Science.gov

Sample records for enhanced precipitation preliminary

  1. Performance of Evapotranspirative Covers Under Enhanced Precipitation: Preliminary Data

    SciTech Connect

    David C. Anderson, Lloyd T. Desotell, David B. Hudson, Gregory J. Shott, Vefa Yucel

    2007-02-01

    Since January 2001, drainage lysimeter studies have been conducted at Yucca Flat, on the Nevada Test Site, in support of an evapotranspirative cover design. Yucca Flat has an arid climate with average precipitation of 16.5 cm annually. The facility consists of six drainage lysimeters 3 m in diameter, 2.4 m deep, and backfilled with a single layer of native soil. The bottom of each lysimeter is sealed and equipped with a small drain that enables direct measurement of saturated drainage. Each lysimeter has eight time-domain reflectometer probes to measure moisture content-depth profiles paired with eight heat-dissipation probes to measure soil-water potential depth profiles. Sensors are connected to dataloggers which are remotely accessed via a phone line. The six lysimeters have three different surface treatments: two are bare-soil; two were revegetated with native species (primarily shadscale, winterfat, ephedra, and Indian rice grass); and two were allowed to revegetate naturally with such species as Russian thistle, halogeton, tumblemustard and cheatgrass. Beginning in October 2003, one half of the paired cover treatments (one bare soil, one invader species, and one native species) were irrigated with an amount of water equal to two times the natural precipitation to achieve a three times natural precipitation treatment. From October 2003 through December 2005, all lysimeters received 52.8 cm precipitation, and the four irrigated lysimeters received an extra 105.6 cm of irrigation. No drainage has occurred from any of the nonirrigated lysimeters, but moisture has accumulated at the bottom of the bare-soil lysimeter and the native-plant lysimeter. All irrigated lysimeters had some drainage. The irrigated baresoil lysimeter had 48.3 cm of drainage or 26.4 percent of the combined precipitation and applied irrigation for the entire monitoring record. The irrigated invader species lysimeter had 5.8 cm of drainage, about 3.2 percent of the combined precipitation and

  2. Electrostatic precipitator efficiency enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Polizzotti, D.M.; Steelhammer, J.C.

    1983-05-24

    Method for enhancing the removal of particles from a particleladen gas stream utilizing an electrostatic precipitator, which comprises treating the gas with morpholine or derivatives thereof. Treated particles are found to also have desirable flow characteristics. Particularly effective compositions for the purpose comprise a combination of the morpholine, or derivative thereof, with an electrostatic precipitator efficiency enhancer, and in particular an alkanolamine.

  3. Preliminary analysis of regional-precipitation periodicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, Charles A.

    1980-01-01

    Precipitation variability plays a major role in nearly every aspect of the hydrologic cycle. Precipitation is not a random event, but it occurs after a sequence of prerequisites has been fulfilled. Recent investigations have shown that activity of the sun can affect atmospheric vorticity, an important factor in precipitation formation. Solar activity is known to be periodic; therefore, through a complex series of physical processes, precipitation variance is solar forced to a certain degree. A preliminary analysis of precipitation periodicity was made for eight regions scattered across the central United States. Each region contained 5 to 10 stations with long-term precipitation records that were averaged to obtain yearly regional-precipitation values. Graphic analysis shows 11-year and 22-year cycles that are nearly in phase with the solar cycles. An example of the effect of cyclic precipitation is presented for the Powder River basin in Wyoming and Montana. A cycle of 22 years exhibits fluctuations of approximately 22 to 27% for precipitation and 38 to 50% for runoff. A more detailed study that investigates solar-forced precipitation cycles and their relationship to hydrologic processes is needed. (USGS)

  4. Enhanced preliminary assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    An Enhanced Preliminary Assessment was conducted at Fort Benjamin Harrison (FBH) Indiana, which is located approximately 12 miles from downtown Indianapolis in Lawrence Township, Marion County. FBH contains 2,501 acres, of which approximately 1,069 acres is covered by woodlands. Activities at FBH include administration, training, housing, and support. Sensitive environments at FBH include wetlands, habitat areas for the endangered Indiana bat, endangered plants, and historically and archeologically significant areas. FBH is a U.S. Army Soldier Support Center under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC). Based on information obtained during and subsequent to a site visit (15 through 18 October 1991), 36 types of Areas Requiring Environmental Evaluation (AREEs) were identified and grouped by the following categories: Facility Operations; Maintenance/Fueling Operations; Water Treatment Operations; Training Areas; Hazardous Materials Storage/Waste Handling Areas; Sanitary Wastewater Treatment Plants; Storage Tanks; Landfills/Incinerators; Medical Facilities; Burn Pit Areas; Spill Areas; Ammunition Storage; Coal Storage; and Facility-wide AREEs. This report presents a summary of findings for each AREE and recommendations for further action.

  5. Free base amino alcohols as electrostatic precipitator efficiency enhancers

    SciTech Connect

    Polizzotti, D.M.; Steelhammer, J.C.

    1980-12-16

    A method is disclosed for improving operation of an electrostatic precipitator. By adding free base amino alcohol to a particle-laden gas being treated by the precipitator, the efficiency of particle removal is significantly enhanced.

  6. A preliminary characterization of the spatial variability of precipitation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Hevesi, J.A.; Flint, A.L.; Ambos, D.S.

    1994-12-31

    Isohyetal maps of precipitation and numerical models for simulating precipitation are needed to characterize natural infiltration at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objective of this study was to characterize the spatial variability of precipitation within the domain of the natural catchments overlying the potential repository, and to define preliminary geostatistical models based on differences in storm type for the numerical simulation of precipitation.

  7. Enhancing radar estimates of precipitation over complex terrain using information derived from an orographic precipitation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crochet, Philippe

    2009-10-01

    SummaryThe objective of this paper is to present a radar-based quantitative precipitation estimation algorithm and assess its quality over the complex terrain of western Iceland. The proposed scheme deals with the treatment of beam blockage, anomalous propagation, vertical profile of reflectivity and includes a radar adjustment technique compensating for range, orographic effects and variations in the Z-R relationship. The quality of the estimated precipitation is remarkably enhanced after post-processing and in reasonably good agreement with what is known about the spatial distribution of precipitation in the studied area from both rain gauge observations and a gridded dataset derived from an orographic precipitation model. The results suggest that this methodology offers a credible solution to obtain an estimate of the distribution of precipitation in mountainous terrain and appears to be of practical value to meteorologists and hydrologists.

  8. Enhancement of satellite precipitation estimation via unsupervised dimensionality reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Mahrooghy, Majid; Younan, Nicolas H.; Anantharaj, Valentine G; Aanstoos, James

    2012-01-01

    A methodology to enhance Satellite Precipitation Estimation (SPE) using unsupervised dimensionality reduction (UDR) techniques is developed. This enhanced technique is an extension to the Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Imagery using an Artificial Neural Network (PERSIANN) and Cloud Classification System (CCS) method (PERSIANN-CCS) enriched using wavelet features combined with dimensionality reduction. Cloud-top brightness temperature measurements from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-12) are used for precipitation estimation at 4 km 4 km spatial resolutions every 30 min. The study area in the continental United States covers parts of Louisiana, Arkansas, Kansas, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Alabama. Based on quantitative measures, root mean square error (RMSE) and Heidke skill score (HSS), the results show that the UDR techniques can improve the precipitation estimation accuracy. In addition, ICA is shown to have better performance than other UDR techniques; and in some cases, it achieves 10% improvement in the HSS.

  9. Mesospheric Odd Nitrogen Enhancements During Relativistic Electron Precipitation Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, A. C.; Smith, H. J. P.

    1999-01-01

    The behavior of mesospheric odd nitrogen species during and following relativistic and diffuse auroral precipitation events is simulated, Below 75 km nitric oxide is enhanced in proportion to the ion pair production function associated with the electron precipitation and the length of the event. Nitrogen dioxide and nitric acid are also enhanced. At 65 km the percentage of odd nitrogen for N is 0.1%, HNO3 is 1.6%, NO2 is 15%, and NO is 83.3%. Between 75 and 85 km NO is depleted during particle events due to the faster destruction of NO by N relative to the production of NO by N reacting with O2. Recovery of NO depends on transport from the lower thermosphere, where NO is produced in abundant amounts during particle events.

  10. A Preliminary Analysis of Precipitation Properties and Processes during NASA GPM IFloodS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, Lawrence; Gatlin, Patrick; Petersen, Walt; Wingo, Matt; Lang, Timothy; Wolff, Dave

    2014-01-01

    The Iowa Flood Studies (IFloodS) is a NASA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) ground measurement campaign, which took place in eastern Iowa from May 1 to June 15, 2013. The goals of the field campaign were to collect detailed measurements of surface precipitation using ground instruments and advanced weather radars while simultaneously collecting data from satellites passing overhead. Data collected by the radars and other ground instruments, such as disdrometers and rain gauges, will be used to characterize precipitation properties throughout the vertical column, including the precipitation type (e.g., rain, graupel, hail, aggregates, ice crystals), precipitation amounts (e.g., rain rate), and the size and shape of raindrops. The impact of physical processes, such as aggregation, melting, breakup and coalescence on the measured liquid and ice precipitation properties will be investigated. These ground observations will ultimately be used to improve rainfall estimates from satellites and in particular the algorithms that interpret raw data for the upcoming GPM mission's Core Observatory satellite, which launches in 2014. The various precipitation data collected will eventually be used as input to flood forecasting models in an effort to improve capabilities and test the utility and limitations of satellite precipitation data for flood forecasting. In this preliminary study, the focus will be on analysis of NASA NPOL (S-band, polarimetric) radar (e.g., radar reflectivity, differential reflectivity, differential phase, correlation coefficient) and NASA 2D Video Disdrometers (2DVDs) measurements. Quality control and processing of the radar and disdrometer data sets will be outlined. In analyzing preliminary cases, particular emphasis will be placed on 1) documenting the evolution of the rain drop size distribution (DSD) as a function of column melting processes and 2) assessing the impact of range on ground-based polarimetric radar estimates of DSD properties.

  11. Enhancing droplet deposition through in-situ precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damak, Maher; Mahmoudi, Seyed Reza; Hyder, Md Nasim; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2016-08-01

    Retention of agricultural sprays on plant surfaces is an important challenge. Bouncing of sprayed pesticide droplets from leaves is a major source of soil and groundwater pollution and pesticide overuse. Here we report a method to increase droplet deposition through in-situ formation of hydrophilic surface defects that can arrest droplets during impact. Defects are created by simultaneously spraying oppositely charged polyelectrolytes that induce surface precipitation when two droplets come into contact. Using high-speed imaging, we study the coupled dynamics of drop impact and surface precipitate formation. We develop a physical model to estimate the energy dissipation by the defects and predict the transition from bouncing to sticking. We demonstrate macroscopic enhancements in spray retention and surface coverage for natural and synthetic non-wetting surfaces and provide insights into designing effective agricultural sprays.

  12. Enhancing droplet deposition through in-situ precipitation

    PubMed Central

    Damak, Maher; Mahmoudi, Seyed Reza; Hyder, Md Nasim; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2016-01-01

    Retention of agricultural sprays on plant surfaces is an important challenge. Bouncing of sprayed pesticide droplets from leaves is a major source of soil and groundwater pollution and pesticide overuse. Here we report a method to increase droplet deposition through in-situ formation of hydrophilic surface defects that can arrest droplets during impact. Defects are created by simultaneously spraying oppositely charged polyelectrolytes that induce surface precipitation when two droplets come into contact. Using high-speed imaging, we study the coupled dynamics of drop impact and surface precipitate formation. We develop a physical model to estimate the energy dissipation by the defects and predict the transition from bouncing to sticking. We demonstrate macroscopic enhancements in spray retention and surface coverage for natural and synthetic non-wetting surfaces and provide insights into designing effective agricultural sprays. PMID:27572948

  13. Enhancing droplet deposition through in-situ precipitation.

    PubMed

    Damak, Maher; Mahmoudi, Seyed Reza; Hyder, Md Nasim; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2016-01-01

    Retention of agricultural sprays on plant surfaces is an important challenge. Bouncing of sprayed pesticide droplets from leaves is a major source of soil and groundwater pollution and pesticide overuse. Here we report a method to increase droplet deposition through in-situ formation of hydrophilic surface defects that can arrest droplets during impact. Defects are created by simultaneously spraying oppositely charged polyelectrolytes that induce surface precipitation when two droplets come into contact. Using high-speed imaging, we study the coupled dynamics of drop impact and surface precipitate formation. We develop a physical model to estimate the energy dissipation by the defects and predict the transition from bouncing to sticking. We demonstrate macroscopic enhancements in spray retention and surface coverage for natural and synthetic non-wetting surfaces and provide insights into designing effective agricultural sprays. PMID:27572948

  14. Quantitative evaluation of bronchial enhancement: preliminary observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odry, Benjamin L.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Novak, Carol L.; Naidich, David P.; Godoy, Myrna C. B.; Schmidt, Bernhard

    2010-03-01

    It has been known for several years that airflow limitations in the small airways may be an important contributor to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Quantification of wall thickness has lately gained attention thanks to the use of high resolution CT, with novel approaches focusing on automated methods that can substitute for visual assessment [1, 2]. While increased thickening of the wall is considered evidence of inflammatory disease, we hypothesize that there may be additional ways to detect and quantify inflammation, specifically the uptake of contrast material. In this preliminary investigation, we selected patients with documented chronic airway inflammation, and for whom pre and post contrast datasets were available. On targeted reconstruction of right upper and lower lobes, we selected airways with no connections to surrounding structures, and used a modified Full-Width-Half-Max method for quantification of lumen diameter, wall thickness, and wall density. Matching airway locations on the pre- and postcontrast cases were compared. Airways from patients without airway disease served as a control. Results for the airway disease cases showed an average enhancement of 72 HU within the airway walls, with a standard deviation of 59 HU. In the control group the average enhancement was 16 HU with standard deviation of 22 HU. While this study is limited in number of cases, we hypothesize that quantification of contrast uptake is an additional factor to consider in assessing airway inflammation. At the same time we are currently investigating whether enhancement can be measured via a "contrast" map created with dual energy scanning, where a 3-value decomposition algorithm differentiates iodine from other materials. This technique would eliminate both the need for a pre-contrast scan, and the task of matching airway locations on pre- and post- scans.

  15. Enhanced precipitation variability decreases grass- and increases shrub-productivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although projections of precipitation change indicate increases in variability, most studies of impacts of climate change on ecosystems focused on effects of changes in amount of precipitation, overlooking precipitation variability effects, especially at the interannual scale. Here, we present resul...

  16. Precipitation isoscapes for New Zealand: enhanced temporal detail using precipitation-weighted daily climatology.

    PubMed

    Baisden, W Troy; Keller, Elizabeth D; Van Hale, Robert; Frew, Russell D; Wassenaar, Leonard I

    2016-01-01

    Predictive understanding of precipitation δ(2)H and δ(18)O in New Zealand faces unique challenges, including high spatial variability in precipitation amounts, alternation between subtropical and sub-Antarctic precipitation sources, and a compressed latitudinal range of 34 to 47 °S. To map the precipitation isotope ratios across New Zealand, three years of integrated monthly precipitation samples were acquired from >50 stations. Conventional mean-annual precipitation δ(2)H and δ(18)O maps were produced by regressions using geographic and annual climate variables. Incomplete data and short-term variation in climate and precipitation sources limited the utility of this approach. We overcome these difficulties by calculating precipitation-weighted monthly climate parameters using national 5-km-gridded daily climate data. This data plus geographic variables were regressed to predict δ(2)H, δ(18)O, and d-excess at all sites. The procedure yields statistically-valid predictions of the isotope composition of precipitation (long-term average root mean square error (RMSE) for δ(18)O = 0.6 ‰; δ(2)H = 5.5 ‰); and monthly RMSE δ(18)O = 1.9 ‰, δ(2)H = 16 ‰. This approach has substantial benefits for studies that require the isotope composition of precipitation during specific time intervals, and may be further improved by comparison to daily and event-based precipitation samples as well as the use of back-trajectory calculations.

  17. The Chilean Coastal Orographic Precipitation Experiment Pilot Project (CCOPE-2015): Overview and Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minder, J. R.; Massmann, A.; Fults, S.; Kingsmill, D. E.; Snider, J.; Garreaud, R. D.; Montecinos, A.; Valenzuela, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Nahuelbuta Mountains are a coastal range of modest height (peak elevation 1.3km ASL) in Southern Chile (38 deg. S). Rain gauge observations reveal a strong orographic enhancement of rainfall over the Nahuelbuta. The interior of the mountains receives about 3.5 m annual rainfall, in contrast to nearby lowland locations that receive about 1 m. The small horizontal scale of the Nahuelbuta (~40km) indicates that orographic precipitation enhancement is potentially sensitive to the effects of aerosol loading and shallow convection. The Chilean Coastal Orographic Precipitation Experiment Pilot Project (CCOPE-2015) was conducted over the Nahuelbuta during the Austral winter of 2015 (May-Aug). Field observations during CCOPE-2015 were collected to improve understanding of orographic precipitation processes over coastal mountain ranges, particularly the role of aerosols, shallow convection, and shallow "non-bright-band" rainfall. Observations collected included: (1) surface rainfall from a network of 10 data logging rain gauges, (2) vertical precipitation profiles from a pair of K-band Micro Rain Radars, (3) rain drop size distributions from an optical disdrometer, (4) aerosol number concentration and size distribution measurements from a condensation particle counter and an Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer, and (5) upstream wind and thermodynamic profiles from radiosonde launches. Mesoscale model simulations and satellite remote sensing provided additional context. An overview of observations collected during CCOPE-2015 will be presented. The character of precipitation over the Nahuelbuta will be contrasted between different precipitation regimes (shallow warm rain, deep synoptically forced, and shallow convection). Additionally, the performance of satellite-based quantitative precipitation estimates over the Nahuelbuta will be assessed.

  18. On an Enhanced PERSIANN-CCS Algorithm for Precipitation Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Mahrooghy, Majid; Anantharaj, Valentine G; Younan, Nicolas H.; Aanstoos, James; Hsu, Kuo-Lin

    2012-01-01

    By employing wavelet and selected features (WSF), median merging (MM), and selected curve-fitting (SCF) techniques, the Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Imagery using an Artificial Neural Networks Cloud Classification System (PERSIANN-CCS) has been improved. The PERSIANN-CCS methodology includes the following four main steps: 1) segmentation of satellite cloud images into cloud patches, 2) feature extraction, 3) classification of cloud patches, and 4) derivation of the temperature rain-rate (T R) relationship for every cluster. The enhancements help improve step 2 by employing WSF, and step 4 by employing MM and SCF. For the study area herein, the results show that the enhanced methodology improves the equitable threat score (ETS) of the daily and hourly rainfall estimates mostly in the winter and fall. The ETS percentage improvement is about 20% for the daily (10% for hourly) estimates in the winter, 10% for the daily (8% for hourly) estimates in the fall, and at most 5% for the daily estimates in the summer at some rainfall thresholds. In the winter and fall, the area bias is improved almost at all rainfall thresholds for daily and hourly estimates. However, no significant improvement is obtained in the spring, and the area bias in the summer is also greater than that of the implemented PERSIANN-CCS algorithm.

  19. Enhanced precipitation variability decreases grass- and increases shrub-productivity

    PubMed Central

    Gherardi, Laureano A.; Sala, Osvaldo E.

    2015-01-01

    Although projections of precipitation change indicate increases in variability, most studies of impacts of climate change on ecosystems focused on effects of changes in amount of precipitation, overlooking precipitation variability effects, especially at the interannual scale. Here, we present results from a 6-y field experiment, where we applied sequences of wet and dry years, increasing interannual precipitation coefficient of variation while maintaining a precipitation amount constant. Increased precipitation variability significantly reduced ecosystem primary production. Dominant plant-functional types showed opposite responses: perennial-grass productivity decreased by 81%, whereas shrub productivity increased by 67%. This pattern was explained by different nonlinear responses to precipitation. Grass productivity presented a saturating response to precipitation where dry years had a larger negative effect than the positive effects of wet years. In contrast, shrubs showed an increasing response to precipitation that resulted in an increase in average productivity with increasing precipitation variability. In addition, the effects of precipitation variation increased through time. We argue that the differential responses of grasses and shrubs to precipitation variability and the amplification of this phenomenon through time result from contrasting root distributions of grasses and shrubs and competitive interactions among plant types, confirmed by structural equation analysis. Under drought conditions, grasses reduce their abundance and their ability to absorb water that then is transferred to deep soil layers that are exclusively explored by shrubs. Our work addresses an understudied dimension of climate change that might lead to widespread shrub encroachment reducing the provisioning of ecosystem services to society. PMID:26417095

  20. Enhanced precipitation variability decreases grass- and increases shrub-productivity.

    PubMed

    Gherardi, Laureano A; Sala, Osvaldo E

    2015-10-13

    Although projections of precipitation change indicate increases in variability, most studies of impacts of climate change on ecosystems focused on effects of changes in amount of precipitation, overlooking precipitation variability effects, especially at the interannual scale. Here, we present results from a 6-y field experiment, where we applied sequences of wet and dry years, increasing interannual precipitation coefficient of variation while maintaining a precipitation amount constant. Increased precipitation variability significantly reduced ecosystem primary production. Dominant plant-functional types showed opposite responses: perennial-grass productivity decreased by 81%, whereas shrub productivity increased by 67%. This pattern was explained by different nonlinear responses to precipitation. Grass productivity presented a saturating response to precipitation where dry years had a larger negative effect than the positive effects of wet years. In contrast, shrubs showed an increasing response to precipitation that resulted in an increase in average productivity with increasing precipitation variability. In addition, the effects of precipitation variation increased through time. We argue that the differential responses of grasses and shrubs to precipitation variability and the amplification of this phenomenon through time result from contrasting root distributions of grasses and shrubs and competitive interactions among plant types, confirmed by structural equation analysis. Under drought conditions, grasses reduce their abundance and their ability to absorb water that then is transferred to deep soil layers that are exclusively explored by shrubs. Our work addresses an understudied dimension of climate change that might lead to widespread shrub encroachment reducing the provisioning of ecosystem services to society. PMID:26417095

  1. Enhanced precipitation variability decreases grass- and increases shrub-productivity.

    PubMed

    Gherardi, Laureano A; Sala, Osvaldo E

    2015-10-13

    Although projections of precipitation change indicate increases in variability, most studies of impacts of climate change on ecosystems focused on effects of changes in amount of precipitation, overlooking precipitation variability effects, especially at the interannual scale. Here, we present results from a 6-y field experiment, where we applied sequences of wet and dry years, increasing interannual precipitation coefficient of variation while maintaining a precipitation amount constant. Increased precipitation variability significantly reduced ecosystem primary production. Dominant plant-functional types showed opposite responses: perennial-grass productivity decreased by 81%, whereas shrub productivity increased by 67%. This pattern was explained by different nonlinear responses to precipitation. Grass productivity presented a saturating response to precipitation where dry years had a larger negative effect than the positive effects of wet years. In contrast, shrubs showed an increasing response to precipitation that resulted in an increase in average productivity with increasing precipitation variability. In addition, the effects of precipitation variation increased through time. We argue that the differential responses of grasses and shrubs to precipitation variability and the amplification of this phenomenon through time result from contrasting root distributions of grasses and shrubs and competitive interactions among plant types, confirmed by structural equation analysis. Under drought conditions, grasses reduce their abundance and their ability to absorb water that then is transferred to deep soil layers that are exclusively explored by shrubs. Our work addresses an understudied dimension of climate change that might lead to widespread shrub encroachment reducing the provisioning of ecosystem services to society.

  2. Preliminary planning for the Satellite Precipitation And Cloud Experiment (SPACE) Field Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, S. F.; Mcnider, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    Preliminary planning has been performed to support NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in the coordination of the field experiment to be conducted in Central Tennessee, Northern Alabama, and Mississippi during the Spring/Summer of 1986. The goal of Satellite Precipitation and Cloud Experiments (SPACE) is to investigate mesoscale cloud/precipitation systems and development of associated satellite remote sensing technology. The field program will incorporate remote sensing observations from aircraft, satellite imagery, radar observations, ground based lightning measurements, rawinsonde observations, and various surface meteorological observations. The coordination of existing and special observation networks will provide a data base for analysis of precipitation events and provide ground truth comparisons for remote sensing capabilities. Existing surface-based observational networks include National Weather Service Meso/Alpha Scale Rawinsonde, radar, and surface measurements; the Tennessee Valley Authority automated and manual precpitation recording stations; and NASA/MSFC lightning measurement stations. Special observational features to be implemented include a meso/beta scale rawinsonde network, a special surface observational network within the rawinsonde network, and the installation of a RADAP II/ICRAD data processing unit on the National Weather Service radar at Nashville, TN. Initial coordination of these observational requirements to accomplish the goals of SPACE have been performed.

  3. Declining streamflows reveal nonstationary orographic precipitation enhancement driven by reduced westerly flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, Charles; Abatzoglou, John; Holden, Zachary

    2016-04-01

    Although orographic enhancement of precipitation lends mountains an important role in water resources, they are dramatically undersampled by long-term precipitation gages. This has led to the widespread practice of extrapolating trends in low-elevation precipitation gage networks to high elevations via simple climatological precipitation ratios developed from isohyetal maps. An implicit assumption in such a process is non-stationarity in orographic precipitation enhancement, an assumption that can lead to large errors in trend detection and attribution of climate change effects. We show an example from the Northwestern United States where streamflows from mountain watersheds show substantial declines over the last 60 years, even while long-term precipitation gage networks in the region show no trend. We demonstrate that these observed streamflow declines are driven by previously unexplored differential trends in precipitation. November to March westerly winds are strongly correlated with high-elevation precipitation but weakly correlated with low-elevation precipitation. Decreases in winter westerlies across the region from 1950 to 2012 are hypothesized to have reduced orographic precipitation enhancement, yielding differential trends in precipitation across elevations leading to the apparent paradox. Climate projections show continued weakening meridional pressure gradients and westerly flow across the region under greenhouse forcing, highlighting an additional stressor that is relevant for climate change impacts on water resources. This study also reveals the potential of wind speed data from circulation reanalysis products to better inform historical precipitation reconstructions.

  4. Enhanced precipitation variability effects on water losses and ecosystem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Climate change will result in increased precipitation variability with more extreme events reflected in more frequent droughts as well as more frequent extremely wet conditions. The increase in precipitation variability will occur at different temporal scales from intra to inter-annual and even long...

  5. An Enhanced Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Validation Network Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwaller, Matthew R.; Morris, K. Robert

    2009-01-01

    A Validation Network (VN) prototype is currently underway that compares data from the Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument on NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite to similar measurements from the U.S. national network of operational weather radars. This prototype is being conducted as part of the ground validation activities of NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. GPM will carry a Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar instrument (DPR) with similar characteristics to the TRMM PR. The purpose of the VN is to identify and resolve significant discrepancies between the U.S. national network of ground radar (GR) observations and satellite observations. The ultimate goal of such comparisons is to understand and resolve the first order variability and bias of precipitation retrievals in different meteorological/hydrological regimes at large scales. This paper presents a description of, and results from, an improved algorithm for volume matching and comparison of PR and ground radar observations.

  6. Nitrogen oxides removal by pulsed corona enhanced wet electrostatics precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, C.H.; Keener, T.C.; Khang, S.J.

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents the results of a bench-scale pulsed-corona enhanced wet electrostatic precipitator (wESP) application for removal of nitrogen oxides. This wESP is designed to operate wet/dry, positive/negative, and pulsed/non-pulsed conditions. The applied pulsed voltage is varied from 0 to 60 kV at 70 Hz. Gas flow rate is a nominal 7 m{sup 3}/hr and the collecting electrode area is 0.20 m{sup 2}. A simulated flue gas with NO concentration up to 1,200 ppm{sub v} has been used to determine the feasibility of NO{sub x} removal in the wESP. NO has to be oxidized to N{sub 2} before any removal takes place. NO{sub x} removal efficiency increased with gas residence time, inlet NO concentration and applied corona power. In the air stream with 10 seconds gas residence time, up to 20% of 1,000 ppm NO (or 22% NO{sub x}) was removed from an air stream of 1.9x10{sup {minus}3} m{sup 3}/s with a water flow of 6.3 x 10{sup {minus}5} m{sup 3}/sec and 20 W, 70 Hz pulsed corona. Both ammonia and ozone injections improve the NO{sub x} removal for both the corona and non-corona cases. With the inclusion of NH{sub 3} (NH{sub 3}/NO{sub x} ratio 1.3) and 25 watts corona power, NO removal efficiency was increased from 28% to 57%. The amount of in-situ ozone is not enough to be considered as a major NO{sub x} removal mechanism in this wESP. However, the additional injection of ozone improves the NO removal from 29% to 38% for both the corona and non-corona cases. When the oxygen concentration is dropped to 3% in a simulated flue gas with 12% CO{sub 2} and 800 ppm NO and 70% relative humidity at 11.5 s of gas residence time, the removal efficiency of NO is only 5%. Adding NH{sub 3} (NH{sub 3}/NO{sub x} ratio 1) at 76 watts corona power, NO removal is increased to 13%.

  7. Drop Size Distribution Measurements Supporting the NASA Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: Infrastructure and Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Walter A.; Carey, Lawerence D.; Gatlin, Patrick N.; Wingo, Matthew; Tokay, Ali; Wolff, David B.; Bringi, V. N.

    2011-01-01

    seasons and for different rain system types. Preliminary results suggest that seasonal variations in the DSD parameters do occur, but are most pronounced when comparing tropical PSDs to either winter or summer convective precipitation. For example the previously documented shift to relatively smaller drop diameters in higher number concentrations for equivalent rain rate bins was observed in tropical storm rainbands occurring over Huntsville. On a more inter seasonal basis empirical fits between parameters such as D0 and ZDR do not appear to exhibit robust seasonal biases- i.e., one fit seems to work for all seasons within acceptable standard error (O[10%]) for estimates of D0. In polarimetric retrievals of the vertical variability in PSD (rain layer) for a tropical rainband we find that the Do varies with height when partitioned by specified precipitation categories (e.g., convective or stratiform, heavy and light stratiform etc.) but this variation is of order 10-20% and is smaller than the difference in D0 observed between the basic delineation of convective and stratiform precipitation types. Currently we are expanding our analysis of the vertical structure of the PSD to include several seasonally and/or dynamically-different storm system types (e.g., winter convection and stratiform events; summer mid-latitude convective etc.) sampled by ARMOR. The study will present the results of our combined analyses.

  8. Cooling enhancement of aerosol particles due to surfactant precipitation.

    PubMed

    Beaver, Melinda R; Freedman, Miriam A; Hasenkopf, Christa A; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2010-07-01

    Light extinction by particles in Earth's atmosphere is strongly dependent on the particle size, chemical composition, and ability to take up water. In this work, we have measured the optical growth factors, fRH(ext)(RH, dry), for complex particles composed of an inorganic salt, sodium nitrate, and an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate. In contrast with previous studies using soluble and slightly soluble organic compounds, optical growth in excess to that expected based on the volume weighted water uptake of the individual components is observed. We explored the relationship between optical growth and concentration of surfactant by investigating the role of particle density, the effect of a surfactant monolayer, and increased light extinction by surfactant aggregates and precipitates. For our experimental conditions, it is likely that surfactant precipitates are responsible for the observed increase in light scattering. The contribution of surfactant precipitates to light scattering of aerosol particles has not been previously explored and has significant implications for characterizing the aerosol direct effect.

  9. Preliminary survey of domestic animals of the Sudan for precipitating antibodies to Rift Valley fever virus.

    PubMed Central

    Eisa, M.

    1984-01-01

    In a preliminary seroepidemiological survey a total of 780 serum samples derived from various domestic animals of the Sudan were examined for Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus precipitating antibodies. The incidence was approximately 34.3% in sheep, 33.2% in cattle, 22% in goats, 7.9% in camels and 4% in donkeys. The findings indicated that RVF is mainly prevalent in the rich savanna areas of the south as well as the irrigated areas close to the Nile in the north. Circumstantial evidence suggests that the detected antibodies were induced by a long-standing cryptically cycling infection and that resurgence of extensive epizootics is unlikely although limited outbreaks may occur. It is concluded that RVF virus circulates across the country in a south-north range along the Nile Valley with little or no extension to the drier lands to the east and west, and that ruminants are the primary species involved in virus maintenance. These species evidently serve as main amplifiers of infection during epizootics, but whether or not they also serve as sole virus reservoirs in inter-epizootic periods has yet to be determined. PMID:6512261

  10. A Gauge-Radar-Satellite Merged Analysis of High-Resolution Regional Precipitation over Eastern China: Preliminary Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Zhao, F.; Shan, Q.; Yang, Z.; Xie, P.

    2011-12-01

    A new technique is being developed at the Zhejiang Meteorological Agency of China Meteorological Administration (CMA) to construct an hourly precipitation analysis over Zhejiang Province of China through merging information from multiple sources. The target precipitation analyses cover the eastern China province of ~100K km2 and its adjacent East China Sea at a very high resolution of 1km by 1km. The precipitation observations used as inputs to the merging system include gauge reports of hourly precipitation at over 1500 automatic stations, radar observations of precipitation, and CMORPH satellite-based estimates. First a gauge-based hourly precipitation analysis is produced on a 1kmx1km grid by interpolating station measurements with consideration of orographic effects. To this end, analyzed fields of hourly precipitation climatology is defined by interpolating gauge observations over a 30 years period from 1981 to 2010 and the adjusted to the PRISM monthly precipitation climatology to reflect the orographic effects. Gridded fields of the ratio between the total hourly precipitation and hourly climatology are then constructed by interpolating corresponding point values at nearby stations using the optimal interpolation (OI) technique. The hourly precipitation analysis is finally defined as the product of the interpolated ratio and the hourly climatology at the grid point. In this preliminary investigation, the high-resolution precipitation analysis is constructed for a 3-year period from 2009 to 2011 and used to examine the error structures of the hourly precipitation fields derived from radar observations and satellite estimates. While the radar and satellite-based precipitation estimates are capable of capturing overall time and space variations associated with major synoptic and meso-scale weather systems, both of them present bias and random error of substantial magnitude. The bias in the radar and satellite precipitation exhibits regional patterns as well as

  11. The Cloud Aerosol Interactions and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX): overview and prominent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, J. R.; Maheskumar, R. S.; Konwar, M.; Deshpande, C. G.; Morwal, S. B.; Padma Kumari, B.; Joshi, R. R.; Pandithurai, G.; Bhalwankar, R. V.; Mujumdar, V. R.; Goswami, B.; Rosenfeld, D.

    2009-12-01

    “Cloud-Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX)”, an Indian national program, funded by Ministry of Earth Sciences, (MoES), Govt. of India is being conducted by Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune during the period 2009-2012. CAIPEEX has two phases. Phase I is devoted for intensive cloud and aerosol observations over different parts of India using an instrumented aircraft. Phase II is devoted for randomized precipitation enhancement experiment. The phase I is being carried out during the period May-September 2009. The main scientific objectives of Phase I are : To measure background concentrations of aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) during pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons over different parts of the country. Measurements of the associated differences in convective cloud microstructure and precipitation forming processes. The important preliminary results from the observational studies are: 1) During the pre-monsoon thick layer of brown haze extends to height of about 5-6 km at the foothills of the Himalaya, but does not normally spill over into the Tibetan Plateau. 2) The deep clouds that form in this layer are typically triggered at the slopes of the Himalaya. The clouds are super-continental microphysically, which means that the cloud drops are very small and prevent any warm rain. However, much ice is formed quickly, probably due to the ice nucleating activity of the aerosols. 3) In the pre-monsoon phase over central and southern India the clouds have similar nature as described for the foothills of the Himalaya, but with lower bases. Still, warm rain is substantially suppressed. During the monsoon, the clouds in the Bangalore-Hyderabad rain shadow area lose quickly their ability to produce warm rain with the increasing levels of CCN eastward away from the west coast. 4) A major finding was the dominance of thick haze in the Arabian Sea during the SW monsoon. It appears to be mostly of Arabian and

  12. A preliminary study on the global land annual precipitation associated with ENSO during 1948-2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, N.; Chen, L. W.; Xia, D. D.

    2002-11-01

    The global land monthly precipitation data (PREC / L) are used to investigate the relation between the global land annual precipitation and ENSO during 1948-2000, and the results of composite analysis are tested with Monte Carlo simulations. Results indicate that the global land annual precipitation was significantly reduced in large scale areas in warm event years; the areas were the equatorial West Pacific, North China; equatorial Central America; North Bengal Bay and Nepal; East Australia; West India and South Pakistan; the district east of the Lena River; West Europe; and Wilkes Land of Antarctica. In contrast to this, the areas where precipitation increased in warm event years were less, and mainly in Chile and Argentina of South America; Somali, Kenya, and Tanzania of East Africa; Turkey, Iraq, and Iran of the Middle East; Libya and Nigeria of North Africa; Namibia of Southwest Africa; and Botswana and Zimbabwe of southern Africa. Statistical tests show that in warm event years, the area where the land annual precipitation was reduced was larger than the area where the annual precipitation increased, and the reduction in precipitation was more significant than the increase. The results in this paper are compared with previous studies. It is also pointed out that the interdecadal change of ENSO had no significant effect on the interdecadal variation of precipitation in the above regions. However, the warm events of El Nino affected the droughts in East Australia and North China more after the 1980s than before.

  13. A preliminary study on the global land annual precipitation associated with ENSO during 1948 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neng, Shi; Luwen, Chen; Dongdong, Xia

    2002-11-01

    The global land monthly precipitation data (PREC/L) are used to investigate the relation between the global land annual precipitation and ENSO during 1948 2000, and the results of composite analysis are tested with Monte Carlo simulations. Results indicate that the global land annual precipitation was significantly reduced in large scale areas in warm event years; the areas were the equatorial West Pacific, North China; equatorial Central America; North Bengal Bay and Nepal; East Australia; West India and South Pakistan; the district east of the Lena River; West Europe; and Wilkes Land of Antarctica. In contrast to this, the areas where precipitation increased in warm event years were less, and mainly in Chile and Argentina of South America; Somali, Kenya, and Tanzania of East Africa; Turkey, Iraq, and Iran of the Middle East; Libya and Nigeria of North Africa; Namibia of Southwest Africa; and Botswana and Zimbabwe of southern Africa. Statistical tests show that in warm event years, the area where the land annual precipitation was reduced was larger than the area where the annual precipitation increased, and the reduction in precipitation was more significant than the increase. The results in this paper are compared with previous studies. It is also pointed out that the interdecadal change of ENSO had no significant effect on the interdecadal variation of precipitation in the above regions. However, the warm events of El Nino affected the droughts in East Australia and North China more after the 1980s than before.

  14. Modelling biological and chemically induced precipitation of calcium phosphate in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems.

    PubMed

    Barat, R; Montoya, T; Seco, A; Ferrer, J

    2011-06-01

    The biologically induced precipitation processes can be important in wastewater treatment, in particular treating raw wastewater with high calcium concentration combined with Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal. Currently, there is little information and experience in modelling jointly biological and chemical processes. This paper presents a calcium phosphate precipitation model and its inclusion in the Activated Sludge Model No 2d (ASM2d). The proposed precipitation model considers that aqueous phase reactions quickly achieve the chemical equilibrium and that aqueous-solid change is kinetically governed. The model was calibrated using data from four experiments in a Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR) operated for EBPR and finally validated with two experiments. The precipitation model proposed was able to reproduce the dynamics of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) formation and later crystallization to hydroxyapatite (HAP) under different scenarios. The model successfully characterised the EBPR performance of the SBR, including the biological, physical and chemical processes.

  15. Enhanced synergistic denitrification and chemical precipitation in a modified BAF process by using Fe2+.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongjie; Dong, Wengyi; Li, Ting; Liu, Tongzhou

    2014-01-01

    A series of laboratory-scale experiments for examining the feasibility and suitability of using Fe(2+) as the precipitant dosed in the pre-denitrification stage of a modified BAF process employing simultaneous chemical precipitation of TSS and phosphorus were carried out. The effects of dosing Fe(2+) on effluent quality and sludge characteristics of the pre-denitrification stage were assessed with comparing to the cases of no additional chemical dosing and dosing Fe(3+). Results obtained demonstrated a sound performance of synergistic denitrification and chemical precipitation in pre-denitrification of the modified BAF process when dosing Fe salts, which showed enhanced by using Fe(2+) as the dosed precipitant in increasing the denitrification loading rate, exhibiting a better controlling of the residual phosphorus in pre-denitrification effluent, and improving sludge settleability. Dosing Fe salt showed no adverse impact in removing COD, but resulted in a relatively higher SS content in the pre-denitrification effluent.

  16. Antiscalant removal in accelerated desupersaturation of RO concentrate via chemically-enhanced seeded precipitation (CESP).

    PubMed

    McCool, Brian C; Rahardianto, Anditya; Cohen, Yoram

    2012-09-01

    An experimental study was carried out to demonstrate and quantify the feasibility of antiscalant (AS) removal from brackish water RO concentrate of high gypsum scaling propensity via lime treatment prior to seeded gypsum precipitation. Based on studies with model solutions, it was shown that sufficient AS removal (up to ∼90%) from RO concentrate is feasible via a lime treatment step (at a dose significantly lower than that required for conventional lime softening) to enable effective subsequent seeded gypsum precipitation. This two-step chemically-enhanced seeded precipitation (CESP) treatment of primary RO concentrate is suitable as an intermediate concentrate demineralization (ICD) stage for high recovery desalting employing secondary RO desalination. Analysis of gypsum precipitation and lime treatment kinetic data suggests that, after adequate CaCO(3) precipitation has been induced for effective AS scavenging, CaSO(4) desupersaturation can be achieved via seeded gypsum precipitation without retardation due to seed poisoning by AS. Also, the lime dose required to prevent seed poisoning during subsequent gypsum desupersaturation via seeded gypsum precipitation can be adequately assessed with a precipitation kinetics model that considers AS seed poisoning based on a Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The degree of AS removal after lime treatment increased linearly with the logarithm of the single lime dose additions. Staged lime dosing (i.e., multiple lime additions), however, removed a higher degree of AS relative to an equivalent single lime dose addition since a higher driving force for CaCO(3) precipitation could be maintained over the course of the lime treatment period. PMID:22673342

  17. Antiscalant removal in accelerated desupersaturation of RO concentrate via chemically-enhanced seeded precipitation (CESP).

    PubMed

    McCool, Brian C; Rahardianto, Anditya; Cohen, Yoram

    2012-09-01

    An experimental study was carried out to demonstrate and quantify the feasibility of antiscalant (AS) removal from brackish water RO concentrate of high gypsum scaling propensity via lime treatment prior to seeded gypsum precipitation. Based on studies with model solutions, it was shown that sufficient AS removal (up to ∼90%) from RO concentrate is feasible via a lime treatment step (at a dose significantly lower than that required for conventional lime softening) to enable effective subsequent seeded gypsum precipitation. This two-step chemically-enhanced seeded precipitation (CESP) treatment of primary RO concentrate is suitable as an intermediate concentrate demineralization (ICD) stage for high recovery desalting employing secondary RO desalination. Analysis of gypsum precipitation and lime treatment kinetic data suggests that, after adequate CaCO(3) precipitation has been induced for effective AS scavenging, CaSO(4) desupersaturation can be achieved via seeded gypsum precipitation without retardation due to seed poisoning by AS. Also, the lime dose required to prevent seed poisoning during subsequent gypsum desupersaturation via seeded gypsum precipitation can be adequately assessed with a precipitation kinetics model that considers AS seed poisoning based on a Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The degree of AS removal after lime treatment increased linearly with the logarithm of the single lime dose additions. Staged lime dosing (i.e., multiple lime additions), however, removed a higher degree of AS relative to an equivalent single lime dose addition since a higher driving force for CaCO(3) precipitation could be maintained over the course of the lime treatment period.

  18. Impacts of an integrated crop-livestock system on soil properties to enhance precipitation capture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cropping/Livestock systems alter soil properties that are important in enhancing capture of precipitation by developing and maintaining water infiltration and storage. In this paper we will relate soil hydraulic conductivity and other physical properties on managed Old World Bluestem grassland, whea...

  19. Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels for LWRS - A Preliminary Systems Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gilles Youinou; R. Sonat Sen

    2013-09-01

    The severe accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plants illustrates the need for continuous improvements through developing and implementing technologies that contribute to safe, reliable and cost-effective operation of the nuclear fleet. Development of enhanced accident tolerant fuel contributes to this effort. These fuels, in comparison with the standard zircaloy – UO2 system currently used by the LWR industry, should be designed such that they tolerate loss of active cooling in the core for a longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, operational transients, and design-basis events. This report presents a preliminary systems analysis related to most of these concepts. The potential impacts of these innovative LWR fuels on the front-end of the fuel cycle, on the reactor operation and on the back-end of the fuel cycle are succinctly described without having the pretension of being exhaustive. Since the design of these various concepts is still a work in progress, this analysis can only be preliminary and could be updated as the designs converge on their respective final version.

  20. Electrostatic precipitation of ultrafine particles enhanced by simultaneous diffusional deposition on wire screens.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Manuel; Alguacil, Francisco José

    2002-11-01

    A laboratory-scale electrostatic precipitator has been designed and constructed in which the grounded collector plate has been substituted by a set of wire screens placed perpendicularly to the gas flow. Particles are deposited onto the screens by two mechanisms--electrostatic deposition and diffusional deposition--which act simultaneously. On the one hand, electrostatic deposition is effective for relatively large particles, but it is quite ineffective for the smallest ones because their charging probability in the corona field is too low. On the other hand, the diffusional collection efficiency of particles on fibers is high for small particles but low for the larger ones. Therefore, the simultaneous diffusional-electrostatic precipitation may become a useful technique for efficient filtration of particles below 0.1 microm. A preliminary experimental evaluation of this filtering device has shown that submicrometer particles with diameters down to a few nanometers can be collected with number efficiencies greater than 99%.

  1. Modification of global precipitation data for enhanced hydrologic modeling of tropical montane watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauch, Michael; Kumar, Rohini; Eisner, Stephanie; Mulligan, Mark; Reinhardt, Julia; Samaniego, Luis; Santini, William; Vetter, Tobias; Friesen, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Global gridded precipitation is an essential driving input for hydrologic models to simulate runoff dynamics in large river basins. However, the data often fail to adequately represent precipitation variability in mountainous regions due to orographic effects and sparse and highly uncertain gauge data. Water balance simulations in tropical montane regions covered by cloud forests are especially challenging because of the additional water input from cloud water interception. The ISI-MIP2 hydrologic model ensemble encountered these problems for Andean sub-basins of the Upper Amazon Basin, where all models significantly underestimated observed runoff. In this paper, we propose simple yet plausible ways to adjust global precipitation data provided by WFDEI, the WATCH Forcing Data methodology applied to ERA-Interim reanalysis, for tropical montane watersheds. The modifications were based on plausible reasoning and freely available tropics-wide data: (i) a high-resolution climatology of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and (ii) the percentage of tropical montane cloud forest cover. Using the modified precipitation data, runoff predictions significantly improved for all hydrologic models considered. The precipitation adjustment methods presented here have the potential to enhance other global precipitation products for hydrologic model applications in the Upper Amazon Basin as well as in other tropical montane watersheds.

  2. A preliminary study on removal of AMD precipitate coatings on pebbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W.; Min, K.; Lee, H.

    2011-12-01

    AMD(acid mine drainage) having a low pH and elevated concentrations of heavy metals affects environments as a major pollutant. In addition to AMD's water contamination, reddish brown precipitates from AMD spoil the watercourse scenery without suitable removal treatments. To examine the removal potentiality of ultrasonic cleaner, the pebble samples coated by reddish brown precipitates were collected at abandoned mine stream and scraped precipitate coatings were analyzed for their chemical compositions and mineralogy. Their average contents of Fe2O3, SO3, and Al2O3 were 84.3%, 6.13%, and 3.69%, respectively and goethite was the major constituent mineral. Laboratorial tests to remove precipitate coatings were performed in an ultrasonic cleaner with the frequency of 40kHz at 20 to 70oC for 10 to 60 minutes. Water and hydrochloric acid of 0.1M to 1M were used as a cleaning solvent and the ratio of solvent to precipitate coated pebbles was 5 in weight. In result, an ultrasonic cleaning treatment is expected to be applied successively in field and removal efficiency was increased as reaction time, temperature, and concentration of solvent rises.

  3. Preliminary Results from a Mesocosm Marsh Experiment with Treatments Simulating Three Tidal Flooding and Precipitation Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our goal was to observe and quantify the effects of low, medium and high tidal flooding regimes and various precipitation conditions on both Spartina alterniflora and Typha angustifolia in greenhouse mesocosms. The experiment was maintained for 4 months. Each of 3 tanks (600L) ha...

  4. Preliminary spatial Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) drought reconstructions for central and northern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez-Garcia, G.; Mendez, J. M.; Magana, V.; Villanueva-Diaz, J.

    2007-05-01

    We developed a spatial drought reconstruction of the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) for northern and central Mexico based on the relationship between tree growth and climate. Many previous tree-rings studies have successfully reconstructed drought indices as Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI), although SPI has become a widely accepted drought index; to our knowledge no SPI reconstructions have been developed using tree-ring chronologies over our study region. The methodology used in this work was the Point by Point Regression (PPR). The data set used was a network of tree-ring chronologies for Mexico and south United States and a 7-month Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) for the season November - May. The observed SPI was based on the Pearson Type III distribution (Guttman 1999), calculated from a 1-degree monthly precipitation dataset (Chen et al 2002). In order to maximize the number of tree-ring chronologies we set our calibration and reconstruction periods for 1948-1985 and 1801- 1985, respectively. According with our analysis, El Nino events are mainly associated with wetter condition over northern Mexico, while La Nina events are characterized by dry conditions. This reconstruction reproduces the 1950s drought which affected most of northern Mexico, the Great Plains and the southwestern United States. Results are compared with other reconstructed gridded drought indices available for the same area (Cook et al 2004).

  5. An on-board processor for a spaceborne Doppler precipitation radar : requirements and preliminary design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durden, Stephen L.; Fischman, M. A.; Tanelli, S.; Johnson, R. A.; Chu, A.

    2004-01-01

    Use of Doppler velocity measurement in spaceborne precipitation radar is highly desirable, since it can allow more accurate retrieval of atmospheric latent heating, which depends on both cloud and rain microphysical processes and on dynamical processes, namely, vertical updrafts and downdrafts. However, if the rain within the antenna beam is very non-uniform, biases can result with conventional pulse-pair processing, and more sophisticated processing is required. The solution is a time-frequency approach, which uses the full Doppler spectrum at each point in time. Since precipitation radars normally operate continuously and collect large amounts of data, real-time, on-board processing of data is needed to reduce the data rate. The objective of this work is to develop an on-board data processor for spaceborne Doppler precipitation radar, using field-programmable gate array (FPGA) technology. This paper describes the simulations and analysis that have been completed during the first year of the project. This includes both analytical calculations and bit-true simulations that allow the effects of finite word length to be explored. Tradeoffs have also been considered between speed and space within the chosen FPGA part. The results of these analyses have been used to develop a complete set of requirements for the processor. Initial design work has begun, based on these requirements. The design is being implemented in Verilog, and a description of this early design effort is also be given.

  6. Enhancement of perfluoropolyether boundary lubrication performance: I. Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Ajayi, O. O.; Goodell, A. J.; Wedeven, L. D.; Devine, E.; Premore, R. E.

    1995-01-01

    A ball bearing simulator operating under starved conditions was used to evaluate the boundary lubrication performance of a perfluoropolyether (PFPE) Krytox 143 AB. Several approaches to enhance boundary lubrication were studied. These included: (1) soluble boundary additives, (2) bearing surface modifications, (3) 'run-in' surface films, and (4) ceramic bearing components. In addition, results were compared with two non-perfluorinated liquid lubricant formulations. Based on these preliminary tests, the following tentative conclusions can be made: (1) substantial improvements in boundary lubrication performance were observed with a beta-diketone boundary additive and a tricresyl phosphate (TCP) liquid surface pretreatment; (2) the use of rough Si3N4 balls (Ra = 40 micro-in) also provided substantial improvement but with concomitant abrasive wear; (3) marginal improvements were seen with two boundary additives (a phosphine and a phosphatriazine) and a neat (100%) fluid (a carboxylic acid terminated PFPE); and surface pretreatments with a synthetic hydrocarbon, a PTFE coating, and TiC coated 440C and smooth Si3N4 balls (R(sub a) less than 1 micro-in); and (4) two non-PFPE lubricant formulations (a PAO and a synthetic hydrocarbon) yielded substantial improvements.

  7. IN-SITU CHEMICAL STABILIZATION OF METALS AND RADIONUCLIDES THROUGH ENHANCED ANAEROBIC REDUCTIVE PRECIPITATION

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Lutes; Angela Frizzell, PG; Todd A. Thornton; James M. Harrington

    2003-08-01

    The objective of this NETL sponsored bench-scale study was to demonstrate the efficacy of enhanced anaerobic reductive precipitation (EARP) technology for precipitating uranium using samples from contaminated groundwater at the Fernald Closure Project (FCP) in Cincinnati, Ohio. EARP enhances the natural biological reactions in the groundwater through addition of food grade substrates (typically molasses) to drive the oxidative-reductive potential of the groundwater to a lower, more reduced state, thereby precipitating uranium from solution. In order for this in-situ technology to be successful in the long term, the precipitated uranium must not be re-dissolved at an unacceptable rate once groundwater geochemical conditions return to their pretreatment, aerobic state. The approach for this study is based on the premise that redissolution of precipitated uranium will be slowed by several mechanisms including the presence of iron sulfide precipitates and coatings, and sorption onto fresh iron oxides. A bench-scale study of the technology was performed using columns packed with site soil and subjected to a continuous flow of uranium-contaminated site groundwater (476 {micro}g/L). The ''treated'' column received a steady stream of dilute food grade molasses injected into the contaminated influent. Upon attainment of a consistently reducing environment and demonstrated removal of uranium, an iron sulfate amendment was added along with the molasses in the influent solution. After a month long period of iron addition, the treatments were halted, and uncontaminated, aerobic, unamended water was introduced to the treated column to assess rebound of uranium concentrations. In the first two months of treatment, the uranium concentration in the treated column decreased to the clean-up level (30 {micro}g/L) or below, and remained there for the remainder of the treatment period. A brief period of resolubilization of uranium was observed as the treated column returned to aerobic

  8. Dissolution enhancement of gliclazide using ultrasound waves and stabilizers in liquid anti-solvent precipitation.

    PubMed

    Al-Nimry, S S; Qandil, A M; Salem, M S

    2014-12-01

    The absorption rate of gliclazide is slow and variable among subjects probably due to poor dissolution from the dosage form. The objective of this study was to enhance the dissolution rate of gliclazide by reducing the particle size. Gliclazide was precipitated from an acetone solution by adding an antisolvent (water) containing stabilizers. A combination of jets (flow rate of 20 ml/min), ultrasound, HPMC 4000, and sodium dodecyl sulfate was used to control particle size and particle size distribution. The effects of concentration of stabilizers, initial drug concentration in solution, time of insonation, antisolvent-to-solvent ratio, and ultrasound power on particle size and particle size distribution were studied. Precipitated drug particles were characterized by laser diffraction particle size analysis, SEM, FTIR spectroscopy, DSC, powder x-ray diffraction and in-vitro dissolution. With increasing almost all the studied parameters, the particle size of gliclazide initially decreased, exhibited a minimum, and then increased. Drug particles of glicazide with a mean particle size of 1.56 ± 0.09 μm and a narrow size distribution (d10/d50/d90 = 0.67/1.67/2.26) were precipitated as compared to unprocessed gliclazide with a mean particle size of 10.67 ± 0.04 μm and a wide size distribution (d10/ds50/d90 = 4.53/9.88/18.03). SEM images indicated changes in the particle morphology. Powder x-ray diffraction patterns and DSC curves indicated no changes in the chemical properties but only decrease in crystallinity and/or particle size. The dissolution rate was enhanced 2.55-fold. In conclusion, drug particles with small size and narrow size distribution were precipitated by selecting favorable process conditions, and dissolution was enhanced several folds.

  9. A preliminary study on relationship between precipitation and flood disaster in summer in southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Zhang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Based on daily precipitation data of 1181 weather stations and records of flood disaster losses in summer from 1983 to 2011 in southern China, the spatiotemporal variations of precipitation and flood disaster were analyzed and relationship between different rainfall grades and losses was established. According to cluster analysis of precipitation, the southern China is divided into six study regions: (Ⅰ) middle and lower reaches of Yangtze River; (Ⅱ) area between Yangtze River and Yellow River; (Ⅲ) Huanan; (Ⅳ) western Jiangnan; (Ⅴ) upper reaches of Yangtze River; (Ⅵ)southwest China. Station-days(SD) of rainfall grades over the southern China exhibits a distinct three-peak distribution with peaks at 0~5mm, 50~60mm and 100~130mm. The SD of large rainfall grades (>50mm) in 1990s is significantly higher inⅠand Ⅳ. The distributions of rainfall grades are similar inⅡ,Ⅴand Ⅵ, with heavy rain decreased dramatically in 1980s. There are more extreme precipitation events occurred in 1990s and 2000s in Ⅲ. Similar to the distributions of SD of rainfall grades, impact population, impact area, direct economy loss and agricultural economy loss with unimodal distributions inⅠand Ⅳ are more serious in 1990s. In Ⅱ, Ⅴ and Ⅵ, disaster losses are trimodally distributed, with peak values in 1991, 1998, and 2006. The disaster losses exhibited bimodal distribution, reaching peak values in 1994 and 2006 in Ⅲ. In general, four kinds of disaster losses reach the maximum values in Ⅰ in 1990s. Based on the average SD of heavy rain (25~50mm), rainstorm (50~100mm) and heavy rainstorm (100~250mm), the values of different disaster loss indexes could be calculated by twenty established multiple regression equations, with all correlation coefficients larger than 0.4, passing a significance level of 0.001. The increased values of flood disaster losses caused by heavy rainstorm are about one order of magnitude larger than those by heavy rain and rainstorm. The

  10. Precipitation and dissolution of calcium phosphonates for the enhancement of squeeze lifetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, F.H.; Fogler, H.S.

    1995-08-01

    Injection of scale inhibitors into a formation is a commonly used technique to prevent scale formation during oil production. The success of a squeeze treatment often is determined by its effective lifetime in inhibiting scale in a reservoir system, and this lifetime is dictated by the retention/release mechanism of inhibitor in the reservoir. This paper focuses on a study of the precipitation/dissolution of calcium 1-hydroxyethylidene-1, 1-diphosphonic acid (HEDP) in a porous medium to elucidate the important factors that affect the release of this precipitate. Experiments carried out in ceramic cores indicate that precipitation squeezes offer longer squeeze lifetimes and more HEDP retention than adsorption squeezes. Micromodel experiments show that the calcium-HEDP precipitate placed in porous media is made up of long, fibrous particles preferentially situated in pore throats. The elution from micromodels indicates that slow dissolution of apparently strong pore-throat plugs dictates the long tailing region. Finally, multiple-shut-in experiments performed in ceramic cores show that, while the amount of calcium-HEDP retention per shut-in does not increase with successive shut-ins, an enhanced returns effect is observed with respect to the squeeze lifetime.

  11. A novel catalyst of warm-cloud seeding to enhance precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H. X.; Li, X. D.; Yang, R. J.

    2016-07-01

    Water is necessary for sustaining human life. In many regions of the world, traditional water sources cannot meet increasing water demands. Warm-cloud seeding is an efficient way to augment water supplies. In this paper, we explore two new hygroscopicity catalysts: Poly acrylamide (PAM) and Sodium polyacrylate (PAAS). We designed a series of experiments to investigate the effects of these catalysts together with common catalyst salt powder (NaCl). The experiment was held in a cloud chamber built in our laboratory. The results show that: 1) Catalysed by NaCl, a dose of 0.91g/m3 can obtain the best precipitation efficiency and enhancement rate at 70.8% and 142%, respectively; 2) A 1.36g/m3 dose catalysed by PAM and PAAS exhibits optimal performance at 76.7% and 70.4% precipitation efficiency, respectively; 3) Under the same conditions, PAM shows better catalytic effects than NaCl does.

  12. Preliminary experience with precipitating hydrophobic injectable liquid in brain arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Koçer, Naci; Hanımoğlu, Hakan; Batur, Şebnem; Kandemirli, Sedat Giray; Kızılkılıç, Osman; Sanus, Zihni; Öz, Büge; Işlak, Civan; Kaynar, Mehmet Yaşar

    2016-01-01

    Advancement in microcatheter design and emergence of new embolic agents offer better results in endovascular treatment of brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Precipitating hydrophobic injectable liquid (PHIL) (Microvention) is a newly introduced dimethyl sulfoxide-based embolic agent for endovascular use. Herein, we present three patients who underwent endovascular treatment of brain AVMs with PHIL, followed by surgical resection. Endovascular features and same-day surgical handling of the new embolic agent PHIL are presented along with histopathologic changes in the acute stage in brain AVMs are presented, and its major differences from Onyx. In our series, PHIL had moderate inflammatory reaction in the acute stage without any associated angionecrosis that is different than Onyx which cause mild inflammatory reaction with angionecrosis. Smallest vessel containing PHIL was 2.9 μm compared to 5 μm with Onyx, which suggests better penetration. PMID:26782157

  13. Preliminary experience with precipitating hydrophobic injectable liquid in brain arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Koçer, Naci; Hanımoğlu, Hakan; Batur, Şebnem; Kandemirli, Sedat Giray; Kızılkılıç, Osman; Sanus, Zihni; Öz, Büge; Işlak, Civan; Kaynar, Mehmet Yaşar

    2016-01-01

    Advancement in microcatheter design and emergence of new embolic agents offer better results in endovascular treatment of brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Precipitating hydrophobic injectable liquid (PHIL) (Microvention) is a newly introduced dimethyl sulfoxide-based embolic agent for endovascular use. Herein, we present three patients who underwent endovascular treatment of brain AVMs with PHIL, followed by surgical resection. Endovascular features and same-day surgical handling of the new embolic agent PHIL are presented along with histopathologic changes in the acute stage in brain AVMs are presented, and its major differences from Onyx. In our series, PHIL had moderate inflammatory reaction in the acute stage without any associated angionecrosis that is different than Onyx which cause mild inflammatory reaction with angionecrosis. Smallest vessel containing PHIL was 2.9 μm compared to 5 μm with Onyx, which suggests better penetration. PMID:26782157

  14. Forecasting Lake-Effect Precipitation in the Great Lakes Region Using NASA Enhanced-Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cipullo, Michelle; Molthan, Andrew; Shafer, Jackie; Case, Jonathan; Jedlovec, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Lake-effect precipitation is common in the Great Lakes region, particularly during the late fall and winter. The synoptic processes of lake-effect precipitation are well understood by operational forecasters, but individual forecast events still present a challenge. Locally run, high resolution models can assist the forecaster in identifying the onset and duration of precipitation, but model results are sensitive to initial conditions, particularly the assumed surface temperature of the Great Lakes. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has created a Great Lakes Surface Temperature (GLST) composite, which uses infrared estimates of water temperatures obtained from the MODIS instrument aboard the Aqua and Terra satellites, other coarser resolution infrared data when MODIS is not available, and ice cover maps produced by the NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab (GLERL). This product has been implemented into the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model Environmental Modeling System (WRF-EMS), used within forecast offices to run local, high resolution forecasts. The sensitivity of the model forecast to the GLST product was analyzed with a case study of the Lake Effect Storm Echinacea, which produced 10 to 12 inches of snowfall downwind of Lake Erie, and 8 to 18 inches downwind of Lake Ontario from 27-29 January 2010. This research compares a forecast using the default Great Lakes surface temperatures from the Real Time Global sea surface temperature (RTG SST), in the WRF-EMS model to the enhanced NASA SPoRT GLST product to study forecast impacts. Results from this case study show that the SPoRT GLST contained less ice cover over Lake Erie and generally cooler water temperatures over Lakes Erie and Ontario. Latent and sensible heat fluxes over Lake Ontario were decreased in the GLST product. The GLST product decreased the quantitative precipitation forecast (QPF), which can be correlated to the decrease in temperatures and heat

  15. Forecasting precipitation and temperatures at the island of Cyprus to enhance wetland management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanou, Georgios; Ioannou, Konstantinos K.; Iakovoglou, Valasia; Zaimes, George N.

    2014-08-01

    Droughts on the island of Cyprus are more frequently occurring during the last decades. This has and will have major impacts on natural resources, particularly on semi-aquatic and aquatic ecosystems. Wetlands are very important aquatic ecosystems with many functions and values, especially in semi-arid regions. The study area is the Wetland of the Larnanca Salt Lake that belongs to the Natura 2000 Network and the Ramsar Convention. It hosts thousands of migratory birds every year. Forecasting accurately the future climatic conditions of an area can greatly enhance the ability to provide the best possible managerial practices regarding a natural resource (e.g. wetland). These climate forecasts can provide significant information on future conditions of the Wetland of Larnaca Salt Lake, particularly when forecasting when and how long the drying conditions could last. In this study, an Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) was used as a tool for short term prediction of the precipitation in the study area. The methodology used two time series (temperature and precipitation) in order to train the ANN. Temperatures were used as the input variable to the ANN while precipitation was used as the output variables. The forecast was based on data from the period between 1993 and 2013. In order to estimate the accuracy of the produced results the correlation coefficient, the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) and the Mean Absolute Percentage Error (MAPE) was correlated. Overall, this tool can help the responsible authorities of the wetland to manage it more efficiently.

  16. Verification of Precipitation Enhancement due to Winter Orographic Cloud Seeding in the Payette River Basin of Western Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrook, V. P.; Kunkel, M. L.; Blestrud, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Idaho Power Company (IPCo) is a hydroelectric based utility serving eastern Oregon and most of southern Idaho. Snowpack is critical to IPCo operations and the company has invested in a winter orographic cloud seeding program for the Payette, Boise, and Upper Snake River basins to augment the snowpack. IPCo and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) are in the middle of a two-year study to determine precipitation enhancement due to winter orographic cloud seeding in the Payette River basin. NCAR developed a cloud seeding module, as an enhancement to the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model, that inputs silver iodide released from both ground based and/or aircraft generators. The cloud seeding module then increases the precipitation as a function of the cloud seeding. The WRF model used for this program is run at the University of Arizona with a resolution of 1.8 kilometers using Thompson microphysics and Mellor-Yamada-Janic boundary layer scheme. Two different types of verification schemes to determine precipitation enhancement is being used for this program; model versus model and model versus precipitation gauges. In the model versus model method, a control model run uses NCAR developed criteria to identify the best times to operate cloud or airborne seeding generators and also establishes the baseline precipitation. The model is then rerun with the cloud seeding module turned on for the time periods determined by the control run. The precipitation enhancement due to cloud seeding is then the difference in precipitation between the control and seeding model runs. The second verification method is to use the model forecast precipitation in the seeded and non-seeded areas, compare against observed precipitation (from mainly SNOTEL gauges), and determine the precipitation enhancement due to cloud seeding. Up to 15 SNOTEL gauges in or near the Payette River basin along with 14 IPCo high resolution rain gauges will be used with this target

  17. Enhanced interannual precipitation variability increases plant functional diversity that in turn ameliorates negative impact on productivity.

    PubMed

    Gherardi, Laureano A; Sala, Osvaldo E

    2015-12-01

    Although precipitation interannual variability is projected to increase due to climate change, effects of changes in precipitation variance have received considerable less attention than effects of changes in the mean state of climate. Interannual precipitation variability effects on functional diversity and its consequences for ecosystem functioning are assessed here using a 6-year rainfall manipulation experiment. Five precipitation treatments were switched annually resulting in increased levels of precipitation variability while maintaining average precipitation constant. Functional diversity showed a positive response to increased variability due to increased evenness. Dominant grasses decreased and rare plant functional types increased in abundance because grasses showed a hump-shaped response to precipitation with a maximum around modal precipitation, whereas rare species peaked at high precipitation values. Increased functional diversity ameliorated negative effects of precipitation variability on primary production. Rare species buffered the effect of precipitation variability on the variability in total productivity because their variance decreases with increasing precipitation variance. PMID:26437913

  18. Enhanced interannual precipitation variability increases plant functional diversity that in turn ameliorates negative impact on productivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although precipitation interannual variability is projected to increase due to climate change, effects of changes in precipitation variance have received considerable less attention than effects of changes in the mean state of climate. Interannual precipitation variability effects on functional dive...

  19. Enhanced interannual precipitation variability increases plant functional diversity that in turn ameliorates negative impact on productivity.

    PubMed

    Gherardi, Laureano A; Sala, Osvaldo E

    2015-12-01

    Although precipitation interannual variability is projected to increase due to climate change, effects of changes in precipitation variance have received considerable less attention than effects of changes in the mean state of climate. Interannual precipitation variability effects on functional diversity and its consequences for ecosystem functioning are assessed here using a 6-year rainfall manipulation experiment. Five precipitation treatments were switched annually resulting in increased levels of precipitation variability while maintaining average precipitation constant. Functional diversity showed a positive response to increased variability due to increased evenness. Dominant grasses decreased and rare plant functional types increased in abundance because grasses showed a hump-shaped response to precipitation with a maximum around modal precipitation, whereas rare species peaked at high precipitation values. Increased functional diversity ameliorated negative effects of precipitation variability on primary production. Rare species buffered the effect of precipitation variability on the variability in total productivity because their variance decreases with increasing precipitation variance.

  20. Enhancements to the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System for simulating in-stream water temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markstrom, S. L.; Hay, L.

    2010-12-01

    A stream temperature module has been developed for the U.S. Geological Survey Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) for simulating maximum- and mean-daily stream temperature. This module provides additional simulation capabilities by coupling PRMS with the U.S. Geological Survey Stream Network Temperature (SNTEMP) model. PRMS is a modular, deterministic, distributed-parameter, physical-process watershed model that simulates watershed response to various combinations of climate and land use. Normal and extreme rainfall and snowmelt can be simulated to evaluate changes in water-balance relations, streamflow regimes, soil-water relations, and ground-water recharge. SNTEMP was developed to help aquatic biologists and engineers predict the effects of flow regime changes on water temperatures. This coupling of PRMS with SNTEMP will allow scientists and watershed managers to evaluate the effects of historical climate and projected climate change, landscape evolution, and resource management scenarios on watershed hydrology and in-stream water temperature. The prototype of this coupled model was developed for the U.S. Geological Survey Southeast Regional Assessment Project (SERAP) and tested in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin in the southeastern United States. Preliminary results from the prototype are presented.

  1. Enhanced gene transfection using calcium phosphate co-precipitates and low-intensity pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mariame A; Ahmed, Iman S; Campbell, Paul; Kondo, Takashi

    2012-11-20

    The capability to controllably disrupt the cell membrane by ultrasound (US), thus facilitating entry of exogenous species, has now reached a state of some maturity. However, a compelling question asks whether there is a residual role for US in enhancing transfection: that is, once the genetic material has been delivered to the cytosol, can US assist in its transport into the nucleus? The present experiment was designed with a view to addressing this question. As such, our experimental setup discriminates between: (i) the precursor cell membrane permealization step, and (ii) any subsequent intracellular trafficking into the nucleus. In this study, calcium phosphate co-precipitates (CaP) were used to internalize plasmid DNA encoding for luciferase (pDNA-Luc) (>90%) in HeLa cells. After 2h incubation with the CaP-pDNA-Luc, cells were washed and insonated for varying durations. The results showed that US can indeed enhance the intracellular trafficking of previously internalized genes when longer insonation periods are implemented, culminating with an increased probability for successful nuclear localization, as inferred from an enhanced luciferase expression. Moreover, the results suggest that the intracellular role of US might be mediated through a pathway that appears not to be limited to destabilizing the endosomal vesicles. The study thus provides new information regarding the intracellular effects of US, and in effect represents a new modality combining US and CaP carriers for improved efficiency in gene delivery.

