech Area I, and started plans for several outdoor testing facilities for Tech Area III, about seven miles to the south of Tech Area I, in 1952. By 1953, SNL completed and put into operation the first group of Tech Area III facilities, which included a rocket sled track, a large centrifuge, a vibration facility, and an instrument control center. Tech Area IV and Tech Area V were developed later to provide facilities for pulsed power and high-energy experiments. As the need developed for outdoor testing facilities remote from the public and other work areas, SNL added many facilities on U.S. Air Force and other federal property in the area known as Coyote Test Field (Sandia National Laboratories, 1997b). Most recently, DOE leased U.S. Air Force facilities in the Manzano Area for SNL to use for storage of low-level radioactive waste, mixed waste (a combination of radioactive and hazardous waste), and transuranic waste (Sandia National Laboratories, 1997a).

  4. Environmental, Health, and Safety Research Needs for Engineered Nanoscale Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    accumulation of nanomaterials in organs and tissues of food- producing animals. To complete the ADME/Tox...noted earlier, rat studies have shown that inhaled or intranasally instilled nanoscale graphite can be transported via the olfactory nerve to the...impervious to particle exposures. Some studies have shown some nanomaterial accumulation in the hair follicles, penetration of sebaceous glands, or

  5. When doctors share visit notes with patients: a study of patient and doctor perceptions of documentation errors, safety opportunities and the patient-doctor relationship.

    PubMed

    Bell, Sigall K; Mejilla, Roanne; Anselmo, Melissa; Darer, Jonathan D; Elmore, Joann G; Leveille, Suzanne; Ngo, Long; Ralston, James D; Delbanco, Tom; Walker, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Patient advocates and safety experts encourage adoption of transparent health records, but sceptics worry that shared notes may offend patients, erode trust or promote defensive medicine. As electronic health records disseminate, such disparate views fuel policy debates about risks and benefits of sharing visit notes with patients through portals. Presurveys and postsurveys from 99 volunteer doctors at three US sites who participated in OpenNotes and postsurveys from 4592 patients who read at least one note and submitted a survey. Patients read notes to be better informed and because they were curious; about a third read them to check accuracy. In total, 7% (331) of patients reported contacting their doctor's office about their note. Of these, 29% perceived an error, and 85% were satisfied with its resolution. Nearly all patients reported feeling better (37%) or the same (62%) about their doctor. Patients who were older (>63), male, non-white, had fair/poor self-reported health or had less formal education were more likely to report feeling better about their doctor. Among doctors, 26% anticipated documentation errors, and 44% thought patients would disagree with notes. After a year, 53% believed patient satisfaction increased, and 51% thought patients trusted them more. None reported ordering more tests or referrals. Despite concerns about errors, offending language or defensive practice, transparent notes overall did not harm the patient-doctor relationship. Rather, doctors and patients perceived relational benefits. Traditionally more vulnerable populations-non-white, those with poorer self-reported health and those with fewer years of formal education-may be particularly likely to feel better about their doctor after reading their notes. Further informing debate about OpenNotes, the findings suggest transparent records may improve patient satisfaction, trust and safety. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  6. Integration of safety engineering into a cost optimized development program.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, L. W.

    1972-01-01

    A six-segment management model is presented, each segment of which represents a major area in a new product development program. The first segment of the model covers integration of specialist engineers into 'systems requirement definition' or the system engineering documentation process. The second covers preparation of five basic types of 'development program plans.' The third segment covers integration of system requirements, scheduling, and funding of specialist engineering activities into 'work breakdown structures,' 'cost accounts,' and 'work packages.' The fourth covers 'requirement communication' by line organizations. The fifth covers 'performance measurement' based on work package data. The sixth covers 'baseline requirements achievement tracking.'

  7. Integration of safety engineering into a cost optimized development program.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, L. W.

    1972-01-01

    A six-segment management model is presented, each segment of which represents a major area in a new product development program. The first segment of the model covers integration of specialist engineers into 'systems requirement definition' or the system engineering documentation process. The second covers preparation of five basic types of 'development program plans.' The third segment covers integration of system requirements, scheduling, and funding of specialist engineering activities into 'work breakdown structures,' 'cost accounts,' and 'work packages.' The fourth covers 'requirement communication' by line organizations. The fifth covers 'performance measurement' based on work package data. The sixth covers 'baseline requirements achievement tracking.'

  8. Understanding safety and production risks in rail engineering planning and protection.

    PubMed

    Wilson, John R; Ryan, Brendan; Schock, Alex; Ferreira, Pedro; Smith, Stuart; Pitsopoulos, Julia

    2009-07-01

    Much of the published human factors work on risk is to do with safety and within this is concerned with prediction and analysis of human error and with human reliability assessment. Less has been published on human factors contributions to understanding and managing project, business, engineering and other forms of risk and still less jointly assessing risk to do with broad issues of 'safety' and broad issues of 'production' or 'performance'. This paper contains a general commentary on human factors and assessment of risk of various kinds, in the context of the aims of ergonomics and concerns about being too risk averse. The paper then describes a specific project, in rail engineering, where the notion of a human factors case has been employed to analyse engineering functions and related human factors issues. A human factors issues register for potential system disturbances has been developed, prior to a human factors risk assessment, which jointly covers safety and production (engineering delivery) concerns. The paper concludes with a commentary on the potential relevance of a resilience engineering perspective to understanding rail engineering systems risk. Design, planning and management of complex systems will increasingly have to address the issue of making trade-offs between safety and production, and ergonomics should be central to this. The paper addresses the relevant issues and does so in an under-published domain - rail systems engineering work.

  9. Mechanical Engineering Safety Note: Analysis and Control of Hazards Associated with NIF Capacitor Module Events

    SciTech Connect

    Brereton, S

    2001-08-01

    The NIF capacitor module was reviewed with respect to pressure venting and shrapnel containment during failures. A modified module concept was proposed that would adequately vent the pressure, yet be effective at containing shrapnel. Two large vents are provided on each side of the module. These have fixed vent areas, and are immediately accessible for pressure venting at the beginning of a pressure transient. A shrapnel shield is located on the outside of each vent opening forming a chute. The chute contains a collimator. This increases the number of bounces that shrapnel must take on the way out, and directs the shrapnel to the trap beneath. The trap contains a depth of clear pine, sufficient to completely absorb the energy of even the most energetic fragment considered. Based on a review of the evidence from past capacitor failures at the FANTM facility at Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, and additional theoretical estimates, the peak pressure generated in the module during explosive events was estimated to be less than 40 psig. This internal pressure in the FANTM module appears to be tolerable, as only minor damage to the module and to internal components was observed after events. The new module concept proposed here provides increased venting area, fully available at the initiation of an event. It is expected that even less damage would be observed if an event occurred in a module with this design. The module joints and connections were formally reviewed with respect to their tolerance to a brief internal pressure as high as 40 psig. With minor modifications that have been incorporated into the design, the module was shown to maintain its integrity during such events. Some of the calculations performed estimated the quantity of dielectric oil that could be involved in a capacitor failure. It was determined that a very small amount of the available oil would contribute to the explosive event, on the order of 500 g or less. This is a small fraction of the total free oil available in a capacitor (approximately 10,900 g), on the order of 5% or less. The estimates of module pressure were used to estimate the potential overpressure in the capacitor bays after an event. It was shown that the expected capacitor bay overpressure would be less than the structural tolerance of the walls. Thus, it does not appear necessary to provide any pressure relief for the capacitor bays. The ray tracing analysis showed the new module concept to be 100% effective at containing fragments generated during the events. The analysis demonstrated that all fragments would impact an energy absorbing surface on the way out of the module. Thus, there is high confidence that energetic fragments will not escape the module. However, since the module was not tested, it was recommended that a form of secondary containment on the walls of the capacitor bays (e.g., 1.0 inch of fire-retardant plywood) be provided. Any doors to the exterior of the capacitor bays should be of equivalent thickness of steel or suitably armed with a thickness of plywood. Penetrations in the ceiling of the interior bays (leading to the mechanical equipment room) do not require additional protection to form a secondary barrier. The mezzanine and the air handling units (penetrations lead directly to the air handling units) provide a sufficient second layer of protection.

  10. Educated Public Relations: School Safety 101. With Engineering Consent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenbaum, Stuart; And Others

    This book is designed to enable school administrators to actively participate in planning and implementing school safety and public relations activities. It provides a conceptual framework of the public relations process and shows its practical application to the problems of school crime and student misbehavior, through discussion of school public…

  11. L-Band Digital Aeronautical Communications System Engineering - Initial Safety and Security Risk Assessment and Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelkin, Natalie; Henriksen, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    This document is being provided as part of ITT's NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract NNC05CA85C, Task 7: "New ATM Requirements--Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development." ITT has completed a safety hazard analysis providing a preliminary safety assessment for the proposed L-band (960 to 1164 MHz) terrestrial en route communications system. The assessment was performed following the guidelines outlined in the Federal Aviation Administration Safety Risk Management Guidance for System Acquisitions document. The safety analysis did not identify any hazards with an unacceptable risk, though a number of hazards with a medium risk were documented. This effort represents a preliminary safety hazard analysis and notes the triggers for risk reassessment. A detailed safety hazards analysis is recommended as a follow-on activity to assess particular components of the L-band communication system after the technology is chosen and system rollout timing is determined. The security risk analysis resulted in identifying main security threats to the proposed system as well as noting additional threats recommended for a future security analysis conducted at a later stage in the system development process. The document discusses various security controls, including those suggested in the COCR Version 2.0.

  12. Radiation safety system (RSS) backbones: Design, engineering, fabrication and installation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, J.E.; Sturrock, J.C.; Gallegos, F.R.

    1998-12-01

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) Backbones are part of an electrical/electronic/mechanical system insuring safe access and exclusion of personnel to areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator. The RSS Backbones control the safety fusible beam plugs which terminate transmission of accelerated ion beams in response to predefined conditions. Any beam or access fault of the backbone inputs will cause insertion of the beam plugs in the low energy beam transport. The Backbones serve the function of tying the beam plugs to the access control systems, beam spill monitoring systems and current-level limiting systems. In some ways the Backbones may be thought of as a spinal column with beam plugs at the head and nerve centers along the spinal column. The two Linac Backbone segments and experimental area segments form a continuous cable plant over 3,500 feet from beam plugs to the tip on the longest tail. The Backbones were installed in compliance with current safety standards, such as installation of the two segments in separate conduits or tray. Monitoring for ground-faults and input wiring verification was an added enhancement to the system. The system has the capability to be tested remotely.

  13. Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones: Design, engineering, fabrication, and installation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, J.E.; Sturrock, J.C.; Gallegos, F.R.

    1998-12-01

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones are part of an electrical/electronic/mechanical system ensuring safe access and exclusion of personnel to areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator. The RSS backbones control the safety-fusible beam plugs which terminate transmission of accelerated ion beams in response to predefined conditions. Any beam or access fault of the backbone inputs will cause insertion of the beam plugs in the low-energy beam transport. The backbones serve the function of tying the beam plugs to the access control systems, beam spill monitoring systems and current-level limiting systems. In some ways the backbones may be thought of as a spinal column with beam plugs at the head and nerve centers along the spinal column. The two linac backbone segments and the experimental area segments form a continuous cable plant over 3500 feet from the beam plugs to the tip on the longest tail. The backbones were installed in compliance with current safety standards, such as installation of the two segments in separate conduits or tray. Monitoring for ground-faults and input wiring verification was an added enhancement to the system. The system has the capability to be tested remotely. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones: Design, engineering, fabrication, and installation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, J. E.; Sturrock, J. C.; Gallegos, F. R.

    1998-12-10

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones are part of an electrical/electronic/mechanical system ensuring safe access and exclusion of personnel to areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator. The RSS backbones control the safety-fusible beam plugs which terminate transmission of accelerated ion beams in response to predefined conditions. Any beam or access fault of the backbone inputs will cause insertion of the beam plugs in the low-energy beam transport. The backbones serve the function of tying the beam plugs to the access control systems, beam spill monitoring systems and current-level limiting systems. In some ways the backbones may be thought of as a spinal column with beam plugs at the head and nerve centers along the spinal column. The two linac backbone segments and the experimental area segments form a continuous cable plant over 3500 feet from the beam plugs to the tip on the longest tail. The backbones were installed in compliance with current safety standards, such as installation of the two segments in separate conduits or tray. Monitoring for ground-faults and input wiring verification was an added enhancement to the system. The system has the capability to be tested remotely.

  15. Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones: Design, engineering, fabrication, and installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmarth, J. E.; Sturrock, J. C.; Gallegos, F. R.

    1998-12-01

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones are part of an electrical/electronic/mechanical system ensuring safe access and exclusion of personnel to areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator. The RSS backbones control the safety-fusible beam plugs which terminate transmission of accelerated ion beams in response to predefined conditions. Any beam or access fault of the backbone inputs will cause insertion of the beam plugs in the low-energy beam transport. The backbones serve the function of tying the beam plugs to the access control systems, beam spill monitoring systems and current-level limiting systems. In some ways the backbones may be thought of as a spinal column with beam plugs at the head and nerve centers along the spinal column. The two linac backbone segments and the experimental area segments form a continuous cable plant over 3500 feet from the beam plugs to the tip on the longest tail. The backbones were installed in compliance with current safety standards, such as installation of the two segments in separate conduits or tray. Monitoring for ground-faults and input wiring verification was an added enhancement to the system. The system has the capability to be tested remotely.

  16. Performance of a Fuel-Injection Spark-Ignition Engine Using a Hydrogenated Safety Fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schey, Oscar W; Young, Alfred W

    1934-01-01

    This report presents the performance of a single-cylinder test engine using a hydrogenated safety fuel. The safety fuel has a flash point of 125 degrees f. (Cleveland open-dup method), which is high enough to remove most of the fire hazard, and an octane number of 95, which permits higher compression ratios to be used than are permissible with most undoped gasolines.

  17. SAFETY ENGINEERING FOR THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER AT THE BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    SciTech Connect

    MUSOLINO,S.V.

    1999-11-14

    THERE ARE ONLY A FEW OTHER HIGH ENERGY PARTICLE ACCELERATORS LIKE RHIC IN THE WORLD. THEREFORE, THE DESIGNERS OF THE MACHINE DO NOT ALWAYS HAVE CONSENSUS DESIGN STANDARDS AND REGULATORY GUIDANCE AVAILABLE TO ESTABLISH THE ENGINEERING PARAMETERS FOR SAFETY. SOME OF THE AREAS WHERE STANDARDS ARE NOT AVAILABLE RELATE TO THE CRYOGENIC SYSTEM, CONTAINMENT OF LARGE VOLUMES OF FLAMMABLE GAS IN FRAGILE VESSELS IN THE EXPERIMENTAL APPARATUS AND MITIGATION OF A DESIGN BASIS ACCIDENT WITH A STORED PARTICLE BEAM. UNIQUE BUT EQUIVALENT SAFETY ENGINEERING MUST BE DETERMINED. SPECIAL DESIGN CRITERIA FOR PROMPT RADIATION WERE DEVELOPED TO PROVIDE GUIDANCE FOR THE DESIGN OF RADIATION SHIELDING.

  18. 30 CFR 250.405 - What are the safety requirements for diesel engines used on a drilling rig?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... engines used on a drilling rig? 250.405 Section 250.405 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND... requirements for diesel engines used on a drilling rig? You must equip each diesel engine with an air take... is continuously manned, you may equip the engine with either an automatic or remote manual air intake...

  19. 30 CFR 250.405 - What are the safety requirements for diesel engines used on a drilling rig?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... engines used on a drilling rig? 250.405 Section 250.405 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND... requirements for diesel engines used on a drilling rig? You must equip each diesel engine with an air take... is continuously manned, you may equip the engine with either an automatic or remote manual air intake...

  20. 30 CFR 250.405 - What are the safety requirements for diesel engines used on a drilling rig?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... engines used on a drilling rig? 250.405 Section 250.405 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND... requirements for diesel engines used on a drilling rig? You must equip each diesel engine with an air take... is continuously manned, you may equip the engine with either an automatic or remote manual air intake...

  1. Rocketdyne Safety Algorithm: Space Shuttle Main Engine Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Arnold M., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The Rocketdyne Safety Algorithm (RSA) has been developed to the point of use on the TTBE at MSFC on Task 4 of LeRC contract NAS3-25884. This document contains a description of the work performed, the results of the nominal test of the major anomaly test cases and a table of the resulting cutoff times, a plot of the RSA value vs. time for each anomaly case, a logic flow description of the algorithm, the algorithm code, and a development plan for future efforts.

  2. Engineering nucleases for gene targeting: safety and regulatory considerations.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Katia; Podevin, Nancy; Breyer, Didier; Carroll, Dana; Herman, Philippe

    2014-01-25

    Nuclease-based gene targeting (NBGT) represents a significant breakthrough in targeted genome editing since it is applicable from single-celled protozoa to human, including several species of economic importance. Along with the fast progress in NBGT and the increasing availability of customized nucleases, more data are available about off-target effects associated with the use of this approach. We discuss how NBGT may offer a new perspective for genetic modification, we address some aspects crucial for a safety improvement of the corresponding techniques and we also briefly relate the use of NBGT applications and products to the regulatory oversight.

  3. Rocketdyne safety algorithm: Space Shuttle main engine fault detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Arnold M., Jr.

    1994-07-01

    The Rocketdyne Safety Algorithm (RSA) has been developed to the point of use on the TTBE at MSFC on Task 4 of LeRC contract NAS3-25884. This document contains a description of the work performed, the results of the nominal test of the major anomaly test cases and a table of the resulting cutoff times, a plot of the RSA value vs. time for each anomaly case, a logic flow description of the algorithm, the algorithm code, and a development plan for future efforts.

  4. Systems engineering applied to integrated safety management for high consequence facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barter, R; Morais, B

    1998-11-10

    Integrated Safety Management is a concept that is being actively promoted by the U.S. Department of Energy as a means of assuring safe operation of its facilities. The concept involves the integration of safety precepts into work planning rather than adjusting for safe operations after defining the work activity. The system engineering techniques used to design an integrated safety management system for a high consequence research facility are described. An example is given to show how the concepts evolved with the system design.

  5. Liver tissue engineering in the evaluation of drug safety.

    PubMed

    Dash, Ajit; Inman, Walker; Hoffmaster, Keith; Sevidal, Samantha; Kelly, Joan; Obach, R Scott; Griffith, Linda G; Tannenbaum, Steven R

    2009-10-01

    Assessment of drug-liver interactions is an integral part of predicting the safety profile of new drugs. Existing model systems range from in vitro cell culture models to FDA-mandated animal tests. Data from these models often fail, however, to predict human liver toxicity, resulting in costly failures of clinical trials. In vitro screens based on cultured hepatocytes are now commonly used in early stages of development, but many toxic responses in vivo seem to be mediated by a complex interplay among several different cell types. We discuss some of the evolving trends in liver cell culture systems applied to drug safety assessment and describe an experimental model that captures complex liver physiology through incorporation of heterotypic cell-cell interactions, 3D architecture and perfused flow. We demonstrate how heterotypic interactions in this system can be manipulated to recreate an inflammatory environment and apply the model to test compounds that potentially exhibit idiosyncratic drug toxicity. Finally, we provide a perspective on how the range of existing and emerging in vitro liver culture approaches, from simple to complex, might serve needs across the range of stages in drug discovery and development, including applications in molecular therapeutics.

  6. Liver tissue engineering in the evaluation of drug safety

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Ajit; Inman, Walker; Hoffmaster, Keith; Sevidal, Samantha; Kelly, Joan; Obach, R Scott; Griffith, Linda G; Tannenbaum, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of drug–liver interactions is an integral part of predicting the safety profile of new drugs. Existing model systems range from in vitro cell culture models to FDA-mandated animal tests. Data from these models often fail, however, to predict human liver toxicity, resulting in costly failures of clinical trials. In vitro screens based on cultured hepatocytes are now commonly used in early stages of development, but many toxic responses in vivo seem to be mediated by a complex interplay among several different cell types. We discuss some of the evolving trends in liver cell culture systems applied to drug safety assessment and describe an experimental model that captures complex liver physiology through incorporation of heterotypic cell–cell interactions, 3D architecture and perfused flow. We demonstrate how heterotypic interactions in this system can be manipulated to recreate an inflammatory environment and apply the model to test compounds that potentially exhibit idiosyncratic drug toxicity. Finally, we provide a perspective on how the range of existing and emerging in vitro liver culture approaches, from simple to complex, might serve needs across the range of stages in drug discovery and development, including applications in molecular therapeutics. PMID:19637986

  7. Genetically Engineered Poxviruses for Recombinant Gene Expression, Vaccination, and Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Bernard

    1996-10-01

    Vaccinia virus, no longer required for immunization against smallpox, now serves as a unique vector for expressing genes within the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. As a research tool, recombinant vaccinia viruses are used to synthesize and analyze the structure--function relationships of proteins, determine the targets of humoral and cell-mediated immunity, and investigate the types of immune response needed for protection against specific infectious diseases and cancer. The vaccine potential of recombinant vaccinia virus has been realized in the form of an effective oral wild-life rabies vaccine, although no product for humans has been licensed. A genetically altered vaccinia virus that is unable to replicate in mammalian cells and produces diminished cytopathic effects retains the capacity for high-level gene expression and immunogenicity while promising exceptional safety for laboratory workers and potential vaccine recipients.

  8. ATV Engineering Support Team Safety Console Preparation for the Johannes Kepler Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, R.; Oliefka, L.

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes the improvements to be implemented in the Safety console position of the Engineering Support Team(EST) at the Automated Transfer Vehicle(ATV) Control Centre(ATV-CC) for the upcoming ATV Johannes Kepler mission. The ATV missions to the International Space Station are monitored and controlled from the ATV-CC in Toulouse, France. The commanding of ATV is performed by the Vehicle Engineering Team(VET) in the main control room under authority of the Flight Director. The EST performs a monitoring function in a room beside the main control room. One of the EST positions is the Safety console, which is staffed by safety engineers from ESA and the industrial prime contractor, Astrium. The function of the Safety console is to check whether the hazard controls are available throughout the mission as required by the Hazard Reports approved by the ISS Safety Review Panel. Safety console preparation activities were limited prior to the first ATV mission due to schedule constraints, and the safety engineers involved have been working to improve the readiness for ATV 2. The following steps have been taken or are in process, and will be described in this paper: • review of the implementation of Operations Control Agreement Documents(OCADs) that record the way operational hazard controls are performed to meet the needs of the Hazard Reports(typically in Flight Rules and Crew Procedures), • crosscheck of operational control needs and implementations with respect to ATV's first flight observations and post flight evaluations, with a view to identifying additional, obsolete or revised operational hazard controls, • participation in the Flight Rule review and update process carried out between missions, • participation in the assessment of anomalies observed during the first ATV mission, to ensure that any impacts are addressed in the ATV 2 safety documentation, • preparation of a Safety console handbook to provide lists of important safety aspects to be

  9. The Attitude of Civil Engineering Students towards Health and Safety Risk Management: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, A. K.; Reynolds, J. H.; Ng, L. W. T.

    2008-01-01

    The highest rate of accidents and injuries in British industries has been reported by the construction industry during the past decade. Since then stakeholders have recognised that a possible solution would be to inculcate a good attitude towards health and safety risk management in undergraduate civil engineering students and construction…

  10. NASA Aviation Safety Program Aircraft Engine Health Management Data Mining Tools Roadmap

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-04-01

    Aircraft Engine Health Management Data Mining Tools is a project led by NASA Glenn Research Center in support of the NASA Aviation Safety Program’s...prognostic and diagnostic methods through the application of data mining technologies to operational data and maintenance records. This will lead to the

  11. Stationary Engineers Apprenticeship. Related Training Modules. 2.1-2.6 Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane Community Coll., Eugene, OR.

    This packet of six learning modules on safety is one of 20 such packets developed for apprenticeship training for stationary engineers. Introductory materials are a complete listing of all available modules and a supplementary reference list. Each module contains some or all of these components: goal, performance indicators, study guide (a…

  12. The Attitude of Civil Engineering Students towards Health and Safety Risk Management: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, A. K.; Reynolds, J. H.; Ng, L. W. T.

    2008-01-01

    The highest rate of accidents and injuries in British industries has been reported by the construction industry during the past decade. Since then stakeholders have recognised that a possible solution would be to inculcate a good attitude towards health and safety risk management in undergraduate civil engineering students and construction…

  13. Resilience Engineering in Critical Long Term Aerospace Software Systems: A New Approach to Spacecraft Software Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulo, D. A.

    Safety critical software systems permeate spacecraft, and in a long term venture like a starship would be pervasive in every system of the spacecraft. Yet software failure today continues to plague both the systems and the organizations that develop them resulting in the loss of life, time, money, and valuable system platforms. A starship cannot afford this type of software failure in long journeys away from home. A single software failure could have catastrophic results for the spaceship and the crew onboard. This paper will offer a new approach to developing safe reliable software systems through focusing not on the traditional safety/reliability engineering paradigms but rather by focusing on a new paradigm: Resilience and Failure Obviation Engineering. The foremost objective of this approach is the obviation of failure, coupled with the ability of a software system to prevent or adapt to complex changing conditions in real time as a safety valve should failure occur to ensure safe system continuity. Through this approach, safety is ensured through foresight to anticipate failure and to adapt to risk in real time before failure occurs. In a starship, this type of software engineering is vital. Through software developed in a resilient manner, a starship would have reduced or eliminated software failure, and would have the ability to rapidly adapt should a software system become unstable or unsafe. As a result, long term software safety, reliability, and resilience would be present for a successful long term starship mission.

  14. Job Prospects for Nuclear Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basta, Nicholas

    1985-01-01

    As the debate over nuclear safety continues, the job market remains healthy for nuclear engineers. The average salary offered to new nuclear engineers with bachelor's degrees is $27,400. Salary averages and increases compare favorably with other engineering disciplines. Various job sources in the field are noted. (JN)

  15. Job Prospects for Nuclear Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basta, Nicholas

    1985-01-01

    As the debate over nuclear safety continues, the job market remains healthy for nuclear engineers. The average salary offered to new nuclear engineers with bachelor's degrees is $27,400. Salary averages and increases compare favorably with other engineering disciplines. Various job sources in the field are noted. (JN)

  16. Effect of Engine Operating Conditions on the Vaporization of Safety Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Waldron, C D

    1932-01-01

    Tests were conducted with the N.A.C.A. combustion apparatus to determine the effect of compression ratio and engine temperature on the vaporization of a hydrogenated "safety fuel" during the compression stroke under conditions similar to those in a spark-ignition engine. The effects of fuel boiling temperature on vaporization using gasoline, safety fuel, and Diesel fuel oil was also investigated. The results show that increasing the compression ratio has little effect on the rate of fuel vaporization, but that increasing the air temperature by increasing the engine temperature increases the rate of fuel vaporization. The results also show that the vaporized fuel forms a homogeneous mixture with the air more rapidly that does the atomized fuel spray.

  17. Feasibility and safety of porcine Descemet's membrane as a carrier for generating tissue-engineered corneal endothelium.

    PubMed

    Diao, Yu-Mei; Hong, Jing

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of porcine Descemet's membrane (DM) as a carrier for the generation of tissue-engineered corneal endothelium by analyzing porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) and the α-gal epitope. The morphology of porcine and human DM was observed by hematoxylin and eosin staining and scanning electron microscopy. Immunohistochemical staining was used to investigate the location of α-gal epitopes on porcine DM used for xenotransplantation. The porcine DM was treated with ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (EDGE) for 2 weeks, and then the PERV gene sequences in porcine DM and DM-EDGE were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR, respectively. The porcine DM had tight basement membrane morphology, which was similar to human DM in terms of thickness. No positive immunohistochemical staining of the α-gal epitope was detected in porcine DM. PERV expression of pol, gag, env-A and env-B was noted in porcine DM, but in DM-EDGE it was completely degraded. Based on structural, immunological and etiological studies, porcine DM may be an ideal and viable carrier for the generation of tissue-engineered corneal endothelium.

  18. Human Participants in Engineering Research: Notes from a Fledgling Ethics Committee.

    PubMed

    Koepsell, David; Brinkman, Willem-Paul; Pont, Sylvia

    2015-08-01

    For the past half-century, issues relating to the ethical conduct of human research have focused largely on the domain of medical, and more recently social-psychological research. The modern regime of applied ethics, emerging as it has from the Nuremberg trials and certain other historical antecedents, applies the key principles of: autonomy, respect for persons, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice to human beings who enter trials of experimental drugs and devices (Martensen in J Hist Med Allied Sci 56(2):168-175, 2001). Institutions such as Institutional Review Boards (in the U.S.) and Ethics Committees (in Europe and elsewhere) oversee most governmentally-funded medical research around the world, in more than a hundred nations that are signers of the Declaration of Helsinki (World Medical Association 2008). Increasingly, research outside of medicine has been recognized to pose potential risks to human subjects of experiments. Ethics committees now operate in the US, Canada, the U.K. and Australia to oversee all governmental-funded research, and in other jurisdictions, the range of research covered by such committees is expanding. Social science, anthropology, and other fields are falling under more clear directives to conduct a formal ethical review for basic research involving human participants (Federman et al. in Responsible research: a systems approach to protecting research participants. National Academies Press, Washington, 2003, p. 36). The legal and institutional response for protecting human subjects in the course of developing non-medical technologies, engineering, and design is currently vague, but some universities are establishing ethics committees to oversee their human subjects research even where the experiments involved are non-medical and not technically covered by the Declaration of Helsinki. In The Netherlands, as in most of Europe, Asia, Latin America, or Africa, no laws mandate an ethical review of non-medical research. Yet, nearly 2

  19. What Do We Really Need? Visions of an Ideal Human-Machine Interface for NOTES Mechatronic Support Systems From the View of Surgeons, Gastroenterologists, and Medical Engineers.

    PubMed

    Kranzfelder, Michael; Schneider, Armin; Fiolka, Adam; Koller, Sebastian; Wilhelm, Dirk; Reiser, Silvano; Meining, Alexander; Feussner, Hubertus

    2015-08-01

    To investigate why natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has not yet become widely accepted and to prove whether the main reason is still the lack of appropriate platforms due to the deficiency of applicable interfaces. To assess expectations of a suitable interface design, we performed a survey on human-machine interfaces for NOTES mechatronic support systems among surgeons, gastroenterologists, and medical engineers. Of 120 distributed questionnaires, each consisting of 14 distinct questions, 100 (83%) were eligible for analysis. A mechatronic platform for NOTES was considered "important" by 71% of surgeons, 83% of gastroenterologist,s and 56% of medical engineers. "Intuitivity" and "simple to use" were the most favored aspects (33% to 51%). Haptic feedback was considered "important" by 70% of participants. In all, 53% of surgeons, 50% of gastroenterologists, and 33% of medical engineers already had experience with NOTES platforms or other surgical robots; however, current interfaces only met expectations in just more than 50%. Whereas surgeons did not favor a certain working posture, gastroenterologists and medical engineers preferred a sitting position. Three-dimensional visualization was generally considered "nice to have" (67% to 72%); however, for 26% of surgeons, 17% of gastroenterologists, and 7% of medical engineers it did not matter (P = 0.018). Requests and expectations of human-machine interfaces for NOTES seem to be generally similar for surgeons, gastroenterologist, and medical engineers. Consensus exists on the importance of developing interfaces that should be both intuitive and simple to use, are similar to preexisting familiar instruments, and exceed current available systems. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF)

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF) is a facility safety reference document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) environmental restoration activities. The BSAF contains information and guidance for safety analysis documentation required by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for environmental restoration (ER) activities, including: Characterization of potentially contaminated sites. Remedial investigations to identify and remedial actions to clean up existing and potential releases from inactive waste sites Decontamination and dismantlement of surplus facilities. The information is INEL-specific and is in the format required by DOE-EM-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports. An author of safety analysis documentation need only write information concerning that activity and refer to BSAF for further information or copy applicable chapters and sections. The information and guidance provided are suitable for: {sm_bullet} Nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480-23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) with hazards that meet the Category 3 threshold (DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) {sm_bullet} Radiological facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94, Hazard Baseline Documentation) Nonnuclear facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94) that are classified as {open_quotes}low{close_quotes} hazard facilities (DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System). Additionally, the BSAF could be used as an information source for Health and Safety Plans and for Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) for nuclear facilities with hazards equal to or greater than the Category 2 thresholds, or for nonnuclear facilities with {open_quotes}moderate{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} hazard classifications.

  1. Educating Next Generation Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineers at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    J. D. Bess; J. B. Briggs; A. S. Garcia

    2011-09-01

    One of the challenges in educating our next generation of nuclear safety engineers is the limitation of opportunities to receive significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Such training is generally restricted to on-the-job-training before this new engineering workforce can adequately provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) can provide students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills. The ICSBEP and IRPhEP publish annual handbooks that contain evaluations of experiments along with summarized experimental data and peer-reviewed benchmark specifications to support the validation of neutronics codes, nuclear cross-section data, and the validation of reactor designs. Participation in the benchmark process not only benefits those who use these Handbooks within the international community, but provides the individual with opportunities for professional development, networking with an international community of experts, and valuable experience to be used in future employment. Traditionally students have participated in benchmarking activities via internships at national laboratories, universities, or companies involved with the ICSBEP and IRPhEP programs. Additional programs have been developed to facilitate the nuclear education of students while participating in the benchmark projects. These programs include coordination with the Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) Next Degree Program, the Collaboration with the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office to train nuclear and criticality safety engineers, and student evaluations as the basis for their Master's thesis in nuclear engineering.

  2. Reliability and Maintainability Engineering - A Major Driver for Safety and Affordability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safie, Fayssal M.

    2011-01-01

    The United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is in the midst of an effort to design and build a safe and affordable heavy lift vehicle to go to the moon and beyond. To achieve that, NASA is seeking more innovative and efficient approaches to reduce cost while maintaining an acceptable level of safety and mission success. One area that has the potential to contribute significantly to achieving NASA safety and affordability goals is Reliability and Maintainability (R&M) engineering. Inadequate reliability or failure of critical safety items may directly jeopardize the safety of the user(s) and result in a loss of life. Inadequate reliability of equipment may directly jeopardize mission success. Systems designed to be more reliable (fewer failures) and maintainable (fewer resources needed) can lower the total life cycle cost. The Department of Defense (DOD) and industry experience has shown that optimized and adequate levels of R&M are critical for achieving a high level of safety and mission success, and low sustainment cost. Also, lessons learned from the Space Shuttle program clearly demonstrated the importance of R&M engineering in designing and operating safe and affordable launch systems. The Challenger and Columbia accidents are examples of the severe impact of design unreliability and process induced failures on system safety and mission success. These accidents demonstrated the criticality of reliability engineering in understanding component failure mechanisms and integrated system failures across the system elements interfaces. Experience from the shuttle program also shows that insufficient Reliability, Maintainability, and Supportability (RMS) engineering analyses upfront in the design phase can significantly increase the sustainment cost and, thereby, the total life cycle cost. Emphasis on RMS during the design phase is critical for identifying the design features and characteristics needed for time efficient processing

  3. Nuclear safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buden, D.

    1991-01-01

    Topics dealing with nuclear safety are addressed which include the following: general safety requirements; safety design requirements; terrestrial safety; SP-100 Flight System key safety requirements; potential mission accidents and hazards; key safety features; ground operations; launch operations; flight operations; disposal; safety concerns; licensing; the nuclear engine for rocket vehicle application (NERVA) design philosophy; the NERVA flight safety program; and the NERVA safety plan.

  4. Anomaly Analysis: NASA's Engineering and Safety Center Checks Recurring Shuttle Glitches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morring, Frank, Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC), set up in the wake of the Columbia accident to backstop engineers in the space shuttle program, is reviewing hundreds of recurring anomalies that the program had determined don't affect flight safety to see if in fact they might. The NESC is expanding its support to other programs across the agency, as well. The effort, which will later extend to the International Space Station (ISS), is a principal part of the attempt to overcome the normalization of deviance--a situation in which organizations proceeded as if nothing was wrong in the face of evidence that something was wrong--cited by sociologist Diane Vaughn as contributing to both space shuttle disasters.

  5. Human factors engineering design review acceptance criteria for the safety parameter display

    SciTech Connect

    McGevna, V.; Peterson, L.R.

    1981-10-02

    This report contains human factors engineering design review acceptance criteria developed by the Human Factors Engineering Branch (HFEB) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to use in evaluating designs of the Safety Parameter Display System (SPDS). These criteria were developed in response to the functional design criteria for the SPDS defined in NUREG-0696, Functional Criteria for Emergency Response Facilities. The purpose of this report is to identify design review acceptance criteria for the SPDS installed in the control room of a nuclear power plant. Use of computer driven cathode ray tube (CRT) displays is anticipated. General acceptance criteria for displays of plant safety status information by the SPDS are developed. In addition, specific SPDS review criteria corresponding to the SPDS functional criteria specified in NUREG-0696 are established.

  6. Overheads, Safety Analysis and Engineering FY 1995 Site Support Program Plan WBS 6.3.5

    SciTech Connect

    DiVincenzo, E.P.

