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Sample records for enhanced death signaling

  1. Enhanced signal-to-noise ratios in frog hearing can be achieved through amplitude death

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Kang-Hun

    2013-01-01

    In the ear, hair cells transform mechanical stimuli into neuronal signals with great sensitivity, relying on certain active processes. Individual hair cell bundles of non-mammals such as frogs and turtles are known to show spontaneous oscillation. However, hair bundles in vivo must be quiet in the absence of stimuli, otherwise the signal is drowned in intrinsic noise. Thus, a certain mechanism is required in order to suppress intrinsic noise. Here, through a model study of elastically coupled hair bundles of bullfrog sacculi, we show that a low stimulus threshold and a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be achieved through the amplitude death phenomenon (the cessation of spontaneous oscillations by coupling). This phenomenon occurs only when the coupled hair bundles have inhomogeneous distribution, which is likely to be the case in biological systems. We show that the SNR has non-monotonic dependence on the mass of the overlying membrane, and find out that the SNR has maximum value in the region of amplitude death. The low threshold of stimulus through amplitude death may account for the experimentally observed high sensitivity of frog sacculi in detecting vibration. The hair bundles' amplitude death mechanism provides a smart engineering design for low-noise amplification. PMID:23883956

  2. Sequential application of anticancer drugs enhances cell death by rewiring apoptotic signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael J; Ye, Albert S; Gardino, Alexandra K; Heijink, Anne Margriet; Sorger, Peter K; MacBeath, Gavin; Yaffe, Michael B

    2012-05-11

    Crosstalk and complexity within signaling pathways and their perturbation by oncogenes limit component-by-component approaches to understanding human disease. Network analysis of how normal and oncogenic signaling can be rewired by drugs may provide opportunities to target tumors with high specificity and efficacy. Using targeted inhibition of oncogenic signaling pathways, combined with DNA-damaging chemotherapy, we report that time-staggered EGFR inhibition, but not simultaneous coadministration, dramatically sensitizes a subset of triple-negative breast cancer cells to genotoxic drugs. Systems-level analysis-using high-density time-dependent measurements of signaling networks, gene expression profiles, and cell phenotypic responses in combination with mathematical modeling-revealed an approach for altering the intrinsic state of the cell through dynamic rewiring of oncogenic signaling pathways. This process converts these cells to a less tumorigenic state that is more susceptible to DNA damage-induced cell death by reactivation of an extrinsic apoptotic pathway whose function is suppressed in the oncogene-addicted state. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. miR-181 interacts with signaling adaptor molecule DENN/MADD and enhances TNF-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Samira; Talebi, Farideh; Ghasemi, Sedigheh; Jahanbazi Jahan Abad, Ali; Vojgani, Mohammed; Noorbakhsh, Farshid

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs, which regulate the expression of protein coding transcripts through mRNA degradation or translational inhibition. Numerous reports have highlighted the role of miRNAs in regulating cell death pathways including the expression of genes involved in the induction of apoptosis. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a proinflammatory cytokine which can send pro-death signals through its receptor TNFR1. Diverse adaptor molecules including DENN/MADD adaptor protein have been shown to modulate TNF-α pro-death signaling via recruitment of MAP kinases to TNFR1 and activation of pro-survival NFκB signaling. Herein, we investigated the role of microRNA-181 (miR-181) in regulating DENN/MADD expression levels and its subsequent effects on TNF-α-induced cell death. Using bioinformatics analyses followed by luciferase reporter assays we showed that miR-181 interacts with the 3’ UTR of DENN/MADD transcripts. miR-181 overexpression also led to decreased endogenous DENN/MADD mRNA levels in L929 murine fibroblasts. Flow cytometric analysis of miR-181 transfected cells showed this miRNA accentuates mitochondrial membrane potential loss caused by TNF-α. These findings were associated with enhanced apoptosis of L929 cells following TNF-α treatment. Overall, these data point to the potential role of miR-181 in regulating TNF-α pro-death signaling, which could be of importance from pathogenesis and therapeutic perspectives in inflammatory disorders associated with tissue degeneration and cell death. PMID:28323882

  4. Suppression of death receptor 5 enhances cancer cell invasion and metastasis through activation of caspase-8/TRAF2-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Oh, You-Take; Yue, Ping; Wang, Dongsheng; Tong, Jing-Shan; Chen, Zhuo G; Khuri, Fadlo R; Sun, Shi-Yong

    2015-12-01

    The role of death receptor 5 (DR5), a well-known cell surface pro-apoptotic protein, in the negative regulation of invasion and metastasis of human cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown and were hence the focus of this study. In this report, we have demonstrated that DR5 functions to suppress invasion and metastasis of human cancer cells, as evidenced by enhanced cancer cell invasion and metastasis upon genetic suppression of DR5 either by gene knockdown or knockout. When DR5 is suppressed, FADD and caspase-8 may recruit and stabilize TRAF2 to form a metastasis and invasion signaling complex, resulting in activation of ERK and JNK/AP-1 signaling that mediate the elevation and activation of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP1) and eventual promotion of cancer invasion and metastasis. Our findings thus highlight a novel non-apoptotic function of DR5 as a suppressor of human cancer cell invasion and metastasis and suggest a basic working model elucidating the underlying biology.

  5. Sequential Application of Anti-Cancer Drugs Enhances Cell Death by Re-wiring Apoptotic Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Michael J.; Ye, Albert S.; Gardino, Alexandra K.; Heijink, Anne Margriet; Sorger, Peter K.; MacBeath, Gavin; Yaffe, Michael B.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Crosstalk and complexity within signaling pathways, and their perturbation by oncogenes, limits component-by-component approaches to understanding human disease. Network analysis of how normal and oncogenic signaling can be re-wired by drugs may provide opportunities to target tumors with high specificity and efficacy. Using targeted inhibition of oncogenic signaling pathways combined with DNA damaging chemotherapy, we report that time-staggered EGFR inhibition, but not simultaneous co-administration, dramatically sensitizes a subset of triple-negative breast cancer cells to genotoxic drugs. Systems-level analysis—using high-density time-dependent measurements of signaling networks, gene expression profiles, and cell phenotypic responses in combination with mathematical modeling— revealed an approach for altering the intrinsic state of the cell through dynamic re-wiring of oncogenic signaling pathways. This process converts these cells to a less tumorigenic state that is more susceptible to DNA damage-induced cell death by re-activation of an extrinsic apoptotic pathway whose function is suppressed in the oncogene-addicted state. PMID:22579283

  6. Streptolysin S Promotes Programmed Cell Death and Enhances Inflammatory Signaling in Epithelial Keratinocytes during Group A Streptococcus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Rebecca A.; Puricelli, Jessica M.; Higashi, Dustin L.; Park, Claudia J.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, or group A Streptococcus (GAS), is a pathogen that causes a multitude of human diseases from pharyngitis to severe infections such as toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis. One of the primary virulence factors produced by GAS is the peptide toxin streptolysin S (SLS). In addition to its well-recognized role as a cytolysin, recent evidence has indicated that SLS may influence host cell signaling pathways at sublytic concentrations during infection. We employed an antibody array-based approach to comprehensively identify global host cell changes in human epithelial keratinocytes in response to the SLS toxin. We identified key SLS-dependent host responses, including the initiation of specific programmed cell death and inflammatory cascades with concomitant downregulation of Akt-mediated cytoprotection. Significant signaling responses identified by our array analysis were confirmed using biochemical and protein identification methods. To further demonstrate that the observed SLS-dependent host signaling changes were mediated primarily by the secreted toxin, we designed a Transwell infection system in which direct bacterial attachment to host cells was prevented, while secreted factors were allowed access to host cells. The results using this approach were consistent with our direct infection studies and reveal that SLS is a bacterial toxin that does not require bacterial attachment to host cells for activity. In light of these findings, we propose that the production of SLS by GAS during skin infection promotes invasive outcomes by triggering programmed cell death and inflammatory cascades in host cells to breach the keratinocyte barrier for dissemination into deeper tissues. PMID:26238711

  7. Streptolysin S Promotes Programmed Cell Death and Enhances Inflammatory Signaling in Epithelial Keratinocytes during Group A Streptococcus Infection.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Rebecca A; Puricelli, Jessica M; Higashi, Dustin L; Park, Claudia J; Lee, Shaun W

    2015-10-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, or group A Streptococcus (GAS), is a pathogen that causes a multitude of human diseases from pharyngitis to severe infections such as toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis. One of the primary virulence factors produced by GAS is the peptide toxin streptolysin S (SLS). In addition to its well-recognized role as a cytolysin, recent evidence has indicated that SLS may influence host cell signaling pathways at sublytic concentrations during infection. We employed an antibody array-based approach to comprehensively identify global host cell changes in human epithelial keratinocytes in response to the SLS toxin. We identified key SLS-dependent host responses, including the initiation of specific programmed cell death and inflammatory cascades with concomitant downregulation of Akt-mediated cytoprotection. Significant signaling responses identified by our array analysis were confirmed using biochemical and protein identification methods. To further demonstrate that the observed SLS-dependent host signaling changes were mediated primarily by the secreted toxin, we designed a Transwell infection system in which direct bacterial attachment to host cells was prevented, while secreted factors were allowed access to host cells. The results using this approach were consistent with our direct infection studies and reveal that SLS is a bacterial toxin that does not require bacterial attachment to host cells for activity. In light of these findings, we propose that the production of SLS by GAS during skin infection promotes invasive outcomes by triggering programmed cell death and inflammatory cascades in host cells to breach the keratinocyte barrier for dissemination into deeper tissues. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Curcumin-loaded nanoparticles enhance apoptotic cell death of U2OS human osteosarcoma cells through the Akt-Bad signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shu-Fen; Lee, Chao-Ying; Hour, Mann-Jen; Tsai, Shih-Chang; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Chen, Fu-An; Shieh, Po-Chuen; Yang, Jai-Sing

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin has potential anticancer activity and has been shown to be involved in several signaling pathways including differentiation and apoptosis. Our previous study showed that water-soluble PLGA curcumin nanoparticles (Cur-NPs) triggered apoptotic cell death through regulation of the function of MDR1 and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cisplatin-resistant human oral cancer CAR cells. In this study, we investigated the anti-proliferative effects of Cur-NPs on human osteosarcoma U2OS cells. The morphology of Cur-NPs showed spherical shape by TEM analysis. The encapsulation efficiency of curcumin in Cur-NPs prepared by single emulsion was 90.5 ± 3.0%. Our results demonstrated that the curcumin fragments on the mass spectrum of Cur-NPs and the peaks of curcumin standard could be found on the Cur-NPs spectrum by 1H-NMR spectra analysis. Cur-NPs induced anti-proliferative effects and apoptosis in U2OS cells. Compared to the untreated U2OS cells, more detectable amount of Cur-NPs was found inside the treated U2OS cells. Cur-NPs induced DNA fragmentation and apoptotic bodies in U2OS cells. Both the activity and the expression levels of caspases-3/-7 and caspase-9 were elevated in the treated U2OS cells. Cur-NPs upregulated the protein expression levels of cleaved caspase-3/caspase-9, cytochrome c, Apaf-1 and Bad and downregulated the protein expression level of p-Akt in U2OS cells. These results suggest Cur-NPs are effective in enhancing apoptosis in human osteosarcoma cells and thus could provide potential for cancer therapeutics.

  9. Cell death signaling and anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Vacchelli, Erika; Kroemer, Guido

    2011-01-01

    For a long time, it was commonly believed that efficient anticancer regimens would either trigger the apoptotic demise of tumor cells or induce a permanent arrest in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle, i.e., senescence. The recent discovery that necrosis can occur in a regulated fashion and the increasingly more precise characterization of the underlying molecular mechanisms have raised great interest, as non-apoptotic pathways might be instrumental to circumvent the resistance of cancer cells to conventional, pro-apoptotic therapeutic regimens. Moreover, it has been shown that some anticancer regimens engage lethal signaling cascades that can ignite multiple oncosuppressive mechanisms, including apoptosis, necrosis, and senescence. Among these signaling pathways is mitotic catastrophe, whose role as a bona fide cell death mechanism has recently been reconsidered. Thus, anticancer regimens get ever more sophisticated, and often distinct strategies are combined to maximize efficacy and minimize side effects. In this review, we will discuss the importance of apoptosis, necrosis, and mitotic catastrophe in the response of tumor cells to the most common clinically employed and experimental anticancer agents.

  10. Cell Death Signaling and Anticancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Vacchelli, Erika; Kroemer, Guido

    2011-01-01

    For a long time, it was commonly believed that efficient anticancer regimens would either trigger the apoptotic demise of tumor cells or induce a permanent arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, i.e., senescence. The recent discovery that necrosis can occur in a regulated fashion and the increasingly more precise characterization of the underlying molecular mechanisms have raised great interest, as non-apoptotic pathways might be instrumental to circumvent the resistance of cancer cells to conventional, pro-apoptotic therapeutic regimens. Moreover, it has been shown that some anticancer regimens engage lethal signaling cascades that can ignite multiple oncosuppressive mechanisms, including apoptosis, necrosis, and senescence. Among these signaling pathways is mitotic catastrophe, whose role as a bona fide cell death mechanism has recently been reconsidered. Thus, anticancer regimens get ever more sophisticated, and often distinct strategies are combined to maximize efficacy and minimize side effects. In this review, we will discuss the importance of apoptosis, necrosis, and mitotic catastrophe in the response of tumor cells to the most common clinically employed and experimental anticancer agents. PMID:22655227

  11. Interleukin-8 enhances the effect of colchicine on cell death.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Chikako; Yajima, Chika; Machida, Tetsuro; Kawahito, Yuji; Uchida, Marie; Hisatomi, Hisashi

    2017-03-25

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines are known to be generated in tumors and play important roles in angiogenesis, mitosis, and tumor progression. However, few studies have investigated the synergistic effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines and anticancer drugs on cell death. In the present study, we examined the combined effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines and colchicine on cell death of cancer cells. Colchicine induces G2/M arrest in the cell cycle by binding to tubulin, one of the main constituents of microtubules. SUIT-2 human pancreatic cancer cell line cells overexpressing pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, were treated with colchicine. The effect of colchicine on cell death was enhanced in cells overexpressing IL-8. Moreover, the effect of colchicine on cell death was enhanced in cells overexpressing two IL-8 up-regulators, NF-κB and IL-6, but not in cells overexpressing an IL-8 down-regulator, splicing factor proline/glutamine-rich (SFPQ). Synergistic effects of IL-8 and colchicine were also observed in cells overexpressing IL-8 isoforms lacking the signal peptide. Therefore, IL-8 appeared to function as an enhancer of cell death in cancer cells treated with colchicine. The present results suggest a new role for IL-8 related to cell death of cancer cells.

  12. Multichannel signal enhancement

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Paul S.

    1990-01-01

    A mixed adaptive filter is formulated for the signal processing problem where desired a priori signal information is not available. The formulation generates a least squares problem which enables the filter output to be calculated directly from an input data matrix. In one embodiment, a folded processor array enables bidirectional data flow to solve the recursive problem by back substitution without global communications. In another embodiment, a balanced processor array solves the recursive problem by forward elimination through the array. In a particular application to magnetoencephalography, the mixed adaptive filter enables an evoked response to an auditory stimulus to be identified from only a single trial.

  13. On involvement of transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, activator protein-1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 in photodynamic therapy-induced death of crayfish neurons and satellite glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhnaya, Elena; Neginskaya, Marya; Kovaleva, Vera; Sharifulina, Svetlana; Ischenko, Irina; Komandirov, Maxim; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Uzdensky, Anatoly B.

    2015-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently used in the treatment of brain tumors. However, not only malignant cells but also neighboring normal neurons and glial cells are damaged during PDT. In order to study the potential role of transcription factors-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), activator protein (AP-1), and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3)-in photodynamic injury of normal neurons and glia, we photosensitized the isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor consisting of a single sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells. Application of different inhibitors and activators showed that transcription factors NF-κB (inhibitors caffeic acid phenethyl ester and parthenolide, activator betulinic acid), AP-1 (inhibitor SR11302), and STAT-3 (inhibitors stattic and cucurbitacine) influenced PDT-induced death and survival of neurons and glial cells in different ways. These experiments indicated involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and apoptosis of glial cells. However, in glial cells, it played the antinecrotic role. AP-1 was not involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glia, but mediated glial apoptosis. STAT-3 was involved in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells and necrosis of neurons and glia. Therefore, signaling pathways that regulate cell death and survival in neurons and glial cells are different. Using various inhibitors or activators of transcription factors, one can differently influence the sensitivity and resistance of neurons and glial cells to PDT.

  14. Tomato 14-3-3 protein 7 (TFT7) positively regulates immunity-associated programmed cell death by enhancing accumulation and signaling ability of MAPKKKalpha

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is triggered when Pto, a serine-threonine protein kinase recognizes either the AvrPto or AvrPtoB effector from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. This PCD requires MAPKKKalpha as a positive regulator in tomato and Nicotiana benthamiana. To examine how PCD-eliciting activi...

  15. Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through Proteasome Inhibition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through Proteasome Inhibition PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steven R Schwarze...SUBTITLE Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Proteasome Inhibition 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0392 5c...proteasome inhibition can act as an anti-neoplastic agent in vivo by sensitizing cancer cells to cell death ligands in the tumor microenvironment

  16. The Janus Face of Death Receptor Signaling during Tumor Immunoediting

    PubMed Central

    O’ Reilly, Eimear; Tirincsi, Andrea; Logue, Susan E.; Szegezdi, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immune surveillance is essential for the inhibition of carcinogenesis. Malignantly transformed cells can be recognized by both the innate and adaptive immune systems through different mechanisms. Immune effector cells induce extrinsic cell death in the identified tumor cells by expressing death ligand cytokines of the tumor necrosis factor ligand family. However, some tumor cells can escape immune elimination and progress. Acquisition of resistance to the death ligand-induced apoptotic pathway can be obtained through cleavage of effector cell expressed death ligands into a poorly active form, mutations or silencing of the death receptors, or overexpression of decoy receptors and pro-survival proteins. Although the immune system is highly effective in the elimination of malignantly transformed cells, abnormal/dysfunctional death ligand signaling curbs its cytotoxicity. Moreover, DRs can also transmit pro-survival and pro-migratory signals. Consequently, dysfunctional death receptor-mediated apoptosis/necroptosis signaling does not only give a passive resistance against cell death but actively drives tumor cell motility, invasion, and contributes to consequent metastasis. This dual contribution of the death receptor signaling in both the early, elimination phase, and then in the late, escape phase of the tumor immunoediting process is discussed in this review. Death receptor agonists still hold potential for cancer therapy since they can execute the tumor-eliminating immune effector function even in the absence of activation of the immune system against the tumor. The opportunities and challenges of developing death receptor agonists into effective cancer therapeutics are also discussed. PMID:27843441

  17. EP2 Receptor Signaling Regulates Microglia Death

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Myung-Soon; Jiang, Jianxiong; Ganesh, Thota; Joe, Eunhye; Dingledine, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    The timely resolution of inflammation prevents continued tissue damage after an initial insult. In the brain, the death of activated microglia by apoptosis has been proposed as one mechanism to resolve brain inflammation. How microglial death is regulated after activation is still unclear. We reported that exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interleukin (IL)-13 together initially activates and then kills rat microglia in culture by a mechanism dependent on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). We show here that activation of the E prostanoid receptor 2 (EP2, PTGER2) for prostaglandin E2 mediates microglial death induced by LPS/IL-13, and that EP2 activation by agonist alone kills microglia. Both EP2 antagonists and reactive oxygen scavengers block microglial death induced by either LPS/IL-13 or EP2 activation. By contrast, the homeostatic induction of heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1) by LPS/IL-13 or EP2 activation protects microglia. Both the Hmox1 inducer cobalt protoporphyrin and a compound that releases the Hmox1 product carbon monoxide (CO) attenuated microglial death produced by LPS/IL-13. Whereas CO reduced COX-2 protein expression, EP2 activation increased Hmox1 and COX-2 expression at both the mRNA and protein level. Interestingly, caspase-1 inhibition prevented microglial death induced by either LPS/IL-13 or low (but not high) concentrations of butaprost, suggestive of a predominantly pyroptotic mode of death. Butaprost also caused the expression of activated caspase-3 in microglia, pointing to apoptosis. These results indicate that EP2 activation, which initially promotes microglial activation, later causes delayed death of activated microglia, potentially contributing to the resolution phase of neuroinflammation. PMID:25715797

  18. Surviving apoptosis: life-death signaling in single cells

    PubMed Central

    Flusberg, Deborah A.; Sorger, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue development and homeostasis are regulated by opposing pro-survival and pro-death signals. An interesting feature of the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) family of ligands is that they simultaneously activate opposing signals within a single cell via the same ligand-receptor complex. The magnitude of pro-death events such as caspase activation and pro-survival events such as NF-κB activation vary not only from one cell type to the next but also among individual cells of the same type due to intrinsic and extrinsic noise. The molecules involved in these pro-survival/pro-death pathways, and the different phenotypes that result from their activities, have been recently reviewed. Here we focus on the impact of cell-to-cell variability in the strength of these opposing signals on shaping cell fate decisions. PMID:25920803

  19. Jasmonic acid signaling modulates ozone-induced hypersensitive cell death.

    PubMed

    Rao, M V; Lee, H; Creelman, R A; Mullet, J E; Davis, K R

    2000-09-01

    Recent studies suggest that cross-talk between salicylic acid (SA)-, jasmonic acid (JA)-, and ethylene-dependent signaling pathways regulates plant responses to both abiotic and biotic stress factors. Earlier studies demonstrated that ozone (O(3)) exposure activates a hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death pathway in the Arabidopsis ecotype Cvi-0. We now have confirmed the role of SA and JA signaling in influencing O(3)-induced cell death. Expression of salicylate hydroxylase (NahG) in Cvi-0 reduced O(3)-induced cell death. Methyl jasmonate (Me-JA) pretreatment of Cvi-0 decreased O(3)-induced H(2)O(2) content and SA concentrations and completely abolished O(3)-induced cell death. Cvi-0 synthesized as much JA as did Col-0 in response to O(3) exposure but exhibited much less sensitivity to exogenous Me-JA. Analyses of the responses to O(3) of the JA-signaling mutants jar1 and fad3/7/8 also demonstrated an antagonistic relationship between JA- and SA-signaling pathways in controlling the magnitude of O(3)-induced HR-like cell death.

  20. Molecular and cellular control of cell death and defense signaling in pepper.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) provides a good experimental system for studying the molecular and functional genomics underlying the ability of plants to defend themselves against microbial pathogens. Cell death is a genetically programmed response that requires specific host cellular factors. Hypersensitive response (HR) is defined as rapid cell death in response to a pathogen attack. Pepper plants respond to pathogen attacks by activating genetically controlled HR- or disease-associated cell death. HR cell death, specifically in incompatible interactions between pepper and Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria, is mediated by the molecular genetics and biochemical machinery that underlie pathogen-induced cell death in plants. Gene expression profiles during the HR-like cell death response, virus-induced gene silencing and transient and transgenic overexpression approaches are used to isolate and identify HR- or disease-associated cell death genes in pepper plants. Reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, cytosolic calcium ion and defense-related hormones such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, ethylene and abscisic acid are involved in the execution of pathogen-induced cell death in plants. In this review, we summarize recent molecular and cellular studies of the pepper cell death-mediated defense response, highlighting the signaling events of cell death in disease-resistant pepper plants. Comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the cellular functions of pepper cell death response genes will aid the development of novel practical approaches to enhance disease resistance in pepper, thereby helping to secure the future supply of safe and nutritious pepper plants worldwide.

  1. Using Literal Text From the Death Certificate to Enhance Mortality Statistics: Characterizing Drug Involvement in Deaths.

    PubMed

    Trinidad, James P; Warner, Margaret; Bastian, Brigham A; Minino, Arialdi M; Hedegaard, Holly

    2016-12-01

    Objectives-This report describes the development and use of a method for analyzing the literal text from death certificates to enhance national mortality statistics on drug-involved deaths. Drug-involved deaths include drug overdose deaths as well as other deaths where, according to death certificate literal text, drugs were associated with or contributed to the death. Methods-The method uses final National Vital Statistics System-Mortality files linked to electronic files containing literal text information from death certificates. Software programs were designed to search the literal text from three fields of the death certificate (the cause of death from Part I, significant conditions contributing to the death from Part II, and a description of how the injury occurred from Box 43) to identify drug mentions as well as contextual information. The list of drug search terms was developed from existing drug classification systems as well as from manual review of the literal text. Literal text surrounding the identified drug search terms was analyzed to ascertain the context. Drugs mentioned in the death certificate literal text were assumed to be involved in the death unless contextual information suggested otherwise (e.g., "METHICILLIN RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS INFECTION"). The literal text analysis method was assessed by comparing the results from application of the method with results based on ICD-10 codes, and by conducting a manual review of a sample of records.

  2. RSL3 and Erastin differentially regulate redox signaling to promote Smac mimetic-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Dächert, Jasmin; Schoeneberger, Hannah; Rohde, Katharina; Fulda, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Redox mechanisms play an important role in the control of various signaling pathways. Here, we report that Second mitochondrial activator of caspases (Smac) mimetic-induced cell death is regulated by redox signaling. We show that RSL3, a glutathione (GSH) peroxidase (GPX) 4 inhibitor, or Erastin, an inhibitor of the cystine/glutamate antiporter, cooperate with the Smac mimetic BV6 to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent cell death in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. Addition of the caspase inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (zVAD.fmk) fails to rescue ROS-induced cell death, demonstrating that RSL3/BV6- or Erastin/BV6-induced cell death occurs in a caspase-independent manner. Interestingly, the iron chelator Deferoxamine (DFO) significantly inhibits RSL3/BV6-induced cell death, whereas it is unable to rescue cell death by Erastin/BV6, showing that RSL3/BV6-, but not Erastin/BV6-mediated cell death depends on iron. ROS production is required for both RSL3/BV6- and Erastin/BV6-induced cell death, since the ROS scavenger α-tocopherol (α-Toc) rescues RSL3/BV6- and Erastin/BV6-induced cell death. By comparison, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of lipid peroxidation by GPX4 overexpression or ferrostatin (Fer)-1 significantly decreases RSL3/BV6-, but not Erastin/BV6-induced cell death, despite inhibition of lipid peroxidation upon exposure to RSL3/BV6 or Erastin/BV6. Of note, inhibition of lipid peroxidation by Fer-1 protects from RSL3/BV6-, but not from Erastin/BV6-stimulated ROS production, indicating that other forms of ROS besides lipophilic ROS occur during Erastin/BV6-induced cell death. Taken together, RSL3/BV6 and Erastin/BV6 differentially regulate redox signaling and cell death in ALL cells. While RSL3/BV6 cotreatment induces ferroptotic cell death, Erastin/BV6 stimulates oxidative cell death independently of iron. These findings have important implications for the therapeutic targeting of redox signaling to

  3. Danger signalling during cancer cell death: origins, plasticity and regulation.

    PubMed

    Garg, A D; Martin, S; Golab, J; Agostinis, P

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that following anti-cancer treatments, cancer cell death can be perceived as immunogenic or tolerogenic by the immune system. The former is made possible due to the ability of certain anti-cancer modalities to induce immunogenic cell death (ICD) that is associated with the emission of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which assist in unlocking a sequence of events leading to the development of anti-tumour immunity. In response to ICD inducers, activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been identified to be indispensable to confer the immunogenic character of cancer cell death, due to its ability to coordinate the danger signalling pathways responsible for the trafficking of vital DAMPs and subsequent anti-cancer immune responses. However, in recent times, certain processes apart from ER stress have emerged (e.g., autophagy and possibly viral response-like signature), which have the ability to influence danger signalling. In this review, we discuss the molecular nature, emerging plasticity in the danger signalling mechanisms and immunological impact of known DAMPs in the context of immunogenic cancer cell death. We also discuss key effector mechanisms modulating the interface between dying cancer cells and the immune cells, which we believe are crucial for the therapeutic relevance of ICD in the context of human cancers, and also discuss the influence of experimental conditions and animal models on these.

  4. Cullin-4 regulates Wingless and JNK signaling-mediated cell death in the Drosophila eye.

    PubMed

    Tare, Meghana; Sarkar, Ankita; Bedi, Shimpi; Kango-Singh, Madhuri; Singh, Amit

    2016-12-29

    In all multicellular organisms, the fundamental processes of cell proliferation and cell death are crucial for growth regulation during organogenesis. Strict regulation of cell death is important to maintain tissue homeostasis by affecting processes like regulation of cell number, and elimination of unwanted/unfit cells. The developing Drosophila eye is a versatile model to study patterning and growth, where complex signaling pathways regulate growth and cell survival. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of these processes is not fully understood. In a gain-of-function screen, we found that misexpression of cullin-4 (cul-4), an ubiquitin ligase, can rescue reduced eye mutant phenotypes. Previously, cul-4 has been shown to regulate chromatin remodeling, cell cycle and cell division. Genetic characterization of cul-4 in the developing eye revealed that loss-of-function of cul-4 exhibits a reduced eye phenotype. Analysis of twin-spots showed that in comparison with their wild-type counterparts, the cul-4 loss-of-function clones fail to survive. Here we show that cul-4 clones are eliminated by induction of cell death due to activation of caspases. Aberrant activation of signaling pathways is known to trigger cell death in the developing eye. We found that Wingless (Wg) and c-Jun-amino-terminal-(NH2)-Kinase (JNK) signaling are ectopically induced in cul-4 mutant clones, and these signals co-localize with the dying cells. Modulating levels of Wg and JNK signaling by using agonists and antagonists of these pathways demonstrated that activation of Wg and JNK signaling enhances cul-4 mutant phenotype, whereas downregulation of Wg and JNK signaling rescues the cul-4 mutant phenotypes of reduced eye. Here we present evidences to demonstrate that cul-4 is involved in restricting Wg signaling and downregulation of JNK signaling-mediated cell death during early eye development. Overall, our studies provide insights into a novel role of cul-4 in promoting cell

  5. Cullin-4 regulates Wingless and JNK signaling-mediated cell death in the Drosophila eye

    PubMed Central

    Tare, Meghana; Sarkar, Ankita; Bedi, Shimpi; Kango-Singh, Madhuri; Singh, Amit

    2016-01-01

    In all multicellular organisms, the fundamental processes of cell proliferation and cell death are crucial for growth regulation during organogenesis. Strict regulation of cell death is important to maintain tissue homeostasis by affecting processes like regulation of cell number, and elimination of unwanted/unfit cells. The developing Drosophila eye is a versatile model to study patterning and growth, where complex signaling pathways regulate growth and cell survival. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of these processes is not fully understood. In a gain-of-function screen, we found that misexpression of cullin-4 (cul-4), an ubiquitin ligase, can rescue reduced eye mutant phenotypes. Previously, cul-4 has been shown to regulate chromatin remodeling, cell cycle and cell division. Genetic characterization of cul-4 in the developing eye revealed that loss-of-function of cul-4 exhibits a reduced eye phenotype. Analysis of twin-spots showed that in comparison with their wild-type counterparts, the cul-4 loss-of-function clones fail to survive. Here we show that cul-4 clones are eliminated by induction of cell death due to activation of caspases. Aberrant activation of signaling pathways is known to trigger cell death in the developing eye. We found that Wingless (Wg) and c-Jun-amino-terminal-(NH2)-Kinase (JNK) signaling are ectopically induced in cul-4 mutant clones, and these signals co-localize with the dying cells. Modulating levels of Wg and JNK signaling by using agonists and antagonists of these pathways demonstrated that activation of Wg and JNK signaling enhances cul-4 mutant phenotype, whereas downregulation of Wg and JNK signaling rescues the cul-4 mutant phenotypes of reduced eye. Here we present evidences to demonstrate that cul-4 is involved in restricting Wg signaling and downregulation of JNK signaling-mediated cell death during early eye development. Overall, our studies provide insights into a novel role of cul-4 in promoting cell

  6. Activation of ERK signaling and induction of colon cancer cell death by piperlongumine.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, H; Kibble, K; Zeng, H; Moyer, M P; Reindl, K M

    2013-09-01

    Piperlongumine (PPLGM) is a bioactive compound isolated from long peppers that shows selective toxicity towards a variety of cancer cell types including colon cancer. The signaling pathways that lead to cancer cell death in response to PPLGM exposure have not been previously identified. Our objective was to identify the intracellular signaling mechanisms by which PPLGM leads to enhanced colon cancer cell death. We found that PPLGM inhibited the growth of colon cancer cells in time- and concentration-dependent manners, but was not toxic toward normal colon mucosal cells at concentrations below 10 μM. Acute (0-60 min) and prolonged (24h) exposure of HT-29 cells to PPLGM resulted in phosphorylation of ERK. To investigate whether ERK signaling was involved in PPLGM-mediated cell death, we treated HT-29 cells with the MEK inhibitor U0126, prior to treating with PPLGM. We found that U0126 attenuated PPLGM-induced activation of ERK and partially protected against PPLGM-induced cell death. These results suggest that PPLGM works, at least in part, through the MEK/ERK pathway to result in colon cancer cell death. A more thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which PPLGM induces colon cancer cell death will be useful in developing therapeutic strategies to treat colon cancer.

  7. Fas death receptor signalling: roles of Bid and XIAP

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, T; Strasser, A; Jost, P J

    2012-01-01

    Fas (also called CD95 or APO-1), a member of a subgroup of the tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily that contain an intracellular death domain, can initiate apoptosis signalling and has a critical role in the regulation of the immune system. Fas-induced apoptosis requires recruitment and activation of the initiator caspase, caspase-8 (in humans also caspase-10), within the death-inducing signalling complex. In so-called type 1 cells, proteolytic activation of effector caspases (-3 and -7) by caspase-8 suffices for efficient apoptosis induction. In so-called type 2 cells, however, killing requires amplification of the caspase cascade. This can be achieved through caspase-8-mediated proteolytic activation of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 homology domain (BH)3-only protein BH3-interacting domain death agonist (Bid), which then causes mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilisation. This in turn leads to mitochondrial release of apoptogenic proteins, such as cytochrome c and, pertinent for Fas death receptor (DR)-induced apoptosis, Smac/DIABLO (second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase/direct IAP binding protein with low Pi), an antagonist of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP), which imposes a brake on effector caspases. In this review, written in honour of Juerg Tschopp who contributed so much to research on cell death and immunology, we discuss the functions of Bid and XIAP in the control of Fas DR-induced apoptosis signalling, and we speculate on how this knowledge could be exploited to develop novel regimes for treatment of cancer. PMID:21959933

  8. Oxidative Stress, Redox Signaling, and Autophagy: Cell Death Versus Survival

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Yepes, Juliana; Burns, Michaela; Anandhan, Annadurai; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; del Razo, Luz Maria; Quintanilla-Vega, Betzabet; Pappa, Aglaia; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The molecular machinery regulating autophagy has started becoming elucidated, and a number of studies have undertaken the task to determine the role of autophagy in cell fate determination within the context of human disease progression. Oxidative stress and redox signaling are also largely involved in the etiology of human diseases, where both survival and cell death signaling cascades have been reported to be modulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Recent Advances: To date, there is a good understanding of the signaling events regulating autophagy, as well as the signaling processes by which alterations in redox homeostasis are transduced to the activation/regulation of signaling cascades. However, very little is known about the molecular events linking them to the regulation of autophagy. This lack of information has hampered the understanding of the role of oxidative stress and autophagy in human disease progression. Critical Issues: In this review, we will focus on (i) the molecular mechanism by which ROS/RNS generation, redox signaling, and/or oxidative stress/damage alter autophagic flux rates; (ii) the role of autophagy as a cell death process or survival mechanism in response to oxidative stress; and (iii) alternative mechanisms by which autophagy-related signaling regulate mitochondrial function and antioxidant response. Future Directions: Our research efforts should now focus on understanding the molecular basis of events by which autophagy is fine tuned by oxidation/reduction events. This knowledge will enable us to understand the mechanisms by which oxidative stress and autophagy regulate human diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 66–85. PMID:24483238

  9. Calcium signaling and cell cycle: Progression or death.

    PubMed

    Humeau, Juliette; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Vitale, Ilio; Nuñez, Lucia; Villalobos, Carlos; Kroemer, Guido; Senovilla, Laura

    2017-07-25

    Cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration levels fluctuate in an ordered manner along the cell cycle, in line with the fact that Ca(2+) is involved in the regulation of cell proliferation. Cell proliferation should be an error-free process, yet is endangered by mistakes. In fact, a complex network of proteins ensures that cell cycle does not progress until the previous phase has been successfully completed. Occasionally, errors occur during the cell cycle leading to cell cycle arrest. If the error is severe, and the cell cycle checkpoints work perfectly, this results into cellular demise by activation of apoptotic or non-apoptotic cell death programs. Cancer is characterized by deregulated proliferation and resistance against cell death. Ca(2+) is a central key to these phenomena as it modulates signaling pathways that control oncogenesis and cancer progression. Here, we discuss how Ca(2+) participates in the exogenous and endogenous signals controlling cell proliferation, as well as in the mechanisms by which cells die if irreparable cell cycle damage occurs. Moreover, we summarize how Ca(2+) homeostasis remodeling observed in cancer cells contributes to deregulated cell proliferation and resistance to cell death. Finally, we discuss the possibility to target specific components of Ca(2+) signal pathways to obtain cytostatic or cytotoxic effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cell death and survival signalling in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Tucka, Joanna; Bennett, Martin; Littlewood, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    The loss of cells is an important factor in many diseases, including those of the cardiovascular system. Whereas apoptosis is an essential process in development and tissue homeostasis, its occurrence is often associated with various pathologies. Apoptosis of neurons that fail to make appropriate connections is essential for the selection of correct neural signalling in the developing embryo, but its appearance in adults is often associated with neurodegenerative disease. Similarly, in the cardiovascular system, remodeling of the mammalian outflow tract during the transition from a single to dual series circulation with four chambers is accompanied by a precise pattern of cell death, but apoptosis of cardiomyocytes contributes to ischemia-reperfusion injury in the heart. In many cases, it is unclear whether apoptosis represents a causative association or merely a consequence of the disease itself. There are many excellent reviews on cell death in the cardiovascular system (1-5); in this review we outline the critical signalling pathways that promote the survival of cardiovascular cells, and their relevance to both physiological cell death and disease.

  11. Tomato MAPKKKε is a positive regulator of cell-death signaling networks associated with plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Melech-Bonfil, Shiri; Sessa, Guido

    2010-11-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascades are fundamental components of the signaling pathways associated with plant immunity. Despite the large number of MAP kinase kinase kinases (MAPKKK) encoded in the plant genome, only very few of them have an assigned function. Here, we identified MAPKKK gene of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), SIMAPKKKε, which is required for hypersensitive response cell death and disease resistance against Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Silencing of SIMAPKKKε compromised tomato resistance to Xanthomonas campestris and Pseudomonas syringae strains, resulting in the appearance of disease symptoms and enhanced bacterial growth. In addition, silencing of NbMAPKKKε in Nicotiana benthamiana plants significantly inhibited the cell death triggered by expression of different R gene/effector gene pairs. Conversely, overexpression of either the full-length SIMAPKKKε gene or its kinase domain in N. benthamiana leaves caused pathogen-independent activation of cell death that required an intact kinase catalytic domain. Moreover, by suppressing the expression of various MAPKK and MAPK genes and overexpressing the SIMAPKKKε kinase domain, we identified a signaling cascade acting downstream of SIMAPKKKε that includes MEK2, WIPK and SIPK. Additional epistasis experiments revealed that SIPKK functions as a negative regulator of SIMAPKKKε-mediated cell death. Our results provide evidence that SIMAPKKKε is a signaling molecule that positively regulates cell death networks associated with plant immunity.

  12. Enhancing Anti-Breast Cancer Immunity by Blocking Death Receptor DR5

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    encoding full length human DR5, phDR5∆ encoding human DR5 with a premature termination signal in the death domain (aa.1-338) and phDR5ECTM encoding the...by Blocking Death Receptor DR5 PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Wei-Zen Wei, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Wayne State University...Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 Sep 2008 – 31 Aug 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Enhancing Anti-Breast Cancer Immunity by Blocking Death

  13. Regulation of Neuroinflammation through Programed Death-1/Programed Death Ligand Signaling in Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shangfeng; Li, Fengwu; Leak, Rehana K.; Chen, Jun; Hu, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    Immune responses in the central nervous system (CNS), which involve both resident glial cells and infiltrating peripheral immune cells, play critical roles in the progress of brain injuries and neurodegeneration. To avoid inflammatory damage to the compromised brain, the immune cell activities in the CNS are controlled by a plethora of chemical mediators and signal transduction cascades, such as inhibitory signaling through programed death-1 (PD-1) and programed death ligand (PD-L) interactions. An increasing number of recent studies have highlighted the importance of PD-1/PD-L pathway in immune regulation in CNS disorders such as ischemic stroke, multiple sclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease. Here, we review the current knowledge of the impact of PD-1/PD-L signaling on brain injury and neurodegeneration. An improved understanding of the function of PD-1/PD-L in the cross-talk between peripheral immune cells, CNS glial cells, and non-immune CNS cells is expected to shed further light on immunomodulation and help develop effective and safe immunotherapies for CNS disorders. PMID:25232304

  14. Hyaluronan activates Hyal-2/WWOX/Smad4 signaling and causes bubbling cell death when the signaling complex is overexpressed.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Li-Jin; Hong, Qunying; Chen, Shur-Tzu; Kuo, Hsiang-Lin; Schultz, Lori; Heath, John; Lin, Sing-Ru; Lee, Ming-Hui; Li, Dong-Zhang; Li, Zih-Ling; Cheng, Hui-Ching; Armand, Gerard; Chang, Nan-Shan

    2016-11-10

    Malignant cancer cells frequently secrete significant amounts of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), hyaluronan (HA) and hyaluronidases to facilitate metastasizing to target organs. In a non-canonical signaling, TGF-β binds membrane hyaluronidase Hyal-2 for recruiting tumor suppressors WWOX and Smad4, and the resulting Hyal-2/WWOX/Smad4 complex is accumulated in the nucleus to enhance SMAD-promoter dependent transcriptional activity. Yeast two-hybrid analysis showed that WWOX acts as a bridge to bind both Hyal-2 and Smad4. When WWOX-expressing cells were stimulated with high molecular weight HA, an increased formation of endogenous Hyal-2/WWOX/Smad4 complex occurred rapidly, followed by relocating to the nuclei in 20-40 min. In WWOX-deficient cells, HA failed to induce Smad2/3/4 relocation to the nucleus. To prove the signaling event, we designed a real time tri-molecular FRET analysis and revealed that HA induces the signaling pathway from ectopic Smad4 to WWOX and finally to p53, as well as from Smad4 to Hyal-2 and then to WWOX. An increased binding of the Smad4/Hyal-2/WWOX complex occurs with time in the nucleus that leads to bubbling cell death. In contrast, HA increases the binding of Smad4/WWOX/p53, which causes membrane blebbing but without cell death. In traumatic brain injury-induced neuronal death, the Hyal-2/WWOX complex was accumulated in the apoptotic nuclei of neurons in the rat brains in 24 hr post injury, as determined by immunoelectron microscopy. Together, HA activates the Hyal-2/WWOX/Smad4 signaling and causes bubbling cell death when the signaling complex is overexpressed.

  15. Origins of signalling and memory: matters of life versus death.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, D N; Christensen, S T

    1999-01-01

    This review focuses on the principles in cell-cell communication and cellular ability to respond to external chemical changes which have been so crucial for the development of life on planet Earth. We now know that the capacity of free-living organisms which evolved more than a billion years ago to respond to intercellular signal molecules, originating either from themselves or from other sources in their vicinity, is so similar possibly even more sophisticated - to that of the cells in our own body, and these findings have had a major impact on our struggle to understand how life has evolved and how it can be maintained. Attention is drawn to the very important topic of mechanisms in cell death, being seen as an aggressive and very powerful instrument in the continuance of life and ability of life to proliferate into a plethora of new species, and use insulin-related material as our paradigm. Such signal molecules (hormones) may have played a major role in cellular maintenance throughout evolution.

  16. Dopamine Promotes Striatal Neuronal Apoptotic Death via ERK Signaling Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Rusnak, Milan; Lombroso, Paul J.; Sidhu, Anita

    2009-01-01

    Although the mechanisms underlying striatal neurodegeneration are poorly understood, we have shown that striatal pathogenesis may be initiated by high synaptic levels of extracellular dopamine (DA). Here we investigated in rat striatal primary neurons the mobilization of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways after treatment with DA. Instead of observing an elevation of the archetypical pro-cytotoxic MAPKs, p-JNK and p-p38 MAPK, we found that DA, acting through D1 DA receptors, induced a sustained stimulation of the phosphorylated form of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) via a cAMP/PKA/Rap1/B-Raf/MEK pathway. Blockade of D2 DA receptors, β-adrenergic receptors or NMDA receptors with receptor-specific antagonists had no significant effect on this process. Activation of D1 DA receptors and PKA by DA caused phosphorylation and inactivation of the striatal–enriched tyrosine phosphatase (STEP), an important phosphatase for the dephosphorylation and subsequent inactivation of p-ERK in striatum. Interestingly p-ERK was primarily retained in the cytoplasm, with only low amounts translocated to the nucleus. The scaffold protein β-arrestin2 interacted with both p-ERK and D1 DA receptor, triggering the cytosolic retention of p-ERK and inducing striatal neuronal apoptotic death. These data provide unique insight into a novel role of p-ERK in striatal neurodegeneration. PMID:19200235

  17. Enhancement Of Optical Registration Signals Through Digital Signal Processing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cote, Daniel R.; Lazo-Wasem, Jeanne

    1988-01-01

    Alignment and setup of lighography processes has largely been conducted on special test wafers. Actual product level optimization has been limited to manual techniques such as optical verniers. This is especially time consuming and prone to inconsistencies when the registration characteristics of lithographic systems are being measured. One key factor obstructing the use of automated metrology equipment on product level wafers is the inability to discern reliably, metrology features from the background noise and variations in optical registration signals. This is often the case for metal levels such as aluminum and tungsten. This paper discusses methods for enhancement of typical registration signals obtained from difficult semiconductor process levels. Brightfield and darkfield registration signals are obtained using a microscope and a 1024 element linear photodiode array. These signals are then digitized and stored on the hard disk of a computer. The techniques utilized include amplitude selective and adaptive and non-adaptive frequency domain filtering techniques. The effect of each of these techniques upon calculated registration values is analyzed by determining the positional variation of the center location of a two line registration feature. Plots of raw and processed signals obtained are presented as are plots of the power spectral density of ideal metrology feature signal and noise patterns. It is concluded that the proper application of digital signal processing (DSP) techniques to problematic optical registration signals greatly enhances the applicability of automated optical registration measurement techniques to difficult semiconductor process levels.

  18. Tyramide Signal Amplification for Immunofluorescent Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Faget, Lauren; Hnasko, Thomas S

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme-linked signal amplification is a key technique used to enhance the immunohistochemical detection of protein, mRNA, and other molecular species. Tyramide signal amplification (TSA) is based on a catalytic reporter deposit in close vicinity to the epitope of interest. The advantages of this technique are its simplicity, enhanced sensitivity, high specificity, and compatibility with modern multi-label fluorescent microscopy. Here, we describe the use of a TSA kit to increase the signal of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) expressed under the control of Slc17a6 regulatory elements in the brain of a transgenic mouse. The labeling procedure consists of 6 basic steps: (1) tissue preparation, (2) blocking of nonspecific epitopes, (3) binding with primary antibody, (4) binding with horseradish peroxidase-conjugated secondary antibody, (5) reacting with fluorescent tyramide substrate, and (6) imaging of the signal. The procedures described herein detail these steps and provide additional guidance and background to assist novice users.

  19. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in brain death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchtmann, M.; Beuing, O.; Skalej, M.; Kohl, J.; Serowy, S.; Bernarding, J.; Firsching, R.

    2014-01-01

    Confirmatory tests for the diagnosis of brain death in addition to clinical findings may shorten observation time required in some countries and may add certainty to the diagnosis under specific circumstances. The practicability of Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography to confirm cerebral circulatory arrest was assessed after the diagnosis of brain death in 15 patients using a 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. In all 15 patients extracranial blood flow distal to the external carotid arteries was undisturbed. In 14 patients no contrast medium was noted within intracerebral vessels above the proximal level of the intracerebral arteries. In one patient more distal segments of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries (A3 and M3) were filled with contrast medium. Gadolinium-enhanced MRA may be considered conclusive evidence of cerebral circulatory arrest, when major intracranial vessels fail to fill with contrast medium while extracranial vessels show normal blood flow.

  20. Redox regulation of resveratrol-mediated switching of death signal into survival signal.

    PubMed

    Das, Samarjit; Khan, Nadeem; Mukherjee, Subhendu; Bagchi, Debasis; Gurusamy, Narasimman; Swartz, Harold; Das, Dipak K

    2008-01-01

    prevented by resveratrol, and resveratrol-mediated preservation of GSH/GSSG ratio was reduced by cisplatin, but not by sh-RNA-Trx-1. RT-PCR revealed an increase in both Trx-1 and Trx-2 transcripts; but only Trx-2 protein, not Trx-1 protein, was enhanced with resveratrol by Western blot analysis. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic study revealed that resveratrol treatment significantly increased the decay rates of nitroxide radicals compared to control hearts, suggesting that resveratrol can switch into the reduction state more compared to control heart. Finally, resveratrol generated a survival signal by phosphorylation of Akt and increase in induction of Bcl-2 expression, which was inhibited by cisplatin, but not by shRNA-Trx-1. Taken together, the results of this study indicate that resveratrol provides cardioprotection by maintaining intracellular redox environments, and Trx-2 is likely to play a role in switching I/R-induced death signal into survival signal.

  1. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Signaling in Plant Immunity—At the Crossroad of Life and Death

    PubMed Central

    Kørner, Camilla J.; Du, Xinran; Vollmer, Marie E.; Pajerowska-Mukhtar, Karolina M.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid and complex immune responses are induced in plants upon pathogen recognition. One form of plant defense response is a programmed burst in transcription and translation of pathogenesis-related proteins, of which many rely on ER processing. Interestingly, several ER stress marker genes are up-regulated during early stages of immune responses, suggesting that enhanced ER capacity is needed for immunity. Eukaryotic cells respond to ER stress through conserved signaling networks initiated by specific ER stress sensors tethered to the ER membrane. Depending on the nature of ER stress the cell prioritizes either survival or initiates programmed cell death (PCD). At present two plant ER stress sensors, bZIP28 and IRE1, have been described. Both sensor proteins are involved in ER stress-induced signaling, but only IRE1 has been additionally linked to immunity. A second branch of immune responses relies on PCD. In mammals, ER stress sensors are involved in activation of PCD, but it is unclear if plant ER stress sensors play a role in PCD. Nevertheless, some ER resident proteins have been linked to pathogen-induced cell death in plants. In this review, we will discuss the current understanding of plant ER stress signaling and its cross-talk with immune signaling. PMID:26556351

  2. Acquirement and enhancement of remote speech signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Tao; Guo, Jin; Zhang, He-yong; Yan, Chun-hui; Wang, Can-jin

    2017-07-01

    To address the challenges of non-cooperative and remote acoustic detection, an all-fiber laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is established. The all-fiber LDV system can offer the advantages of smaller size, lightweight design and robust structure, hence it is a better fit for remote speech detection. In order to improve the performance and the efficiency of LDV for long-range hearing, the speech enhancement technology based on optimally modified log-spectral amplitude (OM-LSA) algorithm is used. The experimental results show that the comprehensible speech signals within the range of 150 m can be obtained by the proposed LDV. The signal-to-noise ratio ( SNR) and mean opinion score ( MOS) of the LDV speech signal can be increased by 100% and 27%, respectively, by using the speech enhancement technology. This all-fiber LDV, which combines the speech enhancement technology, can meet the practical demand in engineering.

  3. Cell death signaling in the cerebellum in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Puig, B; Ferrer, I

    2001-09-01

    Examination of the expression of proteins linked with signaling pathways commanding cell death and cell survival has been carried out to increase understanding on the mechanisms leading to cell death in the cerebellum in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Expression of Fas, Fas ligand (Fas-L), ERK, MEK, Bcl-2, Bax, N-myc, c-myc, pro-caspase-2 and active caspase-3 was examined by immunohistochemistry in the cerebellum of six patients with sporadic CJD, three patients with olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) and six age-matched controls. No modifications in the expression of these proteins were observed in granule cells in CJD and OPCA when compared with controls, except in a few cells in the molecular and granular layers in CJD that displayed dense homogeneous active caspase-3 immunostaining. This suggests selective activation of caspase-3 in association with increased cellular vulnerability in CJD. No modifications in pro-caspase-2 and c-myc immunoreactivity were observed in Purkinje cells in diseased brains when compared with controls. However, increased diffuse Fas, Fas-L, MEK, ERK and Bax expression, and enhanced granular active caspase-3 immunoreactivity was found in the cytoplasm of Purkinje cells in CJD. Increase in Bcl-2 and N-myc occurred in Purkinje cells in CJD and OPCA. These results indicate that enhanced Fas, Fas-L, MERK, ERK, Bax and granular active caspase-3 expression is not lethal to Purkinje cells in CJD, whereas increased Bcl-2 and N-myc does not preclude per se cell death or death survival in CJD and OPCA. These findings point to the likelihood that expression of these cell death proteins in neurodegeneration has functional roles differing from those related with apoptosis.

  4. Functional and regulatory conservation of the soybean ER stress-induced DCD/NRP-mediated cell death signaling in plants.

    PubMed

    Reis, Pedro A B; Carpinetti, Paola A; Freitas, Paula P J; Santos, Eulálio G D; Camargos, Luiz F; Oliveira, Igor H T; Silva, José Cleydson F; Carvalho, Humberto H; Dal-Bianco, Maximiller; Soares-Ramos, Juliana R L; Fontes, Elizabeth P B

    2016-07-12

    The developmental and cell death domain (DCD)-containing asparagine-rich proteins (NRPs) were first identified in soybean (Glycine max) as transducers of a cell death signal derived from prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, osmotic stress, drought or developmentally-programmed leaf senescence via the GmNAC81/GmNAC30/GmVPE signaling module. In spite of the relevance of the DCD/NRP-mediated signaling as a versatile adaptive response to multiple stresses, mechanistic knowledge of the pathway is lacking and the extent to which this pathway may operate in the plant kingdom has not been investigated. Here, we demonstrated that the DCD/NRP-mediated signaling also propagates a stress-induced cell death signal in other plant species with features of a programmed cell death (PCD) response. In silico analysis revealed that several plant genomes harbor conserved sequences of the pathway components, which share functional analogy with their soybean counterparts. We showed that GmNRPs, GmNAC81and VPE orthologs from Arabidopsis, designated as AtNRP-1, AtNRP-2, ANAC036 and gVPE, respectively, induced cell death when transiently expressed in N. benthamiana leaves. In addition, loss of AtNRP1 and AtNRP2 function attenuated ER stress-induced cell death in Arabidopsis, which was in marked contrast with the enhanced cell death phenotype displayed by overexpressing lines as compared to Col-0. Furthermore, atnrp-1 knockout mutants displayed enhanced sensitivity to PEG-induced osmotic stress, a phenotype that could be complemented with ectopic expression of either GmNRP-A or GmNRP-B. In addition, AtNRPs, ANAC036 and gVPE were induced by osmotic and ER stress to an extent that was modulated by the ER-resident molecular chaperone binding protein (BiP) similarly as in soybean. Finally, as putative downstream components of the NRP-mediated cell death signaling, the stress induction of AtNRP2, ANAC036 and gVPE was dependent on the AtNRP1 function. BiP overexpression also conferred

  5. Enhanced Propagating Surface Plasmon Signal Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Y.; Joly, Alan G.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2016-12-21

    Overcoming the dissipative nature of propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) is pre-requisite to realizing functional plasmonic circuitry, in which large bandwidth signals can be manipulated over length scales far-below the diffraction limit of light. To this end, we report on a novel PSP enhanced signal detection technique achieved in an all-metallic substrate. We take advantage of two strategically spatio-temporally separated phase-locked femtosecond laser pulses, incident onto lithographically patterned PSP coupling structures. We follow PSP propagation with joint femtosecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolution in a time-resolved non-linear photoemission electron microscopy scheme. Initially, a PSP signal wave packet is launched from a hole etched into the silver surface from where it propagates through an open trench structure and is decoded through the use of a timed probe pulse. FDTD calculations demonstrate that PSP signal waves may traverse open trenches in excess of 10 microns in diameter, thereby allowing remote detection even through vacuum regions. This arrangement results in a 10X enhancement in photoemission relative to readout from the bare metal surface. The enhancement is attributed to an all-optical homodyne detection technique that mixes signal and reference PSP waves in a non-linear scheme. Larger readout trenches achieve higher readout levels, however reduced transmission through the trench limits the trench size to 6 microns for maximum readout levels. However, the use of an array of trenches increases the maximum enhancement to near 30X. The attainable enhancement factor may be harnessed to achieve extended coherent PSP propagation in ultrafast plasmonic circuitry.

  6. Relationship Between Pak-Mediated Cell Death and Stress-Activated Kinase Signaling in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-02-01

    part of the cell death execution machinery. Here we show that a correlation exists in breast cancer cells between caspase- dependent cleavage of the...inhibits its activity might allow us to specifically inhibit signaling pathways downstream of Pak and evaluate how the cell death process is affected. In...a biochemical approach screening for substrates and possible mediators of cell death signaling components via Pak kinases we identified a guanine

  7. The canonical Wg signaling modulates Bsk-mediated cell death in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S; Chen, C; Wu, C; Yang, Y; Li, W; Xue, L

    2015-01-01

    Cell death is an essential regulatory mechanism for removing unneeded cells in animal development and tissue homeostasis. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway has pivotal roles in the regulation of cell death in response to various intrinsic and extrinsic stress signals. The canonical Wingless (Wg) signaling has been implicated in cell proliferation and cell fate decisions, whereas its role in cell death remains largely elusive. Here, we report that activated Bsk (the Drosophila JNK homolog) induced cell death is mediated by the canonical Wg signaling. First, loss of Wg signaling abrogates Bsk-mediated caspase-independent cell death. Second, activation of Wg signaling promotes cell death in a caspase-independent manner. Third, activation of Bsk signaling results in upregulated transcription of wingless (wg) gene. Finally, Wg pathway participates in the physiological function of Bsk signaling in development. These findings not only reveal a previously undiscovered role of Wg signaling in Bsk-mediated cell death, but also provide a novel mechanism for the interplay between the two important signaling pathways in development. PMID:25855961

  8. Disruption of glycolytic flux is a signal for inflammasome signaling and pyroptotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Sanman, Laura E; Qian, Yu; Eisele, Nicholas A; Ng, Tessie M; van der Linden, Wouter A; Monack, Denise M; Weerapana, Eranthie; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    When innate immune cells such as macrophages are challenged with environmental stresses or infection by pathogens, they trigger the rapid assembly of multi-protein complexes called inflammasomes that are responsible for initiating pro-inflammatory responses and a form of cell death termed pyroptosis. We describe here the identification of an intracellular trigger of NLRP3-mediated inflammatory signaling, IL-1β production and pyroptosis in primed murine bone marrow-derived macrophages that is mediated by the disruption of glycolytic flux. This signal results from a drop of NADH levels and induction of mitochondrial ROS production and can be rescued by addition of products that restore NADH production. This signal is also important for host-cell response to the intracellular pathogen Salmonella typhimurium, which can disrupt metabolism by uptake of host-cell glucose. These results reveal an important inflammatory signaling network used by immune cells to sense metabolic dysfunction or infection by intracellular pathogens. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13663.001 PMID:27011353

  9. Protease signaling in animal and plant-regulated cell death.

    PubMed

    Salvesen, Guy S; Hempel, Anne; Coll, Nuria S

    2016-07-01

    This review aims to highlight the proteases required for regulated cell death mechanisms in animals and plants. The aim is to be incisive, and not inclusive of all the animal proteases that have been implicated in various publications. The review also aims to focus on instances when several publications from disparate groups have demonstrated the involvement of an animal protease, and also when there is substantial biochemical, mechanistic and genetic evidence. In doing so, the literature can be culled to a handful of proteases, covering most of the known regulated cell death mechanisms: apoptosis, regulated necrosis, necroptosis, pyroptosis and NETosis in animals. In plants, the literature is younger and not as extensive as for mammals, although the molecular drivers of vacuolar death, necrosis and the hypersensitive response in plants are becoming clearer. Each of these death mechanisms has at least one proteolytic component that plays a major role in controlling the pathway, and sometimes they combine in networks to regulate cell death/survival decision nodes. Some similarities are found among animal and plant cell death proteases but, overall, the pathways that they govern are kingdom-specific with very little overlap. © 2015 FEBS.

  10. Signal transduction events in aluminum-induced cell death in tomato suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Yakimova, Elena T; Kapchina-Toteva, Veneta M; Woltering, Ernst J

    2007-06-01

    In this study, some of the signal transduction events involved in AlCl(3)-induced cell death in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells were elucidated. Cells treated with 100 microM AlCl(3) showed typical features of programmed cell death (PCD) such as nuclear and cytoplasmic condensation. Cell death was effectively inhibited by protease and human caspase inhibitors indicating a cell death execution mechanism with similarities to animal apoptosis. Cell death was suppressed by application of antoxidants and by inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC), phospholipase D (PLD) and ethylene signalling pathways. The results suggest that low concentrations of heavy metal ions stimulate both PLC and PLD signalling pathways leading to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent cell death executed by caspase-like proteases.

  11. The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-18 alters multiple signaling pathways to inhibit natural killer cell death

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodge, D.L.; Subleski, J.J.; Reynolds, D.A.; Buschman, M.D.; Schill, W.B.; Burkett, M.W.; Malyguine, A.M.; Young, H.A.

    2006-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-18 (IL-18), is a natural killer (NK) cell activator that induces NK cell cytotoxicity and interferon-?? (IFN-??) expression. In this report, we define a novel role for IL-18 as an NK cell protective agent. Specifically, IL-18 prevents NK cell death initiated by different and distinct stress mechanisms. IL-18 reduces NK cell self-destruction during NK-targeted cell killing, and in the presence of staurosporin, a potent apoptotic inducer, IL-18 reduces caspase-3 activity. The critical regulatory step in this process is downstream of the mitochondrion and involves reduced cleavage and activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. The ability of IL-18 to regulate cell survival is not limited to a caspase death pathway in that IL-18 augments tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling, resulting in increased and prolonged mRNA expression of c-apoptosis inhibitor 2 (cIAP2), a prosurvival factor and caspase-3 inhibitor, and TNF receptor-associated factor 1 (TRAF1), a prosurvival protein. The cumulative effects of IL-18 define a novel role for this cytokine as a molecular survival switch that functions to both decrease cell death through inhibition of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and enhance TNF induction of prosurvival factors. ?? Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  12. TRAIL enhances paracetamol-induced liver sinusoidal endothelial cell death in a Bim- and Bid-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Badmann, A; Langsch, S; Keogh, A; Brunner, T; Kaufmann, T; Corazza, N

    2012-01-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen, APAP) is a universally used analgesic and antipyretic agent. Considered safe at therapeutic doses, overdoses cause acute liver damage characterized by centrilobular hepatic necrosis. One of the major clinical problems of paracetamol-induced liver disease is the development of hemorrhagic alterations. Although hepatocytes represent the main target of the cytotoxic effect of paracetamol overdose, perturbations within the endothelium involving morphological changes of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) have also been described in paracetamol-induced liver disease. Recently, we have shown that paracetamol-induced liver damage is synergistically enhanced by the TRAIL signaling pathway. As LSECs are constantly exposed to activated immune cells expressing death ligands, including TRAIL, we investigated the effect of TRAIL on paracetamol-induced LSEC death. We here demonstrate for the first time that TRAIL strongly enhances paracetamol-mediated LSEC death with typical features of apoptosis. Inhibition of caspases using specific inhibitors resulted in a strong reduction of cell death. TRAIL appears to enhance paracetamol-induced LSEC death via the activation of the pro-apoptotic BH3-only proteins Bid and Bim, which initiate the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Taken together this study shows that the liver endothelial layer, mainly LSECs, represent a direct target of the cytotoxic effect of paracetamol and that activation of TRAIL receptor synergistically enhances paracetamol-induced LSEC death via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. TRAIL-mediated acceleration of paracetamol-induced cell death may thus contribute to the pathogenesis of paracetamol-induced liver damage. PMID:23254290

  13. Calcium signaling as a mediator of cell energy demand and a trigger to cell death

    PubMed Central

    Bhosale, Gauri; Sharpe, Jenny A.; Sundier, Stephanie Y.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium signaling is pivotal to a host of physiological pathways. A rise in calcium concentration almost invariably signals an increased cellular energy demand. Consistent with this, calcium signals mediate a number of pathways that together serve to balance energy supply and demand. In pathological states, calcium signals can precipitate mitochondrial injury and cell death, especially when coupled to energy depletion and oxidative or nitrosative stress. This review explores the mechanisms that couple cell signaling pathways to metabolic regulation or to cell death. The significance of these pathways is exemplified by pathological case studies, such as those showing loss of mitochondrial calcium uptake 1 in patients and ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:26375864

  14. Ethylene signaling in salt stress- and salicylic acid-induced programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Poór, Péter; Kovács, Judit; Szopkó, Dóra; Tari, Irma

    2013-02-01

    Salt stress- and salicylic acid (SA)-induced cell death can be activated by various signaling pathways including ethylene (ET) signaling in intact tomato plants. In tomato suspension cultures, a treatment with 250 mM NaCl increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), and ET. The 10(-3) M SA-induced cell death was also accompanied by ROS and NO production, but ET emanation, the most characteristic difference between the two cell death programs, did not change. ET synthesis was enhanced by addition of ET precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, which, after 2 h, increased the ROS production in the case of both stressors and accelerated cell death under salt stress. However, it did not change the viability and NO levels in SA-treated samples. The effect of ET induced by salt stress could be blocked with silver thiosulfate (STS), an inhibitor of ET action. STS reduced the death of cells which is in accordance with the decrease in ROS production of cells exposed to high salinity. Unexpectedly, application of STS together with SA resulted in increasing ROS and reduced NO accumulation which led to a faster cell death. NaCl- and SA-induced cell death was blocked by Ca(2+) chelator EGTA and calmodulin inhibitor W-7, or with the inhibitors of ROS. The inhibitor of MAPKs, PD98059, and the cysteine protease inhibitor E-64 reduced cell death in both cases. These results show that NaCl induces cell death mainly by ET-induced ROS production, but ROS generated by SA was not controlled by ET in tomato cell suspension.

  15. Cleavage of Signal Regulatory Protein α (SIRPα) Enhances Inflammatory Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Londino, James D.; Gulick, Dexter; Isenberg, Jeffrey S.; Mallampalli, Rama K.

    2015-01-01

    Signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα) is a membrane glycoprotein immunoreceptor abundant in cells of monocyte lineage. SIRPα ligation by a broadly expressed transmembrane protein, CD47, results in phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs, resulting in the inhibition of NF-κB signaling in macrophages. Here we observed that proteolysis of SIRPα during inflammation is regulated by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 10 (ADAM10), resulting in the generation of a membrane-associated cleavage fragment in both THP-1 monocytes and human lung epithelia. We mapped a charge-dependent putative cleavage site near the membrane-proximal domain necessary for ADAM10-mediated cleavage. In addition, a secondary proteolytic cleavage within the membrane-associated SIRPα fragment by γ-secretase was identified. Ectopic expression of a SIRPα mutant plasmid encoding a proteolytically resistant form in HeLa cells inhibited activation of the NF-κB pathway and suppressed STAT1 phosphorylation in response to TNFα to a greater extent than expression of wild-type SIRPα. Conversely, overexpression of plasmids encoding the proteolytically cleaved SIRPα fragments in cells resulted in enhanced STAT-1 and NF-κB pathway activation. Thus, the data suggest that combinatorial actions of ADAM10 and γ-secretase on SIRPα cleavage promote inflammatory signaling. PMID:26534964

  16. Cleavage of Signal Regulatory Protein α (SIRPα) Enhances Inflammatory Signaling.

    PubMed

    Londino, James D; Gulick, Dexter; Isenberg, Jeffrey S; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2015-12-25

    Signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα) is a membrane glycoprotein immunoreceptor abundant in cells of monocyte lineage. SIRPα ligation by a broadly expressed transmembrane protein, CD47, results in phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs, resulting in the inhibition of NF-κB signaling in macrophages. Here we observed that proteolysis of SIRPα during inflammation is regulated by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 10 (ADAM10), resulting in the generation of a membrane-associated cleavage fragment in both THP-1 monocytes and human lung epithelia. We mapped a charge-dependent putative cleavage site near the membrane-proximal domain necessary for ADAM10-mediated cleavage. In addition, a secondary proteolytic cleavage within the membrane-associated SIRPα fragment by γ-secretase was identified. Ectopic expression of a SIRPα mutant plasmid encoding a proteolytically resistant form in HeLa cells inhibited activation of the NF-κB pathway and suppressed STAT1 phosphorylation in response to TNFα to a greater extent than expression of wild-type SIRPα. Conversely, overexpression of plasmids encoding the proteolytically cleaved SIRPα fragments in cells resulted in enhanced STAT-1 and NF-κB pathway activation. Thus, the data suggest that combinatorial actions of ADAM10 and γ-secretase on SIRPα cleavage promote inflammatory signaling.

  17. The Fas-FADD Death Domain Complex Structure Unravels Signalling by Receptor Clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, F.; Stec, B; Pop, C; Dobaczewska, M; Lee, J; Monosov, E; Robinson, H; Salvesen, G; Schwarzenbacher, R; Riedl, S

    2009-01-01

    The death inducing signalling complex (DISC) formed by Fas receptor, FADD (Fas-associated death domain protein) and caspase 8 is a pivotal trigger of apoptosis1, 2, 3. The Fas-FADD DISC represents a receptor platform, which once assembled initiates the induction of programmed cell death. A highly oligomeric network of homotypic protein interactions comprised of the death domains of Fas and FADD is at the centre of DISC formation4, 5. Thus, characterizing the mechanistic basis for the Fas-FADD interaction is crucial for understanding DISC signalling but has remained unclear largely because of a lack of structural data. We have successfully formed and isolated the human Fas-FADD death domain complex and report the 2.7 A crystal structure. The complex shows a tetrameric arrangement of four FADD death domains bound to four Fas death domains. We show that an opening of the Fas death domain exposes the FADD binding site and simultaneously generates a Fas-Fas bridge. The result is a regulatory Fas-FADD complex bridge governed by weak protein-protein interactions revealing a model where the complex itself functions as a mechanistic switch. This switch prevents accidental DISC assembly, yet allows for highly processive DISC formation and clustering upon a sufficient stimulus. In addition to depicting a previously unknown mode of death domain interactions, these results further uncover a mechanism for receptor signalling solely by oligomerization and clustering events.

  18. The pepper patatin-like phospholipase CaPLP1 functions in plant cell death and defense signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Sung; Jeun, Yongchull; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2014-02-01

    Phospholipases hydrolyze phospholipids into fatty acids and other lipophilic substances. Phospholipid signaling is crucial for diverse cellular processes in plants. However, the precise role of phospholipases in plant cell death and defense signaling is not fully understood. Here, we identified a pepper (Capsicum annuum) patatin-like phospholipase (CaPLP1) gene that is transcriptionally induced in pepper leaves by avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) infection. CaPLP1 containing an N-terminal signal peptide localized to the cytoplasm and plasma membrane, leading to the secretion into the apoplastic regions. Silencing of CaPLP1 in pepper conferred enhanced susceptibility to Xcv infection. Defense responses to Xcv, including the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), hypersensitive cell death and the expression of the salicylic acid (SA)-dependent marker gene CaPR1, were compromised in the CaPLP1-silenced pepper plants. Transient expression of CaPLP1 in pepper leaves induced the accumulation of fluorescent phenolics, expression of the defense marker genes CaPR1 and CaSAR82A, and generation of ROS, ultimately leading to the hypersensitive cell death response. Overexpression (OX) of CaPLP1 in Arabidopsis also conferred enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infection. CaPLP1-OX leaves showed reduced Pst growth, enhanced ROS burst and electrolyte leakage, induction of the defense response genes AtPR1, AtRbohD and AtGST, as well as constitutive activation of both the SA-dependent gene AtPR1 and the JA-dependent gene AtPDF1.2. Together, these results suggest that CaPLP1 is involved in plant defense and cell death signaling in response to microbial pathogens.