  2. Formulation and optimization of efavirenz nanosuspensions using the precipitation-ultrasonication technique for solubility enhancement.

    PubMed

    Taneja, Sakshi; Shilpi, Satish; Khatri, Kapil

    2016-05-01

    Efavirenz is a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, and is classified as BCS Class II API. Its erratic oral absorption and poor bioavailability make it a potential candidate for being formulated as a nanosuspension. The objective of this study was to formulate efavirenz nanosuspensions employing the antisolvent precipitation-ultrasonication method, and to enhance its solubility by reducing particle size to the nanometer range. The effects of different process parameters were studied and optimized with respect to particle size and poly dispersity index (PDI). The optimized formulation was also subjected to lyophilization, to further increase the solubility and stability, and the technology is potentially suited to a range of poorly water-soluble compounds.

  3. Enhancing Local Climate Projections of Precipitation: Assets and Limitations of Quantile Mapping Techniques for Statistical Downscaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Martin; Kotlarski, Sven; Schär, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    The Swiss CH2011 scenarios provide a portfolio of climate change scenarios for the region of Switzerland, specifically tailored for use in climate impact research. Although widely applied by a variety of end-users, these scenarios are subject to several limitations related to the underlying delta change methodology. Examples are difficulties to appropriately account for changes in the spatio-temporal variability of meteorological fields and for changes in extreme events. The recently launched ELAPSE project (Enhancing local and regional climate change projections for Switzerland) is connected to the EU COST Action VALUE (www.value-cost.eu) and aims at complementing CH2011 by further scenario products, including a bias-corrected version of daily scenarios at the site scale. For this purpose the well-established empirical quantile mapping (QM) methodology is employed. Here, daily temperature and precipitation output of 15 GCM-RCM model chains of the ENSEMBLES project is downscaled and bias-corrected to match observations at weather stations in Switzerland. We consider established QM techniques based on all empirical quantiles or linear interpolation between the empirical percentiles. In an attempt to improve the downscaling of extreme precipitation events, we also apply a parametric approximation of the daily precipitation distribution by a dynamically weighted mixture of a Gamma distribution for the bulk and a Pareto distribution for the right tail for the first time in the context of QM. All techniques are evaluated and intercompared in a cross-validation framework. The statistical downscaling substantially improves virtually all considered distributional and temporal characteristics as well as their spatial distribution. The empirical methods have in general very similar performances. The parametric method does not show an improvement over the empirical ones. Critical sites and seasons are highlighted and discussed. Special emphasis is placed on investigating the

  4. A nanoscale co-precipitation approach for property enhancement of Fe-base alloys

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhongwu; Liu, Chain Tsuan; Miller, Michael K.; Wang, Xun-Li; Wen, Yuren; Fujita, Takeshi; Hirata, Akihiko; Chen, Mingwei; Chen, Guang; Chin, Bryan A.

    2013-01-01

    Precipitate size and number density are two key factors for tailoring the mechanical behavior of nanoscale precipitate-hardened alloys. However, during thermal aging, the precipitate size and number density change, leading to either poor strength or high strength but significantly reduced ductility. Here we demonstrate, by producing nanoscale co-precipitates in composition-optimized multicomponent precipitation-hardened alloys, a unique approach to improve the stability of the alloy against thermal aging and hence the mechanical properties. Our study provides compelling experimental evidence that these nanoscale co-precipitates consist of a Cu-enriched bcc core partially encased by a B2-ordered Ni(Mn, Al) phase. This co-precipitate provides a more complex obstacle for dislocation movement due to atomic ordering together with interphases, resulting in a high yield strength alloy without sacrificing alloy ductility. PMID:23429646

  5. Preliminary Evaluation of an Aviation Safety Thesaurus' Utility for Enhancing Automated Processing of Incident Reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrientos, Francesca; Castle, Joseph; McIntosh, Dawn; Srivastava, Ashok

    2007-01-01

    This document presents a preliminary evaluation the utility of the FAA Safety Analytics Thesaurus (SAT) utility in enhancing automated document processing applications under development at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). Current development efforts at ARC are described, including overviews of the statistical machine learning techniques that have been investigated. An analysis of opportunities for applying thesaurus knowledge to improving algorithm performance is then presented.

  6. Fabrication of doxorubicin nanoparticles by controlled antisolvent precipitation for enhanced intracellular delivery.

    PubMed

    Tam, Yu Tong; To, Kenneth Kin Wah; Chow, Albert Hee Lum

    2016-03-01

    Over-expression of ATP-binding cassette transporters is one of the most important mechanisms responsible for multidrug resistance. Here, we aimed to develop a stable polymeric nanoparticle system by flash nanoprecipitation (FNP) for enhanced anticancer drug delivery into drug resistant cancer cells. As an antisolvent precipitation process, FNP works best for highly lipophilic solutes (logP>6). Thus we also aimed to evaluate the applicability of FNP to drugs with relatively low lipophilicity (logP=1-2). To this end, doxorubicin (DOX), an anthracycline anticancer agent and a P-gp substrate with a logP of 1.3, was selected as a model drug for the assessment. DOX was successfully incorporated into the amphiphilic diblock copolymer, polyethylene glycol-b-polylactic acid (PEG-b-PLA), by FNP using a four-stream multi-inlet vortex mixer. Optimization of key processing parameters and co-formulation with the co-stabilizer, polyvinylpyrrolidone, yielded highly stable, roughly spherical DOX-loaded PEG-b-PLA nanoparticles (DOX.NP) with mean particle size below 100nm, drug loading up to 14%, and drug encapsulation efficiency up to 49%. DOX.NP exhibited a pH-dependent drug release profile with higher cumulative release rate at acidic pHs. Surface analysis of DOX.NP by XPS revealed an absence of DOX on the particle surface, indicative of complete drug encapsulation. While there were no significant differences in cytotoxic effect on P-gp over-expressing LCC6/MDR cell line between DOX.NP and free DOX in buffered aqueous media, DOX.NP exhibited a considerably higher cellular uptake and intracellular retention after efflux. The apparent lack of cytotoxicity enhancement with DOX.NP may be attributable to its slow DOX release inside the cells.

  7. Fabrication of doxorubicin nanoparticles by controlled antisolvent precipitation for enhanced intracellular delivery.

    PubMed

    Tam, Yu Tong; To, Kenneth Kin Wah; Chow, Albert Hee Lum

    2016-03-01

    Over-expression of ATP-binding cassette transporters is one of the most important mechanisms responsible for multidrug resistance. Here, we aimed to develop a stable polymeric nanoparticle system by flash nanoprecipitation (FNP) for enhanced anticancer drug delivery into drug resistant cancer cells. As an antisolvent precipitation process, FNP works best for highly lipophilic solutes (logP>6). Thus we also aimed to evaluate the applicability of FNP to drugs with relatively low lipophilicity (logP=1-2). To this end, doxorubicin (DOX), an anthracycline anticancer agent and a P-gp substrate with a logP of 1.3, was selected as a model drug for the assessment. DOX was successfully incorporated into the amphiphilic diblock copolymer, polyethylene glycol-b-polylactic acid (PEG-b-PLA), by FNP using a four-stream multi-inlet vortex mixer. Optimization of key processing parameters and co-formulation with the co-stabilizer, polyvinylpyrrolidone, yielded highly stable, roughly spherical DOX-loaded PEG-b-PLA nanoparticles (DOX.NP) with mean particle size below 100nm, drug loading up to 14%, and drug encapsulation efficiency up to 49%. DOX.NP exhibited a pH-dependent drug release profile with higher cumulative release rate at acidic pHs. Surface analysis of DOX.NP by XPS revealed an absence of DOX on the particle surface, indicative of complete drug encapsulation. While there were no significant differences in cytotoxic effect on P-gp over-expressing LCC6/MDR cell line between DOX.NP and free DOX in buffered aqueous media, DOX.NP exhibited a considerably higher cellular uptake and intracellular retention after efflux. The apparent lack of cytotoxicity enhancement with DOX.NP may be attributable to its slow DOX release inside the cells. PMID:26724466

  8. New approaches to enhance active steering system functionalities: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serarslan, Benan

    2014-09-01

    An important development of the steering systems in general is active steering systems like active front steering and steer-by-wire systems. In this paper the current functional possibilities in application of active steering systems are explored. A new approach and additional functionalities are presented that can be implemented to the active steering systems without additional hardware such as new sensors and electronic control units. Commercial active steering systems are controlling the steering angle depending on the driving situation only. This paper introduce methods for enhancing active steering system functionalities depending not only on the driving situation but also vehicle parameters like vehicle mass, tyre and road condition. In this regard, adaptation of the steering ratio as a function of above mentioned vehicle parameters is presented with examples. With some selected vehicle parameter changes, the reduction of the undesired influences on vehicle dynamics of these parameter changes has been demonstrated theoretically with simulations and with real-time driving measurements.

  9. Immune enhancing nutrition in traumatic brain injury - A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Painter, Thomas J; Rickerds, Jennifer; Alban, Rodrigo F

    2015-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Certain patients appear to benefit when they receive immune enhancing additives, such as glutamine, arginine, and omega-3 fatty acids. We hypothesized that TBI patients given enteral feedings containing these supplements may have improved nutrition measures and infection rates when compared to standard tube feedings. This is a retrospective review of patients from a Level-One trauma center from July 2009 to July 2013. A total of 240 TBI patients received either an immune enhancing nutrition (IEN) formula (n = 126), or a standard formula (SF) (n = 114) based on the attending surgeon's preference. Data collected included demographic information, infection information and outcome measures. Patients were similar in terms of age, ISS, head AIS, and initial prealbumin level. Patients receiving IEN were found to have lower rates of blood stream infections (10.3% vs 19.3%, p < 0.05), whereas pneumonia and UTI rates were similar between groups. In addition, both groups had similar rates of all-cause mortality and hospital length of stay, however IEN patients spent longer in the ICU and on ventilators. In TBI patients receiving IEN, prealbumin levels were higher at the second, third, and fourth week of admission (week 2 - 22.2 vs 17.4, p = 0.006; week 3 - 24.6 vs 20.1, p = 0.04; week 4 - 26.3 vs 22.1, p = 0.19; week 5 - 25.8 vs 20.3, p = 0.21). This study suggests that patients with traumatic brain injury who receive IEN are more likely to have increased prealbumin levels perhaps reflecting improved nutrition throughout their hospital stay and may show some benefit in rates of infections, particularly in bacteremia.

  10. The HyMeX Special Observation Period in Central Italy: Precipitation Measurements, Retrieval Techniques and Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, Patrick; Wingo, Matt; Petersen, Walt; Marzano, Frank Silvio; Baldini, Luca; Picciotti, Errico; Colantonio, Matteo; Barbieri, Stefano; Di Fabio, Saverio; Montopoli, Mario; Roberto, Nicoletta; Adirosi, Elisa; Gorgucci, Eugenio; Anagnostou, Emmanoil N..; Ferretti, Rossella

    2013-01-01

    The Mediterranean area concentrates the major natural risks related to the water cycle, including heavy precipitation and flash-flooding during the fall season. The capability to predict such high-impact events remains weak because of the contribution of very fine-scale processes and their non-linear interactions with the larger scale processes. These societal and science issues motivate the HyMeX (Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment, http://www.hymex.orgl) experimental programme. HyMeX aims at a better quantification and understanding of the water cycle in the Mediterranean with emphasis on intense events. The observation strategy of HyMEX is organized in a long-term (4 years) Enhanced Observation Periods (EOP) and short-term (2 months) Special Observation Periods (SOP). HyMEX has identified 3 main Mediterranean target areas: North-West (NW), Adriatic (A) and South-East (SE). Within each target area several hydrometeorological sites for heavy rainfall and flash flooding have been set up. The hydrometeorological sire in Central Italy (CI) is interested by both western and eastern fronts coming from the Atlantic Ocean and Siberia, respectively. Orographic precipitations play an important role due to the central Apennine range, which reaches nearly 3000 m (Gran Sasso peak). Moreover, convective systems commonly develop in CI during late summer and beginning of autumn, often causing localized hailstorms with cluster organized cells. Western fronts may heavily hit the Tiber basin crossing large urban areas (Rome), whereas eastern fronts can cause flash floods along the Adriatic coastline. Two major basins are involved within Cl region: Tiber basin (1000 km long) and its tributary Aniene and the Aterno-Pescara basin (300 km long). The first HyMeX SOP1.1 was carried out from Sept. till Nov. 2012 in the NW target area The Italian SOP1.1 was coordinated by the Centre of Excellence CETEMPS, University of L'Aquila, a city located in the CI heart. The CI area

  11. Exogenous N addition enhances the responses of gross primary productivity to individual precipitation events in a temperate grassland.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qun; Hu, Zhong-Min; Li, Sheng-Gong; Yu, Gui-Rui; Sun, Xiao-Min; Li, Ling-Hao; Liang, Nai-Shen; Bai, Wen-Ming

    2016-06-06

    Predicted future shifts in the magnitude and frequency (larger but fewer) of precipitation events and enhanced nitrogen (N) deposition may interact to affect grassland productivity, but the effects of N enrichment on the productivity response to individual precipitation events remain unclear. In this study, we quantified the effects of N addition on the response patterns of gross primary productivity (GPP) to individual precipitation events of different sizes (Psize) in a temperate grassland in China. The results showed that N enrichment significantly increased the time-integrated amount of GPP in response to an individual precipitation event (GPPtotal), and the N-induced stimulation of GPP increased with increasing Psize. N enrichment rarely affected the duration of the GPP response, but it significantly stimulated the maximum absolute GPP response. Higher foliar N content might play an important role in the N-induced stimulation of GPP. GPPtotal in both the N-addition and control treatments increased linearly with Psize with similar Psize intercepts (approximately 5 mm, indicating a similar lower Psize threshold to stimulate the GPP response) but had a steeper slope under N addition. Our work indicates that the projected larger precipitation events will stimulate grassland productivity, and this stimulation might be amplified by increasing N deposition.

  12. Exogenous N addition enhances the responses of gross primary productivity to individual precipitation events in a temperate grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qun; Hu, Zhong-Min; Li, Sheng-Gong; Yu, Gui-Rui; Sun, Xiao-Min; Li, Ling-Hao; Liang, Nai-Shen; Bai, Wen-Ming

    2016-06-01

    Predicted future shifts in the magnitude and frequency (larger but fewer) of precipitation events and enhanced nitrogen (N) deposition may interact to affect grassland productivity, but the effects of N enrichment on the productivity response to individual precipitation events remain unclear. In this study, we quantified the effects of N addition on the response patterns of gross primary productivity (GPP) to individual precipitation events of different sizes (Psize) in a temperate grassland in China. The results showed that N enrichment significantly increased the time-integrated amount of GPP in response to an individual precipitation event (GPPtotal), and the N-induced stimulation of GPP increased with increasing Psize. N enrichment rarely affected the duration of the GPP response, but it significantly stimulated the maximum absolute GPP response. Higher foliar N content might play an important role in the N-induced stimulation of GPP. GPPtotal in both the N-addition and control treatments increased linearly with Psize with similar Psize intercepts (approximately 5 mm, indicating a similar lower Psize threshold to stimulate the GPP response) but had a steeper slope under N addition. Our work indicates that the projected larger precipitation events will stimulate grassland productivity, and this stimulation might be amplified by increasing N deposition.

  13. Exogenous N addition enhances the responses of gross primary productivity to individual precipitation events in a temperate grassland

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qun; Hu, Zhong-min; Li, Sheng-gong; Yu, Gui-rui; Sun, Xiao-min; Li, Ling-hao; Liang, Nai-shen; Bai, Wen-ming

    2016-01-01

    Predicted future shifts in the magnitude and frequency (larger but fewer) of precipitation events and enhanced nitrogen (N) deposition may interact to affect grassland productivity, but the effects of N enrichment on the productivity response to individual precipitation events remain unclear. In this study, we quantified the effects of N addition on the response patterns of gross primary productivity (GPP) to individual precipitation events of different sizes (Psize) in a temperate grassland in China. The results showed that N enrichment significantly increased the time-integrated amount of GPP in response to an individual precipitation event (GPPtotal), and the N-induced stimulation of GPP increased with increasing Psize. N enrichment rarely affected the duration of the GPP response, but it significantly stimulated the maximum absolute GPP response. Higher foliar N content might play an important role in the N-induced stimulation of GPP. GPPtotal in both the N-addition and control treatments increased linearly with Psize with similar Psize intercepts (approximately 5 mm, indicating a similar lower Psize threshold to stimulate the GPP response) but had a steeper slope under N addition. Our work indicates that the projected larger precipitation events will stimulate grassland productivity, and this stimulation might be amplified by increasing N deposition. PMID:27264386

  14. Exogenous N addition enhances the responses of gross primary productivity to individual precipitation events in a temperate grassland.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qun; Hu, Zhong-Min; Li, Sheng-Gong; Yu, Gui-Rui; Sun, Xiao-Min; Li, Ling-Hao; Liang, Nai-Shen; Bai, Wen-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Predicted future shifts in the magnitude and frequency (larger but fewer) of precipitation events and enhanced nitrogen (N) deposition may interact to affect grassland productivity, but the effects of N enrichment on the productivity response to individual precipitation events remain unclear. In this study, we quantified the effects of N addition on the response patterns of gross primary productivity (GPP) to individual precipitation events of different sizes (Psize) in a temperate grassland in China. The results showed that N enrichment significantly increased the time-integrated amount of GPP in response to an individual precipitation event (GPPtotal), and the N-induced stimulation of GPP increased with increasing Psize. N enrichment rarely affected the duration of the GPP response, but it significantly stimulated the maximum absolute GPP response. Higher foliar N content might play an important role in the N-induced stimulation of GPP. GPPtotal in both the N-addition and control treatments increased linearly with Psize with similar Psize intercepts (approximately 5 mm, indicating a similar lower Psize threshold to stimulate the GPP response) but had a steeper slope under N addition. Our work indicates that the projected larger precipitation events will stimulate grassland productivity, and this stimulation might be amplified by increasing N deposition. PMID:27264386

  15. Wintertime Precipitation Enhancement Opportunities in the Great Dividing Range of Southeastern Australia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Elizabeth Jean

    The field of weather modification began in 1946 when Dr. Irving Langmuir along with his assistant, Vincent Schefer, experimented with Dry Ice in a refrigerated chamber and created ice crystals. Today, weather modification is seen as a possible mechanism for increasing water supplies. Such modification projects pertain either directly to seeding or studying supercooled clouds in mountainous regions where water supply augmentation might be attempted. The Australian Winter Storms Experiment AWSE II was conducted during the winter of 1990 in the mountains of southeastern Australia and is the focus of this dissertation. This dissertation determines and explains the water budget and precipitation efficiency of winter mountain storms in southeastern Australia. Precipitation efficiency is a measure of how much precipitation a storm puts on the ground relative to how much condensed-phase water substance passes overhead. This dissertation took a unique approach to precipitation efficiency and studied it in a time-resolved manner. It was determined that during prefrontal ( overline{rm PE} = 0 to 65% in the upwind budget volume, overline{ rm PE} = 0.043 to 44% in the downwind budget volume) and postfrontal (overline {rm PE} = 5 to 50% in the upwind budget volume, overline{rm PE } = 9 to 70% in the downwind budget volume) periods the supercooled liquid water in the clouds is produced at a greater rate than it is removed by diffusion or accretion, suggesting that the natural precipitation process is not efficient and the clouds are then "seedable" (i.e., precipitation efficiency for these periods is low). Precipitation efficiency is a tool which enables one to compare its changes among and throughout storm stages but it is ultimately the amount, location and extent of the supercooled liquid water that determines whether or not a storm is seedable.

  16. New Products for Near Real-Time Enhanced Landslide Identification and Precipitation Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts-Pierel, J.; Ahamed, A.; Fayne, J.; Rumsey, A.

    2015-12-01

    Nepal and the Himalayan region are hotspots for landslide activity due to mountainous topography, complex terrain, and monsoon rains. Current research in landslide modeling and detection generally requires high resolution imagery with software aided classification or manual digitization by analysts. These methods are plagued by low spatial and temporal accuracy. Addressing issues in conventional measurement, this study combined optical data from Landsat 8, a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) generated from Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), and precipitation data from the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission (GPM) to create two products. The Sudden Landslide Identification Product (SLIP) uses Landsat 8 and the ASTER DEM to identify landslides in near real-time, and provides damage assessments by mapping landslides triggered by precipitation. Detecting Real-time Increased Precipitation (DRIP) monitors precipitation levels extracted from the GPM-IMERG 30-minute product to create alerts in near real-time when current rainfall levels exceed regional threshold values. After a landslide detection is made by SLIP, historical rainfall data from DRIP is analyzed to estimate a date for the detected landslide. Together, DRIP and SLIP will be used by local and regional organizations in Nepal such as the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD), as well as the international scientific community to protect lives, preserve infrastructure, and manage local ecosystems.

  17. Irradiation-enhanced α' precipitation in model FeCrAl alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Edmondson, Philip D.; Briggs, Samuel A.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Howard, Richard H.; Sridharan, Kumar; Terrani, Kurt A.; Field, Kevin G.

    2016-02-17

    Model FeCrAl alloys with varying compositions (Fe(10–18)Cr(10–6)Al at.%) have been neutron irradiated at ~ 320 to damage levels of ~ 7 displacements per atom (dpa) to investigate the compositional influence on the formation of irradiation-induced Cr-rich α' precipitates using atom probe tomography. In all alloys, significant number densities of these precipitates were observed. Cluster compositions were investigated and it was found that the average cluster Cr content ranged between 51.1 and 62.5 at.% dependent on initial compositions. This is significantly lower than the Cr-content of α' in binary FeCr alloys. As a result, significant partitioning of the Al from themore » α' precipitates was also observed.« less

  18. Relativistic electron precipitation enhancements near the outer edge of the radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, R.; Baker, N. D.; Blake, J. B.; Kanekal, S.; Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.

    1995-05-01

    Characteristics of relativistic electron precipitation bursts observed by the Heavy Ion Large Telescope (HILT) experiment onboard the Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Partical Explorer (SAMPEX) satellite were examined. Relatively narrow, persistent, latitudinal bands of precipitation with time scales of 10 to approximately 30 sec near the outer edge of the radiation belt which develop and decay with a time scale of a few hours are reported. Acceleration processes more effective than the usual radial diffusion process or scattering process would be needed to explain this strong precipitation band phenomenon. Another prominent signature is microbursts with a time scale down to a few hundred milliseconds. It is suggested that these microbursts are due to wave-particle interaction involving a relaxation-oscillator type of mechanism.

  19. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Carbon Dioxide Flooding by Managing Asphaltene Precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Deo, Milind D.

    2002-02-21

    This project was undertaken to understand fundamental aspects of carbon dioxide (CO2) induced asphaltene precipitation. Oil and asphaltene samples from the Rangely field in Colorado were used for most of the project. The project consisted of pure component and high-pressure, thermodynamic experiments, thermodynamic modeling, kinetic experiments and modeling, targeted corefloods and compositional modeling.

  20. Cognitive enhancement therapy improves emotional intelligence in early course schizophrenia: preliminary effects.

    PubMed

    Eack, Shaun M; Hogarty, Gerard E; Greenwald, Deborah P; Hogarty, Susan S; Keshavan, Matcheri S

    2007-01-01

    This research examined the preliminary effects of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy (CET) on social cognition in early course schizophrenia, using an objective, performance-based measure of emotional intelligence. Individuals in the early course of schizophrenia were randomly assigned to either CET (n=18) or Enriched Supportive Therapy (n=20), and assessed at baseline and after 1 year of treatment with the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test. A series of analyses of covariance showed highly significant (p=.005) and large (Cohen's d=.96) effects favoring CET for improving emotional intelligence, with the most pronounced improvements occurring in patients' ability to understand and manage their own and others' emotions. These findings lend preliminary support to the previously documented benefits of CET on social cognition in schizophrenia, and suggest that such benefits can be extended to patients in the early course of the illness. PMID:17055227

  1. On the fall 2010 Enhancements of the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre's Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, A. W.; Schneider, U.; Meyer-Christoffer, A.; Ziese, M.; Finger, P.; Rudolf, B.

    2010-12-01

    Precipitation is meanwhile a top listed parameter on the WMO GCOS list of 44 essential climate variables (ECV). This is easily justified by its crucial role to sustain any form of life on earth as major source of fresh water, its major impact on weather, climate, climate change and related issues of society’s adaption to the latter. Finally its occurrence is highly variable in space and time thus bearing the potential to trigger major flood and draught related disasters. Since its start in 1989 the Global precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) performs global analyses of monthly precipitation for the earth’s land-surface on the basis of in-situ measurements. The effort was inaugurated as part of the Global Precipitation Climatology Project of the WMO World Climate Research Program (WCRP). Meanwhile, the data set has continuously grown both in temporal coverage (original start of the evaluation period was 1986), as well as extent and quality of the underlying data base. The number of stations involved in the related data base has approximately doubled in the past 8 years by trespassing the 40, 60 and 80k thresholds in 2002, 2006 and 2010. Core data source of the GPCC analyses are the data from station networks operated by the National Meteorological Services worldwide; data deliveries have been received from ca. 190 countries. The GPCC integrates also other global precipitation data collections (i.e. FAO, CRU and GHCN), as well as regional data sets. Currently the Africa data set from S. Nicholson (Univ. Tallahassee) is integrated. As a result of these efforts the GPCC holds the worldwide largest and most comprehensive collection of precipitation data, which is continuously updated and extended. Due to the high spatial-temporal variability of precipitation, even its global analysis requires this high number of stations to provide for a sufficient density of measurement data on almost any place on the globe. The acquired data sets are pre-checked, reformatted

  2. Simulations of The Extreme Precipitation Event Enhanced by Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly over the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakan Doǧan, Onur; Önol, Barış

    2016-04-01

    Istanbul Technical University, Aeronautics and Astronautics Faculty, Meteorological Engineering, Istanbul, Turkey In this study, we examined the extreme precipitation case over the Eastern Black Sea region of Turkey by using regional climate model, RegCM4. The flood caused by excessive rain in August 26, 2010 killed 12 people and the landslides in Rize province have damaged many buildings. The station based two days total precipitation exceeds 200 mm. One of the usual suspects for this extreme event is positive anomaly of sea surface temperature (SST) over the Black Sea where the significant warming trend is clear in the last three decades. In August 2010, the monthly mean SST is higher than 3 °C with respect to the period of 1981-2010. We designed three sensitivity simulations with RegCM4 to define the effects of the Black Sea as a moisture source. The simulation domain with 10-km horizontal resolution covers all the countries bordering the Black Sea and simulation period is defined for entire August 2010. It is also noted that the spatial variability of the precipitation produced by the reference simulation (Sim-0) is consistent with the TRMM data. In terms of analysis of the sensitivity to SST, we forced the simulations by subtracting 1 °C (Sim-1), 2 °C (Sim-2) and 3 °C (Sim-3) from the ERA-Interim 6-hourly SST data (considering only the Black Sea). The sensitivity simulations indicate that daily total precipitation for all these simulations gradually decreased based on the reference simulation (Sim-0). 3-hourly maximum precipitation rates for Sim-0, Sim-1, Sim-2 and Sim-3 are 32, 25, 13 and 10.5 mm respectively over the hotspot region. Despite the fact that the simulations signal points out the same direction, degradation of the precipitation intensity does not indicate the same magnitude for all simulations. It is revealed that 2 °C (Sim-2) threshold is critical for SST sensitivity. We also calculated the humidity differences from the simulation and these

  3. [Preliminary Investigation of the Amount, the Molecular Weight and the Activity of Polysaccharides from Chaenomeles Speciosa Fruits in Ethanol Fractional Precipitation].

    PubMed

    Tian, Bing-mei; Xie, Xiao-mei; Shen, Pan-pan; Yang, Mo; Zhang, Sheng-long; Tang, Qing-jiu

    2015-05-01

    Chaenomeles speciosa fruits were extracted using water. The extracts were precipitated with 20%~95% (φ) ethanol, respectively. The amount of total polysaccharide was measured with phenol-sulfuric acid method. A method using high-performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) equipped with multiangle laser-light-scattering photometry (MALLS) and differential refractometry (RI) was presented for determining the molecular weight and molecular weigh distribution. RAW264.7 macrophage were cultured and stimulated with the polysaccharides in vitro and the production of nitric oxide in the cells was determined by the Griess assay. The aim of the study is to determine the amount and the molecular weight of the polysaccharides from Chaenomeles speciosa fruits, and preliminary investigate the immunomodulatory activity, The study provided the basis datas for the further research of Chaenomeles speciosa fruits. , and provided a simple and system method for the research of natural polysaccharide. The ethanol fractional precipitation showed that the order of total polysaccharide content was 95%>80%>40% ≥60%>20%. The results indicated that most polysaccharide from Chaenomeles speciosa fruits might be precipitated when ethanol concentration was up to 95% (T) and the crude polysaccharide purity had risen from 35. 1% to 45. 0% when the concentration of ethanol increased from 20% to 95%. HPSEC-MALLS-RI system showed that all the polysaccharide samples had the similar compositions. They appeared three chromatographic peaks and the retention time were not apparently different. The Mw were 6. 570 X 10(4) g . mol-1 and 1. 393 X 10(4) g . mol-1 respectively, and one less than 10 000 which was failure to obtain accurate values. The molecular weight of the first two polysaccharide distribution index(Mw/Mn)were 1. 336 and 1. 639 respectively. The polysaccharide samples had not exhibited immunomodulatory activity assessed on the basis of nitric oxide production by RAW264. 7 macrophage

  4. [Preliminary Investigation of the Amount, the Molecular Weight and the Activity of Polysaccharides from Chaenomeles Speciosa Fruits in Ethanol Fractional Precipitation].

    PubMed

    Tian, Bing-mei; Xie, Xiao-mei; Shen, Pan-pan; Yang, Mo; Zhang, Sheng-long; Tang, Qing-jiu

    2015-05-01

    Chaenomeles speciosa fruits were extracted using water. The extracts were precipitated with 20%~95% (φ) ethanol, respectively. The amount of total polysaccharide was measured with phenol-sulfuric acid method. A method using high-performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) equipped with multiangle laser-light-scattering photometry (MALLS) and differential refractometry (RI) was presented for determining the molecular weight and molecular weigh distribution. RAW264.7 macrophage were cultured and stimulated with the polysaccharides in vitro and the production of nitric oxide in the cells was determined by the Griess assay. The aim of the study is to determine the amount and the molecular weight of the polysaccharides from Chaenomeles speciosa fruits, and preliminary investigate the immunomodulatory activity, The study provided the basis datas for the further research of Chaenomeles speciosa fruits. , and provided a simple and system method for the research of natural polysaccharide. The ethanol fractional precipitation showed that the order of total polysaccharide content was 95%>80%>40% ≥60%>20%. The results indicated that most polysaccharide from Chaenomeles speciosa fruits might be precipitated when ethanol concentration was up to 95% (T) and the crude polysaccharide purity had risen from 35. 1% to 45. 0% when the concentration of ethanol increased from 20% to 95%. HPSEC-MALLS-RI system showed that all the polysaccharide samples had the similar compositions. They appeared three chromatographic peaks and the retention time were not apparently different. The Mw were 6. 570 X 10(4) g . mol-1 and 1. 393 X 10(4) g . mol-1 respectively, and one less than 10 000 which was failure to obtain accurate values. The molecular weight of the first two polysaccharide distribution index(Mw/Mn)were 1. 336 and 1. 639 respectively. The polysaccharide samples had not exhibited immunomodulatory activity assessed on the basis of nitric oxide production by RAW264. 7 macrophage

  5. Precipitation regime shift enhanced the rain pulse effect on soil respiration in a semi-arid steppe.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liming; Chen, Shiping; Xia, Jianyang; Luo, Yiqi

    2014-01-01

    The effect of resource pulses, such as rainfall events, on soil respiration plays an important role in controlling grassland carbon balance, but how shifts in long-term precipitation regime regulate rain pulse effect on soil respiration is still unclear. We first quantified the influence of rainfall event on soil respiration based on a two-year (2006 and 2009) continuously measured soil respiration data set in a temperate steppe in northern China. In 2006 and 2009, soil carbon release induced by rainfall events contributed about 44.5% (83.3 g C m(-2)) and 39.6% (61.7 g C m(-2)) to the growing-season total soil respiration, respectively. The pulse effect of rainfall event on soil respiration can be accurately predicted by a water status index (WSI), which is the product of rainfall event size and the ratio between antecedent soil temperature to moisture at the depth of 10 cm (r2 = 0.92, P<0.001) through the growing season. It indicates the pulse effect can be enhanced by not only larger individual rainfall event, but also higher soil temperature/moisture ratio which is usually associated with longer dry spells. We then analyzed a long-term (1953-2009) precipitation record in the experimental area. We found both the extreme heavy rainfall events (>40 mm per event) and the long dry-spells (>5 days) during the growing seasons increased from 1953-2009. It suggests the shift in precipitation regime has increased the contribution of rain pulse effect to growing-season total soil respiration in this region. These findings highlight the importance of incorporating precipitation regime shift and its impacts on the rain pulse effect into the future predictions of grassland carbon cycle under climate change.

  6. Precipitation Regime Shift Enhanced the Rain Pulse Effect on Soil Respiration in a Semi-Arid Steppe

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Liming; Chen, Shiping; Xia, Jianyang; Luo, Yiqi

    2014-01-01

    The effect of resource pulses, such as rainfall events, on soil respiration plays an important role in controlling grassland carbon balance, but how shifts in long-term precipitation regime regulate rain pulse effect on soil respiration is still unclear. We first quantified the influence of rainfall event on soil respiration based on a two-year (2006 and 2009) continuously measured soil respiration data set in a temperate steppe in northern China. In 2006 and 2009, soil carbon release induced by rainfall events contributed about 44.5% (83.3 g C m−2) and 39.6% (61.7 g C m−2) to the growing-season total soil respiration, respectively. The pulse effect of rainfall event on soil respiration can be accurately predicted by a water status index (WSI), which is the product of rainfall event size and the ratio between antecedent soil temperature to moisture at the depth of 10 cm (r2 = 0.92, P<0.001) through the growing season. It indicates the pulse effect can be enhanced by not only larger individual rainfall event, but also higher soil temperature/moisture ratio which is usually associated with longer dry spells. We then analyzed a long-term (1953–2009) precipitation record in the experimental area. We found both the extreme heavy rainfall events (>40 mm per event) and the long dry-spells (>5 days) during the growing seasons increased from 1953–2009. It suggests the shift in precipitation regime has increased the contribution of rain pulse effect to growing-season total soil respiration in this region. These findings highlight the importance of incorporating precipitation regime shift and its impacts on the rain pulse effect into the future predictions of grassland carbon cycle under climate change. PMID:25093573

  7. STIMULATION OF MICROBIAL UREA HYDROLYSIS IN GROUNDWATER TO ENHANCE CALCITE PRECIPITATION

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshiko Fujita; Joanna L. Taylor; Tina L. Gresham; Mark E. Delwiche; Frederick S. Colwell; Travis McLing; Lynn Petzke; Robert W. Smith

    2008-04-01

    Sequential addition of molasses and urea was tested as a means of stimulating microbial urea hydrolysis in the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer in Idaho. Ureolysis is an integral component of a novel remediation approach for divalent trace metal and radionuclide contaminants in groundwater and associated geomedia, where the contaminants are immobilized by coprecipitation in calcite. The generation of carbonate alkalinity from ureolysis promotes calcite precipitation. In calcite-saturated aquifers, this represents a potential long-term contaminant sequestration mechanism. In a single well experiment, dilute molasses was injected three times over two weeks to promote overall microbial growth, followed by one urea injection. With molasses addition, total cell numbers in the groundwater increased one to two orders of magnitude. Estimated ureolysis rates in recovered groundwater samples increased from <0.1 nmol L-1 hr-1 to >25 nmol L-1 hr-1. A quantitative PCR assay for the bacterial ureC gene indicated that urease gene numbers increased up to 170 times above pre-injection levels. Following urea injection, calcite precipitates were recovered. Estimated values for an in situ first order ureolysis rate constant ranged from 0.016 to 0.057 day-1. The results are promising with respect to the potential to manipulate in situ biogeochemical processes to promote contaminant sequestration.

  8. Pathways of F region thermospheric mass density enhancement via soft electron precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Varney, R. H.; Lotko, W.; Brambles, O. J.; Wang, W.; Lei, J.; Wiltberger, M.; Lyon, J. G.

    2015-07-01

    The efficiencies of pathways of thermospheric heating via soft electron precipitation in the dayside cusp region are investigated using the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere model (CMIT). Event-based data-model comparisons show that the CMIT model is capable of reproducing the thermospheric mass density variations measured by the CHAMP satellite during both quite and active periods. During the 24 August 2005 storm event (Kp = 6-) while intense Joule heating rate occurs in the polar cusp region, including soft electron precipitation is important for accurately modeling the F region thermospheric mass density distribution near the cusp region. During the 27 July 2007 event (Kp = 2-) while little Joule heating rate occurs in the polar cusp region, the controlled CMIT simulations suggest that the direct pathway through the energy exchange between soft electrons and thermospheric neutrals is the dominant process during this event, which only has a small effect on the neutral temperature and mass density at 400 km altitude. Comparisons between the two case studies show that the indirect pathway via increasing the F region Joule heating rate is a dominant process during the 24 August 2005 storm event, which is much more efficient than the direct heating process.

  9. Harnessing a radiation inducible promoter of Deinococcus radiodurans for enhanced precipitation of uranium.

    PubMed

    Misra, Chitra Seetharam; Mukhopadhyaya, Rita; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2014-11-10

    Bioremediation is an attractive option for the treatment of radioactive waste. We provide a proof of principle for augmentation of uranium bioprecipitation using the radiation inducible promoter, Pssb from Deinococcus radiodurans. Recombinant cells of D. radiodurans carrying acid phosphatase gene, phoN under the regulation of Pssb when exposed to 7 kGy gamma radiation at two different dose rates of 56.8 Gy/min and 4 Gy/min, showed 8-9 fold increase in acid phosphatase activity. Highest whole cell PhoN activity was obtained after 2h in post irradiation recovery following 8 kGy of high dose rate radiation. Such cells showed faster removal of high concentrations of uranium than recombinant cells expressing PhoN under a radiation non-inducible deinococcal promoter, PgroESL and could precipitate uranium even after continuous exposure to 0.6 Gy/min gamma radiation for 10 days. Radiation induced recombinant D. radiodurans cells when lyophilized retained high levels of PhoN activity and precipitated uranium efficiently. These results highlight the importance of using a suitable promoter for removal of radionuclides from solution.

  10. Stimulation of microbial urea hydrolysis in groundwater to enhance calcite precipitation.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yoshiko; Taylor, Joanna L; Gresham, Tina L T; Delwiche, Mark E; Colwell, Frederick S; Mcling, Travis L; Petzke, Lynn M; Smith, Robert W

    2008-04-15

    Addition of molasses and urea was tested as a means of stimulating microbial urea hydrolysis in the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer in Idaho. Ureolysis is an integral component of a novel remediation approach for divalent trace metal and radionuclide contaminants in groundwater and associated geomedia, where the contaminants are immobilized by coprecipitation in calcite. Generation of carbonate alkalinity from ureolysis promotes calcite precipitation. In calcite-saturated aquifers, this represents a potential long-term contaminant sequestration mechanism. In a single-well experiment, dilute molasses was injected three times over two weeks to promote overall microbial growth, followed by one urea injection. With molasses addition, total cell numbers in the groundwater increased 1-2 orders of magnitude. Estimated ureolysis rates in recovered groundwater samples increased from < 0.1 to > 25 nmol L(-1) hr(-1). A quantitative PCR assay for the bacterial ureC gene indicated that urease gene numbers increased up to 170 times above pre-injection levels. Following urea injection, calcite precipitates were recovered. Estimated values for an in situ first order ureolysis rate constant ranged from 0.016 to 0.057 d(-1). Although collateral impacts such as reduced permeability were observed, overall results indicated the viability of manipulating biogeochemical processes to promote contaminant sequestration.

  11. Sensitivity enhancement in near-field photothermal-lens detection in capillary electrophoresis using laser-induced online precipitation.

    PubMed

    Nedosekin, Dmitry A; Faubel, Werner; Proskurnin, Mikhail A; Pyell, Ute

    2011-11-01

    This paper reports simultaneous photoinduced precipitation-based online preconcentration of target analytes at the inner walls in capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and surface-enhanced near-field crossed-beam photothermal-lens detection of the preconcentrated analytes. A simple technique using online readjustment of the optical scheme of the thermal-lens detector in the course of the separation for gaining optimum sensitivity for both water-soluble and precipitated analytes is proposed. It provides a considerable decrease in the limits of detection (LOD) with good concordance with the previously developed theoretical approach to this combination (D. A. Nedosekin, W. Faubel, M. A. Proskurnin, and U. Pyell, Talanta, 78, 682-690 (2009)). As a result, an enhancement of more than an order of magnitude in the limit of detection of the photoactive 4-aminoazobenzene compared to conventional thermal-lens detection in CZE is achieved while retaining very good sensitivity for unabsorbed analyte (Mordant Yellow 7). The application of the thermal-lens detector to the investigation of laser-induced reactions in flow in capillaries is discussed.

  12. Enhancement of solubility, antioxidant ability and bioavailability of taxifolin nanoparticles by liquid antisolvent precipitation technique.

    PubMed

    Zu, Yuangang; Wu, Weiwei; Zhao, Xiuhua; Li, Yong; Wang, Weiguo; Zhong, Chen; Zhang, Yin; Zhao, Xue

    2014-08-25

    Taxifolin is a kind of flavanonol, whose antioxidant ability is superior to that of ordinary flavonoids compounds owing to its special structure. However, its low bioavailability is a major obstacle for biomedical applications, so the experiment is designed to prepare taxifolin nanoparticles by liquid antisolvent precipitation (LAP) to improve its bioavailability. We selected ethanol as solvent, deionized water as antisolvent, and investigated primarily the type of surfactant and adding amount, drug concentration, volume ratio of antisolvent to solvent, precipitation temperature, dropping speed, stirring speed, stirring time factors affecting drug particles size. Results showed that the poloxamer 188 was selected as the surfactant and the particle size of taxifolin obviously reduced with the increase of the poloxamer 188 concentration, the drug concentration and the dropping speed from 0.08% to 0.45%, from 0.04 g/ml to 0.12 g/ml, from 1 ml/min to 5 ml/min, respectively, when the volume ratio of antisolvent to solvent increased from 2.5 to 20, the particle size of taxifolin first increased and then decreased, the influence of precipitation temperature, stirring speed, stirring time on particle size were not obvious, but along with the increase of mixing time, the drug solution would separate out crystallization. The optimum conditions were: the poloxamer 188 concentration was 0.25%, the drug concentration was 0.08 g/ml, the volume ratio of antisolvent to solvent was 10, the precipitation temperature was 25 °C, the dropping speed was 4 ml/min, the stirring speed was 800 r/min, the stirring time was 5 min. Taxifolin nanosuspension with a MPS of 24.6 nm was obtained under the optimum conditions. For getting taxifolin nanoparticles, the lyophilization method was chosen and correspondingly γ-cyclodextrin was selected as cryoprotectant from γ-cyclodextrin, mannitol, lactose, glucose. Then the properties of raw taxifolin and taxifolin nanoparticles were characterized by

  13. Enhancement of solubility, antioxidant ability and bioavailability of taxifolin nanoparticles by liquid antisolvent precipitation technique.

    PubMed

    Zu, Yuangang; Wu, Weiwei; Zhao, Xiuhua; Li, Yong; Wang, Weiguo; Zhong, Chen; Zhang, Yin; Zhao, Xue

    2014-08-25

    Taxifolin is a kind of flavanonol, whose antioxidant ability is superior to that of ordinary flavonoids compounds owing to its special structure. However, its low bioavailability is a major obstacle for biomedical applications, so the experiment is designed to prepare taxifolin nanoparticles by liquid antisolvent precipitation (LAP) to improve its bioavailability. We selected ethanol as solvent, deionized water as antisolvent, and investigated primarily the type of surfactant and adding amount, drug concentration, volume ratio of antisolvent to solvent, precipitation temperature, dropping speed, stirring speed, stirring time factors affecting drug particles size. Results showed that the poloxamer 188 was selected as the surfactant and the particle size of taxifolin obviously reduced with the increase of the poloxamer 188 concentration, the drug concentration and the dropping speed from 0.08% to 0.45%, from 0.04 g/ml to 0.12 g/ml, from 1 ml/min to 5 ml/min, respectively, when the volume ratio of antisolvent to solvent increased from 2.5 to 20, the particle size of taxifolin first increased and then decreased, the influence of precipitation temperature, stirring speed, stirring time on particle size were not obvious, but along with the increase of mixing time, the drug solution would separate out crystallization. The optimum conditions were: the poloxamer 188 concentration was 0.25%, the drug concentration was 0.08 g/ml, the volume ratio of antisolvent to solvent was 10, the precipitation temperature was 25 °C, the dropping speed was 4 ml/min, the stirring speed was 800 r/min, the stirring time was 5 min. Taxifolin nanosuspension with a MPS of 24.6 nm was obtained under the optimum conditions. For getting taxifolin nanoparticles, the lyophilization method was chosen and correspondingly γ-cyclodextrin was selected as cryoprotectant from γ-cyclodextrin, mannitol, lactose, glucose. Then the properties of raw taxifolin and taxifolin nanoparticles were characterized by

  14. Soft-X-Ray-Enhanced Electrostatic Precipitation for Protection against Inhalable Allergens, Ultrafine Particles, and Microbial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kettleson, Eric M.; Schriewer, Jill M.; Buller, R. Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    Protection of the human lung from infectious agents, allergens, and ultrafine particles is difficult with current technologies. High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters remove airborne particles of >0.3 μm with 99.97% efficiency, but they are expensive to maintain. Electrostatic precipitation has been used as an inexpensive approach to remove large particles from airflows, but it has a collection efficiency minimum in the submicrometer size range, allowing for a penetration window for some allergens and ultrafine particles. Incorporating soft X-ray irradiation as an in situ component of the electrostatic precipitation process greatly improves capture efficiency of ultrafine particles. Here we demonstrate the removal and inactivation capabilities of soft-X-ray-enhanced electrostatic precipitation technology targeting infectious agents (Bacillus anthracis, Mycobacterium bovis BCG, and poxviruses), allergens, and ultrafine particles. Incorporation of in situ soft X-ray irradiation at low-intensity corona conditions resulted in (i) 2-fold to 9-fold increase in capture efficiency of 200- to 600-nm particles and (ii) a considerable delay in the mean day of death as well as lower overall mortality rates in ectromelia virus (ECTV) cohorts. At the high-intensity corona conditions, nearly complete protection from viral and bacterial respiratory infection was afforded to the murine models for all biological agents tested. When optimized for combined efficient particle removal with limited ozone production, this technology could be incorporated into stand-alone indoor air cleaners or scaled for installation in aircraft cabin, office, and residential heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. PMID:23263945

  15. Soft-X-ray-enhanced electrostatic precipitation for protection against inhalable allergens, ultrafine particles, and microbial infections.

    PubMed

    Kettleson, Eric M; Schriewer, Jill M; Buller, R Mark L; Biswas, Pratim

    2013-02-01

    Protection of the human lung from infectious agents, allergens, and ultrafine particles is difficult with current technologies. High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters remove airborne particles of >0.3 μm with 99.97% efficiency, but they are expensive to maintain. Electrostatic precipitation has been used as an inexpensive approach to remove large particles from airflows, but it has a collection efficiency minimum in the submicrometer size range, allowing for a penetration window for some allergens and ultrafine particles. Incorporating soft X-ray irradiation as an in situ component of the electrostatic precipitation process greatly improves capture efficiency of ultrafine particles. Here we demonstrate the removal and inactivation capabilities of soft-X-ray-enhanced electrostatic precipitation technology targeting infectious agents (Bacillus anthracis, Mycobacterium bovis BCG, and poxviruses), allergens, and ultrafine particles. Incorporation of in situ soft X-ray irradiation at low-intensity corona conditions resulted in (i) 2-fold to 9-fold increase in capture efficiency of 200- to 600-nm particles and (ii) a considerable delay in the mean day of death as well as lower overall mortality rates in ectromelia virus (ECTV) cohorts. At the high-intensity corona conditions, nearly complete protection from viral and bacterial respiratory infection was afforded to the murine models for all biological agents tested. When optimized for combined efficient particle removal with limited ozone production, this technology could be incorporated into stand-alone indoor air cleaners or scaled for installation in aircraft cabin, office, and residential heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. PMID:23263945

  16. Silver Iodide-Chitosan Nanotag Induced Biocatalytic Precipitation for Self-Enhanced Ultrasensitive Photocathodic Immunosensor.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lingshan; Dai, Hong; Zhang, Shupei; Lin, Yanyu

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we first exposed that the application of p-type semiconductor, silver iodide-chitosan nanoparticle (SICNP), acted as peroxidase mimetic to catalyze the bioprecipitation reaction for signal-amplification photocathodic immunosensing of human interleukin-6 (IL-6). After immobilization of captured antibody onto a polyethylenimine-functionalized carbon nitride (CN) matrix, SICNPs as photoactive tags and peroxidase mimetics were labeled on secondary antibodies, which were subsequently introduced onto the sensing interface to construct sandwich immunoassay platform through antigen-antibody specific recognition. Due to the matched energy levels between CN and AgI, the photocurrent intensity and photostability of SICNP were dramatically improved with rapid separation and transportation of photogenerated carriers. Moreover, the insoluble product in effective biocatalytic precipitation reaction served as electron acceptor to scavenge the photoexcited electron, leading to great amplification of the photocurrent signal of SICNP again. With the help of multiamplification processes, this photocathodic immunosensor presented a turn-on photoelectrochemical performance for IL-6, which showed wide linear dynamic range from 10(-6) to 10 pg/mL with the ultralow detection limit of 0.737 ag/mL. This work also performed the promising application of SICNP in developing an ultrasensitive, cost-effective, and enzyme-free photocathodic immunosensor for biomarkers. PMID:27180822

  17. A new principle for rapid immunoassay of proteins based on in situ precipitate-enhanced ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Robers, M; Rensink, I J; Hack, C E; Aarden, L A; Reutelingsperger, C P; Glatz, J F; Hermens, W T

    1999-05-01

    A new technique is presented that allows measurement of protein concentrations in the picomolar range with an assay time of only 10-20 min. The method is an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), but uses in-situ ellipsometric measurement of a precipitating enzyme product instead of the usual colorimetric detection of accumulating enzyme product in solution. Quantitative validation was obtained by use of annexin V, a protein with high binding affinity for phosphatidylserine-containing phospholipid membranes, resulting in a transport-limited adsorption rate. This property was exploited to obtain a range of low surface concentrations of annexin V by timed exposures of phospholipid bilayers to known concentrations of annexin V. Using polyvinylchloride (PVC)-coated and silanized silicon slides, various versions of this technique were used for the rapid assay of fatty acid-binding protein (FABP), a recently introduced early marker for acute myocardial infarction with a normal plasma concentration below 1 nmol/l, interleukin 6 (IL-6), a cytokine with normal plasma concentrations below 1 pmol/l, and again, annexin V. A possible future application of the method in the development of a one-step ELISA is discussed.

  18. Silver Iodide-Chitosan Nanotag Induced Biocatalytic Precipitation for Self-Enhanced Ultrasensitive Photocathodic Immunosensor.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lingshan; Dai, Hong; Zhang, Shupei; Lin, Yanyu

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we first exposed that the application of p-type semiconductor, silver iodide-chitosan nanoparticle (SICNP), acted as peroxidase mimetic to catalyze the bioprecipitation reaction for signal-amplification photocathodic immunosensing of human interleukin-6 (IL-6). After immobilization of captured antibody onto a polyethylenimine-functionalized carbon nitride (CN) matrix, SICNPs as photoactive tags and peroxidase mimetics were labeled on secondary antibodies, which were subsequently introduced onto the sensing interface to construct sandwich immunoassay platform through antigen-antibody specific recognition. Due to the matched energy levels between CN and AgI, the photocurrent intensity and photostability of SICNP were dramatically improved with rapid separation and transportation of photogenerated carriers. Moreover, the insoluble product in effective biocatalytic precipitation reaction served as electron acceptor to scavenge the photoexcited electron, leading to great amplification of the photocurrent signal of SICNP again. With the help of multiamplification processes, this photocathodic immunosensor presented a turn-on photoelectrochemical performance for IL-6, which showed wide linear dynamic range from 10(-6) to 10 pg/mL with the ultralow detection limit of 0.737 ag/mL. This work also performed the promising application of SICNP in developing an ultrasensitive, cost-effective, and enzyme-free photocathodic immunosensor for biomarkers.

  19. Artemisinin-Polyvinylpyrrolidone Composites Prepared by Evaporative Precipitation of Nanosuspension for Dissolution Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Kakran, M; Sahoo, N G; Li, L; Judeh, Z; Panda, P

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles of a poorly water-soluble anti-malarial drug, artemisinin (ART), and its composite particles with a hydrophilic polymer, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), were synthesized using a nanofabrication method called the evaporative precipitation of nanosuspension (EPN). ART nanoparticles and ART/PVP composite particles containing ART nanoparticles coated with PVP were successfully prepared with the aim of improving the dissolution rate of ART. The effect of polymer concentration on the physical and morphological properties, and dissolution rate of the EPN-prepared ART/PVP composite particles was investigated. The crystallinity of ART nanoparticles decreased with increasing polymer concentration, as suggested by the differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction studies. The phase solubility studies revealed an AL-type of curve, indicating a linear increase in the drug solubility with PVP concentration. The dissolution of the ART nanoparticles and ART/PVP composite particles markedly increased as compared to that of the original ART powder due to lower particle size and reduced crystallinity of the drug particles. The percent dissolution efficiency (DE), relative dissolution (RD), t 75% and similarity factor (f 2) were calculated for the statistical analysis. Various mathematical models, viz., zero-order, first-order, Korsemeyer-Peppas and Higuchi, were applied to fit the experimental drug-dissolution data and diffusion was found to be the drug release mechanism.

  20. Predictability of horizontal water vapor transport relative to precipitation: Enhancing situational awareness for forecasting western U.S. extreme precipitation and flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavers, David A.; Waliser, Duane E.; Ralph, F. Martin; Dettinger, Michael D.

    2016-03-01

    The western United States is vulnerable to socioeconomic disruption due to extreme winter precipitation and floods. Traditionally, forecasts of precipitation and river discharge provide the basis for preparations. Herein we show that earlier event awareness may be possible through use of horizontal water vapor transport (integrated vapor transport (IVT)) forecasts. Applying the potential predictability concept to the National Centers for Environmental Prediction global ensemble reforecasts, across 31 winters, IVT is found to be more predictable than precipitation. IVT ensemble forecasts with the smallest spreads (least forecast uncertainty) are associated with initiation states with anomalously high geopotential heights south of Alaska, a setup conducive for anticyclonic conditions and weak IVT into the western United States. IVT ensemble forecasts with the greatest spreads (most forecast uncertainty) have initiation states with anomalously low geopotential heights south of Alaska and correspond to atmospheric rivers. The greater IVT predictability could provide warnings of impending storminess with additional lead times for hydrometeorological applications.

  1. Predictability of horizontal water vapor transport relative to precipitation: Enhancing situational awareness for forecasting western U.S. extreme precipitation and flooding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lavers, David A.; Waliser, Duane E.; Ralph, F. Martin; Dettinger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The western United States is vulnerable to socioeconomic disruption due to extreme winter precipitation and floods. Traditionally, forecasts of precipitation and river discharge provide the basis for preparations. Herein we show that earlier event awareness may be possible through use of horizontal water vapor transport (integrated vapor transport (IVT)) forecasts. Applying the potential predictability concept to the National Centers for Environmental Prediction global ensemble reforecasts, across 31 winters, IVT is found to be more predictable than precipitation. IVT ensemble forecasts with the smallest spreads (least forecast uncertainty) are associated with initiation states with anomalously high geopotential heights south of Alaska, a setup conducive for anticyclonic conditions and weak IVT into the western United States. IVT ensemble forecasts with the greatest spreads (most forecast uncertainty) have initiation states with anomalously low geopotential heights south of Alaska and correspond to atmospheric rivers. The greater IVT predictability could provide warnings of impending storminess with additional lead times for hydrometeorological applications.

  2. In Situ Analysis of a Silver Nanoparticle-Precipitating Shewanella Biofilm by Surface Enhanced Confocal Raman Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schkolnik, Gal; Schmidt, Matthias; Mazza, Marco G; Harnisch, Falk; Musat, Niculina

    2015-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an electroactive bacterium, capable of reducing extracellular insoluble electron acceptors, making it important for both nutrient cycling in nature and microbial electrochemical technologies, such as microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis. When allowed to anaerobically colonize an Ag/AgCl solid interface, S. oneidensis has precipitated silver nanoparticles (AgNp), thus providing the means for a surface enhanced confocal Raman microscopy (SECRaM) investigation of its biofilm. The result is the in-situ chemical mapping of the biofilm as it developed over time, where the distribution of cytochromes, reduced and oxidized flavins, polysaccharides and phosphate in the undisturbed biofilm is monitored. Utilizing AgNp bio-produced by the bacteria colonizing the Ag/AgCl interface, we could perform SECRaM while avoiding the use of a patterned or roughened support or the introduction of noble metal salts and reducing agents. This new method will allow a spatially and temporally resolved chemical investigation not only of Shewanella biofilms at an insoluble electron acceptor, but also of other noble metal nanoparticle-precipitating bacteria in laboratory cultures or in complex microbial communities in their natural habitats.

  3. In Situ Analysis of a Silver Nanoparticle-Precipitating Shewanella Biofilm by Surface Enhanced Confocal Raman Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schkolnik, Gal; Schmidt, Matthias; Mazza, Marco G.; Harnisch, Falk; Musat, Niculina

    2015-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an electroactive bacterium, capable of reducing extracellular insoluble electron acceptors, making it important for both nutrient cycling in nature and microbial electrochemical technologies, such as microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis. When allowed to anaerobically colonize an Ag/AgCl solid interface, S. oneidensis has precipitated silver nanoparticles (AgNp), thus providing the means for a surface enhanced confocal Raman microscopy (SECRaM) investigation of its biofilm. The result is the in-situ chemical mapping of the biofilm as it developed over time, where the distribution of cytochromes, reduced and oxidized flavins, polysaccharides and phosphate in the undisturbed biofilm is monitored. Utilizing AgNp bio-produced by the bacteria colonizing the Ag/AgCl interface, we could perform SECRaM while avoiding the use of a patterned or roughened support or the introduction of noble metal salts and reducing agents. This new method will allow a spatially and temporally resolved chemical investigation not only of Shewanella biofilms at an insoluble electron acceptor, but also of other noble metal nanoparticle-precipitating bacteria in laboratory cultures or in complex microbial communities in their natural habitats. PMID:26709923

  4. Enhanced performance of electrostatic precipitators through chemical modification of particle resistivity and cohesion

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M.D.; Baldrey, K.E.; Bustard, C.J.

    1995-11-01

    Control of fine particles, including particulate air toxics, from utility boilers is required near-term by state and federal air regulations. Electrostatic precipitators (ESP) serve as the primary air pollution control device for the majority of coal-fired utility boilers in the Eastern and Midwestern united States. Cost-effective retrofit technologies for fine particle control, including flue gas conditioning, are needed for the large base of existing ESPs. Flue has conditioning is an attractive option because it requires minimal structural changes and lower capital costs. For flue gas conditioning to be effective for fine particle control, cohesive and particle agglomerating agents are needed to reduce reentrainment losses, since a large percentage of particulate emissions from well-performing ESPs are due to erosion, rapping, and non-rapping reentrainment. A related and somewhat ironic development is that emissions reductions of SO{sub 2} from utility boilers, as required by the Title IV acid rain program of the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments, has the potential to substantially increase particulate air toxics from existing ESPs. The switch to low-sulfur coals as an SO{sub 2} control strategy by many utilities has exacerbated ESP performance problems associated with high resistivity flyash. The use of flue gas conditioning has increased in the past several years to maintain adequate performance in ESPs which were not designed for high resistivity ash. However, commercially available flue gas conditioning systems, including NH{sub 3}/SO{sub 3} dual gas conditioning systems, have problems and inherent drawbacks which create a need for alternative conditioning agents. in particular, NH{sub 3}/SO{sub 3} systems can create odor and ash disposal problems due to ammonia outgassing. In addition, there are concerns over chemical handling safety and the potential for accidental releases.

  5. Delivery Order 9 enhanced preliminary assessment, Woodbridge Research Facility, Virginia. Final report, Dec 91-Mar 92

    SciTech Connect

    Shimko, R.G.; Turner, R.E.

    1992-03-01

    An enhanced preliminary assessment was conducted at Woodbridge Research Facility (WRF) in Woodbridge, Virginia. WRF is a 579-acre facility located 22 miles southeast of Washington, D.C. It is operated by Harry Diamond Laboratory (HDL) at Adelphi, Maryland for the U.S. Army Laboratory Command. Its mission is to support HDL in a variety of programs involving nuclear weapons effects and Army systems survivability. Based on information obtained during and subsequent to a site visit (18 through 20 September 1991), 27 areas requiring environmental evaluation (AREE) were identified, including landfills, a pistol range, oil-contaminated areas, waste handling areas, storage areas, test areas, underground storage tanks, transformers, oil/water separators, asbestos, drainage ditches and spill areas. This report presents a summary of findings for each AREE and recommendations for further action.

  6. Utilization of an Enhanced Canonical Correlation Analysis (ECCA) to Predict Daily Precipitation and Temperature in a Semi-Arid Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, S. R.; Hogue, T. S.

    2011-12-01

    Global climate models (GCMs) are primarily used to generate historical and future large-scale circulation patterns at a coarse resolution (typical order of 50,000 km2) and fail to capture climate variability at the ground level due to localized surface influences (i.e topography, marine, layer, land cover, etc). Their inability to accurately resolve these processes has led to the development of numerous 'downscaling' techniques. The goal of this study is to enhance statistical downscaling of daily precipitation and temperature for regions with heterogeneous land cover and topography. Our analysis was divided into two periods, historical (1961-2000) and contemporary (1980-2000), and tested using sixteen predictand combinations from four GCMs (GFDL CM2.0, GFDL CM2.1, CNRM-CM3 and MRI-CGCM2 3.2a. The Southern California area was separated into five county regions: Santa Barbara, Ventura, Los Angeles, Orange and San Diego. Principle component analysis (PCA) was performed on ground-based observations in order to (1) reduce the number of redundant gauges and minimize dimensionality and (2) cluster gauges that behave statistically similarly for post-analysis. Post-PCA analysis included extensive testing of predictor-predictand relationships using an enhanced canonical correlation analysis (ECCA). The ECCA includes obtaining the optimal predictand sets for all models within each spatial domain (county) as governed by daily and monthly overall statistics. Results show all models maintain mean annual and monthly behavior within each county and daily statistics are improved. The level of improvement highly depends on the vegetation extent within each county and the land-to-ocean ratio within the GCM spatial grid. The utilization of the entire historical period also leads to better statistical representation of observed daily precipitation. The validated ECCA technique is being applied to future climate scenarios distributed by the IPCC in order to provide forcing data for

  7. Detect signals of interdecadal climate variations from an enhanced suite of reconstructed precipitation products since 1850 using the historical station data from Global Historical Climatology Network and the dynamical patterns derived from Global Precipitation Climatology Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation describes the detection of interdecadal climate signals in a newly reconstructed precipitation data from 1850-present. Examples are on precipitation signatures of East Asian Monsoon (EAM), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillations (AMO). The new reconstruction dataset is an enhanced edition of a suite of global precipitation products reconstructed by Spectral Optimal Gridding of Precipitation Version 1.0 (SOGP 1.0). The maximum temporal coverage is 1850-present and the spatial coverage is quasi-global (75S, 75N). This enhanced version has three different temporal resolutions (5-day, monthly, and annual) and two different spatial resolutions (2.5 deg and 5.0 deg). It also has a friendly Graphical User Interface (GUI). SOGP uses a multivariate regression method using an empirical orthogonal function (EOF) expansion. The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) precipitation data from 1981-20010 are used to calculate the EOFs. The Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) gridded data are used to calculate the regression coefficients for reconstructions. The sampling errors of the reconstruction are analyzed according to the number of EOF modes used in the reconstruction. Our reconstructed 1900-2011 time series of the global average annual precipitation shows a 0.024 (mm/day)/100a trend, which is very close to the trend derived from the mean of 25 models of the CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5). Our reconstruction has been validated by GPCP data after 1979. Our reconstruction successfully displays the 1877 El Nino (see the attached figure), which is considered a validation before 1900. Our precipitation products are publically available online, including digital data, precipitation animations, computer codes, readme files, and the user manual. This work is a joint effort of San Diego State University (Sam Shen, Gregori Clarke, Christian Junjinger, Nancy Tafolla, Barbara Sperberg, and

  8. Implementation of an enhanced probation program: evaluating process and preliminary outcomes.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Lisa M; Hulbig, Shelia K; Birdwhistell, Shira; Newell, Jennifer; Neal, Connie

    2015-04-01

    Supervision, Monitoring, Accountability, Responsibility, and Treatment (SMART) is Kentucky's enhanced probation pilot program modeled after Hawaii's Opportunity Probation with Enforcement (HOPE). SMART is proposed to decrease substance use, new violations, and incarceration-related costs for high-risk probationers by increasing and randomizing drug testing, intensifying supervision, and creating linkages with needed resources (i.e., mental health and substance use). SMART adopts a holistic approach to rehabilitation by addressing mental health and substance abuse needs as well as life skills for fostering deterrence of criminal behavior vs. punitive action only. A mixed methods evaluation was implemented to assess program implementation and effectiveness. Qualitative interviews with key stakeholders (i.e., administration, judges, attorneys, and law enforcement/corrections) suggested successful implementation and collaboration to facilitate the pilot program. Quantitative analyses of secondary Kentucky Offender Management System (KOMS) data (grant Year 1: 07/01/2012-06/30/2013) also suggested program effectiveness. Specifically, SMART probationers showed significantly fewer: violations of probation (1.2 vs. 2.3), positive drug screens (8.6% vs. 29.4%), and days incarcerated (32.5 vs. 118.1) than comparison probationers. Kentucky's SMART enhanced probation shows preliminary success in reducing violations, substance use, and incarceration. Implications for practice and policy will be discussed.

  9. Smart Weapons Operability Enhancement Joint Test and Evaluation Program Grayling 1: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, James P.; Koenig, George G.

    1993-08-01

    The primary objective of the Smart Weapons Operability Enhancement (SWOE) Joint Test and Evaluation (JT&E) Program is to validate the SWOE Process for the Office of the Secretary of Defense. The SWOE Process is a physics based scene generation capability that will enhance the performance of future smart weapon systems for a global variety of battlefield environments. This process is focused on generating complex background environmental scenes, including targets, for a world wide range of battlefield conditions. The SWOE program is a DoD wide partnership incorporating capabilities from the Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force. The principal thrusts of SWOE are to quantitatively define the environmental factors and processes and to provide the capabilities to measure, model, render and extrapolate their impact on smart weapon system performance. The Grayling I exercise is the first in a series of four coordinate field deployments focused on validation of the SWOE Process. This paper describes the experimental design, sampling plans, measurement efforts and summarizes preliminary results of the Grayling I exercise.

  10. SolarOil Project, Phase I preliminary design report. [Solar Thermal Enhanced Oil Recovery project

    SciTech Connect

    Baccaglini, G.; Bass, J.; Neill, J.; Nicolayeff, V.; Openshaw, F.

    1980-03-01

    The preliminary design of the Solar Thermal Enhanced Oil Recovery (SolarOil) Plant is described in this document. This plant is designed to demonstrate that using solar thermal energy is technically feasible and economically viable in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). The SolarOil Plant uses the fixed mirror solar concentrator (FMSC) to heat high thermal capacity oil (MCS-2046) to 322/sup 0/C (611/sup 0/F). The hot fluid is pumped from a hot oil storage tank (20 min capacity) through a once-through steam generator which produces 4.8 MPa (700 psi) steam at 80% quality. The plant net output, averaged over 24 hr/day for 365 days/yr, is equivalent to that of a 2.4 MW (8.33 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr) oil-fired steam generator having an 86% availability. The net plant efficiency is 57.3% at equinox noon, a 30%/yr average. The plant will be demonstrated at an oilfield site near Oildale, California.

  11. Preliminary studies of enhanced contrast radiography in anatomy and embryology of insects with Elettra synchrotron light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hönnicke, M. G.; Foerster, L. A.; Navarro-Silva, M. A.; Menk, R.-H.; Rigon, L.; Cusatis, C.

    2005-08-01

    Enhanced contrast X-ray imaging is achieved by exploiting the real part of the refraction index, which is responsible for the phase shifts, in addition to the imaginary part, which is responsible for the absorption. Such techniques are called X-ray phase contrast imaging. An analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast imaging set-up with Diffraction Enhanced Imaging processing (DEI) were used for preliminary studies in anatomy and embryology of insects. Parasitized stinkbug and moth eggs used as control agents of pests in vegetables and adult stinkbugs and mosquitoes ( Aedes aegypti) were used as samples. The experimental setup was mounted in the SYRMEP beamline at ELETTRA. Images were obtained using a high spatial resolution CCD detector (pixel size 14×14 μm 2) coupled with magnifying optics. Analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast images (PCI) and edge detection images show contrast and details not observed with conventional synchrotron radiography and open the possibility for future study in the embryonic development of insects.

  12. Competitive removal of Cu-EDTA and Ni-EDTA via microwave-enhanced Fenton oxidation with hydroxide precipitation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qintie; Pan, Hanping; Yao, Kun; Pan, Yonggang; Long, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) can form very stable complexes with heavy metal ions, greatly inhibiting conventional metal-removal technologies used in water treatment. Both the oxidation of EDTA and the reduction of metal ions in metal-EDTA systems via the microwave-enhanced Fenton reaction followed by hydroxide precipitation were investigated. The Cu(II)-Ni(II)-EDTA, Cu(II)-EDTA and Ni(II)-EDTA exhibited widely different decomplexation efficiencies under equivalent conditions. When the reaction reached equilibrium, the chemical oxygen demand was reduced by a microwave-enhanced Fenton reaction in different systems and the reduction order from high to low was Cu(II)-Ni(II)-EDTA ≈ Cu(II)-EDTA > Ni(II)-EDTA. The removal efficiencies of both Cu(2+) and Ni(2+) in Cu-Ni-EDTA wastewaters were much higher than those in a single heavy metal system. The degradation efficiency of EDTA in Cu-Ni-EDTA was lower than that in a single metal system. In the Cu-Ni-EDTA system, the microwave thermal degradation and the Fenton-like reaction created by Cu catalyzed H2O2 altered the EDTA degradation pathway and increased the pH of the wastewater system, conversely inhibiting residual EDTA degradation. PMID:26398034

  13. Competitive removal of Cu-EDTA and Ni-EDTA via microwave-enhanced Fenton oxidation with hydroxide precipitation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qintie; Pan, Hanping; Yao, Kun; Pan, Yonggang; Long, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) can form very stable complexes with heavy metal ions, greatly inhibiting conventional metal-removal technologies used in water treatment. Both the oxidation of EDTA and the reduction of metal ions in metal-EDTA systems via the microwave-enhanced Fenton reaction followed by hydroxide precipitation were investigated. The Cu(II)-Ni(II)-EDTA, Cu(II)-EDTA and Ni(II)-EDTA exhibited widely different decomplexation efficiencies under equivalent conditions. When the reaction reached equilibrium, the chemical oxygen demand was reduced by a microwave-enhanced Fenton reaction in different systems and the reduction order from high to low was Cu(II)-Ni(II)-EDTA ≈ Cu(II)-EDTA > Ni(II)-EDTA. The removal efficiencies of both Cu(2+) and Ni(2+) in Cu-Ni-EDTA wastewaters were much higher than those in a single heavy metal system. The degradation efficiency of EDTA in Cu-Ni-EDTA was lower than that in a single metal system. In the Cu-Ni-EDTA system, the microwave thermal degradation and the Fenton-like reaction created by Cu catalyzed H2O2 altered the EDTA degradation pathway and increased the pH of the wastewater system, conversely inhibiting residual EDTA degradation.

