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Sample records for enhanced radiological detection

  1. Verification of Minimum Detectable Activity for Radiological Threat Source Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Hannah; Myjak, Mitchell; Baciak, James; Detwiler, Rebecca; Seifert, Carolyn

    2015-10-01

    The Department of Homeland Security's Domestic Nuclear Detection Office is working to develop advanced technologies that will improve the ability to detect, localize, and identify radiological and nuclear sources from airborne platforms. The Airborne Radiological Enhanced-sensor System (ARES) program is developing advanced data fusion algorithms for analyzing data from a helicopter-mounted radiation detector. This detector platform provides a rapid, wide-area assessment of radiological conditions at ground level. The NSCRAD (Nuisance-rejection Spectral Comparison Ratios for Anomaly Detection) algorithm was developed to distinguish low-count sources of interest from benign naturally occurring radiation and irrelevant nuisance sources. It uses a number of broad, overlapping regions of interest to statistically compare each newly measured spectrum with the current estimate for the background to identify anomalies. We recently developed a method to estimate the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of NSCRAD in real time. We present this method here and report on the MDA verification using both laboratory measurements and simulated injects on measured backgrounds at or near the detection limits. This work is supported by the US Department of Homeland Security, Domestic Nuclear Detection Office, under competitively awarded contract/IAA HSHQDC-12-X-00376. This support does not constitute an express or implied endorsement on the part of the Gov't.

  2. Current Trends in Gamma Ray Detection for Radiological Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, S., Guss, P., Maurer, R.

    2011-08-18

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies.

  3. Imaging Guidelines for Enhancing Justifications for Radiologic Studies.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Baek, Jung Hwan; Jung, Seung Eun; Do, Kyung Hyun; Yong, Hwan Seok; Kim, Min-Jeong; Choi, Miyoung; Lee, Min; Choi, Sol Ji; Jo, Ae Jeong; Choi, Jin A

    2016-02-01

    Justification in the field of radiology refers to the appropriate use of radiologic imaging modalities, and may be achieved by establishing clinical imaging guidelines (CIGs). Recently, CIGs have been shown to be useful in selecting the proper medical imaging modality, resulting in the reduction of inappropriate radiologic examinations, thereby enhancing justifications. However, the development of CIGs is both time-consuming and difficult as the methodology of evidence-based medicine should be adhered to. Thus, although the radiologic societies in developed countries such as the United Kingdom and USA are already developing and implementing CIGs in their clinical practices, CIGs are not yet readily available in many other countries owing to differences in medical circumstances and resources. In this review, we assess the role and limitations of CIGs by examining the current status of CIGs in developed countries, and also describe the specific efforts made to establish CIGs in Korea.

  4. Imaging Guidelines for Enhancing Justifications for Radiologic Studies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Justification in the field of radiology refers to the appropriate use of radiologic imaging modalities, and may be achieved by establishing clinical imaging guidelines (CIGs). Recently, CIGs have been shown to be useful in selecting the proper medical imaging modality, resulting in the reduction of inappropriate radiologic examinations, thereby enhancing justifications. However, the development of CIGs is both time-consuming and difficult as the methodology of evidence-based medicine should be adhered to. Thus, although the radiologic societies in developed countries such as the United Kingdom and USA are already developing and implementing CIGs in their clinical practices, CIGs are not yet readily available in many other countries owing to differences in medical circumstances and resources. In this review, we assess the role and limitations of CIGs by examining the current status of CIGs in developed countries, and also describe the specific efforts made to establish CIGs in Korea. PMID:26908986

  5. Radiology utilizing a gas multiwire detector with resolution enhancement

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Majewski, Lucasz A.

    1999-09-28

    This invention relates to a process and apparatus for obtaining filmless, radiological, digital images utilizing a gas multiwire detector. Resolution is enhanced through projection geometry. This invention further relates to imaging systems for X-ray examination of patients or objects, and is particularly suited for mammography.

  6. 78 FR 26795 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for the National Radiological and Nuclear Detection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... SECURITY Announcement of Requirements and Registration for the National Radiological and Nuclear Detection Challenge AGENCY: Domestic Nuclear Detection Office, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: DNDO announces the National Radiological and Nuclear Detection (Rad/Nuc) Challenge, a participation challenge being...

  7. Current Trends in Gamma Radiation Detection for Radiological Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, S., Guss, P., Maurer, R.

    2011-09-01

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies. In recent years, since the establishment of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office by the Department of Homeland Security, a tremendous amount of progress has been made in detection materials (scintillators, semiconductors), imaging techniques (Compton imaging, use of active masking and hybrid imaging), data acquisition systems with digital signal processing, field programmable gate arrays and embedded isotopic analysis software (viz. gamma detector response and analysis software [GADRAS]1), fast template matching, and data fusion (merging radiological data with geo-referenced maps, digital imagery to provide better situational awareness). In this stride to progress, a significant amount of interdisciplinary research and development has taken place–techniques and spin-offs from medical science (such as x-ray radiography and tomography), materials engineering (systematic planned studies on scintillators to optimize several qualities of a good scintillator, nanoparticle applications, quantum dots, and photonic crystals, just to name a few). No trend analysis of radiation detection systems would be complete without mentioning the unprecedented strategic position taken by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime transportation–the so-called second line of defense.

  8. Current trends in gamma radiation detection for radiological emergency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Guss, Paul; Maurer, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies. In recent years, since the establishment of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office by the Department of Homeland Security, a tremendous amount of progress has been made in detection materials (scintillators, semiconductors), imaging techniques (Compton imaging, use of active masking and hybrid imaging), data acquisition systems with digital signal processing, field programmable gate arrays and embedded isotopic analysis software (viz. gamma detector response and analysis software [GADRAS]1), fast template matching, and data fusion (merging radiological data with geo-referenced maps, digital imagery to provide better situational awareness). In this stride to progress, a significant amount of inter-disciplinary research and development has taken place-techniques and spin-offs from medical science (such as x-ray radiography and tomography), materials engineering (systematic planned studies on scintillators to optimize several qualities of a good scintillator, nanoparticle applications, quantum dots, and photonic crystals, just to name a few). No trend analysis of radiation detection systems would be complete without mentioning the unprecedented strategic position taken by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime transportation-the so-called second line of defense.

  9. Employing the radiological and nuclear risk assessment methods (RNRAM) for assessing radiological and nuclear detection architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Brigantic, Robert T.; Eddy, Ryan R.

    2014-03-20

    The United States Department of Homeland Security’s Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) is charged with implementing domestic nuclear detection efforts to protect the U.S. from radiological and nuclear threats. DNDO is also responsible for coordinating the development of the Global Nuclear Detection Architecture (GNDA). DNDO utilizes a unique risk analysis tool to conduct a holistic risk assessment of the GNDA known as the Radiological and Nuclear Risk Assessment Methods (RNRAM). The capabilities of this tool will be used to support internal DNDO analyses and has also been used for other entities such as the International Atomic Energy Agency. The model uses a probabilistic risk assessment methodology and includes the ability to conduct a risk assessment of the effectiveness of layered architectures in the GNDA against an attack by an intelligent, adaptive adversary. This paper overviews the basic structure, capabilities, and use of RNRAM as used to assess different architectures and how various risk components are calculated through a series of interconnected modules. Also highlighted is flexible structure of RNRAM which can accommodate new modules in order to examine a variety of threat detection architectures and concepts.

  10. Development of automated detection of radiology reports citing adrenal findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zopf, Jason; Langer, Jessica; Boonn, William; Kim, Woojin; Zafar, Hanna

    2011-03-01

    Indeterminate incidental findings pose a challenge to both the radiologist and the ordering physician as their imaging appearance is potentially harmful but their clinical significance and optimal management is unknown. We seek to determine if it is possible to automate detection of adrenal nodules, an indeterminate incidental finding, on imaging examinations at our institution. Using PRESTO (Pathology-Radiology Enterprise Search tool), a newly developed search engine at our institution that mines dictated radiology reports, we searched for phrases used by attendings to describe incidental adrenal findings. Using these phrases as a guide, we designed a query that can be used with the PRESTO index. The results were refined using a modified version of NegEx to eliminate query terms that have been negated within the report text. In order to validate these findings we used an online random date generator to select two random weeks. We queried our RIS database for all reports created on those dates and manually reviewed each report to check for adrenal incidental findings. This survey produced a ground- truth dataset of reports citing adrenal incidental findings against which to compare query performance. We further reviewed the false positives and negatives identified by our validation study, in an attempt to improve the performance query. This algorithm is an important step towards automating the detection of incidental adrenal nodules on cross sectional imaging at our institution. Subsequently, this query can be combined with electronic medical record data searches to determine the clinical significance of these findings through resultant follow-up.

  11. Detectability of radiological images: the influence of anatomical noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochud, Francois O.; Verdun, Francis R.; Hessler, Christian; Valley, Jean-Francois

    1995-04-01

    Radiological image quality can be objectively quantified by the statistical decision theory. This theory is commonly applied with the noise of the imaging system alone (quantum, screen and film noises) whereas the actual noise present on the image is the 'anatomical noise' (sum of the system noise and the anatomical texture). This anatomical texture should play a role in the detection task. This paper compares these two kinds of noises by performing 2AFC experiments and computing the area under the ROC-curve. It is shown that the 'anatomical noise' cannot be considered as a noise in the sense of Wiener spectrum approach and that the detectability performance is the same as the one obtained with the system noise alone in the case of a small object to be detected. Furthermore, the statistical decision theory and the non- prewhitening observer does not match the experimental results. This is especially the case in the low contrast values for which the theory predicts an increase of the detectability as soon as the contrast is different from zero whereas the experimental result demonstrates an offset of the contrast value below which the detectability is purely random. The theory therefore needs to be improved in order to take this result into account.

  12. Paint for detection of radiological or chemical agents

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Brunk, James L.; Day, Sumner Daniel

    2010-08-24

    A paint that warns of radiological or chemical substances comprising a paint operatively connected to the surface, an indicator material carried by the paint that provides an indication of the radiological or chemical substances, and a thermo-activation material carried by the paint. In one embodiment, a method of warning of radiological or chemical substances comprising the steps of painting a surface with an indicator material, and monitoring the surface for indications of the radiological or chemical substances. In another embodiment, a paint is operatively connected to a vehicle and an indicator material is carried by the paint that provides an indication of the radiological or chemical substances.

  13. Enhancing research in academic radiology departments: recommendations of the 2003 Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Alderson, Philip O; Bresolin, Linda B; Becker, Gary J; Thrall, James H; Dunnick, N Reed; Hillman, Bruce J; Lee, Joseph K T; Nagy, Edward C

    2004-08-01

    Opportunities for funded radiologic research are greater than ever, and the amount of federal funding coming to academic radiology departments is increasing. Even so, many medical school-based radiology departments have little or no research funding. Accordingly, a consensus panel was convened to discuss ways to enhance research productivity and broaden the base of research strength in as many academic radiology departments as possible. The consensus panel included radiologists who have leadership roles in some of the best-funded research departments, radiologists who direct other funded research programs, and radiologists with related expertise. The goals of the consensus panel were to identify the attributes associated with successful research programs and to develop an action plan for radiology research based on these characteristics.

  14. Computerized detection of lung nodules by CT for radiologic technologists in preliminary screening.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yongbum; Tsai, Du-Yih; Hokari, Hiroshi; Minagawa, Yasuko; Tsurumaki, Masaki; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2012-07-01

    In Japan, radiologists and radiologic technologists are endeavoring to improve the quality of lung CT screening. In particular, preliminary screening by radiologic technologists is expected to decrease radiologists' burden and improve the accuracy of CT screening. We considered that an application of computer-aided detection (CAD) would also be as useful in preliminary screening as in the radiologist's regular reading. Our purpose in this study was to investigate the potential of the application of CAD to preliminary screening. CAD software that we developed was applied to 17 lung CT scans that radiologic technologists had pre-interpreted. A radiologist recognized 29 lung nodules from the CT images, whereas radiologic technologists did not recognize 11 of the 29 nodules at their pre-reading. Our CAD software detected lung nodules at an accuracy of 100% (29/29), with 4.1 false positives per case. The 11 nodules that radiologic technologists did not recognize were included in the CAD-detected nodules. This result suggests that the application of CAD may aid radiologic technologists in their preliminary screening.

  15. Use of a dual-labelled oligonucleotide as a DNA dosemeter for radiological exposure detection.

    PubMed

    Wood, T; Lewis, B J; McDermott, K; Bennett, L G I; Avarmaa, K; Corcoran, E C; Wilkinson, D; Jones, A; Jones, T; Kennedy, E; Prud'homme-Lalonde, L; Boudreau, D; Gravel, J-F; Drolet, C; Kerr, A; Schreiner, L J; Pierre, J R M; Blagoeva, R; Veres, T

    2012-01-01

    A reporter molecule consisting of a synthetic oligonucleotide is being characterised for a novel damage detection scenario for its potential use as a field-deployable, personal deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) dosemeter for radiation detection. This dosemeter is devoid of any biological properties other than being naked DNA and therefore has no DNA repair capabilities. It supports biodosimetry techniques, which require lengthy analysis of cells from irradiated individuals, and improves upon inorganic dosimetry, thereby providing for a more relevant means of measuring the accumulated dose from a potentially mixed-radiation field. Radiation-induced single strand breaks (SSBs) within the DNA result in a quantifiable fluorescent signal. Proof of concept has been achieved over 250 mGy-10 Gy dose range in radiation fields from ⁶⁰Co, with similar results seen using a linear accelerator X-ray source. Further refinements to both the molecule and the exposure/detection platform are expected to lead to enhanced levels of detection for mixed-field radiological events.

  16. P4 radiology of hepatobiliary diseases with gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI as a biomarker.

    PubMed

    Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed; Qayyum, Aliya; Bastati, Nina; Fakhrai, Negar; Herold, Christian J; Caseiro Alves, Filipe

    2014-02-01

    A recent paradigm shift in radiology has focused on the globalization of so-called P4 radiology. P4 radiology represents delivery of imaging results that are predictive, personalized, pre-emptive and participatory. The combination of the P4 approach and biomarkers is particularly pertinent to MRI, especially with technological advances such as diffusion-weighted imaging. The development of new liver-specific MRI contrast media, particularly gadoxetic acid, demonstrate specific pharmacokinetic properties, which provide combined morphologic and functional information in the same setting. The evaluation of hepatobiliary pathology beyond morphology gives rise to the possibilty of using gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI as an imaging biomarker of hepatobiliary diseases. The integration of functional imaging with an understanding of complex disease mechanisms forms the basis for P4 radiology, which may ultimately lead to individualized, cost-effective, targeted therapy for patients. This will enable radiologists to determine the prognosis of the disease and estimate early response to treatment, with the participation of all the required medical disciplines.

  17. Chest radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, J.H.M.

    1982-01-01

    This review of chest radiology reexamines normal findings on plain chest radiographs, and presents a new plain film view for detecting metastases in the lungs, and describes new findings on acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Various chest radiologic procedures are examined. (KRM)

  18. Temporal predictability enhances auditory detection

    PubMed Central

    Lawrance, Emma L. A.; Harper, Nicol S.; Cooke, James E.; Schnupp, Jan W. H.

    2015-01-01

    Periodic stimuli are common in natural environments and are ecologically relevant, for example, footsteps and vocalizations. This study reports a detectability enhancement for temporally cued, periodic sequences. Target noise bursts (embedded in background noise) arriving at the time points which followed on from an introductory, periodic “cue” sequence were more easily detected (by ~1.5 dB SNR) than identical noise bursts which randomly deviated from the cued temporal pattern. Temporal predictability and corresponding neuronal “entrainment” have been widely theorized to underlie important processes in auditory scene analysis and to confer perceptual advantage. This is the first study in the auditory domain to clearly demonstrate a perceptual enhancement of temporally predictable, near-threshold stimuli. PMID:24907846

  19. Temporal predictability enhances auditory detection.

    PubMed

    Lawrance, Emma L A; Harper, Nicol S; Cooke, James E; Schnupp, Jan W H

    2014-06-01

    Periodic stimuli are common in natural environments and are ecologically relevant, for example, footsteps and vocalizations. This study reports a detectability enhancement for temporally cued, periodic sequences. Target noise bursts (embedded in background noise) arriving at the time points which followed on from an introductory, periodic "cue" sequence were more easily detected (by ∼1.5 dB SNR) than identical noise bursts which randomly deviated from the cued temporal pattern. Temporal predictability and corresponding neuronal "entrainment" have been widely theorized to underlie important processes in auditory scene analysis and to confer perceptual advantage. This is the first study in the auditory domain to clearly demonstrate a perceptual enhancement of temporally predictable, near-threshold stimuli.

  20. Method and apparatus for enhanced detection of toxic agents

    DOEpatents

    Greenbaum, Elias; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Wu, Jie Jayne; Qi, Hairong

    2013-10-01

    A biosensor based detection of toxins includes enhancing a fluorescence signal by concentrating a plurality of photosynthetic organisms in a fluid into a concentrated region using biased AC electro-osmosis. A measured photosynthetic activity of the photosynthetic organisms is obtained in the concentrated region, where chemical, biological or radiological agents reduce a nominal photosynthetic activity of the photosynthetic organisms. A presence of the chemical, biological and/or radiological agents or precursors thereof, is determined in the fluid based on the measured photosynthetic activity of the concentrated plurality of photosynthetic organisms. A lab-on-a-chip system is used for the concentrating step. The presence of agents is determined from feature vectors, obtained from processing a time dependent signal using amplitude statistics and/or time-frequency analysis, relative to a control signal. A linear discriminant method including support vector machine classification (SVM) is used to identify the agents.

  1. Response of the REWARD detection system to the presence of a Radiological Dispersal Device

    SciTech Connect

    Luis, R.; Baptista, M.; Barros, S.; Marques, J.; Vaz, P.; Balbuena, J.; Disch, C.; Fleta, C.; Jumilla, C.; Lozano, M.

    2015-07-01

    In recent years an increased international concern has emerged about the radiological and nuclear (RN) threats associated with the illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials that could be potentially used for terrorist attacks. The objective of the REWARD (Real Time Wide Area Radiation Surveillance System) project, co-funded by the European Union 7. Framework Programme Security, consisted in building a mobile system for real time, wide area radiation surveillance, using a CdZnTe detector for gamma radiation and a neutron detector based on novel silicon technologies. The sensing unit includes a GPS system and a wireless communication interface to send the data remotely to a monitoring base station, where it will be analyzed in real time and correlated with historical data from the tag location, in order to generate an alarm when an abnormal situation is detected. Due to its portability and accuracy, the system will be extremely useful in many different scenarios such as nuclear terrorism, lost radioactive sources, radioactive contamination or nuclear accidents. This paper shortly introduces the REWARD detection system, depicts some terrorist threat scenarios involving radioactive sources and special nuclear materials and summarizes the simulation work undertaken during the past three years in the framework of the REWARD project. The main objective consisted in making predictions regarding the behavior of the REWARD system in the presence of a Radiological Dispersion Device (RDD), one of the reference scenarios foreseen for REWARD, using the Monte Carlo simulation program MCNP6. The reference scenario is characterized in detail, from the i) radiological protection, ii) radiation detection requirements and iii) communications points of view. Experimental tests were performed at the Fire Brigades Facilities in Rome and at the Naples Fire Brigades, and the results, which validate the simulation work, are presented and analyzed. The response of the REWARD

  2. Detection with Enhanced Energy Windowing Phase I Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, David A.; Enders, Alexander L.

    2016-12-01

    This document reviews the progress of Phase I of the Detection with Enhanced Energy Windowing (DEEW) project. The DEEW project is the implementation of software incorporating an algorithm which reviews data generated by radiation portal monitors and utilizes advanced and novel techniques for detecting radiological and fissile material while not alarming on Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material. Independent testing indicated that the Enhanced Energy Windowing algorithm showed promise at reducing the probability of alarm in the stream of commerce compared to existing algorithms and other developmental algorithms, while still maintaining adequate sensitivity to threats. This document contains a brief description of the project, instructions for setting up and running the applications, and guidance to help make reviewing the output files and source code easier.

  3. Enhanced multifunctional paint for detection of radiation

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Moses, Edward Ira; Rubenchik, Alexander M.

    2017-03-07

    An enhanced multifunctional paint apparatus, systems, and methods for detecting radiation on a surface include providing scintillation particles; providing an enhance neutron absorptive material; providing a binder; combining the scintillation particles, the enhance neutron absorptive material, and the binder creating a multifunctional paint; applying the multifunctional paint to the surface; and monitoring the surface for detecting radiation.

  4. Paint for detection of corrosion and warning of chemical and radiological attack

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.

    2010-08-24

    A system for warning of corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances. The system comprises painting a surface with a paint or coating that includes an indicator material and monitoring the surface for indications of the corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances.

  5. Method for warning of radiological and chemical substances using detection paints on a vehicle surface

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C [Tracy, CA

    2012-03-13

    A system for warning of corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances. The system comprises painting a surface with a paint or coating that includes an indicator material and monitoring the surface for indications of the corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances.

  6. Surface with two paint strips for detection and warning of chemical warfare and radiological agents

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.

    2013-04-02

    A system for warning of corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances. The system comprises painting a surface with a paint or coating that includes an indicator material and monitoring the surface for indications of the corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances.

  7. Aerial vehicle with paint for detection of radiological and chemical warfare agents

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Brunk, James L.; Day, S. Daniel

    2013-04-02

    A paint that warns of radiological or chemical substances comprising a paint operatively connected to the surface, an indicator material carried by the paint that provides an indication of the radiological or chemical substances, and a thermo-activation material carried by the paint. In one embodiment, a method of warning of radiological or chemical substances comprising the steps of painting a surface with an indicator material, and monitoring the surface for indications of the radiological or chemical substances. In another embodiment, a paint is operatively connected to a vehicle and an indicator material is carried by the paint that provides an indication of the radiological or chemical substances.

  8. Method for warning of radiological and chemical agents using detection paints on a vehicle surface

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C [Tracy, CA; Brunk, James L [Martinez, CA; Day, S Daniel [Danville, CA

    2012-03-27

    A paint that warns of radiological or chemical substances comprising a paint operatively connected to the surface, an indicator material carried by the paint that provides an indication of the radiological or chemical substances, and a thermo-activation material carried by the paint. In one embodiment, a method of warning of radiological or chemical substances comprising the steps of painting a surface with an indicator material, and monitoring the surface for indications of the radiological or chemical substances. In another embodiment, a paint is operatively connected to a vehicle and an indicator material is carried by the paint that provides an indication of the radiological or chemical substances.

  9. Network of wireless gamma ray sensors for radiological detection and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzilov, A.; Womble, P.; Novikov, I.; Paschal, J.; Board, J.; Moss, K.

    2007-04-01

    The paper describes the design and development of a network of wireless gamma-ray sensors based on cell phone or WiFi technology. The system is intended for gamma-ray detection and automatic identification of radioactive isotopes and nuclear materials. The sensor is a gamma-ray spectrometer that uses wireless technology to distribute the results. A small-size sensor module contains a scintillation detector along with a small size data acquisition system, PDA, battery, and WiFi radio or a cell phone modem. The PDA with data acquisition and analysis software analyzes the accumulated spectrum on real-time basis and returns results to the screen reporting the isotopic composition and intensity of detected radiation source. The system has been programmed to mitigate false alarms from medical isotopes and naturally occurring radioactive materials. The decision-making software can be "trained" to indicate specific signatures of radiation sources like special nuclear materials. The sensor is supplied with GPS tracker coupling radiological information with geographical coordinates. The sensor is designed for easy use and rapid deployment in common wireless networks.

  10. Deconstructing multisensory enhancement in detection

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Bellido, Alexis; Pereda-Baños, Alexandre; López-Moliner, Joan; Deco, Gustavo; Soto-Faraco, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the integration of sensory information from different modalities have become a topic of intense interest in psychophysics and neuroscience. Many authors now claim that early, sensory-based cross-modal convergence improves performance in detection tasks. An important strand of supporting evidence for this claim is based on statistical models such as the Pythagorean model or the probabilistic summation model. These models establish statistical benchmarks representing the best predicted performance under the assumption that there are no interactions between the two sensory paths. Following this logic, when observed detection performances surpass the predictions of these models, it is often inferred that such improvement indicates cross-modal convergence. We present a theoretical analyses scrutinizing some of these models and the statistical criteria most frequently used to infer early cross-modal interactions during detection tasks. Our current analysis shows how some common misinterpretations of these models lead to their inadequate use and, in turn, to contradictory results and misleading conclusions. To further illustrate the latter point, we introduce a model that accounts for detection performances in multimodal detection tasks but for which surpassing of the Pythagorean or probabilistic summation benchmark can be explained without resorting to early cross-modal interactions. Finally, we report three experiments that put our theoretical interpretation to the test and further propose how to adequately measure multimodal interactions in audiotactile detection tasks. PMID:25520431

  11. Trainee report dashboard: tool for enhancing feedback to radiology trainees about their reports.

    PubMed

    Gorniak, Richard J T; Flanders, Adam E; Sharpe, Richard E

    2013-01-01

    During their radiology residency, trainees must learn multiple facets of radiology practice, including the writing of radiology reports. An important factor in the trainee's development of reporting skills is feedback from the attending radiologist on the trainee's preliminary reports. The quality and quantity of feedback may vary and are not typically documented. As radiology department workloads have increased and stricter limitations have been imposed on trainee work hours, less time is available for attending radiologists and trainees to perform a joint retrospective review of radiology reports. To compensate, the authors have developed a Web-based dashboard that provides trainees with case-specific feedback about their reports. Components include an attending radiologist-trainee report discrepancy logging and communication system that is integrated with the institutional picture archiving and communication system, an automated preliminary report-final report comparator, modules showing statistics related to the discrepancy logger and report comparator components, and a Web page that unifies these components with image and report display capabilities. Both the actual report feedback and the trainee's use of the system are documented, and the resultant data may be used for evaluating trainee competence in written communication, as mandated by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. With these tools, trainees can obtain near-real-time feedback, which may pinpoint issues that can be corrected to improve the quality of their radiology reporting. This system, although it does not supplant face-to-face training sessions with attending radiologists, can augment traditional methods of learning.

  12. Trainee Report Dashboard: Tool for Enhancing Feedback to Radiology Trainees about Their Reports.

    PubMed

    Gorniak, Richard J T; Flanders, Adam E; Sharpe, Richard E

    2013-08-26

    During their radiology residency, trainees must learn multiple facets of radiology practice, including the writing of radiology reports. An important factor in the trainee's development of reporting skills is feedback from the attending radiologist on the trainee's preliminary reports. The quality and quantity of feedback may vary and are not typically documented. As radiology department workloads have increased and stricter limitations have been imposed on trainee work hours, less time is available for attending radiologists and trainees to perform a joint retrospective review of radiology reports. To compensate, the authors have developed a Web-based dashboard that provides trainees with case-specific feedback about their reports. Components include an attending radiologist-trainee report discrepancy logging and communication system that is integrated with the institutional picture archiving and communication system, an automated preliminary report-final report comparator, modules showing statistics related to the discrepancy logger and report comparator components, and a Web page that unifies these components with image and report display capabilities. Both the actual report feedback and the trainee's use of the system are documented, and the resultant data may be used for evaluating trainee competence in written communication, as mandated by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. With these tools, trainees can obtain near-real-time feedback, which may pinpoint issues that can be corrected to improve the quality of their radiology reporting. This system, although it does not supplant face-to-face training sessions with attending radiologists, can augment traditional methods of learning. © RSNA, 2013.

  13. Resolution enhanced sound detecting apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, J. M. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus is described for enhancing the resolution of a sound detector of the type which includes an acoustic mirror for focusing sound from an object onto a microphone to enable the determination of the location from which the sound arises. The enhancement apparatus includes an enclosure which surrounds the space between the mirror and microphone, and contains a gas heavier than air, such as Freon, through which sound moves slower and therefore with a shorter wavelength than in air, so that a mirror of given size has greater resolving power. An acoustically transparent front wall of the enclosure which lies forward of the mirror, can include a pair of thin sheets with pressured air between them, to form an end of the region of heavy gas into a concave shape.

  14. Acoustic enhancement for photo detecting devices

    SciTech Connect

    Thundat, Thomas G; Senesac, Lawrence R; Van Neste, Charles W

    2013-02-19

    Provided are improvements to photo detecting devices and methods for enhancing the sensitivity of photo detecting devices. A photo detecting device generates an electronic signal in response to a received light pulse. An electro-mechanical acoustic resonator, electrically coupled to the photo detecting device, damps the electronic signal and increases the signal noise ratio (SNR) of the electronic signal. Increased photo detector standoff distances and sensitivities will result.

  15. Resolution-enhanced entanglement detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessner, Manuel; Pezzè, Luca; Smerzi, Augusto

    2017-03-01

    We formulate a general family of entanglement criteria for multipartite states on arbitrary Hilbert spaces. Fisher information criteria compare the sensitivity to unitary rotations with the variances of suitable local observables. Generalized squeezing-type criteria provide lower bounds that are less stringent but require only measurements of second moments. The enhancement due to local access to the individual subsystems is studied in detail for the case of N spin-1 /2 particles. The discussed techniques can be readily implemented in current experiments with trapped ions in Paul traps and neutral atoms in optical lattices.

  16. Prospects for improved detection of chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear threats

    SciTech Connect

    Wuest, Craig R.; Hart, Brad; Slezak, Thomas R.

    2012-07-31

    Acquisition and use of Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) weapons continue to be a major focus of concern form the security apparatus of nation states because of their potential for mass casualties when used by a determined adversary.

  17. Human fine body hair enhances ectoparasite detection.

    PubMed

    Dean, Isabelle; Siva-Jothy, Michael T

    2012-06-23

    Although we are relatively naked in comparison with other primates, the human body is covered in a layer of fine hair (vellus and terminal hair) at a relatively high follicular density. There are relatively few explanations for the evolutionary maintenance of this type of human hair. Here, we experimentally test the hypothesis that human fine body hair plays a defensive function against ectoparasites (bed bugs). Our results show that fine body hair enhances the detection of ectoparasites through the combined effects of (i) increasing the parasite's search time and (ii) enhancing its detection.

  18. Detectivity enhancement in THz electrooptical sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Saima; Savolainen, Janne; Hamm, Peter

    2014-01-15

    We demonstrate and discuss a simple scheme that significantly enhances the detectivity of THz electro-optical sampling by introducing a sequence of Brewster windows that increases the ellipticity of the probe beam. By varying the window material or the number of Brewster windows, the enhancement factor can be adjusted; we demonstrate an enhancement factor of ≈20 with four ZnSe Brewster windows. The scheme is particularly useful when very small THz fields are to be measured in connection with low-repetition rate amplified Ti:S laser systems.

  19. The Importance of Building and Enhancing Worldwide Industry Cooperation in the Areas of Radiological Protection, Waste Management and Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Saint-Pierre, S.

    2006-07-01

    The slow or stagnant rate of nuclear power generation development in many developed countries over the last two decades has resulted in a significant shortage in the population of mid-career nuclear industry professionals. This shortage is even more pronounced in some specific areas of expertise such as radiological protection, waste management and decommissioning. This situation has occurred at a time when the renaissance of nuclear power and the globalization of the nuclear industry are steadily gaining momentum and when the industry's involvement in international and national debates in these three fields of expertise (and the industry's impact on these debates) is of vital importance. This paper presents the World Nuclear Association (WNA) approach to building and enhancing worldwide industry cooperation in radiological protection, waste management and decommissioning, which is manifested through the activities of the two WNA working groups on radiological protection (RPWG) and on waste management and decommissioning (WM and DWG). This paper also briefly describes the WNA's participatory role, as of summer 2005, in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standard development committees on radiation safety (RASSC), waste safety (WASSC) and nuclear safety (NUSSC). This participation provides the worldwide nuclear industry with an opportunity to be part of IAEA's discussions on shaping changes to the control regime of IAEA safety standards. The review (and the prospect of a revision) of IAEA safety standards, which began in October 2005, makes this WNA participation and the industry ' s involvement at the national level timely and important. All of this excellent industry cooperation and team effort is done through 'collegial' exchanges between key industry experts, which help tackle important issues more effectively. The WNA is continuously looking to enhance its worldwide industry representation in these fields of expertise through the RPWG and WM and DWG

  20. Expanding the clinical, radiological and neuropathological phenotype of chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS).

    PubMed

    Simon, Neil G; Parratt, John D; Barnett, Michael H; Buckland, Michael E; Gupta, Ruta; Hayes, Michael W; Masters, Lynette T; Reddel, Stephen W

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) is a recently described inflammatory disease of the CNS with a predilection for the hindbrain and responsive to immunotherapy. Five further cases are described with detailed pathology and long term evaluation. CLIPPERS does not represent a benign condition, and without chronic immunosuppression the disease may relapse. The radiological distribution is focused not only in the pons but also in the brachium ponti and cerebellum. Pontocerebellar atrophy occurred early, even in cases treated promptly. Significant cognitive impairment was seen in some cases and was associated with additional cerebral atrophy. The pathology included distinctive histiocytic as well as lymphocytic components and evidence of neuro-axonal injury. Additional subclinical systemic findings on investigation were identified. Relapse was associated with withdrawal of corticosteroids, and disability was least marked in cases where both the presentation and relapses were treated promptly. We propose that the title of the syndrome be amended to chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontocerebellar perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids to more accurately reflect the distribution of the radiological findings.

  1. Using image references in radiology reports to support enhanced report-to-image navigation.

    PubMed

    Mabotuwana, Thusitha; Qian, Yuechen; Sevenster, Merlijn

    2013-01-01

    Radiology reports frequently contain references to image slices that are illustrative of described findings, for instance, "Neurofibroma in superior right extraconal space (series 5, image 104)". In the current workflow, if a report consumer wants to view a referenced image, he or she needs to (1) open prior study, (2) open the series of interest (series 5 in this example), and (3) navigate to the corresponding image slice (image 104). This research aims to improve this report-to-image navigation process by providing hyperlinks to images. We develop and evaluate a regular expressions-based algorithm that recognizes image references at a sentence level. Validation on 314 image references from general radiology reports shows precision of 99.35%, recall of 98.08% and F-measure of 98.71%, suggesting this is a viable approach for image reference extraction. We demonstrate how recognized image references can be hyperlinked in a PACS report viewer allowing one-click access to the images.

  2. Enhanced detection of glycoproteins in polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, G; Marshall, S; Cabrera, M; Horvat, A

    1988-05-01

    A highly sensitive and simple method to enhance detection of glycoproteins resolved by either one- or two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is described. The method is a modification of the procedure described by D. Fargeaud et al. (D. Fargeaud, J. C. Benoit, F. Kato, and G. Chappuis (1984) Arch. Virol. 80, 69-82) that uses concanavalin A conjugated with fluorescein isothyocyanate to detect the carbohydrate moiety of glycoproteins. Briefly, the electrophoresed gel is exposed to the fluorescent lectin, thoroughly washed, and sequentially transferred to 50% methanol in deionized water and to absolute methanol. The result is an abrupt dehydration of the gel which turns evenly white and stiff. At least a twofold enhancement of fluorescence is obtained as detected by exposing the treated gel to an appropriate uv source. The sensitivity of the procedure allows us to detect purified immunoglobulin molecules by their carbohydrate content in the range of 0.2 microgram of total protein. The specificity of the detection is demonstrated by a comparison with the corresponding polypeptide profile obtained by silver nitrate staining of the gel.

  3. Method and apparatus for enhanced detection of toxic agents

    DOEpatents

    Greenbaum, Elias [Knoxville, TN; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Wu, Jie Jayne [Knoxville, TN; Qi, Hairong [Knoxville, TN

    2012-06-12

    A water quality analyzer for real-time detection according to the invention comprises a biased AC electro-osmosis (ACEO) cell for receiving a fluid to be analyzed having a plurality photosynthetic organisms therein, and concentrating the plurality photosynthetic organisms into at least one concentrated region. A photodetector is provided for obtaining a measured photosynthetic activity of the plurality of photosynthetic organisms in the concentrated region, wherein chemical, biological or radiological agents reduce a nominal photosynthetic activity of the photosynthetic organisms. An electronics package analyzes the measured photosynthetic activity to indicate a presence of the chemical, biological or radiological agents in the fluid.

  4. Enhanced Propagating Surface Plasmon Signal Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Y.; Joly, Alan G.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2016-12-21

    Overcoming the dissipative nature of propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) is pre-requisite to realizing functional plasmonic circuitry, in which large bandwidth signals can be manipulated over length scales far-below the diffraction limit of light. To this end, we report on a novel PSP enhanced signal detection technique achieved in an all-metallic substrate. We take advantage of two strategically spatio-temporally separated phase-locked femtosecond laser pulses, incident onto lithographically patterned PSP coupling structures. We follow PSP propagation with joint femtosecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolution in a time-resolved non-linear photoemission electron microscopy scheme. Initially, a PSP signal wave packet is launched from a hole etched into the silver surface from where it propagates through an open trench structure and is decoded through the use of a timed probe pulse. FDTD calculations demonstrate that PSP signal waves may traverse open trenches in excess of 10 microns in diameter, thereby allowing remote detection even through vacuum regions. This arrangement results in a 10X enhancement in photoemission relative to readout from the bare metal surface. The enhancement is attributed to an all-optical homodyne detection technique that mixes signal and reference PSP waves in a non-linear scheme. Larger readout trenches achieve higher readout levels, however reduced transmission through the trench limits the trench size to 6 microns for maximum readout levels. However, the use of an array of trenches increases the maximum enhancement to near 30X. The attainable enhancement factor may be harnessed to achieve extended coherent PSP propagation in ultrafast plasmonic circuitry.

  5. Homodyne detection for the enhancement of antibunching

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, R.; Wang, C.; Singh, S.

    1996-09-01

    We propose a scheme based on homodyne detection for enhancing antibunching in second-harmonic generation and multiatom optical bistability. We show that depending on the reflectivity of the beam splitter, relative field strengths, and relative phase it is possible to achieve perfect antibunching in the superposed field. We also discuss other nonclassical effects exhibited by the superposed field and present curves to illustrate the behavior. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  6. Enhanced photoacoustic detection using photonic crystal substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yunfei; Liu, Kaiyang; McClelland, John; Lu, Meng

    2014-04-21

    This paper demonstrates the enhanced photoacoustic sensing of surface-bound light absorbing molecules and metal nanoparticles using a one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) substrate. The PC structure functions as an optical resonator at the wavelength where the analyte absorption is strong. The optical resonance of the PC sensor provides an intensified evanescent field with respect to the excitation light source and results in enhanced optical absorption by surface-immobilized samples. For the analysis of a light absorbing dye deposited on the PC surface, the intensity of photoacoustic signal was enhanced by more than 10-fold in comparison to an un-patterned acrylic substrate. The technique was also applied to detect gold nanorods and exhibited more than 40 times stronger photoacoustic signals. The demonstrated approach represents a potential path towards single molecule absorption spectroscopy with greater performance and inexpensive instrumentation.

  7. An enhanced Monte Carlo outlier detection method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangxiao; Li, Peiwu; Mao, Jin; Ma, Fei; Ding, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Qi

    2015-09-30

    Outlier detection is crucial in building a highly predictive model. In this study, we proposed an enhanced Monte Carlo outlier detection method by establishing cross-prediction models based on determinate normal samples and analyzing the distribution of prediction errors individually for dubious samples. One simulated and three real datasets were used to illustrate and validate the performance of our method, and the results indicated that this method outperformed Monte Carlo outlier detection in outlier diagnosis. After these outliers were removed, the value of validation by Kovats retention indices and the root mean square error of prediction decreased from 3.195 to 1.655, and the average cross-validation prediction error decreased from 2.0341 to 1.2780. This method helps establish a good model by eliminating outliers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Predicting error in detecting mammographic masses among radiology trainees using statistical models based on BI-RADS features

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, Lars J. Ghate, Sujata V.; Yoon, Sora C.; Kim, Connie; Kuzmiak, Cherie M.; Mazurowski, Maciej A.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) features as predictors of individual errors made by trainees when detecting masses in mammograms. Methods: Ten radiology trainees and three expert breast imagers reviewed 100 mammograms comprised of bilateral medial lateral oblique and craniocaudal views on a research workstation. The cases consisted of normal and biopsy proven benign and malignant masses. For cases with actionable abnormalities, the experts recorded breast (density and axillary lymph nodes) and mass (shape, margin, and density) features according to the BI-RADS lexicon, as well as the abnormality location (depth and clock face). For each trainee, a user-specific multivariate model was constructed to predict the trainee's likelihood of error based on BI-RADS features. The performance of the models was assessed using area under the receive operating characteristic curves (AUC). Results: Despite the variability in errors between different trainees, the individual models were able to predict the likelihood of error for the trainees with a mean AUC of 0.611 (range: 0.502–0.739, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.543–0.680,p < 0.002). Conclusions: Patterns in detection errors for mammographic masses made by radiology trainees can be modeled using BI-RADS features. These findings may have potential implications for the development of future educational materials that are personalized to individual trainees.

  9. X-ray detection by epitaxial CVD diamond for medical radiology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfredotti, C.; Garino, Y.; Visca, L.; Lo Giudice, A.

    2007-09-01

    An epitaxial diamond detector obtained by CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) has been used in order to monitor X-ray pulses from a radiological portable X-ray generator commonly used in hospitals. X-ray maximum energies varied from 50 to 120 KeV, while (electron anodic current)x(time duration) products were in the range from 20 to 100 mAs. Current pulses were recorded and from their shapes the timing and the collected charge were calculated and compared with those obtained by standard 6 cm 3 ionization chambers and by a silicon diode arrays used in quality assurance programs for radiological X-ray apparatuses. Both diamond detector and silicon array display a standard deviation in time recording of 0.3% in the time range from 0.15 up to 2.5 s. The integrated current recorded from diamond is linear with respect the dose recorded by the ionization chamber from 5 up to 125 mGy, with a standard deviation on single points of the order of 0.5%. The stability of the detector is very good even without a priming treatment generally used in order to stabilize diamond dosimeters. Homogeneity of the detector in terms of its response was tested by means of alpha particles, which indicate an energy resolution of 0.7%, quite close to that of a standard surface barrier silicon detector. These results indicate that epitaxial diamond could be considered ready to be used in standard quality control procedures concerning radiological X-ray apparatuses.

  10. Machine Learning and Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. PMID:22465077

  11. Lower limit of detection: definition and elaboration of a proposed position for radiological effluent and environmental measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, L.A.

    1984-09-01

    A manual is provided to define and illustrate a proposed use of the Lower Limit of Detection (LLD) for Radiological Effluent and Environmental Measurements. The manual contains a review of information regarding LLD practices gained from site visits; a review of the literature and a summary of basic principles underlying the concept of detection in Nuclear and Analytical Chemistry; a detailed presentation of the application of LLD principles to a range of problem categories (simple counting to multinuclide spectroscopy), including derivations, equations, and numerical examples; and a brief examination of related issues such as reference samples, numerical quality control, and instrumental limitations. An appendix contains a summary of notation and terminology, a bibliography, and worked-out examples. 100 references, 10 figures, 7 tables.

  12. After Detection: The Improved Accuracy of Lung Cancer Assessment Using Radiologic Computer-aided Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Guy J.; Lehmann, Harold P.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the improved accuracy of radiologic assessment of lung cancer afforded by computer-aided diagnosis (CADx). Materials and Methods Inclusion/exclusion criteria were formulated, and a systematic inquiry of research databases was conducted. Following title and abstract review, an in-depth review of 149 surviving articles was performed with accepted articles undergoing a Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS)-based quality review and data abstraction. Results A total of 14 articles, representing 1868 scans, passed the review. Increases in the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area under the curve of .8 or higher were seen in all nine studies that reported it, except for one that employed subspecialized radiologists. Conclusions This systematic review demonstrated improved accuracy of lung cancer assessment using CADx over manual review, in eight high-quality observer-performance studies. The improved accuracy afforded by radiologic lung-CADx suggests the need to explore its use in screening and regular clinical workflow. PMID:26616209

  13. Enhancing Web applications in radiology with Java: estimating MR imaging relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Dagher, A P; Fitzpatrick, M; Flanders, A E; Eng, J

    1998-01-01

    Java is a relatively new programming language that has been used to develop a World Wide Web-based tool for estimating magnetic resonance (MR) imaging relaxation times, thereby demonstrating how Java may be used for Web-based radiology applications beyond improving the user interface of teaching files. A standard processing algorithm coded with Java is downloaded along with the hypertext markup language (HTML) document. The user (client) selects the desired pulse sequence and inputs data obtained from a region of interest on the MR images. The algorithm is used to modify selected MR imaging parameters in an equation that models the phenomenon being evaluated. MR imaging relaxation times are estimated, and confidence intervals and a P value expressing the accuracy of the final results are calculated. Design features such as simplicity, object-oriented programming, and security restrictions allow Java to expand the capabilities of HTML by offering a more versatile user interface that includes dynamic annotations and graphics. Java also allows the client to perform more sophisticated information processing and computation than is usually associated with Web applications. Java is likely to become a standard programming option, and the development of stand-alone Java applications may become more common as Java is integrated into future versions of computer operating systems.

  14. Novel Application of FTIR Spectroscopy for the Passive Standoff Detection of Radiological Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    laboratory measurements of the diffuse reflectance from a number of radiological or related products, including UO2 , UO3, U3O8 , CoO, Co2O3, IrO2, ThO2...d’un certain nombre de produits radiologiques ou associés, tels que UO2 , UO3, U3O8 , CoO, Co2O3, IrO2, ThO2, SrO, I2O5, La2O3 et le ”yellow cake”. Les...uranium ( UO2 , UO3, U3O8 ), the oxides of cobalt (CoO and Co2O3), iridium oxide (IrO2), thorium oxide (ThO2), strontium oxide (SrO), iodine oxide

  15. Anomaly detection enhanced classification in computer intrusion detection

    SciTech Connect

    Fugate, M. L.; Gattiker, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes work with the goal of enhancing capabilities in computer intrusion detection. The work builds upon a study of classification performance, that compared various methods of classifying information derived from computer network packets into attack versus normal categories, based on a labeled training dataset. This previous work validates our classification methods, and clears the ground for studying whether and how anomaly detection can be used to enhance this performance, The DARPA project that initiated the dataset used here concluded that anomaly detection should be examined to boost the performance of machine learning in the computer intrusion detection task. This report investigates the data set for aspects that will be valuable for anomaly detection application, and supports these results with models constructed from the data. In this report, the term anomaly detection means learning a model from unlabeled data, and using this to make some inference about future data. Our data is a feature vector derived from network packets: an 'example' or 'sample'. On the other hand, classification means building a model from labeled data, and using that model to classify unlabeled (future) examples. There is some precedent in the literature for combining these methods. One approach is to stage the two techniques, using anomaly detection to segment data into two sets for classification. An interpretation of this is a method to combat nonstationarity in the data. In our previous work, we demonstrated that the data has substantial temporal nonstationarity. With classification methods that can be thought of as learning a decision surface between two statistical distributions, performance is expected to degrade significantly when classifying examples that are from regions not well represented in the training set. Anomaly detection can be seen as a problem of learning the density (landscape) or the support (boundary) of a statistical distribution so that

  16. Plasmonically enhanced thermomechanical detection of infrared radiation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Fei; Zhu, Hai; Reed, Jason C; Cubukcu, Ertugrul

    2013-04-10

    Nanoplasmonics has been an attractive area of research due to its ability to localize and manipulate freely propagating radiation on the nanometer scale for strong light-matter interactions. Meanwhile, nanomechanics has set records in the sensing of mass, force, and displacement. In this work, we report efficient coupling between infrared radiation and nanomechanical resonators through nanoantenna enhanced thermoplasmonic effects. Using efficient conversion of electromagnetic energy to mechanical energy in this plasmo-thermomechanical platform with a nanoslot plasmonic absorber integrated directly on a nanobeam mechanical resonator, we demonstrate room-temperature detection of nanowatt level power fluctuations in infrared radiation. We expect our approach, which combines nanoplasmonics with nanomechanical resonators, to lead to optically controlled nanomechanical systems enabling unprecedented functionality in biomolecular and toxic gas sensing and on-chip mass spectroscopy.

  17. Radioactivity and radiological risk associated with effluent sediment containing technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials in amang (tin tailings) processing industry.

    PubMed

    Bahari, Ismail; Mohsen, Nasirian; Abdullah, Pauzi

    2007-01-01

    The processing of amang, or tin tailings, for valuable minerals has been shown to technologically enhance NORM and this has stirred significant radiological safety and health concerns among Malaysia's regulatory authority. A growing radiological concern is now focused on the amang effluent containing NORM in recycling ponds, since these ponds may be reclaimed for future residential developments. A study was carried out to assess the radiological risk associated with amang processing and the accumulated effluent in the recycling ponds. Twenty-six sediment samples from the recycling ponds of two amang plants in the states of Selangor and Perak, Malaysia, were collected and analyzed. The maximum activity concentrations of (238)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K recorded in sediments from these ponds were higher than Malaysia's and the world's natural highest. Correspondingly, the mean radium equivalent activity concentration indices, Ra(eq), and gamma radiation representative level index, I(gammar), were higher than the world's average. The enhancement of NORM in effluent sediments as a consequence of amang processing, and the use of a closed water management recycling system created Effective Dose Rates, E (nSv h(-1)), that signal potential environmental radiological risks in these ponds, should they be reclaimed for future land use.

  18. New radiological material detection technologies for nuclear forensics: Remote optical imaging and graphene-based sensors.

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Richard Karl; Martin, Jeffrey B.; Wiemann, Dora K.; Choi, Junoh; Howell, Stephen W.

    2015-09-01

    We developed new detector technologies to identify the presence of radioactive materials for nuclear forensics applications. First, we investigated an optical radiation detection technique based on imaging nitrogen fluorescence excited by ionizing radiation. We demonstrated optical detection in air under indoor and outdoor conditions for alpha particles and gamma radiation at distances up to 75 meters. We also contributed to the development of next generation systems and concepts that could enable remote detection at distances greater than 1 km, and originated a concept that could enable daytime operation of the technique. A second area of research was the development of room-temperature graphene-based sensors for radiation detection and measurement. In this project, we observed tunable optical and charged particle detection, and developed improved devices. With further development, the advancements described in this report could enable new capabilities for nuclear forensics applications.

  19. [Forensic radiology].

    PubMed

    Stein, K M; Grünberg, K

    2009-01-01

    Forensic radiology includes both clinical and postmortem forensic radiology. Clinical forensic radiology deals with imaging of healthy people from a legal point of view, such as for determining age or to prove and document injuries in victims of crime. Postmortem forensic radiology deals with the application of modern radiological methods in order to optimise post-mortem diagnosis. X-ray examination has for decades been routinely used in postmortem diagnosis. Newer developments include the application of postmortem computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging; these are the methods with the greatest information potential but also with the greatest deviations from diagnostics in living persons. Application of radiological methods for securing evidence in criminal procedures is still in its infancy. Radiologists' technical understanding and forensic doctors' knowledge of postmortem changes in a corpse must be synergised.

  20. Imaging and radiology

    MedlinePlus

    Interventional radiology; Diagnostic radiology; X-ray imaging ... DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY Diagnostic radiology helps health care professionals see structures inside your body. Doctors that specialize in the interpretation ...

  1. Development and Testing of an Air Fluorescence Imaging System for the Detection of Radiological Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Inrig, Elizabeth; Koslowsky, Vern; Andrews, Bob; Dick, Michael; Forget, Patrick; Ing, Harry; Hugron, Roger; Wong, Larry

    2011-12-13

    Detection of radionuclides emitting short-range radiation, such as {alpha} and low-energy {beta} particles, has always presented a challenge, particularly when such radionuclides are dispersed over a wide area. In this situation, conventional detection methods require the area of interest to be surveyed using a fragile probe at very close range--a slow, error-prone, and potentially dangerous process that may take many hours for a single room. The instrument under development uses a novel approach by imaging radiation-induced fluorescence in the air surrounding a contaminated area, rather than detecting the radiation directly. A robust and portable system has been designed and built that will allow contaminated areas to be rapidly detected and delineated. The detector incorporates position-sensitive photo-multiplier tubes, UV filters, a fast electronic shutter and an aspherical phase mask that significantly increases the depth-of-field. Preliminary tests have been conducted using sealed {sup 241}Am sources of varying activities and surface areas. The details of the instrument design will be described and the results of recent testing will be presented.

  2. Tomosynthesis-detected Architectural Distortion: Management Algorithm with Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Durand, Melissa A; Wang, Steven; Hooley, Regina J; Raghu, Madhavi; Philpotts, Liane E

    2016-01-01

    As use of digital breast tomosynthesis becomes increasingly widespread, new management challenges are inevitable because tomosynthesis may reveal suspicious lesions not visible at conventional two-dimensional (2D) full-field digital mammography. Architectural distortion is a mammographic finding associated with a high positive predictive value for malignancy. It is detected more frequently at tomosynthesis than at 2D digital mammography and may even be occult at conventional 2D imaging. Few studies have focused on tomosynthesis-detected architectural distortions to date, and optimal management of these distortions has yet to be well defined. Since implementing tomosynthesis at our institution in 2011, we have learned some practical ways to assess architectural distortion. Because distortions may be subtle, tomosynthesis localization tools plus improved visualization of adjacent landmarks are crucial elements in guiding mammographic identification of elusive distortions. These same tools can guide more focused ultrasonography (US) of the breast, which facilitates detection and permits US-guided tissue sampling. Some distortions may be sonographically occult, in which case magnetic resonance imaging may be a reasonable option, both to increase diagnostic confidence and to provide a means for image-guided biopsy. As an alternative, tomosynthesis-guided biopsy, conventional stereotactic biopsy (when possible), or tomosynthesis-guided needle localization may be used to achieve tissue diagnosis. Practical uses for tomosynthesis in evaluation of architectural distortion are highlighted, potential complications are identified, and a working algorithm for management of tomosynthesis-detected architectural distortion is proposed.

  3. Radiological Impact Associated to Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (TENORM) from Coal-Fired Power Plants Emissions - 13436

    SciTech Connect

    Dinis, Maria de Lurdes; Fiuza, Antonio; Soeiro de Carvalho, Jose; Gois, Joaquim; Meira Castro, Ana Cristina

    2013-07-01

    Certain materials used and produced in a wide range of non-nuclear industries contain enhanced activity concentrations of natural radionuclides. In particular, electricity production from coal is one of the major sources of increased human exposure to naturally occurring radioactive materials. A methodology was developed to assess the radiological impact due to natural radiation background. The developed research was applied to a specific case study, the Sines coal-fired power plant, located in the southwest coastline of Portugal. Gamma radiation measurements were carried out with two different instruments: a sodium iodide scintillation detector counter (SPP2 NF, Saphymo) and a gamma ray spectrometer with energy discrimination (Falcon 5000, Canberra). Two circular survey areas were defined within 20 km of the power plant. Forty relevant measurements points were established within the sampling area: 15 urban and 25 suburban locations. Additionally, ten more measurements points were defined, mostly at the 20-km area. The registered gamma radiation varies from 20 to 98.33 counts per seconds (c.p.s.) corresponding to an external gamma exposure rate variable between 87.70 and 431.19 nGy/h. The highest values were measured at locations near the power plant and those located in an area within the 6 and 20 km from the stacks. In situ gamma radiation measurements with energy discrimination identified natural emitting nuclides as well as their decay products (Pb-212, Pb-2142, Ra-226, Th-232, Ac-228, Th-234, Pa-234, U- 235, etc.). According to the results, an influence from the stacks emissions has been identified both qualitatively and quantitatively. The developed methodology accomplished the lack of data in what concerns to radiation rate in the vicinity of Sines coal-fired power plant and consequently the resulting exposure to the nearby population. (authors)

  4. Radiological technologists' performance for the detection of malignant microcalcifications in digital mammograms without and with a computer-aided detection system.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Takamori, Miho; Uchiyama, Yoshikazu; Shiraishi, Junji

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic performance of radiological technologists (RTs) in the detection of malignant microcalcifications and to evaluate how much computer-aided detection (CADe) improved their performances compared with those by expert breast radiologists (BRs). Six board-certified breast RTs and four board-certified BRs participated in a free-response receiver operating characteristic observer study. The dataset consisted of 75 cases (25 malignant, 25 benign, and 25 normal cases) of digital mammograms, selected from the digital database for screening mammography provided by the University of South Florida. Average figure of merit (FOM) of the RTs' performances was statistically analyzed using jack-knife free-response receiver operating characteristic and compared with that of expert BRs. The detection performance of RTs was significantly improved by using CADe; average sensitivity was increased from 46.7% to 56.7%, with a decrease in the average number of false positives per case from 0.19 to 0.13. Detection accuracy of an average FOM was improved from 0.680 to 0.816 ([Formula: see text]) and the difference in FOMs between RTs and radiologists failed to reach statistical significance. RTs' performances for the identification of malignant microcalcifications on digital mammography were sufficiently high and comparable to those of radiologists by using CADe.

  5. White paper : the fourth amendment : implications for radiological and nuclear detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Levey, Brandon Seth

    2010-01-01

    The need to improve the radiation detection architecture has given rise to increased concern over the potential of equipment or procedures to violate the Fourth Amendment. Protecting the rights guaranteed by the Constitution is a foremost value of every government agency. However, protecting U.S. residents and assets from potentially catastrophic threats is also a crucial role of government. In the absence of clear precedent, the fear of potentially violating rights could lead to the rejection of effective and reasonable means that could reduce risks, possibly savings lives and assets. The goal of this document is not to apply case law to determine what the precedent may be if it exists, but rather provide a detailed outline that defines searches and seizures, identifies what precedent exists and what precedent doesn't exist, and explore what the existing (and non-existing) precedent means for the use of radiation detection used inside the nation's borders.

  6. Maritime Detection of Radiological/Nuclear Threats with Hybrid Imaging System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    LN2. Each dewar has a cryogenic solenoid valve and a temperature sensor on the exhaust to monitor when the dewar is full. The valves and sensors are...plate-mounted atop the palletized array. Separate sensors monitor the pressure on the input lines. The combined weight of the detection...maritime environment. Figure 7. The complete SuperMISTI system on a 60-ft barge. The water ballast tanks used to maintain a level barge are shown

  7. Enhancing international radiation/nuclear detection training opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Thomas L.; Bersell, Bridget M.; Booker, Paul M.; Anderson, Gerald E.; Leitch, Rosalyn M.; Meagher, John B.; Siefken, Rob R.; Spracklen, James L.

    2015-09-23

    The United States has worked domestically to develop and provide radiological and nuclear detection training and education initiatives aimed at interior law enforcement, but the international community has predominantly focused efforts at border and customs officials. The interior law enforcement officials of a State play a critical role in maintaining an effective national-level nuclear detection architecture. To meet this vital need, DNDO was funded by the U.S. Department of State (DOS) to create and deliver a 1-week course at the International Law Enforcement Academy (ILEA) in Budapest, Hungary to inform interior law enforcement personnel of the overall mission, and to provide an understanding of how the participants can combat the threats of radiological and nuclear terrorism through detection efforts. Two courses, with approximately 20 students in each course, were delivered in fiscal year (FY) 2013, two were delivered in FY 2014 and FY 2015, and as of this report’s writing more are planned in FY 2016. However, while the ILEA courses produced measurable success, DNDO requested Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) research potential avenues to further increase the course impact.In a multi-phased approach, PNNL researched and analyzed several possible global training locations and venues, and other possible ways to increase the impact of the course using an agreed-to data-gathering format.

  8. Nearest Neighbor Averaging and its Effect on the Critical Level and Minimum Detectable Concentration for Scanning Radiological Survey Instruments that Perform Facility Release Surveys.

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, Sean Donovan; Beall, Patrick S; Miller, Mark L

    2014-08-01

    Through the SNL New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA) program, several Sandia engineers worked with the Environmental Restoration Group (ERG) Inc. to verify and validate a novel algorithm used to determine the scanning Critical Level (L c ) and Minimum Detectable Concentration (MDC) (or Minimum Detectable Areal Activity) for the 102F scanning system. Through the use of Monte Carlo statistical simulations the algorithm mathematically demonstrates accuracy in determining the L c and MDC when a nearest-neighbor averaging (NNA) technique was used. To empirically validate this approach, SNL prepared several spiked sources and ran a test with the ERG 102F instrument on a bare concrete floor known to have no radiological contamination other than background naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). The tests conclude that the NNA technique increases the sensitivity (decreases the L c and MDC) for high-density data maps that are obtained by scanning radiological survey instruments.

  9. Metal Nanostructures for Detection and Imaging Enhancements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-03

    source spectrum, is delivered into a pig adipose sample. OCT is a widely used optical imaging technique for the diagnoses of many diseases [27-29... Fahr , C. Rockstuhl, and F. Lederer, “Engineering the randomness for enhanced absorption in solar cells,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 171114 (2008). 7. T...Rockstuhl, S. Fahr , and F. Lederer, “Absorption enhancement in solar cells by localized plasmon polaritons,” J. Appl. Phys. 104, 123102 (2008). 31. A

  10. Unsupervised abnormality detection using saliency and Retinex based color enhancement.

    PubMed

    Deeba, Farah; Mohammed, Shahed K; Bui, Francis M; Wahid, Khan A

    2016-08-01

    An efficient and automated abnormality detection method can significantly reduce the burden of screening of the enormous visual information resulting from capsule endoscopic procedure. As a pre-processing stage, color enhancement could be useful to improve the image quality and the detection performance. Therefore, in this paper, we have proposed a two-stage automated abnormality detection algorithm. In the first stage, an adaptive color enhancement method based on Retinex theory is applied on the endoscopic images. In the second stage, an efficient salient region detection algorithm is applied to detect the clinically significant regions. The proposed algorithm is applied on a dataset containing images with diverse pathologies. The algorithm can successfully detect a significant percentage of the abnormal regions. From our experiment, it was evident that color enhancement method improves the performance of abnormality detection. The proposed algorithm can achieve a sensitivity of 97.33% and specificity of 79%, higher than state-of-the-art performance.

  11. Radiology research and medical students.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, Pat W; Agarwal, Ankit; Colucci, Andrew; Sherry, Steven J; Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2013-12-01

    Fostering radiology research among medical students can enhance a student's interest and understanding of radiology and research. It increases the academic productivity of the mentor and the department. Radiology faculty and departments should actively seek to recruit and engage students in research. Once involved, students benefit greatly from being given clear responsibility, close supervision, timely feedback, and a degree of autonomy. At the heart of the student research process is the crucial mentor-mentee relationship, and mentors should be cognizant of their vital role and methods of encouraging and enhancing this relationship. Ultimately, the advancement of the field of radiology depends on constant innovation and improvement. Radiology research by medical students fuels both innovation and the development of future academic radiologists and physician-scientists, helping to secure future growth for our field.

