Science.gov

Sample records for enhanced radiological detection

  1. Verification of Minimum Detectable Activity for Radiological Threat Source Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Hannah; Myjak, Mitchell; Baciak, James; Detwiler, Rebecca; Seifert, Carolyn

    2015-10-01

    The Department of Homeland Security's Domestic Nuclear Detection Office is working to develop advanced technologies that will improve the ability to detect, localize, and identify radiological and nuclear sources from airborne platforms. The Airborne Radiological Enhanced-sensor System (ARES) program is developing advanced data fusion algorithms for analyzing data from a helicopter-mounted radiation detector. This detector platform provides a rapid, wide-area assessment of radiological conditions at ground level. The NSCRAD (Nuisance-rejection Spectral Comparison Ratios for Anomaly Detection) algorithm was developed to distinguish low-count sources of interest from benign naturally occurring radiation and irrelevant nuisance sources. It uses a number of broad, overlapping regions of interest to statistically compare each newly measured spectrum with the current estimate for the background to identify anomalies. We recently developed a method to estimate the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of NSCRAD in real time. We present this method here and report on the MDA verification using both laboratory measurements and simulated injects on measured backgrounds at or near the detection limits. This work is supported by the US Department of Homeland Security, Domestic Nuclear Detection Office, under competitively awarded contract/IAA HSHQDC-12-X-00376. This support does not constitute an express or implied endorsement on the part of the Gov't.

  2. Current Trends in Gamma Ray Detection for Radiological Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, S., Guss, P., Maurer, R.

    2011-08-18

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies.

  3. Radiology utilizing a gas multiwire detector with resolution enhancement

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Majewski, Lucasz A.

    1999-09-28

    This invention relates to a process and apparatus for obtaining filmless, radiological, digital images utilizing a gas multiwire detector. Resolution is enhanced through projection geometry. This invention further relates to imaging systems for X-ray examination of patients or objects, and is particularly suited for mammography.

  4. Current trends in gamma radiation detection for radiological emergency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Guss, Paul; Maurer, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies. In recent years, since the establishment of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office by the Department of Homeland Security, a tremendous amount of progress has been made in detection materials (scintillators, semiconductors), imaging techniques (Compton imaging, use of active masking and hybrid imaging), data acquisition systems with digital signal processing, field programmable gate arrays and embedded isotopic analysis software (viz. gamma detector response and analysis software [GADRAS]1), fast template matching, and data fusion (merging radiological data with geo-referenced maps, digital imagery to provide better situational awareness). In this stride to progress, a significant amount of inter-disciplinary research and development has taken place-techniques and spin-offs from medical science (such as x-ray radiography and tomography), materials engineering (systematic planned studies on scintillators to optimize several qualities of a good scintillator, nanoparticle applications, quantum dots, and photonic crystals, just to name a few). No trend analysis of radiation detection systems would be complete without mentioning the unprecedented strategic position taken by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime transportation-the so-called second line of defense.

  5. Current Trends in Gamma Radiation Detection for Radiological Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, S., Guss, P., Maurer, R.

    2011-09-01

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies. In recent years, since the establishment of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office by the Department of Homeland Security, a tremendous amount of progress has been made in detection materials (scintillators, semiconductors), imaging techniques (Compton imaging, use of active masking and hybrid imaging), data acquisition systems with digital signal processing, field programmable gate arrays and embedded isotopic analysis software (viz. gamma detector response and analysis software [GADRAS]1), fast template matching, and data fusion (merging radiological data with geo-referenced maps, digital imagery to provide better situational awareness). In this stride to progress, a significant amount of interdisciplinary research and development has taken place–techniques and spin-offs from medical science (such as x-ray radiography and tomography), materials engineering (systematic planned studies on scintillators to optimize several qualities of a good scintillator, nanoparticle applications, quantum dots, and photonic crystals, just to name a few). No trend analysis of radiation detection systems would be complete without mentioning the unprecedented strategic position taken by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime transportation–the so-called second line of defense.

  6. Development of automated detection of radiology reports citing adrenal findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zopf, Jason; Langer, Jessica; Boonn, William; Kim, Woojin; Zafar, Hanna

    2011-03-01

    Indeterminate incidental findings pose a challenge to both the radiologist and the ordering physician as their imaging appearance is potentially harmful but their clinical significance and optimal management is unknown. We seek to determine if it is possible to automate detection of adrenal nodules, an indeterminate incidental finding, on imaging examinations at our institution. Using PRESTO (Pathology-Radiology Enterprise Search tool), a newly developed search engine at our institution that mines dictated radiology reports, we searched for phrases used by attendings to describe incidental adrenal findings. Using these phrases as a guide, we designed a query that can be used with the PRESTO index. The results were refined using a modified version of NegEx to eliminate query terms that have been negated within the report text. In order to validate these findings we used an online random date generator to select two random weeks. We queried our RIS database for all reports created on those dates and manually reviewed each report to check for adrenal incidental findings. This survey produced a ground- truth dataset of reports citing adrenal incidental findings against which to compare query performance. We further reviewed the false positives and negatives identified by our validation study, in an attempt to improve the performance query. This algorithm is an important step towards automating the detection of incidental adrenal nodules on cross sectional imaging at our institution. Subsequently, this query can be combined with electronic medical record data searches to determine the clinical significance of these findings through resultant follow-up.

  7. Standardization of radiological evaluation of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI: application in breast cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Furman-Haran, E; Feinberg, M Shapiro; Badikhi, D; Eyal, E; Zehavi, T; Degani, H

    2014-10-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI is applied as an adjuvant tool for breast cancer detection, diagnosis, and follow-up of therapy. Despite improvements through the years in achieving higher spatial and temporal resolution, it still suffers from lack of scanning and processing standardization, and consequently, high variability in the radiological evaluation, particularly differentiating malignant from benign lesions. We describe here a hybrid method for achieving standardization of the radiological evaluation of breast dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols, based on integrating the model based three time point (3TP) method with principal component analysis (PCA). The scanning and image processing procedures consisted of three main steps: 1. 3TP standardization of the MRI acquisition parameters according to a kinetic model, 2. Applying PCA to test cases and constructing an eigenvectors' base related to the contrast-enhancement kinetics and 3. Projecting all new cases on the eigenvectors' base and evaluating the clinical outcome. Datasets of overall 96 malignant and 26 benign breast lesions were recorded on 1.5T and 3T scanners, using three different MRI acquisition parameters optimized by the 3TP method. The final radiological evaluation showed similar detection and diagnostic ability for the three different MRI acquisition parameters. The area under the curve of receiver operating characteristic analysis yielded a value of 0.88 ± 0.034 for differentiating malignant from benign lesions. This 3TP+PCA hybrid method is fast and can be readily applied as a computer aided diagnostic tool of breast cancer. The underlying principles of this method can be extended to standardize the evaluation of malignancies in other organs.

  8. Paint for detection of radiological or chemical agents

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Brunk, James L.; Day, Sumner Daniel

    2010-08-24

    A paint that warns of radiological or chemical substances comprising a paint operatively connected to the surface, an indicator material carried by the paint that provides an indication of the radiological or chemical substances, and a thermo-activation material carried by the paint. In one embodiment, a method of warning of radiological or chemical substances comprising the steps of painting a surface with an indicator material, and monitoring the surface for indications of the radiological or chemical substances. In another embodiment, a paint is operatively connected to a vehicle and an indicator material is carried by the paint that provides an indication of the radiological or chemical substances.

  9. Long Radiology Workdays Reduce Detection and Accommodation Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Berbaum, Kevin S.; Caldwell, Robert T.; Schartz, Kevin M.; Kim, John

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To measure diagnostic accuracy of fracture detection, visual accommodation, reading time, and subjective ratings of fatigue and visual strain before and after a day of clinical reading. Methods: Forty attending radiologists and radiology residents viewed 60 de-identified HIPAA compliant bone examinations, half with fractures, once before any clinical reading (Early) and once after a day of clinical reading (Late). Reading time was recorded. Visual accommodation (ability to maintain focus) was measured before and after each reading session. Subjective ratings of symptoms of fatigue and oculomotor strain were collected. The study was approved by local IRBs. Results: Diagnostic accuracy was reduced significantly after a day of clinical reading, with average receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) of 0.885 for Early reading and 0.852 for Late reading (p < 0.05). After a day of image interpretation, visual accommodation was no more variable, though error in visual accommodation was greater (p < 0.01) and subjective ratings of fatigue were higher. Conclusions: After a day of clinical reading, radiologists have reduced ability to focus, increased symptoms of fatigue and oculomotor strain, and reduced ability to detect fractures. Radiologists need to be aware of the effects of fatigue on diagnostic accuracy and take steps to mitigate these effects. PMID:20816631

  10. 78 FR 26795 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for the National Radiological and Nuclear Detection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: General The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Domestic Nuclear Detection Office... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Announcement of Requirements and Registration for the National Radiological and Nuclear...

  11. Open-ring enhancement in pseudotumoral multiple sclerosis: important radiological aspect.

    PubMed

    de Medeiros, Frederico Carvalho; de Albuquerque, Lucas Alverne Freitas; Pittella, Jose Eymard Homem; de Souza, Renata Brant; Gomes Neto, Antonio Pereira; Christo, Paulo Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Observation of open-ring enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered a specificity marker for diagnosing pseudotumoral multiple sclerosis (MS). This finding is of great value in the differential diagnosis of tumefactive lesions. Case Report. We describe a 55-year-old white woman, with previous history of ovarian cancer and recent history of fatigue and bilateral retroorbital pain. Important bilateral visual impairment evolved over one month. Physical examination detected the presence of right homonymous hemianopia. Cranial MRI showed an expanding lesion with open-ring enhancement. Given the range of diagnostic possibilities, a stereotactic biopsy was performed, and histopathological examination was consistent with an active demyelinating disease. The patient was treated with 1 g of methylprednisolone and symptoms improved following a significant reduction in the lesion. Conclusions. We highlight the MRI results suggestive of pseudotumoral MS, especially open-ring enhancement, which is an important radiologic aspect to diagnosis and can assist in avoiding unnecessary biopsies. PMID:24839572

  12. Using Signal Detection Theory to Model Changes in Serial Learning of Radiological Image Interpretation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boutis, Kathy; Pecaric, Martin; Seeto, Brian; Pusic, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Signal detection theory (SDT) parameters can describe a learner's ability to discriminate (d[prime symbol]) normal from abnormal and the learner's criterion ([lambda]) to under or overcall abnormalities. To examine the serial changes in SDT parameters with serial exposure to radiological cases. 46 participants were recruited for this study: 20…

  13. Method and apparatus for enhanced detection of toxic agents

    DOEpatents

    Greenbaum, Elias; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Wu, Jie Jayne; Qi, Hairong

    2013-10-01

    A biosensor based detection of toxins includes enhancing a fluorescence signal by concentrating a plurality of photosynthetic organisms in a fluid into a concentrated region using biased AC electro-osmosis. A measured photosynthetic activity of the photosynthetic organisms is obtained in the concentrated region, where chemical, biological or radiological agents reduce a nominal photosynthetic activity of the photosynthetic organisms. A presence of the chemical, biological and/or radiological agents or precursors thereof, is determined in the fluid based on the measured photosynthetic activity of the concentrated plurality of photosynthetic organisms. A lab-on-a-chip system is used for the concentrating step. The presence of agents is determined from feature vectors, obtained from processing a time dependent signal using amplitude statistics and/or time-frequency analysis, relative to a control signal. A linear discriminant method including support vector machine classification (SVM) is used to identify the agents.

  14. Acceptance of technology-enhanced learning for a theoretical radiological science course: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Technology-enhanced learning (TEL) gives a view to improved education. However, there is a need to clarify how TEL can be used effectively. The study compared students' attitudes and opinions towards a traditional face-to-face course on theoretical radiological science and a TEL course where students could combine face-to-face lectures and e-learning modules at their best convenience. Methods 42 third-year dental students were randomly assigned to the traditional face-to-face group and the TEL group. Both groups completed questionnaires before the beginning and after completion of the course on attitudes and opinions towards a traditional face-to-face lectures and technology-enhanced learning. After completion of the course both groups also filled in the validated German-language TRIL (Trierer Inventar zur Lehrevaluation) questionnaire for the evaluation of courses given at universities. Results Both groups had a positive attitude towards e-learning that did not change over time. The TEL group attended significantly less face-to-face lectures than the traditional group. However, both groups stated that face-to-face lectures were the basis for education in a theoretical radiological science course. The members of the TEL group rated e-mail reminders significantly more important when they filled in the questionnaire on attitudes and opinions towards a traditional face-to-face lectures and technology-enhanced learning for the second time after completion of the course. The members of the technology-enhanced learning group were significantly less confident in passing the exam compared to the members of the traditional group. However, examination results did not differ significantly for traditional and the TEL group. Conclusions It seems that technology-enhanced learning in a theoretical radiological science course has the potential to reduce the need for face-to-face lectures. At the same time examination results are not impaired. However, technology-enhanced

  15. Deconstructing multisensory enhancement in detection

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Bellido, Alexis; Pereda-Baños, Alexandre; López-Moliner, Joan; Deco, Gustavo; Soto-Faraco, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the integration of sensory information from different modalities have become a topic of intense interest in psychophysics and neuroscience. Many authors now claim that early, sensory-based cross-modal convergence improves performance in detection tasks. An important strand of supporting evidence for this claim is based on statistical models such as the Pythagorean model or the probabilistic summation model. These models establish statistical benchmarks representing the best predicted performance under the assumption that there are no interactions between the two sensory paths. Following this logic, when observed detection performances surpass the predictions of these models, it is often inferred that such improvement indicates cross-modal convergence. We present a theoretical analyses scrutinizing some of these models and the statistical criteria most frequently used to infer early cross-modal interactions during detection tasks. Our current analysis shows how some common misinterpretations of these models lead to their inadequate use and, in turn, to contradictory results and misleading conclusions. To further illustrate the latter point, we introduce a model that accounts for detection performances in multimodal detection tasks but for which surpassing of the Pythagorean or probabilistic summation benchmark can be explained without resorting to early cross-modal interactions. Finally, we report three experiments that put our theoretical interpretation to the test and further propose how to adequately measure multimodal interactions in audiotactile detection tasks. PMID:25520431

  16. Resolution enhanced sound detecting apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, J. M. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus is described for enhancing the resolution of a sound detector of the type which includes an acoustic mirror for focusing sound from an object onto a microphone to enable the determination of the location from which the sound arises. The enhancement apparatus includes an enclosure which surrounds the space between the mirror and microphone, and contains a gas heavier than air, such as Freon, through which sound moves slower and therefore with a shorter wavelength than in air, so that a mirror of given size has greater resolving power. An acoustically transparent front wall of the enclosure which lies forward of the mirror, can include a pair of thin sheets with pressured air between them, to form an end of the region of heavy gas into a concave shape.

  17. Acoustic enhancement for photo detecting devices

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G; Senesac, Lawrence R; Van Neste, Charles W

    2013-02-19

    Provided are improvements to photo detecting devices and methods for enhancing the sensitivity of photo detecting devices. A photo detecting device generates an electronic signal in response to a received light pulse. An electro-mechanical acoustic resonator, electrically coupled to the photo detecting device, damps the electronic signal and increases the signal noise ratio (SNR) of the electronic signal. Increased photo detector standoff distances and sensitivities will result.

  18. Robotic Vision With Enhanced Detection Of Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. L.; Shawaga, L.; Walsh, P.; Kambies, K.

    1993-01-01

    Robotic vision subsystem provides enhanced detection of edges as it preprocesses image of target moving in six degrees of freedom. Subsystem designed to filter out high (spatial) frequency components in image, with frequency response tuned to size of object detected. Blurring and background noise reduced to avoid false detection of moving target. Image produced used by another vision subsystem guiding robot to mate with target. Produces less noise and operates more reliably.

  19. Paint for detection of corrosion and warning of chemical and radiological attack

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.

    2010-08-24

    A system for warning of corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances. The system comprises painting a surface with a paint or coating that includes an indicator material and monitoring the surface for indications of the corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances.

  20. Method for warning of radiological and chemical substances using detection paints on a vehicle surface

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.

    2012-03-13

    A system for warning of corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances. The system comprises painting a surface with a paint or coating that includes an indicator material and monitoring the surface for indications of the corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances.

  1. Surface with two paint strips for detection and warning of chemical warfare and radiological agents

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, Joseph C.

    2013-04-02

    A system for warning of corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances. The system comprises painting a surface with a paint or coating that includes an indicator material and monitoring the surface for indications of the corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances.

  2. Detectivity enhancement in THz electrooptical sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Saima; Savolainen, Janne; Hamm, Peter

    2014-01-15

    We demonstrate and discuss a simple scheme that significantly enhances the detectivity of THz electro-optical sampling by introducing a sequence of Brewster windows that increases the ellipticity of the probe beam. By varying the window material or the number of Brewster windows, the enhancement factor can be adjusted; we demonstrate an enhancement factor of ≈20 with four ZnSe Brewster windows. The scheme is particularly useful when very small THz fields are to be measured in connection with low-repetition rate amplified Ti:S laser systems.

  3. Aerial vehicle with paint for detection of radiological and chemical warfare agents

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Brunk, James L.; Day, S. Daniel

    2013-04-02

    A paint that warns of radiological or chemical substances comprising a paint operatively connected to the surface, an indicator material carried by the paint that provides an indication of the radiological or chemical substances, and a thermo-activation material carried by the paint. In one embodiment, a method of warning of radiological or chemical substances comprising the steps of painting a surface with an indicator material, and monitoring the surface for indications of the radiological or chemical substances. In another embodiment, a paint is operatively connected to a vehicle and an indicator material is carried by the paint that provides an indication of the radiological or chemical substances.

  4. Method for warning of radiological and chemical agents using detection paints on a vehicle surface

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Brunk, James L.; Day, S. Daniel

    2012-03-27

    A paint that warns of radiological or chemical substances comprising a paint operatively connected to the surface, an indicator material carried by the paint that provides an indication of the radiological or chemical substances, and a thermo-activation material carried by the paint. In one embodiment, a method of warning of radiological or chemical substances comprising the steps of painting a surface with an indicator material, and monitoring the surface for indications of the radiological or chemical substances. In another embodiment, a paint is operatively connected to a vehicle and an indicator material is carried by the paint that provides an indication of the radiological or chemical substances.

  5. RCUT: A Non-Invasive Method for Detection, Location, and Quantification of Radiological Contaminants in Pipes and Ducts - 12514

    SciTech Connect

    Bratton, Wesley L.; Maresca, Joseph W. Jr.; Beck, Deborah A.

    2012-07-01

    Radiological Characterization Using Tracers (RCUT) is a minimally invasive method for detection and location of residual radiological contamination in pipes and ducts. The RCUT technology utilizes reactive gaseous tracers that dissociate when exposed to gamma and/or beta radiation emitting from a radiological contaminant in a pipe or duct. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) was selected as a tracer for this radiological application, because it is a chemically inert gas that is both nonflammable, nontoxic, and breaks down when exposed to gamma radiation. Laboratory tests demonstrated that the tracer pair of SF{sub 6} and O{sub 2} formed SO{sub 2}F{sub 2} when exposed to a gamma or beta radioactive field, which indicated the presence of radiological contamination. Field application of RCUT involves first injecting the reactive tracers into the pipe to fill the pipe being inspected and allowing sufficient time for the tracer to interact with any contaminants present. This is followed by the injection of an inert gas at one end of the pipe to push the reactive tracer at a known or constant flow velocity along the pipe and then out the exit and sampling port at the end of the pipeline where its concentration is measured by a gas chromatograph. If a radiological contaminant is present in the pipe being tested, the presence of SO{sub 2}F{sub 2} will be detected. The time of arrival of the SO{sub 2}F{sub 2} can be used to locate the contaminant. If the pipe is free of radiological contamination, no SO{sub 2}F{sub 2} will be detected. RCUT and PCUT are both effective technologies that can be used to detect contamination within pipelines without the need for mechanical or human inspection. These methods can be used to detect, locate, and/or estimate the volume of a variety of radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals such as chlorinated solvents, petroleum products, and heavy metals. While further optimization is needed for RCUT, the key first step of identification of a

  6. Network of wireless gamma ray sensors for radiological detection and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzilov, A.; Womble, P.; Novikov, I.; Paschal, J.; Board, J.; Moss, K.

    2007-04-01

    The paper describes the design and development of a network of wireless gamma-ray sensors based on cell phone or WiFi technology. The system is intended for gamma-ray detection and automatic identification of radioactive isotopes and nuclear materials. The sensor is a gamma-ray spectrometer that uses wireless technology to distribute the results. A small-size sensor module contains a scintillation detector along with a small size data acquisition system, PDA, battery, and WiFi radio or a cell phone modem. The PDA with data acquisition and analysis software analyzes the accumulated spectrum on real-time basis and returns results to the screen reporting the isotopic composition and intensity of detected radiation source. The system has been programmed to mitigate false alarms from medical isotopes and naturally occurring radioactive materials. The decision-making software can be "trained" to indicate specific signatures of radiation sources like special nuclear materials. The sensor is supplied with GPS tracker coupling radiological information with geographical coordinates. The sensor is designed for easy use and rapid deployment in common wireless networks.

  7. Image processing, radiological, and clinical information fusion in breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alto, Hilary; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M.; Solaiman, Basel; Desautels, J. E. Leo; MacGregor, J. H.

    2002-03-01

    Screening mammography is the most efficient and cost-effective method available for detecting the signs of early breast cancer in asymptomatic women between the ages of 50 and 69. To improve the detection rate and reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies, many different computer-aided diagnosis techniques have been developed. Many of these techniques use image processing algorithms to automatically segment and classify the images. The decision-making process associated with the evaluation of mammograms is complex and incorporates multiple sources of information from standard medical knowledge and radiology to pathology. The use of this information combined with the results of image processing offers new challenges to the field of data and information fusion. In this paper, we describe the different information sources and their data as well as the framework that is needed to support this type of fusion. A database of breast cancer screening cases forms the basis of the resulting fusion model. The database and decision-level fusion techniques will facilitate unique and specialized approaches for efficient and sophisticated diagnosis of breast cancer.

  8. Enhanced detection of glycoproteins in polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, G; Marshall, S; Cabrera, M; Horvat, A

    1988-05-01

    A highly sensitive and simple method to enhance detection of glycoproteins resolved by either one- or two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is described. The method is a modification of the procedure described by D. Fargeaud et al. (D. Fargeaud, J. C. Benoit, F. Kato, and G. Chappuis (1984) Arch. Virol. 80, 69-82) that uses concanavalin A conjugated with fluorescein isothyocyanate to detect the carbohydrate moiety of glycoproteins. Briefly, the electrophoresed gel is exposed to the fluorescent lectin, thoroughly washed, and sequentially transferred to 50% methanol in deionized water and to absolute methanol. The result is an abrupt dehydration of the gel which turns evenly white and stiff. At least a twofold enhancement of fluorescence is obtained as detected by exposing the treated gel to an appropriate uv source. The sensitivity of the procedure allows us to detect purified immunoglobulin molecules by their carbohydrate content in the range of 0.2 microgram of total protein. The specificity of the detection is demonstrated by a comparison with the corresponding polypeptide profile obtained by silver nitrate staining of the gel. PMID:3394948

  9. Enhanced detection of glycoproteins in polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, G; Marshall, S; Cabrera, M; Horvat, A

    1988-05-01

    A highly sensitive and simple method to enhance detection of glycoproteins resolved by either one- or two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is described. The method is a modification of the procedure described by D. Fargeaud et al. (D. Fargeaud, J. C. Benoit, F. Kato, and G. Chappuis (1984) Arch. Virol. 80, 69-82) that uses concanavalin A conjugated with fluorescein isothyocyanate to detect the carbohydrate moiety of glycoproteins. Briefly, the electrophoresed gel is exposed to the fluorescent lectin, thoroughly washed, and sequentially transferred to 50% methanol in deionized water and to absolute methanol. The result is an abrupt dehydration of the gel which turns evenly white and stiff. At least a twofold enhancement of fluorescence is obtained as detected by exposing the treated gel to an appropriate uv source. The sensitivity of the procedure allows us to detect purified immunoglobulin molecules by their carbohydrate content in the range of 0.2 microgram of total protein. The specificity of the detection is demonstrated by a comparison with the corresponding polypeptide profile obtained by silver nitrate staining of the gel.

  10. A detection method for streak artifacts and radiological noise in a non-uniform region in a CT image.

    PubMed

    Imai, Kuniharu; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Enchi, Yukihiro; Niimi, Takanaga

    2010-01-01

    By using the CT images obtained by subtracting two CT images acquired under the same conditions and slice locations, we have devised a method for detecting streak artifacts in non-uniform regions and only radiological noise components in CT images. A chest phantom was scanned using 16- and 64-multidetector row helical CT scanners with various mAs values at 120kVp. The upper lung slice image was employed as a target image for evaluating the streak artifacts and radiological noise. One hundred parallel line segments with a length of 80 pixels were placed on the subtracted CT image, and the largest CT value in each CT value profile was employed as a feature variable of the streak artifacts; these feature variables were analyzed with the extreme value theory (Gumbel distribution). To detect only the radiological noise, all CT values contained in the 100 line profile were plotted on normal probability paper and the standard deviation was estimated from the inclination of its fitted line for the CT value plots. The two detection methods devised in this study were able to evaluate the streak artifacts and radiological noise in the CT images with high accuracy.

  11. An Enhanced Smoke Detection Using MODIS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Y.; Qu, J.; Xiong, X.; Hao, X.; Wang, W.; Wang, L.

    2005-12-01

    Smoke emitted from wildfire fires or prescribed fires is one of the major pollutions that pose a risk to human health and affect the air quality significantly. The remote sensing technique has been demonstrated as an efficient approach for detecting and tracing smoke plume. As a mixture pollutant, smoke does not have stable spectral signature because of diversified component mixing levels in different situation, but it has some particular characteristics different from others such as cloud, soil, water and so on. In earlier studies, we have already developed a multi-threshold algorithm to detect smoke in the eastern United States by combining both MODIS reflective solar bands and thermal emissive bands measurements. In order to apply out approach to global scale, we have enhanced the smoke detection algorithm by taking the land surface type into account. Smoke pixels will be output as well as the confidence in the quality of product in final result. In addition, smoke detection is also helpful to fire detection. With current fire detection algorithm, some small and cool fires can not be detected. However, understanding the features and spread direction of smoke can provide us a potential way to identify these fires.

  12. Fusion and normalization to enhance anomaly detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, R.; Atkinson, G.; Antoniades, J.; Baumback, M.; Chester, D.; Edwards, J.; Goldstein, A.; Haas, D.; Henderson, S.; Liu, L.

    2009-05-01

    This study examines normalizing the imagery and the optimization metrics to enhance anomaly and change detection, respectively. The RX algorithm, the standard anomaly detector for hyperspectral imagery, more successfully extracts bright rather than dark man-made objects when applied to visible hyperspectral imagery. However, normalizing the imagery prior to applying the anomaly detector can help detect some of the problematic dark objects, but can also miss some bright objects. This study jointly fuses images of RX applied to normalized and unnormalized imagery and has a single decision surface. The technique was tested using imagery of commercial vehicles in urban environment gathered by a hyperspectral visible/near IR sensor mounted in an airborne platform. Combining detections first requires converting the detector output to a target probability. The observed anomaly detections were fitted with a linear combination of chi square distributions and these weights were used to help compute the target probability. Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) quantitatively assessed the target detection performance. The target detection performance is highly variable depending on the relative number of candidate bright and dark targets and false alarms and controlled in this study by using vegetation and street line masks. The joint Boolean OR and AND operations also generate variable performance depending on the scene. The joint SUM operation provides a reasonable compromise between OR and AND operations and has good target detection performance. In addition, new transforms based on normalizing correlation coefficient and least squares generate new transforms related to canonical correlation analysis (CCA) and a normalized image regression (NIR). Transforms based on CCA and NIR performed better than the standard approaches. Only RX detection of the unnormalized of the difference imagery in change detection provides adequate change detection performance.

  13. Enhanced photoacoustic detection using photonic crystal substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yunfei; Liu, Kaiyang; McClelland, John; Lu, Meng

    2014-04-01

    This paper demonstrates the enhanced photoacoustic sensing of surface-bound light absorbing molecules and metal nanoparticles using a one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) substrate. The PC structure functions as an optical resonator at the wavelength where the analyte absorption is strong. The optical resonance of the PC sensor provides an intensified evanescent field with respect to the excitation light source and results in enhanced optical absorption by surface-immobilized samples. For the analysis of a light absorbing dye deposited on the PC surface, the intensity of photoacoustic signal was enhanced by more than 10-fold in comparison to an un-patterned acrylic substrate. The technique was also applied to detect gold nanorods and exhibited more than 40 times stronger photoacoustic signals. The demonstrated approach represents a potential path towards single molecule absorption spectroscopy with greater performance and inexpensive instrumentation.

  14. Enhanced photoacoustic detection using photonic crystal substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yunfei; Liu, Kaiyang; McClelland, John; Lu, Meng

    2014-04-21

    This paper demonstrates the enhanced photoacoustic sensing of surface-bound light absorbing molecules and metal nanoparticles using a one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) substrate. The PC structure functions as an optical resonator at the wavelength where the analyte absorption is strong. The optical resonance of the PC sensor provides an intensified evanescent field with respect to the excitation light source and results in enhanced optical absorption by surface-immobilized samples. For the analysis of a light absorbing dye deposited on the PC surface, the intensity of photoacoustic signal was enhanced by more than 10-fold in comparison to an un-patterned acrylic substrate. The technique was also applied to detect gold nanorods and exhibited more than 40 times stronger photoacoustic signals. The demonstrated approach represents a potential path towards single molecule absorption spectroscopy with greater performance and inexpensive instrumentation.

  15. An enhanced Monte Carlo outlier detection method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangxiao; Li, Peiwu; Mao, Jin; Ma, Fei; Ding, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Qi

    2015-09-30

    Outlier detection is crucial in building a highly predictive model. In this study, we proposed an enhanced Monte Carlo outlier detection method by establishing cross-prediction models based on determinate normal samples and analyzing the distribution of prediction errors individually for dubious samples. One simulated and three real datasets were used to illustrate and validate the performance of our method, and the results indicated that this method outperformed Monte Carlo outlier detection in outlier diagnosis. After these outliers were removed, the value of validation by Kovats retention indices and the root mean square error of prediction decreased from 3.195 to 1.655, and the average cross-validation prediction error decreased from 2.0341 to 1.2780. This method helps establish a good model by eliminating outliers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Detecting insider activity using enhanced directory virtualization.

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Dongwan; Claycomb, William R.

    2010-07-01

    Insider threats often target authentication and access control systems, which are frequently based on directory services. Detecting these threats is challenging, because malicious users with the technical ability to modify these structures often have sufficient knowledge and expertise to conceal unauthorized activity. The use of directory virtualization to monitor various systems across an enterprise can be a valuable tool for detecting insider activity. The addition of a policy engine to directory virtualization services enhances monitoring capabilities by allowing greater flexibility in analyzing changes for malicious intent. The resulting architecture is a system-based approach, where the relationships and dependencies between data sources and directory services are used to detect an insider threat, rather than simply relying on point solutions. This paper presents such an architecture in detail, including a description of implementation results.

  17. Enhanced detection with bimodal sonar displays.

    PubMed

    Doll, T J; Hanna, T E

    1989-10-01

    Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) required to detect narrow-band signals in white noise were compared for bimodal and single-modality sonar displays at two levels of signal uncertainty and two degrees of spatial compatibility between the auditory and visual displays. In bimodal test conditions the auditory and visual signals were equated in detectability for each subject. An adaptive, two-alternative, forced-choice procedure was used to maintain a constant percentage of correct responses. The decrement in performance with increased signal uncertainty was significantly greater for visual than for auditory displays, suggesting that auditory displays offer advantages for real-world sonar operations. Bimodal displays produced a reliable advantage in SNR required for detection over single-modality displays. Increased compatibility between the visual and auditory displays did not increase the advantage of bimodal presentation, nor did increased signal uncertainty. It was concluded that bimodal displays enhance operators' perceptual sensitivity. The magnitude of the enhancement was consistent with optimal integration of information in the two modalities.

  18. Method and apparatus for enhanced detection of toxic agents

    DOEpatents

    Greenbaum, Elias; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Wu, Jie Jayne; Qi, Hairong

    2012-06-12

    A water quality analyzer for real-time detection according to the invention comprises a biased AC electro-osmosis (ACEO) cell for receiving a fluid to be analyzed having a plurality photosynthetic organisms therein, and concentrating the plurality photosynthetic organisms into at least one concentrated region. A photodetector is provided for obtaining a measured photosynthetic activity of the plurality of photosynthetic organisms in the concentrated region, wherein chemical, biological or radiological agents reduce a nominal photosynthetic activity of the photosynthetic organisms. An electronics package analyzes the measured photosynthetic activity to indicate a presence of the chemical, biological or radiological agents in the fluid.

  19. Prospects for improved detection of chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear threats

    SciTech Connect

    Wuest, Craig R.; Hart, Brad; Slezak, Thomas R.

    2012-07-31

    Acquisition and use of Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) weapons continue to be a major focus of concern form the security apparatus of nation states because of their potential for mass casualties when used by a determined adversary.

  20. Seeing Objects as Faces Enhances Object Detection.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kohske; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2015-10-01

    The face is a special visual stimulus. Both bottom-up processes for low-level facial features and top-down modulation by face expectations contribute to the advantages of face perception. However, it is hard to dissociate the top-down factors from the bottom-up processes, since facial stimuli mandatorily lead to face awareness. In the present study, using the face pareidolia phenomenon, we demonstrated that face awareness, namely seeing an object as a face, enhances object detection performance. In face pareidolia, some people see a visual stimulus, for example, three dots arranged in V shape, as a face, while others do not. This phenomenon allows us to investigate the effect of face awareness leaving the stimulus per se unchanged. Participants were asked to detect a face target or a triangle target. While target per se was identical between the two tasks, the detection sensitivity was higher when the participants recognized the target as a face. This was the case irrespective of the stimulus eccentricity or the vertical orientation of the stimulus. These results demonstrate that seeing an object as a face facilitates object detection via top-down modulation. The advantages of face perception are, therefore, at least partly, due to face awareness.

  1. Seeing Objects as Faces Enhances Object Detection

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    The face is a special visual stimulus. Both bottom-up processes for low-level facial features and top-down modulation by face expectations contribute to the advantages of face perception. However, it is hard to dissociate the top-down factors from the bottom-up processes, since facial stimuli mandatorily lead to face awareness. In the present study, using the face pareidolia phenomenon, we demonstrated that face awareness, namely seeing an object as a face, enhances object detection performance. In face pareidolia, some people see a visual stimulus, for example, three dots arranged in V shape, as a face, while others do not. This phenomenon allows us to investigate the effect of face awareness leaving the stimulus per se unchanged. Participants were asked to detect a face target or a triangle target. While target per se was identical between the two tasks, the detection sensitivity was higher when the participants recognized the target as a face. This was the case irrespective of the stimulus eccentricity or the vertical orientation of the stimulus. These results demonstrate that seeing an object as a face facilitates object detection via top-down modulation. The advantages of face perception are, therefore, at least partly, due to face awareness. PMID:27648219

  2. Seeing Objects as Faces Enhances Object Detection

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    The face is a special visual stimulus. Both bottom-up processes for low-level facial features and top-down modulation by face expectations contribute to the advantages of face perception. However, it is hard to dissociate the top-down factors from the bottom-up processes, since facial stimuli mandatorily lead to face awareness. In the present study, using the face pareidolia phenomenon, we demonstrated that face awareness, namely seeing an object as a face, enhances object detection performance. In face pareidolia, some people see a visual stimulus, for example, three dots arranged in V shape, as a face, while others do not. This phenomenon allows us to investigate the effect of face awareness leaving the stimulus per se unchanged. Participants were asked to detect a face target or a triangle target. While target per se was identical between the two tasks, the detection sensitivity was higher when the participants recognized the target as a face. This was the case irrespective of the stimulus eccentricity or the vertical orientation of the stimulus. These results demonstrate that seeing an object as a face facilitates object detection via top-down modulation. The advantages of face perception are, therefore, at least partly, due to face awareness.

  3. Seeing Objects as Faces Enhances Object Detection.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kohske; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2015-10-01

    The face is a special visual stimulus. Both bottom-up processes for low-level facial features and top-down modulation by face expectations contribute to the advantages of face perception. However, it is hard to dissociate the top-down factors from the bottom-up processes, since facial stimuli mandatorily lead to face awareness. In the present study, using the face pareidolia phenomenon, we demonstrated that face awareness, namely seeing an object as a face, enhances object detection performance. In face pareidolia, some people see a visual stimulus, for example, three dots arranged in V shape, as a face, while others do not. This phenomenon allows us to investigate the effect of face awareness leaving the stimulus per se unchanged. Participants were asked to detect a face target or a triangle target. While target per se was identical between the two tasks, the detection sensitivity was higher when the participants recognized the target as a face. This was the case irrespective of the stimulus eccentricity or the vertical orientation of the stimulus. These results demonstrate that seeing an object as a face facilitates object detection via top-down modulation. The advantages of face perception are, therefore, at least partly, due to face awareness. PMID:27648219

  4. Anomaly detection enhanced classification in computer intrusion detection

    SciTech Connect

    Fugate, M. L.; Gattiker, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes work with the goal of enhancing capabilities in computer intrusion detection. The work builds upon a study of classification performance, that compared various methods of classifying information derived from computer network packets into attack versus normal categories, based on a labeled training dataset. This previous work validates our classification methods, and clears the ground for studying whether and how anomaly detection can be used to enhance this performance, The DARPA project that initiated the dataset used here concluded that anomaly detection should be examined to boost the performance of machine learning in the computer intrusion detection task. This report investigates the data set for aspects that will be valuable for anomaly detection application, and supports these results with models constructed from the data. In this report, the term anomaly detection means learning a model from unlabeled data, and using this to make some inference about future data. Our data is a feature vector derived from network packets: an 'example' or 'sample'. On the other hand, classification means building a model from labeled data, and using that model to classify unlabeled (future) examples. There is some precedent in the literature for combining these methods. One approach is to stage the two techniques, using anomaly detection to segment data into two sets for classification. An interpretation of this is a method to combat nonstationarity in the data. In our previous work, we demonstrated that the data has substantial temporal nonstationarity. With classification methods that can be thought of as learning a decision surface between two statistical distributions, performance is expected to degrade significantly when classifying examples that are from regions not well represented in the training set. Anomaly detection can be seen as a problem of learning the density (landscape) or the support (boundary) of a statistical distribution so that

  5. Plasmonically enhanced thermomechanical detection of infrared radiation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Fei; Zhu, Hai; Reed, Jason C; Cubukcu, Ertugrul

    2013-04-10

    Nanoplasmonics has been an attractive area of research due to its ability to localize and manipulate freely propagating radiation on the nanometer scale for strong light-matter interactions. Meanwhile, nanomechanics has set records in the sensing of mass, force, and displacement. In this work, we report efficient coupling between infrared radiation and nanomechanical resonators through nanoantenna enhanced thermoplasmonic effects. Using efficient conversion of electromagnetic energy to mechanical energy in this plasmo-thermomechanical platform with a nanoslot plasmonic absorber integrated directly on a nanobeam mechanical resonator, we demonstrate room-temperature detection of nanowatt level power fluctuations in infrared radiation. We expect our approach, which combines nanoplasmonics with nanomechanical resonators, to lead to optically controlled nanomechanical systems enabling unprecedented functionality in biomolecular and toxic gas sensing and on-chip mass spectroscopy.

  6. The Importance of Building and Enhancing Worldwide Industry Cooperation in the Areas of Radiological Protection, Waste Management and Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Saint-Pierre, S.

    2006-07-01

    The slow or stagnant rate of nuclear power generation development in many developed countries over the last two decades has resulted in a significant shortage in the population of mid-career nuclear industry professionals. This shortage is even more pronounced in some specific areas of expertise such as radiological protection, waste management and decommissioning. This situation has occurred at a time when the renaissance of nuclear power and the globalization of the nuclear industry are steadily gaining momentum and when the industry's involvement in international and national debates in these three fields of expertise (and the industry's impact on these debates) is of vital importance. This paper presents the World Nuclear Association (WNA) approach to building and enhancing worldwide industry cooperation in radiological protection, waste management and decommissioning, which is manifested through the activities of the two WNA working groups on radiological protection (RPWG) and on waste management and decommissioning (WM and DWG). This paper also briefly describes the WNA's participatory role, as of summer 2005, in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standard development committees on radiation safety (RASSC), waste safety (WASSC) and nuclear safety (NUSSC). This participation provides the worldwide nuclear industry with an opportunity to be part of IAEA's discussions on shaping changes to the control regime of IAEA safety standards. The review (and the prospect of a revision) of IAEA safety standards, which began in October 2005, makes this WNA participation and the industry ' s involvement at the national level timely and important. All of this excellent industry cooperation and team effort is done through 'collegial' exchanges between key industry experts, which help tackle important issues more effectively. The WNA is continuously looking to enhance its worldwide industry representation in these fields of expertise through the RPWG and WM and DWG

  7. A Combined Pharmacokinetic and Radiologic Assessment of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Response to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Semple, Scott Harry, Vanessa N. MRCOG.; Parkin, David E.; Gilbert, Fiona J.

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the combination of pharmacokinetic and radiologic assessment of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an early response indicator in women receiving chemoradiation for advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty women with locally advanced cervical cancer were included in a prospective cohort study. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was carried out before chemoradiation, after 2 weeks of therapy, and at the conclusion of therapy using a 1.5-T MRI scanner. Radiologic assessment of uptake parameters was obtained from resultant intensity curves. Pharmacokinetic analysis using a multicompartment model was also performed. General linear modeling was used to combine radiologic and pharmacokinetic parameters and correlated with eventual response as determined by change in MRI tumor size and conventional clinical response. A subgroup of 11 women underwent repeat pretherapy MRI to test pharmacokinetic reproducibility. Results: Pretherapy radiologic parameters and pharmacokinetic K{sup trans} correlated with response (p < 0.01). General linear modeling demonstrated that a combination of radiologic and pharmacokinetic assessments before therapy was able to predict more than 88% of variance of response. Reproducibility of pharmacokinetic modeling was confirmed. Conclusions: A combination of radiologic assessment with pharmacokinetic modeling applied to dynamic MRI before the start of chemoradiation improves the predictive power of either by more than 20%. The potential improvements in therapy response prediction using this type of combined analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI may aid in the development of more individualized, effective therapy regimens for this patient group.

  8. Spatial frequency characteristics at image decision-point locations for observers with different radiological backgrounds in lung nodule detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzyk, Mariusz W.; Manning, David J.; Dix, Alan; Donovan, Tim

    2009-02-01

    Aim: The goal of the study is to determine the spatial frequency characteristics at locations in the image of overt and covert observers' decisions and find out if there are any similarities in different observers' groups: the same radiological experience group or the same accuracy scored level. Background: The radiological task is described as a visual searching decision making procedure involving visual perception and cognitive processing. Humans perceive the world through a number of spatial frequency channels, each sensitive to visual information carried by different spatial frequency ranges and orientations. Recent studies have shown that particular physical properties of local and global image-based elements are correlated with the performance and the level of experience of human observers in breast cancer and lung nodule detections. Neurological findings in visual perception were an inspiration for wavelet applications in vision research because the methodology tries to mimic the brain processing algorithms. Methods: The wavelet approach to the set of postero-anterior chest radiographs analysis has been used to characterize perceptual preferences observers with different levels of experience in the radiological task. Psychophysical methodology has been applied to track eye movements over the image, where particular ROIs related to the observers' fixation clusters has been analysed in the spaces frame by Daubechies functions. Results: Significance differences have been found between the spatial frequency characteristics at the location of different decisions.

  9. Implementation of Certified EHR, Patient Portal, and "Direct" Messaging Technology in a Radiology Environment Enhances Communication of Radiology Results to Both Referring Physicians and Patients.

    PubMed

    Reicher, Joshua Jay; Reicher, Murray Aaron

    2016-06-01

    Since 2009, the Federal government distributed over $29 billion to providers who were adopting compliant electronic health record (EHR) technology. With a focus on radiology, we explore how EHR technology impacts interoperability with referring clinicians' EHRs and patient engagement. We also discuss the high-level details of contributing supporting frameworks, specifically Direct messaging and health information service provider (HISP) technology. We characterized Direct messaging, a secure e-mail-like protocol built to allow exchange of encrypted health information online, and the new supporting HISP infrastructure. Statistics related to both the testing and active use of this framework were obtained from DirectTrust.org, an organization whose framework supports Direct messaging use by healthcare organizations. To evaluate patient engagement, we obtained usage data from a radiology-centric patient portal between 2014 and 2015, which in some cases included access to radiology reports. Statistics from 2013 to 2015 showed a rise in issued secure Direct addresses from 8724 to 752,496; a rise in the number of participating healthcare organizations from 667 to 39,751; and a rise in the secure messages sent from 122,842 to 27,316,438. Regarding patient engagement, an average of 234,679 patients per month were provided portal access, with 86,400 patients per month given access to radiology reports. Availability of radiology reports online was strongly associated with increased system usage, with a likelihood ratio of 2.63. The use of certified EHR technology and Direct messaging in the practice of radiology allows for the communication of patient information and radiology results with referring clinicians and increases patient use of patient portal technology, supporting bidirectional radiologist-patient communication. PMID:26588906

  10. Predicting error in detecting mammographic masses among radiology trainees using statistical models based on BI-RADS features

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, Lars J. Ghate, Sujata V.; Yoon, Sora C.; Kim, Connie; Kuzmiak, Cherie M.; Mazurowski, Maciej A.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) features as predictors of individual errors made by trainees when detecting masses in mammograms. Methods: Ten radiology trainees and three expert breast imagers reviewed 100 mammograms comprised of bilateral medial lateral oblique and craniocaudal views on a research workstation. The cases consisted of normal and biopsy proven benign and malignant masses. For cases with actionable abnormalities, the experts recorded breast (density and axillary lymph nodes) and mass (shape, margin, and density) features according to the BI-RADS lexicon, as well as the abnormality location (depth and clock face). For each trainee, a user-specific multivariate model was constructed to predict the trainee's likelihood of error based on BI-RADS features. The performance of the models was assessed using area under the receive operating characteristic curves (AUC). Results: Despite the variability in errors between different trainees, the individual models were able to predict the likelihood of error for the trainees with a mean AUC of 0.611 (range: 0.502–0.739, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.543–0.680,p < 0.002). Conclusions: Patterns in detection errors for mammographic masses made by radiology trainees can be modeled using BI-RADS features. These findings may have potential implications for the development of future educational materials that are personalized to individual trainees.

  11. Follow-up Recommendation Detection on Radiology Reports with Incidental Pulmonary Nodules.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Lucas; Tellis, Ranjith; Qian, Yuechen; Trovato, Karen; Mankovich, Gabe

    2015-01-01

    The management of follow-up recommendations is fundamental for the appropriate care of patients with incidental pulmonary findings. The lack of communication of these important findings can result in important actionable information being lost in healthcare provider electronic documents. This study aims to analyze follow-up recommendations in radiology reports containing pulmonary incidental findings by using Natural Language Processing and Regular Expressions. Our evaluation highlights the different follow-up recommendation rates for oncology and non-oncology patient cohorts. The results reveal the need for a context-sensitive approach to tracking different patient cohorts in an enterprise-wide assessment. PMID:26262328

  12. Enhancing Web applications in radiology with Java: estimating MR imaging relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Dagher, A P; Fitzpatrick, M; Flanders, A E; Eng, J

    1998-01-01

    Java is a relatively new programming language that has been used to develop a World Wide Web-based tool for estimating magnetic resonance (MR) imaging relaxation times, thereby demonstrating how Java may be used for Web-based radiology applications beyond improving the user interface of teaching files. A standard processing algorithm coded with Java is downloaded along with the hypertext markup language (HTML) document. The user (client) selects the desired pulse sequence and inputs data obtained from a region of interest on the MR images. The algorithm is used to modify selected MR imaging parameters in an equation that models the phenomenon being evaluated. MR imaging relaxation times are estimated, and confidence intervals and a P value expressing the accuracy of the final results are calculated. Design features such as simplicity, object-oriented programming, and security restrictions allow Java to expand the capabilities of HTML by offering a more versatile user interface that includes dynamic annotations and graphics. Java also allows the client to perform more sophisticated information processing and computation than is usually associated with Web applications. Java is likely to become a standard programming option, and the development of stand-alone Java applications may become more common as Java is integrated into future versions of computer operating systems.

  13. A comparison of line enhancement techniques: applications to guide-wire detection and respiratory motion tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bismuth, Vincent; Vancamberg, Laurence; Gorges, Sébastien

    2009-02-01

    During interventional radiology procedures, guide-wires are usually inserted into the patients vascular tree for diagnosis or healing purpose. These procedures are monitored with an Xray interventional system providing images of the interventional devices navigating through the patient's body. The automatic detection of such tools by image processing means has gained maturity over the past years and enables applications ranging from image enhancement to multimodal image fusion. Sophisticated detection methods are emerging, which rely on a variety of device enhancement techniques. In this article we reviewed and classified these techniques into three families. We chose a state of the art approach in each of them and built a rigorous framework to compare their detection capability and their computational complexity. Through simulations and the intensive use of ROC curves we demonstrated that the Hessian based methods are the most robust to strong curvature of the devices and that the family of rotated filters technique is the most suited for detecting low CNR and low curvature devices. The steerable filter approach demonstrated less interesting detection capabilities and appears to be the most expensive one to compute. Finally we demonstrated the interest of automatic guide-wire detection on a clinical topic: the compensation of respiratory motion in multimodal image fusion.

  14. Enhancing international radiation/nuclear detection training opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Thomas L.; Bersell, Bridget M.; Booker, Paul M.; Anderson, Gerald E.; Leitch, Rosalyn M.; Meagher, John B.; Siefken, Rob R.; Spracklen, James L.

    2015-09-23

    The United States has worked domestically to develop and provide radiological and nuclear detection training and education initiatives aimed at interior law enforcement, but the international community has predominantly focused efforts at border and customs officials. The interior law enforcement officials of a State play a critical role in maintaining an effective national-level nuclear detection architecture. To meet this vital need, DNDO was funded by the U.S. Department of State (DOS) to create and deliver a 1-week course at the International Law Enforcement Academy (ILEA) in Budapest, Hungary to inform interior law enforcement personnel of the overall mission, and to provide an understanding of how the participants can combat the threats of radiological and nuclear terrorism through detection efforts. Two courses, with approximately 20 students in each course, were delivered in fiscal year (FY) 2013, two were delivered in FY 2014 and FY 2015, and as of this report’s writing more are planned in FY 2016. However, while the ILEA courses produced measurable success, DNDO requested Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) research potential avenues to further increase the course impact.In a multi-phased approach, PNNL researched and analyzed several possible global training locations and venues, and other possible ways to increase the impact of the course using an agreed-to data-gathering format.

  15. Droplet Enhanced Fluorescence for Ultrasensitive Detection Using Inkjet.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hulie; Katagiri, Daisuke; Ogino, Taisuke; Nakajima, Hizuru; Kato, Shungo; Uchiyama, Katsumi

    2016-06-21

    A fluorescence enhanced phenomenon was found within a micrometer-sized liquid droplet, and it was adopted to construct droplet enhanced fluorescence (DEF) for ultrasensitive fluorescence detection. In this paper, an inkjet was utilized to eject perfect spherical droplets to construct a microspherical resonator and to develop a DEF system. It was utilized to implement ultrasensitive fluorescence detection in a liquid specimen with a volume of several microliters. The DEF detection of fluorescent molecules, fluorescein sodium, was used as a model to validate the proposed enhanced fluorescence detection method. A low limit of detection (LOD) for fluorescein sodium of 124 pM was obtained. The sensitive detection of single stranded DNA (ssDNA) was experimentally completed, with a wide range of linearity with a LOD of 312 pM. The proposed mechanism can be used as an ultrasensitive detection technique for analyzing microliters of liquid samples. PMID:27282958

  16. Infrared-enhanced TV for fire detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Closed-circuit television is superior to conventional smoke or heat sensors for detecting fires in large open spaces. Single TV camera scans entire area, whereas many conventional sensors and maze of interconnecting wiring might be required to get same coverage. Camera is monitored by person who would trip alarm if fire were detected, or electronic circuitry could process camera signal for fully-automatic alarm system.

  17. Machine learning and radiology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers.

  18. Machine Learning and Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. PMID:22465077

  19. Hyperspectral anomaly detection using enhanced global factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paciencia, Todd J.; Bauer, Kenneth W.

    2016-05-01

    Dimension reduction techniques have become one popular unsupervised approach used towards detecting anomalies in hyperspectral imagery. Although demonstrating promising results in the literature on specific images, these methods can become difficult to directly interpret and often require tuning of their parameters to achieve high performance on a specific set of images. This lack of generality is also compounded by the need to remove noise and atmospheric absorption spectral bands from the image prior to detection. Without a process for this band selection and to make the methods adaptable to different image compositions, performance becomes difficult to maintain across a wider variety of images. Here, we present a framework that uses factor analysis to provide a robust band selection and more meaningful dimension reduction with which to detect anomalies in the imagery. Measurable characteristics of the image are used to create an automated decision process that allows the algorithm to adjust to a particular image, while maintaining high detection performance. The framework and its algorithms are detailed, and results are shown for forest, desert, sea, rural, urban, anomaly-sparse, and anomaly-dense imagery types from different sensors. Additionally, the method is compared to current state-of-the-art methods and is shown to be computationally efficient.

  20. New radiological material detection technologies for nuclear forensics: Remote optical imaging and graphene-based sensors.

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Richard Karl; Martin, Jeffrey B.; Wiemann, Dora K.; Choi, Junoh; Howell, Stephen W.

    2015-09-01

    We developed new detector technologies to identify the presence of radioactive materials for nuclear forensics applications. First, we investigated an optical radiation detection technique based on imaging nitrogen fluorescence excited by ionizing radiation. We demonstrated optical detection in air under indoor and outdoor conditions for alpha particles and gamma radiation at distances up to 75 meters. We also contributed to the development of next generation systems and concepts that could enable remote detection at distances greater than 1 km, and originated a concept that could enable daytime operation of the technique. A second area of research was the development of room-temperature graphene-based sensors for radiation detection and measurement. In this project, we observed tunable optical and charged particle detection, and developed improved devices. With further development, the advancements described in this report could enable new capabilities for nuclear forensics applications.

  1. An air fluorescence imaging system for the detection of radiological contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inrig, Elizabeth; Erhardt, Lorne; Koslowsky, Vernon; Andrews, Bob; Ing, Harry; Dick, Michael; Forget, Patrick

    2011-05-01

    On-site detection and measurement of the activity and extent of alpha (α) contamination presents a significant challenge to radiation detection personnel. Due to the short range of these particles, conventional detection techniques involve bringing a probe within a few centimetres of the suspect area. Performing a thorough survey of an area is a time consuming, painstaking, and potentially dangerous task, as personnel may be exposed to harmful radiation. Conventional detectors may have fragile Mylar windows which are highly prone to breakage. The instrumentation under development employs a novel approach: instead of detecting the radiation directly, it detects radiation-induced air fluorescence surrounding the contaminated area. Optical imaging is used to determine the spatial extent of the contamination, providing a much more rapid, accurate and robust tool for in-situ contamination measurements. A mobile, near-field, wide-angle, fast optical system has been designed and constructed to detect and image this radiation-induced air fluorescence. It incorporates large-area position-sensitive photo-multiplier tubes, UV filters, a specially constructed fast electronic shutter, and an aspherical phase mask to significantly increase the instrument's depth-of-field. First tests indicate that a 0.3 μCi α source can be detected in less than 10 seconds at a standoff distance of 1.5 meters.

  2. Readily implemented enhanced sinusoid detection in noise

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, K.V.

    1992-03-05

    Significant efforts have been devoted, spanning many years, to the problem of sinusoid detection in noise. Many of these efforts have produced superb, yet complex, algorithms which may be difficult to use for a wide segment of the Digital Signal Processing (DSP) community. This paper presents a simple, easily implemented and high effective method which solves this problem. This method severely degrades non-sinusoidal noise while leaving the embedded sinusoid(s) relatively undisturbed. The algorithm, simply put, exploits the difference between the net effect of integration and differentiation of sinusoids versus the effect of these operations on random noise and other signal sequences. The cross-correlation of sine wave with its differentiated (and/or integrated) self is quite high. Conversely, the cross-reduction of a noise sequence with its differentiated (and/or integrated) self is much lower. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume that for sequences consisting of a sinusoid in noise, significant signal-to-noise-ratios (SNRs) in the correlation results are achievable using a combination of differentiation (and/or integration) and cross-correlation operations on such sequences. This technique has been applied to actual Doppler radar data, as well as to synthesized data, with excellent improvement in signal detection capability. 4 refs.

  3. Acoustic emission beamforming for enhanced damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaskey, Gregory C.; Glaser, Steven D.; Grosse, Christian U.

    2008-03-01

    As civil infrastructure ages, the early detection of damage in a structure becomes increasingly important for both life safety and economic reasons. This paper describes the analysis procedures used for beamforming acoustic emission techniques as well as the promising results of preliminary experimental tests on a concrete bridge deck. The method of acoustic emission offers a tool for detecting damage, such as cracking, as it occurs on or in a structure. In order to gain meaningful information from acoustic emission analyses, the damage must be localized. Current acoustic emission systems with localization capabilities are very costly and difficult to install. Sensors must be placed throughout the structure to ensure that the damage is encompassed by the array. Beamforming offers a promising solution to these problems and permits the use of wireless sensor networks for acoustic emission analyses. Using the beamforming technique, the azmuthal direction of the location of the damage may be estimated by the stress waves impinging upon a small diameter array (e.g. 30mm) of acoustic emission sensors. Additional signal discrimination may be gained via array processing techniques such as the VESPA process. The beamforming approach requires no arrival time information and is based on very simple delay and sum beamforming algorithms which can be easily implemented on a wireless sensor or mote.

  4. Radiological technologists' performance for the detection of malignant microcalcifications in digital mammograms without and with a computer-aided detection system.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Takamori, Miho; Uchiyama, Yoshikazu; Shiraishi, Junji

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic performance of radiological technologists (RTs) in the detection of malignant microcalcifications and to evaluate how much computer-aided detection (CADe) improved their performances compared with those by expert breast radiologists (BRs). Six board-certified breast RTs and four board-certified BRs participated in a free-response receiver operating characteristic observer study. The dataset consisted of 75 cases (25 malignant, 25 benign, and 25 normal cases) of digital mammograms, selected from the digital database for screening mammography provided by the University of South Florida. Average figure of merit (FOM) of the RTs' performances was statistically analyzed using jack-knife free-response receiver operating characteristic and compared with that of expert BRs. The detection performance of RTs was significantly improved by using CADe; average sensitivity was increased from 46.7% to 56.7%, with a decrease in the average number of false positives per case from 0.19 to 0.13. Detection accuracy of an average FOM was improved from 0.680 to 0.816 ([Formula: see text]) and the difference in FOMs between RTs and radiologists failed to reach statistical significance. RTs' performances for the identification of malignant microcalcifications on digital mammography were sufficiently high and comparable to those of radiologists by using CADe. PMID:26158109

  5. Radiological technologists’ performance for the detection of malignant microcalcifications in digital mammograms without and with a computer-aided detection system

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Rie; Takamori, Miho; Uchiyama, Yoshikazu; Shiraishi, Junji

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic performance of radiological technologists (RTs) in the detection of malignant microcalcifications and to evaluate how much computer-aided detection (CADe) improved their performances compared with those by expert breast radiologists (BRs). Six board-certified breast RTs and four board-certified BRs participated in a free-response receiver operating characteristic observer study. The dataset consisted of 75 cases (25 malignant, 25 benign, and 25 normal cases) of digital mammograms, selected from the digital database for screening mammography provided by the University of South Florida. Average figure of merit (FOM) of the RTs’ performances was statistically analyzed using jack-knife free-response receiver operating characteristic and compared with that of expert BRs. The detection performance of RTs was significantly improved by using CADe; average sensitivity was increased from 46.7% to 56.7%, with a decrease in the average number of false positives per case from 0.19 to 0.13. Detection accuracy of an average FOM was improved from 0.680 to 0.816 (p=0.001) and the difference in FOMs between RTs and radiologists failed to reach statistical significance. RTs’ performances for the identification of malignant microcalcifications on digital mammography were sufficiently high and comparable to those of radiologists by using CADe. PMID:26158109

  6. Detection for processing history of seam insertion and contrast enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianwei; Zhao, Yao; Ni, Rongrong

    2014-11-01

    With the development of manipulations techniques of digital images, digital image forensic technology is becoming more and more necessary. However, the determination of processing history of multi-operation is still a challenge problem. In this paper, we improve the traditional seam insertion algorithm, and propose corresponding detection method. Then an algorithm that focuses on detecting the processing history of seam insertion and contrast enhancement is proposed, which can be widely used in practical image forgery. Based on comprehensive analysis, we have discovered the inherent relationship between seam insertion and contrast enhancement. Different orders of processing make different impacts on images. By using the newly proposed algorithm, both contrast enhancement followed by seam insertion and seam insertion followed by contrast enhancement can be detected correctly. Plenty of experiments have been implemented to prove the accuracy.

  7. Development and Testing of an Air Fluorescence Imaging System for the Detection of Radiological Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Inrig, Elizabeth; Koslowsky, Vern; Andrews, Bob; Dick, Michael; Forget, Patrick; Ing, Harry; Hugron, Roger; Wong, Larry

    2011-12-13

    Detection of radionuclides emitting short-range radiation, such as {alpha} and low-energy {beta} particles, has always presented a challenge, particularly when such radionuclides are dispersed over a wide area. In this situation, conventional detection methods require the area of interest to be surveyed using a fragile probe at very close range--a slow, error-prone, and potentially dangerous process that may take many hours for a single room. The instrument under development uses a novel approach by imaging radiation-induced fluorescence in the air surrounding a contaminated area, rather than detecting the radiation directly. A robust and portable system has been designed and built that will allow contaminated areas to be rapidly detected and delineated. The detector incorporates position-sensitive photo-multiplier tubes, UV filters, a fast electronic shutter and an aspherical phase mask that significantly increases the depth-of-field. Preliminary tests have been conducted using sealed {sup 241}Am sources of varying activities and surface areas. The details of the instrument design will be described and the results of recent testing will be presented.

  8. Tomosynthesis-detected Architectural Distortion: Management Algorithm with Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Durand, Melissa A; Wang, Steven; Hooley, Regina J; Raghu, Madhavi; Philpotts, Liane E

    2016-01-01

    As use of digital breast tomosynthesis becomes increasingly widespread, new management challenges are inevitable because tomosynthesis may reveal suspicious lesions not visible at conventional two-dimensional (2D) full-field digital mammography. Architectural distortion is a mammographic finding associated with a high positive predictive value for malignancy. It is detected more frequently at tomosynthesis than at 2D digital mammography and may even be occult at conventional 2D imaging. Few studies have focused on tomosynthesis-detected architectural distortions to date, and optimal management of these distortions has yet to be well defined. Since implementing tomosynthesis at our institution in 2011, we have learned some practical ways to assess architectural distortion. Because distortions may be subtle, tomosynthesis localization tools plus improved visualization of adjacent landmarks are crucial elements in guiding mammographic identification of elusive distortions. These same tools can guide more focused ultrasonography (US) of the breast, which facilitates detection and permits US-guided tissue sampling. Some distortions may be sonographically occult, in which case magnetic resonance imaging may be a reasonable option, both to increase diagnostic confidence and to provide a means for image-guided biopsy. As an alternative, tomosynthesis-guided biopsy, conventional stereotactic biopsy (when possible), or tomosynthesis-guided needle localization may be used to achieve tissue diagnosis. Practical uses for tomosynthesis in evaluation of architectural distortion are highlighted, potential complications are identified, and a working algorithm for management of tomosynthesis-detected architectural distortion is proposed. PMID:26963448

  9. Electrocardiogram beat detection enhancement using independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Kuzilek, Jakub; Lhotska, Lenka

    2013-06-01

    Beat detection is a basic and fundamental step in electrocardiogram (ECG) processing. In many ECG applications strong artifacts from biological or technical sources could appear and cause distortion of ECG signals. Beat detection algorithm desired property is to avoid these distortions and detect beats in any situation. Our developed method is an extension of Christov's beat detection algorithm, which detects beat using combined adaptive threshold on transformed ECG signal (complex lead). Our offline extension adds estimation of independent components of measured signal into the transformation of ECG creating a signal called complex component, which enhances ECG activity and enables beat detection in presence of strong noises. This makes the beat detection algorithm much more robust in cases of unpredictable noise appearances, typical for holter ECGs and telemedicine applications of ECG. We compared our algorithm with the performance of our implementation of the Christov's and Hamilton's beat detection algorithm.

  10. An enhanced stream mining approach for network anomaly detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellaachia, Abdelghani; Bhatt, Rajat

    2005-03-01

    Network anomaly detection is one of the hot topics in the market today. Currently, researchers are trying to find a way in which machines could automatically learn both normal and anomalous behavior and thus detect anomalies if and when they occur. Most important applications which could spring out of these systems is intrusion detection and spam mail detection. In this paper, the primary focus on the problem and solution of "real time" network intrusion detection although the underlying theory discussed may be used for other applications of anomaly detection (like spam detection or spy-ware detection) too. Since a machine needs a learning process on its own, data mining has been chosen as a preferred technique. The object of this paper is to present a real time clustering system; we call Enhanced Stream Mining (ESM) which could analyze packet information (headers, and data) to determine intrusions.

  11. White paper : the fourth amendment : implications for radiological and nuclear detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Levey, Brandon Seth

    2010-01-01

    The need to improve the radiation detection architecture has given rise to increased concern over the potential of equipment or procedures to violate the Fourth Amendment. Protecting the rights guaranteed by the Constitution is a foremost value of every government agency. However, protecting U.S. residents and assets from potentially catastrophic threats is also a crucial role of government. In the absence of clear precedent, the fear of potentially violating rights could lead to the rejection of effective and reasonable means that could reduce risks, possibly savings lives and assets. The goal of this document is not to apply case law to determine what the precedent may be if it exists, but rather provide a detailed outline that defines searches and seizures, identifies what precedent exists and what precedent doesn't exist, and explore what the existing (and non-existing) precedent means for the use of radiation detection used inside the nation's borders.