    1994-09-27

    The Safety Analysis & Engineering (SA&E) department provides core competency for safety analysis and risk documentation that supports achievement of the goals and mission as described in the Hanford Mission Plan, Volume I, Site Guidance (DOE-RL 1993). SA&E operations are integrated into the programs that plan and conduct safe waste management, environmental restoration, and operational activities. SA&E personnel are key members of task teams assigned to eliminate urgent risks and inherent threats that exist at the Hanford Site. Key to ensuring protection of public health and safety, and that of onsite workers, are the products and services provided by the department. SA&E will continue to provide a leadership role throughout the DOE complex with innovative, cost-effective approaches to ensuring safety during environmental cleanup operations. The SA&E mission is to provide support to direct program operations through safety analysis and risk documentation and to maintain an infrastructure responsive to the evolutionary climate at the Hanford Site. SA&E will maintain the appropriate skills mix necessary to fulfill the customers need to conduct all operations in a safe and cost-effective manner while ensuring the safety of the public and the onsite worker.

  7. Safety risk assessment for vertical concrete formwork activities in civil engineering construction.

    PubMed

    López-Arquillos, Antonio; Rubio-Romero, Juan Carlos; Gibb, Alistair G F; Gambatese, John A

    2014-01-01

    The construction sector has one of the worst occupational health and safety records in Europe. Of all construction tasks, formwork activities are associated with a high frequency of accidents and injuries. This paper presents an investigation of the activities and related safety risks present in vertical formwork for in-situ concrete construction in the civil engineering sector. Using the methodology of staticized groups, twelve activities and ten safety risks were identified and validated by experts. Every safety risk identified in this manner was quantified for each activity using binary methodology according to the frequency and severity scales developed in prior research. A panel of experts was selected according to the relevant literature on staticized groups. The results obtained show that the activities with the highest risk in vertical formwork tasks are: Plumbing and leveling of forms, cutting of material, handling materials with cranes, and climbing or descending ladders. The most dangerous health and safety risks detected were falls from height, cutting and overexertion. The research findings provide construction practitioners with further evidence of the hazardous activities associated with concrete formwork construction and a starting point for targeting worker health and safety programmes.

  8. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Enhanced Melamine (ML) Foam Acoustic Test (NEMFAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNelis, Anne M.; Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) funded a proposal to achieve initial basic acoustic characterization of ML (melamine) foam, which could serve as a starting point for a future, more comprehensive acoustic test program for ML foam. A project plan was developed and implemented to obtain acoustic test data for both normal and enhanced ML foam. This project became known as the NESC Enhanced Melamine Foam Acoustic Test (NEMFAT). This document contains the outcome of the NEMFAT project.

  9. Engineering Safety- and Security-Related Requirements for Software-Intensive Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-31

    touchdown sensor behavior • Therac – 25 Radiation Therapy Machine — Timing of unusual input sequence results in unexpected output • Patriot Missile...attack. 25 Engineering Safety- & Security-Related Requirements Donald Firesmith, 31 May 2007 © 2007 Carnegie Mellon University Use Case, Use Case Path...be no greater than 25 mm (1.0 in.) and the height of the vehicle floor shall be within plus/minus 12 mm (0.5 in.) of the platform height under all

  10. Development of Risk Assessment Matrix for NASA Engineering and Safety Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Roy W., Jr.; Moses, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a study, which had as its principal goal the development of a sufficiently detailed 5 x 5 Risk Matrix Scorecard. The purpose of this scorecard is to outline the criteria by which technical issues can be qualitatively and initially prioritized. The tool using this score card has been proposed to be one of the information resources the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) takes into consideration when making decisions with respect to incoming information on safety concerns across the entire NASA agency. The contents of this paper discuss in detail each element of the risk matrix scorecard, definitions for those elements and the rationale behind the development of those definitions. This scorecard development was performed in parallel with the tailoring of the existing Futron Corporation Integrated Risk Management Application (IRMA) software tool. IRMA was tailored to fit NESC needs for evaluating incoming safety concerns and was renamed NESC Assessment Risk Management Application (NAFMA) which is still in developmental phase.

  11. Purpose, Principles, and Challenges of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    NASA formed the NASA Engineering and Safety Center in 2003 following the Space Shuttle Columbia accident. It is an Agency level, program-independent engineering resource supporting NASA's missions, programs, and projects. It functions to identify, resolve, and communicate engineering issues, risks, and, particularly, alternative technical opinions, to NASA senior management. The goal is to help ensure fully informed, risk-based programmatic and operational decision-making processes. To date, the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) has conducted or is actively working over 600 technical studies and projects, spread across all NASA Mission Directorates, and for various other U.S. Government and non-governmental agencies and organizations. Since inception, NESC human spaceflight related activities, in particular, have transitioned from Shuttle Return-to-Flight and completion of the International Space Station (ISS) to ISS operations and Orion Multi-purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV), Space Launch System (SLS), and Commercial Crew Program (CCP) vehicle design, integration, test, and certification. This transition has changed the character of NESC studies. For these development programs, the NESC must operate in a broader, system-level design and certification context as compared to the reactive, time-critical, hardware specific nature of flight operations support.

  12. The impact of the European health and safety directives on engineering in higher education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisp, Alan Roy

    This thesis examines the effect that six sets of Health and Safety legislation introduced in 1993 have had on working practices at the University, particularly within the Engineering Departments. The legislation, collectively known colloquially as "the six pack", had much in common with extant United Kingdom (UK) law but, because it emanated from the European Union (EU), it appears to be viewed in the UK as unduly restrictive and time consuming. Much of the thesis is therefore devoted to examining this suspicion in which the EU and its legislation is held by UK employers and employees. The thesis begins by examining the general background and recent history of the EU, before going on to look in greater detail at the development of Health and Safety legislation in particular. The area of interest is then further narrowed to look at the impact of this legislation on Higher Education Institutions by comparing recent accident statistics with those for industry and commerce. The main outcome of this section is that Higher Education has a similar accident profile by 'type' to industry and commerce and therefore would act in a similar manner when implementing the legislation. It is argued that industry and commerce can benefit from this similarity by emulating two case studies at the University where legislation is applied to some engineering equipment and procedures. These are described in detail and the point is made that safety is an approach that pervades all stages of an engineering process, commencing with the design or ordering of equipment. This is reinforced with the results of a primary survey of purchasing at similar institutions with regards to observance of current safety practices. It is concluded that suspicion of the "six pack" legislation is largely the result of overloading of those people responsible for safety by the arrival of a plethora of legislation all at once. Ironically this overloading appears to have influenced safety officers to pay attention

  13. In vitro dosimetry modeling will be a critical step toward efficient assessment of engineered nanomaterials for environmental health and safety

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation Description: The development and application of engineered nanomaterials (ENM) into commercial and consumer products is far outpacing the ability of traditional approaches to evaluate the potential implications for environmental health and safety. This problem recen...

  14. In vitro dosimetry modeling will be a critical step toward efficient assessment of engineered nanomaterials for environmental health and safety

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation Description: The development and application of engineered nanomaterials (ENM) into commercial and consumer products is far outpacing the ability of traditional approaches to evaluate the potential implications for environmental health and safety. This problem recen...

  15. Effects of organizational safety practices and perceived safety climate on PPE usage, engineering controls, and adverse events involving liquid antineoplastic drugs among nurses.

    PubMed

    DeJoy, David M; Smith, Todd D; Woldu, Henok; Dyal, Mari-Amanda; Steege, Andrea L; Boiano, James M

    2017-07-01

    Antineoplastic drugs pose risks to the healthcare workers who handle them. This fact notwithstanding, adherence to safe handling guidelines remains inconsistent and often poor. This study examined the effects of pertinent organizational safety practices and perceived safety climate on the use of personal protective equipment, engineering controls, and adverse events (spill/leak or skin contact) involving liquid antineoplastic drugs. Data for this study came from the 2011 National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Health and Safety Practices Survey of Healthcare Workers which included a sample of approximately 1,800 nurses who had administered liquid antineoplastic drugs during the past seven days. Regression modeling was used to examine predictors of personal protective equipment use, engineering controls, and adverse events involving antineoplastic drugs. Approximately 14% of nurses reported experiencing an adverse event while administering antineoplastic drugs during the previous week. Usage of recommended engineering controls and personal protective equipment was quite variable. Usage of both was better in non-profit and government settings, when workers were more familiar with safe handling guidelines, and when perceived management commitment to safety was higher. Usage was poorer in the absence of specific safety handling procedures. The odds of adverse events increased with number of antineoplastic drugs treatments and when antineoplastic drugs were administered more days of the week. The odds of such events were significantly lower when the use of engineering controls and personal protective equipment was greater and when more precautionary measures were in place. Greater levels of management commitment to safety and perceived risk were also related to lower odds of adverse events. These results point to the value of implementing a comprehensive health and safety program that utilizes available hazard controls and effectively communicates

  16. Knowledge, attitude and practices for design for safety: A study on civil & structural engineers.

    PubMed

    Goh, Yang Miang; Chua, Sijie

    2016-08-01

    Design for safety (DfS) (also known as prevention through design, safe design and Construction (Design and Management)) promotes early consideration of safety and health hazards during the design phase of a construction project. With early intervention, hazards can be more effectively eliminated or controlled leading to safer worksites and construction processes. DfS is practiced in many countries, including Australia, the UK, and Singapore. In Singapore, the Manpower Ministry enacted the DfS Regulations in July 2015, which will be enforced from August 2016 onwards. Due to the critical role of civil and structural (C&S) engineers during design and construction, the DfS knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP) of C&S engineers have significant impact on the successful implementation of DfS. Thus, this study aims to explore the DfS KAP of C&S engineers so as to guide further research in measuring and improving DfS KAP of designers. During the study, it was found that there is a lack of KAP studies in construction management. Therefore, this study also aims to provide useful lessons for future applications of the KAP framework in construction management research. A questionnaire was developed to assess the DfS KAP of C&S engineers. The responses provided by 43 C&S engineers were analyzed. In addition, interviews with experienced construction professionals were carried out to further understand perceptions of DfS and related issues. The results suggest that C&S engineers are supportive of DfS, but the level of DfS knowledge and practices need to be improved. More DfS guidelines and training should be made available to the engineers. To ensure that DfS can be implemented successfully, there is a need to study the contractual arrangements between clients and designers and the effectiveness of different implementation approaches for the DfS process. The questionnaire and findings in this study provided the foundation for a baseline survey with larger sample size, which is

  17. The Design of Transportation Equipment in Terms of Human Capabilities. The Role of Engineering Psychology in Transport Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarland, Ross A.

    Human factors engineering is considered with regard to the design of safety factors for aviation and highway transportation equipment. Current trends and problem areas are identified for jet air transportation and for highway transportation. Suggested solutions to transportation safety problems are developed by applying the techniques of human…

  18. Investigation of the impact of low cost traffic engineering measures on road safety in urban areas.

    PubMed

    Yannis, George; Kondyli, Alexandra; Georgopoulou, Xenia

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of low cost traffic engineering measures (LCTEMs) on the improvement of road safety in urban areas. A number of such measures were considered, such as speed humps, woonerfs, raised intersections and other traffic calming measures, which have been implemented on one-way, one-lane roads in the Municipality of Neo Psychiko in the Greater Athens Area. Data were analysed using the before-and-after safety analysis methodology with large control group. The selected control group comprised of two Municipalities in the Athens Greater Area, which present similar road network and land use characteristics with the area considered. The application of the methodology showed that the total number of crashes presented a statistically significant reduction, which can be possibly attributed to the introduction of LCTEMs. This reduction concerns passenger cars and single-vehicle crashes and is possibly due to the behavioural improvement of drivers of 25 years old or more. The results of this research are very useful for the identification of the appropriate low cost traffic engineering countermeasures for road safety problems in urban areas.

  19. Safety effects of low-cost engineering measures. An observational study in a Portuguese multilane road.

    PubMed

    Vieira Gomes, Sandra; Cardoso, João Lourenço

    2012-09-01

    Single carriageway multilane roads are not, in general, a very safe type of road, mainly because of the high number of seriously injured victims in head-on collisions, when compared with dual carriageway multilane roads, with a median barrier. In this paper the results of a study on the effect of the application of several low cost engineering measures, aimed at road infrastructure correction and road safety improvement on a multilane road (EN6), are presented. The study was developed by the National Laboratory of Civil Engineering (LNEC) for the Portuguese Road Administration and involved a comparison of selected aspects of motorized traffic behaviour (traffic volumes and speeds) measured in several sections of EN6, as well as monitoring of road safety developments in the same road. The applied low cost engineering measures allowed a reduction of 10% in the expected annual number of personal injury accidents and a 70% decrease in the expected annual number of head-on collisions; the expected annual frequency of accidents involving killed and seriously injured persons was reduced by 26%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Development and Practice of e-Learning System for Educating Safety Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Yoshimi; Yukawa, Takashi; Maruyama, Kyuichi

    It is expected to design safety mechanism based on international standards, in the wave of sophistication and globalization. This paper shows the results of developments and evaluations about e-learning program (eSAFE) for education of safety engineers. E-learning contents (11 subjects) have been developed, and delivered to students in other national colleges of technology for credit transfer. Open source LMS (Learning Management System) is applied and enhanced functionally by using intelligent bulletin board system and report system. The former presents simulation tool and filters objective topics. The latter can evaluate the degree of coincidence with each report. These functions are experimented with actual reports of students. Also, automatic mentoring mailing system is developed and evaluated in cohort based model of e-learning.

  1. Quantifying the Metrics That Characterize Safety Culture of Three Engineered Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Julie; Ernesti, Mary; Tokuhiro, Akira

    2002-07-01

    With potential energy shortages and increasing electricity demand, the nuclear energy option is being reconsidered in the United States. Public opinion will have a considerable voice in policy decisions that will 'road-map' the future of nuclear energy in this country. This report is an extension of the last author's work on the 'safety culture' associated with three engineered systems (automobiles, commercial airplanes, and nuclear power plants) in Japan and the United States. Safety culture, in brief is defined as a specifically developed culture based on societal and individual interpretations of the balance of real, perceived, and imagined risks versus the benefits drawn from utilizing a given engineered systems. The method of analysis is a modified scale analysis, with two fundamental Eigen-metrics, time- (t) and number-scales (N) that describe both engineered systems and human factors. The scale analysis approach is appropriate because human perception of risk, perception of benefit and level of (technological) acceptance are inherently subjective, therefore 'fuzzy' and rarely quantifiable in exact magnitude. Perception of risk, expressed in terms of the psychometric factors 'dread risk' and 'unknown risk', contains both time- and number-scale elements. Various engineering system accidents with fatalities, reported by mass media are characterized by t and N, and are presented in this work using the scale analysis method. We contend that level of acceptance infers a perception of benefit at least two orders larger magnitude than perception of risk. The 'amplification' influence of mass media is also deduced as being 100- to 1000-fold the actual number of fatalities/serious injuries in a nuclear-related accident. (authors)

  2. [Examination of safety improvement by failure record analysis that uses reliability engineering].

    PubMed

    Kato, Kyoichi; Sato, Hisaya; Abe, Yoshihisa; Ishimori, Yoshiyuki; Hirano, Hiroshi; Higashimura, Kyoji; Amauchi, Hiroshi; Yanakita, Takashi; Kikuchi, Kei; Nakazawa, Yasuo

    2010-08-20

    How the maintenance checks of the medical treatment system, including start of work check and the ending check, was effective for preventive maintenance and the safety improvement was verified. In this research, date on the failure of devices in multiple facilities was collected, and the data of the trouble repair record was analyzed by the technique of reliability engineering. An analysis of data on the system (8 general systems, 6 Angio systems, 11 CT systems, 8 MRI systems, 8 RI systems, and the radiation therapy system 9) used in eight hospitals was performed. The data collection period assumed nine months from April to December 2008. Seven items were analyzed. (1) Mean time between failures (MTBF) (2) Mean time to repair (MTTR) (3) Mean down time (MDT) (4) Number found by check in morning (5) Failure generation time according to modality. The classification of the breakdowns per device, the incidence, and the tendency could be understood by introducing reliability engineering. Analysis, evaluation, and feedback on the failure generation history are useful to keep downtime to a minimum and to ensure safety.

  3. Electrical safety Q&A. A reference guide for the clinical engineer.

    PubMed

    2005-02-01

    This guide, which ECRI developed to answer the electrical safety questions most frequently asked by member hospitals, features practical advice for addressing electrical safety concerns in the healthcare environment. Questions addressed include: STANDARDS AND APPROVALS: What electrical safety standards apply? How do NFPA 99 and IEC 60601-1 differ? What organizations approve medical devices? LEAKAGE CURRENT LIMITS AND TESTING: How are leakage current limits established? What limits apply to equipment used in the hospital? And how should the limits be applied in special cases, such as the use of PCs in the patient care area or equipment used in the clinical laboratory? ISOLATED POWER: What are its advantages and disadvantages, and is isolated power needed in the operating room? Other topics addressed include double insulation, ground-fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs), and requirements for medical devices used in the home. Supplementary articles discuss acceptable alternatives to UL listing, the use of Hospital Grade plugs, the limitations of leakage current testing of devices connected to isolated power systems, and the debate about whether to designate ORs as wet locations. Experienced clinical engineers should find this guide to be a handy reference, while those new to the field should find it to be a helpful educational resource.

  4. Failure Modes Effects and Criticality Analysis, an Underutilized Safety, Reliability, Project Management and Systems Engineering Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, Daniel Richard

    2013-09-01

    The majority of space programs whether manned or unmanned for science or exploration require that a Failure Modes Effects and Criticality Analysis (FMECA) be performed as part of their safety and reliability activities. This comes as no surprise given that FMECAs have been an integral part of the reliability engineer's toolkit since the 1950s. The reasons for performing a FMECA are well known including fleshing out system single point failures, system hazards and critical components and functions. However, in the author's ten years' experience as a space systems safety and reliability engineer, findings demonstrate that the FMECA is often performed as an afterthought, simply to meet contract deliverable requirements and is often started long after the system requirements allocation and preliminary design have been completed. There are also important qualitative and quantitative components often missing which can provide useful data to all of project stakeholders. These include; probability of occurrence, probability of detection, time to effect and time to detect and, finally, the Risk Priority Number. This is unfortunate as the FMECA is a powerful system design tool that when used effectively, can help optimize system function while minimizing the risk of failure. When performed as early as possible in conjunction with writing the top level system requirements, the FMECA can provide instant feedback on the viability of the requirements while providing a valuable sanity check early in the design process. It can indicate which areas of the system will require redundancy and which areas are inherently the most risky from the onset. Based on historical and practical examples, it is this author's contention that FMECAs are an immense source of important information for all involved stakeholders in a given project and can provide several benefits including, efficient project management with respect to cost and schedule, system engineering and requirements management

  5. C-Band Airport Surface Communications System Engineering-Initial High-Level Safety Risk Assessment and Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelkin, Natalie; Henriksen, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    This document is being provided as part of ITT's NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract: "New ATM Requirements--Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development." ITT has completed a safety hazard analysis providing a preliminary safety assessment for the proposed C-band (5091- to 5150-MHz) airport surface communication system. The assessment was performed following the guidelines outlined in the Federal Aviation Administration Safety Risk Management Guidance for System Acquisitions document. The safety analysis did not identify any hazards with an unacceptable risk, though a number of hazards with a medium risk were documented. This effort represents an initial high-level safety hazard analysis and notes the triggers for risk reassessment. A detailed safety hazards analysis is recommended as a follow-on activity to assess particular components of the C-band communication system after the profile is finalized and system rollout timing is determined. A security risk assessment has been performed by NASA as a parallel activity. While safety analysis is concerned with a prevention of accidental errors and failures, the security threat analysis focuses on deliberate attacks. Both processes identify the events that affect operation of the system; and from a safety perspective the security threats may present safety risks.

  6. Searching for safety: addressing search engine, website, and provider accountability for illicit online drug sales.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bryan A; Mackey, Tim

    2009-01-01

    Online sales of pharmaceuticals are a rapidly growing phenomenon. Yet despite the dangers of purchasing drugs over the Internet, sales continue to escalate. These dangers include patient harm from fake or tainted drugs, lack of clinical oversight, and financial loss. Patients, and in particular vulnerable groups such as seniors and minorities, purchase drugs online either naïvely or because they lack the ability to access medications from other sources due to price considerations. Unfortunately, high risk online drug sources dominate the Internet, and virtually no accountability exists to ensure safety of purchased products. Importantly, search engines such as Google, Yahoo, and MSN, although purportedly requiring "verification" of Internet drug sellers using PharmacyChecker.com requirements, actually allow and profit from illicit drug sales from unverified websites. These search engines are not held accountable for facilitating clearly illegal activities. Both website drug seller anonymity and unethical physicians approving or writing prescriptions without seeing the patient contribute to rampant illegal online drug sales. Efforts in this country and around the world to stem the tide of these sales have had extremely limited effectiveness. Unfortunately, current congressional proposals are fractionated and do not address the key issues of demand by vulnerable patient populations, search engine accountability, and the ease with which financial transactions can be consummated to promote illegal online sales. To deal with the social scourge of illicit online drug sales, this article proposes a comprehensive statutory solution that creates a no-cost/low-cost national Drug Access Program to break the chain of demand from vulnerable patient populations and illicit online sellers, makes all Internet drug sales illegal unless the Internet pharmacy is licensed through a national Internet pharmacy licensing program, prohibits financial transactions for illegal online drug

  7. Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Facilities and Safety Information Document [NOTE: Volume I, Chapters 2 through 5

    SciTech Connect

    March, F.; Guerrero, J.V.; Johns, W.H.; Schetnan, R.; Bayliss, L.S.; Kuzio, K.A.; White, B.B.

    1999-09-01

    The Facilities Business Unit, which includes the Operations and Engineering Center (7800) and the Facilities Management Center (7900), coordinates decisions about the management of facilities, infrastructure, and sites. These decisions include the following: New construction, including siting; Rehabilitation, and renovation; Relocation; Mothballing; Decontamination and decommissioning; and Demolition. Decisions on these matters flow from a corporate decision process in which SNL directors and vice presidents identify the facility and infrastructure requirements for carrying out work for DOE and other customers. DOE and any non-DOE owners of real estate that is leased or permitted to DOE for SNL/NM use must concur with this identification of requirements. Decision-making follows procedures required by DOE and requirements defined by SNL/NM program executives. See Sandia National Laboratories (1997e), Part II, ''Desired Future State and Strategy,'' and appendices to Sandia National Laboratories (1997e) for more information about planning and decision processes. Decisions on siting take surrounding land uses into account and draw on environmental baseline information maintained at SNL/NM. For environmental baseline and land use information, see Sandia National Laboratories (1999).

  8. Safety Analysis of Dual Purpose Metal Cask Subjected to Impulsive Loads due to Aircraft Engine Crash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Koji; Namba, Kosuke; Saegusa, Toshiari

    In Japan, the first Interim Storage Facility of spent nuclear fuel away from reactor site is being planned to start its commercial operation around 2010, in use of dual-purpose metal cask in the northern part of Main Japan Island. Business License Examination for safety design approval has started since March, 2007. To demonstrate the more scientific and rational performance of safety regulation activities on each phase for the first license procedure, CREPEI has executed demonstration tests with full scale casks, such as drop tests onto real targets without impact limiters(1) and seismic tests subjected to strong earthquake motions(2). Moreover, it is important to develop the knowledge for the inherent security of metal casks under extreme mechanical-impact conditions, especially for increasing interest since the terrorist attacks from 11th September 2001(3)-(6). This paper presents dynamic mechanical behavior of the metal cask lid closure system caused by direct aircraft engine crash and describes calculated results (especially, leak tightness based on relative dynamic displacements between metallic seals). Firstly, the local penetration damage of the interim storage facility building by a big passenger aircraft engine crash (diameter 2.7m, length 4.3m, weight 4.4ton, impact velocity 90m/s) has been examined. The reduced velocity is calculated by the local damage formula for concrete structure with its thickness of 70cm. The load vs. time function for this reduced velocity (60m/s) is estimated by the impact analysis using Finite Element code LS-DYNA with the full scale engine model onto a hypothetically rigid target. Secondly, as the most critical scenarios for the metal cask, two impact scenarios (horizontal impact hitting the cask and vertical impact onto the lid metallic seal system) are chosen. To consider the geometry of all bolts for two lids, the gasket reaction forces and the inner pressure of the cask cavity, the detailed three dimensional FEM models are

  9. Study of an engineering method for fatigue life estimation and safety evaluation of well drilling string

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Zengjie; Zhang Yi; Li Helin; Li Zhonghua

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, an engineering method for calculating the loading capacity, predicting the residual life, making the safety evaluation of drilling pipe and connection joint based on fracture mechanics was presented. The stress intensity factors K{sub I}, K{sub II} and K{sub III} at the critical sections were calculated by means of 3D FEM, then the fracture toughness J{sub c} under mixed mode loading of drilling pipe steel 37Mn5 and 4340 was obtained. In addition, the tests of fatigue crack initiation under different stress concentration state and fatigue crack growth performance of the same steel were carried out, and corresponding expressive formulae were researched.

  10. A cell engineering strategy to enhance the safety of stem cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Oricchio, Elisa; Papapetrou, Eirini P; Lafaille, Fabien; Ganat, Yosif M; Kriks, Sonja; Ortega-Molina, Ana; Mark, Willie H; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Huse, Jason T; Reuter, Victor; Sadelain, Michel; Studer, Lorenz; Wendel, Hans-Guido

    2014-09-25

    The long-term risk of malignancy associated with stem cell therapies is a significant concern in the clinical application of this exciting technology. We report a cancer-selective strategy to enhance the safety of stem cell therapies. Briefly, using a cell engineering approach, we show that aggressive cancers derived from human or murine induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are strikingly sensitive to temporary MYC blockade. On the other hand, differentiated tissues derived from human or mouse iPSCs can readily tolerate temporary MYC inactivation. In cancer cells, endogenous MYC is required to maintain the metabolic and epigenetic functions of the embryonic and cancer-specific pyruvate kinase M2 isoform (PKM2). In summary, our results implicate PKM2 in cancer's increased MYC dependence and indicate dominant MYC inhibition as a cancer-selective fail-safe for stem cell therapies. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Field models: Their present and future application in fire safety engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, K. S.; Magnussen, B. F.

    1992-12-01

    Different field models for calculating heat load, fire development, and smoke concentrations have been developed for use in fire safety engineering work. The field model versions of KAMELEON are based on a finite difference solution of the basic equations from fluid dynamics together with different mathematical models. The most important of these models are the kappa-epsilon model of turbulence, the eddy dissipation concept of combustion (EDC), the soot model by Magnussen, and the discrete transfer model for radiation by Shah and Lockwood. All the resulting equations are solved three dimensionally and in transient. A version under development is a calculation tool for flame spread on surface linings. The system uses input data from the cone calorimeter. The paper will mainly deal with the description of the numerical code and especially a version called KAMELEON FIRE E-3D, handling enclosed pool fires.

  12. Range safety signal attenuation by the Space Shuttle main engine exhaust plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, B. E.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis of attenuation of the range safety signal at 416.5 MHz observed after SRB separation and ending at hand over to Bermuda, during which transmission must pass through the LOX/H2 propelled main engine exhaust plumes, is summarized. Absorption by free electrons in the exhaust plume can account for the nearly constant magnitude of the observed attenuation during this period; it does not explain the short term transient increases that occur at one or more times during this portion of the flight. It is necessary to assume that a trace amount (about 0.5 ppm) of easily ionizable impurity must be present in the exhaust flow. Other mechanisms of attenuation, such as scattering by turbulent fluctuations of both free and bound electrons and absorption by water vapor, were examined but found to be inadequate to explain the observations.

  13. An image-based method to measure all-terrain vehicle dimensions for engineering safety purposes.

    PubMed

    Jennissen, Charles A; Miller, Nathan S; Tang, Kaiyang; Denning, Gerene M

    2014-04-01

    All-terrain vehicle (ATV) crashes are a serious public health and safety concern. Engineering approaches that address ATV injury prevention are critically needed. Avenues to pursue include evidence-based seat design that decreases risky behaviours, such as carrying passengers and operation of adult-size vehicles by children. The goal of this study was to create and validate an image-based method to measure ATV seat length and placement. Publicly available ATV images were downloaded. Adobe Photoshop was then used to generate a vertical grid through the centre of the vehicle, to define the grid scale using the manufacturer's reported wheelbase, and to determine seat length and placement relative to the front and rear axles using this scale. Images that yielded a difference greater than 5% between the calculated and the manufacturer's reported ATV lengths were excluded from further analysis. For the 77 images that met inclusion criteria, the mean±SD for the difference in calculated versus reported vehicle length was 1.8%±1.2%. The Pearson correlation coefficient for comparing image-based seat lengths determined by two independent measurers (20 models) and image-based lengths versus lengths measured at dealerships (12 models) were 0.95 and 0.96, respectively. The image-based method provides accurate and reproducible results for determining ATV measurements, including seat length and placement. This method greatly expands the number of ATV models that can be studied, and may be generalisable to other motor vehicle types. These measurements can be used to guide engineering approaches that improve ATV safety design.

  14. Approaches to the safety assessment of engineered nanomaterials (ENM) in food.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Andrew; Bradford, Roberta; Buck, Neil; Constable, Anne; Edwards, Gareth; Haber, Bernd; Hepburn, Paul; Howlett, John; Kampers, Frans; Klein, Christoph; Radomski, Marek; Stamm, Hermann; Wijnhoven, Susan; Wildemann, Tanja

    2012-06-01

    A systematic, tiered approach to assess the safety of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in foods is presented. The ENM is first compared to its non-nano form counterpart to determine if ENM-specific assessment is required. Of highest concern from a toxicological perspective are ENMs which have potential for systemic translocation, are insoluble or only partially soluble over time or are particulate and bio-persistent. Where ENM-specific assessment is triggered, Tier 1 screening considers the potential for translocation across biological barriers, cytotoxicity, generation of reactive oxygen species, inflammatory response, genotoxicity and general toxicity. In silico and in vitro studies, together with a sub-acute repeat-dose rodent study, could be considered for this phase. Tier 2 hazard characterisation is based on a sentinel 90-day rodent study with an extended range of endpoints, additional parameters being investigated case-by-case. Physicochemical characterisation should be performed in a range of food and biological matrices. A default assumption of 100% bioavailability of the ENM provides a 'worst case' exposure scenario, which could be refined as additional data become available. The safety testing strategy is considered applicable to variations in ENM size within the nanoscale and to new generations of ENM.

  15. Updating Human Factors Engineering Guidelines for Conducting Safety Reviews of Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    O, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Stephen Fleger - NRC

    2011-09-19

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the human factors engineering (HFE) programs of applicants for nuclear power plant construction permits, operating licenses, standard design certifications, and combined operating licenses. The purpose of these safety reviews is to help ensure that personnel performance and reliability are appropriately supported. Detailed design review procedures and guidance for the evaluations is provided in three key documents: the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800), the HFE Program Review Model (NUREG-0711), and the Human-System Interface Design Review Guidelines (NUREG-0700). These documents were last revised in 2007, 2004 and 2002, respectively. The NRC is committed to the periodic update and improvement of the guidance to ensure that it remains a state-of-the-art design evaluation tool. To this end, the NRC is updating its guidance to stay current with recent research on human performance, advances in HFE methods and tools, and new technology being employed in plant and control room design. This paper describes the role of HFE guidelines in the safety review process and the content of the key HFE guidelines used. Then we will present the methodology used to develop HFE guidance and update these documents, and describe the current status of the update program.

  16. Numerical field calculations considering the human subject for engineering and safety assurance in MRI

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Christopher M.

    2010-01-01

    Numerical calculations of static, switched, and radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic (EM) fields considering the geometry and EM properties of the human body are used increasingly in MRI to explain observed phenomena, explore the limitations of various approaches, engineer improved techniques and technology, and assure safety. As the static field strengths and RF field frequencies in MRI have increased in recent years, the value of these methods has become more pronounced and their use has become more widespread. With the recent growth in parallel reception techniques and the advent of transmit RF arrays, the utility of these calculations will become only more critical to continued progress of MRI. Proper relation of field calculation results to the MRI experiment can require significant understanding of MRI physics, EM field principles, MRI coil hardware, and EM field safety. Here some fundamental principles are reviewed and current approaches and applications are catalogued to aid the reader in finding resources valuable in beginning field calculations for their own applications in MR, with an eye to the current needs and future utility of numerical field calculations in MRI. PMID:18384179

  17. STS-114: Engine Cut-Off Sensors Are a No-Go: Teaching Notes for NASA Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, Khadijah S.; Johnson, Grace K.

    2013-01-01

    This case study format is intended to simulate the experience of facing the same difficult challenges and making the same critical decisions as managers, engineers, and scientists in the Space Shuttle Program. It has been designed for use in the classroom setting to help students develop skills related to decision-making. Students will read about the engine cut-off sensor anomaly which created challenges during the STS-114 mission and have the opportunity to make decisions as lead NASA engineers and Mission Management Team members. Included within this document are three case study presentation options - class discussion, group activity, and open-ended research. Please read the full case prior to in-class presentation to allow ample time for students' analysis and reflection, as well as to prepare additional questions. activities or exercises, material selection, etc. Depending upon the setting of your presentation and the number of participants, please choose at least one presentation format beforehand and plan accordingly. You may expect the following learning objectives by using the proposed formats. Learning Objectives: To enable students to experience the responsibilities of NASA management, engineers, and analysis; to discover possible procedures for investigating system anomalies; to become familiar with the liquid hydrogen low level engine cut-off sensor, including its function, connecting components, and location within the Space Shuttle; and to encourage critical analysis and stimulating discussion of Space Shuttle mission challenges.

  18. Implementation of Alternative Test Strategies for the Safety Assessment of Engineered Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Nel, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology introduces a new field that requires novel approaches and methods for hazard and risk assessment. For an appropriate scientific platform for safety assessment, nanoscale properties and functions of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), including how the physicochemical properties of the materials related to mechanisms of injury at the nano-bio interface, must be considered. Moreover, this rapidly advancing new field requires novel test strategies that allow multiple toxicants to be screened in robust, mechanism-based assays in which the bulk of the investigation can be carried out at the cellular and biomolecular level whilst maintaining limited animal use and is based on the contribution of toxicological pathways to the pathophysiology of disease. First, a predictive toxicological approach for the safety assessment of ENMs will be discussed against the background of a ‘21st-century vision’ for using alternative test strategies (ATSs) to perform toxicological assessment of large numbers of untested chemicals, thereby reducing a backlog that could otherwise become a problem for nanotechnology. An ATS is defined here as an alternative/reduction alternative to traditional animal testing. Secondly, the approach of selecting pathways of toxicity to screen for the pulmonary hazard potential of carbon nanotubes and metal oxides will be discussed, as well as how to use these pathways to perform high-content or high-throughput testing and how the data can be used for hazard ranking, risk assessment, regulatory decision-making and ‘safer-by-design’ strategies. Finally, the utility and disadvantages of this predictive toxicological approach to ENM safety assessment, and how it can assist the 21st- century vision, will be addressed PMID:23879741

  19. Implementation of alternative test strategies for the safety assessment of engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Nel, A E

    2013-12-01

    Nanotechnology introduces a new field that requires novel approaches and methods for hazard and risk assessment. For an appropriate scientific platform for safety assessment, nanoscale properties and functions of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), including how the physicochemical properties of the materials relate to mechanisms of injury at the nano-bio interface, must be considered. Moreover, this rapidly advancing new field requires novel test strategies that allow multiple toxicants to be screened in robust, mechanism-based assays in which the bulk of the investigation can be carried out at the cellular and biomolecular level whilst maintaining limited animal use and is based on the contribution of toxicological pathways to the pathophysiology of disease. First, a predictive toxicological approach for the safety assessment of ENMs will be discussed against the background of a '21st-century vision' for using alternative test strategies (ATSs) to perform toxicological assessment of large numbers of untested chemicals, thereby reducing a backlog that could otherwise become a problem for nanotechnology. An ATS is defined here as an alternative to animal experiments or refinement/reduction alternative to traditional animal testing. Secondly, the approach of selecting pathways of toxicity to screen for the pulmonary hazard potential of carbon nanotubes and metal oxides will be discussed, as well as how to use these pathways to perform high-content or high-throughput testing and how the data can be used for hazard ranking, risk assessment, regulatory decision-making and 'safer-by-design' strategies. Finally, the utility and disadvantages of this predictive toxicological approach to ENM safety assessment, and how it can assist the 21st-century vision, will be addressed.

  20. ONE Nano: NIEHS's strategic initiative on the health and safety effects of engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Schug, Thaddeus T; Johnson, Anne F; Balshaw, David M; Garantziotis, Stavros; Walker, Nigel J; Weis, Christopher; Nadadur, Srikanth S; Birnbaum, Linda S

    2013-04-01

    The past decade has seen tremendous expansion in the production and application of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). The unique properties that make ENMs useful in the marketplace also make their interactions with biological systems difficult to anticipate and critically important to explore. Currently, little is known about the health effects of human exposure to these materials. As part of its role in supporting the National Nanotechnology Initiative, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) has developed an integrated, strategic research program-"ONE Nano"-to increase our fundamental understanding of how ENMs interact with living systems, to develop predictive models for quantifying ENM exposure and assessing ENM health impacts, and to guide the design of second-generation ENMs to minimize adverse health effects. The NIEHS's research investments in ENM health and safety include extramural grants and grantee consortia, intramural research activities, and toxicological studies being conducted by the National Toxicology Program (NTP). These efforts have enhanced collaboration within the nanotechnology research community and produced toxicological profiles for selected ENMs, as well as improved methods and protocols for conducting in vitro and in vivo studies to assess ENM health effects. By drawing upon the strengths of the NIEHS's intramural, extramural, and NTP programs and establishing productive partnerships with other institutes and agencies across the federal government, the NIEHS's strategic ONE Nano program is working toward new advances to improve our understanding of the health impacts of engineered nanomaterials and support the goals of the National Nanotechnology Initiative.