  12. Hyperspectral anomaly detection using enhanced global factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paciencia, Todd J.; Bauer, Kenneth W.

    2016-05-01

    Dimension reduction techniques have become one popular unsupervised approach used towards detecting anomalies in hyperspectral imagery. Although demonstrating promising results in the literature on specific images, these methods can become difficult to directly interpret and often require tuning of their parameters to achieve high performance on a specific set of images. This lack of generality is also compounded by the need to remove noise and atmospheric absorption spectral bands from the image prior to detection. Without a process for this band selection and to make the methods adaptable to different image compositions, performance becomes difficult to maintain across a wider variety of images. Here, we present a framework that uses factor analysis to provide a robust band selection and more meaningful dimension reduction with which to detect anomalies in the imagery. Measurable characteristics of the image are used to create an automated decision process that allows the algorithm to adjust to a particular image, while maintaining high detection performance. The framework and its algorithms are detailed, and results are shown for forest, desert, sea, rural, urban, anomaly-sparse, and anomaly-dense imagery types from different sensors. Additionally, the method is compared to current state-of-the-art methods and is shown to be computationally efficient.

  13. Toward an Objective Enhanced-V Detection Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunner, Jason; Feltz, Wayne; Moses, John; Rabin, Robert; Ackerman, Steven

    2007-01-01

    The area of coldest cloud tops above thunderstorms sometimes has a distinct V or U shape. This pattern, often referred to as an "enhanced-V' signature, has been observed to occur during and preceding severe weather in previous studies. This study describes an algorithmic approach to objectively detect enhanced-V features with observations from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite and Low Earth Orbit data. The methodology consists of cross correlation statistics of pixels and thresholds of enhanced-V quantitative parameters. The effectiveness of the enhanced-V detection method will be examined using Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer image data from case studies in the 2003-2006 seasons. The main goal of this study is to develop an objective enhanced-V detection algorithm for future implementation into operations with future sensors, such as GOES-R.

  14. Radiological Safety Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Ordnance Center and School, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.

    Written to be used concurrently with the U.S. Army's Radiological Safety Course, this publication discusses the causes, sources, and detection of nuclear radiation. In addition, the transportation and disposal of radioactive materials are covered. The report also deals with the safety precautions to be observed when working with lasers, microwave…

  15. Metallic Nanomaterials for Sensitivity Enhancement of Fluorescence Detection

    PubMed Central

    Goldys, Ewa M.; Xie, Fang

    2008-01-01

    Utrasensitive detection of trace analytes by fluorescence benefits for fluorescence amplifying substrates. We review here our recent work concerned with understanding of enhancement mechanisms and formation of three such substrates: silver fractals, silver coated gold nanoparticles deposited on glass and fluorescence enhancing gold colloids. PMID:27879741

  16. Readily implemented enhanced sinusoid detection in noise

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, K.V.

    1992-03-05

    Significant efforts have been devoted, spanning many years, to the problem of sinusoid detection in noise. Many of these efforts have produced superb, yet complex, algorithms which may be difficult to use for a wide segment of the Digital Signal Processing (DSP) community. This paper presents a simple, easily implemented and high effective method which solves this problem. This method severely degrades non-sinusoidal noise while leaving the embedded sinusoid(s) relatively undisturbed. The algorithm, simply put, exploits the difference between the net effect of integration and differentiation of sinusoids versus the effect of these operations on random noise and other signal sequences. The cross-correlation of sine wave with its differentiated (and/or integrated) self is quite high. Conversely, the cross-reduction of a noise sequence with its differentiated (and/or integrated) self is much lower. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume that for sequences consisting of a sinusoid in noise, significant signal-to-noise-ratios (SNRs) in the correlation results are achievable using a combination of differentiation (and/or integration) and cross-correlation operations on such sequences. This technique has been applied to actual Doppler radar data, as well as to synthesized data, with excellent improvement in signal detection capability. 4 refs.

  17. Detection for processing history of seam insertion and contrast enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianwei; Zhao, Yao; Ni, Rongrong

    2014-11-01

    With the development of manipulations techniques of digital images, digital image forensic technology is becoming more and more necessary. However, the determination of processing history of multi-operation is still a challenge problem. In this paper, we improve the traditional seam insertion algorithm, and propose corresponding detection method. Then an algorithm that focuses on detecting the processing history of seam insertion and contrast enhancement is proposed, which can be widely used in practical image forgery. Based on comprehensive analysis, we have discovered the inherent relationship between seam insertion and contrast enhancement. Different orders of processing make different impacts on images. By using the newly proposed algorithm, both contrast enhancement followed by seam insertion and seam insertion followed by contrast enhancement can be detected correctly. Plenty of experiments have been implemented to prove the accuracy.

  18. Sonoclot(®)-based method to detect iron enhanced coagulation.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Vance G; Henderson, Jon

    2016-07-01

    Thrombelastographic methods have been recently introduced to detect iron mediated hypercoagulability in settings such as sickle cell disease, hemodialysis, mechanical circulatory support, and neuroinflammation. However, these inflammatory situations may have heme oxygenase-derived, coexistent carbon monoxide present, which also enhances coagulation as assessed by the same thrombelastographic variables that are affected by iron. This brief report presents a novel, Sonoclot-based method to detect iron enhanced coagulation that is independent of carbon monoxide influence. Future investigation will be required to assess the sensitivity of this new method to detect iron mediated hypercoagulability in clinical settings compared to results obtained with thrombelastographic techniques.

  19. Enhanced sensitivity for hyperspectral infrared chemical detection

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, P. L.; Petrin, R. R.; Koskelo, A. C.; Quick, C. R.; Romero, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    The sensitivity of imaging, hyperspectral, passive remote sensors in the long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) spectral region is currently limited by the ability to achieve an accurate, time-invariant, pixel-to-pixel calibration of the elements composing the Focal Plane Array (FPA). Pursuing conventional techniques to improve the accuracy of the calibration will always be limited by the trade-off between the time required to collect calibration data of improved precision and the drift in the pixel response that occurs on a timescale comparable to the calibration time. This paper will present the results from a study of a method to circumvent these problems. Improvements in detection capability can be realized by applying a quick, repetitive dither of the field of view (FOV) of the imager (by a small angular amount), so that radiance/spectral differences between individual target areas can be measured by a single FPA pixel. By performing this difference measurement repetitively both residual differences in the pixel-to-pixel calibration and l/f detector drift noise can effectively be eliminated. In addition, variations in the atmosphere and target scene caused by the motion of the sensor platform will cause signal drifts that this technique would be able to remove. This method allows improvements in sensitivity that could potentially scale as the square root of the observation time.

  20. An enhanced stream mining approach for network anomaly detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellaachia, Abdelghani; Bhatt, Rajat

    2005-03-01

    Network anomaly detection is one of the hot topics in the market today. Currently, researchers are trying to find a way in which machines could automatically learn both normal and anomalous behavior and thus detect anomalies if and when they occur. Most important applications which could spring out of these systems is intrusion detection and spam mail detection. In this paper, the primary focus on the problem and solution of "real time" network intrusion detection although the underlying theory discussed may be used for other applications of anomaly detection (like spam detection or spy-ware detection) too. Since a machine needs a learning process on its own, data mining has been chosen as a preferred technique. The object of this paper is to present a real time clustering system; we call Enhanced Stream Mining (ESM) which could analyze packet information (headers, and data) to determine intrusions.

  1. Photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence for early breast cancer biomarker detection.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Brian T; Zangar, Richard C

    2012-08-01

    Photonic crystal surfaces offer a compelling platform for improving the sensitivity of surface-based fluorescent assays used in disease diagnostics. Through the complementary processes of photonic crystal enhanced excitation and enhanced extraction, a periodic dielectric-based nanostructured surface can simultaneously increase the electric field intensity experienced by surface-bound fluorophores and increase the collection efficiency of emitted fluorescent photons. Through the ability to inexpensively fabricate photonic crystal surfaces over substantial surface areas, they are amenable to single-use applications in biological sensing, such as disease biomarker detection in serum. In this review, we will describe the motivation for implementing high-sensitivity, multiplexed biomarker detection in the context of breast cancer diagnosis. We will summarize recent efforts to improve the detection limits of such assays though the use of photonic crystal surfaces. Reduction of detection limits is driven by low autofluorescent substrates for photonic crystal fabrication, and detection instruments that take advantage of their unique features.

  2. RADRELAY RADIOLOGICAL DATA LINK DEVICE

    SciTech Connect

    Harpring, L; Frank Heckendorn, F

    2007-11-06

    The RadRelay effort developed small, field appropriate, portable prototype devices that allow radiological spectra to be downloaded from field radiological detectors, like the identiFINDER-U, and transmitted to land based experts. This communications capability was designed for the U. S. Coast Guard (USCG) but is also applicable to the Customs and Border Protection (CBP) personnel working in remote locations. USCG Level II personnel currently use the identiFINDER-U Hand-Held Radioisotope ID Devices (HHRIID) to detect radiological materials during specific boarding operations. These devices will detect not only radiological emissions but will also evaluate those emissions against a table of known radiological spectra. The RadRelay has been developed to significantly improve the functionality of HHRIID, by providing the capability to download radiological spectra and then transmit them using satellite or cell phone technology. This remote wireless data transfer reduces the current lengthy delay often encountered between the shipboard detection of unknown radiological material and the evaluation of that data by technical and command personnel. That delay is reduced from hours to minutes and allows the field located personnel to remain on station during the inspection and evaluation process.

  3. The Use of an Integrated Website to Enhance the Educational Experience in a Medical School Radiology Clerkship Course.

    PubMed

    Desai, Naman S; Bunch, Paul M; DiSalvo, Donald N; O'Brien, Reiko; Andriole, Katherine P; Smith, Terri; Durfee, Sara M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of creating an integrated website for the medical students enrolled in a core radiology clerkship and to assess the impact of this website on students' overall educational experience. An integrated website was created for the medical students and hosted on the main departmental website. The components of the website included: announcements and password-protected schedule, curriculum, student assessment, information about different radiology sections, digital resources, and fourth year opportunities. The schedule section was created using Google Calendar to facilitate automatic syncing and real-time updates to the students' mobile devices. Weblinks for resources and assignments were incorporated into the calendar entries, which could be "pushed" to students in real time. Student attitudes were assessed via an exit survey. Various website usage statistics were collected. A total of 35 students who have rotated through the month-long clerkship thus far have used the website. Overall, 80% of students accessed the website once or multiple times a day. Over 90% of students thought that the website was well organized and easy to use; having access to the schedule on a smartphone had a positive impact on overall clerkship experience; the website had an overall positive impact on their clerkship experience; and they would recommend it to visiting medical students. Since July 2013, there have been a total of 9740 page views with 4113 unique visits to the website (an average of 17 visits per day from 6 visitors per day). The authors conclude that the creation of an integrated website has a positive impact on students' overall educational experience.

  4. Could contrast-enhanced CT detect STEMI prior to electrocardiogram?

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, Chadi; Rahi, Mayda; Baz, Maria; Haddad, Fadi; Helwe, Omar; Aoun, Noel; Ibrahim, Tony; Abdo, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    We present here a case in which contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) was the first diagnostic tool to detect myocardial hypoperfusion in a patient with atypical symptoms and normal electrocardiogram (ECG) on admission. An ST-segment elevation was detected thereafter on a second ECG realized several minutes after CT with raised troponin levels. Percutaneous coronary intervention was performed after failure of thrombolysis and confirmed occlusion of the left anterior descending artery. Further studies are needed to evaluate the role of high-resolution contrast-enhanced CT with or without coronary angiography in the workup of suspected myocardial infarction in the setting of a normal ECG.

  5. The scope of forensic radiology.

    PubMed

    Brogdon, B G

    1998-06-01

    The use of x-ray in the solution of forensic problems commenced within days of Röntgen's discovery; indeed, most of the applications of radiology to the forensic sciences were accomplished or anticipated within the next two years. The scope of forensic radiology ranges widely and includes determination of identity, evaluation of injury and death, applications in both criminal and civil litigation and in administrative proceedings, detection of abuse, investigation of gunshot wounds, medical education and research. Newer modalities and techniques afford opportunity for the expansion of forensic radiology if problems of accessibility and cost can be resolved along with improvement in interdisciplinary cooperation and understanding.

  6. Asphaltene detection using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS).

    PubMed

    Alabi, O O; Edilbi, A N F; Brolly, C; Muirhead, D; Parnell, J; Stacey, R; Bowden, S A

    2015-04-28

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy using a gold substrate and excitation at 514 nm can detect sub parts per million quantities of asphaltene and thereby petroleum. This simple format and sensitivity make it transformative for applications including sample triage, flow assurance, environmental protection and analysis of unique one of a kind materials.

  7. Comodulation Enhances Signal Detection via Priming of Auditory Cortical Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Sollini, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic environments are composed of complex overlapping sounds that the auditory system is required to segregate into discrete perceptual objects. The functions of distinct auditory processing stations in this challenging task are poorly understood. Here we show a direct role for mouse auditory cortex in detection and segregation of acoustic information. We measured the sensitivity of auditory cortical neurons to brief tones embedded in masking noise. By altering spectrotemporal characteristics of the masker, we reveal that sensitivity to pure tone stimuli is strongly enhanced in coherently modulated broadband noise, corresponding to the psychoacoustic phenomenon comodulation masking release. Improvements in detection were largest following priming periods of noise alone, indicating that cortical segregation is enhanced over time. Transient opsin-mediated silencing of auditory cortex during the priming period almost completely abolished these improvements, suggesting that cortical processing may play a direct and significant role in detection of quiet sounds in noisy environments. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Auditory systems are adept at detecting and segregating competing sound sources, but there is little direct evidence of how this process occurs in the mammalian auditory pathway. We demonstrate that coherent broadband noise enhances signal representation in auditory cortex, and that prolonged exposure to noise is necessary to produce this enhancement. Using optogenetic perturbation to selectively silence auditory cortex during early noise processing, we show that cortical processing plays a crucial role in the segregation of competing sounds. PMID:27927950

  8. Nanostructured surfaces and detection instrumentation for photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Chaudhery, Vikram; George, Sherine; Lu, Meng; Pokhriyal, Anusha; Cunningham, Brian T

    2013-04-26

    Photonic crystal (PC) surfaces have been demonstrated as a compelling platform for improving the sensitivity of surface-based fluorescent assays used in disease diagnostics and life science research. PCs can be engineered to support optical resonances at specific wavelengths at which strong electromagnetic fields are utilized to enhance the intensity of surface-bound fluorophore excitation. Meanwhile, the leaky resonant modes of PCs can be used to direct emitted photons within a narrow range of angles for more efficient collection by a fluorescence detection system. The multiplicative effects of enhanced excitation combined with enhanced photon extraction combine to provide improved signal-to-noise ratios for detection of fluorescent emitters, which in turn can be used to reduce the limits of detection of low concentration analytes, such as disease biomarker proteins. Fabrication of PCs using inexpensive manufacturing methods and materials that include replica molding on plastic, nano-imprint lithography on quartz substrates result in devices that are practical for single-use disposable applications. In this review, we will describe the motivation for implementing high-sensitivity fluorescence detection in the context of molecular diagnosis and gene expression analysis though the use of PC surfaces. Recent efforts to improve the design and fabrication of PCs and their associated detection instrumentation are summarized, including the use of PCs coupled with Fabry-Perot cavities and external cavity lasers.

  9. Entanglement enhanced thermometry in the detection of the Unruh effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zehua; Wang, Jieci; Jing, Jiliang; Dragan, Andrzej

    2017-02-01

    We show how the use of entanglement can enhance the precision of the detection of the Unruh effect with an accelerated probe. We use a two-level atom interacting relativistically with a quantum field as the probe, and treat it as an open quantum system to derive the master equation governing its evolution. By means of quantum state discrimination, we detect the accelerated motion of the atom by examining its time evolving state. It turns out that the optimal strategy for the detection of the Unruh effect, to which the accelerated atom is sensitive, involves letting the atom-thermometer equilibrate with the thermal bath. However, introducing initial entanglement between the detector and an external degree of freedom leads to an enhancement of the sensitivity of the detector. Also, the maximum precision is attained within finite time, before equilibration takes place.

  10. Extraordinary sensitivity enhancement by metasurfaces in terahertz detection of antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Lijuan; Gao, Weilu; Shu, Jie; Ying, Yibin; Kono, Junichiro

    2015-03-01

    We have detected trace amounts of molecules of antibiotics (kanamycin sulfate) dispersed on metasurfaces with terahertz (THz) spectroscopy. Utilizing the extraordinary optical transmission resonance of an array of square-shaped slits on a silicon substrate at ~0.3 THz, we were able to monitor varying concentrations of kanamycin sulfate as low as ~100 picogram/L. In contrast, the lowest detectable concentration of kanamycin sulfate on silicon without any metallic structure was ~1 gram/L. This dramatic ~1010 times enhancement of sensitivity is due to the near-field enhancement of THz electric fields by the metamaterial structure. This result thus demonstrates the power and usefulness of metamaterial-assisted THz spectroscopy in trace molecular detection for biological and chemical sensing as well as for food product quality and safety inspection and control.

  11. Extraordinary sensitivity enhancement by metasurfaces in terahertz detection of antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lijuan; Gao, Weilu; Shu, Jie; Ying, Yibin; Kono, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    We have detected trace amounts of molecules of antibiotics (kanamycin sulfate) dispersed on metasurfaces with terahertz (THz) spectroscopy. Utilizing the extraordinary optical transmission resonance of an array of square-shaped slits on a silicon substrate at ~0.3 THz, we were able to monitor varying concentrations of kanamycin sulfate as low as ~100 picogram/L. In contrast, the lowest detectable concentration of kanamycin sulfate on silicon without any metallic structure was ~1 gram/L. This dramatic ~1010 times enhancement of sensitivity is due to the near-field enhancement of THz electric fields by the metamaterial structure. This result thus demonstrates the power and usefulness of metamaterial-assisted THz spectroscopy in trace molecular detection for biological and chemical sensing as well as for food product quality and safety inspection and control. PMID:25728144

  12. C2SM: a mobile system for detecting and 3D mapping of chemical, radiological, and nuclear contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasiobedzki, Piotr; Ng, Ho-Kong; Bondy, Michel; McDiarmid, C. H.

    2009-05-01

    CBRN Crime Scene Modeler (C2SM) is a prototype mobile CBRN mapping system for First Responders in events where Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear agents where used. The prototype operates on board a small robotic platform, increases situational awareness of the robot operator by providing geo-located images and data, and current robot location. The sensor suite includes stereo and high resolution cameras, a long wave infra red (thermal) camera and gamma and chemical detectors. The system collects and sends geo-located data to a remote command post in near real-time and automatically creates 3D photorealistic model augmented with CBRN measurements. Two prototypes have been successfully tested in field trials and a fully ruggedised commercial version is expected in 2010.

  13. Ultrasensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection in common fluids

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shikuan; Dai, Xianming; Stogin, Birgitt Boschitsch; Wong, Tak-Sing

    2016-01-01

    Detecting target analytes with high specificity and sensitivity in any fluid is of fundamental importance to analytical science and technology. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has proven to be capable of detecting single molecules with high specificity, but achieving single-molecule sensitivity in any highly diluted solutions remains a challenge. Here we demonstrate a universal platform that allows for the enrichment and delivery of analytes into the SERS-sensitive sites in both aqueous and nonaqueous fluids, and its subsequent quantitative detection of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) down to ∼75 fM level (10−15 mol⋅L−1). Our platform, termed slippery liquid-infused porous surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SLIPSERS), is based on a slippery, omniphobic substrate that enables the complete concentration of analytes and SERS substrates (e.g., Au nanoparticles) within an evaporating liquid droplet. Combining our SLIPSERS platform with a SERS mapping technique, we have systematically quantified the probability, p(c), of detecting R6G molecules at concentrations c ranging from 750 fM (p > 90%) down to 75 aM (10−18 mol⋅L−1) levels (p ≤ 1.4%). The ability to detect analytes down to attomolar level is the lowest limit of detection for any SERS-based detection reported thus far. We have shown that analytes present in liquid, solid, or air phases can be extracted using a suitable liquid solvent and subsequently detected through SLIPSERS. Based on this platform, we have further demonstrated ultrasensitive detection of chemical and biological molecules as well as environmental contaminants within a broad range of common fluids for potential applications related to analytical chemistry, molecular diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and national security. PMID:26719413

  14. Peer review in cardiothoracic radiology.

    PubMed

    Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2014-09-01

    A variety of peer review methods can be used as part of quality assurance and quality improvement in cardiothoracic radiology. Traditionally, peer review in radiology is a retrospective process relying primarily on review of previously interpreted studies at the time of follow-up or additional imaging. However, peer review can be enhanced with other methods such as double reads, focused practice review, practice audit, and correlation with operative and pathologic findings. Furthermore, feedback from referring physicians can be extremely useful in improving the quality of a radiology practice. This article discusses peer review in radiology with a focus on cardiothoracic imaging. Types of peer review, advantages and shortcomings, and future challenges are addressed.

  15. Ultrasound enhanced detection of individual meningococcal serogroups by latex immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Sobanski, M A; Vince, R; Biagini, G A; Cousins, C; Guiver, M; Gray, S J; Kaczmarski, E B; Coakley, W T

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To examine A, C, Y, and W135 Neisseria meningitidis serogroup characterisation by ultrasonic standing wave enhanced latex agglutination tests (USELATs) of clinical samples. In addition, to determine USELAT enhancement of detection sensitivity for the individual antigens compared with conventional card latex agglutination tests (LATs). Methods: Wellcogen (Abbott Murex), Slidex meningite kit 5 (bioMerieux), and Pastorex (Sanofi) kits and beads coated in house with antibodies to Y and to W135 alone were tested. Positive control antigens consisted of A and C polysaccharide preparations and the Pastorex Y/W135 kit sample. The limiting concentrations of antigen detection were determined by USELAT and by LAT. Thirty five clinical samples (plasma), previously characterised by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and culture, were tested by USELAT and, when sample volume allowed, by LAT. Results: USELAT enhancement of control antigen detection ranged from 16 to 128 fold for the different latex systems. Enhancements for the different control antigens were comparable between kits. USELAT tests of clinical (A/C/Y/W135) samples (n = 15) with the Wellcogen (A/C/Y/W135) and Slidex meningite (A/C/Y/W135) kits showed comparable specificities. A set (n = 22) of Y and W135 samples gave 18, 19, and 17 positive results for Wellcogen (A/C/Y/W135), Pastorex (A/C/Y/W135), and in house beads (Y/W135), respectively. Positive USELAT PCR and culture results were concordant. A typical sensitivity for the commercial kits was 80% (Wellcogen). Conclusions: USELAT identified serogroups for 80% of samples, whereas LATs identified only 40%. The USELAT detection of the A, C, Y, and W135 antigen serogroups showed comparable enhancement for the kits tested. The commercial availability of latex beads coated with antibody to the Y and W135 serogroups would expedite their identification. PMID:11825922

  16. Enhancement of visual motion detection thresholds in early deaf people.

    PubMed

    Shiell, Martha M; Champoux, François; Zatorre, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    In deaf people, the auditory cortex can reorganize to support visual motion processing. Although this cross-modal reorganization has long been thought to subserve enhanced visual abilities, previous research has been unsuccessful at identifying behavioural enhancements specific to motion processing. Recently, research with congenitally deaf cats has uncovered an enhancement for visual motion detection. Our goal was to test for a similar difference between deaf and hearing people. We tested 16 early and profoundly deaf participants and 20 hearing controls. Participants completed a visual motion detection task, in which they were asked to determine which of two sinusoidal gratings was moving. The speed of the moving grating varied according to an adaptive staircase procedure, allowing us to determine the lowest speed necessary for participants to detect motion. Consistent with previous research in deaf cats, the deaf group had lower motion detection thresholds than the hearing. This finding supports the proposal that cross-modal reorganization after sensory deprivation will occur for supramodal sensory features and preserve the output functions.

  17. [Emphysematous pyelonephritis: radiologic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Kably, M I; Elamraoui, F; Chikhaoui, N

    2003-10-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) is a rare and severe form of acute pyelonephritis. Escherichia coli accounts for 60% of the cases. Predisposing factors are: diabetus mellitus, recent urinary tract infection and obstruction. There is a female predominance (2/1). Conventional radiography reveals the renal emphysema in 85% of the cases. Ultrasonography shows hyperechoic areas corresponding to the gaz. CT scan is the best technique, allowing the exact localization of the gaz inside the renal parenchyma. The natural course of the disease allows its radiologic classification in 4 grades. EPN has a poor prognosis if only a medical treatment is initiated. Every urinary tract infection, in a diabetic patient must be treated, and must lead to a radiologic exploration, which allows an early detection of severe forms of the disease.

  18. Plasmon resonance enhanced mechanical detection of ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Ariyaratne, Amila; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2015-01-05

    Small molecule binding to the active site of enzymes typically modifies the mechanical stiffness of the enzyme. We exploit this effect, in a setup which combines nano-mechanics and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) enhanced optics, for the label free detection of ligand binding to an enzyme. The large dynamic range of the signal allows to easily obtain binding curves for small ligands, in contrast to traditional SPR methods which rely on small changes in index of refraction. Enzyme mechanics, assessed by nano-rheology, thus emerges as an alternative to electronic and spin resonances, assessed by traditional spectroscopies, for detecting ligand binding.

  19. Radiologic-Pathologic Analysis of Contrast-enhanced and Diffusion-weighted MR Imaging in Patients with HCC after TACE: Diagnostic Accuracy of 3D Quantitative Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chapiro, Julius; Wood, Laura D.; Lin, MingDe; Duran, Rafael; Cornish, Toby; Lesage, David; Charu, Vivek; Schernthaner, Rüdiger; Wang, Zhijun; Tacher, Vania; Savic, Lynn Jeanette; Kamel, Ihab R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnostic performance of three-dimensional (3Dthree-dimensional) quantitative enhancement-based and diffusion-weighted volumetric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging assessment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCChepatocellular carcinoma) lesions in determining the extent of pathologic tumor necrosis after transarterial chemoembolization (TACEtransarterial chemoembolization). Materials and Methods This institutional review board–approved retrospective study included 17 patients with HCChepatocellular carcinoma who underwent TACEtransarterial chemoembolization before surgery. Semiautomatic 3Dthree-dimensional volumetric segmentation of target lesions was performed at the last MR examination before orthotopic liver transplantation or surgical resection. The amount of necrotic tumor tissue on contrast material–enhanced arterial phase MR images and the amount of diffusion-restricted tumor tissue on apparent diffusion coefficient (ADCapparent diffusion coefficient) maps were expressed as a percentage of the total tumor volume. Visual assessment of the extent of tumor necrosis and tumor response according to European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASLEuropean Association for the Study of the Liver) criteria was performed. Pathologic tumor necrosis was quantified by using slide-by-slide segmentation. Correlation analysis was performed to evaluate the predictive values of the radiologic techniques. Results At histopathologic examination, the mean percentage of tumor necrosis was 70% (range, 10%–100%). Both 3Dthree-dimensional quantitative techniques demonstrated a strong correlation with tumor necrosis at pathologic examination (R2 = 0.9657 and R2 = 0.9662 for quantitative EASLEuropean Association for the Study of the Liver and quantitative ADCapparent diffusion coefficient, respectively) and a strong intermethod agreement (R2 = 0.9585). Both methods showed a significantly lower discrepancy with pathologically measured necrosis (residual

  20. Utility of rapid database searching for quality assurance: 'detective work' in uncovering radiology coding and billing errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horii, Steven C.; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William; Iyoob, Christopher; Maston, Keith; Coleman, Beverly G.

    2011-03-01

    When the first quarter of 2010 Department of Radiology statistics were provided to the Section Chiefs, the authors (SH, BC) were alarmed to discover that Ultrasound showed a decrease of 2.5 percent in billed examinations. This seemed to be in direct contradistinction to the experience of the ultrasound faculty members and sonographers. Their experience was that they were far busier than during the same quarter of 2009. The one exception that all acknowledged was the month of February, 2010 when several major winter storms resulted in a much decreased Hospital admission and Emergency Department visit rate. Since these statistics in part help establish priorities for capital budget items, professional and technical staffing levels, and levels of incentive salary, they are taken very seriously. The availability of a desktop, Web-based RIS database search tool developed by two of the authors (WK, WB) and built-in database functions of the ultrasound miniPACS, made it possible for us very rapidly to develop and test hypotheses for why the number of billable examinations was declining in the face of what experience told the authors was an increasing number of examinations being performed. Within a short time, we identified the major cause as errors on the part of the company retained to verify billable Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes against ultrasound reports. This information is being used going forward to recover unbilled examinations and take measures to reduce or eliminate the types of coding errors that resulted in the problem.

  1. Using computer-extracted image features for modeling of error-making patterns in detection of mammographic masses among radiology residents

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jing Ghate, Sujata V.; Yoon, Sora C.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Kuzmiak, Cherie M.; Mazurowski, Maciej A.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Mammography is the most widely accepted and utilized screening modality for early breast cancer detection. Providing high quality mammography education to radiology trainees is essential, since excellent interpretation skills are needed to ensure the highest benefit of screening mammography for patients. The authors have previously proposed a computer-aided education system based on trainee models. Those models relate human-assessed image characteristics to trainee error. In this study, the authors propose to build trainee models that utilize features automatically extracted from images using computer vision algorithms to predict likelihood of missing each mass by the trainee. This computer vision-based approach to trainee modeling will allow for automatically searching large databases of mammograms in order to identify challenging cases for each trainee. Methods: The authors’ algorithm for predicting the likelihood of missing a mass consists of three steps. First, a mammogram is segmented into air, pectoral muscle, fatty tissue, dense tissue, and mass using automated segmentation algorithms. Second, 43 features are extracted using computer vision algorithms for each abnormality identified by experts. Third, error-making models (classifiers) are applied to predict the likelihood of trainees missing the abnormality based on the extracted features. The models are developed individually for each trainee using his/her previous reading data. The authors evaluated the predictive performance of the proposed algorithm using data from a reader study in which 10 subjects (7 residents and 3 novices) and 3 experts read 100 mammographic cases. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) methodology was applied for the evaluation. Results: The average area under the ROC curve (AUC) of the error-making models for the task of predicting which masses will be detected and which will be missed was 0.607 (95% CI,0.564-0.650). This value was statistically significantly different

  2. Ultraviolet Resonant Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Short Jr., Billy Joe

    2009-06-01

    Raman-based spectroscopy is potentially militarily useful for standoff detection of high explosives. Normal (non-resonance) and resonance Raman spectroscopies are both light scattering techniques that use a laser to measure the vibrational spectrum of a sample. In resonance Raman, the laser is tuned to match the wavelength of a strong electronic absorbance in the molecule of interest, whereas, in normal Raman the laser is not tuned to any strong electronic absorbance bands. The selection of appropriate excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman can result in a dramatic increase in the Raman scattering efficiency of select band(s) associated with the electronic transition. Other than the excitation wavelength, however, resonance Raman is performed experimentally the same as normal Raman. In these studies, normal and resonance Raman spectral signatures of select solid high explosive (HE) samples and explosive precursors were collected at 785 nm, 244 nm and 229 nm. Solutions of PETN, TNT, and explosive precursors (DNT & PNT) in acetonitrile solvent as an internal Raman standard were quantitatively evaluated using ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) microscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy as a function of power and select excitation wavelengths. Use of an internal standard allowed resonance enhancements to be estimated at 229 nm and 244 nm. Investigations demonstrated that UVRR provided ~2000-fold enhancement at 244 nm and ~800-fold improvement at 229 nm while PETN showed a maximum of ~25-fold at 244 nm and ~190-fold enhancement at 229 nm solely from resonance effects when compared to normal Raman measurements. In addition to the observed resonance enhancements, additional Raman signal enhancements are obtained with ultraviolet excitation (i.e., Raman scattering scales as !4 for measurements based on scattered photons). A model, based partly on the resonance Raman enhancement results for HE solutions, is presented for estimating Raman enhancements for solid HE samples.

  3. Current radiology. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, G.H.; Hanafee, W.N.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. They are: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Interventional Vascular Radiology, Genitourinary Radiology, Skeletal Radiology, Digital Subtraction Angiography, Neuroradiology, Computed Tomographic Evaluation of Degenerative Diseases of the Lumbar Spine, The Lung, Otolaringology and Opthalmology, and Pediatric Radiology: Cranial, Facial, Cervical, Vertebral, and Appendicular.

  4. Radiological Control Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  5. Impact prediction by looming visual stimuli enhances tactile detection.

    PubMed

    Cléry, Justine; Guipponi, Olivier; Odouard, Soline; Wardak, Claire; Ben Hamed, Suliann

    2015-03-11

    From an ecological point of view, approaching objects are potentially more harmful than receding objects. A predator, a dominant conspecific, or a mere branch coming up at high speed can all be dangerous if one does not detect them and produce the appropriate escape behavior fast enough. And indeed, looming stimuli trigger stereotyped defensive responses in both monkeys and human infants. However, while the heteromodal somatosensory consequences of visual looming stimuli can be fully predicted by their spatiotemporal dynamics, few studies if any have explored whether visual stimuli looming toward the face predictively enhance heteromodal tactile sensitivity around the expected time of impact and at its expected location on the body. In the present study, we report that, in addition to triggering a defensive motor repertoire, looming stimuli toward the face provide the nervous system with predictive cues that enhance tactile sensitivity on the face. Specifically, we describe an enhancement of tactile processes at the expected time and location of impact of the stimulus on the face. We additionally show that a looming stimulus that brushes past the face also enhances tactile sensitivity on the nearby cheek, suggesting that the space close to the face is incorporated into the subjects' body schema. We propose that this cross-modal predictive facilitation involves multisensory convergence areas subserving the representation of a peripersonal space and a safety boundary of self.

  6. Assessment of mass detection performance in contrast enhanced digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carton, Ann-Katherine; de Carvalho, Pablo M.; Li, Zhijin; Dromain, Clarisse; Muller, Serge

    2015-03-01

    We address the detectability of contrast-agent enhancing masses for contrast-agent enhanced spectral mammography (CESM), a dual-energy technique providing functional projection images of breast tissue perfusion and vascularity using simulated CESM images. First, the realism of simulated CESM images from anthropomorphic breast software phantoms generated with a software X-ray imaging platform was validated. Breast texture was characterized by power-law coefficients calculated in data sets of real clinical and simulated images. We also performed a 2-alternative forced choice (2-AFC) psychophysical experiment whereby simulated and real images were presented side-by-side to an experienced radiologist to test if real images could be distinguished from the simulated images. It was found that texture in our simulated CESM images has a fairly realistic appearance. Next, the relative performance of human readers and previously developed mathematical observers was assessed for the detection of iodine-enhancing mass lesions containing different contrast agent concentrations. A four alternative-forced-choice (4 AFC) task was designed; the task for the model and human observer was to detect which one of the four simulated DE recombined images contained an iodineenhancing mass. Our results showed that the NPW and NPWE models largely outperform human performance. After introduction of an internal noise component, both observers approached human performance. The CHO observer performs slightly worse than the average human observer. There is still work to be done in improving model observers as predictors of human-observer performance. Larger trials could also improve our test statistics. We hope that in the future, this framework of software breast phantoms, virtual image acquisition and processing, and mathematical observers can be beneficial to optimize CESM imaging techniques.

  7. Radiological Assistance Program Flight Planning Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Messick, C.; Pham, M.; Ridgeway, J.; Smith, R.

    2011-12-19

    The Radiological Assitance Program (RAP) is the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) first responder to radiological emergencies. RAP's mission is to identify and minimize radiological hazards, as well as provide radiological emergency response and technical advice to decision makers. One tool commonly used is aerial radiation detection equipment. During a response getting this equipment in the right place quickly is critical. The RAP Flight Planning Tool (a ArcGIS 10 Desktop addin) helps minimize this response time and provides specific customizable flight path information to the flight staff including maps, coordinates, and azimuths.

  8. Depth resolution enhancement in double-detection optical scanning holography.

    PubMed

    Ou, Haiyan; Poon, Ting-Chung; Wong, Kenneth K Y; Lam, Edmund Y

    2013-05-01

    We propose an optical scanning holography system with enhanced axial resolution using two detections at different depths. By scanning the object twice, we can obtain two different sets of Fresnel zone plates to sample the same object, which in turn provides more information for the sectional image reconstruction process. We develop the computation algorithm that makes use of such information, solving a constrained optimization problem using the conjugate gradient method. Simulation results show that this method can achieve a depth resolution up to 1 μm.

  9. Detecting Chemically Modified DNA Bases Using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Barhoumi, Aoune; Halas, Naomi J

    2011-12-15

    Post-translational modifications of DNA- changes in the chemical structure of individual bases that occur without changes in the DNA sequence- are known to alter gene expression. They are believed to result in frequently deleterious phenotypic changes, such as cancer. Methylation of adenine, methylation and hydroxymethylation of cytosine, and guanine oxidation are the primary DNA base modifications identified to date. Here we show it is possible to use surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to detect these primary DNA base modifications. SERS detection of modified DNA bases is label-free and requires minimal additional sample preparation, reducing the possibility of additional chemical modifications induced prior to measurement. This approach shows the feasibility of DNA base modification assessment as a potentially routine analysis that may be further developed for clinical diagnostics.

  10. INL@Work Radiological Search & Response Training

    SciTech Connect

    Turnage, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Dealing with radiological hazards is just part of the job for many INL scientists and engineers. Dodging bullets isn't. But some Department of Defense personnel may have to do both. INL employee Jennifer Turnage helps train soldiers in the art of detecting radiological and nuclear material. For more information about INL's research projects, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  11. INL@Work Radiological Search & Response Training

    ScienceCinema

    Turnage, Jennifer

    2016-07-12

    Dealing with radiological hazards is just part of the job for many INL scientists and engineers. Dodging bullets isn't. But some Department of Defense personnel may have to do both. INL employee Jennifer Turnage helps train soldiers in the art of detecting radiological and nuclear material. For more information about INL's research projects, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  12. A framework for the systematic realisation of phenomena for enhanced sensing of radiological and nuclear materials, and radiation.

    PubMed

    Healy, M J F

    2015-09-01

    The quest for new sensing phenomena continues because detecting, discriminating, identifying, measuring and monitoring nuclear materials and their radiation from greater range, at lower concentrations, and in a more timely fashion brings greater safety, security and efficiency. The potential phenomena are diverse, and those that have been realised can be found in disparate fields of science, engineering and medicine, which makes the full range difficult to realise and record. The framework presented here offers a means to systematically and comprehensively explore nuclear sensing phenomena. The approach is based on the fundamental concepts of matter and energy, where the sequence starts with the original nuclear material and its emissions, and progressively considers signatures arising from secondary effects and the emissions from associated materials and the environment. Concepts of operations such as active and passive interrogation, and networked sensing are considered. In this operational light, unpacking nuclear signatures forces a fresh look at the sensing concept. It also exposes how some phenomena that exist in established technology may be considered novel based on how they could be exploited rather than what they fundamentally are. This article selects phenomena purely to illustrate the framework and how it can be best used to foster creativity in the quest for novel phenomena rather than exhaustively listing, categorising or comparing any practical aspects of candidate phenomena.

  13. High Sensitivity Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Detection of Tryptophan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandakkathara, Archana

    Raman spectroscopy has the capability of providing detailed information about molecular structure, but the extremely small cross section of Raman scattering prevents this technique from applications requiring high sensitivity. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) on the other hand provides strongly increased Raman signal from molecules attached to metallic nanostructures. SERS is thus a promising technique for high sensitivity analytical applications. One particular area of interest is the application of such techniques for the analysis of the composition of biological cells. However, there are issues which have to be addressed in order to make SERS a reliable technique such as the optimization of conditions for any given analyte, understanding the kinetic processes of binding of the target molecules to the nanostructures and understanding the evolution and coagulation of the nanostructures, in the case of colloidal solutions. The latter processes introduce a delay time for the observation of maximum enhancement factors which must be taken into account for any given implementation of SERS. In the present thesis the goal was to develop very sensitive SERS techniques for the measurement of biomolecules of interest for analysis of the contents of cells. The techniques explored could be eventually be applicable to microfluidic systems with the ultimate goal of analyzing the molecular constituents of single cells. SERS study of different amino acids and organic dyes were performed during the course of this thesis. A high sensitivity detection system based on SERS has been developed and spectrum from tryptophan (Trp) amino acid at very low concentration (10-8 M) has been detected. The concentration at which good quality SERS spectra could be detected from Trp is 4 orders of magnitude smaller than that previously reported in literature. It has shown that at such low concentrations the SERS spectra of Trp are qualitatively distinct from the spectra commonly reported in

  14. Radiological impacts of phosphogypsum.

    PubMed

    Al Attar, Lina; Al-Oudat, Mohammad; Kanakri, Salwa; Budeir, Youssef; Khalily, Hussam; Al Hamwi, Ahmad

    2011-09-01

    This study was carried out to assess the radiological impact of Syrian phosphogypsum (PG) piles in the compartments of the surrounding ecosystem. Estimating the distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides (i.e. (226)Ra, (238)U, (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb) in the raw materials, product and by-product of the Syrian phosphate fertilizer industry was essential. The data revealed that the concentrations of the radionuclides were enhanced in the treated phosphate ore. In PG, (226)Ra content had a mean activity of 318 Bq kg(-1). The uranium content in PG was low, ca. 33 Bq kg(-1), because uranium remained in the phosphoric acid produced. Over 80% of (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb present partitioned in PG. The presence of PG piles did not increase significantly the concentration of (222)Rn or gamma rays exposure dose in the area studied. The annual effective dose was only 0.082 mSv y(-1). The geometric mean of total suspended air particulates (TSP) ca. 85 μg m(-3). The activity concentration of the radionuclides in filtrates and runoff waters were below the detection limits (ca. 0.15 mBq L(-1) for (238)U, 0.1 mBq L(-1) for (232)Th and 0.18 mBq L(-1) for both of (210)Po and (210)Pb); the concentration of the radionuclides in ground water samples and Qattina Lake were less than the permissible limits set for drinking water by the World Health Organisation, WHO, (10, 1 and 0.1 Bq L(-1) for (238)U, (232)Th and both of (210)Po and (210)Pb, respectively). Eastern sites soil samples of PG piles recorded the highest activity concentrations, i.e. 26, 33, 28, 61 and 40 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, (238)U, (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb, respectively, due to the prevailing western and north-western wind in the area, but remained within the natural levels reported in Syrian soil (13-32 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, 24.9-62.2 Bq kg(-1) for (238)U and 10-32 Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th). The impact of PG piles on plants varied upon the plant species. Higher concentrations of the radionuclides were

  15. [Validity of modified radiological views to detect screw protrusion at the distal radius. A comparative study with computerized tomography].

    PubMed

    Mora-Pascual, F E; Aguilella-Fernández, L

    2013-01-01

    Volar fixed-angle plates (VFAP) are currently widely used for the treatment of extra-articular distal radius fractures. Using these plates has a high risk of articular and dorsal screw protrusion due to their special configuration. The aim of this study is to assess the validity of the standard X-rays, performed with the help of wedged supports, in order to detect articular and dorsal screw protrusion. A comparison with computed tomography (CT) scan imaging has been made. The outcome of 26 patients with distal radius articular fracture, treated with a VFAP, is reported. Good correlation between modified X-rays and CT scan was observed. A sensitivity of 100% for articular protrusion and 66% for dorsal have been obtained. When detecting screw protrusion at the distal radius, the use of wedged supports to perform special X-rays intraoperatively is an effective tool.

  16. Is radiology presented to medical students as a fulfilling career?

    PubMed

    Gunderman, Richard B; Huynh, Justin

    2007-10-01

    The Pathway Evaluation Program is a resource that provides profiles of 42 different medical specialities, including diagnostic radiology. It is widely used by medical students. The portrait of radiologic practice it presents is a sobering one and has the potential to deflect top students from careers in radiology. Radiologic educators and practicing radiologists need to understand its findings to improve educational experience and enhance professional fulfillment in the field.

  17. Integrating IT into the radiology environment.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Rather than perpetuating the struggle, "who controls the PACS, Radiology or Information Technology (IT)," Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula (CHOMP) took the approach of incorporating IT support within the Radiology Department. CHOMP faced the challenge of staffing Radiology computer systems and networks by using a two-pronged approach; promoting and training clinical staff in IT functions and transferring an experienced IT person into the Radiology Department. Roles and responsibilities are divided. CHOMP's IT Department supports the Radiology Department's desktop devices, PCs, printers, and standard peripherals; while the department's DICOM print and archive network, specialized hardware (e.g., Merge DICOM interface computers), and applications are supported by the Radiology Department. The IT Department provides operating system support for multi-user VMS, Unix, and NT-based systems, e.g. Sun Solaris for the DICOM archive, and Windows NT for Mitra PACS Broker, the HL7/DICOM interface engine. IT also supports network communications, i.e., network electronics (routers, switches, etc.), TCP/IP communications, and network traffic analysis; and OS operations support for major Radiology systems, e.g. back-ups and off-site tape storage. Radiology staff provides applications support and troubleshooting, including analyst functions for RIS; and are the first point of contact with the Radiology systems vendors, e.g., GE Medical, or Siemens. The Radiology Department's senior IT person, the Clinical Technology Coordinator, transferred from CHOMP's IT Department after 7 years in that department. She performs analysis and design associated with Radiology's computer systems, coordinates development of the department's strategic plan, evaluates vendor proposals, and assists the department with product and application selection. Her IT experience and growing knowledge of Radiology's clinical tasks enhances communications between the Radiology and IT departments. Formal

  18. Educational treasures in Radiology: The Radiology Olympics - striving for gold in Radiology education.

    PubMed

    Talanow, Roland

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on Radiology Olympics (www.RadiologyOlympics.com) - a collaboration with the international Radiology community for Radiology education, Radiolopolis (www.Radiolopolis.com). The Radiology Olympics honour the movers and shakers in Radiology education and offer an easy to use platform for educating medical professionals based on Radiology cases.

  19. Optical extinction monitor using cw cavity enhanced detection.

    PubMed

    Kebabian, Paul L; Robinson, Wade A; Freedman, Andrew

    2007-06-01

    We present details of an apparatus capable of measuring optical extinction (i.e., scattering and/or absorption) with high precision and sensitivity. The apparatus employs one variant of cavity enhanced detection, specifically cavity attenuated phase shift spectroscopy, using a near-confocal arrangement of two high reflectivity (R approximately 0.9999) mirrors in tandem with an enclosed cell 26 cm in length, a light emitting diode (LED), and a vacuum photodiode detector. The square wave modulated light from the LED passes through the absorption cell and is detected as a distorted wave form which is characterized by a phase shift with respect to the initial modulation. The amount of that phase shift is a function of fixed instrument properties-cell length, mirror reflectivity, and modulation frequency-and of the presence of a scatterer or absorber (air, particles, trace gases, etc.) within the cell. The specific implementation reported here employs a blue LED; the wavelength and spectral bandpass of the measurement are defined by the use of an interference filter centered at 440 nm with a 20 nm wide bandpass. The monitor is enclosed within a standard 19 in. rack-mounted instrumentation box, weighs 10 kg, and uses 70 W of electrical power including a vacuum pump. Measurements of the phase shift induced by Rayleigh scattering from several gases (which range in extinction coefficient from 0.4-32 Mm(-1)) exhibit a highly linear dependence (r(2)=0.999 97) when plotted as the co-tangent of the phase shift versus the expected extinction. Using heterodyne demodulation techniques, we demonstrate a detection limit of 0.04 Mm(-1) (4 x 10(-10) cm(-1)) (2sigma) in 10 s integration time and a base line drift of less than +/-0.1 Mm(-1) over a 24 h period. Detection limits decrease as the square root of integration time out to approximately 150 s.

  20. Detection of Acute Radiation Sickness: A Feasibility Study in Non-Human Primates Circulating miRNAs for Triage in Radiological Events

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Naresh; Rogers, Claude J.; Lukaszewicz, Agnes I.; Axtelle, James; Yadav, Marshleen; Song, Feifei; Chakravarti, Arnab; Jacob, Naduparambil K.

    2016-01-01

    Development of biomarkers capable of estimating absorbed dose is critical for effective triage of affected individuals after radiological events. Levels of cell-free circulating miRNAs in plasma were compared for dose-response analysis in non-human primates (NHP) exposed to lethal (6.5 Gy) and sub-lethal (1 and 3 Gy) doses over a 7 day period. The doses and test time points were selected to mimic triage needs in the event of a mass casualty radiological event. Changes in miRNA abundance in irradiated animals were compared to a non-irradiated cohort and a cohort experiencing acute inflammation response from exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). An amplification-free, hybridization-based direct digital counting method was used for evaluation of changes in microRNAs in plasma from all animals. Consistent with previous murine studies, circulating levels of miR-150-5p exhibited a dose- and time-dependent decrease in plasma. Furthermore, plasma miR-150-5p levels were found to correlate well with lymphocyte and neutrophil depletion kinetics. Additionally, plasma levels of several other evolutionarily and functionally conserved miRNAs were found altered as a function of dose and time. Interestingly, miR-574-5p exhibited a distinct, dose-dependent increase 24 h post irradiation in NHPs with lethal versus sub-lethal exposure before returning to the baseline level by day 3. This particular miRNA response was not detected in previous murine studies but was observed in animals exposed to LPS, indicating distinct molecular and inflammatory responses. Furthermore, an increase in low-abundant miR-126, miR-144, and miR-21 as well as high-abundant miR-1-3p and miR-206 was observed in irradiated animals on day 3 and/or day 7. The data from this study could be used to develop a multi-marker panel with known tissue-specific origin that could be used for developing rapid assays for dose assessment and evaluation of radiation injury on multiple organs. Furthermore this approach may be

  1. Carbon Nanotube-based microelectrodes for enhanced detection of neurotransmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher B.

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is one of the common techniques used for rapid measurement of neurotransmitters in vivo. Carbon-fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) are typically used for neurotransmitter detection because of sub-second measurement capabilities, ability to measure changes in neurotransmitter concentration during neurotransmission, and the small size electrode diameter, which limits the amount of damage caused to tissue. Cylinder CFMEs, typically 50 -- 100 microm long, are commonly used for in vivo experiments because the electrode sensitivity is directly related to the electrode surface area. However the length of the electrode can limit the spatial resolution of neurotransmitter detection, which can restrict experiments in Drosophila and other small model systems. In addition, the electrode sensitivity toward dopamine and serotonin detection drops significantly for measurements at rates faster than 10 Hz, limiting the temporal resolution of CFMEs. While the use of FSCV at carbon-fiber microelectrodes has led to substantial strides in our understanding of neurotransmission, techniques that expand the capabilities of CFMEs are crucial to fully maximize the potential uses of FSCV. This dissertation introduces new methods to integrate carbon nanotubes (CNT) into microelectrodes and discusses the electrochemical enhancements of these CNT-microelectrodes. The electrodes are specifically designed with simple fabrication procedures so that highly specialized equipment is not necessary, and they utilize commercially available materials so that the electrodes could be easily integrated into existing systems. The electrochemical properties of CNT modified CFMEs are characterized using FSCV and the effect of CNT functionalization on these properties is explored in Chapter 2. For example, CFME modification using carboxylic acid functionalized CNTs yield about a 6-fold increase in dopamine oxidation current, but modification with octadecylamine CNTs results in a

  2. Rapid Brightness Variations as a Tool to Enhance Satellite Detectability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laas-Bourez, Myrtille; Klotz, Alain; Ducrotte, Etienne; Boer, Michel; Blanchet, Gwendoline

    2009-03-01

    To preserve the space environment for future generations and ensure the safety of space missions, we have to improve our knowledge of the debris at all altitudes. Since 2004, we have started to observe and study satellites and debris on the geostationary orbit. We use a network of robotic telescopes called TAROT (Télescopes Action Rapide pour les Objets Transitoires - Rapid Action Telescope for Transient Objects) which are located in France and Chile. This system processes the data in real time. Its wide field of view is useful for detection, systematic survey and to follow both catalogued and uncatalogued objects. The TAROTs are 25 cm telescopes with a wide field of view of 1.86deg x 1.86deg. It can detect objects up to 17th magnitude with an integration time of 30 seconds, corresponding to an object of 50cm in the geostationary belt with a 0.2 albedo. Tiny debris are also dangerous for space mission and satellites. To detect them, we need either to increase the TAROT sensitivity or to observe them in optimal light conditions.Last year we detected very important magnitude variations from several geostationary satellites during observations close to equinoxes. The brightness of a geostationary satellite evolves during the night and during the year, depending on the angle between the observer, the satellite and the sun. Geostationary satellites will be brighter near March 1st and of October 10th, at their exit of the shade. In this period the sun crosses the equatorial plan of the Earth, the enlightened surface will reach a maximum during a limited periods of time (about 30 minutes), provoking a short, bright flash. This phenomenon is used in two ways: first, it allows to detect smaller objects, which are usually below the detection limit, enhancing the sensitivity of the survey. Secondly, for longer objects the light curve during and outside the °ash contains information on the object intrinsic geometry and reflectivity. In this paper we discuss how the various

  3. Detection of suspicious lesions in dynamic contrast enhanced MRI data.

    PubMed

    Twellmann, T; Saalbach, A; Müller, C; Nattkemper, T W; Wismüller, A

    2004-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnet resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has become an important source of information to aid breast cancer diagnosis. Nevertheless, next to the temporal sequence of 3D volume data from the DCE-MRI technique, the radiologist commonly adducts information from other modalities for his final diagnosis. Thus, the diagnosis process is time consuming and tools are required to support the human expert. We investigate an automatic approach that detects the location and delineates the extent of suspicious masses in multi-temporal DCE-MRI data sets. It applies the state-of-the-art support vector machine algorithm to the classification of the short-time series associated with each voxel. The ROC analysis shows an increased specificity in contrast to standard evaluations techniques.

  4. Image animation for theme enhancement and change detection. [LANDSAT 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    Animated displays are useful in enhancing subtle temporally related changes in scenes viewed by satellites capable of providing repetitive coverage. The detectability of fixed features is also improved through the help of the powerful visual integration process. To expedite the process of assembling and displaying well-registered, time-lapse sequences and to provide means for making quantitative measurements of radiances, displacements, and areas, an electronic satellite image analysis console was constructed. During the LANDSAT-1 program, this equipment was applied to the needs of a number of earth resource investigators with interests principally related to dynamic hydrology. The measurement of the areal extent of snow cover within defined drainage basins is discussed as a representative applications example.

  5. Historical Radiological Event Monitoring

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    During and after radiological events EPA's RadNet monitors the environment for radiation. EPA monitored environmental radiation levels during and after Chernobyl, Fukushima and other international and domestic radiological incidents.

  6. Mobile computing for radiology.

    PubMed

    Auffermann, William F; Chetlen, Alison L; Sharma, Arjun; Colucci, Andrew T; DeQuesada, Ivan M; Grajo, Joseph R; Kung, Justin W; Loehfelm, Thomas W; Sherry, Steven J

    2013-12-01

    The rapid advances in mobile computing technology have the potential to change the way radiology and medicine as a whole are practiced. Several mobile computing advances have not yet found application to the practice of radiology, while others have already been applied to radiology but are not in widespread clinical use. This review addresses several areas where radiology and medicine in general may benefit from adoption of the latest mobile computing technologies and speculates on potential future applications.

  7. Enhancing time-series detection algorithms for automated biosurveillance.

    PubMed

    Tokars, Jerome I; Burkom, Howard; Xing, Jian; English, Roseanne; Bloom, Steven; Cox, Kenneth; Pavlin, Julie A

    2009-04-01

    BioSense is a US national system that uses data from health information systems for automated disease surveillance. We studied 4 time-series algorithm modifications designed to improve sensitivity for detecting artificially added data. To test these modified algorithms, we used reports of daily syndrome visits from 308 Department of Defense (DoD) facilities and 340 hospital emergency departments (EDs). At a constant alert rate of 1%, sensitivity was improved for both datasets by using a minimum standard deviation (SD) of 1.0, a 14-28 day baseline duration for calculating mean and SD, and an adjustment for total clinic visits as a surrogate denominator. Stratifying baseline days into weekdays versus weekends to account for day-of-week effects increased sensitivity for the DoD data but not for the ED data. These enhanced methods may increase sensitivity without increasing the alert rate and may improve the ability to detect outbreaks by using automated surveillance system data.

  8. Enhanced electrochemical detection of quercetin by Natural Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Federico José Vicente; Espino, Magdalena; de Los Angeles Fernandez, María; Raba, Julio; Silva, María Fernanda

    2016-09-14

    New trends in analytical chemistry encourage the development of smart techniques and methods aligned with Green Chemistry. In this sense, Natural Deep Eutectic Solvents represents an excellent opportunity as a new generation of green solvents. In this work a new application for them has been proposed and demonstrated. These solvents were synthesized by combinations of inexpensive and natural components like, Glucose, Fructose, Citric acid and Lactic acid. The different natural solvents were easily prepared and added to buffer solution in different concentrations, allowing the enhancement of electrochemical detection of an important representative antioxidant like quercetin (QR) with improved signal up to 380%. QR is a ubiquitous flavonoid widespread in plants and food of plant origin. The proposed method using phosphate buffer with a eutectic mixture of Citric acid, Glucose and water in combination with carbon screen printed electrodes exhibited a good analytical performance. Detection and quantification limits were of 7.97 and 26.3 nM respectively; and repeatability with %RSDs of 1.41 and 7.49 for peak potential and intensity respectively. In addition, it has proved to be faster, greener and cheaper than other sensors and chromatographic methods available with the additional advantage of being completely portable. Furthermore, the obtained results demonstrated that the proposed method is able for the determination of QR in complex food samples.

  9. Detection Of Biochips By Raman And Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantarovich, Keren; Tsarfati, Inbal; Gheber, Levi A.; Haupt, Karsten; Bar, Ilana

    2010-08-01

    Biochips constitute a rapidly increasing research field driven by the versatility of sensing devices and the importance of their applications in the bioanalytical field, drug development, environmental monitoring, food analysis, etc. Common strategies used for creating biochips and for reading them have extensive limitations, motivating development of miniature biochips and label-free formats. To achieve these goals we combined the nano fountain pen method, for printing microscale features with Raman spectroscopy or surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for reading droplets of synthetic receptors. These receptors include molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs), which are obtained by polymerization of suitable functional and cross-linking monomers around molecular templates. MIPs are characterized by higher physical and chemical stability than biomacromolecules, and therefore are potentially very suitable as recognition elements for biosensors, or biochips. The monitored bands in the Raman and SERS spectra could be related to the taken up compound, allowing direct detection of the template, i.e., the β-blocking drug propranolol in the imprinted droplets, as well as imaging of individual and multiple dots in an array. This study shows that the combination of nanolithography techniques with SERS might open the possibility of miniaturized arrayed MIP sensors with label-free, specific and quantitative detection.

  10. Radiologic-pathologic analysis of quantitative 3D tumour enhancement on contrast-enhanced MR imaging: a study of ROI placement

    PubMed Central

    Chockalingam, Arun; Duran, Rafael; Sohn, Jae Ho; Schernthaner, Rüdiger; Chapiro, Julius; Lee, Howard; Sahu, Sonia; Nguyen, Sonny; Lin, MingDe

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the influence of region-of-interest (ROI) placement on 3D tumour enhancement [Quantitative European Association for the Study of the Liver (qEASL)] in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients treated with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). Methods Phase 1: 40 HCC patients had nine ROIs placed by one reader using systematic techniques (3 ipsilateral to the lesion, 3 contralateral to the lesion, and 3 dispersed throughout the liver) and qEASL variance was measured. Intra-class correlations were computed. Phase 2: 15 HCC patients with histosegmentation were selected. Six ROIs were systematically placed by AC (3 ROIs ipsilateral and 3 ROIs contralateral to the lesion). Three ROIs were placed by 2 radiologists. qEASL values were compared to histopathology by Pearson’s correlation, linear regression, and median difference. Results Phase 1: The dispersed method (abandoned in phase 2) had low consistency and high variance. Phase 2: qEASL correlated strongly with pathology in systematic methods [Pearson’s correlation coefficient=0.886 (ipsilateral) and 0.727 (contralateral)] and in clinical methods (0.625 and 0.879). However, ipsilateral placement matched best with pathology (median difference: 5.4 %; correlation: 0.89; regression CI: [0.904, 0.1409]). Conclusions qEASL is a robust method with comparable values among tested placements. Ipsilateral placement showed high consistency and better pathological correlation. PMID:25994198

  11. Radiological health

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.M.

    1981-12-01

    Dosimeters were provided for development within the crew compartment and on the astronauts flight garments to detect radiation encountered by the space crew during the mission. The STS-1 mission encountered geomagnetically trapped electrons and protons on 13 low altitude passes through the South Atlantic anomaly. The orbital inclination was such that encounters with the outer belt horn was negligible. Radiation dose to the crew from the above events was estimated to be 5 millirad. Total PDL measured dose to the crew from all sources during the STS-1 mission was 20 millirad.