  12. Radiological Impact Associated to Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (TENORM) from Coal-Fired Power Plants Emissions - 13436

    SciTech Connect

    Dinis, Maria de Lurdes; Fiuza, Antonio; Soeiro de Carvalho, Jose; Gois, Joaquim; Meira Castro, Ana Cristina

    2013-07-01

    Certain materials used and produced in a wide range of non-nuclear industries contain enhanced activity concentrations of natural radionuclides. In particular, electricity production from coal is one of the major sources of increased human exposure to naturally occurring radioactive materials. A methodology was developed to assess the radiological impact due to natural radiation background. The developed research was applied to a specific case study, the Sines coal-fired power plant, located in the southwest coastline of Portugal. Gamma radiation measurements were carried out with two different instruments: a sodium iodide scintillation detector counter (SPP2 NF, Saphymo) and a gamma ray spectrometer with energy discrimination (Falcon 5000, Canberra). Two circular survey areas were defined within 20 km of the power plant. Forty relevant measurements points were established within the sampling area: 15 urban and 25 suburban locations. Additionally, ten more measurements points were defined, mostly at the 20-km area. The registered gamma radiation varies from 20 to 98.33 counts per seconds (c.p.s.) corresponding to an external gamma exposure rate variable between 87.70 and 431.19 nGy/h. The highest values were measured at locations near the power plant and those located in an area within the 6 and 20 km from the stacks. In situ gamma radiation measurements with energy discrimination identified natural emitting nuclides as well as their decay products (Pb-212, Pb-2142, Ra-226, Th-232, Ac-228, Th-234, Pa-234, U- 235, etc.). According to the results, an influence from the stacks emissions has been identified both qualitatively and quantitatively. The developed methodology accomplished the lack of data in what concerns to radiation rate in the vicinity of Sines coal-fired power plant and consequently the resulting exposure to the nearby population. (authors)

  13. Enhanced Landmine Detection from Low Resolution IR Image Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tiesheng; Gu, Irene Yu-Hua; Tjahjadi, Tardi

    We deal with the problem of landmine field detection using low-resolution infrared (IR) image sequences measured from airborne or vehicle-borne passive IR cameras. The proposed scheme contains two parts: a) employ a multi-scale detector, i.e., a special type of isotropic bandpass filters, to detect landmine candidates in each frame; b) enhance landmine detection through seeking maximum consensus of corresponding landmine candidates over image frames. Experiments were conducted on several IR image sequences measured from airborne and vehicle-borne cameras, where some results are included. As shown in our experiments, the landmine signatures have been significantly enhanced using the proposed scheme, and automatic detection results are reasonably good. These methods can therefore be applied to assisting humanitarian demining work for landmine field detection.

  14. Nearest Neighbor Averaging and its Effect on the Critical Level and Minimum Detectable Concentration for Scanning Radiological Survey Instruments that Perform Facility Release Surveys.

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, Sean Donovan; Beall, Patrick S; Miller, Mark L

    2014-08-01

    Through the SNL New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA) program, several Sandia engineers worked with the Environmental Restoration Group (ERG) Inc. to verify and validate a novel algorithm used to determine the scanning Critical Level (L c ) and Minimum Detectable Concentration (MDC) (or Minimum Detectable Areal Activity) for the 102F scanning system. Through the use of Monte Carlo statistical simulations the algorithm mathematically demonstrates accuracy in determining the L c and MDC when a nearest-neighbor averaging (NNA) technique was used. To empirically validate this approach, SNL prepared several spiked sources and ran a test with the ERG 102F instrument on a bare concrete floor known to have no radiological contamination other than background naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). The tests conclude that the NNA technique increases the sensitivity (decreases the L c and MDC) for high-density data maps that are obtained by scanning radiological survey instruments.

  15. Enhanced buried UXO detection via GPR/EMI data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masarik, Matthew P.; Burns, Joseph; Thelen, Brian T.; Kelly, Jack; Havens, Timothy C.

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the enhancements to detection of buried unexploded ordinances achieved by combining ground penetrating radar (GPR) data with electromagnetic induction (EMI) data. Novel features from both the GPR and the EMI sensors are concatenated as a long feature vector, on which a non-parametric classifier is then trained. The classifier is a boosting classifier based on tree classifiers, which allows for disparate feature values. The fusion algorithm was applied to a government-provided dataset from an outdoor testing site, and significant performance enhancements were obtained relative to classifiers trained solely on the GPR or EMI data. It is shown that the performance enhancements come from a combination of improvements in detection and in clutter rejection.

  16. Nanostructured Surfaces and Detection Instrumentation for Photonic Crystal Enhanced Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhery, Vikram; George, Sherine; Lu, Meng; Pokhriyal, Anusha; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2013-01-01

    Photonic crystal (PC) surfaces have been demonstrated as a compelling platform for improving the sensitivity of surface-based fluorescent assays used in disease diagnostics and life science research. PCs can be engineered to support optical resonances at specific wavelengths at which strong electromagnetic fields are utilized to enhance the intensity of surface-bound fluorophore excitation. Meanwhile, the leaky resonant modes of PCs can be used to direct emitted photons within a narrow range of angles for more efficient collection by a fluorescence detection system. The multiplicative effects of enhanced excitation combined with enhanced photon extraction combine to provide improved signal-to-noise ratios for detection of fluorescent emitters, which in turn can be used to reduce the limits of detection of low concentration analytes, such as disease biomarker proteins. Fabrication of PCs using inexpensive manufacturing methods and materials that include replica molding on plastic, nano-imprint lithography on quartz substrates result in devices that are practical for single-use disposable applications. In this review, we will describe the motivation for implementing high-sensitivity fluorescence detection in the context of molecular diagnosis and gene expression analysis though the use of PC surfaces. Recent efforts to improve the design and fabrication of PCs and their associated detection instrumentation are summarized, including the use of PCs coupled with Fabry-Perot cavities and external cavity lasers. PMID:23624689

  17. Extraordinary sensitivity enhancement by metasurfaces in terahertz detection of antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lijuan; Gao, Weilu; Shu, Jie; Ying, Yibin; Kono, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    We have detected trace amounts of molecules of antibiotics (kanamycin sulfate) dispersed on metasurfaces with terahertz (THz) spectroscopy. Utilizing the extraordinary optical transmission resonance of an array of square-shaped slits on a silicon substrate at ~0.3 THz, we were able to monitor varying concentrations of kanamycin sulfate as low as ~100 picogram/L. In contrast, the lowest detectable concentration of kanamycin sulfate on silicon without any metallic structure was ~1 gram/L. This dramatic ~1010 times enhancement of sensitivity is due to the near-field enhancement of THz electric fields by the metamaterial structure. This result thus demonstrates the power and usefulness of metamaterial-assisted THz spectroscopy in trace molecular detection for biological and chemical sensing as well as for food product quality and safety inspection and control. PMID:25728144

  18. Ultrasensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection in common fluids

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shikuan; Dai, Xianming; Stogin, Birgitt Boschitsch; Wong, Tak-Sing

    2016-01-01

    Detecting target analytes with high specificity and sensitivity in any fluid is of fundamental importance to analytical science and technology. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has proven to be capable of detecting single molecules with high specificity, but achieving single-molecule sensitivity in any highly diluted solutions remains a challenge. Here we demonstrate a universal platform that allows for the enrichment and delivery of analytes into the SERS-sensitive sites in both aqueous and nonaqueous fluids, and its subsequent quantitative detection of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) down to ∼75 fM level (10−15 mol⋅L−1). Our platform, termed slippery liquid-infused porous surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SLIPSERS), is based on a slippery, omniphobic substrate that enables the complete concentration of analytes and SERS substrates (e.g., Au nanoparticles) within an evaporating liquid droplet. Combining our SLIPSERS platform with a SERS mapping technique, we have systematically quantified the probability, p(c), of detecting R6G molecules at concentrations c ranging from 750 fM (p > 90%) down to 75 aM (10−18 mol⋅L−1) levels (p ≤ 1.4%). The ability to detect analytes down to attomolar level is the lowest limit of detection for any SERS-based detection reported thus far. We have shown that analytes present in liquid, solid, or air phases can be extracted using a suitable liquid solvent and subsequently detected through SLIPSERS. Based on this platform, we have further demonstrated ultrasensitive detection of chemical and biological molecules as well as environmental contaminants within a broad range of common fluids for potential applications related to analytical chemistry, molecular diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and national security. PMID:26719413

  19. Ultrasensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection in common fluids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shikuan; Dai, Xianming; Stogin, Birgitt Boschitsch; Wong, Tak-Sing

    2016-01-12

    Detecting target analytes with high specificity and sensitivity in any fluid is of fundamental importance to analytical science and technology. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has proven to be capable of detecting single molecules with high specificity, but achieving single-molecule sensitivity in any highly diluted solutions remains a challenge. Here we demonstrate a universal platform that allows for the enrichment and delivery of analytes into the SERS-sensitive sites in both aqueous and nonaqueous fluids, and its subsequent quantitative detection of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) down to ∼75 fM level (10(-15) mol⋅L(-1)). Our platform, termed slippery liquid-infused porous surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SLIPSERS), is based on a slippery, omniphobic substrate that enables the complete concentration of analytes and SERS substrates (e.g., Au nanoparticles) within an evaporating liquid droplet. Combining our SLIPSERS platform with a SERS mapping technique, we have systematically quantified the probability, p(c), of detecting R6G molecules at concentrations c ranging from 750 fM (p > 90%) down to 75 aM (10(-18) mol⋅L(-1)) levels (p ≤ 1.4%). The ability to detect analytes down to attomolar level is the lowest limit of detection for any SERS-based detection reported thus far. We have shown that analytes present in liquid, solid, or air phases can be extracted using a suitable liquid solvent and subsequently detected through SLIPSERS. Based on this platform, we have further demonstrated ultrasensitive detection of chemical and biological molecules as well as environmental contaminants within a broad range of common fluids for potential applications related to analytical chemistry, molecular diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and national security. PMID:26719413

  20. Enhancement of visual motion detection thresholds in early deaf people.

    PubMed

    Shiell, Martha M; Champoux, François; Zatorre, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    In deaf people, the auditory cortex can reorganize to support visual motion processing. Although this cross-modal reorganization has long been thought to subserve enhanced visual abilities, previous research has been unsuccessful at identifying behavioural enhancements specific to motion processing. Recently, research with congenitally deaf cats has uncovered an enhancement for visual motion detection. Our goal was to test for a similar difference between deaf and hearing people. We tested 16 early and profoundly deaf participants and 20 hearing controls. Participants completed a visual motion detection task, in which they were asked to determine which of two sinusoidal gratings was moving. The speed of the moving grating varied according to an adaptive staircase procedure, allowing us to determine the lowest speed necessary for participants to detect motion. Consistent with previous research in deaf cats, the deaf group had lower motion detection thresholds than the hearing. This finding supports the proposal that cross-modal reorganization after sensory deprivation will occur for supramodal sensory features and preserve the output functions.

  1. Enhancement of Visual Motion Detection Thresholds in Early Deaf People

    PubMed Central

    Shiell, Martha M.; Champoux, François; Zatorre, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    In deaf people, the auditory cortex can reorganize to support visual motion processing. Although this cross-modal reorganization has long been thought to subserve enhanced visual abilities, previous research has been unsuccessful at identifying behavioural enhancements specific to motion processing. Recently, research with congenitally deaf cats has uncovered an enhancement for visual motion detection. Our goal was to test for a similar difference between deaf and hearing people. We tested 16 early and profoundly deaf participants and 20 hearing controls. Participants completed a visual motion detection task, in which they were asked to determine which of two sinusoidal gratings was moving. The speed of the moving grating varied according to an adaptive staircase procedure, allowing us to determine the lowest speed necessary for participants to detect motion. Consistent with previous research in deaf cats, the deaf group had lower motion detection thresholds than the hearing. This finding supports the proposal that cross-modal reorganization after sensory deprivation will occur for supramodal sensory features and preserve the output functions. PMID:24587381

  2. Orthopaedic radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.M.; Hughes, S.P.F.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an account of the principles of modern diagnostic imaging techniques and their applications in orthopedics. The aim is to show radiology as a dynamic subject. Orthopaedic Radiology is divided into two sections with the first part focusing on the principles of diagnostic imaging and interpretation and the second applying this information to practical clinical problems.

  3. Morphological operators for enhanced polarimetric image target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, João. M.; Rosario, Dalton S.

    2015-09-01

    We introduce an algorithm based on morphological filters with the Stokes parameters that augments the daytime and nighttime detection of weak-signal manmade objects immersed in a predominant natural background scene. The approach features a tailored sequence of signal-enhancing filters, consisting of core morphological operators (dilation, erosion) and higher level morphological operations (e.g., spatial gradient, opening, closing) to achieve a desired overarching goal. Using representative data from the SPICE database, the results show that the approach was able to automatically and persistently detect with a high confidence level the presence of three mobile military howitzer surrogates (targets) in natural clutter.

  4. Plasmon resonance enhanced mechanical detection of ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Ariyaratne, Amila; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2015-01-05

    Small molecule binding to the active site of enzymes typically modifies the mechanical stiffness of the enzyme. We exploit this effect, in a setup which combines nano-mechanics and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) enhanced optics, for the label free detection of ligand binding to an enzyme. The large dynamic range of the signal allows to easily obtain binding curves for small ligands, in contrast to traditional SPR methods which rely on small changes in index of refraction. Enzyme mechanics, assessed by nano-rheology, thus emerges as an alternative to electronic and spin resonances, assessed by traditional spectroscopies, for detecting ligand binding.

  5. Detection of volatile organic compounds using surface enhanced Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, A S; Maiti, A; Ileri, N; Bora, M; Larson, C C; Britten, J A; Bond, T C

    2012-03-22

    The authors present the detection of volatile organic compounds directly in their vapor phase by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates based on lithographically-defined two-dimensional rectangular array of nanopillars. The type of nanopillars is known as the tapered pillars. For the tapered pillars, SERS enhancement arises from the nanofocusing effect due to the sharp tip on top. SERS experiments were carried out on these substrates using various concentrations of toluene vapor. The results show that SERS signal from a toluene vapor concentration of ppm level can be achieved, and the toluene vapor can be detected within minutes of exposing the SERS substrate to the vapor. A simple adsorption model is developed which gives results matching the experimental data. The results also show promising potential for the use of these substrates in environmental monitoring of gases and vapors.

  6. Pixel color feature enhancement for road signs detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qieshi; Kamata, Sei-ichiro

    2010-02-01

    Road signs play an important role in our daily life which used to guide drivers to notice variety of road conditions and cautions. They provide important visual information that can help drivers operating their vehicles in a manner for enhancing traffic safety. The occurrence of some accidents can be reduced by using automatic road signs recognition system which can alert the drivers. This research attempts to develop a warning system to alert the drivers to notice the important road signs early enough to refrain road accidents from happening. For solving this, a non-linear weighted color enhancement method by pixels is presented. Due to the advantage of proposed method, different road signs can be detected from videos effectively. With suitably coefficients and operations, the experimental results have proved that the proposed method is robust, accurate and powerful in road signs detection.

  7. Comparison of Landsat digital enhancement techniques for lineament detection

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, S.J.; Mynar, F. II

    1985-01-01

    The synoptic view of local and regional lineament patterns by Landsat is a useful mapping technique in areas considered to be well mapped as well as in poorly mapped areas. Image enhancement of digital Landsat data increases contrast and sharpness between geologic features and improves the recognition of subtle differences. Five enhancement techniques were applied to Landsat digital data for lineament detection for a portion of the structure in southeastern Oklahoma, specifically a 169 mi/sup 2/ area centered in the Ouachita Mountains. Of the five enhancement techniques evaluated (1) mean value of all four bands, (2) principal components, (3) band ratio, (4) histogram equalization, and (5) high-pass filter, the principal components analysis identified the greatest number of lineaments and the greatest total length of lineaments. All five techniques identified a significant amount of unique lineaments which were not found by any other technique; they agreed, however, in terms of the directions in which the lineaments were oriented. The unique lineaments identified by each technique were combined through a composite process to yield a lineament interpretation which exceeded the detection capability of the principal components enhancement.

  8. NO and N2O detection employing cavity enhanced technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtas, J.; Medrzycki, R.; Rutecka, B.; Mikolajczyk, J.; Nowakowski, M.; Szabra, D.; Gutowska, M.; Stacewicz, T.; Bielecki, Z.

    2012-06-01

    The article describes an application of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy for nitric oxide and nitrous oxide detection. Both oxides are important greenhouse gases that are of large influence on environment, living organisms and human health. These compounds are also biomarkers of some human diseases. They determine the level of acid rain, and can be used for characterization of specific explosive materials. Therefore the sensitive detectors of these gases are of great importance for many applications: from routine air monitoring in industrial and intensive traffic areas, to detection of explosives in airports, finally for medicine investigation, for health care, etc. Our compact detection system provides opportunity for simultaneous measure of both NO and N2O concentration at ppb level. Its sensitivity is comparable with sensitivities of instruments based on other methods, e.g. gas chromatography or mass spectrometry.

  9. Ultraviolet Resonant Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Short Jr., Billy Joe

    2009-06-01

    Raman-based spectroscopy is potentially militarily useful for standoff detection of high explosives. Normal (non-resonance) and resonance Raman spectroscopies are both light scattering techniques that use a laser to measure the vibrational spectrum of a sample. In resonance Raman, the laser is tuned to match the wavelength of a strong electronic absorbance in the molecule of interest, whereas, in normal Raman the laser is not tuned to any strong electronic absorbance bands. The selection of appropriate excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman can result in a dramatic increase in the Raman scattering efficiency of select band(s) associated with the electronic transition. Other than the excitation wavelength, however, resonance Raman is performed experimentally the same as normal Raman. In these studies, normal and resonance Raman spectral signatures of select solid high explosive (HE) samples and explosive precursors were collected at 785 nm, 244 nm and 229 nm. Solutions of PETN, TNT, and explosive precursors (DNT & PNT) in acetonitrile solvent as an internal Raman standard were quantitatively evaluated using ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) microscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy as a function of power and select excitation wavelengths. Use of an internal standard allowed resonance enhancements to be estimated at 229 nm and 244 nm. Investigations demonstrated that UVRR provided ~2000-fold enhancement at 244 nm and ~800-fold improvement at 229 nm while PETN showed a maximum of ~25-fold at 244 nm and ~190-fold enhancement at 229 nm solely from resonance effects when compared to normal Raman measurements. In addition to the observed resonance enhancements, additional Raman signal enhancements are obtained with ultraviolet excitation (i.e., Raman scattering scales as !4 for measurements based on scattered photons). A model, based partly on the resonance Raman enhancement results for HE solutions, is presented for estimating Raman enhancements for solid HE samples.

  10. Aluminosilicates enhance the infectivity of cytomegalovirus in urine using centrifugation-enhanced antigen detection technology.

    PubMed

    Lee, S H; Biondo, F X; Teichberg, S; Lipson, S M

    1996-04-01

    Due to the inherent lability of CMV, necessary laboratory identification of this infectious agent is often compromised by a delay in specimen transport. Previous studies have addressed the phenomenon of infectivity enhancement/reduction in the rate of infectivity loss by the incorporation into various viral assay systems of trace concentrations of the adsorbents montmorillonite (bentonite [M]) or kaolinite (kaolin [K]). We extended these studies to the clinical setting to identify whether such aluminosilicates would effect an enhanced level of CMV infectivity. The shell vial assay-indirect immunofluorescent assay (SVA-IFA) was utilized in comparative testing throughout this study. The addition of trace concentrations of M or K to the SVA-IFA was found to enhance the infectivity of CMV in urine by 115 and 126%, respectively. The total CMV detection rate by SVA-IFA was 29% (30/105). Three of the 30 (10%) CMV positive specimens were detected only in shell vials which had been supplemented with K or M. Two specimens were isolation positive alone. The addition of K or M to shell vials immediately prior to the start of the SVA-IFA has the potential of (a), enhancing assay readability by increasing the number of fluorescent focus units per vial monolayer and (b), of detecting positive urine specimens with low viral titers which might otherwise not be identified using the conventional SVA-IFA procedure.

  11. Impact prediction by looming visual stimuli enhances tactile detection.

    PubMed

    Cléry, Justine; Guipponi, Olivier; Odouard, Soline; Wardak, Claire; Ben Hamed, Suliann

    2015-03-11

    From an ecological point of view, approaching objects are potentially more harmful than receding objects. A predator, a dominant conspecific, or a mere branch coming up at high speed can all be dangerous if one does not detect them and produce the appropriate escape behavior fast enough. And indeed, looming stimuli trigger stereotyped defensive responses in both monkeys and human infants. However, while the heteromodal somatosensory consequences of visual looming stimuli can be fully predicted by their spatiotemporal dynamics, few studies if any have explored whether visual stimuli looming toward the face predictively enhance heteromodal tactile sensitivity around the expected time of impact and at its expected location on the body. In the present study, we report that, in addition to triggering a defensive motor repertoire, looming stimuli toward the face provide the nervous system with predictive cues that enhance tactile sensitivity on the face. Specifically, we describe an enhancement of tactile processes at the expected time and location of impact of the stimulus on the face. We additionally show that a looming stimulus that brushes past the face also enhances tactile sensitivity on the nearby cheek, suggesting that the space close to the face is incorporated into the subjects' body schema. We propose that this cross-modal predictive facilitation involves multisensory convergence areas subserving the representation of a peripersonal space and a safety boundary of self.

  12. Radiological Safety Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Ordnance Center and School, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.

    Written to be used concurrently with the U.S. Army's Radiological Safety Course, this publication discusses the causes, sources, and detection of nuclear radiation. In addition, the transportation and disposal of radioactive materials are covered. The report also deals with the safety precautions to be observed when working with lasers, microwave…

  13. Assessment of mass detection performance in contrast enhanced digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carton, Ann-Katherine; de Carvalho, Pablo M.; Li, Zhijin; Dromain, Clarisse; Muller, Serge

    2015-03-01

    We address the detectability of contrast-agent enhancing masses for contrast-agent enhanced spectral mammography (CESM), a dual-energy technique providing functional projection images of breast tissue perfusion and vascularity using simulated CESM images. First, the realism of simulated CESM images from anthropomorphic breast software phantoms generated with a software X-ray imaging platform was validated. Breast texture was characterized by power-law coefficients calculated in data sets of real clinical and simulated images. We also performed a 2-alternative forced choice (2-AFC) psychophysical experiment whereby simulated and real images were presented side-by-side to an experienced radiologist to test if real images could be distinguished from the simulated images. It was found that texture in our simulated CESM images has a fairly realistic appearance. Next, the relative performance of human readers and previously developed mathematical observers was assessed for the detection of iodine-enhancing mass lesions containing different contrast agent concentrations. A four alternative-forced-choice (4 AFC) task was designed; the task for the model and human observer was to detect which one of the four simulated DE recombined images contained an iodineenhancing mass. Our results showed that the NPW and NPWE models largely outperform human performance. After introduction of an internal noise component, both observers approached human performance. The CHO observer performs slightly worse than the average human observer. There is still work to be done in improving model observers as predictors of human-observer performance. Larger trials could also improve our test statistics. We hope that in the future, this framework of software breast phantoms, virtual image acquisition and processing, and mathematical observers can be beneficial to optimize CESM imaging techniques.

  14. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography image enhancement for automatic disease detection

    PubMed Central

    Logeswaran, Rajasvaran

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To sufficiently improve magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) quality to enable reliable computer-aided diagnosis (CAD). METHODS: A set of image enhancement strategies that included filters (i.e. Gaussian, median, Wiener and Perona-Malik), wavelets (i.e. contourlet, ridgelet and a non-orthogonal noise compensation implementation), graph-cut approaches using lazy-snapping and Phase Unwrapping MAxflow, and binary thresholding using a fixed threshold and dynamic thresholding via histogram analysis were implemented to overcome the adverse characteristics of MRCP images such as acquisition noise, artifacts, partial volume effect and large inter- and intra-patient image intensity variations, all of which pose problems in application development. Subjective evaluation of several popular pre-processing techniques was undertaken to improve the quality of the 2D MRCP images and enhance the detection of the significant biliary structures within them, with the purpose of biliary disease detection. RESULTS: The results varied as expected since each algorithm capitalized on different characteristics of the images. For denoising, the Perona-Malik and contourlet approaches were found to be the most suitable. In terms of extraction of the significant biliary structures and removal of background, the thresholding approaches performed well. The interactive scheme performed the best, especially by using the strengths of the graph-cut algorithm enhanced by user-friendly lazy-snapping for foreground and background marker selection. CONCLUSION: Tests show promising results for some techniques, but not others, as viable image enhancement modules for automatic CAD systems for biliary and liver diseases. PMID:21160667

  15. Coherent stochastic oscillations enhance signal detection in spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Engel, Tatiana A; Helbig, Brian; Russell, David F; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz; Neiman, Alexander B

    2009-08-01

    We study the effect of noisy oscillatory input on the signal discrimination by spontaneously firing neurons. Using analytically tractable model, we contrast signal detection in two situations: (i) when the neuron is driven by coherent oscillations and (ii) when the coherence of oscillations is destroyed. Analytical calculations revealed a region in the parameter space of the model where oscillations act to reduce the variability of neuronal firing and to enhance the discriminability of weak signals. These analytical results are employed to unveil a possible role of coherent oscillations in peripheral electrosensory system of paddlefish in improvement of detection of weak stimuli. The proposed mechanism may be relevant to a wide range of phenomena involving coherently driven oscillators.

  16. The Use of an Integrated Website to Enhance the Educational Experience in a Medical School Radiology Clerkship Course.

    PubMed

    Desai, Naman S; Bunch, Paul M; DiSalvo, Donald N; O'Brien, Reiko; Andriole, Katherine P; Smith, Terri; Durfee, Sara M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of creating an integrated website for the medical students enrolled in a core radiology clerkship and to assess the impact of this website on students' overall educational experience. An integrated website was created for the medical students and hosted on the main departmental website. The components of the website included: announcements and password-protected schedule, curriculum, student assessment, information about different radiology sections, digital resources, and fourth year opportunities. The schedule section was created using Google Calendar to facilitate automatic syncing and real-time updates to the students' mobile devices. Weblinks for resources and assignments were incorporated into the calendar entries, which could be "pushed" to students in real time. Student attitudes were assessed via an exit survey. Various website usage statistics were collected. A total of 35 students who have rotated through the month-long clerkship thus far have used the website. Overall, 80% of students accessed the website once or multiple times a day. Over 90% of students thought that the website was well organized and easy to use; having access to the schedule on a smartphone had a positive impact on overall clerkship experience; the website had an overall positive impact on their clerkship experience; and they would recommend it to visiting medical students. Since July 2013, there have been a total of 9740 page views with 4113 unique visits to the website (an average of 17 visits per day from 6 visitors per day). The authors conclude that the creation of an integrated website has a positive impact on students' overall educational experience. PMID:25896546

  17. Using PCR-based detection and genotyping to trace Streptococcus salivarius meningitis outbreak strain to oral flora of radiology physician assistant.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Velusamy; Gertz, Robert E; Shewmaker, Patricia L; Patrick, Sarah; Chitnis, Amit S; O'Connell, Heather; Benowitz, Isaac; Patel, Priti; Guh, Alice Y; Noble-Wang, Judith; Turabelidze, George; Beall, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    We recently investigated three cases of bacterial meningitis that were reported from a midwestern radiology clinic where facemasks were not worn during spinal injection of contrast agent during myelography procedures. Using pulsed field gel electrophoresis we linked a case strain of S. salivarius to an oral specimen of a radiology physician assistant (RPA). We also used a real-time PCR assay to detect S. salivarius DNA within a culture-negative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimen. Here we extend this investigation through using a nested PCR/sequencing strategy to link the culture-negative CSF specimen to the case strain. We also provide validation of the real-time PCR assay used, demonstrating that it is not solely specific for Streptococcus salivarius, but is also highly sensitive for detection of the closely related oral species Streptococcus vestibularis. Through using multilocus sequence typing and 16S rDNA sequencing we further strengthen the link between the CSF case isolate and the RPA carriage isolate. We also demonstrate that the newly characterized strains from this study are distinct from previously characterized S. salivarius strains associated with carriage and meningitis. PMID:22384169

  18. Using PCR-Based Detection and Genotyping to Trace Streptococcus salivarius Meningitis Outbreak Strain to Oral Flora of Radiology Physician Assistant

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Velusamy; Gertz Jr., Robert E.; Shewmaker, Patricia L.; Patrick, Sarah; Chitnis, Amit S.; O'Connell, Heather; Benowitz, Isaac; Patel, Priti; Guh, Alice Y.; Noble-Wang, Judith; Turabelidze, George; Beall, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    We recently investigated three cases of bacterial meningitis that were reported from a midwestern radiology clinic where facemasks were not worn during spinal injection of contrast agent during myelography procedures. Using pulsed field gel electrophoresis we linked a case strain of S. salivarius to an oral specimen of a radiology physician assistant (RPA). We also used a real-time PCR assay to detect S. salivarius DNA within a culture-negative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimen. Here we extend this investigation through using a nested PCR/sequencing strategy to link the culture-negative CSF specimen to the case strain. We also provide validation of the real-time PCR assay used, demonstrating that it is not solely specific for Streptococcus salivarius, but is also highly sensitive for detection of the closely related oral species Streptococcus vestibularis. Through using multilocus sequence typing and 16S rDNA sequencing we further strengthen the link between the CSF case isolate and the RPA carriage isolate. We also demonstrate that the newly characterized strains from this study are distinct from previously characterized S. salivarius strains associated with carriage and meningitis. PMID:22384169

  19. Polarization control for enhanced defect detection on advanced memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byoung-Ho; Ihm, Dong-Chul; Yeo, Jeong-Ho; Gluk, Yael; Meshulach, Doron

    2006-03-01

    Dense repetitive wafer structures, such as memory cells, with a pitch below the wavelength of the illumination light may take on effective birefringent properties, especially in layers of high refractive index materials such as silicon or conductors. Such induced "form birefringence" effects may result in dependency of the optical response on the illumination polarization and direction. In such structures, control over the polarization of the light becomes important to enhance signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of pattern defects. We present defect detection results and analysis using DUV laser illumination for different polarization configurations and collection perspectives on Flash RAM devices. Improvement in detection SNR of bridge defect type is observed with linear illumination polarization perpendicular to the pattern lines. Generally, for small design rules (smaller than wavelength) polarization effects become more evident. Also, for smaller defect sizes, detection strongly depends on control of the illumination polarization. Linear polarization perpendicular to the pattern showed penetration into the structure even though the pitch is smaller than the illumination wavelength.

  20. Interventional radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Castaneda-Zuniga, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    This reference gives a step-by-step presentation of the elements of interventional radiology. CONTENTS: Introduction; Radiation protection; Embolotherapy; Interventional techniques in the management of gastrointestinal bleeding; Transluminal angioplasty; Thrombolytic therapy; Foreign body removal; Inferior vena cava filter placement; Percutaneous uroradiologic techniques; Interventional techniques in the biliary tract; Nonvascular gastrointestinal tract dilations; Percutaneous biopsy techniques; Drainage of abscess fluid collections in the abdomen.

  1. Orthopaedic radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.M.; Hughes, S.P.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides an account of the principles of modern diagnostic imaging techniques and their applications in orthopedics. The aim of the book is to show radiology as a dynamic subject which can help clinicians, while at the same time assisting radiologists to understand the needs of the orthopedic surgeon.

  2. Enhanced environmental detection of uranyl compounds based on luminescence characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Jean Dennis

    Uranium (U) contamination can be introduced to the environment as a result of mining and manufacturing activities related to nuclear power, detonation of U-containing munitions (DoD), or nuclear weapons production/processing (DOE facilities). In oxidizing environments such as surface soils, U predominantly exists as U(VI), which is highly water soluble and very mobile in soils. U(VI) compounds typically contain the UO22+ group (uranyl compounds). The uniquely structured and long-lived green luminescence (fluorescence) of the uranyl ion (under UV radiation) has been studied and remained a strong topic of interest for two centuries. The presented research is distinct in its objective of improving capabilities for remotely sensing U contamination by understanding what environmental conditions are ideal for detection and need to be taken into consideration. Specific focuses include: (1) the accumulation and fluorescence enhancement of uranyl compounds at soil surfaces using distributed silica gel, and (2) environmental factors capable of influencing the luminescence response, directly or indirectly. In a complex environmental system, matrix effects co-exist from key soil parameters including moisture content (affected by evaporation, temperature and humidity), soil texture, pH, CEC, organic matter and iron content. Chapter 1 is a review of pertinent background information and provides justification for the selected key environmental parameters. Chapter 2 presents empirical investigations related to the fluorescence detection and characterization of uranyl compounds in soil and aqueous samples. An integrative experimental design was employed, testing different soils, generating steady-state fluorescence spectra, and building a comprehensive dataset which was then utilized to simultaneously test three hypotheses: The fluorescence detection of uranyl compounds is dependent upon (1) the key soil parameters, (2) the concentration of U contamination, and (3) time of analysis

  3. Carbon Nanotube-based microelectrodes for enhanced detection of neurotransmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher B.

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is one of the common techniques used for rapid measurement of neurotransmitters in vivo. Carbon-fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) are typically used for neurotransmitter detection because of sub-second measurement capabilities, ability to measure changes in neurotransmitter concentration during neurotransmission, and the small size electrode diameter, which limits the amount of damage caused to tissue. Cylinder CFMEs, typically 50 -- 100 microm long, are commonly used for in vivo experiments because the electrode sensitivity is directly related to the electrode surface area. However the length of the electrode can limit the spatial resolution of neurotransmitter detection, which can restrict experiments in Drosophila and other small model systems. In addition, the electrode sensitivity toward dopamine and serotonin detection drops significantly for measurements at rates faster than 10 Hz, limiting the temporal resolution of CFMEs. While the use of FSCV at carbon-fiber microelectrodes has led to substantial strides in our understanding of neurotransmission, techniques that expand the capabilities of CFMEs are crucial to fully maximize the potential uses of FSCV. This dissertation introduces new methods to integrate carbon nanotubes (CNT) into microelectrodes and discusses the electrochemical enhancements of these CNT-microelectrodes. The electrodes are specifically designed with simple fabrication procedures so that highly specialized equipment is not necessary, and they utilize commercially available materials so that the electrodes could be easily integrated into existing systems. The electrochemical properties of CNT modified CFMEs are characterized using FSCV and the effect of CNT functionalization on these properties is explored in Chapter 2. For example, CFME modification using carboxylic acid functionalized CNTs yield about a 6-fold increase in dopamine oxidation current, but modification with octadecylamine CNTs results in a

  4. Rapid Brightness Variations as a Tool to Enhance Satellite Detectability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laas-Bourez, Myrtille; Klotz, Alain; Ducrotte, Etienne; Boer, Michel; Blanchet, Gwendoline

    2009-03-01

    To preserve the space environment for future generations and ensure the safety of space missions, we have to improve our knowledge of the debris at all altitudes. Since 2004, we have started to observe and study satellites and debris on the geostationary orbit. We use a network of robotic telescopes called TAROT (Télescopes Action Rapide pour les Objets Transitoires - Rapid Action Telescope for Transient Objects) which are located in France and Chile. This system processes the data in real time. Its wide field of view is useful for detection, systematic survey and to follow both catalogued and uncatalogued objects. The TAROTs are 25 cm telescopes with a wide field of view of 1.86deg x 1.86deg. It can detect objects up to 17th magnitude with an integration time of 30 seconds, corresponding to an object of 50cm in the geostationary belt with a 0.2 albedo. Tiny debris are also dangerous for space mission and satellites. To detect them, we need either to increase the TAROT sensitivity or to observe them in optimal light conditions.Last year we detected very important magnitude variations from several geostationary satellites during observations close to equinoxes. The brightness of a geostationary satellite evolves during the night and during the year, depending on the angle between the observer, the satellite and the sun. Geostationary satellites will be brighter near March 1st and of October 10th, at their exit of the shade. In this period the sun crosses the equatorial plan of the Earth, the enlightened surface will reach a maximum during a limited periods of time (about 30 minutes), provoking a short, bright flash. This phenomenon is used in two ways: first, it allows to detect smaller objects, which are usually below the detection limit, enhancing the sensitivity of the survey. Secondly, for longer objects the light curve during and outside the °ash contains information on the object intrinsic geometry and reflectivity. In this paper we discuss how the various

  5. RADRELAY RADIOLOGICAL DATA LINK DEVICE

    SciTech Connect

    Harpring, L; Frank Heckendorn, F

    2007-11-06

    The RadRelay effort developed small, field appropriate, portable prototype devices that allow radiological spectra to be downloaded from field radiological detectors, like the identiFINDER-U, and transmitted to land based experts. This communications capability was designed for the U. S. Coast Guard (USCG) but is also applicable to the Customs and Border Protection (CBP) personnel working in remote locations. USCG Level II personnel currently use the identiFINDER-U Hand-Held Radioisotope ID Devices (HHRIID) to detect radiological materials during specific boarding operations. These devices will detect not only radiological emissions but will also evaluate those emissions against a table of known radiological spectra. The RadRelay has been developed to significantly improve the functionality of HHRIID, by providing the capability to download radiological spectra and then transmit them using satellite or cell phone technology. This remote wireless data transfer reduces the current lengthy delay often encountered between the shipboard detection of unknown radiological material and the evaluation of that data by technical and command personnel. That delay is reduced from hours to minutes and allows the field located personnel to remain on station during the inspection and evaluation process.

  6. Morphological background detection and enhancement of images with poor lighting.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Sánchez, Angélica R; Mendiola-Santibañez, Jorge D; Terol-Villalobos, Iván R; Herrera-Ruíz, Gilberto; Vargas-Vázquez, Damián; García-Escalante, Juan J; Lara-Guevara, Alberto

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, some morphological transformations are used to detect the background in images characterized by poor lighting. Lately, contrast image enhancement has been carried out by the application of two operators based on the Weber's law notion. The first operator employs information from block analysis, while the second transformation utilizes the opening by reconstruction, which is employed to define the multibackground notion. The objective of contrast operators consists in normalizing the grey level of the input image with the purpose of avoiding abrupt changes in intensity among the different regions. Finally, the performance of the proposed operators is illustrated through the processing of images with different backgrounds, the majority of them with poor lighting conditions.

  7. Detection of explosives based on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wackerbarth, Hainer; Salb, Christian; Gundrum, Lars; Niederkrüger, Matthias; Christou, Konstantin; Beushausen, Volker; Viöl, Wolfgang

    2010-08-10

    In this study we present a device based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for the detection of airborne explosives. The explosives are resublimated on a cooled nanostructured gold substrate. The explosives trinitrotoluene (TNT) and triacetone triperoxide (TATP) are used. The SERS spectrum of the explosives is analyzed. Thus, TNT is deposited from an acetonitrile solution on the gold substrate. In the case of TATP, first the bulk TATP Raman spectrum was recorded and compared with the SERS spectrum, generated by deposition out of the gas phase. The frequencies of the SERS spectrum are hardly shifted compared to the spectrum of bulk TATP. The influence of the nanostructured gold substrate temperature on the signals of TATP was studied. A decrease in temperature up to 200 K increased the intensities of the TATP bands in the SERS spectrum; below 200 K, the TATP fingerprint disappeared. PMID:20697437

  8. Detection of explosives based on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wackerbarth, Hainer; Salb, Christian; Gundrum, Lars; Niederkrüger, Matthias; Christou, Konstantin; Beushausen, Volker; Viöl, Wolfgang

    2010-08-10

    In this study we present a device based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for the detection of airborne explosives. The explosives are resublimated on a cooled nanostructured gold substrate. The explosives trinitrotoluene (TNT) and triacetone triperoxide (TATP) are used. The SERS spectrum of the explosives is analyzed. Thus, TNT is deposited from an acetonitrile solution on the gold substrate. In the case of TATP, first the bulk TATP Raman spectrum was recorded and compared with the SERS spectrum, generated by deposition out of the gas phase. The frequencies of the SERS spectrum are hardly shifted compared to the spectrum of bulk TATP. The influence of the nanostructured gold substrate temperature on the signals of TATP was studied. A decrease in temperature up to 200 K increased the intensities of the TATP bands in the SERS spectrum; below 200 K, the TATP fingerprint disappeared.

  9. Enhanced electrochemical detection of quercetin by Natural Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Federico José Vicente; Espino, Magdalena; de Los Angeles Fernandez, María; Raba, Julio; Silva, María Fernanda

    2016-09-14

    New trends in analytical chemistry encourage the development of smart techniques and methods aligned with Green Chemistry. In this sense, Natural Deep Eutectic Solvents represents an excellent opportunity as a new generation of green solvents. In this work a new application for them has been proposed and demonstrated. These solvents were synthesized by combinations of inexpensive and natural components like, Glucose, Fructose, Citric acid and Lactic acid. The different natural solvents were easily prepared and added to buffer solution in different concentrations, allowing the enhancement of electrochemical detection of an important representative antioxidant like quercetin (QR) with improved signal up to 380%. QR is a ubiquitous flavonoid widespread in plants and food of plant origin. The proposed method using phosphate buffer with a eutectic mixture of Citric acid, Glucose and water in combination with carbon screen printed electrodes exhibited a good analytical performance. Detection and quantification limits were of 7.97 and 26.3 nM respectively; and repeatability with %RSDs of 1.41 and 7.49 for peak potential and intensity respectively. In addition, it has proved to be faster, greener and cheaper than other sensors and chromatographic methods available with the additional advantage of being completely portable. Furthermore, the obtained results demonstrated that the proposed method is able for the determination of QR in complex food samples.

  10. Improving Animal Disease Detection Through an Enhanced Passive Surveillance Platform.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Chelsea Wright; Holmstrom, Lindsey; Biggers, Keith; Wall, James; Beckham, Tammy; Coats, Matthew; Korslund, John; Colby, Michelle M

    2016-01-01

    The ability to rapidly detect and report infectious diseases of domestic animals and wildlife is paramount to reducing the size and duration of an outbreak. There is currently a need in the United States livestock industry for a centralized animal disease surveillance platform, capable of collecting, integrating, and analyzing multiple data streams with dissemination to end-users. Such a system would be disease agnostic and establish baseline information on animal health and disease prevalence; it would alert health officials to anomalies potentially indicative of emerging and/or transboundary disease outbreaks, changes in the status of endemic disease, or detection of other causative agents (eg, toxins). As a part of its mission to accelerate and develop countermeasures against the introduction of emerging and/or transboundary animal diseases into the United States, the Department of Homeland Security is leading and investing in the development of an enhanced passive surveillance platform capable of establishing animal health baselines over time and alerting health officials to potential infectious disease outbreaks or other health anomalies earlier, allowing for more rapid response, improved animal health, and increased economic security.

  11. Improving Animal Disease Detection Through an Enhanced Passive Surveillance Platform.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Chelsea Wright; Holmstrom, Lindsey; Biggers, Keith; Wall, James; Beckham, Tammy; Coats, Matthew; Korslund, John; Colby, Michelle M

    2016-01-01

    The ability to rapidly detect and report infectious diseases of domestic animals and wildlife is paramount to reducing the size and duration of an outbreak. There is currently a need in the United States livestock industry for a centralized animal disease surveillance platform, capable of collecting, integrating, and analyzing multiple data streams with dissemination to end-users. Such a system would be disease agnostic and establish baseline information on animal health and disease prevalence; it would alert health officials to anomalies potentially indicative of emerging and/or transboundary disease outbreaks, changes in the status of endemic disease, or detection of other causative agents (eg, toxins). As a part of its mission to accelerate and develop countermeasures against the introduction of emerging and/or transboundary animal diseases into the United States, the Department of Homeland Security is leading and investing in the development of an enhanced passive surveillance platform capable of establishing animal health baselines over time and alerting health officials to potential infectious disease outbreaks or other health anomalies earlier, allowing for more rapid response, improved animal health, and increased economic security. PMID:27419928

  12. Enhanced electrochemical detection of quercetin by Natural Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Federico José Vicente; Espino, Magdalena; de Los Angeles Fernandez, María; Raba, Julio; Silva, María Fernanda

    2016-09-14

    New trends in analytical chemistry encourage the development of smart techniques and methods aligned with Green Chemistry. In this sense, Natural Deep Eutectic Solvents represents an excellent opportunity as a new generation of green solvents. In this work a new application for them has been proposed and demonstrated. These solvents were synthesized by combinations of inexpensive and natural components like, Glucose, Fructose, Citric acid and Lactic acid. The different natural solvents were easily prepared and added to buffer solution in different concentrations, allowing the enhancement of electrochemical detection of an important representative antioxidant like quercetin (QR) with improved signal up to 380%. QR is a ubiquitous flavonoid widespread in plants and food of plant origin. The proposed method using phosphate buffer with a eutectic mixture of Citric acid, Glucose and water in combination with carbon screen printed electrodes exhibited a good analytical performance. Detection and quantification limits were of 7.97 and 26.3 nM respectively; and repeatability with %RSDs of 1.41 and 7.49 for peak potential and intensity respectively. In addition, it has proved to be faster, greener and cheaper than other sensors and chromatographic methods available with the additional advantage of being completely portable. Furthermore, the obtained results demonstrated that the proposed method is able for the determination of QR in complex food samples. PMID:27566343

  13. C2SM: a mobile system for detecting and 3D mapping of chemical, radiological, and nuclear contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasiobedzki, Piotr; Ng, Ho-Kong; Bondy, Michel; McDiarmid, C. H.

    2009-05-01

    CBRN Crime Scene Modeler (C2SM) is a prototype mobile CBRN mapping system for First Responders in events where Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear agents where used. The prototype operates on board a small robotic platform, increases situational awareness of the robot operator by providing geo-located images and data, and current robot location. The sensor suite includes stereo and high resolution cameras, a long wave infra red (thermal) camera and gamma and chemical detectors. The system collects and sends geo-located data to a remote command post in near real-time and automatically creates 3D photorealistic model augmented with CBRN measurements. Two prototypes have been successfully tested in field trials and a fully ruggedised commercial version is expected in 2010.

  14. Genitourinary radiology

    SciTech Connect

    McClennan, B.L.

    1982-01-01

    A literature review of genitourinary radiology highlights new findings in the field that have occurred in the past year. The physiology of contrast media, and the occasional life-threatening contrast medial reaction are discussed. Common urologic problems such as stones, infection, and obstruction are examined in order to interpret static radiographs in a more meaningful way. The field of interventional uroradiology continues to expand, with new procedures being tried and new indications for old procedures being developed. (KRM)

  15. An Egg Apparatus-Specific Enhancer of Arabidopsis, Identified by Enhancer Detection1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Jefferson, Richard A.; Huttner, Eric; Moore, James M.; Gagliano, Wendy B.; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2005-01-01

    Despite a central role in angiosperm reproduction, few gametophyte-specific genes and promoters have been isolated, particularly for the inaccessible female gametophyte (embryo sac). Using the Ds-based enhancer-detector line ET253, we have cloned an egg apparatus-specific enhancer (EASE) from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The genomic region flanking the Ds insertion site was further analyzed by examining its capability to control gusA and GFP reporter gene expression in the embryo sac in a transgenic context. Through analysis of a 5′ and 3′ deletion series in transgenic Arabidopsis, the sequence responsible for egg apparatus-specific expression was delineated to 77 bp. Our data showed that this enhancer is unique in the Arabidopsis genome, is conserved among different accessions, and shows an unusual pattern of sequence variation. This EASE works independently of position and orientation in Arabidopsis but is probably not associated with any nearby gene, suggesting either that it acts over a large distance or that a cryptic element was detected. Embryo-specific ablation in Arabidopsis was achieved by transactivation of a diphtheria toxin gene under the control of the EASE. The potential application of the EASE element and similar control elements as part of an open-source biotechnology toolkit for apomixis is discussed. PMID:16258010

  16. Towards Enhanced Underwater Lidar Detection via Source Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illig, David W.

    separation: The first investigations of statistical separation approaches for underwater lidar are presented. By demonstrating that target and backscatter returns have different statistical properties, a new separation axis is opened. This work investigates and quantifies performance of three statistical separation approaches. 4. Application of detection theory to underwater lidar: While many similar applications use detection theory to assess performance, less development has occurred in the underwater lidar field. This work applies these concepts to statistical separation approaches, providing another perspective in which to assess performance. In addition, by using detection theory approaches, statistical metrics can be used to associate a level of confidence in each ranging measurement. 5. Preliminary investigation of forward scatter suppression: If backscatter is sufficiently suppressed, forward scattering becomes a performance-limiting factor. This work presents a proof-of-concept demonstration of the potential for statistical separation approaches to suppress both forward and backward scatter. These results provide a demonstration of the capability that signal processing has to improve separation between target and backscatter. Separation capability improves in the transition from temporal to frequency to statistical separation approaches, with the statistical separation approaches improving target detection sensitivity by as much as 30 dB. Ranging and detection results demonstrate the enhanced performance this would allow in ranging applications. This increased performance is an important step in moving underwater lidar capability towards the requirements of the next generation of sensors.

  17. A quantum radar detection protocol for fringe visibility enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltenbah, Benjamin; Parazzoli, Claudio; Capron, Barbara

    2016-05-01

    We present analysis of a radar detection technique using a Photon Addition Homodyne Receiver (PAHR) that improves SNR of the interferometer fringes and reduces uncertainty of the phase measurement. This system uses the concept of Photon Addition (PA) in which the coherent photon distribution is altered. We discuss this process first as a purely mathematical concept to introduce PA and illustrate its effect on coherent photon distribution. We then present a notional proof-of-concept experiment involving a parametric down converter (PDC) and probabilistic post-selection of the results. We end with presentation of a more deterministic PAHR concept that is more suitable for development into a working system. Coherent light illuminates a target and the return signal interferes with the local oscillator reference photons to create the desired fringes. The PAHR alters the photon probability distribution of the returned light via interaction between the return photons and atoms. We refer to this technique as "Atom Interaction" or AI. The returning photons are focused at the properly prepared atomic system. The injected atoms into this region are prepared in the desired quantum state. During the interaction time, the initial quantum state evolves in such a way that the photon distribution function changes resulting in higher photon count, lower phase noise and an increase in fringe SNR. The result is a 3-5X increase of fringe SNR. This method is best suited for low light intensity (low photon count, 0.1-5) applications. The detection protocol could extend the range of existing systems without loss of accuracy, or conversely enhance a system's accuracy for given range. We present quantum mathematical analysis of the method to illustrate how both range and angular resolution improve in comparison with standard measurement techniques. We also suggest an experimental path to validate the method which also will lead toward deployment in the field.

  18. Using computer-extracted image features for modeling of error-making patterns in detection of mammographic masses among radiology residents

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jing Ghate, Sujata V.; Yoon, Sora C.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Kuzmiak, Cherie M.; Mazurowski, Maciej A.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Mammography is the most widely accepted and utilized screening modality for early breast cancer detection. Providing high quality mammography education to radiology trainees is essential, since excellent interpretation skills are needed to ensure the highest benefit of screening mammography for patients. The authors have previously proposed a computer-aided education system based on trainee models. Those models relate human-assessed image characteristics to trainee error. In this study, the authors propose to build trainee models that utilize features automatically extracted from images using computer vision algorithms to predict likelihood of missing each mass by the trainee. This computer vision-based approach to trainee modeling will allow for automatically searching large databases of mammograms in order to identify challenging cases for each trainee. Methods: The authors’ algorithm for predicting the likelihood of missing a mass consists of three steps. First, a mammogram is segmented into air, pectoral muscle, fatty tissue, dense tissue, and mass using automated segmentation algorithms. Second, 43 features are extracted using computer vision algorithms for each abnormality identified by experts. Third, error-making models (classifiers) are applied to predict the likelihood of trainees missing the abnormality based on the extracted features. The models are developed individually for each trainee using his/her previous reading data. The authors evaluated the predictive performance of the proposed algorithm using data from a reader study in which 10 subjects (7 residents and 3 novices) and 3 experts read 100 mammographic cases. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) methodology was applied for the evaluation. Results: The average area under the ROC curve (AUC) of the error-making models for the task of predicting which masses will be detected and which will be missed was 0.607 (95% CI,0.564-0.650). This value was statistically significantly different

  19. Enhanced PET resolution by combining pinhole collimation and coincidence detection.

    PubMed

    DiFilippo, Frank P

    2015-10-21

    Spatial resolution of clinical PET scanners is limited by detector design and photon non-colinearity. Although dedicated small animal PET scanners using specialized high-resolution detectors have been developed, enhancing the spatial resolution of clinical PET scanners is of interest as a more available alternative. Multi-pinhole 511 keV SPECT is capable of high spatial resolution but requires heavily shielded collimators to avoid significant background counts. A practical approach with clinical PET detectors is to combine multi-pinhole collimation with coincidence detection. In this new hybrid modality, there are three locations associated with each event, namely those of the two detected photons and the pinhole aperture. These three locations over-determine the line of response and provide redundant information that is superior to coincidence detection or pinhole collimation alone. Multi-pinhole collimation provides high resolution and avoids non-colinearity error but is subject to collimator penetration and artifacts from overlapping projections. However the coincidence information, though at lower resolution, is valuable for determining whether the photon passed near a pinhole within the cone acceptance angle and for identifying through which pinhole the photon passed. This information allows most photons penetrating through the collimator to be rejected and avoids overlapping projections. With much improved event rejection, a collimator with minimal shielding may be used, and a lightweight add-on collimator for high resolution imaging is feasible for use with a clinical PET scanner. Monte Carlo simulations were performed of a (18)F hot rods phantom and a 54-pinhole unfocused whole-body mouse collimator with a clinical PET scanner. Based on coincidence information and pinhole geometry, events were accepted or rejected, and pinhole-specific crystal-map projections were generated. Tomographic images then were reconstructed using a conventional pinhole SPECT

  20. Utility of rapid database searching for quality assurance: 'detective work' in uncovering radiology coding and billing errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horii, Steven C.; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William; Iyoob, Christopher; Maston, Keith; Coleman, Beverly G.

    2011-03-01

    When the first quarter of 2010 Department of Radiology statistics were provided to the Section Chiefs, the authors (SH, BC) were alarmed to discover that Ultrasound showed a decrease of 2.5 percent in billed examinations. This seemed to be in direct contradistinction to the experience of the ultrasound faculty members and sonographers. Their experience was that they were far busier than during the same quarter of 2009. The one exception that all acknowledged was the month of February, 2010 when several major winter storms resulted in a much decreased Hospital admission and Emergency Department visit rate. Since these statistics in part help establish priorities for capital budget items, professional and technical staffing levels, and levels of incentive salary, they are taken very seriously. The availability of a desktop, Web-based RIS database search tool developed by two of the authors (WK, WB) and built-in database functions of the ultrasound miniPACS, made it possible for us very rapidly to develop and test hypotheses for why the number of billable examinations was declining in the face of what experience told the authors was an increasing number of examinations being performed. Within a short time, we identified the major cause as errors on the part of the company retained to verify billable Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes against ultrasound reports. This information is being used going forward to recover unbilled examinations and take measures to reduce or eliminate the types of coding errors that resulted in the problem.

  1. Rapid surface enhanced Raman scattering detection method for chloramphenicol residues.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei; Yao, Weirong

    2015-06-01

    Chloramphenicol (CAP) is a widely used amide alcohol antibiotics, which has been banned from using in food producing animals in many countries. In this study, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) coupled with gold colloidal nanoparticles was used for the rapid analysis of CAP. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were conducted with Gaussian 03 at the B3LYP level using the 3-21G(d) and 6-31G(d) basis sets to analyze the assignment of vibrations. Affirmatively, the theoretical Raman spectrum of CAP was in complete agreement with the experimental spectrum. They both exhibited three strong peaks characteristic of CAP at 1104 cm(-1), 1344 cm(-1), 1596 cm(-1), which were used for rapid qualitative analysis of CAP residues in food samples. The use of SERS as a method for the measurements of CAP was explored by comparing use of different solvents, gold colloidal nanoparticles concentration and absorption time. The method of the detection limit was determined as 0.1 μg/mL using optimum conditions. The Raman peak at 1344 cm(-1) was used as the index for quantitative analysis of CAP in food samples, with a linear correlation of R(2)=0.9802. Quantitative analysis of CAP residues in foods revealed that the SERS technique with gold colloidal nanoparticles was sensitive and of a good stability and linear correlation, and suited for rapid analysis of CAP residue in a variety of food samples. PMID:25754387

  2. Enhancement of detection accuracy of fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeh, Thomas; Schweizer, Hans; Meixner, Andreas; Purde, Andreas; Koch, Alexander W.

    2004-06-01

    Over the course of the last few years, several readout techniques for fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors have been proposed. However, all of them suffer from specific restrictions concerning response speed, accuracy, sensor multiplexibility and cost. In the past, it was often assumed that diffraction grating spectrometers were suitable only for FBG applications with modest resolution. The achievable pixel resolution is nowadays in the range of several tens of pm. For FBG sensors with typical temperature coefficients of 5 pm/K and strain coefficients of 0.7 pm/μɛ this resolution is not sufficient for the majority of applications. We present a discussion on different methods for the subpixel registration of FBG spectra and we introduce a novel detection algorithm: the linear phase operator technique (LPO). Even under extreme noisy conditions LPO ensures a significant resolution enhancement by a factor of three compared to conventional algorithms and is shown to be very efficient in its implementation. The efficiencies of several conventional algorithms and LPO is compared by simulations and by means of a test bench. With slight efforts LPO is adaptable to further applications like spectrometer based Fabry-Perot sensors and other sensors with CCD detectors.

  3. Rapid surface enhanced Raman scattering detection method for chloramphenicol residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Yao, Weirong

    2015-06-01

    Chloramphenicol (CAP) is a widely used amide alcohol antibiotics, which has been banned from using in food producing animals in many countries. In this study, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) coupled with gold colloidal nanoparticles was used for the rapid analysis of CAP. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were conducted with Gaussian 03 at the B3LYP level using the 3-21G(d) and 6-31G(d) basis sets to analyze the assignment of vibrations. Affirmatively, the theoretical Raman spectrum of CAP was in complete agreement with the experimental spectrum. They both exhibited three strong peaks characteristic of CAP at 1104 cm-1, 1344 cm-1, 1596 cm-1, which were used for rapid qualitative analysis of CAP residues in food samples. The use of SERS as a method for the measurements of CAP was explored by comparing use of different solvents, gold colloidal nanoparticles concentration and absorption time. The method of the detection limit was determined as 0.1 μg/mL using optimum conditions. The Raman peak at 1344 cm-1 was used as the index for quantitative analysis of CAP in food samples, with a linear correlation of R2 = 0.9802. Quantitative analysis of CAP residues in foods revealed that the SERS technique with gold colloidal nanoparticles was sensitive and of a good stability and linear correlation, and suited for rapid analysis of CAP residue in a variety of food samples.

  4. Enhanced detection of broadband incoherent light with nanoridge plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Hyeon; Yeo, Jong-Souk

    2015-04-01

    Emerging photonic integrated circuit technologies require integrative functionality at ultrahigh speed and dimensional compatibility with ultrasmall electronics. Plasmonics offers a promise of addressing these challenges with novel nanophotonic approaches for on-chip information processing or sensing applications. Short communication range and strong light-matter interaction enabled by on-chip plasmonics allow us to extend beyond a conventional approach of integrating coherent and narrowband light source. Such hybrid electronic and photonic interconnection desires a on-chip photodetector that is highly responsive to broadband incoherent light, yet provides elegant design for nanoscale integration. Here we demonstrate an ultracompact broadband photodetection with greatly enhanced photoresponsivity using plasmonic nanoridge geometry. The nanoridge photodetector confines a wide spectrum of electromagnetic energy in a nanostructure through the excitation of multiple plasmons, which thus enables the detection of weak and broadband light. With nanoscale design, material, and dimensional compatibility for the integration, the nanoridge photodetector opens up a new possibility of highly sensitive on-chip photodetection for future integrated circuits and sensing applications.

  5. Enhanced climate change and its detection over the Rocky Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Fyfe, J.C.; Flato, G.M.

    1999-01-01

    Results from an ensemble of climate change experiments with increasing greenhouse gas and aerosols using the Canadian Centre for Climate Modeling and Analysis Coupled Climate Model are presented with a focus on surface quantities over the Rocky Mountains. There is a marked elevation dependency of the simulated surface screen temperature increase over the Rocky Mountains in the winter and spring seasons, with more pronounced changes at higher elevations. The elevation signal is linked to a rise in the snow line in the winter and spring seasons, which amplifies the surface warming via the snow-albedo feedback. Analysis of the winter surface energy budget shows that large changes in the solar component of the radiative input are the direct consequence of surface albedo changes caused by decreasing snow cover. Although the warming signal is enhanced at higher elevations, a two-way analysis of variance reveals that the elevation effect has no potential for early climate change detection. In the early stages of surface warming the elevation effect is masked by relatively large noise, so that the signal-to-noise ratio over the Rocky Mountains is no larger than elsewhere. Only after significant continental-scale warming does the local Rocky Mountain signal begin to dominate the pattern of climate change over western North America (and presumably also the surrounding ecosystems and hydrological networks).

  6. Breast Contrast Enhanced MR Imaging: Semi-Automatic Detection of Vascular Map and Predominant Feeding Vessel

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Antonella; Fusco, Roberta; Filice, Salvatore; Granata, Vincenza; Catalano, Orlando; Vallone, Paolo; Di Bonito, Maurizio; D’Aiuto, Massimiliano; Rinaldo, Massimo; Capasso, Immacolata; Sansone, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To obtain breast vascular map and to assess correlation between predominant feeding vessel and tumor location with a semi-automatic method compared to conventional radiologic reading. Methods 148 malignant and 75 benign breast lesions were included. All patients underwent bilateral MR imaging. Written informed consent was obtained from the patients before MRI. The local ethics committee granted approval for this study. Semi-automatic breast vascular map and predominant vessel detection was performed on MRI, for each patient. Semi-automatic detection (depending on grey levels threshold manually chosen by radiologist) was compared with results of two expert radiologists; inter-observer variability and reliability of semi-automatic approach were assessed. Results Anatomic analysis of breast lesions revealed that 20% of patients had masses in internal half, 50% in external half and the 30% in subareolar/central area. As regards the 44 tumors in internal half, based on radiologic consensus, 40 demonstrated a predominant feeding vessel (61% were supplied by internal thoracic vessels, 14% by lateral thoracic vessels, 16% by both thoracic vessels and 9% had no predominant feeding vessel—p<0.01), based on semi-automatic detection, 38 tumors demonstrated a predominant feeding vessel (66% were supplied by internal thoracic vessels, 11% by lateral thoracic vessels, 9% by both thoracic vessels and 14% had no predominant feeding vessel—p<0.01). As regards the 111 tumors in external half, based on radiologic consensus, 91 demonstrated a predominant feeding vessel (25% were supplied by internal thoracic vessels, 39% by lateral thoracic vessels, 18% by both thoracic vessels and 18% had no predominant feeding vessel—p<0.01), based on semi-automatic detection, 94 demonstrated a predominant feeding vessel (27% were supplied by internal thoracic vessels, 45% by lateral thoracic vessels, 4% by both thoracic vessels and 24% had no predominant feeding vessel—p<0.01). An

  7. Detection of Leptomeningeal Metastasis by Contrast-Enhanced 3D T1-SPACE: Comparison with 2D FLAIR and Contrast-Enhanced 2D T1-Weighted Images

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Bomi; Hwang, Eo-Jin; Lee, Song; Jang, Jinhee; Jung, So-Lyung; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Kim, Bum-soo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To compare the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced 3D(dimensional) T1-weighted sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts by using different flip angle evolutions (T1-SPACE), 2D fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images and 2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted image in detection of leptomeningeal metastasis except for invasive procedures such as a CSF tapping. Materials and Methods Three groups of patients were included retrospectively for 9 months (from 2013-04-01 to 2013-12-31). Group 1 patients with positive malignant cells in CSF cytology (n = 22); group 2, stroke patients with steno-occlusion in ICA or MCA (n = 16); and group 3, patients with negative results on MRI, whose symptom were dizziness or headache (n = 25). A total of 63 sets of MR images are separately collected and randomly arranged: (1) CE 3D T1-SPACE; (2) 2D FLAIR; and (3) CE T1-GRE using a 3-Tesla MR system. A faculty neuroradiologist with 8-year-experience and another 2nd grade trainee in radiology reviewed each MR image- blinded by the results of CSF cytology and coded their observations as positives or negatives of leptomeningeal metastasis. The CSF cytology result was considered as a gold standard. Sensitivity and specificity of each MR images were calculated. Diagnostic accuracy was compared using a McNemar’s test. A Cohen's kappa analysis was performed to assess inter-observer agreements. Results Diagnostic accuracy was not different between 3D T1-SPACE and CSF cytology by both raters. However, the accuracy test of 2D FLAIR and 2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted GRE was inconsistent by the two raters. The Kappa statistic results were 0.657 (3D T1-SPACE), 0.420 (2D FLAIR), and 0.160 (2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted GRE). The 3D T1-SPACE images showed the highest inter-observer agreements between the raters. Conclusions Compared to 2D FLAIR and 2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted GRE, contrast-enhanced 3D T1 SPACE showed a better detection rate of

  8. Radiology Rounds

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The following represents the second part of the radiology cases which were presented in the June issue of JCCA. The radiographic findings and a brief discussion of the cases are provided for your interest. These cases were presented as part of a research study that dealt with radiographic interpretation by chiropractors. This research has been funded by the Chiropractic College of Radiologists (CCR). The Journal of the Canadian Chiropractic Association has also assisted in this project with the publication of these cases. It is our hope that everyone has enjoyed the case challenge, even if your were not selected as a participant in our study. ImagesCASE ICASE IICASE IIICASE IVCASE V

  9. Complications of pneumoconiosis: radiologic overview.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jae Sup; Jung, Jung Im; Kim, Hyo Rim; Ahn, Myeong Im; Han, Dae Hee; Ko, Jeong Min; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Hae Giu; Arakawa, Hiroaki; Koo, Jung-Wan

    2013-10-01

    A wide spectrum of pulmonary complications occurs in patients with pneumoconiosis. Those complications include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hemoptysis, pneumothorax, pleural disease, tuberculosis, autoimmune disease, anthracofibrosis, chronic interstitial pneumonia, and malignancy. Generally, imaging workup starts with plain chest radiography. However, sometimes, plain radiography has limited role in the diagnosis of pulmonary complications of pneumoconiosis because of overlapping pneumoconiotic infiltration. Computed tomography (CT), ultrasonography (US), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are potentially helpful for the detection of pulmonary complications in patients with pneumoconiosis. CT, with its excellent contrast resolution, is more sensitive and specific method than plain radiograph in the evaluation of pulmonary abnormalities. CT is useful in detecting lung parenchymal abnormalities caused by infection, anthracofibrosis, and chronic interstitial pneumonia. Also, CT is valuable in distinguishing localized pneumothorax from bullae and aiding the identification of multiloculated effusions. US can be used in detection of complicated pleural effusions and guidance of the thoracentesis procedure. MRI is useful for differentiating between progressive massive fibrosis and lung cancer. Radiologists need to be familiar with the radiologic and clinical manifestations of, as well as diagnostic approaches to, complications associated with pneumoconiosis. Knowledge of the various imaging features of pulmonary complications of pneumoconiosis can enhance early diagnosis and improve the chance to cure.