  1. The Development, Content, Design, and Conduct of the 2011 Piloted US DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program Criticality Safety Engineering Training and Education Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, Calvin Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    In May 1973 the University of New Mexico conducted the first nationwide criticality safety training and education week-long short course for nuclear criticality safety engineers. Subsequent to that course, the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF) developed very successful 'hands-on' subcritical and critical training programs for operators, supervisors, and engineering staff. Since the inception of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project (NCT&SP) in 1983, the DOE has stimulated contractor facilities and laboratories to collaborate in the furthering of nuclear criticality as a discipline. That effort included the education and training of nuclear criticality safety engineers (NCSEs). In 1985 a textbook was written that established a path toward formalizing education and training for NCSEs. Though the NCT&SP went through a brief hiatus from 1990 to 1992, other DOE-supported programs were evolving to the benefit of NCSE training and education. In 1993 the DOE established a Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) and undertook a comprehensive development effort to expand the extant LACEF 'hands-on' course specifically for the education and training of NCSEs. That successful education and training was interrupted in 2006 for the closing of the LACEF and the accompanying movement of materials and critical experiment machines to the Nevada Test Site. Prior to that closing, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was commissioned by the US DOE NCSP to establish an independent hands-on NCSE subcritical education and training course. The course provided an interim transition for the establishment of a reinvigorated and expanded two-week NCSE education and training program in 2011. The 2011 piloted two-week course was coordinated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and jointly conducted by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) classroom education and facility training, the Sandia National

  2. Testing REACH draft technical guidance notes for conducting chemical safety assessments-the experience of a downstream user of a preparation.

    PubMed

    Gade, Anne Lill; Ovrebø, Steinar; Hylland, Ketil

    2008-07-01

    The goal of REACH is the safe use of chemicals. This study examines the efficiency and usefulness of two draft technical guidance notes in the REACH Interim Project 3.2-2 for the development of the chemical safety report and exposure scenarios. A case study was carried out for a paint system for protection of structural steel. The focuses of the study were risk assessment of preparations based on Derived No Effect Level (DNEL) and Predicted No Effect Concentrations (PNEC) and on effective and accurate communication in the supply chain. Exposure scenarios and generic descriptions of uses, risk management measures, and exposure determinants were developed. The study showed that communication formats, software tools, and guidelines for chemical risk assessment need further adjustment to preparations and real-life situations. Web platforms may simplify such communication. The downstream formulator needs basic substance data from the substance manufacturer during the pre-registration phase to develop exposure scenarios for preparations. Default values need to be communicated in the supply chain because these were critical for the derivation of applicable risk management demands. The current guidelines which rely on the available toxicological knowledge are insufficient to advise downstream users on how to develop exposure scenarios for preparations.

  3. A Comparison of Safety Culture Associated with Three Engineered Systems in Japan and the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuhiro, Akira

    The internationally reported nuclear criticality accident at JCO in Tokaimura, Japan has further eroded public confidence in nuclear energy, its related facilities and the (Japanese) government’s ability to handle such a crisis. The JCO accident marked the sixth nuclear-related incident since 1995. The existing state of “safety culture” is being questioned and re-evaluated at a national level. In this work the safety culture associated with engineered systems (ES) such as the automobile, commercial airplane and nuclear power plants (NPP) are evaluated based on a scale-analysis (SA), via proposition of two fundamental parameters called eigenmetrics. The identified eigenmetrics are time- (τ) and number-scales (N) describing both ES and human factors, at the individual and/or societal levels. The SA approach is appropriate because human perception of risk (POR), perception of benefit (POB) and level of (technology) acceptance (LOA) are inherently subjective, therefore “fuzzy” and rarely quantifiable in exact magnitude. POR expressed in terms of the psychometric factors “dread risk” and “unknown risk”, contain both time- and number-scale elements. The JCO accident, as well as auto-fatalities, commercial airline accidents and hypothetical NPP accidents are characterized in terms of τ, N and two additional derived parameters of relevance, Nτ and N/τ. We contend that LOA infers a POB at least two orders of magnitude larger than POR. The “amplification” influence of mass-media is also deduced as being 100 to 1000 fold the actual number of fatalities/serious injuries in a nuclear-related accident.

  4. ONE Nano: NIEHS’s Strategic Initiative on the Health and Safety Effects of Engineered Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Anne F.; Balshaw, David M.; Garantziotis, Stavros; Walker, Nigel J.; Weis, Christopher; Nadadur, Srikanth S.; Birnbaum, Linda S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The past decade has seen tremendous expansion in the production and application of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). The unique properties that make ENMs useful in the marketplace also make their interactions with biological systems difficult to anticipate and critically important to explore. Currently, little is known about the health effects of human exposure to these materials. Objectives: As part of its role in supporting the National Nanotechnology Initiative, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) has developed an integrated, strategic research program—“ONE Nano”—to increase our fundamental understanding of how ENMs interact with living systems, to develop predictive models for quantifying ENM exposure and assessing ENM health impacts, and to guide the design of second-generation ENMs to minimize adverse health effects. Discussion: The NIEHS’s research investments in ENM health and safety include extramural grants and grantee consortia, intramural research activities, and toxicological studies being conducted by the National Toxicology Program (NTP). These efforts have enhanced collaboration within the nanotechnology research community and produced toxicological profiles for selected ENMs, as well as improved methods and protocols for conducting in vitro and in vivo studies to assess ENM health effects. Conclusion: By drawing upon the strengths of the NIEHS’s intramural, extramural, and NTP programs and establishing productive partnerships with other institutes and agencies across the federal government, the NIEHS’s strategic ONE Nano program is working toward new advances to improve our understanding of the health impacts of engineered nanomaterials and support the goals of the National Nanotechnology Initiative. PMID:23407114

  5. Physics Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presents nine physics notes for British secondary school teachers. Some of these notes are: (1) speed of sound in a steel rod; (2) physics extracts-part four (1978); and (3) a graphical approach to acceleration. (HM)

  6. Apparatus Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Bruce G., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presents four notes that report new equipment and techniques of interest to physics teachers. These notes deal with collosions of atoms in solids, determining the viscosity of a liquid, measuring the speed of sound and demonstrating Doppler effect. (HM)

  7. Apparatus Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Bruce G., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presents four notes that report new equipment and techniques of interest to physics teachers. These notes deal with collosions of atoms in solids, determining the viscosity of a liquid, measuring the speed of sound and demonstrating Doppler effect. (HM)

  8. 46 CFR 52.01-120 - Safety valves and safety relief valves (modifies PG-67 through PG-73).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-120 Safety valves and safety relief... lifting bars. When used for these parts, the elongation must be at least 5 percent in 51mm (2 inch) gage... noted in paragraph (d)(2) of this section. (2) (Modifies PG-73.) The lifting device required by PG-73.1...

  9. 46 CFR 52.01-120 - Safety valves and safety relief valves (modifies PG-67 through PG-73).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-120 Safety valves and safety relief... lifting bars. When used for these parts, the elongation must be at least 5 percent in 51mm (2 inch) gage... noted in paragraph (d)(2) of this section. (2) (Modifies PG-73.) The lifting device required by PG-73.1...

  10. 46 CFR 52.01-120 - Safety valves and safety relief valves (modifies PG-67 through PG-73).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-120 Safety valves and safety relief... lifting bars. When used for these parts, the elongation must be at least 5 percent in 51mm (2 inch) gage... noted in paragraph (d)(2) of this section. (2) (Modifies PG-73.) The lifting device required by PG-73.1...

  11. Safety and efficacy of composite collagen-silver nanoparticle hydrogels as tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Alarcon, Emilio I; Udekwu, Klas I; Noel, Christopher W; Gagnon, Luke B-P; Taylor, Patrick K; Vulesevic, Branka; Simpson, Madeline J; Gkotzis, Spyridon; Islam, M Mirazul; Lee, Chyan-Jang; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta; Mah, Thien-Fah; Suuronen, Erik J; Scaiano, Juan C; Griffith, May

    2015-11-28

    The increasing number of multidrug resistant bacteria has revitalized interest in seeking alternative sources for controlling bacterial infection. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), are amongst the most promising candidates due to their wide microbial spectrum of action. In this work, we report on the safety and efficacy of the incorporation of collagen coated AgNPs into collagen hydrogels for tissue engineering. The resulting hybrid materials at [AgNPs] < 0.4 μM retained the mechanical properties and biocompatibility for primary human skin fibroblasts and keratinocytes of collagen hydrogels; they also displayed remarkable anti-infective properties against S. aureus, S. epidermidis, E. coli and P. aeruginosa at considerably lower concentrations than silver nitrate. Further, subcutaneous implants of materials containing 0.2 μM AgNPs in mice showed a reduction in the levels of IL-6 and other inflammation markers (CCL24, sTNFR-2, and TIMP1). Finally, an analysis of silver contents in implanted mice showed that silver accumulation primarily occurred within the tissue surrounding the implant.

  12. NASA Engineering Safety Center NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group 2007 Proactive Task Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle A.

    2007-01-01

    In 2007, the NASA Engineering Safety Center (NESC) chartered the NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group to bring forth and address critical battery-related performance/manufacturing issues for NASA and the aerospace community. A suite of tasks identifying and addressing issues related to Ni-H2 and Li-ion battery chemistries was submitted and selected for implementation. The current NESC funded are: (1) Wet Life of Ni-H2 Batteries (2) Binding Procurement (3) NASA Lithium-Ion Battery Guidelines (3a) Li-Ion Performance Assessment (3b) Li-Ion Guidelines Document (3b-i) Assessment of Applicability of Pouch Cells for Aerospace Missions (3b-ii) High Voltage Risk Assessment (3b-iii) Safe Charge Rates for Li-Ion Cells (4) Availability of Source Material for Li-Ion Cells (5) NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop This presentation provides a brief overview of the tasks in the 2007 plan and serves as an introduction to more detailed discussions on each of the specific tasks.

  13. Safety, Tolerability, and Immunogenicity of a Recombinant, Genetically Engineered, Live-Attenuated Vaccine against Canine Blastomycosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Wüthrich, Marcel; Krajaejun, Theerapong; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie; Bass, Chris; Filutowicz, Hanna I.; Legendre, Alfred M.; Klein, Bruce S.

    2011-01-01

    Blastomycosis is a severe, commonly fatal infection caused by the dimorphic fungus Blastomyces dermatitidis in dogs that live in the United States, Canada, and parts of Africa. The cost of treating an infection can be expensive, and no vaccine against this infection is commercially available. A genetically engineered live-attenuated strain of B. dermatitidis lacking the major virulence factor BAD-1 successfully vaccinates against lethal experimental infection in mice. Here we studied the safety, toxicity, and immunogenicity of this strain as a vaccine in dogs, using 25 beagles at a teaching laboratory and 78 foxhounds in a field trial. In the beagles, escalating doses of live vaccine ranging from 2 × 104 to 2 × 107 yeast cells given subcutaneously were safe and did not disseminate to the lung or induce systemic illness, but a dose of <2 × 106 yeast cells induced less fever and local inflammation. A vaccine dose of 105 yeast cells was also well tolerated in vaccinated foxhounds who had never had blastomycosis; however, vaccinated dogs with prior infection had more local reactions at the vaccine site. The draining lymph node cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes from vaccinated dogs demonstrated gamma interferon (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) specifically in response to stimulation with Blastomyces antigens. Thus, the live-attenuated vaccine against blastomycosis studied here proved safe, well tolerated, and immunogenic in dogs and merits further studies of vaccine efficacy. PMID:21367980

  14. Engineered Nanomaterials in Food: Implications for Food Safety and Consumer Health

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Alina; Schneider, Yves-Jacques

    2014-01-01

    From the current state-of-the-art, it is clear that nanotechnology applications are expected to bring a range of benefits to the food sector aiming at providing better quality and conservation. In the meantime, a growing number of studies indicate that the exposure to certain engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) has a potential to lead to health complications and that there is a need for further investigations in order to unravel the biological outcomes of nanofood consumption. In the current review, we summarize the existing data on the (potential) use of ENMs in the food industry, information on the toxicity profiles of the commonly applied ENMs, such as metal (oxide) nanoparticles (NPs), address the potential food safety implications and health hazards connected with the consumption of nanofood. A number of health complications connected with the human exposure to ENMs are discussed, demonstrating that there is a real basis for the arisen concern not only connected with the gut health, but also with the potency to lead to systemic toxicity. The toxicological nature of hazard, exposure levels and risk to consumers from nanotechnology-derived food are on the earliest stage of investigation and this review also highlights the major gaps that need further research and regulation. PMID:24879486

  15. Environmental, health, and safety effects of engineered nanomaterials: challenges and research needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbrother, Howard

    2010-04-01

    The number of technologies and consumer products that incorporate engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) has grown rapidly. Indeed, ENMs such as carbon nanotubes and nano-silver, are revolutionizing many commercial technologies and have already been incorporated into more than 800 commercial products, including polymer composites, cell phone batteries, sporting equipment and cosmetics. The global market for ENMs has grown steadily from 7.5 billion in 2003 to 12.7 billion in 2008. Over the next five years, their market value is expected to exceed $27 billion. This surge in demand has been responsible for a corresponding increase in the annual production rates of ENMs. For example, Bayer anticipates that single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT and MWNT) production rates will reach 3,000 tons/yr by 2012. Inevitably, some of these synthetic materials will enter the environment either from incidental release during manufacture and transport, or following use and disposal. Consequently, intense scientific research is now being directed towards understanding the environmental, health and safety (EHS) risks posed by ENMs. I will highlight some of the key research challenges and needs in this area, include (i) developing structure-property relationships that will enable physicochemical properties of ENMs to be correlated with environmentally relevant behavior (e.g. colloidal properties, toxicity), (ii) determining the behavior of nanoproducts, and (iii) developing analytical techniques capable of detecting and quantifying the concentration of ENMs in the environment.

  16. Engineered nanomaterials in food: implications for food safety and consumer health.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Alina; Schneider, Yves-Jacques

    2014-05-28

    From the current state-of-the-art, it is clear that nanotechnology applications are expected to bring a range of benefits to the food sector aiming at providing better quality and conservation. In the meantime, a growing number of studies indicate that the exposure to certain engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) has a potential to lead to health complications and that there is a need for further investigations in order to unravel the biological outcomes of nanofood consumption. In the current review, we summarize the existing data on the (potential) use of ENMs in the food industry, information on the toxicity profiles of the commonly applied ENMs, such as metal (oxide) nanoparticles (NPs), address the potential food safety implications and health hazards connected with the consumption of nanofood. A number of health complications connected with the human exposure to ENMs are discussed, demonstrating that there is a real basis for the arisen concern not only connected with the gut health, but also with the potency to lead to systemic toxicity. The toxicological nature of hazard, exposure levels and risk to consumers from nanotechnology-derived food are on the earliest stage of investigation and this review also highlights the major gaps that need further research and regulation.

  17. Suicide notes.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, I; Farmer, R; Catalan, J

    1993-07-01

    Detailed case reports of incidents of suicide and attempted suicide on the London Underground railway system between 1985 and 1989 were examined for the presence of suicide notes. The incidence of note-leaving was 15%. Notes provided little insight into the causes of suicide as subjectively perceived, or strategies for suicide prevention.

  18. A 90-Day Feeding Study in Rats to Assess the Safety of Genetically Engineered Pork

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Gao-jun; Jiang, Sheng-Wang; Qian, Li-Li; Cai, Chun-Bo; Wang, Qing-qing; Ma, De-Zun; Li, Biao; Xie, Shan-shan; Cui, Wen-Tao; Li, Kui

    2016-01-01

    Our laboratory recently produced genetically engineered (GE) Meishan pigs containing a ZFN-edited myostatin loss-of-function mutant. These GE pigs develop and grow as normal as wild type pigs but produce pork with greater lean yield and lower fat mass. To assess any potential subchronic toxicity risks of this GE pork, a 90-day feeding study was conducted in Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were randomly divided into five groups, and fed for 90 days with basic diet and basic diets formulated with low dose and high dose pork prepared from wild type pigs and GE pigs, respectively. Animal behaviors and clinical signs were monitored twice daily, and body weight and food consumption were measured and recorded weekly. At days 45 and 90, blood tests (lipid panel, electrolytes, parameters related to liver and kidney functions, and complete blood counts) were performed. Additionally, gross pathology and histopathological analyses were performed for major organs in each group. Data analysis shows that there were no significant differences in growth rate, food consumption, and blood test parameters between rat groups fed with GE pork and wild type pork. Although differences in some liver function parameters (such as aspartate aminotransferase, total proteins, albumin, and alkaline phosphatase) and white blood cell counts (such as lymphocyte percentage and monocyte percentage) were observed between rats fed with high dose GE pork and basic diet, all test results in rats fed with GE pork are in the normal range. Additionally, there are no apparent lesions noted in all organs isolated from rats in all five feeding groups on days 45 and 90. Overall, our results clearly indicate that food consumption of GE pork produced by ZFN-edited myostatin loss-of-function mutant pigs did not have any long-term adverse effects on the health status in rats. PMID:27812153

  19. A 90-Day Feeding Study in Rats to Assess the Safety of Genetically Engineered Pork.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Gao-Jun; Jiang, Sheng-Wang; Qian, Li-Li; Cai, Chun-Bo; Wang, Qing-Qing; Ma, De-Zun; Li, Biao; Xie, Shan-Shan; Cui, Wen-Tao; Li, Kui

    2016-01-01

    Our laboratory recently produced genetically engineered (GE) Meishan pigs containing a ZFN-edited myostatin loss-of-function mutant. These GE pigs develop and grow as normal as wild type pigs but produce pork with greater lean yield and lower fat mass. To assess any potential subchronic toxicity risks of this GE pork, a 90-day feeding study was conducted in Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were randomly divided into five groups, and fed for 90 days with basic diet and basic diets formulated with low dose and high dose pork prepared from wild type pigs and GE pigs, respectively. Animal behaviors and clinical signs were monitored twice daily, and body weight and food consumption were measured and recorded weekly. At days 45 and 90, blood tests (lipid panel, electrolytes, parameters related to liver and kidney functions, and complete blood counts) were performed. Additionally, gross pathology and histopathological analyses were performed for major organs in each group. Data analysis shows that there were no significant differences in growth rate, food consumption, and blood test parameters between rat groups fed with GE pork and wild type pork. Although differences in some liver function parameters (such as aspartate aminotransferase, total proteins, albumin, and alkaline phosphatase) and white blood cell counts (such as lymphocyte percentage and monocyte percentage) were observed between rats fed with high dose GE pork and basic diet, all test results in rats fed with GE pork are in the normal range. Additionally, there are no apparent lesions noted in all organs isolated from rats in all five feeding groups on days 45 and 90. Overall, our results clearly indicate that food consumption of GE pork produced by ZFN-edited myostatin loss-of-function mutant pigs did not have any long-term adverse effects on the health status in rats.

  20. Early Engagement of Safety and Mission Assurance Expertise Using Systems Engineering Tools: A Risk-Based Approach to Early Identification of Safety and Assurance Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darpel, Scott; Beckman, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Decades of systems engineering practice have demonstrated that the earlier the identification of requirements occurs, the lower the chance that costly redesigns will needed later in the project life cycle. A better understanding of all requirements can also improve the likelihood of a design's success. Significant effort has been put into developing tools and practices that facilitate requirements determination, including those that are part of the model-based systems engineering (MBSE) paradigm. These efforts have yielded improvements in requirements definition, but have thus far focused on a design's performance needs. The identification of safety & mission assurance (S&MA) related requirements, in comparison, can occur after preliminary designs are already established, yielding forced redesigns. Engaging S&MA expertise at an earlier stage, facilitated by the use of MBSE tools, and focused on actual project risk, can yield the same type of design life cycle improvements that have been realized in technical and performance requirements.

  1. Environmental effects of dredging. Engineering considerations for capping subaqueous dredged material deposits -- background and preliminary planning. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect

    1987-02-01

    In recent years, the search for alternatives to expensive and limited upland containment areas for contaminated sediment has centered on in-water capped disposal. This interest was further reinforced when the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter (the London Dumping Convention) accepted the capping concept, subject to monitoring, as an appropriate technology for rapidly rendering harmless the contaminants of concern in dredged material. Subsequent detailed investigations (e.g., Brannon et al. 1985, O`Connor and O`Connor 1983) have confirmed that capping can be effective in chemically and biologically isolating contaminated dredged material from the overlying aquatic environment. However, in order to ensure this effectiveness, capping projects cannot be treated simply as a modification of conventional disposal practices. A capping project must be thought of as an engineered structure with design and construction requirements that must be met, verified, and maintained over the design life. This is not to say that traditional equipment and operational methods cannot be applied to capping contaminated materials. In fact, they have been used with good success. Technologies must, however, be applied in a systems context and with careful control and monitoring.

  2. Recent Experiences of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) GN and C Technical Discipline Team (TDT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennehy, Cornelius J.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC), initially formed in 2003, is an independently funded NASA Program whose dedicated team of technical experts provides objective engineering and safety assessments of critical, high risk projects. The GN&C Technical Discipline Team (TDT) is one of fifteen such discipline-focused teams within the NESC organization. The TDT membership is composed of GN&C specialists from across NASA and its partner organizations in other government agencies, industry, national laboratories, and universities. This paper will briefly define the vision, mission, and purpose of the NESC organization. The role of the GN&C TDT will then be described in detail along with an overview of how this team operates and engages in its objective engineering and safety assessments of critical NASA projects. This paper will then describe selected recent experiences, over the period 2007 to present, of the GN&C TDT in which they directly performed or supported a wide variety of NESC assessments and consultations.

  3. Safety and efficacy of composite collagen-silver nanoparticle hydrogels as tissue engineering scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarcon, Emilio I.; Udekwu, Klas I.; Noel, Christopher W.; Gagnon, Luke B.-P.; Taylor, Patrick K.; Vulesevic, Branka; Simpson, Madeline J.; Gkotzis, Spyridon; Islam, M. Mirazul; Lee, Chyan-Jang; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta; Mah, Thien-Fah; Suuronen, Erik J.; Scaiano, Juan C.; Griffith, May

    2015-11-01

    The increasing number of multidrug resistant bacteria has revitalized interest in seeking alternative sources for controlling bacterial infection. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), are amongst the most promising candidates due to their wide microbial spectrum of action. In this work, we report on the safety and efficacy of the incorporation of collagen coated AgNPs into collagen hydrogels for tissue engineering. The resulting hybrid materials at [AgNPs] < 0.4 μM retained the mechanical properties and biocompatibility for primary human skin fibroblasts and keratinocytes of collagen hydrogels; they also displayed remarkable anti-infective properties against S. aureus, S. epidermidis, E. coli and P. aeruginosa at considerably lower concentrations than silver nitrate. Further, subcutaneous implants of materials containing 0.2 μM AgNPs in mice showed a reduction in the levels of IL-6 and other inflammation markers (CCL24, sTNFR-2, and TIMP1). Finally, an analysis of silver contents in implanted mice showed that silver accumulation primarily occurred within the tissue surrounding the implant.The increasing number of multidrug resistant bacteria has revitalized interest in seeking alternative sources for controlling bacterial infection. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), are amongst the most promising candidates due to their wide microbial spectrum of action. In this work, we report on the safety and efficacy of the incorporation of collagen coated AgNPs into collagen hydrogels for tissue engineering. The resulting hybrid materials at [AgNPs] < 0.4 μM retained the mechanical properties and biocompatibility for primary human skin fibroblasts and keratinocytes of collagen hydrogels; they also displayed remarkable anti-infective properties against S. aureus, S. epidermidis, E. coli and P. aeruginosa at considerably lower concentrations than silver nitrate. Further, subcutaneous implants of materials containing 0.2 μM AgNPs in mice showed a reduction in the levels of IL-6 and

  4. Engineered and Administrative Safety Systems for the Control of Prompt Radiation Hazards at Accelerator Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, James C.; Vylet, Vashek; Walker, Lawrence S.; /SLAC

    2007-12-17

    The ANSI N43.1 Standard, currently in revision (ANSI 2007), sets forth the requirements for accelerator facilities to provide adequate protection for the workers, the public and the environment from the hazards of ionizing radiation produced during and from accelerator operations. The Standard also recommends good practices that, when followed, provide a level of radiation protection consistent with those established for the accelerator communities. The N43.1 Standard is suitable for all accelerator facilities (using electron, positron, proton, or ion particle beams) capable of producing radiation, subject to federal or state regulations. The requirements (see word 'shall') and recommended practices (see word 'should') are prescribed in a graded approach that are commensurate with the complexity and hazard levels of the accelerator facility. Chapters 4, 5 and 6 of the N43.1 Standard address specially the Radiation Safety System (RSS), both engineered and administrative systems, to mitigate and control the prompt radiation hazards from accelerator operations. The RSS includes the Access Control System (ACS) and Radiation Control System (RCS). The main requirements and recommendations of the N43.1 Standard regarding the management, technical and operational aspects of the RSS are described and condensed in this report. Clearly some aspects of the RSS policies and practices at different facilities may differ in order to meet the practical needs for field implementation. A previous report (Liu et al. 2001a), which reviews and summarizes the RSS at five North American high-energy accelerator facilities, as well as the RSS references for the 5 labs (Drozdoff 2001; Gallegos 1996; Ipe and Liu 1992; Liu 1999; Liu 2001b; Rokni 1996; TJNAF 1994; Yotam et al. 1991), can be consulted for the actual RSS implementation at various laboratories. A comprehensive report describing the RSS at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC 2006) can also serve as a reference.

  5. Safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of a recombinant, genetically engineered, live-attenuated vaccine against canine blastomycosis.

    PubMed

    Wüthrich, Marcel; Krajaejun, Theerapong; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie; Bass, Chris; Filutowicz, Hanna I; Legendre, Alfred M; Klein, Bruce S

    2011-05-01

    Blastomycosis is a severe, commonly fatal infection caused by the dimorphic fungus Blastomyces dermatitidis in dogs that live in the United States, Canada, and parts of Africa. The cost of treating an infection can be expensive, and no vaccine against this infection is commercially available. A genetically engineered live-attenuated strain of B. dermatitidis lacking the major virulence factor BAD-1 successfully vaccinates against lethal experimental infection in mice. Here we studied the safety, toxicity, and immunogenicity of this strain as a vaccine in dogs, using 25 beagles at a teaching laboratory and 78 foxhounds in a field trial. In the beagles, escalating doses of live vaccine ranging from 2 × 10⁴ to 2 × 10⁷ yeast cells given subcutaneously were safe and did not disseminate to the lung or induce systemic illness, but a dose of < 2 × 10⁶ yeast cells induced less fever and local inflammation. A vaccine dose of 10⁵ yeast cells was also well tolerated in vaccinated foxhounds who had never had blastomycosis; however, vaccinated dogs with prior infection had more local reactions at the vaccine site. The draining lymph node cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes from vaccinated dogs demonstrated gamma interferon (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) specifically in response to stimulation with Blastomyces antigens. Thus, the live-attenuated vaccine against blastomycosis studied here proved safe, well tolerated, and immunogenic in dogs and merits further studies of vaccine efficacy.

  6. A comprehensive framework for evaluating the environmental health and safety implications of engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Boyes, William K; Thornton, Brittany Lila M; Al-Abed, Souhail R; Andersen, Christian P; Bouchard, Dermont C; Burgess, Robert M; Hubal, Elaine A Cohen; Ho, Kay T; Hughes, Michael F; Kitchin, Kirk; Reichman, Jay R; Rogers, Kim R; Ross, Jeffrey A; Rygiewicz, Paul T; Scheckel, Kirk G; Thai, Sheau-Fung; Zepp, Richard G; Zucker, Robert M

    2017-06-29

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENM) are a growing aspect of the global economy, and their safe and sustainable development, use, and eventual disposal requires the capability to forecast and avoid potential problems. This review provides a framework to evaluate the health and safety implications of ENM releases into the environment, including purposeful releases such as for antimicrobial sprays or nano-enabled pesticides, and inadvertent releases as a consequence of other intended applications. Considerations encompass product life cycles, environmental media, exposed populations, and possible adverse outcomes. This framework is presented as a series of compartmental flow diagrams that serve as a basis to help derive future quantitative predictive models, guide research, and support development of tools for making risk-based decisions. After use, ENM are not expected to remain in their original form due to reactivity and/or propensity for hetero-agglomeration in environmental media. Therefore, emphasis is placed on characterizing ENM as they occur in environmental or biological matrices. In addition, predicting the activity of ENM in the environment is difficult due to the multiple dynamic interactions between the physical/chemical aspects of ENM and similarly complex environmental conditions. Others have proposed the use of simple predictive functional assays as an intermediate step to address the challenge of using physical/chemical properties to predict environmental fate and behavior of ENM. The nodes and interactions of the framework presented here reflect phase transitions that could be targets for development of such assays to estimate kinetic reaction rates and simplify model predictions. Application, refinement, and demonstration of this framework, along with an associated knowledgebase that includes targeted functional assay data, will allow better de novo predictions of potential exposures and adverse outcomes.

  7. [Safety evaluation of tissue engineered medical devices using normal human mesenchymal stem cells].

    PubMed

    Sawada, Rumi; Ito, Tomomi; Tsuchiya, Toshie

    2007-05-01

    Several recent studies demonstrated the potential of bioengineering using somatic stem cells in regenerative medicine. Adult human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) derived from bone marrow have the pluripotency to differentiate into cells of mesodermal origin, e.g., bone, cartilage, adipose, and muscle cells; they, therefore, have many potential clinical applications. On the other hand, stem cells possess a self-renewal capability similar to cancer cells. For safety evaluation of tissue engineered medical devices using normal hMSCs, in this study, we investigated the expression levels of several genes that affect cell proliferation in hMSCs during in vitro culture. We focused on the relationship between the hMSC proliferation and their transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) signaling during in vitro culture. The proliferation rate of hMSCs gradually decreased and cellular senescence was observed for about 3 months. The mRNA expressions of TGFbeta1, TGFbeta2, and TGFbeta receptor type I (TGFbetaRI) in hMSCs increased with the length of cell culture. The mRNA expressions of Smad3 increased, but those of c-myc and nucleostemin decreased with the length hMSCs were in in vitro culture. In addition, the expression profiles of the genes which regulate cellular proliferation in hMSCs were significantly different from those of cancer cells. In conclusion, hMSCs derived from bone marrow seldom underwent spontaneous transformation during 1-2 months in vitro culture for use in clinical applications. In hMSCs as well as in epithelial cells, growth might be controlled by the TGFbeta family signaling.

  8. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Environmental Restoration Program (ERP), Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF). Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-20

    This document was prepared to take the place of a Safety Evaluation Report since the Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF)and associated Baseline Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) File do not meet the requirements of a complete safety analysis documentation. Its purpose is to present in summary form the background of how the BSAF and Baseline TSR originated and a description of the process by which it was produced and approved for use in the Environmental Restoration Program.The BSAF is a facility safety reference document for INEL environmental restoration activities including environmental remediation of inactive waste sites and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of surplus facilities. The BSAF contains safety bases common to environmental restoration activities and guidelines for performing and documenting safety analysis. The common safety bases can be incorporated by reference into the safety analysis documentation prepared for individual environmental restoration activities with justification and any necessary revisions. The safety analysis guidelines in BSAF provide an accepted method for hazard analysis; analysis of normal, abnormal, and accident conditions; human factors analysis; and derivation of TSRS. The BSAF safety bases and guidelines are graded for environmental restoration activities.

  9. Generic Safety Issue (GSI) 171 -- Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) failure from a loop subsequent to LOCA: Assessment of plant vulnerability and CDF contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Guridi, G.; Samanta, P.; Chu, L.; Yang, J.

    1998-03-01

    Generic Safety Issue 171 (GSI-171), Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) from a Loss Of Offsite Power (LOOP) subsequent to a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA), deals with an accident sequence in which a LOCA is followed by a LOOP. This issue was later broadened to include a LOOP followed by a LOCA. Plants are designed to handle a simultaneous LOCA and LOOP. In this paper, the authors address the unique issues that are involved i LOCA with delayed LOOP (LOCA/LOOP) and LOOP with delayed LOCA (LOOP/LOCA) accident sequences. LOCA/LOOP accidents are analyzed further by developing event-tree/fault-tree models to quantify their contributions to core-damage frequency (CDF) in a pressurized water reactor and a boiling water reactor (PWR and a BWR). Engineering evaluation and judgments are used during quantification to estimate the unique conditions that arise in a LOCA/LOOP accident. The results show that the CDF contribution of such an accident can be a dominant contributor to plant risk, although BWRs are less vulnerable than PWRs.

  10. Automated System of Diagnostic Monitoring at Bureya HPP Hydraulic Engineering Installations: a New Level of Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Musyurka, A. V.

    2016-09-15

    This article presents the design, hardware, and software solutions developed and placed in service for the automated system of diagnostic monitoring (ASDM) for hydraulic engineering installations at the Bureya HPP, and assuring a reliable process for monitoring hydraulic engineering installations. Project implementation represents a timely solution of problems addressed by the hydraulic engineering installation diagnostics section.

  11. Integration of Behaviour-Based Safety Programme into Engineering Laboratories and Workshops Conceptually

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koo, Kean Eng; Zain, Ahmad Nurulazam Md; Zainal, Siti Rohaida Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this conceptual research framework is to develop and integrate a safety training model using a behaviour-based safety training programme into laboratories for young adults, during their tertiary education, particularly in technical and vocational education. Hence, this research will be investigating the outcome of basic safety…

  12. Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1987

    1987-01-01

    This section of the journal includes several short notes on science activities and materials for secondary schools. Activities and materials are included that relate to biology, microbiology, microcomputers, chemistry, and physics. (RH)

  13. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes experiments, demonstrations, activities and ideas relating to various fields of chemistry to be used in chemistry courses of secondary schools. Three experiments concerning differential thermal analysis are among these notes presented. (HM)

  14. Project Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Presents sixteen project notes developed by pupils of Chipping Norton School and Bristol Grammar School, in the United Kingdom. These Projects include eight biology A-level projects and eight Chemistry A-level projects. (HM)

  15. Blue Note

    ScienceCinema

    Murray Gibson

    2016-07-12

    Argonne's Murray Gibson is a physicist whose life's work includes finding patterns among atoms. The love of distinguishing patterns also drives Gibson as a musician and Blues enthusiast."Blue" notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale.The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting.

  16. Blue Note

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27

    Argonne's Murray Gibson is a physicist whose life's work includes finding patterns among atoms. The love of distinguishing patterns also drives Gibson as a musician and Blues enthusiast."Blue" notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale.The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting.

  17. Questioning the Role of Requirements Engineering in the Causes of Safety-Critical Software Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. W.; Holloway, C. M.

    2006-01-01

    Many software failures stem from inadequate requirements engineering. This view has been supported both by detailed accident investigations and by a number of empirical studies; however, such investigations can be misleading. It is often difficult to distinguish between failures in requirements engineering and problems elsewhere in the software development lifecycle. Further pitfalls arise from the assumption that inadequate requirements engineering is a cause of all software related accidents for which the system fails to meet its requirements. This paper identifies some of the problems that have arisen from an undue focus on the role of requirements engineering in the causes of major accidents. The intention is to provoke further debate within the emerging field of forensic software engineering.

  18. A new technology perspective and engineering tools approach for large, complex and distributed mission and safety critical systems components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrio, Miguel A., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Rapidly emerging technology and methodologies have out-paced the systems development processes' ability to use them effectively, if at all. At the same time, the tools used to build systems are becoming obsolescent themselves as a consequence of the same technology lag that plagues systems development. The net result is that systems development activities have not been able to take advantage of available technology and have become equally dependent on aging and ineffective computer-aided engineering tools. New methods and tools approaches are essential if the demands of non-stop and Mission and Safety Critical (MASC) components are to be met.

  19. A new technology perspective and engineering tools approach for large, complex and distributed mission and safety critical systems components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrio, Miguel A., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Rapidly emerging technology and methodologies have out-paced the systems development processes' ability to use them effectively, if at all. At the same time, the tools used to build systems are becoming obsolescent themselves as a consequence of the same technology lag that plagues systems development. The net result is that systems development activities have not been able to take advantage of available technology and have become equally dependent on aging and ineffective computer-aided engineering tools. New methods and tools approaches are essential if the demands of non-stop and Mission and Safety Critical (MASC) components are to be met.

  20. The registry case finding engine: an automated tool to identify cancer cases from unstructured, free-text pathology reports and clinical notes.