  12. Breast Contrast Enhanced MR Imaging: Semi-Automatic Detection of Vascular Map and Predominant Feeding Vessel

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Antonella; Fusco, Roberta; Filice, Salvatore; Granata, Vincenza; Catalano, Orlando; Vallone, Paolo; Di Bonito, Maurizio; D’Aiuto, Massimiliano; Rinaldo, Massimo; Capasso, Immacolata; Sansone, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To obtain breast vascular map and to assess correlation between predominant feeding vessel and tumor location with a semi-automatic method compared to conventional radiologic reading. Methods 148 malignant and 75 benign breast lesions were included. All patients underwent bilateral MR imaging. Written informed consent was obtained from the patients before MRI. The local ethics committee granted approval for this study. Semi-automatic breast vascular map and predominant vessel detection was performed on MRI, for each patient. Semi-automatic detection (depending on grey levels threshold manually chosen by radiologist) was compared with results of two expert radiologists; inter-observer variability and reliability of semi-automatic approach were assessed. Results Anatomic analysis of breast lesions revealed that 20% of patients had masses in internal half, 50% in external half and the 30% in subareolar/central area. As regards the 44 tumors in internal half, based on radiologic consensus, 40 demonstrated a predominant feeding vessel (61% were supplied by internal thoracic vessels, 14% by lateral thoracic vessels, 16% by both thoracic vessels and 9% had no predominant feeding vessel—p<0.01), based on semi-automatic detection, 38 tumors demonstrated a predominant feeding vessel (66% were supplied by internal thoracic vessels, 11% by lateral thoracic vessels, 9% by both thoracic vessels and 14% had no predominant feeding vessel—p<0.01). As regards the 111 tumors in external half, based on radiologic consensus, 91 demonstrated a predominant feeding vessel (25% were supplied by internal thoracic vessels, 39% by lateral thoracic vessels, 18% by both thoracic vessels and 18% had no predominant feeding vessel—p<0.01), based on semi-automatic detection, 94 demonstrated a predominant feeding vessel (27% were supplied by internal thoracic vessels, 45% by lateral thoracic vessels, 4% by both thoracic vessels and 24% had no predominant feeding vessel—p<0.01). An

  13. Detection of Leptomeningeal Metastasis by Contrast-Enhanced 3D T1-SPACE: Comparison with 2D FLAIR and Contrast-Enhanced 2D T1-Weighted Images

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Bomi; Hwang, Eo-Jin; Lee, Song; Jang, Jinhee; Jung, So-Lyung; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Kim, Bum-soo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To compare the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced 3D(dimensional) T1-weighted sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts by using different flip angle evolutions (T1-SPACE), 2D fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images and 2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted image in detection of leptomeningeal metastasis except for invasive procedures such as a CSF tapping. Materials and Methods Three groups of patients were included retrospectively for 9 months (from 2013-04-01 to 2013-12-31). Group 1 patients with positive malignant cells in CSF cytology (n = 22); group 2, stroke patients with steno-occlusion in ICA or MCA (n = 16); and group 3, patients with negative results on MRI, whose symptom were dizziness or headache (n = 25). A total of 63 sets of MR images are separately collected and randomly arranged: (1) CE 3D T1-SPACE; (2) 2D FLAIR; and (3) CE T1-GRE using a 3-Tesla MR system. A faculty neuroradiologist with 8-year-experience and another 2nd grade trainee in radiology reviewed each MR image- blinded by the results of CSF cytology and coded their observations as positives or negatives of leptomeningeal metastasis. The CSF cytology result was considered as a gold standard. Sensitivity and specificity of each MR images were calculated. Diagnostic accuracy was compared using a McNemar’s test. A Cohen's kappa analysis was performed to assess inter-observer agreements. Results Diagnostic accuracy was not different between 3D T1-SPACE and CSF cytology by both raters. However, the accuracy test of 2D FLAIR and 2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted GRE was inconsistent by the two raters. The Kappa statistic results were 0.657 (3D T1-SPACE), 0.420 (2D FLAIR), and 0.160 (2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted GRE). The 3D T1-SPACE images showed the highest inter-observer agreements between the raters. Conclusions Compared to 2D FLAIR and 2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted GRE, contrast-enhanced 3D T1 SPACE showed a better detection rate of

  14. Towards Enhanced Underwater Lidar Detection via Source Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illig, David W.

    separation: The first investigations of statistical separation approaches for underwater lidar are presented. By demonstrating that target and backscatter returns have different statistical properties, a new separation axis is opened. This work investigates and quantifies performance of three statistical separation approaches. 4. Application of detection theory to underwater lidar: While many similar applications use detection theory to assess performance, less development has occurred in the underwater lidar field. This work applies these concepts to statistical separation approaches, providing another perspective in which to assess performance. In addition, by using detection theory approaches, statistical metrics can be used to associate a level of confidence in each ranging measurement. 5. Preliminary investigation of forward scatter suppression: If backscatter is sufficiently suppressed, forward scattering becomes a performance-limiting factor. This work presents a proof-of-concept demonstration of the potential for statistical separation approaches to suppress both forward and backward scatter. These results provide a demonstration of the capability that signal processing has to improve separation between target and backscatter. Separation capability improves in the transition from temporal to frequency to statistical separation approaches, with the statistical separation approaches improving target detection sensitivity by as much as 30 dB. Ranging and detection results demonstrate the enhanced performance this would allow in ranging applications. This increased performance is an important step in moving underwater lidar capability towards the requirements of the next generation of sensors.

  15. A quantum radar detection protocol for fringe visibility enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltenbah, Benjamin; Parazzoli, Claudio; Capron, Barbara

    2016-05-01

    We present analysis of a radar detection technique using a Photon Addition Homodyne Receiver (PAHR) that improves SNR of the interferometer fringes and reduces uncertainty of the phase measurement. This system uses the concept of Photon Addition (PA) in which the coherent photon distribution is altered. We discuss this process first as a purely mathematical concept to introduce PA and illustrate its effect on coherent photon distribution. We then present a notional proof-of-concept experiment involving a parametric down converter (PDC) and probabilistic post-selection of the results. We end with presentation of a more deterministic PAHR concept that is more suitable for development into a working system. Coherent light illuminates a target and the return signal interferes with the local oscillator reference photons to create the desired fringes. The PAHR alters the photon probability distribution of the returned light via interaction between the return photons and atoms. We refer to this technique as "Atom Interaction" or AI. The returning photons are focused at the properly prepared atomic system. The injected atoms into this region are prepared in the desired quantum state. During the interaction time, the initial quantum state evolves in such a way that the photon distribution function changes resulting in higher photon count, lower phase noise and an increase in fringe SNR. The result is a 3-5X increase of fringe SNR. This method is best suited for low light intensity (low photon count, 0.1-5) applications. The detection protocol could extend the range of existing systems without loss of accuracy, or conversely enhance a system's accuracy for given range. We present quantum mathematical analysis of the method to illustrate how both range and angular resolution improve in comparison with standard measurement techniques. We also suggest an experimental path to validate the method which also will lead toward deployment in the field.

  16. Detection Enhancement of Protein Structural Vibrations: Measurements and Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niessen, Katherine; Xu, Mengyang; Snell, Edward; Cody, Vivian; Pace, James; Schmidt, Marius; Markelz, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Narrow band intramolecular protein vibrations have been successfully measured using crystal anisotropy THz microscopy (CATM), a near-field technique, on protein crystals. To address the question of how these motions are related to protein function we developed a variation of this technique to rapidly measure a variety of protein crystals. The variation anisotropy measurement consists of introducing a wire-grid polarizer in the THz path and rotating the polarizer between measurements, instead of the sample. While the resulting anisotropic spectra confirm reproducibility and protein specific nature of the response the signal is not directly related to the absorption spectra and in fact shows more structure than CATM. This is due to the polarization sensitivity of the electro-optical detection crystal and the changing THz polarization direction and amplitude at the detector. This combination leads to an enhancement of specific resonances and increased sensitivity to rotation of the THz polarization from the sample itself. Preliminary calculations suggest that the technique is sensitive to the birefringence associated with anisotropic absorbance. The results and significance of these measurements on protein and sucrose crystals and the calculated expected response will be discussed.

  17. Enhanced detection of broadband incoherent light with nanoridge plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Hyeon; Yeo, Jong-Souk

    2015-04-08

    Emerging photonic integrated circuit technologies require integrative functionality at ultrahigh speed and dimensional compatibility with ultrasmall electronics. Plasmonics offers a promise of addressing these challenges with novel nanophotonic approaches for on-chip information processing or sensing applications. Short communication range and strong light-matter interaction enabled by on-chip plasmonics allow us to extend beyond a conventional approach of integrating coherent and narrowband light source. Such hybrid electronic and photonic interconnection desires a on-chip photodetector that is highly responsive to broadband incoherent light, yet provides elegant design for nanoscale integration. Here we demonstrate an ultracompact broadband photodetection with greatly enhanced photoresponsivity using plasmonic nanoridge geometry. The nanoridge photodetector confines a wide spectrum of electromagnetic energy in a nanostructure through the excitation of multiple plasmons, which thus enables the detection of weak and broadband light. With nanoscale design, material, and dimensional compatibility for the integration, the nanoridge photodetector opens up a new possibility of highly sensitive on-chip photodetection for future integrated circuits and sensing applications.

  18. Rapid surface enhanced Raman scattering detection method for chloramphenicol residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Yao, Weirong

    2015-06-01

    Chloramphenicol (CAP) is a widely used amide alcohol antibiotics, which has been banned from using in food producing animals in many countries. In this study, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) coupled with gold colloidal nanoparticles was used for the rapid analysis of CAP. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were conducted with Gaussian 03 at the B3LYP level using the 3-21G(d) and 6-31G(d) basis sets to analyze the assignment of vibrations. Affirmatively, the theoretical Raman spectrum of CAP was in complete agreement with the experimental spectrum. They both exhibited three strong peaks characteristic of CAP at 1104 cm-1, 1344 cm-1, 1596 cm-1, which were used for rapid qualitative analysis of CAP residues in food samples. The use of SERS as a method for the measurements of CAP was explored by comparing use of different solvents, gold colloidal nanoparticles concentration and absorption time. The method of the detection limit was determined as 0.1 μg/mL using optimum conditions. The Raman peak at 1344 cm-1 was used as the index for quantitative analysis of CAP in food samples, with a linear correlation of R2 = 0.9802. Quantitative analysis of CAP residues in foods revealed that the SERS technique with gold colloidal nanoparticles was sensitive and of a good stability and linear correlation, and suited for rapid analysis of CAP residue in a variety of food samples.

  19. Prepancreatic postduodenal portal vein: a rare vascular variant detected on imaging.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vishal Kumar; Rajesh, S; Bhatnagar, Shorav; Dev, Ankur; Mukund, Amar; Arora, Ankur

    2013-09-01

    Anomalous preduodenal portal vein is a rare abdominal vascular variant; even rarer is the prepancreatic postduodenal position. We report an anomalous portal vein positioned in between duodenum and pancreatic head detected on contrast enhanced computed tomography. Awareness and accurate radiological interpretation of this unique and rare vascular pattern can prevent inadvertent injury during surgical and radiological interventions.

  20. Estimating radiological background using imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Schweppe, John E.; Stave, Sean C.; Jordan, David V.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Stewart, Trevor N.; Seifert, Carolyn E.

    2014-06-13

    Optical imaging spectroscopy is investigated as a method to estimate radiological background by spectral identification of soils, sediments, rocks, minerals and building materials derived from natural materials and assigning tabulated radiological emission values to these materials. Radiological airborne surveys are undertaken by local, state and federal agencies to identify the presence of radiological materials out of regulatory compliance. Detection performance in such surveys is determined by (among other factors) the uncertainty in the radiation background; increased knowledge of the expected radiation background will improve the ability to detect low-activity radiological materials. Radiological background due to naturally occurring radiological materials (NORM) can be estimated by reference to previous survey results, use of global 40K, 238U, and 232Th (KUT) values, reference to existing USGS radiation background maps, or by a moving average of the data as it is acquired. Each of these methods has its drawbacks: previous survey results may not include recent changes, the global average provides only a zero-order estimate, the USGS background radiation map resolutions are coarse and are accurate only to 1 km – 25 km sampling intervals depending on locale, and a moving average may essentially low pass filter the data to obscure small changes in radiation counts. Imaging spectroscopy from airborne or spaceborne platforms can offer higher resolution identification of materials and background, as well as provide imaging context information. AVIRIS hyperspectral image data is analyzed using commercial exploitation software to determine the usefulness of imaging spectroscopy to identify qualitative radiological background emissions when compared to airborne radiological survey data.

  1. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-11-21

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint.

  2. Ultraviolet Surface-Enhanced Rama Scattering for Detection Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    on some transition metals such as Fe, Ru, Rh, Pd, and Pt, but the enhancement factors observed have been relatively small; they were typically around...The coinage (Au, Ag, Cu) and alkali metals have large enhancements in the visible region of the spectrum because their free-electron-like behavior...electromagnetic enhancements are expected to be smaller in transition metals because damping due to interband transitions is large.4 The electronic

  3. A novel algorithm for the edge detection and edge enhancement of medical images.

    PubMed

    Crooks, I; Fallone, B G

    1993-01-01

    A novel algorithm, histogram shifting (HS) is presented, which performs edge detection or edge enhancement with the choice of two parameters. The histogram of a region surrounding each pixel is found and translated toward the origin, resulting in the new pixel value. Images from a variety of medical imaging modalities were processed with HS to perform detection and enhancement of edges. Comparison with results obtained from conventional edge detection (e.g., Sobel) and with conventional edge-enhancement algorithms is discussed. HS appears to perform the edge-detection operation without introducing "double-edge" effects often obtained with conventional edge-detection algorithms. HS also appears to perform edge enhancement without introducing extensive noise artifacts, which may be noticeable with many edge-enhancement algorithms.

  4. Radiological Defense. Textbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This textbook has been prepared under the direction of the Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DCPA) Staff College for use as a student reference manual in radiological defense (RADEF) courses. It provides much of the basic technical information necessary for a proper understanding of radiological defense and summarizes RADEF planning and expected…

  5. Enhanced charge detection: Amplification factor, phase reversal and measurement time dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Thorgrimson, J.; Sachrajda, A. S.; Studenikin, S. A.; Bogan, A.; Aers, G. C.; Kam, A.; Zawadzki, P.; Wasilewski, Z. R.

    2013-12-04

    Studenikin et al. recently demonstrated a significant enhancement of the fringe contrast of coherent Landau-Zener-Stückelberg (LZS) oscillations between singlet S and triplet T+ two-spin states using a modified charge detection technique called enhanced charge detection (ECD). In this paper we explain the amplitude phase reversal and confirm the magnitude of the effect is consistent with our calibrations. We also show that the enhancement cannot be explained by a T{sub 1} effect.

  6. Method of enhancing radiation response of radiation detection materials

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven D.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a method of increasing radiation response of a radiation detection material for a given radiation signal by first pressurizing the radiation detection material. Pressurization may be accomplished by any means including mechanical and/or hydraulic. In this application, the term "pressure" includes fluid pressure and/or mechanical stress.

  7. Enhancing community detection by using local structural information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Ju; Hu, Ke; Zhang, Yan; Bao, Mei-Hua; Tang, Liang; Tang, Yan-Ni; Gao, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Jian-Ming; Chen, Benyan; Hu, Jing-Bo

    2016-03-01

    Many real-world networks, such as gene networks, protein-protein interaction networks and metabolic networks, exhibit community structures, meaning the existence of groups of densely connected vertices in the networks. Many local similarity measures in the networks are closely related to the concept of the community structures, and may have a positive effect on community detection in the networks. Here, various local similarity measures are used to extract local structural information, which is then applied to community detection in the networks by using the edge-reweighting strategy. The effect of the local similarity measures on community detection is carefully investigated and compared in various networks. The experimental results show that the local similarity measures are crucial for the improvement of community detection methods, while the positive effect of the local similarity measures is closely related to the networks under study and applied community detection methods.

  8. The infected liver: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Mortelé, Koenraad J; Segatto, Enrica; Ros, Pablo R

    2004-01-01

    Recent technologic advances have significantly enhanced the role of imaging in the detection, characterization, and management of infectious diseases involving the liver. In addition, imaging-guided percutaneous drainage has greatly improved the clinical treatment of patients with focal liver abscess. Infectious liver diseases can be accurately evaluated with ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Characteristic changes in US echogenicity, CT attenuation, or MR imaging signal intensity and typical enhancement patterns can contribute to the diagnosis of specific infectious diseases, including abscesses, parasitic diseases, fungal diseases, granulomatous diseases, viral hepatitis, and other less common infections. CT is particularly helpful in revealing the presence of calcifications and gas and in detailing the enhancement pattern. The multiplanar capability of MR imaging and its sensitivity to small differences in tissue composition increase its specificity for certain hepatic infections, including hydatid cyst and candidiasis. Radiologic findings may be sufficient to obviate aspiration or histologic examination, although in most instances they are less specific. Nevertheless, imaging findings taken together with appropriate clinical information may provide the most likely diagnosis, even if biopsy is sometimes required for confirmation.

  9. Apparatus for safeguarding a radiological source

    DOEpatents

    Bzorgi, Fariborz M

    2014-10-07

    A tamper detector is provided for safeguarding a radiological source that is moved into and out of a storage location through an access porthole for storage and use. The radiological source is presumed to have an associated shipping container approved by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for transporting the radiological source. The tamper detector typically includes a network of sealed tubing that spans at least a portion of the access porthole. There is an opening in the network of sealed tubing that is large enough for passage therethrough of the radiological source and small enough to prevent passage therethrough of the associated shipping cask. Generally a gas source connector is provided for establishing a gas pressure in the network of sealed tubing, and a pressure drop sensor is provided for detecting a drop in the gas pressure below a preset value.

  10. Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Novick, Vincent J.; Johnson, Stanley A.

    1999-01-01

    A vapor sample detection method where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample.

  11. Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Novick, V.J.; Johnson, S.A.

    1999-08-03

    A vapor sample detection method is described where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample. 13 figs.

  12. Clutter and anomaly removal for enhanced target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basener, William F.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we investigate the use of anomaly detection to identify pixels to be removed prior to covariance computation. The resulting covariance matrix provides a better model of the image background and is less likely to be tainted by target spectra. In our tests, this method results in robust improvement in target detection performance for quadratic detection algorithms. Tests are conducted using imagery and targets freely available online. The imagery was acquired over Cooke City, Montana, a small town near Yellowstone Park, using the HyMap V/NIR/SWIR sensor with 126 spectral bands. There are three vehicle and four fabric targets located in the town and surrounding area.

  13. Trace Isotope Detection Enhanced by Coherent Elimination of Power Broadening

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, Alvaro Peralta; Brandt, Lukas; Halfmann, Thomas

    2006-12-15

    The selectivity and spectral resolution of traditional laser-based trace isotope analysis, i.e., resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS), is limited by power broadening of the radiative transition. We use the fact that power broadening does not occur in coherently driven quantum systems when the probing and excitation processes are temporally separated to demonstrate significant improvement of trace element detection, even under conditions of strong signals. Specifically, we apply a coherent variant of RIMS to the detection of traces of molecular nitric oxide (NO) isobars. For large laser intensities, the detected isotope signal can be increased by almost 1 order of magnitude without any loss in spectral resolution.

  14. Trace isotope detection enhanced by coherent elimination of power broadening.

    PubMed

    Conde, Alvaro Peralta; Brandt, Lukas; Halfmann, Thomas

    2006-12-15

    The selectivity and spectral resolution of traditional laser-based trace isotope analysis, i.e., resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS), is limited by power broadening of the radiative transition. We use the fact that power broadening does not occur in coherently driven quantum systems when the probing and excitation processes are temporally separated to demonstrate significant improvement of trace element detection, even under conditions of strong signals. Specifically, we apply a coherent variant of RIMS to the detection of traces of molecular nitric oxide (NO) isobars. For large laser intensities, the detected isotope signal can be increased by almost 1 order of magnitude without any loss in spectral resolution.

  15. Time-delayed contrast-enhanced MRI improves detection of brain metastases: a prospective validation of diagnostic yield.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Inbar, Or; Xu, Zhiyuan; Dodson, Blair; Rizvi, Tanvir; Durst, Christopher R; Mukherjee, Sugoto; Sheehan, Jason P

    2016-12-01

    The radiological detection of brain metastases (BMs) is essential for optimizing a patient's treatment. This statement is even more valid when stereotactic radiosurgery, a noninvasive image guided treatment that can target BM as small as 1-2 mm, is delivered as part of that care. The timing of image acquisition after contrast administration can influence the diagnostic sensitivity of contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for BM. Investigate the effect of time delayed acquisition after administration of intravenous Gadavist® (Gadobutrol 1 mmol/ml) on the detection of BM. This is a prospective IRB approved study of 50 patients with BM who underwent post-contrast MRI sequences after injection of 0.1 mmol/kg Gadavist® as part of clinical care (time-t0), followed by axial T1 sequences after a 10 min (time-t1) and 20 min delay (time-t2). MRI studies were blindly compared by three neuroradiologists. Single measure intraclass correlation coefficients were very high (0.914, 0.904 and 0.905 for time-t0, time-t1 and time-t2 respectively), corresponding to a reliable inter-observer correlation. The delayed MRI at time-t2 delayed sequences showed a significant and consistently higher diagnostic sensitivity for BM by every participating neuroradiologist and for the entire cohort (p = 0.016, 0.035 and 0.034 respectively). A disproportionately high representation of BM detected on the delayed studies was located within posterior circulation territories (compared to predictions based on tissue volume and blood-flow volumes). Considering the safe and potentially high yield nature of delayed MRI sequences, it should supplement the standard MRI sequences in all patients in need of precise delineation of their intracranial disease.

  16. Enhanced detection of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes by AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marisaldi, M.; Argan, A.; Ursi, A.; Gjesteland, T.; Fuschino, F.; Labanti, C.; Galli, M.; Tavani, M.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; D'Amico, F.; Østgaard, N.; Mereghetti, S.; Campana, R.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Bulgarelli, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Dietrich, S.; Longo, F.; Gianotti, F.; Giommi, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Trois, A.

    2015-11-01

    At the end of March 2015 the onboard software configuration of the Astrorivelatore Gamma a Immagini Leggero (AGILE) satellite was modified in order to disable the veto signal of the anticoincidence shield for the minicalorimeter instrument. The motivation for such a change was the understanding that the dead time induced by the anticoincidence prevented the detection of a large fraction of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs). The configuration change was highly successful resulting in an increase of one order of magnitude in TGF detection rate. As expected, the largest fraction of the new events has short duration (<100 μs), and part of them has simultaneous association with lightning sferics detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network. The new configuration provides the largest TGF detection rate surface density (TGFs/km2/yr) to date, opening prospects for improved correlation studies with lightning and atmospheric parameters on short spatial and temporal scales along the equatorial region.

  17. Enhanced detection of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes by AGILE.

    PubMed

    Marisaldi, M; Argan, A; Ursi, A; Gjesteland, T; Fuschino, F; Labanti, C; Galli, M; Tavani, M; Pittori, C; Verrecchia, F; D'Amico, F; Østgaard, N; Mereghetti, S; Campana, R; Cattaneo, P W; Bulgarelli, A; Colafrancesco, S; Dietrich, S; Longo, F; Gianotti, F; Giommi, P; Rappoldi, A; Trifoglio, M; Trois, A

    2015-11-16

    At the end of March 2015 the onboard software configuration of the Astrorivelatore Gamma a Immagini Leggero (AGILE) satellite was modified in order to disable the veto signal of the anticoincidence shield for the minicalorimeter instrument. The motivation for such a change was the understanding that the dead time induced by the anticoincidence prevented the detection of a large fraction of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs). The configuration change was highly successful resulting in an increase of one order of magnitude in TGF detection rate. As expected, the largest fraction of the new events has short duration (<100 μs), and part of them has simultaneous association with lightning sferics detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network. The new configuration provides the largest TGF detection rate surface density (TGFs/km(2)/yr) to date, opening prospects for improved correlation studies with lightning and atmospheric parameters on short spatial and temporal scales along the equatorial region.

  18. Enhancing Community Detection By Affinity-based Edge Weighting Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Andy; Sanders, Geoffrey; Henson, Van; Vassilevski, Panayot

    2015-10-05

    Community detection refers to an important graph analytics problem of finding a set of densely-connected subgraphs in a graph and has gained a great deal of interest recently. The performance of current community detection algorithms is limited by an inherent constraint of unweighted graphs that offer very little information on their internal community structures. In this paper, we propose a new scheme to address this issue that weights the edges in a given graph based on recently proposed vertex affinity. The vertex affinity quantifies the proximity between two vertices in terms of their clustering strength, and therefore, it is ideal for graph analytics applications such as community detection. We also demonstrate that the affinity-based edge weighting scheme can improve the performance of community detection algorithms significantly.

  19. DNA Diagnostics: Nanotechnology-enhanced Electrochemical Detection of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Fang; Lillehoj, Peter B.; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2010-01-01

    The detection of mismatched base pairs in DNA plays a crucial role in the diagnosis of genetic-related diseases and conditions, especially for early stage treatment. Among the various biosensors that have been employed for DNA detection, electrochemical sensors show great promise since they are capable of precise DNA recognition and efficient signal transduction. Advancements in micro- and nanotechnologies, specifically fabrication techniques and new nanomaterials, have enabled for the development of highly sensitive, highly specific sensors making them attractive for the detection of small sequence variations. Furthermore, the integration of sensors with sample preparation and fluidic processes enables for rapid, multiplexed DNA detection for point-of-care (POC) clinical diagnostics. PMID:20075759

  20. Multi-Sensor Fusion and Enhancement for Object Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Zia-Ur

    2005-01-01

    This was a quick &week effort to investigate the ability to detect changes along the flight path of an unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV) over time. Video was acquired by the UAV during several passes over the same terrain. Concurrently, GPS data and UAV attitude data were also acquired. The purpose of the research was to use information from all of these sources to detect if any change had occurred in the terrain encompassed by the flight path.

  1. Enhanced detection of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes by AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marisaldi, M.; Argan, A.; Ursi, A.; Gjesteland, T.; Fuschino, F.; Labanti, C.; Galli, M.; Tavani, M.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; D'Amico, F.; Ostgaard, N.; Mereghetti, S.; Campana, R.; Cattaneo, P.; Bulgarelli, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Dietrich, S.; Longo, F.; Gianotti, F.; Giommi, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Trois, A.

    2015-12-01

    At the end of March 2015 the onboard configuration of the AGILE satellite was modified in order to disable the veto signal of the anticoincidence shield for the minicalorimeter instrument. The motivation for such a change was the understanding that the dead time induced by the anticoincidence prevented the detection of a large fraction of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs), especially the short duration ones. We present here the characteristics of the new TGF sample after several months of stable operations with the new configuration. The configuration change was highly successful resulting in the detection of about 100 TGFs/month, an increase of a factor about 11 in TGFs detection rate with respect to previous configuration. As expected, the largest fraction of the new events has short duration, with a median duration of 80 microseconds. We also obtain a sample of events with simultaneous association, within 100 microseconds, with lightning sferics detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), confirming previous results reported by the Fermi mission. Given the high detection rate and the AGILE very low (+/-2.5°) orbital inclination, the new configuration provides the largest TGF detection rate surface density (TGFs / km2 / year) to date, opening space for correlation studies with lightning and atmospheric parameters on short spatial and temporal scales along the equatorial region. Eventually, the events with associated simultaneous WWLLN sferics provide a highly reliable sample to probe the long-standing issue of the TGF maximal energy.

  2. Sensitive detection of Campylobacter jejuni using nanoparticles enhanced QCM sensor.

    PubMed

    Masdor, Noor Azlina; Altintas, Zeynep; Tothill, Ibtisam E

    2016-04-15

    A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor platform was used to develop an immunosensor for the detection of food pathogen Campylobacter jejuni. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies and commercially available mouse monoclonal antibodies against C. jejuni were investigated to construct direct, sandwich and gold-nanoparticles (AuNPs) amplified sandwich assays. The performance of the QCM immunosensor developed using sandwich assay by utilising the rabbit polyclonal antibody as the capture antibody and conjugated to AuNPs as the detection antibody gave the highest sensitivity. This sensor achieved a limit of detection (LOD) of 150 colony forming unit (CFU)mL(-1) of C. jejuni in solution. The QCM sensor showed excellent sensitivity and specificity for Campylobacter detection with low cross reactivity for other foodborne pathogens such as Salmonella Typhimurium, (7%) Listeria monocytogenes (3%) and Escherichia coli (0%). The development of this biosensor would help in the sensitive detection of Campylobacter which can result in reducing pre-enrichment steps; hence, reducing assay time. This work demonstrates the potential of this technology for the development of a rapid and sensitive detection method for C. jejuni.

  3. Antenna-coupled microcavities for enhanced infrared photo-detection

    SciTech Connect

    Nga Chen, Yuk; Todorov, Yanko Askenazi, Benjamin; Vasanelli, Angela; Sirtori, Carlo; Biasiol, Giorgio; Colombelli, Raffaele

    2014-01-20

    We demonstrate mid-infrared detectors embedded into an array of double-metal nano-antennas. The antennas act as microcavities that squeeze the electric field into thin semiconductor layers, thus enhancing the detector responsivity. Furthermore, thanks to the ability of the antennas to gather photons from an area larger than the device's physical dimensions, the dark current is reduced without hindering the photo-generation rate. In these devices, the background-limited performance is improved with a consequent increase of the operating temperature. Our results illustrate how the antenna-coupled microcavity concept can be applied to enhance the performances of infrared opto-electronic devices.

  4. Contrast-enhanced microwave detection and treatment of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fuqiang

    Contrast agents and heating agents have been proposed for microwave breast tumor imaging and treatment, respectively. The dielectric properties of the tumor are altered with contrast agents or heating agents that locally accumulate in the tumor. The resulting change in dielectric properties of the tumor has the potential to enhance the sensitivity of microwave imaging of breast tumors and increase the efficiency and selectivity of microwave thermal therapy of breast tumors. This dissertation addresses several key challenges in contrast-enhanced microwave imaging and treatment of breast tumors. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been shown to enhance both the relative permittivity and effective conductivity of the host medium, and are promising as theranostic (integrated therapeutic and diagnostic) agents. Thus, our properties characterization work focuses on CNT dispersions. We performed in vitro microwave dielectric properties and heating response characterization of dispersions of CNTs treated by different functionalization methods and identified a CNT formulation that is very promising as a microwave theranostic agent. Stable dispersions of CNTs with concentrations up to 20 mg/ml are obtained with this formulation, and the enhanced microwave properties of these dispersions are extraordinary compared to the control. We also conducted in vivo dielectric properties characterization of mouse tumors with intra-tumoral injections of CNT dispersions and confirmed that the presence of CNTs increases the dielectric properties of the tumor. In parallel, we developed a contrast-enhanced microwave breast tumor imaging algorithm using sparse reconstruction methods. We demonstrated that this algorithm accurately localizes small tumors in 3D numerical breast phantoms. We also demonstrated the experimental feasibility of this method using physical breast phantoms. Lastly, we studied the sensitivity of the distorted Born iterative method (DBIM) to initial guesses and developed a

  5. A Design Protocol to Develop Radiology Dashboards

    PubMed Central

    Karami, Mahtab

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: The main objective of this descriptive and development research was to introduce a design protocol to develop radiology dashboards. Material and methods: The first step was to determine key performance indicators for radiology department. The second step was to determine required infrastructure for implementation of radiology dashboards. Infrastructure was extracted from both data and technology perspectives. The third step was to determine main features of the radiology dashboards. The fourth step was to determine the key criteria for evaluating the dashboards. In all these steps, non-probability sampling methods including convenience and purposive were employed and sample size determined based on a persuasion model. Results: Results showed that there are 92 KPIs, 10 main features for designing dashboards and 53 key criteria for dashboards evaluation. As well as, a Prototype of radiology management dashboards in four aspects including services, clients, personnel and cost-income were implemented and evaluated. Applying such dashboards could help managers to enhance performance, productivity and quality of services in radiology department. PMID:25568585

  6. Radiologic assessment of trauma and foreign bodies of the eye and orbit.

    PubMed

    Lustrin, E S; Brown, J H; Novelline, R; Weber, A L

    1996-02-01

    The detection and definition of orbital trauma is a frequent clinical problem. Therefore, the radiologic assessment is crucial. This article discusses the radiologic techniques and types of injuries that occur to the orbit.

  7. Interventional Radiology in Paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Chippington, Samantha J; Goodwin, Susie J

    2015-01-01

    As in adult practice, there is a growing role for paediatric interventional radiology expertise in the management of paediatric pathologies. This review is targeted for clinicians who may refer their patients to paediatric interventional radiology services, or who are responsible for patients who are undergoing paediatric interventional radiology procedures. The article includes a brief overview of the indications for intervention, techniques involved and the commonest complications. Although some of the procedures described are most commonly performed in a tertiary paediatric centre, many are performed in most Children's hospitals.

  8. [Controlling instruments in radiology].

    PubMed

    Maurer, M

    2013-10-01

    Due to the rising costs and competitive pressures radiological clinics and practices are now facing, controlling instruments are gaining importance in the optimization of structures and processes of the various diagnostic examinations and interventional procedures. It will be shown how the use of selected controlling instruments can secure and improve the performance of radiological facilities. A definition of the concept of controlling will be provided. It will be shown which controlling instruments can be applied in radiological departments and practices. As an example, two of the controlling instruments, material cost analysis and benchmarking, will be illustrated.

  9. Screening and surveillance for the early detection of colorectal cancer and adenomatous polyps, 2008: a joint guideline from the American Cancer Society, the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer, and the American College of Radiology.

    PubMed

    Levin, Bernard; Lieberman, David A; McFarland, Beth; Andrews, Kimberly S; Brooks, Durado; Bond, John; Dash, Chiranjeev; Giardiello, Francis M; Glick, Seth; Johnson, David; Johnson, C Daniel; Levin, Theodore R; Pickhardt, Perry J; Rex, Douglas K; Smith, Robert A; Thorson, Alan; Winawer, Sidney J

    2008-05-01

    In the United States, colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer diagnosed among men and women and the second leading cause of death from cancer. CRC largely can be prevented by the detection and removal of adenomatous polyps, and survival is significantly better when CRC is diagnosed while still localized. In 2006 to 2007, the American Cancer Society, the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer, and the American College of Radiology came together to develop consensus guidelines for the detection of adenomatous polyps and CRC in asymptomatic average-risk adults. In this update of each organization's guidelines, screening tests are grouped into those that primarily detect cancer early and those that can detect cancer early and also can detect adenomatous polyps, thus providing a greater potential for prevention through polypectomy. When possible, clinicians should make patients aware of the full range of screening options, but at a minimum they should be prepared to offer patients a choice between a screening test that primarily is effective at early cancer detection and a screening test that is effective at both early cancer detection and cancer prevention through the detection and removal of polyps. It is the strong opinion of these 3 organizations that colon cancer prevention should be the primary goal of screening.

  10. Screening and surveillance for the early detection of colorectal cancer and adenomatous polyps, 2008: a joint guideline from the American Cancer Society, the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer, and the American College of Radiology.

    PubMed

    Levin, Bernard; Lieberman, David A; McFarland, Beth; Smith, Robert A; Brooks, Durado; Andrews, Kimberly S; Dash, Chiranjeev; Giardiello, Francis M; Glick, Seth; Levin, Theodore R; Pickhardt, Perry; Rex, Douglas K; Thorson, Alan; Winawer, Sidney J

    2008-01-01

    In the United States, colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer diagnosed among men and women and the second leading cause of death from cancer. CRC largely can be prevented by the detection and removal of adenomatous polyps, and survival is significantly better when CRC is diagnosed while still localized. In 2006 to 2007, the American Cancer Society, the US Multi Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer, and the American College of Radiology came together to develop consensus guidelines for the detection of adenomatous polyps and CRC in asymptomatic average-risk adults. In this update of each organization's guidelines, screening tests are grouped into those that primarily detect cancer early and those that can detect cancer early and also can detect adenomatous polyps, thus providing a greater potential for prevention through polypectomy. When possible, clinicians should make patients aware of the full range of screening options, but at a minimum they should be prepared to offer patients a choice between a screening test that is effective at both early cancer detection and cancer prevention through the detection and removal of polyps and a screening test that primarily is effective at early cancer detection. It is the strong opinion of these 3 organizations that colon cancer prevention should be the primary goal of screening.

  11. An AC electrokinetic method for enhanced detection of DNA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Rajaram; Heller, Michael J

    2009-04-01

    In biomedical research and diagnostics it is a challenge to isolate and detect low levels of nanoparticles and nanoscale biomarkers in blood and other biological samples. While highly sensitive epifluorescent microscope systems are available for ultra low level detection, the isolation of the specific entities from large sample volumes is often the bigger limitation. AC electrokinetic techniques like dielectrophoresis (DEP) offer an attractive mechanism for specifically concentrating nanoparticles into microscopic locations. Unfortunately, DEP requires significant sample dilution thus making the technology unsuitable for biological applications. Using a microelectrode array device, special conditions have been found for the separation of hmw-DNA and nanoparticles under high conductance (ionic strength) conditions. At AC frequencies in the 3000-10 000 Hz range, 10 mum microspheres and human T lymphocytes can be isolated into the DEP low field regions, while hmw-DNA and nanoparticles can be concentrated into microscopic high field regions for subsequent detection using an epifluorescent system.

  12. Enhanced Microbial Detection Capabilities by a Rapid Portable Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Heather; Monaco, Lisa; Wainwright, Norm; Steele, Andrew; Damon, Michael; Schenk, Alison; Stimpson, Eric; Maule, Jake; Effinger, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We present data describing a progression of continuing technology development - from expanding the detection capabilities of the current PTS unit to re-outfitting the instrument with a protein microarray increasing the number of detectable compounds. To illustrate the adaptability of the cartridge format, on-orbit operations data from the ISS demonstrate the detection of the fungal cell wall compound beta-glucan using applicable LOCAD-PTS cartridges. LOCAD-PTS is a handheld device consisting of a spectrophotometer, an onboard pumping mechanism, and data storage capabilities. A suite of interchangeable cartridges lined with four distinct capillaries allow a hydrated sample to mix with necessary reagents in the channels before being pumped to the optical well for spectrophotometric analysis. The reagents housed in one type of cartridge trigger a reaction based on the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) assay, which results in the release of paranitroaniline dye. The dye is measured using a 395 nm filter. The LAL assay detects the Gram-negative bacterial cell wall molecule, endotoxin or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The more dye released, the greater the concentration of endotoxin in the sample. Sampling, quantitative analysis, and data retrieval require less than 20 minutes. This is significantly faster than standard culture-based methods, which require at least a 24 hour incubation period.Using modified cartridges, we demonstrate the detection of Gram negative bacteria with protein microarray technology. Additionally, we provide data from multiple field tests where both standard and advanced PTS technologies were used. These tests investigate the transfer of target microbial molecules from one surface to another. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the new cartridges expand the number of compounds detected by LOCAD-PTS, while maintaining the rapid, in situ analysis characteristic of the instrument. The unit provides relevant data for verifying sterile sample collection

  13. Enhanced detection of gold nanoparticles in agarose gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Hasenoehrl, Carina; Alexander, Colleen M; Azzarelli, Nicholas N; Dabrowiak, James C

    2012-04-01

    Gel electrophoresis is a powerful tool in gold nanoparticle (AuNP) research. While the technique is sensitive to the size, charge, and shape of particles, its optimal performance requires a relatively large amount of AuNP in the loading wells for visible detection of bands. We here describe a novel and more sensitive method for detecting AuNPs in agarose gels that involves staining the gel with the common organic fluorophore fluorescein, to produce AuNP band intensities that are linear with nanoparticle concentration and almost an order of magnitude larger than those obtained without staining the gel.

  14. Radiologic Professionalism in Modern Health Care.

    PubMed

    Hryhorczuk, Anastasia L; Hanneman, Kate; Eisenberg, Ronald L; Meyer, Elaine C; Brown, Stephen D

    2015-10-01

    Modern radiology is at the forefront of technological progress in medicine, a position that often places unique challenges on its professional character. This article uses "Medical Professionalism in the New Millennium: A Physician Charter," a document published in 2002 and endorsed by several major radiology organizations, as a lens for exploring professional challenges in modern radiology. The three main tenets of the Charter emphasize patient welfare, patient autonomy, and the reduction of disparities in health care distribution. This article reviews the ways in which modern technology and financial structures potentially create stressors on professionalism in radiology, while highlighting the opportunities they provide for radiologists seeking to fulfill the professional goals articulated in the Charter. Picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) and voice recognition systems have transformed the speed of radiology and enhanced the ability of radiologists to improve patient care but also have brought new tensions to the workplace. Although teleradiology may improve global access to radiologists, it may also promote the commoditization of radiology, which diminishes the professional stature of radiologists. Social media and patient portals provide radiologists with new forums for interacting with the public and patients, potentially promoting patient welfare. However, patient privacy and autonomy are important considerations. Finally, modern financial structures provide radiologists with both entrepreneurial opportunities as well as the temptation for unprofessional conduct. Each of these advances carries the potential for professional growth while testing the professional stature of radiology. By considering the risks and benefits of emerging technologies in the modern radiology world, radiologists can chart an ethical and professional future path.

  15. Future enhancements to ground-based microburst detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Steven D.; Matthews, Michael P.; Dasey, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    This set of viewgraphs presents the results of the Cockpit Weather Information (CWI) program at M.I.T. Lincoln Laboratory. The CWI program has been funded through NaSA Langley Research Center by the joint NASA/FAA Integrated Airborne Wind Shear Program for the past four years. During this time, over 120 microburst penetrations by research aircraft have been conducted under Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) testbed radar surveillance at Orlando, FL. The results of these in-situ measurements have been compared with ground-based detection methods. Several valuable insights were gained from this research activity. First, it was found that the current TDWR microburst shapes do not permit accurate characterization of microburst hazard in terms of the F factor hazard index, because they are based on loss value rather than shear. Second, it was found that the horizontal component of the F factor can be accurately estimated from shear, provided compensation is made for the dependence of outflow strength on altitude. Third, it was found that a simple continuity assumption for estimating the vertical component of the F factor yielded poor results. However, further research has shown that downdraft strength is correlated with features aloft detected by the TDWR radar scan strategy. The outcome of the CWI program is to move from the loss-based wind shear detection algorithm used in the TDWR to a shear-based detection scheme as proposed in the Integrated Terminal Weather System (ITWS).

  16. Polyethylenimine Carbon Nanotube Fiber Electrodes for Enhanced Detection of Neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-based microelectrodes have been investigated as alternatives to carbon-fiber microelectrodes for the detection of neurotransmitters because they are sensitive, exhibit fast electron transfer kinetics, and are more resistant to surface fouling. Wet spinning CNTs into fibers using a coagulating polymer produces a thin, uniform fiber that can be fabricated into an electrode. CNT fibers formed in poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) have been used as microelectrodes to detect dopamine, serotonin, and hydrogen peroxide. In this study, we characterize microelectrodes with CNT fibers made in polyethylenimine (PEI), which have much higher conductivity than PVA-CNT fibers. PEI-CNT fibers have lower overpotentials and higher sensitivities than PVA-CNT fiber microelectrodes, with a limit of detection of 5 nM for dopamine. The currents for dopamine were adsorption controlled at PEI-CNT fiber microelectrodes, independent of scan repetition frequency, and stable for over 10 h. PEI-CNT fiber microelectrodes were resistant to surface fouling by serotonin and the metabolite interferant 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). No change in sensitivity was observed for detection of serotonin after 30 flow injection experiments or after 2 h in 5-HIAA for PEI-CNT electrodes. The antifouling properties were maintained in brain slices when serotonin was exogenously applied multiple times or after bathing the slice in 5-HIAA. Thus, PEI-CNT fiber electrodes could be useful for the in vivo monitoring of neurochemicals. PMID:25117550

  17. Enhanced solid-phase recombinase polymerase amplification and electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Del Río, Jonathan Sabaté; Lobato, Ivan Magriñà; Mayboroda, Olena; Katakis, Ioanis; O'Sullivan, Ciara K

    2017-03-02

    Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is an elegant method for the rapid, isothermal amplification of nucleic acids. Here, we elucidate the optimal surface chemistry for rapid and efficient solid-phase RPA, which was fine-tuned in order to obtain a maximum signal-to-noise ratio, defining the optimal DNA probe density, probe-to-lateral spacer ratio (1:0, 1:1, 1:10 and 1:100) and length of a vertical spacer of the probe as well as investigating the effect of different types of lateral spacers. The use of different labelling strategies was also examined in order to reduce the number of steps required for the analysis, using biotin or horseradish peroxidase-labelled reverse primers. Optimisation of the amplification temperature used and the use of surface blocking agents were also pursued. The combination of these changes facilitated a significantly more rapid amplification and detection protocol, with a lowered limit of detection (LOD) of 1 · 10(-15) M. The optimised protocol was applied to the detection of Francisella tularensis in real samples from hares and a clear correlation with PCR and qPCR results observed and the solid-phase RPA demonstrated to be capable of detecting 500 fM target DNA in real samples. Graphical abstract Relative size of thiolated lateral spacers tested versus the primer and the uvsx recombinase protein.

  18. Society of Interventional Radiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... decoded SIR’s Health Policy and Economics team provides information on the varied activities the society engages in to ensure proper coding of interventional radiology services. SIR is committed to assisting you, your institution ...

  19. Interventional Radiology in China

    SciTech Connect

    Teng Gaojun Xu Ke; Ni Caifang; Li Linsun

    2008-03-15

    With more than 3000 members, the Chinese Society of Interventional Radiology (CSIR) is one of the world's largest societies for interventional radiology (IR). Nevertheless, compared to other societies such as CIRSE and SIR, the CSIR is a relatively young society. In this article, the status of IR in China is described, which includes IR history, structure and patient management, personnel, fellowship, training, modalities, procedures, research, turf battle, and insightful visions for IR from Chinese interventional radiologists.

  20. Detection of open and partially closed surface defects in plates using ultrasonic enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clough, A. R.; Edwards, R. S.

    2013-01-01

    Enhancement of the frequency content of multimodal Lamb waves incident on surface breaking defects has been investigated for use in defect detection and characterization, for different thickness plates with machined defects of varying depth. A fully optical method, using laser ultrasonics, was used to study the enhancement as a function of defect depth when passing either the detection (SLD) or generation (SLS) laser over the defect. Time frequency representations (TFRs) were used to identify the wave modes present at each detection point, and the frequency magnitude of various wave modes was tracked, with an increase in magnitude observed for both scanning laser detection and scanning laser source at the defect. The scanning laser detection enhancement is explained by a superposition of incident waves with those reflected and mode converted from the defect. Scanning laser source enhancement can be explained in terms of several mechanisms; including truncation of the source, the change in geometry at the defect and the change in generation boundary conditions at the defect. The TFR analysis was also applied to samples containing partially closed defects caused by stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Scanning laser detection analysis was shown to be incapable of detecting the defects; however, scanning laser source analysis showed large enhancements over the defect site, illustrating the effectiveness of this method for detection of partially closed cracks.

  1. Single nanoparticle detection using photonic crystal enhanced microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Yue; Hu, Huan; Chen, Weili; Lu, Meng; Tian, Limei; Yu, Hojeong; Long, Kenneth D; Chow, Edmond; King, William P; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-03-07

    We demonstrate a label-free biosensor imaging approach that utilizes a photonic crystal (PC) surface to detect surface attachment of individual dielectric and metal nanoparticles through measurement of localized shifts in the resonant wavelength and resonant reflection magnitude from the PC. Using a microscopy-based approach to scan the PC resonant reflection properties with 0.6 μm spatial resolution, we show that metal nanoparticles attached to the biosensor surface with strong absorption at the resonant wavelength induce a highly localized reduction in reflection efficiency and are able to be detected by modulation of the resonant wavelength. Experimental demonstrations of single-nanoparticle imaging are supported by finite-difference time-domain computer simulations. The ability to image surface-adsorption of individual nanoparticles offers a route to single molecule biosensing, in which the particles can be functionalized with specific recognition molecules and utilized as tags.

  2. Surface-enhanced nonlinear optical effects and detection of adsorbed molecular monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Y.R.; Chen, C.K.; Heinz, T.F.; Ricard, D.

    1981-01-01

    The observation of a number of surface-enhanced nonlinear optical effects is discussed. The feasibility of using second-harmonic generation to detect the adsorption of molecular monolayers on a metal surface in an electrolytic solution is shown.

  3. Radiology image perception and observer performance: How does expertise and clinical information alter interpretation? Stroke detection explored through eye-tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Lindsey; Gale, Alastair; Darker, Iain; Toms, Andoni; Saada, Janak

    2009-02-01

    Historically, radiology research has been dominated by chest and breast screening. Few studies have examined complex interpretative tasks such as the reading of multidimensional brain CT or MRI scans. Additionally, no studies at the time of writing have explored the interpretation of stroke images; from novices through to experienced practitioners using eye movement analysis. Finally, there appears a lack of evidence on the clinical effects of radiology reports and their influence on image appraisal and clinical diagnosis. A computer-based, eye-tracking study was designed to assess diagnostic accuracy and interpretation in stroke CT and MR imagery. Eight predetermined clinical cases, five images per case, were presented to participants (novices, trainee, and radiologists; n=8). The presence or absence of abnormalities was rated on a five-point Likert scale and their locations reported. Half cases of the cases were accompanied by clinical information; half were not, to assess the impact of information on observer performance. Results highlight differences in visual search patterns amongst novice, trainee and expert observers; the most marked differences occurred between novice readers and experts. Experts spent more time in challenging areas of interest (AOI) than novices and trainee, and were more confident unless a lesion was large and obvious. The time to first AOI fixation differed by size, shape and clarity of lesion. 'Time to lesion' dropped significantly when recognition appeared to occur between slices. The influence of clinical information was minimal.

  4. Highly sensitive detection of the soft tissues based on refraction contrast by in-plane diffraction-enhanced imaging CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuasa, Tetsuya; Hashimoto, Eiko; Maksimenko, Anton; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Arai, Yoshinori; Shimao, Daisuke; Ichihara, Shu; Ando, Masami

    2008-07-01

    We discuss the recently proposed computed tomography (CT) technique based on refractive effects for biomedical use, which reconstructs the in-plane refractive-index gradient vector field in a cross-sectional plane of interest by detecting the angular deviation of the beam, refracted by a sample, from the incident beam, using the diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) method. The CT has advantages for delineating biological weakly absorbing soft tissues over the conventional absorption-contrast CT because of the use of phase sensitive detection. The paper aims to define the imaging scheme rigidly and to demonstrate its efficacy for non-destructive measurement of biomedical soft-tissue samples without imaging agent. We first describe the imaging principle of in-plane DEI-CT from the physico-mathematical viewpoints in detail, and investigate what physical quantities are extracted from the reconstructed images. Then, we introduce the imaging system using the synchrotron radiation as a light source, constructed at beamline BL-14B in KEK, Japan. Finally, we demonstrate the advantage of the refraction-based image for non-destructive analysis of biological sample by investigating the image of human breast cancer tumors obtained using the imaging system. Here, the refraction- and the apparent absorption-based images obtained simultaneously by the in-plane DEI-CT are compared. Also, the conventional absorption-based image obtained using micro-computed tomography (μCT) imaging system is compared with them. Thereby, it is shown that the refraction contrast much more sensitively delineates the soft tissues than the absorption contrast. In addition, the radiologic-histologic correlation study not only validates the efficacy for imaging soft tissues, but also produces the potential that the pathological inspection for the breast cancer tumors may be feasible non-destructively.

  5. Nuclear and radiological Security: Introduction.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, James Christopher

    2016-02-24

    Nuclear security includes the prevention and detection of, and response to, theft, sabotage, unauthorized access, illegal transfer, or other malicious acts involving nuclear or other radioactive substances or their associated facilities. The presentation begins by discussing the concept and its importance, then moves on to consider threats--insider threat, sabotage, diversion of materials--with considerable emphasis on the former. The intrusion at Pelindaba, South Africa, is described as a case study. The distinction between nuclear security and security of radiological and portable sources is clarified, and the international legal framework is touched upon. The paper concludes by discussing the responsibilities of the various entities involved in nuclear security.

  6. Enhancing Surface Plasmon Resonance Detection Using Nanostructured Au Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indutnyi, Ivan; Ushenin, Yuriy; Hegemann, Dirk; Vandenbossche, Marianne; Myn'ko, Victor; Lukaniuk, Mariia; Shepeliavyi, Petro; Korchovyi, Andrii; Khrystosenko, Roman

    2016-12-01

    The increase of the sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) refractometers was studied experimentally by forming a periodic relief in the form of a grating with submicron period on the surface of the Au-coated chip. Periodic reliefs of different depths and spatial frequency were formed on the Au film surface using interference lithography and vacuum chalcogenide photoresists. Spatial frequencies of the grating were selected close to the conditions of Bragg reflection of plasmons for the working wavelength of the SPR refractometer and the used environment (solution of glycerol in water). It was found that the degree of refractometer sensitivity enhancement and the value of the interval of environment refractive index variation, Δ n, in which this enhancement is observed, depend on the depth of the grating relief. By increasing the depth of relief from 13.5 ± 2 nm to 21.0 ± 2 nm, Δ n decreased from 0.009 to 0.0031, whereas sensitivity increased from 110 deg./RIU (refractive index unit) for a standard chip up to 264 and 484 deg./RIU for the nanostructured chips, respectively. Finally, it was shown that the working range of the sensor can be adjusted to the refractive index of the studied environment by changing the spatial frequency of the grating, by modification of the chip surface or by rotation of the chip.

  7. Competitive SWIFT cluster templates enhance detection of aging changes

    PubMed Central

    Rebhahn, Jonathan A.; Roumanes, David R.; Qi, Yilin; Khan, Atif; Thakar, Juilee; Rosenberg, Alex; Lee, F. Eun‐Hyung; Quataert, Sally A.; Sharma, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Clustering‐based algorithms for automated analysis of flow cytometry datasets have achieved more efficient and objective analysis than manual processing. Clustering organizes flow cytometry data into subpopulations with substantially homogenous characteristics but does not directly address the important problem of identifying the salient differences in subpopulations between subjects and groups. Here, we address this problem by augmenting SWIFT—a mixture model based clustering algorithm reported previously. First, we show that SWIFT clustering using a “template” mixture model, in which all subpopulations are represented, identifies small differences in cell numbers per subpopulation between samples. Second, we demonstrate that resolution of inter‐sample differences is increased by “competition” wherein a joint model is formed by combining the mixture model templates obtained from different groups. In the joint model, clusters from individual groups compete for the assignment of cells, sharpening differences between samples, particularly differences representing subpopulation shifts that are masked under clustering with a single template model. The benefit of competition was demonstrated first with a semisynthetic dataset obtained by deliberately shifting a known subpopulation within an actual flow cytometry sample. Single templates correctly identified changes in the number of cells in the subpopulation, but only the competition method detected small changes in median fluorescence. In further validation studies, competition identified a larger number of significantly altered subpopulations between young and elderly subjects. This enrichment was specific, because competition between templates from consensus male and female samples did not improve the detection of age‐related differences. Several changes between the young and elderly identified by SWIFT template competition were consistent with known alterations in the elderly, and additional

  8. Competitive SWIFT cluster templates enhance detection of aging changes.

    PubMed

    Rebhahn, Jonathan A; Roumanes, David R; Qi, Yilin; Khan, Atif; Thakar, Juilee; Rosenberg, Alex; Lee, F Eun-Hyung; Quataert, Sally A; Sharma, Gaurav; Mosmann, Tim R

    2016-01-01

    Clustering-based algorithms for automated analysis of flow cytometry datasets have achieved more efficient and objective analysis than manual processing. Clustering organizes flow cytometry data into subpopulations with substantially homogenous characteristics but does not directly address the important problem of identifying the salient differences in subpopulations between subjects and groups. Here, we address this problem by augmenting SWIFT--a mixture model based clustering algorithm reported previously. First, we show that SWIFT clustering using a "template" mixture model, in which all subpopulations are represented, identifies small differences in cell numbers per subpopulation between samples. Second, we demonstrate that resolution of inter-sample differences is increased by "competition" wherein a joint model is formed by combining the mixture model templates obtained from different groups. In the joint model, clusters from individual groups compete for the assignment of cells, sharpening differences between samples, particularly differences representing subpopulation shifts that are masked under clustering with a single template model. The benefit of competition was demonstrated first with a semisynthetic dataset obtained by deliberately shifting a known subpopulation within an actual flow cytometry sample. Single templates correctly identified changes in the number of cells in the subpopulation, but only the competition method detected small changes in median fluorescence. In further validation studies, competition identified a larger number of significantly altered subpopulations between young and elderly subjects. This enrichment was specific, because competition between templates from consensus male and female samples did not improve the detection of age-related differences. Several changes between the young and elderly identified by SWIFT template competition were consistent with known alterations in the elderly, and additional altered subpopulations

  9. Enhanced amperometric detection of glucose using Si29 particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Mantey, Kevin; Nayfeh, Munir H.; Yau, Siu-Tung

    2006-12-01

    The 1nm Si29 particle is used as the sensing element for an enzyme-free amperometric electrochemical glucose sensor. The sensor shows selective glucose detection against interfering substances at physiological concentrations with long-term stability, reusability, and the absence of electrode poisoning. The Si29 particle is significantly more efficient in generating signal current compared to both dissolved and immobilized enzyme. This observation suggests that the particle can be used to replace enzyme in making glucose sensors and that the particle is a suitable material for the realization of nanoscale devices that generate signals sufficiently high for use.

  10. Enhanced Line Integral Convolution with Flow Feature Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, David; Okada, Arthur

    1996-01-01

    The Line Integral Convolution (LIC) method, which blurs white noise textures along a vector field, is an effective way to visualize overall flow patterns in a 2D domain. The method produces a flow texture image based on the input velocity field defined in the domain. Because of the nature of the algorithm, the texture image tends to be blurry. This sometimes makes it difficult to identify boundaries where flow separation and reattachments occur. We present techniques to enhance LIC texture images and use colored texture images to highlight flow separation and reattachment boundaries. Our techniques have been applied to several flow fields defined in 3D curvilinear multi-block grids and scientists have found the results to be very useful.

  11. Detection of nitrogen dioxide by CW cavity-enhanced spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Guo; Han, Ye-Xing; Yu, Zhi-Wei; Tang, Huai-Wu

    2016-11-01

    In the paper, an accurate and sensitive system was used to monitor the ambient atmospheric NO2 concentrations. This system utilizes cavity attenuated phase shift spectroscopy(CAPS), a technology related to cavity ring down spectroscopy(CRDS). Advantages of the CAPS system include such as: (1) cheap and easy to control the light source, (2) high accuracy, and (3) low detection limit. The performance of the CAPS system was evaluated by measuring of the stability and response of the system. The minima ( 0.08 ppb NO2) in the Allan plots show the optimum average time( 100s) for optimum detection performance of the CAPS system. Over a 20-day-long period of the ambient atmospheric NO2 concentrations monitoring, a comparison of the CAPS system with an extremely accurate and precise chemiluminescence-based NOx analyzer showed that the CAPS system was able to reliably and quantitatively measure both large and small fluctuations in the ambient nitrogen dioxide concentration. The experimental results show that the measuring instrument results correlation is 0.95.

  12. Enhanced oil spill detection sensors in low-light environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allik, Toomas H.; Ramboyong, Len; Roberts, Mark; Walters, Mark; Soyka, Thomas J.; Dixon, Roberta; Cho, Jay

    2016-05-01

    Although advances have been made in oil spill remote detection, many electro-optic sensors do not provide real-time images, do not work well under degraded visual environments, nor provide a measure of extreme oil thickness in marine environments. A joint program now exists between BSEE and NVESD that addresses these capability gaps in remote sensing of oil spills. Laboratory experiments, calibration techniques, and field tests were performed at Fort Belvoir, Virginia; Santa Barbara, California; and the Ohmsett Test Facility in Leonardo, New Jersey. Weathered crude oils were studied spectroscopically and characterized with LWIR, and low-light-level visible/NIR, and SWIR cameras. We designed and fabricated an oil emulsion thickness calibration cell for spectroscopic analysis and ground truth, field measurements. Digital night vision cameras provided real-time, wide-dynamic-range imagery, and were able to detect and recognize oil from full sun to partial moon light. The LWIR camera provided quantitative oil analysis (identification) for >1 mm thick crude oils both day and night. Two filtered, co-registered, SWIR cameras were used to determine whether oil thickness could be measured in real time. Spectroscopic results revealed that oil emulsions vary with location and weathered state and some oils (e.g., ANS and Santa Barbara seeps) do not show the spectral rich features from archived Deep Water Horizon hyperspectral data. Multi-sensor imagery collected during the 2015 USCG Airborne Oil Spill Remote Sensing and Reporting Exercise and the design of a compact, multiband imager are discussed.

  13. Enhanced Chemosensory Detection of Negative Emotions in Congenital Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Iversen, Katrine D.; Ptito, Maurice; Møller, Per; Kupers, Ron

    2015-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that congenitally blind individuals develop superior sensory abilities in order to compensate for their lack of vision. Substantial research has been done on somatosensory and auditory sensory information processing of the blind. However, relatively little information is available about compensatory plasticity in the olfactory domain. Although previous studies indicate that blind individuals have superior olfactory abilities, no studies so far have investigated their sense of smell in relation to social and affective communication. The current study compares congenitally blind and normal sighted individuals in their ability to discriminate and identify emotions from body odours. A group of 14 congenitally blind and 14 age- and sex-matched sighted control subjects participated in the study. We compared participants' abilities to detect and identify by smelling sweat from donors who had been watching excerpts from emotional movies showing amusement, fear, disgust, or sexual arousal. Our results show that congenitally blind subjects outperformed sighted controls in identifying fear from male donors. In addition, there was a strong tendency that blind individuals were also better in detecting disgust. Our findings reveal that congenitally blind individuals are better at identifying ecologically important emotions and provide new insights into the mechanisms of social and affective communication in blindness. PMID:25878902

  14. Enhanced chemosensory detection of negative emotions in congenital blindness.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Katrine D; Ptito, Maurice; Møller, Per; Kupers, Ron

    2015-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that congenitally blind individuals develop superior sensory abilities in order to compensate for their lack of vision. Substantial research has been done on somatosensory and auditory sensory information processing of the blind. However, relatively little information is available about compensatory plasticity in the olfactory domain. Although previous studies indicate that blind individuals have superior olfactory abilities, no studies so far have investigated their sense of smell in relation to social and affective communication. The current study compares congenitally blind and normal sighted individuals in their ability to discriminate and identify emotions from body odours. A group of 14 congenitally blind and 14 age- and sex-matched sighted control subjects participated in the study. We compared participants' abilities to detect and identify by smelling sweat from donors who had been watching excerpts from emotional movies showing amusement, fear, disgust, or sexual arousal. Our results show that congenitally blind subjects outperformed sighted controls in identifying fear from male donors. In addition, there was a strong tendency that blind individuals were also better in detecting disgust. Our findings reveal that congenitally blind individuals are better at identifying ecologically important emotions and provide new insights into the mechanisms of social and affective communication in blindness.

  15. Isotopically modified nanoparticles for enhanced detection in bioaccumulation studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Misra, S.K.; Dybowska, A.; Berhanu, D.; Croteau, M.-N.; Luoma, S.N.; Boccaccini, A.R.; Valsami-Jones, E.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents results on synthesis of isotopically enriched (99% 65Cu) copper oxide nanoparticles and its application in ecotoxicological studies. 65CuO nanoparticles were synthesized as spheres (7 nm) and rods (7 ?? 40 nm). Significant differences were observed between the reactivity and dissolution of spherical and rod shaped nanoparticles. The extreme sensitivity of the stable isotope tracing technique developed in this study allowed determining Cu uptake at exposure concentrations equivalent to background Cu concentrations in freshwater systems (0.2-30 ??g/L). Without a tracer, detection of newly accumulated Cu was impossible, even at exposure concentrations surpassing some of the most contaminated water systems (>1 mg/L). ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  16. Motion Estimation Utilizing Range Detection-Enhanced Visual Odometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friend, Paul Russell (Inventor); Chen, Qi (Inventor); Chang, Hong (Inventor); Morris, Daniel Dale (Inventor); Graf, Jodi Seaborn (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A motion determination system is disclosed. The system may receive a first and a second camera image from a camera, the first camera image received earlier than the second camera image. The system may identify corresponding features in the first and second camera images. The system may receive range data comprising at least one of a first and a second range data from a range detection unit, corresponding to the first and second camera images, respectively. The system may determine first positions and the second positions of the corresponding features using the first camera image and the second camera image. The first positions or the second positions may be determined by also using the range data. The system may determine a change in position of the machine based on differences between the first and second positions, and a VO-based velocity of the machine based on the determined change in position.

