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Sample records for enhanced death signaling

  1. Streptolysin S Promotes Programmed Cell Death and Enhances Inflammatory Signaling in Epithelial Keratinocytes during Group A Streptococcus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Rebecca A.; Puricelli, Jessica M.; Higashi, Dustin L.; Park, Claudia J.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, or group A Streptococcus (GAS), is a pathogen that causes a multitude of human diseases from pharyngitis to severe infections such as toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis. One of the primary virulence factors produced by GAS is the peptide toxin streptolysin S (SLS). In addition to its well-recognized role as a cytolysin, recent evidence has indicated that SLS may influence host cell signaling pathways at sublytic concentrations during infection. We employed an antibody array-based approach to comprehensively identify global host cell changes in human epithelial keratinocytes in response to the SLS toxin. We identified key SLS-dependent host responses, including the initiation of specific programmed cell death and inflammatory cascades with concomitant downregulation of Akt-mediated cytoprotection. Significant signaling responses identified by our array analysis were confirmed using biochemical and protein identification methods. To further demonstrate that the observed SLS-dependent host signaling changes were mediated primarily by the secreted toxin, we designed a Transwell infection system in which direct bacterial attachment to host cells was prevented, while secreted factors were allowed access to host cells. The results using this approach were consistent with our direct infection studies and reveal that SLS is a bacterial toxin that does not require bacterial attachment to host cells for activity. In light of these findings, we propose that the production of SLS by GAS during skin infection promotes invasive outcomes by triggering programmed cell death and inflammatory cascades in host cells to breach the keratinocyte barrier for dissemination into deeper tissues. PMID:26238711

  2. Salicylic acid-independent ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 signaling in Arabidopsis immunity and cell death is regulated by the monooxygenase FMO1 and the Nudix hydrolase NUDT7.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Michael; Gobbato, Enrico; Bednarek, Pawel; Debey, Svenja; Schultze, Joachim L; Bautor, Jaqueline; Parker, Jane E

    2006-04-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1) controls defense activation and programmed cell death conditioned by intracellular Toll-related immune receptors that recognize specific pathogen effectors. EDS1 is also needed for basal resistance to invasive pathogens by restricting the progression of disease. In both responses, EDS1, assisted by its interacting partner, PHYTOALEXIN-DEFICIENT4 (PAD4), regulates accumulation of the phenolic defense molecule salicylic acid (SA) and other as yet unidentified signal intermediates. An Arabidopsis whole genome microarray experiment was designed to identify genes whose expression depends on EDS1 and PAD4, irrespective of local SA accumulation, and potential candidates of an SA-independent branch of EDS1 defense were found. We define two new immune regulators through analysis of corresponding Arabidopsis loss-of-function insertion mutants. FLAVIN-DEPENDENT MONOOXYGENASE1 (FMO1) positively regulates the EDS1 pathway, and one member (NUDT7) of a family of cytosolic Nudix hydrolases exerts negative control of EDS1 signaling. Analysis of fmo1 and nudt7 mutants alone or in combination with sid2-1, a mutation that severely depletes pathogen-induced SA production, points to SA-independent functions of FMO1 and NUDT7 in EDS1-conditioned disease resistance and cell death. We find instead that SA antagonizes initiation of cell death and stunting of growth in nudt7 mutants.

  3. Lesion simulating disease 1 and enhanced disease susceptibility 1 differentially regulate UV-C-induced photooxidative stress signalling and programmed cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wituszyńska, Weronika; Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Sobczak, Mirosław; Rusaczonek, Anna; Kozłowska-Makulska, Anna; Witoń, Damian; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2015-02-01

    As obligate photoautotrophs, plants are inevitably exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Because of stratospheric ozone depletion, UV has become more and more dangerous to the biosphere. Therefore, it is important to understand UV perception and signal transduction in plants. In the present study, we show that lesion simulating disease 1 (LSD1) and enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) are antagonistic regulators of UV-C-induced programmed cell death (PCD) in Arabidopsis thaliana. This regulatory dependence is manifested by a complex deregulation of photosynthesis, reactive oxygen species homeostasis, antioxidative enzyme activity and UV-responsive genes expression. We also prove that a UV-C radiation episode triggers apoptotic-like morphological changes within the mesophyll cells. Interestingly, chloroplasts are the first organelles that show features of UV-C-induced damage, which may indicate their primary role in PCD development. Moreover, we show that Arabidopsis Bax inhibitor 1 (AtBI1), which has been described as a negative regulator of plant PCD, is involved in LSD1-dependent cell death in response to UV-C. Our results imply that LSD1 and EDS1 regulate processes extinguishing excessive energy, reactive oxygen species formation and subsequent PCD in response to different stresses related to impaired electron transport.

  4. Lesion simulating disease 1 and enhanced disease susceptibility 1 differentially regulate UV-C-induced photooxidative stress signalling and programmed cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wituszyńska, Weronika; Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Sobczak, Mirosław; Rusaczonek, Anna; Kozłowska-Makulska, Anna; Witoń, Damian; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2015-02-01

    As obligate photoautotrophs, plants are inevitably exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Because of stratospheric ozone depletion, UV has become more and more dangerous to the biosphere. Therefore, it is important to understand UV perception and signal transduction in plants. In the present study, we show that lesion simulating disease 1 (LSD1) and enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) are antagonistic regulators of UV-C-induced programmed cell death (PCD) in Arabidopsis thaliana. This regulatory dependence is manifested by a complex deregulation of photosynthesis, reactive oxygen species homeostasis, antioxidative enzyme activity and UV-responsive genes expression. We also prove that a UV-C radiation episode triggers apoptotic-like morphological changes within the mesophyll cells. Interestingly, chloroplasts are the first organelles that show features of UV-C-induced damage, which may indicate their primary role in PCD development. Moreover, we show that Arabidopsis Bax inhibitor 1 (AtBI1), which has been described as a negative regulator of plant PCD, is involved in LSD1-dependent cell death in response to UV-C. Our results imply that LSD1 and EDS1 regulate processes extinguishing excessive energy, reactive oxygen species formation and subsequent PCD in response to different stresses related to impaired electron transport. PMID:24471507

  5. The apoptosome: signalling platform of cell death.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Stefan J; Salvesen, Guy S

    2007-05-01

    Recent work on the initial switches that trigger cell death has revealed surprising inventions of nature that ensure the ordered suicide of a cell that has been selected for demise. Particularly intriguing is how a signal--the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria--is translated into the activation of the death cascade, which leads to a point of no return. Now there is new understanding of how this crucial process is delicately handled by a cytosolic signalling platform known as the apoptosome. The formation of the apoptosome and the activation of its effector, caspase-9, reveals a sophisticated mechanism that might be more common than was initially thought. PMID:17377525

  6. Decoding cell death signals in liver inflammation.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Catherine; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido

    2013-09-01

    Inflammation can be either beneficial or detrimental to the liver, depending on multiple factors. Mild (i.e., limited in intensity and destined to resolve) inflammatory responses have indeed been shown to exert consistent hepatoprotective effects, contributing to tissue repair and promoting the re-establishment of homeostasis. Conversely, excessive (i.e., disproportionate in intensity and permanent) inflammation may induce a massive loss of hepatocytes and hence exacerbate the severity of various hepatic conditions, including ischemia-reperfusion injury, systemic metabolic alterations (e.g., obesity, diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disorders), alcoholic hepatitis, intoxication by xenobiotics and infection, de facto being associated with irreversible liver damage, fibrosis, and carcinogenesis. Both liver-resident cells (e.g., Kupffer cells, hepatic stellate cells, sinusoidal endothelial cells) and cells that are recruited in response to injury (e.g., monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, natural killer cells) emit pro-inflammatory signals including - but not limited to - cytokines, chemokines, lipid messengers, and reactive oxygen species that contribute to the apoptotic or necrotic demise of hepatocytes. In turn, dying hepatocytes release damage-associated molecular patterns that-upon binding to evolutionary conserved pattern recognition receptors-activate cells of the innate immune system to further stimulate inflammatory responses, hence establishing a highly hepatotoxic feedforward cycle of inflammation and cell death. In this review, we discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms that account for the most deleterious effect of hepatic inflammation at the cellular level, that is, the initiation of a massive cell death response among hepatocytes.

  7. Inhibition of MAPK signaling pathways enhances cell death induced by 5-Aminolevulinic acid-photodynamic therapy in skin squamous carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xinhong; Liu, Jianping; Shi, Zhiyun; Jing, Li; Yu, Nan; Zhang, Xiujuan; Jiao, Yaning; Wang, Yili; Li, P Andy

    2016-04-01

    Combination of a photosensitizer, 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), with photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been widely used to treat skin squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). However, a portion of SCC patients do not respond well to PDT. The molecular reason for this resistance is not clear. We hypothesize that mitogen-activated phosphorylation kinase (MAPK) plays a key role in mediating SCC resistance to PDT. To determine whether inhibition of MAPK signaling enhances the anti-tumor effect of ALA-PDT in SCC. The human squamous carcinoma cell line, SCL-1, was either untreated or treated with various combinations of ALA, PDT light source and inhibitors of MAPK signaling components. ALA-PDT treatment significantly decreased cell viability, increased the percentage of annexin-V positive cells and resulted in formation of apoptotic bodies. ALA-PDT treated cells showed increased levels of p-MEK, p-ERK1/2, p-p38, p-Elk-1, p-JNK and p-c-Jun. Addition of inhibitors for ERK1/2 (PD98059), p38 (SB203580) and JNK (SP60125) reversed the changes and led to a more dramatic decrease in SCL-1 cell viability than seen with ALA-PDT alone. Inhibition of the MAPK pathway enhances the cytotoxic effect of ALA-PDT on SCL-1.

  8. Inhibition of MAPK signaling pathways enhances cell death induced by 5-Aminolevulinic acid-photodynamic therapy in skin squamous carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xinhong; Liu, Jianping; Shi, Zhiyun; Jing, Li; Yu, Nan; Zhang, Xiujuan; Jiao, Yaning; Wang, Yili; Li, P Andy

    2016-04-01

    Combination of a photosensitizer, 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), with photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been widely used to treat skin squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). However, a portion of SCC patients do not respond well to PDT. The molecular reason for this resistance is not clear. We hypothesize that mitogen-activated phosphorylation kinase (MAPK) plays a key role in mediating SCC resistance to PDT. To determine whether inhibition of MAPK signaling enhances the anti-tumor effect of ALA-PDT in SCC. The human squamous carcinoma cell line, SCL-1, was either untreated or treated with various combinations of ALA, PDT light source and inhibitors of MAPK signaling components. ALA-PDT treatment significantly decreased cell viability, increased the percentage of annexin-V positive cells and resulted in formation of apoptotic bodies. ALA-PDT treated cells showed increased levels of p-MEK, p-ERK1/2, p-p38, p-Elk-1, p-JNK and p-c-Jun. Addition of inhibitors for ERK1/2 (PD98059), p38 (SB203580) and JNK (SP60125) reversed the changes and led to a more dramatic decrease in SCL-1 cell viability than seen with ALA-PDT alone. Inhibition of the MAPK pathway enhances the cytotoxic effect of ALA-PDT on SCL-1. PMID:27032574

  9. Cell Death Signaling and Anticancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Vacchelli, Erika; Kroemer, Guido

    2011-01-01

    For a long time, it was commonly believed that efficient anticancer regimens would either trigger the apoptotic demise of tumor cells or induce a permanent arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, i.e., senescence. The recent discovery that necrosis can occur in a regulated fashion and the increasingly more precise characterization of the underlying molecular mechanisms have raised great interest, as non-apoptotic pathways might be instrumental to circumvent the resistance of cancer cells to conventional, pro-apoptotic therapeutic regimens. Moreover, it has been shown that some anticancer regimens engage lethal signaling cascades that can ignite multiple oncosuppressive mechanisms, including apoptosis, necrosis, and senescence. Among these signaling pathways is mitotic catastrophe, whose role as a bona fide cell death mechanism has recently been reconsidered. Thus, anticancer regimens get ever more sophisticated, and often distinct strategies are combined to maximize efficacy and minimize side effects. In this review, we will discuss the importance of apoptosis, necrosis, and mitotic catastrophe in the response of tumor cells to the most common clinically employed and experimental anticancer agents. PMID:22655227

  10. Decoding cell death signals in liver inflammation.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Catherine; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido

    2013-09-01

    Inflammation can be either beneficial or detrimental to the liver, depending on multiple factors. Mild (i.e., limited in intensity and destined to resolve) inflammatory responses have indeed been shown to exert consistent hepatoprotective effects, contributing to tissue repair and promoting the re-establishment of homeostasis. Conversely, excessive (i.e., disproportionate in intensity and permanent) inflammation may induce a massive loss of hepatocytes and hence exacerbate the severity of various hepatic conditions, including ischemia-reperfusion injury, systemic metabolic alterations (e.g., obesity, diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disorders), alcoholic hepatitis, intoxication by xenobiotics and infection, de facto being associated with irreversible liver damage, fibrosis, and carcinogenesis. Both liver-resident cells (e.g., Kupffer cells, hepatic stellate cells, sinusoidal endothelial cells) and cells that are recruited in response to injury (e.g., monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, natural killer cells) emit pro-inflammatory signals including - but not limited to - cytokines, chemokines, lipid messengers, and reactive oxygen species that contribute to the apoptotic or necrotic demise of hepatocytes. In turn, dying hepatocytes release damage-associated molecular patterns that-upon binding to evolutionary conserved pattern recognition receptors-activate cells of the innate immune system to further stimulate inflammatory responses, hence establishing a highly hepatotoxic feedforward cycle of inflammation and cell death. In this review, we discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms that account for the most deleterious effect of hepatic inflammation at the cellular level, that is, the initiation of a massive cell death response among hepatocytes. PMID:23567086

  11. On involvement of transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, activator protein-1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 in photodynamic therapy-induced death of crayfish neurons and satellite glial cells.

    PubMed

    Berezhnaya, Elena; Neginskaya, Marya; Kovaleva, Vera; Sharifulina, Svetlana; Ischenko, Irina; Komandirov, Maxim; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Uzdensky, Anatoly B

    2015-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently used in the treatment of brain tumors. However, not only malignant cells but also neighboring normal neurons and glial cells are damaged during PDT. In order to study the potential role of transcription factors-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), activator protein (AP-1), and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3)-in photodynamic injury of normal neurons and glia, we photosensitized the isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor consisting of a single sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells. Application of different inhibitors and activators showed that transcription factors NF-κB (inhibitors caffeic acid phenethyl ester and parthenolide, activator betulinic acid), AP-1 (inhibitor SR11302), and STAT-3 (inhibitors stattic and cucurbitacine) influenced PDT-induced death and survival of neurons and glial cells in different ways. These experiments indicated involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and apoptosis of glial cells. However, in glial cells, it played the antinecrotic role. AP-1 was not involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glia, but mediated glial apoptosis. STAT-3 was involved in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells and necrosis of neurons and glia. Therefore, signaling pathways that regulate cell death and survival in neurons and glial cells are different. Using various inhibitors or activators of transcription factors, one can differently influence the sensitivity and resistance of neurons and glial cells to PDT. PMID:26160345

  12. On involvement of transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, activator protein-1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 in photodynamic therapy-induced death of crayfish neurons and satellite glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhnaya, Elena; Neginskaya, Marya; Kovaleva, Vera; Sharifulina, Svetlana; Ischenko, Irina; Komandirov, Maxim; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Uzdensky, Anatoly B.

    2015-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently used in the treatment of brain tumors. However, not only malignant cells but also neighboring normal neurons and glial cells are damaged during PDT. In order to study the potential role of transcription factors-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), activator protein (AP-1), and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3)-in photodynamic injury of normal neurons and glia, we photosensitized the isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor consisting of a single sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells. Application of different inhibitors and activators showed that transcription factors NF-κB (inhibitors caffeic acid phenethyl ester and parthenolide, activator betulinic acid), AP-1 (inhibitor SR11302), and STAT-3 (inhibitors stattic and cucurbitacine) influenced PDT-induced death and survival of neurons and glial cells in different ways. These experiments indicated involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and apoptosis of glial cells. However, in glial cells, it played the antinecrotic role. AP-1 was not involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glia, but mediated glial apoptosis. STAT-3 was involved in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells and necrosis of neurons and glia. Therefore, signaling pathways that regulate cell death and survival in neurons and glial cells are different. Using various inhibitors or activators of transcription factors, one can differently influence the sensitivity and resistance of neurons and glial cells to PDT.

  13. Tomato 14-3-3 protein 7 (TFT7) positively regulates immunity-associated programmed cell death by enhancing accumulation and signaling ability of MAPKKKalpha

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is triggered when Pto, a serine-threonine protein kinase recognizes either the AvrPto or AvrPtoB effector from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. This PCD requires MAPKKKalpha as a positive regulator in tomato and Nicotiana benthamiana. To examine how PCD-eliciting activi...

  14. Hydrogen peroxide as a signal controlling plant programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Gechev, Tsanko S.; Hille, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has established itself as a key player in stress and programmed cell death responses, but little is known about the signaling pathways leading from H2O2 to programmed cell death in plants. Recently, identification of key regulatory mutants and near-full genome coverage microarray analysis of H2O2-induced cell death have begun to unravel the complexity of the H2O2 network. This review also describes a novel link between H2O2 and sphingolipids, two signals that can interplay and regulate plant cell death. PMID:15631987

  15. Multichannel signal enhancement

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Paul S.

    1990-01-01

    A mixed adaptive filter is formulated for the signal processing problem where desired a priori signal information is not available. The formulation generates a least squares problem which enables the filter output to be calculated directly from an input data matrix. In one embodiment, a folded processor array enables bidirectional data flow to solve the recursive problem by back substitution without global communications. In another embodiment, a balanced processor array solves the recursive problem by forward elimination through the array. In a particular application to magnetoencephalography, the mixed adaptive filter enables an evoked response to an auditory stimulus to be identified from only a single trial.

  16. Inhibition of death receptor signaling by bacterial gut pathogens.

    PubMed

    Giogha, Cristina; Lung, Tania Wong Fok; Pearson, Jaclyn S; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2014-04-01

    Gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens such as enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, Salmonella and Shigella control inflammatory and apoptotic signaling in human intestinal cells to establish infection, replicate and disseminate to other hosts. These pathogens manipulate host cell signaling through the translocation of virulence effector proteins directly into the host cell cytoplasm, which then target various signaling pathways. Death receptors such as TNFR1, FAS and TRAIL-R induce signaling cascades that are crucial to the clearance of pathogens, and as such are major targets for inhibition by pathogens. This review focuses on what is known about how bacterial gut pathogens inhibit death receptor signaling to suppress inflammation and prevent apoptosis.

  17. Caspases Connect Cell-Death Signaling to Organismal Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; López-Soto, Alejandro; Kumar, Sharad; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-02-16

    Some forms of regulated cell death, such as apoptosis, are precipitated by the activation of cysteine proteases of the caspase family, including caspase 8, 9, and 3. Other caspases, such as caspase 1 and 4, are well known for their pro-inflammatory functions but regulate cell death in a limited number of pathophysiological settings. Accumulating evidence suggests that the most conserved function of mammalian caspases is not to control cell death sensu stricto, but to regulate inflammatory and immune reactions to dying cells and infectious challenges. Here, we review the molecular and cellular mechanisms though which mammalian caspases connect cell-death signaling to the maintenance of organismal homeostasis.

  18. Surviving apoptosis: life-death signaling in single cells

    PubMed Central

    Flusberg, Deborah A.; Sorger, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue development and homeostasis are regulated by opposing pro-survival and pro-death signals. An interesting feature of the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) family of ligands is that they simultaneously activate opposing signals within a single cell via the same ligand-receptor complex. The magnitude of pro-death events such as caspase activation and pro-survival events such as NF-κB activation vary not only from one cell type to the next but also among individual cells of the same type due to intrinsic and extrinsic noise. The molecules involved in these pro-survival/pro-death pathways, and the different phenotypes that result from their activities, have been recently reviewed. Here we focus on the impact of cell-to-cell variability in the strength of these opposing signals on shaping cell fate decisions. PMID:25920803

  19. Molecular and cellular control of cell death and defense signaling in pepper.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) provides a good experimental system for studying the molecular and functional genomics underlying the ability of plants to defend themselves against microbial pathogens. Cell death is a genetically programmed response that requires specific host cellular factors. Hypersensitive response (HR) is defined as rapid cell death in response to a pathogen attack. Pepper plants respond to pathogen attacks by activating genetically controlled HR- or disease-associated cell death. HR cell death, specifically in incompatible interactions between pepper and Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria, is mediated by the molecular genetics and biochemical machinery that underlie pathogen-induced cell death in plants. Gene expression profiles during the HR-like cell death response, virus-induced gene silencing and transient and transgenic overexpression approaches are used to isolate and identify HR- or disease-associated cell death genes in pepper plants. Reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, cytosolic calcium ion and defense-related hormones such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, ethylene and abscisic acid are involved in the execution of pathogen-induced cell death in plants. In this review, we summarize recent molecular and cellular studies of the pepper cell death-mediated defense response, highlighting the signaling events of cell death in disease-resistant pepper plants. Comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the cellular functions of pepper cell death response genes will aid the development of novel practical approaches to enhance disease resistance in pepper, thereby helping to secure the future supply of safe and nutritious pepper plants worldwide.

  20. Death education: enhancing competence across the life span.

    PubMed

    Eddy, J M; St Pierre, R W; Alles, W F; Monismith, S W

    1983-01-01

    Life is full of major and minor events analogous to dying and death that few people realize exist. Throughout life there are a variety of loss situations (e.g., death of a pet, divorce, loss of a job, retirement, death of a friend or relative, etc.) that help to prepare individuals for their own death. If death educators can enhance the life skills necessary to cope with these life events, then perhaps, the individual will be better able to cope with their own death and the death of a significant other. This paper will present an overview of the basic tenets of life span intervention, provide a discussion of life skills directly related to dying and death, and suggest key points of positive intervention.

  1. The convergence of radiation and immunogenic cell death signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Encouse B.; Pellicciotta, Ilenia; Demaria, Sandra; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary H.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) triggers programmed cell death in tumor cells through a variety of highly regulated processes. Radiation-induced tumor cell death has been studied extensively in vitro and is widely attributed to multiple distinct mechanisms, including apoptosis, necrosis, mitotic catastrophe (MC), autophagy, and senescence, which may occur concurrently. When considering tumor cell death in the context of an organism, an emerging body of evidence suggests there is a reciprocal relationship in which radiation stimulates the immune system, which in turn contributes to tumor cell kill. As a result, traditional measurements of radiation-induced tumor cell death, in vitro, fail to represent the extent of clinically observed responses, including reductions in loco-regional failure rates and improvements in metastases free and overall survival. Hence, understanding the immunological responses to the type of radiation-induced cell death is critical. In this review, the mechanisms of radiation-induced tumor cell death are described, with particular focus on immunogenic cell death (ICD). Strategies combining radiotherapy with specific chemotherapies or immunotherapies capable of inducing a repertoire of cancer specific immunogens might potentiate tumor control not only by enhancing cell kill but also through the induction of a successful anti-tumor vaccination that improves patient survival. PMID:22891162

  2. Danger signalling during cancer cell death: origins, plasticity and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Garg, A D; Martin, S; Golab, J; Agostinis, P

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that following anti-cancer treatments, cancer cell death can be perceived as immunogenic or tolerogenic by the immune system. The former is made possible due to the ability of certain anti-cancer modalities to induce immunogenic cell death (ICD) that is associated with the emission of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which assist in unlocking a sequence of events leading to the development of anti-tumour immunity. In response to ICD inducers, activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been identified to be indispensable to confer the immunogenic character of cancer cell death, due to its ability to coordinate the danger signalling pathways responsible for the trafficking of vital DAMPs and subsequent anti-cancer immune responses. However, in recent times, certain processes apart from ER stress have emerged (e.g., autophagy and possibly viral response-like signature), which have the ability to influence danger signalling. In this review, we discuss the molecular nature, emerging plasticity in the danger signalling mechanisms and immunological impact of known DAMPs in the context of immunogenic cancer cell death. We also discuss key effector mechanisms modulating the interface between dying cancer cells and the immune cells, which we believe are crucial for the therapeutic relevance of ICD in the context of human cancers, and also discuss the influence of experimental conditions and animal models on these. PMID:23686135

  3. Activation of ERK signaling and induction of colon cancer cell death by piperlongumine.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, H; Kibble, K; Zeng, H; Moyer, M P; Reindl, K M

    2013-09-01

    Piperlongumine (PPLGM) is a bioactive compound isolated from long peppers that shows selective toxicity towards a variety of cancer cell types including colon cancer. The signaling pathways that lead to cancer cell death in response to PPLGM exposure have not been previously identified. Our objective was to identify the intracellular signaling mechanisms by which PPLGM leads to enhanced colon cancer cell death. We found that PPLGM inhibited the growth of colon cancer cells in time- and concentration-dependent manners, but was not toxic toward normal colon mucosal cells at concentrations below 10 μM. Acute (0-60 min) and prolonged (24h) exposure of HT-29 cells to PPLGM resulted in phosphorylation of ERK. To investigate whether ERK signaling was involved in PPLGM-mediated cell death, we treated HT-29 cells with the MEK inhibitor U0126, prior to treating with PPLGM. We found that U0126 attenuated PPLGM-induced activation of ERK and partially protected against PPLGM-induced cell death. These results suggest that PPLGM works, at least in part, through the MEK/ERK pathway to result in colon cancer cell death. A more thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which PPLGM induces colon cancer cell death will be useful in developing therapeutic strategies to treat colon cancer.

  4. Fas death receptor signalling: roles of Bid and XIAP

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, T; Strasser, A; Jost, P J

    2012-01-01

    Fas (also called CD95 or APO-1), a member of a subgroup of the tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily that contain an intracellular death domain, can initiate apoptosis signalling and has a critical role in the regulation of the immune system. Fas-induced apoptosis requires recruitment and activation of the initiator caspase, caspase-8 (in humans also caspase-10), within the death-inducing signalling complex. In so-called type 1 cells, proteolytic activation of effector caspases (-3 and -7) by caspase-8 suffices for efficient apoptosis induction. In so-called type 2 cells, however, killing requires amplification of the caspase cascade. This can be achieved through caspase-8-mediated proteolytic activation of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 homology domain (BH)3-only protein BH3-interacting domain death agonist (Bid), which then causes mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilisation. This in turn leads to mitochondrial release of apoptogenic proteins, such as cytochrome c and, pertinent for Fas death receptor (DR)-induced apoptosis, Smac/DIABLO (second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase/direct IAP binding protein with low Pi), an antagonist of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP), which imposes a brake on effector caspases. In this review, written in honour of Juerg Tschopp who contributed so much to research on cell death and immunology, we discuss the functions of Bid and XIAP in the control of Fas DR-induced apoptosis signalling, and we speculate on how this knowledge could be exploited to develop novel regimes for treatment of cancer. PMID:21959933

  5. Calcium and cell death signaling in neurodegeneration and aging.

    PubMed

    Smaili, Soraya; Hirata, Hanako; Ureshino, Rodrigo; Monteforte, Priscila T; Morales, Ana P; Muler, Mari L; Terashima, Juliana; Oseki, Karen; Rosenstock, Tatiana R; Lopes, Guiomar S; Bincoletto, Claudia

    2009-09-01

    Transient increase in cytosolic (Cac2+) and mitochondrial Ca2+ (Ca m2+) are essential elements in the control of many physiological processes. However, sustained increases in Ca c2+ and Ca m2+ may contribute to oxidative stress and cell death. Several events are related to the increase in Ca m2+, including regulation and activation of a number of Ca2+ dependent enzymes, such as phospholipases, proteases and nucleases. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) play pivotal roles in the maintenance of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and regulation of cell death. Several lines of evidence have shown that, in the presence of some apoptotic stimuli, the activation of mitochondrial processes may lead to the release of cytochrome c followed by the activation of caspases, nuclear fragmentation and apoptotic cell death. The aim of this review was to show how changes in calcium signaling can be related to the apoptotic cell death induction. Calcium homeostasis was also shown to be an important mechanism involved in neurodegenerative and aging processes.

  6. Cell death and survival signalling in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Tucka, Joanna; Bennett, Martin; Littlewood, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    The loss of cells is an important factor in many diseases, including those of the cardiovascular system. Whereas apoptosis is an essential process in development and tissue homeostasis, its occurrence is often associated with various pathologies. Apoptosis of neurons that fail to make appropriate connections is essential for the selection of correct neural signalling in the developing embryo, but its appearance in adults is often associated with neurodegenerative disease. Similarly, in the cardiovascular system, remodeling of the mammalian outflow tract during the transition from a single to dual series circulation with four chambers is accompanied by a precise pattern of cell death, but apoptosis of cardiomyocytes contributes to ischemia-reperfusion injury in the heart. In many cases, it is unclear whether apoptosis represents a causative association or merely a consequence of the disease itself. There are many excellent reviews on cell death in the cardiovascular system (1-5); in this review we outline the critical signalling pathways that promote the survival of cardiovascular cells, and their relevance to both physiological cell death and disease.

  7. O-GlcNAc signaling attenuates ER stress-induced cardiomyocyte death.

    PubMed

    Ngoh, Gladys A; Hamid, Tariq; Prabhu, Sumanth D; Jones, Steven P

    2009-11-01

    We previously demonstrated that the O-linked beta-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) posttranslational modification confers cardioprotection at least partially through mitochondrial-dependent mechanisms, but it remained unclear if O-GlcNAc signaling interfered with other mechanisms of cell death. Because ischemia/hypoxia causes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, we ascertained whether O-GlcNAc signaling could attenuate ER stress-induced cell death per se. Before induction of ER stress (with tunicamycin or brefeldin A), we adenovirally overexpressed O-GlcNAc transferase (AdOGT) or pharmacologically inhibited O-GlcNAcase [via O-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-d-glucopyranosylidene) amino-N-phenylcarbamate] to augment O-GlcNAc levels or adenovirally overexpressed O-GlcNAcase to reduce O-GlcNAc levels. AdOGT significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated the activation of the maladaptive arm of the unfolded protein response [according to C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) activation] and cardiomyocyte death (reflected by percent propidium iodide positivity). Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of O-GlcNAcase significantly (P < 0.05) mitigated ER stress-induced CHOP activation and cardiac myocyte death. Interestingly, overexpression of GCA did not alter ER stress markers but exacerbated brefeldin A-induced cardiomyocyte death. We conclude that enhanced O-GlcNAc signaling represents a partially proadaptive response to reduce ER stress-induced cell death. These results provide new insights into a possible interaction between O-GlcNAc signaling and ER stress and may partially explain a mechanism of O-GlcNAc-mediated cardioprotection. PMID:19734355

  8. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in brain death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchtmann, M.; Beuing, O.; Skalej, M.; Kohl, J.; Serowy, S.; Bernarding, J.; Firsching, R.

    2014-01-01

    Confirmatory tests for the diagnosis of brain death in addition to clinical findings may shorten observation time required in some countries and may add certainty to the diagnosis under specific circumstances. The practicability of Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography to confirm cerebral circulatory arrest was assessed after the diagnosis of brain death in 15 patients using a 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. In all 15 patients extracranial blood flow distal to the external carotid arteries was undisturbed. In 14 patients no contrast medium was noted within intracerebral vessels above the proximal level of the intracerebral arteries. In one patient more distal segments of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries (A3 and M3) were filled with contrast medium. Gadolinium-enhanced MRA may be considered conclusive evidence of cerebral circulatory arrest, when major intracranial vessels fail to fill with contrast medium while extracranial vessels show normal blood flow.

  9. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Signaling in Plant Immunity—At the Crossroad of Life and Death

    PubMed Central

    Kørner, Camilla J.; Du, Xinran; Vollmer, Marie E.; Pajerowska-Mukhtar, Karolina M.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid and complex immune responses are induced in plants upon pathogen recognition. One form of plant defense response is a programmed burst in transcription and translation of pathogenesis-related proteins, of which many rely on ER processing. Interestingly, several ER stress marker genes are up-regulated during early stages of immune responses, suggesting that enhanced ER capacity is needed for immunity. Eukaryotic cells respond to ER stress through conserved signaling networks initiated by specific ER stress sensors tethered to the ER membrane. Depending on the nature of ER stress the cell prioritizes either survival or initiates programmed cell death (PCD). At present two plant ER stress sensors, bZIP28 and IRE1, have been described. Both sensor proteins are involved in ER stress-induced signaling, but only IRE1 has been additionally linked to immunity. A second branch of immune responses relies on PCD. In mammals, ER stress sensors are involved in activation of PCD, but it is unclear if plant ER stress sensors play a role in PCD. Nevertheless, some ER resident proteins have been linked to pathogen-induced cell death in plants. In this review, we will discuss the current understanding of plant ER stress signaling and its cross-talk with immune signaling. PMID:26556351

  10. Cell death signaling in the cerebellum in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Puig, B; Ferrer, I

    2001-09-01

    Examination of the expression of proteins linked with signaling pathways commanding cell death and cell survival has been carried out to increase understanding on the mechanisms leading to cell death in the cerebellum in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Expression of Fas, Fas ligand (Fas-L), ERK, MEK, Bcl-2, Bax, N-myc, c-myc, pro-caspase-2 and active caspase-3 was examined by immunohistochemistry in the cerebellum of six patients with sporadic CJD, three patients with olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) and six age-matched controls. No modifications in the expression of these proteins were observed in granule cells in CJD and OPCA when compared with controls, except in a few cells in the molecular and granular layers in CJD that displayed dense homogeneous active caspase-3 immunostaining. This suggests selective activation of caspase-3 in association with increased cellular vulnerability in CJD. No modifications in pro-caspase-2 and c-myc immunoreactivity were observed in Purkinje cells in diseased brains when compared with controls. However, increased diffuse Fas, Fas-L, MEK, ERK and Bax expression, and enhanced granular active caspase-3 immunoreactivity was found in the cytoplasm of Purkinje cells in CJD. Increase in Bcl-2 and N-myc occurred in Purkinje cells in CJD and OPCA. These results indicate that enhanced Fas, Fas-L, MERK, ERK, Bax and granular active caspase-3 expression is not lethal to Purkinje cells in CJD, whereas increased Bcl-2 and N-myc does not preclude per se cell death or death survival in CJD and OPCA. These findings point to the likelihood that expression of these cell death proteins in neurodegeneration has functional roles differing from those related with apoptosis.

  11. The canonical Wg signaling modulates Bsk-mediated cell death in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S; Chen, C; Wu, C; Yang, Y; Li, W; Xue, L

    2015-01-01

    Cell death is an essential regulatory mechanism for removing unneeded cells in animal development and tissue homeostasis. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway has pivotal roles in the regulation of cell death in response to various intrinsic and extrinsic stress signals. The canonical Wingless (Wg) signaling has been implicated in cell proliferation and cell fate decisions, whereas its role in cell death remains largely elusive. Here, we report that activated Bsk (the Drosophila JNK homolog) induced cell death is mediated by the canonical Wg signaling. First, loss of Wg signaling abrogates Bsk-mediated caspase-independent cell death. Second, activation of Wg signaling promotes cell death in a caspase-independent manner. Third, activation of Bsk signaling results in upregulated transcription of wingless (wg) gene. Finally, Wg pathway participates in the physiological function of Bsk signaling in development. These findings not only reveal a previously undiscovered role of Wg signaling in Bsk-mediated cell death, but also provide a novel mechanism for the interplay between the two important signaling pathways in development. PMID:25855961

  12. Disruption of glycolytic flux is a signal for inflammasome signaling and pyroptotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Sanman, Laura E; Qian, Yu; Eisele, Nicholas A; Ng, Tessie M; van der Linden, Wouter A; Monack, Denise M; Weerapana, Eranthie; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    When innate immune cells such as macrophages are challenged with environmental stresses or infection by pathogens, they trigger the rapid assembly of multi-protein complexes called inflammasomes that are responsible for initiating pro-inflammatory responses and a form of cell death termed pyroptosis. We describe here the identification of an intracellular trigger of NLRP3-mediated inflammatory signaling, IL-1β production and pyroptosis in primed murine bone marrow-derived macrophages that is mediated by the disruption of glycolytic flux. This signal results from a drop of NADH levels and induction of mitochondrial ROS production and can be rescued by addition of products that restore NADH production. This signal is also important for host-cell response to the intracellular pathogen Salmonella typhimurium, which can disrupt metabolism by uptake of host-cell glucose. These results reveal an important inflammatory signaling network used by immune cells to sense metabolic dysfunction or infection by intracellular pathogens. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13663.001 PMID:27011353

  13. Signal transduction events in aluminum-induced cell death in tomato suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Yakimova, Elena T; Kapchina-Toteva, Veneta M; Woltering, Ernst J

    2007-06-01

    In this study, some of the signal transduction events involved in AlCl(3)-induced cell death in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells were elucidated. Cells treated with 100 microM AlCl(3) showed typical features of programmed cell death (PCD) such as nuclear and cytoplasmic condensation. Cell death was effectively inhibited by protease and human caspase inhibitors indicating a cell death execution mechanism with similarities to animal apoptosis. Cell death was suppressed by application of antoxidants and by inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC), phospholipase D (PLD) and ethylene signalling pathways. The results suggest that low concentrations of heavy metal ions stimulate both PLC and PLD signalling pathways leading to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent cell death executed by caspase-like proteases.

  14. The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-18 alters multiple signaling pathways to inhibit natural killer cell death

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodge, D.L.; Subleski, J.J.; Reynolds, D.A.; Buschman, M.D.; Schill, W.B.; Burkett, M.W.; Malyguine, A.M.; Young, H.A.

    2006-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-18 (IL-18), is a natural killer (NK) cell activator that induces NK cell cytotoxicity and interferon-?? (IFN-??) expression. In this report, we define a novel role for IL-18 as an NK cell protective agent. Specifically, IL-18 prevents NK cell death initiated by different and distinct stress mechanisms. IL-18 reduces NK cell self-destruction during NK-targeted cell killing, and in the presence of staurosporin, a potent apoptotic inducer, IL-18 reduces caspase-3 activity. The critical regulatory step in this process is downstream of the mitochondrion and involves reduced cleavage and activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. The ability of IL-18 to regulate cell survival is not limited to a caspase death pathway in that IL-18 augments tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling, resulting in increased and prolonged mRNA expression of c-apoptosis inhibitor 2 (cIAP2), a prosurvival factor and caspase-3 inhibitor, and TNF receptor-associated factor 1 (TRAF1), a prosurvival protein. The cumulative effects of IL-18 define a novel role for this cytokine as a molecular survival switch that functions to both decrease cell death through inhibition of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and enhance TNF induction of prosurvival factors. ?? Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  15. 1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate promotes caspase 3-activated glioblastoma cell death by overcoming enhanced cytokine expression.

    PubMed

    Williams, Musa; Tietzel, Illya; Quick, Quincy A

    2013-06-01

    The brain consumes ∼20% of the oxygen utilized in the human body, meaning that brain tumors are vulnerable to paradoxical physiological effects from free radical generation. In the present study, 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), a naturally derived antioxidant that inhibits xanthine oxidase, was evaluated for its role as an anti-tumorigenic agent in glioblastomas. The study revealed that ACA inhibited glioblastoma cell proliferation as a consequence of promoting apoptotic cell death by enhancing caspase 3 activity. It was also shown that ACA impaired the migratory ability of glioblastoma cells by decreasing their adhesive properties. Additionally, ACA increased the protein expression levels of the pro-survival signaling cytokines, IL-6 and IL-1α, established cell protectors and survival molecules in brain tumors. Together, these results demonstrate that, despite enhanced expression of compensatory signaling molecules that contribute to tumor cell survival, ACA is an effective pro-apoptotic inducing agent in glioblastomas.

  16. Calcium signaling as a mediator of cell energy demand and a trigger to cell death.

    PubMed

    Bhosale, Gauri; Sharpe, Jenny A; Sundier, Stephanie Y; Duchen, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    Calcium signaling is pivotal to a host of physiological pathways. A rise in calcium concentration almost invariably signals an increased cellular energy demand. Consistent with this, calcium signals mediate a number of pathways that together serve to balance energy supply and demand. In pathological states, calcium signals can precipitate mitochondrial injury and cell death, especially when coupled to energy depletion and oxidative or nitrosative stress. This review explores the mechanisms that couple cell signaling pathways to metabolic regulation or to cell death. The significance of these pathways is exemplified by pathological case studies, such as those showing loss of mitochondrial calcium uptake 1 in patients and ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  17. Calcium signaling as a mediator of cell energy demand and a trigger to cell death

    PubMed Central

    Bhosale, Gauri; Sharpe, Jenny A.; Sundier, Stephanie Y.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium signaling is pivotal to a host of physiological pathways. A rise in calcium concentration almost invariably signals an increased cellular energy demand. Consistent with this, calcium signals mediate a number of pathways that together serve to balance energy supply and demand. In pathological states, calcium signals can precipitate mitochondrial injury and cell death, especially when coupled to energy depletion and oxidative or nitrosative stress. This review explores the mechanisms that couple cell signaling pathways to metabolic regulation or to cell death. The significance of these pathways is exemplified by pathological case studies, such as those showing loss of mitochondrial calcium uptake 1 in patients and ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:26375864

  18. Involvement of phospholipase D-related signal transduction in chemical-induced programmed cell death in tomato cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Iakimova, Elena T; Michaeli, Rina; Woltering, Ernst J

    2013-10-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) and its product phosphatidic acid (PA) are incorporated in a complex metabolic network in which the individual PLD isoforms are suggested to regulate specific developmental and stress responses, including plant programmed cell death (PCD). Despite the accumulating knowledge, the mechanisms through which PLD/PA operate during PCD are still poorly understood. In this work, the role of PLDα1 in PCD and the associated caspase-like proteolysis, ethylene and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) synthesis in tomato suspension cells was studied. Wild-type (WT) and PLDα1-silenced cell lines were exposed to the cell death-inducing chemicals camptothecin (CPT), fumonisin B1 (FB1) and CdSO(4). A range of caspase inhibitors effectively suppressed CPT-induced PCD in WT cells, but failed to alleviate cell death in PLDα1-deficient cells. Compared to WT, in CPT-treated PLDα1 mutant cells, reduced cell death and decreased production of H(2)O(2) were observed. Application of ethylene significantly enhanced CPT-induced cell death both in WT and PLDα1 mutants. Treatments with the PA derivative lyso-phosphatidic acid and mastoparan (agonist of PLD/PLC signalling downstream of G proteins) caused severe cell death. Inhibitors, specific to PLD and PLC, remarkably decreased the chemical-induced cell death. Taken together with our previous findings, the results suggest that PLDα1 contributes to caspase-like-dependent cell death possibly communicated through PA, reactive oxygen species and ethylene. The dead cells expressed morphological features of PCD such as protoplast shrinkage and nucleus compaction. The presented findings reveal novel elements of PLD/PA-mediated cell death response and suggest that PLDα1 is an important factor in chemical-induced PCD signal transduction.

  19. Signal enhancement in AM-FM interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quantieri, Thomas F.; Dunn, Robert B.; McAulay, Robert J.

    1994-05-01

    A new approach to interference suppression is developed to enhance the audibility of signals corrupted by amplitude-modulated (AM) and frequency-modulated (FM) tonal interference. The suppression algorithm uses a short-time, least-squares estimation of the parameters of an AM-FM model of the time-varying tonal interference. The method, developed in a sine-wave analysis/synthesis framework, can be integrated with time and frequency modifications for further signal enhancement. Suppression is applied to single and multitone synthetic and actual AM-FM interference, the latter including man-made signals (e.g., siren interference) and those that occur naturally (e.g., biologic interference). The relative advantages and disadvantages of the sine-wave framework in contrast to a short-time Fourier transform overlap-add framework are described. The enhancement techniques are robust in a large range of environments and can be designed to preserve a random noise background. Finally, it is shown that interference suppression on multichannels prior to beamforming enhances beamformer performance.

  20. The Fas-FADD Death Domain Complex Structure Unravels Signalling by Receptor Clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, F.; Stec, B; Pop, C; Dobaczewska, M; Lee, J; Monosov, E; Robinson, H; Salvesen, G; Schwarzenbacher, R; Riedl, S

    2009-01-01

    The death inducing signalling complex (DISC) formed by Fas receptor, FADD (Fas-associated death domain protein) and caspase 8 is a pivotal trigger of apoptosis1, 2, 3. The Fas-FADD DISC represents a receptor platform, which once assembled initiates the induction of programmed cell death. A highly oligomeric network of homotypic protein interactions comprised of the death domains of Fas and FADD is at the centre of DISC formation4, 5. Thus, characterizing the mechanistic basis for the Fas-FADD interaction is crucial for understanding DISC signalling but has remained unclear largely because of a lack of structural data. We have successfully formed and isolated the human Fas-FADD death domain complex and report the 2.7 A crystal structure. The complex shows a tetrameric arrangement of four FADD death domains bound to four Fas death domains. We show that an opening of the Fas death domain exposes the FADD binding site and simultaneously generates a Fas-Fas bridge. The result is a regulatory Fas-FADD complex bridge governed by weak protein-protein interactions revealing a model where the complex itself functions as a mechanistic switch. This switch prevents accidental DISC assembly, yet allows for highly processive DISC formation and clustering upon a sufficient stimulus. In addition to depicting a previously unknown mode of death domain interactions, these results further uncover a mechanism for receptor signalling solely by oligomerization and clustering events.

  1. Ultrasonic signal enhancement by resonator techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    Ultrasonic resonators increase experimental sensitivity to acoustic dispersion and changes in attenuation. Experimental sensitivity enhancement line shapes are presented which were obtained by modulating the acoustic properties of a CdS resonator with a light beam. Small changes in light level are made to produce almost pure absorptive or dispersive changes in the resonator signal. This effect is due to the coupling of the ultrasonic wave to the CdS conductivity which is proportional to incident light intensity. The resonator conductivity is adjusted in this manner to obtain both dispersive and absorptive sensitivity enhancement line shapes. The data presented verify previous thoretical calculations based on a propagating wave model.

  2. Enhanced multistatic active sonar signal processing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kexin; Liang, Junli; Karlsson, Johan; Li, Jian

    2013-07-01

    Multistatic active sonar systems involve the transmission and reception of multiple probing sequences and can achieve significantly enhanced performance of target detection and localization through exploiting spatial diversity. This paper mainly focuses on two signal processing aspects of such systems, namely, enhanced range-Doppler imaging and improved target parameter estimation. The main contributions of this paper are (1) a hybrid dense-sparse method is proposed to generate range-Doppler images with both low sidelobe levels and high accuracy; (2) a generalized K-Means clustering (GKC) method for target association is developed to associate the range measurements from different transmitter-receiver pairs, which is actually a range fitting procedure; (3) the extended invariance principle-based weighted least-squares method is developed for accurate target position and velocity estimation. The effectiveness of the proposed multistatic active sonar signal processing techniques is verified using numerical examples.

  3. [Death].

    PubMed

    Ribas, Jordi Domingo

    2003-12-01

    Intercultural factors are essential for reflection. In this article, the authors deals with a more direct vision on the special edition about Grief and Mourning, about the topic which lies in the depths of all of our consciences: death and the question what lies beyond death? The author provides us elements to reflect about concepts, some accepted in various cases, rejected in others, but always polemical, which help us to penetrate farther into the real mystery of life: death and what follows death.

  4. Regulation of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation and apoptotic signaling by Sorafenib in hepatoblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Hernández, A; Navarro-Villarán, E; González, R; Pereira, S; Soriano-De Castro, L B; Sarrias-Giménez, A; Barrera-Pulido, L; Álamo-Martínez, J M; Serrablo-Requejo, A; Blanco-Fernández, G; Nogales-Muñoz, A; Gila-Bohórquez, A; Pacheco, D; Torres-Nieto, M A; Serrano-Díaz-Canedo, J; Suárez-Artacho, G; Bernal-Bellido, C; Marín-Gómez, L M; Barcena, J A; Gómez-Bravo, M A; Padilla, C A; Padillo, F J; Muntané, J

    2015-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a relevant role during cell death regulation in tumor cells. The overexpression of nitric oxide synthase type III (NOS-3) induces oxidative and nitrosative stress, p53 and cell death receptor expression and apoptosis in hepatoblastoma cells. S-nitrosylation of cell death receptor modulates apoptosis. Sorafenib is the unique recommended molecular-targeted drug for the treatment of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. The present study was addressed to elucidate the potential role of NO during Sorafenib-induced cell death in HepG2 cells. We determined the intra- and extracellular NO concentration, cell death receptor expression and their S-nitrosylation modifications, and apoptotic signaling in Sorafenib-treated HepG2 cells. The effect of NO donors on above parameters has also been determined. Sorafenib induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. However, low concentration of the drug (10nM) increased cell death receptor expression, as well as caspase-8 and -9 activation, but without activation of downstream apoptotic markers. In contrast, Sorafenib (10 µM) reduced upstream apoptotic parameters but increased caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation in HepG2 cells. The shift of cell death signaling pathway was associated with a reduction of S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors in Sorafenib-treated cells. The administration of NO donors increased S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors and overall induction of cell death markers in control and Sorafenib-treated cells. In conclusion, Sorafenib induced alteration of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation status which may have a relevant repercussion on cell death signaling in hepatoblastoma cells.

  5. Regulation of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation and apoptotic signaling by Sorafenib in hepatoblastoma cells☆

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Hernández, A.; Navarro-Villarán, E.; González, R.; Pereira, S.; Soriano-De Castro, L.B.; Sarrias-Giménez, A.; Barrera-Pulido, L.; Álamo-Martínez, J.M.; Serrablo-Requejo, A.; Blanco-Fernández, G.; Nogales-Muñoz, A.; Gila-Bohórquez, A.; Pacheco, D.; Torres-Nieto, M.A.; Serrano-Díaz-Canedo, J.; Suárez-Artacho, G.; Bernal-Bellido, C.; Marín-Gómez, L.M.; Barcena, J.A.; Gómez-Bravo, M.A.; Padilla, C.A.; Padillo, F.J.; Muntané, J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a relevant role during cell death regulation in tumor cells. The overexpression of nitric oxide synthase type III (NOS-3) induces oxidative and nitrosative stress, p53 and cell death receptor expression and apoptosis in hepatoblastoma cells. S-nitrosylation of cell death receptor modulates apoptosis. Sorafenib is the unique recommended molecular-targeted drug for the treatment of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. The present study was addressed to elucidate the potential role of NO during Sorafenib-induced cell death in HepG2 cells. We determined the intra- and extracellular NO concentration, cell death receptor expression and their S-nitrosylation modifications, and apoptotic signaling in Sorafenib-treated HepG2 cells. The effect of NO donors on above parameters has also been determined. Sorafenib induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. However, low concentration of the drug (10 nM) increased cell death receptor expression, as well as caspase-8 and -9 activation, but without activation of downstream apoptotic markers. In contrast, Sorafenib (10 µM) reduced upstream apoptotic parameters but increased caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation in HepG2 cells. The shift of cell death signaling pathway was associated with a reduction of S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors in Sorafenib-treated cells. The administration of NO donors increased S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors and overall induction of cell death markers in control and Sorafenib-treated cells. In conclusion, Sorafenib induced alteration of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation status which may have a relevant repercussion on cell death signaling in hepatoblastoma cells. PMID:26233703

  6. Targeting cell death signalling in cancer: minimising 'Collateral damage'.

    PubMed

    Fox, Joanna L; MacFarlane, Marion

    2016-06-28

    Targeting apoptosis for the treatment of cancer has become an increasingly attractive strategy, with agents in development to trigger extrinsic apoptosis via TRAIL signalling, or to prevent the anti-apoptotic activity of BCL-2 proteins or inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins. Although the evasion of apoptosis is one of the hallmarks of cancer, many cancers have intact apoptotic signalling pathways, which if unblocked could efficiently kill cancerous cells. However, it is becoming increasing clear that without a detailed understanding of both apoptotic and non-apoptotic signalling, and the key proteins that regulate these pathways, there can be dose-limiting toxicity and adverse effects associated with their modulation. Here we review the main apoptotic pathways directly targeted for anti-cancer therapy and the unforeseen consequences of their modulation. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of an in-depth mechanistic understanding of both the apoptotic and non-apoptotic functions of those proteins under investigation as anti-cancer drug targets and outline some novel approaches to sensitise cancer cells to apoptosis, thereby improving the efficacy of existing therapies when used in combination with novel targeted agents.

  7. Enter the kill zone: initiation of death signaling during virus entry.

    PubMed

    Danthi, Pranav

    2011-03-15

    Infection of host cells by a variety of viruses results in programmed cell death or apoptosis. In many cases, early events in virus replication that occur prior to synthesis of viral proteins and replication of viral genomes directly or indirectly activate signaling pathways that culminate in cell death. Using examples of viruses for which prodeath signaling is better defined, this review will describe how cell entry steps including virus attachment to receptors, virus uncoating in endosomes, and events that occur following membrane penetration lead to apoptosis. The relevance and physiologic consequences of early induction of prodeath signaling to viral pathogenesis also will be discussed.

  8. High Cell Surface Death Receptor Expression Determines Type I Versus Type II Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xue Wei; Peterson, Kevin L.; Dai, Haiming; Schneider, Paula; Lee, Sun-Hee; Zhang, Jin-San; Koenig, Alexander; Bronk, Steve; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Gores, Gregory J.; Kaufmann, Scott H.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that there are two signaling pathways leading from ligation of the Fas receptor to induction of apoptosis. Type I signaling involves Fas ligand-induced recruitment of large amounts of FADD (FAS-associated death domain protein) and procaspase 8, leading to direct activation of caspase 3, whereas type II signaling involves Bid-mediated mitochondrial perturbation to amplify a more modest death receptor-initiated signal. The biochemical basis for this dichotomy has previously been unclear. Here we show that type I cells have a longer half-life for Fas message and express higher amounts of cell surface Fas, explaining the increased recruitment of FADD and subsequent signaling. Moreover, we demonstrate that cells with type II Fas signaling (Jurkat or HCT-15) can signal through a type I pathway upon forced receptor overexpression and that shRNA-mediated Fas down-regulation converts cells with type I signaling (A498) to type II signaling. Importantly, the same cells can exhibit type I signaling for Fas and type II signaling for TRAIL (TNF-α-related apoptosis-inducing ligand), indicating that the choice of signaling pathway is related to the specific receptor, not some other cellular feature. Additional experiments revealed that up-regulation of cell surface death receptor 5 levels by treatment with 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin converted TRAIL signaling in HCT116 cells from type II to type I. Collectively, these results suggest that the type I/type II dichotomy reflects differences in cell surface death receptor expression. PMID:21865165

  9. Chloroplasts of Arabidopsis are the source and a primary target of a plant-specific programmed cell death signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chanhong; Meskauskiene, Rasa; Zhang, Shengrui; Lee, Keun Pyo; Lakshmanan Ashok, Munusamy; Blajecka, Karolina; Herrfurth, Cornelia; Feussner, Ivo; Apel, Klaus

    2012-07-01

    Enhanced levels of singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) in chloroplasts trigger programmed cell death. The impact of (1)O(2) production in chloroplasts was monitored first in the conditional fluorescent (flu) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana that accumulates (1)O(2) upon a dark/light shift. The onset of (1)O(2) production is rapidly followed by a loss of chloroplast integrity that precedes the rupture of the central vacuole and the final collapse of the cell. Inactivation of the two plastid proteins EXECUTER (EX1) and EX2 in the flu mutant abrogates these responses, indicating that disintegration of chloroplasts is due to EX-dependent signaling rather than (1)O(2) directly. In flu seedlings, (1)O(2)-mediated cell death signaling operates as a default pathway that results in seedlings committing suicide. By contrast, EX-dependent signaling in the wild type induces the formation of microlesions without decreasing the viability of seedlings. (1)O(2)-mediated and EX-dependent loss of plastid integrity and cell death in these plants occurs only in cells containing fully developed chloroplasts. Our findings support an as yet unreported signaling role of (1)O(2) in the wild type exposed to mild light stress that invokes photoinhibition of photosystem II without causing photooxidative damage of the plant.

  10. Sorafenib induces autophagic cell death and apoptosis in hepatic stellate cell through the JNK and Akt signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Hao, Huiyao; Zhang, Di; Shi, Junli; Wang, Yan; Chen, Lei; Guo, Yongze; Ma, Junji; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Jiang, Huiqing

    2016-03-01

    Increasing hepatic stellate cell (HSC) death is an attractive approach for limiting liver fibrosis. We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of sorafenib on HSCs. LX2 cells were incubated with sorafenib and a variety of inhibitors of apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis. Electron microscopy was used to observe autophagosomes. Inhibitors and siRNA were used to examine the role of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K and JNK pathways. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that rat HSCs treated with 5 μmol/l sorafenib accumulated residual digested material and empty or autophagic vacuoles. Incubating LX2 cells with lysosomal protease inhibitors increased the accumulation of LC3-II, indicating that sorafenib enhances autophagic flux in HSCs. Autophagy may precede apoptosis. Lower concentrations of sorafenib and a shorter treatment time resulted in the dominance of autophagic cell death over apoptosis. Further analysis showed that Beclin 1 is inactivated by the caspases induced by sorafenib during apoptosis. Inhibition of autophagy in LX2 cells using 3-methyladenine treatment or siRNA-mediated knockdown of Atg5 resulted in a marked increase in apoptosis. Finally, sorafenib induced programmed cell death by attenuation and activation of Akt/mTOR/p70S6K and JNK signaling. Sorafenib-induced cell death is mediated by both autophagy and apoptosis. Elucidation of the signaling pathways activated by sorafenib could potentially lead to novel antifibrosis therapies for chronic liver diseases. PMID:26629768

  11. Atg3 Overexpression Enhances Bortezomib-Induced Cell Death in SKM-1 Cell

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Zhang, Jing; Zhu, Chen; Zhang, Lu; Xu, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Background Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a group of heterogeneous hematopoietic stem cell malignancies with a high risk of transformation into acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Clonal evolutions are significantly associated with transformation to AML. According to a gene expression microarray, atg3 is downregulated in MDS patients progressing to leukemia, but less is known about the function of Atg3 in the survival and death of MSD/AML cells. Moreover, the role of autophagy as a result of bortezomib treatment is controversial. The current study was designed to investigate the function of Atg3 in SKM-1 cells and to study the effect of Atg3 on cell viability and cell death following bortezomib treatment. Methods Four leukemia cell lines (SKM-1, THP-1, NB4 and K562) and two healthy patients’ bone marrow cells were analyzed for Atg3 expression via qRT-PCR and Western blotting analysis. The role of Atg3 in SKM-1 cell survival and cell death was analyzed by CCK-8 assay, trypan blue exclusion assay, DAPI staining and Annexin V/PI dual staining with or without bortezomib treatment. Western blotting analysis was used to detect proteins in autophagic and caspase signaling pathways. Electron microscopy was used to observe ultrastructural changes after Atg3 overexpression. Results Downregulation of Atg3 expression was detected in four leukemia cell lines compared with healthy bone marrow cells. Atg3 mRNA was significantly decreased in MDS patients’ bone marrow cells. Overexpression of Atg3 in SKM-1 cells resulted in AKT-mTOR-dependent autophagy, a significant reduction in cell proliferation and increased cell death, which could be overcome by the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA. SKM-1 cells overexpressing Atg3 were hypersensitive to bortezomib treatment at different concentrations via autophagic cell death and enhanced sensitivity to apoptosis in the SKM-1 cell line. Following treatment with 3-MA, the sensitivity of Atg3-overexpressing cells to bortezomib treatment was reduced

  12. TAK1 regulates caspase 8 activation and necroptotic signaling via multiple cell death checkpoints

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoyun; Yin, Haifeng; Chen, Yi; Li, Lei; Li, Jing; Liu, Qinghang

    2016-01-01

    Necroptosis has emerged as a new form of programmed cell death implicated in a number of pathological conditions such as ischemic injury, neurodegenerative disease, and viral infection. Recent studies indicate that TGFβ-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is nodal regulator of necroptotic cell death, although the underlying molecular regulatory mechanisms are not well defined. Here we reported that TAK1 regulates necroptotic signaling as well as caspase 8-mediated apoptotic signaling through both NFκB-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Inhibition of TAK1 promoted TNFα-induced cell death through the induction of RIP1 phosphorylation/activation and necrosome formation. Further, inhibition of TAK1 triggered two caspase 8 activation pathways through the induction of RIP1-FADD-caspase 8 complex as well as FLIP cleavage/degradation. Mechanistically, our data uncovered an essential role for the adaptor protein TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD) in caspase 8 activation and necrosome formation triggered by TAK1 inhibition. Moreover, ablation of the deubiqutinase CYLD prevented both apoptotic and necroptotic signaling induced by TAK1 inhibition. Finally, blocking the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway prevented the degradation of key pro-survival signaling proteins and necrosome formation. Thus, we identified new regulatory mechanisms underlying the critical role of TAK1 in cell survival through regulation of multiple cell death checkpoints. Targeting key components of the necroptotic pathway (e.g., TRADD and CYLD) and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway may represent novel therapeutic strategies for pathological conditions driven by necroptosis. PMID:27685625

  13. Signal enhancement using a switchable magnetic trap

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2012-05-29

    A system for analyzing a sample including providing a microchannel flow channel; associating the sample with magnetic nanoparticles or magnetic polystyrene-coated beads; moving the sample with said magnetic nanoparticles or magnetic polystyrene-coated beads in the microchannel flow channel; holding the sample with the magnetic nanoparticles or magnetic polystyrene-coated beads in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel; and analyzing the sample obtaining an enhanced analysis signal. An apparatus for analysis of a sample includes magnetic particles connected to the sample, a microchip, a flow channel in the microchip, a source of carrier fluid connected to the flow channel for moving the sample in the flow channel, an electromagnet trap connected to the flow line for selectively magnetically trapping the sample and the magnetic particles, and an analyzer for analyzing the sample.

  14. Arsenic-induced instrumental genes of apoptotic signal amplification in death-survival interplay

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sonali; Narzary, Bardwi; Ray, Atish; Bordoloi, Manobjyoti

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic is a global health concern at present and it is well reported for causing systemic toxicity. It is also well known for generation of free radical and inducing apoptosis in different cell types. Paradoxically arsenic is reported to be a susceptible carcinogen as well. There are several reports demonstrating diverse mechanism of apoptosis in different cell types. However, the universal scenario of instrumental genes and their interaction leading to amplification of apoptotic signal are yet to be completely uncovered, which is predicted here. Conventional studies on signaling pathway aided by time and concentration kinetics data are inadequate for prediction of anchored genes for apoptotic signal amplification. Therefore, expression profile-based approach is adopted. Core apoptosis related and glutathione metabolism genes in 1 and 10 μM of arsenic-treated HepG2 cells were analyzed after 12 h of incubation. An arsenic treatment of 1 μM exhibits no cell death at 12 h, whereas 10 μM arsenic treatment reveals around 50% cell death at 12 h. Results depict 28 and 44 affected genes in 1 and 10 μM arsenic-treated cells, respectively. Early initiation of apoptotic signaling is detected in no cell death regimens (at 1 μM), whereas amplified apoptotic signal is demonstrated at 50% cell death regimens (at 10 μM). Instrumental genes involved in progression of apoptosis in the concourse of cell death and survival is designated from the responsive genes common to both the condition. We predict the initiation process is fairly aided by the activation of intrinsic pathway, which is amplified via TNF signaling and extrinsic pathway. Furthermore, regulatory genes involved in interplay between apoptosis/anti-apoptosis and their interactions are demonstrated here. PMID:27785370

  15. A type III effector antagonises death receptor signalling during bacterial gut infection

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Jaclyn S; Giogha, Cristina; Ong, Sze Ying; Kennedy, Catherine L; Kelly, Michelle; Robinson, Keith S; Wong, Tania; Mansell, Ashley; Riedmaier, Patrice; Oates, Clare VL; Zaid, Ali; Mühlen, Sabrina; Crepin, Valerie F; Marches, Olivier; Ang, Ching-Seng; Williamson, Nicholas A; O’Reilly, Lorraine A; Bankovacki, Aleksandra; Nachbur, Ueli; Infusini, Giuseppe; Webb, Andrew I; Silke, John; Strasser, Andreas; Frankel, Gad; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2013-01-01

    Successful infection by enteric bacterial pathogens depends on the ability of the bacteria to colonise the gut, replicate in host tissues and disseminate to other hosts. Pathogens such as Salmonella, Shigella and enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EPEC and EHEC), utilise a type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver virulence effector proteins into host cells during infection that promote colonisation and interfere with antimicrobial host responses 1-3. Here we report that the T3SS effector NleB1 from EPEC binds to host cell death domain containing proteins and thereby inhibits death receptor signalling. Protein interaction studies identified FADD, TRADD and RIPK1 as binding partners of NleB1. NleB1 expressed ectopically or injected by the bacterial T3SS prevented Fas ligand or TNF-induced formation of the canonical death inducing signalling complex (DISC) and proteolytic activation of caspase-8, an essential step in death receptor induced apoptosis. This inhibition depended on the N-GlcNAc transferase activity of NleB1, which specifically modified Arg117 in the death domain of FADD. The importance of the death receptor apoptotic pathway to host defence was demonstrated using mice deficient in the FAS signalling pathway, which showed delayed clearance of the EPEC-like mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium and reversion to virulence of an nleB mutant. The activity of NleB suggests that EPEC and other attaching and effacing (A/E) pathogens antagonise death receptor induced apoptosis of infected cells, thereby blocking a major antimicrobial host response. PMID:24025841

  16. A type III effector antagonizes death receptor signalling during bacterial gut infection.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Jaclyn S; Giogha, Cristina; Ong, Sze Ying; Kennedy, Catherine L; Kelly, Michelle; Robinson, Keith S; Lung, Tania Wong Fok; Mansell, Ashley; Riedmaier, Patrice; Oates, Clare V L; Zaid, Ali; Mühlen, Sabrina; Crepin, Valerie F; Marches, Olivier; Ang, Ching-Seng; Williamson, Nicholas A; O'Reilly, Lorraine A; Bankovacki, Aleksandra; Nachbur, Ueli; Infusini, Giuseppe; Webb, Andrew I; Silke, John; Strasser, Andreas; Frankel, Gad; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2013-09-12

    Successful infection by enteric bacterial pathogens depends on the ability of the bacteria to colonize the gut, replicate in host tissues and disseminate to other hosts. Pathogens such as Salmonella, Shigella and enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic (EPEC and EHEC, respectively) Escherichia coli use a type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver virulence effector proteins into host cells during infection that promote colonization and interfere with antimicrobial host responses. Here we report that the T3SS effector NleB1 from EPEC binds to host cell death-domain-containing proteins and thereby inhibits death receptor signalling. Protein interaction studies identified FADD, TRADD and RIPK1 as binding partners of NleB1. NleB1 expressed ectopically or injected by the bacterial T3SS prevented Fas ligand or TNF-induced formation of the canonical death-inducing signalling complex (DISC) and proteolytic activation of caspase-8, an essential step in death-receptor-induced apoptosis. This inhibition depended on the N-acetylglucosamine transferase activity of NleB1, which specifically modified Arg 117 in the death domain of FADD. The importance of the death receptor apoptotic pathway to host defence was demonstrated using mice deficient in the FAS signalling pathway, which showed delayed clearance of the EPEC-like mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium and reversion to virulence of an nleB mutant. The activity of NleB suggests that EPEC and other attaching and effacing pathogens antagonize death-receptor-induced apoptosis of infected cells, thereby blocking a major antimicrobial host response.

  17. Reactive oxygen species regulate Smac mimetic/TNFα-induced necroptotic signaling and cell death.

    PubMed

    Schenk, B; Fulda, S

    2015-11-19

    Necroptosis represents a key programmed cell death pathway involved in various physiological and pathophysiological conditions. However, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in necroptotic signaling has remained unclear. In the present study, we identify ROS as critical regulators of BV6/tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα)-induced necroptotic signaling and cell death. We show that BV6/TNFα-induced cell death depends on ROS production, as several ROS scavengers such as butylated hydroxyanisole, N-acetylcysteine, α-tocopherol and ethyl pyruvate significantly rescue cell death. Before cell death, BV6/TNFα-stimulated ROS generation promotes stabilization of the receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIP1)/RIP3 necrosome complex via a potential positive feedback loop, as on the one hand radical scavengers attenuate RIP1/RIP3 necrosome assembly and phosphorylation of mixed lineage kinase domain like (MLKL), but on the other hand silencing of RIP1 or RIP3 reduces ROS production. Although MLKL knockdown effectively decreases BV6/TNFα-induced cell death, it does not affect RIP1/RIP3 interaction and only partly reduces ROS generation. Moreover, the deubiquitinase cylindromatosis (CYLD) promotes BV6/TNFα-induced ROS generation and necrosome assembly even in the presence of BV6, as CYLD silencing attenuates these events. Genetic silencing of phosphoglycerate mutase 5 or dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) fails to protect against BV6/TNFα-induced cell death. By demonstrating that ROS are involved in regulating BV6/TNFα-induced necroptotic signaling, our study provides new insights into redox regulation of necroptosis. PMID:25867066

  18. Necroptotic Cell Death Signaling and Execution Pathway: Lessons from Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Belizário, José; Vieira-Cordeiro, Luiz; Enns, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Under stress conditions, cells in living tissue die by apoptosis or necrosis depending on the activation of the key molecules within a dying cell that either transduce cell survival or death signals that actively destroy the sentenced cell. Multiple extracellular (pH, heat, oxidants, and detergents) or intracellular (DNA damage and Ca2+ overload) stress conditions trigger various types of the nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), cytoplasmatic, and mitochondrion-centered signaling events that allow cells to preserve the DNA integrity, protein folding, energetic, ionic and redox homeostasis, thus escaping from injury. Along the transition from reversible to irreversible injury, death signaling is highly heterogeneous and damaged cells may engage autophagy, apoptotic, or necrotic cell death programs. Studies on multiple double- and triple- knockout mice identified caspase-8, flip, and fadd genes as key regulators of embryonic lethality and inflammation. Caspase-8 has a critical role in pro- and antinecrotic signaling pathways leading to the activation of receptor interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1), RIPK3, and the mixed kinase domain-like (MLKL) for a convergent execution pathway of necroptosis or regulated necrosis. Here we outline the recent discoveries into how the necrotic cell death execution pathway is engaged in many physiological and pathological outcome based on genetic analysis of knockout mice. PMID:26491219

  19. Chloroplast Activity and 3'phosphadenosine 5'phosphate Signaling Regulate Programmed Cell Death in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bruggeman, Quentin; Mazubert, Christelle; Prunier, Florence; Lugan, Raphaël; Chan, Kai Xun; Phua, Su Yin; Pogson, Barry James; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja; Delarue, Marianne; Benhamed, Moussa; Bergounioux, Catherine; Raynaud, Cécile

    2016-03-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a crucial process both for plant development and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. There is accumulating evidence that chloroplasts may play a central role during plant PCD as for mitochondria in animal cells, but it is still unclear whether they participate in PCD onset, execution, or both. To tackle this question, we have analyzed the contribution of chloroplast function to the cell death phenotype of the myoinositol phosphate synthase1 (mips1) mutant that forms spontaneous lesions in a light-dependent manner. We show that photosynthetically active chloroplasts are required for PCD to occur in mips1, but this process is independent of the redox state of the chloroplast. Systematic genetic analyses with retrograde signaling mutants reveal that 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphate, a chloroplast retrograde signal that modulates nuclear gene expression in response to stress, can inhibit cell death and compromises plant innate immunity via inhibition of the RNA-processing 5'-3' exoribonucleases. Our results provide evidence for the role of chloroplast-derived signal and RNA metabolism in the control of cell death and biotic stress response. PMID:26747283

  20. Involvement of ethylene and lipid signalling in cadmium-induced programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Yakimova, E T; Kapchina-Toteva, V M; Laarhoven, L-J; Harren, F M; Woltering, E J

    2006-10-01

    Cadmium-induced cell death was studied in suspension-cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells (line MsK8) treated with CdSO(4). Within 24 h, cadmium treatment induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Cell cultures showed recovery after 2-3 days which indicates the existence of an adaptation mechanism. Cadmium-induced cell death was alleviated by the addition of sub muM concentrations of peptide inhibitors specific to human caspases indicating that cell death proceeds through a mechanism with similarities to animal programmed cell death (PCD, apoptosis). Cadmium-induced cell death was accompanied by an increased production of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and simultaneous addition of antioxidants greatly reduced cell death. Inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC) and phospholipase D (PLD) signalling pathway intermediates reduced cadmium-induced cell death. Treatment with the G-protein activator mastoparan and a cell permeable analogue of the lipid signal second messenger phosphatidic acid (PA) induced cell death. Ethylene, while not inducing cell death when applied alone, stimulated cadmium-induced cell death. Application of the ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor aminoethoxy vinylglycine (AVG) reduced cadmium-induced cell death, and this effect was alleviated by simultaneous treatment with ethylene. Together the results show that cadmium induces PCD exhibiting apoptotic-like features. The cell death process requires increased H(2)O(2) production and activation of PLC, PLD and ethylene signalling pathways.

  1. HIV-1 trans-activator of transcription substitutes for oxidative signaling in activation-induced T cell death.

    PubMed

    Gülow, Karsten; Kaminski, Marcin; Darvas, Katalin; Süss, Dorothee; Li-Weber, Min; Krammer, Peter H

    2005-05-01

    Termination of an immune response requires elimination of activated T lymphocytes by activation-induced cell death (AICD). In AICD, CD95 (Apo-1/Fas) ligand (L) triggers apoptosis of CD95-positive activated T lymphocytes. In AIDS patients, AICD is strongly enhanced and accelerated. We and others have previously shown that HIV-1 trans-activator of transcription (HIV-1 Tat) sensitizes T cells toward CD95-mediated apoptosis and up-regulates CD95L expression by affecting the cellular redox balance. In this study, we show that it is hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) that functions as an essential second messenger in TCR signaling. The H(2)O(2) signal combined with simultaneous calcium (Ca(2+)) influx into the cytosol constitutes the minimal requirement for induction of CD95L expression. Either signal alone is insufficient. We further show that HIV-1 Tat interferes with TCR signaling and induces a H(2)O(2) signal. H(2)O(2) generated by HIV-1 Tat combines with CD4-dependent calcium influx and causes massive T cell apoptosis. Thus, our data provide an explanation for CD4(+) T lymphocyte depletion during progression of AIDS.

  2. Low zinc environment induces stress signaling, senescence and mixed cell death modalities in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Emil; Rudolf, Kamil

    2015-12-01

    Currently it is not clear what type of the final cellular response (i.e. cell death modality or senescence) is induced upon chronic intracellular zinc depletion in colon cancer cells. To address this question, isogenic colon cancer lines SW480 and SW620 exposed to low zinc environment were studied over the period of 6 weeks. Low zinc environment reduced total as well as free intracellular zinc content in both cell lines. Decreased intracellular zinc content resulted in changes in cellular proliferation, cell cycle distribution and activation of stress signaling. In addition, colonocytes with low zinc content displayed increased levels of oxidative stress, changes in mitochondrial activity but in the absence of significant DNA damage. Towards the end of treatment (4th-6th week), exposed cells started to change morphologically, and typical markers of senescence as well as cell death appeared. Of two examined colon cancer cell lines, SW480 cells proved to activate predominantly senescent phenotype, with frequent form of demise being necrosis and mixed cell death modality but not apoptosis. Conversely, SW620 cells activated mostly cell death, with relatively equal distribution of apoptosis and mixed types, while senescent phenotypes and necrosis were present only in a small fraction of cell populations. Addition of zinc at the beginning of 4th week of treatment significantly suppressed cell death phenotypes in both cell lines but had no significant effect on senescence. In conclusion, presented results demonstrate variability of responses to chronic zinc depletion in colon cancer as modeled in vitro.

  3. Ras pathway signaling accelerates programmed cell death in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Andrew J; Crowe, Jonathan D; Ramsdale, Mark

    2006-01-17

    A better understanding of the molecular basis of programmed cell death (PCD) in fungi could provide information that is useful in the design of antifungal drugs that combat life-threatening fungal infections. Harsh environmental stresses, such as acetic acid or hydrogen peroxide, have been shown to induce PCD in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. In this study, we show that dying cells progress from an apoptotic state to a secondary necrotic state and that the rate at which this change occurs is proportional to the intensity of the stimulus. Also, we found that the temporal response is modulated by Ras-cAMP-PKA signals. Mutations that block Ras-cAMP-PKA signaling (ras1Delta, cdc35Delta, tpk1Delta, and tpk2Delta) suppress or delay the apoptotic response, whereas mutations that stimulate signaling (RAS1(val13) and pde2Delta) accelerate the rate of entry of cells into apoptosis. Pharmacological stimulation or inhibition of Ras signaling reinforces these findings. Transient increases in endogenous cAMP occur under conditions that stimulate apoptosis but not growth arrest. Death-specific changes in the abundance of different isoforms of the PKA regulatory subunit, Bcy1p, are also observed. Activation of Ras signals may regulate PCD of C. albicans, either by inhibiting antiapoptotic functions (such as stress responses) or by activating proapoptotic functions. PMID:16407097

  4. The Use of Contrast-Enhanced Post Mortem CT in the Detection of Cardiovascular Deaths

    PubMed Central

    Penzkofer, Tobias; Kuhl, Christiane Katharina; Knüchel, Ruth; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the diagnostic value of contrast enhanced post mortem computed tomography (PMCT) in comparison to non-enhanced post mortem CT in the detection of cardiovascular causes of death (COD). Background As autopsy rates decline, new methods to determine CODs are necessary. So contrast enhanced PMCT shall be evaluated in comparison to established non-enhanced PMCT in order to further improve the method. Methods In a prospective study, 20 corpses were examined using a 64-row multisclice CT (MSCT) before and after intraarterial perfusion with a newly developed, barium-bearing contrast agent and ventilation of the lungs. The cause of death was determined in enhanced and unenhanced scans and a level of confidence (LOC) was given by three experienced radiologists on a scale between 0 and 4. Results were compared to autopsy results as gold standard. Autopsy was performed blinded to PMCT-findings. Results The method allowed visualization of different types of cause of death. There was a significant improvement in LOC in enhanced scans compared to unenhanced scans as well as an improvement in the detection of COD. The cause of death could be determined in 19 out of 20 patients. Conclusions PMCT is feasible and appears to be robust for diagnosing cardiovascular causes of death. When compared with unenhanced post-mortem CT intraarterial perfusion and pulmonary ventilation significantly improve visualization and diagnostic accuracy. These promising results warrant further studies. PMID:24759757

  5. 1′-Acetoxychavicol acetate promotes caspase 3-activated glioblastoma cell death by overcoming enhanced cytokine expression

    PubMed Central

    WILLIAMS, MUSA; TIETZEL, ILLYA; QUICK, QUINCY A.