  14. Seeding Experiment of Liquid Carbon Dioxide for Enhancing Winter-time Precipitation in Saga Prefecture,Northern Kyushu,Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakimizu, K.; Nishiyama, K.; Tomine, K.; Maki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Morita, O.

    2012-12-01

    ice perticles formed by LC seeding grew to the precipitable size and resultant snowfall was detected by radar in approximately 120 min. after seeding operation. In this study, based on these observed facts, optimum design for enhancing winter-time water resources by LC seeding method was suggested. Successive low-level horizontal penetrations of operational aircraft with seeding LC into many moving super-cooled cumuli towards the Japan Islands will lead to the spreading of cloud volume and subsequent coversion of large amount of iv active cloud volume into newly exploited artificial precipitation. As a result, these experiments succeeded, and the total amount of estimated radar precipitation of the be able to secure a large amount of water resource from these experiment results.

  15. Results of Experiments on Convective Precipitation Enhancement in the Camaguey Experimental Area, Cuba.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koloskov, Boris; Zimin, Boris; Beliaev, Vitaly; Seregin, Yury; Chernikov, Albert; Petrov, Victor; Valdés, Mario; Martínez, Daniel; Pérez, Carlos A.; Puente, Guillermo

    1996-09-01

    Experiments on randomized seeding of individual convective clouds and cloud clusters were conducted in the Camaguey experimental area, Cuba, from 1985 through 1990 in order to elucidate whether cold-cloud dynamic seeding can be used to augment convective rainfall. An information measuring system was set up, and primary tools included three instrumented aircraft (AN-26, AN-12 CYCLONE, IL-14), MRL-5 and ARS-3 radars, a system for radiosounding, two special rain gauge networks, and surface weather stations.A total of 232 randomized experiments were carried out during this experimentation period, and 117 individual clouds and 115 cloud clusters were studied during 136 `go' days. Pyrotechnic flares containing silver iodide were ejected in a selected cloud when the seeder aircraft was flying through its top. The seeding effects were monitored by the MRL-5 radar, which was equipped with an automated system for digital processing of data.A total of 46 convective clouds, 29 seeded and 17 nonseeded, were studied during an exploratory experiment in 1985. Analyses of the radar properties of seeded and nonseeded clouds have indicated that the response of convective clouds to AgI seeding is dependent on their type, and the treatment within the range of cloud tops from 6 to 8 km—that is, at top temperatures between 10° and 20°C, is found to increase their maximum height by 13% and the lifetime by 30%, and to enhance rainfall.A confirmatory phase of the experiment in the Camaguey experimental area was conducted during 1986 90. A total of 46 individual convective clouds, 24 seeded and 22 nonseeded, were identified, and their properties were determined using three-dimensional radar data. The results have shown that the AgI seeding of growing clouds with top temperatures over the range from 10° to 20°C increases their lifetime by 24%, maximum height by 9%, area by 64%, and rain volume by 120%, as compared to unseeded clouds. The lifetime, area, and rainfall results are

  16. A highly sensitive immunosensor for calmodulin assay based on enhanced biocatalyzed precipitation adopting a dual-layered enzyme strategy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Liu, Kai; Sun, Qianqian; Lin, Bin; Lu, Danqin; Xu, Zhiai; Hu, Chen; Fan, Guangjian; Zhang, Shengping; Wang, Chuangui; Zhang, Wen

    2014-06-15

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous protein in eukaryotic cells, and it plays an important role in cancer progression. In this paper, a highly sensitive immunosensor adopting a dual-layered enzyme strategy was proposed for electrochemical detection of CaM. This immunosensor was constructed by introducing honeycomb-like mesoporous carbon (HMPC) as a sensor platform to sequentially immobilize antibody (Ab1), CaM and a multi-functionalized label. The label (HRP-PAupc-Ab1) was synthesized by covalently binding Ab1 and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) to poly(acrylic acid)-functionalized Au popcorn (PAupc) nanoparticles. A novel dual-layered enzyme strategy was employed by incubating HRP-secondary antibody (HRP-Ab2) onto the label surface and the enhanced biocatalyzed precipitation was therefore induced. This immunosensor exhibited satisfactory analytical performances for CaM detection with a linear response ranging from 5.0 pg mL(-1) to 100 ng mL(-1) and a detection limit of 1.5 pg mL(-1). The immunosensor has also been successfully applied to the CaM analysis in two cancer cells (HepG2 and MCF-7) with high sensitivity, which has shown great potency for cancer study. PMID:24508817

  17. Effects of experimentally-enhanced precipitation and nitrogen on resistance, recovery and resilience of a semi-arid grassland after drought.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhuwen; Ren, Haiyan; Cai, Jiangping; Wang, Ruzhen; Li, Mai-He; Wan, Shiqiang; Han, Xingguo; Lewis, Bernard J; Jiang, Yong

    2014-12-01

    Resistance, recovery and resilience are three important properties of ecological stability, but they have rarely been studied in semi-arid grasslands under global change. We analyzed data from a field experiment conducted in a native grassland in northern China to explore the effects of experimentally enhanced precipitation and N deposition on both absolute and relative measures of community resistance, recovery and resilience--calculated in terms of community cover--after a natural drought. For both absolute and relative measures, communities with precipitation enhancement showed higher resistance and lower recovery, but no change in resilience compared to communities with ambient precipitation in the semi-arid grassland. The manipulated increase in N deposition had little effect on these community stability metrics except for decreased community resistance. The response patterns of these stability metrics to alterations in precipitation and N are generally consistent at community, functional group and species levels. Contrary to our expectations, structural equation modeling revealed that water-driven community resistance and recovery result mainly from changes in community species asynchrony rather than species diversity in the semi-arid grassland. These findings suggest that changes in precipitation regimes may have significant impacts on the response of water-limited ecosystems to drought stress under global change scenarios.

  18. Preliminary Study for Technology Enhanced Learning: Comparative Study of England and Northern Cyprus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenekeci, Ebru Heyberi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the preliminary study findings from an ongoing PhD study. In this paper, the researcher presents the preliminary study that was carried out with a number of schools in England and Northern Cyprus in order to identify the background or big pictures of each country in terms of available ICT tools that are…

  19. Enhanced sensory re-learning after nerve repair using 3D audio-visual signals and kinaesthesia--preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Schmidhammer, R; Hausner, T; Kröpfl, A; Huber, W; Hopf, R; Leixnering, M; Herz, H; Redl, H

    2007-01-01

    Sensory re-learning methods and basics on cortical reorganization after peripheral nerve lesion are well documented. The aim of enhanced sensory re-learning using 3D audio-visual signals and kinaesthetic training is the augmentation of cognitive memory (visual and acoustic sensory memory) and cognitive function for the improvement of cerebral plasticity processes and starts as soon as possible after nerve repair. Preliminary results are shown.

  20. Analysis of Multiple Precipitation Products and Preliminary Assessment of Their Impact on Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) Land Surface States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottschalck, Jon; Meng, Jesse; Rodel, Matt; Houser, paul

    2005-01-01

    Land surface models (LSMs) are computer programs, similar to weather and climate prediction models, which simulate the stocks and fluxes of water (including soil moisture, snow, evaporation, and runoff) and energy (including the temperature of and sensible heat released from the soil) after they arrive on the land surface as precipitation and sunlight. It is not currently possible to measure all of the variables of interest everywhere on Earth with sufficient accuracy and space-time resolution. Hence LSMs have been developed to integrate the available observations with our understanding of the physical processes involved, using powerful computers, in order to map these stocks and fluxes as they change in time. The maps are used to improve weather forecasts, support water resources and agricultural applications, and study the Earth's water cycle and climate variability. NASA's Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) project facilitates testing of several different LSMs with a variety of input datasets (e.g., precipitation, plant type). Precipitation is arguably the most important input to LSMs. Many precipitation datasets have been produced using satellite and rain gauge observations and weather forecast models. In this study, seven different global precipitation datasets were evaluated over the United States, where dense rain gauge networks contribute to reliable precipitation maps. We then used the seven datasets as inputs to GLDAS simulations, so that we could diagnose their impacts on output stocks and fluxes of water. In terms of totals, the Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP) had the closest agreement with the US rain gauge dataset for all seasons except winter. The CMAP precipitation was also the most closely correlated in time with the rain gauge data during spring, fall, and winter, while the satellitebased estimates performed best in summer. The GLDAS simulations revealed that modeled soil moisture is highly

  1. Atom probe study of irradiation-enhanced α' precipitation in neutron-irradiated Fe–Cr model alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei -Ying; Miao, Yinbin; Wu, Yaqiao; Tomchik, Carolyn A.; Mo, Kun; Gan, Jian; Okuniewski, Maria A.; Maloy, Stuart A.; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-07-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) was performed to study the effects of Cr concentrations, irradiation doses and irradiation temperatures on a' phase formation in Fe-Cr model alloys (10-16 at.%) irradiated at 300 and 450°C to 0.01, 0.1 and 1 dpa. For 1 dpa specimens, α' precipitates with an average radius of 1.0-1.3 nm were observed. The precipitate density varied significantly from 1.1x10²³ to 2.7x10²⁴ 1/m³, depending on Cr concentrations and irradiation temperatures. The volume fraction of α' phase in 1 dpa specimens qualitatively agreed with the phase diagram prediction. For 0.01 dpa and 0.1 dpa, frequency distribution analysis detected slight Cr segregation in high-Cr specimens, but not in Fe-10Cr specimens. Proximity histogram analysis showed that the radial Cr concentration was highest at the center of a' precipitates. For most precipitates, the Cr contents were significantly lower than that predicted by the phase diagram. The Cr concentration at precipitate center increased with increasing precipitate size.

  2. Enhanced NIR downconversion luminescence by precipitating nano Ca5(PO4)3F crystals in Eu2+-Yb3+ co-doped glass.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Song, Zhiguo; Li, Yongjin; Lou, Kai; Qiu, Jianbei; Yang, Zhengwen; Yin, Zhaoyi; Wang, Xue; Wang, Qi; Wan, Ronghua

    2013-10-01

    Eu(2+)-Yb(3+) co-doped transparent glass-ceramic containing nano-Ca5(PO4)3F (FAP) was prepared in reducing atmosphere. XRD and TEM analysis indicated that nano-FAP about 40 nm precipitated homogeneously in glass matrix after heat treatment. Confirmed by spectroscopy measurements, the crystal-like absorption and emission of Eu(2+) indicated the partition of Eu(2+) into FAP nanocrystals in glass ceramic. NIR emission due to the transition (2)F5/2→(2)F7/2 of Yb(3+) ions (about 980-1100 nm) was observed from glasses under ultraviolet excitation, ascribed to downconversion from Eu(2+) to Yb(3+), which can be enhanced by precipitating nano-FAP crystals. The results indicated that Eu(2+)-Yb(3+) co-doped glass-ceramic embedding with nano-FAP is a promising candidate as downconversion materials for enhancing conversion efficiency of solar cells.

  3. Dust Storm Reduction due to Precipitation and Temperature Enhancement in Northwestern China: A Direct Climatic Impact of Absorbing Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y.; Liou, K.; Chen, W.; Liao, H.

    2009-12-01

    Dust storms originating in the Gobi desert and northwestern China critically impact weather, climate, and public health in China and neighboring Pacific Rim countries. The frequent occurrence of dust storms has been attributed to both deforestation and the changing environment. Dust storm formation is determined by a number of factors, including dryness, wind field, soil type, and precipitation, with precipitation being the most essential factor. Dust storms normally originate in northwestern China where annual precipitation is less than 400 mm, particularly in extremely dry areas (less than 200 mm), including the Taklamakan Desert, Tarim basin area, and Gobi Desert, where the most severe dust storms have been reported. In the decades between 1954 and 2007, reports of annual dust storm occurrences at 753 Chinese meteorological sites and the corresponding amount of total precipitation show a reduction in the occurrence and intensity of dust storms and clearly demonstrate an inverse relationship between the two. The correlation between dust storm occurrence and temperature in northwestern China also displays a negative trend but is less significant. Using a global climate model, we demonstrate that increased loading of light-absorbing aerosols in China, such as black carbon (BC), is the primary reason for precipitation and temperature increases over northwestern China, and the consequence of reductions in dust storm frequency and intensity. The model-simulated precipitation and temperature changes over northwestern China compare reasonably well with observed trends when a certain portion of absorbing aerosols has been added to the model, which significantly affects regional climate patterns through the heating of the air column. Anomalies of the observed annual total dust storm cases during the period from 1954 to 2007 (solid) and the corresponding anomalies of the observed annual mean (a) total precipitation (mm) and (b) surface temperature (C°) (dashed), along

  4. Fusing enhanced radar precipitation, in-situ hydrometeorological measurements and airborne LIDAR snowpack estimates in a hyper-resolution hydrologic model to improve seasonal water supply forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gochis, D. J.; Busto, J.; Howard, K.; Mickey, J.; Deems, J. S.; Painter, T. H.; Richardson, M.; Dugger, A. L.; Karsten, L. R.; Tang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Scarcity of spatially- and temporally-continuous observations of precipitation and snowpack conditions in remote mountain watersheds results in fundamental limitations in water supply forecasting. These limitationsin observational capabilities can result in strong biases in total snowmelt-driven runoff amount, the elevational distribution of runoff, river basin tributary contributions to total basin runoff and, equally important for water management, the timing of runoff. The Upper Rio Grande River basin in Colorado and New Mexico is one basin where observational deficiencies are hypothesized to have significant adverse impacts on estimates of snowpack melt-out rates and on water supply forecasts. We present findings from a coordinated observational-modeling study within Upper Rio Grande River basin whose aim was to quanitfy the impact enhanced precipitation, meteorological and snowpack measurements on the simulation and prediction of snowmelt driven streamflow. The Rio Grande SNOwpack and streamFLOW (RIO-SNO-FLOW) Prediction Project conducted enhanced observing activities during the 2014-2015 water year. Measurements from a gap-filling, polarimetric radar (NOXP) and in-situ meteorological and snowpack measurement stations were assimilated into the WRF-Hydro modeling framework to provide continuous analyses of snowpack and streamflow conditions. Airborne lidar estimates of snowpack conditions from the NASA Airborne Snow Observatory during mid-April and mid-May were used as additional independent validations against the various model simulations and forecasts of snowpack conditions during the melt-out season. Uncalibrated WRF-Hydro model performance from simulations and forecasts driven by enhanced observational analyses were compared against results driven by currently operational data inputs. Precipitation estimates from the NOXP research radar validate significantly better against independent in situ observations of precipitation and snow-pack increases

  5. [A preliminary study on the chemical properties of precipitation, throughfall, stemflow and surface run-off in major forest types at Dinghushan under acid deposition].

    PubMed

    Liu, Juxiu; Zhang, Deqiang; Zhou, Guoyi; Wen, Dazhi; Zhang, Qianmei

    2003-08-01

    Studies on the chemical properties of precipitation, throughfall, stemflow and surface run-off in major forest types at Dinghushan under acid deposition showed that the pH value of precipitation was about 4.90, and the frequency of acid rain was over 62%. In broad-leaved forest, the pH value of precipitation was lower than that of throughfall, but higher than that of stemflow and especially the surface run-off, indicating that the soil was naturally acidified. In mixed forest, both throughfall and surface run-off had a higher pH value, but stemflow had a lower pH value than precipitation. The throughfall and stemflow were more acidified than precipitation in coniferous pine forest, but the surface run-off had a higher pH value than precipitation. These results suggested that among the three major forest types at Dinghushan, the canopy of broad-leaved forest had the highest buffering ability, whereas for the soil, the coniferous forest had the highest soil buffering capacity. The concentrations of nutrient elements, such as P, K, Ca, Na and Mg in the throughfall, stemflow and surface run-off were higher than those in bulk precipitation in all forests at Dinghushan, some even 10 times higher, indicating that a large amount of nutrients were leached from the canopy. The concentrations of nutrient elements in stemflow were higher than those in throughfall in all forests, and the concentration of nutrient elements in surface water was higher than those in atmospheric rainfall. Coniferous forest had a higher concentration of nutrients in the throughfall and stemflow and a lower nutrient concentration in the surface run-off than other forest types, which implied that nutrient loss was more serious in broad-leaved and mixed forests than in coniferous forests.

  6. The Enhancement of Resilience via a Wilderness Therapy Program. A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, E.; Allen-Craig, Sandy

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a recent preliminary study into the effects of a wilderness therapy program on the resilience of male youth at-risk. The study focused on participants who completed a wilderness therapy program at Typo Station. The residential program involved a five-week stay at the Typo Station property in north east Victoria,…

  7. Enhanced precipitation-variability effects on water losses and ecosystem functioning: Differential response of arid and mesic regions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Climate change will result in increased precipitation variability with more extreme events across a range of temporal scales. We used a process-based ecosystem model to simulate water losses and soil water availability to plants at 35 grassland locations in the central U.S. under four level of prec...

  8. Cognitive Enhancement Therapy Improves Frontolimbic Regulation of Emotion in Alcohol and/or Cannabis Misusing Schizophrenia: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Wojtalik, Jessica A; Hogarty, Susan S; Cornelius, Jack R; Phillips, Mary L; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Newhill, Christina E; Eack, Shaun M

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia who misuse substances are burdened with impairments in emotion regulation. Cognitive enhancement therapy (CET) may address these problems by enhancing prefrontal brain function. A small sample of outpatients with schizophrenia and alcohol and/or cannabis substance use problems participating in an 18-month randomized trial of CET (n = 10) or usual care (n = 4) completed posttreatment functional neuroimaging using an emotion regulation task. General linear models explored CET effects on brain activity in emotional neurocircuitry. Individuals treated with CET had significantly greater activation in broad regions of the prefrontal cortex, limbic, and striatal systems implicated in emotion regulation compared to usual care. Differential activation favoring CET in prefrontal regions and the insula mediated behavioral improvements in emotional processing. Our data lend preliminary support of CET effects on neuroplasticity in frontolimbic and striatal circuitries, which mediate emotion regulation in people with schizophrenia and comorbid substance misuse problems. PMID:26793128

  9. Cognitive Enhancement Therapy Improves Frontolimbic Regulation of Emotion in Alcohol and/or Cannabis Misusing Schizophrenia: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Wojtalik, Jessica A.; Hogarty, Susan S.; Cornelius, Jack R.; Phillips, Mary L.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Newhill, Christina E.; Eack, Shaun M.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia who misuse substances are burdened with impairments in emotion regulation. Cognitive enhancement therapy (CET) may address these problems by enhancing prefrontal brain function. A small sample of outpatients with schizophrenia and alcohol and/or cannabis substance use problems participating in an 18-month randomized trial of CET (n = 10) or usual care (n = 4) completed posttreatment functional neuroimaging using an emotion regulation task. General linear models explored CET effects on brain activity in emotional neurocircuitry. Individuals treated with CET had significantly greater activation in broad regions of the prefrontal cortex, limbic, and striatal systems implicated in emotion regulation compared to usual care. Differential activation favoring CET in prefrontal regions and the insula mediated behavioral improvements in emotional processing. Our data lend preliminary support of CET effects on neuroplasticity in frontolimbic and striatal circuitries, which mediate emotion regulation in people with schizophrenia and comorbid substance misuse problems. PMID:26793128

  10. Enhanced capabilities and updated users manual for axial-flow turbine preliminary sizing code TURBAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, Arthur J.

    1994-01-01

    Several modifications have been made to the axial-flow turbine preliminary sizing code TURBAN. Turbine cooling has been added to the analysis. New alternative input options allow direct specification of stage reaction, stage work factor, and stage work split. The Reynolds number loss dependency was modified and an internal calculation of air viscosity was added. A complete description of input and output along with sample cases are included.

  11. Effect of Cr content on the thermal stability of tempered lath structures and precipitates in strength enhanced ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassemi Armaki, H.; Chen, R. P.; Kano, S.; Maruyama, K.; Igarashi, M.

    2010-07-01

    The effect of Cr content on the thermal stability of tempered laths (or elongated subgrains) and precipitates has been studied during long-term aging at 650 °C in three P122 grade steels with increasing Cr content from 9 to 10.5 and 12%. Addition of Cr accelerates the coarsening of subgrains during long-term aging. The number fraction of MX precipitates does change up to 104 h aging in 9% and 10.5% Cr steels, whereas it decreases significantly in 12% Cr steel due to the formation of Z phase. The coarsening rate of M23C6 precipitates, mostly located on the subgrain boundaries, increases from 9 to 12% Cr and steel containing 9% Cr has the highest number density of M23C6 after 104 h aging. The addition of Cr from 9 to 12% accelerates the coarsening rate of Laves phase particles during aging. As a result, 9% Cr steel shows the most stable tempered lath martesitic structure during long-term aging.

  12. Climatological characteristics and orographic enhancement of lake-effect precipitation over eastern Lake Ontario and the Tug Hill Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veals, Peter Gregory

    The Tug Hill Plateau of upstate New York rises approximately 500 m above Lake Ontario, observes frequent (often heavy) lake-effect snowfall, and is one of the snowiest regions in the eastern United States. This work presents a climatology of lake-effect precipitation created using data from the KTYX WSR-88D radar situated atop the plateau. Base reflectivity imagery was manually examined to identify lake-effect periods (LEPs) during each cool season (16 Sep--15 May) from 16 Sep 2001--15 May 2014. The most active months for lake effect in this region are December and January. There is a tendency for LEPs to begin within a few hours before and after sunset in the spring and fall, with no such diurnal signal observed in the winter. Correspondingly, lake effect is slightly more frequent at night than during the day. Overall, the diurnal variability is weaker than found over smaller bodies of water such as the Great Salt Lake of Utah. Classification of events by morphological type revealed that broad coverage and long-lake-axis-parallel (LLAP) account for ~72% and ~24% of lake-effect hours, respectively. The diurnal signal for broad coverage (LLAP) events was less (more) pronounced than for LEPs in general. The near-shore areas south and east of Lake Ontario receive the most frequent lake-effect precipitation. The Tug Hill Plateau produces a strong orographic signal, with an echo frequency maximum on the western (typically windward) slope. Data from cooperative observer (COOP) sites and the Snow Data Assimilation System (SNODAS) corroborate these radar-derived results. The `broadening' of high echo frequency over the Tug Hill Plateau, as well as the existence of the lake-orographic morphology, may point to inland/orographic intensification and generation of precipitation during some LEPs.

  13. A monitor for continuous measurement of temperature, pH, and conductance of wet precipitation: Preliminary results from the Adirondack Mountains, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnsson, P.A.; Reddy, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes a continuous wet-only precipitation monitor designed by the U.S. Geological Survey to record variations in rainfall temperature, pH, and specific conductance at 1-min intervals over the course of storms. Initial sampling in the Adirondack Mountains showed that rainfall acidity varied over the course of summer storms, with low initial pH values increasing as storm intensity increased.This report describes a continuous wet-only precipitation monitor designed by the U.S. Geological Survey to record variations in rainfall temperature, pH, and specific conductance at 1-min intervals over the course of storms. Initial sampling in the Adirondack Mountains showed that rainfall acidity varied over the course of summer storms, with low initial pH values increasing as storm intensity increased.

  14. Antidepressant response to aripiprazole augmentation associated with enhanced FDOPA utilization in striatum: a preliminary PET study.

    PubMed

    Conway, Charles R; Chibnall, John T; Cumming, Paul; Mintun, Mark A; Gebara, Marie Anne I; Perantie, Dana C; Price, Joseph L; Cornell, Martha E; McConathy, Jonathan E; Gangwani, Sunil; Sheline, Yvette I

    2014-03-30

    Several double blind, prospective trials have demonstrated an antidepressant augmentation efficacy of aripiprazole in depressed patients unresponsive to standard antidepressant therapy. Although aripiprazole is now widely used for this indication, and much is known about its receptor-binding properties, the mechanism of its antidepressant augmentation remains ill-defined. In vivo animal studies and in vitro human studies using cloned dopamine dopamine D2 receptors suggest aripiprazole is a partial dopamine agonist; in this preliminary neuroimaging trial, we hypothesized that aripiprazole's antidepressant augmentation efficacy arises from dopamine partial agonist activity. To test this, we assessed the effects of aripiprazole augmentation on the cerebral utilization of 6-[(18)F]-fluoro-3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (FDOPA) using positron emission tomography (PET). Fourteen depressed patients, who had failed 8 weeks of antidepressant therapy with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, underwent FDOPA PET scans before and after aripiprazole augmentation; 11 responded to augmentation. Whole brain, voxel-wise comparisons of pre- and post-aripiprazole scans revealed increased FDOPA trapping in the right medial caudate of augmentation responders. An exploratory analysis of depressive symptoms revealed that responders experienced large improvements only in putatively dopaminergic symptoms of lassitude and inability to feel. These preliminary findings suggest that augmentation of antidepressant response by aripiprazole may be associated with potentiation of dopaminergic activity.

  15. Preliminary geologic investigations in the Colorado Plateau using enhanced ERTS images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, A. F. H.; Billingsley, F. C.; Elston, D. P.; Lucchitta, I.; Shoemaker, E. M.

    1973-01-01

    Bulk and computer enhanced frames of the Verde Valley region of Central Arizona, have been analyzed for structural information and rock unit identification. Most major rock units in areas of sparse ground cover are identifiable on enhanced false-color composites. Regional structural patterns are strikingly visible on the ERTS images. New features have been identified which will aid in the search for ground water near Flagstaff, Sedona and Stewart Ranch.

  16. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography for the determination of Crohn’s disease activity – preliminary experience

    PubMed Central

    Białecki, Marcin; Białecka, Agnieszka; Laskowska, Katarzyna; Kłopocka, Maria; Liebert, Ariel; Lemanowicz, Adam; Serafin, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is a recent non-invasive modality, which may partially replace currently used techniques (endoscopy, CT enterography and MR enterography) in the diagnostics and assessment of Crohn’s disease (CD). The aim of the study was to analyze early experience in the use of CEUS for the measurement of activity and staging of CD. Material/Methods Eleven patients previously diagnosed with CD were included in the study. They underwent contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (SonoVue, Bracco), low-dose CT enterography (LDCTE), assessment of laboratory markers of inflammation and clinical CD activity index (CDAI). Contrast enhancement was evaluated using a semi-quantitative method and a quantitative method that included measurement of peak enhancement (PE), enhancement curve rise time (RT) and wash-in-rate (WiR). Results Ileal wall thickening was observed in all patients. Semi-quantitative method was used to observe CD activity in CEUS in 10 cases that perfectly matched LDCTE findings. There was a moderate positive correlation between PE and CDAI (r=0.65, p<0.001). There was no significant relationship between perfusion parameters and laboratory markers of inflammation. Conclusions CEUS is a promising modality for non-invasive assessment of pathologic ileal vascularization in the course of Crohn’s disease. Intensity of enhancement in CEUS reflects activity of the disease detected in LDCTE and correlates with CDAI. PMID:24723988

  17. The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) Combined Precipitation Dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, George J.; Adler, Robert F.; Arkin, Philip; Chang, Alfred; Ferraro, Ralph; Gruber, Arnold; Janowiak, John; McNab, Alan; Rudolf, Bruno; Schneider, Udo

    1997-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) has released the GPCP Version 1 Combined Precipitation Data Set, a global, monthly precipitation dataset covering the period July 1987 through December 1995. The primary product in the dataset is a merged analysis incorporating precipitation estimates from low-orbit-satellite microwave data, geosynchronous-orbit -satellite infrared data, and rain gauge observations. The dataset also contains the individual input fields, a combination of the microwave and infrared satellite estimates, and error estimates for each field. The data are provided on 2.5 deg x 2.5 deg latitude-longitude global grids. Preliminary analyses show general agreement with prior studies of global precipitation and extends prior studies of El Nino-Southern Oscillation precipitation patterns. At the regional scale there are systematic differences with standard climatologies.

  18. Ice-sheet driven enhancement of geothermal flux: preliminary model results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, N. T.; Parizek, B. R.; Alley, R. B.; Pollard, D.; Anandakrishnan, S.

    2013-12-01

    Previous observations in parts of West Antarctica and Greenland, including near the head of the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream, have indicated rapid basal melting, suggesting higher geothermal flux than typical for the expected geological setting. Growth and decay of ice sheets over ice-age cycles cause large and geologically rapid changes in loading and flexure beneath and nearby. Oscillating load will cause oscillating melt volume in deep rocks, and because melt extraction increases with melt volume more rapidly than linearly, ice-age cycling will tend to move melt upward. Melt motion may be greatly aided by fracturing promoted by flexural stresses from the varying ice sheets. Preliminary results from ice-sheet models coupled to lithosphere and asthenosphere will be presented, suggesting that ice-sheet changes may be affecting their basal heat flux.

  19. Alanine with the Precipitate of Tomato Juice Administered to Rats Enhances the Reduction in Blood Ethanol Levels

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Shunji; Shiiya, Sachie; Tokumaru, Yoshimi; Kanda, Tomomasa

    2015-01-01

    Delay in gastric emptying (GE) lowers the blood ethanol concentration (BEC) after alcohol administration. We previously demonstrated that water-insoluble fractions, mainly comprising dietary fiber derived from many types of botanical foods, possessed the ability to absorb ethanol-containing aqueous solutions. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between the absorption of ethanol and lowering of BEC because of delay in GE. Here we identified dietary nutrients that synergize with the water-insoluble fraction of tomatoes to lower BEC in rats. Consequently, unlike tomato juice without alanine, tomato juice with 5.0% alanine decreased BEC depending on the delay in GE and mediated the ethanol-induced decrease in the spontaneous motor activity (an indicator of drunkenness). Our findings indicate that the synergism between tomato juice and alanine to reduce the absorption of ethanol was attributable to the effect of alanine on precipitates such as the water-insoluble fraction of tomatoes. PMID:26713162

  20. Significant enhancement of Sm3+ photoreduction in halide nanophase precipitated AIF3-based glasses under femtosecond laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Qing; Yu, Xue; Yang, Zhengwen; Zhou, Dacheng; Qiu, Jianbei

    2013-06-01

    The electronegativity effect for the efficient photoreduction of Sm3+ to Sm2+ in Br-modified fluoroaluminate glasses was investigated after femtosecond laser (fs) irradiation. Sm2+ luminescence was strongly observed in the higher Br-modified samples, and basing on the TEM and DSC measurements, BaBr2 nanophases were precipitated from the glass matrix in the laser focused areas. From the EDS spectra, it was found that Sm3+ can be selectively incorporated into the BaBr2 nanophases. More electrons provided by the nanophase facilitated the Sm3+ reduction in the irradiation process. Since the photoreduction efficiency of Sm3+ in Br-modified glass is evidently higher than that in Cl-modified glasses, the effect of halide ions electronegativity on Sm3+ photoreduction was identified and relevant mechanism was discussed.

  1. Alanine with the Precipitate of Tomato Juice Administered to Rats Enhances the Reduction in Blood Ethanol Levels.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Shunji; Shiiya, Sachie; Tokumaru, Yoshimi; Kanda, Tomomasa

    2015-01-01

    Delay in gastric emptying (GE) lowers the blood ethanol concentration (BEC) after alcohol administration. We previously demonstrated that water-insoluble fractions, mainly comprising dietary fiber derived from many types of botanical foods, possessed the ability to absorb ethanol-containing aqueous solutions. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between the absorption of ethanol and lowering of BEC because of delay in GE. Here we identified dietary nutrients that synergize with the water-insoluble fraction of tomatoes to lower BEC in rats. Consequently, unlike tomato juice without alanine, tomato juice with 5.0% alanine decreased BEC depending on the delay in GE and mediated the ethanol-induced decrease in the spontaneous motor activity (an indicator of drunkenness). Our findings indicate that the synergism between tomato juice and alanine to reduce the absorption of ethanol was attributable to the effect of alanine on precipitates such as the water-insoluble fraction of tomatoes. PMID:26713162

  2. Enhancing Global Land Surface Hydrology Estimates from the NASA MERRA Reanalysis Using Precipitation Observations and Model Parameter Adjustments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf; Koster, Randal; DeLannoy, Gabrielle; Forman, Barton; Liu, Qing; Mahanama, Sarith; Toure, Ally

    2011-01-01

    The Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) is a state-of-the-art reanalysis that provides. in addition to atmospheric fields. global estimates of soil moisture, latent heat flux. snow. and runoff for J 979-present. This study introduces a supplemental and improved set of land surface hydrological fields ('MERRA-Land') generated by replaying a revised version of the land component of the MERRA system. Specifically. the MERRA-Land estimates benefit from corrections to the precipitation forcing with the Global Precipitation Climatology Project pentad product (version 2.1) and from revised parameters in the rainfall interception model, changes that effectively correct for known limitations in the MERRA land surface meteorological forcings. The skill (defined as the correlation coefficient of the anomaly time series) in land surface hydrological fields from MERRA and MERRA-Land is assessed here against observations and compared to the skill of the state-of-the-art ERA-Interim reanalysis. MERRA-Land and ERA-Interim root zone soil moisture skills (against in situ observations at 85 US stations) are comparable and significantly greater than that of MERRA. Throughout the northern hemisphere, MERRA and MERRA-Land agree reasonably well with in situ snow depth measurements (from 583 stations) and with snow water equivalent from an independent analysis. Runoff skill (against naturalized stream flow observations from 15 basins in the western US) of MERRA and MERRA-Land is typically higher than that of ERA-Interim. With a few exceptions. the MERRA-Land data appear more accurate than the original MERRA estimates and are thus recommended for those interested in using '\\-tERRA output for land surface hydrological studies.

  3. Preliminary Results on Simulations of Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs) detected by The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enriquez Rivera, O.; Lara, A.

    2014-12-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC) is currently under construction at the Sierra Negra Volcano, Puebla in Mexico. Located 4100 m above sea level, this large array is mainly designed to observe high energy gamma rays (TeV). However, by recording scaler data that correspond to the rates of individual photomultiplier tubes, the detection and study of solar energetic particles (known as Ground Level Enhancements) as well as the decrease of the cosmic ray flux due to solar transients (known as Forbush decreases) will also be possible. In order to determine the response of the array to solar transients, we have performed simulations of the scaler output using different sub-array configurations. We present here our preliminary results of such simulations and their comparison with observed Forbush decreases.

  4. A preliminary evaluation of self-made nanobubble in contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunfang; Wu, Kaizhi; Li, Jing; Liu, Haijuan; Zhou, Qibing; Ding, Mingyue

    2014-03-01

    Nanoscale bubbles (nanobubbles) have been reported to improve contrast in tumor-targeted ultrasound imaging due to the enhanced permeation and retention effects at tumor vascular leaks. In this work, a self-made nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent was preliminarily characterized and evaluated in-vitro and in-vivo. Fundamental properties such as morphology appearance, size distribution, zeta potential, bubble concentration (bubble numbers per milliliter contrast agent suspension) and the stability of nanobubbles were assessed by light microscope and particle sizing analysis. Then the concentration intensity curve and time intensity curves (TICs) were acquired by ultrasound imaging experiment in-vitro. Finally, the contrast-enhanced ultrasonography was performed on rat to investigate the procedure of liver perfusion. The results showed that the nanobubbles had good shape and uniform distribution with the average diameter of 507.9 nm, polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.527, and zeta potential of -19.17 mV. Significant contrast enhancement was observed in in-vitro ultrasound imaging, demonstrating that the self-made nanobubbles can enhance the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging efficiently in-vitro. Slightly contrast enhancement was observed in in-vivo ultrasound imaging, indicating that the nanobubbles are not stable enough in-vivo. Future work will be focused on improving the ultrasonic imaging performance, stability, and antibody binding of the nanoscale ultrasound contrast agent.

  5. Insights from preliminary modeling and observational evaluation of a precipitating continental cumulus event observed during the MC3E field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechem, D. B.; Fish, C. S.; Giangrande, S. E.; Borque, P.; Kollias, P.

    2013-12-01

    A case of extensive precipitating cumulus congestus sampled during the MC3E field campaign is analyzed using a multi-sensor observational approach and numerical simulation. The ARM SGP (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Southern Great Plains) radar suite characterizes the evolving statistical behavior of the precipitating cloud system through distributions of reflectivity, horizontal divergence, and different measures of cloud geometry. Large-eddy simulation (LES) with size-resolved (bin) microphysics is employed to determine the forcings most important in producing the salient aspects of the cloud system captured in the radar observations. Specifically, we address how the characteristic spatial scale of the forcing imposed on the simulation influences the evolution of cloud system properties. Additionally, the importance of time-varying vs. steady-state large-scale forcing is evaluated in assessing the model's ability to capture the transient behavior of the cloud system sampled by the radar suite. The long-term goal of this effort is to promote cross-pollination between high-resolution cloud radar observations and LES.

  6. Biomimetic Precapillary Flow Patterns for Enhancing Blood Plasma Separation: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Namgung, Bumseok; Tan, Justin Kok Soon; Wong, Peter Agustinus; Park, Sung-Yong; Leo, Hwa Liang; Kim, Sangho

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a biomimetic microfluidic plasma separation device is discussed. The design of the device drew inspiration from in vivo observations of enhanced cell-free layer (CFL) formation downstream of vascular bifurcations. The working principle for the plasma separation was based on the plasma skimming effect in an arteriolar bifurcation, which is modulated by CFL formation. The enhancement of the CFL width was achieved by a local hematocrit reduction near the collection channel by creating an uneven hematocrit distribution at the bifurcation of the channel. The device demonstrated a high purity of separation (~99.9%) at physiological levels of hematocrit (~40%). PMID:27657090

  7. Motivational Enhancement Therapy for Adolescent Marijuana Users: A Preliminary Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Denise D.; Roffman, Roger A.; Stephens, Robert S.; Wakana, Kim; Berghuis, James

    2006-01-01

    This study's aims were (a) to investigate the feasibility of a school-based motivational enhancement therapy (MET) intervention in voluntarily attracting adolescents who smoke marijuana regularly but who are not seeking formal treatment and (b) to evaluate the efficacy of the intervention in reducing marijuana use. Ninety-seven adolescents who had…

  8. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) for the study of peripheral lung lesions: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Sperandeo, Marco; Sperandeo, Giuseppe; Varriale, Antonio; Filabozzi, Paola; Decuzzi, Marco; Dimitri, Lucia; Vendemiale, Gianluigi

    2006-10-01

    The use of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) for the study of peripheral lung lesions has never been systematically investigated. We evaluated the CEUS patterns of 98 peripheral lung lesions before performing US-guided fine-needle biopsies (FNB). The examinations were done with an Esaote Technos MPX scanner in the harmonic mode with a mechanical index of 0.04 or less. Contrast enhancement was achieved with a 4.8 mL bolus of SonoVue (Bracco) administered via an antecubital vein. All FNBs performed under CEUS guidance were adequate for pathologic diagnosis. Seventy-eight lesions were malignant: 33 (41.9%) were adenocarcinomas, 29 (36.5%) were squamous-cell carcinomas, 13 (17.6%) were undifferentiated large-cell carcinomas and the remaining three (4.1%) were small-cell carcinomas. All presented intralesional enhancement consistent with tumor neovascularization. In some cases, there were unenhanced areas consistent with zones of necrosis and these areas were avoided during FNB. The other 20 lesions were benign (four lipomas, two fibrous lung tumor, two noncaseous granulomas, six abscesses, one rheumatoid nodule, one histiocytosis X, one chondroid hamartoma, one sclerosing hemangioma, two sarcoid nodules) and none presented intralesional enhancement. This initial and admittedly limited experience suggests that CEUS may provide diagnostically useful information on peripheral lung lesions and increase the diagnostic yield of transthoracic FNB by reducing the risk of inadequate tissue sampling.

  9. Genomic Alterations Are Enhanced in Placentas from Pregnancies with Fetal Growth Restriction and Preeclampsia: Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Biron-Shental, Tal; Sharony, Reuven; Shtorch-Asor, Atalia; Keiser, Meirav; Sadeh-Mestechkin, Dana; Laish, Ido; Amiel, Aliza

    2016-01-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) secondary to placental insufficiency and preeclampsia (PE) are associated with substantially increased childhood and adult morbidity and mortality. The long-term outcomes are related to placental aberrations and intrauterine programming. Advances in microarray technology allow high-resolution, genome-wide evaluation for DNA copy number variations - deletions and duplications. The aim of our study was to demonstrate the usefulness of microarray testing in FGR placentas. Using Affymetrix GeneChip for chromosomal microarray (CMA), we analyzed 10 placentas from pregnancies with FGR attributed to placental insufficiency; 5 with FGR below the 5th percentile and 5 from the 5th to <10th percentiles. All fetuses had normal anomaly scans and karyotypes. We also analyzed 5 third-trimester placentas from pregnancies complicated by PE with severe features and 5 from PE without severe features, all with appropriately grown fetuses. The results were compared to 10 placentas from uncomplicated pregnancies with healthy neonates. CMA analysis identified more genomic alterations in FGR (p < 0.05) and in PE (p < 0.05) placentas than in healthy controls. There was a correlation to the severity of FGR and PE. The genomic alterations were below the resolution of normal karyotyping. The altered genes are related to adult human height, stress reactions and to cellular migration, differentiation and adhesion. Though very preliminary, our data support evaluating FGR and PE placentas using CMA. Larger data sets are needed for further evaluation of the findings and their clinical implications. PMID:27022328

  10. Preliminary Evidence for the Enhancement of Self-Conducted Exposures for OCD using Cognitive Bias Modification

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Nader; Kuckertz, Jennie M.; Najmi, Sadia; Conley, Sara L.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure and Response Prevention (ERP) is the most effective treatment for OCD but it is not accessible to most patients. Attempts to increase the accessibility of ERP via self-directed ERP (sERP) programs such as computerized delivery and bibliotherapy have met with noncompliance, presumably because patients find the exposure exercises unacceptable. Previous research suggests that Cognitive Bias Modification (CBM) interventions may help individuals approach feared situations. The goal of the current study was to test the efficacy of a treatment program for OCD that integrates sERP with CBM. Twenty-two individuals meeting diagnostic criteria for OCD enrolled in our 7-week treatment program. Results suggest that sERP with CBM led to significant reduction of OCD symptoms and functional impairment. Indeed, the magnitude of the effect of this novel treatment, that requires only an initial session with a clinician trained in ERP for OCD, was comparable to that of the gold standard clinician-administered ERP. Moreover, preliminary evidence suggests that CBM interventions targeting interpretation bias may be most effective, whereas those targeting attention and working memory bias may not be so. PMID:26366021

  11. Numerical and experimental study of local heat transfer enhancement in helically coiled pipes. Preliminary results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzoli, F.; Cattani, L.; Rainieri, S.; Zachár, A.

    2015-11-01

    In the last years, the attention of heat transfer equipments manufacturers turned toward helically coiled-tube heat exchangers, especially with regards to applications for viscous and/or particulate products. The recent progress achieved in numerical simulation motivated many research groups to develop numerical models for this kind of apparatuses. These models, intended both to improve the knowledge of the fundamental heat transfer mechanisms in curved geometries and to support the industrial design of this kind of apparatuses, are usually validated throughout the comparison with either theoretical or experimental evidences by considering average heat transfer performances. However, this approach doesn't guarantee that the validated models are able to reproduce local effects in details, which are so important in this kind of non-standard geometries. In the present paper a numerical model of convective heat transfer in coiled tubes for laminar flow regime was formulated and discussed. Its goodness was checked throughout the comparison with the latest experimental outcomes of Bozzoli et al. [1] in terms of convective heat flux distribution along the boundary of the duct, by ensuring the effectiveness of the model also in the description of local behaviours. Although the present paper reports only preliminary results of this simulation/validation process, it could be of interest for the research community because it proposes a novel approach that could be useful to validate many numerical models for nonstandard geometries.

  12. Monitoring radiation belt particle precipitation - automatic detection of enhanced transient ionisation in the lower plasmasphere using subionospheric narrow band VLF signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, P.; Lichtenberger, J.; Ferencz, Cs.

    2009-04-01

    Signals of naval VLF transmitters, propagating long distances along the Earth-ionosphere waveguide (EIWG) have been widely applied as effective tools for monitoring transient ionization at mesospheric altitudes. Perturbations in recorded amplitude and/or phase data series of stable frequency signals may refer to the effect of transient enhanced ionization in the EIWG, due to e.g. loss-cone precipitation of trapped energetic electrons (Carpenter et al., 1984, Dowden and Adams, 1990), burst of solar plasma particles (Clilverd et al., 2001). The contribution of precipitating particles are thought to be substantial in certain Sun-to-Earth energy flow processes in the upper atmosphere (Rodger et al., 2005). Narrow band VLF measuring network has been set up, developed and operated in Hungary, running in the last decade almost continuously, dedicated to monitor ionization enhancement regions along numerous transmitter-receiver paths. This setup is based on Omnipal and Ultra-MSK equipment, logging amplitude and phase data of received signals, sampled at frequencies of selected VLF transmitters. Signal trajectories, selected for recording represent proper configuration to survey transient ionization caused by energetic particles in the sub-polar region, such as effect of scattered particles of the inner radiation belt. Reprocessing of the mass archived recordings has been started using a newly developed signal processing code, detecting and classifying different sort of perturbations automatically on narrow band VLF series. Occurrence rates, daily and seasonal variation, statistics of transient ionization enhancements, their geographic distribution within the surveyed range and time period, and correlation with intense geomagnetic and/or Solar event is yielded by this analysis. References: Carpenter, D.L., Inan, U.S., Trimpi, M.L., Helliwell, R.A., and Katsufrakis, J.P.: Perturbations of subionospheric LF and MF signals due to whistler-induced electron precipitation burst

  13. Promising dissolution enhancement effect of soluplus on crystallized celecoxib obtained through antisolvent precipitation and high pressure homogenization techniques.

    PubMed

    Homayouni, Alireza; Sadeghi, Fatemeh; Varshosaz, Jaleh; Afrasiabi Garekani, Hadi; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2014-10-01

    Poor solubility and dissolution of hydrophobic drugs have become a major challenge in pharmaceutical development. Drug nanoparticles have been widely accepted to overcome this problem. The aim of this study was to manufacture celecoxib nanoparticles using antisolvent precipitation and high pressure homogenization techniques in the presence of varying concentrations of soluplus(®) as a hydrophilic stabilizer. Antisolvent crystallization followed by freeze drying (CRS-FD) and antisolvent crystallization followed by high pressure homogenization and freeze drying (HPH-FD) were used to obtain celecoxib nanoparticles. The obtained nanoparticles were analyzed in terms of particle size, saturation solubility, morphology (optical and scanning electron microscopy), solid state (DSC, XRPD and FT-IR) and dissolution behavior. The results showed that celecoxib nanoparticle can be obtained when soluplus was added to the crystallization medium. In addition, the results showed that the concentration of soluplus and the method used to prepare nanoparticles can control the size and dissolution of celecoxib. Samples obtained in the presence of 5% soluplus through HPH technique showed an excellent dissolution (90%) within 4min. It is interesting to note that celecoxib samples with high crystallinity showed better dissolution than those celecoxib samples with high amorphous content, although they had the same concentration of soluplus. DSC and XRPD proved that samples obtained via HPH technique are more crystalline than the samples obtained through only antisolvent crystallization technique. PMID:25124835

  14. Combined Observational and Modeling Efforts to Better Understand Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions Over Land: Preliminary Results from 7-SEAS/BASELInE 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftus, Adrian M.; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2015-01-01

    This talk presents some of the detailed observations of low-level stratocumulus over northern Vietnam during 7-SEASBASELInE 2013 by SMARTLabs' ACHIEVE W-band cloud radar and other remote sensing instruments. These observations are the first of their kind for this region and will aid in ongoing studies of biomass-burning aerosol impacts on local and regional weather and climate. Preliminary results from simulations using the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) with recently implemented triple-moment bulk microphysics to examine the sensitivity of low-level stratocumulus over land to aerosols are also presented. Recommendations for future observational activities in the 7-SEAS northern region in collaboration with international partners will also be discussed.

  15. Preliminary results with dye-enhanced selective laser sclerosis of venous varicosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libutti, Steven K.; Oz, Mehmet C.; Chuck, Roy S. H.; Auteri, Joseph S.; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Nowygrod, Roman; Treat, Michael R.

    1990-06-01

    Laser sclerosis (photosclerosis) of veins after injection of wavelength-specific dyes to enhance and localize energy absorption could provide a useful adjunct to current treatment options. To enhance the absorption of 808nm diode laser energy, ear veins of 18 rabbits were infused with 2-3cc of indocyanine green (maximum absorption 805nm) and exposed for 2 to 20 seconds. Animals were sacrificed between 0 and 28 days after operation. Discrete time intervals of laser exposure exist during which various sized vessels can be photosclerosed without significant thermal injury to the overlying tissue. The use of low power, diode lasers, in conjunction with wavelength-specific dyes, may provide a simple, effective, and cosmetically appealling alternative to current treatment options for superficial varicosities of the extremities.

  16. Evaluation of the thrombus of abdominal aortic aneurysms using contrast enhanced ultrasound - preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Łukasiewicz, Adam; Garkowski, Adam; Rutka, Katarzyna; Janica, Jacek; Łebkowska, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    It is hypothesized that the degree of vascularization of the thrombus may have a significant impact on the rupture of aortic aneurysms. The presence of neovascularization of the vessel wall and mural thrombus has been confirmed only in histopathological studies. However, no non-invasive imaging technique of qualitative assessment of thrombus and neovascularization has been implemented so far. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has been proposed as a feasible and minimally invasive technique for in vivo visualization of neovascularization in the evaluation of tumors and atherosclerotic plaques. The aim of this study was the evaluation of mural thrombus and AAAs wall with CEUS. CEUS was performed in a group of seventeen patients with AAAs. The mural thrombus enhancement was recognized in 12 cases, yet no significant correlation between the degree of contrast enhancement and AAAs diameter, thrombus width, and thrombus echogenicity was found. We observed a rise in AAAs thrombus heterogeneity with the increase in the aneurysm diameter (r = 0.62, p = 0.017). In conclusion CEUS can visualize small channels within AAAs thrombus, which could be a result of an ongoing angiogenesis. There is a need for further research to find out whether the degree of vascularization of the thrombus may have a significant impact on the rupture of aneurysms. PMID:27677245

  17. Evaluation of the thrombus of abdominal aortic aneurysms using contrast enhanced ultrasound - preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łukasiewicz, Adam; Garkowski, Adam; Rutka, Katarzyna; Janica, Jacek; Łebkowska, Urszula

    2016-09-01

    It is hypothesized that the degree of vascularization of the thrombus may have a significant impact on the rupture of aortic aneurysms. The presence of neovascularization of the vessel wall and mural thrombus has been confirmed only in histopathological studies. However, no non-invasive imaging technique of qualitative assessment of thrombus and neovascularization has been implemented so far. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has been proposed as a feasible and minimally invasive technique for in vivo visualization of neovascularization in the evaluation of tumors and atherosclerotic plaques. The aim of this study was the evaluation of mural thrombus and AAAs wall with CEUS. CEUS was performed in a group of seventeen patients with AAAs. The mural thrombus enhancement was recognized in 12 cases, yet no significant correlation between the degree of contrast enhancement and AAAs diameter, thrombus width, and thrombus echogenicity was found. We observed a rise in AAAs thrombus heterogeneity with the increase in the aneurysm diameter (r = 0.62, p = 0.017). In conclusion CEUS can visualize small channels within AAAs thrombus, which could be a result of an ongoing angiogenesis. There is a need for further research to find out whether the degree of vascularization of the thrombus may have a significant impact on the rupture of aneurysms.

  18. Polarity-enhanced gas-sensing performance of Au-loaded ZnO nanospindles synthesized via precipitation and microwave irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Lv, Tan; Zhao, Fang-Xian; Lian, Xiao-Xue; Zou, Yun-Ling; Wang, Qiong

    2016-05-01

    Loading noble metal and exploring suitable morphology to achieve excellent gas-sensing performance is very crucial for the fabrication of gas sensors. We have successfully synthesized Au-loaded ZnO (Au/ZnO) nanospindles (NSs) through a really facile procedure involving a precipitation and subsequent microwave irradiation. The as-prepared products have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM). The formation and gas-sensing mechanism of Au/ZnO NSs were discussed. The SEM micrographs revealed an interesting morphological evolution of the Au/ZnO NSs with Au-loading content ranging from 0 at. % to 7 at. %. The nanostructures were employed for gas-sensing measurement toward various gases. It indicated that the Au/ZnO NSs based sensor showed a highly enhanced response (226.81) to 400 ppm acetone gas at a relatively low working temperature (270°C), and exhibited a fast response (1 s) and recovery speed (10 s). The highly enhanced acetone gas sensitivity of Au/ZnO NSs based sensor could be attributed to its enhanced polarity owing to the peculiar morphology, Schottcky barriers, as well as catalytic effect of Au NPs. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Technical Report on Preliminary Methodology for Enhancing Risk Monitors with Integrated Equipment Condition Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Coles, Garill A.; Coble, Jamie B.; Hirt, Evelyn H.

    2013-09-17

    Small modular reactors (SMRs) generally include reactors with electric output of ~350 MWe or less (this cutoff varies somewhat but is substantially less than full-size plant output of 700 MWe or more). Advanced SMRs (AdvSMRs) refer to a specific class of SMRs and are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts. AdvSMRs may provide a longer-term alternative to traditional light-water reactors (LWRs) and SMRs based on integral pressurized water reactor concepts currently being considered. Enhancing affordability of AdvSMRs will be critical to ensuring wider deployment. AdvSMRs suffer from loss of economies of scale inherent in small reactors when compared to large (~greater than 600 MWe output) reactors. Some of this loss can be recovered through reduced capital costs through smaller size, fewer components, modular fabrication processes, and the opportunity for modular construction. However, the controllable day-to-day costs of AdvSMRs will be dominated by operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Technologies that help characterize real-time risk are important for controlling O&M costs. Risk monitors are used in current nuclear power plants to provide a point-in-time estimate of the system risk given the current plant configuration (e.g., equipment availability, operational regime, and environmental conditions). However, current risk monitors are unable to support the capability requirements listed above as they do not take into account plant-specific normal, abnormal, and deteriorating states of active components and systems. This report documents technology developments that are a step towards enhancing risk monitors that, if integrated with supervisory plant control systems, can provide the capability requirements listed and meet the goals of controlling O&M costs. The report describes research results from an initial methodology for enhanced risk monitors by integrating real-time information about equipment condition and POF into risk monitors.

  20. Cyclic Dipeptide Shuttles as a Novel Skin Penetration Enhancement Approach: Preliminary Evaluation with Diclofenac

    PubMed Central

    Namjoshi, Sarika; Giralt, Ernest; Benson, Heather

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates the effectiveness of a peptide shuttle in delivering diclofenac into and through human epidermis. Diclofenac was conjugated to a novel phenylalanyl-N-methyl-naphthalenylalanine-derived diketopiperazine (DKP) shuttle and to TAT (a classical cell penetrating peptide), and topically applied to human epidermis in vitro. DKP and TAT effectively permeated into and through human epidermis. When conjugated to diclofenac, both DKP and TAT enhanced delivery into and through human epidermis, though DKP was significantly more effective. Penetration of diclofenac through human epidermis (to receptor) was increased by conjugation to the peptide shuttle and cell penetrating peptide with enhancement of 6x by DKP-diclofenac and 3x by TAT-diclofenac. In addition, the amount of diclofenac retained within the epidermis was significantly increased by peptide conjugation. COX-2 inhibition activity of diclofenac was retained when conjugated to DKP. Our study suggests that the peptide shuttle approach may offer a new strategy for targeted delivery of small therapeutic and diagnostic molecules to the skin. PMID:27548780

  1. Cyclic Dipeptide Shuttles as a Novel Skin Penetration Enhancement Approach: Preliminary Evaluation with Diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Yousuf; Teixidó, Meritxell; Namjoshi, Sarika; Giralt, Ernest; Benson, Heather

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates the effectiveness of a peptide shuttle in delivering diclofenac into and through human epidermis. Diclofenac was conjugated to a novel phenylalanyl-N-methyl-naphthalenylalanine-derived diketopiperazine (DKP) shuttle and to TAT (a classical cell penetrating peptide), and topically applied to human epidermis in vitro. DKP and TAT effectively permeated into and through human epidermis. When conjugated to diclofenac, both DKP and TAT enhanced delivery into and through human epidermis, though DKP was significantly more effective. Penetration of diclofenac through human epidermis (to receptor) was increased by conjugation to the peptide shuttle and cell penetrating peptide with enhancement of 6x by DKP-diclofenac and 3x by TAT-diclofenac. In addition, the amount of diclofenac retained within the epidermis was significantly increased by peptide conjugation. COX-2 inhibition activity of diclofenac was retained when conjugated to DKP. Our study suggests that the peptide shuttle approach may offer a new strategy for targeted delivery of small therapeutic and diagnostic molecules to the skin. PMID:27548780

  2. The UAE Rainfall Enhancement Assessment Program: Implications of Thermodynamic Profiles on the Development of Precipitation in Convective Clouds over the Oman Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breed, D.; Bruintjes, R.; Jensen, T.; Salazar, V.; Fowler, T.

    2005-12-01

    During the winter and summer seasons of 2001 and 2002, data were collected to assess the efficacy of cloud seeding to enhance precipitation in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The results of the feasibility study concluded: 1) that winter clouds in the UAE rarely produced conditions amenable to hygroscopic cloud seeding; 2) that summer convective clouds developed often enough, particularly over the Oman Mountains (e.g., the Hajar Mountains along the eastern UAE border and into Oman) to justify a randomized seeding experiment; 3) that collecting quantitative radar observations continues to be a complex but essential part of evaluating a cloud seeding experiment; 4) that successful flight operations would require solving several logistical issues; and 5) that several scientific questions would need to be studied in order to fully evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of hygroscopic cloud seeding, including cloud physical responses, radar-derived rainfall estimates as related to rainfall at the ground, and hydrological impacts. Based on these results, the UAE program proceeded through the design and implemention of a randomized hygroscopic cloud seeding experiment during the summer seasons to statistically quantify the potential for cloud seeding to enhance rainfall, specifically over the UAE and Oman Mountains, while collecting concurrent and separate physical measurements to support the statistical results and provide substantiation for the physical hypothesis. The randomized seeding experiment was carried out over the summers of 2003 and 2004, and a total of 134 cases were treated over the two summer seasons, of which 96 met the analysis criteria established in the experimental design of the program. The statistical evaluation of these cases yielded largely inconclusive results. Evidence will show that the thermodynamic profile had a large influence on storm characteristics and on precipitation development. This in turn provided a confounding factor in the conduct

  3. Enhanced Contaminated Human Remains Pouch: initial development and preliminary performance assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Iseli, A.M.; Kwen, H.D.; Ul-Alam, M.; Balasubramanian, M.; Rajagopalan, S.

    2011-11-07

    The objective is to produce a proof of concept prototype Enhanced Contaminated Human Remains Pouch (ECHRP) with self-decontamination capability to provide increased protection to emergency response personnel. The key objective was to decrease the concentration of toxic chemicals through the use of an absorbent and reactive nanocellulose liner. Additionally, nanomaterials with biocidal properties were developed and tested as a 'stand-alone' treatment. The setting was a private company research laboratory. The main outcome measures were production of a functional prototype. A functional prototype capable of mitigating the threats due to sulfur mustard, Soman, and a large variety of liquid and vapor toxic industrial chemicals was produced. Stand-alone biocidal treatment efficacy was validated. The ECHRP provides superior protection from both chemical and biological hazards to various emergency response personnel and human remains handlers.

  4. Precipitation Recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.; Bras, Rafael L.

    1996-01-01

    The water cycle regulates and reflects natural variability in climate at the regional and global scales. Large-scale human activities that involve changes in land cover, such as tropical deforestation, are likely to modify climate through changes in the water cycle. In order to understand, and hopefully be able to predict, the extent of these potential global and regional changes, we need first to understand how the water cycle works. In the past, most of the research in hydrology focused on the land branch of the water cycle, with little attention given to the atmospheric branch. The study of precipitation recycling which is defined as the contribution of local evaporation to local precipitation, aims at understanding hydrologic processes in the atmospheric branch of the water cycle. Simply stated, any study on precipitation recycling is about how the atmospheric branch of the water cycle works, namely, what happens to water vapor molecules after they evaporate from the surface, and where will they precipitate?

  5. STRONTIUM PRECIPITATION

    DOEpatents

    McKenzie, T.R.

    1960-09-13

    A process is given for improving the precipitation of strontium from an aqueous phosphoric-acid-containing solution with nickel or cobalt ferrocyanide by simultaneously precipitating strontium or calcium phosphate. This is accomplished by adding to the ferrocyanide-containing solution calcium or strontium nitrate in a quantity to yield a concentration of from 0.004 to 0.03 and adjusting the pH of the solution to a value of above 8.

  6. Novel spinal instrumentation to enhance osteogenesis and fusion: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    MacEwan, Matthew R; Talcott, Michael R; Moran, Daniel W; Leuthardt, Eric C

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Instrumented spinal fusion continues to exhibit high failure rates in patients undergoing multilevel lumbar fusion or pseudarthrosis revision; with Grade II or higher spondylolisthesis; or in those possessing risk factors such as obesity, tobacco use, or metabolic disorders. Direct current (DC) electrical stimulation of bone growth represents a unique surgical adjunct in vertebral fusion procedures, yet existing spinal fusion stimulators are not optimized to enhance interbody fusion. To develop an advanced method of applying DC electrical stimulation to promote interbody fusion, a novel osteogenic spinal system capable of routing DC through rigid instrumentation and into the vertebral bodies was fabricated. A pilot study was designed to assess the feasibility of osteogenic instrumentation and compare the ability of osteogenic instrumentation to promote successful interbody fusion in vivo to standard spinal instrumentation with autograft. METHODS Instrumented, single-level, posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with autologous graft was performed at L4-5 in adult Toggenburg/Alpine goats, using both osteogenic spinal instrumentation (plus electrical stimulation) and standard spinal instrumentation (no electrical stimulation). At terminal time points (3 months, 6 months), animals were killed and lumbar spines were explanted for radiographic analysis using a SOMATOM Dual Source Definition CT Scanner and high-resolution Microcat II CT Scanner. Trabecular continuity, radiodensity within the fusion mass, and regional bone formation were examined to determine successful spinal fusion. RESULTS Quantitative analysis of average bone density in pedicle screw beds confirmed that electroactive pedicle screws used in the osteogenic spinal system focally enhanced bone density in instrumented vertebral bodies. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of high-resolution CT scans of explanted lumbar spines further demonstrated that the osteogenic spinal system induced solid

  7. Therapeutic evaluation of sorafenib for hepatocellular carcinoma using contrast-enhanced ultrasonography: Preliminary result

    PubMed Central

    SHIOZAWA, KAZUE; WATANABE, MANABU; IKEHARA, TAKASHI; KOGAME, MICHIO; KIKUCHI, YOSHINORI; IGARASHI, YOSHINORI; SUMINO, YASUKIYO

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the usefulness of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) with Sonazoid in evaluating the therapeutic response to sorafenib for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In total, 26 patients with advanced HCC who received sorafenib and were followed up by CEUS were enrolled in the present study. CEUS was performed prior to and within 2–4 weeks of treatment, and the images of the target lesion in the post-vascular phase with a re-injection method were analyzed. The presence (+) or absence (−) of intratumoral necrosis and the intratumoral vascular architecture on micro-flow imaging (MFI) were compared prior to and subsequent to treatment. Target lesions that exhibited non-enhancement after re-injection were considered to indicate intratumoral necrosis. The intratumoral vascular architecture was classified into three groups, as follows: Vd, the intratumoral vessels visually narrowed or decreased; Vnc, the vessels remained unchanged; and Vi, the vessels were thickened or increased. Survival curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log rank test between the intratumoral necrosis (+) and (−) groups, and among the Vd, Vnc and Vi groups. P<0.05 was considered to indicate a statistically significant difference. The number of patients in the intratumoral necrosis (+) and (−) groups was 8 and 18 patients, respectively, and the median survival time (MST) was 7.2 months [95% confidence interval (CI), 2.2–12.2] and 9.5 months (95% CI, 5.1–13.8), respectively (P=0.44). The MFI findings were observed in 11 patients in the Vd group, 10 patients in the Vnc group and 5 patients in the Vi group. The MSTs in the Vd, Vnc and Vi groups were 15.6 months (95% CI, 5.0–23.3), 11.0 months (95% CI, 3.5–17.6) and 3.6 months (95% CI: 1.2–6.0), respectively. The P-value for the differences between the Vd and Vnc groups, Vd and Vi groups, and Vnc and Vi groups were 0.78, 0.016 and 0.047, respectively, which indicated

  8. Simulations with CAO-3D model of photochemical response caused by precipitating electrons and solar protons at both polar regions during geomagnetic storms in October-November 2003 (preliminary comparison with MIPAS data)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivolutsky, Alexei A.; Banin, Max; Maik Wissing, Jan; Vyushkova, Tatyana

    Relativistic electrons precipitating from radiation belts and solar protons can penetrate below 100 km into the polar atmosphere sometimes reaching the stratospheric levels wasting its energy and causing the ionization. It leads to additional production of NOx and HOx chemical com-pounds which destroy ozone in the chemical catalytic cycles. One of the strongest geomagnetic storms accompained by a strong Solar Proton Eevent (SPE) occured in October-November 2003. This period was covered also by observations with MIPAS instrument placed on board of ENVISAT satellite. The response of atmospheric chemical composition in both polar regions was studied with CAO-3D photochemical-transport model. In order to calculate ionization rates induced by precipitating electrons and solar protons during late October and November 2003, corresponding proton and electron fluxes in different energetic channels from GOES-10 and POES-15/16 have been used. The Atmospheric Ionization Module Osnabruck -AIMOS /Wissing and Kallenrode, 2009/ was used to calculate 3D fields of ionization rates separately by electrons and protons. Photochemical simulations showed that Northern and Southern po-lar regions had different photochemical response. Such difference mostly is the result of the two factors: polar cap expansion during the geomagnetic storm and the effect of horizontal transport. The calculated members of NOy, HOx, Cly families were preliminary compared with corresponding observed data measured by MIPAS and showed a general agreement. The sensitivity of calculated chemical response to the efficiencies of NOx and HOx production by en-ergetic particles have been studied also. This work was supported by Russian Science Foudation for Basic Research (grant 09-05-009949) and by contract 1-6-08 under Russian Sub-Program "Reseach and Investigation of Antarctica".

  9. Enhanced Colloidal Stability of CeO2 Nanoparticles by Ferrous Ions: Adsorption, Redox Reaction, and Surface Precipitation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuyang; Ray, Jessica R; Neil, Chelsea W; Li, Qingyun; Jun, Young-Shin

    2015-05-01

    Due to the toxicity of cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles (NPs), a better understanding of the redox reaction-induced surface property changes of CeO2 NPs and their transport in natural and engineered aqueous systems is needed. This study investigates the impact of redox reactions with ferrous ions (Fe2+) on the colloidal stability of CeO2 NPs. We demonstrated that under anaerobic conditions, suspended CeO2 NPs in a 3 mM FeCl2 solution at pH 4.8 were much more stable against sedimentation than those in the absence of Fe2+. Redox reactions between CeO2 NPs and Fe2+ lead to the formation of 6-line ferrihydrite on the CeO2 surfaces, which enhanced the colloidal stability by increasing the zeta potential and hydrophilicity of CeO2 NPs. These redox reactions can affect the toxicity of CeO2 NPs by increasing cerium dissolution, and by creating new Fe(III) (hydr)oxide reactive surface layers. Thus, these findings have significant implications for elucidating the phase transformation and transport of redox reactive NPs in the environment.

  10. Feasibility and usefulness of using swallow contrast-enhanced ultrasound to diagnose Zenker's diverticulum: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xin-Wu; Ignee, Andre; Baum, Ulrich; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2015-04-01

    Zenker's diverticulum (ZD) may be misdiagnosed on conventional ultrasound as a thyroid nodule or other lesion. A barium esophagram is usually used to confirm the diagnosis; however, this procedure exposes the patient to radiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using swallow contrast-enhanced ultrasound (swallow-CEUS) to diagnose ZD. Ten consecutive patients with ZD (7 men and 3 women, aged 67 ± 11 y) were included in the study. In 4 patients, ZD was incidentally found on head and neck ultrasound, and in 6 patients, ZD was suspected because of dysphagia. All lesions could be detected on conventional ultrasound before swallow-CEUS. Ten healthy volunteers (8 men and 2 women, aged 60 ± 12 y) were chosen as a control group. Written informed consent was obtained. With the patient in the sitting or upright position, conventional ultrasound was performed first to image the lesion, then the patient was asked to swallow ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) (2-4 drops of SonoVue diluted with about 200 mL of tap water). Transity of the contrast agent in the esophagus was imaged with CEUS. Retention of the UCA in the diverticulum was monitored for at least 3 min. All patients underwent a barium esophagram as the gold standard. Swallow-CEUS revealed that in all patients (100%), the UCA was transported from the pharynx to the esophagus while the patient swallowed. ZD appeared as a pouch-shaped structure at the posterior pharyngo-esophageal junction that retained UCA longer than 3 min. The barium esophagram confirmed the diagnosis of ZD in all patients. For the 10 volunteers, no abnormal structure (retaining UCA) was detected during or after swallowing of UCA. With the advantages of no radiation and bedside availability, swallow-CEUS may become a method of choice in confirmation of the diagnosis of ZD, especially when ZD is suspected on conventional ultrasound.