  17. Statistical feature selection for enhanced detection of brain tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaddad, Ahmad; Colen, Rivka R.

    2014-09-01

    Feature-based methods are widely used in the brain tumor recognition system. Robust of early cancer detection is one of the most powerful image processing tools. Specifically, statistical features, such as geometric mean, harmonic mean, mean excluding outliers, median, percentiles, skewness and kurtosis, have been extracted from brain tumor glioma to aid in discriminating two levels namely, Level I and Level II using fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence in the diagnosis of brain tumor. Statistical feature describes the major characteristics of each level from glioma which is an important step to evaluate heterogeneity of cancer area pixels. In this paper, we address the task of feature selection to identify the relevant subset of features in the statistical domain, while discarding those that are either redundant or confusing, thereby improving the performance of feature-based scheme to distinguish between Level I and Level II. We apply a Decision Structure algorithm to find the optimal combination of nonhomogeneity based statistical features for the problem at hand. We employ a Naïve Bayes classifier to evaluate the performance of the optimal statistical feature based scheme in terms of its glioma Level I and Level II discrimination capability and use real-data collected from 17 patients have a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Dataset provided from 3 Tesla MR imaging system by MD Anderson Cancer Center. For the specific data analyzed, it is shown that the identified dominant features yield higher classification accuracy, with lower number of false alarms and missed detections, compared to the full statistical based feature set. This work has been proposed and analyzed specific GBM types which Level I and Level II and the dominant features were considered as feature aid to prognostic indicators. These features were selected automatically to be better able to determine prognosis from classical imaging studies.

  18. Ultrasensitive detection of potassium ions based on target induced DNA conformational switch enhanced fluorescence polarization.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kun; Huang, Yong; Zhao, Shulin; Tian, Jianniao; Wu, Qiang; Zhang, Guohai; Jiang, Jing

    2012-06-21

    We have developed a simple, highly sensitive and selective fluorescence polarization assay for the detection of potassium ions based on target induced DNA conformational switch from hairpin to G-quadruplex enhanced fluorescence polarization. The assay was applied in the detection of low nM concentrations of potassium ions and was highly selective over other cations.

  19. An RNAi-Enhanced Logic Circuit for Cancer Specific Detection and Destruction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    cancer specific detection and destruction. PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ron Weiss...2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER An RNAi-enhanced logic circuit for cancer specific detection and destruction. 5b. GRANT NUMBER...ABSTRACT Modern breast cancer therapies utilize non-specific approaches to kill or remove cancerous cells, inflicting significant collateral damage to

  20. Turf wars in radiology: what must academic radiology do?

    PubMed

    Rao, Vijay M; Levin, David C

    2007-09-01

    In a previous article in this series, the authors called on private practice radiology groups to better support radiology research financially but also pointed out that academic radiology must make some changes as well. In this article, the authors discuss those changes in detail. They include revising the structure of the radiology residency, changing the timing of the American Board of Radiology oral examinations, requiring that all residents receive research training, and emphasizing the value of clinical and translational research. The Society of Chairmen of Academic Radiology Departments needs to assume a leadership role in implementing these changes.

  1. Static corrections for enhanced signal detection at IMS seismic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Neil; Wookey, James; Selby, Neil

    2016-04-01

    Seismic monitoring forms an important part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) for verifying the Comprehensive nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Analysis of seismic data can be used to discriminate between nuclear explosions and the tens of thousands of natural earthquakes of similar magnitude that occur every year. This is known as "forensic seismology", and techniques include measuring the P-to-S wave amplitude ratio, the body-to-surface wave magnitude ratio (mb/Ms), and source depth. Measurement of these seismic discriminants requires very high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) data, and this has led to the development and deployment of seismic arrays as part of the IMS. Array processing methodologies such as stacking can be used, but optimum SNR improvement needs an accurate estimate of the arrival time of the particular seismic phase. To enhance the imaging capability of IMS arrays, we aim to develop site-specific static corrections to the arrival time as a function of frequency, slowness and backazimuth. Here, we present initial results for the IMS TORD array in Niger. Vespagrams are calculated for various events using the F-statistic to clearly identify seismic phases and measure their arrival times. Observed arrival times are compared with those predicted by 1D and 3D velocity models, and residuals are calculated for a range of backazimuths and slownesses. Finally, we demonstrate the improvement in signal fidelity provided by these corrections.

  2. Chemical agent detection by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Gift, Alan; Maksymiuk, Paul; Inscore, Frank E.; Smith, Wayne W.; Morrisey, Kevin; Christesen, Steven D.

    2004-03-01

    In the past decade, the Unites States and its allies have been challenged by a different kind of warfare, exemplified by the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Although suicide bombings are the most often used form of terror, military personnel must consider a wide range of attack scenarios. Among these is the intentional poisoning of water supplies to obstruct military operations in Afghanistan and Iraq. To counter such attacks, the military is developing portable analyzers that can identify and quantify potential chemical agents in water supplies at microgram per liter concentrations within 10 minutes. To aid this effort we have been investigating the value of a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy based portable analyzer. In particular we have been developing silver-doped sol-gels to generate SER spectra of chemical agents and their hydrolysis products. Here we present SER spectra of several chemical agents measured in a generic tap water. Repeat measurements were performed to establish statistical error associated with SERS obtained using the sol-gel coated vials.

  3. Histopathology and enhanced detection of tumor invasion of peritoneal membranes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jey-Hsin; Borges, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Tumor invasion of the peritoneal membrane may have an adverse prognostic significance, but its histopathologic features can be diagnostically difficult to recognize. We observed that local peritoneal injury associated with tumor invasion is characterized by activation and proliferation of serosal stromal cells that express cytokeratin, a characteristic property of injured serosal membranes that may have diagnostic utility. To explore this, we examined 120 primary tumors of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreaticobiliary system using cytokeratin and elastic stains to assess for tumor invasion of peritoneal membranes. Peritoneal invasion by tumor was associated with retraction, splaying, and destruction of the elastic lamina and proliferation of keratin-expressing stromal cells of serosal membranes. All 82 peritoneal invasive tumors were characterized by neoplastic cells that invaded the elastic lamina and the serosal connective tissue with neoplastic cells that abutted or were surrounded by keratin-positive stromal cells, whereas all 38 tumors limited to the subserosa showed none of these features. The diagnosis of tumor invasion of peritoneal membranes is enhanced by the combined use of cytokeratin and elastic stains, which in turn would enable better histopathologic correlation with patient treatment and outcome.

  4. Histopathology and enhanced detection of tumor invasion of peritoneal membranes

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Tumor invasion of the peritoneal membrane may have an adverse prognostic significance, but its histopathologic features can be diagnostically difficult to recognize. We observed that local peritoneal injury associated with tumor invasion is characterized by activation and proliferation of serosal stromal cells that express cytokeratin, a characteristic property of injured serosal membranes that may have diagnostic utility. To explore this, we examined 120 primary tumors of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreaticobiliary system using cytokeratin and elastic stains to assess for tumor invasion of peritoneal membranes. Peritoneal invasion by tumor was associated with retraction, splaying, and destruction of the elastic lamina and proliferation of keratin-expressing stromal cells of serosal membranes. All 82 peritoneal invasive tumors were characterized by neoplastic cells that invaded the elastic lamina and the serosal connective tissue with neoplastic cells that abutted or were surrounded by keratin-positive stromal cells, whereas all 38 tumors limited to the subserosa showed none of these features. The diagnosis of tumor invasion of peritoneal membranes is enhanced by the combined use of cytokeratin and elastic stains, which in turn would enable better histopathologic correlation with patient treatment and outcome. PMID:28282462

  5. Advances in land mine detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Kevin M.; Sylvia, James M.; Janni, James A.; Klein, James D.

    1999-08-01

    We report surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for vapors of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), 1,3-dinitrobenzene, 4-amino-2, 6-dinitrotoluene and trinitrotoluene (TNT) adsorbed onto gold metal foils. Detection of 2,4-DNT down to approximately 1 ppb has been demonstrated. A compact field portable Raman unit with fiber optic SERS attachment has been fabricated and field tested for landmine detection. Preliminary results showed little environmental interference to the SERS measurement and detection of a buried landmine. The results demonstrate that SERS can detect buried landmines and, with further improvements, has the potential to be a man-portable field unit for landmine detection.

  6. Nanoparticle Enhanced Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Improving the Detection of Molecular Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koral, Can; De Giacomo, Alessandro; Mao, Xianglei; Zorba, Vassilia; Russo, Richard E.

    2016-11-01

    Enhancement of molecular band emission in laser-induced plasmas is important for improving sensitivity and limits of detection in molecular sensing and molecular isotope analysis. In this work we introduce the use of Nanoparticle Enhanced Laser Induced Breakdown (NELIBS) for the enhancement of molecular band emission in laser-induced plasmas, and study the underlying mechanisms responsible for the observed enhancement. The use of Ag nanoparticles leads to an order of magnitude enhancement for AlO (B2Σ+ → Χ+ Σ+) system emission from an Al-based alloy. We demonstrate that the mechanism responsible for the enhancement of molecular bands differs from that of atomic emission, and can be traced down to the increased number of atomic species in NELIBS which lead to AlO molecular formation. These findings showcase the potential of NELIBS as a simple and viable technology for enhancing molecular band emission in laser-induced plasmas.

  7. Optofluidic chips with nanochannels for dynamic molecular detection using enhanced fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Postigo, P. A.; Alvaro, R.; Juarros, A.; Merino, S.

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of a novel optofluidic chip using nanochannels optimized for DNA-stretched molecules and optical detection by enhanced fluorescence is reported. The chips are composed of a series of microchannels that allow the transport of molecules in the femto-liter per second inside a fluid or gas. The nanochannels are surrounded by a photonic crystal structure to enhance the emission of fluorescent light from the molecules, which can travel along the nanochannel, allowing for enhanced optical detection of the molecules in motion. The photonic crystal structure provides an enhancement up to 2.5 times in the light emitted from fluorescent molecules inside the nanochannels which increases to around 250 when normalized to the area of the nanochannels emitting fluorescence. The results may help to the detection of fluorescent molecules (like marked-DNA) in series by speeding it and allowing the use of less sophisticated equipment. PMID:27699099

  8. A model framework for the enhancement of community detection in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Dongxiao; Wang, Hongcui; Jin, Di; Liu, Baolin

    2016-11-01

    Community detection is an important data analysis problem in many different areas, and how to enhance the quality of community detection in complicated real applications is still a challenge. Current community detection enhancement methods often take the enhancement as a preprocess of community detection. They mainly focus on how to design the suitable topological similarity of nodes to adjust the original network, but did not consider how to make use of this topological similarity more effectively. In order to better utilize the similarity information, we propose a model framework which integrates the enhancement into the whole community detection procedure. First, we calculate the structural similarity of nodes based on network topology. Second, we present a stochastic model to describe the community memberships of nodes; we then model the strong constraint based on structural similarity, i.e., we make each node have the same community membership distribution with its most similar neighbors; and then we model the weak constraint, i.e., if two nodes have a high similarity we will make their community membership distributions close, otherwise we will make them not close. Finally, we present a nonnegative matrix factorization approach to learn the model parameters. We evaluate our method on both synthetic and real-world networks with ground-truths, and compare it with five comparable methods. The experimental results demonstrate the superior performance of our new method over the competing ones for community detection and enhancement.

  9. Spectral photoplethysmographic imaging sensor fusion for enhanced heart rate detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelard, Robert; Clausi, David A.; Wong, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Continuous heart rate monitoring can provide important context for quantitative clinical assessment in scenarios such as long-term health monitoring and disability prevention. Photoplethysmographic imaging (PPGI) systems are particularly useful for such monitoring scenarios as contact-based devices pose problems related to comfort and mobility. Each pixel can be regarded as a virtual PPG sensor, thus enabling simultaneous measurements of multiple skin sites. Existing PPGI systems analyze temporal PPGI sensor uctuations related to hemodynamic pulsations across a region of interest to extract the blood pulse signal. However, due to spatially varying optical properties of the skin, the blood pulse signal may not be consistent across all PPGI sensors, leading to inaccurate heart rate monitoring. To increase the hemodynamic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), we propose a novel spectral PPGI sensor fusion method for enhanced estimation of the true blood pulse signal. Motivated by the observation that PPGI sensors with high hemodynamic SNR exhibit a spectral energy peak at the heart rate frequency, an entropy-based fusion model was formulated to combine PPGI sensors based on the sensors' spectral energy distribution. The optical PPGI device comprised a near infrared (NIR) sensitive camera and an 850 nm LED. Spatially uniform irradiance was achieved by placing optical elements along the LED beam, providing consistent illumination across the skin area. Dual-mode temporally coded illumination was used to negate the temporal effect of ambient illumination. Experimental results show that the spectrally weighted PPGI method can accurately and consistently extract heart rate information where traditional region-based averaging fails.

  10. Robust predetection data fusion for enhanced target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomopoulos, Stelios C.; Okello, Nickens N.

    1994-02-01

    A robust Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) distributed detection system that operates in heavy clutter with unknown distribution is presented. The system is designed to provide CFARness under clutter power fluctuations and robustness under unknown clutter and noise distributions. The system is also designed to operate successfully under different-power sensors and exhibit fault-tolerance in the presence of sensor power fluctuations. The test statistic at each sensor is a robust CFAR t-statistic. In addition to the primary binary decisions, confidence levels are generated with each decision and used in the fusion logic to robustify the fusion performance and eliminate weaknesses of the Boolean fusion logic. The test statistic and the fusion logic are analyzed theoretically for Weibull and lognormal clutter. The theoretical performance is compared against Monte-Carlo simulations that verify that the system exhibits the desired characteristics of CFARness, robustness, insensitivity to power fluctuations and fault-tolerance. The system is tested with experimental target-in-clear and target-in-clutter data and its experimental performance agrees with the theoretically predicted behavior.

  11. Detection of melamine on fractals of unmodified gold nanoparticles by surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Roy, Pradip Kumar; Huang, Yi-Fan; Chattopadhyay, Surojit

    2014-01-01

    A simple way of detecting melamine in raw milk is demonstrated via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) using fractals of bare and nonfunctionalized ~30 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNP) distributed on a solid support. The technique demonstrates the formation of AuNP fractals, from a random distribution, upon exposure to melamine, that enhance the Raman scattering cross-section to enable detection by SERS. The agglomeration, which is pronounced at higher melamine concentrations, is demonstrated directly through imaging, and the red-shift of the plasmon absorption peak of the AuNP fractal away from 530 nm by finite difference time domain (FDTD) calculations. The agglomeration results in a strong plasmon field, shown by FDTD, over the interparticle sites that enhances the Raman scattering cross-section of melamine and ensures unambiguous detection. Limit of detection of 100 ppb could be achieved reproducibly.

  12. Detection of dimethyl methylphosphonate by thin water film confined surface-enhanced Raman scattering method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Duan, Guotao; Liu, Guangqiang; Li, Yue; Chen, Zhengxing; Xu, Lei; Cai, Weiping

    2016-02-13

    It is important and necessary to effectively detect the chemical warfare agents, such as highly toxic never agent sarin. However, based on the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect, detection of nerve agent simulant dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) which is weakly interacted with SERS-active substrate has been the most challenge for the routine SERS detection method. To overcome this challenge, we put forward a thin water film confined SERS strategy. Under the space-confinement of water film, Raman measurements are carried out in the water evaporation process. The subsequent water evaporation induces concentrating of the DMMP molecules, which are thus successfully restricted within the strong electromagnetic field enhanced area above the SERS substrates, leading to the enhancement of their Raman signals. This study provides a new way to achieve the efficient SERS-based detection of the target molecules weakly interacted with the metal substrates.

  13. Advances in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Runge, Val M

    2010-12-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic radiology are discussed on the basis of current publications in Investigative Radiology. Publications in the journal during 2009 and 2010 are reviewed, evaluating developments by modality and anatomic region. Technological advances continue to play a major role in the evolution and clinical practice of diagnostic radiology, and as such constitute a major publication focus. In the past 2 years, this includes advances in both magnetic resonance and computed tomography (in particular, the advent of dual energy computed tomography). An additional major focus of publications concerns contrast media, and in particular continuing research involving nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, its etiology, and differentiation of the gadolinium chelates on the basis of in vivo stability.

  14. Radiology's value chain.

    PubMed

    Enzmann, Dieter R

    2012-04-01

    A diagnostic radiology value chain is constructed to define its main components, all of which are vulnerable to change, because digitization has caused disaggregation of the chain. Some components afford opportunities to improve productivity, some add value, while some face outsourcing to lower labor cost and to information technology substitutes, raising commoditization risks. Digital image information, because it can be competitive at smaller economies of scale, allows faster, differential rates of technological innovation of components, initiating a centralization-to-decentralization technology trend. Digitization, having triggered disaggregation of radiology's professional service model, may soon usher in an information business model. This means moving from a mind-set of "reading images" to an orientation of creating and organizing information for greater accuracy, faster speed, and lower cost in medical decision making. Information businesses view value chain investments differently than do small professional services. In the former model, producing a better business product will extend image interpretation beyond a radiologist's personal fund of knowledge to encompass expanding external imaging databases. A follow-on expansion with integration of image and molecular information into a report will offer new value in medical decision making. Improved interpretation plus new integration will enrich and diversify radiology's key service products, the report and consultation. A more robust, information-rich report derived from a "systems" and "computational" radiology approach will be facilitated by a transition from a professional service to an information business. Under health care reform, radiology will transition its emphasis from volume to greater value. Radiology's future brightens with the adoption of a philosophy of offering information rather than "reads" for decision making. Staunchly defending the status quo via turf wars is unlikely to constitute a

  15. Informatics in Radiology (infoRAD): Magnetic Resonance Imaging Workbench: analysis and visualization of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging data.

    PubMed

    d'Arcy, James A; Collins, David J; Padhani, Anwar R; Walker-Samuel, Simon; Suckling, John; Leach, Martin O

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging Workbench (MRIW) allows analysis of T1- and T2*-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging data sets to extract tissue permeability and perfusion characteristics by using standard pharmacokinetic models. Parametric maps are calculated from individual pixel enhancement curves in regions of interest (ROIs) and displayed as color overlays on the anatomic images. User-defined ROIs can be saved to ensure consistency of later reanalysis. Individual parametric maps are visualized together with user-selected parameter time-series plots. The following selections are available: overall ROI enhancement curve and fit, histogram, and individual pixel enhancement curve and fit. Summary data (transfer constant, leakage space, rate constant, integrated area under the gadolinium curve after 60 seconds, relative blood volume, relative blood flow, and mean transit time) may be exported to permanent storage along with per-pixel results for statistical analysis. Numerical values for parameters are displayed below the plot for easy reference. The dynamic range of plots and parametric map overlays is interactively adjustable. Viewing individual enhancement curves and parametric maps allows radiologists to investigate the heterogeneity of contrast agent kinetics for lesion characterization and to scrutinize serial changes in response to therapy. MRIW is written in IDL, enabling it to be used on a variety of computer systems.

  16. Westinghouse radiological containment guide

    SciTech Connect

    Aitken, S.B.; Brown, R.L.; Cantrell, J.R.; Wilcox, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides uniform guidance for Westinghouse contractors on the implementation of radiological containments. This document reflects standard industry practices and is provided as a guide. The guidance presented herein is consistent with the requirements of the DOE Radiological Control Manual (DOE N 5480.6). This guidance should further serve to enable and encourage the use of containments for contamination control and to accomplish the following: Minimize personnel contamination; Prevent the spread of contamination; Minimize the required use of protective clothing and personal protective equipment; Minimize the generation of waste.

  17. [Radiological diagnosis of osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Issever, A S; Link, T M

    2011-02-01

    Having at their disposal a wide range of imaging techniques, radiologists play a crucial role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with osteoporosis. The radiological tests range from dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), which is the only reference method accepted by the WHO, to conventional radiographs for fracture characterization, to more recent techniques for analyzing trabecular structure, and the findings are decisive in initiating correct management of osteoporosis patients. This review provides an overview of established radiological techniques and an outline of new diagnostic approaches.

  18. Radiological worker training

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

  19. Marketing a Radiology Practice.

    PubMed

    Levin, David C; Rao, Vijay M; Flanders, Adam E; Sundaram, Baskaran; Colarossi, Margaret

    2016-10-01

    In addition to being a profession, the practice of radiology is a business, and marketing is an important part of that business. There are many facets to marketing a radiology practice. The authors present a number of ideas on how to go about doing this. Some marketing methods can be directed to both patients and referring physicians. Others should be directed just to patients, while still others should be directed just to referring physicians. Aside from marketing, many of them provide value to both target audiences.

  20. Food Signs in Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Mehboob; Al Damegh, Saleh

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Certain diseases show classic radiological signs that resemble various types of food items like fruits, meat, vegetables, eggs, bakery, grocery and confectionary items. In this article various food signs are discussed and correlated with the various food items in a pictorial way. The objective of this pictorial essay is to provide the information and learn the characteristic radiological signs resembling various food items. These food signs are easy to recognize and allows a confident diagnosis on the basis of imaging findings alone or can narrow down the differential diagnosis. PMID:21475464

  1. Gamma-range synchronization of fast-spiking interneurons can enhance detection of tactile stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Siegle, Joshua H.; Pritchett, Dominique L.; Moore, Christopher I.

    2014-01-01

    We tested the sensory impact of repeated synchronization of fast-spiking interneurons (FS), an activity pattern thought to underlie neocortical gamma oscillations. We optogenetically drove “FS-gamma” while mice detected naturalistic vibrissal stimuli and found enhanced detection of less salient stimuli and impaired detection of more salient ones. Prior studies have predicted that the benefit of FS-gamma is generated when sensory neocortical excitation arrives in a specific temporal window 20-25 ms after FS synchronization. To systematically test this prediction, we aligned periodic tactile and optogenetic stimulation. We found that the detection of less salient stimuli was improved only when peripheral drive led to the arrival of excitation 20-25 ms after synchronization and that other temporal alignments either had no effects or impaired detection. These results provide causal evidence that FS-gamma can enhance processing of less salient stimuli, those that benefit from the allocation of attention. PMID:25151266

  2. Surface plasmon-enhanced fluorescence on Au nanohole array for prostate-specific antigen detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingwen; Wu, Lin; Wong, Ten It; Zhang, Jinling; Liu, Xiaohu; Zhou, Xiaodong; Bai, Ping; Liedberg, Bo; Wang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Localized surface plasmon (LSP) has been widely applied for the enhancement of fluorescence emission for biosensing owing to its potential for strong field enhancement. However, due to its small penetration depth, LSP offers limited fluorescence enhancement over a whole sensor chip and, therefore, insufficient sensitivity for the detection of biomolecules, especially large molecules. We demonstrate the simultaneous excitation of LSP and propagating surface plasmon (PSP) on an Au nanohole array under Kretschmann configuration for the detection of prostate-specific antigen with a sandwich immunoassay. The proposed method combines the advantages of high field enhancement by LSP and large surface area probed by PSP field. The simulated results indicated that a maximum enhancement of electric field intensity up to 1,600 times can be achieved under the simultaneous excitation of LSP and PSP modes. The sandwich assay of PSA carried out on gold nanohole array substrate showed a limit of detection of 140 fM supporting coexcitation of LSP and PSP modes. The limit of detection was approximately sevenfold lower than that when only LSP was resonantly excited on the same substrate. The results of this study demonstrate high fluorescence enhancement through the coexcitation of LSP and PSP modes and pave a way for its implementation as a highly sensitive bioassay. PMID:28392689

  3. Surface plasmon-enhanced fluorescence on Au nanohole array for prostate-specific antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingwen; Wu, Lin; Wong, Ten It; Zhang, Jinling; Liu, Xiaohu; Zhou, Xiaodong; Bai, Ping; Liedberg, Bo; Wang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Localized surface plasmon (LSP) has been widely applied for the enhancement of fluorescence emission for biosensing owing to its potential for strong field enhancement. However, due to its small penetration depth, LSP offers limited fluorescence enhancement over a whole sensor chip and, therefore, insufficient sensitivity for the detection of biomolecules, especially large molecules. We demonstrate the simultaneous excitation of LSP and propagating surface plasmon (PSP) on an Au nanohole array under Kretschmann configuration for the detection of prostate-specific antigen with a sandwich immunoassay. The proposed method combines the advantages of high field enhancement by LSP and large surface area probed by PSP field. The simulated results indicated that a maximum enhancement of electric field intensity up to 1,600 times can be achieved under the simultaneous excitation of LSP and PSP modes. The sandwich assay of PSA carried out on gold nanohole array substrate showed a limit of detection of 140 fM supporting coexcitation of LSP and PSP modes. The limit of detection was approximately sevenfold lower than that when only LSP was resonantly excited on the same substrate. The results of this study demonstrate high fluorescence enhancement through the coexcitation of LSP and PSP modes and pave a way for its implementation as a highly sensitive bioassay.

  4. Intelligent Agent-Based Intrusion Detection System Using Enhanced Multiclass SVM

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathy, S.; Yogesh, P.; Kannan, A.

    2012-01-01

    Intrusion detection systems were used in the past along with various techniques to detect intrusions in networks effectively. However, most of these systems are able to detect the intruders only with high false alarm rate. In this paper, we propose a new intelligent agent-based intrusion detection model for mobile ad hoc networks using a combination of attribute selection, outlier detection, and enhanced multiclass SVM classification methods. For this purpose, an effective preprocessing technique is proposed that improves the detection accuracy and reduces the processing time. Moreover, two new algorithms, namely, an Intelligent Agent Weighted Distance Outlier Detection algorithm and an Intelligent Agent-based Enhanced Multiclass Support Vector Machine algorithm are proposed for detecting the intruders in a distributed database environment that uses intelligent agents for trust management and coordination in transaction processing. The experimental results of the proposed model show that this system detects anomalies with low false alarm rate and high-detection rate when tested with KDD Cup 99 data set. PMID:23056036

  5. A hybrid preprocessing method using geometry based diffusion and elective enhancement filtering for pulmonary nodule detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhara, Ashis K.; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta

    2012-03-01

    The computer aided diagnostic (CAD) system has been developed to assist radiologist for early detection and analysis of lung nodules. For pulmonary nodule detection, image preprocessing is required to remove the anatomical structure of lung parenchyma and to enhance the visibility of pulmonary nodules. In this paper a hybrid preprocessing technique using geometry based diffusion and selective enhancement filtering have been proposed. This technique provides a unified preprocessing framework for solid nodule as well as ground glass opacity (GGO) nodules. Geometry based diffusion is applied to smooth the images by preserving the boundary. In order to improve the sensitivity of pulmonary nodule detection, selective enhancement filter is used to highlight blob like structure. But selective enhancement filter sometimes enhances the structures like blood vessel and airways other than nodule and results in large number of false positive. In first step, geometry based diffusion (GBD) is applied for reduction of false positive and in second step, selective enhancement filtering is used for further reduction of false negative. Geometry based diffusion and selective enhancement filtering has been used as preprocessing step separately but their combined effect was not investigated earlier. This hybrid preprocessing approach is suitable for accurate calculation of voxel based features. The proposed method has been validated on one public database named Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) containing 50 nodules (30 solid and 20 GGO nodule) from 30 subjects and one private database containing 40 nodules (25 solid and 15 GGO nodule) from 30 subjects.

  6. 324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Reeder, J.C. Cooper

    2010-06-24

    This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building.

  7. Radiologic Technology Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This guide presents the standard curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum addresses the minimum competencies for a radiologic technology program. The guide contains four major sections. The General Information section contains an introduction giving an overview and defining purpose and objectives; a program description,…

  8. Practical interventional radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Von Sonnenberg, E.; Mueller, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    This book describes techniques employed in interventional radiology with emphasis on imaging leading to intervention. Includes the entire array of procedures available to the radiologist, discussing the indications, materials, technique, results, and complications for each. Covers the chest, abdomen, bone, pediatric considerations, and nursing care.

  9. Paediatric musculoskeletal interventional radiology

    PubMed Central

    Paolantonio, Guglielmo; Fruhwirth, Rodolfo; Alvaro, Giuseppe; Parapatt, George K; Toma', Paolo; Rollo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Interventional radiology technique is now well established and widely used in the adult population. Through minimally invasive procedures, it increasingly replaces surgical interventions that involve higher percentages of invasiveness and, consequently, of morbidity and mortality. For these advantageous reasons, interventional radiology in recent years has spread to the paediatric age as well. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the development, use and perspectives of these procedures in the paediatric musculoskeletal field. Several topics are covered: osteomuscle neoplastic malignant and benign pathologies treated with invasive diagnostic and/or therapeutic procedures such as radiofrequency ablation in the osteoid osteoma; invasive and non-invasive procedures in vascular malformations; treatment of aneurysmal bone cysts; and role of interventional radiology in paediatric inflammatory and rheumatic inflammations. The positive results that have been generated with interventional radiology procedures in the paediatric field highly encourage both the development of new ad hoc materials, obviously adapted to young patients, as well as the improvement of such techniques, in consideration of the fact that childrens' pathologies do not always correspond to those of adults. In conclusion, as these interventional procedures have proven to be less invasive, with lower morbidity and mortality rates as well, they are becoming a viable and valid alternative to surgery in the paediatric population. PMID:26235144

  10. Radiology Technician (AFSC 90370).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobczak, James

    This five-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for radiology technicians. Covered in the individual volumes are radiographic fundamentals (x-ray production; primary beams; exposure devices; film, film holders, and darkrooms; control of film quality; and environmental safety);…

  11. Radiology in emergency medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.; Barsan, W.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book gives a discussion of radiologic modalities currently being used in emergency situations. Radiographs, echocardiographs, radionuclide scans and CT scans are systematically analyzed and evaluated to provide a step-by-step diagnostic process for emergency physicians to follow when a radiologist is not present.

  12. Collaborative Radiological Response Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Exercise and Evaluation Guide EMS Emergency Medical Services EPA Environmental Protection Agency FBI Federal Bureau of Investigation FEMA Federal...Investigation (FBI), water regulators, food regulators, agricultural agencies, hazardous waste regulators, local environmental health agencies...FEDERAL PLANNING EFFORTS The United States Environmental Protection Agency ( EPA ) has had radiological responsibilities since 1970.18 The General

  13. Research Training in Radiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of General Medical Sciences (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    Radiology today is a major clinical specialty of medicine in terms of the number and complexity of patient examinations, and the financial resources, physician manpower, and supporting personnel required for performing its functions. It reached its present status because it provides accurate methods of diagnosis for so many diseases. However, this…

  14. Radiological Defense Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    Originally prepared for use as a student textbook in Radiological Defense (RADEF) courses, this manual provides the basic technical information necessary for an understanding of RADEF. It also briefly discusses the need for RADEF planning and expected postattack emergency operations. There are 14 chapters covering these major topics: introduction…

  15. FIFA World Cup 2006 in Germany: enhanced surveillance improved timeliness and detection.

    PubMed

    Williams, C J; Schenkel, K; Eckmanns, T; Altmann, D; Krause, G

    2009-04-01

    Enhanced surveillance for infectious disease events, with accelerated routine reporting and daily supplementary reports, was undertaken during the 2006 FIFA World Cup in Germany. We evaluated the surveillance outputs, reporting intervals and detection of World Cup-relevant events for the enhanced system. Outbreak numbers for measles, Norovirus and Campylobacter were significantly higher than in previous years, but all increases were explained by prior trends. The median interval (disease onset to receipt at national centre) fell from 17 days in 2005 to 12 days in 2006. Detection of World Cup-relevant events was 44% (8/18) in the routine system and 77% (14/18) in supplementary reports. We did not identify any significant effect on infectious disease epidemiology relating to the FIFA 2006 World Cup. Daily reporting improved timeliness, and supplementary reporting improved relevant event detection. Enhancing existing systems, without the addition of syndromic surveillance, can be an effective approach to mass-event surveillance.

  16. Ethical problems in radiology: radiological consumerism.

    PubMed

    Magnavita, N; Bergamaschi, A

    2009-10-01

    One of the causes of the increasing request for radiological examinations occurring in all economically developed countries is the active role played by the patient-consumer. Consumerism places the radiologist in an ethical dilemma, between the principle of autonomy on the one hand and the ethical principles of beneficence, nonmaleficence and justice on the other. The choice made by radiologists in moral dilemmas is inspired by an adherence to moral principles, which in Italy and elsewhere refer to the Judaeo-Christian tradition or to neo-Darwinian relativism. Whatever the choice, the radiologist is bound to adhere to that choice and to provide the patient with all the relevant information regarding his or her state of health.

  17. Enhanced detection of rolling element bearing fault based on stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Hu, Niaoqing; Cheng, Zhe; Hu, Lei

    2012-11-01

    Early bearing faults can generate a series of weak impacts. All the influence factors in measurement may degrade the vibration signal. Currently, bearing fault enhanced detection method based on stochastic resonance(SR) is implemented by expensive computation and demands high sampling rate, which requires high quality software and hardware for fault diagnosis. In order to extract bearing characteristic frequencies component, SR normalized scale transform procedures are presented and a circuit module is designed based on parameter-tuning bistable SR. In the simulation test, discrete and analog sinusoidal signals under heavy noise are enhanced by SR normalized scale transform and circuit module respectively. Two bearing fault enhanced detection strategies are proposed. One is realized by pure computation with normalized scale transform for sampled vibration signal, and the other is carried out by designed SR hardware with circuit module for analog vibration signal directly. The first strategy is flexible for discrete signal processing, and the second strategy demands much lower sampling frequency and less computational cost. The application results of the two strategies on bearing inner race fault detection of a test rig show that the local signal to noise ratio of the characteristic components obtained by the proposed methods are enhanced by about 50% compared with the band pass envelope analysis for the bearing with weaker fault. In addition, helicopter transmission bearing fault detection validates the effectiveness of the enhanced detection strategy with hardware. The combination of SR normalized scale transform and circuit module can meet the need of different application fields or conditions, thus providing a practical scheme for enhanced detection of bearing fault.

  18. Nanoshell-based substrates for surface enhanced spectroscopic detection of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Levin, Carly S; Kundu, Janardan; Barhoumi, Aoune; Halas, Naomi J

    2009-09-01

    Nanoshells are optically tunable core-shell nanostructures with demonstrated uses in surface enhanced spectroscopies. Based on their ability to support surface plasmons, which give rise to strongly enhanced electromagnetic fields at their surface, nanoshells provide simple, scalable, high-quality substrates. In this article, we outline the development and use of nanoshell-based substrates for direct, spectroscopic detection of biomolecules. Recent advances in the use of these nanostructures lead to improved spectroscopic quality, selectivity, and reproducibility.

  19. Application of head flexion detection for enhancing eye gaze direction classification.

    PubMed

    Al-Rahayfeh, Amer; Faezipour, Miad

    2014-01-01

    Extensive research has been conducted on the tracking and detection of the eye gaze and head movement detection as these aspects of technology can be applied as alternative approaches for various interfacing devices. This paper proposes enhancements to the classification of the eye gaze direction. Viola Jones face detector is applied to first declare the region of the eye. Circular Hough Transform is then used to detect the iris location. Support Vector Machine (SVM) is applied to classify the eye gaze direction. Accuracy of the system is enhanced by calculating the flexion angle of the head through the utilization of a microcontroller and flex sensors. In case of rotated face images, the face can be rotated back to zero degrees through the flexion angle calculation. This is while Viola Jones face detector is limited to face images with very little or no rotation angle. Accuracy is initiated by enhancing the effectiveness of the system in the overall procedure of classifying the direction of the eye gaze. Therefore, the head direction is a main determinant in enhancing the control method. Different control signals are enhanced by the eye gaze direction classification and the head direction detection.

  20. Enhanced change detection performance reveals improved strategy use in avid action video game players.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kait; Fleck, Mathias S; Mitroff, Stephen R

    2011-01-01

    Recent research has shown that avid action video game players (VGPs) outperform non-video game players (NVGPs) on a variety of attentional and perceptual tasks. However, it remains unknown exactly why and how such differences arise; while some prior research has demonstrated that VGPs' improvements stem from enhanced basic perceptual processes, other work indicates that they can stem from enhanced attentional control. The current experiment used a change-detection task to explore whether top-down strategies can contribute to VGPs' improved abilities. Participants viewed alternating presentations of an image and a modified version of the image and were tasked with detecting and localizing the changed element. Consistent with prior claims of enhanced perceptual abilities, VGPs were able to detect the changes while requiring less exposure to the change than NVGPs. Further analyses revealed this improved change detection performance may result from altered strategy use; VGPs employed broader search patterns when scanning scenes for potential changes. These results complement prior demonstrations of VGPs' enhanced bottom-up perceptual benefits by providing new evidence of VGPs' potentially enhanced top-down strategic benefits.

  1. Rapid detection of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium by surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Lan; Zhang, Ping; Zheng, Da-wei; Wang, Yang-jun-qi; Zhong, Ru-gang

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is used as an analytical tool for the detection and identification of pathogenic bacteria of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium). Compared with normal Raman signal, the intensity of SERS signal is greatly enhanced. After processing all SERS data, the obvious differences between the SERS spectra of two species are determined. And applying the chemometric tools of principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis (PCA-HCA), the SERS spectra of two species are distinguished more accurately. The results indicate that SERS analysis can provide a rapid and sensitive method for the detection of pathogenic bacteria.

  2. Rapid bioparticle concentration and detection by combining a discharge driven vortex with surface enhanced Raman scattering

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Diana; Maheshwari, Siddharth; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2007-01-01

    Rapid concentration and detection of bacteria in integrated chips and microfluidic devices is needed for the advancement of lab-on-a-chip devices because current detection methods require high concentrations of bacteria which render them impractical. We present a new chip-scale rapid bacteria concentration technique combined with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) to enhance the detection of low bacteria count samples. This concentration technique relies on convection by a long-range converging vortex to concentrate the bacteria into a packed mound of 200 μm in diameter within 15 min. Concentration of bioparticle samples as low as 104 colony forming units (CFU)∕ml are presented using batch volumes as large as 150 μl. Mixtures of silver nanoparticles with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Escherichia coli F-amp, and Bacillus subtilis produce distinct and noticeably different Raman spectra, illustrating that this technique can be used as a detection and identification tool. PMID:19693355

  3. A detection instrument for enhanced-fluorescence and label-free imaging on photonic crystal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Block, Ian D; Mathias, Patrick C; Ganesh, Nikhil; Jones, Sarah I; Dorvel, Brian R; Chaudhery, Vikram; Vodkin, Lila O; Bashir, Rashid; Cunningham, Brian T

    2009-07-20

    We report on the design and demonstration of an optical imaging system capable of exciting surface-bound fluorophores within the resonant evanescent electric field of a photonic crystal surface and gathering fluorescence emission that is directed toward the imaging objective by the photonic crystal. The system also has the ability to quantify shifts in the local resonance angle induced by the adsorption of biomolecules on the photonic crystal surface for label-free biomolecular imaging. With these two capabilities combined within a single detection system, we demonstrate label-free images self-registered to enhanced fluorescence images with 328x more sensitive fluorescence detection relative to a glass surface. This technique is applied to a DNA microarray where label-free quantification of immobilized capture DNA enables improved quality control and subsequent enhanced fluorescence detection of dye-tagged hybridized DNA yields 3x more genes to be detected versus commercially available microarray substrates.

  4. Novel strategies to enhance lateral flow immunoassay sensitivity for detecting foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Shan, Shan; Lai, Weihua; Xiong, Yonghua; Wei, Hua; Xu, Hengyi

    2015-01-28

    Food contaminated by foodborne pathogens causes diseases, affects individuals, and even kills those affected individuals. As such, rapid and sensitive detection methods should be developed to screen pathogens in food. One current detection method is lateral flow immunoassay, an efficient technique because of several advantages, including rapidity, simplicity, stability, portability, and sensitivity. This review presents the format and principle of lateral flow immunoassay strip and the development of conventional lateral flow immunoassay for detecting foodborne pathogens. Furthermore, novel strategies that can be applied to enhance the sensitivity of lateral flow immunoassay to detect foodborne pathogens are presented; these strategies include innovating new label application, designing new formats of lateral flow immunoassay, combining with other methods, and developing signal amplification systems. With these advancements, detection sensitivity and detection time can be greatly improved.

  5. Plasmonic enhancement of a whispering-gallery-mode biosensor for single nanoparticle detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shopova, S. I.; Rajmangal, R.; Holler, S.; Arnold, S.

    2011-06-01

    We describe and demonstrate a physical mechanism that substantially enhances the label-free sensitivity of a whispering-gallery-mode biosensor for the detection of individual nanoparticles in aqueous solution. It involves the interaction of dielectric nanoparticle in an equatorial carousel orbit with a plasmonic nanoparticle bound at the microparticle's equator. As the dielectric particle parks to hot spots on the plasmonic particle we observe frequency shifts that are enhanced by a factor of 4, consistent with a simple reactive model. Once optimized the enhancement by this mechanism should exceed several orders of magnitude, putting individual protein within reach.

  6. Dual-mode microwave system to enhance early detection of cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, K. L.; El-Mahdi, A. M.; Shaeffer, J.

    1981-01-01

    A dual-mode microwave system has been developed that will permit early detection of cancer. The system combines the use of the passive microwave radiometer with an active transmitter. The active transmitter will provide localized heating to enhance early detection by taking advantage of the differential heating (i.e., tumor temperature with respect to surrounding tissue) associated with the thermal characteristics of tumors.

  7. Detection of Precytopathic Effect of Enteroviruses in Clinical Specimens by Centrifugation-Enhanced Antigen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lipson, Steven M.; David, Kathryn; Shaikh, Fatima; Qian, Lian

    2001-01-01

    Rapid enterovirus detection is important for decisions about antibiotic administration and length of hospital stay. The efficacy of rapid antigen detection-cell culture amplification (Ag-CCA) was evaluated with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 5-D8/1 (DAKO) and Pan-Enterovirus clone 2E11 (Chemicon) with 10 poliovirus, echovirus, and coxsackievirus type A and B stock isolates and College of American Pathologists check samples. By using Ag-CCA technology, MAb 2E11 was more sensitive than 5-D8/1 at detecting a greater number of stock isolates at or past tube (cytopathic effect [CPE]) culture (TC) end points. The efficacy of Ag-CCA in the clinical setting was subsequently confirmed with 273 consecutively freshly collected nasopharyngeal aspirate or swab specimens, rectal swab, and cerebrospinal fluid specimens during the 1999 enterovirus season. All specimens were tested by Ag-CCA in parallel with rhesus monkey kidney (RhMk), MRC-5, and A549 conventional TCs. Approximately 60% of field specimens were additionally tested with Hep-2 and HNK conventional TCs. Sixty-two percent of the clinical specimens tested were Ag-CCA positive after 48 h. Among 51 isolates, the mean time to CPE or culture confirmation was 5.5 days (range, 2 to 18 days). After 48 h, Ag-CCA achieved sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 62, 100, 100, and 93%, respectively. During the same period, TC-CPE displayed test parameters of 12, 100, 100, and 85%, respectively. After 5 days, the sensitivity and specificity of Ag-CCA increased to 92 and 98%, respectively. Within the same period, isolation attained sensitivity and specificity of 52 and 100%, respectively. Although Ag-CCA displayed slightly reduced sensitivity and reduced specificity compared with conventional cell culture after 14 days, the markedly superior 48-h enterovirus Ag-CCA detection rate supports incorporation of this assay into the routine clinical setting. PMID:11473988

  8. Photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence using a quartz substrate to reduce limits of detection

    PubMed Central

    Pokhriyal, Anusha; Lu, Meng; Chaudhery, Vikram; Huang, Cheng-Sheng; Schulz, Stephen; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2010-01-01

    A Photonic Crystal (PC) surface fabricated upon a quartz substrate using nanoimprint lithography has been demonstrated to enhance light emission from fluorescent molecules in close proximity to the PC surface. Quartz was selected for its low autofluorescence characteristics compared to polymer-based PCs, improving the detection sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of PC Enhanced Fluorescence (PCEF). Nanoimprint lithography enables economical fabrication of the subwavelength PCEF surface structure over entire 1x3 in2 quartz slides. The demonstrated PCEF surface supports a transverse magnetic (TM) resonant mode at a wavelength of λ = 632.8 nm and an incident angle of θ = 11°, which amplifies the electric field magnitude experienced by surface-bound fluorophores. Meanwhile, another TM mode at a wavelength of λ = 690 nm and incident angle of θ = 0° efficiently directs the fluorescent emission toward the detection optics. An enhancement factor as high as 7500 × was achieved for the detection of LD-700 dye spin-coated upon the PC, compared to detecting the same material on an unpatterned glass surface. The detection of spotted Alexa-647 labeled polypeptide on the PC exhibits a 330 × SNR improvement. Using dose-response characterization of deposited fluorophore-tagged protein spots, the PCEF surface demonstrated a 140 × lower limit of detection compared to a conventional glass substrate. PMID:21164826

  9. Photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence using a quartz substrate to reduce limits of detection.

    PubMed

    Pokhriyal, Anusha; Lu, Meng; Chaudhery, Vikram; Huang, Cheng-Sheng; Schulz, Stephen; Cunningham, Brian T

    2010-11-22

    A Photonic Crystal (PC) surface fabricated upon a quartz substrate using nanoimprint lithography has been demonstrated to enhance light emission from fluorescent molecules in close proximity to the PC surface. Quartz was selected for its low autofluorescence characteristics compared to polymer-based PCs, improving the detection sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of PC Enhanced Fluorescence (PCEF). Nanoimprint lithography enables economical fabrication of the subwavelength PCEF surface structure over entire 1x3 in2 quartz slides. The demonstrated PCEF surface supports a transverse magnetic (TM) resonant mode at a wavelength of λ = 632.8 nm and an incident angle of θ = 11°, which amplifies the electric field magnitude experienced by surface-bound fluorophores. Meanwhile, another TM mode at a wavelength of λ = 690 nm and incident angle of θ = 0° efficiently directs the fluorescent emission toward the detection optics. An enhancement factor as high as 7500 × was achieved for the detection of LD-700 dye spin-coated upon the PC, compared to detecting the same material on an unpatterned glass surface. The detection of spotted Alexa-647 labeled polypeptide on the PC exhibits a 330 × SNR improvement. Using dose-response characterization of deposited fluorophore-tagged protein spots, the PCEF surface demonstrated a 140 × lower limit of detection compared to a conventional glass substrate.

  10. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for detection of phenylketonuria for newborn screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javanmard, M.; Davis, R. W.

    2014-02-01

    Diagnosis of Phenylketonuria (PKU) in newborns is important because it can potentially help prevent mental retardation since it is treatable by dietary means. PKU results in phenylketonurics having phenylalanine levels as high as 2 mM whereas the normal upper limit in healthy newborns is 120 uM. To this end, we are developing a microfluidic platform integrated with a SERS substrate for detection of high levels of phenylalanine. We have successfully demonstrated SERS detection of phenylalanine using various SERS substrates fabricated using nanosphere lithography, which exhibit high levels of field enhancement. We show detection of SERS at clinically relevant levels.

  11. DNA detection using plasmonic enhanced near-infrared photoluminescence of gallium arsenide.

    PubMed

    Tang, Longhua; Chun, Ik Su; Wang, Zidong; Li, Jinghong; Li, Xiuling; Lu, Yi

    2013-10-15

    Efficient near-infrared detection of specific DNA with single nucleotide polymorphism selectivity is important for diagnostics and biomedical research. Herein, we report the use of gallium arsenide (GaAs) as a sensing platform for probing DNA immobilization and targeting DNA hybridization, resulting in ∼8-fold enhanced GaAs photoluminescence (PL) at ∼875 nm. The new signal amplification strategy, further coupled with the plasmonic effect of Au nanoparticles, is capable of detecting DNA molecules with a detection limit of 0.8 pM and selectivity against single base mismatches. Such an ultrasensitive near-infrared sensor can find a wide range of biochemical and biomedical applications.

  12. Detection of Molecular Oxygen at Low Concentrations Using Quartz Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pohlkötter, Andreas; Köhring, Michael; Willer, Ulrike; Schade, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Molecular oxygen is detected at low concentrations using photoacoustic spectroscopy despite its unfavorable photoacoustic properties. The system consists of a seed laser diode, a tapered amplifier and a quartz tuning fork based spectrophone, thus employing quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS). With this system a detection limit of 13 ppm is reached with a compact and long term stable setup. Further improvement of the detection limit is possible by adding suitable gases to the sample gas that promote the radiationless de-excitation of the oxygen molecules. PMID:22163666

  13. High-sensitivity pesticide detection using particle-enhanced resonant Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Bikas; Saito, Yuika; Verma, Prabhat

    2016-03-01

    The use of pesticides in agriculture has raised concerns, as even a small residual of pesticide on food can be harmful. It is therefore of great importance to develop a robust technique to detect tiny amounts of pesticides. Although Raman spectroscopy is frequently used for chemical identification, it is not suitable for extremely low molecular concentrations. We propose a technique called particle-enhanced resonant Raman spectroscopy to detect extremely low concentrations of pesticides, where gold nanoparticles of desired plasmonic resonance are synthesized to match the resonance in Raman scattering. We successfully demonstrated the detection of extremely low amounts of pesticides on oranges.

  14. Detection of molecular oxygen at low concentrations using quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pohlkötter, Andreas; Köhring, Michael; Willer, Ulrike; Schade, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Molecular oxygen is detected at low concentrations using photoacoustic spectroscopy despite its unfavorable photoacoustic properties. The system consists of a seed laser diode, a tapered amplifier and a quartz tuning fork based spectrophone, thus employing quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS). With this system a detection limit of 13 ppm is reached with a compact and long term stable setup. Further improvement of the detection limit is possible by adding suitable gases to the sample gas that promote the radiationless de-excitation of the oxygen molecules.

  15. Enhanced Detection of Multivariate Outliers Using Algorithm-Based Visual Display Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Wendy B.

    This study uses an algorithm-based visual display technique (FACES) to provide enhanced detection of multivariate outliers within large-scale data sets. The FACES computer graphing algorithm (H. Chernoff, 1973) constructs a cartoon-like face, using up to 18 variables for each case. A major advantage of FACES is the ability to store and show the…

  16. Establishment of enhancer detection lines expressing GFP in the gut of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Reiko; Sasakura, Yasunori

    2012-01-01

    The gut is a tubular, endodermal organ for digesting food and absorbing nutrients. In this study, we characterized eight enhancer detection lines that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the whole or part of the digestive tube of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. Three enhancer detection lines for the pyloric gland, a structure associated with the digestive tube, were also analyzed. These lines are valuable markers for analyzing the mechanisms of development of the gut. Based on the GFP expression of the enhancer detection lines together with morphological characteristics, the digestive tube of Ciona can be subdivided into at least 10 compartments in which different genetic cascades operate. Causal insertion sites of the enhancer detection lines were identified, and the expression pattern of the genes near the insertion sites were characterized by means of whole-mount in situ hybridization. We have characterized four and two genes that were specifically or strongly expressed in the digestive tube and pyloric gland, respectively. The present data provide the basic information and useful resources for studying gut formation in Ciona.

  17. Investigation of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy for hemozoin detection in malaria diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Keren; Xiong, Aoli; Yuen, Clement; Preiser, Peter; Liu, Quan

    2016-03-01

    We report two methods of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for hemozoin detection in malaria infected human blood. In the first method, silver nanoparticles were synthesized separately and then mixed with lysed blood; while in the second method, silver nanoparticles were synthesized directly inside the parasites of Plasmodium falciparum.

  18. Detection of viruses: atomic force microscopy and surface enhanced raman spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper demonstrated the capability of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to function effectively as ultra-sensitive readout tools for chip-scale platforms designed for pathogen detection in complex biological media. AFM allows direct (i.e. label-free) vi...

  19. Embedded Bone Fragment Detection in Chicken Fillets using Transmittance Image Enhancement and Hyperspectral Reflectance Imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper is concerned with the detection of bone fragments embedded in compressed de-boned skinless chicken breast fillets by enhancing single-band transmittance images generated by back-lighting and exploiting spectral information from hyperspectral reflectance images. Optical imaging of chicken ...

  20. Surface enhanced raman spectroscopy technique in rapid detection of live and dead salmonella cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many research proved that Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) can detect pathogens rapidly and accurately. In this study, a silver metal substrate was used for the selected common food pathogen Salmonella typhimurium bacteria. Nano silver rods were deposited on a thin titanium coating over t...

  1. Detection and differentiation of Salmonella serotypes using Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) technique.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) can detect pathogens rapidly and accurately. The metal surface for the SERS spectroscopy was a silver nano-particle encapsulated biopolymer polyvinyl alcohol nano-colloid deposited on a stainless steel plate. Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis...

  2. Data mining in radiology.

    PubMed

    Kharat, Amit T; Singh, Amarjit; Kulkarni, Vilas M; Shah, Digish

    2014-04-01

    Data mining facilitates the study of radiology data in various dimensions. It converts large patient image and text datasets into useful information that helps in improving patient care and provides informative reports. Data mining technology analyzes data within the Radiology Information System and Hospital Information System using specialized software which assesses relationships and agreement in available information. By using similar data analysis tools, radiologists can make informed decisions and predict the future outcome of a particular imaging finding. Data, information and knowledge are the components of data mining. Classes, Clusters, Associations, Sequential patterns, Classification, Prediction and Decision tree are the various types of data mining. Data mining has the potential to make delivery of health care affordable and ensure that the best imaging practices are followed. It is a tool for academic research. Data mining is considered to be ethically neutral, however concerns regarding privacy and legality exists which need to be addressed to ensure success of data mining.

  3. Ethanol as an alternative to formaldehyde for the enhancement of manganese(IV) chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Smith, Zoe M; Terry, Jessica M; Barnett, Neil W; Francis, Paul S

    2014-12-01

    Previous applications of manganese(IV) as a chemiluminescence reagent have required the use of formaldehyde to enhance the emission intensity to analytically useful levels. However, this known human carcinogen (by inhalation) is not ideal for routine application. A wide range of alternative enhancers have been examined but to date none have been found to provide the dramatic increase in chemiluminescence intensities obtained using formaldehyde. Herein, we demonstrate that ethanol offers a simple, safe and inexpensive alternative to the use of formaldehyde for manganese(IV) chemiluminescence detection, without compromising signal intensity or sensitivity. For example, chemiluminescence signals for opiate alkaloids using 50-100% ethanol were 0.8-1.6-fold those using 2M formaldehyde. This innocuous alternative enhancer is shown to be a particularly effective for the direct detection of thiols and disulfides by manganese(IV) chemiluminescence, which we have applied to a simple HPLC procedure to determine a series of biomarkers of oxidative stress.

  4. One year of AGILE Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes detection in the enhanced configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marisaldi, Martino; Ursi, Alessandro; Argan, Andrea; Tavani, Marco; Labanti, Claudio; Fuschino, Fabio; Campana, Riccardo; Mezentsev, Andrey; Østgaard, Nikolai

    2016-04-01

    At the end of March 2015 the onboard configuration of the AGILE MiniCalorimeter was modified in order to disable the veto signal of the Anti-Coincidence shield. This change was motivated by the need to reduce the dead-time for TGF detection to a minimum. The change resulted in a ten fold improvement in Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) detection rate and in a nearly dead-time free TGF sample with events as short as 20 microseconds (M. Marisaldi et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 42, 2015). Estimates based on the initial period of data acquisition in this enhanced configuration suggested the expected yearly TGF rate to be in the range 800-1000. We present here the updated statistical analysis of the enhanced AGILE TGF sample after one complete year of operations in the enhanced configuration.

  5. 3D Ag/ZnO hybrids for sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chenyue; Xu, Chunxiang; Lu, Junfeng; Li, Zhaohui; Tian, Zhengshan

    2016-03-01

    To combine the surface plasma resonance of metal and local field enhancement in metal/semiconductor interface, Ag nanoparticles (NPs) were assembled on a ZnO nanorod array which was grown by hydrothermally on carbon fibers. The construction of dimensional (3D) Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) substrate is used for the sensitive detection of organic pollutants with the advantages such as facile synthesis, short detection time and low cost. The hybrid substrate was manifested a high sensitivity to phenol red at a lower concentration of 1 × 10-9 M and a higher enhancement factor of 3.18 × 109. Moreover, the ZnO nanostructures decorated with Ag NPs were demonstrated self-cleaning function under UV irradiation via photocatalytic degradation of the analytic molecules. The fabrication process of the materials and sensors, optimization of the SERS behaviors for different sized Ag NPs, the mechanism of SERS and recovery were presented with a detailed discussion.

  6. Disabling Radiological Dispersal Terror

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M

    2002-11-08

    Terror resulting from the use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) relies upon an individual's lack of knowledge and understanding regarding its significance. Disabling this terror will depend upon realistic reviews of the current conservative radiation protection regulatory standards. It will also depend upon individuals being able to make their own informed decisions merging perceived risks with reality. Preparation in these areas will reduce the effectiveness of the RDD and may even reduce the possibility of its use.

  7. Optoelectrofluidic sandwich immunoassays for detection of human tumor marker using surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyundoo; Chon, Hyangah; Choo, Jaebum; Park, Je-Kyun

    2010-09-15

    A sandwich immunoassay is a powerful tool for identifying a specific substance in a biological sample. However, its heterogeneous strategy always requires repetitive liquid handlings and long processing time. Here an optoelectrofluidic immunoassay platform for simple, fast, and automated detection of human tumor marker based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been developed. By using a conventional optoelectrofluidic device and a liquid crystal display module, simple and quantitative detection of human tumor marker, alpha-fetoprotein, in a ∼500 nL sample droplet has been automatically conducted with lower detection limit of about 0.1 ng/mL within 5 min. This study depicts the first practical application, for protein detection, of the optoelectrofluidic manipulation technology. This image-driven immunoassay platform opens a new way for simple, fast, automated, and highly sensitive detection of antigens.

  8. Enhanced pulsar and single pulse detection via automated radio frequency interference detection in multipixel feeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocz, J.; Bailes, M.; Barnes, D.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Levin, L.

    2012-02-01

    Single pixel feeds on large aperture radio telescopes have the ability to detect weak (˜10 mJy) impulsive bursts of radio emission and sub-mJy radio pulsars. Unfortunately, in large-scale blind surveys, radio frequency interference (RFI) mimics both radio bursts and radio pulsars, greatly reducing the sensitivity to new discoveries as real signals of astronomical origin get lost among the millions of false candidates. In this paper a technique that takes advantage of multipixel feeds to use eigenvector decomposition of common signals is used to greatly facilitate radio burst and pulsar discovery. Since the majority of RFI occurs with zero dispersion, the method was tested on the total power present in the 13 beams of the Parkes multibeam receiver using data from archival intermediate-latitude surveys. The implementation of this method greatly reduced the number of false candidates and led to the discovery of one new rotating radio transient or RRAT, six new pulsars and five new pulses that shared the swept-frequency characteristics similar in nature to the `Lorimer burst'. These five new signals occurred within minutes of 11 previous detections of a similar type. When viewed together, they display temporal characteristics related to integer seconds, with non-random distributions and characteristic 'gaps' between them, suggesting they are not from a naturally occurring source. Despite the success in removing RFI, false candidates present in the data that are only visible after integrating in time or at non-zero dispersion remained. It is demonstrated that with some computational penalty, the method can be applied iteratively at all trial dispersions and time resolutions to remove the vast majority of spurious candidates.

  9. Supercontinuum high-speed cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy for sensitive multispecies detection.

    PubMed

    Werblinski, Thomas; Lämmlein, Bastian; Huber, Franz J T; Zigan, Lars; Will, Stefan

    2016-05-15

    Cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy is promising for many applications requiring a very high concentration sensitivity but often accompanied by low temporal resolution. In this Letter, we demonstrate a broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer capable of detection rates of up to 50 kHz, based on a spatially coherent supercontinuum (SC) light source and an in-house-built, high-speed near-infrared spectrograph. The SC spectrometer allows for the simultaneous quantitative detection of CO2, C2H2, and H2O within a spectral range from 1420 to 1570 nm. Using cavity mirrors with a specified reflectivity of R=98.0±0.3% a minimal spectrally averaged absorption coefficient of αmin=1·10-5  cm-1 can be detected at a repetition rate of 50 kHz.

  10. Morphologically manipulated Ag/ZnO nanostructures as surface enhanced Raman scattering probes for explosives detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaik, Ummar Pasha; Hamad, Syed; Ahamad Mohiddon, Md.; Soma, Venugopal Rao; Ghanashyam Krishna, M.

    2016-03-01

    The detection of secondary explosive molecules (e.g., ANTA, FOX-7, and CL-20) using Ag decorated ZnO nanostructures as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probes is demonstrated. ZnO nanostructures were grown on borosilicate glass substrates by rapid thermal oxidation of metallic Zn films at 500 °C. The oxide nanostructures, including nanosheets and nanowires, emerged over the surface of the Zn film leaving behind the metal residue. We demonstrate that SERS measurements with concentrations as low as 10 μM, of the three explosive molecules ANTA, FOX-7, and CL-20 over ZnO/Ag nanostructures, resulted in enhancement factors of ˜107, ˜107, and ˜104, respectively. These measurements validate the high sensitivity of detection of explosive molecules using Ag decorated ZnO nanostructures as SERS substrates. The Zn metal residue and conditions of annealing play an important role in determining the detection sensitivity.

  11. Hybrid plasmonic-photonic mode in a subwavelength fiber for enhanced single-nanoparticle detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, You-Ling; Gong, Qihuang

    2015-01-01

    We study a hybrid mode in a composite system consisting of a localized metal nanosphere on a subwavelength fiber. It is found that the hybrid mode resulting from coupling of the fiber propagating mode and the plasmonic resonance is promising for strongly enhanced interaction between light and matter. We then propose a single-nanoparticle detection scheme by monitoring the nanofiber transmission change induced by the plasmonic-enhanced target scattering. The detection limit can be as low as 18 nm in target diameter, showing great potential for sensing single viruses or biomolecules. In the hybrid system, the resonant wavelength is tunable from visible to near-infrared spectral range by employing a metal nanoshell instead of the nanosphere, while the low detection limit of a few tens of nanometers can still remain.