    PubMed

    Hanauer, David A; Miela, Gretchen; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Chang, Alfred E; Blayney, Douglas W

    2007-11-01

    The American College of Surgeons mandates the maintenance of a cancer registry for hospitals seeking accreditation. At the University of Michigan Health System, more than 90% of all registry patients are identified by manual review, a method common to many institutions. We hypothesized that an automated computer system could accurately perform this time- and labor-intensive task. We created a tool to automatically scan free-text medical documents for terms relevant to cancer. We developed custom-made lists containing approximately 2,500 terms and phrases and 800 SNOMED codes. Text is processed by the Case Finding Engine (CaFE), and relevant terms are highlighted for review by a registrar and used to populate the registry database. We tested our system by comparing results from the CaFE to those by trained registrars who read through 2,200 pathology reports and marked relevant cases for the registry. The clinical documentation (eg, electronic chart notes) of an additional 476 patients was also reviewed by registrars and compared with the automated process by the CaFE. For pathology reports, the sensitivity for automated case identification was 100%, but specificity was 85.0%. For clinical documentation, sensitivity was 100% and specificity was 73.7%. Types of errors made by the CaFE were categorized to direct additional improvements. Use of the CaFE has resulted in a considerable increase in the number of cases added to the registry each month. The system has been well accepted by our registrars. CaFE can improve the accuracy and efficiency of tumor registry personnel and helps ensure that cancer cases are not overlooked.

  1. National Ignition Facility start-up/operations engineering and special equipment construction health and safety plan

    SciTech Connect

    Huddleston, P C

    1998-05-08

    This document sets forth the responsibilities, interfaces, guidelines, rules, policy, and regulations for all workers involved in the S/O and SE construction, installation, and acceptance testing. This document is enforced from the first day that S/O and SE workers set foot on the NIF construction site until the end of the Project at Critical Decision 4. This document is applicable only to site activities, which are defined as those that occur within the perimeter of the fenced-off NIF construction zone and the Target Chamber Assembly Area (Helipad). The associated Special Equipment laydown and construction support areas listed in Appendix B are not under this plan; their safety provisions are discussed in the Appendix. Prototype and other support activities, such as the Amplifier Laboratory and Frame Assembly Unit assembly area, are not included in this plan. After completion of the Operational Readiness Review, the Facility Safety Procedure, Operational Safety Requirements, and Operational Safety Procedures are the governing safety documents for the operating facility. The S/O and SE project elements are required to implement measures that create a universal awareness of and promote safe job practices at the site. This includes all Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, University of Rochester, supplement labor organization, and subcontractor employees; visitors; and guests serving the S/O and SE effort.

  2. 46 CFR 62.35-50 - Tabulated monitoring and safety control requirements for specific systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Gas turbine (8) (8) (8) (8) (5) Engines and turbines Jacking/turning gear Engaged (8) Fuel oil (9) (9... instrumentation, alarms, and safety controls required for specific types of systems are listed in Table 62.35-50...) System Service Instrumentation Alarm Safety control Notes Main (Propulsion) boiler (1) (1) (1) (2)...

  3. The effectiveness of insurer-supported safety and health engineering controls in reducing workers' compensation claims and costs.

    PubMed

    Wurzelbacher, Steven J; Bertke, Stephen J; Lampl, Michael P; Bushnell, P Timothy; Meyers, Alysha R; Robins, David C; Al-Tarawneh, Ibraheem S

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a program in which a workers' compensation (WC) insurer provided matching funds to insured employers to implement safety/health engineering controls. Pre- and post-intervention WC metrics were compiled for the employees designated as affected by the interventions within 468 employers for interventions occurring from 2003 to 2009. Poisson, two-part, and linear regression models with repeated measures were used to evaluate differences in pre- and post-data, controlling for time trends independent of the interventions. For affected employees, total WC claim frequency rates (both medical-only and lost-time claims) decreased 66%, lost-time WC claim frequency rates decreased 78%, WC paid cost per employee decreased 81%, and WC geometric mean paid claim cost decreased 30% post-intervention. Reductions varied by employer size, specific industry, and intervention type. The insurer-supported safety/health engineering control program was effective in reducing WC claims and costs for affected employees. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The Effectiveness of Insurer-Supported Safety and Health Engineering Controls in Reducing Workers’ Compensation Claims and Costs

    PubMed Central

    Wurzelbacher, Steven J.; Bertke, Stephen J.; Lampl, Michael P.; Bushnell, P. Timothy; Meyers, Alysha R.; Robins, David C.; Al-Tarawneh, Ibraheem S.

    2015-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the effectiveness of a program in which a workers’ compensation (WC) insurer provided matching funds to insured employers to implement safety/health engineering controls. Methods Pre- and post-intervention WC metrics were compiled for the employees designated as affected by the interventions within 468 employers for interventions occurring from 2003 to 2009. Poisson, two-part, and linear regression models with repeated measures were used to evaluate differences in pre- and post-data, controlling for time trends independent of the interventions. Results For affected employees, total WC claim frequency rates (both medical-only and lost-time claims) decreased 66%, lost-time WC claim frequency rates decreased 78%, WC paid cost per employee decreased 81%, and WC geometric mean paid claim cost decreased 30% post-intervention. Reductions varied by employer size, specific industry, and intervention type. Conclusions The insurer-supported safety/health engineering control program was effective in reducing WC claims and costs for affected employees. PMID:25223846

  5. Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Presented are 27 science activities for secondary school science instruction. Topic areas include microbiology, botany, biochemistry, genetics, safety, earthquakes, problem solving, electricity, heat, solutions, mechanics, quantum mechanics, flame tests, and molecular structure. (CW)

  6. Aircraft Design Considerations to Meet One Engine Inoperative (OEI) Safety Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Commercial airlines are obligated to operate such that an aircraft can suffer an engine failure at any point in its mission and terminate the flight without an accident. Only minimal aircraft damage is allowable, such as brake replacement due to very heavy application, or an engine inspection and/or possible removal due to use of an emergency rating. Such performance criteria are often referred to as zero exposure, referring to zero accident exposure to an engine failure. The critical mission segment for meeting one engine inoperative (OEI) criteria is takeoff. For a given weight, wind, and ambient condition, fixed wing aircraft require a balanced field length. This is the longer of the distance to take off if an engine fails at a predetermined critical point in the takeoff profile, or the distance to reject the takeoff and brake to a stop. Rotorcraft have requirements for horizontal takeoff procedures that are equivalent to a balanced field length requirements for fixed wing aircraft. Rotorcraft also perform vertical procedures where no runway or heliport distance is available. These were developed primarily for elevated heliports as found on oil rigs or rooftops. They are also used for ground level operations as might be found at heliports at the end of piers or other confined areas.

  7. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In this issue's "Classroom Notes" section, the following papers are discussed: (1) "Constructing a line segment whose length is equal to the measure of a given angle" (W. Jacob and T. J. Osler); (2) "Generating functions for the powers of Fibonacci sequences" (D. Terrana and H. Chen); (3) "Evaluation of mean and variance integrals without…

  8. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents information on the teaching of nutrition (including new information relating to many current O-level syllabi) and part 16 of a reading list for A- and S-level biology. Also includes a note on using earthworms as a source of material for teaching meiosis. (JN)

  9. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In this issue's "Classroom Notes" section, the following papers are discussed: (1) "Constructing a line segment whose length is equal to the measure of a given angle" (W. Jacob and T. J. Osler); (2) "Generating functions for the powers of Fibonacci sequences" (D. Terrana and H. Chen); (3) "Evaluation of mean and variance integrals without…

  10. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents information on the teaching of nutrition (including new information relating to many current O-level syllabi) and part 16 of a reading list for A- and S-level biology. Also includes a note on using earthworms as a source of material for teaching meiosis. (JN)

  11. Conference Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Pat

    1996-01-01

    Analyzes some of the comments offered by biology teachers concerning dissection in the classroom. Some teachers no longer do dissection, whereas others say that a number of students in every class want to dissect. Discusses problems noted in teachers' and other educators' attitudes as well as possible misinterpretations of students' attitudes by…

  12. Editor's note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umapathy, Siva

    2017-01-01

    This is an editor's note related to the publication 'Biologically active and thermally stable polymeric Schiff base and its metal polychelates: Their synthesis and spectral aspects' by Raza Rasool and Sumaiya Hasnain, which appeared in Spectrochimica Acta Part A: Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy 148 (2015) 435-443.

  13. Editor's Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smetana, Judith G.

    1994-01-01

    Introduces the articles in this journal issue, noting the burgeoning interest in the roots of parental beliefs, values, and goals. Highlights thematic continuities among the otherwise diverse research approaches presented, for example, synthesis of different theoretical perspectives of parent beliefs, or the context in which parental beliefs…

  14. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In this issue's "Classroom Notes" section, the following papers are described: (1) "Sequences of Definite Integrals" by T. Dana-Picard; (2) "Structural Analysis of Pythagorean Monoids" by M.-Q Zhan and J. Tong; (3) "A Random Walk Phenomenon under an Interesting Stopping Rule" by S. Chakraborty; (4) "On Some Confidence Intervals for Estimating the…

  15. Apparatus Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Bruce G., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    This collection of notes describes (1) an optoelectronic apparatus for classroom demonstrations of mechanical laws, (2) a more efficient method for demonstrated nuclear chain reactions using electrically energized "traps" and ping-pong balls, and (3) an inexpensive demonstration for qualitative analysis of temperature-dependent resistance. (CS)

  16. Environment, Safety and Health progress assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The ES&H Progress Assessments are part of the Department`s continuous improvement process throughout DOE and its contractor organizations. The purpose of the INEL ES&H Progress Assessment is to provide the Department with concise independent information on the following: (1) change in culture and attitude related to ES&H activities; (2) progress and effectiveness of the ES&H corrective actions resulting from previous Tiger Team Assessments; (3) adequacy and effectiveness of the ES&H self-assessment programs of the DOE line organizations and the site management and operating contractor; and (4) effectiveness of DOE and contractor management structures, resources, and systems to effectively address ES&H problems. It is not intended that this Progress Assessment be a comprehensive compliance assessments of ES&H activities. The points of reference for assessing programs at the INEL were, for the most part, the 1991 INEL Tiger Team Assessment, the INEL Corrective Action Plan, and recent appraisals and self-assessments of INEL. Horizontal and vertical reviews of the following programmatic areas were conducted: Management: Corrective action program; self-assessment; oversight; directives, policies, and procedures; human resources management; and planning, budgeting, and resource allocation. Environment: Air quality management, surface water management, groundwater protection, and environmental radiation. Safety and Health: Construction safety, worker safety and OSHA, maintenance, packaging and transportation, site/facility safety review, and industrial hygiene.

  17. Engineering Safety- and Security-Related Requirements for Software-Intensive Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-30

    malicious Agents ( humans , systems , and the environment) • Safety Risks are kept acceptably low • The preceding Problems are Prevented, Detected...consequence mitigated • Threats (i.e., Threatening Conditions) are eliminated or mitigated: — System Vulnerabilities — Malicious Agents ( humans , systems ...Agent (Security) Malware Non-malicious Human Agent User System Developer System Operator System Maintainer Foreign Government Cracker Disgruntled

  18. Using human factors engineering to improve patient safety in the cardiovascular operating room.

    PubMed

    Gurses, Ayse P; Martinez, Elizabeth A; Bauer, Laura; Kim, George; Lubomski, Lisa H; Marsteller, Jill A; Pennathur, Priyadarshini R; Goeschel, Chris; Pronovost, Peter J; Thompson, David

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant medical advances, cardiac surgery remains a high risk procedure. Sub-optimal work system design characteristics can contribute to the risks associated with cardiac surgery. However, hazards due to work system characteristics have not been identified in the cardiovascular operating room (CVOR) in sufficient detail to guide improvement efforts. The purpose of this study was to identify and categorize hazards (anything that has the potential to cause a preventable adverse patient safety event) in the CVOR. An interdisciplinary research team used prospective hazard identification methods including direct observations, contextual inquiry, and photographing to collect data in 5 hospitals for a total 22 cardiac surgeries. We performed thematic analysis of the qualitative data guided by a work system model. 60 categories of hazards such as practice variations, high workload, non-compliance with evidence-based guidelines, not including clinicians' in medical device purchasing decisions were found. Results indicated that hazards are common in cardiac surgery and should be eliminated or mitigated to improve patient safety. To improve patient safety in the CVOR, efforts should focus on creating a culture of safety, increasing compliance with evidence based infection control practices, improving communication and teamwork, and designing better tools and technologies through partnership among all stakeholders.

  19. Current state of nuclear fuel cycles in nuclear engineering and trends in their development according to the environmental safety requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vislov, I. S.; Pischulin, V. P.; Kladiev, S. N.; Slobodyan, S. M.

    2016-08-01

    The state and trends in the development of nuclear fuel cycles in nuclear engineering, taking into account the ecological aspects of using nuclear power plants, are considered. An analysis of advantages and disadvantages of nuclear engineering, compared with thermal engineering based on organic fuel types, was carried out. Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) reprocessing is an important task in the nuclear industry, since fuel unloaded from modern reactors of any type contains a large amount of radioactive elements that are harmful to the environment. On the other hand, the newly generated isotopes of uranium and plutonium should be reused to fabricate new nuclear fuel. The spent nuclear fuel also includes other types of fission products. Conditions for SNF handling are determined by ecological and economic factors. When choosing a certain handling method, one should assess these factors at all stages of its implementation. There are two main methods of SNF handling: open nuclear fuel cycle, with spent nuclear fuel assemblies (NFAs) that are held in storage facilities with their consequent disposal, and closed nuclear fuel cycle, with separation of uranium and plutonium, their purification from fission products, and use for producing new fuel batches. The development of effective closed fuel cycles using mixed uranium-plutonium fuel can provide a successful development of the nuclear industry only under the conditions of implementation of novel effective technological treatment processes that meet strict requirements of environmental safety and reliability of process equipment being applied. The diversity of technological processes is determined by different types of NFA devices and construction materials being used, as well as by the composition that depends on nuclear fuel components and operational conditions for assemblies in the nuclear power reactor. This work provides an overview of technological processes of SNF treatment and methods of handling of nuclear fuel

  20. Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This report contains health and safety information relating to the chemicals that have been identified in the mixed waste streams at the Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Information is summarized in two summary sections--one for health considerations and one for safety considerations. Detailed health and safety information is presented in material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each chemical.

  1. Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Part 2, Chemical constituents

    SciTech Connect

    Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This report contains health and safety information relating to the chemicals that have been identified in the mixed waste streams at the Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Information is summarized in two summary sections--one for health considerations and one for safety considerations. Detailed health and safety information is presented in material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each chemical.

  2. Engineering Infrastructures: Problems of Safety and Security in the Russian Federation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhutov, Nikolay A.; Reznikov, Dmitry O.; Petrov, Vitaly P.

    Modern society cannot exist without stable and reliable engineering infrastructures (EI), whose operation is vital for any national economy. These infrastructures include energy, transportation, water and gas supply systems, telecommunication and cyber systems, etc. Their performance is commensurate with storing and processing huge amounts of information, energy and hazardous substances. Ageing infrastructures are deteriorating — with operating conditions declining from normal to emergency and catastrophic. The complexity of engineering infrastructures and their interdependence with other technical systems makes them vulnerable to emergency situations triggered by natural and manmade catastrophes or terrorist attacks.

  3. Books Noted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Edward J.

    1999-10-01

    The Colloidal Domain: Where Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and Technology Meet, 2nd edition

    D. Fennell Evans and Hakan Wennerstroem. Advances in Interfacial Engineering Series. Wiley-VCH: New York, 1999. xl + 632 pp. ISBN 0-471-24247-0. 89.95.

    Commercial Nuclear Power: Assuring Safety for the Future

    Charles B. Ramsey and Mohammed Modarres. Wiley-Interscience: New York, 1998. xxviii + 508 pp. ISBN 0-471-29186-2. 79.95.

    Advances in Medicinal Chemistry, Vol. 4

    Bruce E. Maryanoff and Allen B. Reitz, Eds. JAI Press: Stamford, CT, 1999. ISBN 1-7623-0064-7. 109.50.

    Advances in Strained and Interesting Organic Molecules, Vol. 7

    Brian Halton, Ed. JAI Press: Stamford, CT, 1999. xii + 259 pp. ISBN 0-7623-0530-4. 109.50.

    Advances in Electron Transfer Chemistry, Vol. 6

    Patrick S. Mariano, Ed. JAI Press: Stamford, CT, 1999. x + 171 pp. ISBN 0-7623-0213-5. 109.50.

    Automating Science and Engineering Laboratories with Visual Basic

    Mark F. Russo and Martin M. Echols. Wiley-Interscience Series on Laboratory Automation. Wiley-Interscience: New York, 1999. xx + 355 pp. ISBN 0-471-25493-2. 49.95.

    Plantwide Process Control

    Kelvin T. Erickson and John L. Hedrick. Wiley Series in Chemical Engineering. Wiley-Interscience: New York, 1999. xii + 547 pp. ISBN 0-471-17835-7. 89.95.

    Heme Peroxidases

    H. Brian Dunford. Wiley-VCH: New York, 1999. xiii + 507 pp. ISBN 0-471-24244-6. 195.00.

    Industrial Ecology: Environmental Chemistry and Hazardous Wastes

    Stanley E. Manahan. Lewis: Boca Raton, FL, 1999. 318 pp. ISBN 1-56670-381-6. 69.95.

    Reviews in Computational Chemistry, Vol. 13

    Kenny B. Lipkowitz and Donald B. Boyd. Wiley-VCH: New York, 1999

  4. Building Models to Better Understand the Importance of Cost versus Safety in Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumrall, William; Mott, Michael

    2010-01-01

    While some disasters involving engineered structures are due to events in nature (e.g., tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes), others may be caused by inadequate materials, design flaws, and poor maintenance. These catastrophes result in the loss of human lives and cost billions of dollars. In the set of lessons described here, students design a…

  5. Building Models to Better Understand the Importance of Cost versus Safety in Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumrall, William; Mott, Michael

    2010-01-01

    While some disasters involving engineered structures are due to events in nature (e.g., tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes), others may be caused by inadequate materials, design flaws, and poor maintenance. These catastrophes result in the loss of human lives and cost billions of dollars. In the set of lessons described here, students design a…

  6. Application note :

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Thomas V.

    2013-08-01

    The development of the XyceTM Parallel Electronic Simulator has focused entirely on the creation of a fast, scalable simulation tool, and has not included any schematic capture or data visualization tools. This application note will describe how to use the open source schematic capture tool gschem and its associated netlist creation tool gnetlist to create basic circuit designs for Xyce, and how to access advanced features of Xyce that are not directly supported by either gschem or gnetlist.

  7. Systems Engineering of Electric and Hybrid Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, D. W.; Levin, R. R.

    1986-01-01

    Technical paper notes systems engineering principles applied to development of electric and hybrid vehicles such that system performance requirements support overall program goal of reduced petroleum consumption. Paper discusses iterative design approach dictated by systems analyses. In addition to obvious peformance parameters of range, acceleration rate, and energy consumption, systems engineering also considers such major factors as cost, safety, reliability, comfort, necessary supporting infrastructure, and availability of materials.

  8. Systems Engineering of Electric and Hybrid Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, D. W.; Levin, R. R.

    1986-01-01

    Technical paper notes systems engineering principles applied to development of electric and hybrid vehicles such that system performance requirements support overall program goal of reduced petroleum consumption. Paper discusses iterative design approach dictated by systems analyses. In addition to obvious peformance parameters of range, acceleration rate, and energy consumption, systems engineering also considers such major factors as cost, safety, reliability, comfort, necessary supporting infrastructure, and availability of materials.

  9. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Included is information regarding: sucrose dehydration by sulphuric acid; an example of school-industry link in studying zinc oxide production; viscous flow in inorganic silicate glass; construction of a peristaltic pump; electrolysis; carbon dioxide preparation; electrophoresis; safety in using hydrogen and sulphuric acid; and approaches to…

  10. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Included is information regarding: sucrose dehydration by sulphuric acid; an example of school-industry link in studying zinc oxide production; viscous flow in inorganic silicate glass; construction of a peristaltic pump; electrolysis; carbon dioxide preparation; electrophoresis; safety in using hydrogen and sulphuric acid; and approaches to…

  11. PRACA Enhancement Pilot Study Report: Engineering for Complex Systems Program (formerly Design for Safety), DFS-IC-0006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korsmeyer, David; Schreiner, John

    2002-01-01

    This technology evaluation report documents the findings and recommendations of the Engineering for Complex Systems Program (formerly Design for Safety) PRACA Enhancement Pilot Study of the Space Shuttle Program's (SSP's) Problem Reporting and Corrective Action (PRACA) System. A team at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) performed this Study. This Study was initiated as a follow-on to the NASA chartered Shuttle Independent Assessment Team (SIAT) review (performed in the Fall of 1999) which identified deficiencies in the current PRACA implementation. The Pilot Study was launched with an initial qualitative assessment and technical review performed during January 2000 with the quantitative formal Study (the subject of this report) started in March 2000. The goal of the PRACA Enhancement Pilot Study is to evaluate and quantify the technical aspects of the SSP PRACA systems and recommend enhancements to address deficiencies and in preparation for future system upgrades.

  12. Concerns related to Safety Management of Engineered Nanomaterials in research environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groso, A.; Meyer, Th

    2013-04-01

    Since the rise of occupational safety and health research on nanomaterials a lot of progress has been made in generating health effects and exposure data. However, when detailed quantitative risk analysis is in question, more research is needed, especially quantitative measures of workers exposure and standards to categorize toxicity/hazardousness data. In the absence of dose-response relationships and quantitative exposure measurements, control banding (CB) has been widely adopted by OHS community as a pragmatic tool in implementing a risk management strategy based on a precautionary approach. Being in charge of health and safety in a Swiss university, where nanomaterials are largely used and produced, we are also faced with the challenge related to nanomaterials' occupational safety. In this work, we discuss the field application of an in-house risk management methodology similar to CB as well as some other methodologies. The challenges and issues related to the process will be discussed. Since exact data on nanomaterials hazardousness are missing for most of the situations, we deduce that the outcome of the analysis for a particular process is essentially the same with a simple methodology that determines only exposure potential and the one taking into account the hazardousness of ENPs. It is evident that when reliable data on hazardousness factors (as surface chemistry, solubility, carcinogenicity, toxicity etc.) will be available, more differentiation will be possible in determining the risk for different materials. On the protective measures side, all CB methodologies are inclined to overprotection side, only that some of them suggest comprehensive protective/preventive measures and others remain with basic advices. The implementation and control of protective measures in research environment will also be discussed.

  13. Engineering, safety, and economic evaluations of ASPIRE (Advanced Safe Pool Immersed REactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, D.K.; Gordon, J.; Piet, S.; Cheng, E.T.; Klein, A.

    1988-02-01

    A preconceptual design of a tokamak fusion reactor concept called ASPIRE (Advanced Safe Pool Immersed REactor) has been developed. This concept provides many of the attractive features that are needed to enhance the capability of fusion to become the power generation technology for the 21st century. Specifically, these features are: inherent safety, low pressure, environmental compatibility, moderate unit size, high availability, high thermal efficiency, simplicity, low radioactive inventory, Class C radioactive waste disposal, and low cost of electricity. We have based ASPIRE on a second stability tokamak. However, the concept is equally applicable to a first stability tokamak or to most other magnetic fusion systems.

  14. 48 CFR 836.579 - Special notes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special notes. 836.579... OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 836.579 Special notes. The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 852.236-91, Special notes, in solicitations and...

  15. 48 CFR 836.579 - Special notes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special notes. 836.579... OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 836.579 Special notes. The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 852.236-91, Special notes, in solicitations and...

  16. Teaching Notes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-07-01

    If you would like to contribute a teaching note for any of these sections please contact ped@iop.org Contents: LET'S INVESTIGATE: Bows and arrows STARTING OUT: A late start ON THE MAP: A South African school making a world of difference TECHNICAL TRIMMINGS: May the force be with you an easily constructed force sensor Modelling Ultrasound A-scanning with the Pico Technology ADC-200 Virtual Instrument PHYSICS ON A SHOESTRING: Sugar cube radioactivity models CURIOSITY: Euler's disk MY WAY: Why heavy things don't fall faster

  17. Editor's Note.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Bruce

    2011-05-27

    The Research Article "A bacterium that can grow by using arsenic instead of phosphorus" by F. Wolfe-Simon et al., published online 2 December 2010, was the subject of extensive discussion and criticism following its online publication. Science received a wide range of correspondence that raised specific concerns about the Research Article's methods and interpretations. Eight Technical Comments that represent the main concerns, as well as a Technical Response by Wolfe-Simon et al., are published online in Science Express at the addresses listed in this note. They have been peer-reviewed and revised according to Science's standard procedure.

  18. Color-coding and human factors engineering to improve patient safety characteristics of paper-based emergency department clinical documentation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Leo; Boss, Robert M; Gibbs, Frantz J; Goldlust, Eric; Hennedy, Michelle M; Monti, James E; Siegel, Nathan A

    2011-01-01

    Investigators studied an emergency department (ED) physical chart system and identified inconsistent, small font labeling; a single-color scheme; and an absence of human factors engineering (HFE) cues. A case study and description of the methodology with which surrogate measures of chart-related patient safety were studied and subsequently used to reduce latent hazards are presented. Medical records present a challenge to patient safety in EDs. Application of HFE can improve specific aspects of existing medical chart organization systems as they pertain to patient safety in acute care environments. During 10 random audits over 5 consecutive days (573 data points), 56 (9.8%) chart binders (range 0.0-23%) were found to be either misplaced or improperly positioned relative to other chart binders; 12 (21%) were in the critical care area. HFE principles were applied to develop an experimental chart binder system with alternating color-based chart groupings, simple and prominent identifiers, and embedded visual cues. Post-intervention audits revealed significant reductions in chart binder location problems overall (p < 0.01), for Urgent Care A and B pods (6.4% to 1.2%; p < 0.05), Fast Track C pod (19.3% to 0.0%; p < 0.05) and Behavioral/Substance Abuse D pod (15.7% to 0.0%; p < 0.05) areas of the ED. The critical care room area did not display an improvement (11.4% to 13.2%; p = 0.40). Application of HFE methods may aid the development, assessment, and modification of acute care clinical environments through evidence-based design methodologies and contribute to safe patient care delivery.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING GUIDANCE FOR SAFETY EVALUATIONS OF ADVANCED REACTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    O'HARA, J.; PERSENSKY, J.; SZABO, A.

    2006-10-01

    Advanced reactors are expected to be based on a concept of operations that is different from what is currently used in today's reactors. Therefore, regulatory staff may need new tools, developed from the best available technical bases, to support licensing evaluations. The areas in which new review guidance may be needed and the efforts underway to address the needs will be discussed. Our preliminary results focus on some of the technical issues to be addressed in three areas for which new guidance may be developed: automation and control, operations under degraded conditions, and new human factors engineering methods and tools.

  20. The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center - A Resource for Training the Next Generation Engineer

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, Bernadette Lugue

    2009-01-01

    RSICC came into existence in 1962 largely as a result of the report made by Alvin Weinbergand others to the Executive Office of the President of the United States on the 'information explosion' and the role of the technical community and government in its preservation and use. This report became known as the Weinberg Report. Its theme was 'Information is an integral part of science; without proper handling of information, science cannot function.' The report recommended the establishment of specialized information centers -'to digest and evaluate -to make condensations and reviews -thus saving the time of the individual research scientist and engineer.'

  1. ESU safety and the clinical engineer: purchasing, preventive maintenance, incident investigation.

    PubMed

    Knickerbocker, G G

    1980-01-01

    The clinical engineer and his or her staff, by virtue of their responsibility for the equipment control program, can make a significant contribution in assuring that electrosurgical units and their accessories are effective and cause minimal harm to patients and staff. This is accomplished not only through the preventive maintenance/periodic inspection/repair functions that they are so well known for providing, but also through their active participation in the process of equipment selection and in the investigation of incidents suspected of arising from the use of these devices. This article outlines specific responsibilities in each of these three areas, including a detailed periodic inspection program for electrosurgical units.

  2. The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) GN and C Technical Discipline Team (TDT): Its Purpose, Practices and Experiences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennehy, Cornelius J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper will briefly define the vision, mission, and purpose of the NESC organization. The role of the GN&C TDT will then be described in detail along with an overview of how this team operates and engages in its objective engineering and safety assessments of critical NASA projects. This paper will then describe key issues and findings from several of the recent GN&C-related independent assessments and consultations performed and/or supported by the NESC GN&C TDT. Among the examples of the GN&C TDT s work that will be addressed in this paper are the following: the Space Shuttle Orbiter Repair Maneuver (ORM) assessment, the ISS CMG failure root cause assessment, the Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technologies (DART) spacecraft mishap consultation, the Phoenix Mars lander thruster-based controllability consultation, the NASA in-house Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Smart Buyer assessment and the assessment of key engineering considerations for the Design, Development, Test & Evaluation (DDT&E) of robust and reliable GN&C systems for human-rated spacecraft.

  3. Noise abatement and traffic safety: The trade-off of quieter engines and pavements on vehicle detection.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, C; Freitas, E; Ferreira, J P; Raimundo, I D; Santos, J A

    2013-03-01

    Road traffic sounds are a major source of noise pollution in urban areas. But recent developments such as low noise pavements and hybrid/electric engine vehicles cast an optimistic outlook over such an environmental problem. However, it can be argued that engine, tire, and road noise could be relevant sources of information to avoid road traffic conflicts and accidents. In this paper, we analyze the potential trade-offs of traffic-noise abatement approaches in an experimental study, focusing for the first time on the impact and interaction of relevant factors such as pavement type, vehicle type, listener's age, and background noise, on vehicle detection levels. Results reveal that vehicle and pavement type significantly affect vehicle detection. Age is a significant factor, as both younger and older people exhibit lower detection levels of incoming vehicles. Low noise pavements combined with all-electric and hybrid vehicles might pose a severe threat to the safety of vulnerable road users. All factors interact simultaneously, and vehicle detection is best predicted by the loudness signal-to-noise ratio. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Spores of Clostridium engineered for clinical efficacy and safety cause regression and cure of tumors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Heap, John T; Theys, Jan; Ehsaan, Muhammad; Kubiak, Aleksandra M; Dubois, Ludwig; Paesmans, Kim; Mellaert, Lieve Van; Knox, Richard; Kuehne, Sarah A; Lambin, Phillipe; Minton, Nigel P

    2014-04-15

    Spores of some species of the strictly anaerobic bacteria Clostridium naturally target and partially lyse the hypoxic cores of tumors, which tend to be refractory to conventional therapies. The anti-tumor effect can be augmented by engineering strains to convert a non-toxic prodrug into a cytotoxic drug specifically at the tumor site by expressing a prodrug-converting enzyme (PCE). Safe doses of the favored prodrug CB1954 lead to peak concentrations of 6.3 µM in patient sera, but at these concentration(s) known nitroreductase (NTR) PCEs for this prodrug show low activity. Furthermore, efficacious and safe Clostridium strains that stably express a PCE have not been reported. Here we identify a novel nitroreductase from Neisseria meningitidis, NmeNTR, which is able to activate CB1954 at clinically-achievable serum concentrations. An NmeNTR expression cassette, which does not contain an antibiotic resistance marker, was stably localized to the chromosome of Clostridium sporogenes using a new integration method, and the strain was disabled for safety and containment by making it a uracil auxotroph. The efficacy of Clostridium-Directed Enzyme Prodrug Therapy (CDEPT) using this system was demonstrated in a mouse xenograft model of human colon carcinoma. Substantial tumor suppression was achieved, and several animals were cured. These encouraging data suggest that the novel enzyme and strain engineering approach represent a promising platform for the clinical development of CDEPT.

  5. Insulin pump safety meeting: summary report.

    PubMed

    Klonoff, David C; Reyes, Juliet S

    2009-03-01

    Diabetes Technology Society convened a panel of insulin pump experts in Bethesda, Maryland, on November 12, 2008, at the request of the Food and Drug Administration. The group consisted of physicians, nurses, diabetes educators, and engineers from across the United States. The panel members (1) discussed safety features of insulin pump therapy and (2) recommended adjustments to current insulin pump design and use to enhance overall safety. Software and hardware features of insulin pumps were analyzed from engineering, medical, nursing, and pump-user perspectives. The meeting was divided into four sections: (1) Engineering Safety-Designing Software and Hardware for Insulin Pump Therapy; (2) Patient Safety-Selecting Patients and Clinical Settings for Insulin Pump Use; (3) Clinical Safety-Determining and Delivering Insulin Dosages Using Insulin Pump Therapy; and (4) Personal Experiences-A Panel Discussion about Insulin Pump Safety. Six aspects of insulin pump technology were noted to present potential safety problems: (1) software, (2) wireless communication, (3) hardware, (4) alarms, (5) human factors, and (6) bolus-dose calculation. There was consensus among meeting participants that insulin pump therapy is beneficial in patients of all ages and that insulin pump safety must be assured through careful regulation.

  6. The 5th World Congress of chemical engineering: Technologies critical to a changing World. Volume II: Agriculture, food biotechnology biomedical electric power process safety

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Volume 2 of the proceedings from the 5th World Congress of Chemical Engineering covers four major topic areas from which papers were selected for the database: Agriculture, Food; Biotechnology; Electric Power, and Process Safety. Pertinent subtopics include: Renewable Resource Engineering; Special Processes in the Food Industry; Advances in Metabolite Production; Advances in Fermentation and Cell Culture Engineering; Coal and Nuclear Central Station Power Plants; Large Natural Gas Fired Power Stations; Distributed Generation; Potential Impact of Biomass Energy; and Chemical Hazards in Plant Design. 29 papers were selected from Volume 1 for the database.

  7. PFR/Treat Safety Experiments: HEDL Transient Test Program Engineering Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.A.; Metcalf, I.L.; Myron, D.L.

    1981-03-01

    The purpose of the PFR/TREAT Safety Test Program is to obtain experimental data of fuel pin behavior during hypothetical, unprotected accidents for cores of large liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors. The steady state and transient experiments, which will be performed under the joint program, are to be as prototypic of fast reactor performance as is possible. The specific objectives of this document are: (1) dictate the activities and responsibilities for the HEDL Transient Test Program; (2) specify the technical requirements for the CO4, CO5, CO6 and CO7 test train (SPTTs); and (3) specify the technical requirement for the CO6 and CO7 Single Pin Test Loops (SPTLs). Specific requirements for single pin loop experiments beyond CO7 and multi pin experiments will be covered in the addenda to this test plan.

  8. Pre-Clinical Study of a Novel Recombinant Botulinum Neurotoxin Derivative Engineered for Improved Safety

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Cintron, Edwin; Tenezaca, Luis; Angeles, Christopher; Syngkon, Aurelia; Liublinska, Victoria; Ichtchenko, Konstantin; Band, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Cyto-012 is a recombinant derivative of Botulinum neurotoxin Type A (BoNT/A). It primarily differs from wild type (wt) BoNT/A1 in that it incorporates two amino acid substitutions in the catalytic domain of the light chain (LC) metalloprotease (E224 > A and Y366 > A), designed to provide a safer clinical profile. Cyto-012 is specifically internalized into rat cortical and hippocampal neurons, and cleaves Synaptosomal-Associated Protein 25 (SNAP-25), the substrate of wt BoNT/A, but exhibits slower cleavage kinetics and therefore requires a higher absolute dose to exhibit pharmacologic activity. The pharmacodynamics of Cyto-012 and wt BoNT/A have similar onset and duration of action using the Digital Abduction Assay (DAS). Intramuscular LD50 values for Cyto-012 and wt BoNT/A respectively, were 0.63 ug (95% CI = 0.61, 0.66) and 6.22 pg (95% CI = 5.42, 7.02). ED50 values for Cyto-012 and wt BoNT/A were respectively, 0.030 ug (95% CI = 0.026, 0.034) and 0.592 pg (95% CI = 0.488, 0.696). The safety margin (intramuscular LD50/ED50 ratio) for Cyto-012 was found to be improved 2-fold relative to wt BoNT/A (p < 0.001). The DAS response to Cyto-012 was diminished when a second injection was administered 32 days after the first. These data suggest that the safety margin of BoNT/A can be improved by modulating their activity towards SNAP-25. PMID:27484492

  9. Pre-Clinical Study of a Novel Recombinant Botulinum Neurotoxin Derivative Engineered for Improved Safety.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Cintron, Edwin; Tenezaca, Luis; Angeles, Christopher; Syngkon, Aurelia; Liublinska, Victoria; Ichtchenko, Konstantin; Band, Philip

    2016-08-03

    Cyto-012 is a recombinant derivative of Botulinum neurotoxin Type A (BoNT/A). It primarily differs from wild type (wt) BoNT/A1 in that it incorporates two amino acid substitutions in the catalytic domain of the light chain (LC) metalloprotease (E224 > A and Y366 > A), designed to provide a safer clinical profile. Cyto-012 is specifically internalized into rat cortical and hippocampal neurons, and cleaves Synaptosomal-Associated Protein 25 (SNAP-25), the substrate of wt BoNT/A, but exhibits slower cleavage kinetics and therefore requires a higher absolute dose to exhibit pharmacologic activity. The pharmacodynamics of Cyto-012 and wt BoNT/A have similar onset and duration of action using the Digital Abduction Assay (DAS). Intramuscular LD50 values for Cyto-012 and wt BoNT/A respectively, were 0.63 ug (95% CI = 0.61, 0.66) and 6.22 pg (95% CI = 5.42, 7.02). ED50 values for Cyto-012 and wt BoNT/A were respectively, 0.030 ug (95% CI = 0.026, 0.034) and 0.592 pg (95% CI = 0.488, 0.696). The safety margin (intramuscular LD50/ED50 ratio) for Cyto-012 was found to be improved 2-fold relative to wt BoNT/A (p < 0.001). The DAS response to Cyto-012 was diminished when a second injection was administered 32 days after the first. These data suggest that the safety margin of BoNT/A can be improved by modulating their activity towards SNAP-25.