  11. A preliminary engineering design of intravascular dual-frequency transducers for contrast-enhanced acoustic angiography and molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianguo; Martin, K; Dayton, Paul A; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2014-05-01

    Current intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) probes are not optimized for contrast detection because of their design for high-frequency fundamental-mode imaging. However, data from transcutaneous contrast imaging suggests the possibility of utilizing contrast ultrasound for molecular imaging or vasa vasorum assessment to further elucidate atherosclerotic plaque deposition. This paper presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a small-aperture (0.6 × 3 mm) IVUS probe optimized for high-frequency contrast imaging. The design utilizes a dual-frequency (6.5 MHz/30 MHz) transducer arrangement for exciting microbubbles at low frequencies (near their resonance) and detecting their broadband harmonics at high frequencies, minimizing detected tissue backscatter. The prototype probe is able to generate nonlinear microbubble response with more than 1.2 MPa of rarefractional pressure (mechanical index: 0.48) at 6.5 MHz, and is also able to detect microbubble response with a broadband receiving element (center frequency: 30 MHz, -6-dB fractional bandwidth: 58.6%). Nonlinear super-harmonics from microbubbles flowing through a 200-μm-diameter micro-tube were clearly detected with a signal-to-noise ratio higher than 12 dB. Preliminary phantom imaging at the fundamental frequency (30 MHz) and dual-frequency super-harmonic imaging results suggest the promise of small aperture, dual-frequency IVUS transducers for contrast-enhanced IVUS imaging. PMID:24801226

  12. A Preliminary Engineering Design of Intravascular Dual-Frequency Transducers for Contrast-Enhanced Acoustic Angiography and Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianguo; Martin, K. Heath; Dayton, Paul A.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2014-01-01

    Current intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) probes are not optimized for contrast detection because of their design for high-frequency fundamental-mode imaging. However, data from transcutaneous contrast imaging suggests the possibility of utilizing contrast ultrasound for molecular imaging or vasa vasorum assessment to further elucidate atherosclerotic plaque deposition. This paper presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a small-aperture (0.6 × 3 mm) IVUS probe optimized for high-frequency contrast imaging. The design utilizes a dual-frequency (6.5 MHz/30 MHz) transducer arrangement for exciting microbubbles at low frequencies (near their resonance) and detecting their broadband harmonics at high frequencies, minimizing detected tissue backscatter. The prototype probe is able to generate nonlinear microbubble response with more than 1.2 MPa of rarefractional pressure (mechanical index: 0.48) at 6.5 MHz, and is also able to detect microbubble response with a broadband receiving element (center frequency: 30 MHz, −6-dB fractional bandwidth: 58.6%). Nonlinear super-harmonics from microbubbles flowing through a 200-μm-diameter micro-tube were clearly detected with a signal-to-noise ratio higher than 12 dB. Preliminary phantom imaging at the fundamental frequency (30 MHz) and dual-frequency super-harmonic imaging results suggest the promise of small aperture, dual-frequency IVUS transducers for contrast-enhanced IVUS imaging. PMID:24801226

  13. Antisolvent precipitation technique: A very promising approach to crystallize curcumin in presence of polyvinyl pyrrolidon for solubility and dissolution enhancement.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Fatemeh; Ashofteh, Mohammad; Homayouni, Alireza; Abbaspour, Mohammadreza; Nokhodchi, Ali; Garekani, Hadi Afrasiabi

    2016-11-01

    Curcumin with a vast number of pharmacological activities is a poorly water soluble drug which its oral bioavailability is profoundly limited by its dissolution or solubility in GI tract. Curcumin could be a good anticancer drug if its solubility could be increased. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to increase the dissolution rate of curcumin by employing antisolvent crystallization technique and to investigate the effect of polyvinyl pyrrolidone K30 (PVP) as colloidal particles in crystallization medium on resultant particles. Curcumin was crystalized in the presence of different amounts of PVP by antisolvent crystallization method and their physical mixtures were prepared for comparison purposes. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The solubility and dissolution of the treated and untreated curcumin were also determined. Antisolvent crystallization of curcumin led to the formation of particles with no definite geometric shape. It was interesting to note that the DSC and XRPD studies indicated the formation of a new polymorph and less crystallinity for particles crystallized in the absence of PVP. However, the crystallized curcumin in the presence of PVP was completely amorphous. All crystalized curcumin samples showed much higher dissolution rate compared to untreated curcumin. The amount of curcumin dissolved within 10 for treated curcumin in the presence of PVP (1:1 curcumin:PVP) was 7 times higher than untreated curcumin and this enhancement in the dissolution for curcumin samples crystallized in the absence of PVP was around 5 times. Overall' the results of this study showed that antisolvent crystallization method in the absence or presence of small amounts of PVP is very efficient in increasing the dissolution rate of curcumin to achieve better efficiency for curcumin. PMID:27518458

  14. Precipitation Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDuffie, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Although weather, including its role in the water cycle, is included in most elementary science programs, any further examination of raindrops and snowflakes is rare. Together rain and snow make up most of the precipitation that replenishes Earth's life-sustaining fresh water supply. When viewed individually, raindrops and snowflakes are quite…

  15. Enhanced UVB emission and analysis of chemical states of Ca5(PO4)3OH:Gd3+,Pr3+ phosphor prepared by co-precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokoena, P. P.; Nagpure, I. M.; Kumar, Vinay; Kroon, R. E.; Olivier, E. J.; Neethling, J. H.; Swart, H. C.; Ntwaeaborwa, O. M.

    2014-08-01

    Hydroxyapatite (Ca5(PO4)3OH) is a well-known bioceramic material used in medical applications because of its ability to form direct chemical bonds with living tissues. This mineral is currently used as a host for rare-earth ions (e.g. Gd3+, Pr3+, Tb3+, etc.) to prepare phosphors that can be used in light emitting devices of different types. In this study Ca5(PO4)3OH:Gd3+,Pr3+ phosphors were prepared by the co-precipitation method and were characterised by x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The x-ray diffraction pattern was consistent with the hexagonal phase of Ca5(PO4)3OH referenced in JCPDS card number 73-0293. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data indicated that Ca2+ occupied two different lattice sites, referred to as Ca1 and Ca2. The photoluminescence data exhibited a narrowband emission located at 313 nm, which is associated with the 6P7/2→8S7/2 transition of the Gd3+ ion. This emission is classified as ultraviolet B and it is suitable for use in phototherapy lamps to treat various skin diseases. The photoluminescence intensity of the 313 nm emission was enhanced considerably by Pr3+ co-doping.

  16. Controllable synthesis of spinel lithium nickel manganese oxide cathode material with enhanced electrochemical performances through a modified oxalate co-precipitation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongmei; Zhu, Guobin; Zhang, Li; Qu, Qunting; Shen, Ming; Zheng, Honghe

    2015-01-01

    A spinel lithium nickel manganese oxide (LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4) cathode material is synthesized with a modified oxalate co-precipitation method by controlling pH value of the precursor solution and introducing excessive Li source in the precursor. All the samples synthesized through this method are of Fd3m phase with a small amount of P4332 phase. It is found that pH value of the precursor solution considerably affects the morphology, stoichiometry and crystallographic structure of the target material, thereby resulting in different amounts of Mn3+ (i.e., different degree of disorder). 5% excessive Li source in the precursor may compensate for the lithium loss during the high-temperature sintering process and eliminate the LixNi1-xO impurity phase. Under the optimized synthesis conditions, the obtained high-purity LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel exhibits enhanced electrochemical performances. A reversible capacity of ca. 140 mAh g-1 can be delivered at 0.1C and the electrode retains 106 mAh g-1 at 10C rate. When cycled at 0.2C, a capacity retention of more than 98% is obtained in the initial 50 electrochemical cycles.

  17. The effect of polymer-surfactant interaction on the rheological properties of surfactant enhanced alkaline flooding formulations. [Phase separation, precipitation and viscosity loss

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

    1993-02-01

    Surfactant-enhanced, lower pH (weak) alkaline chemicals are effective for mobilizing residual oil. Polymer is used for mobility control because if mobility control is lost, then oil recovery is reduced. The ability to maintain mobility control during surfactant-alkaline flooding can be adversely affected by chemical interaction. In this work, interaction between polymers and surfactants was shown to be affected by pH, ionic strength, crude oil, and the properties of the polymers and surfactants. Polymer-surfactant interaction (phase separation, precipitation, and viscosity loss) occurred between most of the polymers and surfactants that were tested. Polymer-surfactant interaction is difficult to eliminate, and no method was found for completely eliminating interaction. Polymer-surfactant interaction occurred at optimal salinity and below optimal salinity. Polymer-surfactant interaction had an adverse effect on polymer rheology; however, the adverse effect of interaction on polymer rheology was lessened when oil was present. Increasing the pH of chemical systems further reduced the adverse effects of interaction on polymer rheology.

  18. Potential impacts of dust on precipitation in the Colorado River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, V.; Cotton, W. R.; Carrio, G. G.

    2013-12-01

    The SW United States has huge demands on water resources. Colorado River Basin (CRB) is potentially affected by aerosol pollution and dust acting as cloud-nucleating aerosol as well as impacting snowpack albedo. Dust can affect precipitation processes. Considering that the basis behind cloud seeding is to enhance precipitation by enhancing IN concentrations we anticipate that dust serving as IN will enhance precipitation in wintertime orographic clouds. Dust serving as GCCN should enhance precipitation, thus support the activity of IN. Dust functioning as CCN will work in opposition to its activity as GCCN and IN and suppress precipitation. We anticipate that this would be the case for wintertime orographic clouds as well. We intend to examine the combined effects of dust serving as IN, GCCN, and CCN on precipitation and on water resources in the CRB for the period of Oct to Apr from 2005-2008. Dust will be initialized from the GEOS-chem model for the shorter runs. For the entire seasonal runs for the four years the GEOS-chem would be nudged to obtain the dust fields. The Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modeling System version 6.0 is used for the simulation. The 32km North American Regional Reanalysis is used for model initialization. RAMS spec: (Grid1=36 km, 85×75 points, Grid 3=3 km; 146×150 points, 45 stretch levels, 75 m at surface to 800 m aloft, Two-moment bin-emulating microphysics, DeMott et al., 2010, heterogeneous ice nucleation). Preliminary results correspond to two 48-hour periods, (Apr 12 and Apr 29 2005) in the San Juan region in the Rocky Mountains. Dust serving as CCN acts to enhance ice particle riming along with dust acting as GCCN, and since dust enhances IN, total precipitation is enhanced in a dustier atmosphere.

  19. The spatial distribution of precipitation frequency for atmospheric river storms in Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuter, S. E.; Kingsmill, D.; White, C.; Wilbanks, M.; Hardin, N.; Cunningham, J.

    2011-12-01

    A key missing piece on the role of atmospheric rivers (ARs ) in flooding events in California is knowledge of the detailed spatial distribution of precipitation over the slopes of the Coastal Range and Sierra Nevada. Existing rain gauges provide incomplete information on precipitation in this region, particularly over rugged mountainous terrain. We utilize operational radar data from National Weather Service WSR-88D radars at six locations in California and Nevada to determine the spatial distribution of precipitation frequency for selected AR events. Preliminary results suggest that the southerly moisture transport by the Sierra Barrier Jet becomes more southeasterly toward the north end of the Sacramento Valley and enhances precipitation in the lee of the Coastal Range.

  20. Electrostatic precipitator with precipitator electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Junkers, G.

    1980-12-16

    The invention relates to an electrostatic precipitator with collecting electrodes which are arranged in rows adjacent to each other and in respective pairs at equal distances from a respective discharge electrode with which they cooperate. Spring elements are provided between the collecting electrodes and influence the stiffness and oscillating properties of the array of the collecting electrodes.

  1. Acidic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    At the International Symposium on Acidic Precipitation, over 400 papers were presented, and nearly 200 of them are included here. They provide an overview of the present state of the art of acid rain research. The Conference focused on atmospheric science (monitoring, source-receptor relationships), aquatic effects (marine eutrophication, lake acidification, impacts on plant and fish populations), and terrestrial effects (forest decline, soil acidification, etc.).

  2. Precipitation hardening austenitic superalloys

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1985-01-01

    Precipitation hardening, austenitic type superalloys are described. These alloys contain 0.5 to 1.5 weight percent silicon in combination with about 0.05 to 0.5 weight percent of a post irradiation ductility enhancing agent selected from the group of hafnium, yttrium, lanthanum and scandium, alone or in combination with each other. In addition, when hafnium or yttrium are selected, reductions in irradiation induced swelling have been noted.

  3. Electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, T.

    1982-08-03

    An electrostatic precipitator comprising a plurality of flat plate dust-collecting electrodes, arranged in substantially equally spaced and parallel relationship with one another and each having a discharge electrode, or electrodes, on and along the edge of one side thereof with the discharge electrodes of the adjacent dust-collecting electrodes alternately facing in opposite directions; the edges having the discharge electrodes are arranged in a setback relation by some distance in relation to the nearby edges of the adjacent dust-collecting plates, where no discharge electrodes are provided, so that uniform and nonuniform electric fields may be produced.

  4. The Global Precipitation Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Scott; Kummerow, Christian

    2000-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Mission (GPM), expected to begin around 2006, is a follow-up to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Unlike TRMM, which primarily samples the tropics, GPM will sample both the tropics and mid-latitudes. The primary, or core, satellite will be a single, enhanced TRMM satellite that can quantify the 3-D spatial distributions of precipitation and its associated latent heat release. The core satellite will be complemented by a constellation of very small and inexpensive drones with passive microwave instruments that will sample the rainfall with sufficient frequency to be not only of climate interest, but also have local, short-term impacts by providing global rainfall coverage at approx. 3 h intervals. The data is expected to have substantial impact upon quantitative precipitation estimation/forecasting and data assimilation into global and mesoscale numerical models. Based upon previous studies of rainfall data assimilation, GPM is expected to lead to significant improvements in forecasts of extratropical and tropical cyclones. For example, GPM rainfall data can provide improved initialization of frontal systems over the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. The purpose of this talk is to provide information about GPM to the USWRP (U.S. Weather Research Program) community and to discuss impacts on quantitative precipitation estimation/forecasting and data assimilation.

  5. Precipitation Indices Low Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Engelen, A. F. V.; Ynsen, F.; Buisman, J.; van der Schrier, G.

    2009-09-01

    Since 1995, KNMI published a series of books(1), presenting an annual reconstruction of weather and climate in the Low Countries, covering the period AD 763-present, or roughly, the last millennium. The reconstructions are based on the interpretation of documentary sources predominantly and comparison with other proxies and instrumental observations. The series also comprises a number of classifications. Amongst them annual classifications for winter and summer temperature and for winter and summer dryness-wetness. The classification of temperature have been reworked into peer reviewed (2) series (AD 1000-present) of seasonal temperatures and temperature indices, the so called LCT (Low Countries Temperature) series, now incorporated in the Millennium databases. Recently we started a study to convert the dryness-wetness classifications into a series of precipitation; the so called LCP (Low Countries Precipitation) series. A brief outline is given here of the applied methodology and preliminary results. The WMO definition for meteorological drought has been followed being that a period is called wet respectively dry when the amount of precipitation is considerable more respectively less than usual (normal). To gain a more quantitative insight for four locations, geographically spread over the Low Countries area (De Bilt, Vlissingen, Maastricht and Uccle), we analysed the statistics of daily precipitation series, covering the period 1900-present. This brought us to the following definition, valid for the Low Countries: A period is considered as (very) dry respectively (very) wet if over a continuous period of at least 60 days (~two months) cq 90 days (~three months) on at least two out of the four locations 50% less resp. 50% more than the normal amount for the location (based on the 1961-1990 normal period) has been measured. This results into the following classification into five drought classes hat could be applied to non instrumental observations: Very wet period

  6. Creep Behavior and Degradation of Subgrain Structures Pinned by Nanoscale Precipitates in Strength-Enhanced 5 to 12 Pct Cr Ferritic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassemi Armaki, Hassan; Chen, Ruiping; Maruyama, Kouichi; Igarashi, Masaaki

    2011-10-01

    Creep behavior and degradation of subgrain structures and precipitates of Gr. 122 type xCr-2W-0.4Mo-1Cu-VNb ( x = 5, 7, 9, 10.5, and 12 pct) steels were evaluated during short-term and long-term static aging and creep with regard to the Cr content of steel. Creep rupture life increased from 5 to 12 pct Cr in the short-term creep region, whereas in the long-term creep region, it increased up to 9 pct Cr and then decreased with the addition of Cr from 9 to 12 pct. Behavior of creep rupture life was attributed to the size of elongated subgrains. In the short-term creep region, subgrain size decreased from 5 to 12 pct Cr, corresponding to the longer creep strength. However, in the long-term creep region after 104 hours, subgrain size increased up to 9 pct Cr and then decreased from 9 to 12 pct, corresponding to the behavior of creep rupture life. M23C6 and MX precipitates had the highest number fraction among all of the precipitates present in the studied steels. Cr concentration dependence of spacing of M23C6 and MX precipitates exhibited a V-like shape during short-term as well as long-term aging at 923 K (650 °C), and the minimum spacing of precipitates belonged to 9 pct Cr steel, corresponding to the lowest recovery speed of subgrain structures. In the short-term creep region, subgrain coarsening during creep was controlled by strain and proceeded slower with the addition of Cr, whereas in long-term creep region, subgrain coarsening was controlled by the stability of precipitates rather than due to the creep plastic deformation and took place faster from 9 to 12 pct and 9 to 5 pct Cr. However, M23C6 precipitates played a more important role than MX precipitates in the control of subgrain coarsening, and there was a closer correlation between spacing of M23C6 precipitates and subgrain size during static aging and long-term creep region.

  7. Online Activities for Enhancing Sex Education Curricula: Preliminary Evidence on the Effectiveness of the Abstinence and Contraception Education Storehouse

    PubMed Central

    Raghupathy, Shobana; Klein, Charles; Card, Josefina

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to conduct a preliminary evaluation of the Abstinence and Contraception Education Storehouse (ACES), a digital, classroom-based resource designed to supplement existing sex education curricula with highly interactive materials such as video clips, multimedia polls and quizzes, and audiovisual demonstrations. 335 students ages 14–19 were randomly assigned to an ACES–based (treatment) or a standard (control) sex education curriculum. Data were collected at the onset of the intervention and 3-months after the completion of the intervention. Preliminary results were highly encouraging, with ACES participants who were sexually initiated at baseline reporting at the 3-month follow-up significant reductions in the number of times they had sex in the past four weeks. Both sexually initiated and non-sexually initiated youth who experienced the ACES curriculum also demonstrated greater intent to abstain from the sex during the follow-up period than those in the control group. PMID:24078799

  8. Online Activities for Enhancing Sex Education Curricula: Preliminary Evidence on the Effectiveness of the Abstinence and Contraception Education Storehouse.

    PubMed

    Raghupathy, Shobana; Klein, Charles; Card, Josefina

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to conduct a preliminary evaluation of the Abstinence and Contraception Education Storehouse (ACES), a digital, classroom-based resource designed to supplement existing sex education curricula with highly interactive materials such as video clips, multimedia polls and quizzes, and audiovisual demonstrations. 335 students ages 14-19 were randomly assigned to an ACES-based (treatment) or a standard (control) sex education curriculum. Data were collected at the onset of the intervention and 3-months after the completion of the intervention. Preliminary results were highly encouraging, with ACES participants who were sexually initiated at baseline reporting at the 3-month follow-up significant reductions in the number of times they had sex in the past four weeks. Both sexually initiated and non-sexually initiated youth who experienced the ACES curriculum also demonstrated greater intent to abstain from the sex during the follow-up period than those in the control group.

  9. Tackling U.S. energy challenges and opportunities: preliminary policy recommendations for enhancing energy innovation in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Anadon, Laura Diaz; Gallagher, Kelly Sims; Bunn, Matthew; Jones, Charles

    2009-02-18

    The report offers preliminary recommendations for near-term actions to strengthen the U.S. effort to develop and deploy advanced energy technologies. The report comes as the Obama Administration and the 111th U.S. Congress face enormous challenges and opportunities in tackling the pressing security, economic, and environmental problems posed by the energy sector. Improving the technologies of energy supply and end-use is a prerequisite for surmounting these challenges in a timely and cost-effective way, and this report elaborates on how policy can support develop of these important energy technologies.

  10. Electrostatic precipitator manual

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.R.; Dean, A.H.

    1982-01-01

    Studies performed by various individuals and organizations on the application of electrostatic precipitators to the collection of fly ash produced in the combustion of pulverized fuel are summarized in this manual. The scope of the studies evaluated include full scale precipitators and laboratory investigations. It covers measurement of fly ash resistivity, rapping reentrainment, conditioning agents, fundamental operations of hot-side precipitators. The major chapter headings are: Terminology and General Design Features Associated with Electrostatic Precipitators Used to Collect Fly Ash Particles; Fundamental Principles of Electrostatic Precipitation; Limiting Factors Affecting Precipitator Performance; Use of Electrostatic Precipitators for the Collection of Fly Ash; Analysis of Factors influencing ESP Performance; Emissions from Electrostatic Precipitators; Choosig an Electrostatic Precipitator: Cold-side versus Hot-side; Safety Aspects of Working with Electrostatic Precipitators; Maintenance Procedures; Troubleshooting; An Electrostatic Precipitator Computer Model; Features of a Well-equipped Electrostatic Precipitator.

  11. A preliminary investigation into the use of alginates for the lifting and enhancement of fingermarks in blood.

    PubMed

    Munro, Mhairi; Deacon, Paul; Farrugia, Kevin J

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies have reported the use of alginate in the lifting and subsequent enhancement of footwear marks in blood. A study was set up to assess the use of such a method in the treatment of fingermarks in blood on a variety of porous, non-porous and semi-porous surfaces. Other variables included ageing of the fingermarks in blood and the application of chemicals prior to or post-alginate lifting. All different variations were compared to direct chemical treatment of the substrate. The results demonstrated that alginate is not compatible with certain substrates (e.g. glass and tile). On substrates that were compatible with alginate (e.g. fabric and paper), the enhanced fingermarks on the alginate cast and the enhanced fingermarks on the post-alginate substrates appeared, overall, inferior compared to direct chemical enhancement without the use of alginate. A further variation using water-based protein stains directly mixed with the alginate appeared to provide enhancement directly on the substrate as well as simultaneous lifting and enhancing the fingermarks in blood on the alginate cast.

  12. Ensemble Cannonical Correlation Prediction of Seasonal Precipitation Over the US

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Shen, Samuel; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of an ensemble cannonical correlation (ECC) prediction scheme developed at the Climate and Radiation Branch, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center for determining the potential predictability of regional precipitation, and for climate downscaling studies. The scheme is tested on seasonal hindcasts of anomalous precipitation over the continental United States using global sea surface temperature (SST) for 1951-2000. To maximize the forecast skill derived from SST, the world ocean is divided into nonoverlapping sectors. The cannonical SST modes for each sector are used as the predictor for the ensemble hindcasts. Results show that the ECC yields a substantial (10-25%) increase in prediction skills for all regions of the US and for all seasonal compared to traditional CCA prediction schemes. For the boreal winter, the tropical Pacific contributes the largest potential predictability to precipitation in the southwestern and southeastern regions, while the North Pacific and the North Atlantic are responsible for enhanced forecast skills in the Pacific Northwest, the northern Great Plains and Ohio Valley. Most importantly, the ECC increases skill for summertime precipitation prediction and substantially reduced the spring predictability barrier over all regions of the US continent. Besides SST, the ECC is designed with the flexibility to include any number of predictor fields, such as soil moisture, snow cover and regional regional data. Moreover, the ECC forecasts can be applied to other climate subsystems and, in conjunction with further diagnostic or model studies will enables a better understanding of the dynamic links between climate variations and precipitation, not only for the US, but also for other regions of the world.

  13. Stable isotopes in alpine precipitation as tracers of atmospheric deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasiuta, V. L.; Lafreniere, M. J.; Kyser, T. K.; Norman, A. L.; Mayer, B.; Wieser, M.

    2010-12-01

    Alpine ecosystems, which are generally nutrient poor and exist under extreme climatic conditions, are particularly sensitive to environmental and climatic stressors. Studies in the USA Rocky Mountains and European Alps have shown that alpine terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems are particularly sensitive to enhanced deposition of reactive nitrogen and can show ecologically destructive responses at relatively low levels of nitrogen deposition. However, there is no base line for atmospheric deposition of natural and anthropogenic contaminants in the Canadian alpine. Preliminary results of isotopic and chemical analyses of precipitation from an elevational transect on a glaciated alpine site in the Canadian Rockies are presented. Precipitation accumulating from early autumn through to spring (2008/2009 and 2009/2010) was sampled by means of seasonal snow cover on alpine glaciers. Summer precipitation was sampled through July and August 2010 using bulk collectors installed at the sites of winter sampling. The isotope ratios of dissolved sulphate (δ34S, δ18O), nitrogen (δ15N, δ18O), as well as precipitation (δ2H, δ18O) are utilized in addition to major ion concentrations and trace metal concentrations. Results from 2008/2009 snowpack samples indicate a strong seasonal trend in sulphate (SO42-) and nitrogen (NO3-) deposition which is consistent across the altitudinal transect. Snow horizons representing early autumn and spring precipitation show higher SO42- and NO3- concentrations in contrast to lower concentrations in winter horizons. The aforementioned suite of isotopic and chemical analyses are used to investigate the variability in dominant geographic source regions for atmospheric SO42- and NO3- (local, regional, or long range transported contaminants), as well as to identify contributions from the major biogeochemical source types (e.g. hydrocarbon combustion, lithogenic dust, agricultural emissions).

  14. Precipitation Indices Low Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Engelen, A. F. V.; Ynsen, F.; Buisman, J.; van der Schrier, G.

    2009-09-01

    Since 1995, KNMI published a series of books(1), presenting an annual reconstruction of weather and climate in the Low Countries, covering the period AD 763-present, or roughly, the last millennium. The reconstructions are based on the interpretation of documentary sources predominantly and comparison with other proxies and instrumental observations. The series also comprises a number of classifications. Amongst them annual classifications for winter and summer temperature and for winter and summer dryness-wetness. The classification of temperature have been reworked into peer reviewed (2) series (AD 1000-present) of seasonal temperatures and temperature indices, the so called LCT (Low Countries Temperature) series, now incorporated in the Millennium databases. Recently we started a study to convert the dryness-wetness classifications into a series of precipitation; the so called LCP (Low Countries Precipitation) series. A brief outline is given here of the applied methodology and preliminary results. The WMO definition for meteorological drought has been followed being that a period is called wet respectively dry when the amount of precipitation is considerable more respectively less than usual (normal). To gain a more quantitative insight for four locations, geographically spread over the Low Countries area (De Bilt, Vlissingen, Maastricht and Uccle), we analysed the statistics of daily precipitation series, covering the period 1900-present. This brought us to the following definition, valid for the Low Countries: A period is considered as (very) dry respectively (very) wet if over a continuous period of at least 60 days (~two months) cq 90 days (~three months) on at least two out of the four locations 50% less resp. 50% more than the normal amount for the location (based on the 1961-1990 normal period) has been measured. This results into the following classification into five drought classes hat could be applied to non instrumental observations: Very wet period

  15. PRECIPITATION OF PLUTONOUS PEROXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Barrick, J.G.; Manion, J.P.

    1961-08-15

    A precipitation process for recovering plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution is described. In the process for precipitating plutonium as plutonous peroxide, hydroxylamine or hydrazine is added to the plutoniumcontaining solution prior to the addition of peroxide to precipitate plutonium. The addition of hydroxylamine or hydrazine increases the amount of plutonium precipitated as plutonous peroxide. (AEC)

  16. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeck, Steven P.; Kakar, Ramesh K.; Azarbarzin, Ardeshir A.; Hou, Arthur Y.

    2010-10-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission will provide enhanced space-based precipitation measurements with sufficient coverage, spatial resolution, temporal sampling, retrieval accuracy, and microphysical information to advance the understanding of Earth's water and energy cycle and to improve predictions of its climate, weather, and hydrometeorological processes. Such improvements will in turn improve decision support systems in broad societal applications (e.g. water resource management, agriculture, transportation, etc). GPM is a partnership between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), building upon their highly successful partnership on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). The GPM architecture consists of NASA satellites operating in partnership with other earth-observing satellites and instruments to produce global precipitation science data. The current generation of multi-satellite global precipitation products based on microwave/infrared sensors from uncoordinated satellite missions has for its anchor the TRMM precipitation radar and the TRMM Microwave Imager measurements over the tropics and subtropics (+/- 35 degrees latitude), with a mean sampling time of approximately 17 hours. The GPM mission will deploy a spaceborne Core Observatory as a reference standard to unify a space constellation of research and operational microwave sensors aimed at providing uniformly calibrated precipitation measurements globally every 2-4 hours. The Core Observatory measurements will provide, for the first time, quantitative information on precipitation particle size distribution needed for improving the accuracy of precipitation estimates by microwave radiometers and radars. In addition, the GPM will also include a second microwave radiometer and a Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) communications subsystem for near real time data relay for a future partner-provided constellation satellite. This second GPM Microwave Imager (GMI

  17. Preliminary MIPCC Enhanced F-4 and F-15 Performance Characteristics for a First Stage Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kloesel, Kurt J.

    2013-01-01

    Performance increases in turbojet engines can theoretically be achieved through Mass Injection Pre-Compressor Cooling (MIPCC), a process involving injecting water or oxidizer or both into an afterburning turbojet engine. The injection of water results in pre-compressor cooling, allowing the propulsion system to operate at high altitudes and Mach numbers. In this way, a MIPCC-enhanced turbojet engine could be used to power the first stage of a reusable launch vehicle or be integrated into an existing aircraft that could launch a 100-lbm payload to a reference 100-nm altitude orbit at 28 deg inclination. The two possible candidates for MIPCC flight demonstration that are evaluated in this study are the F-4 Phantom II airplane and the F-15 Eagle airplane (both of McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois), powered by two General Electric Company (Fairfield, Connecticut) J79 engines and two Pratt & Whitney (East Hartford, Connecticut) F100-PW-100 engines, respectively. This paper presents a conceptual discussion of the theoretical performance of each of these aircraft using MIPCC propulsion techniques. Trajectory studies were completed with the Optimal Trajectories by Implicit Simulation (OTIS) software (NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio) for a standard F-4 airplane and a standard F-15 airplane. Standard aircraft simulation models were constructed, and the thrust in each was altered in accordance with estimated MIPCC performance characteristics. The MIPCC and production aircraft model results were then reviewed to assess the feasibility of a MIPCC-enhanced propulsion system for use as a first-stage reusable launch vehicle; it was determined that the MIPCC-enhanced F-15 model showed a significant performance advantage over the MIPCC-enhanced F-4 model.

  18. Preliminary MIPCC Enhanced F-4 and F-15 Preformance Characteristics for a First Stage Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kloesel, Kurt J.; Clark, Casie M.

    2013-01-01

    Performance increases in turbojet engines can theoretically be achieved through Mass Injection Pre-Compressor Cooling (MIPCC), a process involving injecting water or oxidizer or both into an afterburning turbojet engine. The injection of water results in pre-compressor cooling, allowing the propulsion system to operate at high altitudes and Mach numbers. In this way, a MIPCC-enhanced turbojet engine could be used to power the first stage of a reusable launch vehicle or be integrated into an existing aircraft that could launch a 100-lbm payload to a reference 100-nm altitude orbit at 28 deg inclination. The two possible candidates for MIPCC flight demonstration that are evaluated in this study are the F-4 Phantom II airplane and the F-15 Eagle airplane (both of McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois), powered by two General Electric Company (Fairfield, Connecticut) J79 engines and two Pratt & Whitney (East Hartford, Connecticut) F100-PW-100 engines, respectively. This paper presents a conceptual discussion of the theoretical performance of each of these aircraft using MIPCC propulsion techniques. Trajectory studies were completed with the Optimal Trajectories by Implicit Simulation (OTIS) software (NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio) for a standard F-4 airplane and a standard F-15 airplane. Standard aircraft simulation models were constructed, and the thrust in each was altered in accordance with estimated MIPCC performance characteristics. The MIPCC and production aircraft model results were then reviewed to assess the feasibility of a MIPCC-enhanced propulsion system for use as a first-stage reusable launch vehicle; it was determined that the MIPCC-enhanced F-15 model showed a significant performance advantage over the MIPCC-enhanced F-4 model.

  19. Six Month Outcomes of a Peer-Enhanced Community Reinforcement Approach for Emerging Adults with Substance Misuse: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Douglas C; Davis, Jordan P; Ureche, Daniel J; Dumas, Tara M

    2016-02-01

    Little substance use disorder (SUD) treatment research with emerging adults ages 18-25 has been done in community settings, and it is well-known that peers influence emerging adult substance use. The purpose of this study was to develop and test the feasibility of a peer-enhanced behavioral treatment for emerging adults with substance use problems. Emerging adults (n=35) received a peer-enhanced version of the Community Reinforcement Approach (Peer-CRA), in which their peers (n=34) were trained to provide alcohol-specific social support. Both identified clients and peers were interviewed at treatment intake, and again three and six months later. Six month outcomes included days of abstinence adjusted for controlled environment days, social costs due to substance use, and binge drinking days in the past 90 days. Treatments were delivered with high fidelity, and a high proportion of participants were retained in treatment and follow-up assessments. Growth curve analyses revealed that emerging adults and their peers significantly increased their days of abstinence and reduced their binge drinking over time. Larger randomized trials should a) test whether peer-enhanced treatments are efficacious relative to treatment as usual, b) investigate whether secondary benefits exist for non-treatment seeking peers supporting another's treatment, and c) examine whether proposed mechanisms of change (i.e., peer support and peer reductions in substance use) account for any differences in outcomes.

  20. Experimental investigation of Mars meandering rivers: Chemical precipitation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Lim, Y.; Cleveland, J.; Reid, E.; Jew, C.

    2014-12-01

    On Earth, meandering streams occur where the banks are resistant to erosion, which enhances narrow and deep channels. Often this is because the stream banks are held firm by vegetation. The ancient, highly sinuous channels with cutoffs found on Mars are enigmatic because vegetation played no role in providing bank cohesion and enhancing fine sediment deposition. Possible causes of the meandering therefore include ice under permafrost conditions and chemical processes. We conducted carbonate flume experiments to investigate possible mechanisms creating meandering channels other than vegetation. The experiment includes a tank that dissolves limestone by adding CO2 gas and produces artificial spring water, peristaltic pumps to drive water through the system, a heater to control the temperature of the spring water, and a flume where carbonate sediment deposits. Spring water containing dissolved calcium and carbonate ions moves through a heater to increase temperature, and then into the flume. The flume surface is open to the air to allow CO2 degassing, decrease temperature, and increase pH, which promotes carbonate precipitation. A preliminary experiment was done and successfully created a meander pattern that evolved over a 3-day experiment. The experiment showed lateral migration of the bend and avulsion of the stream, similar to a natural meander. The lateral variation in flow speed increased the local residence time of water, thus increasing the degassing of CO2 on the two sides of the flow and promoting more precipitation. This enhanced precipitation on the sides provided a mechanism to build levees along the channel and created a stream confined in a narrow path. This mechanism also potentially applies to Earthly single thread and/or meandering rivers developed and recorded before vegetation appeared on Earth's surface.

  1. Changes in soil aggregate dynamics following 18 years of experimentally increased precipitation in a cold desert ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Graaff, M.; vanderVeen, J.; Germino, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    Climate change is expected to alter the amount and timing of precipitation in semiarid ecosystems of the intermountain west, which can alter soil carbon dynamics. Specifically, an increase in precipitation in arid ecosystems promotes microbial activity, which can increase soil aggregate formation and enhance sequestration of soil organic carbon within stable aggregates. This study was conducted to assess: (1) how precipitation shifts affect soil aggregate formation and associated soil organic carbon contents in semi arid ecosystems, and (2) how plants mediate precipitation impacts on soil aggregate dynamics. Soil samples were collected from a long-term ecohydrology study located in the cold desert of the Idaho National Lab, USA. Precipitation treatments delivered during the previous 18 years consist of three regimes: (1) a control (ambient precipitation), (2) 200 mm irrigation added during the growing season, and (3) 200 mm irrigation added during the cold dormant season. Experimental plots were planted with a diverse native mix of big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentate) and associated shrubs, grasses, and forbs, but had also become invaded by crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum). Soils were collected in February (2011) with a 4.8 cm diameter soil corer to a depth of 15 cm. Across all precipitation treatments we sampled both directly beneath sagebrush and crested wheatgrass and from relatively bare plant-interspaces. Subsamples (100 g) were sieved (4.75 mm) and air dried. Then, the soils were fractionated into (1) macro aggregates (> 250 μm), (2) free micro aggregates (53-250 μm) and (3) free silt and clay fractions (<53 μm), using a wet sieving protocol. Further, macro aggregates were separated into particulate organic matter (POM), micro aggregates and silt and clay fractions using a micro aggregate isolator. Soil fractions were analyzed for soil organic carbon contents after removal of soil carbonates using sulfurous acid. Our preliminary results indicate

  2. Preliminary Study of Oxygen-Enhanced Longitudinal Relaxation in MRI: A Potential Novel Biomarker of Oxygenation Changes in Solid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, James P.B.; Naish, Josephine H.; Parker, Geoff J.M.; Waterton, John C.; Watson, Yvonne; Jayson, Gordon C.; Buonaccorsi, Giovanni A.; Cheung, Sue; Buckley, David L.; McGrath, Deirdre M.; West, Catharine M.L.; Davidson, Susan E.; Roberts, Caleb; Mills, Samantha J.; Mitchell, Claire L.; Hope, Lynn; Ton, N. Chan; Jackson, Alan

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: There is considerable interest in developing non-invasive methods of mapping tumor hypoxia. Changes in tissue oxygen concentration produce proportional changes in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) longitudinal relaxation rate (R{sub 1}). This technique has been used previously to evaluate oxygen delivery to healthy tissues and is distinct from blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) imaging. Here we report application of this method to detect alteration in tumor oxygenation status. Methods and materials: Ten patients with advanced cancer of the abdomen and pelvis underwent serial measurement of tumor R{sub 1} while breathing medical air (21% oxygen) followed by 100% oxygen (oxygen-enhanced MRI). Gadolinium-based dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was then performed to compare the spatial distribution of perfusion with that of oxygen-induced DELTAR{sub 1}. Results: DELTAR{sub 1} showed significant increases of 0.021 to 0.058 s{sup -1} in eight patients with either locally recurrent tumor from cervical and hepatocellular carcinomas or metastases from ovarian and colorectal carcinomas. In general, there was congruency between perfusion and oxygen concentration. However, regional mismatch was observed in some tumor cores. Here, moderate gadolinium uptake (consistent with moderate perfusion) was associated with low area under the DELTAR{sub 1} curve (consistent with minimal increase in oxygen concentration). Conclusions: These results provide evidence that oxygen-enhanced longitudinal relaxation can monitor changes in tumor oxygen concentration. The technique shows promise in identifying hypoxic regions within tumors and may enable spatial mapping of change in tumor oxygen concentration.

  3. PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT: HUMATE INJECTION AS AN ENHANCED ATTENUATION METHOD AT THE F-AREA SEEPAGE BASINS, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Millings, M.

    2013-09-16

    A field test of a humate technology for uranium and I-129 remediation was conducted at the F-Area Field Research Site as part of the Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) funded by the DOE Office of Soil and Groundwater Remediation. Previous studies have shown that humic acid sorbed to sediments strongly binds uranium at mildly acidic pH and potentially binds iodine-129 (I-129). Use of humate could be applicable for contaminant stabilization at a wide variety of DOE sites however pilot field-scale tests and optimization of this technology are required to move this technical approach from basic science to actual field deployment and regulatory acceptance. The groundwater plume at the F-Area Field Research Site contains a large number of contaminants, the most important from a risk perspective being strontium-90 (Sr-90), uranium isotopes, I-129, tritium, and nitrate. Groundwater remains acidic, with pH as low as 3.2 near the basins and increasing to the background pH of approximately 5at the plume fringes. The field test was conducted in monitoring well FOB 16D, which historically has shown low pH and elevated concentrations of Sr-90, uranium, I-129 and tritium. The field test included three months of baseline monitoring followed by injection of a potassium humate solution and approximately four and half months of post monitoring. Samples were collected and analyzed for numerous constituents but the focus was on attenuation of uranium, Sr-90, and I-129. This report provides background information, methodology, and preliminary field results for a humate field test. Results from the field monitoring show that most of the excess humate (i.e., humate that did not sorb to the sediments) has flushed through the surrounding formation. Furthermore, the data indicate that the test was successful in loading a band of sediment surrounding the injection point to a point where pH could return to near normal during the study

  4. A Lunchtime Walk in Nature Enhances Restoration of Autonomic Control during Night-Time Sleep: Results from a Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Gladwell, Valerie F.; Kuoppa, Pekka; Tarvainen, Mika P.; Rogerson, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Walking within nature (Green Exercise) has been shown to immediately enhance mental well-being but less is known about the impact on physiology and longer lasting effects. Heart rate variability (HRV) gives an indication of autonomic control of the heart, in particular vagal activity, with reduced HRV identified as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Night-time HRV allows vagal activity to be assessed whilst minimizing confounding influences of physical and mental activity. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a lunchtime walk in nature increases night-time HRV. Participants (n = 13) attended on two occasions to walk a 1.8 km route through a built or a natural environment. Pace was similar between the two walks. HRV was measured during sleep using a RR interval sensor (eMotion sensor) and was assessed at 1–2 h after participants noted that they had fallen asleep. Markers for vagal activity were significantly greater after the walk in nature compared to the built walk. Lunchtime walks in nature-based environments may provide a greater restorative effect as shown by vagal activity than equivalent built walks. Nature walks may improve essential recovery during night-time sleep, potentially enhancing physiological health. PMID:26950138

  5. A Lunchtime Walk in Nature Enhances Restoration of Autonomic Control during Night-Time Sleep: Results from a Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Gladwell, Valerie F; Kuoppa, Pekka; Tarvainen, Mika P; Rogerson, Mike

    2016-03-03

    Walking within nature (Green Exercise) has been shown to immediately enhance mental well-being but less is known about the impact on physiology and longer lasting effects. Heart rate variability (HRV) gives an indication of autonomic control of the heart, in particular vagal activity, with reduced HRV identified as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Night-time HRV allows vagal activity to be assessed whilst minimizing confounding influences of physical and mental activity. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a lunchtime walk in nature increases night-time HRV. Participants (n = 13) attended on two occasions to walk a 1.8 km route through a built or a natural environment. Pace was similar between the two walks. HRV was measured during sleep using a RR interval sensor (eMotion sensor) and was assessed at 1-2 h after participants noted that they had fallen asleep. Markers for vagal activity were significantly greater after the walk in nature compared to the built walk. Lunchtime walks in nature-based environments may provide a greater restorative effect as shown by vagal activity than equivalent built walks. Nature walks may improve essential recovery during night-time sleep, potentially enhancing physiological health.

  6. A Lunchtime Walk in Nature Enhances Restoration of Autonomic Control during Night-Time Sleep: Results from a Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Gladwell, Valerie F; Kuoppa, Pekka; Tarvainen, Mika P; Rogerson, Mike

    2016-03-01

    Walking within nature (Green Exercise) has been shown to immediately enhance mental well-being but less is known about the impact on physiology and longer lasting effects. Heart rate variability (HRV) gives an indication of autonomic control of the heart, in particular vagal activity, with reduced HRV identified as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Night-time HRV allows vagal activity to be assessed whilst minimizing confounding influences of physical and mental activity. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a lunchtime walk in nature increases night-time HRV. Participants (n = 13) attended on two occasions to walk a 1.8 km route through a built or a natural environment. Pace was similar between the two walks. HRV was measured during sleep using a RR interval sensor (eMotion sensor) and was assessed at 1-2 h after participants noted that they had fallen asleep. Markers for vagal activity were significantly greater after the walk in nature compared to the built walk. Lunchtime walks in nature-based environments may provide a greater restorative effect as shown by vagal activity than equivalent built walks. Nature walks may improve essential recovery during night-time sleep, potentially enhancing physiological health. PMID:26950138

  7. Bilateral Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Language Treatment Enhances Functional Connectivity in the Left Hemisphere: Preliminary Data from Aphasia.

    PubMed

    Marangolo, Paola; Fiori, Valentina; Sabatini, Umberto; De Pasquale, Giada; Razzano, Carmela; Caltagirone, Carlo; Gili, Tommaso

    2016-05-01

    Several studies have already shown that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a useful tool for enhancing recovery in aphasia. However, no reports to date have investigated functional connectivity changes on cortical activity because of tDCS language treatment. Here, nine aphasic persons with articulatory disorders underwent an intensive language therapy in two different conditions: bilateral anodic stimulation over the left Broca's area and cathodic contralesional stimulation over the right homologue of Broca's area and a sham condition. The language treatment lasted 3 weeks (Monday to Friday, 15 sessions). In all patients, language measures were collected before (T0) and at the end of treatment (T15). Before and after each treatment condition (real vs. sham), each participant underwent a resting-state fMRI study. Results showed that, after real stimulation, patients exhibited the greatest recovery not only in terms of better accuracy in articulating the treated stimuli but also for untreated items on different tasks of the language test. Moreover, although after the sham condition connectivity changes were confined to the right brain hemisphere, real stimulation yielded to stronger functional connectivity increase in the left hemisphere. In conclusion, our data provide converging evidence from behavioral and functional imaging data that bilateral tDCS determines functional connectivity changes within the lesioned hemisphere, enhancing the language recovery process in stroke patients. PMID:26807842

  8. Bilateral Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Language Treatment Enhances Functional Connectivity in the Left Hemisphere: Preliminary Data from Aphasia.

    PubMed

    Marangolo, Paola; Fiori, Valentina; Sabatini, Umberto; De Pasquale, Giada; Razzano, Carmela; Caltagirone, Carlo; Gili, Tommaso

    2016-05-01

    Several studies have already shown that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a useful tool for enhancing recovery in aphasia. However, no reports to date have investigated functional connectivity changes on cortical activity because of tDCS language treatment. Here, nine aphasic persons with articulatory disorders underwent an intensive language therapy in two different conditions: bilateral anodic stimulation over the left Broca's area and cathodic contralesional stimulation over the right homologue of Broca's area and a sham condition. The language treatment lasted 3 weeks (Monday to Friday, 15 sessions). In all patients, language measures were collected before (T0) and at the end of treatment (T15). Before and after each treatment condition (real vs. sham), each participant underwent a resting-state fMRI study. Results showed that, after real stimulation, patients exhibited the greatest recovery not only in terms of better accuracy in articulating the treated stimuli but also for untreated items on different tasks of the language test. Moreover, although after the sham condition connectivity changes were confined to the right brain hemisphere, real stimulation yielded to stronger functional connectivity increase in the left hemisphere. In conclusion, our data provide converging evidence from behavioral and functional imaging data that bilateral tDCS determines functional connectivity changes within the lesioned hemisphere, enhancing the language recovery process in stroke patients.

  9. A preliminary test of the application of the Lightning Detection and Ranging System (LDAR) as a thunderstorm warning and location device for the FHA including a correlation with updrafts, turbulence, and radar precipitation echoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poehler, H. A.

    1978-01-01

    Results of a test of the use of a Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) remote display in the Patrick AFB RAPCON facility are presented. Agreement between LDAR and radar precipitation echoes of the RAPCON radar was observed, as well as agreement between LDAR and pilot's visual observations of lightning flashes. A more precise comparison between LDAR and KSC based radars is achieved by the superposition of LDAR precipitation echoes. Airborne measurements of updrafts and turbulence by an armored T-28 aircraft flying through the thunderclouds are correlated with LDAR along the flight path. Calibration and measurements of the accuracy of the LDAR System are discussed, and the extended range of the system is illustrated.

  10. PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM NEOWISE: AN ENHANCEMENT TO THE WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER FOR SOLAR SYSTEM SCIENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Mainzer, A.; Bauer, J.; Masiero, J.; Eisenhardt, P.; Grav, T.; Cutri, R. M.; Dailey, J.; Alles, R.; Beck, R.; Brandenburg, H.; Conrow, T.; Evans, T.; Fowler, J.; Jarrett, T.; McMillan, R. S.; Wright, E.; Walker, R.; Jedicke, R.; Tholen, D.; Spahr, T.

    2011-04-10

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) has surveyed the entire sky at four infrared wavelengths with greatly improved sensitivity and spatial resolution compared to its predecessors, the Infrared Astronomical Satellite and the Cosmic Background Explorer. NASA's Planetary Science Division has funded an enhancement to the WISE data processing system called 'NEOWISE' that allows detection and archiving of moving objects found in the WISE data. NEOWISE has mined the WISE images for a wide array of small bodies in our solar system, including near-Earth objects (NEOs), Main Belt asteroids, comets, Trojans, and Centaurs. By the end of survey operations in 2011 February, NEOWISE identified over 157,000 asteroids, including more than 500 NEOs and {approx}120 comets. The NEOWISE data set will enable a panoply of new scientific investigations.

  11. Supercritical fluid precipitation of ketoprofen in novel structured lipid carriers for enhanced mucosal delivery--a comparison with solid lipid particles.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, V S S; Matias, A A; Rodríguez-Rojo, S; Nogueira, I D; Duarte, C M M

    2015-11-10

    Structured lipid carriers based on mixture of solid lipids with liquid lipids are the second generation of solid lipid particles, offering the advantage of improved drug loading capacity and higher storage stability. In this study, structured lipid carriers were successfully prepared for the first time by precipitation from gas saturated solutions. Glyceryl monooleate (GMO), a liquid glycerolipid, was selected in this work to be incorporated into three solid glycerolipids with hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) ranging from 1 to 13, namely Gelucire 43/01™, Geleol™ and Gelucire 50/13™. In general, microparticles with a irregular porous morphology and a wide particle size distribution were obtained. The HLB of the individual glycerolipids might be a relevant parameter to take into account during the processing of solid:liquid lipid blends. As expected, the addition of a liquid lipid into a solid lipid matrix led to increased stability of the lipid carriers, with no significant modifications in their melting enthalpy after 6 months of storage. Additionally, Gelucire 43/01™:GMO particles were produced with different mass ratios and loaded with ketoprofen. The drug loading capacity of the structured lipid carriers increased as the GMO content in the particles increased, achieving a maximum encapsulation efficiency of 97% for the 3:1 mass ratio. Moreover, structured lipid carriers presented an immediate release of ketoprofen from its matrix with higher permeation through a mucous-membrane model, while solid lipid particles present a controlled release of the drug with less permeation capacity.

  12. Dual-energy approach to contrast-enhanced mammography using the balanced filter method: Spectral optimization and preliminary phantom measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Masatoshi

    2007-11-15

    Dual-energy contrast agent-enhanced mammography is a technique of demonstrating breast cancers obscured by a cluttered background resulting from the contrast between soft tissues in the breast. The technique has usually been implemented by exploiting two exposures to different x-ray tube voltages. In this article, another dual-energy approach using the balanced filter method without switching the tube voltages is described. For the spectral optimization of dual-energy mammography using the balanced filters, we applied a theoretical framework reported by Lemacks et al. [Med. Phys. 29, 1739-1751 (2002)] to calculate the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in an iodinated contrast agent subtraction image. This permits the selection of beam parameters such as tube voltage and balanced filter material, and the optimization of the latter's thickness with respect to some critical quantity--in this case, mean glandular dose. For an imaging system with a 0.1 mm thick CsI:Tl scintillator, we predict that the optimal tube voltage would be 45 kVp for a tungsten anode using zirconium, iodine, and neodymium balanced filters. A mean glandular dose of 1.0 mGy is required to obtain an SNR of 5 in order to detect 1.0 mg/cm{sup 2} iodine in the resulting clutter-free image of a 5 cm thick breast composed of 50% adipose and 50% glandular tissue. In addition to spectral optimization, we carried out phantom measurements to demonstrate the present dual-energy approach for obtaining a clutter-free image, which preferentially shows iodine, of a breast phantom comprising three major components - acrylic spheres, olive oil, and an iodinated contrast agent. The detection of iodine details on the cluttered background originating from the contrast between acrylic spheres and olive oil is analogous to the task of distinguishing contrast agents in a mixture of glandular and adipose tissues.

  13. Preliminary Evidence That Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Enhances Time to Task Failure of a Sustained Submaximal Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Petra S.; Hoffman, Richard L.; Clark, Brian C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) delivered while performing a sustained submaximal contraction would increase time to task failure (TTF) compared to sham stimulation. Healthy volunteers (n = 18) performed two fatiguing contractions at 20% of maximum strength with the elbow flexors on separate occasions. During fatigue task performance, either anodal or sham stimulation was delivered to the motor cortex for up to 20 minutes. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to assess changes in cortical excitability during stimulation. There was no systematic effect of the anodal tDCS stimulation on TTF for the entire subject set (n = 18; p = 0.64). Accordingly, a posteriori subjects were divided into two tDCS-time groups: Full-Time (n = 8), where TTF occurred prior to the termination of tDCS, and Part-Time (n = 10), where TTF extended after tDCS terminated. The TTF for the Full-Time group was 31% longer with anodal tDCS compared to sham (p = 0.04), whereas TTF for the Part-Time group did not differ (p = 0.81). Therefore, the remainder of our analysis addressed the Full-Time group. With anodal tDCS, the amount of muscle fatigue was 6% greater at task failure (p = 0.05) and the amount of time the Full-Time group performed the task at an RPE between 8–10 (“very hard”) increased by 38% (p = 0.04) compared to sham. There was no difference in measures of cortical excitability between stimulation conditions (p = 0.90). That the targeted delivery of anodal tDCS during task performance both increased TTF and the amount of muscle fatigue in a subset of subjects suggests that augmenting cortical excitability with tDCS enhanced descending drive to the spinal motorpool to recruit more motor units. The results also suggest that the application of tDCS during performance of fatiguing activity has the potential to bolster the capacity to exercise under conditions

  14. Urban Aerosol-Induced Changes of Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, D.; Givati, A.; Khain, A.; Kelman, G.

    2003-12-01

    Precipitation has been shown often to be enhanced over and downwind of major urban areas. These effects were most noticeable in convective clouds of the warm season, and were ascribed to dynamic causes, such as the urban heat island and the urban topography. In contrast, recent observations have shown that urban and industrial aerosols suppress rain and snow, by providing large concentrations of small cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), which when ingested into the clouds create large number of small cloud droplets. The clouds need to grow to greater depth and colder cloud top temperatures for the onset of precipitation. Therefore it was expected that precipitation would be most suppressed when the pollution is ingested into relatively shallow and short-living clouds. Such clouds occur in winter over orographic barriers downwind of coastal cities. This was examined by measuring the orographic enhancement factor (RO, ratio of rainfall over the hills versus the upwind lowland rainfall) of the precipitation downwind of the urban areas in California and Israel. It was found that in both locations RO has decreased by 15 to 25 percent during the last century whereas no change occured in side wind little urbanized areas. Some compensation occurred further downwind on the drier downwind side of the mountains. The aerosols suppress the onset of precipitation also in warm-base convective clouds that develop in moist tropical air masses, such as occur during the summer in Houston and St. Louis. Simulations of clouds with explicit microphysical processes show that the delay of the onset of the warm rain in such clouds delays also the onset of the downdraft, and by that allows the updraft to invigorate further and produce more violent and precipitation producing thunderstorms. This is proposed as an additional enhancement mechanism that works at the same direction of the urban heat island. The conversion from warm to ice precipitation processes advects more cloud water to the

  15. Phase Behavior, Solid Organic Precipitation, and Mobility Characterization Studies in Support of Enhanced Heavy Oil Recovery on the Alaska North Slope

    SciTech Connect

    Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar; Santanu Khataniar

    2008-12-31

    The medium-heavy oil (viscous oil) resources in the Alaska North Slope are estimated at 20 to 25 billion barrels. These oils are viscous, flow sluggishly in the formations, and are difficult to recover. Recovery of this viscous oil requires carefully designed enhanced oil recovery processes. Success of these recovery processes is critically dependent on accurate knowledge of the phase behavior and fluid properties, especially viscosity, of these oils under variety of pressure and temperature conditions. This project focused on predicting phase behavior and viscosity of viscous oils using equations of state and semi-empirical correlations. An experimental study was conducted to quantify the phase behavior and physical properties of viscous oils from the Alaska North Slope oil field. The oil samples were compositionally characterized by the simulated distillation technique. Constant composition expansion and differential liberation tests were conducted on viscous oil samples. Experiment results for phase behavior and reservoir fluid properties were used to tune the Peng-Robinson equation of state and predict the phase behavior accurately. A comprehensive literature search was carried out to compile available compositional viscosity models and their modifications, for application to heavy or viscous oils. With the help of meticulously amassed new medium-heavy oil viscosity data from experiments, a comparative study was conducted to evaluate the potential of various models. The widely used corresponding state viscosity model predictions deteriorate when applied to heavy oil systems. Hence, a semi-empirical approach (the Lindeloff model) was adopted for modeling the viscosity behavior. Based on the analysis, appropriate adjustments have been suggested: the major one is the division of the pressure-viscosity profile into three distinct regions. New modifications have improved the overall fit, including the saturated viscosities at low pressures. However, with the limited

  16. Co-precipitation synthesis of nano-composites consists of zinc and tin oxides coatings on glass with enhanced photocatalytic activity on degradation of Reactive Blue 160 KE2B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, Mohammad Hossein; Mardani, Maryam

    2015-02-01

    Nano-composite containing zinc oxide-tin oxide was obtained by a facile co-precipitation route using tin chloride tetrahydrate and zinc chloride as precursors and coated on glass by Doctor Blade deposition. The crystalline structure and morphology of composites were evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The XRD results showed peaks relative to zinc oxide with hexagonal wurtzite structure and tin oxide with tetragonal structure. FESEM observations showed that the nano-composite consisted of aggregates of particles with an average particle size of 18 nm. The photocatalytic activity of the pure SnO2, pure ZnO, ZnSnO3-Zn2SnO4 and ZnO-SnO2 nano-structure thin films was examined using the degradation of a textile dye Reactive Blue 160 (KE2B). ZnO-SnO2 nano-composite showed enhanced photo-catalytic activity than the pure zinc oxide and tin oxide. The enhanced photo-catalytic activity of the nano-composite was ascribed to an improved charge separation of the photo-generated electron-hole pairs.

  17. Co-precipitation synthesis of nano-composites consists of zinc and tin oxides coatings on glass with enhanced photocatalytic activity on degradation of Reactive Blue 160 KE2B.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Mohammad Hossein; Mardani, Maryam

    2015-02-25

    Nano-composite containing zinc oxide-tin oxide was obtained by a facile co-precipitation route using tin chloride tetrahydrate and zinc chloride as precursors and coated on glass by Doctor Blade deposition. The crystalline structure and morphology of composites were evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The XRD results showed peaks relative to zinc oxide with hexagonal wurtzite structure and tin oxide with tetragonal structure. FESEM observations showed that the nano-composite consisted of aggregates of particles with an average particle size of 18 nm. The photocatalytic activity of the pure SnO2, pure ZnO, ZnSnO3-Zn2SnO4 and ZnO-SnO2 nano-structure thin films was examined using the degradation of a textile dye Reactive Blue 160 (KE2B). ZnO-SnO2 nano-composite showed enhanced photo-catalytic activity than the pure zinc oxide and tin oxide. The enhanced photo-catalytic activity of the nano-composite was ascribed to an improved charge separation of the photo-generated electron-hole pairs. PMID:25265524

  18. Co-precipitation synthesis of nano-composites consists of zinc and tin oxides coatings on glass with enhanced photocatalytic activity on degradation of Reactive Blue 160 KE2B.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Mohammad Hossein; Mardani, Maryam

    2015-02-25

    Nano-composite containing zinc oxide-tin oxide was obtained by a facile co-precipitation route using tin chloride tetrahydrate and zinc chloride as precursors and coated on glass by Doctor Blade deposition. The crystalline structure and morphology of composites were evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The XRD results showed peaks relative to zinc oxide with hexagonal wurtzite structure and tin oxide with tetragonal structure. FESEM observations showed that the nano-composite consisted of aggregates of particles with an average particle size of 18 nm. The photocatalytic activity of the pure SnO2, pure ZnO, ZnSnO3-Zn2SnO4 and ZnO-SnO2 nano-structure thin films was examined using the degradation of a textile dye Reactive Blue 160 (KE2B). ZnO-SnO2 nano-composite showed enhanced photo-catalytic activity than the pure zinc oxide and tin oxide. The enhanced photo-catalytic activity of the nano-composite was ascribed to an improved charge separation of the photo-generated electron-hole pairs.

  19. Precipitation during irradiation: an experimental example

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    Neutron damage can significantly alter the process of precipitation from supersaturated solid solution. This is demonstrated by a series of experiments using a precipitation strengthened superalloy, Nimonic PE16 irradiated with fast neutrons over the temperature 400 to 650/sup 0/C. In disagreement with earlier predictions, precipitate development is found to be controlled by the competing processes of Ostwald coarsening and solute segregation due to drag by point defects to point defect sinks. Analysis of the kinetics of Ostwald coarsening reveals significant enhancement of diffusion rates due to irradiation in agreement with predictions and involving an activation energy on the order of one quarter that of thermal diffusion. Unusual precipitate morphologies were observed such as void shells, linear precipitate arrays and Archimedes' screw configurations. However, predicted temperature dependencies for solute segregation are not obeyed. An explanation is presented involving the coupling of the Ostwald coarsening mechanism with the solute segregation process.

  20. Precipitation during irradiation: an experimental example

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    Neutron damage can significantly alter the process of precipitation from supersaturated solid solution. This is demonstrated by a series of experiments using a precipitation strengthened superalloy, Nimonic PE16 irradiated with fast neutrons over the temperature 400 to 650/sup 0/C. In disagreement with earlier predictions, precipitate development is found to be controlled by the competing processes of Ostwald coarsening and solute segregation due to drag by point defects to point defect sinks. Analysis of the kinetics of Ostwald coarsening reveals significant enhancement of diffusion rates due to irradiation in agreement with predictions and involving an activation energy on the order of one quarter that of thermal diffusion. Unusual precipitate morphologies were observed such as void shells, linear precipitate arrays and Archimedes' screw configurations. However, predicted temperature dependencies for solute segregation are not obeyed.

  1. Global Precipitation Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Kummerow, Christian D.; Shepherd, James Marshall

    2008-01-01

    This chapter begins with a brief history and background of microwave precipitation sensors, with a discussion of the sensitivity of both passive and active instruments, to trace the evolution of satellite-based rainfall techniques from an era of inference to an era of physical measurement. Next, the highly successful Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission will be described, followed by the goals and plans for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission and the status of precipitation retrieval algorithm development. The chapter concludes with a summary of the need for space-based precipitation measurement, current technological capabilities, near-term algorithm advancements and anticipated new sciences and societal benefits in the GPM era.

  2. Selective Precipitation of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Matulis, Daumantas

    2016-01-01

    Selective precipitation of proteins can be used as a bulk method to recover the majority of proteins from a crude lysate, as a selective method to fractionate a subset of proteins from a protein solution, or as a very specific method to recover a single protein of interest from a purification step. This unit describes a number of methods suitable for selective precipitation. In each of the protocols that are outlined, the physical or chemical basis of the precipitation process, the parameters that can be varied for optimization, and the basic steps for developing an optimized precipitation are described.

  3. Uncertainty Estimation of Global Precipitation Measurement through Objective Validation Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, H.; Utsumi, N.; Seto, S.; Oki, T.

    2014-12-01

    Since Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) has been launched in 1997 as the first satellite mission dedicated to measuring precipitation, the spatiotemporal gaps of precipitation observation have been filled significantly. On February 27th, 2014, Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) satellite has been launched as a core observatory of Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM), an international multi-satellite mission aiming to provide the global three hourly map of rainfall and snowfall. In addition to Ku-band, Ka-band radar is newly equipped, and their combination is expected to introduce higher precision than the precipitation measurement of TRMM/PR. In this study, the GPM level-2 orbit products are evaluated comparing to various precipitation observations which include TRMM/PR, in-situ data, and ground radar. In the preliminary validation over intercross orbits of DPR and TRMM, Ku-band measurements in both satellites shows very close spatial pattern and intensity, and the DPR is capable to capture broader range of precipitation intensity than of the TRMM. Furthermore, we suggest a validation strategy based on 'objective classification' of background atmospheric mechanisms. The Japanese 55-year Reanalysis (JRA-55) and auxiliary datasets (e.g., tropical cyclone best track) is used to objectively determine the types of precipitation. Uncertainty of abovementioned precipitation products is quantified as their relative differences and characterized for different precipitation mechanism. Also, it is discussed how the uncertainty affects the synthesis of TRMM and GPM for a long-term satellite precipitation observation records which is internally consistent.

  4. Precipitation Recycling in the NASA GEOS Data Assimilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Schubert, Siegfried; Molod, Andrea; Takacs, Lawrence L.

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of precipitation recycling can improve the understanding of regional hydrologic anomalies, especially their evolution and maintenance. Diagnostic models of the recycling of precipitation and are applied to 15 years of the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Data Assimilation System (DAS). Recycled precipitation is defined as the fraction of precipitation within a given region that originated as surface evaporation from the same region. The focus of the present work is on the interannual variability of the central United States hydrologic cycle and precipitation recycling. The extreme years of 1988 (drought) and 1993 (flood) are compared with the 15 year base period mean annual cycle. The results indicate that recycling ratio (the amount of precipitation with a local source relative to the total precipitation) is greater in 1988 than both the base period mean and the 1993 season (with 1993 recycling ratio less than the mean). On the other hand, both the summers of 1988 and 1993 show less total recycled precipitation than the mean. The results also show that precipitation recycling may have been more important in the spring of 1993, when the region was primed for flooding, than the summer, when the sever flooding occurred. The diagnostic approaches to precipitation recycling suffer from some weaknesses. Numerical simulations and assimilation using passive tracers have the potential to provide more accurate calculations of precipitation recycling and the remote sources of water. This ability is being incorporated into the latest GEOS data assimilation system, and some preliminary results will be presented.

  5. Dissolution of ordered precipitates under ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Camus, E.; Bourdeau, F.; Abromeit, C.; Wanderka, N.; Wollenberger, H.

    1995-09-01

    The stability of the ordered {gamma}{prime} precipitates under 300-keV Ni{sup +} irradiation was investigated between room temperature and 623 K. The two competing mechanisms of destabilization by cascade producing irradiation, i.e. disordering and dissolution of the {gamma}{prime} precipitates in Nimonic PE16 alloy, has been studied separately by electron microscopy and field-ion microscopy with atom probe. At high temperatures, the precipitates are stable. At intermediate temperatures, the precipitates dissolve by ballistic mixing into the matrix, but the interface is restored by the radiation-enhanced atomic jumps. The order in the precipitates remains stable. At low temperatures, the precipitates are dissolved by atomic mixing. The dissolution proceeds in a diffusional manner with a diffusion coefficient normalized by the displacement rate D/K = 0.75 nm{sup 2}dpa{sup {minus}1}. The precipitates become disordered by a fluence of 0.1 dpa, whereas precipitate dissolution needs much higher fluences.

  6. Influence of ENSO and MJO Phases on Extreme Events of Precipitation over Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, M. H.; Ambrizzi, T.

    2014-12-01

    Several droughts and floods in Amazonia has occurred in the last years - some of them being classified as the most severe in the last 40 years - and future projections from Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) indicate an increase of these extreme events. El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is one of the phenomena associated with extreme rainfall events in the Amazon. However, some recent studies have indicated that the basic response of ENSO is dependent on the phase of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). Hence, this study aims to analyze the influence of the MJO on the extreme events over northern South America, and especially over Amazon, in El Niño and La Niña years. We intend to explore the relative importance of the MJO to precipitation anomalies during ENSO events. Extreme events of precipitation over northern South America for the austral summer (November to March) were obtained through a composite analysis of the combinations of ENSO and MJO phases. The results showed that the MJO convection can enhance or weaken the basic response of ENSO on extreme precipitation events. Moreover, the results show that during positive extreme rainfall events (floods) over Amazon there is also an enhancement of the precipitation over the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ) when the MJO is active (inactive) in El Niño (La Niña) years. Air circulation at high levels were also analyzed and supports these patterns. Therefore, they suggest that the influence of ENSO may be modulate by the MJO phase. This work contributes to a better understanding of the climate variability and will be helpful for the forecast of ENSO effects on extreme events of temperature and precipitation over South America. Also, this study presents preliminary results of one of the Collaborative Researches in Support of GOAmazon Campaign Science, funding by U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) and São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP).

  7. Experience from practice: compound storm surge and high precipitation in a coastal area in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oldenborgh, Geert Jan; van den Hurk, Bart; van Heeringen, Klaas Jan; Gooijer, Jan

    2013-04-01

    In Januari 2012 a near-flooding occurred in Northern Netherlands by compound occurrence of a high soil moisture saturation degree due to past long term precipitation, a strong 1/10 year precipitation event and a coinciding storm surge that prevented the area to drain water to the Northsea for 5 days. The situation was nearly critical: reserved floodplains were used to reduce the water level in the populated areas, and evacuation plans were standby. After 5 days, the end of the storm surge allowed to discharge large water volumes, restoring the situation to normal conditions. The event has triggered the awareness in both the arenas of water management and science. Are the current standards adequate when these compound events occur more frequently than expected from random correlation? And do weather and climate modellers pay adequate attention to the output of their models that is truly meaningful to society, like combinations of strong winds over sea and high precipitation volumes in land? Preliminary analyses with observed records show that safety standards are sensitive to the assumed correlation between storm surge and local precipitation. Output from high resolution climate model projections for future conditions (with increased winter time precipitation and increased sea level) has been analysed particularly for climate induced chnages in the probability of simultaneous occurrence of these relevant events. Sea level rise is shown to give a pronounced contribution to an increased occurrence of adverse conditions, while increases in precipitation intensity weakly enhance this occurrence. The paper is concluded by a summary of required model experiments and analyses needed to address the influence of current and future compound events on safety standards in the coastal areas in the Netherlands.

  8. PRECIPITATION OF PROTACTINIUM

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.L.

    1958-07-15

    An lmprovement in the separation of protactinium from aqueous nitric acid solutions is described. 1t covers the use of lead dioxide and tin dioxide as carrier precipitates for the protactinium. In carrying out the process, divalent lead or divalent tin is addcd to the solution and oxidized, causing formation of a carrier precipitate of lead dioxide or stannic oxide, respectively.

  9. On scaling in spatial precipitation from radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschalis, Athanasios; Molnar, Peter; Burlando, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    The topic of self-similarity in precipitation in time and space has been prominent in precipitation research for at least the last 3 decades. Data analysts have explored evidence for self-similarity and reported departures from it. Modellers have developed stochastic models that are based on self-similarity concepts or at least reproduce the observed scaling behaviour. Physicists and meteorologists have argued why scale invariance should, or should not, exist in precipitation. Although there appears to be consensus between these communities that precipitation may exhibit scale invariance in some range of scales, most of us would probably also agree that the scaling properties are connected to the precipitation generation mechanisms (e.g. convection, orographic enhancement, etc.) and are not generally valid. The demonstration of this variability in scaling properties of precipitation and their relation to possible precipitation generating mechanisms is the focus of this paper. We analyse the spatial structure of radar precipitation for the orographically complex environment of the Swiss Alps as a multi-scaling process. A reliable 7 year long, high quality precipitation radar dataset, derived from the operational weather radars of MeteoSwiss is used to conduct a comprehensive data analysis and to reveal potential connections of the scaling processes of the precipitation structure and its respective generating mechanisms. We use different analysis techniques to quantify scale-dependent properties, from spectral analysis to multiplicative random cascades, employing estimation techniques spanning from traditional moment scaling to wavelet based estimators. We compare the results seasonally for radars in two different locations, one north and one south of the main Alpine divide, with very different topography. The main result is that distinct seasonal and spatial patterns in precipitation scaling properties exist which highlight the effect of topography on precipitation

  10. Ensemble Canonical Correlation Prediction of Seasonal Precipitation Over the United States: Raising the Bar for Dynamical Model Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Shen, S. P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of an ensemble canonical correlation (ECC) prediction scheme developed at the Climate and Radiation Branch, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center for determining the potential predictability of regional precipitation, and for climate downscaling studies. The scheme is tested on seasonal hindcasts of anomalous precipitation over the continental United States using global sea surface temperature (SST) for 1951-2000. To maximize the forecast skill derived from SST, the world ocean is divided into non-overlapping sectors. The canonical SST modes for each sector are used as the predictor for the ensemble hindcasts. Results show that the ECC yields a substantial (10-25%) increase in prediction skills for all the regions of the US in every season compared to traditional CCA prediction schemes. For the boreal winter, the tropical Pacific contributes the largest potential predictability to precipitation in the southwestern and southeastern regions, while the North Pacific and the North Atlantic are responsible to the enhanced forecast skills in the Pacific Northwest, the northern Great Plains and Ohio Valley. Most importantly, the ECC increases skill for summertime precipitation prediction and substantially reduces the spring predictability barrier over all the regions of the US continent. Besides SST, the ECC is designed with the flexibility to include any number of predictor fields, such as soil moisture, snow cover and additional local observations. The enhanced ECC forecast skill provides a new benchmark for evaluating dynamical model forecasts.