    2013-01-01

    The brain consumes ∼20% of the oxygen utilized in the human body, meaning that brain tumors are vulnerable to paradoxical physiological effects from free radical generation. In the present study, 1′-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), a naturally derived antioxidant that inhibits xanthine oxidase, was evaluated for its role as an anti-tumorigenic agent in glioblastomas. The study revealed that ACA inhibited glioblastoma cell proliferation as a consequence of promoting apoptotic cell death by enhancing caspase 3 activity. It was also shown that ACA impaired the migratory ability of glioblastoma cells by decreasing their adhesive properties. Additionally, ACA increased the protein expression levels of the pro-survival signaling cytokines, IL-6 and IL-1α, established cell protectors and survival molecules in brain tumors. Together, these results demonstrate that, despite enhanced expression of compensatory signaling molecules that contribute to tumor cell survival, ACA is an effective pro-apoptotic inducing agent in glioblastomas. PMID:23833677

  6. Fusaric acid induction of programmed cell death modulated through nitric oxide signalling in tobacco suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiao; Zhou, Benguo; Zhu, Xiaoping; Gao, Zhengliang; Liang, Yuancun

    2013-10-01

    Fusaric acid (FA) is a nonhost-selective toxin mainly produced by Fusarium oxysporum, the causal agent of plant wilt diseases. We demonstrate that FA can induce programmed cell death (PCD) in tobacco suspension cells and the FA-induced PCD is modulated by nitric oxide (NO) signalling. Cells undergoing cell death induced by FA treatment exhibited typical characteristics of PCD including cytoplasmic shrinkage, chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation, membrane plasmolysis, and formation of small cytoplasmic vacuoles. In addition, caspase-3-like activity was activated upon the FA treatment. The process of FA-induced PCD was accompanied by a rapid accumulation of NO in a FA dose-dependent manner. Pre-treatment of cells with NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) or NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-arginine monoacetate (L-NMMA) significantly reduced the rate of FA-induced cell death. Furthermore, the caspase-3-like activity and the expression of PAL and Hsr203J genes were alleviated by application of cPTIO or L-NMMA to FA-treated tobacco cells. This indicates that NO is an important factor involved in the FA-induced PCD. Our results also show that pre-treatment of tobacco cells with a caspase-3-specific inhibitor, Ac-DEVD-CHO, can reduce the rate of FA-induced cell death. These results demonstrate that the FA-induced cell death is a PCD and is modulated by NO signalling through caspase-3-like activation. PMID:23838885

  7. Inseparable tandem: evolution chooses ATP and Ca2+ to control life, death and cellular signalling.

    PubMed

    Plattner, Helmut; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2016-08-01

    From the very dawn of biological evolution, ATP was selected as a multipurpose energy-storing molecule. Metabolism of ATP required intracellular free Ca(2+) to be set at exceedingly low concentrations, which in turn provided the background for the role of Ca(2+) as a universal signalling molecule. The early-eukaryote life forms also evolved functional compartmentalization and vesicle trafficking, which used Ca(2+) as a universal signalling ion; similarly, Ca(2+) is needed for regulation of ciliary and flagellar beat, amoeboid movement, intracellular transport, as well as of numerous metabolic processes. Thus, during evolution, exploitation of atmospheric oxygen and increasingly efficient ATP production via oxidative phosphorylation by bacterial endosymbionts were a first step for the emergence of complex eukaryotic cells. Simultaneously, Ca(2+) started to be exploited for short-range signalling, despite restrictions by the preset phosphate-based energy metabolism, when both phosphates and Ca(2+) interfere with each other because of the low solubility of calcium phosphates. The need to keep cytosolic Ca(2+) low forced cells to restrict Ca(2+) signals in space and time and to develop energetically favourable Ca(2+) signalling and Ca(2+) microdomains. These steps in tandem dominated further evolution. The ATP molecule (often released by Ca(2+)-regulated exocytosis) rapidly grew to be the universal chemical messenger for intercellular communication; ATP effects are mediated by an extended family of purinoceptors often linked to Ca(2+) signalling. Similar to atmospheric oxygen, Ca(2+) must have been reverted from a deleterious agent to a most useful (intra- and extracellular) signalling molecule. Invention of intracellular trafficking further increased the role for Ca(2+) homeostasis that became critical for regulation of cell survival and cell death. Several mutually interdependent effects of Ca(2+) and ATP have been exploited in evolution, thus turning an originally

  8. Inseparable tandem: evolution chooses ATP and Ca2+ to control life, death and cellular signalling.

    PubMed

    Plattner, Helmut; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2016-08-01

    From the very dawn of biological evolution, ATP was selected as a multipurpose energy-storing molecule. Metabolism of ATP required intracellular free Ca(2+) to be set at exceedingly low concentrations, which in turn provided the background for the role of Ca(2+) as a universal signalling molecule. The early-eukaryote life forms also evolved functional compartmentalization and vesicle trafficking, which used Ca(2+) as a universal signalling ion; similarly, Ca(2+) is needed for regulation of ciliary and flagellar beat, amoeboid movement, intracellular transport, as well as of numerous metabolic processes. Thus, during evolution, exploitation of atmospheric oxygen and increasingly efficient ATP production via oxidative phosphorylation by bacterial endosymbionts were a first step for the emergence of complex eukaryotic cells. Simultaneously, Ca(2+) started to be exploited for short-range signalling, despite restrictions by the preset phosphate-based energy metabolism, when both phosphates and Ca(2+) interfere with each other because of the low solubility of calcium phosphates. The need to keep cytosolic Ca(2+) low forced cells to restrict Ca(2+) signals in space and time and to develop energetically favourable Ca(2+) signalling and Ca(2+) microdomains. These steps in tandem dominated further evolution. The ATP molecule (often released by Ca(2+)-regulated exocytosis) rapidly grew to be the universal chemical messenger for intercellular communication; ATP effects are mediated by an extended family of purinoceptors often linked to Ca(2+) signalling. Similar to atmospheric oxygen, Ca(2+) must have been reverted from a deleterious agent to a most useful (intra- and extracellular) signalling molecule. Invention of intracellular trafficking further increased the role for Ca(2+) homeostasis that became critical for regulation of cell survival and cell death. Several mutually interdependent effects of Ca(2+) and ATP have been exploited in evolution, thus turning an originally

  9. Forecasting Cell Death Dose-Response from Early Signal Transduction Responses In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Vrana, Julie A.; Currie, Holly N.; Han, Alice A.; Boyd, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    The rapid pharmacodynamic response of cells to toxic xenobiotics is primarily coordinated by signal transduction networks, which follow a simple framework: the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycle mediated by kinases and phosphatases. However, the time course from initial pharmacodynamic response(s) to cell death following exposure can have a vast range. Viewing this time lag between early signaling events and the ultimate cellular response as an opportunity, we hypothesize that monitoring the phosphorylation of proteins related to cell death and survival pathways at key, early time points may be used to forecast a cell's eventual fate, provided that we can measure and accurately interpret the protein responses. In this paper, we focused on a three-phased approach to forecast cell death after exposure: (1) determine time points relevant to important signaling events (protein phosphorylation) by using estimations of adenosine triphosphate production to reflect the relationship between mitochondrial-driven energy metabolism and kinase response, (2) experimentally determine phosphorylation values for proteins related to cell death and/or survival pathways at these significant time points, and (3) use cluster analysis to predict the dose-response relationship between cellular exposure to a xenobiotic and plasma membrane degradation at 24 h post-exposure. To test this approach, we exposed HepG2 cells to two disparate treatments: a GSK-3β inhibitor and a MEK inhibitor. After using our three-phased approach, we were able to accurately forecast the 24 h HepG2 plasma membrane degradation dose-response from protein phosphorylation values as early as 20 min post-MEK inhibitor exposure and 40 min post-GSK-3β exposure. PMID:24824809

  10. Forecasting cell death dose-response from early signal transduction responses in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vrana, Julie A; Currie, Holly N; Han, Alice A; Boyd, Jonathan

    2014-08-01

    The rapid pharmacodynamic response of cells to toxic xenobiotics is primarily coordinated by signal transduction networks, which follow a simple framework: the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycle mediated by kinases and phosphatases. However, the time course from initial pharmacodynamic response(s) to cell death following exposure can have a vast range. Viewing this time lag between early signaling events and the ultimate cellular response as an opportunity, we hypothesize that monitoring the phosphorylation of proteins related to cell death and survival pathways at key, early time points may be used to forecast a cell's eventual fate, provided that we can measure and accurately interpret the protein responses. In this paper, we focused on a three-phased approach to forecast cell death after exposure: (1) determine time points relevant to important signaling events (protein phosphorylation) by using estimations of adenosine triphosphate production to reflect the relationship between mitochondrial-driven energy metabolism and kinase response, (2) experimentally determine phosphorylation values for proteins related to cell death and/or survival pathways at these significant time points, and (3) use cluster analysis to predict the dose-response relationship between cellular exposure to a xenobiotic and plasma membrane degradation at 24 h post-exposure. To test this approach, we exposed HepG2 cells to two disparate treatments: a GSK-3β inhibitor and a MEK inhibitor. After using our three-phased approach, we were able to accurately forecast the 24 h HepG2 plasma membrane degradation dose-response from protein phosphorylation values as early as 20 min post-MEK inhibitor exposure and 40 min post-GSK-3β exposure.

  11. Role of TLR2- and TLR4-mediated signaling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced macrophage death.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Dulfary; Rojas, Mauricio; Hernández, Israel; Radzioch, Danuta; García, Luis F; Barrera, Luis F

    2010-01-01

    Infection of macrophages with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) induces cell death by apoptosis or necrosis. TLRs 2 and 4 recognition of mycobacterial ligands has been independently associated to apoptosis induction. To try to understand the particular contribution of these receptors to apoptotic or necrotic signaling upon infection with live Mtb H37Rv, we used macrophage lines derived from wild-type or TLR2-, TLR4-, and MyD88-deficient mouse strains. Mtb-infection triggered apoptosis depending on a TLR2/TLR4/MyD88/p38/ERK/PI-3K/NF-kB pathway; however, necrosis was favored in absence of TLR4 signaling independently of p38, ERK1/2, PI-3K or NF-kappaB activity. In conclusion, our results indicate that cooperation between TLR2- and TLR4-dependent mediated signals play a critical role in macrophage apoptosis induced by Mtb and the TLR4-mediated signaling has important role in the maintenance of the balance between apoptotic vs. necrotic cell death induced by macrophage infection with Mtb.

  12. Docetaxel induced-JNK2/PHD1 signaling pathway increases degradation of HIF-1α and causes cancer cell death under hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Eun-Taex; Kim, Chan Woo; Kim, Soo Jung; Lee, Jae-Seon; Hong, Soon-Sun; Park, Heon Joo

    2016-01-01

    HIF-1 (hypoxia-inducible factor-1) regulates the expression of more than 70 genes involved in angiogenesis, tumor growth, metastasis, chemoresistance, and radioresistance. Thus, there is growing interest in using HIF-1 inhibitors as anticancer drugs. Docetaxel, a Food and Drug Administration-approved anticancer drug, is reported to enhance HIF-1α degradation. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying docetaxel-induced HIF-1α degradation and cancer cell death under hypoxic conditions. Docetaxel pretreatment enhanced the polyubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation of HIF-1α, and increased cancer cell death under hypoxic conditions. Docetaxel also activated the prolyl hydroxylase, PHD1, in hypoxia, and pharmacological inhibition or siRNA-mediated knockdown of PHD1 prevented docetaxel-induced HIF-1α degradation and cancer cell death. Additionally, siRNA-mediated JNK2 knockdown blocked docetaxel-induced HIF-1α degradation and cancer cell death by inhibiting PHD1 activation. A luciferase reporter assay revealed that inhibition of the JNK2/PHD1 signaling pathway significantly increased the transcriptional activity of HIF-1 in docetaxel-treated cancer cells under hypoxia. Consistent with these results, docetaxel-treated JNK2-knockdown tumors grew much faster than control tumors through inhibition of docetaxel-induced PHD1 activation and degradation of HIF-1α. Our results collectively show that, under hypoxic conditions, docetaxel induces apoptotic cell death through JNK2/PHD1 signaling-mediated HIF-1α degradation. PMID:27263528

  13. Role of inorganic polyphosphate in mammalian cells: from signal transduction and mitochondrial metabolism to cell death.

    PubMed

    Angelova, Plamena R; Baev, Artyom Y; Berezhnov, Alexey V; Abramov, Andrey Y

    2016-02-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) is a polymer compromised of linearly arranged orthophosphate units that are linked through high-energy phosphoanhydride bonds. The chain length of this polymer varies from five to several thousand orthophosphates. PolyP is distributed in the most of the living organisms and plays multiple functions in mammalian cells, it is important for blood coagulation, cancer, calcium precipitation, immune response and many others. Essential role of polyP is shown for mitochondria, from implication into energy metabolism and mitochondrial calcium handling to activation of permeability transition pore (PTP) and cell death. PolyP is a gliotransmitter which transmits the signal in astrocytes via activation of P2Y1 receptors and stimulation of phospholipase C. PolyP-induced calcium signal in astrocytes can be stimulated by different lengths of this polymer but only long chain polyP induces mitochondrial depolarization by inhibition of respiration and opening of the PTP. It leads to induction of astrocytic cell death which can be prevented by inhibition of PTP with cyclosporine A. Thus, medium- and short-length polyP plays role in signal transduction and mitochondrial metabolism of astrocytes and long chain of this polymer can be toxic for the cells. PMID:26862186

  14. Programmed death-1/programmed death-L1 signaling pathway and its blockade in hepatitis C virus immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Mohamed L; El-Badawy, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a public health issue that often progresses to life-threatening complications, including liver cirrhosis, fibrosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Impaired immune responses to HCV are key features of chronic HCV infection. Therefore, intervention strategies usually involve enhancing the immune responses against HCV. Cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTLs) play a critical role in the control of HCV infection. However, their cytolytic function can be impaired by the expression of co-inhibitory molecules. Programmed death-1 (PD-1) receptor and its ligand PD-L1 function in a T cell co-inhibitory pathway, which either blocks the function of CTLs or the differentiation of CD8+ T cells. During chronic HCV infection, the immune inhibitory receptor PD-1 is upregulated on dysfunctional HCV-specific CD8+ T cells. As such, blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway in these CD8+ T cells might restore their functional capabilities. Indeed, clinical trials using therapies to block this pathway have shown promise in the fostering of anti-HCV immunity. Understanding how chronic HCV infection induces upregulation of PD-1 on HCV specific T cells and how the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction develops HCV specific T cell dysfunction will accelerate the development of an efficacious prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination against chronic HCV infections, which will significantly improve HCV treatments and patient survival. In this review, we discuss the relationship between PD-1 expression and clinical responses and the potential use of PD-1 blockade for anti-HCV therapy. PMID:26483866

  15. Co-localization of cell death with antigen deposition in skin enhances vaccine immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Depelsenaire, Alexandra C.I.; Meliga, Stefano C.; McNeilly, Celia L.; Pearson, Frances E.; Coffey, Jacob W.; Haigh, Oscar L.; Flaim, Christopher J.; Frazer, Ian H.; Kendall, Mark A.F.

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines delivered to the skin by microneedles – with and without adjuvants – have increased immunogenicity with lower doses than standard vaccine delivery techniques such as intramuscular (i.m.) or intradermal (i.d.) injection. However, the mechanisms behind this skin-mediated ‘adjuvant’ effect are not clear. Here, we show that the dynamic application of a microprojection array (the Nanopatch) to skin generates localized transient stresses invoking cell death around each projection. Nanopatch application caused significantly higher levels (~65-fold) of cell death in murine ear skin than i.d. injection using a hypodermic needle. Measured skin cell death is associated with modeled stresses ~1–10 MPa. Nanopatch-immunized groups also yielded consistently higher anti-IgG endpoint titers (up to 50-fold higher) than i.d. groups after delivery of a split virion influenza vaccine. Importantly, co-localization of cell death with nearby live skin cells and delivered antigen was necessary for immunogenicity enhancement. These results suggest a correlation between cell death caused by the Nanopatch with increased immunogenicity. We propose that the localized cell death serves as a ‘physical immune enhancer’ for the adjacent viable skin cells, which also receive antigen from the projections. This natural immune enhancer effect has the potential to mitigate or replace chemical-based adjuvants in vaccines. PMID:24714201

  16. Pepper pathogenesis-related protein 4c is a plasma membrane-localized cysteine protease inhibitor that is required for plant cell death and defense signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) type III effector AvrBsT triggers programmed cell death (PCD) and activates the hypersensitive response (HR) in plants. Here, we isolated and identified the plasma membrane localized pathogenesis-related (PR) protein 4c gene (CaPR4c) from pepper (Capsicum annuum) leaves undergoing AvrBsT-triggered HR cell death. CaPR4c encodes a protein with a signal peptide and a Barwin domain. Recombinant CaPR4c protein expressed in Escherichia coli exhibited cysteine protease-inhibitor activity and ribonuclease (RNase) activity. Subcellular localization analyses revealed that CaPR4c localized to the plasma membrane in plant cells. CaPR4c expression was rapidly and specifically induced by avirulent Xcv (avrBsT) infection. Transient expression of CaPR4c caused HR cell death in pepper leaves, which was accompanied by enhanced accumulation of H2 O2 and significant induction of some defense-response genes. Deletion of the signal peptide from CaPR4c abolished the induction of HR cell death, indicating a requirement for plasma membrane localization of CaPR4c for HR cell death. CaPR4c silencing in pepper disrupted both basal and AvrBsT-triggered resistance responses, and enabled Xcv proliferation in infected leaves. H2 O2 accumulation, cell-death induction, and defense-response gene expression were distinctly reduced in CaPR4c-silenced pepper. CaPR4c overexpression in transgenic Arabidopsis plants conferred greater resistance against infection by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. These results collectively suggest that CaPR4c plays an important role in plant cell death and defense signaling.

  17. Signal-enhancement reflective pulse oximeter with Fresnel lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Shuang-Chao; Sun, Ching-Cherng

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a new reflective pulse oximeter is proposed and demonstrated with implanting a Fresnel lens, which enhances the reflected signal. An optical simulation model incorporated with human skin characteristics is presented to evaluate the capability of the Fresnel lens. In addition, the distance between the light emitting diode and the photodiode is optimized. Compared with the other reflective oximeters, the reflected signal light detected by the photodiode is enhanced to more than 140%.

  18. Intravital imaging reveals p53-dependent cancer cell death induced by phototherapy via calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Ramirez, Fabian Galindo; Morciano, Giampaolo; Morganti, Claudia; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Mammano, Fabio; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    One challenge in biology is signal transduction monitoring in a physiological context. Intravital imaging techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of tumor and host cell behaviors in the tumor environment. However, these deep tissue imaging techniques have not yet been adopted to investigate the second messenger calcium (Ca2+). In the present study, we established conditions that allow the in vivo detection of Ca2+ signaling in three-dimensional tumor masses in mouse models. By combining intravital imaging and a skinfold chamber technique, we determined the ability of photodynamic cancer therapy to induce an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and, consequently, an increase in cell death in a p53-dependent pathway. PMID:25544762

  19. Intravital imaging reveals p53-dependent cancer cell death induced by phototherapy via calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Carlotta; Bonora, Massimo; Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Ramirez, Fabian Galindo; Morciano, Giampaolo; Morganti, Claudia; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Mammano, Fabio; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-30

    One challenge in biology is signal transduction monitoring in a physiological context. Intravital imaging techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of tumor and host cell behaviors in the tumor environment. However, these deep tissue imaging techniques have not yet been adopted to investigate the second messenger calcium (Ca²⁺). In the present study, we established conditions that allow the in vivo detection of Ca²⁺ signaling in three-dimensional tumor masses in mouse models. By combining intravital imaging and a skinfold chamber technique, we determined the ability of photodynamic cancer therapy to induce an increase in intracellular Ca²⁺ concentrations and, consequently, an increase in cell death in a p53-dependent pathway.

  20. Light acclimation, retrograde signalling, cell death and immune defences in plants.

    PubMed

    Karpiński, Stanisław; Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Wituszyńska, Weronika; Burdiak, Paweł

    2013-04-01

    This review confronts the classical view of plant immune defence and light acclimation with recently published data. Earlier findings have linked plant immune defences to nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR)-dependent recognition of pathogen effectors and to the role of plasma membrane-localized NADPH-dependent oxidoreductase (AtRbohD), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and salicylic acid (SA). However, recent results suggest that plant immune defence also depends on the absorption of excessive light energy and photorespiration. Rapid changes in light intensity and quality often cause the absorption of energy, which is in excess of that required for photosynthesis. Such excessive light energy is considered to be a factor triggering photoinhibition and disturbance in ROS/hormonal homeostasis, which leads to cell death in foliar tissues. We highlight here the tight crosstalk between ROS- and SA-dependent pathways leading to light acclimation, and defence responses leading to pathogen resistance. We also show that LESION SIMULATING DISEASE 1 (LSD1) regulates and integrates these processes. Moreover, we discuss the role of plastid-nucleus signal transduction, photorespiration, photoelectrochemical signalling and 'light memory' in the regulation of acclimation and immune defence responses. All of these results suggest that plants have evolved a genetic system that simultaneously regulates systemic acquired resistance (SAR), cell death and systemic acquired acclimation (SAA).

  1. Ganglioside GD2 in reception and transduction of cell death signal in tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    expression correlated with susceptibility of tumor cell lines to cytotoxic effect of anti-GD2 antibodies. Conclusions Results of this study demonstrate that anti-GD2 antibodies not only passively bind to the surface of tumor cells but also directly induce rapid cell death after the incubation with GD2-positive tumor cells. These results suggest a new role of GD2 as a receptor that actively transduces death signal in malignant cells. PMID:24773917

  2. A cardiac mitochondrial cAMP signaling pathway regulates calcium accumulation, permeability transition and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Liu, D; Varin, A; Nicolas, V; Courilleau, D; Mateo, P; Caubere, C; Rouet, P; Gomez, A-M; Vandecasteele, G; Fischmeister, R; Brenner, C

    2016-01-01

    Although cardiac cytosolic cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) regulates multiple processes, such as beating, contractility, metabolism and apoptosis, little is known yet on the role of this second messenger within cardiac mitochondria. Using cellular and subcellular approaches, we demonstrate here the local expression of several actors of cAMP signaling within cardiac mitochondria, namely a truncated form of soluble AC (sACt) and the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1 (Epac1), and show a protective role for sACt against cell death, apoptosis as well as necrosis in primary cardiomyocytes. Upon stimulation with bicarbonate (HCO3−) and Ca2+, sACt produces cAMP, which in turn stimulates oxygen consumption, increases the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and ATP production. cAMP is rate limiting for matrix Ca2+ entry via Epac1 and the mitochondrial calcium uniporter and, as a consequence, prevents mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). The mitochondrial cAMP effects involve neither protein kinase A, Epac2 nor the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. In addition, in mitochondria isolated from failing rat hearts, stimulation of the mitochondrial cAMP pathway by HCO3− rescued the sensitization of mitochondria to Ca2+-induced MPT. Thus, our study identifies a link between mitochondrial cAMP, mitochondrial metabolism and cell death in the heart, which is independent of cytosolic cAMP signaling. Our results might have implications for therapeutic prevention of cell death in cardiac pathologies. PMID:27100892

  3. Signal generation and enhancement in a delayed system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J. H.; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.; Liu, H. G.

    2015-05-01

    We present an effective way to generate periodic signal in a delayed nonlinear system. The generated signal at a desired frequency can be enhanced greatly by a nonlinear term. Specifically, the amplitude of the generated signal can be much larger than that of the input signal by the cooperation of an appropriate time delay and a nonlinear term. When the primary, subharmonic or superharmonic resonance occurs, the desired signal is improved significantly. Further, the delay time that induces the resonance behavior can be analytically predicted. The result herein is different from the phenomenon of stochastic resonance or vibrational resonance observed in time delayed systems. Compared with the stochastic resonance or vibrational resonance, the method used here is much simpler and the desired signal can be generated in a much wider scope without changing the excitation. We believe that our results might be useful for the signal processing research.

  4. Enhancement of activation-induced cell death by fibronectin in murine CD4+ CD8+ thymocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, E; Kina, T; Katsura, Y; Tadakuma, T

    1998-01-01

    Development of T cells in the thymus is achieved through the interactions of thymocytes with their microenvironments. This study focused on the function of fibronectin (FN), a major extracellular matrix molecule in the thymus, in the cell death induced by activation via the T-cell antigen receptor. FN alone did not increase cell death in murine thymocytes above the baseline level, but it significantly enhanced the cell death induced by fixed anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb), especially when a high concentration of anti-CD3 mAb was used. DNA fragmentation increased in parallel with cell death, indicating that cell death was a result of the apoptosis. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis revealed that the activation-induced cell death (AICD) caused by anti-CD3 mAb alone, or by a combination of anti-CD3 mAb and FN, occurred selectively in CD4+ CD8+ thymocytes. Very late activation antigen (VLA)-4 and VLA-5 are two major ligands to FN on thymocytes. The expression of both ligands was investigated at different stages of thymocyte development. VLA-4 was predominantly expressed at the CD4- CD8- stage, and thereafter the expression was reduced, whereas VLA-5 was constantly expressed during maturation. Furthermore, the enhancing effect by FN was inhibited in the presence of the Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro (GRGDSP) peptide but not in the presence of the connecting segment-1 (CS-1) peptide, suggesting that enhancement of AICD observed in CD4+ CD8+ thymocytes is mediated through VLA-5. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 PMID:9893044

  5. Phosphorylation of caveolin-1 on tyrosine-14 induced by ROS enhances palmitate-induced death of beta-pancreatic cells.

    PubMed

    Wehinger, Sergio; Ortiz, Rina; Díaz, María Inés; Aguirre, Adam; Valenzuela, Manuel; Llanos, Paola; Mc Master, Christopher; Leyton, Lisette; Quest, Andrew F G

    2015-05-01

    A considerable body of evidence exists implicating high levels of free saturated fatty acids in beta pancreatic cell death, although the molecular mechanisms and the signaling pathways involved have not been clearly defined. The membrane protein caveolin-1 has long been implicated in cell death, either by sensitizing to or directly inducing apoptosis and it is normally expressed in beta cells. Here, we tested whether the presence of caveolin-1 modulates free fatty acid-induced beta cell death by reexpressing this protein in MIN6 murine beta cells lacking caveolin-1. Incubation of MIN6 with palmitate, but not oleate, induced apoptotic cell death that was enhanced by the presence of caveolin-1. Moreover, palmitate induced de novo ceramide synthesis, loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in MIN6 cells. ROS generation promoted caveolin-1 phosphorylation on tyrosine-14 that was abrogated by the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine or the incubation with the Src-family kinase inhibitor, PP2 (4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7(dimethylethyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine). The expression of a non-phosphorylatable caveolin-1 tyrosine-14 to phenylalanine mutant failed to enhance palmitate-induced apoptosis while for MIN6 cells expressing the phospho-mimetic tyrosine-14 to glutamic acid mutant caveolin-1 palmitate sensitivity was comparable to that observed for MIN6 cells expressing wild type caveolin-1. Thus, caveolin-1 expression promotes palmitate-induced ROS-dependent apoptosis in MIN6 cells in a manner requiring Src family kinase mediated tyrosine-14 phosphorylation. PMID:25572853

  6. Enhanced release of primary signals may render intercellular signalling ineffective due to spatial aspects

    PubMed Central

    Kundrát, Pavel; Friedland, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Detailed mechanistic modelling has been performed of the intercellular signalling cascade between precancerous cells and their normal neighbours that leads to a selective removal of the precancerous cells by apoptosis. Two interconnected signalling pathways that were identified experimentally have been modelled, explicitly accounting for temporal and spatial effects. The model predicts highly non-linear behaviour of the signalling. Importantly, under certain conditions, enhanced release of primary signals by precancerous cells renders the signalling ineffective. This counter-intuitive behaviour arises due to spatial aspects of the underlying signalling scheme: Increased primary signalling by precancerous cells does, upon reaction with factors derived from normal cells, produce higher yields of apoptosis-triggering molecules. However, the apoptosis-triggering signals are formed farther from the precancerous cells, so that these are attacked less efficiently. Spatial effects thus may represent a novel analogue of negative feedback mechanisms. PMID:27645799

  7. Enhanced release of primary signals may render intercellular signalling ineffective due to spatial aspects.

    PubMed

    Kundrát, Pavel; Friedland, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Detailed mechanistic modelling has been performed of the intercellular signalling cascade between precancerous cells and their normal neighbours that leads to a selective removal of the precancerous cells by apoptosis. Two interconnected signalling pathways that were identified experimentally have been modelled, explicitly accounting for temporal and spatial effects. The model predicts highly non-linear behaviour of the signalling. Importantly, under certain conditions, enhanced release of primary signals by precancerous cells renders the signalling ineffective. This counter-intuitive behaviour arises due to spatial aspects of the underlying signalling scheme: Increased primary signalling by precancerous cells does, upon reaction with factors derived from normal cells, produce higher yields of apoptosis-triggering molecules. However, the apoptosis-triggering signals are formed farther from the precancerous cells, so that these are attacked less efficiently. Spatial effects thus may represent a novel analogue of negative feedback mechanisms. PMID:27645799

  8. The Gordon Wilson Lecture: Neurohormonal Signaling Pathways That Link Cardiac Growth and Death

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Gerald W.

    2007-01-01

    Far from being a simple muscular pump, the heart senses changes in hemodynamic forces and neurohormonal signaling, and responds by elaborating autocrine and paracrine factors that self-regulate cardiomyocyte contraction, growth, and programmed death. Interference with the afferent or efferent arms of this stress-response mechanism, as with inhibition of the β-adrenergic or renin/angiotensin systems, is a mainstay of pharmacological therapy for heart failure. However, despite striking group-mean effects showing mortality benefits of neurohormonal antagonists, inter-individual variability in the therapeutic response to these agents suggests a pharmacogenomic interaction, where common sequence variations of genes that regulate neurohormonal signaling modify the individual response to treatment. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence that, depending upon physiological milieu, conventional neurohormone receptor-ligand pairs can activate non-traditional signaling pathways, with pathological consequences. Recently, studies that integrate the findings from human gene polymorphism discovery, recombinant gene variant expression in cell and animal models, and outcome or risk analysis of polymorphisms in human disease have provided additional understanding into adaptive and maladaptive events that are the consequence of the cardiac stress-response sequence. PMID:18528498

  9. Induction of apoptosis by tumor suppressor FHIT via death receptor signaling pathway in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wu-Guo; Nishizaki, Masahiko; Fang, Bingliang; Roth, Jack A; Ji, Lin

    2007-04-20

    FHIT is a novel tumor suppressor gene located at human chromosome 3p14.2. Restoration of wild-type FHIT in 3p14.2-deficient human lung cancer cells inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis. In this study, we analyzed potential upstream/downstream molecular targets of the FHIT protein and found that FHIT specifically targeted and regulated death receptor (DR) genes in human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Exogenous expression of FHIT by a recombinant adenoviral vector (Ad)-mediated gene transfer upregulated expression of DR genes. Treatment with a recombinant TRAIL protein, a DR-specific ligand, in Ad-FHIT-transduced NSCLC cells considerably enhanced FHIT-induced apoptosis, further demonstrating the involvement of DRs in FHIT-induced apoptosis. Moreover, we also found that FHIT targeted downstream of the DR-mediated signaling pathway. FHIT overexpression disrupted mitochondrial membrane integrity and activated multiple pro-apoptotic proteins in NSCLC cell. These results suggest that FHIT induces apoptosis through a sequential activation of DR-mediated pro-apoptotic signaling pathways in human NSCLC cells. PMID:17328863

  10. Activation, Isolation, and Analysis of the Death-Inducing Signaling Complex.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Michelle A; Langlais, Claudia; Cain, Kelvin; MacFarlane, Marion

    2015-12-02

    This protocol describes activation, isolation, and analysis of the CD95 (APO-1/Fas) death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) using affinity purification. Activation is achieved using a biotin-labeled anti-CD95 antibody and the native DISC complex is captured using streptavidin beads. This approach minimizes both the number of steps involved and any potential nonspecific interactions or cross-reactivity of antibodies commonly seen in immunoprecipitations using unlabeled antibodies and protein A/G beads. Composition of the isolated complex is analyzed via western blot to identify known DISC components, and dimerization-induced autocatalytic processing of procaspase-8 at the DISC can be confirmed by detection of caspase-8 cleavage products. The potential for DISC-associated caspase-8 to activate the caspase cascade can be determined by measuring caspase-8-dependent cleavage of the fluorigenic substrate Ac-IETD.AFC, or by performing a bioassay using exogenous protein substrates.

  11. Self-regulatory role of 4-hydroxynonenal in signaling for stress-induced programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Yogesh C; Sharma, Rajendra; Sharma, Abha; Yadav, Sushma; Singhal, Sharad S; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Awasthi, Sanjay

    2008-07-15

    Within the last two decades, 4-hydroxynonenal has emerged as an important second messenger involved in the regulation of various cellular processes. Our recent studies suggest that HNE can induce apoptosis in various cells through the death receptor Fas (CD95)-mediated extrinsic pathway as well as through the p53-dependent intrinsic pathway. Interestingly, through its interaction with the nuclear protein Daxx, HNE can self-limit its apoptotic role by translocating Daxx to cytoplasm where it binds to Fas and inhibits Fas-mediated apoptosis. In this paper, after briefly describing recent studies on various biological activities of HNE, based on its interactions with Fas, Daxx, and p53, we speculate on possible mechanisms through which HNE may affect a multitude of cellular processes and draw a parallel between signaling roles of H(2)O(2) and HNE.

  12. Live to die another way: modes of programmed cell death and the signals emanating from dying cells

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Yaron; Steller, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Preface All life ends in death, but perhaps one of life’s grander ironies is that it also depends on death. Cell-intrinsic suicide pathways, termed programmed cell death (PCD), are crucial for animal development, tissue homeostasis and pathogenesis. Originally, PCD was virtually synonymous with apoptosis, but recently, alternative PCD mechanisms have been reported. Here, we provide an overview of several distinct PCD mechanisms, namely apoptosis, autophagy and necroptosis. In addition, we discuss the complex signals emanating from dying cells, which can either fuel regeneration or instruct additional killing. Further advances in understanding the physiological role of multiple cell death mechanisms and associated signals will be important to selectively manipulate PCD for therapeutic purposes. PMID:25991373

  13. Water-soluble germanium nanoparticles cause necrotic cell death and the damage can be attenuated by blocking the transduction of necrotic signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yu-Hsin; Huang, Chin-Ping; Tsai, Jia-Shiuan; Shen, Mo-Yuan; Li, Yaw-Kuen; Lin, Lih-Yuan

    2011-12-15

    Water-soluble germanium nanoparticles (wsGeNPs) with allyamine-conjugated surfaces were fabricated and emit blue fluorescence under ultraviolet light. The wsGeNP was physically and chemically stable at various experimental conditions. Cytotoxicity of the fabricated wsGeNP was examined. MTT assay demonstrated that wsGeNP possessed high toxicity to cells and clonogenic survival assay further indicated that this effect was not resulted from retarding cell growth. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that wsGeNP did not alter the cell cycle profile but the sub-G1 fraction was absent from treated cells. Results from DNA fragmentation and propidium iodide exclusion assays also suggested that apoptotic cell death did not occur in cells treated with wsGeNP. Addition of a necrosis inhibitor, necrostatin-1, attenuated cell damage and indicated that wsGeNP caused necrotic cell death. Cell signaling leads to necrotic death was investigated. Intracellular calcium and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were increased upon wsGeNP treatment. These effects can be abrogated by BAPTA-AM and N-acetyl cysteine respectively, resulting in a reduction in cell damage. In addition, wsGeNP caused a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) which could be recovered by cyclosporine A. The cellular signaling events revealed that wsGeNP increase the cellular calcium level which enhances the production of ROS and leads to a reduction of MMP, consequentially results in necrotic cell death.

  14. Method for enhancing signals transmitted over optical fibers

    DOEpatents

    Ogle, J.W.; Lyons, P.B.

    1981-02-11

    A method for spectral equalization of high frequency spectrally broadband signals transmitted through an optical fiber is disclosed. The broadband signal input is first dispersed by a grating. Narrow spectral components are collected into an array of equalizing fibers. The fibers serve as optical delay lines compensating for material dispersion of each spectral component during transmission. The relative lengths of the individual equalizing fibers are selected to compensate for such prior dispersion. The output of the equalizing fibers couple the spectrally equalized light onto a suitable detector for subsequent electronic processing of the enhanced broadband signal.

  15. Method for enhancing signals transmitted over optical fibers

    DOEpatents

    Ogle, James W.; Lyons, Peter B.

    1983-01-01

    A method for spectral equalization of high frequency spectrally broadband signals transmitted through an optical fiber. The broadband signal input is first dispersed by a grating. Narrow spectral components are collected into an array of equalizing fibers. The fibers serve as optical delay lines compensating for material dispersion of each spectral component during transmission. The relative lengths of the individual equalizing fibers are selected to compensate for such prior dispersion. The output of the equalizing fibers couple the spectrally equalized light onto a suitable detector for subsequent electronic processing of the enhanced broadband signal.

  16. Enhancement of suicidal DNA vaccine potency by delaying suicidal DNA-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Kim, T W; Hung, C-F; Juang, J; He, L; Hardwick, J M; Wu, T-C

    2004-02-01

    DNA-based alphaviral RNA replicon vectors, also called suicidal DNA vectors, alleviate the concerns of integration or transformation related to conventional DNA vectors since suicidal DNA vectors eventually cause apoptosis of transfected cells. However, the expression of inserted genes in these vectors is transient and the potency of suicidal DNA vaccines may be compromised because of apoptotic cell death. Therefore, to enhance the immune response to the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E7 antigen, we generated a DNA-based Semliki Forest virus vector, pSCA1, encoding E7 fused with BCL-xL, an antiapoptotic member of the BCL-2 family. Our results indicated that pSCA1 encoding E7/BCL-xL fusion protein delayed cell death in the pSCA1-transfected dendritic cell line and generated significantly higher E7-specific CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immune responses and better antitumor effects than pSCA1 encoding wild-type E7 gene in vaccinated mice. The antiapoptotic function of BCL-xL is important for the enhancement of antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses in vaccinated mice, because a point mutant of BCL-xL lacking antiapoptotic function was ineffective. These results suggest that strategies to delay suicidal DNA-induced cell death using antiapoptotic proteins may greatly enhance the potency of suicidal DNA.

  17. Arabidopsis radical-induced cell death1 is involved in UV-B signaling.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Wang, Yan; Björn, Lars Olof; Li, Shaoshan

    2009-06-01

    The Arabidopsis radical-induced cell death1 (rcd1) mutant is sensitive to ozone fumigation and apoplastic superoxide, but tolerant to methyl viologen. In the present article, we report that the rcd1 mutant is also tolerant to supplementary UV-B radiation. The rcd1-1 mutant exhibits less accumulation of TT dimers, increased hypocotyl growth inhibition and higher accumulation of flavonoids under supplemental UV-B radiation. Moreover, the expression of HY5 (elongated hypocotyl5) is increased in the mutant after UV-B treatment. Gene expression downstream of UV-B signaling reveals that COP1 (constitutively photomorphogenic1)-regulated genes have an elevated expression in rcd1-1 mutant under UV-B radiation, while expression of UVR8 (UV resistance locus 8)-regulated and HY5-independent genes are not changed. Interestingly, the expression of RCD1 genes is not significantly changed by UV-B radiation. Previous study has shown that STO protein is interacting with RCD1 in vitro. Here, we found the mRNA level of STO (salt tolerance) is greatly increased in rcd1-1 mutant after UV-B radiation. However, UV-B-induced HY5 and CHS expression is partially inhibited in sto mutant. Based on the above results, it is deduced that the RCD1, working together with STO, is involved in Arabidopsis UV-B signaling.

  18. Natural small-molecule enhancers of autophagy induce autophagic cell death in apoptosis-defective cells

    PubMed Central

    Law, Betty Yuen Kwan; Chan, Wai Kit; Xu, Su Wei; Wang, Jing Rong; Bai, Li Ping; Liu, Liang; Wong, Vincent Kam Wai

    2014-01-01

    Resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy is a significant problem in oncology, and the development of sensitising agents or small-molecules with new mechanisms of action to kill these cells is needed. Autophagy is a cellular process responsible for the turnover of misfolded proteins or damaged organelles, and it also recycles nutrients to maintain energy levels for cell survival. In some apoptosis-resistant cancer cells, autophagy can also enhance the efficacy of anti-cancer drugs through autophagy-mediated mechanisms of cell death. Because the modulation of autophagic processes can be therapeutically useful to circumvent chemoresistance and enhance the effects of cancer treatment, the identification of novel autophagic enhancers for use in oncology is highly desirable. Many novel anti-cancer compounds have been isolated from natural products; therefore, we worked to discover natural, anti-cancer small-molecule enhancers of autophagy. Here, we have identified a group of natural alkaloid small-molecules that function as novel autophagic enhancers. These alkaloids, including liensinine, isoliensinine, dauricine and cepharanthine, stimulated AMPK-mTOR dependent induction of autophagy and autophagic cell death in a panel of apoptosis-resistant cells. Taken together, our work provides novel insights into the biological functions, mechanisms and potential therapeutic values of alkaloids for the induction of autophagy. PMID:24981420

  19. Cell death-resistance of differentiated myotubes is associated with enhanced anti-apoptotic mechanisms compared to myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Rijin; Ferry, Amy L.

    2011-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is associated with elevated apoptosis while muscle differentiation results in apoptosis resistance, indicating that the role of apoptosis in skeletal muscle is multifaceted. The objective of this study was to investigate mechanisms underlying apoptosis susceptibility in proliferating myoblasts compared to differentiated myotubes and we hypothesized that cell death-resistance in differentiated myotubes is mediated by enhanced anti-apoptotic pathways. C2C12 myoblasts and myotubes were treated with H2O2 or staurosporine (Stsp) to induce cell death. H2O2 and Stsp induced DNA fragmentation in more than 50% of myoblasts, but in myotubes less than 10% of nuclei showed apoptotic changes. Mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation was detected with H2O2 and Stsp in myoblasts, while this response was greatly diminished in myotubes. Caspase-3 activity was 10-fold higher in myotubes compared to myoblasts, and Stsp caused a significant caspase-3 induction in both. However, exposure to H2O2 did not lead to caspase-3 activation in myoblasts, and only to a modest induction in myotubes. A similar response was observed for caspase-2, -8 and -9. Abundance of caspase-inhibitors (apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC), and heat shock protein (HSP) 70 and -25 was significantly higher in myotubes compared to myoblasts, and in addition ARC was suppressed in response to Stsp in myotubes. Moreover, increased expression of HSPs in myoblasts attenuated cell death in response to H2O2 and Stsp. Protein abundance of the pro-apoptotic protein endonuclease G (EndoG) and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) was higher in myotubes compared to myoblasts. These results show that resistance to apoptosis in myotubes is increased despite high levels of pro-apoptotic signaling mechanisms, and we suggest that this protective effect is mediated by enhanced anti-caspase mechanisms. PMID:21161388

  20. Signaling pathways that regulate life and cell death: evolution of apoptosis in the context of self-defense.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Pinedo, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Programmed Cell Death is essential for the life cycle of many organisms. Cell death in multicellular organisms can occur as a consequence of massive damage (necrosis) or in a controlled form, through engagement of diverse biochemical programs. The best well known form of programmed cell death is apoptosis. Apoptosis occurs in animals as a consequence of a variety of stimuli including stress and social signals and it plays essential roles in morphogenesis and immune defense. The machinery of apoptosis is well conserved among animals and it is composed of caspases (the proteases which execute cell death), adapter proteins (caspase activators), Bcl-2 family proteins and Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs). We will describe in this chapter the main apoptotic pathways in animals: the extrinsic (death receptor-mediated), the intrinsic/mitochondrial and the Granzyme B pathway. Other forms of non-apoptotic Programmed Cell Death which occur in animals will also be discussed. We will summarize the current knowledge about apoptotic-like and other forms of cell death in other organisms such as plants and protists.Additionally, we will discuss the hypothesis that apoptosis originated as part of a host defense mechanism. We will explore the similarities between the protein complexes which mediate apoptosis (apoptosomes) and complexes involved in immunity: inflammasomes. Additional functions of apoptotic proteins related to immune function will be summarized, in an effort to explore the evolutionary origins of cell death.

  1. Flavivirus NS4A-induced autophagy protects cells against death and enhances virus replication.

    PubMed

    McLean, Jeffrey E; Wudzinska, Aleksandra; Datan, Emmanuel; Quaglino, Daniela; Zakeri, Zahra

    2011-06-24

    Flaviviruses include the most prevalent and medically challenging viruses. Persistent infection with flaviviruses of epithelial cells and hepatocytes that do not undergo cell death is common. Here, we report that, in epithelial cells, up-regulation of autophagy following flavivirus infection markedly enhances virus replication and that one flavivirus gene, NS4A, uniquely determines the up-regulation of autophagy. Dengue-2 and Modoc (a murine flavivirus) kill primary murine macrophages but protect epithelial cells and fibroblasts against death provoked by several insults. The flavivirus-induced protection derives from the up-regulation of autophagy, as up-regulation of autophagy by starvation or inactivation of mammalian target of rapamycin also protects the cells against insult, whereas inhibition of autophagy via inactivation of PI3K nullifies the protection conferred by flavivirus. Inhibition of autophagy also limits replication of both Dengue-2 and Modoc virus in epithelial cells. Expression of flavivirus NS4A is sufficient to induce PI3K-dependent autophagy and to protect cells against death; expression of other viral genes, including NS2A and NS4B, fails to protect cells against several stressors. Flavivirus NS4A protein induces autophagy in epithelial cells and thus protects them from death during infection. As autophagy is vital to flavivirus replication in these cells, NS4A is therefore also identified as a critical determinant of flavivirus replication. PMID:21511946

  2. Enhancement of endocannabinoid signaling protects against cocaine-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Vilela, Luciano R.; Gobira, Pedro H.; Viana, Thercia G.; Medeiros, Daniel C.; Ferreira-Vieira, Talita H.; Doria, Juliana G.; Rodrigues, Flávia; Aguiar, Daniele C.; Pereira, Grace S.; Massessini, André R.; Ribeiro, Fabíola M.; Oliveira, Antonio Carlos P. de; Moraes, Marcio F.D.; Moreira, Fabricio A.

    2015-08-01

    Cocaine is an addictive substance with a potential to cause deleterious effects in the brain. The strategies for treating its neurotoxicity, however, are limited. Evidence suggests that the endocannabinoid system exerts neuroprotective functions against various stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the main enzyme responsible for terminating the actions of the endocannabinoid anandamide, reduces seizures and cell death in the hippocampus in a model of cocaine intoxication. Male Swiss mice received injections of endocannabinoid-related compounds followed by the lowest dose of cocaine that induces seizures, electroencephalographic activity and cell death in the hippocampus. The molecular mechanisms were studied in primary cell culture of this structure. The FAAH inhibitor, URB597, reduced cocaine-induced seizures and epileptiform electroencephalographic activity. The cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor selective agonist, ACEA, mimicked these effects, whereas the antagonist, AM251, prevented them. URB597 also inhibited cocaine-induced activation and death of hippocampal neurons, both in animals and in primary cell culture. Finally, we investigated if the PI3K/Akt/ERK intracellular pathway, a cell surviving mechanism coupled to CB{sub 1} receptor, mediated these neuroprotective effects. Accordingly, URB597 injection increased ERK and Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus. Moreover, the neuroprotective effect of this compound was reversed by the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. In conclusion, the pharmacological facilitation of the anandamide/CB1/PI3K signaling protects the brain against cocaine intoxication in experimental models. This strategy may be further explored in the development of treatments for drug-induced neurotoxicity. - Highlights: • Cocaine toxicity is characterized by seizures and hippocampal cell death. • The endocannabinoid anandamide acts as a brain protective mechanism. • Inhibition of anandamide hydrolysis

  3. Cypermethrin Induces Macrophages Death through Cell Cycle Arrest and Oxidative Stress-Mediated JNK/ERK Signaling Regulated Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fang; Liu, Qiaoyun; Xie, Shujun; Xu, Jian; Huang, Bo; Wu, Yihua; Xia, Dajing

    2016-06-17

    Cypermethrin is one of the most highly effective synthetic pyrethroid insecticides. The toxicity of cypermethrin to the reproductive and nervous systems has been well studied. However, little is known about the toxic effect of cypermethrin on immune cells such as macrophages. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of cypermethrin on macrophages and the underlying molecular mechanisms. We found that cypermethrin reduced cell viability and induced apoptosis in RAW 264.7 cells. Cypermethrin also increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, cypermethrin-induced G1 cell cycle arrest was associated with an enhanced expression of p21, wild-type p53, and down-regulation of cyclin D1, cyclin E and CDK4. In addition, cypermethrin treatment activated MAPK signal pathways by inducing c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and increased the cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). Further, pretreatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) effectively abrogated cypermethrin-induced cell cytotoxicity, G1 cell cycle arrest, DNA damage, PARP activity, and JNK and ERK1/2 activation. The specific JNK inhibitor (SP600125) and ERK1/2 inhibitor (PD98059) effectively reversed the phosphorylation level of JNK and ERK1/2, and attenuated the apoptosis. Taken together, these data suggested that cypermethrin caused immune cell death via inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis regulated by ROS-mediated JNK/ERK pathway.

  4. Cypermethrin Induces Macrophages Death through Cell Cycle Arrest and Oxidative Stress-Mediated JNK/ERK Signaling Regulated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fang; Liu, Qiaoyun; Xie, Shujun; Xu, Jian; Huang, Bo; Wu, Yihua; Xia, Dajing

    2016-01-01

    Cypermethrin is one of the most highly effective synthetic pyrethroid insecticides. The toxicity of cypermethrin to the reproductive and nervous systems has been well studied. However, little is known about the toxic effect of cypermethrin on immune cells such as macrophages. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of cypermethrin on macrophages and the underlying molecular mechanisms. We found that cypermethrin reduced cell viability and induced apoptosis in RAW 264.7 cells. Cypermethrin also increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, cypermethrin-induced G1 cell cycle arrest was associated with an enhanced expression of p21, wild-type p53, and down-regulation of cyclin D1, cyclin E and CDK4. In addition, cypermethrin treatment activated MAPK signal pathways by inducing c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and increased the cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). Further, pretreatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) effectively abrogated cypermethrin-induced cell cytotoxicity, G1 cell cycle arrest, DNA damage, PARP activity, and JNK and ERK1/2 activation. The specific JNK inhibitor (SP600125) and ERK1/2 inhibitor (PD98059) effectively reversed the phosphorylation level of JNK and ERK1/2, and attenuated the apoptosis. Taken together, these data suggested that cypermethrin caused immune cell death via inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis regulated by ROS-mediated JNK/ERK pathway. PMID:27322250

  5. Structural basis of death domain signaling in the p75 neurotrophin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhi; Tann, Jason Y; Goh, Eddy TH; Kelly, Claire; Lim, Kim Buay; Gao, Jian Fang; Ibanez, Carlos F

    2015-01-01

    Death domains (DDs) mediate assembly of oligomeric complexes for activation of downstream signaling pathways through incompletely understood mechanisms. Here we report structures of complexes formed by the DD of p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) with RhoGDI, for activation of the RhoA pathway, with caspase recruitment domain (CARD) of RIP2 kinase, for activation of the NF-kB pathway, and with itself, revealing how DD dimerization controls access of intracellular effectors to the receptor. RIP2 CARD and RhoGDI bind to p75NTR DD at partially overlapping epitopes with over 100-fold difference in affinity, revealing the mechanism by which RIP2 recruitment displaces RhoGDI upon ligand binding. The p75NTR DD forms non-covalent, low-affinity symmetric dimers in solution. The dimer interface overlaps with RIP2 CARD but not RhoGDI binding sites, supporting a model of receptor activation triggered by separation of DDs. These structures reveal how competitive protein-protein interactions orchestrate the hierarchical activation of downstream pathways in non-catalytic receptors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11692.001 PMID:26646181

  6. Contributions of mitochondria to animal physiology: from homeostatic sensor to calcium signalling and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Duchen, Michael R

    1999-01-01

    Over recent years, it has become clear that mitochondria play a central role in many key aspects of animal physiology and pathophysiology. Their central and ubiquitous task is clearly the production of ATP. Nevertheless, they also play subtle roles in glucose homeostasis, acting as the sensor for substrate supply in the transduction pathway that promotes insulin secretion by the pancreatic β-cell and that modulates the excitability of the hypothalamic glucose-sensitive neurons involved in appetite control. Mitochondria may also act as sensors of availability of oxygen, the other major mitochondrial substrate, in the regulation of respiration. Mitochondria take up calcium, and the high capacity mitochondrial calcium uptake pathway provides a mechanism that couples energy demand to increased ATP production through the calcium-dependent upregulation of mitochondrial enzyme activity. Mitochondrial calcium accumulation may also have a substantial impact on the spatiotemporal dynamics of cellular calcium signals, with subtle differences of detail in different cell types. Recent work has also revealed the centrality of mitochondrial dysfunction as an irreversible step in the pathway to both necrotic and apoptotic cell death. This review looks at recent developments in these rapidly evolving areas of cell physiology in an attempt to draw together disparate areas of research into a common theme. PMID:10066918

  7. Redox Signaling in Diabetic Nephropathy: Hypertrophy versus Death Choices in Mesangial Cells and Podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Manda, Gina; Checherita, Alexandru-Ionel; Comanescu, Maria Victoria; Hinescu, Mihail Eugen

    2015-01-01

    This review emphasizes the role of oxidative stress in diabetic nephropathy, acting as trigger, modulator, and linker within the complex network of pathologic events. It highlights key molecular pathways and new hypothesis in diabetic nephropathy, related to the interferences of metabolic, oxidative, and inflammatory stresses. Main topics this review is addressing are biomarkers of oxidative stress in diabetic nephropathy, the sources of reactive oxygen species (mitochondria, NADPH-oxidases, hyperglycemia, and inflammation), and the redox-sensitive signaling networks (protein kinases, transcription factors, and epigenetic regulators). Molecular switches deciding on the renal cells fate in diabetic nephropathy are presented, such as hypertrophy versus death choices in mesangial cells and podocytes. Finally, the antioxidant response of renal cells in diabetic nephropathy is tackled, with emphasis on targeted therapy. An integrative approach is needed for identifying key molecular networks which control cellular responses triggered by the array of stressors in diabetic nephropathy. This will foster the discovery of reliable biomarkers for early diagnosis and prognosis, and will guide the discovery of new therapeutic approaches for personalized medicine in diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26491232

  8. Pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor protects against apoptotic neuronal death and mitochondrial damage in ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaowan; Li, Hailong; Ding, Shinghua

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that Pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF), also known as nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), the rate-limiting enzyme in mammalian NAD+ biosynthesis pathway, plays a brain and neuronal protective role in ischemic stroke. In this study, we further investigated the mechanism of its neuroprotective effect after ischemia in the primary cultured mouse cortical neurons. Using apoptotic cell death assay, fluorescent imaging, molecular biology, mitochondrial biogenesis measurements and Western blotting analysis, our results show that the overexpression of PBEF in neurons can significantly promote neuronal survival, reduce the translocation of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria to nuclei and inhibit the activation of capase-3 after glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. We further found that the overexpression of PBEF can suppress glutamate-induced mitochondrial fragmentation, the loss of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and the reduction of PGC-1 and NRF-1 expressions. Furthermore, these beneficial effects by PBEF are dependent on its enzymatic activity of NAD+ synthesis. In summary, our study demonstrated that PBEF ameliorates ischemia-induced neuronal death through inhibiting caspase-dependent and independent apoptotic signaling pathways and suppressing mitochondrial damage and dysfunction. Our study provides novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effect of PBEF, and helps to identify potential targets for ischemic stroke therapy. PMID:27576732

  9. Pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor protects against apoptotic neuronal death and mitochondrial damage in ischemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowan; Li, Hailong; Ding, Shinghua

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that Pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF), also known as nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), the rate-limiting enzyme in mammalian NAD(+) biosynthesis pathway, plays a brain and neuronal protective role in ischemic stroke. In this study, we further investigated the mechanism of its neuroprotective effect after ischemia in the primary cultured mouse cortical neurons. Using apoptotic cell death assay, fluorescent imaging, molecular biology, mitochondrial biogenesis measurements and Western blotting analysis, our results show that the overexpression of PBEF in neurons can significantly promote neuronal survival, reduce the translocation of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria to nuclei and inhibit the activation of capase-3 after glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. We further found that the overexpression of PBEF can suppress glutamate-induced mitochondrial fragmentation, the loss of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and the reduction of PGC-1 and NRF-1 expressions. Furthermore, these beneficial effects by PBEF are dependent on its enzymatic activity of NAD(+) synthesis. In summary, our study demonstrated that PBEF ameliorates ischemia-induced neuronal death through inhibiting caspase-dependent and independent apoptotic signaling pathways and suppressing mitochondrial damage and dysfunction. Our study provides novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effect of PBEF, and helps to identify potential targets for ischemic stroke therapy. PMID:27576732

  10. Ergosterol peroxide activates Foxo3-mediated cell death signaling by inhibiting AKT and c-Myc in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangmin; Wu, Qingping; Bu, Ming; Hu, Liming; Du, William W; Jiao, Chunwei; Pan, Honghui; Sdiri, Mouna; Wu, Nan; Xie, Yizhen; Yang, Burton B

    2016-06-01

    Sterols are the important active ingredients of fungal secondary metabolites to induce death of tumor cells. In our previous study, we found that ergosterol peroxide (5α, 8α-epidioxiergosta-6, 22-dien-3β-ol), purified from Ganoderma lucidum, induced human cancer cell death. Since the amount of purified ergosterol peroxide is not sufficient to perform in vivo experiments or apply clinically, we developed an approach to synthesize ergosterol peroxide chemically. After confirming the production of ergosterol peroxide, we examined the biological functions of the synthetic ergosterol peroxide. The results showed that ergosterol peroxide induced cell death and inhibited cell migration, cell cycle progression, and colony growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. We further examined the mechanism associated with this effect and found that treatment with ergosterol peroxide increased the expression of Foxo3 mRNA and protein in HepG2 cells. The upstream signal proteins pAKT and c-Myc, which can inhibit Foxo3 functions, were clearly decreased in HepG2 cells treated with ergosterol peroxide. The levels of Puma and Bax, pro-apoptotic proteins, were effectively enhanced. Our results suggest that ergosterol peroxide stimulated Foxo3 activity by inhibiting pAKT and c-Myc and activating pro-apoptotic protein Puma and Bax to induce cancer cell death. PMID:27058618

  11. Ergosterol peroxide activates Foxo3-mediated cell death signaling by inhibiting AKT and c-Myc in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Liming; Du, William W.; Jiao, Chunwei; Pan, Honghui; Sdiri, Mouna; Wu, Nan; Xie, Yizhen; Yang, Burton B.

    2016-01-01

    Sterols are the important active ingredients of fungal secondary metabolites to induce death of tumor cells. In our previous study, we found that ergosterol peroxide (5α, 8α-epidioxiergosta-6, 22-dien-3β-ol), purified from Ganoderma lucidum, induced human cancer cell death. Since the amount of purified ergosterol peroxide is not sufficient to perform in vivo experiments or apply clinically, we developed an approach to synthesize ergosterol peroxide chemically. After confirming the production of ergosterol peroxide, we examined the biological functions of the synthetic ergosterol peroxide. The results showed that ergosterol peroxide induced cell death and inhibited cell migration, cell cycle progression, and colony growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. We further examined the mechanism associated with this effect and found that treatment with ergosterol peroxide increased the expression of Foxo3 mRNA and protein in HepG2 cells. The upstream signal proteins pAKT and c-Myc, which can inhibit Foxo3 functions, were clearly decreased in HepG2 cells treated with ergosterol peroxide. The levels of Puma and Bax, pro-apoptotic proteins, were effectively enhanced. Our results suggest that ergosterol peroxide stimulated Foxo3 activity by inhibiting pAKT and c-Myc and activating pro-apoptotic protein Puma and Bax to induce cancer cell death. PMID:27058618

  12. Nanoscale Thermotropic Phase Transitions Enhancing Photothermal Microscopy Signals.

    PubMed

    Parra-Vasquez, A Nicholas G; Oudjedi, Laura; Cognet, Laurent; Lounis, Brahim

    2012-05-17

    The photothermal heterodyne imaging technique enables studies of individual weakly absorbing nano-objects in various environments. It uses a photoinduced change in the refractive index of the environment. Taking advantage of the dramatic index of refraction change occurring around a thermotropic liquid-crystalline phase transition, we demonstrate a 40-fold signal-to-noise ratio enhancement for gold nanoparticles imaged in 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) liquid crystals over those in a water environment. We studied the photothermal signal as a function of probe laser polarization, heating power, and sample temperature quantifying the optimal enhancement. This study established photothermal microscopy as a valuable technique for inducing and/or detecting local phase transitions at the nanometer scales.

  13. Coherent stochastic oscillations enhance signal detection in spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Engel, Tatiana A; Helbig, Brian; Russell, David F; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz; Neiman, Alexander B

    2009-08-01

    We study the effect of noisy oscillatory input on the signal discrimination by spontaneously firing neurons. Using analytically tractable model, we contrast signal detection in two situations: (i) when the neuron is driven by coherent oscillations and (ii) when the coherence of oscillations is destroyed. Analytical calculations revealed a region in the parameter space of the model where oscillations act to reduce the variability of neuronal firing and to enhance the discriminability of weak signals. These analytical results are employed to unveil a possible role of coherent oscillations in peripheral electrosensory system of paddlefish in improvement of detection of weak stimuli. The proposed mechanism may be relevant to a wide range of phenomena involving coherently driven oscillators.

  14. Mammalian apoptotic signalling pathways: multiple targets of protozoan parasites to activate or deactivate host cell death.

    PubMed

    Graumann, Kristin; Hippe, Diana; Gross, Uwe; Lüder, Carsten G K

    2009-11-01

    Programmed cell death is an essential mechanism of the host to combat infectious agents and to regulate immunity during infection. Consequently, activation and deactivation of the hosts' cell death pathways by protozoan parasites play critical roles in parasite control, pathogenesis, immune evasion and parasite dissemination within the host. Here, we discuss advances in the understanding of these fascinating host-parasite interactions with special emphasis on how protozoa can modulate the cell death apparatus of its host.

  15. Proteomics and functional analyses of pepper abscisic acid-responsive 1 (ABR1), which is involved in cell death and defense signaling.

    PubMed

    Choi, Du Seok; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2011-02-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a key regulator of plant growth and development, as well as plant defense responses. A high-throughput in planta proteome screen identified the pepper (Capsicum annuum) GRAM (for glucosyltransferases, Rab-like GTPase activators, and myotubularins) domain-containing ABA-RESPONSIVE1 (ABR1), which is highly induced by infection with avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria and also by treatment with ABA. The GRAM domain is essential for the cell death response and for the nuclear localization of ABR1. ABR1 is required for priming cell death and reactive oxygen species production, as well as ABA-salicylic acid (SA) antagonism. Silencing of ABR1 significantly compromised the hypersensitive response but enhanced bacterial pathogen growth and ABA levels in pepper. High levels of ABA in ABR1-silenced plants antagonized the SA levels induced by pathogen infection. Heterologous transgenic expression of ABR1 in Arabidopsis thaliana conferred enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infection. The susceptibility of the Arabidopsis ABR1 putative ortholog mutant, abr1, to these pathogens also supports the involvement of ABR1 in disease resistance. Together, these results reveal ABR1 as a novel negative regulator of ABA signaling and suggest that the nuclear ABR1 pool is essential for the cell death induction associated with ABA-SA antagonism.

  16. Enhancement of endocannabinoid signaling protects against cocaine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Luciano R; Gobira, Pedro H; Viana, Thercia G; Medeiros, Daniel C; Ferreira-Vieira, Talita H; Doria, Juliana G; Rodrigues, Flávia; Aguiar, Daniele C; Pereira, Grace S; Massessini, André R; Ribeiro, Fabíola M; de Oliveira, Antonio Carlos P; Moraes, Marcio F D; Moreira, Fabricio A

    2015-08-01

    Cocaine is an addictive substance with a potential to cause deleterious effects in the brain. The strategies for treating its neurotoxicity, however, are limited. Evidence suggests that the endocannabinoid system exerts neuroprotective functions against various stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the main enzyme responsible for terminating the actions of the endocannabinoid anandamide, reduces seizures and cell death in the hippocampus in a model of cocaine intoxication. Male Swiss mice received injections of endocannabinoid-related compounds followed by the lowest dose of cocaine that induces seizures, electroencephalographic activity and cell death in the hippocampus. The molecular mechanisms were studied in primary cell culture of this structure. The FAAH inhibitor, URB597, reduced cocaine-induced seizures and epileptiform electroencephalographic activity. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor selective agonist, ACEA, mimicked these effects, whereas the antagonist, AM251, prevented them. URB597 also inhibited cocaine-induced activation and death of hippocampal neurons, both in animals and in primary cell culture. Finally, we investigated if the PI3K/Akt/ERK intracellular pathway, a cell surviving mechanism coupled to CB1 receptor, mediated these neuroprotective effects. Accordingly, URB597 injection increased ERK and Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus. Moreover, the neuroprotective effect of this compound was reversed by the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. In conclusion, the pharmacological facilitation of the anandamide/CB1/PI3K signaling protects the brain against cocaine intoxication in experimental models. This strategy may be further explored in the development of treatments for drug-induced neurotoxicity.

  17. Expression of GADS enhances FLT3-induced mitogenic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chougule, Rohit A.; Cordero, Eugenia; Moharram, Sausan A.; Pietras, Kristian; Rönnstrand, Lars; Kazi, Julhash U.

    2016-01-01

    GADS is a member of a family of SH2 and SH3 domain-containing adaptors that functions in tyrosine kinase-mediated signaling cascades. Its expression is largely restricted to hematopoietic tissues and cell lines. Therefore, GADS is mainly involved in leukocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase signaling. GADS is known to interact with tyrosine-phosphorylated SHC, BCR-ABL and KIT. The SH2 domain of GADS has a similar binding specificity to that of GRB2 but its SH3 domain displays a different binding specificity, and thus it is involved in other downstream signaling pathways than GRB2. In the present study, we examined the role of GADS in FLT3 signaling. FLT3 is a type III receptor tyrosine kinase, which is mutated in more than 30% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and the most common mutations is the internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations. We observed that expression of GADS enhanced oncogenic FLT3-ITD-induced cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro. In a mouse xenograft model, GADS accelerated FLT3-ITD-dependent tumor formation. Furthermore, expression of GADS induced a transcriptional program leading to upregulation of MYC and mTORC1 target genes. GADS localizes to the cell membrane and strongly binds to ligand-stimulated wild-type FLT3 or is constitutively associated with the oncogenic mutant FLT3-ITD. We mapped the binding sites in FLT3 to pY955 and pY969 which overlaps with the GRB2 binding sites. Expression of GADS enhanced FLT3-mediated phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2, p38 and STAT5. Taken together, our data suggests that GADS is an important downstream component of FLT3 signaling and expression of GADS potentiates FLT3-mediated mitogenic signaling. PMID:26895103

  18. Homocysteine-NMDA receptor mediated activation of extracellular-signal regulated kinase leads to neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, Ranjana; Paul, Surojit

    2009-01-01

    Hyper-homocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for stroke and neurological abnormalities. However the underlying cellular mechanisms by which elevated homocysteine can promote neuronal death is not clear. In the present study we have examined the role of NMDA receptor mediated activation of the extracellular-signal regulated mitogen activated protein (ERK MAP) kinase pathway in homocysteine-dependent neurotoxicity. The study demonstrates that in neurons L-homocysteine-induced cell death is mediated through activation of NMDA receptors. The study also shows that homocysteine-dependent NMDA receptor stimulation and resultant Ca2+ influx leads to rapid and sustained phosphorylation of ERK MAP kinase. Inhibition of ERK phosphorylation attenuates homocysteine mediated neuronal cell death thereby demonstrating that activation of ERK MAP kinase signaling pathway is an intermediate step that couples homocysteine mediated NMDA receptor stimulation to neuronal death. The findings also show that cAMP response-element binding protein (CREB), a pro-survival transcription factor and a downstream target of ERK, is only transiently activated following homocysteine exposure. The sustained activation of ERK but a transient activation of CREB together suggest that exposure to homocysteine initiates a feedback loop that shuts off CREB signaling without affecting ERK phosphorylation and thereby facilitates homocysteine mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:19508427

  19. Fangchinoline induces autophagic cell death via p53/sestrin2/AMPK signalling in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Pan, Weidong; Zhu, Meifen; Zhang, Maosheng; Hao, Xiaojian; Liang, Guangyi; Feng, Yibin

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Fangchinoline is a novel anti-tumour agent with little known of its cellular and molecular mechanisms of action. Here we have investigated the mode of cell death induced by fangchinoline and its underlying mechanism in two human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines, HepG2 and PLC/PRF/5. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Apoptosis and autophagy were monitored in fangchinoline-treated HepG2 and PLC/PRF/5 cells by histological methods. The signal transduction pathways involved in activation of autophagy were examined, using immunoblotting, real-time PCR and siRNA techniques. KEY RESULTS Fangchinoline did not induce apoptosis in HepG2 and PLC/PRF/5 cells but triggered, dose-dependently, autophagy, an alternative mode of cell death which may contribute to fangchinoline's anti-tumour action. Nuclear translocation of p53 was involved in induction of autophagy by fangchinoline, followed by selective transactivation of the autophagy-related gene sestrin2 and initiation of the autophagic process. Signalling by the AMP-activated protein kinase was also involved as a downstream target of sestrin2 and induced mTOR-independent autophagic cell death in both cell lines. siRNA for Atg 5 or pharmacological block of p53 abolished fangchinoline-induced autophagy and inhibition of autophagy switched cell death to apoptosis in these cells, suggesting that cell death is irreversible once autophagy is induced by fangchinoline. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Fangchinoline is a highly specific agent inducing autophagic cell death in hepatocellular carcinoma cells with a novel mechanism, which elucidates the potential of fangchinoline to potentiate programmed cell death in cancer cells. PMID:21418191

  20. Gold nanorods as photothermal agents and autofluorescence enhancer to track cell death during plasmonic photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannadorai, Ravi Kumar; Chiew, Geraldine Giap Ying; Luo, Kathy Qian; Liu, Quan

    2015-07-01

    The transverse and longitudinal plasmon resonance in gold nanorods can be exploited to localize the photothermal therapy and influence the fluorescence to monitor the treatment outcome at the same time. While the longitudinal plasmon peak contributes to the photothermal effect, the transverse peak can enhance fluorescence. After cells take in PEGylated nanorods through endocytosis, autofluorescence from endogenous fluorophores such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) in the mitochondria is enhanced two times, which is a good indicator of the respiratory status of the cell. When cells are illuminated continuously with near infrared laser, the temperature reaches the hyperthermic region within the first four minutes, which demonstrates the efficiency of gold nanorods in photothermal therapy. The cell viability test and autofluorescence intensity show good correlation indicating the progress of cell death over time.

  1. Excessive L-cysteine induces vacuole-like cell death by activating endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in intestinal porcine epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yun; Wu, Zhenlong; Dai, Zhaolai; Sun, Kaiji; Zhang, Qing; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    High intake of dietary cysteine is extremely toxic to animals and the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that excessive L-cysteine induces cell death by activating endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling in intestinal porcine epithelial cells. Jejunal enterocytes were cultured in the presence of 0-10 mmol/L L-cysteine. Cell viability, morphologic alterations, mRNA levels for genes involved in ER stress, protein abundances for glucose-regulated protein 78, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor-2 (eIF2α), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), p38 MAPK, and c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK1/2) were determined. The results showed that L-cysteine (5-10 mmol/L) reduced cell viability (P < 0.05) and led to vacuole-like cell death in intestinal porcine epithelial cells. These adverse effects of L-cysteine were not affected by the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. The protein abundances for CHOP, phosphorylated (p)-eIF2α, p-JNK1/2, p-p38 MAPK, and the spliced form of XBP-1 mRNA were enhanced (P < 0.05), whereas those for p-ERK1/2 were reduced (P < 0.05). Collectively, excessive L-cysteine induces vacuole-like cell death via the activation of ER stress and MAPK signaling in small intestinal epithelial cells. These signaling pathways may be potential targets for developing effective strategies to prevent the toxicity of dietary cysteine.

  2. Enhanced recovery program for hip and knee replacement reduces death rate

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Multimodal techniques can aid early rehabilitation and discharge of patients following primary joint replacement. We hypothesized that this not only reduces the economic burden of joint replacement by reducing length of stay, but also helps in reduction of early complications. Patients and methods We evaluated 4,500 consecutive unselected total hip replacements and total knee replacements regarding length of hospital stay, mortality, and perioperative complications. The first 3,000 underwent a traditional protocol while the other 1,500 underwent an enhanced recovery protocol involving behavioral, pharmacological, and procedural modifications. Results There was a reduction in 30-day death rate (0.5% to 0.1%, p = 0.02) and 90-day death rate (0.8% to 0.2%, p = 0.01). The median length of stay decreased from 6 days to 3 days (p < 0.001), resulting in a saving of 5,418 bed days. Requirement for blood transfusion was reduced (23% to 9.8%, p < 0.001). There was a trend of a reduced rate of 30-day myocardial infarction (0.8% to 0.5%. p = 0 .2) and stroke (0.5% to 0.2%, p = 0.2). The 60-day deep vein thrombosis figures (0.8% to 0.6%, p = 0.5) and pulmonary embolism figures (1.2% to 1.1%, p = 0.9) were similar. Re-admission rate remained unchanged during the period of the study (4.7% to 4.8%, p = 0.8). Interpretation This large observational study of unselected consecutive hip and knee arthroplasty patients shows a substantial reduction in death rate, reduced length of stay, and reduced transfusion requirements after the introduction of a multimodal enhanced recovery protocol. PMID:21895500

  3. Enhancement of Glioma Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy Response With Targeted Antibody Therapy Against Death Receptor 5

    SciTech Connect

    Fiveash, John B. Gillespie, G. Yancey; Oliver, Patsy G.; Zhou Tong; Belenky, Michael L.; Buchsbaum, Donald J.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: TRA-8 is an agonistic mouse monoclonal antibody that binds to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptor 5, which induces apoptosis in cancer cells through a caspase-8-dependent mechanism. We investigated the ability of TRA-8 to augment the radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy response of human glioma cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Materials: The in vitro cytotoxicity of TRA-8 and temozolomide (Tmz) or RT was examined using adenosine triphosphate-dependent viability and clonogenic survival assays with five glioma cell lines. Death receptor 5 expression was determined by flow cytometry. In vivo studies included subcutaneous and intracranial xenograft models testing various combination treatments, including RT, Tmz, and TRA-8. Results: TRA-8, combined with Tmz or RT, produced enhanced cytotoxicity against five glioma cell lines compared with the use of the individual agents alone. Death receptor 5 upregulation occurred in response to RT. Complete tumor regression in the subcutaneous experiments was the most common in animals that received combination therapy with TRA-8/Tmz/RT. TRA-8 enhanced tumor growth delay in combination with RT or Tmz. TRA-8 alone had limited activity against intracranial tumors. In contrast, the median survival of mice treated with TRA-8/Tmz/RT was significantly greater than the control or TRA-8-alone-treated mice. The median survival of the mice treated with TRA-8/Tmz/RT or chemoradiotherapy only was significantly greater than the control or TRA-8-treated mice. A trend toward improved survival was observed between TRA-8/Tmz/RT-treated and Tmz/RT-treated mice. Conclusions: These preliminary findings support the hypothesis that TRA-8 will augment the RT and chemotherapy response in gliomas. A humanized version of TRA-8 is being evaluated in a Phase II clinical trial.

  4. Environmental enrichment enhances autophagy signaling in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tomohisa; Shimizu, Kunio; Shimazaki, Kuniko; Toda, Hiroyuki; Nibuya, Masashi

    2014-12-10

    The findings that antidepressive treatments increase hippocampal neurotrophins have led researchers to emphasize the importance of neurogenesis, formation of new dendrites, and survival of neurons in the brain. However, it is difficult to maintain neural plasticity just by enriching the environment to facilitate formation of new networks. Neural plasticity also requires a degradation process that clears off unnecessary and undesirable components. We have recently reported an increase in autophagy signaling (wherein the cell digests components of itself) that has the potential of enhancing neuronal and synaptic plasticity after multiple sessions of electroconvulsive seizure treatment. The present study revealed an increase in autophagy signaling in the rat hippocampus following 2 weeks of environmental enrichment (EE), a procedure known to elicit antidepressive and anxiolytic behavioral changes in various animal paradigms. Western blot analysis showed an increase in hippocampal expression of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3-II (LC3-II), which is lipidated from LC3-I, in rats in the EE group. The effectiveness of the 2-week EE housing condition was validated by anxiolytic effects observed in the elevated plus maze test, enhanced habituation in the open field test, and elevation of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression. In addition, we showed that the EE housing condition ameliorated numbing/avoidance behaviors, but not hypervigilant behaviors, in an animal model of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This is the first report to show that EE can increase autophagy signaling and improve numbing/avoidance behaviors in an animal model of PTSD.