  19. Regulation of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation and apoptotic signaling by Sorafenib in hepatoblastoma cells☆

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Hernández, A.; Navarro-Villarán, E.; González, R.; Pereira, S.; Soriano-De Castro, L.B.; Sarrias-Giménez, A.; Barrera-Pulido, L.; Álamo-Martínez, J.M.; Serrablo-Requejo, A.; Blanco-Fernández, G.; Nogales-Muñoz, A.; Gila-Bohórquez, A.; Pacheco, D.; Torres-Nieto, M.A.; Serrano-Díaz-Canedo, J.; Suárez-Artacho, G.; Bernal-Bellido, C.; Marín-Gómez, L.M.; Barcena, J.A.; Gómez-Bravo, M.A.; Padilla, C.A.; Padillo, F.J.; Muntané, J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a relevant role during cell death regulation in tumor cells. The overexpression of nitric oxide synthase type III (NOS-3) induces oxidative and nitrosative stress, p53 and cell death receptor expression and apoptosis in hepatoblastoma cells. S-nitrosylation of cell death receptor modulates apoptosis. Sorafenib is the unique recommended molecular-targeted drug for the treatment of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. The present study was addressed to elucidate the potential role of NO during Sorafenib-induced cell death in HepG2 cells. We determined the intra- and extracellular NO concentration, cell death receptor expression and their S-nitrosylation modifications, and apoptotic signaling in Sorafenib-treated HepG2 cells. The effect of NO donors on above parameters has also been determined. Sorafenib induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. However, low concentration of the drug (10 nM) increased cell death receptor expression, as well as caspase-8 and -9 activation, but without activation of downstream apoptotic markers. In contrast, Sorafenib (10 µM) reduced upstream apoptotic parameters but increased caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation in HepG2 cells. The shift of cell death signaling pathway was associated with a reduction of S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors in Sorafenib-treated cells. The administration of NO donors increased S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors and overall induction of cell death markers in control and Sorafenib-treated cells. In conclusion, Sorafenib induced alteration of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation status which may have a relevant repercussion on cell death signaling in hepatoblastoma cells. PMID:26233703

  20. Regulation of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation and apoptotic signaling by Sorafenib in hepatoblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Hernández, A; Navarro-Villarán, E; González, R; Pereira, S; Soriano-De Castro, L B; Sarrias-Giménez, A; Barrera-Pulido, L; Álamo-Martínez, J M; Serrablo-Requejo, A; Blanco-Fernández, G; Nogales-Muñoz, A; Gila-Bohórquez, A; Pacheco, D; Torres-Nieto, M A; Serrano-Díaz-Canedo, J; Suárez-Artacho, G; Bernal-Bellido, C; Marín-Gómez, L M; Barcena, J A; Gómez-Bravo, M A; Padilla, C A; Padillo, F J; Muntané, J

    2015-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a relevant role during cell death regulation in tumor cells. The overexpression of nitric oxide synthase type III (NOS-3) induces oxidative and nitrosative stress, p53 and cell death receptor expression and apoptosis in hepatoblastoma cells. S-nitrosylation of cell death receptor modulates apoptosis. Sorafenib is the unique recommended molecular-targeted drug for the treatment of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. The present study was addressed to elucidate the potential role of NO during Sorafenib-induced cell death in HepG2 cells. We determined the intra- and extracellular NO concentration, cell death receptor expression and their S-nitrosylation modifications, and apoptotic signaling in Sorafenib-treated HepG2 cells. The effect of NO donors on above parameters has also been determined. Sorafenib induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. However, low concentration of the drug (10nM) increased cell death receptor expression, as well as caspase-8 and -9 activation, but without activation of downstream apoptotic markers. In contrast, Sorafenib (10 µM) reduced upstream apoptotic parameters but increased caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation in HepG2 cells. The shift of cell death signaling pathway was associated with a reduction of S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors in Sorafenib-treated cells. The administration of NO donors increased S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors and overall induction of cell death markers in control and Sorafenib-treated cells. In conclusion, Sorafenib induced alteration of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation status which may have a relevant repercussion on cell death signaling in hepatoblastoma cells. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Targeted Lymphoma Cell Death by Novel Signal Transduction Modifications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-14

    CD22-binding peptides that initiate signal transduction and apoptosis in non -Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), 2) optimize CD22-mediated signal transduction...positive non -Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), much as rituximab (Rituxan) is an option to patients with CD20-positive NHL. By sequencing the heavy and...Int J Pept Res Ther (2008) 14:237–246 8. O’Donnell RT, Pearson D, McKnight HC, Ma YP, Tuscano JM. Treatment of non -Hodgkin’s lymphoma xenografts with

  2. Neuronal death enhanced by N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Stefovska, Vanya; Turski, Lechoslaw

    2000-01-01

    Glutamate promotes neuronal survival during brain development and destroys neurons after injuries in the mature brain. Glutamate antagonists are in human clinical trials aiming to demonstrate limitation of neuronal injury after head trauma, which consists of both rapid and slowly progressing neurodegeneration. Furthermore, glutamate antagonists are considered for neuroprotection in chronic neurodegenerative disorders with slowly progressing cell death only. Therefore, humans suffering from Huntington's disease, characterized by slowly progressing neurodegeneration of the basal ganglia, are subjected to trials with glutamate antagonists. Here we demonstrate that progressive neurodegeneration in the basal ganglia induced by the mitochondrial toxin 3-nitropropionate or in the hippocampus by traumatic brain injury is enhanced by N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists but ameliorated by α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate antagonists. These observations reveal that N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists may increase neurodestruction in mature brain undergoing slowly progressing neurodegeneration, whereas blockade of the action of glutamate at α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptors may be neuroprotective. PMID:11058158

  3. Altered Death Receptor Signaling Promotes Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Acquired Chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Antoon, James W.; Lai, Rongye; Struckhoff, Amanda P.; Nitschke, Ashley M.; Elliott, Steven; Martin, Elizabeth C.; Rhodes, Lyndsay V.; Yoon, Nam Seung; Salvo, Virgilio A.; Shan, Bin; Beckman, Barbara S.; Nephew, Kenneth P.; Burow, Matthew E.

    2012-01-01

    Altered death receptor signaling and resistance to subsequent apoptosis is an important clinical resistance mechanism. Here, we investigated the role of death receptor resistance in breast cancer progression. Resistance of the estrogen receptor alpha (ER)-positive, chemosensitive MCF7 breast cancer cell line to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was associated with loss of ER expression and a multi-drug resistant phenotype. Changes in three major pathways were involved in this transition to a multidrug resistance phenotype: ER, Death Receptor and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Resistant cells exhibited altered ER signaling, resulting in decreased ER target gene expression. The death receptor pathway was significantly altered, blocking extrinsic apoptosis and increasing NF-kappaB survival signaling. TNF resistance promoted EMT changes, resulting in a more aggressive phenotype. This first report identifying specific mechanisms underlying acquired resistance to TNF could lead to a better understanding of the progression of breast cancer in response to chemotherapy treatment. PMID:22844580

  4. Enhancing the antitumor efficacy of a cell-surface death ligand by covalent membrane display.

    PubMed

    Nair, Pradeep M; Flores, Heather; Gogineni, Alvin; Marsters, Scot; Lawrence, David A; Kelley, Robert F; Ngu, Hai; Sagolla, Meredith; Komuves, Laszlo; Bourgon, Richard; Settleman, Jeffrey; Ashkenazi, Avi

    2015-05-05

    TNF superfamily death ligands are expressed on the surface of immune cells and can trigger apoptosis in susceptible cancer cells by engaging cognate death receptors. A recombinant soluble protein comprising the ectodomain of Apo2 ligand/TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (Apo2L/TRAIL) has shown remarkable preclinical anticancer activity but lacked broad efficacy in patients, possibly owing to insufficient exposure or potency. We observed that antibody cross-linking substantially enhanced cytotoxicity of soluble Apo2L/TRAIL against diverse cancer cell lines. Presentation of the ligand on glass-supported lipid bilayers enhanced its ability to drive receptor microclustering and apoptotic signaling. Furthermore, covalent surface attachment of Apo2L/TRAIL onto liposomes--synthetic lipid-bilayer nanospheres--similarly augmented activity. In vivo, liposome-displayed Apo2L/TRAIL achieved markedly better exposure and antitumor activity. Thus, covalent synthetic-membrane attachment of a cell-surface ligand enhances efficacy, increasing therapeutic potential. These findings have translational implications for liposomal approaches as well as for Apo2L/TRAIL and other clinically relevant TNF ligands.

  5. Cannabidiol attenuates cardiac dysfunction, oxidative stress, fibrosis, and inflammatory and cell death signaling pathways in diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Mohanraj; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Bátkai, Sándor; Patel, Vivek; Saito, Keita; Matsumoto, Shingo; Kashiwaya, Yoshihiro; Horváth, Béla; Mukhopadhyay, Bani; Becker, Lauren; Haskó, György; Liaudet, Lucas; Wink, David A; Veves, Aristidis; Mechoulam, Raphael; Pacher, Pál

    2010-12-14

    In this study, we have investigated the effects of cannabidiol (CBD) on myocardial dysfunction, inflammation, oxidative/nitrative stress, cell death, and interrelated signaling pathways, using a mouse model of type I diabetic cardiomyopathy and primary human cardiomyocytes exposed to high glucose. Cannabidiol, the most abundant nonpsychoactive constituent of Cannabis sativa (marijuana) plant, exerts anti-inflammatory effects in various disease models and alleviates pain and spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis in humans. Left ventricular function was measured by the pressure-volume system. Oxidative stress, cell death, and fibrosis markers were evaluated by molecular biology/biochemical techniques, electron spin resonance spectroscopy, and flow cytometry. Diabetic cardiomyopathy was characterized by declined diastolic and systolic myocardial performance associated with increased oxidative-nitrative stress, nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (c-Jun N-terminal kinase, p-38, p38α) activation, enhanced expression of adhesion molecules (intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1), tumor necrosis factor-α, markers of fibrosis (transforming growth factor-β, connective tissue growth factor, fibronectin, collagen-1, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9), enhanced cell death (caspase 3/7 and poly[adenosine diphosphate-ribose] polymerase activity, chromatin fragmentation, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling), and diminished Akt phosphorylation. Remarkably, CBD attenuated myocardial dysfunction, cardiac fibrosis, oxidative/nitrative stress, inflammation, cell death, and interrelated signaling pathways. Furthermore, CBD also attenuated the high glucose-induced increased reactive oxygen species generation, nuclear factor-κB activation, and cell death in primary human cardiomyocytes. Collectively, these results coupled with the excellent safety and tolerability profile of CBD in humans, strongly

  6. Ras Homolog Enriched in Brain (Rheb) Enhances Apoptotic Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Karassek, Sascha; Berghaus, Carsten; Schwarten, Melanie; Goemans, Christoph G.; Ohse, Nadine; Kock, Gerd; Jockers, Katharina; Neumann, Sebastian; Gottfried, Sebastian; Herrmann, Christian; Heumann, Rolf; Stoll, Raphael

    2010-01-01

    Rheb is a homolog of Ras GTPase that regulates cell growth, proliferation, and regeneration via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Because of the well established potential of activated Ras to promote survival, we sought to investigate the ability of Rheb signaling to phenocopy Ras. We found that overexpression of lipid-anchored Rheb enhanced the apoptotic effects induced by UV light, TNFα, or tunicamycin in an mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1)-dependent manner. Knocking down endogenous Rheb or applying rapamycin led to partial protection, identifying Rheb as a mediator of cell death. Ras and c-Raf kinase opposed the apoptotic effects induced by UV light or TNFα but did not prevent Rheb-mediated apoptosis. To gain structural insight into the signaling mechanisms, we determined the structure of Rheb-GDP by NMR. The complex adopts the typical canonical fold of RasGTPases and displays the characteristic GDP-dependent picosecond to nanosecond backbone dynamics of the switch I and switch II regions. NMR revealed Ras effector-like binding of activated Rheb to the c-Raf-Ras-binding domain (RBD), but the affinity was 1000-fold lower than the Ras/RBD interaction, suggesting a lack of functional interaction. shRNA-mediated knockdown of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK-1) strongly reduced UV or TNFα-induced apoptosis and suppressed enhancement by Rheb overexpression. In conclusion, Rheb-mTOR activation not only promotes normal cell growth but also enhances apoptosis in response to diverse toxic stimuli via an ASK-1-mediated mechanism. Pharmacological regulation of the Rheb/mTORC1 pathway using rapamycin should take the presence of cellular stress into consideration, as this may have clinical implications. PMID:20685651

  7. Signal enhancement using a switchable magnetic trap

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald [Pleasanton, CA

    2012-05-29

    A system for analyzing a sample including providing a microchannel flow channel; associating the sample with magnetic nanoparticles or magnetic polystyrene-coated beads; moving the sample with said magnetic nanoparticles or magnetic polystyrene-coated beads in the microchannel flow channel; holding the sample with the magnetic nanoparticles or magnetic polystyrene-coated beads in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel; and analyzing the sample obtaining an enhanced analysis signal. An apparatus for analysis of a sample includes magnetic particles connected to the sample, a microchip, a flow channel in the microchip, a source of carrier fluid connected to the flow channel for moving the sample in the flow channel, an electromagnet trap connected to the flow line for selectively magnetically trapping the sample and the magnetic particles, and an analyzer for analyzing the sample.

  8. Radar range data signal enhancement tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and performance characteristics are described of two digital data signal enhancement filters which are capable of being inserted between the Space Shuttle Navigation Sensor outputs and the guidance computer. Commonality of interfaces has been stressed so that the filters may be evaluated through operation with simulated sensors or with actual prototype sensor hardware. The filters will provide both a smoothed range and range rate output. Different conceptual approaches are utilized for each filter. The first filter is based on a combination low pass nonrecursive filter and a cascaded simple average smoother for range and range rate, respectively. Filter number two is a tracking filter which is capable of following transient data of the type encountered during burn periods. A test simulator was also designed which generates typical shuttle navigation sensor data.

  9. Evolutionary pulse shaping in CARS signal enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehendale, Manjusha; Bosacchi, Bruno; Warren, Warren S.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the role of evolutionary adaptive algorithms in shaping femtosecond pulses with an eye toward their use in the quantum control of optical properties. In particular, we report preliminary results from an ongoing attempt to implement the recently proposed FAST CARS technique for the detection and identification of bacterial spores. In the initail phase of this project, we are studying the CARS signal from a deuterated water (D2O) solution of Dipicolinic Acid (DPA), which is an important constituent of the spores. enhancement of the CARS intensity associated with the DPA vibrational resonance at ~ 3000cm-1. This effect is weak, but significant. It is premature to ascribe it to any particular mechanism, but its detection encourages its optimization by searching the space of all possible pulse shapes via an evolutionary feedback algorithm.

  10. Enhancement of Death Acceptance by a Grief Counseling Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Harvey J.; Melbin-Helberg, Elizabeth B.

    1992-01-01

    Investigated impact of grief counseling course in terms of two-component formulation of death acceptance. Compared to controls, participants showed significant and sustained increase in cognitive confrontation of death and in assimilation of attitudes at emotional level. Identified predictors of extent of effect included individual's initial death…

  11. Fenretinide-dependent upregulation of death receptors through ASK1 and p38α enhances death receptor ligand-induced cell death in Ewing's sarcoma family of tumours.

    PubMed

    White, D E; Burchill, S A

    2010-10-26

    Sustained p38(MAPK) phosphorylation upregulates p75 neurotrophin (p75(NTR)) and induces apoptosis in Ewing's sarcoma family of tumours (ESFT). As fenretinide induces ESFT death through sustained p38(MAPK) phosphorylation, we hypothesised that this may be effected through upregulation of death receptors (DRs) and that treatment of fenretinide plus DR ligands may enhance apoptosis. DR expression was determined by flow cytometry. Trypan blue exclusion assays, caspase-8 flow cytometry and immunoblotting for Bid were used to measure cell death. Fenretinide upregulated cell surface expression of tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors, FAS and p75(NTR), in an ASK1- and p38α-dependent manner. Cotreatment with fenretinide and DR ligands resulted in synergistic death compared with either agent alone; caspase-8 and Bid were cleaved in a time-dependent manner. Fenretinide did not increase DR expression in non-malignant cells. Furthermore, fenretinide, TRAIL or a combination of both agents was non-cytotoxic to non-malignant cells. Etoposide and actinomycin D increased expression of all DRs examined, whereas vincristine increased FAS alone. Only actinomycin D and TRAIL, and etoposide with TRAIL or FasL, enhanced death compared with either agent alone. The synergistic death observed with fenretinide and DR ligands suggests that this combination may be an attractive strategy for the treatment of ESFT.

  12. Fenretinide-dependent upregulation of death receptors through ASK1 and p38α enhances death receptor ligand-induced cell death in Ewing's sarcoma family of tumours

    PubMed Central

    White, D E; Burchill, S A

    2010-01-01

    Background: Sustained p38MAPK phosphorylation upregulates p75 neurotrophin (p75NTR) and induces apoptosis in Ewing's sarcoma family of tumours (ESFT). As fenretinide induces ESFT death through sustained p38MAPK phosphorylation, we hypothesised that this may be effected through upregulation of death receptors (DRs) and that treatment of fenretinide plus DR ligands may enhance apoptosis. Methods: DR expression was determined by flow cytometry. Trypan blue exclusion assays, caspase-8 flow cytometry and immunoblotting for Bid were used to measure cell death. Results: Fenretinide upregulated cell surface expression of tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors, FAS and p75NTR, in an ASK1- and p38α-dependent manner. Cotreatment with fenretinide and DR ligands resulted in synergistic death compared with either agent alone; caspase-8 and Bid were cleaved in a time-dependent manner. Fenretinide did not increase DR expression in non-malignant cells. Furthermore, fenretinide, TRAIL or a combination of both agents was non-cytotoxic to non-malignant cells. Etoposide and actinomycin D increased expression of all DRs examined, whereas vincristine increased FAS alone. Only actinomycin D and TRAIL, and etoposide with TRAIL or FasL, enhanced death compared with either agent alone. Conclusion: The synergistic death observed with fenretinide and DR ligands suggests that this combination may be an attractive strategy for the treatment of ESFT. PMID:20877355

  13. [Signal pathways of cell proliferation and death as targets of potential chemotherapeutics].

    PubMed

    Repický, A; Jantová, S; Milata, V

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review current information concerning signal transduction pathways of cell proliferation and cell death applicable in the research of antitumor compounds with a specific effect. Actually, cancer counts among the world gravest diseases. Research of the mechanisms of action of chemotherapeutics helps us to find compounds with high cytotoxic activity to tumor cells and low or no cytotoxicity to normal cells. Many present studies deal with the ability of drugs to hit the proliferation signal pathways or cell death pathways specifically. Various proliferation signal pathways have been identified, e.g. pathways of mitogen-activated proteinkinases. In original studies, cell death was considered to perform in necrotic and apoptotic forms, whereas in contrast to necrosis, apoptosis represented the programmed process. However, other forms of programmed cell death were discovered, the programmed necrosis and autophagic cell death. Similarly, beside the intrinsic, mitochondrial-mediated, and extrinsic, receptor-mediated pathways, new mechanisms of induction of apoptosis were discovered: the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway in which calcium plays an important role, the lysosomal pathway and the ceramide-induced pathway. Current information concerning transduction of antiproliferative and death stimuli in cells allows to explain the mechanisms of action of known drugs and also brings novel therapeutical targets which can serve in treatment of such diseases as cancer.

  14. Quercetin enhances TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in colon cancer cells by inducing the accumulation of death receptors in lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Psahoulia, Faiy H; Drosopoulos, Konstantinos G; Doubravska, Lenka; Andera, Ladislav; Pintzas, Alexander

    2007-09-01

    Cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) can induce apoptosis in colon cancer cells through engagement of death receptors. Nevertheless, evading apoptosis induced by anticancer drugs characterizes many types of cancers. This results in the need for combination therapy. In this study, we have investigated whether the flavonoid quercetin could sensitize human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. We report that quercetin enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis by causing the redistribution of DR4 and DR5 into lipid rafts. Nystatin, a cholesterol-sequestering agent, prevented quercetin-induced clustering of death receptors and sensitization to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in colon adenocarcinoma cells. In addition, our experiments show that quercetin, in combination with TRAIL, triggered the mitochondrial-dependent death pathway, as shown by Bid cleavage and the release of cytochrome c to the cytosol. Together, our findings propose that quercetin, through its ability to redistribute death receptors at the cell surface, facilitates death-inducing signaling complex formation and activation of caspases in response to death receptor stimulation. Based on these results, this study provides a challenging approach to enhance the efficiency of TRAIL-based therapies.

  15. Semaphorin 3A is a retrograde cell death signal in developing sympathetic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wehner, Amanda B.; Abdesselem, Houari; Dickendesher, Travis L.; Imai, Fumiyasu; Yoshida, Yutaka; Giger, Roman J.; Pierchala, Brian A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During development of the peripheral nervous system, excess neurons are generated, most of which will be lost by programmed cell death due to a limited supply of neurotrophic factors from their targets. Other environmental factors, such as ‘competition factors' produced by neurons themselves, and axon guidance molecules have also been implicated in developmental cell death. Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A), in addition to its function as a chemorepulsive guidance cue, can also induce death of sensory neurons in vitro. The extent to which Sema3A regulates developmental cell death in vivo, however, is debated. We show that in compartmentalized cultures of rat sympathetic neurons, a Sema3A-initiated apoptosis signal is retrogradely transported from axon terminals to cell bodies to induce cell death. Sema3A-mediated apoptosis utilizes the extrinsic pathway and requires both neuropilin 1 and plexin A3. Sema3A is not retrogradely transported in older, survival factor-independent sympathetic neurons, and is much less effective at inducing apoptosis in these neurons. Importantly, deletion of either neuropilin 1 or plexin A3 significantly reduces developmental cell death in the superior cervical ganglia. Taken together, a Sema3A-initiated apoptotic signaling complex regulates the apoptosis of sympathetic neurons during the period of naturally occurring cell death. PMID:27143756

  16. Two Adjacent Trimeric Fas Ligands Are Required for Fas Signaling and Formation of a Death-Inducing Signaling Complex

    PubMed Central

    Holler, Nils; Tardivel, Aubry; Kovacsovics-Bankowski, Magdalena; Hertig, Sylvie; Gaide, Olivier; Martinon, Fabio; Tinel, Antoine; Deperthes, David; Calderara, Silvio; Schulthess, Therese; Engel, Jürgen; Schneider, Pascal; Tschopp, Jürg

    2003-01-01

    The membrane-bound form of Fas ligand (FasL) signals apoptosis in target cells through engagement of the death receptor Fas, whereas the proteolytically processed, soluble form of FasL does not induce cell death. However, soluble FasL can be rendered active upon cross-linking. Since the minimal extent of oligomerization of FasL that exerts cytotoxicity is unknown, we engineered hexameric proteins containing two trimers of FasL within the same molecule. This was achieved by fusing FasL to the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G1 or to the collagen domain of ACRP30/adiponectin. Trimeric FasL and hexameric FasL both bound to Fas, but only the hexameric forms were highly cytotoxic and competent to signal apoptosis via formation of a death-inducing signaling complex. Three sequential early events in Fas-mediated apoptosis could be dissected, namely, receptor binding, receptor activation, and recruitment of intracellular signaling molecules, each of which occurred independently of the subsequent one. These results demonstrate that the limited oligomerization of FasL, and most likely of some other tumor necrosis factor family ligands such as CD40L, is required for triggering of the signaling pathways. PMID:12556501

  17. TAK1 regulates caspase 8 activation and necroptotic signaling via multiple cell death checkpoints

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoyun; Yin, Haifeng; Chen, Yi; Li, Lei; Li, Jing; Liu, Qinghang

    2016-01-01

    Necroptosis has emerged as a new form of programmed cell death implicated in a number of pathological conditions such as ischemic injury, neurodegenerative disease, and viral infection. Recent studies indicate that TGFβ-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is nodal regulator of necroptotic cell death, although the underlying molecular regulatory mechanisms are not well defined. Here we reported that TAK1 regulates necroptotic signaling as well as caspase 8-mediated apoptotic signaling through both NFκB-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Inhibition of TAK1 promoted TNFα-induced cell death through the induction of RIP1 phosphorylation/activation and necrosome formation. Further, inhibition of TAK1 triggered two caspase 8 activation pathways through the induction of RIP1-FADD-caspase 8 complex as well as FLIP cleavage/degradation. Mechanistically, our data uncovered an essential role for the adaptor protein TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD) in caspase 8 activation and necrosome formation triggered by TAK1 inhibition. Moreover, ablation of the deubiqutinase CYLD prevented both apoptotic and necroptotic signaling induced by TAK1 inhibition. Finally, blocking the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway prevented the degradation of key pro-survival signaling proteins and necrosome formation. Thus, we identified new regulatory mechanisms underlying the critical role of TAK1 in cell survival through regulation of multiple cell death checkpoints. Targeting key components of the necroptotic pathway (e.g., TRADD and CYLD) and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway may represent novel therapeutic strategies for pathological conditions driven by necroptosis. PMID:27685625

  18. Partial equilibrium approximations in apoptosis. II. The death-inducing signaling complex subsystem.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Jing; Hong, Liu; Yong, Wen-An

    2015-12-01

    This paper is a continuation of our previous work (Huang and Yong, 2013) for simplifying the Fas signaling-induced apoptotic pathway identified by Hua et al. (2005) for human tumor T cells. The previous paper studied the downstream intracelluar-signaling subsystem, while the present one is concerned with the upstream death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) subsystem. Under the assumption that the bind of Fas-associated death domains and FLICE-inhibitory proteins to the DISC is much faster than that of the initiator procaspases, we greatly simplify the upstream subsystem from 35 reactions with 26 species to 6 reactions with 9 species by adopting the classical and recently justified partial equilibrium approximation method. Numerical simulations show that the simplified model is in an excellent agreement with the original model. Most importantly, the simplified model clearly reveals the key reactants and dominated pathways in the Fas signaling process, and thus provides new insights into the apoptosis.

  19. HYAL-2–WWOX–SMAD4 Signaling in Cell Death and Anticancer Response

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Li-Jin; Chiang, Ming-Fu; Sze, Chun-I; Su, Wan-Pei; Yap, Ye Vone; Lee, I-Ting; Kuo, Hsiang-Ling; Chang, Nan-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronidase HYAL-2 is a membrane-anchored protein and also localizes, in part, in the lysosome. Recent study from animal models revealed that both HYAL-1 and HYAL-2 are essential for the metabolism of hyaluronan (HA). Hyal-2 deficiency is associated with chronic thrombotic microangiopathy with hemolytic anemia in mice due to over accumulation of high molecular size HA. HYAL-2 is essential for platelet generation. Membrane HYAL-2 degrades HA bound by co-receptor CD44. Also, in a non-canonical signal pathway, HYAL-2 serves as a receptor for transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) to signal with downstream tumor suppressors WWOX and SMAD4 to control gene transcription. When SMAD4 responsive element is overly driven by the HYAL-2–WWOX–SMAD4 signaling complex, cell death occurs. When rats are subjected to traumatic brain injury, over accumulation of a HYAL-2–WWOX complex occurs in the nucleus to cause neuronal death. HA induces the signaling of HYAL-2–WWOX–SMAD4 and relocation of the signaling complex to the nucleus. If the signaling complex is overexpressed, bubbling cell death occurs in WWOX-expressing cells. In addition, a small synthetic peptide Zfra (zinc finger-like protein that regulates apoptosis) binds membrane HYAL-2 of non-T/non-B spleen HYAL-2+ CD3− CD19− Z lymphocytes and activates the cells to generate memory anticancer response against many types of cancer cells in vivo. Whether the HYAL-2–WWOX–SMAD4 signaling complex is involved is discussed. In this review and opinion article, we have updated the current knowledge of HA, HYAL-2 and WWOX, HYAL-2–WWOX–SMAD4 signaling, bubbling cell death, and Z cell activation for memory anticancer response. PMID:27999774

  20. Oligopeptides as External Molecular Signals Affecting Growth and Death in Animal Cell Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franek, František

    Protein hydrolysates in the form of oligopeptides and free amino acids are widely used in animal cell culture for the production of therapeutic proteins. The primary function of protein hydrolysates is to provide nitrogen source and at the same they may increase cell density and higher yields of proteins. It is interesting to note that some peptides exclusively increase cell density, others improve both cell density and product yield, and some peptides suppress cell growth and enhance the product yield. Thus it is very clear that oligopeptides act as external molecular signals affecting growth and death. However, the effect of peptide size and amino acid composition in the protein hydrolysates and the exact mechanism as how this is achieved is still not elucidated in animal cells. In this chapter we describe our work on the fractionation of protein hydrolysates and the use of synthetic peptides on hybridomas. This research work shed some insight about the peptide size, amino acids, concentration and composition of peptides, feeding strategies for peptides but by any means this is not complete and more work needs to be done. For example it is essential to extend this type of work with peptides larger than tetra and penta peptides and with different cell lines to elucidate the mode of action of peptides.

  1. Activation of ERK signaling and induction of colon cancer cell death by piperlongumine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Piperlongumine (PPLGM) is a bioactive compound isolated from long peppers that shows selective toxicity towards a variety of cancer cell types including colon cancer. The signaling pathways that lead to cancer cell death in response to PPLGM exposure have not been previously identified. Our objectiv...

  2. A type III effector antagonises death receptor signalling during bacterial gut infection

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Jaclyn S; Giogha, Cristina; Ong, Sze Ying; Kennedy, Catherine L; Kelly, Michelle; Robinson, Keith S; Wong, Tania; Mansell, Ashley; Riedmaier, Patrice; Oates, Clare VL; Zaid, Ali; Mühlen, Sabrina; Crepin, Valerie F; Marches, Olivier; Ang, Ching-Seng; Williamson, Nicholas A; O’Reilly, Lorraine A; Bankovacki, Aleksandra; Nachbur, Ueli; Infusini, Giuseppe; Webb, Andrew I; Silke, John; Strasser, Andreas; Frankel, Gad; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2013-01-01

    Successful infection by enteric bacterial pathogens depends on the ability of the bacteria to colonise the gut, replicate in host tissues and disseminate to other hosts. Pathogens such as Salmonella, Shigella and enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EPEC and EHEC), utilise a type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver virulence effector proteins into host cells during infection that promote colonisation and interfere with antimicrobial host responses 1-3. Here we report that the T3SS effector NleB1 from EPEC binds to host cell death domain containing proteins and thereby inhibits death receptor signalling. Protein interaction studies identified FADD, TRADD and RIPK1 as binding partners of NleB1. NleB1 expressed ectopically or injected by the bacterial T3SS prevented Fas ligand or TNF-induced formation of the canonical death inducing signalling complex (DISC) and proteolytic activation of caspase-8, an essential step in death receptor induced apoptosis. This inhibition depended on the N-GlcNAc transferase activity of NleB1, which specifically modified Arg117 in the death domain of FADD. The importance of the death receptor apoptotic pathway to host defence was demonstrated using mice deficient in the FAS signalling pathway, which showed delayed clearance of the EPEC-like mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium and reversion to virulence of an nleB mutant. The activity of NleB suggests that EPEC and other attaching and effacing (A/E) pathogens antagonise death receptor induced apoptosis of infected cells, thereby blocking a major antimicrobial host response. PMID:24025841

  3. Multiple Signaling Pathways Regulate Yeast Cell Death during the Response to Mating Pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan-Nan; Dudgeon, Drew D.; Paliwal, Saurabh; Levchenko, Andre; Grote, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Mating pheromones promote cellular differentiation and fusion of yeast cells with those of the opposite mating type. In the absence of a suitable partner, high concentrations of mating pheromones induced rapid cell death in ∼25% of the population of clonal cultures independent of cell age. Rapid cell death required Fig1, a transmembrane protein homologous to PMP-22/EMP/MP20/Claudin proteins, but did not require its Ca2+ influx activity. Rapid cell death also required cell wall degradation, which was inhibited in some surviving cells by the activation of a negative feedback loop involving the MAP kinase Slt2/Mpk1. Mutants lacking Slt2/Mpk1 or its upstream regulators also underwent a second slower wave of cell death that was independent of Fig1 and dependent on much lower concentrations of pheromones. A third wave of cell death that was independent of Fig1 and Slt2/Mpk1 was observed in mutants and conditions that eliminate calcineurin signaling. All three waves of cell death appeared independent of the caspase-like protein Mca1 and lacked certain “hallmarks” of apoptosis. Though all three waves of cell death were preceded by accumulation of reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial respiration was only required for the slowest wave in calcineurin-deficient cells. These findings suggest that yeast cells can die by necrosis-like mechanisms during the response to mating pheromones if essential response pathways are lacking or if mating is attempted in the absence of a partner. PMID:16738305

  4. Induction of Cancer Cell Death by Isoflavone: The Role of Multiple Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yiwei; Kong, Dejuan; Bao, Bin; Ahmad, Aamir; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2011-01-01

    Soy isoflavones have been documented as dietary nutrients broadly classified as “natural agents” which plays important roles in reducing the incidence of hormone-related cancers in Asian countries, and have shown inhibitory effects on cancer development and progression in vitro and in vivo, suggesting the cancer preventive or therapeutic activity of soy isoflavones against cancers. Emerging experimental evidence shows that isoflavones could induce cancer cell death by regulating multiple cellular signaling pathways including Akt, NF-κB, MAPK, Wnt, androgen receptor (AR), p53 and Notch signaling, all of which have been found to be deregulated in cancer cells. Therefore, homeostatic regulation of these important cellular signaling pathways by isoflavones could be useful for the activation of cell death signaling, which could result in the induction of apoptosis of both pre-cancerous and/or cancerous cells without affecting normal cells. In this article, we have attempted to summarize the current state-of-our-knowledge regarding the induction of cancer cell death pathways by isoflavones, which is believed to be mediated through the regulation of multiple cellular signaling pathways. The knowledge gained from this article will provide a comprehensive view on the molecular mechanism(s) by which soy isoflavones may exert their effects on the prevention of tumor progression and/or treatment of human malignancies, which would also aid in stimulating further in-depth mechanistic research and foster the initiation of novel clinical trials. PMID:22200028

  5. Redox Regulation of Intracellular Zinc: Molecular Signaling in the Life and Death of Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Aizenman, Elias

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Zn2+ has emerged as a major regulator of neuronal physiology, as well as an important signaling agent in neural injury. The intracellular concentration of this metal is tightly regulated through the actions of Zn2+ transporters and the thiol-rich metal binding protein metallothionein, closely linking the redox status of the cell to cellular availability of Zn2+. Accordingly, oxidative and nitrosative stress during ischemic injury leads to an accumulation of neuronal free Zn2+ and the activation of several downstream cell death processes. While this Zn2+ rise is an established signaling event in neuronal cell death, recent evidence suggests that a transient, sublethal accumulation of free Zn2+ can also play a critical role in neuroprotective pathways activated during ischemic preconditioning. Thus, redox-sensitive proteins, like metallothioneins, may play a critical role in determining neuronal cell fate by regulating the localization and concentration of intracellular free Zn2+. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 2249–2263. PMID:20849376

  6. Ethylene signaling pathway and MAPK cascades are required for AAL toxin-induced programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Mase, Keisuke; Mizuno, Takahito; Ishihama, Nobuaki; Fujii, Takayuki; Mori, Hitoshi; Kodama, Motoichiro; Yoshioka, Hirofumi

    2012-08-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD), known as hypersensitive response cell death, has an important role in plant defense response. The signaling pathway of PCD remains unknown. We employed AAL toxin and Nicotiana umbratica to analysis plant PCD. AAL toxin is a pathogenicity factor of the necrotrophic pathogen Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici. N. umbratica is sensitive to AAL toxin, susceptible to pathogens, and effective in Tobacco rattle virus-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). VIGS analyses indicated that AAL toxin-triggered cell death (ACD) is dependent upon the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase MEK2, which is upstream of both salicylic acid-induced protein kinase (SIPK) and wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK) responsible for ethylene (ET) synthesis. ET treatment of MEK2-silenced N. umbratica re-established ACD. In SIPK- and WIPK-silenced N. umbratica, ACD was compromised and ET accumulation was not observed. However, in contrast to the case of MEK2-silenced plants, ET treatment did not induce cell death in SIPK- and WIPK-silenced plants. This work showed that ET-dependent pathway and MAP kinase cascades are required in ACD. Our results suggested that MEK2-SIPK/WIPK cascades have roles in ET biosynthesis; however, SIPK and WIPK have other roles in ET signaling or another pathway leading to cell death by AAL toxin.

  7. Chloroplast Activity and 3'phosphadenosine 5'phosphate Signaling Regulate Programmed Cell Death in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bruggeman, Quentin; Mazubert, Christelle; Prunier, Florence; Lugan, Raphaël; Chan, Kai Xun; Phua, Su Yin; Pogson, Barry James; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja; Delarue, Marianne; Benhamed, Moussa; Bergounioux, Catherine; Raynaud, Cécile

    2016-03-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a crucial process both for plant development and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. There is accumulating evidence that chloroplasts may play a central role during plant PCD as for mitochondria in animal cells, but it is still unclear whether they participate in PCD onset, execution, or both. To tackle this question, we have analyzed the contribution of chloroplast function to the cell death phenotype of the myoinositol phosphate synthase1 (mips1) mutant that forms spontaneous lesions in a light-dependent manner. We show that photosynthetically active chloroplasts are required for PCD to occur in mips1, but this process is independent of the redox state of the chloroplast. Systematic genetic analyses with retrograde signaling mutants reveal that 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphate, a chloroplast retrograde signal that modulates nuclear gene expression in response to stress, can inhibit cell death and compromises plant innate immunity via inhibition of the RNA-processing 5'-3' exoribonucleases. Our results provide evidence for the role of chloroplast-derived signal and RNA metabolism in the control of cell death and biotic stress response. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  8. FLIP ing the coin? Death receptor-mediated signals during skin tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Leverkus, Martin; Diessenbacher, Philip; Geserick, Peter

    2008-07-01

    Keratinocyte skin cancer is a multi-step process, during which a number of obstacles have to be overcome by the tumor cell to allow the development of a manifest tumor. Beside proliferation and immortality, apoptosis resistance is one additional and critical step during skin carcinogenesis. Over the past two decades, much has been learned about the prototypical membrane-bound inducers of apoptosis, namely the death receptors and their ligands, and the apoptosis signalling pathways activated by death receptors have been elucidated in great detail. In contrast, much less is known about the tissue-specific role of the death receptor/ligands systems during the development of skin cancer. Here, we summarize and discuss the role of this intriguing receptor family and the potential mechanistical impact of the intracellular caspase-8 inhibitor cFLIP for keratinocyte skin cancer. Given more recent data about cFLIP and its isoforms, a more complex regulatory role of cFLIP can be suspected. Indeed, cFLIP may not solely interfere with death receptor-mediated apoptosis signalling pathways, but may positively or negatively influence other, potential harmful signalling pathways such as the production of inflammatory cytokines, tumor cell migration or the activation of transcription factors such as NF-kappaB, considered crucial during skin tumorigenesis. In this respect, cFLIP may act to 'FLIP the coin' during the development of keratinocyte skin cancer.

  9. Regulation of neuronal cell death by MST1-FOXO1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zengqiang; Lehtinen, Maria K; Merlo, Paola; Villén, Judit; Gygi, Steven; Bonni, Azad

    2009-04-24

    The protein kinase mammalian Sterile 20-like kinase 1 (MST1) plays a critical role in the regulation of cell death. Recent studies suggest that MST1 mediates oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death by phosphorylating the transcription factor FOXO3 at serine 207, a site that is conserved in other FOXO family members. Here, we show that MST1-induced phosphorylation of FOXO1 at serine 212, corresponding to serine 207 in FOXO3, disrupts the association of FOXO1 with 14-3-3 proteins. Accordingly, MST1 mediates the nuclear translocation of FOXO1 in primary rat cerebellar granule neurons that are deprived of neuronal activity. We also find a requirement for MST1 in cell death of granule neurons upon withdrawal of growth factors and neuronal activity, and MST1 induces cell death in a FOXO1-dependent manner. Finally, we show that the MST1-regulatory, scaffold protein Nore1 is required for survival factor deprivation induced neuronal death. Collectively, these findings define MST1-FOXO1 signaling as an important link survival factor deprivation-induced neuronal cell death with implications for our understanding of brain development and neurological diseases.

  10. Involvement of ethylene and lipid signalling in cadmium-induced programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Yakimova, E T; Kapchina-Toteva, V M; Laarhoven, L-J; Harren, F M; Woltering, E J

    2006-10-01

    Cadmium-induced cell death was studied in suspension-cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells (line MsK8) treated with CdSO(4). Within 24 h, cadmium treatment induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Cell cultures showed recovery after 2-3 days which indicates the existence of an adaptation mechanism. Cadmium-induced cell death was alleviated by the addition of sub muM concentrations of peptide inhibitors specific to human caspases indicating that cell death proceeds through a mechanism with similarities to animal programmed cell death (PCD, apoptosis). Cadmium-induced cell death was accompanied by an increased production of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and simultaneous addition of antioxidants greatly reduced cell death. Inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC) and phospholipase D (PLD) signalling pathway intermediates reduced cadmium-induced cell death. Treatment with the G-protein activator mastoparan and a cell permeable analogue of the lipid signal second messenger phosphatidic acid (PA) induced cell death. Ethylene, while not inducing cell death when applied alone, stimulated cadmium-induced cell death. Application of the ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor aminoethoxy vinylglycine (AVG) reduced cadmium-induced cell death, and this effect was alleviated by simultaneous treatment with ethylene. Together the results show that cadmium induces PCD exhibiting apoptotic-like features. The cell death process requires increased H(2)O(2) production and activation of PLC, PLD and ethylene signalling pathways.

  11. Signal Enhancement in AM-FM Interference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-17

    the short-time linear assumption, it provides a good test of the suppression algorithm. A 10-ms Hamming window, a 4-ms frame, and a 2048-point DFT...complex suppression with a different test signal consisting of the AM-FM interference added to an information signal generated from a closing stapler...1st The results of an informal listening test are also listed in Table 1, based on the judgment of interference reduction and clarity of the information

  12. Programmed cell death-10 enhances proliferation and protects malignant T cells from apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lauenborg, Britt; Kopp, Katharina; Krejsgaard, Thorbjørn; Eriksen, Karsten W; Geisler, Carsten; Dabelsteen, Sally; Gniadecki, Robert; Zhang, Qian; Wasik, Mariusz A; Woetmann, Anders; Odum, Niels

    2010-10-01

    The programmed cell death-10 (PDCD10; also known as cerebral cavernous malformation-3 or CCM3) gene encodes an evolutionarily conserved protein associated with cell apoptosis. Mutations in PDCD10 result in cerebral cavernous malformations, an important cause of cerebral hemorrhage. PDCD10 is associated with serine/threonine kinases and phosphatases and modulates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway suggesting a role in the regulation of cellular growth. Here we provide evidence of a constitutive expression of PDCD10 in malignant T cells and cell lines from peripheral blood of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (Sezary syndrome) patients. PDCD10 is associated with protein phosphatase-2A, a regulator of mitogenesis and apoptosis in malignant T cells. Inhibition of oncogenic signal pathways [Jak3, Notch1, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)] partly inhibits the constitutive PDCD10 expression, whereas an activator of Jak3 and NF-κB, interleukin-2 (IL-2), enhances PDCD10 expression. Functional data show that PDCD10 depletion by small interfering RNA induces apoptosis and decreases proliferation of the sensitive cells. To our knowledge, these data provide the first functional link between PDCD10 and cancer.

  13. Requirement of the cytosolic interaction between PATHOGENESIS-RELATED PROTEIN10 and LEUCINE-RICH REPEAT PROTEIN1 for cell death and defense signaling in pepper.

    PubMed

    Choi, Du Seok; Hwang, In Sun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2012-04-01

    Plants recruit innate immune receptors such as leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins to recognize pathogen attack and activate defense genes. Here, we identified the pepper (Capsicum annuum) pathogenesis-related protein10 (PR10) as a leucine-rich repeat protein1 (LRR1)-interacting partner. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays confirmed the specific interaction between LRR1 and PR10 in planta. Avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria infection induces PR10 expression associated with the hypersensitive cell death response. Transient expression of PR10 triggers hypersensitive cell death in pepper and Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, which is amplified by LRR1 coexpression as a positive regulator. LRR1 promotes the ribonuclease activity and phosphorylation of PR10, leading to enhanced cell death signaling. The LRR1-PR10 complex is formed in the cytoplasm, resulting in its secretion into the apoplastic space. Engineered nuclear confinement of both proteins revealed that the cytoplasmic localization of the PR10-LRR1 complex is essential for cell death-mediated defense signaling. PR10/LRR1 silencing in pepper compromises resistance to avirulent X. campestris pv vesicatoria infection. By contrast, PR10/LRR1 overexpression in Arabidopsis thaliana confers enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. Together, these results suggest that the cytosolic LRR-PR10 complex is responsible for cell death-mediated defense signaling.

  14. Experimental assessment of fluorescence microscopy signal enhancement by stimulated emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dake, Fumihiro; Yazawa, Hiroki

    2017-08-01

    The quantity of photons generated during fluorescence microscopy is principally determined by the quantum yield of the fluorescence dyes and the optical power of the excitation beam. However, even though low quantum yields can produce poor images, it is challenging to tune this parameter, while increasing the power of the excitation beam often results in photodamage. Here, we propose the use of stimulated emission (SE) as a means of enhancing both the signal intensity and signal-to-noise ratio during confocal fluorescence microscopy. This work experimentally confirmed that both these factors can be enhanced by SE radiation, through generating a greater number of photons than are associated with the standard fluorescence signal. We also propose the concept of stimulated emission enhancing fluorescence (SEEF) microscopy, which employs both the SE and fluorescence signals, and demonstrate that the intensity of an SEEF signal is greater than those of the individual SE and fluorescence signals.

  15. Signalling mechanisms mediating Zn2+-induced TRPM2 channel activation and cell death in microglial cells

    PubMed Central

    Mortadza, Sharifah Syed; Sim, Joan A.; Stacey, Martin; Jiang, Lin-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Excessive Zn2+ causes brain damage via promoting ROS generation. Here we investigated the role of ROS-sensitive TRPM2 channel in H2O2/Zn2+-induced Ca2+ signalling and cell death in microglial cells. H2O2/Zn2+ induced concentration-dependent increases in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c), which was inhibited by PJ34, a PARP inhibitor, and abolished by TRPM2 knockout (TRPM2-KO). Pathological concentrations of H2O2/Zn2+ induced substantial cell death that was inhibited by PJ34 and DPQ, PARP inhibitors, 2-APB, a TRPM2 channel inhibitor, and prevented by TRPM2-KO. Further analysis indicate that Zn2+ induced ROS production, PARP-1 stimulation, increase in the [Ca2+]c and cell death, all of which were suppressed by chelerythrine, a protein kinase C inhibitor, DPI, a NADPH-dependent oxidase (NOX) inhibitor, GKT137831, a NOX1/4 inhibitor, and Phox-I2, a NOX2 inhibitor. Furthermore, Zn2+-induced PARP-1 stimulation, increase in the [Ca2+]c and cell death were inhibited by PF431396, a Ca2+-sensitive PYK2 inhibitor, and U0126, a MEK/ERK inhibitor. Taken together, our study shows PKC/NOX-mediated ROS generation and PARP-1 activation as an important mechanism in Zn2+-induced TRPM2 channel activation and, TRPM2-mediated increase in the [Ca2+]c to trigger the PYK2/MEK/ERK signalling pathway as a positive feedback mechanism that amplifies the TRPM2 channel activation. Activation of these TRPM2-depenent signalling mechanisms ultimately drives Zn2+-induced Ca2+ overloading and cell death. PMID:28322340

  16. Cadmium and cellular signaling cascades: interactions between cell death and survival pathways.

    PubMed

    Thévenod, Frank; Lee, Wing-Kee

    2013-10-01

    Cellular stress elicited by the toxic metal Cd(2+) does not coerce the cell into committing to die from the onset. Rather, detoxification and adaptive processes are triggered concurrently, allowing survival until normal function is restored. With high Cd(2+), death pathways predominate. However, if sublethal stress levels affect cells for prolonged periods, as in chronic low Cd(2+) exposure, adaptive and survival mechanisms may deregulate, such that tumorigenesis ensues. Hence, death and malignancy are the two ends of a continuum of cellular responses to Cd(2+), determined by magnitude and duration of Cd(2+) stress. Signaling cascades are the key factors affecting cellular reactions to Cd(2+). This review critically surveys recent literature to outline major features of death and survival signaling pathways as well as their activation, interactions and cross talk in cells exposed to Cd(2+). Under physiological conditions, receptor activation generates 2nd messengers, which are short-lived and act specifically on effectors through their spatial and temporal dynamics to transiently alter effector activity. Cd(2+) recruits physiological 2nd messenger systems, in particular Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), which control key Ca(2+)- and redox-sensitive molecular switches dictating cell function and fate. Severe ROS/Ca(2+) signals activate cell death effectors (ceramides, ASK1-JNK/p38, calpains, caspases) and/or cause irreversible damage to vital organelles, such as mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), whereas low localized ROS/Ca(2+) levels act as 2nd messengers promoting cellular adaptation and survival through signal transduction (ERK1/2, PI3K/Akt-PKB) and transcriptional regulators (Ref1-Nrf2, NF-κB, Wnt, AP-1, bestrophin-3). Other cellular proteins and processes targeted by ROS/Ca(2+) (metallothioneins, Bcl-2 proteins, ubiquitin-proteasome system, ER stress-associated unfolded protein response, autophagy, cell cycle) can evoke death or survival

  17. Role of lysosome rupture in controlling Nlrp3 signaling and necrotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Jr., Heriberto; Jacobson, Lee S.; Goldberg, Michael F.; Chandran, Kartik; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Lisanti, Michael P.; Brojatsch, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    The Nod-like receptor, Nlrp3, has been linked to inflammatory diseases and adjuvant-mediated immune responses. A wide array of structurally diverse agents does not interact directly with Nlrp3, but is thought to activate the Nlrp3 inflammasome by inducing a common upstream signal, such as lysosome rupture. To test the connection between lysosome integrity and Nlrp3 signaling, we analyzed inflammasome activation following stimulation of murine macrophages with lysosome-destabilizing agents and pyroptosis inducers. Here we provide evidence that lysosomal rupture and the corresponding release of lysosomal hydrolases is an early event in macrophages exposed to the lysosome-destabilizing adjuvants LLOMe and alum. Lysosome rupture preceded cell death induction mediated by these agents and was associated with the degradation of low-molecular weight proteins, including the inflammasome component caspase-1. Proteolysis of caspase-1 was controlled by specific cathepsins, but was independent of autocatalytic processes and Nlrp3 signaling. Consistent with these findings, lysosome-disrupting agents triggered only minimal caspase-1 activation and failed to cause caspase-1-dependent cell death (pyroptosis), generally associated with Nlrp3 signaling. In contrast, lysosome rupture was a late event in macrophages exposed to prototypical pyroptosis inducers. These agents triggered extensive Nlrp3 signaling prior to lysosome rupture with only minimal impact on the cellular proteome. Taken together, our findings suggest that lysosome impairment triggers a cascade of events culminating in cell death but is not crucial for Nlrp3 signaling. The significant differences observed between lysosome-disrupting agents and pyroptosis inducers might explain the distinct immunologic responses associated with these compounds. PMID:23708522

  18. Glucose deprivation activates a metabolic and signaling amplification loop leading to cell death

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Nicholas A; Tahmasian, Martik; Kohli, Bitika; Komisopoulou, Evangelia; Zhu, Maggie; Vivanco, Igor; Teitell, Michael A; Wu, Hong; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Mischel, Paul S; Graeber, Thomas G

    2012-01-01

    The altered metabolism of cancer can render cells dependent on the availability of metabolic substrates for viability. Investigating the signaling mechanisms underlying cell death in cells dependent upon glucose for survival, we demonstrate that glucose withdrawal rapidly induces supra-physiological levels of phospho-tyrosine signaling, even in cells expressing constitutively active tyrosine kinases. Using unbiased mass spectrometry-based phospho-proteomics, we show that glucose withdrawal initiates a unique signature of phospho-tyrosine activation that is associated with focal adhesions. Building upon this observation, we demonstrate that glucose withdrawal activates a positive feedback loop involving generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NADPH oxidase and mitochondria, inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases by oxidation, and increased tyrosine kinase signaling. In cells dependent on glucose for survival, glucose withdrawal-induced ROS generation and tyrosine kinase signaling synergize to amplify ROS levels, ultimately resulting in ROS-mediated cell death. Taken together, these findings illustrate the systems-level cross-talk between metabolism and signaling in the maintenance of cancer cell homeostasis. PMID:22735335

  19. Low zinc environment induces stress signaling, senescence and mixed cell death modalities in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Emil; Rudolf, Kamil

    2015-12-01

    Currently it is not clear what type of the final cellular response (i.e. cell death modality or senescence) is induced upon chronic intracellular zinc depletion in colon cancer cells. To address this question, isogenic colon cancer lines SW480 and SW620 exposed to low zinc environment were studied over the period of 6 weeks. Low zinc environment reduced total as well as free intracellular zinc content in both cell lines. Decreased intracellular zinc content resulted in changes in cellular proliferation, cell cycle distribution and activation of stress signaling. In addition, colonocytes with low zinc content displayed increased levels of oxidative stress, changes in mitochondrial activity but in the absence of significant DNA damage. Towards the end of treatment (4th-6th week), exposed cells started to change morphologically, and typical markers of senescence as well as cell death appeared. Of two examined colon cancer cell lines, SW480 cells proved to activate predominantly senescent phenotype, with frequent form of demise being necrosis and mixed cell death modality but not apoptosis. Conversely, SW620 cells activated mostly cell death, with relatively equal distribution of apoptosis and mixed types, while senescent phenotypes and necrosis were present only in a small fraction of cell populations. Addition of zinc at the beginning of 4th week of treatment significantly suppressed cell death phenotypes in both cell lines but had no significant effect on senescence. In conclusion, presented results demonstrate variability of responses to chronic zinc depletion in colon cancer as modeled in vitro.

  20. Pro-Death Signaling of GRK2 in Cardiac Myocytes after Ischemic Stress Occurs via ERK-Dependent, Hsp90-Mediated Mitochondrial Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mai; Sat, Priscila Y.; Chuprun, J. Kurt; Peroutka, Raymond J.; Otis, Nicholas J.; Ibetti, Jessica; Pan, Shi; Sheu, Shey-Shing; Gao, Erhe; Koch, Walter J.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale GRK2 is abundantly expressed in the heart and its expression and activity is increased in injured or stressed myocardium. This up-regulation has been shown to be pathological. GRK2 can promote cell death in ischemic myocytes and its inhibition by a peptide comprised of the last 194 amino acids of GRK2 (known as βARKct) is cardioprotective. Objective The aim of this study was to elucidate the signaling mechanism that accounts for the pro-death signaling seen in the presence of elevated GRK2 and the cardioprotection afforded by the βARKct. Methods and Results Using in vivo mouse models of ischemic injury and also cultured myocytes we found that GRK2 localizes to mitochondria providing novel insight into GRK2-dependent pathophysiological signaling mechanisms. Mitochondrial localization of GRK2 in cardiomyocytes was enhanced after ischemic and oxidative stress, events that induced pro-death signaling. Localization of GRK2 to mitochondria was dependent upon phosphorylation at residue Ser670 within its extreme carboxyl-terminus by extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), resulting in enhanced GRK2 binding to heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), which chaperoned GRK2 to mitochondria. Mechanistic studies invivo and invitro showed that ERK regulation of the C-tail of GRK2 was an absolute requirement for stress-induced, mitochondrial-dependent pro-death signaling, and blocking this led to cardioprotection. Elevated mitochondrial GRK2 also caused increased Ca2+-induced opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, a key step in cellular injury. Conclusions We identify GRK2 as a pro-death kinase in the heart acting in a novel manner through mitochondrial localization via ERK regulation. PMID:23467820

  1. New nucleotide analogues with enhanced signal properties.

    PubMed

    Cherkasov, Dmitry; Biet, Thorsten; Bäuml, Englbert; Traut, Walther; Lohoff, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We describe synthesis and testing of a novel type of dye-modified nucleotides which we call macromolecular nucleotides (m-Nucs). Macromolecular nucleotides comprise a nucleotide moiety, a macromolecular linear linker, and a large macromolecular ligand carrying multiple fluorescent dyes. With incorporation of the nucleotide moiety into the growing nucleic acid strand during enzymatic synthesis, the macromolecular ligand together with the coupled dyes is bound to the nucleic acid. By the use of this new class of modified nucleotides, signals from multiple dye molecules can be obtained after a single enzymatic incorporation event. The modified nucleotides are considered especially useful in the fields of nanobiotechnology, where signal stability and intensity is a limiting factor.

  2. Enhancing the Signal of Corticomuscular Coherence

    PubMed Central

    Micheli, Cristiano; Braun, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    The availability of multichannel neuroimaging techniques, such as MEG and EEG, provides us with detailed topographical information of the recorded magnetic and electric signals and therefore gives us a good overview on the concomitant signals generated in the brain. To assess the location and the temporal dynamics of neuronal sources with noninvasive recordings, reconstruction tools such as beamformers have been shown to be useful. In the current study, we are in particular interested in cortical motor control involved in the isometric contraction of finger muscles. To this end we are measuring the interaction between the dynamics of brain signals and the electrical activity of hand muscles. We were interested to find out whether in addition to the well-known correlated activity between contralateral primary motor cortex and the hand muscles, additional functional connections can be demonstrated. We adopted coherence as a functional index and propose a so-called nulling beamformer method which is computationally efficient and addresses the localization of multiple correlated sources. In simulations of cortico-motor coherence, the proposed method was able to correctly localize secondary sources. The application of the approach on real electromyographic and magnetoencephalographic data collected during an isometric contraction and rest revealed an additional activity in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the hand involved in the task. PMID:22654959

  3. Cold atmospheric helium plasma causes synergistic enhancement in cell death with hyperthermia and an additive enhancement with radiation.

    PubMed

    Moniruzzaman, Rohan; Rehman, Mati Ur; Zhao, Qing-Li; Jawaid, Paras; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru; Tomihara, Kei; Noguchi, Kyo; Kondo, Takashi; Noguchi, Makoto

    2017-09-15

    Cold atmospheric plasmas (CAPs) have been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for its anti-cancer potential. However, its biological effects in combination with other physical modalities remain elusive. Therefore, this study examined the effects of cold atmospheric helium plasma (He-CAP) in combination with hyperthermia (HT) 42 °C or radiation 5 Gy. Synergistic enhancement in the cell death with HT and an additive enhancement with radiation were observed following He-CAP treatment. The synergistic effects were accompanied by increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2(•-)) generation was increased immediately after He-CAP treatment, but fails to initiate cell death process. Interestingly, at late hour's He-CAP-induced O2(•-) generation subsides, however the combined treatment showed sustained increased intracellular O2(•-) level, and enhanced cell death than either treatment alone. He-CAP caused marked induction of ROS in the aqueous medium, but He-CAP-induced ROS seems insufficient or not completely incorporated intra-cellularly to activate cell death machinery. The observed synergistic effects were due to the HT effects on membrane fluidity which facilitate the incorporation of He-CAP-induced ROS into the cells, thus results in the enhanced cancer cell death following combined treatment. These findings would be helpful when establishing a therapeutic strategy for CAP in combination with HT or radiation.

  4. Signal-enhancement reflective pulse oximeter with Fresnel lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Shuang-Chao; Sun, Ching-Cherng

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a new reflective pulse oximeter is proposed and demonstrated with implanting a Fresnel lens, which enhances the reflected signal. An optical simulation model incorporated with human skin characteristics is presented to evaluate the capability of the Fresnel lens. In addition, the distance between the light emitting diode and the photodiode is optimized. Compared with the other reflective oximeters, the reflected signal light detected by the photodiode is enhanced to more than 140%.

  5. Role of TLR2- and TLR4-mediated signaling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced macrophage death.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Dulfary; Rojas, Mauricio; Hernández, Israel; Radzioch, Danuta; García, Luis F; Barrera, Luis F

    2010-01-01

    Infection of macrophages with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) induces cell death by apoptosis or necrosis. TLRs 2 and 4 recognition of mycobacterial ligands has been independently associated to apoptosis induction. To try to understand the particular contribution of these receptors to apoptotic or necrotic signaling upon infection with live Mtb H37Rv, we used macrophage lines derived from wild-type or TLR2-, TLR4-, and MyD88-deficient mouse strains. Mtb-infection triggered apoptosis depending on a TLR2/TLR4/MyD88/p38/ERK/PI-3K/NF-kB pathway; however, necrosis was favored in absence of TLR4 signaling independently of p38, ERK1/2, PI-3K or NF-kappaB activity. In conclusion, our results indicate that cooperation between TLR2- and TLR4-dependent mediated signals play a critical role in macrophage apoptosis induced by Mtb and the TLR4-mediated signaling has important role in the maintenance of the balance between apoptotic vs. necrotic cell death induced by macrophage infection with Mtb.

  6. Large enhancement of perfusion contribution on fMRI signal

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The perfusion contribution to the total functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal was investigated using a rat model with mild hypercapnia at 9.4 T, and human subjects with visual stimulation at 4 T. It was found that the total fMRI signal change could be approximated as a linear superposition of ‘true' blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD; T2/T2*) effect and the blood flow-related (T1) effect. The latter effect was significantly enhanced by using short repetition time and large radiofrequency pulse flip angle and became comparable to the ‘true' BOLD signal in response to a mild hypercapnia in the rat brain, resulting in an improved contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Bipolar diffusion gradients suppressed the intravascular signals but had no significant effect on the flow-related signal. Similar results of enhanced fMRI signal were observed in the human study. The overall results suggest that the observed flow-related signal enhancement is likely originated from perfusion, and this enhancement can improve CNR and the spatial specificity for mapping brain activity and physiology changes. The nature of mixed BOLD and perfusion-related contributions in the total fMRI signal also has implication on BOLD quantification, in particular, the BOLD calibration model commonly used to estimate the change of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen. PMID:22395206

  7. SFM signal parameter estimation based on an enhanced DSFMT algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lei; Li, Xingguang; Chen, Dianren

    2017-01-01

    It is proposed a SFM signal parameter estimation method based on the Enhanced DSFMT(EDSFMT) algorithm and provided the derivation of transformation formulas in this paper .Analysis and simulations were performed, which proved its capability of arbitrary multi-component SFM signal parameter estimation.

  8. Manipulating insulin signaling to enhance mosquito reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Arik, Anam J; Rasgon, Jason L; Quicke, Kendra M; Riehle, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    Backgrond In the mosquito Aedes aegypti the insulin/insulin growth factor I signaling (IIS) cascade is a key regulator of many physiological processes, including reproduction. Two important reproductive events, steroidogenesis in the ovary and yolk synthesis in the fat body, are regulated by the IIS cascade in mosquitoes. The signaling molecule phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is a key inhibitor of the IIS cascade that helps modulate the activity of the IIS cascade. In Ae. aegypti, six unique splice variants of AaegPTEN were previously identified, but the role of these splice variants, particularly AaegPTEN3 and 6, were unknown. Results Knockdown of AaegPTEN or its specific splice variant AaegPTEN6 (the splice variant thought to regulate reproduction in the ovary and fat body) using RNAi led to a 15–63% increase in egg production with no adverse effects on egg viability during the first reproductive cycle. Knockdown of AaegPTEN3, expressed predominantly in the head, had no effect on reproduction. We also characterized the protein expression patterns of these two splice variants during development and in various tissues during a reproductive cycle. Conclusion Previous studies in a range of organisms, including Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans, have demonstrated that disruption of the IIS cascade leads to decreased reproduction or sterility. In this study we demonstrate that knockdown of the IIS inhibitor PTEN can actually increase reproduction in the mosquito, at least during the first reproductive cycle. PMID:19695103

  9. Colocalization of cell death with antigen deposition in skin enhances vaccine immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Depelsenaire, Alexandra C I; Meliga, Stefano C; McNeilly, Celia L; Pearson, Frances E; Coffey, Jacob W; Haigh, Oscar L; Flaim, Christopher J; Frazer, Ian H; Kendall, Mark A F

    2014-09-01

    Vaccines delivered to the skin by microneedles-with and without adjuvants-have increased immunogenicity with lower doses than standard vaccine delivery techniques such as intramuscular or intradermal injection. However, the mechanisms underlying this skin-mediated "adjuvant" effect are not clear. Here, we show that the dynamic application of a microprojection array (the Nanopatch) to skin generates localized transient stresses invoking cell death around each projection. Nanopatch application caused significantly higher levels (∼65-fold) of cell death in murine ear skin than i.d. injection using a hypodermic needle. Measured skin cell death is associated with modeled stresses ∼1-10 MPa. Nanopatch-immunized groups also yielded consistently higher anti-immunoglobulin G endpoint titers (up to 50-fold higher) than i.d. groups after delivery of a split virion influenza vaccine. Importantly, colocalization of cell death with nearby live skin cells and delivered antigen was necessary for immunogenicity enhancement. These results suggest a correlation between cell death caused by the Nanopatch with increased immunogenicity. We propose that the localized cell death serves as a "physical immune enhancer" for the adjacent viable skin cells, which also receive antigen from the projections. This natural immune enhancer effect has the potential to mitigate or replace chemical-based adjuvants in vaccines.

  10. Signaling molecules and cell death in Melissa officinalis plants exposed to ozone.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Elisa; Trivellini, Alice; Campanella, Alessandra; Francini, Alessandra; Lorenzini, Giacomo; Nali, Cristina; Vernieri, Paolo

    2013-12-01

    The study focuses on the interaction between reactive oxygen species and hormones that regulate the programmed cell death in plants of Melissa officinalis exposed to ozone. Interaction between hormone and redox signaling pathways has been investigated in ozone-stressed (200 ppb, 5 h) lemon balm to verify if the response resembles the biotic defense reactions. In comparison to controls, plants exhibited foliar injury and the cell death was induced by (1) biphasic production of hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radical; (2) hormonal regulation of ozone-induced lesion formation with a significant production of ethylene, salicylic, jasmonic and abscisic acid; (3) ozone degradation to reactive oxygen species and their detoxification by some enzymatic (such as superoxide dismutase) and non-enzymatic antioxidant systems (such as ascorbic acid, glutathione and carotenoids), that worked in cooperation without providing a defense against free radicals (such as confirmed by the modification of the antioxidant properties of leaf tissue). This integrated view showed that reactive oxygen species interact with hormonal signaling pathway regulating cell death and the sensitivity of lemon balm to ozone.

  11. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling to Akt promotes keratinocyte differentiation versus death.

    PubMed

    Calautti, Enzo; Li, Jian; Saoncella, Stefania; Brissette, Janice L; Goetinck, Paul F

    2005-09-23

    Signaling pathways regulating the differentiation program of epidermal cells overlap widely with those activated during apoptosis. How differentiating cells remain protected from premature death, however, is still poorly defined. We show here that the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway is activated at early stages of mouse keratinocyte differentiation both in culture and in the intact epidermis in vivo. Expression of active Akt in keratinocytes promotes growth arrest and differentiation, whereas pharmacological blockade of PI3K inhibits the expression of "late" differentiation markers and leads to death of cells that would otherwise differentiate. Mechanistically, the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway in keratinocyte differentiation depends on the activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor and Src families of tyrosine kinases and the engagement of E-cadherin-mediated adhesion. During this process, PI3K associates increasingly with cadherin-catenin protein complexes bearing tyrosine phosphorylated YXXM motifs. Thus, the PI3K signaling pathway regulates the choice between epidermal cell differentiation and death at the cross-talk between tyrosine kinases and cadherin-associated catenins.

  12. Inhibition of programmed cell death by cyclosporin A; preferential blocking of cell death induced by signals via TCR/CD3 complex and its mode of action.

    PubMed Central

    Yasutomi, D; Odaka, C; Saito, S; Niizeki, H; Kizaki, H; Tadakuma, T

    1992-01-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) is reported to inhibit programmed cell death. We confirmed this by using T-cell hybridomas which are inducible to programmed cell death by activation with immobilized anti-CD3 antibody or with anti-Thy 1.2 antibody. Cell death and DNA fragmentation, characteristic features of programmed cell death, were almost completely blocked by CsA or FK506. To investigate whether CsA inhibits only the cell death through the signals via the TCR/CD3 complex or all of the programmed cell death induced by various reagents, we further established CD4+8+ thymic lymphomas which result in programmed cell death after activation with calcium ionophore, dexamethasone, cyclic AMP or anti-CD3 antibody. It was revealed that CsA could block only the cell death mediated by the TCR/CD3 complex. For the clarification of the site of action of CsA, Ca2+ influx and endocytosis of receptors after stimulation with anti-CD3 antibody were monitored in the presence of CsA, and no significant effects of CsA were observed. Furthermore, prevention of cell death was examined by adding CsA at various periods of time after initiation of culture. CsA was found to exert its effect even when added after 4 h of cultivation, and the kinetic pattern of suppression was similar to that of the suppressive effect on IL-2 production. These observations indicate that in the events of programmed cell death, the major site of action of CsA will not be the inhibition of the immediate membrane events after activation of the TCR/CD3 complex but rather the interference in the function of molecules that transmit signals between membrane events and the activation of genes in the nucleus. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1383138

  13. A note on signal enhancement for dual magnetometer systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.

    1973-01-01

    Demonstration of the value of cross-correlation signal enhancement achieved by means of a dual magnetometer system. A unique feature of a dual magnetometer system is, as pointed out by Ness et al. (1971), the opportunity it allows for signal enhancement by using cross-correlation techniques developed in statistical communication theory. Their use is shown to make it possible to overcome the limitations that the intrinsic sensor ambient noise and the measurement-contaminating spacecraft field fluctuations impose upon the signal detection performance of a single magnetometer.

  14. Cyclic programmed cell death stimulates hormone signaling and root development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Wei; Band, Leah R; Kumpf, Robert P; Van Damme, Daniël; Parizot, Boris; De Rop, Gieljan; Opdenacker, Davy; Möller, Barbara K; Skorzinski, Noemi; Njo, Maria F; De Rybel, Bert; Audenaert, Dominique; Nowack, Moritz K; Vanneste, Steffen; Beeckman, Tom

    2016-01-22

    The plant root cap, surrounding the very tip of the growing root, perceives and transmits environmental signals to the inner root tissues. In Arabidopsis thaliana, auxin released by the root cap contributes to the regular spacing of lateral organs along the primary root axis. Here, we show that the periodicity of lateral organ induction is driven by recurrent programmed cell death at the most distal edge of the root cap. We suggest that synchronous bursts of cell death in lateral root cap cells release pulses of auxin to surrounding root tissues, establishing the pattern for lateral root formation. The dynamics of root cap turnover may therefore coordinate primary root growth with root branching in order to optimize the uptake of water and nutrients from the soil.

  15. Liver protects metastatic prostate cancer from induced death by activating E-cadherin signaling.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bo; Wheeler, Sarah E; Clark, Amanda M; Whaley, Diana L; Yang, Min; Wells, Alan

    2016-11-01

    Liver is one of the most common sites of cancer metastasis. Once disseminated, the prognosis is poor as these tumors often display generalized chemoresistance, particularly for carcinomas that derive not from the aerodigestive tract. When these cancers seed the liver, the aggressive cells usually undergo a mesenchymal to epithelial reverting transition that both aids colonization and renders the tumor cells chemoresistant. In vitro studies demonstrate that hepatocytes drive this phenotypic shift. However, the in vivo evidence and the molecular signals that protect these cells from induced death are yet to be defined. Herein, we report that membrane surface E-cadherin-expressing prostate cancer cells were resistant to cell death by chemotherapeutic drugs but E-cadherin null cells or those expressing E-cadherin only in the cytoplasm were sensitive to death signals and chemotherapies both in vitro and in vivo. While cell-cell E-cadherin ligandation reduced mitogenesis, this chemoprotection was proliferation-independent as killing of both 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine-positive (or Ki67(+) ) and 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine-negative (Ki67(-) ) cells was inversely related to membrane-bound E-cadherin. Inhibiting the canonical survival kinases extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases, protein kinase B, and Janus kinase, which are activated by chemotherapeutics in epithelial cell-transitioned prostate cancer, abrogated the chemoresistance both in cell culture and in animal models of metastatic cancer. For disseminated tumors, protein kinase B disruption in itself had no effect on tumor survival but was synergistic with chemotherapy, leading to increased killing.

  16. Programmed death-1/programmed death-L1 signaling pathway and its blockade in hepatitis C virus immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Salem, Mohamed L; El-Badawy, Ahmed

    2015-10-18

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a public health issue that often progresses to life-threatening complications, including liver cirrhosis, fibrosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Impaired immune responses to HCV are key features of chronic HCV infection. Therefore, intervention strategies usually involve enhancing the immune responses against HCV. Cytotoxic CD8(+) T lymphocytes (CTLs) play a critical role in the control of HCV infection. However, their cytolytic function can be impaired by the expression of co-inhibitory molecules. Programmed death-1 (PD-1) receptor and its ligand PD-L1 function in a T cell co-inhibitory pathway, which either blocks the function of CTLs or the differentiation of CD8(+) T cells. During chronic HCV infection, the immune inhibitory receptor PD-1 is upregulated on dysfunctional HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells. As such, blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway in these CD8(+) T cells might restore their functional capabilities. Indeed, clinical trials using therapies to block this pathway have shown promise in the fostering of anti-HCV immunity. Understanding how chronic HCV infection induces upregulation of PD-1 on HCV specific T cells and how the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction develops HCV specific T cell dysfunction will accelerate the development of an efficacious prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination against chronic HCV infections, which will significantly improve HCV treatments and patient survival. In this review, we discuss the relationship between PD-1 expression and clinical responses and the potential use of PD-1 blockade for anti-HCV therapy.

  17. Co-localization of cell death with antigen deposition in skin enhances vaccine immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Depelsenaire, Alexandra C.I.; Meliga, Stefano C.; McNeilly, Celia L.; Pearson, Frances E.; Coffey, Jacob W.; Haigh, Oscar L.; Flaim, Christopher J.; Frazer, Ian H.; Kendall, Mark A.F.