  11. Enhancing the Quality of Prescribing Practices for Older Veterans Discharged from the Emergency Department (EQUiPPED): Preliminary Results from Enhancing Quality of Prescribing Practices for Older Veterans Discharged from the Emergency Department, a Novel Multicomponent Interdisciplinary Quality Improvement Initiative.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Melissa B; Hastings, Susan Nicole; Powers, James; Vandenberg, Ann E; Echt, Katharina V; Bryan, William E; Peggs, Kiffany; Markland, Alayne D; Hwang, Ula; Hung, William W; Schmidt, Anita J; McGwin, Gerald; Ikpe-Ekpo, Edidiong; Clevenger, Carolyn; Johnson, Theodore M; Vaughan, Camille P

    2015-05-01

    Suboptimal medication prescribing for older adults has been described in a number of emergency department (ED) studies. Despite this, few studies have examined ED-targeted interventions aimed at reducing the use of potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs). Enhancing Quality of Prescribing Practices for Older Veterans Discharged from the ED (EQUiPPED) is an ongoing multicomponent, interdisciplinary quality improvement initiative in eight Department of Veterans Affairs EDs. The project aims to decrease the use of PIMs, as identified by the Beers criteria, prescribed to veterans aged 65 and older at the time of ED discharge. Interventions include provider education; informatics-based clinical decision support with electronic medical record-embedded geriatric pharmacy order sets and links to online geriatric content; and individual provider education including academic detailing, audit and feedback, and peer benchmarking. Poisson regression was used to compare the number of PIMs that staff providers prescribed to veterans aged 65 and older discharged from the ED before and after the initiation of the EQUiPPED intervention. Initial data from the first implementation site show that the average monthly proportion of PIMs that staff providers prescribed was 9.4±1.5% before the intervention and 4.6±1.0% after the initiation of EQUiPPED (relative risk=0.48, 95% confidence interval=0.40-0.59, P<.001). Preliminary evaluation demonstrated a significant and sustained reduction of ED-prescribed PIMs in older veterans after implementation of EQUiPPED. Longer follow-up and replication at collaborating sites would allow for an assessment of the effect on health outcomes and costs. PMID:25945692

  12. Precipitation sensitivity to warming estimated from long island records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polson, D.; Hegerl, G. C.; Solomon, S.

    2016-07-01

    Some of the most damaging impacts of climate change are a consequence of changes to the global water cycle. Atmospheric warming causes the water cycle to intensify, increasing both atmospheric water vapor concentrations and global precipitation and enhancing existing patterns of precipitation minus evaporation (P - E). This relationship between temperature and precipitation therefore makes understanding how precipitation has changed with global temperatures in the past crucial for projecting changes with future warming. In situ observations cannot readily estimate global precipitation sensitivity to temperature (dP/dT), as land precipitation changes are affected by water limitation. Satellite observations of precipitation over ocean are only available after 1979, but studies based on them suggest a precipitation sensitivity over wet tropical (30N-30S) oceans that exceeds the Clausius-Clapeyron value. Here, we determine for the first time precipitation sensitivity using longer (1930-2005), island-based in situ observations to estimate dP/dT over islands. The records show a robust pattern of increasing precipitation in the tropics and decreasing precipitation in the subtropics, as predicted from physical arguments, and heavy precipitation shows a stronger sensitivity than mean precipitation over many islands. The pattern and magnitude of island-based dP/dT agree with climate models if masked to island locations, supporting model predictions of future changes.

  13. Electrostatic precipitator upgrading -- Twelve years of progress

    SciTech Connect

    Grieco, G.J.

    1997-09-01

    In 1984 the author presented a paper entitled ``Electrostatic Precipitator Upgrading: A Technology Overview`` which reviewed various technologies for electrostatic precipitator performance enhancement in the utility industry. This evaluation was based on a set of criteria which included: commercial status; space requirements; required outage time for installation; installed cost; operating cost; range of applicability; and performance enhancement factor. The upgrade technologies discussed and evaluated included: gas/particulate flow upgrade; microprocessor controller retrofit; transformer-rectifier (T/R) set upgrade; pulse energization; electrode rapping modification; flue gas conditioning agents such as sulfur trioxide, ammonia and sodium; pulse energization; precipitator rebuild; and precipitator retrofit. The findings of this 1984 survey are summarized on Table 1. The installed costs listed on this table range from a low end cost associated with large precipitators with 250,000 ft{sup 2} of collecting electrode plate area and above, to a high end cost for small precipitators with only 25,000 ft{sup 2} of plate area. Twelve years later this subject is revisited and, surprisingly, significant progress has been made--this in spite of what some experts would characterize as a mature and somewhat stagnant technology field. Commercially proven techniques such as advanced flue gas conditioning, sonic horns, selective fuel blending using powder river basin coals, prudent selection of electrode geometry, and pulse energization are discussed and evaluated. Updated costs are presented for these technologies.

  14. Potential impact of acid precipitation on arsenic and selenium.

    PubMed Central

    Mushak, P

    1985-01-01

    The potential impact of acidic precipitation on the environmental mobility of the metalloids arsenic (As) and selenium (Se) has not been given much attention and is poorly understood. As with other elements, the interest here is the potential effect of environmental acidification on environmental behavior in ways that are relevant to human exposure to these metalloids. Available information on acid precipitation and the environmental behavior of these metalloids do, however, permit some preliminary conclusions to be drawn. Both As and Se appear to be mobilized from household plumbing into tap water by the corrosive action of soft, mildly acidic water, while surface water catchment systems in areas impacted by acidic deposition may contain elevated soluble As levels. Acidification of aquatic ecosystems that are drinking water sources may pose the prospect of enhanced release of As from sediment to water as well as reduction in water levels of Se. Acidification of ground waters, where As appears to be especially mobile, is of particular concern in this regard. The potential impact of acidic deposition on As and Se in soils cannot readily be assessed with respect to human exposure, but it would appear that the behavior of these metalloids in poorly buffered, poorly immobilizing soils, e.g., sandy soils of low metal hydrous oxide content, would be most affected. The effect is opposite for the two elements; lowered pH would appear to enhance As mobility and to reduce Se availability. Altered acidity of both soil and aquatic systems poses a risk for altered biotransformation processes involving both As and Se, thereby affecting the relative amounts of different chemical forms varying in their toxicity to humans as well as influencing biogeochemical cycling. PMID:4076075

  15. Potential impact of acid precipitation on arsenic and selenium.

    PubMed

    Mushak, P

    1985-11-01

    The potential impact of acidic precipitation on the environmental mobility of the metalloids arsenic (As) and selenium (Se) has not been given much attention and is poorly understood. As with other elements, the interest here is the potential effect of environmental acidification on environmental behavior in ways that are relevant to human exposure to these metalloids. Available information on acid precipitation and the environmental behavior of these metalloids do, however, permit some preliminary conclusions to be drawn. Both As and Se appear to be mobilized from household plumbing into tap water by the corrosive action of soft, mildly acidic water, while surface water catchment systems in areas impacted by acidic deposition may contain elevated soluble As levels. Acidification of aquatic ecosystems that are drinking water sources may pose the prospect of enhanced release of As from sediment to water as well as reduction in water levels of Se. Acidification of ground waters, where As appears to be especially mobile, is of particular concern in this regard. The potential impact of acidic deposition on As and Se in soils cannot readily be assessed with respect to human exposure, but it would appear that the behavior of these metalloids in poorly buffered, poorly immobilizing soils, e.g., sandy soils of low metal hydrous oxide content, would be most affected. The effect is opposite for the two elements; lowered pH would appear to enhance As mobility and to reduce Se availability. Altered acidity of both soil and aquatic systems poses a risk for altered biotransformation processes involving both As and Se, thereby affecting the relative amounts of different chemical forms varying in their toxicity to humans as well as influencing biogeochemical cycling.

  16. Cloud and Precipitation Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Martin; Höller, Hartmut; Schmidt, Kersten

    Precipitation or weather radar is an essential tool for research, diagnosis, and nowcasting of precipitation events like fronts or thunderstorms. Only with weather radar is it possible to gain insights into the three-dimensional structure of thunderstorms and to investigate processes like hail formation or tornado genesis. A number of different radar products are available to analyze the structure, dynamics and microphysics of precipitation systems. Cloud radars use short wavelengths to enable detection of small ice particles or cloud droplets. Their applications differ from weather radar as they are mostly orientated vertically, where different retrieval techniques can be applied.

  17. New trends in electrostatic precipitation: wide duct spacing, precharging, pulse energization

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, H.H.

    1981-09-01

    In a new design concept the precipitator duct spacing is increased from the traditional 200-300 mm up to 400-600 mm, and the precipitator voltage is raised correspondingly, with precipitator performance remaining almost unchanged for the same precipitator volume and the same gas flow. For suitable applications, this design results in reduced installation costs and easier maintenance. Devices for precharging of high resistivity dust now under development improve particle charging and enhance precipitator performance. Pulse energization improves the performance of precipitators collecting high resistivity dust by improving particle charging and current distribution and allowing regulation of the precipitator current independent of the precipitator voltage.

  18. IMERG Global Precipitation Rates

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission has produced its first global map of rainfall and snowfall. The GPM Core Observatory launched one year ago on Feb. 27, 2014 as a collaboration betwee...

  19. My NASA Data Precipitation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This lesson has two activities that help students develop a basic understanding of the relationship between cloud type and the form of precipitation and the relationship between the amount of water...

  20. Precipitation Estimates for Hydroelectricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapiador, Francisco J.; Hou, Arthur Y.; de Castro, Manuel; Checa, Ramiro; Cuartero, Fernando; Barros, Ana P.

    2011-01-01

    Hydroelectric plants require precise and timely estimates of rain, snow and other hydrometeors for operations. However, it is far from being a trivial task to measure and predict precipitation. This paper presents the linkages between precipitation science and hydroelectricity, and in doing so it provides insight into current research directions that are relevant for this renewable energy. Methods described include radars, disdrometers, satellites and numerical models. Two recent advances that have the potential of being highly beneficial for hydropower operations are featured: the Global Precipitation Measuring (GPM) mission, which represents an important leap forward in precipitation observations from space, and high performance computing (HPC) and grid technology, that allows building ensembles of numerical weather and climate models.

  1. Chemisorption And Precipitation Reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transport and bioavailability of chemical components within soils is, in part, controlled by partitioning between solids and solution. General terms used to describe these partitioning reactions include chemisorption and precipitation. Chemisorption is inclusive of the suit...

  2. Precipitates in Biomedical Co-Cr Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narushima, Takayuki; Mineta, Shingo; Kurihara, Yuto; Ueda, Kyosuke

    2013-04-01

    Herein, precipitates in biomedical Co-Cr-Mo and Co-Cr-W-Ni alloys are reviewed with a focus on their phase, chemical composition, morphology, and formation/dissolution during heat treatment. The effects of the heat-treatment conditions and the addition of minor alloying elements such as carbon, nitrogen, Si, and Mn on the precipitates are also discussed. Mostly, the precipitates in the alloys are of the σ-phase, M23X6-type phase, η-phase (M6X-M12X type), π-phase (M2T3X type), χ-phase, M7X3-type phase, or M2X-type phase (M and T refer to metallic elements, and X refers to carbon and/or nitrogen); the σ- and χ-phases are intermetallic compounds, and the others are carbides, nitrides, and carbonitrides. The dissolution of the precipitates during solution treatment is delayed by the formation of the π-phase at temperatures where partial melting occurs in the alloys. In addition, the stability of the precipitates depends on the content of minor alloying elements. For example, the addition of carbon enhances the formation of M23X6-type and M7X3-type precipitates. Nitrogen stabilizes the M2X-type, η-phase, and π-phase precipitates, and Si stabilizes the η-phase and χ-phase precipitates. The balance between the minor alloying element abundances also affects the constitution of the precipitates in Co-Cr alloys.

  3. as the Strengthening Precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qi; Xu, Wei; van der Zwaag, Sybrand

    2014-12-01

    Generally, Laves phase and M23C6 are regarded as undesirable phases in creep-resistant steels due to their very high-coarsening rates and the resulting depletion of beneficial alloying elements from the matrix. In this study, a computational alloy design approach is presented to develop martensitic steels strengthened by Laves phase and/or M23C6, for which the coarsening rates are tailored such that they are at least one order of magnitude lower than those in existing alloys. Their volume fractions are optimized by tuning the chemical composition in parallel. The composition domain covering 10 alloying elements at realistic levels is searched by a genetic algorithm to explore the full potential of simultaneous maximization of the volume fraction and minimization of the precipitates coarsening rate. The calculations show that Co and W can drastically reduce the coarsening rate of Laves and M23C6 and yield high-volume fractions of precipitates. Mo on the other hand was shown to have a minimal effect on coarsening. The strengthening effects of Laves phase and M23C6 in the newly designed alloys are compared to existing counterparts, showing substantially higher precipitation-strengthening contributions especially after a long service time. New alloys were designed in which both Laves phase and M23C6 precipitates act as strengthening precipitates. Successfully combining MX and M23C6 was found to be impossible.

  4. Precipitating factors of asthma.

    PubMed

    Lee, T H

    1992-01-01

    Asthma is characterised by bronchial hyperresponsiveness. This feature of the asthmatic diathesis predisposes patients to wheezing in response to a number of different factors. These precipitating factors include specific allergen acting via sensitised mediator cells through an IgE-dependent mechanism. There are irritants which may work through a non-specific manner, or stimuli such as exercise and hyperventilation, which probably also act through mediator release via a non-IgE-dependent manner. The mechanism whereby physical stimuli such as exercise induce bronchoconstriction is of interest, because it increases the context in which the mast cell may participate in acute asthmatic bronchoconstriction. Respiratory infections also commonly provoke asthma, especially in infants and may, indeed, precipitate the asthmatic state itself. Finally, drugs can often trigger asthma attacks and the mechanisms of asthma precipitated by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin have been the subject of recent research.

  5. URANIUM PRECIPITATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Thunaes, A.; Brown, E.A.; Smith, H.W.; Simard, R.

    1957-12-01

    A method for the recovery of uranium from sulfuric acid solutions is described. In the present process, sulfuric acid is added to the uranium bearing solution to bring the pH to between 1 and 1.8, preferably to about 1.4, and aluminum metal is then used as a reducing agent to convert hexavalent uranium to the tetravalent state. As the reaction proceeds, the pH rises amd a selective precipitation of uranium occurs resulting in a high grade precipitate. This process is an improvement over the process using metallic iron, in that metallic aluminum reacts less readily than metallic iron with sulfuric acid, thus avoiding consumption of the reducing agent and a raising of the pH without accomplishing the desired reduction of the hexavalent uranium in the solution. Another disadvantage to the use of iron is that positive ferric ions will precipitate with negative phosphate and arsenate ions at the pH range employed.

  6. FORMATION OF URANIUM PRECIPITATES

    DOEpatents

    Googin, J.M. Jr.

    1959-03-17

    A method is described for precipitation of uranium peroxide from uranium- containing solutions so as to obtain larger aggregates which facilitates washings decantations filtrations centrifugations and the like. The desired larger aggregate form is obtained by maintaining the pH of the solution in the approximate range of 1 to 3 and the temperature at about 25 deg C or below while carrytng out the precipitation. Then prior to removal of the precipitate a surface active sulfonated bicarboxyacids such as di-octyl sodium sulfo-succinates is incorporated in an anount of the order of 0.01 to 0.05 percent by weights and the slurry is allowed to ripen for about one-half hour at a temperatare below 10 deg C.

  7. Precipitation-Regulated Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voit, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Star formation in the central galaxies of galaxy clusters appears to be fueled by precipitation of cold clouds out of hot circumgalactic gas via thermal instability. I will present both observational and theoretical support for the precipitation mode in large galaxies and discuss how it can be implemented in cosmological simulations of galaxy evolution. Galaxy cluster cores are unique laboratories for studying the astrophysics of thermal instability and may be teaching us valuable lessons about how feedback works in galaxies spanning the entire mass spectrum.

  8. Electrostatic particle precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiya, T.; Hikizi, S.; Yabuta, H.

    1984-04-03

    An electrostatic particle precipitator for removing dust particles from a flue gas. The precipitator includes a plurality of collecting electrodes in the shape of plates mounted on endless chains and moving between a first region through which flue gas to be treated flows and a second region where the flow of gas is extremely scarce. A dust removal mechanism is positioned in the second region to remove dust which accumulates on the electrode plates. The moving speed of the collecting electrodes is controlled within a certain range to maintain a prescribed thickness of dust on the electrodes whereby the ocurrence of reverse ionization phenomenon is prevented.

  9. Acid Precipitation; (USA)

    SciTech Connect

    Rushing, J.W.; Hicks, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    This publication, Acid Precipitation (APC) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information on acid precipitation and closely related subjects, including wet and dry deposition, long-range transport, environmental effects, modeling, and socioeconomic factors. Information on the following subjects is included within the scope of this publication, but all subjects may not appear in each issue: Pollution sources and pollution control technology; atmospheric transport and chemistry; terrestrial transport and chemistry; aquatic transport and chemistry; biological effects; corrosive effects; and socioeconomics, policy, and legislation.

  10. Dynamic modeling of orographically induced precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barros, Ana Paula; Lettenmaier, P.

    1994-01-01

    Local orography governs the triggering of cloud formation and the enhancement of processes such as condensation and hydrometeor nucleation and growth in mountainous regions. Intense, lengthy precipitation events are typical upwind of the topographic divide, with sharply decreasing magnitude and duration on the lee side. Differences in mean annual precipitation of several hundred percent between windward slopes of orographic barriers and adjacent valleys or lee side slopes are not unusual. Because much of the streamflow in areas such as the western United States is derived from mountainous areas that are remote and often poorly instrumented, modeling of orographic precipitation has important implications for water resources management. Models of orographically induced precipitation differ by their treatment of atmospheric dynamics and by the extent to which they rely on bulk parameterization of cloud and precipitation physics. Adiabatic ascent and a direct proportionality between efficiency and orographically magnified updrafts are the most frequent assumptions in orographic precipitation modeling. Space-time discretization (i.e., resolution) is a major issue because of the high spatial variability of orographic precipitation. For a specific storm, relative errors as large as 50 to 100% are common in the forecast/hindcast of precipitation intensity and can be even larger in the case of catastrophic storms. When monthly or seasonal timescales are used to evaluate model performance, the magnitude of such errors decreases dramatically, reaching values as low as 10 to 15%. Current research is focusing on the development of data assimilation techniques to incorporate radar and satellite observations, and on the development of aggregation and disaggregation methodologies to address the implications of modeling a multiscale problem at restricted spatial and temporal resolutions.

  11. Dynamic Controls on Recent Increases in Northwest Greenland Coastal Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, G. J.; Osterberg, E. C.; Hawley, R. L.; Courville, Z.; Ferris, D. G.; Howley, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic precipitation has been rising over recent decades, with implications for glacier mass balance, sea level rise, and thermohaline circulation via the freshening of the Arctic seas. Coastal instrumental data and proxy records in northwest (NW) Greenland indicate positive summer precipitation trends from 1952-2012 along with a long-term, significant (p < 0.05) summer warming trend. While the observed precipitation increase is likely due in part to Clausius-Clapeyron increases in vapor pressure, the dynamical mechanisms responsible for the increasing trend remain poorly understood. Here we use a 61-year record of precipitation from Thule Air Base in NW Greenland and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data to identify atmospheric circulation patterns associated with enhanced precipitation in recent decades. We evaluate Thule precipitation-circulation relationships for the warm season (July-October [JASO]; 49% of annual precipitation) and cold season (December-February [DJF]; 20% of annual precipitation). Anomalously high precipitation in DJF and JASO is associated with enhanced southerly flow of warm, moist air and enhanced uplift (omega) in Northern Baffin Bay. Meridional flow in Baffin Bay is strongly correlated with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). We observe enhanced southerly flow, uplift and Thule precipitation during negative NAO conditions in winter and to a weaker extent JASO. Based on this mechanism, the trend (p < 0.10) of declining annual NAO index values since 1981 is consistent with the rising trends in Thule annual precipitation over this interval. We find evidence that a NW Greenland ice core proxy record (2Barrel) has a diminished JASO seasonal bias compared with the coast, and thus a future, longer proxy record collected from the 2Barrel site would be well suited for capturing both summer and winter climate variability.

  12. Global precipitation measurement (GPM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeck, Steven P.; Flaming, Gilbert M.; Adams, W. James; Smith, Eric A.

    2001-12-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is studying options for future space-based missions for the EOS Follow-on Era (post 2003), building upon the measurements made by Pre-EOS and EOS First Series Missions. One mission under consideration is the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM), a cooperative venture of NASA, Japan, and other international partners. GPM will capitalize on the experience of the highly successful Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM). Its goal is to extend the measurement of rainfall to high latitudes with high temporal frequency, providing a global data set every three hours. A reference concept has been developed consisting of an improved TRMM-like primary satellite with precipitation radar and microwave radiometer to make detailed and accurate estimates of the precipitation structure and a constellation of small satellites flying compact microwave radiometers to provide the required temporal sampling of highly variable precipitation systems. Considering that DMSP spacecraft equipped with SSMIS microwave radiometers, successor NPOESS spacecraft equipped with CMIS microwave radiometers, and other relevant international systems are expected to be in operation during the timeframe of the reference concept, the total number of small satellites required to complete the constellation will be reduced. A nominal plan is to begin implementation in FY'03 with launches in 2007. NASA is presently engaged in advanced mission studies and advanced instrument technology development related to the mission.

  13. Total Precipitable Water

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    The simulation was performed on 64K cores of Intrepid, running at 0.25 simulated-years-per-day and taking 25 million core-hours. This is the first simulation using both the CAM5 physics and the highly scalable spectral element dynamical core. The animation of Total Precipitable Water clearly shows hurricanes developing in the Atlantic and Pacific.

  14. Convective and stratiform precipitation trends in the Spanish Mediterranean coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Leo, A. M.; Hernández, E.; Queralt, S.; Maqueda, G.

    2013-01-01

    Eastern Iberian Peninsula is characterized by the large occurrence of convective precipitation events, which entail important economic and social damage consequences. In order to prevent and minimize its effects, a good knowledge and understanding of the meteorological processes involved are necessary to be achieved. In this regard, an algorithm for classifying convective and stratiform precipitation components has been applied to a decadal precipitation record. Dataset were provided by National Spanish Meteorological Agency (AEMET) for the period 1998-2008. Hourly precipitation records have been analyzed. The goals of this study have been: a) to classify total precipitation into its stratiform and convective components in Levante region (located in the Eastern Spanish Coast) and b) to analyze annual and seasonal trends of such components. For determining both convective and stratiform precipitation components, a suitable exponential function has been used. After a computation process, critical precipitation intensity (so-called Rc) is obtained for each year and season of the studied period. Every precipitation episode in Levante region is classified into prevailing convective or stratiform regime according to the threshold value defined by Rc. The results obtained have been compared to Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA-COARE) to verify the validity of the algorithm. First results show an annual and seasonal significant positive trend in total precipitation and stratiform component for 1998-2008 decade. Further analysis reveals that convective precipitation exhibits no significant trend. Preliminary conclusions state that the total precipitation amount in Levante Region strongly depends on the stratiform component evolution.

  15. Precipitation-runoff modeling system; user's manual

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leavesley, G.H.; Lichty, R.W.; Troutman, B.M.; Saindon, L.G.

    1983-01-01

    The concepts, structure, theoretical development, and data requirements of the precipitation-runoff modeling system (PRMS) are described. The precipitation-runoff modeling system is a modular-design, deterministic, distributed-parameter modeling system developed to evaluate the impacts of various combinations of precipitation, climate, and land use on streamflow, sediment yields, and general basin hydrology. Basin response to normal and extreme rainfall and snowmelt can be simulated to evaluate changes in water balance relationships, flow regimes, flood peaks and volumes, soil-water relationships, sediment yields, and groundwater recharge. Parameter-optimization and sensitivity analysis capabilites are provided to fit selected model parameters and evaluate their individual and joint effects on model output. The modular design provides a flexible framework for continued model system enhancement and hydrologic modeling research and development. (Author 's abstract)

  16. Seasonal and diurnal spatial patterns of precipitation frequency from the TRMM Precipitation Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuter, Sandra; Biasutti, Michela; Sobel, Adam; Burleyson, Casey

    2010-05-01

    precipitation frequencies along the lower flanks of the range during the night. Concavities in the New Guinea and New Britain coastlines also yield high frequencies of precipitation associated with diurnal land breezes. The frequency of orographic precipitation associated with the Western Ghats mountain range on the Indian subcontinent is comparable to that for the Himalayas but the Himalayas have higher conditional rain rates. In comparison to Asia and the Maritime Continent, Africa has lower frequencies of precipitation in the mountains and near the coast associated with sea/land breezes. Precipitation frequency over the African continent is highest near -12 deg S latitude corresponding to Angola, Zambia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. In the Americas, the concave southern coastline of Panama and western coastline of Columbia yields very high precipitation frequencies. The Andes do not exhibit the strong local enhancement of conditional rain rate and reflectivities aloft associated with the Himalayas. Areas with high yearly rainfall accumulations but lower rainfall frequencies, such as Darwin, Australia, indicate regions with a few intense storms. Regions where a small number of storms are responsible for the majority of local fresh water resources are potentially at higher risk for variations in fresh water availability in a changing climate.

  17. Anthropogenic Osmium in Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Sedwick, P. N.; Sharma, M.

    2007-12-01

    Here we report the Os isotopic composition for precipitation from Hanover (NH), Soda Springs (CA) and the Ross Sea (Antarctica) as determined by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry. All samples yielded non- radiogenic Os isotopic compositions. Snow and rain samples from Hanover, NH had Os concentrations of 0.8 - 12.2 fg/g (1 fg/g = 1E-15 g/g) and 187Os/188Os from 0.16 - 0.24. Snowpack from the high Sierra Nevada (Central Sierra Snow Laboratory, Soda Springs, CA) yielded Os concentration and isotopic composition of 3.6 fg/g and 0.21, respectively; Antarctic snow deposited above first year pack ice had [Os] = 0.8 fg/g and 187Os/188Os = 0.42. The isotopic ratios indicate that potential natural sources of Os to the atmosphere, such as continental mineral aerosols (187Os/188Os = 1.26) and seawater (187Os/188Os = 1.05) do not contribute bulk of Os to the precipitation. Instead, the isotopic ratios are identical to the platinum ores from the Merensky Reef in the Bushveld Igneous Complex, South Africa and Noril'sk Ni-Cu sulfide deposit associated with the Siberian Flood Basalts, Russia. These two deposits produce greater than 95 percent of the total Pt, Pd and Rh consumed annually primarily by the automotive industry. We infer that anthropogenic Os contribution dominates the isotopic composition of precipitation. The similar and non-radiogenic Os isotopic compositions observed in precipitation from disparate locations suggest that contamination of the troposphere with anthropogenic Os may be global in scale. We think that processing of ore to extract Pt, Pd, and Rh from PGE ores (PGE: group of six closely related elements Os, Ir, Pt, Pd, Rh, and Ru), which involves smelting and converting at high temperature and in the presence of oxygen, releases the volatile, toxic compound OsO4 into the troposphere, where it is mixed and then scavenged by precipitation, thus explaining both the non-radiogenic isotopic composition and the high and variable Os concentrations of

  18. Precipitation extremes with climate variability and change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, A. R.

    2011-12-01

    Significant gaps exist in our understanding of hydro-meteorological processes in the context of climate variability or change. However, despite the uncertainties, developing relatively credible insights for precipitation extremes at scales relevant for hydrology is necessary and may be possible. Statistical analyses of observed and model-simulated precipitation data, particularly methods based on extreme value theory, have demonstrated the potential to yield new insights. Specifically, a delineation of the impacts of global climate change versus regional changes in land use or urbanization may be possible and could be important for policy-makers. Precipitation extremes have known dependence on variables like sea surface temperatures, atmospheric temperature profiles and wind velocities, some of which may be better predicted than precipitation from models, exhibit less variability in observations and may not be as subject to thresholds and intermittences in either models or observations. Thus, leveraging the information content in these auxiliary variables through data mining or network science based approaches, especially if the techniques are informed by process understanding at multiple scales, may help improve regional projections of precipitation and corresponding extremes. Enhanced regional projections of precipitation and their extremes can help drive models of hydrology and hence better inform water managers, especially at scales that matter for water resources planning or managing hydraulic infrastructures. A combination of physics-based models, data-guided mathematical approaches, and quantitative techniques informed by conceptual process understanding, may be a way forward to understand the possible consequences of climate variability and global or regional change on precipitation extremes. Examples and case studies are presented from the published literature and from ongoing research.

  19. Duskside relativistic electron precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorentzen, Kirsten Ruth

    1999-10-01

    On August 20, 1996, a balloon-borne X-ray pinhole camera and a high resolution germanium X-ray spectrometer observed an intense X-ray event near Kiruna, Sweden, at 1835 MLT, on an L-shell of 5.8. This X-ray event consisted of seven bursts spaced 100-200 seconds apart, with smaller 10-20 second variations observed within individual bursts. The energy spectra of these bursts show the presence of X-rays with energies greater than 1 MeV, which are best accounted for by atmospheric bremsstrahlung from mono-energetic 1.7 MeV precipitating electrons. The X-ray imager observed no significant motion or small-scale spatial structure in the event, implying that the bursts were temporal in nature. Ultra- violet images from the Polar satellite and energetic particle data from the Los Alamos geosynchronous satellites show a small magnetospheric substorm onset about 24 minutes before the start of the relativistic precipitation event. Since the balloon was south of the auroral oval and there was no associated increase in relativistic electron flux at geosynchronous altitude, the event must be the result of some mechanism selectively precipitating ambient relativistic electrons from the radiation belts. The balloon X-ray observations are analyzed in a magnetospheric context, in order to determine which of several mechanisms for selective precipitation of relativistic electrons can account for the event. Resonance with electromagnetic ion cyclotron mode waves on the equator is the most likely candidate. The drift of substorm-injected warm protons is calculated using input from the geosynchronous satellites. Wave growth in the model is driven by temperature anisotropies in the warm proton population. A numerical solution of the wave dispersion relation shows that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves can be excited in high-density duskside regions such as the plasmasphere or detached plasma regions. These waves can selectively precipitate relativistic electrons of energy 1.7 MeV in

  20. Assimilating the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Estimates in the Canadian Precipitation Analysis (CaPA) Over North America.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boluwade, A.; Rasmussen, P. F.; Stadnyk, T. A.; Fortin, V.; Guy, R.

    2015-12-01

    The importance of precipitation measurement using estimates from satellite products cannot be over emphasized. Observations from space using sensors mounted on satellites cover wider areas and provide high spatial and temporal resolution. The estimates derived from this process are very useful in integrated hydrologic modeling, weather forecasting and monitoring landslides, droughts and floods, etc. Example of a satellite precipitation product is the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) and Global Precipitation Mission (GPM). TRMM was primarily designed to measure heavy-to-moderate rainfall over tropical and subtropical regions. GPM was designed to extend, enhance, and improve TRMM precipitation data. The primary objective of this study is the assimilation GPM satellite based precipitation estimates into the Canadian Precipitation Analysis (CaPA). CaPA combines the Global Environmental Multi-Scale model (GEM) dataset and observed precipitation from monitoring stations to provide precipitation estimates at 6hr and 24hr time steps and spatial resolution of 10km covering North America. In the result, we used the Equitable Threat Score (ETS) as performance evaluation. GPM assimilation provides higher skill (ETS) at precipitation values below 3mm while being used as additional data source. GPM has better skill as background field at precipitation value above 3mm.

  1. Preliminary considerations concerning actinide solubilities

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, T.W.; Bayhurst, B.P.; Daniels, W.R.; Erdal, B.R.; Ogard, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    Work at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory on the fundamental solution chemistry of the actinides has thus far been confined to preliminary considerations of the problems involved in developing an understanding of the precipitation and dissolution behavior of actinide compounds under environmental conditions. Attempts have been made to calculate solubility as a function of Eh and pH using the appropriate thermodynamic data; results have been presented in terms of contour maps showing lines of constant solubility as a function of Eh and pH. Possible methods of control of the redox potential of rock-groundwater systems by the use of Eh buffers (redox couples) is presented.

  2. Acid neutralization of precipitation in Northern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuesi; Yu, Wenpeng; Pan, Yuepeng; Wu, Dan

    2012-02-01

    There is an increasing concern over the impact of human-related emissions on the acid precipitation in China. However, few measurements have been conducted so far to clarify the acid-neutralization of precipitation on a regional scale. Under a network of 10 sites across Northern China operated during a 3-year period from December 2007 to November 2010, a total of 1118 rain and snow samples were collected. Of this total, 28% was acid precipitation with pH < 5.6. Out of these acid samples, 53% were found heavily acidic with pH value below 5.0, indicating significantly high levels of acidification of precipitation. Most of the acidity of precipitation was caused by H2SO4 and HNO3, their relative contribution being 72% and 28%, respectively. However; the contribution of HNO3 to precipitation acidity will be enhanced due to the increasing NO(x) and stable SO2 emissions in future. Neutralization factors for K+, NH4+, Ca2+, Na+, and Mg2+ were estimated as 0.06, 0.71, 0.72, 0.15, and 0.13, respectively. The application of multiple regression analysis further quantified higher NH4+ and Ca2+ contribution to the neutralization process, but the dominant neutralizing agent varied from site to site. The neutralization was less pronounced in the rural than urban areas, probably due to different levels of alkaline species, which strongly buffered the acidity. Presence of high concentrations of basic ions was mainly responsible for high pH of precipitation with annual volume-weighted mean (VWM) values larger than 5.6 at several sites. It was estimated that in the absence of buffering ions, for the given concentration of SO4(2-) and NO3-, the annual VWM pH of precipitation would have been recorded around 3.5 across Northern China. This feature suggested that emissions of particles and gaseous NH3 played very important role in controlling the spatial variations of pH of precipitation in the target areas.

  3. Visual-spatial memory may be enhanced with theta burst deep brain stimulation of the fornix: a preliminary investigation with four cases.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jonathan P; Sweet, Jennifer A; Bailey, Christopher M; Munyon, Charles N; Luders, Hans O; Fastenau, Philip S

    2015-07-01

    Memory loss after brain injury can be a source of considerable morbidity, but there are presently few therapeutic options for restoring memory function. We have previously demonstrated that burst stimulation of the fornix is able to significantly improve memory in a rodent model of traumatic brain injury. The present study is a preliminary investigation with a small group of cases to explore whether theta burst stimulation of the fornix might improve memory in humans. Four individuals undergoing stereo-electroencephalography evaluation for drug-resistant epilepsy were enrolled. All participants were implanted with an electrode into the proximal fornix and dorsal hippocampal commissure on the language dominant (n = 3) or language non-dominant (n = 1) side, and stimulation of this electrode reliably produced a diffuse evoked potential in the head and body of the ipsilateral hippocampus. Each participant underwent testing of verbal memory (Rey Auditory-Verbal Learning Test), visual-spatial memory (Medical College of Georgia Complex Figure Test), and visual confrontational naming (Boston Naming Test Short Form) once per day over at least two consecutive days using novel test forms each day. For 50% of the trials, the fornix electrode was continuously stimulated using a burst pattern (200 Hz in 100 ms trains, five trains per second, 100 µs, 7 mA) and was compared with sham stimulation. Participants and examiners were blinded to whether stimulation was active or not, and the order of stimulation was randomized. The small sample size precluded use of inferential statistics; therefore, data were analysed using descriptive statistics and graphic analysis. Burst stimulation of the fornix was not perceived by any of the participants but was associated with a robust reversible improvement in immediate and delayed performance on the Medical College of Georgia Complex Figure Test. There were no apparent differences on either Rey Auditory-Verbal Learning Test or Boston Naming

  4. Potential Impacts of Pollution Aerosol and Dust Acting As Cloud-Nucleating Aerosol on Precipitation in the Colorado River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, V.; Cotton, W. R.; Carrio, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    The southwest US has huge demands on water resources. The Colorado River Basin (CRB) is potentially affected by anthropogenic aerosol pollution and dust acting as cloud-nucleating aerosol as well as impacting snowpack albedo.The specific objective of this research is to quantify the impacts of both dust and pollution aerosols on wintertime precipitation in the Colorado Mountains for the years 2005-2006. We examine the combined effects of anthropogenic pollution aerosol and dust serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), ice nuclei (IN) and giant CCN(GCCN) on precipitation in the CRB. Anthropogenic pollution can enhance droplet concentrations, and decrease collision and coalescence and ice particle riming largely via the "spillover" effect. Dust can serve as IN and enhance precipitation in wintertime orographic clouds. Dust coated with sulfates or originating over dry lake beds can serve as GCCN which when wetted can result in larger cloud droplets and thereby enhance the warm-rain collision and coalescence process and ice particle riming. But smaller dust particles coated with sulfates, can decrease collision and coalescence and ice particle riming similar to anthropogenic pollution aerosols. The Colorado State University (CSU) Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) version 6.0 is used for this study. RAMS was modified to ingest GEOS-CHEM output data and periodically update aerosol fields. GEOS-CHEM is a chemical transport model which uses assimilated meteorological data from the NASA Goddard Earth Observation System (GEOS). The aerosol data comprise a sum of hydrophobic and hydrophilic black carbon and organic aerosol, hydrophilic SOAs, hydrocarbon oxidation and inorganic aerosols (nitrate, sulfate and ammonium). In addition, a RAMS-based dust source and transport model is used. Preliminary analysis suggests pollution dominates over dust resulting in a decrease in precipitation via the spillover effect. Dust serving as GCCN and IN tend to enhance ice

  5. DISSOLUTION OF LANTHANUM FLUORIDE PRECIPITATES

    DOEpatents

    Fries, B.A.

    1959-11-10

    A plutonium separatory ore concentration procedure involving the use of a fluoride type of carrier is presented. An improvement is given in the derivation step in the process for plutonium recovery by carrier precipitation of plutonium values from solution with a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate and subsequent derivation from the resulting plutonium bearing carrier precipitate of an aqueous acidic plutonium-containing solution. The carrier precipitate is contacted with a concentrated aqueous solution of potassium carbonate to effect dissolution therein of at least a part of the precipitate, including the plutonium values. Any remaining precipitate is separated from the resulting solution and dissolves in an aqueous solution containing at least 20% by weight of potassium carbonate. The reacting solutions are combined, and an alkali metal hydroxide added to a concentration of at least 2N to precipitate lanthanum hydroxide concomitantly carrying plutonium values.

  6. Aerosol-precipitation interactions in the southern Appalachian Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, G. M.; Taubman, B. F.; Perry, L. B.; Sherman, J. P.; Soulé, P. T.; Sheridan, P. J.

    2012-02-01

    There are many uncertainties associated with aerosol-precipitation interactions, particularly in mountain regions where a variety of processes at different spatial scales influence precipitation patterns. Aerosol-precipitation linkages were examined in the southern Appalachian Mountains, guided by the following research questions: (1) how do aerosol properties observed during precipitation events vary by season (e.g., summer vs. winter) and synoptic event type (e.g., frontal vs. non-frontal); and (2) what influence does air mass source region have on aerosol properties? Precipitation events were identified based on regional precipitation data and classified using a synoptic classification scheme developed for this study. Hourly aerosol data were collected at the Appalachian Atmospheric Interdisciplinary Research (AppalAIR) facility at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC (1110 m a.s.l., 36.215°, -81.680°). Backward air trajectories provided information on upstream atmospheric characteristics and source regions. During the warm season (June to September), greater aerosol loading dominated by larger particles was observed, while cool season (November to April) precipitation events exhibited overall lower aerosol loading with an apparent influence from biomass burning particles. Aerosol-induced precipitation enhancement may have been detected in each season, particularly during warm season non-frontal precipitation.

  7. Improving Groundwater Predictions using Seasonal Precipitation Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almanaseer, N.; Arumugam, S.; Bales, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    This research aims to evaluate the utility of precipitation forecasts in improving groundwater and streamflow predictions at seasonal and monthly time scales using statistical modeling techniques. For this purpose, we select ten groundwater wells from the Groundwater Climate Response Network (GCRN) and nine streamgauges from the Hydro-Climatic Data Network (HCDN) to represent groundwater and surface water variability with minimal anthropogenic influences over Flint River Basin (FRB) in Georgia, U.S. Preliminary analysis shows significant correlation between precipitation forecasts over FRB with observed precipitation (P), streamflow discharges (Q) and depth to groundwater (G). Three statistical models are developed using principle component regression (PCR) and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) with leave-5-out cross-validation to predict winter (JFM) and spring (AMJ) as well as monthly (Jan through Jun) groundwater and streamflow for the selected sites. The three models starts at the end of Dec and uses Oct, Nov and Dec (OND) observed records to predict 2-seasons and 6-months ahead. Model-1 is the "null model" that does not include precipitation forecasts as predictors. It is developed using PCR to predict seasonal and monthly Q and G independently based on previous (Oct. Nov. and Dec; OND) observations of Q or G at a given site without using climate information. Model predictands are JFM, AMJ for seasonal and Jan. through Jun for monthly. Model-2 is also developed using PCR, but it uses the issued at January precipitation forecasts from nine ECHAM 4.5 grid points as additional predictors. Model-3 is developed using CCA and it aims to integrate additional information on the predictands (i.e., groundwater) from adjacent basins to improve the prediction. Model-3 is designed to evaluate the role of climate versus the role groundwater and surface water flows in the selected basins. Finally, comparisons between the three models for each site and across the sites

  8. Impacts of irrigation on dry season precipitation in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen Roy, Shouraseni; Mahmood, Rezaul; Quintanar, Arturo I.; Gonzalez, Astrid

    2011-05-01

    There is a lack of observed data-based studies examining the role of enhanced soil moisture conditions (due to irrigation) on the prevailing precipitation. Therefore, in the present study, we have examined the impacts of the Green Revolution (GR) related expansion of irrigation and changes in dry season (the rabi (November to May) and the zaid (March to June)) precipitation in India. The results for some regions indicated decreasing and increasing trend in precipitation during the pre- and post-GR periods, respectively. For example, in eastern Madhya Pradesh, the pre- and post-GR precipitation trends for the zaid season were -0.45 and 2.40 mm year-1, respectively. On the other hand, some regions reported lower rate of decline in precipitation during the post-GR period. This paper suggests that both positive and lower declining trend during the post-GR period were linked to increased precipitation due to the introduction of irrigation. The study has found up to 69 mm (121%) increase in total amount of precipitation for growing seasons during the post-GR period. Moreover, a 175% increase in average precipitation was also recorded. All irrigated regions show a notable increase in precipitation during post-GR growing seasons. It was found that differences in growing season average precipitation between the pre- and post-GR periods were statistically significant for most of the regions. For further verification of results, the MM5 and Noah land surface model were applied. These applications show changes in precipitation and various precipitation controlling factors due to changes in soil moisture.

  9. Passive Microwave Precipitation Detection Biases: Relationship to Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viramontez, A.; Rapp, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate satellite precipitation estimates are essential for understanding the long-term variability in the global hydrologic cycle and for constraining global climate models. Spaceborne precipitation estimates depend heavily on passive microwave remote sensors due to the large spatial coverage and long record of observations available from such sensors; however, light precipitation is frequently undetected or underestimated by passive microwave rainfall retrievals. Observations from the CloudSat Profiling Radar (CPR) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) provide a unique opportunity for long-term collocated precipitation measurements from passive microwave sensors and an active radar with sensitivity to very light precipitation that can be used to assess the precipitation detection biases. For this study, collocated measurements from AMSR-E and CloudSat during 2008 will be used to identify environments where AMSR-E underestimates precipitation. Environmental variables from the ECMWF Reanalysis (ERA-Interim) will be used to understand the characteristics of the large-scale and thermodynamic environments associated with AMSR-E precipitation biases. A preliminary comparison of CPR rain rates and AMSR-E Level-2B rain rates show a large fraction of rain missed by AMSR-E, with nearly 80% of missed light rain in regions with SSTs below 25°C. This is consistent with prior studies showing large detection biases in regions of large-scale subsidence. The relationship between precipitation biases and other factors such as 2 m air temperature, column water vapor, lower tropospheric stability, and vertical velocity will be explored.

  10. Precipitation responses to radiative effects of ice clouds: A cloud-resolving modeling study of a pre-summer torrential precipitation event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xinyong; Huang, Wenyan; Guo, Chunyan; Jiang, Xiaocen

    2016-10-01

    The precipitation responses to the radiative effects of ice clouds are investigated through analysis of five-day and horizontally averaged data from 2D cumulus ensemble model experiments of a pre-summer torrential precipitation event. The exclusion of the radiative effects of ice clouds lowered the precipitation rate through a substantial reduction in the decrease of hydrometeors when the radiative effects of water clouds were switched on, whereas it increased the precipitation rate through hydrometeor change from an increase to a decrease when the radiative effects of ice clouds were turned off. The weakened hydrometeor decrease was associated with the enhanced longwave radiative cooling mainly through the decreases in the melting of non-precipitating ice to non-precipitating water. The hydrometeor change from an increase to a decrease corresponded to the strengthened longwave radiative cooling in the upper troposphere through the weakened collection of non-precipitating water by precipitation water.

  11. Observed trends in light precipitation events over global land during 1961-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Guanhuan; Huang, Gang; Tao, Weichen; Liu, Chunxia

    2016-07-01

    Based on daily station precipitation data, this study investigates the trends in light precipitation events (less than the 50th percentile) over global land during 1961-2010. It is found that the frequency of light precipitation events decreases over East China (EC) and northern Eurasia (NE) but increases over the United States of America (US), Australia (AU), and the Iberian Peninsula (IP). However, the trends in the intensity of light precipitation events are opposite to those in frequency. We find that the trends in light precipitation events are possibly associated with the changes in static stability. Over EC and NE (US, AU, and IP), the static stability weakens (strengthens) during 1961-2010. The weakening (strengthening) of static stability leads to increase (decrease) in precipitation intensity due to the enhancement (reduction) of upward motion; light (relatively heavier) precipitation events accordingly shift toward relatively heavier (light) precipitation, and the frequency of light precipitation events decreases (increases) consequently.

  12. Treatment of ink effluents from flexographic printing by lime precipitation and boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrochemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Diamadopoulos, Evan; Barndõk, Helen; Xekoukoulotakis, Nikolaos P; Mantzavinos, Dionissios

    2009-01-01

    Effluent treatment from flexographic printing was investigated by precipitation/coagulation and electrochemical oxidation over boron-doped diamond electrodes. Precipitation with 3 g/L of lime led to complete removal of effluent turbidity (initial value of about 410 NTU) but only about 20% chemical oxygen demand (COD) decrease (initial value of about 1,900 mg/L). Higher lime dosages (up to 15 g/L) had no effect on separation. On the other hand, coagulation with alum in the range 0.05-1 mM failed to enhance the extent of solids separation achieved by gravity settling alone (i.e. about 60%). Preliminary electrochemical oxidation experiments in the presence of sulphuric acid as supporting electrolyte showed that treatment performance (in terms of COD removal and decrease in sample absorbance at 300 nm) increased with increasing applied current. The latter was more efficiently utilized at shorter treatment times and lower currents with efficiency reaching 30%. Following lime precipitation, the effluent was electrochemically oxidized at alkaline conditions for 360 min yielding 64% absorbance reduction and 50% COD removal (this corresponds to 60% overall COD removal for the combined process). The rather low electrochemical treatment performance may be attributed to limestone deposition and fouling of electrodes and other electrochemical reactor components as evidenced by the gradual drop in conductivity/current throughout the operation.

  13. Treatment of ink effluents from flexographic printing by lime precipitation and boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrochemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Diamadopoulos, Evan; Barndõk, Helen; Xekoukoulotakis, Nikolaos P; Mantzavinos, Dionissios

    2009-01-01

    Effluent treatment from flexographic printing was investigated by precipitation/coagulation and electrochemical oxidation over boron-doped diamond electrodes. Precipitation with 3 g/L of lime led to complete removal of effluent turbidity (initial value of about 410 NTU) but only about 20% chemical oxygen demand (COD) decrease (initial value of about 1,900 mg/L). Higher lime dosages (up to 15 g/L) had no effect on separation. On the other hand, coagulation with alum in the range 0.05-1 mM failed to enhance the extent of solids separation achieved by gravity settling alone (i.e. about 60%). Preliminary electrochemical oxidation experiments in the presence of sulphuric acid as supporting electrolyte showed that treatment performance (in terms of COD removal and decrease in sample absorbance at 300 nm) increased with increasing applied current. The latter was more efficiently utilized at shorter treatment times and lower currents with efficiency reaching 30%. Following lime precipitation, the effluent was electrochemically oxidized at alkaline conditions for 360 min yielding 64% absorbance reduction and 50% COD removal (this corresponds to 60% overall COD removal for the combined process). The rather low electrochemical treatment performance may be attributed to limestone deposition and fouling of electrodes and other electrochemical reactor components as evidenced by the gradual drop in conductivity/current throughout the operation. PMID:19923752

  14. Precipitation in pores: A geochemical frontier

    DOE PAGES

    Stack, Andrew G.

    2015-07-29

    This article's purpose is to review some of the recent research in which geochemists have examined precipitation of solid phases in porous media, particularly in pores a few nanometers in diameter (nanopores). While this is a “review,” it is actually more forward-looking in that the list of things about this phenomenon that we do not know or cannot control at this time is likely longer than what we do know and can control. For example, there are three directly contradictory theories on how to predict how precipitation proceeds in a medium of varying pore size, as will be discussed below.more » The confusion on this subject likely stems from the complexity of the phenomenon itself: One can easily clog a porous medium by inducing a rapid, homogeneous precipitation directly from solution, or have limited precipitation occur that does not affect permeability or even porosity substantially. It is more difficult to engineer mineral precipitation in order to obtain a specific outcome, such as filling all available pore space over a targeted area for the purposes of contaminant sequestration. However, breakthrough discoveries could occur in the next five to ten years that enhance our ability to predict robustly and finely control precipitation in porous media by understanding how porosity and permeability evolve in response to system perturbations. These discoveries will likely stem (at least in part) from advances in our ability to 1) perform and interpret X-ray/neutron scattering experiments that reveal the extent of precipitation and its locales within porous media (Anovitz and Cole 2015, this volume), and 2) utilize increasingly powerful simulations to test concepts and models about the evolution of porosity and permeability as precipitation occurs (Steefel et al. 2015, this volume). A further important technique to isolate specific phenomena and understand reactivity is also microfluidics cell experiments that allow specific control of flow paths and fluid

  15. Precipitation in pores: A geochemical frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Stack, Andrew G.

    2015-07-29

    This article's purpose is to review some of the recent research in which geochemists have examined precipitation of solid phases in porous media, particularly in pores a few nanometers in diameter (nanopores). While this is a “review,” it is actually more forward-looking in that the list of things about this phenomenon that we do not know or cannot control at this time is likely longer than what we do know and can control. For example, there are three directly contradictory theories on how to predict how precipitation proceeds in a medium of varying pore size, as will be discussed below. The confusion on this subject likely stems from the complexity of the phenomenon itself: One can easily clog a porous medium by inducing a rapid, homogeneous precipitation directly from solution, or have limited precipitation occur that does not affect permeability or even porosity substantially. It is more difficult to engineer mineral precipitation in order to obtain a specific outcome, such as filling all available pore space over a targeted area for the purposes of contaminant sequestration. However, breakthrough discoveries could occur in the next five to ten years that enhance our ability to predict robustly and finely control precipitation in porous media by understanding how porosity and permeability evolve in response to system perturbations. These discoveries will likely stem (at least in part) from advances in our ability to 1) perform and interpret X-ray/neutron scattering experiments that reveal the extent of precipitation and its locales within porous media (Anovitz and Cole 2015, this volume), and 2) utilize increasingly powerful simulations to test concepts and models about the evolution of porosity and permeability as precipitation occurs (Steefel et al. 2015, this volume). A further important technique to isolate specific phenomena and understand reactivity is also microfluidics cell experiments that allow specific control of flow paths and fluid velocities

  16. Feasibility of preparing nanodrugs by high-gravity reactive precipitation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Feng; Zhou, Min-Yi; Shao, Lei; Wang, Yu-Yong; Yun, Jimmy; Chew, Nora Y K; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2004-01-01

    To study the feasibility of producing nanoparticles of organic pharmaceuticals using a novel high-gravity reactive precipitation (HGRP) technique, reactive precipitation of benzoic acid as a model compound was carried out in a rotating packed bed under high gravity. The main factors such as the rotating bed speed, concentration and volume flow rate of the reactants (sodium benzoate and HCl) affecting the particle size of the precipitate were studied. Particle size was measured by transmission electron microscopy. Benzoic acid was precipitated as nanoparticles as fine as 10nm. The particle size was decreased with increasing rotating bed speed, concentration and volume flow rate of the reactants. The formation of ultrafine particles was due to intensified micro-mixing of reactants in the rotating bed to enhance nucleation while suppressing crystal growth. The results have demonstrated the feasibility to produce nanodrugs by the principle of acid-base precipitating reaction using HGRP.

  17. Preliminary Results on FeCrAl Alloys in the As-received and Welded State Designed to Have Enhanced Weldability and Radiation Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Hu, Xunxiang; Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2015-09-30

    The present report summarizes and discusses the recent results on developing a modern, nuclear grade FeCrAl alloy designed to have enhanced radiation tolerance and weldability. The alloys used for these investigations are modern FeCrAl alloys based on a Fe-13Cr-5Al-2Mo-0.2Si-0.05Y alloy (in wt.%, designated C35M). Development efforts have focused on assessing the influence of chemistry and microstructure on the fabricability and performance of these newly developed alloys. Specific focus was made to assess the weldability, thermal stability, and radiation tolerance.

  18. Chemical modification of TiO2 by H2PO{4/-}/HPO{4/2-} anions using the sol-gel route with controlled precipitation and hydrolysis: enhancing thermal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elghniji, Kais; Saad, Mohamed El Khames; Araissi, Manel; Elaloui, Elimame; Moussaoui, Younes

    2014-12-01

    Two titanium phosphate materials (T p P and T h P) have been successfully synthesized by sol-gel route with controlled precipitation and hydrolysis. The T p P material was obtained from the reaction between precipitated titania and phosphate buffer solution H2PO{4/-} /HPO{4/2-} (pH = 7.3). The T p P material was prepared through hydrolysis of titanium in the presence of H2PO{4/-}/HPO{4/2}. The probable state of the phosphate anions in titania framework and their effect on the anatase-to-rutile transformation were characterized by ICP-AES, DTA-TG, 31P NMR, FT-IR, and Raman analysis HRTEM/SEM. FT-IR and 31P NMR analyses of titanium phosphate T p P calcined at low temperature showed that the phosphate species existed not only as Ti-O-P in the bulk TiO2 but also as amorphous titanium phosphates, including bidentate Ti(HPO4)2 and monodentate Ti(H2PO4)4. Increased calcination temperature only gave an enrichment of bidentate structure on the titania surface. For the T p P material, H2PO{4/-}/HPO{4/2-} anions were introduced into the initial solution, before precipitation, what promoted their lattice localization. At high temperatures, all the phosphorus inside the bulk of TiO2 migrated to the surface. The Raman analysis of both samples showed that the bidentate phosphates increased the temperature of the anatase-to-rutile phase transformation to more than 1000 °C with the formation of well crystalline TiP2O7 phase. This phenomenon was more evident for T p P sample.

  19. Contrast-enhanced, real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging of tissue perfusion: preliminary results in a rabbit model of testicular torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paltiel, H. J.; Padua, H. M.; Gargollo, P. C.; Cannon, G. M., Jr.; Alomari, A. I.; Yu, R.; Clement, G. T.

    2011-04-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (US) imaging is potentially applicable to the clinical investigation of a wide variety of perfusion disorders. Quantitative analysis of perfusion is not widely performed, and is limited by the fact that data are acquired from a single tissue plane, a situation that is unlikely to accurately reflect global perfusion. Real-time perfusion information from a tissue volume in an experimental rabbit model of testicular torsion was obtained with a two-dimensional matrix phased array US transducer. Contrast-enhanced imaging was performed in 20 rabbits during intravenous infusion of the microbubble contrast agent Definity® before and after unilateral testicular torsion and contralateral orchiopexy. The degree of torsion was 0° in 4 (sham surgery), 180° in 4, 360° in 4, 540° in 4, and 720° in 4. An automated technique was developed to analyze the time history of US image intensity in experimental and control testes. Comparison of mean US intensity rate of change and of ratios between mean US intensity rate of change in experimental and control testes demonstrated good correlation with testicular perfusion and mean perfusion ratios obtained with radiolabeled microspheres, an accepted 'gold standard'. This method is of potential utility in the clinical evaluation of testicular and other organ perfusion.

  20. ER-2 Observations of Precipitation Systems During TRMM-LBA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald; Tian, Lin; Geerts, Bart

    1999-01-01

    The NASA ER-2 performed numerous flights over precipitation systems in Rondonia, Brazil. The ER-2 carried a payload including the ER-2 Doppler Radar (EDOP), the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR), the Lightning Instrument Package, and other instruments. This presentation will overview the types of data sets collected during TRMM-LBA (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Satellite-Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia) with particular emphasis on EDOP measurements. Numerous cases of convection ranging from weak to very intense, were overflown by the ER-2. Two TRMM overpasses were coincident with ER-2 flights which allowed for intercomparisons between the Precipitation Radiometer (PR), EDOP, and the S-POL (S-band Polarimetric Radar) and TOGA (Tropical Oceans and Global Atmosphere) ground-based radars. Preliminary results from this comparison will be presented as well as initial selection of case studies and efforts involving vertical motions in convection.

  1. Electron Precipitation at Mars: Advancing Our Understanding with MAVEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Noori, H.; Lillis, R. J.; Fillingim, M. O.

    2015-12-01

    Electrons from the solar wind enter the Martian upper atmosphere from space in a process known as electron precipitation. These electrons are confined to move along magnetic field lines and, when those field lines intersect the atmosphere, the electrons collide with atmospheric neutral particles, resulting in heating, dissociation, ionization and excitation of those neutrals. Electron precipitation is an important source of energy input to the Mars upper atmosphere, and is typically the dominant source on the nightside. Past observations from Mars Global Surveyor have characterized patterns of electron precipitation, but only at ~400 km and ~2 AM local time. The MAVEN mission and in particular the SWEA instrument, provides an opportunity to study the distribution of suprathermal electrons in near-Mars space, over a range of altitudes from 120-6000 km and at a range of local times. We will present preliminary observations of flux patterns of these electrons.

  2. ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) Science Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, L. R.; Prather, K.; Ralph, R.; Rosenfeld, D.; Spackman, R.; DeMott, P.; Fairall, C.; Fan, J.; Hagos, S.; Hughes, M.; Long, C.; Rutledge, S.; Waliser, D.; Wang, H.

    2014-09-01

    The western U.S. receives precipitation predominantly during the cold season when storms approach from the Pacific Ocean. The snowpack that accumulates during winter storms provides about 70-90% of water supply for the region. Understanding and modeling the fundamental processes that govern the large precipitation variability and extremes in the western U.S. is a critical test for the ability of climate models to predict the regional water cycle, including floods and droughts. Two elements of significant importance in predicting precipitation variability in the western U.S. are atmospheric rivers and aerosols. Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are narrow bands of enhanced water vapor associated with the warm sector of extratropical cyclones over the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Because of the large lower-tropospheric water vapor content, strong atmospheric winds and neutral moist static stability, some ARs can produce heavy precipitation by orographic enhancement during landfall on the U.S. West Coast. While ARs are responsible for a large fraction of heavy precipitation in that region during winter, much of the rest of the orographic precipitation occurs in post-frontal clouds, which are typically quite shallow, with tops just high enough to pass the mountain barrier. Such clouds are inherently quite susceptible to aerosol effects on both warm rain and ice precipitation-forming processes.

  3. Effective Assimilation of Global Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, G.; Kalnay, E.; Miyoshi, T.; Huffman, G. J.

    2012-12-01

    Assimilating precipitation observations by modifying the moisture and sometimes temperature profiles has been shown successful in forcing the model precipitation to be close to the observed precipitation, but only while the assimilation is taking place. After the forecast start, the model tends to "forget" the assimilation changes and lose their extra skill after few forecast hours. This suggests that this approach is not an efficient way to modify the potential vorticity field, since this is the variable that the model would remember. In this study, the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) method is used to effectively change the potential vorticity field by allowing ensemble members with better precipitation to receive higher weights. In addition to using an EnKF, two other changes in the precipitation assimilation process are proposed to solve the problems related to the highly non-Gaussian nature of the precipitation variable: a) transform precipitation into a Gaussian distribution based on its climatological distribution, and b) only assimilate precipitation at the location where some ensemble members have positive precipitation. The idea is first tested by the observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) using SPEEDY, a simplified but realistic general circulation model. When the global precipitation is assimilated in addition to conventional rawinsonde observations, both the analyses and the medium range forecasts are significantly improved as compared to only having rawinsonde observations. The improvement is much reduced when only modifying the moisture field with the same approach, which shows the importance of the error covariance between precipitation and all other model variables. The effect of precipitation assimilation is larger in the Southern Hemisphere than that in the Northern Hemisphere because the Northern Hemisphere analyses are already accurate as a result of denser rawinsonde stations. Assimilation of precipitation using a more comprehensive

  4. Care and Respect for Elders in Emergencies program: a preliminary report of a volunteer approach to enhance care in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Sanon, Martine; Baumlin, Kevin M; Kaplan, Shari Sirkin; Grudzen, Corita R

    2014-02-01

    Older adults who present to an emergency department (ED) generally have more-complex medical conditions with complicated care needs and are at high risk for preventable adverse outcomes during their ED visit. The Care and Respect for Elders with Emergencies (CARE) volunteer initiative is a geriatric-focused volunteer program developed to help prevent avoidable complications such as falls, delirium and use of restraints, and functional decline in vulnerable elders in the ED. The CARE program consists of bedside volunteer interventions ranging from conversation to various short activities designed to engage and reorient high-risk, older, unaccompanied individuals in the ED. This article describes the development and characteristics of the CARE program, the services provided, the experiences of the elderly patients and their volunteers, and the growth of the program over time. CARE volunteers provide elders with the additional attention needed in an often chaotic, unfamiliar environment by enhancing their care, improving satisfaction, and preventing potential decline.

  5. Application of Gis Technology for the Precipitation Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyras, I.; Serafin-Rek, D.

    2003-04-01

    Precipitation is one of the most variable meteorological parameters in time and space. The standard surface measurement network provides a very localised information about the precipitation. The satellite, radar observations and Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models provide the continuous information on the state of the atmosphere, however, with the much lower resolution. Combining these data into one system allows analysing the data from different sources in order to estimate the precipitation intensity and range. The paper presents the works undertaken for the Central Europe region for the stratiform and convective precipitation. The analysis results are prepared in the form of maps of precipitation intensity and range. The satellite data available from an Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) on board of NOAA-15, 16 and 17 satellites enhanced the possibilities of the new meteorological precipitation related products derivation. The products such as Rain Rate (RR), Scattering Index (SI), Total Precipitation Water (TPW), Precipitation Probability (PP) and Liquid Water Path (LWP) were prepared basing on the regression algorithms. The data from spring and summer seasons in 2001 and 2002 were used. The temperature and precipitation thematic layers are created from the NWP model grid data. Also SYNOP and TEMP data are converted into thematic coverages. The progress in GIS technology application for NOAA/AMSU microwave derived products preparation and visualization in the Satellite Research Department in Poland was accomplished. The developed system allows displaying the rain field forecasted by the NWP model Aladin and the precipitation observed with the satellite data and other ancillary information. The maps of precipitation with additional geographical data and administrative boundaries are available for the weather forecasting units via Intranet. It is planned to make images available on the web for external customers. Radar and lightning data as well as

  6. Sparse Downscaling and Adaptive Fusion of Multi-sensor Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebtehaj, M.; Foufoula, E.

    2011-12-01

    The past decades have witnessed a remarkable emergence of new sources of multiscale multi-sensor precipitation data including data from global spaceborne active and passive sensors, regional ground based weather surveillance radars and local rain-gauges. Resolution enhancement of remotely sensed rainfall and optimal integration of multi-sensor data promise a posteriori estimates of precipitation fluxes with increased accuracy and resolution to be used in hydro-meteorological applications. In this context, new frameworks are proposed for resolution enhancement and multiscale multi-sensor precipitation data fusion, which capitalize on two main observations: (1) sparseness of remotely sensed precipitation fields in appropriately chosen transformed domains, (e.g., in wavelet space) which promotes the use of the newly emerged theory of sparse representation and compressive sensing for resolution enhancement; (2) a conditionally Gaussian Scale Mixture (GSM) parameterization in the wavelet domain which allows exploiting the efficient linear estimation methodologies, while capturing the non-Gaussian data structure of rainfall. The proposed methodologies are demonstrated using a data set of coincidental observations of precipitation reflectivity images by the spaceborne precipitation radar (PR) aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) satellite and ground-based NEXRAD weather surveillance Doppler radars. Uniqueness and stability of the solution, capturing non-Gaussian singular structure of rainfall, reduced uncertainty of estimation and efficiency of computation are the main advantages of the proposed methodologies over the commonly used standard Gaussian techniques.

  7. Precipitation controls isoprene emissions from tropical ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potosnak, M. J.; Gatti, L. V.; Guenther, A. B.; Karl, T.; Trostdorf, C. R.; Martins, W. C.; Rinne, H. J.; Yamazaki, A.

    2003-12-01

    Isoprene emissions from tropical regions account for a majority of isoprene produced globally. Current estimates of global isoprene emissions use meteorological inputs (temperature and light), ecosystem leaf area, and a time invariant, ecosystem specific emissions factor. This approach has been verified to work well for deciduous mid-latitude forests, but the approach has not been tested for tropical ecosystems where seasonality is induced by precipitation. Recent flux studies at two field stations in the tropics found strong effects of precipitation regime (dry vs. wet season) on isoprene emissions. A flux study conducted during the wet season (October 1999) at the La Selva Biological Station (10° 26' N, 83° 59' W, precipitation 4000 mm yr{-1}) found whole system isoprene emissions rates between 2--10 mg C m-2 h-1, while a second campaign during the dry season (April 2003) found values ranging 8--16 mg C m-2 h-1. This difference could not be explained by changes in ambient temperature or light using established emissions algorithms. The second field site near Santarém, Brazil in the Floresta Nacional do Tapajós (2° 51' S, 54° 58' W, precipitation 2000 mm yr{-1}), part of the Large scale Biosphere-atmosphere experiment in Amazônia (LBA), showed a similar pattern. Additionally, a 13 month isoprene concentration record at this station found a 4 fold increase during the dry season. Application of a one dimensional chemistry model predicts a similar change in isoprene source strength. A standard emission model using temperature and light could not account for these seasonal changes, but adding an empirical term that accounted for previous precipitation greatly enhanced the fit.

  8. Modeling of asphaltene and wax precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, F.; Sarathi, P.; Jones, R.

    1991-01-01

    This research project was designed to focus on the development of a predictive technique for organic deposition during gas injection for petroleum EOR. A thermodynamic model has been developed to describe the effects of temperature, pressure, and composition on asphaltene precipitation. The proposed model combines regular solution theory with Flory-Huggins polymer solutions theory to predict maximum volume fractions of asphaltene dissolved in oil. The model requires evaluation of vapor-liquid equilibria, first using an equation of state followed by calculations of asphaltene solubility in the liquid-phase. A state-of-the-art technique for C{sub 7+} fraction characterization was employed in developing this model. The preliminary model developed in this work was able to predict qualitatively the trends of the effects of temperature, pressure, and composition. Since the mechanism of paraffinic wax deposition is different from that of asphaltene deposition, another thermodynamic model based on the solid-liquid solution theory was developed to predict the wax formation. This model is simple and can predict the wax appearance temperature with reasonable accuracy. Accompanying the modeling work, experimental studies were conducted to investigate the solubility of asphaltene in oil land solvents and to examine the effects of oil composition, CO{sub 2}, and solvent on asphaltene precipitation and its properties. This research focused on the solubility reversibility of asphaltene in oil and the precipitation caused by CO{sub 2} injection at simulated reservoir temperature and pressure conditions. These experiments have provided many observations about the properties of asphaltenes for further improvement of the model, but more detailed information about the properties of asphaltenes in solution is needed for the development of more reliable asphaltene characterization techniques. 50 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. Pesticides in Iowa precipitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nations, B.K.; Hallberg, G.R.

    1992-01-01

    Rainfall was sampled for pesticides to assess their occurrence in precipitation and potential impacts on water resources. Three areas in Iowa were sampled; two localities were in rural settings, and a third in an urban area. Fourteen pesticides, including ten herbicides and four insecticides, were detected from October 1987 through September 1990. Atrazine, alachlor, cyanazine, and metolachlor were the most commonly detected, with one or more of these four herbicides found in almost every rainfall sample during the growing season. Concentrations of individual pesticides ranged from 0.1 ??g L-1 to 40.0 ??g L-1, with most detections under 1.0 ??g L-1. Pesticide detections in rainfall began in April and ended in July or August, probably related to the timing of chemical application and greater volatilization rates during warmer weather. Samples from the urban site had detections of the same agricultural chemicals found at the rural sites, but in lesser quantities. In addition to the commonly detected herbicides, three of the four insecticides detected in rainfall were only found in urban samples. Two of these have urban as well as agricultural uses. Some variation of pesticide detections were seen at the three sampling localities, related to regional and local use patterns. Concentrations were greater at sampling sites near fields where pesticides are applied, suggesting that local volatilization and distance of transport affect the concentrations in rainfall. Pesticide concentrations were highest at the beginning of a rainfall event with concentrations becoming lower in samples taken later in the event.

  10. A preliminary look at AVE-SESAME 3 conducted on 25-26 April 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, S. F.; Horvath, N.; Turner, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    General weather conditions, including synoptic maps, radar reports, satellite photographs, precipitation areas and amounts, and a summary of severe weather reports are presented. These data provide researchers a preliminary look at conditions during the AVE-SESAME 3 period.

  11. Deep vein thrombosis using noncontrast-enhanced MR venography with electrocardiographically gated three-dimensional half-Fourier FSE: preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Ono, Atsushi; Murase, Kenya; Taniguchi, Toshitaka; Shibutani, Osamu; Takata, Satoru; Kobashi, Yasuyuki; Miyazaki, Mitsue

    2009-04-01

    Three noncontrast-enhanced MR venography techniques are presented for assessing deep vein thrombosis (DVT) at 0.5 T in patients with metallic implants. Two cardiac-gated 3D half-Fourier FSE fresh blood imaging sequences with flow-refocusing pulses (FR-FBI) in the read-out (RO) direction and without FR pulses (non-FR-FBI) were developed for slower-flowing blood. For faster flowing blood, a swap phase-encode arterial double-subtraction elimination (SPADE) technique was developed. The three techniques were assessed both quantitatively using signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-noise-ratio (CNR) measurements and qualitatively by subjective image analysis in 15 volunteers. SPADE was compared to FR-FBI in the pelvic veins and FR-FBI was compared to non-FR-FBI in the thigh and calf veins. Both SPADE and FR-FBI techniques produced significantly higher SNRs, CNRs, and image quality in each comparative study (P<0.001). Five patients with metallic implants and confirmed DVT underwent SPADE (pelvic veins) and FR-FBI (thigh and calf veins) examinations and the results were compared to conventional venography. The SPADE and FR-FBI images showed all DVTs from all five patients without interference from implant susceptibility artifacts. The excellent image quality produced by both SPADE and FR-FBI throughout peripheral vasculature demonstrates their promise for detecting DVT in postsurgery patients.

  12. A CT-ultrasound-coregistered augmented reality enhanced image-guided surgery system and its preliminary study on brain-shift estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. H.; Hsieh, C. H.; Lee, J. D.; Huang, W. C.; Lee, S. T.; Wu, C. T.; Sun, Y. N.; Wu, Y. T.

    2012-08-01

    With the combined view on the physical space and the medical imaging data, augmented reality (AR) visualization can provide perceptive advantages during image-guided surgery (IGS). However, the imaging data are usually captured before surgery and might be different from the up-to-date one due to natural shift of soft tissues. This study presents an AR-enhanced IGS system which is capable to correct the movement of soft tissues from the pre-operative CT images by using intra-operative ultrasound images. First, with reconstructing 2-D free-hand ultrasound images to 3-D volume data, the system applies a Mutual-Information based registration algorithm to estimate the deformation between pre-operative and intra-operative ultrasound images. The estimated deformation transform describes the movement of soft tissues and is then applied to the pre-operative CT images which provide high-resolution anatomical information. As a result, the system thus displays the fusion of the corrected CT images or the real-time 2-D ultrasound images with the patient in the physical space through a head mounted display device, providing an immersive augmented-reality environment. For the performance validation of the proposed system, a brain phantom was utilized to simulate brain-shift scenario. Experimental results reveal that when the shift of an artificial tumor is from 5mm ~ 12mm, the correction rates can be improved from 32% ~ 45% to 87% ~ 95% by using the proposed system.