  12. Detection of nerve gases using surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates with high droplet adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakonen, Aron; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk; Andersson, Per Ola; Juhlin, Lars; Svedendahl, Mikael; Boisen, Anja; Käll, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Threats from chemical warfare agents, commonly known as nerve gases, constitute a serious security issue of increasing global concern because of surging terrorist activity worldwide. However, nerve gases are difficult to detect using current analytical tools and outside dedicated laboratories. Here we demonstrate that surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) can be used for sensitive detection of femtomol quantities of two nerve gases, VX and Tabun, using a handheld Raman device and SERS substrates consisting of flexible gold-covered Si nanopillars. The substrate surface exhibits high droplet adhesion and nanopillar clustering due to elasto-capillary forces, resulting in enrichment of target molecules in plasmonic hot-spots with high Raman enhancement. The results may pave the way for strategic life-saving SERS detection of chemical warfare agents in the field.Threats from chemical warfare agents, commonly known as nerve gases, constitute a serious security issue of increasing global concern because of surging terrorist activity worldwide. However, nerve gases are difficult to detect using current analytical tools and outside dedicated laboratories. Here we demonstrate that surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) can be used for sensitive detection of femtomol quantities of two nerve gases, VX and Tabun, using a handheld Raman device and SERS substrates consisting of flexible gold-covered Si nanopillars. The substrate surface exhibits high droplet adhesion and nanopillar clustering due to elasto-capillary forces, resulting in enrichment of target molecules in plasmonic hot-spots with high Raman enhancement. The results may pave the way for strategic life-saving SERS detection of chemical warfare agents in the field. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06524k

  13. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering-Based Immunoassay Technologies for Detection of Disease Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Smolsky, Joseph; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Hayashi, Chihiro; Batra, Surinder K.; Krasnoslobodtsev, Alexey V.

    2017-01-01

    Detection of biomarkers is of vital importance in disease detection, management, and monitoring of therapeutic efficacy. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the development of novel diagnostic methods that detect and quantify biomarkers with higher sensitivity and reliability, contributing to better disease diagnosis and prognosis. When it comes to such devastating diseases as cancer, these novel powerful methods allow for disease staging as well as detection of cancer at very early stages. Over the past decade, there have been some advances in the development of platforms for biomarker detection of diseases. The main focus has recently shifted to the development of simple and reliable diagnostic tests that are inexpensive, accurate, and can follow a patient’s disease progression and therapy response. The individualized approach in biomarker detection has been also emphasized with detection of multiple biomarkers in body fluids such as blood and urine. This review article covers the developments in Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) and related technologies with the primary focus on immunoassays. Limitations and advantages of the SERS-based immunoassay platform are discussed. The article thoroughly describes all components of the SERS immunoassay and highlights the superior capabilities of SERS readout strategy such as high sensitivity and simultaneous detection of a multitude of biomarkers. Finally, it introduces recently developed strategies for in vivo biomarker detection using SERS. PMID:28085088

  14. Spatially selective photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence and application to background reduction for biomolecule detection assays.

    PubMed

    Chaudhery, Vikram; Huang, Cheng-Sheng; Pokhriyal, Anusha; Polans, James; Cunningham, Brian T

    2011-11-07

    By combining photonic crystal label-free biosensor imaging with photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence, it is possible to selectively enhance the fluorescence emission from regions of the PC surface based upon the density of immobilized capture molecules. A label-free image of the capture molecules enables determination of optimal coupling conditions of the laser used for fluorescence imaging of the photonic crystal surface on a pixel-by-pixel basis, allowing maximization of fluorescence enhancement factor from regions incorporating a biomolecule capture spot and minimization of background autofluorescence from areas between capture spots. This capability significantly improves the contrast of enhanced fluorescent images, and when applied to an antibody protein microarray, provides a substantial advantage over conventional fluorescence microscopy. Using the new approach, we demonstrate detection limits as low as 0.97 pg/ml for a representative protein biomarker in buffer.

  15. Feasibility for detecting liver metastases in dogs using gadobenate dimeglumine-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Louvet, Arnaud; Duconseille, Anne-Carole

    2015-01-01

    Early detection of liver metastases may improve the prognosis for successful treatment in dogs with primary tumors. Hepatobiliary-specific contrast agents have been shown to allow an increase in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection of liver metastases in humans. The purpose of this prospective study was to test the feasibility for using one of these agents, gadobenate dimeglumine, to detect liver metastases in dogs. Ten consecutive dogs known to have a primary tumor were recruited for inclusion in the study. All dogs were scanned using the same protocol that included a T2-weighted respiratory-triggered sequence, T1 VIBE, diffusion-weighted imaging, and 3D-FLASH before and after dynamic injection of gadobenate dimeglumine contrast medium. Delayed imaging was performed less than 30 min after injection and up to 60 min in two cases. Histological analysis of liver lesions identified in delayed phases was performed for each case and confirmed metastatic origin. In all cases, lesion number detected in hepatobiliary contrast-enhanced sequences was statistically higher than in other sequences. Optimal lesion detection occurred with a 3D-FLASH sequence acquired in the transverse plane and less than 30 min after injection. Findings indicated that gabobenate dimeglumine enhanced MRI is a feasible technique for detecting liver metastases in dogs.

  16. Enhancement of the Feature Extraction Capability in Global Damage Detection Using Wavelet Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saleeb, Atef F.; Ponnaluru, Gopi Krishna

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to assess the specific capabilities of the defect energy parameter technique for global damage detection developed by Saleeb and coworkers. The feature extraction is the most important capability in any damage-detection technique. Features are any parameters extracted from the processed measurement data in order to enhance damage detection. The damage feature extraction capability was studied extensively by analyzing various simulation results. The practical significance in structural health monitoring is that the detection at early stages of small-size defects is always desirable. The amount of changes in the structure's response due to these small defects was determined to show the needed level of accuracy in the experimental methods. The arrangement of fine/extensive sensor network to measure required data for the detection is an "unlimited" ability, but there is a difficulty to place extensive number of sensors on a structure. Therefore, an investigation was conducted using the measurements of coarse sensor network. The white and the pink noises, which cover most of the frequency ranges that are typically encountered in the many measuring devices used (e.g., accelerometers, strain gauges, etc.) are added to the displacements to investigate the effect of noisy measurements in the detection technique. The noisy displacements and the noisy damage parameter values are used to study the signal feature reconstruction using wavelets. The enhancement of the feature extraction capability was successfully achieved by the wavelet theory.

  17. Hand-held spectroscopic device for in vivo and intraoperative tumor detection: contrast enhancement, detection sensitivity, and tissue penetration.

    PubMed

    Mohs, Aaron M; Mancini, Michael C; Singhal, Sunil; Provenzale, James M; Leyland-Jones, Brian; Wang, May D; Nie, Shuming

    2010-11-01

    Surgery is one of the most effective and widely used procedures in treating human cancers, but a major problem is that the surgeon often fails to remove the entire tumor, leaving behind tumor-positive margins, metastatic lymph nodes, and/or satellite tumor nodules. Here we report the use of a hand-held spectroscopic pen device (termed SpectroPen) and near-infrared contrast agents for intraoperative detection of malignant tumors, based on wavelength-resolved measurements of fluorescence and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals. The SpectroPen utilizes a near-infrared diode laser (emitting at 785 nm) coupled to a compact head unit for light excitation and collection. This pen-shaped device effectively removes silica Raman peaks from the fiber optics and attenuates the reflected excitation light, allowing sensitive analysis of both fluorescence and Raman signals. Its overall performance has been evaluated by using a fluorescent contrast agent (indocyanine green, or ICG) as well as a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) contrast agent (pegylated colloidal gold). Under in vitro conditions, the detection limits are approximately 2-5 × 10(-11) M for the indocyanine dye and 0.5-1 × 10(-13) M for the SERS contrast agent. Ex vivo tissue penetration data show attenuated but resolvable fluorescence and Raman signals when the contrast agents are buried 5-10 mm deep in fresh animal tissues. In vivo studies using mice bearing bioluminescent 4T1 breast tumors further demonstrate that the tumor borders can be precisely detected preoperatively and intraoperatively, and that the contrast signals are strongly correlated with tumor bioluminescence. After surgery, the SpectroPen device permits further evaluation of both positive and negative tumor margins around the surgical cavity, raising new possibilities for real-time tumor detection and image-guided surgery.

  18. A PDMS-Based Cylindrical Hybrid Lens for Enhanced Fluorescence Detection in Microfluidic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bor-Shyh; Yang, Yu-Ching; Ho, Chong-Yi; Yang, Han-Yu; Wang, Hsiang-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic systems based on fluorescence detection have been developed and applied for many biological and chemical applications. Because of the tiny amount of sample in the system; the induced fluorescence can be weak. Therefore, most microfluidic systems deploy multiple optical components or sophisticated equipment to enhance the efficiency of fluorescence detection. However, these strategies encounter common issues of complex manufacturing processes and high costs. In this study; a miniature, cylindrical and hybrid lens made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to improve the fluorescence detection in microfluidic systems is proposed. The hybrid lens integrates a laser focusing lens and a fluorescence collecting lens to achieve dual functions and simplify optical setup. Moreover, PDMS has advantages of low-cost and straightforward fabrication compared with conventional optical components. The performance of the proposed lens is first examined with two fluorescent dyes and the results show that the lens provides satisfactory enhancement for fluorescence detection of Rhodamine 6G and Nile Red. The overall increments in collected fluorescence signal and detection sensitivity are more than 220% of those without lens, and the detection limits of Rhodamine 6G and Nile red are lowered to 0.01 μg/mL and 0.05 μg/mL, respectively. The hybrid lens is further applied to the detection of Nile red-labeled Chlorella vulgaris cells and it increases both signal intensity and detection sensitivity by more than 520%. The proposed hybrid lens also dramatically reduces the variation in detected signal caused by the deviation in incident angle of excitation light. PMID:24531300

  19. Surface enhanced Raman scattering for detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrift, Will; Bhattacharjee, Arunima; Darvishzadeh-Varcheie, Mahsa; Lu, Ying; Hochbaum, Allon; Capolino, Filippo; Whiteson, Katrine; Ragan, Regina

    2015-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA), a biofilm forming bacterium, commonly affects cystic fibrosis, burn victims, and immunocompromised patients. PA produces pyocyanin, an aromatic, redox active, secondary metabolite as part of its quorum sensing signaling system activated during biofilm formation. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors composed of Au nanospheres chemically assembled into clusters on diblock copolymer templates were fabricated and the ability to detect pyocyanin to monitor biofilm formation was investigated. Electromagnetic full wave simulations of clusters observed in scanning electron microcopy images show that the localized surface plasmon resonance wavelength is 696 nm for a dimer with a gap spacing of 1 nm in an average dielectric environment of the polymer and analyte; the local electric field enhancement is on the order of 400 at resonance, relative to free space. SERS data acquired at 785 nm excitation from a monolayer of benzenethiol on fabricated samples was compared with Raman data of pure benzenethiol and enhancement factors as large as 8×109 were calculated that are consistent with simulated field enhancements. Using this system, the limit of detection of pyocyanin in pure gradients was determined to be 10 parts per billion. In SERS data of the supernatant from the time dependent growth of PA shaking cultures, pyocyanin vibrational modes were clearly observable during the logarithmic growth phase corresponding to activation of genes related to biofilm formation. These results pave the way for the use of SERS sensors for the early detection of biofilm formation, leading to reduced healthcare costs and better patient outcomes.

  20. Metal enhanced fluorescence improved protein and DNA detection by zigzag Ag nanorod arrays.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaofan; Xiao, Chenyu; Lau, Wai-Fung; Li, Jianping; Fu, Junxue

    2016-08-15

    As metal nano-arrays show great potential on metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF) than random nanostructures, MEF of Ag zigzag nanorod (ZNR) arrays made by oblique angle deposition has been studied for biomolecule-protein interaction and DNA hybridization. By changing the folding number and the deposition substrate temperature, a 14-fold enhancement factor (EF) is obtained for biotin-neutravidin detection. The optimal folding number is decided as Z=7, owing to the high scattering intensity of Ag ZNRs. The substrate temperature T=25°C and 0°C slightly alters the morphology of Ag ZNRs but has no big difference in EF. Further, Ag ZNRs deposited on a layer of Ag film have been introduced to the DNA hybridization and a significant signal enhancement has been observed through the fluorescence microscope. Through a detailed quantitative EF analysis, which excludes the enhancing effect from the increased surface area of ZNRs and only considers the contribution of MEF, an EF of 28 is achieved for the hybridization of two single-stranded oligonucleotides with 33 bases. Furthermore, a limit of detection is determined as 0.01pM. We believe that the Ag ZNR arrays can serve as a universal and sensitive bio-detection platform.

  1. Residual pesticide detection on food with particle-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Bikas; Huang, LiChuan; Masui, Kyoko; Saito, Yuika; Verma, Prabhat

    2014-08-01

    Modern farming relies highly on pesticides to protect agricultural food items from insects for high yield and better quality. Increasing use of pesticide has raised concern about its harmful effects on human health and hence it has become very important to detect even small amount of pesticide residues. Raman spectroscopy is a suitable nondestructive method for pesticide detection, however, it is not very effective for low concentration of pesticide molecules. Here, we report an approach based on plasmonic enhancement, namely, particle enhanced Raman spectroscopy (PERS), which is rapid, nondestructive and sensitive. In this technique, Raman signals are enhanced via the resonance excitation of localized plasmons in metallic nanoparticles. Gold nanostructures are promising materials that have ability to tune surface plasmon resonance frequency in visible to near-IR, which depends on shape and size of nanostructures. We synthesized gold nanorods (GNRs) with desired shape and size by seed mediated growth method, and successfully detected very tiny amount of pesticide present on food items. We also conformed that the detection of pesticide was not possible by usual Raman spectroscopy.

  2. Sensitive Detection of Biomolecules by Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering using Plant Leaves as Natural Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vipul; Krishnan, Venkata

    2017-03-01

    Detection of biomolecules is highly important for biomedical and other biological applications. Although several methods exist for the detection of biomolecules, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has a unique role in greatly enhancing the sensitivity. In this work, we have demonstrated the use of natural plant leaves as facile, low cost and eco-friendly SERS substrates for the sensitive detection of biomolecules. Specifically, we have investigated the influence of surface topography of five different plant leaf based substrates, deposited with Au, on the SERS performance by using L-cysteine as a model biomolecule. In addition, we have also compared the effect of sputter deposition of Au thin film with dropcast deposition of Au nanoparticles on the leaf substrates. Our results indicate that L-cysteine could be detected with high sensitivity using these plant leaf based substrates and the leaf possessing hierarchical micro/nanostructures on its surface shows higher SERS enhancement compared to a leaf having a nearplanar surface. Furthermore, leaves with drop-casted Au nanoparticle clusters performed better than the leaves sputter deposited with a thin Au film.

  3. Highly sensitive detection of superoxide dismutase based on an immunoassay with surface-enhanced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoming; Dou, Yao; Zhu, Shanshan

    2013-06-07

    Herein, a novel highly sensitive enhanced-fluorescence immunoassay for detection of superoxide dismutase (SOD) is established by combining surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) with immuno-magnetic separation. Based on a sandwich-type immunoassay, analytes in samples are first captured by magnetic beads coated with a monoclonal antibody and then "sandwiched" by another monoclonal antibody on silver nanoparticles labeled with fluorescein-labeled oligonucleotides in the presence of a magnet. Subsequently, the immune complex is enriched by exposure to a magnetic field. Lastly, the fluorescence intensity is measured according to the number of dissociated fluoresceins. The increased fluorescence intensity permits highly sensitive detection of SOD in a linear range of 10-8 × 10(5) pg mL(-1), with a detection limit of 4 pg mL(-1) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. Significantly, this method was validated for detection of SOD in human serum, human urine, and cosmetic samples. Moreover, the reliability and accuracy of results obtained by the enhanced-fluorescence method was confirmed by the analysis of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  4. Fast and sensitive detection of ochratoxin A in red wine by nanoparticle-enhanced SPR.

    PubMed

    Karczmarczyk, Aleksandra; Reiner-Rozman, Ciril; Hageneder, Simone; Dubiak-Szepietowska, Monika; Dostálek, Jakub; Feller, Karl-Heinz

    2016-09-21

    Herein, we present a fast and sensitive biosensor for detection of Ochratoxin A (OTA) in a red wine that utilizes gold nanoparticle-enhanced surface plasmon resonance (SPR). By combining an indirect competitive inhibition immunoassay and signal enhancement by secondary antibodies conjugated with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), highly sensitive detection of low molecular weight compounds (such as OTA) was achieved. The reported biosensor allowed for OTA detection at concentrations as low as 0.75 ng mL(-1) and its limit of detection was improved by more than one order of magnitude to 0.068 ng mL(-1) by applying AuNPs as a signal enhancer. The study investigates the interplay of size of AuNPs and affinity of recognition elements affecting the efficiency of the signal amplification strategy based on AuNP. Furthermore, we observed that the presence of polyphenolic compounds in wine samples strongly interferes with the affinity binding on the surface. To overcome this limitation, a simple pre-treatment of the wine sample with the binding agent poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) was successfully applied.

  5. Optical antenna arrays on a fiber facet for in situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Smythe, Elizabeth J; Dickey, Michael D; Bao, Jiming; Whitesides, George M; Capasso, Federico

    2009-03-01

    This paper reports a bidirectional fiber optic probe for the detection of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). One facet of the probe features an array of gold optical antennas designed to enhance Raman signals, while the other facet of the fiber is used for the input and collection of light. Simultaneous detection of benzenethiol and 2-[(E)-2-pyridin-4-ylethenyl]pyridine is demonstrated through a 35 cm long fiber. The array of nanoscale optical antennas was first defined by electron-beam lithography on a silicon wafer. The array was subsequently stripped from the wafer and then transferred to the facet of a fiber. Lithographic definition of the antennas provides a method for producing two-dimensional arrays with well-defined geometry, which allows (i) the optical response of the probe to be tuned and (ii) the density of "hot spots" generating the enhanced Raman signal to be controlled. It is difficult to determine the Raman signal enhancement factor (EF) of most fiber optic Raman sensors featuring hot spots because the geometry of the Raman enhancing nanostructures is poorly defined. The ability to control the size and spacing of the antennas enables the EF of the transferred array to be estimated. EF values estimated after focusing a laser directly onto the transferred array ranged from 2.6 x 10(5) to 5.1 x 10(5).

  6. A hierarchical framework approach for voice activity detection and speech enhancement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Tang, Zhen-min; Li, Yan-ping; Luo, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and effective voice activity detection (VAD) is a fundamental step for robust speech or speaker recognition. In this study, we proposed a hierarchical framework approach for VAD and speech enhancement. The modified Wiener filter (MWF) approach is utilized for noise reduction in the speech enhancement block. For the feature selection and voting block, several discriminating features were employed in a voting paradigm for the consideration of reliability and discriminative power. Effectiveness of the proposed approach is compared and evaluated to other VAD techniques by using two well-known databases, namely, TIMIT database and NOISEX-92 database. Experimental results show that the proposed method performs well under a variety of noisy conditions.

  7. Gas trace detection with cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy: a review of its process in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Siqi; Luo, Zhifu; Tan, Zhongqi; Long, Xingwu

    2016-11-01

    Cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) is a technology in which the intracavity absorption is deduced from the intensity of light transmitted by the high finesse optical cavity. Then the samples' parameters, such as their species, concentration and absorption cross section, would be detection. It was first proposed and demonstrated by Engeln R. [1] and O'Keefe[2] in 1998. This technology has extraordinary detection sensitivity, high resolution and good practicability, so it is used in many fields , such as clinical medicine, gas detection and basic physics research. In this paper, we focus on the use of gas trace detection, including the advance of CEAS over the past twenty years, the newest research progresses, and the prediction of this technology's development direction in the future.

  8. Detection of chemical residues in food oil via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kexi; Huang, Qing

    2016-05-01

    Highly ordered hexagonally patterned Ag-nanorod (Ag-NR) arrays for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of unhealthy chemical residues in food oil was reported, which was obtained by sputtering Ag on the alumina nanotip arrays stuck out of conical-pore anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates. SERS measurements demonstrate that the as-fabricated large-scale Ag-nanostructures can serve as highly sensitive and reproducible SERS substrates for detection of trace amount of chemicals in oil with the lower detection limits of 2×10-6 M for thiram and 10-7 M for rhodamine B, showing the potential of application of SERS in rapid trace detection of pesticide residues and illegal additives in food oils.

  9. Single molecule detection of 4-dimethylaminoazobenzene by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. L.; Yin, Y. F.; Jiang, J. W.; Mo, Y. J.

    2009-02-01

    4-Dimethylaminoazobenzene (DAB) is anticipated to be a human carcinogen based on sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals. The trace detection of DAB is of great significance in environmental protection and safe life of the people. To test the availability of DAB trace detection using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), the SERS spectra of DAB single molecules adsorbed on the silver particle aggregates in colloid were investigated. The phenomena of blinking, spectral diffusion, and intensity fluctuations of the vibrational lines in the SERS spectra were observed. Statistical analysis of spectral intensity fluctuations indicates a multimodal distribution of some specific Raman bands, which are consistent with the identification of single molecule detection. Our results demonstrated that SERS can be applied to the trace detection of DAB molecules and other azo dyes.

  10. Enhancing Nanoparticle-Based Visible Detection by Controlling the Extent of Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Seokwon; Koo, Ok Kyung; You, Young Sang; Lee, Yeong Eun; Kim, Min-Sik; Chang, Pahn-Shick; Kang, Dong Hyun; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Choi, Young Jin; Gunasekaran, Sundaram

    2012-06-01

    Visible indication based on the aggregation of colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) is highly advantageous for rapid on-site detection of biological entities, which even untrained persons can perform without specialized instrumentation. However, since the extent of aggregation should exceed a certain minimum threshold to produce visible change, further applications of this conventional method have been hampered by insufficient sensitivity or certain limiting characteristics of the target. Here we report a signal amplification strategy to enhance visible detection by introducing switchable linkers (SLs), which are designed to lose their function to bridge NPs in the presence of target and control the extent of aggregation. By precisely designing the system, considering the quantitative relationship between the functionalized NPs and SLs, highly sensitive and quantitative visible detection is possible. We confirmed the ultrahigh sensitivity of this method by detecting the presence of 20 fM of streptavidin and fewer than 100 CFU/mL of Escherichia coli.

  11. Enhanced backscattering for infrared detection using photonic crystal based flat lens.

    PubMed

    Oden, Jonathan; Hofman, Maxence; Mélique, Xavier; Lippens, Didier; Vanbésien, Olivier

    2012-08-10

    An n=-1 flat lens based on photonic crystal semiconductor technology is evaluated for infrared detection purposes. The idea consists in exploiting the backscattered waves of an incident plane wave impinging on a target placed in the focal region of a flat lens. It is shown that subwavelength detection of micronic dielectric targets can be obtained at 1.55 μm using the double focus of reflected waves induced by negative refraction. Complex relations among the intrinsic nature, the shape and size of the target, and detection efficiency are interpreted in terms of target eigenmode excitation. Reflectivity is modulated by the intrinsic mode nature, transverse, circular, or longitudinal, with an enhancement of the detection sensitivity in the case of whispering-gallery modes. It is believed that such a study paves the way to the definition of original noninvasive infrared sensors.

  12. Electrochemical detection of amaranth in food based on the enhancement effect of carbon nanotube film.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Hu, Xiaozhong; Cheng, Qin; Zhao, Xiaoya; Fu, Xiaofang; Wu, Kangbing

    2010-12-08

    Amaranth is widely added to food and can cause many adverse health effects when it is excessively consumed. Therefore, the monitoring of amaranth is quite important. Herein, an electrochemical sensor for the sensitive and rapid detection of amaranth was reported using multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT) as the sensing film. Due to the large surface area and high accumulation efficiency, the MWNT sensor showed a strong enhancement effect on the oxidation of amaranth, and greatly increased the current signal. The detection conditions such as pH value, amount of MWNT, accumulation potential and time were optimized. The linear range is from 40 nM to 0.8 μM, and the limit of detection is 35 nM. Finally, the new sensor was successfully employed to detect amaranth in soft drinks, and the results were tested by high-performance liquid chromatography.

  13. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI detects early response to adoptive NK cellular immunotherapy targeting the NG2 proteoglycan in a rat model of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Rygh, Cecilie Brekke; Wang, Jian; Thuen, Marte; Gras Navarro, Andrea; Huuse, Else Marie; Thorsen, Frits; Poli, Aurelie; Zimmer, Jacques; Haraldseth, Olav; Lie, Stein Atle; Enger, Per Øyvind; Chekenya, Martha

    2014-01-01

    There are currently no established radiological parameters that predict response to immunotherapy. We hypothesised that multiparametric, longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of physiological parameters and pharmacokinetic models might detect early biological responses to immunotherapy for glioblastoma targeting NG2/CSPG4 with mAb9.2.27 combined with natural killer (NK) cells. Contrast enhanced conventional T1-weighted MRI at 7±1 and 17±2 days post-treatment failed to detect differences in tumour size between the treatment groups, whereas, follow-up scans at 3 months demonstrated diminished signal intensity and tumour volume in the surviving NK+mAb9.2.27 treated animals. Notably, interstitial volume fraction (ve), was significantly increased in the NK+mAb9.2.27 combination therapy group compared mAb9.2.27 and NK cell monotherapy groups (p = 0.002 and p = 0.017 respectively) in cohort 1 animals treated with 1 million NK cells. ve was reproducibly increased in the combination NK+mAb9.2.27 compared to NK cell monotherapy in cohort 2 treated with increased dose of 2 million NK cells (p<0.0001), indicating greater cell death induced by NK+mAb9.2.27 treatment. The interstitial volume fraction in the NK monotherapy group was significantly reduced compared to mAb9.2.27 monotherapy (p<0.0001) and untreated controls (p = 0.014) in the cohort 2 animals. NK cells in monotherapy were unable to kill the U87MG cells that highly expressed class I human leucocyte antigens, and diminished stress ligands for activating receptors. A significant association between apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of water and ve in combination NK+mAb9.2.27 and NK monotherapy treated tumours was evident, where increased ADC corresponded to reduced ve in both cases. Collectively, these data support histological measures at end-stage demonstrating diminished tumour cell proliferation and pronounced apoptosis in the NK+mAb9.2.27 treated tumours compared to the other groups. In

  14. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI Detects Early Response to Adoptive NK Cellular Immunotherapy Targeting the NG2 Proteoglycan in a Rat Model of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Thuen, Marte; Gras Navarro, Andrea; Huuse, Else Marie; Thorsen, Frits; Poli, Aurelie; Zimmer, Jacques; Haraldseth, Olav; Lie, Stein Atle; Enger, Per Øyvind; Chekenya, Martha

    2014-01-01

    There are currently no established radiological parameters that predict response to immunotherapy. We hypothesised that multiparametric, longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of physiological parameters and pharmacokinetic models might detect early biological responses to immunotherapy for glioblastoma targeting NG2/CSPG4 with mAb9.2.27 combined with natural killer (NK) cells. Contrast enhanced conventional T1-weighted MRI at 7±1 and 17±2 days post-treatment failed to detect differences in tumour size between the treatment groups, whereas, follow-up scans at 3 months demonstrated diminished signal intensity and tumour volume in the surviving NK+mAb9.2.27 treated animals. Notably, interstitial volume fraction (ve), was significantly increased in the NK+mAb9.2.27 combination therapy group compared mAb9.2.27 and NK cell monotherapy groups (p = 0.002 and p = 0.017 respectively) in cohort 1 animals treated with 1 million NK cells. ve was reproducibly increased in the combination NK+mAb9.2.27 compared to NK cell monotherapy in cohort 2 treated with increased dose of 2 million NK cells (p<0.0001), indicating greater cell death induced by NK+mAb9.2.27 treatment. The interstitial volume fraction in the NK monotherapy group was significantly reduced compared to mAb9.2.27 monotherapy (p<0.0001) and untreated controls (p = 0.014) in the cohort 2 animals. NK cells in monotherapy were unable to kill the U87MG cells that highly expressed class I human leucocyte antigens, and diminished stress ligands for activating receptors. A significant association between apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of water and ve in combination NK+mAb9.2.27 and NK monotherapy treated tumours was evident, where increased ADC corresponded to reduced ve in both cases. Collectively, these data support histological measures at end-stage demonstrating diminished tumour cell proliferation and pronounced apoptosis in the NK+mAb9.2.27 treated tumours compared to the other groups. In

  15. Radiological Toolbox User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Eckerman, KF

    2004-07-01

    A toolbox of radiological data has been assembled to provide users access to the physical, chemical, anatomical, physiological and mathematical data relevant to the radiation protection of workers and member of the public. The software runs on a PC and provides users, through a single graphical interface, quick access to contemporary data and the means to extract these data for further computations and analysis. The numerical data, for the most part, are stored within databases in SI units. However, the user can display and extract values using non-SI units. This is the first release of the toolbox which was developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  16. Ultrasensitive detection of waste products in water using fluorescence emission cavity-enhanced spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bixler, Joel N; Cone, Michael T; Hokr, Brett H; Mason, John D; Figueroa, Eleonora; Fry, Edward S; Yakovlev, Vladislav V; Scully, Marlan O

    2014-05-20

    Clean water is paramount to human health. In this article, we present a technique for detection of trace amounts of human or animal waste products in water using fluorescence emission cavity-enhanced spectroscopy. The detection of femtomolar concentrations of urobilin, a metabolic byproduct of heme metabolism that is excreted in both human and animal waste in water, was achieved through the use of an integrating cavity. This technique could allow for real-time assessment of water quality without the need for expensive laboratory equipment.

  17. The detection of climate change due to the enhanced greenhouse effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiffer, Robert A.; Unninayar, Sushel

    1991-01-01

    The greenhouse effect is accepted as an undisputed fact from both theoretical and observational considerations. In Earth's atmosphere, the primary greenhouse gas is water vapor. The specific concern today is that increasing concentrations of anthropogenically introduced greenhouse gases will, sooner or later, irreversibly alter the climate of Earth. Detecting climate change has been complicated by uncertainties in historical observations and measurements. Thus, the primary concern for the GEDEX project is how can climate change and enhanced greenhouse effects be unambiguously detected and quantified. Specifically examined are the areas of: Earth surface temperature; the free atmosphere (850 millibars and above); space-based measurements; measurement uncertainties; and modeling the observed temperature record.

  18. Enhanced fluorescence detection of miRNA-16 on a photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Frascella, F; Ricciardi, S; Pasquardini, L; Potrich, C; Angelini, A; Chiadò, A; Pederzolli, C; De Leo, N; Rivolo, P; Pirri, C F; Descrovi, E

    2015-08-21

    We report a novel sensing method for fluorescence-labelled microRNAs (miRNAs) spotted on an all-dielectric photonic structure. Such a photonic structure provides an enhanced excitation and a directional beaming of the emitted fluorescence, resulting in a significant improvement of the overall signal collected. As a result, the Limit of Detection (LoD) is demonstrated to decrease by a factor of about 50. A compact read-out system allows a wide-field imaging-based detection, with little or no optical alignment issues, which makes this approach particularly interesting for further development for example in microarray-type bioassays.

  19. Sensitivity Enhancement in Multiple-Quantum NMR Experiments with CPMG Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kwang Hun; Nguyen, Tuan; Mazur, Tanya; Wemmer, David E.; Pines, Alexander

    2002-07-01

    We present a modified multiple-quantum (MQ) experiment, which implements the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) detection scheme in the static MQ NMR experiment proposed by W. S. Warren et al. (1980, J. Chem. Phys.73, 2084-2099) and exploited further by O. N. Antzutkin and R. Tycko (1999, J. Chem. Phys.110, 2749-2752). It is demonstrated that a significant enhancement in the sensitivity can be achieved by acquiring echo trains in the MQ experiments for static powder samples. The modified scheme employing the CPMG detection was superior to the original MQ experiment, in particular for the carbonyl carbon with a very large chemical shift anisotropy.

  20. Trace Detection of Metalloporphyrin-Based Coordination Polymer Particles via Modified Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Assisted by Surface Metallization

    PubMed Central

    Caravella, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    This study proposed a facile method to detect metalloporphyrin-based coordination polymer particles (Z-CPPs) in aqueous solution by modified surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The SERS-active particles are photodeposited on the surface of Z-CPPs, offering an enhanced Raman signal for the trace detection of Z-CPPs. PMID:28115934

  1. NanoCluster Beacons as reporter probes in rolling circle enhanced enzyme activity detection.

    PubMed

    Juul, Sissel; Obliosca, Judy M; Liu, Cong; Liu, Yen-Liang; Chen, Yu-An; Imphean, Darren M; Knudsen, Birgitta R; Ho, Yi-Ping; Leong, Kam W; Yeh, Hsin-Chih

    2015-05-14

    As a newly developed assay for the detection of endogenous enzyme activity at the single-catalytic-event level, Rolling Circle Enhanced Enzyme Activity Detection (REEAD) has been used to measure enzyme activity in both single human cells and malaria-causing parasites, Plasmodium sp. Current REEAD assays rely on organic dye-tagged linear DNA probes to report the rolling circle amplification products (RCPs), the cost of which may hinder the widespread use of REEAD. Here we show that a new class of activatable probes, NanoCluster Beacons (NCBs), can simplify the REEAD assays. Easily prepared without any need for purification and capable of large fluorescence enhancement upon hybridization, NCBs are cost-effective and sensitive. Compared to conventional fluorescent probes, NCBs are also more photostable. As demonstrated in reporting the human topoisomerases I (hTopI) cleavage-ligation reaction, the proposed NCBs suggest a read-out format attractive for future REEAD-based diagnostics.

  2. Enhanced electrochemiluminescence from luminol at carboxyl graphene for detection of α-fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojian; Guo, Qingfang; Cao, Wei; Li, Yueyun; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin

    2014-07-15

    In this study, a novel sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor was constructed by carboxyl graphene (GR) for enhancing luminol-O2 system emission. Here, carboxyl GR was used to enhance the ECL intensity of luminol that had excellent electron transfer ability and good solubility. The sensing platform was constructed by depositing carboxyl GR on electrodes and immobilizing antibodies on the surface of carboxyl GR through amidation. The specific immunoreaction between α-fetoprotein (AFP) and antibodies resulted in a decrease of ECL intensity, and the intensity decreased linearly with AFP concentrations in the range of 5 pg ml(-1) to 14 ng ml(-1) with a detection limit of 2.0 pg ml(-1). The proposed immunosensor exhibits high specificity, good reproducibility, and longtime stability. It may become a promising technique for protein detection.

  3. Enhanced soft X-ray detection efficiencies for imaging microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, G. W.; Barstow, M. A.; Whiteley, M. J.; Wells, A.

    1982-12-01

    Although the microchannel plate (MCP) electron multipliers used in X-ray astronomy facilitate X-ray imaging with high spatial resolution, their intrinsic soft X-ray detection efficiencies of 1-10 percent are much lower than the near-unity values available with competing gas proportional counters. A high photoelectric yield material may be deposited on the MCP front surface and channel walls in order to enhance X-ray sensitivity at energies below a few keV. High 0.18-1.5 keV X-ray detection efficiencies are reported for MCPs bearing CsI deposition photocathodes, by which efficiency enhancement factors of up to 15 have been obtained. These results are especially pertinent to the sensitivity of such future X-ray astronomy experiments as the Roentgensatellit (Rosat) Wide Field Camera.

  4. Surface enhanced Raman scattering detection of single R6G molecules on nanoporous gold films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongwen; Zhang, L.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Iwasaki, H.; Inouye, Y.; Xue, Q. K.; Chen, M. W.

    2011-03-01

    Detecting single molecules with high sensitivity and molecular specificity is of great practical interest in many fields such as chemistry, biology, medicine, and pharmacology. For this purpose, cheap and highly active substrates are of crucial importance. Recently, nanoporous metals (NPMs), with a three-dimensional continuous network structure and pore channels usually much smaller than the wavelength of visible light, revealed outstanding optical properties in surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this work, we further modify the nanoporous gold films by growing a high density of gold nano-tips on the surface. Extremely focused electromagnetic fields can be produced at the apex of the nano-tips, resulting in so-called hot spots. With this NPM-based and affordable substrate, single molecule-detection is achievable with ultrahigh enhancement in SERS.

  5. Quantitative surface enhanced Raman scattering detection based on the ``sandwich'' structure substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junmeng; Qu, Shengchun; Zhang, Lisheng; Tang, Aiwei; Wang, Zhanguo

    2011-08-01

    A sandwich structured substrate was designed for quantitative molecular detection using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), in which the probe molecule was sandwiched between silver nanoparticles (SNPs) and silver nanoarrays. The SNPs was prepared using Lee-Meisel method, and the silver nanoarrays was fabricated on porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) using electrodepositing method. The SERS studies show that the sandwich structured substrate exhibits good stability and reproducibility, and the detection sensitivity of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and Melamine can respectively reach up to 10 -19 M and 10 -9 M, which is improved greatly as compared to other SERS substrates. The improved SERS sensitivity is closely associated with the stronger electromagnetic field enhancement, which stems from localized surface plasmon (LSP) coupling between the two silver nanostructures. Furthermore, the SERS intensity increased almost linearly as the mother concentration increased, which indicates that such a sandwich structure may be used as a good SERS substrate for quantitative analysis.

  6. Tuning plasmonic and chemical enhancement for SERS detection on graphene-based Au hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiu; Liang, Benliang; Pan, Zhenghui; Lang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Yuegang; Wang, Guangsheng; Yin, Penggang; Guo, Lin

    2015-11-01

    Various graphene-based Au nanocomposites have been developed as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates recently. However, efficient use of SERS has been impeded by the difficulty of tuning SERS enhancement effects induced from chemical and plasmonic enhancement by different preparation methods of graphene. Herein, we developed graphene-based Au hybrids through physical sputtering gold NPs on monolayer graphene prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) as a CVD-G/Au hybrid, as well as graphene oxide-gold (GO/Au) and reduced-graphene oxide (rGO/Au) hybrids prepared using the chemical in situ crystallization growth method. Plasmonic and chemical enhancements were tuned effectively by simple methods in these as-prepared graphene-based Au systems. SERS performances of CVD-G/Au, rGO/Au and GO/Au showed a gradually monotonic increasing tendency of enhancement factors (EFs) for adsorbed Rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules, which show clear dependence on chemical bonds between graphene and Au, indicating that the chemical enhancement can be steadily controlled by chemical groups in a graphene-based Au hybrid system. Most notably, we demonstrate that the optimized GO/Au was able to detect biomolecules of adenine, which displayed high sensitivity with a detection limit of 10-7 M as well as good reproducibility and uniformity.Various graphene-based Au nanocomposites have been developed as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates recently. However, efficient use of SERS has been impeded by the difficulty of tuning SERS enhancement effects induced from chemical and plasmonic enhancement by different preparation methods of graphene. Herein, we developed graphene-based Au hybrids through physical sputtering gold NPs on monolayer graphene prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) as a CVD-G/Au hybrid, as well as graphene oxide-gold (GO/Au) and reduced-graphene oxide (rGO/Au) hybrids prepared using the chemical in situ crystallization growth method. Plasmonic

  7. Using a silver-enhanced microarray sandwich structure to improve SERS sensitivity for protein detection.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xuefang; Yan, Yuerong; Jiang, Guoqing; Adkins, Jason; Shi, Jian; Jiang, Guomin; Tian, Shu

    2014-03-01

    A simple and sensitive method, based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), for immunoassay and label-free protein detection is reported. A series of bowl-shaped silver cavity arrays were fabricated by electrodeposition using a self-assembled polystyrene spheres template. The reflection spectra of these cavity arrays were recorded as a function of film thickness, and then correlated with SERS enhancement using sodium thiophenolate as the probe molecule. The results reveal that SERS enhancement can be maximized when the frequency of both the incident laser and the Raman scattering approach the frequency of the localized surface plasmon resonance. The optimized array was then used as the bottom layer of a silver nanoparticle-protein-bowl-shaped silver cavity array sandwich. The second layer of silver was introduced by the interactions between the proteins in the middle layer of the sandwich architecture and silver nanoparticles. Human IgG bound to the surface of this microcavity array can retain its recognition function. With the Raman reporter molecules labeled on the antibody, a detection limit down to 0.1 ng mL(-1) for human IgG is easily achieved. Furthermore, the SERS spectra of label-free proteins (catalase, cytochrome C, avidin and lysozyme) from the assembled sandwich have excellent reproducibility and high quality. The results reveal that the proposed approach has potential for use in qualitative and quantitative detection of biomolecules.

  8. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging detects mossy fiber sprouting in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Malheiros, Jackeline M.; Polli, Roberson S.; Paiva, Fernando F.; Longo, Beatriz M.; Mello, Luiz E.; Silva, Afonso C.; Tannús, Alberto; Covolan, Luciene

    2012-01-01

    Summary Purpose Mossy fiber sprouting (MFS) is a frequent finding following status epilepticus (SE). The present study aimed to test the feasibility of using manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) to detect MFS in the chronic phase of the well-established pilocarpine (Pilo) rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Methods To modulate MFS, cycloheximide (CHX), a protein synthesis inhibitor, was co-administered with Pilo in a sub-group of animals. In vivo MEMRI was performed 3 months after induction of SE and compared to the neo-Timm histological labeling of zinc mossy fiber terminals in the dentate gyrus (DG). Key findings Chronically epileptic rats displaying MFS as detected by neo-Timm histology had a hyperintense MEMRI signal in the DG, while chronically epileptic animals that did not display MFS had minimal MEMRI signal enhancement compared to non-epileptic control animals. A strong correlation (r = 0.81, P<0.001) was found between MEMRI signal enhancement and MFS. Significance This study shows that MEMRI is an attractive non-invasive method to detect mossy fiber sprouting in vivo and can be used as an evaluation tool in testing therapeutic approaches to manage chronic epilepsy. PMID:22642664

  9. Bifunctional nanoparticles for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy-based leukemia biomarker detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehn, Dora; Morasso, Carlo; Vanna, Renzo; Schiumarini, Domitilla; Bedoni, Marzia; Ciceri, Fabio; Gramatica, Furio

    2014-03-01

    The Wilms tumor gene (WT1) is a biomarker overexpressed in more than 90% of acute myeloid leukemia patients. Fast and sensitive detection of the WT1 in blood samples would allow monitoring of the minimal residual disease during clinical remission and would permit early detection of a potential relapse in acute myeloid leukemia. In this work, Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) based detection of the WT1 sequence using bifunctional, magnetic core - gold shell nanoparticles is presented. The classical co-precipitation method was applied to generate magnetic nanoparticles which were coated with a gold shell after modification with aminopropyltriethoxy silane and subsequent deposition of gold nanoparticle seeds. Simple hydroquinone based reduction procedure was applied for the shell growing in water based reaction mixture at room temperature. Thiolated ssDNA probes of the WT1 sequence were immobilized as capture oligonucleotides on the gold surface. Malachite green was applied both for testing the amplification performance of the core-shell colloidal SERS substrate and also as label dye of the target DNA sequence. The SERS enhancer efficacy of the core-shell nanomaterial was compared with the efficacy of classical spherical gold particles produced using the conventional citrate reduction method. The core-shell particles were found not only to provide an opportunity for facile separation in a heterogeneous reaction system but also to be superior regarding robustness as SERS enhancers.

  10. Label-Free Ag+ Detection by Enhancing DNA Sensitized Tb3+ Luminescence

    PubMed Central

    Kleinke, Kimberly; Saran, Runjhun; Liu, Juewen

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the effect of Ag+ on DNA sensitized Tb3+ luminescence was studied initially using the Ag+-specific RNA-cleaving DNAzyme, Ag10c. While we expected to observe luminescence quenching by Ag+, a significant enhancement was produced. Based on this observation, simple DNA oligonucleotide homopolymers were used with systematically varied sequence and length. We discovered that both poly-G and poly-T DNA have a significant emission enhancement by Ag+, while the absolute intensity is stronger with the poly-G DNA, indicating that a G-quadruplex DNA is not required for this enhancement. Using the optimized length of the G7 DNA (an oligo constituted with seven guanines), Ag+ was measured with a detection limit of 57.6 nM. The signaling kinetics, G7 DNA conformation, and the binding affinity of Tb3+ to the DNA in the presence or absence of Ag+ are also studied to reveal the mechanism of emission enhancement. This observation is useful not only for label-free detection of Ag+, but also interesting for the rational design of new biosensors using Tb3+ luminescence. PMID:27571082

  11. Two improved forensic methods of detecting contrast enhancement in digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xufeng; Wei, Xingjie; Li, Chang-Tsun

    2014-02-01

    Contrast enhancements, such as histogram equalization or gamma correction, are widely used by malicious attackers to conceal the cut-and-paste trails in doctored images. Therefore, detecting the traces left by contrast enhancements can be an effective way of exposing cut-and-paste image forgery. In this work, two improved forensic methods of detecting contrast enhancement in digital images are put forward. More specifically, the first method uses a quadratic weighting function rather than a simple cut-off frequency to measure the histogram distortion introduced by contrast enhancements, meanwhile the averaged high-frequency energy measure of his- togram is replaced by the ratio taken up by the high-frequency components in the histogram spectrum. While the second improvement is achieved by applying a linear-threshold strategy to get around the sensitivity of threshold selection. Compared with their original counterparts, these two methods both achieve better performance in terms of ROC curves and real-world cut-and-paste image forgeries. The effectiveness and improvement of the two proposed algorithms are experimentally validated on natural color images captured by commercial camera.

  12. Feminist theoretical perspectives on ethics in radiology.

    PubMed

    Condren, Mary

    2009-07-01

    The substantive safety of radiological and other medical procedures can be radically reduced by unconscious factors governing scientific thought. In addition, the historical exclusion of women from these disciplines has possibly skewed their development in directions that now need to be addressed. This paper focuses on three such factors: gendered libidos that privilege risk taking over prevention, fragmented forms of knowledge that encourage displaced forms of responsibility and group dynamics that discourage critique of accepted practices and limit the definition of one's group. The substantive safety of the practice and scientific contribution of radiologists might be considerably enhanced were the focus to switch from radiology to diagnosis. Such enlargement might redefine the brief of radiologists towards preventing as well as curing; evaluating some non-invasive and low-tech options, adopting some inclusive paradigms of clinical ecology and enlarging group identities to include those currently excluded through geography or social class from participating in the benefits of science.

  13. Radiological sinonasal anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Alrumaih, Redha A.; Ashoor, Mona M.; Obidan, Ahmed A.; Al-Khater, Khulood M.; Al-Jubran, Saeed A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the prevalence of common radiological variants of sinonasal anatomy among Saudi population and compare it with the reported prevalence of these variants in other ethnic and population groups. Methods: This is a retrospective cross-sectional study of 121 computerized tomography scans of the nose and paranasal sinuses of patients presented with sinonasal symptoms to the Department of Otorhinolarngology, King Fahad Hospital of the University, Khobar, Saudi Arabia, between January 2014 and May 2014. Results: Scans of 121 patients fulfilled inclusion criteria were reviewed. Concha bullosa was found in 55.4%, Haller cell in 39.7%, and Onodi cell in 28.9%. Dehiscence of the internal carotid artery was found in 1.65%. Type-1 and type-2 optic nerve were the prevalent types. Type-II Keros classification of the depth of olfactory fossa was the most common among the sample (52.9%). Frontal cells were found in 79.3%; type I was the most common. Conclusions: There is a difference in the prevalence of some radiological variants of the sinonasal anatomy between Saudi population and other study groups. Surgeon must pay special attention in the preoperative assessment of patients with sinonasal pathology to avoid undesirable complications. PMID:27146614

  14. Patient-centered Radiology.

    PubMed

    Itri, Jason N

    2015-10-01

    Patient-centered care (ie, care organized around the patient) is a model in which health care providers partner with patients and families to identify and satisfy patients' needs and preferences. In this model, providers respect patients' values and preferences, address their emotional and social needs, and involve them and their families in decision making. Radiologists have traditionally been characterized as "doctor-to-doctor" consultants who are distanced from patients and work within a culture that does not value patient centeredness. As medicine becomes more patient driven and the trajectory of health care is toward increasing patient self-reliance, radiologists must change the perception that they are merely consultants and become more active participants in patient care by embracing greater patient interaction. The traditional business model for radiology practices, which devalues interaction between patients and radiologists, must be transformed into a patient-centered model in which radiologists are reintegrated into direct patient care and imaging processes are reorganized around patients' needs and preferences. Expanding radiology's core assets to include direct patient care may be the most effective deterrent to the threat of commoditization. As the assault on the growth of Medicare spending continues, with medical imaging as a highly visible target, radiologists must adapt to the changing landscape by focusing on their most important consumer: the patient. This may yield substantial benefits in the form of improved quality and patient safety, reduced costs, higher-value care, improved patient outcomes, and greater patient and provider satisfaction.

  15. Iodophenol blue-enhanced luminol chemiluminescence and its application to hydrogen peroxide and glucose detection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dalong; Wang, Ping; Zhao, Yanjun; Fan, Aiping

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we found that iodophenol blue can enhance the weak chemiluminescence (CL) of luminol-H2O2 system. With the aid of CL spectral, electron spin resonance (ESR) spectral measurements and studies on the effects of various free radical scavengers on the iodophenol blue-enhanced luminol-H2O2 system, we speculated that iodophenol blue may react with H2O2 and oxygen to produce oxidizing radical species such as OH(•) and O2(•-) resulting the formation of (1)O2. The generated (1)O2 may react with luminol anion generating an unstable endoperoxide and subsequent 3-aminophthalate* (3-APA*). When the excited-state 3-APA returned to the ground-state, an enhanced CL was observed. Based on the H2O2 concentration dependence of the catalytic activity of iodophenol blue, a cheap, simple, sensitive CL assay for the determination of H2O2 was established. Under the optimum experimental conditions, a linear relationship between the relative CL intensity and H2O2 concentration in the range of 0.025-10 μM was obtained. As low as 14 nM H2O2 can be sensitively detected by using the proposed method. The relative standard deviation for 5, 1 and 0.25 μM H2O2 was 2.58%, 5.16% and 4.66%, respectively. By combining the glucose oxidase (GOx)-catalyzed oxidation reaction, CL detection of glucose was realized. The linear range of glucose detection was 0.1-30 μM with a detection limit of 0.06 μM. The proposed method has been applied to the detection of glucose in diluted serum.

  16. Automatic Annotation of Radiological Observations in Liver CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, Francisco; Xu, Jiajing; Liu, Yi; Liu, Tiffany; Beaulieu, Christopher; Rubin, Daniel; Napel, Sandy

    2012-01-01

    We aim to predict radiological observations using computationally-derived imaging features extracted from computed tomography (CT) images. We created a dataset of 79 CT images containing liver lesions identified and annotated by a radiologist using a controlled vocabulary of 76 semantic terms. Computationally-derived features were extracted describing intensity, texture, shape, and edge sharpness. Traditional logistic regression was compared to L1-regularized logistic regression (LASSO) in order to predict the radiological observations using computational features. The approach was evaluated by leave one out cross-validation. Informative radiological observations such as lesion enhancement, hypervascular attenuation, and homogeneous retention were predicted well by computational features. By exploiting relationships between computational and semantic features, this approach could lead to more accurate and efficient radiology reporting. PMID:23304295

  17. Smart detection of microRNAs through fluorescence enhancement on a photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Pasquardini, L; Potrich, C; Vaghi, V; Lunelli, L; Frascella, F; Descrovi, E; Pirri, C F; Pederzolli, C

    2016-04-01

    The detection of low abundant biomarkers, such as circulating microRNAs, demands innovative detection methods with increased resolution, sensitivity and specificity. Here, a biofunctional surface was implemented for the selective capture of microRNAs, which were detected through fluorescence enhancement directly on a photonic crystal. To set up the optimal biofunctional surface, epoxy-coated commercially available microscope slides were spotted with specific anti-microRNA probes. The optimal concentration of probe as well as of passivating agent were selected and employed for titrating the microRNA hybridization. Cross-hybridization of different microRNAs was also tested, resulting negligible. Once optimized, the protocol was adapted to the photonic crystal surface, where fluorescent synthetic miR-16 was hybridized and imaged with a dedicated equipment. The photonic crystal consists of a dielectric multilayer patterned with a grating structure. In this way, it is possible to take advantage from both a resonant excitation of fluorophores and an angularly redirection of the emitted radiation. As a result, a significant fluorescence enhancement due to the resonant structure is collected from the patterned photonic crystal with respect to the outer non-structured surface. The dedicated read-out system is compact and based on a wide-field imaging detection, with little or no optical alignment issues, which makes this approach particularly interesting for further development such as for example in microarray-type bioassays.

  18. Characterization and Detection of Uranyl Ion Sorption on Silver Surfaces using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Retterer, Scott T; Wells, Sabrina M; Sepaniak, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The study of the chemical behavior of uranyl species and its rapid detection is of primary environmental and non-proliferation concern. Herein we report on a surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic study of uranyl ion (UO22+) sorption onto the thermally vapor deposited silver particle surface. The ability of vibrational spectroscopy to characterize surface phenomenon and the remarkable sensitivity of the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) have been introduced as an appropriate combination for the surface characterization and detection of UO22+ onto the silver surface. The appearance of symmetric stretching frequency of UO22+ around 700 cm-1 and the disappearance of the 854 cm-1 band is attributed to the development of a chemical bond between silver surface and uranyl species. The effects of temperature, solute-surface interaction time, and pH have been studied using silver modified polypropylene filter (PPF) substrates. Results show that under appropriate conditions, the concentration of uranyl ion as low as 20 ng/mL can be easily detected using the discussed SERS approach without any surface modification of silver nanoparticles. Moreover, an alteranative SERS approach of uranyl detection is demonstrated using nano-lithographically fabricated SERS substrates.

  19. Developments of thrombosis detection algorithm using the contrast enhanced CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Jun; Suzuki, Hidenobu; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Sugiura, Toshihiko; Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Takiguchi, Yuichi; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2011-03-01

    In the diagnosis of thrombosis with no specific clinic symptoms, diagnostic imaging plays a greater role. Particularly, contrast Enhanced CT is low invasive diagnostics, and the thrombus in the pulmonary artery can be detected as a low density without the contrast effect. Moreover, because describing the change of concentration in lung field and the decline in lung blood vessel shadow is also possible, it is indispensable to diagnose of thrombosis. As the image diagnosis support, it is necessary to classify the pulmonary artery and vein that relate to the thrombosis, and to analyze the lung blood vessel quantitatively. The technique for detecting the thrombosis by detecting the position of the thrombus has been proposed so far. In this study, it aims to focusing on the dilation of the main pulmonary artery and to detect the thrombosis. The effectiveness of the method is shown by measuring the pulmonary trunk diameter by using the extracted pulmonary artery from contrast Enhanced CT through semi-automated method, and comparing it with a normal case.

  20. Implementation of molecularly imprinted polymer beads for surface enhanced Raman detection.

    PubMed

    Kamra, Tripta; Zhou, Tongchang; Montelius, Lars; Schnadt, Joachim; Ye, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) have a predesigned molecular recognition capability that can be used to build robust chemical sensors. MIP-based chemical sensors allow label-free detection and are particularly interesting due to their simple operation. In this work we report the use of thiol-terminated MIP microspheres to construct surfaces for detection of a model organic analyte, nicotine, by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The nicotine-imprinted microspheres are synthesized by RAFT precipitation polymerization and converted into thiol-terminated microspheres through aminolysis. The thiol groups on the MIP surface allow the microspheres to be immobilized on a gold-coated substrate. Three different strategies are investigated to achieve surface enhanced Raman scattering in the vicinity of the imprinted sites: (1) direct sputtering of gold nanoparticles, (2) immobilization of gold colloids through the MIP's thiol groups, and (3) trapping of the MIP microspheres in a patterned SERS substrate. For the first time we show that large MIP microspheres can be turned into selective SERS surfaces through the three different approaches of assembly. The MIP-based sensing surfaces are used to detect nicotine to demonstrate the proof of concept. As synthesis and surface functionalization of MIP microspheres and nanoparticles are well established, the methods reported in this work are handy and efficient for constructing label-free chemical sensors, in particular for those based on SERS detection.

  1. Enhanced UV light detection using wavelength-shifting properties of Silicon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magill, S.; Nayfeh, M.; Fizari, M.; Malloy, J.; Maximenko, Y.; Xie, J.; Yu, H.

    2015-05-01

    Detection of UV photons is becoming increasingly necessary with the use of noble gases and liquids in elementary particle experiments. Cerenkov light in crystals and glasses, scintillation light in neutrino, dark matter, and rare decay experiments all require sensitivity to UV photons. New sensor materials are needed that can directly detect UV photons and/or absorb UV photons and re-emit light in the visible range measurable by existing photosensors. It has been shown that silicon nanoparticles are sensitive to UV light in a wavelength range around ~ 200 nm. UV light is absorbed and re-emitted at wavelengths in the visible range depending on the size of the nanoparticles. Initial tests of the wavelength-shifting properties of silicon nanoparticles are presented here that indicate by placing a film of nanoparticles in front of a standard visible-wavelength detecting photosensor, the response of the sensor is significantly enhanced at wavelengths < 320 nm.

  2. Enhancing patient freedom in rehabilitation robotics using gaze-based intention detection.

    PubMed

    Novak, Domen; Riener, Robert

    2013-06-01

    Several design strategies for rehabilitation robotics have aimed to improve patients' experiences using motivating and engaging virtual environments. This paper presents a new design strategy: enhancing patient freedom with a complex virtual environment that intelligently detects patients' intentions and supports the intended actions. A 'virtual kitchen' scenario has been developed in which many possible actions can be performed at any time, allowing patients to experiment and giving them more freedom. Remote eye tracking is used to detect the intended action and trigger appropriate support by a rehabilitation robot. This approach requires no additional equipment attached to the patient and has a calibration time of less than a minute. The system was tested on healthy subjects using the ARMin III arm rehabilitation robot. It was found to be technically feasible and usable by healthy subjects. However, the intention detection algorithm should be improved using better sensor fusion, and clinical tests with patients are needed to evaluate the system's usability and potential therapeutic benefits.

  3. Detecting hydrolysis products of blister agents in water by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inscore, Frank; Farquharson, Stuart

    2005-11-01

    Protecting the nation's drinking water from terrorism, requires microg/L detection of chemical agents and their hydrolysis products in less than 10 minutes. In an effort to aid military personnel and the public at large, we have been investigating the ability of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to detect microgram per liter (part-per-billion) concentrations of chemical agents in water. It is equally important to detect and distinguish the hydrolysis products of these agents to eliminate false-positive responses and evaluate the extent of an attack. Previously, we reported the SER spectra of GA, GB, VX and most of their hydrolysis products. Here we extend these studies to include the chemical agent sulfur-mustard, also known as HD, and its principle hydrolysis product thiodiglycol. We also report initial continuous measurements of thiodiglycol flowing through a SERS-active capillary.

  4. Saliva surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for noninvasive optical detection of nasopharyngeal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xueliang; Ge, Xiaosong; Xu, Zhihong; Zheng, Zuci; Huang, Wei; Hong, Quanxing; Lin, Duo

    2016-10-01

    The early cancer detection is of great significance to increase the patient's survival rate and reduce the risk of cancer development. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technique, a rapid, convenient, nondestructive optical detection method, can provide a characteristic "fingerprint" information of target substances, even achieving single molecule detection. Its ultra-high detection sensitivity has made it become one of the most potential biochemical detection methods. Saliva, a multi-constituent oral fluid, contains the bio-markers which is capable of reflecting the systemic health condition of human, showing promising potential as an effect medium for disease monitoring. Compared with the serum samples, the collection and processing of saliva is safer, more convenient and noninvasive. Thus, saliva test is becoming the hotspot issues of the noninvasive cancer research field. This review highlights and analyzes current application progress within the field of SERS saliva test in cancer detection. Meanwhile, the primary research results of SERS saliva for the noninvasive differentiation of nasopharyngeal cancer, normal and rhinitis obtained by our group are shown.

  5. Combined enhanced fluorescence and label-free biomolecular detection with a photonic crystal surface.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Patrick C; Ganesh, Nikhil; Chan, Leo L; Cunningham, Brian T

    2007-04-20

    A 2D photonic crystal surface with a different period in each lateral direction is demonstrated to detect biomolecules using two distinct sensing modalities. The sensing mechanisms both rely on the generation of a resonant reflection peak at one of two specific wavelengths, depending on the polarization of light that is incident on the photonic crystal. One polarization results in a resonant reflection peak in the visible spectrum to coincide with the excitation wavelength of a fluorophore, while the orthogonal polarization results in a resonant reflection peak at an infrared wavelength which is used for label-free detection of adsorbed biomolecules. The photonic crystal resonance for fluorescence excitation causes enhanced near fields at the structure surface, resulting in increased signal from fluorophores within 100 nm of the device surface. Label-free detection is performed by illuminating the photonic crystal with white light and monitoring shifts in the peak reflected wavelength of the infrared resonance with a high-resolution imaging detection instrument. Rigorous coupled-wave analysis was used to determine optimal dimensions for the photonic crystal structure, and devices were fabricated using a polymer-based nanoreplica molding approach. Fluorescence-based and label-free detection were demonstrated using arrays of spots of dye-conjugated streptavidin. Quantification of the fluorescent signal showed that the fluorescence output from protein spots on the photonic crystal was increased by up to a factor of 35, and deposited spots were also imaged in the label-free detection mode.

  6. Gold nanoparticle-based enhanced chemiluminescence immunosensor for detection of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B (SEB) in food

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Minghui; Kostov, Yordan; Bruck, Hugh A.; Rasooly, Avraham

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) are major cause of foodborne diseases, so sensitive detection (<1 ng/ml) methods are needed for SE detection in food. The surface area, geometric and physical properties of gold nanoparticles make them well-suited for enhancing interactions with biological molecules in assays. To take advantage of the properties of gold nanoparticles for immunodetection, we have developed a gold nanoparticle-based enhanced chemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor for detection of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B (SEB) in food. Anti-SEB primary antibodies were immobilized onto a gold nanoparticle surface through physical adsorption and then the antibody–gold nanoparticle mixture was immobilized onto a polycarbonate surface. SEB was detected by a “sandwich-type” ELISA assay on the polycarbonate surface with a secondary antibody and ECL detection. The signal from ECL was read using a point-of-care detector based on a cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor or a plate reader. The system was used to test for SEB in buffer and various foods (mushrooms, tomatoes, and baby food meat). The limit of detection was found to be ~0.01 ng/mL, which is ~10 times more sensitive than traditional ELISA. The gold nanoparticles were relatively easy to use for antibody immobilization because of their physical adsorption mechanism; no other reagents were required for immobilization. The use of our simple and inexpensive detector combined with the gold nanoparticle-based ECL method described here is adaptable to simplify and increase sensitivity of any immunological assay and for point-of-care diagnostics. PMID:19540011

  7. Gold nanorods 3D-supercrystals as surface enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy substrates for the rapid detection of scrambled prions.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Puebla, Ramón A; Agarwal, Ashish; Manna, Pramit; Khanal, Bishnu P; Aldeanueva-Potel, Paula; Carbó-Argibay, Enrique; Pazos-Pérez, Nicolas; Vigderman, Leonid; Zubarev, Eugene R; Kotov, Nicholas A; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2011-05-17

    Highly organized supercrystals of Au nanorods with plasmonic antennae enhancement of electrical field have made possible fast direct detection of prions in complex biological media such as serum and blood. The nearly perfect three-dimensional organization of nanorods render these systems excellent surface enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy substrates with uniform electric field enhancement, leading to reproducibly high enhancement factor in the desirable spectral range.