  5. Nanoscale Catalysts for NMR Signal Enhancement by Reversible Exchange

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two types of nanoscale catalysts were created to explore NMR signal enhancement via reversible exchange (SABRE) at the interface between heterogeneous and homogeneous conditions. Nanoparticle and polymer comb variants were synthesized by covalently tethering Ir-based organometallic catalysts to support materials composed of TiO2/PMAA (poly(methacrylic acid)) and PVP (polyvinylpyridine), respectively, and characterized by AAS, NMR, and DLS. Following parahydrogen (pH2) gas delivery to mixtures containing one type of “nano-SABRE” catalyst particle, a target substrate, and ethanol, up to ∼(−)40-fold and ∼(−)7-fold 1H NMR signal enhancements were observed for pyridine substrates using the nanoparticle and polymer comb catalysts, respectively, following transfer to high field (9.4 T). These enhancements appear to result from intact particles and not from any catalyst molecules leaching from their supports; unlike the case with homogeneous SABRE catalysts, high-field (in situ) SABRE effects were generally not observed with the nanoscale catalysts. The potential for separation and reuse of such catalyst particles is also demonstrated. Taken together, these results support the potential utility of rational design at molecular, mesoscopic, and macroscopic/engineering levels for improving SABRE and HET-SABRE (heterogeneous-SABRE) for applications varying from fundamental studies of catalysis to biomedical imaging. PMID:26185545

  6. Target of rapamycin signaling regulates high mobility group protein association to chromatin, which functions to suppress necrotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) is an evolutionarily conserved signal transduction pathway activated by environmental nutrients that regulates gene transcription to control cell growth and proliferation. How TORC1 modulates chromatin structure to control gene expression, however, is largely unknown. Because TORC1 is a major transducer of environmental information, defining this process has critical implications for both understanding environmental effects on epigenetic processes and the role of aberrant TORC1 signaling in many diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Results To elucidate the role of TORC1 signaling in chromatin regulation, we screened a budding yeast histone H3 and H4 mutant library using the selective TORC1 inhibitor rapamycin to identify histone residues functionally connected to TORC1. Intriguingly, we identified histone H3 lysine 37 (H3K37) as a residue that is essential during periods of limited TORC1 activity. An H3K37A mutation resulted in cell death by necrosis when TORC1 signaling was simultaneously impaired. The induction of necrosis was linked to alterations in high mobility group (HMG) protein binding to chromatin. Furthermore, the necrotic phenotype could be recapitulated in wild-type cells by deregulating the model HMG proteins, Hmo1 or Ixr1, thus implicating a direct role for HMG protein deregulation as a stimulus for inducing necrosis. Conclusions This study identifies histone H3 and H4 residues functionally required for TORC1-dependent cell growth and proliferation that are also candidate epigenetic pathways regulated by TORC1 signaling. It also demonstrates a novel role for H3K37 and TORC1 in regulating the binding of select HMG proteins to chromatin and that HMG protein deregulation can initiate a necrotic cell death response. Overall, the results from this study suggest a possible model by which chromatin anchors HMG proteins during periods of limited TORC1 signaling, such as that

  7. Signal enhanced holographic fluorescence microscopy with guide-star reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jang, Changwon; Clark, David C; Kim, Jonghyun; Lee, Byoungho; Kim, Myung K

    2016-04-01

    We propose a signal enhanced guide-star reconstruction method for holographic fluorescence microscopy. In the late 00's, incoherent digital holography started to be vigorously studied by several groups to overcome the limitations of conventional digital holography. The basic concept of incoherent digital holography is to acquire the complex hologram from incoherent light by utilizing temporal coherency of a spatially incoherent light source. The advent of incoherent digital holography opened new possibility of holographic fluorescence microscopy (HFM), which was difficult to achieve with conventional digital holography. However there has been an important issue of low and noisy signal in HFM which slows down the system speed and degrades the imaging quality. When guide-star reconstruction is adopted, the image reconstruction gives an improved result compared to the conventional propagation reconstruction method. The guide-star reconstruction method gives higher imaging signal-to-noise ratio since the acquired complex point spread function provides optimal system-adaptive information and can restore the signal buried in the noise more efficiently. We present theoretical explanation and simulation as well as experimental results. PMID:27446653

  8. Signal enhanced holographic fluorescence microscopy with guide-star reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Changwon; Clark, David C.; Kim, Jonghyun; Lee, Byoungho; Kim, Myung K.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a signal enhanced guide-star reconstruction method for holographic fluorescence microscopy. In the late 00’s, incoherent digital holography started to be vigorously studied by several groups to overcome the limitations of conventional digital holography. The basic concept of incoherent digital holography is to acquire the complex hologram from incoherent light by utilizing temporal coherency of a spatially incoherent light source. The advent of incoherent digital holography opened new possibility of holographic fluorescence microscopy (HFM), which was difficult to achieve with conventional digital holography. However there has been an important issue of low and noisy signal in HFM which slows down the system speed and degrades the imaging quality. When guide-star reconstruction is adopted, the image reconstruction gives an improved result compared to the conventional propagation reconstruction method. The guide-star reconstruction method gives higher imaging signal-to-noise ratio since the acquired complex point spread function provides optimal system-adaptive information and can restore the signal buried in the noise more efficiently. We present theoretical explanation and simulation as well as experimental results. PMID:27446653

  9. Signaling pathways relevant to cognition-enhancing drug targets.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Caroline; Gaudreau, Pierrette; Quirion, Rémi

    2015-01-01

    Aging is generally associated with a certain cognitive decline. However, individual differences exist. While age-related memory deficits can be observed in humans and rodents in the absence of pathological conditions, some individuals maintain intact cognitive functions up to an advanced age. The mechanisms underlying learning and memory processes involve the recruitment of multiple signaling pathways and gene expression, leading to adaptative neuronal plasticity and long-lasting changes in brain circuitry. This chapter summarizes the current understanding of how these signaling cascades could be modulated by cognition-enhancing agents favoring memory formation and successful aging. It focuses on data obtained in rodents, particularly in the rat as it is the most common animal model studied in this field. First, we will discuss the role of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate and its receptors, downstream signaling effectors [e.g., calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), protein kinase C (PKC), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB)], associated immediate early gene (e.g., Homer 1a, Arc and Zif268), and growth factors [insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)] in synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Second, the impact of the cholinergic system and related modulators on memory will be briefly reviewed. Finally, since dynorphin neuropeptides have recently been associated with memory impairments in aging, it is proposed as an attractive target to develop novel cognition-enhancing agents. PMID:25977080

  10. Ultrasonic correlator versus signal averager as a signal to noise enhancement instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kishoni, Doron; Pietsch, Benjamin E.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of thick and attenuating materials is hampered by the reduce amplitudes of the propagated waves to a degree that the noise is too high to enable meaningful interpretation of the data. In order to overcome the low signal to noise ratio (S/N), a correlation technique has been developed. In this method, a continuous pseudo-random pattern generated digitally is transmitted and detected by piezoelectric transducers. A correlation is performed in the instrument between the received signal and a variable delayed image of the transmitted one. The result is shown to be proportional to the impulse response of the investigated material, analogous to a signal received from a pulsed system, with an improved S/N ratio. The degree of S/N enhancement depends on the sweep rate. The correlator is described, and it is compared to the method of enhancing S/N ratio by averaging the signals. The similarities and differences between the two are highlighted and the potential advantage of the correlator system is explained.

  11. An approach to predict Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD) using time domain and bispectrum features from HRV signal.

    PubMed

    Houshyarifar, Vahid; Chehel Amirani, Mehdi

    2016-08-12

    In this paper we present a method to predict Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) with higher order spectral (HOS) and linear (Time) features extracted from heart rate variability (HRV) signal. Predicting the occurrence of SCA is important in order to avoid the probability of Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD). This work is a challenge to predict five minutes before SCA onset. The method consists of four steps: pre-processing, feature extraction, feature reduction, and classification. In the first step, the QRS complexes are detected from the electrocardiogram (ECG) signal and then the HRV signal is extracted. In second step, bispectrum features of HRV signal and time-domain features are obtained. Six features are extracted from bispectrum and two features from time-domain. In the next step, these features are reduced to one feature by the linear discriminant analysis (LDA) technique. Finally, KNN and support vector machine-based classifiers are used to classify the HRV signals. We used two database named, MIT/BIH Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD) Database and Physiobank Normal Sinus Rhythm (NSR). In this work we achieved prediction of SCD occurrence for six minutes before the SCA with the accuracy over 91%. PMID:27567781

  12. Quantitative Ultrasound Characterization of Tumor Cell Death: Ultrasound-Stimulated Microbubbles for Radiation Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunjung Christina; Al-Mahrouki, Azza; Gorjizadeh, Alborz; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Karshafian, Raffi; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of quantitative ultrasound imaging in characterizing cancer cell death caused by enhanced radiation treatments. This investigation focused on developing this ultrasound modality as an imaging-based non-invasive method that can be used to monitor therapeutic ultrasound and radiation effects. High-frequency (25 MHz) ultrasound was used to image tumor responses caused by ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles in combination with radiation. Human prostate xenografts grown in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice were treated using 8, 80, or 1000 µL/kg of microbubbles stimulated with ultrasound at 250, 570, or 750 kPa, and exposed to 0, 2, or 8 Gy of radiation. Tumors were imaged prior to treatment and 24 hours after treatment. Spectral analysis of images acquired from treated tumors revealed overall increases in ultrasound backscatter intensity and the spectral intercept parameter. The increase in backscatter intensity compared to the control ranged from 1.9±1.6 dB for the clinical imaging dose of microbubbles (8 µL/kg, 250 kPa, 2 Gy) to 7.0±4.1 dB for the most extreme treatment condition (1000 µL/kg, 750 kPa, 8 Gy). In parallel, in situ end-labelling (ISEL) staining, ceramide, and cyclophilin A staining demonstrated increases in cell death due to DNA fragmentation, ceramide-mediated apoptosis, and release of cyclophilin A as a result of cell membrane permeabilization, respectively. Quantitative ultrasound results indicated changes that paralleled increases in cell death observed from histology analyses supporting its use for non-invasive monitoring of cancer treatment outcomes. PMID:25051356

  13. Human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells respond to interaction with Entamoeba histolytica by changes in morphology, integrin signalling and cell death.

    PubMed

    Faust, Daniela M; Marquay Markiewicz, Jacques; Danckaert, Anne; Soubigou, Guillaume; Guillen, Nancy

    2011-07-01

    Invasive infection with Entamoeba histolytica causes intestinal and hepatic amoebiasis. In liver, parasites cross the endothelial barrier before abscess formation in the parenchyma. We focussed on amoebae interactions with human hepatic endothelial cells, the latter potentially playing a dual role in the infection process: as a barrier and as modulators of host defence responses. We characterized early responses of a human liver sinusoidal endothelial cell line to virulent and virulence-attenuated E. histolytica. Within the first minutes human cells start to retract, enter into apoptosis and die. In the presence of virulent amoebae, expression of genes related to cell cycle, cell death and integrin-mediated adhesion signalling was modulated, and actin fibre, focal adhesion kinase and paxillin localizations changed. Effects of inhibitors and amoeba strains not expressing pathogenic factors amoebapore A and cysteine protease A5 indicated that cell death and cytoskeleton disorganization depend upon parasite adhesion and amoebic cysteine proteinase activities. The data establish a relation between cytotoxic effects of E. histolytica and altered human target cell adhesion and suggest that interference with adhesion signalling triggers endothelial cell retraction and death. Understanding the roles of integrin signalling in endothelial cells will provide clues to unravel host-pathogen interactions during amoebic liver infection. PMID:21624031

  14. Activation of PI3K signaling prevents aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death in the murine cochlea.

    PubMed

    Jadali, Azadeh; Kwan, Kelvin Y

    2016-01-01

    Loss of sensory hair cells of the inner ear due to aminoglycoside exposure is a major cause of hearing loss. Using an immortalized multipotent otic progenitor (iMOP) cell line, specific signaling pathways that promote otic cell survival were identified. Of the signaling pathways identified, the PI3K pathway emerged as a strong candidate for promoting hair cell survival. In aging animals, components for active PI3K signaling are present but decrease in hair cells. In this study, we determined whether activated PI3K signaling in hair cells promotes survival. To activate PI3K signaling in hair cells, we used a small molecule inhibitor of PTEN or genetically ablated PTEN using a conditional knockout animal. Hair cell survival was challenged by addition of gentamicin to cochlear cultures. Hair cells with activated PI3K signaling were more resistant to aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. These results indicate that increased PI3K signaling in hair cells promote survival and the PI3K signaling pathway is a target for preventing aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss.

  15. Role of the insulin/Tor signaling network in starvation-induced programmed cell death in Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, T L; McCall, K

    2012-06-01

    Amino-acid starvation leads to an inhibition of cellular proliferation and the induction of programmed cell death (PCD) in the Drosophila ovary. Disruption of insulin signaling has been shown to inhibit the progression of oogenesis, but it is unclear whether this phenotype mimics starvation. Here, we investigate whether the insulin-mediated phosphoinositide kinase-3 pathway regulates PCD in mid oogenesis. We reasoned that under well-fed conditions, disruption of positive components of the insulin signaling pathway within the germline would mimic starvation and produce degenerating egg chambers. Surprisingly, mutants did not mimic starvation but instead produced many abnormal egg chambers in which the somatic follicle cells disappeared and the germline persisted. These abnormal egg chambers did not show an induction of caspases and lysosomes like that observed in wild-type (WT) degenerating egg chambers. Egg chambers from insulin signaling mutants were resistant to starvation-induced PCD, indicating that a complete block in insulin-signaling prevents the proper response to starvation. However, target of rapamycin (Tor) mutants did show a phenotype that mimicked WT starvation-induced PCD, indicating an insulin independent regulation of PCD via Tor signaling. These results suggest that inhibition of the insulin signaling pathway is not sufficient to regulate starvation-induced PCD in mid oogenesis. Furthermore, starvation-induced PCD is regulated by Tor signaling converging with the canonical insulin signaling pathway.

  16. Activation of PI3K signaling prevents aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death in the murine cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Jadali, Azadeh

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Loss of sensory hair cells of the inner ear due to aminoglycoside exposure is a major cause of hearing loss. Using an immortalized multipotent otic progenitor (iMOP) cell line, specific signaling pathways that promote otic cell survival were identified. Of the signaling pathways identified, the PI3K pathway emerged as a strong candidate for promoting hair cell survival. In aging animals, components for active PI3K signaling are present but decrease in hair cells. In this study, we determined whether activated PI3K signaling in hair cells promotes survival. To activate PI3K signaling in hair cells, we used a small molecule inhibitor of PTEN or genetically ablated PTEN using a conditional knockout animal. Hair cell survival was challenged by addition of gentamicin to cochlear cultures. Hair cells with activated PI3K signaling were more resistant to aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. These results indicate that increased PI3K signaling in hair cells promote survival and the PI3K signaling pathway is a target for preventing aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss. PMID:27142333

  17. Chronic stress enhances microglia activation and exacerbates death of nigral dopaminergic neurons under conditions of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s disease is an irreversible neurodegenerative disease linked to progressive movement disorders and is accompanied by an inflammatory reaction that is believed to contribute to its pathogenesis. Since sensitivity to inflammation is not the same in all brain structures, the aim of this work was to test whether physiological conditions as stress could enhance susceptibility to inflammation in the substantia nigra, where death of dopaminergic neurons takes place in Parkinson’s disease. Methods To achieve our aim, we induced an inflammatory process in nonstressed and stressed rats (subject to a chronic variate stress) by a single intranigral injection of lipopolysaccharide, a potent proinflammogen. The effect of this treatment was evaluated on inflammatory markers as well as on neuronal and glial populations. Results Data showed a synergistic effect between inflammation and stress, thus resulting in higher microglial activation and expression of proinflammatory markers. More important, the higher inflammatory response seen in stressed animals was associated with a higher rate of death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, the most characteristic feature seen in Parkinson’s disease. This effect was dependent on glucocorticoids. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that stress sensitises midbrain microglia to further inflammatory stimulus. This suggests that stress may be an important risk factor in the degenerative processes and symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:24565378

  18. Signal quality enhancement using higher order wavelets for ultrasonic TOFD signals from austenitic stainless steel welds.

    PubMed

    Praveen, Angam; Vijayarekha, K; Abraham, Saju T; Venkatraman, B

    2013-09-01

    Time of flight diffraction (TOFD) technique is a well-developed ultrasonic non-destructive testing (NDT) method and has been applied successfully for accurate sizing of defects in metallic materials. This technique was developed in early 1970s as a means for accurate sizing and positioning of cracks in nuclear components became very popular in the late 1990s and is today being widely used in various industries for weld inspection. One of the main advantages of TOFD is that, apart from fast technique, it provides higher probability of detection for linear defects. Since TOFD is based on diffraction of sound waves from the extremities of the defect compared to reflection from planar faces as in pulse echo and phased array, the resultant signal would be quite weak and signal to noise ratio (SNR) low. In many cases the defect signal is submerged in this noise making it difficult for detection, positioning and sizing. Several signal processing methods such as digital filtering, Split Spectrum Processing (SSP), Hilbert Transform and Correlation techniques have been developed in order to suppress unwanted noise and enhance the quality of the defect signal which can thus be used for characterization of defects and the material. Wavelet Transform based thresholding techniques have been applied largely for de-noising of ultrasonic signals. However in this paper, higher order wavelets are used for analyzing the de-noising performance for TOFD signals obtained from Austenitic Stainless Steel welds. It is observed that higher order wavelets give greater SNR improvement compared to the lower order wavelets.

  19. Proteomic analysis of novel targets associated with the enhancement of TrkA-induced SK-N-MC cancer cell death caused by NGF

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Eun Joo; Chung, Ky Hyun; Bae, Dong-Won; Kim, Choong Won

    2016-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is known to regulate both cancer cell survival and death signaling, depending on the cellular circumstances, in various cell types. In this study, we showed that NGF strongly upregulated the protein level of tropomyosin-related kinase A (TrkA) in TrkA-inducible SK-N-MC cancer cells, resulting in increases in various TrkA-dependent cellular processes, including the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and caspase-8 cleavage. In addition, NGF enhanced TrkA-induced morphological changes and cell death, and this effect was significantly suppressed by the JNK inhibitor SP600125, but not by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor wortmannin. To investigate novel targets associated with the enhancement of TrkA-induced SK-N-MC cell death caused by NGF, we performed Coomassie Brilliant Blue staining and two-dimensional (2D) proteomic analysis in TrkA-inducible SK-N-MC cells. We identified 31 protein spots that were either greatly upregulated or downregulated by TrkA during NGF treatment using matrix-associated laser desorption/ionization time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry, and we analyzed the effects of SP600125 and wortmannin on the spots. Interestingly, 11 protein spots, including heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K), lamin B1 and TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP43), were significantly influenced by SP600125, but not by wortmannin. Moreover, the NGF/TrkA-dependent inhibition of cell viability was significantly enhanced by knockdown of hnRNP K using small interfering RNA, demonstrating that hnRNP K is a novel target associated with the regulation of TrkA-dependent SK-N-MC cancer cell death enhanced by NGF. PMID:27229480

  20. Enhancement of new physics signal sensitivity with mistagged charm quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Doojin; Park, Myeonghun

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the potential for enhancing search sensitivity for signals having charm quarks in the final state, using the sizable bottom-mistagging rate for charm quarks at the LHC. Provided that the relevant background processes contain light quarks instead of charm quarks, the application of b-tagging on charm quark-initiated jets enables us to reject more background events than signal ones due to the relatively small mistagging rate for light quarks. The basic idea is tested with two rare top decay processes: i) t → ch → cb b bar and ii) t → bH+ → b b bar c where h and H+ denote the Standard Model-like higgs boson and a charged higgs boson, respectively. The major background source is a hadronic top quark decay such as t → bW+ → b s bar c. We test our method with Monte Carlo simulation at the LHC 14 TeV, and find that the signal-over-background ratio can be increased by a factor of O (6- 7) with a suitably designed (heavy) flavor tagging algorithm and scheme.

  1. RHOA inactivation enhances Wnt signaling and promotes colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Paulo; Macaya, Irati; Bazzocco, Sarah; Mazzolini, Rocco; Andretta, Elena; Dopeso, Higinio; Mateo-Lozano, Silvia; Bilić, Josipa; Cartón-García, Fernando; Nieto, Rocio; Suárez-López, Lucia; Afonso, Elsa; Landolfi, Stefania; Hernandez-Losa, Javier; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Cajal, Santiago Ramón y; Tabernero, Josep; Tebbutt, Niall C.; Mariadason, John M.; Schwartz, Simo; Arango, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the small GTPase RHOA has strong oncogenic effects in many tumor types, although its role in colorectal cancer remains unclear. Here we show that RHOA inactivation contributes to colorectal cancer progression/metastasis, largely through the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. RhoA inactivation in the murine intestine accelerates the tumorigenic process and in human colon cancer cells leads to the redistribution of β-catenin from the membrane to the nucleus and enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling, resulting in increased proliferation, invasion and de-differentiation. In mice, RHOA inactivation contributes to colon cancer metastasis and reduced RHOA levels were observed at metastatic sites compared to primary human colon tumors. Therefore, we have identified a new mechanism of activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and characterized the role of RHOA as a novel tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. These results constitute a shift from the current paradigm and demonstrate that RHO GTPases can suppress tumor progression and metastasis. PMID:25413277

  2. Direct reconstruction of enhanced signal in computed tomography perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Lyu, Qingwen; Ma, Jianhua; Wang, Jing

    2016-04-01

    High imaging dose has been a concern in computed tomography perfusion (CTP) as repeated scans are performed at the same location of a patient. On the other hand, signal changes only occur at limited regions in CT acquired at different time points. In this work, we propose a new reconstruction strategy by effectively utilizing the initial phase high-quality CT to reconstruct the later phase CT acquired with a low-dose protocol. In the proposed strategy, initial high-quality CT is considered as a base image and enhanced signal (ES) is reconstructed directly by minimizing the penalized weighted least-square (PWLS) criterion. The proposed PWLS-ES strategy converts the conventional CT reconstruction into a sparse signal reconstruction problem. Digital and anthropomorphic phantom studies were performed to evaluate the performance of the proposed PWLS-ES strategy. Both phantom studies show that the proposed PWLS-ES method outperforms the standard iterative CT reconstruction algorithm based on the same PWLS criterion according to various quantitative metrics including root mean squared error (RMSE) and the universal quality index (UQI).

  3. Enhanced insulin signaling in density-enhanced phosphatase-1 (DEP-1) knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Janine; Brachs, Sebastian; Trappiel, Manuela; Kintscher, Ulrich; Meyborg, Heike; Wellnhofer, Ernst; Thöne-Reineke, Christa; Stawowy, Philipp; Östman, Arne; Birkenfeld, Andreas L.; Böhmer, Frank D.; Kappert, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Objective Insulin resistance can be triggered by enhanced dephosphorylation of the insulin receptor or downstream components in the insulin signaling cascade through protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Downregulating density-enhanced phosphatase-1 (DEP-1) resulted in an improved metabolic status in previous analyses. This phenotype was primarily caused by hepatic DEP-1 reduction. Methods Here we further elucidated the role of DEP-1 in glucose homeostasis by employing a conventional knockout model to explore the specific contribution of DEP-1 in metabolic tissues. Ptprj−/− (DEP-1 deficient) and wild-type C57BL/6 mice were fed a low-fat or high-fat diet. Metabolic phenotyping was combined with analyses of phosphorylation patterns of insulin signaling components. Additionally, experiments with skeletal muscle cells and muscle tissue were performed to assess the role of DEP-1 for glucose uptake. Results High-fat diet fed-Ptprj−/− mice displayed enhanced insulin sensitivity and improved glucose tolerance. Furthermore, leptin levels and blood pressure were reduced in Ptprj−/− mice. DEP-1 deficiency resulted in increased phosphorylation of components of the insulin signaling cascade in liver, skeletal muscle and adipose tissue after insulin challenge. The beneficial effect on glucose homeostasis in vivo was corroborated by increased glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells in which DEP-1 was downregulated, and in skeletal muscle of Ptprj−/− mice. Conclusion Together, these data establish DEP-1 as novel negative regulator of insulin signaling. PMID:25830095

  4. The Fas-associated death domain protein/caspase-8/c-FLIP signaling pathway is involved in TNF-induced activation of ERK

    SciTech Connect

    Lueschen, Silke; Falk, Markus; Scherer, Gudrun; Ussat, Sandra; Paulsen, Maren; Adam-Klages, Sabine . E-mail: sadam@email.uni-kiel.de

    2005-10-15

    The cytokine TNF activates multiple signaling pathways leading to cellular responses ranging from proliferation and survival to apoptosis. While most of these pathways have been elucidated in detail over the past few years, the molecular mechanism leading to the activation of the MAP kinases ERK remains ill defined and is controversially discussed. Therefore, we have analyzed TNF-induced ERK activation in various human and murine cell lines and show that it occurs in a cell-type-specific manner. In addition, we provide evidence for the involvement of the signaling components Fas-associated death domain protein (FADD), caspase-8, and c-FLIP in the pathway activating ERK in response to TNF. This conclusion is based on the following observations: (I) Overexpression of FADD, caspase-8, or a c-FLIP protein containing the death effector domains only leads to enhanced and prolonged ERK activation after TNF treatment. (II) TNF-induced ERK activation is strongly diminished in the absence of FADD. Interestingly, the enzymatic function of caspase-8 is not required for TNF-induced ERK activation. Additional evidence suggests a role for this pathway in the proliferative response of murine fibroblasts to TNF.

  5. Biochemical Analysis of Initiator Caspase-Activating Complexes: The Apoptosome and the Death-Inducing Signaling Complex.

    PubMed

    Langlais, Claudia; Hughes, Michelle A; Cain, Kelvin; MacFarlane, Marion

    2015-12-02

    Apoptosis is a highly regulated process that can be initiated by activation of death receptors or perturbation of mitochondria causing the release of apoptogenic proteins. This results in the activation of caspases, which are responsible for many of the biochemical and morphological changes associated with apoptosis. Caspases are normally inactive and require activation in a cascade emanating from an "initiator" or activating caspase, which in turn activates a downstream or "effector" caspase. Activation of initiator caspases is tightly regulated and requires the assembly of caspase-9 (via mitochondrial perturbation) or caspase-8/10 (via death receptor ligation) activating complexes, which are termed the apoptosome and the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), respectively. These large multiprotein complexes can initially be separated according to size by gel filtration chromatography and subsequently analyzed by affinity purification or immunoprecipitation. The advantage of combining these techniques is one can first assess the assembly of individual components into a multiprotein complex, and then assess the size and composition of the native functional signaling platform within a particular cell type alongside a biochemical analysis of the enriched/purified complex. Here, we describe various methods currently used for characterization of the apoptosome and DISC.

  6. Araguspongine C Induces Autophagic Death in Breast Cancer Cells through Suppression of c-Met and HER2 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Akl, Mohamed R.; Ayoub, Nehad M.; Ebrahim, Hassan Y.; Mohyeldin, Mohamed M.; Orabi, Khaled Y.; Foudah, Ahmed I.; El Sayed, Khalid A.

    2015-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases are key regulators of cellular growth and proliferation. Dysregulations of receptor tyrosine kinases in cancer cells may promote tumorigenesis by multiple mechanisms including enhanced cell survival and inhibition of cell death. Araguspongines represent a group of macrocyclic oxaquinolizidine alkaloids isolated from the marine sponge Xestospongia species. This study evaluated the anticancer activity of the known oxaquinolizidine alkaloids araguspongines A, C, K and L, and xestospongin B against breast cancer cells. Araguspongine C inhibited the proliferation of multiple breast cancer cell lines in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, araguspongine C-induced autophagic cell death in HER2-overexpressing BT-474 breast cancer cells was characterized by vacuole formation and upregulation of autophagy markers including LC3A/B, Atg3, Atg7, and Atg16L. Araguspongine C-induced autophagy was associated with suppression of c-Met and HER2 receptor tyrosine kinase activation. Further in-silico docking studies and cell-free Z-LYTE assays indicated the potential of direct interaction between araguspongine C and the receptor tyrosine kinases c-Met and HER2 at their kinase domains. Remarkably, araguspongine C treatment resulted in the suppression of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling cascade in breast cancer cells undergoing autophagy. Induction of autophagic death in BT-474 cells was also associated with decreased levels of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor upon treatment with effective concentration of araguspongine C. In conclusion, results of this study are the first to reveal the potential of araguspongine C as an inhibitor to receptor tyrosine kinases resulting in the induction of autophagic cell death in breast cancer cells. PMID:25580621

  7. Discovery of small-molecule enhancers of reactive oxygen species that are nontoxic or cause genotype-selective cell death.

    PubMed

    Adams, Drew J; Boskovic, Zarko V; Theriault, Jimmy R; Wang, Alex J; Stern, Andrew M; Wagner, Bridget K; Shamji, Alykhan F; Schreiber, Stuart L

    2013-05-17

    Elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels has been observed in many cancer cells relative to nontransformed cells, and recent reports have suggested that small-molecule enhancers of ROS may selectively kill cancer cells in various in vitro and in vivo models. We used a high-throughput screening approach to identify several hundred small-molecule enhancers of ROS in a human osteosarcoma cell line. A minority of these compounds diminished the viability of cancer cell lines, indicating that ROS elevation by small molecules is insufficient to induce death of cancer cell lines. Three chemical probes (BRD5459, BRD56491, BRD9092) are highlighted that most strongly elevate markers of oxidative stress without causing cell death and may be of use in a variety of cellular settings. For example, combining nontoxic ROS-enhancing probes with nontoxic doses of L-buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis previously studied in cancer patients, led to potent cell death in more than 20 cases, suggesting that even nontoxic ROS-enhancing treatments may warrant exploration in combination strategies. Additionally, a few ROS-enhancing compounds that contain sites of electrophilicity, including piperlongumine, show selective toxicity for transformed cells over nontransformed cells in an engineered cell-line model of tumorigenesis. These studies suggest that cancer cell lines are more resilient to chemically induced increases in ROS levels than previously thought and highlight electrophilicity as a property that may be more closely associated with cancer-selective cell death than ROS elevation.

  8. Melatonin enhances hyperthermia-induced apoptotic cell death in human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Carlos; Cabrera, Javier; Perdomo, Juan; Estévez, Francisco; Loro, Juan F; Reiter, Russel J; Quintana, José

    2016-10-01

    Melatonin is an endogenous indoleamine with a wide range of biological functions. In addition to modulating circadian rhythms, it plays important roles in the health as an antioxidant. Melatonin has also the ability to induce apoptosis in cancer cells and to enhance the antitumoral activity of chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, the effect of melatonin on hyperthermia-induced apoptosis was explored using human leukemia cells. The results demonstrate that melatonin greatly improved the cytotoxicity of hyperthermia in U937 cells. The potentiation of cell death was achieved with 1 mmol/L concentrations of the indoleamine but not with concentrations close to physiological levels in blood (1 nmol/L). This effect was associated to an enhancement of the apoptotic response, revealed by an increase in cells with hypodiploid DNA content and activation of multiple caspases (caspase-2, caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9). Melatonin also increased hyperthermia-induced Bid activation as well as translocation of Bax from the cytosol to mitochondria and cytochrome c release. Hyperthermia-provoked apoptosis and potentiation by melatonin were abrogated by a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor (z-VAD-fmk) as well as by specific inhibitors against caspase-8 or caspase-3. In contrast, blocking of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis either with a caspase-9 inhibitor or overexpressing the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 (U937/Bcl-2) reduced the number of apoptotic cells in response to hyperthermia but it was unable to suppress melatonin enhancement. Melatonin appears to modulate the apoptotic response triggered by hyperthermia in a cell type-specific manner as similar results were observed in HL-60 but not in K562 or MOLT-3 cells.

  9. Melatonin enhances hyperthermia-induced apoptotic cell death in human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Carlos; Cabrera, Javier; Perdomo, Juan; Estévez, Francisco; Loro, Juan F; Reiter, Russel J; Quintana, José

    2016-10-01

    Melatonin is an endogenous indoleamine with a wide range of biological functions. In addition to modulating circadian rhythms, it plays important roles in the health as an antioxidant. Melatonin has also the ability to induce apoptosis in cancer cells and to enhance the antitumoral activity of chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, the effect of melatonin on hyperthermia-induced apoptosis was explored using human leukemia cells. The results demonstrate that melatonin greatly improved the cytotoxicity of hyperthermia in U937 cells. The potentiation of cell death was achieved with 1 mmol/L concentrations of the indoleamine but not with concentrations close to physiological levels in blood (1 nmol/L). This effect was associated to an enhancement of the apoptotic response, revealed by an increase in cells with hypodiploid DNA content and activation of multiple caspases (caspase-2, caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9). Melatonin also increased hyperthermia-induced Bid activation as well as translocation of Bax from the cytosol to mitochondria and cytochrome c release. Hyperthermia-provoked apoptosis and potentiation by melatonin were abrogated by a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor (z-VAD-fmk) as well as by specific inhibitors against caspase-8 or caspase-3. In contrast, blocking of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis either with a caspase-9 inhibitor or overexpressing the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 (U937/Bcl-2) reduced the number of apoptotic cells in response to hyperthermia but it was unable to suppress melatonin enhancement. Melatonin appears to modulate the apoptotic response triggered by hyperthermia in a cell type-specific manner as similar results were observed in HL-60 but not in K562 or MOLT-3 cells. PMID:27465521

  10. Cannabidiol enhances anandamide signaling and alleviates psychotic symptoms of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Leweke, F M; Piomelli, D; Pahlisch, F; Muhl, D; Gerth, C W; Hoyer, C; Klosterkötter, J; Hellmich, M; Koethe, D

    2012-01-01

    Cannabidiol is a component of marijuana that does not activate cannabinoid receptors, but moderately inhibits the degradation of the endocannabinoid anandamide. We previously reported that an elevation of anandamide levels in cerebrospinal fluid inversely correlated to psychotic symptoms. Furthermore, enhanced anandamide signaling let to a lower transition rate from initial prodromal states into frank psychosis as well as postponed transition. In our translational approach, we performed a double-blind, randomized clinical trial of cannabidiol vs amisulpride, a potent antipsychotic, in acute schizophrenia to evaluate the clinical relevance of our initial findings. Either treatment was safe and led to significant clinical improvement, but cannabidiol displayed a markedly superior side-effect profile. Moreover, cannabidiol treatment was accompanied by a significant increase in serum anandamide levels, which was significantly associated with clinical improvement. The results suggest that inhibition of anandamide deactivation may contribute to the antipsychotic effects of cannabidiol potentially representing a completely new mechanism in the treatment of schizophrenia. PMID:22832859

  11. Cannabidiol enhances anandamide signaling and alleviates psychotic symptoms of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Leweke, F M; Piomelli, D; Pahlisch, F; Muhl, D; Gerth, C W; Hoyer, C; Klosterkötter, J; Hellmich, M; Koethe, D

    2012-03-20

    Cannabidiol is a component of marijuana that does not activate cannabinoid receptors, but moderately inhibits the degradation of the endocannabinoid anandamide. We previously reported that an elevation of anandamide levels in cerebrospinal fluid inversely correlated to psychotic symptoms. Furthermore, enhanced anandamide signaling let to a lower transition rate from initial prodromal states into frank psychosis as well as postponed transition. In our translational approach, we performed a double-blind, randomized clinical trial of cannabidiol vs amisulpride, a potent antipsychotic, in acute schizophrenia to evaluate the clinical relevance of our initial findings. Either treatment was safe and led to significant clinical improvement, but cannabidiol displayed a markedly superior side-effect profile. Moreover, cannabidiol treatment was accompanied by a significant increase in serum anandamide levels, which was significantly associated with clinical improvement. The results suggest that inhibition of anandamide deactivation may contribute to the antipsychotic effects of cannabidiol potentially representing a completely new mechanism in the treatment of schizophrenia.

  12. Inorganic mercury attenuates CD95-mediated apoptosis by interfering with formation of the death inducing signaling complex.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Michael J; Whitekus, Michael J; Hyun, Joogyung; Eckles, Kevin G; McCollum, Geniece; Rosenspire, Allen J

    2003-07-15

    Inorganic mercury (Hg2+) modulates several lymphocyte signaling pathways and has been implicated as an environmental factor linked to autoimmune disease. From the standpoint that autoimmune diseases represent disorders of cell accumulation, in which dysregulated apoptosis may be one mechanism leading to the accumulation of autoreactive lymphocytes, we have been investigating the influences of Hg2+ on CD95-mediated apoptosis. We demonstrate here that low and noncytotoxic concentrations of Hg2+ impair CD95 agonist-induced apoptosis in representative Type-I and Type-II T cell lines. Hg2+ treatment blocks the CD95 agonist-induced activation of initiator and effector caspases as well as the association between CD95 and the signaling adaptor, FADD. CD95 multimerization does not appear to be affected by Hg2+. Thus, the Hg2+ sensitive step within the CD95 death pathway is localized to the level of the death inducing signaling complex (DISC). Disruption of proper DISC formation may be a biochemical mechanism whereby Hg2+ contributes to autoimmune disease.

  13. Melatonin enhances arsenic trioxide-induced cell death via sustained upregulation of Redd1 expression in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sun-Mi; Woo, Sang Hyeok; Oh, Sang Taek; Hong, Sung-Eun; Choe, Tae-Boo; Ye, Sang-Kyu; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Seong, Min Ki; Kim, Hyun-A; Noh, Woo Chul; Lee, Jin Kyung; Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Lee, Yun-Han; Park, In-Chul

    2016-02-15

    Melatonin is implicated in various physiological functions, including anticancer activity. However, the mechanism(s) of its anticancer activity is not well understood. In the present study, we investigated the combined effects of melatonin and arsenic trioxide (ATO) on cell death in human breast cancer cells. Melatonin enhanced the ATO-induced apoptotic cell death via changes in the protein levels of Survivin, Bcl-2, and Bax, thus affecting cytochrome c release from the mitochondria to the cytosol. Interestingly, we found that the cell death induced by co-treatment with melatonin and ATO was mediated by sustained upregulation of Redd1, which was associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Combined treatment with melatonin and ATO induced the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAP kinase downstream from Redd1 expression. Rapamycin and S6K1 siRNA enhanced, while activation of mTORC1 by transfection with TSC2 siRNA suppressed the cell death induced by melatonin and ATO treatment. Taken together, our findings suggest that melatonin enhances ATO-induced apoptotic cell death via sustained upregulation of Redd1 expression and inhibition of mTORC1 upstream of the activation of the p38/JNK pathways in human breast cancer cells. PMID:26607805

  14. Static corrections for enhanced signal detection at IMS seismic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Neil; Wookey, James; Selby, Neil

    2016-04-01

    Seismic monitoring forms an important part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) for verifying the Comprehensive nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Analysis of seismic data can be used to discriminate between nuclear explosions and the tens of thousands of natural earthquakes of similar magnitude that occur every year. This is known as "forensic seismology", and techniques include measuring the P-to-S wave amplitude ratio, the body-to-surface wave magnitude ratio (mb/Ms), and source depth. Measurement of these seismic discriminants requires very high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) data, and this has led to the development and deployment of seismic arrays as part of the IMS. Array processing methodologies such as stacking can be used, but optimum SNR improvement needs an accurate estimate of the arrival time of the particular seismic phase. To enhance the imaging capability of IMS arrays, we aim to develop site-specific static corrections to the arrival time as a function of frequency, slowness and backazimuth. Here, we present initial results for the IMS TORD array in Niger. Vespagrams are calculated for various events using the F-statistic to clearly identify seismic phases and measure their arrival times. Observed arrival times are compared with those predicted by 1D and 3D velocity models, and residuals are calculated for a range of backazimuths and slownesses. Finally, we demonstrate the improvement in signal fidelity provided by these corrections.

  15. UVB-Induced Cell Death Signaling Is Associated with G1-S Progression and Transcription Inhibition in Primary Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ortolan, Tatiana Grohmann; Menck, Carlos Frederico M.

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage induced by ultraviolet (UV) radiation can be removed by nucleotide excision repair through two sub-pathways, one general (GGR) and the other specific for transcribed DNA (TCR), and the processing of unrepaired lesions trigger signals that may lead to cell death. These signals involve the tumor suppressor p53 protein, a central regulator of cell responses to DNA damage, and the E3 ubiquitin ligase Mdm2, that forms a feedback regulatory loop with p53. The involvement of cell cycle and transcription on the signaling to apoptosis was investigated in UVB-irradiated synchronized, DNA repair proficient, CS-B (TCR-deficient) and XP-C (GGR-deficient) primary human fibroblasts. Cells were irradiated in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, with two doses with equivalent levels of apoptosis (low and high), defined for each cell line. In the three cell lines, the low doses of UVB caused only a transient delay in progression to the S phase, whereas the high doses induced permanent cell cycle arrest. However, while accumulation of Mdm2 correlated well with the recovery from transcription inhibition at the low doses for normal and CS-B fibroblasts, for XP-C cells this protein was shown to be accumulated even at UVB doses that induced high levels of apoptosis. Thus, UVB-induced accumulation of Mdm2 is critical for counteracting p53 activation and apoptosis avoidance, but its effect is limited due to transcription inhibition. However, in the case of XP-C cells, an excess of unrepaired DNA damage would be sufficient to block S phase progression, which would signal to apoptosis, independent of Mdm2 accumulation. The data clearly discriminate DNA damage signals that lead to cell death, depending on the presence of UVB-induced DNA damage in replicating or transcribing regions. PMID:24155908

  16. UVB-induced cell death signaling is associated with G1-S progression and transcription inhibition in primary human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ortolan, Tatiana Grohmann; Menck, Carlos Frederico M

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage induced by ultraviolet (UV) radiation can be removed by nucleotide excision repair through two sub-pathways, one general (GGR) and the other specific for transcribed DNA (TCR), and the processing of unrepaired lesions trigger signals that may lead to cell death. These signals involve the tumor suppressor p53 protein, a central regulator of cell responses to DNA damage, and the E3 ubiquitin ligase Mdm2, that forms a feedback regulatory loop with p53. The involvement of cell cycle and transcription on the signaling to apoptosis was investigated in UVB-irradiated synchronized, DNA repair proficient, CS-B (TCR-deficient) and XP-C (GGR-deficient) primary human fibroblasts. Cells were irradiated in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, with two doses with equivalent levels of apoptosis (low and high), defined for each cell line. In the three cell lines, the low doses of UVB caused only a transient delay in progression to the S phase, whereas the high doses induced permanent cell cycle arrest. However, while accumulation of Mdm2 correlated well with the recovery from transcription inhibition at the low doses for normal and CS-B fibroblasts, for XP-C cells this protein was shown to be accumulated even at UVB doses that induced high levels of apoptosis. Thus, UVB-induced accumulation of Mdm2 is critical for counteracting p53 activation and apoptosis avoidance, but its effect is limited due to transcription inhibition. However, in the case of XP-C cells, an excess of unrepaired DNA damage would be sufficient to block S phase progression, which would signal to apoptosis, independent of Mdm2 accumulation. The data clearly discriminate DNA damage signals that lead to cell death, depending on the presence of UVB-induced DNA damage in replicating or transcribing regions. PMID:24155908

  17. Fumonisin B1-induced cell death in arabidopsis protoplasts requires jasmonate-, ethylene-, and salicylate-dependent signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Asai, T; Stone, J M; Heard, J E; Kovtun, Y; Yorgey, P; Sheen, J; Ausubel, F M

    2000-10-01

    We have established an Arabidopsis protoplast model system to study plant cell death signaling. The fungal toxin fumonisin B1 (FB1) induces apoptosis-like programmed cell death (PCD) in wild-type protoplasts. FB1, however, only marginally affects the viability of protoplasts isolated from transgenic NahG plants, in which salicylic acid (SA) is metabolically degraded; from pad4-1 mutant plants, in which an SA amplification mechanism is thought to be impaired; or from jar1-1 or etr1-1 mutant plants, which are insensitive to jasmonate (JA) or ethylene (ET), respectively. FB1 susceptibility of wild-type protoplasts decreases in the dark, as does the cellular content of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, a light-inducible enzyme involved in SA biosynthesis. Interestingly, however, FB1-induced PCD does not require the SA signal transmitter NPR1, given that npr1-1 protoplasts display wild-type FB1 susceptibility. Arabidopsis cpr1-1, cpr6-1, and acd2-2 protoplasts, in which the SA signaling pathway is constitutively activated, exhibit increased susceptibility to FB1. The cpr6-1 and acd2-2 mutants also constitutively express the JA and ET signaling pathways, but only the acd2-2 protoplasts undergo PCD in the absence of FB1. These results demonstrate that FB1 killing of Arabidopsis is light dependent and requires SA-, JA-, and ET-mediated signaling pathways as well as one or more unidentified factors activated by FB1 and the acd2-2 mutation.

  18. Activation of surrogate death receptor signaling triggers peroxynitrite-dependent execution of cisplatin-resistant cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Seah, S; Low, I C C; Hirpara, J L; Sachaphibulkij, K; Kroemer, G; Brenner, C; Pervaiz, S

    2015-01-01

    Platinum-based drugs remain as the cornerstone of cancer chemotherapy; however, development of multidrug resistance presents a therapeutic challenge. This study aims at understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to cisplatin and unraveling surrogate signaling networks that could revert sensitivity to apoptosis stimuli. We made use of three different sets of cell lines, A549 and H2030 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and A2780 ovarian cancer cells and their cisplatin-resistant variants. Here we report that cisplatin-resistant cell lines displayed a multidrug-resistant phenotype. Changes in mitochondrial metabolism and defective mitochondrial signaling were unraveled in the resistant cells. More interestingly, a marked increase in sensitivity of the resistant cells to death receptor-induced apoptosis, in particular TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand)-mediated execution, was observed. Although this was not associated with an increase in gene transcription, a significant increase in the localization of TRAIL death receptor, DR4, to the lipid raft subdomains of plasma membrane was detected in the resistant variants. Furthermore, exposure of cisplatin-resistant cells to TRAIL resulted in upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and increase in nitric oxide (NO) production that triggered the generation of peroxynitrite (ONOO−). Scavenging ONOO− rescued cells from TRAIL-induced apoptosis, thereby suggesting a critical role of ONOO− in TRAIL-induced execution of cisplatin-resistant cells. Notably, preincubation of cells with TRAIL restored sensitivity of resistant cells to cisplatin. These data provide compelling evidence for employing strategies to trigger death receptor signaling as a second-line treatment for cisplatin-resistant cancers. PMID:26492363

  19. Inflammatory Signalling Associated with Brain Dead Organ Donation: From Brain Injury to Brain Stem Death and Posttransplant Ischaemia Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Ryan P.; Thom, Ogilvie; Fraser, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Brain death is associated with dramatic and serious pathophysiologic changes that adversely affect both the quantity and quality of organs available for transplant. To fully optimise the donor pool necessitates a more complete understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of organ dysfunction associated with transplantation. These injurious processes are initially triggered by catastrophic brain injury and are further enhanced during both brain death and graft transplantation. The activated inflammatory systems then contribute to graft dysfunction in the recipient. Inflammatory mediators drive this process in concert with the innate and adaptive immune systems. Activation of deleterious immunological pathways in organ grafts occurs, priming them for further inflammation after engraftment. Finally, posttransplantation ischaemia reperfusion injury leads to further generation of inflammatory mediators and consequent activation of the recipient's immune system. Ongoing research has identified key mediators that contribute to the inflammatory milieu inherent in brain dead organ donation. This has seen the development of novel therapies that directly target the inflammatory cascade. PMID:23691272

  20. TRAF2 multitasking in TNF receptor-induced signaling to NF-κB, MAP kinases and cell death.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Alice; Verstrepen, Lynn; Beyaert, Rudi

    2016-09-15

    Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) is a potent inflammatory cytokine that exerts its functions through the activation of two distinct receptors, TNFR1 and TNFR2. Both receptors can activate canonical NF-κB and JNK MAP kinase signaling, while TNFR2 can also activate non-canonical NF-κB signaling, leading to numerous changes in gene expression that drive inflammation, cell proliferation and cell survival. On the other hand, TNFR1 also activates signaling pathways leading to cell death by either apoptosis or necroptosis, depending on the cellular context. A key player in TNFR1- and TNFR2-induced signaling is the RING finger protein TRAF2, which is recruited to both receptors upon their stimulation. TRAF2 exerts multiple receptor-specific functions but also mediates cross-talk between TNFR1 and TNFR2, dictating the outcome of TNF stimulation. In this review, we provide an overview of the positive and negative regulatory role of TRAF2 in different TNFR1 and TNFR2 signaling pathways. We discuss the underlying molecular mechanism of action, distinguishing between TRAF2 scaffold and E3 ubiquitin ligase functions, and the regulation of TRAF2 by specific post-translational modifications. Finally, we elaborate on some possible strategies to modulate TRAF2 function in the context of therapeutic targeting in autoimmunity and cancer.

  1. TRAF2 multitasking in TNF receptor-induced signaling to NF-κB, MAP kinases and cell death.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Alice; Verstrepen, Lynn; Beyaert, Rudi

    2016-09-15

    Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) is a potent inflammatory cytokine that exerts its functions through the activation of two distinct receptors, TNFR1 and TNFR2. Both receptors can activate canonical NF-κB and JNK MAP kinase signaling, while TNFR2 can also activate non-canonical NF-κB signaling, leading to numerous changes in gene expression that drive inflammation, cell proliferation and cell survival. On the other hand, TNFR1 also activates signaling pathways leading to cell death by either apoptosis or necroptosis, depending on the cellular context. A key player in TNFR1- and TNFR2-induced signaling is the RING finger protein TRAF2, which is recruited to both receptors upon their stimulation. TRAF2 exerts multiple receptor-specific functions but also mediates cross-talk between TNFR1 and TNFR2, dictating the outcome of TNF stimulation. In this review, we provide an overview of the positive and negative regulatory role of TRAF2 in different TNFR1 and TNFR2 signaling pathways. We discuss the underlying molecular mechanism of action, distinguishing between TRAF2 scaffold and E3 ubiquitin ligase functions, and the regulation of TRAF2 by specific post-translational modifications. Finally, we elaborate on some possible strategies to modulate TRAF2 function in the context of therapeutic targeting in autoimmunity and cancer. PMID:26993379

  2. Lipid rafts and raft-mediated supramolecular entities in the regulation of CD95 death receptor apoptotic signaling.

    PubMed

    Gajate, Consuelo; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2015-05-01

    Membrane lipid rafts are highly ordered membrane domains enriched in cholesterol, sphingolipids and gangliosides that have the property to segregate and concentrate proteins. Lipid and protein composition of lipid rafts differs from that of the surrounding membrane, thus providing sorting platforms and hubs for signal transduction molecules, including CD95 death receptor-mediated signaling. CD95 can be recruited to rafts in a reversible way through S-palmitoylation following activation of cells with its physiological cognate ligand as well as with a wide variety of inducers, including several antitumor drugs through ligand-independent intracellular mechanisms. CD95 translocation to rafts can be modulated pharmacologically, thus becoming a target for the treatment of apoptosis-defective diseases, such as cancer. CD95-mediated signaling largely depends on protein-protein interactions, and the recruitment and concentration of CD95 and distinct downstream apoptotic molecules in membrane raft domains, forming raft-based supramolecular entities that act as hubs for apoptotic signaling molecules, favors the generation and amplification of apoptotic signals. Efficient CD95-mediated apoptosis involves CD95 and raft internalization, as well as the involvement of different subcellular organelles. In this review, we briefly summarize and discuss the involvement of lipid rafts in the regulation of CD95-mediated apoptosis that may provide a new avenue for cancer therapy.

  3. Influence of Berry-Polyphenols on Receptor Signaling and Cell-Death Pathways: Implications for Breast Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Aiyer, Harini S; Warri, Anni M; Woode, Denzel R; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena; Clarke, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women worldwide. Many women have become more aware of the benefits of increasing fruit consumption, as part of a healthy lifestyle, for the prevention of cancer. The mechanisms by which fruits, including berries, prevent breast cancer can be partially explained by exploring their interactions with pathways known influence cell-proliferation and evasion of cell-death. Two receptor pathways- estrogen receptor (ER) and tyrosine kinase receptors, especially the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family- are drivers of cell-proliferation and play a significant role in the development of both primary and recurrent breast cancer. There is strong evidence to show that several phytochemicals present in berries such as cyanidin, delphinidin, quercetin, kaempferol, ellagic acid, resveratrol and pterostilbene, interact with and alter the effects of these pathways. Further, they also induce cell death (apoptosis and autophagy) via their influence on kinase signaling. In this review, we summarize in vitro data regarding the interaction of berry polyphenols with the specific receptors and the mechanisms by which they induce cell death. Further, we also present in vivo data of primary breast cancer prevention by individual compounds and whole berries. Finally, we present a possible role for berries and berry compounds in the prevention of breast cancer and our perspective on the areas that require further research. PMID:22300613

  4. Fisetin induces autophagic cell death through suppression of mTOR signaling pathway in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Yewseok; Afaq, Farrukh; Khan, Naghma; Johnson, Jeremy J.; Khusro, Fatima H.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is an important component of PTEN/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, which is frequently deregulated in prostate cancer (CaP). Recent studies suggest that targeting PTEN/PI3K/Akt and mTOR signaling pathway could be an effective strategy for the treatment of hormone refractory CaP. Here, we show that the treatment of androgen-independent and PTEN-negative human CaP PC3 cells with fisetin, a dietary flavonoid, resulted in inhibition of mTOR kinase signaling pathway. Treatment of cells with fisetin inhibited mTOR activity and downregulated Raptor, Rictor, PRAS40 and GβL that resulted in loss of mTOR complexes (mTORC)1/2 formation. Fisetin also activated the mTOR repressor TSC2 through inhibition of Akt and activation of AMPK. Fisetin-mediated inhibition of mTOR resulted in hypophosphorylation of 4EBP1 and suppression of Cap-dependent translation. We also found that fisetin treatment leads to induction of autophagic-programmed cell death rather than cytoprotective autophagy as shown by small interfering RNA Beclin1-knockdown and autophagy inhibitor. Taken together, we provide evidence that fisetin functions as a dual inhibitor of mTORC1/2 signaling leading to inhibition of Cap-dependent translation and induction of autophagic cell death in PC3 cells. These results suggest that fisetin could be a useful chemotherapeutic agent in treatment of hormone refractory CaP. PMID:20530556

  5. Ultrafast 3D spin-echo acquisition improves Gadolinium-enhanced MRI signal contrast enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Han, S. H.; Cho, F. H.; Song, Y. K.; Paulsen, J.; Song, Y. Q.; Kim, Y. R.; Kim, J. K.; Cho, G.; Cho, H.

    2014-01-01

    Long scan times of 3D volumetric MR acquisitions usually necessitate ultrafast in vivo gradient-echo acquisitions, which are intrinsically susceptible to magnetic field inhomogeneities. This is especially problematic for contrast-enhanced (CE)-MRI applications, where non-negligible T2* effect of contrast agent deteriorates the positive signal contrast and limits the available range of MR acquisition parameters and injection doses. To overcome these shortcomings without degrading temporal resolution, ultrafast spin-echo acquisitions were implemented. Specifically, a multiplicative acceleration factor from multiple spin echoes (×32) and compressed sensing (CS) sampling (×8) allowed highly-accelerated 3D Multiple-Modulation-Multiple-Echo (MMME) acquisition. At the same time, the CE-MRI of kidney with Gd-DOTA showed significantly improved signal enhancement for CS-MMME acquisitions (×7) over that of corresponding FLASH acquisitions (×2). Increased positive contrast enhancement and highly accelerated acquisition of extended volume with reduced RF irradiations will be beneficial for oncological and nephrological applications, in which the accurate in vivo 3D quantification of contrast agent concentration is necessary with high temporal resolution. PMID:24863102

  6. Death and survival in Streptococcus mutans: differing outcomes of a quorum-sensing signaling peptide

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Vincent; Dufour, Delphine; Lévesque, Céline M.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are considered “social” organisms able to communicate with one another using small hormone-like molecules (pheromones) in a process called quorum-sensing (QS). These signaling molecules increase in concentration as a function of bacterial cell density. For most human pathogens, QS is critical for virulence and biofilm formation, and the opportunity to interfere with bacterial QS could provide a sophisticated means for manipulating the composition of pathogenic biofilms, and possibly eradicating the infection. Streptococcus mutans is a well-characterized resident of the dental plaque biofilm, and is the major pathogen of dental caries (cavities). In S. mutans, its CSP QS signaling peptide does not act as a classical QS signal by accumulating passively in proportion to cell density. In fact, particular stresses such as those encountered in the oral cavity, induce the production of the CSP pheromone, suggesting that the pheromone most probably functions as a stress-inducible alarmone by triggering the signaling to the bacterial population to initiate an adaptive response that results in different phenotypic outcomes. This mini-review discusses two different CSP-induced phenotypes, bacterial “suicide” and dormancy, and the underlying mechanisms by which S. mutans utilizes the same QS signaling peptide to regulate two opposite phenotypes. PMID:26557114

  7. Local readout enhancement for detuned signal-recycling interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Rehbein, Henning; Mueller-Ebhardt, Helge; Schnabel, Roman; Danzmann, Karsten; Somiya, Kentaro; Chen Yanbei; Li Chao

    2007-09-15

    High power detuned signal-recycling interferometers currently planned for second-generation interferometric gravitational-wave detectors (for example Advanced LIGO) are characterized by two resonances in the detection band, an optical resonance and an optomechanical resonance which is upshifted from the suspension pendulum frequency due to the so-called optical-spring effect. The detector's sensitivity is enhanced around these two resonances. However, at frequencies below the optomechanical resonance frequency, the sensitivity of such interferometers is significantly lower than non-optical-spring configurations with comparable circulating power; such a drawback can also compromise high-frequency sensitivity, when an optimization is performed on the overall sensitivity of the interferometer to a class of sources. In this paper, we clarify the reason for such a low sensitivity, and propose a way to fix this problem. Motivated by the optical-bar scheme of Braginsky, Gorodetsky, and Khalili, we propose to add a local readout scheme which measures the motion of the arm-cavity front mirror, which at low frequencies moves together with the arm-cavity end mirror, under the influence of gravitational waves. This scheme improves the low-frequency quantum-noise-limited sensitivity of optical-spring interferometers significantly and can be considered as an incorporation of the optical-bar scheme into currently planned second-generation interferometers. On the other hand it can be regarded as an extension of the optical-bar scheme. Taking compact binary inspiral signals as an example, we illustrate how this scheme can be used to improve the sensitivity of the planned Advanced LIGO interferometer, in various scenarios, using a realistic classical-noise budget. We also discuss how this scheme can be implemented in Advanced LIGO with relative ease.

  8. The disease resistance signaling components EDS1 and PAD4 are essential regulators of the cell death pathway controlled by LSD1 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rustérucci, C; Aviv, D H; Holt, B F; Dangl, J L; Parker, J E

    2001-10-01

    Specific recognition of pathogens is mediated by plant disease resistance (R) genes and translated into a successful defense response. The extent of associated hypersensitive cell death varies from none to an area encompassing cells surrounding an infection site, depending on the R gene activated. We constructed double mutants in Arabidopsis between positive regulators of R function and a negative regulator of cell death, LSD1, to address whether genes required for normal R function also regulate the runaway cell death observed in lsd1 mutants. We report here that EDS1 and PAD4, two signaling genes that mediate some but not all R responses, also are required for runaway cell death in the lsd1 mutant. Importantly, this novel function of EDS1 and PAD4 is operative when runaway cell death in lsd1 is initiated through an R gene that does not require EDS1 or PAD4 for disease resistance. NDR1, another component of R signaling, also contributes to the control of plant cell death. The roles of EDS1 and PAD4 in regulating lsd1 runaway cell death are related to the interpretation of reactive oxygen intermediate-derived signals at infection sites. We further demonstrate that the fate of superoxide at infection sites is different from that observed at the leading margins of runaway cell death lesions in lsd1 mutants.

  9. Divergent signalling via APO-1/Fas and the TNF receptor, two homologous molecules involved in physiological cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Schulze-Osthoff, K; Krammer, P H; Dröge, W

    1994-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNF-R) and APO-1/Fas (CD95) are members of the tumor necrosis factor/nerve growth factor receptor superfamily involved in various forms of physiological cell death. Due to the structural homology between these receptors and their ligands, it has been suggested that APO-1/Fas and TNF-R kill cells by similar mechanisms. Here, we compared the killing pathways mediated by each receptor molecule in TNF-sensitive L929 cells stably transfected with APO-1/Fas cDNA. Morphological analysis revealed that TNF-induced cell death resembles necrosis, while APO-1/Fas-mediated cell killing shows an apoptotic pattern, evident by the appearance of membrane blebbing, nuclear condensation and non-random DNA degradation. Studies with inhibitors of several intracellular pathways further demonstrate that the mechanisms of TNF- and APO-1/Fas-mediated cell killing are substantially different. TNF cytotoxicity is mediated by reactive oxygen intermediates generated during mitochondrial respiration. However, these mediators are not involved in APO-1/Fas-mediated cell death as neither mitochondrial inhibitors nor antioxidants exert a protecting effect. Moreover, several inhibitors of calcium metabolism, ADP ribosylation and phospholipase action suppress TNF cytotoxicity, but not APO-1/Fas-mediated apoptosis. Additional differences between the two molecules were observed at the transcriptional level. Whereas transcription factor NF-kappa B was readily activated by TNF, activation was not induced by triggering APO-1/Fas. These data suggest that the two molecules, though structurally related, utilize distinct signal transduction pathways, even in a single cell type. Hence, cells may undergo different programs of cell death depending on the activating stimulus. Images PMID:7523113

  10. Role of Rac1 GTPase in JNK signaling and delayed neuronal cell death following global cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quan-Guang; Wang, Ruimin; Han, Dong; Dong, Yan; Brann, Darrell W

    2009-04-10

    The overall goal of this study was to determine the role of Rac1 in POSH/MLK/JNK signaling and delayed neuronal cell death following cerebral ischemia. Temporal studies revealed that Rac1 GTPase activation was significantly elevated in hippocampus CA1 at 10 min to 72 h after cerebral ischemia reperfusion, with peak levels 30 min to 6 h after reperfusion. Total Rac1 protein levels were not significantly changed following cerebral ischemia. Rac1 has been shown to interact with POSH (plenty of SH3s), a scaffold protein that binds to and regulates MLK3 and JNK activation. Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) studies revealed that POSH-Rac1-MLK3 complex formation displayed a significant and prolonged elevation after reperfusion, with a correlative increase in phosphorylation/activation of MLK3 as compared to sham controls. Intracerebroventricular administration of Rac1 antisense oligonucleotides (AS-ODNs) significantly attenuated Rac1 levels and Rac1 activation at 30 min after reperfusion, with a correlated significant attenuation of POSH-MLK3-Rac1 complex formation and MLK3 activation in hippocampus CA1. Infusion of Rac1 AS-ODNs also significantly attenuated post-ischemic activation of JNK, downstream of MLK3, and strongly protected the hippocampus CA1 from ischemic damage. Missense oligos had no effect on any of the parameters measured. The Rac1 AS-ODNs results were further confirmed by administration of a Rac1 inhibitor (NSC23766), which markedly attenuated activation of Rac1 and JNK, and significantly attenuated apoptotic delayed neuronal cell death following cerebral ischemia. As a whole, these studies demonstrate an important role for Rac1 in activation of the prodeath MLK3-JNK kinase signaling pathway and delayed neuronal cell death following cerebral ischemia.

  11. Reactive oxygen species trigger motoneuron death in non-cell-autonomous models of ALS through activation of c-Abl signaling.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Fabiola; Gonzalez, David; Cortes, Nicole; Ampuero, Estibaliz; Hernández, Diego E; Fritz, Elsa; Abarzua, Sebastián; Martinez, Alexis; Elorza, Alvaro A; Alvarez, Alejandra; Court, Felipe; van Zundert, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease in which pathogenesis and death of motor neurons are triggered by non-cell-autonomous mechanisms. We showed earlier that exposing primary rat spinal cord cultures to conditioned media derived from primary mouse astrocyte conditioned media (ACM) that express human SOD1(G93A) (ACM-hSOD1(G93A)) quickly enhances Nav channel-mediated excitability and calcium influx, generates intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and leads to death of motoneurons within days. Here we examined the role of mitochondrial structure and physiology and of the activation of c-Abl, a tyrosine kinase that induces apoptosis. We show that ACM-hSOD1(G93A), but not ACM-hSOD1(WT), increases c-Abl activity in motoneurons, interneurons and glial cells, starting at 60 min; the c-Abl inhibitor STI571 (imatinib) prevents this ACM-hSOD1(G93A)-mediated motoneuron death. Interestingly, similar results were obtained with ACM derived from astrocytes expressing SOD1(G86R) or TDP43(A315T). We further find that co-application of ACM-SOD1(G93A) with blockers of Nav channels (spermidine, mexiletine, or riluzole) or anti-oxidants (Trolox, esculetin, or tiron) effectively prevent c-Abl activation and motoneuron death. In addition, ACM-SOD1(G93A) induces alterations in the morphology of neuronal mitochondria that are related with their membrane depolarization. Finally, we find that blocking the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore with cyclosporine A, or inhibiting mitochondrial calcium uptake with Ru360, reduces ROS production and c-Abl activation. Together, our data point to a sequence of events in which a toxic factor(s) released by ALS-expressing astrocytes rapidly induces hyper-excitability, which in turn increases calcium influx and affects mitochondrial structure and physiology. ROS production, mediated at least in part through mitochondrial alterations, trigger c-Abl signaling and lead to motoneuron death. PMID

  12. Reactive oxygen species trigger motoneuron death in non-cell-autonomous models of ALS through activation of c-Abl signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Fabiola; Gonzalez, David; Cortes, Nicole; Ampuero, Estibaliz; Hernández, Diego E.; Fritz, Elsa; Abarzua, Sebastián; Martinez, Alexis; Elorza, Alvaro A.; Alvarez, Alejandra; Court, Felipe; van Zundert, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease in which pathogenesis and death of motor neurons are triggered by non-cell-autonomous mechanisms. We showed earlier that exposing primary rat spinal cord cultures to conditioned media derived from primary mouse astrocyte conditioned media (ACM) that express human SOD1G93A (ACM-hSOD1G93A) quickly enhances Nav channel-mediated excitability and calcium influx, generates intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and leads to death of motoneurons within days. Here we examined the role of mitochondrial structure and physiology and of the activation of c-Abl, a tyrosine kinase that induces apoptosis. We show that ACM-hSOD1G93A, but not ACM-hSOD1WT, increases c-Abl activity in motoneurons, interneurons and glial cells, starting at 60 min; the c-Abl inhibitor STI571 (imatinib) prevents this ACM-hSOD1G93A-mediated motoneuron death. Interestingly, similar results were obtained with ACM derived from astrocytes expressing SOD1G86R or TDP43A315T. We further find that co-application of ACM-SOD1G93A with blockers of Nav channels (spermidine, mexiletine, or riluzole) or anti-oxidants (Trolox, esculetin, or tiron) effectively prevent c-Abl activation and motoneuron death. In addition, ACM-SOD1G93A induces alterations in the morphology of neuronal mitochondria that are related with their membrane depolarization. Finally, we find that blocking the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore with cyclosporine A, or inhibiting mitochondrial calcium uptake with Ru360, reduces ROS production and c-Abl activation. Together, our data point to a sequence of events in which a toxic factor(s) released by ALS-expressing astrocytes rapidly induces hyper-excitability, which in turn increases calcium influx and affects mitochondrial structure and physiology. ROS production, mediated at least in part through mitochondrial alterations, trigger c-Abl signaling and lead to motoneuron death. PMID:26106294

  13. Mechanisms in photodynamic therapy: part two—cellular signaling, cell metabolism and modes of cell death

    PubMed Central

    Castano, Ana P.; Demidova, Tatiana N.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been known for over a hundred years, but is only now becoming widely used. Originally developed as a tumor therapy, some of its most successful applications are for non-malignant disease. In the second of a series of three reviews, we will discuss the mechanisms that operate in PDT on a cellular level. In Part I [Castano AP, Demidova TN, Hamblin MR. Mechanism in photodynamic therapy: part one—photosensitizers, photochemistry and cellular localization. Photodiagn Photodyn Ther 2004;1:279–93] it was shown that one of the most important factors governing the outcome of PDT, is how the photosensitizer (PS) interacts with cells in the target tissue or tumor, and the key aspect of this interaction is the subcellular localization of the PS. PS can localize in mitochondria, lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and plasma membranes. An explosion of investigation and explorations in the field of cell biology have elucidated many of the pathways that mammalian cells undergo when PS are delivered in tissue culture and subsequently illuminated. There is an acute stress response leading to changes in calcium and lipid metabolism and production of cytokines and stress proteins. Enzymes particularly, protein kinases, are activated and transcription factors are expressed. Many of the cellular responses are centered on mitochondria. These effects frequently lead to induction of apoptosis either by the mitochondrial pathway involving caspases and release of cytochrome c, or by pathways involving ceramide or death receptors. However, under certain circumstances cells subjected to PDT die by necrosis. Although there have been many reports of DNA damage caused by PDT, this is not thought to be an important cell-death pathway. This mechanistic research is expected to lead to optimization of PDT as a tumor treatment, and to rational selection of combination therapies that include PDT as a component. PMID:25048553

  14. Concurrent MEK and autophagy inhibition is required to restore cell death associated danger-signalling in Vemurafenib-resistant melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Martin, S; Dudek-Perić, A M; Maes, H; Garg, A D; Gabrysiak, M; Demirsoy, S; Swinnen, J V; Agostinis, P

    2015-02-01

    Vemurafenib (PLX4032), an inhibitor of BRAF(V600E), has demonstrated significant clinical anti-melanoma effects. However, the majority of treated patients develop resistance, due to a variety of molecular mechanisms including MAPK reactivation through MEK. The induction of a cancer cell death modality associated with danger-signalling resulting in surface mobilization of crucial damage-associated-molecular-patterns (DAMPs), e.g. calreticulin (CRT) and heat shock protein-90 (HSP90), from dying cells, is emerging to be crucial for therapeutic success. Both cell death and danger-signalling are modulated by autophagy, a key adaptation mechanism stimulated during melanoma progression. However, whether melanoma cell death induced by MAPK inhibition is associated with danger-signalling, and the reliance of these mechanisms on autophagy, has not yet been scrutinized. Using a panel of isogenic PLX4032-sensitive and resistant melanoma cell lines we show that PLX4032-induced caspase-dependent cell death and DAMPs exposure in the drug-sensitive cells, but failed to do so in the drug-resistant cells, displaying heightened MEK activation. MEK inhibitor, U0126, treatment sensitized PLX4032-resistant cells to death and re-established their danger-signalling capacity. Only melanoma cells exposing death-induced danger-signals were phagocytosed and induced DC maturation. Although the PLX4032-resistant melanoma cells displayed higher basal and drug-induced autophagy, compromising autophagy, pharmacologically or by ATG5 knockdown, was insufficient to re-establish their PLX4032 sensitivity. Interestingly, autophagy abrogation was particularly efficacious in boosting cell death and ecto-CRT/ecto-HSP90 in PLX4032-resistant cells upon blockage of MEK hyper-activation by U0126. Thus combination of MEK inhibitors with autophagy blockers may represent a novel treatment regime to increase both cell death and danger-signalling in Vemurafenib-resistant metastatic melanoma.

  15. Blockade of PD-1 Signaling Enhances Th2 Cell Responses and Aggravates Liver Immunopathology in Mice with Schistosomiasis japonica

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sha; Jin, Xin; Li, Yalin; Li, Wei; Chen, Xiaojun; Xu, Lei; Zhu, Jifeng; Xu, Zhipeng; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Feng; Su, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Background More than 220 million people worldwide are chronically infected with schistosomes, causing severe disease or even death. The major pathological damage occurring in schistosomiasis is attributable to the granulomatous inflammatory response and liver fibrosis induced by schistosome eggs. The inflammatory response is tightly controlled and parallels immunosuppressive regulation, constantly maintaining immune homeostasis and limiting excessive immunopathologic damage in important host organs. It is well known that the activation of programmed death 1 (PD-1) signaling causes a significant suppression of T cell function. However, the roles of PD-1 signaling in modulating CD4+ T cell responses and immunopathology during schistosome infection, have yet to be defined. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we show that PD-1 is upregulated in CD4+ T cells in Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum)-infected patients. We also show the upregulation of PD-1 expression in CD4+ T cells in the spleens, mesenteric lymph nodes, and livers of mice with S. japonicum infection. Finally, we found that the blockade of PD-1 signaling enhanced CD4+ T helper 2 (Th2) cell responses and led to more severe liver immunopathology in mice with S. japonicum infection, without a reduction of egg production or deposition in the host liver. Conclusions/Significance Overall, our study suggests that PD-1 signaling is specifically induced to control Th2-associated inflammatory responses during schistosome infection and is beneficial to the development of PD-1-based control of liver immunopathology. PMID:27792733

  16. Involvement of fish signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in nodavirus infection induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Huang, Youhua; Huang, Xiaohong; Yang, Ying; Wang, Wei; Yu, Yepin; Qin, Qiwei

    2015-03-01

    The Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling pathway is an important signaling pathway activated by interferons in response to virus infection. Fish STAT3 has been demonstrated to be involved in Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) infection and virus induced paraptosis, but its effects on the replication of other fish viruses still remained uncertain. Here, the roles of grouper STAT3 (Ec-STAT3) in red spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV) infection were investigated. The present data showed that the distribution of phosphorylated Ec-STAT3 was altered in RGNNV infected fish cells, and the promoter activity of STAT3 was significantly increased during virus infection, suggesting that STAT3 activation was involved in RGNNV infection. Using STAT3 specific inhibitor, we found that inhibition of Ec-STAT3 in vitro did not affect the transcription and protein synthesis of RGNNV coat protein (CP), however, the severity of RGNNV induced vacuolation and autophagy was significantly increased. Meanwhile, at the late stage of virus infection, RGNNV induced necrotic cell death was significantly decreased after inhibition of Ec-STAT3. Further studies indicated that Ec-STAT3 inhibition significantly increased the transcript level of autophagy related genes, including UNC-51-like kinase 2 (ULK2) and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II) induced by RGNNV infection. Moreover, the expression of several pro-inflammatory factors, including TNFα, IL-1β and IL-8 were mediated by Ec-STAT3 during RGNNV infection. Together, our results not only firstly revealed that STAT3 exerted novel roles in response to fish virus infection, but also provided new insights into understanding the roles of STAT3 in different forms of programmed cell death. PMID:25555814

  17. Rac1 signaling protects monocytic AML cells expressing the MLL-AF9 oncogene from caspase-mediated apoptotic death.

    PubMed

    Hinterleitner, C; Huelsenbeck, J; Henninger, C; Wartlick, F; Schorr, A; Kaina, B; Fritz, G

    2013-08-01

    We investigated the relevance of signaling mechanisms regulated by the Ras-homologous GTPase Rac1 for survival of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells harbouring the MLL-AF9 oncogene due to t(9;11)(p21;q23) translocation. Monocytic MLL-AF9 expressing cells (MM6, THP-1) were hypersensitive to both small-molecule inhibitors targeting Rac1 (EHT 1864, NSC 23766) (IC50EHT ~12.5 μM) and lipid lowering drugs (lovastatin, atorvastatin) (IC50Lova ~7.5 μM) as compared to acute myelocytic leukemia (NOMO-1, HL60) and T cell leukemia (Jurkat) cells (IC50EHT >30 μM; IC50Lova >25 μM). Hypersensitivity of monocytic cells following Rac1 inhibition resulted from caspase-driven apoptosis as shown by profound activation of caspase-8,-9,-7,-3 and substantial (~90 %) decrease in protein expression of pro-survival factors (survivin, XIAP, p-Akt). Apoptotic death was preceded by S139-posphorylation of histone H2AX (γH2AX), a prototypical surrogate marker of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Taken together, abrogation of Rac1 signaling causes DSBs in acute monocytic leukemia cells harbouring the MLL-AF9 oncogene, which, together with downregulation of survivin, XIAP and p-Akt, results in massive induction of caspase-driven apoptotic death. Apparently, Rac1 signaling is required for maintaining genetic stability and maintaining survival in specific subtypes of AML. Hence, targeting of Rac1 is considered a promising novel strategy to induce lethality in MLL-AF9 expressing AML. PMID:23624644

  18. Involvement of fish signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in nodavirus infection induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Huang, Youhua; Huang, Xiaohong; Yang, Ying; Wang, Wei; Yu, Yepin; Qin, Qiwei

    2015-03-01

    The Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling pathway is an important signaling pathway activated by interferons in response to virus infection. Fish STAT3 has been demonstrated to be involved in Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) infection and virus induced paraptosis, but its effects on the replication of other fish viruses still remained uncertain. Here, the roles of grouper STAT3 (Ec-STAT3) in red spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV) infection were investigated. The present data showed that the distribution of phosphorylated Ec-STAT3 was altered in RGNNV infected fish cells, and the promoter activity of STAT3 was significantly increased during virus infection, suggesting that STAT3 activation was involved in RGNNV infection. Using STAT3 specific inhibitor, we found that inhibition of Ec-STAT3 in vitro did not affect the transcription and protein synthesis of RGNNV coat protein (CP), however, the severity of RGNNV induced vacuolation and autophagy was significantly increased. Meanwhile, at the late stage of virus infection, RGNNV induced necrotic cell death was significantly decreased after inhibition of Ec-STAT3. Further studies indicated that Ec-STAT3 inhibition significantly increased the transcript level of autophagy related genes, including UNC-51-like kinase 2 (ULK2) and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II) induced by RGNNV infection. Moreover, the expression of several pro-inflammatory factors, including TNFα, IL-1β and IL-8 were mediated by Ec-STAT3 during RGNNV infection. Together, our results not only firstly revealed that STAT3 exerted novel roles in response to fish virus infection, but also provided new insights into understanding the roles of STAT3 in different forms of programmed cell death.