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines delivered to the skin by microneedles – with and without adjuvants – have increased immunogenicity with lower doses than standard vaccine delivery techniques such as intramuscular (i.m.) or intradermal (i.d.) injection. However, the mechanisms behind this skin-mediated ‘adjuvant’ effect are not clear. Here, we show that the dynamic application of a microprojection array (the Nanopatch) to skin generates localized transient stresses invoking cell death around each projection. Nanopatch application caused significantly higher levels (~65-fold) of cell death in murine ear skin than i.d. injection using a hypodermic needle. Measured skin cell death is associated with modeled stresses ~1–10 MPa. Nanopatch-immunized groups also yielded consistently higher anti-IgG endpoint titers (up to 50-fold higher) than i.d. groups after delivery of a split virion influenza vaccine. Importantly, co-localization of cell death with nearby live skin cells and delivered antigen was necessary for immunogenicity enhancement. These results suggest a correlation between cell death caused by the Nanopatch with increased immunogenicity. We propose that the localized cell death serves as a ‘physical immune enhancer’ for the adjacent viable skin cells, which also receive antigen from the projections. This natural immune enhancer effect has the potential to mitigate or replace chemical-based adjuvants in vaccines. PMID:24714201

  18. Blockade of programmed death-1/programmed death ligand pathway enhances the antitumor immunity of human invariant natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Kamata, Toshiko; Suzuki, Akane; Mise, Naoko; Ihara, Fumie; Takami, Mariko; Makita, Yuji; Horinaka, Atsushi; Harada, Kazuaki; Kunii, Naoki; Yoshida, Shigetoshi; Yoshino, Ichiro; Nakayama, Toshinori; Motohashi, Shinichiro

    2016-12-01

    The role of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells in antitumor immunity has been studied extensively, and clinical trials in patients with advanced cancer have revealed a prolonged survival in some cases. In recent years, humanized blocking antibodies against co-stimulatory molecules such as PD-1 have been developed. The enhancement of T cell function is reported to improve antitumor immunity, leading to positive clinical effects. However, there are limited data on the role of PD-1/programmed death ligand (PDL) molecules in human iNKT cells. In this study, we investigated the interaction between PD-1 on iNKT cells and PDL on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the context of iNKT cell stimulation. The blockade of PDL1 at the time of stimulation resulted in increased release of helper T cell (Th) 1 cytokines from iNKT cells, leading to the activation of NK cells. The direct antitumor function of iNKT cells was also enhanced after stimulation with anti-PDL1 antibody-treated APCs. According to these results, we conclude that the co-administration of anti-PDL1 antibody and alpha-galactosylceramide (αGalCer)-pulsed APCs enhances iNKT cell-mediated antitumor immunity.

  19. Enhanced release of primary signals may render intercellular signalling ineffective due to spatial aspects

    PubMed Central

    Kundrát, Pavel; Friedland, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Detailed mechanistic modelling has been performed of the intercellular signalling cascade between precancerous cells and their normal neighbours that leads to a selective removal of the precancerous cells by apoptosis. Two interconnected signalling pathways that were identified experimentally have been modelled, explicitly accounting for temporal and spatial effects. The model predicts highly non-linear behaviour of the signalling. Importantly, under certain conditions, enhanced release of primary signals by precancerous cells renders the signalling ineffective. This counter-intuitive behaviour arises due to spatial aspects of the underlying signalling scheme: Increased primary signalling by precancerous cells does, upon reaction with factors derived from normal cells, produce higher yields of apoptosis-triggering molecules. However, the apoptosis-triggering signals are formed farther from the precancerous cells, so that these are attacked less efficiently. Spatial effects thus may represent a novel analogue of negative feedback mechanisms. PMID:27645799

  20. Sparse representation-based ECG signal enhancement and QRS detection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yichao; Hu, Xiyuan; Tang, Zhenmin; Ahn, Andrew C

    2016-12-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG) signal enhancement and QRS complex detection is a critical preprocessing step for further heart disease analysis and diagnosis. In this paper, we propose a sparse representation-based ECG signal enhancement and QRS complex detection algorithm. Unlike traditional Fourier or wavelet transform-based methods, which use fixed bases, the proposed algorithm models the ECG signal as the superposition of a few inner structures plus additive random noise, where these structures (referred to here as atoms) can be learned from the input signal or a training set. Using these atoms and their properties, we can accurately approximate the original ECG signal and remove the noise and other artifacts such as baseline wandering. Additionally, some of the atoms with larger kurtosis values can be modified and used as an indication function to detect and locate the QRS complexes in the enhanced ECG signals. To demonstrate the robustness and efficacy of the proposed algorithm, we compare it with several state-of-the-art ECG enhancement and QRS detection algorithms using both simulated and real-life ECG recordings.

  1. Pepper pathogenesis-related protein 4c is a plasma membrane-localized cysteine protease inhibitor that is required for plant cell death and defense signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) type III effector AvrBsT triggers programmed cell death (PCD) and activates the hypersensitive response (HR) in plants. Here, we isolated and identified the plasma membrane localized pathogenesis-related (PR) protein 4c gene (CaPR4c) from pepper (Capsicum annuum) leaves undergoing AvrBsT-triggered HR cell death. CaPR4c encodes a protein with a signal peptide and a Barwin domain. Recombinant CaPR4c protein expressed in Escherichia coli exhibited cysteine protease-inhibitor activity and ribonuclease (RNase) activity. Subcellular localization analyses revealed that CaPR4c localized to the plasma membrane in plant cells. CaPR4c expression was rapidly and specifically induced by avirulent Xcv (avrBsT) infection. Transient expression of CaPR4c caused HR cell death in pepper leaves, which was accompanied by enhanced accumulation of H2 O2 and significant induction of some defense-response genes. Deletion of the signal peptide from CaPR4c abolished the induction of HR cell death, indicating a requirement for plasma membrane localization of CaPR4c for HR cell death. CaPR4c silencing in pepper disrupted both basal and AvrBsT-triggered resistance responses, and enabled Xcv proliferation in infected leaves. H2 O2 accumulation, cell-death induction, and defense-response gene expression were distinctly reduced in CaPR4c-silenced pepper. CaPR4c overexpression in transgenic Arabidopsis plants conferred greater resistance against infection by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. These results collectively suggest that CaPR4c plays an important role in plant cell death and defense signaling.

  2. Intravital imaging reveals p53-dependent cancer cell death induced by phototherapy via calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Ramirez, Fabian Galindo; Morciano, Giampaolo; Morganti, Claudia; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Mammano, Fabio; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    One challenge in biology is signal transduction monitoring in a physiological context. Intravital imaging techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of tumor and host cell behaviors in the tumor environment. However, these deep tissue imaging techniques have not yet been adopted to investigate the second messenger calcium (Ca2+). In the present study, we established conditions that allow the in vivo detection of Ca2+ signaling in three-dimensional tumor masses in mouse models. By combining intravital imaging and a skinfold chamber technique, we determined the ability of photodynamic cancer therapy to induce an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and, consequently, an increase in cell death in a p53-dependent pathway. PMID:25544762

  3. Controlling metabolism and cell death: at the heart of mitochondrial calcium signalling

    PubMed Central

    Murgia, Marta; Giorgi, Carlotta; Pinton, Paolo; Rizzuto, Rosario

    2009-01-01

    Transient increases in intracellular calcium concentration activate and coordinate a wide variety of cellular processes in virtually every cell type. This review describes the main homeostatic mechanisms that control Ca2+ transients, focusing on the mitochondrial checkpoint. We subsequently extend this paradigm to the cardiomyocyte and to the interplay between cytosol, endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria that occurs beat-to-beat in excitation-contraction coupling. The mechanisms whereby mitochondria decode fast cytosolic calcium spikes are discussed in the light of the results obtained with recombinant photoproteins targeted to the mitochondrial matrix of contracting cardiomyocytes. Mitochondrial calcium homeostasis is then highlighted as a crucial point of convergence of the environmental signals that mediate cardiac cell death, both by necrosis and by apoptosis. Altogether we point to a role of the mitochondrion as an integrator of calcium signalling and fundamental decision maker in cardiomyocyte metabolism and survival. PMID:19285982

  4. Intravital imaging reveals p53-dependent cancer cell death induced by phototherapy via calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Carlotta; Bonora, Massimo; Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Ramirez, Fabian Galindo; Morciano, Giampaolo; Morganti, Claudia; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Mammano, Fabio; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-30

    One challenge in biology is signal transduction monitoring in a physiological context. Intravital imaging techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of tumor and host cell behaviors in the tumor environment. However, these deep tissue imaging techniques have not yet been adopted to investigate the second messenger calcium (Ca²⁺). In the present study, we established conditions that allow the in vivo detection of Ca²⁺ signaling in three-dimensional tumor masses in mouse models. By combining intravital imaging and a skinfold chamber technique, we determined the ability of photodynamic cancer therapy to induce an increase in intracellular Ca²⁺ concentrations and, consequently, an increase in cell death in a p53-dependent pathway.

  5. Drug-induced death signaling strategy rapidly predicts cancer response to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Montero, Joan; Sarosiek, Kristopher A.; DeAngelo, Joseph D.; Maertens, Ophélia; Ryan, Jeremy; Ercan, Dalia; Piao, Huiying; Horowitz, Neil S.; Berkowitz, Ross S.; Matulonis, Ursula; Jänne, Pasi A.; Amrein, Philip C.; Cichowski, Karen; Drapkin, Ronny; Letai, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY There is a lack of effective predictive biomarkers to precisely assign optimal therapy to cancer patients. While most efforts are directed at inferring drug response phenotype based on genotype, there is very focused and useful phenotypic information to be gained from directly perturbing the patient’s living cancer cell with the drug(s) in question. To satisfy this unmet need we developed the Dynamic BH3 Profiling technique to measure early changes in net pro-apoptotic signaling at the mitochondrion (‘priming’) induced by chemotherapeutic agents in cancer cells, not requiring prolonged ex vivo culture. We find in cell line and clinical experiments that early drug-induced death signaling measured by Dynamic BH3 Profiling predicts chemotherapy response across many cancer types and many agents, including combinations of chemotherapies. We propose that Dynamic BH3 Profiling can be used as a broadly applicable predictive biomarker to predict cytotoxic response of cancers to chemotherapeutics in vivo. PMID:25723171

  6. Inseparable tandem: evolution chooses ATP and Ca2+ to control life, death and cellular signalling

    PubMed Central

    Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2016-01-01

    From the very dawn of biological evolution, ATP was selected as a multipurpose energy-storing molecule. Metabolism of ATP required intracellular free Ca2+ to be set at exceedingly low concentrations, which in turn provided the background for the role of Ca2+ as a universal signalling molecule. The early-eukaryote life forms also evolved functional compartmentalization and vesicle trafficking, which used Ca2+ as a universal signalling ion; similarly, Ca2+ is needed for regulation of ciliary and flagellar beat, amoeboid movement, intracellular transport, as well as of numerous metabolic processes. Thus, during evolution, exploitation of atmospheric oxygen and increasingly efficient ATP production via oxidative phosphorylation by bacterial endosymbionts were a first step for the emergence of complex eukaryotic cells. Simultaneously, Ca2+ started to be exploited for short-range signalling, despite restrictions by the preset phosphate-based energy metabolism, when both phosphates and Ca2+ interfere with each other because of the low solubility of calcium phosphates. The need to keep cytosolic Ca2+ low forced cells to restrict Ca2+ signals in space and time and to develop energetically favourable Ca2+ signalling and Ca2+ microdomains. These steps in tandem dominated further evolution. The ATP molecule (often released by Ca2+-regulated exocytosis) rapidly grew to be the universal chemical messenger for intercellular communication; ATP effects are mediated by an extended family of purinoceptors often linked to Ca2+ signalling. Similar to atmospheric oxygen, Ca2+ must have been reverted from a deleterious agent to a most useful (intra- and extracellular) signalling molecule. Invention of intracellular trafficking further increased the role for Ca2+ homeostasis that became critical for regulation of cell survival and cell death. Several mutually interdependent effects of Ca2+ and ATP have been exploited in evolution, thus turning an originally unholy alliance into a

  7. Inhibition of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 enhances endochondral bone formation by increasing chondrocyte survival.

    PubMed

    Eaton, G J; Zhang, Q-S; Diallo, C; Matsuzawa, A; Ichijo, H; Steinbeck, M J; Freeman, T A

    2014-11-13

    Endochondral ossification is the result of chondrocyte differentiation, hypertrophy, death and replacement by bone. The careful timing and progression of this process is important for normal skeletal bone growth and development, as well as fracture repair. Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1 (ASK1) is a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which is activated by reactive oxygen species and other cellular stress events. Activation of ASK1 initiates a signaling cascade known to regulate diverse cellular events including cytokine and growth factor signaling, cell cycle regulation, cellular differentiation, hypertrophy, survival and apoptosis. ASK1 is highly expressed in hypertrophic chondrocytes, but the role of ASK1 in skeletal tissues has not been investigated. Herein, we report that ASK1 knockout (KO) mice display alterations in normal growth plate morphology, which include a shorter proliferative zone and a lengthened hypertrophic zone. These changes in growth plate dynamics result in accelerated long bone mineralization and an increased formation of trabecular bone, which can be attributed to an increased resistance of terminally differentiated chondrocytes to undergo cell death. Interestingly, under normal cell culture conditions, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from ASK1 KO mice show no differences in either MAPK signaling or osteogenic or chondrogenic differentiation when compared with wild-type (WT) MEFs. However, when cultured with stress activators, H2O2 or staurosporine, the KO cells show enhanced survival, an associated decrease in the activation of proteins involved in death signaling pathways and a reduction in markers of terminal differentiation. Furthermore, in both WT mice treated with the ASK1 inhibitor, NQDI-1, and ASK1 KO mice endochondral bone formation was increased in an ectopic ossification model. These findings highlight a previously unrealized role for ASK1 in regulating endochondral bone formation. Inhibition of ASK1 has

  8. Inhibition of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 enhances endochondral bone formation by increasing chondrocyte survival

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, G J; Zhang, Q-S; Diallo, C; Matsuzawa, A; Ichijo, H; Steinbeck, M J; Freeman, T A

    2014-01-01

    Endochondral ossification is the result of chondrocyte differentiation, hypertrophy, death and replacement by bone. The careful timing and progression of this process is important for normal skeletal bone growth and development, as well as fracture repair. Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1 (ASK1) is a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which is activated by reactive oxygen species and other cellular stress events. Activation of ASK1 initiates a signaling cascade known to regulate diverse cellular events including cytokine and growth factor signaling, cell cycle regulation, cellular differentiation, hypertrophy, survival and apoptosis. ASK1 is highly expressed in hypertrophic chondrocytes, but the role of ASK1 in skeletal tissues has not been investigated. Herein, we report that ASK1 knockout (KO) mice display alterations in normal growth plate morphology, which include a shorter proliferative zone and a lengthened hypertrophic zone. These changes in growth plate dynamics result in accelerated long bone mineralization and an increased formation of trabecular bone, which can be attributed to an increased resistance of terminally differentiated chondrocytes to undergo cell death. Interestingly, under normal cell culture conditions, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from ASK1 KO mice show no differences in either MAPK signaling or osteogenic or chondrogenic differentiation when compared with wild-type (WT) MEFs. However, when cultured with stress activators, H2O2 or staurosporine, the KO cells show enhanced survival, an associated decrease in the activation of proteins involved in death signaling pathways and a reduction in markers of terminal differentiation. Furthermore, in both WT mice treated with the ASK1 inhibitor, NQDI-1, and ASK1 KO mice endochondral bone formation was increased in an ectopic ossification model. These findings highlight a previously unrealized role for ASK1 in regulating endochondral bone formation. Inhibition of ASK1 has

  9. Searching for early-warning signals of impending dieback and death in Mediterranean oaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colangelo, Michele; Ripullone, Francesco; Julio Camarero, Jesus; De Micco, Veronica; Gazol, Antonio; Gentilesca, Tiziana; Borghetti, Marco

    2017-04-01

    In recent decades, forest dieback episodes have been recorded worldwide affecting different tree species. In particular, several cases of widespread dieback and increased mortality rates have been described for Mediterranean oak (Quercus spp.) species. These dieback cases are revealing the high vulnerability of Mediterranean oaks, manifested as a loss in tree vigour (leaf shedding, canopy and shoot dieback), growth decline and sometimes tree death, as a consequence of temperatures rising at unprecedented rates and drying trends. However, in the wake of the so-called 'oak decline phenomenon', the attention on these species has generally been limited, perhaps because they are often regarded as well-adapted to the dry conditions typical of Mediterranean areas. Indeed, according to recent studies, the reduced size, the ability to sprout and the anisohydric behavior of Mediterranean oak species (reduced control of water loss and high stomatal conductance rates) would make them better adapted to withstand heat and drought stress then taller and non-sprouting isohydric species (e.g. conifer, with strict control of water loss by closing stomata). Here, we investigated the vulnerability of Mediterranean oaks by comparing neighboring living and recently dead trees in species with low (Q. pubescens), intermediate (Q. cerris, Q. frainetto) and high (Q. robur) sensitivity to water shortage. We analysed changes in tree vigour using tree-ring width and functional wood anatomical traits as proxies to search for early-warning signals of dieback, in connection with the main proposed dieback mechanisms (hydraulic failure and/or carbon starvation). We also modeled the probability of tree death as a function of tree size (diameter, height) by quantifying recent changes in growth and wood anatomy along tree-ring series. Contrary to the general concept that trees tend to experience increasing cavitation risk with increasing height, our studies show that smaller oaks are more prone to die

  10. Gamma oscillations of spiking neural populations enhance signal discrimination.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Naoki; Doiron, Brent

    2007-11-01

    Selective attention is an important filter for complex environments where distractions compete with signals. Attention increases both the gamma-band power of cortical local field potentials and the spike-field coherence within the receptive field of an attended object. However, the mechanisms by which gamma-band activity enhances, if at all, the encoding of input signals are not well understood. We propose that gamma oscillations induce binomial-like spike-count statistics across noisy neural populations. Using simplified models of spiking neurons, we show how the discrimination of static signals based on the population spike-count response is improved with gamma induced binomial statistics. These results give an important mechanistic link between the neural correlates of attention and the discrimination tasks where attention is known to enhance performance. Further, they show how a rhythmicity of spike responses can enhance coding schemes that are not temporally sensitive.

  11. Light acclimation, retrograde signalling, cell death and immune defences in plants.

    PubMed

    Karpiński, Stanisław; Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Wituszyńska, Weronika; Burdiak, Paweł

    2013-04-01

    This review confronts the classical view of plant immune defence and light acclimation with recently published data. Earlier findings have linked plant immune defences to nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR)-dependent recognition of pathogen effectors and to the role of plasma membrane-localized NADPH-dependent oxidoreductase (AtRbohD), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and salicylic acid (SA). However, recent results suggest that plant immune defence also depends on the absorption of excessive light energy and photorespiration. Rapid changes in light intensity and quality often cause the absorption of energy, which is in excess of that required for photosynthesis. Such excessive light energy is considered to be a factor triggering photoinhibition and disturbance in ROS/hormonal homeostasis, which leads to cell death in foliar tissues. We highlight here the tight crosstalk between ROS- and SA-dependent pathways leading to light acclimation, and defence responses leading to pathogen resistance. We also show that LESION SIMULATING DISEASE 1 (LSD1) regulates and integrates these processes. Moreover, we discuss the role of plastid-nucleus signal transduction, photorespiration, photoelectrochemical signalling and 'light memory' in the regulation of acclimation and immune defence responses. All of these results suggest that plants have evolved a genetic system that simultaneously regulates systemic acquired resistance (SAR), cell death and systemic acquired acclimation (SAA).

  12. Systems modelling methodology for the analysis of apoptosis signal transduction and cell death decisions.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Markus; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2013-06-01

    Systems biology and systems medicine, i.e. the application of systems biology in a clinical context, is becoming of increasing importance in biology, drug discovery and health care. Systems biology incorporates knowledge and methods that are applied in mathematics, physics and engineering, but may not be part of classical training in biology. We here provide an introduction to basic concepts and methods relevant to the construction and application of systems models for apoptosis research. We present the key methods relevant to the representation of biochemical processes in signal transduction models, with a particular reference to apoptotic processes. We demonstrate how such models enable a quantitative and temporal analysis of changes in molecular entities in response to an apoptosis-inducing stimulus, and provide information on cell survival and cell death decisions. We introduce methods for analyzing the spatial propagation of cell death signals, and discuss the concepts of sensitivity analyses that enable a prediction of network responses to disturbances of single or multiple parameters.

  13. Nuclear clusterin/XIP8, an x-ray-induced Ku70-binding protein that signals cell death

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chin-Rang; Leskov, Konstantin; Hosley-Eberlein, Kelly; Criswell, Tracy; Pink, John J.; Kinsella, Timothy J.; Boothman, David A.

    2000-01-01

    Clusterin [CLU, a.k.a. TRPM-2, SGP-2, or ionizing radiation (IR)-induced protein-8 (XIP8)] was implicated in apoptosis, tissue injury, and aging. Its function remains elusive. We reisolated CLU/XIP8 by yeast two-hybrid analyses using as bait the DNA double-strand break repair protein Ku70. We show that a delayed (2–3 days), low-dose (0.02–10 Gy) IR-inducible nuclear CLU/XIP8 protein coimmunoprecipitated and colocalized (by confocal microscopy) in vivo with Ku70/Ku80, a DNA damage sensor and key double-strand break repair protein, in human MCF-7:WS8 breast cancer cells. Overexpression of nuclear CLU/XIP8 or its minimal Ku70 binding domain (120 aa of CLU/XIP8 C terminus) in nonirradiated MCF-7:WS8 cells dramatically reduced cell growth and colony-forming ability concomitant with increased G1 cell cycle checkpoint arrest and increased cell death. Enhanced expression and accumulation of nuclear CLU/XIP8-Ku70/Ku80 complexes appears to be an important cell death signal after IR exposure. PMID:10823943

  14. Benefits of Software GPS Receivers for Enhanced Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    1 Published in GPS SOLUTIONS 4(1) Summer, 2000, pages 56-66. Benefits of Software GPS Receivers for Enhanced Signal Processing Alison Brown...Diego, CA 92110-3127 Number of Pages: 24 Number of Figures: 20 ABSTRACT In this paper the architecture of a software GPS receiver is described...and an analysis is included of the performance of a software GPS receiver when tracking the GPS signals in challenging environments. Results are

  15. A cardiac mitochondrial cAMP signaling pathway regulates calcium accumulation, permeability transition and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Liu, D; Varin, A; Nicolas, V; Courilleau, D; Mateo, P; Caubere, C; Rouet, P; Gomez, A-M; Vandecasteele, G; Fischmeister, R; Brenner, C

    2016-01-01

    Although cardiac cytosolic cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) regulates multiple processes, such as beating, contractility, metabolism and apoptosis, little is known yet on the role of this second messenger within cardiac mitochondria. Using cellular and subcellular approaches, we demonstrate here the local expression of several actors of cAMP signaling within cardiac mitochondria, namely a truncated form of soluble AC (sACt) and the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1 (Epac1), and show a protective role for sACt against cell death, apoptosis as well as necrosis in primary cardiomyocytes. Upon stimulation with bicarbonate (HCO3−) and Ca2+, sACt produces cAMP, which in turn stimulates oxygen consumption, increases the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and ATP production. cAMP is rate limiting for matrix Ca2+ entry via Epac1 and the mitochondrial calcium uniporter and, as a consequence, prevents mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). The mitochondrial cAMP effects involve neither protein kinase A, Epac2 nor the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. In addition, in mitochondria isolated from failing rat hearts, stimulation of the mitochondrial cAMP pathway by HCO3− rescued the sensitization of mitochondria to Ca2+-induced MPT. Thus, our study identifies a link between mitochondrial cAMP, mitochondrial metabolism and cell death in the heart, which is independent of cytosolic cAMP signaling. Our results might have implications for therapeutic prevention of cell death in cardiac pathologies. PMID:27100892

  16. The pepper RNA-binding protein CaRBP1 functions in hypersensitive cell death and defense signaling in the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hyuk; Kim, Dae Sung; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2012-10-01

    The regulation of gene expression via post-transcriptional modification by RNA-binding proteins is crucial for plant disease and innate immunity. Here, we report the identification of the pepper (Capsicum annuum) RNA-binding protein1 gene (CaRBP1) as essential for hypersensitive cell death and defense signaling in the cytoplasm. CaRBP1 contains an RNA recognition motif and is rapidly and strongly induced in pepper by avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) infection. CaRBP1 displays in vitro RNA- and DNA-binding activity and in planta nucleocytoplasmic localization. Transient expression of CaRBP1 in pepper leaves triggers cell-death and defense responses. Notably, cytoplasmic localization of CaRBP1, mediated by the N-terminal region of CaRBP1, is essential for the hypersensitive cell-death response. Silencing of CaRBP1 in pepper plants significantly enhances susceptibility to avirulent Xcv infection. This is accompanied by compromised hypersensitive cell death, production of reactive oxygen species in oxidative bursts, expression of defense marker genes and accumulation of endogenous salicylic acid and jasmonic acid. Over-expression of CaRBP1 in Arabidopsis confers reduced susceptibility to infection by the biotrophic oomycete Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. Together, these results suggest that cytoplasmic localization of CaRBP1 is required for plant signaling of hypersensitive cell-death and defense responses. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Ganglioside GD2 in reception and transduction of cell death signal in tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    expression correlated with susceptibility of tumor cell lines to cytotoxic effect of anti-GD2 antibodies. Conclusions Results of this study demonstrate that anti-GD2 antibodies not only passively bind to the surface of tumor cells but also directly induce rapid cell death after the incubation with GD2-positive tumor cells. These results suggest a new role of GD2 as a receptor that actively transduces death signal in malignant cells. PMID:24773917

  18. Ganglioside GD2 in reception and transduction of cell death signal in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Doronin, Igor I; Vishnyakova, Polina A; Kholodenko, Irina V; Ponomarev, Eugene D; Ryazantsev, Dmitry Y; Molotkovskaya, Irina M; Kholodenko, Roman V

    2014-04-28

    susceptibility of tumor cell lines to cytotoxic effect of anti-GD2 antibodies. Results of this study demonstrate that anti-GD2 antibodies not only passively bind to the surface of tumor cells but also directly induce rapid cell death after the incubation with GD2-positive tumor cells. These results suggest a new role of GD2 as a receptor that actively transduces death signal in malignant cells.

  19. Radiation induces autophagic cell death via the p53/DRAM signaling pathway in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Li; Song, Zhiheng; Liang, Bing; Jia, Lili; Ma, Shumei; Liu, Xiaodong

    2016-06-01

    Autophagy is known to play a role in the response of breast cancer cells to radiation therapy. However, the mechanisms that mediate the process of autophagy and contribute to radiation-induced cell death and cell survival remain to be fully characterized. Therefore, in this study, the functional role of autophagy in radiation-induced cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells was investigated. After MCF-7 cells were exposed to various doses of radiation, increased monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining and a greater deposition of LC3-positive puncta were observed. Expression of the autophagy-related proteins, Beclin 1 and LC3-II, were also found to be upregulated. Radiation-induced autophagic cell death was partially abrogated following the administration of 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and in knockdown experiments of Atg5 and Beclin 1. In the gene microarray analysis performed after irradiation, a number of differentially expressed genes were identified. In particular, upregulation of both the mRNA and protein levels of the autophagy-related genes, DRAM and TIGAR, were detected. However, inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA reduced the radiation-induced upregulation of LC3-II and DRAM. Conversely, silencing of p53 downregulated the expression of LC3-II and DRAM following radiation. Silencing of DRAM reversed the upregulation of LC3-II and DRAM following radiation, partially blocked radiation-induced cell death, and no significant change in p53 expression was detected. Based on these results, the p53/DRAM signaling pathway appears to contribute to radiation-induced autophagic cell death in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

  20. [Enhancement of image used in optical imaging of intrinsic signal].

    PubMed

    Yin, Yu; Xia, Yang

    2012-02-01

    Optical imaging of intrinsic signals is a secondary image of the cerebral cortex. The weak optical signal is decided by anatomical structure of brain. The spatial filter is a powerful technology for de-noising and image enhancement. We used different linear and nonlinear filters to deal with optical imaging. Furthermore, we compared the degree of noise suppression and discussed the image details. Our result showed that nonlinear median filter can keep more image details with effective noise reduction. It is useful for image enhancement of optical imaging.

  1. Pulse Onset Detection using Neighbor Pulse-Based Signal Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Peng; Bergsneider, Marvin; Hu, Xiao

    2008-01-01

    Detecting onsets of cardiovascular pulse wave signals is an important prerequisite for successfully conducting various analysis tasks involving the concept of pulse wave velocity. However, pulse onsets are frequently influenced by inherent noise and artifacts in signals continuously acquired in a clinical environment. The present work proposed and validated a neighbor pulse-based signal enhancement algorithm for reducing error in the detected pulse onset locations from noise-contaminated pulsatile signals. Pulse onset was proposed to be detected using the first principal component extracted from three adjacent pulses. This algorithm was evaluated using test signals constructed by mixing arterial blood pressure, cerebral blood flow velocity and intracranial pressure pulses recorded from neurosurgical patients with white noise of various levels. The results showed that the proposed pulse enhancement algorithm improved (p < 0.05) pulse onset detection according to all three different onset definitions and for all three types of pulsatile signals as compared to results without using the pulse enhancement. These results suggested that the proposed algorithm could help achieve robustness in pulse onset detection and facilitate pulse wave analysis using clinical recordings. PMID:18632299

  2. Method for enhancing signals transmitted over optical fibers

    DOEpatents

    Ogle, James W.; Lyons, Peter B.

    1983-01-01

    A method for spectral equalization of high frequency spectrally broadband signals transmitted through an optical fiber. The broadband signal input is first dispersed by a grating. Narrow spectral components are collected into an array of equalizing fibers. The fibers serve as optical delay lines compensating for material dispersion of each spectral component during transmission. The relative lengths of the individual equalizing fibers are selected to compensate for such prior dispersion. The output of the equalizing fibers couple the spectrally equalized light onto a suitable detector for subsequent electronic processing of the enhanced broadband signal.

  3. Method for enhancing signals transmitted over optical fibers

    DOEpatents

    Ogle, J.W.; Lyons, P.B.

    1981-02-11

    A method for spectral equalization of high frequency spectrally broadband signals transmitted through an optical fiber is disclosed. The broadband signal input is first dispersed by a grating. Narrow spectral components are collected into an array of equalizing fibers. The fibers serve as optical delay lines compensating for material dispersion of each spectral component during transmission. The relative lengths of the individual equalizing fibers are selected to compensate for such prior dispersion. The output of the equalizing fibers couple the spectrally equalized light onto a suitable detector for subsequent electronic processing of the enhanced broadband signal.

  4. Requirement of the Cytosolic Interaction between PATHOGENESIS-RELATED PROTEIN10 and LEUCINE-RICH REPEAT PROTEIN1 for Cell Death and Defense Signaling in Pepper[W

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Du Seok; Hwang, In Sun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2012-01-01

    Plants recruit innate immune receptors such as leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins to recognize pathogen attack and activate defense genes. Here, we identified the pepper (Capsicum annuum) pathogenesis-related protein10 (PR10) as a leucine-rich repeat protein1 (LRR1)–interacting partner. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays confirmed the specific interaction between LRR1 and PR10 in planta. Avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria infection induces PR10 expression associated with the hypersensitive cell death response. Transient expression of PR10 triggers hypersensitive cell death in pepper and Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, which is amplified by LRR1 coexpression as a positive regulator. LRR1 promotes the ribonuclease activity and phosphorylation of PR10, leading to enhanced cell death signaling. The LRR1-PR10 complex is formed in the cytoplasm, resulting in its secretion into the apoplastic space. Engineered nuclear confinement of both proteins revealed that the cytoplasmic localization of the PR10-LRR1 complex is essential for cell death–mediated defense signaling. PR10/LRR1 silencing in pepper compromises resistance to avirulent X. campestris pv vesicatoria infection. By contrast, PR10/LRR1 overexpression in Arabidopsis thaliana confers enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. Together, these results suggest that the cytosolic LRR-PR10 complex is responsible for cell death–mediated defense signaling. PMID:22492811

  5. Cadmium toxicity in cultured tomato cells--role of ethylene, proteases and oxidative stress in cell death signaling.

    PubMed

    Iakimova, Elena T; Woltering, Ernst J; Kapchina-Toteva, Veneta M; Harren, Frans J M; Cristescu, Simona M

    2008-12-01

    Our aim was to investigate the ability of cadmium to induce programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells and to determine the involvement of proteolysis, oxidative stress and ethylene. Tomato suspension cells were exposed to treatments with CdSO(4) and cell death was calculated after fluorescein diacetate staining of the living cells. Ethylene was measured in a flow-through system using a laser-driven photo acoustic detector; hydrogen peroxide was determined by chemiluminescence in a ferricyanide-catalysed oxidation of luminol. We have demonstrated that cadmium induces cell death in tomato suspension cells involving caspase-like proteases, indicating that programmed cell death took place. Using range of inhibitors, we found that cysteine and serine peptidases, oxidative stress, calcium and ethylene are players in the cadmium-induced cell death signaling. Cadmium-induced cell death in tomato suspension cells exhibits morphological and biochemical similarities to plant hypersensitive response and to cadmium effects in animal systems.

  6. Blockade of constitutively activated ERK signaling enhances cytotoxicity of microtubule-destabilizing agents in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Tanimura, Susumu; Uchiyama, Aya; Watanabe, Kazushi; Yasunaga, Masahiro; Inada, Yoshiyuki; Kawabata, Takumi; Iwashita, Ken-Ichi; Noda, Sinji; Ozaki, Kei-Ichi; Kohno, Michiaki

    2009-01-16

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway is constitutively activated in many human tumor cell types. Given the cytoprotective role of this pathway, we examined whether its specific blockade might sensitize human tumor cells to the induction of apoptosis by various anticancer drugs. Although blockade of ERK signaling alone did not induce substantial cell death, it resulted in marked and selective enhancement of the induction of apoptosis by microtubule-destabilizing agents in tumor cells in which the ERK pathway is constitutively activated. The synergistic activation of c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase by the combination of an ERK pathway inhibitor and a microtubule-destabilizing agent appeared to be responsible, at least in part, for this effect. These results suggest that administration of the combination of an ERK pathway inhibitor and a microtubule-destabilizing agent is a potential chemotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of tumor cells with constitutive activation of the ERK pathway.

  7. Matrix Crosslinking Forces Tumor Progression by Enhancing Integrin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Levental, Kandice R.; Yu, Hongmei; Kass, Laura; Lakins, Johnathon N.; Egeblad, Mikala; Erler, Janine T.; Fong, Sheri F.T.; Csiszar, Katalin; Giaccia, Amato; Weninger, Wolfgang; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Gasser, David L.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Tumors are characterized by extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and stiffening. The importance of ECM remodeling to cancer is appreciated; the relevance of stiffening is less clear. We found that breast tumorigenesis is accompanied by collagen crosslinking, ECM stiffening and increased focal adhesions. Inducing collagen crosslinking stiffened the ECM, promoted focal adhesions, enhanced PI3 Kinase (PI3K) activity, and induced the invasion of an oncogene-initiated epithelium. Inhibiting integrin signaling repressed the invasion of a premalignant epithelium into a stiffened, crosslinked ECM, and forced integrin clustering promoted focal adhesions, enhanced PI3K signaling and induced the invasion of a premalignant epithelium. Consistently, reducing lysyl oxidase-mediated collagen crosslinking prevented MMTV-Neu-induced fibrosis, decreased focal adhesions and PI3K activity, impeded malignancy and lowered tumor incidence. These data show how collagen crosslinking can modulate tissue fibrosis and stiffness to force focal adhesions, growth factor signaling and breast malignancy. PMID:19931152

  8. Vitamin D receptor signaling enhances locomotive ability in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Sadaoki; Suzuki, Miho; Tashiro, Yoshihito; Tanaka, Keisuke; Takeda, Satoshi; Aizawa, Ken; Hirata, Michinori; Yogo, Kenji; Endo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Bone fractures markedly reduce quality of life and life expectancy in elderly people. Although osteoporosis increases bone fragility, fractures frequently occur in patients with normal bone mineral density. Because most fractures occur on falling, preventing falls is another focus for reducing bone fractures. In this study, we investigated the role of vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling in locomotive ability. In the rotarod test, physical exercise enhanced locomotive ability of wild-type (WT) mice by 1.6-fold, whereas exercise did not enhance locomotive ability of VDR knockout (KO) mice. Compared with WT mice, VDR KO mice had smaller peripheral nerve axonal diameter and disordered AChR morphology on the extensor digitorum longus muscle. Eldecalcitol (ED-71, ELD), an analog of 1,25(OH)2 D3 , administered to rotarod-trained C57BL/6 mice enhanced locomotor performance compared with vehicle-treated nontrained mice. The area of AChR cluster on the extensor digitorum longus was greater in ELD-treated mice than in vehicle-treated mice. ELD and 1,25(OH)2 D3 enhanced expression of IGF-1, myelin basic protein, and VDR in rat primary Schwann cells. VDR signaling regulates neuromuscular maintenance and enhances locomotive ability after physical exercise. Further investigation is required, but Schwann cells and the neuromuscular junction are targets of vitamin D3 signaling in locomotive ability.

  9. Silaffin peptides as a novel signal enhancer for gravimetric biosensors.

    PubMed

    Nam, Dong Hyun; Lee, Jeong-O; Sang, Byoung-In; Won, Keehoon; Kim, Yong Hwan

    2013-05-01

    Application of biomimetic silica formation to gravimetric biosensors has been conducted for the first time. As a model system, silaffin peptides fused with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were immobilized on a gold quartz crystal resonator for quartz crystal microbalances using a self-assembled monolayer. When a solution of silicic acid was supplied, silica particles were successfully deposited on the Au surface, resulting in a significant change in resonance frequency (i.e., signal enhancement) with the silaffin-GFP. However, frequency was not altered when bare GFP was used as a control. The novel peptide enhancer is advantageous because it can be readily and quantitatively conjugated with sensing proteins using recombinant DNA technology. As a proof of concept, this study shows that the silaffin domains can be employed as a novel and efficient biomolecular signal enhancer for gravimetric biosensors.

  10. Phenotypic Reversion or Death of Cancer Cells by Altering Signaling Pathways in Three-Dimensional Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Hansen, Rhonda K.; Radisky, Derek; Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Petersen, Ole W.; Turley, Eva A.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2010-01-01

    Background We previously used a three-dimensional (3D) reconstituted basement membrane (rBM) assay to demonstrate that tumorigenic HMT-3522 T4–2 human breast cells can be induced to form morphologically normal structures (“reversion”) by treatment with inhibitors of β1 integrin, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). We have now used this assay to identify reversion and/or death requirements of several more aggressive human breast cancer cell lines. Methods Breast tumor cell lines MCF7, Hs578T, and MDA-MB-231 were cultured in 3D rBM and treated with inhibitors of β1 integrin, MAPK, or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). MDA-MB-231 cells, which lack E-cadherin, were transfected with an E-cadherin cDNA. The extent of reversion was assessed by changes in morphology and polarity, growth in 3D rBM or soft agar, level of invasiveness, and tumor formation in nude mice. Results All three cell lines showed partial reversion (MCF7 the greatest and Hs578T the least) of tumorigenic properties treated with a single β1 integrin, MAPK, or PI3K inhibitor. Combined inhibition of β1 integrin and either PI3K or MAPK resulted in nearly complete phenotypic reversion (MDA-MB-231, MCF7) or in cell death (Hs578T). E-cadherin-transfected MDA-MB-231 cells showed partial reversion, but exposure of the transfectants to an inhibitor of β1 integrin, PI3K, or MAPK led to nearly complete reversion. Conclusion The 3D rBM assay can be used to identify signaling pathways that, when manipulated in concert, can lead to the restoration of morphologically normal breast structures or to death of the tumor cells, even highly metastatic cells. This approach may be useful to design therapeutic intervention strategies for aggressive breast cancers. PMID:12359858

  11. Nitric oxide implication in cadmium-induced programmed cell death in roots and signaling response of yellow lupine plants.

    PubMed

    Arasimowicz-Jelonek, Magdalena; Floryszak-Wieczorek, Jolanta; Deckert, Joanna; Rucińska-Sobkowiak, Renata; Gzyl, Jarosław; Pawlak-Sprada, Sylwia; Abramowski, Dariusz; Jelonek, Tomasz; Gwóźdź, Edward A

    2012-09-01

    The sequence of events leading to the programmed cell death (PCD) induced by heavy metals in plants is still the object of extensive investigation. In this study we showed that roots of 3-day old yellow lupine (Lupinus luteus L.) seedlings exposed to cadmium (Cd, 89μM CdCl(2)) resulted in PCD starting from 24h of stress duration, which was evidenced by TUNEL-positive reaction. Cd-induced PCD was preceded by a relatively early burst of nitric oxide (NO) localized mainly in the root tips. Above changes were accompanied by the NADPH-oxidase-dependent superoxide anion (O(2)(·-)) production. However, the concomitant high level of both NO and O(2)(·-) at the 24th h of Cd exposure did not provoke an enhanced peroxynitrite formation. The treatment with the NADPH-oxidase inhibitor and NO-scavenger significantly reduced O(2)(·-) and NO production, respectively, as well as diminished the pool of cells undergoing PCD. The obtained data indicate that boosted NO and O(2)(·-) production is required for Cd-induced PCD in lupine roots. Moreover, we found that in roots of 14-day old lupine plants the NO-dependent Cd-induced PCD was correlated with the enhanced level of the post-stress signals in leaves, including distal NO cross-talk with hydrogen peroxide. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Mitochondria death/survival signaling pathways in cardiotoxicity induced by anthracyclines and anticancer-targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Montaigne, David; Hurt, Christopher; Neviere, Remi

    2012-01-01

    Anthracyclines remain the cornerstone of treatment in many malignancies but these agents have a cumulative dose relationship with cardiotoxicity. Development of cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure induced by anthracyclines are typically dose-dependent, irreversible, and cumulative. Although past studies of cardiotoxicity have focused on anthracyclines, more recently interest has turned to anticancer drugs that target many proteins kinases, such as tyrosine kinases. An attractive model to explain the mechanism of this cardiotoxicity could be myocyte loss through cell death pathways. Inhibition of mitochondrial transition permeability is a valuable tool to prevent doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. In response to anthracycline treatment, activation of several protein kinases, neuregulin/ErbB2 signaling, and transcriptional factors modify mitochondrial functions that determine cell death or survival through the modulation of mitochondrial membrane permeability. Cellular response to anthracyclines is also modulated by a myriad of transcriptional factors that influence cell fate. Several novel targeted chemotherapeutic agents have been associated with a small but worrying risk of left ventricular dysfunction. Agents such as trastuzumab and tyrosine kinase inhibitors can lead to cardiotoxicity that is fundamentally different from that caused by anthracyclines, whereas biological effects converge to the mitochondria as a critical target.

  13. Mitochondria Death/Survival Signaling Pathways in Cardiotoxicity Induced by Anthracyclines and Anticancer-Targeted Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Montaigne, David; Hurt, Christopher; Neviere, Remi

    2012-01-01

    Anthracyclines remain the cornerstone of treatment in many malignancies but these agents have a cumulative dose relationship with cardiotoxicity. Development of cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure induced by anthracyclines are typically dose-dependent, irreversible, and cumulative. Although past studies of cardiotoxicity have focused on anthracyclines, more recently interest has turned to anticancer drugs that target many proteins kinases, such as tyrosine kinases. An attractive model to explain the mechanism of this cardiotoxicity could be myocyte loss through cell death pathways. Inhibition of mitochondrial transition permeability is a valuable tool to prevent doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. In response to anthracycline treatment, activation of several protein kinases, neuregulin/ErbB2 signaling, and transcriptional factors modify mitochondrial functions that determine cell death or survival through the modulation of mitochondrial membrane permeability. Cellular response to anthracyclines is also modulated by a myriad of transcriptional factors that influence cell fate. Several novel targeted chemotherapeutic agents have been associated with a small but worrying risk of left ventricular dysfunction. Agents such as trastuzumab and tyrosine kinase inhibitors can lead to cardiotoxicity that is fundamentally different from that caused by anthracyclines, whereas biological effects converge to the mitochondria as a critical target. PMID:22482055

  14. A dynamic mathematical model to clarify signaling circuitry underlying programmed cell death control in Arabidopsis disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Vikas; Zhang, Chu; Shapiro, Allan D; Dhurjati, Prasad S

    2004-01-01

    Plant cells undergo programmed cell death in response to invading pathogens. This cell death limits the spread of the infection and triggers whole plant antimicrobial and immune responses. The signaling network connecting molecular recognition of pathogens to these responses is a prime target for manipulation in genetic engineering strategies designed to improve crop plant disease resistance. Moreover, as alterations to metabolism can be misinterpreted as pathogen infection, successful plant metabolic engineering will ultimately depend on controlling these signaling pathways to avoid inadvertent activation of cell death. Programmed cell death resulting from infection of Arabidopsis thaliana with Pseudomonas syringae bacterial pathogens was chosen as a model system. Signaling circuitry hypotheses in this model system were tested by construction of a differential-equations-based mathematical model. Model-based simulations of time evolution of signaling components matched experimental measurements of programmed cell death and associated signaling components obtained in a companion study. Simulation of systems-level consequences of mutations used in laboratory studies led to two major improvements in understanding of signaling circuitry: (1) Simulations supported experimental evidence that a negative feedback loop in salicylic acid biosynthesis postulated by others does not exist. (2) Simulations showed that a second negative regulatory circuit for which there was strong experimental support did not affect one of two pathways leading to programmed cell death. Simulations also generated testable predictions to guide future experiments. Additional testable hypotheses were generated by results of individually varying each model parameter over 2 orders of magnitude that predicted biologically important changes to system dynamics. These predictions will be tested in future laboratory studies designed to further elucidate the signaling network control structure.

  15. Live to die another way: modes of programmed cell death and the signals emanating from dying cells

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Yaron; Steller, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Preface All life ends in death, but perhaps one of life’s grander ironies is that it also depends on death. Cell-intrinsic suicide pathways, termed programmed cell death (PCD), are crucial for animal development, tissue homeostasis and pathogenesis. Originally, PCD was virtually synonymous with apoptosis, but recently, alternative PCD mechanisms have been reported. Here, we provide an overview of several distinct PCD mechanisms, namely apoptosis, autophagy and necroptosis. In addition, we discuss the complex signals emanating from dying cells, which can either fuel regeneration or instruct additional killing. Further advances in understanding the physiological role of multiple cell death mechanisms and associated signals will be important to selectively manipulate PCD for therapeutic purposes. PMID:25991373

  16. Live to die another way: modes of programmed cell death and the signals emanating from dying cells.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Yaron; Steller, Hermann

    2015-06-01

    All life ends in death, but perhaps one of life's grander ironies is that it also depends on death. Cell-intrinsic suicide pathways, termed programmed cell death (PCD), are crucial for animal development, tissue homeostasis and pathogenesis. Originally, PCD was almost synonymous with apoptosis; recently, however, alternative mechanisms of PCD have been reported. Here, we provide an overview of several distinct PCD mechanisms, namely apoptosis, autophagy and necroptosis. In addition, we discuss the complex signals that emanate from dying cells, which can either trigger regeneration or instruct additional killing. Further advances in understanding the physiological roles of the various mechanisms of cell death and their associated signals will be important to selectively manipulate PCD for therapeutic purposes.

  17. PRAME promotes in vitro leukemia cells death by regulating S100A4/p53 signaling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Rong, L-J; Meng, S-L; Hou, F-L; Zhang, J-H; Pan, G

    2016-01-01

    PRAME (Preferentially Expressed Antigen in Melanoma) is a tumor-associated antigen recognized by immunocytes, and it induces cytotoxic T cell-mediated responses in melanoma. PRAME is expressed in a wide variety of tumors, but in contrast with most other tumor-associated antigens, it is also expressed in leukemias. The physiologic role of PRAME remains elusive. Recently, it has found PRAME could be involved in the regulation of cell death in leukemias, but the mechanism of the function is unclear. Here, we confirm that PRAME induces leukemias cell death by regulation of S100A4/p53 signaling. The pCDNA3-PRAME plasmid and its control were transfected with the KG-1 cells. The pCDNA3-PRAME transfected KG-1 cells were then transiently transfected with S100A4 cDNA or wt-p53 siRNA. The PRAME siRNA and its control were transfected with the K562 cells. The PRAME siRNA transfected K562 cells were then transiently transfected with S100A4 siRNA or pGMp53-Lu. PRAME, S100A4 and P53 were detected by Western blot assay in different time point. Annexin V/propidium iodide and MTT methods were used to detect apoptosis and cell survival rate. KG-1 cells overexpressing the PRAME gene significantly induces apoptosis and decreases proliferation in vitro, followed by down-regulation of S100A4 and up-regulation of p53. Up-regulation of S100A4 by S100A4 transfection inhibits PRAME-induced p53 up-regulation. Furthermore, up-regulation of S100A4 by S100A4 transfection or down-regulation of p53 by p53 siRNA transfection reduces apoptosis and increases proliferation in vitro. Knockdown of PRAME in K562 cells significantly increases proliferation in vitro, followed by up-regulation of S100A4 and down-regulation of p53. The downregulation of S100A4 by S100A4 siRNA transfection increased p53 expression. Furthermore, downregulation of S100A4 by S100A4 siRNA transfection or up-regulation of p53 by p53 transfection decreases proliferation in vitro. Our results suggest that the leukemias expressing

  18. Effects of mass density enhancements on VLF transmitter signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Lammer, Helmut; Al-Haddad, Eimad; Leitzinger, Martin; Krauss, Sandro

    2015-04-01

    We study the variation of the electric field measurements recorded by DEMETER micro-satellite above specific very low frequency (VLF) transmitters. The investigated period starts from August 2004 to December 2010. The VLF signals are combined with the mass density measurements recorded, in the same time interval, by GRACE and CHAMP satellites. Particular enhancements of the mass densities were observed at polar and sub-polar regions by both satellites. Those mass density enhancements are found to propagate from the northern or southern hemisphere to the equator region. We attempt in this study to analyse the VLF signal variations in the time interval where the mass density enhancements are recorded. Such disturbances of the atmosphere can probably affect the Earth's ionosphere. The VLF signal may be attenuated and then not detected by DEMETER. We find that it is the case at some specific occasions. Nevertheless we show that several parameters have to be taken into consideration: (a) the origin of the mass density enhancement in the polar region (e.g. solar particles), (b) its phase speed from the pole to the equator and (c) the satellite (CHAMP, DEMETER, GRACE) local time.

  19. Erythropoietin (EPO)-receptor signaling induces cell death of primary myeloma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Våtsveen, Thea Kristin; Sponaas, Anne-Marit; Tian, Erming; Zhang, Qing; Misund, Kristine; Sundan, Anders; Børset, Magne; Waage, Anders; Brede, Gaute

    2016-08-31

    Multiple myeloma is an incurable complex disease characterized by clonal proliferation of malignant plasma cells in a hypoxic bone marrow environment. Hypoxia-dependent erythropoietin (EPO)-receptor (EPOR) signaling is central in various cancers, but the relevance of EPOR signaling in multiple myeloma cells has not yet been thoroughly investigated. Myeloma cell lines and malignant plasma cells isolated from bone marrow of myeloma patients were used in this study. Transcript levels were analysed by quantitative PCR and cell surface levels of EPOR in primary cells by flow cytometry. Knockdown of EPOR by short interfering RNA was used to show specific EPOR signaling in the myeloma cell line INA-6. Flow cytometry was used to assess viability in primary cells treated with EPO in the presence and absence of neutralizing anti-EPOR antibodies. Gene expression data for total therapy 2 (TT2), total therapy 3A (TT3A) trials and APEX 039 and 040 were retrieved from NIH GEO omnibus and EBI ArrayExpress. We show that the EPOR is expressed in myeloma cell lines and in primary myeloma cells both at the mRNA and protein level. Exposure to recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) reduced viability of INA-6 myeloma cell line and of primary myeloma cells. This effect could be partially reversed by neutralizing antibodies against EPOR. In INA-6 cells and primary myeloma cells, janus kinase 2 (JAK-2) and extracellular signal regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK-1/2) were phosphorylated by rhEPO treatment. Knockdown of EPOR expression in INA-6 cells reduced rhEPO-induced phospo-JAK-2 and phospho-ERK-1/2. Co-cultures of primary myeloma cells with bone marrow-derived stroma cells did not protect the myeloma cells from rhEPO-induced cell death. In four different clinical trials, survival data linked to gene expression analysis indicated that high levels of EPOR mRNA were associated with better survival. Our results demonstrate for the first time active EPOR signaling in malignant plasma cells. EPO

  20. 5-Aminolevulinic acid enhances cell death under thermal stress in certain cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chibazakura, Taku; Toriyabe, Yui; Fujii, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kiwamu; Kawakami, Mariko; Kuwamura, Haruna; Haga, Hazuki; Ogura, Shun-ichiro; Abe, Fuminori; Nakajima, Motowo; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Tanaka, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) is contained in all organisms and a starting substrate for heme biosynthesis. Since administration of 5-ALA specifically leads cancer cells to accumulate protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), a potent photosensitizer, we tested if 5-ALA also serves as a thermosensitizer. 5-ALA enhanced heat-induced cell death of cancer cell lines such as HepG2, Caco-2, and Kato III, but not other cancer cell lines including U2-OS and normal cell lines including WI-38. Those 5-ALA-sensitive cancer cells, but neither U2-OS nor WI-38, accumulated intracellular PpIX and exhibited an increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation under thermal stress with 5-ALA treatment. In addition, blocking the PpIX-exporting transporter ABCG2 in U2-OS and WI-38 cells enhanced their cell death under thermal stress with 5-ALA. Finally, a ROS scavenger compromised the cell death enhancement by 5-ALA. These suggest that 5-ALA can sensitize certain cancer cells, but not normal cells, to thermal stress via accumulation of PpIX and increase of ROS generation.

  1. Enhancement of endocannabinoid signaling protects against cocaine-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Vilela, Luciano R.; Gobira, Pedro H.; Viana, Thercia G.; Medeiros, Daniel C.; Ferreira-Vieira, Talita H.; Doria, Juliana G.; Rodrigues, Flávia; Aguiar, Daniele C.; Pereira, Grace S.; Massessini, André R.; Ribeiro, Fabíola M.; Oliveira, Antonio Carlos P. de; Moraes, Marcio F.D.; Moreira, Fabricio A.

    2015-08-01

    Cocaine is an addictive substance with a potential to cause deleterious effects in the brain. The strategies for treating its neurotoxicity, however, are limited. Evidence suggests that the endocannabinoid system exerts neuroprotective functions against various stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the main enzyme responsible for terminating the actions of the endocannabinoid anandamide, reduces seizures and cell death in the hippocampus in a model of cocaine intoxication. Male Swiss mice received injections of endocannabinoid-related compounds followed by the lowest dose of cocaine that induces seizures, electroencephalographic activity and cell death in the hippocampus. The molecular mechanisms were studied in primary cell culture of this structure. The FAAH inhibitor, URB597, reduced cocaine-induced seizures and epileptiform electroencephalographic activity. The cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor selective agonist, ACEA, mimicked these effects, whereas the antagonist, AM251, prevented them. URB597 also inhibited cocaine-induced activation and death of hippocampal neurons, both in animals and in primary cell culture. Finally, we investigated if the PI3K/Akt/ERK intracellular pathway, a cell surviving mechanism coupled to CB{sub 1} receptor, mediated these neuroprotective effects. Accordingly, URB597 injection increased ERK and Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus. Moreover, the neuroprotective effect of this compound was reversed by the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. In conclusion, the pharmacological facilitation of the anandamide/CB1/PI3K signaling protects the brain against cocaine intoxication in experimental models. This strategy may be further explored in the development of treatments for drug-induced neurotoxicity. - Highlights: • Cocaine toxicity is characterized by seizures and hippocampal cell death. • The endocannabinoid anandamide acts as a brain protective mechanism. • Inhibition of anandamide hydrolysis

  2. Blockade of interleukin-6 signalling with siltuximab enhances melphalan cytotoxicity in preclinical models of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Hunsucker, Sally A; Magarotto, Valeria; Kuhn, Deborah J; Kornblau, Steven M; Wang, Michael; Weber, Donna M; Thomas, Sheeba K; Shah, Jatin J; Voorhees, Peter M; Xie, Hong; Cornfeld, Mark; Nemeth, Jeffrey A; Orlowski, Robert Z

    2011-03-01

    Signalling through the interleukin (IL)-6 pathway induces proliferation and drug resistance of multiple myeloma cells. We therefore sought to determine whether the IL-6-neutralizing monoclonal antibody siltuximab, formerly CNTO 328, could enhance the activity of melphalan, and to examine some of the mechanisms underlying this interaction. Siltuximab increased the cytotoxicity of melphalan in KAS-6/1, INA-6, ANBL-6, and RPMI 8226 human myeloma cell lines (HMCLs) in an additive-to-synergistic manner, and sensitized resistant RPMI 8226.LR5 cells to melphalan. These anti-proliferative effects were accompanied by enhanced activation of drug-specific apoptosis in HMCLs grown in suspension, and in HMCLs co-cultured with a human-derived stromal cell line. Siltuximab with melphalan enhanced activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, and the downstream effector caspase-3 compared with either of the single agents. This increased induction of cell death occurred in association with enhanced Bak activation. Neutralization of IL-6 also suppressed signalling through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway, as evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of Akt, p70 S6 kinase and 4E-BP1. Importantly, the siltuximab/melphalan regimen demonstrated enhanced anti-proliferative effects against primary plasma cells derived from patients with myeloma, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, and amyloidosis. These studies provide a rationale for translation of siltuximab into the clinic in combination with melphalan-based therapies.

  3. Natural small-molecule enhancers of autophagy induce autophagic cell death in apoptosis-defective cells.

    PubMed

    Law, Betty Yuen Kwan; Chan, Wai Kit; Xu, Su Wei; Wang, Jing Rong; Bai, Li Ping; Liu, Liang; Wong, Vincent Kam Wai

    2014-07-01

    Resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy is a significant problem in oncology, and the development of sensitising agents or small-molecules with new mechanisms of action to kill these cells is needed. Autophagy is a cellular process responsible for the turnover of misfolded proteins or damaged organelles, and it also recycles nutrients to maintain energy levels for cell survival. In some apoptosis-resistant cancer cells, autophagy can also enhance the efficacy of anti-cancer drugs through autophagy-mediated mechanisms of cell death. Because the modulation of autophagic processes can be therapeutically useful to circumvent chemoresistance and enhance the effects of cancer treatment, the identification of novel autophagic enhancers for use in oncology is highly desirable. Many novel anti-cancer compounds have been isolated from natural products; therefore, we worked to discover natural, anti-cancer small-molecule enhancers of autophagy. Here, we have identified a group of natural alkaloid small-molecules that function as novel autophagic enhancers. These alkaloids, including liensinine, isoliensinine, dauricine and cepharanthine, stimulated AMPK-mTOR dependent induction of autophagy and autophagic cell death in a panel of apoptosis-resistant cells. Taken together, our work provides novel insights into the biological functions, mechanisms and potential therapeutic values of alkaloids for the induction of autophagy.

  4. Enhancing the significance of gravitational wave bursts through signal classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinciguerra, S.; Drago, M.; Prodi, G. A.; Klimenko, S.; Lazzaro, C.; Necula, V.; Salemi, F.; Tiwari, V.; Tringali, M. C.; Vedovato, G.

    2017-05-01

    The quest to observe gravitational waves challenges our ability to discriminate signals from detector noise. This issue is especially relevant for transient gravitational waves searches with a robust eyes wide open approach, the so called all-sky burst searches. Here we show how signal classification methods inspired by broad astrophysical characteristics can be implemented in all-sky burst searches preserving their generality. In our case study, we apply a multivariate analyses based on artificial neural networks to classify waves emitted in compact binary coalescences. We enhance by orders of magnitude the significance of signals belonging to this broad astrophysical class against the noise background. Alternatively, at a given level of mis-classification of noise events, we can detect about 1/4 more of the total signal population. We also show that a more general strategy of signal classification can actually be performed, by testing the ability of artificial neural networks in discriminating different signal classes. The possible impact on future observations by the LIGO-Virgo network of detectors is discussed by analysing recoloured noise from previous LIGO-Virgo data with coherent WaveBurst, one of the flagship pipelines dedicated to all-sky searches for transient gravitational waves.

  5. Observations of enhanced OTR signals from a compressed electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Sereno, N.S.; Borland, M.; Li, Y.; Nemeth, K.; Pasky, S.; /Argonne

    2008-05-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) injector complex includes an option for photocathode (PC) gun beam injection into the 450-MeV S-band linac. At the 150-MeV point, a 4-dipole chicane was used to compress the micropulse bunch length from a few ps to sub 0.5 ps (FWHM). Noticeable enhancements of the optical transition radiation (OTR) signal sampled after the APS chicane were then observed as has been reported in LCLS injector commissioning. A FIR CTR detector and interferometer were used to monitor the bunch compression process and correlate the appearance of localized spikes of OTR signal (5 to 10 times brighter than adjacent areas) within the beam image footprint. We have done spectral dependency measurements at 375 MeV with a series of band pass filters centered in 50-nm increments from 400 to 700 nm and observed a broadband enhancement in these spikes. Discussions of the possible mechanisms will be presented.

  6. Enhanced Multistatic Active Sonar via Innovative Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    DATES COVERED (From - To) Oct. 01. 2013-Sept. 30, 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Enhanced Multistatic Active Sonar via Innovative Signal Processing 5a...DISTRIBUTION AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Pulsed active sonar ...PAS) and continuous active sonar (CAS) in the presence of strong direct blast are studied for the Doppler-tolerant linear frequency modulation

  7. Signaling pathways that regulate life and cell death: evolution of apoptosis in the context of self-defense.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Pinedo, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Programmed Cell Death is essential for the life cycle of many organisms. Cell death in multicellular organisms can occur as a consequence of massive damage (necrosis) or in a controlled form, through engagement of diverse biochemical programs. The best well known form of programmed cell death is apoptosis. Apoptosis occurs in animals as a consequence of a variety of stimuli including stress and social signals and it plays essential roles in morphogenesis and immune defense. The machinery of apoptosis is well conserved among animals and it is composed of caspases (the proteases which execute cell death), adapter proteins (caspase activators), Bcl-2 family proteins and Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs). We will describe in this chapter the main apoptotic pathways in animals: the extrinsic (death receptor-mediated), the intrinsic/mitochondrial and the Granzyme B pathway. Other forms of non-apoptotic Programmed Cell Death which occur in animals will also be discussed. We will summarize the current knowledge about apoptotic-like and other forms of cell death in other organisms such as plants and protists.Additionally, we will discuss the hypothesis that apoptosis originated as part of a host defense mechanism. We will explore the similarities between the protein complexes which mediate apoptosis (apoptosomes) and complexes involved in immunity: inflammasomes. Additional functions of apoptotic proteins related to immune function will be summarized, in an effort to explore the evolutionary origins of cell death.

  8. Expression of FADD and cFLIPL balances mitochondrial integrity and redox signaling to substantiate apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Kishu; Pathak, Chandramani

    2016-11-01

    FADD and cFLIP both are pivotal components of death receptor signaling. The cellular signaling of apoptosis accomplished with death receptors and mitochondria follows independent pathways for cell death. FADD and cFLIP both have an important role in the regulation of apoptotic and non-apoptotic functions. Dysregulated expression of FADD and cFLIP is associated with resistance to apoptosis in cancer cells. Mitochondria are known to play critical role in maintaining cellular respiration and homeostasis in the cells as well as transduces various signals to determine the fate of cell death. However, involvement of FADD and cFLIP in regulation of mitochondrial integrity and programmed cell death signaling to define the fate of cells remains elusive. In the present study, we explored that, induced expression of FADD challenges the mitochondrial integrity and pulverizes the membrane potential by altering the expression of Bcl-2 and cytochrome c. In contrast, mutant of FADD was unable to affect the mitochondrial integrity. Interestingly, expression of FADD and cFLIP helps to balance redox potential by regulating the anti-oxidant levels. Further, we noticed that, knockdown of cFLIPL and induced expression of FADD rapidly accumulate intracellular ROS accompanied by JNK1 activation to substantiate apoptosis. Notably, the ectopic expression of cFLIPL resists the sensitivity of cancer cells against apoptosis inducers Etoposide and HA14-1. Altogether, our findings suggest that FADD and cFLIPL are important modulators of mitochondrial-associated apoptosis apart from the death receptor signaling.

  9. Enhancement of endocannabinoid signaling protects against cocaine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Luciano R; Gobira, Pedro H; Viana, Thercia G; Medeiros, Daniel C; Ferreira-Vieira, Talita H; Doria, Juliana G; Rodrigues, Flávia; Aguiar, Daniele C; Pereira, Grace S; Massessini, André R; Ribeiro, Fabíola M; de Oliveira, Antonio Carlos P; Moraes, Marcio F D; Moreira, Fabricio A

    2015-08-01

    Cocaine is an addictive substance with a potential to cause deleterious effects in the brain. The strategies for treating its neurotoxicity, however, are limited. Evidence suggests that the endocannabinoid system exerts neuroprotective functions against various stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the main enzyme responsible for terminating the actions of the endocannabinoid anandamide, reduces seizures and cell death in the hippocampus in a model of cocaine intoxication. Male Swiss mice received injections of endocannabinoid-related compounds followed by the lowest dose of cocaine that induces seizures, electroencephalographic activity and cell death in the hippocampus. The molecular mechanisms were studied in primary cell culture of this structure. The FAAH inhibitor, URB597, reduced cocaine-induced seizures and epileptiform electroencephalographic activity. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor selective agonist, ACEA, mimicked these effects, whereas the antagonist, AM251, prevented them. URB597 also inhibited cocaine-induced activation and death of hippocampal neurons, both in animals and in primary cell culture. Finally, we investigated if the PI3K/Akt/ERK intracellular pathway, a cell surviving mechanism coupled to CB1 receptor, mediated these neuroprotective effects. Accordingly, URB597 injection increased ERK and Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus. Moreover, the neuroprotective effect of this compound was reversed by the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. In conclusion, the pharmacological facilitation of the anandamide/CB1/PI3K signaling protects the brain against cocaine intoxication in experimental models. This strategy may be further explored in the development of treatments for drug-induced neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Zinc induces cell death in immortalized embryonic hippocampal cells via activation of Akt-GSK-3beta signaling.

    PubMed

    Min, Young Kyu; Lee, Jong Eun; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2007-01-15

    Zinc is an essential catalytic and structural element of many proteins and a signaling messenger that is released by neuronal activity at many central excitatory synapses. Excessive synaptic release of zinc followed by entry into vulnerable neurons contributes severe neuronal cell death. We have previously observed that zinc-induced neuronal cell death is accompanied by Akt activation in embryonic hippocampal progenitor (H19-7) cells. In the present study, we examined the role of Akt activation and its downstream signaling events during extracellular zinc-induced neuronal cell death. Treatment of H19-7 cells with 10 microM of zinc plus zinc ionophore, pyrithione, led to increased phosphorylation of Akt at Ser-473/Thr-308 and increased Akt kinase activity. Zinc-induced Akt activation was accompanied by increased Tyr-phosphorylated GSK-3beta as well as increased GSK-3beta kinase activity. Transient overexpression of a kinase-deficient Akt mutant remarkably suppressed GSK-3beta activation and cell death. Furthermore, tau phosphorylation, but not the degradation of beta-catenin, was dependent upon zinc-induced GSK-3beta activation and contributed to cell death. The current data suggest that, following exposure to zinc, the sequential activation of Akt and GSK-3beta plays an important role directing hippocampal neural precursor cell death.

  11. The TIR domain of TIR-NB-LRR resistance proteins is a signaling domain involved in cell death induction.

    PubMed

    Swiderski, Michal R; Birker, Doris; Jones, Jonathan D G

    2009-02-01

    In plants, the TIR (toll interleukin 1 receptor) domain is found almost exclusively in nucleotide-binding (NB) leucine-rich repeat resistance proteins and their truncated homologs, and has been proposed to play a signaling role during resistance responses mediated by TIR containing R proteins. Transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves of "TIR + 80", the RPS4 truncation without the NB-ARC domain, leads to EDS1-, SGT1-, and HSP90-dependent cell death. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing the RPS4 TIR+80 from either dexamethasone or estradiol-inducible promoters display inducer-dependent cell death. Cell death is also elicited by transient expression of similarly truncated constructs from two other R proteins, RPP1A and At4g19530, but is not elicited by similar constructs representing RPP2A and RPP2B proteins. Site-directed mutagenesis of the RPS4 TIR domain identified many loss-of-function mutations but also revealed several gain-of function substitutions. Lack of cell death induction by the E160A substitution suggests that amino acids outside of the TIR domain contribute to cell death signaling in addition to the TIR domain itself. This is consistent with previous observations that the TIR domain itself is insufficient to induce cell death upon transient expression.

  12. Cypermethrin Induces Macrophages Death through Cell Cycle Arrest and Oxidative Stress-Mediated JNK/ERK Signaling Regulated Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fang; Liu, Qiaoyun; Xie, Shujun; Xu, Jian; Huang, Bo; Wu, Yihua; Xia, Dajing

    2016-06-17

    Cypermethrin is one of the most highly effective synthetic pyrethroid insecticides. The toxicity of cypermethrin to the reproductive and nervous systems has been well studied. However, little is known about the toxic effect of cypermethrin on immune cells such as macrophages. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of cypermethrin on macrophages and the underlying molecular mechanisms. We found that cypermethrin reduced cell viability and induced apoptosis in RAW 264.7 cells. Cypermethrin also increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, cypermethrin-induced G1 cell cycle arrest was associated with an enhanced expression of p21, wild-type p53, and down-regulation of cyclin D1, cyclin E and CDK4. In addition, cypermethrin treatment activated MAPK signal pathways by inducing c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and increased the cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). Further, pretreatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) effectively abrogated cypermethrin-induced cell cytotoxicity, G1 cell cycle arrest, DNA damage, PARP activity, and JNK and ERK1/2 activation. The specific JNK inhibitor (SP600125) and ERK1/2 inhibitor (PD98059) effectively reversed the phosphorylation level of JNK and ERK1/2, and attenuated the apoptosis. Taken together, these data suggested that cypermethrin caused immune cell death via inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis regulated by ROS-mediated JNK/ERK pathway.

  13. Cypermethrin Induces Macrophages Death through Cell Cycle Arrest and Oxidative Stress-Mediated JNK/ERK Signaling Regulated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fang; Liu, Qiaoyun; Xie, Shujun; Xu, Jian; Huang, Bo; Wu, Yihua; Xia, Dajing

    2016-01-01

    Cypermethrin is one of the most highly effective synthetic pyrethroid insecticides. The toxicity of cypermethrin to the reproductive and nervous systems has been well studied. However, little is known about the toxic effect of cypermethrin on immune cells such as macrophages. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of cypermethrin on macrophages and the underlying molecular mechanisms. We found that cypermethrin reduced cell viability and induced apoptosis in RAW 264.7 cells. Cypermethrin also increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, cypermethrin-induced G1 cell cycle arrest was associated with an enhanced expression of p21, wild-type p53, and down-regulation of cyclin D1, cyclin E and CDK4. In addition, cypermethrin treatment activated MAPK signal pathways by inducing c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and increased the cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). Further, pretreatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) effectively abrogated cypermethrin-induced cell cytotoxicity, G1 cell cycle arrest, DNA damage, PARP activity, and JNK and ERK1/2 activation. The specific JNK inhibitor (SP600125) and ERK1/2 inhibitor (PD98059) effectively reversed the phosphorylation level of JNK and ERK1/2, and attenuated the apoptosis. Taken together, these data suggested that cypermethrin caused immune cell death via inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis regulated by ROS-mediated JNK/ERK pathway. PMID:27322250

  14. An adaptive Kalman filter for ECG signal enhancement.

    PubMed

    Vullings, Rik; de Vries, Bert; Bergmans, Jan W M

    2011-04-01

    The ongoing trend of ECG monitoring techniques to become more ambulatory and less obtrusive generally comes at the expense of decreased signal quality. To enhance this quality, consecutive ECG complexes can be averaged triggered on the heartbeat, exploiting the quasi-periodicity of the ECG. However, this averaging constitutes a tradeoff between improvement of the SNR and loss of clinically relevant physiological signal dynamics. Using a bayesian framework, in this paper, a sequential averaging filter is developed that, in essence, adaptively varies the number of complexes included in the averaging based on the characteristics of the ECG signal. The filter has the form of an adaptive Kalman filter. The adaptive estimation of the process and measurement noise covariances is performed by maximizing the bayesian evidence function of the sequential ECG estimation and by exploiting the spatial correlation between several simultaneously recorded ECG signals, respectively. The noise covariance estimates thus obtained render the filter capable of ascribing more weight to newly arriving data when these data contain morphological variability, and of reducing this weight in cases of no morphological variability. The filter is evaluated by applying it to a variety of ECG signals. To gauge the relevance of the adaptive noise-covariance estimation, the performance of the filter is compared to that of a Kalman filter with fixed, (a posteriori) optimized noise covariance. This comparison demonstrates that, without using a priori knowledge on signal characteristics, the filter with adaptive noise estimation performs similar to the filter with optimized fixed noise covariance, favoring the adaptive filter in cases where no a priori information is available or where signal characteristics are expected to fluctuate.