  8. Detection of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with diffusion weighted MRI after (chemo)radiotherapy: Correlation between radiologic and histopathologic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Vandecaveye, Vincent; Keyzer, Frederik de; Nuyts, Sandra; Deraedt, Karen; Dirix, Piet; Hamaekers, Pascal; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Delaere, Pierre; Hermans, Robert . E-mail: Robert.Hermans@uzleuven.be

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the value of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) in differentiating persistent or recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) from nontumoral postradiotherapeutic alterations. Methods and Materials: In 26 patients with suspicion of persistent or recurrent HNSCC, MRI of the head and neck was performed, including routine turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences and an additional echo-planar DW-MRI sequence, using a large range of b-values (0-1000 s/mm{sup 2}). Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were calculated. In the suspect areas at the primary site and in the suspect lymph nodes, signal intensity was measured on the native b0 and b1000 images and ADC values were calculated for these tissues. The same was done for surrounding irradiated normal tissue. Imaging results were correlated to histopathology. Results: Signal intensity on native b0 images was significantly lower for HNSCC than for nontumoral postradiotherapeutic tissue (p < 0.0001), resulting in a sensitivity of 66.2%, specificity of 60.8%, and accuracy of 62.4%. Signal intensity on native b1000 images was significantly higher for HNSCC than for nontumoral tissue (p < 0.0001), resulting in a sensitivity of 71.6%, specificity of 71.3%, and accuracy of 71.4%. ADC values were significantly lower for HNSCC than for nontumoral tissue (p < 0.0001), resulting in a sensitivity of 94.6%, specificity of 95.9%, and accuracy of 95.5%. When compared with computed tomography, TSE-MRI and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography, DW-MRI yielded fewer false-positive results in persistent primary site abnormalities and in persistent adenopathies, and aided in the detection of subcentimetric nodal metastases. Conclusions: Diffusion weighted-MRI accurately differentiates persistent or recurrent HNSCC from nontumoral tissue changes after (chemo)radiotherapy.

  9. Detection of Perchlorate Anion on Functionalized Silver Colloids Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tio, J.; Wang, W.; Gu, B.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate anion interferes with the uptake of iodide by the human thyroid gland and consequently disrupts the regulation of metabolism. Chronic exposure to high levels of perchlorate may lead to the formation of thyroid gland tumors. Although the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has not set a maximum contaminant level (MCL) for perchlorate, a draft drinking water range of 4-18 ppb based on 2 liter daily consumption of water has been established. The current EPA approved method for detecting perchlorate uses ion chromatography which has a detection limit of ~1ppb and involves lengthy analytical time in the laboratory. A unique combination of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect and the bifunctional anion exchange resin’s high selectivity may provide an alternative way to detect perchlorate at such low concentrations and with high specificity. SERS, which uses laser excitation of adsorbed perchlorate anions on silver nanoparticles, has been shown to detect perchlorate anions at concentrations as low as 50 ppb. Normal micro-Raman analysis of perchlorate sorbed onto the resin beads has detected an even lower concentration of 10 ppb. In an effort to integrate these two effects, silver nanoparticles were coated with N-trimethoxysilylpropyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride, a functional group similar to that found on the resin bead, and subsequently inserted into different perchlorate concentration environments. This method has resulted in perchlorate detection down to ~10 ppb and a more consistent detection of perchlorate anion at ~50 ppb than that of earlier methods. As suggested by the direct insertion of functionalized silver colloids into perchlorate samples, this technique may potentially allow for the development of a probe using on-site Raman spectrometry to detect significantly low concentrations of perchlorate in situ rather than in the laboratory.

  10. Radiological accident and incident in Thailand: lesson to be learned.

    PubMed

    Ya-anant, Nanthavan; Tiyapun, Kanokrat; Saiyut, Kittiphong

    2011-07-01

    Radioactive materials in Thailand have been used in medicine, research and industry for more than 50 y. Several radiological accident and incidents happened in the past 10 y. A serious one was the radiological accident that occurred in Samut Prakan, Thailand in 2000. The serious radiological accident occurred when the (60)Co head was partially dismantled, taken from that storage to sell as scrap metal. Three victims died and 10 people received high dose from the source. The lesson learned from the radiological accident in Samut Prakan was to improve in many subjects, such as efficiency in Ministerial Regulations and Atomic Energy Act, emergency response and etc. In addition to the serious accident, there are also some small incidents that occurred, such as detection of contaminated scrap metals from the re-cycling of scrap metals from steel factories. Therefore, the radiation protection infrastructure was established after the accident. Laws and regulations of radiation safety and the relevant regulatory procedures must be revised.

  11. Standardized radiological dose evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, V.L.; Stahlnecker, E.

    1996-05-01

    Following the end of the Cold War, the mission of Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site changed from production of nuclear weapons to cleanup. Authorization baseis documents for the facilities, primarily the Final Safety Analysis Reports, are being replaced with new ones in which accident scenarios are sorted into coarse bins of consequence and frequency, similar to the approach of DOE-STD-3011-94. Because this binning does not require high precision, a standardized approach for radiological dose evaluations is taken for all the facilities at the site. This is done through a standard calculation ``template`` for use by all safety analysts preparing the new documents. This report describes this template and its use.

  12. Radiology today. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Heuck, F.H.W.; Donner, M.W.

    1987-01-01

    The book discusses the following contents: Advances in Cardiovascular Imaging: Digital Arteriography: Ongoing Developments. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Cardiovascular System. Comparison of Vascular CT and MRI. Characterization of Vascular Lesions by Ultrasound - Progress in Vascular Interventions: Laser Angioplasty: A Review. Fibrinolytic Therapy Combined with Clot Extraction. Drugs Useful in Angioplasty. Developments in Cardiovascular Imaging: Blood Flow Measurements with Digital Arteriography. Selection of Imaging Techniques for Venous Thromboembolic Disease. Clinical Usefulness of High-Verus Low-Osmolality Contrast Agents. Developments in Angiographic and Interventional Instrumentation. Progress in Cardiovascular Interventions. Inferior Vena Cava Filters: Types, Placement, and Efficiency. Transluminal Vascular Stenting and Grafting. Venography and Sclerotherapy of Varioceles in Children and Adolescents. A New Catheter System - Important Hip Problems: Radiologic and Pathologic Correlation and Hip Disease. Comparison of Imaging Modalities in Femoral Head Necrosis. Osteoartrosis and Arthritis (Synovitis) of the Hip. Hip Anthrography.

  13. Smartphone Detection of UV LED-Enhanced Particle Immunoassay on Paper Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Park, Tu San; Cho, Soohee; Nahapetian, Tigran G; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2017-02-01

    Use of a smartphone as an optical detector for paper microfluidic devices has recently gained substantial attention due to its simplicity, ease of use, and handheld capability. Utilization of a UV light source enhances the optical signal intensities, especially for the particle immunoagglutination assay that has typically used visible or ambient light. Such enhancement is essential for true assimilation of assays to field deployable and point-of-care applications by greatly reducing the effects by independent environmental factors. This work is the first demonstration of using a UV LED (UVA) to enhance the Mie scatter signals from the particle immunoagglutination assay on the paper microfluidic devices and subsequent smartphone detection. Smartphone's CMOS camera can recognize the UVA scatter from the paper microfluidic channels efficiently in its green channel. For an Escherichia coli assay, the normalized signal intensities increased up to 50% from the negative signal with UV LED, compared with the 4% to 7% with ambient light. Detection limit was 10 colony-forming units/mL. Similar results were obtained in the presence of 10% human whole blood.

  14. Plasmon Coupling Enhanced Raman Scattering Nanobeacon for Single-Step, Ultrasensitive Detection of Cholera Toxin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chong-Hua; Liu, Ling-Wei; Liang, Ping; Tang, Li-Juan; Yu, Ru-Qin; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2016-08-02

    We report the development of a novel plasmon coupling enhanced Raman scattering (PCERS) method, PCERS nanobeacon, for ultrasensitive, single-step, homogeneous detection of cholera toxin (CT). This method relies on our design of the plasmonic nanoparticles, which have a bilayer phospholipid coating with embedded Raman indicators and CT-binding ligands of monosialoganglioside (GM1). This design allows a facile synthesis of the plasmonic nanoparticle via two-step self-assembly without any specific modification or chemical immobilization. The realization of tethering GM1 on the surface imparts the plasmonic nanoparticles with high affinity, excellent specificity, and multivalence for interaction with CT. The unique lipid-based bilayer coated structure also affords excellent biocompatibility and stability for the plasmonic nanoparticles. The plasmonic nanoparticles are able to show substantial enhancement of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals in a single-step interaction with CT, because of their assembly into aggregates in response to the CT-sandwiched interactions. The results reveal that the developed nanobeacon provides a simple but ultrasensitive sensor for rapid detection of CT with a large signal-to-background ratio and excellent reproducibility in a wide dynamic range, implying its potential for point-of-care applications in preventive and diagnostic monitoring of cholera.

  15. Silver mirror for enhancing the detection ability of near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cuicui; Wang, Shuyu; Cai, Wensheng; Shao, Xueguang

    2017-01-01

    Near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (NIRDRS) has been proved to be a convenient and fast quantitative method for complex samples. The sensitivity or the detection limit, however, has been the obstacle in practical uses, although great efforts have been made through experimental and chemometric approaches. Due to the strong reflectivity of silver in near-infrared region, a novel method that utilizes silver layer as the adsorption substrate was developed to enhance the detection ability of NIRDRS in this study. For investigating the enhancement effect of the method, lysozyme samples with different concentrations were spotted on the silver layer and NIR spectra were measured. Then quantitative determination was performed using multivariate calibration. For comparison, the comparative experiment was performed using the copper sheet as the substrate. The results show that the intensity of diffuse reflection can be enhanced, and the background variation was reduced by taking the mirror layer as the substrate. A linear variation was obtained between the concentrations and the intensities of the spectral response at a wavenumber. Using multivariate calibration for quantitative analysis, the optimal PLS model was obtained. The maximum deviation of the prediction results can be as low as 12.8µg. Therefore, this study made a progress for NIRDRS technique in microanalysis.

  16. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering for quantitative detection of ethyl carbamate in alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Yang, Danting; Zhou, Haibo; Ying, Yibin; Niessner, Reinhard; Haisch, Christoph

    2013-11-01

    Ethyl carbamate, a by-product of fermentation and storage with widespread occurrence in fermented food and alcoholic beverages, is a compound potentially toxic to humans. In this work, a new approach for quantitative detection of ethyl carbamate in alcoholic beverages, based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), is reported. Individual silver-coated gold nanoparticle colloids are used as SERS amplifiers, yielding high Raman enhancement of ethyl carbamate in three kinds of alcoholic beverages (vodka, Obstler, and white rum). The characteristic band at 1,003 cm(-1), which is the strongest and best reproducible peak in the SERS spectra, was used for quantitative evaluation of ethyl carbamate. The limit of detection, which corresponds to a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, was 9.0 × 10(-9) M (0.8 μg · L(-1)), 1.3 × 10(-7) M (11.6 μg · L(-1)), and 7.8 × 10(-8) M (6.9 μg · L(-1)), respectively. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy offers great practical potential for the in situ assessment and identification of ethyl carbamate in the alcoholic beverage industry.

  17. Metamaterial-enhanced vibrational absorption spectroscopy for the detection of protein molecules.

    PubMed

    Bui, Tung S; Dao, Thang D; Dang, Luu H; Vu, Lam D; Ohi, Akihiko; Nabatame, Toshihide; Lee, YoungPak; Nagao, Tadaaki; Hoang, Chung V

    2016-08-24

    From visible to mid-infrared frequencies, molecular sensing has been a major successful application of plasmonics because of the enormous enhancement of the surface electromagnetic nearfield associated with the induced collective motion of surface free carriers excited by the probe light. However, in the lower-energy terahertz (THz) region, sensing by detecting molecular vibrations is still challenging because of low sensitivity, complicated spectral features, and relatively little accumulated knowledge of molecules. Here, we report the use of a micron-scale thin-slab metamaterial (MM) architecture, which functions as an amplifier for enhancing the absorption signal of the THz vibration of an ultrathin adsorbed layer of large organic molecules. We examined bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a prototype large protein molecule and Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) and 3,3'-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI) as examples of small molecules. Among them, our MM significantly magnified only the signal strength of bulky BSA. On the other hand, DTTCI and Rh6G are inactive, as they lack low-frequency vibrational modes in this frequency region. The results obtained here clearly demonstrate the promise of MM-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the THz region for detection and structural monitoring of large biomolecules such as proteins or pathogenic enzymes.

  18. Metamaterial-enhanced vibrational absorption spectroscopy for the detection of protein molecules

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Tung S.; Dao, Thang D.; Dang, Luu H.; Vu, Lam D.; Ohi, Akihiko; Nabatame, Toshihide; Lee, YoungPak; Nagao, Tadaaki; Hoang, Chung V.

    2016-01-01

    From visible to mid-infrared frequencies, molecular sensing has been a major successful application of plasmonics because of the enormous enhancement of the surface electromagnetic nearfield associated with the induced collective motion of surface free carriers excited by the probe light. However, in the lower-energy terahertz (THz) region, sensing by detecting molecular vibrations is still challenging because of low sensitivity, complicated spectral features, and relatively little accumulated knowledge of molecules. Here, we report the use of a micron-scale thin-slab metamaterial (MM) architecture, which functions as an amplifier for enhancing the absorption signal of the THz vibration of an ultrathin adsorbed layer of large organic molecules. We examined bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a prototype large protein molecule and Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) and 3,3′-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI) as examples of small molecules. Among them, our MM significantly magnified only the signal strength of bulky BSA. On the other hand, DTTCI and Rh6G are inactive, as they lack low-frequency vibrational modes in this frequency region. The results obtained here clearly demonstrate the promise of MM-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the THz region for detection and structural monitoring of large biomolecules such as proteins or pathogenic enzymes. PMID:27555217

  19. Metamaterial-enhanced vibrational absorption spectroscopy for the detection of protein molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Tung S.; Dao, Thang D.; Dang, Luu H.; Vu, Lam D.; Ohi, Akihiko; Nabatame, Toshihide; Lee, Youngpak; Nagao, Tadaaki; Hoang, Chung V.

    2016-08-01

    From visible to mid-infrared frequencies, molecular sensing has been a major successful application of plasmonics because of the enormous enhancement of the surface electromagnetic nearfield associated with the induced collective motion of surface free carriers excited by the probe light. However, in the lower-energy terahertz (THz) region, sensing by detecting molecular vibrations is still challenging because of low sensitivity, complicated spectral features, and relatively little accumulated knowledge of molecules. Here, we report the use of a micron-scale thin-slab metamaterial (MM) architecture, which functions as an amplifier for enhancing the absorption signal of the THz vibration of an ultrathin adsorbed layer of large organic molecules. We examined bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a prototype large protein molecule and Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) and 3,3‧-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI) as examples of small molecules. Among them, our MM significantly magnified only the signal strength of bulky BSA. On the other hand, DTTCI and Rh6G are inactive, as they lack low-frequency vibrational modes in this frequency region. The results obtained here clearly demonstrate the promise of MM-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the THz region for detection and structural monitoring of large biomolecules such as proteins or pathogenic enzymes.

  20. Automatic detection of regional heart rejection in USPIO-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsun-Hsien; Moura, José M F; Wu, Yijen L; Ho, Chien

    2008-08-01

    Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful to study the infiltration of cells in vivo. This research adopts ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles as contrast agents. USPIO particles administered intravenously can be endocytosed by circulating immune cells, in particular, macrophages. Hence, macrophages are labeled with USPIO particles. When a transplanted heart undergoes rejection, immune cells will infiltrate the allograft. Imaged by T(2)(*)-weighted MRI, USPIO-labeled macrophages display dark pixel intensities. Detecting these labeled cells in the image facilitates the identification of acute heart rejection. This paper develops a classifier to detect the presence of USPIO-labeled macrophages in the myocardium in the framework of spectral graph theory. First, we describe a USPIO-enhanced heart image with a graph. Classification becomes equivalent to partitioning the graph into two disjoint subgraphs. We use the Cheeger constant of the graph as an objective functional to derive the classifier. We represent the classifier as a linear combination of basis functions given from the spectral analysis of the graph Laplacian. Minimization of the Cheeger constant based functional leads to the optimal classifier. Experimental results and comparisons with other methods suggest the feasibility of our approach to study the rejection of hearts imaged by USPIO-enhanced MRI.

  1. DNA sequence detection using surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy in a homogeneous multiplexed assay.

    PubMed

    MacAskill, Alexandra; Crawford, David; Graham, Duncan; Faulds, Karen

    2009-10-01

    Detection of specific DNA sequences is central to modern molecular biology and also to molecular diagnostics where identification of a particular disease is based on nucleic acid identification. Many methods exist, and fluorescence spectroscopy dominates the detection technologies employed with different assay formats. This study demonstrates the use of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) to detect specific DNA sequences when coupled with modified SERRS-active probes that have been designed to modify the affinity of double- and single-stranded DNA for the surface of silver nanoparticles resulting in discernible differences in the SERRS which can be correlated to the specific DNA hybridization event. The principle of the assay lies on the lack of affinity of double-stranded DNA for silver nanoparticle surfaces; therefore, hybridization of the probe to the target results in a reduction in the SERRS signal. Use of locked nucleic acid (LNA) residues in the DNA probes resulted in greater discrimination between exact match and mismatches when used in comparison to unmodified labeled DNA probes. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products were detected using this methodology, and ultimately a multiplex detection of sequences relating to a hospital-acquired infection, namely, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), demonstrated the versatility and applicability of this approach to real-life situations.

  2. Sensitive detection of nucleic acids with rolling circle amplification and surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Juan; Zhang, Chun-yang

    2010-11-01

    Detection of specific DNA sequences is important to molecular biology research and clinical diagnostics. To improve the sensitivity of surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy (SERS), a variety of signal amplification methods has been developed, including Raman-active-dye, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology, molecular beacon, SERS-active substrates, and SERS-tag. However, the combination of rolling circle amplification (RCA) with SERS for nucleic acid detection has not been reported. Herein, we describe a new approach for nucleic acid detection by the combination of RCA reaction with SERS. Because of the binding of abundance repeated sequences of RCA products with gold nanoparticle (Au NP) and Rox-modified detection probes, SERS signal is significantly amplified and the detection limit of 10.0 pM might be achieved. The sensitivity of RCA-based SERS has increased by as much as 3 orders of magnitude as compared to PCR-based SERS and is also comparable with or even exceeds that of both RCA-based electrochemical and RCA-based fluorescent methods. This RCA-based SERS might discriminate perfect matched target DNA from 1-base mismatched DNA with high selectivity. The high sensitivity and selectivity of RCA-based SERS makes it a potential tool for early diagnosis of gene-related disease and also offers a great promise for multiplexed assays with DNA microarrays.

  3. Rapid Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria from Fresh Produce by Filtration and Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaomeng; Han, Caiqin; Chen, Jing; Huang, Yao-Wen; Zhao, Yiping

    2016-04-01

    The detection of Salmonella Poona from cantaloupe cubes and E. coli O157:H7 from lettuce has been explored by using a filtration method and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based on vancomycin-functionalized silver nanorod array substrates. It is found that with a two-step filtration process, the limit of detection (LOD) of Salmonella Poona from cantaloupe cubes can be as low as 100 CFU/mL in less than 4 h, whereas the chlorophyll in the lettuce causes severe SERS spectral interference. To improve the LOD of lettuce, a three-step filtration method with a hydrophobic filter is proposed. The hydrophobic filter can effectively eliminate the interferences from chlorophyll and achieve a LOD of 1000 CFU/mL detection of E. coli O157:H7 from lettuce samples within 5 h. With the low LODs and rapid detection time, the SERS biosensing platform has demonstrated its potential as a rapid, simple, and inexpensive means for pathogenic bacteria detection from fresh produce.

  4. Novel signal-enhancing immunoassay for ultrasensitive biomarker detection based on laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Kunping; Wei, Yin; Wang, Xu; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-03-03

    An innovative signal-enhancing immunoassay for ultrasensitive biomarker detection based on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has been developed. A novel LIF optical system with high collection efficiency was constructed by using a parabolic mirror. Carboxyl-functionalized magnetic beads were used to immobilize antibody for achieving a conventional sandwich assay. Fluorescence from Rhodamine 6G (R6G)-labeled antibody was collected by the newly designed optical system. To reduce photobleaching of R6G under laser irradiation, ethanol instead of commonly used aqueous solution was used as assay buffer in the last stage. The newly developed LIF immunoassay displayed excellent analytical performance for α-fetoprotein (AFP) detection in the concentration range from 0.005 to 1.0 ng/mL with a detection limit of 0.0016 ng/mL. The detection limit obtained in this work is about 3 orders of magnitude better than that of conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In addition, the proposed method exhibited excellent precision, acceptable stability, and good reproducibility. Furthermore, the proposed immunoassay was successfully applied to AFP determination in real serum specimens. Therefore, the present immunoassay was demonstrated to be a powerful tool for ultrasensitive biomarker detection.

  5. Validation of a mobile phone-assisted microarray decoding platform for signal-enhanced mutation detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guanbin; Li, Caixia; Lu, Yuan; Hu, Hua; Xiang, Guangxin; Liang, Zhiqing; Liao, Pu; Dai, Pu; Xing, Wanli; Cheng, Jing

    2011-08-15

    We have established a mobile phone-assisted microarray decoding platform for signal-enhanced mutation detection. A large amount of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) was obtained by combining symmetric PCR and magnetic isolation, and ssDNA prepared with magnetic bead as label was further allowed to hybridize against the tag-array for decoding purpose. High sensitivity and specificity was achieved with the detection of genomic DNA. When simultaneously genotyping nine common mutations associated with hereditary hearing loss, the detection limit of 1 ng genomic DNA was achieved. Significantly, a mobile phone was also used to record and decode the genotyping results through a custom-designed imaging adaptor and a dedicated mobile phone software. A total of 51 buccal swabs from patients probably with deafness-related mutations were collected and analyzed. The genotyping results were all confirmed by fluorescence-based laser confocal scanning and direct DNA sequencing. This mobile phone-assisted decoding platform provides an effective but economic mutation detection alternative for the future quicker and sensitive detection of virtually any mutation-related diseases in developing and underdeveloped countries.

  6. Quantitative surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of dipicolinic acid--towards rapid anthrax endospore detection.

    PubMed

    Bell, Steven E J; Mackle, Joseph N; Sirimuthu, Narayana M S

    2005-04-01

    Dipicolinic acid (DPA) is an excellent marker compound for bacterial spores, including those of Bacillus anthracis (anthrax). Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) potentially has the sensitivity and discrimination needed for trace DPA analysis, but mixing DPA solutions with citrate-reduced silver colloid only yielded measurable SERS spectra at much higher (>80 ppm) concentrations than would be desirable for anthrax detection. Aggregation of the colloid with halide salts eliminated even these small DPA bands but aggregation with Na2SO4(aq) resulted in a remarkable increase in the DPA signals. With sulfate aggregation even 1 ppm solutions gave detectable signals with 10 s accumulation times, which is in the sensitivity range required. Addition of CNS- as an internal standard allowed quantitative DPA analysis, plotting the intensity of the strong DPA 1010 cm(-1) band (normalised to the ca. 2120 cm(-1) CNS- band) against DPA concentration gave a linear calibration (R2 = 0.986) over the range 0-50 ppm DPA. The inclusion of thiocyanate also allows false negatives due to accidental deactivation of the enhancing medium to be detected.

  7. Toward PCR-free mutation detection based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culha, Mustafa; Karatas, Omer F.; Aydin, Omer; Kahraman, Mehmet; Keseroğlu, Kemal; Sayin, Ismail; Bayrak, Omer F.

    2009-02-01

    The development of an assay for the detection of gene mutations has been attempted based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Using multiplexing property and high sensitivity of SERS technique, the detection of all mutation possibilities on one given spot is achievable. To test the feasibility of approach, SNPs and other types of mutations such as insertion and deletion are investigated. The PCR amplified and isolated genomic DNA without PCR amplification is immobilized on poly-L/D-lysine coated glass surface after denaturing with heating. The SERS probes are prepared by simultaneous attachment of oligonucleotides complementary to the target mutation regions and Raman active dyes to 13 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs). After the hybridization of SERS probes on the poly-L/D-lysine surfaces, it was stained with silver colloidal nanoparticles for further enhancement of Raman scattering. In the second approach, Raman active dyes are chemically attached on gold nanoparticles and a thin layer of silver film is deposited on top of it to prepare core-shell nanoparticles. The complementary oligonucleotides to the target regions of the gene are chemically attached to silver surfaces of the nanoparticles. The promising results indicate that it is possible to detect certain mutation types without PCR amplification using the approach.

  8. Capillary-driven surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based microfluidic chip for abrin detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hao; Deng, Min; Ga, Shan; Chen, Shouhui; Kang, Lin; Wang, Junhong; Xin, Wenwen; Zhang, Tao; You, Zherong; An, Yuan; Wang, Jinglin; Cui, Daxiang

    2014-03-01

    Herein, we firstly demonstrate the design and the proof-of-concept use of a capillary-driven surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based microfluidic chip for abrin detection. The micropillar array substrate was etched and coated with a gold film by microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) process to integrate into a lateral flow test strip. The detection of abrin solutions of various concentrations was performed by the as-prepared microfluidic chip. It was shown that the correlation between the abrin concentration and SERS signal was found to be linear within the range of 0.1 ng/mL to 1 μg/mL with a limit of detection of 0.1 ng/mL. Our microfluidic chip design enhanced the operability of SERS-based immunodiagnostic techniques, significantly reducing the complication and cost of preparation as compared to previous SERS-based works. Meanwhile, this design proved the superiority to conventional lateral flow test strips in respect of both sensitivity and quantitation and showed great potential in the diagnosis and treatment for abrin poisoning as well as on-site screening of abrin-spiked materials.

  9. Detection of Prohibited Fish Drugs Using Silver Nanowires as Substrate for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jia; Huang, Yiqun; Fan, Yuxia; Zhao, Zhihui; Yu, Wansong; Rasco, Barbara A.; Lai, Keqiang

    2016-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering or surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a promising detection technology, and has captured increasing attention. Silver nanowires were synthesized using a rapid polyol method and optimized through adjustment of the molar ratio of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) and silver nitrate in a glycerol system. Ultraviolet-visible spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the silver nanowires. The optimal silver nanowires were used as a SERS substrate to detect prohibited fish drugs, including malachite green, crystal violet, furazolidone, and chloramphenicol. The SERS spectra of crystal violet could be clearly identified at concentrations as low as 0.01 ng/mL. The minimum detectable concentration for malachite green was 0.05 ng/mL, and for both furazolidone and chloramphenicol were 0.1 μg/mL. The results showed that the as-prepared Ag nanowires SERS substrate exhibits high sensitivity and activity. PMID:28335303

  10. Exploring the recovery and detection of messenger RNA and DNA from enhanced fingermarks in blood.

    PubMed

    Fox, A; Gittos, M; Harbison, S A; Fleming, R; Wivell, R

    2014-05-01

    Often in the examination of bloodstained fingermarks discussion occurs around whether to prioritise the fingerprint evidence or focus on the biological evidence. Collecting a sample for genetic profiling may result in the loss of ridge detail that could have been used for fingerprint comparison. Fingermark enhancement and recovery methods along with sample collection methods could also compromise downstream genetic analysis. Previous forensic casework has highlighted circumstances where, after enhancement had been performed, it would have been extremely valuable to both identify the body fluid and generate a DNA profile from the same sample. We enhanced depletion series of fingermarks made in blood, using single treatments consisting of aqueous amido black, methanol-based amido black, acid yellow and leucocrystal violet, and exposure to long wave UV light. We then extracted the DNA and RNA for profiling, to assess the recovery and detection of genetic material from the enhanced fingermarks. We have shown that genetic profiling of bloodstained fingermarks can be successful after chemical enhancement; however it may still be necessary to prioritise evidence types in certain circumstances. From our results it appears that even with visible bloodstained fingermarks, leucocrystal violet can reduce the effectiveness of subsequent messenger RNA profiling. Aqueous amido black and acid yellow also have adverse effects on messenger RNA profiling of depleted fingermarks with low levels of cellular material. These results help with forensic decision-making by expanding knowledge of the extent of the detrimental effects of blood-enhancement reagents on both DNA profiling and body fluid identification using messenger RNA profiling.

  11. Identification and quantitation of Bacillus globigii using metal enhanced electrochemical detection and capillary biosensor.

    PubMed

    Mwilu, Samuel K; Aluoch, Austin O; Miller, Seth; Wong, Paula; Sadik, Omowunmi A; Fatah, Alim A; Arcilesi, Richard D

    2009-09-15

    Presented herein are two detection strategies for the identification and quantification of Bacillus globigii, a spore forming nonpathogenic simulant of Bacillus anthracis. The first strategy involves a label-free, metal-enhanced electrochemical immunosensor for the quantitative detection of Bacillus globigii (atrophaeus). The immunosensor comprises of antibacillus globigii (BG) antibody self-assembled onto a gold quartz crystal electrode via cystamine bond. A solid-phase monolayer of silver underpotentially deposited onto the cystamine modified-Au-electrode surface is used as the redox probe. The monolayer was also generated by adsorbing silver nanoparticles on the gold electrode. When the antibody-modified electrode is exposed to BG spores, the antibody-antigen (Ab-Ag) complex formed insulated the electrode surface toward the silver redox probe. The variation of redox current was found to be proportional to the concentration of the BG spores between 1 x 10(2)-3.5 x 10(4) spores/mL. A detection limit of 602 spores/mL was obtained, which is well-below the infectious dose of anthrax spores at 2.5 x 10(5) spores/mL. The second approach involves the use of ultrasensitive portable capillary biosensor (UPAC) to detect the spores. The capillary is an enclosed system that acts as the flow cell, the waveguide, and the solid support for immobilized bimolecular probes. An evanescent excitation generates a signal from an antigen-antibody-fluorophore complex, which propagates along the capillary and is guided to the detector. A limit of detection of 112 spores/mL was reported using the UPAC sensor. Both methods showed lower detection limits compared to the conventional ELISA. The effect of potential interferants tested using Bacillus pumilus confirmed the selectivity for the analyte. This work should allow the first responders to rapidly detect and quantify Bacillus globigii spores at concentrations that are well-below the infectious dose.

  12. [Parametric biomedical imaging--what defines the quality of quantitative radiological approaches?].

    PubMed

    Glüer, C-C; Barkmann, R; Hahn, H K; Majumdar, S; Eckstein, F; Nickelsen, T N; Bolte, H; Dicken, V; Heller, M

    2006-12-01

    Quantitative parametric imaging approaches provide new perspectives for radiological imaging. These include quantitative 2D, 3D, and 4D visualization options along with the parametric depiction of biological tissue properties and tissue function. This allows the interpretation of radiological data from a biochemical, biomechanical, or physiological perspective. Quantification permits the detection of small changes that are not yet visually apparent, thus allowing application in early disease diagnosis and monitoring therapy with enhanced sensitivity. This review outlines the potential of quantitative parametric imaging methods and demonstrates this on the basis of a few exemplary applications. One field of particular interest, the use of these methods for investigational new drug application studies, is presented. Assessment criteria for judging the quality of quantitative imaging approaches are discussed in the context of the potential and the limitations of these methods. While quantitative parametric imaging methods do not replace but rather supplement established visual interpretation methods in radiology, they do open up new perspectives for diagnosis and prognosis and in particular for monitoring disease progression and therapy.

  13. Enhanced electrochemical detection of DNA hybridization with carbon nanotube modified paste electrode.

    PubMed

    Nie, Libo; Guo, Huishi; He, Quanguo; Chen, Jianrong; Miao, Yuqing

    2007-02-01

    A novel electrochemical genesensor using twice hybridization enhancement of gold nanoparticles based on carbon paste modified electrode is described. The carbon nanotube modified carbon paste electrode (CNTPE) and mesoporous molecular sieve SBA-15 modified carbon paste electrode (MSCPE) were investigated. The assay relies on the immobilization of streptavidin-biotin labeled target oligonucleotides onto the electrode surface and its hybridization to the gold nanoparticle-labeled DNA probe. After twice hybridization enhanced connection of gold nanoparticles to the hybridized system, the differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) signal of total gold nanoparticles was monitored. It was found that the adsorption of oligonucleotide and hybridized DPV signal on CNTPE were both enhanced in comparison with that of pure carbon paste electrode (CPE). But this trend was reverse on MSCPE. The DPV detection of twice hybridized gold nanoparticles indicated that the sensitivity of the genesensor enhanced about one order of magnitude compared with one-layer hybridization. One-base mismatched DNA and complementary DNA could be distinguished clearly. However, no distinct advantage of MSCPE over CPE was found.

  14. A scheme of pulse compression lidar with enhanced modulated bandwidth for detection through scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng-hua; Zhang, Yong; Jin, Chen-fei; Xu, Lu; Yang, Xu; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Yue-hao; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a scheme of pulse compression lidar with enhanced electrical modulated bandwidth. An ultra-wideband linear frequency modulated signal with a bandwidth of 50 GHz is generated using femtosecond laser and superimposed linear chirp fiber Bragg gratings in the transmitter, which separates the echo of the target from the backward scattered noise with low modulated frequency. An optical pulse compression system based on a negative dispersion fiber Bragg grating is used to compress the ultra-wideband linear frequency modulated signal in the receiver. SNR and range resolution of the proposed scheme are numerically simulated to prove its feasibility. The simulation results indicate that an enhancement of SNR by 15.8 dB can be achieved using the scheme, and the range resolution of the scheme increases from 0.68 m to 0.0027 m. It is therefore concluded that the proposed scheme is suitable for detection through scattering media.

  15. Gd(III)-induced Supramolecular Hydrogelation with Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Performance for Enzyme Detection

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yongquan; Pu, Guojuan; Ou, Caiwen; Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Ling; Sun, Jiangtao; Yang, Zhimou; Chen, Minsheng

    2017-01-01

    Here we report a supramolecular hydrogel based on Gd(III)-peptide complexes with dramatically enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) performance. The hydrogelations were formed by adding Gd(III) ion to the nanofiber dispersion of self-assembling peptides naphthalene-Gly-Phe-Phe-Tyr-Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp (Nap-GFFYGRGD) or naphthalene-Gly-Phe-Phe-Tyr-Gly-Arg-Gly-Glu (Nap-GFFYGRGE). We further showed that, by adjusting the molar ratio between Gd(III) and the corresponding peptide, the mechanical property of resulting gels could be fine-tuned. The longitudinal relaxivity (r1) of the Nap-GFFYGRGE-Gd(III) was 58.9 mM−1 S−1, which to our knowledge is the highest value for such peptide-Gd(III) complexes so far. Such an enhancement of r1 value could be applied for enzyme detection in aqueous solutions and cell lysates. PMID:28074904

  16. Raman signal enhancement by multiple beam excitation and its application for the detection of chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Sakshi; Ahmad, Azeem; Mehta, Dalip S.; Gambhir, Vijayeta; Reddy, Martha N.

    2015-08-31

    In a typical Raman based sensor, a single laser beam is used for exciting the sample and the backscattered or forward scattered light is collected using collection optics and is analyzed by a spectrometer. We have investigated that by means of exciting the sample with multiple beams, i.e., by dividing the same input power of the single beam into two or three or more beams and exciting the sample from different angles, the Raman signal enhances significantly. Due to the presence of multiple beams passing through the same volume of the sample, an interference pattern is formed and the volume of interaction of excitation beams with the sample increases. By means of this geometry, the enhancement in the Raman signal is observed and it was found that the signal strength increases linearly with the increase in number of excitation beams. Experimental results of this scheme for excitation of the samples are reported for explosive detection at a standoff distance.

  17. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection for chemical and biological agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fei; Stokes, David L.; Wabuyele, Musundi B.; Griffin, Guy D.; Vass, Arpad A.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2004-07-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of chemical agent simulants such as dimethyl methylphonate (DMMP), pinacolyl methylphosphonate (PMP), diethyl phosphoramidate (DEPA), and 2-chloroethyl ethylsulfide (CEES), and biological agent simulants such as bacillus globigii (BG), erwinia herbicola (EH), and bacillus thuringiensis (BT) were obtained from silver oxide film-deposited substrates. Thin AgO films ranging in thickness from 50 nm to 250 nm were produced by chemical bath deposition onto glass slides. Further Raman intensity enhancements were noticed in UV irradiated surfaces due to photo-induced Ag nanocluster formation, which may provide a possible route to producing highly useful plasmonic sensors for the detection of chemical and biological agents upon visible light illumination.

  18. Tubular Enhanced Geodesic Active Contours for Continuum Robot Detection using 3D Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hongliang; Dupont, Pierre E

    2012-01-01

    Three dimensional ultrasound is a promising imaging modality for minimally invasive robotic surgery. As the robots are typically metallic, they interact strongly with the sound waves in ways that are not modeled by the ultrasound system's signal processing algorithms. Consequently, they produce substantial imaging artifacts that can make image guidance difficult, even for experienced surgeons. This paper introduces a new approach for detecting curved continuum robots in 3D ultrasound images. The proposed approach combines geodesic active contours with a speed function that is based on enhancing the "tubularity" of the continuum robot. In particular, it takes advantage of the known robot diameter along its length. It also takes advantage of the fact that the robot surface facing the ultrasound probe provides the most accurate image. This method, termed Tubular Enhanced Geodesic Active Contours (TEGAC), is demonstrated through ex vivo intracardiac experiments to offer superior performance compared to conventional active contours.

  19. Electrically biased GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures for enhanced detection of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziziyan, Mohammad R.; Hassen, Walid M.; Dubowski, Jan J.

    2016-03-01

    We have examined the influence of electrical bias on immobilization of bacteria on the surface of GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures, functionalized with an alkanethiol based architecture. A mixture of biotinylated polyethylene glycol (PEG) thiol and hexadecanethiol was applied to attach neutravidin and antibodies targeting specific immobilization of Legionella pneumophila. An electrochemical setup was designed to bias biofunctionalized samples with the potential measured versus silver/silver chloride reference electrode in a three electrode configuration system. The immobilization efficiency has been examined with fluorescence microscopy after tagging captured bacteria with fluorescein labeled antibodies. We demonstrate more than 2 times enhanced capture of Legionella pneumophila, suggesting the potential of electrically biased biochips to deliver enhanced sensitivity in detecting these bacteria.

  20. A Hierarchical Framework Approach for Voice Activity Detection and Speech Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Tang, Zhen-min; Li, Yan-ping; Luo, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and effective voice activity detection (VAD) is a fundamental step for robust speech or speaker recognition. In this study, we proposed a hierarchical framework approach for VAD and speech enhancement. The modified Wiener filter (MWF) approach is utilized for noise reduction in the speech enhancement block. For the feature selection and voting block, several discriminating features were employed in a voting paradigm for the consideration of reliability and discriminative power. Effectiveness of the proposed approach is compared and evaluated to other VAD techniques by using two well-known databases, namely, TIMIT database and NOISEX-92 database. Experimental results show that the proposed method performs well under a variety of noisy conditions. PMID:24959621

  1. Image enhancement and color constancy for a vehicle-mounted change detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tektonidis, Marco; Monnin, David

    2016-10-01

    Vehicle-mounted change detection systems allow to improve situational awareness on outdoor itineraries of inter- est. Since the visibility of acquired images is often affected by illumination effects (e.g., shadows) it is important to enhance local contrast. For the analysis and comparison of color images depicting the same scene at different time points it is required to compensate color and lightness inconsistencies caused by the different illumination conditions. We have developed an approach for image enhancement and color constancy based on the center/surround Retinex model and the Gray World hypothesis. The combination of the two methods using a color processing function improves color rendition, compared to both methods. The use of stacked integral images (SII) allows to efficiently perform local image processing. Our combined Retinex/Gray World approach has been successfully applied to image sequences acquired on outdoor itineraries at different time points and a comparison with previous Retinex-based approaches has been carried out.

  2. Gd(III)-induced Supramolecular Hydrogelation with Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Performance for Enzyme Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Yongquan; Pu, Guojuan; Ou, Caiwen; Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Ling; Sun, Jiangtao; Yang, Zhimou; Chen, Minsheng

    2017-01-01

    Here we report a supramolecular hydrogel based on Gd(III)-peptide complexes with dramatically enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) performance. The hydrogelations were formed by adding Gd(III) ion to the nanofiber dispersion of self-assembling peptides naphthalene-Gly-Phe-Phe-Tyr-Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp (Nap-GFFYGRGD) or naphthalene-Gly-Phe-Phe-Tyr-Gly-Arg-Gly-Glu (Nap-GFFYGRGE). We further showed that, by adjusting the molar ratio between Gd(III) and the corresponding peptide, the mechanical property of resulting gels could be fine-tuned. The longitudinal relaxivity (r1) of the Nap-GFFYGRGE-Gd(III) was 58.9 mM‑1 S‑1, which to our knowledge is the highest value for such peptide-Gd(III) complexes so far. Such an enhancement of r1 value could be applied for enzyme detection in aqueous solutions and cell lysates.

  3. Risk management in radiology departments

    PubMed Central

    Craciun, Horea; Mankad, Kshitij; Lynch, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Medical imaging and interventional radiology sustained prompt changes in the last few years, mainly as a result of technology breakthroughs, rise in workload, deficit in workforce and globalization. Risk is considered to be the chance or possibility of incurring loss or of a negative event happening that may cause injury to patients or medical practitioners. There are various causes of risks leading to harm and injury in radiology departments, and it is one of the objectives of this paper to scrutinize some of the causes. This will drive to consideration of some of the approaches that are used in managing risks in radiology. This paper aims at investigating risk management in radiology, and this will be achieved through a thorough assessment of the risk control measures that are used in the radiology department. It has been observed that the major focus of risk management in such medical setting is to reduce and eliminate harm and injury to patients through integration of various medical precautions. The field of Radiology is rapidly evolving due to technology advances and the globalization of healthcare. This ongoing development will have a great impact on the level of quality of care and service delivery. Thus, risk management in radiology is essential in protecting the patients, radiologists, and the medical organization in terms of capital and widening of the reputation of the medical organization with the patients. PMID:26120383

  4. AC Electroosmosis-Enhanced Nanoplasmofluidic Detection of Ultralow-Concentration Cytokine.

    PubMed

    Song, Yujing; Chen, Pengyu; Chung, Meng Ting; Nidetz, Robert; Park, Younggeun; Liu, Zhenhui; McHugh, Walker; Cornell, Timothy T; Fu, Jianping; Kurabayashi, Katsuo

    2017-04-12

    Label-free, nanoparticle-based plasmonic optical biosensing, combined with device miniaturization and microarray integration, has emerged as a promising approach for rapid, multiplexed biomolecular analysis. However, limited sensitivity prevents the wide use of such integrated label-free nanoplasmonic biosensors in clinical and life science applications where low-abundance biomolecule detection is needed. Here, we present a nanoplasmofluidic device integrated with microelectrodes for rapid, label-free analysis of a low-abundance cell signaling protein, detected by AC electroosmosis-enhanced localized surface plasmon resonance (ACE-LSPR) biofunctional nanoparticle imaging. The ACE-LSPR device is constructed using both bottom-up and top-down sensor fabrication methods, allowing the seamless integration of antibody-conjugated gold nanorod (AuNR) biosensor arrays with microelectrodes on the same microfluidic platform. Applying an AC voltage to microelectrodes while scanning the scattering light intensity variation of the AuNR biosensors results in significantly enhanced biosensing performance. The AC electroosmosis (ACEO) based enhancement of the biosensor performance enables rapid (5-15 min) quantification of IL-1β, a pro-inflammatory cytokine biomarker, with a sensitivity down to 158.5 fg/mL (9.1 fM) for spiked samples in PBS and 1 pg/mL (58 fM) for diluted human serum. Together with the optimized detection sensitivity and speed, our study presents the first critical step toward the application of nanoplasmonic biosensing technology to immune status monitoring guided by low-abundance cytokine measurement.

  5. Silver-enhanced colloidal gold metalloimmunoassay for Schistosoma japonicum antibody detection.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xia; Xiang, Zhi-Feng; Fu, Xin; Wang, Shi-Ping; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2005-06-01

    A silver-enhanced colloidal gold metalloimmunoassay has been proposed for the determination of Schistosoma japonicum antibody (SjAb) in rabbit serum. The adult worm antigen of S. japonicum (SjAg) was adsorbed passively on the walls of a polystyrene microwell and then reacted with the desired SjAb. The colloidal gold-labeled goat anti-rabbit IgG secondary antibody was adsorbed on the walls of the polystyrene microwells through the reaction with SjAb, followed by the silver enhancement process, dissolution of silver metal atoms in an acidic solution, and determination of dissolved silver ions by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) at a glassy-carbon electrode. Assay conditions were optimized, including the reaction time of SjAg with SjAb, the interaction of SjAb with the colloidal gold-labeled secondary antibody, the dilution ratio of the colloidal gold-labeled secondary antibody and the silver enhancement time. The integration of the anodic stripping peak current depended linearly on the SjAb logarithmic concentration over the range of 6.4 ng/ml to 100 microg/ml. A detection limit as low as 3.0 ng/ml SjAb was achieved, which was better than the piezoelectric body acoustic wave sensor (detection limit of 7.2 microg/ml) and the renewable amperometric immunosensor (detection limit of 0.36 microg/ml). Rabbit serum samples with various degrees of infection were analyzed, and the results demonstrate that the proposed method meets the requirements of clinical analysis.

  6. The effect of mark enhancement techniques on the subsequent detection of semen/spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Rory; Deacon, Paul; Phillips, Darren J; Farrugia, Kevin

    2014-11-01

    Fingermarks, footwear marks, blood and semen are amongst the most commonly encountered types of evidence at crime scenes. Previous work has extensively investigated fingermark and blood enhancement techniques and a sequence developed to maximise evidence recovery; however, there is limited research as to the effect of these techniques on the subsequent detection of body fluids such as semen. In this study, seven fingermark and blood enhancement techniques (e.g. powder suspension, cyanoacrylate fuming and acid violet 17) were employed followed by the subsequent detection of semen/spermatozoa. Other variables included in the study were the use of two substrates (white ceramic tiles and grey laminate flooring), a depletion series and ageing periods of 1, 7, 14 and 28 days. The effect these techniques had on the subsequent detection of semen was assessed by visual and fluorescence examination followed by presumptive and confirmatory testing for semen and spermatozoa. The results found that protein stains (acid violet 17 and acid yellow 7) caused a loss in presumptive test reactivity; however, sperm heads were still observed using microscopic examination after extraction and staining. The use of black magnetic powder, Bluestar(®) Forensic Magnum luminol, Lumicyano™ 4% and cyanoacrylate fuming followed by basic yellow 40 staining did not hinder subsequent presumptive and confirmatory tests for semen and sperm heads. Powder suspension caused a loss in both presumptive test reactivity and sperm heads from the substrate. In general, the enhancement techniques resulted in the improved visualisation of the semen stains under white and violet/blue light. The results from this study aim to provide a strategy to maximise evidence recovery and improve efficiency in an integrated forensic approach.

  7. Mass Spectrometric Detection of Neuropeptides Using Affinity-Enhanced Microdialysis with Antibody-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Schmerberg, Claire M.; Li, Lingjun

    2012-01-01

    Microdialysis (MD) is a useful sampling tool for many applications due to its ability to permit sampling from an animal concurrent with normal activity. MD is of particular importance in the field of neuroscience, in which it is used to sample neurotransmitters (NTs) while the animal is behaving in order to correlate dynamic changes in NTs with behavior. One important class of signaling molecules, the neuropeptides (NPs), however, presented significant challenges when studied with MD, due to the low relative recovery (RR) of NPs by this technique. Affinity-enhanced microdialysis (AE-MD) has previously been used to improve recovery of NPs and similar molecules. For AE-MD, an affinity agent (AA), such as an antibody-coated particle or free antibody, is added to the liquid perfusing the MD probe. This AA provides an additional mass transport driving force for analyte to pass through the dialysis membrane, and thus increases the RR. In this work, a variety of AAs have been investigated for AE-MD of NPs in vitro and in vivo, including particles with C18 surface functionality and antibody-coated particles. Antibody-coated magnetic nanoparticles (AbMnP) provided the best RR enhancement in vitro, with statistically significant (p<0.05) enhancements for 4 out of 6 NP standards tested, and RR increases up to 41-fold. These particles were then used for in vivo MD in the Jonah crab, Cancer borealis, during a feeding study, with mass spectrometric (MS) detection. 31 NPs were detected in a 30 min collection sample, compared to 17 when no AA was used. The use of AbMnP also increased the temporal resolution from 4–18 hrs in previous studies to just 30 min in this study. The levels of NPs detected were also sufficient for reliable quantitation with the MS system in use, permitting quantitative analysis of the concentration changes for 7 identified NPs on a 30 min time course during feeding. PMID:23249250

  8. Infrared image enhancement based on the edge detection and mathematical morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linlin; Zhao, Yuejin; Dong, Liquan; Liu, Xiaohua; Yu, Xiaomei; Hui, Mei; Chu, Xuhong; Gong, Cheng

    2010-11-01

    The development of the un-cooled infrared imaging technology from military necessity. At present, It is widely applied in industrial, medicine, scientific and technological research and so on. The infrared radiation temperature distribution of the measured object's surface can be observed visually. The collection of infrared images from our laboratory has following characteristics: Strong spatial correlation, Low contrast , Poor visual effect; Without color or shadows because of gray image , and has low resolution; Low definition compare to the visible light image; Many kinds of noise are brought by the random disturbances of the external environment. Digital image processing are widely applied in many areas, it can now be studied up close and in detail in many research field. It has become one kind of important means of the human visual continuation. Traditional methods for image enhancement cannot capture the geometric information of images and tend to amplify noise. In order to remove noise and improve visual effect. Meanwhile, To overcome the above enhancement issues. The mathematical model of FPA unit was constructed based on matrix transformation theory. According to characteristics of FPA, Image enhancement algorithm which combined with mathematical morphology and edge detection are established. First of all, Image profile is obtained by using the edge detection combine with mathematical morphological operators. And then, through filling the template profile by original image to get the ideal background image, The image noise can be removed on the base of the above method. The experiments show that utilizing the proposed algorithm can enhance image detail and the signal to noise ratio.

  9. Release protocol to address DOE moratorium on shipments of waste generated in radiologically controlled areas

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbun, L A; Boothe, G F

    1992-10-01

    On May 17, 1991 the US DOE Office of Waste Operations issued a moratorium on the shipment of hazardous waste from radiologically contaminated or potentially contaminated areas on DOE sites to offsite facilities not licensed for radiological material. This document describes a release protocol generated by Westinghouse Hanford submitted for US DOE approval. Topics considered include designating Radiological Materials Management Areas (RMMAs), classification of wastes, handling of mixed wastes, detection limits.

  10. Non-degenerate two photon absorption enhancement for laser dyes by precise lock-in detection

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, B.; Katan, C.; Bjorgaard, J. A.; Kobayashi, T.

    2015-12-15

    This study demonstrates a measurement system for a non-degenerate two-photon absorption (NDTPA) spectrum. The NDTPA light sources are a white light super continuum beam (WLSC, 500 ∼ 720 nm) and a fundamental beam (798 nm) from a Ti:Sapphire laser. A reliable broadband NDTPA spectrum is acquired in a single-shot detection procedure using a 128-channel lock-in amplifier. The NDTPA spectra for several common laser dyes are measured. Two photon absorption cross section enhancements are found in the experiment and validated by theoretical calculation for all of the chromophores.

  11. Angle modulated surface plasmon resonance spectrometer for refractive index sensing with enhanced detection resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinlei; Chen, Ke; Li, Li; Peng, Wei; Yu, Qingxu

    2017-01-01

    We design and manufacture an angle modulated surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectrometer with high detection resolution for refractive index sensing. The presented SPR spectrometer is based on a five-layer Kretchmann configuration. To enhance the sensitivity and resolution of the SPR spectrometer, we introduce a reference beam into the system, which has improved the stability of the system by nearly one order of magnitude. Numerical simulation and experimental study are presented and the results show that a sensitivity of 85 degrees/RIU (refractive index unit) and a good repeatability (standard deviation=3.7×10-6 RIU) have been achieved.

  12. Visible wavelength surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy from In-InP nanopillars for biomolecule detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdoch, B. J.; Portoles, J. F.; Tardio, S.; Barlow, A. J.; Fletcher, I. W.; Cumpson, P. J.

    2016-12-01

    Visible wavelength surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been observed from bovine serum albumin (BSA) using In-InP nanopillars synthesised by Ar gas cluster ion beam sputtering of InP wafers. InP provides a high local refractive index for plasmonic In structures, which increases the wavelength of the In surface plasmon resonance. The Raman scattering signal was determined to be up to 285 times higher for BSA deposited onto In-InP nanopillars when compared with Si wafer substrates. These substrates demonstrate the label-free detection of biomolecules by visible wavelength SERS, without the use of noble metal particles.

  13. NanoCluster Beacons as reporter probes in rolling circle enhanced enzyme activity detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juul, Sissel; Obliosca, Judy M.; Liu, Cong; Liu, Yen-Liang; Chen, Yu-An; Imphean, Darren M.; Knudsen, Birgitta R.; Ho, Yi-Ping; Leong, Kam W.; Yeh, Hsin-Chih

    2015-04-01

    As a newly developed assay for the detection of endogenous enzyme activity at the single-catalytic-event level, Rolling Circle Enhanced Enzyme Activity Detection (REEAD) has been used to measure enzyme activity in both single human cells and malaria-causing parasites, Plasmodium sp. Current REEAD assays rely on organic dye-tagged linear DNA probes to report the rolling circle amplification products (RCPs), the cost of which may hinder the widespread use of REEAD. Here we show that a new class of activatable probes, NanoCluster Beacons (NCBs), can simplify the REEAD assays. Easily prepared without any need for purification and capable of large fluorescence enhancement upon hybridization, NCBs are cost-effective and sensitive. Compared to conventional fluorescent probes, NCBs are also more photostable. As demonstrated in reporting the human topoisomerases I (hTopI) cleavage-ligation reaction, the proposed NCBs suggest a read-out format attractive for future REEAD-based diagnostics.As a newly developed assay for the detection of endogenous enzyme activity at the single-catalytic-event level, Rolling Circle Enhanced Enzyme Activity Detection (REEAD) has been used to measure enzyme activity in both single human cells and malaria-causing parasites, Plasmodium sp. Current REEAD assays rely on organic dye-tagged linear DNA probes to report the rolling circle amplification products (RCPs), the cost of which may hinder the widespread use of REEAD. Here we show that a new class of activatable probes, NanoCluster Beacons (NCBs), can simplify the REEAD assays. Easily prepared without any need for purification and capable of large fluorescence enhancement upon hybridization, NCBs are cost-effective and sensitive. Compared to conventional fluorescent probes, NCBs are also more photostable. As demonstrated in reporting the human topoisomerases I (hTopI) cleavage-ligation reaction, the proposed NCBs suggest a read-out format attractive for future REEAD-based diagnostics. Electronic

  14. Lamb-shift enhancement and detection in strongly driven superconducting circuits.

    PubMed

    Gramich, Vera; Gasparinetti, Simone; Solinas, Paolo; Ankerhold, Joachim

    2014-07-11

    It is shown that strong driving of a quantum system substantially enhances the Lamb shift induced by broadband reservoirs, which are typical for solid-state devices. By varying drive parameters the impact of environmental vacuum fluctuations with continuous spectral distribution onto system observables can be tuned in a distinctive way. This provides experimentally feasible measurement schemes for the Lamb shift in superconducting circuits based on Cooper pair boxes, where it can be detected either in shifted dressed transition frequencies or in pumped charge currents.

  15. Esophageal cancer detection based on tissue surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and multivariate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shangyuan; Lin, Juqiang; Huang, Zufang; Chen, Guannan; Chen, Weisheng; Wang, Yue; Chen, Rong; Zeng, Haishan

    2013-01-01

    The capability of using silver nanoparticle based near-infrared surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy combined with principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminate analysis (LDA) to differentiate esophageal cancer tissue from normal tissue was presented. Significant differences in Raman intensities of prominent SERS bands were observed between normal and cancer tissues. PCA-LDA multivariate analysis of the measured tissue SERS spectra achieved diagnostic sensitivity of 90.9% and specificity of 97.8%. This exploratory study demonstrated great potential for developing label-free tissue SERS analysis into a clinical tool for esophageal cancer detection.

  16. Fiber optic apparatus for detecting molecular species by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Angel, S.M.; Sharma, S.K.

    1987-11-30

    Optrode apparatus for detecting constituents of a fluid medium includes an optical fiber having a metal coating on at least a portion of a light transmissive core. The metal is one, such as silver, gold or copper, which enhances emission of Raman signal frequencies by molecules adsorbed on the surface of the coating when monochromatic probe light of a different frequency is scattered by such molecules and the metal coating is sufficiently thin to transmit light between the adsorbed molecules and the core of the fiber. Probe light is directed into one end of the fiber and a detector analyzes light emitted from the fiber for Raman frequencies that identify one or more particular molecular species. In one form, the optrode may function as a working electrode of an electrochemical cell while also serving to detect the products of oxidation or reduction reactions which occur at the electrode surface. 6 figs.

  17. Fiber optic apparatus for detecting molecular species by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Angel, S.M.; Sharma, S.K.

    1988-11-01

    Optrode apparatus for detecting constituents of a fluid medium includes an optical fiber having a metal coating on at least a portion of a light transmissive core. The metal is one, such as silver, gold or copper, which enhances emission of Raman signal frequencies by molecules adsorbed on the surface of the coating when monochromatic probe light of a different frequency is scattered by such molecules and the metal coating is sufficiently thin to transmit light between the absorbed molecules and the core of the fiber. Probe light is directed into one end of the fiber and a detector analyzes light emitted from the fiber for Raman frequencies that identify one or more particular molecular species. In one form, the optrode may function as a working electrode of an electrochemical cell while also serving to detect the products of oxidation or reduction reactions which occur at the electrode surface. 6 figs.

  18. Detection of thiabendazole applied on citrus fruits and bananas using surface enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Müller, Csilla; David, Leontin; Chiş, Vasile; Pînzaru, Simona Cintă

    2014-02-15

    Thiabendazole (TBZ) is a chemical fungicide and parasiticide largely used in food industry against mold and blight in vegetables and fruits during transportation and long term deposit. We investigated the possibility to detect and monitor the TBZ from the chemically treated bananas and citrus fruits available on Romanian market, using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) with a compact, portable, mini-Raman spectrometer. To assess the potential of the technique for fast, cheap and sensitive detection, we report the first complete vibrational characterization of the TBZ in a large pH and concentration range in conjunction with the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. From the relative intensity of the specific SERS bands as a function of concentration, we estimated a total amount of TZB as 78 mg/kg in citrus fruits, 13 times higher than the maximum allowed by current regulations, whereas in banana fruit the value was in the allowed limit.

  19. Direct detection of aptamer-thrombin binding via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagba, Cynthia V.; Lane, Stephen M.; Cho, Hansang; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2010-07-01

    In this study, we exploit the sensitivity offered by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for the direct detection of thrombin using the thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) as molecular receptor. The technique utilizes immobilized silver nanoparticles that are functionalized with thiolated thrombin-specific binding aptamer, a 15-mer (5'-GGTTGGTGTGGTTGG-3') quadruplex forming oligonucleotide. In addition to the Raman vibrational bands corresponding to the aptamer and blocking agent, new peaks (mainly at 1140, 1540, and 1635 cm-1) that are characteristic of the protein are observed upon binding of thrombin. These spectral changes are not observed when the aptamer-nanoparticle assembly is exposed to a nonbinding protein such as bovine serum albumin (BSA). This methodology could be further used for the development of label-free biosensors for direct detection of proteins and other molecules of interest for which aptamers are available.

  20. Use of superconducting imaging surfaces to enhance detection of weak magnetic sources by SQUID systems

    SciTech Connect

    Overton, W.C. Jr.; van Hulsteyn, D.B.; Flynn, E.R.

    1989-01-01

    The use of superconducting magnetometers and gradiometers to detect weak magnetic signals is well known. The weak sources produce small field changes in the vicinity of superconducting pickup coil combinations which respond to changes in the local magnetic flux. When coupled to SQUID detectors, these systems can respond to changes as small as 10 ft. However, magnetic noise severely restricts the operation of such systems. We show that combinations of flat and curved superconducting sheets in combination with superconducting pickup coils can enhance the detection capability and improve noise rejection. Surface currents induced in the sheets are represented by the source dipole and its image. They give rise to signals similar to those of the first-order gradiometer. The theory of images is used to analyze the signals. Several configurations of sense coils and superconducting imaging surfaces are analyzed. 15 refs., 28 figs.

  1. Use of touch-down polymerase chain reaction to enhance the sensitivity of Mycobacterium bovis detection.

    PubMed

    Zumárraga, Martín J; Meikle, Virginia; Bernardelli, Amelia; Abdala, Alejandro; Tarabla, Hector; Romano, María I; Cataldi, Angel

    2005-05-01

    The confirmatory diagnosis of Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) in animal samples is carried out by culture in Stonebrink media. However, culture is very slow because of the extremely long duplication time of the bacillus and difficult because of the scarcity of bacilli in diagnostic samples. This study describes the development of a single-tube touch-down polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol for the detection of M. bovis using primers that target the IS6110 element. Spiked water and milk as well as routine diagnostic samples (milk and nasal swabs) from M. bovis-positive cattle were tested. This protocol allows the rapid and sensitive detection of M. bovis in bovine samples by enhancing the sensitivity of standard PCR amplification.