  10. [Emphysematous pyelonephritis: radiologic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Kably, M I; Elamraoui, F; Chikhaoui, N

    2003-10-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) is a rare and severe form of acute pyelonephritis. Escherichia coli accounts for 60% of the cases. Predisposing factors are: diabetus mellitus, recent urinary tract infection and obstruction. There is a female predominance (2/1). Conventional radiography reveals the renal emphysema in 85% of the cases. Ultrasonography shows hyperechoic areas corresponding to the gaz. CT scan is the best technique, allowing the exact localization of the gaz inside the renal parenchyma. The natural course of the disease allows its radiologic classification in 4 grades. EPN has a poor prognosis if only a medical treatment is initiated. Every urinary tract infection, in a diabetic patient must be treated, and must lead to a radiologic exploration, which allows an early detection of severe forms of the disease. PMID:14606307

  11. A framework for the systematic realisation of phenomena for enhanced sensing of radiological and nuclear materials, and radiation.

    PubMed

    Healy, M J F

    2015-09-01

    The quest for new sensing phenomena continues because detecting, discriminating, identifying, measuring and monitoring nuclear materials and their radiation from greater range, at lower concentrations, and in a more timely fashion brings greater safety, security and efficiency. The potential phenomena are diverse, and those that have been realised can be found in disparate fields of science, engineering and medicine, which makes the full range difficult to realise and record. The framework presented here offers a means to systematically and comprehensively explore nuclear sensing phenomena. The approach is based on the fundamental concepts of matter and energy, where the sequence starts with the original nuclear material and its emissions, and progressively considers signatures arising from secondary effects and the emissions from associated materials and the environment. Concepts of operations such as active and passive interrogation, and networked sensing are considered. In this operational light, unpacking nuclear signatures forces a fresh look at the sensing concept. It also exposes how some phenomena that exist in established technology may be considered novel based on how they could be exploited rather than what they fundamentally are. This article selects phenomena purely to illustrate the framework and how it can be best used to foster creativity in the quest for novel phenomena rather than exhaustively listing, categorising or comparing any practical aspects of candidate phenomena.

  12. Enhancement of optic cup detection through an improved vessel kink detection framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Damon W. K.; Liu, Jiang; Tan, Ngan Meng; Zhang, Zhuo; Lu, Shijian; Lim, Joo Hwee; Li, Huiqi; Wong, Tien Yin

    2010-03-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness. The presence and extent of progression of glaucoma can be determined if the optic cup can be accurately segmented from retinal images. In this paper, we present a framework which improves the detection of the optic cup. First, a region of interest is obtained from the retinal fundus image, and a pallor-based preliminary cup contour estimate is determined. Patches are then extracted from the ROI along this contour. To improve the usability of the patches, adaptive methods are introduced to ensure the patches are within the optic disc and to minimize redundant information. The patches are then analyzed for vessels by an edge transform which generates pixel segments of likely vessel candidates. Wavelet, color and gradient information are used as input features for a SVM model to classify the candidates as vessel or non-vessel. Subsequently, a rigourous non-parametric method is adopted in which a bi-stage multi-resolution approach is used to probe and localize the location of kinks along the vessels. Finally, contenxtual information is used to fuse pallor and kink information to obtain an enhanced optic cup segmentation. Using a batch of 21 images obtained from the Singapore Eye Research Institute, the new method results in a 12.64% reduction in the average overlap error against a pallor only cup, indicating viable improvements in the segmentation and supporting the use of kinks for optic cup detection.

  13. Battlefield radiology

    PubMed Central

    Graham, R N J

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing tempo of military conflicts in the last decade, much has been learnt about imaging battlefield casualties in the acute setting. Ultrasound in the form of focused abdominal sonography in trauma (FAST) has proven invaluable in emergency triage of patients for immediate surgery. Multidetector CT allows accurate determination of battlefield trauma injuries. It permits the surgeons and anaesthetists to plan their interventions more thoroughly and to be made aware of clinically occult injuries. There are common injury patterns associated with blast injury, gunshot wounds and blunt trauma. While this body of knowledge is most applicable to the battlefield, there are parallels with peacetime radiology, particularly in terrorist attacks and industrial accidents. This pictorial review is based on the experiences of a UK radiologist deployed in Afghanistan in 2010. PMID:22806621

  14. 2015 RAD-AID Conference on International Radiology for Developing Countries: The Evolving Global Radiology Landscape.

    PubMed

    Kesselman, Andrew; Soroosh, Garshasb; Mollura, Daniel J

    2016-09-01

    Radiology in low- and middle-income (developing) countries continues to make progress. Research and international outreach projects presented at the 2015 annual RAD-AID conference emphasize important global themes, including (1) recent slowing of emerging market growth that threatens to constrain the advance of radiology, (2) increasing global noncommunicable diseases (such as cancer and cardiovascular disease) needing radiology for detection and management, (3) strategic prioritization for pediatric radiology in global public health initiatives, (4) continuous expansion of global health curricula at radiology residencies and the RAD-AID Chapter Network's participating institutions, and (5) technologic innovation for recently accelerated implementation of PACS in low-resource countries. PMID:27233909

  15. Importance of contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging to detect paradoxical expansion of tuberculoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Jin

    2014-07-01

    Tuberculosis is a significant public health problem that continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Tuberculous meningoencephalitis (TM) is the most common extrapulmonary lesion in tuberculosis. A 41-year-old female was thought to have TM. Tests to confirm the TM diagnosis were initially negative, including tuberculosis PCR and adenosine deaminase level in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Anti-tuberculous medication and intravenous steroids were administered to her on the basis of brain imaging and lactate dehydrogenase electrophoresis in CSF, suggestive of the diagnosis of TM. Her neurological problems improved rapidly following treatment. Serologic and CSF markers were positive in PCR and culture after 60 days. Radiological findings are often nonspecific and TM is difficult to diagnose without an increased index of suspicion. The detection of paradoxical expansion of tuberculoma is very important in the maintenance of medication. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to detect paradoxical expansion of the tuberculoma using various methods, such as contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (CE-FLAIR) imaging. CE-FLAIR imaging conspicuously showed paradoxical expansion of the tuberculoma. If patients present with clear meningitis, without any identified pathogen, there is a need to constantly and scrupulously check for TM, including with the use of CE-FLAIR brain imaging.

  16. [Validity of modified radiological views to detect screw protrusion at the distal radius. A comparative study with computerized tomography].

    PubMed

    Mora-Pascual, F E; Aguilella-Fernández, L

    2013-01-01

    Volar fixed-angle plates (VFAP) are currently widely used for the treatment of extra-articular distal radius fractures. Using these plates has a high risk of articular and dorsal screw protrusion due to their special configuration. The aim of this study is to assess the validity of the standard X-rays, performed with the help of wedged supports, in order to detect articular and dorsal screw protrusion. A comparison with computed tomography (CT) scan imaging has been made. The outcome of 26 patients with distal radius articular fracture, treated with a VFAP, is reported. Good correlation between modified X-rays and CT scan was observed. A sensitivity of 100% for articular protrusion and 66% for dorsal have been obtained. When detecting screw protrusion at the distal radius, the use of wedged supports to perform special X-rays intraoperatively is an effective tool.

  17. Additional Value of Diffusion-weighted MRI to Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced Hepatic MRI for the Detection of Liver Metastasis: the Difference Depending on the Experience of the Radiologists.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Wataru; Nakamura, Yuko; Higaki, Toru; Tatsugami, Fuminari; Iida, Makoto; Awai, Kazuo

    2015-06-01

    This retrospective study was to investigate whether adding diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI (EOB-MRI) improved the detection of liver metastasis in radiology resident and board-certified radiologist groups. It was approved by our institutional review board. We selected 18 patients with 35 liver metastases and 12 patients without liver tumors. Five board-certified radiologists and 5 radiology residents participated in the observer performance study. Each observer first interpreted T1- and T2-weighted-, plain-, arterial phase-, and hepatobiliary phase images and specified the location of the liver metastases. The software subsequently displayed the DWI images simultaneously and all participants repeated the reading. We used Jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis to compare the observer performance in detecting liver metastases. The mean values for the area under the curve (AUC) for EOB-MRI without and with DWI were 0.78 ± 0.13 [standard deviation: SD] and 0.87 ± 0.09, respectively, for the radiology residents, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.045). For the board- certified radiologists these values were 0.92 ± 0.02 and 0.96 ± 0.01, respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.092). EOB-MRI with DWI significantly improved the performance of radiology residents in the identification of liver metastases.

  18. Additional Value of Diffusion-weighted MRI to Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced Hepatic MRI for the Detection of Liver Metastasis: the Difference Depending on the Experience of the Radiologists.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Wataru; Nakamura, Yuko; Higaki, Toru; Tatsugami, Fuminari; Iida, Makoto; Awai, Kazuo

    2015-06-01

    This retrospective study was to investigate whether adding diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI (EOB-MRI) improved the detection of liver metastasis in radiology resident and board-certified radiologist groups. It was approved by our institutional review board. We selected 18 patients with 35 liver metastases and 12 patients without liver tumors. Five board-certified radiologists and 5 radiology residents participated in the observer performance study. Each observer first interpreted T1- and T2-weighted-, plain-, arterial phase-, and hepatobiliary phase images and specified the location of the liver metastases. The software subsequently displayed the DWI images simultaneously and all participants repeated the reading. We used Jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis to compare the observer performance in detecting liver metastases. The mean values for the area under the curve (AUC) for EOB-MRI without and with DWI were 0.78 ± 0.13 [standard deviation: SD] and 0.87 ± 0.09, respectively, for the radiology residents, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.045). For the board- certified radiologists these values were 0.92 ± 0.02 and 0.96 ± 0.01, respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.092). EOB-MRI with DWI significantly improved the performance of radiology residents in the identification of liver metastases. PMID:26211220

  19. Screen-detected ductal carcinoma in situ found on stereotactic vacuum-assisted biopsy of suspicious microcalcifications without mass: radiological-histological correlation

    PubMed Central

    Kasprzak, Piotr; Biecek, Przemyslaw; Halon, Agnieszka; Matkowski, Rafal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Commonly identified on screening mammography breast microcalcifications are the predominant manifestation of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between clinico-radiological features and histological findings in patients with screen-detected DCIS. Patients and methods Consecutive 127 patients with pure DCIS found on stereotactic vacuum-assisted biopsy of screen-detected suspicious microcalcifications without mass entered the study. Patient age, type and distribution of microcalcifications, DCIS nuclear grade (NG) and the presence of comedonecrosis were investigated. Association between parameters was statistically analysed with P < 0.05 as a significance level. Results. Powdery microcalcifications were most often clustered while regional were most common of casting-type (P < 0.001). High, intermediate and low NG of DCIS was significantly related to casting-type, crushed stone-like and powdery microcalcifications, respectively (P < 0.01). Low and intermediate NG DCIS were the most common in clustered and grouped microcalcifications while high NG DCIS was the most often when regional distribution was observed (P < 0.05). Comedonecrosis was significantly more common in high NG DCIS (P < 0.01). The association between comedonecrosis and type of microcalcifications was not significant, but with their distribution was close to the significance level (P = 0.07). Patient age was not significantly related to imaging or histological findings. Conclusions The association between pattern of mammographic microcalcifications and histological findings related to more aggressive disease can be helpful in optimal surgery planning in patients with screen-detected DCIS, regarding the extent of breast intervention and consideration of synchronous sentinel node biopsy. PMID:27247546

  20. Method of enhancing radiation response of radiation detection materials

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven D.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a method of increasing radiation response of a radiation detection material for a given radiation signal by first pressurizing the radiation detection material. Pressurization may be accomplished by any means including mechanical and/or hydraulic. In this application, the term "pressure" includes fluid pressure and/or mechanical stress.

  1. Hands-on resonance-enhanced photoacoustic detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euler, Manfred

    2001-10-01

    The design of an improved photoacoustic converter cell using kitchen equipment is described. It operates by changing manually the Helmholtz resonance frequency of bottles by adjusting the distance between the bottleneck and the outer ear. The experiment helps to gain insights in ear performance, in photoacoustic detection methods, in resonance phenomena and their role for detecting small periodic signals in the presence of noise.

  2. Enhancing community detection by using local structural information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Ju; Hu, Ke; Zhang, Yan; Bao, Mei-Hua; Tang, Liang; Tang, Yan-Ni; Gao, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Jian-Ming; Chen, Benyan; Hu, Jing-Bo

    2016-03-01

    Many real-world networks, such as gene networks, protein-protein interaction networks and metabolic networks, exhibit community structures, meaning the existence of groups of densely connected vertices in the networks. Many local similarity measures in the networks are closely related to the concept of the community structures, and may have a positive effect on community detection in the networks. Here, various local similarity measures are used to extract local structural information, which is then applied to community detection in the networks by using the edge-reweighting strategy. The effect of the local similarity measures on community detection is carefully investigated and compared in various networks. The experimental results show that the local similarity measures are crucial for the improvement of community detection methods, while the positive effect of the local similarity measures is closely related to the networks under study and applied community detection methods.

  3. Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Novick, Vincent J.; Johnson, Stanley A.

    1999-01-01

    A vapor sample detection method where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample.

  4. Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Novick, V.J.; Johnson, S.A.

    1999-08-03

    A vapor sample detection method is described where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample. 13 figs.

  5. Trace Isotope Detection Enhanced by Coherent Elimination of Power Broadening

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, Alvaro Peralta; Brandt, Lukas; Halfmann, Thomas

    2006-12-15

    The selectivity and spectral resolution of traditional laser-based trace isotope analysis, i.e., resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS), is limited by power broadening of the radiative transition. We use the fact that power broadening does not occur in coherently driven quantum systems when the probing and excitation processes are temporally separated to demonstrate significant improvement of trace element detection, even under conditions of strong signals. Specifically, we apply a coherent variant of RIMS to the detection of traces of molecular nitric oxide (NO) isobars. For large laser intensities, the detected isotope signal can be increased by almost 1 order of magnitude without any loss in spectral resolution.

  6. Radiological Assistance Program Flight Planning Tool

    2011-12-19

    The Radiological Assitance Program (RAP) is the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) first responder to radiological emergencies. RAP's mission is to identify and minimize radiological hazards, as well as provide radiological emergency response and technical advice to decision makers. One tool commonly used is aerial radiation detection equipment. During a response getting this equipment in the right place quickly is critical. The RAP Flight Planning Tool (a ArcGIS 10 Desktop addin) helps minimize this responsemore » time and provides specific customizable flight path information to the flight staff including maps, coordinates, and azimuths.« less

  7. Radiological Assistance Program Flight Planning Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Messick, C.; Pham, M.; Ridgeway, J.; Smith, R.

    2011-12-19

    The Radiological Assitance Program (RAP) is the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) first responder to radiological emergencies. RAP's mission is to identify and minimize radiological hazards, as well as provide radiological emergency response and technical advice to decision makers. One tool commonly used is aerial radiation detection equipment. During a response getting this equipment in the right place quickly is critical. The RAP Flight Planning Tool (a ArcGIS 10 Desktop addin) helps minimize this response time and provides specific customizable flight path information to the flight staff including maps, coordinates, and azimuths.

  8. INL@Work Radiological Search & Response Training

    SciTech Connect

    Turnage, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Dealing with radiological hazards is just part of the job for many INL scientists and engineers. Dodging bullets isn't. But some Department of Defense personnel may have to do both. INL employee Jennifer Turnage helps train soldiers in the art of detecting radiological and nuclear material. For more information about INL's research projects, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  9. INL@Work Radiological Search & Response Training

    ScienceCinema

    Turnage, Jennifer

    2016-07-12

    Dealing with radiological hazards is just part of the job for many INL scientists and engineers. Dodging bullets isn't. But some Department of Defense personnel may have to do both. INL employee Jennifer Turnage helps train soldiers in the art of detecting radiological and nuclear material. For more information about INL's research projects, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  10. Enhanced detection of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes by AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marisaldi, M.; Argan, A.; Ursi, A.; Gjesteland, T.; Fuschino, F.; Labanti, C.; Galli, M.; Tavani, M.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; D'Amico, F.; Østgaard, N.; Mereghetti, S.; Campana, R.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Bulgarelli, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Dietrich, S.; Longo, F.; Gianotti, F.; Giommi, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Trois, A.

    2015-11-01

    At the end of March 2015 the onboard software configuration of the Astrorivelatore Gamma a Immagini Leggero (AGILE) satellite was modified in order to disable the veto signal of the anticoincidence shield for the minicalorimeter instrument. The motivation for such a change was the understanding that the dead time induced by the anticoincidence prevented the detection of a large fraction of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs). The configuration change was highly successful resulting in an increase of one order of magnitude in TGF detection rate. As expected, the largest fraction of the new events has short duration (<100 μs), and part of them has simultaneous association with lightning sferics detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network. The new configuration provides the largest TGF detection rate surface density (TGFs/km2/yr) to date, opening prospects for improved correlation studies with lightning and atmospheric parameters on short spatial and temporal scales along the equatorial region.

  11. DNA Diagnostics: Nanotechnology-enhanced Electrochemical Detection of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Fang; Lillehoj, Peter B.; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2010-01-01

    The detection of mismatched base pairs in DNA plays a crucial role in the diagnosis of genetic-related diseases and conditions, especially for early stage treatment. Among the various biosensors that have been employed for DNA detection, electrochemical sensors show great promise since they are capable of precise DNA recognition and efficient signal transduction. Advancements in micro- and nanotechnologies, specifically fabrication techniques and new nanomaterials, have enabled for the development of highly sensitive, highly specific sensors making them attractive for the detection of small sequence variations. Furthermore, the integration of sensors with sample preparation and fluidic processes enables for rapid, multiplexed DNA detection for point-of-care (POC) clinical diagnostics. PMID:20075759

  12. Enhancing Community Detection By Affinity-based Edge Weighting Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Andy; Sanders, Geoffrey; Henson, Van; Vassilevski, Panayot

    2015-10-05

    Community detection refers to an important graph analytics problem of finding a set of densely-connected subgraphs in a graph and has gained a great deal of interest recently. The performance of current community detection algorithms is limited by an inherent constraint of unweighted graphs that offer very little information on their internal community structures. In this paper, we propose a new scheme to address this issue that weights the edges in a given graph based on recently proposed vertex affinity. The vertex affinity quantifies the proximity between two vertices in terms of their clustering strength, and therefore, it is ideal for graph analytics applications such as community detection. We also demonstrate that the affinity-based edge weighting scheme can improve the performance of community detection algorithms significantly.

  13. Multi-Sensor Fusion and Enhancement for Object Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Zia-Ur

    2005-01-01

    This was a quick &week effort to investigate the ability to detect changes along the flight path of an unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV) over time. Video was acquired by the UAV during several passes over the same terrain. Concurrently, GPS data and UAV attitude data were also acquired. The purpose of the research was to use information from all of these sources to detect if any change had occurred in the terrain encompassed by the flight path.

  14. Enhanced detection of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes by AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marisaldi, M.; Argan, A.; Ursi, A.; Gjesteland, T.; Fuschino, F.; Labanti, C.; Galli, M.; Tavani, M.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; D'Amico, F.; Ostgaard, N.; Mereghetti, S.; Campana, R.; Cattaneo, P.; Bulgarelli, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Dietrich, S.; Longo, F.; Gianotti, F.; Giommi, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Trois, A.

    2015-12-01

    At the end of March 2015 the onboard configuration of the AGILE satellite was modified in order to disable the veto signal of the anticoincidence shield for the minicalorimeter instrument. The motivation for such a change was the understanding that the dead time induced by the anticoincidence prevented the detection of a large fraction of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs), especially the short duration ones. We present here the characteristics of the new TGF sample after several months of stable operations with the new configuration. The configuration change was highly successful resulting in the detection of about 100 TGFs/month, an increase of a factor about 11 in TGFs detection rate with respect to previous configuration. As expected, the largest fraction of the new events has short duration, with a median duration of 80 microseconds. We also obtain a sample of events with simultaneous association, within 100 microseconds, with lightning sferics detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), confirming previous results reported by the Fermi mission. Given the high detection rate and the AGILE very low (+/-2.5°) orbital inclination, the new configuration provides the largest TGF detection rate surface density (TGFs / km2 / year) to date, opening space for correlation studies with lightning and atmospheric parameters on short spatial and temporal scales along the equatorial region. Eventually, the events with associated simultaneous WWLLN sferics provide a highly reliable sample to probe the long-standing issue of the TGF maximal energy.

  15. Sensitive detection of Campylobacter jejuni using nanoparticles enhanced QCM sensor.

    PubMed

    Masdor, Noor Azlina; Altintas, Zeynep; Tothill, Ibtisam E

    2016-04-15

    A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor platform was used to develop an immunosensor for the detection of food pathogen Campylobacter jejuni. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies and commercially available mouse monoclonal antibodies against C. jejuni were investigated to construct direct, sandwich and gold-nanoparticles (AuNPs) amplified sandwich assays. The performance of the QCM immunosensor developed using sandwich assay by utilising the rabbit polyclonal antibody as the capture antibody and conjugated to AuNPs as the detection antibody gave the highest sensitivity. This sensor achieved a limit of detection (LOD) of 150 colony forming unit (CFU)mL(-1) of C. jejuni in solution. The QCM sensor showed excellent sensitivity and specificity for Campylobacter detection with low cross reactivity for other foodborne pathogens such as Salmonella Typhimurium, (7%) Listeria monocytogenes (3%) and Escherichia coli (0%). The development of this biosensor would help in the sensitive detection of Campylobacter which can result in reducing pre-enrichment steps; hence, reducing assay time. This work demonstrates the potential of this technology for the development of a rapid and sensitive detection method for C. jejuni.

  16. Sensitive detection of Campylobacter jejuni using nanoparticles enhanced QCM sensor.

    PubMed

    Masdor, Noor Azlina; Altintas, Zeynep; Tothill, Ibtisam E

    2016-04-15

    A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor platform was used to develop an immunosensor for the detection of food pathogen Campylobacter jejuni. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies and commercially available mouse monoclonal antibodies against C. jejuni were investigated to construct direct, sandwich and gold-nanoparticles (AuNPs) amplified sandwich assays. The performance of the QCM immunosensor developed using sandwich assay by utilising the rabbit polyclonal antibody as the capture antibody and conjugated to AuNPs as the detection antibody gave the highest sensitivity. This sensor achieved a limit of detection (LOD) of 150 colony forming unit (CFU)mL(-1) of C. jejuni in solution. The QCM sensor showed excellent sensitivity and specificity for Campylobacter detection with low cross reactivity for other foodborne pathogens such as Salmonella Typhimurium, (7%) Listeria monocytogenes (3%) and Escherichia coli (0%). The development of this biosensor would help in the sensitive detection of Campylobacter which can result in reducing pre-enrichment steps; hence, reducing assay time. This work demonstrates the potential of this technology for the development of a rapid and sensitive detection method for C. jejuni. PMID:26649490

  17. Antenna-coupled microcavities for enhanced infrared photo-detection

    SciTech Connect

    Nga Chen, Yuk; Todorov, Yanko Askenazi, Benjamin; Vasanelli, Angela; Sirtori, Carlo; Biasiol, Giorgio; Colombelli, Raffaele

    2014-01-20

    We demonstrate mid-infrared detectors embedded into an array of double-metal nano-antennas. The antennas act as microcavities that squeeze the electric field into thin semiconductor layers, thus enhancing the detector responsivity. Furthermore, thanks to the ability of the antennas to gather photons from an area larger than the device's physical dimensions, the dark current is reduced without hindering the photo-generation rate. In these devices, the background-limited performance is improved with a consequent increase of the operating temperature. Our results illustrate how the antenna-coupled microcavity concept can be applied to enhance the performances of infrared opto-electronic devices.

  18. Radiological Control Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  19. Enhanced Microbial Detection Capabilities by a Rapid Portable Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Heather; Monaco, Lisa; Wainwright, Norm; Steele, Andrew; Damon, Michael; Schenk, Alison; Stimpson, Eric; Maule, Jake; Effinger, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We present data describing a progression of continuing technology development - from expanding the detection capabilities of the current PTS unit to re-outfitting the instrument with a protein microarray increasing the number of detectable compounds. To illustrate the adaptability of the cartridge format, on-orbit operations data from the ISS demonstrate the detection of the fungal cell wall compound beta-glucan using applicable LOCAD-PTS cartridges. LOCAD-PTS is a handheld device consisting of a spectrophotometer, an onboard pumping mechanism, and data storage capabilities. A suite of interchangeable cartridges lined with four distinct capillaries allow a hydrated sample to mix with necessary reagents in the channels before being pumped to the optical well for spectrophotometric analysis. The reagents housed in one type of cartridge trigger a reaction based on the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) assay, which results in the release of paranitroaniline dye. The dye is measured using a 395 nm filter. The LAL assay detects the Gram-negative bacterial cell wall molecule, endotoxin or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The more dye released, the greater the concentration of endotoxin in the sample. Sampling, quantitative analysis, and data retrieval require less than 20 minutes. This is significantly faster than standard culture-based methods, which require at least a 24 hour incubation period.Using modified cartridges, we demonstrate the detection of Gram negative bacteria with protein microarray technology. Additionally, we provide data from multiple field tests where both standard and advanced PTS technologies were used. These tests investigate the transfer of target microbial molecules from one surface to another. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the new cartridges expand the number of compounds detected by LOCAD-PTS, while maintaining the rapid, in situ analysis characteristic of the instrument. The unit provides relevant data for verifying sterile sample collection

  20. Liquid core capillary-based Raman probe for surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhuo; Xiao, Rui; Yang, Tianxin; Bo, Xiaochen; Wang, Shengqi

    2014-03-01

    High-sensitivity surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal detection was achieved using a novel optical probe based on a processed capillary tube. The probe was produced by immobilizing silver nanoparticles (SNPs) in alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers on a capillary tube wall surface through a chemical coating technique. The developed probe could detect Rhodamine 6G with good sensitivity (10-9) due to enhanced interaction volume, high excitation and collection efficiency, and additional enhancement of hot nanojunctions. The proposed Raman probe provides a simple, cheap, fast, compact, and high-sensitivity SERS signal detection method for many potential applications, including chemical, biological, medical, and environmental fields.

  1. A graphene-enhanced molecular beacon for homogeneous DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Fan; Huang, Yan; Yang, Qing; Zhong, Zentao; Li, Di; Wang, Lihua; Song, Shiping; Fan, Chunhai

    2010-06-01

    In this work, we report the design of a novel graphene-based molecular beacon (MB) that could sensitively and selectively detect specific DNA sequences. The ability of water-soluble graphene oxide (GO) to differentiated hairpin and dsDNA offered a new approach to detect DNA. We found that the background fluorescence of MB was significantly suppressed in the presence of GO, which increased the signal-to-background ratio, hence the sensitivity. Moreover, the single-mismatch differentiation ability of hairpin DNA was maintained, leading to high selectivity of this new method.

  2. Radiological impacts of phosphogypsum.

    PubMed

    Al Attar, Lina; Al-Oudat, Mohammad; Kanakri, Salwa; Budeir, Youssef; Khalily, Hussam; Al Hamwi, Ahmad

    2011-09-01

    This study was carried out to assess the radiological impact of Syrian phosphogypsum (PG) piles in the compartments of the surrounding ecosystem. Estimating the distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides (i.e. (226)Ra, (238)U, (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb) in the raw materials, product and by-product of the Syrian phosphate fertilizer industry was essential. The data revealed that the concentrations of the radionuclides were enhanced in the treated phosphate ore. In PG, (226)Ra content had a mean activity of 318 Bq kg(-1). The uranium content in PG was low, ca. 33 Bq kg(-1), because uranium remained in the phosphoric acid produced. Over 80% of (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb present partitioned in PG. The presence of PG piles did not increase significantly the concentration of (222)Rn or gamma rays exposure dose in the area studied. The annual effective dose was only 0.082 mSv y(-1). The geometric mean of total suspended air particulates (TSP) ca. 85 μg m(-3). The activity concentration of the radionuclides in filtrates and runoff waters were below the detection limits (ca. 0.15 mBq L(-1) for (238)U, 0.1 mBq L(-1) for (232)Th and 0.18 mBq L(-1) for both of (210)Po and (210)Pb); the concentration of the radionuclides in ground water samples and Qattina Lake were less than the permissible limits set for drinking water by the World Health Organisation, WHO, (10, 1 and 0.1 Bq L(-1) for (238)U, (232)Th and both of (210)Po and (210)Pb, respectively). Eastern sites soil samples of PG piles recorded the highest activity concentrations, i.e. 26, 33, 28, 61 and 40 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, (238)U, (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb, respectively, due to the prevailing western and north-western wind in the area, but remained within the natural levels reported in Syrian soil (13-32 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, 24.9-62.2 Bq kg(-1) for (238)U and 10-32 Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th). The impact of PG piles on plants varied upon the plant species. Higher concentrations of the radionuclides were

  3. Radiological impacts of phosphogypsum.

    PubMed

    Al Attar, Lina; Al-Oudat, Mohammad; Kanakri, Salwa; Budeir, Youssef; Khalily, Hussam; Al Hamwi, Ahmad

    2011-09-01

    This study was carried out to assess the radiological impact of Syrian phosphogypsum (PG) piles in the compartments of the surrounding ecosystem. Estimating the distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides (i.e. (226)Ra, (238)U, (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb) in the raw materials, product and by-product of the Syrian phosphate fertilizer industry was essential. The data revealed that the concentrations of the radionuclides were enhanced in the treated phosphate ore. In PG, (226)Ra content had a mean activity of 318 Bq kg(-1). The uranium content in PG was low, ca. 33 Bq kg(-1), because uranium remained in the phosphoric acid produced. Over 80% of (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb present partitioned in PG. The presence of PG piles did not increase significantly the concentration of (222)Rn or gamma rays exposure dose in the area studied. The annual effective dose was only 0.082 mSv y(-1). The geometric mean of total suspended air particulates (TSP) ca. 85 μg m(-3). The activity concentration of the radionuclides in filtrates and runoff waters were below the detection limits (ca. 0.15 mBq L(-1) for (238)U, 0.1 mBq L(-1) for (232)Th and 0.18 mBq L(-1) for both of (210)Po and (210)Pb); the concentration of the radionuclides in ground water samples and Qattina Lake were less than the permissible limits set for drinking water by the World Health Organisation, WHO, (10, 1 and 0.1 Bq L(-1) for (238)U, (232)Th and both of (210)Po and (210)Pb, respectively). Eastern sites soil samples of PG piles recorded the highest activity concentrations, i.e. 26, 33, 28, 61 and 40 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, (238)U, (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb, respectively, due to the prevailing western and north-western wind in the area, but remained within the natural levels reported in Syrian soil (13-32 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, 24.9-62.2 Bq kg(-1) for (238)U and 10-32 Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th). The impact of PG piles on plants varied upon the plant species. Higher concentrations of the radionuclides were

  4. Polyethylenimine carbon nanotube fiber electrodes for enhanced detection of neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Zestos, Alexander G; Jacobs, Christopher B; Trikantzopoulos, Elefterios; Ross, Ashley E; Venton, B Jill

    2014-09-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-based microelectrodes have been investigated as alternatives to carbon-fiber microelectrodes for the detection of neurotransmitters because they are sensitive, exhibit fast electron transfer kinetics, and are more resistant to surface fouling. Wet spinning CNTs into fibers using a coagulating polymer produces a thin, uniform fiber that can be fabricated into an electrode. CNT fibers formed in poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) have been used as microelectrodes to detect dopamine, serotonin, and hydrogen peroxide. In this study, we characterize microelectrodes with CNT fibers made in polyethylenimine (PEI), which have much higher conductivity than PVA-CNT fibers. PEI-CNT fibers have lower overpotentials and higher sensitivities than PVA-CNT fiber microelectrodes, with a limit of detection of 5 nM for dopamine. The currents for dopamine were adsorption controlled at PEI-CNT fiber microelectrodes, independent of scan repetition frequency, and stable for over 10 h. PEI-CNT fiber microelectrodes were resistant to surface fouling by serotonin and the metabolite interferant 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). No change in sensitivity was observed for detection of serotonin after 30 flow injection experiments or after 2 h in 5-HIAA for PEI-CNT electrodes. The antifouling properties were maintained in brain slices when serotonin was exogenously applied multiple times or after bathing the slice in 5-HIAA. Thus, PEI-CNT fiber electrodes could be useful for the in vivo monitoring of neurochemicals. PMID:25117550

  5. Future enhancements to ground-based microburst detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Steven D.; Matthews, Michael P.; Dasey, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    This set of viewgraphs presents the results of the Cockpit Weather Information (CWI) program at M.I.T. Lincoln Laboratory. The CWI program has been funded through NaSA Langley Research Center by the joint NASA/FAA Integrated Airborne Wind Shear Program for the past four years. During this time, over 120 microburst penetrations by research aircraft have been conducted under Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) testbed radar surveillance at Orlando, FL. The results of these in-situ measurements have been compared with ground-based detection methods. Several valuable insights were gained from this research activity. First, it was found that the current TDWR microburst shapes do not permit accurate characterization of microburst hazard in terms of the F factor hazard index, because they are based on loss value rather than shear. Second, it was found that the horizontal component of the F factor can be accurately estimated from shear, provided compensation is made for the dependence of outflow strength on altitude. Third, it was found that a simple continuity assumption for estimating the vertical component of the F factor yielded poor results. However, further research has shown that downdraft strength is correlated with features aloft detected by the TDWR radar scan strategy. The outcome of the CWI program is to move from the loss-based wind shear detection algorithm used in the TDWR to a shear-based detection scheme as proposed in the Integrated Terminal Weather System (ITWS).

  6. Enhanced detection of land mines using broadband EMI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ping; Collins, Leslie M.; Moulton, J. R., Jr.; Makowsky, Larry; Weaver, Richard C.; Keiswetter, Dean A.; Won, I. J.

    1999-08-01

    EMI sensors are used extensively to detect landmines. These sensors operate by detecting the metal that is present in mines. However, mines vary in their construction form metal- cased varieties with a large mass of metal to plastic-cased varieties with minute amounts of metal. Unfortunately, there is often a significant amount of metallic clutter present in the environment. Consequently, EMI sensors that utilize traditional detection algorithms based solely on metal content suffer from large false alarm rates. This false alarm problem can be mitigated for high-metal content mines by developing statistical algorithms that exploit models of the underlying physics. In such models it is commonly assumed that the soil has a negligible effect on the sensor response. To date, no testing has been done to validate the assumption that when modeling the response of EMI sensors to low-metal mines, the solid effects are negligible. In addition, advanced algorithms have not been applied specifically to the detection of low-metal mines. The Joint UXO Coordination Office (JUXOCO) is sponsoring a series of experiments designed to establish a performance baseline for EMI sensor. This baseline will be used to measure the potential improvements in performance offered by advanced signal processing algorithms. This paper describes the results of several experiments performed in conjunction with the JUXOCO effort. The results indicate that (1) the properties of the soil do affect the response of a broadband EMI sensor to low-metal mines, and (2) advanced algorithms can improve detection performance over traditional algorithms based solely on metal content.

  7. Anomaly detection in clutter using spectrally enhanced LADAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhabra, Puneet S.; Wallace, Andrew M.; Hopgood, James R.

    2015-05-01

    Discrete return (DR) Laser Detection and Ranging (Ladar) systems provide a series of echoes that reflect from objects in a scene. These can be first, last or multi-echo returns. In contrast, Full-Waveform (FW)-Ladar systems measure the intensity of light reflected from objects continuously over a period of time. In a camflouaged scenario, e.g., objects hidden behind dense foliage, a FW-Ladar penetrates such foliage and returns a sequence of echoes including buried faint echoes. The aim of this paper is to learn local-patterns of co-occurring echoes characterised by their measured spectra. A deviation from such patterns defines an abnormal event in a forest/tree depth profile. As far as the authors know, neither DR or FW-Ladar, along with several spectral measurements, has not been applied to anomaly detection. This work presents an algorithm that allows detection of spectral and temporal anomalies in FW-Multi Spectral Ladar (FW-MSL) data samples. An anomaly is defined as a full waveform temporal and spectral signature that does not conform to a prior expectation, represented using a learnt subspace (dictionary) and set of coefficients that capture co-occurring local-patterns using an overlapping temporal window. A modified optimization scheme is proposed for subspace learning based on stochastic approximations. The objective function is augmented with a discriminative term that represents the subspace's separability properties and supports anomaly characterisation. The algorithm detects several man-made objects and anomalous spectra hidden in a dense clutter of vegetation and also allows tree species classification.

  8. Surface-enhanced nonlinear optical effects and detection of adsorbed molecular monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Y.R.; Chen, C.K.; Heinz, T.F.; Ricard, D.

    1981-01-01

    The observation of a number of surface-enhanced nonlinear optical effects is discussed. The feasibility of using second-harmonic generation to detect the adsorption of molecular monolayers on a metal surface in an electrolytic solution is shown.

  9. Competitive SWIFT cluster templates enhance detection of aging changes

    PubMed Central

    Rebhahn, Jonathan A.; Roumanes, David R.; Qi, Yilin; Khan, Atif; Thakar, Juilee; Rosenberg, Alex; Lee, F. Eun‐Hyung; Quataert, Sally A.; Sharma, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Clustering‐based algorithms for automated analysis of flow cytometry datasets have achieved more efficient and objective analysis than manual processing. Clustering organizes flow cytometry data into subpopulations with substantially homogenous characteristics but does not directly address the important problem of identifying the salient differences in subpopulations between subjects and groups. Here, we address this problem by augmenting SWIFT—a mixture model based clustering algorithm reported previously. First, we show that SWIFT clustering using a “template” mixture model, in which all subpopulations are represented, identifies small differences in cell numbers per subpopulation between samples. Second, we demonstrate that resolution of inter‐sample differences is increased by “competition” wherein a joint model is formed by combining the mixture model templates obtained from different groups. In the joint model, clusters from individual groups compete for the assignment of cells, sharpening differences between samples, particularly differences representing subpopulation shifts that are masked under clustering with a single template model. The benefit of competition was demonstrated first with a semisynthetic dataset obtained by deliberately shifting a known subpopulation within an actual flow cytometry sample. Single templates correctly identified changes in the number of cells in the subpopulation, but only the competition method detected small changes in median fluorescence. In further validation studies, competition identified a larger number of significantly altered subpopulations between young and elderly subjects. This enrichment was specific, because competition between templates from consensus male and female samples did not improve the detection of age‐related differences. Several changes between the young and elderly identified by SWIFT template competition were consistent with known alterations in the elderly, and additional

  10. Enhanced amperometric detection of glucose using Si29 particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Mantey, Kevin; Nayfeh, Munir H.; Yau, Siu-Tung

    2006-12-01

    The 1nm Si29 particle is used as the sensing element for an enzyme-free amperometric electrochemical glucose sensor. The sensor shows selective glucose detection against interfering substances at physiological concentrations with long-term stability, reusability, and the absence of electrode poisoning. The Si29 particle is significantly more efficient in generating signal current compared to both dissolved and immobilized enzyme. This observation suggests that the particle can be used to replace enzyme in making glucose sensors and that the particle is a suitable material for the realization of nanoscale devices that generate signals sufficiently high for use.

  11. Electronic entanglement purification scheme enhanced by charge detections

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Xunli; Kwek, L. C.; Oh, C.H.

    2005-06-15

    We present an entanglement purification scheme for the mixed entangled states of electrons with the aid of charge detections. Our scheme adopts the electronic polarizing beam splitters rather than the controlled-NOT (CNOT) operations, but the total successful probability of our scheme can reach the quantity as large as that of the the CNOT-operation-based protocol and twice as large as that of linear-optics-based protocol for the purification of photonic entangled states. Thus our scheme can achieve a high successful probability without the usage of CNOT operations.

  12. Enhanced Fault Detection of Rolling Element Bearing Based on Cepstrum Editing and Stochastic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Hu, Niaoqing; Hu, Lei; Fan, Bin; Cheng, Zhe

    2012-05-01

    By signal pre-whitening based on cepstrum editing,the envelope analysis can be done over the full bandwidth of the pre-whitened signal, and this enhances the bearing characteristic frequencies. The bearing faults detection could be enhanced without knowledge of the optimum frequency bands to demodulate, however, envelope analysis over full bandwidth brings more noise interference. Stochastic resonance (SR), which is now often used in weak signal detection, is an important nonlinear effect. By normalized scale transform, SR can be applied in weak signal detection of machinery system. In this paper, signal pre-whitening based on cepstrum editing and SR theory are combined to enhance the detection of bearing fault. The envelope spectrum kurtosis of bearing fault characteristic components is used as indicators of bearing faults. Detection results of planted bearing inner race faults on a test rig show the enhanced detecting effects of the proposed method. And the indicators of bearing inner race faults enhanced by SR are compared to the ones without enhancement to validate the proposed method.

  13. Sonification enhances target detection in multi-band imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, John M.; Israel, Steven A.

    2005-05-01

    Growing military requirements and shorter timelines are placing greater demands on imagery analysts. At the same time, advances in sensor technology have vastly increased the quantity and types of imagery data available. Together, these factors are driving toward greater reliance on automated exploitation tools, such as automated target cueing (ATC). Several studies indicate that operational performance depends not only on the accuracy of the ATC algorithm, but also on effectively conveying the ATC information to the user. Sonification, the presentation of information through audio signals, provides a novel method for assisting analysts with visual search tasks. This paper presents a recent proof-of-concept experiment in which analysts search for geometric targets in synthetic, two-band color imagery. The performance results indicate that sonification can enhance performance, particularly through false alarm mitigation. The range of performance across users also suggests that user training may play a big role in effective operational use of sonification methods.

  14. Enhanced Line Integral Convolution with Flow Feature Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, David; Okada, Arthur

    1996-01-01

    The Line Integral Convolution (LIC) method, which blurs white noise textures along a vector field, is an effective way to visualize overall flow patterns in a 2D domain. The method produces a flow texture image based on the input velocity field defined in the domain. Because of the nature of the algorithm, the texture image tends to be blurry. This sometimes makes it difficult to identify boundaries where flow separation and reattachments occur. We present techniques to enhance LIC texture images and use colored texture images to highlight flow separation and reattachment boundaries. Our techniques have been applied to several flow fields defined in 3D curvilinear multi-block grids and scientists have found the results to be very useful.

  15. Enhanced oil spill detection sensors in low-light environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allik, Toomas H.; Ramboyong, Len; Roberts, Mark; Walters, Mark; Soyka, Thomas J.; Dixon, Roberta; Cho, Jay

    2016-05-01

    Although advances have been made in oil spill remote detection, many electro-optic sensors do not provide real-time images, do not work well under degraded visual environments, nor provide a measure of extreme oil thickness in marine environments. A joint program now exists between BSEE and NVESD that addresses these capability gaps in remote sensing of oil spills. Laboratory experiments, calibration techniques, and field tests were performed at Fort Belvoir, Virginia; Santa Barbara, California; and the Ohmsett Test Facility in Leonardo, New Jersey. Weathered crude oils were studied spectroscopically and characterized with LWIR, and low-light-level visible/NIR, and SWIR cameras. We designed and fabricated an oil emulsion thickness calibration cell for spectroscopic analysis and ground truth, field measurements. Digital night vision cameras provided real-time, wide-dynamic-range imagery, and were able to detect and recognize oil from full sun to partial moon light. The LWIR camera provided quantitative oil analysis (identification) for >1 mm thick crude oils both day and night. Two filtered, co-registered, SWIR cameras were used to determine whether oil thickness could be measured in real time. Spectroscopic results revealed that oil emulsions vary with location and weathered state and some oils (e.g., ANS and Santa Barbara seeps) do not show the spectral rich features from archived Deep Water Horizon hyperspectral data. Multi-sensor imagery collected during the 2015 USCG Airborne Oil Spill Remote Sensing and Reporting Exercise and the design of a compact, multiband imager are discussed.

  16. Enhanced chemosensory detection of negative emotions in congenital blindness.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Katrine D; Ptito, Maurice; Møller, Per; Kupers, Ron

    2015-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that congenitally blind individuals develop superior sensory abilities in order to compensate for their lack of vision. Substantial research has been done on somatosensory and auditory sensory information processing of the blind. However, relatively little information is available about compensatory plasticity in the olfactory domain. Although previous studies indicate that blind individuals have superior olfactory abilities, no studies so far have investigated their sense of smell in relation to social and affective communication. The current study compares congenitally blind and normal sighted individuals in their ability to discriminate and identify emotions from body odours. A group of 14 congenitally blind and 14 age- and sex-matched sighted control subjects participated in the study. We compared participants' abilities to detect and identify by smelling sweat from donors who had been watching excerpts from emotional movies showing amusement, fear, disgust, or sexual arousal. Our results show that congenitally blind subjects outperformed sighted controls in identifying fear from male donors. In addition, there was a strong tendency that blind individuals were also better in detecting disgust. Our findings reveal that congenitally blind individuals are better at identifying ecologically important emotions and provide new insights into the mechanisms of social and affective communication in blindness. PMID:25878902

  17. Enhanced Chemosensory Detection of Negative Emotions in Congenital Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Iversen, Katrine D.; Ptito, Maurice; Møller, Per; Kupers, Ron

    2015-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that congenitally blind individuals develop superior sensory abilities in order to compensate for their lack of vision. Substantial research has been done on somatosensory and auditory sensory information processing of the blind. However, relatively little information is available about compensatory plasticity in the olfactory domain. Although previous studies indicate that blind individuals have superior olfactory abilities, no studies so far have investigated their sense of smell in relation to social and affective communication. The current study compares congenitally blind and normal sighted individuals in their ability to discriminate and identify emotions from body odours. A group of 14 congenitally blind and 14 age- and sex-matched sighted control subjects participated in the study. We compared participants' abilities to detect and identify by smelling sweat from donors who had been watching excerpts from emotional movies showing amusement, fear, disgust, or sexual arousal. Our results show that congenitally blind subjects outperformed sighted controls in identifying fear from male donors. In addition, there was a strong tendency that blind individuals were also better in detecting disgust. Our findings reveal that congenitally blind individuals are better at identifying ecologically important emotions and provide new insights into the mechanisms of social and affective communication in blindness. PMID:25878902

  18. Motion Estimation Utilizing Range Detection-Enhanced Visual Odometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friend, Paul Russell (Inventor); Chen, Qi (Inventor); Chang, Hong (Inventor); Morris, Daniel Dale (Inventor); Graf, Jodi Seaborn (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A motion determination system is disclosed. The system may receive a first and a second camera image from a camera, the first camera image received earlier than the second camera image. The system may identify corresponding features in the first and second camera images. The system may receive range data comprising at least one of a first and a second range data from a range detection unit, corresponding to the first and second camera images, respectively. The system may determine first positions and the second positions of the corresponding features using the first camera image and the second camera image. The first positions or the second positions may be determined by also using the range data. The system may determine a change in position of the machine based on differences between the first and second positions, and a VO-based velocity of the machine based on the determined change in position.

  19. Enhanced detection of LED runway/approach lights for EVS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, J. Richard

    2008-04-01

    The acquisition of approach and runway lights by an imager is critical to landing-credit operations with EVS. Using a GPS clock, LED sources are pulsed at one-half the EVS video rate of 60 Hz or more. The camera then uses synchronous (lock-in) detection to store the imaged lights in alternate frames, with digital subtraction of the background for each respective frame-pair. Range and weather penetration, limited only by detector background shot-noise (or camera system noise at night), substantially exceed that of the human eye. An alternative is the use of short-wave infrared cameras with eyesafe laser diode emitters. Also, runway identification may be encoded on the pulses. With standardized cameras and emitters, an "instrument qualified visual range" may be established. The concept extends to portable beacons at austere airfields, and to see-and-avoid sensing of other aircraft including UAVs.

  20. Isotopically modified nanoparticles for enhanced detection in bioaccumulation studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Misra, S.K.; Dybowska, A.; Berhanu, D.; Croteau, M.-N.; Luoma, S.N.; Boccaccini, A.R.; Valsami-Jones, E.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents results on synthesis of isotopically enriched (99% 65Cu) copper oxide nanoparticles and its application in ecotoxicological studies. 65CuO nanoparticles were synthesized as spheres (7 nm) and rods (7 ?? 40 nm). Significant differences were observed between the reactivity and dissolution of spherical and rod shaped nanoparticles. The extreme sensitivity of the stable isotope tracing technique developed in this study allowed determining Cu uptake at exposure concentrations equivalent to background Cu concentrations in freshwater systems (0.2-30 ??g/L). Without a tracer, detection of newly accumulated Cu was impossible, even at exposure concentrations surpassing some of the most contaminated water systems (>1 mg/L). ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  1. Statistical feature selection for enhanced detection of brain tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaddad, Ahmad; Colen, Rivka R.

    2014-09-01

    Feature-based methods are widely used in the brain tumor recognition system. Robust of early cancer detection is one of the most powerful image processing tools. Specifically, statistical features, such as geometric mean, harmonic mean, mean excluding outliers, median, percentiles, skewness and kurtosis, have been extracted from brain tumor glioma to aid in discriminating two levels namely, Level I and Level II using fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence in the diagnosis of brain tumor. Statistical feature describes the major characteristics of each level from glioma which is an important step to evaluate heterogeneity of cancer area pixels. In this paper, we address the task of feature selection to identify the relevant subset of features in the statistical domain, while discarding those that are either redundant or confusing, thereby improving the performance of feature-based scheme to distinguish between Level I and Level II. We apply a Decision Structure algorithm to find the optimal combination of nonhomogeneity based statistical features for the problem at hand. We employ a Naïve Bayes classifier to evaluate the performance of the optimal statistical feature based scheme in terms of its glioma Level I and Level II discrimination capability and use real-data collected from 17 patients have a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Dataset provided from 3 Tesla MR imaging system by MD Anderson Cancer Center. For the specific data analyzed, it is shown that the identified dominant features yield higher classification accuracy, with lower number of false alarms and missed detections, compared to the full statistical based feature set. This work has been proposed and analyzed specific GBM types which Level I and Level II and the dominant features were considered as feature aid to prognostic indicators. These features were selected automatically to be better able to determine prognosis from classical imaging studies.

  2. Chemical agent detection by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Gift, Alan; Maksymiuk, Paul; Inscore, Frank E.; Smith, Wayne W.; Morrisey, Kevin; Christesen, Steven D.

    2004-03-01

    In the past decade, the Unites States and its allies have been challenged by a different kind of warfare, exemplified by the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Although suicide bombings are the most often used form of terror, military personnel must consider a wide range of attack scenarios. Among these is the intentional poisoning of water supplies to obstruct military operations in Afghanistan and Iraq. To counter such attacks, the military is developing portable analyzers that can identify and quantify potential chemical agents in water supplies at microgram per liter concentrations within 10 minutes. To aid this effort we have been investigating the value of a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy based portable analyzer. In particular we have been developing silver-doped sol-gels to generate SER spectra of chemical agents and their hydrolysis products. Here we present SER spectra of several chemical agents measured in a generic tap water. Repeat measurements were performed to establish statistical error associated with SERS obtained using the sol-gel coated vials.

  3. Split quartz tuning fork sensors for enhanced sensitivity force detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labardi, M.; Lucchesi, M.

    2015-03-01

    Quartz tuning forks (TFs) are often employed in dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) as piezoelectric force sensors, to replace the usual AFM microcantilevers, especially in ultra-high vacuum or cryogenic environments. A sharp tip is attached to one of the fork prongs, to obtain atomic scale AFM resolution. We devise a novel TF design by splitting the electrodes of its two prongs, which are produced at the factory as connected to each other, in order to address each of them separately. In such way, the motion of the probe tip can be unambiguously measured, irrespective of the motion of the other prong, which conversely influences its measurement in standard TFs. Furthermore, attachment of the probe tip dramatically spoils the oscillator Q-factor, as it unbalances the two prongs of the TF, with consequent dissipation of energy through the fork holder, due to the motion of the center of mass (CM) of the system. The possibility to independently drive the two prongs of the split TF gives the opportunity to rebalance them just by electrical means, thereby restoring the original Q-factor, by stopping the CM motion. By modeling the split TF as a three-mass, four-spring system, its behavior can be accurately described. Our model is used to explore alternative operation modes with enhanced sensitivity to applied forces.

  4. Static corrections for enhanced signal detection at IMS seismic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Neil; Wookey, James; Selby, Neil

    2016-04-01

    Seismic monitoring forms an important part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) for verifying the Comprehensive nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Analysis of seismic data can be used to discriminate between nuclear explosions and the tens of thousands of natural earthquakes of similar magnitude that occur every year. This is known as "forensic seismology", and techniques include measuring the P-to-S wave amplitude ratio, the body-to-surface wave magnitude ratio (mb/Ms), and source depth. Measurement of these seismic discriminants requires very high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) data, and this has led to the development and deployment of seismic arrays as part of the IMS. Array processing methodologies such as stacking can be used, but optimum SNR improvement needs an accurate estimate of the arrival time of the particular seismic phase. To enhance the imaging capability of IMS arrays, we aim to develop site-specific static corrections to the arrival time as a function of frequency, slowness and backazimuth. Here, we present initial results for the IMS TORD array in Niger. Vespagrams are calculated for various events using the F-statistic to clearly identify seismic phases and measure their arrival times. Observed arrival times are compared with those predicted by 1D and 3D velocity models, and residuals are calculated for a range of backazimuths and slownesses. Finally, we demonstrate the improvement in signal fidelity provided by these corrections.

  5. Detection of explosive vapour using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, X.; Ahmad, S. R.

    2009-11-01

    A commercially available nano-structured gold substrate was used for activating surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Raman spectra of the vapour of explosive material, triacetonetriperoxide (TATP), at trace concentrations produced from adsorbed molecules on such surfaces have been studied. Prominent Raman lines of the explosive molecular species were recorded at a sample temperature of ˜35°C, which is near to human body temperature. For this study, the concentration of the adsorbed TATP molecules on the nano-structured surface was varied by heating the sample to different temperatures and exposing the substrate to the sample vapour for different lengths of time. The intensities of the Raman lines have been found to increase with the increase in temperature and also with the increase in the duration of exposure for a fixed temperature. However, as expected, the Raman intensities have been found to saturate at higher temperatures and longer exposures. These saturation effects of the strengths of the Raman lines in the SERS of TATP vapour have been investigated in this paper. The results indicate that the optimisation for vapour deposition on the surface could be a crucial factor for any quantitative estimate of the concentration of the molecular species adsorbed on the nano-structured substrates.

  6. Society of Interventional Radiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... comments to CMS on two MACRA coding issues; society is engaged with CMS as they develop codes ... radiology case studies Developed by ACR Copyright © 2016 Society of Interventional Radiology. All rights reserved. 3975 Fair ...

  7. Common Interventional Radiology Procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... of common interventional techniques is below. Common Interventional Radiology Procedures Angiography An X-ray exam of the ... into the vertebra. Copyright © 2016 Society of Interventional Radiology. All rights reserved. 3975 Fair Ridge Drive • Suite ...

  8. Nanoparticle Enhanced Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Improving the Detection of Molecular Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koral, Can; De Giacomo, Alessandro; Mao, Xianglei; Zorba, Vassilia; Russo, Richard E.

    2016-11-01

    Enhancement of molecular band emission in laser-induced plasmas is important for improving sensitivity and limits of detection in molecular sensing and molecular isotope analysis. In this work we introduce the use of Nanoparticle Enhanced Laser Induced Breakdown (NELIBS) for the enhancement of molecular band emission in laser-induced plasmas, and study the underlying mechanisms responsible for the observed enhancement. The use of Ag nanoparticles leads to an order of magnitude enhancement for AlO (B2Σ+ → Χ+ Σ+) system emission from an Al-based alloy. We demonstrate that the mechanism responsible for the enhancement of molecular bands differs from that of atomic emission, and can be traced down to the increased number of atomic species in NELIBS which lead to AlO molecular formation. These findings showcase the potential of NELIBS as a simple and viable technology for enhancing molecular band emission in laser-induced plasmas.

  9. Microsphere-enhanced label-free high-throughput molecular detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Cheng; Huang, Guoliang; Xu, Shukuan; Zhu, Jing; Ma, Rui; Han, Chao; Chen, Shengyi; Ma, Chen

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we developed a microsphere enhanced and label free high throughput molecular detection based on SPRI and microarray chips, and a self-built surface plasmon resonance imaging instrument was set. One label-free protein chip forming a 7× probe array was designed and fabricated using a commercial microarray robot spotter on chemical modified gold-coated glass slide. Antibody molecules were successfully detected in label-free and high-throughput method by using this chip. The detection signals on the chip was successfully enhanced by using microspheres with a diameter of 1 μm.

  10. Optofluidic chips with nanochannels for dynamic molecular detection using enhanced fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Postigo, P. A.; Alvaro, R.; Juarros, A.; Merino, S.

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of a novel optofluidic chip using nanochannels optimized for DNA-stretched molecules and optical detection by enhanced fluorescence is reported. The chips are composed of a series of microchannels that allow the transport of molecules in the femto-liter per second inside a fluid or gas. The nanochannels are surrounded by a photonic crystal structure to enhance the emission of fluorescent light from the molecules, which can travel along the nanochannel, allowing for enhanced optical detection of the molecules in motion. The photonic crystal structure provides an enhancement up to 2.5 times in the light emitted from fluorescent molecules inside the nanochannels which increases to around 250 when normalized to the area of the nanochannels emitting fluorescence. The results may help to the detection of fluorescent molecules (like marked-DNA) in series by speeding it and allowing the use of less sophisticated equipment. PMID:27699099

  11. Optofluidic chips with nanochannels for dynamic molecular detection using enhanced fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Postigo, P. A.; Alvaro, R.; Juarros, A.; Merino, S.

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of a novel optofluidic chip using nanochannels optimized for DNA-stretched molecules and optical detection by enhanced fluorescence is reported. The chips are composed of a series of microchannels that allow the transport of molecules in the femto-liter per second inside a fluid or gas. The nanochannels are surrounded by a photonic crystal structure to enhance the emission of fluorescent light from the molecules, which can travel along the nanochannel, allowing for enhanced optical detection of the molecules in motion. The photonic crystal structure provides an enhancement up to 2.5 times in the light emitted from fluorescent molecules inside the nanochannels which increases to around 250 when normalized to the area of the nanochannels emitting fluorescence. The results may help to the detection of fluorescent molecules (like marked-DNA) in series by speeding it and allowing the use of less sophisticated equipment.

  12. A model framework for the enhancement of community detection in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Dongxiao; Wang, Hongcui; Jin, Di; Liu, Baolin

    2016-11-01

    Community detection is an important data analysis problem in many different areas, and how to enhance the quality of community detection in complicated real applications is still a challenge. Current community detection enhancement methods often take the enhancement as a preprocess of community detection. They mainly focus on how to design the suitable topological similarity of nodes to adjust the original network, but did not consider how to make use of this topological similarity more effectively. In order to better utilize the similarity information, we propose a model framework which integrates the enhancement into the whole community detection procedure. First, we calculate the structural similarity of nodes based on network topology. Second, we present a stochastic model to describe the community memberships of nodes; we then model the strong constraint based on structural similarity, i.e., we make each node have the same community membership distribution with its most similar neighbors; and then we model the weak constraint, i.e., if two nodes have a high similarity we will make their community membership distributions close, otherwise we will make them not close. Finally, we present a nonnegative matrix factorization approach to learn the model parameters. We evaluate our method on both synthetic and real-world networks with ground-truths, and compare it with five comparable methods. The experimental results demonstrate the superior performance of our new method over the competing ones for community detection and enhancement.

  13. Enhancing the radiation dose detection sensitivity of optical fibres.

    PubMed

    Bradley, D A; Mahdiraji, G Amouzad; Ghomeishi, M; Dermosesian, E; Adikan, F R M; Rashid, H A A; Maah, M J

    2015-06-01

    A method for improving the thermoluminescence (TL) yield of silica-based optical fibres is demonstrated. Using silica obtained from a single manufacturer, three forms of pure (undoped) fibre (capillary-, flat-, and photonic crystal fibre (PCF)) and two forms of Ge-doped fibre (capillary- and flat-fibre) were fabricated. The pure fibre samples were exposed to 6 and 21MeV electrons, the doped fibres to 6MV photons. The consistent observation of large TL yield enhancement is strongly suggestive of surface-strain defects generation. For 6MeV irradiations of flat-fibre and PCF, respective TL yields per unit mass of about 12.0 and 17.5 times that of the undoped capillary-fibre have been observed. Similarly, by making a Ge-doped capillary-fibre into flat-fibre, the TL response is found to increase by some 6.0 times. Thus, in addition to TL from the presence of a dopant, the increase in fused surface areas of flat-fibres and PCF is seen to be a further important source of TL. The glow-curves of the undoped fibres have been analysed by computational deconvolution. Trap centre energies have been estimated and compared for the various fibre samples. Two trap centre types observed in capillary-fibre are also observed in flat-fibre and PCF. An additional trap centre in flat-fibre and one further trap centre in PCF are observed when compared to capillary fibre. These elevated-energy trap centres are linked with strain-generated defects in the collapsed regions of the flat fibre and PCF.

  14. Spectral photoplethysmographic imaging sensor fusion for enhanced heart rate detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelard, Robert; Clausi, David A.; Wong, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Continuous heart rate monitoring can provide important context for quantitative clinical assessment in scenarios such as long-term health monitoring and disability prevention. Photoplethysmographic imaging (PPGI) systems are particularly useful for such monitoring scenarios as contact-based devices pose problems related to comfort and mobility. Each pixel can be regarded as a virtual PPG sensor, thus enabling simultaneous measurements of multiple skin sites. Existing PPGI systems analyze temporal PPGI sensor uctuations related to hemodynamic pulsations across a region of interest to extract the blood pulse signal. However, due to spatially varying optical properties of the skin, the blood pulse signal may not be consistent across all PPGI sensors, leading to inaccurate heart rate monitoring. To increase the hemodynamic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), we propose a novel spectral PPGI sensor fusion method for enhanced estimation of the true blood pulse signal. Motivated by the observation that PPGI sensors with high hemodynamic SNR exhibit a spectral energy peak at the heart rate frequency, an entropy-based fusion model was formulated to combine PPGI sensors based on the sensors' spectral energy distribution. The optical PPGI device comprised a near infrared (NIR) sensitive camera and an 850 nm LED. Spatially uniform irradiance was achieved by placing optical elements along the LED beam, providing consistent illumination across the skin area. Dual-mode temporally coded illumination was used to negate the temporal effect of ambient illumination. Experimental results show that the spectrally weighted PPGI method can accurately and consistently extract heart rate information where traditional region-based averaging fails.

  15. Radiological health

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.M.

    1981-12-01

    Dosimeters were provided for development within the crew compartment and on the astronauts flight garments to detect radiation encountered by the space crew during the mission. The STS-1 mission encountered geomagnetically trapped electrons and protons on 13 low altitude passes through the South Atlantic anomaly. The orbital inclination was such that encounters with the outer belt horn was negligible. Radiation dose to the crew from the above events was estimated to be 5 millirad. Total PDL measured dose to the crew from all sources during the STS-1 mission was 20 millirad.

  16. Detection of melamine on fractals of unmodified gold nanoparticles by surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Roy, Pradip Kumar; Huang, Yi-Fan; Chattopadhyay, Surojit

    2014-01-01

    A simple way of detecting melamine in raw milk is demonstrated via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) using fractals of bare and nonfunctionalized ~30 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNP) distributed on a solid support. The technique demonstrates the formation of AuNP fractals, from a random distribution, upon exposure to melamine, that enhance the Raman scattering cross-section to enable detection by SERS. The agglomeration, which is pronounced at higher melamine concentrations, is demonstrated directly through imaging, and the red-shift of the plasmon absorption peak of the AuNP fractal away from 530 nm by finite difference time domain (FDTD) calculations. The agglomeration results in a strong plasmon field, shown by FDTD, over the interparticle sites that enhances the Raman scattering cross-section of melamine and ensures unambiguous detection. Limit of detection of 100 ppb could be achieved reproducibly.

  17. Detection of dimethyl methylphosphonate by thin water film confined surface-enhanced Raman scattering method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Duan, Guotao; Liu, Guangqiang; Li, Yue; Chen, Zhengxing; Xu, Lei; Cai, Weiping

    2016-02-13

    It is important and necessary to effectively detect the chemical warfare agents, such as highly toxic never agent sarin. However, based on the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect, detection of nerve agent simulant dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) which is weakly interacted with SERS-active substrate has been the most challenge for the routine SERS detection method. To overcome this challenge, we put forward a thin water film confined SERS strategy. Under the space-confinement of water film, Raman measurements are carried out in the water evaporation process. The subsequent water evaporation induces concentrating of the DMMP molecules, which are thus successfully restricted within the strong electromagnetic field enhanced area above the SERS substrates, leading to the enhancement of their Raman signals. This study provides a new way to achieve the efficient SERS-based detection of the target molecules weakly interacted with the metal substrates. PMID:26513568

  18. Contrast-Enhanced Anatomic Imaging as Compared to Contrast-Enhanced Tissue Characterization for Detection of Left Ventricular Thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Weinsaft, Jonathan W.; Kim, Raymond J.; Ross, Michael; Krauser, Daniel; Manoushagian, Shant; LaBounty, Troy M.; Cham, Matthew D.; Min, James K.; Healy, Kirsten; Wang, Yi; Parker, Michele; Roman, Mary J.; Devereux, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare contrast-enhanced anatomic imaging to contrast-enhanced tissue characterization (DE-CMR) for left ventricular (LV) thrombus detection. Background Contrast echocardiography (echo) detects LV thrombus based on anatomic appearance whereas delayed-enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance (DE-CMR) imaging detects thrombus based on tissue characteristics. DE-CMR has been validated as an accurate technique for thrombus but its utility compared to contrast echo is unknown. Methods Multimodality imaging was performed in 121 patients at high-risk for thrombus due to myocardial infarction or heart failure. Imaging included three anatomic imaging techniques for thrombus detection (contrast echo, non-contrast echo, cine-CMR) and a reference of DE-CMR tissue characterization. LV structural parameters were quantified to identify markers for thrombus and predictors of additive utility of contrast-enhanced thrombus imaging. Results 24 patients had thrombus by DE-CMR. Patients with thrombus had larger infarcts (by DE-CMR), more aneurysms and lower LVEF (by CMR and echo) than those without thrombus. Contrast echo nearly doubled sensitivity (61% vs. 33%, p<0.05) and yielded improved accuracy (92% vs. 82%, p<0.01) vs. non-contrast echo. Patients who derived incremental diagnostic utility from DE-CMR had lower LVEF vs. those in whom non-contrast echo alone accurately assessed thrombus (35±9% vs. 42±14%, p<0.01), with a similar trend for patients that derived incremental benefit from contrast echo (p=0.08). Contrast echo and cine-CMR closely agreed on the diagnosis of thrombus (kappa=0.79, p<0.001). Thrombus prevalence was lower by contrast echo than DE-CMR (p<0.05). Thrombus detected by DE-CMR but not by contrast echo was more likely to be mural in shape or, when apical, small in volume (p<0.05). Conclusions Echo contrast in high-risk patients markedly improves detection of LV thrombus, but does not detect a substantial number of thrombi identified by DE-CMR tissue

  19. Fast microcalcification detection in ultrasound images using image enhancement and threshold adjacency statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Baek Hwan; Chang, Chuho; Lee, Jong-Ha; Ko, Eun Young; Seong, Yeong Kyeong; Woo, Kyoung-Gu

    2013-02-01

    The existence of microcalcifications (MCs) is an important marker of malignancy in breast cancer. In spite of the benefits in mass detection for dense breasts, ultrasonography is believed that it might not reliably detect MCs. For computer aided diagnosis systems, however, accurate detection of MCs has the possibility of improving the performance in both Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon description for calcifications and malignancy classification. We propose a new efficient and effective method for MC detection using image enhancement and threshold adjacency statistics (TAS). The main idea of TAS is to threshold an image and to count the number of white pixels with a given number of adjacent white pixels. Our contribution is to adopt TAS features and apply image enhancement to facilitate MC detection in ultrasound images. We employed fuzzy logic, tophat filter, and texture filter to enhance images for MCs. Using a total of 591 images, the classification accuracy of the proposed method in MC detection showed 82.75%, which is comparable to that of Haralick texture features (81.38%). When combined, the performance was as high as 85.11%. In addition, our method also showed the ability in mass classification when combined with existing features. In conclusion, the proposed method exploiting image enhancement and TAS features has the potential to deal with MC detection in ultrasound images efficiently and extend to the real-time localization and visualization of MCs.