  15. Death receptor-associated pro-apoptotic signaling in aged skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Pistilli, Emidio E; Jackson, Janna R; Alway, Stephen E

    2006-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is elevated in the serum as a result of aging and it promotes pro-apoptotic signaling upon binding to the type I TNF receptor. It is not known if activation of this apoptotic pathway contributes to the well-documented age-associated decline in muscle mass (i.e. sarcopenia). We tested the hypothesis that skeletal muscles from aged rodents would exhibit elevations in markers involved in the extrinsic apoptotic pathway when compared to muscles from young adult rodents, thereby contributing to an increased incidence of nuclear apoptosis in these muscles. The plantaris (fast) and soleus (slow) muscles were studied in young adult (5-7 mo, n=8) and aged (33 mo, n=8) Fischer(344) x Brown Norway rats. Muscles from aged rats were significantly smaller while exhibiting a greater incidence of apoptosis. Furthermore, muscles from aged rats had higher type I TNF receptor and Fas associated death domain protein (FADD) mRNA, protein contents for FADD, BCL-2 Interacting Domain (Bid), FLICE-inhibitory protein (FLIP), and enzymatic activities of caspase-8 and caspase-3 than muscles from young adult rats. Significant correlations were observed in the plantaris muscle between caspase activity and muscle weight and the apoptotic index, while similar relationships were not found in the soleus. These data demonstrate that pro-apoptotic signaling downstream of the TNF receptor is active in aged muscles. Furthermore, our data extend the previous demonstration that type II fibers are preferentially affected by aging and support the hypothesis that type II fiber containing skeletal muscles may be more susceptible to muscle mass loses via the extrinsic apoptotic pathway.

  16. Pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor protects against apoptotic neuronal death and mitochondrial damage in ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaowan; Li, Hailong; Ding, Shinghua

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that Pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF), also known as nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), the rate-limiting enzyme in mammalian NAD+ biosynthesis pathway, plays a brain and neuronal protective role in ischemic stroke. In this study, we further investigated the mechanism of its neuroprotective effect after ischemia in the primary cultured mouse cortical neurons. Using apoptotic cell death assay, fluorescent imaging, molecular biology, mitochondrial biogenesis measurements and Western blotting analysis, our results show that the overexpression of PBEF in neurons can significantly promote neuronal survival, reduce the translocation of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria to nuclei and inhibit the activation of capase-3 after glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. We further found that the overexpression of PBEF can suppress glutamate-induced mitochondrial fragmentation, the loss of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and the reduction of PGC-1 and NRF-1 expressions. Furthermore, these beneficial effects by PBEF are dependent on its enzymatic activity of NAD+ synthesis. In summary, our study demonstrated that PBEF ameliorates ischemia-induced neuronal death through inhibiting caspase-dependent and independent apoptotic signaling pathways and suppressing mitochondrial damage and dysfunction. Our study provides novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effect of PBEF, and helps to identify potential targets for ischemic stroke therapy. PMID:27576732

  17. Mitochondrial calcium signalling and cell death: approaches for assessing the role of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Hajnóczky, György; Csordás, György; Das, Sudipto; Garcia-Perez, Cecilia; Saotome, Masao; Roy, Soumya Sinha; Yi, Muqing

    2009-01-01

    Summary Local Ca2+ transfer between adjoining domains of the sarcoendoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) and mitochondria allows ER/SR Ca2+ release to activate mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and to evoke a matrix [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]m) rise. [Ca2+]m exerts control on several steps of energy metabolism to synchronize ATP generation with cell function. However, calcium signal propagation to the mitochondria may also ignite a cell death program through opening of the permeability transition pore (PTP). This occurs when the Ca2+ release from the ER/SR is enhanced or is coincident with sensitization of the PTP. Recent studies have shown that several pro-apoptotic factors, including members of the Bcl-2 family proteins and reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulate the Ca2+ sensitivity of both the Ca2+ release channels in the ER and the PTP in the mitochondria. To test the relevance of the mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation in various apoptotic paradigms, methods are available for buffering of [Ca2+], for dissipation of the driving force of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and for inhibition of the mitochondrial Ca2+ transport mechanisms. However, in intact cells, the efficacy and the specificity of these approaches have to be established. Here we discuss mechanisms that recruit the mitochondrial calcium signal to a pro-apoptotic cascade and the approaches available for assessment of the relevance of the mitochondrial Ca2+ handling in apoptosis. We also present a systematic evaluation of the effect of ruthenium red and Ru360, two inhibitors of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake on cytosolic [Ca2+] and [Ca2+]m in intact cultured cells. PMID:17074387

  18. Contributions of mitochondria to animal physiology: from homeostatic sensor to calcium signalling and cell death.

    PubMed

    Duchen, M R

    1999-04-01

    Over recent years, it has become clear that mitochondria play a central role in many key aspects of animal physiology and pathophysiology. Their central and ubiquitous task is clearly the production of ATP. Nevertheless, they also play subtle roles in glucose homeostasis, acting as the sensor for substrate supply in the transduction pathway that promotes insulin secretion by the pancreatic -cell and that modulates the excitability of the hypothalamic glucose-sensitive neurons involved in appetite control. Mitochondria may also act as sensors of availability of oxygen, the other major mitochondrial substrate, in the regulation of respiration. Mitochondria take up calcium, and the high opacity mitochondrial calcium uptake pathway provides a mechanism that couples energy demand to increased ATP production through the calcium-dependent upregulation of mitochondrial enzyme activity. Mitochondrial calcium accumulation may also have a substantial impact on the spatiotemporal dynamics of cellular calcium signals, with subtle differences of detail in different cell types. Recent work has also revealed the centrality of mitochondrial dysfunction as an irreversible step in the pathway to both necrotic and apoptotic cell death. This review looks at recent developments in these rapidly evolving areas of cell physiology in an attempt to draw together disparate areas of research into a common theme.

  19. Redox Signaling in Diabetic Nephropathy: Hypertrophy versus Death Choices in Mesangial Cells and Podocytes.

    PubMed

    Manda, Gina; Checherita, Alexandru-Ionel; Comanescu, Maria Victoria; Hinescu, Mihail Eugen

    2015-01-01

    This review emphasizes the role of oxidative stress in diabetic nephropathy, acting as trigger, modulator, and linker within the complex network of pathologic events. It highlights key molecular pathways and new hypothesis in diabetic nephropathy, related to the interferences of metabolic, oxidative, and inflammatory stresses. Main topics this review is addressing are biomarkers of oxidative stress in diabetic nephropathy, the sources of reactive oxygen species (mitochondria, NADPH-oxidases, hyperglycemia, and inflammation), and the redox-sensitive signaling networks (protein kinases, transcription factors, and epigenetic regulators). Molecular switches deciding on the renal cells fate in diabetic nephropathy are presented, such as hypertrophy versus death choices in mesangial cells and podocytes. Finally, the antioxidant response of renal cells in diabetic nephropathy is tackled, with emphasis on targeted therapy. An integrative approach is needed for identifying key molecular networks which control cellular responses triggered by the array of stressors in diabetic nephropathy. This will foster the discovery of reliable biomarkers for early diagnosis and prognosis, and will guide the discovery of new therapeutic approaches for personalized medicine in diabetic nephropathy.

  20. Nanoscale Catalysts for NMR Signal Enhancement by Reversible Exchange

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two types of nanoscale catalysts were created to explore NMR signal enhancement via reversible exchange (SABRE) at the interface between heterogeneous and homogeneous conditions. Nanoparticle and polymer comb variants were synthesized by covalently tethering Ir-based organometallic catalysts to support materials composed of TiO2/PMAA (poly(methacrylic acid)) and PVP (polyvinylpyridine), respectively, and characterized by AAS, NMR, and DLS. Following parahydrogen (pH2) gas delivery to mixtures containing one type of “nano-SABRE” catalyst particle, a target substrate, and ethanol, up to ∼(−)40-fold and ∼(−)7-fold 1H NMR signal enhancements were observed for pyridine substrates using the nanoparticle and polymer comb catalysts, respectively, following transfer to high field (9.4 T). These enhancements appear to result from intact particles and not from any catalyst molecules leaching from their supports; unlike the case with homogeneous SABRE catalysts, high-field (in situ) SABRE effects were generally not observed with the nanoscale catalysts. The potential for separation and reuse of such catalyst particles is also demonstrated. Taken together, these results support the potential utility of rational design at molecular, mesoscopic, and macroscopic/engineering levels for improving SABRE and HET-SABRE (heterogeneous-SABRE) for applications varying from fundamental studies of catalysis to biomedical imaging. PMID:26185545

  1. Security Enhancement of Wireless Sensor Networks Using Signal Intervals.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jaegeun; Jung, Im Y; Yoo, Jaesoo

    2017-04-02

    Various wireless technologies, such as RF, Bluetooth, and Zigbee, have been applied to sensor communications. However, the applications of Bluetooth-based wireless sensor networks (WSN) have a security issue. In one pairing process during Bluetooth communication, which is known as simple secure pairing (SSP), the devices are required to specify I/O capability or user interference to prevent man-in-the-middle (MITM) attacks. This study proposes an enhanced SSP in which a nonce to be transferred is converted to a corresponding signal interval. The quantization level, which is used to interpret physical signal intervals, is renewed at every connection by the transferred nonce and applied to the next nonce exchange so that the same signal intervals can represent different numbers. Even if attackers eavesdrop on the signals, they cannot understand what is being transferred because they cannot determine the quantization level. Furthermore, the proposed model does not require exchanging passkeys as data, and the devices are secure in the case of using a fixed PIN. Subsequently, the new quantization level is calculated automatically whenever the same devices attempt to connect with each other. Therefore, the pairing process can be protected from MITM attacks and be convenient for users.

  2. Signal enhanced holographic fluorescence microscopy with guide-star reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Changwon; Clark, David C.; Kim, Jonghyun; Lee, Byoungho; Kim, Myung K.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a signal enhanced guide-star reconstruction method for holographic fluorescence microscopy. In the late 00’s, incoherent digital holography started to be vigorously studied by several groups to overcome the limitations of conventional digital holography. The basic concept of incoherent digital holography is to acquire the complex hologram from incoherent light by utilizing temporal coherency of a spatially incoherent light source. The advent of incoherent digital holography opened new possibility of holographic fluorescence microscopy (HFM), which was difficult to achieve with conventional digital holography. However there has been an important issue of low and noisy signal in HFM which slows down the system speed and degrades the imaging quality. When guide-star reconstruction is adopted, the image reconstruction gives an improved result compared to the conventional propagation reconstruction method. The guide-star reconstruction method gives higher imaging signal-to-noise ratio since the acquired complex point spread function provides optimal system-adaptive information and can restore the signal buried in the noise more efficiently. We present theoretical explanation and simulation as well as experimental results. PMID:27446653

  3. Security Enhancement of Wireless Sensor Networks Using Signal Intervals

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jaegeun; Jung, Im Y.; Yoo, Jaesoo

    2017-01-01

    Various wireless technologies, such as RF, Bluetooth, and Zigbee, have been applied to sensor communications. However, the applications of Bluetooth-based wireless sensor networks (WSN) have a security issue. In one pairing process during Bluetooth communication, which is known as simple secure pairing (SSP), the devices are required to specify I/O capability or user interference to prevent man-in-the-middle (MITM) attacks. This study proposes an enhanced SSP in which a nonce to be transferred is converted to a corresponding signal interval. The quantization level, which is used to interpret physical signal intervals, is renewed at every connection by the transferred nonce and applied to the next nonce exchange so that the same signal intervals can represent different numbers. Even if attackers eavesdrop on the signals, they cannot understand what is being transferred because they cannot determine the quantization level. Furthermore, the proposed model does not require exchanging passkeys as data, and the devices are secure in the case of using a fixed PIN. Subsequently, the new quantization level is calculated automatically whenever the same devices attempt to connect with each other. Therefore, the pairing process can be protected from MITM attacks and be convenient for users. PMID:28368341

  4. Enhanced photoacoustic signal from DNA assembled gold nanoparticle networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchkremer, A.; Beckmann, M. F.; Linn, M.; Ruff, J.; Rosencrantz, R. R.; von Plessen, G.; Schmitz, G.; Simon, U.

    2014-12-01

    We report an experimental finding of photoacoustic signal enhancement from finite sized DNA-gold nanoparticle networks. We synthesized DNA-functionalized hollow and solid gold nanospheres (AuNS) to form finite sized networks, which were characterized by means of optical extinction spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and scanning electron microscopy in transmission mode. It is shown that the signal amplification scales with network size for networks comprising either hollow or solid AuNS as well as networks consisting of both types of nanoparticles. The laser intensities applied in our multispectral setup (λ = 650 nm, 850 nm, 905 nm) were low enough to maintain the structural integrity of the networks. This reflects that the binding and recognition properties of the temperature-sensitive cross-linking DNA-molecules are retained.

  5. Ergosterol peroxide activates Foxo3-mediated cell death signaling by inhibiting AKT and c-Myc in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Liming; Du, William W.; Jiao, Chunwei; Pan, Honghui; Sdiri, Mouna; Wu, Nan; Xie, Yizhen; Yang, Burton B.

    2016-01-01

    Sterols are the important active ingredients of fungal secondary metabolites to induce death of tumor cells. In our previous study, we found that ergosterol peroxide (5α, 8α-epidioxiergosta-6, 22-dien-3β-ol), purified from Ganoderma lucidum, induced human cancer cell death. Since the amount of purified ergosterol peroxide is not sufficient to perform in vivo experiments or apply clinically, we developed an approach to synthesize ergosterol peroxide chemically. After confirming the production of ergosterol peroxide, we examined the biological functions of the synthetic ergosterol peroxide. The results showed that ergosterol peroxide induced cell death and inhibited cell migration, cell cycle progression, and colony growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. We further examined the mechanism associated with this effect and found that treatment with ergosterol peroxide increased the expression of Foxo3 mRNA and protein in HepG2 cells. The upstream signal proteins pAKT and c-Myc, which can inhibit Foxo3 functions, were clearly decreased in HepG2 cells treated with ergosterol peroxide. The levels of Puma and Bax, pro-apoptotic proteins, were effectively enhanced. Our results suggest that ergosterol peroxide stimulated Foxo3 activity by inhibiting pAKT and c-Myc and activating pro-apoptotic protein Puma and Bax to induce cancer cell death. PMID:27058618

  6. Inhibition of heat shock protein response enhances PS-341-mediated glioma cell death.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaohua; Zheng, Tianhu; Zhao, Shiguang; Liu, Huailei; Han, Dayong; Zhen, Yunbo; Xu, Dongxiao; Wang, Yu; Yang, Hongyu; Zhang, Guang; Wang, Chunlei; Wu, Jianing; Ye, Yuanzhu

    2012-07-01

    Previous study indicated that PS-341 induces cell death via JNK pathway in vitro in glioma. However, suppressing proteasome complex by PS-341 may induce expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs), which confer potential protection against cellular stress. In this study, we explored whether induction of HSPs could impair PS-341-induced cell death and whether inhibition of HSPs could enhance cell damage induced by PS-341 in glioma cells. HSP expression in glioma cells was modulated by HSP inhibitor, sublethal heat, or knockdown of heat shock factor1 (HSF1), then PS-341-induced cell damage was examined by different methods. Similar experiments were also performed in HSF1+/+ and HSF1-/- cells. HSP70 expression and HSF1 nuclear localization were compared between glioma and normal brain tissues. HSP level was upregulated mediated by HSF1 when glioma cells were treated with PS-341. PS-341-mediated cell damage could be significantly augmented by HSP inhibition. Furthermore, HSP70 expression and HSF1 nuclear localization were much more abundant in gliomas than in normal brain tissues. Our results demonstrated that HSP70 impaired cell death induced by PS-341 in glioma cells. Administration of PS-341 in combination with either HSP70 inhibitor or HSF1 knockdown may act as a new approach to treatment of glioma.

  7. Ultrasonic correlator versus signal averager as a signal to noise enhancement instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kishoni, Doron; Pietsch, Benjamin E.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of thick and attenuating materials is hampered by the reduce amplitudes of the propagated waves to a degree that the noise is too high to enable meaningful interpretation of the data. In order to overcome the low signal to noise ratio (S/N), a correlation technique has been developed. In this method, a continuous pseudo-random pattern generated digitally is transmitted and detected by piezoelectric transducers. A correlation is performed in the instrument between the received signal and a variable delayed image of the transmitted one. The result is shown to be proportional to the impulse response of the investigated material, analogous to a signal received from a pulsed system, with an improved S/N ratio. The degree of S/N enhancement depends on the sweep rate. The correlator is described, and it is compared to the method of enhancing S/N ratio by averaging the signals. The similarities and differences between the two are highlighted and the potential advantage of the correlator system is explained.

  8. Ultrasonic correlator versus signal averager as a signal to noise enhancement instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kishoni, Doron; Pietsch, Benjamin E.

    1989-01-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of thick and attenuating materials is hampered by the reduced amplitudes of the propagated waves to a degree that the noise is too high to enable meaningful interpretation of the data. In order to overcome the low Signal to Noise (S/N) ratio, a correlation technique has been developed. In this method, a continuous pseudo-random pattern generated digitally is transmitted and detected by piezoelectric transducers. A correlation is performed in the instrument between the received signal and a variable delayed image of the transmitted one. The result is shown to be proportional to the impulse response of the investigated material, analogous to a signal received from a pulsed system, with an improved S/N ratio. The degree of S/N enhancement depends on the sweep rate. This paper describes the correlator, and compares it to the method of enhancing S/N ratio by averaging the signals. The similarities and differences between the two are highlighted and the potential advantage of the correlator system is explained.

  9. Ligand dependent restoration of human TLR3 signaling and death in p53 mutant cells

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, Daniel; Lowe, Julie M.; Snipe, Joyce; Resnick, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Diversity within the p53 transcriptional network can arise from a matrix of changes that include target response element sequences and p53 expression level variations. We previously found that wild type p53 (WT p53) can regulate expression of most innate immune-related Toll-like-receptor genes (TLRs) in human cells, thereby affecting immune responses. Since many tumor-associated p53 mutants exhibit change-of-spectrum transactivation from various p53 targets, we examined the ability of twenty-five p53 mutants to activate endogenous expression of the TLR gene family in p53 null human cancer cell lines following transfection with p53 mutant expression vectors. While many mutants retained the ability to drive TLR expression at WT levels, others exhibited null, limited, or change-of-spectrum transactivation of TLR genes. Using TLR3 signaling as a model, we show that some cancer-associated p53 mutants amplify cytokine, chemokine and apoptotic responses after stimulation by the cognate ligand poly(I:C). Furthermore, restoration of WT p53 activity for loss-of-function p53 mutants by the p53 reactivating drug RITA restored p53 regulation of TLR3 gene expression and enhanced DNA damage-induced apoptosis via TLR3 signaling. Overall, our findings have many implications for understanding the impact of WT and mutant p53 in immunological responses and cancer therapy. PMID:27533082

  10. Adaptive enhancement of magnetoencephalographic signals via multichannel filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, P.S.

    1989-01-01

    A time-varying spatial/temporal filter for enhancing multichannel magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings of evoked responses is described. This filter is based in projections derived from a combination of measured data and a priori models of the expected response. It produces estimates of the evoked fields in single trial measurements. These estimates can reduce the need for signal averaging in some situations. The filter uses the a priori model information to enhance responses where they exist, but avoids creating responses that do not exist. Examples are included of the filter's application to both MEG single trial data containing an auditory evoked field and control data with no evoked field. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Proteomics and Functional Analyses of Pepper Abscisic Acid–Responsive 1 (ABR1), Which Is Involved in Cell Death and Defense Signaling[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Du Seok; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2011-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a key regulator of plant growth and development, as well as plant defense responses. A high-throughput in planta proteome screen identified the pepper (Capsicum annuum) GRAM (for glucosyltransferases, Rab-like GTPase activators, and myotubularins) domain-containing ABA-RESPONSIVE1 (ABR1), which is highly induced by infection with avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria and also by treatment with ABA. The GRAM domain is essential for the cell death response and for the nuclear localization of ABR1. ABR1 is required for priming cell death and reactive oxygen species production, as well as ABA-salicylic acid (SA) antagonism. Silencing of ABR1 significantly compromised the hypersensitive response but enhanced bacterial pathogen growth and ABA levels in pepper. High levels of ABA in ABR1-silenced plants antagonized the SA levels induced by pathogen infection. Heterologous transgenic expression of ABR1 in Arabidopsis thaliana conferred enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infection. The susceptibility of the Arabidopsis ABR1 putative ortholog mutant, abr1, to these pathogens also supports the involvement of ABR1 in disease resistance. Together, these results reveal ABR1 as a novel negative regulator of ABA signaling and suggest that the nuclear ABR1 pool is essential for the cell death induction associated with ABA-SA antagonism. PMID:21335377

  12. Proteomics and functional analyses of pepper abscisic acid-responsive 1 (ABR1), which is involved in cell death and defense signaling.

    PubMed

    Choi, Du Seok; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2011-02-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a key regulator of plant growth and development, as well as plant defense responses. A high-throughput in planta proteome screen identified the pepper (Capsicum annuum) GRAM (for glucosyltransferases, Rab-like GTPase activators, and myotubularins) domain-containing ABA-RESPONSIVE1 (ABR1), which is highly induced by infection with avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria and also by treatment with ABA. The GRAM domain is essential for the cell death response and for the nuclear localization of ABR1. ABR1 is required for priming cell death and reactive oxygen species production, as well as ABA-salicylic acid (SA) antagonism. Silencing of ABR1 significantly compromised the hypersensitive response but enhanced bacterial pathogen growth and ABA levels in pepper. High levels of ABA in ABR1-silenced plants antagonized the SA levels induced by pathogen infection. Heterologous transgenic expression of ABR1 in Arabidopsis thaliana conferred enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infection. The susceptibility of the Arabidopsis ABR1 putative ortholog mutant, abr1, to these pathogens also supports the involvement of ABR1 in disease resistance. Together, these results reveal ABR1 as a novel negative regulator of ABA signaling and suggest that the nuclear ABR1 pool is essential for the cell death induction associated with ABA-SA antagonism.

  13. Gold nanorods as photothermal agents and autofluorescence enhancer to track cell death during plasmonic photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannadorai, Ravi Kumar; Chiew, Geraldine Giap Ying; Luo, Kathy Qian; Liu, Quan

    2015-07-01

    The transverse and longitudinal plasmon resonance in gold nanorods can be exploited to localize the photothermal therapy and influence the fluorescence to monitor the treatment outcome at the same time. While the longitudinal plasmon peak contributes to the photothermal effect, the transverse peak can enhance fluorescence. After cells take in PEGylated nanorods through endocytosis, autofluorescence from endogenous fluorophores such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) in the mitochondria is enhanced two times, which is a good indicator of the respiratory status of the cell. When cells are illuminated continuously with near infrared laser, the temperature reaches the hyperthermic region within the first four minutes, which demonstrates the efficiency of gold nanorods in photothermal therapy. The cell viability test and autofluorescence intensity show good correlation indicating the progress of cell death over time.

  14. Comodulation Enhances Signal Detection via Priming of Auditory Cortical Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Sollini, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic environments are composed of complex overlapping sounds that the auditory system is required to segregate into discrete perceptual objects. The functions of distinct auditory processing stations in this challenging task are poorly understood. Here we show a direct role for mouse auditory cortex in detection and segregation of acoustic information. We measured the sensitivity of auditory cortical neurons to brief tones embedded in masking noise. By altering spectrotemporal characteristics of the masker, we reveal that sensitivity to pure tone stimuli is strongly enhanced in coherently modulated broadband noise, corresponding to the psychoacoustic phenomenon comodulation masking release. Improvements in detection were largest following priming periods of noise alone, indicating that cortical segregation is enhanced over time. Transient opsin-mediated silencing of auditory cortex during the priming period almost completely abolished these improvements, suggesting that cortical processing may play a direct and significant role in detection of quiet sounds in noisy environments. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Auditory systems are adept at detecting and segregating competing sound sources, but there is little direct evidence of how this process occurs in the mammalian auditory pathway. We demonstrate that coherent broadband noise enhances signal representation in auditory cortex, and that prolonged exposure to noise is necessary to produce this enhancement. Using optogenetic perturbation to selectively silence auditory cortex during early noise processing, we show that cortical processing plays a crucial role in the segregation of competing sounds. PMID:27927950

  15. Monte Carlo Study Elucidates the Type 1/Type 2 Choice in Apoptotic Death Signaling in Healthy and Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Raychaudhuri, Subhadip; Raychaudhuri, Somkanya C

    2013-01-01

    Apoptotic cell death is coordinated through two distinct (type 1 and type 2) intracellular signaling pathways. How the type 1/type 2 choice is made remains a central problem in the biology of apoptosis and has implications for apoptosis related diseases and therapy. We study the problem of type 1/type 2 choice in silico utilizing a kinetic Monte Carlo model of cell death signaling. Our results show that the type 1/type 2 choice is linked to deterministic versus stochastic cell death activation, elucidating a unique regulatory control of the apoptotic pathways. Consistent with previous findings, our results indicate that caspase 8 activation level is a key regulator of the choice between deterministic type 1 and stochastic type 2 pathways, irrespective of cell types. Expression levels of signaling molecules downstream also regulate the type 1/type 2 choice. A simplified model of DISC clustering elucidates the mechanism of increased active caspase 8 generation and type 1 activation in cancer cells having increased sensitivity to death receptor activation. We demonstrate that rapid deterministic activation of the type 1 pathway can selectively target such cancer cells, especially if XIAP is also inhibited; while inherent cell-to-cell variability would allow normal cells stay protected. PMID:24709706

  16. Chloroplast Activity and 3′phosphadenosine 5′phosphate Signaling Regulate Programmed Cell Death in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Mazubert, Christelle; Prunier, Florence; Chan, Kai Xun; Pogson, Barry James; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja; Delarue, Marianne; Benhamed, Moussa; Bergounioux, Catherine; Raynaud, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a crucial process both for plant development and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. There is accumulating evidence that chloroplasts may play a central role during plant PCD as for mitochondria in animal cells, but it is still unclear whether they participate in PCD onset, execution, or both. To tackle this question, we have analyzed the contribution of chloroplast function to the cell death phenotype of the myoinositol phosphate synthase1 (mips1) mutant that forms spontaneous lesions in a light-dependent manner. We show that photosynthetically active chloroplasts are required for PCD to occur in mips1, but this process is independent of the redox state of the chloroplast. Systematic genetic analyses with retrograde signaling mutants reveal that 3′-phosphoadenosine 5′-phosphate, a chloroplast retrograde signal that modulates nuclear gene expression in response to stress, can inhibit cell death and compromises plant innate immunity via inhibition of the RNA-processing 5′-3′ exoribonucleases. Our results provide evidence for the role of chloroplast-derived signal and RNA metabolism in the control of cell death and biotic stress response. PMID:26747283

  17. Homocysteine-NMDA receptor mediated activation of extracellular-signal regulated kinase leads to neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, Ranjana; Paul, Surojit

    2009-01-01

    Hyper-homocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for stroke and neurological abnormalities. However the underlying cellular mechanisms by which elevated homocysteine can promote neuronal death is not clear. In the present study we have examined the role of NMDA receptor mediated activation of the extracellular-signal regulated mitogen activated protein (ERK MAP) kinase pathway in homocysteine-dependent neurotoxicity. The study demonstrates that in neurons L-homocysteine-induced cell death is mediated through activation of NMDA receptors. The study also shows that homocysteine-dependent NMDA receptor stimulation and resultant Ca2+ influx leads to rapid and sustained phosphorylation of ERK MAP kinase. Inhibition of ERK phosphorylation attenuates homocysteine mediated neuronal cell death thereby demonstrating that activation of ERK MAP kinase signaling pathway is an intermediate step that couples homocysteine mediated NMDA receptor stimulation to neuronal death. The findings also show that cAMP response-element binding protein (CREB), a pro-survival transcription factor and a downstream target of ERK, is only transiently activated following homocysteine exposure. The sustained activation of ERK but a transient activation of CREB together suggest that exposure to homocysteine initiates a feedback loop that shuts off CREB signaling without affecting ERK phosphorylation and thereby facilitates homocysteine mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:19508427

  18. Excessive L-cysteine induces vacuole-like cell death by activating endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in intestinal porcine epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yun; Wu, Zhenlong; Dai, Zhaolai; Sun, Kaiji; Zhang, Qing; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    High intake of dietary cysteine is extremely toxic to animals and the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that excessive L-cysteine induces cell death by activating endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling in intestinal porcine epithelial cells. Jejunal enterocytes were cultured in the presence of 0-10 mmol/L L-cysteine. Cell viability, morphologic alterations, mRNA levels for genes involved in ER stress, protein abundances for glucose-regulated protein 78, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor-2 (eIF2α), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), p38 MAPK, and c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK1/2) were determined. The results showed that L-cysteine (5-10 mmol/L) reduced cell viability (P < 0.05) and led to vacuole-like cell death in intestinal porcine epithelial cells. These adverse effects of L-cysteine were not affected by the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. The protein abundances for CHOP, phosphorylated (p)-eIF2α, p-JNK1/2, p-p38 MAPK, and the spliced form of XBP-1 mRNA were enhanced (P < 0.05), whereas those for p-ERK1/2 were reduced (P < 0.05). Collectively, excessive L-cysteine induces vacuole-like cell death via the activation of ER stress and MAPK signaling in small intestinal epithelial cells. These signaling pathways may be potential targets for developing effective strategies to prevent the toxicity of dietary cysteine.

  19. Critical signaling events during the aminoglycoside-induced death of sensory hair cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Jonathan I; Gale, Jonathan E; Warchol, Mark E

    2004-11-01

    Sensory hair cells undergo apoptosis following exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics. In neurons, apoptosis is associated with a transient increase in intracellular Ca2+, phosphorylation of the transcription factor c-Jun, and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytosol, which along with other cofactors results in the activation of caspases. To examine the possible role of these events in the survival and death of the sensory receptors of the inner ear, we examined the effects of neomycin treatment on cytoplasmic calcium, activation of c-Jun-N-Terminal kinases (JNKs), cytochrome c release, and caspase-3 activation in cultured vestibular hair cells. Increased numbers of phospho-c-Jun-labeled hair cells (a downstream indicator of JNK activation) were observed at 3-12 h after neomycin treatment, whereas increased numbers of cells with cytoplasmic cytochrome c were observed at 12-18 h following the onset of neomycin treatment. This was followed by an increase in the number of cells that contained activated caspase-3 and displayed pyknotic nuclei. Treatment with the general caspase inhibitor BAF did not affect the release of cytochrome c and the number of p-c-Jun-labeled cells, but reduced the number of cells with activated caspase-3 and pyknotic nuclei. In contrast, treatment with CEP-11004, an indirect inhibitor of the JNK signaling pathway, promoted hair cell survival following neomycin treatment and reduced the number of cells with phosphorylated JNK and c-Jun, cytoplasmic cytochrome c, and activated caspase 3. These results suggest that JNK activation occurs upstream of the release of cytochrome c and that cytochrome c release precedes caspase activation. Cytochrome c release and JNK activation were also preceded by large changes in cytoplasmic calcium. Cytoplasmic calcium increases may be causally related to the release of cytochrome c, and may also be a potential pathway for activation of JNK in hair cells.

  20. Signal quality enhancement using higher order wavelets for ultrasonic TOFD signals from austenitic stainless steel welds.

    PubMed

    Praveen, Angam; Vijayarekha, K; Abraham, Saju T; Venkatraman, B

    2013-09-01

    Time of flight diffraction (TOFD) technique is a well-developed ultrasonic non-destructive testing (NDT) method and has been applied successfully for accurate sizing of defects in metallic materials. This technique was developed in early 1970s as a means for accurate sizing and positioning of cracks in nuclear components became very popular in the late 1990s and is today being widely used in various industries for weld inspection. One of the main advantages of TOFD is that, apart from fast technique, it provides higher probability of detection for linear defects. Since TOFD is based on diffraction of sound waves from the extremities of the defect compared to reflection from planar faces as in pulse echo and phased array, the resultant signal would be quite weak and signal to noise ratio (SNR) low. In many cases the defect signal is submerged in this noise making it difficult for detection, positioning and sizing. Several signal processing methods such as digital filtering, Split Spectrum Processing (SSP), Hilbert Transform and Correlation techniques have been developed in order to suppress unwanted noise and enhance the quality of the defect signal which can thus be used for characterization of defects and the material. Wavelet Transform based thresholding techniques have been applied largely for de-noising of ultrasonic signals. However in this paper, higher order wavelets are used for analyzing the de-noising performance for TOFD signals obtained from Austenitic Stainless Steel welds. It is observed that higher order wavelets give greater SNR improvement compared to the lower order wavelets.

  1. Enhanced insulin signaling in density-enhanced phosphatase-1 (DEP-1) knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Janine; Brachs, Sebastian; Trappiel, Manuela; Kintscher, Ulrich; Meyborg, Heike; Wellnhofer, Ernst; Thöne-Reineke, Christa; Stawowy, Philipp; Östman, Arne; Birkenfeld, Andreas L.; Böhmer, Frank D.; Kappert, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Objective Insulin resistance can be triggered by enhanced dephosphorylation of the insulin receptor or downstream components in the insulin signaling cascade through protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Downregulating density-enhanced phosphatase-1 (DEP-1) resulted in an improved metabolic status in previous analyses. This phenotype was primarily caused by hepatic DEP-1 reduction. Methods Here we further elucidated the role of DEP-1 in glucose homeostasis by employing a conventional knockout model to explore the specific contribution of DEP-1 in metabolic tissues. Ptprj−/− (DEP-1 deficient) and wild-type C57BL/6 mice were fed a low-fat or high-fat diet. Metabolic phenotyping was combined with analyses of phosphorylation patterns of insulin signaling components. Additionally, experiments with skeletal muscle cells and muscle tissue were performed to assess the role of DEP-1 for glucose uptake. Results High-fat diet fed-Ptprj−/− mice displayed enhanced insulin sensitivity and improved glucose tolerance. Furthermore, leptin levels and blood pressure were reduced in Ptprj−/− mice. DEP-1 deficiency resulted in increased phosphorylation of components of the insulin signaling cascade in liver, skeletal muscle and adipose tissue after insulin challenge. The beneficial effect on glucose homeostasis in vivo was corroborated by increased glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells in which DEP-1 was downregulated, and in skeletal muscle of Ptprj−/− mice. Conclusion Together, these data establish DEP-1 as novel negative regulator of insulin signaling. PMID:25830095

  2. Signaling Pathways that Medicine Neurotoxin-Induced Death of Dopamine Neurons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    4-phenyl-1,2,3,tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) or the pesticide rotenone . These neurotoxins inhibit complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain...neurodegeneration, apoptosis, dopamine neurons, MPTP, rotenone , intrinsic death pathway 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...prevent death. Our overall working hypothesis is that the Parkinsonian neurotoxins, MPP+ and rotenone , share a common mechanism of action to

  3. Salmonella typhimurium intercepts Escherichia coli signaling to enhance antibiotic tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Nicole M.; Allison, Kyle R.; Samuels, Amanda N.; Klempner, Mark S.; Collins, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial communication plays an important role in many population-based phenotypes and interspecies interactions, including those in host environments. These interspecies interactions may prove critical to some infectious diseases, and it follows that communication between pathogenic bacteria and commensal bacteria is a subject of growing interest. Recent studies have shown that Escherichia coli uses the signaling molecule indole to increase antibiotic tolerance throughout its population. Here, we show that the intestinal pathogen Salmonella typhimurium increases its antibiotic tolerance in response to indole, even though S. typhimurium does not natively produce indole. Increased antibiotic tolerance can be induced in S. typhimurium by both exogenous indole added to clonal S. typhimurium populations and indole produced by E. coli in mixed-microbial communities. Our data show that indole-induced tolerance in S. typhimurium is mediated primarily by the oxidative stress response and, to a lesser extent, by the phage shock response, which were previously shown to mediate indole-induced tolerance in E. coli. Further, we find that indole signaling by E. coli induces S. typhimurium antibiotic tolerance in a Caenorhabditis elegans model for gastrointestinal infection. These results suggest that the intestinal pathogen S. typhimurium can intercept indole signaling from the commensal bacterium E. coli to enhance its antibiotic tolerance in the host intestine. PMID:23946425

  4. Direct reconstruction of enhanced signal in computed tomography perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Lyu, Qingwen; Ma, Jianhua; Wang, Jing

    2016-04-01

    High imaging dose has been a concern in computed tomography perfusion (CTP) as repeated scans are performed at the same location of a patient. On the other hand, signal changes only occur at limited regions in CT acquired at different time points. In this work, we propose a new reconstruction strategy by effectively utilizing the initial phase high-quality CT to reconstruct the later phase CT acquired with a low-dose protocol. In the proposed strategy, initial high-quality CT is considered as a base image and enhanced signal (ES) is reconstructed directly by minimizing the penalized weighted least-square (PWLS) criterion. The proposed PWLS-ES strategy converts the conventional CT reconstruction into a sparse signal reconstruction problem. Digital and anthropomorphic phantom studies were performed to evaluate the performance of the proposed PWLS-ES strategy. Both phantom studies show that the proposed PWLS-ES method outperforms the standard iterative CT reconstruction algorithm based on the same PWLS criterion according to various quantitative metrics including root mean squared error (RMSE) and the universal quality index (UQI).

  5. Enhancement of new physics signal sensitivity with mistagged charm quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Doojin; Park, Myeonghun

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the potential for enhancing search sensitivity for signals having charm quarks in the final state, using the sizable bottom-mistagging rate for charm quarks at the LHC. Provided that the relevant background processes contain light quarks instead of charm quarks, the application of b-tagging on charm quark-initiated jets enables us to reject more background events than signal ones due to the relatively small mistagging rate for light quarks. The basic idea is tested with two rare top decay processes: i) t → ch → cb b bar and ii) t → bH+ → b b bar c where h and H+ denote the Standard Model-like higgs boson and a charged higgs boson, respectively. The major background source is a hadronic top quark decay such as t → bW+ → b s bar c. We test our method with Monte Carlo simulation at the LHC 14 TeV, and find that the signal-over-background ratio can be increased by a factor of O (6- 7) with a suitably designed (heavy) flavor tagging algorithm and scheme.

  6. RHOA inactivation enhances Wnt signaling and promotes colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Paulo; Macaya, Irati; Bazzocco, Sarah; Mazzolini, Rocco; Andretta, Elena; Dopeso, Higinio; Mateo-Lozano, Silvia; Bilić, Josipa; Cartón-García, Fernando; Nieto, Rocio; Suárez-López, Lucia; Afonso, Elsa; Landolfi, Stefania; Hernandez-Losa, Javier; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Cajal, Santiago Ramón y; Tabernero, Josep; Tebbutt, Niall C.; Mariadason, John M.; Schwartz, Simo; Arango, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the small GTPase RHOA has strong oncogenic effects in many tumor types, although its role in colorectal cancer remains unclear. Here we show that RHOA inactivation contributes to colorectal cancer progression/metastasis, largely through the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. RhoA inactivation in the murine intestine accelerates the tumorigenic process and in human colon cancer cells leads to the redistribution of β-catenin from the membrane to the nucleus and enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling, resulting in increased proliferation, invasion and de-differentiation. In mice, RHOA inactivation contributes to colon cancer metastasis and reduced RHOA levels were observed at metastatic sites compared to primary human colon tumors. Therefore, we have identified a new mechanism of activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and characterized the role of RHOA as a novel tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. These results constitute a shift from the current paradigm and demonstrate that RHO GTPases can suppress tumor progression and metastasis. PMID:25413277

  7. Enhanced hypothalamic glucose sensing in obesity: alteration of redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Colombani, Anne-Laure; Carneiro, Lionel; Benani, Alexandre; Galinier, Anne; Jaillard, Tristan; Duparc, Thibaut; Offer, Géraldine; Lorsignol, Anne; Magnan, Christophe; Casteilla, Louis; Pénicaud, Luc; Leloup, Corinne

    2009-10-01

    Recent data demonstrated that glucose sensing in different tissues is initiated by an intracellular redox signaling pathway in physiological conditions. However, the relevance of such a mechanism in metabolic disease is not known. The aim of the present study was to determine whether brain glucose hypersensitivity present in obese Zücker rats is related to an alteration in redox signaling. Brain glucose sensing alteration was investigated in vivo through the evaluation of electrical activity in arcuate nucleus, changes in reactive oxygen species levels, and hypothalamic glucose-induced insulin secretion. In basal conditions, modifications of redox state and mitochondrial functions were assessed through oxidized glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, manganese superoxide dismutase, aconitase activities, and mitochondrial respiration. Hypothalamic hypersensitivity to glucose was characterized by enhanced electrical activity of the arcuate nucleus and increased insulin secretion at a low glucose concentration, which does not produce such an effect in normal rats. It was associated with 1) increased reactive oxygen species levels in response to this low glucose load, 2) constitutive oxidized environment coupled with lower antioxidant enzyme activity at both the cellular and mitochondrial level, and 3) overexpression of several mitochondrial subunits of the respiratory chain coupled with a global dysfunction in mitochondrial activity. Moreover, pharmacological restoration of the glutathione hypothalamic redox state by reduced glutathione infusion in the third ventricle fully reversed the cerebral hypersensitivity to glucose. The data demonstrated that obese Zücker rats' impaired hypothalamic regulation in terms of glucose sensing is linked to an abnormal redox signaling, which originates from mitochondria dysfunction.

  8. MOCA is an integrator of the neuronal death signals that are activated by familial Alzheimer's disease-related mutants of amyloid β precursor protein and presenilins.

    PubMed

    Tachi, Nobuyuki; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Matsuoka, Masaaki

    2012-03-01

    The death of cholinergic neurons in the cerebral cortex and certain subcortical regions is linked to irreversible dementia relevant to AD (Alzheimer's disease). Although multiple studies have shown that expression of a FAD (familial AD)-linked APP (amyloid β precursor protein) or a PS (presenilin) mutant, but not that of wild-type APP or PS, induced neuronal death by activating intracellular death signals, it remains to be addressed how these signals are interrelated and what the key molecule involved in this process is. In the present study, we show that the PS1-mediated (or possibly the PS2-mediated) signal is essential for the APP-mediated death in a γ-secretase-independent manner and vice versa. MOCA (modifier of cell adhesion), which was originally identified as being a PS- and Rac1-binding protein, is a common downstream constituent of these neuronal death signals. Detailed molecular analysis indicates that MOCA is a key molecule of the AD-relevant neuronal death signals that links the PS-mediated death signal with the APP-mediated death signal at a point between Rac1 [or Cdc42 (cell division cycle 42)] and ASK1 (apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1).

  9. The Outcomes of Concentration-Specific Interactions between Salicylate and Jasmonate Signaling Include Synergy, Antagonism, and Oxidative Stress Leading to Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Mur, Luis A.J.; Kenton, Paul; Atzorn, Rainer; Miersch, Otto; Wasternack, Claus

    2006-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) has been proposed to antagonize jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis and signaling. We report, however, that in salicylate hydroxylase-expressing tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants, where SA levels were reduced, JA levels were not elevated during a hypersensitive response elicited by Pseudomonas syringae pv phaseolicola. The effects of cotreatment with various concentrations of SA and JA were assessed in tobacco and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). These suggested that there was a transient synergistic enhancement in the expression of genes associated with either JA (PDF1.2 [defensin] and Thi1.2 [thionin]) or SA (PR1 [PR1a-β-glucuronidase in tobacco]) signaling when both signals were applied at low (typically 10–100 μm) concentrations. Antagonism was observed at more prolonged treatment times or at higher concentrations. Similar results were also observed when adding the JA precursor, α-linolenic acid with SA. Synergic effects on gene expression and plant stress were NPR1- and COI1-dependent, SA- and JA-signaling components, respectively. Electrolyte leakage and Evans blue staining indicated that application of higher concentrations of SA + JA induced plant stress or death and elicited the generation of apoplastic reactive oxygen species. This was indicated by enhancement of hydrogen peroxide-responsive AoPR10-β-glucuronidase expression, suppression of plant stress/death using catalase, and direct hydrogen peroxide measurements. Our data suggests that the outcomes of JA-SA interactions could be tailored to pathogen/pest attack by the relative concentration of each hormone. PMID:16377744

  10. Hyperuricemia Causes Pancreatic β-Cell Death and Dysfunction through NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Lu; Xing, Jing; Ding, Ying; Shen, Yachen; Shi, Xuhui; Ren, Wei; Wan, Meng; Guo, Jianjin; Zheng, Shujing; Liu, Yun; Liang, Xiubin; Su, Dongming

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating clinical evidence suggests that hyperuricemia is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. However, it is still unclear whether elevated levels of uric acid can cause direct injury of pancreatic β-cells. In this study, we examined the effects of uric acid on β-cell viability and function. Uric acid solution or normal saline was administered intraperitoneally to mice daily for 4 weeks. Uric acid-treated mice exhibited significantly impaired glucose tolerance and lower insulin levels in response to glucose challenge than did control mice. However, there were no significant differences in insulin sensitivity between the two groups. In comparison to the islets in control mice, the islets in the uric acid–treated mice were markedly smaller in size and contained less insulin. Treatment of β-cells in vitro with uric acid activated the NF-κB signaling pathway through IκBα phosphorylation, resulting in upregulated inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and excessive nitric oxide (NO) production. Uric acid treatment also increased apoptosis and downregulated Bcl-2 expression in Min6 cells. In addition, a reduction in insulin secretion under glucose challenge was observed in the uric acid–treated mouse islets. These deleterious effects of uric acid on pancreatic β-cells were attenuated by benzbromarone, an inhibitor of uric acid transporters, NOS inhibitor L-NMMA, and Bay 11–7082, an NF-κB inhibitor. Further investigation indicated that uric acid suppressed levels of MafA protein through enhancing its degradation. Collectively, our data suggested that an elevated level of uric acid causes β-cell injury via the NF-κB-iNOS-NO signaling axis. PMID:24205181

  11. Walsuronoid B induces mitochondrial and lysosomal dysfunction leading to apoptotic rather than autophagic cell death via ROS/p53 signaling pathways in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Geng, Ya-di; Zhang, Chao; Lei, Jian-Li; Yu, Pei; Xia, Yuan-Zheng; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Lei; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2017-10-15

    Walsuronoid B is a limonoid compound extracted from Walsura robusta. Previous studies have shown that limonoid compounds possess anti-cancer potential, although the molecular mechanism of this activity remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that walsuronoid B inhibited cell proliferation in several human cancer lines. Liver cancer cells (HepG2 and Bel-7402) were chosen for their high sensitivity to walsuronoid B. Walsuronoid B induced cell death through G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis and induced the accumulation of autophagosomes through the suppression of mTOR signaling, which serves as a cell survival mechanism and prevents cell death. We further examined the molecular mechanisms and found that walsuronoid B-induced dysfunction of the mitochondria and lysosomes rather than the endoplasmic reticulum contributed to its cell death effect. Walsuronoid B enhanced the generation of hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide and superoxide anion radical, resulting in elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, ROS induced by walsuronoid B upregulated p53 levels; conversely, p53 stimulated ROS. These results suggested that ROS and p53 reciprocally promoted each other's production and cooperated to induce liver cancer cell death. We found that the induction of ROS and p53 significantly triggered G2/M phase arrest and mitochondrial and lysosomal apoptosis. Finally, walsuronoid B suppressed tumor growth in vivo with few side effects. In summary, our findings demonstrated that walsuronoid B caused G2/M phase arrest and induced mitochondrial and lysosomal apoptosis through the ROS/p53 signaling pathway in human liver cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ozone-Induced Cell Death Mediated with Oxidative and Calcium Signaling Pathways in Tobacco Bel-W3 and Bel-B Cell Suspension Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Kadono, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Yuka; Furuichi, Takuya; Hirono, Manabu; Garrec, Jean Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Ozone (O3)-induced cell death in two suspension-cultured cell lines of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) derived from Bel-W3 (hyper-sensitive to O3) and Bel-B (highly tolerant to O3) varieties were studied. By exposing the newly prepared cell lines to the pulse of ozonized air, we could reproduce the conditions demonstrating the difference in O3 sensitivity as observed in their original plants, depending on the exposure time. Since O3-induced acute cell death was observed in the dark, the requirement for photochemical reactions could be eliminated. Addition of several ROS scavengers and chelators inhibited the cell death induced by O3, indicating that singlet oxygen (1O2), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxyl radical and redox-active metals such as Fe2+ play central roles in O3-induced acute damages to the cells. As expected, we observed the generation of 1O2 and H2O2 in the O3-treated cells using chemiluminescent probes. On the other hand, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and some SOD mimics showed no inhibitory effect. Thiols added as antioxidants unexpectedly behaved as prooxidants drastically enhancing the O3-induced cell death. It is noteworthy that some ROS scavengers effectively rescued the cells from dying even treated after the pulse of O3 exposure, confirming the post-ozone progress of ROS-dependent cell death mechanism. Since one of the key differences between Bel-B and Bel-W3 was suggested to be the capacity for ROS detoxification by catalase, the endogenous catalase activities were compared in vivo in two cell lines. As expected, catalase activity in Bel-B cells was ca. 7-fold greater than that in Bel-W3 cells. Interestingly, Ca2+ chelators added prior to (not after) the pulse of O3 effectively inhibited the induction of cell death. In addition, increases in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration sensitive to Ca2+ chelators, ion channel blockers, and ROS scavengers were observed in the transgenic Bel-W3 cells expressing aequorin, suggesting the

  13. Quantitative Ultrasound Characterization of Tumor Cell Death: Ultrasound-Stimulated Microbubbles for Radiation Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunjung Christina; Al-Mahrouki, Azza; Gorjizadeh, Alborz; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Karshafian, Raffi; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of quantitative ultrasound imaging in characterizing cancer cell death caused by enhanced radiation treatments. This investigation focused on developing this ultrasound modality as an imaging-based non-invasive method that can be used to monitor therapeutic ultrasound and radiation effects. High-frequency (25 MHz) ultrasound was used to image tumor responses caused by ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles in combination with radiation. Human prostate xenografts grown in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice were treated using 8, 80, or 1000 µL/kg of microbubbles stimulated with ultrasound at 250, 570, or 750 kPa, and exposed to 0, 2, or 8 Gy of radiation. Tumors were imaged prior to treatment and 24 hours after treatment. Spectral analysis of images acquired from treated tumors revealed overall increases in ultrasound backscatter intensity and the spectral intercept parameter. The increase in backscatter intensity compared to the control ranged from 1.9±1.6 dB for the clinical imaging dose of microbubbles (8 µL/kg, 250 kPa, 2 Gy) to 7.0±4.1 dB for the most extreme treatment condition (1000 µL/kg, 750 kPa, 8 Gy). In parallel, in situ end-labelling (ISEL) staining, ceramide, and cyclophilin A staining demonstrated increases in cell death due to DNA fragmentation, ceramide-mediated apoptosis, and release of cyclophilin A as a result of cell membrane permeabilization, respectively. Quantitative ultrasound results indicated changes that paralleled increases in cell death observed from histology analyses supporting its use for non-invasive monitoring of cancer treatment outcomes. PMID:25051356

  14. Quantitative ultrasound characterization of tumor cell death: ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles for radiation enhancement.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunjung Christina; Al-Mahrouki, Azza; Gorjizadeh, Alborz; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Karshafian, Raffi; Czarnota, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of quantitative ultrasound imaging in characterizing cancer cell death caused by enhanced radiation treatments. This investigation focused on developing this ultrasound modality as an imaging-based non-invasive method that can be used to monitor therapeutic ultrasound and radiation effects. High-frequency (25 MHz) ultrasound was used to image tumor responses caused by ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles in combination with radiation. Human prostate xenografts grown in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice were treated using 8, 80, or 1000 µL/kg of microbubbles stimulated with ultrasound at 250, 570, or 750 kPa, and exposed to 0, 2, or 8 Gy of radiation. Tumors were imaged prior to treatment and 24 hours after treatment. Spectral analysis of images acquired from treated tumors revealed overall increases in ultrasound backscatter intensity and the spectral intercept parameter. The increase in backscatter intensity compared to the control ranged from 1.9±1.6 dB for the clinical imaging dose of microbubbles (8 µL/kg, 250 kPa, 2 Gy) to 7.0±4.1 dB for the most extreme treatment condition (1000 µL/kg, 750 kPa, 8 Gy). In parallel, in situ end-labelling (ISEL) staining, ceramide, and cyclophilin A staining demonstrated increases in cell death due to DNA fragmentation, ceramide-mediated apoptosis, and release of cyclophilin A as a result of cell membrane permeabilization, respectively. Quantitative ultrasound results indicated changes that paralleled increases in cell death observed from histology analyses supporting its use for non-invasive monitoring of cancer treatment outcomes.

  15. Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Enhances Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) Transcriptional Activity in Gastric Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nuñez, Felipe; Bravo, Soraya; Cruzat, Fernando; Montecino, Martín; De Ferrari, Giancarlo V.

    2011-01-01

    Background Increased expression of the cyclooxygenase-2 enzyme (COX2) is one of the main characteristics of gastric cancer (GC), which is a leading cause of death in the world, particularly in Asia and South America. Although the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway has been involved in the transcriptional activation of the COX2 gene, the precise mechanism modulating this response is still unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we studied the transcriptional regulation of the COX2 gene in GC cell lines and assessed whether this phenomenon is modulated by Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We first examined the expression of COX2 mRNA in GC cells and found that there is a differential expression pattern consistent with high levels of nuclear-localized β-catenin. Pharmacological treatment with either lithium or valproic acid and molecular induction with purified canonical Wnt3a significantly enhanced COX2 mRNA expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Serial deletion of a 1.6 Kbp COX2 promoter fragment and gain- or loss-of-function experiments allowed us to identify a minimal Wnt/β-catenin responsive region consisting of 0.8 Kbp of the COX2 promoter (pCOX2-0.8), which showed maximal response in gene-reporter assays. The activity of this pCOX2-0.8 promoter region was further confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis and DNA-protein binding assays. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that the pCOX2-0.8 minimal promoter contains a novel functional T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF)-response element (TBE Site II; -689/-684) that responds directly to enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling and which may be important for the onset/progression of GC. PMID:21494638

  16. Cell death patterns in Arabidopsis cells subjected to four physiological stressors indicate multiple signalling pathways and cell cycle phase specificity.

    PubMed

    Pathirana, Ranjith; West, Phillip; Hedderley, Duncan; Eason, Jocelyn

    2017-03-01

    Corpse morphology, nuclear DNA fragmentation, expression of senescence-associated genes (SAG) and cysteine protease profiles were investigated to understand cell death patterns in a cell cycle-synchronised Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture treated with four physiological stressors in the late G2 phase. Within 4 h of treatment, polyethylene glycol (PEG, 20 %), mannose (100 mM) and hydrogen peroxide (2 mM) caused DNA fragmentation coinciding with cell permeability to Evans Blue (EB) and produced corpse morphology corresponding to apoptosis-like programmed cell death (AL-PCD) with cytoplasmic retraction from the cell wall. Ethylene (8 mL per 250-mL flask) caused permeability of cells to EB without concomitant nuclear DNA fragmentation and cytoplasmic retraction, suggesting necrotic cell death. Mannose inducing glycolysis block and PEG causing dehydration resulted in relatively similar patterns of upregulation of SAG suggesting similar cell death signalling pathways for these two stress factors, whereas hydrogen peroxide caused unique patterns indicating an alternate pathway for cell death induced by oxidative stress. Ethylene did not cause appreciable changes in SAG expression, confirming necrotic cell death. Expression of AtDAD, BoMT1 and AtSAG2 genes, previously shown to be associated with plant senescence, also changed rapidly during AL-PCD in cultured cells. The profiles of nine distinct cysteine protease-active bands ranging in size from ca. 21.5 to 38.5 kDa found in the control cultures were also altered after treatment with the four stressors, with mannose and PEG again producing similar patterns. Results also suggest that cysteine proteases may have a role in necrotic cell death.

  17. Involvement of PACAP/ADNP signaling in the resistance to cell death in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) cells.

    PubMed

    Castorina, Alessandro; Giunta, Salvatore; Scuderi, Soraya; D'Agata, Velia

    2012-11-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are sarcomas able to grow under conditions of metabolic stress caused by insufficient nutrients or oxygen. Both pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) have glioprotective potential. However, whether PACAP/ADNP signaling is involved in the resistance to cell death in MPNST cells remains to be clarified. Here, we investigated the involvement of this signaling system in the survival response of MPNST cells against hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-evoked death both in the presence of normal serum (NS) and in serum-starved (SS) cells. Results showed that ADNP levels increased time-dependently (6-48 h) in SS cells. Treatment with PACAP38 (10(-9) to 10(-5) M) dose-dependently increased ADNP levels in NS but not in SS cells. PAC(1)/VPAC receptor antagonists completely suppressed PACAP-stimulated ADNP increase and partially reduced ADNP expression in SS cells. NS-cultured cells exposed to H(2)O(2) showed significantly reduced cell viability (~50 %), increased p53 and caspase-3, and DNA fragmentation, without affecting ADNP expression. Serum starvation significantly reduced H(2)O(2)-induced detrimental effects in MPNST cells, which were not further ameliorated by PACAP38. Altogether, these finding provide evidence for the involvement of an endogenous PACAP-mediated ADNP signaling system that increases MPNST cell resistance to H(2)O(2)-induced death upon serum starvation.

  18. Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid Prevents Amyloid-β Peptide–Induced Neuronal Death Via a Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase–Dependent Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Solá, Susana; Castro, Rui E; Laires, Pedro A; Steer, Clifford J; Rodrigues, Cecília MP

    2003-01-01

    Tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), an endogenous bile acid, modulates cell death by interrupting classic pathways of apoptosis. Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease, where a significant loss of neuronal cells is thought to occur by apoptosis. In this study, we explored the cell death pathway and signaling mechanisms involved in Aβ-induced toxicity and further investigated the anti-apoptotic effect(s) of TUDCA. Our data show significant induction of apoptosis in isolated cortical neurons incubated with Aβ peptide. Apoptosis was associated with translocation of pro-apoptotic Bax to the mitochondria, followed by cytochrome c release, caspase activation, and DNA and nuclear fragmentation. In addition, there was almost immediate but weak activation of the serine/threonine protein kinase Akt. Inhibition of the phosphatidylinositide 3′-OH kinase (PI3K) pathway with wortmannin did not markedly affect Aβ-induced cell death, suggesting that this signaling pathway is not crucial for Aβ-mediated toxicity. Notably, co-incubation with TUDCA significantly modulated each of the Aβ-induced apoptotic events. Moreover, wortmannin decreased TUDCA protection against Aβ-induced apoptosis, reduced Akt phosphorylation, and increased Bax translocation to mitochondria. Together, these findings indicate that Aβ-induced apoptosis of cortical neurons proceeds through a Bax mitochondrial pathway. Further, the PI3K signaling cascade plays a role in regulating the anti-apoptotic effects of TUDCA. PMID:15208744

  19. Cannabidiol enhances anandamide signaling and alleviates psychotic symptoms of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Leweke, F M; Piomelli, D; Pahlisch, F; Muhl, D; Gerth, C W; Hoyer, C; Klosterkötter, J; Hellmich, M; Koethe, D

    2012-03-20

    Cannabidiol is a component of marijuana that does not activate cannabinoid receptors, but moderately inhibits the degradation of the endocannabinoid anandamide. We previously reported that an elevation of anandamide levels in cerebrospinal fluid inversely correlated to psychotic symptoms. Furthermore, enhanced anandamide signaling let to a lower transition rate from initial prodromal states into frank psychosis as well as postponed transition. In our translational approach, we performed a double-blind, randomized clinical trial of cannabidiol vs amisulpride, a potent antipsychotic, in acute schizophrenia to evaluate the clinical relevance of our initial findings. Either treatment was safe and led to significant clinical improvement, but cannabidiol displayed a markedly superior side-effect profile. Moreover, cannabidiol treatment was accompanied by a significant increase in serum anandamide levels, which was significantly associated with clinical improvement. The results suggest that inhibition of anandamide deactivation may contribute to the antipsychotic effects of cannabidiol potentially representing a completely new mechanism in the treatment of schizophrenia.

  20. A Disease-associated Mutant of NLRC4 Shows Enhanced Interaction with SUG1 Leading to Constitutive FADD-dependent Caspase-8 Activation and Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Raghawan, Akhouri Kishore; Sripada, Anand; Gopinath, Gayathri; Pushpanjali, Pendyala; Kumar, Yatender; Radha, Vegesna; Swarup, Ghanshyam

    2017-01-27

    Nod-like receptor family card containing 4 (NLRC4)/Ipaf is involved in recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns leading to caspase-1 activation and cytokine release, which mediate protective innate immune response. Point mutations in NLRC4 cause autoinflammatory syndromes. Although all the mutations result in constitutive caspase-1 activation, their phenotypic presentations are different, implying that these mutations cause different alterations in properties of NLRC4. NLRC4 interacts with SUG1 and induces caspase-8-mediated cell death. Here, we show that one of the autoinflammatory syndrome-causing mutants of NLRC4, H443P, but not T337A and V341A, constitutively activates caspase-8 and induces apoptotic cell death in human lung epithelial cells. Compared with wild type NLRC4, the H443P mutant shows stronger interaction with SUG1 and with ubiquitinated cellular proteins. Phosphorylation of NLRC4 at Ser(533) plays a crucial role in caspase-8 activation and cell death. However, H443P mutant does not require Ser(533) phosphorylation for caspase-8 activation and cell death. Caspase-8 activation by NLRC4 and its H443P mutant are dependent on the adaptor protein FADD. A phosphomimicking mutant of NLRC4, S533D does not require SUG1 activity for inducing cell death. Ubiquitin-tagged NLRC4 could induce cell death and activate caspase-8 independent of Ser(533) phosphorylation. Our work suggests that SUG1-mediated signaling results in enhanced ubiquitination and regulates FADD-dependent caspase-8 activation by NLRC4. We show that the autoinflammation-associated H443P mutant is altered in interaction with SUG1 and ubiquitinated proteins, triggering constitutive caspase-8-mediated cell death dependent on FADD but independent of Ser(533) phosphorylation.

  1. A mutation in the GTP hydrolysis site of Arabidopsis dynamin-related protein 1E confers enhanced cell death in response to powdery mildew infection.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dingzhong; Ade, Jules; Frye, Catherine A; Innes, Roger W

    2006-07-01

    We screened for mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana that displayed enhanced disease resistance to the powdery mildew pathogen Erysiphe cichoracearum and identified the edr3 mutant, which formed large gray lesions upon infection with E. cichoracearum and supported very little sporulation. The edr3-mediated disease resistance and cell death phenotypes were dependent on salicylic acid signaling, but independent of ethylene and jasmonic acid signaling. In addition, edr3 plants displayed enhanced susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, but showed normal responses to virulent and avirulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. The EDR3 gene was isolated by positional cloning and found to encode Arabidopsis dynamin-related protein 1E (DRP1E). The edr3 mutation caused an amino acid substitution in the GTPase domain of DRP1E (proline 77 to leucine) that is predicted to block GTP hydrolysis, but not GTP binding. A T-DNA insertion allele in DRP1E did not cause powdery mildew-induced lesions, suggesting that this phenotype is caused by DRP1E being locked in the GTP-bound state, rather than by a loss of DRP1E activity. Analysis of DRP1E-green fluorescent protein fusion proteins revealed that DRP1E is at least partially localized to mitochondria. These observations suggest a mechanistic link between salicylic acid signaling, mitochondria and programmed cell death in plants.

  2. Pepper arginine decarboxylase is required for polyamine and γ-aminobutyric acid signaling in cell death and defense response.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Kim, Beom Seok; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2013-08-01

    The Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria (Xcv) effector AvrBsT induces a hypersensitive cell death in pepper (Capsicum annuum). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying AvrBsT-triggered cell death are not fully understood. Here, we identified pepper arginine decarboxylase (CaADC1) as an AvrBsT-interacting protein, which is early and strongly induced in incompatible pepper-Xcv interactions. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that the CaADC1-AvrBsT complex was localized to the cytoplasm. Transient coexpression of CaADC1 with avrBsT in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves specifically enhanced AvrBsT-triggered cell death, accompanied by an accumulation of polyamines, nitric oxide (NO), and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) bursts. Among the polyamines, spermine application strongly induced NO and H₂O₂ bursts, ultimately leading to cell death. CaADC1 silencing in pepper leaves significantly compromised NO and H₂O₂ accumulation and cell death induction, leading to the enhanced avirulent Xcv growth during infection. The levels of salicylic acid, polyamines, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and the expression of defense response genes during avirulent Xcv infection, were distinctly lower in CaADC1-silenced plants than those in the empty vector control plants. GABA application significantly inhibited avirulent Xcv growth in CaADC1-silenced leaves and the empty vector control plants. Together, these results suggest that CaADC1 may act as a key defense and cell death regulator via mediation of polyamine and GABA metabolism.

  3. Multicenter evaluation of signal enhancement algorithms for hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Luts, Heleen; Eneman, Koen; Wouters, Jan; Schulte, Michael; Vormann, Matthias; Buechler, Michael; Dillier, Norbert; Houben, Rolph; Dreschler, Wouter A; Froehlich, Matthias; Puder, Henning; Grimm, Giso; Hohmann, Volker; Leijon, Arne; Lombard, Anthony; Mauler, Dirk; Spriet, Ann

    2010-03-01

    In the framework of the European HearCom project, promising signal enhancement algorithms were developed and evaluated for future use in hearing instruments. To assess the algorithms' performance, five of the algorithms were selected and implemented on a common real-time hardware/software platform. Four test centers in Belgium, The Netherlands, Germany, and Switzerland perceptually evaluated the algorithms. Listening tests were performed with large numbers of normal-hearing and hearing-impaired subjects. Three perceptual measures were used: speech reception threshold (SRT), listening effort scaling, and preference rating. Tests were carried out in two types of rooms. Speech was presented in multitalker babble arriving from one or three loudspeakers. In a pseudo-diffuse noise scenario, only one algorithm, the spatially preprocessed speech-distortion-weighted multi-channel Wiener filtering, provided a SRT improvement relative to the unprocessed condition. Despite the general lack of improvement in SRT, some algorithms were preferred over the unprocessed condition at all tested signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). These effects were found across different subject groups and test sites. The listening effort scores were less consistent over test sites. For the algorithms that did not affect speech intelligibility, a reduction in listening effort was observed at 0 dB SNR.

  4. Static corrections for enhanced signal detection at IMS seismic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Neil; Wookey, James; Selby, Neil

    2016-04-01

    Seismic monitoring forms an important part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) for verifying the Comprehensive nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Analysis of seismic data can be used to discriminate between nuclear explosions and the tens of thousands of natural earthquakes of similar magnitude that occur every year. This is known as "forensic seismology", and techniques include measuring the P-to-S wave amplitude ratio, the body-to-surface wave magnitude ratio (mb/Ms), and source depth. Measurement of these seismic discriminants requires very high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) data, and this has led to the development and deployment of seismic arrays as part of the IMS. Array processing methodologies such as stacking can be used, but optimum SNR improvement needs an accurate estimate of the arrival time of the particular seismic phase. To enhance the imaging capability of IMS arrays, we aim to develop site-specific static corrections to the arrival time as a function of frequency, slowness and backazimuth. Here, we present initial results for the IMS TORD array in Niger. Vespagrams are calculated for various events using the F-statistic to clearly identify seismic phases and measure their arrival times. Observed arrival times are compared with those predicted by 1D and 3D velocity models, and residuals are calculated for a range of backazimuths and slownesses. Finally, we demonstrate the improvement in signal fidelity provided by these corrections.

  5. Local erythropoietin signaling enhances regeneration in peripheral axons.

    PubMed

    Toth, C; Martinez, J A; Liu, W Q; Diggle, J; Guo, G F; Ramji, N; Mi, R; Hoke, A; Zochodne, D W

    2008-06-23

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and its receptor (EPO-R), mediate neuroprotection from axonopathy and apoptosis in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). We examined the impact and potential mechanisms of local EPO signaling on regenerating PNS axons in vivo and in vitro. As a consequence of injury, peripheral nerve axons and DRG neurons have a marked increase in the expression of EPO and EPO-R. Local delivery of EPO via conduit over 2 weeks to rat sciatic nerve following crush injury increased the density and maturity of regenerating myelinated axons growing distally from the crush site. In addition, EPO also rescued retrograde degeneration and atrophy of axons. EPO substantially increased the density and intensity of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression within outgrowing axons. Behavioral improvements in sensorimotor function also occurred in rats exposed to near nerve EPO delivery. EPO delivery led to decreased nuclear factor kappaB (NFkB) activation but increased phosphorylation of Akt and STAT3 within nerve and dorsal root ganglia neurons indicating rescue from an injury phenotype. Spinal cord explant studies also demonstrated a similar dose-dependent effect of EPO upon motor axonal outgrowth. Local EPO signaling enhances regenerating peripheral nervous system axons in addition to its known neuroprotection. Exogenous EPO may have a therapeutic role in a large number of peripheral nerve diseases through its impact on regeneration.

  6. Signaling through OX40 Enhances Anti-tumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Shawn M.; Maston, Levi D.; Gough, Michael J.; Ruby, Carl E.; Redmond, William L.; Crittenden, Marka; Li, Yuhuan; Puri, Sachin; Poehlein, Christian H.; Morris, Nick; Kovacsovics-Bankowski, Magdalena; Moudgil, Tarsem; Twitty, Chris; Walker, Edwin B.; Hu, Hong-Ming; Urba, Walter J.; Weinberg, Andrew D.; Curti, Brendan D; Fox, Bernard A.

    2010-01-01

    The existence of tumor-specific T cells, as well as their ability to be primed in cancer patients confirms that the immune response can be deployed to combat cancer. However, there are obstacles that must be overcome to convert the ineffective immune response commonly found in the tumor environment to one that leads to sustained destruction of tumor. Members of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily direct diverse immune functions. OX40 and its ligand, OX40L, are key TNF members that augment T-cell expansion, cytokine production, and survival. OX40 signaling also controls regulatory T cell differentiation and suppressive function. Studies over the past decade have demonstrated that OX40 agonists enhance anti-tumor immunity in preclinical models using immunogenic tumors; however, treatment of poorly immunogenic tumors has been less successful. Combining strategies that prime tumor-specific T cells together with OX40 signaling could generate and maintain a therapeutic anti-tumor immune response. PMID:21074068

  7. Enhanced Hypothalamic Glucose Sensing in Obesity: Alteration of Redox Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Colombani, Anne-Laure; Carneiro, Lionel; Benani, Alexandre; Galinier, Anne; Jaillard, Tristan; Duparc, Thibaut; Offer, Géraldine; Lorsignol, Anne; Magnan, Christophe; Casteilla, Louis; Pénicaud, Luc; Leloup, Corinne

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Recent data demonstrated that glucose sensing in different tissues is initiated by an intracellular redox signaling pathway in physiological conditions. However, the relevance of such a mechanism in metabolic disease is not known. The aim of the present study was to determine whether brain glucose hypersensitivity present in obese Zücker rats is related to an alteration in redox signaling. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Brain glucose sensing alteration was investigated in vivo through the evaluation of electrical activity in arcuate nucleus, changes in reactive oxygen species levels, and hypothalamic glucose-induced insulin secretion. In basal conditions, modifications of redox state and mitochondrial functions were assessed through oxidized glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, manganese superoxide dismutase, aconitase activities, and mitochondrial respiration. RESULTS Hypothalamic hypersensitivity to glucose was characterized by enhanced electrical activity of the arcuate nucleus and increased insulin secretion at a low glucose concentration, which does not produce such an effect in normal rats. It was associated with 1) increased reactive oxygen species levels in response to this low glucose load, 2) constitutive oxidized environment coupled with lower antioxidant enzyme activity at both the cellular and mitochondrial level, and 3) overexpression of several mitochondrial subunits of the respiratory chain coupled with a global dysfunction in mitochondrial activity. Moreover, pharmacological restoration of the glutathione hypothalamic redox state by reduced glutathione infusion in the third ventricle fully reversed the cerebral hypersensitivity to glucose. CONCLUSIONS The data demonstrated that obese Zücker rats' impaired hypothalamic regulation in terms of glucose sensing is linked to an abnormal redox signaling, which originates from mitochondria dysfunction. PMID:19581415

  8. Proteomic analysis of novel targets associated with the enhancement of TrkA-induced SK-N-MC cancer cell death caused by NGF.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eun Joo; Chung, Ky Hyun; Bae, Dong-Won; Kim, Choong Won

    2016-05-27

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is known to regulate both cancer cell survival and death signaling, depending on the cellular circumstances, in various cell types. In this study, we showed that NGF strongly upregulated the protein level of tropomyosin-related kinase A (TrkA) in TrkA-inducible SK-N-MC cancer cells, resulting in increases in various TrkA-dependent cellular processes, including the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and caspase-8 cleavage. In addition, NGF enhanced TrkA-induced morphological changes and cell death, and this effect was significantly suppressed by the JNK inhibitor SP600125, but not by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor wortmannin. To investigate novel targets associated with the enhancement of TrkA-induced SK-N-MC cell death caused by NGF, we performed Coomassie Brilliant Blue staining and two-dimensional (2D) proteomic analysis in TrkA-inducible SK-N-MC cells. We identified 31 protein spots that were either greatly upregulated or downregulated by TrkA during NGF treatment using matrix-associated laser desorption/ionization time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry, and we analyzed the effects of SP600125 and wortmannin on the spots. Interestingly, 11 protein spots, including heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K), lamin B1 and TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP43), were significantly influenced by SP600125, but not by wortmannin. Moreover, the NGF/TrkA-dependent inhibition of cell viability was significantly enhanced by knockdown of hnRNP K using small interfering RNA, demonstrating that hnRNP K is a novel target associated with the regulation of TrkA-dependent SK-N-MC cancer cell death enhanced by NGF.