  19. Targeting cell death signalling in cancer: minimising ‘Collateral damage'

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Joanna L; MacFarlane, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Targeting apoptosis for the treatment of cancer has become an increasingly attractive strategy, with agents in development to trigger extrinsic apoptosis via TRAIL signalling, or to prevent the anti-apoptotic activity of BCL-2 proteins or inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins. Although the evasion of apoptosis is one of the hallmarks of cancer, many cancers have intact apoptotic signalling pathways, which if unblocked could efficiently kill cancerous cells. However, it is becoming increasing clear that without a detailed understanding of both apoptotic and non-apoptotic signalling, and the key proteins that regulate these pathways, there can be dose-limiting toxicity and adverse effects associated with their modulation. Here we review the main apoptotic pathways directly targeted for anti-cancer therapy and the unforeseen consequences of their modulation. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of an in-depth mechanistic understanding of both the apoptotic and non-apoptotic functions of those proteins under investigation as anti-cancer drug targets and outline some novel approaches to sensitise cancer cells to apoptosis, thereby improving the efficacy of existing therapies when used in combination with novel targeted agents. PMID:27140313

  20. Oviductal estrogen receptor α signaling prevents protease-mediated embryo death

    PubMed Central

    Winuthayanon, Wipawee; Bernhardt, Miranda L; Padilla-Banks, Elizabeth; Myers, Page H; Edin, Matthew L; Lih, Fred B; Hewitt, Sylvia C; Korach, Kenneth S; Williams, Carmen J

    2015-01-01

    Development of uterine endometrial receptivity for implantation is orchestrated by cyclic steroid hormone-mediated signals. It is unknown if these signals are necessary for oviduct function in supporting fertilization and preimplantation development. Here we show that conditional knockout (cKO) mice lacking estrogen receptor α (ERα) in oviduct and uterine epithelial cells have impaired fertilization due to a dramatic reduction in sperm migration. In addition, all successfully fertilized eggs die before the 2-cell stage due to persistence of secreted innate immune mediators including proteases. Elevated protease activity in cKO oviducts causes premature degradation of the zona pellucida and embryo lysis, and wild-type embryos transferred into cKO oviducts fail to develop normally unless rescued by concomitant transfer of protease inhibitors. Thus, suppression of oviductal protease activity mediated by estrogen-epithelial ERα signaling is required for fertilization and preimplantation embryo development. These findings have implications for human infertility and post-coital contraception. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10453.001 PMID:26623518

  1. Brief Report: Signals Enhance the Suppressive Effects of Noncontingent Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringdahl, Joel E.; Call, Nathan A.; Christensen, Tory; Boelter, Eric W.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of noncontingent reinforcement (NCR) schedules on responding were assessed across two parameters: presence of signal and schedule density. Results indicated that signaled NCR schedules were correlated with greater overall reductions in responding and quicker reductions relative to NCR schedules without a signal. The clinical…

  2. Inactivation of the MAPK signaling pathway by Listeria monocytogenes infection promotes trophoblast giant cell death

    PubMed Central

    Hashino, Masanori; Tachibana, Masato; Nishida, Takashi; Hara, Hideki; Tsuchiya, Kohsuke; Mitsuyama, Masao; Watanabe, Kenta; Shimizu, Takashi; Watarai, Masahisa

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has a well-characterized ability to cross the placental barrier, resulting in spontaneous abortion and fetal infections. However, the mechanisms resulting in infection-associated abortion are not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrate that the dephosphorylation of MAPK family proteins caused by L. monocytogenes infection of trophoblast giant (TG) cells, which are placental immune cells, contributes to infectious abortion. Dephosphorylation of c-Jun, p38, and ERK1/2 was observed in infected TG cells, causing the downregulation of cytoprotective heme oxygenase (HO)-1. Blocking the dephosphorylation of proteins, including MAPK family proteins, inhibited the decrease in HO-1 expression. Treatment with MAPK inhibitors inhibited bacterial internalization into TG cells. Moreover, Toll-like receptor 2 involved in the expression of MAPK family proteins. Infection with a listeriolysin O-deleted mutant impaired dephosphorylation of MAPK family proteins in TG cells and did not induce infectious abortion in a mouse model. These results suggest that inactivation of the MAPK pathway by L. monocytogenes induces TG cell death and causes infectious abortion. PMID:26528279

  3. A magnetic switch for the control of cell death signalling in in vitro and in vivo systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Mi Hyeon; Lee, Eun Jung; Son, Mina; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Yoo, Dongwon; Kim, Ji-Wook; Park, Seung Woo; Shin, Jeon-Soo; Cheon, Jinwoo

    2012-12-01

    The regulation of cellular activities in a controlled manner is one of the most challenging issues in fields ranging from cell biology to biomedicine. Nanoparticles have the potential of becoming useful tools for controlling cell signalling pathways in a space and time selective fashion. Here, we have developed magnetic nanoparticles that turn on apoptosis cell signalling by using a magnetic field in a remote and non-invasive manner. The magnetic switch consists of zinc-doped iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (Zn0.4Fe2.6O4), conjugated with a targeting antibody for death receptor 4 (DR4) of DLD-1 colon cancer cells. The magnetic switch, in its On mode when a magnetic field is applied to aggregate magnetic nanoparticle-bound DR4s, promotes apoptosis signalling pathways. We have also demonstrated that the magnetic switch is operable at the micrometre scale and that it can be applied in an in vivo system where apoptotic morphological changes of zebrafish are successfully induced.

  4. Nanomaterial-Assisted Signal Enhancement of Hybridization for DNA Biosensors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinhuai; Liu, Jinyun; Yang, Liangbao; Chen, Xing; Zhang, Meiyun; Meng, Fanli; Luo, Tao; Li, Minqiang

    2009-01-01

    Detection of DNA sequences has received broad attention due to its potential applications in a variety of fields. As sensitivity of DNA biosensors is determined by signal variation of hybridization events, the signal enhancement is of great significance for improving the sensitivity in DNA detection, which still remains a great challenge. Nanomaterials, which possess some unique chemical and physical properties caused by nanoscale effects, provide a new opportunity for developing novel nanomaterial-based signal-enhancers for DNA biosensors. In this review, recent progress concerning this field, including some newly-developed signal enhancement approaches using quantum-dots, carbon nanotubes and their composites reported by our group and other researchers are comprehensively summarized. Reports on signal enhancement of DNA biosensors by non-nanomaterials, such as enzymes and polymer reagents, are also reviewed for comparison. Furthermore, the prospects for developing DNA biosensors using nanomaterials as signal-enhancers in future are also indicated. PMID:22399999

  5. Chromosomal instability triggers cell death via local signalling through the innate immune receptor Toll

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dawei; Shaukat, Zeeshan; Saint, Robert B.; Gregory, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal instability (CIN) is a hallmark of cancer and has been implicated in cancer initiation, progression and the development of resistance to traditional cancer therapy. Here we identify a new property of CIN cells, showing that inducing CIN in proliferating Drosophila larval tissue leads to the activation of innate immune signalling in CIN cells. Manipulation of this immune pathway strongly affects the survival of CIN cells, primarily via JNK, which responds to both Toll and TNFα/Eiger. This pathway also activates Mmp1, which recruits hemocytes to the CIN tissue to provide local amplification of the immune response that is needed for effective elimination of CIN cells. PMID:26462024

  6. Black Soybean Seed Coat Extract Prevents Hydrogen Peroxide-Mediated Cell Death via Extracellular Signal-Related Kinase Signalling in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Naoto; Oki, Tomoyuki; Sasaki, Kazunori; Suda, Ikuo; Okuno, Shigenori

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress reduces cell viability and contributes to disease processes. Flavonoids including anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins reportedly induce intracellular antioxidant defence systems. Thus, in this study, we examined the antioxidant effects of a commercial extract from black soybean seed coats (BE), which are rich in anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin, and investigated the associated intracellular mechanisms in HepG2 cells. HepG2 cells treated with hydrogen peroxide (HPO) showed 60% viability, whereas pretreatment with BE-containing media for 2 h ameliorated HPO-mediated cell death by up to 90%. Pretreatment with BE for 2 h partially blocked HPO-mediated activation of ERK in HepG2 cells, and that for 1 h led to a 20% increase in intracellular total protein phosphatase (PP) activity, which is known to deactivate protein kinases. These results indicate that BE prevents HPO-mediated cell damage by inhibiting ERK signalling, potentially via PPs.

  7. Regulation of hippocampal Fas receptor and death-inducing signaling complex after kainic acid treatment in mice.

    PubMed

    Keller, Benjamin; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-12-01

    Kainic acid (KA)-induced brain neuronal cell death (especially in the hippocampus) was shown to be mainly mediated by the intrinsic (mitochondrial) apoptotic pathway. This study investigated the regulation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway mediated by Fas ligand/Fas receptor and components of the indispensable death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) in the hippocampus (marked changes) and cerebral cortex (modest changes) of KA-treated mice. KA (45mg/kg) induced a severe behavioral syndrome with recurrent motor seizures (scores; maximal at 60-90min; minimal at 72h) with activation of hippocampal pro-apoptotic JNK (+2.5 fold) and increased GFAP (+57%) and nuclear PARP-1 fragmentation (+114%) 72h post-treatment (delayed neurotoxicity). In the extrinsic apoptotic pathway (hippocampus), KA (72h) reduced Fas ligand (-92%) and Fas receptor aggregates (-24%). KA (72h) also altered the contents of major DISC components: decreased FADD adaptor (-44%), reduced activation of initiator caspase-8 (-47%) and increased survival FLIP-S (+220%). Notably, KA (72h) upregulated the content of anti-apoptotic p-Ser191 FADD (+41%) and consequently the expression of p-FADD/FADD ratio (+1.9-fold), a neuroplastic index. Moreover, the p-FADD dependent transcription factor NF-κB was also increased (+61%) in the hippocampus after KA (72h). The convergent adaptation of the extrinsic apoptotic machinery 72h after KA in mice (with otherwise normal gross behavior) is a novel finding which suggests the induction of survival mechanisms to partly counteract the delayed neuronal death in the hippocampus.

  8. Regulation of hippocampal Fas receptor and death-inducing signaling complex after kainic acid treatment in mice.

    PubMed

    Keller, Benjamin; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-12-01

    Kainic acid (KA)-induced brain neuronal cell death (especially in the hippocampus) was shown to be mainly mediated by the intrinsic (mitochondrial) apoptotic pathway. This study investigated the regulation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway mediated by Fas ligand/Fas receptor and components of the indispensable death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) in the hippocampus (marked changes) and cerebral cortex (modest changes) of KA-treated mice. KA (45mg/kg) induced a severe behavioral syndrome with recurrent motor seizures (scores; maximal at 60-90min; minimal at 72h) with activation of hippocampal pro-apoptotic JNK (+2.5 fold) and increased GFAP (+57%) and nuclear PARP-1 fragmentation (+114%) 72h post-treatment (delayed neurotoxicity). In the extrinsic apoptotic pathway (hippocampus), KA (72h) reduced Fas ligand (-92%) and Fas receptor aggregates (-24%). KA (72h) also altered the contents of major DISC components: decreased FADD adaptor (-44%), reduced activation of initiator caspase-8 (-47%) and increased survival FLIP-S (+220%). Notably, KA (72h) upregulated the content of anti-apoptotic p-Ser191 FADD (+41%) and consequently the expression of p-FADD/FADD ratio (+1.9-fold), a neuroplastic index. Moreover, the p-FADD dependent transcription factor NF-κB was also increased (+61%) in the hippocampus after KA (72h). The convergent adaptation of the extrinsic apoptotic machinery 72h after KA in mice (with otherwise normal gross behavior) is a novel finding which suggests the induction of survival mechanisms to partly counteract the delayed neuronal death in the hippocampus. PMID:26044520

  9. Harnessing system models of cell death signalling for cytotoxic chemotherapy: towards personalised medicine approaches?

    PubMed

    Huber, Heinrich J; McKiernan, Ross G; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2014-03-01

    Most cytotoxic chemotherapeutics are believed to kill cancer cells by inducing apoptosis. Understanding the factors that contribute to impairment of apoptosis in cancer cells is therefore critical for the development of novel therapies that circumvent the widespread chemoresistance. Apoptosis, however, is a complex and tightly controlled process that can be induced by different classes of chemotherapeutics targeting different signalling nodes and pathways. Moreover, apoptosis initiation and apoptosis execution strongly depend on patient-specific, genomic and proteomic signatures. Here, we will review recent translational studies that suggest a critical link between the sensitivity of cancer cells to initiate apoptosis and clinical outcome. Next we will discuss recent advances in the field of system modelling of apoptosis pathways for the prediction of treatment responses. We propose that initiation of mitochondrial apoptosis, defined as the process of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilisation (MOMP), is a dose-dependent decision process that allows for a prediction of individual therapy responses and therapeutic windows. We provide evidence in contrast that apoptosis execution post-MOMP may be a binary decision that dictates whether apoptosis is executed or not. We will discuss the implications of this concept for the future use of novel adjuvant therapeutics that specifically target apoptosis signalling pathways or which may be used to reduce the impact of cell-to-cell heterogeneity on therapy responses. Finally, we will discuss the technical and regulatory requirements surrounding the use and implications of system-based patient stratification tools for the future of personalised oncology. PMID:24477766

  10. Calcium Signaling Involvement in Cadmium-Induced Astrocyte Cytotoxicity and Cell Death Through Activation of MAPK and PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiao Hua; Ge, Guo; Gao, Kai; Pang, Ying; Chai, Rui Chao; Jia, Xi Hua; Kong, Jin Ge; Yu, Albert Cheung-Hoi

    2015-09-01

    Cadmium (Cd), a highly ubiquitous toxic heavy metal, can contaminate the environment, including agricultural soil, water and air, via industrial runoff and other sources of pollution. Cd accumulated in the body via direct exposure or through the food chain results in neurodegeneration and many other diseases. Previous studies on its toxicity in the central nervous system (CNS) focused mainly on neurons. To obtain a more comprehensive understanding of Cd toxicity for the CNS, we investigated how astrocytes respond to acute and chronic Cd exposure and its toxic molecular mechanisms. When primary cultures of cerebral cortical astrocytes incubated with 1-300 μM CdCl2, morphological changes, LDH release and cell death were observed in a time and dose-dependent manner. Further studies demonstrated that acute and chronic Cd treatment phosphorylated JNK, p38 and Akt to different degrees, while ERK1/2 was only phosphorylated under low doses of Cd (10 μM) exposure. Inhibition of JNK and PI3K/Akt, but not of p38, could partially protect astrocyte from cytotoxicity in chronic and acute Cd exposure. Moreover, Cd also induced a strong calcium signal, while BAPTA, a specific intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) chelator, prevented Cd-induced intracellular increase of calcium levels in astrocytes; inhibited the Cd-induced activation of ERK1/2, JNK, p38 and Akt; and also significantly reduced astrocyte cell death. All of these results suggested that the Cd-Ca(2+)-MAPK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways were involved in Cd-induced toxicity in astrocytes. This toxicity involvement indicates that these pathways may be exploited as a target for the prevention of Cd-induced neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26248512

  11. Gene profiling reveals hydrogen sulphide recruits death signaling via the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor identifying commonalities with excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minghui Jessica; Peng, Zhao Feng; Manikandan, Jayapal; Melendez, Alirio J; Tan, Gek San; Chung, Ching Ming; Li, Qiu-Tian; Tan, Theresa M; Deng, Lih Wen; Whiteman, Matthew; Beart, Philip M; Moore, Phillip K; Cheung, Nam Sang

    2011-05-01

    Recently the role of hydrogen sulphide (H(2) S) as a gasotransmitter stimulated wide interest owing to its involvement in Alzheimer's disease and ischemic stroke. Previously we demonstrated the importance of functional ionotropic glutamate receptors (GluRs) by neurons is critical for H(2) S-mediated dose- and time-dependent injury. Moreover N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonists abolished the consequences of H(2) S-induced neuronal death. This study focuses on deciphering the downstream effects activation of NMDAR on H(2) S-mediated neuronal injury by analyzing the time-course of global gene profiling (5, 15, and 24 h) to provide a comprehensive description of the recruitment of NMDAR-mediated signaling. Microarray analyses were performed on RNA from cultured mouse primary cortical neurons treated with 200 µM sodium hydrosulphide (NaHS) or NMDA over a time-course of 5-24 h. Data were validated via real-time PCR, western blotting, and global proteomic analysis. A substantial overlap of 1649 genes, accounting for over 80% of NMDA global gene profile present in that of H(2) S and over 50% vice versa, was observed. Within these commonly occurring genes, the percentage of transcriptional consistency at each time-point ranged from 81 to 97%. Gene families involved included those related to cell death, endoplasmic reticulum stress, calcium homeostasis, cell cycle, heat shock proteins, and chaperones. Examination of genes exclusive to H(2) S-mediated injury (43%) revealed extensive dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. These data form a foundation for the development of screening platforms and define targets for intervention in H(2) S neuropathologies where NMDAR-activated signaling cascades played a substantial role.

  12. Involvement of NtERF3 in the cell death signalling pathway mediated by SIPK/WIPK and WRKY1 in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Ogata, T; Okada, H; Kawaide, H; Takahashi, H; Seo, S; Mitsuhara, I; Matsushita, Y

    2015-09-01

    We previously reported that one of the ethylene response factors (ERFs), NtERF3, and other members of the subgroup VIII-a ERFs of the AP2/ERF family exhibit cell death-inducing ability in tobacco leaves. In this study, we focused on the involvement of NtERF3 in a cell death signalling pathway in tobacco plants, particularly downstream of NtSIPK/NtWIPK and NtWRKY1, which are mitogen-activated protein kinases and a phosphorylation substrate of NtSIPK, respectively. An ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif-deficient NtERF3b mutant (NtERF3bΔEAR) that lacked cell death-inducing ability suppressed the induction of cell death caused by NtERF3a. The transient co-expression of NtERF3bΔEAR suppressed the hypersensitive reaction (HR)-like cell death induced by NtSIPK and NtWRKY1. The induction of cell death by NtSIPK and NtWRKY1 was also inhibited in transgenic plants expressing NtERF3bΔEAR. Analysis of gene expression, ethylene production and cell death symptoms in salicylic acid-deficient tobacco plants suggested the existence of some feedback regulation in the HR cell death signalling pathway mediated by SIPK/WIPK and WRKY1. Overall, these results suggest that NtERF3 functions downstream of NtSIPK/NtWIPK and NtWRKY1 in a cell death signalling pathway, with some feedback regulation.

  13. Nicotine-mediated signals modulate cell death and survival of T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Oloris, Silvia C.S.; Frazer-Abel, Ashley A.; Jubala, Cristan M.; Fosmire, Susan P.; Helm, Karen M.; Robinson, Sally R.; Korpela, Derek M.; Duckett, Megan M.; Baksh, Shairaz; Modiano, Jaime F.

    2010-02-01

    The capacity of nicotine to affect the behavior of non-neuronal cells through neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) has been the subject of considerable recent attention. Previously, we showed that exposure to nicotine activates the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcription factor in lymphocytes and endothelial cells, leading to alterations in cellular growth and vascular endothelial growth factor production. Here, we extend these studies to document effects of nicotine on lymphocyte survival. The data show that nicotine induces paradoxical effects that might alternatively enforce survival or trigger apoptosis, suggesting that depending on timing and context, nicotine might act both as a survival factor or as an inducer of apoptosis in normal or transformed lymphocytes, and possibly other non-neuronal cells. In addition, our results show that, while having overlapping functions, low and high affinity nAChRs also transmit signals that promote distinct outcomes in lymphocytes. The sum of our data suggests that selective modulation of nAChRs might be useful to regulate lymphocyte activation and survival in health and disease.

  14. Singapore grouper iridovirus, a large DNA virus, induces nonapoptotic cell death by a cell type dependent fashion and evokes ERK signaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaohong; Huang, Youhua; Ouyang, Zhengliang; Xu, Lixiao; Yan, Yang; Cui, Huachun; Han, Xin; Qin, Qiwei

    2011-08-01

    Virus induced cell death, including apoptosis and nonapoptotic cell death, plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of viral diseases. Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV), a novel iridovirus of genus Ranavirus, causes high mortality and heavy economic losses in grouper aquaculture. Here, using fluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy and biochemical assays, we found that SGIV infection in host (grouper spleen, EAGS) cells evoked nonapoptotic programmed cell death (PCD), characterized by appearance of cytoplasmic vacuoles and distended endoplasmic reticulum, in the absence of DNA fragmentation, apoptotic bodies and caspase activation. In contrast, SGIV induced typical apoptosis in non-host (fathead minnow, FHM) cells, as evidenced by caspase activation and DNA fragmentation, suggesting that SGIV infection induced nonapoptotic cell death by a cell type dependent fashion. Furthermore, viral replication was essential for SGIV induced nonapoptotic cell death, but not for apoptosis. Notably, the disruption of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) and externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) were not detected in EAGS cells but in FHM cells after SGIV infection. Moreover, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling was involved in SGIV infection induced nonapoptotic cell death and viral replication. This is a first demonstration of ERK-mediated nonapoptotic cell death induced by a DNA virus. These findings contribute to understanding the mechanisms of iridovirus pathogenesis.

  15. Investigation of enhanced forward and backward anti-stokes Raman signals in lithium niobate waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Da; Hong, Pengda; Ding, Yujie J.; Liu, Zhaojun; Wang, Lei; Hua, Ping-Rang; Zhang, De-Long

    2015-07-07

    We have observed enhancements of the anti-Stokes Raman signals generated in lithium niobate waveguides in the forward and backward configurations by at least one order of magnitude under the pump power of the microwatt level. These output signals were measured using a single photon detector. The forward and backward propagating anti-Stokes signals exhibited different spectral features.

  16. Signal enhancement in ligand-receptor interactions using dynamic polymers at quartz crystal microbalance sensors.

    PubMed

    Dunér, Gunnar; Anderson, Henrik; Pei, Zhichao; Ingemarsson, Björn; Aastrup, Teodor; Ramström, Olof

    2016-06-20

    The signal enhancement properties of QCM sensors based on dynamic, biotinylated poly(acrylic acid) brushes has been studied in interaction studies with an anti-biotin Fab fragment. The poly(acrylic acid) sensors showed a dramatic increase in signal response with more than ten times higher signal than the carboxyl-terminated self-assembled monolayer surface. PMID:27196531

  17. Dexamethasone enhances necrosis-like neuronal death in ischemic rat hippocampus involving μ-calpain activation.

    PubMed

    Müller, Georg Johannes; Hasseldam, Henrik; Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Johansen, Flemming Fryd

    2014-11-01

    Transient forebrain ischemia (TFI) leads to hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cell death which is aggravated by glucocorticoids (GC). It is unknown how GC affect apoptosis and necrosis in cerebral ischemia. We therefore investigated the co-localization of activated caspase-3 (casp-3) with apoptosis- and necrosis-like cell death morphologies in CA1 of rats treated with dexamethasone prior to TFI (DPTI). In addition, apoptosis- (casp-9, casp-3, casp-3-cleaved PARP and cleaved α-spectrin 145/150 and 120kDa) and necrosis-related (calpain-specific casp-9 cleavage, μ-calpain upregulation and cleaved α-spectrin 145/150kDa) cell death mechanisms were investigated by Western blot analysis. DPTI expedited CA1 neuronal death from day 4 to day 1 and increased the magnitude of CA1 neuronal death from 66.2% to 91.3% at day 7. Furthermore, DPTI decreased the overall (days 1-7) percentage of dying neurons displaying apoptosis-like morphology from 4.7% to 0.3% and, conversely, increased the percentage of neurons with necrosis-like morphology from 95.3% to 99.7%. In animals subjected to TFI without dexamethasone (ischemia-only), 7.4% of all dying CA1 neurons were casp-3-immunoreactive (IR), of which 3.1% co-localized with apoptosis-like and 4.3% with necrosis-like changes. By contrast, DPTI decreased the percentage of dying neurons with casp-3 IR to 1.4%, of which 0.3% co-localized with apoptosis-like changes and 1.1% with necrosis-like changes. Western blot analysis from DPTI animals showed a significant elevation of μ-calpain, a calpain-produced necrosis-related casp-9 fragment (25kDa) and cleavage of α-spectrin into 145/150kDa fragments at day 4, whereas in ischemia-only animals a significant increase of casp-3-cleaved PARP, cleavage of α-spectrin into 145/150 and 120kDa fragments was detected at day 7. We conclude that DPTI, in addition to augmenting and expediting CA1 neuronal death, causes a shift from apoptosis-like cell death to necrosis involving μ-calpain activation.

  18. Multinuclear giant cell formation is enhanced by down-regulation of Wnt signaling in gastric cancer cell line, AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Shi-Mun; Kim, Rockki; Ryu, Jae-Hyun; Jho, Eek-Hoon; Song, Ki-Joon; Jang, Shyh-Ing; Kee, Sun-Ho . E-mail: keesh@korea.ac.kr

    2005-08-01

    AGS cells, which were derived from malignant gastric adenocarcinoma tissue, lack E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion but have a high level of nuclear {beta}-catenin, which suggests altered Wnt signal. In addition, approximately 5% of AGS cells form multinuclear giant cells in the routine culture conditions, while taxol treatment causes most AGS cells to become giant cells. The observation of reduced nuclear {beta}-catenin levels in giant cells induced by taxol treatment prompted us to investigate the relationship between Wnt signaling and giant cell formation. After overnight serum starvation, the shape of AGS cells became flattened, and this morphological change was accompanied by decrease in Myc expression and an increase in the giant cell population. Lithium chloride treatment, which inhibits GSK3{beta} activity, reversed these serum starvation effects, which suggests an inverse relationship between Wnt signaling and giant cell formation. Furthermore, the down-regulation of Wnt signaling caused by the over-expression of ICAT, E-cadherin, and Axin enhanced giant cell formation. Therefore, down-regulation of Wnt signaling may be related to giant cell formation, which is considered to be a survival mechanism against induced cell death.

  19. Phospholipase C/diacylglycerol kinase-mediated signalling is required for benzothiadiazole-induced oxidative burst and hypersensitive cell death in rice suspension-cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Zhang, Weidong; Song, Fengming; Zheng, Zhong

    2007-01-01

    The involvement of phospholipase C/diacylglycerol kinase (PLC/DGK)-mediated signalling in oxidative burst and hypersensitive cell death was studied in rice suspension-cultured cells treated with benzothiadiazole (BTH) and infected by Xanthomonas oryza pv. oryza (Xoo), the causal agent of rice leaf blight disease. Treatment of rice suspension cells with BTH resulted in a significant oxidative burst, as indicated by accumulation of superoxide anion and H(2)O(2), and hypersensitive cell death, as determined by Evans blue staining. A peak in oxidative burst was detected 3-4 h after BTH treatment and hypersensitive cell death was observed 8 h after treatment. In addition, significant oxidative burst and hypersensitive cell death were detected in BTH-treated suspension cells, but not in untreated control cells, after Xoo infection. Scavengers and antioxidants of active oxygen species, e.g., superoxide dismutase, catalase, N-acetylcysteine, and flavone, reduced significantly the BTH-induced oxidative burst and hypersensitive cell death, indicating that oxidative burst is required for BTH-induced hypersensitive cell death. Expression of the PLC/DGK pathway genes, a diacylglycerol kinase gene, OsDAGK1, and a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C gene, OsPI-PLC1, and a defence-related EREBP transcriptional factor gene, OsBIERF3, was activated in rice cells after BTH treatment and in the BTH-treated cells after Xoo infection. Treatment of rice cells with phosphatidic acid, a phospholipid signalling molecule, resulted in the production of oxidative burst and hypersensitive cell death. However, neomycin, a PLC inhibitor, inhibited partially but not completely the production of oxidative burst, hypersensitive cell death, and expression of OsBIERF3 and OsDAGK1 induced by BTH in rice cells. These results suggest that PLC/DGK-mediated signalling plays an important role in BTH-induced oxidative burst, hypersensitive response, and activation of defence response in rice.

  20. Arctigenin enhances chemosensitivity of cancer cells to cisplatin through inhibition of the STAT3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiangyang; Zhu, Fenfen; Zhao, Zhihui; Liu, Chang; Luo, Lan; Yin, Zhimin

    2011-10-01

    Arctigenin is a dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan isolated from Bardanae fructus, Arctium lappa L, Saussureamedusa, Torreya nucifera, and Ipomea cairica. It has been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory activities, which is mainly mediated through its inhibitory effect on nuclear transcription factor-kappaB (NF-κB). But the role of arctigenin in JAK-STAT3 signaling pathways is still unclear. In present study, we investigated the effect of arctigenin on signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathway and evaluated whether suppression of STAT3 activity by arctigenin could sensitize cancer cells to a chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin. Our results show that arctigenin significantly suppressed both constitutively activated and IL-6-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and subsequent nuclear translocation in cancer cells. Inhibition of STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation was found to be achieved through suppression of Src, JAK1, and JAK2, while suppression of STAT3 serine phosphorylation was mediated by inhibition of ERK activation. Pervanadate reversed the arctigenin-induced downregulation of STAT3 activation, suggesting the involvement of a protein tyrosine phosphatase. Indeed, arctigenin can obviously induce the expression of the PTP SHP-2. Furthermore, the constitutive activation level of STAT3 was found to be correlated to the resistance of cancer cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Arctigenin dramatically promoted cisplatin-induced cell death in cancer cells, indicating that arctigenin enhanced the sensitivity of cancer cells to cisplatin mainly via STAT3 suppression. These observations suggest a novel anticancer function of arctigenin and a potential therapeutic strategy of using arctigenin in combination with chemotherapeutic agents for cancer treatment.

  1. 5-Hydroxy-7-Methoxyflavone Triggers Mitochondrial-Associated Cell Death via Reactive Oxygen Species Signaling in Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Souren; Jakhar, Rekha; Han, Jaehong; Kang, Sun Chul

    2016-01-01

    Plant-derived compounds are an important source of clinically useful anti-cancer agents. Chrysin, a biologically active flavone found in many plants, has limited usage for cancer chemotherapeutics due to its poor oral bioavailability. 5-Hydroxy-7-methoxyflavone (HMF), an active natural chrysin derivative found in various plant sources, is known to modulate several biological activities. However, the mechanism underlying HMF-induced apoptotic cell death in human colorectal carcinoma cells in vitro is still unknown. Herein, HMF was shown to be capable of inducing cytotoxicity in HCT-116 cells and induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of HCT-116 cells with HMF caused DNA damage and triggered mitochondrial membrane perturbation accompanied by Cyt c release, down-regulation of Bcl-2, activation of BID and Bax, and caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. These results show that ROS generation by HMF was the crucial mediator behind ER stress induction, resulting in intracellular Ca2+ release, JNK phosphorylation, and activation of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Furthermore, time course study also reveals that HMF treatment leads to increase in mitochondrial and cytosolic ROS generation and decrease in antioxidant enzymes expression. Temporal upregulation of IRE1-α expression and JNK phosphorylation was noticed after HMF treatment. These results were further confirmed by pre-treatment with the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), which completely reversed the effects of HMF treatment by preventing lipid peroxidation, followed by abolishment of JNK phosphorylation and attenuation of apoptogenic marker proteins. These results emphasize that ROS generation by HMF treatment regulates the mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic signaling pathway in HCT-116 cells, demonstrating HMF as a promising pro-oxidant therapeutic candidate for targeting colorectal cancer. PMID:27116119

  2. Group IVA phospholipase A(2) deficiency prevents CCl4-induced hepatic cell death through the enhancement of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Keiichi; Kanai, Shiho; Tanaka, Kikuko; Kawashita, Eri; Akiba, Satoshi

    2016-02-26

    Group IVA phospholipase A2 (IVA-PLA2), which generates arachidonate, plays a role in inflammation. IVA-PLA2-deficiency reduced hepatotoxicity and hepatocyte cell death in mice that received a single dose of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) without any inhibitory effects on CCl4-induced lipid peroxidation. An immunoblot analysis of extracts from wild-type mouse- and IVA-PLA2 KO mouse-derived primary hepatocytes that transiently expressed microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3B (LC3) revealed a higher amount of LC3-II, a typical index of autophagosome formation, in IVA-PLA2-deficient cells, suggesting the enhancement of constitutive autophagy. IVA-PLA2 may promote CCl4-induced cell death through the suppression of constitutive autophagy in hepatocytes.

  3. Enhanced heat-induced cellular leakage and death of Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella typhimurium by 2,3 Butanedione.

    PubMed

    Farah, Ibrahim O

    2003-01-01

    Influence of diacetyl on cellular leakage and/or death of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus; FRI-100) and Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) in the presence and absence of 30% sucrose and NZ-amine broth at 37, 45 and 55 degrees C was studied using Microbiological and Spectrophotmetric techniques. Diacetyl exists naturally in starter distillate and is usually added to enhance the flavor at the end of the fermentation process. Our objective was to examine its use before the onset of fermentation towards the safety of fermented products. Results showed significant difference (p < 0.05) between control and diacetyl treatments; average mean difference was > 5 log colony forming units per ml (CFU/ml) within 1 hour (h). Interesting trends were also observed when differences with respect to absorbance ratios when data was normalized. Results also showed that diacetyl (0.1%) caused more cellular leakage and death of S. aureus at 45 degrees C as compared to 37 degrees C, and that cellular leakage per se was not directly related to death. Diacetyl, however, caused rapid death of S. aureus and S. typhimurium in the presence of 30% sucrose and NZ-amine broth at 55 degrees C; > 7 log CFU/ml death within 1 and 2 h respectively. We also conducted a study with commercial starter distillate (7%) and proved its ability to control both organisms under the same test conditions within 1 h at 55 degrees C. It is concluded that diacetyl is a potential candidate for the control of foodborne pathogens especially under low water activity conditions such as those encountered during meat fermentation.

  4. A Method of Speech Periodicity Enhancement Using Transform-domain Signal Decomposition☆

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tan; Kleijn, W. Bastiaan; Kong, Ying-Yee

    2015-01-01

    Periodicity is an important property of speech signals. It is the basis of the signal’s fundamental frequency and the pitch of voice, which is crucial to speech communication. This paper presents a novel framework of periodicity enhancement for noisy speech. The enhancement is applied to the linear prediction residual of speech. The residual signal goes through a constant-pitch time warping process and two sequential lapped-frequency transforms, by which the periodic component is concentrated in certain transform coefficients. By emphasizing the respective transform coefficients, periodicity enhancement of noisy residual signal is achieved. The enhanced residual signal and estimated linear prediction filter parameters are used to synthesize the output speech. An adaptive algorithm is proposed for adjusting the weights for the periodic and aperiodic components. Effectiveness of the proposed approach is demonstrated via experimental evaluation. It is observed that harmonic structure of the original speech could be properly restored to improve the perceptual quality of enhanced speech. PMID:26150679

  5. Vibrio vulnificus VvhA induces autophagy-related cell death through the lipid raft-dependent c-Src/NOX signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eun Ju; Lee, Sei-Jung; Lim, Hyeon Su; Kim, Jun Sung; Jang, Kyung Ku; Choi, Sang Ho; Han, Ho Jae

    2016-01-01

    VvhA, a virulent factor of Vibrio (V.) vulnificus, induces acute cell death in a destructive manner. Autophagy plays an important role in cell death, but the functional role of VvhA in autophagy-related cell death has not been elucidated yet. We found that rVvhA significantly increased LC3 puncta formation and autophagic flux in promoting the cell death of human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. The cell death induced by rVvhA was independent of lysosomal permeabilizaton and caspase activation. rVvhA induced rapid phosphorylation of c-Src in the membrane lipid raft, which resulted in an increased interaction between lipid raft molecule caveolin-1 and NADPH oxidase (NOX) complex Rac1 for ROS production. NOX-mediated ROS signaling induced by rVvhA increased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) which are required for mRNA expression of Atg5 and Atg16L1 involved in autophagosome formation. In an in vivo model, VvhA increased autophagy activation and paracellular permeabilization in intestinal epithelium. Collectively, the results here show that VvhA plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis and dissemination of V. vulnificus by autophagy upregulation, through the lipid raft-mediated c-Src/NOX signaling pathway and ERK/eIF2α activation. PMID:27250250

  6. Vibrio vulnificus VvhA induces autophagy-related cell death through the lipid raft-dependent c-Src/NOX signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun Ju; Lee, Sei-Jung; Lim, Hyeon Su; Kim, Jun Sung; Jang, Kyung Ku; Choi, Sang Ho; Han, Ho Jae

    2016-06-02

    VvhA, a virulent factor of Vibrio (V.) vulnificus, induces acute cell death in a destructive manner. Autophagy plays an important role in cell death, but the functional role of VvhA in autophagy-related cell death has not been elucidated yet. We found that rVvhA significantly increased LC3 puncta formation and autophagic flux in promoting the cell death of human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. The cell death induced by rVvhA was independent of lysosomal permeabilizaton and caspase activation. rVvhA induced rapid phosphorylation of c-Src in the membrane lipid raft, which resulted in an increased interaction between lipid raft molecule caveolin-1 and NADPH oxidase (NOX) complex Rac1 for ROS production. NOX-mediated ROS signaling induced by rVvhA increased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) which are required for mRNA expression of Atg5 and Atg16L1 involved in autophagosome formation. In an in vivo model, VvhA increased autophagy activation and paracellular permeabilization in intestinal epithelium. Collectively, the results here show that VvhA plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis and dissemination of V. vulnificus by autophagy upregulation, through the lipid raft-mediated c-Src/NOX signaling pathway and ERK/eIF2α activation.

  7. Defect Signal Enhancement in Inspection Lines by Magnetic Flux Leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etcheverry, J.; Pignotti, A.; Sánchez, G.; Stickar, P.

    2003-03-01

    The detection of flaws that involve 5% or more of the pipe wall thickness is not easy to achieve for internal defects inspected from the outside. In this work we focus on a relatively straightforward technique, based on obtaining the characteristic signature of relevant defects, and projecting the actual signals on these "standard" defect configurations, thus increasing the signal-to-noise ratio and providing an alternative way to determine the nature of the defect. Several options are discussed, including some that are computationally less demanding, and are susceptible of being implemented on-line.

  8. E4orf1 Enhances Glucose Uptake Independent of Proximal Insulin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Na, Ha-Na; Hegde, Vijay; Dubuisson, Olga; Dhurandhar, Nikhil V.

    2016-01-01

    Impaired proximal insulin signaling is often present in diabetes. Hence, approaches to enhance glucose disposal independent of proximal insulin signaling are desirable. Evidence indicates that Adenovirus-derived E4orf1 protein may offer such an approach. This study determined if E4orf1 improves insulin sensitivity and downregulates proximal insulin signaling in vivo and enhances cellular glucose uptake independent of proximal insulin signaling in vitro. High fat fed mice were injected with a retrovirus plasmid expressing E4orf1, or a null vector. E4orf1 significantly improved insulin sensitivity in response to a glucose load. Yet, their proximal insulin signaling in fat depots was impaired, as indicated by reduced tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor (IR), and significantly increased abundance of ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase-1 (ENPP1). In 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes E4orf1 expression impaired proximal insulin signaling. Whereas, treatment with rosiglitazone reduced ENPP1 abundance. Unaffected by IR-KD (insulin receptor knockdown) with siRNA, E4orf1 significantly up-regulated distal insulin signaling pathway and enhanced cellular glucose uptake. In vivo, E4orf1 impairs proximal insulin signaling in fat depots yet improves glycemic control. This is probably explained by the ability of E4orf1 to promote cellular glucose uptake independent of proximal insulin signaling. E4orf1 may provide a therapeutic template to enhance glucose disposal in the presence of impaired proximal insulin signaling. PMID:27537838

  9. E4orf1 Enhances Glucose Uptake Independent of Proximal Insulin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Na, Ha-Na; Hegde, Vijay; Dubuisson, Olga; Dhurandhar, Nikhil V

    2016-01-01

    Impaired proximal insulin signaling is often present in diabetes. Hence, approaches to enhance glucose disposal independent of proximal insulin signaling are desirable. Evidence indicates that Adenovirus-derived E4orf1 protein may offer such an approach. This study determined if E4orf1 improves insulin sensitivity and downregulates proximal insulin signaling in vivo and enhances cellular glucose uptake independent of proximal insulin signaling in vitro. High fat fed mice were injected with a retrovirus plasmid expressing E4orf1, or a null vector. E4orf1 significantly improved insulin sensitivity in response to a glucose load. Yet, their proximal insulin signaling in fat depots was impaired, as indicated by reduced tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor (IR), and significantly increased abundance of ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase-1 (ENPP1). In 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes E4orf1 expression impaired proximal insulin signaling. Whereas, treatment with rosiglitazone reduced ENPP1 abundance. Unaffected by IR-KD (insulin receptor knockdown) with siRNA, E4orf1 significantly up-regulated distal insulin signaling pathway and enhanced cellular glucose uptake. In vivo, E4orf1 impairs proximal insulin signaling in fat depots yet improves glycemic control. This is probably explained by the ability of E4orf1 to promote cellular glucose uptake independent of proximal insulin signaling. E4orf1 may provide a therapeutic template to enhance glucose disposal in the presence of impaired proximal insulin signaling. PMID:27537838

  10. Involvement of ERK-Nrf-2 signaling in ionizing radiation induced cell death in normal and tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Raghavendra S; Checker, Rahul; Sharma, Deepak; Sandur, Santosh K; Sainis, Krishna B

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged oxidative stress favors tumorigenic environment and inflammation. Oxidative stress may trigger redox adaptation mechanism(s) in tumor cells but not normal cells. This may increase levels of intracellular antioxidants and establish a new redox homeostasis. Nrf-2, a master regulator of battery of antioxidant genes is constitutively activated in many tumor cells. Here we show that, murine T cell lymphoma EL-4 cells show constitutive and inducible radioresistance via activation of Nrf-2/ERK pathway. EL-4 cells contained lower levels of ROS than their normal counterpart murine splenic lymphocytes. In response to radiation, the thiol redox circuits, GSH and thioredoxin were modified in EL-4 cells. Pharmacological inhibitors of ERK and Nrf-2 significantly enhanced radiosensitivity and reduced clonogenic potential of EL-4 cells. Unirradiated lymphoma cells showed nuclear accumulation of Nrf-2, upregulation of its dependent genes and protein levels. Interestingly, MEK inhibitor abrogated its nuclear translocation suggesting role of ERK in basal and radiation induced Nrf-2 activation in tumor cells. Double knockdown of ERK and Nrf-2 resulted in higher sensitivity to radiation induced cell death as compared to individual knockdown cells. Importantly, NF-kB which is reported to be constitutively active in many tumors was not present at basal levels in EL-4 cells and its inhibition did not influence radiosensitivity of EL-4 cells. Thus our results reveal that, tumor cells which are subjected to heightened oxidative stress employ master regulator cellular redox homeostasis Nrf-2 for prevention of radiation induced cell death. Our study reveals the molecular basis of tumor radioresistance and highlights role of Nrf-2 and ERK.

  11. Bacillus bombysepticus α-Toxin Binding to G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Regulates cAMP/PKA Signaling Pathway to Induce Host Death

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ping; Cheng, Tingcai; Ma, Sanyuan; Gao, Junping; Jin, Shengkai; Jiang, Liang; Xia, Qingyou

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens and their toxins target host receptors, leading to aberrant behavior or host death by changing signaling events through subversion of host intracellular cAMP level. This is an efficient and widespread mechanism of microbial pathogenesis. Previous studies describe toxins that increase cAMP in host cells, resulting in death through G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling pathways by influencing adenylyl cyclase or G protein activity. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) has a central role in regulation of GPCR desensitization. However, little information is available about the pathogenic mechanisms of toxins associated with GRK2. Here, we reported a new bacterial toxin-Bacillus bombysepticus (Bb) α-toxin that was lethal to host. We showed that Bb α-toxin interacted with BmGRK2. The data demonstrated that Bb α-toxin directly bound to BmGRK2 to promote death by affecting GPCR signaling pathways. This mechanism involved stimulation of Gαs, increase level of cAMP and activation of protein kinase A (PKA). Activated cAMP/PKA signal transduction altered downstream effectors that affected homeostasis and fundamental biological processes, disturbing the structural and functional integrity of cells, resulting in death. Preventing cAMP/PKA signaling transduction by inhibitions (NF449 or H-89) substantially reduced the pathogenicity of Bb α-toxin. The discovery of a toxin-induced host death specifically linked to GRK2 mediated signaling pathway suggested a new model for bacterial toxin action. Characterization of host genes whose expression and function are regulated by Bb α-toxin and GRK2 will offer a deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of infectious diseases caused by pathogens that elevate cAMP. PMID:27022742

  12. Endothelial epsin deficiency decreases tumor growth by enhancing VEGF signaling.

    PubMed

    Pasula, Satish; Cai, Xiaofeng; Dong, Yunzhou; Messa, Mirko; McManus, John; Chang, Baojun; Liu, Xiaolei; Zhu, Hua; Mansat, Robert Silasi; Yoon, Seon-Joo; Hahn, Scott; Keeling, Jacob; Saunders, Debra; Ko, Genevieve; Knight, John; Newton, Gail; Luscinskas, Francis; Sun, Xiaohong; Towner, Rheal; Lupu, Florea; Xia, Lijun; Cremona, Ottavio; De Camilli, Pietro; Min, Wang; Chen, Hong

    2012-12-01

    Epsins are a family of ubiquitin-binding, endocytic clathrin adaptors. Mice lacking both epsins 1 and 2 (Epn1/2) die at embryonic day 10 and exhibit an abnormal vascular phenotype. To examine the angiogenic role of endothelial epsins, we generated mice with constitutive or inducible deletion of Epn1/2 in vascular endothelium. These mice exhibited no abnormal phenotypes under normal conditions, suggesting that lack of endothelial epsins 1 and 2 did not affect normal blood vessels. In tumors, however, loss of epsins 1 and 2 resulted in disorganized vasculature, significantly increased vascular permeability, and markedly retarded tumor growth. Mechanistically, we show that VEGF promoted binding of epsin to ubiquitinated VEGFR2. Loss of epsins 1 and 2 specifically impaired endocytosis and degradation of VEGFR2, which resulted in excessive VEGF signaling that compromised tumor vascular function by exacerbating nonproductive leaky angiogenesis. This suggests that tumor vasculature requires a balance in VEGF signaling to provide sufficient productive angiogenesis for tumor development and that endothelial epsins 1 and 2 negatively regulate the output of VEGF signaling. Promotion of excessive VEGF signaling within tumors via a block of epsin 1 and 2 function may represent a strategy to prevent normal angiogenesis in cancer patients who are resistant to anti-VEGF therapies.

  13. Enhanced BMP signaling results in supernumerary tooth formation in USAG-1 deficient mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Murashima-Suginami, Akiko; Takahashi, Katsu Sakata, Tomoko; Tsukamoto, Hiroko; Sugai, Manabu; Yanagita, Motoko; Shimizu, Akira; Sakurai, Takeshi; Slavkin, Harold C.; Bessho, Kazuhisa

    2008-05-16

    Uterine sensitization associated gene-1 (USAG-1) is a BMP antagonist, and also modulates Wnt signaling. We previously reported that USAG-1 deficient mice have supernumerary teeth. The supernumerary maxillary incisor appears to form as a result of the successive development of the rudimentary upper incisor. USAG-1 abrogation rescued apoptotic elimination of odontogenic mesenchymal cells. We confirmed that BMPs were expressed in both the epithelium and mesenchyme of the rudimentary incisor at E14 and E15. BMP signaling in the rudimentary maxillary incisor, assessed by expressions of Msx1 and Dlx2 and the phosphorylation of Smad protein, was significantly enhanced. Wnt signaling as demonstrated by the nuclear localization of {beta}-catenin was also up-regulated. Inhibition of BMP signaling rescues supernumerary tooth formation in E15 incisor explant culture. Based upon these results, we conclude that enhanced BMP signaling results in supernumerary teeth and BMP signaling was modulated by Wnt signaling in the USAG-1 deficient mouse model.

  14. A Novel Gene, OZONE-RESPONSIVE APOPLASTIC PROTEIN1, Enhances Cell Death in Ozone Stress in Rice.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Yoshiaki; Siddique, Shahid; Frei, Michael

    2015-09-01

    A novel protein, OZONE-RESPONSIVE APOPLASTIC PROTEIN1 (OsORAP1), was characterized, which was previously suggested as a candidate gene underlying OzT9, a quantitative trait locus for ozone stress tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa). The sequence of OsORAP1 was similar to that of ASCORBATE OXIDASE (AO) proteins. It was localized in the apoplast, as shown by transient expression of an OsORAP1/green fluorescent protein fusion construct in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf epidermal and mesophyll cells, but did not possess AO activity, as shown by heterologous expression of OsORAP1 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants with reduced background AO activity. A knockout rice line of OsORAP1 showed enhanced tolerance to ozone stress (120 nL L(-1) average daytime concentration, 20 d), as demonstrated by less formation of leaf visible symptoms (i.e. cell death), less lipid peroxidation, and lower NADPH oxidase activity, indicating reduced active production of reactive oxygen species. In contrast, the effect of ozone on chlorophyll content was not significantly different among the lines. These observations suggested that OsORAP1 specifically induced cell death in ozone stress. Significantly enhanced expression of jasmonic acid-responsive genes in the knockout line implied the involvement of the jasmonic acid pathway in symptom mitigation. Sequence analysis revealed extensive polymorphisms in the promoter region of OsORAP1 between the ozone-susceptible cv Nipponbare and the ozone-tolerant cv Kasalath, the OzT9 donor variety, which could be responsible for the differential regulation of OsORAP1 reported earlier. These pieces of evidence suggested that OsORAP1 enhanced cell death in ozone stress, and its expression levels could explain the effect of a previously reported quantitative trait locus.

  15. A Novel Gene, OZONE-RESPONSIVE APOPLASTIC PROTEIN1, Enhances Cell Death in Ozone Stress in Rice1

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Yoshiaki; Siddique, Shahid; Frei, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A novel protein, OZONE-RESPONSIVE APOPLASTIC PROTEIN1 (OsORAP1), was characterized, which was previously suggested as a candidate gene underlying OzT9, a quantitative trait locus for ozone stress tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa). The sequence of OsORAP1 was similar to that of ASCORBATE OXIDASE (AO) proteins. It was localized in the apoplast, as shown by transient expression of an OsORAP1/green fluorescent protein fusion construct in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf epidermal and mesophyll cells, but did not possess AO activity, as shown by heterologous expression of OsORAP1 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants with reduced background AO activity. A knockout rice line of OsORAP1 showed enhanced tolerance to ozone stress (120 nL L−1 average daytime concentration, 20 d), as demonstrated by less formation of leaf visible symptoms (i.e. cell death), less lipid peroxidation, and lower NADPH oxidase activity, indicating reduced active production of reactive oxygen species. In contrast, the effect of ozone on chlorophyll content was not significantly different among the lines. These observations suggested that OsORAP1 specifically induced cell death in ozone stress. Significantly enhanced expression of jasmonic acid-responsive genes in the knockout line implied the involvement of the jasmonic acid pathway in symptom mitigation. Sequence analysis revealed extensive polymorphisms in the promoter region of OsORAP1 between the ozone-susceptible cv Nipponbare and the ozone-tolerant cv Kasalath, the OzT9 donor variety, which could be responsible for the differential regulation of OsORAP1 reported earlier. These pieces of evidence suggested that OsORAP1 enhanced cell death in ozone stress, and its expression levels could explain the effect of a previously reported quantitative trait locus. PMID:26220952

  16. AKT/TSC2/p70S6K signaling pathway is involved in quinocetone-induced death-promoting autophagy in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shen; Zhang, Chaoming; Tang, Shusheng; Deng, Sijun; Zhou, Yan; Dai, Chongshan; Yang, Xiayun; Xiao, Xilong

    2016-05-01

    Quinocetone (QCT, 3-methyl-2-quinoxalin benzenevinylketo-1, 4-dioxide) is widely used as a veterinary drug and animal feed additive in China. Although it promotes growth and improves feed efficiency, QCT's in vitro and in vivo toxicities remain uncertain. This study was conducted to explore the mechanism of QCT-induced autophagy in HepG2 cells. By the results obtained from monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining, ultrastructural observation by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), as well as Western blotting analysis for LC3, p62, and Beclin-1, it was demonstrated that QCT induced autophagy in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, PI3K/AKT inhibitor significantly enhanced QCT-induced autophagy, while TSC2 knockdown attenuated this process. In addition, inhibition of autophagy by pharmacological approach remarkably increased the viability of QCT-treated cells detected by MTT assay, suggesting that QCT-triggered autophagy may play as a promotion mechanism for cell death. Meanwhile, apoptosis was markedly downregulated after autophagy blockage, and evaluated by flow cytometry and Western blotting analysis for caspase-3 cleavage. Consequently, these results suggested that QCT-induced autophagy was mediated by AKT/TSC2/p70S6K signaling pathway, and inhibition of autophagy promoted QCT-treated cell survival by attenuating apoptosis. PMID:27098396

  17. Seismo-electromagnetic thin-bed responses: Natural signal enhancements?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobbe, N.; Slob, E. C.

    2016-04-01

    We study if nature can help us overcome the very low signal-to-noise ratio of seismo-electromagnetic converted fields by investigating the effects of thin-bed geological structures on the seismo-electromagnetic signal. To investigate the effects of bed thinning on the seismo-electromagnetic interference patterns, we numerically simulate seismo-electromagnetic wave propagation through horizontally layered media with different amounts and thicknesses of thin beds. We distinguish two limits of bed thickness. Below the upper limit, the package of thin beds starts acting like an "effective" medium. Below the lower limit, further thinning does not affect the seismo-electromagnetic interface response signal strength anymore. We demonstrate seismo-electromagnetic sensitivity to changes in medium parameters on a spatial scale much smaller than the seismic resolution. Increasing amounts of thin beds can cause the interface response signal strength to increase or decrease. Whether constructive or destructive interference occurs seems to be dependent on the seismo-electromagnetic coupling coefficient contrasts. When the combined result of the contrast, between upper half-space and package of thin beds and the internal thin-bed contrast, is positive, constructive interference occurs. Destructive interference occurs when the combined contrast is negative. Maximum amplitude tuning occurs for thicknesses of thin-bed packages similar to the dominant pressure and shear wavelengths. Artifacts due to model periodicity are excluded by comparing periodic media with random models. By simulating moving oil/water contacts during production, where the oil layer is gradually being thinned, seismo-electromagnetic signals are proven very sensitive to oil/water contacts. An oil layer with a thickness of <1% of the dominant shear wavelength is still recognized.

  18. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 Regulates Cell Death and Survival Signaling in Tumor Cells under Redox Stress1

    PubMed Central

    Venè, Roberta; Cardinali, Barbara; Arena, Giuseppe; Ferrari, Nicoletta; Benelli, Roberto; Minghelli, Simona; Poggi, Alessandro; Noonan, Douglas M.; Albini, Adriana; Tosetti, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Targeting tumor-specific metabolic adaptations is a promising anticancer strategy when tumor defense mechanisms are restrained. Here, we show that redox-modulating drugs including the retinoid N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide (4HPR), the synthetic triterpenoid bardoxolone (2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oic acid methyl ester), arsenic trioxide (As2O3), and phenylethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), while affecting tumor cell viability, induce sustained Ser9 phosphorylation of the multifunctional kinase glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β). The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine decreased GSK3β phosphorylation and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage induced by 4HPR, As2O3, and PEITC, implicating oxidative stress in these effects. GSK3β phosphorylation was associated with up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes, in particular heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and transient elevation of intracellular glutathione (GSH) in cells surviving acute stress, before occurrence of irreversible damage and death. Genetic inactivation of GSK3β or transfection with the non-phosphorylatable GSK3β-S9A mutant inhibited HO-1 induction under redox stress, while tumor cells resistant to 4HPR exhibited increased GSK3β phosphorylation, HO-1 expression, and GSH levels. The above-listed findings are consistent with a role for sustained GSK3β phosphorylation in a signaling network activating antioxidant effector mechanisms during oxidoreductive stress. These data underlie the importance of combination regimens of antitumor redox drugs with inhibitors of survival signaling to improve control of tumor development and progression and overcome chemoresistance. PMID:25246272

  19. Joint Maximum Likelihood Time Delay Estimation of Unknown Event-Related Potential Signals for EEG Sensor Signal Quality Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyungsoo; Lim, Sung-Ho; Lee, Jaeseok; Kang, Won-Seok; Moon, Cheil; Choi, Ji-Woong

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalograms (EEGs) measure a brain signal that contains abundant information about the human brain function and health. For this reason, recent clinical brain research and brain computer interface (BCI) studies use EEG signals in many applications. Due to the significant noise in EEG traces, signal processing to enhance the signal to noise power ratio (SNR) is necessary for EEG analysis, especially for non-invasive EEG. A typical method to improve the SNR is averaging many trials of event related potential (ERP) signal that represents a brain's response to a particular stimulus or a task. The averaging, however, is very sensitive to variable delays. In this study, we propose two time delay estimation (TDE) schemes based on a joint maximum likelihood (ML) criterion to compensate the uncertain delays which may be different in each trial. We evaluate the performance for different types of signals such as random, deterministic, and real EEG signals. The results show that the proposed schemes provide better performance than other conventional schemes employing averaged signal as a reference, e.g., up to 4 dB gain at the expected delay error of 10°. PMID:27322267

  20. Joint Maximum Likelihood Time Delay Estimation of Unknown Event-Related Potential Signals for EEG Sensor Signal Quality Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyungsoo; Lim, Sung-Ho; Lee, Jaeseok; Kang, Won-Seok; Moon, Cheil; Choi, Ji-Woong

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalograms (EEGs) measure a brain signal that contains abundant information about the human brain function and health. For this reason, recent clinical brain research and brain computer interface (BCI) studies use EEG signals in many applications. Due to the significant noise in EEG traces, signal processing to enhance the signal to noise power ratio (SNR) is necessary for EEG analysis, especially for non-invasive EEG. A typical method to improve the SNR is averaging many trials of event related potential (ERP) signal that represents a brain’s response to a particular stimulus or a task. The averaging, however, is very sensitive to variable delays. In this study, we propose two time delay estimation (TDE) schemes based on a joint maximum likelihood (ML) criterion to compensate the uncertain delays which may be different in each trial. We evaluate the performance for different types of signals such as random, deterministic, and real EEG signals. The results show that the proposed schemes provide better performance than other conventional schemes employing averaged signal as a reference, e.g., up to 4 dB gain at the expected delay error of 10°. PMID:27322267

  1. Loss of TRB3 alters dynamics of MLK3-JNK signaling and inhibits cytokine-activated pancreatic beta cell death.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Rohan K; Ray, Anamika; Gonuguntla, Sumati; Hao, Ergeng; Jhala, Ulupi S

    2014-10-24

    Disabling cellular defense mechanisms is essential for induction of apoptosis. We have previously shown that cytokine-mediated activation of the MAP3K MLK3 stabilizes TRB3 protein levels to inhibit AKT and compromise beta cell survival. Here, we show that genetic deletion of TRB3 results in basal activation of AKT, preserves mitochondrial integrity, and confers resistance against cytokine-induced pancreatic beta cell death. Mechanistically, we find that TRB3 stabilizes MLK3, most likely by suppressing AKT-directed phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and proteasomal degradation of MLK3. Accordingly, TRB3(-/-) islets show a decrease in both the amplitude and duration of cytokine-stimulated MLK3 induction and JNK activation. It is well known that JNK signaling is facilitated by a feed forward loop of sequential kinase phosphorylation and is reinforced by a mutual stabilization of the module components. The failure of TRB3(-/-) islets to mount an optimal JNK activation response, coupled with the ability of TRB3 to engage and maintain steady state levels of MLK3, recasts TRB3 as an integral functional component of the JNK module in pancreatic beta cells. PMID:25204656

  2. Domain-Specific Activation of Death-Associated Intracellular Signalling Cascades by the Cellular Prion Protein in Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Vilches, Silvia; Vergara, Cristina; Nicolás, Oriol; Mata, Ágata; Del Río, José A; Gavín, Rosalina

    2016-09-01

    The biological functions of the cellular prion protein remain poorly understood. In fact, numerous studies have aimed to determine specific functions for the different protein domains. Studies of cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) domains through in vivo expression of molecules carrying internal deletions in a mouse Prnp null background have provided helpful data on the implication of the protein in signalling cascades in affected neurons. Nevertheless, understanding of the mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity induced by these PrP(C) deleted forms is far from complete. To better define the neurotoxic or neuroprotective potential of PrP(C) N-terminal domains, and to overcome the heterogeneity of results due to the lack of a standardized model, we used neuroblastoma cells to analyse the effects of overexpressing PrP(C) deleted forms. Results indicate that PrP(C) N-terminal deleted forms were properly processed through the secretory pathway. However, PrPΔF35 and PrPΔCD mutants led to death by different mechanisms sharing loss of alpha-cleavage and activation of caspase-3. Our data suggest that both gain-of-function and loss-of-function pathogenic mechanisms may be associated with N-terminal domains and may therefore contribute to neurotoxicity in prion disease. Dissecting the molecular response induced by PrPΔF35 may be the key to unravelling the physiological and pathological functions of the prion protein. PMID:26250617

  3. Domain-Specific Activation of Death-Associated Intracellular Signalling Cascades by the Cellular Prion Protein in Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Vilches, Silvia; Vergara, Cristina; Nicolás, Oriol; Mata, Ágata; Del Río, José A; Gavín, Rosalina

    2016-09-01

    The biological functions of the cellular prion protein remain poorly understood. In fact, numerous studies have aimed to determine specific functions for the different protein domains. Studies of cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) domains through in vivo expression of molecules carrying internal deletions in a mouse Prnp null background have provided helpful data on the implication of the protein in signalling cascades in affected neurons. Nevertheless, understanding of the mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity induced by these PrP(C) deleted forms is far from complete. To better define the neurotoxic or neuroprotective potential of PrP(C) N-terminal domains, and to overcome the heterogeneity of results due to the lack of a standardized model, we used neuroblastoma cells to analyse the effects of overexpressing PrP(C) deleted forms. Results indicate that PrP(C) N-terminal deleted forms were properly processed through the secretory pathway. However, PrPΔF35 and PrPΔCD mutants led to death by different mechanisms sharing loss of alpha-cleavage and activation of caspase-3. Our data suggest that both gain-of-function and loss-of-function pathogenic mechanisms may be associated with N-terminal domains and may therefore contribute to neurotoxicity in prion disease. Dissecting the molecular response induced by PrPΔF35 may be the key to unravelling the physiological and pathological functions of the prion protein.

  4. Programmed Death-1 Affects Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling-1 Expression in T Cells During Hepatitis C Infection

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, Ashley D.; Zhang, Chun L.; Ni, Lei; Ma, Cheng J.; Zhang, Ying; Wu, Xiao Y.; Atia, Antwan N.; Yao, Zhi Q.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with T-cell exhaustion that is mediated through upregulation of the PD-1 negative regulatory pathway. PD-1 expression is induced by HCV core protein, which also induces upregulation of SOCS-1, a key modulator that controls the Jak/STAT pathway regulating cytokine expression. To determine whether these two negative regulatory pathways are linked during T-cell signaling, SOCS-1 expression was examined by blocking the PD-1 pathway in T cells stimulated with anti-CD3/CD28 in the presence of HCV core protein. T cells isolated from healthy subjects or HCV-infected individuals were treated with anti-PD-1 or anti-PDL-1 antibodies in the presence or absence of HCV core protein, and SOCS-1 gene expression was detected by RT-PCR or immunoblotting, while T-cell functions were assayed by flow cytometric analyses. Both PD-1 and SOCS-1 gene expression were upregulated in healthy T cells exposed to HCV core protein, and blocking the PD-1 pathway downregulated SOCS-1 gene expression in these cells. Additionally, T cells isolated from chronically HCV-infected subjects exhibited increased PD-1 and SOCS-1 expression compared to healthy subjects, and SOCS-1 expression in T cells isolated from HCV-infected subjects was also inhibited by blocking PD-1 signaling; this in turn enhanced the phosphorylation of STAT-1, and improved the impaired T-cell proliferation observed in the setting of HCV infection. These data demonstrate that PD-1 and SOCS-1 are linked in dysregulating T-cell signaling during HCV infection, and their cross-talk may coordinately inhibit T-cell signaling pathways that lead to T-cell exhaustion during chronic viral infection. PMID:20883163

  5. High LET radiation enhances nocodazole Induced cell death in HeLa cells through mitotic catastrophe and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Zhou, Libin; Dai, Zhongying; Jin, Xiaodong; Liu, Xinguo; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Li, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    To understand how human tumor cells respond to the combined treatment with nocodazole and high LET radiation, alterations in cell cycle, mitotic disturbances and cell death were investigated in the present study. Human cervix carcinoma HeLa cells were exposed to nocodazole for 18 h immediately followed by high LET iron ion irradiation and displayed a sequence of events leading to DNA damages, mitotic aberrations, interphase restitution and endocycle as well as cell death. A prolonged mitotic arrest more than 10 h was observed following nocodazole exposure, no matter the irradiation was present or not. The occurrence of mitotic slippage following the mitotic arrest was only drug-dependent and the irradiation did not accelerate it. The amount of polyploidy cells was increased following mitotic slippage. No detectable G(2) or G(1) arrest was observed in cells upon the combined treatment and the cells reentered the cell cycle still harboring unrepaired cellular damages. This premature entry caused an increase of multipolar mitotic spindles and amplification of centrosomes, which gave rise to lagging chromosomal material, failure of cytokinesis and polyploidization. These mitotic disturbances and their outcomes confirmed the incidence of mitotic catastrophe and delayed apoptotic features displayed by TUNEL method after the combined treatment. These results suggest that the addition of high-LET iron ion irradiation to nocodazole enhanced mitotic catastrophe and delayed apoptosis in HeLa cells. These might be important cell death mechanisms involved in tumor cells in response to the treatment of antimitotic drug combined with high LET radiation.

  6. Library synthesis, screening, and discovery of modified Zinc(II)-Bis(dipicolylamine) probe for enhanced molecular imaging of cell death.

    PubMed

    Plaunt, Adam J; Harmatys, Kara M; Wolter, William R; Suckow, Mark A; Smith, Bradley D

    2014-04-16

    Zinc(II)-bis(dipicolylamine) (Zn-BDPA) coordination complexes selectively target the surfaces of dead and dying mammalian cells, and they have promise as molecular probes for imaging cell death. A necessary step toward eventual clinical imaging applications is the development of next-generation Zn-BDPA complexes with enhanced affinity for the cell death membrane biomarker, phosphatidylserine (PS). This study employed an iterative cycle of library synthesis and screening, using a novel rapid equilibrium dialysis assay, to discover a modified Zn-BDPA structure with high and selective affinity for vesicles containing PS. The lead structure was converted into a deep-red fluorescent probe and its targeting and imaging performance was compared with an unmodified control Zn-BDPA probe. The evaluation process included a series of FRET-based vesicle titration studies, cell microscopy experiments, and rat tumor biodistribution measurements. In all cases, the modified probe exhibited comparatively higher affinity and selectivity for the target membranes of dead and dying cells. The results show that this next-generation deep-red fluorescent Zn-BDPA probe is well suited for preclinical molecular imaging of cell death in cell cultures and animal models. Furthermore, it should be possible to substitute the deep-red fluorophore with alternative reporter groups that enable clinically useful, deep-tissue imaging modalities, such as MRI and nuclear imaging.

  7. Gallium arsenide enhances digital signal processing in electronic warfare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, B.; Apte, D.

    1985-07-01

    The higher electron mobility and velocity of GaAs digital signal processing IC devices for electronic warfare (EW) allow operation times that are several times faster than those of ICs based on silicon. Particular benefits are foreseen for the response time and broadband capability of ECM systems. Many data manipulation methods can be implemented in emitter-coupled logic (ECL) GaAs devices, and digital GaAs RF memories are noted to show great promise for improved ECM system performance while encompassing microwave frequency and chirp signal synthesis, repeater jamming, and multiple false target generation. EW digital frequency synthesizers are especially in need of GaAS IC technology, since bandwidth and resolution have been limited by ECL technology to about 250 MHz.

  8. MiR-133b targets antiapoptotic genes and enhances death receptor-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Patron, Juan P; Fendler, Annika; Bild, Matthias; Jung, Ulrike; Müller, Henrik; Arntzen, Magnus Ø; Piso, Chloe; Stephan, Carsten; Thiede, Bernd; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim; Jung, Klaus; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Schreiber, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Despite the importance of microRNAs (miRs) for regulation of the delicate balance between cell proliferation and death, evidence for their specific involvement during death receptor (DR)-mediated apoptosis is scarce. Transfection with miR-133b rendered resistant HeLa cells sensitive to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα)-induced cell death. Similarly, miR-133b caused exacerbated proapoptotic responses to TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) or an activating antibody to Fas/CD95. Comprehensive analysis, encompassing global RNA or protein expression profiling performed by microarray experiments and pulsed stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (pSILAC), led to the discovery of the antiapoptotic protein Fas apoptosis inhibitory molecule (FAIM) as immediate miR-133b target. Moreover, miR-133b impaired the expression of the detoxifying protein glutathione-S-transferase pi (GSTP1). Expression of miR-133b in tumor specimens of prostate cancer patients was significantly downregulated in 75% of the cases, when compared with matched healthy tissue. Furthermore, introduction of synthetic miR-133b into an ex-vivo model of prostate cancer resulted in impaired proliferation and cellular metabolic activity. PC3 cells were also sensitized to apoptotic stimuli after transfection with miR-133b similar to HeLa cells. These data reveal the ability of a single miR to influence major apoptosis pathways, suggesting an essential role for this molecule during cellular transformation, tumorigenesis and tissue homeostasis.

  9. LISA Framework for Enhancing Gravitational Wave Signal Extraction Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David E.; Thirumalainambi, Rajkumar

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a Framework for benchmarking and comparing signal-extraction and noise-interference-removal methods that are applicable to interferometric Gravitational Wave detector systems. The primary use is towards comparing signal and noise extraction techniques at LISA frequencies from multiple (possibly confused) ,gravitational wave sources. The Framework includes extensive hybrid learning/classification algorithms, as well as post-processing regularization methods, and is based on a unique plug-and-play (component) architecture. Published methods for signal extraction and interference removal at LISA Frequencies are being encoded, as well as multiple source noise models, so that the stiffness of GW Sensitivity Space can be explored under each combination of methods. Furthermore, synthetic datasets and source models can be created and imported into the Framework, and specific degraded numerical experiments can be run to test the flexibility of the analysis methods. The Framework also supports use of full current LISA Testbeds, Synthetic data systems, and Simulators already in existence through plug-ins and wrappers, thus preserving those legacy codes and systems in tact. Because of the component-based architecture, all selected procedures can be registered or de-registered at run-time, and are completely reusable, reconfigurable, and modular.

  10. Overcoming low-alignment signal contrast induced alignment failure by alignment signal enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byeong Soo; Kim, Young Ha; Hwang, Hyunwoo; Lee, Jeongjin; Kong, Jeong Heung; Kang, Young Seog; Paarhuis, Bart; Kok, Haico; de Graaf, Roelof; Weichselbaum, Stefan; Droste, Richard; Mason, Christopher; Aarts, Igor; de Boeij, Wim P.

    2016-03-01

    Overlay is one of the key factors which enables optical lithography extension to 1X node DRAM manufacturing. It is natural that accurate wafer alignment is a prerequisite for good device overlay. However, alignment failures or misalignments are commonly observed in a fab. There are many factors which could induce alignment problems. Low alignment signal contrast is one of the main issues. Alignment signal contrast can be degraded by opaque stack materials or by alignment mark degradation due to processes like CMP. This issue can be compounded by mark sub-segmentation from design rules in combination with double or quadruple spacer process. Alignment signal contrast can be improved by applying new material or process optimization, which sometimes lead to the addition of another process-step with higher costs. If we can amplify the signal components containing the position information and reduce other unwanted signal and background contributions then we can improve alignment performance without process change. In this paper we use ASML's new alignment sensor (as was introduced and released on the NXT:1980Di) and sample wafers with special stacks which can induce poor alignment signal to demonstrate alignment and overlay improvement.

  11. Ciglitazone enhances ovarian cancer cell death via inhibition of glucose transporter-1.

    PubMed

    Shin, So Jin; Kim, Jin Young; Kwon, Sun Young; Mun, Kyo-Cheol; Cho, Chi Heum; Ha, Eunyoung

    2014-11-15

    Ciglitazone is a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonist and improves insulin sensitivity. Apart from antidiabetic activity, ciglitazone elicits inhibitory effects on cancer cell growth. Recent studies indicate that glucose metabolism plays a key role in malignant diseases. Significant increase in glucose consumption is found under malignant conditions. The role of ciglitazone in cancer cell death in relation to glucose metabolism is unclear. Thus we designed this study to determine the effect of ciglitazone on glucose metabolism. First, we found ciglitazone inhibited glucose uptake in ovarian cancer cells but did not affect hexokinase activity. Ciglitazone decreased expression levels of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1). We also found that ciglitazone and siGLUT-1 treatments induced cell death in ovarian cancer cells. We identified that ciglitazone decreased expressions of specific protein 1 (Sp-1) and β-catenin while increased phosphorylation levels of AMP-activated protein kinase. In vivo study using NOD-scid IL2Rgamma(null) mice confirmed that ciglitazone significantly decreased ovarian cancer mass transplanted onto the back of the mice. Finally, we determined GLUT-1 expressions in patients with serous type ovarian cancer and found that GLUT-1 expression was markedly increased in cancer patients and expression level was proportional to the degree of cancer stages. These results suggest that ciglitazone induces apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells by the inhibition of GLUT-1 and provides a possible therapeutic effect of ciglitazone as an adjuvant drug in the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:25240713

  12. Autophagy Negatively Regulates Cell Death by Controlling NPR1-Dependent Salicylic Acid Signaling during Senescence and the Innate Immune Response in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimoto, Kohki; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Kamiya, Yuji; Kusano, Miyako; Consonni, Chiara; Panstruga, Ralph; Ohsumi, Yoshinori; Shirasu, Ken

    2009-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved intracellular process for vacuolar degradation of cytoplasmic components. In higher plants, autophagy defects result in early senescence and excessive immunity-related programmed cell death (PCD) irrespective of nutrient conditions; however, the mechanisms by which cells die in the absence of autophagy have been unclear. Here, we demonstrate a conserved requirement for salicylic acid (SA) signaling for these phenomena in autophagy-defective mutants (atg mutants). The atg mutant phenotypes of accelerated PCD in senescence and immunity are SA signaling dependent but do not require intact jasmonic acid or ethylene signaling pathways. Application of an SA agonist induces the senescence/cell death phenotype in SA-deficient atg mutants but not in atg npr1 plants, suggesting that the cell death phenotypes in the atg mutants are dependent on the SA signal transducer NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1. We also show that autophagy is induced by the SA agonist. These findings imply that plant autophagy operates a novel negative feedback loop modulating SA signaling to negatively regulate senescence and immunity-related PCD. PMID:19773385

  13. Acetylcholine is released from taste cells, enhancing taste signalling

    PubMed Central

    Dando, Robin; Roper, Stephen D

    2012-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh), a candidate neurotransmitter that has been implicated in taste buds, elicits calcium mobilization in Receptor (Type II) taste cells. Using RT-PCR analysis and pharmacological interventions, we demonstrate that the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M3 mediates these actions. Applying ACh enhanced both taste-evoked Ca2+ responses and taste-evoked afferent neurotransmitter (ATP) secretion from taste Receptor cells. Blocking muscarinic receptors depressed taste-evoked responses in Receptor cells, suggesting that ACh is normally released from taste cells during taste stimulation. ACh biosensors confirmed that, indeed, taste Receptor cells secrete acetylcholine during gustatory stimulation. Genetic deletion of muscarinic receptors resulted in significantly diminished ATP secretion from taste buds. The data demonstrate a new role for acetylcholine as a taste bud transmitter. Our results imply specifically that ACh is an autocrine transmitter secreted by taste Receptor cells during gustatory stimulation, enhancing taste-evoked responses and afferent transmitter secretion. PMID:22570381

  14. Acetylcholine is released from taste cells, enhancing taste signalling.

    PubMed

    Dando, Robin; Roper, Stephen D

    2012-07-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh), a candidate neurotransmitter that has been implicated in taste buds, elicits calcium mobilization in Receptor (Type II) taste cells. Using RT-PCR analysis and pharmacological interventions, we demonstrate that the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M3 mediates these actions. Applying ACh enhanced both taste-evoked Ca2+ responses and taste-evoked afferent neurotransmitter (ATP) secretion from taste Receptor cells. Blocking muscarinic receptors depressed taste-evoked responses in Receptor cells, suggesting that ACh is normally released from taste cells during taste stimulation. ACh biosensors confirmed that, indeed, taste Receptor cells secrete acetylcholine during gustatory stimulation. Genetic deletion of muscarinic receptors resulted in significantly diminished ATP secretion from taste buds. The data demonstrate a new role for acetylcholine as a taste bud transmitter. Our results imply specifically that ACh is an autocrine transmitter secreted by taste Receptor cells during gustatory stimulation, enhancing taste-evoked responses and afferent transmitter secretion.

  15. 4-1BB Signaling Enhances Primary and Secondary Population Expansion of CD8+ T Cells by Maximizing Autocrine IL-2/IL-2 Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ho S; Choi, Beom K; Kim, Young H; Lee, Don G; Hwang, Sunhee; Lee, Myoung J; Park, Sang H; Bae, Yong-Soo; Kwon, Byoung S

    2015-01-01

    4-1BB (CD137), a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF), is primarily expressed on activated T cells and is known to enhance proliferation of T cells, prevent activation-induced cell death, and promote memory formation of CD8+ T cells. In particular, it is well acknowledged that 4-1BB triggering preferentially enhances the expansion of CD8+ T cells rather than CD4+ T cells, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we found that 4-1BB triggering markedly increased IL-2Rα (CD25) and IL-2 expressions of CD8+ T cells but minimally for CD4+ T cells. Proliferation of CD8+ T cells was moderately enhanced by direct 4-1BB triggering in the absence of signaling through IL-2Rα/IL-2 interactions, but further promoted in the presence of IL-2Rα/IL-2 interactions. Among the TNFRSF members including OX40, GITR, CD30, and CD27, 4-1BB was superior in the ability to induce IL-2Rα expression on CD8+ T cells. When the primary and secondary expansions of CD8+ T cells in vivo were examined by adoptively transferring OVA-specific CD8+ T cells along with the treatment with agonistic anti-4-1BB and/or antagonistic anti-CD25 F(ab')2 mAb, 4-1BB triggering enhanced both primary and secondary expansion of CD8+ T cells in vivo, and the 4-1BB effects were moderately suppressed in primary expansion while completely abolished in secondary expansion of OVA-specific CD8+ T cells by blocking IL-2Rα. These results suggest that 4-1BB-mediated increases of IL-2Rα and IL-2 prolong the effects of transient TCR- and 4-1BB-mediated signaling in CD8+ T cells, and that 4-1BB triggering preferentially enhances the expansion of CD8+ T cells through the amplification of autocrine IL-2/IL-2R signaling loop. PMID:25962156

  16. 4-1BB Signaling Enhances Primary and Secondary Population Expansion of CD8+ T Cells by Maximizing Autocrine IL-2/IL-2 Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ho S.; Choi, Beom K.; Kim, Young H.; Lee, Don G.; Hwang, Sunhee; Lee, Myoung J.; Park, Sang H.; Bae, Yong-Soo; Kwon, Byoung S.