  20. Whole-body MRI in the detection of bone marrow infiltration in patients with plasma cell neoplasms in comparison to the radiological skeletal survey.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Nadir; Lohrmann, Christian; Engelhardt, Monika; Pache, Gregor; Uhl, Markus; Saueressig, Ulrich; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias

    2006-05-01

    To compare the diagnostic value of whole-body MRI versus radiological skeletal survey (RSS) in staging patients with plasma cell neoplasms (PCN) and to evaluate the possible therapeutic impact of the replacement of RSS by whole-body MRI. Fifty-four patients with PCN [multiple myeloma (MM), n=47; monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS), n=7] were studied by whole-body MRI and RSS in a monocenter prospective analysis from August 2002 to May 2004. The MRIs were performed using a rolling table platform "AngioSURF" for unlimited field of view with a 1.5-T system (Magnetom Sonata/Maestro Class, Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany). A coronal STIR sequence (TR5500-4230/TE102-94/TI160) was used for imaging of the different body regions, including the head, neck, thorax, abdomen, pelvis and upper and lower extremities. The RSS consisted of eight different projections of the axial and appendicular skeleton. In 41/54 (74%) patients, the results of the whole-body MRI and RSS were concordant. In 11/54 (20%) patients, both imaging techniques were negative. Bone involvement was observed in 30/54 (55%) patients; however, whole-body MRI revealed this more extensively than the RSS in 27/30 (90%) patients with concordant positive imaging findings. In 3/30 (10%) patients, both imaging techniques demonstrated a similar extent of bone marrow infiltration. In 10/54 (19%) patients, the whole-body MRI was superior to RSS in detecting bone marrow infiltration, whereas the RSS was negative. In 3/54 (6%) patients, the RSS was proven to be false positive by the clinical course, whereas the whole-body MRI was truly negative. Whole-body MRI is a fast and highly effective method for staging PCN patients by the use of a rolling table platform. Moreover, it is more sensitive and specific than RSS and reveals bone marrow infiltration and extensive disease more reliably. Therefore, whole-body MRI should be performed as an additional method of exactly staging PCN patients and

  1. Whole-body MRI in the detection of bone marrow infiltration in patients with plasma cell neoplasms in comparison to the radiological skeletal survey.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Nadir; Lohrmann, Christian; Engelhardt, Monika; Pache, Gregor; Uhl, Markus; Saueressig, Ulrich; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias

    2006-05-01

    To compare the diagnostic value of whole-body MRI versus radiological skeletal survey (RSS) in staging patients with plasma cell neoplasms (PCN) and to evaluate the possible therapeutic impact of the replacement of RSS by whole-body MRI. Fifty-four patients with PCN [multiple myeloma (MM), n=47; monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS), n=7] were studied by whole-body MRI and RSS in a monocenter prospective analysis from August 2002 to May 2004. The MRIs were performed using a rolling table platform "AngioSURF" for unlimited field of view with a 1.5-T system (Magnetom Sonata/Maestro Class, Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany). A coronal STIR sequence (TR5500-4230/TE102-94/TI160) was used for imaging of the different body regions, including the head, neck, thorax, abdomen, pelvis and upper and lower extremities. The RSS consisted of eight different projections of the axial and appendicular skeleton. In 41/54 (74%) patients, the results of the whole-body MRI and RSS were concordant. In 11/54 (20%) patients, both imaging techniques were negative. Bone involvement was observed in 30/54 (55%) patients; however, whole-body MRI revealed this more extensively than the RSS in 27/30 (90%) patients with concordant positive imaging findings. In 3/30 (10%) patients, both imaging techniques demonstrated a similar extent of bone marrow infiltration. In 10/54 (19%) patients, the whole-body MRI was superior to RSS in detecting bone marrow infiltration, whereas the RSS was negative. In 3/54 (6%) patients, the RSS was proven to be false positive by the clinical course, whereas the whole-body MRI was truly negative. Whole-body MRI is a fast and highly effective method for staging PCN patients by the use of a rolling table platform. Moreover, it is more sensitive and specific than RSS and reveals bone marrow infiltration and extensive disease more reliably. Therefore, whole-body MRI should be performed as an additional method of exactly staging PCN patients and

  2. Detection and analysis of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) in environmental samples by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hatab, Nahla A.; Gu, Baohua; Eres, Gyula; Hatzinger, Paul B.

    2010-10-01

    Techniques for rapid and sensitive detection of energetics such as cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) are needed both for environmental and security screening applications. Here we report the use of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy to detect traces of RDX with good sensitivity and reproducibility. Using gold (Au) nanoparticles ( 90 100 nm in diameter) as SERS substrates, RDX was detectable at concentrations as low as 0.15 mg/l in a contaminated groundwater sample. This detection limit is about two orders of magnitude lower than those reported previously using SERS techniques. A surface enhancement factor of 6 104 was obtained. This research further demonstrates the potential for using SERS as a rapid, in situ field screening tool for energetics detection when coupled with a portable Raman spectrometer.

  3. Detection and Analysis of Cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) in Environmental Samples by Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Abu Hatab, Nahla A; Eres, Gyula; Hatzinger, Paul B.; Gu, Baohua

    2010-01-01

    Techniques for rapid and sensitive detection of energetics such as cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) are needed both for environmental and security screening applications. Here we report the use of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to detect traces of RDX with good sensitivity and reproducibility. Using gold (Au) nanoparticles (~90-100 nm in diameter) as SERS substrates, RDX was detectable at concentrations as low as 0.15 mg/L in a contaminated groundwater sample. This detection limit is about two orders of magnitude lower than those reported previously using SERS techniques. A surface enhancement factor of ~6x104 was obtained. This research further demonstrates the potential for using SERS as a rapid, in-situ field screening tool for energetics detection when coupled with a portable Raman spectrometer.

  4. Gamma-range synchronization of fast-spiking interneurons can enhance detection of tactile stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Siegle, Joshua H.; Pritchett, Dominique L.; Moore, Christopher I.

    2014-01-01

    We tested the sensory impact of repeated synchronization of fast-spiking interneurons (FS), an activity pattern thought to underlie neocortical gamma oscillations. We optogenetically drove “FS-gamma” while mice detected naturalistic vibrissal stimuli and found enhanced detection of less salient stimuli and impaired detection of more salient ones. Prior studies have predicted that the benefit of FS-gamma is generated when sensory neocortical excitation arrives in a specific temporal window 20-25 ms after FS synchronization. To systematically test this prediction, we aligned periodic tactile and optogenetic stimulation. We found that the detection of less salient stimuli was improved only when peripheral drive led to the arrival of excitation 20-25 ms after synchronization and that other temporal alignments either had no effects or impaired detection. These results provide causal evidence that FS-gamma can enhance processing of less salient stimuli, those that benefit from the allocation of attention. PMID:25151266

  5. Intelligent Agent-Based Intrusion Detection System Using Enhanced Multiclass SVM

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathy, S.; Yogesh, P.; Kannan, A.

    2012-01-01

    Intrusion detection systems were used in the past along with various techniques to detect intrusions in networks effectively. However, most of these systems are able to detect the intruders only with high false alarm rate. In this paper, we propose a new intelligent agent-based intrusion detection model for mobile ad hoc networks using a combination of attribute selection, outlier detection, and enhanced multiclass SVM classification methods. For this purpose, an effective preprocessing technique is proposed that improves the detection accuracy and reduces the processing time. Moreover, two new algorithms, namely, an Intelligent Agent Weighted Distance Outlier Detection algorithm and an Intelligent Agent-based Enhanced Multiclass Support Vector Machine algorithm are proposed for detecting the intruders in a distributed database environment that uses intelligent agents for trust management and coordination in transaction processing. The experimental results of the proposed model show that this system detects anomalies with low false alarm rate and high-detection rate when tested with KDD Cup 99 data set. PMID:23056036

  6. Intelligent agent-based intrusion detection system using enhanced multiclass SVM.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy, S; Yogesh, P; Kannan, A

    2012-01-01

    Intrusion detection systems were used in the past along with various techniques to detect intrusions in networks effectively. However, most of these systems are able to detect the intruders only with high false alarm rate. In this paper, we propose a new intelligent agent-based intrusion detection model for mobile ad hoc networks using a combination of attribute selection, outlier detection, and enhanced multiclass SVM classification methods. For this purpose, an effective preprocessing technique is proposed that improves the detection accuracy and reduces the processing time. Moreover, two new algorithms, namely, an Intelligent Agent Weighted Distance Outlier Detection algorithm and an Intelligent Agent-based Enhanced Multiclass Support Vector Machine algorithm are proposed for detecting the intruders in a distributed database environment that uses intelligent agents for trust management and coordination in transaction processing. The experimental results of the proposed model show that this system detects anomalies with low false alarm rate and high-detection rate when tested with KDD Cup 99 data set.

  7. Microfluidic biosensor for the detection of DNA by fluorescence enhancement and the following streptavidin detection by fluorescence quenching.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Aki, Michihiko; Onoshima, Daisuke; Arinaga, Kenji; Kaji, Noritada; Tokeshi, Manabu; Fujita, Shozo; Yokoyama, Naoki; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2014-01-15

    We reported an optical DNA/protein microfluidic sensor which consists of single stranded (ss) DNA-Cy3 probes on gold surface and simple line-shape microfluidic channel. These ssDNA-Cy3 probes with random sequence in bulk solution or on gold surface exhibits fluorescence enhancement after binding with complementary ssDNA (cssDNA) targets. Particularly it did not require complicated design or hairpin-like stem-loop conformation, which made it easier to be made and applied in analytes detection by fluorescence switching techniques. Using ssDNA-cy3 probes attached on gold surface in a microfluidic channel, strong fluorescence enhancement was measured by ssDNA with cssDNA binding or ssDNA with cssDNA-biotin binding. The following introduction of streptavidin resulted in fluorescence quenching (fluorescence decrease) because of the binding of hybridized DNA-biotin with streptavidin. This sensor showed strong affinity and high sensitivity toward the streptavidin, the minimum detectable concentration for streptavidin was 1 pM, equating to an absolute detection limit of 60 amol in this microfluidic channel. Microfluidic channel height and flow rate is optimized to increase surface reaction efficiency and fluorescence switching efficiency. In contrast to previously reported optical molecular beacon approach, this sensor can be used not only for the detection of cssDNA target, but also for the detection of streptavidin. This microfluidic sensor offers the promise of analyzing kinds of molecular targets or immunoreactions.

  8. Performance-enhancing methods for Au film over nanosphere surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate and melamine detection application.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun Feng; Wu, Xue Zhong; Xiao, Rui; Dong, Pei Tao; Wang, Chao Guang

    2014-01-01

    A new high-performance surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate with extremely high SERS activity was produced. This SERS substrate combines the advantages of Au film over nanosphere (AuFON) substrate and Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs). A three order enhancement of SERS was observed when Rhodamine 6G (R6G) was used as a probe molecule to compare the SERS effects of the new substrate and commonly used AuFON substrate. These new SERS substrates can detect R6G down to 1 nM. The new substrate was also utilized to detect melamine, and the limit of detection (LOD) is 1 ppb. A linear relationship was also observed between the SERS intensity at Raman peak 682 cm(-1) and the logarithm of melamine concentrations ranging from 10 ppm to 1 ppb. This ultrasensitive SERS substrate is a promising tool for detecting trace chemical molecules because of its simple and effective fabrication procedure, high sensitivity and high reproducibility of the SERS effect.

  9. Utilizing digital breast tomosynthesis projection views correlation for microcalcification enhancement for detection purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baddar, Wissam J.; Kim, Eun Joon; Kim, Dae Hoe; Ro, Yong Man

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a novel method for enhancing the contrast of microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis projection views for detection purposes. The proposed method relies on the correlation between the projection views in order to reduce the effect of noise, due to the low-dose exposure, and increase the contrast of the microcalcification particles for microcalcification cluster detection purposes. The method performs a series of multi-shift operations to capture the microcalcification particle movement information and compensate it in order to enhance microcalcification particles contrast. Furthermore, the proposed approach utilizes the projection view correlation in order to reduce the falsely detected regions of interest, and improve the classification of the detected regions into false positives or actual microcalcification clusters. Comparative experiments have been performed to quantitatively measure the contrast enhancement of microcalcification particles and its effect on the MC cluster detection. To that end, the contrast to noise ratio have been calculated and compared with some with previous methods. Furthermore, the free response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curve have been used to measure the effect of the proposed enhancement on the microcalcification cluster detectability.

  10. Navy/Marine Corps innovative science and technology developments for future enhanced mine detection capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, John H., Jr.; Witherspoon, Ned H.; Miller, Richard E.; Davis, Kenn S.; Suiter, Harold R.; Hilton, Russell J.

    2000-08-01

    JMDT is a Navy/Marine Corps 6.2 Exploratory Development program that is closely coordinated with the 6.4 COBRA acquisition program. The objective of the program is to develop innovative science and technology to enhance future mine detection capabilities. The objective of the program is to develop innovative science and technology to enhance future mine detection capabilities. Prior to transition to acquisition, the COBRA ATD was extremely successful in demonstrating a passive airborne multispectral video sensor system operating in the tactical Pioneer unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), combined with an integrated ground station subsystem to detect and locate minefields from surf zone to inland areas. JMDT is investigating advanced technology solutions for future enhancements in mine field detection capability beyond the current COBRA ATD demonstrated capabilities. JMDT has recently been delivered next- generation, innovative hardware which was specified by the Coastal System Station and developed under contract. This hardware includes an agile-tuning multispectral, polarimetric, digital video camera and advanced multi wavelength laser illumination technologies to extend the same sorts of multispectral detections from a UAV into the night and over shallow water and other difficult littoral regions. One of these illumination devices is an ultra- compact, highly-efficient near-IR laser diode array. The other is a multi-wavelength range-gateable laser. Additionally, in conjunction with this new technology, algorithm enhancements are being developed in JMDT for future naval capabilities which will outperform the already impressive record of automatic detection of minefields demonstrated by the COBAR ATD.

  11. Detection of circulating tumor cells using targeted surface-enhanced Raman scattering nanoparticles and magnetic enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Paproski, Robert J.; Moore, Ronald; Zemp, Roger

    2014-05-01

    While more than 90% of cancer deaths are due to metastases, our ability to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is limited by low numbers of these cells in the blood and factors confounding specificity of detection. We propose a magnetic enrichment and detection technique for detecting CTCs with high specificity. We targeted both magnetic and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles to cancer cells. Only cells that are dual-labeled with both kinds of nanoparticles demonstrate an increasing SERS signal over time due to magnetic trapping.

  12. Mammography 1984: challenge to radiology

    SciTech Connect

    McLelland, R.

    1984-07-01

    Mammography has made major contributions in the detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. It is the only reliable means of detecting nonpalpable cancers and can detect many small breast cancers in early stages, when they may be curable. It should be applied more widely, especially in screening asymptomatic women aged 40 or over. Restraints on its optimal application to the control of breast cancer are the expense of examination and the lack of properly trained and committed radiologists. These are challenges to radiology that must be addressed.

  13. Enhanced detection of rolling element bearing fault based on stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Hu, Niaoqing; Cheng, Zhe; Hu, Lei

    2012-11-01

    Early bearing faults can generate a series of weak impacts. All the influence factors in measurement may degrade the vibration signal. Currently, bearing fault enhanced detection method based on stochastic resonance(SR) is implemented by expensive computation and demands high sampling rate, which requires high quality software and hardware for fault diagnosis. In order to extract bearing characteristic frequencies component, SR normalized scale transform procedures are presented and a circuit module is designed based on parameter-tuning bistable SR. In the simulation test, discrete and analog sinusoidal signals under heavy noise are enhanced by SR normalized scale transform and circuit module respectively. Two bearing fault enhanced detection strategies are proposed. One is realized by pure computation with normalized scale transform for sampled vibration signal, and the other is carried out by designed SR hardware with circuit module for analog vibration signal directly. The first strategy is flexible for discrete signal processing, and the second strategy demands much lower sampling frequency and less computational cost. The application results of the two strategies on bearing inner race fault detection of a test rig show that the local signal to noise ratio of the characteristic components obtained by the proposed methods are enhanced by about 50% compared with the band pass envelope analysis for the bearing with weaker fault. In addition, helicopter transmission bearing fault detection validates the effectiveness of the enhanced detection strategy with hardware. The combination of SR normalized scale transform and circuit module can meet the need of different application fields or conditions, thus providing a practical scheme for enhanced detection of bearing fault.

  14. Visual detection of subsurface defects using enhanced magneto-optic imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yu Hua H.; Liu, Xingmake; Tian, Gui Y.; Bai, Libing

    2013-01-01

    An enhanced magneto-optic (MO) imaging system is presented to detect the invisible and buried subsurface flaws in metallic specimens. The choice of the MO thin films, the design of the magnetic excitation device and the development of the image processing approaches are presented in this paper and the quality improvement in MO imaging has been demonstrated due to the proposed methods. Experimental results have been provided and verify the reliability and accuracy of the enhanced MO imaging system.

  15. Rapid detection of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium by surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Lan; Zhang, Ping; Zheng, Da-wei; Wang, Yang-jun-qi; Zhong, Ru-gang

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is used as an analytical tool for the detection and identification of pathogenic bacteria of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium). Compared with normal Raman signal, the intensity of SERS signal is greatly enhanced. After processing all SERS data, the obvious differences between the SERS spectra of two species are determined. And applying the chemometric tools of principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis (PCA-HCA), the SERS spectra of two species are distinguished more accurately. The results indicate that SERS analysis can provide a rapid and sensitive method for the detection of pathogenic bacteria.

  16. Optical detection enhancement in porous volumetric microfluidic capture elements using refractive index matching fluids

    PubMed Central

    Wiederoder, M. S.; Peterken, L.; Lu, A. X.; Rahmanian, O. D.; Raghavan, S. R.; DeVoe, D. L.

    2015-01-01

    Porous volumetric capture elements in microfluidic sensors are advantageous compared to planar capture surfaces due to higher reaction site density and decreased diffusion lengths that can reduce detection limits and total assay time. However a mismatch in refractive indices between the capture matrix and fluid within the porous interstices results in scattering of incident, reflected, or emitted light, significantly reducing the signal for optical detection. Here we demonstrate that perfusion of an index-matching fluid within a porous matrix minimizes scattering, thus enhancing optical signal by enabling the entire capture element volume to be probed. Signal enhancement is demonstrated for both fluorescence and absorbance detection, using porous polymer monoliths in a silica capillary and packed beds of glass beads within thermoplastic microchannels, respectively. Fluorescence signal was improved by a factor of 3.5× when measuring emission from a fluorescent compound attached directly to the polymer monolith, and up to 2.6× for a rapid 10 min direct immunoassay. When combining index matching with a silver enhancement step, a detection limit of 0.1 ng/mL human IgG and a 5 log dynamic range was achieved. The demonstrated technique provides a simple method for enhancing optical sensitivity for a wide range of assays, enabling the full benefits of porous detection elements in miniaturized analytical systems to be realized. PMID:26160546

  17. Subconscious detection of threat as reflected by an enhanced response bias.

    PubMed

    Windmann, S; Krüger, T

    1998-12-01

    Neurobiological and cognitive models of unconscious information processing suggest that subconscious threat detection can lead to cognitive misinterpretations and false alarms, while conscious processing is assumed to be perceptually and conceptually accurate and unambiguous. Furthermore, clinical theories suggest that pathological anxiety results from a crude preattentive warning system predominating over more sophisticated and controlled modes of processing. We investigated the hypothesis that subconscious detection of threat in a cognitive task is reflected by enhanced "false signal" detection rather than by selectively enhanced discrimination of threat items in 30 patients with panic disorder and 30 healthy controls. We presented a tachistoscopic word-nonword discrimination task and a subsequent recognition task and analyzed the data by means of process-dissociation procedures. In line with our expectations, subjects of both groups showed more false signal detection to threat than to neutral stimuli as indicated by an enhanced response bias, whereas indices of discriminative sensitivity did not show this effect. In addition, patients with panic disorder showed a generally enhanced response bias in comparison to healthy controls. They also seemed to have processed the stimuli less elaborately and less differentially. Results are consistent with the assumption that subconscious threat detection can lead to misrepresentations of stimulus significance and that pathological anxiety is characterized by a hyperactive preattentive alarm system that is insufficiently controlled by higher cognitive processes.

  18. Optical detection enhancement in porous volumetric microfluidic capture elements using refractive index matching fluids.

    PubMed

    Wiederoder, M S; Peterken, L; Lu, A X; Rahmanian, O D; Raghavan, S R; DeVoe, D L

    2015-08-21

    Porous volumetric capture elements in microfluidic sensors are advantageous compared to planar capture surfaces due to higher reaction site density and decreased diffusion lengths that can reduce detection limits and total assay time. However a mismatch in refractive indices between the capture matrix and fluid within the porous interstices results in scattering of incident, reflected, or emitted light, significantly reducing the signal for optical detection. Here we demonstrate that perfusion of an index-matching fluid within a porous matrix minimizes scattering, thus enhancing optical signal by enabling the entire capture element volume to be probed. Signal enhancement is demonstrated for both fluorescence and absorbance detection, using porous polymer monoliths in a silica capillary and packed beds of glass beads within thermoplastic microchannels, respectively. Fluorescence signal was improved by a factor of 3.5× when measuring emission from a fluorescent compound attached directly to the polymer monolith, and up to 2.6× for a rapid 10 min direct immunoassay. When combining index matching with a silver enhancement step, a detection limit of 0.1 ng mL(-1) human IgG and a 5 log dynamic range was achieved. The demonstrated technique provides a simple method for enhancing optical sensitivity for a wide range of assays, enabling the full benefits of porous detection elements in miniaturized analytical systems to be realized. PMID:26160546

  19. Contrast enhancement in dense breast images to aid clustered microcalcifications detection.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Fátima L S; Schiabel, Homero; Goes, Claudio E

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a method to provide contrast enhancement in dense breast digitized images, which are difficult cases in testing of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) schemes. Three techniques were developed, and data from each method were combined to provide a better result in relation to detection of clustered microcalcifications. Results obtained during the tests indicated that, by combining all the developed techniques, it is possible to improve the performance of a processing scheme designed to detect microcalcification clusters. It also allows operators to distinguish some of these structures in low-contrast images, which were not detected via conventional processing before the contrast enhancement. This investigation shows the possibility of improving CAD schemes for better detection of microcalcifications in dense breast images.

  20. Dual-mode microwave system to enhance early detection of cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, K. L.; El-Mahdi, A. M.; Shaeffer, J.

    1981-01-01

    A dual-mode microwave system has been developed that will permit early detection of cancer. The system combines the use of the passive microwave radiometer with an active transmitter. The active transmitter will provide localized heating to enhance early detection by taking advantage of the differential heating (i.e., tumor temperature with respect to surrounding tissue) associated with the thermal characteristics of tumors.

  1. Detection of Precytopathic Effect of Enteroviruses in Clinical Specimens by Centrifugation-Enhanced Antigen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lipson, Steven M.; David, Kathryn; Shaikh, Fatima; Qian, Lian

    2001-01-01

    Rapid enterovirus detection is important for decisions about antibiotic administration and length of hospital stay. The efficacy of rapid antigen detection-cell culture amplification (Ag-CCA) was evaluated with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 5-D8/1 (DAKO) and Pan-Enterovirus clone 2E11 (Chemicon) with 10 poliovirus, echovirus, and coxsackievirus type A and B stock isolates and College of American Pathologists check samples. By using Ag-CCA technology, MAb 2E11 was more sensitive than 5-D8/1 at detecting a greater number of stock isolates at or past tube (cytopathic effect [CPE]) culture (TC) end points. The efficacy of Ag-CCA in the clinical setting was subsequently confirmed with 273 consecutively freshly collected nasopharyngeal aspirate or swab specimens, rectal swab, and cerebrospinal fluid specimens during the 1999 enterovirus season. All specimens were tested by Ag-CCA in parallel with rhesus monkey kidney (RhMk), MRC-5, and A549 conventional TCs. Approximately 60% of field specimens were additionally tested with Hep-2 and HNK conventional TCs. Sixty-two percent of the clinical specimens tested were Ag-CCA positive after 48 h. Among 51 isolates, the mean time to CPE or culture confirmation was 5.5 days (range, 2 to 18 days). After 48 h, Ag-CCA achieved sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 62, 100, 100, and 93%, respectively. During the same period, TC-CPE displayed test parameters of 12, 100, 100, and 85%, respectively. After 5 days, the sensitivity and specificity of Ag-CCA increased to 92 and 98%, respectively. Within the same period, isolation attained sensitivity and specificity of 52 and 100%, respectively. Although Ag-CCA displayed slightly reduced sensitivity and reduced specificity compared with conventional cell culture after 14 days, the markedly superior 48-h enterovirus Ag-CCA detection rate supports incorporation of this assay into the routine clinical setting. PMID:11473988

  2. Estimating radiological background using imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Schweppe, John E.; Stave, Sean C.; Jordan, David V.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Stewart, Trevor N.; Seifert, Carolyn E.

    2014-06-13

    Optical imaging spectroscopy is investigated as a method to estimate radiological background by spectral identification of soils, sediments, rocks, minerals and building materials derived from natural materials and assigning tabulated radiological emission values to these materials. Radiological airborne surveys are undertaken by local, state and federal agencies to identify the presence of radiological materials out of regulatory compliance. Detection performance in such surveys is determined by (among other factors) the uncertainty in the radiation background; increased knowledge of the expected radiation background will improve the ability to detect low-activity radiological materials. Radiological background due to naturally occurring radiological materials (NORM) can be estimated by reference to previous survey results, use of global 40K, 238U, and 232Th (KUT) values, reference to existing USGS radiation background maps, or by a moving average of the data as it is acquired. Each of these methods has its drawbacks: previous survey results may not include recent changes, the global average provides only a zero-order estimate, the USGS background radiation map resolutions are coarse and are accurate only to 1 km – 25 km sampling intervals depending on locale, and a moving average may essentially low pass filter the data to obscure small changes in radiation counts. Imaging spectroscopy from airborne or spaceborne platforms can offer higher resolution identification of materials and background, as well as provide imaging context information. AVIRIS hyperspectral image data is analyzed using commercial exploitation software to determine the usefulness of imaging spectroscopy to identify qualitative radiological background emissions when compared to airborne radiological survey data.

  3. Using hyperspectral image enhancement method for small size object detection on the sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lu; Noro, Naoki; Takara, Yohei; Ando, Fuminori; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2015-10-01

    Small size object detection in vast ocean plays an important role in rescues after accident or disaster. One of the promising approach is a hyperspectral imaging system (HIS). However, due to the limitation of HIS sensor's resolution, interested target might occupy only several pixels or less in the image, it's difficult to detect small object, moreover the sun glint of the sea surface make it even more difficult. In this paper, we propose an image analysis technique suitable for the computer aided detection of small objects on the sea surface, especially humans. We firstly separate objects from background by adapting a previously proposed image enhancement method and then apply a linear unmixing method to define the endmember's spectrum. At last, we use spectral angle mapping method to classify presented objects and thus detect small size object. The proposed system provides the following results for supporting the detection of humans and other small objects on the sea surface; an image with spectral color enhancement, alerts of various objects, and the human detection results. This multilayered approach is expected to reduce the oversight, i.e., false negative error. Results of the proposed technique have been compared with existent methods, and our method has successfully enhance the hyperspectral image, and detect small object from the sea surface with high human detection rate, shows the ability to further detection of human in this study). The result are less influenced by the sun glint effects. This study helps recognizing small objects on the sea surface, and it leads to advances in the rescuing system using aircraft equipped HIS technology.

  4. Screening and surveillance for the early detection of colorectal cancer and adenomatous polyps, 2008: a joint guideline from the American Cancer Society, the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer, and the American College of Radiology.

    PubMed

    Levin, Bernard; Lieberman, David A; McFarland, Beth; Andrews, Kimberly S; Brooks, Durado; Bond, John; Dash, Chiranjeev; Giardiello, Francis M; Glick, Seth; Johnson, David; Johnson, C Daniel; Levin, Theodore R; Pickhardt, Perry J; Rex, Douglas K; Smith, Robert A; Thorson, Alan; Winawer, Sidney J

    2008-05-01

    In the United States, colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer diagnosed among men and women and the second leading cause of death from cancer. CRC largely can be prevented by the detection and removal of adenomatous polyps, and survival is significantly better when CRC is diagnosed while still localized. In 2006 to 2007, the American Cancer Society, the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer, and the American College of Radiology came together to develop consensus guidelines for the detection of adenomatous polyps and CRC in asymptomatic average-risk adults. In this update of each organization's guidelines, screening tests are grouped into those that primarily detect cancer early and those that can detect cancer early and also can detect adenomatous polyps, thus providing a greater potential for prevention through polypectomy. When possible, clinicians should make patients aware of the full range of screening options, but at a minimum they should be prepared to offer patients a choice between a screening test that primarily is effective at early cancer detection and a screening test that is effective at both early cancer detection and cancer prevention through the detection and removal of polyps. It is the strong opinion of these 3 organizations that colon cancer prevention should be the primary goal of screening.

  5. Screening and surveillance for the early detection of colorectal cancer and adenomatous polyps, 2008: a joint guideline from the American Cancer Society, the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer, and the American College of Radiology.

    PubMed

    Levin, Bernard; Lieberman, David A; McFarland, Beth; Smith, Robert A; Brooks, Durado; Andrews, Kimberly S; Dash, Chiranjeev; Giardiello, Francis M; Glick, Seth; Levin, Theodore R; Pickhardt, Perry; Rex, Douglas K; Thorson, Alan; Winawer, Sidney J

    2008-01-01

    In the United States, colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer diagnosed among men and women and the second leading cause of death from cancer. CRC largely can be prevented by the detection and removal of adenomatous polyps, and survival is significantly better when CRC is diagnosed while still localized. In 2006 to 2007, the American Cancer Society, the US Multi Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer, and the American College of Radiology came together to develop consensus guidelines for the detection of adenomatous polyps and CRC in asymptomatic average-risk adults. In this update of each organization's guidelines, screening tests are grouped into those that primarily detect cancer early and those that can detect cancer early and also can detect adenomatous polyps, thus providing a greater potential for prevention through polypectomy. When possible, clinicians should make patients aware of the full range of screening options, but at a minimum they should be prepared to offer patients a choice between a screening test that is effective at both early cancer detection and cancer prevention through the detection and removal of polyps and a screening test that primarily is effective at early cancer detection. It is the strong opinion of these 3 organizations that colon cancer prevention should be the primary goal of screening.

  6. Socioeconomic trends in radiology.

    PubMed

    Barneveld Binkhuysen, F H

    1998-01-01

    For radiology the socioeconomic environment is a topic of increasing importance. In addition to the well-known important scientific developments in radiology such as interventional MRI, several other major trends can be recognized: (1) changes in the delivery of health care, in which all kinds of managed care are developing and will influence the practice of radiology, and (2) the process of computerization and digitization. The socioeconomic environment of radiology will be transformed by the developments in managed care, teleradiology and the integration of information systems. If radiologists want to manage future radiology departments they must have an understanding of the changes in the fields of economics and politics that are taking place and that will increasingly influence radiology. Some important and recognizable aspects of these changes will be described here. PMID:9477292

  7. High-sensitivity pesticide detection using particle-enhanced resonant Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Bikas; Saito, Yuika; Verma, Prabhat

    2016-03-01

    The use of pesticides in agriculture has raised concerns, as even a small residual of pesticide on food can be harmful. It is therefore of great importance to develop a robust technique to detect tiny amounts of pesticides. Although Raman spectroscopy is frequently used for chemical identification, it is not suitable for extremely low molecular concentrations. We propose a technique called particle-enhanced resonant Raman spectroscopy to detect extremely low concentrations of pesticides, where gold nanoparticles of desired plasmonic resonance are synthesized to match the resonance in Raman scattering. We successfully demonstrated the detection of extremely low amounts of pesticides on oranges.

  8. DNA detection using plasmonic enhanced near-infrared photoluminescence of gallium arsenide.

    PubMed

    Tang, Longhua; Chun, Ik Su; Wang, Zidong; Li, Jinghong; Li, Xiuling; Lu, Yi

    2013-10-15

    Efficient near-infrared detection of specific DNA with single nucleotide polymorphism selectivity is important for diagnostics and biomedical research. Herein, we report the use of gallium arsenide (GaAs) as a sensing platform for probing DNA immobilization and targeting DNA hybridization, resulting in ∼8-fold enhanced GaAs photoluminescence (PL) at ∼875 nm. The new signal amplification strategy, further coupled with the plasmonic effect of Au nanoparticles, is capable of detecting DNA molecules with a detection limit of 0.8 pM and selectivity against single base mismatches. Such an ultrasensitive near-infrared sensor can find a wide range of biochemical and biomedical applications.

  9. Detection of molecular oxygen at low concentrations using quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pohlkötter, Andreas; Köhring, Michael; Willer, Ulrike; Schade, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Molecular oxygen is detected at low concentrations using photoacoustic spectroscopy despite its unfavorable photoacoustic properties. The system consists of a seed laser diode, a tapered amplifier and a quartz tuning fork based spectrophone, thus employing quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS). With this system a detection limit of 13 ppm is reached with a compact and long term stable setup. Further improvement of the detection limit is possible by adding suitable gases to the sample gas that promote the radiationless de-excitation of the oxygen molecules. PMID:22163666

  10. Detection of Molecular Oxygen at Low Concentrations Using Quartz Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pohlkötter, Andreas; Köhring, Michael; Willer, Ulrike; Schade, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Molecular oxygen is detected at low concentrations using photoacoustic spectroscopy despite its unfavorable photoacoustic properties. The system consists of a seed laser diode, a tapered amplifier and a quartz tuning fork based spectrophone, thus employing quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS). With this system a detection limit of 13 ppm is reached with a compact and long term stable setup. Further improvement of the detection limit is possible by adding suitable gases to the sample gas that promote the radiationless de-excitation of the oxygen molecules. PMID:22163666

  11. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for detection of phenylketonuria for newborn screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javanmard, M.; Davis, R. W.

    2014-02-01

    Diagnosis of Phenylketonuria (PKU) in newborns is important because it can potentially help prevent mental retardation since it is treatable by dietary means. PKU results in phenylketonurics having phenylalanine levels as high as 2 mM whereas the normal upper limit in healthy newborns is 120 uM. To this end, we are developing a microfluidic platform integrated with a SERS substrate for detection of high levels of phenylalanine. We have successfully demonstrated SERS detection of phenylalanine using various SERS substrates fabricated using nanosphere lithography, which exhibit high levels of field enhancement. We show detection of SERS at clinically relevant levels.

  12. A surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy platform based on nanoshells for detection of β-amyloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beier, Hope T.; Cowan, Christopher B.; Good, Theresa A.; Coté, Gerard L.

    2008-02-01

    A major limitation of many surfaced enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) approaches is the dependence of the Raman enhancement on the local nanostructure. While these local "hot spots" may provide areas of extremely strong enhancement, which make trace analyte detection possible, they also make quantitative measurements problematic. Gold nanoshells however, with the ratio of the radius of their silica core to gold shell tuned to the near infrared excitation wavelength, have been used as a platform for uniform SERS enhancement. By using nanoshells, the SERS enhancement is dependent on the resonance of single nanoshells, without relying on the uncontrolled contribution from localized "hot spots". The nanoshell platform is functionalized with sialic acid to mimic neuronal cells surfaces to allow for the specific binding of β-amyloid, the primary protein component of the senile plaques found in Alzheimer's disease patients. We ultimately hope that this mechanism will provide insight into the relationship between the progression of Alzheimer's disease and β-amyloid through detection of the toxic form of the protein with structural and concentration information. With this approach, we have obtained concentration dependent spectra, consistent across the platform surface, which indicate the feasibility of detecting β-amyloid oligomers into the picomolar range. Additionally, by monitoring SERS spectra as β-amyloid changes its structural conformation from monomer to fibril, we have demonstrated conformational dependence of the SERS signals.

  13. Detection of viruses: atomic force microscopy and surface enhanced raman spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper demonstrated the capability of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to function effectively as ultra-sensitive readout tools for chip-scale platforms designed for pathogen detection in complex biological media. AFM allows direct (i.e. label-free) vi...

  14. Enhanced Detection of Multivariate Outliers Using Algorithm-Based Visual Display Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Wendy B.

    This study uses an algorithm-based visual display technique (FACES) to provide enhanced detection of multivariate outliers within large-scale data sets. The FACES computer graphing algorithm (H. Chernoff, 1973) constructs a cartoon-like face, using up to 18 variables for each case. A major advantage of FACES is the ability to store and show the…

  15. Subnanogram detection of dyes on filter paper by surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, C.D.

    1984-04-01

    A technique is demonstrated for the detection of subnanogram quantities of dyes adsorbed on filter paper. The introduction of silver colloidal hydrosols stabilized on the filter paper provides the necessary conditions for surface-enhanced Raman scattering. The Raman scattering was performed using a 3 mW He-Ne laser.

  16. Detection and differentiation of Salmonella serotypes using Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) technique.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) can detect pathogens rapidly and accurately. The metal surface for the SERS spectroscopy was a silver nano-particle encapsulated biopolymer polyvinyl alcohol nano-colloid deposited on a stainless steel plate. Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis...

  17. Investigation of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy for hemozoin detection in malaria diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Keren; Xiong, Aoli; Yuen, Clement; Preiser, Peter; Liu, Quan

    2016-03-01

    We report two methods of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for hemozoin detection in malaria infected human blood. In the first method, silver nanoparticles were synthesized separately and then mixed with lysed blood; while in the second method, silver nanoparticles were synthesized directly inside the parasites of Plasmodium falciparum.

  18. Surface enhanced raman spectroscopy technique in rapid detection of live and dead salmonella cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many research proved that Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) can detect pathogens rapidly and accurately. In this study, a silver metal substrate was used for the selected common food pathogen Salmonella typhimurium bacteria. Nano silver rods were deposited on a thin titanium coating over t...

  19. Embedded Bone Fragment Detection in Chicken Fillets using Transmittance Image Enhancement and Hyperspectral Reflectance Imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper is concerned with the detection of bone fragments embedded in compressed de-boned skinless chicken breast fillets by enhancing single-band transmittance images generated by back-lighting and exploiting spectral information from hyperspectral reflectance images. Optical imaging of chicken ...

  20. DNA reorientation on Au nanoparticles: label-free detection of hybridization by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Evanthia; Bell, Steven E J

    2011-10-21

    DNA sequences attached to Au nanoparticles via thiol linkers stand up from the surface, giving preferential enhancement of the adenine ring breathing SERS band. Non-specific binding via the nucleobases reorients the DNA, reducing this effect. This change in intensity on reorientation was utilised for label-free detection of hybridization of a molecular beacon.

  1. Eccentricity dependent auditory enhancement of visual stimulus detection but not discrimination.

    PubMed

    Gleiss, Stephanie; Kayser, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Sensory perception is enhanced by the complementary information provided by our different sensory modalities and even apparently task irrelevant stimuli in one modality can facilitate performance in another. While perception in general comprises both, the detection of sensory objects as well as their discrimination and recognition, most studies on audio-visual interactions have focused on either of these aspects. However, previous evidence, neuroanatomical projections between early sensory cortices and computational mechanisms suggest that sounds might differentially affect visual detection and discrimination and differentially at central and peripheral retinal locations. We performed an experiment to directly test this by probing the enhancement of visual detection and discrimination by auxiliary sounds at different visual eccentricities and within the same subjects. Specifically, we quantified the enhancement provided by sounds that reduce the overall uncertainty about the visual stimulus beyond basic multisensory co-stimulation. This revealed a general trend for stronger enhancement at peripheral locations in both tasks, but a statistically significant effect only for detection and only at peripheral locations. Overall this suggests that there are topographic differences in the auditory facilitation of basic visual processes and that these may differentially affect basic aspects of visual recognition.

  2. An atlas of radiological anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, J.; Abrahams, P.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains a wealth of radiologic images of normal human anatomy; plain radiographs, contrast-enhanced radiographs, and computed tomography (CT) scans. There are 18 pages of magnetic resonance (MR) images, most on the brain and spinal cord, so that there are only two pages on MR imaging of the heart and two pages on abdominal and pelvic MR imaging. Twelve pages of ultrasound (US) images are included. This book has the radiologic image paired with an explanatory drawing; the image is on the left with a paragraph or two of text, and the drawing is on the right with legends. This book includes images of the brain and spinal cord obtained with arteriography, venography, myelography, encephalography, CT, and MR imaging.

  3. Imaging and radiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... imaging or a PET scan Ultrasound INTERVENTIONAL RADIOLOGY Interventional radiologists are doctors that use imaging such as CT, ultrasound, MRI and fluoroscopy to help guide procedures. The imaging ...

  4. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-11-21

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint.

  5. One year of AGILE Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes detection in the enhanced configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marisaldi, Martino; Ursi, Alessandro; Argan, Andrea; Tavani, Marco; Labanti, Claudio; Fuschino, Fabio; Campana, Riccardo; Mezentsev, Andrey; Østgaard, Nikolai

    2016-04-01

    At the end of March 2015 the onboard configuration of the AGILE MiniCalorimeter was modified in order to disable the veto signal of the Anti-Coincidence shield. This change was motivated by the need to reduce the dead-time for TGF detection to a minimum. The change resulted in a ten fold improvement in Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) detection rate and in a nearly dead-time free TGF sample with events as short as 20 microseconds (M. Marisaldi et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 42, 2015). Estimates based on the initial period of data acquisition in this enhanced configuration suggested the expected yearly TGF rate to be in the range 800-1000. We present here the updated statistical analysis of the enhanced AGILE TGF sample after one complete year of operations in the enhanced configuration.

  6. 3D Ag/ZnO hybrids for sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chenyue; Xu, Chunxiang; Lu, Junfeng; Li, Zhaohui; Tian, Zhengshan

    2016-03-01

    To combine the surface plasma resonance of metal and local field enhancement in metal/semiconductor interface, Ag nanoparticles (NPs) were assembled on a ZnO nanorod array which was grown by hydrothermally on carbon fibers. The construction of dimensional (3D) Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) substrate is used for the sensitive detection of organic pollutants with the advantages such as facile synthesis, short detection time and low cost. The hybrid substrate was manifested a high sensitivity to phenol red at a lower concentration of 1 × 10-9 M and a higher enhancement factor of 3.18 × 109. Moreover, the ZnO nanostructures decorated with Ag NPs were demonstrated self-cleaning function under UV irradiation via photocatalytic degradation of the analytic molecules. The fabrication process of the materials and sensors, optimization of the SERS behaviors for different sized Ag NPs, the mechanism of SERS and recovery were presented with a detailed discussion.

  7. Ethanol as an alternative to formaldehyde for the enhancement of manganese(IV) chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Smith, Zoe M; Terry, Jessica M; Barnett, Neil W; Francis, Paul S

    2014-12-01

    Previous applications of manganese(IV) as a chemiluminescence reagent have required the use of formaldehyde to enhance the emission intensity to analytically useful levels. However, this known human carcinogen (by inhalation) is not ideal for routine application. A wide range of alternative enhancers have been examined but to date none have been found to provide the dramatic increase in chemiluminescence intensities obtained using formaldehyde. Herein, we demonstrate that ethanol offers a simple, safe and inexpensive alternative to the use of formaldehyde for manganese(IV) chemiluminescence detection, without compromising signal intensity or sensitivity. For example, chemiluminescence signals for opiate alkaloids using 50-100% ethanol were 0.8-1.6-fold those using 2M formaldehyde. This innocuous alternative enhancer is shown to be a particularly effective for the direct detection of thiols and disulfides by manganese(IV) chemiluminescence, which we have applied to a simple HPLC procedure to determine a series of biomarkers of oxidative stress.

  8. Enhanced pulsar and single pulse detection via automated radio frequency interference detection in multipixel feeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocz, J.; Bailes, M.; Barnes, D.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Levin, L.

    2012-02-01

    Single pixel feeds on large aperture radio telescopes have the ability to detect weak (˜10 mJy) impulsive bursts of radio emission and sub-mJy radio pulsars. Unfortunately, in large-scale blind surveys, radio frequency interference (RFI) mimics both radio bursts and radio pulsars, greatly reducing the sensitivity to new discoveries as real signals of astronomical origin get lost among the millions of false candidates. In this paper a technique that takes advantage of multipixel feeds to use eigenvector decomposition of common signals is used to greatly facilitate radio burst and pulsar discovery. Since the majority of RFI occurs with zero dispersion, the method was tested on the total power present in the 13 beams of the Parkes multibeam receiver using data from archival intermediate-latitude surveys. The implementation of this method greatly reduced the number of false candidates and led to the discovery of one new rotating radio transient or RRAT, six new pulsars and five new pulses that shared the swept-frequency characteristics similar in nature to the `Lorimer burst'. These five new signals occurred within minutes of 11 previous detections of a similar type. When viewed together, they display temporal characteristics related to integer seconds, with non-random distributions and characteristic 'gaps' between them, suggesting they are not from a naturally occurring source. Despite the success in removing RFI, false candidates present in the data that are only visible after integrating in time or at non-zero dispersion remained. It is demonstrated that with some computational penalty, the method can be applied iteratively at all trial dispersions and time resolutions to remove the vast majority of spurious candidates.

  9. Tuning plasmonic and chemical enhancement for SERS detection on graphene-based Au hybrids.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiu; Liang, BenLiang; Pan, Zhenghui; Lang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Yuegang; Wang, Guangsheng; Yin, Penggang; Guo, Lin

    2015-12-21

    Various graphene-based Au nanocomposites have been developed as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates recently. However, efficient use of SERS has been impeded by the difficulty of tuning SERS enhancement effects induced from chemical and plasmonic enhancement by different preparation methods of graphene. Herein, we developed graphene-based Au hybrids through physical sputtering gold NPs on monolayer graphene prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) as a CVD-G/Au hybrid, as well as graphene oxide-gold (GO/Au) and reduced-graphene oxide (rGO/Au) hybrids prepared using the chemical in situ crystallization growth method. Plasmonic and chemical enhancements were tuned effectively by simple methods in these as-prepared graphene-based Au systems. SERS performances of CVD-G/Au, rGO/Au and GO/Au showed a gradually monotonic increasing tendency of enhancement factors (EFs) for adsorbed Rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules, which show clear dependence on chemical bonds between graphene and Au, indicating that the chemical enhancement can be steadily controlled by chemical groups in a graphene-based Au hybrid system. Most notably, we demonstrate that the optimized GO/Au was able to detect biomolecules of adenine, which displayed high sensitivity with a detection limit of 10(-7) M as well as good reproducibility and uniformity. PMID:26575834

  10. The Use of Contrast-Enhanced Post Mortem CT in the Detection of Cardiovascular Deaths

    PubMed Central

    Penzkofer, Tobias; Kuhl, Christiane Katharina; Knüchel, Ruth; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the diagnostic value of contrast enhanced post mortem computed tomography (PMCT) in comparison to non-enhanced post mortem CT in the detection of cardiovascular causes of death (COD). Background As autopsy rates decline, new methods to determine CODs are necessary. So contrast enhanced PMCT shall be evaluated in comparison to established non-enhanced PMCT in order to further improve the method. Methods In a prospective study, 20 corpses were examined using a 64-row multisclice CT (MSCT) before and after intraarterial perfusion with a newly developed, barium-bearing contrast agent and ventilation of the lungs. The cause of death was determined in enhanced and unenhanced scans and a level of confidence (LOC) was given by three experienced radiologists on a scale between 0 and 4. Results were compared to autopsy results as gold standard. Autopsy was performed blinded to PMCT-findings. Results The method allowed visualization of different types of cause of death. There was a significant improvement in LOC in enhanced scans compared to unenhanced scans as well as an improvement in the detection of COD. The cause of death could be determined in 19 out of 20 patients. Conclusions PMCT is feasible and appears to be robust for diagnosing cardiovascular causes of death. When compared with unenhanced post-mortem CT intraarterial perfusion and pulmonary ventilation significantly improve visualization and diagnostic accuracy. These promising results warrant further studies. PMID:24759757

  11. Hybrid plasmonic-photonic mode in a subwavelength fiber for enhanced single-nanoparticle detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, You-Ling; Gong, Qihuang

    2015-01-01

    We study a hybrid mode in a composite system consisting of a localized metal nanosphere on a subwavelength fiber. It is found that the hybrid mode resulting from coupling of the fiber propagating mode and the plasmonic resonance is promising for strongly enhanced interaction between light and matter. We then propose a single-nanoparticle detection scheme by monitoring the nanofiber transmission change induced by the plasmonic-enhanced target scattering. The detection limit can be as low as 18 nm in target diameter, showing great potential for sensing single viruses or biomolecules. In the hybrid system, the resonant wavelength is tunable from visible to near-infrared spectral range by employing a metal nanoshell instead of the nanosphere, while the low detection limit of a few tens of nanometers can still remain.

  12. Morphologically manipulated Ag/ZnO nanostructures as surface enhanced Raman scattering probes for explosives detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaik, Ummar Pasha; Hamad, Syed; Ahamad Mohiddon, Md.; Soma, Venugopal Rao; Ghanashyam Krishna, M.

    2016-03-01

    The detection of secondary explosive molecules (e.g., ANTA, FOX-7, and CL-20) using Ag decorated ZnO nanostructures as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probes is demonstrated. ZnO nanostructures were grown on borosilicate glass substrates by rapid thermal oxidation of metallic Zn films at 500 °C. The oxide nanostructures, including nanosheets and nanowires, emerged over the surface of the Zn film leaving behind the metal residue. We demonstrate that SERS measurements with concentrations as low as 10 μM, of the three explosive molecules ANTA, FOX-7, and CL-20 over ZnO/Ag nanostructures, resulted in enhancement factors of ˜107, ˜107, and ˜104, respectively. These measurements validate the high sensitivity of detection of explosive molecules using Ag decorated ZnO nanostructures as SERS substrates. The Zn metal residue and conditions of annealing play an important role in determining the detection sensitivity.

  13. Detection of nerve gases using surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates with high droplet adhesion.

    PubMed

    Hakonen, Aron; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk; Andersson, Per Ola; Juhlin, Lars; Svedendahl, Mikael; Boisen, Anja; Käll, Mikael

    2016-01-21

    Threats from chemical warfare agents, commonly known as nerve gases, constitute a serious security issue of increasing global concern because of surging terrorist activity worldwide. However, nerve gases are difficult to detect using current analytical tools and outside dedicated laboratories. Here we demonstrate that surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) can be used for sensitive detection of femtomol quantities of two nerve gases, VX and Tabun, using a handheld Raman device and SERS substrates consisting of flexible gold-covered Si nanopillars. The substrate surface exhibits high droplet adhesion and nanopillar clustering due to elasto-capillary forces, resulting in enrichment of target molecules in plasmonic hot-spots with high Raman enhancement. The results may pave the way for strategic life-saving SERS detection of chemical warfare agents in the field. PMID:26676552

  14. Childhood arthritis: classification and radiology.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Karl; Gardner-Medwin, Janet

    2002-01-01

    Childhood arthritis has now been reclassified into a single internationally recognized entity of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Radiology provides an important role in the management of JIA, in helping in the differential diagnosis, monitoring disease progression and detecting complications. Traditionally, plain radiographs have been the imaging investigation of choice but magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound are now providing a more effective and safer alternative. The appropriate use of sequences in MR imaging is important in the early detection of joint abnormalities in JIA. PMID:11798203

  15. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic detection of Bacillus subtilis spores using gold nanoparticle based substrates.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Han-Wen; Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Lin, Xin-Xin; Huan, Shuang-Yan; Wu, Hai-Long; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2011-11-30

    The detection of bacterial spores requires the capability of highly sensitive and biocompatible probes. This report describes the findings of an investigation of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic (SERS) detection of Bacillus subtilis spores using gold-nanoparticle (Au NP) based substrates as the spectroscopic probe. The SERS substrates are shown to be highly sensitive for the detection of B. subtilis spores, which release calcium dipicolinate (CaDPA) as a biomarker. The SERS bands of CaDPA released from the spores by extraction using nitric acid provide the diagnostic signal for the detection, exhibiting a limit of detection (LOD) of 1.5×10(9) spores L(-1) (or 2.5×10(-14) M). The LOD for the Au NP based substrates is quite comparable with that reported for Ag nanoparticle based substrates for the detection of spores, though the surface adsorption equilibrium constant is found to be smaller by a factor of 1-2 orders of magnitude than the Ag nanoparticle based substrates. The results have also revealed the viability of SERS detection of CaDPA released from the spores under ambient conditions without extraction using any reagents, showing a significant reduction of the diagnostic peak width for the detection. These findings have demonstrated the viability of Au NP based SERS substrates for direct use with high resolution and sensitivity as a biocompatible probe for the detection of bacterial spores.

  16. Detection of nerve gases using surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates with high droplet adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakonen, Aron; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk; Andersson, Per Ola; Juhlin, Lars; Svedendahl, Mikael; Boisen, Anja; Käll, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Threats from chemical warfare agents, commonly known as nerve gases, constitute a serious security issue of increasing global concern because of surging terrorist activity worldwide. However, nerve gases are difficult to detect using current analytical tools and outside dedicated laboratories. Here we demonstrate that surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) can be used for sensitive detection of femtomol quantities of two nerve gases, VX and Tabun, using a handheld Raman device and SERS substrates consisting of flexible gold-covered Si nanopillars. The substrate surface exhibits high droplet adhesion and nanopillar clustering due to elasto-capillary forces, resulting in enrichment of target molecules in plasmonic hot-spots with high Raman enhancement. The results may pave the way for strategic life-saving SERS detection of chemical warfare agents in the field.Threats from chemical warfare agents, commonly known as nerve gases, constitute a serious security issue of increasing global concern because of surging terrorist activity worldwide. However, nerve gases are difficult to detect using current analytical tools and outside dedicated laboratories. Here we demonstrate that surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) can be used for sensitive detection of femtomol quantities of two nerve gases, VX and Tabun, using a handheld Raman device and SERS substrates consisting of flexible gold-covered Si nanopillars. The substrate surface exhibits high droplet adhesion and nanopillar clustering due to elasto-capillary forces, resulting in enrichment of target molecules in plasmonic hot-spots with high Raman enhancement. The results may pave the way for strategic life-saving SERS detection of chemical warfare agents in the field. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06524k

  17. Surpassingly competitive electromagnetic field enhancement at the silica/silver interface for selective intracellular surface enhanced Raman scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Radziuk, Darya; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2015-03-24

    A thin plasmonic nanofilm is formed by preformed silver nanoparticles (30 nm) in the matrix of poly(vinyl alcohol) adsorbed on silica microparticles (1.5 μm) (SiO2@Ag-PVA). By applying finite element method (FEM) analysis the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) enhancement factors (EFs) can reach 10(5) with higher values from 10(9) to 10(11) in the silver layer of 5 nm thickness. Nanoparticles in the SiO2@Ag-PVA nanofilm need at least 15 nm radius to exhibit SERS EFs greater than 10(7). High values of this enhancement at the silver/silica interface of spherical geometry can be reached faster by using a 532 nm compared to 785 nm excitation wavelength. By this approach different SERS spectral features can be distinguished between live fibroblasts with spread ("healthy" state) or round ("unhealthy" state) shapes. Characteristic features of secondary protein structures, detection of different acidic conditions and cholesterol with at least a 3-fold higher sensitivity are examined. Moreover, a greater amount of glucose (glucogen) and also tyrosine can be monitored in real time. This is important in identification of higher risk of diabetes as well as in several genetic metabolic disorders (e.g., phenylketonuria, tyrosinaemia type II and tyrosinosis).

  18. Surpassingly competitive electromagnetic field enhancement at the silica/silver interface for selective intracellular surface enhanced Raman scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Radziuk, Darya; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2015-03-24

    A thin plasmonic nanofilm is formed by preformed silver nanoparticles (30 nm) in the matrix of poly(vinyl alcohol) adsorbed on silica microparticles (1.5 μm) (SiO2@Ag-PVA). By applying finite element method (FEM) analysis the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) enhancement factors (EFs) can reach 10(5) with higher values from 10(9) to 10(11) in the silver layer of 5 nm thickness. Nanoparticles in the SiO2@Ag-PVA nanofilm need at least 15 nm radius to exhibit SERS EFs greater than 10(7). High values of this enhancement at the silver/silica interface of spherical geometry can be reached faster by using a 532 nm compared to 785 nm excitation wavelength. By this approach different SERS spectral features can be distinguished between live fibroblasts with spread ("healthy" state) or round ("unhealthy" state) shapes. Characteristic features of secondary protein structures, detection of different acidic conditions and cholesterol with at least a 3-fold higher sensitivity are examined. Moreover, a greater amount of glucose (glucogen) and also tyrosine can be monitored in real time. This is important in identification of higher risk of diabetes as well as in several genetic metabolic disorders (e.g., phenylketonuria, tyrosinaemia type II and tyrosinosis). PMID:25704061

  19. Spatially selective photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence and application to background reduction for biomolecule detection assays

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhery, Vikram; Huang, Cheng-Sheng; Pokhriyal, Anusha; Polans, James; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2011-01-01

    By combining photonic crystal label-free biosensor imaging with photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence, it is possible to selectively enhance the fluorescence emission from regions of the PC surface based upon the density of immobilized capture molecules. A label-free image of the capture molecules enables determination of optimal coupling conditions of the laser used for fluorescence imaging of the photonic crystal surface on a pixel-by-pixel basis, allowing maximization of fluorescence enhancement factor from regions incorporating a biomolecule capture spot and minimization of background autofluorescence from areas between capture spots. This capability significantly improves the contrast of enhanced fluorescent images, and when applied to an antibody protein microarray, provides a substantial advantage over conventional fluorescence microscopy. Using the new approach, we demonstrate detection limits as low as 0.97 pg/ml for a representative protein biomarker in buffer. PMID:22109210

  20. Challenge of false alarms in nitroaromatic explosive detection--a detection device based on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wackerbarth, Hainer; Gundrum, Lars; Salb, Christian; Christou, Konstantin; Viöl, Wolfgang

    2010-08-10

    A challenge in the detection of explosives is the differentiation between explosives and contaminants. Synthetic musk-containing perfumes can cause false alarms, as these perfumes are nitroaromatic compounds, which can be mistaken for trinitro toluene (TNT) by some detectors. We present a detection principle based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). A stream of the airborne compounds is focused and resublimated on a cooled nanostructured gold surface. We recorded high-resolution SERS spectra of TNT, musk xylene, and musk ketone. The nitroaromatic compounds can be identified unambiguously by their SERS spectra. Even the dominant bands containing nitro-group scissoring and symmetric stretching modes are significantly shifted by the difference in molecular structure. PMID:20697438

  1. Enhancement of the Feature Extraction Capability in Global Damage Detection Using Wavelet Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saleeb, Atef F.; Ponnaluru, Gopi Krishna

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to assess the specific capabilities of the defect energy parameter technique for global damage detection developed by Saleeb and coworkers. The feature extraction is the most important capability in any damage-detection technique. Features are any parameters extracted from the processed measurement data in order to enhance damage detection. The damage feature extraction capability was studied extensively by analyzing various simulation results. The practical significance in structural health monitoring is that the detection at early stages of small-size defects is always desirable. The amount of changes in the structure's response due to these small defects was determined to show the needed level of accuracy in the experimental methods. The arrangement of fine/extensive sensor network to measure required data for the detection is an "unlimited" ability, but there is a difficulty to place extensive number of sensors on a structure. Therefore, an investigation was conducted using the measurements of coarse sensor network. The white and the pink noises, which cover most of the frequency ranges that are typically encountered in the many measuring devices used (e.g., accelerometers, strain gauges, etc.) are added to the displacements to investigate the effect of noisy measurements in the detection technique. The noisy displacements and the noisy damage parameter values are used to study the signal feature reconstruction using wavelets. The enhancement of the feature extraction capability was successfully achieved by the wavelet theory.

  2. Apparatus for safeguarding a radiological source

    DOEpatents

    Bzorgi, Fariborz M

    2014-10-07

    A tamper detector is provided for safeguarding a radiological source that is moved into and out of a storage location through an access porthole for storage and use. The radiological source is presumed to have an associated shipping container approved by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for transporting the radiological source. The tamper detector typically includes a network of sealed tubing that spans at least a portion of the access porthole. There is an opening in the network of sealed tubing that is large enough for passage therethrough of the radiological source and small enough to prevent passage therethrough of the associated shipping cask. Generally a gas source connector is provided for establishing a gas pressure in the network of sealed tubing, and a pressure drop sensor is provided for detecting a drop in the gas pressure below a preset value.

  3. A PDMS-based cylindrical hybrid lens for enhanced fluorescence detection in microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bor-Shyh; Yang, Yu-Ching; Ho, Chong-Yi; Yang, Han-Yu; Wang, Hsiang-Yu

    2014-02-13

    Microfluidic systems based on fluorescence detection have been developed and applied for many biological and chemical applications. Because of the tiny amount of sample in the system; the induced fluorescence can be weak. Therefore, most microfluidic systems deploy multiple optical components or sophisticated equipment to enhance the efficiency of fluorescence detection. However, these strategies encounter common issues of complex manufacturing processes and high costs. In this study; a miniature, cylindrical and hybrid lens made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to improve the fluorescence detection in microfluidic systems is proposed. The hybrid lens integrates a laser focusing lens and a fluorescence collecting lens to achieve dual functions and simplify optical setup. Moreover, PDMS has advantages of low-cost and straightforward fabrication compared with conventional optical components. The performance of the proposed lens is first examined with two fluorescent dyes and the results show that the lens provides satisfactory enhancement for fluorescence detection of Rhodamine 6G and Nile Red. The overall increments in collected fluorescence signal and detection sensitivity are more than 220% of those without lens, and the detection limits of Rhodamine 6G and Nile red are lowered to 0.01 μg/mL and 0.05 μg/mL, respectively. The hybrid lens is further applied to the detection of Nile red-labeled Chlorella vulgaris cells and it increases both signal intensity and detection sensitivity by more than 520%. The proposed hybrid lens also dramatically reduces the variation in detected signal caused by the deviation in incident angle of excitation light.

  4. Visual motion detection sensitivity is enhanced by an orthogonal motion aftereffect.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Hiromasa; Murakami, Ikuya

    2010-09-09

    A recent study (H. Takemura & I. Murakami, 2010) showed enhancement of motion detection sensitivity by an orthogonal induced motion, suggesting that a weak motion component can combine with an orthogonal motion component to generate stronger oblique motion perception. Here we examined how an orthogonal motion aftereffect (MAE) affects motion detection sensitivity. After adaptation to vertical motion, a Gabor patch barely moving leftward or rightward was presented. As a result of an interaction between horizontal physical motion and a vertical MAE, subjects perceived the stimulus as moving obliquely. Subjects were asked to judge the horizontal direction of motion irrespective of the vertical MAE. The performance was enhanced when the Gabor patch was perceived as moving obliquely as the result of a weak MAE. The enhancement effect depended on the strength of the MAE for each subject rather than on the temporal frequency of the adapting stimulus. These results suggest that weak motion information that is hard to detect can interact with orthogonal adaptation and yield stronger oblique motion perception, making directional judgment easier. Moreover, the present results indicate that the enhancement effect of orthogonal motion involves general motion integration mechanisms rather than a specific mechanism only applicable to a particular type of illusory motion.

  5. Surface enhanced Raman scattering for detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrift, Will; Bhattacharjee, Arunima; Darvishzadeh-Varcheie, Mahsa; Lu, Ying; Hochbaum, Allon; Capolino, Filippo; Whiteson, Katrine; Ragan, Regina

    2015-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA), a biofilm forming bacterium, commonly affects cystic fibrosis, burn victims, and immunocompromised patients. PA produces pyocyanin, an aromatic, redox active, secondary metabolite as part of its quorum sensing signaling system activated during biofilm formation. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors composed of Au nanospheres chemically assembled into clusters on diblock copolymer templates were fabricated and the ability to detect pyocyanin to monitor biofilm formation was investigated. Electromagnetic full wave simulations of clusters observed in scanning electron microcopy images show that the localized surface plasmon resonance wavelength is 696 nm for a dimer with a gap spacing of 1 nm in an average dielectric environment of the polymer and analyte; the local electric field enhancement is on the order of 400 at resonance, relative to free space. SERS data acquired at 785 nm excitation from a monolayer of benzenethiol on fabricated samples was compared with Raman data of pure benzenethiol and enhancement factors as large as 8×109 were calculated that are consistent with simulated field enhancements. Using this system, the limit of detection of pyocyanin in pure gradients was determined to be 10 parts per billion. In SERS data of the supernatant from the time dependent growth of PA shaking cultures, pyocyanin vibrational modes were clearly observable during the logarithmic growth phase corresponding to activation of genes related to biofilm formation. These results pave the way for the use of SERS sensors for the early detection of biofilm formation, leading to reduced healthcare costs and better patient outcomes.

  6. [Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy trace gas detection system based on the Fabry-Perot demodulation].

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng; Zhu, Yong; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Tian, Li; Xu, Zu-Wen

    2013-05-01

    An all-optical quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy system, based on the F-P demodulation, for trace gas detection in the open environment was proposed. In quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS), an optical fiber Fabry-Perot method was used to replace the conventional electronic demodulation method. The photoacoustic signal was obtained by demodulating the variation of the Fabry-Perot cavity between the quartz tuning fork side and the fiber face. An experimental system was setup. The experiment for detection of water vapour in the open environment was carried on. A normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 2.80 x 10(-7) cm(-1) x W x Hz(-1/2) was achieved. The result demonstrated that the sensitivity of the all-optical quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy system is about 2.6 times higher than that of the conventional QEPAS system. The all-optical quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy system is immune to electromagnetic interference, safe in flammable and explosive gas detection, suitable for high temperature and high humidity environments and realizable for long distance, multi-point and network sensing.