  9. Graphene Nanogrids FET Immunosensor: Signal to Noise Ratio Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Jayeeta; RoyChaudhuri, Chirasree

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a reproducible and scalable chemical method for fabrication of smooth graphene nanogrids has been reported which addresses the challenges of graphene nanoribbons (GNR). These nanogrids have been found to be capable of attomolar detection of biomolecules in field effect transistor (FET) mode. However, for detection of sub-femtomolar concentrations of target molecule in complex mixtures with reasonable accuracy, it is not sufficient to only explore the steady state sensitivities, but is also necessary to investigate the flicker noise which dominates at frequencies below 100 kHz. This low frequency noise is dependent on the exposure time of the graphene layer in the buffer solution and concentration of charged impurities at the surface. In this paper, the functionalization strategy of graphene nanogrids has been optimized with respect to concentration and incubation time of the cross linker for an enhancement in signal to noise ratio (SNR). It has been interestingly observed that as the sensitivity and noise power change at different rates with the functionalization parameters, SNR does not vary monotonically but is maximum corresponding to a particular parameter. The optimized parameter has improved the SNR by 50% which has enabled a detection of 0.05 fM Hep-B virus molecules with a sensitivity of around 30% and a standard deviation within 3%. Further, the SNR enhancement has resulted in improvement of quantification accuracy by five times and selectivity by two orders of magnitude. PMID:27740605

  10. Structural Insight for Roles of DR5 Death Domain Mutations on Oligomerization of DR5 Death Domain-FADD Complex in the Death-Inducing Signaling Complex Formation: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongyi; Song, Yuhua

    2016-04-01

    Death receptor 5 (DR5)-induced apoptosis that prioritizes the death of tumor cells has been proposed as one of the promising cancer therapies. In this process, oligomerized DR5 death domain (DD) binding to Fas-associated death domain (FADD) leads to FADD activating caspase-8, which marks the formation of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) that initiates apoptosis. DR5 DD mutations found in cancer cells have been suggested to play an important pathological role, the mechanism through which those mutants prevent the DR5-activated DISC formation is not clear yet. This study sought to provide structural and molecular insight for the roles of four selected DR5 DD mutations (E355K, E367K, K415N, and L363F) in the oligomerization of DR5 DD-FADD complex during the DISC formation. Results from the molecular dynamics simulations show that the simulated mutants induce conformational, dynamical motions and interactions changes in the DR5 DD-FADD tetramer complex, including changes in a protein's backbone flexibility, less exposure of FADD DED's caspase-8 binding site, reduced H-bonding and hydrophobic contacts at the DR5 DD-FADD DD binding, altered distribution of the electrostatic potentials and correlated motions of residues, and reduced binding affinity of DR5 DD binding to FADD. This study provides structural and molecular insight for the influence of DR5 DD mutations on oligomerization of DR5 DD-FADD complex, which is expected to foster understanding of the DR5 DD mutants' resistance mechanism against DR5-activated DISC formation.

  11. The Death Domain Superfamily in Intracellular Signaling of Apoptosis and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Ho; Lo, Yu-Chih; Lin, Su-Chang; Wang, Liwei; Yang, Jin Kuk; Wu, Hao

    2010-01-01

    The death domain (DD) superfamily comprising the death domain (DD) subfamily, the death effector domain (DED) subfamily, the caspase recruitment domain (CARD) subfamily and the pyrin domains (PYD) subfamily is one of the largest domain superfamilies. By mediating homotypic interactions within each domain subfamily, these proteins play important roles in the assembly and activation of apoptotic and inflammatory complexes. In this article, we review the molecular complexes that are assembled by these proteins, the structural and biochemical features of these domains and the molecular interactions mediated by them. By analyzing the potential molecular basis for the function of these domains, we hope to provide a comprehensive understanding on the function, structure, interaction and evolution of this important family of domains. PMID:17201679

  12. MR {open_quotes}hot nose sign{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}intravascular enhancement sign{close_quotes} in brain death

    SciTech Connect

    Orrison, W.W. Jr.; Champlin, A.M.; Kesterson, O.L.; Hartshorne, M.F.; King, J.N. |

    1994-05-01

    Three cases of MR with gadopentetate dimeglumine in patients diagnosed with cerebral death are presented. Observation of an MR {open_quotes}hot nose sign{close_quotes} and an {open_quotes}intravascular enhancement sign{close_quotes} provided additional imaging support in the clinical diagnosis of brain death. The MR findings in brain death include: (1) transtentorial and foramen magnum herniation, (2) absent intracranial vascular flow void, (3) poor gray matter/white matter differentiation, (4) no intracranial contrast enhancement, (5) carotid artery enhancement (intravascular enhancement sign), and (6) prominent nasal and scalp enhancement (MR hot nose sign). Additional modalities for confirming brain death are discussed. 41 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Value of the signal-averaged electrocardiogram as a predictor of sudden death in myocardial infarction and dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Y; Inoue, T; Fukuzaki, H

    1990-02-01

    To clarify the prognostic significance of signal averaged electrocardiogram (SAE), 100 patients with old myocardial infarction (OMI) and 54 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) were studied. Late potentials (LPs) were detected in 31 patients with OMI and in 21 patients with DCM. During a mean follow up of 18 months (3 to 60) in OMI and 28 months (3 to 71) in DCM, 29 patients died. Fifteen patients died suddenly (8 in OMI, 7 in DCM). In OMI, the sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), predictive accuracy (PA) of LPs for sudden death were 75%, 72%, and 73%, respectively. The presence of either LPs or prolonged filtered QRS (f-QRS) predicted sudden death with a high Se, and the presence of both LPs and prolonged f-QRS predicted with high Sp and PA. In DCM, Se, Sp, and PA of LPs were lower than those in OMI (Se; 71%, Sp; 66%, PA; 67%). A life table analysis showed that the probability of remaining free from sudden death was significantly lower in patients with LPs than those without them in OMI, but no significant difference was observed between those with and without LPs in DCM. Patients with either LPs or prolonged f-QRS, however, had a significantly higher probability of sudden death in both diseases and no patient with normal SAE died suddenly. SAE was also useful in separating high risk patients in either normal or low cardiac index group in both diseases. Ventricular tachycardia (VT) and % fractional shortening in OMI and only VT in DCM were also useful predictors among other parameters. In conclusion, SAE provides useful information in a noninvasive method to identify patients at risk of sudden death, and patients with normal SAE have a low risk of sudden death in OMI and DCM.

  14. Neuroprotective Strategy in Retinal Degeneration: Suppressing ER Stress-Induced Cell Death via Inhibition of the mTOR Signal

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Bin; Sun, Ying-Jian; Liu, Shu-Yan; Che, Lin; Li, Guang-Yu

    2017-01-01

    The retina is a specialized sensory organ, which is essential for light detection and visual formation in the human eye. Inherited retinal degenerations are a heterogeneous group of eye diseases that can eventually cause permanent vision loss. UPR (unfolded protein response) and ER (endoplasmic reticulum) stress plays an important role in the pathological mechanism of retinal degenerative diseases. mTOR (the mammalian target of rapamycin) kinase, as a signaling hub, controls many cellular processes, covering protein synthesis, RNA translation, ER stress, and apoptosis. Here, the hypothesis that inhibition of mTOR signaling suppresses ER stress-induced cell death in retinal degenerative disorders is discussed. This review surveys knowledge of the influence of mTOR signaling on ER stress arising from misfolded proteins and genetic mutations in retinal degenerative diseases and highlights potential neuroprotective strategies for treatment and therapeutic implications. PMID:28106827

  15. Ex vivo Perfusion with Adenosine A2A Receptor Agonist Enhances Rehabilitation of Murine Donor Lungs after Circulatory Death

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Mathew L.; Sharma, Ashish K.; Mas, Valeria. R.; Gehrau, Ricardo C.; Mulloy, Daniel P.; Zhao, Yunge; Lau, Christine L.; Kron, Irving L.; Laubach, Victor E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) enables assessment and rehabilitation of marginal donor lungs prior to transplantation. We previously demonstrated that adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) agonism attenuates lung ischemia-reperfusion injury. The current study utilizes a novel murine EVLP model to test the hypothesis that A2AR agonist enhances EVLP-mediated rehabilitation of donation after circulatory death (DCD) lungs. Methods Mice underwent euthanasia and 60 min warm ischemia, and lungs were flushed with Perfadex and underwent cold static preservation (CSP, 60 min). Three groups were studied: no EVLP (CSP), EVLP with Steen solution for 60 min (EVLP), and EVLP with Steen solution supplemented with ATL1223, a selective A2AR agonist (EVLP+ATL1223). Lung function, wet/dry weight, cytokines and neutrophil numbers were measured. Microarrays were performed using the Affymetrix GeneChip Mouse Genome 430A 2.0 Array. Results EVLP significantly improved lung function versus CSP, which was further, significantly improved by EVLP+ATL1223. Lung edema, cytokines and neutrophil counts were reduced after EVLP and further, significantly reduced after EVLP+ATL1223. Gene array analysis revealed differential expression of 1,594 genes after EVLP, which comprise canonical pathways involved in inflammation and innate immunity including IL-1, IL-8, IL-6 and IL-17 signaling. Several pathways were uniquely regulated by EVLP+ATL1223 including the downregulation of genes involved in IL-1 signaling such as ADCY9, ECSIT, IRAK1, MAPK12 and TOLLIP. Conclusion EVLP modulates pro-inflammatory genes and reduces pulmonary dysfunction, edema and inflammation in DCD lungs, which are further reduced by A2AR agonism. This murine EVLP model provides a novel platform to study rehabilitative mechanisms of DCD lungs. PMID:26262504

  16. Ex Vivo Perfusion With Adenosine A2A Receptor Agonist Enhances Rehabilitation of Murine Donor Lungs After Circulatory Death.

    PubMed

    Stone, Matthew L; Sharma, Ashish K; Mas, Valeria R; Gehrau, Ricardo C; Mulloy, Daniel P; Zhao, Yunge; Lau, Christine L; Kron, Irving L; Huerter, Mary E; Laubach, Victor E

    2015-12-01

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) enables assessment and rehabilitation of marginal donor lungs before transplantation. We previously demonstrated that adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) agonism attenuates lung ischemia-reperfusion injury. The current study utilizes a novel murine EVLP model to test the hypothesis that A2AR agonist enhances EVLP-mediated rehabilitation of donation after circulatory death (DCD) lungs. Mice underwent euthanasia and 60 minutes warm ischemia, and lungs were flushed with Perfadex and underwent cold static preservation (CSP, 60 minutes). Three groups were studied: no EVLP (CSP), EVLP with Steen solution for 60 minutes (EVLP), and EVLP with Steen solution supplemented with ATL1223, a selective A2AR agonist (EVLP + ATL1223). Lung function, wet/dry weight, cytokines and neutrophil numbers were measured. Microarrays were performed using the Affymetrix GeneChip Mouse Genome 430A 2.0 Array. Ex vivo lung perfusion significantly improved lung function versus CSP, which was further, significantly improved by EVLP + ATL1223. Lung edema, cytokines, and neutrophil counts were reduced after EVLP and further, significantly reduced after EVLP + ATL1223. Gene array analysis revealed differential expression of 1594 genes after EVLP, which comprise canonical pathways involved in inflammation and innate immunity including IL-1, IL-8, IL-6, and IL-17 signaling. Several pathways were uniquely regulated by EVLP + ATL1223 including the downregulation of genes involved in IL-1 signaling, such as ADCY9, ECSIT, IRAK1, MAPK12, and TOLLIP. Ex vivo lung perfusion modulates proinflammatory genes and reduces pulmonary dysfunction, edema, and inflammation in DCD lungs, which are further reduced by A2AR agonism. This murine EVLP model provides a novel platform to study rehabilitative mechanisms of DCD lungs.

  17. Local readout enhancement for detuned signal-recycling interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Rehbein, Henning; Mueller-Ebhardt, Helge; Schnabel, Roman; Danzmann, Karsten; Somiya, Kentaro; Chen Yanbei; Li Chao

    2007-09-15

    High power detuned signal-recycling interferometers currently planned for second-generation interferometric gravitational-wave detectors (for example Advanced LIGO) are characterized by two resonances in the detection band, an optical resonance and an optomechanical resonance which is upshifted from the suspension pendulum frequency due to the so-called optical-spring effect. The detector's sensitivity is enhanced around these two resonances. However, at frequencies below the optomechanical resonance frequency, the sensitivity of such interferometers is significantly lower than non-optical-spring configurations with comparable circulating power; such a drawback can also compromise high-frequency sensitivity, when an optimization is performed on the overall sensitivity of the interferometer to a class of sources. In this paper, we clarify the reason for such a low sensitivity, and propose a way to fix this problem. Motivated by the optical-bar scheme of Braginsky, Gorodetsky, and Khalili, we propose to add a local readout scheme which measures the motion of the arm-cavity front mirror, which at low frequencies moves together with the arm-cavity end mirror, under the influence of gravitational waves. This scheme improves the low-frequency quantum-noise-limited sensitivity of optical-spring interferometers significantly and can be considered as an incorporation of the optical-bar scheme into currently planned second-generation interferometers. On the other hand it can be regarded as an extension of the optical-bar scheme. Taking compact binary inspiral signals as an example, we illustrate how this scheme can be used to improve the sensitivity of the planned Advanced LIGO interferometer, in various scenarios, using a realistic classical-noise budget. We also discuss how this scheme can be implemented in Advanced LIGO with relative ease.

  18. Caspase Inhibition Blocks Cell Death and Enhances Mitophagy but Fails to Promote T-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sih-han; Martin, Sean M.; Harris, Peter S.; Knudson, C. Michael

    2011-01-01

    Caspase-9 is a component of the apoptosome that mediates cell death following release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. Inhibition of Caspase-9 with a dominant negative construct (Casp9DN) blocks apoptosome function, promotes viability and has been implicated in carcinogenesis. Inhibition of the apoptosome in vitro impairs mitochondrial function and promotes mitophagy. To examine whether inhibition of the apoptosome would enhance mitophagy and promote oncogenesis in vivo, transgenic mice were generated that express Casp9DN in the T cell lineage. The effects of Casp9DN on thymocyte viability, mitophagy and thymic tumor formation were examined. In primary thymocytes, Casp9DN delayed dexamethasone (Dex)-induced cell death, altered mitochondrial structure, and decreased oxidant production. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that inhibition of the apoptosome resulted in structurally abnormal mitochondria that in some cases were engulfed by double-membrane structures resembling autophagosomes. Consistent with mitochondria being engulfed by autophagosomes (mitophagy), confocal microscopy showed colocalization of LC3-GFP and mitochondria. However, Casp9DN did not significantly accelerate T-cell lymphoma alone, or in combination with Lck-Bax38/1, or with Beclin 1+/− mice, two tumor-prone strains in which altered mitochondrial function has been implicated in promoting tumor development. In addition, heterozygous disruption of Beclin 1 had no effect on T-cell lymphoma formation in Lck-Bax38/1 mice. Further studies showed that Beclin 1 levels had no effect on Casp9DN-induced loss of mitochondrial function. These results demonstrate that neither inhibition of apoptosome function nor Beclin 1 haploinsufficiency accelerate T-cell lymphoma development in mice. PMID:21611191

  19. Melatonin enhances arsenic trioxide-induced cell death via sustained upregulation of Redd1 expression in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sun-Mi; Woo, Sang Hyeok; Oh, Sang Taek; Hong, Sung-Eun; Choe, Tae-Boo; Ye, Sang-Kyu; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Seong, Min Ki; Kim, Hyun-A; Noh, Woo Chul; Lee, Jin Kyung; Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Lee, Yun-Han; Park, In-Chul

    2016-02-15

    Melatonin is implicated in various physiological functions, including anticancer activity. However, the mechanism(s) of its anticancer activity is not well understood. In the present study, we investigated the combined effects of melatonin and arsenic trioxide (ATO) on cell death in human breast cancer cells. Melatonin enhanced the ATO-induced apoptotic cell death via changes in the protein levels of Survivin, Bcl-2, and Bax, thus affecting cytochrome c release from the mitochondria to the cytosol. Interestingly, we found that the cell death induced by co-treatment with melatonin and ATO was mediated by sustained upregulation of Redd1, which was associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Combined treatment with melatonin and ATO induced the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAP kinase downstream from Redd1 expression. Rapamycin and S6K1 siRNA enhanced, while activation of mTORC1 by transfection with TSC2 siRNA suppressed the cell death induced by melatonin and ATO treatment. Taken together, our findings suggest that melatonin enhances ATO-induced apoptotic cell death via sustained upregulation of Redd1 expression and inhibition of mTORC1 upstream of the activation of the p38/JNK pathways in human breast cancer cells.

  20. Hydrogen peroxide is a diffusible paracrine signal for the induction of epithelial cell death by activated myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Waghray, Meghna; Cui, Zongbin; Horowitz, Jeffrey C; Subramanian, Indhu M; Martinez, Fernando J; Toews, Galen B; Thannickal, Victor J

    2005-05-01

    Cell-cell signaling roles for reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated in response to growth factors/cytokines in nonphagocytic cells are not well defined. In this study, we show that fibroblasts isolated from lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) generate extracellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in response to the multifunctional cytokine, transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1). In contrast, TGF-beta1 stimulation of small airway epithelial cells (SAECs) does not result in detectable levels of extracellular H2O2. IPF fibroblasts independently stimulated with TGF-beta1 induce loss of viability and death of overlying SAECs when cocultured in a compartmentalized Transwell system. These effects on SAECs are inhibited by the addition of catalase to the coculture system or by the selective enzymatic blockade of H2O2 production by IPF fibroblasts. IPF fibroblasts heterogeneously express alpha-smooth muscle actin stress fibers, a marker of myofibroblast differentiation. Cellular localization of H2O2 by a fluorescent-labeling strategy demonstrated that extracellular secretion of H2O2 is specific to the myofibroblast phenotype. Thus, myofibroblast secretion of H2O2 functions as a diffusible death signal for lung epithelial cells. This novel mechanism for intercellular ROS signaling may be important in physiological/pathophysiological processes characterized by regenerating epithelial cells and activated myofibroblasts.

  1. Switch from type II to I Fas/CD95 death signaling upon in vitro culturing of primary hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Dorothée; Schmich, Kathrin; Vogel, Sandra; Pick, Robert; Kaufmann, Thomas; Hochmuth, Florian Christoph; Haber, Angelika; Neubert, Karin; McNelly, Sabine; von Weizsäcker, Fritz; Merfort, Irmgard; Maurer, Ulrich; Strasser, Andreas; Borner, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Fas/CD95-induced apoptosis of hepatocytes in vivo proceeds through the so-called type II pathway, requiring the pro-apoptotic BH3-only Bcl-2 family member Bid for mitochondrial death signaling. Consequently, Bid-deficient mice are protected from anti-Fas antibody injection induced fatal hepatitis. Here we report the unexpected finding that freshly isolated mouse hepatocytes, cultured on collagen or Matrigel™, become independent of Bid for Fas-induced apoptosis, thereby switching death signaling from type II to type I. In such in vitro cultures, FasL activates caspase-3 without Bid cleavage, Bax/Bak activation or cytochrome c release, and neither Bid ablation nor Bcl-2 overexpression is protective. The type II to type I switch depends on extracellular matrix adhesion, as primary hepatocytes in suspension die in a Bid-dependent manner. Moreover, the switch is specific for FasL-induced apoptosis as collagen-plated Bid-deficient hepatocytes are protected from TNFα/ActD-induced apoptosis. Conclusion Our data suggest a selective crosstalk between extracellular matrix and Fas-mediated signaling which favours mitochondria-independent type I apoptosis induction. PMID:19003879

  2. Enhanced line signals from annihilating Kaluza-Klein dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arina, Chiara; Bringmann, Torsten; Silk, Joseph; Vollmann, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Monochromatic gamma ray lines have long been known to provide potential smoking-gun signals for annihilating dark matter. Here, we demonstrate that the situation is particularly interesting for Kaluza-Klein dark matter because resonant annihilation is generically expected for small, but not necessarily vanishing relative velocities of the annihilating particles. We calculate the contribution from those hitherto neglected resonances and show that the annihilation rate into monochromatic photons can be significantly enhanced, in a way that is much more pronounced than for the associated production of continuum photons. For favorable astrophysical conditions, this leads to promising prospects for the detection of TeV-scale Kaluza-Klein dark matter. We also point out that the situation may be even more interesting in the vicinity of black holes, like the supermassive black hole at the center of our Galaxy, where in principle center-of-mass energies much larger than the rest mass are available. In this case, annihilating Kaluza-Klein dark matter may show the striking and unique signature of several gamma ray lines, with an equidistant spacing corresponding to twice the compactification radius of the extra dimension.

  3. Activation of surrogate death receptor signaling triggers peroxynitrite-dependent execution of cisplatin-resistant cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Seah, S; Low, I C C; Hirpara, J L; Sachaphibulkij, K; Kroemer, G; Brenner, C; Pervaiz, S

    2015-01-01

    Platinum-based drugs remain as the cornerstone of cancer chemotherapy; however, development of multidrug resistance presents a therapeutic challenge. This study aims at understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to cisplatin and unraveling surrogate signaling networks that could revert sensitivity to apoptosis stimuli. We made use of three different sets of cell lines, A549 and H2030 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and A2780 ovarian cancer cells and their cisplatin-resistant variants. Here we report that cisplatin-resistant cell lines displayed a multidrug-resistant phenotype. Changes in mitochondrial metabolism and defective mitochondrial signaling were unraveled in the resistant cells. More interestingly, a marked increase in sensitivity of the resistant cells to death receptor-induced apoptosis, in particular TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand)-mediated execution, was observed. Although this was not associated with an increase in gene transcription, a significant increase in the localization of TRAIL death receptor, DR4, to the lipid raft subdomains of plasma membrane was detected in the resistant variants. Furthermore, exposure of cisplatin-resistant cells to TRAIL resulted in upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and increase in nitric oxide (NO) production that triggered the generation of peroxynitrite (ONOO−). Scavenging ONOO− rescued cells from TRAIL-induced apoptosis, thereby suggesting a critical role of ONOO− in TRAIL-induced execution of cisplatin-resistant cells. Notably, preincubation of cells with TRAIL restored sensitivity of resistant cells to cisplatin. These data provide compelling evidence for employing strategies to trigger death receptor signaling as a second-line treatment for cisplatin-resistant cancers. PMID:26492363

  4. Signaling Pathways that Mediate Neurotoxin-Induced Death of Dopamine Neurons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-01

    undergoing apoptosis. Cell Death and Differentiation, 12: 255-265, 2005. 5. Zimmermann, AK, FA Loucks , SS Le, BD Butts, M McClure, RJ Bouchard, KA...279-289, 2005. 7. Le, SS, FA Loucks , H Udo, S Richardson-Burns, RA Phelps, RJ Bouchard, H Barth, K Aktories, KL Tyler, ER Kandel, KA Heidenreich...Apoptosis in Biochemistry and Structural Biology. 2004 2. Loucks FA, Zimmermann AK, Le SS, Bouchard RJ, Laessig TA, Heidenreich KA, and Linseman DA

  5. Signaling Pathways that Mediate Neurotoxin-Induced Death of Dopamine Neurons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-01

    these factors had little effect , but N-acetylcysteine protected suggesting that oxidative stress kills the neurons by a non-apoptotic mechanism...the Bcl-2/Bcl-x(L) inhibitor induces CGN apoptosis via an oxidative stress -dependent mechan- ism. Differential effects of antioxidants on CGN...promotes autophagy and death of Purkinje neurons in the absence of trophic stimuli In contrast to its effects on basal survival, the p75ntr antisense

  6. Heterogeneity of microglia and TNF signaling as determinants for neuronal death or survival

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Andrew D.; McPherson, Christopher A; Harry, G. Jean

    2012-01-01

    Microglia do not constitute a single, uniform cell population, but rather comprise cells with varied phenotypes, some which are beneficial and others that may require active regulatory control. Thus, gaining a better understanding of the heterogeneity of resident microglia responses will contribute to any interpretation regarding the impact of any such response in the brain. Microglia are the primary source of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) that can initiate various effects through the activation of membrane receptors. The TNF p55 receptor contains a death domain and activation normally leads to cellular apoptosis; however, under specific conditions, receptor activation can also lead to the activation of NFκB and contribute to cell survival. These divergent outcomes have been linked to receptor localization with receptor internalization leading to cell death and membrane localization supporting cell survival. A second TNF receptor, TNF p75 receptor, is normally linked to cell growth and survival, however, it can cooperate with the p55 receptor and contribute to cell death. Thus, while an elevation in TNFα in the brain is often considered an indicator of microglia activation and neuroinflammation, a number of factors come into play to determine the final outcome. Data is reviewed demonstrating that heterogeneity in morphological response of microglia and the expression of TNFα and TNF receptors are critical in identifying and characterizing neurotoxic events as they relate to neuroinflammation, neuronal damage and in stimulating neuroprotection. PMID:19596372

  7. MHC Class II Structural Requirements for the Association with Igα/β, and Signaling of Calcium Mobilization and Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lei; Stolpa, John C.; Young, Ryan M.; Pugh-Bernard, Aimee E.; Refaeli, Yosef; Cambier, John C.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Emerging evidence indicates that in addition to their well-characterized role in antigen presentation, MHC II molecules transmit signals that induce death of APCs. Appropriately timed APC death is important for prevention of autoimmunity. Though the exact mechanism of MHC II-mediated cell death signaling is unknown, the response appears independent of caspase activation and does not involve Fas-FasL interaction. Here we investigated MHC II structural requirements for mediation of cell death signaling in a murine B cell lymphoma. We found that neither the transmembrane spanning regions nor the cytoplasmic tails of MHC II, which are required for MHC II-mediated cAMP production and PKC activation, are required for the death response. However, mutations in the connecting peptide region of MHC II α chain (αCP), but not the β chain (βCP), resulted in significant impairment of the death response. The αCP mutant was also unable to mediate calcium mobilization responses, and did not associate with Igα/β. Knock-down of Igβ by shRNA eliminated the MHC II mediated calcium response but not cell death. We propose that MHC II mediates cell death signaling via association with an undefined cell surface protein(s), whose interaction is partially dependent on αCP region. PMID:18194817

  8. Lipid rafts and raft-mediated supramolecular entities in the regulation of CD95 death receptor apoptotic signaling.

    PubMed

    Gajate, Consuelo; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2015-05-01

    Membrane lipid rafts are highly ordered membrane domains enriched in cholesterol, sphingolipids and gangliosides that have the property to segregate and concentrate proteins. Lipid and protein composition of lipid rafts differs from that of the surrounding membrane, thus providing sorting platforms and hubs for signal transduction molecules, including CD95 death receptor-mediated signaling. CD95 can be recruited to rafts in a reversible way through S-palmitoylation following activation of cells with its physiological cognate ligand as well as with a wide variety of inducers, including several antitumor drugs through ligand-independent intracellular mechanisms. CD95 translocation to rafts can be modulated pharmacologically, thus becoming a target for the treatment of apoptosis-defective diseases, such as cancer. CD95-mediated signaling largely depends on protein-protein interactions, and the recruitment and concentration of CD95 and distinct downstream apoptotic molecules in membrane raft domains, forming raft-based supramolecular entities that act as hubs for apoptotic signaling molecules, favors the generation and amplification of apoptotic signals. Efficient CD95-mediated apoptosis involves CD95 and raft internalization, as well as the involvement of different subcellular organelles. In this review, we briefly summarize and discuss the involvement of lipid rafts in the regulation of CD95-mediated apoptosis that may provide a new avenue for cancer therapy.

  9. Electromagnetic field therapy delays cellular senescence and death by enhancement of the heat shock response.

    PubMed

    Perez, Felipe P; Zhou, Ximing; Morisaki, Jorge; Jurivich, Donald

    2008-04-01

    Hormesis may result when mild repetitive stress increases cellular defense against diverse injuries. This process may also extend in vitro cellular proliferative life span as well as delay and reverse some of the age-dependent changes in both replicative and non-replicative cells. This study evaluated the potential hormetic effect of non-thermal repetitive electromagnetic field shock (REMFS) and its impact on cellular aging and mortality in primary human T lymphocytes and fibroblast cell lines. Unlike previous reports employing electromagnetic radiation, this study used a long wave length, low energy, and non-thermal REMFS (50MHz/0.5W) for various therapeutic regimens. The primary outcomes examined were age-dependent morphological changes in cells over time, cellular death prevention, and stimulation of the heat shock response. REMFS achieved several biological effects that modified the aging process. REMFS extended the total number of population doublings of mouse fibroblasts and contributed to youthful morphology of cells near their replicative lifespan. REMFS also enhanced cellular defenses of human T cells as reflected in lower cell mortality when compared to non-treated T cells. To determine the mechanism of REMFS-induced effects, analysis of the cellular heat shock response revealed Hsp90 release from the heat shock transcription factor (HSF1). Furthermore, REMFS increased HSF1 phosphorylation, enhanced HSF1-DNA binding, and improved Hsp70 expression relative to non-REMFS-treated cells. These results show that non-thermal REMFS activates an anti-aging hormetic effect as well as reduces cell mortality during lethal stress. Because the REMFS configuration employed in this study can potentially be applied to whole body therapy, prospects for translating these data into clinical interventions for Alzheimer's disease and other degenerative conditions with aging are discussed.

  10. Inflammatory signalling associated with brain dead organ donation: from brain injury to brain stem death and posttransplant ischaemia reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Watts, Ryan P; Thom, Ogilvie; Fraser, John F

    2013-01-01

    Brain death is associated with dramatic and serious pathophysiologic changes that adversely affect both the quantity and quality of organs available for transplant. To fully optimise the donor pool necessitates a more complete understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of organ dysfunction associated with transplantation. These injurious processes are initially triggered by catastrophic brain injury and are further enhanced during both brain death and graft transplantation. The activated inflammatory systems then contribute to graft dysfunction in the recipient. Inflammatory mediators drive this process in concert with the innate and adaptive immune systems. Activation of deleterious immunological pathways in organ grafts occurs, priming them for further inflammation after engraftment. Finally, posttransplantation ischaemia reperfusion injury leads to further generation of inflammatory mediators and consequent activation of the recipient's immune system. Ongoing research has identified key mediators that contribute to the inflammatory milieu inherent in brain dead organ donation. This has seen the development of novel therapies that directly target the inflammatory cascade.

  11. Brief report: Signals enhance the suppressive effects of noncontingent reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Ringdahl, Joel E; Call, Nathan A; Christensen, Tory; Boelter, Eric W

    2010-03-01

    The effects of noncontingent reinforcement (NCR) schedules on responding were assessed across two parameters: presence of signal and schedule density. Results indicated that signaled NCR schedules were correlated with greater overall reductions in responding and quicker reductions relative to NCR schedules without a signal. The clinical significance of these findings is discussed.

  12. Brief Report: Signals Enhance the Suppressive Effects of Noncontingent Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringdahl, Joel E.; Call, Nathan A.; Christensen, Tory; Boelter, Eric W.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of noncontingent reinforcement (NCR) schedules on responding were assessed across two parameters: presence of signal and schedule density. Results indicated that signaled NCR schedules were correlated with greater overall reductions in responding and quicker reductions relative to NCR schedules without a signal. The clinical…

  13. Reduced hippocampal manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) signal during pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus: edema or apoptosis?

    PubMed

    Malheiros, Jackeline Moraes; Persike, Daniele Suzete; Castro, Leticia Urbano Cardoso de; Sanches, Talita Rojas Cunha; Andrade, Lúcia da Conceição; Tannús, Alberto; Covolan, Luciene

    2014-05-01

    Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) has been considered a surrogate marker of Ca(+2) influx into activated cells and tracer of neuronal active circuits. However, the induction of status epilepticus (SE) by kainic acid does not result in hippocampal MEMRI hypersignal, in spite of its high cell activity. Similarly, short durations of status (5 or 15min) induced by pilocarpine did not alter the hippocampal MEMRI, while 30 min of SE even reduced MEMRI signal Thus, this study was designed to investigate possible explanations for the absence or decrease of MEMRI signal after short periods of SE. We analyzed hippocampal caspase-3 activation (to evaluate apoptosis), T2 relaxometry (tissue water content) and aquaporin 4 expression (water-channel protein) of rats subjected to short periods of pilocarpine-induced SE. For the time periods studied here, apoptotic cell death did not contribute to the decrease of the hippocampal MEMRI signal. However, T2 relaxation was higher in the group of animals subjected to 30min of SE than in the other SE or control groups. This result is consistent with higher AQP-4 expression during the same time period. Based on apoptosis and tissue water content analysis, the low hippocampal MEMRI signal 30min after SE can potentially be attributed to local edema rather than to cell death.

  14. Blockade of PD-1 Signaling Enhances Th2 Cell Responses and Aggravates Liver Immunopathology in Mice with Schistosomiasis japonica

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sha; Jin, Xin; Li, Yalin; Li, Wei; Chen, Xiaojun; Xu, Lei; Zhu, Jifeng; Xu, Zhipeng; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Feng; Su, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Background More than 220 million people worldwide are chronically infected with schistosomes, causing severe disease or even death. The major pathological damage occurring in schistosomiasis is attributable to the granulomatous inflammatory response and liver fibrosis induced by schistosome eggs. The inflammatory response is tightly controlled and parallels immunosuppressive regulation, constantly maintaining immune homeostasis and limiting excessive immunopathologic damage in important host organs. It is well known that the activation of programmed death 1 (PD-1) signaling causes a significant suppression of T cell function. However, the roles of PD-1 signaling in modulating CD4+ T cell responses and immunopathology during schistosome infection, have yet to be defined. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we show that PD-1 is upregulated in CD4+ T cells in Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum)-infected patients. We also show the upregulation of PD-1 expression in CD4+ T cells in the spleens, mesenteric lymph nodes, and livers of mice with S. japonicum infection. Finally, we found that the blockade of PD-1 signaling enhanced CD4+ T helper 2 (Th2) cell responses and led to more severe liver immunopathology in mice with S. japonicum infection, without a reduction of egg production or deposition in the host liver. Conclusions/Significance Overall, our study suggests that PD-1 signaling is specifically induced to control Th2-associated inflammatory responses during schistosome infection and is beneficial to the development of PD-1-based control of liver immunopathology. PMID:27792733

  15. Nanomaterial-Assisted Signal Enhancement of Hybridization for DNA Biosensors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinhuai; Liu, Jinyun; Yang, Liangbao; Chen, Xing; Zhang, Meiyun; Meng, Fanli; Luo, Tao; Li, Minqiang

    2009-01-01

    Detection of DNA sequences has received broad attention due to its potential applications in a variety of fields. As sensitivity of DNA biosensors is determined by signal variation of hybridization events, the signal enhancement is of great significance for improving the sensitivity in DNA detection, which still remains a great challenge. Nanomaterials, which possess some unique chemical and physical properties caused by nanoscale effects, provide a new opportunity for developing novel nanomaterial-based signal-enhancers for DNA biosensors. In this review, recent progress concerning this field, including some newly-developed signal enhancement approaches using quantum-dots, carbon nanotubes and their composites reported by our group and other researchers are comprehensively summarized. Reports on signal enhancement of DNA biosensors by non-nanomaterials, such as enzymes and polymer reagents, are also reviewed for comparison. Furthermore, the prospects for developing DNA biosensors using nanomaterials as signal-enhancers in future are also indicated. PMID:22399999

  16. Death and survival in Streptococcus mutans: differing outcomes of a quorum-sensing signaling peptide.

    PubMed

    Leung, Vincent; Dufour, Delphine; Lévesque, Céline M

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are considered "social" organisms able to communicate with one another using small hormone-like molecules (pheromones) in a process called quorum-sensing (QS). These signaling molecules increase in concentration as a function of bacterial cell density. For most human pathogens, QS is critical for virulence and biofilm formation, and the opportunity to interfere with bacterial QS could provide a sophisticated means for manipulating the composition of pathogenic biofilms, and possibly eradicating the infection. Streptococcus mutans is a well-characterized resident of the dental plaque biofilm, and is the major pathogen of dental caries (cavities). In S. mutans, its CSP QS signaling peptide does not act as a classical QS signal by accumulating passively in proportion to cell density. In fact, particular stresses such as those encountered in the oral cavity, induce the production of the CSP pheromone, suggesting that the pheromone most probably functions as a stress-inducible alarmone by triggering the signaling to the bacterial population to initiate an adaptive response that results in different phenotypic outcomes. This mini-review discusses two different CSP-induced phenotypes, bacterial "suicide" and dormancy, and the underlying mechanisms by which S. mutans utilizes the same QS signaling peptide to regulate two opposite phenotypes.

  17. Fisetin induces autophagic cell death through suppression of mTOR signaling pathway in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Yewseok; Afaq, Farrukh; Khan, Naghma; Johnson, Jeremy J.; Khusro, Fatima H.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is an important component of PTEN/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, which is frequently deregulated in prostate cancer (CaP). Recent studies suggest that targeting PTEN/PI3K/Akt and mTOR signaling pathway could be an effective strategy for the treatment of hormone refractory CaP. Here, we show that the treatment of androgen-independent and PTEN-negative human CaP PC3 cells with fisetin, a dietary flavonoid, resulted in inhibition of mTOR kinase signaling pathway. Treatment of cells with fisetin inhibited mTOR activity and downregulated Raptor, Rictor, PRAS40 and GβL that resulted in loss of mTOR complexes (mTORC)1/2 formation. Fisetin also activated the mTOR repressor TSC2 through inhibition of Akt and activation of AMPK. Fisetin-mediated inhibition of mTOR resulted in hypophosphorylation of 4EBP1 and suppression of Cap-dependent translation. We also found that fisetin treatment leads to induction of autophagic-programmed cell death rather than cytoprotective autophagy as shown by small interfering RNA Beclin1-knockdown and autophagy inhibitor. Taken together, we provide evidence that fisetin functions as a dual inhibitor of mTORC1/2 signaling leading to inhibition of Cap-dependent translation and induction of autophagic cell death in PC3 cells. These results suggest that fisetin could be a useful chemotherapeutic agent in treatment of hormone refractory CaP. PMID:20530556

  18. Using linkage between hospital and ABS mortality data to enhance reporting of deaths among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

    PubMed

    Neville, Sarah E; Taylor, Lee K; Moore, Helen; Madden, Richard; Ring, Ian; Pulver, Lisa Jackson; Tickle, Leonie

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the potential of record linkage between the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) mortality data and the NSW Admitted Patient Data Collection (APDC) to improve reporting of deaths among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. ABS mortality data for 2002 to 2006 were linked with APDC records for 2001 to 2006. Six algorithms were developed to enumerate deaths. Possible biases by age, sex and geographic remoteness were investigated. Levels of reporting ranged from baseline reporting on the ABS mortality data to the largest enhancement with the 'ever reported as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander' algorithm. Enhancement was more likely in females, older people and residents of major cities. Data linkage substantially improved reporting of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander deaths. An algorithm that includes both the number of APDC records and the number of facilities reporting a person as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander was considered most promising. Inclusion of other datasets in the enhancement process is warranted to further improve reporting and address possible bias produced by using APDC records only. Further work should take into account the possibility that a person may be falsely reported as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander or not reported in either hospital or death records. © 2011 The Authors. ANZJPH © 2011 Public Health Association of Australia.

  19. Chronic blockade of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors ameliorates synaptic dysfunction and pro-death signaling in Huntington disease transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Dau, Alejandro; Gladding, Clare M; Sepers, Marja D; Raymond, Lynn A

    2014-02-01

    In the YAC128 mouse model of Huntington disease (HD), elevated extrasynaptic NMDA receptor (Ex-NMDAR) expression contributes to the onset of striatal dysfunction and atrophy. A shift in the balance of synaptic-extrasynaptic NMDAR signaling and localization is paralleled by early stage dysregulation of intracellular calcium signaling pathways, including calpain and p38 MAPK activation, that couple to pro-death cascades. However, whether aberrant calcium signaling is a consequence of elevated Ex-NMDAR expression in HD is unknown. Here, we aimed to identify calcium-dependent pathways downstream of Ex-NMDARs in HD. Chronic (2-month) treatment of YAC128 and WT mice with memantine (1 and 10mg/kg/day), which at a low dose selectively blocks Ex-NMDARs, reduced striatal Ex-NMDAR expression and current in 4-month old YAC128 mice without altering synaptic NMDAR levels. In contrast, calpain activity was not affected by memantine treatment, and was elevated in untreated YAC128 mice at 1.5months but not 4months of age. In YAC128 mice, memantine at 1mg/kg/day rescued CREB shut-off, while both doses suppressed p38 MAPK activation to WT levels. Taken together, our results indicate that Ex-NMDAR activity perpetuates increased extrasynaptic NMDAR expression and drives dysregulated p38 MAPK and CREB signaling in YAC128 mice. Elucidation of the pathways downstream of Ex-NMDARs in HD could help provide novel therapeutic targets for this disease.

  20. Novel role for mitochondria: protein kinase Ctheta-dependent oxidative signaling organelles in activation-induced T-cell death.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Marcin; Kiessling, Michael; Süss, Dorothee; Krammer, Peter H; Gülow, Karsten

    2007-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a key role in regulation of activation-induced T-cell death (AICD) by induction of CD95L expression. However, the molecular source and the signaling steps necessary for ROS production are largely unknown. Here, we show that the proximal T-cell receptor-signaling machinery, including ZAP70 (zeta chain-associated protein kinase 70), LAT (linker of activated T cells), SLP76 (SH2 domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa), PLCgamma1 (phospholipase Cgamma1), and PKCtheta (protein kinase Ctheta), are crucial for ROS production. PKCtheta is translocated to the mitochondria. By using cells depleted of mitochondrial DNA, we identified the mitochondria as the source of activation-induced ROS. Inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport complex I assembly by small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of the chaperone NDUFAF1 resulted in a block of ROS production. Complex I-derived ROS are converted into a hydrogen peroxide signal by the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. This signal is essential for CD95L expression, as inhibition of complex I assembly by NDUFAF1-specific siRNA prevents AICD. Similar results were obtained when metformin, an antidiabetic drug and mild complex I inhibitor, was used. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that PKCtheta-dependent ROS generation by mitochondrial complex I is essential for AICD.

  1. From intracellular signaling networks to cell death: the dual role of reactive oxygen species in seed physiology.

    PubMed

    Bailly, Christophe; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Corbineau, Françoise

    2008-10-01

    Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) are continuously produced during seed development, from embryogenesis to germination, but also during seed storage. ROS play a dual role in seed physiology behaving, on the one hand, as actors of cellular signaling pathways and, on the other hand, as toxic products that accumulate under stress conditions. ROS, provided that their amount is tightly regulated by the balance between production and scavenging, appear now as being beneficial for germination, and in particular to act as a positive signal for seed dormancy release. Such an effect might result from the interplay between ROS and hormone signaling pathways thus leading to changes in gene expression or in cellular redox status. We also propose that changes in ROS homeostasis would play a role in perception of environmental factors by seeds during their germination, and thus act as a signal controlling the completion of germination. However, uncontrolled accumulation of ROS is likely to occur during seed aging or seed desiccation thus leading to oxidative damage toward a wide range of biomolecules and ultimately to necroses and cell death. We present here the concept of the "oxidative window for germination", which restricts the occurrence of the cellular events associated with germination to a critical range of ROS level, enclosed by lower and higher limits. Above or below the "oxidative window for germination", weak or high amounts of ROS, respectively, would not permit progress toward germination.

  2. Delicaflavone induces autophagic cell death in lung cancer via Akt/mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Sui, Yuxia; Yao, Hong; Li, Shaoguang; Jin, Long; Shi, Peiying; Li, Zhijun; Wang, Gang; Lin, Shilan; Wu, Youjia; Li, Yuxiang; Huang, Liying; Liu, Qicai; Lin, Xinhua

    2017-03-01

    Searching for potential anticancer agents from natural sources is an effective strategy for developing novel chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, data supporting the in vitro and in vivo anticancer effects of delicaflavone, a rarely occurring biflavonoid from Selaginella doederleinii, were reported. Delicaflavone exhibited favorable anticancer properties, as shown by the MTT assay and xenograft model of human non-small cell lung cancer in male BALB/c nude mice without observable adverse effect. By transmission electron microscopy with acridine orange and Cyto-ID®Autophagy detection dyes, Western blot analysis, and RT-PCR assay, we confirmed that delicaflavone induces autophagic cell death by increasing the ratio of LC3-II to LC3-I, which are autophagy-related proteins, and promoting the generation of acidic vesicular organelles and autolysosomes in the cytoplasm of human lung cancer A549 and PC-9 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Delicaflavone downregulated the expression of phospho-Akt, phospho-mTOR, and phospho-p70S6K in a time- and dose-dependent manner, suggesting that it induced autophagy by inhibiting the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway in A549 and PC-9 cells. Delicaflavone is a potential anticancer agent that can induce autophagic cell death in human non-small cell lung cancer via the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway. Delicaflavone showed anti-lung cancer effects in vitro and in vivo. Delicaflavone induced autophagic cell death via Akt/mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway. Delicaflavone did not show observable side effects in a xenograft mouse model. Delicaflavone may represent a potential therapeutic agent for lung cancer.

  3. 15-epi-lipoxin A4 inhibits myeloperoxidase signaling and enhances resolution of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    El Kebir, Driss; József, Levente; Pan, Wanling; Wang, Lili; Petasis, Nicos A; Serhan, Charles N; Filep, János G

    2009-08-15

    Apoptosis is essential for removal of neutrophils from inflamed tissues and efficient resolution of inflammation. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), abundantly expressed in neutrophils, not only generates cytotoxic oxidants but also signals through the beta(2) integrin Mac-1 to rescue neutrophils from constitutive apoptosis, thereby prolonging inflammation. Because aspirin-triggered 15-epi-lipoxin A(4) (15-epi-LXA(4)) modulates Mac-1 expression, we investigated the impact of 15-epi-LXA(4) on MPO suppression of neutrophil apoptosis and MPO-mediated neutrophil-dependent acute lung injury. Human neutrophils were cultured with MPO with or without 15-epi-LXA(4) to investigate development of apoptosis. Acute lung injury was produced by intratracheal injection of carrageenan plus MPO or intraperitoneal injection of live Escherichia coli in mice, and the animals were treated with 15-epi-LXA(4) at the peak of inflammation. 15-Epi-LXA(4) through down-regulation of Mac-1 expression promoted apoptosis of human neutrophils by attenuating MPO-induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Akt-mediated phosphorylation of Bad and by reducing expression of the antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1, thereby aggravating mitochondrial dysfunction. The proapoptotic effect of 15-epi-LXA(4) was dominant over MPO-mediated effects even when it was added at 4 hours post MPO. In mice, treatment with 15-epi-LXA(4) accelerated the resolution of established carrageenan plus MPO-evoked as well as E. coli-induced neutrophil-dependent pulmonary inflammation through redirecting neutrophils to caspase-mediated cell death and facilitating their removal by macrophages. These results demonstrate that aspirin-triggered 15-epi-LXA(4) enhances resolution of inflammation by overriding the powerful antiapoptosis signal from MPO, thereby demonstrating a hitherto unrecognized mechanism by which aspirin promotes resolution of inflammation.

  4. Adaptive phase matching probe-injection technique for enhancement of Brillouin scattering signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongwei; Shi, Guangyao; Lv, Yuelan; Zhang, Hongying; Gao, Wei

    2017-08-01

    We report on a simple and efficient method for enhancing Brillouin scattering signal, i.e., adaptive phase matching (APM) probe-injection technique. In this technique, a low-polarization broad-spectrum probe wave is injected opposite to the pump, which can enhance any stokes signal in its APM range instantly by selective stimulated Brillouin amplification. With advantages of simple scheme, real-time multi-signal enhancement and sweep-free measurement, this technique has a great potential for improving the signal-to-noise ratio of Brillouin gain spectrum in the Brillouin scattering application systems.

  5. Mechanisms in photodynamic therapy: part two—cellular signaling, cell metabolism and modes of cell death

    PubMed Central

    Castano, Ana P.; Demidova, Tatiana N.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been known for over a hundred years, but is only now becoming widely used. Originally developed as a tumor therapy, some of its most successful applications are for non-malignant disease. In the second of a series of three reviews, we will discuss the mechanisms that operate in PDT on a cellular level. In Part I [Castano AP, Demidova TN, Hamblin MR. Mechanism in photodynamic therapy: part one—photosensitizers, photochemistry and cellular localization. Photodiagn Photodyn Ther 2004;1:279–93] it was shown that one of the most important factors governing the outcome of PDT, is how the photosensitizer (PS) interacts with cells in the target tissue or tumor, and the key aspect of this interaction is the subcellular localization of the PS. PS can localize in mitochondria, lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and plasma membranes. An explosion of investigation and explorations in the field of cell biology have elucidated many of the pathways that mammalian cells undergo when PS are delivered in tissue culture and subsequently illuminated. There is an acute stress response leading to changes in calcium and lipid metabolism and production of cytokines and stress proteins. Enzymes particularly, protein kinases, are activated and transcription factors are expressed. Many of the cellular responses are centered on mitochondria. These effects frequently lead to induction of apoptosis either by the mitochondrial pathway involving caspases and release of cytochrome c, or by pathways involving ceramide or death receptors. However, under certain circumstances cells subjected to PDT die by necrosis. Although there have been many reports of DNA damage caused by PDT, this is not thought to be an important cell-death pathway. This mechanistic research is expected to lead to optimization of PDT as a tumor treatment, and to rational selection of combination therapies that include PDT as a component. PMID:25048553

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons enhance terminal cell death of human ectocervical cells.

    PubMed

    Rorke, E A; Sizemore, N; Mukhtar, H; Couch, L H; Howard, P C

    1998-09-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are a class of chemical carcinogens whose active metabolites form DNA adducts, resulting in specific mutational events. The tumor suppressor protein p53 is believed to play a pivotal role in the ability of cells to response to DNA damage, resulting in either cell cycle arrest in G1 or apoptosis under conditions of excessive damage. This growth inhibition is associated with the concomitant induction of p53 and enhanced terminal cell differentiation. In this study we evaluated the effects of PAH on cell growth, cell differentiation, xenobiotic metabolism, and DNA adduct levels in normal ectocervical epithelial cells (ECE) and compared them to cervical cells whose p53 have been inactivated either by binding to viral HPV E6 oncogene (ECE16-1) or by mutation (C33A). The PAH 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC) inhibited normal ECE and to a lesser extent ECE16-1 cell proliferation. Not only did the growth inhibition occur at lower concentrations in the normal cells but the extent of inhibition was also greater in normal as compared to immortalized cells. Benzanthracene (BA) had a minor effect on normal ECE cells with no effect on immortalized ECE16-1 cells. C33A cell growth was unaffected by 3MC and BA. Terminal cell death was enhanced only in normal ECE cells as evidenced by increased envelope formation and was paralleled by an increase in the level of p53 following 3MC treatment. The differentiation status of the 3MC-treated cells was similar to untreated cells as indicated by three independent markers of cell differentiation; transglutaminase, involucrin, keratin expression. There was no difference in the pattern or level of DNA adducts formed in normal and immortalized cells following 3MC treatment. In addition the basal level of metabolism of 14C-BaP to phenols, diols and quinnones was unaltered by pretreatment with either 3MC or BA. These results demonstrate that immortalized cervical cells are less sensitive to toxicant damage [i

  7. Reactive oxygen species trigger motoneuron death in non-cell-autonomous models of ALS through activation of c-Abl signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Fabiola; Gonzalez, David; Cortes, Nicole; Ampuero, Estibaliz; Hernández, Diego E.; Fritz, Elsa; Abarzua, Sebastián; Martinez, Alexis; Elorza, Alvaro A.; Alvarez, Alejandra; Court, Felipe; van Zundert, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease in which pathogenesis and death of motor neurons are triggered by non-cell-autonomous mechanisms. We showed earlier that exposing primary rat spinal cord cultures to conditioned media derived from primary mouse astrocyte conditioned media (ACM) that express human SOD1G93A (ACM-hSOD1G93A) quickly enhances Nav channel-mediated excitability and calcium influx, generates intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and leads to death of motoneurons within days. Here we examined the role of mitochondrial structure and physiology and of the activation of c-Abl, a tyrosine kinase that induces apoptosis. We show that ACM-hSOD1G93A, but not ACM-hSOD1WT, increases c-Abl activity in motoneurons, interneurons and glial cells, starting at 60 min; the c-Abl inhibitor STI571 (imatinib) prevents this ACM-hSOD1G93A-mediated motoneuron death. Interestingly, similar results were obtained with ACM derived from astrocytes expressing SOD1G86R or TDP43A315T. We further find that co-application of ACM-SOD1G93A with blockers of Nav channels (spermidine, mexiletine, or riluzole) or anti-oxidants (Trolox, esculetin, or tiron) effectively prevent c-Abl activation and motoneuron death. In addition, ACM-SOD1G93A induces alterations in the morphology of neuronal mitochondria that are related with their membrane depolarization. Finally, we find that blocking the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore with cyclosporine A, or inhibiting mitochondrial calcium uptake with Ru360, reduces ROS production and c-Abl activation. Together, our data point to a sequence of events in which a toxic factor(s) released by ALS-expressing astrocytes rapidly induces hyper-excitability, which in turn increases calcium influx and affects mitochondrial structure and physiology. ROS production, mediated at least in part through mitochondrial alterations, trigger c-Abl signaling and lead to motoneuron death. PMID:26106294

  8. Reactive oxygen species trigger motoneuron death in non-cell-autonomous models of ALS through activation of c-Abl signaling.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Fabiola; Gonzalez, David; Cortes, Nicole; Ampuero, Estibaliz; Hernández, Diego E; Fritz, Elsa; Abarzua, Sebastián; Martinez, Alexis; Elorza, Alvaro A; Alvarez, Alejandra; Court, Felipe; van Zundert, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease in which pathogenesis and death of motor neurons are triggered by non-cell-autonomous mechanisms. We showed earlier that exposing primary rat spinal cord cultures to conditioned media derived from primary mouse astrocyte conditioned media (ACM) that express human SOD1(G93A) (ACM-hSOD1(G93A)) quickly enhances Nav channel-mediated excitability and calcium influx, generates intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and leads to death of motoneurons within days. Here we examined the role of mitochondrial structure and physiology and of the activation of c-Abl, a tyrosine kinase that induces apoptosis. We show that ACM-hSOD1(G93A), but not ACM-hSOD1(WT), increases c-Abl activity in motoneurons, interneurons and glial cells, starting at 60 min; the c-Abl inhibitor STI571 (imatinib) prevents this ACM-hSOD1(G93A)-mediated motoneuron death. Interestingly, similar results were obtained with ACM derived from astrocytes expressing SOD1(G86R) or TDP43(A315T). We further find that co-application of ACM-SOD1(G93A) with blockers of Nav channels (spermidine, mexiletine, or riluzole) or anti-oxidants (Trolox, esculetin, or tiron) effectively prevent c-Abl activation and motoneuron death. In addition, ACM-SOD1(G93A) induces alterations in the morphology of neuronal mitochondria that are related with their membrane depolarization. Finally, we find that blocking the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore with cyclosporine A, or inhibiting mitochondrial calcium uptake with Ru360, reduces ROS production and c-Abl activation. Together, our data point to a sequence of events in which a toxic factor(s) released by ALS-expressing astrocytes rapidly induces hyper-excitability, which in turn increases calcium influx and affects mitochondrial structure and physiology. ROS production, mediated at least in part through mitochondrial alterations, trigger c-Abl signaling and lead to motoneuron death.

  9. A Method of Speech Periodicity Enhancement Using Transform-domain Signal Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huang; Lee, Tan; Kleijn, W Bastiaan; Kong, Ying-Yee

    2015-03-01

    Periodicity is an important property of speech signals. It is the basis of the signal's fundamental frequency and the pitch of voice, which is crucial to speech communication. This paper presents a novel framework of periodicity enhancement for noisy speech. The enhancement is applied to the linear prediction residual of speech. The residual signal goes through a constant-pitch time warping process and two sequential lapped-frequency transforms, by which the periodic component is concentrated in certain transform coefficients. By emphasizing the respective transform coefficients, periodicity enhancement of noisy residual signal is achieved. The enhanced residual signal and estimated linear prediction filter parameters are used to synthesize the output speech. An adaptive algorithm is proposed for adjusting the weights for the periodic and aperiodic components. Effectiveness of the proposed approach is demonstrated via experimental evaluation. It is observed that harmonic structure of the original speech could be properly restored to improve the perceptual quality of enhanced speech.

  10. Enhanced endocannabinoid signaling elevates neuronal excitability in fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Longhua; Alger, Bradley E

    2010-04-21

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) results from deficiency of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FXS is the most common heritable form of mental retardation, and is associated with the occurrence of seizures. Factors responsible for initiating FXS-related hyperexcitability are poorly understood. Many protein-synthesis-dependent functions of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (Gp1 mGluRs) are exaggerated in FXS. Gp1 mGluR activation can mobilize endocannabinoids (eCBs) in the hippocampus and thereby increase excitability, but whether FMRP affects eCBs is unknown. We studied Fmr1 knock-out (KO) mice lacking FMRP to test the hypothesis that eCB function is altered in FXS. Whole-cell evoked IPSCs (eIPSCs) and field potentials were recorded in the CA1 region of acute hippocampal slices. Three eCB-mediated responses were examined: depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition (DSI), mGluR-initiated eCB-dependent inhibitory short-term depression (eCB-iSTD), and eCB-dependent inhibitory long-term depression (eCB-iLTD). Low concentrations of a Gp1 mGluR agonist produced larger eCB-mediated responses in Fmr1 KO mice than in wild-type (WT) mice, without affecting DSI. Western blots revealed that levels of mGluR1, mGluR5, or cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) were unchanged in Fmr1 KO animals, suggesting that the coupling between mGluR activation and eCB mobilization was enhanced by FMRP deletion. The increased susceptibility of Fmr1 KO slices to eCB-iLTD was physiologically relevant, since long-term potentiation of EPSP-spike (E-S) coupling induced by the mGluR agonist was markedly larger in Fmr1 KO mice than in WT animals. Alterations in eCB signaling could contribute to the cognitive dysfunction associated with FXS.

  11. Targeting cell death signalling in cancer: minimising ‘Collateral damage'

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Joanna L; MacFarlane, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Targeting apoptosis for the treatment of cancer has become an increasingly attractive strategy, with agents in development to trigger extrinsic apoptosis via TRAIL signalling, or to prevent the anti-apoptotic activity of BCL-2 proteins or inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins. Although the evasion of apoptosis is one of the hallmarks of cancer, many cancers have intact apoptotic signalling pathways, which if unblocked could efficiently kill cancerous cells. However, it is becoming increasing clear that without a detailed understanding of both apoptotic and non-apoptotic signalling, and the key proteins that regulate these pathways, there can be dose-limiting toxicity and adverse effects associated with their modulation. Here we review the main apoptotic pathways directly targeted for anti-cancer therapy and the unforeseen consequences of their modulation. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of an in-depth mechanistic understanding of both the apoptotic and non-apoptotic functions of those proteins under investigation as anti-cancer drug targets and outline some novel approaches to sensitise cancer cells to apoptosis, thereby improving the efficacy of existing therapies when used in combination with novel targeted agents. PMID:27140313

  12. Oviductal estrogen receptor α signaling prevents protease-mediated embryo death

    PubMed Central

    Winuthayanon, Wipawee; Bernhardt, Miranda L; Padilla-Banks, Elizabeth; Myers, Page H; Edin, Matthew L; Lih, Fred B; Hewitt, Sylvia C; Korach, Kenneth S; Williams, Carmen J

    2015-01-01

    Development of uterine endometrial receptivity for implantation is orchestrated by cyclic steroid hormone-mediated signals. It is unknown if these signals are necessary for oviduct function in supporting fertilization and preimplantation development. Here we show that conditional knockout (cKO) mice lacking estrogen receptor α (ERα) in oviduct and uterine epithelial cells have impaired fertilization due to a dramatic reduction in sperm migration. In addition, all successfully fertilized eggs die before the 2-cell stage due to persistence of secreted innate immune mediators including proteases. Elevated protease activity in cKO oviducts causes premature degradation of the zona pellucida and embryo lysis, and wild-type embryos transferred into cKO oviducts fail to develop normally unless rescued by concomitant transfer of protease inhibitors. Thus, suppression of oviductal protease activity mediated by estrogen-epithelial ERα signaling is required for fertilization and preimplantation embryo development. These findings have implications for human infertility and post-coital contraception. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10453.001 PMID:26623518

  13. [Death of neurons and glial cells, induced by a photodynamic injury: signaling processes and neurone-glial interactions].

    PubMed

    Uzdenskiĭ, A B; Kolosov, M S; Lobanov, A V

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms of photodynamic (PD) injury of neurons and glial cells are reviewed. Neuron responses: firing stimulation at high photosensitizer concentrations and inhibition at low concentrations (< 10(-7) M) that were followed by necrosis, are described. Glial cells died from both necrosis and apoptosis. Local laser inactivation of a neuron enhanced PD-induced apoptosis of glial cells, thus indicating that neuron maintained the survival of glia. Inter- and intracellular signaling mediated photodamage of these cells. Using inhibitors or activators of signaling proteins, the involvement of Ca(2+)-, adenylate cyclase- and tyrosine kinase-mediated signaling pathways in responses of neurons and glial cells to photosensitization was shown. Their pharmacological modulation can change selectivity of PD injury of neuronal and glial cells and efficiency of PD therapy.

  14. Honokiol synergizes chemotherapy drugs in multidrug resistant breast cancer cells via enhanced apoptosis and additional programmed necrotic death.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei; Deng, Yongchuan; Li, Ling; He, Haifei; Sun, Jie; Xu, Dong

    2013-02-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major challenge in cancer therapy. Apoptosis tolerance is one of the key mechanisms of MDR. Honokiol, a small-molecule pharmacologically active component, exhibits competent cytotoxicity in a variety of human cancer cells through apoptosis and other forms of programmed cell death (such as programmed necrosis). Although much work has been done on its antitumor effects, little attention has been paid on systemic evaluation of efficacy of honokiol combined with other chemotherapeutic agents, especially in drug‑resistant cell lines. Here, we systematically and quantitatively assess its combinational effect with different chemotherapeutic agents using the combination index (CI) equation. We found that honokiol synergized with chemotherapeutic agents both in sensitive and resistant, solid and non-solid (MCF-7, HL-60, MCF-7/ADR and HL-60/ADR) cell lines. Honokiol (40 µg/ml) induced necrotic cell death in MCF-7/ADR cells with characterized morphological and biochemical features. Co-incubation with honokiol and etoposide (VP-16) activated a complex death modality, which was composed of necrotic cell death and apoptosis. This dual-death pathway was shut down when pretreated with pan-caspase inhibitor (z-VAD-fmk) and cyclophilin D inhibitor (cyclosporin A). Western blot analysis results proved that honokiol also enhanced VP-16-induced apoptosis potentially via blocking nuclear factor‑κB (NF-κB) activation. Our data for the first time quantitatively demonstrate that honokiol synergizes frequently-used chemotherapeutic agents via enhanced apoptosis and additional programmed necrotic death. These findings indicate a promising way to circumvent MDR and apoptosis tolerance.

  15. Smad1/Smad5 signaling in limb ectoderm functions redundantly and is required for interdigital programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yuk Lau; Behringer, Richard R; Kwan, Kin Ming

    2012-03-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are secreted signals that regulate apical ectodermal ridge (AER) functions and interdigital programmed cell death (PCD) of developing limb. However the identities of the intracellular mediators of these signals are unknown. To investigate the role of Smad proteins in BMP-regulated AER functions in limb development, we inactivated Smad1 and Smad5 selectively in AER and ventral ectoderm of developing limb, using Smad1 or/and Smad5 floxed alleles and an En1(Cre/+) knock-in allele. Single inactivation of either Smad1 or Smad5 did not result in limb abnormalities. However, the Smad1/Smad5 double mutants exhibited syndactyly due to a reduction in interdigital PCD and an increase in interdigital cell proliferation. Cell tracing experiments in the Smad1/Smad5 double mutants showed that ventral ectoderm became thicker and the descendents of ventral En1(Cre/+) expressing ectodermal cells were located at dorsal interdigital regions. At the molecular level, Fgf8 expression was prolonged in the interdigital ectoderm of embryonic day (E) 13 Smad1/Smad5 double mutants, suggesting that the ectopic Fgf8 expression may serve as a survival signal for interdigital epithelial and mesenchymal cells. Our result suggests that Smad1 and Smad5 are required and function redundantly as intracellular mediators for BMP signaling in the AER and ventral ectoderm. Smad1/Smad5 signaling in the AER and ventral ectoderm regulates interdigital tissue regression of developing limb. Our mutants with defects in interdigital PCD could also serve as a valuable model for investigation of PCD regulation machinery.

  16. The Inhibition of microRNA-128 on IGF-1-Activating mTOR Signaling Involves in Temozolomide-Induced Glioma Cell Apoptotic Death

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peng-Hsu; Cheng, Chia-Hsiung; Shih, Chwen-Ming; Ho, Kuo-Hao; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Liu, Ann-Jeng; Chang, Cheng-Kuei

    2016-01-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ), an alkylating agent of the imidazotetrazine series, is a first-line chemotherapeutic drug used in the clinical therapy of glioblastoma multiforme, the most common and high-grade primary glioma in adults. Micro (mi)RNAs, which are small noncoding RNAs, post-transcriptionally regulate gene expressions and are involved in gliomagenesis. However, no studies have reported relationships between TMZ and miRNA gene regulation. We investigated TMZ-mediated miRNA profiles and its molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of glioma cell death. By performing miRNA microarray and bioinformatics analyses, we observed that expression of 248 miRNAs was altered, including five significantly upregulated and 17 significantly downregulated miRNAs, in TMZ-treated U87MG cells. miR-128 expression levels were lower in different glioma cells and strongly associated with poor survival. TMZ treatment significantly upregulated miR-128 expression. TMZ significantly enhanced miR-128-1 promoter activity and transcriptionally regulated miR-128 levels through c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2/c-Jun pathways. The overexpression and knockdown of miR-128 expression significantly affected TMZ-mediated cell viability and apoptosis-related protein expression. Furthermore, the overexpression of miR-128 alone enhanced apoptotic death of glioma cells through caspase-3/9 activation, poly(ADP ribose) polymerase degradation, reactive oxygen species generation, mitochondrial membrane potential loss, and non-protective autophagy formation. Finally, we identified that key members in mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling including mTOR, rapamycin-insensitive companion of mTOR, insulin-like growth factor 1, and PIK3R1, but not PDK1, were direct target genes of miR-128. TMZ inhibited mTOR signaling through miR-128 regulation. These results indicate that miR-128-inhibited mTOR signaling is involved in TMZ-mediated cytotoxicity. Our findings may provide a better understanding of cytotoxic

  17. The N-terminal loop of IRAK-4 death domain regulates ordered assembly of the Myddosome signalling scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Dossang, Anthony C. G.; Motshwene, Precious G.; Yang, Yang; Symmons, Martyn F.; Bryant, Clare E.; Borman, Satty; George, Julie; Weber, Alexander N. R.; Gay, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of Toll-like receptors induces dimerization and the recruitment of the death domain (DD) adaptor protein MyD88 into an oligomeric post receptor complex termed the Myddosome. The Myddosome is a hub for inflammatory and oncogenic signaling and has a hierarchical arrangement with 6–8 MyD88 molecules assembling with exactly 4 of IRAK-4 and 4 of IRAK-2. Here we show that a conserved motif in IRAK-4 (Ser8-X-X-X-Arg12) is autophosphorylated and that the phosphorylated DD is unable to form Myddosomes. Furthermore a mutant DD with the phospho-mimetic residue Asp at this position is impaired in both signalling and Myddosome assembly. IRAK-4 Arg12 is also essential for Myddosome assembly and signalling and we propose that phosphorylated Ser8 induces the N-terminal loop to fold into an α-helix. This conformer is stabilised by an electrostatic interaction between phospho-Ser8 and Arg12 and would destabilise a critical interface between IRAK-4 and MyD88. Interestingly IRAK-2 does not conserve this motif and has an alternative interface in the Myddosome that requires Arg67, a residue conserved in paralogues, IRAK-1 and 3(M). PMID:27876844

  18. A magnetic switch for the control of cell death signalling in in vitro and in vivo systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Mi Hyeon; Lee, Eun Jung; Son, Mina; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Yoo, Dongwon; Kim, Ji-Wook; Park, Seung Woo; Shin, Jeon-Soo; Cheon, Jinwoo

    2012-12-01

    The regulation of cellular activities in a controlled manner is one of the most challenging issues in fields ranging from cell biology to biomedicine. Nanoparticles have the potential of becoming useful tools for controlling cell signalling pathways in a space and time selective fashion. Here, we have developed magnetic nanoparticles that turn on apoptosis cell signalling by using a magnetic field in a remote and non-invasive manner. The magnetic switch consists of zinc-doped iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (Zn0.4Fe2.6O4), conjugated with a targeting antibody for death receptor 4 (DR4) of DLD-1 colon cancer cells. The magnetic switch, in its On mode when a magnetic field is applied to aggregate magnetic nanoparticle-bound DR4s, promotes apoptosis signalling pathways. We have also demonstrated that the magnetic switch is operable at the micrometre scale and that it can be applied in an in vivo system where apoptotic morphological changes of zebrafish are successfully induced.

  19. Inhibition of autophagy enhances Hydroquinone-induced TK6 cell death.

    PubMed

    Xu, Longmei; Liu, Jiaxian; Chen, Yuting; Yun, Lin; Chen, Shaoyun; Zhou, Kairu; Lai, Bei; Song, Li; Yang, Hui; Liang, Hairong; Tang, Huanwen

    2017-03-02

    Hydroquinone (HQ), one of the metabolic products of benzene, is a carcinogen. It can induce apoptosis in lymphoma cells. However, whether HQ can induce autophagy and what roles autophagy plays in TK6 cells exposured to HQ remains unclear. In this study, we found that HQ could induce autophagy through techniques of qRT-PCR, Western blot, immunofluorescent assay of LC3 and transmission electron microscope. Furthermore, inhibiting autophagy using 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or chloroquine (CQ) significantly enhanced HQ-induced cell apoptosis, suggesting that autophagy may be a survival mechanism. Our study also showed that HQ activated PARP-1. Moreover, knockdown of PARP-1 strongly exhibited decreased autophagy related genes expression. In contrast, the absence of SIRT1 increased that. Altogether, our data provided evidence that HQ induced autophagy in TK6 cells and autophagy protected TK6 from HQ attack-induced injury in vitro, and the autophagy was partially mediated via activation of the PARP-1-SIRT1 signaling pathway.

  20. Heat shock protein 60 or 70 activates nitric-oxide synthase (NOS) I- and inhibits NOS II-associated signaling and depresses the mitochondrial apoptotic cascade during brain stem death.

    PubMed

    Chan, Julie Y H; Cheng, Hsiao-Lei; Chou, Jimmy L J; Li, Faith C H; Dai, Kuang-Yu; Chan, Samuel H H; Chang, Alice Y W

    2007-02-16

    The cellular and molecular basis of brain stem death remains an enigma. As the origin of a "life-and-death" signal that reflects the progression toward brain stem death, the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) is a suitable neural substrate for mechanistic delineation of this phenomenon. Here, we evaluated the hypothesis that heat shock proteins (HSPs) play a neuroprotective role in the RVLM during brain stem death and delineated the underlying mechanisms, using a clinically relevant animal model that employed the organophosphate pesticide mevinphos (Mev) as the experimental insult. In Sprague-Dawley rats, proteomic, Western blot, and real-time PCR analyses demonstrated that Mev induced de novo synthesis of HSP60 or HSP70 in the RVLM without affecting HSP90 level. Loss-of-function manipulations of HSP60 or HSP70 in the RVLM using anti-serum or antisense oligonucleotide potentiated Mev-elicited cardiovascular depression alongside reduced nitric-oxide synthase (NOS) I/protein kinase G signaling, enhanced NOS II/peroxynitrite cascade, intensified nucleosomal DNA fragmentation, elevated cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragments or activated caspase-3, and augmented the cytochrome c/caspase-3 cascade of apoptotic signaling in the RVLM. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments further revealed a progressive increase in the complex formed between HSP60 and mitochondrial or cytosolic Bax or mitochondrial Bcl-2 during Mev intoxication, alongside a dissociation of the cytosolic HSP60-Bcl-2 complex. We conclude that HSP60 and HSP70 confer neuroprotection against Mev intoxication by ameliorating cardiovascular depression via an anti-apoptotic action in the RVLM. The possible underlying intracellular processes include enhancing NOS I/protein kinase G signaling and inhibiting the NOS II/peroxynitrite cascade. In addition, HSP60 exerts its effects against apoptosis by blunting Mev-induced activation of the Bax/cytochrome c/caspase-3 cascade.