    2015-01-01

    4-1BB (CD137), a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF), is primarily expressed on activated T cells and is known to enhance proliferation of T cells, prevent activation-induced cell death, and promote memory formation of CD8+ T cells. In particular, it is well acknowledged that 4-1BB triggering preferentially enhances the expansion of CD8+ T cells rather than CD4+ T cells, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we found that 4-1BB triggering markedly increased IL-2Rα (CD25) and IL-2 expressions of CD8+ T cells but minimally for CD4+ T cells. Proliferation of CD8+ T cells was moderately enhanced by direct 4-1BB triggering in the absence of signaling through IL-2Rα/IL-2 interactions, but further promoted in the presence of IL-2Rα/IL-2 interactions. Among the TNFRSF members including OX40, GITR, CD30, and CD27, 4-1BB was superior in the ability to induce IL-2Rα expression on CD8+ T cells. When the primary and secondary expansions of CD8+ T cells in vivo were examined by adoptively transferring OVA-specific CD8+ T cells along with the treatment with agonistic anti-4-1BB and/or antagonistic anti-CD25 F(ab’)2 mAb, 4-1BB triggering enhanced both primary and secondary expansion of CD8+ T cells in vivo, and the 4-1BB effects were moderately suppressed in primary expansion while completely abolished in secondary expansion of OVA-specific CD8+ T cells by blocking IL-2Rα. These results suggest that 4-1BB-mediated increases of IL-2Rα and IL-2 prolong the effects of transient TCR- and 4-1BB-mediated signaling in CD8+ T cells, and that 4-1BB triggering preferentially enhances the expansion of CD8+ T cells through the amplification of autocrine IL-2/IL-2R signaling loop. PMID:25962156

  17. Programmed Cell Death 10 (PDCD10)/ cerebral cavernous malformation 3 (CCM3) enhances proliferation and protects malignant T cells from apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lauenborg, Britt; Kopp, Katharina; Krejsgaard, Thorbjørn; Eriksen, Karsten W.; Geisler, Carsten; Dabelsteen, Sally; Gniadecki, Robert; Zhang, Qian; Wasik, Mariusz A.; Woetmann, Anders; Odum, Niels

    2010-01-01

    The Programmed Cell Death 10 (PDCD10) (also known as Cerebral Cavernous Malformation-3; CCM3) gene encodes an evolutionarily conserved protein associated with cell apoptosis. Mutations in PDCD10 result in cerebral cavernous malformations, an important cause of cerebral hemorrhage. PDCD10 is associated with serine/threonine kinases and phosphatases and modulates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway suggesting a role of in the regulation of cellular growth. Here we provide evidence of a constitutive expression of PDCD10 in malignant T cells and cell lines from peripheral blood of cutaneous T cell lymphoma (Sezary syndrome) patients. PDCD10 is associated with Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a regulator of mitogenesis and apoptosis in malignant T cells. Inhibition of oncogenic signal pathways (Jak3, Notch1, and NF-κB partly inhibits the constitutive PDCD10 expression, while an activator of Jak3 and NFkB, interleukin-2 (IL-2), enhances PDCD10 expression. Functional data show that PDCD10 depletion by siRNA induces apoptosis and decreases proliferation of the sensitive cells. To our knowledge, these data provide the first functional link between PDCD10 and cancer. PMID:20854465

  18. PEGylation of a Maltose Biosensor Promotes Enhanced Signal Response

    SciTech Connect

    Dattelbaum, Andrew; Baker, Gary A; Fox, John M; Iyer, Srinivas; Dattelbaum, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    A robust method to immobilize a maltose biosensor is described using an engineered maltose periplasmic binding protein (PBP) covalently coupled to NBDamide, an environmentally sensitive fluorophore. A mesoporous silica sol-gel derived from diglycerylsilane (DGS) was constructed to embed the maltose biosensor, and the ligand reporting fluorescence properties were meas red. When sequestered in the DGS-derived silica matrix, the biosensor retained maltose-dependent fluorescence sensing capability with micromolar affinity, which is consistent with the protein free in solution. The MBP-NBD conjugate was further modified by covalent conjugation with poly(ethylene glycol)-5000 (PEG) to promote the retention of water molecules around the protein and to reduce possible steric effects between the silica matrix and protein. Bioconjugation with PEG molecules does not significantly affect the signaling response of the protein in solution. When immobilized in the DGS polymer, a consistent increase in fluorescence intensity was observed as compared to the protein not functionalized with PEG. To our knowledge, this report presents the first successful method to embed a PBP biosensor in a polymerized matrix and retain signaling response using an environmentally sensitive probe. The immobilization method presented here should be easily adaptable to all conformation-dependent biosensors.

  19. Enhancement of MS Signal Processing For Improved Cancer Biomarker Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Qian

    Technological advances in proteomics have shown great potential in detecting cancer at the earliest stages. One way is to use the time of flight mass spectroscopy to identify biomarkers, or early disease indicators related to the cancer. Pattern analysis of time of flight mass spectra data from blood and tissue samples gives great hope for the identification of potential biomarkers among the complex mixture of biological and chemical samples for the early cancer detection. One of the keys issues is the pre-processing of raw mass spectra data. A lot of challenges need to be addressed: unknown noise character associated with the large volume of data, high variability in the mass spectroscopy measurements, and poorly understood signal background and so on. This dissertation focuses on developing statistical algorithms and creating data mining tools for computationally improved signal processing for mass spectrometry data. I have introduced an advanced accurate estimate of the noise model and a half-supervised method of mass spectrum data processing which requires little knowledge about the data.

  20. Selective Disruption of Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) Signaling via Phosphoinositide-dependent Kinase-1 Prevents the Protective Effect of IGF-1 on Human Cancer Cell Death*

    PubMed Central

    Alberobello, A. Teresa; D'Esposito, Vittoria; Marasco, Daniela; Doti, Nunzianna; Ruvo, Menotti; Bianco, Roberto; Tortora, Giampaolo; Esposito, Iolanda; Fiory, Francesca; Miele, Claudia; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling system exerts a broad antiapoptotic function and plays a crucial role in resistance to anticancer therapies. Exposure of MCF-7 breast cancer cells to IGF-1 rapidly and transiently induced tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1). This was paralleled by Akt/protein kinase B and protein kinase C-ζ phosphorylation, at Thr308 and Thr410, respectively. IGF-1 treatment also enhanced PDK1 interaction with IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) in intact MCF-7 cells. Pulldown assays revealed that PDK1 bound IGF-1R in vitro and that the region encompassing amino acids 51–359 of PDK1 was necessary for the interaction. Synthetic peptides corresponding to IGF-1R C terminus amino acids 1295–1337 (C43) and to PDK1 amino acids 114–141 reduced in vitro IGF-1R/PDK1 interaction in a concentration-dependent manner. Loading of fluoresceinated-C43 (fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-C43) into MCF-7 cells significantly reduced IGF-1R/PDK1 interaction and phosphorylation of PDK1 substrates. Moreover, FITC-C43 intracellular loading reverted the protective effect of IGF-1 on growth factor deprivation-induced cell death. Finally, the inhibition of IGF-1R/PDK1 interaction and signaling by FITC-C43 was accompanied by 2-fold enhanced killing capacity of cetuximab in human GEO colon adenocarcinoma cells and was sufficient to restore cell death in cetuximab-resistant cell clones. Thus, disruption of PDK1 interaction with IGF-1R reduces IGF-1 survival effects in cancer cells and may enhance cell death by anticancer agents. PMID:20044479

  1. p53 death signal is mainly mediated by Nuc1(EndoG) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Vanessa; Mangiapelo, Eleonora; Piloto, Cristina; Pieri, Luisa; Muscolini, Michela; Tuosto, Loretta; Mazzoni, Cristina

    2013-11-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 plays a central role in the regulation of cellular growth and apoptosis. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the overexpression of the human p53 leads to growth inhibition and apoptotic cell death on minimal medium. In the present work, we show that p53-expressing cells are more susceptible to cell death after an apoptotic stimulus such as H2O2. The analysis of mutants involved in yeast apoptosis-like death suggests that the observed cell death is Yca1 independent and mainly mediated through Nuc1p.

  2. Supramolecular Nanofibers Enhance Growth Factor Signaling by Increasing Lipid Raft Mobility.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, Christina J; Sur, Shantanu; Lee, Sungsoo S; Yu, Jeong Min; Zhou, Yan; Snead, Malcolm L; Stupp, Samuel I

    2016-05-11

    The nanostructures of self-assembling biomaterials have been previously designed to tune the release of growth factors in order to optimize biological repair and regeneration. We report here on the discovery that weakly cohesive peptide nanostructures in terms of intermolecular hydrogen bonding, when combined with low concentrations of osteogenic growth factor, enhance both BMP-2 and Wnt mediated signaling in myoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells, respectively. Conversely, analogous nanostructures with enhanced levels of internal hydrogen bonding and cohesion lead to an overall reduction in BMP-2 signaling. We propose that the mechanism for enhanced growth factor signaling by the nanostructures is related to their ability to increase diffusion within membrane lipid rafts. The phenomenon reported here could lead to new nanomedicine strategies to mediate growth factor signaling for translational targets. PMID:27070195

  3. Supramolecular Nanofibers Enhance Growth Factor Signaling by Increasing Lipid Raft Mobility.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, Christina J; Sur, Shantanu; Lee, Sungsoo S; Yu, Jeong Min; Zhou, Yan; Snead, Malcolm L; Stupp, Samuel I

    2016-05-11

    The nanostructures of self-assembling biomaterials have been previously designed to tune the release of growth factors in order to optimize biological repair and regeneration. We report here on the discovery that weakly cohesive peptide nanostructures in terms of intermolecular hydrogen bonding, when combined with low concentrations of osteogenic growth factor, enhance both BMP-2 and Wnt mediated signaling in myoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells, respectively. Conversely, analogous nanostructures with enhanced levels of internal hydrogen bonding and cohesion lead to an overall reduction in BMP-2 signaling. We propose that the mechanism for enhanced growth factor signaling by the nanostructures is related to their ability to increase diffusion within membrane lipid rafts. The phenomenon reported here could lead to new nanomedicine strategies to mediate growth factor signaling for translational targets.

  4. The root hair assay facilitates the use of genetic and pharmacological tools in order to dissect multiple signalling pathways that lead to programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Kacprzyk, Joanna; Devine, Aoife; McCabe, Paul F

    2014-01-01

    The activation of programmed cell death (PCD) is often a result of complex signalling pathways whose relationship and intersection are not well understood. We recently described a PCD root hair assay and proposed that it could be used to rapidly screen genetic or pharmacological modulators of PCD. To further assess the applicability of the root hair assay for studying multiple signalling pathways leading to PCD activation we have investigated the crosstalk between salicylic acid, autophagy and apoptosis-like PCD (AL-PCD) in Arabidopsis thaliana. The root hair assay was used to determine rates of AL-PCD induced by a panel of cell death inducing treatments in wild type plants treated with chemical modulators of salicylic acid synthesis or autophagy, and in genetic lines defective in autophagy or salicylic acid signalling. The assay demonstrated that PCD induced by exogenous salicylic acid or fumonisin B1 displayed a requirement for salicylic acid signalling and was partially dependent on the salicylic acid signal transducer NPR1. Autophagy deficiency resulted in an increase in the rates of AL-PCD induced by salicylic acid and fumonisin B1, but not by gibberellic acid or abiotic stress. The phenylalanine ammonia lyase-dependent salicylic acid synthesis pathway contributed only to death induced by salicylic acid and fumonisin B1. 3-Methyladenine, which is commonly used as an inhibitor of autophagy, appeared to influence PCD induction in all treatments suggesting a possible secondary, non-autophagic, effect on a core component of the plant PCD pathway. The results suggest that salicylic acid signalling is negatively regulated by autophagy during salicylic acid and mycotoxin-induced AL-PCD. However, this crosstalk does not appear to be directly involved in PCD induced by gibberellic acid or abiotic stress. This study demonstrates that the root hair assay is an effective tool for relatively rapid investigation of complex signalling pathways leading to the activation of

  5. The Root Hair Assay Facilitates the Use of Genetic and Pharmacological Tools in Order to Dissect Multiple Signalling Pathways That Lead to Programmed Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Kacprzyk, Joanna; Devine, Aoife; McCabe, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    The activation of programmed cell death (PCD) is often a result of complex signalling pathways whose relationship and intersection are not well understood. We recently described a PCD root hair assay and proposed that it could be used to rapidly screen genetic or pharmacological modulators of PCD. To further assess the applicability of the root hair assay for studying multiple signalling pathways leading to PCD activation we have investigated the crosstalk between salicylic acid, autophagy and apoptosis-like PCD (AL-PCD) in Arabidopsis thaliana. The root hair assay was used to determine rates of AL-PCD induced by a panel of cell death inducing treatments in wild type plants treated with chemical modulators of salicylic acid synthesis or autophagy, and in genetic lines defective in autophagy or salicylic acid signalling. The assay demonstrated that PCD induced by exogenous salicylic acid or fumonisin B1 displayed a requirement for salicylic acid signalling and was partially dependent on the salicylic acid signal transducer NPR1. Autophagy deficiency resulted in an increase in the rates of AL-PCD induced by salicylic acid and fumonisin B1, but not by gibberellic acid or abiotic stress. The phenylalanine ammonia lyase-dependent salicylic acid synthesis pathway contributed only to death induced by salicylic acid and fumonisin B1. 3-Methyladenine, which is commonly used as an inhibitor of autophagy, appeared to influence PCD induction in all treatments suggesting a possible secondary, non-autophagic, effect on a core component of the plant PCD pathway. The results suggest that salicylic acid signalling is negatively regulated by autophagy during salicylic acid and mycotoxin-induced AL-PCD. However, this crosstalk does not appear to be directly involved in PCD induced by gibberellic acid or abiotic stress. This study demonstrates that the root hair assay is an effective tool for relatively rapid investigation of complex signalling pathways leading to the activation of

  6. Inflammation Enhances the Risks of Stroke and Death in Chronic Chagas Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Paulo Marcos Matta; de Andrade, Cléber Mesquita; Nunes, Daniela Ferreira; de Sena Pereira, Nathalie; Queiroga, Tamyres Bernadete Dantas; Machado-Coelho, George Luiz Lins; Nascimento, Manuela Sales Lima; Do-Valle-Matta, Maria Adelaide; da Câmara, Antônia Cláudia Jácome; Chiari, Egler; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha

    2016-04-01

    Ischemic strokes have been implicated as a cause of death in Chagas disease patients. Inflammation has been recognized as a key component in all ischemic processes, including the intravascular events triggered by vessel interruption, brain damage and repair. In this study, we evaluated the association between inflammatory markers and the death risk (DR) and stroke risk (SR) of patients with different clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease. The mRNA expression levels of cytokines, transcription factors expressed in the adaptive immune response (Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22 and regulatory T cell), and iNOS were analyzed by real-time PCR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of chagasic patients who exhibited the indeterminate, cardiac, digestive and cardiodigestive clinical forms of the disease, and the levels of these transcripts were correlated with the DR and SR. Cardiac patients exhibited lower mRNA expression levels of GATA-3, FoxP3, AHR, IL-4, IL-9, IL-10 and IL-22 but exhibited higher expression of IFN-γ and TNF-α compared with indeterminate patients. Digestive patients showed similar levels of GATA-3, IL-4 and IL-10 than indeterminate patients. Cardiodigestive patients exhibited higher levels of TNF-α compared with indeterminate and digestive patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated that patients with high DR and SR exhibited lower GATA-3, FoxP3, and IL-10 expression and higher IFN-γ, TNF-α and iNOS mRNA expression than patients with low DR and SR. A negative correlation was observed between Foxp3 and IL-10 mRNA expression and the DR and SR. Moreover, TNF-α and iNOS expression was positively correlated with DR and SR. Our data suggest that an inflammatory imbalance in chronic Chagas disease patients is associated with a high DR and SR. This study provides a better understanding of the stroke pathobiology in the general population and might aid the development of therapeutic strategies for controlling the morbidity and mortality of Chagas disease. PMID

  7. Inflammation Enhances the Risks of Stroke and Death in Chronic Chagas Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Paulo Marcos Matta; de Andrade, Cléber Mesquita; Nunes, Daniela Ferreira; de Sena Pereira, Nathalie; Queiroga, Tamyres Bernadete Dantas; Machado-Coelho, George Luiz Lins; Nascimento, Manuela Sales Lima; Do-Valle-Matta, Maria Adelaide; da Câmara, Antônia Cláudia Jácome; Chiari, Egler; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha

    2016-04-01

    Ischemic strokes have been implicated as a cause of death in Chagas disease patients. Inflammation has been recognized as a key component in all ischemic processes, including the intravascular events triggered by vessel interruption, brain damage and repair. In this study, we evaluated the association between inflammatory markers and the death risk (DR) and stroke risk (SR) of patients with different clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease. The mRNA expression levels of cytokines, transcription factors expressed in the adaptive immune response (Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22 and regulatory T cell), and iNOS were analyzed by real-time PCR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of chagasic patients who exhibited the indeterminate, cardiac, digestive and cardiodigestive clinical forms of the disease, and the levels of these transcripts were correlated with the DR and SR. Cardiac patients exhibited lower mRNA expression levels of GATA-3, FoxP3, AHR, IL-4, IL-9, IL-10 and IL-22 but exhibited higher expression of IFN-γ and TNF-α compared with indeterminate patients. Digestive patients showed similar levels of GATA-3, IL-4 and IL-10 than indeterminate patients. Cardiodigestive patients exhibited higher levels of TNF-α compared with indeterminate and digestive patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated that patients with high DR and SR exhibited lower GATA-3, FoxP3, and IL-10 expression and higher IFN-γ, TNF-α and iNOS mRNA expression than patients with low DR and SR. A negative correlation was observed between Foxp3 and IL-10 mRNA expression and the DR and SR. Moreover, TNF-α and iNOS expression was positively correlated with DR and SR. Our data suggest that an inflammatory imbalance in chronic Chagas disease patients is associated with a high DR and SR. This study provides a better understanding of the stroke pathobiology in the general population and might aid the development of therapeutic strategies for controlling the morbidity and mortality of Chagas disease.

  8. Inflammation Enhances the Risks of Stroke and Death in Chronic Chagas Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Paulo Marcos Matta; de Andrade, Cléber Mesquita; Nunes, Daniela Ferreira; de Sena Pereira, Nathalie; Queiroga, Tamyres Bernadete Dantas; Machado-Coelho, George Luiz Lins; Nascimento, Manuela Sales Lima; Do-Valle-Matta, Maria Adelaide; da Câmara, Antônia Cláudia Jácome; Chiari, Egler; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic strokes have been implicated as a cause of death in Chagas disease patients. Inflammation has been recognized as a key component in all ischemic processes, including the intravascular events triggered by vessel interruption, brain damage and repair. In this study, we evaluated the association between inflammatory markers and the death risk (DR) and stroke risk (SR) of patients with different clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease. The mRNA expression levels of cytokines, transcription factors expressed in the adaptive immune response (Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22 and regulatory T cell), and iNOS were analyzed by real-time PCR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of chagasic patients who exhibited the indeterminate, cardiac, digestive and cardiodigestive clinical forms of the disease, and the levels of these transcripts were correlated with the DR and SR. Cardiac patients exhibited lower mRNA expression levels of GATA-3, FoxP3, AHR, IL-4, IL-9, IL-10 and IL-22 but exhibited higher expression of IFN-γ and TNF-α compared with indeterminate patients. Digestive patients showed similar levels of GATA-3, IL-4 and IL-10 than indeterminate patients. Cardiodigestive patients exhibited higher levels of TNF-α compared with indeterminate and digestive patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated that patients with high DR and SR exhibited lower GATA-3, FoxP3, and IL-10 expression and higher IFN-γ, TNF-α and iNOS mRNA expression than patients with low DR and SR. A negative correlation was observed between Foxp3 and IL-10 mRNA expression and the DR and SR. Moreover, TNF-α and iNOS expression was positively correlated with DR and SR. Our data suggest that an inflammatory imbalance in chronic Chagas disease patients is associated with a high DR and SR. This study provides a better understanding of the stroke pathobiology in the general population and might aid the development of therapeutic strategies for controlling the morbidity and mortality of Chagas disease. PMID

  9. A Novel Putative miRNA Target Enhancer Signal

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Thorsten; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Stümpflen, Volker

    2009-01-01

    It is known that miRNA target sites are very short and the effect of miRNA-target site interaction alone appears as being unspecific. Recent experiments suggest further context signals involved in miRNA target site recognition and regulation. Here, we present a novel GC-rich RNA motif downstream of experimentally supported miRNA target sites in human mRNAs with no similarity to previously reported functional motifs. We demonstrate that the novel motif can be found in at least one third of all transcripts regulated by miRNAs. Furthermore, we show that motif occurrence and the frequency of miRNA target sites as well as the stability of their duplex structures correlate. The finding, that the novel motif is significantly associated with miRNA target sites, suggests a functional role of the motif in miRNA target site biology. Beyond, the novel motif has the impact to improve prediction of miRNA target sites significantly. PMID:19649282

  10. Rational use of stacking principles for signal enhancement in capillary electrophoretic separations of poliovirus samples.

    PubMed

    Oita, Iuliana; Halewyck, Hadewych; Pieters, Sigrid; Dejaegher, Bieke; Thys, Bert; Rombaut, Bart; Vander Heyden, Yvan

    2011-04-28

    The use of an earlier developed capillary electrophoresis (CE) method, either to investigate poliovirus (PV) samples with a low viral-purity level or to study the less abundant sub-viral particles, revealed the necessity for an intra-column signal enhancement strategy. Although intra-column signal enhancement is a very popular approach to assay small molecules, it is less straightforward for the analysis of biological macromolecules or particles. A reason could be that, for a proper signal enhancement approach, these samples have to be thoroughly studied to understand the factors affecting the separation process. For the investigated PV samples, a screening design revealed that injecting larger sample plugs significantly enhanced the analytical signal, but also significantly decreased the separation efficiency. A subsequently executed central composite design determined the largest sample plug that can be injected without compromising the separation. Finally, the sample dilution and the length of the injected plug were used for tuning the intensity of the analytical response. Two combinations of sample dilution and injected plug size, at extreme values, were investigated in detail to define the best procedure for PV analysis using CE. In both situations, PV was effectively separated and quantified in rather complex samples, showing a good repeatability, an acceptable linearity for the PV particles and a decreased limit of detection in comparison with the existing method. In conclusion, intra-column signal enhancement can be successfully applied for viral suspensions, extending the applicability of CE methods to samples with lower virus concentrations, and/or allowing a significant reduction in the minimum required volume of sample. For PV samples, 5μl of sample is necessary instead of the previous 20μl, while the analytical signal was enhanced up to 14 times. The results of this study can provide a basis for the development of routine CE methods for viral

  11. A Comparison of Signal Enhancement Methods for Extracting Tonal Acoustic Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.

    1998-01-01

    The measurement of pure tone acoustic pressure signals in the presence of masking noise, often generated by mean flow, is a continual problem in the field of passive liner duct acoustics research. In support of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Noise Reduction Program, methods were investigated for conducting measurements of advanced duct liner concepts in harsh, aeroacoustic environments. This report presents the results of a comparison study of three signal extraction methods for acquiring quality acoustic pressure measurements in the presence of broadband noise (used to simulate the effects of mean flow). The performance of each method was compared to a baseline measurement of a pure tone acoustic pressure 3 dB above a uniform, broadband noise background.

  12. Arabidopsis SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENE101 stabilizes and signals within an ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 complex in plant innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Feys, Bart J; Wiermer, Marcel; Bhat, Riyaz A; Moisan, Lisa J; Medina-Escobar, Nieves; Neu, Christina; Cabral, Adriana; Parker, Jane E

    2005-09-01

    Plant innate immunity against invasive biotrophic pathogens depends on the intracellular defense regulator ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1). We show here that Arabidopsis thaliana EDS1 interacts in vivo with another protein, SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENE101 (SAG101), discovered through a proteomic approach to identify new EDS1 pathway components. Together with PHYTOALEXIN-DEFICIENT4 (PAD4), a known EDS1 interactor, SAG101 contributes intrinsic and indispensable signaling activity to EDS1-dependent resistance. The combined activities of SAG101 and PAD4 are necessary for programmed cell death triggered by the Toll-Interleukin-1 Receptor type of nucleotide binding/leucine-rich repeat immune receptor in response to avirulent pathogen isolates and in restricting the growth of normally virulent pathogens. We further demonstrate by a combination of cell fractionation, coimmunoprecipitation, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments the existence of an EDS1-SAG101 complex inside the nucleus that is molecularly and spatially distinct from EDS1-PAD4 associations in the nucleus and cytoplasm. By contrast, EDS1 homomeric interactions were detected in the cytoplasm but not inside the nucleus. These data, combined with evidence for coregulation between individual EDS1 complexes, suggest that dynamic interactions of EDS1 and its signaling partners in multiple cell compartments are important for plant defense signal relay.

  13. Use and Protection of GPS Sidelobe Signals for Enhanced Navigation Performance in High Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Joel J. K.; Valdez, Jennifer E.; Bauer, Frank H.; Moreau, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    GPS (Global Positioning System) Space Service Volume (SSV) signal environment is from 3,000-36,000 kilometers altitude. Current SSV specifications only capture performance provided by signals transmitted within 23.5(L1) or 26(L2-L5) off-nadir angle. Recent on-orbit data lessons learned show significant PNT (Positioning, Navigation and Timing) performance improvements when the full aggregate signal is used. Numerous military civil operational missions in High Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (HEOGEO) utilize the full signal to enhance vehicle PNT performance

  14. Fisher-information condition for enhanced signal detection via stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Duan, Fabing; Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Abbott, Derek

    2011-11-01

    Various situations where a signal is enhanced by noise through stochastic resonance are now known. This paper contributes to determining general conditions under which improvement by noise can be a priori decided as feasible or not. We focus on the detection of a known signal in additive white noise. Under the assumptions of a weak signal and a sufficiently large sample size, it is proved, with an inequality based on the Fisher information, that improvement by adding noise is never possible, generically, in these conditions. However, under less restrictive conditions, an example of signal detection is shown with favorable action of adding noise.

  15. Entamoeba histolytica P-glycoprotein (EhPgp) inhibition, induce trophozoite acidification and enhance programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Medel Flores, Olivia; Gómez García, Consuelo; Sánchez Monroy, Virgina; Villalba Magadaleno, José D'Artagnan; Nader García, Elvira; Pérez Ishiwara, D Guillermo

    2013-11-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is induced in Entamoeba histolytica by a variety of stimuli in vitro and in vivo. In mammals, intracellular acidification serves as a global switch for inactivating cellular processes and initiates molecular mechanisms implicated in the destruction of the genome. In contrast, intracellular alkalinization produced by P-glycoprotein overexpression in multidrug-resistant cells has been related to apoptosis resistance. Our previous studies showed that overexpression of E. histolytica P-glycoprotein (PGP) altered chloride-dependent currents and triggered trophozoite swelling, the reverse process of cell shrinkage produced during PCD. Here we showed that antisense inhibition of PGP expression produced a synchronous death of trophozoites and the enhancement of biochemical and morphological characteristics of PCD induced by G418. The nucleus was contracted, and the nuclear membrane was disrupted. Moreover, chromatin was extensively fragmented. Ca(2+) concentration was increased, while the intracellular pH (ipH) was acidified. In contrast, PGP overexpression prevented intracellular acidification and circumvented the apoptotic effect of G418.

  16. Retinoic acid receptor-α signalling antagonizes both intracellular and extracellular amyloid-β production and prevents neuronal cell death caused by amyloid-β.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, C I; Goncalves, M B; Clarke, E; Dogruel, M; Kalindjian, S B; Thomas, S A; Maden, M; Corcoran, J P T

    2010-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition in the brain, neuronal cell loss and cognitive decline. We show here that retinoic acid receptor (RAR)α signalling in vitro can prevent both intracellular and extracellular Aβ accumulation. RARα signalling increases the expression of a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10, an α-secretase that processes the amyloid precursor protein into the non-amyloidic pathway, thus reducing Aβ production. We also show that RARα agonists are neuroprotective, as they prevent Aβ-induced neuronal cell death in cortical cultures. If RARα agonists are given to the Tg2576 mouse, the normal Aβ production in their brains is suppressed. In contrast, neither RARβ nor γ-agonists affect Aβ production or Aβ-mediated neuronal cell death. Therefore, RARα agonists have therapeutic potential for the treatment of AD.

  17. Enhancement of Second-Order Nonlinear-Optical Signals by Optical Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, A. J.; Tisdale, W. A.

    2015-05-01

    Second-order nonlinear optical interactions such as sum- and difference-frequency generation are widely used for bioimaging and as selective probes of interfacial environments. However, inefficient nonlinear optical conversion often leads to poor signal-to-noise ratio and long signal acquisition times. Here, we demonstrate the dramatic enhancement of weak second-order nonlinear optical signals via stimulated sum- and difference-frequency generation. We present a conceptual framework to quantitatively describe the interaction and show that the process is highly sensitive to the relative optical phase of the stimulating field. To emphasize the utility of the technique, we demonstrate stimulated enhancement of second harmonic generation (SHG) from bovine collagen-I fibrils. Using a stimulating pulse fluence of only 3 nJ /cm2 , we obtain an SHG enhancement >104 relative to the spontaneous signal. The stimulation enhancement is greatest in situations where spontaneous signals are the weakest—such as low laser power, small sample volume, and weak nonlinear susceptibility—emphasizing the potential for this technique to improve signal-to-noise ratios in biological imaging and interfacial spectroscopy.

  18. The mutual effect of metal sample and turboflame in LIBS signal enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezelbash, M.; Mousavi, S. J.; Majd, A. E.; Darbani, S. M. R.; Saghafifar, H.; Maleki, A.

    2016-08-01

    The main aim of the present study is to evaluate the mutual effect of copper sample and turboflame in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) signal enhancement. The use of copper sample leads to a signal enhancement in CN ( B 2Σ+- X 2Σ+) 384.2-388.4 nm molecular transition, N742nm, N744nm, N746nm (a triplet generated by the fine splitting of the 2 s 22 p 2(3 P)3 s-2 s 22 p 2(3 P)3 p transition) and Hα, 656.3 nm (as a flame inductor) atomic lines analysis. Additionally, increase in copper sample temperature with flame can enhance the Cu atomic line intensities (as copper sample inductors). Moreover, in this paper, the comparison between turboflame and alcohol flame on LIBS analysis was studied. LIBS signal intensity variation in a turboflame and turboflame coupled with copper sample at different laser pulse energies indicated that the low laser pulse energy could be compensated by using a copper sample that is coupled with turboflame and improved LIBS signal enhancement. For flames analysis, the use of metal sample in LIBS method is demonstrated to be costeffective, compact, and capable of signal enhancement.

  19. Akt/GSK3β signaling is involved in fipronil-induced apoptotic cell death of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Eun; Kang, Jin Sun; Ki, Yeo-Woon; Lee, Sang-Hun; Lee, Soo-Jin; Lee, Kyung Suk; Koh, Hyun Chul

    2011-04-25

    Fipronil (FPN) is a phenylpyrazole insecticide acted on insect gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors. Although action of FPN is restricted on insect neuronal or muscular transmitter system, a few studies have assessed the effects of this neurotoxicant on neuronal cell death. To determine the mechanisms underlying FPN-induced neuronal cell death, we investigated whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a role in FPN-induced apoptosis, using an in vitro model of human dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells. FPN was cytotoxic to these cells and its cytotoxicity showed a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, FPN treatment significantly decreased the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression without change of glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) expression. FPN-induced dopaminergic cell death involved in increase of ROS generation since pretreatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), an anti-oxidant, reduced cell death. After FPN treatment, dopamine (DA) levels decreased significantly in both cell and culture media, and oxidative effects of DA were blocked by NAC pretreatment. We showed that cell death in response to FPN was due to apoptosis since FPN increased cytochrome c release into the cytosol and activated caspase-3. It also led to nuclear accumulation of p53 and reduced the level of Bcl-2 protein in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, FPN altered the level of Akt/glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3β) phosphorylation. FPN reduced the Akt phosphorylation on Ser473, and in parallel with the inactivation of Akt, phosphorylation of GSK3β on Ser9 which inactivates GSK3β, decreased after treatment with FPN. Furthermore, inhibition of the GSK3β signal protected the cell against FPN-induced cell death. These results suggest that regulation of GSK3β activity may control the apoptosis induced by FPN-induced oxidative stress associated with neuronal cell death.

  20. A novel homozygous Fas ligand mutation leads to early protein truncation, abrogation of death receptor and reverse signaling and a severe form of the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nabhani, Schafiq; Hönscheid, Andrea; Oommen, Prasad T; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Schaper, Jörg; Kuhlen, Michaela; Laws, Hans-Jürgen; Borkhardt, Arndt; Fischer, Ute

    2014-12-01

    We report a novel type of mutation in the death ligand FasL that was associated with a severe phenotype of the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in two patients. A frameshift mutation in the intracellular domain led to complete loss of FasL expression. Cell death signaling via its receptor and reverse signaling via its intracellular domain were completely abrogated. In vitro lymphocyte proliferation induced by weak T cell receptor stimulation could be blocked and cell death was induced by engagement of FasL in T cells derived from healthy individuals and a heterozygous carrier, but not in FasL-deficient patient derived cells. Expression of genes implicated in lymphocyte proliferation and activation (CCND1, NFATc1, NF-κB1) was increased in FasL-deficient T cells and could not be downregulated by FasL engagement as in healthy cells. Our data thus suggest, that deficiency in FasL reverse signaling may contribute to the clinical lymphoproliferative phenotype of ALPS. PMID:25451160

  1. UVB irradiation-enhanced zinc oxide nanoparticles-induced DNA damage and cell death in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Pal, Anu; Alam, Shamshad; Mittal, Sandeep; Arjaria, Nidhi; Shankar, Jai; Kumar, Mahadeo; Singh, Dhirendra; Pandey, Alok Kumar; Ansari, Kausar Mahmood

    2016-09-01

    UV-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in photocarcinogenesis and skin aging. This is because UV-induced ROS can induce DNA damage that, if unrepaired, can lead to carcinogenesis. Sunscreens contain UV attenuators, such as organic chemical and/or physical UV filters, which can prevent all forms of damage from UV irradiation. In recent years, the effective broad-spectrum UV attenuation properties of ZnO-nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) have made them attractive as active components in sunscreens and other personal care products. As the use of ZnO-NPs in sunscreens is on the rise, so is public concern about their safety, particularly with exposure to sunlight. Therefore, in the present study, using various experimental approaches, we investigated the possible toxic effects resulting from exposure to UVB and ZnO-NPs in primary mouse keratinocytes (PMKs) as well as in the skin of SKH-1 hairless mice. The findings of the present study demonstrated that co-exposure to UVB and ZnO-NPs: (1) translocated the ZnO-NPs into the nucleus of PMKs; (2) caused enhanced generation of ROS; (3) induced more severe DNA damage as evident by alkaline comet assay and immunocytochemistry for γ-H2AX and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG); and (4) subsequently caused much more pronounced cell death in PMKs. Further, to elucidate the physiological relevance of these in vitro findings, SKH-1 hairless mice were topically treated with ZnO-NPs and after 30min irradiated with UVB (50mJ/cm(2)). Interestingly, we found that co-exposure of ZnO-NPs and UVB caused increased oxidative DNA damage and cell death, indicated by immunostaining for 8-OHdG and TUNEL assay in sections of exposed mouse skin. Thus, collectively, our findings suggest that UVB exposure increases ZnO-NPs-mediated oxidative stress and oxidative damage, thereby enhancing ZnO-NPs-induced cell death. PMID:27542711

  2. Enhanced suicidal erythrocyte death in mice carrying a loss-of-function mutation of the adenomatous polyposis coli gene.

    PubMed

    Qadri, Syed M; Mahmud, Hasan; Lang, Elisabeth; Gu, Shuchen; Bobbala, Diwakar; Zelenak, Christine; Jilani, Kashif; Siegfried, Alexandra; Föller, Michael; Lang, Florian

    2012-05-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in human adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) lead to multiple colonic adenomatous polyps eventually resulting in colonic carcinoma. Similarly, heterozygous mice carrying defective APC (apc(Min/+)) suffer from intestinal tumours. The animals further suffer from anaemia, which in theory could result from accelerated eryptosis, a suicidal erythrocyte death triggered by enhanced cytosolic Ca(2+) activity and characterized by cell membrane scrambling and cell shrinkage. To explore, whether APC-deficiency enhances eryptosis, we estimated cell membrane scrambling from annexin V binding, cell size from forward scatter and cytosolic ATP utilizing luciferin-luciferase in isolated erythrocytes from apc(Min/+) mice and wild-type mice (apc(+/+)). Clearance of circulating erythrocytes was estimated by carboxyfluorescein-diacetate-succinimidyl-ester labelling. As a result, apc(Min/+) mice were anaemic despite reticulocytosis. Cytosolic ATP was significantly lower and annexin V binding significantly higher in apc(Min/+) erythrocytes than in apc(+/+) erythrocytes. Glucose depletion enhanced annexin V binding, an effect significantly more pronounced in apc(Min/+) erythrocytes than in apc(+/+) erythrocytes. Extracellular Ca(2+) removal or inhibition of Ca(2+) entry with amiloride (1 mM) blunted the increase but did not abrogate the genotype differences of annexin V binding following glucose depletion. Stimulation of Ca(2+) -entry by treatment with Ca(2+) -ionophore ionomycin (10 μM) increased annexin V binding, an effect again significantly more pronounced in apc(Min/+) erythrocytes than in apc(+/+) erythrocytes. Following retrieval and injection into the circulation of the same mice, apc(Min/+) erythrocytes were more rapidly cleared from circulating blood than apc(+/+) erythrocytes. Most labelled erythrocytes were trapped in the spleen, which was significantly enlarged in apc(Min/+) mice. The observations point to accelerated eryptosis and subsequent

  3. [A modified speech enhancement algorithm for electronic cochlear implant and its digital signal processing realization].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yulin; Tian, Xuelong

    2014-08-01

    In order to improve the speech quality and auditory perceptiveness of electronic cochlear implant under strong noise background, a speech enhancement system used for electronic cochlear implant front-end was constructed. Taking digital signal processing (DSP) as the core, the system combines its multi-channel buffered serial port (McBSP) data transmission channel with extended audio interface chip TLV320AIC10, so speech signal acquisition and output with high speed are realized. Meanwhile, due to the traditional speech enhancement method which has the problems as bad adaptability, slow convergence speed and big steady-state error, versiera function and de-correlation principle were used to improve the existing adaptive filtering algorithm, which effectively enhanced the quality of voice communications. Test results verified the stability of the system and the de-noising performance of the algorithm, and it also proved that they could provide clearer speech signals for the deaf or tinnitus patients.

  4. [A modified speech enhancement algorithm for electronic cochlear implant and its digital signal processing realization].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yulin; Tian, Xuelong

    2014-08-01

    In order to improve the speech quality and auditory perceptiveness of electronic cochlear implant under strong noise background, a speech enhancement system used for electronic cochlear implant front-end was constructed. Taking digital signal processing (DSP) as the core, the system combines its multi-channel buffered serial port (McBSP) data transmission channel with extended audio interface chip TLV320AIC10, so speech signal acquisition and output with high speed are realized. Meanwhile, due to the traditional speech enhancement method which has the problems as bad adaptability, slow convergence speed and big steady-state error, versiera function and de-correlation principle were used to improve the existing adaptive filtering algorithm, which effectively enhanced the quality of voice communications. Test results verified the stability of the system and the de-noising performance of the algorithm, and it also proved that they could provide clearer speech signals for the deaf or tinnitus patients. PMID:25464779

  5. [A modified speech enhancement algorithm for electronic cochlear implant and its digital signal processing realization].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yulin; Tian, Xuelong

    2014-08-01

    In order to improve the speech quality and auditory perceptiveness of electronic cochlear implant under strong noise background, a speech enhancement system used for electronic cochlear implant front-end was constructed. Taking digital signal processing (DSP) as the core, the system combines its multi-channel buffered serial port (McBSP) data transmission channel with extended audio interface chip TLV320AIC10, so speech signal acquisition and output with high speed are realized. Meanwhile, due to the traditional speech enhancement method which has the problems as bad adaptability, slow convergence speed and big steady-state error, versiera function and de-correlation principle were used to improve the existing adaptive filtering algorithm, which effectively enhanced the quality of voice communications. Test results verified the stability of the system and the de-noising performance of the algorithm, and it also proved that they could provide clearer speech signals for the deaf or tinnitus patients. PMID:25508410

  6. Camptothecin Enhances Cell Death Induced by (177)Lu-EDTMP in Osteosarcoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Chandan; Vats, Kusum; Lohar, Sharad P; Korde, Aruna; Samuel, Grace

    2014-10-01

    Lutetium-177 is an assured therapeutic radionuclide with favorable half-life and suitable β(-) energy. Radiolabeled (177)Lu-EDTMP (Ethylenediamine tetramethylene phosphonic acid) is by and large used for bone pain palliation in cancer patients. In vitro cell studies are carried out in osteosarcoma cells MG-63 to evaluate the combined effect of anticancer drug camptothecin (CPT) and (177)Lu-EDTMP. Two concentrations of (177)Lu-EDTMP (3.7 and 37 MBq) were incubated with MG63 cell line for 48 hours with and without pretreatment of CPT (10 nM) for 1 hour. After completion of incubation, the cells were harvested and cellular toxicity was estimated by LDH, MTT, and trypan blue dye. Apoptotic DNA fragmentation was estimated by ELISA kit. The expression of proteins such as bcl2, PARP, and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) that were related to apoptotic signaling pathways was assessed by western blotting. The results indicated that cellular toxicity and apoptosis were relatively higher in MG63 cells that were treated with CPT prior to treating with (177)Lu-EDTMP in comparison with the corresponding individual controls.

  7. Ultra-violet B (UVB)-induced skin cell death occurs through a cyclophilin D intrinsic signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Chao; Yang, Bo; Yang, Zhi; Tu, Ying; Yang, Yan-li; He, Li; Bi, Zhi-Gang

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UVB radiated skin keratinocytes show cyclophilin D (Cyp-D) upregulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NAC inhibits UVB induced Cyp-D expression, while H{sub 2}O{sub 2} facilitates it. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyp-D-deficient cells are significantly less susceptible to UVB induced cell death. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Over-expression of Cyp-D causes spontaneous keratinocytes cell death. -- Abstract: UVB-induced skin cell damage involves the opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), which leads to both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Cyclophilin D (Cyp-D) translocation to the inner membrane of mitochondrion acts as a key component to open the mPTP. Our Western-Blot results in primary cultured human skin keratinocytes and in HaCaT cell line demonstrated that UVB radiation and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) induced Cyp-D expression, which was inhibited by anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). We created a stable Cyp-D deficiency skin keratinocytes by expressing Cyp-D-shRNA through lentiviral infection. Cyp-D-deficient cells were significantly less susceptible than their counterparts to UVB- or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell death. Further, cyclosporine A (Cs-A), a Cyp-D inhibitor, inhibited UVB- or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced keratinocytes cell death. Reversely, over-expression of Cyp-D in primary keratinocytes caused spontaneous keratinocytes cell death. These results suggest Cyp-D's critical role in UVB/oxidative stress-induced skin cell death.

  8. Enhanced weak-signal sensitivity in two-photon microscopy by adaptive illumination.

    PubMed

    Chu, Kengyeh K; Lim, Daryl; Mertz, Jerome

    2007-10-01

    We describe a technique to enhance both the weak-signal relative sensitivity and the dynamic range of a laser scanning optical microscope. The technique is based on maintaining a fixed detection power by fast feedback control of the illumination power, thereby transferring high measurement resolution to weak signals while virtually eliminating the possibility of image saturation. We analyze and demonstrate the benefits of adaptive illumination in two-photon fluorescence microscopy.

  9. Dragon enhances BMP signaling and increases transepithelial resistance in kidney epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yin; Babitt, Jodie L; Bouley, Richard; Zhang, Ying; Da Silva, Nicolas; Chen, Shanzhuo; Zhuang, Zhenjie; Samad, Tarek A; Brenner, Gary J; Anderson, Jennifer L; Hong, Charles C; Schneyer, Alan L; Brown, Dennis; Lin, Herbert Y

    2010-04-01

    The neuronal adhesion protein Dragon acts as a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) coreceptor that enhances BMP signaling. Given the importance of BMP signaling in nephrogenesis and its putative role in the response to injury in the adult kidney, we studied the localization and function of Dragon in the kidney. We observed that Dragon localized predominantly to the apical surfaces of tubular epithelial cells in the thick ascending limbs, distal convoluted tubules, and collecting ducts of mice. Dragon expression was weak in the proximal tubules and glomeruli. In mouse inner medullary collecting duct (mIMCD3) cells, Dragon generated BMP signals in a ligand-dependent manner, and BMP4 is the predominant endogenous ligand for the Dragon coreceptor. In mIMCD3 cells, BMP4 normally signaled through BMPRII, but Dragon enhanced its signaling through the BMP type II receptor ActRIIA. Dragon and BMP4 increased transepithelial resistance (TER) through the Smad1/5/8 pathway. In epithelial cells isolated from the proximal tubule and intercalated cells of collecting ducts, we observed coexpression of ActRIIA, Dragon, and BMP4 but not BMPRII. Taken together, these results suggest that Dragon may enhance BMP signaling in renal tubular epithelial cells and maintain normal renal physiology.

  10. Pathogen-induced SGT1 of Arachis diogoi induces cell death and enhanced disease resistance in tobacco and peanut.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dilip; Kirti, Pulugurtha Bharadwaja

    2015-01-01

    We have identified a transcript derived fragment (TDF) corresponding to SGT1 in a study of differential gene expression on the resistant wild peanut, Arachis diogoi, upon challenge from the late leaf spot pathogen, Phaeoisariopsis personata, and cloned its full-length cDNA followed by subsequent validation through q-PCR. Sodium nitroprusside, salicylic acid, ethephon and methyl jasmonate induced the expression of AdSGT1, while the treatment with abscisic acid did not elicit its up-regulation. AdSGT1 is localized to both nucleus and cytoplasm. Its overexpression induced hypersensitive-like cell death in tobacco under transient conditional expression using the estradiol system, and this conditional expression of AdSGT1 was also associated with the up-regulation of NtHSR203J, HMGR and HIN1, which have been shown to be associated with hypersensitive response in tobacco in earlier studies. Expression of the cDNA in a susceptible cultivated peanut variety enhanced its resistance against the late leaf spot pathogen, Phaeoisariopsis personata, while the heterologous expression in tobacco enhanced its resistance against Phytophthora parasitica var. nicotianae, Alternaria alternata var. nicotianae and Rhizoctonia solani. Constitutive expression in peanut was associated with the co-expression of resistance-related genes, CC-NB-LRR and some protein kinases. PMID:25236372

  11. Pathogen-induced SGT1 of Arachis diogoi induces cell death and enhanced disease resistance in tobacco and peanut.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dilip; Kirti, Pulugurtha Bharadwaja

    2015-01-01

    We have identified a transcript derived fragment (TDF) corresponding to SGT1 in a study of differential gene expression on the resistant wild peanut, Arachis diogoi, upon challenge from the late leaf spot pathogen, Phaeoisariopsis personata, and cloned its full-length cDNA followed by subsequent validation through q-PCR. Sodium nitroprusside, salicylic acid, ethephon and methyl jasmonate induced the expression of AdSGT1, while the treatment with abscisic acid did not elicit its up-regulation. AdSGT1 is localized to both nucleus and cytoplasm. Its overexpression induced hypersensitive-like cell death in tobacco under transient conditional expression using the estradiol system, and this conditional expression of AdSGT1 was also associated with the up-regulation of NtHSR203J, HMGR and HIN1, which have been shown to be associated with hypersensitive response in tobacco in earlier studies. Expression of the cDNA in a susceptible cultivated peanut variety enhanced its resistance against the late leaf spot pathogen, Phaeoisariopsis personata, while the heterologous expression in tobacco enhanced its resistance against Phytophthora parasitica var. nicotianae, Alternaria alternata var. nicotianae and Rhizoctonia solani. Constitutive expression in peanut was associated with the co-expression of resistance-related genes, CC-NB-LRR and some protein kinases.

  12. Bortezomib enhances cancer cell death by blocking the autophagic flux through stimulating ERK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kao, C; Chao, A; Tsai, C-L; Chuang, W-C; Huang, W-P; Chen, G-C; Lin, C-Y; Wang, T-H; Wang, H-S; Lai, C-H

    2014-01-01

    The antitumor activity of an inhibitor of 26S proteasome bortezomib (Velcade) has been observed in various malignancies, including colon cancer, prostate cancer, breast cancer, and ovarian cancer. Bortezomib has been proposed to stimulate autophagy, but scientific observations did not always support this. Interactions between ERK activity and autophagy are complex and not completely clear. Autophagy proteins have recently been shown to regulate the functions of ERK, and ERK activation has been found to induce autophagy. On the other hand, sustained activation of ERK has also been shown to inhibit the maturation step of the autophagy process. In this study, we sought to identify the mechanism of autophagy regulation in cancer cells treated with bortezomib. Our results indicate that bortezomib blocked the autophagic flux without inhibiting the fusion of the autophagosome and lysosome. In ovarian cancer, as well as endometrial cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma cells, bortezomib inhibited protein degradation in lysosomes by suppressing cathepsins, which requires the participation of ERK phosphorylation, but not JNK or p38. Our findings that ERK phosphorylation reduced cathepsins further explain how ERK phosphorylation inhibits the autophagic flux. In conclusion, bortezomib may induce ERK phosphorylation to suppress cathepsin B and inhibit the catalytic process of autophagy in ovarian cancer and other solid tumors. The inhibition of cisplatin-induced autophagy by bortezomib can enhance chemotherapy efficacy in ovarian cancer. As we also found that bortezomib blocks the autophagic flux in other cancers, the synergistic cytotoxic effect of bortezomib by abolishing chemotherapy-related autophagy may help us develop strategies of combination therapies for multiple cancers.

  13. Equalization-enhanced phase noise for coherent-detection systems using electronic digital signal processing.

    PubMed

    Shieh, William; Ho, Keang-Po

    2008-09-29

    In coherent optical systems employing electronic digital signal processing, the fiber chromatic dispersion can be gracefully compensated in electronic domain without resorting to optical techniques. Unlike optical dispersion compensator, the electronic equalizer enhances the impairments from the laser phase noise. This equalization-enhanced phase noise (EEPN) imposes a tighter constraint on the receive laser phase noise for transmission systems with high symbol rate and large electronically-compensated chromatic dispersion.

  14. A Novel Transcription Factor, ERD15 (Early Responsive to Dehydration 15), Connects Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress with an Osmotic Stress-induced Cell Death Signal*

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Murilo S.; Reis, Pedro A. B.; Dadalto, Silvana P.; Faria, Jerusa A. Q. A.; Fontes, Elizabeth P. B.; Fietto, Luciano G.

    2011-01-01

    As in all other eukaryotic organisms, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress triggers the evolutionarily conserved unfolded protein response in soybean, but it also communicates with other adaptive signaling responses, such as osmotic stress-induced and ER stress-induced programmed cell death. These two signaling pathways converge at the level of gene transcription to activate an integrated cascade that is mediated by N-rich proteins (NRPs). Here, we describe a novel transcription factor, GmERD15 (Glycine max Early Responsive to Dehydration 15), which is induced by ER stress and osmotic stress to activate the expression of NRP genes. GmERD15 was isolated because of its capacity to stably associate with the NRP-B promoter in yeast. It specifically binds to a 187-bp fragment of the NRP-B promoter in vitro and activates the transcription of a reporter gene in yeast. Furthermore, GmERD15 was found in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus, and a ChIP assay revealed that it binds to the NRP-B promoter in vivo. Expression of GmERD15 in soybean protoplasts activated the NRP-B promoter and induced expression of the NRP-B gene. Collectively, these results support the interpretation that GmERD15 functions as an upstream component of stress-induced NRP-B-mediated signaling to connect stress in the ER to an osmotic stress-induced cell death signal. PMID:21482825

  15. Morphine Enhances HIV-1SF162-Mediated Neuron Death and Delays Recovery of Injured Neurites

    PubMed Central

    Masvekar, Ruturaj R.; El-Hage, Nazira; Hauser, Kurt F.; Knapp, Pamela E.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 enters the CNS soon after initial systemic infection; within the CNS parenchyma infected and/or activated perivascular macrophages, microglia and astrocytes release viral and cellular toxins that drive secondary toxicity in neurons and other cell types. Our previous work has largely modeled HIV-neuropathology using the individual viral proteins Tat or gp120, with murine striatal neurons as targets. To model disease processes more closely, the current study uses supernatant from HIV-1-infected cells. Supernatant from HIV-1SF162-infected differentiated-U937 cells (HIV+sup) was collected and p24 level was measured by ELISA to assess the infection. Injection drug abuse is a significant risk factor for HIV-infection, and opiate drug abusers show increased HIV-neuropathology, even with anti-retroviral treatments. We therefore assessed HIV+sup effects on neuronal survival and neurite growth/pruning with or without concurrent exposure to morphine, an opiate that preferentially acts through µ-opioid receptors. Effects of HIV+sup ± morphine were assessed on neuronal populations, and also by time-lapse imaging of individual cells. HIV+sup caused dose-dependent toxicity over a range of p24 levels (10–500 pg/ml). Significant interactions occurred with morphine at lower p24 levels (10 and 25 pg/ml), and GSK3β was implicated as a point of convergence. In the presence of glia, selective neurotoxic measures were significantly enhanced and interactions with morphine were also augmented, perhaps related to a decreased level of BDNF. Importantly, the arrest of neurite growth that occurred with exposure to HIV+sup was reversible unless neurons were continuously exposed to morphine. Thus, while reducing HIV-infection levels may be protective, ongoing exposure to opiates may limit recovery. Opiate interactions observed in this HIV-infective environment were similar, though not entirely concordant, with Tat/gp120 interactions reported previously, suggesting unique interactions

  16. Alpha-tubulin enhanced renal tubular cell proliferation and tissue repair but reduced cell death and cell-crystal adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Manissorn, Juthatip; Khamchun, Supaporn; Vinaiphat, Arada; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion of calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals on renal tubular epithelial cells is a critical event for kidney stone disease that triggers many cascades of cellular response. Our previous expression proteomics study identified several altered proteins in MDCK renal tubular cells induced by CaOx crystals. However, functional significance of those changes had not been investigated. The present study thus aimed to define functional roles of such proteome data. Global protein network analysis using STRING software revealed α-tubulin, which was decreased, as one of central nodes of protein-protein interactions. Overexpression of α-tubulin (pcDNA6.2-TUBA1A) was then performed and its efficacy was confirmed. pcDNA6.2-TUBA1A could maintain levels of α-tubulin and its direct interacting partner, vimentin, after crystal exposure. Also, pcDNA6.2-TUBA1A successfully reduced cell death to almost the basal level and increased cell proliferation after crystal exposure. Additionally, tissue repair capacity was improved in pcDNA6.2-TUBA1A cells. Moreover, cell-crystal adhesion was reduced by pcDNA6.2-TUBA1A. Finally, levels of potential crystal receptors (HSP90, HSP70, and α-enolase) on apical membrane were dramatically reduced to basal levels by pcDNA6.2-TUBA1A. These findings implicate that α-tubulin has protective roles in kidney stone disease by preventing cell death and cell-crystal adhesion, but on the other hand, enhancing cell proliferation and tissue repair function. PMID:27363348

  17. Involvement of Raft Aggregates Enriched in Fas/CD95 Death-Inducing Signaling Complex in the Antileukemic Action of Edelfosine in Jurkat Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gajate, Consuelo; Gonzalez-Camacho, Fernando; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that co-clustering of Fas/CD95 death receptor and lipid rafts plays a major role in death receptor-mediated apoptosis. Methodology/Principal Findings By a combination of genetic, biochemical, and ultrastructural approaches, we provide here compelling evidence for the involvement of lipid raft aggregates containing recruited Fas/CD95 death receptor, Fas-associated death domain-containing protein (FADD), and procaspase-8 in the induction of apoptosis in human T-cell leukemia Jurkat cells by the antitumor drug edelfosine, the prototype compound of a promising family of synthetic antitumor lipids named as synthetic alkyl-lysophospholipid analogues. Co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed that edelfosine induced the generation of the so-called death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), made up of Fas/CD95, FADD, and procaspase-8, in lipid rafts. Electron microscopy analyses allowed to visualize the formation of raft clusters and their co-localization with DISC components Fas/CD95, FADD, and procaspase-8 following edelfosine treatment of Jurkat cells. Silencing of Fas/CD95 by RNA interference, transfection with a FADD dominant-negative mutant that blocks Fas/CD95 signaling, and specific inhibition of caspase-8 prevented the apoptotic response triggered by edelfosine, hence demonstrating the functional role of DISC in drug-induced apoptosis. By using radioactive labeled edelfosine and a fluorescent analogue, we found that edelfosine accumulated in lipid rafts, forming edelfosine-rich membrane raft clusters in Jurkat leukemic T-cells. Disruption of these membrane raft domains abrogated drug uptake and drug-induced DISC assembly and apoptosis. Thus, edelfosine uptake into lipid rafts was critical for the onset of both co-aggregation of DISC in membrane rafts and subsequent apoptotic cell death. Conclusions/Significance This work shows the involvement of DISC clusters in lipid raft aggregates as a supramolecular and physical entity

  18. A mechanism of cell death involving an adenylyl cyclase/PKA signaling pathway is induced by the Cry1Ab toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuebin; Candas, Mehmet; Griko, Natalya B.; Taussig, Ronald; Bulla, Lee A.

    2006-01-01

    Many pathogenic organisms and their toxins target host cell receptors, the consequence of which is altered signaling events that lead to aberrant activity or cell death. A significant body of literature describes various molecular and cellular aspects of toxins associated with bacterial invasion, colonization, and host cell disruption. However, there is little information on the molecular and cellular mechanisms associated with the insecticidal action of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry toxins. Recently, we reported that the Cry1Ab toxin produced by Bt kills insect cells by activating a Mg2+-dependent cytotoxic event upon binding of the toxin to its receptor BT-R1. Here we show that binding of Cry toxin to BT-R1 provokes cell death by activating a previously undescribed signaling pathway involving stimulation of G protein (Gαs) and adenylyl cyclase, increased cAMP levels, and activation of protein kinase A. Induction of the adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A pathway is manifested by sequential cytological changes that include membrane blebbing, appearance of ghost nuclei, cell swelling, and lysis. The discovery of a toxin-induced cell death pathway specifically linked to BT-R1 in insect cells should provide insights into how insects evolve resistance to Bt and into the development of new, safer insecticides. PMID:16788061

  19. A mechanism of cell death involving an adenylyl cyclase/PKA signaling pathway is induced by the Cry1Ab toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuebin; Candas, Mehmet; Griko, Natalya B; Taussig, Ronald; Bulla, Lee A

    2006-06-27

    Many pathogenic organisms and their toxins target host cell receptors, the consequence of which is altered signaling events that lead to aberrant activity or cell death. A significant body of literature describes various molecular and cellular aspects of toxins associated with bacterial invasion, colonization, and host cell disruption. However, there is little information on the molecular and cellular mechanisms associated with the insecticidal action of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry toxins. Recently, we reported that the Cry1Ab toxin produced by Bt kills insect cells by activating a Mg(2+)-dependent cytotoxic event upon binding of the toxin to its receptor BT-R(1). Here we show that binding of Cry toxin to BT-R(1) provokes cell death by activating a previously undescribed signaling pathway involving stimulation of G protein (G(alphas)) and adenylyl cyclase, increased cAMP levels, and activation of protein kinase A. Induction of the adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A pathway is manifested by sequential cytological changes that include membrane blebbing, appearance of ghost nuclei, cell swelling, and lysis. The discovery of a toxin-induced cell death pathway specifically linked to BT-R(1) in insect cells should provide insights into how insects evolve resistance to Bt and into the development of new, safer insecticides.

  20. Intensive Rehabilitation Enhances Lymphocyte BDNF-TrkB Signaling in Patients With Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Fontanesi, Cecilia; Kvint, Svetlana; Frazzitta, Giuseppe; Bera, Rossana; Ferrazzoli, Davide; Di Rocco, Alessandro; Rebholz, Heike; Friedman, Eitan; Pezzoli, Gianni; Quartarone, Angelo; Wang, Hoau-Yan; Ghilardi, M Felice

    2016-06-01

    Background In a combined animal and human study, we have previously found that a 5-day treatment that enhances cortical plasticity also facilitates brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB) signaling and increases activated TrkB and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) association in both the cortex and the peripheral lymphocytes. Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), in general, show decreased cortical plasticity, as demonstrated by electrophysiological and behavioral studies. Here, we test the hypothesis that an exercise program that improves motor function and seems to slow down symptom progression can enhance BDNF-TrkB signaling in lymphocytes. Methods A total of 16 patients with PD underwent a 4-week multidisciplinary intensive rehabilitation treatment (MIRT), which included aerobic training and physical and occupational therapy. Blood was collected before and after 2 and 4 weeks of MIRT. Lymphocytes were isolated to examine BDNF-TrkB signaling induced by incubation with recombinant human BDNF. TrkB signaling complexes, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase-2 and protein-kinase-B were immunoprecipitated; the content of immunocomplexes was determined by Western blotting. Results After MIRT, all patients showed improvement in motor function. TrkB interaction with NMDAR and BDNF-TrkB signaling increased in peripheral lymphocytes at receptor, intracellular mediator, and downstream levels. The decrements in Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale II (UPDRSII) and total scores were significantly correlated with the increases in TrkB signaling at receptor, intracellular mediator, and NMDAR interaction levels. Conclusions The significant correlation between reduced UPDRS scores and the changes in lymphocyte activity suggest that enhanced BDNF-TrkB signaling in lymphocyte and reduced severity of PD symptoms may be related. PMID:26253177

  1. Acetylated chitosan oligosaccharides act as antagonists against glutamate-induced PC12 cell death via Bcl-2/Bax signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Hao, Cui; Gao, Lixia; Zhang, Yiran; Wang, Wei; Yu, Guangli; Guan, Huashi; Zhang, Lijuan; Li, Chunxia

    2015-03-12

    Chitosan oligosaccharides (COSs), depolymerized products of chitosan composed of β-(1→4) D-glucosamine units, have broad range of biological activities such as antitumour, antifungal, and antioxidant activities. In this study, peracetylated chitosan oligosaccharides (PACOs) and N-acetylated chitosan oligosaccharides (NACOs) were prepared from the COSs by chemcal modification. The structures of these monomers were identified using NMR and ESI-MS spectra. Their antagonist effects against glutamate-induced PC12 cell death were investigated. The results showed that pretreatment of PC12 cells with the PACOs markedly inhibited glutamate-induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. The PACOs were better glutamate antagonists compared to the COSs and the NACOs, suggesting the peracetylation is essential for the neuroprotective effects of chitosan oligosaccharides. In addition, the PACOs pretreatment significantly reduced lactate dehydrogenase release and reactive oxygen species production. It also attenuated the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Further studies indicated that the PACOs inhibited glutamate-induced cell death by preventing apoptosis through depressing the elevation of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and caspase-3 activation. These results suggest that PACOs might be promising antagonists against glutamate-induced neural cell death.

  2. Acetylated Chitosan Oligosaccharides Act as Antagonists against Glutamate-Induced PC12 Cell Death via Bcl-2/Bax Signal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Cui; Gao, Lixia; Zhang, Yiran; Wang, Wei; Yu, Guangli; Guan, Huashi; Zhang, Lijuan; Li, Chunxia

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan oligosaccharides (COSs), depolymerized products of chitosan composed of β-(1→4) d-glucosamine units, have broad range of biological activities such as antitumour, antifungal, and antioxidant activities. In this study, peracetylated chitosan oligosaccharides (PACOs) and N-acetylated chitosan oligosaccharides (NACOs) were prepared from the COSs by chemcal modification. The structures of these monomers were identified using NMR and ESI-MS spectra. Their antagonist effects against glutamate-induced PC12 cell death were investigated. The results showed that pretreatment of PC12 cells with the PACOs markedly inhibited glutamate-induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. The PACOs were better glutamate antagonists compared to the COSs and the NACOs, suggesting the peracetylation is essential for the neuroprotective effects of chitosan oligosaccharides. In addition, the PACOs pretreatment significantly reduced lactate dehydrogenase release and reactive oxygen species production. It also attenuated the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Further studies indicated that the PACOs inhibited glutamate-induced cell death by preventing apoptosis through depressing the elevation of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and caspase-3 activation. These results suggest that PACOs might be promising antagonists against glutamate-induced neural cell death. PMID:25775423

  3. Quantitative evaluation of optical coherence tomography signal enhancement with gold nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anant; Huang, Stanley; Wei Haw Lin, Alex; Lee, Min-Ho; Barton, Jennifer K; Drezek, Rebekah A; Pfefer, T Joshua

    2006-01-01

    Nanoshell-enhanced optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a novel technique with the potential for molecular imaging and improved disease detection. However, optimization of this approach will require a quantitative understanding of the influence of nanoshell parameters on detected OCT signals. In this study, OCT was performed at 1310 nm in water and turbid tissue-simulating phantoms to which nanoshells were added. The effect of nanoshell concentration, core diameter, and shell thickness on signal enhancement was characterized. Experimental results indicated trends that were consistent with predicted optical properties-a monotonic increase in signal intensity and attenuation with increasing shell and core size. Threshold concentrations for a 2-dB OCT signal intensity gain were determined for several nanoshell geometries. For the most highly backscattering nanoshells tested-291-nm core diameter, 25-nm shell thickness-a concentration of 10(9) nanoshells/mL was needed to produce this signal increase. Based on these results, we discuss various practical considerations for optimizing nanoshell-enhanced OCT. Quantitative experimental data presented here will facilitate optimization of OCT-based diagnostics and may also be relevant to other reflectance-based approaches as well. PMID:16965149

  4. ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY 1 and SALICYLIC ACID act redundantly to regulate resistance gene-mediated signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance (R) protein–associated pathways are well known to participate in defense against a variety of microbial pathogens. Salicylic acid (SA) and its associated proteinaceous signaling components, including enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1), non–race-specific disease resistance 1 (NDR1), ...

  5. Gold nanoparticle based signal enhancement liquid crystal biosensors for DNA hybridization assays.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengyuan; Liu, Yanmei; Tan, Hui; Wu, Chao; Wu, Zhaoyang; Shen, Guoli; Yu, Ruqin

    2012-03-18

    A novel signal enhanced liquid crystal biosensor based on using AuNPs for highly sensitive DNA detection has been developed. This biosensor not only significantly decreases the detection limit, but also offers a simple detection process and shows a good selectivity to distinguish perfectly matched target DNA from two-base mismatched DNA. PMID:22302154

  6. Activation of the dsRNA-dependent protein kinase, PKR, induces apoptosis through FADD-mediated death signaling.

    PubMed Central

    Balachandran, S; Kim, C N; Yeh, W C; Mak, T W; Bhalla, K; Barber, G N

    1998-01-01

    The dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) is considered to play a key role in interferon-mediated host defense against viral infection and conceivably malignant transformation. To investigate further the mechanisms of PKR-induced growth inhibition, we have developed tetracycline-inducible murine cell lines that express wild-type PKR or a catalytically inactive PKR variant, PKRdelta6. Following induction, the growth of the wild-type PKR-expressing cells was similar to that of cells transfected with vector alone, while cells expressing PKRdelta6 became malignantly transformed. Significantly, treatment with dsRNA caused the wild-type PKR-overexpressing cells to undergo programed cell death while, conversely, cells expressing PKRdelta6 were completely resistant. Our studies demonstrated that activation of PKR induces the expression of members of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family, including Fas (CD95/Apo-1) and pro-apopotic Bax. In contrast, transcripts representing Fas, TNFR-1, FADD (Fas-associated death domain), FLICE, Bad and Bax were ablated in cells expressing PKRdelta6. The involvement of the death receptors in PKR-induced apoptosis was underscored by demonstrating that murine fibroblasts lacking FADD were almost completely resistant to dsRNA-mediated cell death. Thus, PKR, a key cellular target for viral repression, is a receptor/inducer for the induction of pro-apoptotic genes by dsRNA and probably functions in interferon-mediated host defense to trigger cell death in response to virus infection and perhaps tumorigenesis. PMID:9843495

  7. Nucleolar localization of parathyroid hormone-related peptide enhances survival of chondrocytes under conditions that promote apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, J E; Amizuka, N; Warshawsky, H; Biasotto, D; Lanske, B M; Goltzman, D; Karaplis, A C

    1995-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) is a mediator of cellular growth and differentiation as well as a cause of malignancy-induced hypercalcemia. Most of the actions of PTHrP have been attributed to its interaction with a specific cell surface receptor that binds the N-terminal domain of the protein. Here we present evidence that PTHrP promotes some of its cellular effects by translocating to the nucleolus. Localization of transiently expressed PTHrP to the nucleolus was dependent on the presence of a highly basic region at the carboxyl terminus of the molecule that bears homology to nucleolar targeting sequences identified within human retroviral (human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1) regulatory proteins. Endogenous PTHrP also localized to the nucleolus in osseous cells in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, expression of PTHrP in chondrocytic cells (CFK2) delayed apoptosis induced by serum deprivation, and this effect depended on the presence of an intact nucleolar targeting signal. The present findings demonstrate a unique intracellular mode of PTHrP action and a novel mechanism by which this peptide growth factor may modulate programmed cell death. PMID:7623802

  8. Osmotin, a plant antifungal protein, subverts signal transduction to enhance fungal cell susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Yun, D J; Ibeas, J I; Lee, H; Coca, M A; Narasimhan, M L; Uesono, Y; Hasegawa, P M; Pardo, J M; Bressan, R A

    1998-05-01

    The plant pathogenesis-related protein osmotin is an antifungal cytotoxic agent that causes rapid cell death in the yeast S. cerevisiae. We show here that osmotin uses a signal transduction pathway to weaken defensive cell wall barriers and increase its cytotoxic efficacy. The pathway activated by osmotin includes the regulatory elements of the mating pheromone response STE4, STE18, STE20, STE5, STE11, STE7, FUS3, KSS1, and STE12. Neither the pheromone receptor nor its associated G protein alpha subunit GPA1 are required for osmotin action. However, mutation of SST2, a negative regulator of G alpha proteins, resulted in supersensitivity to osmotin. Phosphorylation of STE7 was rapidly stimulated by osmotin preceding any changes in cell vitality or morphology. These results demonstrate that osmotin subverts target cell signal transduction as part of its mechanism of action. PMID:9660964

  9. Raman signal enhancement by multiple beam excitation and its application for the detection of chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Sakshi; Ahmad, Azeem; Mehta, Dalip S.; Gambhir, Vijayeta; Reddy, Martha N.

    2015-08-31

    In a typical Raman based sensor, a single laser beam is used for exciting the sample and the backscattered or forward scattered light is collected using collection optics and is analyzed by a spectrometer. We have investigated that by means of exciting the sample with multiple beams, i.e., by dividing the same input power of the single beam into two or three or more beams and exciting the sample from different angles, the Raman signal enhances significantly. Due to the presence of multiple beams passing through the same volume of the sample, an interference pattern is formed and the volume of interaction of excitation beams with the sample increases. By means of this geometry, the enhancement in the Raman signal is observed and it was found that the signal strength increases linearly with the increase in number of excitation beams. Experimental results of this scheme for excitation of the samples are reported for explosive detection at a standoff distance.

  10. Enhancement for Φ-OTDR performance by using narrow linewidth light source and signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Wang, Song; Zheng, Yuanwei; Yang, Yao; Sa, Xingjie; Zhang, Li

    2016-03-01

    In order to enhance the signal-to-noise-ratio of a distributed acoustic sensing system based on phase-sensitive optical time-domain reflectometry (Φ-OTDR), we have proposed a combination of segmented unwrapping algorithm, averaging estimation of phase difference, and infinite impulse response (IIR) filtering method. The enhancement of signal quality is numerically demonstrated. Moreover, we have studied the influence resulted from the light source noise on the Φ-OTDR performance. The result has shown that when the linewidth of light source used in the Φ-OTDR system is narrower, the performance of the system is better. In a word, such a Φ-OTDR system could obtain higher quality demodulated signals when the narrower linewidth light source is chosen and the method of averaging estimation phase difference is used.

  11. Higher-order-statistics-based radial basis function networks for signal enhancement.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bor-Shyh; Lin, Bor-Shing; Chong, Fok-Ching; Lai, Feipei

    2007-05-01

    In this paper, a higher-order-statistics (HOS)-based radial basis function (RBF) network for signal enhancement is introduced. In the proposed scheme, higher order cumulants of the reference signal were used as the input of HOS-based RBF. An HOS-based supervised learning algorithm, with mean square error obtained from higher order cumulants of the desired input and the system output as the learning criterion, was used to adapt weights. The motivation is that the HOS can effectively suppress Gaussian and symmetrically distributed non-Gaussian noise. The influence of a Gaussian noise on the input of HOS-based RBF and the HOS-based learning algorithm can be mitigated. Simulated results indicate that HOS-based RBF can provide better performance for signal enhancement under different noise levels, and its performance is insensitive to the selection of learning rates. Moreover, the efficiency of HOS-based RBF under the nonstationary Gaussian noise is stable.

  12. Spatial extent of plasmonic enhancement of vibrational signals in the infrared.

    PubMed

    Neubrech, Frank; Beck, Sebastian; Glaser, Tobias; Hentschel, Mario; Giessen, Harald; Pucci, Annemarie

    2014-06-24

    Infrared vibrations of molecular species can be enhanced by several orders of magnitude with plasmonic nanoantennas. Based on the confined electromagnetic near-fields of resonantly excited metal nanoparticles, this antenna-assisted surface-enhanced infrared spectroscopy enables the detection of minute amounts of analytes localized in the nanometer-scale vicinity of the structure. Among other important parameters, the distance of the vibrational oscillator of the analyte to the nanoantenna surface determines the signal enhancement. For sensing applications, this is a particularly important issue since the vibrating dipoles of interest may be located far away from the antenna surface because of functional layers and the large size of biomolecules, proteins, or bacteria. The relation between distance and signal enhancement is thus of paramount importance and measured here with in situ infrared spectroscopy during the growth of a probe layer. Our results indicate a diminishing signal enhancement and the effective saturation of the plasmonic resonance shift beyond 100 nm. The experiments carried out under ultra-high-vacuum conditions are supported by numerical calculations.

  13. Spatial extent of plasmonic enhancement of vibrational signals in the infrared.

    PubMed

    Neubrech, Frank; Beck, Sebastian; Glaser, Tobias; Hentschel, Mario; Giessen, Harald; Pucci, Annemarie

    2014-06-24

    Infrared vibrations of molecular species can be enhanced by several orders of magnitude with plasmonic nanoantennas. Based on the confined electromagnetic near-fields of resonantly excited metal nanoparticles, this antenna-assisted surface-enhanced infrared spectroscopy enables the detection of minute amounts of analytes localized in the nanometer-scale vicinity of the structure. Among other important parameters, the distance of the vibrational oscillator of the analyte to the nanoantenna surface determines the signal enhancement. For sensing applications, this is a particularly important issue since the vibrating dipoles of interest may be located far away from the antenna surface because of functional layers and the large size of biomolecules, proteins, or bacteria. The relation between distance and signal enhancement is thus of paramount importance and measured here with in situ infrared spectroscopy during the growth of a probe layer. Our results indicate a diminishing signal enhancement and the effective saturation of the plasmonic resonance shift beyond 100 nm. The experiments carried out under ultra-high-vacuum conditions are supported by numerical calculations. PMID:24811345

  14. Organic secondary ion mass spectrometry: signal enhancement by water vapor injection.

    PubMed

    Mouhib, Taoufiq; Delcorte, Arnaud; Poleunis, Claude; Bertrand, Patrick

    2010-12-01

    The enhancement of the static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) signals resulting from the injection, closely to the sample surface, of H(2)O vapor at relatively high-pressure, was investigated for a set of organic materials. While the ion signals are generally improved with increasing H(2)O pressure upon 12 keV Ga(+) bombardment, a specific enhancement of the protonated ion intensity is clearly demonstrated in each case. For instance, the presence of H(2)O vapor induces an enhancement by one order of magnitude of the [M + H](+) static SIMS intensity for the antioxidant Irgafos 168 and a ∼1.5-fold increase for polymers such as poly(vinyl pyrrolidone).

  15. Triggering of death receptor apoptotic signaling by human papillomavirus 16 E2 protein in cervical cancer cell lines is mediated by interaction with c-FLIP.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Fang, Yong; Sima, Ni; Li, Yan; Li, Wei; Li, Li; Han, Linfei; Liao, Shujie; Han, Zhiqiang; Gao, Qinglei; Li, Kezhen; Deng, Dongrui; Meng, Li; Zhou, Jianfeng; Wang, Shixuan; Ma, Ding

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) E2 gene disruption is one of the key features of HPV-induced cervical malignant transformation. Though it is thought to prevent progression of carcinogenesis, the pro-apoptotic function of E2 protein remains poorly understood. This study shows that expression of HPV16 E2 induces apoptosis both in HPV-positive and -negative cervical cancer cell lines and leads to hyperactivation of caspase-8 and caspase-3. Activation of these signaling factors is responsible for the observed sensitivity to apoptosis upon treatment with anti-Fas antibody or TNF-α. In addition, immunoprecipitation experiments clearly show an interaction between HPV16 E2 and c-FLIP, a key regulator of apoptotic cell death mediated by death receptor signaling. Moreover, c-FLIP and a caspase-8 inhibitor protect cells from HPV16 E2-mediated apoptosis. Overexpression of c-FLIP rescues cervical cancer cells from apoptosis induced by HPV16 E2 protein expression. The data suggest that HPV16 E2 abrogates the apoptosis-inhibitory function of c-FLIP and renders the cell hypersensitive to the Fas/FasL apoptotic signal even below threshold concentration. This suggests a novel mechanism for deregulation of cervical epithelial cell growth upon HPV-induced transformation, which is of great significance in developing therapeutic strategies for intervention of cervical carcinogenesis.