  13. Preliminary report: comparison of 980-nm, 808-nm diode laser enhanced with indocyanine green to the Nd:YAG laser applied to equine respiratory tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Lloyd P.; Blikslager, Anthony T.; Campbell, Nigel B.

    2001-05-01

    The Neodynium: Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser has been the mainstay of performing upper respiratory laser surgery in the equine since 1984. The 808-nm diode laser has also been applied transendoscopically as well as the 980-nm diode laser over recent years. It has been shown that Indocyanine Green (ICG) enhances the performance of the 808- nm laser because it is absorbed at 810 nm of light. The 808- nm laser's tissue interaction combined with ICG is equivalent to or greater than the Nd:YAG laser's cutting ability. The 980-nm diode laser performance was similar to that of the Nd:YAG as determined by the parameters of this study. This study compared the depths and widths of penetration achieved with the 808-nm diode laser after intravenous injection of ICG on equine respiratory tissue. It also compared depths and widths of penetration achieved by the non-contact application of the 980-nm diode laser delivering the same energy of 200 joules. The depths and widths of penetration of both diode lasers were compared to themselves and to the Nd:YAG laser with all factors remaining constant.

  14. Comparison of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound and Computed Tomography in Classifying Endoleaks After Endovascular Treatment of Abdominal Aorta Aneurysms: Preliminary Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Lagana, Domenico; Recaldini, Chiara; Mangini, Monica; Bertolotti, Elena; Caronno, Roberto; Tozzi, Matteo; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Annibale Genovese, Eugenio; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2006-12-15

    The purpose of the study was to assess the effectiveness of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) in endoleak classification after endovascular treatment of an abdominal aortic aneurysm compared to computed tomography angiography (CTA). From May 2001 to April 2003, 10 patients with endoleaks already detected by CTA underwent CEUS with Sonovue (registered) to confirm the CTA classification or to reclassify the endoleak. In three conflicting cases, the patients were also studied with conventional angiography. CEUS confirmed the CTA classification in seven cases (type II endoleaks). Two CTA type III endoleaks were classified as type II using CEUS and one CTA type II endoleak was classified as type I by CEUS. Regarding the cases with discordant classification, conventional angiography confirmed the ultrasound classification. Additionally, CEUS documented the origin of type II endoleaks in all cases. After CEUS reclassification of endoleaks, a significant change in patient management occurred in three cases. CEUS allows a better attribution of the origin of the endoleak, as it shows the flow in real time. CEUS is more specific than CTA in endoleak classification and gives more accurate information in therapeutic planning.

  15. Follow-up of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair: Preliminary validation of digital tomosynthesis and contrast enhanced ultrasound in detection of medium- to long-term complications

    PubMed Central

    Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Guerrini, Susanna; Mazzei, Francesco Giuseppe; Cioffi Squitieri, Nevada; Notaro, Dario; de Donato, Gianmarco; Galzerano, Giuseppe; Sacco, Palmino; Setacci, Francesco; Volterrani, Luca; Setacci, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To validate the feasibility of digital tomosynthesis of the abdomen (DTA) combined with contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in assessing complications after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) by using computed tomography angiography (CTA) as the gold standard. METHODS: For this prospective study we enrolled 163 patients (123 men; mean age, 65.7 years) referred for CTA for EVAR follow-up. CTA, DTA and CEUS were performed at 1 and 12 mo in all patients, with a maximum time interval of 2 d. RESULTS: Among 163 patients 33 presented complications at CTA. DTA and CTA correlated for the presence of complications in 32/33 (96.96%) patients and for the absence of complications in 127/130 (97.69%) patients; the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy of DTA were 97%, 98%, 91%, 99%, and 98%, respectively. CEUS and CTA correlated for the presence of complications in 19/33 (57.57%) patients and for the absence of complications in 129/130 (99.23%) patients; the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy of CEUS were 58%, 99%, 95%, 90%, and 91%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of combining DTA and CEUS together in detecting EVAR complications were 77%, 98% and 95%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Combining DTA and CEUS in EVAR follow-up has the potential to limit the use of CTA only in doubtful cases. PMID:27247719

  16. Precipitation in the Solar System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    As an astronomy instructor, I am always looking for commonly observed Earthly experiences to help my students and me understand and appreciate similar occurrences elsewhere in the solar system. Recently I wrote a short TPT article on frost. This paper is on the related phenomena of precipitation. Precipitation, so common on most of the Earth's…

  17. Resistivity Problems in Electrostatic Precipitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Harry J.

    1974-01-01

    The process of electrostatic precipitation has ever-increasing application in more efficient collection of fine particles from industrial air emissions. This article details a large number of new developments in the field. The emphasis is on high resistivity particles which are a common cause of poor precipitator performance. (LS)

  18. Precipitation Process and Apparatus Therefor

    DOEpatents

    Stang, Jr, L C

    1950-12-05

    This invention concerns an apparatus for remotely-controlled precipitation and filtration operations. Liquid within a precipitation chamber is maintained above a porous member by introducing air beneath the member; pressure beneath the porous member is reduced to suck the liquid through the member and effect filtration.

  19. Encoding information into precipitation structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Kirsten; Bena, Ioana; Droz, Michel; Rácz, Zoltan

    2008-12-01

    Material design at submicron scales would be profoundly affected if the formation of precipitation patterns could be easily controlled. It would allow the direct building of bulk structures, in contrast to traditional techniques which consist of removing material in order to create patterns. Here, we discuss an extension of our recent proposal of using electrical currents to control precipitation bands which emerge in the wake of reaction fronts in A+ + B- → C reaction-diffusion processes. Our main result, based on simulating the reaction-diffusion-precipitation equations, is that the dynamics of the charged agents can be guided by an appropriately designed time-dependent electric current so that, in addition to the control of the band spacing, the width of the precipitation bands can also be tuned. This makes straightforward the encoding of information into precipitation patterns and, as an amusing example, we demonstrate the feasibility by showing how to encode a musical rhythm.

  20. Geochemical effects of CO2 injection on produced water chemistry at an enhanced oil recovery site in the Permian Basin of northwest Texas, USA: Preliminary geochemical and Li isotope results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, S.; Gardiner, J.; Phan, T. T.; Macpherson, G. L.; Diehl, J. R.; Lopano, C. L.; Stewart, B. W.; Capo, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Injection of supercritical CO2 for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) presents an opportunity to evaluate the effects of CO2 on reservoir properties and formation waters during geologic carbon sequestration. Produced water from oil wells tapping a carbonate-hosted reservoir at an active EOR site in the Permian Basin of Texas both before and after injection were sampled to evaluate geochemical and isotopic changes associated with water-rock-CO2 interaction. Produced waters from the carbonate reservoir rock are Na-Cl brines with TDS levels of 16.5-34 g/L and detectable H2S. These brines are potentially diluted with shallow groundwater from earlier EOR water flooding. Initial lithium isotope data (δ7Li) from pre-injection produced water in the EOR field fall within the range of Gulf of Mexico Coastal sedimentary basin and Appalachian basin values (Macpherson et al., 2014, Geofluids, doi: 10.1111/gfl.12084). Pre-injection produced water 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.70788-0.70795) are consistent with mid-late Permian seawater/carbonate. CO2 injection took place in October 2013, and four of the wells sampled in May 2014 showed CO2 breakthrough. Preliminary comparison of pre- and post-injection produced waters indicates no significant changes in the major inorganic constituents following breakthrough, other than a possible drop in K concentration. Trace element and isotope data from pre- and post-breakthrough wells are currently being evaluated and will be presented.

  1. in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshiko Fujita; Robert W. Smith

    2009-08-01

    in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization Yoshiko Fujita (Yoshiko.fujita@inl.gov) (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Robert W. Smith (University of Idaho-Idaho Falls, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Subsurface radionuclide and trace metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOE’s greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent trace ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide strontium-90, is co-precipitation in calcite. Calcite, a common mineral in the arid western U.S., can form solid solutions with trace metals. The rate of trace metal incorporation is susceptible to manipulation using either abiotic or biotic means. We have previously demonstrated that increasing the calcite precipitation rate by stimulating the activity of urea hydrolyzing microorganisms can result in significantly enhanced Sr uptake. Urea hydrolysis causes the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing pH and alkalinity, and also by liberating the reactive cations from the aquifer matrix via exchange reactions involving the ammonium ion derived from urea: H2NCONH2 + 3H2O ? 2NH4+ + HCO3- + OH- urea hydrolysis >X:2Ca + 2NH4+ ? 2>X:NH4 + Ca2+ ion exchange Ca2+ + HCO3- + OH- ? CaCO3(s) + H2O calcite precipitation where >X: is a cation exchange site on the aquifer matrix. This contaminant immobilization approach has several attractive features. Urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which is produced by many indigenous subsurface microorganisms. Addition of foreign microbes is unnecessary. In turn the involvement of the native microbes and the consequent in situ generation of reactive components in the aqueous phase (e.g., carbonate and Ca or Sr) can allow dissemination of the reaction over a larger volume and/or farther away from an amendment injection point, as compared to direct addition of the reactants at

  2. The Changing Character of Precipitation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenberth, Kevin E.; Dai, Aiguo; Rasmussen, Roy M.; Parsons, David B.

    2003-09-01

    From a societal, weather, and climate perspective, precipitation intensity, duration, frequency, and phase are as much of concern as total amounts, as these factors determine the disposition of precipitation once it hits the ground and how much runs off. At the extremes of precipitation incidence are the events that give rise to floods and droughts, whose changes in occurrence and severity have an enormous impact on the environment and society. Hence, advancing understanding and the ability to model and predict the character of precipitation is vital but requires new approaches to examining data and models. Various mechanisms, storms and so forth, exist to bring about precipitation. Because the rate of precipitation, conditional on when it falls, greatly exceeds the rate of replenishment of moisture by surface evaporation, most precipitation comes from moisture already in the atmosphere at the time the storm begins, and transport of moisture by the storm-scale circulation into the storm is vital. Hence, the intensity of precipitation depends on available moisture, especially for heavy events. As climate warms, the amount of moisture in the atmosphere, which is governed by the Clausius- Clapeyron equation, is expected to rise much faster than the total precipitation amount, which is governed by the surface heat budget through evaporation. This implies that the main changes to be experienced are in the character of precipitation: increases in intensity must be offset by decreases in duration or frequency of events. The timing, duration, and intensity of precipitation can be systematically explored via the diurnal cycle, whose correct simulation in models remains an unsolved challenge of vital importance in global climate change. Typical problems include the premature initiation of convection, and precipitation events that are too light and too frequent. These challenges in observations, modeling, and understanding precipitation changes are being taken up in the NCAR

  3. Precipitation Response to Land Cover Changes in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, E.; Lenderink, G.; Hutjes, R. W. A.; Holtslag, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Precipitation has increased by 25% over the last century in the Netherlands. In this period, conversion of peat areas into grassland, expansion of urban areas, and the creation of new land in Lake Ijssel were the largest land cover changes. Both station data analysis (Daniels et al. 2014) and high-resolution (2.5 km) simulations with the atmospheric Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model suggest that the observed increase in precipitation is not due to these land cover changes. Instead, the change from historical (1900) to present (2000) land cover decreases precipitation in WRF (Figure). However, WRF seems to be very sensitive to changes in evapotranspiration. The creation of new land and the expansion of urban areas are similar from a moisture perspective, since they locally decrease evapotranspiration, and therefore affect the soil moisture-precipitation feedback mechanism. In our simulations, the resulting feedback is always positive, as a reduction in evapotranspiration causes a reduction of precipitation. There is a difference between urban areas and land in WRF however. Over urban areas, the planetary boundary layer (PBL) height increases more than the lifting condensation level (LCL), and the potential to trigger precipitation hereby increases. This in turn decreases the strength, but not sign, of the soil moisture-precipitation feedback. WRF is therefore unable to reproduce the observed precipitation enhancement downwind of urban areas. In all, it seems the sensitivity of WRF to changes in surface moisture might be too high and this questions the applicability of the model to investigate land cover changes. Daniels, E. E., G. Lenderink, R. W. A. Hutjes, and A. A. M. Holtslag, 2014: Spatial precipitation patterns and trends in The Netherlands during 1951-2009. International Journal of Climatology, 34, 1773-1784. Figure: Composite summer precipitation (mm) based on 19 single day cases (a), showing the decreases resulting from changing present to

  4. Estimation of continental precipitation recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, K.L.; Entekhabi, D.; Eagleson, P.S. )

    1993-06-01

    The total amount of water that precipitates on large continental regions is supplied by two mechanisms: (1) advection from the surrounding areas external to the region and (2) evaporation and transpiration from the land surface within the region. The latter supply mechanism is tantamount to the recycling of precipitation over the Continental area. The degree to which regional precipitation is supplied by recycled moisture is a potentially significant climate feedback mechanism and land surface-atmosphere interaction, which may contribute to the persistence and intensification of droughts. Gridded data on observed wind and humidity in the global atmosphere are used to determine the convergence of atmospheric water vapor over continental regions. A simplified model of the atmospheric moisture over continents and simultaneous estimates of regional precipitation are employed to estimate, for several large continental regions, the fraction of precipitation that is locally derived. The results indicate that the contribution of regional evaporation to regional precipitation varies substantially with location and season. For the regions studied, the ratio of locally contributed to total monthly precipitation generally lies between 0. 10 and 0.30 but is as high as 0.40 in several cases. 48 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Estimation of continental precipitation recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brubaker, Kaye L.; Entekhabi, Dara; Eagleson, P. S.

    1993-01-01

    The total amount of water that precipitates on large continental regions is supplied by two mechanisms: 1) advection from the surrounding areas external to the region and 2) evaporation and transpiration from the land surface within the region. The latter supply mechanism is tantamount to the recycling of precipitation over the continental area. The degree to which regional precipitation is supplied by recycled moisture is a potentially significant climate feedback mechanism and land surface-atmosphere interaction, which may contribute to the persistence and intensification of droughts. Gridded data on observed wind and humidity in the global atmosphere are used to determine the convergence of atmospheric water vapor over continental regions. A simplified model of the atmospheric moisture over continents and simultaneous estimates of regional precipitation are employed to estimate, for several large continental regions, the fraction of precipitation that is locally derived. The results indicate that the contribution of regional evaporation to regional precipitation varies substantially with location and season. For the regions studied, the ratio of locally contributed to total monthly precipitation generally lies between 0. 10 and 0.30 but is as high as 0.40 in several cases.

  6. Studies of heat precipitable immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, R.; Roberts, Mary; Pruzansky, J. J.

    1970-01-01

    The nature of the heat precipitation of 3 mononoclonal heat labile immunoglobulins was studied. These included 2 γG pyroglobulins and one γM pyroglobulin. Thermoprecipitable activity of both γG pyroglobulins could be localized to their heavy chains and to the Fab fragments of one of them. Heat precipitability of the γM paraprotein required the presence of the intact γM molecule since 7S subunits did not precipitate. The thermal precipitates appeared to result from intramolecular or intermolecular reactions with the formation of strong covalent bonds rather than weak non-covalent bonds. The importance of disulphide bonding was excluded in the precipitation of both γG but not in the γM pyroglobulins. Heat precipitation of the monoclonal γM resulted in coprecipitation of other proteins, particularly γG globulin, which suggested a specific type of reaction with this immunoglobulin. The interaction of the γM pyroglobulin, normal γG and heat produced an irreversible precipitate. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:4099668

  7. Lobe cell convection and polar cap precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S.; Peria, W. J.; Bonnell, J. W.; Su, Y.-J.; Ergun, R. E.; Tung, Y.-K.; Parks, G. K.; Carlson, C. W.

    2003-05-01

    The characteristic electric and magnetic field signature of lobe cells as observed by the low-altitude FAST satellite in 55 dawn-dusk passes are compared with Polar ultraviolet images of polar cap auroral activity. Initial results from 34 events of UV image coverage suggest that there is an intimate coupling between the sunward convection flow of the lobe cell and transpolar auroral arcs or diffuse polar cap precipitation in ˜62% of these cases. However, in some cases where the field signatures are suggestive of lobe cell convection, there is no detectable particle precipitation either in Polar UVI or the FAST data sets. Moreover, the presence of lobe cells coincide with UV data intensifications in the premidnight 2000-2400 MLT sector and/or the postnoon 1500 MLT region in ˜59% of all cases with UVI coverage. The magnetic local time dependence of the lobe cells and polar cap precipitation on the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) are examined using the upstream Wind monitor. The relative importance of the IMF By and Bz components are investigated and compared with the predictions of the antiparallel merging model and strongly suggests a connection with the magnetospheric sash, as is further implied by the mapping of magnetic field lines using the [2002] (T01) model. It was also noted that a majority of lobe cell events occurred during enhanced AE index substorm-like conditions and that generally stronger AE indices are measured for stronger IMF By magnitudes during these events.

  8. Extreme precipitation events and related weather patterns over Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    raheem Al-nassar, Ali; Sangrà, Pablo; Alarcón, Marta

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to investigate the extreme precipitation events and the associated weather phenomena in the Middle East and particularly in Iraq. For this purpose we used Baghdad daily precipitation records from the Iraqi Meteorological and Seismology Organization combined with ECMWF (ERA-Interim) reanalysis data for the period from January 2002 to December 2013. Extreme events were found statistically at the 90% percentile of the recorded precipitation, and were highly correlated with hydrological flooding in some cities of Iraq. We identified fifteen extreme precipitation events. The analysis of the corresponding weather patterns (500 hPa and 250 hPa geopotential and velocity field distribution) indicated that 5 events were related with cut off low causing the highest precipitation (180 mm), 3 events related with rex block (158 mm), 3 events related with jet streak occurrence (130 mm) and 4 events related with troughs (107 mm). . Five of these events caused flash floods and in particular one of them related with a rex block was the most dramatic heavy rain event in Iraq in 30 years. We investigated for each case the convective instability and dynamical forcing together with humidity sources. For convective instability we explored the distribution of the K index and SWEAT index. For dynamical forcing we analyzed at several levels Q vector, divergence, potential and relative vorticity advection and omega vertical velocity. Source of humidity was investigated through humidity and convergence of specific humidity distribution. One triggering factor of all the events is the advection and convergence of humidity from the Red Sea and the Persian Gulf. Therefore a necessary condition for extreme precipitation in Iraq is the advection and convergence of humidity from the Red Sea and Persian Gulf. Our preliminary analysis also indicates that extreme precipitation events are primary dynamical forced playing convective instability a secondary role.

  9. Passive microwave precipitation detection biases: Relationship to cloud morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marter, R. E.; Rapp, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate measurement of the Earth's hydrologic cycle requires a more precise understanding of precipitation accumulation and intensity on a global scale. While there is a long record of passive microwave satellite measurements, passive microwave rainfall retrievals often fail to detect light precipitation or have light rain intensity biases because they cannot differentiate between emission from cloud and rain water. Previous studies have shown that AMSR-E significantly underestimates rainfall occurrence and volume compared to CloudSat. This underestimation totals just below 0.6 mm/day quasi-globally (60S-60N), but there are larger regional variations related to the dominant cloud regime. This study aims to use Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the 94-GHz CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR), which has a high sensitivity to light rain, with the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) observations, to help better characterize the properties of clouds that lead to passive microwave rainfall detection biases. CPR cloud and precipitation retrievals. AMSR-E Level-2B Goddard Profiling 2010 Algorithm (GPROF 2010) rainfall retrievals, and MODIS cloud properties were collocated and analyzed for 2008. Results are consistent with past studies and show large passive microwave precipitation detection biases compared to CloudSat in stratocumulus and shallow cumulus regimes. A preliminary examination of cases where AMSR-E failed to detect precipitation detected by CloudSat shows that over 50% of missed warm precipitation occurs in clouds with top heights below 2 km. MODIS cloud microphysical and macrophysical properties, such as optical thickness, particle effective radius, and liquid water path will be analyzed when precipitation is detected by CloudSat and missed by AMSR-E. The overall goal is to understand how cloud morphology relates to detection biases.

  10. Acid rain: Some preliminary results from global data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sequeira, R.

    1981-02-01

    Preliminary results of an analysis of global precipitation data from WMO (World Meteorological Organization) stations suggest that even remote maritime baseline stations, far removed from major continents, could become predisposed to acid rain if there is a deficiency of non-marine calcium relative to non-marine sulfate. The regional stations show greater complexity than the baseline stations in their precipitation chemistry. The overall results of this analysis suggest that not all non-marine sulfate and nitrate in precipitation could be present as acid.

  11. Precipitation Measurements from Space: The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.

    2007-01-01

    Water is fundamental to the life on Earth and its phase transition between the gaseous, liquid, and solid states dominates the behavior of the weather/climate/ecological system. Precipitation, which converts atmospheric water vapor into rain and snow, is central to the global water cycle. It regulates the global energy balance through interactions with clouds and water vapor (the primary greenhouse gas), and also shapes global winds and dynamic transport through latent heat release. Surface precipitation affects soil moisture, ocean salinity, and land hydrology, thus linking fast atmospheric processes to the slower components of the climate system. Precipitation is also the primary source of freshwater in the world, which is facing an emerging freshwater crisis in many regions. Accurate and timely knowledge of global precipitation is essential for understanding the behavior of the global water cycle, improving freshwater management, and advancing predictive capabilities of high-impact weather events such as hurricanes, floods, droughts, and landslides. With limited rainfall networks on land and the impracticality of making extensive rainfall measurements over oceans, a comprehensive description of the space and time variability of global precipitation can only be achieved from the vantage point of space. This presentation will examine current capabilities in space-borne rainfall measurements, highlight scientific and practical benefits derived from these observations to date, and provide an overview of the multi-national Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission scheduled to bc launched in the early next decade.

  12. Inducing mineral precipitation in groundwater by addition of phosphate

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    bacterial cells appears to be associated with delayed HAP precipitation, changes in the lattice parameters, and reduced incorporation of trace elements as compared to cell-free systems. Schemes to remediate groundwater contaminated with trace metals that are based on enhanced phosphate mineral precipitation may need to account for these phenomena, particularly if the remediation approach relies on enhancement of in situ microbial populations. PMID:22029908

  13. Effect of strain path change on precipitation behaviour of Al-Cu-Mg-Si alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S.; Kulkarni, K.; Gurao, N. P.

    2015-04-01

    The effect of strain path change on precipitation behaviour of Al- Cu-Mg-Si alloy was investigated. Two different types of crystallographic textures were produced by changing the strain path during rolling. The deformed samples were subjected to a short recrystallization treatment and ageing to identify the effect of strain path change manifested in terms of crystallographic texture on precipitation behaviour. Preliminary characterization indicates that ageing kinetics as well as precipitate morphology vary depending upon the mode of rolling. The coherency strains associated with a coherent interface is relieved in a unlike manner for differently rolled samples.

  14. Silica Precipitation and Lithium Sorption

    SciTech Connect

    Jay Renew

    2015-09-20

    This file contains silica precipitation and lithium sorption data from the project. The silica removal data is corrected from the previous submission. The previous submission did not take into account the limit of detection of the ICP-MS procedure.

  15. The 2014 Silba Precipitation Extreme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasol, Dubravka; Ólafsson, Haraldur

    2015-04-01

    On 30 July 2014 a 24 h precipitation record of 218 mm was set at the island of Silba in the N-Adriatic Sea. The precipitation was of convective nature and significantly less precipitation was recorded only small distances away, at the coast of mainland Croatia. The event is reproduced numerically and discussed in terms of dynamics and predictability. On a large scale, the precipitation extreme was associated with a slow-moving upper tropospheric low that formed over the N-Atlantic several days earlier. At lower levels, there were humid mediterranean airmasses. On a smaller scale, there are indications that the extreme convection may have been triggered by an orographic disturbance.

  16. Environmental Radioactivity, Temperature, and Precipitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riland, Carson A.

    1996-01-01

    Reports that environmental radioactivity levels vary with temperature and precipitation and these effects are due to radon. Discusses the measurement of this environmental radioactivity and the theory behind it. (JRH)

  17. Some Statistics of Instantaneous Precipitation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Douglas M. A.; Wendland, Wayne M.

    1984-09-01

    Known sources of data from arrays of instantaneous precipitation intensity recorders in southern Germany, east-central Illinois, northeastern Illinois, central Florida, and Hilo, Hawaii are obtained. These data are analyzed for line averages of the percent frequency of occurrence of the exceedance of selected threshold precipitation intensities. The correlation coefficients of the precipitation intensity at sites at varying distances from a reference site are determined. The decay in correlation is found to be a function of climatic region and the type of precipitation: showery or continuous. Showery rains are found to be essentially uncorrelated about 12 km from the reference site while continuous rain exhibits no correlation beyond about 50 km.Single-station intensity data collected at Urbana, Illinois; Paris, France; Inyanga, Zimbabwe; Bogor, Indonesia; Reading, United Kingdom; Island Beach, New Jersey; Miami, Florida; Franklin, North Carolina; and Majuro, Marshall Islands, are compared.

  18. NASA Dual Precipitation Radar Arrives at Goddard

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) built by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core Observatory arrived on Friday, Marc...

  19. Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) for remote observation of precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galliano, J. A.; Platt, R. H.

    1990-01-01

    The design, development, and tests of the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) operating in the 10 to 85 GHz range specifically for precipitation retrieval and mesoscale storm system studies from a high altitude aircraft platform (i.e., ER-2) are described. The primary goals of AMPR are the exploitation of the scattering signal of precipitation at frequencies near 10, 19, 37, and 85 GHz together to unambiguously retrieve precipitation and storm structure and intensity information in support of proposed and planned space sensors in geostationary and low earth orbit, as well as storm-related field experiments. The development of AMPR will have an important impact on the interpretation of microwave radiances for rain retrievals over both land and ocean for the following reasons: (1) A scanning instrument, such as AMPR, will allow the unambiguous detection and analysis of features in two dimensional space, allowing an improved interpretation of signals in terms of cloud features, and microphysical and radiative processes; (2) AMPR will offer more accurate comparisons with ground-based radar data by feature matching since the navigation of the ER-2 platform can be expected to drift 3 to 4 km per hour of flight time; and (3) AMPR will allow underflights of the SSM/I satellite instrument with enough spatial coverage at the same frequencies to make meaningful comparisons of the data for precipitation studies.

  20. Effects of proton irradiation on nanocluster precipitation in ferritic steel containing fcc alloying additions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhongwu; Liu, C T; Wang, Xun-Li; Miller, Michael K; Ma, Dong; Chen, Guang; Williams, J R; Chin, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Newly-developed precipitate-strengthened ferritic steels with and without pre-existing nanoscale precipitates were irradiated with 4 MeV protons to a dose of ~5 mdpa at 50 C and subsequently examined by nanoindentation and atom probe tomography (APT). Irradiation-enhanced precipitation and coarsening of pre-existing nanoscale precipitates were observed. Copper partitions to the precipitate core along with a segregation of Ni, Al and Mn to the precipitate/matrix interface after both thermal aging and proton irradiation. Proton irradiation induces the precipitation reaction and coarsening of pre-existing nanoscale precipitates, and these results are similar to a thermal aging process. The precipitation and coarsening of nanoscale precipitates are responsible for the changes in hardness. The observation of the radiation-induced softening is essentially due to the coarsening of the pre-existing Cu-rich nanoscale precipitates. The implication of the precipitation on the embrittlement of reactor-pressure-vessel steels after irradiation is discussed.

  1. Geostatistical Study of Precipitation on the Island of Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agou, Vasiliki D.; Varouchakis, Emmanouil A.; Hristopulos, Dionissios T.

    2015-04-01

    Understanding and predicting the spatiotemporal patterns of precipitation in the Mediterranean islands is an important topic of research, which is emphasized by alarming long-term predictions for increased drought conditions [4]. The analysis of records from drought-prone areas around the world has demonstrated that precipitation data are non-Gaussian. Typically, such data are fitted to the gamma distribution function and then transformed into a normalized index, the so-called Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) [5]. The SPI can be defined for different time scales and has been applied to data from various regions [2]. Precipitation maps can be constructed using the stochastic method of Ordinary Kriging [1]. Such mathematical tools help to better understand the space-time variability and to plan water resources management. We present preliminary results of an ongoing investigation of the space-time precipitation distribution on the island of Crete (Greece). The study spans the time period from 1948 to 2012 and extends over an area of 8 336 km2. The data comprise monthly precipitation measured at 56 stations. Analysis of the data showed that the most severe drought occurred in 1950 followed by 1989, whereas the wettest year was 2002 followed by 1977. A spatial trend was observed with the spatially averaged annual precipitation in the West measured at about 450mm higher than in the East. Analysis of the data also revealed strong correlations between the precipitation in the western and eastern parts of the island. In addition to longitude, elevation (masl) was determined to be an important factor that exhibits strong linear correlation with precipitation. The precipitation data exhibit wet and dry periods with strong variability even during the wet period. Thus, fitting the data to specific probability distribution models has proved challenging. Different time scales, e.g. monthly, biannual, and annual have been investigated. Herein we focus on annual

  2. Chemical Data for Precipitate Samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Andrea L.; Koski, Randolph A.

    2008-01-01

    During studies of sulfide oxidation in coastal areas of Prince William Sound in 2005, precipitate samples were collected from onshore and intertidal locations near the Ellamar, Threeman, and Beatson mine sites (chapter A, fig. 1; table 7). The precipitates include jarosite and amorphous Fe oxyhydroxide from Ellamar, amorphous Fe oxyhydroxide from Threeman, and amorphous Fe oxyhydroxide, ferrihydrite, and schwertmannite from Beatson. Precipitates occurring in the form of loose, flocculant coatings were harvested using a syringe and concentrated in the field by repetitive decanting. Thicker accumulations were either scraped gently from rocks using a stainless steel spatula or were scooped directly into receptacles (polyethylene jars or plastic heavy-duty zippered bags). Most precipitate samples contain small amounts of sedimentary detritus. With three jarosite-bearing samples from Ellamar, an attempt was made to separate the precipitate from the heavy-mineral fraction of the sediment. In this procedure, the sample was stirred in a graduated cylinder containing deionized water. The jarosite-rich suspension was decanted onto analytical filter paper and air dried before analysis. Eleven precipitate samples from the three mine sites were analyzed in laboratories of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Denver, Colorado (table 8). Major and trace elements were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry following multiacid (HCl-HNO3-HClO4-HF) digestion (Briggs and Meier, 2002), except for mercury, which was analyzed by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (Brown and others, 2002a). X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were performed on powdered samples (<200 mesh) by S. Sutley of the USGS. Additional details regarding sample preparation and detection limits are found in Taggert (2002). Discussions of the precipitate chemistry and associated microbial communities are presented in Koski and others (2008) and Foster and others (2008), respectively.

  3. Event Detection and Spatial Analysis for Characterizing Extreme Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, S.; Prabhat, M.; Byna, S.; Collins, W.; Wehner, M. F.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric Rivers (ARs) are large spatially coherent weather systems with high concentrations of elevated water vapor that often cause severe downpours and flooding over western coastal United States. With the availability of more atmospheric moisture in the future under global warming, we expect ARs to play an important role as a potential cause of extreme precipitation. We have recently developed TECA software for automatically identifying and tracking features in climate datasets. In particular, we are able to identify ARs that make landfall on the western coast of North America. This detection tool examines integrated water vapor field above a certain threshold and performs geometric analysis. Based on the detection procedure, we investigate impacts of ARs by exploring spatial extent of AR precipitation for CMIP5 simulations, and characterize spatial pattern of dependence for future projections under climate change within the framework of extreme value theory. The results show that AR events in RCP8.5 scenario (2076-2100) tend to produce heavier rainfall with higher frequency and longer duration than the events from historical run (1981-2005). Range of spatial dependence between extreme precipitations is concentrated on smaller localized area in California under the highest emission scenario than present day. Preliminary results are illustrated in Figure 1 and 2. Fig 1: Boxplot of annual max precipitation (left two) and max AR precipitation (right two) from GFDL-ESM2M during 25-year time period by station in California, US. Fig 2: Spatial dependence of max AR precipitation calculated from Station 4 (triangle) for historical run (left) and for future projections of RCP8.5 (right) from GFDL-ESM2M. Green and orange colors represent complete dependence and independence between two stations respectively.

  4. Are hourly precipitation extremes increasing faster than daily precipitation extremes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, Renaud; Fowler, Hayley; Blenkinsop, Stephen; Lenderink, Geert

    2016-04-01

    Extreme precipitation events appear to be increasing with climate change in many regions of the world, including the United States. These extreme events have large societal impacts, as seen during the recent Texas-Oklahoma flooding in May 2015 which caused several billion in damages and left 47 deaths in its path. Better understanding of past changes in the characteristics of extreme rainfall events is thus critical for reliable projections of future changes. Although it has been documented in several studies that daily precipitation extremes are increasing across parts of the contiguous United States, very few studies have looked at hourly extremes. However, this is of primary importance as recent studies on the temperature scaling of extreme precipitation have shown that increases above the Clausius-Clapeyron (~ 7% °C‑1) are possible for hourly precipitation. In this study, we used hourly precipitation data (HPD) from the National Climatic Data Center and extracted more than 1,000 stations across the US with more than 40 years of data spanning the period 1950-2010. As hourly measurements are often associated with a range of issues, the data underwent multiple quality control processes to exclude erroneous data. While no significant changes were found in annual maximum precipitation using both hourly and daily resolution datasets, significant increasing trends in terms of frequency of episodes exceeding present-day 95th percentiles of wet hourly/daily precipitation were observed across a significant portion of the US. The fraction of stations with significant increasing trends falls outside the confidence interval range during all seasons but the summer. While less than 12% of stations exhibit significant trends at the daily scale in the wintertime, more than 45% of stations, mostly clustered in central and Northern United States, show significant increasing trends at the hourly scale. This suggests that short-duration storms have increased faster than daily

  5. Dust particles precipitation in AC/DC electrostatic precipitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworek, A.; Marchewicz, A.; Krupa, A.; Sobczyk, A. T.; Czech, T.; Antes, T.; Śliwiński, Ł.; Kurz, M.; Szudyga, M.; Rożnowski, W.

    2015-10-01

    Submicron and nanoparticles removal from flue or exhaust gases remain still a challenge for engineers. The most effective device used for gas cleaning in power plants or industry is electrostatic precipitator, but its collection efficiency steeply decreases for particles smaller than 1 micron. In this paper, fractional collection efficiency of two-stage electrostatic precipitator comprising of alternating electric field charger and DC supplied parallel-plate collection stage has been investigated. The total number collection efficiency for PM2.5 particles was higher than 95% and mass collection efficiency >99%. Fractional collection efficiency for particles between 300 nm and 1 μm was >95%.

  6. Are hourly precipitation extremes increasing faster than daily precipitation extremes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, Renaud; Fowler, Hayley; Blenkinsop, Stephen; Lenderink, Geert

    2016-04-01

    Extreme precipitation events appear to be increasing with climate change in many regions of the world, including the United States. These extreme events have large societal impacts, as seen during the recent Texas-Oklahoma flooding in May 2015 which caused several billion in damages and left 47 deaths in its path. Better understanding of past changes in the characteristics of extreme rainfall events is thus critical for reliable projections of future changes. Although it has been documented in several studies that daily precipitation extremes are increasing across parts of the contiguous United States, very few studies have looked at hourly extremes. However, this is of primary importance as recent studies on the temperature scaling of extreme precipitation have shown that increases above the Clausius-Clapeyron (~ 7% °C-1) are possible for hourly precipitation. In this study, we used hourly precipitation data (HPD) from the National Climatic Data Center and extracted more than 1,000 stations across the US with more than 40 years of data spanning the period 1950-2010. As hourly measurements are often associated with a range of issues, the data underwent multiple quality control processes to exclude erroneous data. While no significant changes were found in annual maximum precipitation using both hourly and daily resolution datasets, significant increasing trends in terms of frequency of episodes exceeding present-day 95th percentiles of wet hourly/daily precipitation were observed across a significant portion of the US. The fraction of stations with significant increasing trends falls outside the confidence interval range during all seasons but the summer. While less than 12% of stations exhibit significant trends at the daily scale in the wintertime, more than 45% of stations, mostly clustered in central and Northern United States, show significant increasing trends at the hourly scale. This suggests that short-duration storms have increased faster than daily

  7. The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Gail

    2014-05-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core satellite, scheduled for launch at the end of February 2014, is well designed estimate precipitation from 0.2 to 110 mm/hr and to detect falling snow. Knowing where and how much rain and snow falls globally is vital to understanding how weather and climate impact both our environment and Earth's water and energy cycles, including effects on agriculture, fresh water availability, and responses to natural disasters. The design of the GPM Core Observatory is an advancement of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)'s highly successful rain-sensing package [3]. The cornerstone of the GPM mission is the deployment of a Core Observatory in a unique 65o non-Sun-synchronous orbit to serve as a physics observatory and a calibration reference to improve precipitation measurements by a constellation of 8 or more dedicated and operational, U.S. and international passive microwave sensors. The Core Observatory will carry a Ku/Ka-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a multi-channel (10-183 GHz) GPM Microwave Radiometer (GMI). The DPR will provide measurements of 3-D precipitation structures and microphysical properties, which are key to achieving a better understanding of precipitation processes and improving retrieval algorithms for passive microwave radiometers. The combined use of DPR and GMI measurements will place greater constraints on possible solutions to radiometer retrievals to improve the accuracy and consistency of precipitation retrievals from all constellation radiometers. Furthermore, since light rain and falling snow account for a significant fraction of precipitation occurrence in middle and high latitudes, the GPM instruments extend the capabilities of the TRMM sensors to detect falling snow, measure light rain, and provide, for the first time, quantitative estimates of microphysical properties of precipitation particles. The GPM Core Observatory was developed and tested at NASA

  8. Eocene precipitation: a global monsoon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, D. R.; Huber, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Eocene was the warmest part of the Cenozoic, with warm climates extending across all continents including Antarctica, and extending into the Arctic. Substantive paleobotanical evidence (leaf floras and palynofloras) has demonstrated the existence of broadleaf and coniferous polar forests - a circumpolar rain forest - at both poles. North and South America, Australia, and China in the Eocene were well-forested and humid continents, in contrast to today where 2/3 of these continental areas are arid or semi-arid and lack forests. Each of these regions reflect past climate states - mesothermal moist climates with low thermal seasonality at high latitudes - that have no analog in the modern world. Recent modelling and paleontological proxy data, however, is revealing a high degree of seasonality to precipitation for these continental areas, indicating a monsoon-type precipitation regime may have characterized Eocene 'greenhouse climates'. Paleobotanical proxies offer 2 methods for estimated paleo-precipitation; leaf physiognomy (including both CLAMP and leaf area analysis), and quantitative analysis of nearest living relatives ('NLRs') of macrofloras. Presented here are 1) an updated leaf area analysis calibration with smaller errors of the estimate than previously provided, and 2) analyses of fossil floras from North America, Canada, the Arctic, and Australia. Analysis of the Canadian floras indicate moist climates (MAP >100cm/a) in the early and middle Eocene at middle and high paleolatitudes. Precipitation for western North America at mid-latitudes is also estimated as high, but a seasonally dry interior and south-east is indicated. For Australia, precipitation in the south-east is estimated >120 cm/a, but the macrofloras indicate a drier interior (MAP ~60 cm/a) and seasonal drought, contradicting estimates of ~120 cm/a based on NLR analysis of pollen floras. Recently published data show that north-eastern China in the Eocene had a monsoonal-type seasonality for

  9. Simulation of Orographically-Driven Precipitation in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, T. M.; Georgakakos, K. P.

    2008-12-01

    The proximity of the Pacific Ocean to the Transverse and Peninsular Mountain Ranges of coastal Southern California may lead to significant, orographically-enhanced precipitation in the region. With abundant moisture, such as evidenced in Pineapple Express events or atmospheric rivers, this precipitation may lead to other hydrologic hazards as flash flooding, landslides or debris flows. Available precipitation observation networks are relatively sparse in the mountainous regions and often do not capture the spatial variation of these events with high resolution. This study aims to simulate the topographically-driven precipitation over Southern California with high spatial resolution using a simplified orographic precipitation model. The model employs potential theory flow to estimate steady state three-dimensional wind fields for given free stream velocity forcing winds, atmospheric moisture advection, and cloud and precipitation microphysics proposed by Kessler (1969). The advantage of this modeling set-up is the computational efficiency as compared to regional mesoscale models such as the MM5. For this application, the Southern California region, comprised of the counties of Santa Barbara, Ventura, Los Angeles, Orange, and San Diego, and portions of San Bernardino and Riverside counties, are modeled at a 3-km resolution. The orographic precipitation model is forced by free stream wind velocities given by the 700mb winds from the NCEP Reanalysis I dataset. Atmospheric moisture initial conditions are defined also by the NCEP Reanalysis I dataset, and updated 4x- daily with the available 6-hourly NCEP Reanalysis forcing. This paper presents a comparison of the simulated precipitation to observations for over a variety of spatial scales and over the historical wet season periods from October 2000 to April 2005. The comparison is made over several performance measurements including (a) the occurrence/non-occurrence of precipitation, (b) overall bias and correlation, (c

  10. Detecting human influence in observed changes in precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polson, Debbie; Hegerl, Gabriele; Bollasina, Massimo; Wilcox, Laura; Zhang, Xuebin; Osborn, Timothy; Balan Sarojini, Beena

    2015-04-01

    Human induced changes to the precipitation could cause some of the most serious impacts of climate change, with potential consequences for water resources, health, agriculture and ecosystems. However, quantifying and understanding the drivers of changes to precipitation is challenging due to its large spatial and temporal variability, the lack of long-term observational records over much of the globe and the counteracting affects of greenhouse gases and aerosols. Nevertheless, detection and attribution studies have shown that human influence has changed both global and regional precipitation over the latter half of the 20th century. Using climates models to derive fingerprints of external forcing, we are able to show that greenhouse gas warming has driven large scale changes in precipitation. Greenhouse gas forcing is detectable in observed changes to zonal mean precipitation over land (Polson et al., 2012a). It has also been shown to have caused the intensification of the water cycle, enhancing existing patterns of the precipitation in the tropics and subtropics, over both land and ocean (Polson et al., 2012b). While at global scales, the influence of greenhouse gases is detectable in observations, separating the response of precipitation to anthropogenic aerosol forcing is more difficult. However, in some regions the influence of aerosols dominate, making it possible to detect aerosol forcing. Observed precipitation in the monsoon regions underwent substantial changes during the second half of the twentieth century, with drying from the 1950s to mid-1980s and increasing precipitation in recent decades. Climate model simulations are used to derive fingerprints of individual climate forcings (i.e., greenhouse gas, anthropogenic aerosol, and natural) and detection and attribution methods applied to determine which, if any, have driven these changes to monsoon precipitation. Even when accounting for internal variability of the climate, a clear signal of anthropogenic

  11. Spatial and temporal variability of Antarctic precipitation from atmospheric methods

    SciTech Connect

    Cullather, R.L.; Bromwich, D.H.; Van Woert, M.L.

    1998-03-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of net precipitation (precipitation minus evaporation/sublimation) for Antarctica derived from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts operational analyses via the atmospheric moisture budget is assessed in comparison to a variety of glaciological and meteorological observations and datasets. For the 11-yr period 1985-95, the average continental value is 151 mm yr{sup {minus}1} water equivalent. Large regional differences with other datasets are identified, and the sources of error are considered. Interannual variability in the Southern Ocean storm tracks is found to be an important mechanism for enhanced precipitation minus evaporation (P-E) in both east and west Antarctica. In relation to the present findings, an evaluation of the rawinsonde method for estimating net precipitation in east Antarctica is conducted. Estimates of P-E using synthetic rawinsondes derived from the analyses are found to compare favorably to glaciological estimates. A significant upward trend of 2.4 mm yr{sup {minus}1} is found for the Antarctic continent that is consistent with findings from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction, formerly the National Meteorological Center, and the National Center for Atmospheric Research Reanalysis precipitation dataset. Despite large regional discrepancies, the general agreement on the main features of Antarctic precipitation between studies suggests that a threshold has been reached, where the assessment of the smaller terms including evaporation/sublimation and drift snow loss is required to explain the differences. 76 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Use of TRMM and GPM Multi-Satellite Precipitation Data for Hydrological Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercan, M. B.; Lakshmi, V.; Skofronick Jackson, G.; Huffman, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite data has proven to be a credible alternative to gauge precipitation for use in hydrologic models as gauge data are sparse and sometimes not available. In the case of large watersheds, the spatial distribution of precipitation is the key for representing hydrologic variability. Spatially distributed gauge data is usually available for experimental watersheds at small scales. Satellite precipitation data such as the Integrated MultisatellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) are the most extensively available global data. TMPA data is available at 0.25° spatial and 3 hour temporal resolution for the latitude band 50°S-50°N . TMPA data has been used in hydrologic models. With the end of the TRMM mission, more-detailed IMERG data is replacing TMPA. IMERG data is available at 0.1° spatial and 0.5 hour temporal resolution for the latitude band 60°S-60°N. IMERG data is in its early stages and its application in hydrologic models has not been extensively tested. The objective of this study is to evaluate IMERG precipitation data in a hydrologic model against gauge, radar and TMPA precipitation. We created a model of the Upper Mississippi River Basin (UMRB) using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). We have used areal averaging for IMERG, TMPA and radar precipitation data, and Ordinary Krigging (OK) for gauge precipitations to interpolate precipitation data to SWAT model sub-watersheds. Finally, SWAT model simulation results are compared for each precipitation data input. Preliminary results indicated that IMERG data produced promising model performance compare to other precipitation inputs. The calibrated SWAT model results for each precipitation data will be presented.

  13. Electrostatic precipitator construction having spacers

    SciTech Connect

    Jonelis, J.A.

    1984-10-23

    The present invention relates to an improved construction for an electrostatic precipitator. The electrostatic precipitator collects solid particles carried by a flue gas from a source of combustion. The precipitator includes a plurality of spaced plates for collecting solid particles from the flue gas by electrostatic attraction of the solid particles to the plates. A plurality of elongated electrodes is positioned among the plates. Each of the electrodes is mounted between a pair of adjacent plates. Each of the electrodes is parallel to the other electrodes and is parallel to the plates. A plurality of identical spacers is positioned between adjacent plates to hold the plates in a flat attitude and to maintain adjacent surfaces of adjacent plates equidistantly spaced from one another. Each of the spacers is an elongated single unitary member and has one end fixed to a surface of one of a pair of adjacent surfaces of the plates and the other end abutting the other of the adjacent surfaces.

  14. Portable liquid collection electrostatic precipitator

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Duane C.; DeGange, John J.; Halverson, Justin E.

    2005-10-18

    A portable liquid collection electrostatic collection precipitator for analyzing air is provided which is a relatively small, self-contained device. The device has a tubular collection electrode, a reservoir for a liquid, and a pump. The pump pumps the liquid into the collection electrode such that the liquid flows down the exterior of the collection electrode and is recirculated to the reservoir. An air intake is provided such that air to be analyzed flows through an ionization section to ionize analytes in the air, and then flows near the collection electrode where ionized analytes are collected. A portable power source is connected to the air intake and the collection electrode. Ionizable constituents in the air are ionized, attracted to the collection electrode, and precipitated in the liquid. The precipitator may also have an analyzer for the liquid and may have a transceiver allowing remote operation and data collection.

  15. Anthropogenic Aerosols and Tropical Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Kim, D.; Ekman, A. M. L.; Barth, M. C.; Rasch, P. J.

    2009-04-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols can affect the radiative balance of the Earth-atmosphere system and precipitation by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN) and thus modifying the optical and microphysical properties as well as lifetimes of clouds. Recent studies have also suggested that the direct radiative effect of anthropogenic aerosols, particularly absorbing aerosols, can perturb the large-scale circulation and cause a significant change in both quantity and distribution of critical tropical precipitation systems ranging from Pacific and Indian to Atlantic Oceans. This effect of aerosols on precipitation often appears in places away from aerosol-concentrated regions and current results suggest that the precipitation changes caused by it could be much more substantial than that by the microphysics-based aerosol effect. To understand the detailed mechanisms and strengths of such a "remote impact" and the climate response/feedback to anthropogenic aerosols in general, an interactive aerosol-climate model has been developed based on the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) of NCAR. Its aerosol module describes size, chemical composition, and mixing states of various sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols. Several model processes are derived based on 3D cloud-resolving model simulations. We have conducted a set of long integrations using the model driven by radiative effects of different combinations of various carbonaceous and sulfate aerosols and their mixtures. The responses of tropical precipitation systems to the forcing of these aerosols are analyzed using both model and observational data. Detailed analyses on the aerosol-precipitation causal relations of two systems: i.e., the Indian summer monsoon and Pacific ITCZ will be specifically presented.

  16. Timber Mountain Precipitation Monitoring Station

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, Brad; McCurdy, Greg; Chapman, Jenny; Miller, Julianne

    2012-01-01

    A precipitation monitoring station was placed on the west flank of Timber Mountain during the year 2010. It is located in an isolated highland area near the western border of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), south of Pahute Mesa. The cost of the equipment, permitting, and installation was provided by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) project. Data collection, analysis, and maintenance of the station during fiscal year 2011 was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration, Soils Activity. The station is located near the western headwaters of Forty Mile Wash on the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). Overland flows from precipitation events that occur in the Timber Mountain high elevation area cross several of the contaminated Soils project CAU (Corrective Action Unit) sites located in the Forty Mile Wash watershed. Rain-on-snow events in the early winter and spring around Timber Mountain have contributed to several significant flow events in Forty Mile Wash. The data from the new precipitation gauge at Timber Mountain will provide important information for determining runoff response to precipitation events in this area of the NNSS. Timber Mountain is also a groundwater recharge area, and estimation of recharge from precipitation was important for the EMSI project in determining groundwater flowpaths and designing effective groundwater monitoring for Yucca Mountain. Recharge estimation additionally provides benefit to the Underground Test Area Sub-project analysis of groundwater flow direction and velocity from nuclear test areas on Pahute Mesa. Additionally, this site provides data that has been used during wild fire events and provided a singular monitoring location of the extreme precipitation events during December 2010 (see data section for more details). This letter report provides a summary of the site location, equipment, and data collected in

  17. Influence of Precipitation Regime on Microbial Decomposition Patterns in Semi-Arid Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feris, K. P.; Jilek, C.; Huber, D. P.; Reinhardt, K.; deGraaff, M.; Lohse, K.; Germino, M.

    2011-12-01

    In water-limited semi-arid sagebrush steppe ecosystems predicted changes in climate may manifest as a shift from historically winter/snow-dominated precipitation regimes to one dominated by spring rains. In these ecosystems soil microorganisms play a vital role in linking the effects of water availability and plant productivity to biogeochemical cycling. Patterns of soil microbial catalyzed organic matter decomposition patters (i.e. patterns of extracellular enzyme activity (EEA)) are thought to depend upon the quantity and quality of soil organic matter (SOM), pH, and mean annual precipitation (Sinsabaugh, 2008), and less on the timing and magnitude of precipitation. However, sagebrush-steppe plant communities respond strongly to changes in the timing and magnitude of precipitation, and preliminary findings by our group suggest that corresponding changes in SOM quantity, quality, N-cycle dynamics, and soil structure are occurring. Therefore, we hypothesized: 1) Shifts in the timing and magnitude of precipitation would indirectly affect soil microbial decomposition patterns via responses in the plant community structure; and 2) Changes in precipitation patterns can directly affect soil microbial community structure and function, in effect uncoupling the interaction between plant community structure and soil community structure. We tested our hypotheses by determining the influence of experimentally manipulated timing and magnitude of precipitation on soil microbial EEA using standard flourometric assays in soils sampled under plant canopies and plant interspaces. We assessed this response in a mature (18 + years) ecohydrologic field experiment in eastern Idaho that annually imitates three possible post climatic-shift precipitation regimes (Ambient (AMB): no additional precipitation, ~200mm annually; Summer (SUMM): 200mm provisioned at 50mm bi-weekly starting in June; and Fall/Spring (F/S): 200mm provisioned over 1-2 weeks in October or April) (n=3). Within plant

  18. Synoptic Control of Cross-Barrier Precipitation Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mass, C.; Vargas, R.

    2013-12-01

    The substantial precipitation contrasts across mountain barriers, with windward enhancement on one side and leeward reduction on the other, have been the subject of several studies and reviews, both observational and theoretical. A lesser number of papers have examined the temporal variability of the orographic precipitation contrasts, including the origins of such variability. For example, Siler et al. (2013) examined the variability of the rain-shadow effect across the Cascade Mountains of Washington State. They found that the intensity of the winter-mean rain shadow was weaker in El Nino than La Nina years, and suggested that the strongest (weakest) rain shadows occurred for warm-sector (warm-frontal) situations. Dettinger et al. (2004) examined the synoptic controls of varying orographic precipitation ratios across the Sierra Nevada of California, with ratios defined by the difference in precipitation between the Central Valley and the western slopes of the barrier. They found increased ratios when the flow was more normal to the terrain and when vertical stability was less, with higher ratios after cold frontal passage compared to the warm sectors of midlatitude cyclones. The latter result appears to contradict the findings of Siler et al (2013). This presentation explores the temporal variations in the intensity of the precipitation gradient across the Cascade Mountains of Washington State and describes the synoptic conditions associated with periods in which precipitation is heavier on the western side, heavier on the eastern side, or nearly equal across the barrier. The talk will begin by summarizing the temporal variations of precipitation on the windward and leeward sides of the Cascades for a several year period. Segregating the hours when precipitation is substantially greater on the windward side, greater on the leeward side, or roughly equal, provides a series of dates used for synoptic composites for these three situations. It is shown that there are

  19. Energy distribution asymmetry of electron precipitation signatures at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soobiah, Y. I. J.; Barabash, S.; Nilsson, H.; Stenberg, G.; Lundin, R.; Coates, A. J.; Winningham, J. D.; Frahm, R. A.

    2013-02-01

    The different types of asymmetry observed in the energy distributions of electrons and heavy-ions (M/Q=16-44) during signatures of electron precipitation in the Martian ionosphere have been classified. This has been achieved using the space plasma instrumentation of MEX ASPERA-3 from peri-centre altitude to 2200 km. ASPERA-3 ELS observes signatures of electron precipitation on 43.0% of MEX orbits. Unaccelerated electrons in the form of sudden electron flux enhancements are the most common type of electron precipitation signature at Mars and account for ∼70% of the events observed in this study. Electrons that form unaccelerated electron precipitation signatures are either local ionospheric electrons with enhanced density, or electrons transported from another region of ionosphere, solar wind or tail, or a combination of local and transported electrons. The heating of electrons has a strong influence on the shape of most electron energy spectra from accelerated precipitation signatures. On most occasions the general flow of heavy-ions away from Mars is unchanged during the precipitation of electrons, which is thought to be the result of the finite gyroradius effect of the heavy-ions on crustal magnetic field lines. Only ∼17% of events show some form of heavy-ion acceleration that is either concurrent or at the periphery of an electron precipitation signature. The most common combination of electron and heavy-ion energy distributions for signatures of electron precipitation involves electrons that visually have very little asymmetry or are isotropic and heavy-ions that have a upward net flux, and suggest the upward current associated with aurora. Due to a lack of reliable measurements of electrons travelling towards Mars, it is likely we miss further evidence of upward currents. The second most common combination of electron and heavy-ion energy distributions for signatures of electron precipitation, are those distributions of electrons that are asymmetric and

  20. An Improved Plutonium Trifluoride Precipitation Flowsheet

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, H.D.

    2001-06-26

    This report discusses results of the plutonium trifluoride two-stage precipitation study. A series of precipitation experiments was used to identify the significant process variables affecting precipitation performance. A mathematical model of the precipitation process was developed which is based on the formation of plutonium fluoride complexes. The precipitation model relates all process variables, in a single equation, to a single parameter which can be used to control the performance of the plutonium trifluoride precipitation process. Recommendations have been made which will optimize the FB-Line plutonium trifluoride precipitation process.

  1. Pore-size-dependent calcium carbonate precipitation controlled by surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Stack, Andrew G; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Allard, Lawrence F; Bañuelos, José L; Rother, Gernot; Anovitz, Lawrence M; Cole, David R; Waychunas, Glenn A

    2014-06-01

    Induced mineral precipitation is potentially important for the remediation of contaminants, such as during mineral trapping during carbon or toxic metal sequestration. The prediction of precipitation reactions is complicated by the porous nature of rocks and soils and their interaction with the precipitate, introducing transport and confinement effects. Here X-ray scattering measurements, modeling, and electron microscopies were used to measure the kinetics of calcium carbonate precipitation in a porous amorphous silica (CPG) that contained two discrete distributions of pore sizes: nanopores and macropores. To examine the role of the favorability of interaction between the substrate and precipitate, some of the CPG was functionalized with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) similar to those known to enhance nucleation densities on planar substrates. Precipitation was found to occur exclusively in macropores in the native CPG, while simultaneous precipitation in nanopores and macropores was observed in the functionalized CPG. The rate of precipitation in the nanopores estimated from the model of the X-ray scattering matched that measured on calcite single crystals. These results suggest that the pore-size distribution in which a precipitation reaction preferentially occurs depends on the favorability of interaction between substrate and precipitate, something not considered in most studies of precipitation in porous media.

  2. The relationships between insoluble precipitation residues, clouds, and precipitation over California's southern Sierra Nevada during winter storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creamean, Jessie M.; White, Allen B.; Minnis, Patrick; Palikonda, Rabindra; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2016-09-01

    Ice formation in orographic mixed-phase clouds can enhance precipitation and depends on the type of aerosols that serve as ice nucleating particles (INPs). The resulting precipitation from these clouds is a viable source of water, especially for regions such as the California Sierra Nevada. Thus, a better understanding of the sources of INPs that impact orographic clouds is important for assessing water availability in California. This study presents a multi-site, multi-year analysis of single-particle insoluble residues in precipitation samples that likely influenced cloud ice and precipitation formation above Yosemite National Park. Dust and biological particles represented the dominant fraction of the residues (64% on average). Cloud glaciation, determined using satellite observations, not only depended on high cloud tops (>5.9 km) and low temperatures (<-23 °C), but also on the presence of what were likely dust and biological INPs. The greatest prevalence of ice-phase clouds occurred in conjunction with biologically-rich residues and mineral dust rich in calcium, followed by iron and aluminosilicates. Dust and biological particles are known to be efficient INPs, thus these residues likely influenced ice formation in clouds above the sites and subsequent precipitation quantities reaching the surface during events with similar meteorology. The goal of this study is to use precipitation chemistry information to gain a better understanding of the potential sources of INPs in the south-central Sierra Nevada, where cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions are poorly understood and where mixed-phase orographic clouds represent a key element in the generation of precipitation and thus the water supply in California.

  3. Bacterially Induced Calcite Precipitation and Strontium Co-Precipitation under Flow Conditions in a Porous Media System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, R.; Mitchell, A. C.; Schultz, L.; Cunningham, A.

    2009-12-01

    The process of in situ carbonate mineral formation has implications in many environmental applications, including, but not limited to aquifer decontamination, enhancement of soil stability, and carbon capture and storage (CCS). The high stability of carbonates and the potential for co-precipitation of contaminants within carbonates are attractive attributes for several potential engineering applications. Ureolytic precipitation of calcium and strontium carbonates by Sporosarcina pasteurii was examined in two-dimensional flat plate porous media reactors. Complete reactor plugging due to biofilm formation and calcium carbonate precipitation was achieved in Sr-free systems after 14 hours and in Sr-inclusive systems after 15 hours. Comparison of the reactor influent and effluent after 11 hours indicated that Ca2+ concentrations in the Sr-free reactor effluent were reduced to approximately 0.48% of the influent concentration while the Ca2+ and Sr2+ concentrations of the Sr-inclusive effluent were reduced to 0.64% and 2.34% of the influent concentration indicating a slight inhibitory effect of strontium on calcium carbonate precipitation . Despite this slight inhibition, more than 98% of the Ca2+ entering the reactors was precipitated. Calcite was identified as the main mineral formed and a larger mean crystal size and density were observed near the reactor influent. Homogenous partition coefficients calculated from extracted precipitates suggest higher Sr2+ partitioning near the inlet region, where higher precipitation kinetics exist. Results confirm the possibility of effective calcite-based co-precipitation of Sr2+ under flow conditions and contributes towards the development of field-scale calcium carbonate mineral-based immobilization strategies.

  4. Bacterially Induced Calcite Precipitation and Strontium Co-Precipitation under Flow Conditions in a Porous Media System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, Robin; Mitchell, Andrew C.; Schultz, Logan N.; Cunningham, Al B.

    2010-05-01

    The process of in situ carbonate mineral formation has implications in many environmental applications, including, but not limited to aquifer decontamination, enhancement of soil stability, and carbon capture and storage (CCS). The high stability of carbonates and the potential for co-precipitation of contaminants within carbonates are attractive attributes for several potential engineering applications. Ureolytic precipitation of calcium and strontium carbonates by Sporosarcina pasteurii was examined in two-dimensional flat plate porous media reactors. Complete reactor plugging due to biofilm formation and calcium carbonate precipitation was achieved in Sr-free systems after 14 hours and in Sr-inclusive systems after 15 hours. Comparison of the reactor influent and effluent after 11 hours indicated that Ca2+ concentrations in the Sr-free reactor effluent were reduced to approximately 0.48% of the influent concentration while the Ca2+ and Sr2+ concentrations of the Sr-inclusive effluent were reduced to 0.64% and 2.34% of the influent concentration indicating a slight inhibitory effect of strontium on calcium carbonate precipitation . Despite this slight inhibition, more than 98% of the Ca2+ entering the reactors was precipitated. Calcite was identified as the main mineral formed and a larger mean crystal size and density were observed near the reactor influent. Homogenous partition coefficients calculated from extracted precipitates suggest higher Sr2+ partitioning near the inlet region, where higher precipitation kinetics exist. Results confirm the possibility of effective calcite-based co-precipitation of Sr2+ under flow conditions and contributes towards the development of field-scale calcium carbonate mineral-based immobilization strategies.

  5. Remote climate drivers as predictors of precipitation in data sparse regions, an example from Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Samuel G.; Wilby, Robert L.

    2016-04-01

    It is widely understood that hydrologic variables, such as precipitation and stream flow can be significantly influenced by large scale atmospheric circulation patterns. Global scale analysis of teleconnection patterns between remote large scale climate drivers (e.g. ENSO) and hydrologic variables has highlighted the potential for forecasting precipitation anomalies (Dai and Wigley, 2000). Detailed analysis at smaller spatial scales is required to determine the strength of relationships at the catchment scale. These relationships have significant potential for regions with sparse ground based monitoring networks, such as Central Asia. However, sparse observations hinder the determination of relationships between remote climate drivers and patterns of precipitation. The area based nature of remotely sensed precipitation estimates can combat this problem allowing precipitation patterns to be understood at relatively high spatial and temporal scales. Using Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation estimates, correlation patterns are determined between several remote climate drivers (ENSO, NAO and South Asian Monsoon) and Central Asian precipitation. Preliminary analysis has shown statistically significant negative correlations between Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) and winter precipitation over the headwaters of the Amu Darya (Pamir Mountains, Tajikistan). Introducing a lag interval of up to six months increases correlations across Tajikistan, as well as introducing statistically significant correlations over the headwaters of the Syr Darya (Tien Shan Mountains, Kyrgyzstan). These findings open promising avenues for exploration, including the potential to use remote climate drivers as predictors for seasonal flow forecasting.

  6. Preliminary evaluation of a constructed wetland for treating extremely alkaline (pH 12) steel slag drainage.

    PubMed

    Mayes, W M; Aumônier, J; Jarvis, A P

    2009-01-01

    High pH (> 12) leachates are an environmental problem associated with drainage from lime (CaO)-rich industrial residues such as steel slags, lime spoil and coal combustion residues. Recent research has highlighted the potential for natural ('volunteer') wetlands to buffer extremely alkaline influent waters. This appears ascribable to high CO(2) partial pressures in the wetland waters from microbial respiration, which accelerates precipitation of calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)), and the high specific surface area for mineral precipitation offered by macrophytes. The research presented here builds on this and provides preliminary evaluation of a constructed wetland built in March 2008 to buffer drainage from steel slag heaps in north-east England. The drainage water from the slag mounds is characterised by a mean pH of 11.9, high concentrations of Ca (up to 700 mg/L), total alkalinity (up to 800 mg/L as CaCO(3)) and are slightly brackish (Na = 300 mg/L; Cl = 400 mg/L) reflecting native groundwaters at this coastal setting. Documented calcite precipitation rates (mean of 5 g CaCO(3)/m(2)/day) from nearby volunteer sites receiving steel slag drainage were used to scale the constructed wetland planted with Phragmites australis; a species found to spontaneously grow in the vicinity of the discharge. Improved performance of the wetland during summer months may at least in part be due to biological activity which enhances rates of calcite precipitation and thus lowering of pH. Secondary Ca-rich precipitates also serve as a sink for some trace elements present at low concentrations in the slag leachate such as Ni and V. The implications for scaling and applying constructed wetlands for highly alkaline drainage are discussed.

  7. Classroom Exercises Utilizing Precipitation Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohler, Fred

    Precipitation data for Macomb (Illinois) for the period 1912-1981 were the bases for developing classroom exercises that offered college students experience in collecting such data. After students collected the data, they reduced them to manageable proportions, and then examined average long-term relations which may have emerged among yearly,…

  8. Acid Precipitation: Causes and Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babich, Harvey; And Others

    1980-01-01

    This article is the first of three articles in a series on the acid rain problem in recent years. Discussed are the causes of acid precipitation and its consequences for the abiotic and biotic components of the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, and for man-made materials. (Author/SA)

  9. Electrostatic Precipitator (ESP) TRAINING MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual assists engineers in using a computer program, the ESPVI 4.0W, that models all elements of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The program is a product of the Electric Power Research Institute and runs in the Windows environment. Once an ESP is accurately modeled, the...

  10. How often precipitation records break?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papalexiou, Simon Michael; Oikonomou, Maria; Floutsakou, Athina; Bessas, Nikolaos; Mamassis, Nikos

    2016-04-01

    How often precipitation records break? Are there any factors that determine the average time needed for the next maximum to occur? In order to investigate these simple questions we use several hundreds of daily precipitation records (more than 100 years long each) and we study the time intervals between each successive maximum precipitation value. We investigate if the record breaking time interval is related (a) to the autocorrelation structure, (b) to probability dry, and (c) to the tail of the marginal distribution. For the last, we first, evaluate which type of tail is better fitted by choosing among three general types of tails corresponding to the distributions Pareto, Lognormal and Weibull; and second, we assess the heaviness of the tail based on the estimated shape parameter. The performance of each tail is evaluated in terms of return period values, i.e., we compare the empirical return periods of precipitation values above a threshold with the predicted ones by each of the three types of fitted tails.

  11. Waste and Simulant Precipitation Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, W.V.

    2000-11-29

    As Savannah River Site (SRS) personnel have studied methods of preparing high-level waste for vitrification in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), questions have arisen with regard to the formation of insoluble waste precipitates at inopportune times. One option for decontamination of the SRS waste streams employs the use of an engineered form of crystalline silicotitanate (CST). Testing of the process during FY 1999 identified problems associated with the formation of precipitates during cesium sorption tests using CST. These precipitates may, under some circumstances, obstruct the pores of the CST particles and, hence, interfere with the sorption process. In addition, earlier results from the DWPF recycle stream compatibility testing have shown that leaching occurs from the CST when it is stored at 80 C in a high-pH environment. Evidence was established that some level of components of the CST, such as silica, was leached from the CST. This report describes the results of equilibrium modeling and precipitation studies associated with the overall stability of the waste streams, CST component leaching, and the presence of minor components in the waste streams.

  12. Lobe Cell Convection and Polar cap Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S.; Peria, W. J.; Su, Y.; Ergun, R. E.; Tung, Y.; Parks, G.; Carlson, C. W.

    2002-12-01

    The characteristic electric and magnetic field signature of lobe cells as observed by the low-altitude FAST satellite are compared with Polar ultraviolet images of polar cap auroral activity. Initial results from 55 events suggest that there is an intimate coupling between the sunward convection flow of the lobe cell and transpolar auroral arcs or diffuse polar cap precipitation. Moreover, the presence of lobe cells coincide with UV data intensifications in the premidnight 2100-2400 MLT sector and/or the postnoon 1500 MLT region in ~54% of all cases with UVI coverage. The magnetic local time dependence of the lobe cells and polar cap precipitation on the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) are examined using the upstream Wind monitor. The relative importance of the IMF By and Bz components are investigated and compared with the predictions of the antiparallel merging model and strongly suggests a connection with the magnetospheric sash, as is further implied by the mapping of magnetic field lines using the Tsyganenko [2002] (T01) model. It was also noted that a majority of events occurred during enhanced AE index substorm-like conditions and that generally stronger AE indices are measured for stronger IMF By magnitudes.