  7. Metal enhanced fluorescence improved protein and DNA detection by zigzag Ag nanorod arrays.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaofan; Xiao, Chenyu; Lau, Wai-Fung; Li, Jianping; Fu, Junxue

    2016-08-15

    As metal nano-arrays show great potential on metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF) than random nanostructures, MEF of Ag zigzag nanorod (ZNR) arrays made by oblique angle deposition has been studied for biomolecule-protein interaction and DNA hybridization. By changing the folding number and the deposition substrate temperature, a 14-fold enhancement factor (EF) is obtained for biotin-neutravidin detection. The optimal folding number is decided as Z=7, owing to the high scattering intensity of Ag ZNRs. The substrate temperature T=25°C and 0°C slightly alters the morphology of Ag ZNRs but has no big difference in EF. Further, Ag ZNRs deposited on a layer of Ag film have been introduced to the DNA hybridization and a significant signal enhancement has been observed through the fluorescence microscope. Through a detailed quantitative EF analysis, which excludes the enhancing effect from the increased surface area of ZNRs and only considers the contribution of MEF, an EF of 28 is achieved for the hybridization of two single-stranded oligonucleotides with 33 bases. Furthermore, a limit of detection is determined as 0.01pM. We believe that the Ag ZNR arrays can serve as a universal and sensitive bio-detection platform. PMID:27088369

  8. Error in radiology.

    PubMed

    Goddard, P; Leslie, A; Jones, A; Wakeley, C; Kabala, J

    2001-10-01

    The level of error in radiology has been tabulated from articles on error and on "double reporting" or "double reading". The level of error varies depending on the radiological investigation, but the range is 2-20% for clinically significant or major error. The greatest reduction in error rates will come from changes in systems.

  9. Radiological Defense. Textbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This textbook has been prepared under the direction of the Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DCPA) Staff College for use as a student reference manual in radiological defense (RADEF) courses. It provides much of the basic technical information necessary for a proper understanding of radiological defense and summarizes RADEF planning and expected…

  10. Fast and sensitive detection of ochratoxin A in red wine by nanoparticle-enhanced SPR.

    PubMed

    Karczmarczyk, Aleksandra; Reiner-Rozman, Ciril; Hageneder, Simone; Dubiak-Szepietowska, Monika; Dostálek, Jakub; Feller, Karl-Heinz

    2016-09-21

    Herein, we present a fast and sensitive biosensor for detection of Ochratoxin A (OTA) in a red wine that utilizes gold nanoparticle-enhanced surface plasmon resonance (SPR). By combining an indirect competitive inhibition immunoassay and signal enhancement by secondary antibodies conjugated with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), highly sensitive detection of low molecular weight compounds (such as OTA) was achieved. The reported biosensor allowed for OTA detection at concentrations as low as 0.75 ng mL(-1) and its limit of detection was improved by more than one order of magnitude to 0.068 ng mL(-1) by applying AuNPs as a signal enhancer. The study investigates the interplay of size of AuNPs and affinity of recognition elements affecting the efficiency of the signal amplification strategy based on AuNP. Furthermore, we observed that the presence of polyphenolic compounds in wine samples strongly interferes with the affinity binding on the surface. To overcome this limitation, a simple pre-treatment of the wine sample with the binding agent poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) was successfully applied.

  11. Fast and sensitive detection of ochratoxin A in red wine by nanoparticle-enhanced SPR.

    PubMed

    Karczmarczyk, Aleksandra; Reiner-Rozman, Ciril; Hageneder, Simone; Dubiak-Szepietowska, Monika; Dostálek, Jakub; Feller, Karl-Heinz

    2016-09-21

    Herein, we present a fast and sensitive biosensor for detection of Ochratoxin A (OTA) in a red wine that utilizes gold nanoparticle-enhanced surface plasmon resonance (SPR). By combining an indirect competitive inhibition immunoassay and signal enhancement by secondary antibodies conjugated with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), highly sensitive detection of low molecular weight compounds (such as OTA) was achieved. The reported biosensor allowed for OTA detection at concentrations as low as 0.75 ng mL(-1) and its limit of detection was improved by more than one order of magnitude to 0.068 ng mL(-1) by applying AuNPs as a signal enhancer. The study investigates the interplay of size of AuNPs and affinity of recognition elements affecting the efficiency of the signal amplification strategy based on AuNP. Furthermore, we observed that the presence of polyphenolic compounds in wine samples strongly interferes with the affinity binding on the surface. To overcome this limitation, a simple pre-treatment of the wine sample with the binding agent poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) was successfully applied. PMID:27590556

  12. Residual pesticide detection on food with particle-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Bikas; Huang, LiChuan; Masui, Kyoko; Saito, Yuika; Verma, Prabhat

    2014-08-01

    Modern farming relies highly on pesticides to protect agricultural food items from insects for high yield and better quality. Increasing use of pesticide has raised concern about its harmful effects on human health and hence it has become very important to detect even small amount of pesticide residues. Raman spectroscopy is a suitable nondestructive method for pesticide detection, however, it is not very effective for low concentration of pesticide molecules. Here, we report an approach based on plasmonic enhancement, namely, particle enhanced Raman spectroscopy (PERS), which is rapid, nondestructive and sensitive. In this technique, Raman signals are enhanced via the resonance excitation of localized plasmons in metallic nanoparticles. Gold nanostructures are promising materials that have ability to tune surface plasmon resonance frequency in visible to near-IR, which depends on shape and size of nanostructures. We synthesized gold nanorods (GNRs) with desired shape and size by seed mediated growth method, and successfully detected very tiny amount of pesticide present on food items. We also conformed that the detection of pesticide was not possible by usual Raman spectroscopy.

  13. Radiology image perception and observer performance: How does expertise and clinical information alter interpretation? Stroke detection explored through eye-tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Lindsey; Gale, Alastair; Darker, Iain; Toms, Andoni; Saada, Janak

    2009-02-01

    Historically, radiology research has been dominated by chest and breast screening. Few studies have examined complex interpretative tasks such as the reading of multidimensional brain CT or MRI scans. Additionally, no studies at the time of writing have explored the interpretation of stroke images; from novices through to experienced practitioners using eye movement analysis. Finally, there appears a lack of evidence on the clinical effects of radiology reports and their influence on image appraisal and clinical diagnosis. A computer-based, eye-tracking study was designed to assess diagnostic accuracy and interpretation in stroke CT and MR imagery. Eight predetermined clinical cases, five images per case, were presented to participants (novices, trainee, and radiologists; n=8). The presence or absence of abnormalities was rated on a five-point Likert scale and their locations reported. Half cases of the cases were accompanied by clinical information; half were not, to assess the impact of information on observer performance. Results highlight differences in visual search patterns amongst novice, trainee and expert observers; the most marked differences occurred between novice readers and experts. Experts spent more time in challenging areas of interest (AOI) than novices and trainee, and were more confident unless a lesion was large and obvious. The time to first AOI fixation differed by size, shape and clarity of lesion. 'Time to lesion' dropped significantly when recognition appeared to occur between slices. The influence of clinical information was minimal.

  14. Adaptive methods of two-scale edge detection in post-enhancement visual pattern processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Zia-ur; Jobson, Daniel J.; Woodell, Glenn A.

    2008-04-01

    Adaptive methods are defined and experimentally studied for a two-scale edge detection process that mimics human visual perception of edges and is inspired by the parvo-cellular (P) and magno-cellular (M) physiological subsystems of natural vision. This two-channel processing consists of a high spatial acuity/coarse contrast channel (P) and a coarse acuity/fine contrast (M) channel. We perform edge detection after a very strong non-linear image enhancement that uses smart Retinex image processing. Two conditions that arise from this enhancement demand adaptiveness in edge detection. These conditions are the presence of random noise further exacerbated by the enhancement process, and the equally random occurrence of dense textural visual information. We examine how to best deal with both phenomena with an automatic adaptive computation that treats both high noise and dense textures as too much information, and gracefully shifts from a smallscale to medium-scale edge pattern priorities. This shift is accomplished by using different edge-enhancement schemes that correspond with the (P) and (M) channels of the human visual system. We also examine the case of adapting to a third image condition, namely too little visual information, and automatically adjust edge detection sensitivities when sparse feature information is encountered. When this methodology is applied to a sequence of images of the same scene but with varying exposures and lighting conditions, this edge-detection process produces pattern constancy that is very useful for several imaging applications that rely on image classification in variable imaging conditions.

  15. Electrochemical detection of amaranth in food based on the enhancement effect of carbon nanotube film.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Hu, Xiaozhong; Cheng, Qin; Zhao, Xiaoya; Fu, Xiaofang; Wu, Kangbing

    2010-12-01

    Amaranth is widely added to food and can cause many adverse health effects when it is excessively consumed. Therefore, the monitoring of amaranth is quite important. Herein, an electrochemical sensor for the sensitive and rapid detection of amaranth was reported using multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT) as the sensing film. Due to the large surface area and high accumulation efficiency, the MWNT sensor showed a strong enhancement effect on the oxidation of amaranth, and greatly increased the current signal. The detection conditions such as pH value, amount of MWNT, accumulation potential and time were optimized. The linear range is from 40 nM to 0.8 μM, and the limit of detection is 35 nM. Finally, the new sensor was successfully employed to detect amaranth in soft drinks, and the results were tested by high-performance liquid chromatography.

  16. Detection of chemical residues in food oil via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kexi; Huang, Qing

    2016-05-01

    Highly ordered hexagonally patterned Ag-nanorod (Ag-NR) arrays for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of unhealthy chemical residues in food oil was reported, which was obtained by sputtering Ag on the alumina nanotip arrays stuck out of conical-pore anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates. SERS measurements demonstrate that the as-fabricated large-scale Ag-nanostructures can serve as highly sensitive and reproducible SERS substrates for detection of trace amount of chemicals in oil with the lower detection limits of 2×10-6 M for thiram and 10-7 M for rhodamine B, showing the potential of application of SERS in rapid trace detection of pesticide residues and illegal additives in food oils.

  17. Molecular detection of bacterial pathogens using microparticle enhanced double-stranded DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Riahi, Reza; Mach, Kathleen E; Mohan, Ruchika; Liao, Joseph C; Wong, Pak Kin

    2011-08-15

    Rapid, specific, and sensitive detection of bacterial pathogens is essential toward clinical management of infectious diseases. Traditional approaches for pathogen detection, however, often require time-intensive bacterial culture and amplification procedures. Herein, a microparticle enhanced double-stranded DNA probe is demonstrated for rapid species-specific detection of bacterial 16S rRNA. In this molecular assay, the binding of the target sequence to the fluorophore conjugated probe thermodynamically displaces the quencher probe and allows the fluorophore to fluoresce. By incorporation of streptavidin-coated microparticles to localize the biotinylated probes, the sensitivity of the assay can be improved by 3 orders of magnitude. The limit of detection of the assay is as few as eight bacteria without target amplification and is highly specific against other common pathogens. Its applicability toward clinical diagnostics is demonstrated by directly identifying bacterial pathogens in urine samples from patients with urinary tract infections.

  18. Single molecule detection of 4-dimethylaminoazobenzene by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. L.; Yin, Y. F.; Jiang, J. W.; Mo, Y. J.

    2009-02-01

    4-Dimethylaminoazobenzene (DAB) is anticipated to be a human carcinogen based on sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals. The trace detection of DAB is of great significance in environmental protection and safe life of the people. To test the availability of DAB trace detection using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), the SERS spectra of DAB single molecules adsorbed on the silver particle aggregates in colloid were investigated. The phenomena of blinking, spectral diffusion, and intensity fluctuations of the vibrational lines in the SERS spectra were observed. Statistical analysis of spectral intensity fluctuations indicates a multimodal distribution of some specific Raman bands, which are consistent with the identification of single molecule detection. Our results demonstrated that SERS can be applied to the trace detection of DAB molecules and other azo dyes.

  19. Colloid-gold nanoparticle enhanced detection sensitivity of paired surface plasma waves biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hsieh-Ting; Chen, Yi-Ling; Huang, Yen-Chen; Liu, Wei-Chih; Ng, Ming-Yaw; Chang, Yin-Fong; Hsieh, Bao-Yu; Chou, Chien

    2007-02-01

    Previous work with amplitude-sensitive paired surface plasma waves biosensor (PSPWB) demonstrated that the detection sensitivity of PSPWB is able to experimentally detect 0.001% sucrose-water solution and biomolecular interaction of 10pg/ml mouse IgG interacting with immobilized anti-mouse IgG successfully. Further development of the detection sensitivity of PSPWB has been conducted by using 20nm in diameter colloid gold nanoparticles conjugated with target molecules that can result in a higher mass coverage and a larger resonant angle change of plasmon resonance, thereby its detection sensitivity is further enhanced significantly. Bare gold nanoparticles, which is randomly suspended in solution, is adopted to differentiate biospecific binding induced further signal enhancement. Experimentally, the sensitivity at 330fg/ml of Au-nanoparticle conjugated protein A (PA-Au) interacting with mouse IgG which is immobilized on a CM5 sensor chip was detected successfully. By this arrangement, 6-fold signal amplification is demonstrated compared with the same concentration of PA without conjugated gold nanoparticles.

  20. Enhanced sensory processing accompanies successful detection of change for real-world sounds.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Melissa K; Snyder, Joel S

    2012-08-01

    Change deafness is the inability of listeners to detect changes occurring in their auditory environment. It is a matter of some debate whether change deafness occurs because of a failure of auditory-specific processes or a failure of more general semantic/verbal memory. To address this issue, we measured event-related potentials (ERPs) to pairs of scenes consisting of naturalistic auditory objects while listeners made a same/different judgment for scenes presented before and after an interruption. ERPs to the post-change scene revealed an enhanced early sensory response (N1) and an enhanced late positivity (P3) for detected changes. Change detection performance was better when there was a large acoustic spread among the objects within Scenes 1 and 2, suggesting that the deficits reflected by the ERP components during change deafness are related to successfully segregating the pre- and post-change objects. We also found that a separate sensory response (P2) reflects implicit, unconscious change detection. Overall, the results provide evidence that auditory-specific sensory processing is critical for both explicit and implicit change detection in natural auditory scenes.

  1. Ultrasensitive detection of waste products in water using fluorescence emission cavity-enhanced spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bixler, Joel N; Cone, Michael T; Hokr, Brett H; Mason, John D; Figueroa, Eleonora; Fry, Edward S; Yakovlev, Vladislav V; Scully, Marlan O

    2014-05-20

    Clean water is paramount to human health. In this article, we present a technique for detection of trace amounts of human or animal waste products in water using fluorescence emission cavity-enhanced spectroscopy. The detection of femtomolar concentrations of urobilin, a metabolic byproduct of heme metabolism that is excreted in both human and animal waste in water, was achieved through the use of an integrating cavity. This technique could allow for real-time assessment of water quality without the need for expensive laboratory equipment.

  2. The detection of climate change due to the enhanced greenhouse effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiffer, Robert A.; Unninayar, Sushel

    1991-01-01

    The greenhouse effect is accepted as an undisputed fact from both theoretical and observational considerations. In Earth's atmosphere, the primary greenhouse gas is water vapor. The specific concern today is that increasing concentrations of anthropogenically introduced greenhouse gases will, sooner or later, irreversibly alter the climate of Earth. Detecting climate change has been complicated by uncertainties in historical observations and measurements. Thus, the primary concern for the GEDEX project is how can climate change and enhanced greenhouse effects be unambiguously detected and quantified. Specifically examined are the areas of: Earth surface temperature; the free atmosphere (850 millibars and above); space-based measurements; measurement uncertainties; and modeling the observed temperature record.

  3. Ultrasensitive detection of waste products in water using fluorescence emission cavity-enhanced spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bixler, Joel N.; Cone, Michael T.; Hokr, Brett H.; Mason, John D.; Figueroa, Eleonora; Fry, Edward S.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2014-01-01

    Clean water is paramount to human health. In this article, we present a technique for detection of trace amounts of human or animal waste products in water using fluorescence emission cavity-enhanced spectroscopy. The detection of femtomolar concentrations of urobilin, a metabolic byproduct of heme metabolism that is excreted in both human and animal waste in water, was achieved through the use of an integrating cavity. This technique could allow for real-time assessment of water quality without the need for expensive laboratory equipment. PMID:24799690

  4. Ultrasensitive detection of waste products in water using fluorescence emission cavity-enhanced spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bixler, Joel N; Cone, Michael T; Hokr, Brett H; Mason, John D; Figueroa, Eleonora; Fry, Edward S; Yakovlev, Vladislav V; Scully, Marlan O

    2014-05-20

    Clean water is paramount to human health. In this article, we present a technique for detection of trace amounts of human or animal waste products in water using fluorescence emission cavity-enhanced spectroscopy. The detection of femtomolar concentrations of urobilin, a metabolic byproduct of heme metabolism that is excreted in both human and animal waste in water, was achieved through the use of an integrating cavity. This technique could allow for real-time assessment of water quality without the need for expensive laboratory equipment. PMID:24799690

  5. Fisher-information condition for enhanced signal detection via stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Duan, Fabing; Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Abbott, Derek

    2011-11-01

    Various situations where a signal is enhanced by noise through stochastic resonance are now known. This paper contributes to determining general conditions under which improvement by noise can be a priori decided as feasible or not. We focus on the detection of a known signal in additive white noise. Under the assumptions of a weak signal and a sufficiently large sample size, it is proved, with an inequality based on the Fisher information, that improvement by adding noise is never possible, generically, in these conditions. However, under less restrictive conditions, an example of signal detection is shown with favorable action of adding noise.

  6. Response enhancement of olfactory sensory neurons-based biosensors for odorant detection*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chun-sheng; Chen, Pei-hua; Yuan, Qing; Wang, Ping

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a novel strategy for the response enhancement of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs)-based biosensors by monitoring the enhancive responses of OSNs to odorants. An OSNs-based biosensor was developed on the basis of the light addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS), in which rat OSNs were cultured on the surface of LAPS chip and served as sensing elements. LY294002, the specific inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), was used to enhance the responses of OSNs to odorants. The responses of OSNs to odorants with and without the treatment of LY294002 were recorded by LAPS. The results show that the enhancive effect of LY294002 was recorded efficiently by LAPS and the responses of this OSNs-LAPS hybrid biosensor were enhanced by LY294002 by about 1.5-fold. We conclude that this method can enhance the responses of OSNs-LAPS hybrid biosensors, which may provide a novel strategy for the bioelectrical signal monitor of OSNs in biosensors. It is also suggested that this strategy may be applicable to other kinds of OSNs-based biosensors for cellular activity detection, such as microelectrode array (MEA) and field effect transistor (FET). PMID:19353747

  7. Detection of Enhancer-Associated Rearrangements Reveals Mechanisms of Oncogene Dysregulation in B-cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Russell J.H.; Drier, Yotam; Whitton, Holly; Cotton, M. Joel; Kaur, Jasleen; Issner, Robbyn; Gillespie, Shawn; Epstein, Charles B.; Nardi, Valentina; Sohani, Aliyah R.; Hochberg, Ephraim P.; Bernstein, Bradley E.

    2015-01-01

    B-cell lymphomas frequently contain genomic rearrangements that lead to oncogene activation by heterologous distal regulatory elements. We utilized a novel approach, termed ‘Pinpointing Enhancer-Associated Rearrangements by Chromatin Immunoprecipitation’ or PEAR-ChIP, to simultaneously map enhancer activity and proximal rearrangements in lymphoma cell lines and patient biopsies. This method detects rearrangements involving known cancer genes, including CCND1, BCL2, MYC, PDCD1LG2, NOTCH1, CIITA, and SGK1, as well as novel enhancer duplication events of likely oncogenic significance. We identify lymphoma subtype-specific enhancers in the MYC locus that are silenced in lymphomas with MYC-activating rearrangements and are associated with germline polymorphisms that alter lymphoma risk. We show that BCL6-locus enhancers are acetylated by the BCL6-activating transcription factor MEF2B, and can undergo genomic duplication, or target the MYC promoter for activation in the context of a “pseudo-double-hit” t(3;8)(q27;q24) rearrangement linking the BCL6 and MYC loci. Our work provides novel insights regarding enhancer-driven oncogene activation in lymphoma. PMID:26229090

  8. Surface enhanced Raman scattering detection of single R6G molecules on nanoporous gold films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongwen; Zhang, L.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Iwasaki, H.; Inouye, Y.; Xue, Q. K.; Chen, M. W.

    2011-03-01

    Detecting single molecules with high sensitivity and molecular specificity is of great practical interest in many fields such as chemistry, biology, medicine, and pharmacology. For this purpose, cheap and highly active substrates are of crucial importance. Recently, nanoporous metals (NPMs), with a three-dimensional continuous network structure and pore channels usually much smaller than the wavelength of visible light, revealed outstanding optical properties in surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this work, we further modify the nanoporous gold films by growing a high density of gold nano-tips on the surface. Extremely focused electromagnetic fields can be produced at the apex of the nano-tips, resulting in so-called hot spots. With this NPM-based and affordable substrate, single molecule-detection is achievable with ultrahigh enhancement in SERS.

  9. Quantitative surface enhanced Raman scattering detection based on the ``sandwich'' structure substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junmeng; Qu, Shengchun; Zhang, Lisheng; Tang, Aiwei; Wang, Zhanguo

    2011-08-01

    A sandwich structured substrate was designed for quantitative molecular detection using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), in which the probe molecule was sandwiched between silver nanoparticles (SNPs) and silver nanoarrays. The SNPs was prepared using Lee-Meisel method, and the silver nanoarrays was fabricated on porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) using electrodepositing method. The SERS studies show that the sandwich structured substrate exhibits good stability and reproducibility, and the detection sensitivity of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and Melamine can respectively reach up to 10 -19 M and 10 -9 M, which is improved greatly as compared to other SERS substrates. The improved SERS sensitivity is closely associated with the stronger electromagnetic field enhancement, which stems from localized surface plasmon (LSP) coupling between the two silver nanostructures. Furthermore, the SERS intensity increased almost linearly as the mother concentration increased, which indicates that such a sandwich structure may be used as a good SERS substrate for quantitative analysis.

  10. Medical student radiology teaching in Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, R M; Kim, C; Scally, P

    2007-08-01

    This study, involving 19 centres, establishes the status of medical student radiology teaching in Australia and New Zealand. It aims to document the academic and clinical staff profile involved in teaching, to indicate the methods of instructions used, to outline the available radiology library resources for medical students, to list the textbooks used in teaching and to uncover how many radiology departments are involving medical students in research. The findings can be used to plan and execute further actions that will enhance radiology teaching of medical students.

  11. [Quantitative Approach to Melamine Detection in Egg White with Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiao-hua; Liu, Ya-li; Ma, Mei-hu; Wang, Hong

    2015-04-01

    Due to the harmfulness of melamine to human, the quantitative detection of melamine in egg is very necessary. In the present study, the surface enhanced Raman spectra technology combined with chemometric analysis method was used to conduct melamine quantitative detection in egg white. Firstly, the melamine egg sample could be got by the method of artificial feeding hens usingdifferent feeding formulation. Then the surface enhanced Raman spectra of egg white was determined using portable Raman spectroscopy (Opto Trace RamTracer-200) and Raman enhancement reagents, and the melamine content within the white eggs was measured with gas chromatography mass spectrometry technology. The software of Raman Analyzer was used for baseline correction of Raman spectra. The correlation coefficient method was used to choose 320 spectral variables from the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy as input variables to establish partial least squares quantitative calibration model . And the peaks-decomposition method was used to establish peaks-decomposition quantitative calibration model. Both models selected 90 and 44 samples respectively as calibration sets and validation sets during model establishment, and both models achieved good prediction effect. The determination coefficient between predicted values of partial least squares quantitative calibration model and measured values of gas chromatography mass spectrometry was 0.856, and root mean square error of prediction was 1.547. The determination coefficient was 0.947 and RMSEP was 0.893 for the peaks-decomposition quantitative calibration model. This study demonstrated that the method can effectively quantitatively detect melamine in eggs. Testing a sample only takes 15 minutes, which can provide a new way for the melamine egg detection. PMID:26197575

  12. Tuning plasmonic and chemical enhancement for SERS detection on graphene-based Au hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiu; Liang, Benliang; Pan, Zhenghui; Lang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Yuegang; Wang, Guangsheng; Yin, Penggang; Guo, Lin

    2015-11-01

    Various graphene-based Au nanocomposites have been developed as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates recently. However, efficient use of SERS has been impeded by the difficulty of tuning SERS enhancement effects induced from chemical and plasmonic enhancement by different preparation methods of graphene. Herein, we developed graphene-based Au hybrids through physical sputtering gold NPs on monolayer graphene prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) as a CVD-G/Au hybrid, as well as graphene oxide-gold (GO/Au) and reduced-graphene oxide (rGO/Au) hybrids prepared using the chemical in situ crystallization growth method. Plasmonic and chemical enhancements were tuned effectively by simple methods in these as-prepared graphene-based Au systems. SERS performances of CVD-G/Au, rGO/Au and GO/Au showed a gradually monotonic increasing tendency of enhancement factors (EFs) for adsorbed Rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules, which show clear dependence on chemical bonds between graphene and Au, indicating that the chemical enhancement can be steadily controlled by chemical groups in a graphene-based Au hybrid system. Most notably, we demonstrate that the optimized GO/Au was able to detect biomolecules of adenine, which displayed high sensitivity with a detection limit of 10-7 M as well as good reproducibility and uniformity.Various graphene-based Au nanocomposites have been developed as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates recently. However, efficient use of SERS has been impeded by the difficulty of tuning SERS enhancement effects induced from chemical and plasmonic enhancement by different preparation methods of graphene. Herein, we developed graphene-based Au hybrids through physical sputtering gold NPs on monolayer graphene prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) as a CVD-G/Au hybrid, as well as graphene oxide-gold (GO/Au) and reduced-graphene oxide (rGO/Au) hybrids prepared using the chemical in situ crystallization growth method. Plasmonic

  13. Radiologic Professionalism in Modern Health Care.

    PubMed

    Hryhorczuk, Anastasia L; Hanneman, Kate; Eisenberg, Ronald L; Meyer, Elaine C; Brown, Stephen D

    2015-10-01

    Modern radiology is at the forefront of technological progress in medicine, a position that often places unique challenges on its professional character. This article uses "Medical Professionalism in the New Millennium: A Physician Charter," a document published in 2002 and endorsed by several major radiology organizations, as a lens for exploring professional challenges in modern radiology. The three main tenets of the Charter emphasize patient welfare, patient autonomy, and the reduction of disparities in health care distribution. This article reviews the ways in which modern technology and financial structures potentially create stressors on professionalism in radiology, while highlighting the opportunities they provide for radiologists seeking to fulfill the professional goals articulated in the Charter. Picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) and voice recognition systems have transformed the speed of radiology and enhanced the ability of radiologists to improve patient care but also have brought new tensions to the workplace. Although teleradiology may improve global access to radiologists, it may also promote the commoditization of radiology, which diminishes the professional stature of radiologists. Social media and patient portals provide radiologists with new forums for interacting with the public and patients, potentially promoting patient welfare. However, patient privacy and autonomy are important considerations. Finally, modern financial structures provide radiologists with both entrepreneurial opportunities as well as the temptation for unprofessional conduct. Each of these advances carries the potential for professional growth while testing the professional stature of radiology. By considering the risks and benefits of emerging technologies in the modern radiology world, radiologists can chart an ethical and professional future path.

  14. Radiologic Professionalism in Modern Health Care.

    PubMed

    Hryhorczuk, Anastasia L; Hanneman, Kate; Eisenberg, Ronald L; Meyer, Elaine C; Brown, Stephen D

    2015-10-01

    Modern radiology is at the forefront of technological progress in medicine, a position that often places unique challenges on its professional character. This article uses "Medical Professionalism in the New Millennium: A Physician Charter," a document published in 2002 and endorsed by several major radiology organizations, as a lens for exploring professional challenges in modern radiology. The three main tenets of the Charter emphasize patient welfare, patient autonomy, and the reduction of disparities in health care distribution. This article reviews the ways in which modern technology and financial structures potentially create stressors on professionalism in radiology, while highlighting the opportunities they provide for radiologists seeking to fulfill the professional goals articulated in the Charter. Picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) and voice recognition systems have transformed the speed of radiology and enhanced the ability of radiologists to improve patient care but also have brought new tensions to the workplace. Although teleradiology may improve global access to radiologists, it may also promote the commoditization of radiology, which diminishes the professional stature of radiologists. Social media and patient portals provide radiologists with new forums for interacting with the public and patients, potentially promoting patient welfare. However, patient privacy and autonomy are important considerations. Finally, modern financial structures provide radiologists with both entrepreneurial opportunities as well as the temptation for unprofessional conduct. Each of these advances carries the potential for professional growth while testing the professional stature of radiology. By considering the risks and benefits of emerging technologies in the modern radiology world, radiologists can chart an ethical and professional future path. PMID:26466185

  15. Optical fiber tip-based quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensor for trace gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhili; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Chao; Ren, Wei

    2016-05-01

    We reported the development of an evanescent-wave quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensor (EW-QEPAS) using a single-mode optical fiber tip for sensitive gas detection in the extended near-infrared region. It is a spectroscopic technique based on the combination of quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy with fiber-optic evanescent-wave absorption to achieve low optical noise, easy optical alignment, and high compactness. Carbon monoxide (CO) detection at 2.3 μm using a fiber-coupled, continuous-wave, distributed-feedback laser was selected for the sensor demonstration. By tapering the optical fiber down to 2.5 μm diameter using the flame-brushing technique, an evanescent field of ~0.6 mW around the fiber tip was absorbed by CO molecules. Besides an excellent linear response ( R 2 = 0.9996) to CO concentrations, the EW-QEPAS sensor achieved a normalized noise-equivalent absorption (NNEA) coefficient of 8.6 × 10-8 cm-1W/√Hz for an incident optical power of 1.8 mW and integration time of 1 s. The sensor detection sensitivity can be further improved by enhancing the evanescent-wave power on the fiber tip.

  16. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging detects mossy fiber sprouting in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Malheiros, Jackeline M.; Polli, Roberson S.; Paiva, Fernando F.; Longo, Beatriz M.; Mello, Luiz E.; Silva, Afonso C.; Tannús, Alberto; Covolan, Luciene

    2012-01-01

    Summary Purpose Mossy fiber sprouting (MFS) is a frequent finding following status epilepticus (SE). The present study aimed to test the feasibility of using manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) to detect MFS in the chronic phase of the well-established pilocarpine (Pilo) rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Methods To modulate MFS, cycloheximide (CHX), a protein synthesis inhibitor, was co-administered with Pilo in a sub-group of animals. In vivo MEMRI was performed 3 months after induction of SE and compared to the neo-Timm histological labeling of zinc mossy fiber terminals in the dentate gyrus (DG). Key findings Chronically epileptic rats displaying MFS as detected by neo-Timm histology had a hyperintense MEMRI signal in the DG, while chronically epileptic animals that did not display MFS had minimal MEMRI signal enhancement compared to non-epileptic control animals. A strong correlation (r = 0.81, P<0.001) was found between MEMRI signal enhancement and MFS. Significance This study shows that MEMRI is an attractive non-invasive method to detect mossy fiber sprouting in vivo and can be used as an evaluation tool in testing therapeutic approaches to manage chronic epilepsy. PMID:22642664

  17. Sound-driven enhancement of vision: disentangling detection-level from decision-level contributions.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Bellido, Alexis; Soto-Faraco, Salvador; López-Moliner, Joan

    2013-02-01

    Cross-modal enhancement can be mediated both by higher-order effects due to attention and decision making and by detection-level stimulus-driven interactions. However, the contribution of each of these sources to behavioral improvements has not been conclusively determined and quantified separately. Here, we apply psychophysical analysis based on Piéron functions in order to separate stimulus-dependent changes from those accounted by decision-level contributions. Participants performed a simple visual speeded detection task on Gabor patches of different spatial frequencies and contrast values, presented with and without accompanying sounds. On one hand, we identified an additive cross-modal improvement in mean reaction times across all types of visual stimuli that would be well explained by interactions not strictly based on stimulus-driven modulations (e.g., due to reduction of temporal uncertainty and motor times). On the other hand, we singled out an audio-visual benefit that strongly depended on stimulus features such as frequency and contrast. This particular enhancement was selective to low-visual spatial frequency stimuli, optimized for magnocellular sensitivity. We therefore conclude that interactions at detection stages and at decisional processes in response selection that contribute to audio-visual enhancement can be separated online and express on partly different aspects of visual processing.

  18. Bifunctional nanoparticles for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy-based leukemia biomarker detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehn, Dora; Morasso, Carlo; Vanna, Renzo; Schiumarini, Domitilla; Bedoni, Marzia; Ciceri, Fabio; Gramatica, Furio

    2014-03-01

    The Wilms tumor gene (WT1) is a biomarker overexpressed in more than 90% of acute myeloid leukemia patients. Fast and sensitive detection of the WT1 in blood samples would allow monitoring of the minimal residual disease during clinical remission and would permit early detection of a potential relapse in acute myeloid leukemia. In this work, Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) based detection of the WT1 sequence using bifunctional, magnetic core - gold shell nanoparticles is presented. The classical co-precipitation method was applied to generate magnetic nanoparticles which were coated with a gold shell after modification with aminopropyltriethoxy silane and subsequent deposition of gold nanoparticle seeds. Simple hydroquinone based reduction procedure was applied for the shell growing in water based reaction mixture at room temperature. Thiolated ssDNA probes of the WT1 sequence were immobilized as capture oligonucleotides on the gold surface. Malachite green was applied both for testing the amplification performance of the core-shell colloidal SERS substrate and also as label dye of the target DNA sequence. The SERS enhancer efficacy of the core-shell nanomaterial was compared with the efficacy of classical spherical gold particles produced using the conventional citrate reduction method. The core-shell particles were found not only to provide an opportunity for facile separation in a heterogeneous reaction system but also to be superior regarding robustness as SERS enhancers.

  19. Label-Free Ag+ Detection by Enhancing DNA Sensitized Tb3+ Luminescence

    PubMed Central

    Kleinke, Kimberly; Saran, Runjhun; Liu, Juewen

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the effect of Ag+ on DNA sensitized Tb3+ luminescence was studied initially using the Ag+-specific RNA-cleaving DNAzyme, Ag10c. While we expected to observe luminescence quenching by Ag+, a significant enhancement was produced. Based on this observation, simple DNA oligonucleotide homopolymers were used with systematically varied sequence and length. We discovered that both poly-G and poly-T DNA have a significant emission enhancement by Ag+, while the absolute intensity is stronger with the poly-G DNA, indicating that a G-quadruplex DNA is not required for this enhancement. Using the optimized length of the G7 DNA (an oligo constituted with seven guanines), Ag+ was measured with a detection limit of 57.6 nM. The signaling kinetics, G7 DNA conformation, and the binding affinity of Tb3+ to the DNA in the presence or absence of Ag+ are also studied to reveal the mechanism of emission enhancement. This observation is useful not only for label-free detection of Ag+, but also interesting for the rational design of new biosensors using Tb3+ luminescence. PMID:27571082

  20. Label-Free Ag⁺ Detection by Enhancing DNA Sensitized Tb(3+) Luminescence.

    PubMed

    Kleinke, Kimberly; Saran, Runjhun; Liu, Juewen

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the effect of Ag⁺ on DNA sensitized Tb(3+) luminescence was studied initially using the Ag⁺-specific RNA-cleaving DNAzyme, Ag10c. While we expected to observe luminescence quenching by Ag⁺, a significant enhancement was produced. Based on this observation, simple DNA oligonucleotide homopolymers were used with systematically varied sequence and length. We discovered that both poly-G and poly-T DNA have a significant emission enhancement by Ag⁺, while the absolute intensity is stronger with the poly-G DNA, indicating that a G-quadruplex DNA is not required for this enhancement. Using the optimized length of the G7 DNA (an oligo constituted with seven guanines), Ag⁺ was measured with a detection limit of 57.6 nM. The signaling kinetics, G7 DNA conformation, and the binding affinity of Tb(3+) to the DNA in the presence or absence of Ag⁺ are also studied to reveal the mechanism of emission enhancement. This observation is useful not only for label-free detection of Ag⁺, but also interesting for the rational design of new biosensors using Tb(3+) luminescence. PMID:27571082

  1. Iodophenol blue-enhanced luminol chemiluminescence and its application to hydrogen peroxide and glucose detection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dalong; Wang, Ping; Zhao, Yanjun; Fan, Aiping

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we found that iodophenol blue can enhance the weak chemiluminescence (CL) of luminol-H2O2 system. With the aid of CL spectral, electron spin resonance (ESR) spectral measurements and studies on the effects of various free radical scavengers on the iodophenol blue-enhanced luminol-H2O2 system, we speculated that iodophenol blue may react with H2O2 and oxygen to produce oxidizing radical species such as OH(•) and O2(•-) resulting the formation of (1)O2. The generated (1)O2 may react with luminol anion generating an unstable endoperoxide and subsequent 3-aminophthalate* (3-APA*). When the excited-state 3-APA returned to the ground-state, an enhanced CL was observed. Based on the H2O2 concentration dependence of the catalytic activity of iodophenol blue, a cheap, simple, sensitive CL assay for the determination of H2O2 was established. Under the optimum experimental conditions, a linear relationship between the relative CL intensity and H2O2 concentration in the range of 0.025-10 μM was obtained. As low as 14 nM H2O2 can be sensitively detected by using the proposed method. The relative standard deviation for 5, 1 and 0.25 μM H2O2 was 2.58%, 5.16% and 4.66%, respectively. By combining the glucose oxidase (GOx)-catalyzed oxidation reaction, CL detection of glucose was realized. The linear range of glucose detection was 0.1-30 μM with a detection limit of 0.06 μM. The proposed method has been applied to the detection of glucose in diluted serum. PMID:26695314

  2. Iodophenol blue-enhanced luminol chemiluminescence and its application to hydrogen peroxide and glucose detection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dalong; Wang, Ping; Zhao, Yanjun; Fan, Aiping

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we found that iodophenol blue can enhance the weak chemiluminescence (CL) of luminol-H2O2 system. With the aid of CL spectral, electron spin resonance (ESR) spectral measurements and studies on the effects of various free radical scavengers on the iodophenol blue-enhanced luminol-H2O2 system, we speculated that iodophenol blue may react with H2O2 and oxygen to produce oxidizing radical species such as OH(•) and O2(•-) resulting the formation of (1)O2. The generated (1)O2 may react with luminol anion generating an unstable endoperoxide and subsequent 3-aminophthalate* (3-APA*). When the excited-state 3-APA returned to the ground-state, an enhanced CL was observed. Based on the H2O2 concentration dependence of the catalytic activity of iodophenol blue, a cheap, simple, sensitive CL assay for the determination of H2O2 was established. Under the optimum experimental conditions, a linear relationship between the relative CL intensity and H2O2 concentration in the range of 0.025-10 μM was obtained. As low as 14 nM H2O2 can be sensitively detected by using the proposed method. The relative standard deviation for 5, 1 and 0.25 μM H2O2 was 2.58%, 5.16% and 4.66%, respectively. By combining the glucose oxidase (GOx)-catalyzed oxidation reaction, CL detection of glucose was realized. The linear range of glucose detection was 0.1-30 μM with a detection limit of 0.06 μM. The proposed method has been applied to the detection of glucose in diluted serum.

  3. Surface-Enhanced Electrochemiluminescence of Ru@SiO2 for Ultrasensitive Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daifang; Li, Yanyan; Lin, Zhenyu; Qiu, Bin; Guo, Longhua

    2015-06-16

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is recognized as a disease biomarker to reflect the existence of various cancers and tumors in the human body. Sensitive detection of CEA in body fluid is valuable for clinical diagnosis and treatment assessment of cancers. Herein, we present a new approach for ultrasensitive determination of CEA in human serum based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) enhanced electrochemiluminescence (ECL) of Ru(bpy)3(2+). In this surface-enhanced ECL (SEECL) sensing scheme, Ru(bpy)3(2+)-doped SiO2 nanoparticles (Ru@SiO2) act as ECL luminophores, and AuNPs are used as LSPR source to enhance the ECL signal. Two different kinds of aptamers specific to CEA are modified on the surface of Ru@SiO2 and AuNPs, respectively. In the presence of CEA, a multilayer of Ru@SiO2-AuNPs nanoarchitectures would be formed. Our investigation reveals that the ECL signal of Ru@SiO2 can be effectively enhanced by AuNPs. One layer of Ru@SiO2-AuNPs nanoarchitectures would generate about 3-fold ECL enhancement compared with the ECL of the nanoarchitectures without the presence of AuNPs. As much as 30-fold ECL enhancement could be obtained by a multilayer of Ru@SiO2-AuNPs nanoarchitectures. Under the optimal conditions, a detection limit of 1.52 × 10(-6) ng/mL of CEA in human serum was achieved. To the best of our knowledge, CEA assays with such a low LOD have never been reported for an ECL sensor.

  4. Hazard control indices for radiological and non-radiological materials

    SciTech Connect

    Boothe, G.F.

    1994-12-21

    This document devises a method of comparing radiological and non-radiological hazard control levels. Such a comparison will be useful in determining the design control features for facilities that handle radioactive mixed waste. The design control features of interest are those that assure the protection of workers and the environment from unsafe airborne levels of radiological or non-radiological hazards.

  5. The disaggregation of radiology.

    PubMed

    Brant-Zawadzki, Michael N; Enzmann, Dieter R

    2008-12-01

    The authors discuss certain market and political forces buffeting the traditional structure of radiology, both in practice and in the academic setting. These forces can be, to a certain degree, disruptive and produce fragmentation of what are now integrated radiology services and specialties. The potential fallout from the current rapidly changing environment of health care, including strategies for delivering care along service lines or within discrete episodes of care, may have a profound impact on the future of radiology. Understanding the dynamics of the current environment may help plan strategies for dealing with the potential impact on our specialty. PMID:19027680

  6. Detection of amino acid neurotransmitters by surface enhanced Raman scattering and hollow core photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Vidhu S.; Khetani, Altaf; Monfared, Ali Momenpour T.; Smith, Brett; Anis, Hanan; Trudeau, Vance L.

    2012-03-01

    The present work explores the feasibility of using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for detecting the neurotransmitters such as glutamate (GLU) and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA). These amino acid neurotransmitters that respectively mediate fast excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain, are important for neuroendocrine control, and upsets in their synthesis are also linked to epilepsy. Our SERS-based detection scheme enabled the detection of low amounts of GLU (10-7 M) and GABA (10-4 M). It may complement existing techniques for characterizing such kinds of neurotransmitters that include high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or mass spectrography (MS). This is mainly because SERS has other advantages such as ease of sample preparation, molecular specificity and sensitivity, thus making it potentially applicable to characterization of experimental brain extracts or clinical diagnostic samples of cerebrospinal fluid and saliva. Using hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) further enhanced the Raman signal relative to that in a standard cuvette providing sensitive detection of GLU and GABA in micro-litre volume of aqueous solutions.

  7. Quantitative detection of nitrate in water and wastewater by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gajaraj, Shashikanth; Fan, Cui; Lin, Mengshi; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2013-07-01

    The presence of inorganic nitrogen species in water can be unsuitable for drinking and detrimental to the environment. In this study, a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) method coupled with a commercially available gold nanosubstrate (a gold-coated silicon material) was evaluated for the detection of nitrate and nitrite in water and wastewater. Applications of SERS coupled with gold nanosubstrates resulted in an enhancement of Raman signals by a factor of ∼10(4) compared to that from Raman spectroscopy. The new method was able to detect nitrate with linear ranges of 1-10,000 mg NO3(-)/L (R(2)= 0.978) and 1-100 mg NO3(-)/L (R(2)= 0.919) for water and wastewater samples, respectively. Among the common anions, phosphate appeared to be the major interfering anion affecting nitrate measurement. Nevertheless, the percentage error of nitrate measurement in wastewater by the proposed SERS method was comparable to that by ion chromatography. The nitrate detection limits in water and wastewater samples were about 0.5 mg/L. The SERS method could simultaneously detect sulfate, which may serve as a reference standard in water. These results suggested that the SERS coupled with nanosubstrates is a promising method to determine nitrate concentrations in water and wastewater.

  8. Enhanced Community Structure Detection in Complex Networks with Partial Background Information

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhong-Yuan; Sun, Kai-Di; Wang, Si-Qi

    2013-01-01

    Community structure detection in complex networks is important since it can help better understand the network topology and how the network works. However, there is still not a clear and widely-accepted definition of community structure, and in practice, different models may give very different results of communities, making it hard to explain the results. In this paper, different from the traditional methodologies, we design an enhanced semi-supervised learning framework for community detection, which can effectively incorporate the available prior information to guide the detection process and can make the results more explainable. By logical inference, the prior information is more fully utilized. The experiments on both the synthetic and the real-world networks confirm the effectiveness of the framework. PMID:24247657

  9. Rapid Detection of Melamine in Milk Using Immunological Separation and Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiyuan; Feng, Shaolong; Hu, Yaxi; Sheng, Wei; Zhang, Yan; Yuan, Shifang; Zeng, Haishan; Wang, Shuo; Lu, Xiaonan

    2015-06-01

    We integrated immunological separation and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to detect melamine in milk. Antimelamine was produced by New Zealand white rabbits following the injection with melamine hapten-ovalbumin immunogen. Melamine was separated from milk by binding to the converted protein G-antimelamine complex. After releasing antimelamine and melamine from the complex, the eluents were deposited directly onto the silver dendrite SERS-active substrate for spectral collection. Multivariate statistical analysis including unsupervised principal component analysis and supervised soft independent modeling of class analogy validated the feasibility of applying this method to detect trace levels of melamine in milk. The limit of detection can be as low as 0.79×10(-3) mmol/L. The overall analysis can be completed in 20 min, thus, it is a high-throughput technique to screen for melamine in milk samples. PMID:25920520

  10. Cavity enhanced detection methods for probing the dynamics of spin correlated radical pairs in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neil, Simon R. T.; Maeda, Kiminori; Henbest, Kevin B.; Goez, Martin; Hemmens, Robert; Timmel, Christiane R.; Mackenzie, Stuart R.

    2010-04-01

    Cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) combined with phase-sensitive detection is employed to study the effects of static magnetic fields on radical recombination reactions. The chemical system comprises the photochemically generated thionine semiquinone radical and a 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO) cationic radical in a micellar solution of sodium dodecyl sulphate. Data obtained using the modulated CEAS technique, describing the magnetic field effect (MFE) on reaction yields, are shown to be superior to those obtained using conventional transient absorption (TA) flash photolysis methods typically employed for these measurements. The high sensitivity afforded by modulated CEAS detection is discussed in terms of the new possibilities it offers such as the measurement of magnetic field effects in real biological systems which have hitherto been largely beyond the detection capabilities of existing techniques.

  11. Label-free detection of Phytophthora ramorum using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Sezin; Schwenkbier, Lydia; Pollok, Sibyll; Weber, Karina; Cialla-May, Dana; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we report on a novel approach for the label-free and species-specific detection of the plant pathogen Phytophthora ramorum from real samples using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this context, we consider the entire analysis chain including sample preparation, DNA isolation, amplification and hybridization on SERS substrate-immobilized adenine-free capture probes. Thus, the SERS-based detection of target DNA is verified by the strong spectral feature of adenine which indicates the presence of hybridized target DNA. This property was realized by replacing adenine moieties in the species-specific capture probes with 2-aminopurine. In the case of the matching capture and target sequence, the characteristic adenine peak serves as an indicator for specific DNA hybridization. Altogether, this is the first assay demonstrating the detection of a plant pathogen from an infected plant material by label-free SERS employing DNA hybridization on planar SERS substrates consisting of silver nanoparticles.

  12. Gold nanoparticle-based enhanced chemiluminescence immunosensor for detection of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B (SEB) in food

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Minghui; Kostov, Yordan; Bruck, Hugh A.; Rasooly, Avraham

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) are major cause of foodborne diseases, so sensitive detection (<1 ng/ml) methods are needed for SE detection in food. The surface area, geometric and physical properties of gold nanoparticles make them well-suited for enhancing interactions with biological molecules in assays. To take advantage of the properties of gold nanoparticles for immunodetection, we have developed a gold nanoparticle-based enhanced chemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor for detection of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B (SEB) in food. Anti-SEB primary antibodies were immobilized onto a gold nanoparticle surface through physical adsorption and then the antibody–gold nanoparticle mixture was immobilized onto a polycarbonate surface. SEB was detected by a “sandwich-type” ELISA assay on the polycarbonate surface with a secondary antibody and ECL detection. The signal from ECL was read using a point-of-care detector based on a cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor or a plate reader. The system was used to test for SEB in buffer and various foods (mushrooms, tomatoes, and baby food meat). The limit of detection was found to be ~0.01 ng/mL, which is ~10 times more sensitive than traditional ELISA. The gold nanoparticles were relatively easy to use for antibody immobilization because of their physical adsorption mechanism; no other reagents were required for immobilization. The use of our simple and inexpensive detector combined with the gold nanoparticle-based ECL method described here is adaptable to simplify and increase sensitivity of any immunological assay and for point-of-care diagnostics. PMID:19540011

  13. Radiology capital asset management.

    PubMed

    Wagener, G N; Pridlides, A J

    1993-01-01

    Radiology administrators are expected not only to take on the ultimate accountability for meeting the needs and challenges of present day-to-day operations, but also to plan for the future. Computer Aided Facility Management (CAFM), as a tool, enables radiology managers to obtain up-to-date data to manage their services. Using Autocad on a unix-based minicomputer as the graphical base generator and integrating information from a MUMPS-based minicomputer, the CAFM process can define areas to be studied for productivity and life cycle costs. From an analysis of radiology service, management was able to make solid judgement calls for equipment replacement and facility project renovation to effectively manage radiology resources.

  14. Radiologic Technology Program Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This publication contains statewide standards for the radiologic technology program in Georgia. The standards are divided into 12 categories; Foundations (philosophy, purpose, goals, program objectives, availability, evaluation); Admissions (admission requirements, provisional admission requirements, recruitment, evaluation and planning); Program…

  15. Successful Transformational Radiology Leaders.

    PubMed

    Douget, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Transformational radiology leaders elevate subordinates, expand self-awareness, develop lasting relationships, strive to exceed expectations, and uphold the vision and goals of the organization. In order for radiology leaders to become more transformational in their leadership style there are four fundamental elements they must learn: idealized influence, individualized consideration, inspirational motivation, and intellectual stimulation. Leaders can utilize personality and self-assessments to learn more about themselves, identify areas of strengths and weaknesses, and learn to be more effective when leading employees.

  16. Basic bone radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    This clinical book surveys the skeletal system as seen through radiological imaging. It emphasizing abnormalities, disease, and trauma, and includes vital information on bones, bone growth, and the cells involved in bone pathology. It covers many bone diseases and injuries which are rarely covered in medical texts, as well as descriptions of radiologic procedures that specifically relate to the skeleton. This edition includes many illustrations, information on MR imaging and CT scanning, and discussions of osteoporosis, dysplasias, and metabolic bone disease.

  17. Detection of Perchlorate Anion on Functionalized Silver Colloids Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tio, J.; Wang, W.; Gu, B.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate anion interferes with the uptake of iodide by the human thyroid gland and consequently disrupts the regulation of metabolism. Chronic exposure to high levels of perchlorate may lead to the formation of thyroid gland tumors. Although the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has not set a maximum contaminant level (MCL) for perchlorate, a draft drinking water range of 4-18 ppb based on 2 liter daily consumption of water has been established. The current EPA approved method for detecting perchlorate uses ion chromatography which has a detection limit of ~1ppb and involves lengthy analytical time in the laboratory. A unique combination of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect and the bifunctional anion exchange resin’s high selectivity may provide an alternative way to detect perchlorate at such low concentrations and with high specificity. SERS, which uses laser excitation of adsorbed perchlorate anions on silver nanoparticles, has been shown to detect perchlorate anions at concentrations as low as 50 ppb. Normal micro-Raman analysis of perchlorate sorbed onto the resin beads has detected an even lower concentration of 10 ppb. In an effort to integrate these two effects, silver nanoparticles were coated with N-trimethoxysilylpropyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride, a functional group similar to that found on the resin bead, and subsequently inserted into different perchlorate concentration environments. This method has resulted in perchlorate detection down to ~10 ppb and a more consistent detection of perchlorate anion at ~50 ppb than that of earlier methods. As suggested by the direct insertion of functionalized silver colloids into perchlorate samples, this technique may potentially allow for the development of a probe using on-site Raman spectrometry to detect significantly low concentrations of perchlorate in situ rather than in the laboratory.

  18. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering for quantitative detection of ethyl carbamate in alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Yang, Danting; Zhou, Haibo; Ying, Yibin; Niessner, Reinhard; Haisch, Christoph

    2013-11-01

    Ethyl carbamate, a by-product of fermentation and storage with widespread occurrence in fermented food and alcoholic beverages, is a compound potentially toxic to humans. In this work, a new approach for quantitative detection of ethyl carbamate in alcoholic beverages, based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), is reported. Individual silver-coated gold nanoparticle colloids are used as SERS amplifiers, yielding high Raman enhancement of ethyl carbamate in three kinds of alcoholic beverages (vodka, Obstler, and white rum). The characteristic band at 1,003 cm(-1), which is the strongest and best reproducible peak in the SERS spectra, was used for quantitative evaluation of ethyl carbamate. The limit of detection, which corresponds to a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, was 9.0 × 10(-9) M (0.8 μg · L(-1)), 1.3 × 10(-7) M (11.6 μg · L(-1)), and 7.8 × 10(-8) M (6.9 μg · L(-1)), respectively. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy offers great practical potential for the in situ assessment and identification of ethyl carbamate in the alcoholic beverage industry.

  19. Metamaterial-enhanced vibrational absorption spectroscopy for the detection of protein molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Tung S.; Dao, Thang D.; Dang, Luu H.; Vu, Lam D.; Ohi, Akihiko; Nabatame, Toshihide; Lee, Youngpak; Nagao, Tadaaki; Hoang, Chung V.

    2016-08-01

    From visible to mid-infrared frequencies, molecular sensing has been a major successful application of plasmonics because of the enormous enhancement of the surface electromagnetic nearfield associated with the induced collective motion of surface free carriers excited by the probe light. However, in the lower-energy terahertz (THz) region, sensing by detecting molecular vibrations is still challenging because of low sensitivity, complicated spectral features, and relatively little accumulated knowledge of molecules. Here, we report the use of a micron-scale thin-slab metamaterial (MM) architecture, which functions as an amplifier for enhancing the absorption signal of the THz vibration of an ultrathin adsorbed layer of large organic molecules. We examined bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a prototype large protein molecule and Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) and 3,3‧-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI) as examples of small molecules. Among them, our MM significantly magnified only the signal strength of bulky BSA. On the other hand, DTTCI and Rh6G are inactive, as they lack low-frequency vibrational modes in this frequency region. The results obtained here clearly demonstrate the promise of MM-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the THz region for detection and structural monitoring of large biomolecules such as proteins or pathogenic enzymes.

  20. Metamaterial-enhanced vibrational absorption spectroscopy for the detection of protein molecules.

    PubMed

    Bui, Tung S; Dao, Thang D; Dang, Luu H; Vu, Lam D; Ohi, Akihiko; Nabatame, Toshihide; Lee, YoungPak; Nagao, Tadaaki; Hoang, Chung V

    2016-01-01

    From visible to mid-infrared frequencies, molecular sensing has been a major successful application of plasmonics because of the enormous enhancement of the surface electromagnetic nearfield associated with the induced collective motion of surface free carriers excited by the probe light. However, in the lower-energy terahertz (THz) region, sensing by detecting molecular vibrations is still challenging because of low sensitivity, complicated spectral features, and relatively little accumulated knowledge of molecules. Here, we report the use of a micron-scale thin-slab metamaterial (MM) architecture, which functions as an amplifier for enhancing the absorption signal of the THz vibration of an ultrathin adsorbed layer of large organic molecules. We examined bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a prototype large protein molecule and Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) and 3,3'-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI) as examples of small molecules. Among them, our MM significantly magnified only the signal strength of bulky BSA. On the other hand, DTTCI and Rh6G are inactive, as they lack low-frequency vibrational modes in this frequency region. The results obtained here clearly demonstrate the promise of MM-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the THz region for detection and structural monitoring of large biomolecules such as proteins or pathogenic enzymes. PMID:27555217

  1. Metamaterial-enhanced vibrational absorption spectroscopy for the detection of protein molecules

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Tung S.; Dao, Thang D.; Dang, Luu H.; Vu, Lam D.; Ohi, Akihiko; Nabatame, Toshihide; Lee, YoungPak; Nagao, Tadaaki; Hoang, Chung V.

    2016-01-01

    From visible to mid-infrared frequencies, molecular sensing has been a major successful application of plasmonics because of the enormous enhancement of the surface electromagnetic nearfield associated with the induced collective motion of surface free carriers excited by the probe light. However, in the lower-energy terahertz (THz) region, sensing by detecting molecular vibrations is still challenging because of low sensitivity, complicated spectral features, and relatively little accumulated knowledge of molecules. Here, we report the use of a micron-scale thin-slab metamaterial (MM) architecture, which functions as an amplifier for enhancing the absorption signal of the THz vibration of an ultrathin adsorbed layer of large organic molecules. We examined bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a prototype large protein molecule and Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) and 3,3′-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI) as examples of small molecules. Among them, our MM significantly magnified only the signal strength of bulky BSA. On the other hand, DTTCI and Rh6G are inactive, as they lack low-frequency vibrational modes in this frequency region. The results obtained here clearly demonstrate the promise of MM-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the THz region for detection and structural monitoring of large biomolecules such as proteins or pathogenic enzymes. PMID:27555217

  2. Noble-Metal-Free Materials for Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Detection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xianjun; Melkersson, Jenny; Wu, Shiqun; Wang, Lingzhi; Zhang, Jinlong

    2016-09-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is an attractive tool for the sensing of molecules in the fields of chemical and biochemical analysis as it enables the sensitive detection of molecular fingerprint information even at the single-molecule level. In addition to traditional coinage metals in SERS analysis, recent research on noble-metal-free materials has also yielded highly sensitive SERS activity. This Minireview presents the recent development of noble-metal-free materials as SERS substrates and their potential applications, especially semiconductors and emerging graphene-based nanostructures. Rather than providing an exhaustive review of this field, possible contributions from semiconductor substrates, characteristics of graphene enhanced Raman scattering, as well as effect factors such as surface plasmon resonance, structure and defects of the nanostructures that are considered essential for SERS activity are emphasized. The intention is to illustrate, through these examples, that the promise of noble-metal-free materials for enhancing detection sensitivity can further fuel the development of SERS-related applications. PMID:27191682

  3. Gold immunochromatographic strips for enhanced detection of avian influenza and Newcastle disease viruses.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinfeng; Zou, Mingqiang; Chen, Yan; Xue, Qiang; Zhang, Fan; Li, Beibei; Wang, Yanfei; Qi, Xiaohua; Yang, Yi

    2013-06-11

    A new technique that uses gold immunochromatographic strips enhances the detection sensitivity by inducing the clustering of additional gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) around the immunogold particles immobilized on nitrocellulose strips. The additional AuNPs provide an intense signal that can be detected by the naked eye. The AuNPs were synthesized and conjugated to monoclonal antibodies using self-assembly. Other antibodies were immobilized in a defined detection zone on the nitrocellulose membrane. The detection principle is based on a "sandwich" immunoreaction, where gold-labeled antibodies serve as signal vehicles. To improve the sensitivity of the strips, we use a mixture of 1% HAuCl4 and 10 mmol L(-1) NH2OH·HCl to "enlarge" the gold nanoparticles. The detecting limits of Avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are significantly increased. Compared with commercial test strips, this method is 100-fold more sensitive. This method is easy to perform and can be carried out on-site in test laboratories.

  4. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Rotavirus Molecular Signatures Using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Driskell, Jeremy D.; Zhu, Yu; Kirkwood, Carl D.; Zhao, Yiping; Dluhy, Richard A.; Tripp, Ralph A.

    2010-01-01

    Human enteric virus infections range from gastroenteritis to life threatening diseases such as myocarditis and aseptic meningitis. Rotavirus is one of the most common enteric agents and mortality associated with infection can be very significant in developing countries. Most enteric viruses produce diseases that are not distinct from other pathogens, and current diagnostics is limited in breadth and sensitivity required to advance virus detection schemes for disease intervention strategies. A spectroscopic assay based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been developed for rapid and sensitive detection of rotavirus. The SERS method relies on the fabrication of silver nanorod array substrates that are extremely SERS-active allowing for direct structural characterization of viruses. SERS spectra for eight rotavirus strains were analyzed to qualitatively identify rotaviruses and to classify each according to G and P genotype and strain with >96% accuracy, and a quantitative model based on partial least squares regression analysis was evaluated. This novel SERS-based virus detection method shows that SERS can be used to identify spectral fingerprints of human rotaviruses, and suggests that this detection method can be used for pathogen detection central to human health care. PMID:20419101

  5. Rapid detection of acetamiprid in foods using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS).

    PubMed

    Wijaya, Wisiani; Pang, Shintaro; Labuza, Theodore P; He, Lili

    2014-04-01

    Acetamiprid is a neonicotinoid pesticide that is commonly used in modern farming. Acetamiprid residue in food commodities can be a potential harm to human and has been implicated in the honey bee hive die off crisis. In this study, we developed rapid, simple, and sensitive methods to detect acetamiprid in apple juice and on apple surfaces using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). No pretreatment of apple juice sample was performed. A simple surface swab method was used to recover acetamiprid from the apple surface. Samples were incubated with silver dendrites for several minutes and SERS spectra were taken directly from the silver surface. Detection of a set of 5 apple juice samples can be done within 10 min. The swab-SERS method took 15 min for a set of 5 samples. Resulting spectral data were analyzed using principal component analysis. The highest acetamiprid peak at 634 cm(-1) was used to detect and quantify the amount of acetamiprid spiked in 1:1 water-methanol solvent, apple juice, and on apple surface. The SERS method was able to successfully detect acetamiprid at 0.5 μg/mL (0.5 ppm) in solvent, 3 μg/mL (3 ppm) in apple juice, and 0.125 μg/cm(2) on apple surfaces. The SERS methods provide simple, rapid, and sensitive ways to detect acetamiprid in beverages and on the surfaces of thick skinned fruits and vegetables. PMID:24620941

  6. Sensitive detection of nucleic acids with rolling circle amplification and surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Juan; Zhang, Chun-yang

    2010-11-01

    Detection of specific DNA sequences is important to molecular biology research and clinical diagnostics. To improve the sensitivity of surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy (SERS), a variety of signal amplification methods has been developed, including Raman-active-dye, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology, molecular beacon, SERS-active substrates, and SERS-tag. However, the combination of rolling circle amplification (RCA) with SERS for nucleic acid detection has not been reported. Herein, we describe a new approach for nucleic acid detection by the combination of RCA reaction with SERS. Because of the binding of abundance repeated sequences of RCA products with gold nanoparticle (Au NP) and Rox-modified detection probes, SERS signal is significantly amplified and the detection limit of 10.0 pM might be achieved. The sensitivity of RCA-based SERS has increased by as much as 3 orders of magnitude as compared to PCR-based SERS and is also comparable with or even exceeds that of both RCA-based electrochemical and RCA-based fluorescent methods. This RCA-based SERS might discriminate perfect matched target DNA from 1-base mismatched DNA with high selectivity. The high sensitivity and selectivity of RCA-based SERS makes it a potential tool for early diagnosis of gene-related disease and also offers a great promise for multiplexed assays with DNA microarrays.

  7. Rapid Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria from Fresh Produce by Filtration and Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaomeng; Han, Caiqin; Chen, Jing; Huang, Yao-Wen; Zhao, Yiping

    2016-04-01

    The detection of Salmonella Poona from cantaloupe cubes and E. coli O157:H7 from lettuce has been explored by using a filtration method and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based on vancomycin-functionalized silver nanorod array substrates. It is found that with a two-step filtration process, the limit of detection (LOD) of Salmonella Poona from cantaloupe cubes can be as low as 100 CFU/mL in less than 4 h, whereas the chlorophyll in the lettuce causes severe SERS spectral interference. To improve the LOD of lettuce, a three-step filtration method with a hydrophobic filter is proposed. The hydrophobic filter can effectively eliminate the interferences from chlorophyll and achieve a LOD of 1000 CFU/mL detection of E. coli O157:H7 from lettuce samples within 5 h. With the low LODs and rapid detection time, the SERS biosensing platform has demonstrated its potential as a rapid, simple, and inexpensive means for pathogenic bacteria detection from fresh produce.

  8. Detecting microvariability in type 2 quasars using enhanced F-test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polednikova, J.; Ederoclite, A.; de Diego, J. A.; Cepa, J.; González-Serrano, J. I.; Bongiovanni, A.; Oteo, I.; García, A. M. Pérez; Pérez-Martínez, R.; Pintos-Castro, I.; Ramón-Pérez, M.; Sánchez-Portal, M.

    2016-08-01

    Microvariability (intranight variability) is a low amplitude flux change at short time-scales (i.e. hours). It has been detected in unobscured type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGN) and blazars. However in type 2 AGN, the detection is hampered by the low contrast between the presumably variable nucleus and the host galaxy. In this paper, we present a search for microvariability in a sample of four type 2 quasars as an astrostatistical problem. We are exploring the use of a newly introduced enhanced F-test, proposed by Diego. The presented results show that out of four observed target, we are able to apply this statistical method to three of them. Evidence of microvariations is clear in the case of quasar J0802+2552 in all used filters (g', r' and i') during both observing nights, and they are present in one of the nights of observations, J1258+5239 in one filter (i'), while for the J1316+4452, there is evidence for microvariability within our detection levels during one night and two filters (r' and i'). We demonstrate the feasibility of the enhanced F-test to detect microvariability in obscured type 2 quasars. At the end of this paper, we discuss possible causes of microvariability. One of the options is the misclassification of the targets. A likely scenario for explanation of the phenomenon involves optically thin gaps in a clumpy obscuring medium, in accordance with the present view of the circumnuclear medium. There is a possible interesting connection between the merging state of the targets and detection of microvariability.

  9. Bisphosphonate-functionalized gold nanoparticles for contrast-enhanced X-ray detection of breast microcalcifications.

    PubMed

    Cole, Lisa E; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Roeder, Ryan K

    2014-02-01

    Microcalcifications are one of the most common abnormalities detected by mammography for the diagnosis of breast cancer. However, the detection of microcalcifications and correct diagnosis of breast cancer are limited by the sensitivity and specificity of mammography. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the potential of bisphosphonate-functionalized gold nanoparticles (BP-Au NPs) for contrast-enhanced radiographic detection of breast microcalcifications using two models of breast microcalcifications, which allowed for precise control over levels of hydroxyapatite (HA) mineral within a low attenuating matrix. First, an in vitro imaging phantom was prepared with varying concentrations of HA uniformly dispersed in an agarose hydrogel. The X-ray attenuation of HA-agarose compositions labeled by BP-Au NPs was increased by up to 26 HU compared to unlabeled compositions for HA concentrations ranging from 1 to 10 mg/mL. Second, an ex vivo tissue model was developed to more closely mimic the heterogeneity of breast tissue by injecting varying concentrations of HA in a Matrigel carrier into murine mammary glands. The X-ray attenuation of HA-Matrigel compositions labeled by BP-Au NPs was increased by up to 289 HU compared to unlabeled compositions for HA concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 25 mg/mL, which included an HA concentration (0.5 mg/mL) that was otherwise undetectable by micro-computed tomography. Cumulatively, both models demonstrated the ability of BP-Au NPs to enhance contrast for radiographic detection of microcalcifications, including at a clinically-relevant imaging resolution. Therefore, BP-Au NPs may have potential to improve clinical detection of breast microcalcifications by mammography. PMID:24360718

  10. Bisphosphonate-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles for Contrast-Enhanced X-Ray Detection of Breast Microcalcifications

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Lisa E.; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Roeder, Ryan K.