  1. Extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-induced tau overexpression mediates neuronal death through suppressing survival signaling ERK phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xu-Ying; Tuo, Qing-Zhang; Liuyang, Zhen-Yu; Xie, Ao-Ji; Feng, Xiao-Long; Yan, Xiong; Qiu, Mei; Li, Shen; Wang, Xiu-Lian; Cao, Fu-Yuan; Wang, Xiao-Chuan; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular accumulation of the hyperphosphorylated tau is a pathological hallmark in the brain of Alzheimer disease. Activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors (E-NMDARs) induces excitatory toxicity that is involved in Alzheimer's neurodegeneration. However, the intrinsic link between E-NMDARs and the tau-induced neuronal damage remains elusive. In the present study, we showed in cultured primary cortical neurons that activation of E-NMDA receptors but not synaptic NMDA receptors dramatically increased tau mRNA and protein levels, with a simultaneous neuronal degeneration and decreased neuronal survival. Memantine, a selective antagonist of E-NMDARs, reversed E-NMDARs-induced tau overexpression. Activation of E-NMDARs in wild-type mouse brains resulted in neuron loss in hippocampus, whereas tau deletion in neuronal cultures and in the mouse brains rescued the E-NMDARs-induced neuronal death and degeneration. The E-NMDARs-induced tau overexpression was correlated with a reduced ERK phosphorylation, whereas the increased MEK activity, decreased binding and activity of ERK phosphatase to ERK, and increased ERK phosphorylation were observed in tau knockout mice. On the contrary, addition of tau proteins promoted ERK dephosphorylation in vitro. Taking together, these results indicate that tau overexpression mediates the excitatory toxicity induced by E-NMDAR activation through inhibiting ERK phosphorylation. PMID:27809304

  2. Deoxycholic acid modulates cell death signaling through changes in mitochondrial membrane properties[S

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Tânia; Castro, Rui E.; Pinto, Sandra N.; Coutinho, Ana; Lucas, Susana D.; Moreira, Rui; Rodrigues, Cecília M. P.; Prieto, Manuel; Fernandes, Fábio

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic bile acids, such as deoxycholic acid (DCA), are responsible for hepatocyte cell death during intrahepatic cholestasis. The mechanisms responsible for this effect are unclear, and recent studies conflict, pointing to either a modulation of plasma membrane structure or mitochondrial-mediated toxicity through perturbation of mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) properties. We conducted a comprehensive comparative study of the impact of cytotoxic and cytoprotective bile acids on the membrane structure of different cellular compartments. We show that DCA increases the plasma membrane fluidity of hepatocytes to a minor extent, and that this effect is not correlated with the incidence of apoptosis. Additionally, plasma membrane fluidity recovers to normal values over time suggesting the presence of cellular compensatory mechanisms for this perturbation. Colocalization experiments in living cells confirmed the presence of bile acids within mitochondrial membranes. Experiments with active isolated mitochondria revealed that physiologically active concentrations of DCA change MOM order in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, and that these changes preceded the mitochondrial permeability transition. Importantly, these effects are not observed on liposomes mimicking MOM lipid composition, suggesting that DCA apoptotic activity depends on features of mitochondrial membranes that are absent in protein-free mimetic liposomes, such as the double-membrane structure, lipid asymmetry, or mitochondrial protein environment. In contrast, the mechanism of action of cytoprotective bile acids is likely not associated with changes in cellular membrane structure. PMID:26351365

  3. Black Soybean Seed Coat Extract Prevents Hydrogen Peroxide-Mediated Cell Death via Extracellular Signal-Related Kinase Signalling in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Naoto; Oki, Tomoyuki; Sasaki, Kazunori; Suda, Ikuo; Okuno, Shigenori

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress reduces cell viability and contributes to disease processes. Flavonoids including anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins reportedly induce intracellular antioxidant defence systems. Thus, in this study, we examined the antioxidant effects of a commercial extract from black soybean seed coats (BE), which are rich in anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin, and investigated the associated intracellular mechanisms in HepG2 cells. HepG2 cells treated with hydrogen peroxide (HPO) showed 60% viability, whereas pretreatment with BE-containing media for 2 h ameliorated HPO-mediated cell death by up to 90%. Pretreatment with BE for 2 h partially blocked HPO-mediated activation of ERK in HepG2 cells, and that for 1 h led to a 20% increase in intracellular total protein phosphatase (PP) activity, which is known to deactivate protein kinases. These results indicate that BE prevents HPO-mediated cell damage by inhibiting ERK signalling, potentially via PPs.

  4. Signal enhancement in collinear four-wave mixing

    SciTech Connect

    McKinstrie, C.J.; Luther, G.G.; Batha, S. )

    1990-03-01

    The solitary-wave solutions of the four-wave equations are studied, and their relevance to four-wave mixing in finite media is discussed. In general, the transfer of action from the pump waves to the probe and signal waves is limited by nonlinear phase shifts that detune the interaction. However, by controlling the linear phase mismatch judiciously, it is often possible to effect a complete transfer of action from the pump waves to the probe and signal waves.

  5. Cell death triggers olfactory circuit plasticity via glial signaling in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kazama, Hokto; Yaksi, Emre; Wilson, Rachel I.

    2011-01-01

    The Drosophila antennal lobe is organized into glomerular compartments where olfactory receptor neurons synapse onto projection neurons. Projection neuron dendrites also receive input from local neurons which interconnect glomeruli. In this study, we investigated how activity in this circuit changes over time when sensory afferents are chronically removed in vivo. In the normal circuit, excitatory connections between glomeruli are weak. However, after we chronically severed receptor neuron axons projecting to a subset of glomeruli, we found that odor-evoked lateral excitatory input to deafferented projection neurons was potentiated several-fold. This was due at least in part to strengthened electrical synapses from excitatory local neurons onto projection neurons, as well as increased activity in excitatory local neurons. Merely silencing receptor neurons was not sufficient to elicit these changes, implying that severing receptor neuron axons is the relevant signal. When we expressed the neuroprotective gene Wallerian degeneration slow (WldS) in receptor neurons prior to severing their axons, this blocked the induction of plasticity. Because expressing WldS prevents severed axons from recruiting glia, this result suggests a role for glia. Consistent with this, we found that blocking endocytosis in ensheathing glia blocked the induction of plasticity. In sum, these results reveal a novel injury response whereby severed sensory axons recruit glia, which in turn signal to central neurons to upregulate their activity. By strengthening excitatory interactions between neurons in a deafferented brain region, this mechanism might help boost activity to compensate for lost sensory input. PMID:21613475

  6. Cell death triggers olfactory circuit plasticity via glial signaling in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Hokto; Yaksi, Emre; Wilson, Rachel I

    2011-05-25

    The Drosophila antennal lobe is organized into glomerular compartments, where olfactory receptor neurons synapse onto projection neurons. Projection neuron dendrites also receive input from local neurons, which interconnect glomeruli. In this study, we investigated how activity in this circuit changes over time when sensory afferents are chronically removed in vivo. In the normal circuit, excitatory connections between glomeruli are weak. However, after we chronically severed receptor neuron axons projecting to a subset of glomeruli, we found that odor-evoked lateral excitatory input to deafferented projection neurons was potentiated severalfold. This was caused, at least in part, by strengthened electrical coupling from excitatory local neurons onto projection neurons, as well as increased activity in excitatory local neurons. Merely silencing receptor neurons was not sufficient to elicit these changes, implying that severing receptor neuron axons is the relevant signal. When we expressed the neuroprotective gene Wallerian degeneration slow (Wld(S)) in receptor neurons before severing their axons, this blocked the induction of plasticity. Because expressing Wld(S) prevents severed axons from recruiting glia, this result suggests a role for glia. Consistent with this, we found that blocking endocytosis in ensheathing glia blocked the induction of plasticity. In sum, these results reveal a novel injury response whereby severed sensory axons recruit glia, which in turn signal to central neurons to upregulate their activity. By strengthening excitatory interactions between neurons in a deafferented brain region, this mechanism might help boost activity to compensate for lost sensory input.

  7. Deciphering the Complex Signaling Systems That Regulate Intestinal Epithelial Cell Death Processes and Shedding

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Angela M.; Watson, Alastair J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells play a fundamental role in maintaining homeostasis. Shedding of intestinal cells in a controlled manner is critical to maintenance of barrier function. Barrier function is maintained during this shedding process by a redistribution of tight junctional proteins to facilitate closure of the gap left by the shedding cell. However, despite the obvious importance of epithelial cell shedding to gut health, a central question is how the extrusion of epithelial cells is achieved, enabling barrier integrity to be maintained in the healthy gut and restored during inflammation remains largely unanswered. Recent studies have provided evidence that excessive epithelial cell shedding and loss of epithelial barrier integrity is triggered by exposure to lipopolysaccharide or tumor necrosis factor alpha. Subsequent studies have provided evidence of the involvement of specific cellular components and signaling mechanisms as well as the functionality of microbiota that can be either detrimental or beneficial for intestinal barrier integrity. This review will focus on the evidence and decipher how the signaling systems through which the mucosal immune system and microbiota can regulate epithelial cell shedding and how these mechanisms interact to preserve the viability of the epithelium. PMID:28769935

  8. Xenopus death receptor-M1 and -M2, new members of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, trigger apoptotic signaling by differential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Kei; Noyama, Tomoko; Ishizawa, Yo-Hei; Takamatsu, Nobuhiko; Shiba, Tadayoshi; Ito, Michihiko

    2004-02-27

    Signaling through the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily can lead to apoptosis or promote cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation. A subset of this family, including TNFR1 and Fas, signals cell death via an intracellular death domain and therefore is termed the death receptor (DR) family. In this study, we identified new members of the DR family, designated xDR-M1 and xDR-M2, in Xenopus laevis. The two proteins, which show high homology (71.7% identity), have characteristics of the DR family, that is, three cysteine-rich domains, a transmembrane domain, and a death domain. To elucidate how members of xDR-M subfamily regulate cell death and survival, we examined the intracellular signaling mediated by these receptors in 293T and A6 cells. Overexpression of xDR-M2 induced apoptosis and activated caspase-8, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and nuclear factor-kappaB, although its death domain to a greater extent than did that of xDR-M1 in 293T cells. A caspase-8 inhibitor potently blocked this apoptosis induced by xDR-M2. In contrast, xDR-M1 showed a greater ability to induce apoptosis through its death domain than did xDR-M2 in A6 cells. Interestingly, a general serine protease inhibitor, but not the caspase-8 inhibitor, blocked the xDR-M1-induced apoptosis. These results imply that activation of caspase-8 or serine protease(s) may be required for the xDR-M2- or xDR-M1-induced apoptosis, respectively. Although xDR-M1 and xDR-M2 are very similar to each other, the difference in their death domains may result in diverse signaling, suggesting distinct roles of xDR-M1 and xDR-M2 in cell death or survival.

  9. Calcium Signaling Involvement in Cadmium-Induced Astrocyte Cytotoxicity and Cell Death Through Activation of MAPK and PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiao Hua; Ge, Guo; Gao, Kai; Pang, Ying; Chai, Rui Chao; Jia, Xi Hua; Kong, Jin Ge; Yu, Albert Cheung-Hoi

    2015-09-01

    Cadmium (Cd), a highly ubiquitous toxic heavy metal, can contaminate the environment, including agricultural soil, water and air, via industrial runoff and other sources of pollution. Cd accumulated in the body via direct exposure or through the food chain results in neurodegeneration and many other diseases. Previous studies on its toxicity in the central nervous system (CNS) focused mainly on neurons. To obtain a more comprehensive understanding of Cd toxicity for the CNS, we investigated how astrocytes respond to acute and chronic Cd exposure and its toxic molecular mechanisms. When primary cultures of cerebral cortical astrocytes incubated with 1-300 μM CdCl2, morphological changes, LDH release and cell death were observed in a time and dose-dependent manner. Further studies demonstrated that acute and chronic Cd treatment phosphorylated JNK, p38 and Akt to different degrees, while ERK1/2 was only phosphorylated under low doses of Cd (10 μM) exposure. Inhibition of JNK and PI3K/Akt, but not of p38, could partially protect astrocyte from cytotoxicity in chronic and acute Cd exposure. Moreover, Cd also induced a strong calcium signal, while BAPTA, a specific intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) chelator, prevented Cd-induced intracellular increase of calcium levels in astrocytes; inhibited the Cd-induced activation of ERK1/2, JNK, p38 and Akt; and also significantly reduced astrocyte cell death. All of these results suggested that the Cd-Ca(2+)-MAPK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways were involved in Cd-induced toxicity in astrocytes. This toxicity involvement indicates that these pathways may be exploited as a target for the prevention of Cd-induced neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Impact of Nutrient Imbalance on Wine Alcoholic Fermentations: Nitrogen Excess Enhances Yeast Cell Death in Lipid-Limited Must

    PubMed Central

    Tesnière, Catherine; Delobel, Pierre; Pradal, Martine; Blondin, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the consequences of nutritional imbalances, particularly lipid/nitrogen imbalances, on wine yeast survival during alcoholic fermentation. We report that lipid limitation (ergosterol limitation in our model) led to a rapid loss of viability during the stationary phase of fermentation and that the cell death rate is strongly modulated by nitrogen availability and nature. Yeast survival was reduced in the presence of excess nitrogen in lipid-limited fermentations. The rapidly dying yeast cells in fermentations in high nitrogen and lipid-limited conditions displayed a lower storage of the carbohydrates trehalose and glycogen than observed in nitrogen-limited cells. We studied the cell stress response using HSP12 promoter-driven GFP expression as a marker, and found that lipid limitation triggered a weaker stress response than nitrogen limitation. We used a SCH9-deleted strain to assess the involvement of nitrogen signalling pathways in the triggering of cell death. Deletion of SCH9 increased yeast viability in the presence of excess nitrogen, indicating that a signalling pathway acting through Sch9p is involved in this nitrogen-triggered cell death. We also show that various nitrogen sources, but not histidine or proline, provoked cell death. Our various findings indicate that lipid limitation does not elicit a transcriptional programme that leads to a stress response protecting yeast cells and that nitrogen excess triggers cell death by modulating this stress response, but not through HSP12. These results reveal a possibly negative role of nitrogen in fermentation, with reported effects referring to ergosterol limitation conditions. These effects should be taken into account in the management of alcoholic fermentations. PMID:23658613

  11. Quercetin enhances apoptotic effect of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in ovarian cancer cells through reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated CCAAT enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP)-death receptor 5 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Liu; Zongyuan, Yang; Cheng, Gong; Lingyun, Zhang; GuiLian, Yu; Wei, Gong

    2014-01-01

    Although tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) has shown efficacy in a phase 2 clinical trial, development of resistance to TRAIL by tumor cells is a major roadblock. We investigated whether quercetin, a flavonoid, can sensitize human ovarian cancer cells to TRAIL. Results indicate that quercetin sensitized cancer cells to TRAIL. The quercetin induced expression of death receptor DR5 but did not affect expression of DR4 in cancer cells. The induction of DR5 was mediated through activation of JNK and through upregulation of a transcription factor CCAAT enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP); as silencing of these signaling molecules abrogated the effect of quercetin. Upregulation of DR5 was mediated through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as ROS scavengers reduced the effect of quercetin on JNK activation, CHOP upregulation, DR induction, TRAIL sensitization, downregulated the expression of cell survival proteins and upregulated the proapoptotic proteins. Furthermore, quercetin enhances TRAIL mediated inhibition of tumor growth of human SKOV-3 xenograft was associated with induction of apoptosis, activation of caspase-3, CHOP and DR5. Overall, our data suggest that quercetin enhances apoptotic death of ovarian cancer cells to TRAIL through upregulation of CHOP-induced DR5 expression following ROS mediated endoplasmic reticulum-stress. PMID:24612139

  12. Regulation of hippocampal Fas receptor and death-inducing signaling complex after kainic acid treatment in mice.

    PubMed

    Keller, Benjamin; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-12-03

    Kainic acid (KA)-induced brain neuronal cell death (especially in the hippocampus) was shown to be mainly mediated by the intrinsic (mitochondrial) apoptotic pathway. This study investigated the regulation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway mediated by Fas ligand/Fas receptor and components of the indispensable death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) in the hippocampus (marked changes) and cerebral cortex (modest changes) of KA-treated mice. KA (45mg/kg) induced a severe behavioral syndrome with recurrent motor seizures (scores; maximal at 60-90min; minimal at 72h) with activation of hippocampal pro-apoptotic JNK (+2.5 fold) and increased GFAP (+57%) and nuclear PARP-1 fragmentation (+114%) 72h post-treatment (delayed neurotoxicity). In the extrinsic apoptotic pathway (hippocampus), KA (72h) reduced Fas ligand (-92%) and Fas receptor aggregates (-24%). KA (72h) also altered the contents of major DISC components: decreased FADD adaptor (-44%), reduced activation of initiator caspase-8 (-47%) and increased survival FLIP-S (+220%). Notably, KA (72h) upregulated the content of anti-apoptotic p-Ser191 FADD (+41%) and consequently the expression of p-FADD/FADD ratio (+1.9-fold), a neuroplastic index. Moreover, the p-FADD dependent transcription factor NF-κB was also increased (+61%) in the hippocampus after KA (72h). The convergent adaptation of the extrinsic apoptotic machinery 72h after KA in mice (with otherwise normal gross behavior) is a novel finding which suggests the induction of survival mechanisms to partly counteract the delayed neuronal death in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Danger signaling protein HMGB1 induces a distinct form of cell death accompanied by formation of giant mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gdynia, Georg; Keith, Martina; Kopitz, Jürgen; Bergmann, Marion; Fassl, Anne; Weber, Alexander N R; George, Julie; Kees, Tim; Zentgraf, Hans-Walter; Wiestler, Otmar D; Schirmacher, Peter; Roth, Wilfried

    2010-11-01

    Cells dying by necrosis release the high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, which has immunostimulatory effects. However, little is known about the direct actions of extracellular HMGB1 protein on cancer cells. Here, we show that recombinant human HMGB1 (rhHMGB1) exerts strong cytotoxic effects on malignant tumor cells. The rhHMGB1-induced cytotoxicity depends on the presence of mitochondria and leads to fast depletion of mitochondrial DNA, severe damage of the mitochondrial proteome by toxic malondialdehyde adducts, and formation of giant mitochondria. The formation of giant mitochondria is independent of direct nuclear signaling events, because giant mitochondria are also observed in cytoplasts lacking nuclei. Further, the reactive oxygen species scavenger N-acetylcysteine as well as c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase blockade inhibited the cytotoxic effect of rhHMGB1. Importantly, glioblastoma cells, but not normal astrocytes, were highly susceptible to rhHMGB1-induced cell death. Systemic treatment with rhHMGB1 results in significant growth inhibition of xenografted tumors in vivo. In summary, rhHMGB1 induces a distinct form of cell death in cancer cells, which differs from the known forms of apoptosis, autophagy, and senescence, possibly representing an important novel mechanism of specialized necrosis. Further, our findings suggest that rhHMGB1 may offer therapeutic applications in treatment of patients with malignant brain tumors.

  14. Accumulation of the SET protein in HEK293T cells and mild oxidative stress: cell survival or death signaling.

    PubMed

    Leopoldino, Andréia M; Squarize, Cristiane H; Garcia, Cristiana B; Almeida, Luciana O; Pestana, Cezar R; Polizello, Ana C M; Uyemura, Sérgio A; Tajara, Eloiza H; Gutkind, J Silvio; Curti, Carlos

    2012-04-01

    SET protein (I2PP2A) is an inhibitor of PP2A, which regulates the phosphorylated Akt (protein kinase B) levels. We assessed the effects of SET overexpression in HEK293T cells, both in the presence and the absence of mild oxidative stress induced by 50 μM tert-butyl hydroperoxide. Immunoblotting assays demonstrated that SET accumulated in HEK293T cells and increased the levels of phosphorylated Akt and PTEN; in addition, SET decreased glutathione antioxidant defense of cell and increased expression of genes encoding antioxidant defense proteins. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that accumulated SET was equally distributed in cytoplasm and nucleus; however, in cells that had been exposed to oxidative stress, SET was found in large aggregates in the cytoplasm. SET accumulation in HEK293T cells correlated with inhibition of basal apoptosis as evidenced by a decrease in annexin V staining and activity of caspases; under mild oxidative stress, SET accumulation correlated with caspase-independent cell death, as evidenced by increased PI and annexin V/PI double staining. The results suggest that accumulated SET could act via Akt/PTEN either as cell survival signal or as oxidative stress sensor for cell death.

  15. Matched filtering algorithm based on phase-shifting pursuit for ground-penetrating radar signal enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hairu; Ouyang, Shan; Wang, Guofu; Wu, Suolu; Zhang, Faquan

    2014-01-01

    The received signals from ground-penetrating radar (GPR) contain round-trip echoes, clutters, and complex noise signals. These jamming signals seriously affect the interpretation precision of shallow geological subsurface information. In order to dissolve some useless signals in GPR signals, it is necessary to take appropriate measures to repress interference. Based on the electromagnetic field theory, the propagation characteristics of the transmitted GPR signal are analyzed. On this basis, a matched filtering algorithm based on phase-shifting pursuit is proposed to enhance the received GPR signals. At first, the intrinsic component libraries (ICL) can be generated by changing the phase of the transmitted GPR signal. Then, the correlation analysis between the local information of the received GPR signals extracted by sliding window method and each sample in ICL is studied to extract target echo signals. Experiments based on the GPR imaging demonstrate that the proposed algorithm could enhance the target echo signals to a certain extent. The integrated side lobe ratio of the imaging result of the enhanced GPR signals is 6.33 dB lower than the original ones. The resolution of target imaging can be improved.

  16. Enterococcus faecalis infection activates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling to block apoptotic cell death in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jun; Shankar, Nathan

    2014-12-01

    Apoptosis is an intrinsic immune defense mechanism in the host response to microbial infection. Not surprisingly, many pathogens have evolved various strategies to manipulate this important pathway to benefit their own survival and dissemination in the host during infection. To our knowledge, no attempts have been made to explore the host cell survival signals modulated by the bacterium Enterococcus faecalis. Here, we show for the first time that during early stages of infection, internalized enterococci can prevent host cell (RAW264.7 cells, primary macrophages, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts [MEFs]) apoptosis induced by a wide spectrum of proapoptotic stimuli. Activation of caspase 3 and cleavage of the caspase 3 substrate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase were inhibited in E. faecalis-infected cells, indicating that E. faecalis protects macrophages from apoptosis by inhibiting caspase 3 activation. This antiapoptotic activity in E. faecalis-infected cells was dependent on the activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway, which resulted in the increased expression of the antiapoptotic factor Bcl-2 and decreased expression of the proapoptotic factor Bax. Further analysis revealed that active E. faecalis physiology was important for inhibition of host cell apoptosis, and this feature seemed to be a strain-independent trait among E. faecalis isolates. Employing a mouse peritonitis model, we also determined that cells collected from the peritoneal lavage fluid of E. faecalis-infected mice showed reduced levels of apoptosis compared to cells from uninfected mice. These results show early modulation of apoptosis during infection and have important implications for enterococcal pathogenesis.

  17. Multinuclear giant cell formation is enhanced by down-regulation of Wnt signaling in gastric cancer cell line, AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Shi-Mun; Kim, Rockki; Ryu, Jae-Hyun; Jho, Eek-Hoon; Song, Ki-Joon; Jang, Shyh-Ing; Kee, Sun-Ho . E-mail: keesh@korea.ac.kr

    2005-08-01

    AGS cells, which were derived from malignant gastric adenocarcinoma tissue, lack E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion but have a high level of nuclear {beta}-catenin, which suggests altered Wnt signal. In addition, approximately 5% of AGS cells form multinuclear giant cells in the routine culture conditions, while taxol treatment causes most AGS cells to become giant cells. The observation of reduced nuclear {beta}-catenin levels in giant cells induced by taxol treatment prompted us to investigate the relationship between Wnt signaling and giant cell formation. After overnight serum starvation, the shape of AGS cells became flattened, and this morphological change was accompanied by decrease in Myc expression and an increase in the giant cell population. Lithium chloride treatment, which inhibits GSK3{beta} activity, reversed these serum starvation effects, which suggests an inverse relationship between Wnt signaling and giant cell formation. Furthermore, the down-regulation of Wnt signaling caused by the over-expression of ICAT, E-cadherin, and Axin enhanced giant cell formation. Therefore, down-regulation of Wnt signaling may be related to giant cell formation, which is considered to be a survival mechanism against induced cell death.

  18. The canonical intrinsic mitochondrial death pathway has a non-apoptotic role in signaling lens cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Gregory F; Menko, A Sue

    2005-06-10

    The mitochondrial cell death pathway is known for its role in signaling apoptosis. Here, we describe a novel function for the mitochondrial cell death pathway in signaling initiation of differentiation in the developing lens. Most remarkably, we induced lens cell differentiation by short-term exposure of lens epithelial cells to the apoptogen staurosporine. Activation of apoptosis-related pathways induced lens epithelial cells to express differentiation-specific markers and to undergo morphogenetic changes that led to formation of the lens-like structures known as lentoids. The fact that multiple stages of differentiation are expressed at a single stage of development in the embryonic lens made it possible to precisely determine the timing of expression of proteins associated with the apoptotic pathway. We discovered that there was high expression in the lens equatorial epithelium (the region of the lens in which differentiation is initiated) of pro-apoptotic molecules such as Bax and Bcl-x(S) and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. Furthermore, we found significant caspase-3-like activity in the equatorial epithelium, yet this activity was far lower than that associated with lens cell apoptosis. These apoptotic pathways are likely regulated by the concurrent expression of prosurvival molecules, including Bcl-2 and Bcl-x(L); phosphorylation of Bad; and high expression of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins chicken IAP1, IAP3, and survivin. This finding suggests that prosurvival pathways allow pro-apoptotic molecules to function as molecular switches in the differentiation process without tipping the balance toward apoptosis. We call this process apoptosis-related Bcl-2- and caspase-dependent (ABC) differentiation.

  19. Gene profiling reveals hydrogen sulphide recruits death signaling via the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor identifying commonalities with excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minghui Jessica; Peng, Zhao Feng; Manikandan, Jayapal; Melendez, Alirio J; Tan, Gek San; Chung, Ching Ming; Li, Qiu-Tian; Tan, Theresa M; Deng, Lih Wen; Whiteman, Matthew; Beart, Philip M; Moore, Phillip K; Cheung, Nam Sang

    2011-05-01

    Recently the role of hydrogen sulphide (H(2) S) as a gasotransmitter stimulated wide interest owing to its involvement in Alzheimer's disease and ischemic stroke. Previously we demonstrated the importance of functional ionotropic glutamate receptors (GluRs) by neurons is critical for H(2) S-mediated dose- and time-dependent injury. Moreover N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonists abolished the consequences of H(2) S-induced neuronal death. This study focuses on deciphering the downstream effects activation of NMDAR on H(2) S-mediated neuronal injury by analyzing the time-course of global gene profiling (5, 15, and 24 h) to provide a comprehensive description of the recruitment of NMDAR-mediated signaling. Microarray analyses were performed on RNA from cultured mouse primary cortical neurons treated with 200 µM sodium hydrosulphide (NaHS) or NMDA over a time-course of 5-24 h. Data were validated via real-time PCR, western blotting, and global proteomic analysis. A substantial overlap of 1649 genes, accounting for over 80% of NMDA global gene profile present in that of H(2) S and over 50% vice versa, was observed. Within these commonly occurring genes, the percentage of transcriptional consistency at each time-point ranged from 81 to 97%. Gene families involved included those related to cell death, endoplasmic reticulum stress, calcium homeostasis, cell cycle, heat shock proteins, and chaperones. Examination of genes exclusive to H(2) S-mediated injury (43%) revealed extensive dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. These data form a foundation for the development of screening platforms and define targets for intervention in H(2) S neuropathologies where NMDAR-activated signaling cascades played a substantial role.

  20. Dual functions of gold nanorods as photothermal agent and autofluorescence enhancer to track cell death during plasmonic photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Kannadorai, Ravi Kumar; Chiew, Geraldine Giap Ying; Luo, Kathy Qian; Liu, Quan

    2015-02-01

    Gold nanorods have the potential to localize the treatment procedure by hyperthermia and influence the fluorescence. The longitudinal plasmon peak contributes to the photothermal effect by converting light to heat. When these nanorods are PEGylated, it not only makes it biocompatible but also acts as a spacer layer during fluorescence enhancement. When the PEGylated nanorods are internalized inside the cells through endocytosis, the transverse plasmonic peak combined with the enhanced absorption and scattering properties of the nanorods can enhance the autofluorescence emission intensity from the cell. The autofluorescence from the mitochondria inside cells which reflects the respiratory status of the cell was enhanced two times by the presence of nanorods within the cell. At four minutes, the nanorods incubated cells reached the hyperthermic temperature when illuminated continuously with near infrared laser. The cell viability test and autofluorescence intensity curve showed a similar trend indicating the progress of cell death over time. This is the first report to the best of our knowledge to suggest the potential of exploiting the dual capabilities of gold nanorods as photothermal agents and autofluorescence enhancer to track cell death.

  1. A Method of Speech Periodicity Enhancement Using Transform-domain Signal Decomposition☆

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tan; Kleijn, W. Bastiaan; Kong, Ying-Yee

    2015-01-01

    Periodicity is an important property of speech signals. It is the basis of the signal’s fundamental frequency and the pitch of voice, which is crucial to speech communication. This paper presents a novel framework of periodicity enhancement for noisy speech. The enhancement is applied to the linear prediction residual of speech. The residual signal goes through a constant-pitch time warping process and two sequential lapped-frequency transforms, by which the periodic component is concentrated in certain transform coefficients. By emphasizing the respective transform coefficients, periodicity enhancement of noisy residual signal is achieved. The enhanced residual signal and estimated linear prediction filter parameters are used to synthesize the output speech. An adaptive algorithm is proposed for adjusting the weights for the periodic and aperiodic components. Effectiveness of the proposed approach is demonstrated via experimental evaluation. It is observed that harmonic structure of the original speech could be properly restored to improve the perceptual quality of enhanced speech. PMID:26150679

  2. Arctigenin enhances chemosensitivity of cancer cells to cisplatin through inhibition of the STAT3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiangyang; Zhu, Fenfen; Zhao, Zhihui; Liu, Chang; Luo, Lan; Yin, Zhimin

    2011-10-01

    Arctigenin is a dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan isolated from Bardanae fructus, Arctium lappa L, Saussureamedusa, Torreya nucifera, and Ipomea cairica. It has been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory activities, which is mainly mediated through its inhibitory effect on nuclear transcription factor-kappaB (NF-κB). But the role of arctigenin in JAK-STAT3 signaling pathways is still unclear. In present study, we investigated the effect of arctigenin on signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathway and evaluated whether suppression of STAT3 activity by arctigenin could sensitize cancer cells to a chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin. Our results show that arctigenin significantly suppressed both constitutively activated and IL-6-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and subsequent nuclear translocation in cancer cells. Inhibition of STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation was found to be achieved through suppression of Src, JAK1, and JAK2, while suppression of STAT3 serine phosphorylation was mediated by inhibition of ERK activation. Pervanadate reversed the arctigenin-induced downregulation of STAT3 activation, suggesting the involvement of a protein tyrosine phosphatase. Indeed, arctigenin can obviously induce the expression of the PTP SHP-2. Furthermore, the constitutive activation level of STAT3 was found to be correlated to the resistance of cancer cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Arctigenin dramatically promoted cisplatin-induced cell death in cancer cells, indicating that arctigenin enhanced the sensitivity of cancer cells to cisplatin mainly via STAT3 suppression. These observations suggest a novel anticancer function of arctigenin and a potential therapeutic strategy of using arctigenin in combination with chemotherapeutic agents for cancer treatment. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Growth-hormone-induced signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 signaling causes gigantism, inflammation, and premature death but protects mice from aggressive liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Friedbichler, Katrin; Themanns, Madeleine; Mueller, Kristina M; Schlederer, Michaela; Kornfeld, Jan-Wilhelm; Terracciano, Luigi M; Kozlov, Andrey V; Haindl, Susanne; Kenner, Lukas; Kolbe, Thomas; Mueller, Mathias; Snibson, Kenneth J; Heim, Markus H; Moriggl, Richard

    2012-03-01

    Persistently high levels of growth hormone (GH) can cause liver cancer. GH activates multiple signal-transduction pathways, among them janus kinase (JAK) 2-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 5). Both hyperactivation and deletion of STAT5 in hepatocytes have been implicated in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC); nevertheless, the role of STAT5 in the development of HCC as a result of high GH levels remains enigmatic. Thus, we crossed a mouse model of gigantism and inflammatory liver cancer caused by hyperactivated GH signaling (GH(tg) ) to mice with hepatic deletion of STAT5 (STAT5(Δhep) ). Unlike GH(tg) mice, GH(tg) STAT5(Δhep) animals did not display gigantism. Moreover, the premature mortality, which was associated with chronic inflammation, as well as the pathologic alterations of hepatocytes observed in GH(tg) mice, were not observed in GH(tg) animals lacking STAT5. Strikingly, loss of hepatic STAT5 proteins led to enhanced HCC development in GH(tg) mice. Despite reduced chronic inflammation, GH(tg) STAT5(Δhep) mice displayed earlier and more advanced HCC than GH(tg) animals. This may be attributed to the combination of increased peripheral lipolysis, hepatic lipid synthesis, loss of hepatoprotective mediators accompanied by aberrant activation of tumor-promoting c-JUN and STAT3 signaling cascades, and accumulation of DNA damage secondary to loss of cell-cycle control. Thus, HCC was never observed in STAT5(Δhep) mice. As a result of their hepatoprotective functions, STAT5 proteins prevent progressive fatty liver disease and the formation of aggressive HCC in the setting of hyperactivated GH signaling. At the same time, they play a key role in controlling systemic inflammation and regulating organ and body size. Copyright © 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  4. miR-134 regulates ischemia/reperfusion injury-induced neuronal cell death by regulating CREB signaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weidong; Liu, Xiaobin; Cao, Jie; Meng, Facai; Li, Min; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Jie

    2015-04-01

    microRNA-134 (miR-134) has been reported to be a brain-specific miRNA and is differently expressed in brain tissues subjected to ischemic injury. However, the underlying mechanism of miR-134 in regulating cerebral ischemic injury remains poorly understood. The current study was designed to delineate the molecular basis of miR-134 in regulating cerebral ischemic injury. Using the oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model of hippocampal neuron ischemia in vitro, we found that the overexpression of miR-134 mediated by recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector infection significantly promoted neuron death induced by OGD/reoxygenation, whereas the inhibition of miR-134 provided protective effects against OGD/reoxygenation-induced cell death. Moreover, cyclic AMP (cAMP) response element-binding protein (CREB) as a putative target of miR-134 was downregulated and upregulated by miR-134 overexpression or inhibition, respectively. The direct interaction between miR-134 and the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of CREB mRNA was further confirmed by dual-luciferase reporter assay. Overexpression of miR-134 also inhibited the expression of the downstream gene of CREB, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-2, whereas the inhibition of miR-134 upregulated the expression of BDNF and Bcl-2 in neurons after OGD/reoxygenation. Notably, the knockdown of CREB by CREB siRNA apparently abrogated the protective effect of anti-miR-134 on OGD/reoxygenation-induced cell death. Taken together, our study suggests that downregulation of miR-134 alleviates ischemic injury through enhancing CREB expression and downstream genes, providing a promising and potential therapeutic target for cerebral ischemic injury.

  5. SAR image enhancement via post-correlation signal processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, N. D.; Kaupp, V. H.; Waite, W. P.; Macdonald, H. C.

    1984-01-01

    Seventeen interpreters ranked sets of computer-generated radar imagery to assess the value of post-correlation processing on the interpretability of SAR (synthetic aperture radar) imagery. The post-correlation processing evaluated amounts to a nonlinear mapping of the signal exiting a digital correlator and allows full use of signal bandwidth for improving the spatial resolution or for noise reduction. The results indicate that it is reasonable to hypothesize an optimal SAR presentation format for specific applications even though this study was too limited to be specific.

  6. Phytosphingosine in combination with ionizing radiation enhances apoptotic cell death in radiation-resistant cancer cells through ROS-dependent and -independent AIF release.

    PubMed

    Park, Moon-Taek; Kim, Min-Jung; Kang, Young-Hee; Choi, Soon-Young; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Choi, Jung-A; Kang, Chang-Mo; Cho, Chul-Koo; Kang, Seongman; Bae, Sangwoo; Lee, Yun-Sil; Chung, Hee Yong; Lee, Su-Jae

    2005-02-15

    The use of chemical modifiers as radiosensitizers in combination with low-dose irradiation may increase the therapeutic effect on cancer by overcoming a high apoptotic threshold. Here, we showed that phytosphingosine treatment in combination with gamma-radiation enhanced apoptotic cell death of radiation-resistant human T-cell lymphoma in a caspase-independent manner. Combination treatment induced an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, mitochondrial relocalization of B-cell lymphoma-2(Bcl-2)-associated X protein (Bax), poly-adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1) activation, and nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). siRNA targeting of AIF effectively protected cells from the combination treatment-induced cell death. An antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), inhibited Bax relocalization and AIF translocation but not PARP-1 activation. Moreover, transfection of Bax-siRNA significantly inhibited AIF translocation. Pretreatment of PARP-1 inhibitor, DPQ (3,4-dihydro-5-[4-(1-piperidinyl)-butoxy]-1(2H)-isoquinolinone), or PARP-1-siRNA also partially attenuated AIF translocation, whereas the same treatment did not affect intracellular ROS level and Bax redistribution. Taken together, these results demonstrate that enhancement of cell death of radiation-resistant cancer cells by phytosphingosine treatment in combination with gamma-radiation is mediated by nuclear translocation of AIF, which is in turn mediated both by ROS-dependent Bax relocalization and ROS-independent PARP-1 activation. The molecular signaling pathways that we elucidated in this study may provide potential drug targets for radiation sensitization of cancers refractive to radiation therapy.

  7. Aging and amyloid β oligomers enhance TLR4 expression, LPS-induced Ca(2+) responses, and neuron cell death in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Rodríguez, María; de la Fuente, Carmen; García-Durillo, Mónica; García-Rodríguez, Carmen; Villalobos, Carlos; Núñez, Lucía

    2017-01-31

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are transmembrane pattern-recognition receptors of the innate immune system recognizing diverse pathogen-derived and tissue damage-related ligands. It has been suggested that TLR signaling contributes to the pathogenesis of age-related, neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is associated to oligomers of the amyloid β peptide (Aβo) that cause intracellular Ca(2+) dishomeostasis and neuron cell death in rat hippocampal neurons. Here we assessed the interplay between inflammation and Aβo in long-term cultures of rat hippocampal neurons, an in vitro model of neuron aging and/or senescence. Ca(2+) imaging and immunofluorescence against annexin V and TLR4 were applied in short- and long-term cultures of rat hippocampal neurons to test the effects of TLR4-agonist LPS and Aβo on cytosolic [Ca(2+)] and on apoptosis as well as on expression of TLR4. LPS increases cytosolic [Ca(2+)] and promotes apoptosis in rat hippocampal neurons in long-term culture considered aged and/or senescent neurons, but not in short-term cultured neurons considered young neurons. TLR4 antagonist CAY10614 prevents both effects. TLR4 expression in rat hippocampal neurons is significantly larger in aged hippocampal cultures. Treatment of aged hippocampal cultures with Aβo increases TLR4 expression and enhances LPS-induced Ca(2+) responses and neuron cell death. Aging and amyloid β oligomers, the neurotoxin involved in Alzheimer's disease, enhance TLR4 expression as well as LPS-induced Ca(2+) responses and neuron cell death in rat hippocampal neurons aged in vitro.

  8. Visual reminders of death enhance nociceptive-related cortical responses and event-related alpha desynchronisation.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Elia; Nicolardi, Valentina; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria

    2017-08-30

    Previous research suggests that prompting individuals to think on their own mortality affects their perception of painful somatic stimuli and related brain activity. Grounded on the assumption that reminders of mortality may recruit threat-defence mechanisms similar to the ones activated by painful nociceptive stimuli, we hypothesize that the effects exerted by linguistic reminders of death on pain perception and brain activity would be elicited by passive observation of death-related pictures vs. more generic threat-related pictures. Results showed an increase of the laser evoked P2 amplitude and oscillatory theta activity when participants observed death-related images. However, no change in pain ratings was found. Moreover, observation of death-related content was linked to increased oscillatory alpha desynchronisation but not to variations of visual evoked potentials amplitude. Our findings indicate that pairing potentially noxious stimuli with death-related images exerts a preferential modulation of nociceptive and visual cortical representations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Enhancement of the Raman scattering signal due to a nanolens effect.

    PubMed

    Desmedt, A; Talaga, D; Bruneel, J L

    2007-06-01

    The Raman scattering signal of a substrate is investigated using a polystyrene nanolens of a few hundred nanometers inserted within the light path of a confocal microspectrometer. As observed in solid immersion microscopy, the nanolens is at the origin of the improvement of the spatial resolution. Furthermore, enhancement of the Raman scattering signal of the substrate is observed when measuring through the polystyrene bead. The enhancement factors have been measured for silicon, highly ordered pyrolytic graphite, and gallium arsenide substrates. This setup provides a new way of enhancing the Raman signal by means of a nanolens.

  10. High-fat diet-induced adipocyte cell death occurs through a cyclophilin D intrinsic signaling pathway independent of adipose tissue inflammation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Daorong; Tang, Yan; Kwon, Hyokjoon; Zong, Haihong; Hawkins, Meredith; Kitsis, Richard N; Pessin, Jeffrey E

    2011-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) develop insulin resistance with proinflammatory macrophage infiltration into white adipose tissue. Concomitantly, adipocytes undergo programmed cell death with the loss of the adipocyte-specific lipid droplet protein perilipin, and the dead/dying adipocytes are surrounded by macrophages that are organized into crown-like structures. This study investigated whether adipocyte cell death provides the driving signal for macrophage inflammation or if inflammation induces adipocyte cell death. Two knockout mouse models were used: granulocyte/monocyte-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-null mice that are protected against HFD-induced adipose tissue inflammation and cyclophilin D (CyP-D)-null mice that are protected against adipocyte cell death. Mice were fed for 4-14 weeks with a 60% HFD, and different markers of cell death and inflammation were analyzed. HFD induced a normal extent of adipocyte cell death in GM-CSF-null mice, despite a marked reduction in adipose tissue inflammation. Similarly, depletion of macrophages by clodronate treatment prevented HFD-induced adipose tissue inflammation without any affect on adipocyte cell death. However, CyP-D deficiency strongly protected adipocytes from HFD-induced cell death, without affecting adipose tissue inflammation. These data demonstrate that HFD-induced adipocyte cell death is an intrinsic cellular response that is CyP-D dependent but is independent of macrophage infiltration/activation.

  11. Nicotine-mediated signals modulate cell death and survival of T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Oloris, Silvia C.S.; Frazer-Abel, Ashley A.; Jubala, Cristan M.; Fosmire, Susan P.; Helm, Karen M.; Robinson, Sally R.; Korpela, Derek M.; Duckett, Megan M.; Baksh, Shairaz; Modiano, Jaime F.

    2010-02-01

    The capacity of nicotine to affect the behavior of non-neuronal cells through neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) has been the subject of considerable recent attention. Previously, we showed that exposure to nicotine activates the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcription factor in lymphocytes and endothelial cells, leading to alterations in cellular growth and vascular endothelial growth factor production. Here, we extend these studies to document effects of nicotine on lymphocyte survival. The data show that nicotine induces paradoxical effects that might alternatively enforce survival or trigger apoptosis, suggesting that depending on timing and context, nicotine might act both as a survival factor or as an inducer of apoptosis in normal or transformed lymphocytes, and possibly other non-neuronal cells. In addition, our results show that, while having overlapping functions, low and high affinity nAChRs also transmit signals that promote distinct outcomes in lymphocytes. The sum of our data suggests that selective modulation of nAChRs might be useful to regulate lymphocyte activation and survival in health and disease.

  12. Enhanced BMP signaling results in supernumerary tooth formation in USAG-1 deficient mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Murashima-Suginami, Akiko; Takahashi, Katsu Sakata, Tomoko; Tsukamoto, Hiroko; Sugai, Manabu; Yanagita, Motoko; Shimizu, Akira; Sakurai, Takeshi; Slavkin, Harold C.; Bessho, Kazuhisa

    2008-05-16

    Uterine sensitization associated gene-1 (USAG-1) is a BMP antagonist, and also modulates Wnt signaling. We previously reported that USAG-1 deficient mice have supernumerary teeth. The supernumerary maxillary incisor appears to form as a result of the successive development of the rudimentary upper incisor. USAG-1 abrogation rescued apoptotic elimination of odontogenic mesenchymal cells. We confirmed that BMPs were expressed in both the epithelium and mesenchyme of the rudimentary incisor at E14 and E15. BMP signaling in the rudimentary maxillary incisor, assessed by expressions of Msx1 and Dlx2 and the phosphorylation of Smad protein, was significantly enhanced. Wnt signaling as demonstrated by the nuclear localization of {beta}-catenin was also up-regulated. Inhibition of BMP signaling rescues supernumerary tooth formation in E15 incisor explant culture. Based upon these results, we conclude that enhanced BMP signaling results in supernumerary teeth and BMP signaling was modulated by Wnt signaling in the USAG-1 deficient mouse model.

  13. The pepper receptor-like cytoplasmic protein kinase CaPIK1 is involved in plant signaling of defense and cell-death responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Sung; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2011-05-01

    Certain protein kinases have been shown to be crucial for plant cell signaling pathways associated with plant immune responses. Here we identified a pepper (Capsicum annuum) receptor-like cytoplasmic protein kinase (RLCK) gene (CaPIK1) that is transcriptionally activated by infection with Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv). Silencing of CaPIK1 in pepper plants confers enhanced susceptibility to Xcv infection. Salicylic acid-dependent defense responses are attenuated in the CaPIK1-silenced plants, including expression of salicylic acid-dependent genes, but not of a jasmonic acid-regulated gene. Induction of salicylic acid accumulation by Xcv infection is compromised in CaPIK1-silenced plants. The functional CaPIK1 protein not only autophosphorylates, but also phosphorylates myelin basic protein. CaPIK1 exists in the cytoplasm and also localizes to the plasma membrane of plant cells via its N-terminus. Transient expression of CaPIK1 in pepper leaves leads to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), ultimately leading to hypersensitive cell death. Over-expression (OX) of CaPIK1 in Arabidopsis enhances the basal resistance to infection with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis, associated with elevated ROS bursts. Salicylic acid levels in CaPIK1-OX plants are higher than those in wild-type plants. Together, these results suggest that CaPIK1 modulates the signaling required for the salicylic acid-dependent defense response to pathogen infection. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Involvement of NtERF3 in the cell death signalling pathway mediated by SIPK/WIPK and WRKY1 in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Ogata, T; Okada, H; Kawaide, H; Takahashi, H; Seo, S; Mitsuhara, I; Matsushita, Y

    2015-09-01

    We previously reported that one of the ethylene response factors (ERFs), NtERF3, and other members of the subgroup VIII-a ERFs of the AP2/ERF family exhibit cell death-inducing ability in tobacco leaves. In this study, we focused on the involvement of NtERF3 in a cell death signalling pathway in tobacco plants, particularly downstream of NtSIPK/NtWIPK and NtWRKY1, which are mitogen-activated protein kinases and a phosphorylation substrate of NtSIPK, respectively. An ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif-deficient NtERF3b mutant (NtERF3bΔEAR) that lacked cell death-inducing ability suppressed the induction of cell death caused by NtERF3a. The transient co-expression of NtERF3bΔEAR suppressed the hypersensitive reaction (HR)-like cell death induced by NtSIPK and NtWRKY1. The induction of cell death by NtSIPK and NtWRKY1 was also inhibited in transgenic plants expressing NtERF3bΔEAR. Analysis of gene expression, ethylene production and cell death symptoms in salicylic acid-deficient tobacco plants suggested the existence of some feedback regulation in the HR cell death signalling pathway mediated by SIPK/WIPK and WRKY1. Overall, these results suggest that NtERF3 functions downstream of NtSIPK/NtWIPK and NtWRKY1 in a cell death signalling pathway, with some feedback regulation.

  15. Programmed cell death 1 forms negative costimulatory microclusters that directly inhibit T cell receptor signaling by recruiting phosphatase SHP2

    PubMed Central

    Takamatsu, Masako; Kobayashi-Imanishi, Wakana; Hashimoto-Tane, Akiko; Azuma, Miyuki

    2012-01-01

    Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) is a negative costimulatory receptor critical for the suppression of T cell activation in vitro and in vivo. Single cell imaging elucidated a molecular mechanism of PD-1–mediated suppression. PD-1 becomes clustered with T cell receptors (TCRs) upon binding to its ligand PD-L1 and is transiently associated with the phosphatase SHP2 (Src homology 2 domain–containing tyrosine phosphatase 2). These negative costimulatory microclusters induce the dephosphorylation of the proximal TCR signaling molecules. This results in the suppression of T cell activation and blockade of the TCR-induced stop signal. In addition to PD-1 clustering, PD-1–TCR colocalization within microclusters is required for efficient PD-1–mediated suppression. This inhibitory mechanism also functions in PD-1hi T cells generated in vivo and can be overridden by a neutralizing anti–PD-L1 antibody. Therefore, PD-1 microcluster formation is important for regulation of T cell activation. PMID:22641383

  16. Heme oxygenase-1 plays a pro-life role in experimental brain stem death via nitric oxide synthase I/protein kinase G signaling at rostral ventrolateral medulla.

    PubMed

    Dai, Kuang-Yu; Chan, Samuel Hh; Chang, Alice Yw

    2010-09-07

    Despite its clinical importance, a dearth of information exists on the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underpin brain stem death. A suitable neural substrate for mechanistic delineation on brain stem death resides in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) because it is the origin of a life-and-death signal that sequentially increases (pro-life) and decreases (pro-death) to reflect the advancing central cardiovascular regulatory dysfunction during the progression towards brain stem death in critically ill patients. The present study evaluated the hypothesis that heme oxygnase-1 (HO-1) may play a pro-life role as an interposing signal between hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and nitric oxide synthase I (NOS I)/protein kinase G (PKG) cascade in RVLM, which sustains central cardiovascular regulatory functions during brain stem death. We performed cardiovascular, pharmacological, biochemical and confocal microscopy experiments in conjunction with an experimental model of brain stem death that employed microinjection of the organophosphate insecticide mevinphos (Mev; 10 nmol) bilaterally into RVLM of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Western blot analysis coupled with laser scanning confocal microscopy revealed that augmented HO-1 expression that was confined to the cytoplasm of RVLM neurons occurred preferentially during the pro-life phase of experimental brain stem death and was antagonized by immunoneutralization of HIF-1α or HIF-1β in RVLM. On the other hand, the cytoplasmic presence of HO-2 in RVLM neurons manifested insignificant changes during both phases. Furthermore, immunoneutralization of HO-1 or knockdown of ho-1 gene in RVLM blunted the augmented life-and-death signals exhibited during the pro-life phase. Those pretreatments also blocked the upregulated pro-life NOS I/PKG signaling without affecting the pro-death NOS II/peroxynitrite cascade in RVLM. We conclude that transcriptional upregulation of HO-1 on activation by HIF-1 in RVLM plays a

  17. Heme oxygenase-1 plays a pro-life role in experimental brain stem death via nitric oxide synthase I/protein kinase G signaling at rostral ventrolateral medulla

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite its clinical importance, a dearth of information exists on the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underpin brain stem death. A suitable neural substrate for mechanistic delineation on brain stem death resides in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) because it is the origin of a life-and-death signal that sequentially increases (pro-life) and decreases (pro-death) to reflect the advancing central cardiovascular regulatory dysfunction during the progression towards brain stem death in critically ill patients. The present study evaluated the hypothesis that heme oxygnase-1 (HO-1) may play a pro-life role as an interposing signal between hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and nitric oxide synthase I (NOS I)/protein kinase G (PKG) cascade in RVLM, which sustains central cardiovascular regulatory functions during brain stem death. Methods We performed cardiovascular, pharmacological, biochemical and confocal microscopy experiments in conjunction with an experimental model of brain stem death that employed microinjection of the organophosphate insecticide mevinphos (Mev; 10 nmol) bilaterally into RVLM of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Results Western blot analysis coupled with laser scanning confocal microscopy revealed that augmented HO-1 expression that was confined to the cytoplasm of RVLM neurons occurred preferentially during the pro-life phase of experimental brain stem death and was antagonized by immunoneutralization of HIF-1α or HIF-1β in RVLM. On the other hand, the cytoplasmic presence of HO-2 in RVLM neurons manifested insignificant changes during both phases. Furthermore, immunoneutralization of HO-1 or knockdown of ho-1 gene in RVLM blunted the augmented life-and-death signals exhibited during the pro-life phase. Those pretreatments also blocked the upregulated pro-life NOS I/PKG signaling without affecting the pro-death NOS II/peroxynitrite cascade in RVLM. Conclusions We conclude that transcriptional upregulation of HO-1 on

  18. Contrast medium enhanced susceptibility imaging signal mechanism; should we use contrast medium?

    PubMed

    Aydın, Ömer; Büyükkaya, Ramazan; Hakyemez, Bahattin

    2017-01-01

    Intracranial lesions exhibit clear contrast enhancement in T1-weighted imaging, but the mechanism whereby contrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted imaging (CE-SWI) generates signals remains unclear. Contrast enhancement patterns cannot be reliably predicted. To explore the mechanism of CE-SWI contrast enhancement. Fifty-five patients were retrospectively enrolled. All of the imaging employed a clinical 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system fitted with a 32-channel head coil. Minimum-intensity projection reformatted images were evaluated. Intracranial lesions and brain parenchymal intensities were explored using SWI and CE-SWI. signal intensity rates were calculated by dividing the lesional intensity by the white matter intensity, after which the SWI and CE-SWI signal intensity rate were compared. Two observers independently performed intralesional susceptibility signal analysis. After contrast medium administration, malignant and extra-axial tumors exhibited obvious contrast enhancement on CE-SWI (P < 0.001 and P = 0.013, respectively). The signal intensity of white matter was significantly reduced. The signal intensity rates rose significantly in the benign, malignant, and extra-axial groups (P < 0.001). Between-radiologist agreement in terms of intralesional susceptibility signal assessment was strong (kappa = 0.8, P < 0.001). Contrast media can either reduce or increase SWI signal intensities. The dual contrast feature of CE-SWI can be useful when exploring intracranial disorders. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2016.

  19. MEMD-enhanced multivariate fuzzy entropy for the evaluation of complexity in biomedical signals.

    PubMed

    Azami, Hamed; Smith, Keith; Escudero, Javier

    2016-08-01

    Multivariate multiscale entropy (mvMSE) has been proposed as a combination of the coarse-graining process and multivariate sample entropy (mvSE) to quantify the irregularity of multivariate signals. However, both the coarse-graining process and mvSE may not be reliable for short signals. Although the coarse-graining process can be replaced with multivariate empirical mode decomposition (MEMD), the relative instability of mvSE for short signals remains a problem. Here, we address this issue by proposing the multivariate fuzzy entropy (mvFE) with a new fuzzy membership function. The results using white Gaussian noise show that the mvFE leads to more reliable and stable results, especially for short signals, in comparison with mvSE. Accordingly, we propose MEMD-enhanced mvFE to quantify the complexity of signals. The characteristics of brain regions influenced by partial epilepsy are investigated by focal and non-focal electroencephalogram (EEG) time series. In this sense, the proposed MEMD-enhanced mvFE and mvSE are employed to discriminate focal EEG signals from non-focal ones. The results demonstrate the MEMD-enhanced mvFE values have a smaller coefficient of variation in comparison with those obtained by the MEMD-enhanced mvSE, even for long signals. The results also show that the MEMD-enhanced mvFE has better performance to quantify focal and non-focal signals compared with multivariate multiscale permutation entropy.

  20. Joint Maximum Likelihood Time Delay Estimation of Unknown Event-Related Potential Signals for EEG Sensor Signal Quality Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyungsoo; Lim, Sung-Ho; Lee, Jaeseok; Kang, Won-Seok; Moon, Cheil; Choi, Ji-Woong

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalograms (EEGs) measure a brain signal that contains abundant information about the human brain function and health. For this reason, recent clinical brain research and brain computer interface (BCI) studies use EEG signals in many applications. Due to the significant noise in EEG traces, signal processing to enhance the signal to noise power ratio (SNR) is necessary for EEG analysis, especially for non-invasive EEG. A typical method to improve the SNR is averaging many trials of event related potential (ERP) signal that represents a brain’s response to a particular stimulus or a task. The averaging, however, is very sensitive to variable delays. In this study, we propose two time delay estimation (TDE) schemes based on a joint maximum likelihood (ML) criterion to compensate the uncertain delays which may be different in each trial. We evaluate the performance for different types of signals such as random, deterministic, and real EEG signals. The results show that the proposed schemes provide better performance than other conventional schemes employing averaged signal as a reference, e.g., up to 4 dB gain at the expected delay error of 10°. PMID:27322267

  1. TAK-242 treatment ameliorates liver ischemia/reperfusion injury by inhibiting TLR4 signaling pathway in a swine model of Maastricht-category-III cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zigong; Jiao, Baoping; Liu, Tingting; Cheng, Ying; Liu, Hao; Liu, Yongfeng

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to test the effects of TAK-242 on liver transplant viability in a model of swine Maastricht-category-III cardiac death. A swine DCD Maastricht-III model of cardiac death was established, and TAK-242 was administered prior to the induction of cardiac death. The protein and mRNA level of TLR4 signaling pathway molecules and cytokines that are important in mediating immune and inflammatory responses were assessed at different time points following the induction of cardiac death. After induction of cardiac death, both the mRNA and protein levels of key molecules (TLR4, TRAF6, NF-ϰB, ICAM-1, MCP-1 and MPO), TNF-α and IL-6 increased significantly. Infusion of TAK-242 1h before induction of cardiac death blocked the increase of immune and inflammatory response molecules. However, the increase of TLR4 level was not affected by infusion of TAK-242. Histology study showed that infusion of TAK-242 protect liver tissue from damage during cardiac death. These results indicates that TLR4 signaling pathway may contribute to ischemia/reperfusion injury in the liver grafts, and blocking TLR4 pathway with TAk-242 may reduce TLR4-mediated tissue damage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Suppression of extracellular signal-related kinase and activation of p38 MAPK are two critical events leading to caspase-8- and mitochondria-mediated cell death in phytosphingosine-treated human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Moon-Taek; Choi, Jung-A; Kim, Min-Jeong; Um, Hong-Duck; Bae, Sangwoo; Kang, Chang-Mo; Cho, Chul-Koo; Kang, Seongman; Chung, Hee Yong; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Su-Jae

    2003-12-12

    We previously demonstrated that the phytosphingosine-induced apoptosis was accompanied by the concomitant induction of both the caspase-8-mediated and mitochondrial activation-mediated apoptosis pathways. In the present study, we investigated the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in the activation of these two distinct cell death pathways induced by phytosphingosine in human cancer cells. Phytosphingosine caused strong induction of caspase-8 activity and caspase-independent Bax translocation to the mitochondria. A rapid decrease of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and a marked increase of p38 MAPK phosphorylation were observed within 10 min after phytosphingosine treatment. Activation of ERK1/2 by pretreatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or forced expression of ERK1/2 attenuated phytosphingosine-induced caspase-8 activation. However, Bax translocation and caspase-9 activation was unaffected, indicating that down-regulation of the ERK activity is specifically required for the phytosphingosine-induced caspase-8-dependent cell death pathway. On the other hand, treatment with SB203580, a p38 MAPK-specific inhibitor, or expression of a dominant negative form of p38 MAPK suppressed phytosphingosine-induced translocation of the proapoptotic protein, Bax, from the cytosol to mitochondria, cytochrome c release, and subsequent caspase-9 activation but did not affect caspase-8 activation, indicating that activation of p38 MAPK is involved in the mitochondrial activation-mediated cell death pathway. Our results suggest that phytosphingosine can utilize two different MAPK signaling pathways for amplifying the apoptosis cascade, enhancing the understanding of the molecular mechanisms utilized by naturally occurring metabolites to regulate cell death. Molecular dissection of the signaling pathways that activate the apoptotic cell death machinery is critical for both our understanding of cell death events and development of cancer therapeutic agents.

  3. Enhanced Multistatic Active Sonar via Innovative Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    290-302, April 2014. [published, refereed]. W. Rowe, P. Stoica, and J. Li, "Spectrally Constrained Waveform Design," IEEE Signal Processing Magazine ...PAS systems work on the principle of broadcasting a low duty cycle high instantaneous power pulse into the region of interest followed by a long...listening time, while the CAS systems broadcast a waveform that is characterized by a high duty cycle and low instantaneous power . PAS systems due to

  4. Enhancing integrin function by VEGF/neuropilin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Hira Lal; Mercurio, Arthur M.

    2012-01-01

    This review advances the hypothesis that the ability of integrins to engage their extracellular matrix ligands and signal can be regulated in tumor cells by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a major angiogenic factor that also has direct effects on the function of tumor cells. More specifically, we will discuss how neuropilins (NRPs), a distinct class of VEGF receptors, enable the function of specific integrins that contribute to tumor initiation and progression. PMID:23076131

  5. Signal enhancement and suppression during visual-spatial selective attention.

    PubMed

    Couperus, J W; Mangun, G R

    2010-11-04

    Selective attention involves the relative enhancement of relevant versus irrelevant stimuli. However, whether this relative enhancement involves primarily enhancement of attended stimuli, or suppression of irrelevant stimuli, remains controversial. Moreover, if both enhancement and suppression are involved, whether they result from a single mechanism or separate mechanisms during attentional control or selection is not known. In two experiments using a spatial cuing paradigm with task-relevant targets and irrelevant distractors, target, and distractor processing was examined as a function of distractor expectancy. Additionally, in the second study the interaction of perceptual load and distractor expectancy was explored. In both experiments, distractors were either validly cued (70%) or invalidly cued (30%) in order to examine the effects of distractor expectancy on attentional control as well as target and distractor processing. The effects of distractor expectancy were assessed using event-related potentials recorded during the cue-to-target period (preparatory attention) and in response to the task-relevant target stimuli (selective stimulus processing). Analyses of distractor-present displays (anticipated versus unanticipated), showed modulations in brain activity during both the preparatory period and during target processing. The pattern of brain responses suggest both facilitation of attended targets and suppression of unattended distractors. These findings provide evidence for a two-process model of visual-spatial selective attention, where one mechanism (facilitation) influences relevant stimuli and another (suppression) acts to filter distracting stimuli.

  6. LISA Framework for Enhancing Gravitational Wave Signal Extraction Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David E.; Thirumalainambi, Rajkumar

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a Framework for benchmarking and comparing signal-extraction and noise-interference-removal methods that are applicable to interferometric Gravitational Wave detector systems. The primary use is towards comparing signal and noise extraction techniques at LISA frequencies from multiple (possibly confused) ,gravitational wave sources. The Framework includes extensive hybrid learning/classification algorithms, as well as post-processing regularization methods, and is based on a unique plug-and-play (component) architecture. Published methods for signal extraction and interference removal at LISA Frequencies are being encoded, as well as multiple source noise models, so that the stiffness of GW Sensitivity Space can be explored under each combination of methods. Furthermore, synthetic datasets and source models can be created and imported into the Framework, and specific degraded numerical experiments can be run to test the flexibility of the analysis methods. The Framework also supports use of full current LISA Testbeds, Synthetic data systems, and Simulators already in existence through plug-ins and wrappers, thus preserving those legacy codes and systems in tact. Because of the component-based architecture, all selected procedures can be registered or de-registered at run-time, and are completely reusable, reconfigurable, and modular.

  7. Enhancement of Signal to Noise Ratio Using Bispectrum. A Quantitative Analysis for Very Low SNR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    Enhancement of Signal to Noise Ratio Using Bispectrum A Quantitative Analysis for Very Low SNR Payam Yeganeh, Mohammad H. Moradi, Ali Reshad...Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, AMIR KABIR University of Technology Abstract- Bispectrum has been widely used to enhance the SNR . This is based...consider the use of Bispectrum techniques when repeated measurements are made of a deterministic signal embedded in random noise where SNR is in the

  8. Oncogenic Ras and B-Raf proteins positively regulate death receptor 5 expression through co-activation of ERK and JNK signaling.

    PubMed

    Oh, You-Take; Yue, Ping; Zhou, Wei; Balko, Justin M; Black, Esther P; Owonikoko, Taofeek K; Khuri, Fadlo R; Sun, Shi-Yong

    2012-01-02

    Oncogenic mutations of ras and B-raf frequently occur in many cancer types and are critical for cell transformation and tumorigenesis. Death receptor 5 (DR5) is a cell surface pro-apoptotic death receptor for tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand and has been targeted in cancer therapy. The current study has demonstrated induction of DR5 expression by the oncogenic proteins Ras and B-Raf and revealed the underlying mechanisms. We demonstrated that both Ras and B-Raf induce DR5 expression by enforced expression of oncogenic Ras (e.g. H-Ras12V or K-Ras12V) or B-Raf (i.e. V600E) in cells and by analyzing gene expression array data generated from cancer cell lines and from human cancer tissues. This finding is further supported by our results that knockdown of endogenous K-Ras or B-Raf (V600E) reduced the expression of DR5. Importantly, we have elucidated that Ras induces DR5 expression through co-activation of ERK/RSK and JNK signaling pathways and subsequent cooperative effects among the transcriptional factors CHOP, Elk1, and c-Jun to enhance DR5 gene transcription. Moreover, we found that the majority of cancer cell lines highly sensitive to the DR5 agonistic antibody AMG655 have either Ras or B-Raf mutations. Our findings warrant further study on the biology of DR5 regulation by Ras and B-Raf, which may provide new insight into the biology of Ras and B-Raf, and on the potential impact of Ras or B-Raf mutations on the outcome of DR5-targeted cancer therapy.

  9. Group IVA phospholipase A(2) deficiency prevents CCl4-induced hepatic cell death through the enhancement of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Keiichi; Kanai, Shiho; Tanaka, Kikuko; Kawashita, Eri; Akiba, Satoshi

    2016-02-26

    Group IVA phospholipase A2 (IVA-PLA2), which generates arachidonate, plays a role in inflammation. IVA-PLA2-deficiency reduced hepatotoxicity and hepatocyte cell death in mice that received a single dose of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) without any inhibitory effects on CCl4-induced lipid peroxidation. An immunoblot analysis of extracts from wild-type mouse- and IVA-PLA2 KO mouse-derived primary hepatocytes that transiently expressed microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3B (LC3) revealed a higher amount of LC3-II, a typical index of autophagosome formation, in IVA-PLA2-deficient cells, suggesting the enhancement of constitutive autophagy. IVA-PLA2 may promote CCl4-induced cell death through the suppression of constitutive autophagy in hepatocytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Signal-to-noise ratio enhancement based on wavelet filtering in ultrasonic testing.

    PubMed

    Matz, Vaclav; Smid, Radislav; Starman, Stanislav; Kreidl, Marcel

    2009-12-01

    In ultrasonic non-destructive testing of materials with a coarse-grained structure the scattering from the grains causes backscattering noise, which masks flaw echoes in the measured signal. Several filtering methods have been proposed for improving the signal-to-noise ratio. In this paper we present a comparative study of methods based on the wavelet transform. Experiments with stationary, discrete and wavelet packet de-noising are evaluated by means of signal-to-noise ratio enhancement. Measured and simulated ultrasonic signals are used to verify the proposed de-noising methods. For comparison, we use signal-to-noise ratio enhancement related to fault echo amplitudes and filtering efficiency specific for ultrasonic signals. The best results in our setup were achieved with the wavelet packet de-noising method.

  11. Adaptive real-time signal processing for image enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadjadi, Firooz A.; Au, Wing K.

    1993-09-01

    A significant need exists for autonomous landing of an aircraft in adverse weather conditions, e.g., fog, haze, rain or snow. Such systems must provide the pilot the ability to view the runway and its surrounding with timely display information for each weather landing category. The most important requirements of such vision systems include a large field-of-view, a high update/frame rate, and high spatial resolution at low glazing angle in poor visibility conditions. To satisfy these requirements, Honeywell's System and Research Center has developed and demonstrated through flight tests the feasibility of a synthetic vision system for aircraft landing. This paper introduces the concept of the synthetic vision system, based on the Honeywell 35 GHz millimeter wave radar. It provides a detailed discussion on the adaptive image enhancement algorithms and their real-time implementation. The algorithms include beam sharpening and range adaptive contrast enhancement.

  12. 5-Hydroxy-7-Methoxyflavone Triggers Mitochondrial-Associated Cell Death via Reactive Oxygen Species Signaling in Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Souren; Jakhar, Rekha; Han, Jaehong; Kang, Sun Chul

    2016-01-01

    Plant-derived compounds are an important source of clinically useful anti-cancer agents. Chrysin, a biologically active flavone found in many plants, has limited usage for cancer chemotherapeutics due to its poor oral bioavailability. 5-Hydroxy-7-methoxyflavone (HMF), an active natural chrysin derivative found in various plant sources, is known to modulate several biological activities. However, the mechanism underlying HMF-induced apoptotic cell death in human colorectal carcinoma cells in vitro is still unknown. Herein, HMF was shown to be capable of inducing cytotoxicity in HCT-116 cells and induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of HCT-116 cells with HMF caused DNA damage and triggered mitochondrial membrane perturbation accompanied by Cyt c release, down-regulation of Bcl-2, activation of BID and Bax, and caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. These results show that ROS generation by HMF was the crucial mediator behind ER stress induction, resulting in intracellular Ca2+ release, JNK phosphorylation, and activation of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Furthermore, time course study also reveals that HMF treatment leads to increase in mitochondrial and cytosolic ROS generation and decrease in antioxidant enzymes expression. Temporal upregulation of IRE1-α expression and JNK phosphorylation was noticed after HMF treatment. These results were further confirmed by pre-treatment with the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), which completely reversed the effects of HMF treatment by preventing lipid peroxidation, followed by abolishment of JNK phosphorylation and attenuation of apoptogenic marker proteins. These results emphasize that ROS generation by HMF treatment regulates the mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic signaling pathway in HCT-116 cells, demonstrating HMF as a promising pro-oxidant therapeutic candidate for targeting colorectal cancer. PMID:27116119

  13. Inflammatory Signals Enhance Piezo2-Mediated Mechanosensitive Currents

    PubMed Central

    Dubin, Adrienne E.; Schmidt, Manuela; Mathur, Jayanti; Petrus, Matthew J.; Xiao, Bailong; Coste, Bertrand; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2012-01-01

    Summary Heightened nociceptor function caused by inflammatory mediators such as bradykinin contributes to increased pain perception (hyperalgesia) to noxious mechanical and thermal stimuli. While sensitization of the heat transducer TRPV1 largely subserves thermal hyperalgesia, cellular mechanisms underlying mechanical hyperalgesia have been elusive. The role of the mechanically-activated (MA) channel piezo2 (known as FAM38B) present in mammalian sensory neurons is unknown. We test the hypothesis that piezo2 activity is enhanced by bradykinin, an algogenic peptide that induces mechanical hyperalgesia within minutes. Piezo2 current amplitude is increased and inactivation slowed by bradykinin 2 receptor (BDKRB2) activation in heterologous expression systems. Protein Kinase A (PKA) and Protein Kinase C (PKC) agonists enhance piezo2 activity. BDKRB2-mediated effects are abolished by PKA and PKC inhibitors. Finally, piezo2-dependent MA currents in a class of native sensory neurons are enhanced 8-fold by bradykinin via PKA and PKC. Thus, piezo2 sensitization may contribute to PKA- and PKC-mediated mechanical hyperalgesia. PMID:22921401

  14. Inflammatory signals enhance piezo2-mediated mechanosensitive currents.

    PubMed

    Dubin, Adrienne E; Schmidt, Manuela; Mathur, Jayanti; Petrus, Matthew J; Xiao, Bailong; Coste, Bertrand; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2012-09-27

    Heightened nociceptor function caused by inflammatory mediators such as bradykinin (BK) contributes to increased pain sensitivity (hyperalgesia) to noxious mechanical and thermal stimuli. Although it is known that sensitization of the heat transducer TRPV1 largely subserves thermal hyperalgesia, the cellular mechanisms underlying mechanical hyperalgesia have been elusive. The role of the mechanically activated (MA) channel piezo2 (known as FAM38B) present in mammalian sensory neurons is unknown. We test the hypothesis that piezo2 activity is enhanced by BK, an algogenic peptide that induces mechanical hyperalgesia within minutes. Piezo2 current amplitude is increased and inactivation is slowed by bradykinin receptor beta 2 (BDKRB2) activation in heterologous expression systems. Protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC) agonists enhance piezo2 activity. BDKRB2-mediated effects are abolished by PKA and PKC inhibitors. Finally, piezo2-dependent MA currents in a class of native sensory neurons are enhanced 8-fold by BK via PKA and PKC. Thus, piezo2 sensitization may contribute to PKA- and PKC-mediated mechanical hyperalgesia. Copyright © 2012 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Amyloid-β induced astrocytosis and astrocyte death: Implication of FoxO3a-Bim-caspase3 death signaling.

    PubMed

    Saha, Pampa; Biswas, Subhas Chandra

    2015-09-01

    Astrocytes, the main element of the homeostatic system in the brain, are affected in various neurological conditions including Alzheimer's disease (AD). A common astrocytic reaction in pathological state is known as astrocytosis which is characterized by a specific change in astrocyte shape due to cytoskeletal remodeling, cytokine secretion and cellular proliferation. Astrocytes also undergo apoptosis in various neurological conditions or in response to toxic insults. AD is pathologically characterized by progressive deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) in senile plaques, intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles, synaptic dysfunction and neuron death. Astrocytosis and astrocyte death have been reported in AD brain as well as in response to Aβ in vitro. However, how astrocytes undergo both proliferation and death in response to Aβ remains elusive. In this study, we used primary cultures of cortical astrocytes and exposed them to various doses of oligomeric Aβ. We found that cultured astrocytes proliferate and manifest all signs of astrocytosis at a low dose of Aβ. However, at high dose of Aβ the activated astrocytes undergo apoptosis. Astrocytosis was also noticed in vivo in response to Aβ in the rat brain. Next, we investigated the mechanism of astrocyte apoptosis in response to a high dose of Aβ. We found that death of astrocyte induced by Aβ requires a set of molecules that are instrumental for neuron death in response to Aβ. It involves activation of Forkhead transcription factor Foxo3a, induction of its pro-apoptotic target Bim and activation of its downstream molecule, caspase3. Hence, this study demonstrates that the concentration of Aβ decides whether astrocytes do proliferate or undergo apoptosis via a mechanism that is required for neuron death. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. HnRNP-L mediates bladder cancer progression by inhibiting apoptotic signaling and enhancing MAPK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lv, Daojun; Wu, Huayan; Xing, Rongwei; Shu, Fangpeng; Lei, Bin; Lei, Chengyong; Zhou, Xumin; Wan, Bo; Yang, Yu; Zhong, Liren; Mao, Xiangming; Zou, Yaguang

    2017-01-11

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L (hnRNP-L) is a promoter of various kinds of cancers, but its actions in bladder cancer (BC) are unclear. In this study, we investigated the function and the underlying mechanism of hnRNP-L in bladder carcinogenesis. Our results demonstrated that enhanced hnRNP-L expression in BC tissues was associated with poor overall survival of BC patients. Depletion of hnRNP-L significantly suppressed cell proliferation in vitro and inhibited xenograft tumor growth in vivo. Furthermore, downregulation of hnRNP-L resulted in G1-phase cell cycle arrest and enhanced apoptosis accompanied by inhibition of EMT and cell migration. All these cellular changes were reversed by ectopic expression of hnRNP-L. Deletion of hnRNP-L resulted in decreased expression of Bcl-2, enhanced expression of caspases-3, -6 and -9 and inhibition of the MAPK signaling pathway. These findings demonstrate that hnRNP-L contributes to poor prognosis and tumor progression of BC by inhibiting the intrinsic apoptotic signaling and enhancing MAPK signaling pathways.