  10. Technical note: Erroneous data in {open_quotes}Nuclear Safety Guide, TID-7016, Revision 2,{close_quotes} NUREG/CR-0095, ORNL/NUREG/CSD-6 (1978)

    SciTech Connect

    Whitesides, G.E.

    1991-04-01

    Nuclear Safety Guide, TID-7016 Rev 2 was issued as NUREG/CR-0095 in 1978. Table 2.8 of this report has been found to contain errors. The table was designed to indicate configurations with effective multipliction factors of 0.95. Because of an error in configuration descriptions, some of the configurations have multiplication factors as high as 1.09. A corrected table is available from the undersigned, and Revision 3 of the report is being prepared. Norman L. Pruvost, LANL HSE-6, P. O. Box 1663, M/S-F691, Los Alamos, NM 87545.

  11. Airborne monitoring to distinguish engineered nanomaterials from incidental particles for environmental health and safety

    PubMed Central

    Peters, TM; Elzey, S; Johnson, R; Park, H; Grassian, VH; Maher, T; O'Shaughnessy, P

    2016-01-01

    Two methods were used to distinguish airborne engineered nanomaterials from other airborne particles in a facility that produces nano-structured lithium titanate metal oxide powder. The first method involved off-line analysis of filter samples collected with conventional respirable samplers at each of seven locations (six near production processes and one outdoors). Throughout most of the facility and outdoors, respirable mass concentrations were low (<0.050 mg m−3) and were attributed to particles other than the nanomaterial (<10% by mass titanium determined with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry). In contrast, in a single area with extensive material handling, mass concentrations were greatest (0.118 mg m−3) and contained up to 39% +/− 11% lithium titanium, indicating the presence of airborne nanomaterial. Analysis of the filter samples collected in this area by transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope revealed that the airborne nanomaterial was associated only with spherical aggregates (clusters of fused 10–80 nm nanoparticles) that were larger than 200 nm. This analysis also showed that nanoparticles in this area were the smallest particles of a larger distribution of submicrometer chain agglomerates likely from welding in an adjacent area of the facility. The second method used two, hand-held, direct-reading, battery-operated instruments to obtain a time series of very fine particle number (<300 nm), respirable mass, and total mass concentration, which were then related to activities within the area of extensive material handling. This activity-based monitoring showed that very fine particle number concentrations (<300 nm) had no apparent correlation to worker activities, but that sharp peaks in the respirable and total mass concentration coincided with loading a hopper and replacing nanomaterial collection bags. These findings were consistent with those from the filter-based method in that they

  12. The Research of Medical Safety Information Engineering in Hospital Application Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Hao; Fan, Zhang; Li-nong, Yu; Jie, Wang; Jun, Fei; Ping, Hao; Ya-wei, Shen; Yue-jin, Chang

    Objective-Explore and research the application effect of medical security information engineering in the hospital. Methods-Based on the real examples of the medical security hidden danger, the transportation module system of medical security is set up. By the all survival cycle's theory and IOP modeling method, four modules of structure model are developed, which are disposal of medical hidden danger. Results-The medical information system is developed, which includes four-in-one modules of structure model of integrated medical security transportation system, disputes evaluation system, protocol handling system, medical case analysis and handling system. And it is applied in the implementation of hospital management. Conclusions-The application of the research in the implementation of hospital management can find security hidden danger of hospital timely, the objective existence of medical disputes problems timely. And it can solve medical disputes timely and appropriately, and achieve ideal result, which is worth popularizing and applying in the hospital management.

  13. Editors' note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, Carsten; Feller, Alex; Schmidt, Wolfgang; von der Lühe, Oskar

    2012-11-01

    This topical issue of Astronomische Nachrichten/Astronomical Notes is a collection of reference articles covering the GREGOR solar telescope, its science capabilities, its subsystems, and its dedicated suite of instruments for high-resolution observations of the Sun. Because ground-based telescopes have life spans of several decades, it is only natural that they continuously reinvent themselves. Literally, the GREGOR telescope builds on the foundations of the venerable Gregory-Coudé Telescope (GCT) at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain. Acknowledging the fact that new discoveries in observational solar physics are driven by larger apertures to collect more photons and to scrutinize the Sun in finer detail, the GCT was decommissioned and the building was made available to the GREGOR project.

  14. Editors' note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-03-01

    The widespread eutrophication of coastal waters clearly involves increased nitrogen loads, in most cases with nitrogen derived from human activities on contributing watersheds. This has prompted regulators, managers, and other stakeholders to set standards for water quality that involve lowering nitrogen loads to estuaries and other coastal waters. To carry out the proscribed lowering of nitrogen loads there are a number of options. In many instances and sites with high human density and intense activity, advanced wastewater treatment plants are unavoidable, but such environmental engineering approaches are costly. There are many coastal zones with lower population densities where other, less costly alternative strategies might be less expensive and more attuned to "green" approaches.

  15. Editors’ Note

    PubMed Central

    COHN, ELLEN R.; CASON, JANA

    2016-01-01

    The Spring 2016 issue of the International Journal of Telerehabilitation (IJT) presents original and innovative work in three diverse sections: usability, intervention, and pedagogy, followed by a book review on teleaudiology. The contributors to this issue are notably multi-disciplinary and include an audiologist, computer scientists, engineers, an epidemiologist, occupational therapists, a rehabilitation counselor, a physician (physical medicine and rehabilitation), and speechlanguage pathologists. The common thread linking the Journal’s authors and their manuscripts, is excellence in telerehabilitation related innovation. PMID:27563385

  16. Optimization of a nanotechnology based antimicrobial platform for food safety applications using Engineered Water Nanostructures (EWNS)

    PubMed Central

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Vedantam, Pallavi; Cirenza, Caroline; McDevitt, James; Eleftheriadou, Mary; Leonard, Stephen S.; Demokritou, Philip

    2016-01-01

    A chemical free, nanotechnology-based, antimicrobial platform using Engineered Water Nanostructures (EWNS) was recently developed. EWNS have high surface charge, are loaded with reactive oxygen species (ROS), and can interact-with, and inactivate an array of microorganisms, including foodborne pathogens. Here, it was demonstrated that their properties during synthesis can be fine tuned and optimized to further enhance their antimicrobial potential. A lab based EWNS platform was developed to enable fine-tuning of EWNS properties by modifying synthesis parameters. Characterization of EWNS properties (charge, size and ROS content) was performed using state-of-the art analytical methods. Further their microbial inactivation potential was evaluated with food related microorganisms such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria innocua, Mycobacterium parafortuitum, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae inoculated onto the surface of organic grape tomatoes. The results presented here indicate that EWNS properties can be fine-tuned during synthesis resulting in a multifold increase of the inactivation efficacy. More specifically, the surface charge quadrupled and the ROS content increased. Microbial removal rates were microorganism dependent and ranged between 1.0 to 3.8 logs after 45 mins of exposure to an EWNS aerosol dose of 40,000 #/cm3. PMID:26875817

  17. Optimization of a nanotechnology based antimicrobial platform for food safety applications using Engineered Water Nanostructures (EWNS).

    PubMed

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Vedantam, Pallavi; Cirenza, Caroline; McDevitt, James; Eleftheriadou, Mary; Leonard, Stephen S; Demokritou, Philip

    2016-02-15

    A chemical free, nanotechnology-based, antimicrobial platform using Engineered Water Nanostructures (EWNS) was recently developed. EWNS have high surface charge, are loaded with reactive oxygen species (ROS), and can interact-with, and inactivate an array of microorganisms, including foodborne pathogens. Here, it was demonstrated that their properties during synthesis can be fine tuned and optimized to further enhance their antimicrobial potential. A lab based EWNS platform was developed to enable fine-tuning of EWNS properties by modifying synthesis parameters. Characterization of EWNS properties (charge, size and ROS content) was performed using state-of-the art analytical methods. Further their microbial inactivation potential was evaluated with food related microorganisms such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria innocua, Mycobacterium parafortuitum, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae inoculated onto the surface of organic grape tomatoes. The results presented here indicate that EWNS properties can be fine-tuned during synthesis resulting in a multifold increase of the inactivation efficacy. More specifically, the surface charge quadrupled and the ROS content increased. Microbial removal rates were microorganism dependent and ranged between 1.0 to 3.8 logs after 45 mins of exposure to an EWNS aerosol dose of 40,000 #/cm(3).

  18. Antibody-cytokine fusion proteins for treatment of cancer: engineering cytokines for improved efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Young, Patricia A; Morrison, Sherie L; Timmerman, John M

    2014-10-01

    The true potential of cytokine therapies in cancer treatment is limited by the inability to deliver optimal concentrations into tumor sites due to dose-limiting systemic toxicities. To maximize the efficacy of cytokine therapy, recombinant antibody-cytokine fusion proteins have been constructed by a number of groups to harness the tumor-targeting ability of monoclonal antibodies. The aim is to guide cytokines specifically to tumor sites where they might stimulate more optimal anti-tumor immune responses while avoiding the systemic toxicities of free cytokine therapy. Antibody-cytokine fusion proteins containing interleukin (IL)-2, IL-12, IL-21, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, and interferons (IFNs) α, β, and γ have been constructed and have shown anti-tumor activity in preclinical and early-phase clinical studies. Future priorities for development of this technology include optimization of tumor targeting, bioactivity of the fused cytokine, and choice of appropriate agents for combination therapies. This review is intended to serve as a framework for engineering an ideal antibody-cytokine fusion protein, focusing on previously developed constructs and their clinical trial results.

  19. Optimization of a nanotechnology based antimicrobial platform for food safety applications using Engineered Water Nanostructures (EWNS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Vedantam, Pallavi; Cirenza, Caroline; McDevitt, James; Eleftheriadou, Mary; Leonard, Stephen S.; Demokritou, Philip

    2016-02-01

    A chemical free, nanotechnology-based, antimicrobial platform using Engineered Water Nanostructures (EWNS) was recently developed. EWNS have high surface charge, are loaded with reactive oxygen species (ROS), and can interact-with, and inactivate an array of microorganisms, including foodborne pathogens. Here, it was demonstrated that their properties during synthesis can be fine tuned and optimized to further enhance their antimicrobial potential. A lab based EWNS platform was developed to enable fine-tuning of EWNS properties by modifying synthesis parameters. Characterization of EWNS properties (charge, size and ROS content) was performed using state-of-the art analytical methods. Further their microbial inactivation potential was evaluated with food related microorganisms such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria innocua, Mycobacterium parafortuitum, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae inoculated onto the surface of organic grape tomatoes. The results presented here indicate that EWNS properties can be fine-tuned during synthesis resulting in a multifold increase of the inactivation efficacy. More specifically, the surface charge quadrupled and the ROS content increased. Microbial removal rates were microorganism dependent and ranged between 1.0 to 3.8 logs after 45 mins of exposure to an EWNS aerosol dose of 40,000 #/cm3.

  20. Editorial Note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meer, F.; Ommen Kloeke, E.

    2015-07-01

    With this editorial note we would like to update you on the performance of the International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation (JAG) and inform you about changes that have been made to the composition of the editorial team. Our Journal publishes original papers that apply earth observation data for the management of natural resources and the environment. Environmental issues include biodiversity, land degradation, industrial pollution and natural hazards such as earthquakes, floods and landslides. As such the scope is broad and ranges from conceptual and more fundamental work on earth observation and geospatial sciences to the more problem-solving type of work. When I took over the role of Editor-in-Chief in 2012, I together with the Publisher set myself the mission to position JAG in the top-3 of the remote sensing and GIS journals. To do so we strived at attracting high quality and high impact papers to the journal and to reduce the review turnover time to make JAG a more attractive medium for publications. What has been achieved? Have we reached our ambitions? We can say that: The submissions have increased over the years with over 23% for the last 12 months. Naturally not all may lead to more papers, but at least a portion of the additional submissions should lead to a growth in journal content and quality.

  1. Example of a Human Factors Engineering approach to a medication administration work system: potential impact on patient safety.

    PubMed

    Beuscart-Zéphir, Marie-Catherine; Pelayo, Sylvia; Bernonville, Stéphanie

    2010-04-01

    The objectives of this paper are: In this approach, the implementation of such a complex IT solution is considered a major redesign of the work system. The paper describes the Human Factor (HF) tasks embedded in the project lifecycle: (1) analysis and modelling of the current work system and usability assessment of the medication CPOE solution; (2) HF recommendations for work re-design and usability recommendations for IT system re-engineering both aiming at a safer and more efficient work situation. Standard ethnographic methods were used to support the analysis of the current work system and work situations, coupled with cognitive task analysis methods and documents review. Usability inspection (heuristic evaluation) and both in-lab (simulated tasks) and on-site (real tasks) usability tests were performed for the evaluation of the CPOE candidate. Adapted software engineering models were used in combination with usual textual descriptions, tasks models and mock-ups to support the recommendations for work and product re-design. The analysis of the work situations identified different work organisations and procedures across the hospital's departments. The most important differences concerned the doctor-nurse communications and cooperation modes and the procedures for preparing and administering the medications. The assessment of the medication CPOE functions uncovered a number of usability problems including severe ones leading to impossible to detect or to catch errors. Models of the actual and possible distribution of tasks and roles were used to support decision making in the work design process. The results of the usability assessment were translated into requirements to support the necessary re-engineering of the IT application. The HFE approach to medication CPOE efficiently identifies and distinguishes currently unsafe or uncomfortable work situations that could obviously benefit from an IT solution from other work situations incorporating efficient work

  2. Roadmap to an Engineering-Scale Nuclear Fuel Performance & Safety Code

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, John A; Clarno, Kevin T; Hansen, Glen A

    2009-09-01

    -development activities. Realizing the full benefits of this approach will likely take some time. However, it is important that the developmental activities for modeling and simulation be tightly coupled with the experimental activities to maximize feedback effects and accelerate both the experimental and analytical elements of the program toward a common objective. The close integration of modeling and simulation and experimental activities is key to developing a useful fuel performance simulation capability, providing a validated design and analysis tool, and understanding the uncertainties within the models and design process. The efforts of this project are integrally connected to the Transmutation Fuels Campaign (TFC), which maintains as a primary objective to formulate, fabricate, and qualify a transuranic-based fuel with added minor actinides for use in future fast reactors. Additional details of the TFC scope can be found in the Transmutation Fuels Campaign Execution Plan. This project is an integral component of the TFC modeling and simulation effort, and this multiyear plan borrowed liberally from the Transmutation Fuels Campaign Modeling and Simulation Roadmap. This document provides the multiyear staged development plan to develop a continuum-level Integrated Performance and Safety Code (IPSC) to predict the behavior of the fuel and cladding during normal reactor operations and anticipated transients up to the point of clad breach.

  3. Reaction Control System Thruster Cracking Consultation: NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Materials Super Problem Resolution Team (SPRT) Findings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKay, Rebecca A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Shah, Sandeep R.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2005-01-01

    The shuttle orbiter s reaction control system (RCS) primary thruster serial number 120 was found to contain cracks in the counter bores and relief radius after a chamber repair and rejuvenation was performed in April 2004. Relief radius cracking had been observed in the 1970s and 1980s in seven thrusters prior to flight; however, counter bore cracking had never been seen previously in RCS thrusters. Members of the Materials Super Problem Resolution Team (SPRT) of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) conducted a detailed review of the relevant literature and of the documentation from the previous RCS thruster failure analyses. It was concluded that the previous failure analyses lacked sufficient documentation to support the conclusions that stress corrosion cracking or hot-salt cracking was the root cause of the thruster cracking and lacked reliable inspection controls to prevent cracked thrusters from entering the fleet. The NESC team identified and performed new materials characterization and mechanical tests. It was determined that the thruster intergranular cracking was due to hydrogen embrittlement and that the cracking was produced during manufacturing as a result of processing the thrusters with fluoride-containing acids. Testing and characterization demonstrated that appreciable environmental crack propagation does not occur after manufacturing.

  4. Twenty-third water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 3, structural and seismic engineering, primary systems integrity, equipment operability and aging, ECCS strainer blockage research and regulatory issues

    SciTech Connect

    Monteleone, S.

    1996-03-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty- Third Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 23-25, 1995. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Italy, Japan, Norway, Russia, Sweden, and Switzerland. This document, Volume 3, presents topics in Structural & Seismic Engineering, Primary Systems Integrity, Equipment Operability and Aging, and ECCS Strainer Blockage Research & Regulatory Issues. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  5. SU-E-T-785: Using Systems Engineering to Design HDR Skin Treatment Operation for Small Lesions to Enhance Patient Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Saw, C; Baikadi, M; Peters, C; Brereton, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Using systems engineering to design HDR skin treatment operation for small lesions using shielded applicators to enhance patient safety. Methods: Systems engineering is an interdisciplinary field that offers formal methodologies to study, design, implement, and manage complex engineering systems as a whole over their life-cycles. The methodologies deal with human work-processes, coordination of different team, optimization, and risk management. The V-model of systems engineering emphasize two streams, the specification and the testing streams. The specification stream consists of user requirements, functional requirements, and design specifications while the testing on installation, operational, and performance specifications. In implementing system engineering to this project, the user and functional requirements are (a) HDR unit parameters be downloaded from the treatment planning system, (b) dwell times and positions be generated by treatment planning system, (c) source decay be computer calculated, (d) a double-check system of treatment parameters to comply with the NRC regulation. These requirements are intended to reduce human intervention to improve patient safety. Results: A formal investigation indicated that the user requirements can be satisfied. The treatment operation consists of using the treatment planning system to generate a pseudo plan that is adjusted for different shielded applicators to compute the dwell times. The dwell positions, channel numbers, and the dwell times are verified by the medical physicist and downloaded into the HDR unit. The decayed source strength is transferred to a spreadsheet that computes the dwell times based on the type of applicators and prescribed dose used. Prior to treatment, the source strength, dwell times, dwell positions, and channel numbers are double-checked by the radiation oncologist. No dosimetric parameters are manually calculated. Conclusion: Systems engineering provides methodologies to

  6. Applied Fluid Mechanics. Lecture Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Newton D.

    This set of lecture notes is used as a supplemental text for the teaching of fluid dynamics, as one component of a thermodynamics course for engineering technologists. The major text for the course covered basic fluids concepts such as pressure, mass flow, and specific weight. The objective of this document was to present additional fluids…

  7. Applied Fluid Mechanics. Lecture Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Newton D.

    This set of lecture notes is used as a supplemental text for the teaching of fluid dynamics, as one component of a thermodynamics course for engineering technologists. The major text for the course covered basic fluids concepts such as pressure, mass flow, and specific weight. The objective of this document was to present additional fluids…

  8. 30 CFR 250.405 - What are the safety requirements for diesel engines used on a drilling rig?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... engines used on a drilling rig? 250.405 Section 250.405 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE... engines used on a drilling rig? You must equip each diesel engine with an air take device to shut down the... manned, you may equip the engine with either an automatic or remote manual air intake shutdown device; (c...

  9. Bayesian ranking of sites for engineering safety improvements: decision parameter, treatability concept, statistical criterion, and spatial dependence.

    PubMed

    Miaou, Shaw-Pin; Song, Joon Jin

    2005-07-01

    In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in applying statistical ranking criteria to identify sites on a road network, which potentially present high traffic crash risks or are over-represented in certain type of crashes, for further engineering evaluation and safety improvement. This requires that good estimates of ranks of crash risks be obtained at individual intersections or road segments, or some analysis zones. The nature of this site ranking problem in roadway safety is related to two well-established statistical problems known as the small area (or domain) estimation problem and the disease mapping problem. The former arises in the context of providing estimates using sample survey data for a small geographical area or a small socio-demographic group in a large area, while the latter stems from estimating rare disease incidences for typically small geographical areas. The statistical problem is such that direct estimates of certain parameters associated with a site (or a group of sites) with adequate precision cannot be produced, due to a small available sample size, the rareness of the event of interest, and/or a small exposed population or sub-population in question. Model based approaches have offered several advantages to these estimation problems, including increased precision by "borrowing strengths" across the various sites based on available auxiliary variables, including their relative locations in space. Within the model based approach, generalized linear mixed models (GLMM) have played key roles in addressing these problems for many years. The objective of the study, on which this paper is based, was to explore some of the issues raised in recent roadway safety studies regarding ranking methodologies in light of the recent statistical development in space-time GLMM. First, general ranking approaches are reviewed, which include naïve or raw crash-risk ranking, scan based ranking, and model based ranking. Through simulations, the

  10. Recent Experiences of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Guidance Navigation and Control (GN and C) Technical Discipline Team (TDT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennehy, Cornelius J.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) is an independently funded NASA Program whose dedicated team of technical experts provides objective engineering and safety assessments of critical, high risk projects. NESC's strength is rooted in the diverse perspectives and broad knowledge base that add value to its products, affording customers a responsive, alternate path for assessing and preventing technical problems while protecting vital human and national resources. The Guidance Navigation and Control (GN&C) Technical Discipline Team (TDT) is one of fifteen such discipline-focused teams within the NESC organization. The TDT membership is composed of GN&C specialists from across NASA and its partner organizations in other government agencies, industry, national laboratories, and universities. This paper will briefly define the vision, mission, and purpose of the NESC organization. The role of the GN&C TDT will then be described in detail along with an overview of how this team operates and engages in its objective engineering and safety assessments of critical NASA.

  11. Station Program Note Pull Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Upon commencement of my internship, I was in charge of maintaining the CoFR (Certificate of Flight Readiness) Tool. The tool acquires data from existing Excel workbooks on NASA's and Boeing's databases to create a new spreadsheet listing out all the potential safety concerns for upcoming flights and software transitions. Since the application was written in Visual Basic, I had to learn a new programming language and prepare to handle any malfunctions within the program. Shortly afterwards, I was given the assignment to automate the Station Program Note (SPN) Pull process. I developed an application, in Python, that generated a GUI (Graphical User Interface) that will be used by the International Space Station Safety & Mission Assurance team here at Johnson Space Center. The application will allow its users to download online files with the click of a button, import SPN's based on three different pulls, instantly manipulate and filter spreadsheets, and compare the three sources to determine which active SPN's (Station Program Notes) must be reviewed for any upcoming flights, missions, and/or software transitions. Initially, to perform the NASA SPN pull (one of three), I had created the program to allow the user to login to a secure webpage that stores data, input specific parameters, and retrieve the desired SPN's based on their inputs. However, to avoid any conflicts with sustainment, I altered it so that the user may login and download the NASA file independently. After the user has downloaded the file with the click of a button, I defined the program to check for any outdated or pre-existing files, for successful downloads, to acquire the spreadsheet, convert it from a text file to a comma separated file and finally into an Excel spreadsheet to be filtered and later scrutinized for specific SPN numbers. Once this file has been automatically manipulated to provide only the SPN numbers that are desired, they are stored in a global variable, shown on the GUI, and

  12. Quick note on tissue engineering-based surgical measures to treat patients with neurogenic bladder-due detrusor/sphincter dyssynergia.

    PubMed

    Alberti, Contardo

    2015-01-01

    To treat the neurogenic bladder-due detrusor/urethral rhabdosphincter dyssynergia, early combined clean intermittent catheterization/ pharmacotherapy (anticholinergic-, β3-adrenoceptor agonist drugs) management may be at times crowned with success of preserving an adequate bladder compliance and renal safe conditions.The persistence, instead, of elevated bladder filling pressure levels with high voiding pressure/uroflow values, together with aberrant urethral rhabdosphincter electromyographic findings, make necessary the resort to surgery strategies, among which - a part from rhabdosphincterotomy or alternatively intrasphincteric botulinum A toxin injection or urethral stent insertion - the bladder augmentation cystoplasty, with either reconfigurated bowel- or gastric segment, is today the most efficacious surgical measure to increase the bladder urinary storage meanwhile lowering bladder filling pressure. Given the enterocistoplasty-dependent both potential systemic metabolic imbalances - such as hyperchloremic acidosis/hypokaliemia, hyperoxaluria, bone demineralization, chologenic diarrhoea/steatorrhoea, vit B12 deficiency - together with bowel prosthetic mucus overproduction-due recurrent stone formation, and, sometimes, malignant complications particularly at the intestinal-urinary tract suture line, tissue engineering techniques have been taken into consideration, more than twenty years ago, as alternative measure for bladder augmentation cystoplasty, until to reach successful clinical validation just in patients suffering from either congenital dysraphism- or acquired spinal cord injury-dependent neurogenic bladder. Nevertheless, also the tissue engineering-made augmentation cistoplasty, as well as that bowel-based one, unfortunately remains influenced by spinal cord neuropathydue dysfunctional effects, hence the tissue engineering research could be today directed to suitably overcome such disadvantageous conditions.

  13. Genetically Engineered Safety Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Kucinich, Dennis J. [D-OH-10

    2010-06-23

    House - 11/16/2010 Referred to the Subcommittee on Rural Development, Biotechnology, Specialty Crops, and Foreign Agriculture. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  14. Genetically Engineered Safety Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Kucinich, Dennis J. [D-OH-10

    2011-12-02

    House - 12/19/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Rural Development, Research, Biotechnology, and Foreign Agriculture. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  15. Genetically Engineered Safety Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Kucinich, Dennis J. [D-OH-10

    2010-06-23

    11/16/2010 Referred to the Subcommittee on Rural Development, Biotechnology, Specialty Crops, and Foreign Agriculture. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  16. Genetically Engineered Safety Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Kucinich, Dennis J. [D-OH-10

    2011-12-02

    12/19/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Rural Development, Research, Biotechnology, and Foreign Agriculture. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  17. Genetically Engineered Safety Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Kucinich, Dennis J. [D-OH-10

    2010-06-23

    11/16/2010 Referred to the Subcommittee on Rural Development, Biotechnology, Specialty Crops, and Foreign Agriculture. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. Genetically Engineered Safety Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Kucinich, Dennis J. [D-OH-10

    2011-12-02

    12/19/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Rural Development, Research, Biotechnology, and Foreign Agriculture. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. A collection of Schottky-scan notes

    SciTech Connect

    Sabersky, A.P.

    1980-10-01

    This paper is a republication of ISR-RF notes and performance reports on work done in 1974-1975. The original notes have been edited, corrected and, in most cases, shortened. Discussed in this note are the following topics: noise, errors and the Schottky scan; speeding up the Schottky scan; Schottky markers and fast Schottky scans; and some engineering aspects of the fast Schottky scan.

  20. Electrochemical Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkire, Richard

    1976-01-01

    Discusses an electrochemical engineering course that combines transport phenomena and basic physical chemistry. Lecture notes and homework problems are used instead of a textbook; an outline of lecture topics is presented. (MLH)

  1. Quo Vadis Payload Safety?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fodroci, Michael P.; Schwartz, MaryBeth

    2008-01-01

    As we complete the preparations for the fourth Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission, we note an anniversary approaching: it was 30 years ago in July that the first HST payload safety review panel meeting was held. This, in turn, was just over a year after the very first payload safety review, a Phase 0 review for the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite and its Inertial Upper Stage, held in June of 1977. In adapting a process that had been used in the review and certification of earlier Skylab payloads, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) engineers sought to preserve the lessons learned in the development of technical payload safety requirements, while creating a new process that would serve the very different needs of the new space shuttle program. Their success in this undertaking is substantiated by the fact that this process and these requirements have proven to be remarkably robust, flexible, and adaptable. Furthermore, the payload safety process has, to date, served us well in the critical mission of safeguarding our astronauts, cosmonauts, and spaceflight participants. Both the technical requirements and their interpretation, as well as the associated process requirements have grown, evolved, been streamlined, and have been adapted to fit multiple programs, including the International Space Station (ISS) program, the Shuttle/Mir program, and most recently the United States Constellation program. From its earliest days, it was anticipated that the payload safety process would be international in scope, and so it has been. European Space Agency (ESA), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), German Space Agency (DLR), Canadian Space Agency (CSA), Russian Space Agency (RSA), and many additional countries have flown payloads on both the space shuttle and on the ISS. Our close cooperation and long-term working relationships have culminated in the franchising of the payload safety review process itself to our partners in ESA, which in

  2. Safety Engineering and Protective Technology in Support of Army Modernization Programs--Picatinny Arsenal Papers Presented at the 16th Annual Explosive Safety Seminar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    facing operations, are performed remotely in earth covered steel arch igloos. Separations between igloo .structures conform to earth covered steel... arch separation distances of Safety Manual AMCR 385-100. Protective Structures As mentioned, where separation distances are barricaded intraline...explosive weight of the distributed charge. Minimized operational space requirements necessitate the use of earth covered steel arch magazine

  3. Feedback from uncertainties propagation research projects conducted in different hydraulic fields: outcomes for engineering projects and nuclear safety assessment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacchi, Vito; Duluc, Claire-Marie; Bertrand, Nathalie; Bardet, Lise

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, in the context of hydraulic risk assessment, much effort has been put into the development of sophisticated numerical model systems able reproducing surface flow field. These numerical models are based on a deterministic approach and the results are presented in terms of measurable quantities (water depths, flow velocities, etc…). However, the modelling of surface flows involves numerous uncertainties associated both to the numerical structure of the model, to the knowledge of the physical parameters which force the system and to the randomness inherent to natural phenomena. As a consequence, dealing with uncertainties can be a difficult task for both modelers and decision-makers [Ioss, 2011]. In the context of nuclear safety, IRSN assesses studies conducted by operators for different reference flood situations (local rain, small or large watershed flooding, sea levels, etc…), that are defined in the guide ASN N°13 [ASN, 2013]. The guide provides some recommendations to deal with uncertainties, by proposing a specific conservative approach to cover hydraulic modelling uncertainties. Depending of the situation, the influencing parameter might be the Strickler coefficient, levee behavior, simplified topographic assumptions, etc. Obviously, identifying the most influencing parameter and giving it a penalizing value is challenging and usually questionable. In this context, IRSN conducted cooperative (Compagnie Nationale du Rhone, I-CiTy laboratory of Polytech'Nice, Atomic Energy Commission, Bureau de Recherches Géologiques et Minières) research activities since 2011 in order to investigate feasibility and benefits of Uncertainties Analysis (UA) and Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA) when applied to hydraulic modelling. A specific methodology was tested by using the computational environment Promethee, developed by IRSN, which allows carrying out uncertainties propagation study. This methodology was applied with various numerical models and in

  4. Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes health and safety concerns associated with the Mixed and Low-level Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Various hazards are described such as fire, electrical, explosions, reactivity, temperature, and radiation hazards, as well as the potential for accidental spills, exposure to toxic materials, and other general safety concerns.

  5. Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Part 1, Waste streams and treatment technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes health and safety concerns associated with the Mixed and Low-level Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Various hazards are described such as fire, electrical, explosions, reactivity, temperature, and radiation hazards, as well as the potential for accidental spills, exposure to toxic materials, and other general safety concerns.

  6. Preliminary Safety Analysis Report for the Transuranic Storage Area Retrieval Enclosure at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Revision 8

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This Transuranic Storage Area Retrieval Enclosure Preliminary Safety Analysis Report was completed as required by DOE Order 5480.23. The purpose of this document is to construct a safety basis that supports the design and permits construction of the facility. The facility has been designed to the requirements of a Radioactive Solid Waste Facility presented in DOE Order 6430.1A.

  7. Application of an engineering problem-solving methodology to address persistent problems in patient safety: a case study on retained surgical sponges after surgery.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Devon E; Watts, Bradley V

    2013-09-01

    Despite innumerable attempts to eliminate the postoperative retention of surgical sponges, the medical error persists in operating rooms worldwide and places significant burden on patient safety, quality of care, financial resources, and hospital/physician reputation. The failure of countless solutions, from new sponge counting methods to radio labeled sponges, to truly eliminate the event in the operating room requires that the emerging field of health-care delivery science find innovative ways to approach the problem. Accordingly, the VA National Center for Patient Safety formed a unique collaboration with a team at the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College to evaluate the retention of surgical sponges after surgery and find a solution. The team used an engineering problem solving methodology to develop the best solution. To make the operating room a safe environment for patients, the team identified a need to make the sponge itself safe for use as opposed to resolving the relatively innocuous counting methods. In evaluation of this case study, the need for systematic engineering evaluation to resolve problems in health-care delivery becomes clear.

  8. Nuclear Powerplant Safety: Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Nuclear Energy Office.

    Powerplant systems and procedures that ensure the day-to-day health and safety of people in and around the plant is referred to as operational safety. This safety is the result of careful planning, good engineering and design, strict licensing and regulation, and environmental monitoring. Procedures that assure operational safety at nuclear…

  9. The comparison of heparinized insulin syringes and safety-engineered blood gas syringes used in arterial blood gas sampling in the ED setting (randomized controlled study).

    PubMed

    Baskın, Sevcan Baki; Oray, Neşe Çolak; Yanturalı, Sedat; Bayram, Başak

    2014-05-01

    The arterial blood gas measurement process is a painful and invasive procedure, often uncomfortable for both the patient and the physician. Because the patient-related factors that determine the difficulty of the process cannot be controlled, the physician-related factors and blood gas measurement techniques are a modifiable area of improvement that ought to be considered. Many hospitals use insulin syringes or syringes washed with heparin for the purpose of blood gas measurement because they do not have blood gas-specific syringes. In this prospective cross-sectional study, we aimed to compare safety-engineered blood gas syringes and conventional heparinized syringes used during the arterial blood gas extraction process in terms of ease of operation, the physician-patient satisfaction, laboratory appropriateness, and complications. Our study included patients whose arterial blood gas needed to be measured in the emergency department and who agreed to participate in the study. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups. The arterial blood gas of the patients from the first group was measured by using conventional heparinized syringes, whereas safety-engineered blood gas syringes were used to measure the arterial blood gas of the patients from the second group. The groups were compared in terms of demographic data, the number of attempts, the physician and patient satisfaction, early and late-term complications, and laboratory appropriateness of the taken sample. A total of 550 patients were included in our study in a 2-month study period. There were no significant differences between patients in terms of sex, age, weight, height, body mass index, and wrist circumference. In addition, the number of attempts (P=.489), patients' pain level during the procedure (P=.145), and the degree of difficulty of the procedure according to the patient (P=.109) and physician (P=.554) were not significantly different between the groups. After arterial blood gas extraction

  10. HEALTH AND SAFETY BUILDING, TRA667. SOUTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS. FLOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HEALTH AND SAFETY BUILDING, TRA-667. SOUTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS. FLOOR PLAN AND ROOM DESIGNATIONS. NOTE PAIR OF ENTRY DOORS IN WEST ELEVATION FOR MEN AND WOMEN. CONCRETE T-BEAMS. F.C. TORKELSON CO. 842-MTR-667-A1, 1/1963. INL INDEX NO. 531-0667-00-851-151143, REV. 4. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. Fire safety. Explosion safety - Handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baratov, Anatolii Nikolaevich

    The physicochemical principles underlying combustion and explosion processes are examined, and the main fire and explosion safety characteristics of materials are reviewed with particular reference to the ignition limits of combustible mixtures, the minimal oxygen content that constitutes an explosion hazard, and the flash point and ignition temperatures. Fire-fighting and explosion suppression methods and equipment are described. The discussion also covers the efficiency of fire prevention measures and safety engineering in fire fighting.

  12. The designing of launch vehicles with liquid propulsion engines ensuring fire, explosion and environmental safety requirements of worked-off stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushlyakov, V.; Shatrov, Ya.; Sujmenbaev, B.; Baranov, D.

    2017-02-01

    The paper addresses the problem of the launch vehicles (LV) with main liquid propulsion engines launch technogenic impact in different environment areas. Therefore, as the study subjects were chosen the worked-off stages (WS) with unused propellant residues in tanks, the cosmodrome ecological monitoring system, the worked-off stage design and construction solutions development system and the unified system with the "WS+the cosmodrome ecological monitoring system+design and construction solutions development system" feedback allowing to form the optimal ways of the WS design and construction parameters variations for its fire and explosion hazard management in different areas of the environment. It is demonstrated that the fire hazard effects of propellant residues in WS tanks increase the ecosystem disorder level for the Vostochny cosmodrome impact area ecosystem. Applying the system analysis, the proposals on the selection of technologies, schematic and WS design and construction solutions aimed to the fire and explosion safety improvement during the LV worked-off stages with the main liquid propulsion engines operation were formulated. Among them are the following: firstly, the unused propellant residues in tanks convective gasification based on the hot gas (heat carrier) supply in WS tanks after main liquid propulsion engines cutoff is proposed as the basic technology; secondly, the obtained unused propellant residues in WS tanks gasification products (evaporated propellant residues + pressurizing agent + heat carrier) are used for WS stabilization and orientation while descending trajectory moving. The applying of the proposed technologies allows providing fire and explosion safety requirements of LV with main liquid propulsion engines practically.

  13. Note-Making with T-Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Elvis G.; Davis, Archie D.

    The T-Note system is an easy way for students to take notes, is organized for effective review, and is adaptable because it provides a system for recording five types of information typically presented in the classroom. The student first divides a single loose-leaf notebook page vertically down the middle, and horizontally about one or two inches…

  14. Possibilities of lasers within NOTES.

    PubMed

    Stepp, Herbert; Sroka, Ronald

    2010-10-01

    Lasers possess unique properties that render them versatile light sources particularly for NOTES. Depending on the laser light sources used, diagnostic as well as therapeutic purposes can be achieved. The diagnostic potential offered by innovative concepts such as new types of ultra-thin endoscopes and optical probes supports the physician with optical information of ultra-high resolution, tissue discrimination and manifold types of fluorescence detection. In addition, the potential 3-D capability promises enhanced recognition of tissue type and pathological status. These diagnostic techniques might enable or at least contribute to accurate and safe procedures within the spatial restrictions inherent with NOTES. The therapeutic potential ranges from induction of phototoxic effects over tissue welding, coagulation and tissue cutting to stone fragmentation. As proven in many therapeutic laser endoscopic treatment concepts, laser surgery is potentially bloodless and transmits the energy without mechanical forces. Specialized NOTES endoscopes will likely incorporate suitable probes for improving diagnostic procedures, laser fibres with advantageous light delivery possibility or innovative laser beam manipulation systems. NOTES training centres may support the propagation of the complex handling and the safety aspects for clinical use to the benefit of the patient.