    2014-01-01

    Microcalcifications are one of the most common abnormalities detected by mammography for the diagnosis of breast cancer. However, the detection of microcalcifications and correct diagnosis of breast cancer are limited by the sensitivity and specificity of mammography. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the potential of bisphosphonate-functionalized gold nanoparticles (BP-Au NPs) for contrast-enhanced radiographic detection of breast microcalcifications using two models of breast microcalcifications which allowed for precise control over levels of hydroxyapatite (HA) mineral within a low attenuating matrix. First, an in vitro imaging phantom was prepared with varying concentrations of HA uniformly dispersed in an agarose hydrogel. The X-ray attenuation of HA-agarose compositions labeled by BP-Au NPs was increased by up to 26 HU compared to unlabeled compositions for HA concentrations ranging from 1–10 mg/mL. Second, an ex vivo tissue model was developed to more closely mimic the heterogeneity of breast tissue by injecting varying concentrations of HA in a Matrigel carrier into murine mammary glands. The X-ray attenuation of HA-Matrigel compositions labeled by BP-Au NPs was increased by up to 289 HU compared to unlabeled compositions for HA concentrations ranging from 0.5–25 mg/mL, which included an HA concentration (0.5 mg/mL) that was otherwise undetectable by micro-computed tomography. Cumulatively, both models demonstrated the ability of BP-Au NPs to enhance contrast for radiographic detection of microcalcifications, including at a clinically-relevant imaging resolution. Therefore, BP-Au NPs may have potential to improve clinical detection of breast microcalcifications by mammography. PMID:24360718

  11. Reporter-encapsulated liposomes on graphene field effect transistors for signal enhanced detection of physiological enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hu; Lim, Seng Koon; Chen, Peng; Huang, Jingfeng; Wang, Yi; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Platt, Mark; Liedberg, Bo; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong

    2015-02-01

    A novel approach for enzymatic assay using reporter-encapsulated liposomes on graphene field effect transistors (FET) is proposed. This approach involves real time monitoring of drain current (Id) of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) upon rupture of reporter-encapsulated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) liposomes triggered by enzymes. For validation of the proposed approach, 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (TNP) is used as the reporter for specific detection of phospholipase A2 (PLA2), a key enzyme in various membrane related physiological processes. Experimental results revealed that Id increased with PLA2 concentration, which is attributed to the interaction between released TNP and rGO. The limit of detection (LOD) achieved by the proposed approach was 80 pM, which is superior to most assays reported previously and much lower than the cut-off level of circulating secretory PLA2 (2.07 nM). Besides the high accuracy of the electronic detection methodology, the signal enhancement effect realized by the excess concentration of TNP (approximately 1 mM) in liposomes is believed to be the main reason for the significantly enhanced sensitivity of the proposed assay, indicating great potential for further improvement in the sensitivity by increasing the concentration of TNP. In addition, the proposed approach is rapid (incubation time ≤ 10 min) and label-free, thus showing great potential for practical applications in the future.

  12. Supercontinuum high-speed cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy for sensitive multispecies detection.

    PubMed

    Werblinski, Thomas; Lämmlein, Bastian; Huber, Franz J T; Zigan, Lars; Will, Stefan

    2016-05-15

    Cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy is promising for many applications requiring a very high concentration sensitivity but often accompanied by low temporal resolution. In this Letter, we demonstrate a broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer capable of detection rates of up to 50 kHz, based on a spatially coherent supercontinuum (SC) light source and an in-house-built, high-speed near-infrared spectrograph. The SC spectrometer allows for the simultaneous quantitative detection of CO2, C2H2, and H2O within a spectral range from 1420 to 1570 nm. Using cavity mirrors with a specified reflectivity of R=98.0±0.3% a minimal spectrally averaged absorption coefficient of αmin=1·10-5  cm-1 can be detected at a repetition rate of 50 kHz. PMID:27176993

  13. Capillary electrophoresis with gold nanoparticles enhanced electrochemiluminescence for the detection of roxithromycin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingwu; Yang, Zhiming; Wang, Xiaoxia; Yang, Nianjun

    2008-06-30

    Tris(2,2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium(II) (Ru(bpy)(3)(2+))-roxithromycin based electrochemiluminescence (ECL) was enhanced greatly by gold nanoparticles 10 nm in diameter. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was coupled with the resultant ECL system as a detector for roxithromycin. This ECL emission is explained by the coreactant mechanism where roxithromycin behaves as a coreactant to generate strong reducing species and gold nanoparticles act as "floating nanoelectrodes". The reaction of Ru(bpy)(3)(3+) with the generated strong reducing species on the Pt working electrode as well as on "floating nanoelectrodes" releases Ru(bpy)(3)(2+*), resulting in enhancement of ECL emission. The selectivity of this detection system towards roxithromycin was examined by CE. Under the optimized conditions, the intensity of ECL emission varies linearly with the concentration of roxithromycin from 24 nM to 0.24 mM. The detection limit is 8.4 nM, while without adding gold nanoparticles it is only 84 nM. The detection of roxithromycin in pharmaceutical and urine samples was also performed by the proposed CE-ECL method.

  14. JC Virus PCR Detection Is Not Infallible: A Fulminant Case of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy with False-Negative Cerebrospinal Fluid Studies despite Progressive Clinical Course and Radiological Findings

    PubMed Central

    Babi, Mohamed-Ali; Pendlebury, William; Braff, Steven; Waheed, Waqar

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case with a false-negative PCR-based analysis for JC virus in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in a patient with clinical and radiological findings suggestive of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) who was on chronic immunosuppressive therapy for rheumatoid arthritis. Our patient developed rapidly progressive global decline with clinical and radiographic findings suggestive of PML, but JC virus PCR in CSF was negative. The patient passed away 3 months from the onset of her neurological symptoms. Autopsy confirmed the diagnosis of PML with presence of JC-polyoma virus by immunohistochemical staining. This case highlights the potential of false-negative JC virus PCR in CSF when radiographic and clinical features are suggestive of “possible PML.” We review the plausible causes of potential false-negative CSF results and suggest that when the clinical presentation is suspicious for PML repeat CSF analysis utilizing ultrasensitive PCR assay and subsequent brain biopsy should be considered if CSF remains negative. Additionally, appropriate exclusion of other neurologic conditions is essential. PMID:25861493

  15. Exploring the recovery and detection of messenger RNA and DNA from enhanced fingermarks in blood.

    PubMed

    Fox, A; Gittos, M; Harbison, S A; Fleming, R; Wivell, R

    2014-05-01

    Often in the examination of bloodstained fingermarks discussion occurs around whether to prioritise the fingerprint evidence or focus on the biological evidence. Collecting a sample for genetic profiling may result in the loss of ridge detail that could have been used for fingerprint comparison. Fingermark enhancement and recovery methods along with sample collection methods could also compromise downstream genetic analysis. Previous forensic casework has highlighted circumstances where, after enhancement had been performed, it would have been extremely valuable to both identify the body fluid and generate a DNA profile from the same sample. We enhanced depletion series of fingermarks made in blood, using single treatments consisting of aqueous amido black, methanol-based amido black, acid yellow and leucocrystal violet, and exposure to long wave UV light. We then extracted the DNA and RNA for profiling, to assess the recovery and detection of genetic material from the enhanced fingermarks. We have shown that genetic profiling of bloodstained fingermarks can be successful after chemical enhancement; however it may still be necessary to prioritise evidence types in certain circumstances. From our results it appears that even with visible bloodstained fingermarks, leucocrystal violet can reduce the effectiveness of subsequent messenger RNA profiling. Aqueous amido black and acid yellow also have adverse effects on messenger RNA profiling of depleted fingermarks with low levels of cellular material. These results help with forensic decision-making by expanding knowledge of the extent of the detrimental effects of blood-enhancement reagents on both DNA profiling and body fluid identification using messenger RNA profiling.

  16. Label-free, zeptomole cancer biomarker detection by surface-enhanced fluorescence on nanoporous gold disk plasmonic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Santos, Greggy M; Zhao, Fusheng; Zeng, Jianbo; Li, Ming; Shih, Wei-Chuan

    2015-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a label-free biosensor for the ERBB2 cancer gene DNA target based on the distance-dependent detection of surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) on nanoporous gold disk (NPGD) plasmonic nanoparticles. We achieve detection of 2.4 zeptomole of DNA target on the NPGD substrate with an upper concentration detection limit of 1 nM. Without the use of molecular spacers, the NPGD substrate as an SEF platform was shown to provide higher net fluorescence for visible and NIR fluorophores compared to glass and non-porous gold substrates. The enhanced fluorescence signals in patterned nanoporous gold nanoparticles make NPGD a viable material for further reducing detection limits for biomolecular targets used in clinical assays. With patterned nanoporous gold disk (NPGD) plasmonic nanoparticles, a label-free biosensor that makes use of distance-dependent detection of surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) is constructed and tested for zeptomole detection of ERBB2 cancer gene DNA targets.

  17. Enhancements of target detection using atmospheric correction preprocessing techniques in hyperspectral remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Peter W. T.; Bishop, Gary J.

    2004-12-01

    This paper reports the result of a study on how atmospheric correction techniques (ACT) enhance target detection in hyperspectral remote sensing, using different sets of real data. Based on the data employed in this study, it has been shown that ACT can reduce the masking effect of the atmosphere and effectively improving spectral contrast. By using the standard Kmeans cluster based unsupervised classifier, it has been shown that the accuracy of the classification obtained from the atmospheric corrected data is almost an order of magnitude better than that achieved using the radiance data. This enhancement is entirely due to the improved separability of the classes in the atmospherically corrected data. Moreover, it has been found that intrinsic information concerning the nature of the imaged surface can be retrieved from the atmospherically corrected data. This has been done to within an error of 5% by using a model based atmospheric correction package ATCOR.

  18. Raman signal enhancement by multiple beam excitation and its application for the detection of chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Sakshi; Ahmad, Azeem; Mehta, Dalip S.; Gambhir, Vijayeta; Reddy, Martha N.

    2015-08-31

    In a typical Raman based sensor, a single laser beam is used for exciting the sample and the backscattered or forward scattered light is collected using collection optics and is analyzed by a spectrometer. We have investigated that by means of exciting the sample with multiple beams, i.e., by dividing the same input power of the single beam into two or three or more beams and exciting the sample from different angles, the Raman signal enhances significantly. Due to the presence of multiple beams passing through the same volume of the sample, an interference pattern is formed and the volume of interaction of excitation beams with the sample increases. By means of this geometry, the enhancement in the Raman signal is observed and it was found that the signal strength increases linearly with the increase in number of excitation beams. Experimental results of this scheme for excitation of the samples are reported for explosive detection at a standoff distance.

  19. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection for chemical and biological agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fei; Stokes, David L.; Wabuyele, Musundi B.; Griffin, Guy D.; Vass, Arpad A.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2004-07-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of chemical agent simulants such as dimethyl methylphonate (DMMP), pinacolyl methylphosphonate (PMP), diethyl phosphoramidate (DEPA), and 2-chloroethyl ethylsulfide (CEES), and biological agent simulants such as bacillus globigii (BG), erwinia herbicola (EH), and bacillus thuringiensis (BT) were obtained from silver oxide film-deposited substrates. Thin AgO films ranging in thickness from 50 nm to 250 nm were produced by chemical bath deposition onto glass slides. Further Raman intensity enhancements were noticed in UV irradiated surfaces due to photo-induced Ag nanocluster formation, which may provide a possible route to producing highly useful plasmonic sensors for the detection of chemical and biological agents upon visible light illumination.

  20. Electrically biased GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures for enhanced detection of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziziyan, Mohammad R.; Hassen, Walid M.; Dubowski, Jan J.

    2016-03-01

    We have examined the influence of electrical bias on immobilization of bacteria on the surface of GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures, functionalized with an alkanethiol based architecture. A mixture of biotinylated polyethylene glycol (PEG) thiol and hexadecanethiol was applied to attach neutravidin and antibodies targeting specific immobilization of Legionella pneumophila. An electrochemical setup was designed to bias biofunctionalized samples with the potential measured versus silver/silver chloride reference electrode in a three electrode configuration system. The immobilization efficiency has been examined with fluorescence microscopy after tagging captured bacteria with fluorescein labeled antibodies. We demonstrate more than 2 times enhanced capture of Legionella pneumophila, suggesting the potential of electrically biased biochips to deliver enhanced sensitivity in detecting these bacteria.

  1. Enhanced detection of dentinal lesions in OCT images using the RKT transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hobin; Darling, Cynthia L.; Tom, Henry; Fried, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    Several studies have shown that optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used to measure the remaining enamel thickness and detect the location of subsurface lesions hidden under the sound enamel. The purpose of this study was to develop algorithms to enhance the visibility of subsurface structures such as hidden occlusal lesions and the dentinal-enamel junction. Extracted teeth with natural occlusal lesions were imaged with OCT with and without added high index fluids. A Rotating Kernel Transformation (RKT) nonlinear image processing filter was applied to PS-OCT images to enhance the visibility of the subsurface lesions under the sound enamel. The filter significantly increased (P<0.05) the visibility of the subsurface lesions.

  2. Detection of nitro polynuclear aromatic compounds by surface-enhanced Raman spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Enlow, P.D.; Buncick, M.; Warmack, R.J.; Vo-Dinh, T.

    1986-05-01

    The various nitro polynuclear aromatic compounds, including 1-nitropyrene, 9-nitroanthracene, 2-nitronaphthalene, and 2-nitrofluorene have been investigated by use of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrometry technique. Silver-coated substrates consisting of latex spheres on glass and filter paper and prolate SiO/sub 2/ posts on quartz were used. The limit of detection of 1-nitropyrene was found to be 0.3 ng. The SERS signals were enhanced over conventional Raman signals by a factor of 5 x 10/sup 6/ to 9 x 10/sup 6/ for 1-nitropyrene adsorbed on various SERS-active substrates. The production and practicality of SERS-active substrates with glass, paper, and quartz supports are discussed. 30 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  3. The effect of mark enhancement techniques on the subsequent detection of semen/spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Rory; Deacon, Paul; Phillips, Darren J; Farrugia, Kevin

    2014-11-01

    Fingermarks, footwear marks, blood and semen are amongst the most commonly encountered types of evidence at crime scenes. Previous work has extensively investigated fingermark and blood enhancement techniques and a sequence developed to maximise evidence recovery; however, there is limited research as to the effect of these techniques on the subsequent detection of body fluids such as semen. In this study, seven fingermark and blood enhancement techniques (e.g. powder suspension, cyanoacrylate fuming and acid violet 17) were employed followed by the subsequent detection of semen/spermatozoa. Other variables included in the study were the use of two substrates (white ceramic tiles and grey laminate flooring), a depletion series and ageing periods of 1, 7, 14 and 28 days. The effect these techniques had on the subsequent detection of semen was assessed by visual and fluorescence examination followed by presumptive and confirmatory testing for semen and spermatozoa. The results found that protein stains (acid violet 17 and acid yellow 7) caused a loss in presumptive test reactivity; however, sperm heads were still observed using microscopic examination after extraction and staining. The use of black magnetic powder, Bluestar(®) Forensic Magnum luminol, Lumicyano™ 4% and cyanoacrylate fuming followed by basic yellow 40 staining did not hinder subsequent presumptive and confirmatory tests for semen and sperm heads. Powder suspension caused a loss in both presumptive test reactivity and sperm heads from the substrate. In general, the enhancement techniques resulted in the improved visualisation of the semen stains under white and violet/blue light. The results from this study aim to provide a strategy to maximise evidence recovery and improve efficiency in an integrated forensic approach.

  4. Non-degenerate two photon absorption enhancement for laser dyes by precise lock-in detection

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, B.; Katan, C.; Bjorgaard, J. A.; Kobayashi, T.

    2015-12-15

    This study demonstrates a measurement system for a non-degenerate two-photon absorption (NDTPA) spectrum. The NDTPA light sources are a white light super continuum beam (WLSC, 500 ∼ 720 nm) and a fundamental beam (798 nm) from a Ti:Sapphire laser. A reliable broadband NDTPA spectrum is acquired in a single-shot detection procedure using a 128-channel lock-in amplifier. The NDTPA spectra for several common laser dyes are measured. Two photon absorption cross section enhancements are found in the experiment and validated by theoretical calculation for all of the chromophores.

  5. NanoCluster Beacons as reporter probes in rolling circle enhanced enzyme activity detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juul, Sissel; Obliosca, Judy M.; Liu, Cong; Liu, Yen-Liang; Chen, Yu-An; Imphean, Darren M.; Knudsen, Birgitta R.; Ho, Yi-Ping; Leong, Kam W.; Yeh, Hsin-Chih

    2015-04-01

    As a newly developed assay for the detection of endogenous enzyme activity at the single-catalytic-event level, Rolling Circle Enhanced Enzyme Activity Detection (REEAD) has been used to measure enzyme activity in both single human cells and malaria-causing parasites, Plasmodium sp. Current REEAD assays rely on organic dye-tagged linear DNA probes to report the rolling circle amplification products (RCPs), the cost of which may hinder the widespread use of REEAD. Here we show that a new class of activatable probes, NanoCluster Beacons (NCBs), can simplify the REEAD assays. Easily prepared without any need for purification and capable of large fluorescence enhancement upon hybridization, NCBs are cost-effective and sensitive. Compared to conventional fluorescent probes, NCBs are also more photostable. As demonstrated in reporting the human topoisomerases I (hTopI) cleavage-ligation reaction, the proposed NCBs suggest a read-out format attractive for future REEAD-based diagnostics.As a newly developed assay for the detection of endogenous enzyme activity at the single-catalytic-event level, Rolling Circle Enhanced Enzyme Activity Detection (REEAD) has been used to measure enzyme activity in both single human cells and malaria-causing parasites, Plasmodium sp. Current REEAD assays rely on organic dye-tagged linear DNA probes to report the rolling circle amplification products (RCPs), the cost of which may hinder the widespread use of REEAD. Here we show that a new class of activatable probes, NanoCluster Beacons (NCBs), can simplify the REEAD assays. Easily prepared without any need for purification and capable of large fluorescence enhancement upon hybridization, NCBs are cost-effective and sensitive. Compared to conventional fluorescent probes, NCBs are also more photostable. As demonstrated in reporting the human topoisomerases I (hTopI) cleavage-ligation reaction, the proposed NCBs suggest a read-out format attractive for future REEAD-based diagnostics. Electronic

  6. Lamb-shift enhancement and detection in strongly driven superconducting circuits.

    PubMed

    Gramich, Vera; Gasparinetti, Simone; Solinas, Paolo; Ankerhold, Joachim

    2014-07-11

    It is shown that strong driving of a quantum system substantially enhances the Lamb shift induced by broadband reservoirs, which are typical for solid-state devices. By varying drive parameters the impact of environmental vacuum fluctuations with continuous spectral distribution onto system observables can be tuned in a distinctive way. This provides experimentally feasible measurement schemes for the Lamb shift in superconducting circuits based on Cooper pair boxes, where it can be detected either in shifted dressed transition frequencies or in pumped charge currents.

  7. Non-degenerate two photon absorption enhancement for laser dyes by precise lock-in detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, B.; Katan, C.; Bjorgaard, J. A.; Kobayashi, T.

    2015-12-01

    This study demonstrates a measurement system for a non-degenerate two-photon absorption (NDTPA) spectrum. The NDTPA light sources are a white light super continuum beam (WLSC, 500 ˜ 720 nm) and a fundamental beam (798 nm) from a Ti:Sapphire laser. A reliable broadband NDTPA spectrum is acquired in a single-shot detection procedure using a 128-channel lock-in amplifier. The NDTPA spectra for several common laser dyes are measured. Two photon absorption cross section enhancements are found in the experiment and validated by theoretical calculation for all of the chromophores.

  8. Enhanced surveillance for detection and management of infectious diseases: regional collaboration in the middle East.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Alex; Ramlawi, Assad; Belbiesi, Adel; Sheikh, Sami; Haddadin, Akhtam; Husseini, Sari; Abdeen, Ziad; Cohen, Dani

    2013-01-01

    Formed before international negotiations of the revised International Health Regulations (IHR), the Middle East Consortium for Infectious Disease Surveillance (MECIDS) is a regional collaboration aimed at facilitating implementation of the revised IHR and, more broadly, improving the detection and control of infectious disease outbreaks among neighboring countries in an area of continuous dispute. Initially focused on enhancing foodborne disease surveillance, MECIDS has expanded the scope of its work to also include avian and pandemic influenza and other emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases. Here, we describe the history and governance of MECIDS, highlighting key achievements over the consortium's seven-year history, and discuss the future of MECIDS. PMID:23362413

  9. Highly sensitive detection of chromium (III) ions by resonance Rayleigh scattering enhanced by gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Min; Cai, Huai-Hong; Yang, Fen; Lin, Dewen; Yang, Pei-Hui; Cai, Jiye

    2014-01-01

    Simple and sensitive determination of chromium (III) ions (Cr3+) has potential applications for detecting trace contamination in environment. Here, the assay is based on the enhancement of resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) by Cr3+-induced aggregation of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy were employed to characterize the nanostructures and spectroscopic properties of the Cr3+-AuNP system. The experiment conditions, such as reaction time, pH value, salt concentration and interfering ions, were investigated. The combination of signal amplification of Cr3+-citrate chelation with high sensitivity of RRS technique allow a selective assay of Cr3+ ions with a detection limit of up to 1.0 pM. The overall assay can be carried out at room temperature within only twenty minutes, making it suitable for high-throughput routine applications in environment and food samples.

  10. Serum albumin analysis for type II diabetes detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jinyong; Cao, Gang; Lin, Juqiang; Liu, Nenrong; Liao, Fadian; Ruan, Qiuyong; Wu, Shanshan; Huang, Zufang; Li, Ling; Chen, Rong

    2014-09-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy combined with membrane electrophoresis (ME) was firstly employed to detect albumin variation in type II diabetic development. Albumin was first purified from human serum by ME and then mixed with silver nanoparticles to perform SERS spectral analysis. SERS spectra were obtained from blood albumin samples of 20 diabetic patients and 19 healthy volunteers. Subtle but discernible changes in the acquired mean spectra of the two groups were observed. Tentative assignment of albumin SERS bands indicated specific structural changes of albumin molecule with diabetic development. Meanwhile, PCA-LDA diagnostic algorithms were employed to classify the two kinds of albumin SERS spectra, yielding the diagnostic sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 94.7%. The results from this exploratory study demonstrated that the EM-SERS method in combination with multivariate statistical analysis has great potential for the label-free detection of albumin variation for improving type II diabetes screening.

  11. Saliva analysis combining membrane protein purification with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for nasopharyngeal cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shangyuan; Lin, Duo; Lin, Juqiang; Huang, Zufang; Chen, Guannan; Li, Yongzeng; Huang, Shaohua; Zhao, Jianhua; Chen, Rong; Zeng, Haishan

    2014-02-01

    A method for saliva analysis combining membrane protein purification with silver nanoparticle-based surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for non-invasive nasopharyngeal cancer detection was present in this paper. In this method, cellulose acetate membrane was used to obtain purified whole proteins from human saliva while removing other native saliva constituents and exogenous substances. The purified proteins were mixed with silver nanoparticle for SERS analysis. A diagnostic accuracy of 90.2% can be achieved by principal components analysis combined with linear discriminate analysis, for saliva samples obtained from patients with nasopharyngeal cancer (n = 62) and healthy volunteers (n = 30). This exploratory study demonstrated the potential for developing non-invasive, rapid saliva SERS analysis for nasopharyngeal cancer detection.

  12. Fiber optic apparatus for detecting molecular species by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Angel, S.M.; Sharma, S.K.

    1987-11-30

    Optrode apparatus for detecting constituents of a fluid medium includes an optical fiber having a metal coating on at least a portion of a light transmissive core. The metal is one, such as silver, gold or copper, which enhances emission of Raman signal frequencies by molecules adsorbed on the surface of the coating when monochromatic probe light of a different frequency is scattered by such molecules and the metal coating is sufficiently thin to transmit light between the adsorbed molecules and the core of the fiber. Probe light is directed into one end of the fiber and a detector analyzes light emitted from the fiber for Raman frequencies that identify one or more particular molecular species. In one form, the optrode may function as a working electrode of an electrochemical cell while also serving to detect the products of oxidation or reduction reactions which occur at the electrode surface. 6 figs.

  13. Fiber optic apparatus for detecting molecular species by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Angel, S.M.; Sharma, S.K.

    1988-11-01

    Optrode apparatus for detecting constituents of a fluid medium includes an optical fiber having a metal coating on at least a portion of a light transmissive core. The metal is one, such as silver, gold or copper, which enhances emission of Raman signal frequencies by molecules adsorbed on the surface of the coating when monochromatic probe light of a different frequency is scattered by such molecules and the metal coating is sufficiently thin to transmit light between the absorbed molecules and the core of the fiber. Probe light is directed into one end of the fiber and a detector analyzes light emitted from the fiber for Raman frequencies that identify one or more particular molecular species. In one form, the optrode may function as a working electrode of an electrochemical cell while also serving to detect the products of oxidation or reduction reactions which occur at the electrode surface. 6 figs.

  14. Perchlorate Detection at Nanomolar Concentrations by Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Baohua; Ruan, Chuanmin; Wang, Wei

    2009-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4) has emerged as a widespread environmental contaminant and been detected in various food products and even in human breast milk and urine. This research developed a sensing technique based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for rapid screening and monitoring of this contaminant in groundwater and surface water. The technique was found to be capable of detecting ClO4 at concentrations as low as 10-9 M (or ~0.1 g/L) by using 2-dimethylaminoethanethiol (DMAE) modified gold nanoparticles as a SERS substrate. Quantitative analysis of ClO4 was validated with good reproducibility by using both simulated and contaminated groundwater samples. When coupled with a portable Raman spectrometer, this technique thus has the potential to be used as a in situ, rapid screening tool for perchlorate in the environment.

  15. Enhanced second-harmonic-generation detection of collagen by means of optical wavefront shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Jonathan V.; Throckmorton, Graham A.; Hokr, Brett H.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2016-03-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) has proven to be an effective method to both image and detect structural variations in fibrillar collagen. The ability to detect these differences is especially useful in studying diseases like cancer and fibrosis.1 SHG techniques have historically been limited by their ability to penetrate and image through strongly scattering tissues. Recently, optical wavefront shaping has enabled light to be focused through highly scattering media such as biological tissue.2-4 This technology also enables us to examine the dependence of second harmonic generation on the spatial phase of the pump laser. Here, we demonstrate that wavefront shaping can be used to enhance the generation of second harmonic light from collagen fibrils even when scattering is low or non-existent.

  16. Detection of thiabendazole applied on citrus fruits and bananas using surface enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Müller, Csilla; David, Leontin; Chiş, Vasile; Pînzaru, Simona Cintă

    2014-02-15

    Thiabendazole (TBZ) is a chemical fungicide and parasiticide largely used in food industry against mold and blight in vegetables and fruits during transportation and long term deposit. We investigated the possibility to detect and monitor the TBZ from the chemically treated bananas and citrus fruits available on Romanian market, using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) with a compact, portable, mini-Raman spectrometer. To assess the potential of the technique for fast, cheap and sensitive detection, we report the first complete vibrational characterization of the TBZ in a large pH and concentration range in conjunction with the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. From the relative intensity of the specific SERS bands as a function of concentration, we estimated a total amount of TZB as 78 mg/kg in citrus fruits, 13 times higher than the maximum allowed by current regulations, whereas in banana fruit the value was in the allowed limit.

  17. Automated lesion detection in dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xi; Kotagiri, Romamohanarao; Frazer, Helen; Yang, Qing

    2015-03-01

    We propose an automated method in detecting lesions to assist radiologists in interpreting dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) of breast. The aim is to highlight the suspicious regions of interest to reduce the searching time of the lesions and the possibility of radiologists overlooking small regions. In our method, we locate the suspicious regions by applying a threshold on essential features. The features are normalized to reduce the variation between patients. Support vector machine classifier is then applied to exclude normal tissues from these regions, using both kinetic and morphological features extracted in the lesions. In the evaluation of the system on 21 patients with 50 lesions, all lesions were successfully detected with 5.02 false positive regions per breast.

  18. AGILE detection of enhanced gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, M.; Striani, E.; Bulgarelli, A.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Argan, A.; Trois, A.; de Paris, G.; Vittorini, V.; D'Ammando, F.; Sabatini, S.; Piano, G.; Costa, E.; Donnarumma, I.; Feroci, M.; Pacciani, L.; Del Monte, E.; Lazzarotto, F.; Soffitta, P.; Evangelista, Y.; Lapshov, I.; Chen, A.; Giuliani, A.; Marisaldi, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Labanti, C.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Caraveo, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Perotti, F.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Vercellone, S.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Barbiellini, G.; Longo, F.; Picozza, P.; Morselli, A.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Giommi, P.; Santolamazza, P.; Lucarelli, F.; Colafrancesco, S.; Salotti, L.

    2010-09-01

    AGILE is detecting an increased gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the Crab Nebula. Integrating during the period 2010-09-19 00:10 UT to 2010-09-21 00:10 UT the AGILE-GRID detected enhanced gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV from a source at Galactic coordinates (l,b) = (184.6, -6.0) +/- 0.4 (stat.) +/- 0.1 (syst.) deg, and flux F > 500 e-8 ph/cm2/sec above 100 MeV, corresponding to an excess with significance above 4.4 sigma with respect to the average flux from the Crab nebula (F = (220 +/- 15)e-8 ph/cm^2/sec, Pittori et al., 2009, A&A, 506, 1563).

  19. Enhancing the mathematical properties of new haplotype homozygosity statistics for the detection of selective sweeps.

    PubMed

    Garud, Nandita R; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2015-06-01

    Soft selective sweeps represent an important form of adaptation in which multiple haplotypes bearing adaptive alleles rise to high frequency. Most statistical methods for detecting selective sweeps from genetic polymorphism data, however, have focused on identifying hard selective sweeps in which a favored allele appears on a single haplotypic background; these methods might be underpowered to detect soft sweeps. Among exceptions is the set of haplotype homozygosity statistics introduced for the detection of soft sweeps by Garud et al. (2015). These statistics, examining frequencies of multiple haplotypes in relation to each other, include H12, a statistic designed to identify both hard and soft selective sweeps, and H2/H1, a statistic that conditional on high H12 values seeks to distinguish between hard and soft sweeps. A challenge in the use of H2/H1 is that its range depends on the associated value of H12, so that equal H2/H1 values might provide different levels of support for a soft sweep model at different values of H12. Here, we enhance the H12 and H2/H1 haplotype homozygosity statistics for selective sweep detection by deriving the upper bound on H2/H1 as a function of H12, thereby generating a statistic that normalizes H2/H1 to lie between 0 and 1. Through a reanalysis of resequencing data from inbred lines of Drosophila, we show that the enhanced statistic both strengthens interpretations obtained with the unnormalized statistic and leads to empirical insights that are less readily apparent without the normalization. PMID:25891325

  20. Enhancing the mathematical properties of new haplotype homozygosity statistics for the detection of selective sweeps

    PubMed Central

    Garud, Nandita R.; Rosenberg, Noah A.

    2015-01-01

    Soft selective sweeps represent an important form of adaptation in which multiple haplotypes bearing adaptive alleles rise to high frequency. Most statistical methods for detecting selective sweeps from genetic polymorphism data, however, have focused on identifying hard selective sweeps in which a favored allele appears on a single haplotypic background; these methods might be underpowered to detect soft sweeps. Among exceptions is the set of haplotype homozygosity statistics introduced for the detection of soft sweeps by Garud et al. (2015). These statistics, examining frequencies of multiple haplotypes in relation to each other, include H12, a statistic designed to identify both hard and soft selective sweeps, and H2/H1, a statistic that conditional on high H12 values seeks to distinguish between hard and soft sweeps. A challenge in the use of H2/H1 is that its range depends on the associated value of H12, so that equal H2/H1 values might provide different levels of support for a soft sweep model at different values of H12. Here, we enhance the H12 and H2/H1 haplotype homozygosity statistics for selective sweep detection by deriving the upper bound on H2/H1 as a function of H12, thereby generating a statistic that normalizes H2/H1 to lie between 0 and 1. Through a reanalysis of resequencing data from inbred lines of Drosophila, we show that the enhanced statistic both strengthens interpretations obtained with the unnormalized statistic and leads to empirical insights that are less readily apparent without the normalization. PMID:25891325

  1. Explosive and chemical threat detection by surface-enhanced Raman scattering: a review.

    PubMed

    Hakonen, Aron; Andersson, Per Ola; Stenbæk Schmidt, Michael; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Käll, Mikael

    2015-09-17

    Acts of terror and warfare threats are challenging tasks for defense agencies around the world and of growing importance to security conscious policy makers and the general public. Explosives and chemical warfare agents are two of the major concerns in this context, as illustrated by the recent Boston Marathon bombing and nerve gas attacks on civilians in the Middle East. To prevent such tragic disasters, security personnel must be able to find, identify and deactivate the threats at multiple locations and levels. This involves major technical and practical challenges, such as detection of ultra-low quantities of hazardous compounds at remote locations for anti-terror purposes and monitoring of environmental sanitation of dumped or left behind toxic substances and explosives. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is one of todays most interesting and rapidly developing methods for label-free ultrasensitive vibrational "fingerprinting" of a variety of molecular compounds. Performance highlights include attomolar detection of TNT and DNT explosives, a sensitivity that few, if any, other technique can compete with. Moreover, instrumentation needed for SERS analysis are becoming progressively better, smaller and cheaper, and can today be acquired for a retail price close to 10,000 US$. This contribution aims to give a comprehensive overview of SERS as a technique for detection of explosives and chemical threats. We discuss the prospects of SERS becoming a major tool for convenient in-situ threat identification and we summarize existing SERS detection methods and substrates with particular focus on ultra-sensitive real-time detection. General concepts, detection capabilities and perspectives are discussed in order to guide potential users of the technique for homeland security and anti-warfare purposes. PMID:26398417

  2. Explosive and chemical threat detection by surface-enhanced Raman scattering: a review.

    PubMed

    Hakonen, Aron; Andersson, Per Ola; Stenbæk Schmidt, Michael; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Käll, Mikael

    2015-09-17

    Acts of terror and warfare threats are challenging tasks for defense agencies around the world and of growing importance to security conscious policy makers and the general public. Explosives and chemical warfare agents are two of the major concerns in this context, as illustrated by the recent Boston Marathon bombing and nerve gas attacks on civilians in the Middle East. To prevent such tragic disasters, security personnel must be able to find, identify and deactivate the threats at multiple locations and levels. This involves major technical and practical challenges, such as detection of ultra-low quantities of hazardous compounds at remote locations for anti-terror purposes and monitoring of environmental sanitation of dumped or left behind toxic substances and explosives. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is one of todays most interesting and rapidly developing methods for label-free ultrasensitive vibrational "fingerprinting" of a variety of molecular compounds. Performance highlights include attomolar detection of TNT and DNT explosives, a sensitivity that few, if any, other technique can compete with. Moreover, instrumentation needed for SERS analysis are becoming progressively better, smaller and cheaper, and can today be acquired for a retail price close to 10,000 US$. This contribution aims to give a comprehensive overview of SERS as a technique for detection of explosives and chemical threats. We discuss the prospects of SERS becoming a major tool for convenient in-situ threat identification and we summarize existing SERS detection methods and substrates with particular focus on ultra-sensitive real-time detection. General concepts, detection capabilities and perspectives are discussed in order to guide potential users of the technique for homeland security and anti-warfare purposes.

  3. Stand-off detection of explosives vapors by resonance-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Ida; Ceco, Ema; Ehlerding, Anneli; Östmark, Henric

    2013-06-01

    This paper describes a system for stand-off vapor detection based on Resonant Raman spectroscopy, RRS. The system is a step towards a RRS LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) system, capable of detecting vapors from explosives and explosives precursors at long distances. The current system was used to detect the vapor of nitromethane and mononitrotoluene outdoors in the open air, at a stand-off distance of 11-13 meters. Also, the signal dependence upon irradiation wavelength and sample concentration was studied in controlled laboratory conditions. A tunable Optical Parametric Oscillator pumped by an Nd:YAG laser, with a pulse length of 6 ns, was operated in the UV range of interest, 210-400 nm, illuminating the sample vapor. The backscattered Raman signal was collected by a telescope and a roundto- slit optical fiber was used to transmit collected light to the spectrometer with minimum losses. A gated intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) registered the spectra. The nitromethane cross section was resonance enhanced more than a factor 30 700, when measured at 220 nm, compared to the 532 nm value. The results show that a decrease in concentration can have a positive effect on the sensitivity of the system, due to a decrease in absorption and selfabsorption in the sample.

  4. Broadband cavity-enhanced detection of magnetic field effects in chemical models of a cryptochrome magnetoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Neil, Simon R T; Li, Jing; Sheppard, Dean M W; Storey, Jonathan; Maeda, Kiminori; Henbest, Kevin B; Hore, P J; Timmel, Christiane R; Mackenzie, Stuart R

    2014-04-17

    Broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS) is shown to be a sensitive method for the detection of magnetic field effects (MFEs) in two flavin-based chemical reactions which are simple models for cryptochrome magnetoreceptors. The advantages of optical cavity-based detection and (pseudo-white-light) supercontinuum radiation have been combined to provide full spectral coverage across the whole of the visible spectrum (425 < λ < 700 nm). This region covers the absorbance spectra of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) as well as their photogenerated radicals. To illustrate the power of this technique, BBCEAS has been used to record the spectral dependence of MFEs for photoinduced radical pairs formed in the intermolecular reaction of FMN with lysozyme and the intramolecular photochemistry of FAD. These reactions have been chosen for their photochemical similarities to cryptochrome proteins which have been proposed as key to the magnetic compass sense of many animals including birds. In experiments performed using low protein concentrations (10 μM) and 1 mm optical path-lengths, absorbance changes as small as 1 × 10(-7) (representing <0.1% MFEs) have been detected with good signal-to-noise offering the prospect of sensitive MFE detection in cryptochrome. PMID:24655160

  5. Sensitive detection of Ochratoxin A in food and drinks using metal-enhanced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Todescato, Francesco; Antognoli, Agnese; Meneghello, Anna; Cretaio, Erica; Signorini, Raffaella; Bozio, Renato

    2014-07-15

    Easy, sensitive, rapid and low cost ochratoxin biosensors are strongly demanded in food analysis since Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a widely diffused food contaminant, highly detrimental for human health. In this work, a novel plasmonic based optical biosensor prototype for ochratoxin A is described. It exploits the metal-enhanced fluorescence phenomenon due to the silver film over nanosphere plasmonic substrate. Since ochratoxin A could be present in different food commodities, sensor performances have been tested on three different matrices (dried milk, juices, and wheat mix). Firstly, a common OTA extraction solvent and a labeling and detection protocol were defined for the analyzed matrices. Then, the efficiency of the Ag-FON surfaces in signal amplification for the detection of low ochratoxin A concentrations was defined. Using samples spiked with OTA-AF 647 or with unlabeled OTA we were able to detect the mycotoxin at concentrations lower than E.U. specifications of 0.5 μg/kg in wheat, milk and apple juice. The test performances are comparable to those of ELISA kits but the platform presented here, once optimized, present some perspective advantages, such as: low cost and time consuming, versatility of the protocol for the investigation of different matrices, employment also in non-qualified laboratories, small dimensions that allow its integration in a compact device for OTA on-site detection. PMID:24583316

  6. Enhancement of immunohistochemical detection of Salmonella in tissues of experimentally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Rieger, J; Janczyk, P; Hünigen, H; Plendl, J

    2015-07-09

    Salmonella Typhimurium is one of the main pathogens compromising porcine and human health as well as food safety, because it is a prevailing source of foodborne infections due to contaminated pork. A prominent problem in the management of this bacteriosis is the number of subclinically infected carrier pigs. As very little is known concerning the mechanisms allowing Salmonella to persist in pigs, the objective of this study was to develop an immunohistochemical approach for the detection of salmonellae in tissue of pigs experimentally infected with Salmonella Typhimurium. Samples were obtained from a challenge trial in which piglets of the German Landrace were intragastrically infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 (1.4-2.1x1010 CFU). Piglets were sacrificed on days 2 and 28 post infection. Tissue samples of jejunum, ileum, colon, ileocecal mesenteric lymph nodes (Lnn. ileocolici), and tonsils (Tonsilla veli palatini) were fixed in Zamboni's fixative and paraffin-embedded. Different immunohistochemical staining protocols were evaluated. Salmonella was detected in varying amounts in the tissues. Brown iron-containing pigments in the lymph nodes interfered with the identification of Salmonella if DAB was used as a staining reagent. Detergents like Triton X-100 or Saponin enhanced the sensitivity. It seems advisable not to use a detection system with brown staining for bacteria in an experimental setup involving intestinal damage including haemorrhage. The use of detergents appears to result in a higher sensitivity in the immunohistochemical detection of salmonellae.

  7. Optical resonance-enhanced absorption-based near-field immunochip biosensor for allergen detection.

    PubMed

    Maier, Irene; Morgan, Michael R A; Lindner, Wolfgang; Pittner, Fritz

    2008-04-15

    An optical immunochip biosensor has been developed as a rapid method for allergen detection in complex food matrixes, and its application evaluated for the detection of the egg white allergens, ovalbumin and ovomucoid. The optical near-field phenomenon underlying the basic principle of the sensor design is called resonance-enhanced absorption (REA), which utilizes gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) as signal transducers in a highly sensitive interferometric setup. Using this approach, a novel, simple, and rapid colorimetric solid-phase immunoassay on a planar chip substrate was realized in direct and sandwich assay formats, with a detection system that does not require any instrumentation for readout. Semiquantitative immunochemical responses are directly visible to the naked eye of the analyst. The biosensor shows concentration-dependent color development by capturing antibody-functionalized Au NPs on allergen-coated chips and has a detection limit of 1 ng/mL. To establish a rapid method, we took advantage of the physicochemical microenvironment of the Au NP-antibody bioconjugate to be bound directly over an interacting poly(styrene-methyl methacrylate) interlayer by an immobilized antigen. In the direct assay format, a coating time with allergen of only 5 min under "soft" nondenaturing conditions was sufficient for accurate reproducibility and sensitivity. In conclusion, the REA-based immunochip sensor is easy to fabricate, is reproducible and selective in its performance, has minimal technical requirements, and will enable high-throughput screening of affinity binding interactions in technological and medical applications. PMID:18358010

  8. Sensitive detection of Ochratoxin A in food and drinks using metal-enhanced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Todescato, Francesco; Antognoli, Agnese; Meneghello, Anna; Cretaio, Erica; Signorini, Raffaella; Bozio, Renato

    2014-07-15

    Easy, sensitive, rapid and low cost ochratoxin biosensors are strongly demanded in food analysis since Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a widely diffused food contaminant, highly detrimental for human health. In this work, a novel plasmonic based optical biosensor prototype for ochratoxin A is described. It exploits the metal-enhanced fluorescence phenomenon due to the silver film over nanosphere plasmonic substrate. Since ochratoxin A could be present in different food commodities, sensor performances have been tested on three different matrices (dried milk, juices, and wheat mix). Firstly, a common OTA extraction solvent and a labeling and detection protocol were defined for the analyzed matrices. Then, the efficiency of the Ag-FON surfaces in signal amplification for the detection of low ochratoxin A concentrations was defined. Using samples spiked with OTA-AF 647 or with unlabeled OTA we were able to detect the mycotoxin at concentrations lower than E.U. specifications of 0.5 μg/kg in wheat, milk and apple juice. The test performances are comparable to those of ELISA kits but the platform presented here, once optimized, present some perspective advantages, such as: low cost and time consuming, versatility of the protocol for the investigation of different matrices, employment also in non-qualified laboratories, small dimensions that allow its integration in a compact device for OTA on-site detection.

  9. Nanoprobe-Enhanced, Split Aptamer-Based Electrochemical Sandwich Assay for Ultrasensitive Detection of Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tao; Liu, Ran; Ding, Xiaofan; Zhao, Juncai; Yu, Haixiang; Wang, Lei; Xu, Qing; Wang, Xuan; Lou, Xinhui; He, Miao; Xiao, Yi

    2015-08-01

    It is quite challenging to improve the binding affinity of antismall molecule aptamers. We report that the binding affinity of anticocaine split aptamer pairs improved by up to 66-fold by gold nanoparticles (AuNP)-attached aptamers due to the substantially increased local concentration of aptamers and multiple and simultaneous ligand interactions. The significantly improved binding affinity enables the detection of small molecule targets with unprecedented sensitivity, as demonstrated in nanoprobe-enhanced split aptamer-based electrochemical sandwich assays (NE-SAESA). NE-SAESA replaces the traditional molecular reporter probe with AuNPs conjugated to multiple reporter probes. The increased binding affinity allowed us to use 1,000-fold lower reporter probe concentrations relative to those employed in SAESA. We show that the near-elimination of background in NE-SAESA effectively improves assay sensitivity by ∼1,000-100,000-fold for ATP and cocaine detection, relative to equivalent SAESA. With the ongoing development of new strategies for the selection of aptamers, we anticipate that our sensor platform should offer a generalizable approach for the high-sensitivity detection of diverse targets. More importantly, we believe that NE-SAESA represents a novel strategy to improve the binding affinity between a small molecule and its aptamer and potentially can be extended to other detection platforms.

  10. Enhancement of immunohistochemical detection of Salmonella in tissues of experimentally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Rieger, J; Janczyk, P; Hünigen, H; Plendl, J

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium is one of the main pathogens compromising porcine and human health as well as food safety, because it is a prevailing source of foodborne infections due to contaminated pork. A prominent problem in the management of this bacteriosis is the number of subclinically infected carrier pigs. As very little is known concerning the mechanisms allowing Salmonella to persist in pigs, the objective of this study was to develop an immunohistochemical approach for the detection of salmonellae in tissue of pigs experimentally infected with Salmonella Typhimurium. Samples were obtained from a challenge trial in which piglets of the German Landrace were intragastrically infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 (1.4-2.1x1010 CFU). Piglets were sacrificed on days 2 and 28 post infection. Tissue samples of jejunum, ileum, colon, ileocecal mesenteric lymph nodes (Lnn. ileocolici), and tonsils (Tonsilla veli palatini) were fixed in Zamboni's fixative and paraffin-embedded. Different immunohistochemical staining protocols were evaluated. Salmonella was detected in varying amounts in the tissues. Brown iron-containing pigments in the lymph nodes interfered with the identification of Salmonella if DAB was used as a staining reagent. Detergents like Triton X-100 or Saponin enhanced the sensitivity. It seems advisable not to use a detection system with brown staining for bacteria in an experimental setup involving intestinal damage including haemorrhage. The use of detergents appears to result in a higher sensitivity in the immunohistochemical detection of salmonellae. PMID:26428884

  11. Aspects of the Application of Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopy to Nitrogen Oxides Detection

    PubMed Central

    Wojtas, Jacek; Mikolajczyk, Janusz; Bielecki, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    This article presents design issues of high-sensitive laser absorption spectroscopy systems for nitrogen oxides (NOx) detection. Examples of our systems and their investigation results are also described. The constructed systems use one of the most sensitive methods, cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS). They operate at different wavelength ranges using a blue—violet laser diode (410 nm) as well as quantum cascade lasers (5.27 μm and 4.53 μm). Each of them is configured as a one or two channel measurement device using, e.g., time division multiplexing and averaging. During the testing procedure, the main performance features such as detection limits and measurements uncertainties have been determined. The obtained results are 1 ppb NO2, 75 ppb NO and 45 ppb N2O. For all systems, the uncertainty of concentration measurements does not exceed a value of 13%. Some experiments with explosives are also discussed. A setup equipped with a concentrator of explosives vapours was used. The detection method is based either on the reaction of the sensors to the nitrogen oxides directly emitted by the explosives or on the reaction to the nitrogen oxides produced during thermal decomposition of explosive vapours. For TNT, PETN, RDX and HMX a detection limit better than 1 ng has been achieved. PMID:23752566

  12. Comparison of histochemical methods for murine eosinophil detection in a RSV vaccine-enhanced inflammation model

    PubMed Central

    Meyerholz, David K.; Griffin, Michelle A.; Castilow, Elaine M.; Varga, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    A comparative study of histochemical detection of eosinophils in fixed murine tissue is lacking. Five histochemical methods previously reported for eosinophil detection were quantitatively and qualitatively compared in an established murine RSV vaccine-enhanced inflammation model. Nonspecific neutrophil staining was evaluated in tissue sections of neutrophilic soft tissue lesions and bone marrow from respective animals. Eosinophils had granular red to orange-red cytoplasmic staining, depending on the method, whereas neutrophils had, when stained, a more homogenous cytoplasmic pattern. Nonspecific background staining of similar coloration was variably seen in arterial walls and erythrocytes. Astra Blue/Vital New Red, Congo Red, Luna, Modified Hematoxylin & Eosin, and Sirius Red techniques were all effective in detecting increased eosinophil recruitment compared to controls; however, differences in eosinophil quantification significantly varied between techniques. Astra Blue/Vital New Red had the best specificity for differentiating eosinophils and neutrophils, but had a reduced ability to enumerate eosinophils and was the most time intensive. The Luna stain had excessive non specific staining of tissues and a reduced enumeration of infiltrating eosinophils making it suboptimal. For multiple parameters such as eosinophil detection, specificity, and contrast with background tissues, the Sirius Red followed by Congo Red and Modified Hematoxylin & Eosin methods were useful, each with their own staining qualities. PMID:19181630

  13. Aspects of the application of cavity enhanced spectroscopy to nitrogen oxides detection.

    PubMed

    Wojtas, Jacek; Mikolajczyk, Janusz; Bielecki, Zbigniew

    2013-06-10

    This article presents design issues of high-sensitive laser absorption spectroscopy systems for nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) detection. Examples of our systems and their investigation results are also described. The constructed systems use one of the most sensitive methods, cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS). They operate at different wavelength ranges using a blue--violet laser diode (410 nm) as well as quantum cascade lasers (5.27 µm and 4.53 µm). Each of them is configured as a one or two channel measurement device using, e.g., time division multiplexing and averaging. During the testing procedure, the main performance features such as detection limits and measurements uncertainties have been determined. The obtained results are 1 ppb NO(2), 75 ppb NO and 45 ppb N(2)O. For all systems, the uncertainty of concentration measurements does not exceed a value of 13%. Some experiments with explosives are also discussed. A setup equipped with a concentrator of explosives vapours was used. The detection method is based either on the reaction of the sensors to the nitrogen oxides directly emitted by the explosives or on the reaction to the nitrogen oxides produced during thermal decomposition of explosive vapours. For TNT, PETN, RDX and HMX a detection limit better than 1 ng has been achieved.

  14. Enhancement of Immunohistochemical Detection of Salmonella in Tissues of Experimentally Infected Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, J.; Janczyk, P.; Hünigen, H.; Plendl, J.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium is one of the main pathogens compromising porcine and human health as well as food safety, because it is a prevailing source of foodborne infections due to contaminated pork. A prominent problem in the management of this bacteriosis is the number of subclinically infected carrier pigs. As very little is known concerning the mechanisms allowing Salmonella to persist in pigs, the objective of this study was to develop an immunohistochemical approach for the detection of salmonellae in tissue of pigs experimentally infected with Salmonella Typhimurium. Samples were obtained from a challenge trial in which piglets of the German Landrace were intragastrically infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 (1.4-2.1×1010 CFU). Piglets were sacrificed on days 2 and 28 post infection. Tissue samples of jejunum, ileum, colon, ileocecal mesenteric lymph nodes (Lnn. ileocolici), and tonsils (Tonsilla veli palatini) were fixed in Zamboni’s fixative and paraffin-embedded. Different immunohistochemical staining protocols were evaluated. Salmonella was detected in varying amounts in the tissues. Brown iron-containing pigments in the lymph nodes interfered with the identification of Salmonella if DAB was used as a staining reagent. Detergents like Triton X-100 or Saponin enhanced the sensitivity. It seems advisable not to use a detection system with brown staining for bacteria in an experimental setup involving intestinal damage including haemorrhage. The use of detergents appears to result in a higher sensitivity in the immunohistochemical detection of salmonellae. PMID:26428884

  15. Ultrasensitive detection of nucleic acids by template enhanced hybridization followed by rolling circle amplification and catalytic hairpin assembly.

    PubMed

    Song, Weiling; Zhang, Qiao; Sun, Wenbo

    2015-02-11

    An ultrasensitive protocol for fluorescent detection of DNA is designed by combining the template enhanced hybridization process (TEHP) with Rolling Circle Amplification (RCA) and Catalytic Hairpin Assembly (CHA), showing a remarkable amplification efficiency.

  16. Surface enhanced Raman scattering based sensitive detection of histone demethylase activity using a formaldehyde-selective reactive probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Deng, Xianghua; Liu, Jinwen; Tang, Hao; Jiang, Jianhui

    2013-10-01

    A novel surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) based assay using a formaldehyde-selective reactive probe for sensitive detection of activity of histone demethylases (HDMs) by direct observation of by-product formaldehyde was reported.

  17. Surface-enhanced Raman Immunoassay (SERIA): detection of Bacillus globigii in ground water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guicheteau, Jason A.; Christesen, Steven D.

    2004-12-01

    This work presents the development of new methodologies centering on surfaces with immunologically induced affinities for biomaterials in aqueous systems. The immunologically active surfaces concentrate the biomaterials at the interface and therefore eliminate the need for preconcentration steps. This results in a highly sensitive and rapid immunoassay technique. The very strong localized of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) that occurs at noble metal surfaces is combined with the unparalleled selectivity of immunoassays. Localization of the SERS signal eliminates the problem of washing and allows assays to be performed without treatment steps associated with removing excess agents. Previous work with small illicit drug molecules and large microorganisms clearly demonstrates trace detection of species in aqueous environments is possible. This paper discusses further work to detect Bacillus globigii by couping surface enhanced Raman scattering with immunoassays (SERIA) using citrate reduced silver nanoparticles. The spores of B. globigii are used to simulate the behavior of another bacterium that forms spores-the potential biological warfare agent, Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax.

  18. Aminolevulinic Acid-Based Tumor Detection and Therapy: Molecular Mechanisms and Strategies for Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue; Palasuberniam, Pratheeba; Kraus, Daniel; Chen, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is the first metabolite in the heme biosynthesis pathway in humans. In addition to the end product heme, this pathway also produces other porphyrin metabolites. Protoporphyrin (PpIX) is one heme precursor porphyrin with good fluorescence and photosensitizing activity. Because tumors and other proliferating cells tend to exhibit a higher level of PpIX than normal cells after ALA incubation, ALA has been used as a prodrug to enable PpIX fluorescence detection and photodynamic therapy (PDT) of lesion tissues. Extensive studies have been carried out in the past twenty years to explore why some tumors exhibit elevated ALA-mediated PpIX and how to enhance PpIX levels to achieve better tumor detection and treatment. Here we would like to summarize previous research in order to stimulate future studies on these important topics. In this review, we focus on summarizing tumor-associated alterations in heme biosynthesis enzymes, mitochondrial functions and porphyrin transporters that contribute to ALA-PpIX increase in tumors. Mechanism-based therapeutic strategies for enhancing ALA-based modalities including iron chelators, differentiation agents and PpIX transporter inhibitors are also discussed. PMID:26516850

  19. Dispersion Curve Engineering of TiO₂/Silver Hybrid Substrates for Enhanced Surface Plasmon Resonance Detection.

    PubMed

    El-Gohary, Sherif H; Choi, Munsik; Kim, Young L; Byun, Kyung Min

    2016-01-01

    As surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensors are well translated into biological, chemical, environmental, and clinical fields, it is critical to further realize stable and sustainable systems, avoiding oxidation susceptibility of metal films-in particular, silver substrates. We report an enhanced SPR detection performance by incorporating a TiO₂ layer on top of a thin silver film. A uniform TiO₂ film fabricated by electron beam evaporation at room temperature is an effective alternative in bypassing oxidation of a silver film. Based on our finding that the sensor sensitivity is strongly correlated with the slope of dispersion curves, SPR sensing results obtained by parylene film deposition shows that TiO₂/silver hybrid substrates provide notable sensitivity improvement compared to a conventional bare silver film, which confirms the possibility of engineering the dispersion characteristic according to the incidence wavelength. The reported SPR structures with TiO₂ films enhance the sensitivity significantly in water and air environments and its overall qualitative trend in sensitivity improvement is consistent with numerical simulations. Thus, we expect that our approach can extend the applicability of TiO₂-mediated SPR biosensors to highly sensitive detection for biomolecular binding events of low concentrations, while serving a practical and reliable biosensing platform. PMID:27618043

  20. Enhanced detectability of small objects in correlated clutter using an improved 2-D adaptive lattice algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ffrench, P A; Zeidler, J H; Ku, W H

    1997-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2-D) adaptive filtering is a technique that can be applied to many image processing applications. This paper will focus on the development of an improved 2-D adaptive lattice algorithm (2-D AL) and its application to the removal of correlated clutter to enhance the detectability of small objects in images. The two improvements proposed here are increased flexibility in the calculation of the reflection coefficients and a 2-D method to update the correlations used in the 2-D AL algorithm. The 2-D AL algorithm is shown to predict correlated clutter in image data and the resulting filter is compared with an ideal Wiener-Hopf filter. The results of the clutter removal will be compared to previously published ones for a 2-D least mean square (LMS) algorithm. 2-D AL is better able to predict spatially varying clutter than the 2-D LMS algorithm, since it converges faster to new image properties. Examples of these improvements are shown for a spatially varying 2-D sinusoid in white noise and simulated clouds. The 2-D LMS and 2-D AL algorithms are also shown to enhance a mammogram image for the detection of small microcalcifications and stellate lesions.

  1. Dispersion curve-based sensitivity engineering for enhanced surface plasmon resonance detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gohary, Sherif H.; Eom, Seyoung; Lee, Soo Yeol; Byun, Kyung Min

    2016-07-01

    Manipulation of dispersion curve for enhancing surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection is proposed. Based on strong correlation between slope of dispersion curve and SPR angle shift, it is confirmed that dispersion curve characteristics can be employed as an analysis tool to evaluate SPR sensor performance and to predict anomalous plasmonic behaviors. Complicated resonance shift in SPR angle, especially in the presence of metallic nanograting, such as negative shift, can be controlled reliably by engineering the dispersion curve. As it has a dependence on geometrical parameters of metallic films and gratings, dispersion relation engineering is also useful in optimizing the sensor sensitivity. For a wavelength of λ=630 nm, introduction of a gold nanograting shows a significant improvement in sensitivity by more than 5 times, compared to a traditional thin-film-based SPR structure. In addition, we find that use of a longer wavelength in near-infrared region can be advantageous for avoiding a negative SPR shift and obtaining a narrow and deep SPR curve. Our approach is expected to extend the applicability of dispersion-based sensitivity engineering technique to a variety of SPR platforms for highly enhanced SPR detection.

  2. Ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of nucleic acids by template enhanced hybridization followed with rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hanxu; Yan, Feng; Lei, Jianping; Ju, Huangxian

    2012-08-21

    An ultrasensitive protocol for electrochemical detection of DNA is designed with quantum dots (QDs) as a signal tag by combining the template enhanced hybridization process (TEHP) and rolling circle amplification (RCA). Upon the recognition of the molecular beacon (MB) to target DNA, the MB hybridizes with assistants and target DNA to form a ternary ''Y-junction''. The target DNA can be dissociated from the structure under the reaction of nicking endonuclease to initiate the next hybridization process. The template enhanced MB fragments further act as the primers of the RCA reaction to produce thousands of repeated oligonucleotide sequences, which can bind with oligonucleotide functionalized QDs. The attached signal tags can be easily read out by square-wave voltammetry after dissolving with acid. Because of the cascade signal amplification and the specific TEHP and RCA reaction, this newly designed protocol provides an ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of DNA down to the attomolar level (11 aM) with a linear range of 6 orders of magnitude (from 1 × 10(-17) to 1 × 10(-11) M) and can discriminate mismatched DNA from perfect matched target DNA with high selectivity. The high sensitivity and specificity make this method a great potential for early diagnosis in gene-related diseases.

  3. Dispersion Curve Engineering of TiO₂/Silver Hybrid Substrates for Enhanced Surface Plasmon Resonance Detection.

    PubMed

    El-Gohary, Sherif H; Choi, Munsik; Kim, Young L; Byun, Kyung Min

    2016-09-07

    As surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensors are well translated into biological, chemical, environmental, and clinical fields, it is critical to further realize stable and sustainable systems, avoiding oxidation susceptibility of metal films-in particular, silver substrates. We report an enhanced SPR detection performance by incorporating a TiO₂ layer on top of a thin silver film. A uniform TiO₂ film fabricated by electron beam evaporation at room temperature is an effective alternative in bypassing oxidation of a silver film. Based on our finding that the sensor sensitivity is strongly correlated with the slope of dispersion curves, SPR sensing results obtained by parylene film deposition shows that TiO₂/silver hybrid substrates provide notable sensitivity improvement compared to a conventional bare silver film, which confirms the possibility of engineering the dispersion characteristic according to the incidence wavelength. The reported SPR structures with TiO₂ films enhance the sensitivity significantly in water and air environments and its overall qualitative trend in sensitivity improvement is consistent with numerical simulations. Thus, we expect that our approach can extend the applicability of TiO₂-mediated SPR biosensors to highly sensitive detection for biomolecular binding events of low concentrations, while serving a practical and reliable biosensing platform.

  4. ZnO-Ag hybrids for ultrasensitive detection of trinitrotoluene by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    He, Xuan; Wang, Hui; Li, Zhongbo; Chen, Dong; Zhang, Qi

    2014-07-28

    An efficient and green approach was used to fabricate novel and low-cost surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy sensors based on 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) functionalized ZnO-Ag hybrid nanoflowers for the detection of explosives. Such SERS sensors exhibited high sensitivity to rhodamine 6G (R6G) at a low concentration of 10(-12) M and an enhancement factor of over 4.12 × 10(6) was achieved. Moreover, the Raman-inactive trinitrotoluene (TNT) initiated the high Raman scattering of non-resonated 4-ATP through the formation of a π-donor-π-acceptor interaction between the π-acceptor, TNT, and the π-donor, the 4-ATP-Ag-ZnO complex, on the flower-like hybrids. Because this π-donor-π-acceptor interaction could effectively induce the "hot spots" for SERS, TNT concentrations as low as 5 × 10(-9) M could be detected. Furthermore, other derivatives of TNT were also explored, and this sensor exhibited better selectivity for TNT than other similarly structured explosives. The low-cost hybrid SERS substrates presented good sensitivity and reproducibility for the analytes employed, demonstrating promising application in forensic science and homeland security.

  5. Physical and chemical methods for enhancing rapid detection of viruses and other agents.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, J H

    1993-01-01

    Viral replication events can be enhanced by physical, chemical, or heat treatment of cells. The centrifugation of cells can stimulate them to proliferate, reduce their generation times, and activate gene expression. Human endothelial cells can be activated to release cyclo-oxygenase metabolites after rocking for 5 min, and mechanical stress can stimulate endothelial cells to proliferate. Centrifugation of virus-infected cultures can increase cytopathic effects (CPE), enhance the number of infected cells, increase viral yields, and reduce viral detection times and may increase viral isolation rates. The rolling of virus-infected cells also has an effect similar to that of centrifugation. The continuous rolling of virus-infected cultures at < or = 2.0 rpm can enhance enterovirus, rhinovirus, reovirus, rotavirus, paramyxovirus, herpesvirus, and vaccinia virus CPE or yields or both. For some viruses, the continuous rolling of infected cell cultures at 96 rpm (1.9 x g) is superior to rolling at 2.0 rpm for viral replication or CPE production. In addition to centrifugation and rolling, the treatment of cells with chemicals or heat can also enhance viral yields or CPE. For example, the treatment of virus-infected cells with dimethyl sulfoxide can enhance viral transformation, increase plaque numbers and plaque size, increase the number of cells producing antigens, and increase viral yields. The infectivity of fowl plague virus is increased by 80-fold when 4% dimethyl sulfoxide is added to culture medium immediately after infection. The heat shocking of virus-infected cells also has been shown to have a stimulatory effect on the replication events of cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and human immunodeficiency virus. The effects of motion, chemicals, or heat treatments on viral replication are not well understood. These treatments apparently activate cells to make them more permissive to viral infection and viral replication. Perhaps heat shock proteins or stress

  6. Organizational decentralization in radiology.

    PubMed

    Aas, I H Monrad

    2006-01-01

    At present, most hospitals have a department of radiology where images are captured and interpreted. Decentralization is the opposite of centralization and means 'away from the centre'. With a Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) and broadband communications, transmitting radiology images between sites will be far easier than before. Qualitative interviews of 26 resource persons were performed in Norway. There was a response rate of 90%. Decentralization of radiology interpretations seems less relevant than centralization, but several forms of decentralization have a role to play. The respondents mentioned several advantages, including exploitation of capacity and competence. They also mentioned several disadvantages, including splitting professional communities and reduced contact between radiologists and clinicians. With the new technology decentralization and centralization of image interpretation are important possibilities in organizational change. This will be important for the future of teleradiology.