  17. Enhancement of MS Signal Processing For Improved Cancer Biomarker Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Qian

    Technological advances in proteomics have shown great potential in detecting cancer at the earliest stages. One way is to use the time of flight mass spectroscopy to identify biomarkers, or early disease indicators related to the cancer. Pattern analysis of time of flight mass spectra data from blood and tissue samples gives great hope for the identification of potential biomarkers among the complex mixture of biological and chemical samples for the early cancer detection. One of the keys issues is the pre-processing of raw mass spectra data. A lot of challenges need to be addressed: unknown noise character associated with the large volume of data, high variability in the mass spectroscopy measurements, and poorly understood signal background and so on. This dissertation focuses on developing statistical algorithms and creating data mining tools for computationally improved signal processing for mass spectrometry data. I have introduced an advanced accurate estimate of the noise model and a half-supervised method of mass spectrum data processing which requires little knowledge about the data.

  18. Signalling cascades integrating light-enhanced nitrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lillo, Cathrine

    2008-10-01

    In higher plants, light is crucial for regulation of nitrate uptake, translocation and assimilation into organic compounds. Part of this metabolism is tightly coupled to photosynthesis because the enzymes involved, nitrite reductase and glutamate synthase, are localized to the chloroplasts and receive reducing power from photosynthetic electron transport. However, important enzymes in nitrate acquisition and reduction are localized to cellular compartments other than chloroplasts and are also up-regulated by light, i.e. transporters in cell and organellar membranes and nitrate reductase in the cytosol. This review describes the different light-dependent signalling cascades regulating nitrate metabolism at the transcriptional as well as post-transcriptional level, and how reactions in different compartments of the cell are co-ordinated. Essential players in this network are phytochrome and HY5 (long hypocotyls 5)/HYH (HY5 homologue)-dependent signalling pathways, the energy-related AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) protein kinase homologue SNRK1 (sucrose non-fermenting kinase 1-related kinase), chloroplastic thioredoxins and the prokaryotically originated PII protein. A complex light-dependent network of regulation emerges, which appears to be necessary for optimal nitrogen assimilation and for avoiding the accumulation of toxic intermediates and side products, such as nitrite and reactive oxygen compounds.

  19. PEGylation of a Maltose Biosensor Promotes Enhanced Signal Response

    SciTech Connect

    Dattelbaum, Andrew; Baker, Gary A; Fox, John M; Iyer, Srinivas; Dattelbaum, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    A robust method to immobilize a maltose biosensor is described using an engineered maltose periplasmic binding protein (PBP) covalently coupled to NBDamide, an environmentally sensitive fluorophore. A mesoporous silica sol-gel derived from diglycerylsilane (DGS) was constructed to embed the maltose biosensor, and the ligand reporting fluorescence properties were meas red. When sequestered in the DGS-derived silica matrix, the biosensor retained maltose-dependent fluorescence sensing capability with micromolar affinity, which is consistent with the protein free in solution. The MBP-NBD conjugate was further modified by covalent conjugation with poly(ethylene glycol)-5000 (PEG) to promote the retention of water molecules around the protein and to reduce possible steric effects between the silica matrix and protein. Bioconjugation with PEG molecules does not significantly affect the signaling response of the protein in solution. When immobilized in the DGS polymer, a consistent increase in fluorescence intensity was observed as compared to the protein not functionalized with PEG. To our knowledge, this report presents the first successful method to embed a PBP biosensor in a polymerized matrix and retain signaling response using an environmentally sensitive probe. The immobilization method presented here should be easily adaptable to all conformation-dependent biosensors.

  20. Enhancement of carboplatin- and quercetin-induced cell death by roscovitine is Akt dependent and p53 independent in hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aanchal; Bhat, Manoj Kumar

    2011-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common malignancy worldwide and has an annual occurrence of one million new cases. Novel therapeutic strategies of increased efficacy in the treatment of HCC-bearing patients would certainly be helpful. Hence, the authors explored the effect of combination treatment of roscovitine with chemotherapeutic drugs or quercetin (Qctn) in hepatoma cells, HepG2 and Hep3B. Cell viability was assessed by MTT assay, cell growth assay, and nuclear morphological changes by DAPI staining. The altered expression of signaling proteins and apoptotic molecules was established by Western blotting. Roscovitine pretreatment considerably enhanced the drugs and Qctn-induced cell death in HepG2 and Hep3B cells. The exploratory studies revealed that augmented cell killing in HepG2 and Hep3B was mediated via Akt pathway and was independent of p53. pAkt was found to be significantly downregulated in combination treatment of roscovitine with carboplatin or Qctn. Corresponding to reduced expression of pAkt, the downstream molecules Bcl-2 and proactive forms of caspase 9 and caspase 3 were also downregulated indicating apoptosis. The present study reports for the first time, in hepatoma cells, the potentiation of carboplatin- and Qctn-induced cell death by the cell cycle inhibitor roscovitine. Roscovitine can thus be considered as a potential therapeutic target in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs or Qctn for treatment of HCC.

  1. Transient ischemia/hypoxia enhances gentamicin ototoxicity via caspase-dependent cell death pathway.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Der; Kao, Ming-Ching; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Lai, Chih-Ho; Wei, I-Hua; Tsai, Mang-Hung; Tang, Chih-Hsin; Lin, Cheng-Wen; Hsu, Chuan-Jen; Lin, Ching-Yuang

    2011-07-01

    Aminoglycoside ototoxicity is a common cause of drug-induced hearing loss. Toxicity is dose related, but some patients may still develop hearing loss even under safe dosage. Apart for genetic idiosyncrasy, indirect evidences imply that ischemia may increase the aminoglycoside ototoxic sensitivity because common clinical situations associated with cochlear ischemia such as noise, sepsis, and shock are known to augment the development of aminoglycoside ototoxicity. At present, a direct interaction of cochlear ischemia and aminoglycoside ototoxicity is still lacking. This study demonstrated a direct evidence of increased gentamicin (GM) ototoxic sensitivity in chronic guinea pig models of transient cochlear ischemia. No permanent auditory changes were observed after a single dose of GM (125 mg/kg) or after transient cochlear ischemia for 30 min. Persistent and significant auditory threshold shift was detected when GM was given after transient cochlear ischemia. Cochlear hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons are the major regions affected. Apoptosis contributes to hair cell death during acute interaction of ischemia and GM ototoxicity. Increased apoptotic cell death was also depicted when GM crossreacted with hypoxia in vitro, using cochlear cell lines. Generation of reactive oxygen species, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, calcium release, and caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death were shown during the interaction of hypoxia and GM ototoxicity in vitro. This synergistic ototoxicity may be critical to aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss in clinical scenarios. The results should improve our understanding of the interacting mechanism and potential preventive strategy to aminoglycoside ototoxicity.

  2. Signaling Noise Enhances Chemotactic Drift of E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Marlo; Shimizu, Thomas S.; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Tostevin, Filipe

    2012-10-01

    Noise in the transduction of chemotactic stimuli to the flagellar motor of E. coli will affect the random run-and-tumble motion of the cell and the ability to perform chemotaxis. Here we use numerical simulations to show that an intermediate level of noise in the slow methylation dynamics enhances drift while not compromising localization near concentration peaks. A minimal model shows how such an optimal noise level arises from the interplay of noise and the dependence of the motor response on the network output. Our results suggest that cells can exploit noise to improve chemotactic performance.

  3. A Novel Gene, OZONE-RESPONSIVE APOPLASTIC PROTEIN1, Enhances Cell Death in Ozone Stress in Rice1

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Yoshiaki; Siddique, Shahid; Frei, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A novel protein, OZONE-RESPONSIVE APOPLASTIC PROTEIN1 (OsORAP1), was characterized, which was previously suggested as a candidate gene underlying OzT9, a quantitative trait locus for ozone stress tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa). The sequence of OsORAP1 was similar to that of ASCORBATE OXIDASE (AO) proteins. It was localized in the apoplast, as shown by transient expression of an OsORAP1/green fluorescent protein fusion construct in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf epidermal and mesophyll cells, but did not possess AO activity, as shown by heterologous expression of OsORAP1 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants with reduced background AO activity. A knockout rice line of OsORAP1 showed enhanced tolerance to ozone stress (120 nL L−1 average daytime concentration, 20 d), as demonstrated by less formation of leaf visible symptoms (i.e. cell death), less lipid peroxidation, and lower NADPH oxidase activity, indicating reduced active production of reactive oxygen species. In contrast, the effect of ozone on chlorophyll content was not significantly different among the lines. These observations suggested that OsORAP1 specifically induced cell death in ozone stress. Significantly enhanced expression of jasmonic acid-responsive genes in the knockout line implied the involvement of the jasmonic acid pathway in symptom mitigation. Sequence analysis revealed extensive polymorphisms in the promoter region of OsORAP1 between the ozone-susceptible cv Nipponbare and the ozone-tolerant cv Kasalath, the OzT9 donor variety, which could be responsible for the differential regulation of OsORAP1 reported earlier. These pieces of evidence suggested that OsORAP1 enhanced cell death in ozone stress, and its expression levels could explain the effect of a previously reported quantitative trait locus. PMID:26220952

  4. N-rich protein (NRP)-mediated cell death signaling: a new branch of the ER stress response with implications for plant biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Reis, Pedro A B; Fontes, Elizabeth P B

    2012-06-01

    Upon disruption of ER homeostasis, plant cells activate at least two branches of the unfolded protein response (UPR) through IRE1-like and ATAF6-like transducers, resulting in the upregulation of ER-resident molecular chaperones and the activation of the ER-associated degradation protein system. Here, we discuss a new ER stress response pathway in plants that is associated with an osmotic stress response in transducing a cell death signal. Both ER and osmotic stress induce the expression of the novel transcription factor GmERD15, which binds and activates N-rich protein (NRP) promoters to induce NRP expression and cause the upregulation of GmNAC6, an effector of the cell death response. In contrast to this activation mechanism, the ER-resident molecular chaperone binding protein (BiP) attenuates the propagation of the cell death signal by modulating the expression and activity of components of the ER and osmotic stress-induced NRP-mediated cell death signaling. This interaction attenuates dehydration-induced cell death and promotes a better adaptation of BiP-overexpressing transgenic lines to drought.

  5. 3',5-dihydroxy-3,4',7-trimethoxyflavone-induces ER-stress-associated HCT-116 programmed cell death via redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mahendra Pal; Han, Jaehong; Kang, Sun Chul

    2017-04-01

    Quercetin, a well cognized bioactive flavone possessing great medicinal value, has limited usage. The rapid gastrointestinal digestion of quercetin is also a major obstacle for its clinical implementation due to low bioavailability and poor aqueous solubility. 3',5-dihydroxy-3,4',7-trimethoxyflavone (DTMF), a novel semi-synthetic derivative of quercetin, is known to modulate several biological activities. Therefore, in the present study we examined the cytotoxic mechanism of DTMF in concentration-dependent manner (25, 50, and 100μM; 24h) against HCT-116 human colon carcinoma cells. The cytotoxic potential of DTMF was characterized based on deformed cell morphology, increased ROS accumulation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔѰm), increased mitochondrial mass, chromatin condensation, and typical DNA-fragmentation in HCT-116 cells. The results showed that DTMF-induced enhanced ROS production at higher concentration (100μM) as evidenced by upregulated expression of ER stress and apoptotic proteins with concomitant increase in PERK, CHOP, and JNK levels, when compared to N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, ROS inhibitor) treated HCT-116 cells, which depicts that DTMF might act as a crucial mediator of apoptosis signaling. Collectively, our results suggest that DTMF stimulates ROS-mediated oxidative stress, which in turn induces PERK-CHOP and JNK pathway of apoptosis to promote HCT-116 cell death. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. A p38MAPK/MK2 signaling pathway leading to redox stress, cell death and ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many diseases and pathological conditions are characterized by transient or constitutive overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS are causal for ischemia/reperfusion (IR)-associated tissue injury (IRI), a major contributor to organ dysfunction or failure. Preventing IRI with antioxidants failed in the clinic, most likely due to the difficulty to timely and efficiently target them to the site of ROS production and action. IR is also characterized by changes in the activity of intracellular signaling molecules including the stress kinase p38MAPK. While ROS can cause the activation of p38MAPK, we recently obtained in vitro evidence that p38MAPK activation is responsible for elevated mitochondrial ROS levels, thus suggesting a role for p38MAPK upstream of ROS and their damaging effects. Results Here we identified p38MAPKα as the predominantly expressed isoform in HL-1 cardiomyocytes and siRNA-mediated knockdown demonstrated the pro-oxidant role of p38MAPKα signaling. Moreover, the knockout of the p38MAPK effector MAPKAP kinase 2 (MK2) reproduced the effect of inhibiting or knocking down p38MAPK. To translate these findings into a setting closer to the clinic a stringent kidney clamping model was used. p38MAPK activity increased upon reperfusion and p38MAPK inhibition by the inhibitor BIRB796 almost completely prevented severe functional impairment caused by IR. Histological and molecular analyses showed that protection resulted from decreased redox stress and apoptotic cell death. Conclusions These data highlight a novel and important mechanism for p38MAPK to cause IRI and suggest it as a potential therapeutic target for prevention of tissue injury. PMID:24423080

  7. Downregulation of renal tubular Wnt/β-catenin signaling by Dickkopf-3 induces tubular cell death in proteinuric nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, D W L; Yiu, W H; Wu, H J; Li, R X; Liu, Y; Chan, K W; Leung, J C K; Chan, L Y Y; Lai, K N; Tang, S C W

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in different forms of kidney disease have yielded discrepant results. Here, we report the biphasic change of renal β-catenin expression in mice with overload proteinuria in which β-catenin was upregulated at the early stage (4 weeks after disease induction) but abrogated at the late phase (8 weeks). Acute albuminuria was observed at 1 week after bovine serum albumin injection, followed by partial remission at 4 weeks that coincided with overexpression of renal tubular β-catenin. Interestingly, a rebound in albuminuria at 8 weeks was accompanied by downregulated tubular β-catenin expression and heightened tubular apoptosis. In addition, there was an inverse relationship between Dickkopf-3 (Dkk-3) and renal tubular β-catenin expression at these time points. In vitro, a similar trend in β-catenin expression was observed in human kidney-2 (HK-2) cells with acute (upregulation) and prolonged (downregulation) exposure to albumin. Induction of a proapoptotic phenotype by albumin was significantly enhanced by silencing β-catenin in HK-2 cells. Finally, Dkk-3 expression and secretion was increased after prolonged exposure to albumin, leading to the suppression of intracellular β-catenin signaling pathway. The effect of Dkk-3 on β-catenin signaling was confirmed by incubation with exogenous Dkk-3 in HK-2 cells. Taken together, these data suggest that downregulation of tubular β-catenin signaling induced by Dkk-3 has a detrimental role in chronic proteinuria, partially through the increase in apoptosis. PMID:27010856

  8. N-glycosylation of mouse TRAIL-R and human TRAIL-R1 enhances TRAIL-induced death

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Florent; Rattier, Thibault; Shirley, Sarah; Picarda, Gaelle; Constantinescu, Andrei Alexandru; Morlé, Aymeric; Zakaria, Al Batoul; Marcion, Guillaume; Causse, Sebastien; Szegezdi, Eva; Zajonc, Dirk Michael; Seigneuric, Renaud; Guichard, Gilles; Gharbi, Tijani; Picaud, Fabien; Herlem, Guillaume; Garrido, Carmen; Schneider, Pascal; Benedict, Chris Alan; Micheau, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    APO2L/TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) induces death of tumor cells through two agonist receptors, TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2. We demonstrate here that N-linked glycosylation (N-glyc) plays also an important regulatory role for TRAIL-R1-mediated and mouse TRAIL receptor (mTRAIL-R)-mediated apoptosis, but not for TRAIL-R2, which is devoid of N-glycans. Cells expressing N-glyc-defective mutants of TRAIL-R1 and mouse TRAIL-R were less sensitive to TRAIL than their wild-type counterparts. Defective apoptotic signaling by N-glyc-deficient TRAIL receptors was associated with lower TRAIL receptor aggregation and reduced DISC formation, but not with reduced TRAIL-binding affinity. Our results also indicate that TRAIL receptor N-glyc impacts immune evasion strategies. The cytomegalovirus (CMV) UL141 protein, which restricts cell-surface expression of human TRAIL death receptors, binds with significant higher affinity TRAIL-R1 lacking N-glyc, suggesting that this sugar modification may have evolved as a counterstrategy to prevent receptor inhibition by UL141. Altogether our findings demonstrate that N-glyc of TRAIL-R1 promotes TRAIL signaling and restricts virus-mediated inhibition. PMID:28186505

  9. Rotating machine fault diagnosis through enhanced stochastic resonance by full-wave signal construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Siliang; He, Qingbo; Zhang, Haibin; Kong, Fanrang

    2017-02-01

    This study proposes a full-wave signal construction (FSC) strategy for enhancing rotating machine fault diagnosis by exploiting stochastic resonance (SR). The FSC strategy is utilized to transform a half-wave signal (e.g., an envelope signal) into a full-wave one by conducting a Mirror-Cycle-Add (MCA) operation. The constructed full-wave signal evenly modulates the bistable potential and makes the potential tilt back and forth smoothly. This effect provides the equivalent transition probabilities of particle bounce between the two potential wells. A stable SR output signal with better periodicity, which is beneficial to periodic signal detection, can be obtained. In addition, the MCA operation can improve the input signal-to-noise ratio by enhancing the periodic component while attenuating the noise components. These two advantages make the proposed FSCSR method surpass the traditional SR method in fault signal processing. Performance evaluation is conducted by numerical analysis and experimental verification. The proposed MCA-based FSC strategy has the potential to be a universal signal pre-processing technique. Moreover, the proposed FSCSR method can be used in rotating machine fault diagnosis and other areas related to weak signal detection.

  10. Supramolecular Nanofibers Enhance Growth Factor Signaling by Increasing Lipid Raft Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomb, Christina J.; Sur, Shantanu; Lee, Sungsoo S.; Yu, Jeong Min; Zhou, Yan; Snead, Malcolm L.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2016-04-12

    The nanostructures of self-assembling biomaterials have been previously designed to tune the release of growth factors in order to optimize biological repair and regeneration. We report here on the discovery that weakly cohesive peptide nanostructures in terms of intermolecular hydrogen bonding, when combined with low concentrations of osteogenic growth factor, enhance both BMP-2 and Wnt mediated signaling in myoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells, respectively. Conversely, analogous nanostructures with enhanced levels of internal hydrogen bonding and cohesion lead to an overall reduction in BMP-2 signaling. We propose that the mechanism for enhanced growth factor signaling by the nanostructures is related to their ability to increase diffusion within membrane lipid rafts. The phenomenon reported here could lead to new nanomedicine strategies to mediate growth factor signaling for translational targets.

  11. Long-term blue light exposure induces RGC-5 cell death in vitro: involvement of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, oxidative stress, and MAPK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chen; Zhang, Pei; Wang, Wei; Xu, Yongsheng; Wang, Minshu; Chen, Xiaoyong; Dong, Xuran

    2014-06-01

    The mechanism of blue light-induced retinal ganglion cell (RGC) injury is poorly understood. In this study, we established a patented light-emitting diode-based system to study the effects of long-term blue light exposure under culture conditions on RGC-5 cells. Long-term blue light exposure significantly reduced cell viability in a time-dependent manner and induced apoptosis and necrosis in RGC-5 cells. Long-term blue light exposure marked an increase in the expression of Bax and active Caspase-3 (p17), which was accompanied by Bcl-2 down-regulation, and displayed features of the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway. Blue light exposure also increased the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and was a strong inducer of ROS-sensitive protein nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. Moreover, blue light exposure constitutively activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), as well as induced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase in the early phase, in blue light-exposed RGC-5 cells. The protein expression of c-jun and c-fos was further enhanced after RGC-5 cells were exposed to blue light. Taken together, these findings indicated that blue light induced RGC-5 cell line death in dependence upon exposure duration. The potential mechanisms for this phenomenon might be via activated mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, increased ROS production and protein expressions of Nrf2 and HO-1, and activated JNK/p38 MAPK signaling pathways.

  12. Vorinostat-induced autophagy switches from a death-promoting to a cytoprotective signal to drive acquired resistance.

    PubMed

    Dupéré-Richer, D; Kinal, M; Ménasché, V; Nielsen, T H; Del Rincon, S; Pettersson, F; Miller, W H

    2013-02-07

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have shown promising activity against hematological malignancies in clinical trials and have led to the approval of vorinostat for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. However, de novo or acquired resistance to HDACi therapy is inevitable, and their molecular mechanisms are still unclear. To gain insight into HDACi resistance, we developed vorinostat-resistant clones from the hematological cell lines U937 and SUDHL6. Although cross-resistant to some but not all HDACi, the resistant cell lines exhibit dramatically increased sensitivity toward chloroquine, an inhibitor of autophagy. Consistent with this, resistant cells growing in vorinostat show increased autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy in vorinostat-resistant U937 cells by knockdown of Beclin-1 or Lamp-2 (lysosome-associated membrane protein 2) restores sensitivity to vorinostat. Interestingly, autophagy is also activated in parental U937 cells by de novo treatment with vorinostat. However, in contrast to the resistant cells, inhibition of autophagy decreases sensitivity to vorinostat. These results indicate that autophagy can switch from a proapoptotic signal to a prosurvival function driving acquired resistance. Moreover, inducers of autophagy (such as mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors) synergize with vorinostat to induce cell death in parental cells, whereas the resistant cells remain insensitive. These data highlight the complexity of the design of combination strategies using modulators of autophagy and HDACi for the treatment of hematological malignancies.

  13. Identification of novel binding partners (annexins) for the cell death signal phosphatidylserine and definition of their recognition motif.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Sabrina; Kreft, Sandra; Etich, Julia; Frie, Christian; Stermann, Jacek; Grskovic, Ivan; Frey, Benjamin; Mielenz, Dirk; Pöschl, Ernst; Gaipl, Udo; Paulsson, Mats; Brachvogel, Bent

    2011-02-18

    Identification and clearance of apoptotic cells prevents the release of harmful cell contents thereby suppressing inflammation and autoimmune reactions. Highly conserved annexins may modulate the phagocytic cell removal by acting as bridging molecules to phosphatidylserine, a characteristic phagocytosis signal of dying cells. In this study five members of the structurally and functionally related annexin family were characterized for their capacity to interact with phosphatidylserine and dying cells. The results showed that AnxA3, AnxA4, AnxA13, and the already described interaction partner AnxA5 can bind to phosphatidylserine and apoptotic cells, whereas AnxA8 lacks this ability. Sequence alignment experiments located the essential amino residues for the recognition of surface exposed phosphatidylserine within the calcium binding motifs common to all annexins. These amino acid residues were missing in the evolutionary young AnxA8 and when they were reintroduced by site directed mutagenesis AnxA8 gains the capability to interact with phosphatidylserine containing liposomes and apoptotic cells. By defining the evolutionary conserved amino acid residues mediating phosphatidylserine binding of annexins we show that the recognition of dying cells represent a common feature of most annexins. Hence, the individual annexin repertoire bound to the cell surface of dying cells may fulfil opsonin-like function in cell death recognition.

  14. Up-regulation of FLIP in cisplatin-selected HeLa cells causes cross-resistance to CD95/Fas death signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Kamarajan, Pachiyappan; Sun, Nian-Kang; Chao, Chuck C-K

    2003-01-01

    Cisplatin-selected cervix carcinoma HeLa cell lines induced less apoptosis, and weaker activation by cisplatin or Fas-activating antibody, of mitochondrial-associated caspase-9 and death receptor-mediated caspase-8 than did parental cells. Furthermore, less DISC (death-inducing signalling complex) was formed in cisplatin-selected cell lines than in parental cells. Ac-IETD-CHO (acetyl-Ile-Glu-Thr-Asp-aldehyde), which has a certain preference for inhibiting caspase-8, or Fas-antagonistic antibody, significantly inhibited cisplatin-induced apoptosis in both parental and cisplatin-selected HeLa cell lines. These results imply that cell-surface death signalling is inducible by cisplatin; that reduction of this pathway is associated with drug resistance, and that cisplatin-selected cells acquire cross-resistance to cell-surface death signalling. Sequential up-regulation of FLIP (FLICE-like inhibitory protein), but not Bcl-2, Bcl-x(L) or inhibitors of apoptosis protein (IAPs), was observed in resistant cells but not in parental cells. The inhibition of FLIP by FLIP antisense oligonucleotides promotes cisplatin and Fas-antibody-induced apoptosis. However, the modulation of apoptosis by FLIP antisense oligonucleotides in resistant cells is greater than that in parental cells. The presented data reveal that the up-regulation of FLIP may contribute to the suppression of apoptosis and thereby change cells that are resistant to cisplatin and Fas-mediated death signals. The results also show that cancer cells that have undergone long-term chemotherapy and become chemoresistant may change the FLIP level, becoming cross-resistant to death factors such as Fas. PMID:12911332

  15. Hyperthermia-enhanced TRAIL- and mapatumumab-induced apoptotic death is mediated through mitochondria in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Xinxin; Kim, Han-Cheon; Kim, Seog-Young; Basse, Per; Park, Bae-Hang; Lee, Byeong-Chel; Lee, Yong J

    2012-05-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world; death usually results from uncontrolled metastatic disease. Previously, we developed a novel strategy of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (Apo2L/TRAIL) in combination with hyperthermia to treat hepatic colorectal metastases. However, previous studies suggest a potential hepatocyte cytotoxicity with TRAIL. Unlike TRAIL, anti-human TRAIL receptor antibody induces apoptosis without hepatocyte toxicity. In this study, we evaluated the anti-tumor efficacy of humanized anti-death receptor 4 (DR4) antibody mapatumumab (Mapa) by comparing it with TRAIL in combination with hyperthermia. TRAIL, which binds to both DR4 and death receptor 5 (DR5), was approximately tenfold more effective than Mapa in inducing apoptosis. However, hyperthermia enhances apoptosis induced by either agent. We observed that the synergistic effect was mediated through elevation of reactive oxygen species, c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation, Bax oligomerization, and translocalization to the mitochondria, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c to cytosol, activation of caspases, and increase in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. We believe that the successful outcome of this study will support the application of Mapa in combination with hyperthermia to colorectal hepatic metastases. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Hyperthermia-enhanced TRAIL- and mapatumumab-induced apoptotic death is mediated through mitochondria in human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xinxin; Kim, Han-Cheon; Kim, Seog-Young; Basse, Per; Park, Bae-Hang; Lee, Byeong-Chel; Lee, Yong J.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world; death usually results from uncontrolled metastatic disease. Previously, we developed a novel strategy of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (Apo2L/TRAIL) in combination with hyperthermia to treat hepatic colorectal metastases. However, previous studies suggest a potential hepatocyte cytotoxicity with TRAIL. Unlike TRAIL, anti-human TRAIL receptor antibody induces apoptosis without hepatocyte toxicity. In this study, we evaluated the anti-tumor efficacy of humanized anti-death receptor 4 (DR4) antibody mapatumumab (Mapa) by comparing it with TRAIL in combination with hyperthermia. TRAIL, which binds to both DR4 and death receptor 5 (DR5), was approximately 10-fold more effective than Mapa in inducing apoptosis. However, hyperthermia enhances apoptosis induced by either agent. We observed that the synergistic effect was mediated through elevation of reactive oxygen species, c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation, Bax oligomerization and translocalization to the mitochondria, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c to cytosol, activation of caspases and increase in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. We believe that the successful outcome of this study will support the application of Mapa in combination with hyperthermia to colorectal hepatic metastases. PMID:22174016

  17. Library Synthesis, Screening, and Discovery of Modified Zinc(II)-Bis(dipicolylamine) Probe for Enhanced Molecular Imaging of Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Zinc(II)-bis(dipicolylamine) (Zn-BDPA) coordination complexes selectively target the surfaces of dead and dying mammalian cells, and they have promise as molecular probes for imaging cell death. A necessary step toward eventual clinical imaging applications is the development of next-generation Zn-BDPA complexes with enhanced affinity for the cell death membrane biomarker, phosphatidylserine (PS). This study employed an iterative cycle of library synthesis and screening, using a novel rapid equilibrium dialysis assay, to discover a modified Zn-BDPA structure with high and selective affinity for vesicles containing PS. The lead structure was converted into a deep-red fluorescent probe and its targeting and imaging performance was compared with an unmodified control Zn-BDPA probe. The evaluation process included a series of FRET-based vesicle titration studies, cell microscopy experiments, and rat tumor biodistribution measurements. In all cases, the modified probe exhibited comparatively higher affinity and selectivity for the target membranes of dead and dying cells. The results show that this next-generation deep-red fluorescent Zn-BDPA probe is well suited for preclinical molecular imaging of cell death in cell cultures and animal models. Furthermore, it should be possible to substitute the deep-red fluorophore with alternative reporter groups that enable clinically useful, deep-tissue imaging modalities, such as MRI and nuclear imaging. PMID:24575875

  18. Toward resolving deep neoaves phylogeny: data, signal enhancement, and priors.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Renae C; Gibb, Gillian C; Morgan-Richards, Mary; Phillips, Matthew J; Hendy, Michael D; Penny, David

    2009-02-01

    We report three developments toward resolving the challenge of the apparent basal polytomy of neoavian birds. First, we describe improved conditional down-weighting techniques to reduce noise relative to signal for deeper divergences and find increased agreement between data sets. Second, we present formulae for calculating the probabilities of finding predefined groupings in the optimal tree. Finally, we report a significant increase in data: nine new mitochondrial (mt) genomes (the dollarbird, New Zealand kingfisher, great potoo, Australian owlet-nightjar, white-tailed trogon, barn owl, a roadrunner [a ground cuckoo], New Zealand long-tailed cuckoo, and the peach-faced lovebird) and together they provide data for each of the six main groups of Neoaves proposed by Cracraft J (2001). We use his six main groups of modern birds as priors for evaluation of results. These include passerines, cuckoos, parrots, and three other groups termed "WoodKing" (woodpeckers/rollers/kingfishers), "SCA" (owls/potoos/owlet-nightjars/hummingbirds/swifts), and "Conglomerati." In general, the support is highly significant with just two exceptions, the owls move from the "SCA" group to the raptors, particularly accipitrids (buzzards/eagles) and the osprey, and the shorebirds may be an independent group from the rest of the "Conglomerati". Molecular dating mt genomes support a major diversification of at least 12 neoavian lineages in the Late Cretaceous. Our results form a basis for further testing with both nuclear-coding sequences and rare genomic changes.

  19. Use and Protection of GPS Sidelobe Signals for Enhanced Navigation Performance in High Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Joel J. K.; Valdez, Jennifer E.; Bauer, Frank H.; Moreau, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    GPS (Global Positioning System) Space Service Volume (SSV) signal environment is from 3,000-36,000 kilometers altitude. Current SSV specifications only capture performance provided by signals transmitted within 23.5(L1) or 26(L2-L5) off-nadir angle. Recent on-orbit data lessons learned show significant PNT (Positioning, Navigation and Timing) performance improvements when the full aggregate signal is used. Numerous military civil operational missions in High Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (HEOGEO) utilize the full signal to enhance vehicle PNT performance

  20. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1/heme oxygenase 1 cascade as upstream signals in the prolife role of heat shock protein 70 at rostral ventrolateral medulla during experimental brain stem death.

    PubMed

    Chang, Alice Y W; Chan, Julie Y H; Cheng, Hsiao-Lei; Tsai, Ching-Yi; Chan, Samuel H H

    2009-12-01

    As the origin of a life-and-death signal that reflects central cardiovascular regulatory failure during brain stem death, the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) is a suitable neural substrate to delineate the cellular mechanisms of this fateful phenomenon. Based on a clinically relevant animal model that used the organophosphate pesticide mevinphos (Mev) as the experimental insult, we reported previously that heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in RVLM plays a prolife role by ameliorating circulatory depression during brain stem death. Because Mev also elicits significant hypoxia in RVLM, this study evaluated the hypothesis that the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1)/heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) cascade acts as upstream signals in the prolife role of HSP70 at RVLM during experimental brain stem death. In Sprague-Dawley rats maintained under propofol anesthesia, transcription activity assay or Western blot analysis revealed an enhancement of nuclear activity of HIF-1alpha or augmentation of HO-1 and HSP70 expression in RVLM preferentially during the prolife phase of Mev intoxication. Loss-of-function manipulations in RVLM using HIF-1alpha, HIF-1beta, or HO-1 antiserum or antisense hif-1alpha or ho-1 oligonucleotide significantly antagonized the preferential upregulation of HSP70, depressed the sustained cardiovascular regulatory machinery during the prolife phase, and exacerbated circulatory depression during the prodeath phase. Immunoneutralization of HIF-1alpha also blunted the preferential increase in HO-1 expression. We conclude that the repertoire of cellular events in RVLM during the prolife phase in our Mev intoxication of brain stem death triggered by hypoxia entails sequential activation of HIF-1, HO-1, and HSP70, leading to neuroprotection by amelioration of cardiovascular depression.

  1. FcRL4 acts as an adaptive to innate molecular switch dampening BCR signaling and enhancing TLR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Hae Won; Krueger, Peter D.; Davis, Randall S.

    2011-01-01

    Fc receptor–like 4 (FcRL4) is expressed on the surface of a subset of memory B cells (MBCs) located at sites of invading pathogens in mucosal lymphoid tissues in healthy individuals. Recently, FcRL4+ MBCs were shown to be greatly increased in number in the peripheral blood of HIV-infected viremic individuals, in whom they are associated with B-cell exhaustion, and in individuals chronically reinfected with malaria. In the present study, we provide evidence that the expression of FcRL4 in human B-cell lines disrupts immune synapse formation and blocks antigen-induced BCR signaling at the point of Syk phosphorylation, blocking downstream activation of PLC-γ2 and Vav and the induction of calcium responses and CD69 expression. FcRL4 functions by ligation-independent mechanisms that require the 3 tyrosine residues in its cytoplasmic domain and involves its phosphorylation and association with the tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2. Remarkably, FcRL4 is concentrated in endosomes after treatment with the TLR9 agonist CpG and enhances signaling through TLR9, as measured by increased expression of CD23. These findings suggest that FcRL4 may act as a molecular switch in B cells to dampen adaptive immune signaling and enhance innate signaling in response to chronic antigenic stimulation. PMID:21908428

  2. Heparanase Enhances the Insulin Receptor Signaling Pathway to Activate Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase in Multiple Myeloma*

    PubMed Central

    Purushothaman, Anurag; Babitz, Stephen K.; Sanderson, Ralph D.

    2012-01-01

    ERK signaling regulates proliferation, survival, drug resistance, and angiogenesis in cancer. Although the mechanisms regulating ERK activation are not fully understood, we previously demonstrated that ERK phosphorylation is elevated by heparanase, an enzyme associated with aggressive behavior of many cancers. In the present study, myeloma cell lines expressing either high or low levels of heparanase were utilized to determine how heparanase stimulates ERK signaling. We discovered that the insulin receptor was abundant on cells expressing either high or low levels of heparanase, but the receptor was highly phosphorylated in heparanase-high cells compared with heparanase-low cells. In addition, protein kinase C activity was elevated in heparanase-high cells, and this enhanced expression of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), the principle intracellular substrate for phosphorylation by the insulin receptor. Blocking insulin receptor function with antibody or a small molecule inhibitor or knockdown of IRS-1 expression using shRNA diminished heparanase-mediated ERK activation in the tumor cells. In addition, up-regulation of the insulin signaling pathway by heparanase and the resulting ERK activation were dependent on heparanase retaining its enzyme activity. These results reveal a novel mechanism whereby heparanase enhances activation of the insulin receptor signaling pathway leading to ERK activation and modulation of myeloma behavior. PMID:23048032

  3. A Comparison of Signal Enhancement Methods for Extracting Tonal Acoustic Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.

    1998-01-01

    The measurement of pure tone acoustic pressure signals in the presence of masking noise, often generated by mean flow, is a continual problem in the field of passive liner duct acoustics research. In support of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Noise Reduction Program, methods were investigated for conducting measurements of advanced duct liner concepts in harsh, aeroacoustic environments. This report presents the results of a comparison study of three signal extraction methods for acquiring quality acoustic pressure measurements in the presence of broadband noise (used to simulate the effects of mean flow). The performance of each method was compared to a baseline measurement of a pure tone acoustic pressure 3 dB above a uniform, broadband noise background.

  4. The histone deacetylase inhibitors LAQ824 and LBH589 do not require death receptor signaling or a functional apoptosome to mediate tumor cell death or therapeutic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Leigh; Bots, Michael; Lindemann, Ralph K; Bolden, Jessica E; Newbold, Andrea; Cluse, Leonie A; Scott, Clare L; Strasser, Andreas; Atadja, Peter; Lowe, Scott W; Johnstone, Ricky W

    2009-07-09

    LAQ824 and LBH589 (panobinostat) are histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) developed as cancer therapeutics and we have used the Emu-myc lymphoma model to identify the molecular events required for their antitumor effects. Induction of tumor cell death was necessary for these agents to mediate therapeutic responses in vivo and both HDACi engaged the intrinsic apoptotic cascade that did not require p53. Death receptor pathway blockade had no effect on the therapeutic activities of LAQ824 and LBH589; however, overexpression of Bcl-2 or Bcl-X(L) protected lymphoma cells from HDACi-induced killing and suppressed their therapeutic activities. Deletion of Apaf-1 or Caspase-9 delayed HDACi-induced lymphoma killing in vitro and in vivo, associated with suppression of many biochemical indicators of apoptosis, but did not provide long-term resistance to these agents and failed to inhibit their therapeutic activities. Emu-myc lymphomas lacking a functional apoptosome displayed morphologic and biochemical features of autophagy after treatment with LAQ824 and LBH589, indicating that, in the absence of a complete intrinsic apoptosis pathway involving apoptosome formation, these HDACi can still mediate a therapeutic response. Our data indicate that damage to the mitochondria is the key event necessary for LAQ824 and LBH589 to mediate tumor cell death and a robust therapeutic response.

  5. The histone deacetylase inhibitors LAQ824 and LBH589 do not require death receptor signaling or a functional apoptosome to mediate tumor cell death or therapeutic efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Leigh; Bots, Michael; Lindemann, Ralph K.; Bolden, Jessica E.; Newbold, Andrea; Cluse, Leonie A.; Scott, Clare L.; Strasser, Andreas; Atadja, Peter; Lowe, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    LAQ824 and LBH589 (panobinostat) are histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) developed as cancer therapeutics and we have used the Eμ-myc lymphoma model to identify the molecular events required for their antitumor effects. Induction of tumor cell death was necessary for these agents to mediate therapeutic responses in vivo and both HDACi engaged the intrinsic apoptotic cascade that did not require p53. Death receptor pathway blockade had no effect on the therapeutic activities of LAQ824 and LBH589; however, overexpression of Bcl-2 or Bcl-XL protected lymphoma cells from HDACi-induced killing and suppressed their therapeutic activities. Deletion of Apaf-1 or Caspase-9 delayed HDACi-induced lymphoma killing in vitro and in vivo, associated with suppression of many biochemical indicators of apoptosis, but did not provide long-term resistance to these agents and failed to inhibit their therapeutic activities. Eμ-myc lymphomas lacking a functional apoptosome displayed morphologic and biochemical features of autophagy after treatment with LAQ824 and LBH589, indicating that, in the absence of a complete intrinsic apoptosis pathway involving apoptosome formation, these HDACi can still mediate a therapeutic response. Our data indicate that damage to the mitochondria is the key event necessary for LAQ824 and LBH589 to mediate tumor cell death and a robust therapeutic response. PMID:19383971

  6. An enhanced sparse representation strategy for signal classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yin; Gao, Jinglun; Barner, Kenneth E.

    2012-06-01

    Sparse representation based classification (SRC) has achieved state-of-the-art results on face recognition. It is hence desired to extend its power to a broader range of classification tasks in pattern recognition. SRC first encodes a query sample as a linear combination of a few atoms from a predefined dictionary. It then identifies the label by evaluating which class results in the minimum reconstruction error. The effectiveness of SRC is limited by an important assumption that data points from different classes are not distributed along the same radius direction. Otherwise, this approach will lose their discrimination ability, even though data from different classes are actually well-separated in terms of Euclidean distance. This assumption is reasonable for face recognition as images of the same subject under different intensity levels are still considered to be of same-class. However, the assumption is not always satisfied when dealing with many other real-world data, e.g., the Iris dataset, where classes are stratified along the radius direction. In this paper, we propose a new coding strategy, called Nearest- Farthest Neighbors based SRC (NF-SRC), to effectively overcome the limitation within SRC. The dictionary is composed of both the Nearest Neighbors and the Farthest Neighbors. While the Nearest Neighbors are used to narrow the selection of candidate samples, the Farthest Neighbors are employed to make the dictionary more redundant. NF-SRC encodes each query signal in a greedy way similar to OMP. The proposed approach is evaluated over extensive experiments. The encouraging results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method.

  7. Sex steroid blockade enhances thymopoiesis by modulating Notch signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jennifer J.; Holland, Amanda M.; Wertheimer, Tobias; Yu, Vionnie W.C.; Zakrzewski, Johannes L.; Tuckett, Andrea Z.; Singer, Natalie V.; West, Mallory L.; Smith, Odette M.; Young, Lauren F.; Kreines, Fabiana M.; Levy, Emily R.; Boyd, Richard L.; Scadden, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Paradoxical to its importance for generating a diverse T cell repertoire, thymic function progressively declines throughout life. This process has been at least partially attributed to the effects of sex steroids, and their removal promotes enhanced thymopoiesis and recovery from immune injury. We show that one mechanism by which sex steroids influence thymopoiesis is through direct inhibition in cortical thymic epithelial cells (cTECs) of Delta-like 4 (Dll4), a Notch ligand crucial for the commitment and differentiation of T cell progenitors in a dose-dependent manner. Consistent with this, sex steroid ablation (SSA) led to increased expression of Dll4 and its downstream targets. Importantly, SSA induced by luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor antagonism bypassed the surge in sex steroids caused by LHRH agonists, the gold standard for clinical ablation of sex steroids, thereby facilitating increased Dll4 expression and more rapid promotion of thymopoiesis. Collectively, these findings not only reveal a novel mechanism underlying improved thymic regeneration upon SSA but also offer an improved clinical strategy for successfully boosting immune function. PMID:25332287

  8. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 plays a pro-life role in experimental brain stem death via MAPK signal-interacting kinase at rostral ventrolateral medulla.

    PubMed

    Chan, Samuel H H; Sun, Enya Y H; Chang, Alice Y W

    2010-03-15

    As the origin of a life-and-death signal detected from systemic arterial pressure, which sequentially increases (pro-life) and decreases (pro-death) to reflect progressive dysfunction of central cardiovascular regulation during the advancement towards brain stem death in critically ill patients, the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) is a suitable neural substrate for mechanistic delineation of this fatal phenomenon. The present study assessed the hypothesis that extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) that is important for cell survival and is activated specifically by MAPK kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2), plays a pro-life role in RVLM during brain stem death. We further delineated the participation of MAPK signal-interacting kinase (MNK), a novel substrate of ERK in this process. An experimental model of brain stem death that employed microinjection of the organophosphate insecticide mevinphos (Mev; 10 nmol) bilaterally into RVLM of Sprague-Dawley rats was used, in conjunction with cardiovascular, pharmacological and biochemical evaluations. Results from ELISA showed that whereas the total ERK1/2 was not affected, augmented phosphorylation of ERK1/2 at Thr202 and Tyr204 in RVLM occurred preferentially during the pro-life phase of experimental brain stem death. Furthermore, pretreatment by microinjection into the bilateral RVLM of a specific ERK2 inhibitor, ERK activation inhibitor peptide II (1 nmol); a specific MEK1/2 inhibitor, U0126 (5 pmol); or a specific MNK1/2 inhibitor, CGP57380 (5 pmol) exacerbated the hypotension and blunted the augmented life-and-death signals exhibited during the pro-life phase. Those pretreatments also blocked the upregulated nitric oxide synthase I (NOS I)/protein kinase G (PKG) signaling, the pro-life cascade that sustains central cardiovascular regulatory functions during experimental brain stem death. Our results demonstrated that activation of MEK1/2, ERK1/2 and MNK1

  9. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 plays a pro-life role in experimental brain stem death via MAPK signal-interacting kinase at rostral ventrolateral medulla

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background As the origin of a life-and-death signal detected from systemic arterial pressure, which sequentially increases (pro-life) and decreases (pro-death) to reflect progressive dysfunction of central cardiovascular regulation during the advancement towards brain stem death in critically ill patients, the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) is a suitable neural substrate for mechanistic delineation of this fatal phenomenon. The present study assessed the hypothesis that extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) that is important for cell survival and is activated specifically by MAPK kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2), plays a pro-life role in RVLM during brain stem death. We further delineated the participation of MAPK signal-interacting kinase (MNK), a novel substrate of ERK in this process. Methods An experimental model of brain stem death that employed microinjection of the organophosphate insecticide mevinphos (Mev; 10 nmol) bilaterally into RVLM of Sprague-Dawley rats was used, in conjunction with cardiovascular, pharmacological and biochemical evaluations. Results Results from ELISA showed that whereas the total ERK1/2 was not affected, augmented phosphorylation of ERK1/2 at Thr202 and Tyr204 in RVLM occurred preferentially during the pro-life phase of experimental brain stem death. Furthermore, pretreatment by microinjection into the bilateral RVLM of a specific ERK2 inhibitor, ERK activation inhibitor peptide II (1 nmol); a specific MEK1/2 inhibitor, U0126 (5 pmol); or a specific MNK1/2 inhibitor, CGP57380 (5 pmol) exacerbated the hypotension and blunted the augmented life-and-death signals exhibited during the pro-life phase. Those pretreatments also blocked the upregulated nitric oxide synthase I (NOS I)/protein kinase G (PKG) signaling, the pro-life cascade that sustains central cardiovascular regulatory functions during experimental brain stem death. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that

  10. Oxygen in human health from life to death--An approach to teaching redox biology and signaling to graduate and medical students.

    PubMed

    Briehl, Margaret M

    2015-08-01

    In the absence of oxygen human life is measured in minutes. In the presence of oxygen, normal metabolism generates reactive species (ROS) that have the potential to cause cell injury contributing to human aging and disease. Between these extremes, organisms have developed means for sensing oxygen and ROS and regulating their cellular processes in response. Redox signaling contributes to the control of cell proliferation and death. Aberrant redox signaling underlies many human diseases. The attributes acquired by altered redox homeostasis in cancer cells illustrate this particularly well. This teaching review and the accompanying illustrations provide an introduction to redox biology and signaling aimed at instructors of graduate and medical students.

  11. Dexamethasone enhances serum deprivation-induced necrotic death of rat C6 glioma cells through activation of glucocorticoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Morita, K; Ishimura, K; Tsuruo, Y; Wong, D L

    1999-01-23

    Glucocorticoids have been shown to be neurotoxic and appear to play a role in neuronal cell loss during aging and following neuropathological insults. However, very little is known about the effects of these steroid hormones on glial cells. The effect of the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (DEX) on glial cell viability was therefore examined by measuring neutral red uptake into rat C6 glioma cells. Serum deprivation markedly reduced cell viability, and this effect was significantly enhanced by DEX. Electrophoretic analysis showed that the cell damage induced by either serum deprivation alone or in combination with DEX was not accompanied by the degradation of DNA into nucleosomic fragments. Electron microscopic studies confirmed that serum deprivation and glucocorticoid treatment caused necrotic cell death. Furthermore, the effect of DEX on cell viability could be mimicked by the glucocorticoid receptor agonist RU28362, and completely prevented by the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU38486. These results indicate that dexamethasone can enhance the necrotic death of glioma cells induced by serum deprivation, suggesting that glucocorticoids may be involved in the chronic alteration of brain function arising from neuropathological damage to glial cells.

  12. Quercetin enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells via increased protein stability of death receptor 5

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Young-Hwa; Heo, Jeonghoon; Lee, Yong J.; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Kim, Young-Ho

    2010-01-01

    Aims Quercetin has been shown to enhance tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis of prostate cancer cells via mechanisms that include upregulation of death receptor (DR) 5, a protein reported to play an important role in sensitizing cancer cells to apoptosis. We aimed to determine the specific mechanisms underlying quercetin-induced DR5 expression. Main methods Human prostate cancer cells were exposed to quercetin and TRAIL. Trypan blue assays and terminal transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assays evaluated changes in TRAIL resistance after quercetin treatment, and flow cytometry examined quercetin-induced death receptor expression in DU-145 cells. Western blotting, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and transiently transfection were utilized to confirm apoptotic patterns of prostate cancer cells. Key findings After stimulation with quercetin, DU-145 cells exhibited stronger sensitization to TRAIL. Quercetin treatment enhanced TRAIL-induced activation proteins in the caspase pathway, such as poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), caspase-3, and caspase-9. Quercetin dose-dependently increased DR5 levels in prostate cancer cells, which was mediated by increased transcription and protein stability, but not mRNA stability. Ectopic expression of DR5 dose-dependently increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Significance Our results showed that the role of quercetin and TRAIL combination therapy may provide a novel strategy for treating prostate cancer by overcoming critical mechanisms of apoptosis resistance. PMID:20096292

  13. Autophagy negatively regulates cell death by controlling NPR1-dependent salicylic acid signaling during senescence and the innate immune response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Kohki; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Kamiya, Yuji; Kusano, Miyako; Consonni, Chiara; Panstruga, Ralph; Ohsumi, Yoshinori; Shirasu, Ken

    2009-09-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved intracellular process for vacuolar degradation of cytoplasmic components. In higher plants, autophagy defects result in early senescence and excessive immunity-related programmed cell death (PCD) irrespective of nutrient conditions; however, the mechanisms by which cells die in the absence of autophagy have been unclear. Here, we demonstrate a conserved requirement for salicylic acid (SA) signaling for these phenomena in autophagy-defective mutants (atg mutants). The atg mutant phenotypes of accelerated PCD in senescence and immunity are SA signaling dependent but do not require intact jasmonic acid or ethylene signaling pathways. Application of an SA agonist induces the senescence/cell death phenotype in SA-deficient atg mutants but not in atg npr1 plants, suggesting that the cell death phenotypes in the atg mutants are dependent on the SA signal transducer NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1. We also show that autophagy is induced by the SA agonist. These findings imply that plant autophagy operates a novel negative feedback loop modulating SA signaling to negatively regulate senescence and immunity-related PCD.

  14. Evidence against signal enhancement as a mechanism of direct selection by color.

    PubMed

    Vierck, Esther; Miller, Jeff

    2007-04-01

    Two of the possible mechanisms that have been put forward to explain precuing effects are signal enhancement and uncertainty reduction. Signal enhancement leads to processing advantages for valid information because the signal at the known input channel is enhanced, whereas uncertainty reduction allows observers to ignore confusing distractor items in a display. Both mechanisms have been reported to be involved in location precuing, but it is still unclear which of these two mechanisms is responsible for color cuing effects. Two experiments are reported in which expectancy for a certain color in a single-item display was created. Targetswere presented briefly and were masked. If color cues produce signal enhancement, then a color cuing effect should result. If color cues only allow uncertainty reduction, however, there should be no color cuing effect because there are no distractors in single-item displays. The results of both experiments favor uncertainty reduction as the mechanism behind color cuing, because no signs of signal enhancement-based cuing effects were observed.

  15. The mutual effect of metal sample and turboflame in LIBS signal enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezelbash, M.; Mousavi, S. J.; Majd, A. E.; Darbani, S. M. R.; Saghafifar, H.; Maleki, A.

    2016-08-01

    The main aim of the present study is to evaluate the mutual effect of copper sample and turboflame in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) signal enhancement. The use of copper sample leads to a signal enhancement in CN ( B 2Σ+- X 2Σ+) 384.2-388.4 nm molecular transition, N742nm, N744nm, N746nm (a triplet generated by the fine splitting of the 2 s 22 p 2(3 P)3 s-2 s 22 p 2(3 P)3 p transition) and Hα, 656.3 nm (as a flame inductor) atomic lines analysis. Additionally, increase in copper sample temperature with flame can enhance the Cu atomic line intensities (as copper sample inductors). Moreover, in this paper, the comparison between turboflame and alcohol flame on LIBS analysis was studied. LIBS signal intensity variation in a turboflame and turboflame coupled with copper sample at different laser pulse energies indicated that the low laser pulse energy could be compensated by using a copper sample that is coupled with turboflame and improved LIBS signal enhancement. For flames analysis, the use of metal sample in LIBS method is demonstrated to be costeffective, compact, and capable of signal enhancement.

  16. Selective disruption of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling via phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 prevents the protective effect of IGF-1 on human cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Alberobello, A Teresa; D'Esposito, Vittoria; Marasco, Daniela; Doti, Nunzianna; Ruvo, Menotti; Bianco, Roberto; Tortora, Giampaolo; Esposito, Iolanda; Fiory, Francesca; Miele, Claudia; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro

    2010-02-26

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling system exerts a broad antiapoptotic function and plays a crucial role in resistance to anticancer therapies. Exposure of MCF-7 breast cancer cells to IGF-1 rapidly and transiently induced tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1). This was paralleled by Akt/protein kinase B and protein kinase C-zeta phosphorylation, at Thr(308) and Thr(410), respectively. IGF-1 treatment also enhanced PDK1 interaction with IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) in intact MCF-7 cells. Pulldown assays revealed that PDK1 bound IGF-1R in vitro and that the region encompassing amino acids 51-359 of PDK1 was necessary for the interaction. Synthetic peptides corresponding to IGF-1R C terminus amino acids 1295-1337 (C43) and to PDK1 amino acids 114-141 reduced in vitro IGF-1R/PDK1 interaction in a concentration-dependent manner. Loading of fluoresceinated-C43 (fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-C43) into MCF-7 cells significantly reduced IGF-1R/PDK1 interaction and phosphorylation of PDK1 substrates. Moreover, FITC-C43 intracellular loading reverted the protective effect of IGF-1 on growth factor deprivation-induced cell death. Finally, the inhibition of IGF-1R/PDK1 interaction and signaling by FITC-C43 was accompanied by 2-fold enhanced killing capacity of cetuximab in human GEO colon adenocarcinoma cells and was sufficient to restore cell death in cetuximab-resistant cell clones. Thus, disruption of PDK1 interaction with IGF-1R reduces IGF-1 survival effects in cancer cells and may enhance cell death by anticancer agents.

  17. Selective Disruption of Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) Signaling via Phosphoinositide-dependent Kinase-1 Prevents the Protective Effect of IGF-1 on Human Cancer Cell Death*

    PubMed Central

    Alberobello, A. Teresa; D'Esposito, Vittoria; Marasco, Daniela; Doti, Nunzianna; Ruvo, Menotti; Bianco, Roberto; Tortora, Giampaolo; Esposito, Iolanda; Fiory, Francesca; Miele, Claudia; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling system exerts a broad antiapoptotic function and plays a crucial role in resistance to anticancer therapies. Exposure of MCF-7 breast cancer cells to IGF-1 rapidly and transiently induced tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1). This was paralleled by Akt/protein kinase B and protein kinase C-ζ phosphorylation, at Thr308 and Thr410, respectively. IGF-1 treatment also enhanced PDK1 interaction with IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) in intact MCF-7 cells. Pulldown assays revealed that PDK1 bound IGF-1R in vitro and that the region encompassing amino acids 51–359 of PDK1 was necessary for the interaction. Synthetic peptides corresponding to IGF-1R C terminus amino acids 1295–1337 (C43) and to PDK1 amino acids 114–141 reduced in vitro IGF-1R/PDK1 interaction in a concentration-dependent manner. Loading of fluoresceinated-C43 (fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-C43) into MCF-7 cells significantly reduced IGF-1R/PDK1 interaction and phosphorylation of PDK1 substrates. Moreover, FITC-C43 intracellular loading reverted the protective effect of IGF-1 on growth factor deprivation-induced cell death. Finally, the inhibition of IGF-1R/PDK1 interaction and signaling by FITC-C43 was accompanied by 2-fold enhanced killing capacity of cetuximab in human GEO colon adenocarcinoma cells and was sufficient to restore cell death in cetuximab-resistant cell clones. Thus, disruption of PDK1 interaction with IGF-1R reduces IGF-1 survival effects in cancer cells and may enhance cell death by anticancer agents. PMID:20044479

  18. Proteolytic activation of proapoptotic kinase protein kinase Cδ by tumor necrosis factor α death receptor signaling in dopaminergic neurons during neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The mechanisms of progressive dopaminergic neuronal loss in Parkinson’s disease (PD) remain poorly understood, largely due to the complex etiology and multifactorial nature of disease pathogenesis. Several lines of evidence from human studies and experimental models over the last decade have identified neuroinflammation as a potential pathophysiological mechanism contributing to disease progression. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF) has recently emerged as the primary neuroinflammatory mediator that can elicit dopaminergic cell death in PD. However, the signaling pathways by which TNF mediates dopaminergic cell death have not been completely elucidated. Methods In this study we used a dopaminergic neuronal cell model and recombinant TNF to characterize intracellular signaling pathways activated during TNF-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Etanercept and neutralizing antibodies to tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) were used to block TNF signaling. We confirmed the results from our mechanistic studies in primary embryonic mesencephalic cultures and in vivo using the stereotaxic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) model of nigral dopaminergic degeneration. Results TNF signaling in dopaminergic neuronal cells triggered the activation of protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), an isoform of the novel PKC family, by caspase-3 and caspase-8 dependent proteolytic cleavage. Both TNFR1 neutralizing antibodies and the soluble TNF receptor Etanercept blocked TNF-induced PKCδ proteolytic activation. Proteolytic activation of PKCδ was accompanied by translocation of the kinase to the nucleus. Notably, inhibition of PKCδ signaling by small interfering (si)RNA or overexpression of a PKCδ cleavage-resistant mutant protected against TNF-induced dopaminergic neuronal cell death. Further, primary dopaminergic neurons obtained from PKCδ knockout (−/−) mice were resistant to TNF toxicity. The proteolytic activation of PKCδ in the mouse substantia nigra in the neuroinflammatory LPS

  19. Aberration of the enzymatic activity of Fhit tumor suppressor protein enhances cancer cell death upon photodynamic therapy similarly to that driven by wild-type Fhit.

    PubMed

    Ferens, Bartosz; Kawiak, Anna; Banecki, Bogdan; Bielawski, Krzysztof P; Zawacka-Pankau, Joanna

    2009-07-18

    The tumor suppressor Fhit protein lost in many human pre-malignant tissues, possesses diadenosine triphosphate activity regulated by a photosensitizer, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in vitro. Interestingly, when exogenously restored, the protein suppresses the growth of human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells which is further enhanced by PpIX. Additionally, Fhit production enhances the overall response of cells to PpIX-mediated photodynamic reaction. In the present study, we have estimated, for the first time, the biological activity of two Fhit mutated forms exhibiting aberrant Ap(3)A hydrolase activity in vitro which emphasizes the recent findings that hydrolysis of Ap(3)A is not necessary for Fhit tumor suppression function. Using several biophysical methods we revealed the dynamic nature of mutant Fhit-PpIX complexes in vitro which support our previous hypothesis that Fhit-Ap(3)A-PpIX might be a signaling molecule driving apoptosis in cancer cells. Moreover, according to our findings, substitution at histidine94 in Fhit active site induces the vulnerability of HeLa cells to PpIX-PDT in a similar manner to that caused by wild-type Fhit protein. These results support the view that inhibition of Fhit hydrolase activity might be a crucial element in a Fhit-driven cancer cells death.

  20. PKCδ activated by c-MET enhances infiltration of human glioblastoma cells through NOTCH2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seok-Gu; Kim, Rae-Kwon; Cui, Yan-Hong; Lee, Hae-June; Kim, Min-Jung; Lee, Jae-Seong; Kim, In-Gyu; Suh, Yongjoon; Lee, Su-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Poor prognosis of glioblastoma (GBM) is attributable to the propensity of tumor cells to infiltrate into the brain parenchyma. Protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes are highly expressed or aberrantly activated in GBM. However, how this signaling node translates to GBM cell invasiveness remains unknown. Here, we report that among PKC isoforms, PKCδ is strongly associated with infiltration of GBM cells. Notably, PKCδ enhanced Tyr418 phosphorylation of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase SRC, which in turn activated STAT3 and subsequent NOTCH2 signaling, ultimately leading to GBM cell invasiveness. Furthermore, we showed that PKCδ was aberrantly activated in GBM cells by c-MET, a receptor tyrosine kinase hyperactivated in GBM. In agreement, inhibition either component in the c-MET/PKCδ/SRC/STAT3 signaling axis effectively blocked the NOTCH2 signaling and invasiveness of GBM cells. Taken together, our findings shed a light on the signaling mechanisms behind the constitutive activation of PKCδ signaling in GBM. PMID:26700818

  1. ASIC channel inhibition enhances excitotoxic neuronal death in an in vitro model of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Graciela L; Veeraraghavan, Priyadharishini; Gonzalez-Inchauspe, Carlota; Nistri, Andrea; Uchitel, Osvaldo D

    2017-02-20

    In the spinal cord high extracellular glutamate evokes excitotoxic damage with neuronal loss and severe locomotor impairment. During the cell dysfunction process, extracellular pH becomes acid and may activate acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) which could be important contributors to neurodegenerative pathologies. Our previous studies have shown that transient application of the glutamate analog kainate (KA) evokes delayed excitotoxic death of spinal neurons, while white matter is mainly spared. The present goal was to enquire if ASIC channels modulated KA damage in relation to locomotor network function and cell death. Mouse spinal cord slices were treated with KA (0.01 or 0.1mM) for 1h, and then washed out for 24h prior to analysis. RT-PCR results showed that KA (at 0.01mM concentration that is near-threshold for damage) increased mRNA expression of ASIC1a, ASIC1b, ASIC2 and ASIC3, an effect reversed by the ASIC inhibitor 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). A KA neurotoxic dose (0.1mM) reduced ASIC1a and ASIC2 expression. Cell viability assays demonstrated KA-induced large damage in spinal slices from mice with ASIC1a gene ablation. Likewise, immunohistochemistry indicated significant neuronal loss when KA was followed by the ASIC inhibitors DAPI or amiloride. Electrophysiological recording from ventral roots of isolated spinal cords showed that alternating oscillatory cycles were slowed down by 0.01mMKA, and intensely inhibited by subsequently applied DAPI or amiloride. Our data suggest that early rise in ASIC expression and function counteracted deleterious effects on spinal networks by raising the excitotoxicity threshold, a result with potential implications for improving neuroprotection. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. CD95 triggers Orai1-mediated localized Ca2+ entry, regulates recruitment of protein kinase C (PKC) β2, and prevents death-inducing signaling complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Khadra, Nadine; Bresson-Bepoldin, Laurence; Penna, Aubin; Chaigne-Delalande, Benjamin; Ségui, Bruno; Levade, Thierry; Vacher, Anne-Marie; Reiffers, Josy; Ducret, Thomas; Moreau, Jean-François; Cahalan, Michael D.; Vacher, Pierre; Legembre, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The death receptor CD95 plays a pivotal role in immune surveillance and immune tolerance. Binding of CD95L to CD95 leads to recruitment of the adaptor protein Fas-associated death domain protein (FADD), which in turn aggregates caspase-8 and caspase-10. Efficient formation of the CD95/FADD/caspase complex, known as the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), culminates in the induction of apoptosis. We show that cells exposed to CD95L undergo a reorganization of the plasma membrane in which the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ channel Orai1 and the endoplasmic reticulum-resident activator stromal interaction molecule 1 colocalize with CD95 into a micrometer-sized cluster in which the channel elicits a polarized entry of calcium. Orai1 knockdown and expression of a dominant negative construct (Orai1E106A) reveal that on CD95 engagement, the Orai1-driven localized Ca2+ influx is fundamental to recruiting the Ca2+-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) β2 to the DISC. PKCβ2 in turn transiently holds the complex in an inactive status, preventing caspase activation and transmission of the apoptotic signal. This study identifies a biological role of Ca2+ and the Orai1 channel that drives a transient negative feedback loop, introducing a lag phase in the early steps of the CD95 signal. We suggest that these localized events provide a time of decision to prevent accidental cell death. PMID:22065776

  3. Local Cell Death Changes the Orientation of Cell Division in the Developing Drosophila Wing Imaginal Disc Without Using Fat or Dachsous as Orienting Signals.

    PubMed

    Kale, Abhijit; Rimesso, Gerard; Baker, Nicholas E

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila imaginal disc cells exhibit preferred cell division orientations according to location within the disc. These orientations are altered if cell death occurs within the epithelium, such as is caused by cell competition or by genotypes affecting cell survival. Both normal cell division orientations, and their orientations after cell death, depend on the Fat-Dachsous pathway of planar cell polarity (PCP). The hypothesis that cell death initiates a planar polarity signal was investigated. When clones homozygous for the pineapple eye (pie) mutation were made to initiate cell death, neither Dachsous nor Fat was required in pie cells for the re-orientation of nearby cells, indicating a distinct signal for this PCP pathway. Dpp and Wg were also not needed for pie clones to re-orient cell division. Cell shapes were evaluated in wild type and mosaic wing discs to assess mechanical consequences of cell loss. Although proximal wing disc cells and cells close to the dorso-ventral boundary were elongated in their preferred cell division axes in wild type discs, cell shapes in much of the wing pouch were symmetrical on average and did not predict their preferred division axis. Cells in pie mutant clones were slightly larger than their normal counterparts, consistent with mechanical stretching following cell loss, but no bias in cell shape was detected in the surrounding cells. These findings indicate that an unidentified signal influences PCP-dependent cell division orientation in imaginal discs.

  4. CD95 triggers Orai1-mediated localized Ca2+ entry, regulates recruitment of protein kinase C (PKC) β2, and prevents death-inducing signaling complex formation.

    PubMed

    Khadra, Nadine; Bresson-Bepoldin, Laurence; Penna, Aubin; Chaigne-Delalande, Benjamin; Ségui, Bruno; Levade, Thierry; Vacher, Anne-Marie; Reiffers, Josy; Ducret, Thomas; Moreau, Jean-François; Cahalan, Michael D; Vacher, Pierre; Legembre, Patrick

    2011-11-22

    The death receptor CD95 plays a pivotal role in immune surveillance and immune tolerance. Binding of CD95L to CD95 leads to recruitment of the adaptor protein Fas-associated death domain protein (FADD), which in turn aggregates caspase-8 and caspase-10. Efficient formation of the CD95/FADD/caspase complex, known as the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), culminates in the induction of apoptosis. We show that cells exposed to CD95L undergo a reorganization of the plasma membrane in which the Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) channel Orai1 and the endoplasmic reticulum-resident activator stromal interaction molecule 1 colocalize with CD95 into a micrometer-sized cluster in which the channel elicits a polarized entry of calcium. Orai1 knockdown and expression of a dominant negative construct (Orai1E106A) reveal that on CD95 engagement, the Orai1-driven localized Ca(2+) influx is fundamental to recruiting the Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) β2 to the DISC. PKCβ2 in turn transiently holds the complex in an inactive status, preventing caspase activation and transmission of the apoptotic signal. This study identifies a biological role of Ca(2+) and the Orai1 channel that drives a transient negative feedback loop, introducing a lag phase in the early steps of the CD95 signal. We suggest that these localized events provide a time of decision to prevent accidental cell death.

  5. (125)I Seeds Radiation Induces Paraptosis-Like Cell Death via PI3K/AKT Signaling Pathway in HCT116 Cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lelin; Wang, Hao; Zhao, Yong; Wang, Junjie

    2016-01-01

    (125)I seeds brachytherapy implantation has been extensively performed in unresectable and rerecurrent rectal carcinoma. Many studies on the cancer-killing activity of (125)I seeds radiation mainly focused on its ability to trigger apoptosis, which is the most well-known and dominant type of cell death induced by radiation. However our results showed some unique morphological features such as cell swelling, cytoplasmic vacuolation, and plasma membrane integrity, which is obviously different to apoptosis. In this study, clonogenic proliferation was carried out to assay survival fraction. Transmission electron microscopy was used to analyze ultrastructural and evaluate morphologic feature of HCT116 cells after exposure to (125)I seeds radiation. Immunofluorescence analysis was used to detect the origin of cytoplasmic vacuoles. Flow cytometry analysis was employed to detect the size and granularity of HCT116 cells. Western blot was performed to measure the protein level of AIP1, caspase-3, AKT, p-Akt (Thr308), p-Akt (Ser473), and β-actin. We found that (125)I seeds radiation activated PI3K/AKT signaling pathway and could trigger paraptosis-like cell death. Moreover, inhibitor of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway could inhibit paraptosis-like cell death induced by (125)I seeds radiation. Our data suggest that (125)I seeds radiation can induce paraptosis-like cell death via PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

  6. Local Cell Death Changes the Orientation of Cell Division in the Developing Drosophila Wing Imaginal Disc Without Using Fat or Dachsous as Orienting Signals

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Abhijit; Rimesso, Gerard; Baker, Nicholas E.

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila imaginal disc cells exhibit preferred cell division orientations according to location within the disc. These orientations are altered if cell death occurs within the epithelium, such as is caused by cell competition or by genotypes affecting cell survival. Both normal cell division orientations, and their orientations after cell death, depend on the Fat-Dachsous pathway of planar cell polarity (PCP). The hypothesis that cell death initiates a planar polarity signal was investigated. When clones homozygous for the pineapple eye (pie) mutation were made to initiate cell death, neither Dachsous nor Fat was required in pie cells for the re-orientation of nearby cells, indicating a distinct signal for this PCP pathway. Dpp and Wg were also not needed for pie clones to re-orient cell division. Cell shapes were evaluated in wild type and mosaic wing discs to assess mechanical consequences of cell loss. Although proximal wing disc cells and cells close to the dorso-ventral boundary were elongated in their preferred cell division axes in wild type discs, cell shapes in much of the wing pouch were symmetrical on average and did not predict their preferred division axis. Cells in pie mutant clones were slightly larger than their normal counterparts, consistent with mechanical stretching following cell loss, but no bias in cell shape was detected in the surrounding cells. These findings indicate that an unidentified signal influences PCP-dependent cell division orientation in imaginal discs. PMID:28030539

  7. 125I Seeds Radiation Induces Paraptosis-Like Cell Death via PI3K/AKT Signaling Pathway in HCT116 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lelin; Wang, Hao; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    125I seeds brachytherapy implantation has been extensively performed in unresectable and rerecurrent rectal carcinoma. Many studies on the cancer-killing activity of 125I seeds radiation mainly focused on its ability to trigger apoptosis, which is the most well-known and dominant type of cell death induced by radiation. However our results showed some unique morphological features such as cell swelling, cytoplasmic vacuolation, and plasma membrane integrity, which is obviously different to apoptosis. In this study, clonogenic proliferation was carried out to assay survival fraction. Transmission electron microscopy was used to analyze ultrastructural and evaluate morphologic feature of HCT116 cells after exposure to 125I seeds radiation. Immunofluorescence analysis was used to detect the origin of cytoplasmic vacuoles. Flow cytometry analysis was employed to detect the size and granularity of HCT116 cells. Western blot was performed to measure the protein level of AIP1, caspase-3, AKT, p-Akt (Thr308), p-Akt (Ser473), and β-actin. We found that 125I seeds radiation activated PI3K/AKT signaling pathway and could trigger paraptosis-like cell death. Moreover, inhibitor of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway could inhibit paraptosis-like cell death induced by 125I seeds radiation. Our data suggest that 125I seeds radiation can induce paraptosis-like cell death via PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. PMID:28078301

  8. p53 death signal is mainly mediated by Nuc1(EndoG) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Vanessa; Mangiapelo, Eleonora; Piloto, Cristina; Pieri, Luisa; Muscolini, Michela; Tuosto, Loretta; Mazzoni, Cristina

    2013-11-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 plays a central role in the regulation of cellular growth and apoptosis. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the overexpression of the human p53 leads to growth inhibition and apoptotic cell death on minimal medium. In the present work, we show that p53-expressing cells are more susceptible to cell death after an apoptotic stimulus such as H2O2. The analysis of mutants involved in yeast apoptosis-like death suggests that the observed cell death is Yca1 independent and mainly mediated through Nuc1p.