  16. Ribavirin and alpha interferon enhance death receptor-mediated apoptosis and caspase activation in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Stephan F; Schuler, Markus; Berg, Christoph P; Lauber, Kirsten; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Schmahl, Friedrich Wilhelm; Wesselborg, Sebastian

    2003-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the clinical effects of alpha interferon (IFN) and ribavirin are not understood. Elimination of infected cells occurs in part by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) expressing CD95 ligand and thereby attacking target cells which are positive for the death receptor CD95. Since many viruses have evolved mechanisms to inhibit apoptosis, the opposite, namely, promotion of apoptosis, could be a strategy to strengthen the host antiviral response. In the present study, we have asked whether the antiviral substances IFN and ribavirin could support CD95-mediated apoptosis by interfering with the activation of caspases, a family of proteases known for their essential role in apoptosis. HepG2 cells, stimulated with the agonistic anti-CD95 antibody, served as a minimal model to mimic the CD95 stimulation occurring during a CTL attack of target cells in vivo. Apoptosis was quantitated by flow cytometric detection of hypodiploid nuclei. Caspase activity was measured by cytofluorometry, immunocytochemistry, and immunoblot analysis. IFN and ribavirin sensitized HepG2 cells for CD95-mediated apoptosis. This effect was correlated with an increase in CD95-mediated caspase activation and enhanced cleavage of the caspase substrate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Furthermore, the positive effect on CD95-mediated caspase activation by IFN and ribavirin was confirmed by immunocytochemistry for activated caspase-3 and by immunoblot detection of activated caspase-3, caspase-7, and caspase-8. Our data demonstrate that the antiviral substances IFN and ribavirin are able to sensitize for CD95-mediated apoptosis. IFN and ribavirin also enhance CD95-mediated caspase activation, which might in part be responsible for the apoptosis-promoting effect of these antiviral compounds. PMID:12760867

  17. Identification of Fusarium virguliforme FvTox1-Interacting Synthetic Peptides for Enhancing Foliar Sudden Death Syndrome Resistance in Soybean.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Swaminathan, Sivakumar; Bhattacharyya, Madan K

    2015-01-01

    Soybean is one of the most important crops grown across the globe. In the United States, approximately 15% of the soybean yield is suppressed due to various pathogen and pests attack. Sudden death syndrome (SDS) is an emerging fungal disease caused by Fusarium virguliforme. Although growing SDS resistant soybean cultivars has been the main method of controlling this disease, SDS resistance is partial and controlled by a large number of quantitative trait loci (QTL). A proteinacious toxin, FvTox1, produced by the pathogen, causes foliar SDS. Earlier, we demonstrated that expression of an anti-FvTox1 single chain variable fragment antibody resulted in reduced foliar SDS development in transgenic soybean plants. Here, we investigated if synthetic FvTox1-interacting peptides, displayed on M13 phage particles, can be identified for enhancing foliar SDS resistance in soybean. We screened three phage-display peptide libraries and discovered four classes of M13 phage clones displaying FvTox1-interacting peptides. In vitro pull-down assays and in vivo interaction assays in yeast were conducted to confirm the interaction of FvTox1 with these four synthetic peptides and their fusion-combinations. One of these peptides was able to partially neutralize the toxic effect of FvTox1 in vitro. Possible application of the synthetic peptides in engineering SDS resistance soybean cultivars is discussed. PMID:26709700

  18. Docosahexaenoic acid enhances iron uptake by modulating iron transporters and accelerates apoptotic death in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Schonfeld, Eldi; Yasharel, Ilanit; Yavin, Ephraim; Brand, Annette

    2007-10-01

    The effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6 n-3) on Fe(2+)-mediated and/or H(2)O(2)-mediated oxidative stress (OS) was investigated in a PC12 pheochromocytoma cell line in the presence or absence of 50 ng/ml nerve growth factor (NGF). DHA-supplemented cells showed enhanced Fe(2+)-induced cell damage as evident by increased lipid peroxides formation (10-fold) and reduced neutral red (NR) dye uptake in a NGF-independent fashion. DHA caused a nearly 10-fold increase in free iron uptake in NGF-treated cells and doubled iron uptake in nondifferentiated cells. DHA-enrichment induced an elevation in the transferrin receptor protein in the nondifferentiated cells whereas NGF-treatment led to a substantial increase in the ubiquitous divalent metal ion transporter 1 (DMT-1) as detected by mRNA levels using qRT-PCR. The mechanism of action of DHA to accelerate cell death may be associated with the externalization of amino-phosphoglycerides (PG) species of which, increased ethanolamine plasmalogen levels, may be essential for cell rescue as noted in NGF-treated PC12 cells. PMID:17551831

  19. Dexamethasone-loaded Block Copolymer Nanoparticles Induce Leukemia Cell Death and Enhances Therapeutic Efficacy: A Novel Application in Pediatric Nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Vinu; Xu, Xian; Barwe, Sonali P.; Yang, Xiaowei; Czymmek, Kirk; Waldman, Scott A.; Mason, Robert W.; Jia, Xinqiao; Rajasekaran, Ayyappan K.

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology approaches have tremendous potential for enhancing treatment efficacy with lower doses of chemotherapeutics. Nanoparticle-based drug delivery approaches are poorly developed for childhood leukemia. Dexamethasone (Dex) is one of the most common chemotherapeutic drugs used in the treatment of childhood leukemia. In this study, we encapsulated Dex in polymeric nanoparticles and validated their anti-leukemic potential in vitro and in vivo. Nanoparticles (NPs) with an average diameter of 110 nm were assembled from amphiphilic block copolymers poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) bearing pendant cyclic ketals. The blank nanoparticles were non-toxic to cultured cells in vitro and to mice in vivo. Encapsulation of Dex into the nanoparticles (Dex-NP) did not compromise the bioactivity of the drug. Dex-NPs induced glucocorticoid phosphorylation and showed cytotoxicity similar to the free Dex in leukemic cells. Studies using nanoparticles labeled with fluorescent dyes revealed leukemic cell surface binding and internalization. In vivo biodistribution studies showed NP accumulation in the liver and spleen with subsequent clearance of the particles with time. In a pre-clinical model of leukemia, Dex-NPs significantly improved the quality of life and survival of mice compared to the free drug. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing the efficacy of polymeric nanoparticles to deliver Dex to potentially treat childhood leukemia and reveals that low dose of Dex should be sufficient for inducing cell death and improve survival. PMID:23194373

  20. Method of Enhancing On-Board State Estimation Using Communication Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anzalone, Evan J. (Inventor); Chuang, Jason C. H. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method of enhancing on-board state estimation for a spacecraft utilizes a network of assets to include planetary-based assets and space-based assets. Communication signals transmitted from each of the assets into space are defined by a common protocol. Data is embedded in each communication signal transmitted by the assets. The data includes a time-of-transmission for a corresponding one of the communication signals and a position of a corresponding one of the assets at the time-of-transmission. A spacecraft is equipped to receive the communication signals, has a clock synchronized to the space-wide time reference frame, and has a processor programmed to generate state estimates of the spacecraft. Using its processor, the spacecraft determines a one-dimensional range from itself to at least one of the assets and then updates its state estimates using each one-dimensional range.

  1. Characterisation of signal enhancements achieved when utilizing a photon diode in deep Raman spectroscopy of tissue

    PubMed Central

    Vardaki, Martha Z.; Matousek, Pavel; Stone, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    We characterise the performance of a beam enhancing element (‘photon diode’) for use in deep Raman spectroscopy (DRS) of biological tissues. The optical component enhances the number of laser photons coupled into a tissue sample by returning escaping photons back into it at the illumination zone. The method is compatible with transmission Raman spectroscopy, a deep Raman spectroscopy concept, and its implementation leads to considerable enhancement of detected Raman photon rates. In the past, the enhancement concept was demonstrated with a variety of samples (pharmaceutical tablets, tissue, etc) but it was not systematically characterized with biological tissues. In this study, we investigate the enhancing properties of the photon diode in the transmission Raman geometry as a function of: a) the depth and b) the optical properties of tissue samples. Liquid tissue phantoms were employed to facilitate systematic variation of optical properties. These were chosen to mimic optical properties of human tissues, including breast and prostate. The obtained results evidence that a photon diode can enhance Raman signals of tissues by a maximum of × 2.4, although it can also decrease the signals created towards the back of samples that exhibit high scattering or absorption properties. PMID:27375932

  2. Visible light communications using predistortion signal to enhance the response of passive optical receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Chen, Hung-Yu; Liang, Kevin; Wei, Liang-Yu; Chow, Chi-Wai; Yeh, Chien-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Traditional visible light communication (VLC) uses positive-intrinsic-negative photodiode (PD) or avalanche PD as the optical receivers (Rx). We demonstrate using a solar cell as the VLC Rx. The solar cell is flexible and low cost and converts the optical signal into an electrical signal directly without the need of external power supply. In addition to acting as the VLC passive Rx, the converted electrical signal from the solar cell can charge up the battery of the Rx nodes. Hence, the proposed scheme can be a promising candidate for the future Internet of Things network. However, a solar cell acting as a VLC Rx is very challenging, since the response of the solar cell is limited. Here, we propose and demonstrate using predistortion to significantly enhance the solar cell Rx response for the first time up to the authors' knowledge. Experimental results show that the response of the solar cell Rx is significantly enhanced; and the original 2-kHz detection bandwidth of the solar cell can be enhanced by 250 times for receiving 500-kbit/s VLC signal at a transmission distance of 1 m. The operation principle, the generated voltage by the solar cell, and the maximum data rates achieved at different transmission distances are also studied.

  3. Producing >60,000-fold room-temperature 89Y NMR signal enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumata, Lloyd; Jindal, Ashish; Merritt, Matthew; Malloy, Craig; Sherry, A. Dean; Kovacs, Zoltan

    2011-03-01

    89 Y in chelated form is potentially valuable in medical imaging because its chemical shift is sensitive to local factors in tumors such as pH. However, 89 Y has a low gyromagnetic ratio γn thus its NMR signal is hampered by low thermal polarization. Here we show that we can enhance the room-temperature NMR signal of 89 Y up to 65,000 times the thermal signal, which corresponds to 10 % nuclear polarization, via fast dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). The relatively long spin-lattice relaxation time T1 (~ 500 s) of 89 Y translates to a long polarization lifetime. The 89 Y NMR enhancement is optimized by varying the glassing matrices and paramagnetic agents as well as doping the samples with a gadolinium relaxation agent. Co-polarization of 89 Y-DOTA with a 13 C sample shows that both nuclear spin species acquire the same spin temperature Ts , consistent with thermal mixing mechanism of DNP. The high room-temperature NMR signal enhancement places 89 Y, one of the most challenging nuclei to detect by NMR, in the list of viable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agents when hyperpolarized under optimized conditions. This work is supported in part by the National Institutes of Health grant numbers 1R21EB009147-01 and RR02584.

  4. Mycobacteria-responsive sonic hedgehog signaling mediates programmed death-ligand 1- and prostaglandin E2-induced regulatory T cell expansion

    PubMed Central

    Holla, Sahana; Stephen-Victor, Emmanuel; Prakhar, Praveen; Sharma, Meenu; Saha, Chaitrali; Udupa, Vibha; Kaveri, Srinivas V.; Bayry, Jagadeesh; Balaji, Kithiganahalli Narayanaswamy

    2016-01-01

    CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are exploited by mycobacteria to subvert the protective host immune responses. The Treg expansion in the periphery requires signaling by professional antigen presenting cells and in particularly dendritic cells (DC). However, precise molecular mechanisms by which mycobacteria instruct Treg expansion via DCs are not established. Here we demonstrate that mycobacteria-responsive sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling in human DCs leads to programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) expression and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-catalyzed prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) that orchestrate mycobacterial infection-induced expansion of Tregs. While SHH-responsive transcription factor GLI1 directly arbitrated COX-2 transcription, specific microRNAs, miR-324-5p and miR-338-5p, which target PD-L1 were downregulated by SHH signaling. Further, counter-regulatory roles of SHH and NOTCH1 signaling during mycobacterial-infection of human DCs was also evident. Together, our results establish that Mycobacterium directs a fine-balance of host signaling pathways and molecular regulators in human DCs to expand Tregs that favour immune evasion of the pathogen. PMID:27080341

  5. Dopamine D2-receptor blockade enhances decoding of prefrontal signals in humans.

    PubMed

    Kahnt, Thorsten; Weber, Susanna C; Haker, Helene; Robbins, Trevor W; Tobler, Philippe N

    2015-03-01

    The prefrontal cortex houses representations critical for ongoing and future behavior expressed in the form of patterns of neural activity. Dopamine has long been suggested to play a key role in the integrity of such representations, with D2-receptor activation rendering them flexible but weak. However, it is currently unknown whether and how D2-receptor activation affects prefrontal representations in humans. In the current study, we use dopamine receptor-specific pharmacology and multivoxel pattern-based functional magnetic resonance imaging to test the hypothesis that blocking D2-receptor activation enhances prefrontal representations. Human subjects performed a simple reward prediction task after double-blind and placebo controlled administration of the D2-receptor antagonist amisulpride. Using a whole-brain searchlight decoding approach we show that D2-receptor blockade enhances decoding of reward signals in the medial orbitofrontal cortex. Examination of activity patterns suggests that amisulpride increases the separation of activity patterns related to reward versus no reward. Moreover, consistent with the cortical distribution of D2 receptors, post hoc analyses showed enhanced decoding of motor signals in motor cortex, but not of visual signals in visual cortex. These results suggest that D2-receptor blockade enhances content-specific representations in frontal cortex, presumably by a dopamine-mediated increase in pattern separation. These findings are in line with a dual-state model of prefrontal dopamine, and provide new insights into the potential mechanism of action of dopaminergic drugs.

  6. Dopamine D2-receptor blockade enhances decoding of prefrontal signals in humans.

    PubMed

    Kahnt, Thorsten; Weber, Susanna C; Haker, Helene; Robbins, Trevor W; Tobler, Philippe N

    2015-03-01

    The prefrontal cortex houses representations critical for ongoing and future behavior expressed in the form of patterns of neural activity. Dopamine has long been suggested to play a key role in the integrity of such representations, with D2-receptor activation rendering them flexible but weak. However, it is currently unknown whether and how D2-receptor activation affects prefrontal representations in humans. In the current study, we use dopamine receptor-specific pharmacology and multivoxel pattern-based functional magnetic resonance imaging to test the hypothesis that blocking D2-receptor activation enhances prefrontal representations. Human subjects performed a simple reward prediction task after double-blind and placebo controlled administration of the D2-receptor antagonist amisulpride. Using a whole-brain searchlight decoding approach we show that D2-receptor blockade enhances decoding of reward signals in the medial orbitofrontal cortex. Examination of activity patterns suggests that amisulpride increases the separation of activity patterns related to reward versus no reward. Moreover, consistent with the cortical distribution of D2 receptors, post hoc analyses showed enhanced decoding of motor signals in motor cortex, but not of visual signals in visual cortex. These results suggest that D2-receptor blockade enhances content-specific representations in frontal cortex, presumably by a dopamine-mediated increase in pattern separation. These findings are in line with a dual-state model of prefrontal dopamine, and provide new insights into the potential mechanism of action of dopaminergic drugs. PMID:25740537

  7. Methoxychlor enhances degranulation of murine mast cells by regulating FcεRI-mediated signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Yasunaga, Sho; Nishi, Kosuke; Nishimoto, Sogo; Sugahara, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    Methoxychlor, an organochlorine insecticide developed to replace DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane), has been reported to induce mast cell degranulation and to enhance IgE-mediated allergic responses. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects are not clear. To clarify potential mechanisms, the effects of methoxychlor on degranulation of mast cells were examined. Degranulation responses were evaluated using RBL-2H3 cells and mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells with either the antigen-induced or calcium ionophore-induced stimulation. Phosphorylation of enzymes related to signaling events associated with mast cell degranulation was analyzed by immunoblotting. Effects on vascular permeability in the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis reaction were evaluated following oral administration of methoxychlor to BALB/c mice. The results indicated that methoxychlor caused increased mast cell degranulation in the presence of antigen, whereas it had no effect on calcium ionophore-induced degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells. Immunoblot analyses demonstrated that the phosphorylation level of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (which plays a central role in mast cell signaling) was increased by methoxychlor during antigen-induced degranulation. In addition, methoxychlor activated the signaling pathway via the high-affinity IgE receptor by inducing phosphorylation of Syk and PLCγ1/2, which transfer the signal for degranulation downstream. Lastly, oral administration of methoxychlor exhibited a tendency to promote vascular permeability in passive cutaneous anaphylaxis model mice. Taken together, the results here suggested that methoxychlor enhanced degranulation through FcεRI-mediated signaling and promoted allergenic symptoms involved in mast cell degranulation.

  8. Enhanced spin signal in nonlocal devices based on a ferromagnetic CoFeAl alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridoux, G.; Costache, M. V.; Van de Vondel, J.; Neumann, I.; Valenzuela, S. O.

    2011-09-01

    We systematically study the nonlocal spin signal in lateral spin valves based on CoFeAl injectors and detectors and compare the results with identically fabricated devices based on CoFe. The devices are fabricated by electron beam evaporation at room temperature. We observe a > 10-fold enhancement of the spin signal in the CoFeAl devices. We explain this increase as due to the formation of a highly spin-polarized Co2FeAl Heusler compound with large resistivity. These results suggest that Heusler compounds are promising candidates as spin polarized electrodes in lateral spin devices for future spintronic applications.

  9. Knockdown of TWIST1 enhances arsenic trioxide- and ionizing radiation-induced cell death in lung cancer cells by promoting mitochondrial dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Sung-Keum; Kim, Jae-Hee; Choi, Ha-Na; Choe, Tae-Boo; Hong, Seok-Il; Yi, Jae-Youn; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Lee, Hyun-Gyu; Lee, Yun-Han; Park, In-Chul

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Knockdown of TWIST1 enhanced ATO- and IR-induced cell death in NSCLCs. • Intracellular ROS levels were increased in cells treated with TWIST1 siRNA. • TWIST1 siRNA induced MMP loss and mitochondrial fragmentation. • TWIST1 siRNA upregulated the fission-related proteins FIS1 and DRP1. - Abstract: TWIST1 is implicated in the process of epithelial mesenchymal transition, metastasis, stemness, and drug resistance in cancer cells, and therefore is a potential target for cancer therapy. In the present study, we found that knockdown of TWIST1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) enhanced arsenic trioxide (ATO)- and ionizing radiation (IR)-induced cell death in non-small-cell lung cancer cells. Interestingly, intracellular reactive oxygen species levels were increased in cells treated with TWIST1 siRNA and further increased by co-treatment with ATO or IR. Pretreatment of lung cancer cells with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine markedly suppressed the cell death induced by combined treatment with TWIST1 siRNA and ATO or IR. Moreover, treatment of cells with TWIST1 siRNA induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization and significantly increased mitochondrial fragmentation (fission) and upregulated the fission-related proteins FIS1 and DRP1. Collectively, our results demonstrate that siRNA-mediated TWIST1 knockdown induces mitochondrial dysfunction and enhances IR- and ATO-induced cell death in lung cancer cells.

  10. Signal enhancement in polarized light imaging by means of independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Dammers, Jürgen; Axer, Markus; Grässel, David; Palm, Christoph; Zilles, Karl; Amunts, Katrin; Pietrzyk, Uwe

    2010-01-15

    Polarized light imaging (PLI) enables the evaluation of fiber orientations in histological sections of human postmortem brains, with ultra-high spatial resolution. PLI is based on the birefringent properties of the myelin sheath of nerve fibers. As a result, the polarization state of light propagating through a rotating polarimeter is changed in such a way that the detected signal at each measurement unit of a charged-coupled device (CCD) camera describes a sinusoidal signal. Vectors of the fiber orientation defined by inclination and direction angles can then directly be derived from the optical signals employing PLI analysis. However, noise, light scatter and filter inhomogeneities interfere with the original sinusoidal PLI signals. We here introduce a novel method using independent component analysis (ICA) to decompose the PLI images into statistically independent component maps. After decomposition, gray and white matter structures can clearly be distinguished from noise and other artifacts. The signal enhancement after artifact rejection is quantitatively evaluated in 134 histological whole brain sections. Thus, the primary sinusoidal signals from polarized light imaging can be effectively restored after noise and artifact rejection utilizing ICA. Our method therefore contributes to the analysis of nerve fiber orientation in the human brain within a micrometer scale. PMID:19733674

  11. Canonical Wnt signaling transiently stimulates proliferation and enhances neurogenesis in neonatal neural progenitor cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, Cordula; Campano, Louise M.; Woehrle, Simon; Hecht, Andreas . E-mail: andreas.hecht@mol-med.uni-freiburg.de

    2007-02-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling triggers the formation of heterodimeric transcription factor complexes consisting of {beta}-catenin and T cell factors, and thereby controls the execution of specific genetic programs. During the expansion and neurogenic phases of embryonic neural development canonical Wnt signaling initially controls proliferation of neural progenitor cells, and later neuronal differentiation. Whether Wnt growth factors affect neural progenitor cells postnatally is not known. Therefore, we have analyzed the impact of Wnt signaling on neural progenitors isolated from cerebral cortices of newborn mice. Expression profiling of pathway components revealed that these cells are fully equipped to respond to Wnt signals. However, Wnt pathway activation affected only a subset of neonatal progenitors and elicited a limited increase in proliferation and neuronal differentiation in distinct subsets of cells. Moreover, Wnt pathway activation only transiently stimulated S-phase entry but did not support long-term proliferation of progenitor cultures. The dampened nature of the Wnt response correlates with the predominant expression of inhibitory pathway components and the rapid actuation of negative feedback mechanisms. Interestingly, in differentiating cell cultures activation of canonical Wnt signaling reduced Hes1 and Hes5 expression suggesting that during postnatal neural development, Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling enhances neurogenesis from progenitor cells by interfering with Notch pathway activity.

  12. Rab7 Mutants Associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Exhibit Enhanced NGF-Stimulated Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Elsa; Wilson, Michael C.; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Missense mutants in the late endosomal Rab7 GTPase cause the autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2B (CMT2B). As yet, the pathological mechanisms connecting mutant Rab7 protein expression to altered neuronal function are undefined. Here, we analyze the effects Rab7 CMT2B mutants on nerve growth factor (NGF) dependent intracellular signaling in PC12 cells. The nerve growth factor receptor TrkA interacted similarly with Rab7 wild-type and CMT2B mutant proteins, but the mutant proteins significantly enhanced TrkA phosphorylation in response to brief NGF stimulation. Two downstream signaling pathways (Erk1/2 and Akt) that are directly activated in response to phospho-TrkA were differentially affected. Akt signaling, arising in response to activated TrkA at the plasma membrane was unaffected. However Erk1/2 phosphorylation, triggered on signaling endosomes, was increased. Cytoplasmic phospho-Erk1/2 persisted at elevated levels relative to control samples for up to 24 h following NGF stimulation. Nuclear shuttling of phospho Erk1/2, which is required to induce MAPK phosphatase expression and down regulate signaling, was greatly reduced by the Rab7 CMT2B mutants and explains the previously reported inhibition in PC12 neurite outgrowth. In conclusion, the data demonstrate a mechanistic link between Rab7 CMT2B mutants and altered TrkA and Erk1/2 signaling from endosomes. PMID:21151572

  13. E-cadherin enhances neuregulin signaling and promotes Schwann cell myelination.

    PubMed

    Basak, Sayantani; Desai, Darshan J; Rho, Esther H; Ramos, Roselle; Maurel, Patrice; Kim, Haesun A

    2015-09-01

    In myelinating Schwann cells, E-cadherin is a component of the adherens junctions that stabilize the architecture of the noncompact myelin region. In other cell types, E-cadherin has been considered as a signaling receptor that modulates intracellular signal transduction and cellular responses. To determine whether E-cadherin plays a regulatory role during Schwann cell myelination, we investigated the effects of E-cadherin deletion and over-expression in Schwann cells. In vivo, Schwann cell-specific E-cadherin ablation results in an early myelination delay. In Schwann cell-dorsal root ganglia neuron co-cultures, E-cadherin deletion attenuates myelin formation and shortens the myelin segment length. When over-expressed in Schwann cells, E-cadherin improves myelination on Nrg1 type III(+/-) neurons and induces myelination on normally non-myelinated axons of sympathetic neurons. The pro-myelinating effect of E-cadherin is associated with an enhanced Nrg1-erbB receptor signaling, including activation of the downstream Akt and Rac. Accordingly, in the absence of E-cadherin, Nrg1-signaling is diminished in Schwann cells. Our data also show that E-cadherin expression in Schwann cell is induced by axonal Nrg1 type III, indicating a reciprocal interaction between E-cadherin and the Nrg1 signaling. Altogether, our data suggest a regulatory function of E-cadherin that modulates Nrg1 signaling and promotes Schwann cell myelin formation.

  14. Mg-Protoporphyrin IX Signals Enhance Plant’s Tolerance to Cold Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Wu, Zi-Li; Feng, Ling-Yang; Dong, Li-Hua; Song, An-Jun; Yuan, Ming; Chen, Yang-Er; Zeng, Jian; Chen, Guang-Deng; Yuan, Shu

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between Mg-protoporphyrin IX (Mg-Proto IX) signals and plant’s tolerance to cold stress is investigated. Arabidopsis seedlings grown for 3 weeks were pretreated with 2 mM glutamate (Glu) and 2 mM MgCl2 for 48 h at room temperature to induce Mg-Proto IX accumulation. Then cold stress was performed at 4°C for additional 72 h. Glu + MgCl2 pre-treatments alleviated the subsequent cold stress significantly by rising the leaf temperature through inducing Mg-Proto IX signals. The protective role of Glu + MgCl2 treatment was greatly compromised in the mutants of Mg-Proto IX synthesis, Mg-Proto IX signaling, and cyanide-resistant respiration. And the enhancement of cold-responsive gene expression was greatly compromised in the mutants of Mg-Proto IX synthesis, Mg-Proto IX signaling and ABA signaling, but not in the mutant of cyanide-resistant respiration. Cold stress promoted cyanide-resistant respiration and leaf total respiration exponentially, which could be further induced by the Glu + MgCl2 treatment. Mg-Proto IX signals also activate antioxidant enzymes and increase non-enzymatic antioxidants [glutathione but not ascorbic acid (AsA)] to maintain redox equilibrium during the cold stress. PMID:27803706

  15. Insulin enhances striatal dopamine release by activating cholinergic interneurons and thereby signals reward

    PubMed Central

    Stouffer, Melissa A.; Woods, Catherine A.; Patel, Jyoti C.; Lee, Christian R.; Witkovsky, Paul; Bao, Li; Machold, Robert P.; Jones, Kymry T.; de Vaca, Soledad Cabeza; Reith, Maarten E. A.; Carr, Kenneth D.; Rice, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin activates insulin receptors (InsRs) in the hypothalamus to signal satiety after a meal. However, the rising incidence of obesity, which results in chronically elevated insulin levels, implies that insulin may also act in brain centres that regulate motivation and reward. We report here that insulin can amplify action potential-dependent dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudate–putamen through an indirect mechanism that involves striatal cholinergic interneurons that express InsRs. Furthermore, two different chronic diet manipulations in rats, food restriction (FR) and an obesogenic (OB) diet, oppositely alter the sensitivity of striatal DA release to insulin, with enhanced responsiveness in FR, but loss of responsiveness in OB. Behavioural studies show that intact insulin levels in the NAc shell are necessary for acquisition of preference for the flavour of a paired glucose solution. Together, these data imply that striatal insulin signalling enhances DA release to influence food choices. PMID:26503322

  16. Insulin enhances striatal dopamine release by activating cholinergic interneurons and thereby signals reward.

    PubMed

    Stouffer, Melissa A; Woods, Catherine A; Patel, Jyoti C; Lee, Christian R; Witkovsky, Paul; Bao, Li; Machold, Robert P; Jones, Kymry T; de Vaca, Soledad Cabeza; Reith, Maarten E A; Carr, Kenneth D; Rice, Margaret E

    2015-01-01

    Insulin activates insulin receptors (InsRs) in the hypothalamus to signal satiety after a meal. However, the rising incidence of obesity, which results in chronically elevated insulin levels, implies that insulin may also act in brain centres that regulate motivation and reward. We report here that insulin can amplify action potential-dependent dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudate-putamen through an indirect mechanism that involves striatal cholinergic interneurons that express InsRs. Furthermore, two different chronic diet manipulations in rats, food restriction (FR) and an obesogenic (OB) diet, oppositely alter the sensitivity of striatal DA release to insulin, with enhanced responsiveness in FR, but loss of responsiveness in OB. Behavioural studies show that intact insulin levels in the NAc shell are necessary for acquisition of preference for the flavour of a paired glucose solution. Together, these data imply that striatal insulin signalling enhances DA release to influence food choices. PMID:26503322

  17. Insulin enhances striatal dopamine release by activating cholinergic interneurons and thereby signals reward.

    PubMed

    Stouffer, Melissa A; Woods, Catherine A; Patel, Jyoti C; Lee, Christian R; Witkovsky, Paul; Bao, Li; Machold, Robert P; Jones, Kymry T; de Vaca, Soledad Cabeza; Reith, Maarten E A; Carr, Kenneth D; Rice, Margaret E

    2015-10-27

    Insulin activates insulin receptors (InsRs) in the hypothalamus to signal satiety after a meal. However, the rising incidence of obesity, which results in chronically elevated insulin levels, implies that insulin may also act in brain centres that regulate motivation and reward. We report here that insulin can amplify action potential-dependent dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudate-putamen through an indirect mechanism that involves striatal cholinergic interneurons that express InsRs. Furthermore, two different chronic diet manipulations in rats, food restriction (FR) and an obesogenic (OB) diet, oppositely alter the sensitivity of striatal DA release to insulin, with enhanced responsiveness in FR, but loss of responsiveness in OB. Behavioural studies show that intact insulin levels in the NAc shell are necessary for acquisition of preference for the flavour of a paired glucose solution. Together, these data imply that striatal insulin signalling enhances DA release to influence food choices.

  18. Optical wavefront shaping for the enhancement of Raman signal in scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Jonathan V.; Throckmorton, Graham A.; Hokr, Brett H.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2016-03-01

    The ability to non-invasively focus light through scattering media has significant applications in many fields ranging from nanotechnology to deep tissue sensing. Until recently, the multiple light scattering events that occur in complex media such as biological tissue have inhibited the focusing ability and penetration depth of optical tools. Through the use of optical wavefront shaping, the spatial distortions due to these scattering events can be corrected, and the incident light can be focused through the scattering medium. Here, we demonstrate that wavefront shaping can be used to non-invasively enhance the Raman signal of a material through a scattering medium. Raman signal enhancement was achieved using backscattered light and a continuous sequential algorithm. Our results show the potential of wavefront shaping as an important addition to non-invasive detection techniques.

  19. Manipulating Memory CD8 T Cell Numbers by Timed Enhancement of IL-2 Signals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Marie T; Kurup, Samarchith P; Starbeck-Miller, Gabriel R; Harty, John T

    2016-09-01

    As a result of the growing burden of tumors and chronic infections, manipulating CD8 T cell responses for clinical use has become an important goal for immunologists. In this article, we show that dendritic cell (DC) immunization coupled with relatively early (days 1-3) or late (days 4-6) administration of enhanced IL-2 signals increase peak effector CD8 T cell numbers, but only early IL-2 signals enhance memory numbers. IL-2 signals delivered at relatively late time points drive terminal differentiation and marked Bim-mediated contraction and do not increase memory T cell numbers. In contrast, early IL-2 signals induce effector cell metabolic profiles that are more conducive to memory formation. Of note, downregulation of CD80 and CD86 was observed on DCs in vivo following early IL-2 treatment. Mechanistically, early IL-2 treatment enhanced CTLA-4 expression on regulatory T cells, and CTLA-4 blockade alongside IL-2 treatment in vivo prevented the decrease in CD80 and CD86, supporting a cell-extrinsic role for CTLA-4 in downregulating B7 ligand expression on DCs. Finally, DC immunization followed by early IL-2 treatment and anti-CTLA-4 blockade resulted in lower memory CD8 T cell numbers compared with the DC+early IL-2 treatment group. These data suggest that curtailed signaling through the B7-CD28 costimulatory axis during CD8 T cell activation limits terminal differentiation and preserves memory CD8 T cell formation; thus, it should be considered in future T cell-vaccination strategies. PMID:27439516

  20. IL-17 enhancement of the IL-6 signaling cascade in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiangyu; Reynolds, Stephanie L; Baker, Brandi J; Li, Xingang; Benveniste, Etty N; Qin, Hongwei

    2010-05-01

    Astrocytes have important physiological roles in CNS homeostasis and serve as a bridge between the CNS and immune system. IL-17 and IL-6 are important in many CNS disorders characterized by neuroinflammation. We examined the role of IL-17 on the IL-6 signaling cascade in primary astrocytes. IL-17 functioned in a synergistic manner with IL-6 to induce IL-6 expression in astrocytes. The synergistic effect involved numerous signaling pathways including NF-kappaB, JNK MAPK, and p38 MAPK. The NF-kappaB pathway inhibitor BAY-11, JNK inhibitor JNKi II, and p38 inhibitor SB203580 suppressed the synergistic effect of IL-6 and IL-17 on IL-6 expression. IL-17 synergized with IL-6 to enhance the recruitment of activated NF-kappaB p65, c-Fos, c-Jun, and the histone acetyltransferases CREB-binding protein and p300 to the IL-6 promoter in vivo to induce IL-6 transcription. This was accompanied by enhanced acetylation of histones H3 and H4 on the IL-6 promoter. Moreover, we elucidated an important role for suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) 3 in IL-17 enhancement of IL-6 signaling in astrocytes. SOCS3 small interfering RNA knockdown and SOCS3 deletion in astrocytes augmented the synergistic effect of IL-6 and IL-17 due to an enhancement of activation of the NF-kappaB and MAPK pathways. These results indicate that astrocytes can serve as a target of Th17 cells and IL-17 in the CNS, and SOCS3 participates in IL-17 functions in the CNS as a negative feedback regulator.

  1. Dual-modal silica nanoprobes with surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic and fluorescent signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Myung

    2015-07-01

    We present that dual-modal silica nanoprobes based on surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and fluorescence, demonstrating the several combinations of two spectroscopic signals for the noble combinatorial nanoprobes (F-SERS dot). Their synthetic procedure was introduced and dual-modal spectroscopic analyses were performed as preliminary studies. Hopefully, F-SERS dots will be one of promising and multifunctional nanoprobes for the various in vitro and in vivo biological diagnoses and screenings.

  2. Nonlinear data processing method for the signal enhancement of GPR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Sung; Jeng, Yih

    2011-09-01

    An alternative data processing procedure is proposed in this paper for the purpose of enhancing the signal/noise (S/N) ratio of ground penetrating radar (GPR) data. The processing methodology is achieved by performing the logarithmic transform in conjunction with the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD), a new nonlinear data analysis method in signal processing. The synthetic model study and field example indicate that the logarithmic transform is effective in alleviating the attenuation problem. Additionally, the spectrogram obtained from Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) shows that the decomposition sensitivity of the EEMD method is greatly improved with the aid of the logarithmic transform. This new method allows us to extract the signal components from noisy GPR data efficiently. The success of this study suggests a possible nonlinear analysis application in future GPR investigation, particularly in the filter design and gain correction.

  3. An enhanced functional interrogation/manipulation of intracellular signaling pathways with the peptide 'stapling' technology.

    PubMed

    He, Y; Chen, D; Zheng, W

    2015-11-12

    Specific protein-protein interactions (PPIs) constitute a key underlying mechanism for the presence of a multitude of intracellular signaling pathways, which are essential for the survival of normal and cancer cells. Specific molecular blockers for a crucial PPI would therefore be invaluable tools for an enhanced functional interrogation of the signaling pathway harboring this particular PPI. On the other hand, if a particular PPI is essential for the survival of cancer cells but is absent in or dispensable for the survival of normal cells, its specific molecular blockers could potentially be developed into effective anticancer therapeutics. Due to the flat and extended PPI interface, it would be conceivably difficult for small molecules to achieve an effective blockade, a problem which could be potentially circumvented with peptides or proteins. However, the well-documented proteolytic instability and cellular impermeability of peptides and proteins in general would make their developing into effective intracellular PPI blockers quite a challenge. With the advent of the peptide 'stapling' technology which was demonstrated to be able to stabilize the α-helical conformation of a peptide via bridging two neighboring amino-acid side chains with a 'molecular staple', a linear parent peptide could be transformed into a stronger PPI blocker with enhanced proteolytic stability and cellular permeability. This review will furnish an account on the peptide 'stapling' technology and its exploitation in efforts to achieve an enhanced functional interrogation or manipulation of intracellular signaling pathways especially those that are cancer relevant.

  4. Fusarium Oxysporum Volatiles Enhance Plant Growth Via Affecting Auxin Transport and Signaling.

    PubMed

    Bitas, Vasileios; McCartney, Nathaniel; Li, Ningxiao; Demers, Jill; Kim, Jung-Eun; Kim, Hye-Seon; Brown, Kathleen M; Kang, Seogchan

    2015-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have well-documented roles in plant-plant communication and directing animal behavior. In this study, we examine the less understood roles of VOCs in plant-fungal relationships. Phylogenetically and ecologically diverse strains of Fusarium oxysporum, a fungal species complex that often resides in the rhizosphere of assorted plants, produce volatile compounds that augment shoot and root growth of Arabidopsis thaliana and tobacco. Growth responses of A. thaliana hormone signaling mutants and expression patterns of a GUS reporter gene under the auxin-responsive DR5 promoter supported the involvement of auxin signaling in F. oxysporum volatile-mediated growth enhancement. In addition, 1-naphthylthalamic acid, an inhibitor of auxin efflux, negated F. oxysporum volatile-mediated growth enhancement in both plants. Comparison of the profiles of volatile compounds produced by F. oxysporum strains that differentially affected plant growth suggests that the relative compositions of both growth inhibitory and stimulatory compounds may determine the degree of plant growth enhancement. Volatile-mediated signaling between fungi and plants may represent a potentially conserved, yet mostly overlooked, mechanism underpinning plant-fungus interactions and fungal niche adaption. PMID:26617587

  5. Development of Antigen-Immobilized Metallothionein Sensor that Exploits Gold Nanoparticle-Based Enhancement of Signal.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namsoo; Son, So-Hee

    2015-08-01

    An antigen-immobilized indirect-competitive immunosensor that detects metallothionein (MT), a potent biomarker of contamination with heavy metals, was developed exploiting enhancement of signal based on an additional binding of gold nanoparticles to an anti-MT antibody through the biotin-avidin interaction. The sensor was constructed by the immobilization of MT at 1 mg/mL on a 9-MHz quartz crystal microbalance and the concentration of the antibody for competitive reaction was optimized as 10 µg/mL based on the degree of sensor response. At this moment, the control response of the sensor obtained with enhancement of signal was 343.8 Hz and was larger than that without enhancement of signal 2.47 fold. The sensor responses decreased gradually with increasing analyte concentrations, and a linear relationship between analyte concentration and sensor response was acquired in the range of 0.005-1 ng/mL MT in double-logarithmic scales with a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.9858. The limit of detection of the present sensor was presumed to be present below 5 pg/mL MT.

  6. Nedd4-induced monoubiquitination of IRS-2 enhances IGF signalling and mitogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Toshiaki; Yoshihara, Hidehito; Furuta, Haruka; Kamei, Hiroyasu; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Luan, Jing; Duan, Cunming; Saeki, Yasushi; Tanaka, Keiji; Iemura, Shun-Ichiro; Natsume, Tohru; Chida, Kazuhiro; Nakatsu, Yusuke; Kamata, Hideaki; Asano, Tomoichiro; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro

    2015-04-16

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) induce proliferation of various cell types and play important roles in somatic growth and cancer development. Phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1/2 by IGF-I receptor tyrosine kinase is essential for IGF action. Here we identify Nedd4 as an IRS-2 ubiquitin ligase. Nedd4 monoubiquitinates IRS-2, which promotes its association with Epsin1, a ubiquitin-binding protein. Nedd4 recruits IRS-2 to the membrane, probably through promoting Epsin1 binding, and enhances IGF-I receptor-induced IRS-2 tyrosine phosphorylation. In thyroid FRTL-5 cells, activation of the cyclic AMP pathway increases the association of Nedd4 with IRS-2, thereby enhancing IRS-2-mediated signalling and cell proliferation induced by IGF-I. The Nedd4 and IRS-2 association is also required for maximal activation of IGF-I signalling and cell proliferation in prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Nedd4 overexpression accelerates zebrafish embryonic growth through IRS-2 in vivo. We conclude that Nedd4-induced monoubiquitination of IRS-2 enhances IGF signalling and mitogenic activity.

  7. Mutant p53 enhances MET trafficking and signalling to drive cell scattering and invasion.

    PubMed

    Muller, P A J; Trinidad, A G; Timpson, P; Morton, J P; Zanivan, S; van den Berghe, P V E; Nixon, C; Karim, S A; Caswell, P T; Noll, J E; Coffill, C R; Lane, D P; Sansom, O J; Neilsen, P M; Norman, J C; Vousden, K H

    2013-03-01

    Tumour-derived mutant p53 proteins promote invasion, in part, by enhancing Rab coupling protein (RCP)-dependent receptor recycling. Here we identified MET as an RCP-binding protein and showed that mutant p53 promoted MET recycling. Mutant p53-expressing cells were more sensitive to hepatocyte growth factor, the ligand for MET, leading to enhanced MET signalling, invasion and cell scattering that was dependent on both MET and RCP. In cells expressing the p53 family member TAp63, inhibition of TAp63 also lead to cell scattering and MET-dependent invasion. However, in cells that express very low levels of TAp63, the ability of mutant p53 to promote MET-dependent cell scattering was independent of TAp63. Taken together, our data show that mutant p53 can enhance MET signalling to promote cell scattering and invasion through both TAp63-dependent and -independent mechanisms. MET has a predominant role in metastatic progression and the identification of mechanisms through which mutations in p53 can drive MET signalling may help to identify and direct therapy.

  8. Fusarium Oxysporum Volatiles Enhance Plant Growth Via Affecting Auxin Transport and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bitas, Vasileios; McCartney, Nathaniel; Li, Ningxiao; Demers, Jill; Kim, Jung-Eun; Kim, Hye-Seon; Brown, Kathleen M.; Kang, Seogchan

    2015-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have well-documented roles in plant-plant communication and directing animal behavior. In this study, we examine the less understood roles of VOCs in plant-fungal relationships. Phylogenetically and ecologically diverse strains of Fusarium oxysporum, a fungal species complex that often resides in the rhizosphere of assorted plants, produce volatile compounds that augment shoot and root growth of Arabidopsis thaliana and tobacco. Growth responses of A. thaliana hormone signaling mutants and expression patterns of a GUS reporter gene under the auxin-responsive DR5 promoter supported the involvement of auxin signaling in F. oxysporum volatile-mediated growth enhancement. In addition, 1-naphthylthalamic acid, an inhibitor of auxin efflux, negated F. oxysporum volatile-mediated growth enhancement in both plants. Comparison of the profiles of volatile compounds produced by F. oxysporum strains that differentially affected plant growth suggests that the relative compositions of both growth inhibitory and stimulatory compounds may determine the degree of plant growth enhancement. Volatile-mediated signaling between fungi and plants may represent a potentially conserved, yet mostly overlooked, mechanism underpinning plant-fungus interactions and fungal niche adaption. PMID:26617587

  9. Chronic administration of calcitriol enhanced neuregulin-1/ErbB signaling in rat myocardium.

    PubMed

    Dang, Ruili; Guo, Yujin; Zhu, Yungui; Yang, Ranyao; Cai, Hualin; Jiang, Pei

    2016-04-01

    Although emerging evidence suggests that vitamin D has beneficial effects in the cardiovascular health, the underlying mechanisms are far from fully elucidated. Given the indispensable role of neuregulin-1 (NRG1)/ErbB signaling in the cardiovascular system, the present study investigated the influences of prolonged administration of calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D, on the NRG1/ErbB system. We examined the protein expression of NRG1, ErbB receptors (ErbB2 and ErbB4) and their phosphorylated forms in the myocardium of rats following 6-week administration of calcitriol (50 ng/kg/day or 100 ng/kg/day). We further assessed the myocardial vitamin D receptor (VDR) to confirm the effect of calcitriol treatment. Additionally, serum neuregulin-1 level was also analyzed. Generally, calcitriol enhanced myocardial VDR expression and NRG1/ErbB signaling. Calcitriol increased NRG1 protein level at the higher dose, while both doses promoted ErbB2 and phosphorylated ErbB2 expression. Although calcitriol has no significant influence on ErbB4 expression, phosphorylated ErbB4 receptors were enhanced at the higher dose. Furthermore, the serum neuregulin-1 concentration was increased at both doses. Overall, our data firstly showed that chronic calcitriol administration enhanced NRG1/ErbB signaling in the heart, indicating a novel mechanism underlying the cardiac effects of vitamin D. PMID:27209698

  10. Enhanced brain signal variability in children with autism spectrum disorder during early childhood

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Yuko; Hiraishi, Hirotoshi; Hasegawa, Chiaki; Munesue, Toshio; Higashida, Haruhiro; Minabe, Yoshio; Kikuchi, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Extensive evidence shows that a core neurobiological mechanism of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) involves aberrant neural connectivity. Recent advances in the investigation of brain signal variability have yielded important information about neural network mechanisms. That information has been applied fruitfully to the assessment of aging and mental disorders. Multiscale entropy (MSE) analysis can characterize the complexity inherent in brain signal dynamics over multiple temporal scales in the dynamics of neural networks. For this investigation, we sought to characterize the magnetoencephalography (MEG) signal variability during free watching of videos without sound using MSE in 43 children with ASD and 72 typically developing controls (TD), emphasizing early childhood to older childhood: a critical period of neural network maturation. Results revealed an age‐related increase of brain signal variability in a specific timescale in TD children, whereas atypical age‐related alteration was observed in the ASD group. Additionally, enhanced brain signal variability was observed in children with ASD, and was confirmed particularly for younger children. In the ASD group, symptom severity was associated region‐specifically and timescale‐specifically with reduced brain signal variability. These results agree well with a recently reported theory of increased brain signal variability during development and aberrant neural connectivity in ASD, especially during early childhood. Results of this study suggest that MSE analytic method might serve as a useful approach for characterizing neurophysiological mechanisms of typical‐developing and its alterations in ASD through the detection of MEG signal variability at multiple timescales. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1038–1050, 2016. © 2015 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26859309

  11. Insulin receptor substrate 1 expression enhances the sensitivity of 32D cells to chemotherapy-induced cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Holly A.; Carey, Gregory B.; Keegan, Achsah D.

    2012-08-15

    The adapters IRS1 and IRS2 link growth factor receptors to downstream signaling pathways that regulate proliferation and survival. Both suppress factor-withdrawal-induced apoptosis and have been implicated in cancer progression. However, recent studies suggest IRS1 and IRS2 mediate differential functions in cancer pathogenesis. IRS1 promoted breast cancer proliferation, while IRS2 promoted metastasis. The role of IRS1 and IRS2 in controlling cell responses to chemotherapy is unknown. To determine the role of IRS1 and IRS2 in the sensitivity of cells to chemotherapy, we treated 32D cells lacking or expressing IRS proteins with various concentrations of chemotherapeutic agents. We found that expression of IRS1, in contrast to IRS2, enhanced the sensitivity of 32D cells to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. When IRS2 was expressed with IRS1, the cells no longer showed enhanced sensitivity. Expression of IRS1 did not alter the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins; however, 32D-IRS1 cells expressed higher levels of Annexin A2. In 32D-IRS1 cells, IRS1 and Annexin A2 were both located in cytoplasmic and membrane fractions. We also found that IRS1 coprecipitated with Annexin A2, while IRS2 did not. Decreasing Annexin A2 levels reduced 32D-IRS1 cell sensitivity to chemotherapy. These results suggest IRS1 enhances sensitivity to chemotherapy in part through Annexin A2. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IRS1 enhanced the sensitivity of 32D cells to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This sensitivity is abrogated by the expression of IRS2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expressing IRS1 in 32D cells increased levels of Annexin A2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both IRS1 and Annexin A2 were located in cytoplasmic and membrane fractions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreasing Annexin A2 in 32D-IRS1 cells abated their sensitivity to chemotherapy.

  12. Dominant Enhancers of Egfr in Drosophila Melanogaster: Genetic Links between the Notch and Egfr Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Price, J. V.; Savenye, E. D.; Lum, D.; Breitkreutz, A.

    1997-01-01

    The Drosophila epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a key component of a complex signaling pathway that participates in multiple developmental processes. We have performed an F(1) screen for mutations that cause dominant enhancement of wing vein phenotypes associated with mutations in Egfr. With this screen, we have recovered mutations in Hairless (H), vein, groucho (gro), and three apparently novel loci. All of the E(Egfr)s we have identified show dominant interactions in transheterozygous combinations with each other and with alleles of N or Su(H), suggesting that they are involved in cross-talk between the N and EGFR signaling pathways. Further examination of the phenotypic interactions between Egfr, H, and gro revealed that reductions in Egfr activity enhanced both the bristle loss associated with H mutations, and the bristle hyperplasia and ocellar hypertrophy associated with gro mutations. Double mutant combinations of Egfr and gro hypomorphic alleles led to the formation of ectopic compound eyes in a dosage sensitive manner. Our findings suggest that these E(Egfr)s represent links between the Egfr and Notch signaling pathways, and that Egfr activity can either promote or suppress Notch signaling, depending on its developmental context. PMID:9383058

  13. The inhibition of IGF-1 signaling promotes proteostasis by enhancing protein aggregation and deposition.

    PubMed

    Moll, Lorna; Ben-Gedalya, Tziona; Reuveni, Hadas; Cohen, Ehud

    2016-04-01

    The discovery that the alteration of aging by reducing the activity of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) cascade protects nematodes and mice from neurodegeneration-linked, toxic protein aggregation (proteotoxicity) raises the prospect that IIS inhibitors bear therapeutic potential to counter neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, we reported that NT219, a highly efficient IGF-1 signaling inhibitor, protects model worms from the aggregation of amyloid β peptide and polyglutamine peptides that are linked to the manifestation of Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases, respectively. Here, we employed cultured cell systems to investigate whether NT219 promotes protein homeostasis (proteostasis) in mammalian cells and to explore its underlying mechanisms. We found that NT219 enhances the aggregation of misfolded prion protein and promotes its deposition in quality control compartments known as "aggresomes." NT219 also elevates the levels of certain molecular chaperones but, surprisingly, reduces proteasome activity and impairs autophagy. Our findings show that IGF-1 signaling inhibitors in general and NT219 in particular can promote proteostasis in mammalian cells by hyperaggregating hazardous proteins, thereby bearing the potential to postpone the onset and slow the progression of neurodegenerative illnesses in the elderly.-Moll, L., Ben-Gedalya, T., Reuveni, H., Cohen, E. The inhibition of IGF-1 signaling promotes proteostasis by enhancing protein aggregation and deposition. PMID:26722006

  14. Enhanced magnetic flux density mapping using coherent steady state equilibrium signal in MREIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Woo Chul; Lee, Mun Bae; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2016-03-01

    Measuring the z-component of magnetic flux density B = (Bx, By, Bz) induced by transversally injected current, magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) aims to visualize electrical property (current density and/or conductivity distribution) in a three-dimensional imaging object. For practical implementations of MREIT technique, it is critical to reduce injection of current pulse within safety requirements. With the goal of minimizing the noise level in measured Bz data, we propose a new method to enhance the measure Bz data using steady-state coherent gradient multi-echo (SSC-GME) MR pulse sequence combining with injection current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) method in MREIT, where the ICNE technique injects current during a readout gradient to maximize the signal intensity of phase signal including Bz. The total phase offset in SSC-GME includes additional magnetic flux density due to the injected current, which is different from the phase signal for the conventional spoiled MR pulse sequence. We decompose the magnetization precession phase from the total phase offset including Bz and optimize Bz data using the steady-state equilibrium signal. Results from a real phantom experiment including different kinds of anomalies demonstrated that the proposed method enhanced Bz comparing to a conventional spoiled pulse sequence.

  15. Programmable ion-sensitive transistor interfaces. III. Design considerations, signal generation, and sensitivity enhancement.

    PubMed

    Jayant, Krishna; Auluck, Kshitij; Rodriguez, Sergio; Cao, Yingqiu; Kan, Edwin C

    2014-05-01

    We report on factors that affect DNA hybridization detection using ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs). Signal generation at the interface between the transistor and immobilized biomolecules is widely ascribed to unscreened molecular charges causing a shift in surface potential and hence the transistor output current. Traditionally, the interaction between DNA and the dielectric or metal sensing interface is modeled by treating the molecular layer as a sheet charge and the ionic profile with a Poisson-Boltzmann distribution. The surface potential under this scenario is described by the Graham equation. This approximation, however, often fails to explain large hybridization signals on the order of tens of mV. More realistic descriptions of the DNA-transistor interface which include factors such as ion permeation, exclusion, and packing constraints have been proposed with little or no corroboration against experimental findings. In this study, we examine such physical models by their assumptions, range of validity, and limitations. We compare simulations against experiments performed on electrolyte-oxide-semiconductor capacitors and foundry-ready floating-gate ISFETs. We find that with weakly charged interfaces (i.e., low intrinsic interface charge), pertinent to the surfaces used in this study, the best agreement between theory and experiment exists when ions are completely excluded from the DNA layer. The influence of various factors such as bulk pH, background salinity, chemical reactivity of surface groups, target molecule concentration, and surface coatings on signal generation is studied. Furthermore, in order to overcome Debye screening limited detection, we suggest two signal enhancement strategies. We first describe frequency domain biosensing, highlighting the ability to sort short DNA strands based on molecular length, and then describe DNA biosensing in multielectrolytes comprising trace amounts of higher-valency salt in a background of

  16. [Raman Signal Enhancement for Gas Detection Using a Near Concentric Cavity].

    PubMed

    Yang, De-wang; Guo, Jin-jia; Du, Zeng-feng; Wang, Zhen-nan; Zheng, Rong-er

    2015-03-01

    The detection of dissolved gases in seawater plays an important role in ocean observation and exploration. Raman spectroscopy has a great advantage in simultaneous multiple species detection and is thus regarded as a favorable choice for ocean application. However, its sensitivity remains insufficient, and a demand in enhancements is called! for before putting Raman spectroscopy to actual use in marine studies In this work, we developed a near-concentric cavity, in which laser beam could be trapped and reflected back and forth, for the purpose of intensifying Raman signals. The factors that would influence Raman signals were taken into account. The result show that the smaller angle between collection direction and optical axis of reflection mirror, the stronger the signal and signal to noise ratio (SNR) is. With a collection angle of 30 degrees, our Near-concentric Cavity System managed to raise the SNR to a figure about 16 times larger than that of common methods applying 90 degrees. Moreover, the alignment pattern in our system made it possible to excel concentric cavity with a 3 times larger SNR. Compared with the single-pass Raman signal, the signal intensity of our near-concentric cavity was up to 70 times enhanced. According to the obtained results of CO2 measurement, it can be seen that the new system provides a limit of detection(LOD) for CO2 about 0.19 mg x L(-1) using 3-σ criterion standard, and the LOD of 11.5 μg x L(-1) for CH4 was evaluated with the theoretical cross section values of CO2 and CH4.

  17. Timeseries Signal Processing for Enhancing Mobile Surveys: Learning from Field Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risk, D. A.; Lavoie, M.; Marshall, A. D.; Baillie, J.; Atherton, E. E.; Laybolt, W. D.

    2015-12-01

    Vehicle-based surveys using laser and other analyzers are now commonplace in research and industry. In many cases when these studies target biologically-relevant gases like methane and carbon dioxide, the minimum detection limits are often coarse (ppm) relative to the analyzer's capabilities (ppb), because of the inherent variability in the ambient background concentrations across the landscape that creates noise and uncertainty. This variation arises from localized biological sinks and sources, but also atmospheric turbulence, air pooling, and other factors. Computational processing routines are widely used in many fields to increase resolution of a target signal in temporally dense data, and offer promise for enhancing mobile surveying techniques. Signal processing routines can both help identify anomalies at very low levels, or can be used inversely to remove localized industrially-emitted anomalies from ecological data. This presentation integrates learnings from various studies in which simple signal processing routines were used successfully to isolate different temporally-varying components of 1 Hz timeseries measured with laser- and UV fluorescence-based analyzers. As illustrative datasets, we present results from industrial fugitive emission studies from across Canada's western provinces and other locations, and also an ecological study that aimed to model near-surface concentration variability across different biomes within eastern Canada. In these cases, signal processing algorithms contributed significantly to the clarity of both industrial, and ecological processes. In some instances, signal processing was too computationally intensive for real-time in-vehicle processing, but we identified workarounds for analyzer-embedded software that contributed to an improvement in real-time resolution of small anomalies. Signal processing is a natural accompaniment to these datasets, and many avenues are open to researchers who wish to enhance existing, and future

  18. Lenalidomide induces lipid raft assembly to enhance erythropoietin receptor signaling in myelodysplastic syndrome progenitors.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Kathy L; Basiorka, Ashley A; Johnson, Joseph O; Clark, Justine; Caceres, Gisela; Padron, Eric; Heaton, Ruth; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Wei, Sheng; Sokol, Lubomir; List, Alan F

    2014-01-01

    Anemia remains the principal management challenge for patients with lower risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS). Despite appropriate cytokine production and cellular receptor display, erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) signaling is impaired. We reported that EpoR signaling is dependent upon receptor localization within lipid raft microdomains, and that disruption of raft integrity abolishes signaling capacity. Here, we show that MDS erythroid progenitors display markedly diminished raft assembly and smaller raft aggregates compared to normal controls (p = 0.005, raft number; p = 0.023, raft size). Because lenalidomide triggers raft coalescence in T-lymphocytes promoting immune synapse formation, we assessed effects of lenalidomide on raft assembly in MDS erythroid precursors and UT7 cells. Lenalidomide treatment rapidly induced lipid raft formation accompanied by EpoR recruitment into raft fractions together with STAT5, JAK2, and Lyn kinase. The JAK2 phosphatase, CD45, a key negative regulator of EpoR signaling, was displaced from raft fractions. Lenalidomide treatment prior to Epo stimulation enhanced both JAK2 and STAT5 phosphorylation in UT7 and primary MDS erythroid progenitors, accompanied by increased STAT5 DNA binding in UT7 cells, and increased erythroid colony forming capacity in both UT7 and primary cells. Raft induction was associated with F-actin polymerization, which was blocked by Rho kinase inhibition. These data indicate that deficient raft integrity impairs EpoR signaling, and provides a novel strategy to enhance EpoR signal fidelity in non-del(5q) MDS.

  19. Programmable ion-sensitive transistor interfaces. III. Design considerations, signal generation, and sensitivity enhancement.

    PubMed

    Jayant, Krishna; Auluck, Kshitij; Rodriguez, Sergio; Cao, Yingqiu; Kan, Edwin C

    2014-05-01

    We report on factors that affect DNA hybridization detection using ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs). Signal generation at the interface between the transistor and immobilized biomolecules is widely ascribed to unscreened molecular charges causing a shift in surface potential and hence the transistor output current. Traditionally, the interaction between DNA and the dielectric or metal sensing interface is modeled by treating the molecular layer as a sheet charge and the ionic profile with a Poisson-Boltzmann distribution. The surface potential under this scenario is described by the Graham equation. This approximation, however, often fails to explain large hybridization signals on the order of tens of mV. More realistic descriptions of the DNA-transistor interface which include factors such as ion permeation, exclusion, and packing constraints have been proposed with little or no corroboration against experimental findings. In this study, we examine such physical models by their assumptions, range of validity, and limitations. We compare simulations against experiments performed on electrolyte-oxide-semiconductor capacitors and foundry-ready floating-gate ISFETs. We find that with weakly charged interfaces (i.e., low intrinsic interface charge), pertinent to the surfaces used in this study, the best agreement between theory and experiment exists when ions are completely excluded from the DNA layer. The influence of various factors such as bulk pH, background salinity, chemical reactivity of surface groups, target molecule concentration, and surface coatings on signal generation is studied. Furthermore, in order to overcome Debye screening limited detection, we suggest two signal enhancement strategies. We first describe frequency domain biosensing, highlighting the ability to sort short DNA strands based on molecular length, and then describe DNA biosensing in multielectrolytes comprising trace amounts of higher-valency salt in a background of

  20. TRAIL-Death Receptor 4 Signaling via Lysosome Fusion and Membrane Raft Clustering In Coronary Arterial Endothelial Cells: Evidence from ASM Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Han, Wei-Qing; Boini, Krishna M.; Xia, Min; Zhang, Yang; Li, Pin-Lan

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) and its receptor death receptor 4 (DR4) have been implicated in the development of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. However, the signaling mechanism mediating DR4 activation and leading to endothelial injury remains unclear. We recently demonstrated that ceramide production via hydrolysis of membrane sphingomyelin by acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) results in membrane raft (MRs) clustering and formation of important redox signaling platforms, which play a crucial role in amplifying redox signaling in endothelial cells leading to endothelial dysfunction. The present study aims to investigate whether TRAIL triggers MR clustering via lysosome fusion and ASM activation, thereby conducting transmembrane redox signaling and changing endothelial function. Using confocal microscopy, we found that TRAIL induced MR clustering and its co-localization with DR4 in coronary arterial endothelial cells (CAECs) isolated from wild-type (Smpd1+/+) mice. Further, TRAIL triggered ASM translocation, ceramide production and NADPH oxidase aggregation in MR clusters in Smpd1+/+ CAECs, whereas these observations were not found in Smpd1−/− CAECs. Moreover, ASM deficiency reduced TRAIL-induced O2−· production in CAECs and abolished TRAIL-induced impairment on endothelium-dependent vasodilation in small resistance arteries. By measuring fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we found that Lamp-1 (lysosome membrane marker protein) and ganglioside GM1 (MR marker) were trafficking together in Smpd1+/+ CAECs, which was absent in Smpd1−/− CAECs. Consistently, fluorescence imaging of living cells with specific lysosome probes demonstrated that TRAIL-induced lysosome fusion with membrane was also absent in Smpd1−/− CAECs. Taken together, these results suggest that ASM is essential for TRAIL-induced lysosomal trafficking and fusion with membrane and formation of MR redox signaling platforms, which may

  1. Induction of hepatoma carcinoma cell apoptosis through activation of the JNK-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase-ROS self-driven death signal circuit.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ke-Wu; Song, Fang-Jiao; Wang, Ying-Hong; Li, Ning; Yu, Qian; Liao, Li-Xi; Jiang, Yong; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2014-10-28

    As an efficient method for inducing tumor cell apoptosis, ROS can be constantly formed and accumulated in NADPH oxidase overactivated-cells, resulting in further mitochondrial membrane damage and mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. In addition, JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (JNK MAPK) signal also acts as a vital candidate pathway for inducing tumor cell apoptosis by targeting mitochondrial death pathway. However, the relationship between NADPH oxidase-ROS and JNK MAPK signal still remains unclear. Here, we discovered a novel self-driven signal circuit between NADPH oxidase-ROS and JNK MAPK, which was induced by a cytotoxic steroidal saponin (ASC) in hepatoma carcinoma cells. NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production was markedly activated by ASC and directly led to JNK MAPK activation. Moreover, antioxidant, NADPH oxidase inhibitor and specific knock-out for p47 subunit of NADPH oxidase could effectively block NADPH oxidase-ROS-dependent JNK activation, suggesting that NADPH oxidase is an upstream regulator of JNK MAPK. Conversely, a specific JNK inhibitor could inhibit ASC-induced NADPH oxidase activation and down-regulate ROS levels as well, indicating that JNK might also regulate NADPH oxidase activity to some extent. These observations indicate that NADPH oxidase and JNK MAPK activate each other as a signal circuit. Furthermore, drug pretreatment experiments with ASC showed this signal circuit operated continuously via a self-driven mode and finally induced apoptosis in hepatoma carcinoma cells. Taken together, we provide a proof for inducing hepatoma carcinoma cell apoptosis by activating the JNK-NADPH oxidase-ROS-dependent self-driven signal circuit pathway. PMID:25064608

  2. Dietary phytochemicals and cancer prevention: Nrf2 signaling, epigenetics, and cell death mechanisms in blocking cancer initiation and progression

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Hun; Khor, Tin Oo; Shu, Limin; Su, Zheng-Yuan; Fuentes, Francisco; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2013-01-01

    Reactive metabolites from carcinogens and oxidative stress can drive genetic mutations, genomic instability, neoplastic transformation, and ultimately carcinogenesis. Numerous dietary phytochemicals in vegetables/fruits have been shown to possess cancer chemopreventive effects in both preclinical animal models and human epidemiological studies. These phytochemicals could prevent the initiation of carcinogenesis via either direct scavenging of reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) or, more importantly, the induction of cellular defense detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes. These defense enzymes mediated by Nrf2-antioxidative stress and anti-inflammatory signaling pathways can contribute to cellular protection against ROS/RNS and reactive metabolites of carcinogens. In addition, these compounds would kill initiated/transformed cancer cells in vitro and in in vivo xenografts via diverse anti-cancer mechanisms. These mechanisms include the activation of signaling kinases (e.g., JNK), caspases and the mitochondria damage/cytochrome c pathways. Phytochemicals may also have anti-cancer effects by inhibiting the IKK/NF-κB pathway, inhibiting STAT3, and causing cell cycle arrest. In addition, other mechanisms may include epigenetic alterations (e.g., inhibition of HDACs, miRNAs, and the modification of the CpG methylation of cancer-related genes). In this review, we will discuss: the current advances in the study of Nrf2 signaling; Nrf2-deficient tumor mouse models; the epigenetic control of Nrf2 in tumorigenesis and chemoprevention; Nrf2-mediated cancer chemoprevention by naturally occurring dietary phytochemicals; and the mutation or hyper-expression of the Nrf2–Keap1 signaling pathway in advanced tumor cells. The future development of dietary phytochemicals for chemoprevention must integrate in vitro signaling mechanisms, relevant biomarkers of human diseases, and combinations of different phytochemicals and/or non-toxic therapeutic drugs, including

  3. Signal enhancement of lead and arsenic in soil using laser ablation combined with fast electric discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kexue, L. I.; Zhou, Weidong; Shen, Qinmei; Shao, Jie; Qian, Huiguo

    2010-05-01

    In comparison to the traditional single pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (SP-LIBS), a significant enhancement of atomic emission of lead and arsenic from laser plasma of soil has been demonstrated by the use of a laser ablation and fast pulse discharge plasma spectroscopy technique (LA-FPDPS). In this technique, a specifically designed high voltage and rapid discharge circuit was used to reheat the laser plasma and to enhance the plasma emission. A rapid and time damped alternating discharge current was observed with a short oscillating period ˜ 0.6 μs and sustained for about 6 μs. The peak intensities of Pb (283.31 nm) and As (286.04 nm) lines from soil plasma emission were greatly enhanced when compare to the traditional single pulse (SP) LIBS system. In addition, the precision of measurements in terms of the relative standard deviation (RSD) and the signal to noise ( S/ N) ratios were also improved. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the laser ablation regions indicated that the plasma reheating by the discharge spark was presumably the main mechanism for observed signal enhancement in the LA-FPDPS technique.

  4. Short-term synaptic plasticity can enhance weak signal detectability in nonrenewal spike trains.

    PubMed

    Lüdtke, Niklas; Nelson, Mark E

    2006-12-01

    We study the encoding of weak signals in spike trains with interspike interval (ISI) correlations and the signals' subsequent detection in sensory neurons. Motivated by the observation of negative ISI correlations in auditory and electrosensory afferents, we assess the theoretical performance limits of an individual detector neuron receiving a weak signal distributed across multiple afferent inputs. We assess the functional role of ISI correlations in the detection process using statistical detection theory and derive two sequential likelihood ratio detector models: one for afferents with renewal statistics; the other for afferents with negatively correlated ISIs. We suggest a mechanism that might enable sensory neurons to implicitly compute conditional probabilities of presynaptic spikes by means of short-term synaptic plasticity. We demonstrate how this mechanism can enhance a postsynaptic neuron's sensitivity to weak signals by exploiting the correlation structure of the input spike trains. Our model not only captures fundamental aspects of early electrosensory signal processing in weakly electric fish, but may also bear relevance to the mammalian auditory system and other sensory modalities.

  5. Tyk2 expression and its signaling enhances the invasiveness of prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ide, Hisamitsu; Nakagawa, Takashi; Terado, Yuichi; Kamiyama, Yutaka; Muto, Satoru; Horie, Shigeo

    2008-05-02

    Protein tyrosine kinase plays a central role in the proliferation and differentiation of various types of cells. One of these protein kinases, Tyk2, a member of the Jak family kinases, is known to play important roles in receptor signal transduction by interferons, interleukins, growth factors, and other hormones. In the present study, we investigated Tyk2 expression and its role in the growth and invasiveness of human prostate cancer cells. We used a small interfering RNA targeting Tyk2 and an inhibitor of Tyk2, tyrphostin A1, to suppress the expression and signaling of Tyk2 in prostate cancer cells. We detected mRNAs for Jak family kinases in prostate cancer cell lines by RT-PCR and Tyk2 protein in human prostate cancer specimens by immunohistochemistry. Inhibition of Tyk2 signaling resulted in attenuation of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator-enhanced invasiveness of prostate cancer cells in vitro without affecting the cellular growth rate. These results suggest that Tyk2 signaling in prostate cancer cells facilitate invasion of these cells, and interference with this signaling may be a potential therapeutic pathway.

  6. Physcomitrella patens activates reinforcement of the cell wall, programmed cell death and accumulation of evolutionary conserved defence signals, such as salicylic acid and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, but not jasmonic acid, upon Botrytis cinerea infection.

    PubMed

    Ponce De León, Inés; Schmelz, Eric A; Gaggero, Carina; Castro, Alexandra; Álvarez, Alfonso; Montesano, Marcos

    2012-10-01

    The moss Physcomitrella patens is an evolutionarily basal model system suitable for the analysis of plant defence responses activated after pathogen assault. Upon infection with the necrotroph Botrytis cinerea, several defence mechanisms are induced in P. patens, including the fortification of the plant cell wall by the incorporation of phenolic compounds and the induced expression of related genes. Botrytis cinerea infection also activates the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and cell death with hallmarks of programmed cell death in moss tissues. Salicylic acid (SA) levels also increase after fungal infection, and treatment with SA enhances transcript accumulation of the defence gene phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) in P. patens colonies. The expression levels of the genes involved in 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) synthesis, including lipoxygenase (LOX) and allene oxide synthase (AOS), increase in P. patens gametophytes after pathogen assault, together with a rise in free linolenic acid and OPDA concentrations. However, jasmonic acid (JA) could not be detected in healthy or infected tissues of this plant. Our results suggest that, although conserved defence signals, such as SA and OPDA, are synthesized and are probably involved in the defence response of P. patens against B. cinerea infection, JA production appears to be missing. Interestingly, P. patens responds to OPDA and methyl jasmonate by reducing moss colony growth and rhizoid length, suggesting that jasmonate perception is present in mosses. Thus, P. patens can provide clues with regard to the evolution of different defence pathways in plants, including signalling and perception of OPDA and jasmonates in nonflowering and flowering plants.

  7. A new link between diabetes and cancer: enhanced WNT/β-catenin signaling by high glucose.

    PubMed

    García-Jiménez, Custodia; García-Martínez, Jose Manuel; Chocarro-Calvo, Ana; De la Vieja, Antonio

    2014-02-01

    Extensive epidemiological studies suggest that the diabetic population is at higher risk of site-specific cancers. The diabetes-cancer link has been hypothesized to rely on various hormonal (insulin, IGF1, adipokines), immunological (inflammation), or metabolic (hyperglycemia) characteristics of the disease and even on certain treatments. Inflammation may have an important but incompletely understood role. As a growth factor, insulin directly, or indirectly through IGF1, has been considered the major link between diabetes and cancer, while high glucose has been considered as a subordinate cause. Here we discuss the evidence that supports a role for insulin/IGF1 in general in cancer, and the mechanism by which hyperglycemia may enhance the appearance, growth and survival of diabetes-associated cancers. High glucose triggers several direct and indirect mechanisms that cooperate to promote cancer cell proliferation, migration, invasion and immunological escape. In particular, high glucose enhancement of WNT/β-catenin signaling in cancer cells promotes proliferation, survival and senescence bypass, and represents a previously unrecognized direct mechanism linking diabetes-associated hyperglycemia to cancer. Increased glucose uptake is a hallmark of tumor cells and may ensure enhanced WNT signaling for continuous proliferation. Mechanistically, high glucose unbalances acetylation through increased p300 acetyl transferase and decreased sirtuin 1 deacetylase activity, leading to β-catenin acetylation at lysine K354, a requirement for nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activation of WNT-target genes. The impact of high glucose on β-catenin illustrates the remodeling of cancer-associated signaling pathways by metabolites. Metabolic remodeling of cancer-associated signaling will receive much research attention in the coming years. Future epidemiological studies may be guided and complemented by the identification of these metabolic interplays. Together, these

  8. Genotoxicity of ferric oxide nanoparticles in Raphanus sativus: Deciphering the role of signaling factors, oxidative stress and cell death.

    PubMed

    Saquib, Quaiser; Faisal, Mohammad; Alatar, Abdulrahman A; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Ahmed, Mukhtar; Ansari, Sabiha M; Alwathnani, Hend A; Okla, Mohammad K; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Musarrat, Javed; Praveen, Shelly; Khan, Shams T; Wahab, Rizwan; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Ahmad, Javed

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the genotoxic and apoptotic potential of ferric oxide nanoparticles (Fe2O3-NPs) in Raphanus sativus (radish). Fe2O3-NPs retarded the root length and seed germination in radish. Ultrathin sections of treated roots showed subcellular localization of Fe2O3-NPs, along with the appearance of damaged mitochondria and excessive vacuolization. Flow cytometric analysis of Fe2O3-NPs (1.0mg/mL) treated groups exhibited 219.5%, 161%, 120.4% and 161.4% increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), nitric oxide (NO) and Ca(2+) influx in radish protoplasts. A concentration dependent increase in the antioxidative enzymes glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) has been recorded. Comet assay showed a concentration dependent increase in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) strand breaks in Fe2O3-NPs treated groups. Cell cycle analysis revealed 88.4% of cells in sub-G1 apoptotic phase, suggesting cell death in Fe2O3-NPs (2.0mg/mL) treated group. Taking together, the genotoxicity induced by Fe2O3-NPs highlights the importance of environmental risk associated with improper disposal of nanoparticles (NPs) and radish can serve as a good indicator for measuring the phytotoxicity of NPs grown in NP-polluted environment. PMID:27593272

  9. Genotoxicity of ferric oxide nanoparticles in Raphanus sativus: Deciphering the role of signaling factors, oxidative stress and cell death.

    PubMed

    Saquib, Quaiser; Faisal, Mohammad; Alatar, Abdulrahman A; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Ahmed, Mukhtar; Ansari, Sabiha M; Alwathnani, Hend A; Okla, Mohammad K; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Musarrat, Javed; Praveen, Shelly; Khan, Shams T; Wahab, Rizwan; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Ahmad, Javed

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the genotoxic and apoptotic potential of ferric oxide nanoparticles (Fe2O3-NPs) in Raphanus sativus (radish). Fe2O3-NPs retarded the root length and seed germination in radish. Ultrathin sections of treated roots showed subcellular localization of Fe2O3-NPs, along with the appearance of damaged mitochondria and excessive vacuolization. Flow cytometric analysis of Fe2O3-NPs (1.0mg/mL) treated groups exhibited 219.5%, 161%, 120.4% and 161.4% increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), nitric oxide (NO) and Ca(2+) influx in radish protoplasts. A concentration dependent increase in the antioxidative enzymes glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) has been recorded. Comet assay showed a concentration dependent increase in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) strand breaks in Fe2O3-NPs treated groups. Cell cycle analysis revealed 88.4% of cells in sub-G1 apoptotic phase, suggesting cell death in Fe2O3-NPs (2.0mg/mL) treated group. Taking together, the genotoxicity induced by Fe2O3-NPs highlights the importance of environmental risk associated with improper disposal of nanoparticles (NPs) and radish can serve as a good indicator for measuring the phytotoxicity of NPs grown in NP-polluted environment.

  10. Tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced apoptosis in cardiac myocytes. Involvement of the sphingolipid signaling cascade in cardiac cell death.

    PubMed

    Krown, K A; Page, M T; Nguyen, C; Zechner, D; Gutierrez, V; Comstock, K L; Glembotski, C C; Quintana, P J; Sabbadini, R A

    1996-12-15

    In the present study, it was shown that physiologically relevant levels of the proinflammatory cytokine TNFalpha induced apoptosis in rat cardiomyocytes in vitro, as quantified by single cell microgel electrophoresis of nuclei ("cardiac comets") as well as by morphological and biochemical criteria. It was also shown that TNFalpha stimulated production of the endogenous second messenger, sphingosine, suggesting sphingolipid involvement in TNFalpha-mediated cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Consistent with this hypothesis, sphingosine strongly induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. The ability of the appropriate stimulus to drive cardiomyocytes into apoptosis indicated that these cells were primed for apoptosis and were susceptible to clinically relevant apoptotic triggers, such as TNFalpha. These findings suggest that the elevated TNFalpha levels seen in a variety of clinical conditions, including sepsis and ischemic myocardial disorders, may contribute to TNFalpha-induced cardiac cell death. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis is also discussed in terms of its potential beneficial role in limiting the area of cardiac cell involvement as a consequence of myocardial infarction, viral infection, and primary cardiac tumors.