  13. Conditional Generation of Monthly Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, U.; Kaluarachchi, J. J.

    2006-12-01

    Monthly precipitation models can be used in basin-wide modeling to develop long-term strategies for water resources planning and management and to estimate the change of water yield due to climate change. Such precipitation models are especially important for effective management of river basins in developing countries such as the upper Blue Nile River basin of Ethiopia where the water resource utilization is limited. Many studies have been previously performed to preserve historical temporal and spatial structures when generating precipitation series. The main focus of those studies was to preserve the historical statistics. Other important factors to be considered are transition and spatial correlations. A few recent studies attempted to preserve transition as well as the statistics of historical record. These studies provided satisfactory results while showing the difficulty and complexity of computations in their methods. The conditional generation method (CGM) that can preserve both historical temporal and spatial structures is presented in this study. Because the CGM is driven from the historical conditional probabilities occurring given amounts of precipitation between two successive months or two stations, it is computationally simple and reliable, i.e., parameterization, inverse matrix, or optimum band width is not required. The CGM was applied to reproducing the precipitation pattern of the upper Blue Nile River basin in Ethiopia using monthly precipitation data of 10 stations to demonstrate its applicability. Comparing to the method of inverse transformation of cumulative distribution functions of the gamma distribution and nonparametric kernel estimator with variable band width selected from the goodness-of-fit tests, the CGM showed improved performance, especially in representing the transition characteristics. The CGM also generated the historical spatial correlations between the stations with acceptable accuracy. The results suggested that the CGM

  14. Precipitation output of INCA system: evaluation and use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyznarova, Hana; Novak, Petr; Brezkova, Lucie; Janal, Petr; Salek, Milan

    2013-04-01

    INCA is a system that provides detailed analysis of current weather and improves NWP forecasts by using latest information from meteorological stations, radars, sounding and satellite data. It was developed by the Zentralanstalt für Meteorologie und Geodynamik in Austria and provided for use by other countries. The Czech Hydrometeorological Institute (CHMI) uses adapted version of the INCA system (INCA-CZ) in the frame of INCA-CE project. This contribution presents the first results of use of INCA-CZ precipitation module for quantitative precipitation analysis (QPE) and forecast (QPF) and their comparison with the algorithms currently used by the CHMI. Testing of the INCA-CZ precipitation output is focused on QPE and QPF up to 3 hours, since INCA is tested and used as an input into hydrological model for flash flood forecasting. INCA-CZ QPE was compared with algorithms used by the CHMI for QPE (based on conditional merging (CM) and on kriging with external drift (KED)). The comparison was carried out on 10 minute and 1 hour precipitation data. Generally 10 minute precipitation sums are burdened by higher uncertainties than 1 hour precipitation data, still they are very useful when used in convective situations and when we try to forecast highly localized flash floods. Preliminary results suggest that INCA-CZ QPE is comparable with QPEs used by the CHMI. As expected, the performance of the algorithms when using 10 minute data is generally worse than for 1 hour precipitation sums. INCA-CZ QPF was compared with the QPF made by the CHMI implementation of the COTREC algorithm. COTREC algorithm is operatively applied on the CHMI radar data. 1 hour QPEs computed by KED algorithm and INCA-CZ were used as the true values. QPFs of average 1hour precipitation sums computed over 119 operative catchments were compared. The forecasted sums were computed over 0-1, 1-2, 2-3 hour. Quality indices CSI, FAR and POD for 0.1mm and 1.0mm thresholds were used. CSI values of both INCA

  15. Analysis of satellite precipitation over East Africa during last decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattani, Elsa; Wenhaji Ndomeni, Claudine; Merino, Andrés; Levizzani, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    Daily accumulated precipitation time series from satellite retrieval algorithms (e.g., ARC2 and TAMSAT) are exploited to extract the spatial and temporal variability of East Africa (EA - 5°S-20°N, 28°E-52°E) precipitation during last decades (1983-2013). The Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis is applied to precipitation time series to investigate the spatial and temporal variability in particular for October-November-December referred to as the short rain season. Moreover, the connection among EA's precipitation, sea surface temperature, and soil moisture is analyzed through the correlation with the dominant EOF modes of variability. Preliminary results concern the first two EOF's modes for the ARC2 data set. EOF1 is characterized by an inter-annual variability and a positive correlation between precipitation and El Niño, positive Indian Ocean Dipole mode, and soil moisture, while EOF2 shows a dipole structure of spatial variability associated with a longer scale temporal variability. This second dominant mode is mostly linked to sea surface temperature variations in the North Atlantic Ocean. Further analyses are carried out by computing the time series of the joint CCI/CLIVAR/JCOMM Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices (ETCCDI, http://etccdi.pacificclimate.org/index.shtml), i.e. RX1day, RX5day, CDD, CDD, CWD, SDII, PRCPTOT, R10, R20. The purpose is to identify the occurrenes of extreme events (droughts and floods) and extract precipitation temporal variation by trend analysis (Mann-Kendall technique). Results for the ARC2 data set demonstrate the existence of a dipole spatial pattern in the linear trend of the time series of PRCPTOT (annual precipitation considering days with a rain rate > 1 mm) and SDII (average precipitation on wet days over a year). A negative trend is mainly present over West Ethiopia and Sudan, whereas a positive trend is exhibited over East Ethiopia and Somalia. CDD (maximum number of consecutive dry days) and

  16. Fracture-aperture alteration induced by calcite precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T.; Detwiler, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral precipitation significantly alters the transport properties of fractured rock. Chemical solubility gradients that favor precipitation induce mineral growth, which decreases the local aperture and alters preferential flow paths. Understanding the resulting development of spatial heterogeneities is necessary to predict the evolution of transport properties in the subsurface. We present experimental results that quantify the relationship between mineral precipitation and aperture alteration in a transparent analog fracture, 7.62cm x 7.62cm, with a uniform aperture of ~200 μm. Prior to flow experiments, a pump circulated a super-saturated calcite solution over the bottom glass, coating the glass surface with calcite. This method of seeding resulted in clusters of calcite crystals with large reactive surface area and provided micro-scale variability in the aperture field. A continuous flow syringe pump injected a reactive fluid into the fracture at 0.5 ml/min. The fluid was a mixture of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3, 0.02M) and calcium chloride (CaCl2 0.0004M) with a saturation index, Ω, of 8.51 with respect to calcite. A strobed LED panel backlit the fracture and a high-resolution CCD camera monitored changes in transmitted light intensity. Light transmission techniques provided a quantitative measurement of fracture aperture over the flow field. Results from these preliminary experiments showed growth near the inlet of the fracture, with decreasing precipitation rates in the flow direction. Over a period of two weeks, the fracture aperture decreased by 17% within the first 4mm of the inlet. Newly precipitated calcite bridged individual crystal clusters and smoothed the reacting surface. This observation is an interesting contradiction to the expectation of surface roughening induced by mineral growth. Additionally, the aperture decreased uniformly across the width of the fracture due to the initial aperture distribution. Future experiments of precipitation

  17. Evaluation of GPM precipitation products using Q3 over the CONUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Given the one-year-plus, successful operation of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission, it is now possible to provide quantitative evaluation for a new generation of space-borne instrument measurements and retrieved precipitation products using ground-based precipitation observations with greater certainty. This study compares three Day-1 GPM surface precipitation products derived from the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and DPR-GMI CoMBined (CMB) algorithms, as well as the near-real-time Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) Late Run product, with the NOAA Multi-Radar Multi-Sensor suite (MRMS; now called "Q3"). The comparisons are conducted over the conterminous United States (CONUS) at various spatial and temporal scales with respect to different precipitation intensities, and filtered with radar quality index (RQI) thresholds and precipitation types. Preliminary comparisons of Day-1 GPM products and Q3 are in reasonably good overall agreement. Based on the mission-to-date (expected to be March 2014 - November 2015) data from all GPM overpasses, the biases relative to Q3 for GMI and DPR precipitation estimates at 0.5o resolution are negative, whereas the biases for CMB precipitation estimates are positive. Based on all available data (March-July 2015 at this writing), the CONUS-averaged near-real-time IMERG Late Run hourly precipitation estimate is about 33% higher than MRMS. Detailed comparison results are available at http://wallops-prf.gsfc.nasa.gov/NMQ/. This evaluation is carried out over the CONUS. Additional work is required to determine how applicable the results drawn from this land area might be to oceanic areas and regional land sites, as the precipitation error statistics can be highly regime dependent. Accordingly, the authors plan to conduct more comprehensive comparisons over a variety of regimes as GPM continues its mission.

  18. Anhydrite precipitation in seafloor hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theissen-Krah, Sonja; Rüpke, Lars H.

    2016-04-01

    The composition and metal concentration of hydrothermal fluids venting at the seafloor is strongly temperature-dependent and fluids above 300°C are required to transport metals to the seafloor (Hannington et al. 2010). Ore-forming hydrothermal systems and high temperature vents in general are often associated with faults and fracture zones, i.e. zones of enhanced permeabilities that act as channels for the uprising hydrothermal fluid (Heinrich & Candela, 2014). Previous numerical models (Jupp and Schultz, 2000; Andersen et al. 2015) however have shown that high permeabilities tend to decrease fluid flow temperatures due to mixing with cold seawater and the resulting high fluid fluxes that lead to short residence times of the fluid near the heat source. A possible mechanism to reduce the permeability and thereby to focus high temperature fluid flow are mineral precipitation reactions that clog the pore space. Anhydrite for example precipitates from seawater if it is heated to temperatures above ~150°C or due to mixing of seawater with hydrothermal fluids that usually have high Calcium concentrations. We have implemented anhydrite reactions (precipitation and dissolution) in our finite element numerical models of hydrothermal circulation. The initial results show that the precipitation of anhydrite efficiently alters the permeability field, which affects the hydrothermal flow field as well as the resulting vent temperatures. C. Andersen et al. (2015), Fault geometry and permeability contrast control vent temperatures at the Logatchev 1 hydrothermal field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Geology, 43(1), 51-54. M. D. Hannington et al. (2010), Modern Sea-Floor Massive Sulfides and Base Metal Resources: Toward an Estimate of Global Sea-Floor Massive Sulfide Potential, in The Challenge of Finding New Mineral Resources: Global Metallogeny, Innovative Exploration, and New Discoveries, edited by R. J. Goldfarb, E. E. Marsh and T. Monecke, pp. 317-338, Society of Economic Geologists

  19. Structural and magnetic properties of nano-sized NiCuZn ferrites synthesized by co-precipitation method with ultrasound irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harzali, Hassen; Saida, Fairouz; Marzouki, Arij; Megriche, Adel; Baillon, Fabien; Espitalier, Fabienne; Mgaidi, Arbi

    2016-12-01

    Sonochemically assisted co-precipitation has been used to prepare nano-sized Ni-Cu-Zn-ferrite powders. A suspension of constituent hydroxides was ultrasonically irradiated for various times at different temperatures with high intensity ultrasound radiation using a direct immersion titanium horn. Structural and magnetic properties were investigated using X-diffraction (XRD), FT-IR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Nitrogen adsorption at 77 K (BET) and Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Preliminary experimental results relative to optimal parameters showed that reaction time t=2 h, temperature θ=90 °C and dissipated Power Pdiss=46.27 W. At these conditions, this work shows the formation of nanocrystalline single-phase structure with particle size 10-25 nm. Also, ours magnetic measurements proved that the sonochemistry method has a great influence on enhancing the magnetic properties of the ferrite.

  20. Passive Microwave Studies of Atmospheric Precipitation and State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, David H.; Rosenkranz, Philip W.; Shiue, James C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The principal contributions of this research on novel passive microwave spectral techniques are in the areas of: (1) global precipitation mapping using the opaque spectral bands on research and operational weather satellites, (2) development and analysis of extensive aircraft observational imaging data sets obtained using the MIT instrument NAST-M near 54 and 118 GHz over hurricanes and weather ranging from tropical to polar; simultaneous data from the 8500-channel infrared spectrometer NAST-I was obtained and analyzed separately, (3) estimation of hydrometeor diameters in cell tops using data from aircraft and spacecraft, (4) continued improvement of expressions for atmospheric transmittance at millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths, (5) development and airborne use of spectrometers operating near 183- and 425-GHz bands, appropriate to practical systems in geosynchronous orbit, and (6) preliminary studies of the design and performance of future geosynchronous microwave sounders for temperature and humidity profiles and for continuous monitoring of regional precipitation through most clouds. This work was a natural extension of work under NASA Grant NAG5-2545 and its predecessors. This earlier work had developed improved airborne imaging microwave spectrometers and had shown their sensitivity to precipitation altitude and character. They also had prepared the foundations for precipitation estimation using the opaque microwave bands. The field demonstration and improvement of these capabilities was then a central part of the present research reported here, during which period the first AMSU data became available and several hurricanes were overflown by NAST-M, yielding unique data about their microwave signatures. This present work has in turn helped lay the foundation for future progress in incorporating the opaque microwave channels in systems for climatologically precise global precipitation mapping from current and future operational satellites. Extension of

  1. A copula-based downscaling methodology of RCM precipitation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Many hydrological studies require long term precipitation time series at a fine spatial resolution. While regional climate models are nowadays capable of simulating reasonable high-resolution precipitation fields, the long computing time makes the generation of such long term time series often infeasible for practical purposes. We introduce a comparatively fast stochastic approach to simulate precipitation fields which resemble the spatial dependencies and density distributions of the dynamic model. Nested RCM simulations at two different spatial resolutions serve as a training set to derive the statistics which will then be used in a random path simulation where fine scale precipitation values are simulated from a multivariate Gaussian Copula. The chosen RCM is the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF). Simulated daily precipitation fields of the RCM are based on ERA-Interim reanalysis data from 1971 to 2000 and are available at a spatial resolution of 42 km (Europe) and 7 km (Germany). In order to evaluate the method, the stochastic algorithm is applied to the nested German domain and the resulting spatial dependencies and density distributions are compared to the original 30 years long 7 km WRF simulations. Preliminary evaluations based on QQ-plots for one year indicate that the distributions of the downscaled values are very similar to the original values for most cells. In this presentation, a detailed overview of the stochastic downscaling algorithm and the evaluation of the long term simulations are given. Additionally, an outlook for a 5 km and 1 km downscaling experiment for urban hydrology studies is presented.

  2. Inhibition of nickel precipitation by gluconate. 2: Kinetic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, H.L.; Nikolaidis, N.P.; Grasso, D.

    1998-08-01

    Gluconate has been shown to inhibit nickel precipitation. This can result in adverse system performance when treating nickel plating wastewater. A kinetic model based on the formation of major species was developed to simulate nickel precipitation in the absence and presence of gluconate. The model was calibrated and verified against batch kinetic experimental results. The model simulated the studied nickel-gluconate systems well. However, no universal mechanisms could be adopted to explain all of the phenomena observed in the kinetic study, indicating different controlling mechanisms in each system. The results of this study can be used to evaluate optimum conditions for nickel precipitation and to aid in the design of treatment processes enhancing the optimization of nickel recovery from metal finishing wastewaters.

  3. Substorm-induced energetic electron precipitation: Impact on atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seppälä, A.; Clilverd, M. A.; Beharrell, M. J.; Rodger, C. J.; Verronen, P. T.; Andersson, M. E.; Newnham, D. A.

    2015-10-01

    Magnetospheric substorms drive energetic electron precipitation into the Earth's atmosphere. We use the output from a substorm model to describe electron precipitation forcing of the atmosphere during an active substorm period in April-May 2007. We provide the first estimate of substorm impact on the neutral composition of the polar middle atmosphere. Model simulations show that the enhanced ionization from a series of substorms leads to an estimated ozone loss of 5-50% in the mesospheric column depending on season. This is similar in scale to small to medium solar proton events (SPEs). This effect on polar ozone balance is potentially more important on long time scales (months to years) than the impulsive but sporadic (few SPE/year versus three to four substorms/day) effect of SPEs. Our results suggest that substorms should be considered an important source of energetic particle precipitation into the atmosphere and included in high-top chemistry-climate models.

  4. Mesoscale modeling of solute precipitation and radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Schwen, Daniel; Ke, Huibin; Bai, Xianming; Hales, Jason

    2015-09-01

    This report summarizes the low length scale effort during FY 2014 in developing mesoscale capabilities for microstructure evolution in reactor pressure vessels. During operation, reactor pressure vessels are subject to hardening and embrittlement caused by irradiation-induced defect accumulation and irradiation-enhanced solute precipitation. Both defect production and solute precipitation start from the atomic scale, and manifest their eventual effects as degradation in engineering-scale properties. To predict the property degradation, multiscale modeling and simulation are needed to deal with the microstructure evolution, and to link the microstructure feature to material properties. In this report, the development of mesoscale capabilities for defect accumulation and solute precipitation are summarized. Atomic-scale efforts that supply information for the mesoscale capabilities are also included.

  5. How ENSO impacts precipitation in southwest central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, Annarita

    2007-08-01

    A linkage between ENSO and the hydroclimatic variability of the southwest central Asia region (SWCA) is established through observational analysis of precipitation, moisture flux and sea level pressure data, with further support from an atmospheric model of intermediate complexity. Enhanced precipitation in SWCA during warm ENSO events results from an anomalous southwesterly moisture flux coming from the Arabian Sea and tropical Africa, which is generated along the northwestern flank of the high pressure anomaly over the Indian and western Pacific Oceans, part of the canonical ENSO sea-saw pressure anomalies. The ENSO impact on SWCA precipitation is found to be greatest in the transition seasons of autumn and spring, but the dynamical impact on pressure and circulation persists throughout the year. This connection was particularly strong in recent decades. Model sensitivity experiments further show that this is driven primarily by tropical Pacific SST anomalies and associated large-scale sea-level pressure changes, while the Indian Ocean SST has opposite effects.

  6. Impact of clouds and precipitation on atmospheric aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronache, Constantin

    2015-04-01

    Aerosols have a significant impact on the dynamics and microphysics of continental mixed-phase convective clouds. High aerosol concentrations provide enhanced cloud condensation nuclei that can lead to the invigoration of convection and increase of surface rainfall. Such effects are dependent on environmental conditions and aerosol properties. Clouds are not only affected by aerosol, they also alter aerosol properties by various processes. Cloud processing of aerosol includes: convective redistribution, modification in the number and size of aerosol particles, chemical processing, new particle formation around clouds, and aerosol removal by rainfall to the surface. Among these processes, the wet removal during intense rain events, in polluted continental regions, can lead to spikes in acidic deposition into environment. In this study, we address the effects of clouds and precipitation on the aerosol distribution in cases of convective precipitation events in eastern US. We examine the effects of clouds and precipitation on various aerosol species, as well as their temporal and spatial variability.

  7. Modeling precipitate evolution in zirconium alloys during irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, J. D.

    2016-08-01

    The second phase precipitates (SPPs) in zirconium alloys are critical in controlling their performance. During service, SPPs are subject to both thermal and irradiation effects that influence volume fraction, number, and size. In this paper, a model has been developed to capture the combined effect of thermal and irradiation exposure on the Zr(Fe,Cr)2 precipitates in Zircaloy. The model includes irradiation induced precipitate destabilization integrated into a classical size class model for nucleation, growth and coarsening. The model has been applied to predict the effect of temperature and irradiation on SPP evolution. Increasing irradiation displacement rate is predicted to strongly enhance the loss of particles that arises from coarsening alone. The effect of temperature is complex due to competition between coarsening and irradiation damage. As temperature increases, coarsening is predicted to become increasingly important compared to irradiation induced dissolution and may increase resistance to irradiation induced dissolution by increasing particle size.

  8. Evaluate the urban effect on summer convective precipitation by coupling a urban canopy model with a Regional Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Liu, S.; Xue, Y.; Oleson, K. W.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most significant urbanization in the world occurred in Great Beijing Area of China during the past several decades. The land use and land cover changes modifies the land surface physical characteristics, including the anthropogenic heat and thermo-dynamic conduction. All of those play important roles in the urban regional climate changes. We developed a single layer urban canopy module based on the Community Land Surface Model Urban Module (CLMU). We have made further improvements in the urban module: the energy balances on the five surface conditions are considered separately: building roof, sun side and shade side wall, pervious and impervious land surface. Over each surface, a method to calculate sky view factor (SVF) is developed based on the physically process while most urban models simply provide an empirical value; A new scheme for calculating the latent heat flux is applied on both wall and impervious land; anthropogenic heat is considered in terms of industrial production, domestic wastes, vehicle and air condition. All of these developments improve the accuracy of surface energy balance processing in urban area. The urban effect on summer convective precipitation under the unstable atmospheric condition in the Great Beijing Area was investigated by simulating a heavy rainfall event in July 21st 2012. In this storm, strong meso-scale convective complexes (MCC) brought precipitation of averagely 164 mm within 6 hours, which is the record of past 60 years in the region. Numerical simulating experiment was set up by coupling MCLMU with WRF. Several condition/blank control cases were also set up. The horizontal resolution in all simulations was 2 km. While all of the control results drastically underestimate the urban precipitation, the result of WRF-MCLMU is much closer to the observation though still underestimated. More sensitive experiments gave a preliminary conclusion of how the urban canopy physics processing affects the local precipitation

  9. Future changes in atmospheric circulation types and related precipitation extremes in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homann, Markus; Jacobeit, Jucundus; Beck, Christoph; Philipp, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The statistical evaluation of the relationships between atmospheric circulation types and areal precipitation events took place in the context of an international project called WETRAX (Weather patterns, storm tracks and related precipitation extremes). The aim of the project was to estimate the regional flooding potential in Central Europe under enhanced climate change conditions. For parts of southern Central Europe, a gridded daily precipitation set with 6km horizontal resolution has been generated for the period 1951-2006 by the Austrian Zentralanstalt für Meteorologie und Geodynamik (ZAMG). To determine regions with similar precipitation variability, a S-mode principal component analysis has been applied. Extreme precipitation events are defined by the 95% percentile, based on regional arithmetic means of daily precipitation. Large-scale atmospheric circulation types have been derived by different statistical methods and variables using the COST733 classification software and gridded daily NCEP1 reanalysis data. To evaluate the performance of a particular circulation type classification with respect to regional precipitation extremes, multiple regression models have been derived between the circulation type frequencies as predictor variables and monthly frequencies of extreme precipitation as well as monthly rainfall amounts from these events. To estimate the regional flooding potential in Central Europe under enhanced climate change conditions, multiple regression models are applied to different projected GCM predictor data. Thus, future changes in circulation type occurrence frequencies are transferred into assessments of future changes in precipitation extremes on a regional scale.

  10. Formation of Amorphous Mg-Si Precipitates Mediated by Microbial Activity: A Recent Analogue For Understanding their Role in Microbialite Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacton, M.; Ariztegui, D.; Vasconcelos, C.; Barbarand, J.; Gorin, G. E.; McKenzie, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    Occurrence of amorphous Mg-Si precipitates has been reported in different environments, i.e., biofilms and microbialites, from acidic to alkaline conditions. They are always associated to microbial activity, while their authigenesis remains elusive. Although a biological factor is undoubtedly linked to their occurrence, different assumptions have been proposed in order to explain their role in the formation of sediments. Léveillé et al. (2002) and Souza-Egipsy et al. (2005) showed that a highly hydrated Mg-Si gel is mediated by EPS. They have been thought to be a precursor of some clays, e.g., kerolite (Léveillé et al., 2005) and dolomite (Bontognali et al., 2008). On the other hand, Arp et al. (2003) considered that they have precipitated after the dissolution of a primary carbonate mineral. They have been also demonstrated as an agent of preservation of cell walls enhancing fossilization in rocks: Mg-Si permineralization of cell walls was reported as a possible explanation for the preservation of green algae remains in subfossil freshwater microbialites (Arp et al., 2003) and cyanobacterial cell walls (Souza-Egipsy et al., 2005). From a physico-chemical point of view, little is known about the conditions required for Mg-Si complexation. For example, Kent and Kastner (1985) proposed that chemical Mg-hydroxysilicate precipitation is likely to occur in carbonate-containing siliceous sediments because the CaCO3 dissolution helps to maintain pH values near 8. However, other environments exhibit more acidic pH suggesting that the latter is not a fundamental parameter for the nucleation of Mg-Si precipitates. Modern microbial mats are excellent systems to study the processes leading to the formation of Mg-Si precipitates. Two samples from microbial mats retrieved at the hypersaline Lagoa Vermelha (Brazil) were studied. One sample was studied after recovery without any further treatment, whereas an equivalent sample was placed in an anoxic chamber without light

  11. Application of Nimbus-6 microwave data to problems in precipitation prediction for the Pacific west coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viezee, W.; Shigeishi, H.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1979-01-01

    The preliminary results of a research study that emphasizes the analysis and interpretation of data related to total precipitable water and nonprecipitating cloud liquid water obtained from NIMBUS-6 SCAMS are reported. Sixteen cyclonic storm situations in the northeastern Pacific Ocean that resulted in significant rainfall along the west coast of the United States during the winter season October 1975 through February 1976 are analyzed in terms of their distributions and amounts of total water vapor and liquid water, as obtained from SCAMS data. The water-substance analyses for each storm case are related to the distribution and amount of coastal precipitation observed during the subsequent time period when the storm system crosses the coastline. Concomitant precipitation predictions from the LFM are also incorporated. Techniques by which satellite microwave data over the ocean can be used to improve precipitation prediction for the Pacific West Coast are emphasized.

  12. A new Grid Product of Tropical Cyclone Precipitation (TCP) for North America from 1930 to 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.

    2015-12-01

    We first developed a new method that collects daily TCP by using historical storm tracks and precipitation observation based on daily rain gauges in both U.S. and Mexico and calibrated it with satellite precipitation observation. We used a parametrized wind field to correct the possible under-estimations of precipitation in rain gauges. Grid interpolation parameters were optimized by testing different historical rain gauge densities and comparing our grid estimation of TCP and the observation from TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (3B42) by for the data available period from 1998 to 2013. The calibrated method was then used for the whole 94 years of TCP estimation. The preliminary result shows that the frequency of TCP events does not have significant change but the TCP intensity has significant increasing trends, especially in certain locations in North Carolina and Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico. This new long term TCP climatology can potentially assist model calibration and disaster prevention/mitigation.

  13. Effects of precipitation on soil acid phosphatase activity in three successional forests in Southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.; Liu, J.; Zhou, G.; Zhang, D.; Deng, Q.

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is often a limiting nutrient for plant growth in tropical and subtropical forests. Global climate change has led to alterations in precipitation in the recent years, which inevitably influences P cycling. Soil acid phosphatase plays a vital role in controlling P mineralization, and its activity reflects the capacity of P supply to ecosystems. In order to study the effects of precipitation on soil acid phosphatase activity, an experiment of precipitation treatments (no precipitation, natural precipitation and doubled precipitation) in three forests of early-, mid- and advanced-successional stages in Southern China was carried out. Results showed that driven by seasonality of precipitation, changes in soil acid phosphatase activities coincided with the seasonal climate pattern, with significantly higher values in the wet season than in the dry season. Soil acid phosphatase activities were closely linked to forest successional stages, with enhanced values in the later stages of forest succession. In the dry season, soil acid phosphatase activities in the three forests showed a rising trend with increasing precipitation treatments. In the wet season, no precipitation treatment depressed soil acid phosphatase activity, while doubled precipitation treatment exerted no positive effects on it, and even significantly lowered it in the advanced forest. These indicate the potential transformation rate of organic P might be more dependent on water in the dry season than in the wet season. The negative responses of soil acid phosphatase activity to precipitation suggest that P supply in subtropical ecosystems might be reduced if there was a drought in a whole year or more rainfall in the wet season in the future. NP, no precipitation; Control, natural precipitation; DP, double precipitation.

  14. Subseasonal variability of precipitation in China during boreal winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Y.; Lin, H.; Wu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Using pentad data of the Northern Hemisphere extended winter from 1979 to 2012 that are derived from the daily rainfall of the National Meteorological Information Center of China, subseasonal variability of precipitation in China is analyzed. The two dominant modes of subseasonal precipitation variability are identified with an empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis. The first mode (EOF1) is characterized by a monopole in South China, whereas the second mode (EOF2) has a meridional dipole structure with opposite precipitation anomalies over the Yangtze River Basin and the coastal area of South China. These two modes tend to have a phase shift to each other in both space and time, indicating that part of their variability is related to a common process and represents a southward propagating pattern. The subseasonal variability is decomposed into two components, i.e., that related to the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) and that independent of the MJO. The MJO-related component is obtained using a bivariate linear regression with respect to the MJO index as defined by Wheeler and Hendon. It is found that the MJO contributes to only a small amount (up to 10%) of precipitation variability in South China. EOF1 is associated with the MJO phase 3, corresponding to enhanced equatorial convection in the Indian Ocean and depressed convection in the western Pacific, while EOF2 is related to the MJO phase 5, when the enhanced tropical convection moves to the Maritime continent region. A large part of the subseasonal precipitation variability in China is independent of the MJO. Lagged regression analysis is performed between the leading principal component (PC1) and the MJO-independent component of variability of 500-hPa geopotential height, sea-level pressure and 2-meter air temperature. It is found that the subseasonal precipitation variability in China is related to a wave train from the North Atlantic, development of the Siberian high, and cold air outbreak in East

  15. Irradiation-induced nano-voids in strained tin precipitates in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Gaiduk, P. I.; Lundsgaard Hansen, J. Nylandsted Larsen, A.

    2014-04-14

    We report on self-assembling of spherically shaped voids in nanometer size strained Sn precipitates after irradiation with He{sup +} ions in different conditions. It is found that high-temperature irradiation induces vacancies which are collected by compressively strained Sn precipitates enhancing of out-diffusion of Sn atoms from the precipitates. Nano-voids formation takes place simultaneously with a β- to α-phase transformation in the Sn precipitates. Post-irradiation thermal treatment leads to the removal of voids and a backward transformation of the Sn phase to β-phase. Strain-enhanced separation of point defects along with vacancy assisted Sn out-diffusion and precipitate dissolution are discussed.

  16. CONCENTRATION OF Pu USING AN IODATE PRECIPITATE

    DOEpatents

    Fries, B.A.

    1960-02-23

    A method is given for separating plutonium from lanthanum in a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitation process for the recovery of plutonium values from an aqueous solution. The carrier precipitation process includes the steps of forming a lanthanum fluoride precipi- . tate, thereby carrying plutonium out of solution, metathesizing the fluoride precipitate to a hydroxide precipitate, and then dissolving the hydroxide precipitate in nitric acid. In accordance with the invention, the nitric acid solution, which contains plutonium and lanthanum, is made 0.05 to 0.15 molar in potassium iodate. thereby precipitating plutonium as plutonous iodate and the plutonous iodate is separated from the lanthanum- containing supernatant solution.

  17. Understanding mechanisms behind intense precipitation events in East Antarctica: merging modeling and remote sensing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorodetskaya, Irina V.; Maahn, Maximilian; Gallée, Hubert; Kneifel, Stefan; Souverijns, Niels; Gossart, Alexandra; Crewell, Susanne; Van Lipzig, Nicole P. M.

    2016-04-01

    through now. Preliminary results show that MAR simulates well the timing of major synoptic-scale precipitation events, while a bias exists towards higher radar reflectivities using MAR snowfall properties compared to PE MRR measurements. This bias can be related to the differences both in the amount and type of snowflakes reaching the surface. The spatial extent of precipitation also matters as PE provides only vertical profiling. PAMTRA is used to evaluate specific intense snowfall events at PE-centered grid, while MAR-simulated atmospheric fields are further analyzed for understanding the large- and meso-scale atmospheric circulation and moisture transport patterns, together with cloud properties responsible for these events. PE measurements showed that the most intense precipitation events at PE (up to 30 mm water equivalent per day) have been associated with atmospheric rivers, where enhanced tropospheric integrated water vapor amounts are concentrated in narrow long bands stretching from subtropical latitudes to the East Antarctic coast. We analyze representation of such events in MAR, including their extent, intensity, as well as time and location of where such moisture bands are reaching the Antarctic coast.

  18. Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation for Subsurface Immobilization of Contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. W.; Fujita, Y.; Ginn, T. R.; Hubbard, S. S.; Dafflon, B.; Delwiche, M.; Gebrehiwet, T.; Henriksen, J. R.; Peterson, J.; Taylor, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Subsurface radionuclide and metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of the greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent trace ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide 90Sr, is co-precipitation in calcite. We have found that calcite precipitation and co-precipitation of Sr can be accelerated by the activity of urea hydrolyzing microorganisms, that higher calcite precipitation rates can result in increased Sr partitioning, and that nutrient additions can stimulate ureolytic activity. To extend our understanding of microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) in an aquifer setting a continuous recirculation field experiment evaluating MICP was conducted at the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site located at Rifle, CO. In this experiment, groundwater extracted from an onsite well was amended with urea (total mass of 42.5 kg) and molasses (a carbon and electron donor) and re-injected into a well approximately 4 meters up-gradient for a period of 12 days followed by 10 months of groundwater sampling and monitoring. Crosshole radar and electrical tomographic data were collected prior, during, and after the MICP treatment. The urea and molasses treatment resulted in an enhanced population of sediment associated urea hydrolyzing organisms as evidenced by increases in the number of ureC gene copies, increases in 14C urea hydrolysis rates, and long-term observations of ammonium (a urea hydrolysis product) in the injection, extraction and down gradient monitoring wells. Permeability changes and increases in the calcite saturation indexes in the well field suggest that mineral precipitation has occurred; ongoing analysis of field samples seeks to confirm this. Changes in dielectric constant and electrical conductivity were used to interpret the spatiotemporal distribution of the injectate and subsequent calcite precipitation. Modeling activities are underway to

  19. Desert dust suppressing precipitation: a possible desertification feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, D; Rudich, Y; Lahav, R

    2001-05-22

    The effect of desert dust on cloud properties and precipitation has so far been studied solely by using theoretical models, which predict that rainfall would be enhanced. Here we present observations showing the contrary; the effect of dust on cloud properties is to inhibit precipitation. Using satellite and aircraft observations we show that clouds forming within desert dust contain small droplets and produce little precipitation by drop coalescence. Measurement of the size distribution and the chemical analysis of individual Saharan dust particles collected in such a dust storm suggest a possible mechanism for the diminished rainfall. The detrimental impact of dust on rainfall is smaller than that caused by smoke from biomass burning or anthropogenic air pollution, but the large abundance of desert dust in the atmosphere renders it important. The reduction of precipitation from clouds affected by desert dust can cause drier soil, which in turn raises more dust, thus providing a possible feedback loop to further decrease precipitation. Furthermore, anthropogenic changes of land use exposing the topsoil can initiate such a desertification feedback process.

  20. Desert dust suppressing precipitation: A possible desertification feedback loop

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Rudich, Yinon; Lahav, Ronen

    2001-01-01

    The effect of desert dust on cloud properties and precipitation has so far been studied solely by using theoretical models, which predict that rainfall would be enhanced. Here we present observations showing the contrary; the effect of dust on cloud properties is to inhibit precipitation. Using satellite and aircraft observations we show that clouds forming within desert dust contain small droplets and produce little precipitation by drop coalescence. Measurement of the size distribution and the chemical analysis of individual Saharan dust particles collected in such a dust storm suggest a possible mechanism for the diminished rainfall. The detrimental impact of dust on rainfall is smaller than that caused by smoke from biomass burning or anthropogenic air pollution, but the large abundance of desert dust in the atmosphere renders it important. The reduction of precipitation from clouds affected by desert dust can cause drier soil, which in turn raises more dust, thus providing a possible feedback loop to further decrease precipitation. Furthermore, anthropogenic changes of land use exposing the topsoil can initiate such a desertification feedback process. PMID:11353821

  1. Acid precipitation; an annotated bibliography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiltshire, Denise A.; Evans, Margaret L.

    1984-01-01

    This collection of 1660 bibliographies references on the causes and environmental effects of acidic atmospheric deposition was compiled from computerized literature searches of earth-science and chemistry data bases. Categories of information are (1) atmospheric chemistry (gases and aerosols), (2) precipitation chemistry, (3) transport and deposition (wet and dry), (4) aquatic environments (biological and hydrological), (5) terrestrial environments, (6) effects on materials and structures, (7) air and precipitation monitoring and data collection, and (8) modeling studies. References date from the late 1800 's through December 1981. The bibliography includes short summaries of most documents. Omitted are unpublished manuscripts, publications in press, master 's theses and doctoral dissertations, newspaper articles, and book reviews. Coauthors and subject indexes are included. (USGS)

  2. Precipitation patterns during channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamtveit, B.; Hawkins, C.; Benning, L. G.; Meier, D.; Hammer, O.; Angheluta, L.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral precipitation during channelized fluid flow is widespread in a wide variety of geological systems. It is also a common and costly phenomenon in many industrial processes that involve fluid flow in pipelines. It is often referred to as scale formation and encountered in a large number of industries, including paper production, chemical manufacturing, cement operations, food processing, as well as non-renewable (i.e. oil and gas) and renewable (i.e. geothermal) energy production. We have studied the incipient stages of growth of amorphous silica on steel plates emplaced into the central areas of the ca. 1 meter in diameter sized pipelines used at the hydrothermal power plant at Hellisheidi, Iceland (with a capacity of ca 300 MW electricity and 100 MW hot water). Silica precipitation takes place over a period of ca. 2 months at approximately 120°C and a flow rate around 1 m/s. The growth produces asymmetric ca. 1mm high dendritic structures ';leaning' towards the incoming fluid flow. A novel phase-field model combined with the lattice Boltzmann method is introduced to study how the growth morphologies vary under different hydrodynamic conditions, including non-laminar systems with turbulent mixing. The model accurately predicts the observed morphologies and is directly relevant for understanding the more general problem of precipitation influenced by turbulent mixing during flow in channels with rough walls and even for porous flow. Reference: Hawkins, C., Angheluta, L., Hammer, Ø., and Jamtveit, B., Precipitation dendrites in channel flow. Europhysics Letters, 102, 54001

  3. Trends of regional precipitation and their control mechanisms during the 1979-2013 global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Trends in precipitation are critical to water resources. Considerable uncertainty remains concerning trends of regional precipitation in response to global warming and their controlling mechanism(s). Here we use an inter-annual difference method to derive trends of regional precipitation from data of Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) and Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis in the near-global domain of 60°S-60°N during a major global warming period of 1979-2013. We find that trends of regional annual precipitation are primarily driven by changes in the top 30 % heavy precipitation which in turn are controlled by changes in precipitable water in response to global warming, i.e. by thermodynamic processes. Significant drying trends are found in most of the US and eastern Canada, the Middle East, and eastern South America, while significant increases in precipitation occur in northern Australia, southern Africa, western India and western China. In addition, as the climate warms there are extensive enhancements and expansions of the three major tropical precipitation centers, namely the Maritime Continent (MC), Central America, and tropical Africa, leading to a significant strengthening of the global hydrological cycle. However, there are significant discrepancies between observed trends derived from GPCP and those from a typical climate model (MPI ECHAM5) during the period 1979-2013, raising a serious concern regarding the capability of climate models in their projections of trends of regional precipitation in response to global warming.

  4. Potential impacts of the Arctic on interannual and interdecadal summer precipitation over China

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuefeng; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-02-01

    After the end of the 1970s, there has been a tendency for enhanced summer precipitation over South China and the Yangtze River valley and drought over North China and Northeastern China. Coincidentally, Arctic ice concentration has decreased since the late 1970s, with larger reduction in summer than spring. However, the Arctic warming is more significant in spring than summer, suggesting that spring Arctic conditions could be more important in their remote impacts. This study investigates the potential impacts of the Arctic on summer precipitation in China. The leading spatial patterns and time coefficients of the unfiltered, interannual, and interdecadal precipitation (1960-2008) modes were analyzed and compared using empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis, which shows that the first three EOFs can capture the principal precipitation patterns (northern, central and southern patterns) over eastern China. Regression of the Arctic spring and summer temperature onto the time coefficients of the leading interannual and interdecadal precipitation modes shows that interdecadal summer precipitation in China is related to the Arctic spring warming, but the relationship with Arctic summer temperature is weak. Moreover, no notable relationships were found between the first three modes of interannual precipitation and Arctic spring or summer temperatures. Finally, correlations between summer precipitation and the Arctic Oscillation (AO) index from January to August were investigated, which indicate that summer precipitation in China correlates with AO only to some extent. Overall, this study suggests important relationships between the Arctic spring temperature and summer precipitation over China at the interdecadal time scale.

  5. Hydrologically-Aided Interpolation (HAI) of Precipitation in Complex Alpine Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riboust, P.; Le Moine, N.; Gailhard, J.; Hendrickx, F.; Garcon, R.; Gottardi, F.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrological modeling in mountainous regions requires unbiaised precipitation estimates at scales of a few hundreds to a few thousands square-kilometers (meso-scale). At these scales, precipitation patterns are complex and exhibit orographic enhancement, a phenomenon which is often poorly captured by scarce gage networks. Usually, the estimation of areal precipitation is performed independently of the hydrological modeling step (e.g. using precipitation reanalysis datasets or gage interpolation products). In this approach, it is not possible to easily correct precipitation biases in the case of discrepancies between observed and simulated discharges. In this study, we introduce the concept of Hydrologically-Aided Interpolation (HAI): a gage-based interpolation scheme, producing gridded daily precipitation estimates, is coupled to a semi-distributed hydrological model running at the daily time-step. The parameters of the interpolation scheme (precipitation gradients with elevation) are estimated jointly with the parameters of the hydrological model (snow scheme, soil moisture accounting scheme, and routing scheme). The whole hydrometeorological model is evaluated against cross-validation precipitation gages, point-scale snow water equivalent (SWE) measurements, and catchment-scale discharge estimates at several streamflow gaging sites in a 3,500 square-kilometer Alpine catchment in the French Southern Alps. Results show that adding hydrological constraints leads to much more robust estimates of precipitation gradients, which in turn produce improved precipitation estimates in temporal cross-validation both at point-scale and catchment-scale.

  6. Global Precipitation Mission Visualization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwaller, Mathew

    2011-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) software provides graphic visualization tools that enable easy comparison of ground- and space-based radar observations. It was initially designed to compare ground radar reflectivity from operational, ground-based, S- and C-band meteorological radars with comparable measurements from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite's precipitation radar instrument. This design is also applicable to other groundbased and space-based radars, and allows both ground- and space-based radar data to be compared for validation purposes. The tool creates an operational system that routinely performs several steps. It ingests satellite radar data (precipitation radar data from TRMM) and groundbased meteorological radar data from a number of sources. Principally, the ground radar data comes from national networks of weather radars (see figure). The data ingested by the visualization tool must conform to the data formats used in GPM Validation Network Geometry-matched data product generation. The software also performs match-ups of the radar volume data for the ground- and space-based data, as well as statistical and graphical analysis (including two-dimensional graphical displays) on the match-up data. The visualization tool software is written in IDL, and can be operated either in the IDL development environment or as a stand-alone executable function.

  7. Predictibility in Nowcasting of Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, I.; Sourcel, M.; Berenguer, M.

    2009-05-01

    Present short term precipitation forecasting is based on two methods: Lagrangian persistence (nowcasting) and numerical weather prediction (NWP). An improvement over these methods is obtained by the combination of the two. The obvious shortcoming of nowcasting is its severe limitation in capturing new development or dissipation of precipitation. NWP has the ability to predict both but very imprecisely. An attempt to correct model errors by post-processing leads to some improvement in the skill of NWP, but the improvement, although significative, is not very impressive. The goal of our effort is to take a step back and to describe, in a quantitative manner, a) the nature of the uncertainties affecting Lagrangian persistence and NWP forecasts, as well as to determineb) the physical causes of the uncertainties. We quantify the uncertainties in short term forecasting due to limitation of nowcasting algorithms and NWP to capture correctly some of the physical phenomena that determine the predictability of precipitation. The first factor considered is the diurnal cycle that appears as the one physically determined factors that limit the precision of short term prediction. We study the cycle in radar mosaics over US and compare this to nowcasts and model outputs. The seasonal and geographical dependence of the diurnal cycle is quantitatively evaluated.

  8. Antecedent precipitation index determined from CST estimates of rainfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, David W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper deals with an experimental calculation of a satellite-based antecedent precipitation index (API). The index is also derived from daily rain images produced from infrared images using an improved version of GSFC's Convective/Stratiform Technique (CST). API is a measure of soil moisture, and is based on the notion that the amount of moisture in the soil at a given time is related to precipitation at earlier times. Four different CST programs as well as the Geostationary Operational Enviroment Satellite (GOES) Precipitation Index developed by Arkin in 1979 are compared to experimental results, for the Mississippi Valley during the month of July. Rain images are shown for the best CST code and the ARK program. Comparisons are made as to the accuracy and detail of the results for the two codes. This project demonstrates the feasibility of running the CST on a synoptic scale. The Mississippi Valley case is well suited for testing the feasibility of monitoring soil moisture by means of CST. Preliminary comparisons of CST and ARK indicate significant differences in estimates of rain amount and distribution.

  9. Assessment of the extremity of heavy precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smidova, Jana; Müller, Miloslav

    2013-04-01

    Considering all natural disasters occurring on the Czech territory, heavy precipitation and associated flooding pose the greatest direct risk. To explain the causes and development of flood events, it is important to analyze the occurrence of intense precipitation in the past. A frequently used method of evaluation of heavy precipitation which is based only on rainfall intensity, total rainfall depth or duration of the events does not enable to compare precipitation events in terms of their spatiotemporal extremity. The methods presented in the paper introduce spatial and temporal dimensions in the assessment of the extremity of heavy precipitation, which allows, among other things, to specify the predominant character of precipitation. This study investigates the dependencies between temporal and spatial variability of heavy precipitation and their extremeness. Selected cases of heavy precipitation observed in the upper Elbe basin to the gauging station Němčice, Czech Republic, in the second half of the 20th century, are studied. SAD (severity-area-duration) curves and severity diagrams are developed for each precipitation event. These figures show a continuous view on the territory in which precipitation was concentrated during specific time interval. Methods in the evaluation of extremity precipitation events are based from the return period precipitation amounts measured in stations. The events are further characterized by the size of the area and rainfall duration. One-day to six-day return periods of precipitation are always confronted. Applied methods allow comparing precipitation events not only in terms of extremity (return period precipitation) but also their temporal and spatial distribution. They show that the heavy precipitation concentrated over a large area, or conversely affected only a small area. Temporal scales are taken into account in the analysis of extremity of heavy precipitation and duration time of heavy precipitation is also displayed

  10. Electron precipitation patterns and substorm morphology.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, R. A.; Burch, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Statistical analysis of data from the auroral particles experiment aboard OGO 4, performed in a statistical framework interpretable in terms of magnetospheric substorm morphology, both spatial and temporal. Patterns of low-energy electron precipitation observed by polar satellites are examined as functions of substorm phase. The implications of the precipitation boundaries identifiable at the low-latitude edge of polar cusp electron precipitation and at the poleward edge of precipitation in the premidnight sector are discussed.

  11. Precipitation of relativistic electrons as seen by NOAA POES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahnin, Alexander; Gvozdevsky, Boris; Yahnina, Tatyana; Semenova, Nadezhda

    The MEPED instrument onboard NOAA Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (NOAA POES) was designed to measure precipitating and quasi-trapped protons and electrons in the ranges 30 keV to 200 MeV (for protons) and 30 keV to 2500 keV (for electrons). In particular, proton telescopes measure protons in six channels: P1 (30-80 keV), P2 (80-250 keV), P3 (250-800 keV), P4 (800-2500 keV), P5 (2500-6900 keV), and P6 (>6900 keV). Protons appear in the P6 channel very seldom (only during Solar Proton Events). At the same time, this channel can be contaminated by relativistic (E ~ 1 MeV) electrons. Using P6 data we performed a study of the relativistic electron precipitation (REP) within the interval of 25 July - 31 August 2005 characterizing by variable geomagnetic activity. We found that most often the REP events are observed in the night sector in relation to the isotropy boundary of relativistic electrons. It means that these REP events are due to violation of the adiabatic motion of particles in the region of a relatively weak magnetic field in the equatorial plane of magnetosphere. Further, a substantial part of REP events is observed in association with enhancements of energetic (E>30 keV) electrons equatorward of the electron isotropy boundary. We interpret the precipitation of electrons in the wide range of energies as result of scattering the particles into the loss cone by ELF/VLF waves. Finally, relativistic electrons can be scattered into the loss cone by EMIC waves. This possibility is actively discussed in the literature. It is known that EMIC waves effectively scatter energetic protons and produce proton precipitation bursts equatorward of the proton isotropic boundary. To investigate the REP/EMIC wave relationship we consider how such proton precipitation bursts seen in P1-P3 channels correlate with REP. It turned out that proton precipitation bursts observed in the morning and day sectors do not correlate with REP events, but in the evening

  12. Acid Precipitation and the Forest Ecosystem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dochinger, Leon S.; Seliga, Thomas A.

    1975-01-01

    The First International Symposium on Acid Precipitation and the Forest Ecosystem dealt with the potential magnitude of the global effects of acid precipitation on aquatic ecosystems, forest soils, and forest vegetation. The problem is discussed in the light of atmospheric chemistry, transport, and precipitation. (Author/BT)

  13. Utilization of Precipitation and Moisture Products Derived from Satellites to Support NOAA Operational Precipitation Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, R.; Zhao, L.; Kuligowski, R. J.; Kusselson, S.; Ma, L.; Kidder, S. Q.; Forsythe, J. M.; Jones, A. S.; Ebert, E. E.; Valenti, E.

    2012-12-01

    NOAA/NESDIS operates a constellation of polar and geostationary orbiting satellites to support weather forecasts and to monitor the climate. Additionally, NOAA utilizes satellite assets from other U.S. agencies like NASA and the Department of Defense, as well as those from other nations with similar weather and climate responsibilities (i.e., EUMETSAT and JMA). Over the past two decades, through joint efforts between U.S. and international government researchers, academic partners, and private sector corporations, a series of "value added" products have been developed to better serve the needs of weather forecasters and to exploit the full potential of precipitation and moisture products generated from these satellites. In this presentation, we will focus on two of these products - Ensemble Tropical Rainfall Potential (eTRaP) and Blended Total Precipitable Water (bTPW) - and provide examples on how they contribute to hydrometeorological forecasts. In terms of passive microwave satellite products, TPW perhaps is most widely used to support real-time forecasting applications, as it accurately depicts tropospheric water vapor and its movement. In particular, it has proven to be extremely useful in determining the location, timing, and duration of "atmospheric rivers" which contribute to and sustain flooding events. A multi-sensor approach has been developed and implemented at NESDIS in which passive microwave estimates from multiple satellites and sensors are merged to create a seamless, bTPW product that is more efficient for forecasters to use. Additionally, this product is being enhanced for utilization for television weather forecasters. Examples will be shown to illustrate the roll of atmospheric rivers and contribution to flooding events, and how the bTPW product was used to improve the forecast of these events. Heavy rains associated with land falling tropical cyclones (TC) frequently trigger floods that cause millions of dollars of damage and tremendous loss

  14. Extraction of rare earth elements from hydrate-phosphate precipitates of apatite processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andropov, M. O.; Anufrieva, A. V.; Buynovskiy, A. S.; Makaseev, Y. N.; Mazov, I. N.; Nefedov, R. A.; Sachkov, V. I.; Stepanova, O. B.; Valkov, AV

    2016-01-01

    The features of extraction of rare earth elements (REE) were considered from hydrate-phosphate precipitates of REE of apatite processing by nitric acid technology. The preliminary purification of nitrate solution of REE from impurities of titanium, aluminum, iron, uranium and thorium was suggested to obtain stable solutions not forming precipitates. Washing the extract was recommended with the evaporated reextract that allows to obtain directly on the cascade of REE extraction the concentrated solutions suitable for the separation into groups by the extraction method. Technical decisions were suggested for the separation of REE in groups without the use of salting-out agent.

  15. The Effects of Air Pollution Particles on Clouds and Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Z.

    2006-05-01

    The WMO and the IUGG identified the role of pollution on clouds and precipitation as an area that needs clarification, because of its importance to water supplies and to climate. A group of scientists have been assigned to write a review on this subject. The report is not yet completed, but it is already clear that a lot of work has been published on the effects of aerosols on clouds, but relatively little observational work has been carried out to determine how and if aerosols modify precipitation on the ground. This lecture will cover some of the work on the effects of aerosols on precipitation with special emphasis on the role of giant cloud condensation nuclei (GCCN) on the microphysics of clouds. Using numerical models it has been shown that pollution tends to decrease precipitation amounts. The effect of GCCN is to increase rain amounts, but not enough to compensate for the decrease due to pollution. Furthermore, the models show that at least for convective clouds in the Mediterranean enhancement of aerosols with ice nucleating capabilities seems to reduce the amount of rainfall. In heavily polluted clouds the effects of enhanced ice nuclei on rainfall is negligible. The enhancement of aerosol input into large convective clouds leads to longer lifetimes, larger anvils and to larger cloud fraction as seen from above. These are in agreement with recent observations from satellites. On the other hand, recent study using three numerical models show that when enhanced pollution is introduced to small warm clouds in the Amazonian, Caribbean and the Mediterranean the cloud lifetime decreases, the clouds shrinks and the cloud fraction is reduced. These modeling results conflict with some observations from satellites. The discrepancy between modeling and observations of small warm clouds suggest that more high resolution observations from satellites are needed.

  16. Simulating multimodal seasonality in extreme daily precipitation occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tye, Mari R.; Blenkinsop, Stephen; Fowler, Hayley J.; Stephenson, David B.; Kilsby, Christopher G.

    2016-06-01

    Floods pose multi-dimensional hazards to critical infrastructure and society and these hazards may increase under climate change. While flood conditions are dependent on catchment type and soil conditions, seasonal precipitation extremes also play an important role. The extreme precipitation events driving flood occurrence may arrive non-uniformly in time. In addition, their seasonal and inter-annual patterns may also cause sequences of several events and enhance likely flood responses. Spatial and temporal patterns of extreme daily precipitation occurrence are characterized across the UK. Extreme and very heavy daily precipitation is not uniformly distributed throughout the year, but exhibits spatial differences, arising from the relative proximity to the North Atlantic Ocean or North Sea. Periods of weeks or months are identified during which extreme daily precipitation occurrences are most likely to occur, with some regions of the UK displaying multimodal seasonality. A Generalized Additive Model is employed to simulate extreme daily precipitation occurrences over the UK from 1901 to 2010 and to allow robust statistical testing of temporal changes in the seasonal distribution. Simulations show that seasonality has the strongest correlation with intra-annual variations in extreme event occurrence, while Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and Mean Sea Level Pressure (MSLP) have the strongest correlation with inter-annual variations. The north and west of the UK are dominated by MSLP in the mid-North Atlantic and the south and east are dominated by local SST. All regions now have a higher likelihood of autumnal extreme daily precipitation than earlier in the twentieth century. This equates to extreme daily precipitation occurring earlier in the autumn in the north and west, and later in the autumn in the south and east. The change in timing is accompanied by increases in the probability of extreme daily precipitation occurrences during the autumn, and in the number of

  17. Skill assessment of precipitation nowcasting in Mediterranean Heavy Precipitation Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, Joan; Berenguer, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Very short-term precipitation forecasting (i.e nowcasting) systems may provide valuable support in the weather surveillance process as they allow to issue automated early warnings for heavy precipitation events (HPE) as reviewed recently by Pierce et al. (2012). The need for warnings is essential in densely populated regions of small catchments, such as those typically found in Mediterranean coastal areas, prone to flash-floods. Several HPEs that occurred in NE Spain are analyzed using a nowcasting system based on the extrapolation of rainfall fields observed with weather radar following a Lagrangian approach developed and tested successfully in previous studies (Berenguer et al. 2005, 2011). Radar-based nowcasts, with lead times up to 3 h, are verified here against quality-controlled weather radar quantitative precipitation estimates and also against a dense network of raingauges. The basic questions studied are the dependence of forecast quality with lead time and rainfall amounts in several high-impact HPEs such as the 7 September 2005 Llobregat Delta river tornado outbreak (Bech et al. 2007) or the 2 November 2008 supercell tornadic thunderstorms (Bech et al. 2011) - both cases had intense rainfall rates (30' amounts exceeding 38.2 and 12.3 mm respectively) and daily values above 100 mm. Verification scores indicated that forecasts of 30' precipitation amounts provided useful guidance for lead times up to 60' for moderate intensities (up to 1 mm in 30') and up to 2.5h for lower rates (above 0.1 mm). On the other hand correlations of radar estimates and forecasts exceeded Eulerian persistence of precipitation estimates for lead times of 1.5 h for moderate intensities (up to 0.8 mm/h). We complete the analysis with a discussion on the reliability of threshold to lead time dependence based on the event-to-event variability found. This work has been done in the framework of the ProFEWS project (CGL2010-15892). References Bech J, N Pineda, T Rigo, M Aran, J Amaro, M

  18. Hydrocarbonates in precipitation of Moscow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, Igor; Eremina, Iren; Aloyan, Artash; Arutunan, Vardan; Chubarova, Natalia; Yermakov, Alexandr

    2016-04-01

    According to monitoring of the atmospheric precipitation of Moscow a number of episodes is revealed, the content of hydrocarbonates in which repeatedly surpasses equilibrium level. Facts of their registration are linked to complex structure of precipitation which is caused by a different chemical composition of condensation nucleus. As a result on the underlying surface two groups of drops with acidity of the different nature are transferred. The acidity of the first, "metal" group of droplets, is determined by a carbonate equilibrium with atmospheric CO2 and with dissolved carbonates of alkali and alkaline earth metals. The acidity of the second, "ammonium" group droplets, is characterized by the balance between an ammonia absorbed from the air and atmospheric acids. Regulation of acidity of the deposits measured in a course of monitoring, occurs for this reason not only in the air, but also in the condensate receiver. A mixing "metal" and "ammonium" groups precipitation accompanied by only a partial transfer of hydrocarbonates in the dissolved CO2. The process is braked as a result of a practical stop of exit of CO2 into the atmosphere because of a mass transfer deceleration. In turn it leads to excess of equilibrium level of hydrocarbonates in the receiver. Estimates show that the acidity of "ammonia" component of precipitation should be much higher than the reported monitoring data. In other words, real acidity of rain drops can essentially exceed that is measured by standard procedures of monitoring of deposits, that it is necessary to take into consideration at calculations of so-called critical levels of acid loading on people and environment. In other words, the actual acidity of raindrops could greatly exceed that is measured by the standard procedures for monitoring rainfall, which should be taken into account when calculating the so-called critical levels of acid loads on people and the environment. It follows that the true level of hazard of acid rain

  19. Climatological analysis of precipitation patterns over Mount Baldo (Southern Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletti, G.; Zardi, D.; de Franceschi, M.

    2010-09-01

    The mountain range of Mount Baldo is an elongated chain in the southern Prealps. Bounded on the western side by Lake Garda, and on the eastern side by the parallel-running deep furrow of the River Adige Valley, the whole Mount Baldo range stretches in the direction southwest-northeast for about 40 km, from the southern highlands of Caprino Veronese up to the elevated saddle joining the surroundings of Rovereto (in the Adige Valley) to the plain of Nago-Torbole (northern shore of Lake Garda). Mount Baldo displays for most of its length a sharp and uninterrupted crest ridge, mostly running over 2000 m MSL. Its surface covers a variety of altitudinal ranges, from 65 m MSL at the mountain feet, along the Lake Garda shores, to 2,218 m MSL at its highest peak (Cima Valdritta). Furthermore the particular layout of being the southernmost alpine headland, projecting as a balcony over the Po Plain, makes it exposed to the climatic influence of the larger Mediterranean basin. All of these factors concurred to develop a remarkable variety of local microclimates, geographical characters and ecosystems. In particular Mount Baldo is well known for its varied flora, whence it has been named, since 16th century, Hortus Europae (Europe Garden). Precipitation is one of the key factors characterising the peculiar local climates of Mount Baldo. Various precipitation features can be produced by a variety of processes, including both orographic uplift of moist air advected by synoptic systems, and evaporation and up-slope advection of moist air from Lake Garda or from the Po Plain. Furthermore these effects may variously develop, and even combine, under different meteorological scenarios. In the present contribution the preliminary results are shown from a research work aiming at retrieving, collecting in a homogeneous dataset and analysing data from 18 weather stations disseminated on Mount Baldo, in order to produce a climatological analysis of precipitation in the area. The whole

  20. Temperature-precipitation relationships for Canadian stations

    SciTech Connect

    Isaac, G.A. ); Stuart, R.A. )

    1992-08-01

    The dependence of daily precipitation upon average daily temperature has been examined for all seasons using climatological data from 56 stations across Canada. For east and west coast sites, and the north, more precipitation occurs with warm and cold temperatures during January and July, respectively. In the middle of the country, the temperature dependence tends to increase toward the Arctic, with strong dependencies in the Northwest Territories and weaker dependencies on the Prairies. Southern Ontario and Quebec show almost no dependence of precipitation upon temperature during July, but more precipitation falls during warm weather during the winter. For stations within and immediately downwind of the Rockies, for all seasons, more precipitation occurs when the temperature is colder. These temperature-precipitation relationships can provide information on precipitation formation processes, as well as assistance in weather and climate forecasting.

  1. Preliminary Drill Sites

    DOE Data Explorer

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28

    Preliminary locations for intermediate depth temperature gradient holes and/or resource confirmation wells based on compilation of geological, geophysical and geochemical data prior to carrying out the DOE-funded reflection seismic survey.

  2. Seasonality and spatial variability of dynamic precipitation controls on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curio, Julia; Scherer, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is the origin of many large Asian rivers, which provide water resources for large regions in south and east Asia. Therefore, the water cycle on the TP and adjacent high mountain ranges, in particular the precipitation distribution and variability play an important role for the water availability for billions of people in the downstream regions of the TP. The High Asia Refined analysis (HAR) is used to analyse the dynamical factors that influence precipitation variability in the TP region, including the factors resulting in the enhancement and suppression of precipitation. Four dynamical fields that can influence precipitation are considered: the 300 hPa wind speed and wind speed 2 km above ground, the 300 hPa vertical wind speed, and the atmospheric water transport. The study focusses on the seasonality and the spatial variability of the precipitation controls and their dominant patterns. Results show that different factors have different effects on precipitation in different regions and seasons. This depends mainly on the dominant type of precipitation, i.e. convective or frontal/cyclonic precipitation. Additionally, the study reveals that the midlatitude westerlies have a high impact on the precipitation distribution on the TP and its surroundings year-round and not only in winter.

  3. Trends of regional precipitation and their control mechanisms during 1979-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Run; Liu, Shaw Chen; Shiu, Chein-Jung; Li, Jun; Zhang, Yuanhang

    2016-02-01

    Trends in precipitation are critical to water resources. Considerable uncertainty remains concerning the trends of regional precipitation in response to global warming and their controlling mechanisms. Here, we use an interannual difference method to derive trends of regional precipitation from GPCP (Global Precipitation Climatology Project) data and MERRA (Modern- Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications) reanalysis in the near-global domain of 60°S-60°N during a major global warming period of 1979-2013. We find that trends of regional annual precipitation are primarily driven by changes in the top 30% heavy precipitation events, which in turn are controlled by changes in precipitable water in response to global warming, i.e., by thermodynamic processes. Significant drying trends are found in most parts of the U.S. and eastern Canada, the Middle East, and eastern South America, while significant increases in precipitation occur in northern Australia, southern Africa, western India and western China. In addition, as the climate warms there are extensive enhancements and expansions of the three major tropical precipitation centers-the Maritime Continent, Central America, and tropical Africa-leading to the observed widening of Hadley cells and a significant strengthening of the global hydrological cycle.

  4. Observations of Aerosol Conditions Associated with Precipitation Events in the Remote Sierra Nevada Foothills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, D. B.; Kingsmill, D.; Roberts, G. C.; Noblitt, S.; Prather, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    Recent investigations of atmospheric aerosols have suggested their importance in affecting clouds and precipitation patterns, especially in regions where anthropogenic contributions to aerosol loadings are large. Aerosols entrained into precipitating clouds have been shown to either enhance or suppress precipitation based on the characteristics of the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN) introduced. Due to the inherent chemical dependence of CCN activity, the chemical composition of aerosols introduced into precipitating clouds will determine their effect on precipitation. This presentation will utilize ground-based chemical and physical measurements of aerosols and precipitation from multiple winter seasons gathered at Sugar Pine Dam (Foresthill, CA) as part of the CalWater experiment. The coupled behavior of landfalling frontal systems, regional terrain-parallel flow along the windward slopes of the Sierra Nevada (i.e., the Sierra Barrier Jet), and observed aerosol conditions in the Sierra Nevada foothills will be demonstrated and related issues explored. Temporally correlated changes in aerosol chemical composition with approaching winter storms may provide key insights into the evolution of the Sierra Barrier Jet, a dynamic feature that can have a major influence on orographically-forced precipitation in this region, and could provide clues to the coupling of Central Valley pollution with winter-time orographic precipitation episodes (or lack thereof). Gaining an overall understanding of the frequency and magnitude of the entrainment of Central Valley pollutants on winter storm systems will ultimately provide an estimate of how much aerosols affect precipitation in California.

  5. Paleo Mars energetic particle precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alho, Markku; McKenna-Lawlor, Susan; Kallio, Esa

    2015-12-01

    A young Mars may well have possessed a global dipolar magnetic field that provided protection for the planet's atmosphere from the space weather environment. Against this background, we study in the present paper the effect of various dipole magnetic fields on particle precipitation (range 10 keV-4.5 MeV) on the upper Martian atmosphere as the magnetosphere gradually declined to become an induced magnetosphere. We utilized a hybrid plasma model to provide, in a self-consistent fashion, simulations (that included ion-kinetic effects) of the interaction between the Martian obstacle (magnetized or otherwise) and the solar wind. Besides the intrinsic dipole, with field strengths of ~100 nT and below, we assume modern solar and atmospheric parameters to examine the effect of the single variable, that is the dipole strength. We thereby investigated the precipitation of solar energetic particles on the upper atmosphere of the planet in circumstances characterized by the evolution of a diminishing Martian dynamo that initially generated an ideal dipolar field. It is demonstrated that an assumed Martian dipole would have provided, in the energy range investigated, significant shielding against proton impingement and that the interaction between the solar wind and the assumed Martian magnetic dipole would have been responsible for generating the shielding effect identified.

  6. Precipitation chemistry in central Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreae, M. O.; Talbot, R. W.; Berresheim, H.; Beecher, K. M.

    1990-09-01

    Rain samples from three sites in central Amazonia were collected over a period of 6 weeks during the 1987 wet season and analyzed for ionic species and dissolved organic carbon. A continuous record of precipitation chemistry and amount was obtained at two of these sites, which were free from local or regional pollution, for a time period of over 1 month. The volume-weighted mean concentrations of most species were found to be about a factor of 5 lower during the wet season compared with previous results from the dry season. Only sodium, potassium, and chloride showed similar concentrations in both seasons. When the seasonal difference in rainfall amount is taken into consideration, the deposition fluxes are only slightly lower for most species during the wet season than during the dry season, again with the exception of chloride, potassium, and sodium. Sodium and chloride are present in the same ratio as in sea salt; rapid advection of air masses of marine origin to the central Amazon Basin during the wet season may be responsible for the observed higher deposition flux of these species. Statistical analysis suggests that sulfate is, to a large extent, of marine (sea salt and biogenic) origin, but that long-range transport of combustion-derived aerosols also makes a significant contribution to sulfate and nitrate levels in Amazonian rain. Organic acid concentrations in rain were responsible for a large fraction of the observed precipitation acidity; their concentration was strongly influenced by gas/liquid interactions.

  7. Precipitation chemistry in central Amazonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreae, M. O.; Talbot, R. W.; Berresheim, H.; Beecher, K. M.

    1990-01-01

    Rain samples from three sites in central Amazonia were collected over a period of 6 weeks during the 1987 wet season and analyzed for ionic species and dissolved organic carbon. A continuous record of precipitation chemistry and amount was obtained at two of these sites, which were free from local or regional pollution, for a time period of over 1 month. The volume-weighted mean concentrations of most species were found to be about a factor of 5 lower during the wet season compared with previous results from the dry season. Only sodium, potassium, and chloride showed similar concentrations in both seasons. When the seasonal difference in rainfall amount is taken into consideration, the deposition fluxes are only slightly lower for most species during the wet season than during the dry season, again with the exception of chloride, potassium, and sodium. Sodium and chloride are present in the same ratio as in sea salt; rapid advection of air masses of marine origin to the central Amazon Basin during the wet season may be responsible for the observed higher deposition flux of these species. Statistical analysis suggests that sulfate is, to a large extent, of marine (sea salt and biogenic) origin, but that long-range transport of combustion-derived aerosols also makes a significant contribution to sulfate and nitrate levels in Amazonian rain. Organic acid concentrations in rain were responsible for a large fraction of the observed precipitation acidity; their concentration was strongly influenced by gas/liquid interactions.

  8. Hemispheric Assymeries in Auroral Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mende, S. B.

    2014-12-01

    It is widely accepted that the space weather related electrodynamic forcing of the geospace environment acts through the high geomagnetic latitude regions. At high latitudes inter-hemispheric asymmetries are largely due to the differences in solar illumination, the direction of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field components and to a lesser extent, due to differences between the two hemispheric internal fields. So far most research regarding interhemispheric differences concentrated on learning about the basic magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling mechanisms. It has been well established that sunlit conditions affect the energy flux of auroral precipitation resulting from the reduction in the mean energy of the auroral electrons in the sunlit summer hemisphere. This can be explained by the partial shorting out of the particle accelerating fields by the sunlight induced conductivity. It has also been found that sunlit conditions reduce the particle fluxes and therefore the associated field aligned currents. Unless the precipitation-induced conductivities overwhelm the sunlit component of conductivity, this would imply that the magnetospheric current generator responds to the ionospheric load in a highly non-linear manner. Interhemispheric currents may also play an important role that has not been fully explored. Interhemispheric asymmetries in substorm morphology have been explored critically because conjugacy implies that substorms have a common source at equatorial latitudes. In some cases the lack of conjugacy of substorms could be explained by considering the magnitude and direction of the IMF.

  9. A Global Precipitation Perspective on Persistent Extratropical Flow Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, George J.; Adler, Robert F.; Bolvin, David T.

    1999-01-01

    Two globally-complete, observation-only precipitation datasets have recently been developed for the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP). Both depend heavily on a variety of satellite input, as well as gauge data over land. The first, Version 2 x 79, provides monthly estimates on a 2.5 deg x 2.5 deg lat/long grid for the period 1979 through late 1999 (by the time of the conference). The second, the One-Degree Daily (1DD), provides daily estimates on a 1 deg x 1 deg grid for the period 1997 through late 1999 (by the time of the conference). Both are in beta test preparatory to release as official GPCP products. These datasets provide a unique perspective on the hydrological effects of the various atmospheric flow anomalies that have been identified by meteorologists. In this paper we discuss the regional precipitation effects that result from persistent extratropical flow anomalies. We will focus on the Pacific-North America (PNA) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) patterns. Each characteristically becomes established on synoptic time scales, but then persists for periods that can exceed a month. The onset phase of each appears to have systematic mobile features, while the mature phase tend to be more stationary. Accordingly, composites of monthly data for outstanding positive and negative events (separately) contained in the 20-year record reveal the climatological structure of the precipitation during the mature phase. The climatological anomalies of the positive, negative, and (positive-negative) composites show the expected storm-track-related shifts in precipitation, and provide the advantage of putting the known precipitation effects over land in the context of the total pattern over land and ocean. As well, this global perspective points out some unexpected areas of correlation. Day-by-day composites of daily data anchored to the onset date demonstrate the systematic features during the onset. Although the 1DD has a fairly short record, some

  10. Temporal variability in a stochastic precipitation field simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolberg, Sjur

    2016-04-01

    The space-time statistics of short-term precipitation is studied for two cities in northern Europe, and related to radiosonde observations. The motivation is to construct the temporally varying parameters needed to drive a stochastic short-term precipitation generator. Moments, intermittency, semivariograms, temporal covariance and advection parameters need to be characterised in order to produce realistic scenario simulations for extreme value estimation at different scales. It is hoped that the temporal variability in these parameters can be related to radiosonde data. Hourly values from 46 precipitation stations within a 100*130 km2 region around Copenhagen during the period 1979-2012 is analysed. Bi-daily radiosonde profiles are present from 1969 to 2006. These soundings (vertical profiles of temperature, dew point and wind vector) describe the atmospheric moisture content and convective potential of the current weather situation. Preliminary analysis show that some of the indices extracted from the 12h radiosonde data show good temporal autocorrelation, supporting interpolation to match the 1-hour precipitation data. The precipitation data show a rapidly decreasing temporal autocorrelation function (typically below 0.5 above approx. 12 km), indicating that there is a high variance fraction below scales that the station network is able to reveal. The second data set consists of 7.5-minute C-band radar data from Trondheim, available from June 2013 to October 2015. During the 2014 and 2015 summer seasons, around 25 tipping-bucket precipitation gauges within a 15*20 km area supply observations with temporal resolution down to minute-scale. Nearby radiosonde data are available bi-daily from 1963 to 2015. These data will be explored to provide insight in high-frequency spatial and temporal variability not detectable from the long-term Copenhagen data set. The analysis is a part of the EU-7FP project "Pearl" (http://www.pearl-fp7.eu/, Greve case study), the Norwegian

  11. Combined observational and modeling efforts of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions over Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loftus, Adrian; Tsay, Si-Chee; Nguyen, Xuan Anh

    2016-04-01

    Low-level stratocumulus (Sc) clouds cover more of the Earth's surface than any other cloud type rendering them critical for Earth's energy balance, primarily via reflection of solar radiation, as well as their role in the global hydrological cycle. Stratocumuli are particularly sensitive to changes in aerosol loading on both microphysical and macrophysical scales, yet the complex feedbacks involved in aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions remain poorly understood. Moreover, research on these clouds has largely been confined to marine environments, with far fewer studies over land where major sources of anthropogenic aerosols exist. The aerosol burden over Southeast Asia (SEA) in boreal spring, attributed to biomass burning (BB), exhibits highly consistent spatiotemporal distribution patterns, with major variability due to changes in aerosol loading mediated by processes ranging from large-scale climate factors to diurnal meteorological events. Downwind from source regions, the transported BB aerosols often overlap with low-level Sc cloud decks associated with the development of the region's pre-monsoon system, providing a unique, natural laboratory for further exploring their complex micro- and macro-scale relationships. Compared to other locations worldwide, studies of springtime biomass-burning aerosols and the predominately Sc cloud systems over SEA and their ensuing interactions are underrepresented in scientific literature. Measurements of aerosol and cloud properties, whether ground-based or from satellites, generally lack information on microphysical processes; thus cloud-resolving models are often employed to simulate the underlying physical processes in aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) cloud model has recently been enhanced with a triple-moment (3M) bulk microphysics scheme as well as the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) version 6 aerosol module. Because the aerosol burden not only affects cloud

  12. Characteristics of wind-induced loss of solid precipitation derived from a Norwegian field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen-Øverleir, Asgeir; Wolff, Mareile; Isaksen, Ketil; Ødemark, Karianne; Reitan, Trond; Brækkan, Ragnar

    2016-04-01

    Solid precipitation measurements are known to be plagued by under-catch in windy conditions. Adjustment techniques, either based on a dynamic relationship between under-catch and measured determinants or static corrections, are then typically invoked. Such adjustment procedures, especially if the adjustment algorithm is unfit, introduce notable uncertainties that impact hydrological modelling in snow-dominated regions. In 2010, a test-site was established at a mountain plateau in Haukeli, Telemark, Southern Norway. Precipitation data of automatic gauges were compared with a precipitation gauge located in a Double Fence Inter-comparison Reference (DFIR) wind shield construction that served as the reference. A large number of sensors were additionally monitoring supportive meteorological parameters. The study presented in this poster considers data from three winters that were used to study and determine the wind-induced loss of solid precipitation. A general model framework was proposed, and Bayesian methods were used to objectively choose the most plausible sub-model to describe the loss ratio - wind speed - temperature relationship from the Haukeli data. The derived adjustment function is continuous and accounts for measurements of all types of winter precipitation (from rain to dry snow). The analysis shows a non-linear relationship between the loss ratio and wind speed during significant precipitation events, and there is a clear temperature dependency, believed to be mostly related to the precipitation type. The data also displayed a distinctive scatter that is believed to be an artefact mainly caused by neglecting the varying aerodynamic characteristics of the precipitation particles (for a given temperature) as a determinant. The adjustment formula allowed for the first time to derive an adjustment function with a data-tested validity beyond 8-9 m/s and proved a stabilisation of the wind-induced precipitation loss for higher wind speeds. Preliminary tests of

  13. A kinetic model of the formation of the hot oxygen geocorona 2. Influence of O{sup +} ion precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Bisikalo, D.V.; Shematovich, V.I.; Gerard, J.C.