  9. Death receptor-independent FADD signalling triggers hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma in mice with liver parenchymal cell-specific NEMO knockout.

    PubMed

    Ehlken, H; Krishna-Subramanian, S; Ochoa-Callejero, L; Kondylis, V; Nadi, N E; Straub, B K; Schirmacher, P; Walczak, H; Kollias, G; Pasparakis, M

    2014-11-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) usually develops in the context of chronic hepatitis triggered by viruses or toxic substances causing hepatocyte death, inflammation and compensatory proliferation of liver cells. Death receptors of the TNFR superfamily regulate cell death and inflammation and are implicated in liver disease and cancer. Liver parenchymal cell-specific ablation of NEMO/IKKγ, a subunit of the IκB kinase (IKK) complex that is essential for the activation of canonical NF-κB signalling, sensitized hepatocytes to apoptosis and caused the spontaneous development of chronic hepatitis and HCC in mice. Here we show that hepatitis and HCC development in NEMO(LPC-KO) mice is triggered by death receptor-independent FADD-mediated hepatocyte apoptosis. TNF deficiency in all cells or conditional LPC-specific ablation of TNFR1, Fas or TRAIL-R did not prevent hepatocyte apoptosis, hepatitis and HCC development in NEMO(LPC-KO) mice. To address potential functional redundancies between death receptors we generated and analysed NEMO(LPC-KO) mice with combined LPC-specific deficiency of TNFR1, Fas and TRAIL-R and found that also simultaneous lack of all three death receptors did not prevent hepatocyte apoptosis, chronic hepatitis and HCC development. However, LPC-specific combined deficiency in TNFR1, Fas and TRAIL-R protected the NEMO-deficient liver from LPS-induced liver failure, showing that different mechanisms trigger spontaneous and LPS-induced hepatocyte apoptosis in NEMO(LPC-KO) mice. In addition, NK cell depletion did not prevent liver damage and hepatitis. Moreover, NEMO(LPC-KO) mice crossed into a RAG-1-deficient genetic background-developed hepatitis and HCC. Collectively, these results show that the spontaneous development of hepatocyte apoptosis, chronic hepatitis and HCC in NEMO(LPC-KO) mice occurs independently of death receptor signalling, NK cells and B and T lymphocytes, arguing against an immunological trigger as the critical stimulus driving

  10. [A modified speech enhancement algorithm for electronic cochlear implant and its digital signal processing realization].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yulin; Tian, Xuelong

    2014-08-01

    In order to improve the speech quality and auditory perceptiveness of electronic cochlear implant under strong noise background, a speech enhancement system used for electronic cochlear implant front-end was constructed. Taking digital signal processing (DSP) as the core, the system combines its multi-channel buffered serial port (McBSP) data transmission channel with extended audio interface chip TLV320AIC10, so speech signal acquisition and output with high speed are realized. Meanwhile, due to the traditional speech enhancement method which has the problems as bad adaptability, slow convergence speed and big steady-state error, versiera function and de-correlation principle were used to improve the existing adaptive filtering algorithm, which effectively enhanced the quality of voice communications. Test results verified the stability of the system and the de-noising performance of the algorithm, and it also proved that they could provide clearer speech signals for the deaf or tinnitus patients.

  11. Enhanced correlation of received power-signal fluctuations in bidirectional optical links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minet, Jean; Vorontsov, Mikhail A.; Polnau, Ernst; Dolfi, Daniel

    2013-02-01

    A study of the correlation between the power signals received at both ends of bidirectional free-space optical links is presented. By use of the quasi-optical approximation, we show that an ideal (theoretically 100%) power-signal correlation can be achieved in optical links with specially designed monostatic transceivers based on single-mode fiber collimators. The theoretical prediction of enhanced correlation is supported both by experiments conducted over a 7 km atmospheric path and wave optics numerical analysis of the corresponding bidirectional optical link. In the numerical simulations, we also compare correlation properties of received power signals for different atmospheric conditions and for optical links with monostatic and bistatic geometries based on single-mode fiber collimator and on power-in-the-bucket transceiver types. Applications of the observed phenomena for signal fading mitigation and turbulence-enhanced communication link security in free-space laser communication links are discussed.

  12. Signal Enhancement with Stacked Magnets for High-Resolution Radio Frequency Glow Discharge Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wei, Juan; Dong, Jiangli; Zhuo, Shangjun; Qian, Rong; Fang, Yuanxing; Chen, Qiao; Patel, Ekbal

    2017-01-17

    A method for signal enhancement utilizing stacked magnets was introduced into high-resolution radio frequency glow discharge-mass spectrometry (rf-GD-MS) for significantly improved analysis of inorganic materials. Compared to the block magnet, the stacked magnets method was able to achieve 50-59% signal enhancement for typical elements in Y2O3, BSO, and BTN samples. The results indicated that signal was enhanced as the increase of discharge pressure from 1.3 to 8.0 mPa, the increase of rf-power from 10 to 50 W with a frequency of 13.56 MHz, the decrease of sample thickness, and the increase of number of stacked magnets. The possible mechanism for the signal enhancement was further probed using the software "Mechanical APDL (ANSYS) 14.0". It was found that the distinct oscillated magnetic field distribution from the stacked magnets was responsible for signal enhancement, which could extend the movement trajectories of electrons and increase the collisions between the electrons and neutral particles to increase the ionization efficiency. Two NIST samples were used for the validation of the method, and the results suggested that relative errors were within 13% and detection limit for six transverse stacked magnets could reach as low as 0.0082 μg g(-1). Additionally, the stability of the method was also studied. RSD within 15% of the elements in three nonconducting samples could be obtained during the sputtering process. Together, the results showed that the signal enhancement method with stacked magnets could offer great promises in providing a sensitive, stable, and facile solution for analyzing the nonconducting materials.

  13. Transient enhancement of spike-evoked calcium signaling by a serotonergic interneuron.

    PubMed

    Hill, Evan S; Sakurai, Akira; Katz, Paul S

    2008-11-01

    Enhancement of presynaptic Ca(2+) signals is widely recognized as a potential mechanism for heterosynaptic potentiation of neurotransmitter release. Here we show that stimulation of a serotonergic interneuron increased spike-evoked Ca(2+) in a manner consistent with its neuromodulatory effect on synaptic transmission. In the gastropod mollusk, Tritonia diomedea, stimulation of a serotonergic dorsal swim interneuron (DSI) at physiological rates heterosynaptically enhances the strength of output synapses made by another swim interneuron, C2, onto neurons in the pedal ganglion. Using intracellular electrophysiological recording combined with real-time confocal imaging of C2 (loaded with Oregon Green Bapta 1), it was determined that DSI stimulation increases the amplitude of spike-evoked Ca(2+) signals in C2 without altering basal Ca(2+) signals. This neuromodulatory action was restricted to distal neurites of C2 where synapses with pedal neurons are located. The effect of DSI stimulation on C2 spike-evoked Ca(2+) signals resembled DSI heterosynaptic enhancement of C2 synapses in several measures: both decayed within 15 s, both were abolished by the serotonin receptor antagonist, methysergide, and both were independent of DSI's depolarizing actions on C2. A brief puff of serotonin could mimic the enhancement of spike-evoked Ca(2+) signals in the distal neurites of C2, but larger puffs or bath-applied serotonin elicited nonphysiological effects. These results suggest that DSI heterosynaptic enhancement of C2 synaptic strength may be mediated by a local enhancement of spike-evoked Ca(2+) signals in the distal neurites of C2.

  14. Wedelolactone, a Naturally Occurring Coumestan, Enhances Interferon-γ Signaling through Inhibiting STAT1 Protein Dephosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhimin; Sun, Xiaoxiao; Shen, Shensi; Zhang, Haohao; Ma, Xiuquan; Liu, Jingli; Kuang, Shan; Yu, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1) transduces signals from cytokines and growth factors, particularly IFN-γ, and regulates expression of genes involved in cell survival/death, proliferation, and migration. STAT1 is activated through phosphorylation on its tyrosine 701 by JAKs and is inactivated through dephosphorylation by tyrosine phosphatases. We discovered a natural compound, wedelolactone, that increased IFN-γ signaling by inhibiting STAT1 dephosphorylation and prolonging STAT1 activation through specific inhibition of T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP), an important tyrosine phosphatase for STAT1 dephosphorylation. More interestingly, wedelolactone inhibited TCPTP through interaction with the C-terminal autoinhibition domain of TCPTP. We also found that wedelolactone synergized with IFN-γ to induce apoptosis of tumor cells. Our data suggest a new target for anticancer or antiproliferation drugs, a new mechanism to regulate PTPs specifically, and a new drug candidate for treating cancer or other proliferation disorders. PMID:23580655

  15. Inflammation Enhances the Risks of Stroke and Death in Chronic Chagas Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Paulo Marcos Matta; de Andrade, Cléber Mesquita; Nunes, Daniela Ferreira; de Sena Pereira, Nathalie; Queiroga, Tamyres Bernadete Dantas; Machado-Coelho, George Luiz Lins; Nascimento, Manuela Sales Lima; Do-Valle-Matta, Maria Adelaide; da Câmara, Antônia Cláudia Jácome; Chiari, Egler; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha

    2016-04-01

    Ischemic strokes have been implicated as a cause of death in Chagas disease patients. Inflammation has been recognized as a key component in all ischemic processes, including the intravascular events triggered by vessel interruption, brain damage and repair. In this study, we evaluated the association between inflammatory markers and the death risk (DR) and stroke risk (SR) of patients with different clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease. The mRNA expression levels of cytokines, transcription factors expressed in the adaptive immune response (Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22 and regulatory T cell), and iNOS were analyzed by real-time PCR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of chagasic patients who exhibited the indeterminate, cardiac, digestive and cardiodigestive clinical forms of the disease, and the levels of these transcripts were correlated with the DR and SR. Cardiac patients exhibited lower mRNA expression levels of GATA-3, FoxP3, AHR, IL-4, IL-9, IL-10 and IL-22 but exhibited higher expression of IFN-γ and TNF-α compared with indeterminate patients. Digestive patients showed similar levels of GATA-3, IL-4 and IL-10 than indeterminate patients. Cardiodigestive patients exhibited higher levels of TNF-α compared with indeterminate and digestive patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated that patients with high DR and SR exhibited lower GATA-3, FoxP3, and IL-10 expression and higher IFN-γ, TNF-α and iNOS mRNA expression than patients with low DR and SR. A negative correlation was observed between Foxp3 and IL-10 mRNA expression and the DR and SR. Moreover, TNF-α and iNOS expression was positively correlated with DR and SR. Our data suggest that an inflammatory imbalance in chronic Chagas disease patients is associated with a high DR and SR. This study provides a better understanding of the stroke pathobiology in the general population and might aid the development of therapeutic strategies for controlling the morbidity and mortality of Chagas disease.

  16. Inflammation Enhances the Risks of Stroke and Death in Chronic Chagas Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Paulo Marcos Matta; de Andrade, Cléber Mesquita; Nunes, Daniela Ferreira; de Sena Pereira, Nathalie; Queiroga, Tamyres Bernadete Dantas; Machado-Coelho, George Luiz Lins; Nascimento, Manuela Sales Lima; Do-Valle-Matta, Maria Adelaide; da Câmara, Antônia Cláudia Jácome; Chiari, Egler; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic strokes have been implicated as a cause of death in Chagas disease patients. Inflammation has been recognized as a key component in all ischemic processes, including the intravascular events triggered by vessel interruption, brain damage and repair. In this study, we evaluated the association between inflammatory markers and the death risk (DR) and stroke risk (SR) of patients with different clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease. The mRNA expression levels of cytokines, transcription factors expressed in the adaptive immune response (Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22 and regulatory T cell), and iNOS were analyzed by real-time PCR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of chagasic patients who exhibited the indeterminate, cardiac, digestive and cardiodigestive clinical forms of the disease, and the levels of these transcripts were correlated with the DR and SR. Cardiac patients exhibited lower mRNA expression levels of GATA-3, FoxP3, AHR, IL-4, IL-9, IL-10 and IL-22 but exhibited higher expression of IFN-γ and TNF-α compared with indeterminate patients. Digestive patients showed similar levels of GATA-3, IL-4 and IL-10 than indeterminate patients. Cardiodigestive patients exhibited higher levels of TNF-α compared with indeterminate and digestive patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated that patients with high DR and SR exhibited lower GATA-3, FoxP3, and IL-10 expression and higher IFN-γ, TNF-α and iNOS mRNA expression than patients with low DR and SR. A negative correlation was observed between Foxp3 and IL-10 mRNA expression and the DR and SR. Moreover, TNF-α and iNOS expression was positively correlated with DR and SR. Our data suggest that an inflammatory imbalance in chronic Chagas disease patients is associated with a high DR and SR. This study provides a better understanding of the stroke pathobiology in the general population and might aid the development of therapeutic strategies for controlling the morbidity and mortality of Chagas disease. PMID

  17. Enhancing the heavy Higgs boson [r arrow][ital WW] signal at hadron-hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.D.; Griffin, P.A. )

    1994-07-01

    The jet-jet profile methods that we developed to enhance the heavy Higgs boson [r arrow][ital ZZ] signal over its backgrounds at a proton-proton collider energy of 40 TeV are extended to the heavy Higgs boson [r arrow][ital WW] signal and backgrounds. The dominant background is now the pair production of top quarks via the subprocess [ital gg][r arrow][ital t[bar t

  18. Enhanced expression of proapoptotic and autophagic proteins involved in the cell death of glioblastoma induced by synthetic glycans.

    PubMed

    Faried, Ahmad; Arifin, Muhammad Zafrullah; Ishiuchi, Shogo; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Yazawa, Shin

    2014-06-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive malignant brain tumor, and overall patient survival has not been prolonged even by conventional therapies. Previously, the authors found that chemically synthesized glycans could be anticancer agents against growth of a series of cancer cells. In this study, the authors examined the effects of glycans on the growth of glioblastoma cells both in vitro and in vivo. The authors investigated not only the occurrence of changes in the cell signaling molecules and expression levels of various proteins related to cell death, but also a mouse model involving the injection of glioblastoma cells following the administration of synthetic glycans. Synthetic glycans inhibited the growth of glioblastoma cells, induced the apoptosis of the cells with cleaved poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP) expression and DNA fragmentation, and also caused autophagy, as shown by the detection of autophagosome proteins and monodansylcadaverine staining. Furthermore, tumor growth in the in vivo mouse model was significantly inhibited. A dramatic induction of programmed cell death was found in glioblastoma cells after treatment with synthetic glycans. These results suggest that synthetic glycans could be a promising novel anticancer agent for performing chemotherapy against glioblastoma.

  19. Enhancing Anti-Breast Cancer Immunity by Blocking Death Receptor DR5

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    apoptosis. Histone deacetylase induced the expression of TRAIL in tumor cells via SP -1 and may be used to complement DR5 vaccination. Furthermore...latter via the transcription factor Sp -1. Combining DR5 vaccination with HDAC inhibitor or other TRAIL/DR5 inducing chemotherapeutic agents may be a...cause Sp1 cleavage (data not shown), suggest- ing that Sp1 cleavage by the treatments may enhance Sp1 acti- vity , leading to increased TRAIL expression

  20. The Root Hair Assay Facilitates the Use of Genetic and Pharmacological Tools in Order to Dissect Multiple Signalling Pathways That Lead to Programmed Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Kacprzyk, Joanna; Devine, Aoife; McCabe, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    The activation of programmed cell death (PCD) is often a result of complex signalling pathways whose relationship and intersection are not well understood. We recently described a PCD root hair assay and proposed that it could be used to rapidly screen genetic or pharmacological modulators of PCD. To further assess the applicability of the root hair assay for studying multiple signalling pathways leading to PCD activation we have investigated the crosstalk between salicylic acid, autophagy and apoptosis-like PCD (AL-PCD) in Arabidopsis thaliana. The root hair assay was used to determine rates of AL-PCD induced by a panel of cell death inducing treatments in wild type plants treated with chemical modulators of salicylic acid synthesis or autophagy, and in genetic lines defective in autophagy or salicylic acid signalling. The assay demonstrated that PCD induced by exogenous salicylic acid or fumonisin B1 displayed a requirement for salicylic acid signalling and was partially dependent on the salicylic acid signal transducer NPR1. Autophagy deficiency resulted in an increase in the rates of AL-PCD induced by salicylic acid and fumonisin B1, but not by gibberellic acid or abiotic stress. The phenylalanine ammonia lyase-dependent salicylic acid synthesis pathway contributed only to death induced by salicylic acid and fumonisin B1. 3-Methyladenine, which is commonly used as an inhibitor of autophagy, appeared to influence PCD induction in all treatments suggesting a possible secondary, non-autophagic, effect on a core component of the plant PCD pathway. The results suggest that salicylic acid signalling is negatively regulated by autophagy during salicylic acid and mycotoxin-induced AL-PCD. However, this crosstalk does not appear to be directly involved in PCD induced by gibberellic acid or abiotic stress. This study demonstrates that the root hair assay is an effective tool for relatively rapid investigation of complex signalling pathways leading to the activation of

  1. Inhibition of interleukin-1 signaling enhances elimination of tyrosine kinase inhibitor–treated CML stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Chu, Su; Agarwal, Puneet; Campbell, Victoria L.; Hopcroft, Lisa; Jørgensen, Heather G.; Lin, Allen; Gaal, Karl; Holyoake, Tessa L.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) with BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) fails to eliminate leukemia stem cells (LSC). Patients remain at risk for relapse, and additional approaches to deplete CML LSC are needed to enhance the possibility of discontinuing TKI treatment. We have previously reported that expression of the pivotal proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) is increased in CML bone marrow. We show here that CML LSC demonstrated increased expression of the IL-1 receptors, IL-1 receptor accessory protein and IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1), and enhanced sensitivity to IL-1-induced NF-κB signaling compared with normal stem cells. Treatment with recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) inhibited IL-1 signaling in CML LSC and inhibited growth of CML LSC. Importantly, the combination of IL-1RA with TKI resulted in significantly greater inhibition of CML LSC compared with TKI alone. Our studies also suggest that IL-1 signaling contributes to overexpression of inflammatory mediators in CML LSC, suggesting that blocking IL-1 signaling could modulate the inflammatory milieu. We conclude that IL-1 signaling contributes to maintenance of CML LSC following TKI treatment and that IL-1 blockade with IL-1RA enhances elimination of TKI-treated CML LSC. These results provide a strong rationale for further exploration of anti-IL-1 strategies to enhance LSC elimination in CML. PMID:27621307

  2. Low dose gamma irradiation enhances defined signaling components of intercellular reactive oxygen-mediated apoptosis induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, G.

    2011-01-01

    Transformed cells are selectively removed by intercellular ROS-mediated induction of apoptosis. Signaling is based on the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite pathway (major pathways) and the nitryl chloride and the metal-catalyzed Haber-Weiss pathway (minor pathways). During tumor progression, resistance against intercellular induction of apoptosis is acquired through expression of membrane-associated catalase. Low dose radiation of nontransformed cells has been shown to enhance intercellular induction of apoptosis. The present study was performed to define the signaling components which are modulated by low dose gamma irradiation. Low dose radiation induced the release of peroxidase from nontransformed, transformed and tumor cells. Extracellular superoxide anion generation was strongly enhanced in the case of transformed cells and tumor cells, but not in nontransformed cells. Enhancement of peroxidase release and superoxide anion generation either increased intercellular induction of apoptosis of transformed cells, or caused a partial protection under specific signaling conditions. In tumor cells, low dose radiation enhanced the production of major signaling components, but this had no effect on apoptosis induction, due to the strong resistance mechanism of tumor cells. Our data specify the nature of low dose radiation-induced effects on specific signaling components of intercellular induction of apoptosis at defined stages of multistep carcinogenesis.

  3. Inhibition of interleukin-1 signaling enhances elimination of tyrosine kinase inhibitor-treated CML stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Chu, Su; Agarwal, Puneet; Campbell, Victoria L; Hopcroft, Lisa; Jørgensen, Heather G; Lin, Allen; Gaal, Karl; Holyoake, Tessa L; Bhatia, Ravi

    2016-12-08

    Treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) with BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) fails to eliminate leukemia stem cells (LSC). Patients remain at risk for relapse, and additional approaches to deplete CML LSC are needed to enhance the possibility of discontinuing TKI treatment. We have previously reported that expression of the pivotal proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) is increased in CML bone marrow. We show here that CML LSC demonstrated increased expression of the IL-1 receptors, IL-1 receptor accessory protein and IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1), and enhanced sensitivity to IL-1-induced NF-κB signaling compared with normal stem cells. Treatment with recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) inhibited IL-1 signaling in CML LSC and inhibited growth of CML LSC. Importantly, the combination of IL-1RA with TKI resulted in significantly greater inhibition of CML LSC compared with TKI alone. Our studies also suggest that IL-1 signaling contributes to overexpression of inflammatory mediators in CML LSC, suggesting that blocking IL-1 signaling could modulate the inflammatory milieu. We conclude that IL-1 signaling contributes to maintenance of CML LSC following TKI treatment and that IL-1 blockade with IL-1RA enhances elimination of TKI-treated CML LSC. These results provide a strong rationale for further exploration of anti-IL-1 strategies to enhance LSC elimination in CML. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  4. FasL, Fas, and death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) proteins are recruited to membrane rafts after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Davis, Angela R; Lotocki, George; Marcillo, Alex E; Dietrich, W Dalton; Keane, Robert W

    2007-05-01

    The Fas/CD95 receptor-ligand system plays an essential role in apoptosis that contributes to secondary damage after spinal cord injury (SCI), but the mechanism regulating the efficiency of FasL/Fas signaling in the central nervous system (CNS) is unknown. Here, FasL/Fas signaling complexes in membrane rafts were investigated in the spinal cord of adult female Fischer rats subjected to moderate cervical SCI and sham operation controls. In sham-operated animals, a portion of FasL, but not Fas was present in membrane rafts. SCI resulted in FasL and Fas translocation into membrane raft microdomains where Fas associates with the adaptor proteins Fas-associated death domain (FADD), caspase-8, cellular FLIP long form (cFLIPL ), and caspase-3, forming a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC). Moreover, SCI induced expression of Fas in clusters around the nucleus in both neurons and astrocytes. The formation of the DISC signaling platform leads to rapid activation of initiator caspase-8 and effector caspase-3, and the modification of signaling intermediates such as FADD and cFLIP(L) . Thus, FasL/Fas-mediated signaling after SCI is similar to Fas expressing Type I cell apoptosis.

  5. Dragon enhances BMP signaling and increases transepithelial resistance in kidney epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yin; Babitt, Jodie L; Bouley, Richard; Zhang, Ying; Da Silva, Nicolas; Chen, Shanzhuo; Zhuang, Zhenjie; Samad, Tarek A; Brenner, Gary J; Anderson, Jennifer L; Hong, Charles C; Schneyer, Alan L; Brown, Dennis; Lin, Herbert Y

    2010-04-01

    The neuronal adhesion protein Dragon acts as a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) coreceptor that enhances BMP signaling. Given the importance of BMP signaling in nephrogenesis and its putative role in the response to injury in the adult kidney, we studied the localization and function of Dragon in the kidney. We observed that Dragon localized predominantly to the apical surfaces of tubular epithelial cells in the thick ascending limbs, distal convoluted tubules, and collecting ducts of mice. Dragon expression was weak in the proximal tubules and glomeruli. In mouse inner medullary collecting duct (mIMCD3) cells, Dragon generated BMP signals in a ligand-dependent manner, and BMP4 is the predominant endogenous ligand for the Dragon coreceptor. In mIMCD3 cells, BMP4 normally signaled through BMPRII, but Dragon enhanced its signaling through the BMP type II receptor ActRIIA. Dragon and BMP4 increased transepithelial resistance (TER) through the Smad1/5/8 pathway. In epithelial cells isolated from the proximal tubule and intercalated cells of collecting ducts, we observed coexpression of ActRIIA, Dragon, and BMP4 but not BMPRII. Taken together, these results suggest that Dragon may enhance BMP signaling in renal tubular epithelial cells and maintain normal renal physiology.

  6. Enhanced expression of Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) protein in benign vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Amaya, Clarissa N; Wians, Frank H; Bryan, Brad A; Torabi, Alireza

    2017-04-01

    Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and its ligands have been shown to play a significant role in evasion of malignant tumour cells from the immune system. Last year, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved anti-PD-1 inhibitors for treatment of non-small cell lung carcinoma and recently has approved anti-PD-L1 blocker for treatment of metastatic urothelial cell carcinoma. However, the role that the immune system might have on benign tumours including vascular anomalies has received less attention. In this study, we evaluated PD-1 and PD-L1 expression on two benign vascular anomalies: infantile haemangiomas and venous malformations. Tissue microarrays (TMAs) from these two entities were stained for PD-1 and PD-L1 antibodies. Blood vessels from normal tissue were used as control. The endothelial cells in both infantile haemangioma and venous malformation showed high expression of PD-1 but were negative for PD-L1. Endothelial cells within the blood vessels in normal tissues were negative for both PD-1 and PD-L1. Our results showed over-expression of PD-1 in subsets of vascular anomalies, while PD-L1 was negative. This would raise the possibility of immunotherapy in benign vascular tumour when other options are exhausted.

  7. Wnt/β-catenin signaling enhances hypoxia-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in hepatocellular carcinoma via crosstalk with hif-1α signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Bai, Xueli; Chen, Wei; Ma, Tao; Hu, Qida; Liang, Chao; Xie, Shangzhi; Chen, Conglin; Hu, Liqiang; Xu, Shiguo; Liang, Tingbo

    2013-05-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a critical process for tumor invasion and metastasis. Hypoxia may induce EMT, and upregulated β-catenin expression has been found in various tumors. In this study, we investigate the role of β-catenin in hypoxia-induced EMT in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Induction of EMT in HCC cell lines by hypoxia was confirmed by altered morphology, expression change of EMT-associated markers and enhanced invasion capacity. We showed that hypoxia-induced EMT could be enhanced by addition of recombinant Wnt3a while it was repressed by β-catenin small interfering RNA. An interaction between β-catenin and hypoxia-induced factor-1α (hif-1α) was found, and an underlying competition for β-catenin between hif-1α and T-cell factor-4 was implied. Notably, increased hif-1α activity was accompanied with more significant EMT features. We also showed that the pro-EMT effect of β-catenin in hypoxia was deprived in the absence of hif-1α. Moreover, β-catenin was found to be responsible for the maintenance of viability and proliferation for tumor cells undergoing hypoxia. We further showed a correlation between hif-1α and β-catenin expression, and corresponding expression of EMT-associated markers in human HCC tissues. Our results suggest that Wnt/β-catenin signaling enhances hypoxia-induced EMT in HCC by increasing the EMT-associated activity of hif-1α and preventing tumor cell death.

  8. Enhanced FCGR2A and FCGR3A signaling by HIV viremic controller IgG

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Raymond A.; Maestre, Ana M.; Durham, Natasha D.; Barria, Maria Ines; Ishii-Watabe, Akiko; Tada, Minoru; Hotta, Mathew T.; Rodriguez-Caprio, Gabriela; Fierer, Daniel S.; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Simon, Viviana; Chen, Benjamin K.

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1 viremic controllers (VC) spontaneously control infection without antiretroviral treatment. Several studies indicate that IgG Abs from VCs induce enhanced responses from immune effector cells. Since signaling through Fc-γ receptors (FCGRs) modulate these Ab-driven responses, here we examine if enhanced FCGR activation is a common feature of IgG from VCs. Using an infected cell–based system, we observed that VC IgG stimulated greater FCGR2A and FCGR3A activation as compared with noncontrollers, independent of the magnitude of HIV-specific Ab binding or virus neutralization activities. Multivariate regression analysis showed that enhanced FCGR signaling was a significant predictor of VC status as compared with chronically infected patients (CIP) on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of patient IgG functions primarily grouped VC IgG profiles by enhanced FCGR2A, FCGR3A, or dual signaling activity. Our findings demonstrate that enhanced FCGR signaling is a common and significant predictive feature of VC IgG, with VCs displaying a distinct spectrum of FCGR activation profiles. Thus, profiling FCGR activation may provide a useful method for screening and distinguishing protective anti-HIV IgG responses in HIV-infected patients and in monitoring HIV vaccination regimens. PMID:28239647

  9. NMR signal enhancement of >50 000 times in fast dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Pinto, L F; Marín-Montesinos, I; Lloveras, V; Muñoz-Gómez, J L; Pons, M; Veciana, J; Vidal-Gancedo, J

    2017-03-17

    Herein, we report the synthesis and the study of a novel mixed biradical with BDPA and TEMPO radical units that are covalently bound by an ester group (BDPAesterTEMPO) as a polarizing agent for fast dissolution DNP. The biradical exhibits an extremely high DNP NMR enhancement of >50 000 times, which constitutes one of the largest signal enhancements observed so far, to the best of our knowledge.

  10. Equalization-enhanced phase noise for coherent-detection systems using electronic digital signal processing.

    PubMed

    Shieh, William; Ho, Keang-Po

    2008-09-29

    In coherent optical systems employing electronic digital signal processing, the fiber chromatic dispersion can be gracefully compensated in electronic domain without resorting to optical techniques. Unlike optical dispersion compensator, the electronic equalizer enhances the impairments from the laser phase noise. This equalization-enhanced phase noise (EEPN) imposes a tighter constraint on the receive laser phase noise for transmission systems with high symbol rate and large electronically-compensated chromatic dispersion.

  11. Model-based speech enhancement using a bone-conducted signal.

    PubMed

    Kechichian, Patrick; Srinivasan, Sriram

    2012-03-01

    Codebook-based single-microphone noise suppressors, which exploit prior knowledge about speech and noise statistics, provide better performance in nonstationary noise. However, as the enhancement involves a joint optimization over speech and noise codebooks, this results in high computational complexity. A codebook-based method is proposed that uses a reference signal observed by a bone-conduction microphone, and a mapping between air- and bone-conduction codebook entries generated during an offline training phase. A smaller subset of air-conducted speech codebook entries that accurately models the clean speech signal is selected using this reference signal. Experiments support the expected improvement in performance at low computational complexity.

  12. Dichloroacetate Enhances Apoptotic Cell Death via Oxidative Damage and Attenuates Lactate Production in Metformin-Treated Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Haugrud, Allison B.; Zhuang, Yongxian; Coppock, Joseph D.; Miskimins, W. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The unique metabolism of breast cancer cells provides interest in exploiting this phenomenon therapeutically. Metformin, a promising breast cancer therapeutic, targets complex I of the electron transport chain leading to an accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that eventually lead to cell death. Inhibition of complex I leads to lactate production, a metabolic byproduct already highly produced by reprogrammed cancer cells and associated with a poor prognosis. While metformin remains a promising cancer therapeutic, we sought a complementary agent to increase apoptotic promoting effects of metformin while attenuating lactate production possibly leading to greatly improve efficacy. Dichloroacetate (DCA) is a well-established drug used in the treatment of lactic acidosis which functions through inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) promoting mitochondrial metabolism. Our purpose was to examine the synergy and mechanisms by which these two drugs kill breast cancer cells. Methods Cell lines were subjected to the indicated treatments and analyzed for cell death and various aspects of metabolism. Cell death and ROS production was analyzed using flow cytometry, Western blot analysis, and cell counting methods. Images of cells were taken with phase contrast microscopy or confocal microscopy. Metabolism of cells was analyzed using the Seahorse XF24 analyzer, lactate assays, and pH analysis. Results We show that when DCA and metformin are used in combination, synergistic induction of apoptosis of breast cancer cells occurs. Metformin-induced oxidative damage is enhanced by DCA through PDK1 inhibition which also diminishes metformin promoted lactate production. Conclusions We demonstrate that DCA and metformin combine to synergistically induce caspase-dependent apoptosis involving oxidative damage with simultaneous attenuation of metformin promoted lactate production. Innovative combinations such as metformin and DCA show promise in expanding breast

  13. The histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid induces growth inhibition and enhances taxol-induced cell death in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yi-kang; Li, Zhong-hua; Han, Xi-qian; Yi, Ji-hu; Wang, Zhen-hua; Hou, Jing-li; Feng, Cong-ran; Fang, Qing-hong; Wang, Hui-hui; Zhang, Peng-fei; Wang, Feng-shan; Shen, Jie; Wang, Peng

    2010-11-01

    The histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) enhances taxol-induced antitumor effects against some human cancer cells. The aim of this study is to investigate whether SAHA can enhance taxol-induced cell death against human breast cancer cells and to illustrate the mechanism in detail. A panel of eight human breast cancer cell lines and an immortalized human breast epithelial cell line were used to determine the inhibitory effects of SAHA, taxol, or their combination by MTT assay. The effects of SAHA with or without taxol on cell cycle distributions, apoptosis, and protein expressions were also examined. The inhibitory effects on tumor growth were characterized in vivo in BALB/c nude mice bearing a breast cancer xenograft model. Taxol-resistant and multi-resistant breast cancer cells were as sensitive to SAHA as taxol-sensitive breast cancer cells. A dose-dependent synergistic growth inhibition was found in all the tested breast cancer cell lines treated with the SAHA/taxol combinations. The synergetic effect was also observed in the in vivo xenograft tumor model. The cell cycle analysis and apoptosis assay showed that the synergistic effects resulted from enhanced G2/M arrest and apoptosis. SAHA increased the anti-tumor effects of taxol in breast cancer in vitro and in vivo. The combination of SAHA and taxol may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of breast cancer.

  14. Blood Contrast Agents Enhance Intrinsic Signals in the Retina: Evidence for an Underlying Blood Volume Component

    PubMed Central

    Ts'o, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the extent to which neurovascular coupling contributes to stimulus-evoked intrinsic signals in the retina. Methods. The retinas of five adult cats were examined in vivo. Animals were anesthetized and paralyzed for imaging stability. The retinas were imaged through a modified fundus camera capable of presenting patterned visual stimuli simultaneous with a diffuse near infrared (NIR). Results. Injections of nigrosin increased signal strength by as much as 36.3%, and indocyanine green (ICG) increased signal magnitudes by as much as 38.1%. In both cases, intrinsic signals maintained a colocalized pattern of activation corresponding to the visual stimulus presented. The time course of the evoked signals remained unaltered. The spectral dependency of signal enhancement mirrored the absorption spectra of the injected dyes. Conclusions. The data are consistent with a neurovascular coupling effect in the retina. Patterned visual stimuli evoke colocalized NIR reflectance changes. The patterned decrease in reflectance was enhanced after nigrosin or ICG was injected into the systemic circulation. These findings suggest stimulus-evoked changes in blood volume underlie a component of the retinal intrinsic signals. PMID:21051719

  15. Entamoeba histolytica P-glycoprotein (EhPgp) inhibition, induce trophozoite acidification and enhance programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Medel Flores, Olivia; Gómez García, Consuelo; Sánchez Monroy, Virgina; Villalba Magadaleno, José D'Artagnan; Nader García, Elvira; Pérez Ishiwara, D Guillermo

    2013-11-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is induced in Entamoeba histolytica by a variety of stimuli in vitro and in vivo. In mammals, intracellular acidification serves as a global switch for inactivating cellular processes and initiates molecular mechanisms implicated in the destruction of the genome. In contrast, intracellular alkalinization produced by P-glycoprotein overexpression in multidrug-resistant cells has been related to apoptosis resistance. Our previous studies showed that overexpression of E. histolytica P-glycoprotein (PGP) altered chloride-dependent currents and triggered trophozoite swelling, the reverse process of cell shrinkage produced during PCD. Here we showed that antisense inhibition of PGP expression produced a synchronous death of trophozoites and the enhancement of biochemical and morphological characteristics of PCD induced by G418. The nucleus was contracted, and the nuclear membrane was disrupted. Moreover, chromatin was extensively fragmented. Ca(2+) concentration was increased, while the intracellular pH (ipH) was acidified. In contrast, PGP overexpression prevented intracellular acidification and circumvented the apoptotic effect of G418.

  16. Factors enhancing adherence of toxigenic Staphylococcus aureus to epithelial cells and their possible role in sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saadi, A T; Blackwell, C C; Raza, M W; James, V S; Stewart, J; Elton, R A; Weir, D M

    1993-06-01

    Toxigenic strains of Staphylococcus aureus have been suggested to play a role in sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). In this study we examined two factors that might enhance binding of toxigenic staphylococci to epithelial cells of infants in the age range in which cot deaths are prevalent: expression of the Lewis(a) antigen and infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). By flow cytometry we demonstrated that binding of three toxigenic strains of S. aureus to cells from nonsecretors was significantly greater than to cells of secretors. Pre-treatment of epithelial cells with monoclonal anti-Lewis(a) or anti-type-1 precursor significantly reduced bacterial binding (P < 0.01); however, attachment of the bacteria correlated only with the amount of Lewis(a) antigen detected on the cells (P < 0.01). HEp-2 cells infected with RSV bound significantly more bacteria than uninfected cells. These findings are discussed in context of factors previously associated with SIDS (mother's smoking, bottle feeding and the prone sleeping position) and a hypothesis proposed to explain some cases of SIDS.

  17. Fermented wheat germ extract induced cell death and enhanced cytotoxicity of Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil on human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Wang, Wen-Ching; Wang, Chien-Kai; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Yang, Mei-Due; Chang, Yu-Jia; Jian, Jiun-Yu; Tai, Chen-Jei

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Due to the difficulties of early diagnosis, curative treatments are not available for most patients. Palliative treatments such as chemotherapy are often associated with low response rate, strong adverse effects and limited clinical benefits for patients. The alternative approaches such as fermented wheat germ extract (FWGE) with anti-tumor efficacy may provide improvements in the clinical outcome of current therapy for HCC. This study aimed to clarify antitumor efficacy of FWGE and the combination drug effect of FWGE with chemotherapeutic agents, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) in human HCC cells, HepG2, Hep3B, and HepJ5. The present study indicated that FWGE exhibited potential to suppress HepG2, Hep3B, and HepJ5 cells, with the half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of FWGE were 0.494, 0.371 and 1.524 mg/mL, respectively. FWGE also induced Poly (Adenosine diphosphate ribose) polymerase (PARP) associated cell death in Hep3B cells. Moreover, the FWGE treatment further enhanced the cytotoxicity of cisplatin in all tested HCC cells, and cytotoxicity of 5-Fu in a synergistic manner in HepJ5 cells. Collectively, the results identified the anti-tumor efficacy of FWGE in HCC cells and suggested that FWGE can be used as a supplement to effectively improve the tumor suppression efficiency of cisplatin and 5-Fu in HCC cells.

  18. A biological inspired fuzzy adaptive window median filter (FAWMF) for enhancing DNA signal processing.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muneer; Jung, Low Tan; Bhuiyan, Al-Amin

    2017-10-01

    Digital signal processing techniques commonly employ fixed length window filters to process the signal contents. DNA signals differ in characteristics from common digital signals since they carry nucleotides as contents. The nucleotides own genetic code context and fuzzy behaviors due to their special structure and order in DNA strand. Employing conventional fixed length window filters for DNA signal processing produce spectral leakage and hence results in signal noise. A biological context aware adaptive window filter is required to process the DNA signals. This paper introduces a biological inspired fuzzy adaptive window median filter (FAWMF) which computes the fuzzy membership strength of nucleotides in each slide of window and filters nucleotides based on median filtering with a combination of s-shaped and z-shaped filters. Since coding regions cause 3-base periodicity by an unbalanced nucleotides' distribution producing a relatively high bias for nucleotides' usage, such fundamental characteristic of nucleotides has been exploited in FAWMF to suppress the signal noise. Along with adaptive response of FAWMF, a strong correlation between median nucleotides and the Π shaped filter was observed which produced enhanced discrimination between coding and non-coding regions contrary to fixed length conventional window filters. The proposed FAWMF attains a significant enhancement in coding regions identification i.e. 40% to 125% as compared to other conventional window filters tested over more than 250 benchmarked and randomly taken DNA datasets of different organisms. This study proves that conventional fixed length window filters applied to DNA signals do not achieve significant results since the nucleotides carry genetic code context. The proposed FAWMF algorithm is adaptive and outperforms significantly to process DNA signal contents. The algorithm applied to variety of DNA datasets produced noteworthy discrimination between coding and non-coding regions contrary

  19. Mild hyperthermia enhances sensitivity of gastric cancer cells to chemotherapy through reactive oxygen species-induced autophagic death.

    PubMed

    Ba, Ming-Chen; Long, Hui; Cui, Shu-Zhong; Gong, Yuan-Feng; Yan, Zhao-Fei; Wang, Shuai; Wu, Yin-Bing

    2017-06-01

    Mild hyperthermia enhances anti-cancer effects of chemotherapy, but the precise biochemical mechanisms involved are not clear. This study was carried out to investigate whether mild hyperthermia sensitizes gastric cancer cells to chemotherapy through reactive oxygen species-induced autophagic death. In total, 20 BABL/c mice of MKN-45 human gastric cancer tumor model were divided into hyperthermia + chemotherapy group, hyperthermia group, chemotherapy group, N-acetyl-L-cysteine group, and mock group. Reactive oxygen species production and expression of autophagy-related genes Beclin1, LC3B, and mammalian target of rapamycin were determined. The relationships between tumor growth regression, expression of autophagy-related genes, and reactive oxygen species production were evaluated. Tumor size and wet weight of hyperthermia + chemotherapy group was significantly decreased relative to values from hyperthermia group, chemotherapy group, N-acetyl-L-cysteine group, and mock group ( F = 6.92, p < 0.01 and F = 5.36, p < 0.01, respectively). Reactive oxygen species production was significantly higher in hyperthermia + chemotherapy group than in hyperthermia, chemotherapy, and mock groups. The expression levels of Beclin1 and LC3B were significantly higher, while those of mammalian target of rapamycin were significantly lower in hyperthermia + chemotherapy group than in hyperthermia, chemotherapy, and mock groups. Tumor growth regression was consistent with changes in reactive oxygen species production and expression of autophagy-related genes. N-acetyl-L-cysteine inhibited changes in the expression of the autophagy-related genes and also suppressed reactive oxygen species production and tumor growth. Hyperthermia + chemotherapy increase expression of autophagy-related genes Beclin1 and LC3B, decrease expression of mammalian target of rapamycin, and concomitantly increase reactive oxygen species generation. These results strongly indicate

  20. Ammonium secretion by Colletotrichum coccodes activates host NADPH oxidase activity enhancing host cell death and fungal virulence in tomato fruits.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Noam; Davydov, Olga; Sagi, Moshe; Fluhr, Robert; Prusky, Dov

    2009-12-01

    Colletotrichum pathogens of fruit and leaves are known ammonium secretors. Here, we show that Colletotrichum coccodes virulence, as measured by tomato (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Motelle) fruit tissue necrosis, correlates with the amount of ammonium secreted. Ammonium application to fruit tissue induced hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) accumulation. To examine whether the tomato NADPH oxidase, SlRBOH, is a source for the ammonium-induced H(2)O(2), wild-type and antisense lines abrogated for SlRBOH (SlRBOH-AS) were examined. Wild-type lines produced 7.5-fold more reactive oxygen species when exposed to exogenous ammonium than did SlRBOH-AS lines. C. coccodes colonization of wild-type tomato lines resulted in higher H(2)O(2) production and faster fungal growth rate compared with colonization in the SlRBOH-AS mutant, although the amount of ammonium secreted by the fungi was similar in both cases. Enhanced ion leakage and cell death of fruit tissue were correlated with H(2)O(2) accumulation, and treatment with the reactive oxygen scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine decreased H(2)O(2) production, ion leakage, and cell death. Importantly, the activation of reactive oxygen species production by ammonium was positively affected by an extracellular pH increase from 4 to 9, implying that ammonium exerts its control via membrane penetration. Our results show that C. coccodes activates host reactive oxygen species and H(2)O(2) production through ammonium secretion. The resultant enhancement in host tissue decay is an important step in the activation of the necrotrophic process needed for colonization.

  1. Cross-modal enhancement of speech detection in young and older adults: does signal content matter?

    PubMed

    Tye-Murray, Nancy; Spehar, Brent; Myerson, Joel; Sommers, Mitchell S; Hale, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of age and visual content on cross-modal enhancement of auditory speech detection. Visual content consisted of three clearly distinct types of visual information: an unaltered video clip of a talker's face, a low-contrast version of the same clip, and a mouth-like Lissajous figure. It was hypothesized that both young and older adults would exhibit reduced enhancement as visual content diverged from the original clip of the talker's face, but that the decrease would be greater for older participants. Nineteen young adults and 19 older adults were asked to detect a single spoken syllable (/ba/) in speech-shaped noise, and the level of the signal was adaptively varied to establish the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at threshold. There was an auditory-only baseline condition and three audiovisual conditions in which the syllable was accompanied by one of the three visual signals (the unaltered clip of the talker's face, the low-contrast version of that clip, or the Lissajous figure). For each audiovisual condition, the SNR at threshold was compared with the SNR at threshold for the auditory-only condition to measure the amount of cross-modal enhancement. Young adults exhibited significant cross-modal enhancement with all three types of visual stimuli, with the greatest amount of enhancement observed for the unaltered clip of the talker's face. Older adults, in contrast, exhibited significant cross-modal enhancement only with the unaltered face. Results of this study suggest that visual signal content affects cross-modal enhancement of speech detection in both young and older adults. They also support a hypothesized age-related deficit in processing low-contrast visual speech stimuli, even in older adults with normal contrast sensitivity.

  2. Crossmodal enhancement of speech detection in young and older adults: Does signal content matter?

    PubMed Central

    Tye-Murray, Nancy; Spehar, Brent; Myerson, Joel; Sommers, Mitchell S.; Hale, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of age and visual content on cross-modal enhancement of auditory speech detection. Visual content consisted of three clearly distinct types of visual information: an unaltered video clip of a talker’s face, a low-contrast version of the same clip, and a mouth-like Lissajous figure. It was hypothesized that both young and older adults would exhibit reduced enhancement as visual content diverged from the original clip of the talker’s face, but that the decrease would be greater for older participants. Design Nineteen young adults and 19 older adults were asked to detect a single spoken syllable (/ba/) in speech-shaped noise, and the level of the signal was adaptively varied to establish the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at threshold. There was an auditory-only baseline condition and three audiovisual conditions in which the syllable was accompanied by one of the three visual signals (the unaltered clip of the talker’s face, the low-contrast version of that clip, or the Lissajous figure). For each audiovisual condition, the SNR at threshold was compared with the SNR at threshold for the auditory-only condition to measure the amount of cross-modal enhancement. Results Young adults exhibited significant cross-modal enhancement with all three types of visual stimuli, with the greatest amount of enhancement observed for the unaltered clip of the talker’s face. Older adults, in contrast, exhibited significant cross-modal enhancement only with the unaltered face. Conclusions Results of the current study suggest that visual signal content affects cross-modal enhancement of speech detection in both young and older adults. They also support a hypothesized age-related deficit in processing low-contrast visual speech stimuli, even in older adults with normal contrast sensitivity. PMID:21478751

  3. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Based on Single Beam Splitting and Geometric Configuration for Effective Signal Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Lin, Qingyu; Ding, Yu; Tian, Di; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-01-01

    A new laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based on single-beam-splitting (SBS) and proper optical geometric configuration has been initially explored in this work for effective signal enhancement. In order to improve the interaction efficiency of laser energy with the ablated material, a laser beam operated in pulse mode was divided into two streams to ablate/excite the target sample in different directions instead of the conventional one beam excitation in single pulse LIBS (SP-LIBS). In spatial configuration, the laser beam geometry plays an important role in the emission signal enhancement. Thus, an adjustable geometric configuration with variable incident angle between the two splitted laser beams was constructed for achieving maximum signal enhancement. With the optimized angles of 60° and 70° for Al and Cu atomic emission lines at 396.15 nm and 324.75 nm respectively, about 5.6- and 4.8-folds signal enhancements were achieved for aluminum alloy and copper alloy samples compared to SP-LIBS. Furthermore, the temporal analysis, in which the intensity of atomic lines in SP-LIBS decayed at least ten times faster than the SBS-LIBS, proved that the energy coupling efficiency of SBS-LIBS was significantly higher than that of SP-LIBS. PMID:25557721

  4. ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY 1 and SALICYLIC ACID act redundantly to regulate resistance gene-mediated signaling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Resistance (R) protein–associated pathways are well known to participate in defense against a variety of microbial pathogens. Salicylic acid (SA) and its associated proteinaceous signaling components, including enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1), non–race-specific disease resistance 1 (NDR1), ...

  5. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy based on single beam splitting and geometric configuration for effective signal enhancement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Lin, Qingyu; Ding, Yu; Tian, Di; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-01-05

    A new laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based on single-beam-splitting (SBS) and proper optical geometric configuration has been initially explored in this work for effective signal enhancement. In order to improve the interaction efficiency of laser energy with the ablated material, a laser beam operated in pulse mode was divided into two streams to ablate/excite the target sample in different directions instead of the conventional one beam excitation in single pulse LIBS (SP-LIBS). In spatial configuration, the laser beam geometry plays an important role in the emission signal enhancement. Thus, an adjustable geometric configuration with variable incident angle between the two splitted laser beams was constructed for achieving maximum signal enhancement. With the optimized angles of 60° and 70° for Al and Cu atomic emission lines at 396.15 nm and 324.75 nm respectively, about 5.6- and 4.8-folds signal enhancements were achieved for aluminum alloy and copper alloy samples compared to SP-LIBS. Furthermore, the temporal analysis, in which the intensity of atomic lines in SP-LIBS decayed at least ten times faster than the SBS-LIBS, proved that the energy coupling efficiency of SBS-LIBS was significantly higher than that of SP-LIBS.

  6. Oxidative stress activates the TRPM2-Ca(2+)-CaMKII-ROS signaling loop to induce cell death in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Huang, Lihong; Yue, Jianbo

    2016-12-20

    High intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause oxidative stress that results in numerous pathologies, including cell death. Transient potential receptor melastatin-2 (TRPM2), a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel, is mainly activated by intracellular adenosine diphosphate ribose (ADPR) in response to oxidative stress. Here we studied the role and mechanisms of TRPM2-mediated Ca(2+) influx on oxidative stress-induced cell death in cancer cells. We found that oxidative stress activated the TRPM2-Ca(2+)-CaMKII cascade to inhibit early autophagy induction, which ultimately led to cell death in TRPM2 expressing cancer cells. On the other hand, TRPM2 knockdown switched cells from cell death to autophagy for survival in response to oxidative stress. Moreover, we found that oxidative stress activated the TRPM2-CaMKII cascade to further induce intracellular ROS production, which led to mitochondria fragmentation and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. In summary, our data demonstrated that oxidative stress activates the TRPM2-Ca(2+)-CaMKII-ROS signal loop to inhibit autophagy and induce cell death.

  7. Synergistic activation of a Drosophila enhancer by HOM/EXD and DPP signaling.

    PubMed Central

    Grieder, N C; Marty, T; Ryoo, H D; Mann, R S; Affolter, M

    1997-01-01

    The homeotic proteins encoded by the genes of the Drosophila HOM and the vertebrate HOX complexes do not bind divergent DNA sequences with a high selectivity. In vitro, HOM (HOX) specificity can be increased by the formation of heterodimers with Extradenticle (EXD) or PBX homeodomain proteins. We have identified a single essential Labial (LAB)/EXD-binding site in a Decapentaplegic (DPP)-responsive enhancer of the homeotic gene lab which drives expression in the developing midgut. We show that LAB and EXD bind cooperatively to the site in vitro, and that the expression of the enhancer in vivo requires exd and lab function. In addition, point mutations in either the EXD or the LAB subsite compromise enhancer function, strongly suggesting that EXD and LAB bind to this site in vivo. Interestingly, we found that the activity of the enhancer is only stimulated by DPP signaling significantly upon binding of LAB and EXD. Thus, the enhancer appears to integrate positional information via the homeotic gene lab, and spatiotemporal information via DPP signaling; only when these inputs act in concert in an endodermal cell is the enhancer fully active. Our results illustrate how a tissue-specific response to DPP can be generated through synergistic effects on an enhancer carrying both DPP- and HOX-responsive sequences. PMID:9405369

  8. Camptothecin Enhances Cell Death Induced by (177)Lu-EDTMP in Osteosarcoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Chandan; Vats, Kusum; Lohar, Sharad P; Korde, Aruna; Samuel, Grace

    2014-10-01

    Lutetium-177 is an assured therapeutic radionuclide with favorable half-life and suitable β(-) energy. Radiolabeled (177)Lu-EDTMP (Ethylenediamine tetramethylene phosphonic acid) is by and large used for bone pain palliation in cancer patients. In vitro cell studies are carried out in osteosarcoma cells MG-63 to evaluate the combined effect of anticancer drug camptothecin (CPT) and (177)Lu-EDTMP. Two concentrations of (177)Lu-EDTMP (3.7 and 37 MBq) were incubated with MG63 cell line for 48 hours with and without pretreatment of CPT (10 nM) for 1 hour. After completion of incubation, the cells were harvested and cellular toxicity was estimated by LDH, MTT, and trypan blue dye. Apoptotic DNA fragmentation was estimated by ELISA kit. The expression of proteins such as bcl2, PARP, and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) that were related to apoptotic signaling pathways was assessed by western blotting. The results indicated that cellular toxicity and apoptosis were relatively higher in MG63 cells that were treated with CPT prior to treating with (177)Lu-EDTMP in comparison with the corresponding individual controls.

  9. A novel homozygous Fas ligand mutation leads to early protein truncation, abrogation of death receptor and reverse signaling and a severe form of the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nabhani, Schafiq; Hönscheid, Andrea; Oommen, Prasad T; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Schaper, Jörg; Kuhlen, Michaela; Laws, Hans-Jürgen; Borkhardt, Arndt; Fischer, Ute

    2014-12-01

    We report a novel type of mutation in the death ligand FasL that was associated with a severe phenotype of the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in two patients. A frameshift mutation in the intracellular domain led to complete loss of FasL expression. Cell death signaling via its receptor and reverse signaling via its intracellular domain were completely abrogated. In vitro lymphocyte proliferation induced by weak T cell receptor stimulation could be blocked and cell death was induced by engagement of FasL in T cells derived from healthy individuals and a heterozygous carrier, but not in FasL-deficient patient derived cells. Expression of genes implicated in lymphocyte proliferation and activation (CCND1, NFATc1, NF-κB1) was increased in FasL-deficient T cells and could not be downregulated by FasL engagement as in healthy cells. Our data thus suggest, that deficiency in FasL reverse signaling may contribute to the clinical lymphoproliferative phenotype of ALPS.

  10. Raman signal enhancement by multiple beam excitation and its application for the detection of chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Sakshi; Ahmad, Azeem; Mehta, Dalip S.; Gambhir, Vijayeta; Reddy, Martha N.

    2015-08-31

    In a typical Raman based sensor, a single laser beam is used for exciting the sample and the backscattered or forward scattered light is collected using collection optics and is analyzed by a spectrometer. We have investigated that by means of exciting the sample with multiple beams, i.e., by dividing the same input power of the single beam into two or three or more beams and exciting the sample from different angles, the Raman signal enhances significantly. Due to the presence of multiple beams passing through the same volume of the sample, an interference pattern is formed and the volume of interaction of excitation beams with the sample increases. By means of this geometry, the enhancement in the Raman signal is observed and it was found that the signal strength increases linearly with the increase in number of excitation beams. Experimental results of this scheme for excitation of the samples are reported for explosive detection at a standoff distance.

  11. Wnt/β-catenin signaling inhibitor ICG-001 enhances pigmentation of cultured melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Il; Jeong, Do-Sun; Jung, Eui Chang; Lee, Jeung-Hoon; Kim, Chang Deok; Yoon, Tae-Jin

    2016-11-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling is important in development and differentiation of melanocytes. The object of this study was to evaluate the effects of several Wnt/β-catenin signaling inhibitors on pigmentation using melanoma cells. Melanoma cells were treated with Wnt/β-catenin signaling inhibitors, and then melanin content and tyrosinase activity were checked. Although some inhibitors showed slight inhibition of pigmentation, we failed to observe potential inhibitory effect of those chemicals on pigmentation of HM3KO melanoma cells. Rather, one of powerful Wnt/β-catenin signaling inhibitors, ICG-001, increased the pigmentation of HM3KO melanoma cells. Pigmentation-enhancing effect of ICG-001 was reproducible in other melanoma cell line MNT-1. Consistent with these results. ICG-001 increased the expression of pigmentation-related genes, such as MITF, tyrosinase and TRP1. When ICG-001 was treated, the phosphorylation of CREB was significantly increased. In addition, ICG-001 treatment led to quick increase of intracellular cAMP level, suggesting that ICG-001 activated PKA signaling. The blockage of PKA signaling with pharmaceutical inhibitor H89 inhibited the ICG-001-induced pigmentation significantly. These results suggest that PKA signaling is pivotal in pigmentation process itself, while the importance of Wnt/β-catenin signaling should be emphasized in the context of development and differentiation. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Enhanced brain signal variability in children with autism spectrum disorder during early childhood.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tetsuya; Yoshimura, Yuko; Hiraishi, Hirotoshi; Hasegawa, Chiaki; Munesue, Toshio; Higashida, Haruhiro; Minabe, Yoshio; Kikuchi, Mitsuru

    2016-03-01

    Extensive evidence shows that a core neurobiological mechanism of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) involves aberrant neural connectivity. Recent advances in the investigation of brain signal variability have yielded important information about neural network mechanisms. That information has been applied fruitfully to the assessment of aging and mental disorders. Multiscale entropy (MSE) analysis can characterize the complexity inherent in brain signal dynamics over multiple temporal scales in the dynamics of neural networks. For this investigation, we sought to characterize the magnetoencephalography (MEG) signal variability during free watching of videos without sound using MSE in 43 children with ASD and 72 typically developing controls (TD), emphasizing early childhood to older childhood: a critical period of neural network maturation. Results revealed an age-related increase of brain signal variability in a specific timescale in TD children, whereas atypical age-related alteration was observed in the ASD group. Additionally, enhanced brain signal variability was observed in children with ASD, and was confirmed particularly for younger children. In the ASD group, symptom severity was associated region-specifically and timescale-specifically with reduced brain signal variability. These results agree well with a recently reported theory of increased brain signal variability during development and aberrant neural connectivity in ASD, especially during early childhood. Results of this study suggest that MSE analytic method might serve as a useful approach for characterizing neurophysiological mechanisms of typical-developing and its alterations in ASD through the detection of MEG signal variability at multiple timescales.

  13. Spatial extent of plasmonic enhancement of vibrational signals in the infrared.

    PubMed

    Neubrech, Frank; Beck, Sebastian; Glaser, Tobias; Hentschel, Mario; Giessen, Harald; Pucci, Annemarie

    2014-06-24

    Infrared vibrations of molecular species can be enhanced by several orders of magnitude with plasmonic nanoantennas. Based on the confined electromagnetic near-fields of resonantly excited metal nanoparticles, this antenna-assisted surface-enhanced infrared spectroscopy enables the detection of minute amounts of analytes localized in the nanometer-scale vicinity of the structure. Among other important parameters, the distance of the vibrational oscillator of the analyte to the nanoantenna surface determines the signal enhancement. For sensing applications, this is a particularly important issue since the vibrating dipoles of interest may be located far away from the antenna surface because of functional layers and the large size of biomolecules, proteins, or bacteria. The relation between distance and signal enhancement is thus of paramount importance and measured here with in situ infrared spectroscopy during the growth of a probe layer. Our results indicate a diminishing signal enhancement and the effective saturation of the plasmonic resonance shift beyond 100 nm. The experiments carried out under ultra-high-vacuum conditions are supported by numerical calculations.

  14. Pepper Arginine Decarboxylase Is Required for Polyamine and γ-Aminobutyric Acid Signaling in Cell Death and Defense Response1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Kim, Beom Seok; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2013-01-01

    The Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria (Xcv) effector AvrBsT induces a hypersensitive cell death in pepper (Capsicum annuum). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying AvrBsT-triggered cell death are not fully understood. Here, we identified pepper arginine decarboxylase (CaADC1) as an AvrBsT-interacting protein, which is early and strongly induced in incompatible pepper-Xcv interactions. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that the CaADC1-AvrBsT complex was localized to the cytoplasm. Transient coexpression of CaADC1 with avrBsT in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves specifically enhanced AvrBsT-triggered cell death, accompanied by an accumulation of polyamines, nitric oxide (NO), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) bursts. Among the polyamines, spermine application strongly induced NO and H2O2 bursts, ultimately leading to cell death. CaADC1 silencing in pepper leaves significantly compromised NO and H2O2 accumulation and cell death induction, leading to the enhanced avirulent Xcv growth during infection. The levels of salicylic acid, polyamines, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and the expression of defense response genes during avirulent Xcv infection, were distinctly lower in CaADC1-silenced plants than those in the empty vector control plants. GABA application significantly inhibited avirulent Xcv growth in CaADC1-silenced leaves and the empty vector control plants. Together, these results suggest that CaADC1 may act as a key defense and cell death regulator via mediation of polyamine and GABA metabolism. PMID:23784462

  15. Signal enhancement strategy for a micro-arrayed polydiacetylene (PDA) immunosensor using enzyme-catalyzed precipitation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Uk; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Lee, Doo Sung; Sim, Sang Jun

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a signal enhancement strategy to improve the sensitivity of an antibody-based immunosensor that uses polydiacetylene (PDA) liposomes to detect a target protein (human immunoglobulin E [hIgE]). To achieve ultrasensitive detection, multiple stimuli applied to PDA immunosensor chips offer a signal enhancement method that combines the primary immune reaction between antigen and antibody with the sandwich method of polyclonal antibody (pAb)-conjugated horseradish peroxidase (HRP). In the second step, fluorescence is enhanced by the mechanical pressure from the precipitate formed by enzyme catalysis. In order to detect hIgE, the surface of immobilized PDA liposomes was conjugated with monoclonal antibodies against hIgE, and fluorescence signals were detected after the antigen-antibody reaction. In this step, hIgE concentrations as low as 10 ng/mL were detected. Fluorescence signals slightly increased when anti-hIgE pAb-HRP was used as an amplifying agent after primary immunoresponse. After secondary immunoresponse, HRP-catalyzed oxidation of 3,3'-diaminobenzidine produced an insoluble precipitate that strongly stimulated PDA liposomes by their weight and pressure, thereby dramatically increasing the fluorescence signal. Thus, PDA liposome immunosensor could detect hIgE concentrations as low as 0.01 ng/mL, representing a 1000-fold increase in sensitivity over the signal generated by the primary immunoresponse. This study indicates that increasing the external mechanical force applied to PDA liposomes by enzyme-catalyzed precipitate formation enhanced the sensitivity of the PDA liposome immunosensor chip. This strategy can be applied to the detection of other biomolecules in experimental or clinical settings where ultrasensitive and highly specific biosensing is required. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Label-free electrochemical lead (II) aptasensor using thionine as the signaling molecule and graphene as signal-enhancing platform.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Gao, Cai; He, Suyu; Wang, Qingxiang; Wu, Aiqun

    2016-07-15

    A label-free and highly sensitive electrochemical aptasensor for Pb(2+) was constructed using thionine (TH) as the signaling molecule and graphene (GR) as the signal-enhancing platform. The electrochemical sensing interface was fabricated by stepwise assembly of GR and TH on the lead (II) specific aptamer (LSA) modified electrode. Upon interaction with Pb(2+), the aptamer probe on the sensor underwent conformational switch from a single-stranded DNA form to the G-quadruplex structure, causing the GR with assembled TH released from the electrode surface into solution. As a result, the electrochemical signal of TH on the aptasensor was substantially reduced. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the attenuation of peak currents presented a good linear relationship with the logarithm of Pb(2+) concentrations over the range from 1.6×10(-13) to 1.6×10(-10)M. The detection limit was estimated to be 3.2×10(-14)M. The aptasensor also exhibited good regenerability, excellent selectivity, and acceptable reproducibility, indicating promising application in environment monitoring of lead.

  17. A familial ATP13A2 mutation enhances alpha-synuclein aggregation and promotes cell death.

    PubMed

    Lopes da Fonseca, Tomás; Pinho, Raquel; Outeiro, Tiago F

    2016-07-15

    Aberrant protein-protein interactions are a common pathological hallmark among neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD). Thus far, mutations in more than 20 genes have been associated with PD. These genes encode for proteins involved in distinct intracellular pathways, complicating our understanding of the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the disease. Recent reports suggested that the endolysosomal protein ATP13A2 can determine the fate of alpha-synuclein (α-Syn), although no consensus has yet been reached on the mechanisms underlying this effect. Here, we describe, for the first time, the deleterious effect arising from the interaction between the ATP13A2 familial mutant Dup22 with α-Syn. We show that this ATP13A2 mutant can enhance α-Syn oligomerization and aggregation in cell culture. Additionally, we report the accumulation of both proteins in abnormal endoplasmic reticulum membranous structures and the activation of the protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase pathway. Ultimately, our data bring new insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the interplay of these two proteins, opening novel perspectives for therapeutic intervention.

  18. Loss of anchorage primarily induces non-apoptotic cell death in a human mammary epithelial cell line under atypical focal adhesion kinase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, F; Ushida, K; Mori, K; Shibanuma, M

    2015-01-01

    Anchorage dependence of cellular growth and survival prevents inappropriate cell growth or survival in ectopic environments, and serves as a potential barrier to metastasis of cancer cells. Therefore, obtaining a better understanding of anchorage-dependent responses in normal cells is the first step to understand and impede anchorage independence of growth and survival in cancer cells and finally to eradicate cancer cells during metastasis. Anoikis, a type of apoptosis specifically induced by lack of appropriate cell-extracellular matrix adhesion, has been established as the dominant response of normal epithelial cells to anchorage loss. For example, under detached conditions, the untransformed mammary epithelial cell (MEC) line MCF-10 A, which exhibits myoepithelial characteristics, underwent anoikis dependent on classical ERK signaling. On the other hand, recent studies have revealed a variety of phenotypes resulting in cell death modalities distinct from anoikis, such as autophagy, necrosis, and cornification, in detached epithelial cells. In the present study, we characterized detachment-induced cell death (DICD) in primary human MECs immortalized with hTERT (TertHMECs), which are bipotent progenitor-like cells with a differentiating phenotype to luminal cells. In contrast to MCF-10 A cells, apoptosis was not observed in detached TertHMECs; instead, non-apoptotic cell death marked by features of entosis, cornification, and necrosis was observed along with downregulation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling. Cell death was overcome by anchorage-independent activities of FAK but not PI3K/AKT, SRC, and MEK/ERK, suggesting critical roles of atypical FAK signaling pathways in the regulation of non-apoptotic cell death. Further analysis revealed an important role of TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) as a mediator of FAK signaling in regulation of entosis and necrosis and a role of p38 MAPK in the induction of necrosis. Overall

  19. Chemokine CCL2-CCR2 Signaling Induces Neuronal Cell Death via STAT3 Activation and IL-1β Production after Status Epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Tian, Dai-Shi; Peng, Jiyun; Murugan, Madhuvika; Feng, Li-Jie; Liu, Jun-Li; Eyo, Ukpong B; Zhou, Li-Jun; Mogilevsky, Rochelle; Wang, Wei; Wu, Long-Jun

    2017-08-16

    Elevated levels of chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2) and its receptor CCR2 have been reported in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and in experimental seizures. However, the functional significance and molecular mechanism underlying CCL2-CCR2 signaling in epileptic brain remains largely unknown. In this study, we found that the upregulated CCL2 was mainly expressed in hippocampal neurons and activated microglia from mice 1 d after kainic acid (KA)-induced seizures. Taking advantage of CX3CR1(GFP/+):CCR2(RFP/+) double-transgenic mice, we demonstrated that CCL2-CCR2 signaling has a role in resident microglial activation and blood-derived monocyte infiltration. Moreover, seizure-induced degeneration of neurons in the hippocampal CA3 region was attenuated in mice lacking CCL2 or CCR2. We further showed that CCR2 activation induced STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) phosphorylation and IL-1β production, which are critical for promoting neuronal cell death after status epilepticus. Consistently, pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 by WP1066 reduced seizure-induced IL-1β production and subsequent neuronal death. Two weeks after KA-induced seizures, CCR2 deficiency not only reduced neuronal loss, but also attenuated seizure-induced behavioral impairments, including anxiety, memory decline, and recurrent seizure severity. Together, we demonstrated that CCL2-CCR2 signaling contributes to neurodegeneration via STAT3 activation and IL-1β production after status epilepticus, providing potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of epilepsy.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Epilepsy is a global concern and epileptic seizures occur in many neurological conditions. Neuroinflammation associated with microglial activation and monocyte infiltration are characteristic of epileptic brains. However, molecular mechanisms underlying neuroinflammation in neuronal death following epilepsy remain to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate that CCL2-CCR2 signaling is

  20. Pathogen-induced SGT1 of Arachis diogoi induces cell death and enhanced disease resistance in tobacco and peanut.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dilip; Kirti, Pulugurtha Bharadwaja

    2015-01-01

    We have identified a transcript derived fragment (TDF) corresponding to SGT1 in a study of differential gene expression on the resistant wild peanut, Arachis diogoi, upon challenge from the late leaf spot pathogen, Phaeoisariopsis personata, and cloned its full-length cDNA followed by subsequent validation through q-PCR. Sodium nitroprusside, salicylic acid, ethephon and methyl jasmonate induced the expression of AdSGT1, while the treatment with abscisic acid did not elicit its up-regulation. AdSGT1 is localized to both nucleus and cytoplasm. Its overexpression induced hypersensitive-like cell death in tobacco under transient conditional expression using the estradiol system, and this conditional expression of AdSGT1 was also associated with the up-regulation of NtHSR203J, HMGR and HIN1, which have been shown to be associated with hypersensitive response in tobacco in earlier studies. Expression of the cDNA in a susceptible cultivated peanut variety enhanced its resistance against the late leaf spot pathogen, Phaeoisariopsis personata, while the heterologous expression in tobacco enhanced its resistance against Phytophthora parasitica var. nicotianae, Alternaria alternata var. nicotianae and Rhizoctonia solani. Constitutive expression in peanut was associated with the co-expression of resistance-related genes, CC-NB-LRR and some protein kinases. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Synergistic enhancement of breast cancer cell death using ultrasound-microbubbles in combination with cisplatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetha, Sheliza; Karshafian, Raffi

    2017-03-01

    .0001) based on Bliss Independence model with a 95% confidence interval of p<0.05 after 48-hour incubation. The combination of ultrasound-microbubble and cisplatin synergistically enhances chemotherapeutic effectiveness in breast cancer cells. However, this enhanced effectiveness, in breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231), is dependent on incubation time and cisplatin (CDDP) concentration.

  2. Ultra-violet B (UVB)-induced skin cell death occurs through a cyclophilin D intrinsic signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Chao; Yang, Bo; Yang, Zhi; Tu, Ying; Yang, Yan-li; He, Li; Bi, Zhi-Gang

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UVB radiated skin keratinocytes show cyclophilin D (Cyp-D) upregulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NAC inhibits UVB induced Cyp-D expression, while H{sub 2}O{sub 2} facilitates it. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyp-D-deficient cells are significantly less susceptible to UVB induced cell death. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Over-expression of Cyp-D causes spontaneous keratinocytes cell death. -- Abstract: UVB-induced skin cell damage involves the opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), which leads to both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Cyclophilin D (Cyp-D) translocation to the inner membrane of mitochondrion acts as a key component to open the mPTP. Our Western-Blot results in primary cultured human skin keratinocytes and in HaCaT cell line demonstrated that UVB radiation and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) induced Cyp-D expression, which was inhibited by anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). We created a stable Cyp-D deficiency skin keratinocytes by expressing Cyp-D-shRNA through lentiviral infection. Cyp-D-deficient cells were significantly less susceptible than their counterparts to UVB- or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell death. Further, cyclosporine A (Cs-A), a Cyp-D inhibitor, inhibited UVB- or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced keratinocytes cell death. Reversely, over-expression of Cyp-D in primary keratinocytes caused spontaneous keratinocytes cell death. These results suggest Cyp-D's critical role in UVB/oxidative stress-induced skin cell death.

  3. Lysosomal Signaling Enhances Mitochondria-Mediated Photodynamic Therapy in A431 Cancer Cells: Role of Iron

    PubMed Central

    Saggu, Shalini; Hung, Hsin-I; Quiogue, Geraldine; Lemasters, John J.; Nieminen, Anna-Liisa

    2015-01-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), light activates a photosensitizer added to a tissue, resulting in singlet oxygen formation and cell death. The photosensitizer phthalocyanine 4 (Pc 4) localizes primarily to mitochondrial membranes in cancer cells, resulting in mitochondria-mediated cell death. The aim of this study was to determine how lysosomes contribute to PDT-induced cell killing by mitochondria-targeted photosensitizers such as Pc 4. We monitored cell killing of A431 cells after Pc 4-PDT in the presence and absence of bafilomycin, an inhibitor of the vacuolar proton pump of lysosomes and endosomes. Bafilomycin was not toxic by itself, but greatly enhanced Pc 4-PDT-induced cell killing. To investigate whether iron loading of lysosomes affects bafilomycin-induced killing, cells were incubated with ammonium ferric citrate (30 μm) for 30 h prior to PDT. Ammonium ferric citrate enhanced Pc 4 plus bafilomycin-induced cell killing without having toxicity by itself. Iron chelators (desferrioxamine and starch-desferrioxamine) and the inhibitor of the mitochondrial calcium (and ferrous iron) uniporter, Ru360, protected against Pc 4 plus bafilomycin toxicity. These results support the conclusion that chelatable iron stored in the lysosomes enhances the efficacy of bafilomycin-mediated PDT and that lysosomal disruption augments PDT with Pc 4. PMID:22220628