  15. Writing a Condolence Note

    MedlinePlus

    ... Grief at Work Working Through Grief About Us Writing a Condolence Note By Helen Fitzgerald, CT Focusing ... to write an anniversary or birthday greeting. But writing a condolence note is something altogether different because, ...

  16. BASINS Technical Notes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has developed several technical notes that provide in depth information on a specific function in BASINS. Technical notes can be used to answer questions users may have, or to provide additional information on the application of features in BASINS.

  17. Keeping Engineers Current.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Ellen Ruppel

    1985-01-01

    Notes several options for keeping practicing engineers abreast of the state of the art, including university seminars, videotape courses, and instruction via satellite. Also cites the need for engineers to be encouraged to pursue life-long professional education. (DH)

  18. Roads to Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauer, Ezra

    1991-01-01

    Contends that the level of safety built into roads is largely unpremeditated and that roads and highways are not as safe as they might be. Discusses practices, standards, and deficiencies in highway and traffic safety related to geometric design and traffic engineering. Recommends increased transportation engineering professionalism and public…

  19. Roads to Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauer, Ezra

    1991-01-01

    Contends that the level of safety built into roads is largely unpremeditated and that roads and highways are not as safe as they might be. Discusses practices, standards, and deficiencies in highway and traffic safety related to geometric design and traffic engineering. Recommends increased transportation engineering professionalism and public…

  20. 30 CFR 250.405 - What are the safety requirements for diesel engines used on a drilling rig?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... engines used on a drilling rig? 250.405 Section 250.405 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations General Requirements § 250.405...

  1. Liquid Nitrogen Subcooler Pressure Vessel Engineering Note

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1997-04-24

    The normal operating pressure of this dewar is expected to be less than 15 psig. This vessel is open to atmospheric pressure thru a non-isolatable vent line. The backpressure in the vent line was calculated to be less than 1.5 psig at maximum anticipated flow rates.

  2. Acquisition Environment, Safety, and Occupational Health: Lessons Learned From DoD Acquisition Systems Engineering Program Support Reviews

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    Administration ( FAA ) Airworthiness Certification process do not fully address the unique safety issues of Military Operations of the NA-1 ⌐ The...PESHE states once the FAA approves the NA-1, the aircraft will be safe for humans, but this does not fully cover ESOH risks. Additionally, an FAA ...Budget sufficiency and phasing, staffing, system schedule, and assets available to meet program objectives . 3. Management – Acquisition strategy and

  3. Industrial Education. "Small Engines".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parma City School District, OH.

    Part of a series of curriculum guides dealing with industrial education in junior high schools, this guide provides the student with information and manipulative experiences on small gasoline engines. Included are sections on shop adjustment, safety, small engines, internal combustion, engine construction, four stroke engines, two stroke engines,…

  4. Industrial Education. "Small Engines".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parma City School District, OH.

    Part of a series of curriculum guides dealing with industrial education in junior high schools, this guide provides the student with information and manipulative experiences on small gasoline engines. Included are sections on shop adjustment, safety, small engines, internal combustion, engine construction, four stroke engines, two stroke engines,…

  5. Safety and Health: Whose Job Is It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fountain, Melvin

    1991-01-01

    Describes occupations involved with safety and health including safety professionals, industrial hygienists, health and regulatory inspectors, public health microbiologists, ecologists, pollution control engineers, health physicists, and ergonomists. (JOW)

  6. Safety and Health: Whose Job Is It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fountain, Melvin

    1991-01-01

    Describes occupations involved with safety and health including safety professionals, industrial hygienists, health and regulatory inspectors, public health microbiologists, ecologists, pollution control engineers, health physicists, and ergonomists. (JOW)

  7. Using a Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety to Evaluate a Hospital-Wide Daily Chlorhexidine Bathing Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Caya, Teresa; Musuuza, Jackson; Yanke, Eric; Schmitz, Michelle; Anderson, Brooke; Carayon, Pascale; Safdar, Nasia

    2015-01-01

    We undertook a systems engineering approach to evaluate housewide implementation of daily chlorhexidine bathing. We performed direct observations of the bathing process and conducted provider and patient surveys. The main outcome was compliance with bathing using a checklist. Fifty-seven percent of baths had full compliance with the chlorhexidine bathing protocol. Additional time was the main barrier. Institutions undertaking daily chlorhexidine bathing should perform a rigorous assessment of implementation to optimize the benefits of this intervention. PMID:26035708

  8. Using a Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety to Evaluate a Hospital-wide Daily Chlorhexidine Bathing Intervention.

    PubMed

    Caya, Teresa; Musuuza, Jackson; Yanke, Eric; Schmitz, Michelle; Anderson, Brooke; Carayon, Pascale; Safdar, Nasia

    2015-01-01

    We undertook a systems engineering approach to evaluate housewide implementation of daily chlorhexidine bathing. We performed direct observations of the bathing process and conducted provider and patient surveys. The main outcome was compliance with bathing using a checklist. Fifty-seven percent of baths had full compliance with the chlorhexidine bathing protocol. Additional time was the main barrier. Institutions undertaking daily chlorhexidine bathing should perform a rigorous assessment of implementation to optimize the benefits of this intervention.

  9. Aviation Safety: FAA and DOD Response to Similar Safety Concerns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    General Accounting Office GAO January 2002 AVIATION SAFETY FAA and DOD Response to Similar Safety Concerns GAO-02-77 Report Documentation Page Report...Date 00JAN2002 Report Type N/A Dates Covered (from... to) - Title and Subtitle AVIATION SAFETY FAA and DOD: Response to Similar Safety Concerns ...public release, distribution unlimited Supplementary Notes Abstract Safety of aircraft is a paramount concern in both civilian and military aviation

  10. Workplace exposure to engineered nanomaterials: the Italian path for the definition of occupational health and safety policies.

    PubMed

    Mirabile, Marco; Boccuni, Fabio; Gagliardi, Diana; Rondinone, Bruna Maria; Iavicoli, Sergio

    2014-07-01

    This study explores the way the publication of a National White Book on health and safety risks that affect workers in jobs involving Nanotechnologies and Nanomaterials influenced the key Italian stakeholders attitude toward this issue and identifies the standpoints and priorities shared among researchers and stakeholders to develop a policy framework to address this issue. The study not only highlights some important assumptions (i.e. the acknowledgment by the key stakeholders of the need for actions and the identification of objectives which can gain a wide consensus) for the establishment of a policy community that sustains the development of a policymaking process on the issue but, through the interaction between stakeholders and OSH researchers, it also identifies some in nuce proposals that represent the starting point for policy interventions aimed at meeting the needs of both stakeholders and scientific community. Results obtained in terms of clarification of interests at stake, identification of potential areas of consensus and level of key national actors' engagement achieved, show the potentialities of adopting a knowledge based and inclusive approach to policy-making to address the issue of prevention and management of health and safety risks related to technological innovation within a framework of scientific uncertainty. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1982 to the DOE Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Protection, Safety and Emergency Preparedness. Part 5. Environmental and occupational protection, assessment, and engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Bair, W.J.

    1983-02-01

    Part 5 of the 1982 Annual Report to the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Protection, Safety and Emergency Preparedness presents Pacific Northwest Laboratory's progress on work performed for the Office of Environmental Programs, Office of Operational Safety, and the Office of Nuclear Safety. The report is in three sections, introduced by blue divider pages, corresponding to the program elements: Technology Impacts, Environmental and Safety Engineering, Operational and Environmental Safety. In each section, articles describe progress made during FY 1982 on individual projects, as identified by the Field Task Proposal/Agreement. Authors of these articles represent a broad spectrum of capabilities derived from various segments of the Laboratory, reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the work.

  12. A phase 1 trial of the Fc-engineered CD19 antibody XmAb5574 (MOR00208) demonstrates safety and preliminary efficacy in relapsed CLL

    PubMed Central

    Awan, Farrukh; Flinn, Ian W.; Berdeja, Jesus G.; Wiley, Elizabeth; Mansoor, Sharmeen; Huang, Ying; Lozanski, Gerard; Foster, Paul A.; Byrd, John C.

    2014-01-01

    CD19 is ubiquitously expressed on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells and is therefore an attractive candidate for antibody targeting. XmAb5574 (aka MOR00208) is a novel humanized CD19 monoclonal antibody with an engineered Fc region to enhance Fcγ receptor binding affinity. Here we report results of a first in human phase 1 trial of XmAb5574 in patients with relapsed or refractory CLL. Twenty-seven patients were enrolled to 6 escalating dose levels, with expansion at the highest dose level of 12 mg/kg. Nine doses of XmAb5574 were infused over 8 weeks. No maximal tolerated dose was reached, and the drug was generally well tolerated, with infusion reactions of grades 1 and 2 being the most common toxicities. Grade 3 and 4 toxicities occurred in 5 patients and included neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, increased aspartate aminotransferase, febrile neutropenia, and tumor lysis syndrome. XmAb5574 showed preliminary efficacy, with 18 patients (66.7%) responding by physical examination criteria and laboratory studies, and 8 patients (29.6%) responding by computed tomography criteria. Pharmacokinetics showed a half-life of 14 days with clearance that was not dose-dependent. In conclusion, this phase 1 trial demonstrates safety and preliminary efficacy of a novel Fc-engineered CD19 monoclonal antibody XmAb5574 and justifies movement into the phase 2 setting. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01161511. PMID:25301708

  13. A Fungal Insecticide Engineered for Fast Per Os Killing of Caterpillars Has High Field Efficacy and Safety in Full-Season Control of Cabbage Insect Pests

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong-Jie; Liu, Jing; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Fungal insecticides developed from filamentous pathogens of insects are notorious for their slow killing action through cuticle penetration, depressing commercial interest and practical application. Genetic engineering may accelerate their killing action but cause ecological risk. Here we show that a Beauveria bassiana formulation, HV8 (BbHV8), engineered for fast per os killing of caterpillars by an insect midgut-acting toxin (Vip3Aa1) overexpressed in conidia has both high field efficacy and safety in full-season protection of cabbage from the damage of an insect pest complex dominated by Pieris rapae larvae, followed by Plutella xylostella larvae and aphids. In two fields repeatedly sprayed during summer, BbHV8 resulted in overall mean efficacies of killing of 71% and 75%, which were similar or close to the 70% and 83% efficacies achieved by commercially recommended emamectin benzoate but much higher than the 31% and 48% efficacies achieved by the same formulation of the parental wild-type strain (WT). Both BbHV8 and WT sprays exerted no adverse effect on a nontarget spider community during the trials, and the sprays did not influence saprophytic fungi in soil samples taken from the field plots during 4 months after the last spray. Strikingly, BbHV8 and the WT showed low fitness when they were released into the environment because both were decreasingly recovered from the field lacking native B. bassiana strains (undetectable 5 months after the spray), and the recovered isolates became much less tolerant to high temperature and UV-B irradiation. Our results highlight for the first time that a rationally engineered fungal insecticide can compete with a chemical counterpart to combat insect pests at an affordable cost and with low ecological risk. PMID:23956386

  14. A fungal insecticide engineered for fast per os killing of caterpillars has high field efficacy and safety in full-season control of cabbage insect pests.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Jie; Liu, Jing; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2013-10-01

    Fungal insecticides developed from filamentous pathogens of insects are notorious for their slow killing action through cuticle penetration, depressing commercial interest and practical application. Genetic engineering may accelerate their killing action but cause ecological risk. Here we show that a Beauveria bassiana formulation, HV8 (BbHV8), engineered for fast per os killing of caterpillars by an insect midgut-acting toxin (Vip3Aa1) overexpressed in conidia has both high field efficacy and safety in full-season protection of cabbage from the damage of an insect pest complex dominated by Pieris rapae larvae, followed by Plutella xylostella larvae and aphids. In two fields repeatedly sprayed during summer, BbHV8 resulted in overall mean efficacies of killing of 71% and 75%, which were similar or close to the 70% and 83% efficacies achieved by commercially recommended emamectin benzoate but much higher than the 31% and 48% efficacies achieved by the same formulation of the parental wild-type strain (WT). Both BbHV8 and WT sprays exerted no adverse effect on a nontarget spider community during the trials, and the sprays did not influence saprophytic fungi in soil samples taken from the field plots during 4 months after the last spray. Strikingly, BbHV8 and the WT showed low fitness when they were released into the environment because both were decreasingly recovered from the field lacking native B. bassiana strains (undetectable 5 months after the spray), and the recovered isolates became much less tolerant to high temperature and UV-B irradiation. Our results highlight for the first time that a rationally engineered fungal insecticide can compete with a chemical counterpart to combat insect pests at an affordable cost and with low ecological risk.

  15. A note on notes: note taking and containment.

    PubMed

    Levine, Howard B

    2007-07-01

    In extreme situations of massive projective identification, both the analyst and the patient may come to share a fantasy or belief that his or her own psychic reality will be annihilated if the psychic reality of the other is accepted or adopted (Britton 1998). In the example of' Dr. M and his patient, the paradoxical dilemma around note taking had highly specific transference meanings; it was not simply an instance of the generalized human response of distracted attention that Freud (1912) had spoken of, nor was it the destabilization of analytic functioning that I tried to describe in my work with Mr. L. Whether such meanings will always exist in these situations remains a matter to be determined by further clinical experience. In reopening a dialogue about note taking during sessions, I have attempted to move the discussion away from categorical injunctions about what analysis should or should not do, and instead to foster a more nuanced, dynamic, and pair-specific consideration of the analyst's functioning in the immediate context of the analytic relationship. There is, of course, a wide variety of listening styles among analysts, and each analyst's mental functioning may be affected differently by each patient whom the analyst sees. I have raised many questions in the hopes of stimulating an expanded discussion that will allow us to share our experiences and perhaps reach additional conclusions. Further consideration may lead us to decide whether note taking may have very different meanings for other analysts and analyst-patient pairs, and whether it may serve useful functions in addition to the one that I have described.

  16. Risk Assessment for NOTES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    Navy System Safety regulations, NAVOSH regulations (Navy Ocupational , Safety and Health ), and the Environmental Safety regulations. 13 NAVSWC TR 91...significant fields lie over navigable waterways). Health No evidence of long-term health effects of EMP exposure to operating employees has been found, even...34 10 NAVSWC TR 91-328 Identify the risks and controls that would achieve the lowest reasonably achievable risk (consider safety, health , performance

  17. Sticky-Note Murals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Ian

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a sticky-note mural project that originated from his desire to incorporate contemporary materials into his assignments as well as to inspire collaboration between students. The process takes much more than sticking sticky notes to the wall. It takes critical thinking skills and teamwork to design and complete…

  18. Sticky-Note Murals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Ian

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a sticky-note mural project that originated from his desire to incorporate contemporary materials into his assignments as well as to inspire collaboration between students. The process takes much more than sticking sticky notes to the wall. It takes critical thinking skills and teamwork to design and complete…

  19. European Science Notes. Volume 41, Number 9.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    management system and of the following: Secretaria de la Revista the inference engine. de Psicologia Social , Facultad de Psico- Application of Knowledge-Based...Notes NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Social and Environmental Psychology .................... William D. Crano 519 Applied Artificial Intelligence...An International Journal ................................. William D. Crano 520 New Spanish Journal of Social Psychology ................. William D

  20. Playground Safety. The Long Trail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallach, Frances

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the evolution of playground safety, discussing the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) "Handbook for Public Playground Safety" and examining the direction in which CPSC guidelines are moving. The paper notes the importance of certification of playground equipment, reviews pertinent questions to address, and…

  1. Advax™, a novel microcrystalline polysaccharide particle engineered from delta inulin, provides robust adjuvant potency together with tolerability and safety.

    PubMed

    Petrovsky, Nikolai; Cooper, Peter D

    2015-11-04

    There is an ongoing need for new adjuvants to facilitate development of vaccines against HIV, tuberculosis, malaria and cancer, amongst many others. Unfortunately, the most potent adjuvants are often associated with toxicity and safety issues. Inulin, a plant-derived polysaccharide, has no immunological activity in its native soluble form but when crystallized into a stable microcrystalline particulate from (delta inulin) acquires potent adjuvant activity. Delta inulin has been shown to enhance humoral and cellular immune responses against a broad range of co-administered viral, bacterial, parasitic and toxin antigens. Inulin normally crystallizes as large heterogeneous particles with a broad size distribution and variable solubility temperatures. To ensure reproducible delta inulin particles with a consistent size distribution and temperature of solubility, a current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) process was designed to produce Advax™ adjuvant. In its cCMP form, Advax™ adjuvant has proved successful in human trials of vaccines against seasonal and pandemic influenza, hepatitis B and insect sting anaphylaxis, enhancing antibody and T-cell responses while being safe and well tolerated. Advax™ adjuvant represents a novel human adjuvant that enhances both humoral and cellular immunity. This review describes the discovery and development of Advax™ adjuvant and research into its unique mechanism of action.

  2. Advax™, a novel microcrystalline polysaccharide particle engineered from delta inulin, provides robust adjuvant potency together with tolerability and safety

    PubMed Central

    Petrovsky, Nikolai; Cooper, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    There is an ongoing need for new adjuvants to facilitate development of vaccines against HIV, tuberculosis, malaria and cancer, amongst many others. Unfortunately, the most potent adjuvants are often associated with toxicity and safety issues. Inulin, a plant-derived polysaccharide, has no immunological activity in its native soluble form but when crystallised into stable microparticles (delta inulin) acquires potent adjuvant activity. Delta inulin has been shown to enhance humoral and cellular immune responses against a broad range of co-administered viral, bacterial, parasitic and toxin antigens. Inulin normally crystallises as large heterogeneous particles with a broad size distribution and variable solubility temperatures. To ensure reproducible delta inulin particles with a consistent size distribution and temperature of solubility, a current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) process was designed to produce Advax™ adjuvant. In its cGMP form, Advax™ adjuvant has proved successful in human trials of vaccines against seasonal and pandemic influenza, hepatitis B and insect sting anaphylaxis, enhancing antibody and T-cell responses while at the same time being safe and well tolerated. Advax™ adjuvant thereby represents a novel human adjuvant with positive effects on both humoral and cellular immunity. This review describes the discovery and development of Advax™ adjuvant and research into its unique mechanism of action. PMID:26407920

  3. Why risk is not variance: an expository note.

    PubMed

    Cox, Louis Anthony Tony

    2008-08-01

    Variance (or standard deviation) of return is widely used as a measure of risk in financial investment risk analysis applications, where mean-variance analysis is applied to calculate efficient frontiers and undominated portfolios. Why, then, do health, safety, and environmental (HS&E) and reliability engineering risk analysts insist on defining risk more flexibly, as being determined by probabilities and consequences, rather than simply by variances? This note suggests an answer by providing a simple proof that mean-variance decision making violates the principle that a rational decisionmaker should prefer higher to lower probabilities of receiving a fixed gain, all else being equal. Indeed, simply hypothesizing a continuous increasing indifference curve for mean-variance combinations at the origin is enough to imply that a decisionmaker must find unacceptable some prospects that offer a positive probability of gain and zero probability of loss. Unlike some previous analyses of limitations of variance as a risk metric, this expository note uses only simple mathematics and does not require the additional framework of von Neumann Morgenstern utility theory.

  4. 24 CFR 232.525 - Note and security form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Note and security form. 232.525... LIVING FACILITIES Eligibility Requirements-Supplemental Loans To Finance Purchase and Installation of Fire Safety Equipment Eligible Security Instruments § 232.525 Note and security form. The lender shall...

  5. 24 CFR 232.525 - Note and security form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Note and security form. 232.525... LIVING FACILITIES Eligibility Requirements-Supplemental Loans To Finance Purchase and Installation of Fire Safety Equipment Eligible Security Instruments § 232.525 Note and security form. The lender shall...

  6. 24 CFR 232.525 - Note and security form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Note and security form. 232.525... LIVING FACILITIES Eligibility Requirements-Supplemental Loans To Finance Purchase and Installation of Fire Safety Equipment Eligible Security Instruments § 232.525 Note and security form. The lender shall...

  7. 24 CFR 232.525 - Note and security form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Note and security form. 232.525... MORTGAGE INSURANCE FOR NURSING HOMES, INTERMEDIATE CARE FACILITIES, BOARD AND CARE HOMES, AND ASSISTED... Fire Safety Equipment Eligible Security Instruments § 232.525 Note and security form. The lender shall...

  8. 24 CFR 232.525 - Note and security form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Note and security form. 232.525... MORTGAGE INSURANCE FOR NURSING HOMES, INTERMEDIATE CARE FACILITIES, BOARD AND CARE HOMES, AND ASSISTED... Fire Safety Equipment Eligible Security Instruments § 232.525 Note and security form. The lender shall...

  9. LUVOIR Tech Notes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Shaklan, Stuart; Roberge, Aki; Rioux, Norman; Feinberg, Lee; Werner, Michael; Rauscher, Bernard; Mandell, Avi; France, Kevin; Schiminovich, David

    2016-01-01

    We present nine "tech notes" prepared by the Large UV/Optical/Infrared (LUVOIR) Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT), Study Office, and Technology Working Group. These tech notes are intended to highlight technical challenges that represent boundaries in the trade space for developing the LUVOIR architecture that may impact the science objectives being developed by the STDT. These tech notes are intended to be high-level discussions of the technical challenges and will serve as starting points for more in-depth analysis as the LUVOIR study progresses.

  10. Multi-Functional Surface Engineering for Li-Excess Layered Cathode Material Targeting Excellent Electrochemical and Thermal Safety Properties.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xiaofei; Fu, Qiang; Pang, Qiang; Gao, Yu; Wei, Yingjin; Zou, Bo; Du, Fei; Chen, Gang

    2016-02-10

    The Li(Li(0.18)Ni(0.15)Co(0.15)Mn(0.52))O2 cathode material is modified by a Li4M5O12-like heterostructure and a BiOF surface layer. The interfacial heterostructure triggers the layered-to-Li4M5O12 transformation of the material which is different from the layered-to-LiMn2O4 transformation of the pristine Li(Li(0.18)Ni(0.15)Co(0.15)Mn(0.52))O2. This Li4M5O12-like transformation helps the material to keep high working voltage, long cycle life and excellent rate capability. Mass spectrometry, in situ X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope show that the Li4M5O12-like phase prohibits oxygen release from the material bulk at elevated temperatures. In addition, the BiOF coating layer protects the material from harmful side reactions with the electrolyte. These advantages significantly improve the electrochemical performance of Li(Li(0.18)Ni(0.15)Co(0.15)Mn(0.52))O2. The material shows a discharge capacity of 292 mAh g(-1) at 0.2 C with capacity retention of 92% after 100 cycles. Moreover, a high discharge capacity of 78 mAh g(-1) could be obtained at 25 C. The exothermic temperature of the fully charged electrode is elevated from 203 to 261 °C with 50% reduction of the total thermal release, highlighting excellent thermal safety of the material.

  11. Lecture Notes on Engineering Measurement for Software Engineers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    atmospheric pressure, ioniza- tion of either sign equal to one electrostatic unit of charge Nikola Tesla American physi- tesla : magnetic 1 weber per...scale) Charles R. Richter (scale) Michael Faraday (2 answers) Wilhelm Rontgen Enrico Fermi Nikola Tesla Karl Friedrich Gauss Allesandro Volta Joseph... tesla matician, astro- flux density nomer 1777-1855 Joseph Henry American physi- henry: inductance inductance of a circuit in which cist 1797-1878 the

  12. Assessing the quality of operation notes: a review of 1092 operation notes in 9 UK hospitals.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Julia

    2016-01-01

    The General Medical Council states that effective note keeping is essential and records should be clear, accurate and legible. However previous studies of operation notes have shown they can be variable in quality and affect patient safety. This study compares the quality of operation notes against the National Standards set by the Royal College of Surgeons of England and the British Orthopaedic Association (BOA) for improving patient safety. Information from Orthopaedic operation notes was collected prospectively over a 2-week period. All elective and trauma operations performed were included and trainees from the region coordinated data collection in 9 hospitals. Data from 1092 operation notes was reviewed. A number of important standards were nearly met including legibility (98.4 %), the name of the operating surgeon (99.3 %) and the operation title (99.1 %). However a number of standards were not met and those with potential patient safety implications include availability on the ward (88.8 %), documentation of type of anaesthetic used (78.6 %), diagnosis (73.4 %) and findings (80.1 %). In addition, the postoperative instructions recorded the need for and type of postoperative antibiotics or venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in only 49.7 % and 48.8 % of cases respectively. The quality and content of operation notes studied across the region in this period was variable. Use of software programmes in some hospitals for creating operation notes meant that some centres had better results for elements such as date, time and patient identification details. Following this study, greater awareness of the standards combined with additional local measures may improve the quality of operation notes.

  13. Notes on Linguistics, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notes on Linguistics, 1998

    1998-01-01

    The four issues of the journal of language research and linguistic theory include these articles: "Notes on Determiners in Chamicuro" (Steve Parker); Lingualinks Field Manual Development" (Larry Hayashi); "Comments from an International Linguistics Consultant: Thumbnail Sketch" (Austin Hale); "Carlalinks…

  14. Safety engineered injection devices for intramuscular, subcutaneous and intradermal injections in healthcare delivery settings: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Harb, Alain C; Tarabay, Rami; Diab, Batoul; Ballout, Rami A; Khamassi, Selma; Akl, Elie A

    2015-01-01

    Occupational sharps injuries are associated with transmission of bloodborne viruses to healthcare workers, including hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Similarly reuse of syringes in healthcare settings might transmit these infections between patients. The objective of this study was to systematically review the evidence about the effects of the use by health care workers of two types of safety engineered injection devices, when delivering intramuscular, subcutaneous, or intradermal injectable medications: sharps injury protection syringes and reuse prevention syringes. We included both randomized and non-randomized studies comparing safety syringes to syringes without safety features. Outcomes of interest included needlestick injuries, and HIV, HBV and HCV infections amongst HCWs (for sharps injury prevention syringes) and patients (for reuse prevention syringes). When possible, we conducted meta-analyses using a random-effects model. We tested results for heterogeneity across studies using the I statistic. We assessed the quality of evidence by outcome using the GRADE methodology. We included nine eligible studies: six assessed devices that qualify as sharps injury prevention devices, and three assessed devices that qualify as both injury prevention devices and reuse prevention devices. Eight studies were observational while one was randomized. All studies assessed a single outcome: needle stick injuries among healthcare workers. For sharp injury prevention syringes, the meta-analysis of five studies resulted in a pooled relative risk of 0.54 [0.41, 0.71] for the effect on needlestick injuries per healthcare worker. The associated quality of evidence was rated as moderate. For reuse prevention syringes, data from one study provided a relative risk of 0.40 [0.27, 0.59] for the effect on needlestick injuries per healthcare worker. The associated quality of evidence was rated as moderate. We identified no

  15. 22. TEMPORARY CENTRIFIGAL PUMP. NOTE CHAPMAN HYDRAULICOPERATED VALVE FOR LATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. TEMPORARY CENTRIFIGAL PUMP. NOTE CHAPMAN HYDRAULIC-OPERATED VALVE FOR LATER CONNECTION OF ENGINE PUMP END TO DISCHARGE HEADER. - Lakeview Pumping Station, Clarendon & Montrose Avenues, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  16. 16. VIEW OF FIRST FLOOR EAST OPERATING GALLERY. NOTE THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. VIEW OF FIRST FLOOR EAST OPERATING GALLERY. NOTE THE SERIES OF MANIPULATOR ARMS ALONG THE LEFT WALL. - Nevada Test Site, Engine Maintenance Assembly & Disassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  17. 23. TEMPORARY CENTRIFUGAL PUMP. NOTE CHAPMAN HYDRAULICOPERATED VALVE FOR LATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. TEMPORARY CENTRIFUGAL PUMP. NOTE CHAPMAN HYDRAULIC-OPERATED VALVE FOR LATER CONNECTION OF ENGINE PUMP ENG TO DISCHARGE HEADER. - Lakeview Pumping Station, Clarendon & Montrose Avenues, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  18. Motorcycle safety, environmental effects, and performance studies. 1964-June, 1980 (a bibliography with abstracts). Report for 1964-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Kenton, E.

    1980-07-01

    The reports cited in this bibliography primarily are concerned with motorcycle safety and pollution. These studies cover safety equipment and education, visual and visibility factors, noise, fuel consumption, engine performance, air pollution, vehicle design, tire and brake characteristics, and illuminating systems. Testing programs are described for both machines and operators, underlining impact and anthropomorphic crash data. Training programs are noted for drivers. Particular attention is given to accident prevention, safety helmets, and protective clothing. (This updated bibliography contains 172 abstracts, 37 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  19. Characterizing Engineered Nanomaterials: From Environmental, Health and Safety Research to the Development of Shaped Nanosphere Lithography for Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewicka, Zuzanna A.

    In this thesis two issues in nanotechnology have been addressed. The first is the comprehensive characterization of engineered nanomaterials prior to their examination in toxicology and environmental studies. The second is the development of a method to produce nanostructure arrays over large areas and for low cost. A major challenge when assessing nanomaterial’s risks is the robust characterization of their physicochemical properties, particularly in commercial products. Such data allows the critical features for biological outcomes to be determined. This work focused on the inorganic oxides that were studied in powdered and dispersed forms as well as directly in consumer sunscreen products. The most important finding was that the commercial sunscreens that listed titania or zinc oxide as ingredients contained nanoscale materials. Cell free photochemical tests revealed that ZnO particles without any surface coating were more active at generating ROS than surface coated TiO2 nanoparticles. These studies make clear the importance of exposure studies that examine the native form of nanomaterials directly in commercial products. The second part of this thesis presents the development of a new method to fabricate gold nanoring and nanocrescent arrays over large areas; such materials have unique optical properties consonant with those described as metamaterials. A new shaped nanosphere lithography approach was used to manipulate the form of silica nanospheres packed onto a surface; the resulting array of mushroom structures provided a mask that after gold evaporation and etching left either golden rings or crescents over the surface. The structures had tunable features, with outer diameters ranging from 200 to 350 nm for rings and crescent gap angles of ten to more than a hundred degrees. The use of a double mask method ensured the uniform coverage of these structured over 1 cm² areas. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the optical properties of the

  20. Proceedings of Fuel Safety Workshop Held at Alexandria, Virginia on 29 October-1 November 1985.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-31

    Massachusetts, Mr. Rivers received his Bachelor of Science Degree in 1961 from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Master’s Degree in Chemical Engineering...Administration AI, Aircraft Safety & Airport Technology Division 14. Sponsoring Agency CodeWashington, D.C. 20591 APM-700 i5. Supplementary Notes Hold at...re-evaluate past approaches in terms of current technology ; and 4) To propose a course of action for future industry/government research, especially

  1. 29 CFR Appendices to Subpart L of... - Note

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Note Appendices to Subpart L of Part 1910 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Fire Protection Pt. 1910, Subpt. L, Apps. Nt. Appendices to Subpart L...

  2. 29 CFR Appendices to Subpart L of... - Note

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Note Appendices to Subpart L of Part 1910 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Fire Protection Pt. 1910, Subpt. L, Apps. Nt. Appendices to Subpart L...

  3. 29 CFR Appendices to Subpart L of... - Note

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Note Appendices to Subpart L of Part 1910 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Fire Protection Pt. 1910, Subpt. L, Apps. Nt. Appendices to Subpart L...

  4. 29 CFR Appendices to Subpart L of... - Note

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Note Appendices to Subpart L of Part 1910 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Fire Protection Pt. 1910, Subpt. L, Apps. Nt. Appendices to Subpart L...

  5. 29 CFR Appendices to Subpart L of... - Note

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Note Appendices to Subpart L of Part 1910 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Fire Protection Pt. 1910, Subpt. L, Apps. Nt. Appendices to Subpart L...

  6. Safety of isotropic flywheels

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, M.W.

    1981-04-30

    A probabilistic safety criterion for isotropic flywheel rotors is established based on the tolerated noncontainment failure rates of commercial aircraft turbojet engine rotors. A technique is developed combining reliability with fracture mechanics, and a sample calculation provided, to show the energy-storage levels that isotropic flywheel rotors could achieve within the constraints of this safety criterion.

  7. TWRS safety program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Calderon, L.M., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    Management of Nuclear Safety, Industrial Safety, Industrial Hygiene, and Fire Protection programs, functions, and field support resources for Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) has, until recently, been centralized in TWRS Safety, under the Emergency, Safety, and Quality organization. Industrial hygiene technician services were also provided to support operational needs related to safety basis compliance. Due to WHC decentralization of safety and reengineering efforts in West Tank Farms, staffing and safety responsibilities have been transferred to the facilities. Under the new structure, safety personnel for TWRS are assigned directly to East Tank Farms, West Tank Farms, and a core Safety Group in TWRS Engineering. The Characterization Project Operations (CPO) safety organization will remain in tact as it currently exists. Personnel assigned to East Tank Farms, West Tank Farms, and CPO will perform facility-specific or project-specific duties and provide field implementation of programs. Those assigned to the core group will focus on activities having a TWRS-wide or programmatic focus. Hanford-wide activities will be the responsibility of the Safety Center of Expertise. In order to ensure an effective and consistent safety program for TWRS under the new organization program functions, goals, organizational structure, roles, responsibilities, and path forward must be clearly established. The purpose of the TWRS Safety Program Plan is to define the overall safety program, responsibilities, relationships, and communication linkages for safety personnel under the new structure. In addition, issues associated with reorganization transition are addressed, including training, project ownership, records management, and dissemination of equipment. For the purpose of this document ``TWRS Safety`` refers to all safety professionals and technicians (Industrial Safety, Industrial Hygiene, Fire Protection, and Nuclear Safety) within the TWRS organization, regardless of their

  8. Robotics Technical Note 102.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    IAfl-AIBZ 4U2 AIR FORCE BUSINESS RESEARCH MANAGEMENT CENTER WRIGHT-ETC F/6 13/8 I ROBOTICS TECHNIICAL NOTE 102.(U) JUN Al B M BLABIERSALL UNCLASSIFE...CATALOG uME 1T4.T7- Subtitle S. TYPE OF REPOR & PERIOO COVERED Technical Note 102 Robotics 𔄁 FInal r ---- 6. PERFORMING O1G. REPORT NUMBER C 7. A tNORa B...Identify by block number) Robotics Manufacturing Industrial Robots Robot Technology SRobotics Application BQ~.STRACT (Continue on revere* side It

  9. Notes on Piezoelectricity

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo, Antonio

    2016-02-03

    These notes provide a pedagogical discussion of the physics of piezoelectricity. The exposition starts with a brief analysis of the classical (continuum) theory of piezoelectric phenomena in solids. The main subject of the notes is, however, a quantum mechanical analysis. We first derive the Frohlich Hamiltonian as part of the description of the electron-phonon interaction. The results of this analysis are then employed to derive the equations of piezoelectricity. A couple of examples with the zinc blende and and wurtzite structures are presented at the end

  10. A fire safety engineering perspective on crowd evacuation dynamics. Comment on "Human behaviours in evacuation crowd dynamics: From modelling to "big data" toward crisis management" by Nicola Bellomo et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronchi, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    The review presented by Bellomo et al. [1] addresses the modelling approaches employed to represent human behaviour in evacuation in a comprehensive manner. The authors discuss crowd evacuation modelling in light of crisis management, a relevant and current topic given the recent escalation of terrorist threats all over the world. The need for designing buildings for rapid evacuation using crowd evacuation models has been recently raised in important forums [2]. This research area is strictly linked to the field of Fire Safety Engineering.

  11. Engineering ethics beyond engineers' ethics.

    PubMed

    Basart, Josep M; Serra, Montse

    2013-03-01

    Engineering ethics is usually focused on engineers' ethics, engineers acting as individuals. Certainly, these professionals play a central role in the matter, but engineers are not a singularity inside engineering; they exist and operate as a part of a complex network of mutual relationships between many other people, organizations and groups. When engineering ethics and engineers' ethics are taken as one and the same thing the paradigm of the ethical engineer which prevails is that of the heroic engineer, a certain model of the ideal engineer: someone both quite individualistic and strong enough to deal with all the moral challenges that could arise. We argue that this is not the best approach, at least today in our interrelated world. We have achieved a high degree of independence from nature by means of technology. In exchange for this autonomy we have become increasingly tied up with very complex systems to which we constantly delegate new tasks and powers. Concerns about safety keep growing everywhere due to the fact that now we have a sensitive awareness of the huge amount of power we are both consuming and deploying, thus, new forms of dialogue and consensus have to be incorporated at different levels, in different forums and at different times. Within these democratic channels of participation not just the needs and interests, but also the responsibilities and mutual commitments of all parties should be taken into account.