    1995-03-01

    The authors model oxygen precipitation in the upper atmosphere by a Monte Carlo treatment of the Boltzman equation, during geomagnetically unstable times. They attempt to simulate the O precipitation for the storm conditions on September 17, 1971. They find that O precipitation greatly modifies the electron velocity distribution for the bulk oxygen population in the upper atmosphere, resulting in an enhanced hot O tail density.

  14. East Asian summer monsoon precipitation variability since the last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fahu; Xu, Qinghai; Chen, Jianhui; Birks, H. John B.; Liu, Jianbao; Zhang, Xiaojian; Jin, Liya

    2016-04-01

    The lack of a precisely-dated, unequivocal climate proxy from northern China, where precipitation variability is traditionally considered as an East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) indicator, impedes our understanding of the behaviour and dynamics of the EASM. Here we present a well-dated, pollen-based, ~20-yr-resolution quantitative precipitation reconstruction (derived using a transfer function) from an alpine lake in North China, which provides for the first time a direct record of EASM evolution since 14.7 ka (ka=thousands of years before present, where the "present" is defined as the year AD 1950). Our record reveals a gradually intensifying monsoon from 14.7-7.0 ka, a maximum monsoon (30% higher precipitation than present) from ~7.8-5.3 ka, and a rapid decline since ~3.3 ka. These insolation-driven EASM trends were punctuated by two millennial-scale weakening events which occurred synchronously to the cold Younger Dryas and at ~9.5-8.5 ka, and by two centennial-scale intervals of enhanced (weakened) monsoon during the Medieval Warm Period (Little Ice Age). Our precipitation reconstruction, consistent with temperature changes but quite different from the prevailing view of EASM evolution, points to strong internal feedback processes driving the EASM, and may aid our understanding of future monsoon behaviour under ongoing anthropogenic climate change.

  15. East Asian summer monsoon precipitation variability since the last deglaciation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fahu; Xu, Qinghai; Chen, Jianhui; Birks, H John B; Liu, Jianbao; Zhang, Shengrui; Jin, Liya; An, Chengbang; Telford, Richard J; Cao, Xianyong; Wang, Zongli; Zhang, Xiaojian; Selvaraj, Kandasamy; Lu, Houyuan; Li, Yuecong; Zheng, Zhuo; Wang, Haipeng; Zhou, Aifeng; Dong, Guanghui; Zhang, Jiawu; Huang, Xiaozhong; Bloemendal, Jan; Rao, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    The lack of a precisely-dated, unequivocal climate proxy from northern China, where precipitation variability is traditionally considered as an East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) indicator, impedes our understanding of the behaviour and dynamics of the EASM. Here we present a well-dated, pollen-based, ~20-yr-resolution quantitative precipitation reconstruction (derived using a transfer function) from an alpine lake in North China, which provides for the first time a direct record of EASM evolution since 14.7 ka (ka = thousands of years before present, where the "present" is defined as the year AD 1950). Our record reveals a gradually intensifying monsoon from 14.7-7.0 ka, a maximum monsoon (30% higher precipitation than present) from ~7.8-5.3 ka, and a rapid decline since ~3.3 ka. These insolation-driven EASM trends were punctuated by two millennial-scale weakening events which occurred synchronously to the cold Younger Dryas and at ~9.5-8.5 ka, and by two centennial-scale intervals of enhanced (weakened) monsoon during the Medieval Warm Period (Little Ice Age). Our precipitation reconstruction, consistent with temperature changes but quite different from the prevailing view of EASM evolution, points to strong internal feedback processes driving the EASM, and may aid our understanding of future monsoon behaviour under ongoing anthropogenic climate change.

  16. Effect of humic substances on phosphorus removal by struvite precipitation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen; Hu, Dalong; Ren, Weichao; Zhao, Yuzeng; Jiang, Lu-Man; Wang, Luochun

    2015-12-01

    Humic substances (HS) are a major fraction of dissolved organic matters in wastewater. The effect of HS on phosphorus removal by struvite precipitation was investigated using synthetic wastewater under different initial pH values, Mg/P molar ratios and HS concentrations. The composition, morphology and thermal properties of harvested precipitates were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. It showed that inhibition effect of HS reached its maximum value of 48.9% at pH 8.0, and decreased to below 10% at pH>9.0. The increase of Mg/P ratio enhanced phosphorus removal efficiency, and thus reduced the influence of HS on struvite precipitation. At pH 9.0, the inhibitory effect of initial HS concentration matched the modified Monod model with half maximum inhibition concentration of 356mgL(-1), and 29% HS was removed in conjunction with struvite crystallisation. XRD analysis revealed that the crystal form of struvite precipitates was changed in the presence of HS. The morphology of harvested struvite was transformed from prismatic to pyramid owing to the coprecipitation of HS on crystal surface. TGA results revealed that the presence of HS could compromise struvite purity. PMID:26151483

  17. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates.

    PubMed

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T; Asta, Mark D; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E; Liaw, Peter K

    2015-01-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures. PMID:26548303

  18. East Asian summer monsoon precipitation variability since the last deglaciation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fahu; Xu, Qinghai; Chen, Jianhui; Birks, H John B; Liu, Jianbao; Zhang, Shengrui; Jin, Liya; An, Chengbang; Telford, Richard J; Cao, Xianyong; Wang, Zongli; Zhang, Xiaojian; Selvaraj, Kandasamy; Lu, Houyuan; Li, Yuecong; Zheng, Zhuo; Wang, Haipeng; Zhou, Aifeng; Dong, Guanghui; Zhang, Jiawu; Huang, Xiaozhong; Bloemendal, Jan; Rao, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    The lack of a precisely-dated, unequivocal climate proxy from northern China, where precipitation variability is traditionally considered as an East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) indicator, impedes our understanding of the behaviour and dynamics of the EASM. Here we present a well-dated, pollen-based, ~20-yr-resolution quantitative precipitation reconstruction (derived using a transfer function) from an alpine lake in North China, which provides for the first time a direct record of EASM evolution since 14.7 ka (ka = thousands of years before present, where the "present" is defined as the year AD 1950). Our record reveals a gradually intensifying monsoon from 14.7-7.0 ka, a maximum monsoon (30% higher precipitation than present) from ~7.8-5.3 ka, and a rapid decline since ~3.3 ka. These insolation-driven EASM trends were punctuated by two millennial-scale weakening events which occurred synchronously to the cold Younger Dryas and at ~9.5-8.5 ka, and by two centennial-scale intervals of enhanced (weakened) monsoon during the Medieval Warm Period (Little Ice Age). Our precipitation reconstruction, consistent with temperature changes but quite different from the prevailing view of EASM evolution, points to strong internal feedback processes driving the EASM, and may aid our understanding of future monsoon behaviour under ongoing anthropogenic climate change. PMID:26084560

  19. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures. PMID:26548303

  20. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; et al

    2015-11-09

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones.more » These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. Finally, the present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.« less

  1. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-09

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. Finally, the present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.

  2. Precipitation variability in East Timor during Younger Dryas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Shen, C.; Mii, H.; Sone, T.; Lin, Y.; Chen, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Here we present a δ18O record of stalagmite collected from Lekiraka cave, East Timor ( 8o47'10.8"S, 126o23'31.1"E; 626 m above sea level). This stalagmite stable oxygen isotope record, covering an age interval of 13.5-10.8 thousand years ago (ka, before 1950 AD) by an age model using 230Th dates. Featured with an increasing precipitation trend during Younger Dryas (YD), this record is similar to the Gunung Buda cave record in Borneo(Partin et al., Nature, 2007, 449, 452-455) and Liang Luar cave record from Flores(Griffiths et al., Nature Geosciences, 2009, 2, 636-639). However, the detailed YD precipitation variability in Lekiraka record is not completely consistent with that in the nearby Liang Luar record with a precipitation maximum at ~12.4 ka. We propose the intensified precipitation in YD period was attributed to an enhanced Australian-Indonesian summer monsoon and was responded to sea level rise and a southward shift of Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), which was driven by oceanic/atmospheric circulation change originally from the North Atlantic at the YD.

  3. East Asian summer monsoon precipitation variability since the last deglaciation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fahu; Xu, Qinghai; Chen, Jianhui; Birks, H. John B.; Liu, Jianbao; Zhang, Shengrui; Jin, Liya; An, Chengbang; Telford, Richard J.; Cao, Xianyong; Wang, Zongli; Zhang, Xiaojian; Selvaraj, Kandasamy; Lu, Houyuan; Li, Yuecong; Zheng, Zhuo; Wang, Haipeng; Zhou, Aifeng; Dong, Guanghui; Zhang, Jiawu; Huang, Xiaozhong; Bloemendal, Jan; Rao, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    The lack of a precisely-dated, unequivocal climate proxy from northern China, where precipitation variability is traditionally considered as an East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) indicator, impedes our understanding of the behaviour and dynamics of the EASM. Here we present a well-dated, pollen-based, ~20-yr-resolution quantitative precipitation reconstruction (derived using a transfer function) from an alpine lake in North China, which provides for the first time a direct record of EASM evolution since 14.7 ka (ka = thousands of years before present, where the “present” is defined as the year AD 1950). Our record reveals a gradually intensifying monsoon from 14.7–7.0 ka, a maximum monsoon (30% higher precipitation than present) from ~7.8–5.3 ka, and a rapid decline since ~3.3 ka. These insolation-driven EASM trends were punctuated by two millennial-scale weakening events which occurred synchronously to the cold Younger Dryas and at ~9.5–8.5 ka, and by two centennial-scale intervals of enhanced (weakened) monsoon during the Medieval Warm Period (Little Ice Age). Our precipitation reconstruction, consistent with temperature changes but quite different from the prevailing view of EASM evolution, points to strong internal feedback processes driving the EASM, and may aid our understanding of future monsoon behaviour under ongoing anthropogenic climate change. PMID:26084560

  4. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.

  5. Sulfate removal from waste chemicals by precipitation.

    PubMed

    Benatti, Cláudia Telles; Tavares, Célia Regina Granhen; Lenzi, Ervim

    2009-01-01

    Chemical oxidation using Fenton's reagent has proven to be a viable alternative to the oxidative destruction of organic pollutants in mixed waste chemicals, but the sulfate concentration in the treated liquor was still above the acceptable limits for effluent discharge. In this paper, the feasibility of sulfate removal from complex laboratory wastewaters using barium and calcium precipitation was investigated. The process was applied to different wastewater cases (two composite samples generated in different periods) in order to study the effect of the wastewater composition on the sulfate precipitation. The experiments were performed with raw and oxidized wastewater samples, and carried out according to the following steps: (1) evaluate the pH effect upon sulfate precipitation on raw wastewaters at pH range of 2-8; (2) conduct sulfate precipitation experiments on raw and oxidized wastewaters; and (3) characterize the precipitate yielded. At a concentration of 80 g L(-1), barium precipitation achieved a sulfate removal up to 61.4% while calcium precipitation provided over 99% sulfate removal in raw and oxidized wastewaters and for both samples. Calcium precipitation was chosen to be performed after Fenton's oxidation; hence this process configuration favors the production of higher quality precipitates. The results showed that, when dried at 105 degrees C, the precipitate is composed of hemidrate and anhydrous calcium sulfate ( approximately 99.8%) and trace metals ( approximately 0.2%: Fe, Cr, Mn, Co, Ag, Mg, K, Na), what makes it suitable for reuse in innumerous processes.

  6. Precipitation and Moisture Sources in North American Monsoon Surges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffer, N. J.; Nesbitt, S. W.

    2009-12-01

    Prediction of North American Monsoon (NAM) precipitation plays an important role in decision-making on time scales from minutes for severe weather to seasons and years for agriculture. Gulf of California (GoC) moisture surges are connected to NAM precipitation and play a role in modulating the monsoon. This study aims to improve understanding of the relationship between precipitation, surges, and the larger scale moisture sources of the NAM with the ultimate goal of improving precipitation forecasts over the monsoon region. Although previous studies have relied primarily on dew point temperature to identify surges, relative humidity accounts for the cool and moist qualities of surges simultaneously. Using an updated method to recognize surges, relative humidity, temperature, and dew point from surface observations all show distinct trends that are consistent with surges lasting 1-2 days. The NARR identifies surges more precisely based on a plan view of θe anomalies than a pseudo-surface observation at a single data point near Yuma. With an eye towards climate change, 29 years of surface observations show surge length is not changing, but surges may be growing more frequent, less humid, and warmer. Surges show a pronounced relationship with Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 3B42-estimated precipitation. As the surge progresses northward along the GoC, precipitation follows, showing little delay until the surge breaches the northern end of the GoC. Yuma, AZ, surface observations show a one-day delay between surge arrival and precipitation enhancement, probably because surge arrival is defined at the beginning of the rise in atmospheric moisture. This positive precipitation anomaly in the Desert Southwest appears at the same time that negative anomalies dominate the Great Plains, intimating an inverse relationship suggested in previous studies. In terms of surge moisture source, there is no significant connection between the GoC and an outside moisture

  7. Impacts of long range transported dust and biological particles on clouds and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, K. A.; Creamean, J.; Suski, K. J.; Cuadra-Rodriguez, L. A.; Fitzgerald, E.; DeMott, P. J.; Cazorla, A.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols play a profound role in impacting cloud properties and precipitation processes. Some studies suggest air pollution aerosols suppress orographic precipitation, whereas other studies show a precipitation enhancement during periods with long range dust transport. To gain a more complete understanding of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions, we have performed two field studies, CalWater and ICE-T, probing clouds over California and the Caribbean. Ground and aircraft measurements were used to characterize the sources of aerosols seeding clouds and the resulting impact on cloud microphysics. This presentation will focus on how dust and biological aerosols transported from the Sahara, Middle East, and Asia appeared in glaciated high-altitude clouds coincident with elevated ice nuclei (IN) concentrations. Our results suggest that dust and biological IN are persistent components of the upper atmosphere and thus could be playing important roles in affecting orographic precipitation processes over many regions of the world.

  8. Precipitation Anomalies in the Tropical Indian Ocean and Possible Links to the Initiation of El Nino

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Scott; Adler, Robert F.; Huffman, George J.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A pattern of variability in precipitation and 1000mb zonal winds for the tropical Indian Ocean during, 1979 to 1999 (AtmIO mode) is described using EOFs. The AtmIO mode consists of a cross-equatorial gradient of precipitation anomalies and equatorial wind anomalies of alternating signs on the Equator. The positive phase is defined as enhanced precipitation to the In "n south of the equator, suppressed precipitation to the north, and anomalous westerlies centered on the island of Sumatra. In September-October 1981, February-March 1990, and October-December 1996 the AtmIO mod-, was positive and there was a significant 30-60 day variability in the gradient of precipitation anomalies. These cases coincided with moderate to heavy ,activity in the Madden-Jullan Oscillation (MJO). Links between the AtmIO, MJO, and El Nino are discussed.

  9. Dust and Biological Aerosols from the Sahara and Asia Influence Precipitation in the Western US

    SciTech Connect

    Creamean, Jessie; Suski, Kaitlyn; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Cazorla, Alberto; DeMott, Paul J.; Sullivan, Ryan C.; White, Allen B.; Ralph, F. M.; Minnis, Patrick; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Prather, Kimberly

    2013-03-29

    Winter storms in California’s Sierra Nevada increase seasonal snowpack and provide critical water resources for the state. Thus, the mechanisms influencing precipitation in this region have been the subject of research for decades. Previous studies suggest Asian dust enhances cloud ice and precipitation (1), while few studies consider biological aerosols as an important global source of ice nuclei (IN). Here, we show that dust and biological aerosols transported from as far as the Sahara were present in glaciated high-altitude clouds coincident with elevated IN concentrations and ice-induced precipitation. This study presents the first direct cloud and precipitation measurements showing that Saharan and Asian dust and biological aerosols likely serve as IN and play an important role in orographic precipitation processes over the western United States.

  10. SUPER ESP: Ultimate electrostatic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Plaks, N.

    1991-01-01

    The paper discusses SUPER ESP, a new electrostatic precipitator (ESP) concept, enabling high collection efficiencies with considerably smaller collection areas than has previously been possible. The new concept allows a major reduction in ESP size by using an alternating sequence of prechargers and short collector sections. The length of the collection section in each precharger/collector pair (module) dominates the optimization. The size reduction is greater for ESPs operating with high resistivity particulate matter than with low resistivity particulate matter. The relationship in number of modules, collector section size, and overall ESP collection is presented and discussed. Comparisons are given of ESP size for both conventional and SUPER ESP technology operating with either high or low resistivity particulate matter. Because of the size reduction, the cost of the SUPER ESP is projected to be lower than that of a conventional ESP of comparable efficiencY. The paper is based on an ESP model, ESPVI 4.0.

  11. Niobium carbide and tin precipitation in continuously cast microalloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Julian

    contents (0.046 wt. pct. and 0.014 wt. pct.). TEM investigation of carbon extraction replicas and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurements of electrochemically-dissolved precipitates were performed to analyze the NbC precipitation behavior at the slab centerline, columnar region and surface in the as-cast and prior-to-rolling condition (following tunnel furnace equalization). In the centerline and columnar slab regions of the as-cast condition of both steels no precipitation was found. In the slab surface, temperature fluctuations (related to intermittent water spray cooling) enhance the formation of finer particles and increase the percentages of precipitation. An increase of Nb concentration generally led to larger average particle sizes and larger percentages of precipitation. After an initial coarsening, particles dissolved in the tunnel furnace, and the extent of dissolution increased at lower Nb contents.

  12. Correlation between Poynting flux and soft electron precipitation in the dayside polar cap boundary regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yue; Sheng, Cheng; Su, Yi-Jiun; Hairston, Marc R.; Knipp, Delores; Huang, Cheryl Y.; Ober, Daniel; Redmon, Rob J.; Coley, Robin

    2015-10-01

    Observations have revealed large Poynting flux and soft electron precipitation around the cusp region, which have strong impacts on the polar ionosphere/thermosphere. Simulations also confirmed that Poynting flux and soft electron precipitation significantly change the neutral density and dynamics around the dayside polar cap boundary regions. However, no detailed study has been conducted to show if they should coincide with each other or not. Our analysis of Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellite data reveals a complex correlation between them. Poynting flux and soft particle precipitation are coincident in some cases (match cases), but a clear displacement between them can also be identified in others (nonmatch cases). In the 29 cusp crossings from F13 we investigated, the ratio between nonmatch and match cases is close to 1:4. In nonmatch cases, the displacement between the Poynting flux enhancement and soft particle precipitation enhancement can be as large as 1° in geomagnetic latitude.

  13. Estimating Global Precipitation for Science and Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, George J.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades there has been vigorous development in the satellite assets and the algorithms necessary to estimate precipitation around the globe. In particular the highly successful joint NASAJAXA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and the upcoming Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, also joint between NASA and JAXA, have driven these issues. At the same time, the long-running Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) continues to extend a stable, climate-oriented view of global precipitation. This talk will provide an overview of these projects and the wider international community of precipitation datasets, sketch plans for next-generation products, and provide some examples of the best use for the different products. One key lesson learned is that different data sets are needed to address the variety of issues that need precipitation data, including detailed 3-D views of hurricanes, flash flood forecasting, drought analysis, and global change.

  14. An Automated Technique for Estimating Daily Precipitation over the State of Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Follansbee, W. A.; Chamberlain, L. W., III

    1981-01-01

    Digital IR and visible imagery obtained from a geostationary satellite located over the equator at 75 deg west latitude were provided by NASA and used to obtain a linear relationship between cloud top temperature and hourly precipitation. Two computer programs written in FORTRAN were used. The first program computes the satellite estimate field from the hourly digital IR imagery. The second program computes the final estimate for the entire state area by comparing five preliminary estimates of 24 hour precipitation with control raingage readings and determining which of the five methods gives the best estimate for the day. The final estimate is then produced by incorporating control gage readings into the winning method. In presenting reliable precipitation estimates for every cell in Virginia in near real time on a daily on going basis, the techniques require on the order of 125 to 150 daily gage readings by dependable, highly motivated observers distributed as uniformly as feasible across the state.

  15. Inward electrostatic precipitation of interplanetary particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rulison, Aaron J.; Flagan, Richard C.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1993-01-01

    An inward precipitator collects particles initially dispersed in a gas throughout either a cylindrical or spherical chamber onto a small central planchet. The instrument is effective for particle diameters greater than about 1 micron. One use is the collection of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) which are stopped in a noble gas (xenon) by drag and ablation after perforating the wall of a thin-walled spacecraft-mounted chamber. First, the particles are positively charged for several seconds by the corona production of positive xenon ions from inward facing needles placed on the chamber wall. Then an electric field causes the particles to migrate toward the center of the instrument and onto the planchet. The collection time (on the order of hours for a 1 m radius spherical chamber) is greatly reduced by the use of optimally located screens which reapportion the electric field. Some of the electric field lines terminate on the wires of the screens so a fraction of the total number of particles in the chamber is lost. The operation of the instrument is demonstrated by experiments which show the migration of carbon soot particles with radius of approximately 1 micron in a 5 cm diameter cylindrical chamber with a single field enhancing screen toward a 3.2 mm central collection rod.

  16. METHOD FOR REMOVING CONTAMINATION FROM PRECIPITATES

    DOEpatents

    Stahl, G.W.

    1959-01-01

    An improvement in the bismuth phosphate carrier precipitation process is presented for the recovery and purification of plutonium. When plutonium, in the tetravalent state, is carried on a bismuth phosphate precipitate, amounts of centain of the fission products are carried along with the plutonium. The improvement consists in washing such fission product contaminated preeipitates with an aqueous solution of ammonium hydrogen fluoride. since this solution has been found to be uniquely effective in washing fission production contamination from the bismuth phosphate precipitate.

  17. Improved Electronic Control for Electrostatic Precipitators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    Electrostatic precipitators remove particulate matter from smoke created by burning refuse. Smoke exposed to electrostatic field, and particles become electrically charged and migrate to electrically charged collecting surfaces. New microprocessor-based electronic control maintains precipitator power at maximum particulate-collection level. Control automatically senses changes in smoke composition due to variations in fuel or combustion and adjusts precipitator voltage and current accordingly. Also, sensitive yet stable fault detection provided.

  18. Thermodynamics of wax precipitation in petroleum mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Lira-Galeana, C.; Firoozabadi, A.; Prausnitz, J.M. |

    1996-01-01

    A thermodynamic framework is developed for calculating wax precipitation in petroleum mixtures over a wide temperature range. The framework uses the experimentally supported assumption that precipitated wax consists of several solid phases; each solid phase is described as a pure component or pseudocomponent that does not mix with other solid phases. Liquid-phase properties are obtained from an equation of state. Calculated wax-precipitation data are in excellent agreement with experimental results for binary and multicomponent hydrocarbon mixtures, including petroleum.

  19. Thermodynamics of wax precipitation in petroleum mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Firoozabadi, A.; Lira-Galeana, C.L.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1995-12-01

    A thermodynamic framework is developed for calculating wax precipitation in petroleum mixtures over a wide temperature range. The framework assumes that the precipitated wax consists of several solid phases; each solid-phase is described as a pure component or pseudocomponent which does not mix with other solid phases. Liquid-phase properties are obtained from an equation of state. Calculated wax precipitation data are in excellent agreement with experimental results for binary and multicomponent hydrocarbon mixtures, including petroleum.

  20. Recombination, emission and EBIC contrast of metallic precipitate embedded in a semiconductor matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarento, R.-J.; Debez, M.; Mekki, D. E.; Djemel, A.

    2014-02-01

    The barrier height and the recombination velocity at the interface between a metallic precipitate and a semiconductor matrix are calculated self-consistently by taking into account both recombination and emission processes. The precipitate size is of great importance due to the precipitate surface charge density which is enhanced when the size decreases but reaches a constant value at small size controlled by the defect concentration at the interface. The EBIC contrast has been investigated versus the size, the temperature and the defect and doping concentrations.

  1. Variability in heavy precipitation over southern Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shein, K. A.

    2009-12-01

    Southern Florida is home to the unique Everglades ecosystem that feeds into the Florida Bay. Heavy precipitation events, either over the Everglades or the Bay can introduce pollutants and excessive fresh water into the bay, while prolonged drought reduces water levels in the wetlands and can contribute to hypersalinity events in the bay. Systematic changes in precipitation frequency and intensity can result in long-term negative impacts to these southern Florida ecosystems. This paper examines the historical in situ record of precipitation over southern Florida, with special emphasis on evaluating the behavior of heavy precipitation events and periods of deficit.

  2. Observation of solid precipitation using satellite gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, K.; Waliser, D. E.; Ryu, D.; Tian, B.; Kim, B.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding hydrological processes in the arctic region and their variation are emerging and important issues in the association with global climate changes. Solid precipitation is particularly important because it plays a major role in controlling the winter hydrological cycle and spring discharge. Nevertheless, observations of winter snowfall in high latitudes is challenging due to sharply decreasing numbers of precipitation gauges and gauge measurement biases. In addition, conventional satellite methods that work well in low-latitudes are unsuitable for the high latitude conditions. In this study, we present a new method of estimating winter snowfall in the arctic region with GRACE time varying gravity measurements. In northern high latitudes, it is very cold in winter, and thus solid precipitation accumulates with very limited melting and evapotranspiration. Therefore, observed gravity increments during winter mainly result from solid precipitation. We estimate amount of solid precipitation during winter (DJF) from four major arctic basins, Mackenzie, Lena, Yenisei and Ob. New estimates using satellite gravity are compared to global satellite and reanalysis precipitation products , which are GPCP, CMAP, NCEP/NCAR, ECMWF and JCDAS. GRACE-based estimates of snowfall are very close to those of CMAP, ECMWF and JCDAS. We extend the methodology to examine spatial distribution of solid precipitation in the pan-arctic land areas, which shows a good agreement with JCDAS. This new measurement of solid precipitation can provide an altogether new form of observations for hydrological cycle research studies, model and precipitation product evaluation and data assimilation efforts.

  3. Precipitation Across India's Ghats Mountains (IMERG)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Animation of precipitation rates across India and surrounding countries. Notice the heavy rains throughout the Ghats Mountain range which resulted in devastating landslides along India's west coast...

  4. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azarbarzin, Ardeshir Art

    2011-01-01

    Mission Objective: (1) Improve scientific understanding of the global water cycle and fresh water availability (2) Improve the accuracy of precipitation forecasts (3) Provide frequent and complete sampling of the Earth s precipitation Mission Description (Class B, Category I): (1) Constellation of spacecraft provide global precipitation measurement coverage (2) NASA/JAXA Core spacecraft: Provides a microwave radiometer (GMI) and dual-frequency precipitation radar (DPR) to cross-calibrate entire constellation (3) 65 deg inclination, 400 km altitude (4) Launch July 2013 on HII-A (5) 3 year mission (5 year propellant) (6) Partner constellation spacecraft.

  5. Electrostatic precipitator control for high resistivity particulate

    SciTech Connect

    Bibbo, P.P.; Hankins, F.E.; Jakoplic, R.

    1982-01-19

    A method and apparatus are described for optimizing the operating efficiency of an electrostatic precipitator based on controlling the average input power of the precipitator electrodes in response to control signals derived by sensing changes in specific instantaneous peak voltages associated with the average electrode voltages. The method is particularly well suited for electrostatic precipitators processing high resistivity fly ash and exhibiting an inflection region in its kvmin electrode voltage characteristic. The apparatus is organized to serve as a stand alone control system, or as an adjunct to existing electrostatic precipitator control systems.

  6. Precipitates in Biomedical Co-Cr-Mo-C-N-Si-Mn Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfirano; Mineta, Shingo; Namba, Shigenobu; Yoneda, Takashi; Ueda, Kyosuke; Narushima, Takayuki

    2012-06-01

    The microstructures of biomedical ASTM F 75/F 799 Co-28Cr-6Mo-0.25C-0.175N-(0 to 1)Si-(0 to 1)Mo alloys (mass pct) were investigated before and after heat treatment, with special attention paid to the effect of nitrogen on the phases and the dissolution of precipitates. The heat treatment temperatures and holding periods employed ranged from 1448 to 1548 K (1175 to 1275 °C) and 0 to 43.2 ks, respectively. A blocky-dense π-phase precipitate and a lamellar cellular colony, which consisted of an M2X type precipitate and a γ phase, were mainly detected in the as-cast alloys with and without added Si, respectively. The addition of nitrogen caused cellular precipitation, while the addition of Si suppressed it and enhanced the formation of the π phase. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses suggested that a discontinuous reaction, i.e., γ 1 → γ 2 + M2X, might be a possible formation mechanism for the lamellar cellular colony. Nitrogen was enriched in the M2X type, η-phase, and π-phase precipitates, but was excluded from the M23X6 type precipitate. Complete precipitate dissolution was observed in all of the alloys under varied heat treatment conditions depending on the alloy composition. The addition of nitrogen decreased the time required for complete precipitate dissolution at low heat-treatment temperatures. At high temperatures, i.e., 1548 K (1275 °C), complete precipitate dissolution was delayed by the partial melting that accompanied the formation of the precipitates such as the π phase resulting in the boundary between the complete and incomplete precipitate dissolution regions in having a C-curved shape.

  7. Shifting covariability of North American summer monsoon precipitation with antecedent winter precipitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J.; Clark, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that a general inverse relation exists between winter precipitation in the southwestern United states (US) and summer monsoon precipitation. In addition, it has been suggested that this inverse relation between winter precipitation and the magnitude of the southwestern US monsoon breaks down under certain climatic conditions that override the regional winter/monsoon precipitation relations. Results from this new study indicate that the winter/monsoon precipitation relations do not break down, but rather shift location through time. The strength of winter/monsoon precipitation relations, as indexed by 20-year moving correlations between winter precipitation and monsoon precipitation, decreased in Arizona after about 1970, but increased in New Mexico. The changes in these correlations appear to be related to an eastward shift in the location of monsoon precipitation in the southwestern US. This eastward shift in monsoon precipitation and the changes in correlations with winter precipitation also appear to be related to an eastward shift in July/August atmospheric circulation over the southwestern US that resulted in increased monsoon precipitation in New Mexico. Results also indicate that decreases in sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) in the central North Pacific Ocean also may be associated with th changes in correlations between winter and monsoon precipitation. Copyright ?? 2006 Royal Meteorological Society.

  8. Isotopic Fractionation of Mercury in Great Lakes Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratz, L. E.; Keeler, G. J.; Blum, J. D.; Sherman, L. S.

    2009-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a hazardous bioaccumulative neurotoxin, and atmospheric deposition is a primary way in which mercury enters terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. However, the chemical processes and transport regimes that mercury undergoes from emission to deposition are not well understood. Thus the use of mercury isotopes to characterize the biogeochemical cycling of mercury is a rapidly growing area of study. Precipitation samples were collected in Chicago, IL, Holland, MI, and Dexter, MI from April 2007 - October 2007 to begin examining the isotopic fractionation of atmospheric mercury in the Great Lakes region. Results show that mass-dependent fractionation relative to NIST-3133 (MDF - δ202Hg) ranged from -0.8‰ to 0.2‰ (±0.2‰) in precipitation samples, while mass-independent fractionation (MIF - Δ199Hg) varied from 0.1‰ to 0.6‰ (±0.1‰). Although clear urban-rural differences were not observed, this may be due to the weekly collection of precipitation samples rather than collection of individual events, making it difficult to truly characterize the meteorology and source influences associated with each sample and suggesting that event-based collection is necessary during future sampling campaigns. Additionally, total vapor phase mercury samples were collected in Dexter, MI in 2009 to examine isotopic fractionation of mercury in ambient air. In ambient samples δ202Hg ranged from 0.3‰ to 0.5‰ (±0.1‰), however Δ199Hg was not significant. Because mercury in precipitation is predominantly Hg2+, while ambient vapor phase mercury is primarily Hg0, these results may suggest the occurrence of MIF during the oxidation of Hg0 to Hg2+ prior to deposition. Furthermore, although it has not been previously reported or predicted, MIF of 200Hg was also detected. Δ200Hg ranged from 0.0‰ to 0.2‰ in precipitation and from -0.1‰ to 0.0‰ in ambient samples. This work resulted in methodological developments in the collection and processing of

  9. Rising Mediterranean Sea Surface Temperatures Amplify Extreme Summer Precipitation in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Volosciuk, Claudia; Maraun, Douglas; Semenov, Vladimir A; Tilinina, Natalia; Gulev, Sergey K; Latif, Mojib

    2016-01-01

    The beginning of the 21st century was marked by a number of severe summer floods in Central Europe associated with extreme precipitation (e.g., Elbe 2002, Oder 2010 and Danube 2013). Extratropical storms, known as Vb-cyclones, cause summer extreme precipitation events over Central Europe and can thus lead to such floodings. Vb-cyclones develop over the Mediterranean Sea, which itself strongly warmed during recent decades. Here we investigate the influence of increased Mediterranean Sea surface temperature (SST) on extreme precipitation events in Central Europe. To this end, we carry out atmosphere model simulations forced by average Mediterranean SSTs during 1970-1999 and 2000-2012. Extreme precipitation events occurring on average every 20 summers in the warmer-SST-simulation (2000-2012) amplify along the Vb-cyclone track compared to those in the colder-SST-simulation (1970-1999), on average by 17% in Central Europe. The largest increase is located southeast of maximum precipitation for both simulated heavy events and historical Vb-events. The responsible physical mechanism is increased evaporation from and enhanced atmospheric moisture content over the Mediterranean Sea. The excess in precipitable water is transported from the Mediterranean Sea to Central Europe causing stronger precipitation extremes over that region. Our findings suggest that Mediterranean Sea surface warming amplifies Central European precipitation extremes. PMID:27573802

  10. Rising Mediterranean Sea Surface Temperatures Amplify Extreme Summer Precipitation in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volosciuk, Claudia; Maraun, Douglas; Semenov, Vladimir A.; Tilinina, Natalia; Gulev, Sergey K.; Latif, Mojib

    2016-08-01

    The beginning of the 21st century was marked by a number of severe summer floods in Central Europe associated with extreme precipitation (e.g., Elbe 2002, Oder 2010 and Danube 2013). Extratropical storms, known as Vb-cyclones, cause summer extreme precipitation events over Central Europe and can thus lead to such floodings. Vb-cyclones develop over the Mediterranean Sea, which itself strongly warmed during recent decades. Here we investigate the influence of increased Mediterranean Sea surface temperature (SST) on extreme precipitation events in Central Europe. To this end, we carry out atmosphere model simulations forced by average Mediterranean SSTs during 1970–1999 and 2000–2012. Extreme precipitation events occurring on average every 20 summers in the warmer-SST-simulation (2000–2012) amplify along the Vb-cyclone track compared to those in the colder-SST-simulation (1970–1999), on average by 17% in Central Europe. The largest increase is located southeast of maximum precipitation for both simulated heavy events and historical Vb-events. The responsible physical mechanism is increased evaporation from and enhanced atmospheric moisture content over the Mediterranean Sea. The excess in precipitable water is transported from the Mediterranean Sea to Central Europe causing stronger precipitation extremes over that region. Our findings suggest that Mediterranean Sea surface warming amplifies Central European precipitation extremes.

  11. Identifying Precipitation Types Using Dual-Polarization-Based Radar and Numerical Weather Prediction Model Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, B. C.; Bradley, A.; Krajewski, W. F.

    2015-12-01

    The recent upgrade of dual-polarization with NEXRAD radars has assisted in improving the characterization of microphysical processes in precipitation and thus has enabled precipitation estimation based on the identified precipitation types. While this polarimetric capability promises the potential for the enhanced accuracy in quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE), recent studies show that the polarimetric estimates are still affected by uncertainties arising from the radar beam geometry/sampling space associated with the vertical variability of precipitation. The authors, first of all, focus on evaluating the NEXRAD hydrometeor classification product using ground reference data (e.g., ASOS) that provide simple categories of the observed precipitation types (e.g., rain, snow, and freezing rain). They also investigate classification uncertainty features caused by the variability of precipitation between the ground and the altitudes where radar samples. Since this variability is closely related to the atmospheric conditions (e.g., temperature) at near surface, useful information (e.g., critical thickness and temperature profile) that is not available in radar observations is retrieved from the numerical weather prediction (NWP) model data such as Rapid Refresh (RAP)/High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR). The NWP retrieved information and polarimetric radar data are used together to improve the accuracy of precipitation type identification at near surface. The authors highlight major improvements and discuss limitations in the real-time application.

  12. Rising Mediterranean Sea Surface Temperatures Amplify Extreme Summer Precipitation in Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Volosciuk, Claudia; Maraun, Douglas; Semenov, Vladimir A.; Tilinina, Natalia; Gulev, Sergey K.; Latif, Mojib

    2016-01-01

    The beginning of the 21st century was marked by a number of severe summer floods in Central Europe associated with extreme precipitation (e.g., Elbe 2002, Oder 2010 and Danube 2013). Extratropical storms, known as Vb-cyclones, cause summer extreme precipitation events over Central Europe and can thus lead to such floodings. Vb-cyclones develop over the Mediterranean Sea, which itself strongly warmed during recent decades. Here we investigate the influence of increased Mediterranean Sea surface temperature (SST) on extreme precipitation events in Central Europe. To this end, we carry out atmosphere model simulations forced by average Mediterranean SSTs during 1970–1999 and 2000–2012. Extreme precipitation events occurring on average every 20 summers in the warmer-SST-simulation (2000–2012) amplify along the Vb-cyclone track compared to those in the colder-SST-simulation (1970–1999), on average by 17% in Central Europe. The largest increase is located southeast of maximum precipitation for both simulated heavy events and historical Vb-events. The responsible physical mechanism is increased evaporation from and enhanced atmospheric moisture content over the Mediterranean Sea. The excess in precipitable water is transported from the Mediterranean Sea to Central Europe causing stronger precipitation extremes over that region. Our findings suggest that Mediterranean Sea surface warming amplifies Central European precipitation extremes. PMID:27573802

  13. Rising Mediterranean Sea Surface Temperatures Amplify Extreme Summer Precipitation in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Volosciuk, Claudia; Maraun, Douglas; Semenov, Vladimir A; Tilinina, Natalia; Gulev, Sergey K; Latif, Mojib

    2016-08-30

    The beginning of the 21st century was marked by a number of severe summer floods in Central Europe associated with extreme precipitation (e.g., Elbe 2002, Oder 2010 and Danube 2013). Extratropical storms, known as Vb-cyclones, cause summer extreme precipitation events over Central Europe and can thus lead to such floodings. Vb-cyclones develop over the Mediterranean Sea, which itself strongly warmed during recent decades. Here we investigate the influence of increased Mediterranean Sea surface temperature (SST) on extreme precipitation events in Central Europe. To this end, we carry out atmosphere model simulations forced by average Mediterranean SSTs during 1970-1999 and 2000-2012. Extreme precipitation events occurring on average every 20 summers in the warmer-SST-simulation (2000-2012) amplify along the Vb-cyclone track compared to those in the colder-SST-simulation (1970-1999), on average by 17% in Central Europe. The largest increase is located southeast of maximum precipitation for both simulated heavy events and historical Vb-events. The responsible physical mechanism is increased evaporation from and enhanced atmospheric moisture content over the Mediterranean Sea. The excess in precipitable water is transported from the Mediterranean Sea to Central Europe causing stronger precipitation extremes over that region. Our findings suggest that Mediterranean Sea surface warming amplifies Central European precipitation extremes.

  14. Copper precipitation in large-diameter Czochralski silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Zhenqiang; Chen, Jun; Yang, Deren; Lawerenz, A.; Moeller, H. J.

    2005-05-01

    The behavior of the copper precipitation in the large-diameter Czochralski silicon (Cz -Si) annealed at 1100°C followed by air cooling or slow cooling was studied by means of scanning infrared microscopy (SIRM), optical microscopy, and surface photovoltage. For the air-cooled specimen, a high density of copper-precipitate colonies with strong contrast could be easily found in the A-defect zone, while in the D-defect zone of the same specimen almost no colonies could be observed through SIRM. However, optical images showed that the higher density of the etching pits induced by the copper-precipitate colonies occurred in the D-defect zone, which indicates that the copper-precipitate colonies in the D-defect zone was below the detection limitation of SIRM. This suggestion was confirmed by minority-carrier diffusion-length mapping, which revealed that the diffusion length of the minority carriers in the D-defect zone was noticeably lower than that in the A-defect zone. As for the slow-cooled specimen, big star-like colonies formed both in the D-defect zone and A-defect zone, but the diffusion length of the minority carriers in the D-defect zone was also lower than that in the A-defect zone. On the basis of experiments, it is suggested that the as-grown vacancies or their related defects in the D-defect zone enhance the nucleation of copper precipitation either under air cooling or under slow cooling, resulting in the lower diffusion length of minority carriers.

  15. Distribution of tritium in precipitation and surface water in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, Patrick A.; Visser, Ate; Moran, Jean E.; Esser, Brad K.

    2016-03-01

    The tritium concentration in the surface hydrosphere throughout California was characterized to examine the reasons for spatial variability and to enhance the applicability of tritium in hydrological investigations. Eighteen precipitation samples were analyzed and 148 samples were collected from surface waters across California in the Summer and Fall of 2013, with repeat samples from some locations collected in Winter and Spring of 2014 to examine seasonal variation. The concentration of tritium in present day precipitation varied from 4.0 pCi/L near the California coast to 17.8 pCi/L in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Concentrations in precipitation increase in spring due to the 'Spring Leak' phenomenon. The average coastal concentration (6.3 ± 1.2 pCi/L) in precipitation matches estimated pre-nuclear levels. Surface water samples show a trend of increasing tritium with inland distance. Superimposed on that trend, elevated tritium concentrations are found in the San Francisco Bay area compared to other coastal areas, resulting from municipal water imported from inland mountain sources and local anthropogenic sources. Tritium concentrations in most surface waters decreased between Summer/Fall 2013 and Winter/Spring 2014 likely due to an increased groundwater signal as a result of drought conditions in 2014. A relationship between tritium and electrical conductivity in surface water was found to be indicative of water provenance and anthropogenic influences such as agricultural runoff. Despite low initial concentrations in precipitation, tritium continues to be a valuable tracer in a post nuclear bomb pulse world.

  16. Data Rescue for precipitation station network in Slovak Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasko, Pavel; Bochníček, Oliver; Švec, Marek; Paľušová, Zuzana; Markovič, Ladislav

    2016-04-01

    Transparency of archive catalogues presents very important task for the data saving. It helps to the further activities e.g. digitalization and homogenization. For the time being visualization of time series continuation in precipitation stations (approximately 1250 stations) is under way in Slovak Republic since the beginning of observation (meteorological stations gradually began to operate during the second half of the 19th century in Slovakia). Visualization is joined with the activities like verification and accessibility of the data mentioned in the archive catalogue, station localization according to the historical annual books, conversion of coordinates into x-JTSK, y-JTSK and hydrological catchment assignment. Clustering of precipitation stations at the specific hydrological catchment in the map and visualization of the data duration (line graph) will lead to the effective assignment of corresponding precipitation stations for the prolongation of time series. This process should be followed by the process of turn or trend detection and homogenization. The risks and problems at verification of records from archive catalogues, their digitalization, repairs and the way of visualization will be seen in poster. During the searching process of the historical and often short time series, we realized the importance of mainly those stations, located in the middle and higher altitudes. They might be used as replacement for up to now quoted fictive points used at the construction of precipitation maps. Supplementing and enhancing the time series of individual stations will enable to follow changes in precipitation totals during the certain period as well as area totals for individual catchments in various time periods appreciated mainly by hydrologists and agro-climatologists.

  17. Marcasite precipitation from hydrothermal solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murowchick, James B.; Barnes, H. L.

    1986-12-01

    Pyrite and marcasite were precipitated by both slow addition of aqueous Fe2+ and SiO32- to an H2S solution and by mixing aqueous Fe2+ and Na2S4 solutions at 75°C. H2S2 or HS2- and H2S4 or HS4- were formed in the S2O32- and Na2S4 experiments, respectively. Marcasite formed at pH < pK1 of the polysulfide species present (for H2S2, pK1 = 5.0; for H2S4, pK1 = 3.8 at 25°C). Marcasite forms when the neutral sulfane is the dominant polysulfide, whereas pyrite forms when mono-or divalent polysulfides are dominant. In natural solutions where H2S2 and HS2 are likely to be the dominant polysulfides, marcasite will form only below pH 5 at all temperatures. The pH-dependent precipitation of pyrite and marcasite may be caused by electrostatic interactions between polysulfide species and pyrite or marcasite growth surfaces: the protonated ends of H2S2 and HS2 are repelled from pyrite growth sites but not from marcasite growth sites. The negative ions HS2 and S22- are strongly attracted to the positive pyrite growth sites. Masking of 1πg* electrons in the S2 group by the protons makes HS2 and H2S2 isoelectronic with AsS2- and As22-, respectively (TOSSELLet al., 1981). Thus, the loellingitederivative structure (marcasite) results when both ends of the polysulfide are protonated. Marcasite occurs abundantly only for conditions below pH 5 and where H2S2 was formed near the site of deposition by either partial oxidation of aqueous H2S by O2 or by the reaction of higher oxidation state sulfur species that are reactive with H2S at the conditions of formation e.g., S2O32- but not SO42-. The temperature of formation of natural marcasite may be as high as 240°C (HANNINGTON and SCOTT, 1985), but preservation on a multimillion-year scale seems to require post-depositional temperatures of below about 160°C (RISING, 1973; MCKIBBEN and ELDERS, 1985).

  18. Parameterization of precipitating shallow convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Axel

    2015-04-01

    Shallow convective clouds play a decisive role in many regimes of the atmosphere. They are abundant in the trade wind regions and essential for the radiation budget in the sub-tropics. They are also an integral part of the diurnal cycle of convection over land leading to the formation of deeper modes of convection later on. Errors in the representation of these small and seemingly unimportant clouds can lead to misforecasts in many situations. Especially for high-resolution NWP models at 1-3 km grid spacing which explicitly simulate deeper modes of convection, the parameterization of the sub-grid shallow convection is an important issue. Large-eddy simulations (LES) can provide the data to study shallow convective clouds and their interaction with the boundary layer in great detail. In contrast to observation, simulations provide a complete and consistent dataset, which may not be perfectly realistic due to the necessary simplifications, but nevertheless enables us to study many aspects of those clouds in a self-consistent way. Today's supercomputing capabilities make it possible to use domain sizes that not only span several NWP grid boxes, but also allow for mesoscale self-organization of the cloud field, which is an essential behavior of precipitating shallow convection. By coarse-graining the LES data to the grid of an NWP model, the sub-grid fluctuations caused by shallow convective clouds can be analyzed explicitly. These fluctuations can then be parameterized in terms of a PDF-based closure. The necessary choices for such schemes like the shape of the PDF, the number of predicted moments, etc., will be discussed. For example, it is shown that a universal three-parameter distribution of total water may exist at scales of O(1 km) but not at O(10 km). In a next step the variance budgets of moisture and temperature in the cloud-topped boundary layer are studied. What is the role and magnitude of the microphysical correlation terms in these equations, which

  19. Improving satellite quantitative precipitation estimates by incorporating deep convective cloud optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenz, Ronald D.

    precipitation especially over non-precipitating (anvil) regions of a DCS. Preliminary testing of this new algorithm to identify precipitating area has produced significant improvements over the current SCaMPR algorithm. This modified version of SCaMPR can be used to provide precipitation estimates in gaps of radar and rain gauge coverage to aid in hydrological and flood forecasting.

  20. High resolution precipitaion mapping over the South of Norway using a linear model of orographic precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martino, Sara; Kolberg, Sjur

    2014-05-01

    Spatially distributed precipitation estimates are needed in hydrological modelling as well as in regional climate analysis. In mountainous regions, interpolating data from a rain gauge network often provides mediocre results, in particular due to high terrain-induced variability on a smaller scale than the gauge network typically resolves. The interpolation is particularly difficult at short time scales like daily or hourly precipitation. Smith and Barstad (2004) introduced a linear model for simulating orographic precipitation over a digital elevation model (DEM), driven by spatially homogeneous input of wind, temperature and humidity. The model has been used to dynamically downscale reanalysis data and future climate predictions (Crochet et al 2007; Johannesson et al.2007). The current investigation applies the orography model in conjunction with interpolation from precipitation gauges, in order to construct daily precipitation maps with a level of detail finer than the gauge network density. The experiment is carried out over the southern part of Norway, a region with high mountains, glaciers, and strong precipitation gradients. We feed the orography model with the last re-analysis data from ECMWF (ERA-Interim) over the period 1979-2012. Preliminary results using the older ERA40 reanalysis data show the simulated orographic precipitation to be in good agreement with precipitation observations accumulated over various time scales. In particular, the orographic prediction improve on lapse rate based methods to incorporate terrain effects. However, the first experiments have also revealed practical challenges in applying the model on a permanent basis for large regions. Work therefore continues to adapt the theory to operational use, to optimize pre-processing and data flow, and to identify scale limits and situations for which the model is inadequate. A cross-validation approach is used to quantify performance and compare different settings in the orography model.

  1. Circulation factors affecting precipitation over Bulgaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojarov, Peter

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to determine the influence of circulation factors on precipitation in Bulgaria. The study succeeds investigation on the influence of circulation factors on air temperatures in Bulgaria, as the focus here is directed toward precipitation amounts. Circulation factors are represented through two circulation indices, showing west-east or south-north transport of air masses over Bulgaria and four teleconnection indices (patterns)—North Atlantic Oscillation, East Atlantic, East Atlantic/Western Russia, and Scandinavian. Omega values at 700-hPa level show vertical motions in the atmosphere. Annual precipitation trends are mixed and not statistically significant. A significant decrease of precipitation in Bulgaria is observed in November due to the strengthening of the eastward transport of air masses (strengthening of EA teleconnection pattern) and anticyclonal weather (increase of descending motions in the atmosphere). There is also a precipitation decrease in May and June due to the growing influence of the Azores High. An increase of precipitation happens in September. All this leads to a redistribution of annual precipitation course, but annual precipitation amounts remain the same. However, this redistribution has a negative impact on agriculture and winter ski tourism. Zonal circulation has a larger influence on precipitation in Bulgaria compared to meridional. Eastward transport throughout the year leads to lower than the normal precipitation, and vice versa. With regard to the four teleconnection patterns, winter precipitation in Bulgaria is determined mainly by EA/WR teleconnection pattern, spring and autumn by EA teleconnection pattern, and summer by SCAND teleconnection pattern.

  2. Toxicity of dissolved and precipitated aluminium to marine diatoms.

    PubMed

    Gillmore, Megan L; Golding, Lisa A; Angel, Brad M; Adams, Merrin S; Jolley, Dianne F

    2016-05-01

    Localised aluminium contamination can lead to high concentrations in coastal waters, which have the potential for adverse effects on aquatic organisms. This research investigated the toxicity of 72-h exposures of aluminium to three marine diatoms (Ceratoneis closterium (formerly Nitzschia closterium), Minutocellus polymorphus and Phaeodactylum tricornutum) by measuring population growth rate inhibition and cell membrane damage (SYTOX Green) as endpoints. Toxicity was correlated to the time-averaged concentrations of different aluminium size-fractions, operationally defined as <0.025μm filtered, <0.45μm filtered (dissolved) and unfiltered (total) present in solution over the 72-h bioassay. The chronic population growth rate inhibition after aluminium exposure varied between diatom species. C. closterium was the most sensitive species (10% inhibition of growth rate (72-h IC10) of 80 (55-100)μg Al/L (95% confidence limits)) while M. polymorphus (540 (460-600)μg Al/L) and P. tricornutum (2100 (2000-2200)μg Al/L) were less sensitive (based on measured total aluminium). Dissolved aluminium was the primary contributor to toxicity in C. closterium, while a combination of dissolved and precipitated aluminium forms contributed to toxicity in M. polymorphus. In contrast, aluminium toxicity to the most tolerant diatom P. tricornutum was due predominantly to precipitated aluminium. Preliminary investigations revealed the sensitivity of C. closterium and M. polymorphus to aluminium was influenced by initial cell density with aluminium toxicity significantly (p<0.05) increasing with initial cell density from 10(3) to 10(5)cells/mL. No effects on plasma membrane permeability were observed for any of the three diatoms suggesting that mechanisms of aluminium toxicity to diatoms do not involve compromising the plasma membrane. These results indicate that marine diatoms have a broad range in sensitivity to aluminium with toxic mechanisms related to both dissolved and precipitated

  3. Toxicity of dissolved and precipitated aluminium to marine diatoms.

    PubMed

    Gillmore, Megan L; Golding, Lisa A; Angel, Brad M; Adams, Merrin S; Jolley, Dianne F

    2016-05-01

    Localised aluminium contamination can lead to high concentrations in coastal waters, which have the potential for adverse effects on aquatic organisms. This research investigated the toxicity of 72-h exposures of aluminium to three marine diatoms (Ceratoneis closterium (formerly Nitzschia closterium), Minutocellus polymorphus and Phaeodactylum tricornutum) by measuring population growth rate inhibition and cell membrane damage (SYTOX Green) as endpoints. Toxicity was correlated to the time-averaged concentrations of different aluminium size-fractions, operationally defined as <0.025μm filtered, <0.45μm filtered (dissolved) and unfiltered (total) present in solution over the 72-h bioassay. The chronic population growth rate inhibition after aluminium exposure varied between diatom species. C. closterium was the most sensitive species (10% inhibition of growth rate (72-h IC10) of 80 (55-100)μg Al/L (95% confidence limits)) while M. polymorphus (540 (460-600)μg Al/L) and P. tricornutum (2100 (2000-2200)μg Al/L) were less sensitive (based on measured total aluminium). Dissolved aluminium was the primary contributor to toxicity in C. closterium, while a combination of dissolved and precipitated aluminium forms contributed to toxicity in M. polymorphus. In contrast, aluminium toxicity to the most tolerant diatom P. tricornutum was due predominantly to precipitated aluminium. Preliminary investigations revealed the sensitivity of C. closterium and M. polymorphus to aluminium was influenced by initial cell density with aluminium toxicity significantly (p<0.05) increasing with initial cell density from 10(3) to 10(5)cells/mL. No effects on plasma membrane permeability were observed for any of the three diatoms suggesting that mechanisms of aluminium toxicity to diatoms do not involve compromising the plasma membrane. These results indicate that marine diatoms have a broad range in sensitivity to aluminium with toxic mechanisms related to both dissolved and precipitated

  4. Interdecadal and Interannual Variability of Winter Precipitation in Southeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Fraedrich, K.; Zhu, X.; Sielmann, F.

    2013-12-01

    China, which is caused by the weakened (strengthened) East Asian Winter Monsoon (EAWM) due to weakening (strengthening) of Siberia High (SH) and eastward (westward) extending of East Asian Trough (EAT). (ii) The effects of El Niño and sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies over South China Sea (SCS) on rainfall in Southeast China are independent. El Niño years, the anomalous anticyclone (cyclone) over Philippines leads to positive (negative) anomalies of rainfall over South China, while in years with the anomalous positive (negative) SST over SCS (non-ENSO), more (less) water vapor is conveyed to Southeast China, thereby enhancing (reducing) precipitation over south of the Yangtze River. (iii) Contributions from all impact factors (EAWM, SH, EAT, El Niño events and SST SCS anomalies) do not counteract with one aother to generate the Southeast China winter precipitation variability.

  5. Precipitated silica as flow regulator.

    PubMed

    Müller, Anne-Kathrin; Ruppel, Joanna; Drexel, Claus-Peter; Zimmermann, Ingfried

    2008-08-01

    Flow regulators are added to solid pharmaceutical formulations to improve the flow properties of the powder mixtures. The primary particles of the flow regulators exist in the form of huge agglomerates which are broken down into smaller aggregates during the blending process. These smaller aggregates adsorb at the surface of the solid's grains and thus diminish attractive Van-der-Waals-forces by increasing the roughness of the host's surface. In most cases amorphous silica is used as flow additive but material properties like particle size or bond strength influence the desagglomeration tendency of the agglomerates and thus the flow regulating potency of each silica. For some silica types we will show that the differences in their flow regulating potency are due to the rate and extent by which they are able to cover the surface of the host particles. Binary powder mixtures consisting of a pharmaceutical excipient and an added flow regulator were blended in a Turbula mixer for a defined period of time. As pharmaceutical excipient corn starch was used. The flow regulators were represented by a selection of amorphous silicon dioxide types like a commercial fumed silica and various types of SIPERNAT precipitated silica provided by Evonik-Degussa GmbH, Hanau, Germany. Flowability parameters of the mixtures were characterized by means of a tensile strength tester. The reduction of tensile strength with the blending time can be correlated with an increase in fragmentation of the flow regulator. PMID:18595668

  6. Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation (ENAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinsley, B. A.

    1988-01-01

    The Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation experiment is scheduled to be flown on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) NASA mission. The objective of this experiment is to measure very faint emissions at nighttime arising from fluxes of energetic neutral atoms in the thermosphere. These energetic atoms have energies ranging up to about 50 keV, and arise from ions of hydrogen, helium, and oxygen trapped in the inner magnetosphere. Some of these ions become neutralized in charge exchange reactions with neutral hydrogen in the hydrogen geocorona that extends through the region. The ions are trapped on magnetic field lines which cross the equatorial plane at 2 to 6 earth radii distance, and they mirror at a range of heights on these field lines, extending down to the thermosphere at 500 km altitude. The ATLAS 1 measurements will not be of the neutral atoms themselves but of the optical emission produced by those on trajectories that intersect the thermosphere. The ENAP measurements are to be made using the Imaging Spectrometric Observatory (ISO) which is being flown on the ATLAS mission primarily for daytime spectral observations, and the ENAP measurements will all be nighttime measurements because of the faintness of the emissions and the relatively low level of magnetic activity expected.

  7. Aluminosilicate Precipitation Impact on Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    WILMARTH, WILLIAM

    2006-03-10

    Experiments have been conducted to examine the fate of uranium during the formation of sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) when wastes containing high aluminate concentrations are mixed with wastes of high silicate concentration. Testing was conducted at varying degrees of uranium saturation. Testing examined typical tank conditions, e.g., stagnant, slightly elevated temperature (50 C). The results showed that under sub-saturated conditions uranium is not removed from solution to any large extent in both simulant testing and actual tank waste testing. This aspect was not thoroughly understood prior to this work and was necessary to avoid criticality issues when actual tank wastes were aggregated. There are data supporting a small removal due to sorption of uranium on sites in the NAS. Above the solubility limit the data are clear that a reduction in uranium concentration occurs concomitant with the formation of aluminosilicate. This uranium precipitation is fairly rapid and ceases when uranium reaches its solubility limit. At the solubility limit, it appears that uranium is not affected, but further testing might be warranted.

  8. The Toxicity of Precipitated Silica

    PubMed Central

    Byers, P. D.; Gage, J. C.

    1961-01-01

    The proportion of respirable particles in dust clouds generated from three samples of precipitated silica has been shown to range between one-quarter and one-third by weight. After a single intratracheal dose of the silicas to rats, chemical analysis shows a progressive disappearance of silica from the lungs, though it is still detectable after 12 months. Some silica appears in the liver and kidneys but in two of the three samples none remains after 12 months. The nature and duration of the lung lesions produced in rats after a single intratracheal injection are described. A mild degree of fibrosis was observed which showed a steady regression with time and was to some extent influenced by the nature of the silica injected. The lesions showed little resemblance to those arising from quartz and were more akin to those produced by non-fibrogenic dusts. Recommendations are made for the precautions to be taken during the industrial handling of these dusts. Images PMID:13875292

  9. Impacts of extreme precipitation and seasonal changes in precipitation on plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeppel, M. J. B.; Wilks, J.; Lewis, J. D.

    2013-10-01

    The hydrological cycle is predicted to become more intense in future climates, with both larger precipitation events and longer times between events. Redistribution of precipitation may occur both within and across seasons, and the resulting wide fluctuations in soil water content may dramatically affect plants. Though these responses remain poorly understood, recent research in this emerging field suggests the effects of redistributed precipitation may differ from predictions based on previous drought studies. We review available studies on both extreme precipitation (redistribution within seasons) and seasonal changes in precipitation (redistribution across seasons) on grasslands and forests. Extreme precipitation differentially affected Aboveground Net Primary Productivity (ANPP), depending on whether extreme precipitation led to increased or decreased soil water content (SWC), which differed based on the current precipitation at the site. Specifically, studies to date reported that extreme precipitation decreased ANPP in mesic sites, but, conversely, increased ANPP in xeric sites, suggesting that plant available water is a key factor driving responses to extreme precipitation. Similarly, the effects of seasonal changes in precipitation on ANPP, phenology, and leaf and fruit development varied with the effect on SWC. Reductions in spring or summer generally had negative effects on plants, associated with reduced SWC, while subsequent reductions in autumn or winter had little effect on SWC or plants. Similarly, increased summer precipitation had a more dramatic impact on plants than winter increases in precipitation. The patterns of response suggest xeric biomes may respond positively to extreme precipitation, while comparatively mesic biomes may be more likely to be negatively affected. And, seasonal changes in precipitation during warm or dry seasons may have larger effects than changes during cool or wet seasons. Accordingly, responses to redistributed

  10. Cesium removal and kinetics equilibrium: Precipitation kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.J.

    1999-12-17

    This task consisted of both non-radioactive and radioactive (tracer) tests examining the influence of potentially significant variables on cesium tetraphenylborate precipitation kinetics. The work investigated the time required to reach cesium decontamination and the conditions that affect the cesium precipitation kinetics.

  11. Precipitator inlet particulate distribution flow analysis

    SciTech Connect

    LaRose, J.A.; Averill, A.

    1994-12-31

    The B and W Rothemuhle precipitators located at PacifiCorp`s Wyodak Generating Station in Gillette, Wyoming have, for the past two years, been experiencing discharge wire breakage. The breakage is due to corrosion of the wires: however, the exact cause of the corrosion is unknown. One aspect thought to contribute to the problem is an unbalance of ash loading among the four precipitators. Plant operation has revealed that the ash loading to precipitator C appears to be the heaviest of the four casing, and also appears to have the most severe corrosion. Data from field measurements showed that the gas flows to the four precipitators are fairly uniform, within {+-}9% of the average. The ash loading data showed a large maldistribution among the precipitators. Precipitator C receives 60% more ash than the next heaviest loaded precipitator. A numerical model was created which showed the same results. The model was then utilized to determine design modifications to the existing flue and turning vanes to improve the ash loading distribution. The resulting design was predicted to improve the ash loading to all the precipitators, within {+-}10% of the average.

  12. Layered double hydroxide formation in Bayer liquor and its promotional effect on oxalate precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Perrotta, A.J.; Williams, F.

    1996-10-01

    Enhancing the precipitation of sodium oxalate from Bayer process liquor to improve the quality of alumina product remains an important objective for Bayer refining. The formation of layered double hydroxides by the reaction of alkaline earth oxides, such as lime and magnesia, with Bayer liquor gives a crystal structure which is capable of intercalating anions, both inorganic and organic, within its structure. Both lime and magnesia, with long contact times in Bayer liquor, show layered double hydroxide formation. This layered double hydroxide formation is accompanied with a decrease in the sodium oxalate content in the liquor from about 3 g/L to below 1 g/L. Short contact times lead to a destabilization of the liquor which facilitates sodium oxalate precipitation. Additional work on magnesium hydroxide shows, in comparison to lime and magnesia, much less layered double hydroxide formation with equivalent residence time in the liquor. Destabilization of the liquor also occurs, giving enhanced oxalate precipitation with less alumina being consumed in agreement with lower layered double hydroxide formation. Thermal regeneration of these structures, followed by in-situ recrystallization in Bayer liquor, also gives enhanced oxalate precipitation, suggesting that there is an opportunity for a regenerable oxalate reduction system. The implementation of these experiments and other related technology into the plant has resulted in the Purox Process for enhancing the precipitation of sodium oxalate from Bayer liquor.

  13. Understanding Precessional Variations in Tropical Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tigchelaar, M.; Timmermann, A.

    2012-12-01

    Various records of Pleistocene tropical paleoclimate as well as numerous modeling experiments show strong precessional variability in (annual mean) tropical precipitation. The occurrence of annual mean precessional climate signals is remarkable given the fact that the precessional cycle is associated with a zero annual mean forcing. This points at the existence of nonlinear rectification mechanisms, translating the zero-annual-mean forcing into a non-zero-annual-mean response. While the need for such mechanisms in the climate system has been previously acknowledged, little work has been done to specifically identify and understand them. We hypothesize a number of nonlinear rectification mechanisms that can introduce precessional variability into the different types of tropical precipitation: 1. Positive definite statistics: The most obvious nonlinearity associated with precipitation is the fact that precipitation is a positive definite variable: one cannot have negative precipitation. An increase in seasonality somehow increasing precipitation in part of the year might not equally diminish precipitation in another part of the year, leading to a change in annual mean precipitation. This nonlinearity will be especially important in areas with little precipitation or with a large seasonal cycle. 2. Nonlinear relationship between tropical SSTs and precipitation: In the tropics a nonlinear relationship exists between SSTs and convective precipitation, suggesting that a change in the seasonality of tropical SSTs might translate into a change in annual mean precipitation. This mechanism will play an important role in areas where precipitation is locally driven, although the anomalous diabatic forcing associated with these local changes might also drive remote precipitation changes. This temperature-moisture nonlinearity could also be important for the monsoon systems, which have been suggested to be driven by a moisture-advection feedback. 3. Mid- and high-latitude albedo

  14. Understanding changes in precipitation patterns in Tuscany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatichi, S.; Caporali, E.

    2009-09-01

    In the context of climate change science is important to understand if hydro-meteorological and environmental variables are already subjected to modifications and eventually quantify these changes as trends or general non-stationary behaviors. An important issue related to this science is covered by the modification of precipitation regime and its implications in term of drought periods, water resources availability or flood risk modification. The general lack of long sequences of data and the frequent gaps in time series increase the difficulties in analyze long periods of climatic events. Here the authors provide a spatial analysis of trends of several indexes of precipitation regime. Through spatial interpolation techniques, a specific methodology is adopted to include a number of data higher than usual, which include the gauges with very short time series, even only 1 year long. The characteristics of precipitation regime analyzed include common indexes as Total Annual Precipitation (TAP) and number of wet days (precipitation > 1 mm), and other indexes able to characterize specific precipitation features like the Precipitation Concentration Index (PCI), the number of days with more than 10 mm of precipitation, the maximum number of consecutive dry days (precipitation < 1 mm), the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), the 1 day maximum precipitation. The study is carried out in the central part of Italy (Tuscany), using a dataset containing totally 896 recording rain gauges. The period of analysis, ranging from 1916 to 2008, is quite long in comparison to other studies. The territory analyzed is subdivided in a 1 km square grid, every time series of the indexes for every cell is investigated by means of the Mann-Kendall test, modified to take into account the autocorrelation, thus realizing a distributed trend analyses. The results show a significant reduction of the number of days with more than 10 mm of precipitation and of the maximum number of consecutive

  15. Understanding the Rapid Precipitation Response to CO2 and Aerosol Forcing on a Regional Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Thomas; Forster, Piers; Parker, Doug; Andrews, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Regional precipitation change is one of the most uncertain aspects of climate change prediction, and can have major societal implications. On a global scale, precipitation is tightly constrained by the radiative cooling of the troposphere. As a result, precipitation exhibits a significant rapid adjustment in response to certain forcing agents, which is important for understanding long term climate change. However, the mechanisms which drive the spatial pattern of rapid adjustment are not well understood. In this study we analyze the spatial pattern of rapid precipitation change using simulations with fixed sea surface temperature. Using data obtained from sixteen models participating in the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5), we investigate the response to three different forcing scenarios; an abrupt quadrupling of CO2, an increase in all aerosols, and an increase in sulphate aerosol from pre-industrial to present day levels. Analysis of the local atmospheric energy budget is used to understand the observed changes. We find that the spatial pattern of rapid precipitation adjustment due to forcing is primarily driven by the rapid land surface response. As a result, the spatial pattern due to quadrupling CO2 opposes that due to increased sulphate and increased all aerosols. Increasing CO2 levels causes warming of the land surface, due to enhanced downwelling longwave radiation. This destabilizes the atmosphere by warming the lower troposphere, producing an overall shift of convection and precipitation to over land. The reverse is observed for increased sulphate and increased all aerosols. Changes in tropospheric cooling are important in determining the magnitude of regional precipitation change, thereby satisfying global energy budget constraints. We find the spatial pattern of rapid precipitation change due to quadrupling CO2 levels is robust between models. The most significant precipitation changes occur in the tropics, with significant

  16. Orbital history and seasonality of regional precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, O.K.; Sellers, W.D. )

    1994-03-01

    The Arizona monsoon, a major source of precipitation in the Southwest, shares many features with the monsoons of other continents. Computer modeling and fossil data indicate maximum extent of the African and Asian monsoons 9000 years ago. Fossil data indicate increased summer precipitation 9000 years ago, synchronous with the maxima of the African and Asian monsoons and, paradoxically, with the early-Holocene xerothermic of the Pacific Northwest. Climate model runs for 6000, 9000, 11,500, 13,000, and 18,000 years ago indicate increased summer precipitation 9000 years ago and a reciprocal relationship between precipitation in the Northwest and Southwest, but they relegate insolation to a role secondary to the North American ice sheet in regulating climate, and suggest a non-monsoon source for much of the summer precipitation in the Southwest prior to 9000 years ago.

  17. Nonlinear Acoustical Assessment of Precipitate Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to show that measurements of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter in heat treatable alloys as a function of heat treatment time can provide quantitative information about the kinetics of precipitate nucleation and growth in such alloys. Generally, information on the kinetics of phase transformations is obtained from time-sequenced electron microscopical examination and differential scanning microcalorimetry. The present nonlinear acoustical assessment of precipitation kinetics is based on the development of a multiparameter analytical model of the effects on the nonlinearity parameter of precipitate nucleation and growth in the alloy system. A nonlinear curve fit of the model equation to the experimental data is then used to extract the kinetic parameters related to the nucleation and growth of the targeted precipitate. The analytical model and curve fit is applied to the assessment of S' precipitation in aluminum alloy 2024 during artificial aging from the T4 to the T6 temper.

  18. Why Does the Leeward Side of Mt. Tamalpais Experience a Climatological Precipitation Maximum?