  7. Organizational centralization in radiology.

    PubMed

    Aas, I H Monrad

    2006-01-01

    Traditionally, hospitals have a radiology department, where images are taken and interpretation occurs. Teleradiology makes it possible to capture images in one location and transmit them elsewhere for interpretation. Organizational centralization of radiology interpretations is therefore of interest. Empirical data have been collected in qualitative interviews of 26 resource persons with substantial experience with picture archiving and communication systems and teleradiology, from 12 departments of radiology in Norway. The response rate was 90%. A total of 21 theoretically possible types of centralization of image interpretation were identified, representing combinations of three categories of geographical centralization, and seven categories of centralization according to function. Various advantages and disadvantages of centralization were identified. Organizational changes may be decisive for the future of teleradiology, but it may be wise to plan for change in small steps, since we know little about how broad future organizational changes based on teleradiology will be, or what will decide how far particular organizations will go. PMID:16438776

  8. Organizational decentralization in radiology.

    PubMed

    Aas, I H Monrad

    2006-01-01

    At present, most hospitals have a department of radiology where images are captured and interpreted. Decentralization is the opposite of centralization and means 'away from the centre'. With a Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) and broadband communications, transmitting radiology images between sites will be far easier than before. Qualitative interviews of 26 resource persons were performed in Norway. There was a response rate of 90%. Decentralization of radiology interpretations seems less relevant than centralization, but several forms of decentralization have a role to play. The respondents mentioned several advantages, including exploitation of capacity and competence. They also mentioned several disadvantages, including splitting professional communities and reduced contact between radiologists and clinicians. With the new technology decentralization and centralization of image interpretation are important possibilities in organizational change. This will be important for the future of teleradiology. PMID:16884560

  9. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) for Detection in Immunoassays. Applications, fundamentals, and optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Driskell, Jeremy Daniel

    2006-08-09

    Immunoassays have been utilized for the detection of biological analytes for several decades. Many formats and detection strategies have been explored, each having unique advantages and disadvantages. More recently, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been introduced as a readout method for immunoassays, and has shown great potential to meet many key analytical figures of merit. This technology is in its infancy and this dissertation explores the diversity of this method as well as the mechanism responsible for surface enhancement. Approaches to reduce assay times are also investigated. Implementing the knowledge gained from these studies will lead to a more sensitive immunoassay requiring less time than its predecessors. This dissertation is organized into six sections. The first section includes a literature review of the previous work that led to this dissertation. A general overview of the different approaches to immunoassays is given, outlining the strengths and weaknesses of each. Included is a detailed review of binding kinetics, which is central for decreasing assay times. Next, the theoretical underpinnings of SERS is reviewed at its current level of understanding. Past work has argued that surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the enhancing substrate influences the SERS signal; therefore, the SPR of the extrinsic Raman labels (ERLs) utilized in our SERS-based immunoassay is discussed. Four original research chapters follow the Introduction, each presented as separate manuscripts. Chapter 2 modifies a SERS-based immunoassay previously developed in our group, extending it to the low-level detection of viral pathogens and demonstrating its versatility in terms of analyte type, Chapter 3 investigates the influence of ERL size, material composition, and separation distance between the ERLs and capture substrate on the SERS signal. This chapter links SPR with SERS enhancement factors and is consistent with many of the results from theoretical treatments

  10. Radiology's value chain.

    PubMed

    Enzmann, Dieter R

    2012-04-01

    A diagnostic radiology value chain is constructed to define its main components, all of which are vulnerable to change, because digitization has caused disaggregation of the chain. Some components afford opportunities to improve productivity, some add value, while some face outsourcing to lower labor cost and to information technology substitutes, raising commoditization risks. Digital image information, because it can be competitive at smaller economies of scale, allows faster, differential rates of technological innovation of components, initiating a centralization-to-decentralization technology trend. Digitization, having triggered disaggregation of radiology's professional service model, may soon usher in an information business model. This means moving from a mind-set of "reading images" to an orientation of creating and organizing information for greater accuracy, faster speed, and lower cost in medical decision making. Information businesses view value chain investments differently than do small professional services. In the former model, producing a better business product will extend image interpretation beyond a radiologist's personal fund of knowledge to encompass expanding external imaging databases. A follow-on expansion with integration of image and molecular information into a report will offer new value in medical decision making. Improved interpretation plus new integration will enrich and diversify radiology's key service products, the report and consultation. A more robust, information-rich report derived from a "systems" and "computational" radiology approach will be facilitated by a transition from a professional service to an information business. Under health care reform, radiology will transition its emphasis from volume to greater value. Radiology's future brightens with the adoption of a philosophy of offering information rather than "reads" for decision making. Staunchly defending the status quo via turf wars is unlikely to constitute a

  11. In Vivo and Ex Vivo Transcutaneous Glucose Detection Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ke

    Diabetes mellitus is widely acknowledged as a large and growing health concern. The lack of practical methods for continuously monitoring glucose levels causes significant difficulties in successful diabetes management. Extensive validation work has been carried out using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for in vivo glucose sensing. This dissertation details progress made towards a Raman-based glucose sensor for in vivo, transcutaneous glucose detection. The first presented study combines spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) with SERS (SESORS) to explore the possibility of in vivo, transcutaneous glucose sensing. A SERS-based glucose sensor was implanted subcutaneously in Sprague-Dawley rats. SERS spectra were acquired transcutaneously and analyzed using partial least-squares (PLS). Highly accurate and consistent results were obtained, especially in the hypoglycemic range. Additionally, the sensor demonstrated functionality at least17 days after implantation. A subsequent study further extends the application of SESORS to the possibility of in vivo detection of glucose in brain through skull. Specifically, SERS nanoantennas were buried in an ovine tissue behind a bone with 8 mm thickness and detected by using SESORS. In addition, quantitative detection through bones by using SESORS was also demonstrated. A device that could measure glucose continuously as well as noninvasively would be of great use to patients with diabetes. The inherent limitation of the SESORS approach may prevent this technique from becoming a noninvasive method. Therefore, the prospect of using normal Raman spectroscopy for glucose detection was re-examined. Quantitative detection of glucose and lactate in the clinically relevant range was demonstrated by using normal Raman spectroscopy with low power and short acquisition time. Finally, a nonlinear calibration method called least-squares support vector machine regression (LS-SVR) was investigated for analyzing spectroscopic

  12. piggyBac-based insertional mutagenesis and enhancer detection as a tool for functional insect genomics.

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Carsten; Offen, Nils; Nystedt, Sverker; Häcker, Udo; Wimmer, Ernst A

    2003-01-01

    Transposon mutagenesis provides a fundamental tool for functional genomics. Here we present a non-species-specific, combined enhancer detection and binary expression system based on the transposable element piggyBac: For the different components of this insertional mutagenesis system, we used widely applicable transposons and distinguishable broad-range transformation markers, which should enable this system to be operational in nonmodel arthropods. In a pilot screen in Drosophila melanogaster, piggyBac mutator elements on the X chromosome were mobilized in males by a Hermes-based jumpstarter element providing piggyBac transposase activity under control of the alpha1-tubulin promoter. As primary reporters in the piggyBac mutator elements, we employed the heterologous transactivators GAL4delta or tTA. To identify larval and adult enhancer detectors, strains carrying UASp-EYFP or TRE-EYFP as secondary reporter elements were used. Tissue-specific enhancer activities were readily observed in the GAL4delta/UASp-based systems, but only rarely in the tTA/TRE system. Novel autosomal insertions were recovered with an average jumping rate of 80%. Of these novel insertions, 3.8% showed homozygous lethality, which was reversible by piggyBac excision. Insertions were found in both coding and noncoding regions of characterized genes and also in noncharacterized and non-P-targeted CG-number genes. This indicates that piggyBac will greatly facilitate the intended saturation mutagenesis in Drosophila. PMID:12618403

  13. Breast cancer detection based on serum sample surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Obieta, Enrique; Martínez-Espinosa, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Zerega, Brenda Esmeralda; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; González-Solís, José Luis

    2016-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a vibrational technique which provides information about the chemical structure. Nevertheless, since many chemicals are present in a sample at very low concentration, the Raman signal observed is extremely weak. In surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), Raman signals can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude when nanoparticles are used. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in the breast cancer detection based on serum SERS. The serum samples were obtained from 12 patients who were clinically diagnosed with advanced breast cancer and 15 controls. In the same proportion, the serum samples were mixed with colloidal gold nanoparticles of 40 nm using sonication. At least 10 spectra were collected of each serum sample using a Jobin-Yvon LabRAM Raman Spectrometer with a laser of 830 nm. Raw spectra were processed by carrying baseline correction, smoothing, and normalization and then analyzed using principle component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Raman spectra showed strongly enhanced bands in the 600-1800 cm (-1) range due to the nanoparticle colloidal clusters observed. These Raman bands allowed identifying biomolecules present at low concentration as amide I and III, β carotene, glutathione, tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine. Preliminary results demonstrated that SERS and PCA-LDA can be used to discriminate between control and cancer samples with high sensitivity and specificity. SERS allowed short exposures and required a minimal sample preparation. The preliminary results suggest that SERS and PCA-LDA could be an excellent support technique for the breast cancer detection using serum samples.

  14. Renal stones on portal venous phase contrast-enhanced CT: does intravenous contrast interfere with detection?

    PubMed Central

    Dym, R. Joshua; Duncan, Dameon R.; Spektor, Michael; Cohen, Hillel W.; Scheinfeld, Meir H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the sensitivity of portal venous phase contrast-enhanced CT for the detection of renal stones. Methods This retrospective study included 97 CT examinations of the abdomen without and with intravenous contrast, including 85 (87.6%) examinations with at least one renal stone on the “gold standard” noncontrast images, as scored by a single radiologist. Three other radiologists each independently reviewed only the contrast-enhanced images from all 97 examinations and recorded all renal stones. Reviewer sensitivity for stones was categorized by stone diameter. Reviewer sensitivity and specificity for stone disease were also calculated on a per-kidney basis. Results The 97 cases included a total of 238 stones ≥1 mm, with a mean (±SD) of 1.2 ± 1.9 stones per kidney and a stone diameter of 3.5 ± 3.0 mm. Pooling data for the three reviewers, sensitivity for all stones was 81%; sensitivity for stones ≥2, ≥3, ≥4, and ≥5 mm was 88%, 95%, 99%, and 98%, respectively. Sensitivity for stone disease on a per-kidney basis was 94% when considering all stones; when considering only stones ≥2, ≥3, and ≥4 mm, sensitivity was 96%, 99%, and 100%, respectively. Specificity for stone disease on a per-kidney basis was 98% overall, 99% when considering only stones ≥2 mm, and 100% when considering only stones ≥3 mm. Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced CT is highly sensitive for the detection of renal stones ≥3 mm in diameter and less sensitive for smaller stones. In cases where the clinical diagnosis is uncertain and performance of a CT examination is being contemplated, intravenous contrast utilization would allow assessment for stone disease while also optimizing evaluation for other conditions. PMID:24504541

  15. Breast cancer detection based on serum sample surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Obieta, Enrique; Martínez-Espinosa, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Zerega, Brenda Esmeralda; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; González-Solís, José Luis

    2016-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a vibrational technique which provides information about the chemical structure. Nevertheless, since many chemicals are present in a sample at very low concentration, the Raman signal observed is extremely weak. In surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), Raman signals can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude when nanoparticles are used. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in the breast cancer detection based on serum SERS. The serum samples were obtained from 12 patients who were clinically diagnosed with advanced breast cancer and 15 controls. In the same proportion, the serum samples were mixed with colloidal gold nanoparticles of 40 nm using sonication. At least 10 spectra were collected of each serum sample using a Jobin-Yvon LabRAM Raman Spectrometer with a laser of 830 nm. Raw spectra were processed by carrying baseline correction, smoothing, and normalization and then analyzed using principle component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Raman spectra showed strongly enhanced bands in the 600-1800 cm (-1) range due to the nanoparticle colloidal clusters observed. These Raman bands allowed identifying biomolecules present at low concentration as amide I and III, β carotene, glutathione, tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine. Preliminary results demonstrated that SERS and PCA-LDA can be used to discriminate between control and cancer samples with high sensitivity and specificity. SERS allowed short exposures and required a minimal sample preparation. The preliminary results suggest that SERS and PCA-LDA could be an excellent support technique for the breast cancer detection using serum samples. PMID:27289243

  16. Detection of aflatoxin B₁ with immunochromatographic test strips: Enhanced signal sensitivity using gold nanoflowers.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yanwei; Ren, Meiling; Li, Yanping; Huang, Zhibing; Shu, Mei; Yang, Hongwei; Xiong, Yonghua; Xu, Yang

    2015-09-01

    Immunochromatographic test strips (ICTS) are commonly limited to higher concentrations of analytes. This limitation stems from the relatively low sensitivity of conventional gold nanospheres (AuNSs with a diameter of 20 nm) to emit detectable brightness values. The larger multi-branched gold nanoflowers (AuNFs) with a higher optical brightness as well as good colloidal stability exhibit significant improvements over conventional AuNSs for enhanced sensitivity of ICTS. In this study, blue AuNFs with an average diameter of 75±5 nm were synthetized and employed as a signal amplification probe for ultrasensitive and quantitative detection of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) in rice. A portable optical strip reader was used to record the optical densities of test and control lines of the strip. Under the optimal conditions, the AuNF based ICTS system accurately detected AFB1 linearly and dynamically over the range of 0.5-25 pg/mL with a half maximal inhibitory concentration at 4.17 pg/mL. The inhibitory concentration was achieved 10 times lower than that of the traditional AuNS based ICTS systems (41.25 pg/mL). The limit of detection for AFB1 in rice extract was achieved at 0.32 pg/mL. In summary, AuNFs are a novel probe that exhibited excellent sensitivity in the ICTS system and could be used for ultrasensitive detection of other analytes in food safety monitoring, and even medical diagnostics. PMID:26003713

  17. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection of silver nanoparticles in environmental and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huiyuan; Xing, Baoshan; Hamlet, Leigh C; Chica, Andrea; He, Lili

    2016-06-01

    Growing concerns over the potential release and threat of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) to environmental and biological systems urge researchers to investigate their fate and behavior. However, current analytical techniques cannot meet the requirements for rapidly, sensitively and reliably probing AgNPs in complex matrices. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has shown great capability for rapid detection of AgNPs based on an indicator molecule that can bind on the AgNP surface. The objective of this study was to exploit SERS to detect AgNPs in environmental and biological samples through optimizing the Raman indicator for SERS. Seven indicator molecules were selected and determined to obtain their SERS signals at optimal concentrations. Among them, 1,2-di(4-pyridyl)ethylene (BPE), crystal violet and ferric dimethyl-dithiocarbamate (ferbam) produced the highest SERS intensities. Further experiments on binding competition between each two of the three candidates showed that ferbam had the highest AgNPs-binding ability. The underlying mechanism lies in the strong binding affinity of ferbam with AgNPs via multiple sulfur atoms. We further validated ferbam to be an effective indicator for SERS detection of as low as 0.1mg/L AgNPs in genuine surface water and 0.57 mg/L in spinach juice. Moreover, limited interference on SERS detection of AgNPs was found from environmentally relevant inorganic ions, organic matter, inorganic particles, as well as biologically relevant components, demonstrating the ferbam-assisted SERS is an effective and sensitive method to detect AgNPs in complex environmental and biological samples.

  18. The Clinical Urine Culture: Enhanced Techniques Improve Detection of Clinically Relevant Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Price, Travis K.; Dune, Tanaka; Hilt, Evann E.; Thomas-White, Krystal J.; Kliethermes, Stephanie; Brincat, Cynthia; Brubaker, Linda; Wolfe, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced quantitative urine culture (EQUC) detects live microorganisms in the vast majority of urine specimens reported as “no growth” by the standard urine culture protocol. Here, we evaluated an expanded set of EQUC conditions (expanded-spectrum EQUC) to identify an optimal version that provides a more complete description of uropathogens in women experiencing urinary tract infection (UTI)-like symptoms. One hundred fifty adult urogynecology patient-participants were characterized using a self-completed validated UTI symptom assessment (UTISA) questionnaire and asked “Do you feel you have a UTI?” Women responding negatively were recruited into the no-UTI cohort, while women responding affirmatively were recruited into the UTI cohort; the latter cohort was reassessed with the UTISA questionnaire 3 to 7 days later. Baseline catheterized urine samples were plated using both standard urine culture and expanded-spectrum EQUC protocols: standard urine culture inoculated at 1 μl onto 2 agars incubated aerobically; expanded-spectrum EQUC inoculated at three different volumes of urine onto 7 combinations of agars and environments. Compared to expanded-spectrum EQUC, standard urine culture missed 67% of uropathogens overall and 50% in participants with severe urinary symptoms. Thirty-six percent of participants with missed uropathogens reported no symptom resolution after treatment by standard urine culture results. Optimal detection of uropathogens could be achieved using the following: 100 μl of urine plated onto blood (blood agar plate [BAP]), colistin-nalidixic acid (CNA), and MacConkey agars in 5% CO2 for 48 h. This streamlined EQUC protocol achieved 84% uropathogen detection relative to 33% detection by standard urine culture. The streamlined EQUC protocol improves detection of uropathogens that are likely relevant for symptomatic women, giving clinicians the opportunity to receive additional information not currently reported using standard urine culture

  19. Biosynthetic enhancement of the detection of bacteria by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Do, Julie S; Weigel, Kris M; Meschke, John S; Cangelosi, Gerard A

    2014-01-01

    Molecular viability testing (MVT) was previously reported to specifically detect viable bacterial cells in complex samples. In MVT, brief nutritional stimulation induces viable cells, but not non-viable cells, to produce abundant amounts of species-specific ribosomal RNA precursors (pre-rRNA). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is used to quantify specific pre-rRNAs in a stimulated aliquot relative to a non-stimulated control. In addition to excluding background signal from non-viable cells and from free DNA, we report here that MVT increases the analytical sensitivity of qPCR when detecting viable cells. Side-by-side limit-of-detection comparisons showed that MVT is 5-fold to >10-fold more sensitive than standard (static) DNA-targeted qPCR when detecting diverse bacterial pathogens (Aeromonas hydrophila, Acinetobacter baumannii, Listeria monocytogenes, Mycobacterium avium, and Staphylococcus aureus) in serum, milk, and tap water. Sensitivity enhancement may come from the elevated copy number of pre-rRNA relative to genomic DNA, and also from the ratiometric measurement which reduces ambiguity associated with weak or borderline signals. We also report that MVT eliminates false positive signals from bacteria that have been inactivated by moderately elevated temperatures (pasteurization), a condition that can confound widely-used cellular integrity tests that utilize membrane-impermeant compounds such as propidium iodide (PI) or propidium monoazide (PMA) to differentiate viable from inactivated bacteria. MVT enables the sensitive and specific detection of very small numbers of viable bacteria in complex matrices.

  20. Westinghouse radiological containment guide

    SciTech Connect

    Aitken, S.B.; Brown, R.L.; Cantrell, J.R.; Wilcox, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides uniform guidance for Westinghouse contractors on the implementation of radiological containments. This document reflects standard industry practices and is provided as a guide. The guidance presented herein is consistent with the requirements of the DOE Radiological Control Manual (DOE N 5480.6). This guidance should further serve to enable and encourage the use of containments for contamination control and to accomplish the following: Minimize personnel contamination; Prevent the spread of contamination; Minimize the required use of protective clothing and personal protective equipment; Minimize the generation of waste.

  1. Successful Transformational Radiology Leaders.

    PubMed

    Douget, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Transformational radiology leaders elevate subordinates, expand self-awareness, develop lasting relationships, strive to exceed expectations, and uphold the vision and goals of the organization. In order for radiology leaders to become more transformational in their leadership style there are four fundamental elements they must learn: idealized influence, individualized consideration, inspirational motivation, and intellectual stimulation. Leaders can utilize personality and self-assessments to learn more about themselves, identify areas of strengths and weaknesses, and learn to be more effective when leading employees. PMID:26710553

  2. Radiological worker training

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

  3. [Raman Signal Enhancement for Gas Detection Using a Near Concentric Cavity].

    PubMed

    Yang, De-wang; Guo, Jin-jia; Du, Zeng-feng; Wang, Zhen-nan; Zheng, Rong-er

    2015-03-01

    The detection of dissolved gases in seawater plays an important role in ocean observation and exploration. Raman spectroscopy has a great advantage in simultaneous multiple species detection and is thus regarded as a favorable choice for ocean application. However, its sensitivity remains insufficient, and a demand in enhancements is called! for before putting Raman spectroscopy to actual use in marine studies In this work, we developed a near-concentric cavity, in which laser beam could be trapped and reflected back and forth, for the purpose of intensifying Raman signals. The factors that would influence Raman signals were taken into account. The result show that the smaller angle between collection direction and optical axis of reflection mirror, the stronger the signal and signal to noise ratio (SNR) is. With a collection angle of 30 degrees, our Near-concentric Cavity System managed to raise the SNR to a figure about 16 times larger than that of common methods applying 90 degrees. Moreover, the alignment pattern in our system made it possible to excel concentric cavity with a 3 times larger SNR. Compared with the single-pass Raman signal, the signal intensity of our near-concentric cavity was up to 70 times enhanced. According to the obtained results of CO2 measurement, it can be seen that the new system provides a limit of detection(LOD) for CO2 about 0.19 mg x L(-1) using 3-σ criterion standard, and the LOD of 11.5 μg x L(-1) for CH4 was evaluated with the theoretical cross section values of CO2 and CH4.

  4. Contrast-enhanced MR angiography utilizing parallel acquisition techniques in renal artery stenosis detection.

    PubMed

    Slanina, Martin; Zizka, Jan; Klzo, Ludovít; Lojík, Miroslav

    2010-07-01

    Significant renal artery stenosis (RAS) is a potentially curable cause of renovascular hypertension and/or renal impairment. It is caused by either atherosclerosis or fibromuscular dysplasia. Correct and timely diagnosis remains a diagnostic challenge. MR angiography (MRA) as a minimally invasive method seems to be suitable for RAS detection, however, its diagnostic value widely differs in the literature (sensitivity 62-100% and specificity 75-100%). The aim of our prospective study was to compare the diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced MRA utilizing parallel acquisition techniques in the detection of significant RAS with digital subtraction angiography (DSA). A total of 78 hypertensive subjects with suspected renal artery stenosis were examined on a 1.5 Tesla MR system using a body array coil. Bolus tracking was used to monitor the arrival of contrast agent to the abdominal aorta. The MRA sequence parameters were as follows: TR 3.7 ms; TE 1.2 ms; flip angle 25 degrees; acquisition time 18s; voxel size 1.1 mm x1.0 mm x 1.1 mm; centric k-space sampling; parallel acquisition technique with acceleration factor of 2 (GRAPPA). Renal artery stenosis of 60% and more was considered hemodynamically significant. The results of MRA were compared to digital subtraction angiography serving as a standard of reference. Sensitivity and specificity of MRA in the detection of hemodynamically significant renal artery stenosis were 90% and 96%, respectively. Prevalence of RAS was 39% in our study population. Contrast-enhanced MRA with high spatial resolution offers sufficient sensitivity and specificity for screening of RAS. PMID:19671492

  5. Semi-automated scar detection in delayed enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisi, Rita; Donini, Bruno; Lanconelli, Nico; Rosengarden, James; Morgan, John; Harden, Stephen; Curzen, Nick

    2015-06-01

    Late enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance images (MRI) has the ability to precisely delineate myocardial scars. We present a semi-automated method for detecting scars in cardiac MRI. This model has the potential to improve routine clinical practice since quantification is not currently offered due to time constraints. A first segmentation step was developed for extracting the target regions for potential scar and determining pre-candidate objects. Pattern recognition methods are then applied to the segmented images in order to detect the position of the myocardial scar. The database of late gadolinium enhancement (LE) cardiac MR images consists of 111 blocks of images acquired from 63 patients at the University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust (UK). At least one scar was present for each patient, and all the scars were manually annotated by an expert. A group of images (around one third of the entire set) was used for training the system which was subsequently tested on all the remaining images. Four different classifiers were trained (Support Vector Machine (SVM), k-nearest neighbor (KNN), Bayesian and feed-forward neural network) and their performance was evaluated by using Free response Receiver Operating Characteristic (FROC) analysis. Feature selection was implemented for analyzing the importance of the various features. The segmentation method proposed allowed the region affected by the scar to be extracted correctly in 96% of the blocks of images. The SVM was shown to be the best classifier for our task, and our system reached an overall sensitivity of 80% with less than 7 false positives per patient. The method we present provides an effective tool for detection of scars on cardiac MRI. This may be of value in clinical practice by permitting routine reporting of scar quantification.

  6. Enhanced detection of surface-associated bacteria in indoor environments by quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Buttner, M P; Cruz-Perez, P; Stetzenbach, L D

    2001-06-01

    Methods for detecting microorganisms on surfaces are needed to locate biocontamination sources and to relate surface and airborne concentrations. Research was conducted in an experimental room to evaluate surface sampling methods and quantitative PCR (QPCR) for enhanced detection of a target biocontaminant present on flooring materials. QPCR and culture analyses were used to quantitate Bacillus subtilis (Bacillus globigii) endospores on vinyl tile, commercial carpet, and new and soiled residential carpet with samples obtained by four surface sampling methods: a swab kit, a sponge swipe, a cotton swab, and a bulk method. The initial data showed that greater overall sensitivity was obtained with the QPCR than with culture analysis; however, the QPCR results for bulk samples from residential carpet were negative. The swab kit and the sponge swipe methods were then tested with two levels of background biological contamination consisting of Penicillium chrysogenum spores. The B. subtilis values obtained by the QPCR method were greater than those obtained by culture analysis. The differences between the QPCR and culture data were significant for the samples obtained with the swab kit for all flooring materials except soiled residential carpet and with the sponge swipe for commercial carpet. The QPCR data showed that there were no significant differences between the swab kit and sponge swipe sampling methods for any of the flooring materials. Inhibition of QPCR due solely to biological contamination of flooring materials was not evident. However, some degree of inhibition was observed with the soiled residential carpet, which may have been caused by the presence of abiotic contaminants, alone or in combination with biological contaminants. The results of this research demonstrate the ability of QPCR to enhance detection and enumeration of biocontaminants on surface materials and provide information concerning the comparability of currently available surface sampling

  7. Computerized breast mass detection using multi-scale Hessian-based analysis for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Hao; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Chang, Ruey-Feng

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate a computer-aided system for detecting breast masses using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for clinical use. Detection performance of the system was analyzed on 61 biopsy-confirmed lesions (21 benign and 40 malignant lesions) in 34 women. The breast region was determined using the demons deformable algorithm. After the suspicious tissues were identified by kinetic feature (area under the curve) and the fuzzy c-means clustering method, all breast masses were detected based on the rotation-invariant and multi-scale blob characteristics. Subsequently, the masses were further distinguished from other detected non-tumor regions (false positives). Free-response operating characteristics (FROC) curve and detection rate were used to evaluate the detection performance. Using the combined features, including blob, enhancement, morphologic, and texture features with 10-fold cross validation, the mass detection rate was 100 % (61/61) with 15.15 false positives per case and 91.80 % (56/61) with 4.56 false positives per case. In conclusion, the proposed computer-aided detection system can help radiologists reduce inter-observer variability and the cost associated with detection of suspicious lesions from a large number of images. Our results illustrated that breast masses can be efficiently detected and that enhancement and morphologic characteristics were useful for reducing non-tumor regions.

  8. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy on Liquid Interfacial Nanoparticle Arrays for Multiplex Detecting Drugs in Urine.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yongmei; Liu, Honglin; Mao, Mei; Meng, Juan; Yang, Liangbao; Liu, Jinhuai

    2016-08-16

    The design and application of liquid interfacial plasmonic platform is still in its infancy but is an exciting topic in tunable optical devices, sensors, and catalysis. Here, we developed an interfacial surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) platform through the large-scale self-assembly of gold nanoparticle (GNP) arrays at the cyclohexane (CYH)/water interface for detecting trace drug molecules in the urine of humans. The molecules extracted by the CYH phase from a urine sample were directly localized into the self-organized plasmonic hotspots, yielded excellent Raman enhancement, and realized the substrate-free interfacial SERS detection. Synchrotron radiation small-angle X-ray scattering (SR-SAXS) experiments reveals a good uniformity of approximately 2-3 nm interparticle distance in the GNP arrays. SERS colocalization experiments demonstrated that amphetamine molecules of different concentration levels could be loaded into the interfacial GNP arrays and realized the coassembly together with nanoparticles at the liquid/liquid interface. Interfacial GNP arrays with dynamic nanogaps in liquid interfacial structure can make surrounding molecules easily diffuse into the nanogaps. In contrast, the fixed GNP arrays on Si wafer were more irregular, such as multilayer stack, random aggregates, and voids, during the drying process. When the drugs directly participate in the self-assembly process, it becomes easier for analytes diffusing into the nanogaps of GNP arrays, produces a concentration effect, and amplified the SERS sensitivity. This feature also enables molecules to be adsorbed evenly in the arrays and makes a more uniform distribution of both the analytes and GNPs in the liquid interface and realizes the significant increase in signal reproducibility. Interfacial SERS produced a standard deviation of 12.5% at 1001 cm(-1) peak of methamphetamine (MAMP) molecules under the concentration of 1 ppm, implying a good reproducibility. Moreover, dual-analyte detection

  9. Emergency radiological monitoring and analysis United States Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Thome, D.J.

    1994-09-01

    The United States Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) provides the framework for integrating the various Federal agencies responding to a major radiological emergency. Following a major radiological incident the FRERP authorizes the creation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). The FRMAC is established to coordinate all Federal agencies involved in the monitoring and assessment of the off-site radiological conditions in support of the impacted states and the Lead Federal Agency (LFA). Within the FRMAC, the Monitoring and Analysis Division is responsible for coordinating all FRMAC assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis and quality assurance. This program includes: (1) Aerial Radiological Monitoring - Fixed Wing and Helicopter, (2) Field Monitoring and Sampling, (3) Radioanalysis - Mobile and Fixed Laboratories, (4) Radiation Detection Instrumentation - Calibration and Maintenance, (5) Environmental Dosimetry, and (6) An integrated program of Quality Assurance. To assure consistency, completeness and the quality of the data produced, a methodology and procedures handbook is being developed. This paper discusses the structure, assets and operations of FRMAC monitoring and analysis and the content and preparation of this handbook.

  10. Detection of Bacillus spores within 15 minutes by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shende, Chetan; Inscore, Frank; Huang, Hermes; Farquharson, Stuart; Sengupta, Atanu

    2012-06-01

    Since the distribution of Bacillus anthracis causing spores through the US Postal System, there has been a persistent fear that biological warfare agents (BWAs) will be used by terrorists against our military abroad and our civilians at home. Despite the substantial effort to develop BWA analyzers, they remain either too slow, produce high falsealarm rates, lack sensitivity, or cannot be fielded. Consequently there remains a need for a portable analyzer that can overcome these limitations as expressed at the 2011 Biological Weapons Convention. To meet this need we have been developing a sample system that selectively binds BWAs and produce surface-enhanced Raman (SER) spectra using portable Raman spectrometers. Here we describe the use of a short peptide ligand functionalized on silver nanoparticles to selectively capture Bacillus cereus spores (a surrogate of B. anthracis) and their subsequent detection by SER spectroscopy. This technique was used to specifically detect B. cereus spores over closely related species like B. subtilis belonging to the same genus within 15 minutes. Sensitivity of the method was demonstrated by detecting 104 B. cereus spores/mL of water. The technology, once developed should prove invaluable for rapid monitoring of BWAs, which will immensely help first responders and emergency personnel in implementing appropriate counter measures.

  11. Detection of toxic industrial chemicals in water supplies using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Kevin M.; Sylvia, James M.; Spencer, Sarah A.; Clauson, Susan L.

    2010-04-01

    An effective method to create fear in the populace is to endanger the water supply. Homeland Security places significant importance on ensuring drinking water integrity. Beyond terrorism, accidental supply contamination from a spill or chemical residual increases is a concern. A prominent class of toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) is pesticides, which are prevalent in agricultural use and can be very toxic in minute concentrations. Detection of TICs or warfare agents must be aggressive; the contaminant needs to be rapidly detected and identified to enable isolation and remediation of the contaminated water while continuing a clean water supply for the population. Awaiting laboratory analysis is unacceptable as delay in identification and remediation increases the likelihood of infection. Therefore, a portable or online water quality sensor is required that can produce rapid results. In this presentation, Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) is discussed as a viable fieldable sensor that can be immersed directly into the water supply and can provide results in <5 minutes from the time the instrument is turned on until analysis is complete. The ability of SERS to detect several chemical warfare agent degradation products, simulants and toxic industrial chemicals in distilled water, tap water and untreated water will be shown. In addition, results for chemical warfare agent degradation products and simulants will be presented. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves will also be presented.

  12. A Nanosensor for TNT Detection Based on Molecularly Imprinted Polymers and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Holthoff, Ellen L.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.; Hankus, Mikella E.

    2011-01-01

    We report on a new sensor strategy that integrates molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The sensor was developed to detect the explosive, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). Micron thick films of sol gel-derived xerogels were deposited on a SERS-active surface as the sensing layer. Xerogels were molecularly imprinted for TNT using non-covalent interactions with the polymer matrix. Binding of the TNT within the polymer matrix results in unique SERS bands, which allow for detection and identification of the molecule in the MIP. This MIP-SERS sensor exhibits an apparent dissociation constant of (2.3 ± 0.3) × 10−5 M for TNT and a 3 μM detection limit. The response to TNT is reversible and the sensor is stable for at least 6 months. Key challenges, including developing a MIP formulation that is stable and integrated with the SERS substrate, and ensuring the MIP does not mask the spectral features of the target analyte through SERS polymer background, were successfully met. The results also suggest the MIP-SERS protocol can be extended to other target analytes of interest. PMID:22163761

  13. Rapid detection of copper chlorophyll in vegetable oils based on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lian, Wei-Nan; Shiue, Jessie; Wang, Huai-Hsien; Hong, Wei-Chen; Shih, Po-Han; Hsu, Chao-Kai; Huang, Ching-Yi; Hsing, Cheng-Rong; Wei, Ching-Ming; Wang, Juen-Kai; Wang, Yuh-Lin

    2015-01-01

    The addition of copper chlorophyll and its derivatives (Cu-Chl) to vegetable oils to disguise them as more expensive oils, such as virgin olive oils, would not only create public confusion, but also disturb the olive oil market. Given that existing detection methods of Ch-Chl in oils, such as LC-MS are costly and time consuming, it is imperative to develop economical and fast analytical techniques to provide information quickly. This paper demonstrates a rapid analytical method based on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to detect Cu-Chl in vegetable oils; the spectroscopic markers of Cu-Chl are presented and a detection limit of 5 mg kg(-1) is demonstrated. The analysis of a series of commercial vegetable oils is undertaken with this method and the results verified by a government agency. This study shows that a SERS-based assessment method holds high potential for quickly pinpointing the addition of minute amounts of Cu-Chl in vegetable oils.

  14. Silicon nanonets for biological sensing applications with enhanced optical detection ability.

    PubMed

    Serre, P; Stambouli, V; Weidenhaupt, M; Baron, T; Ternon, C

    2015-06-15

    Optical sensors based on fluorescence methods are used in numerous areas of society, ranging from healthcare to environmental monitoring. But the race to elaborate portable and highly sensitive detection systems leads to the huge development of nanomaterial-based sensors. Here, we have fabricated a silicon nanonet, or silicon nanowire (SiNW) network, -based biosensor for DNA hybridization detection by fluorescence microscopy. We demonstrate that by leveraging the properties of the SiNWs such as their large specific surface and the high aspect ratio, these nanonet sensors have significantly enhanced sensitivity and better selectivity compared to plane substrates. The fluorescence signal shows an intensity increasing with the SiNW density on the nanonet and for the denser nanonets, the detection limit for DNA hybridization is 1 nM. The elaborated Si nanonet-based DNA sensors present more than 50% change in fluorescence intensity between complementary DNA and 1 base mismatch DNA which shows their high selectivity. Finally, we have integrated the Si nanonet-based sensor into a DNA chip and we have shown that this selective sensor can be reproduced on a large scale area.

  15. Enhancing allele-specific PCR for specifically detecting short deletion and insertion DNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiran; Rollin, Joseph A; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2010-02-01

    Allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) has been widely used for the detection of single nucleotide polymorphism. But there are some challenges in using AS-PCR for specifically detecting DNA variations with short deletions or insertions. The challenges are associated with designing selective allele-specific primers as well as the specificity of AS-PCR in distinguishing some types of single base-pair mismatches. In order to address such problems and enhance the applicability of AS-PCR, a general primer design method was developed to create a multiple base-pair mismatch between the primer 3'-terminus and the template DNA. This approach can destabilize the primer-template complex more efficiently than does a single base-pair mismatch, and can dramatically increase the specificity of AS-PCR. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, the method of primer design was applied in colony PCR for identifying plasmid DNA deletion or insertion mutants after site-directed mutagenesis. As anticipated, multiple base-pair mismatches achieved much more specific PCR amplification than single base-pair mismatches. Therefore, with the proposed primer design method, the detection of short nucleotide deletion and insertion mutations becomes simple, accurate and more reliable.

  16. THz quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensor for H₂S trace gas detection.

    PubMed

    Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Patimisco, Pietro; Pennetta, Riccardo; Sampaolo, Angelo; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Vitiello, Miriam S; Tittel, Frank K

    2015-03-23

    We report on a quartz-enhanced photoacoustic (QEPAS) gas sensing system for hydrogen sulphide (H₂S) detection. The system architecture is based on a custom quartz tuning fork (QTF) optoacoustic transducer with a novel geometry and a quantum cascade laser (QCL) emitting 1.1 mW at a frequency of 2.913 THz. The QTF operated on the first flexion resonance frequency of 2871 Hz, with a quality factor Q = 17,900 at 20 Torr. The tuning range of the available QCL allowed the excitation of a H₂S rotational absorption line with a line-strength as small as S = 1.13·10⁻²² cm/mol. The measured detection sensitivity is 30 ppm in 3 seconds and 13 ppm for a 30 seconds integration time, which corresponds to a minimum detectable absorption coefficient α(min) = 2.3·10⁻⁷ cm⁻¹ and a normalized noise-equivalent absorption NNEA = 4.4·10⁻¹⁰ W·cm⁻¹·Hz(-1/2), several times lower than the values previously reported for near-IR and mid-IR H₂S QEPAS sensors.

  17. Short-term synaptic plasticity can enhance weak signal detectability in nonrenewal spike trains.

    PubMed

    Lüdtke, Niklas; Nelson, Mark E

    2006-12-01

    We study the encoding of weak signals in spike trains with interspike interval (ISI) correlations and the signals' subsequent detection in sensory neurons. Motivated by the observation of negative ISI correlations in auditory and electrosensory afferents, we assess the theoretical performance limits of an individual detector neuron receiving a weak signal distributed across multiple afferent inputs. We assess the functional role of ISI correlations in the detection process using statistical detection theory and derive two sequential likelihood ratio detector models: one for afferents with renewal statistics; the other for afferents with negatively correlated ISIs. We suggest a mechanism that might enable sensory neurons to implicitly compute conditional probabilities of presynaptic spikes by means of short-term synaptic plasticity. We demonstrate how this mechanism can enhance a postsynaptic neuron's sensitivity to weak signals by exploiting the correlation structure of the input spike trains. Our model not only captures fundamental aspects of early electrosensory signal processing in weakly electric fish, but may also bear relevance to the mammalian auditory system and other sensory modalities.

  18. A rapid detection method of Escherichia coli by surface enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Feifei; Peng, Yankun; Xu, Tianfeng

    2015-05-01

    Conventional microbiological detection and enumeration methods are time-consuming, labor-intensive, and giving retrospective information. The objectives of the present work are to study the capability of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) to detect Escherichia coli (E. coli) using the presented silver colloidal substrate. The obtained results showed that the adaptive iteratively reweighed Penalized Least Squares (airPLS) algorithm could effectively remove the fluorescent background from original Raman spectra, and Raman characteristic peaks of 558, 682, 726, 1128, 1210 and 1328 cm-1 could be observed stably in the baseline corrected SERS spectra of all studied bacterial concentrations. The detection limit of SERS could be determined to be as low as 0.73 log CFU/ml for E. coli with the prepared silver colloidal substrate. The quantitative prediction results using the intensity values of characteristic peaks were not good, with the correlation coefficients of calibration set and cross validation set of 0.99 and 0.64, respectively.

  19. Detection of Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaques in Experimental Atherosclerosis with the USPIO-Enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chun-Mei; Du, Lili; Wu, Wei-Heng; Li, Dong-Ye; Hao, Ji; Gong, Lei; Deng, Liangrong; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Yu

    2015-11-01

    This study's goal was to assess the diagnostic value of the USPIO-(ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detection of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques in abdominal aorta in experimental atherosclerosis. Thirty New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into two groups, Group A and Group B. Each group comprised 15 animals which were fed with high cholesterol diet for 8 weeks and then subjected to balloon-induced endothelial injury of the abdominal aorta. After another 8 weeks, animals in Group B received adenovirus carrying p53 gene that was injected through a catheter into the aortic segments rich in plaques. Two weeks later, all rabbits were challenged with the injection of Chinese Russell's viper venom and histamine. Pre-contrast images and USPIO-enhanced MRI images were obtained after pharmacological triggering with injection of USPIO for 5 days. Blood specimens were taken for biochemical and serological tests at 0 and 18 weeks. Abdominal aorta was histologically studied. The levels of serum ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 were quantified by ELISA. Vulnerable plaques appeared as a local hypo-intense signal on the USPIO-enhanced MRI, especially on T2*-weighted sequences. The signal strength of plaques reached the peak at 96 h. Lipid levels were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in both Group A and B compared with the levels before the high cholesterol diet. The ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 levels were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in Group B compared with Group A. The USPIO-enhanced MRI efficiently identifies vulnerable plaques due to accumulation of USPIO within macrophages in abdominal aorta plaques. PMID:27352319

  20. 324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Reeder, J.C. Cooper

    2010-06-24

    This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building.

  1. Paediatric musculoskeletal interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Natali, Gian L; Paolantonio, Guglielmo; Fruhwirth, Rodolfo; Alvaro, Giuseppe; Parapatt, George K; Toma', Paolo; Rollo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Interventional radiology technique is now well established and widely used in the adult population. Through minimally invasive procedures, it increasingly replaces surgical interventions that involve higher percentages of invasiveness and, consequently, of morbidity and mortality. For these advantageous reasons, interventional radiology in recent years has spread to the paediatric age as well. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the development, use and perspectives of these procedures in the paediatric musculoskeletal field. Several topics are covered: osteomuscle neoplastic malignant and benign pathologies treated with invasive diagnostic and/or therapeutic procedures such as radiofrequency ablation in the osteoid osteoma; invasive and non-invasive procedures in vascular malformations; treatment of aneurysmal bone cysts; and role of interventional radiology in paediatric inflammatory and rheumatic inflammations. The positive results that have been generated with interventional radiology procedures in the paediatric field highly encourage both the development of new ad hoc materials, obviously adapted to young patients, as well as the improvement of such techniques, in consideration of the fact that childrens' pathologies do not always correspond to those of adults. In conclusion, as these interventional procedures have proven to be less invasive, with lower morbidity and mortality rates as well, they are becoming a viable and valid alternative to surgery in the paediatric population.

  2. Radiologic Technology Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This guide presents the standard curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum addresses the minimum competencies for a radiologic technology program. The guide contains four major sections. The General Information section contains an introduction giving an overview and defining purpose and objectives; a program description,…

  3. Dosimetry in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Meghzifene, Ahmed; Dance, David R; McLean, Donald; Kramer, Hans-Michael

    2010-10-01

    Dosimetry is an area of increasing importance in diagnostic radiology. There is a realisation amongst health professionals that the radiation dose received by patients from modern X-ray examinations and procedures can be at a level of significance for the induction of cancer across a population, and in some unfortunate instances, in the acute damage to particular body organs such as skin and eyes. The formulation and measurement procedures for diagnostic radiology dosimetry have recently been standardised through an international code of practice which describes the methodologies necessary to address the diverging imaging modalities used in diagnostic radiology. Common to all dosimetry methodologies is the measurement of the air kerma from the X-ray device under defined conditions. To ensure the accuracy of the dosimetric determination, such measurements need to be made with appropriate instrumentation that has a calibration that is traceable to a standards laboratory. Dosimetric methods are used in radiology departments for a variety of purposes including the determination of patient dose levels to allow examinations to be optimized and to assist in decisions on the justification of examination choices. Patient dosimetry is important for special cases such as for X-ray examinations of children and pregnant patients. It is also a key component of the quality control of X-ray equipment and procedures. PMID:20655679

  4. Radiological Defense Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    Originally prepared for use as a student textbook in Radiological Defense (RADEF) courses, this manual provides the basic technical information necessary for an understanding of RADEF. It also briefly discusses the need for RADEF planning and expected postattack emergency operations. There are 14 chapters covering these major topics: introduction…

  5. Radiology Technician (AFSC 90370).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobczak, James

    This five-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for radiology technicians. Covered in the individual volumes are radiographic fundamentals (x-ray production; primary beams; exposure devices; film, film holders, and darkrooms; control of film quality; and environmental safety);…

  6. Radiology of spinal curvature

    SciTech Connect

    De Smet, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    This book offers the only comprehensive, concise summary of both the clinical and radiologic features of thoracic and lumbar spine deformity. Emphasis is placed on idiopathic scoliosis, which represents 85% of all patients with scoliosis, but less common areas of secondary scoliosis, kyphosis and lordosis are also covered.

  7. Research Training in Radiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of General Medical Sciences (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    Radiology today is a major clinical specialty of medicine in terms of the number and complexity of patient examinations, and the financial resources, physician manpower, and supporting personnel required for performing its functions. It reached its present status because it provides accurate methods of diagnosis for so many diseases. However, this…

  8. Enhanced ratio of signals enables digital mutation scanning for rare allele detection.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Rizaldos, Elena; Paweletz, Cloud; Song, Chen; Oxnard, Geoffrey R; Mamon, Harvey; Jänne, Pasi A; Makrigiorgos, G Mike

    2015-05-01

    The use of droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) for low-level DNA mutation detection in cancer, prenatal diagnosis, and infectious diseases is growing rapidly. However, although ddPCR has been implemented successfully for detection of rare mutations at pre-determined positions, no ddPCR adaptation for mutation scanning exists. Yet, frequently, clinically relevant mutations reside on multiple sequence positions in tumor suppressor genes or complex hotspot mutations in oncogenes. Here, we describe a combination of coamplification at lower denaturation temperature PCR (COLD-PCR) with ddPCR that enables digital mutation scanning within approximately 50-bp sections of a target amplicon. Two FAM/HEX-labeled hydrolysis probes matching the wild-type sequence are used during ddPCR. The ratio of FAM/HEX-positive droplets is constant when wild-type amplicons are amplified but deviates when mutations anywhere under the FAM or HEX probes are present. To enhance the change in FAM/HEX ratio, we employed COLD-PCR cycling conditions that enrich mutation-containing amplicons anywhere on the sequence. We validated COLD-ddPCR on multiple mutations in TP53 and in EGFR using serial mutation dilutions and cell-free circulating DNA samples, and demonstrate detection down to approximately 0.2% to 1.2% mutation abundance. COLD-ddPCR enables a simple, rapid, and robust two-fluorophore detection method for the identification of multiple mutations during ddPCR and potentially can identify unknown DNA variants present in the target sequence.

  9. Nanogold probe enhanced Surface Plasmon Resonance immunosensor for improved detection of antibiotic residues.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Fátima; Sánchez-Baeza, Francisco; Marco, M-Pilar

    2012-04-15

    An exhaustive study is reported on the effect that antibody nanogold probes produce on the performance of a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) immunosensor. The paper studies the improvement that different nanogold probes prepared at different antibody:gold nanoparticle (IgG:AuNP) ratios and AuNP sizes produce on the maximum signal and detectability of a simple SPR immunosensor developed to analyze fluoroquinolone (FQ) antibiotic residues (SPReeta system). The investigation compares the features of sensor enhanced formats using both, secondary and primary nanogold probes (anti-IgG and IgG coupled to AuNP, on double and single-antibody immunochemical assay steps, respectively), in respect to the unenhanced format. For this purpose, a reproducible bioconjugation procedure for preparing gold biohybrid nanoparticles has been established, involving the formation of a mixed self-assembled monolayer (m-SAM) with PEGylated cross-linkers around the AuNP followed by the covalent attachment of the antibodies. The procedure allows controlling the IgG:AuNP ratio of the nanogold probes on a reproducible manner and the functionalized NPs have been found to be stable during assay and storage. Both formats, using secondary and primary nanogold probes, are excellent strategies to improve immunosensor detectability. Thus, using anti-IgG-AuNP, the detectability could be improved by a factor of 14 (LOD 0.07±0.01 μg L(-1) vs. 0.98±0.38 μg L(-1)) reducing at the same time the amount of primary antibody used (30,000 vs. 1000 dilution factor). Likewise, the format using IgG-AuNP also allows improving detectability (LOD 0.11±0.01 μg L(-1)), but reducing the number of needed steps.

  10. Effective detection of human noroviruses in Hawaiian waters using enhanced RT-PCR methods.

    PubMed

    Tong, Hsin-I; Connell, Christina; Boehm, Alexandria B; Lu, Yuanan

    2011-11-15

    The current recreational water quality criteria using growth-based measurements of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentration have their limitations for swimmer protection. To evaluate the possible use of enteric viruses as an improved indicator of human sewage contamination in recreational waters for enhanced health risk assessment, human norovirus (huNoV) was tested as a model in this study. To establish a highly sensitive protocol for effective huNoV detection in waters, 16 published and newly designed reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) primer pairs specific for huNoV genogroup I (GI) and genogroup II (GII) were comparatively evaluated side-by-side using single sources of huNoV RNA stock extracted from local clinical isolates. Under optimized conditions, these RT-PCR protocols shared a very different pattern of detection sensitivity for huNoV. The primer sets COG2F/COG2R and QNIF4/NV1LCR were determined to be the most sensitive ones for huNoV GII and GI, respectively, with up to 10(5)- and 10(6)-fold more sensitive as compared to other sets tested. These two sensitive protocols were validated by positive detection of huNoV in untreated and treated urban wastewater samples. In addition, these RT-PCR protocols enabled detection of the prevalence of huNoV in 5 (GI) and 10 (GII) of 16 recreational water samples collected around the island of O'ahu, which was confirmed by DNA sequencing and sequence analysis. Findings from this study support the possible use of enteric viral pathogens for environmental monitoring and argue the importance and essentiality for such monitoring activity to ensure a safe use of recreational waters. PMID:21945082

  11. Ethical problems in radiology: radiological consumerism.

    PubMed

    Magnavita, N; Bergamaschi, A

    2009-10-01

    One of the causes of the increasing request for radiological examinations occurring in all economically developed countries is the active role played by the patient-consumer. Consumerism places the radiologist in an ethical dilemma, between the principle of autonomy on the one hand and the ethical principles of beneficence, nonmaleficence and justice on the other. The choice made by radiologists in moral dilemmas is inspired by an adherence to moral principles, which in Italy and elsewhere refer to the Judaeo-Christian tradition or to neo-Darwinian relativism. Whatever the choice, the radiologist is bound to adhere to that choice and to provide the patient with all the relevant information regarding his or her state of health.

  12. Nano and Microparticle-Enhanced Immunosensor Approaches for the Detection of Cancer Biomarker Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Vigneshwaran

    assays. The high sensitivity of these approaches will allow monitoring of biomarker levels in diseases states where proteins are in sub pg mL -1 concentrations that are normally challenging to detect using traditional methods such as enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Further emphases will be on SPR-based fundamental studies on binding affinity enhancement of MP conjugates to protein surfaces. In addition, this thesis describes the assembly of glucose/O2 enzymatic biofuel cells for power generation utilizing layer-by-layer films of osmium redox polymers and enzymes. Towards the end, the present thesis describes a simple, low-cost and accurate paper-based electrochemical device fabrication methods and its applications towards monitoring genotoxic activities in the environmental samples.

  13. Detection and quantification of dithiocarbamate pesticides by Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saute, Benjamin Calvin

    Dithiocarbamates are a subclass of carbamate pesticides that are widely used as insecticidal agents on food crops in the US and abroad. Quantitative determination of trace quantities of dithiocarbamates is necessary in order to mitigate potential human exposure via pesticide residues left on inadequately washed food items as well as groundwater contamination from agricultural runoff. The focus of this research is on the development and optimization of a Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) based analytical technique for the quantitative determination of trace amounts of dithiocarbamate pesticides in different matrices. Gold nanoparticles of different shapes and sizes will be investigated to determine the suitability of these materials as SERS active substrates for the trace analysis of dithiocarbamate pesticides. Analytical sensitivity will be evaluated by determining the limits of detection using established statistical methods.

  14. Awareness and Detection of Traffic and Obstacles Using Synthetic and Enhanced Vision Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Randall E.

    2012-01-01

    Research literature are reviewed and summarized to evaluate the awareness and detection of traffic and obstacles when using Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) and Enhanced Vision Systems (EVS). The study identifies the critical issues influencing the time required, accuracy, and pilot workload associated with recognizing and reacting to potential collisions or conflicts with other aircraft, vehicles and obstructions during approach, landing, and surface operations. This work considers the effect of head-down display and head-up display implementations of SVS and EVS as well as the influence of single and dual pilot operations. The influences and strategies of adding traffic information and cockpit alerting with SVS and EVS were also included. Based on this review, a knowledge gap assessment was made with recommendations for ground and flight testing to fill these gaps and hence, promote the safe and effective implementation of SVS/EVS technologies for the Next Generation Air Transportation System

  15. Three-dimensional resolution and contrast-enhanced confocal microscopy with array detection.

    PubMed

    Ge, Baoliang; Wang, Yifan; Huang, Yujia; Kuang, Cuifang; Fang, Yue; Xiu, Peng; Rong, Zihao; Liu, Xu

    2016-05-01

    What we believe is a novel method for improving confocal microscopy's resolution and contrast in 3D space is proposed. Based on a conventional confocal microscopy setup, we use an array detector composed of 32 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) to replace one point-detector, where the location offset of each PMT caused a different effective point spread function (PSF). By applying array detection and the fluorescence emission difference method of an image with a solid PSF and another with a donut-shaped PSF, we can enhance lateral resolution about 27% in real time with only one scan, and improve the axial resolving ability by about 22% simultaneously. Experimental results of both fluorescent beads and living cells are presented to verify the applicability and effectiveness of our method. PMID:27128062

  16. Spectral analysis of human saliva for detection of lung cancer using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Yang, Tianyue; Lin, Junxiu

    2012-03-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been shown to be able to detect low-concentration biofluids. Saliva SERS readings of 21 lung cancer patients and 20 normal people were measured and differentiated. Most of the Raman peak intensities decrease for lung cancer patients compared with that of normal people. Those peaks were assigned to proteins and nucleic acids, which indicate a corresponding decrease of those substances in saliva. Principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were used to reduce and discriminate between the two groups of data, and the study resulted in accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity being 80%, 78%, and 83%, respectively. In conclusion, SERS of saliva showed the ability to predict lung cancer in our experiment.

  17. Method and apparatus of spectro-acoustically enhanced ultrasonic detection for diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Norton, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting a discontinuity in a material includes a source of electromagnetic radiation has a wavelength and an intensity sufficient to induce an enhancement in contrast between a manifestation of an acoustic property in the material and of the acoustic property in the discontinuity, as compared to when the material is not irradiated by the electromagnetic radiation. An acoustic emitter directs acoustic waves to the discontinuity in the material. The acoustic waves have a sensitivity to the acoustic property. An acoustic receiver receives the acoustic waves generated by the acoustic emitter after the acoustic waves have interacted with the material and the discontinuity. The acoustic receiver also generates a signal representative of the acoustic waves received by the acoustic receiver. A processor, in communication with the acoustic receiver and responsive to the signal generated by the acoustic receiver, is programmed to generate informational output about the discontinuity based on the signal generated by the acoustic receiver.

  18. Highly reproducible surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate for detection of phenolic pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhiqiang; Tang, Dan; Liu, Liwei; Wang, Yin; Zhou, Qingwei; Su, Shaoqiang; Hu, Die; Han, Bing; Jin, Mingliang; Ao, Xianyu; Zhan, Runze; Gao, Xingsen; Lu, Xubing; Zhou, Guofu; Senz, Stephan; Zhang, Zhang; Liu, Junming

    2016-11-01

    The ordering degree of nanostructures is the key to determining the uniformity of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). However, fabrication of large-area ordered nanostructures remains a challenge, especially with the ultrahigh-density (>1010 cm‑2). Here, we report a fabrication of large-area ultrahigh-density ordered Ag@Al2O3/Ag core–shell nanosphere (NS) arrays with tunable nanostructures. The ultrahigh-density (2.8 × 1010 cm‑2) ordered NS arrays over a large-area capability (diameter >4.0 cm) enable the uniform SERS signals with the relative standard deviation of less than 5%. The as-fabricated highly reproducible SERS substrate can be applied to detect trace phenolic pollutants in water. This work does not only provide a new route for synthesizing the ultrahigh-density ordered nanostructures, but also create a new class of SERS substrates with high sensitivity and excellent reproducibility.

  19. Quantitative carbon detector for enhanced detection of molecules in foods, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, flavors, and fuels.

    PubMed

    Beach, Connor A; Krumm, Christoph; Spanjers, Charles S; Maduskar, Saurabh; Jones, Andrew J; Dauenhauer, Paul J

    2016-03-01

    Analysis of trace compounds, such as pesticides and other contaminants, within consumer products, fuels, and the environment requires quantification of increasingly complex mixtures of difficult-to-quantify compounds. Many compounds of interest are non-volatile and exhibit poor response in current gas chromatography and flame ionization systems. Here we show the reaction of trimethylsilylated chemical analytes to methane using a quantitative carbon detector (QCD; the Polyarc™ reactor) within a gas chromatograph (GC), thereby enabling enhanced detection (up to 10×) of highly functionalized compounds including carbohydrates, acids, drugs, flavorants, and pesticides. Analysis of a complex mixture of compounds shows that the GC-QCD method exhibits faster and more accurate analysis of complex mixtures commonly encountered in everyday products and the environment. PMID:26842653

  20. Detection range enhancement using circularly polarized light in scattering environments for infrared wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    van der Laan, J. D.; Scrymgeour, D. A.; Kemme, S. A.; Dereniak, E. L.

    2015-03-13

    We find for infrared wavelengths there are broad ranges of particle sizes and refractive indices that represent fog and rain where the use of circular polarization can persist to longer ranges than linear polarization. Using polarization tracking Monte Carlo simulations for varying particle size, wavelength, and refractive index, we show that for specific scene parameters circular polarization outperforms linear polarization in maintaining the intended polarization state for large optical depths. This enhancement with circular polarization can be exploited to improve range and target detection in obscurant environments that are important in many critical sensing applications. Specifically, circular polarization persists better than linear for radiation fog in the short-wave infrared, for advection fog in the short-wave infrared and the long-wave infrared, and large particle sizes of Sahara dust around the 4 micron wavelength.

  1. Detection range enhancement using circularly polarized light in scattering environments for infrared wavelengths

    DOE PAGESBeta

    van der Laan, J. D.; Sandia National Lab.; Scrymgeour, D. A.; Kemme, S. A.; Dereniak, E. L.

    2015-03-13

    We find for infrared wavelengths there are broad ranges of particle sizes and refractive indices that represent fog and rain where the use of circular polarization can persist to longer ranges than linear polarization. Using polarization tracking Monte Carlo simulations for varying particle size, wavelength, and refractive index, we show that for specific scene parameters circular polarization outperforms linear polarization in maintaining the intended polarization state for large optical depths. This enhancement with circular polarization can be exploited to improve range and target detection in obscurant environments that are important in many critical sensing applications. Specifically, circular polarization persists bettermore » than linear for radiation fog in the short-wave infrared, for advection fog in the short-wave infrared and the long-wave infrared, and large particle sizes of Sahara dust around the 4 micron wavelength.« less

  2. Gray-level transformation and Canny edge detection for 3D seismic discontinuity enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Haibin; Gao, Dengliang

    2014-11-01

    In a 3D seismic survey, detecting seismic discontinuities is vital to robust structural and stratigraphic analysis in the subsurface. Previous methods have difficulty highlighting subtle discontinuities from seismic data in cases where the local amplitude variation is of non-zero mean. This study proposes implementing a gray-level transformation and the Canny edge detector for improved imaging of discontinuities. Specifically, the new process transforms seismic signals to be of zero mean and helps amplify subtle discontinuities, leading to an enhanced visualization for structural and stratigraphic details. Applications to various 3D seismic datasets demonstrate that the new algorithm helps better define channels, faults, and fractures than the traditional similarity, amplitude gradient, and semblance attributes.

  3. Enhanced detection of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus by pretreatment of cell monolayers with polyethylene glycol

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Batts, W.N.; Winton, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    To improve quantification of very low levels of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in samples of tissue, ovarian fluid, or natural water supplies, we tested the ability of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to enhance the sensitivity and speed of the plaque assay system. We compared 4, 7, and 10% solutions of PEG of molecular weight 6,000, 8,000, or 20,000 applied at selected volumes and for various durations. When cell monolayers of epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC), fathead minnow (FHM), chinook salmon embryo (CHSE-214), and bluegill fry (BF2) were pretreated with 7% PEG-20,000, they produced 4-17-fold increases in plaque assay titers of IHNV. The plaque assay titers of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, chum salmon reovirus, and chinook salmon paramyxovirus were also enhanced by exposure of CHSE-214 cells to PEG, but the titers of infectious pancreatic necrosis virus and Oncorhynchus masou virus were not substantially changed. Plaques formed by IHNV on PEG-treated EPC cells incubated at 15°C had a larger mean diameter at 6 d than those on control cells at 8 d; this suggests the assay could be shortened by use of PEG. Pretreatment of EPC cell monolayers with PEG enabled detection of IHNV in some samples that appeared negative with untreated cells. For example, when ovarian fluid samples from chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha were inoculated onto untreated monolayers of EPC cells, IHNV was detected in only 11 of 51 samples; 17 of the samples were positive when PEG-treated EPC cells were used.PDF

  4. Enhanced catalytic activity of gold nanoparticle-carbon nanotube hybrids for influenza virus detection.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Syed Rahin; Kim, Jeonghyo; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Lee, Jaebeom; Park, Enoch Y

    2016-11-15

    Multifunctional nanohybrids have created new and valuable opportunities for a wide range of catalysis and biotechnology applications. Here, we present a relatively simple method for producing nanohybrids composed of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) that does not require an acidic pre-treatment of the CNTs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectra revealed that Au NPs bonded to the CNT surface. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) revealed a stronger signal from Au-CNT nanohybrids than from pristine CNTs. The Au-CNT nanohybrids showed catalytic activity in the oxidation of 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethyl-benzidine (TMB) by H2O2 and developed a unique blue colour in aqueous solution. Because of the enhanced peroxidase-like activity of these Au-CNT nanohybrids, they were selected for use as part of a highly sensitive colorimetric test for influenza virus A (H3N2). In the presence of influenza A virus (H3N2) in the test system (specific antibody-conjugated Au CNT nanohybrids-TMB-H2O2), a deep blue colour developed, the optical density of which was dependent on the virus concentration (10-50,000 PFU/ml). The limit of detection of this proposed method was 3.4 PFU/ml, a limit 385 times lower than that of conventional ELISA (1312 PFU/ml). The sensitivity of this test was also 500 times greater than that of commercial immunochromatography kits. The nanohybrid preparation and colorimetric detection methods reported herein may be easily adapted to other nanohybrid structures with enzyme mimetic properties for broader applications in catalysis and nanobiotechnology. PMID:27209577

  5. Enhanced catalytic activity of gold nanoparticle-carbon nanotube hybrids for influenza virus detection.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Syed Rahin; Kim, Jeonghyo; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Lee, Jaebeom; Park, Enoch Y

    2016-11-15

    Multifunctional nanohybrids have created new and valuable opportunities for a wide range of catalysis and biotechnology applications. Here, we present a relatively simple method for producing nanohybrids composed of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) that does not require an acidic pre-treatment of the CNTs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectra revealed that Au NPs bonded to the CNT surface. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) revealed a stronger signal from Au-CNT nanohybrids than from pristine CNTs. The Au-CNT nanohybrids showed catalytic activity in the oxidation of 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethyl-benzidine (TMB) by H2O2 and developed a unique blue colour in aqueous solution. Because of the enhanced peroxidase-like activity of these Au-CNT nanohybrids, they were selected for use as part of a highly sensitive colorimetric test for influenza virus A (H3N2). In the presence of influenza A virus (H3N2) in the test system (specific antibody-conjugated Au CNT nanohybrids-TMB-H2O2), a deep blue colour developed, the optical density of which was dependent on the virus concentration (10-50,000 PFU/ml). The limit of detection of this proposed method was 3.4 PFU/ml, a limit 385 times lower than that of conventional ELISA (1312 PFU/ml). The sensitivity of this test was also 500 times greater than that of commercial immunochromatography kits. The nanohybrid preparation and colorimetric detection methods reported herein may be easily adapted to other nanohybrid structures with enzyme mimetic properties for broader applications in catalysis and nanobiotechnology.

  6. Design Enhancements of the Fourier Kelvin Stellar Interferometer to Enable Detection of Earth Twins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Richard K.; Danchi, William C.; Lopez, Bruno; Rinehart, Stephan; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Beust, Herve; Bonfils, Xavier; Borde, Pascal; Kern, Pierre; Leger, Alain; Monin, Jean-Louis; Mourard, Denis; Ollivier, Marc; Petrov, Roman; Vakhili, Farrokh

    2009-01-01

    During the last few years, considerable effort has been directed towards very large-scale (> $5 billion) missions to detect and characterize Mars-radius to Earth-radius planets around nearby stars; such as the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer and Darwin missions. However, technological issues such as formation flying and control of systematic noise sources will likely prevent these missions from entering Phase A until at least the end of the next decade. Presently more than 350 planets have been discovered by a variety of techniques, and little is known about the majority of them other than their approximate mass. However, a simplified nulling interferometer operating in the near- to mid-infrared (e.g. approx. 5-15 microns), like the enhanced version of the Fourier Kelvin Stellar Interferometer (FKSI), can characterize the atmospheres of a large sample of the known planets - including Earth twins. Many other scientific problems can be addressed with a system like FKSI, including the studies of debris disks, active galactic nuclei, and low mass companions around nearby stars. We report results of a recent engineering study on an enhanced version of FKSI that includes 1-meter primary mirrors, 20-meter boom length, and an advanced sun shield that will provide a 45-degree FOR and 40K operating temperature for all optics including siderostats.

  7. Fermi/GBM Detection of Transient Enhanced Emission from SGR J1550-5418

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Yuku; Gogus, Ersin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Granot, Jonathan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Watts, Anna L.; Finger, Mark H.; Gehrels, Neil; Pe'Er, Asaf; van der Klis, Michiel; von Kienlin, Andreas; Wachter, Stefanie; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Woods, Peter M.

    On 2009 January 22, SGR J1550-5418 (previously known as AXP 1E 1547.0-5408) went into a very active bursting episode, and Fermi/GBM detected ˜450 bursts from this source on this day alone. Within the GBM data at the onset of this intense bursting period, we identified underlying enhanced persistent emission with coherent pulsation. We present the detailed timing and spectral analysis of the enhanced emission, which revealed intriguing properties: (i) clear pulsations up to ˜110 keV at the spin period of the neutron star, (ii) spectra requiring a blackbody component with a temperature of ˜17 keV in addition to a power law, and (iii) pulsed fraction that is strongly energy dependent and peaks in 50-74 keV. The estimated area of the blackbody emitting region is very small: ˜0.4 km2 (roughly a few ×10-5 of the neutron star surface area), which may correspond to the size of magnetically-confined hot plasma in the twisted magnetic field near the star's surface.