  11. REST alleviates neurotoxic prion peptide-induced synaptic abnormalities, neurofibrillary degeneration and neuronal death partially via LRP6-mediated Wnt-β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhiqi; Zhu, Ting; Zhou, Xiangmei; Barrow, Paul; Yang, Wei; Cui, Yongyong; Yang, Lifeng; Zhao, Deming

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases are a group of infectious neurodegenerative diseases characterized by multiple neuropathological hallmarks including synaptic damage, spongiform degeneration and neuronal death. The factors and mechanisms that maintain cellular morphological integrity and protect against neurodegeneration in prion diseases are still unclear. Here we report that after stimulation with the neurotoxic PrP106-126 fragment in primary cortical neurons, REST translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and protects neurons from harmful effects of PrP106-126. Overexpression of REST reduces pathological damage and abnormal biochemical alterations of neurons induced by PrP106-126 and maintains neuronal viability by stabilizing the level of pro-survival protein FOXO1 and inhibiting the permeability of the mitochondrial outer membrane, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytoplasm and the activation of Capase3. Conversely, knockdown of REST exacerbates morphological damage and inhibits the expression of FOXO1. Additionally, by overexpression or knockdown of LRP6, we further show that LRP6-mediated Wnt-β-catenin signaling partly regulates the expression of REST. Collectively, we demonstrate for the first time novel neuroprotective function of REST in prion diseases and hypothesise that the LRP6-Wnt-β-catenin/REST signaling plays critical and collaborative roles in neuroprotection. This signaling of neuronal survival regulation could be explored as a viable therapeutic target for prion diseases and associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26919115

  12. Correlation dynamics and enhanced signals for the identification of serial biomolecules and DNA bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Towfiq; Haraldsen, Jason T.; Rehr, John J.; Di Ventra, Massimiliano; Schuller, Ivan; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2014-03-01

    Nanopore-based sequencing has demonstrated a significant potential for the development of fast, accurate, and cost-efficient fingerprinting techniques for next generation molecular detection and sequencing. We propose a specific multilayered graphene-based nanopore device architecture for the recognition of single biomolecules. Molecular detection and analysis can be accomplished through the detection of transverse currents as the molecule or DNA base translocates through the nanopore. To increase the overall signal-to-noise ratio and the accuracy, we implement a new ‘multi-point cross-correlation’ technique for identification of DNA bases or other molecules on the single molecular level. We demonstrate that the cross-correlations between each nanopore will greatly enhance the transverse current signal for each molecule. We implement first-principles transport calculations for DNA bases surveyed across a multilayered graphene nanopore system to illustrate the advantages of the proposed geometry. A time-series analysis of the cross-correlation functions illustrates the potential of this method for enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio. This work constitutes a significant step forward in facilitating fingerprinting of single biomolecules using solid state technology.

  13. A simple solution for antibody signal enhancement in immunofluorescence and triple immunogold assays.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Arellano, Abraham; Villalobos-González, Juan B; Palma-Tirado, Lourdes; Beltrán, Felipe A; Cárabez-Trejo, Alfonso; Missirlis, Fanis; Castro, Maite A

    2016-10-01

    Immunolocalization techniques are standard in biomedical research. Tissue fixation with aldehydes and cell membrane permeabilization with detergents can distort the specific binding of antibodies to their high affinity epitopes. In immunofluorescence protocols, it is desirable to quench the sample's autofluorescence without reduction of the antibody-dependent signal. Here we show that adding glycine to the blocking buffer and diluting the antibodies in a phosphate saline solution containing glycine, Triton X-100, Tween20 and hydrogen peroxide increase the specific antibody signal in tissue immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy. This defined antibody signal enhancer (ASE) solution gives similar results to the commercially available Pierce Immunostain Enhancer (PIE). Furthermore, prolonged tissue incubation in resin and fixative and application of ASE or PIE are described in an improved protocol for triple immunogold electron microscopy that is used to show co-localization of GABA-A ρ2 and dopamine D2 receptors in GFAP-positive astrocytes in the mouse striatum. The addition of glycine, Triton X-100, Tween20 and hydrogen peroxide during antibody incubation steps is recommended in immunohistochemistry methods.

  14. Selective 14-3-3γ induction quenches p-β-catenin Ser37/Bax-enhanced cell death in cerebral cortical neurons during ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lai, X J; Ye, S Q; Zheng, L; Li, L; Liu, Q R; Yu, S B; Pang, Y; Jin, S; Li, Q; Yu, A C H; Chen, X Q

    2014-01-01

    Ischemia-induced cell death is a major cause of disability or death after stroke. Identifying the key intrinsic protective mechanisms induced by ischemia is critical for the development of effective stroke treatment. Here, we reported that 14-3-3γ was a selective ischemia-inducible survival factor in cerebral cortical neurons reducing cell death by downregulating Bax depend direct 14-3-3γ/p-β-catenin Ser37 interactions in the nucleus. 14-3-3γ, but not other 14-3-3 isoforms, was upregulated in primary cerebral cortical neurons upon oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) as measured by quantitative PCR, western blot and fluorescent immunostaining. The selective induction of 14-3-3γ in cortical neurons by OGD was verified by the in vivo ischemic stroke model. Knocking down 14-3-3γ alone or inhibiting 14-3-3/client interactions was sufficient to induce cell death in normal cultured neurons and exacerbate OGD-induced neuronal death. Ectopic overexpression of 14-3-3γ significantly reduced OGD-induced cell death in cultured neurons. Co-immunoprecipitation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer demonstrated that endogenous 14-3-3γ bound directly to more p-β-catenin Ser37 but not p-Bad, p-Ask-1, p-p53 and Bax. During OGD, p-β-catenin Ser37 but not p-β-catenin Ser45 was increased prominently, which correlated with Bax elevation in cortical neurons. OGD promoted the entry of 14-3-3γ into the nuclei, in correlation with the increase of nuclear p-β-catenin Ser37 in neurons. Overexpression of 14-3-3γ significantly reduced Bax expression, whereas knockdown of 14-3-3γ increased Bax in cortical neurons. Abolishing β-catenin phosphorylation at Ser37 (S37A) significantly reduced Bax and cell death in neurons upon OGD. Finally, 14-3-3γ overexpression completely suppressed β-catenin-enhanced Bax and cell death in neurons upon OGD. Based on these data, we propose that the 14-3-3γ/p-β-catenin Ser37/Bax axis determines cell survival or death of neurons during ischemia

  15. β-cyclocitral upregulates salicylic acid signalling to enhance excess light acclimation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lv, Feifei; Zhou, Jun; Zeng, Lizhang; Xing, Da

    2015-08-01

    β-cyclocitral (β-CC), a volatile oxidized derivative of β-carotene, can upregulate the expression of defence genes to enhance excess light (EL) acclimation. However, the signalling cascades underlying this process remain unclear. In this study, salicylic acid (SA) is involved in alleviating damage to promote β-CC-enhanced EL acclimation. In early stages of EL illumination, β-CC pretreatment induced SA accumulation and impeded reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the chloroplast. A comparative analysis of two SA synthesis pathways in Arabidopsis revealed that SA concentration mainly increased via the isochorismate synthase 1 (ICS1)-mediated isochorismate pathway, which depended on essential regulative function of enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1). Further results showed that, in the process of β-CC-enhanced EL acclimation, nuclear localization of nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related genes 1 (NPR1) was regulated by SA accumulation and NPR1 induced subsequent transcriptional reprogramming of gluthathione-S-transferase 5 (GST5) and GST13 implicated in detoxification. In summary, β-CC-induced SA synthesis contributes to EL acclimation response by decreasing ROS production in the chloroplast, promoting nuclear localization of NPR1, and upregulating GST transcriptional expression. This process is a possible molecular regulative mechanism of β-CC-enhanced EL acclimation.

  16. Signal enhancement ratio (SER) quantified from breast DCE-MRI and breast cancer risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shandong; Kurland, Brenda F.; Berg, Wendie A.; Zuley, Margarita L.; Jankowitz, Rachel C.; Sumkin, Jules; Gur, David

    2015-03-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recommended as an adjunct to mammography for women who are considered at elevated risk of developing breast cancer. As a key component of breast MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) uses a contrast agent to provide high intensity contrast between breast tissues, making it sensitive to tissue composition and vascularity. Breast DCE-MRI characterizes certain physiologic properties of breast tissue that are potentially related to breast cancer risk. Studies have shown that increased background parenchymal enhancement (BPE), which is the contrast enhancement occurring in normal cancer-unaffected breast tissues in post-contrast sequences, predicts increased breast cancer risk. Signal enhancement ratio (SER) computed from pre-contrast and post-contrast sequences in DCE-MRI measures change in signal intensity due to contrast uptake over time and is a measure of contrast enhancement kinetics. SER quantified in breast tumor has been shown potential as a biomarker for characterizing tumor response to treatments. In this work we investigated the relationship between quantitative measures of SER and breast cancer risk. A pilot retrospective case-control study was performed using a cohort of 102 women, consisting of 51 women who had diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer and 51 matched controls (by age and MRI date) with a unilateral biopsy-proven benign lesion. SER was quantified using fully-automated computerized algorithms and three SER-derived quantitative volume measures were compared between the cancer cases and controls using logistic regression analysis. Our preliminary results showed that SER is associated with breast cancer risk, after adjustment for the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS)-based mammographic breast density measures. This pilot study indicated that SER has potential for use as a risk factor for breast cancer risk assessment in women at elevated risk of developing breast cancer.

  17. 6-Shogaol Inhibits Breast Cancer Cells and Stem Cell-Like Spheroids by Modulation of Notch Signaling Pathway and Induction of Autophagic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Anasuya; Vasudevan, Smreti; Sengupta, Suparna

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) pose a serious obstacle to cancer therapy as they can be responsible for poor prognosis and tumour relapse. In this study, we have investigated inhibitory activity of the ginger-derived compound 6-shogaol against breast cancer cells both in monolayer and in cancer-stem cell-like spheroid culture. The spheroids were generated from adherent breast cancer cells. 6-shogaol was effective in killing both breast cancer monolayer cells and spheroids at doses that were not toxic to noncancerous cells. The percentages of CD44+CD24-/low cells and the secondary sphere content were reduced drastically upon treatment with 6-shogaol confirming its action on CSCs. Treatment with 6-shogaol caused cytoplasmic vacuole formation and cleavage of microtubule associated protein Light Chain3 (LC3) in both monolayer and spheroid culture indicating that it induced autophagy. Kinetic analysis of the LC3 expression and a combination treatment with chloroquine revealed that the autophagic flux instigated cell death in 6-shogaol treated breast cancer cells in contrast to the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine. Furthermore, 6-shogaol-induced cell death got suppressed in the presence of chloroquine and a very low level of apoptosis was exhibited even after prolonged treatment of the compound, suggesting that autophagy is the major mode of cell death induced by 6-shogaol in breast cancer cells. 6-shogaol reduced the expression levels of Cleaved Notch1 and its target proteins Hes1 and Cyclin D1 in spheroids, and the reduction was further pronounced in the presence of a γ-secretase inhibitor. Secondary sphere formation in the presence of the inhibitor was also further reduced by 6-shogaol. Together, these results indicate that the inhibitory action of 6-shogaol on spheroid growth and sustainability is conferred through γ-secretase mediated down-regulation of Notch signaling. The efficacy of 6-shogaol in monolayer and cancer stem cell-like spheroids raise hope for its

  18. Cadmium exposure activates the ERK signaling pathway leading to altered osteoblast gene expression and apoptotic death in Saos-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Arbon, Kate S.; Christensen, Cody M.; Harvey, Wendy A.; Heggland, Sara J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports of cadmium in electronic waste and jewelry have increased public awareness regarding this toxic metal. Human exposure to cadmium is associated with the development of osteoporosis. We previously reported cadmium induces apoptosis in human tumor-derived Saos-2 osteoblasts. In this study, we examine the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and protein kinase C (PKC) pathways in cadmium-induced apoptosis and altered osteoblast gene expression. Saos-2 osteoblasts were cultured in the presence or absence of 10 μM CdCl2 for 2–72 hours. We detected significant ERK activation in response to CdCl2 and pretreatment with the ERK inhibitor PD98059 attenuated cadmium-induced apoptosis. However, PKCα activation was not observed after exposure to CdCl2 and pretreatment with the PKC inhibitor, Calphostin C, was unable to rescue cells from cadmium-induced apoptosis. Gene expression studies were conducted using qPCR. Cells exposed to CdCl2 exhibited a significant decrease in the bone-forming genes osteopontin (OPN) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mRNA. In contrast, SOST, whose protein product inhibits bone formation, significantly increased in response to CdCl2. Pretreatment with PD98059 had a recovery effect on cadmium-induced changes in gene expression. This research demonstrates cadmium can directly inhibit osteoblasts via ERK signaling pathway and identifies SOST as a target for cadmium-induced osteotoxicity. PMID:22019892

  19. Human engineering design considerations for the use of signal color enhancement in ASW displays

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, W.W.

    1990-11-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was requested to examine and define man-machine limits as part of the Office of Naval Technology's High Gain Initiative program (HGI). As an initial investigative area, LLNL's Systems and Human Performance effort focused upon color display interfaces and the use of color enhancement techniques to define human and system interface limits in signal detection and discrimination tasks. The knowledgeable and prudent use of color in different types of display is believed to facilitate human visual detection, discrimination and recognition in complex visual tasks. The consideration and understanding of the complex set of interacting variables associated with the prudent use of color is essential to optimize human performance, especially in the ASW community. The designers of advanced display technology and signal processing algorithms may be eventually called upon to present pre-processed information to ASW operators and researchers using the latest color enhancement techniques. These techniques, however, may be limited if one does not understand the complexity and limits of human information processing which reflects the assessed state of knowledge relevant to the use of color in displays. The initial sections of this report discuss various aspects of color presentation and the problems typically encountered, while the last section deals with a specific research proposal required to further our understanding and proper use of color enhancement methods.

  20. Mitochondria-derived hydrogen peroxide selectively enhances T cell receptor-initiated signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Gill, Tejpal; Levine, Alan D

    2013-09-01

    T cell receptor (TCR)-initiated signal transduction is reported to increase production of intracellular reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide (O2˙(-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), as second messengers. Although H2O2 can modulate signal transduction by inactivating protein phosphatases, the mechanism and the subcellular localization of intracellular H2O2 as a second messenger of the TCR are not known. The antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) catalyzes the dismutation of highly reactive O2˙(-) into H2O2 and thus acts as an intracellular generator of H2O2. As charged O2˙(-) is unable to diffuse through intracellular membranes, cells express distinct SOD isoforms in the cytosol (Cu,Zn-SOD) and mitochondria (Mn-SOD), where they locally scavenge O2˙(-) leading to production of H2O2. A 2-fold organelle-specific overexpression of either SOD in Jurkat T cell lines increases intracellular production of H2O2 but does not alter the levels of intracellular H2O2 scavenging enzymes such as catalase, membrane-bound peroxiredoxin1 (Prx1), and cytosolic Prx2. We report that overexpression of Mn-SOD enhances tyrosine phosphorylation of TCR-associated membrane proximal signal transduction molecules Lck, LAT, ZAP70, PLCγ1, and SLP76 within 1 min of TCR cross-linking. This increase in mitochondrial H2O2 specifically modulates MAPK signaling through the JNK/cJun pathway, whereas overexpressing Cu,Zn-SOD had no effect on any of these TCR-mediated signaling molecules. As mitochondria translocate to the immunological synapse during TCR activation, we hypothesize this translocation provides the effective concentration of H2O2 required to selectively modulate downstream signal transduction pathways.

  1. Medial–Frontal Stimulation Enhances Learning in Schizophrenia by Restoring Prediction Error Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Reinhart, Robert M.G.; Zhu, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Posterror learning, associated with medial–frontal cortical recruitment in healthy subjects, is compromised in neuropsychiatric disorders. Here we report novel evidence for the mechanisms underlying learning dysfunctions in schizophrenia. We show that, by noninvasively passing direct current through human medial–frontal cortex, we could enhance the event-related potential related to learning from mistakes (i.e., the error-related negativity), a putative index of prediction error signaling in the brain. Following this causal manipulation of brain activity, the patients learned a new task at a rate that was indistinguishable from healthy individuals. Moreover, the severity of delusions interacted with the efficacy of the stimulation to improve learning. Our results demonstrate a causal link between disrupted prediction error signaling and inefficient learning in schizophrenia. These findings also demonstrate the feasibility of nonpharmacological interventions to address cognitive deficits in neuropsychiatric disorders. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT When there is a difference between what we expect to happen and what we actually experience, our brains generate a prediction error signal, so that we can map stimuli to responses and predict outcomes accurately. Theories of schizophrenia implicate abnormal prediction error signaling in the cognitive deficits of the disorder. Here, we combine noninvasive brain stimulation with large-scale electrophysiological recordings to establish a causal link between faulty prediction error signaling and learning deficits in schizophrenia. We show that it is possible to improve learning rate, as well as the neural signature of prediction error signaling, in patients to a level quantitatively indistinguishable from that of healthy subjects. The results provide mechanistic insight into schizophrenia pathophysiology and suggest a future therapy for this condition. PMID:26338333

  2. Inactivation of Akt by arsenic trioxide induces cell death via mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic signaling in SGC-7901 human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan-Hui; Zhang, Hao-Peng; Yang, Shu-Meng; Yang, Yue; Ma, Yu-Yan; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Yang, Yan-Mei

    2014-04-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has been recognized as a potential chemotherapeutic agent, yet the details concerning its mechanism of action in solid cancers remain undetermined. The present study assessed the role of Akt in the cell death induced by As2O3. The MTT assay showed that As2O3 suppressed the proliferation of SGC-7901 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Characteristic apoptotic changes were observed in the As2O3‑treated cells by Hoechst 33342 staining, and FACS analysis showed that As2O3 caused dose-dependent apoptotic cell death. As2O3 activated caspase-3 and -9, and PARP cleavage in a dose-dependent manner. Compromised mitochondrial membrane potential and an increased protein level of Bax indicated involvement of mitochondia. As2O3 decreased the levels of p-Akt (Ser473), p-Akt (Thr308) and p-GSK-3β (Ser9), suggesting that As2O3 inactivated Akt kinase. In addition, LY294002 (a PI3 kinase inhibitor) augmented the apoptosis induced by As2O3. These results demonstrated that inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling was involved in As2O3-induced apoptosis of gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. PMID:24482137

  3. Cutting Edge: Molecular Structure of the IL-1R-Associated Kinase-4 Death Domain and Its Implications for TLR Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Lasker, Michael V.; Gajjar, Mark M.; Nair, Satish K.

    2010-07-19

    IL-1R-associated kinase (IRAK) 4 is an essential component of innate immunity. IRAK-4 deficiency in mice and humans results in severe impairment of IL-1 and TLR signaling. We have solved the crystal structure for the death domain of Mus musculus IRAK-4 to 1.7 {angstrom} resolution. This is the first glimpse of the structural details of a mammalian IRAK family member. The crystal structure reveals a six-helical bundle with a prominent loop, which among IRAKs and Pelle, a Drosophila homologue, is unique to IRAK-4. This highly structured loop contained between helices two and three, comprises an 11-aa stretch. Although innate immune domain recognition is thought to be very similar between Drosophila and mammals, this structural component points to a drastic difference. This structure can be used as a framework for future mutation and deletion studies and potential drug design.

  4. Inhibition of γ-secretase activity synergistically enhances tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand induced apoptosis in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells via upregulation of death receptor 5

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Lisa M.; Nathwani, Seema M.; Zisterer, Daniela M.

    2016-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a rare and aggressive hematopoietic malignancy prone to relapse and drug resistance. Half of all T-ALL patients exhibit mutations in Notch1, which leads to aberrant Notch1 associated signaling cascades. Notch1 activation is mediated by the γ-secretase cleavage of the Notch1 receptor into the active intracellular domain of Notch1 (NCID). Clinical trials of γ-secretase small molecule inhibitors (GSIs) as single agents for the treatment of T-ALL have been unsuccessful. The present study demonstrated, using immunofluorescence and western blotting, that blocking γ-secretase activity in T-ALL cells with N-[(3,5-difluorophenyl) acetyl]-L-alanyl-2-phenyl] glycine-1,1-dimethylethyl ester (DAPT) downregulated NCID and upregulated the tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptor 5 (DR5). Upregulation of DR5 restored the sensitivity of T-ALL cells to TRAIL. Combination index revealed that the combined treatment of DAPT and TRAIL synergistically enhanced apoptosis compared with treatment with either drug alone. TRAIL combined with the clinically evaluated γ-secretase inhibitor 3-[(1r, 4s)-4-(4-chlorophenylsulfonyl)-4-(2, 5-difluorophenyl) cyclohexyl] propanoic acid (MK-0752) also significantly enhanced TRAIL-induced cell death compared with either drug alone. DAPT/TRAIL apoptotic synergy was dependent on the extrinsic apoptotic pathway and was associated with a decrease in BH3 interacting-domain death agonist and x-linked inhibitor of apoptosis. In conclusion, γ-secretase inhibition represents a potential therapeutic strategy to overcome TRAIL resistance for the treatment of T-ALL.

  5. BAMBI Promotes C2C12 Myogenic Differentiation by Enhancing Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiangling; Shi, Xin-E; Song, Chengchuang; Sun, Shiduo; Yang, Gongshe; Li, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenic protein and activin membrane-bound inhibitor (BAMBI) is regarded as an essential regulator of cell proliferation and differentiation that represses transforming growth factor-β and enhances Wnt/β-catenin signaling in various cell types. However, its role in skeletal muscle remains largely unknown. In the current study, we found that the expression level of BAMBI peaked in the early differentiation phase of the C2C12 rodent myoblast cell line. Knockdown of BAMBI via siRNA inhibited C2C12 differentiation, indicated by repressed MyoD, MyoG, and MyHC expression as well as reductions in the differentiation and fusion indices. BAMBI knockdown reduced the activity of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, as characterized by the decreased nuclear translocation of β-catenin and the lowered transcription of Axin2, which is a well-documented target gene of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Furthermore, treatment with LiCl, an activator of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, rescued the reduction in C2C12 differentiation caused by BAMBI siRNA. Taken together, our data suggest that BAMBI is required for normal C2C12 differentiation, and that its role in myogenesis is mediated by the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. PMID:26247931

  6. Glucose-induced β-catenin acetylation enhances Wnt signaling in cancer.

    PubMed

    Chocarro-Calvo, Ana; García-Martínez, Jose Manuel; Ardila-González, Soraya; De la Vieja, Antonio; García-Jiménez, Custodia

    2013-02-01

    Nuclear accumulation of β-catenin, a widely recognized marker of poor cancer prognosis, drives cancer cell proliferation and senescence bypass and regulates incretins, critical regulators of fat and glucose metabolism. Diabetes, characterized by elevated blood glucose levels, is associated with increased cancer risk, partly because of increased insulin growth factor 1 signaling, but whether elevated glucose directly impacts cancer-associated signal-transduction pathways is unknown. Here, we show that high glucose is essential for nuclear localization of β-catenin in response to Wnt signaling. Glucose-dependent β-catenin nuclear retention requires lysine 354 and is mediated by alteration of the balance between p300 and sirtuins that trigger β-catenin acetylation. Consequently β-catenin accumulates in the nucleus and activates target promoters under combined glucose and Wnt stimulation, but not with either stimulus alone. Our results reveal a mechanism by which high glucose enhances signaling through the cancer-associated Wnt/β-catenin pathway and may explain the increased frequency of cancer associated with obesity and diabetes.

  7. Calcium-mediated repression of β-catenin and its transcriptional signaling mediates neural crest cell death in an avian model of fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Flentke, George R; Garic, Ana; Amberger, Ed; Hernandez, Marcos; Smith, Susan M

    2011-07-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a common birth defect in many societies. Affected individuals have neurodevelopmental disabilities and a distinctive craniofacial dysmorphology. These latter deficits originate during early development from the ethanol-mediated apoptotic depletion of cranial facial progenitors, a population known as the neural crest. We showed previously that this apoptosis is caused because acute ethanol exposure activates G-protein-dependent intracellular calcium within cranial neural crest progenitors, and this calcium transient initiates the cell death. The dysregulated signals that reside downstream of ethanol's calcium transient and effect neural crest death are unknown. Here we show that ethanol's repression of the transcriptional effector β-catenin causes the neural crest losses. Clinically relevant ethanol concentrations (22-78 mM) rapidly deplete nuclear β-catenin from neural crest progenitors, with accompanying losses of β-catenin transcriptional activity and downstream genes that govern neural crest induction, expansion, and survival. Using forced expression studies, we show that β-catenin loss of function (via dominant-negative T cell transcription factor [TCF]) recapitulates ethanol's effects on neural crest apoptosis, whereas β-catenin gain-of-function in ethanol's presence preserves neural crest survival. Blockade of ethanol's calcium transient using Bapta-AM normalizes β-catenin activity and prevents the neural crest losses, whereas ionomycin treatment is sufficient to destabilize β-catenin. We propose that ethanol's repression of β-catenin causes the neural crest losses in this model of FAS. β-Catenin is a novel target for ethanol's teratogenicity. β-Catenin/Wnt signals participate in many developmental events and its rapid and persistent dysregulation by ethanol may explain why the latter is such a potent teratogen.

  8. Developments in near electrical resonance signal enhancement (NERSE) eddy-current methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Robert; Dixon, Steve

    2015-03-01

    In industry, the detection of small defects above a background noise threshold is always a limiting factor. This is true for even the most sensitivity and reliable of NDT techniques. However, defect signals in eddy-current (EC) inspections have the potential to be boosted above noise thresholds by exploiting the near electrical resonance signal enhancement (NERSE) phenomena, resulting from resonant frequency-shifting of an EC system as the coil passes over a defect. Following on from the observation and characterisation of this phenomenon, NERSE based EC methods are being investigated and developed for the detection of sub-millimeter surface defects in Aerospace superalloys. This paper discusses current advances in the development of such techniques and explores the potential of NERSE exploitation as well as examining its limitations.

  9. Identification of compounds that potentiate CREB signaling as possible enhancers of long-term memory

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Guo, Vicky; Southall, Noel; Cho, Ming-Hsuang; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P.; Nirenberg, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have implicated the cAMP Response Element Binding (CREB) protein signaling pathway in long-term memory. To identify small molecule enhancers of CREB activation of gene expression, we screened ≈73,000 compounds, each at 7–15 concentrations in a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) format, for activity in cells by assaying CREB mediated β-lactamase reporter gene expression. We identified 1,800 compounds that potentiated CREB mediated gene expression, with potencies as low as 16 nM, comprising 96 structural series. Mechanisms of action were systematically determined, and compounds that affect phosphodiesterase 4, protein kinase A, and cAMP production were identified, as well as compounds that affect CREB signaling via apparently unidentified mechanisms. qHTS folowed by interrogation of pathway targets is an efficient paradigm for lead generation for chemical genomics and drug development. PMID:19196967

  10. Optimization for enhancement of signal effectiveness in three-dimensional (3D) cell based electrochemical biosensor.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Se Hoon; Ku, Bosung; Yi, Sang Hyun; Lee, Dong Woo; Lee, Hye Seon; Kim, Jhingook

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses the optimization for enhancement of signal effectiveness in 3D cell based electrochemical biosensor. While 2D culture has a structural limitation to mimic an in vivo, 3D culture can provide more similar cell responses. In addition, although 3D cultured cells have been applied to measure electrically, the intensity of electrical signal from cells on the electrode was extremely low. Thus, we have optimized and evaluated the condition of gelation between several types of sol-gel and cancer cells using the electrical measurement to make fine 3D cell structure on the electrode. These results show that our work can be an useful method for monitoring cell activity by compensating a limitation of 2D culture in real time. PMID:22256300

  11. Immune response and insulin signalling alter mosquito feeding behaviour to enhance malaria transmission potential.

    PubMed

    Cator, Lauren J; Pietri, Jose E; Murdock, Courtney C; Ohm, Johanna R; Lewis, Edwin E; Read, Andrew F; Luckhart, Shirley; Thomas, Matthew B

    2015-01-01

    Malaria parasites alter mosquito feeding behaviour in a way that enhances parasite transmission. This is widely considered a prime example of manipulation of host behaviour to increase onward transmission, but transient immune challenge in the absence of parasites can induce the same behavioural phenotype. Here, we show that alterations in feeding behaviour depend on the timing and dose of immune challenge relative to blood ingestion and that these changes are functionally linked to changes in insulin signalling in the mosquito gut. These results suggest that altered phenotypes derive from insulin signalling-dependent host resource allocation among immunity, blood feeding, and reproduction in a manner that is not specific to malaria parasite infection. We measured large increases in mosquito survival and subsequent transmission potential when feeding patterns are altered. Leveraging these changes in physiology, behaviour and life history could promote effective and sustainable control of female mosquitoes responsible for transmission.

  12. Homocysteine enhances MMP-9 production in murine macrophages via ERK and Akt signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung Jin; Lee, Yi Sle; Seo, Kyo Won; Bae, Jin Ung; Kim, Gyu Hee; Park, So Youn; Kim, Chi Dae

    2012-04-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) at elevated levels is an independent risk factor of cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of Hcy on the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) in murine macrophages. Among the MMP known to regulate the activities of collagenase and gelatinase, Hcy exclusively increased the gelatinolytic activity of MMP-9 in J774A.1 cells as well as in mouse peritoneal macrophages. Furthermore, this activity was found to be correlated with Western blot findings in J774A.1 cells, which showed that MMP-9 expression was concentration- and time-dependently increased by Hcy. Inhibition of the ERK and Akt pathways led to a significant decrease in Hcy-induced MMP-9 expression, and combined treatment with inhibitors of the ERK and Akt pathways showed an additive effects. Activity assays for ERK and Akt showed that Hcy increased the phosphorylation of both, but these phosphorylation were not affected by inhibitors of the Akt and ERK pathways. In line with these findings, the molecular inhibition of ERK and Akt using siRNA did not affect the Hcy-induced phosphorylation of Akt and ERK, respectively. Taken together, these findings suggest that Hcy enhances MMP-9 production in murine macrophages by separately activating the ERK and Akt signaling pathways. -- Highlights: ► Homocysteine (Hcy) induced MMP-9 production in murine macrophages. ► Hcy induced MMP-9 production through ERK and Akt signaling pathways. ► ERK and Akt signaling pathways were activated by Hcy in murine macrophages. ► ERK and Akt pathways were additively act on Hcy-induced MMP-9 production. ► Hcy enhances MMP-9 production in macrophages via activation of ERK and Akt signaling pathways in an independent manner.

  13. LL37 and Cationic Peptides Enhance TLR3 Signaling by Viral Double-stranded RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yvonne; Adhikarakunnathu, Sreedevi; Bhardwaj, Kanchan; Ranjith-Kumar, C. T.; Wen, Yahong; Jordan, Jarrat L.; Wu, Linda H.; Dragnea, Bogdan; Mateo, Lani San; Kao, C. Cheng

    2011-01-01

    Background Toll-like Receptor 3 (TLR3) detects viral dsRNA during viral infection. However, most natural viral dsRNAs are poor activators of TLR3 in cell-based systems, leading us to hypothesize that TLR3 needs additional factors to be activated by viral dsRNAs. The anti-microbial peptide LL37 is the only known human member of the cathelicidin family of anti-microbial peptides. LL37 complexes with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to prevent activation of TLR4, binds to ssDNA to modulate TLR9 and ssRNA to modulate TLR7 and 8. It synergizes with TLR2/1, TLR3 and TLR5 agonists to increase IL8 and IL6 production. This work seeks to determine whether LL37 enhances viral dsRNA recognition by TLR3. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS2B) and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293T) transiently transfected with TLR3, we found that LL37 enhanced poly(I:C)-induced TLR3 signaling and enabled the recognition of viral dsRNAs by TLR3. The presence of LL37 also increased the cytokine response to rhinovirus infection in BEAS2B cells and in activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Confocal microscopy determined that LL37 could co-localize with TLR3. Electron microscopy showed that LL37 and poly(I:C) individually formed globular structures, but a complex of the two formed filamentous structures. To separate the effects of LL37 on TLR3 and TLR4, other peptides that bind RNA and transport the complex into cells were tested and found to activate TLR3 signaling in response to dsRNAs, but had no effect on TLR4 signaling. This is the first demonstration that LL37 and other RNA-binding peptides with cell penetrating motifs can activate TLR3 signaling and facilitate the recognition of viral ligands. Conclusions/Significance LL37 and several cell-penetrating peptides can enhance signaling by TLR3 and enable TLR3 to respond to viral dsRNA. PMID:22039520

  14. AlliedSignal driver's viewer enhancement (DVE) for paramilitary and commercial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel, Michael; Caron, Hubert; Kovacevic, Branislav; Faina-Cherkaoui, Marcela; Wrobel, Leslie; Turcotte, Gilles

    1999-07-01

    AlliedSignal Driver's Viewer Enhancement (DVE) system is a thermal imager using a 320 X 240 uncooled microbolometer array. This high performance system was initially developed for military combat and tactical wheeled vehicles. It features a very small sensor head remotely mounted from the display, control and processing module. The sensor head has a modular design and is being adapted to various commercial applications such as truck and car-driving aid, using specifically designed low cost optics. Tradeoffs in the system design, system features and test results are discussed in this paper. A short video shows footage of the DVE system while driving at night.

  15. Thermally enhanced signal strength and SNR improvement of photoacoustic radar module

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Mandelis, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    A thermally enhanced method for improving photoacoustic imaging depth and signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio is presented in this paper. Experimental results showed that the maximum imaging depth increased by 20% through raising the temperature of absorbing biotissues (ex-vivo beef muscle) uniformly from 37 to 43°C, and the SNR was increased by 8%. The parameters making up the Gruneisen constant were investigated experimentally and theoretically. The studies showed that the Gruneisen constant of biotissues increases with temperature, and the results were found to be consistent with the photoacousitc radar theory. PMID:25136501

  16. Death imagery and death anxiety.

    PubMed

    McDonald, R T; Hilgendorf, W A

    1986-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between positive/negative death imagery and death anxiety. Subjects were 179 undergraduate students at a large, private, midwestern university. Results reveal that on five measures of death anxiety the subjects with low death anxiety scores had significantly more positive death images than did those with high death anxiety scores. The few subjects who imagined death to be young (N = 14) had a significantly more positive image of death than those who perceived it to be an old person. Death was seen as male by 92% of the male respondents and 74% of the female respondents. Significant differences in death imagery and death anxiety were found between subjects enrolled in an introductory psychology course and those enrolled in a thanatology course. No sex differences in death anxiety or positive/negative death imagery were found.

  17. Combination Treatment with Sublethal Ionizing Radiation and the Proteasome Inhibitor, Bortezomib, Enhances Death-Receptor Mediated Apoptosis and Anti-Tumor Immune Attack

    PubMed Central

    Cacan, Ercan; Spring, Alexander M.; Kumari, Anita; Greer, Susanna F.; Garnett-Benson, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    Sub-lethal doses of radiation can modulate gene expression, making tumor cells more susceptible to T-cell-mediated immune attack. Proteasome inhibitors demonstrate broad anti-tumor activity in clinical and pre-clinical cancer models. Here, we use a combination treatment of proteasome inhibition and irradiation to further induce immunomodulation of tumor cells that could enhance tumor-specific immune responses. We investigate the effects of the 26S proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, alone or in combination with radiotherapy, on the expression of immunogenic genes in normal colon and colorectal cancer cell lines. We examined cells for changes in the expression of several death receptors (DR4, DR5 and Fas) commonly used by T cells for killing of target cells. Our results indicate that the combination treatment resulted in increased cell surface expression of death receptors by increasing their transcript levels. The combination treatment further increases the sensitivity of carcinoma cells to apoptosis through FAS and TRAIL receptors but does not change the sensitivity of normal non-malignant epithelial cells. Furthermore, the combination treatment significantly enhances tumor cell killing by tumor specific CD8+ T cells. This study suggests that combining radiotherapy and proteasome inhibition may simultaneously enhance tumor immunogenicity and the induction of antitumor immunity by enhancing tumor-specific T-cell activity. PMID:26703577

  18. SAR650984 directly induces multiple myeloma cell death via lysosomal-associated and apoptotic pathways, which is further enhanced by pomalidomide.

    PubMed

    Jiang, H; Acharya, C; An, G; Zhong, M; Feng, X; Wang, L; Dasilva, N; Song, Z; Yang, G; Adrian, F; Qiu, L; Richardson, P; Munshi, N C; Tai, Y-T; Anderson, K C

    2016-02-01

    The anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody SAR650984 (SAR) is showing promising clinical activity in treatment of relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma (MM). Besides effector-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, we here define molecular mechanisms of SAR-directed MM cell death and enhanced anti-MM activity triggered by SAR with Pomalidomide (Pom). Without Fc-cross-linking agents or effector cells, SAR specifically induces homotypic aggregation (HA)-associated cell death in MM cells dependent on the level of cell surface CD38 expression, actin cytoskeleton and membrane lipid raft. SAR and its F(ab)'2 fragments trigger caspase 3/7-dependent apoptosis in MM cells highly expressing CD38, even with p53 mutation. Importantly, SAR specifically induces lysosome-dependent cell death (LCD) by enlarging lysosomes and increasing lysosomal membrane permeabilization associated with leakage of cathepsin B and LAMP-1, regardless of the presence of interleukin-6 or bone marrow stromal cells. Conversely, the lysosomal vacuolar H+-ATPase inhibitor blocks SAR-induced LCD. SAR further upregulates reactive oxygen species. Pom enhances SAR-induced direct and indirect killing even in MM cells resistant to Pom/Len. Taken together, SAR is the first therapeutic monoclonal antibody mediating direct cytotoxicity against MM cells via multiple mechanisms of action. Our data show that Pom augments both direct and effector cell-mediated MM cytotoxicity of SAR, providing the framework for combination clinical trials. PMID:26338273

  19. From cell protection to death: may Ca2+ signals explain the chameleonic attributes of the mammalian prion protein?

    PubMed

    Sorgato, M Catia; Bertoli, Alessandro

    2009-02-01

    It is now accepted that a conformational change of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) generates the prion, the infectious agent responsible for lethal neurodegenerative disorders, named transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, or prion diseases. The mechanisms of prion-associated neurodegeneration are still obscure, as is the cell role of PrP(C), although increasing evidence attributes to PrP(C) important functions in cell survival. Such a behavioral dichotomy thus enables the prion protein to switch from a benign role under normal conditions, to the execution of neurons during disease. By reviewing data from models of prion disease and PrP(C)-null paradigms, which suggest a relation between the prion protein and Ca(2+) homeostasis, here we discuss the possibility that Ca(2+) is the factor behind the enigma of the pathophysiology of PrP(C). Ca(2+) features in almost all processes of cell signaling, and may thus tell us much about a protein that pivots between health and disease.

  20. Enhancement of leptin receptor signaling by SOCS3 deficiency induces development of gastric tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Inagaki-Ohara, K; Mayuzumi, H; Kato, S; Minokoshi, Y; Otsubo, T; Kawamura, Y I; Dohi, T; Matsuzaki, G; Yoshimura, A

    2014-01-01

    Leptin acts on its receptor (ObR) in the hypothalamus to inhibit food intake and energy expenditure. Leptin and ObR are also expressed in the gastrointestinal tract; however, the physiological significance of leptin signaling in the gut remains uncertain. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) is a key negative feedback regulator of ObR-mediated signaling in the hypothalamus. We now show that gastrointestinal epithelial cell-specific SOCS3 conditional knockout (T3b-SOCS3 cKO) mice developed gastric tumors by enhancing leptin production and the ObRb/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway. All T3b-SOCS3 cKO mice developed tumors in the stomach but not in the bowels by 2 months of age, even though the SOCS3 deletion occurred in both the epithelium of stomach and bowels. The tumors developed in the absence of the inflammatory response and all cKO mice died within 6 months. These tumors displayed pathology and molecular alterations, such as an increase in MUC2 (Mucin 2, oligomeric mucus/gel-forming) and TFF3 (trefoil factor 3), resembling human intestinal-type gastric tumors. Administration of antileptin antibody to T3b-SOCS3 cKO mice reduced hyperplasia of gastric mucosa, which is the step of the initiation of gastric tumor. These data suggest that SOCS3 is an antigastric tumor gene that suppresses leptin overexpression and ObRb/STAT3 hyperactivation, supporting the hypothesis that the leptin/ObRb/STAT3 axis accelerates tumorigenesis and that it may represent a new therapeutic target for the treatment of gastric cancer.

  1. Anticancer Activity of Buttermilk Against SW480 Colon Cancer Cells is Associated with Caspase-Independent Cell Death and Attenuation of Wnt, Akt, and ERK Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kuchta-Noctor, Anna M; Murray, Brian A; Stanton, Catherine; Devery, Rosaleen; Kelly, Phil M

    2016-10-01

    Buttermilk is a rich source of milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) fragments assembled from bioactive polar lipids and proteins that originate from bovine mammary epithelial cells. The objective of this study was to examine growth-modulatory effects of experimental buttermilks varying in sphingolipid and phospholipid composition on a colon cancer cell line of human origin. Buttermilks were prepared from washed and unwashed cream using gravity or centrifugation. Compositional analysis showed that sphingomyelin (SM) (10.4-29.5%) and lactosylceramide (LacCer) (1.2-44.3%) were the predominant sphingolipids detected. Experimental samples inhibited in vitro growth of SW480 colon cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Antiproliferative activity was selective toward cancer cells. A fraction enriched in LacCer (44.3%), obtained by microfiltration induced caspase-independent cell death as evident by phosphatidylserine externalization, increased percentage of degraded DNA, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in SW480 cells. This fraction downregulated growth-signaling pathways mediated by β-catenin, phosphorylated Akt (serine/threonine-specific protein kinase), ERK1/2 (extracellular signal-regulated kinase), and c-myc. This study is to our knowledge the first to screen buttermilk samples that vary in polar lipid composition for antiproliferative activity in vitro. PMID:27472445

  2. TLR9-ERK-mTOR signaling is critical for autophagic cell death induced by CpG oligodeoxynucleotide 107 combined with irradiation in glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoli; Cen, Yanyan; Cai, Yongqing; Liu, Tao; Liu, Huan; Cao, Guanqun; Liu, Dan; Li, Bin; Peng, Wei; Zou, Jintao; Pang, Xueli; Zheng, Jiang; Zhou, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides containing unmethylated CpG dinucleotides (CpG ODN) function as potential radiosensitizers for glioma treatment, although the underlying mechanism is unclear. It was observed that CpG ODN107, when combined with irradiation, did not induce apoptosis. Herein, the effect of CpG ODN107 + irradiation on autophagy and the related signaling pathways was investigated. In vitro, CpG ODN107 + irradiation induced autophagosome formation, increased the ratio of LC3 II/LC3 I, beclin 1 and decreased p62 expression in U87 cells. Meanwhile, CpG ODN107 also increased LC3 II/LC3 I expression in U251 and CHG-5 cells. In vivo, CpG ODN107 combined with local radiotherapy induced autophagosome formation in orthotopic transplantation tumor. Investigation of the molecular mechanisms demonstrated that CpG ODN107 + irradiation increased the levels of TLR9 and p-ERK, and decreased the level of p-mTOR in glioma cells. Further, TLR9-specific siRNA could affect the expressions of p-ERK and autophagy-related proteins in glioma cells. Taken together, CpG ODN107 combined with irradiation could induce autophagic cell death, and this effect was closely related to the TLR9-ERK-mTOR signaling pathway in glioma cells, providing new insights into the investigation mechanism of CpG ODN. PMID:27251306

  3. Varying butyric acid amounts induce different stress- and cell death-related signals in nerve growth factor-treated PC12 cells: implications in neuropathic pain absence during periodontal disease progression.

    PubMed

    Seki, Keisuke; Cueno, Marni E; Kamio, Noriaki; Saito, Yuko; Kamimoto, Atsushi; Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    2016-06-01

    Neuropathic pain is absent from the early stages of periodontal disease possibly due to neurite retraction. Butyric acid (BA) is a periodontopathic metabolite that activates several stress-related signals and, likewise, induce neurite retraction. Neuronal cell death is associated to neurite retraction which would suggest that BA-induced neurite retraction is ascribable to neuronal cell death. However, the underlying mechanism of BA-related cell death signaling remains unknown. In this study, we exposed NGF-treated PC12 cells to varying BA concentrations [0 (control), 0.5, 1.0, 5.0 mM] and determined selected stress-related (H2O2, glutathione reductase, calcium (Ca(2+)), plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase (PMCA), and GADD153/CHOPS) and cell death-associated (extrinsic: FasL, TNF-α, TWEAK, and TRAIL; intrinsic: cytochrome C (CytC), NF-kB, CASP8, CASP9, CASP10, and CASP3) signals. Similarly, we confirmed cell death execution by chromatin condensation. Our results showed that low (0.5 mM) and high (1.0 and 5.0 mM) BA levels differ in stress and cell death signaling. Moreover, at periodontal disease-level BA concentration (5 mM), we observed that only FasL amounts were affected and occurred concurrently with chromatin condensation insinuating that cells have fully committed to neurodegeneration. Thus, we believe that both stress and cell death signaling in NGF-treated PC12 cells are affected differently depending on BA concentration. In a periodontal disease scenario, we hypothesize that during the early stages, low BA amounts accumulate resulting to both stress- and cell death-related signals that favor neurite non-proliferation, whereas, during the later stages, high BA amounts accumulate resulting to both stress- and cell death-related signals that favor neurodegeneration. More importantly, we propose that neuropathic pain absence at any stage of periodontal disease progression is ascribable to BA accumulation regardless of amount. PMID:26994613

  4. Endothelial Cells Enhance Tumor Cell Invasion through a Crosstalk Mediated by CXC Chemokine Signaling1

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Kristy A; Miyazawa, Marta; Cordeiro, Mabel M R; Love, William J; Pinsky, Matthew S; Neiva, Kathleen G; Spalding, Aaron C; Nör, Jacques E

    2008-01-01

    Field cancerization involves the lateral spread of premalignant or malignant disease and contributes to the recurrence of head and neck tumors. The overall hypothesis underlying this work is that endothelial cells actively participate in tumor cell invasion by secreting chemokines and creating a chemotactic gradient for tumor cells. Here we demonstrate that conditioned medium from head and neck tumor cells enhance Bcl-2 expression in neovascular endothelial cells. Oral squamous cell carcinoma-3 (OSCC3) and Kaposi's sarcoma (SLK) show enhanced invasiveness when cocultured with pools of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells stably expressing Bcl-2 (HDMEC-Bcl-2), compared to cocultures with empty vector controls (HDMEC-LXSN). Xenografted OSCC3 tumors vascularized with HDMEC-Bcl-2 presented higher local invasion than OSCC3 tumors vascularized with control HDMEC-LXSN. CXCL1 and CXCL8 were upregulated in primary endothelial cells exposed to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), as well as in HDMEC-Bcl-2. Notably, blockade of CXCR2 signaling, but not CXCR1, inhibited OSCC3 and SLK invasion toward endothelial cells. These data demonstrate that CXC chemokines secreted by endothelial cells induce tumor cell invasion and suggest that the process of lateral spread of tumor cells observed in field cancerization is guided by chemotactic signals that originated from endothelial cells. PMID:18283335

  5. Tim-3 enhances FcεRI-proximal signaling to modulate mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Phong, Binh L; Avery, Lyndsay; Sumpter, Tina L; Gorman, Jacob V; Watkins, Simon C; Colgan, John D; Kane, Lawrence P

    2015-12-14

    T cell (or transmembrane) immunoglobulin and mucin domain protein 3 (Tim-3) has attracted significant attention as a novel immune checkpoint receptor (ICR) on chronically stimulated, often dysfunctional, T cells. Antibodies to Tim-3 can enhance antiviral and antitumor immune responses. Tim-3 is also constitutively expressed by mast cells, NK cells and specific subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells. There is ample evidence for a positive role for Tim-3 in these latter cell types, which is at odds with the model of Tim-3 as an inhibitory molecule on T cells. At this point, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which Tim-3 regulates the function of T cells or other cell types. We have focused on defining the effects of Tim-3 ligation on mast cell activation, as these cells constitutively express Tim-3 and are activated through an ITAM-containing receptor for IgE (FcεRI), using signaling pathways analogous to those in T cells. Using a variety of gain- and loss-of-function approaches, we find that Tim-3 acts at a receptor-proximal point to enhance Lyn kinase-dependent signaling pathways that modulate both immediate-phase degranulation and late-phase cytokine production downstream of FcεRI ligation.

  6. Nitrite circumvents canonical cGMP signaling to enhance proliferation of myocyte precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Totzeck, Matthias; Schicho, Andreas; Stock, Pia; Kelm, Malte; Rassaf, Tienush; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B

    2015-03-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue has a remarkable high regenerative capacity. The underlying cellular events are governed by complex signaling processes, and the proliferation of skeletal myoblasts is a key initial event. The role of nitric oxide (NO) in cell cycle regulation is well-appreciated. Nitrite, an NO oxidation product, is a stable source for NO-like bioactivity particularly in cases when oxygen shortage compromises NO-synthases activity. Although numerous studies suggest that nitrite effects are largely related to NO-dependent signaling, emerging evidence also implicates that nitrite itself can activate protein pathways albeit under physiological, normoxic conditions. This includes a recently demonstrated cyclic guanosine monophosphate-(cGMP)-independent enhancement of endothelial cell proliferation. Whether nitrite itself has the potential to affect myoblast proliferation and metabolism with or without activation of the canonical NO/cGMP pathway to subsequently support muscle cell regeneration is not known. Here we show that nitrite increases proliferation and metabolic activity of murine cultured myoblasts dose-dependently. This effect is not abolished by the NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimida-zoline-1-oxyl-3 oxide and does not affect intracellular cGMP levels, implicating a cGMP-independent mechanism. Nitrite circumvents the rapamycin induced attenuation of myoblast proliferation and enhances mTOR activity. Our results provide evidence for a novel potential physiological and therapeutic approach of nitrite in skeletal muscle regeneration processes under normoxia independent of NO and cGMP. PMID:25501648

  7. β-Arrestin1 enhances hepatocellular carcinogenesis through inflammation-mediated Akt signalling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yidong; Guo, Yunwei; Tan, Siwei; Ke, Bilun; Tao, Jin; Liu, Huiling; Jiang, Jie; Chen, Jianning; Chen, Guihua; Wu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) constitute the largest known superfamily for signal transduction and transmission, and they control a variety of physiological and pathological processes. GPCR adaptor β-arrestins (ARRBs) play a role in cancerous proliferation. However, the effect of ARRBs in inflammation-mediated hepatocellular carcinogenesis is unknown. Here we show that ARRB1, but not ARRB2, is upregulated in inflammation-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and paracancerous tissues in humans. A genotoxic carcinogen, diethylnitrosamine (DEN), significantly induces hepatic inflammation, TNF-α production and ARRB1 expression. Although ARRB1 deficiency does not affect hepatic inflammation and TNF-α production, it markedly represses hepatocellular carcinogenesis by suppressing malignant proliferation in DEN-treated mice. Furthermore, TNF-α directly induces hepatic ARRB1 expression and enhances ARRB1 interaction with Akt by binding to boost Akt phosphorylation, resulting in malignant proliferation of liver cells. Our data suggest that ARRB1 enhances hepatocellular carcinogenesis by inflammation-mediated Akt signalling and that ARRB1 may be a potential therapeutic target for HCC.

  8. Ultrasound signal processing for characterization and enhanced biometry of the cornea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Ronald H.; Reinstein, Dan Z.; Lizzi, Frederick L.; Coleman, D. J.

    2001-05-01

    Purpose: The cornea acts as the window of the eye's optical system, and its chief refractive component. The lack of intervening tissues makes the cornea accessible to very high frequency ultrasonic study. In this report, we detail use of radiofrequency (RF) signal processing methods to characterize corneal pathology and to enhance biometric precision. Methods: Using a 50 MHz PVDF transducer, we scanned the cornea using an arc motion so as to maintain normality and consistent range. RF data were acquired at a sample rate of 500 MHz. Deconvolution against a glass-plate echo allowed biometric enhancement (by effectively broadening the bandwidth) and measurement of tissue backscatter spectra. Results: Calibrated spectrum analysis was used to quantitatively measure backscatter in corneal scars and other pathologies. Signal processing allowed us to attain reproducibility for repeated measurements of the corneal epithelium (approximately 50 microns thick) to 1 micron. By combining measurements from a series of planes, maps of the thickness of the individual layers comprising the cornea were produced. Conclusion: The layers of the cornea have different optical refractive indices, and thus their thicknesses directly affect visual acuity. The scattering of light by a corneal scar is caused by inhomogeneities or irregularities that may result in acoustic backscatter as well. The ability of ultrasound to quantify backscatter and corneal layer thickness provides a new avenue for diagnosis of corneal disease and refractive abnormalities.

  9. Signal enhancement in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using fast square-pulse discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobral, H.; Robledo-Martinez, A.

    2016-10-01

    A fast, high voltage square-shaped electrical pulse initiated by laser ablation was investigated as a means to enhance the analytical capabilities of laser Induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The electrical pulse is generated by the discharge of a charged coaxial cable into a matching impedance. The pulse duration and the stored charge are determined by the length of the cable. The ablation plasma was produced by hitting an aluminum target with a nanosecond 532-nm Nd:YAG laser beam under variable fluence 1.8-900 J cm- 2. An enhancement of up to one order of magnitude on the emission signal-to-noise ratio can be achieved with the spark discharge assisted laser ablation. Besides, this increment is larger for ionized species than for neutrals. LIBS signal is also increased with the discharge voltage with a tendency to saturate for high laser fluences. Electron density and temperature evolutions were determined from time delays of 100 ns after laser ablation plasma onset. Results suggest that the spark discharge mainly re-excites the laser produced plume.

  10. Tim-3 enhances FcεRI-proximal signaling to modulate mast cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Phong, Binh L.; Avery, Lyndsay; Sumpter, Tina L.; Gorman, Jacob V.; Watkins, Simon C.; Colgan, John D.

    2015-01-01

    T cell (or transmembrane) immunoglobulin and mucin domain protein 3 (Tim-3) has attracted significant attention as a novel immune checkpoint receptor (ICR) on chronically stimulated, often dysfunctional, T cells. Antibodies to Tim-3 can enhance antiviral and antitumor immune responses. Tim-3 is also constitutively expressed by mast cells, NK cells and specific subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells. There is ample evidence for a positive role for Tim-3 in these latter cell types, which is at odds with the model of Tim-3 as an inhibitory molecule on T cells. At this point, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which Tim-3 regulates the function of T cells or other cell types. We have focused on defining the effects of Tim-3 ligation on mast cell activation, as these cells constitutively express Tim-3 and are activated through an ITAM-containing receptor for IgE (FcεRI), using signaling pathways analogous to those in T cells. Using a variety of gain- and loss-of-function approaches, we find that Tim-3 acts at a receptor-proximal point to enhance Lyn kinase-dependent signaling pathways that modulate both immediate-phase degranulation and late-phase cytokine production downstream of FcεRI ligation. PMID:26598760

  11. Small molecule aptamer assays based on fluorescence anisotropy signal-enhancer oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Perrier, Sandrine; Bouilloud, Prisca; De Oliveira Coelho, Gisella; Henry, Mickael; Peyrin, Eric

    2016-08-15

    Herein, we design novel fluorescence anisotropy (FA) aptamer sensing platforms dedicated to small molecule detection. The assay strategy relied on enhanced fluctuations of segmental motion dynamics of the aptamer tracer mediated by an unlabelled, partially complementary oligonucleotide. The signal-enhancer oligonucleotide (SEO) essentially served as a free probe fraction revealer. By targeting specific regions of the signalling functional nucleic acid, the SEO binding to the unbound aptamer triggered perturbations of both the internal DNA flexibility and the localized dye environment upon the free probe to duplex structure transition. This potentiating effect determined increased FA variations between the duplex and target bound states of the aptameric probe. FA assay responses were obtained with both pre-structured (adenosine) and unstructured (tyrosinamide) aptamers and with dyes of different photochemical properties (fluorescein and texas red). The multiplexed analysis ability was further demonstrated through the simultaneous multicolour detection of the two small targets. The FA method appears to be especially simple, sensitive and widely applicable. PMID:27085946

  12. Enhancement of neuromuscular dynamics and strength behavior using extremely low magnitude mechanical signals in mice.

    PubMed

    Mettlach, Gabriel; Polo-Parada, Luis; Peca, Lauren; Rubin, Clinton T; Plattner, Florian; Bibb, James A

    2014-01-01

    Exercise in general, and mechanical signals in particular, help ameliorate the neuromuscular symptoms of aging and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders by enhancing muscle function. To better understand the salutary mechanisms of such physical stimuli, we evaluated the potential for low intensity mechanical signals to promote enhanced muscle dynamics. The effects of daily brief periods of low intensity vibration (LIV) on neuromuscular functions and behavioral correlates were assessed in mice. Physiological analysis revealed that LIV increased isometric force production in semitendinosus skeletal muscle. This effect was evident in both young and old mice. Isometric force recordings also showed that LIV reduced the fatiguing effects of intensive synaptic muscle stimulation. Furthermore, LIV increased evoked neurotransmitter release at neuromuscular synapses but had no effect on spontaneous end plate potential amplitude or frequency. In behavioral studies, LIV increased mouse grip strength and potentiated initial motor activity in a novel environment. These results provide evidence for the efficacy of LIV in producing changes in the neuromuscular system that translate into performance gains at a behavioral scale.

  13. Plasmonic Enhancement of Raman Signal using Complex Metallic Nanostructures based on DNA Origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, Gleb

    2015-03-01

    DNA-based nanostructures, such as ``DNA origami,'' have recently emerged as one of the leading techniques for precise positioning of nanoscale materials in fields ranging from computer science to biomedical engineering. The origami is composed of a single scaffold DNA strand to which smaller ``staple`` strands are attached through DNA complementarity. The staples help to fold the scaffold strand into the designed structure of a predetermined shape. The resulting templates are highly addressable and have proven to be versatile tools for site-specific placement of various nanocomponents, such as metallic nanoparticles, quantum dots, fluorophores, etc. Building upon massively paralleled assembly mechanism of the origami and its ability to position nanocomponents, one may hope to utilize it for biosensing purposes. One attractive goal is the Raman spectroscopy, which provides a highly specific chemical fingerprint. Unfortunately, the Raman scattering cross section is small; Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) enhances the otherwise weak Raman signal by trapping the analyte molecules in the regions of intense electric field produced near rough metallic surfaces. These ``hot spots`` can be understood as resulting from localized surface plasmon modes resonantly exited by the incident laser excitation. We have earlier shown that metallic nanoparticles controllably attached to DNA origami can be further enlarged via an in-solution metallization; this technique allowed us to build metallic structures of complex topology. Recently, we have performed Raman spectroscopy of molecules attached to these metallic assemblies. Specifically, DNA origami is first used to organize the metallic structures, followed by a covalent attachment of Raman-active molecules to the metal. We found that the substrates with four nanoparticles per origami produce a strongly enhanced Raman signal compared to the control samples with only one nanoparticle per origami for the same particle

  14. Hydrogen sulfide interacts with calcium signaling to enhance the chromium tolerance in Setaria italica.

    PubMed

    Fang, Huihui; Jing, Tao; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Liping; Jin, Zhuping; Pei, Yanxi

    2014-12-01

    The oscillation of intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) concentration is a primary event in numerous biological processes in plants, including stress response. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), an emerging gasotransmitter, was found to have positive effects in plants responding to chromium (Cr(6+)) stress through interacting with Ca(2+) signaling. While Ca(2+) resemblances H2S in mediating biotic and abiotic stresses, crosstalk between the two pathways remains unclear. In this study, Ca(2+) signaling interacted with H2S to produce a complex physiological response, which enhanced the Cr(6+) tolerance in foxtail millet (Setaria italica). Results indicate that Cr(6+) stress activated endogenous H2S synthesis as well as Ca(2+) signaling. Moreover, toxic symptoms caused by Cr(6+) stress were strongly moderated by 50μM H2S and 20mM Ca(2+). Conversely, treatments with H2S synthesis inhibitor and Ca(2+) chelators prior to Cr(6+)-exposure aggravated these toxic symptoms. Interestingly, Ca(2+) upregulated expression of two important factors in metal metabolism, MT3A and PCS, which participated in the biosynthesis of heavy metal chelators, in a H2S-dependent manner to cope with Cr(6+) stress. These findings also suggest that the H2S dependent pathway is a component of the Ca(2+) activating antioxidant system and H2S partially contributes Ca(2+)-activating antioxidant system.

  15. Cyclic AMP Signaling through Epac Axis Modulates Human Hemogenic Endothelium and Enhances Hematopoietic Cell Generation.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Shobhit; Rönn, Roger E; Guibentif, Carolina; Moraghebi, Roksana; Woods, Niels-Bjarne

    2016-05-10

    Hematopoietic cells emerge from hemogenic endothelium in the developing embryo. Mechanisms behind human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell development remain unclear. Using a human pluripotent stem cell differentiation model, we report that cyclic AMP (cAMP) induction dramatically increases HSC-like cell frequencies. We show that hematopoietic cell generation requires cAMP signaling through the Exchange proteins activated by cAMP (cAMP-Epac) axis; Epac signaling inhibition decreased both hemogenic and non-hemogenic endothelium, and abrogated hematopoietic cell generation. Furthermore, in hematopoietic progenitor and stem-like cells, cAMP induction mitigated oxidative stress, created a redox-state balance, and enhanced C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) expression, benefiting the maintenance of these primitive cells. Collectively, our study provides insights and mechanistic details on the previously unrecognized role of cAMP signaling in regulating human hematopoietic development. These findings advance the mechanistic understanding of hematopoietic development toward the development of transplantable human hematopoietic cells for therapeutic needs. PMID:27117782

  16. Induction of a quorum sensing pathway by environmental signals enhances group A streptococcal resistance to lysozyme

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jennifer C.; Jimenez, Juan Cristobal; Federle, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The human-restricted pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A Streptococcus, GAS) is responsible for wide-ranging pathologies at numerous sites in the body, but has the proclivity to proliferate in individuals asymptomatically. The ability to survive in diverse tissues is undoubtedly benefited by sensory pathways that recognize environmental cues corresponding to stress and nutrient availability and thereby trigger adaptive responses. We investigated the impact that environmental signals contribute to cell-to-cell chemical communication (quorum sensing, QS) by monitoring activity of the Rgg2/Rgg3 and SHP-pheromone system in GAS. We identified metal limitation and the alternate carbon source mannose as two environmental indicators likely to be encountered by GAS in the host that significantly induced the Rgg-SHP system. Disruption of the metal regulator MtsR partially accounted for the response to metal depletion, whereas ptsABCD was primarily responsible for QS induction due to mannose, but each sensory system induced Rgg-SHP signaling apparently by different mechanisms. Significantly, we found that induction of QS, regardless of the GAS serotype tested, led to enhanced resistance to the antimicrobial agent lysozyme. These results indicate the benefits for GAS to integrate environmental signals with intercellular communication pathways in protection from host defenses. PMID:26062094

  17. Enhanced disease susceptibility 1 and salicylic acid act redundantly to regulate resistance gene-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, Srivathsa C; Jeong, Rae-Dong; Mandal, Mihir K; Zhu, Shifeng; Chandra-Shekara, A C; Xia, Ye; Hersh, Matthew; Stromberg, Arnold J; Navarre, DuRoy; Kachroo, Aardra; Kachroo, Pradeep

    2009-07-01

    Resistance (R) protein-associated pathways are well known to participate in defense against a variety of microbial pathogens. Salicylic acid (SA) and its associated proteinaceous signaling components, including enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1), non-race-specific disease resistance 1 (NDR1), phytoalexin deficient 4 (PAD4), senescence associated gene 101 (SAG101), and EDS5, have been identified as components of resistance derived from many R proteins. Here, we show that EDS1 and SA fulfill redundant functions in defense signaling mediated by R proteins, which were thought to function independent of EDS1 and/or SA. Simultaneous mutations in EDS1 and the SA-synthesizing enzyme SID2 compromised hypersensitive response and/or resistance mediated by R proteins that contain coiled coil domains at their N-terminal ends. Furthermore, the expression of R genes and the associated defense signaling induced in response to a reduction in the level of oleic acid were also suppressed by compromising SA biosynthesis in the eds1 mutant background. The functional redundancy with SA was specific to EDS1. Results presented here redefine our understanding of the roles of EDS1 and SA in plant defense.

  18. Neural Inhibition of Dopaminergic Signaling Enhances Immunity in a Cell-Non-autonomous Manner.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiou; Aballay, Alejandro

    2016-09-12

    The innate immune system is the front line of host defense against microbial infections, but its rapid and uncontrolled activation elicits microbicidal mechanisms that have deleterious effects [1, 2]. Increasing evidence indicates that the metazoan nervous system, which responds to stimuli originating from both the internal and the external environment, functions as a modulatory apparatus that controls not only microbial killing pathways but also cellular homeostatic mechanisms [3-5]. Here we report that dopamine signaling controls innate immune responses through a D1-like dopamine receptor, DOP-4, in Caenorhabditis elegans. Chlorpromazine inhibition of DOP-4 in the nervous system activates a microbicidal PMK-1/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway that enhances host resistance against bacterial infections. The immune inhibitory function of dopamine originates in CEP neurons and requires active DOP-4 in downstream ASG neurons. Our findings indicate that dopamine signaling from the nervous system controls immunity in a cell-non-autonomous manner and identifies the dopaminergic system as a potential therapeutic target for not only infectious diseases but also a range of conditions that arise as a consequence of malfunctioning immune responses.

  19. PARG dysfunction enhances DNA double strand break formation in S-phase after alkylation DNA damage and augments different cell death pathways

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, H; Poetsch, A R; Gunji, A; Maeda, D; Fujimori, H; Fujihara, H; Yoshida, T; Ogino, H; Masutani, M

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is the primary enzyme responsible for the degradation of poly(ADP-ribose). PARG dysfunction sensitizes cells to alkylating agents and induces cell death; however, the details of this effect have not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which PARG deficiency leads to cell death in different cell types using methylmethanesulfonate (MMS), an alkylating agent, and Parg−/− mouse ES cells and human cancer cell lines. Parg−/− mouse ES cells showed increased levels of γ-H2AX, a marker of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), accumulation of poly(ADP-ribose), p53 network activation, and S-phase arrest. Early apoptosis was enhanced in Parg−/− mouse ES cells. Parg−/− ES cells predominantly underwent caspase-dependent apoptosis. PARG was then knocked down in a p53-defective cell line, MIAPaCa2 cells, a human pancreatic cancer cell line. MIAPaCa2 cells were sensitized to MMS by PARG knockdown. Enhanced necrotic cell death was induced in MIAPaCa2 cells after augmenting γ-H2AX levels and S-phase arrest. Taken together, these data suggest that DSB repair defect causing S-phase arrest, but p53 status was not important for sensitization to alkylation DNA damage by PARG dysfunction, whereas the cell death pathway is dependent on the cell type. This study demonstrates that functional inhibition of PARG may be useful for sensitizing at least particular cancer cells to alkylating agents. PMID:23744356

  20. Enhancement of Antiviral Immunity by Small Molecule Antagonist of Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Chulbul M. I.; Dabelic, Rea; Martin, James P.; Jager, Lindsey D.; Haider, S. Mohammad; Johnson, Howard M.

    2011-01-01

    Suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCSs) are negative regulators of both innate and adaptive immunity via inhibition of signaling by cytokines such as type I and type II IFNs. We have developed a small peptide antagonist of SOCS-1 that corresponds to the activation loop of JAK2. SOCS-1 inhibits both type I and type II IFN activities by binding to the kinase activation loop via the kinase inhibitory region of the SOCS. The antagonist, pJAK2(1001–1013), inhibited the replication of vaccinia virus and encephalomyocarditis virus in cell culture, suggesting that it possesses broad antiviral activity. In addition, pJAK2(1001–1013) protected mice against lethal vaccinia and encephalomyocarditis virus infection. pJAK2(1001–1013) increased the intracellular level of the constitutive IFN-β, which may play a role in the antagonist antiviral effect at the cellular level. Ab neutralization suggests that constitutive IFN-β may act intracellularly, consistent with recent findings on IFN-γ intracellular signaling. pJAK2(1001–1013) also synergizes with IFNs as per IFN-γ mimetic to exert a multiplicative antiviral effect at the level of transcription, the cell, and protection of mice against lethal viral infection. pJAK2(1001–1013) binds to the kinase inhibitory region of both SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 and blocks their inhibitory effects on the IFN-γ activation site promoter. In addition to a direct antiviral effect and synergism with IFN, the SOCS antagonist also exhibits adjuvant effects on humoral and cellular immunity as well as an enhancement of polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid activation of TLR3. The SOCS antagonist thus presents a novel and effective approach to enhancement of host defense against viruses. PMID:20543109

  1. Dysregulation of Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (Wif1) expression resulted in aberrant Wnt-β-catenin signaling and cell death of the cloaca endoderm, and anorectal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Ng, R C-L; Matsumaru, D; Ho, A S-H; Garcia-Barceló, M-M; Yuan, Z-W; Smith, D; Kodjabachian, L; Tam, P K-H; Yamada, G; Lui, V C-H

    2014-01-01

    In mammalian urorectal development, the urorectal septum (urs) descends from the ventral body wall to the cloaca membrane (cm) to partition the cloaca into urogenital sinus and rectum. Defective urs growth results in human congenital anorectal malformations (ARMs), and their pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. Recent studies only focused on the importance of urs mesenchyme proliferation, which is induced by endoderm-derived Sonic Hedgehog (Shh). Here, we showed that the programmed cell death of the apical urs and proximal cm endoderm is particularly crucial for the growth of urs during septation. The apoptotic endoderm was closely associated with the tempo-spatial expression of Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (Wif1), which is an inhibitor of Wnt-β-catenin signaling. In Wif1lacZ/lacZ mutant mice and cultured urorectum with exogenous Wif1, cloaca septation was defective with undescended urs and hypospadias-like phenotypes, and such septation defects were also observed in Shh−/− mutants and in endodermal β-catenin gain-of-function (GOF) mutants. In addition, Wif1 and Shh were expressed in a complementary manner in the cloaca endoderm, and Wif1 was ectopically expressed in the urs and cm associated with excessive endodermal apoptosis and septation defects in Shh−/− mutants. Furthermore, apoptotic cells were markedly reduced in the endodermal β-catenin GOF mutant embryos, which counteracted the inhibitory effects of Wif1. Taken altogether, these data suggest that regulated expression of Wif1 is critical for the growth of the urs during cloaca septation. Hence, Wif1 governs cell apoptosis of urs endoderm by repressing β-catenin signal, which may facilitate the protrusion of the underlying proliferating mesenchymal cells towards the cm for cloaca septation. Dysregulation of this endodermal Shh-Wif1-β-catenin signaling axis contributes to ARM pathogenesis. PMID:24632949

  2. Amylin-Induced Central IL-6 Production Enhances Ventromedial Hypothalamic Leptin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Miranda D.; Dunn-Meynell, Ambrose A.; Boyle, Christina N.; Lutz, Thomas A.; Levin, Barry E.

    2015-01-01

    Amylin acts acutely via the area postrema to reduce food intake and body weight, but it also interacts with leptin over longer periods of time, possibly via the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), to increase leptin signaling and phosphorylation of STAT3. We postulated that amylin enhances VMH leptin signaling by inducing interleukin (IL)-6, which then interacts with its gp130 receptor to activate STAT3 signaling and gene transcription downstream of the leptin receptor. We found that components of the amylin receptor (RAMPs1–3, CTR1a,b) are expressed in cultured VMH astrocytes, neurons, and microglia, as well as in micropunches of arcuate and ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei (VMN). Amylin exposure for 5 days increased IL-6 mRNA expression in VMH explants and microglia by two- to threefold, respectively, as well as protein abundance in culture supernatants by five- and twofold, respectively. Amylin had no similar effects on cultured astrocytes or neurons. In rats, 5 days of amylin treatment decreased body weight gain and/or food intake and increased IL-6 mRNA expression in the VMN. Similar 5-day amylin treatment increased VMN leptin-induced phosphorylation of STAT3 expression in wild-type mice and rats infused with lateral ventricular IgG but not in IL-6 knockout mice or rats infused with ventricular IL-6 antibody. Lateral ventricular infusion of IL-6 antibody also prevented the amylin-induced decrease of body weight gain. These results show that amylin-induced VMH microglial IL-6 production is the likely mechanism by which amylin treatment interacts with VMH leptin signaling to increase its effect on weight loss. PMID:25409701

  3. SH2B1beta adaptor is a key enhancer of RET tyrosine kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Donatello, S; Fiorino, A; Degl'Innocenti, D; Alberti, L; Miranda, C; Gorla, L; Bongarzone, I; Rizzetti, M G; Pierotti, M A; Borrello, M G

    2007-10-01

    The RET gene encodes two main isoforms of a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) implicated in various human diseases. Activating germ-line point mutations are responsible for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2-associated medullary thyroid carcinomas, inactivating germ-line mutations for Hirschsprung's disease, while somatic rearrangements (RET/PTCs) are specific to papillary thyroid carcinomas. SH2B1beta, a member of the SH2B adaptors family, and binding partner for several RTKs, has been recently described to interact with proto-RET. Here, we show that both RET isoforms and its oncogenic derivatives bind to SH2B1beta through the SRC homology 2 (SH2) domain and a kinase activity-dependent mechanism. As a result, RET phosphorylates SH2B1beta, which in turn enhances its autophosphorylation, kinase activity, and downstream signaling. RET tyrosine residues 905 and 981 are important determinants for functional binding of the adaptor, as removal of both autophosphorylation sites displaces its recruitment. Binding of SH2B1beta appears to protect RET from dephosphorylation by protein tyrosine phosphatases, and might represent a likely mechanism contributing to its upregulation. Thus, overexpression of SH2B1beta, by enhancing phosphorylation/activation of RET transducers, potentiates the cellular differentiation and the neoplastic transformation thereby induced, and counteracts the action of RET inhibitors. Overall, our results identify SH2B1beta as a key enhancer of RET physiologic and pathologic activities.

  4. Pharmacology of novel small-molecule tubulin inhibitors in glioblastoma cells with enhanced EGFR signalling.

    PubMed

    Phoa, Athena F; Browne, Stephen; Gurgis, Fadi M S; Åkerfeldt, Mia C; Döbber, Alexander; Renn, Christian; Peifer, Christian; Stringer, Brett W; Day, Bryan W; Wong, Chin; Chircop, Megan; Johns, Terrance G; Kassiou, Michael; Munoz, Lenka

    2015-12-15

    We recently reported that CMPD1, originally developed as an inhibitor of MK2 activation, primarily inhibits tubulin polymerisation and induces apoptosis in glioblastoma cells. In the present study we provide detailed pharmacological investigation of CMPD1 analogues with improved molecular properties. We determined their anti-cancer efficacy in glioblastoma cells with enhanced EGFR signalling, as deregulated EGFR often leads to chemoresistance. Eight analogues of CMPD1 with varying lipophilicity and basicity were synthesised and tested for efficacy in the cell viability assay using established glioblastoma cell lines and patient-derived primary glioblastoma cells. The mechanism of action for the most potent analogue 15 was determined using MK2 activation and tubulin polymerisation assays, together with the immunofluorescence analysis of the mitotic spindle formation. Apoptosis was analysed by Annexin V staining, immunoblotting analysis of bcl-2 proteins and PARP cleavage. The apoptotic activity of CMPD1 and analogue 15 was comparable across glioblastoma cell lines regardless of the EGFR status. Primary glioblastoma cells of the classical subtype that are characterized by enhanced EGFR activity were most sensitive to the treatment with CMPD1 and 15. In summary, we present mechanism of action for a novel small molecule tubulin inhibitor, compound 15 that inhibits tubulin polymerisation and mitotic spindle formation, induces degradation of anti-apoptotic bcl-2 proteins and leads to apoptosis of glioblastoma cells. We also demonstrate that the enhanced EGFR activity does not decrease the efficacy of tubulin inhibitors developed in this study.

  5. Fast and simple acquisition of solid-state 14N NMR spectra with signal enhancement via population transfer.

    PubMed

    O'Dell, Luke A; Schurko, Robert W

    2009-05-20

    A new approach for the acquisition of static, wideline (14)N NMR powder patterns is outlined. The method involves the use of frequency-swept pulses which serve two simultaneous functions: (1) broad-band excitation of magnetization and (2) signal enhancement via population transfer. The signal enhancement mechanism is described using numerical simulations and confirmed experimentally. This approach, which we call DEISM (Direct Enhancement of Integer Spin Magnetization), allows high-quality (14)N spectra to be acquired at intermediate field strengths in an uncomplicated way and in a fraction of the time required for previously reported methods.