  2. Serum albumin analysis for type II diabetes detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jinyong; Cao, Gang; Lin, Juqiang; Liu, Nenrong; Liao, Fadian; Ruan, Qiuyong; Wu, Shanshan; Huang, Zufang; Li, Ling; Chen, Rong

    2014-09-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy combined with membrane electrophoresis (ME) was firstly employed to detect albumin variation in type II diabetic development. Albumin was first purified from human serum by ME and then mixed with silver nanoparticles to perform SERS spectral analysis. SERS spectra were obtained from blood albumin samples of 20 diabetic patients and 19 healthy volunteers. Subtle but discernible changes in the acquired mean spectra of the two groups were observed. Tentative assignment of albumin SERS bands indicated specific structural changes of albumin molecule with diabetic development. Meanwhile, PCA-LDA diagnostic algorithms were employed to classify the two kinds of albumin SERS spectra, yielding the diagnostic sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 94.7%. The results from this exploratory study demonstrated that the EM-SERS method in combination with multivariate statistical analysis has great potential for the label-free detection of albumin variation for improving type II diabetes screening.

  3. Detection of metronidazole and ronidazole from environmental samples by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Han, Caiqin; Chen, Jing; Wu, Xiaomeng; Huang, Yao-Wen; Zhao, Yiping

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the surface enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) of two prohibited veterinary drugs, metronidazole (MNZ) and ronidazole (RNZ), have been acquired, and compared to the theoretically calculated spectra using density function theory (DFT). The experimental Raman and SERS spectra of MNZ and RNZ exhibit high resemblance with the DFT calculations. SERS detection of MNZ and RNZ from standard solutions as well as real environmental samples (tap, lake, swamp waters and soil) was performed on highly sensitive and reproducible silver nanorod array substrates. The limits of detection for MNZ and RNZ are 10 and 1 µg/mL in methanol and ultra-pure water, respectively, and 10-50 µg/mL in the environmental samples. The SERS-based method demonstrates its potential as a rapid, simple, and inexpensive means for the onsite screening of banned antibiotics from the aquatic and sediment environments, with minimal requirement for sample pretreatment.

  4. Protein-protein binding detection with nanoparticle photonic crystal enhanced microscopy (NP-PCEM).

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Yue; Tian, Limei; Chen, Weili; Yu, Hojeong; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel microscopy-based biosensing approach that utilizes a photonic crystal (PC) surface to detect protein-protein binding with the functionalized nanoparticles as tags. This imaging approach utilizes the measurement of localized shifts in the resonant wavelength and resonant reflection magnitude from the PC biosensor in the presence of individual nanoparticles. Moreover, it substantially increases the sensitivity of the imaging approach through tunable localized surface plasmon resonant frequency of the nanoparticle matching with the resonance of the PC biosensor. Experimental demonstrations of photonic crystal enhanced microscopy (PCEM) imaging with single nanoparticle resolution are supported by Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) computer simulations. The ability to detect the surface adsorption of individual nanoparticles as tags offers a route to single molecule biosensing with photonic crystal biosensor in the future.

  5. Saliva analysis combining membrane protein purification with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for nasopharyngeal cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shangyuan; Lin, Duo; Lin, Juqiang; Huang, Zufang; Chen, Guannan; Li, Yongzeng; Huang, Shaohua; Zhao, Jianhua; Chen, Rong; Zeng, Haishan

    2014-02-01

    A method for saliva analysis combining membrane protein purification with silver nanoparticle-based surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for non-invasive nasopharyngeal cancer detection was present in this paper. In this method, cellulose acetate membrane was used to obtain purified whole proteins from human saliva while removing other native saliva constituents and exogenous substances. The purified proteins were mixed with silver nanoparticle for SERS analysis. A diagnostic accuracy of 90.2% can be achieved by principal components analysis combined with linear discriminate analysis, for saliva samples obtained from patients with nasopharyngeal cancer (n = 62) and healthy volunteers (n = 30). This exploratory study demonstrated the potential for developing non-invasive, rapid saliva SERS analysis for nasopharyngeal cancer detection.

  6. Mobile autonomous robot for radiological surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Dudar, A.M.; Wagner, D.G.; Teese, G.D. )

    1992-01-01

    The robotics development group at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) is developing a mobile autonomous robot that performs radiological surveys of potentially contaminated floors. The robot is called SIMON, which stands for Semi-Intelligent Mobile Observing Navigator. Certain areas of SRL are classified as radiologically controlled areas (RCAs). In an RCA, radioactive materials are frequently handled by workers, and thus, the potential for contamination is ever present. Current methods used for floor radiological surveying includes labor-intensive manual scanning or random smearing of certain floor locations. An autonomous robot such as SIMON performs the surveying task in a much more efficient manner and will track down contamination before it is contacted by humans. SIMON scans floors at a speed of 1 in./s and stops and alarms upon encountering contamination. Its environment is well defined, consisting of smooth building floors with wide corridors. The kind of contaminations that SIMON is capable of detecting are alpha and beta-gamma. The contamination levels of interest are low to moderate.

  7. Sensitive detection of Ochratoxin A in food and drinks using metal-enhanced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Todescato, Francesco; Antognoli, Agnese; Meneghello, Anna; Cretaio, Erica; Signorini, Raffaella; Bozio, Renato

    2014-07-15

    Easy, sensitive, rapid and low cost ochratoxin biosensors are strongly demanded in food analysis since Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a widely diffused food contaminant, highly detrimental for human health. In this work, a novel plasmonic based optical biosensor prototype for ochratoxin A is described. It exploits the metal-enhanced fluorescence phenomenon due to the silver film over nanosphere plasmonic substrate. Since ochratoxin A could be present in different food commodities, sensor performances have been tested on three different matrices (dried milk, juices, and wheat mix). Firstly, a common OTA extraction solvent and a labeling and detection protocol were defined for the analyzed matrices. Then, the efficiency of the Ag-FON surfaces in signal amplification for the detection of low ochratoxin A concentrations was defined. Using samples spiked with OTA-AF 647 or with unlabeled OTA we were able to detect the mycotoxin at concentrations lower than E.U. specifications of 0.5 μg/kg in wheat, milk and apple juice. The test performances are comparable to those of ELISA kits but the platform presented here, once optimized, present some perspective advantages, such as: low cost and time consuming, versatility of the protocol for the investigation of different matrices, employment also in non-qualified laboratories, small dimensions that allow its integration in a compact device for OTA on-site detection.

  8. High sensitivity detection of bacteria by surface plasmon resonance enhanced common path interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greef, Charles; Petropavlovskikh, Viatcheslav; Nilsen, Oyvind; Hacioglu, Bilge; Khattatov, Boris; Hall, John

    2007-04-01

    Real time monitoring of biowarfare agents (BWA) for military and civilian protection remains a high priority for homeland security and battlefield readiness. Available devices have adequate sensitivity, but the detection modules have limited periods of deployment, require frequent maintenance, employ single-use disposable components, and have limited multiplexing capability. Surface Plasmon Resonance enhanced Common Path Interferometry (SPR-CPI) is a label-free, high sensitivity biomolecular interaction measurement technology that allows multiplexed real-time measurement of biowarfare agents, including small molecules, proteins, and microbes. The technology permits continuous operation in a field-deployable detection module of an integrated BWA monitoring system. SPR-CPI measures difference in phase shift of polarized light reflected from the transducer interface caused by changes in refractive index induced by biomolecular interactions. The measurement is performed on a discrete 2-dimensional area functionalized with biomolecule capture reagents in a microarray format, allowing simultaneous measurement of up to 100 separate analytes. Output consists of simultaneous voltage measurements proportional to the phase differences resulting from the refractive index changes and is automatically processed and displayed graphically or delivered to a decision making algorithm. This enables a fully automatic field-deployable detection system capable of integration into existing modular BWA detection systems. Proof-of-concept experiments on surrogate models of anticipated BWA threats have demonstrated utility. Efforts are in progress for full development and deployment of the device.

  9. Enhancement of immunohistochemical detection of Salmonella in tissues of experimentally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Rieger, J; Janczyk, P; Hünigen, H; Plendl, J

    2015-07-09

    Salmonella Typhimurium is one of the main pathogens compromising porcine and human health as well as food safety, because it is a prevailing source of foodborne infections due to contaminated pork. A prominent problem in the management of this bacteriosis is the number of subclinically infected carrier pigs. As very little is known concerning the mechanisms allowing Salmonella to persist in pigs, the objective of this study was to develop an immunohistochemical approach for the detection of salmonellae in tissue of pigs experimentally infected with Salmonella Typhimurium. Samples were obtained from a challenge trial in which piglets of the German Landrace were intragastrically infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 (1.4-2.1x1010 CFU). Piglets were sacrificed on days 2 and 28 post infection. Tissue samples of jejunum, ileum, colon, ileocecal mesenteric lymph nodes (Lnn. ileocolici), and tonsils (Tonsilla veli palatini) were fixed in Zamboni's fixative and paraffin-embedded. Different immunohistochemical staining protocols were evaluated. Salmonella was detected in varying amounts in the tissues. Brown iron-containing pigments in the lymph nodes interfered with the identification of Salmonella if DAB was used as a staining reagent. Detergents like Triton X-100 or Saponin enhanced the sensitivity. It seems advisable not to use a detection system with brown staining for bacteria in an experimental setup involving intestinal damage including haemorrhage. The use of detergents appears to result in a higher sensitivity in the immunohistochemical detection of salmonellae.

  10. Aspects of the Application of Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopy to Nitrogen Oxides Detection

    PubMed Central

    Wojtas, Jacek; Mikolajczyk, Janusz; Bielecki, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    This article presents design issues of high-sensitive laser absorption spectroscopy systems for nitrogen oxides (NOx) detection. Examples of our systems and their investigation results are also described. The constructed systems use one of the most sensitive methods, cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS). They operate at different wavelength ranges using a blue—violet laser diode (410 nm) as well as quantum cascade lasers (5.27 μm and 4.53 μm). Each of them is configured as a one or two channel measurement device using, e.g., time division multiplexing and averaging. During the testing procedure, the main performance features such as detection limits and measurements uncertainties have been determined. The obtained results are 1 ppb NO2, 75 ppb NO and 45 ppb N2O. For all systems, the uncertainty of concentration measurements does not exceed a value of 13%. Some experiments with explosives are also discussed. A setup equipped with a concentrator of explosives vapours was used. The detection method is based either on the reaction of the sensors to the nitrogen oxides directly emitted by the explosives or on the reaction to the nitrogen oxides produced during thermal decomposition of explosive vapours. For TNT, PETN, RDX and HMX a detection limit better than 1 ng has been achieved. PMID:23752566

  11. Aspects of the application of cavity enhanced spectroscopy to nitrogen oxides detection.

    PubMed

    Wojtas, Jacek; Mikolajczyk, Janusz; Bielecki, Zbigniew

    2013-06-10

    This article presents design issues of high-sensitive laser absorption spectroscopy systems for nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) detection. Examples of our systems and their investigation results are also described. The constructed systems use one of the most sensitive methods, cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS). They operate at different wavelength ranges using a blue--violet laser diode (410 nm) as well as quantum cascade lasers (5.27 µm and 4.53 µm). Each of them is configured as a one or two channel measurement device using, e.g., time division multiplexing and averaging. During the testing procedure, the main performance features such as detection limits and measurements uncertainties have been determined. The obtained results are 1 ppb NO(2), 75 ppb NO and 45 ppb N(2)O. For all systems, the uncertainty of concentration measurements does not exceed a value of 13%. Some experiments with explosives are also discussed. A setup equipped with a concentrator of explosives vapours was used. The detection method is based either on the reaction of the sensors to the nitrogen oxides directly emitted by the explosives or on the reaction to the nitrogen oxides produced during thermal decomposition of explosive vapours. For TNT, PETN, RDX and HMX a detection limit better than 1 ng has been achieved.

  12. Ultrasensitive and selective homogeneous sandwich immunoassay detection by Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS).

    PubMed

    Pekdemir, Mustafa Ersin; Ertürkan, Deniz; Külah, Haluk; Boyacı, Ismail H; Ozgen, Canan; Tamer, Uğur

    2012-10-21

    In this report, a simple and highly selective homogeneous sandwich immunoassay was developed for ultrasensitive detection of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B (SEB) using Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS). The assay uses polyclonal-antibody functionalized magnetic gold nanorod particles as capture probes for SEB, which can be collected via a simple magnet. After separating SEB from the sample matrix, they are sandwiched by using binding-specific antibody-antigen pairs with the help of gold nanorod particles. Gold nanorod particles are bifunctional by design and contain self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of a SERS tag molecule (5,5-dithiobis (2-nitrobenzoic acid), DTNB) and carboxylic functionalities of DTNB for coupling with a suitable antibody. The correlation between the SEB concentration and SERS signal was found to be linear within the range of 3 fM to 0.3 μM. The limit of detection for the assay was determined to be 768 aM (ca., 9250 SEB molecules per 20 μL sample volume). The gold heterogeneous assay system for SEB detection was also compared with the same SERS probes and gold-coated surfaces as capture substrates. The developed method was further evaluated for detecting SEB in artificially contaminated milk. Finally, the method was used for investigating the SEB specificity on bovine serum albumin (BSA) and avidin.

  13. Comparison of histochemical methods for murine eosinophil detection in a RSV vaccine-enhanced inflammation model

    PubMed Central

    Meyerholz, David K.; Griffin, Michelle A.; Castilow, Elaine M.; Varga, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    A comparative study of histochemical detection of eosinophils in fixed murine tissue is lacking. Five histochemical methods previously reported for eosinophil detection were quantitatively and qualitatively compared in an established murine RSV vaccine-enhanced inflammation model. Nonspecific neutrophil staining was evaluated in tissue sections of neutrophilic soft tissue lesions and bone marrow from respective animals. Eosinophils had granular red to orange-red cytoplasmic staining, depending on the method, whereas neutrophils had, when stained, a more homogenous cytoplasmic pattern. Nonspecific background staining of similar coloration was variably seen in arterial walls and erythrocytes. Astra Blue/Vital New Red, Congo Red, Luna, Modified Hematoxylin & Eosin, and Sirius Red techniques were all effective in detecting increased eosinophil recruitment compared to controls; however, differences in eosinophil quantification significantly varied between techniques. Astra Blue/Vital New Red had the best specificity for differentiating eosinophils and neutrophils, but had a reduced ability to enumerate eosinophils and was the most time intensive. The Luna stain had excessive non specific staining of tissues and a reduced enumeration of infiltrating eosinophils making it suboptimal. For multiple parameters such as eosinophil detection, specificity, and contrast with background tissues, the Sirius Red followed by Congo Red and Modified Hematoxylin & Eosin methods were useful, each with their own staining qualities. PMID:19181630

  14. Detection of low-quantity anticancer drugs by surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Litti, Lucio; Amendola, Vincenzo; Toffoli, Giuseppe; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasensitive detection of low-quantity drugs is important for personalized therapeutic approaches in several diseases and, in particular, for cancer treatment. In this field, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) can be very useful for its ability to precisely identify analytes from their unique vibrational spectra, with very high sensitivity. Here, we report a study about SERS detection of sunitinib, paclitaxel and irinotecan, i.e. three commonly used antineoplastic drugs, and of SN-38, i.e. the metabolite of irinotecan, dissolved in methanol solutions. By using commercial Klarite substrates, we found that sunitinib, irinotecan and SN-38 have detection limits of 20-70 ng, which is below the threshold for applications in cancer therapy. Conversely, the SERS signal was not appreciable with paclitaxel, and this is explained by the absence of optical resonances in the visible range. Overall, our results show that ultrasensitive SERS detection of sunitinib, irinotecan and SN-38 is feasible, encouraging further development of this technology also for other drugs with similar molecular structure especially for those analytes with absorption bands in the visible range.

  15. A Simple Metallothionein-Based Biosensor for Enhanced Detection of Arsenic and Mercury

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Gordon W.; Tan, Swee Ngin; Stillman, Martin J.

    2017-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are a family of cysteine-rich proteins whose biological roles include the regulation of essential metal ions and protection against the harmful effects of toxic metals. Due to its high affinity for many toxic, soft metals, recombinant human MT isoform 1a was incorporated into an electrochemical-based biosensor for the detection of As3+ and Hg2+. A simple design was chosen to maximize its potential in environmental monitoring and MT was physically adsorbed onto paper discs placed on screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs). This system was tested with concentrations of arsenic and mercury typical of contaminated water sources ranging from 5 to 1000 ppb. The analytical performance of the MT-adsorbed paper discs on SPCEs demonstrated a greater than three-fold signal enhancement and a lower detection limit compared to blank SPCEs, 13 ppb for As3+ and 45 ppb for Hg2+. While not being as low as some of the recommended drinking water limits, the sensitivity of the simple MT-biosensor would be potentially useful in monitoring of areas of concern with a known contamination problem. This paper describes the ability of the metal binding protein metallothionein to enhance the effectiveness of a simple, low-cost electrochemical sensor. PMID:28335390

  16. A Simple Metallothionein-Based Biosensor for Enhanced Detection of Arsenic and Mercury.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Gordon W; Tan, Swee Ngin; Stillman, Martin J

    2017-03-13

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are a family of cysteine-rich proteins whose biological roles include the regulation of essential metal ions and protection against the harmful effects of toxic metals. Due to its high affinity for many toxic, soft metals, recombinant human MT isoform 1a was incorporated into an electrochemical-based biosensor for the detection of As(3+) and Hg(2+). A simple design was chosen to maximize its potential in environmental monitoring and MT was physically adsorbed onto paper discs placed on screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs). This system was tested with concentrations of arsenic and mercury typical of contaminated water sources ranging from 5 to 1000 ppb. The analytical performance of the MT-adsorbed paper discs on SPCEs demonstrated a greater than three-fold signal enhancement and a lower detection limit compared to blank SPCEs, 13 ppb for As(3+) and 45 ppb for Hg(2+). While not being as low as some of the recommended drinking water limits, the sensitivity of the simple MT-biosensor would be potentially useful in monitoring of areas of concern with a known contamination problem. This paper describes the ability of the metal binding protein metallothionein to enhance the effectiveness of a simple, low-cost electrochemical sensor.

  17. Polarization sensitivity in the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii enhances the detection of moving transparent objects.

    PubMed

    Tuthill, John C; Johnsen, Sönke

    2006-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that polarization sensitivity enhances the detection of moving, transparent objects by examining the escape response of the red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii Girard) from a visual threat. A transparent, birefringent target trans-illuminated by either partially linear polarized or unpolarized light was advanced toward individual crayfish. The optical axis of the target was aligned such that it would be conspicuous to a viewer with polarization sensitivity when trans-illuminated by polarized light. Under polarized light, significantly more crayfish retreated from the target than under unpolarized light of identical intensity (P<0.00005, Fisher's exact test). Whereas the potential for polarization sensitivity has been shown in neurophysiological and structural studies of the visual system of P. clarkii and the signal crayfish Pasifastacus leniusculus (Dana), our results provide the first behavioral evidence for polarization sensitivity among crayfish. The ecological function of this ability is unclear, but it may enhance the detection of fish with silvered scales, transparent zooplankton or macroinvertebrates. Because escape responses are generally more reliably induced than other behaviors, the method employed in this study may prove useful for examining sensory capabilities in other species.

  18. Surface-enhanced Raman Immunoassay (SERIA): detection of Bacillus globigii in ground water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guicheteau, Jason A.; Christesen, Steven D.

    2004-12-01

    This work presents the development of new methodologies centering on surfaces with immunologically induced affinities for biomaterials in aqueous systems. The immunologically active surfaces concentrate the biomaterials at the interface and therefore eliminate the need for preconcentration steps. This results in a highly sensitive and rapid immunoassay technique. The very strong localized of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) that occurs at noble metal surfaces is combined with the unparalleled selectivity of immunoassays. Localization of the SERS signal eliminates the problem of washing and allows assays to be performed without treatment steps associated with removing excess agents. Previous work with small illicit drug molecules and large microorganisms clearly demonstrates trace detection of species in aqueous environments is possible. This paper discusses further work to detect Bacillus globigii by couping surface enhanced Raman scattering with immunoassays (SERIA) using citrate reduced silver nanoparticles. The spores of B. globigii are used to simulate the behavior of another bacterium that forms spores-the potential biological warfare agent, Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax.

  19. Aminolevulinic Acid-Based Tumor Detection and Therapy: Molecular Mechanisms and Strategies for Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue; Palasuberniam, Pratheeba; Kraus, Daniel; Chen, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is the first metabolite in the heme biosynthesis pathway in humans. In addition to the end product heme, this pathway also produces other porphyrin metabolites. Protoporphyrin (PpIX) is one heme precursor porphyrin with good fluorescence and photosensitizing activity. Because tumors and other proliferating cells tend to exhibit a higher level of PpIX than normal cells after ALA incubation, ALA has been used as a prodrug to enable PpIX fluorescence detection and photodynamic therapy (PDT) of lesion tissues. Extensive studies have been carried out in the past twenty years to explore why some tumors exhibit elevated ALA-mediated PpIX and how to enhance PpIX levels to achieve better tumor detection and treatment. Here we would like to summarize previous research in order to stimulate future studies on these important topics. In this review, we focus on summarizing tumor-associated alterations in heme biosynthesis enzymes, mitochondrial functions and porphyrin transporters that contribute to ALA-PpIX increase in tumors. Mechanism-based therapeutic strategies for enhancing ALA-based modalities including iron chelators, differentiation agents and PpIX transporter inhibitors are also discussed. PMID:26516850

  20. Soy flour-derived carbon dots: facile preparation, fluorescence enhancement, and sensitive Fe3+ detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Liyang; Xu, Qian; Zheng, Xing; Zhang, Weina; Zheng, Jingtang; Wu, Mingbo; Wu, Wenting

    2016-08-01

    Soy flour-derived carbon quantum dots (C-dots) were successfully synthesized via a facile one-step hydrothermal approach. The as-prepared C-dots exhibit an average diameter of 2.5 nm and the crystalline lattices are consistent with graphitic carbons. Meanwhile, they show strong photoluminescence (quantum yield is 7.85 %), good water solubility, and high photostability. Importantly, structural defects of the C-dots were designed to obtain controllable fluorescence, which was achieved by changing the contents of N defects and O defects of C-dots. Our results indicate that N defects can more effectively enhance the fluorescence emission than O defects. As the preparation temperature increases, the N defects are fine-tuned by substituting for partial O defects, reducing nonradiative recombination and enhancing fluorescence intensity, which is further confirmed by surface passivation. Due to its fine photostability, high sensitivity, and good selectivity for Fe3+, the as-prepared C-dots were used as fluorescence probes for detection of ferric ion. The detection limitation comes to 0.021 µM.

  1. Radiological design guide

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.A.

    1994-08-16

    The purpose of this design guide is to provide radiological safety requirements, standards, and information necessary for designing facilities that will operate without unacceptable risk to personnel, the public, or the environment as required by the US Department of Energy (DOE). This design guide, together with WHC-CM-4-29, Nuclear Criticality Safety, WHC-CM-4-46, Nonreactor Facility Safety Analysis, and WHC-CM-7-5, Environmental Compliance, covers the radiation safety design requirements at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). This design guide applies to the design of all new facilities. The WHC organization with line responsibility for design shall determine to what extent this design guide shall apply to the modifications to existing facilities. In making this determination, consideration shall include a cost versus benefit study. Specifically, facilities that store, handle, or process radioactive materials will be covered. This design guide replaces WHC-CM-4-9 and is designated a living document. This design guide is intended for design purposes only. Design criteria are different from operational criteria and often more stringent. Criteria that might be acceptable for operations might not be adequate for design.

  2. Cardiac radiology: centenary review.

    PubMed

    de Roos, Albert; Higgins, Charles B

    2014-11-01

    During the past century, cardiac imaging technologies have revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of acquired and congenital heart disease. Many important contributions to the field of cardiac imaging were initially reported in Radiology. The field developed from the early stages of cardiac imaging, including the use of coronary x-ray angiography and roentgen kymography, to nowadays the widely used echocardiographic, nuclear medicine, cardiac computed tomographic (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) applications. It is surprising how many of these techniques were not recognized for their potential during their early inception. Some techniques were described in the literature but required many years to enter the clinical arena and presently continue to expand in terms of clinical application. The application of various CT and MR contrast agents for the diagnosis of myocardial ischemia is a case in point, as the utility of contrast agents continues to expand the noninvasive characterization of myocardium. The history of cardiac imaging has included a continuous process of advances in our understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system, along with advances in imaging technology that continue to the present day.

  3. Self-citation: comparison between Radiología, European Radiology and Radiology for 1997-1998.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Alberto; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis

    2002-01-01

    Self-citation, considered as the number of times a paper cites other papers in the same journal, is an important criteria of journal quality. Our objective is to evaluate the self-citation in the official journal of the Spanish Society of Radiology (Radiología), and to compare it with the European Radiology and Radiology journals. Papers published in Radiología, European Radiology, and Radiology during 1997 and 1998 were analyzed. The Self Citation Index, considered as the ratio between self-references and total number of references per article, for the journals Radiología (SCIR), European Radiology (SCIER), and Radiology (SCIRY), were obtained and expressed as percentages. Also, the number of references to Radiología in European Radiology and Radiology papers were calculated. Stratification of the index per thematic area and article type was also performed. Mean SCIR, SCIER, and SCIRY values were compared with the ANOVA and the Student-Newman-Keuls tests. The self-citation index was statistically higher in Radiology (23.2%; p<0.0001) than in Radiología (1.8%) and European Radiology (0.8%). There were no statistically significant differences between SCIR and SCIER indexes ( p=0.25). In the stratification per thematic areas and article type, self-citation in Radiology was statistically higher ( p<0.0001), with the only exception of "Radioprotection" area ( p=0.2), to SCIR and SCIER. Although there were no statistically significant differences, by thematic areas SCIR was always larger than SCIER, with the only exception of the "Genitourinary imaging" area, and by article type SCIR also went greater to SCIER, except in review articles. Radiología, The Spanish official radiological journal, although not included in Index Medicus and its database Medline, had a larger number of self-citing than European Radiology in the period 1997-1998.

  4. Environmental Tools and Radiological Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation details two tools (SADA and FRAMES) available for use in environmental assessments of chemicals that can also be used for radiological assessments of the environment. Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA) is a Windows freeware program that incorporate...

  5. Negotiating the radiologically isolated syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cummings, A; Chataway, J

    2014-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis, always challenging, hands down a particular gauntlet with the concept of the radiologically isolated syndrome. This article discusses what it is, recent developments in the field and how these patients should be managed.

  6. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) - formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. This report provides a listing and brief description of experiments performed at RARAF during the May 1, 1992 through April 30, 1993.

  7. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. Experiments performed from May 1991--April 1992 are described.

  8. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) for Detection in Immunoassays. Applications, fundamentals, and optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Driskell, Jeremy Daniel

    2006-08-09

    Immunoassays have been utilized for the detection of biological analytes for several decades. Many formats and detection strategies have been explored, each having unique advantages and disadvantages. More recently, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been introduced as a readout method for immunoassays, and has shown great potential to meet many key analytical figures of merit. This technology is in its infancy and this dissertation explores the diversity of this method as well as the mechanism responsible for surface enhancement. Approaches to reduce assay times are also investigated. Implementing the knowledge gained from these studies will lead to a more sensitive immunoassay requiring less time than its predecessors. This dissertation is organized into six sections. The first section includes a literature review of the previous work that led to this dissertation. A general overview of the different approaches to immunoassays is given, outlining the strengths and weaknesses of each. Included is a detailed review of binding kinetics, which is central for decreasing assay times. Next, the theoretical underpinnings of SERS is reviewed at its current level of understanding. Past work has argued that surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the enhancing substrate influences the SERS signal; therefore, the SPR of the extrinsic Raman labels (ERLs) utilized in our SERS-based immunoassay is discussed. Four original research chapters follow the Introduction, each presented as separate manuscripts. Chapter 2 modifies a SERS-based immunoassay previously developed in our group, extending it to the low-level detection of viral pathogens and demonstrating its versatility in terms of analyte type, Chapter 3 investigates the influence of ERL size, material composition, and separation distance between the ERLs and capture substrate on the SERS signal. This chapter links SPR with SERS enhancement factors and is consistent with many of the results from theoretical treatments

  9. In vivo detection of membrane protein expression using surface plasmon enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS).

    PubMed

    Krupka, Simone S; Wiltschi, Birgit; Reuning, Ute; Hölscher, Kerstin; Hara, Masahiko; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin

    2006-08-15

    Surface plasmon enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) was applied for the detection of expression and functional incorporation of integral membrane proteins into plasma membranes of living cells in real time. A vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) tagged mutant of photoreceptor bovine rhodopsin was generated for high level expression with the semliki forest virus (SFV) system. Adherent baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells were cultivated on fibronectin-coated gold surfaces and infected with genetically engineered virus driving the expression of rhodopsin. Using premixed fluorescently (Alexa Fluor 647) labeled anti-mouse secondary antibody and monoclonal anti-VSV primary antibody, expression of rhodopsin in BHK-21 cells was monitored by SPFS. Fluorescence enhancement by surface plasmons occurs exclusively in the close vicinity of the gold surface. Thus, only the Alexa Fluor 647 labeled antibodies binding to the VSV-tag at rhodopsin molecules exposed on the cell surface experienced fluorescence enhancement, whereas, unbound antibody molecules in the bulk solution were negligibly excited. With this novel technique, we successfully recorded an increase of fluorescence with proceeding rhodopsin expression. Thus, we were able to observe the incorporation of heterologously expressed rhodopsin in the plasma membrane of living cells in real time using a relatively simple and rapid method. We confirmed our results by comparison with conventional wide field fluorescence microscopy.

  10. Interventional Radiology: Equipment and Techniques.

    PubMed

    Scansen, Brian A

    2016-05-01

    The breadth of small animal diseases that can now be treated by a minimally invasive, transcatheter approach continues to expand. Interventional radiology is the field of medicine that affects a therapeutic outcome via minimally invasive catheterization of peripheral blood vessels or body orifices guided by imaging. The intent of this article is to provide an overview of the equipment required for interventional radiology in veterinary medicine with a discussion of technical uses in diseases of dogs and cats.

  11. FDH radiological design review guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Millsap, W.J.

    1998-09-29

    These guidelines discuss in more detail the radiological design review process used by the Project Hanford Management Contractors as described in HNF-PRO-1622, Radiological Design Review Process. They are intended to supplement the procedure by providing background information on the design review process and providing a ready source of information to design reviewers. The guidelines are not intended to contain all the information in the procedure, but at points, in order to maintain continuity, they contain some of the same information.

  12. Financial accounting for radiology executives.

    PubMed

    Seidmann, Abraham; Mehta, Tushar

    2005-03-01

    The authors review the role of financial accounting information from the perspective of a radiology executive. They begin by introducing the role of pro forma statements. They discuss the fundamental concepts of accounting, including the matching principle and accrual accounting. The authors then explore the use of financial accounting information in making investment decisions in diagnostic medical imaging. The paper focuses on critically evaluating the benefits and limitations of financial accounting for decision making in a radiology practice.

  13. Radiology of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Amplatz, K.

    1986-01-01

    This is a text on the radiologic diagnosis of congenital heart disease and its clinical manifestations. The main thrust of the book is the logical approach which allows an understanding of the complex theory of congenital heart disease. The atlas gives a concise overview of the entire field of congenital heart disease. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical and radiological consequences. Surgical treatment is included since it provides a different viewpoint of the anatomy.

  14. Radiological training for tritium facilities

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    This program management guide describes a recommended implementation standard for core training as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The standard is to assist those individuals, both within DOE and Managing and Operating contractors, identified as having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RCM. This training may also be given to radiological workers using tritium to assist in meeting their job specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835.

  15. In Vivo and Ex Vivo Transcutaneous Glucose Detection Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ke

    Diabetes mellitus is widely acknowledged as a large and growing health concern. The lack of practical methods for continuously monitoring glucose levels causes significant difficulties in successful diabetes management. Extensive validation work has been carried out using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for in vivo glucose sensing. This dissertation details progress made towards a Raman-based glucose sensor for in vivo, transcutaneous glucose detection. The first presented study combines spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) with SERS (SESORS) to explore the possibility of in vivo, transcutaneous glucose sensing. A SERS-based glucose sensor was implanted subcutaneously in Sprague-Dawley rats. SERS spectra were acquired transcutaneously and analyzed using partial least-squares (PLS). Highly accurate and consistent results were obtained, especially in the hypoglycemic range. Additionally, the sensor demonstrated functionality at least17 days after implantation. A subsequent study further extends the application of SESORS to the possibility of in vivo detection of glucose in brain through skull. Specifically, SERS nanoantennas were buried in an ovine tissue behind a bone with 8 mm thickness and detected by using SESORS. In addition, quantitative detection through bones by using SESORS was also demonstrated. A device that could measure glucose continuously as well as noninvasively would be of great use to patients with diabetes. The inherent limitation of the SESORS approach may prevent this technique from becoming a noninvasive method. Therefore, the prospect of using normal Raman spectroscopy for glucose detection was re-examined. Quantitative detection of glucose and lactate in the clinically relevant range was demonstrated by using normal Raman spectroscopy with low power and short acquisition time. Finally, a nonlinear calibration method called least-squares support vector machine regression (LS-SVR) was investigated for analyzing spectroscopic

  16. Breast cancer detection based on serum sample surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Obieta, Enrique; Martínez-Espinosa, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Zerega, Brenda Esmeralda; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; González-Solís, José Luis

    2016-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a vibrational technique which provides information about the chemical structure. Nevertheless, since many chemicals are present in a sample at very low concentration, the Raman signal observed is extremely weak. In surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), Raman signals can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude when nanoparticles are used. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in the breast cancer detection based on serum SERS. The serum samples were obtained from 12 patients who were clinically diagnosed with advanced breast cancer and 15 controls. In the same proportion, the serum samples were mixed with colloidal gold nanoparticles of 40 nm using sonication. At least 10 spectra were collected of each serum sample using a Jobin-Yvon LabRAM Raman Spectrometer with a laser of 830 nm. Raw spectra were processed by carrying baseline correction, smoothing, and normalization and then analyzed using principle component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Raman spectra showed strongly enhanced bands in the 600-1800 cm (-1) range due to the nanoparticle colloidal clusters observed. These Raman bands allowed identifying biomolecules present at low concentration as amide I and III, β carotene, glutathione, tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine. Preliminary results demonstrated that SERS and PCA-LDA can be used to discriminate between control and cancer samples with high sensitivity and specificity. SERS allowed short exposures and required a minimal sample preparation. The preliminary results suggest that SERS and PCA-LDA could be an excellent support technique for the breast cancer detection using serum samples.

  17. GM-CSF Enhances Macrophage Glycolytic Activity In Vitro and Improves Detection of Inflammation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Parmanand; González-Ramos, Silvia; Mojena, Marina; Rosales-Mendoza, César Eduardo; Emami, Hamed; Swanson, Jeffrey; Morss, Alex; Fayad, Zahi A.; Rudd, James H.F.; Gelfand, Jeffrey; Paz-García, Marta; Martín-Sanz, Paloma; Boscá, Lisardo

    2016-01-01

    18F-FDG accumulates in glycolytically active tissues and is known to concentrate in tissues that are rich in activated macrophages. In this study, we tested the hypotheses that human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a clinically used cytokine, increases macrophage glycolysis and deoxyglucose uptake in vitro and acutely enhances 18F-FDG uptake within inflamed tissues such as atherosclerotic plaques in vivo. Methods: In vitro experiments were conducted on human macrophages whereby inflammatory activation and uptake of radiolabeled 2-deoxyglucose was assessed before and after GM-CSF exposure. In vivo studies were performed on mice and New Zealand White rabbits to assess the effect of GM-CSF on 18F-FDG uptake in normal versus inflamed arteries, using PET. Results: Incubation of human macrophages with GM-CSF resulted in increased glycolysis and increased 2-deoxyglucose uptake (P < 0.05). This effect was attenuated by neutralizing antibodies against tumor necrosis factor–α or after silencing or inhibition of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase. In vivo, in mice and in rabbits, intravenous GM-CSF administration resulted in a 70% and 73% increase (P < 0.01 for both), respectively, in arterial 18F-FDG uptake in atherosclerotic animals but not in nonatherosclerotic controls. Histopathologic analysis demonstrated a significant correlation between in vivo 18F-FDG uptake and macrophage staining (R = 0.75, P < 0.01). Conclusion: GM-CSF substantially augments glycolytic flux in vitro (via a mechanism dependent on ubiquitous type 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase and tumor necrosis factor–α) and increases 18F-FDG uptake within inflamed atheroma in vivo. These findings demonstrate that GM-CSF can be used to enhance detection of inflammation. Further studies should explore the role of GM-CSF stimulation to enhance the detection of inflammatory foci in other disease states. PMID:27081166

  18. Radiological Control Manual. Revision 0, January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  19. Enhanced detection of quantum dots by the magnetohydrodynamic effect for electrochemical biosensing.

    PubMed

    Martín-Yerga, Daniel; Fanjul-Bolado, Pablo; Hernández-Santos, David; Costa-García, Agustín

    2017-04-07

    In this work, we describe the use of a magnetoelectrochemical support for screen-printed electrodes to improve the anodic stripping voltammetry of cadmium due to the generated magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effect. To create a significant MHD effect, Fe(iii) was added at mM concentrations to the solution. The reduction of Fe(iii) simultaneously with the cadmium deposition on the electrode surface allowed the production of a high cathodic current, which generated a large Lorentz force capable of exerting a convective effect on the solution in the presence of the magnetic field. This convective effect allowed the increase in the mass transfer in the quiescent solution, enhancing the deposition of cadmium as observed by an increased stripping peak current. The optimized method was applied to the detection of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) in solution. Using the magnetoelectrochemical support, we were able to detect extremely low concentrations of QDs, with a detection limit of 100 amol of QDs (in particle number). The great performance shown by this system was evaluated in biosensing applications. Firstly, detection of biotin was carried out using a competitive bioassay between biotin and QD-labelled biotin, obtaining good analytical results (0.6 × 10(-10) M as the limit of detection). Then, the magnetoelectrochemical support was tested in a more complex biosensor for the determination of anti-transglutaminase IgA antibodies, a celiac disease biomarker. This work shows that the improvement in the metal electrodeposition caused by the MHD effect can be used successfully for the development of disposable electrochemical biosensors with great performance using screen-printed electrodes.

  20. Semi-automated scar detection in delayed enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisi, Rita; Donini, Bruno; Lanconelli, Nico; Rosengarden, James; Morgan, John; Harden, Stephen; Curzen, Nick

    2015-06-01

    Late enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance images (MRI) has the ability to precisely delineate myocardial scars. We present a semi-automated method for detecting scars in cardiac MRI. This model has the potential to improve routine clinical practice since quantification is not currently offered due to time constraints. A first segmentation step was developed for extracting the target regions for potential scar and determining pre-candidate objects. Pattern recognition methods are then applied to the segmented images in order to detect the position of the myocardial scar. The database of late gadolinium enhancement (LE) cardiac MR images consists of 111 blocks of images acquired from 63 patients at the University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust (UK). At least one scar was present for each patient, and all the scars were manually annotated by an expert. A group of images (around one third of the entire set) was used for training the system which was subsequently tested on all the remaining images. Four different classifiers were trained (Support Vector Machine (SVM), k-nearest neighbor (KNN), Bayesian and feed-forward neural network) and their performance was evaluated by using Free response Receiver Operating Characteristic (FROC) analysis. Feature selection was implemented for analyzing the importance of the various features. The segmentation method proposed allowed the region affected by the scar to be extracted correctly in 96% of the blocks of images. The SVM was shown to be the best classifier for our task, and our system reached an overall sensitivity of 80% with less than 7 false positives per patient. The method we present provides an effective tool for detection of scars on cardiac MRI. This may be of value in clinical practice by permitting routine reporting of scar quantification.

  1. Surface modification of silver nanofilms for improved perchlorate detection by surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jumin; Han, Mei-Juan; Li, Jinwei; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2012-07-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), as one of the most sensitive spectroscopic analysis methods, has been investigated extensively for the detection of environmental contaminants in recent years. In this work, we reported the new development of robust SERS substrates for rapid and sensitive sensing of aqueous perchlorate, a widespread environmental contaminant. The fabrication of the substrates consisted of two simple steps: (a) formation of Ag nanofilms on Cu and surface-roughened Cu foils (Ag/Cu and Ag/rCu nanofilms) using a controllable and inexpensive one-step electroless plating process, and (b) surface modification of the Ag nanofilms with cysteamine (Cys) self-assembly monolayer (SAM) (Cys-Ag/Cu and Cys-Ag/rCu substrates). Due to the strong affinity of -NH(3)(+) groups of the Cys molecules for perchlorate ions, the rapid SERS detection of perchlorate has been realized with a limit of detection (LOD) down to 5 μg L(-1) (ppb) for aqueous samples without need for drying. Various calibration curves with good linear relationships were obtained, indicating the quantification potential of SERS analysis of perchlorate using these new substrates. It was found that the neutral pH yielded the maximum SERS signals, and 85% of original sensitivity was remained in 5 days of storage time in the air, indicating the substrates are fairly stable. Within 10 regeneration-reuse cycles, the SERS signals of perchlorate kept in the range of 85-105% of the original value, verifying its reusability.

  2. Detection of Bacillus spores within 15 minutes by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shende, Chetan; Inscore, Frank; Huang, Hermes; Farquharson, Stuart; Sengupta, Atanu

    2012-06-01

    Since the distribution of Bacillus anthracis causing spores through the US Postal System, there has been a persistent fear that biological warfare agents (BWAs) will be used by terrorists against our military abroad and our civilians at home. Despite the substantial effort to develop BWA analyzers, they remain either too slow, produce high falsealarm rates, lack sensitivity, or cannot be fielded. Consequently there remains a need for a portable analyzer that can overcome these limitations as expressed at the 2011 Biological Weapons Convention. To meet this need we have been developing a sample system that selectively binds BWAs and produce surface-enhanced Raman (SER) spectra using portable Raman spectrometers. Here we describe the use of a short peptide ligand functionalized on silver nanoparticles to selectively capture Bacillus cereus spores (a surrogate of B. anthracis) and their subsequent detection by SER spectroscopy. This technique was used to specifically detect B. cereus spores over closely related species like B. subtilis belonging to the same genus within 15 minutes. Sensitivity of the method was demonstrated by detecting 104 B. cereus spores/mL of water. The technology, once developed should prove invaluable for rapid monitoring of BWAs, which will immensely help first responders and emergency personnel in implementing appropriate counter measures.

  3. Static magnetic field stimulation over parietal cortex enhances somatosensory detection in humans.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-López, Carmen; Soto-León, Vanesa; Céspedes, Virginia; Profice, Paolo; Strange, Bryan A; Foffani, Guglielmo; Oliviero, Antonio

    2017-03-09

    The role of neuronal oscillations in human somatosensory perception is currently unclear. To address this, here we employ non-invasive brain stimulation to artificially modulate cortical network dynamics in the context of neurophysiological and behavioral recordings. We demonstrate that transcranial static magnetic stimulation (tSMS) over the somatosensory parietal cortex increases oscillatory power specifically in the alpha range, without significantly affecting bottom-up thalamo-cortical inputs indexed by the early cortical component of somatosensory evoked potentials. Critically, we next show that parietal tSMS enhances the detection of near-threshold somatosensory stimuli. Interestingly, this behavioral improvement reflects a decrease of habituation to somatosensation. Our data therefore provide causal evidence that somatosensory perception depends on parietal alpha activity. Artificially increasing alpha power by placing a powerful magnetic field over the parietal cortex overcomes the natural decline in detection probability of a repeated near-threshold sensory stimulus.SignificanceStatement Artificially increasing alpha power by placing a powerful magnetic field over the somatosensory cortex overcomes the natural decline in detection probability of a repeated near-threshold sensory stimulus.

  4. Detection of infragenual arterial disease using noncontrast-enhanced MR angiography in patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Na; Fan, Zhaoyang; Feng, Fei; Yang, Qi; Zheng, Hairong; Liu, Pengcheng; Li, Debiao

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnostic performance of a newly developed noncontrast-enhanced MR angiography (NCE-MRA) technique using flow-sensitive dephasing (FSD) prepared steady-state free precession (SSFP) for detecting calf arterial disease in patients with diabetes. Materials and Methods Forty-five patients with diabetes who underwent routine CE-MRA of lower extremities were recruited for NCE-MRA at the calf on a 1.5T MR system. Image quality evaluated on a four-point scale and diagnostic performance for detecting more than 50% arterial stenosis were statistically analyzed, using CE-MRA as the standard of reference. Results A total of 264 calf arterial segments were obtained in the 45 patients with 88 legs. The percentage of diagnostic arterial segments was all 98% for NCE- and CE-MRA. The image quality, SNR, CNR was 3.3, 177, 138 and 3.5, 103, 99 for NCE-MRA and CE-MRA respectively. The average sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of NCE-MRA were 97%, 96%, 90%, 99%, and 96%, respectively on a per-segment basis and 90%, 84%, 82%, 91%, and 87%, respectively on a per-patients basis. Conclusion The NCE-MRA technique demonstrates adequate image quality in the delineation of calf arteries and consistent diagnostic performance for detecting significant stenosis with CE-MRA in patients with diabetes. PMID:24925770

  5. Probes for biomolecules detection based on RET-enhanced fluorescence polarization.

    PubMed

    Ren, Dahai; Wang, Jun; Wang, Bin; You, Zheng

    2016-05-15

    Fluorescent probes based on the principle of resonance energy transfer (RET) or the principle of fluorescence polarization (FP) are already used to detect biomolecules independently. However, there were no in-depth studies about the impact of RET on FP. Also, very few studies gave a comprehensive analysis on how to effectively design such a fluorescent probe. Based on the principle of resonance energy transfer (RET), we constructed fluorescent probes (SA-488-sub-nanogold) using streptavidin labeled Alexa488 (SA-488), nanogold and biotinylated substrate peptide (biotin-subpeptide). The influence of the structure and the ingredients of the substrate peptide were discussed. After SA-488 was combined with the biotin-subpeptide and the nanogold, its fluorescence intensity (FI) would be suppressed due to the energy transfer, leading to an increase in its volume and mass. The suppression of the FI led to a decrease in SA-488's effective concentration, and the increase in the volume or mass prolonged the SA-488's rotational relaxation time. Both changes increased SA-488's polarization in the solution. Therefore, the FP performance of the probe is enhanced by the RET. Using the probe, trypsin and biotin were detected by the change in both fluorescence intensity and fluorescence polarization, showing higher reliability, higher sensitivity, and a lower detection limit.

  6. Kanamycin detection based on the catalytic ability enhancement of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengke; Chen, Dan; Wang, Qingqing; Tan, Rong

    2017-05-15

    In this paper, we demonstrated that kanamycin could enhance the peroxidase-like activity of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) through two steps: the attachment of kanamycin onto AuNPs through -NH2 (on kanamycin) and -COOH (on AuNPs) interactions; and the specifically interaction between glucoside on kanamycin and AuNPs which changes the surface property of AuNPs, and produced •OH radicals and Au(3+) in the solution, and catalyzed the chromogenic reactions between 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and H2O2. Based on this principle, a novel method for kanamycin detection has been developed. This method exhibited high sensitivity and selectivity, as low as 0.1nM kanamycin could be detected with a linear range from 0.1nM to 20nM and 20nM to 300nM, respectively. This method was also successfully applied for the detection of kanamycin content in milk and meat samples.

  7. Non-invasive optical detection of HBV based on serum surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zuci; Wang, Qiwen; Weng, Cuncheng; Lin, Xueliang; Lin, Yao; Feng, Shangyuan

    2016-10-01

    An optical method of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was developed for non-invasive detection of hepatitis B surface virus (HBV). Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) is an established serological marker that is routinely used for the diagnosis of acute or chronic hepatitis B virus(HBV) infection. Utilizing SERS to analyze blood serum for detecting HBV has not been reported in previous literature. SERS measurements were performed on two groups of serum samples: one group for 50 HBV patients and the other group for 50 healthy volunteers. Blood serum samples are collected from healthy control subjects and patients diagnosed with HBV. Furthermore, principal components analysis (PCA) combined with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were employed to differentiate HBV patients from healthy volunteer and achieved sensitivity of 80.0% and specificity of 74.0%. This exploratory work demonstrates that SERS serum analysis combined with PCA-LDA has tremendous potential for the non-invasive detection of HBV.

  8. Detection of toxic industrial chemicals in water supplies using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Kevin M.; Sylvia, James M.; Spencer, Sarah A.; Clauson, Susan L.

    2010-04-01

    An effective method to create fear in the populace is to endanger the water supply. Homeland Security places significant importance on ensuring drinking water integrity. Beyond terrorism, accidental supply contamination from a spill or chemical residual increases is a concern. A prominent class of toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) is pesticides, which are prevalent in agricultural use and can be very toxic in minute concentrations. Detection of TICs or warfare agents must be aggressive; the contaminant needs to be rapidly detected and identified to enable isolation and remediation of the contaminated water while continuing a clean water supply for the population. Awaiting laboratory analysis is unacceptable as delay in identification and remediation increases the likelihood of infection. Therefore, a portable or online water quality sensor is required that can produce rapid results. In this presentation, Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) is discussed as a viable fieldable sensor that can be immersed directly into the water supply and can provide results in <5 minutes from the time the instrument is turned on until analysis is complete. The ability of SERS to detect several chemical warfare agent degradation products, simulants and toxic industrial chemicals in distilled water, tap water and untreated water will be shown. In addition, results for chemical warfare agent degradation products and simulants will be presented. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves will also be presented.

  9. Rapid detection of copper chlorophyll in vegetable oils based on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lian, Wei-Nan; Shiue, Jessie; Wang, Huai-Hsien; Hong, Wei-Chen; Shih, Po-Han; Hsu, Chao-Kai; Huang, Ching-Yi; Hsing, Cheng-Rong; Wei, Ching-Ming; Wang, Juen-Kai; Wang, Yuh-Lin

    2015-01-01

    The addition of copper chlorophyll and its derivatives (Cu-Chl) to vegetable oils to disguise them as more expensive oils, such as virgin olive oils, would not only create public confusion, but also disturb the olive oil market. Given that existing detection methods of Ch-Chl in oils, such as LC-MS are costly and time consuming, it is imperative to develop economical and fast analytical techniques to provide information quickly. This paper demonstrates a rapid analytical method based on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to detect Cu-Chl in vegetable oils; the spectroscopic markers of Cu-Chl are presented and a detection limit of 5 mg kg(-1) is demonstrated. The analysis of a series of commercial vegetable oils is undertaken with this method and the results verified by a government agency. This study shows that a SERS-based assessment method holds high potential for quickly pinpointing the addition of minute amounts of Cu-Chl in vegetable oils.

  10. A rapid detection method of Escherichia coli by surface enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Feifei; Peng, Yankun; Xu, Tianfeng

    2015-05-01

    Conventional microbiological detection and enumeration methods are time-consuming, labor-intensive, and giving retrospective information. The objectives of the present work are to study the capability of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) to detect Escherichia coli (E. coli) using the presented silver colloidal substrate. The obtained results showed that the adaptive iteratively reweighed Penalized Least Squares (airPLS) algorithm could effectively remove the fluorescent background from original Raman spectra, and Raman characteristic peaks of 558, 682, 726, 1128, 1210 and 1328 cm-1 could be observed stably in the baseline corrected SERS spectra of all studied bacterial concentrations. The detection limit of SERS could be determined to be as low as 0.73 log CFU/ml for E. coli with the prepared silver colloidal substrate. The quantitative prediction results using the intensity values of characteristic peaks were not good, with the correlation coefficients of calibration set and cross validation set of 0.99 and 0.64, respectively.

  11. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Based Nonfluorescent Probe for Multiplex DNA Detection

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lan; Yu, Chenxu; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    To provide rapid and accurate detection of DNA markers in a straightforward, inexpensive and multiplex format, an alternative surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) based probe was designed and fabricated to covalently attach both DNA probing sequence and non-fluorescent Raman tags to the surface of gold nanoparticles (DNA-AuP-RTag). The intensity of Raman signal of the probes could be controlled through the surface coverage of the non-fluorescent Raman tags (RTags). Detection sensitivity of these probes could be optimized by fine-tuning the amount of DNA molecules and RTags on the probes. Long-term stability of the DNA-AuP-RTag probes was found to be good (over 3 months). Excellent multiplexing capability of the DNA-AuP-RTag scheme was demonstrated by simultaneous identification of up to eight probes in a mixture. Detection of hybridization of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to its complementary targets was successfully accomplished with a long-term goal to use non-fluorescent RTags in a Raman-based DNA microarray platform. PMID:17465531

  12. Enhanced codebook algorithm for fast moving object detection from dynamic background using scene visual perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousse, Mikaël A.; Motamed, Cina; Ezin, Eugène C.

    2016-11-01

    The detection of moving objects in a video sequence is the first step in an automatic video surveillance system. This work proposes an enhancement of a codebook-based algorithm for moving objects extraction. The proposed algorithm used a perceptual-based approach to optimize foreground information extraction complexity by using a modified codebook algorithm. The purpose of the adaptive strategy is to reduce the computational complexity of the foreground detection algorithm while maintaining its global accuracy. In this algorithm, we use a superpixels segmentation approach to model the spatial dependencies between pixels. The processing of the superpixels is controlled to focus it on the superpixels that are near to the possible location of foreground objects. The performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated and compared to other algorithms of the state of the art using a public dataset that proposes sequences with a dynamic background. Experimental results prove that the proposed algorithm obtained the best the frame processing rate during the foreground detection.

  13. Improved coded exposure for enhancing imaging quality and detection accuracy of moving targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Baoqi; Chen, Li; Han, Lin; Shen, Weimin

    2016-09-01

    The blur due to the rapidly relative motion between scene and camera during exposure has the well-known influence on the quality of acquired image and then target detection. An improved coded exposure is introduced in this paper to remove the image blur and obtain high quality image, so that the test accuracy of the surface defect and edge contour of motion objects can be enhanced. The improved exposure method takes advantage of code look-up table to control exposure process and image restoration. The restored images have higher Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR) and Structure SIMilarity (SSIM) than traditional deblur algorithm such as Wiener and regularization filter methods. The edge contour and defect of part samples, which move at constant speed relative to the industry camera used in our experiment, are detected with Sobel operator from the restored images. Experimental results verify that the improved coded exposure is better suitable for imaging moving object and detecting moving target than the traditional.

  14. A nanosensor for TNT detection based on molecularly imprinted polymers and surface enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Holthoff, Ellen L; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N; Hankus, Mikella E

    2011-01-01

    We report on a new sensor strategy that integrates molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The sensor was developed to detect the explosive, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). Micron thick films of sol gel-derived xerogels were deposited on a SERS-active surface as the sensing layer. Xerogels were molecularly imprinted for TNT using non-covalent interactions with the polymer matrix. Binding of the TNT within the polymer matrix results in unique SERS bands, which allow for detection and identification of the molecule in the MIP. This MIP-SERS sensor exhibits an apparent dissociation constant of (2.3 ± 0.3) × 10(-5) M for TNT and a 3 μM detection limit. The response to TNT is reversible and the sensor is stable for at least 6 months. Key challenges, including developing a MIP formulation that is stable and integrated with the SERS substrate, and ensuring the MIP does not mask the spectral features of the target analyte through SERS polymer background, were successfully met. The results also suggest the MIP-SERS protocol can be extended to other target analytes of interest.

  15. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of multiple viral antigens using magnetic capture of SERS-active nanoparticles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A highly sensitive immunoassay based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy has been developed for multiplex detection of surface envelope and capsid antigens of the viral zoonotic pathogens West Nile virus (WNV) and Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV). Detection was mediated by antibo...

  16. DOE standard: Radiological control

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ``Occupational Radiation Protection``. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835.

  17. Coherence based contrast enhancement in x-ray radiography with a photoelectron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwu, Y.; Lai, B.; Mancini, D. C.; Je, J. H.; Noh, D. Y.; Bertolo, M.; Tromba, G.; Margaritondo, G.

    1999-10-01

    We show that a photoelectron spectromicroscope of the photoelectron emission microscope type can be used as an x-ray imaging detector for radiology. Using high penetration hard-x-ray photons (wavelength <0.1 nm), samples as thick as a few millimeters can be imaged with submicron resolution. The high imaging resolution enables us to substantially decrease the object-detector distance needed to observe coherent based contrast enhancement with respect to the standard film-based detection technique. Our result implies several advantages, the most important being a marked reduction of the required source emittance for contrast enhanced radiology.

  18. Enhanced Ratio of Signals Enables Digital Mutation Scanning for Rare Allele Detection

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos-Rizaldos, Elena; Paweletz, Cloud; Song, Chen; Oxnard, Geoffrey R.; Mamon, Harvey; Jänne, Pasi A.; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike

    2016-01-01

    The use of droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) for low-level DNA mutation detection in cancer, prenatal diagnosis, and infectious diseases is growing rapidly. However, although ddPCR has been implemented successfully for detection of rare mutations at pre-determined positions, no ddPCR adaptation for mutation scanning exists. Yet, frequently, clinically relevant mutations reside on multiple sequence positions in tumor suppressor genes or complex hotspot mutations in oncogenes. Here, we describe a combination of coamplification at lower denaturation temperature PCR (COLD-PCR) with ddPCR that enables digital mutation scanning within approximately 50-bp sections of a target amplicon. Two FAM/HEX-labeled hydrolysis probes matching the wild-type sequence are used during ddPCR. The ratio of FAM/HEX-positive droplets is constant when wild-type amplicons are amplified but deviates when mutations anywhere under the FAM or HEX probes are present. To enhance the change in FAM/HEX ratio, we employed COLD-PCR cycling conditions that enrich mutation-containing amplicons anywhere on the sequence. We validated COLD-ddPCR on multiple mutations in TP53 and in EGFR using serial mutation dilutions and cell-free circulating DNA samples, and demonstrate detection down to approximately 0.2% to 1.2% mutation abundance. COLD-ddPCR enables a simple, rapid, and robust two-fluorophore detection method for the identification of multiple mutations during ddPCR and potentially can identify unknown DNA variants present in the target sequence. PMID:25772705

  19. Multiple-pulse pumping for enhanced fluorescence detection and molecular imaging in tissue.

    PubMed

    Rich, Ryan M; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Fudala, Rafal; Borejdo, Julian; Stankowska, Dorota L; Krishnamoorthy, Raghu R; Raut, Sangram; Maliwal, Badri P; Shumilov, Dmytro; Doan, Hung; Gryczynski, Zygmunt

    2014-03-15

    Applications of fluorescence based imaging techniques for detection in cellular and tissue environments are severely limited by autofluorescence of endogenous components of cells, tissue, and the fixatives used in sample processing. To achieve sufficient signal-to-background ratio, a high concentration of the probe needs to be used which is not always feasible. Since typically autofluorescence is in the nanosecond range, long-lived fluorescence probes in combination with time-gated detection can be used for suppression of unwanted autofluorescence. Unfortunately, this requires the sacrifice of the large portion the probe signal in order to sufficiently filter the background. We report a simple and practical approach to achieve a many-fold increase in the intensity of a long-lived probe without increasing the background fluorescence. Using controllable, well separated bursts of closely spaced laser excitation pulses, we are able to highly increase the fluorescence signal of a long-lived marker over the endogenous fluorescent background and scattering, thereby greatly increasing detection sensitivity. Using a commercially available confocal microscopy system equipped with a laser diode and time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) detection, we are able to enhance the signal of a long-lived Ruthenium (Ru)-based probe by nearly an order of magnitude. We used 80 MHz bursts of pulses (12.5 ns pulse separation) repeated with a 320 kHz repetition rate as needed to adequately image a dye with a 380 ns lifetime. Just using 10 pulses in the burst increases the Ru signal almost 10-fold without any increase in the background signal.

  20. Carbon nanoparticle-enhanced immunoelectrochemical detection for protein tumor marker with cadmium sulfide biotracers.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ja-an Annie; Lin, Yeh-Chun; Wang, Li-Sheng; Hwang, Kuo-Chu; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2009-02-15

    We have developed a sensitive electrochemical immunoassay system for the detection of a protein tumor marker, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), that is based on a carbon nanoparticle (CNP)/poly(ethylene imine) (PEI)-modified screen-printed graphite electrode (CNP-PEI/SPGE) covered with anti-CEA antibodies. The signal amplification strategy--using CdS nanocrystals as biotracers and CNPs to enhance electron transfer--improves the sensitivity and detection limit for CEA, suggesting that this system holds promise for development into a point-of-care or disposable home-care self-diagnostic tool. This biosensor is based on a sandwich complex immunoassay, which we assembled from sequential layers of the anti-CEA antibody (alphaCEA) on CNP-PEI/SPGE, the CEA sample, and the CdS nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) sensitized with alphaCEA (alphaCEA-CdS QD). We used square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) to amplify the signal current response obtained from the dissolved alphaCEA-CdS QDs. The calibration curve for CEA concentration was linear in the range of 0.032-10 ng/mL; the detection limit (estimated as the mean of the blank sample plus three times the standard deviation obtained on the blank sample) was 32 pg/mL (equivalent to 160 fg in a 5 microL sample). This method is suitably precise and sensitive to function as a means of determining urinary CEA, which is a better marker than serum CEA for the early detection of urothelial carcinoma.

  1. Detection range enhancement using circularly polarized light in scattering environments for infrared wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    van der Laan, J. D.; Scrymgeour, D. A.; Kemme, S. A.; Dereniak, E. L.

    2015-03-13

    We find for infrared wavelengths there are broad ranges of particle sizes and refractive indices that represent fog and rain where the use of circular polarization can persist to longer ranges than linear polarization. Using polarization tracking Monte Carlo simulations for varying particle size, wavelength, and refractive index, we show that for specific scene parameters circular polarization outperforms linear polarization in maintaining the intended polarization state for large optical depths. This enhancement with circular polarization can be exploited to improve range and target detection in obscurant environments that are important in many critical sensing applications. Specifically, circular polarization persists better than linear for radiation fog in the short-wave infrared, for advection fog in the short-wave infrared and the long-wave infrared, and large particle sizes of Sahara dust around the 4 micron wavelength.