  8. Sensitivity-enhanced solid-state NMR detection of expansin's target in plant cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum; Caporini, Marc A.; Rosay, Melanie; Zhong, Linghao; Cosgrove, Daniel J.; Hong, Mei

    2013-08-29

    Structure determination of protein binding to noncrystalline macromolecular assemblies such as plant cell walls (CWs) poses a significant structural biology challenge. CWs are loosened during growth by expansin proteins, which weaken the noncovalent network formed by cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins, but the CW target of expansins has remained elusive because of the minute amount of the protein required for activity and the complex nature of the CW. Using solid-state NMR spectroscopy, combined with sensitivity-enhancing dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and differential isotopic labeling of expansin and polysaccharides, we have now determined the functional binding target of expansin in the Arabidopsis thaliana CW. By transferring the electron polarization of a biradical dopant to the nuclei, DNP allowed selective detection of 13C spin diffusion from trace concentrations of 13C, 15N-labeled expansin in the CW to nearby polysaccharides. From the spin diffusion data of wild-type and mutant expansins, we conclude that to loosen the CW, expansin binds highly specific cellulose domains enriched in xyloglucan, whereas more abundant binding to pectins is unrelated to activity. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate short 13C-13C distances of 4–6 Å between a hydrophobic surface of the cellulose microfibril and an aromatic motif on the expansin surface, consistent with the observed NMR signals. DNP-enhanced 2D 13C correlation spectra further reveal that the expansin-bound cellulose has altered conformation and is enriched in xyloglucan, thus providing unique insight into the mechanism of CW loosening. DNP-enhanced NMR provides a powerful, generalizable approach for investigating protein binding to complex macromolecular targets.

  9. Sensitivity-enhanced solid-state NMR detection of expansin's target in plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum; Caporini, Marc A; Rosay, Melanie; Zhong, Linghao; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Hong, Mei

    2013-10-01

    Structure determination of protein binding to noncrystalline macromolecular assemblies such as plant cell walls (CWs) poses a significant structural biology challenge. CWs are loosened during growth by expansin proteins, which weaken the noncovalent network formed by cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins, but the CW target of expansins has remained elusive because of the minute amount of the protein required for activity and the complex nature of the CW. Using solid-state NMR spectroscopy, combined with sensitivity-enhancing dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and differential isotopic labeling of expansin and polysaccharides, we have now determined the functional binding target of expansin in the Arabidopsis thaliana CW. By transferring the electron polarization of a biradical dopant to the nuclei, DNP allowed selective detection of (13)C spin diffusion from trace concentrations of (13)C, (15)N-labeled expansin in the CW to nearby polysaccharides. From the spin diffusion data of wild-type and mutant expansins, we conclude that to loosen the CW, expansin binds highly specific cellulose domains enriched in xyloglucan, whereas more abundant binding to pectins is unrelated to activity. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate short (13)C-(13)C distances of 4-6 Å between a hydrophobic surface of the cellulose microfibril and an aromatic motif on the expansin surface, consistent with the observed NMR signals. DNP-enhanced 2D (13)C correlation spectra further reveal that the expansin-bound cellulose has altered conformation and is enriched in xyloglucan, thus providing unique insight into the mechanism of CW loosening. DNP-enhanced NMR provides a powerful, generalizable approach for investigating protein binding to complex macromolecular targets.

  10. TGF-β1-Enhanced TCP-Coated Sensate Scaffolds Can Detect Bone Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Szivek, J.A.; Margolis, D.S.; Garrison, B.K.; Nelson, E.; Vaidyanathan, R.K.; DeYoung, D.W.

    2008-01-01

    Porous polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) scaffold systems were tested as orthopedic implants to determine whether these scaffolds could be used to detect strain transfer following bone growth into the scaffold. Three types of scaffold systems were tested: porous PBT scaffolds, porous PBT scaffolds with a thin β-tricalcium phosphate coating (LC-PBT), and porous PBT scaffolds with the TCP coating vacuum packed into the scaffold pores (VI-PBT). In addition, the effect of applying TGF-β1 to scaffolds as an enhancement was examined. The scaffolds were placed onto the femora of rats and left in vivo for 4 months. The amount of bone ingrowth and the strain transfer through various scaffolds was evaluated by using scanning electron microscopy, histology, histomorphometry, and cantilever bend testing. The VI-PBT scaffold showed the highest and most consistent degree of mechanical interaction between bone and scaffold, providing strain transfers of 68.5% (±20.6) and 79.2% (±8.7) of control scaffolds in tension and compression, respectively. The strain transfer through the VI-PBT scaffold decreased to 29.1% (±24.3) and 30.4% (±25.8) in tension and compression when used with TGF-β1. TGF-β1 enhancement increased the strain transfer through LC-PBT scaffolds in compression from 9.4% (±8.7) to 49.7% (±31.0). The significant changes in mechanical strain transfer through LC-PBT and VI-PBT scaffolds correlated with changes in bone ingrowth fraction, which was increased by 39.6% in LC-PBT scaffolds and was decreased 21.3% in VI-PBT scaffolds after TGF-β1 enhancement. Overall, the results indicate that strain transfer through TCP-coated PBT scaffolds correlate with bone ingrowth after implantation, making these instrumented scaffolds useful for monitoring bone growth by monitoring strain transfer. PMID:15682399

  11. Tryptophan PET predicts spatial and temporal patterns of post-treatment glioblastoma progression detected by contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Bosnyák, Edit; Kamson, David O; Robinette, Natasha L; Barger, Geoffrey R; Mittal, Sandeep; Juhász, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid PET is increasingly utilized for the detection of recurrent gliomas. Increased amino acid uptake is often observed outside the contrast-enhancing brain tumor mass. In this study, we evaluated if non-enhancing PET+ regions could predict spatial and temporal patterns of subsequent MRI progression in previously treated glioblastomas. Twelve patients with a contrast-enhancing area suspicious for glioblastoma recurrence on MRI underwent PET scanning with the amino acid radiotracer alpha-[(11)C]-methyl-L-tryptophan (AMT). Brain regions showing increased AMT uptake in and outside the contrast-enhancing volume were objectively delineated to include high uptake consistent with glioma (as defined by previous studies). Volume and tracer uptake of such non-enhancing PET+ regions were compared to spatial patterns and timing of subsequent progression of the contrast-enhancing lesion, as defined by serial surveillance MRI. Non-enhancing PET+ volumes varied widely across patients and extended up to 24 mm from the edge of MRI contrast enhancement. In ten patients with clear progression of the contrast-enhancing lesion, the non-enhancing PET+ volumes predicted the location of new enhancement, which extended beyond the PET+ brain tissue in six. In two patients, with no PET+ area beyond the initial contrast enhancement, MRI remained stable. There was a negative correlation between AMT uptake in non-enhancing brain and time to subsequent progression (r = -0.77, p = 0.003). Amino acid PET imaging could complement MRI not only for detecting glioma recurrence but also predicting the location and timing of subsequent tumor progression. This could support decisions for surgical intervention or other targeted therapies for recurrent gliomas.

  12. Intensity and resolution enhancement of local regions for object detection and tracking in wide area surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, Evan; Asari, Vijayan K.; Arigela, Saibabu; Aspiras, Theus

    2015-05-01

    Object tracking in wide area motion imagery is a complex problem that consists of object detection and target tracking over time. This challenge can be solved by human analysts who naturally have the ability to keep track of an object in a scene. A computer vision solution for object tracking has the potential to be a much faster and efficient solution. However, a computer vision solution faces certain challenges that do not affect a human analyst. To overcome these challenges, a tracking process is proposed that is inspired by the known advantages of a human analyst. First, the focus of a human analyst is emulated by doing processing only the local object search area. Second, it is proposed that an intensity enhancement process should be done on the local area to allow features to be detected in poor lighting conditions. This simulates the ability of the human eye to discern objects in complex lighting conditions. Third, it is proposed that the spatial resolution of the local search area is increased to extract better features and provide more accurate feature matching. A quantitative evaluation is performed to show tracking improvement using the proposed method. The three databases, each grayscale sequences that were obtained from aircrafts, used for these evaluations include the Columbus Large Image Format database, the Large Area Image Recorder database, and the Sussex database.

  13. Dye-enhanced multimodal confocal microscopy for noninvasive detection of skin cancers in mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jesung; Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.

    2010-03-01

    Skin cancer is the most common form of human cancer. Its early diagnosis and timely treatment is of paramount importance for dermatology and surgical oncology. In this study, we evaluate the use of reflectance and fluorescence confocal microscopy for detecting skin cancers in an in-vivo trial with B16F10 melanoma and SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma in mice. For the experiments, the mice are anesthetized, then the tumors are infiltrated with aqueous solution of methylene blue and imaged. Reflectance images are acquired at 658 nm. Fluorescence is excited at 658 nm and registered in the range between 690 and 710 nm. After imaging, the mice are sacrificed. The tumors are excised and processed for hematoxylin and eosin histopathology, which is compared to the optical images. The results of the study indicate that in-vivo reflectance images provide valuable information on vascularization of the tumor, whereas the fluorescence images mimic the structural features seen in histopathology. Simultaneous dye-enhanced reflectance and fluorescence confocal microscopy shows promise for the detection, demarcation, and noninvasive monitoring of skin cancer development.

  14. Three-Dimensional Clustered Nanostructures for Microfluidic Surface-Enhanced Raman Detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Li, Kerui; Purcell, Francis J; Zhao, De; Zhang, Wei; He, Zhongyuan; Tan, Shuai; Tang, Zhenguan; Wang, Hongzhi; Reichmanis, Elsa

    2016-09-21

    A materials fabrication concept based on a fluid-construction strategy to create three-dimensional (3D) ZnO@ZnS-Ag active nanostructures at arbitrary position within confined microchannels to form an integrated microfluidic surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) system is presented. The fluid-construction process allowed facile construction of the nanostructured substrates, which were shown to possess a substantial number of integrated hot spots that support SERS activity. Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) analysis suggested that the 3D clustered geometry facilitated hot spot formation. High sensitivity and good recycle performance were demonstrated using 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (4-MBA) and a mixture of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and 4-MBA as target organic pollutants to evaluate the SERS microfluidic device performance. The 3D clustered nanostructures were also effective in the detection of a representative nerve agent and biomolecule. The results of this investigation provide a materials and process approach to the fabrication of requisite nanostructures for the online detection of organic pollutants, devices for real-time observation of environmental hazards, and personal-health monitoring.

  15. Blood surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy based on Ag and Au nanoparticles for nasopharyngeal cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Duo; Ge, Xiaosong; Lin, Xueliang; Chen, Guannan; Chen, Rong

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to evaluate and compare the utility of blood surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based on Au or Ag nanoparticles (NPs), respectively, for detection of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). A rapid home-made Raman system was employed for SERS measurement, and high quality SERS spectra can be recorded from blood plasma samples belonging to 60 healthy volunteers and 100 NPC patients, using both metallic NPs. The spectral differences under Ag-SERS measurement between the normal and cancer groups are more significant than Au-SERS. Principal component analysis combined with linear discriminant analysis (PCA-LDA) was used for differentiating the two blood groups with a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 90% and 95%, respectively, using Ag-SERS method, which has almost a 20% improvement in diagnostic specificity in comparison to Au-SERS. This exploratory study demonstrates that blood SERS based on Ag NPs is capable of achieving a better diagnostic performance for NPC detection, and has promising potential for improving NPC screening.

  16. Fiber optic apparatus for detecting molecular species by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Angel, Stanley M.; Sharma, Shiv K.

    1988-01-01

    Optrode apparatus for detecting constituents of a fluid medium includes an optical fiber (13, 13a to 13e) having a metal coating (22, 22a to 22e) on at least a portion of a light transmissive core (17, 17a to 17d). The metal is one, such as silver, gold or copper, which enhances emission of Raman signal frequencies by molecules adsorbed on the surface of the coating when monochromatic probe light of a different frequency is scattered by such molecules and the metal coating is sufficiently thin to transmit light between the absorbed molecules and the core of the fiber. Probe light is directed into one end of the fiber and a detector (16, 16d, 16e) analyzes light emitted from the fiber for Raman frequencies that identify one or more particular molecular species. In one form, the optrode (13e) may function as a working electrode of an electrochemical cell (53) while also serving to detect the products of oxidation or reduction reactions which occur at the electrode surface.

  17. Use of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for the detection of human integrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Mustafa H.; Gant, V. Alexander; Trache, Andreea; Baldwin, Angela M.; Meininger, Gerald A.; Coté, Gerard L.

    2006-03-01

    Current research has revealed the importance of a class of cell surface proteins called integrins in various vital physiological functions such as blood clotting, regulation of blood pressure, tissue blood flow, and vascular remodeling. The key to integrin functionality is its ability to mediate force transmission by interacting with the extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton. In addition, they play a role in signal transduction via their connection with the proteins in focal adhesion (FA) points. To understand the complex mechanism of cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion that is responsible for these diverse biochemical interactions, it is necessary to identify the integrins on cells and monitor their interaction with various ligands. To this end, for the first time, we employ surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to detect integrins. The results show the capability using SERS to detect the integrins to the nanomolar concentration regime and to distinguish between two different kinds of integrins, αVβ3 and α5β1, that are present in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). It is anticipated that the SERS approach will potentially help elucidate the mechanism of integrin-ligand interactions in a variety of phenomena of physiological importance.

  18. Odors Pulsed at Wing Beat Frequencies are Tracked by Primary Olfactory Networks and Enhance Odor Detection

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Shreejoy J.; Peters, Oakland J.; Staudacher, Erich M.; Kalwar, Faizan R.; Hatfield, Mandy N.; Daly, Kevin C.

    2009-01-01

    Each down stroke of an insect's wings accelerates axial airflow over the antennae. Modeling studies suggest that this can greatly enhance penetration of air and air-born odorants through the antennal sensilla thereby periodically increasing odorant-receptor interactions. Do these periodic changes result in entrainment of neural responses in the antenna and antennal lobe (AL)? Does this entrainment affect olfactory acuity? To address these questions, we monitored antennal and AL responses in the moth Manduca sexta while odorants were pulsed at frequencies from 10–72 Hz, encompassing the natural wingbeat frequency. Power spectral density (PSD) analysis was used to identify entrainment of neural activity. Statistical analysis of PSDs indicates that the antennal nerve tracked pulsed odor up to 30 Hz. Furthermore, at least 50% of AL local field potentials (LFPs) and between 7–25% of unitary spiking responses also tracked pulsed odor up to 30 Hz in a frequency-locked manner. Application of bicuculline (200 μM) abolished pulse tracking in both LFP and unitary responses suggesting that GABAA receptor activation is necessary for pulse tracking within the AL. Finally, psychophysical measures of odor detection establish that detection thresholds are lowered when odor is pulsed at 20 Hz. These results suggest that AL networks can respond to the oscillatory dynamics of stimuli such as those imposed by the wing beat in a manner analogous to mammalian sniffing. PMID:20407584

  19. The detection of breathing behavior using Eulerian-enhanced thermal video.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Stephanie L; Goubran, Rafik; Knoefel, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The current gold standard for detecting and distinguishing between types of sleep apnea is expensive and invasive. This paper aims to examine the potential of inexpensive and unobtrusive thermal cameras in the identification and distinction between types of sleep apnea. A thermal camera was used to gather video of a subject performing regular nasal breathing, nasal hyperventilation and an additional trial simulating one type of sleep apnea. Simultaneously, a respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) band gathered respiratory data. Thermal video of all three trials were subjected to Eulerian Video Magnification; a procedure developed at MIT for enhancing subtle color variations in video data. Post magnification, nasal regions of interest were defined and mean region intensities were found for each frame of each trial. These signals were compared to determine the best performing region and compared to RIP data to validate breathing behavior. While some regions performed better, all region intensity signals depicted correct breathing behavior. The mean intensity signals for normal breathing and hyperventilation were correct and correlated well with RIP data. Furthermore, the RIP data resulting from the sleep apnea simulation clearly depicted chest movement while the corresponding mean intensity signal depicted lack of cyclical air flow. These results indicate that a subject's breathing behavior can be captured using thermal video and suggest that, with further development and additional equipment, thermal video can be used to detect and distinguish between types of sleep apnea.

  20. Feasibility of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for rapid detection of aflatoxins in maize.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Min; Herrman, Timothy J; Bisrat, Yordanos; Murray, Seth C

    2014-05-14

    Rapid and sensitive surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for aflatoxin detection was employed for development of the models to classify and quantify aflatoxin levels in maize at concentrations of 0 to 1,206 μg/kg. Highly effective SERS substrate (Ag nanosphere) was prepared and mixed with a sample extract for SERS measurement. Strong Raman bands associated with aflatoxins and changes in maize kernels induced by aflatoxin contamination were observed in different SERS spectroscopic regions. The k-nearest neighbors (KNN) classification model yielded high classification accuracy and lower prediction error with no misclassification of contaminated samples as aflatoxin negative. The multiple linear regression (MLR) models showed a higher predictive accuracy with stronger correlation coefficients (r = 0.939-0.967) and a higher sensitivity with lower limits of detection (13-36 μg/kg) and quantitation (44-121 μg/kg) over other quantification models. Paired sample t test exhibited no statistically significant difference between the reference values and the predicted values of SERS in most chemometric models. The proposed SERS method would be a more effective and efficient analytical tool with a higher accuracy and lower constraints for aflatoxin analysis in maize compared to other existing spectroscopic methods and conventional Raman spectroscopy.

  1. Sheath-Flow Microfluidic Approach for Combined Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering and Electrochemical Detection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The combination of hydrodynamic focusing with embedded capillaries in a microfluidic device is shown to enable both surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and electrochemical characterization of analytes at nanomolar concentrations in flow. The approach utilizes a versatile polystyrene device that contains an encapsulated microelectrode and fluidic tubing, which is shown to enable straightforward hydrodynamic focusing onto the electrode surface to improve detection. A polydimethyslsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel positioned over both the embedded tubing and SERS active electrode (aligned ∼200 μm from each other) generates a sheath flow that confines the analyte molecules eluting from the embedded tubing over the SERS electrode, increasing the interaction between the Riboflavin (vitamin B2) and the SERS active electrode. The microfluidic device was characterized using finite element simulations, amperometry, and Raman experiments. This device shows a SERS and amperometric detection limit near 1 and 100 nM, respectively. This combination of SERS and amperometry in a single device provides an improved method to identify and quantify electroactive analytes over either technique independently. PMID:25815795

  2. Target Detection Is Enhanced by Polarization Vision in a Fiddler Crab.

    PubMed

    How, Martin J; Christy, John H; Temple, Shelby E; Hemmi, Jan M; Marshall, N Justin; Roberts, Nicholas W

    2015-12-01

    We are constantly surprised by the ability of relatively simple animals to perform precise visually guided movements within complex visual scenes, often using eyes with limited resolution. Exceptional examples include the capture of airborne prey by dragonflies, the learning flights of bees and wasps, and the tracking of conspecifics by crabs on intertidal mudflats. Most studies have focused on how animals do this using sensitivity to intensity or color. However, it is increasingly evident that a third ability, polarization vision, may contribute to such tasks. In many insects, polarization-sensitive photoreceptors are confined within an area of the eye known as the dorsal rim, which detects the polarized sky pattern specifically for navigation. However, some animals, including fiddler crabs, are sensitive to the polarization of light across the majority of their image-forming eyes, potentially allowing them to use polarization information to increase perceived contrast for general visual tasks. Investigations into the use of polarization image-parsing by animals have largely been confined to laboratory settings under artificial lighting. This approach can occasionally mislead if the lighting conditions are different from natural. This study presents the first behavioral evidence from the natural context for a function of polarization image parsing. Using experimental manipulations in wild populations of the fiddler crab Uca stenodactylus, we provide evidence that these animals use their polarization vision to enhance contrast in their visual environment, thereby increasing their ability to detect and respond to objects on the mudflat surface. PMID:26585278

  3. Enhancing the detection and management of acute hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Martinello, Marianne; Matthews, Gail V

    2015-10-01

    Acute HCV infection refers to the 6-month period following infection acquisition, although this definition is somewhat arbitrary. While spontaneous clearance occurs in approximately 25%, the majority will develop chronic HCV infection with the potential for development of cirrhosis, end stage liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. Detection of acute HCV infection has been hampered by its asymptomatic or non-specific presentation, lack of specific diagnostic tests and the inherent difficulties in identifying and following individuals at highest risk of transmitting and acquiring HCV infection, such as people who inject drugs (PWID). However, recognition of those with acute infection may have individual and population level benefits and could represent an ideal opportunity for intervention. Despite demonstration that HCV treatment is feasible and successful in PWID, treatment uptake remains low with multiple barriers to care at an individual and systems level. Given the burden of HCV-related disease among PWID, strategies to enhance HCV assessment, treatment and prevention in this group are urgently needed. As the therapeutic landscape of chronic HCV management is revolutionised by the advent of simple, highly effective directly-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy, similar opportunities may exist in acute infection. This review will discuss issues surrounding improving the detection and management of acute HCV infection, particularly in PWID. PMID:26254495

  4. Nanoparticle-enhanced electrical impedance detection and its potential significance in image tomography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ran; Jin, Cuiyun; Song, Fengjuan; Liu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    The conductivity and permittivity of tumors are known to differ significantly from those of normal tissues. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a relatively new imaging method for exploiting these differences. However, the accuracy of data capture is one of the difficult problems urgently to be solved in the clinical application of EIT technology. A new concept of EIT sensitizers is put forward in this paper with the goal of expanding the contrast ratio of tumor and healthy tissue to enhance EIT imaging quality. The use of nanoparticles for changing tumor characteristics and determining the infiltration vector for easier detection has been widely accepted in the biomedical field. Ultra-pure water, normal saline, and gold nanoparticles, three kinds of material with large differences in electrical characteristics, are considered as sensitizers and undergo mathematical model analysis and animal experimentation. Our preliminary results suggest that nanoparticles are promising for sensitization work. Furthermore, in experimental and simulation results, we found that we should select different sensitizers for the detection of different types and stages of tumor. PMID:23319858

  5. Superficial esophageal lesions detected by endoscopic ultrasound enhanced with submucosal edema

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-Jun; He, Long-Jun; Shan, Hong-Bo; Wang, Thomas D; Xiong, Huan; Chen, Li-Ming; Xu, Guo-Liang; Li, Xiao-Hai; Huang, Xin-Xin; Luo, Guang-Yu; Li, Yin; Zhang, Rong

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine if there is consistency between endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) findings and pathological results for detecting lesions of different depth in the esophageal mucosa. METHODS: A canine (Beagle) model was established in which lesions of different depths were created in the esophageal mucosa by thermal burning. Seventy-two hours later, these lesions and adjacent tissue in the esophagus were examined by EUS. EUS findings including infiltrating depth, strength of echogenicity and homogeneity were recorded. Dogs were sacrificed and tissue specimens were obtained. We then compared the EUS findings with the pathology reports. RESULTS: Thermal burns created at different power settings caused lesions of different depth in the esophageal mucosa. When the echo strength was shifted from high, medium, to low echogenicity, an increase in the infiltrating depth of the lesion was noted, which coincided with results of the pathology examination. Obvious submucosal edema visualized by EUS was also detected by pathology. Furthermore, because of the enhancement caused by the submucosal edema, the lesions invading into the submucosa were easily visualized by EUS. CONCLUSION: There is consistency between EUS findings and pathological results of esophageal lesions with different depths. Submucosal edema can serve as an ultrasonic contrast agent. PMID:24379628

  6. Target Detection Is Enhanced by Polarization Vision in a Fiddler Crab.

    PubMed

    How, Martin J; Christy, John H; Temple, Shelby E; Hemmi, Jan M; Marshall, N Justin; Roberts, Nicholas W

    2015-12-01

    We are constantly surprised by the ability of relatively simple animals to perform precise visually guided movements within complex visual scenes, often using eyes with limited resolution. Exceptional examples include the capture of airborne prey by dragonflies, the learning flights of bees and wasps, and the tracking of conspecifics by crabs on intertidal mudflats. Most studies have focused on how animals do this using sensitivity to intensity or color. However, it is increasingly evident that a third ability, polarization vision, may contribute to such tasks. In many insects, polarization-sensitive photoreceptors are confined within an area of the eye known as the dorsal rim, which detects the polarized sky pattern specifically for navigation. However, some animals, including fiddler crabs, are sensitive to the polarization of light across the majority of their image-forming eyes, potentially allowing them to use polarization information to increase perceived contrast for general visual tasks. Investigations into the use of polarization image-parsing by animals have largely been confined to laboratory settings under artificial lighting. This approach can occasionally mislead if the lighting conditions are different from natural. This study presents the first behavioral evidence from the natural context for a function of polarization image parsing. Using experimental manipulations in wild populations of the fiddler crab Uca stenodactylus, we provide evidence that these animals use their polarization vision to enhance contrast in their visual environment, thereby increasing their ability to detect and respond to objects on the mudflat surface.

  7. Potential of non-invasive esophagus cancer detection based on urine surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shaohua; Wang, Lan; Chen, Weisheng; Feng, Shangyuan; Lin, Juqiang; Huang, Zufang; Chen, Guannan; Li, Buhong; Chen, Rong

    2014-11-01

    Non-invasive esophagus cancer detection based on urine surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) analysis was presented. Urine SERS spectra were measured on esophagus cancer patients (n = 56) and healthy volunteers (n = 36) for control analysis. Tentative assignments of the urine SERS spectra indicated some interesting esophagus cancer-specific biomolecular changes, including a decrease in the relative content of urea and an increase in the percentage of uric acid in the urine of esophagus cancer patients compared to that of healthy subjects. Principal component analysis (PCA) combined with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was employed to analyze and differentiate the SERS spectra between normal and esophagus cancer urine. The diagnostic algorithms utilizing a multivariate analysis method achieved a diagnostic sensitivity of 89.3% and specificity of 83.3% for separating esophagus cancer samples from normal urine samples. These results from the explorative work suggested that silver nano particle-based urine SERS analysis coupled with PCA-LDA multivariate analysis has potential for non-invasive detection of esophagus cancer.

  8. Cavity Enhanced absorption spectroscopy with an Optical Comb: Detection of atmospheric radicals in the near UV.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méjean, G.; Kassi, S.; Romanini, D.

    2009-04-01

    The atmospheric chemistry community suffers a lack of fast, reliable and space resolved measurement for a wide set of very reactive molecules (e.g. radicals such as OH, NO3, BrO, IO, etc.). Due to their high reactivity, these molecules largely control the lifetime and concentration of numerous key atmospheric species. The concentrations of radicals are extremely low (ppbv or less) and highly variable in time and space. Measuring their concentration is often extremely laborious, expensive and requires heavy equipment (chemical sampling and treatment followed by mass spectrometry and/or chromatography). We recently introduced an optical spectroscopy technique based on a femtosecond laser oscillator, "Mode-Locked Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy", that we propose to develop into an instrument for in situ measurement of local concentration of traces of reactive molecules [1-3]. We have already demonstrated the possibility of measuring part in 1E12 by volume concentrations of radicals of high atmospheric interest, such as IO or BrO [4], as needed for monitoring these species in the environment. We apply cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the near UV range using a frequency-doubled Ti:Sa modelocked femtosecond laser. Efficient broadband injection of a high finesse cavity is obtained by matching this optical frequency-comb source to the comb of cavity transmission resonances. A grating spectrograph and a detector array disperse and detect the spectrum transmitted by the cavity carrying the absorption features of intracavity molecules. IO traces were obtained by mixing together controlled flows of gaseous iodine and ozone inside a high finesse cavity (F~6000). A Chameleon Ultra II ML-Laser (gracefully lent during 1 month by Coherent Inc.) was frequency doubled to address an absorption band of IO at 436 nm. A locking scheme allowed the cavity transmission to be smooth and stable. The transmitted light was dispersed using a high resolution (0.07nm) grating

  9. New way for both quality enhancement of THz images and detection of concealed objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.

    2015-08-01

    As it is well-known, the passive THz camera allows seeing concealed object without contact with a person and this camera is non-dangerous for a person. Obviously, efficiency of using the passive THz camera depends on its temperature resolution. This characteristic specifies possibilities of the detection for concealed object: minimal size of the object; maximal distance of the detection; image quality. Computer processing of the THz image may lead to many times improving of the image quality without any additional engineering efforts. Therefore, developing of modern novel computer code for its application to THz images is urgent problem. Using appropriate new methods one may expect such temperature resolution which will allow to see banknote in pocket of a person without any real contact. Modern algorithms for computer processing of THz images allow also to see object inside the human body using a temperature trace on the human skin. This circumstance enhances essentially opportunity of passive THz camera applications for counterterrorism problems. We developed new real-time algorithm, based on the correlation function, for the detection of cancelled objects by using computer processing of the passive THz images without their viewing. This algorithm allows us to make a conclusion about presence of forbidden objects on the human body. To see this object with high quality we propose one more algorithm which allows to increase the image quality. Current approach for computer processing of the THz images differs from approaches developed by us early. We apply new algorithms with success to the images captured by passive THz camera TS4 manufactured by ThruVision Inc. The distance between the camera and person is changed from 4 to 10 metres.

  10. On the enhanced detectability of GPS anomalous behavior with relative entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jeongho

    2016-10-01

    A standard receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM) technique for the global positioning system (GPS) has been dedicated to provide an integrity monitoring capability for safety-critical GPS applications, such as in civil aviation for the en-route (ER) through non-precision approach (NPA) or lateral navigation (LNAV). The performance of the existing RAIM method, however, may not meet more stringent aviation requirements for availability and integrity during the precision approach and landing phases of flight due to insufficient observables and/or untimely warning to the user beyond a specified time-to-alert in the event of a significant GPS failure. This has led to an enhanced RAIM architecture ensuring stricter integrity requirement by greatly decreasing the detection time when a satellite failure or a measurement error has occurred. We thus attempted to devise a user integrity monitor which is capable of identifying the GPS failure more rapidly than a standard RAIM scheme by incorporating the RAIM with the relative entropy, which is a likelihood ratio approach to assess the inconsistence between two data streams, quite different from a Euclidean distance. In addition, the delay-coordinate embedding technique needs to be considered and preprocessed to associate the discriminant measure obtained from the RAIM with the relative entropy in the new RAIM design. In simulation results, we demonstrate that the proposed user integrity monitor outperforms the standard RAIM with a higher level of detection rate of anomalies which could be hazardous to the users in the approach or landing phase and is a very promising alternative for the detection of deviations in GPS signal. The comparison also shows that it enables to catch even small anomalous gradients more rapidly than a typical user integrity monitor.

  11. Diagnostic and interventional radiology in the post-operative period and follow-up of patients after rectal resection with coloanal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Severini, A; Civelli, E M; Uslenghi, E; Cozzi, G; Salvetti, M; Milella, M; Gallino, G; Bonfanti, G; Belli, F; Leo, E

    2000-01-01

    Surgical treatment of carcinoma of the distal third of the rectum with anal sphincter preservation is increasingly used in accredited cancer centers. This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of radiological investigations in the management of patients who had undergone resection with coloanal anastomosis for carcinoma of the rectum, in the immediate post-operative period, during closure of the protective colostomy and in the follow-up of symptomatic recanalized patients. A total of 175 patients who had undergone total rectal resection with end-to-side anastomosis for carcinoma of the distal third of the rectal ampulla, most of whom had received postoperative radiotherapy, were evaluated radiologically. In the postoperative period radiological investigation was ordered only for symptomatic patients to detect pathology of the anastomosis and the pouch sutures and was used direct film abdominal radiography and contrast-enhanced radiography of the rectal stump with a water-soluble radio-opaque agent. Before closure of the colostomy, 2 months after rectal excision or approximately 4 months after if postoperative radiotherapy was given, the anastomosis and pouch of all patients, even asymptomatic ones, were studied with water-soluble contrast enema to check for normal canalization. In the follow-up after recanalization radiological examinations were done to complete the study of the large intestine if the endoscopist was not able to examine it up to the cecum. Of the 175 patients examined radiologically during the postoperative period and/or subsequent follow-up, 95 showed no pathological findings. Seventy-nine patients had fistulas of the coloanal anastomosis or the pouch, 23 of which supplied a presacral collection. In the absence of severe sepsis, the only therapeutic measures were systemic antibiotics and washing of the surgical catheters to maintain efficient operation. In 2 patients in whom transanal drainage was performed radiologically the fistula

  12. Highly sensitive detection of proteins and bacteria in aqueous solution using surface-enhanced Raman scattering and optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuan; Gu, Claire; Qian, Fang; Li, Yat; Zhang, Jin Z

    2011-08-01

    We report the detection of the proteins lysozyme and cytochrome c as well as the live bacterial cells of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in aqueous solutions with sensitivities order(s) of magnitude higher than those previously reported. Two highly sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based biosensors using optical fibers have been employed for such label-free macromolecule detections. The first sensor is based on a tip-coated multimode fiber (TCMMF) with a double-substrate "sandwich" structure, and a detection limit of 0.2 μg/mL is achieved in protein detections. The second sensor is based on a liquid core photonic crystal fiber (LCPCF) with a better confinement of light inside the fiber core, and a detection limit of 10(6) cells/mL is achieved for the bacteria detection. Both SERS biosensors show great potential for highly sensitive and molecule-specific detection and identification of biomolecules. PMID:21692506

  13. Detection of trace organics in Martian soil analogs using fluorescence-free surface enhanced 1064-nm Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Suning; Chen, Bin; McKay, Christopher P; Navarro-Gonzálezv, Rafael; Wang, Alan X

    2016-09-19

    A significant technology challenge in planetary missions is the in situ detection of organics at the sub-part-per-million (ppm) level in soils. This article reports the organic compound detection in Mars-like soils at the sub-ppm level using an ultra-sensitive spectral sensing technique based on fluorescence-free surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), which has a significantly improved sensitivity and reduced fluorescence noise. Raman spectral detection of ppm level organics in Antarctic Dry Valley and Mojave Desert soils have been obtained for the first time, which otherwise are not detected by other Raman spectral techniques.

  14. Detection of trace organics in Martian soil analogs using fluorescence-free surface enhanced 1064-nm Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Suning; Chen, Bin; McKay, Christopher P; Navarro-Gonzálezv, Rafael; Wang, Alan X

    2016-09-19

    A significant technology challenge in planetary missions is the in situ detection of organics at the sub-part-per-million (ppm) level in soils. This article reports the organic compound detection in Mars-like soils at the sub-ppm level using an ultra-sensitive spectral sensing technique based on fluorescence-free surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), which has a significantly improved sensitivity and reduced fluorescence noise. Raman spectral detection of ppm level organics in Antarctic Dry Valley and Mojave Desert soils have been obtained for the first time, which otherwise are not detected by other Raman spectral techniques. PMID:27661945

  15. Data mining in radiology.

    PubMed

    Kharat, Amit T; Singh, Amarjit; Kulkarni, Vilas M; Shah, Digish

    2014-04-01

    Data mining facilitates the study of radiology data in various dimensions. It converts large patient image and text datasets into useful information that helps in improving patient care and provides informative reports. Data mining technology analyzes data within the Radiology Information System and Hospital Information System using specialized software which assesses relationships and agreement in available information. By using similar data analysis tools, radiologists can make informed decisions and predict the future outcome of a particular imaging finding. Data, information and knowledge are the components of data mining. Classes, Clusters, Associations, Sequential patterns, Classification, Prediction and Decision tree are the various types of data mining. Data mining has the potential to make delivery of health care affordable and ensure that the best imaging practices are followed. It is a tool for academic research. Data mining is considered to be ethically neutral, however concerns regarding privacy and legality exists which need to be addressed to ensure success of data mining. PMID:25024513

  16. Data mining in radiology

    PubMed Central

    Kharat, Amit T; Singh, Amarjit; Kulkarni, Vilas M; Shah, Digish

    2014-01-01

    Data mining facilitates the study of radiology data in various dimensions. It converts large patient image and text datasets into useful information that helps in improving patient care and provides informative reports. Data mining technology analyzes data within the Radiology Information System and Hospital Information System using specialized software which assesses relationships and agreement in available information. By using similar data analysis tools, radiologists can make informed decisions and predict the future outcome of a particular imaging finding. Data, information and knowledge are the components of data mining. Classes, Clusters, Associations, Sequential patterns, Classification, Prediction and Decision tree are the various types of data mining. Data mining has the potential to make delivery of health care affordable and ensure that the best imaging practices are followed. It is a tool for academic research. Data mining is considered to be ethically neutral, however concerns regarding privacy and legality exists which need to be addressed to ensure success of data mining. PMID:25024513

  17. Data mining in radiology.

    PubMed

    Kharat, Amit T; Singh, Amarjit; Kulkarni, Vilas M; Shah, Digish

    2014-04-01

    Data mining facilitates the study of radiology data in various dimensions. It converts large patient image and text datasets into useful information that helps in improving patient care and provides informative reports. Data mining technology analyzes data within the Radiology Information System and Hospital Information System using specialized software which assesses relationships and agreement in available information. By using similar data analysis tools, radiologists can make informed decisions and predict the future outcome of a particular imaging finding. Data, information and knowledge are the components of data mining. Classes, Clusters, Associations, Sequential patterns, Classification, Prediction and Decision tree are the various types of data mining. Data mining has the potential to make delivery of health care affordable and ensure that the best imaging practices are followed. It is a tool for academic research. Data mining is considered to be ethically neutral, however concerns regarding privacy and legality exists which need to be addressed to ensure success of data mining.

  18. Demystifying radiology information systems.

    PubMed

    Swearingen, R

    2000-01-01

    Selecting the right radiology information system (RIS) can be a difficult and tedious task for radiology managers. Sometimes the information systems department ends up selecting the RIS. As a radiology manager, you can help yourself and your department greatly by becoming more educated concerning the technology and terminology of radiology information systems. You can then participate in one of the most important decisions that will ever be made regarding your department. There is much confusion about the meanings of the terms interfaced and integrated. Two applications are generally considered integrated if they freely access and update each other's databases. Two applications are generally considered interfaced if they pass data to each other but don't directly access nor update the other's databases. Two more terms are centralized and decentralized. Centralized is the concept of "putting all of your eggs in one basket." Decentralization means you spread your resources out. The main difference between centralized and decentralized is that all components of a centralized system share the same fate (good or bad), while decentralized components operate independently and aren't affected directly by failures in another system. Another significant term relevant to RIS systems is HL7, which is a standardized data format that allows one application to pass data to another application in a format that the receiving application understands. RIS vendors generally fall in three categories: single-source vendors, multiproduct vendors and single-product vendors. Single-product vendors include best-of-breed vendors. No one approach is necessarily better than the others; which you choose will depend on your needs. When considering the purchase of an RIS system, there are important questions to ask yourself, the vendor and the vendors' customers as you gather information and prepare to make a decision.

  19. Disabling Radiological Dispersal Terror

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M

    2002-11-08

    Terror resulting from the use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) relies upon an individual's lack of knowledge and understanding regarding its significance. Disabling this terror will depend upon realistic reviews of the current conservative radiation protection regulatory standards. It will also depend upon individuals being able to make their own informed decisions merging perceived risks with reality. Preparation in these areas will reduce the effectiveness of the RDD and may even reduce the possibility of its use.

  20. Photo-induced enhanced Raman spectroscopy for universal ultra-trace detection of explosives, pollutants and biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Jaber, Sultan; Peveler, William J.; Quesada-Cabrera, Raul; Cortés, Emiliano; Sotelo-Vazquez, Carlos; Abdul-Karim, Nadia; Maier, Stefan A.; Parkin, Ivan P.

    2016-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is one of the most sensitive spectroscopic techniques available, with single-molecule detection possible on a range of noble-metal substrates. It is widely used to detect molecules that have a strong Raman response at very low concentrations. Here we present photo-induced-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, where the combination of plasmonic nanoparticles with a photo-activated substrate gives rise to large signal enhancement (an order of magnitude) for a wide range of small molecules, even those with a typically low Raman cross-section. We show that the induced chemical enhancement is due to increased electron density at the noble-metal nanoparticles, and demonstrate the universality of this system with explosives, biomolecules and organic dyes, at trace levels. Our substrates are also easy to fabricate, self-cleaning and reusable. PMID:27412699

  1. Photo-induced enhanced Raman spectroscopy for universal ultra-trace detection of explosives, pollutants and biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Jaber, Sultan; Peveler, William J.; Quesada-Cabrera, Raul; Cortés, Emiliano; Sotelo-Vazquez, Carlos; Abdul-Karim, Nadia; Maier, Stefan A.; Parkin, Ivan P.

    2016-07-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is one of the most sensitive spectroscopic techniques available, with single-molecule detection possible on a range of noble-metal substrates. It is widely used to detect molecules that have a strong Raman response at very low concentrations. Here we present photo-induced-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, where the combination of plasmonic nanoparticles with a photo-activated substrate gives rise to large signal enhancement (an order of magnitude) for a wide range of small molecules, even those with a typically low Raman cross-section. We show that the induced chemical enhancement is due to increased electron density at the noble-metal nanoparticles, and demonstrate the universality of this system with explosives, biomolecules and organic dyes, at trace levels. Our substrates are also easy to fabricate, self-cleaning and reusable.

  2. Photo-induced enhanced Raman spectroscopy for universal ultra-trace detection of explosives, pollutants and biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Ben-Jaber, Sultan; Peveler, William J; Quesada-Cabrera, Raul; Cortés, Emiliano; Sotelo-Vazquez, Carlos; Abdul-Karim, Nadia; Maier, Stefan A; Parkin, Ivan P

    2016-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is one of the most sensitive spectroscopic techniques available, with single-molecule detection possible on a range of noble-metal substrates. It is widely used to detect molecules that have a strong Raman response at very low concentrations. Here we present photo-induced-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, where the combination of plasmonic nanoparticles with a photo-activated substrate gives rise to large signal enhancement (an order of magnitude) for a wide range of small molecules, even those with a typically low Raman cross-section. We show that the induced chemical enhancement is due to increased electron density at the noble-metal nanoparticles, and demonstrate the universality of this system with explosives, biomolecules and organic dyes, at trace levels. Our substrates are also easy to fabricate, self-cleaning and reusable. PMID:27412699

  3. Detection of anionic energetic material residues in enhanced fingermarks on porous and non-porous surfaces using ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Love, Catherine; Gilchrist, Elizabeth; Smith, Norman; Barron, Leon

    2013-09-10

    The ability to link criminal activity and identity using validated analytical approaches can be of great value to forensic scientists. Herein, the factors affecting the recovery and detection of inorganic and organic energetic material residues within chemically or physically enhanced fingermarks on paper and glass substrates are presented using micro-bore anion exchange chromatography with suppressed conductivity detection. Fingermarks on both surfaces were enhanced using aluminium powder or ninhydrin after spiking with model test mixtures or through contact with black-powder substitutes. A quantitative study of the effects of environmental/method interferences, the sweat matrix, the surface and the enhancement technique on the relative anion recovery of forensically relevant species is presented. It is shown that the analytical method could detect target analytes at the nanogram level even within excesses of enhancement reagents and their reaction products when using solid phase extraction and/or microfiltration. To our knowledge, this work demonstrates for the first time that ion chromatography can detect anions in energetic materials within fingermarks on two very different surfaces, after operational enhancement techniques commonly used by forensic scientists and police have been applied.

  4. DNA Origami Nanoantennas with over 5000-fold Fluorescence Enhancement and Single-Molecule Detection at 25 μM.

    PubMed

    Puchkova, Anastasiya; Vietz, Carolin; Pibiri, Enrico; Wünsch, Bettina; Sanz Paz, María; Acuna, Guillermo P; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2015-12-01

    Optical nanoantennas are known to focus freely propagating light and reversely to mediate the emission of a light source located at the nanoantenna hotspot. These effects were previously exploited for fluorescence enhancement and single-molecule detection at elevated concentrations. We present a new generation of self-assembled DNA origami based optical nanoantennas with improved robustness, reduced interparticle distance, and optimized quantum-yield improvement to achieve more than 5000-fold fluorescence enhancement and single-molecule detection at 25 μM background fluorophore concentration. Besides outperforming lithographic optical antennas, DNA origami nanoantennas are additionally capable of incorporating single emitters or biomolecular assays at the antenna hotspot. PMID:26523768

  5. DNA Origami Nanoantennas with over 5000-fold Fluorescence Enhancement and Single-Molecule Detection at 25 μM.

    PubMed

    Puchkova, Anastasiya; Vietz, Carolin; Pibiri, Enrico; Wünsch, Bettina; Sanz Paz, María; Acuna, Guillermo P; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2015-12-01

    Optical nanoantennas are known to focus freely propagating light and reversely to mediate the emission of a light source located at the nanoantenna hotspot. These effects were previously exploited for fluorescence enhancement and single-molecule detection at elevated concentrations. We present a new generation of self-assembled DNA origami based optical nanoantennas with improved robustness, reduced interparticle distance, and optimized quantum-yield improvement to achieve more than 5000-fold fluorescence enhancement and single-molecule detection at 25 μM background fluorophore concentration. Besides outperforming lithographic optical antennas, DNA origami nanoantennas are additionally capable of incorporating single emitters or biomolecular assays at the antenna hotspot.

  6. A peptide probe for the detection of neurokinin-1 receptor by disaggregation enhanced fluorescence and magnetic resonance signals

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jingxian; Zou, Rongfeng; Wang, Qi; Xue, Yajing; Wei, Ping; Yang, Shiping; Wu, Junchen; Tian, He

    2014-01-01

    We report a novel peptide probe for the detection of neurokinin-1 receptor using disaggregation-caused signal enhancement. The probe was obtained via the aggregation of a modified substance P in a terpyridine-Fe (II) complex with Gd (III)-DOTA into well-defined nanostructures, which effectively weaken ligand fluorescence and slow the exchange rate of inner-sphere water molecules. This probe disaggregates upon binding to the neurokinin-1 receptor and activates the contrast agents to generate a fluorescent signal that positively enhances magnetic resonance imaging contrast and allows for the detection of overexpressed receptors on tumor cells and the identification of lung cancer using serum samples. PMID:25270511

  7. Detection of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with diffusion weighted MRI after (chemo)radiotherapy: Correlation between radiologic and histopathologic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Vandecaveye, Vincent; Keyzer, Frederik de; Nuyts, Sandra; Deraedt, Karen; Dirix, Piet; Hamaekers, Pascal; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Delaere, Pierre; Hermans, Robert . E-mail: Robert.Hermans@uzleuven.be

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the value of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) in differentiating persistent or recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) from nontumoral postradiotherapeutic alterations. Methods and Materials: In 26 patients with suspicion of persistent or recurrent HNSCC, MRI of the head and neck was performed, including routine turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences and an additional echo-planar DW-MRI sequence, using a large range of b-values (0-1000 s/mm{sup 2}). Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were calculated. In the suspect areas at the primary site and in the suspect lymph nodes, signal intensity was measured on the native b0 and b1000 images and ADC values were calculated for these tissues. The same was done for surrounding irradiated normal tissue. Imaging results were correlated to histopathology. Results: Signal intensity on native b0 images was significantly lower for HNSCC than for nontumoral postradiotherapeutic tissue (p < 0.0001), resulting in a sensitivity of 66.2%, specificity of 60.8%, and accuracy of 62.4%. Signal intensity on native b1000 images was significantly higher for HNSCC than for nontumoral tissue (p < 0.0001), resulting in a sensitivity of 71.6%, specificity of 71.3%, and accuracy of 71.4%. ADC values were significantly lower for HNSCC than for nontumoral tissue (p < 0.0001), resulting in a sensitivity of 94.6%, specificity of 95.9%, and accuracy of 95.5%. When compared with computed tomography, TSE-MRI and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography, DW-MRI yielded fewer false-positive results in persistent primary site abnormalities and in persistent adenopathies, and aided in the detection of subcentimetric nodal metastases. Conclusions: Diffusion weighted-MRI accurately differentiates persistent or recurrent HNSCC from nontumoral tissue changes after (chemo)radiotherapy.

  8. Enhancement of object detection with transcranial direct current stimulation is associated with increased attention

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously found that Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) improves learning and performance in a task where subjects learn to detect potential threats indicated by small target objects hidden in a complex virtual environment. In the present study, we examined the hypothesis that these effects on learning and performance are related to changes in attention. The effects of tDCS were tested for three forms of attention (alerting, orienting, and executive attention) using the Attention Network Task (ANT), which were compared with performance on the object-learning task. Results Participants received either 0.1 mA (N = 10) or 2.0 mA (N = 9) tDCS during training and were tested for performance in object-identification before training (baseline-test) and again immediately after training (immediate test). Participants next performed the Attention Networks Task (ANT), and were later tested for object-identification performance a final time (delayed test). Alerting, but not orienting or executive attention, was significantly higher for participants receiving 2.0 mA compared with 0.1 mA tDCS (p < 0.02). Furthermore, alerting scores were significantly correlated with the proportion of hits (p < 0.01) for participants receiving 2.0 mA. Conclusions These results indicate that tDCS enhancement of performance in this task may be related in part to the enhancement of alerting attention, which may benefit the initial identification, learning and/or subsequent recognition of target objects indicating potential threats. PMID:22963503

  9. Feature-enhancing zoom to facilitate Ki-67 hot spot detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molin, Jesper; Shaga Devan, Kavitha; Wârdell, Karin; Lundström, Claes

    2014-03-01

    Image processing algorithms in pathology commonly include automated decision points such as classifications. While this enables efficient automation, there is also a risk that errors are induced. A different paradigm is to use image processing for enhancements without introducing explicit classifications. Such enhancements can help pathologists to increase efficiency without sacrificing accuracy. In our work, this paradigm has been applied to Ki-67 hot spot detection. Ki-67 scoring is a routine analysis to quantify the proliferation rate of tumor cells. Cell counting in the hot spot, the region of highest concentration of positive tumor cells, is a method increasingly used in clinical routine. An obstacle for this method is that while hot spot selection is a task suitable for low magnification, high magnification is needed to discern positive nuclei, thus the pathologist must perform many zooming operations. We propose to address this issue by an image processing method that increases the visibility of the positive nuclei at low magnification levels. This tool displays the modified version at low magnification, while gradually blending into the original image at high magnification. The tool was evaluated in a feasibility study with four pathologists targeting routine clinical use. In a task to compare hot spot concentrations, the average accuracy was 75+/-4.1% using the tool and 69+/-4.6% without it (n=4). Feedback on the system, gathered from an observer study, indicate that the pathologists found the tool useful and fitting in their existing diagnostic process. The pathologists judged the tool to be feasible for implementation in clinical routine.

  10. Surface enhanced Raman scattering by graphene-nanosheet-gapped plasmonic nanoparticle arrays for multiplexed DNA detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Bo; Zhou, Jiajing; Fang, Zheng; Wang, Chenxu; Wang, Xiujuan; Hemond, Harold F.; Chan-Park, Mary B.; Duan, Hongwei

    2015-07-01

    We have developed a new type of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate with thiolated graphene oxide (tGO) nanosheets sandwiched between two layers of closely packed plasmonic nanoparticles. The trilayered substrate is built up through alternative loading of interfacially assembled plasmonic nanoparticle arrays and tGO nanosheets, followed by coating the nanoparticle surfaces with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). Here tGO plays multifunctional roles as a 2D scaffold to immobilized interfacially assembled plasmonic nanoparticles, a nanospacer to create SERS-active nanogaps between two layers of nanoparticle arrays, and a molecule harvester to enrich molecules of interest via π-π interaction. In particular, the molecule harvesting capability of the tGO nanospacer and the stealth properties of PEG coating on the plasmonic nanoparticles collectively lead to preferential positioning of selective targets such as aromatic molecules and single-stranded DNA at the SERS-active nanogap hotspots. We have demonstrated that an SERS assay based on the PEGylated trilayered substrate, in combination with magnetic separation, allows for sensitive, multiplexed ``signal-off'' detection of DNA sequences of bacterial pathogens.We have developed a new type of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate with thiolated graphene oxide (tGO) nanosheets sandwiched between two layers of closely packed plasmonic nanoparticles. The trilayered substrate is built up through alternative loading of interfacially assembled plasmonic nanoparticle arrays and tGO nanosheets, followed by coating the nanoparticle surfaces with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). Here tGO plays multifunctional roles as a 2D scaffold to immobilized interfacially assembled plasmonic nanoparticles, a nanospacer to create SERS-active nanogaps between two layers of nanoparticle arrays, and a molecule harvester to enrich molecules of interest via π-π interaction. In particular, the molecule harvesting capability of

  11. Improved Detection of Microearthquakes: Application of Matched Field Processing (MFP) to Traditional and Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, D. C.; Harris, D.; Goebel, M.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the microseismicity in both traditional and Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) and compare the temporal distribution of microseismic events to well fluid injection data. We apply the empirical and model-based Matched Field Processing (MFP) methods to continuous seismic data from the Salton Sea geothermal field and the DOE Newberry EGS site. MFP is a non-traditional event detection method that can identify more and smaller events than traditional detection methods alone. The empirical MFP method uses known catalog events as master templates to identify new microearthquakes while the model-based MFP method uses synthetic sources computed across a subsurface 3D grid as master templates. Salton Sea data between January 2008 and December 2011 was downloaded off the SCEDC website and high-quality master events were identified from the online catalog. We created empirical matched field steering vector calibrations for 7 three-component stations within the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. The original Salton Sea earthquake catalog identified 4202 events. When we applied the empirical MFP technique to the same data, we identified 5005 additional events (~119% more events). We compare the results from this traditional geothermal area with results obtained from the Newberry EGS site, for which we have 8 three-component stations. The Newberry catalog originally identified 204 events in 3 months while the MFP technique identified 249 additional events (~122% more events). We will compare the results from using the empirical MFP method at the Newberry EGS site with results obtained from using model-based master templates. Additionally, we compare the number of events in the improved earthquake catalogs with available fluid injection data. This work is performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Computer-aided detection of bladder mass within contrast-enhanced region of CTU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Kenny; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Chan, Heang-Ping; Caoili, Elaine M.; Cohan, Richard H.; Zhou, Chuan

    2015-03-01

    We are developing a computer-aided detection system for bladder cancer on CTU. The bladder was automatically segmented with our Conjoint Level set Analysis and Segmentation System (CLASS). In this preliminary study, we developed a system for detecting mass within the contrast-enhanced (C) region of the bladder. The C region was delineated from the segmented bladders using a method based on maximum intensity projection. The bladder wall of the C region was extracted using thresholding to remove the contrast material. The wall on each slice was transformed into a wall profile. Morphology and voxel intensity along the profile were analyzed and suspicious locations were labeled as lesion candidates. The candidates were segmented and 20 morphological features were extracted from each candidate. A data set of 35 patients with 45 biopsy-proven bladder lesions within the C region was used for system evaluation. Stepwise feature selection with simplex optimization and leave-one-case-out method was used for training and validation. For each partition in the leave-one-case-out method, features were selected from the training cases and a linear discriminant (LDA) classifier was designed to merge the selected features into a single score for classification of the lesion candidates into bladder lesions and normal findings in the left-out case. A single score was generated for each lesion candidate. The performance of the CAD system was evaluated by FROC analysis. At an FP rate of 2.5 FPs/case, the system achieved a sensitivity of 82%, while at 1.7 FPs/case, a sensitivity of 71%.

  13. Determination of manganese- and manganese-containing fungicides with lucigenin-Tween-20-enhanced chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Yaqoob, Mohammad; Asghar, Mohammad; Nabi, Abdul

    2015-11-01

    A flow-injection (FI) method is reported for the determination of Mn(II), maneb and mancozeb fungicides based on the catalytic effect of Mn(II) on the oxidation of lucigenin and dissolved oxygen in a basic solution. The Tween-20 surfactant has been reported for first time to enhance lucigenin chemiluminescence (CL) intensity in the presence of Mn(II) (53%) and maneb and mancozeb (89%). The calibration graphs were linear in the concentration range of 0.001-1.5 mg L(-1) (R(2) = 0.9982 (n = 11) with a limit of detection (S/N = 3) of 0.1 µg L(-1) for Mn(II) and 0.01-3.0 mg L(-1) [R(2) = 0.9989 and R(2) = 0.9992 (n = 6)] with a limit of detection (S/N =3) of 1.0 µg L(-1) for maneb and mancozeb respectively. Injection throughputs of 90 and 120 h(-1) for Mn(II) and maneb and mancozeb respectively, and relative standard deviations of 1.0-3.4% were obtained in the concentration range studied. The experimental variables, e.g., reagents concentrations, flow rates, sample volume, and photomultiplier tube voltage, were optimized and potential interferences were investigated. The analysis of Mn(II) in river water reference materials (SLRS-4 and SLRS-5) showed good agreement with the certified values incorporating an on-line 8-hydroxyquinoline chelating column in the manifold for removing interfering metal ions. Recoveries for maneb and mancozeb were in the range of 92 ± 5 to 104 ± 3% and 91 ± 2 to 100 ± 4% (n = 3) respectively. The effect of 30 other pesticides (fungicides, herbicides and insecticides) was also examined in the lucigenin-Tween-20 CL system. PMID:25640332

  14. Detection of enhancement in number densities of background galaxies due to magnification by massive galaxy clusters

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chiu, I.; Dietrich, J. P.; Mohr, J.; Applegate, D. E.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bayliss, M. B.; Bocquet, S.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Capasso, R.; et al

    2016-02-18

    We present a detection of the enhancement in the number densities of background galaxies induced from lensing magnification and use it to test the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) inferred masses in a sample of 19 galaxy clusters with median redshift z≃0.42 selected from the South Pole Telescope SPT-SZ survey. Two background galaxy populations are selected for this study through their photometric colours; they have median redshifts zmedian≃0.9 (low-z background) and zmedian≃1.8 (high-z background). Stacking these populations, we detect the magnification bias effect at 3.3σ and 1.3σ for the low- and high-z backgrounds, respectively. We fit NFW models simultaneously to all observedmore » magnification bias profiles to estimate the multiplicative factor η that describes the ratio of the weak lensing mass to the mass inferred from the SZE observable-mass relation. We further quantify systematic uncertainties in η resulting from the photometric noise and bias, the cluster galaxy contamination and the estimations of the background properties. The resulting η for the combined background populations with 1σ uncertainties is 0.83 ± 0.24(stat) ± 0.074(sys), indicating good consistency between the lensing and the SZE-inferred masses. We also use our best-fit η to predict the weak lensing shear profiles and compare these predictions with observations, showing agreement between the magnification and shear mass constraints. Our work demonstrates the promise of using the magnification as a complementary method to estimate cluster masses in large surveys.« less

  15. Rapid detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biomarkers in biological fluids using surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaomeng; Chen, Jing; Zhao, Yiping; Zughaier, Susu M.

    2014-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an opportunistic pathogen that causes major infection not only in Cystic Fibrosis patients but also in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in critically ill patients in intensive care units. Successful antibiotic treatment of the infection relies on accurate and rapid identification of the infectious agents. Conventional microbiological detection methods usually take more than 3 days to obtain accurate results. We have developed a rapid diagnostic technique based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering to directly identify PA from biological fluids. P. aeruginosa strains, PAO1 and PA14, are cultured in lysogeny broth, and the SERS spectra of the broth show the signature Raman peaks from pyocyanin and pyoverdine, two major biomarkers that P. aeruginosa secretes during its growth, as well as lipopolysaccharides. This provides the evidence that the presence of these biomarkers can be used to indicate P. aeruginosa infection. A total of 22 clinical exhaled breath condensates (EBC) samples were obtained from subjects with CF disease and from non-CF healthy donors. SERS spectra of these EBC samples were obtained and further analyzed by both principle component analysis and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). PLS-DA can discriminate the samples with P. aeruginosa infection and the ones without P. aeruginosa infection at 99.3% sensitivity and 99.6% specificity. In addition, this technique can also discriminate samples from subject with CF disease and healthy donor with 97.5% sensitivity and 100% specificity. These results demonstrate the potential of using SERS of EBC samples as a rapid diagnostic tool to detect PA infection.

  16. Detection of enhancement in number densities of background galaxies due to magnification by massive galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, I.; Dietrich, J. P.; Mohr, J.; Applegate, D. E.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bayliss, M. B.; Bocquet, S.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Capasso, R.; Desai, S.; Gangkofner, C.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Gupta, N.; Hennig, C.; Hoekstra, H.; von der Linden, A.; Liu, J.; McDonald, M.; Reichardt, C. L.; Saro, A.; Schrabback, T.; Strazzullo, V.; Stubbs, C. W.; Zenteno, A.

    2016-04-01

    We present a detection of the enhancement in the number densities of background galaxies induced from lensing magnification and use it to test the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE-) inferred masses in a sample of 19 galaxy clusters with median redshift z ≃ 0.42 selected from the South Pole Telescope SPT-SZ survey. These clusters are observed by the Megacam on the Magellan Clay Telescope though gri filters. Two background galaxy populations are selected for this study through their photometric colours; they have median redshifts zmedian ≃ 0.9 (low-z background) and zmedian ≃ 1.8 (high-z background). Stacking these populations, we detect the magnification bias effect at 3.3σ and 1.3σ for the low- and high-z backgrounds, respectively. We fit Navarro, Frenk and White models simultaneously to all observed magnification bias profiles to estimate the multiplicative factor η that describes the ratio of the weak lensing mass to the mass inferred from the SZE observable-mass relation. We further quantify systematic uncertainties in η resulting from the photometric noise and bias, the cluster galaxy contamination and the estimations of the background properties. The resulting η for the combined background populations with 1σ uncertainties is 0.83 ± 0.24(stat) ± 0.074(sys), indicating good consistency between the lensing and the SZE-inferred masses. We use our best-fitting η to predict the weak lensing shear profiles and compare these predictions with observations, showing agreement between the magnification and shear mass constraints. This work demonstrates the promise of using the magnification as a complementary method to estimate cluster masses in large surveys.

  17. Contrast-enhanced X-ray detection of breast microcalcifications in a murine model using targeted gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cole, Lisa E; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Roeder, Ryan K

    2014-07-22

    Microcalcifications are deposits of hydroxyapatite (HA) mineral within breast tissue and the most common abnormality detected by mammography when screening for breast cancer due to exhibiting greater X-ray attenuation than the surrounding tissue. However, the detection of microcalcifications is limited by the sensitivity and specificity of mammography. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate in vivo targeted delivery of bisphosphonate-functionalized gold nanoparticles (BP-Au NPs) for contrast-enhanced detection of microcalcifications using computed tomography (CT). A murine model was developed for precise, a priori control over the level of microcalcification burden by injecting varying concentrations of HA crystals in a Matrigel carrier into mammary glands. The measured X-ray attenuation of microcalcifications containing varying HA concentrations demonstrated that the model was reproducible and able to recapitulate varying levels of microcalcification burden, including levels undetectable by CT in the absence of contrast enhancement. After intramammary delivery, BP-Au NPs provided enhanced contrast for the detection of microcalcifications that were otherwise below the CT detection limit. BP-Au NPs targeted microcalcifications due to specific binding to HA crystal surfaces, resulting in contrast between the HA microcalcification site and surrounding tissue which was visibly apparent (∼30-135 HU) within 2 days after delivery. Therefore, targeted BP-Au NPs enabled improved sensitivity and specificity for the detection of microcalcifications.

  18. Contrast-Enhanced X-ray Detection of Microcalcifications in Radiographically Dense Mammary Tissue Using Targeted Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cole, Lisa E; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Roeder, Ryan K

    2015-09-22

    Breast density reduces the accuracy of mammography, motivating methods to improve sensitivity and specificity for detecting abnormalities within dense breast tissue, but preclinical animal models are lacking. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to investigate a murine model of radiographically dense mammary tissue and contrast-enhanced X-ray detection of microcalcifications in dense mammary tissue by targeted delivery of bisphosphonate-functionalized gold nanoparticles (BP-Au NPs). Mammary glands (MGs) in the mouse mammary tumor virus - polyomavirus middle T antigen (MMTV-PyMT or PyMT) model exhibited greater radiographic density with age and compared with strain- and age-matched wild-type (WT) controls at 6-10 weeks of age. The greater radiographic density of MGs in PyMT mice obscured radiographic detection of microcalcifications that were otherwise detectable in MGs of WT mice. However, BP-Au NPs provided enhanced contrast for the detection of microcalcifications in both radiographically dense (PyMT) and WT mammary tissues as measured by computed tomography after intramammary delivery. BP-Au NPs targeted microcalcifications to enhance X-ray contrast with surrounding mammary tissue, which resulted in improved sensitivity and specificity for detection in radiographically dense mammary tissues. PMID:26308767

  19. Contrast-enhanced X-ray detection of breast microcalcifications in a murine model using targeted gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cole, Lisa E; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Roeder, Ryan K

    2014-07-22

    Microcalcifications are deposits of hydroxyapatite (HA) mineral within breast tissue and the most common abnormality detected by mammography when screening for breast cancer due to exhibiting greater X-ray attenuation than the surrounding tissue. However, the detection of microcalcifications is limited by the sensitivity and specificity of mammography. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate in vivo targeted delivery of bisphosphonate-functionalized gold nanoparticles (BP-Au NPs) for contrast-enhanced detection of microcalcifications using computed tomography (CT). A murine model was developed for precise, a priori control over the level of microcalcification burden by injecting varying concentrations of HA crystals in a Matrigel carrier into mammary glands. The measured X-ray attenuation of microcalcifications containing varying HA concentrations demonstrated that the model was reproducible and able to recapitulate varying levels of microcalcification burden, including levels undetectable by CT in the absence of contrast enhancement. After intramammary delivery, BP-Au NPs provided enhanced contrast for the detection of microcalcifications that were otherwise below the CT detection limit. BP-Au NPs targeted microcalcifications due to specific binding to HA crystal surfaces, resulting in contrast between the HA microcalcification site and surrounding tissue which was visibly apparent (∼30-135 HU) within 2 days after delivery. Therefore, targeted BP-Au NPs enabled improved sensitivity and specificity for the detection of microcalcifications. PMID:24992365

  20. Delivering radiology supplies just-in-time.

    PubMed

    Clinton, M

    1999-01-01

    The radiology department at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC) adopted a just-in-time (JIT) inventory management system in 1992, reducing the volume of its in-house inventory of radiology supplies from a value of $400,000 to $16,000, just enough for four to five days of activity. An asset manager, the only person authorized to order supplies, was given responsibility for maintaining the department's supply of fixed and consumable assets. The first step in implementing the new system was to identify the supplies needed, standardize them and determine how often deliveries would be made. The JIT implementation team developed a request for proposal (RFP) that incorporated the standardized list of supplies. Three radiology supply vendors were invited to respond to the RFP. The team later determined that only one vendor was capable of implementing the JIT program. A three-year contract was awarded to that vendor. As that three-year contract reached completion, DHMC offered the JIT program to its eight affiliate hospitals and four outpatient clinics. The team decided to re-bid the contract for the entire network, which collectively performed 700,000 radiology exams annually. The new RFP encompassed 90 percent of the network's consumable supplies and offered customized delivery for each facility. The team identified eight criteria necessary for the evaluation of each vendor response to the RFP, rather than use price as the only consideration. The company that won the three-year contract furnished 90 percent of the radiology supplies for the DHMC network, allowing even further savings by the network, particularly for the smaller facilities and clinics. The program is continually monitored, adjusted and enhanced in order to incorporate changing departmental needs. PMID:10539360