  6. Newly synthesized quinazolinone HMJ-38 suppresses angiogenetic responses and triggers human umbilical vein endothelial cell apoptosis through p53-modulated Fas/death receptor signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Jo-Hua; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Hour, Mann-Jen; Chang, Shu-Jen; Lee, Tsung-Han; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2013-06-01

    The current study aims to investigate the antiangiogenic responses and apoptotic death of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by a newly synthesized compound named 2-(3′-methoxyphenyl)-6-pyrrolidinyl-4-quinazolinone (HMJ-38). This work attempted to not only explore the effects of angiogenesis on in vivo and ex vivo studies but also hypothesize the implications for HUVECs (an ideal cell model for angiogenesis in vitro) and further undermined apoptotic experiments to verify the underlying molecular signaling by HMJ-38. Our results demonstrated that HMJ-38 significantly inhibited blood vessel growth and microvessel formation by the mouse Matrigel plug assay of angiogenesis, and the suppression of microsprouting from the rat aortic ring assay was observed after HMJ-38 exposure. In addition, HMJ-38 disrupted the tube formation and blocked the ability of HUVECs to migrate in response to VEGF. We also found that HMJ-38 triggered cell apoptosis of HUVECs in vitro. HMJ-38 concentration-dependently suppressed viability and induced apoptotic damage in HUVECs. HMJ-38-influenced HUVECs were performed by determining the oxidative stress (ROS production) and ATM/p53-modulated Fas and DR4/DR5 signals that were examined by flow cytometry, Western blotting, siRNA and real-time RT-PCR analyses, respectively. Our findings demonstrate that p53-regulated extrinsic pathway might fully contribute to HMJ-38-provoked apoptotic death in HUVECs. In view of these observations, we conclude that HMJ-38 reduces angiogenesis in vivo and ex vivo as well as induces apoptosis of HUVECs in vitro. Overall, HMJ-38 has a potent anti-neovascularization effect and could warrant being a vascular targeting agent in the future. - Highlights: • HMJ-38 suppresses angiogenic actions in vivo and ex vivo. • Inhibitions of blood vessel and microvessel formation by HMJ-38 are acted. • Cytotoxic effects of HUVECs occur by HMJ-38 challenge. • p53-modulated extrinsic pathway contributes to HMJ-38

  7. Erythropoietin enhancement of rat pancreatic tumor cell proliferation requires the activation of ERK and JNK signals.

    PubMed

    Bose, Chhanda; Udupa, Kodetthoor B

    2008-08-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) regulates the proliferation and differentiation of erythroid cells by binding to its specific transmembrane receptor EPOR. Recent studies, however, have shown that the EPOR is additionally present in various cancer cells and EPO induces the proliferation of these cells, suggesting a different function for EPO other than erythropoiesis. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to examine EPOR expression and the role of EPO in the proliferation and signaling cascades involved in this process, using the rat pancreatic tumor cell line AR42J. Our results showed that AR42J cells expressed EPOR, and EPO significantly enhanced their proliferation. Cell cycle analysis of EPO-treated cells indicated an increased percentage of cells in the S phase, whereas cell numbers in G0/G1 phase were significantly reduced. Phosphorylation of extracellular regulatory kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and c-Jun NH(2) terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2) was rapidly stimulated and sustained after EPO addition. Treatment of cells with mitogen-activated protein/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor PD98059 or JNK inhibitor SP600125 significantly inhibited EPO-enhanced proliferation and also increased the fraction of cells in G0/G1 phase. Furthermore, the inhibition of JNK using small interference RNA (siRNA) suppressed EPO-enhanced proliferation of AR42J cells. Taken together, our results indicate that AR42J cells express EPOR and that the activation of both ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 by EPO is essential in regulating proliferation and the cell cycle. Thus both appear to play a key role in EPO-enhanced proliferation and suggest that the presence of both is required for EPO-mediated proliferation of AR42J cells.

  8. The pepper GNA-related lectin and PAN domain protein gene, CaGLP1, is required for plant cell death and defense signaling during bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Lee, Dong Hyuk; Choi, Du Seok; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-12-01

    Carbohydrate-binding proteins, commonly referred to as lectins or agglutinins, function in defense responses to microbial pathogens. Pepper (Capsicum annuum) GNA-related lectin and PAN-domain protein gene CaGLP1 was isolated and functionally characterized from pepper leaves infected with Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv). CaGLP1 contained an amine-terminus prokaryotic membrane lipoprotein lipid attachment site, a Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectin domain responsible for the recognition of high-mannose N-glycans, and a carboxyl-terminus PAN/apple domain. RNA gel blot and immunoblot analyses determined that CaGLP1 was strongly induced in pepper by compatible and incompatible Xcv infection. CaGLP1 protein localized primarily to the plasma membrane and exhibited mannose-binding specificity. CaGLP1-silenced pepper plants were more susceptible to compatible or incompatible Xcv infection compared with that of non-silenced control plants. CaGLP1 silencing in pepper leaves did not accumulate H2O2 and induce cell death during incompatible Xcv infection. Defense-related CaDEF1 (defensin) gene expression was significantly reduced in CaGLP1-silenced pepper plants. CaGLP1-overexpression in Arabidopsis thaliana enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. Defense-related AtPDF1.2 expression was elevated in CaGLP1-overexpression lines. Together, these results suggest that CaGLP1 is required for plant cell death and defense responses through the reactive oxygen species burst and downstream defense-related gene expression in response to bacterial pathogen challenge.

  9. Rapamycin reverses NPM-ALK-induced glucocorticoid resistance in lymphoid tumor cells by inhibiting mTOR signaling pathway, enhancing G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gu, L; Gao, J; Li, Q; Zhu, Y P; Jia, C S; Fu, R Y; Chen, Y; Liao, Q K; Ma, Z

    2008-11-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is an oncogene product involved in hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic malignancies. Recent studies have demonstrated that nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK, originated from the fusion of NPM and ALK genes, causes cell transformation through diverse mechanisms. Here, we show a novel mechanism by which NPM-ALK transforms lymphoid tumor cells to become resistant to glucocorticoid (GC) or dexamethasone (Dex) treatment. Transformed BaF3 cells by NPM-ALK were much more resistant to Dex compared with their parental cells, and concurrently had a constitutive activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, as evidenced by hyperphosphorylation of its downstream effectors, p70 S6 kinase (p70S6K) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1). The mTOR inhibitor rapamycin suppressed activation of p70S6K in BaF3/NPM-ALK cells and reversed GC resistance by synergistically inhibiting mTOR signaling pathway, enhancing cell cycle arrest at G(1) phase and promoting apoptotic cell death. In conclusion, our data indicate that the ALK fusion kinase, NPM-ALK, induces GC resistance by activating mTOR signaling, and addition of mTOR inhibitors to the chemotherapeutic regimen of ALK+ lymphomas may improve the prognosis.

  10. Enhanced BDNF signalling following chronic hypoxia potentiates catecholamine release from cultured rat adrenal chromaffin cells

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Angela L; Zhang, Min; Nurse, Colin A

    2015-01-01

    Environmental stressors, including chronic hypoxia, enhance the ability of adrenomedullary chromaffin cells (AMCs) to secrete catecholamines; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we investigated the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling in rat AMCs exposed to chronic hypoxia. In rat adrenal glands, BDNF and its tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor are highly expressed in the cortex and medulla, respectively. Exposure of AMCs to chronic hypoxia (2% O2; 48 h) in vitro caused a significant increase to TrkB mRNA expression. A similar increase was observed in an immortalized chromaffin cell line (MAH cells); however, it was absent in MAH cells deficient in the transcription factor HIF-2α. A specific TrkB agonist, 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF), stimulated quantal catecholamine secretion from chronically hypoxic (CHox; 2% O2) AMCs to a greater extent than normoxic (Nox; 21% O2) controls. Activation of TrkB by BDNF or 7,8-DHF increased intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), an effect that was significantly larger in CHox cells. The 7,8-DHF-induced [Ca2+]i rise was sensitive to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor K252a and nickel (2 mm), but not the Ca2+ store-depleting agent cyclopiazonic acid. Blockade of T-type calcium channels with TTA-P2 (1 μm) or voltage-gated Na+ channels with TTX inhibited BDNF-induced [Ca2+]i increases. BDNF also induced a dose-dependent enhancement of action potential firing in CHox cells. These data demonstrate that during chronic hypoxia, enhancement of BDNF-TrkB signalling increases voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx and catecholamine secretion in chromaffin cells, and that T-type Ca2+ channels play a key role in the signalling pathway. Key points We investigated the role of the neurotrophin BDNF signalling via the TrkB receptor in rat adrenomedullary chromaffin cells (AMCs) exposed to normoxia (Nox; 21% O2) and chronic hypoxia (CHox; 2% O2) in vitro for ∼48 h. TrkB receptor expression was

  11. Male satin bowerbirds (Ptilonorhynchus violaceus) compensate for sexual signal loss by enhancing multiple display features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravery, Benjamin D.; Goldizen, Anne W.

    2007-06-01

    Numerous studies have focussed on the relationship between female choice and the multiple exaggerated sexual traits of males. However, little is known about the ability of males to actively enhance specific components of their display in response to the loss of one component. We investigated the capacity of male satin bowerbirds (Ptilonorhynchus violaceus) to respond to the loss of one of their sexual signals by performing an experiment in which we removed decorations at their bowers. We found that males compensated for decoration loss by increasing bower construction behaviour and decreasing their latency to bower painting. These results are novel because they suggest that males can assess the quality of their own display and make decisions about how to augment their displays. We discuss these results in the context of previous studies of mate choice in satin bowerbirds, as both of the supplementary behaviours we observed are known correlates of male mating success.

  12. Peroxidase-encapsulated cyclodextrin nanosponge immunoconjugates as a signal enhancement tool in optical and electrochemical assays.

    PubMed

    Wajs, Ewelina; Caldera, Fabrizio; Trotta, Francesco; Fragoso, Alex

    2014-01-21

    Cyclodextrin nanosponges bearing carboxylate groups have been prepared by crosslinking β-cyclodextrin with pyromellitic dianhydride to form a carboxylic acid terminated nanoporous material. The surface of the particles was covalently modified with an anti-IgG antibody and then loaded with horseradish peroxidase. The structures of unmodified and protein modified nanosponge particles were investigated by Raman spectroscopy and imaging methods. Confocal microscopy indicates that the antibody is located in the outside of the particle while HRP is encapsulated in the inner part. The possibility to use these modified nanosponges as a signal enhancement tool in enzyme-linked colorimetric and electrochemical assays was evaluated using a sandwich format comprising immobilised gliadin as an antigen, a target anti-gliadin antibody and an anti-IgG antibody conjugated to the enzyme-loaded nanosponge immunoconjugates.

  13. USP15 targets ALK3/BMPR1A for deubiquitylation to enhance bone morphogenetic protein signalling

    PubMed Central

    Herhaus, Lina; Al-Salihi, Mazin A.; Dingwell, Kevin S.; Cummins, Timothy D.; Wasmus, Lize; Vogt, Janis; Ewan, Richard; Bruce, David; Macartney, Thomas; Weidlich, Simone; Smith, James C.; Sapkota, Gopal P.

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinase ALK3/BMPR1A mediates bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling through phosphorylation and activation of SMADs 1/5/8. SMAD6, a transcriptional target of BMP, negatively regulates the BMP pathway by recruiting E3 ubiquitin ligases and targeting ALK3 for ubiquitin-mediated degradation. Here, we identify a deubiquitylating enzyme USP15 as an interactor of SMAD6 and ALK3. We show that USP15 enhances BMP-induced phosphorylation of SMAD1 by interacting with and deubiquitylating ALK3. RNAi-mediated depletion of USP15 increases ALK3 K48-linked polyubiquitylation, and reduces both BMP-induced SMAD1 phosphorylation and transcription of BMP target genes. We also show that loss of USP15 expression from mouse myoblast cells inhibits BMP-induced osteoblast differentiation. Furthermore, USP15 modulates BMP-induced phosphorylation of SMAD1 and transcription during Xenopus embryogenesis. PMID:24850914

  14. USP15 targets ALK3/BMPR1A for deubiquitylation to enhance bone morphogenetic protein signalling.

    PubMed

    Herhaus, Lina; Al-Salihi, Mazin A; Dingwell, Kevin S; Cummins, Timothy D; Wasmus, Lize; Vogt, Janis; Ewan, Richard; Bruce, David; Macartney, Thomas; Weidlich, Simone; Smith, James C; Sapkota, Gopal P

    2014-05-01

    Protein kinase ALK3/BMPR1A mediates bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling through phosphorylation and activation of SMADs 1/5/8. SMAD6, a transcriptional target of BMP, negatively regulates the BMP pathway by recruiting E3 ubiquitin ligases and targeting ALK3 for ubiquitin-mediated degradation. Here, we identify a deubiquitylating enzyme USP15 as an interactor of SMAD6 and ALK3. We show that USP15 enhances BMP-induced phosphorylation of SMAD1 by interacting with and deubiquitylating ALK3. RNAi-mediated depletion of USP15 increases ALK3 K48-linked polyubiquitylation, and reduces both BMP-induced SMAD1 phosphorylation and transcription of BMP target genes. We also show that loss of USP15 expression from mouse myoblast cells inhibits BMP-induced osteoblast differentiation. Furthermore, USP15 modulates BMP-induced phosphorylation of SMAD1 and transcription during Xenopus embryogenesis. PMID:24850914

  15. Enhancement of arachidonic acid signaling pathway by nicotinic acid receptor HM74A

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yuting . E-mail: ytang@prdus.jnj.com; Zhou, Lubing; Gunnet, Joseph W.; Wines, Pamela G.; Cryan, Ellen V.; Demarest, Keith T.

    2006-06-23

    HM74A is a G protein-coupled receptor for nicotinic acid (niacin), which has been used clinically to treat dyslipidemia for decades. The molecular mechanisms whereby niacin exerts its pleiotropic effects on lipid metabolism remain largely unknown. In addition, the most common side effect in niacin therapy is skin flushing that is caused by prostaglandin release, suggesting that the phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2})/arachidonic acid (AA) pathway is involved. Various eicosanoids have been shown to activate peroxisome-proliferator activated receptors (PPAR) that play a diverse array of roles in lipid metabolism. To further elucidate the potential roles of HM74A in mediating the therapeutic effects and/or side effects of niacin, we sought to explore the signaling events upon HM74A activation. Here we demonstrated that HM74A synergistically enhanced UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner in A431 cells. Activation of HM74A also led to Ca{sup 2+}-mobilization and enhanced bradykinin-promoted Ca{sup 2+}-mobilization through Gi protein. While HM74A increased ERK1/2 activation by the bradykinin receptor, it had no effects on UTP-promoted ERK1/2 activation.Furthermore, UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release was significantly decreased in the presence of both MAPK kinase inhibitor PD 098059 and PKC inhibitor GF 109203X. However, the synergistic effects of HM74A were not dramatically affected by co-treatment with both inhibitors, indicating the cross-talk occurred at the receptor level. Finally, stimulation of A431 cells transiently transfected with PPRE-luciferase with AA significantly induced luciferase activity, mimicking the effects of PPAR{gamma} agonist rosiglitazone, suggesting that alteration of AA signaling pathway can regulate gene expression via endogenous PPARs.

  16. Signal-to-noise ratio enhancement of silicon nanowires biosensor with rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Gao, Anran; Zou, Nengli; Dai, Pengfei; Lu, Na; Li, Tie; Wang, Yuelin; Zhao, Jianlong; Mao, Hongju

    2013-09-11

    Herein, we describe a novel approach for rapid, label-free and specific DNA detection by applying rolling circle amplification (RCA) based on silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (SiNW-FET) for the first time. Highly responsive SiNWs were fabricated with a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible anisotropic self-stop etching technique which eliminated the need for hybrid method. The probe DNA was immobilized on the surface of SiNW, followed by sandwich hybridization with the perfectly matched target DNA and RCA primer that acted as a primer to hybridize the RCA template. The RCA reaction created a long single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) product and thus enhanced the electronic responses of SiNW significantly. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as a figure-of-merit was analyzed to estimate the signal enhancement and possible detection limit. The nanosensor showed highly sensitive concentration-dependent conductance change in response to specific target DNA sequences. Because of the binding of an abundance of repeated sequences of RCA products, the SNR of >20 for 1 fM DNA detection was achieved, implying a detection floor of 50 aM. This RCA-based SiNW biosensor also discriminated perfectly matched target DNA from one-base mismatched DNA with high selectivity due to the substantially reduced nonspecific binding onto the SiNW surface through RCA. The combination of SiNW FET sensor with RCA will increase diagnostic capacity and the ability of laboratories to detect unexpected viruses, making it a potential tool for early diagnosis of gene-related diseases. PMID:23937430

  17. Caffeine intake improves fructose-induced hypertension and insulin resistance by enhancing central insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Tung-Chen; Liu, Chun-Peng; Cheng, Wen-Han; Chen, Bo-Rong; Lu, Pei-Jung; Cheng, Pei-Wen; Ho, Wen-Yu; Sun, Gwo-Ching; Liou, Jau-Cheng; Tseng, Ching-Jiunn

    2014-03-01

    Recent clinical studies found that fructose intake leads to insulin resistance and hypertension. Fructose consumption promotes protein fructosylation and formation of superoxide. In a previous study, we revealed that inhibition of superoxide production in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) reduces blood pressure. Caffeine displays significant antioxidant ability in protecting membranes against oxidative damage and can lower the risk of insulin resistance. However, the mechanism through which caffeine improves fructose-induced insulin resistance is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether caffeine consumption can abolish superoxide generation to enhance insulin signaling in the NTS, thereby reducing blood pressure in rats with fructose-induced hypertension. Treatment with caffeine for 4 weeks decreased blood pressure, serum fasting glucose, insulin, homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance, and triglyceride levels and increased the serum direct high-density lipoprotein level in fructose-fed rats but not in control rats. Caffeine treatment resulted in the recovery of fructose-induced decrease in nitric oxide production in the NTS. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescence analyses further showed that caffeine reduced the fructose-induced phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1(S307)) and reversed Akt(S473) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation. Similarly, caffeine was able to improve insulin sensitivity and decrease insulin levels in the NTS evoked by fructose. Caffeine intake also reduced the production of superoxide and expression of receptor of advanced glycation end product in the NTS. These results suggest that caffeine may enhance insulin receptor substrate 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt-neuronal nitric oxide synthase signaling to decrease blood pressure by abolishing superoxide production in the NTS.

  18. Prolactin signaling enhances colon cancer stemness by modulating Notch signaling in a Jak2-STAT3/ERK manner.

    PubMed

    Neradugomma, Naveen K; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Tawfik, Ossama W; Goffin, Vincent; Kumar, T Rajendra; Jensen, Roy A; Anant, Shrikant

    2014-04-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is a secretory cytokine produced by various tissues. Binding to the cognate PRL receptor (PRLR), it activates intracellular signaling via janus kinase (JAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins. PRL regulates diverse activities under normal and abnormal conditions, including malignancies. Previous clinical data suggest serum PRL levels are elevated in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. In this study, we first determined the expression of PRL and PRLR in colon cancer tissue and cell lines. Higher levels of PRLR expression were observed in the cancer cells and cell lines compared with normal colonic epithelial cells. Incubation of colon cancer cells with PRL-induced JAK2, STAT3 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation and increased expression of Jagged 1, which is a Notch-1 receptor ligand. Notch signaling regulates CRC stem cell population. We observed increased accumulation of the cleaved/active form of Notch-1 receptor (Notch intracellular domain) and increased expression of Notch responsive genes HEY1, HES1 and stem cell marker genes DCLK1, LGR5, ALDH1 and CD44. Finally, inhibiting PRL induced JAK2-STAT3 and JAK2-ERK1/2 using AG490 and PD98059, respectively, leads to complete abrogation of Notch signaling, suggesting a role for this pathway in regulating CRC stem cells. Together, our results demonstrate that cytokine signaling induced by PRL is active in colorectal cancers and may provide a novel target for therapeutic intervention.

  19. Galloflavin, a new lactate dehydrogenase inhibitor, induces the death of human breast cancer cells with different glycolytic attitude by affecting distinct signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Farabegoli, F; Vettraino, M; Manerba, M; Fiume, L; Roberti, M; Di Stefano, G

    2012-11-20

    Galloflavin (GF), a recently identified lactate dehydrogenase inhibitor, hinders the proliferation of cancer cells by blocking glycolysis and ATP production. The aim of the present experiments was to study the effect of this compound on breast cancer cell lines reproducing different pathological subtypes of this tumor: MCF-7 (the well differentiated form), MDA-MB-231 (the aggressive triple negative tumor) and MCF-Tam (a sub-line of MCF-7 with acquired tamoxifen resistance). We observed marked differences in the energetic metabolism of these cell lines. Compared to MCF-7 cells, both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-Tam cells exhibited higher LDH levels and glucose uptake and showed lower capacity of oxygen consumption. In spite of these differences, GF exerted similar growth inhibitory effects. This result was explained by the finding of a constitutively activated stress response in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-Tam cells, which reproduce the poor prognosis tumor forms. As a further proof, different signaling pathways were found to be involved in the antiproliferative action of GF. In MCF-7 cells we observed a down regulation of the ERα-mediated signaling needed for cell survival. On the contrary, in MCF-Tam and MDA-MB-231 cells growth inhibition appeared to be contributed by an oxidative stress condition. The prevalent mechanism of cell death was found to be apoptosis induction. Because of the clinical relevance of breast cancer forms having the triple negative and/or chemoresistant phenotype, our results showing comparable effects of GF even on aggressively growing cells encourage further studies to verify the potential of this compound in improving the chemotherapy of breast cancer.

  20. Smad8 is expressed in the anterior necrotic zone: evidence for a role of bone morphogenetic proteins/SMAD signaling in the activation of a molecular cascade that culminates in cell death.

    PubMed

    Abarca-Buis, René F; Bustamante, Marcia; Cuervo, Rodrigo; Aguilar-Fernández-de-Lara, Dante; Chimal-Monroy, Jesús

    2011-08-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) play a crucial role in programmed cell death (PCD), a biological process required for the sculpturing of the embryonic limbs. However, it is unknown if BMP signaling directly promotes cell death, or if it induces a molecular cascade that culminates in cell death. Given that Smad8, which encodes one component of BMP signaling, is expressed during the regression of interdigital tissue and responds to BMPs, we presumed that it may be expressed in other cell death areas during chick limb development such as the anterior and posterior necrotic zones (ANZ and PNZ). The present study found that the Smad8 expression pattern in the anterior mesoderm of the hindlimb is very similar to that observed in limbs stained to detect cell death. Also, BMPs and retinoic acid, which act as apoptosis-promoting factors, induced expression of Smad8 before the onset of cell death, while sonic hedgehog protein, acting as a survival factor, inhibited Smad8 expression in the ANZ. However, although there was correlation between Smad8 expression patterns and PCD in the ANZ, phosphorylated forms of SMAD1/5/8 and TUNEL staining did not co-localize in dying cells. Interestingly, a short pulse of BMP was sufficient to trigger cell death. On the other hand, most dying cells were located in the avascular region, while many cells expressing Smad8 were located in the vascular region of the ANZ. These results suggest that BMPs mediated by SMAD signaling activate a molecular cascade that culminates in PCD.

  1. Spatial covert attention increases contrast sensitivity across the CSF: support for signal enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrasco, M.; Penpeci-Talgar, C.; Eckstein, M.

    2000-01-01

    This study is the first to report the benefits of spatial covert attention on contrast sensitivity in a wide range of spatial frequencies when a target alone was presented in the absence of a local post-mask. We used a peripheral precue (a small circle indicating the target location) to explore the effects of covert spatial attention on contrast sensitivity as assessed by orientation discrimination (Experiments 1-4), detection (Experiments 2 and 3) and localization (Experiment 3) tasks. In all four experiments the target (a Gabor patch ranging in spatial frequency from 0.5 to 10 cpd) was presented alone in one of eight possible locations equidistant from fixation. Contrast sensitivity was consistently higher for peripherally- than for neutrally-cued trials, even though we eliminated variables (distracters, global masks, local masks, and location uncertainty) that are known to contribute to an external noise reduction explanation of attention. When observers were presented with vertical and horizontal Gabor patches an external noise reduction signal detection model accounted for the cueing benefit in a discrimination task (Experiment 1). However, such a model could not account for this benefit when location uncertainty was reduced, either by: (a) Increasing overall performance level (Experiment 2); (b) increasing stimulus contrast to enable fine discriminations of slightly tilted suprathreshold stimuli (Experiment 3); and (c) presenting a local post-mask (Experiment 4). Given that attentional benefits occurred under conditions that exclude all variables predicted by the external noise reduction model, these results support the signal enhancement model of attention.

  2. Spatial covert attention increases contrast sensitivity across the CSF: support for signal enhancement.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, M; Penpeci-Talgar, C; Eckstein, M

    2000-01-01

    This study is the first to report the benefits of spatial covert attention on contrast sensitivity in a wide range of spatial frequencies when a target alone was presented in the absence of a local post-mask. We used a peripheral precue (a small circle indicating the target location) to explore the effects of covert spatial attention on contrast sensitivity as assessed by orientation discrimination (Experiments 1-4), detection (Experiments 2 and 3) and localization (Experiment 3) tasks. In all four experiments the target (a Gabor patch ranging in spatial frequency from 0.5 to 10 cpd) was presented alone in one of eight possible locations equidistant from fixation. Contrast sensitivity was consistently higher for peripherally- than for neutrally-cued trials, even though we eliminated variables (distracters, global masks, local masks, and location uncertainty) that are known to contribute to an external noise reduction explanation of attention. When observers were presented with vertical and horizontal Gabor patches an external noise reduction signal detection model accounted for the cueing benefit in a discrimination task (Experiment 1). However, such a model could not account for this benefit when location uncertainty was reduced, either by: (a) Increasing overall performance level (Experiment 2); (b) increasing stimulus contrast to enable fine discriminations of slightly tilted suprathreshold stimuli (Experiment 3); and (c) presenting a local post-mask (Experiment 4). Given that attentional benefits occurred under conditions that exclude all variables predicted by the external noise reduction model, these results support the signal enhancement model of attention.

  3. Signal enhancement in cantilever magnetometry based on a co-resonantly coupled sensor.

    PubMed

    Körner, Julia; Reiche, Christopher F; Gemming, Thomas; Büchner, Bernd; Gerlach, Gerald; Mühl, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Cantilever magnetometry is a measurement technique used to study magnetic nanoparticles. With decreasing sample size, the signal strength is significantly reduced, requiring advances of the technique. Ultrathin and slender cantilevers can address this challenge but lead to increased complexity of detection. We present an approach based on the co-resonant coupling of a micro- and a nanometer-sized cantilever. Via matching of the resonance frequencies of the two subsystems we induce a strong interplay between the oscillations of the two cantilevers, allowing for a detection of interactions between the sensitive nanocantilever and external influences in the amplitude response curve of the microcantilever. In our magnetometry experiment we used an iron-filled carbon nanotube acting simultaneously as nanocantilever and magnetic sample. Measurements revealed an enhancement of the commonly used frequency shift signal by five orders of magnitude compared to conventional cantilever magnetometry experiments with similar nanomagnets. With this experiment we do not only demonstrate the functionality of our sensor design but also its potential for very sensitive magnetometry measurements while maintaining a facile oscillation detection with a conventional microcantilever setup. PMID:27547621

  4. Signal enhancement in cantilever magnetometry based on a co-resonantly coupled sensor

    PubMed Central

    Körner, Julia; Reiche, Christopher F; Gemming, Thomas; Büchner, Bernd; Gerlach, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cantilever magnetometry is a measurement technique used to study magnetic nanoparticles. With decreasing sample size, the signal strength is significantly reduced, requiring advances of the technique. Ultrathin and slender cantilevers can address this challenge but lead to increased complexity of detection. We present an approach based on the co-resonant coupling of a micro- and a nanometer-sized cantilever. Via matching of the resonance frequencies of the two subsystems we induce a strong interplay between the oscillations of the two cantilevers, allowing for a detection of interactions between the sensitive nanocantilever and external influences in the amplitude response curve of the microcantilever. In our magnetometry experiment we used an iron-filled carbon nanotube acting simultaneously as nanocantilever and magnetic sample. Measurements revealed an enhancement of the commonly used frequency shift signal by five orders of magnitude compared to conventional cantilever magnetometry experiments with similar nanomagnets. With this experiment we do not only demonstrate the functionality of our sensor design but also its potential for very sensitive magnetometry measurements while maintaining a facile oscillation detection with a conventional microcantilever setup. PMID:27547621

  5. Blockade of IL-18 signaling diminished neuropathic pain and enhanced the efficacy of morphine and buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Pilat, Dominika; Piotrowska, Anna; Rojewska, Ewelina; Jurga, Agnieszka; Ślusarczyk, Joanna; Makuch, Wioletta; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka; Przewlocka, Barbara; Mika, Joanna

    2016-03-01

    Currently, the low efficacy of antinociceptive drugs for the treatment of neuropathic pain is a major therapeutic problem. Here, we show the potential role of interleukin (IL)-18 signaling in this phenomenon. IL-18 is an important molecule that performs various crucial functions, including the alteration of nociceptive transmission in response to neuropathic pain. We have studied the changes in the mRNA and protein levels (qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively) of IL-18, IL-18-binding protein (IL-18BP) and the IL-18 receptor (IL-18R) over time in rats following chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. Our study demonstrated that the spinal levels of IL-18BP were slightly downregulated at days 7 and 14 in the rats subjected to CCI. In contrast, the IL-18 and IL-18R mRNA expression and protein levels were elevated in the ipsilateral spinal cord on days 2, 7 and 14. Moreover, in rats exposed to a single intrathecal administration of IL-18BP (50 and 100 ng) 7 or 14 days following CCI, symptoms of neuropathic pain were attenuated, and the analgesia pursuant to morphine and buprenorphine (0.5 and 2.5 μg) was enhanced. In summary, the restoration of the analgesic activity of morphine and buprenorphine via the blockade of IL-18 signaling suggests that increased IL-18 pathway may account for the decreased analgesic efficacy of opioids for neuropathic pain.

  6. Cooperative integrin/ITAM signaling in platelets enhances thrombus formation in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Huiying; Rauova, Lubica; Hayes, Vincent; Gao, Cunji; Boylan, Brian; Newman, Debra K.; McKenzie, Steven E.; Cooley, Brian C.; Poncz, Mortimer; Newman, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    The integrin family is composed of a series of 24 αβ heterodimer transmembrane adhesion receptors that mediate cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Adaptor molecules bearing immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) have recently been shown to cooperate with specific integrins to increase the efficiency of transmitting ligand-binding–induced signals into cells. In human platelets, Fc receptor γ-chain IIa (FcγRIIa) has been identified as an ITAM-bearing transmembrane receptor responsible for mediating “outside-in” signaling through αIIbβ3, the major adhesion receptor on the platelet surface. To explore the importance of FcγRIIa in thrombosis and hemostasis, we subjected FcγRIIa-negative and FcγRIIa-positive murine platelets to a number of well-accepted models of platelet function. Compared with their FcγRIIa-negative counterparts, FcγRIIa-positive platelets exhibited increased tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk and phospholipase Cγ2 and increased spreading upon interaction with immobilized fibrinogen, retracted a fibrin clot faster, and showed markedly enhanced thrombus formation when perfused over a collagen-coated flow chamber under conditions of arterial and venous shear. They also displayed increased thrombus formation and fibrin deposition in in vivo models of vascular injury. Taken together, these data establish FcγRIIa as a physiologically important functional conduit for αIIbβ3-mediated outside-in signaling, and suggest that modulating the activity of this novel integrin/ITAM pair might be effective in controlling thrombosis. PMID:23264598

  7. Novel MYH11 and ACTA2 mutations reveal a role for enhanced TGFβ signaling in FTAAD

    PubMed Central

    Renard, Marjolijn; Callewaert, Bert; Baetens, Machteld; Campens, Laurence; MacDermot, Kay; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Bonduelle, Maryse; Dietz, Hal; Gaspar, Isabel Mendes; Cavaco, Diogo; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Schrander-Stumpel, Constance; Coucke, Paul; Loeys, Bart; De Paepe, Anne; De Backer, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Background Thoracic aortic aneurysm / dissection (TAAD) is a common phenotype that may occur as an isolated manifestation or within the constellation of a defined syndrome. In contrast to syndromic TAAD, the elucidation of the genetic basis of isolated TAAD has only recently started. To date, defects have been found in genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins (fibrillin-1, FBN1; collagen type III alpha 1, COL3A1), proteins involved in transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signaling (TGFβ receptor 1 and 2, TGFBR1/2; and SMAD3) or proteins that build up the contractile apparatus of aortic smooth muscle cells (myosin heavy chain 11, MYH11; smooth muscle actin alpha 2, ACTA2; and MYLK). Methods and results In 110 non-syndromic TAAD patients that previously tested negative for FBN1 or TGFBR1/2 mutations, we identified 7 ACTA2 mutations in a cohort of 43 familial TAAD patients, including 2 premature truncating mutations. Sequencing of MYH11 revealed an in frame splice-site alteration in one out of two probands with TAA(D) associated with PDA but none in the series of 22 probands from the cohort of 110 patients with non-syndromic TAAD. Interestingly, immunohistochemical staining of aortic biopsies of a patient and a family member with MYH11 and patients with ACTA2 missense mutations showed upregulation of the TGFβ signaling pathway. Conclusions MYH11 mutations are rare and typically identified in patients with TAAD associated with PDA. ACTA2 mutations were identified in 16% of a cohort presenting familial TAAD. Different molecular defects in TAAD may account for a different pathogenic mechanism of enhanced TGFβ signaling. PMID:21937134

  8. Betaine supplementation enhances anabolic endocrine and Akt signaling in response to acute bouts of exercise.

    PubMed

    Apicella, Jenna M; Lee, Elaine C; Bailey, Brooke L; Saenz, Catherine; Anderson, Jeffrey M; Craig, Stuart A S; Kraemer, William J; Volek, Jeff S; Maresh, Carl M

    2013-03-01

    Our aim was to examine the effect of betaine supplementation on selected circulating hormonal measures and Akt muscle signaling proteins after an acute exercise session. Twelve trained men (age 19.7 ± 1.23 years) underwent 2 weeks of supplementation with either betaine (B) (1.25 g BID) or placebo (P). Following a 2-week washout period, subjects underwent supplementation with the other treatment (B or P). Before and after each 2-week period, subjects performed an acute exercise session (AES). Circulating GH, IGF-1, cortisol, and insulin were measured. Vastus lateralis samples were analyzed for signaling proteins (Akt, p70 S6k, AMPK). B (vs. P) supplementation approached a significant increase in GH (mean ± SD (Area under the curve, AUC), B: 40.72 ± 6.14, P: 38.28 ± 5.54, p = 0.060) and significantly increased IGF-1 (mean ± SD (AUC), B: 106.19 ± 13.45, P: 95.10 ± 14.23, p = 0.010), but significantly decreased cortisol (mean ± SD (AUC), B: 1,079.18 ± 110.02, P: 1,228.53 ± 130.32, p = 0.007). There was no difference in insulin (AUC). B increased resting Total muscle Akt (p = 0.003). B potentiated phosphorylation (relative to P) of Akt (Ser(473)) and p70 S6 k (Thr(389)) (p = 0.016 and p = 0.005, respectively). Phosphorylation of AMPK (Thr(172)) decreased during both treatments (both p = 0.001). Betaine (vs. placebo) supplementation enhanced both the anabolic endocrine profile and the corresponding anabolic signaling environment, suggesting increased protein synthesis.

  9. Enhancing kidney function with thrombolytic therapy following donation after cardiac death: a multicenter quasi-blinded prospective randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Woodside, Kenneth J; Goldfarb, David A; Rabets, John C; Sanchez, Edmund Q; Lebovitz, Daniel J; Schulak, James A; Fung, John J; Eghtesad, Bijan

    2015-12-01

    Kidneys from donors after cardiac death (DCD) are at risk for inferior outcomes, possibly due to microthrombi and additional warm ischemia. We describe an organ procurement organization-wide trial utilizing thrombolytic tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) during machine pulsatile perfusion (MPP). A kidney from each recovered kidney pair was prospectively randomized to receive tPA (50 mg Alteplase) or no tPA (control) in the MPP perfusate. From 2011 to 2013, 24 kidneys were placed with enrolled recipients from 19 DCD kidney donors. There were no significant differences for absolute values of flow or resistance while undergoing MPP between the groups, nor rates of achieving discrete flow and resistance targets. While there was a trend toward lower creatinine and higher glomerular filtration rates in the tPA group at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months, these differences were not significant. Delayed graft function (DGF) rates were 41.7% in the tPA group vs. 58.4% in the control group (OR 0.51, 95%CI 0.10-2.59, p = 0.68). Death-censored graft survival was similar between the groups. In this pilot study, encouraging trends are seen in kidney allograft function independent of MPP parameters following DCD kidney transplantation for those kidneys receiving thrombolytic tPA and MPP, compared with standard MPP.

  10. Genistein inhibition of OGD-induced brain neuron death correlates with its modulation of apoptosis, voltage-gated potassium and sodium currents and glutamate signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xue-Ling; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Yu-Xiang; He, Cong-Cong; Tian, Kun; Wang, Hong-Gang; An, Di; Heng, Bin; Liu, Yan-Qiang

    2016-07-25

    In the present study, we established an in vitro model of hypoxic-ischemia via exposing primary neurons of newborn rats to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and observing the effects of genistein, a soybean isoflavone, on hypoxic-ischemic neuron viability, apoptosis, voltage-activated potassium (Kv) and sodium (Nav) currents, and glutamate receptor subunits. The results indicated that OGD exposure reduced the viability and increased the apoptosis of brain neurons. Meanwhile, OGD exposure caused changes in the current-voltage curves and current amplitude values of voltage-activated potassium and sodium currents; OGD exposure also decreased GluR2 expression and increased NR2 expression. However, genistein at least partially reversed the effects caused by OGD. The results suggest that hypoxic-ischemia-caused neuronal apoptosis/death is related to an increase in K(+) efflux, a decrease in Na(+) influx, a down-regulation of GluR2, and an up-regulation of NR2. Genistein may exert some neuroprotective effects via the modulation of Kv and Nav currents and the glutamate signal pathway, mediated by GluR2 and NR2. PMID:27238724

  11. Human papilloma virus 16 E6 RNA interference enhances cisplatin and death receptor-mediated apoptosis in human cervical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shinta; Hougardy, Brigitte M T; Meersma, Gert J; Schaap, Bessel; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; van der Zee, Ate G J; de Jong, Steven

    2012-05-01

    In cervical cancer, the p53 and retinoblastoma (pRb) tumor suppressor pathways are disrupted by the human papilloma virus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncoproteins, because E6 targets p53 and E7 targets pRb for rapid proteasome-mediated degradation. We have investigated whether E6 suppression with small interfering RNA (siRNA) restores p53 functionality and sensitizes the HPV16-positive cervical cancer cell line SiHa to apoptosis by cisplatin, irradiation, recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (rhTRAIL), or agonistic anti-Fas antibody. E6 siRNA resulted in decreased E6 mRNA levels and enhanced p53 and p21 expression, demonstrating the restoration of p53 functionality in SiHa cells, without inducing high levels of apoptosis (<10%). Cell surface expression of the proapoptotic death receptors (DRs) DR4, DR5, and Fas was not affected by E6 suppression. E6 suppression conferred susceptibility to cisplatin-induced apoptosis but not to irradiation-, rhTRAIL-, or anti-Fas antibody-induced apoptosis. Combining cisplatin with rhTRAIL or anti-Fas antibody induced even higher apoptosis levels in E6-suppressed cells. At the molecular level, cisplatin treatment resulted in elevated p53 levels, enhanced caspase-3 activation, and reduced p21 levels in E6-suppressed cells. Cisplatin in combination with death receptor ligands enhanced caspase-8 and caspase-3 activation and reduced X-linked inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein (XIAP) levels in these cells. We showed using siRNA that the enhanced apoptosis in E6-supressed cells was related to reduced XIAP levels and not due to reduced p21 levels. In conclusion, targeting E6 or XIAP in combination with cisplatin can efficiently potentiate rhTRAIL-induced apoptosis in HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. PMID:22328720

  12. cAMP enhances BMP2-signaling through PKA and MKP1-dependent mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Ghayor, Chafik; Ehrbar, Martin; Miguel, Blanca San; Graetz, Klaus W.; Weber, Franz E.

    2009-04-03

    Recent studies suggest that the elevation of intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and the activation of the protein kinase A regulate BMP-induced osteogenesis. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the enhancing effect of cAMP on BMP2 signaling were not completely revealed. In this study we investigated the effect of elevated cAMP level and PKA activation on the BMP2-induced osteoblastic differentiation in pluripotent C2C12 cells. Alkaline phosphatase activity and its mRNA were consistently induced by BMP2 treatment. The pretreatment of C2C12 cells with Forskolin, a cAMP generating agent, dbcAMP, an analogue of cAMP, or IBMX (3-isobutyl 1-methyl xanthine), and a nonspecific inhibitor of phosphodiesterases elicited further activation of alkaline phosphatase. Furthermore, elevated intracellular cAMP level increased BMP2-induced MKP1. On the other hand, BMP2-induced Erk phosphorylation (p44/p42) and cell proliferation were suppressed in the presence of cAMP. Thus, cAMP might enhance BMP2-induced osteoblastic differentiation by a MKP1-Erk-dependent mechanism.

  13. Reporter-encapsulated liposomes on graphene field effect transistors for signal enhanced detection of physiological enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hu; Lim, Seng Koon; Chen, Peng; Huang, Jingfeng; Wang, Yi; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Platt, Mark; Liedberg, Bo; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong

    2015-02-01

    A novel approach for enzymatic assay using reporter-encapsulated liposomes on graphene field effect transistors (FET) is proposed. This approach involves real time monitoring of drain current (Id) of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) upon rupture of reporter-encapsulated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) liposomes triggered by enzymes. For validation of the proposed approach, 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (TNP) is used as the reporter for specific detection of phospholipase A2 (PLA2), a key enzyme in various membrane related physiological processes. Experimental results revealed that Id increased with PLA2 concentration, which is attributed to the interaction between released TNP and rGO. The limit of detection (LOD) achieved by the proposed approach was 80 pM, which is superior to most assays reported previously and much lower than the cut-off level of circulating secretory PLA2 (2.07 nM). Besides the high accuracy of the electronic detection methodology, the signal enhancement effect realized by the excess concentration of TNP (approximately 1 mM) in liposomes is believed to be the main reason for the significantly enhanced sensitivity of the proposed assay, indicating great potential for further improvement in the sensitivity by increasing the concentration of TNP. In addition, the proposed approach is rapid (incubation time ≤ 10 min) and label-free, thus showing great potential for practical applications in the future.

  14. Modulation enhancement in the electrical signal improves perception of interaural time differences with bimodal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Francart, Tom; Lenssen, Anneke; Wouters, Jan

    2014-08-01

    Interaural timing cues are important for sound source localization and for binaural unmasking of speech that is spatially separated from interfering sounds. Users of a cochlear implant (CI) with residual hearing in the non-implanted ear (bimodal listeners) can only make very limited use of interaural timing cues with their clinical devices. Previous studies showed that bimodal listeners can be sensitive to interaural time differences (ITDs) for simple single- and three-channel stimuli. The modulation enhancement strategy (MEnS) was developed to improve the ITD perception of bimodal listeners. It enhances temporal modulations on all stimulated electrodes, synchronously with modulations in the acoustic signal presented to the non-implanted ear, based on measurement of the amplitude peaks occurring at the rate of the fundamental frequency in voiced phonemes. In the first experiment, ITD detection thresholds were measured using the method of constant stimuli for five bimodal listeners for an artificial vowel, processed with either the advanced combination encoder (ACE) strategy or with MEnS. With MEnS, detection thresholds were significantly lower, and for four subjects well within the physically relevant range. In the second experiment, the extent of lateralization was measured in three subjects with both strategies, and ITD sensitivity was determined using an adaptive procedure. All subjects could lateralize sounds based on ITD and sensitivity was significantly better with MEnS than with ACE. The current results indicate that ITD cues can be provided to bimodal listeners with modified sound processing.

  15. Acacetin-induced apoptosis of human breast cancer MCF-7 cells involves caspase cascade, mitochondria-mediated death signaling and SAPK/JNK1/2-c-Jun activation.

    PubMed

    Shim, Hye-Young; Park, Jong-Hwa; Paik, Hyun-Dong; Nah, Seung-Yeol; Kim, Darrick S H L; Han, Ye Sun

    2007-08-31

    The mechanism of acacetin-induced apoptosis of human breast cancer MCF-7 cells was investigated. Acacetin caused 50% growth inhibition (IC50) of MCF-7 cells at 26.4% 0.7% M over 24 h in the MTT assay. Apoptosis was characterized by DNA fragmentation and an increase of sub-G1 cells and involved activation of caspase-7 and PARP (poly-ADP-ribose polymerase). Maximum caspase 7 activity was observed with 100 microM acacetin for 24 h. Caspase 8 and 9 activation cascades mediated the activation of caspase 7. Acacetin caused a reduction of Bcl-2 expression leading to an increase of the Bax:Bcl-2 ratio. It also caused a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential that induced release of cytochrome c and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) into the cytoplasm, enhancing ROS generation and subsequently resulting in apoptosis. Pretreatment of cells with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) reduced ROS generation and cell growth inhibition, and pretreatment with NAC or a caspase 8 inhibitor (Z-IETD-FMK) inhibited the acacetin-induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and release of cytochrome c and AIF. Stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun NH4-terminal kinase 1/2 (SAPK/ JNK1/2) and c-Jun were activated by acacetin but extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2) nor p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) were not. Our results show that acacetin-induced apoptosis of MCF-7 cells is mediated by caspase activation cascades, ROS generation, mitochondria-mediated cell death signaling and the SAPK/JNK1/2-c-Jun signaling pathway, activated by acacetin-induced ROS generation.

  16. Mechanism of programmed cell death factor 4/nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway in porcine coronary micro-embolization-induced cardiac dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Su, Qiang; Wang, Jiangyou; Zhou, You; Liu, Yangchun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the programmed cell death factor 4 (PDCD4)/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway in coronary micro-embolism (CME)-induced inflammatory responses and cardiac dysfunction in a porcine model. Bama miniature pigs were randomly divided into four groups (n = 5 per group). Micro-embolization balls or saline were infused through a microcatheter in the left anterior descending (LAD) artery in the CME and Sham groups, respectively. PDCD4 siRNA or control siRNA mixed with transfection reagent was infused via the LAD artery 72 h before CME induction in the CME + siRNA-PDCD4 and siRNA-control groups, respectively. Cardiac function was evaluated with ultrasound. Tissue biopsy was stained with hematoxylin–eosin (HE) and hematoxylin basic fuchsin picric acid (HBFP) to measure infarction area. Myocardial PDCD4 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) mRNA and protein expression were analyzed by quantitative PCR and Western blotting. NF-κB activity was evaluated in gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Echocardiographic parameters showed that compared with the sham group, the CME group had impaired heart function, manifested as systolic dysfunction and left ventricular dilatation (reduced left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF], left ventricular fractional shortening [FS], and cardiac output [CO] [P < 0.05] and increased left ventricular end-diastolic diameter [LVEDd] [P < 0.05]). Compared with the CME group, the CME + siRNA-PDCD4 group had attenuated CME-induced cardiac function damage (increased LVEF, FS and CO [P < 0.05] and reduced LVEDd [P < 0.05]). Compared with the sham group, the CME group had significantly increased PDCD4 and TNF-α mRNA and protein expression and increased NF-κB activity (P < 0.05). These effects were significantly inhibited in the CME + siRNA-PDCD4 group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, PDCD4/NF-κB signaling pathway activation is an important mechanism for CME

  17. Cot Deaths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyrrell, Shelagh

    1985-01-01

    Addresses the tragedy of crib deaths, giving particular attention to causes, prevention, and medical research on Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Gives anecdotal accounts of coping strategies used by parents and families of SIDS infants. (DT)

  18. The death receptor antagonist FAIM promotes neurite outgrowth by a mechanism that depends on ERK and NF-kapp B signaling.

    PubMed

    Sole, Carme; Dolcet, Xavier; Segura, Miguel F; Gutierrez, Humberto; Diaz-Meco, Maria-Teresa; Gozzelino, Raffaella; Sanchis, Daniel; Bayascas, Jose R; Gallego, Carme; Moscat, Jorge; Davies, Alun M; Comella, Joan X

    2004-11-01

    Fas apoptosis inhibitory molecule (FAIM) is a protein identified as an antagonist of Fas-induced cell death. We show that FAIM overexpression fails to rescue neurons from trophic factor deprivation, but exerts a marked neurite growth-promoting action in different neuronal systems. Whereas FAIM overexpression greatly enhanced neurite outgrowth from PC12 cells and sympathetic neurons grown with nerve growth factor (NGF), reduction of endogenous FAIM levels by RNAi decreased neurite outgrowth in these cells. FAIM overexpression promoted NF-kappa B activation, and blocking this activation by using a super-repressor I kappa B alpha or by carrying out experiments using cortical neurons from mice that lack the p65 NF-kappa B subunit prevented FAIM-induced neurite outgrowth. The effect of FAIM on neurite outgrowth was also blocked by inhibition of the Ras-ERK pathway. Finally, we show that FAIM interacts with both Trk and p75 neurotrophin receptor NGF receptors in a ligand-dependent manner. These results reveal a new function of FAIM in promoting neurite outgrowth by a mechanism involving activation of the Ras-ERK pathway and NF-kappa B.

  19. Lovastatin enhances adenovirus-mediated TRAIL induced apoptosis by depleting cholesterol of lipid rafts and affecting CAR and death receptor expression of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Youhong; Chen, Lin; Gong, Zhicheng; Shen, Liangfang; Kao, Chinghai; Hock, Janet M; Sun, Lunquan; Li, Xiong

    2015-02-20

    Oncolytic adenovirus and apoptosis inducer TRAIL are promising cancer therapies. Their antitumor efficacy, when used as single agents, is limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have low infection activity, and cancer cells develop resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we explored combining prostate-restricted replication competent adenovirus-mediated TRAIL (PRRA-TRAIL) with lovastatin, a commonly used cholesterol-lowering drug, as a potential therapy for advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Lovastatin significantly enhanced the efficacy of PRRA-TRAIL by promoting the in vivo tumor suppression, and the in vitro cell killing and apoptosis induction, via integration of multiple molecular mechanisms. Lovastatin enhanced PRRA replication and virus-delivered transgene expression by increasing the expression levels of CAR and integrins, which are critical for adenovirus 5 binding and internalization. Lovastatin enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis by increasing death receptor DR4 expression. These multiple effects of lovastatin on CAR, integrins and DR4 expression were closely associated with cholesterol-depletion in lipid rafts. These studies, for the first time, show correlations between cholesterol/lipid rafts, oncolytic adenovirus infection efficiency and the antitumor efficacy of TRAIL at the cellular level. This work enhances our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that support use of lovastatin, in combination with PRRA-TRAIL, as a candidate strategy to treat human refractory prostate cancer in the future. PMID:25605010

  20. Improved Long-Term Memory via Enhancing cGMP-PKG Signaling Requires cAMP-PKA Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bollen, Eva; Puzzo, Daniela; Rutten, Kris; Privitera, Lucia; De Vry, Jochen; Vanmierlo, Tim; Kenis, Gunter; Palmeri, Agostino; D'Hooge, Rudi; Balschun, Detlef; Steinbusch, Harry MW; Blokland, Arjan; Prickaerts, Jos

    2014-01-01

    Memory consolidation is defined by the stabilization of a memory trace after acquisition, and consists of numerous molecular cascades that mediate synaptic plasticity. Commonly, a distinction is made between an early and a late consolidation phase, in which early refers to the first hours in which labile synaptic changes occur, whereas late consolidation relates to stable and long-lasting synaptic changes induced by de novo protein synthesis. How these phases are linked at a molecular level is not yet clear. Here we studied the interaction of the cyclic nucleotide-mediated pathways during the different phases of memory consolidation in rodents. In addition, the same pathways were studied in a model of neuronal plasticity, long-term potentiation (LTP). We demonstrated that cGMP/protein kinase G (PKG) signaling mediates early memory consolidation as well as early-phase LTP, whereas cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling mediates late consolidation and late-phase-like LTP. In addition, we show for the first time that early-phase cGMP/PKG signaling requires late-phase cAMP/PKA-signaling in both LTP and long-term memory formation. PMID:24813825

  1. Research on the enhancement of signal-to-noise ratio of light-addressable potentiometric sensor by optical focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Liu, Shi-bin; Yin, Shi-min; Liang, Jin-tao

    2016-01-01

    For enhancing the response of light-addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS) and further improving its signal- to-noise ratio ( SNR), an optical focusing method is adopted. Experimental research and theoretical analysis reveal that the magnitude of responsive signal is increased by optical focusing, and the SNR is improved remarkably. These research results indicate that the optical focusing is an effective approach for improving SNR of LAPS.

  2. DNA replication arrest leads to enhanced homologous recombination and cell death in meristems of rice OsRecQl4 mutants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mammalian BLM helicase is involved in DNA replication, DNA repair and homologous recombination (HR). These DNA transactions are associated tightly with cell division and are important for maintaining genome stability. However, unlike in mammals, cell division in higher plants is restricted mainly to the meristem, thus genome maintenance at the meristem is critical. The counterpart of BLM in Arabidopsis (AtRecQ4A) has been identified and its role in HR and in the response to DNA damage has been confirmed. However, the function of AtRecQ4A in the meristem during replication stress has not yet been well elucidated. Results We isolated the BLM counterpart gene OsRecQl4 from rice and analyzed its function using a reverse genetics approach. Osrecql4 mutant plants showed hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents and enhanced frequency of HR compared to wild-type (WT) plants. We further analyzed the effect of aphidicolin—an inhibitor of S-phase progression via its inhibitory effect on DNA polymerases—on genome stability in the root meristem in osrecql4 mutant plants and corresponding WT plants. The following effects were observed upon aphidicolin treatment: a) comet assay showed induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mutant plants, b) TUNEL assay showed enhanced DNA breaks at the root meristem in mutant plants, c) a recombination reporter showed enhanced HR frequency in mutant calli, d) propidium iodide (PI) staining of root tips revealed an increased incidence of cell death in the meristem of mutant plants. Conclusions These results demonstrate that the aphidicolin-sensitive phenotype of osrecql4 mutants was in part due to induced DSBs and cell death, and that OsRecQl4 plays an important role as a caretaker, maintaining genome stability during DNA replication stress in the rice meristem. PMID:23586618

  3. HSP90 Inhibition Enhances Antimitotic Drug-Induced Mitotic Arrest and Cell Death in Preclinical Models of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Brenda C.; O'Callaghan, Katie; Tillotson, Bonnie; Douglas, Mark; Hafeez, Nafeeza; West, Kip A.; Stern, Howard; Ali, Janid A.; Changelian, Paul; Fritz, Christian C.; Palombella, Vito J.; McGovern, Karen; Kutok, Jeffery L.

    2014-01-01

    HSP90 inhibitors are currently undergoing clinical evaluation in combination with antimitotic drugs in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but little is known about the cellular effects of this novel drug combination. Therefore, we investigated the molecular mechanism of action of IPI-504 (retaspimycin HCl), a potent and selective inhibitor of HSP90, in combination with the microtubule targeting agent (MTA) docetaxel, in preclinical models of NSCLC. We identified a subset of NSCLC cell lines in which these drugs act in synergy to enhance cell death. Xenograft models of NSCLC demonstrated tumor growth inhibition, and in some cases, regression in response to combination treatment. Treatment with IPI-504 enhanced the antimitotic effects of docetaxel leading to the hypothesis that the mitotic checkpoint is required for the response to drug combination. Supporting this hypothesis, overriding the checkpoint with an Aurora kinase inhibitor diminished the cell death synergy of IPI-504 and docetaxel. To investigate the molecular basis of synergy, an unbiased stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) proteomic approach was employed. Several mitotic regulators, including components of the ubiquitin ligase, anaphase promoting complex (APC/C), were specifically down-regulated in response to combination treatment. Loss of APC/C by RNAi sensitized cells to docetaxel and enhanced its antimitotic effects. Treatment with a PLK1 inhibitor (BI2536) also sensitized cells to IPI-504, indicating that combination effects may be broadly applicable to other classes of mitotic inhibitors. Our data provide a preclinical rationale for testing the combination of IPI-504 and docetaxel in NSCLC. PMID:25542032

  4. A peptide probe for the detection of neurokinin-1 receptor by disaggregation enhanced fluorescence and magnetic resonance signals

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jingxian; Zou, Rongfeng; Wang, Qi; Xue, Yajing; Wei, Ping; Yang, Shiping; Wu, Junchen; Tian, He

    2014-01-01

    We report a novel peptide probe for the detection of neurokinin-1 receptor using disaggregation-caused signal enhancement. The probe was obtained via the aggregation of a modified substance P in a terpyridine-Fe (II) complex with Gd (III)-DOTA into well-defined nanostructures, which effectively weaken ligand fluorescence and slow the exchange rate of inner-sphere water molecules. This probe disaggregates upon binding to the neurokinin-1 receptor and activates the contrast agents to generate a fluorescent signal that positively enhances magnetic resonance imaging contrast and allows for the detection of overexpressed receptors on tumor cells and the identification of lung cancer using serum samples. PMID:25270511

  5. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells enhance autophagy via PI3K/AKT signalling to reduce the severity of ischaemia/reperfusion-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Zhou, Jian; Zhang, Dan; Song, Yuanlin; She, Jun; Bai, Chunxue

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, a type II programmed cell death, is essential for cell survival under stress, e.g. lung injury, and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) have great potential for cell therapy. However, the mechanisms underlying the BM-MSC activation of autophagy to provide a therapeutic effect in ischaemia/reperfusion-induced lung injury (IRI) remain unclear. Thus, we investigate the activation of autophagy in IRI following transplantation with BM-MSCs. Seventy mice were pre-treated with BM-MSCs before they underwent lung IRI surgery in vivo. Human pulmonary micro-vascular endothelial cells (HPMVECs) were pre-conditioned with BM-MSCs by oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD) in vitro. Expression markers for autophagy and the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) signalling pathway were analysed. In IRI-treated mice, administration of BM-MSCs significantly attenuated lung injury and inflammation, and increased the level of autophagy. In OGD-treated HPMVECs, co-culture with BM-MSCs attenuated endothelial permeability by decreasing the level of cell death and enhanced autophagic activation. Moreover, administration of BM-MSCs decreased the level of PI3K class I and p-Akt while the expression of PI3K class III was increased. Finally, BM-MSCs-induced autophagic activity was prevented using the inhibitor LY294002. Administration of BM-MSCs attenuated lung injury by improving the autophagy level via the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway. These findings provide further understanding of the mechanisms related to BM-MSCs and will help to develop new cell-based therapeutic strategies in lung injury. PMID:26177266

  6. Reduction in Aβ-induced cell death in the hippocampus of 17β-estradiol-treated female rats is associated with an increase in IGF-I signaling and somatostatinergic tone.

    PubMed

    Perianes-Cachero, Aránzazu; Canelles, Sandra; Aguado-Llera, David; Frago, Laura M; Toledo-Lobo, María Val; Carrera, Iván; Cacabelos, Ramón; Chowen, Julie A; Argente, Jesús; Arilla-Ferreiro, Eduardo; Barrios, Vicente

    2015-12-01

    Several studies indicate that 17β-estradiol (E2) protects against amyloid β-peptide (Aβ)-induced cell death and activates factors associated with learning and memory, a function involving the hippocampal somatostatinergic system. As alterations in somatostatin have been demonstrated in Alzheimer's disease, we examined whether E2 prevents changes in the hippocampal somatostatinergic system induced by Aβ25-35 and cell death, as well as the possible involvement of leptin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I signaling. We also measured the levels of Aβ proteases neprilysin and insulin-degrading-enzyme. Co-administration of E2 with Aβ25-35 reduced both its levels and cell death, in addition to preventing the Aβ-induced depletion of some somatostatinergic parameters. Activation of leptin and IGF-I pathways increased after E2 co-administration, and this correlated with changes in the somatostatinergic system. Changes in some components of this system were inversely related with Aβ levels and cell death. Moreover, neprilysin levels were increased only in Aβ plus E2-treated rats and E2 prevented the Aβ-induced insulin-degrading-enzyme reduction. Our results suggest that the E2-induced reduction in cell death is related to lower Aβ levels, probably because of IGF-I and somatostatin modulation of Aβ proteases. We asked how 17β-estradiol (E2) protects against β-amyloid (Aβ)-induced cell death. E2 co-administration prevents Aβ-produced depletion of hippocampal somatostatin (SRIF) by an IGF-I-mediated mechanism, being related this protective effect with an increase in Aβ proteases. Our results suggest that the E2-induced reduction in cell death is related to lower Aβ levels, probably because of SRIF modulation of Aβ proteases. CREB, cAMP response element-binding protein; IGF-I, insulin-like growth factor-I; STAT3, signal transducer and activator of transcription-3.

  7. Filtering of the Radon transform to enhance linear signal features via wavelet pyramid decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meckley, John R.

    1995-09-01

    The information content in many signal processing applications can be reduced to a set of linear features in a 2D signal transform. Examples include the narrowband lines in a spectrogram, ship wakes in a synthetic aperture radar image, and blood vessels in a medical computer-aided tomography scan. The line integrals that generate the values of the projections of the Radon transform can be characterized as a bank of matched filters for linear features. This localization of energy in the Radon transform for linear features can be exploited to enhance these features and to reduce noise by filtering the Radon transform with a filter explicitly designed to pass only linear features, and then reconstructing a new 2D signal by inverting the new filtered Radon transform (i.e., via filtered backprojection). Previously used methods for filtering the Radon transform include Fourier based filtering (a 2D elliptical Gaussian linear filter) and a nonlinear filter ((Radon xfrm)**y with y >= 2.0). Both of these techniques suffer from the mismatch of the filter response to the true functional form of the Radon transform of a line. The Radon transform of a line is not a point but is a function of the Radon variables (rho, theta) and the total line energy. This mismatch leads to artifacts in the reconstructed image and a reduction in achievable processing gain. The Radon transform for a line is computed as a function of angle and offset (rho, theta) and the line length. The 2D wavelet coefficients are then compared for the Haar wavelets and the Daubechies wavelets. These filter responses are used as frequency filters for the Radon transform. The filtering is performed on the wavelet pyramid decomposition of the Radon transform by detecting the most likely positions of lines in the transform and then by convolving the local area with the appropriate response and zeroing the pyramid coefficients outside of the response area. The response area is defined to contain 95% of the total

  8. Resveratrol enhances ultraviolet B-induced cell death through nuclear factor-{kappa}B pathway in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Preeti; Kalra, Neetu; Nigam, Nidhi; George, Jasmine; Ray, Ratan Singh; Hans, Rajendra K.; Prasad, Sahdeo; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2009-06-26

    Resveratrol has been reported to suppress cancer progression in several in vivo and in vitro models, whereas ultraviolet B (UVB), a major risk for skin cancer, is known to induce cell death in cancerous cells. Here, we investigated whether resveratrol can sensitize A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells to UVB-induced cell death. We examined the combined effect of UVB (30 mJ/cm{sup 2}) and resveratrol (60 {mu}M) on A431 cells. Exposure of A431 carcinoma cells to UVB radiation or resveratrol can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. However, the combination of resveratrol and UVB exposure was associated with increased proliferation inhibition of A431 cells compared with either agent alone. Furthermore, results showed that resveratrol and UVB treatment of A431 cells disrupted the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-{kappa}B) pathway by blocking phosphorylation of serine 536 and inactivating NF-{kappa}B and subsequent degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, which regulates the expression of survivin. Resveratrol and UVB treatment also decreased the phosphorylation of tyrosine 701 of the important transcription factor signal transducer activator of transcription (STAT1), which in turn inhibited translocation of phospho-STAT1 to the nucleus. Moreover, resveratrol/UVB also inhibited the metastatic protein LIMK1, which reduced the motility of A431 cells. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the combination of resveratrol and UVB act synergistically against skin cancer cells. Thus, resveratrol is a potential chemotherapeutic agent against skin carcinogenesis.

  9. LPS/TLR4 Signaling Enhances TGF-β Response Through Downregulating BAMBI During Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    He, Yao; Ou, Zhenyu; Chen, Xiang; Zu, Xiongbing; Liu, Longfei; Li, Yuan; Cao, Zhenzhen; Chen, Minfeng; Chen, Zhi; Chen, Hequn; Qi, Lin; Wang, Long

    2016-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) development involves accumulation of mesenchymal-like cells derived from the prostatic epithelium by epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β induces EMT phenotypes with low E-cadherin and high vimentin expression in prostatic epithelial cells. Here we report that LPS/TLR4 signalling induces down-regulation of the bone morphogenic protein and activin membrane-bound inhibitor (BAMBI), which enhances TGF-β signalling in the EMT process during prostatic hyperplasia. Additionally, we found that the mean TLR4 staining score was significantly higher in BPH tissues with inflammation compared with BPH tissues without inflammation (5.13 ± 1.21 and 2.96 ± 0.73, respectively; P < 0.001). Moreover, patients with inflammatory infiltrate were more likely to have a higher age (P = 0.020), BMI (P = 0.026), prostate volume (P = 0.024), total IPSS score (P = 0.009) and IPSS-S (P < 0.001). Pearson’s correlation coefficient and multiple regression analyses demonstrated that TLR4 mRNA expression level was significantly positively associated with age, BMI, serum PSA levels, urgency and nocturia subscores of IPSS in the inflammatory group. These findings provide new insights into the TLR4-amplified EMT process and the association between TLR4 levels and storage LUTS, suggesting chronic inflammation as vital to the pathogenesis of BPH. PMID:27243216

  10. LPS/TLR4 Signaling Enhances TGF-β Response Through Downregulating BAMBI During Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    He, Yao; Ou, Zhenyu; Chen, Xiang; Zu, Xiongbing; Liu, Longfei; Li, Yuan; Cao, Zhenzhen; Chen, Minfeng; Chen, Zhi; Chen, Hequn; Qi, Lin; Wang, Long

    2016-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) development involves accumulation of mesenchymal-like cells derived from the prostatic epithelium by epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β induces EMT phenotypes with low E-cadherin and high vimentin expression in prostatic epithelial cells. Here we report that LPS/TLR4 signalling induces down-regulation of the bone morphogenic protein and activin membrane-bound inhibitor (BAMBI), which enhances TGF-β signalling in the EMT process during prostatic hyperplasia. Additionally, we found that the mean TLR4 staining score was significantly higher in BPH tissues with inflammation compared with BPH tissues without inflammation (5.13 ± 1.21 and 2.96 ± 0.73, respectively; P < 0.001). Moreover, patients with inflammatory infiltrate were more likely to have a higher age (P = 0.020), BMI (P = 0.026), prostate volume (P = 0.024), total IPSS score (P = 0.009) and IPSS-S (P < 0.001). Pearson's correlation coefficient and multiple regression analyses demonstrated that TLR4 mRNA expression level was significantly positively associated with age, BMI, serum PSA levels, urgency and nocturia subscores of IPSS in the inflammatory group. These findings provide new insights into the TLR4-amplified EMT process and the association between TLR4 levels and storage LUTS, suggesting chronic inflammation as vital to the pathogenesis of BPH. PMID:27243216

  11. Pancreatic β Cell Mass Death

    PubMed Central

    Marrif, Husnia I.; Al-Sunousi, Salma I.

    2016-01-01

    Type two diabetes (T2D) is a challenging metabolic disorder for which a cure has not yet been found. Its etiology is associated with several phenomena, including significant loss of insulin-producing, beta cell (β cell) mass via progressive programmed cell death and disrupted cellular autophagy. In diabetes, the etiology of β cell death and the role of mitochondria are complex and involve several layers of mechanisms. Understanding the dynamics of those mechanisms could permit researchers to develop an intervention for the progressive loss of β cells. Currently, diabetes research has shifted toward rejuvenation and plasticity technology and away from the simplified approach of hormonal compensation. Diabetes research is currently challenged by questions such as how to enhance cell survival, decrease apoptosis and replenish β cell mass in diabetic patients. In this review, we discuss evidence that β cell development and mass formation are guided by specific signaling systems, particularly hormones, transcription factors, and growth factors, all of which could be manipulated to enhance mass growth. There is also strong evidence that β cells are dynamically active cells, which, under specific conditions such as obesity, can increase in size and subsequently increase insulin secretion. In certain cases of aggressive or advanced forms of T2D, β cells become markedly impaired, and the only alternatives for maintaining glucose homeostasis are through partial or complete cell grafting (the Edmonton protocol). In these cases, the harvesting of an enriched population of viable β cells is required for transplantation. This task necessitates a deep understanding of the pharmacological agents that affect β cell survival, mass, and function. The aim of this review is to initiate discussion about the important signals in pancreatic β cell development and mass formation and to highlight the process by which cell death occurs in diabetes. This review also examines the

  12. Reduction in Smad2/3 signaling enhances tumorigenesis but suppresses metastasis of breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fang; DaCosta Byfield, Stacey; Parks, W Tony; Yoo, Stephen; Felici, Angelina; Tang, Binwu; Piek, Ester; Wakefield, Lalage M; Roberts, Anita B

    2003-12-01

    The role of transforming growth factor beta in breast cancer is controversial with tumor suppressor and pro-oncogenic activities having been demonstrated. To address whether the same or different signal transduction pathways mediate these opposing activities, we manipulated the Smad2/3 signaling pathway in cells of common origin but differing degrees of malignancy derived from MCF10A human breast cells. We show that interference with endogenous Smad2/3 signaling enhances the malignancy of xenografted tumors of premalignant and well-differentiated tumor cells but strongly suppresses lung metastases of more aggressive carcinoma cells after tail vein injection. Overexpression of Smad3 in the same cells has opposite effects. The data demonstrate that the Smad2/3 signaling pathway mediates tumor suppressor and prometastatic signals, depending on the cellular context.

  13. Osterix Controls Cementoblast Differentiation through Downregulation of Wnt-signaling via Enhancing DKK1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhengguo; Liu, Rubing; Zhang, Hua; Liao, Haiqing; Zhang, Yufeng; Hinton, Robert J.; Feng, Jian Q.

    2015-01-01

    Osterix (Osx), a transcriptional factor essential for osteogenesis, is also critical for in vivo cellular cementum formation. However, the molecular mechanism by which Osx regulates cementoblasts is largely unknown. In this study, we initially demonstrated that overexpression of Osx in a cementoblast cell line upregulated the expression of markers vital to cementogenesis such as osteopontin (OPN), osteocalcin (OCN), and bone sialoprotein (BSP) at both mRNA and protein levels, and enhanced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. Unexpectedly, we demonstrated a sharp increase in the expression of DKK1 (a potent canonical Wnt antagonist), and a great reduction in protein levels of β-catenin and its nuclear translocation by overexpression of Osx. Further, transient transfection of Osx reduced protein levels of TCF1 (a target transcription factor of β-catenin), which were partially reversed by an addition of DKK1. We also demonstrated that activation of canonical Wnt signaling by LiCl or Wnt3a significantly enhanced levels of TCF1 and suppressed the expression of OPN, OCN, and BSP, as well as ALP activity and formation of extracellular mineralized nodules. Importantly, we confirmed that there were a sharp reduction in DKK1 and a concurrent increase in β-catenin in Osx cKO mice (crossing between the Osx loxP and 2.3 Col 1-Cre lines), in agreement with the in vitro data. Thus, we conclude that the key role of Osx in control of cementoblast proliferation and differentiation is to maintain a low level of Wnt-β-catenin via direct up-regulation of DKK1. PMID:25678852

  14. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling enhances nuclear localization and transcriptional activity of BRCA1

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, Cimona V.; Fitzgerald, Latricia D.; Thompson, Marilyn E. . E-mail: methompson@mmc.edu

    2007-05-15

    Signaling pathways involved in regulating nuclear-cytoplasmic distribution of BRCA1 have not been previously reported. Here, we provide evidence that heregulin {beta}1-induced activation of the Akt pathway increases the nuclear content of BRCA1. First, treatment of T47D breast cancer cells with heregulin {beta}1 results in a two-fold increase in nuclear BRCA1 as assessed by FACS analysis, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. This heregulin-induced increase in nuclear BRCA1 is blocked by siRNA-mediated down-regulation of Akt. Second, mutation of threonine 509 in BRCA1, the site of Akt phosphorylation, to an alanine, attenuates the ability of heregulin to induce BRCA1 nuclear accumulation. These data suggest that Akt-catalyzed phosphorylation of BRCA1 is required for the heregulin-regulated nuclear concentration of BRCA1. Because most functions ascribed to BRCA1 occur within the nucleus, we postulated that phosphorylation-dependent nuclear accumulation of BRCA1 would result in enhanced nuclear activity, specifically transcriptional activity, of BRCA1. This postulate is affirmed by our observation that the ability of BRCA1 to transactivate GADD45 promoter constructs was enhanced in T47D cells treated with heregulin {beta}1. Furthermore, the heterologous expression of BRCA1 in HCC1937 human breast cancer cells, which have constitutively active Akt, also induces GADD45 promoter activity, whereas the expression of BRCA1 in which threonine 509 has been mutated to an alanine is able to only minimally induce promoter activity. These findings implicate Akt in upstream events leading to BRCA1 nuclear localization and function.

  15. Blockade of beta-adrenoceptors enhances cAMP signal transduction in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, E. J.; Johnson, A. K.; Lewis, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the blockade of beta-adrenoceptors would enhance cAMP-mediated signal transduction processes in vivo. The administration of the membrane permeable cAMP analogue, 8-(4-chlorophenylthiol)-cAMP (8-CPT-cAMP, 10 micromol/kg, i.v.) produced an increase in heart rate (+27 +/- 2%, P < 0.05), a fall in mean arterial blood pressure (-21 +/- 3%, P < 0.05) and falls in hindquarter (-12 +/- 3%, P < 0.05) and mesenteric (-32 +/- 3%, P < 0.05) vascular resistances in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats. The beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, propranolol (1 mg/kg, i.v.) lowered heart rate (-12 +/- 3%, P < 0.05) but did not affect mean arterial blood pressure or vascular resistances. The tachycardia, hypotension and vasodilation produced by 8-CPT-cAMP were exaggerated after administration of propranolol (P < 0.05 for all comparisons). The nitric oxide-donor, sodium nitroprusside (2 microg/kg, i.v.), produced falls in mean arterial blood pressure and vascular resistances of similar magnitude to those produced by 8-CPT-cAMP. These sodium nitroprusside-induced responses were unaffected by propranolol (P < 0.05 for all comparisons). Sodium nitroprusside also produced a minor increase in heart rate (+5 +/- 1%, P < 0.05) which was abolished by propranolol. These findings suggest that 8-CPT-cAMP directly increases heart rate and that blockade of beta-adrenoceptors enhances the potency of cAMP within the heart and vasculature.

  16. Identification and characterization of a FasL-like protein and cDNAs encoding the channel catfish death-inducing signaling complex

    PubMed Central

    Long, Scott; Wilson, Melanie; Bengtén, Eva; William Clem, L.; Miller, Norman W.; Gregory Chinchar, V.

    2005-01-01

    To elucidate cytolytic mechanisms in the channel catfish, lysates from catfish lymphoid and fibroblast cell lines were screened by Western blot analysis using a panel of antibodies reactive with components of the mammalian apoptotic pathway. Strong reactivity with three proteins (approximate Mr 70,000, 37,000, and 15,000) was seen using an antibody targeted to mammalian Fas ligand (FasL). The sizes of the two smaller proteins are consistent with their tentative designation as membrane-bound (37,000 Mr) and soluble (15,000 Mr) FasL. Treatments known to induce FasL in mammalian systems (e.g., PMA/calcium ionophore, UV-irradiation) induced expression of the 37,000-Mr protein in catfish T-cell lines. Moreover, expression of the 37,000-Mr protein in clonal T cells was up-regulated by increasing cell density. At the nucleotide level, homologues of Fas receptor (FasR), FADD, and caspase 8 were identified and characterized. These gene products likely constitute the teleost equivalent of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC). FADD was constitutively expressed in all (T, B, macrophage, and fibroblast) cell lines examined as well as in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), whereas FasR and caspase 8 were expressed in all cell lines except CCO, a FasL-positive fibroblast line. In contrast to FasL, expression of FasR and caspase 8 was inversely proportional to cell density. Collectively these studies identified four membrane-proximal proteins involved in the initiation of apoptosis in channel catfish and suggest that mechanisms of cell-mediated cytotoxicity in teleosts are similar to those used by mammals. PMID:15375637

  17. Methylation and mRNA expression levels of P15, death-associated protein kinase, and suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 genes in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin; Tan, Lin; He, Zhenxin

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to investigate the methylation status and mRNA expression levels of P15, death-associated protein kinase (DAPK), and suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS1) genes in multiple myeloma (MM). Materials and Methods: The bone marrow samples of 54 MM patients were collected and the methylation status of the P15, DAPK, and SOCS1 gene promoter regions was determined by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Automated sequencing technology was used to sequence the amplified products in order to analyze the base methylation sites. mRNA expression levels were determined using real-time fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results: Among the 54 MM patients, the positive methylation rates of the P15, DAPK, and SOCS1 genes were 27.78%, 18.52%, and 16.67%, respectively. The methylation results were confirmed by sequencing. The positive methylation rates of the P15, DAPK, and SOCS1 genes showed no correlation with patient gender, age, typing, staging, and grouping (P>0.05). There was no significant difference in the mRNA expression levels of the P15, DAPK, and SOCS1 genes between the MM patient group and the control group (P>0.05). Conclusions: Aberrant methylation of the P15, DAPK, and SOCS1 genes exists in MM, and these genes may play certain roles in pathogenesis of MM. There was no significant difference in mRNA expression levels between the methylated group and the non-methylated group, suggesting that these genes are regulated by other mechanisms during their transcription. PMID:27635200

  18. Cinobufagin induces autophagy-mediated cell death in human osteosarcoma U2OS cells through the ROS/JNK/p38 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kun; Zhang, Chuan; Huang, Man-Yu; Li, Wu-Yin; Hu, Guo-Qiang

    2016-07-01

    phosphorylation of the JNK and p38 signaling pathway. Our research proved that cinobufagin triggered apoptosis and autophagic cell death via activation of the ROS/JNK/p-38 axis. PMID:27176794

  19. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester protects 661W cells from H2O2-mediated cell death and enhances electroretinography response in dim-reared albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Tran, Julie-Thu A.; Anderson, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), an active component of honeybee propolis, has a wide range of beneficial properties. The purpose of this study was to test the protective role of CAPE in 661W cells (in vitro) against H2O2-mediated cell death and in albino rats (in vivo) against various light conditions. Methods The 661W cells were pretreated with CAPE and then stressed with H2O2. Cell death was measured with lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay, and mRNA and proteins were analyzed. Sprague Dawley rats were raised on either a control or CAPE (0.02%) diet and exposed to various light conditions for short or long periods. Retinal histology, mRNA, protein, lipid composition, and retinal function by electroretinography (ERG) were measured at the end of feeding. Results Pretreatment of 661W cells with CAPE reduced H2O2-mediated cell death in a dose-dependent manner and induced expression of heme oxygenase-1 (Ho1). Albino rats fed with CAPE had greater expression of Ho1 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (Icam1), less expression of FOS-like antigen (Fosl) and lipoxygenase 12 (Lox12) genes in the retina, less translocation of nuclear factor kappaB protein to the nucleus, and a lower molar ratio of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Further, the ERGs of the retinas of CAPE-fed rats were significantly higher than those of the control-fed rats when raised in dim light. Conclusions CAPE can activate the antioxidative gene expression pathway in retinal cells in vitro and in vivo. Feeding CAPE to albino rats can enhance ERG responses and change the lipid profile in the rats’ retinas. PMID:22690111