  2. Microshell Arrays Enhanced Sensitivity in Detection of Specific Antibody for Reduced Graphene Oxide Optical Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wen-Shuai; Xin, Wei; Chen, Shao-Nan; Li, Cun-Bo; Gao, Xiao-Guang; Pan, Lei-Ting; Liu, Zhi-Bo; Tian, Jian-Guo

    2017-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play an important role in the investigation of biomolecules. In this paper, we reported on the use of a reduced graphene oxide microshell (RGOM)-based optical biosensor for the determination of goat anti-rabbit IgG. The biosensor was prepared through a self-assembly of monolayers of monodisperse polystyrene microspheres, combined with a high-temperature reduction, in order to decorate the RGOM with rabbit IgG. The periodic microshells allowed a simpler functionalization and modification of RGOM with bioreceptor units, than reduced graphene oxide (RGO). With additional antibody-antigen binding, the RGOM-based biosensor achieved better real-time and label-free detection. The RGOM-based biosensor presented a more satisfactory response to goat anti-rabbit IgG than the RGO-based biosensor. This method is promising for immobilizing biomolecules on graphene surfaces and for the fabrication of biosensors with enhanced sensitivity. PMID:28125011

  3. Detection and quantification of dithiocarbamate pesticides by Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saute, Benjamin Calvin

    Dithiocarbamates are a subclass of carbamate pesticides that are widely used as insecticidal agents on food crops in the US and abroad. Quantitative determination of trace quantities of dithiocarbamates is necessary in order to mitigate potential human exposure via pesticide residues left on inadequately washed food items as well as groundwater contamination from agricultural runoff. The focus of this research is on the development and optimization of a Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) based analytical technique for the quantitative determination of trace amounts of dithiocarbamate pesticides in different matrices. Gold nanoparticles of different shapes and sizes will be investigated to determine the suitability of these materials as SERS active substrates for the trace analysis of dithiocarbamate pesticides. Analytical sensitivity will be evaluated by determining the limits of detection using established statistical methods.

  4. Awareness and Detection of Traffic and Obstacles Using Synthetic and Enhanced Vision Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Randall E.

    2012-01-01

    Research literature are reviewed and summarized to evaluate the awareness and detection of traffic and obstacles when using Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) and Enhanced Vision Systems (EVS). The study identifies the critical issues influencing the time required, accuracy, and pilot workload associated with recognizing and reacting to potential collisions or conflicts with other aircraft, vehicles and obstructions during approach, landing, and surface operations. This work considers the effect of head-down display and head-up display implementations of SVS and EVS as well as the influence of single and dual pilot operations. The influences and strategies of adding traffic information and cockpit alerting with SVS and EVS were also included. Based on this review, a knowledge gap assessment was made with recommendations for ground and flight testing to fill these gaps and hence, promote the safe and effective implementation of SVS/EVS technologies for the Next Generation Air Transportation System

  5. Detection of mast cell secretion by using surface enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juan; Li, Ren; Zheng, Liqin; Wang, Yuhua; Xie, Shusen; Lin, Juqiang

    2016-10-01

    Acupuncture can cause a remarkable increase in degranulation of the mast cells, which has attracted the interest of researchers since the 1980s. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) could obtain biochemical information with high sensitivity and specificity. In this study, SERS was used to detect the degree of degranulation of mast cells according to different incubate time. Mast cells was incubated with culture medium for 0 h, 12 h and 24 h, then centrifuge the culture medium, decant the supernatant, and discard the mast cell. SERS was performed to obtain the biochemical fingerprinting signatures of the centrifuged medium. The spectra data are then analyzed by spectral peaks attribution and the principal component analysis (PCA). The measured Raman spectra of the two groups were separated well by PCA. It indicated that mast cells had secreted some substances into cultured medium though degranulation did not happen.

  6. Spectral analysis of human saliva for detection of lung cancer using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Yang, Tianyue; Lin, Junxiu

    2012-03-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been shown to be able to detect low-concentration biofluids. Saliva SERS readings of 21 lung cancer patients and 20 normal people were measured and differentiated. Most of the Raman peak intensities decrease for lung cancer patients compared with that of normal people. Those peaks were assigned to proteins and nucleic acids, which indicate a corresponding decrease of those substances in saliva. Principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were used to reduce and discriminate between the two groups of data, and the study resulted in accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity being 80%, 78%, and 83%, respectively. In conclusion, SERS of saliva showed the ability to predict lung cancer in our experiment.

  7. Method and apparatus of spectro-acoustically enhanced ultrasonic detection for diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Norton, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting a discontinuity in a material includes a source of electromagnetic radiation has a wavelength and an intensity sufficient to induce an enhancement in contrast between a manifestation of an acoustic property in the material and of the acoustic property in the discontinuity, as compared to when the material is not irradiated by the electromagnetic radiation. An acoustic emitter directs acoustic waves to the discontinuity in the material. The acoustic waves have a sensitivity to the acoustic property. An acoustic receiver receives the acoustic waves generated by the acoustic emitter after the acoustic waves have interacted with the material and the discontinuity. The acoustic receiver also generates a signal representative of the acoustic waves received by the acoustic receiver. A processor, in communication with the acoustic receiver and responsive to the signal generated by the acoustic receiver, is programmed to generate informational output about the discontinuity based on the signal generated by the acoustic receiver.

  8. Detection range enhancement using circularly polarized light in scattering environments for infrared wavelengths

    DOE PAGES

    van der Laan, J. D.; Sandia National Lab.; Scrymgeour, D. A.; ...

    2015-03-13

    We find for infrared wavelengths there are broad ranges of particle sizes and refractive indices that represent fog and rain where the use of circular polarization can persist to longer ranges than linear polarization. Using polarization tracking Monte Carlo simulations for varying particle size, wavelength, and refractive index, we show that for specific scene parameters circular polarization outperforms linear polarization in maintaining the intended polarization state for large optical depths. This enhancement with circular polarization can be exploited to improve range and target detection in obscurant environments that are important in many critical sensing applications. Specifically, circular polarization persists bettermore » than linear for radiation fog in the short-wave infrared, for advection fog in the short-wave infrared and the long-wave infrared, and large particle sizes of Sahara dust around the 4 micron wavelength.« less

  9. Quantitative carbon detector for enhanced detection of molecules in foods, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, flavors, and fuels.

    PubMed

    Beach, Connor A; Krumm, Christoph; Spanjers, Charles S; Maduskar, Saurabh; Jones, Andrew J; Dauenhauer, Paul J

    2016-03-07

    Analysis of trace compounds, such as pesticides and other contaminants, within consumer products, fuels, and the environment requires quantification of increasingly complex mixtures of difficult-to-quantify compounds. Many compounds of interest are non-volatile and exhibit poor response in current gas chromatography and flame ionization systems. Here we show the reaction of trimethylsilylated chemical analytes to methane using a quantitative carbon detector (QCD; the Polyarc™ reactor) within a gas chromatograph (GC), thereby enabling enhanced detection (up to 10×) of highly functionalized compounds including carbohydrates, acids, drugs, flavorants, and pesticides. Analysis of a complex mixture of compounds shows that the GC-QCD method exhibits faster and more accurate analysis of complex mixtures commonly encountered in everyday products and the environment.

  10. Unsupervised video-based lane detection using location-enhanced topic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Boliang; El-Sheimy, Naser

    2010-10-01

    An unsupervised learning algorithm based on topic models is presented for lane detection in video sequences observed by uncalibrated moving cameras. Our contributions are twofold. First, we introduce the maximally stable extremal region (MSER) detector for lane-marking feature extraction and derive a novel shape descriptor in an affine invariant manner to describe region shapes and a modified scale-invariant feature transform descriptor to capture feature appearance characteristics. MSER features are more stable compared to edge points or line pairs and hence provide robustness to lane-marking variations in scale, lighting, viewpoint, and shadows. Second, we proposed a novel location-enhanced probabilistic latent semantic analysis (pLSA) topic model for simultaneous lane recognition and localization. The proposed model overcomes the limitation of a pLSA model for effective topic localization. Experimental results on traffic sequences in various scenarios demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method.

  11. Multifunctional ZnO/Ag nanorod array as highly sensitive substrate for surface enhanced Raman detection.

    PubMed

    Shan, Guiye; Zheng, Shujing; Chen, Shaopeng; Chen, Yanwei; Liu, Yichun

    2012-06-01

    A multifunctional ZnO/Ag nanorod arrays has been prepared to construct SERS-active and photocatalytic substrate by a hydrothermal method. The morphology, microstructure and optical properties of ZnO/Ag nanorod arrays are characterized by X-ray diffraction spectra, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption and photoluminescence measurement to confirm the successful Ag deposition on the ZnO nanorod arrays. Such arrays exhibit strong and reproducible SERS signals of the Raman probe molecules. The mechanism of SERS enhancement was discussed due to the formation of interfacial electric field between ZnO nanorods and Ag. Furthermore, ZnO/Ag nanorod arrays also show catalytic properties by photocatalytic degradation of target molecules adsorbed to the substrate, which provides promising application for detecting and eliminating organic pollutant.

  12. ON THE ENHANCED CORONAL MASS EJECTION DETECTION RATE SINCE THE SOLAR CYCLE 23 POLAR FIELD REVERSAL

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, G. J. D.

    2015-10-10

    Compared to cycle 23, coronal mass ejections (CMEs) with angular widths >30° have been observed to occur at a higher rate during solar cycle 24, per sunspot number. This result is supported by data from three independent databases constructed using Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment coronagraph images, two employing automated detection techniques and one compiled manually by human observers. According to the two databases that cover a larger field of view, the enhanced CME rate actually began shortly after the cycle 23 polar field reversal, in 2004, when the polar fields returned with a 40% reduction in strength and the interplanetary radial magnetic field became ≈30% weaker. This result is consistent with the link between anomalous CME expansion and the heliospheric total pressure decrease recently reported by Gopalswamy et al.

  13. Highly reproducible surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate for detection of phenolic pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhiqiang; Tang, Dan; Liu, Liwei; Wang, Yin; Zhou, Qingwei; Su, Shaoqiang; Hu, Die; Han, Bing; Jin, Mingliang; Ao, Xianyu; Zhan, Runze; Gao, Xingsen; Lu, Xubing; Zhou, Guofu; Senz, Stephan; Zhang, Zhang; Liu, Junming

    2016-11-01

    The ordering degree of nanostructures is the key to determining the uniformity of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). However, fabrication of large-area ordered nanostructures remains a challenge, especially with the ultrahigh-density (>1010 cm-2). Here, we report a fabrication of large-area ultrahigh-density ordered Ag@Al2O3/Ag core-shell nanosphere (NS) arrays with tunable nanostructures. The ultrahigh-density (2.8 × 1010 cm-2) ordered NS arrays over a large-area capability (diameter >4.0 cm) enable the uniform SERS signals with the relative standard deviation of less than 5%. The as-fabricated highly reproducible SERS substrate can be applied to detect trace phenolic pollutants in water. This work does not only provide a new route for synthesizing the ultrahigh-density ordered nanostructures, but also create a new class of SERS substrates with high sensitivity and excellent reproducibility.

  14. Carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide composites as SPR biosensors with enhanced sensitivity for immunoaffinity detection.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Nan-Fu; Fan, Shi-Yuan; Yang, Cheng-Du; Huang, Teng-Yi

    2017-03-15

    This work demonstrates the excellent potential of carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide (GO-COOH) composites to form biocompatible surfaces on sensing films for use in surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based immunoaffinity biosensors. Carboxyl-functionalization of graphene carbon can modulate its visible spectrum, and can therefore be used to improve and control the plasmonic coupling mechanism. The binding properties of the molecules between a sensing film and a protein were elucidated at various flow rates of those molecules. The bio-specific binding interaction among the molecules was investigated by performing an antigen and antibody affinity immunoassay. The results thus obtained revealed that the overall affinity binding value, KA, of the Au/GO-COOH chip can be significantly enhanced by up to ∼5.15 times that of the Au/GO chip. With respect to the shifts of the SPR angles of the chips, the affinity immunoassay interaction at a BSA concentration of 1μg/ml for an Au/GO-COOH chip, an Au/GO chip and a traditional SPR chip are 35.5m°, 9.128m° and 8.816m°, respectively. The enhancement of the antigen-antibody interaction of the Au/GO-COOH chip cause this chip to become four times as sensitive to the SPR angle shift and to have the lowest antibody detection limit of 0.01pg/ml. These results indicate the potential of the chip in detecting specific proteins, and the development of real-time in vivo blood analysis and diagnosis based on cancer tumor markers.

  15. Enhanced detection of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus by pretreatment of cell monolayers with polyethylene glycol

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Batts, W.N.; Winton, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    To improve quantification of very low levels of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in samples of tissue, ovarian fluid, or natural water supplies, we tested the ability of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to enhance the sensitivity and speed of the plaque assay system. We compared 4, 7, and 10% solutions of PEG of molecular weight 6,000, 8,000, or 20,000 applied at selected volumes and for various durations. When cell monolayers of epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC), fathead minnow (FHM), chinook salmon embryo (CHSE-214), and bluegill fry (BF2) were pretreated with 7% PEG-20,000, they produced 4-17-fold increases in plaque assay titers of IHNV. The plaque assay titers of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, chum salmon reovirus, and chinook salmon paramyxovirus were also enhanced by exposure of CHSE-214 cells to PEG, but the titers of infectious pancreatic necrosis virus and Oncorhynchus masou virus were not substantially changed. Plaques formed by IHNV on PEG-treated EPC cells incubated at 15°C had a larger mean diameter at 6 d than those on control cells at 8 d; this suggests the assay could be shortened by use of PEG. Pretreatment of EPC cell monolayers with PEG enabled detection of IHNV in some samples that appeared negative with untreated cells. For example, when ovarian fluid samples from chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha were inoculated onto untreated monolayers of EPC cells, IHNV was detected in only 11 of 51 samples; 17 of the samples were positive when PEG-treated EPC cells were used.PDF

  16. Nasopharyngeal cancer detection based on blood plasma surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shangyuan; Chen, Rong; Lin, Juqiang; Pan, Jianji; Chen, Guannan; Li, Yongzeng; Cheng, Min; Huang, Zufang; Chen, Jiesi; Zeng, Haishan

    2010-07-15

    A surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) method was developed for blood plasma biochemical analysis for the first time with the aim to develop a simple blood test for non-invasive nasopharyngeal cancer detection. Silver nanoparticles (Ag NP) as the SERS-active nanostructures were directly mixed with blood plasma to enhance the Raman scattering signals of various biomolecular constituents such as proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. High quality SERS spectrum from blood plasma-Ag NP mixture can be obtained within 10s using a Renishaw micro-Raman system. SERS measurements were performed on two groups of blood plasma samples: one group from patients (n=43) with pathologically confirmed nasopharyngeal carcinomas (WHO type I, II, and III) and the other group from healthy volunteers (control subjects, n=33). Tentative assignments of the Raman bands in the measured SERS spectra suggest interesting cancer specific biomolecular differences, including an increase in the relative amounts of nucleic acid, collagen, phospholipids and phenylalanine and a decrease in the percentage of amino acids and saccharide contents in the blood plasma of nasopharyngeal cancer patients as compared to that of healthy subjects. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the measured SERS spectra separated the spectral features of the two groups into two distinct clusters with little overlaps. Linear discriminate analysis (LDA) based on the PCA generated features differentiated the nasopharyngeal cancer SERS spectra from normal SERS spectra with high sensitivity (90.7%) and specificity (100%). The results from this exploratory study demonstrated great potentials for developing SERS blood plasma analysis into a novel clinical tool for non-invasive detection of nasopharyngeal cancers.

  17. Enhanced photoelectric detection of NV magnetic resonances in diamond under dual-beam excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, E.; Londero, E.; Buczak, K.; Hruby, J.; Gulka, M.; Balasubramaniam, Y.; Wachter, G.; Stursa, J.; Dobes, K.; Aumayr, F.; Trupke, M.; Gali, A.; Nesladek, M.

    2017-01-01

    The core issue for the implementation of NV center qubit technology is a sensitive readout of the NV spin state. We present here a detailed theoretical and experimental study of NV center photoionization processes, used as a basis for the design of a dual-beam photoelectric method for the detection of NV magnetic resonances (PDMR). This scheme, based on NV one-photon ionization, is significantly more efficient than the previously reported single-beam excitation scheme. We demonstrate this technique on small ensembles of ˜10 shallow NVs implanted in electronic grade diamond (a relevant material for quantum technology), on which we achieve a cw magnetic resonance contrast of 9%—three times enhanced compared to previous work. The dual-beam PDMR scheme allows independent control of the photoionization rate and spin magnetic resonance contrast. Under a similar excitation, we obtain a significantly higher photocurrent, and thus an improved signal-to-noise ratio, compared to single-beam PDMR. Finally, this scheme is predicted to enhance magnetic resonance contrast in the case of samples with a high proportion of substitutional nitrogen defects, and could therefore enable the photoelectric readout of single NV spins.

  18. Design Enhancements of the Fourier Kelvin Stellar Interferometer to Enable Detection of Earth Twins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Richard K.; Danchi, William C.; Lopez, Bruno; Rinehart, Stephan; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Beust, Herve; Bonfils, Xavier; Borde, Pascal; Kern, Pierre; Leger, Alain; Monin, Jean-Louis; Mourard, Denis; Ollivier, Marc; Petrov, Roman; Vakhili, Farrokh

    2009-01-01

    During the last few years, considerable effort has been directed towards very large-scale (> $5 billion) missions to detect and characterize Mars-radius to Earth-radius planets around nearby stars; such as the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer and Darwin missions. However, technological issues such as formation flying and control of systematic noise sources will likely prevent these missions from entering Phase A until at least the end of the next decade. Presently more than 350 planets have been discovered by a variety of techniques, and little is known about the majority of them other than their approximate mass. However, a simplified nulling interferometer operating in the near- to mid-infrared (e.g. approx. 5-15 microns), like the enhanced version of the Fourier Kelvin Stellar Interferometer (FKSI), can characterize the atmospheres of a large sample of the known planets - including Earth twins. Many other scientific problems can be addressed with a system like FKSI, including the studies of debris disks, active galactic nuclei, and low mass companions around nearby stars. We report results of a recent engineering study on an enhanced version of FKSI that includes 1-meter primary mirrors, 20-meter boom length, and an advanced sun shield that will provide a 45-degree FOR and 40K operating temperature for all optics including siderostats.

  19. Advanced signal processing method for ground penetrating radar feature detection and enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Venkatachalam, Anbu Selvam; Huston, Dryver; Xia, Tian

    2014-03-01

    This paper focuses on new signal processing algorithms customized for an air coupled Ultra-Wideband (UWB) Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) system targeting highway pavements and bridge deck inspections. The GPR hardware consists of a high-voltage pulse generator, a high speed 8 GSps real time data acquisition unit, and a customized field-programmable gate array (FPGA) control element. In comparison to most existing GPR system with low survey speeds, this system can survey at normal highway speed (60 mph) with a high horizontal resolution of up to 10 scans per centimeter. Due to the complexity and uncertainty of subsurface media, the GPR signal processing is important but challenging. In this GPR system, an adaptive GPR signal processing algorithm using Curvelet Transform, 2D high pass filtering and exponential scaling is proposed to alleviate noise and clutter while the subsurface features are preserved and enhanced. First, Curvelet Transform is used to remove the environmental and systematic noises while maintain the range resolution of the B-Scan image. Then, mathematical models for cylinder-shaped object and clutter are built. A two-dimension (2D) filter based on these models removes clutter and enhances the hyperbola feature in a B-Scan image. Finally, an exponential scaling method is applied to compensate the signal attenuation in subsurface materials and to improve the desired signal feature. For performance test and validation, rebar detection experiments and subsurface feature inspection in laboratory and field configurations are performed.

  20. Multiplexed detection of serological cancer markers with plasmon-enhanced Raman spectro-immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Kang, Jeon Woong; Sukumar, Saraswati; Dasari, Ramachandra Rao; Barman, Ishan

    2015-07-01

    Circulating biomarkers have emerged as promising non-invasive, real-time surrogates for cancer diagnosis, prognostication and monitoring of therapeutic response. Emerging data, however, suggest that single markers are inadequate in describing complex pathologic transformations. Architecting assays capable of parallel measurements of multiple biomarkers can help achieve the desired clinical sensitivity and specificity while conserving patient specimen and reducing turn-around time. Here we describe a plasmon-enhanced Raman spectroscopic assay featuring nanostructured biomolecular probes and spectroscopic imaging for multiplexed detection of disseminated breast cancer markers cancer antigen (CA) 15-3, CA 27-29 and cancer embryonic antigen (CEA). In the developed SERS assay, both the assay chip and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) tags are functionalized with monoclonal antibodies against CA15-3, CA27-29 and CEA, respectively. Sequential addition of biomarkers and functionalized SERS tags onto the functionalized assay chip enable the specific recognition of these biomarkers through the antibody-antigen interactions, leading to a sandwich spectro-immunoassay. In addition to offering extensive multiplexing capability, our method provides higher sensitivity than conventional immunoassays and demonstrates exquisite specificity owing to selective formation of conjugated complexes and fingerprint spectra of the Raman reporter. We envision that clinical translation of this assay may further enable asymptomatic surveillance of cancer survivors and speedy assessment of treatment benefit through a simple blood test.

  1. Workflow management systems in radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendler, Thomas; Meetz, Kirsten; Schmidt, Joachim

    1998-07-01

    In a situation of shrinking health care budgets, increasing cost pressure and growing demands to increase the efficiency and the quality of medical services, health care enterprises are forced to optimize or complete re-design their processes. Although information technology is agreed to potentially contribute to cost reduction and efficiency improvement, the real success factors are the re-definition and automation of processes: Business Process Re-engineering and Workflow Management. In this paper we discuss architectures for the use of workflow management systems in radiology. We propose to move forward from information systems in radiology (RIS, PACS) to Radiology Management Systems, in which workflow functionality (process definitions and process automation) is implemented through autonomous workflow management systems (WfMS). In a workflow oriented architecture, an autonomous workflow enactment service communicates with workflow client applications via standardized interfaces. In this paper, we discuss the need for and the benefits of such an approach. The separation of workflow management system and application systems is emphasized, and the consequences that arise for the architecture of workflow oriented information systems. This includes an appropriate workflow terminology, and the definition of standard interfaces for workflow aware application systems. Workflow studies in various institutions have shown that most of the processes in radiology are well structured and suited for a workflow management approach. Numerous commercially available Workflow Management Systems (WfMS) were investigated, and some of them, which are process- oriented and application independent, appear suitable for use in radiology.

  2. Radiological Work Planning and Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    KURTZ, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Each facility is tasked with maintaining personnel radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). A continued effort is required to meet this goal by developing and implementing improvements to technical work documents (TWDs) and work performance. A review of selected TWDs from most facilities shows there is a need to incorporate more radiological control requirements into the TWD. The Radioactive Work Permit (RWP) provides a mechanism to place some of the requirements but does not provide all the information needed by the worker as he/she is accomplishing the steps of the TWD. Requiring the engineers, planners and procedure writers to put the radiological control requirements in the work steps would be very easy if all personnel had a strong background in radiological work planning and radiological controls. Unfortunately, many of these personnel do not have the background necessary to include these requirements without assistance by the Radiological Control organization at each facility. In addition, there seems to be confusion as to what should be and what should not be included in the TWD.

  3. [Rapid detection of 6-benzylaminopurine residues in sprout beans by surface-enhanced raman spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Zheng, Da-wei; Liu, Jing; Zhong, Ru-gang; Liu, Chun-wei; Guo, Xun; Wang, Hong

    2012-05-01

    New method for rapid and quantitative analysis of 6-benzylaminopurine (6-BA) residues in sprout beans was studied by using FAST-SPE and portable surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). With homemade sprout bean samples as blank control, 6-BA solutions extracted from inserted-treatment samples showed typical characteristic Raman peaks at 1002 cm(-1) tested by SERS, and normalized 1002 cm(-1) intensities had a good linear relationship with gradient concentrations of 6-BA insert-standard solutions. The high concentration linear range was 0.5-14 microg x mL(-1), and the low one was 0. 1-2 microg x mL(-1). The quantitative detection limit was down to 0.02 mg x kg(-1) that was below the maximum allowable residues (MAL) of 0. 2 mg kg(-1) in related National Standard. The recoveries were 82.3%-95.1% and the RSD was below 5%. This method with portable equipment and simple pre-treatment showed good reproducibility, short test time-consuming and easy operating, and thus it would provide efficient and sensitive solutions for large-scale on-site and rapid detections.

  4. In vitro detection of beta amyloid exploiting surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) using a nanofluidic biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benford, Melodie E.; Chou, I.-Hsien; Beier, Hope T.; Wang, Miao; Kameoka, Jun; Good, Theresa A.; Coté, Gerard L.

    2008-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), a neurodegenerative disease and the most common cause of dementia, affects 4.5 million people according to the 2000 US census and is expected to triple to 13.2 million by the year 2050. Since no definitive pre-mortem tests exist to distinguish AD from mild cognitive impairment due to the natural aging process, we focus on detecting the beta amyloid (Aβ) protein, the primary component of the senile plaques characteristic of AD. We specifically detect cytotoxic species of Aβ by exploiting surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Using a nanofluidic device with a bottleneck shape (a microchannel leading into a nanochannel); we trapped gold colloid particles (60 nm) at the entrance to the nanochannel, with Aβ restricted within the interstices between the aggregated nanoparticles. The continuous flow generated from pumping the solution into the device produced size-dependent trapping of the gold colloid particles, resulting in a high density of aggregated nanoparticles at this precise region, creating localized "hot spots" in the interstitial region between nanoparticles, and shifting the plasmon resonance to the near infrared region, in resonance with incident laser wavelength. With this robust sensing platform, we were able to obtain concentration-dependent SERS spectra of Aβ and of different proteins present in the cerebrospinal fluid of healthy people and people with Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Enhanced detection of quantum dots labeled protein by simultaneous bismuth electrodeposition into microfluidic channel.

    PubMed

    Medina-Sánchez, Mariana; Miserere, Sandrine; Cadevall, Miquell; Merkoçi, Arben

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we propose an electrochemical immunoassay into a disposable microfluidic platform, using quantum dots (QDs) as labels and their enhanced detection using bismuth as an alternative to mercury electrodes. CdSe@ZnS QDs were used to tag human IgG as a model protein and detected through highly sensitive stripping voltammetry of the dissolved metallic component (cadmium in our case). The modification of the screen printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs) was done by a simple electrodeposition of bismuth that was previously mixed with the sample containing QDs. A magneto-immunosandwich assay was performed using a micromixer. A magnet placed at its outlet in order to capture the magnetic beads used as solid support for the immunoassay. SPCEs were integrated at the end of the channel as detector. Different parameters such as bismuth concentration, flow rate, and incubation times, were optimized. The LOD for HIgG in presence of bismuth was 3.5 ng/mL with a RSD of 13.2%. This LOD was about 3.3-fold lower than the one obtained without bismuth. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the system was increased 100-fold respect to experiments carried out with classical screen-printed electrodes, both in presence of bismuth.

  6. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MR relaxometry for the detection and staging of liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Haimerl, Michael; Utpatel, Kirsten; Verloh, Niklas; Zeman, Florian; Fellner, Claudia; Nickel, Dominik; Teufel, Andreas; Fichtner-Feigl, Stefan; Evert, Matthias; Stroszczynski, Christian; Wiggermann, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    Gd-EOB-DTPA, a liver-specific contrast agent with T1-shortening effects, is routinely used in clinical routine for detection and characterization of focal liver lesions and has recently received increasing attention as a tool for the quantitative analyses of liver function. We report the relationship between the extent of Gd-EOB-DTPA- induced T1 relaxation and the degree of liver fibrosis, which was assessed according to the METAVIR score. For the T1 relaxometry, a transverse 3D VIBE sequence with inline T1 calculation was acquired prior to and 20 minutes after Gd-EOB-DTPA administration. The reduction rates of the T1 relaxation time (rrT1) between the pre- and postcontrast images were calculated, and the optimal cutoff values for the fibrosis stages were determined with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses. The rrT1 decreased with the severity of liver fibrosis and regression analysis revealed a significant correlation of the rrT1 with the stage of liver fibrosis (r = −0.906, p < 0.001). ROC analysis revealed sensitivities ≥78% and specificities ≥94% for the differentiation of different fibrosis stages. Gd-EOB-DTPA–enhanced T1 relaxometry is a reliable tool for both the detection of initial hepatic fibrosis and the staging of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:28128291

  7. Enhanced copy number variants detection from whole-exome sequencing data using EXCAVATOR2

    PubMed Central

    D'Aurizio, Romina; Pippucci, Tommaso; Tattini, Lorenzo; Giusti, Betti; Pellegrini, Marco; Magi, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Copy Number Variants (CNVs) are structural rearrangements contributing to phenotypic variation that have been proved to be associated with many disease states. Over the last years, the identification of CNVs from whole-exome sequencing (WES) data has become a common practice for research and clinical purpose and, consequently, the demand for more and more efficient and accurate methods has increased. In this paper, we demonstrate that more than 30% of WES data map outside the targeted regions and that these reads, usually discarded, can be exploited to enhance the identification of CNVs from WES experiments. Here, we present EXCAVATOR2, the first read count based tool that exploits all the reads produced by WES experiments to detect CNVs with a genome-wide resolution. To evaluate the performance of our novel tool we use it for analysing two WES data sets, a population data set sequenced by the 1000 Genomes Project and a tumor data set made of bladder cancer samples. The results obtained from these analyses demonstrate that EXCAVATOR2 outperforms other four state-of-the-art methods and that our combined approach enlarge the spectrum of detectable CNVs from WES data with an unprecedented resolution. EXCAVATOR2 is freely available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/excavator2tool/. PMID:27507884

  8. Blood surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy based on Ag and Au nanoparticles for nasopharyngeal cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Duo; Ge, Xiaosong; Lin, Xueliang; Chen, Guannan; Chen, Rong

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to evaluate and compare the utility of blood surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based on Au or Ag nanoparticles (NPs), respectively, for detection of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). A rapid home-made Raman system was employed for SERS measurement, and high quality SERS spectra can be recorded from blood plasma samples belonging to 60 healthy volunteers and 100 NPC patients, using both metallic NPs. The spectral differences under Ag-SERS measurement between the normal and cancer groups are more significant than Au-SERS. Principal component analysis combined with linear discriminant analysis (PCA-LDA) was used for differentiating the two blood groups with a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 90% and 95%, respectively, using Ag-SERS method, which has almost a 20% improvement in diagnostic specificity in comparison to Au-SERS. This exploratory study demonstrates that blood SERS based on Ag NPs is capable of achieving a better diagnostic performance for NPC detection, and has promising potential for improving NPC screening.

  9. Dye-enhanced multimodal confocal microscopy for noninvasive detection of skin cancers in mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jesung; Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.

    2010-03-01

    Skin cancer is the most common form of human cancer. Its early diagnosis and timely treatment is of paramount importance for dermatology and surgical oncology. In this study, we evaluate the use of reflectance and fluorescence confocal microscopy for detecting skin cancers in an in-vivo trial with B16F10 melanoma and SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma in mice. For the experiments, the mice are anesthetized, then the tumors are infiltrated with aqueous solution of methylene blue and imaged. Reflectance images are acquired at 658 nm. Fluorescence is excited at 658 nm and registered in the range between 690 and 710 nm. After imaging, the mice are sacrificed. The tumors are excised and processed for hematoxylin and eosin histopathology, which is compared to the optical images. The results of the study indicate that in-vivo reflectance images provide valuable information on vascularization of the tumor, whereas the fluorescence images mimic the structural features seen in histopathology. Simultaneous dye-enhanced reflectance and fluorescence confocal microscopy shows promise for the detection, demarcation, and noninvasive monitoring of skin cancer development.

  10. Non-invasive detection of nasopharyngeal carcinoma using saliva surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Sufang; Xu, Yuanji; Huang, Lingling; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Chaobin; Huang, Shaohua; Lin, Jinyong; Lin, Duo; Feng, Shangyuan; Chen, Rong; Pan, Jianji

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the use of saliva surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for the detection of non-invasive nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). SERS measurements were taken from 62 saliva samples, of which 32 were from NPC patients and 30 from healthy volunteers. Notable biochemical Raman bands in the SERS spectra were tentatively assigned to various saliva components. The saliva SERS spectra obtained from the NPC patients and the healthy volunteers were also analyzed by multivariate statistical techniques based on principal component analysis and linear discriminant analysis (PCA-LDA). Significant differences were observed between the saliva SERS spectral intensities for NPC patients and healthy volunteers, particularly at 447, 496, 635, 729, 1134, 1270 and 1448 cm(-1), which primarily contained signals associated with proteins, nucleic acids, fatty acids, glycogen and collagen. The classification results based on the PCA-LDA method provided a relatively high diagnostic sensitivity of 86.7%, specificity of 81.3% and diagnostic accuracy of 83.9% for NPC identification. The results from the present study demonstrate that saliva SERS analysis used in conjunction with PCA-LDA diagnostic algorithms possesses a promising clinical application for the non-invasive detection of NPC.

  11. Target Detection Is Enhanced by Polarization Vision in a Fiddler Crab.

    PubMed

    How, Martin J; Christy, John H; Temple, Shelby E; Hemmi, Jan M; Marshall, N Justin; Roberts, Nicholas W

    2015-12-07

    We are constantly surprised by the ability of relatively simple animals to perform precise visually guided movements within complex visual scenes, often using eyes with limited resolution. Exceptional examples include the capture of airborne prey by dragonflies, the learning flights of bees and wasps, and the tracking of conspecifics by crabs on intertidal mudflats. Most studies have focused on how animals do this using sensitivity to intensity or color. However, it is increasingly evident that a third ability, polarization vision, may contribute to such tasks. In many insects, polarization-sensitive photoreceptors are confined within an area of the eye known as the dorsal rim, which detects the polarized sky pattern specifically for navigation. However, some animals, including fiddler crabs, are sensitive to the polarization of light across the majority of their image-forming eyes, potentially allowing them to use polarization information to increase perceived contrast for general visual tasks. Investigations into the use of polarization image-parsing by animals have largely been confined to laboratory settings under artificial lighting. This approach can occasionally mislead if the lighting conditions are different from natural. This study presents the first behavioral evidence from the natural context for a function of polarization image parsing. Using experimental manipulations in wild populations of the fiddler crab Uca stenodactylus, we provide evidence that these animals use their polarization vision to enhance contrast in their visual environment, thereby increasing their ability to detect and respond to objects on the mudflat surface.

  12. SWIFT MRI Enhances Detection of Breast Cancer Metastasis to the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Naoharu; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Corum, Curt; Weber, Joseph; Garwood, Michael; Sachdev, Deepali

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the capability of longitudinal MR scans using sweep imaging with Fourier transformation (SWIFT) to detect breast cancer metastasis to the lung in mice. Methods Mice with breast cancer metastatic to the lung were generated by tail vein injection of MDA-MB-231-LM2 cells. Thereafter, MR imaging was performed every week using three different pulse sequences: SWIFT (TE~3 μs), concurrent dephasing and excitation (CODE; TE~300 μs), and 3D gradient echo (GRE; TE=2.2 ms). Motion during the long SWIFT MR scans was compensated for by rigid-body motion correction. Maximum intensity projection (MIP) images were generated to visualize changes in lung vascular structures during the development and growth of metastases. Results SWIFT MRI was more sensitive to signals from the lung parenchyma than CODE or 3D GRE MRI. Metastatic tumor growth in the lungs induced a progressive increase in intensity of parenchymal signals in SWIFT images. MIP images from SWIFT clearly visualized lung vascular structures and their disruption due to progression of breast cancer metastases in the lung. Conclusion SWIFT MRI’s sensitivity to fast-decaying signals and tolerance of magnetic susceptibility enhances its effectiveness at detecting structural changes in lung parenchyma and vasculature due to breast cancer metastases in the lung. PMID:24919566

  13. Gold nanostructures for detection of pesticides, nitrates and drugs using Surface Enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedyalkov, N.; Nikov, Ru.; Nikov, Ro.; Nikolov, A.; Atanasov, P.; Nakajima, Y.; Terakawa, M.; Sawczak, M.; Grochowska, K.; Sliwinski, G.

    2016-01-01

    In this work laser-assisted methods for metal nanostructures formation and their application as active substrates in Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy are presented. The nanostructures are fabricated by laser processing of gold thin films deposited on low cost substrates as glass, ceramic, polymer and paper. The films are deposited by classical PLD technology. The produced films are then processed by nanosecond pulses delivered by nanosecond Nd:YAG laser system. At certain conditions the laser treatment leads to formation of discrete nanostructure on the substrate surface. Femtosecond Pulsed Laser Deposition in air is also applied for direct deposition of gold nanostructure. In another set of experiments gold nanoparticle colloids are fabricated by laser ablation of gold target in chloroform. The fabricated structures are then tested as active systems in SERS, as detection of pesticides (DDT), nitrates (NH4NO3), and drugs (Methylene blue) is demonstrated. The obtained results show that these nanostructures can be efficiently used in the detection and monitoring of materials with a high social impact.

  14. Fiber optic apparatus for detecting molecular species by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Angel, Stanley M.; Sharma, Shiv K.

    1988-01-01

    Optrode apparatus for detecting constituents of a fluid medium includes an optical fiber (13, 13a to 13e) having a metal coating (22, 22a to 22e) on at least a portion of a light transmissive core (17, 17a to 17d). The metal is one, such as silver, gold or copper, which enhances emission of Raman signal frequencies by molecules adsorbed on the surface of the coating when monochromatic probe light of a different frequency is scattered by such molecules and the metal coating is sufficiently thin to transmit light between the absorbed molecules and the core of the fiber. Probe light is directed into one end of the fiber and a detector (16, 16d, 16e) analyzes light emitted from the fiber for Raman frequencies that identify one or more particular molecular species. In one form, the optrode (13e) may function as a working electrode of an electrochemical cell (53) while also serving to detect the products of oxidation or reduction reactions which occur at the electrode surface.

  15. Sheath-flow microfluidic approach for combined surface enhanced Raman scattering and electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Matthew R; Pentecost, Amber M; Selimovic, Asmira; Martin, R Scott; Schultz, Zachary D

    2015-04-21

    The combination of hydrodynamic focusing with embedded capillaries in a microfluidic device is shown to enable both surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and electrochemical characterization of analytes at nanomolar concentrations in flow. The approach utilizes a versatile polystyrene device that contains an encapsulated microelectrode and fluidic tubing, which is shown to enable straightforward hydrodynamic focusing onto the electrode surface to improve detection. A polydimethyslsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel positioned over both the embedded tubing and SERS active electrode (aligned ∼200 μm from each other) generates a sheath flow that confines the analyte molecules eluting from the embedded tubing over the SERS electrode, increasing the interaction between the Riboflavin (vitamin B2) and the SERS active electrode. The microfluidic device was characterized using finite element simulations, amperometry, and Raman experiments. This device shows a SERS and amperometric detection limit near 1 and 100 nM, respectively. This combination of SERS and amperometry in a single device provides an improved method to identify and quantify electroactive analytes over either technique independently.

  16. Odors Pulsed at Wing Beat Frequencies are Tracked by Primary Olfactory Networks and Enhance Odor Detection

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Shreejoy J.; Peters, Oakland J.; Staudacher, Erich M.; Kalwar, Faizan R.; Hatfield, Mandy N.; Daly, Kevin C.

    2009-01-01

    Each down stroke of an insect's wings accelerates axial airflow over the antennae. Modeling studies suggest that this can greatly enhance penetration of air and air-born odorants through the antennal sensilla thereby periodically increasing odorant-receptor interactions. Do these periodic changes result in entrainment of neural responses in the antenna and antennal lobe (AL)? Does this entrainment affect olfactory acuity? To address these questions, we monitored antennal and AL responses in the moth Manduca sexta while odorants were pulsed at frequencies from 10–72 Hz, encompassing the natural wingbeat frequency. Power spectral density (PSD) analysis was used to identify entrainment of neural activity. Statistical analysis of PSDs indicates that the antennal nerve tracked pulsed odor up to 30 Hz. Furthermore, at least 50% of AL local field potentials (LFPs) and between 7–25% of unitary spiking responses also tracked pulsed odor up to 30 Hz in a frequency-locked manner. Application of bicuculline (200 μM) abolished pulse tracking in both LFP and unitary responses suggesting that GABAA receptor activation is necessary for pulse tracking within the AL. Finally, psychophysical measures of odor detection establish that detection thresholds are lowered when odor is pulsed at 20 Hz. These results suggest that AL networks can respond to the oscillatory dynamics of stimuli such as those imposed by the wing beat in a manner analogous to mammalian sniffing. PMID:20407584

  17. A rapid method for detecting protein-nucleic acid interactions by protein induced fluorescence enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Valuchova, Sona; Fulnecek, Jaroslav; Petrov, Alexander P.; Tripsianes, Konstantinos; Riha, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Many fundamental biological processes depend on intricate networks of interactions between proteins and nucleic acids and a quantitative description of these interactions is important for understanding cellular mechanisms governing DNA replication, transcription, or translation. Here we present a versatile method for rapid and quantitative assessment of protein/nucleic acid (NA) interactions. This method is based on protein induced fluorescence enhancement (PIFE), a phenomenon whereby protein binding increases the fluorescence of Cy3-like dyes. PIFE has mainly been used in single molecule studies to detect protein association with DNA or RNA. Here we applied PIFE for steady state quantification of protein/NA interactions by using microwell plate fluorescence readers (mwPIFE). We demonstrate the general applicability of mwPIFE for examining various aspects of protein/DNA interactions with examples from the restriction enzyme BamHI, and the DNA repair complexes Ku and XPF/ERCC1. These include determination of sequence and structure binding specificities, dissociation constants, detection of weak interactions, and the ability of a protein to translocate along DNA. mwPIFE represents an easy and high throughput method that does not require protein labeling and can be applied to a wide range of applications involving protein/NA interactions. PMID:28008962

  18. Intensity and resolution enhancement of local regions for object detection and tracking in wide area surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, Evan; Asari, Vijayan K.; Arigela, Saibabu; Aspiras, Theus

    2015-05-01

    Object tracking in wide area motion imagery is a complex problem that consists of object detection and target tracking over time. This challenge can be solved by human analysts who naturally have the ability to keep track of an object in a scene. A computer vision solution for object tracking has the potential to be a much faster and efficient solution. However, a computer vision solution faces certain challenges that do not affect a human analyst. To overcome these challenges, a tracking process is proposed that is inspired by the known advantages of a human analyst. First, the focus of a human analyst is emulated by doing processing only the local object search area. Second, it is proposed that an intensity enhancement process should be done on the local area to allow features to be detected in poor lighting conditions. This simulates the ability of the human eye to discern objects in complex lighting conditions. Third, it is proposed that the spatial resolution of the local search area is increased to extract better features and provide more accurate feature matching. A quantitative evaluation is performed to show tracking improvement using the proposed method. The three databases, each grayscale sequences that were obtained from aircrafts, used for these evaluations include the Columbus Large Image Format database, the Large Area Image Recorder database, and the Sussex database.

  19. The detection of breathing behavior using Eulerian-enhanced thermal video.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Stephanie L; Goubran, Rafik; Knoefel, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The current gold standard for detecting and distinguishing between types of sleep apnea is expensive and invasive. This paper aims to examine the potential of inexpensive and unobtrusive thermal cameras in the identification and distinction between types of sleep apnea. A thermal camera was used to gather video of a subject performing regular nasal breathing, nasal hyperventilation and an additional trial simulating one type of sleep apnea. Simultaneously, a respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) band gathered respiratory data. Thermal video of all three trials were subjected to Eulerian Video Magnification; a procedure developed at MIT for enhancing subtle color variations in video data. Post magnification, nasal regions of interest were defined and mean region intensities were found for each frame of each trial. These signals were compared to determine the best performing region and compared to RIP data to validate breathing behavior. While some regions performed better, all region intensity signals depicted correct breathing behavior. The mean intensity signals for normal breathing and hyperventilation were correct and correlated well with RIP data. Furthermore, the RIP data resulting from the sleep apnea simulation clearly depicted chest movement while the corresponding mean intensity signal depicted lack of cyclical air flow. These results indicate that a subject's breathing behavior can be captured using thermal video and suggest that, with further development and additional equipment, thermal video can be used to detect and distinguish between types of sleep apnea.

  20. Immune cells detection of the in vivo rejecting heart in USPIO-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsun-Hsien; Moura, José M F; Wu, Yijen L; Ho, Chien

    2006-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful to study the infiltration of immune cells, in particular macrophages. Contrast agents, for example ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles, administered intravenously into the blood stream will be engulfed by macrophages circulating in the circulation system. When a transplanted heart rejects, macrophages and other immune cells will infiltrate the rejecting tissue. Imaged by T*2 weighted MRI, USPIO-labeled macrophages will display dark pixel intensities. Detecting the presence of USPIO particles in the images facilitates the study of heart rejection. We cast the problem of detecting the presence of USPIO-labeled myocardium in the framework of spectral graph theory, and treat our decision function as a level set function on the image. The pixels with positive level set values correspond to the presence of immune cells, and negative to the absence. When the image is modeled by a graph, the spectral analysis of the graph Laplacian provides a basis to represent the level set function. We develop from the Cheeger constant of the graph an objective functional of the level set function. The minimization of the objective leads to the optimal level set function. Experimental results suggest the feasibility of our approach in the study of rejecting hearts.

  1. WE-D-16A-01: ACR Radiology Leadership Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, G

    2014-06-15

    The Radiology Leadership Institute (RLI) was established in 2011 by the American College of Radiology with a mission to prepare leaders who will shape the future of radiology to ensure quality, elevate service and deliver extraordinary patient care. Leadership skills are critical to medical physicists in order for them to assure that imaging and therapy are safe and of the highest quality possible. This session will provide an introduction to the RLI and its programs with an emphasis on how medical physicists can get involved and what they might expect to gain through their engagement with the RLI. The session will also provide a framework for leadership in healthcare with an emphasis on roles and opportunities for medical physicists to enhance their effectiveness as members of the healthcare, medical education, and research communities.

  2. White Paper: Curriculum in Interventional Radiology.

    PubMed

    Mahnken, Andreas H; Bücker, Arno; Hohl, Christian; Berlis, Ansgar

    2017-04-01

    Purpose Scope and clinical importance of interventional radiology markedly evolved over the last decades. Consequently it was acknowledged as independent subspecialty by the "European Union of Medical Specialists" (UEMS). Based on radiological imaging techniques Interventional Radiology is an integral part of Radiology. Materials und Methods In 2009 the German Society for Interventional Radiology and minimally-invasive therapy (DeGIR) developed a structured training in Interventional Radiology. In cooperation with the German Society of Neuroradiology (DGNR) this training was extended to also cover Interventional Neuroradiology in 2012. Tailored for this training in Interventional Radiology a structured curriculum was developed, covering the scope of this modular training. Results The curriculum is based on the DeGIR/DGNR modular training concept in Interventional Radiology. There is also an European Curriculum and Syllabus for Interventional Radiology developed by the "Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe" (CIRSE). The presented curriculum in Interventional Radiology is designed to provide a uniform base for the training in Interventional Radiology in Germany, based on the competencies obtained during residency. Conclusion This curriculum can be used as a basis for training in Interventional Radiology by all training sites. Key Points: · Interventional Radiology is an integral part of clinical radiology. · The German Society for Interventional Radiology and minimally-invasive therapy (DeGIR) developed a curriculum in Interventional Radiology. · This curriculum is an integrative basis for the training in interventional. Citation Format · Mahnken AH, Bücker A, Hohl C et al. White Paper: Curriculum in Interventional Radiology. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2017; 189: 309 - 311.

  3. Renal Papillary Necrosis: Role of Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Vaidehi K.

    2016-01-01

    Renal Papillary Necrosis (RPN) is idefined as Ischemic necrobiosis of the papilla in the medulla of the kidneys. Variety of etiological factors are recognized which cause papillary necrosis, such as analgesic nephropathy, diabetes mellitus, urinary obstruction and sickle cell haemoglobinopathy. The early diagnosis of RPN is important to improve prognosis and reduce morbidity. Radiological Imaging offers early diagnosis and can guide prompt treatment of papillary necrosis and can minimize a decline in renal function. Here we report three cases of RPN with typical imaging findings. One of them was diabetic and hypertensive female with recurrent Urinary tract Infections and other was a male with no known co-morbidity. Both of them were diagnosed to have renal papillary necrosis on CT scan and were managed operatively and conservatively, respectively. Third case was a healthy female being investigated to be renal donor for her son. Here RPN was an incidental finding and was treated conservatively. Thus CT scan could detect it pre-operatively and complications due to transplantation of a kidney with papillary necrosis were avoided. So, we want to emphasize the importance of Radiology, particularly CT scanning in detection of RPN and to guide early and prompt treatment. PMID:26894147

  4. On the enhanced detectability of GPS anomalous behavior with relative entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jeongho

    2016-10-01

    A standard receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM) technique for the global positioning system (GPS) has been dedicated to provide an integrity monitoring capability for safety-critical GPS applications, such as in civil aviation for the en-route (ER) through non-precision approach (NPA) or lateral navigation (LNAV). The performance of the existing RAIM method, however, may not meet more stringent aviation requirements for availability and integrity during the precision approach and landing phases of flight due to insufficient observables and/or untimely warning to the user beyond a specified time-to-alert in the event of a significant GPS failure. This has led to an enhanced RAIM architecture ensuring stricter integrity requirement by greatly decreasing the detection time when a satellite failure or a measurement error has occurred. We thus attempted to devise a user integrity monitor which is capable of identifying the GPS failure more rapidly than a standard RAIM scheme by incorporating the RAIM with the relative entropy, which is a likelihood ratio approach to assess the inconsistence between two data streams, quite different from a Euclidean distance. In addition, the delay-coordinate embedding technique needs to be considered and preprocessed to associate the discriminant measure obtained from the RAIM with the relative entropy in the new RAIM design. In simulation results, we demonstrate that the proposed user integrity monitor outperforms the standard RAIM with a higher level of detection rate of anomalies which could be hazardous to the users in the approach or landing phase and is a very promising alternative for the detection of deviations in GPS signal. The comparison also shows that it enables to catch even small anomalous gradients more rapidly than a typical user integrity monitor.

  5. Emergency department digital radiology: moving from photos to pixels.

    PubMed

    White, Faber A; Zwemer, Frank L; Beach, Christopher; Westesson, Per-Lennart; Fairbanks, Rollin J; Scialdone, Gary

    2004-11-01

    Emergency department (ED) patient care relies heavily on radiologic imaging. As advances in technologic innovation continue to present opportunities to streamline and simplify the delivery of care, emergency medicine (EM) practitioners face the challenge of transitioning from a system of primarily film-based radiography to one that utilizes digitized images. The move to digital radiology can result in enhanced quality of patient care, reduction of errors, and increased ED efficiency; however, making this transition will necessarily involve changes in EM practice. As the technology evolves, digital radiology will gradually become ingrained into everyday practice because of these and other notable benefits; however, EM practitioners will need to overcome several challenges to make the transition smoothly and consider the potential impacts that this change will have on ED workflow. The authors discuss the benefits, challenges, and other operational considerations involved with the ED implementation of digital radiology and close by presenting guiding principles for current and future users. Despite the unresolved issues, digital radiology will mature as a technology and improve EM practice, making it one of the great information technology advances in EM.

  6. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Analytical Response

    SciTech Connect

    E.C. Nielsen

    2003-04-01

    The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is authorized by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan to coordinate all off-site radiological response assistance to state and local government s, in the event of a major radiological emergency in the United States. The FRMAC is established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, to coordinate all Federal assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of radiological environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, quality assurance, and dose assessment. During an emergency response, the initial analytical data is provided by portable field instrumentation. As incident responders scale up their response based on the seriousness of the incident, local analytical assets and mobile laboratories add additional capability and capacity. During the intermediate phase of the response, data quality objectives and measurement quality objectives are more rigorous. These higher objectives will require the use of larger laboratories, with greater capacity and enhanced capabilities. These labs may be geographically distant from the incident, which will increase sample management challenges. This paper addresses emergency radioanalytical capability and capacity and its utilization during FRMAC operations.

  7. [Useful radiological techniques in orthodontics].

    PubMed

    Felizardo, Rufino; Thomas, Alexis; Foucart, Jean-Michel

    2012-03-01

    Specialists in dento-facial orthopedics have a large range of dental radiological techniques at their disposal to help them in their diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Peri-apical, occlusal, panoramic, and cephalometric X-Rays are two-dimensional techniques that orthodontists can complement, if necessary, with Multi slices CT scan or Cone Beam Computed Tomography. Orthodontists must apply and respect quality criteria for each type of film in order to derive the best information from every image and to avoid producing artifacts or false images that will reduce their diagnostic value and, accordingly, the service that they render to patients. Practitioners must be willing to spend the few moments it takes to position patients correctly in the radiological apparatus instead of taking multiple views to compensate for failing to scrupulously follow protocols of radiology.

  8. Radiological control manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kloepping, R.

    1996-05-01

    This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Radiological Control Manual (LBNL RCM) has been prepared to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements and interpretation of the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is one methodology to implement the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835) and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. Information given in this manual is also intended to provide demonstration of compliance to specific requirements in 10 CFR 835. The LBNL RCM (Publication 3113) and LBNL Health and Safety Manual Publication-3000 form the technical basis for the LBNL RPP and will be revised as necessary to ensure that current requirements from Rules and Orders are represented. The LBNL RCM will form the standard for excellence in the implementation of the LBNL RPP.

  9. Detection of trace organics in Martian soil analogs using fluorescence-free surface enhanced 1064-nm Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Suning; Chen, Bin; McKay, Christopher P; Navarro-Gonzálezv, Rafael; Wang, Alan X

    2016-09-19

    A significant technology challenge in planetary missions is the in situ detection of organics at the sub-part-per-million (ppm) level in soils. This article reports the organic compound detection in Mars-like soils at the sub-ppm level using an ultra-sensitive spectral sensing technique based on fluorescence-free surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), which has a significantly improved sensitivity and reduced fluorescence noise. Raman spectral detection of ppm level organics in Antarctic Dry Valley and Mojave Desert soils have been obtained for the first time, which otherwise are not detected by other Raman spectral techniques.

  10. Nanoresolution radiology of neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H. R.; Chen, S. T.; Chu, Y. S.; Conley, R.; Bouet, N.; Chien, C. C.; Chen, H. H.; Lin, C. H.; Tung, H. T.; Chen, Y. S.; Margaritondo, G.; Je, J. H.; Hwu, Y.

    2012-06-01

    We report recent advances in hard-x-ray optics—including record spatial resolution—and in staining techniques that enable synchrotron microradiology to produce neurobiology images of quality comparable to electron and visible microscopy. In addition, microradiology offers excellent penetration and effective three-dimensional detection as required for many neuron studies. Our tests include tomographic reconstruction based on projection image sets.

  11. Nanoresolution radiology of neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H. R.; Chen, S. T.; Chu, Y. S.; Conley, R.; Bouet, N.; Chien, C. C.; Chen, H. H.; Lin, C. H.; Tung, H. T.; Chen, Y. S.; Margaritondo, G.; Je, J. H.; Hwu, Y.

    2012-05-29

    We report recent advances in hard-x-ray optics—including record spatial resolution—and in staining techniques that enable synchrotron microradiology to produce neurobiology images of quality comparable to electron and visible microscopy. In addition, microradiology offers excellent penetration and effective three-dimensional detection as required for many neuron studies. Our tests include tomographic reconstruction based on projection image sets.

  12. Nanoresolution radiology of neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.R.; Chen, S.T.; Chu, Y.S.; Conley, R.; Bouet, N.; Chien, C.C.; Chen, H.H.; Lin, C.H.; Tung, H.T.; Chen, Y.S.; Margaritondo, G.; Je, J.H.; Hwu, Y.

    2013-04-08

    We report recent advances in hard-x-ray optics - including record spatial resolution - and in staining techniques that enable synchrotron microradiology to produce neurobiology images of quality comparable to electron and visible microscopy. In addition, microradiology offers excellent penetration and effective three-dimensional detection as required for many neuron studies. Our tests include tomographic reconstruction based on projection image sets.

  13. Analysis of radiology business models.

    PubMed

    Enzmann, Dieter R; Schomer, Donald F

    2013-03-01

    As health care moves to value orientation, radiology's traditional business model faces challenges to adapt. The authors describe a strategic value framework that radiology practices can use to best position themselves in their environments. This simplified construct encourages practices to define their dominant value propositions. There are 3 main value propositions that form a conceptual triangle, whose vertices represent the low-cost provider, the product leader, and the customer intimacy models. Each vertex has been a valid market position, but each demands specific capabilities and trade-offs. The underlying concepts help practices select value propositions they can successfully deliver in their competitive environments.

  14. Interventional Radiology in Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Karani, John B. Yu, Dominic F.Q.C.; Kane, Pauline A.

    2005-04-15

    Radiology is a key specialty within a liver transplant program. Interventional techniques not only contribute to graft and recipient survival but also allow appropriate patient selection and ensure that recipients with severe liver decompensation, hepatocellular carcinoma or portal hypertension are transplanted with the best chance of prolonged survival. Equally inappropriate selection for these techniques may adversely affect survival. Liver transplantation is a dynamic field of innovative surgical techniques with a requirement for interventional radiology to parallel these developments. This paper reviews the current practice within a major European center for adult and pediatric transplantation.

  15. Industrial Pleuropulmonary Disorders: Radiological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Garland, L. Henry

    1965-01-01

    Industrial pleuropulmonary disorders may result from exposure of the human respiratory tract to diverse types of dusts and fumes, visible and invisible, benign and toxic, organic and inorganic. Meticulous radiological examination, combined with history and physical examination, appropriate laboratory tests, and the exclusion of other disorders which could produce similar changes, is essential for correct diagnosis. Criteria for the radiological diagnosis of pulmonary fibrosis, of generalized emphysema, and of cor pulmonale are outlined. The commoner types of pneumoconiosis are discussed in some detail, and the possible relationship of various inhaled noxa to primary bronchial carcinoma is considered. PMID:14288143

  16. Application of 4-iodophenol-enhanced luminol chemiluminescence to direct detection of horseradish peroxidase encapsulated in liposomes.

    PubMed

    Kamidate, Tamio; Maruya, Masumi; Tani, Hirofumi; Ishida, Akihiko

    2009-09-01

    4-Iodophenol was applied to an enhancer in the direct detection of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) encapsulated in liposomes by using luminol chemiluminescence (CL). Luminol, 4-iodophenol and hydrogen peroxide permeate into the inner phase of liposomes containing HRP, resulting in the progress of 4-iodophenol-enhanced luminol CL catalyzed by HRP in liposomes. The CL intensity observed in liposomes was a factor of 150 greater than that observed in a lipid-free bulk solution. The detection limit in the direct detection of HRP encapsulated in liposomes was sensitive by a factor of 30 compared with that in a lipid-free bulk solution. 4-Iodophenol effectively functioned as an enhancer in HRP-catalyzed luminol CL in liposomes.

  17. Microwave-accelerated metal-enhanced fluorescence: application to detection of genomic and exosporium anthrax DNA in <30 seconds.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Kadir; Zhang, Yongxia; Hibbs, Stephen; Baillie, Les; Previte, Michael J R; Geddes, Chris D

    2007-11-01

    We describe the ultra-fast and sensitive detection of the gene encoding the protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis the causative agent of anthrax. Our approach employs a highly novel platform technology, Microwave-Accelerated Metal-Enhanced Fluorescence (MAMEF), which combines the use of Metal-Enhanced Fluorescence to enhance assay sensitivity and focused microwave heating to spatially and kinetically accelerate DNA hybridization. Genomic and exosporium target DNA of Bacillus anthracis spores was detected within a minute in the nanograms per microliter concentration range using low-power focused microwave heating. The MAMEF technology was able to distinguish between B. anthracis and B. cereus, a non-virulent close relative. We believe that this study has set the stage and indeed provides an opportunity for the ultra-fast and specific detection of B. anthracis spores with minimal pre-processing steps using a relatively simple but cost-effective technology that could minimize casualties in the event of another anthrax attack.

  18. [Radiological media and modern supporting tools in radiology].

    PubMed

    Sachs, A; Pokieser, P

    2014-01-01

    Radiology is a field with a high demand on information. Nowadays, a huge variety of electronic media and tools exists in addition to the classical media. Asynchronous and synchronous e-learning are constantly growing and support radiology with case collections, webinars and online textbooks. Various internet resources, social media and online courses have been established. Dynamic websites show a variety of interactive elements and it is easier and faster to access large amounts of data. Social media have an exponentially growing number of users and enable an efficient collaboration as well as forming professional networks. Massive open online courses (MOOCs) complete the offer of education and increase the opportunity to take part in educational activities. Apart from the existing variety of resources it is essential to focus on a critical selection for using these radiological media. It is reasonable to combine classical and electronic media instead of a one-sided use. As dynamic as the progress in the field of radiological media and its tools may be, the personal contact remains and should be maintained.

  19. Photo-induced enhanced Raman spectroscopy for universal ultra-trace detection of explosives, pollutants and biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Jaber, Sultan; Peveler, William J.; Quesada-Cabrera, Raul; Cortés, Emiliano; Sotelo-Vazquez, Carlos; Abdul-Karim, Nadia; Maier, Stefan A.; Parkin, Ivan P.

    2016-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is one of the most sensitive spectroscopic techniques available, with single-molecule detection possible on a range of noble-metal substrates. It is widely used to detect molecules that have a strong Raman response at very low concentrations. Here we present photo-induced-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, where the combination of plasmonic nanoparticles with a photo-activated substrate gives rise to large signal enhancement (an order of magnitude) for a wide range of small molecules, even those with a typically low Raman cross-section. We show that the induced chemical enhancement is due to increased electron density at the noble-metal nanoparticles, and demonstrate the universality of this system with explosives, biomolecules and organic dyes, at trace levels. Our substrates are also easy to fabricate, self-cleaning and reusable. PMID:27412699

  20. Asian Radiology Forum 2015 for Building an Asian Friendship: A Step toward the Vigorous Intersociety Collaboration in Asia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho Sung; Choi, Jung-Ah; Lee, Jongmin

    2016-01-01

    According to the reports presented at the Asian Radiology Forum 2015, organized by the Korean Society of Radiology (KSR) during the Korean Congress of Radiology (KCR) in September 2015 in Seoul, there is an increasing need to promote international exchange and collaboration amongst radiology societies in Asian countries. The Asian Radiology Forum was first held by KSR and the national delegates of Asian radiological partner societies, who attended this meeting with the aim of discussing selected subjects of global relevance in radiology. In 2015, current stands, pros and cons, and future plans for inter-society collaboration between each Asian radiological partner societies were primarily discussed. The Asian radiology societies have international collaborations with each other through various activities, such as joint symposia, exchange programs, social exchange, and international membership. The advantages of continuing inter-society collaboration in most of the Asian radiology societies include international speakers, diverse clinical research, and cutting edge technology; while limited range of financial and human resources, language barrier, differences in goals and expectations are claimed as disadvantages. With regard to the future, most of the Asian radiology societies focus on expanding partner societies and enhancing globalization and collaboration programs through various international meetings and exchange programs.