  12. Programmable Logic Application Notes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard

    2000-01-01

    This column will be provided each quarter as a source for reliability, radiation results, NASA capabilities, and other information on programmable logic devices and related applications. This quarter will start a series of notes concentrating on analysis techniques with this issues section discussing worst-case analysis requirements.

  13. NCTM Student Math Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maletsky, Evan, Ed.; Yunker, Lee E., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Five sets of activities for students are included in this document. Each is designed for use in junior high and secondary school mathematics instruction. The first Note concerns mathematics on postage stamps. Historical procedures and mathematicians, metric conversion, geometric ideas, and formulas are among the topics considered. Successful…

  14. Notes on Literacy, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notes on Literacy, 1997

    1997-01-01

    The 1997 volume of "Notes on Literacy," numbers 1-4, includes the following articles: "Community Based Literacy, Burkina Faso"; "The Acquisition of a Second Writing System"; "Appropriate Methodology and Social Context"; "Literacy Megacourse Offered"; "Fitting in with Local Assumptions about…

  15. Notes on Linguistics, 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notes on Linguistics, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This document consists of the four issues of "Notes on Linguistics" published during 1990. Articles in the four issues include: "The Indians Do Say Ugh-Ugh" (Howard W. Law); "Constraints of Relevance, A Key to Particle Typology" (Regina Blass); "Whatever Happened to Me? (An Objective Case Study)" (Aretta…

  16. Notes and Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal of Physics, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Includes eleven short notes, comments and responses to comments on a variety of topics such as uncertainty in a least-squares fit, display of diffraction patterns, the dark night sky paradox, error in the dynamics of deformable bodies and relative velocities and the runner. (GA)

  17. Student Math Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maletsky, Evan, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Five sets of activities for students are included in this document. Each is designed for use in junior high and secondary school mathematics instruction. The first "Note" concerns magic squares in which the numbers in every row, column, and diagonal add up to the same sum. An etching by Albrecht Durer is presented, with four questions followed by…

  18. Sawtooth Functions. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirst, Keith

    2004-01-01

    Using MAPLE enables students to consider many examples which would be very tedious to work out by hand. This applies to graph plotting as well as to algebraic manipulation. The challenge is to use these observations to develop the students' understanding of mathematical concepts. In this note an interesting relationship arising from inverse…

  19. Programmable Logic Application Notes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report will be provided each quarter as a source for reliability, radiation results, NASA capabilities, and other information on programmable logic devices and related applications. This quarter will continue a series of notes concentrating on analysis techniques with this issue's section discussing the use of Root-Sum-Square calculations for digital delays.

  20. Notes on Linguistics, 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loos, Eugene, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    This document consists of the four issues of "Notes on Linguistics" published during 1991. Articles in the four issues include: "Linguistics without Books: A Diary Entry" (John Verhaar); "Writing for Scholarly Publications" (Howard Law); "Will Kofi Understand the White Woman's Dictionary?" (Gillian Hansford); "Tips About 'WORD'" (Bryan Harmelink);…

  1. Notes on Linguistics, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, David, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    The 1999 issues of "Notes on Linguistics," published quarterly, include the following articles, review articles, reviews, book notices, and reports: "A New Program for Doing Morphology: Hermit Crab"; "Lingualinks CD-ROM: Field Guide to Recording Language Data"; "'Unruly' Phonology: An Introduction to Optimality Theory"; "Borrowing vs. Code…

  2. Notes and Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal of Physics, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Includes eleven short notes, comments and responses to comments on a variety of topics such as uncertainty in a least-squares fit, display of diffraction patterns, the dark night sky paradox, error in the dynamics of deformable bodies and relative velocities and the runner. (GA)

  3. Pediatric safety pin ingestion.

    PubMed

    Sarihan, H; Kaklikkaya, I; Ozcan, F

    1998-08-01

    Fifteen consecutive children with ingested safety pins were evaluated retrospectively. Eight patients were males and seven were girls. The mean age of the patients was 5.4 years ranging from 7 months to 16 years. Two of 15 patients were mentally retarded Seven safety pins ingestion were noted by parents, three older children applied with safety pin swallowing. Three infants referred with hypersalivation and swallowing difficulty. One of two mentally retarded patients had recurrent aspiration pneumonia, the other had neck abscess. These patients' lesions were detected incidentally by thoracic X-ray. Nine safety pins were at the level of the cricopharyngeus, one at the level of the aortic arch and five at the esophagogastric junction. A right esophagoscopy was used for extraction of safety pins under general anesthesia and endotracheal intubation were used. Before esophagoscopy control plain X-ray was obtained for location of safety pin. Nine safety pins were extracted by esophagoscopy. Three safety pins spontaneously and three during anesthesia induction passed through the esophagus falling down the stomach. Five of these six safety pins were spontaneously extracted without complication. However one open safety pin lodged at the duodenum and laparotomy was required. In this article, etiology and management of safety pin ingestion in children are discussed.

  4. Evaluation of endogenous allergens for the safety evaluation of genetically engineered food crops: review of potential risks, test methods, examples and relevance.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Richard E; Panda, Rakhi; Ariyarathna, Harsha

    2013-09-04

    The safety of food produced from genetically engineered (GE) crops is assessed for potential risks of food allergy on the basis of an international consensus guideline outlined by the Codex Alimentarius Commission (2003). The assessment focuses on evaluation of the potential allergenicity of the newly expressed protein(s) as the primary potential risk using a process that markedly limits risks to allergic consumers. However, Codex also recommended evaluating a second concern, potential increases in endogenous allergens of commonly allergenic food crops that might occur due to insertion of the gene. Unfortunately, potential risks and natural variation of endogenous allergens in non-GE varieties are not understood, and risks from increases have not been demonstrated. Because regulatory approvals in some countries are delayed due to increasing demands for measuring endogenous allergens, we present a review of the potential risks of food allergy, risk management for food allergy, and test methods that may be used in these evaluations. We also present new data from our laboratory studies on the variation of the allergenic lipid transfer protein in non-GE maize hybrids as well as data from two studies of endogenous allergen comparisons for three GE soybean lines, their nearest genetic soy lines, and other commercial lines. We conclude that scientifically based limits of acceptable variation cannot been established without an understanding of natural variation in non-GE crops. Furthermore, the risks from increased allergen expression are minimal as the risk management strategy for food allergy is for allergic individuals to avoid consuming any food containing their allergenic source, regardless of the crop variety.

  5. AGING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    C.E. Sanders

    2004-09-10

    The purpose of this design calculation is to revise and update the previous criticality calculation for the Aging Facility (documented in BSC 2004a). This design calculation will also demonstrate and ensure that the storage and aging operations to be performed in the Aging Facility meet the criticality safety design criteria in the ''Project Design Criteria Document'' (Doraswamy 2004, Section 4.9.2.2), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirement described in the ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004f, p. 3-12). The scope of this design calculation covers the systems and processes for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and staging Department of Energy (DOE) SNF/High-Level Waste (HLW) prior to its placement in the final waste package (WP) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-1). Aging commercial SNF is a thermal management strategy, while staging DOE SNF/HLW will make loading of WPs more efficient (note that aging DOE SNF/HLW is not needed since these wastes are not expected to exceed the thermal limits form emplacement) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-2). The description of the changes in this revised document is as follows: (1) Include DOE SNF/HLW in addition to commercial SNF per the current ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC 2004f). (2) Update the evaluation of Category 1 and 2 event sequences for the Aging Facility as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004c, Section 7). (3) Further evaluate the design and criticality controls required for a storage/aging cask, referred to as MGR Site-specific Cask (MSC), to accommodate commercial fuel outside the content specification in the Certificate of Compliance for the existing NRC-certified storage casks. In addition, evaluate the design required for the MSC that will accommodate DOE SNF/HLW. This design calculation will achieve the objective of providing the criticality safety results to support the preliminary design of the Aging

  6. CRITICALITY SAFETY CONTROLS AND THE SAFETY BASIS AT PFP

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, S

    2009-04-21

    reviewing documents used in classifying controls for Nuclear Safety, it was noted that DOE-HDBK-1188, 'Glossary of Environment, Health, and Safety Terms', defines an Administrative Control (AC) in terms that are different than typically used in Criticality Safety. As part of this CCR, a new term, Criticality Administrative Control (CAC) was defined to clarify the difference between an AC used for criticality safety and an AC used for nuclear safety. In Nuclear Safety terms, an AC is a provision relating to organization and management, procedures, recordkeeping, assessment, and reporting necessary to ensure safe operation of a facility. A CAC was defined as an administrative control derived in a criticality safety analysis that is implemented to ensure double contingency. According to criterion 2 of Section IV, 'Linkage to the Documented Safety Analysis', of DOESTD-3007-2007, the consequence of a criticality should be examined for the purposes of classifying the significance of a control or component. HNF-PRO-700, 'Safety Basis Development', provides control selection criteria based on consequence and risk that may be used in the development of a Criticality Safety Evaluation (CSE) to establish the classification of a component as a design feature, as safety class or safety significant, i.e., an Engineered Safety Feature (ESF), or as equipment important to safety; or merely provides defense-in-depth. Similar logic is applied to the CACs. Criterion 8C of DOE-STD-3007-2007, as written, added to the confusion of using the basic CCR from HNF-7098. The PFP CCR attempts to clarify this criterion by revising it to say 'Programmatic commitments or general references to control philosophy (e.g., mass control or spacing control or concentration control as an overall control strategy for the process without specific quantification of individual limits) is included in the PFP DSA'. Table 1 shows the PFP methodology for evaluating CACs. This evaluation process has been in use since

  7. Middle School Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Outlines a variety of laboratory procedures, discussions, and demonstrations including Brownian motion, a synchronous motor, jet engine, atmospheric pressure vortex ring machines, solid chemical dispensing, testing household detergents, wallchart storage, pollution by industrial chemicals, an optical illusion, and buoyancy. (GS)

  8. Middle School Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Outlines a variety of laboratory procedures, discussions, and demonstrations including Brownian motion, a synchronous motor, jet engine, atmospheric pressure vortex ring machines, solid chemical dispensing, testing household detergents, wallchart storage, pollution by industrial chemicals, an optical illusion, and buoyancy. (GS)

  9. Motorcycle safety, environmental effects, and performance studies. 1964-October, 1981 (citations from the NTIS Data Base). Report for 1964-Oct 81

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    The reports cited in this bibliography primarily are concerned with motorcycle safety and pollution. These studies cover safety equipment and education, visual and visibility factors, noise, fuel consumption, engine performance, air pollution, vehicle design, tire and brake characteristics, and illuminating systems. Testing programs are described for both machines and operators, underlining impact and anthropomorphic crash data. Training programs are noted for drivers. Particular attention is given to accident prevention, safety helmets, and protective clothing. (This updated bibliography contains 233 citations, 61 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  10. Engine-Vibration Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolmei, V. R.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed circuit would monitor vibration spectrum of engines under test or in service. It could detect subtle out-of-specification conditions and could be programed to shut down engine if an out-of-limits condition develops. Possible uses of monitor are in bench testing automobiles and outboard motors and as a safety device in very critical engine applications.

  11. Lift truck safety review

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1997-03-01

    This report presents safety information about powered industrial trucks. The basic lift truck, the counterbalanced sit down rider truck, is the primary focus of the report. Lift truck engineering is briefly described, then a hazard analysis is performed on the lift truck. Case histories and accident statistics are also given. Rules and regulations about lift trucks, such as the US Occupational Safety an Health Administration laws and the Underwriter`s Laboratories standards, are discussed. Safety issues with lift trucks are reviewed, and lift truck safety and reliability are discussed. Some quantitative reliability values are given.

  12. Physicians' attitudes towards copy and pasting in electronic note writing.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Heather C; Kaushal, Rainu; Barrón, Yolanda; Callahan, Mark A; Adelman, Ronald D; Siegler, Eugenia L

    2009-01-01

    The ability to copy and paste text within computerized physician documentation facilitates electronic note writing, but may affect the quality of physician notes and patient care. Little is known about physicians' collective experience with the copy and paste function (CPF). To determine physicians' CPF use, perceptions of its impact on notes and patient care, and opinions regarding its future use. Cross-sectional survey. Resident and faculty physicians within two affiliated academic medical centers currently using a computerized documentation system. Responses on a self-administered survey. A total of 315 (70%) of 451 eligible physicians responded to the survey. Of the 253 (80%) physicians who wrote inpatient notes electronically, 226 (90%) used CPF, and 177 (70%) used it almost always or most of the time when writing daily progress notes. While noting that inconsistencies (71%) and outdated information (71%) were more common in notes containing copy and pasted text, few physicians felt that CPF had a negative impact on patient documentation (19%) or led to mistakes in patient care (24%). The majority of physicians (80%) wanted to continue to use CPF. Although recognizing deficits in notes written using CPF, the majority of physicians used CPF to write notes and did not perceive an overall negative impact on physician documentation or patient care. Further studies of the effects of electronic note writing on the quality and safety of patient care are required.

  13. Middle School Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes equipment, experiments, and activities useful in middle school science instruction, including demonstrating how strong paper can be, the inclined plane illusion, a simplified diet calculation, a magnetic levitator, science with soap bubbles, a model motor and dynamo, and a pocketed sorter for safety glasses. (SK)

  14. Middle School Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes equipment, experiments, and activities useful in middle school science instruction, including demonstrating how strong paper can be, the inclined plane illusion, a simplified diet calculation, a magnetic levitator, science with soap bubbles, a model motor and dynamo, and a pocketed sorter for safety glasses. (SK)

  15. 40 CFR 1033.625 - Special certification provisions for non-locomotive-specific engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... name of the engine manufacturer and engine family identifier for the engines. (ii) A brief engineering... proprietary engine software. Note that this allowance to separately submit some of the information required...

  16. 40 CFR 1033.625 - Special certification provisions for non-locomotive-specific engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... name of the engine manufacturer and engine family identifier for the engines. (ii) A brief engineering... proprietary engine software. Note that this allowance to separately submit some of the information required...

  17. Software Safety Risk in Legacy Safety-Critical Computer Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Janice L.; Baggs, Rhoda

    2007-01-01

    Safety Standards contain technical and process-oriented safety requirements. Technical requirements are those such as "must work" and "must not work" functions in the system. Process-Oriented requirements are software engineering and safety management process requirements. Address the system perspective and some cover just software in the system > NASA-STD-8719.13B Software Safety Standard is the current standard of interest. NASA programs/projects will have their own set of safety requirements derived from the standard. Safety Cases: a) Documented demonstration that a system complies with the specified safety requirements. b) Evidence is gathered on the integrity of the system and put forward as an argued case. [Gardener (ed.)] c) Problems occur when trying to meet safety standards, and thus make retrospective safety cases, in legacy safety-critical computer systems.

  18. The impact of the monetary crisis and the development of a health and social safety-net with a special note on donor participation--real life experiences on the role of health services in public health.

    PubMed

    Suparmanto, S A; Sundoro, T; Stokoe, P

    1999-01-01

    South-East Asia (i.e. Indonesia) has enjoyed economic boom and rapid unbridled growth for the last decade. This rapid expansion was fuelled by cheap labour, foreign and local investments and the extensive development of the oil and non-oil sector. Dark clouds, however, loomed on the economic and financial horizons of these rapidly developing 'tiger' economies. Indonesia was not only affected by various facts-of-life elements which contributed to these grave forecasts but also by a wave of natural disasters on an unprecedented scale, with devastating social and economic effects on the poor and susceptible groups. Although economic recovery will take time, the most pressing and practical measure remains the need to create a health and social safety net to maintain the health, social and nutritional status of the "population-at-risk". This paper is an exposure of "lessons learnt" and the invaluable role of health services and public health to the negative impact of the monetary crisis experienced by various inter-sectors, which the authors believe can be used as a long-term investment measure in other countries.

  19. 4. Panama Mount. Note concrete ring and metal rail. Note ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Panama Mount. Note concrete ring and metal rail. Note cliff erosion under foundation at left center. Looking 297° W. - Fort Funston, Panama Mounts for 155mm Guns, Skyline Boulevard & Great Highway, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  20. HSE's safety assessment principles for criticality safety.

    PubMed

    Simister, D N; Finnerty, M D; Warburton, S J; Thomas, E A; Macphail, M R

    2008-06-01

    The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) published its revised Safety Assessment Principles for Nuclear Facilities (SAPs) in December 2006. The SAPs are primarily intended for use by HSE's inspectors when judging the adequacy of safety cases for nuclear facilities. The revised SAPs relate to all aspects of safety in nuclear facilities including the technical discipline of criticality safety. The purpose of this paper is to set out for the benefit of a wider audience some of the thinking behind the final published words and to provide an insight into the development of UK regulatory guidance. The paper notes that it is HSE's intention that the Safety Assessment Principles should be viewed as a reflection of good practice in the context of interpreting primary legislation such as the requirements under site licence conditions for arrangements for producing an adequate safety case and for producing a suitable and sufficient risk assessment under the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1999 (SI1999/3232 www.opsi.gov.uk/si/si1999/uksi_19993232_en.pdf).

  1. Actuator system history of safety rod lower latch problems review of latch inspection video tapes

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, J.J.

    1992-06-24

    During pre-restart testing the safety rod at position X26-YlO bound after being driven approximately two (2) feet out of the reactor. Subsequently, the rod was manually returned to it's seated position. Inspection of the lower latch showed that the latch locking plunger button (screwed on to the bottom of the plunger shaft and retained by a pin through a hole drilled through the button and the plunger shaft) was missing. The shaft failed through the hole drilled for the retaining pin. The button, with the retaining pin intact, was found lodged between the safety rod upper adapter collar and the top of the safety rod thimble top fitting. Analysis of the safety rod latch and accompanying forest guide tube design provided assurance that this type of failure would not cause binding during the scramming'' of the safety rods. Inspection of all of the K'' safety rod lower latches revealed six other latches with missing plunger buttons, and nine with other non-conformances which required latch replacement. A history search conducted by Reactor Engineering Design, Components Handling Group, is included in this report. The history search shows that latch design modifications, as a part of initial development of the latch system and later to improve the delatching operation, were made from 1950 to 1960. These modifications created a condition where latch damage could occur. Video tapes were made during inspection of the safety rod latches in K area and control rod latches in L area. These tapes were reviewed by Reactor Engineering Design Components Handling engineers. The reviews were used for correlation of latch problems reported by the engineers/mechanics making the inspections. The K area tapes showed inspection of 65 of the 66 safety rod latches. The review of the tapes showed the plunger buttons to be missing from five latches. RED-CH reviewed the L Area video taped inspection of 35 control rod clusters (245 latches). No non-conformances were noted.

  2. Actuator system history of safety rod lower latch problems review of latch inspection video tapes

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, J.J.

    1992-06-24

    During pre-restart testing the safety rod at position X26-YlO bound after being driven approximately two (2) feet out of the reactor. Subsequently, the rod was manually returned to it`s seated position. Inspection of the lower latch showed that the latch locking plunger button (screwed on to the bottom of the plunger shaft and retained by a pin through a hole drilled through the button and the plunger shaft) was missing. The shaft failed through the hole drilled for the retaining pin. The button, with the retaining pin intact, was found lodged between the safety rod upper adapter collar and the top of the safety rod thimble top fitting. Analysis of the safety rod latch and accompanying forest guide tube design provided assurance that this type of failure would not cause binding during the ``scramming`` of the safety rods. Inspection of all of the ``K`` safety rod lower latches revealed six other latches with missing plunger buttons, and nine with other non-conformances which required latch replacement. A history search conducted by Reactor Engineering Design, Components Handling Group, is included in this report. The history search shows that latch design modifications, as a part of initial development of the latch system and later to improve the delatching operation, were made from 1950 to 1960. These modifications created a condition where latch damage could occur. Video tapes were made during inspection of the safety rod latches in K area and control rod latches in L area. These tapes were reviewed by Reactor Engineering Design Components Handling engineers. The reviews were used for correlation of latch problems reported by the engineers/mechanics making the inspections. The K area tapes showed inspection of 65 of the 66 safety rod latches. The review of the tapes showed the plunger buttons to be missing from five latches. RED-CH reviewed the L Area video taped inspection of 35 control rod clusters (245 latches). No non-conformances were noted.

  3. Note-Taking: Different Notes for Different Research Stages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Explains the need to teach students different strategies for taking notes for research, especially at the exploration and collecting information stages, based on Carol Kuhlthau's research process. Discusses format changes; using index cards; notes for live presentations or media presentations versus notes for printed sources; and forming focus…

  4. Science Education Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents eight separate articles on science education. Topic areas addressed include: an inservice course in primary science; improving physics teaching; reducing chemistry curriculum; textbook readability measures; school-industry link for introductory engineering; local education authority initiatives in primary school science; and "Winnie…

  5. Failure after 5 years of self-regulation: a health and safety audit of New Zealand engineering companies carrying out welding.

    PubMed

    Walls, C B; Dryson, E W

    2002-09-01

    The aim of this study was to audit the degree of compliance with new health and safety legislation 5 years after enactment in a typical cross-section of New Zealand manufacturing industries. To this end, 299 randomly selected enterprises using a welding process were visited by Occupational Safety and Health Officers of the Department of Labour. An interviewer-administered questionnaire concerning the nature of the hazards encountered in that enterprise and the chosen control measures employed to protect the health of their employees was undertaken and analysed. Only 40% of New Zealand businesses in this sample undertaking welding had adopted the most basic of regulatory requirements to control health and safety risks. This percentage seemed independent of employer size. Fundamental safety issues (e.g. welding in confined spaces) were ignored by >50% of enterprises. In conclusion, self-management of health and safety risks had not occurred in over half the enterprises surveyed.

  6. Technical note: preventive maintenance quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Russell, D

    1992-01-01

    Performance improvements in healthcare and, specifically, in clinical engineering are required by the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations' Plant Technology and Safety Management (PTSM) documents. The goals of healthcare service quality assurance are to establish performance requirements and improve patient outcomes. It is important that these goals be kept in the forefront of the design of clinical engineering quality assurance planning. Indicator/threshold pairs must be carefully chosen on the basis of some logical relation to the desired goals of the overall program.

  7. Home Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Swimming and Water Apply Swimming and Water filter Toy Safety Apply Toy Safety filter TV and Furniture Tip-Overs Apply ... Laundry Packets Medication Poison Sleep Safety and Suffocation Toy Safety TV and Furniture Tip-Overs Water and ...

  8. COBRA Main Engine Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snoddy, Jim; Sides, Steve; Lyles, Garry M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The COBRA (CO-Optimized Booster for Reusable Applications) project include the following: 1. COBRA main engine project team. 2. COBRA and RLX cycles selected. 3. COBRA proto-type engine approach enables mission success. 4. COBRA provides quick, low cost demo of cycle and technologies. 5. COBRA cycle I risk reduction supports. 6. Achieving engine safety. 6. RLX cycle I risk reduction supports. 7. Flight qualification. 9. Life extension engine testing.

  9. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1981 to the DOE Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Protection, Safety and Emergency Preparedness. Part 5. Environmental and occupational protection, assessment, and engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, W.A.

    1982-02-01

    This report describes research in environment, health, and safety conducted during fiscal year 1981. The five parts of the report are oriented to particular segments of the program. Parts 1 to 4 report on research performed for the DOE Office of Health and Environmental Research in the Office of Energy Research. Part 5 reports progress on all research performed for the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Protection, Safety and Emergency Preparedness. The parts are: Part 1: Biomedical Sciences under Program Manager, H. Drucker; Part 2: Ecological Sciences, under Program Manager, B.E. Vaughan; Part 3: Atmospheric Sciences under Program Manager, C.E. Elderkin; Part 4: Physical Sciences under Program Manager, J.M. Nielsen; and Part 5: Environmental and Occupational Protection, Assessment, and Engineering under Program Managers, D.L. Hessel, S. Marks, and W.A. Glass.

  10. Safety and health concerns in forestry operations

    Treesearch

    Robert B. Rummer

    1997-01-01

    The author discusses several safety models, including the "Three E?s": engineering, education, and enforcement; the Heinrich-Lateiner model; the organizational model; and the behavioral safety model. Rummer encourages approaching safety from a broader perspective, enabling the industry to track changes in all aspects and to keep leading the safety target....

  11. 9. Interior, original Boiler and Engine Room, Engine Stores Building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Interior, original Boiler and Engine Room, Engine Stores Building, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, view to south (90mm lens). Note the roof truss system and built-up iron longitudinal roof girders. - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Engine Stores Building, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  12. 10. Interior detail, original Boiler and Engine Room, Engine Stores ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Interior detail, original Boiler and Engine Room, Engine Stores Building, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, view to east (90mm lens). Note the pin-connected roof truss system and built-up iron longitudinal roof girders. - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Engine Stores Building, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  13. The hybrid progress note: semiautomating daily progress notes to achieve high-quality documentation and improve provider efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kargul, George J; Wright, Scott M; Knight, Amy M; McNichol, Mary T; Riggio, Jeffrey M

    2013-01-01

    Health care institutions are moving toward fully functional electronic medical records (EMRs) that promise improved documentation, safety, and quality of care. However, many hospitals do not yet use electronic documentation. Paper charting, including writing daily progress notes, is time-consuming and error prone. To improve the quality of documentation at their hospital, the authors introduced a highly formatted paper note template (hybrid note) that is prepopulated with data from the EMR. Inclusion of vital signs and active medications improved from 75.5% and 60% to 100% (P < .001), respectively. The use of unapproved abbreviations in the medication list decreased from 13.3% to 0% (P < .001). Prepopulating data enhances provider efficiency. Interviews of key clinician leaders also suggest that the initiative is well accepted and that documentation quality is enhanced. The hybrid progress note improves documentation and provider efficiency, promotes quality care, and initiates the development of the forthcoming electronic progress note.

  14. Software system safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uber, James G.

    1988-01-01

    Software itself is not hazardous, but since software and hardware share common interfaces there is an opportunity for software to create hazards. Further, these software systems are complex, and proven methods for the design, analysis, and measurement of software safety are not yet available. Some past software failures, future NASA software trends, software engineering methods, and tools and techniques for various software safety analyses are reviewed. Recommendations to NASA are made based on this review.

  15. Overview of safety research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enders, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Aircraft safety is reviewed by first establishing a perspective of air transportation accidents as a function of calendar year, geographic area, and phase of flight, and then by describing the threats to safety and NASA research underway in the three representative areas of engine operational problems, meteorological phenomena, and fire. Engine rotor burst protection, aircraft nacelle fire extinguishment, the aircraft-weather interface, severe weather wind shears and turbulence, clear air turbulence, and lightning are among the topics covered. Fire impact management through fire resistant materials technology development is emphasized.

  16. Deep Borehole Disposal Safety Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Stein, Emily; Price, Laura L.; MacKinnon, Robert J.; Tillman, Jack Bruce

    2016-10-01

    This report presents a preliminary safety analysis for the deep borehole disposal (DBD) concept, using a safety case framework. A safety case is an integrated collection of qualitative and quantitative arguments, evidence, and analyses that substantiate the safety, and the level of confidence in the safety, of a geologic repository. This safety case framework for DBD follows the outline of the elements of a safety case, and identifies the types of information that will be required to satisfy these elements. At this very preliminary phase of development, the DBD safety case focuses on the generic feasibility of the DBD concept. It is based on potential system designs, waste forms, engineering, and geologic conditions; however, no specific site or regulatory framework exists. It will progress to a site-specific safety case as the DBD concept advances into a site-specific phase, progressing through consent-based site selection and site investigation and characterization.

  17. CRITICALITY SAFETY TRAINING AT FLUOR HANFORD (FH)

    SciTech Connect

    TOFFER, H.

    2005-05-02

    The Fluor Hanford Criticality Safety engineers are extensively trained. The objectives and requirements for training are derived from Department of Energy (DOE) and American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society Standards (ANSI/ANS), and are captured in the Hanford Criticality Safety Program manual, HNF-7098. Qualification cards have been established for the general Criticality Safety Engineer (CSE) analyst, CSEs who support specific facilities, and for the facility Criticality Safety Representatives (CSRs). Refresher training and continuous education in the discipline are emphasized. Weekly Brown Bag Sessions keep the criticality safety engineers informed of the latest developments and historic perspectives.

  18. What's In a Note: Construction of a Suicide Note Corpus.

    PubMed

    Pestian, John P; Matykiewicz, Pawel; Linn-Gust, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of an initiative to create and annotate a corpus of suicide notes that can be used for machine learning. Ultimately, the corpus included 1,278 notes that were written by someone who died by suicide. Each note was reviewed by at least three annotators who mapped words or sentences to a schema of emotions. This corpus has already been used for extensive scientific research.

  19. NACA Wartime Safety Poster

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1945-04-21

    One of many safety posters produced by NACA artists during World War II. The Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory established a Safety Office in 1942 to coordinate and oversee safety-related activities. The lab struggled to maintain a full staff during the war when military research projects were at a peak. NACA management mandated six-day work weeks without overtime and the elimination of holidays. As such, workplace injuries were a serious threat to maintaining productivity needed to sustain the military’s aeronautics efforts.

  20. Software Safety Risk in Legacy Safety-Critical Computer Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Janice; Baggs, Rhoda

    2007-01-01

    Safety-critical computer systems must be engineered to meet system and software safety requirements. For legacy safety-critical computer systems, software safety requirements may not have been formally specified during development. When process-oriented software safety requirements are levied on a legacy system after the fact, where software development artifacts don't exist or are incomplete, the question becomes 'how can this be done?' The risks associated with only meeting certain software safety requirements in a legacy safety-critical computer system must be addressed should such systems be selected as candidates for reuse. This paper proposes a method for ascertaining formally, a software safety risk assessment, that provides measurements for software safety for legacy systems which may or may not have a suite of software engineering documentation that is now normally required. It relies upon the NASA Software Safety Standard, risk assessment methods based upon the Taxonomy-Based Questionnaire, and the application of reverse engineering CASE tools to produce original design documents for legacy systems.

  1. Addressing Problem Behavior at Recess Using Peer Praise Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teerlink, Elise; Caldarella, Paul; Anderson, Darlene H.; Richardson, Michael J.; Guzman, E. Geovanni

    2017-01-01

    School recess, though beneficial to students in many ways, can be a problematic setting due to inadequate supervision, structure, and safety. A peer praise note (PPN) intervention was implemented on the recess playground to address these concerns at a Title I elementary school. Researchers used a single-subject reversal design across all students…

  2. 247. Axial Parkway alignment along ridge top. Note the open ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    247. Axial Parkway alignment along ridge top. Note the open vistas to either side of the roadway. These are maintained through vegetation management. The wood guide rail is a primary safety feature. View is to the northeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  3. Retrieval comparison of EndNote to search MEDLINE (Ovid and PubMed) versus searching them directly.

    PubMed

    Gall, Carole; Brahmi, Frances A

    2004-01-01

    Using EndNote version 7.0, the authors tested the search capabilities of the EndNote search engine for retrieving citations from MEDLINE for importation into EndNote, a citation management software package. Ovid MEDLINE and PubMed were selected for the comparison. Several searches were performed on Ovid MEDLINE and PubMed using EndNote as the search engine, and the same searches were run on both Ovid and PubMed directly. Findings indicate that it is preferable to search MEDLINE directly rather than using EndNote. The publishers of EndNote do warn its users about the limitations of their product as a search engine when searching external databases. In this article, the limitations of EndNote as a search engine for searching MEDLINE were explored as related to MeSH, non-MeSH, citation verification, and author searching.

  4. Drug Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... over-the-counter drug. The FDA evaluates the safety of a drug by looking at Side effects ... clinical trials The FDA also monitors a drug's safety after approval. For you, drug safety means buying ...

  5. Vaccine Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... FAQs about Vaccine Safety Research Publications HDM Reports ISO Scientific Agenda Ensuring Safety History Understanding Side Effects ... Datalink Publications Emergency Preparedness Vaccine Safety Partners About ISO File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

  6. Urban construction and safety project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogarth, P. T.

    1976-01-01

    Technology utilization projects in the area of urban construction and safety included the following: development of undercarpet and baseboard flat conductor cables, flood insurance studies, tornado safety engineering, the Project TECH house at the Langley Research Center, assistance to the City of Atlanta in their environmental habitability and resource allocation program, and market assessment of a solid state diesel engine controller. The flat conductor cable and the flood insurance studies are given particular attention.

  7. Apollo experience report: Safety activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, C. N.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of the flight safety experiences gained during the Apollo Program and safety, from the viewpoint of program management, engineering, mission planning, and ground test operations was discussed. Emphasis is placed on the methods used to identify the risks involved in flight and in certain ground test operations. In addition, there are discussions on the management and engineering activities used to eliminate or reduce these risks.

  8. Offshore safety case approach and formal safety assessment of ships.

    PubMed

    Wang, J

    2002-01-01

    Tragic marine and offshore accidents have caused serious consequences including loss of lives, loss of property, and damage of the environment. A proactive, risk-based "goal setting" regime is introduced to the marine and offshore industries to increase the level of safety. To maximize marine and offshore safety, risks need to be modeled and safety-based decisions need to be made in a logical and confident way. Risk modeling and decision-making tools need to be developed and applied in a practical environment. This paper describes both the offshore safety case approach and formal safety assessment of ships in detail with particular reference to the design aspects. The current practices and the latest development in safety assessment in both the marine and offshore industries are described. The relationship between the offshore safety case approach and formal ship safety assessment is described and discussed. Three examples are used to demonstrate both the offshore safety case approach and formal ship safety assessment. The study of risk criteria in marine and offshore safety assessment is carried out. The recommendations on further work required are given. This paper gives safety engineers in the marine and offshore industries an overview of the offshore safety case approach and formal ship safety assessment. The significance of moving toward a risk-based "goal setting" regime is given.

  9. Online Class Size, Note Reading, Note Writing and Collaborative Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qiu, Mingzhu; Hewitt, Jim; Brett, Clare

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have long recognized class size as affecting students' performance in face-to-face contexts. However, few studies have examined the effects of class size on exact reading and writing loads in online graduate-level courses. This mixed-methods study examined relationships among class size, note reading, note writing, and collaborative…

  10. Online Class Size, Note Reading, Note Writing and Collaborative Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qiu, Mingzhu; Hewitt, Jim; Brett, Clare

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have long recognized class size as affecting students' performance in face-to-face contexts. However, few studies have examined the effects of class size on exact reading and writing loads in online graduate-level courses. This mixed-methods study examined relationships among class size, note reading, note writing, and collaborative…

  11. Safety Picks up "STEAM"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Ken

    2016-01-01

    This column shares safety information for the classroom. STEAM subjects--science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics--are essential for fostering students' 21st-century skills. STEAM promotes critical-thinking skills, including analysis, assessment, categorization, classification, interpretation, justification, and prediction, and are…

  12. Aerospace safety advisory panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Data acquired on the actual flight experience with the various subsystems are assessed. These subsystems include: flight control and performance, structural integrity, orbiter landing gear, lithium batteries, EVA and prebreathing, and main engines. Improvements for routine operations are recommended. Policy issues for operations and flight safety for aircraft operations are discussed.

  13. Safety Picks up "STEAM"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Ken

    2016-01-01

    This column shares safety information for the classroom. STEAM subjects--science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics--are essential for fostering students' 21st-century skills. STEAM promotes critical-thinking skills, including analysis, assessment, categorization, classification, interpretation, justification, and prediction, and are…

  14. Liquefied natural gas (LNG) safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ordin, P. M.

    1977-01-01

    Bibliography, assembled from computer search of NASA Aerospace Safety Data Bank, including title of report, author, abstract, source, description of figures, key references, and key words or subject terms. Publication is indexed by key subjects and by authors. Items are relevant to design engineers and safety specialists.

  15. Liquefied natural gas (LNG) safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ordin, P. M.

    1977-01-01

    Bibliography, assembled from computer search of NASA Aerospace Safety Data Bank, including title of report, author, abstract, source, description of figures, key references, and key words or subject terms. Publication is indexed by key subjects and by authors. Items are relevant to design engineers and safety specialists.

  16. Application of software to development of reactor-safety codes

    SciTech Connect

    Wilburn, N.P.; Niccoli, L.G.

    1980-09-01

    Over the past two-and-a-half decades, the application of new techniques has reduced hardware cost for digital computer systems and increased computational speed by several orders of magnitude. A corresponding cost reduction in business and scientific software development has not occurred. The same situation is seen for software developed to model the thermohydraulic behavior of nuclear systems under hypothetical accident situations. For all cases this is particularly noted when costs over the total software life cycle are considered. A solution to this dilemma for reactor safety code systems has been demonstrated by applying the software engineering techniques which have been developed over the course of the last few years in the aerospace and business communities. These techniques have been applied recently with a great deal of success in four major projects at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL): 1) a rewrite of a major safety code (MELT); 2) development of a new code system (CONACS) for description of the response of LMFBR containment to hypothetical accidents, and 3) development of two new modules for reactor safety analysis.

  17. 40 CFR 1033.625 - Special certification provisions for non-locomotive-specific engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and engine family identifier for the engines. (ii) A brief engineering analysis describing how the... engine software. Note that this allowance to separately submit some of the information required by § 1033...

  18. 40 CFR 1033.625 - Special certification provisions for non-locomotive-specific engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and engine family identifier for the engines. (ii) A brief engineering analysis describing how the... engine software. Note that this allowance to separately submit some of the information required by §...

  19. Research Notes and Information References

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, III, Dean S.

    1994-12-01

    The RNS (Research Notes System) is a set of programs and databases designed to aid the research worker in gathering, maintaining, and using notes taken from the literature. The sources for the notes can be books, journal articles, reports, private conversations, conference papers, audiovisuals, etc. The system ties the databases together in a relational structure, thus eliminating data redundancy while providing full access to all the information. The programs provide the means for access and data entry in a way that reduces the key-entry burden for the user. Each note has several data fields. Included are the text of the note, the subject classification (for retrieval), and the reference identification data. These data are divided into four databases: Document data - title, author, publisher, etc., fields to identify the article within the document; Note data - text and page of the note; Sublect data - subject categories to ensure uniform spelling for searches. Additionally, there are subsidiary files used by the system, including database index and temporary work files. The system provides multiple access routes to the notes, both structurally (access method) and topically (through cross-indexing). Output may be directed to a printer or saved as a file for input to word processing software.

  20. 49 CFR Appendix - Editorial Note:

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Editorial Note: Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation ORGANIZATION AND DELEGATION OF POWERS AND DUTIES Operating Administrations.... Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting appendix A to part 1, see the List of CFR Sections...

  1. Automotive Stirling Engine Mod 1 Design Review, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Risk assessment, safety analysis of the automotive stirling engine (ASE) mod I, design criteria and materials properties for the ASE mod I and reference engines, combustion are flower development, and the mod I engine starter motor are discussed. The stirling engine system, external heat system, hot engine system, cold engine system, and engine drive system are also discussed.

  2. 5. Interior Detail of Roof Structure and Trusses Note: Photographs ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Interior Detail of Roof Structure and Trusses Note: Photographs Nos. CA-1543F-6 through CA-1543F-19 are photocopies of construction drawings (various dates). Originals located at Mare Island Naval Shipyard-Staff Civil Engineer's Office. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Chemical Cleaning Facility, North of Fourteenth Street, between California & Railroad Avenue, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  3. DETAIL OF MAIN ENTRANCE ON NORTH SIDE; NOTE GOTHIC DETAILING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF MAIN ENTRANCE ON NORTH SIDE; NOTE GOTHIC DETAILING ON ENTRANCE PAVILION, PARAPET: ORIGINAL, PORTION OF THIS BUILDING WAS DESIGNED BY RATH PLANT ENGINEER J.S. BARTLEY IN 1925 - Rath Packing Company, Administration Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  4. 48 CFR 852.236-91 - Special notes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... buildings, structures, and communications facilities, or other engineering projects, including furnishing... function as noted on drawings and specifications. There shall be no additional cost to the Government. (d) In some instances it may have been impracticable to detail all items in specifications or on...

  5. Improving Highway Safety Manpower: Traffic Engineering Technician Project at Longview Community College and Community College of Denver. Phase 2. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korim, Andrew S.

    In Phase 2, materials on traffic accident investigation were introduced into the curriculum to determine the appropriateness of such materials in preparing traffic engineering technicians. This report gives findings, conclusions, and recommendations based on the testing efforts. The primary conclusion is that the curriculum being tested was…

  6. Model-Based Safety Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Anjali; Heimdahl, Mats P. E.; Miller, Steven P.; Whalen, Mike W.

    2006-01-01

    System safety analysis techniques are well established and are used extensively during the design of safety-critical systems. Despite this, most of the techniques are highly subjective and dependent on the skill of the practitioner. Since these analyses are usually based on an informal system model, it is unlikely that they will be complete, consistent, and error free. In fact, the lack of precise models of the system architecture and its failure modes often forces the safety analysts to devote much of their effort to gathering architectural details about the system behavior from several sources and embedding this information in the safety artifacts such as the fault trees. This report describes Model-Based Safety Analysis, an approach in which the system and safety engineers share a common system model created using a model-based development process. By extending the system model with a fault model as well as relevant portions of the physical system to be controlled, automated support can be provided for much of the safety analysis. We believe that by using a common model for both system and safety engineering and automating parts of the safety analysis, we can both reduce the cost and improve the quality of the safety analysis. Here we present our vision of model-based safety analysis and discuss the advantages and challenges in making this approach practical.

  7. Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting. Volume 3, Primary system integrity; Aging research, products and applications; Structural and seismic engineering; Seismology and geology: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Monteleone, S.

    1994-04-01

    This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25-27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Selected papers were indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  8. Twenty-second water reactor safety information meeting: Proceedings. Volume 3: Primary systems integrity; Structural and seismic engineering; Aging research, products and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Monteleone, S.

    1995-04-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty-Second Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 24--26, 1994. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from Finland, France, Italy, Japan, Russia, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  9. 75 FR 27428 - Safety Standards for Steel Erection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration 29 CFR Part 1926 Safety Standards for Steel Erection AGENCY... technical amendment adds a nonmandatory note to the OSHA standards governing steel erection. The note... employers engaged in activities covered by OSHA's steel erection standards. DATES: Effective date: May...

  10. 14. INTERIOR OF ENGINE ROOM, CONTAINING MESTACORLISS CROSSCOMPOUND ENGINE, FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. INTERIOR OF ENGINE ROOM, CONTAINING MESTA-CORLISS CROSS-COMPOUND ENGINE, FOR 40" BLOOMING MILL. THIS VIEW HIGHLIGHTS THE CRANK AND 24' DIAMETER FLYWHEEL. THE ENGINE IS A 7,940 HP MESTA-CORLISS CROSS-COMPOUND STEAM ENGINE ITS BORE AND STROKE ARE 32"X84"X60". NOTE FLY BALL GOVERNOR ON ENGINE. MILL DRIVE SHAFT ATTACHED TO PULLEY ON LOCATED ON CRANK. - Republic Iron & Steel Company, Youngstown Works, Blooming Mill & Blooming Mill Engines, North of Poland Avenue, Youngstown, Mahoning County, OH

  11. Safety Basis Report

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Garrett

    2002-01-14

    As part of the internal Integrated Safety Management Assessment verification process, it was determined that there was a lack of documentation that summarizes the safety basis of the current Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) site characterization activities. It was noted that a safety basis would make it possible to establish a technically justifiable graded approach to the implementation of the requirements identified in the Standards/Requirements Identification Document. The Standards/Requirements Identification Documents commit a facility to compliance with specific requirements and, together with the hazard baseline documentation, provide a technical basis for ensuring that the public and workers are protected. This Safety Basis Report has been developed to establish and document the safety basis of the current site characterization activities, establish and document the hazard baseline, and provide the technical basis for identifying structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that perform functions necessary to protect the public, the worker, and the environment from hazards unique to the YMP site characterization activities. This technical basis for identifying SSCs serves as a grading process for the implementation of programs such as Conduct of Operations (DOE Order 5480.19) and the Suspect/Counterfeit Items Program. In addition, this report provides a consolidated summary of the hazards analyses processes developed to support the design, construction, and operation of the YMP site characterization facilities and, therefore, provides a tool for evaluating the safety impacts of changes to the design and operation of the YMP site characterization activities.

  12. POEM, the Prototypical "New NOTES" Procedure and First Successful NOTES Procedure.

    PubMed

    Bechara, Robert; Inoue, Haruhiro

    2016-04-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) was first performed in 2008 as a novel treatment of achalasia. It is now performed globally, demonstrating the evolution of the first successful natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) procedure. There is extensive data demonstrating the safety and efficacy of POEM, and now long-term data has emerged demonstrating that the efficacy is durable. POEM is also being used to successfully treat diffuse esophageal spasm (DES) and jackhammer esophagus. With jackhammer esophagus and DES, inclusion of the lower esophageal sphincter in the myotomy minimizes the risk of symptom development from iatrogenic ineffective esophageal motility.

  13. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    An assessment of NASA's safety performance for 1983 affirms that NASA Headquarters and Center management teams continue to hold the safety of manned flight to be their prime concern, and that essential effort and resources are allocated for maintaining safety in all of the development and operational programs. Those conclusions most worthy of NASA management concentration are given along with recommendations for action concerning; product quality and utility; space shuttle main engine; landing gear; logistics and management; orbiter structural loads, landing speed, and pitch control; the shuttle processing contractor; and the safety of flight operations. It appears that much needs to be done before the Space Transportation System can achieve the reliability necessary for safe, high rate, low cost operations.

  14. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-03-01

    The Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) provided oversight on the safety aspects of many NASA programs. In addition, ASAP undertook three special studies. At the request of the Administrator, the panel assessed the requirements for an assured crew return vehicle (ACRV) for the space station and reviewed the organization of the safety and mission quality function within NASA. At the behest of Congress, the panel formed an independent, ad hoc working group to examine the safety and reliability of the space shuttle main engine. Section 2 presents findings and recommendations. Section 3 consists of information in support of these findings and recommendations. Appendices A, B, C, and D, respectively, cover the panel membership, the NASA response to the findings and recommendations in the March 1992 report, a chronology of the panel's activities during the reporting period, and the entire ACRV study report.

  15. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) provided oversight on the safety aspects of many NASA programs. In addition, ASAP undertook three special studies. At the request of the Administrator, the panel assessed the requirements for an assured crew return vehicle (ACRV) for the space station and reviewed the organization of the safety and mission quality function within NASA. At the behest of Congress, the panel formed an independent, ad hoc working group to examine the safety and reliability of the space shuttle main engine. Section 2 presents findings and recommendations. Section 3 consists of information in support of these findings and recommendations. Appendices A, B, C, and D, respectively, cover the panel membership, the NASA response to the findings and recommendations in the March 1992 report, a chronology of the panel's activities during the reporting period, and the entire ACRV study report.

  16. Safety Cases for Advanced Control Software: Safety Case Patterns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-15

    safety claims about conventional software. For example, Littlewood and Strigini note in [8] that, at best, statistical testing can show a failure...ERA Technology Ltd, Report 97-0365, Project 13-01-4745, 1997 [8] B. Littlewood and L. Strigini, Assessment of ultra-high dependability of

  17. 40 CFR 87.6 - Aircraft safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aircraft safety. 87.6 Section 87.6... POLLUTION FROM AIRCRAFT AND AIRCRAFT ENGINES General Provisions § 87.6 Aircraft safety. The provisions of... be met within the specified time without creating a hazard to aircraft safety....

  18. 40 CFR 87.6 - Aircraft safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Aircraft safety. 87.6 Section 87.6... POLLUTION FROM AIRCRAFT AND AIRCRAFT ENGINES General Provisions § 87.6 Aircraft safety. The provisions of... be met within the specified time without creating a hazard to aircraft safety....

  19. [Problem-oriented nursing notes].

    PubMed

    Plante, A

    1989-09-01

    These notes use the nursing process to communicate effectively the work done with the patient. The author describes with the help of examples this professional work system, which is simple yet revealing of the nurse's capacity for analysis.

  20. Earthquake Safety: Activities for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Washington, DC.

    Lessons on earthquake safety involving planning, preparation, and practice are presented in this booklet for teachers. Included are classroom activities designed for K-6 students, teaching notes, "Learning Links" that summarize interdisciplinary connections, a set of 15 masters for reproducing transparencies, handouts, and worksheets. Part 1 shows…

  1. NASA's Software Safety Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsay, Christopher M.

    2005-01-01

    NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) relies more and more on software to control, monitor, and verify its safety critical systems, facilities and operations. Since the 1960's there has hardly been a spacecraft (manned or unmanned) launched that did not have a computer on board that provided vital command and control services. Despite this growing dependence on software control and monitoring, there has been no consistent application of software safety practices and methodology to NASA's projects with safety critical software. Led by the NASA Headquarters Office of Safety and Mission Assurance, the NASA Software Safety Standard (STD-18l9.13B) has recently undergone a significant update in an attempt to provide that consistency. This paper will discuss the key features of the new NASA Software Safety Standard. It will start with a brief history of the use and development of software in safety critical applications at NASA. It will then give a brief overview of the NASA Software Working Group and the approach it took to revise the software engineering process across the Agency.

  2. SSC Safety Review Document

    SciTech Connect

    Toohig, T.E.

    1988-11-01

    The safety strategy of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Central Design Group (CDG) is to mitigate potential hazards to personnel, as far as possible, through appropriate measures in the design and engineering of the facility. The Safety Review Document identifies, on the basis of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) and related studies, potential hazards inherent in the SSC project independent of its site. Mitigative measures in the design of facilities and in the structuring of laboratory operations are described for each of the hazards identified.

  3. 7 CFR 1786.154 - Qualified Notes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Qualified Notes. 1786.154 Section 1786.154... Discounted Prepayments on RUS Electric Loans § 1786.154 Qualified Notes. An eligible borrower may prepay Qualified Notes under this subpart at the discounted present value. A Qualified Note is a note evidencing an...

  4. 12 CFR 161.33 - Note account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Note account. 161.33 Section 161.33 Banks and... SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS § 161.33 Note account. The term note account means a note, subject to the right of immediate call, evidencing funds held by depositories electing the note option under applicable United...

  5. 12 CFR 390.300 - Note account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Note account. 390.300 Section 390.300 Banks and... Associations § 390.300 Note account. The term note account means a note, subject to the right of immediate call, evidencing funds held by depositories electing the note option under applicable United States Treasury...

  6. 7 CFR 1786.154 - Qualified Notes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Qualified Notes. 1786.154 Section 1786.154... Discounted Prepayments on RUS Electric Loans § 1786.154 Qualified Notes. An eligible borrower may prepay Qualified Notes under this subpart at the discounted present value. A Qualified Note is a note evidencing an...

  7. 7 CFR 1786.154 - Qualified Notes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Qualified Notes. 1786.154 Section 1786.154 Agriculture... Prepayments on RUS Electric Loans § 1786.154 Qualified Notes. An eligible borrower may prepay Qualified Notes under this subpart at the discounted present value. A Qualified Note is a note evidencing an RUS...

  8. 12 CFR 561.33 - Note account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Note account. 561.33 Section 561.33 Banks and... SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS § 561.33 Note account. The term note account means a note, subject to the right of immediate call, evidencing funds held by depositories electing the note option under applicable United...

  9. 12 CFR 161.33 - Note account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Note account. 161.33 Section 161.33 Banks and... SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS § 161.33 Note account. The term note account means a note, subject to the right of immediate call, evidencing funds held by depositories electing the note option under applicable United...

  10. 12 CFR 561.33 - Note account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Note account. 561.33 Section 561.33 Banks and... SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS § 561.33 Note account. The term note account means a note, subject to the right of immediate call, evidencing funds held by depositories electing the note option under applicable United...

  11. 12 CFR 561.33 - Note account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Note account. 561.33 Section 561.33 Banks and... SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS § 561.33 Note account. The term note account means a note, subject to the right of immediate call, evidencing funds held by depositories electing the note option under applicable United...

  12. 12 CFR 561.33 - Note account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Note account. 561.33 Section 561.33 Banks and... SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS § 561.33 Note account. The term note account means a note, subject to the right of immediate call, evidencing funds held by depositories electing the note option under applicable United...

  13. The Use of Enhanced Guided Notes in an Electric Circuit Class: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawanto, O.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate students' (n=70) learning performance after their participation in lectures using enhanced guided notes (EGN) in an electric circuits course for non-electrical engineering students. Unlike traditional guided notes, EGN include questions that prompt students to evaluate their metacognitive knowledge. The results…

  14. The Use of Enhanced Guided Notes in an Electric Circuit Class: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawanto, O.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate students' (n=70) learning performance after their participation in lectures using enhanced guided notes (EGN) in an electric circuits course for non-electrical engineering students. Unlike traditional guided notes, EGN include questions that prompt students to evaluate their metacognitive knowledge. The results…

  15. Food Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... the safety of fish caught in your local lakes, rivers, and coastal areas. Advisories may recommend that ... Charts Picky Eating Physical Activity Food Safety Resources Kids Students Adults Families Professionals Multiple Languages MyPlate, MyWins ...

  16. Water Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Water Safety KidsHealth > For Parents > Water Safety A A ... best measure of protection. previous continue Making Kids Water Wise It's important to teach your kids proper ...

  17. Water Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Water Safety KidsHealth > For Teens > Water Safety A A ... tied to alcohol use. previous continue At the Water Park OK, so you do more splashing than ...

  18. Hand Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis de la base del pulgar Dedo en gatillo ... Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis de la base del pulgar Dedo en gatillo ...

  19. Rationale for Incorporating Health and Safety into the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleischman, Marvin

    1988-01-01

    Presents a philosophical commentary on the need and rationale for incorporating safety and health into the chemical engineering curriculum. Proposes safety and health assessments as useful teaching methods. Describes an approach to bringing safety and health into undergraduate engineering curricula. Gives examples of integration of these curricula…

  20. The Engineered Adjustment Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spilker, George

    Described are the curriculum, behavioral modification program, summer activities, and parent involvement in the Papillion (Nebraska) Title III elementary level "engineered classroom" program for emotionally disturbed students. Noted is program initiation after parents and teachers became upset over poor academic progress and behaviors of…

  1. Nuclear criticality safety: 2-day training course

    SciTech Connect

    Schlesser, J.A.

    1997-02-01

    This compilation of notes is presented as a source reference for the criticality safety course. At the completion of this training course, the attendee will: be able to define terms commonly used in nuclear criticality safety; be able to appreciate the fundamentals of nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify factors which affect nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify examples of criticality controls as used as Los Alamos; be able to identify examples of circumstances present during criticality accidents; have participated in conducting two critical experiments; be asked to complete a critique of the nuclear criticality safety training course.

  2. Fire safety

    Treesearch

    Robert H. White; Mark A. Dietenberger

    1999-01-01

    Fire safety is an important concern in all types of construction. The high level of national concern for fire safety is reflected in limitations and design requirements in building codes. These code requirements are discussed in the context of fire safety design and evaluation in the initial section of this chapter. Since basic data on fire behavior of wood products...

  3. Safety Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD.

    Safety policies, procedures, and related information are presented in this manual to assist school personnel in a continuing program of accident prevention. Chapter 1 discusses safety education and accident prevention in general. Chapter 2 covers traffic regulations relating to school safety patrols, school bus transportation, bicycles, and…

  4. Child passenger safety.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Dennis R

    2011-04-01

    Child passenger safety has dramatically evolved over the past decade; however, motor vehicle crashes continue to be the leading cause of death of children 4 years and older. This policy statement provides 4 evidence-based recommendations for best practices in the choice of a child restraint system to optimize safety in passenger vehicles for children from birth through adolescence: (1) rear-facing car safety seats for most infants up to 2 years of age; (2) forward-facing car safety seats for most children through 4 years of age; (3) belt-positioning booster seats for most children through 8 years of age; and (4) lap-and-shoulder seat belts for all who have outgrown booster seats. In addition, a fifth evidence-based recommendation is for all children younger than 13 years to ride in the rear seats of vehicles. It is important to note that every transition is associated with some decrease in protection; therefore, parents should be encouraged to delay these transitions for as long as possible. These recommendations are presented in the form of an algorithm that is intended to facilitate implementation of the recommendations by pediatricians to their patients and families and should cover most situations that pediatricians will encounter in practice. The American Academy of Pediatrics urges all pediatricians to know and promote these recommendations as part of child passenger safety anticipatory guidance at every health-supervision visit.

  5. Engines/Fuels Workshop, 6-8 December 1982, San Antonio, Texas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    different from Report) 18. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 19. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse side if necessary and identify by block number) Diesel Fuel Gas Turbine...Engine Fuel Diesel Engine Combustion Gas Turbine Engine Combustion Diesel Engines Gas Turbine Engines Adiabatic Diesel Engine Multifuel Engines...compound adiabatic diesel , provide promise for real efficiency gains but also provide challenges for combustion optimization. At this workshop

  6. Logistical Evaluation of the T53-L-7 Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1965-03-31

    release mechanism prior to the removal of the ground safety pin . 11 RECOMMENDATION: Recommend that a "CAUTION" note be added foilowing paragraph 2...the solenoid be reset prior to remnoval of ground safety pin . " These measures are necessary to prevent inadvertent release of the drop tank when the...paragraph 4-150c, "CAUTION" note, covers a safety measure i)r the electrical release mechanism prior to the removal of the ground safety pin but does

  7. 30 CFR 7.103 - Safety system control test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... allowable low water level. Run the engine until the exhaust gas temperature sensor activates the safety... shutdown system and stop the engine at or above the minimum allowable low water level established from... the engine until the low water sensor activates the safety shutdown system and stops the...

  8. Safety analysis report for packaging for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory TRA Type 1 Shipping Container and TRA Type 2 Shipping Capsule

    SciTech Connect

    Havlovick, B.J.

    1992-07-27

    The TRA Type I Shipping Container and TRA Type II Shipping Capsule were designed and fabricated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory as special form containers for the transport of non-fissile radioisotopes and fissile radioisotopes in exempt quantities. The Type I container measures 0.75 in. outside diameter and 3.000 in long. The Type II capsule is 0.495 in. outside diameter 2.000 in. long. The container and capsule were tested and evaluated to determine their compliance with Title 49 Code of Federal Regulations 173, which governs packages for special form radioactive material. This report is based upon those tests and evaluations. The results of those tests and evaluations demonstrate the container and capsule are in full compliance with the special form shipping container regulations of 49 CFR 173.

  9. Aircraft engines. II

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    An account is given of the design features and prospective performance gains of ultrahigh bypass subsonic propulsion configurations and various candidate supersonic commercial aircraft powerplants. The supersonic types, whose enhanced thermodynamic cycle efficiency is considered critical to the economic viability of a second-generation SST, are the variable-cycle engine, the variable stream control engine, the turbine-bypass engine, and the supersonic-throughflow fan. Also noted is the turboramjet concept, which will be applicable to hypersonic aircraft whose airframe structure materials can withstand the severe aerothermodynamic conditions of this flight regime.

  10. Some Notes on a Functional Equation. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ren, Zhong-Pu; Wu, Zhi-Qin; Zhou, Qi-Fa; Guo, Bai-Ni; Qi, Feng

    2004-01-01

    In this short note, a mathematical proposition on a functional equation for f(xy)=xf(y) + yf(x)for x,y [does not equal] 0, which is encountered in calculus, is generalized step by step. These steps involve continuity, differentiability, a functional equation, an ordinary differential linear equation of the first order, and relationships between…

  11. Lightning safety of animals.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Chandima

    2012-11-01

    This paper addresses a concurrent multidisciplinary problem: animal safety against lightning hazards. In regions where lightning is prevalent, either seasonally or throughout the year, a considerable number of wild, captive and tame animals are injured due to lightning generated effects. The paper discusses all possible injury mechanisms, focusing mainly on animals with commercial value. A large number of cases from several countries have been analyzed. Economically and practically viable engineering solutions are proposed to address the issues related to the lightning threats discussed.

  12. Standardized Curriculum for Diesel Engine Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson. Office of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    Standardized curricula are provided for two courses for the secondary vocational education program in Mississippi: diesel engine mechanics I and II. The eight units in diesel engine mechanics I are as follows: orientation; shop safety; basic shop tools; fasteners; measurement; engine operating principles; engine components; and basic auxiliary…

  13. 14 CFR 25.903 - Engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.903 Engines. (a) Engine type certificate. (1... safety of the airplane. Each component of the stopping system on the engine side of the firewall that... engine installations— (1) Design precautions must be taken to minimize the hazards to the airplane in the...

  14. 14 CFR 25.903 - Engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.903 Engines. (a) Engine type certificate. (1... safety of the airplane. Each component of the stopping system on the engine side of the firewall that... engine installations— (1) Design precautions must be taken to minimize the hazards to the airplane in the...

  15. Standardized Curriculum for Diesel Engine Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson. Office of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    Standardized curricula are provided for two courses for the secondary vocational education program in Mississippi: diesel engine mechanics I and II. The eight units in diesel engine mechanics I are as follows: orientation; shop safety; basic shop tools; fasteners; measurement; engine operating principles; engine components; and basic auxiliary…

  16. Aging and service wear of electric motor-operated valves used in engineered safety-feature systems of nuclear power plants: Aging assessments and monitoring method evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, H.D.

    1989-08-01

    Motor-operated valves (MOVs) are located in almost all plant fluid systems. Their failures have resulted in significant plant maintenance efforts. More important, the operational readiness if nuclear plant safety-related systems has often been affected by MOV degradation and failure. Thus, in recent years MOVs have received considerable attention by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the nuclear power industry and were identified as a component for study by the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. In support of the NPAR Program, a comprehensive Phase II aging assessment on MOVs was performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the results of this study are presented in this report. An evaluation of commercially available MOV monitoring methods was carried out, as well as an assessment of other potentially useful techniques. These assessments led to the identification of an effective, nonintrusive, and remote technique, namely, motor current signature analysis (MCSA). The capabilities of monitoring methods (especially MCSA) for detecting changes in operating conditions and MOV degradation were investigated in controlled laboratory tests at ORNL, in situ MOV tests at a neighboring nuclear power plant, and the Gate Valve Flow Interruption Blowdown test in Huntsville, Alabama. 17 refs., 121 figs., 10 tabs.

  17. Pre-Engineered Explosives Magazines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    JUN 2001 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Pre-Engineered Explosives Magazines 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Pre-engineered magazines provide a cost...Design Guidelines for Physical Security of Facilities.? Pre-engineered magazines are available in a variety of sizes at about half the cost of onsite

  18. Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Teacher, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Some topics included are: the relative merits of a programmable calculator and a microcomputer; the advantages of acquiring a sound-level meter for the laboratory; how to locate a virtual image in a plane mirror; center of gravity of a student; and how to demonstrate interference of light using two cords.

  19. Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Teacher, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Some topics included are: the relative merits of a programmable calculator and a microcomputer; the advantages of acquiring a sound-level meter for the laboratory; how to locate a virtual image in a plane mirror; center of gravity of a student; and how to demonstrate interference of light using two cords.

  20. Engineering Liver

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Linda G.; Wells, Alan; Stolz, Donna Beer

    2014-01-01

    Interest in “engineering liver” arises from multiple communities: therapeutic replacement; mechanistic models of human processes; and drug safety and efficacy studies. An explosion of micro- and nano-fabrication, biomaterials, microfluidic, and other technologies potentially afford unprecedented opportunity to create microphysiological models of human liver, but engineering design principles for how to deploy these tools effectively towards specific applications, including how to define the essential constraints of any given application (including available sources of cells, acceptable cost, and user-friendliness) are still emerging. Arguably less appreciated is the parallel growth in computational systems biology approaches towards these same problems – particularly, in parsing complex disease processes from clinical material, building models of response networks, and in how to interpret the growing compendium of data on drug efficacy and toxicology in patient populations. Here, we provide insight into how the complementary paths of “engineering liver” – experimental and computational – are beginning to interplay towards greater illumination of human disease states and technologies for drug development. PMID:24668880

  1. Engineering liver.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Linda G; Wells, Alan; Stolz, Donna B

    2014-10-01

    Interest in "engineering liver" arises from multiple communities: therapeutic replacement; mechanistic models of human processes; and drug safety and efficacy studies. An explosion of micro- and nanofabrication, biomaterials, microfluidic, and other technologies potentially affords unprecedented opportunity to create microphysiological models of the human liver, but engineering design principles for how to deploy these tools effectively toward specific applications, including how to define the essential constraints of any given application (available sources of cells, acceptable cost, and user-friendliness), are still emerging. Arguably less appreciated is the parallel growth in computational systems biology approaches toward these same problems-particularly in parsing complex disease processes from clinical material, building models of response networks, and in how to interpret the growing compendium of data on drug efficacy and toxicology in patient populations. Here, we provide insight into how the complementary paths of engineering liver-experimental and computational-are beginning to interplay toward greater illumination of human disease states and technologies for drug development. © 2014 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  2. National Safety Council

    MedlinePlus

    ... Introduction Safety Management Systems Workplace Safety Consulting Employee Perception Surveys Research Journey to Safety Excellence Join the ... Safety Safety Management Systems Workplace Safety Consulting Employee Perception Surveys Research Journey to Safety Excellence Join the ...

  3. Engineering Encounters: Engineering Adaptations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatling, Anne; Vaughn, Meredith Houle

    2015-01-01

    Engineering is not a subject that has historically been taught in elementary schools, but with the emphasis on engineering in the "Next Generation Science Standards," curricula are being developed to explicitly teach engineering content and design. However, many of the scientific investigations already conducted with students have…

  4. Engineering Encounters: Engineering Adaptations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatling, Anne; Vaughn, Meredith Houle

    2015-01-01

    Engineering is not a subject that has historically been taught in elementary schools, but with the emphasis on engineering in the "Next Generation Science Standards," curricula are being developed to explicitly teach engineering content and design. However, many of the scientific investigations already conducted with students have…

  5. Effects on groundwater flow of abandoned engineered structures for the safety assessment of the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository site at Forsmark, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockgård, Niclas; Marsic, Niko; Follin, Sven

    2014-09-01

    Effects on groundwater flow of abandoned engineered structures in relation to a potential geological repository for spent high-level nuclear fuel in fractured crystalline rock at the Forsmark site, Sweden, are studied by means of numerical modeling. The effects are analyzed by means of particle tracking, and transport-related performance measures are calculated. The impacts of abandoned, partially open repository tunnels are studied for two situations with different climate conditions: a "temperate" climate case with present-day boundary conditions, and a generic future "glacial" climate case with an ice sheet covering the repository. Then, the impact of abandoned open boreholes drilled through the repository is studied for present-day climate conditions. It is found that open repository tunnels and open boreholes can act as easy pathways from repository level to the ground surface; hence, they can attract a considerable proportion of particles released in the model at deposition hole positions within the repository. The changed flow field and flow paths cause some changes in the studied performance measures, i.e., increased flux at the deposition holes and decreased transport lengths and flow-related transport resistances. However, these effects are small and the transport resistance values are still high.

  6. 10 CFR 70.62 - Safety program and integrated safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 70.62 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR... Nuclear Material § 70.62 Safety program and integrated safety analysis. (a) Safety program. (1) Each... performed by a team with expertise in engineering and process operations. The team shall include at...

  7. Aging and service wear of check valves used in engineered safety-feature systems of nuclear power plants: Aging assessments and monitoring method evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, H.D. )

    1991-04-01

    Check valves are used extensively in nuclear power plant safety systems and balance-of-plant systems. The failures of these valves have resulted in significant maintenance efforts and, on occasion, have resulted in water hammer, overpressurization of low-pressure systems, and damage to flow system components. These failures have largely been attributed to severe degradation of internal parts (e.g., hinge pins, hinge arms, discs, and disc nut pins) resulting from instability (flutter) of check valve discs under normal plant operating conditions. Present surveillance requirements for nuclear power plant check valves have been inadequate for timely detection and trending of such degradation because neither the flutter nor the resulting wear can be detected prior to failure. Consequently, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has had a continuing strong interest in resolving check valve problems. In support of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has carried out an evaluation of several developmental and/or commercially available check valve diagnostic monitoring methods, in particular, those based on measurements of acoustic emission, ultrasonics, and magnetic flux. In each case, the evaluations have been focused on the capability of each method to provide diagnostic information useful in determining check valve aging and service wear effects (degradation), check valve failures, and undesirable operating modes. A description of each monitoring method is provided in this report, including examples of test data acquired under controlled laboratory conditions. In some cases, field test data acquired in situ are also presented. The methods are compared, and suggested areas in need of further development are identified. 6 refs., 36 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. A brief note regarding randomization.

    PubMed

    Senn, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    This note argues, contrary to claims in this journal, that the possible existence of indefinitely many causal factors does not invalidate randomization. The effect of such factors has to be bounded by outcome, and since inference is based on a ratio of between-treatment-group to within-treatment-group variation, randomization remains valid.

  9. EndNote at Lehigh.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Sharon; Simboli, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Describes the experiences of librarians at Lehigh University in implementing campus-wide use of EndNote, a citation management software package that allows users to create a searchable library of downloaded or manually entered references for any type of publication to be able to insert citations and format footnotes or endnotes within a…

  10. Lunar nomenclature: A dissenting note

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arthur, D.W.G.

    1976-01-01

    This note reviews the nature of the traditional (Ma??dler) lunar nomenclature and the recent developments based on the use of more than 2000 named provinces. It appears that the new nomenclature is less efficient than the old in many cases and may lead to an impossible publication situation. The unnecessary break with the past is especially critized. ?? 1976.

  11. Notes on the Montessori Adolescent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Margaret E.

    2000-01-01

    Maintains that Montessori education of adolescents (Erdkinder) should prepare them to exercise a self-disciplined will and judgment. Notes the importance of preparing children through Cosmic Education and through community service. Maintains that the logical focus of study for the third plane is the cosmic plan and the adolescent's place in it.…

  12. A Note on Hamiltonian Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skurnick, Ronald; Davi, Charles; Skurnick, Mia

    2005-01-01

    Since 1952, several well-known graph theorists have proven numerous results regarding Hamiltonian graphs. In fact, many elementary graph theory textbooks contain the theorems of Ore, Bondy and Chvatal, Chvatal and Erdos, Posa, and Dirac, to name a few. In this note, the authors state and prove some propositions of their own concerning Hamiltonian…

  13. EndNote at Lehigh.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Sharon; Simboli, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Describes the experiences of librarians at Lehigh University in implementing campus-wide use of EndNote, a citation management software package that allows users to create a searchable library of downloaded or manually entered references for any type of publication to be able to insert citations and format footnotes or endnotes within a…

  14. A Note on Hamiltonian Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skurnick, Ronald; Davi, Charles; Skurnick, Mia

    2005-01-01

    Since 1952, several well-known graph theorists have proven numerous results regarding Hamiltonian graphs. In fact, many elementary graph theory textbooks contain the theorems of Ore, Bondy and Chvatal, Chvatal and Erdos, Posa, and Dirac, to name a few. In this note, the authors state and prove some propositions of their own concerning Hamiltonian…

  15. 77 FR 13978 - Railroad Workplace Safety; Adjacent-Track On-Track Safety for Roadway Workers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-08

    ... Federal Railroad Administration 49 CFR Part 214 RIN 2130-AB96 Railroad Workplace Safety; Adjacent-Track On... rulemaking (RIN 2130-AB96). Note that all comments received will be posted without change to http://www... published a final rule amending its regulations on railroad workplace safety to further reduce the risk of...

  16. RS-84 Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegman, E.

    2003-01-01

    The RS-84 is the first reusable hydrocarbon staged combustion liquid rocket engine. This engine is being developed to meet NASA s crew safety goals with a highly reliable and low cost main engine as a part of the NASA Space Launch Initiative program for the next generation reusable launch system. The NASA-MSFC and Rocketdyne team brings over 50 years of successful rocket engine development experience to meet the challenges of this new program. This team s extensive design database has been anchored with almost five decades of hydrocarbon rocket engine development and flight operations experience including Delta, Atlas, and Saturn vehicles and nearly three decades of successfully operating the world s only reusable pump-fed rocket engine, the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The team also fully benefits from the proven and experienced engineering staffs that recently completed the successful MC-1 FASTRAC , XRS-2200, and RS-68 engine development programs and the ongoing IPD and RS-76 technology development. Advances in integrated parametric design and analysis tools, advanced materials knowledge base, and state-of-the-art fabrication processes anchored and refined during the recent engine development programs are already being used by the team to design this engine.

  17. Lecture Notes on Multigrid Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Vassilevski, P S

    2010-06-28

    The Lecture Notes are primarily based on a sequence of lectures given by the author while been a Fulbright scholar at 'St. Kliment Ohridski' University of Sofia, Sofia, Bulgaria during the winter semester of 2009-2010 academic year. The notes are somewhat expanded version of the actual one semester class he taught there. The material covered is slightly modified and adapted version of similar topics covered in the author's monograph 'Multilevel Block-Factorization Preconditioners' published in 2008 by Springer. The author tried to keep the notes as self-contained as possible. That is why the lecture notes begin with some basic introductory matrix-vector linear algebra, numerical PDEs (finite element) facts emphasizing the relations between functions in finite dimensional spaces and their coefficient vectors and respective norms. Then, some additional facts on the implementation of finite elements based on relation tables using the popular compressed sparse row (CSR) format are given. Also, typical condition number estimates of stiffness and mass matrices, the global matrix assembly from local element matrices are given as well. Finally, some basic introductory facts about stationary iterative methods, such as Gauss-Seidel and its symmetrized version are presented. The introductory material ends up with the smoothing property of the classical iterative methods and the main definition of two-grid iterative methods. From here on, the second part of the notes begins which deals with the various aspects of the principal TG and the numerous versions of the MG cycles. At the end, in part III, we briefly introduce algebraic versions of MG referred to as AMG, focusing on classes of AMG specialized for finite element matrices.

  18. PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA605. NORTH SIDE. CAMERA FACING SOUTH. NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA-605. NORTH SIDE. CAMERA FACING SOUTH. NOTE STEPPED ROOFLINE. WINDOWS ARE IN SHOP AND CONTROL AREAS. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-35-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 4/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA605. WEST SIDE. CAMERA FACING EAST. NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA-605. WEST SIDE. CAMERA FACING EAST. NOTE POURED CONCRETE WALLS. EQUIPMENT DELIVERY DOOR AND LOADING PLATFORM IN CENTER. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-34-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 4/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA605. ELEVATIONS. NOTE THREE ROOF HEIGHTS, CONCRETE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA-605. ELEVATIONS. NOTE THREE ROOF HEIGHTS, CONCRETE WALLS. REMOVABLE PANELS IN EAST WALL FOR FUTURE EXPANSION. EXTERIOR STAIRWAYS AND DOORS IN WEST WALL. BLAW-KNOX 3150-805-5, 12/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0605-00-098-100661, REV. 1. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID