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Sample records for enhanced resonance raman

  1. Ultraviolet Resonant Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Short Jr., Billy Joe

    2009-06-01

    Raman-based spectroscopy is potentially militarily useful for standoff detection of high explosives. Normal (non-resonance) and resonance Raman spectroscopies are both light scattering techniques that use a laser to measure the vibrational spectrum of a sample. In resonance Raman, the laser is tuned to match the wavelength of a strong electronic absorbance in the molecule of interest, whereas, in normal Raman the laser is not tuned to any strong electronic absorbance bands. The selection of appropriate excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman can result in a dramatic increase in the Raman scattering efficiency of select band(s) associated with the electronic transition. Other than the excitation wavelength, however, resonance Raman is performed experimentally the same as normal Raman. In these studies, normal and resonance Raman spectral signatures of select solid high explosive (HE) samples and explosive precursors were collected at 785 nm, 244 nm and 229 nm. Solutions of PETN, TNT, and explosive precursors (DNT & PNT) in acetonitrile solvent as an internal Raman standard were quantitatively evaluated using ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) microscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy as a function of power and select excitation wavelengths. Use of an internal standard allowed resonance enhancements to be estimated at 229 nm and 244 nm. Investigations demonstrated that UVRR provided ~2000-fold enhancement at 244 nm and ~800-fold improvement at 229 nm while PETN showed a maximum of ~25-fold at 244 nm and ~190-fold enhancement at 229 nm solely from resonance effects when compared to normal Raman measurements. In addition to the observed resonance enhancements, additional Raman signal enhancements are obtained with ultraviolet excitation (i.e., Raman scattering scales as !4 for measurements based on scattered photons). A model, based partly on the resonance Raman enhancement results for HE solutions, is presented for estimating Raman enhancements for solid HE samples.

  2. Ultrasensitive fiber enhanced UV resonance Raman sensing of drugs.

    PubMed

    Frosch, Torsten; Yan, Di; Popp, Jürgen

    2013-07-02

    Fiber enhanced UV resonance Raman spectroscopy is introduced for chemical selective and ultrasensitive analysis of drugs in aqueous media. The application of hollow-core optical fibers provides a miniaturized sample container for analyte flow and efficient light-guiding, thus leading to strong light-analyte interactions and highly improved analytical sensitivity with the lowest sample demand. The Raman signals of the important antimalaria drugs chloroquine and mefloquine were strongly enhanced utilizing deep UV and electronic resonant excitation augmented by fiber enhancement. An experimental design was developed and realized for reproducible and quantitative Raman fiber sensing, thus the enhanced Raman signals of the pharmaceuticals show excellent linear relationship with sample concentration. A thorough model accounts for the different effects on signal performance in resonance Raman fiber sensing, and conclusions are drawn how to improve fiber enhanced Raman spectroscopy (FERS) for chemical selective analysis with picomolar sensitivity.

  3. Resonant Raman scattering from silicon nanoparticles enhanced by magnetic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Pavel A.; Baranov, Denis G.; Milichko, Valentin A.; Makarov, Sergey V.; Mukhin, Ivan S.; Samusev, Anton K.; Krasnok, Alexander E.; Belov, Pavel A.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2016-05-01

    Enhancement of optical response with high-index dielectric nanoparticles is attributed to the excitation of their Mie-type magnetic and electric resonances. Here we study Raman scattering from crystalline silicon nanoparticles and reveal that magnetic dipole modes have a much stronger effect on the scattering than electric modes of the same order. We demonstrate experimentally a 140-fold enhancement of the Raman signal from individual silicon spherical nanoparticles at the magnetic dipole resonance. Our results confirm the importance of the optically-induced magnetic response of subwavelength dielectric nanoparticles for enhancing light-matter interactions.Enhancement of optical response with high-index dielectric nanoparticles is attributed to the excitation of their Mie-type magnetic and electric resonances. Here we study Raman scattering from crystalline silicon nanoparticles and reveal that magnetic dipole modes have a much stronger effect on the scattering than electric modes of the same order. We demonstrate experimentally a 140-fold enhancement of the Raman signal from individual silicon spherical nanoparticles at the magnetic dipole resonance. Our results confirm the importance of the optically-induced magnetic response of subwavelength dielectric nanoparticles for enhancing light-matter interactions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07965a

  4. Resonant enhancement of Raman scattering in metamaterials with hybrid electromagnetic and plasmonic resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guddala, Sriram; Narayana Rao, D.; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2016-06-01

    A tri-layer metamaterial perfect absorber of light, consisting of (Al/ZnS/Al) films with the top aluminum layer patterned as an array of circular disk nanoantennas, is investigated for resonantly enhancing Raman scattering from C60 fullerene molecules deposited on the metamaterial. The metamaterial is designed to have resonant bands due to plasmonic and electromagnetic resonances at the Raman pump frequency (725 nm) as well as Stokes emission bands. The Raman scattering from C60 on the metamaterial with resonantly matched bands is measured to be enhanced by an order of magnitude more than C60 on metamaterials with off-resonant absorption bands peaking at 1090 nm. The Raman pump is significantly enhanced due to the resonance with a propagating surface plasmon band, while the highly impedance-matched electromagnetic resonance is expected to couple out the Raman emission efficiently. The nature and hybridization of the plasmonic and electromagnetic resonances to form compound resonances are investigated by numerical simulations.

  5. Ultraviolet Resonance Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    SUBJECT TERMS Raman Spectroscopy, Standoff Detection, High Explosives, Explosive Detection, Inelastic Scattering, Resonance Raman 16. PRICE CODE...absolute Raman cross sections of TATP, PETN, RDX and TNT explosives from 620 to 248 nm at a constant flux of 2.5 1024 quanta s1 cm2 using KNO3

  6. Guided-mode-resonance coupled localized surface plasmons for dually resonance enhanced Raman scattering sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheng; Liu, Chao; Li, Erwen; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Xu, Xiaochuan; Wang, Alan X.; Fan, D. L.; Chen, Ray T.

    2017-02-01

    Raman scattering spectroscopy is a unique tool to probe vibrational, rotational, and other low-frequency modes of a molecular system and therefore could be utilized to identify chemistry and quantity of molecules. However, the ultralow efficient Raman scattering, which is only 1/109 1/1014 of the excitation light due to the small Raman scattering cross-sections of molecules, have significantly hindered its development in practical sensing applications. The discovery of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) in the 1970s and the significant progress in nanofabrication technique, provide a promising solution to overcome the inherent issues of Raman spectroscopy. It is found that In the vicinity of nanoparticles and their junctions, the Raman signals of molecules can be significantly improved by an enhancement factor as high as 1010, due to the ultrahigh electric field generated by the localized surface plasmons resonance (LSPR), where the intensity of Raman scattering is proportional to the |E|4. In this work, we propose and demonstrate a new approach combining LSPR from nanocapsules with densely assembled silver nanoparticles (NC-AgNPs) and guidemode- resonance (GMR) from dielectric photonic crystal slabs (PCSs) for SERS substrates with robustly high performance.

  7. Electronic Resonance Enhancement in Raman and CARS Spectroscopy: Surface Enhanced Scattering of Highly Fluorescent Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawhead, Carlos; Ujj, Laszlo

    2015-03-01

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is an extremely useful tool in increasing sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy; this technique significantly increases the signal from vibrational resonances which can overcome background fluoresces. Silver nanoparticles coated substrates and the silver nanoparticles in solution were used on a variety of fluorescent molecules in order to overcome sample complexities and measure the vibrational spectra. The possible enhancement of SERS using a coherent Raman (CARS) method was investigated, but enhancement factors due to Surface Enhanced CARS have yet to be verified. The instrument used was developed in the University of West Florida Physics Department utilized the second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser to provide the excitation wavelength at 532 nm and is capable of both transmission and reflection Raman measurements. Special thanks to the UWF Office of Undergraduate Research.

  8. Signal enhancement of surface enhanced Raman scattering and surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering using in situ colloidal synthesis in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Rab; Bowden, Stephen A; Parnell, John; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate the enhanced analytical sensitivity of both surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) responses, resulting from the in situ synthesis of silver colloid in a microfluidic flow structure, where both mixing and optical interrogation were integrated on-chip. The chip-based sensor was characterized with a model Raman active label, rhodamine-6G (R6G), and had a limit of detection (LOD) of ca. 50 fM (equivalent to single molecule detection). The device was also used for the determination of the natural pigment, scytonemin, from cyanobacteria (as an analogue for extraterrestrial life existing in extreme environments). The observed LOD of approximately 10 pM (ca. <400 molecules) demonstrated the analytical advantages of working with freshly synthesized colloid in such a flow system. In both cases, sensitivities were between 1 and 2 orders of magnitude greater in the microfluidic system than those measured using the same experimental parameters, with colloid synthesized off-chip, under quiescent conditions.

  9. A deformable nanoplasmonic membrane reveals universal correlations between plasmon resonance and surface enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Kang, Minhee; Kim, Jae-Jun; Oh, Young-Jae; Park, Sang-Gil; Jeong, Ki-Hun

    2014-07-09

    A quantitative correlation between plasmon resonance and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals is revealed by using a novel active plasmonic method, that is, a deformable nanoplasmonic membrane. A single SERS peak has the maximum gain at the corresponding plasmon resonance wavelength, which has the maximum extinction product of an excitation and the corresponding Raman scattering wavelengths.

  10. Near-field enhanced ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy using aluminum bow-tie nano-antenna

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling; Fang Lim, Shuang; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Riehn, Robert; Hallen, H. D.

    2012-01-01

    An aluminum bow-tie nano-antenna is combined with the resonance Raman effect in the deep ultraviolet to dramatically increase the sensitivity of Raman spectra to a small volume of material, such as benzene used here. We further demonstrate gradient-field Raman peaks for several strong infrared modes. We achieve a gain of ∼105 in signal intensity from the near field enhancement due to the surface plasmon resonance in the aluminum nanostructure. The on-line resonance enhancement contributes another factor of several thousands, limited by the laser line width. Thus, an overall gain of hundreds of million is achieved. PMID:23066168

  11. Definitive evidence for linked resonances in surface-enhanced Raman scattering: Excitation profile of Cu phthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    . Londero, Pablo S.; Leona, Marco; Lombardi, John R.

    2013-03-01

    We have characterized the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) spectrum of copper phthalocyanine as a function of excitation wavelength in the 435-635 nm region using a tunable excitation Raman system. We show that the Raman excitation spectrum within the surface plasmon resonance is dominated by totally symmetric modes in the blue and non-totally symmetric modes in the red. The findings are compared to our recent theoretical work on the nature of SERS enhancement. The experimental results are interpreted to be a consequence of vibronically coupled intensity borrowing by charge transfer resonances from allowed molecular transitions, enhancing non-totally symmetric modes.

  12. Distance dependence of surface-enhanced resonance raman enhancement in Langmuir-Blodgett dye multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, T.M.; Uphaus, R.A.; Moebius, D.

    1986-11-06

    Monolayers of a surface-active dye incorporated into inert matrix material were transferred onto structurally defined silver island films by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. The dye-containing monolayers were spaced from the surface by accurately known increments by deposition of inert spacer monolayers. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectra were observed from dye molecules spaced as distant as six spacer increments (ca. 16 nm) from the silver surface. These results indicate an electromagnetic mechanism is operative in this system in contradiction to a chemical mechanism which would require direct contact between the Raman-active species and the metal surface.

  13. High-sensitivity pesticide detection using particle-enhanced resonant Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Bikas; Saito, Yuika; Verma, Prabhat

    2016-03-01

    The use of pesticides in agriculture has raised concerns, as even a small residual of pesticide on food can be harmful. It is therefore of great importance to develop a robust technique to detect tiny amounts of pesticides. Although Raman spectroscopy is frequently used for chemical identification, it is not suitable for extremely low molecular concentrations. We propose a technique called particle-enhanced resonant Raman spectroscopy to detect extremely low concentrations of pesticides, where gold nanoparticles of desired plasmonic resonance are synthesized to match the resonance in Raman scattering. We successfully demonstrated the detection of extremely low amounts of pesticides on oranges.

  14. Comparative study of resonance Raman and surface-enhanced resonance Raman chlorophyll a spectra using soret and red excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, L.L.; Kim, Jaeho; Cotton, T.M. )

    1990-12-05

    Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) spectra are reported for chlorophyll a adsorbed on a silver electrode at 298 and 77 K with 406.7-, 457.9-, 514.5-, and 647.1-nm excitation. Submerging the electrode in degassed water at 298 K was found to improve the spectral quality by minimizing sample heating and photooxidation. Spectral intensities and peak resolutions were greater at all excitation wavelengths at liquid nitrogen temperature. Most significantly, roughened silver at the low temperature quenched the fluorescence accompanying red excitation and minimized sample photooxidation, resulting in richly detailed SERRS spectra of chlorophyll a. The close correspondence between chlorophyll a resonance Raman (RR) and SERRS spectra suggests that an electromagnetic mechanism is the major source of the surface enhancement, rather than a chemical mechanism (e.g. a charge-transfer complex between chlorophyll a and the metal). The spectral similarities, together with the presence of the MgN{sub 4} vibration band in the SERRS spectra, also provide evidence that structural alterations (e.g. cleavage of ring V or loss of Mg) do not occur in chlorophyll a after adsorption at the electrode surface. A distinctive SERRS spectrum was obtained for each excitation wavelength. Selective excitation within the various electronic transitions can thus be utilized to verify assignments of the vibrational modes of chlorophyll a and to monitor its interactions and photochemical behavior in biomimetic systems.

  15. Intercalation between antitumor anthracyclines and DNA as probed by resonance and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smulevich, G.; Mantini, A. R.; Casu, M.; Marzocchi, M. P.

    1991-05-01

    The antiturnor anthracyclincs, idarubicin (IDA ), adrianiycin (ADM), epirubicin (EPI), carminomycin (CAR) and 1 1-deoxycarminornycin (DCM), whose siructural formula includes a substituted hydroxyanthraquirionc chrornophore and a sugar residue, form intercalation complexes with DNA. The stacking interaction between the chromophore and the base-pairs of DNA gives rise to noticeable ciTects on resonance Raman (RR) and surface-enhanced resonance Raman (SERRS) scattering as well as on the absorption (ABS), its second derivative (D2) and fluorescence emission (FEM) spectra.

  16. Resonance-Enhanced Excited-State Raman Spectroscopy of Conjugated Thiophene Derivatives: Combining Experiment with Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barclay, Matthew S.; Quincy, Timothy J.; Caricato, Marco; Elles, Christopher G.

    2017-06-01

    Resonance-enhanced Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy (FSRS) is an ultrafast experimental method that allows for the study of excited-state structural behaviors, as well as the characterization of higher electronically excited states accessible through the resonant conditions of the observed vibrations. However, interpretation of the experiment is difficult without an accurate vibrational assignment of the resonance-enhanced spectra. We therefore utilize simulations of off-resonant excited-state Raman spectra, in which we employ a numerical derivative of the analytical excited-state polarizabilities along the normal mode displacements, in order to identify and interpret the resonance-enhanced vibrations observed in experiment. We present results for a benchmark series of conjugated organic thiophene derivatives, wherein we have computed the off-resonant excited-state Raman spectra for each molecule and matched it with its resonance-enhanced experimental spectrum. This comparison allows us to successfully identify the vibrational displacements of the observed FSRS bands, as well as validate the accuracy of the theoretical results through an experimental benchmark. The agreement between the experimental and computed results demonstrates that we are able to predict qualitatively accurate excited-state Raman spectra for these conjugated thiophenes, allowing for a more thorough interpretation of excited-state Raman signals at relatively low computational cost.

  17. Visualization of Vibrational Modes in Real Space by Tip-Enhanced Non-Resonant Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Sai; Tian, Guangjun; Luo, Yi

    2016-01-18

    We present a general theory to model the spatially resolved non-resonant Raman images of molecules. It is predicted that the vibrational motions of different Raman modes can be fully visualized in real space by tip-enhanced non-resonant Raman scattering. As an example, the non-resonant Raman images of water clusters were simulated by combining the new theory and first-principles calculations. Each individual normal mode gives rise its own distinct Raman image, which resembles the expected vibrational motions of the atoms very well. The characteristics of intermolecular vibrations in supermolecules could also be identified. The effects of the spatial distribution of the plasmon as well as nonlinear scattering processes were also addressed. Our study not only suggests a feasible approach to spatially visualize vibrational modes, but also provides new insights in the field of nonlinear plasmonic spectroscopy.

  18. Quantitative evaluation of proteins with bicinchoninic acid (BCA): resonance Raman and surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering-based methods.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Yu, Zhi; Lee, Youngju; Wang, Xu; Zhao, Bing; Jung, Young Mee

    2012-12-21

    A rapid and highly sensitive bicinchoninic acid (BCA) reagent-based protein quantitation tool was developed using competitive resonance Raman (RR) and surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) methods. A chelation reaction between BCA and Cu(+), which is reduced by protein in an alkaline environment, is exploited to create a BCA-Cu(+) complex that has strong RR and SERRS activities. Using these methods, protein concentrations in solutions can be quantitatively measured at concentrations as low as 50 μg mL(-1) and 10 pg mL(-1). There are many advantages of using RR and SERRS-based assays. These assays exhibit a much wider linear concentration range and provide an additional one (RR method) to four (SERRS method) orders of magnitude increase in detection limits relative to UV-based methods. Protein-to-protein variation is determined using a reference to a standard curve at concentrations of BSA that exhibits excellent recoveries. These novel methods are extremely accurate in detecting total protein concentrations in solution. This improvement in protein detection sensitivity could yield advances in the biological sciences and medical diagnostic field and extend the applications of reagent-based protein assay techniques.

  19. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) simulates PCR for sensitive DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haibo; Lin, Shenyu; Nie, Yichu; Yang, Danting; Wang, Qiqin; Chen, Weijia; Huang, Ning; Jiang, Zhengjin; Chen, Shanze

    2015-11-21

    This paper describes a novel double-stranded DNA detection method through resonance between SYBR Green I and DNA with the surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) assay, which opens an avenue to the quantitative and reliable application of SERRS in DNA detection.

  20. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering from methylviologen at a silver electrode: Evidence for two distinct adsorption interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Qiao; Yue, W.; Cotton, T.M. )

    1990-03-08

    The electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectra of methylviologen radical cation (MV{sup {sm bullet}+}) and fully reduced methylviologen (MV{sup 0}) have been characterized. The enhancement of Raman and resonance Raman (RR) scattering from the dication and its reduction products at polished and roughened silver electrodes was also investigated.

  1. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Using Silica Whispering-Gallery Mode Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The motivation of this work was to have robust spectroscopic sensors for sensitive detection and chemical analysis of organic and molecular compounds. The solution is to use silica sphere optical resonators to provide surface-enhanced spectroscopic signal. Whispering-gallery mode (WGM) resonators made from silica microspheres were used for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) without coupling to a plasmonic mechanism. Large Raman signal enhancement is observed by exclusively using 5.08-micron silica spheres with 785-nm laser excitation. The advantage of this non-plasmonic approach is that the active substrate is chemically inert silica, thermally stable, and relatively simple to fabricate. The Raman signal enhancement is broadly applicable to a wide range of molecular functional groups including aliphatic hydrocarbons, siloxanes, and esters. Applications include trace organic analysis, particularly for in situ planetary instruments that require robust sensors with consistent response.

  2. Activated vibrational modes and Fermi resonance in tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mengtao; Fang, Yurui; Zhang, Zhenyu; Xu, Hongxing

    2013-02-01

    Using p-aminothiophenol (PATP) molecules on a gold substrate and high-vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (HV-TERS), we show that the vibrational spectra of these molecules are distinctly different from those in typical surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Detailed first-principles calculations help to assign the Raman peaks in the TERS measurements as Raman-active and IR-active vibrational modes of dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB), providing strong spectroscopic evidence for the dimerization of PATP molecules to DMAB under the TERS setup. The activation of the IR-active modes is due to enhanced electromagnetic field gradient effects within the gap region of the highly asymmetric tip-surface geometry. Fermi resonances are also observed in HV-TERS. These findings help to broaden the versatility of TERS as a promising technique for ultrasensitive molecular spectroscopy.

  3. Surface plasmon enhanced interfacial electron transfer and resonance Raman, surface-enhanced resonance Raman studies of cytochrome C mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Junwei

    1999-11-08

    Surface plasmon resonance was utilized to enhance the electron transfer at silver/solution interfaces. Photoelectrochemical reductions of nitrite, nitrate, and CO2 were studied on electrochemically roughened silver electrode surfaces. The dependence of the photocurrent on photon energy, applied potential and concentration of nitrite demonstrates that the photoelectrochemical reduction proceeds via photoemission process followed by the capture of hydrated electrons. The excitation of plasmon resonances in nanosized metal structures resulted in the enhancement of the photoemission process. In the case of photoelectrocatalytic reduction of CO2, large photoelectrocatalytic effect for the reduction of CO2 was observed in the presence of surface adsorbed methylviologen, which functions as a mediator for the photoexcited electron transfer from silver metal to CO2 in solution. Photoinduced reduction of microperoxidase-11 adsorbed on roughened silver electrode was also observed and attributed to the direct photoejection of free electrons of silver metal. Surface plasmon assisted electron transfer at nanostructured silver particle surfaces was further determined by EPR method.

  4. Spectral shapes of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering sensitive to the refractive index of media around single Ag nanoaggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Itoh, Tamitake; Biju, Vasudevanpillai; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2009-12-01

    We found large spectral changes in surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) with increasing refractive index of media around single Ag nanoaggregates. We analyzed relationship between the spectral changes in SERRS and those in plasma (plasmon) resonance based on the twofold electromagnetic (EM) enhancement theory. The analysis revealed that the changes in SERRS spectra are induced by changes in spectral shapes of twofold EM enhancement factors, which arise from coupling of plasma resonance with both incident and Raman scattering light.

  5. Resonance Raman enhancement optimization in the visible range by selecting different excitation wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong; Li, Yuee

    2015-09-01

    Resonance enhancement of Raman spectroscopy (RS) has been used to significantly improve the sensitivity and selectivity of detection for specific components in complicated environments. Resonance RS gives more insight into the biochemical structure and reactivity. In this field, selecting a proper excitation wavelength to achieve optimal resonance enhancement is vital for the study of an individual chemical/biological ingredient with a particular absorption characteristic. Raman spectra of three azo derivatives with absorption spectra in the visible range are studied under the same experimental conditions at 488, 532, and 633 nm excitations. Universal laws in the visible range have been concluded by analyzing resonance Raman (RR) spectra of samples. The long wavelength edge of the absorption spectrum is a better choice for intense enhancement and the integrity of a Raman signal. The obtained results are valuable for applying RR for the selective detection of biochemical constituents whose electronic transitions take place at energies corresponding to the visible spectra, which is much friendlier to biologial samples compared to ultraviolet.

  6. Raman scattering enhancement in photon-plasmon resonance mediated metal-dielectric microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Guddala, Sriram; Narayana Rao, D. E-mail: dnrsp@uohyd.ernet.in; Dwivedi, Vindesh K.; Vijaya Prakash, G.

    2013-12-14

    Here, we report the photon-plasmon interaction scheme and enhanced field strengths resulted into the amplification of phonon in a novel microcavity. A metal-dielectric microcavity, with unified cavity photonic mode and localized surface plasmon resonances, is visualized by impregnating the gold nanoparticles into the deep see-through nano-sized pores of porous silicon microcavity. The intense optical field strengths resulting from the photon-plasmon interactions are probed by both resonant and non-resonant Raman scattering experiments. Due to photon-plasmon-phonon interaction mechanism, several orders of enhancement in the intensity of scattered Raman Stokes photon (at 500 cm{sup −1}) are observed. Our metal nanoparticle-microcavity hybrid system shows the potential to improve the sensing figure of merit as well as the applications of plasmonics for optoelectronics, photovoltaics, and related technologies.

  7. Detection of acetylene by electronic resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, N.; Naik, S. V.; Kulatilaka, W. D.; Laurendeau, N. M.; Lucht, R. P.; Roy, S.; Gord, J. R.

    2007-06-01

    We report the detection of acetylene (C2H2) at low concentrations by electronic resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (ERE-CARS). Visible pump and Stokes beams are tuned into resonance with Q-branch transitions in the v2 Raman band of acetylene. An ultraviolet probe beam is tuned into resonance with the tilde{A}-tilde{X} electronic transition of C2H2, resulting in significant electronic resonance enhancement of the CARS signal. The signal is found to increase significantly with rising pressure for the pressure range 0.1-8 bar at 300 K. Collisional narrowing of the spectra appears to be important at 2 bar and above. A detection limit of approximately 25 ppm at 300 K and 1 bar is achieved for our experimental conditions. The signal magnitudes and the shape of the C2H2 spectrum are essentially constant for UV probe wavelengths from 233.0 to 238.5 nm, thus indicating that significant resonant enhancement is achieved even without tuning the probe beam into resonance with a specific electronic resonance transition.

  8. Resonance contributions to anti-Stokes/Stokes ratios under surface enhanced Raman scattering conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, R. C.; Hou, J.; Cohen, L. F.; Le Ru, E. C.; Hadfield, J. M.; Harvey, J. E.; Etchegoin, P. G.; Liu, F. M.; Green, M.; Brown, R. J. C.; Milton, M. J. T.

    2005-08-01

    Anti-Stokes/Stokes asymmetries under surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) conditions are studied for a wide variety of SERS-active media and different analytes. Evidence is provided for the existence of underlying resonances that create these asymmetries. We show here that these resonances are associated with the electromagnetic coupling between the analyte (probe) and the metal. The work demonstrates the use of the anti-Stokes/Stokes ratio as a tool to understand the hierarchy of resonances in the SERS problem, which is essential for quantification purposes.

  9. Maximizing the electromagnetic and chemical resonances of surface-enhanced Raman scattering for nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Lindsay M; Pang, Lin; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2014-08-26

    Although surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has previously been performed with nucleic acids, the measured intensities for each nucleic acid have varied significantly depending on the SERS substrate and excitation wavelength. We have demonstrated that the charge-transfer (CT) mechanism, also known as the chemical enhancement of SERS, is responsible for the discrepancies previously reported in literature. The electronic states of cytosine and guanine attached to silver atoms are computationally calculated and experimentally measured to be in the visible range, which leads to a resonance Raman effect at the corresponding maximum wavelengths. The resulting SERS measurements are in good agreement with the simulated values, in which cytosine-silver shows stronger enhancement at 532 nm and guanine-silver shows stronger enhancement at 785 nm. An atomic layer of aluminum oxide is deposited on substrates to prevent charge-transfer, and corresponding measurements show weaker Raman signals caused by the suppression of the chemical resonance. These findings suggest the optimal SERS signal can be achieved by tuning the excitation wavelength to match both the electromagnetic and chemical resonances, paving the way for future single molecule detection of nucleic acids other than adenine.

  10. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering on nanoshells with tunable surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon A; Ross, Daniel J; Nazri, G-Abbas; Aroca, Ricardo F

    2005-11-08

    Fabrication, characterization, and optical enhancement applications of bimetallic AgAu nanoparticles and nanoshells are reported. Nanoparticles with tunable surface plasmon resonances are synthesized at room temperature and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and photon correlation spectroscopy. The collective electron oscillation of the nanoparticles shows a controllable tunability in the 400-990 nm spectral range, in agreement with plasmon absorption calculated using Mie theory, providing an optimum substrate for surface plasmon-assisted enhanced spectroscopy. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering experiments show that the average enhancement factor obtained with nanoshells could be higher than those obtained with silver sols.

  11. Quantitative surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering of phthalocyanine-labelled oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Macaskill, A.; Chernonosov, A. A.; Koval, V. V.; Lukyanets, E. A.; Fedorova, O. S.; Smith, W. E.; Faulds, K.; Graham, D.

    2007-01-01

    The evaluation of phthalocyanine labels for the surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) detection of oligonucleotides is reported. Three phthalocyanine-labelled oligonucleotides were assessed, each containing a different metal centre. Detection limits for each labelled oligonucleotide were determined using two excitation frequencies where possible. Limits of detection as low as 2.8 × 10−11 mol. dm−3 were obtained which are comparable to standard fluorescently labelled probes used in previous SERRS studies. The identification of two phthalocyanine-labelled oligonucleotides without separation was also demonstrated indicating their suitability for multiplexing. This study extends the range of labels suitable for quantitative surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering with silver nanoparticles and offers more flexibility and choice when considering SERRS for quantitative DNA detection. PMID:17289751

  12. Surface-enhanced resonance hyper-Raman spectra of bacteriorhodopsin adsorbed on silver colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, A. V.; Nabiev, Igor R.

    1991-05-01

    Surface-enhanced resonance hyper-Raman scattering (SERHRS) spectra of bacteriorhodopsin (BRh) located in purple membranes of Halobacterium halobium adsorbed on aggregated hydrosol Ag particles are obtained for the first time. The SERIIR spectra excited by pulse 1064 nm radiation are compared with SERR spectra excited by radiation with doubled frequency (532 nm). The bands corresponding to the BRh57O and M412 forms of Brh are observed in both spectra. The relative intensities of these bands are discussed. 1.

  13. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy on a surface plasmon resonance biosensor platform for gene diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, W.; Ho, H. P.; Suen, Y. K.; Kong, S. K.; Lin, Chinlon; Prasad, Paras N.; Li, J.; Ong, Daniel H. C.

    2008-02-01

    We propose to integrate the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) detection capability with a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor platform. As a demonstration setup, the experimental scheme is built from a Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscope. The sample surface is a gold-coated plasmonic crystal substrate. Two oligonucleotide (ODN) probes that have been labeled with two different Raman active dyes are used to achieve a sandwich assay of target ODNs or polynucleotide. Upon complementary hybridizations between the target and probe ODNs, the target can be identified by detecting the narrow-band spectroscopic fingerprints of the Raman tags. This concept has high potential for achieving multiplexed detection of ODN targets because a very large number of probes can be incorporated to the plasmonic crystal substrate, which may find applications in gene based diseases diagnostics. We also explored the detection of single molecules and achieved some preliminary results.

  14. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopic characterization of the protein native structure.

    PubMed

    Feng, Manliang; Tachikawa, Hiroyasu

    2008-06-11

    Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) spectra of biological species are often different from their resonance Raman (RR) spectra. A home-designed Raman flow system is used to determine the factors that contribute to the difference between the SERRS and RR of met-myoglobin (metMb). The results indicate that both the degree of protein-nanoparticles interaction and the laser irradiation contribute to the structural changes and are responsible for the observed differences between the SERRS and RR spectra of metMb. The prolonged adsorption of the protein molecules on the nanoparticle surface, which is the condition normally used for the conventional SERRS experiments, disturbs the heme pocket structure and facilitates the charge transfer process and the photoinduced transformation of proteins. The disruption of the heme pocket results in the loss of the distal water molecule, and the resulting SERRS spectrum of metMb shows a 5-coordinated high-spin heme. The flow system, when operated at a moderately high flow rate, can basically eliminate the factors that disturb the protein structure while maintaining a high enhancement factor. The SERRS spectrum obtained from a 1 x 10 (-7) M metMb solution using this flow system is basically identical to the RR spectrum of a 5 x 10 (-4) M metMb solution. Therefore, the Raman flow system reported here should be useful for characterizing the protein-nanoparticles interaction and the native structure of proteins using SERRS spectroscopy.

  15. Characterization of photosynthetic reaction centers by surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumanov, George D.; Cotton, Therese M.; Zhou, Chengli; Gaul, Dale; Picorel, Rafael; Seibert, Michael

    1993-06-01

    Surface-enhanced Resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) spectra were obtained for the reaction center complexes of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RC) and from photosystem II (PSII) of spinach, adsorbed on Ag and Au surfaces. These preliminary results demonstrate the considerable potential of this technique for selectively exciting resonance Raman scattering from reaction center components within their distinct absorption bands. Because of the high sensitivity afforded by SERRS, spectra could be measured from a single monolayer of reaction centers adsorbed on a metal surface. The surface-sensitivity provides new information indicating the topology of the PSII reaction center 47 kD light-harvesting protein complex. The activity of the PSII reaction center complex adsorbed on metal surfaces was monitored by photochemical reduction of cyt b-559. Measurement of fluorescence emission was shown to be a new and sensitive method for monitoring the structural and functional integrity of the PSII reaction center complex on the metal surface.

  16. Applicability of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering for the direct discrimination of ballpoint pen inks.

    PubMed

    Seifar, R M; Verheul, J M; Ariese, F; Brinkman, U A; Gooijer, C

    2001-08-01

    In situ surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) with excitation at 685 nm is suitable for the direct discrimination of blue and black ballpoint pen inks on paper. For black inks, shorter excitation wavelengths can also be used. For blue inks, SERRS at 514.5 and 457.9 nm does not provide adequate discriminative power. At these excitation wavelengths, the SERRS signals of the Methyl Violet derivatives present in inks easily dominate the overall spectrum because of resonance enhancement and preferential interaction with silver sol particles. At 685 nm, this problem is not encountered as the Methyl Violet derivatives do not show resonance enhancement, while other components may still exhibit resonance. Thirteen blue and thirteen black ink lines were examined. For the blue and black inks, on the basis of the 685 nm SERR spectra, eight and six groups of spectra, respectively, could be distinguished. This discrimination largely agrees with information from thin layer chromatography (TLC) experiments, although some differences in group compositions are found. The in situ SERR spectra show good repeatability with regard to the Raman frequencies, band shapes and relative intensities of the spectral bands. However, absolute intensities cannot be used for discrimination purposes.

  17. Surface plasmon resonance and surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensing enabled by digital versatile discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Xuan; Chung, Pei-Yu; Jiang, Peng; Dai, Jianli

    2012-01-01

    We report the simultaneous achievement of sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensing using digital versatile discs (DVDs). The aluminum-covered data tracks of DVDs can efficiently concentrate local electromagnetic field, resulting in an excellent SPR medium (with sensitivity of ˜850 nm per refractive index unit which is higher than that of most available nanofabricated plasmonic substrates) with a small but measurable SERS enhancement. The SPR sensitivity and the optical spectra, as well as the distribution of electric field amplitude, are simulated using a finite-difference time-domain model. The theoretical predictions agree reasonably well with the experimental results.

  18. Demonstration of composite signal enhancement from surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy in a liquid core optical ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Ian M.; Gohring, John; Fan, Xudong

    2007-09-01

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) utilizing silver colloids for localized plasmonic enhancement has been heavily researched due to its tremendous increase in the Raman signal of bio/chemical molecules. We demonstrate further enhancement by multiplying the SERS effect by the resonant enhancement of a ring resonator microcavity. The liquid core optical ring resonator (LCORR) offers a high-performance and practical design to obtain this composite enhancement for bio/chemical molecule detection. The LCORR integrates an array of optical ring resonators into a capillary-based microfluidic channel to form a novel bio/chemical sensing platform. The circular cross-section of the glass capillary acts as an optical ring resonator, with the evanescent field of the resonant light interacting with the sample passing through the capillary. The LCORR has already been well-studied for applications in label free biomolecule sensing. In this work, we utilize a silver colloid solution inside the capillary to perform SERS-based detection. In contrast to a typical SERS system where the incident light interacts with the colloid and target molecules only once, in the LCORR system, the tightly confined light resonates around the capillary wall, repeatedly interacting with the SERS system. Our experimental results show the increased enhancement due to the composite effect of the cavity resonance and the localized plasmonic effect of the nanoparticles inside the cavity. We have achieved detection of 3.3 nM R6G inside the LCORR. In addition to the excellent sensitivity, this detection system represents an advancement in the development of practical SERS bio/chemical sensors due to the arrayed nature of the sensors combined with the integrated microfluidics of the LCORR.

  19. Interaction of proflavine with DNA studied by colloid surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koglin, E.; Séquaris, J.-M.

    1986-03-01

    The interaction of the mutagenic highly fluourescing proflavine (3,6-diaminoacridine: PF) dye with calf thymus DNA has been studied by Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering (SERRS). Since the Ag-colloids almost completely quenche the strong fluorescence it is possible to obtain excellent vibrational spectra in a wide frequency range providing valuable information about the intercalation. The intercalation does not affect the vibrational frequencies of the proflavine dye. On the other hand, intensity changes are observed in some of the ring- and NH 2-modes of proflavine upon intercalation. This Raman hypochromism is characteristic for ring stacking interactions and in the SERRS spetroscopy for an additional effects of the dye orientation to the surface.

  20. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering in optical tweezers using co-axial second harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Pamela; Cooper, Jon; McNay, Graeme; Docherty, Frances; Graham, Duncan; Smith, W; Sinclair, Gavin; Padgett, Miles

    2005-05-30

    Silica particles were partially coated with silver, and a suitable chromophore, such that they could be simultaneously trapped within an optical tweezers system, and emit a surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) response. A standard 1064 nm TEM00 mode laser was used to trap the bead whilst a frequency doubling crystal inserted into the beam gave several microwatts of 532 nm co-linear light to excite the SERRS emission. The con fi guration has clear applications in providing apparatus that can simultaneously manipulate a particle whilst obtaining surface sensitive sensory information.

  1. Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering Nanostars for High Precision Cancer Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Harmsen, Stefan; Huang, Ruimin; Wall, Matthew A.; Karabeber, Hazem; Samii, Jason M.; Spaliviero, Massimiliano; White, Julie R.; Monette, Sébastien; O’Connor, Rachael; Pitter, Kenneth L.; Sastra, Stephen A.; Saborowski, Michael; Holland, Eric C.; Singer, Samuel; Olive, Kenneth P.; Lowe, Scott W.; Blasberg, Ronald G.; Kircher, Moritz F.

    2015-01-01

    The inability to visualize the true extent of cancers represents a significant challenge in many areas of oncology. The margins of most cancer types are not well demarcated because the cancer diffusely infiltrates the surrounding tissues. Furthermore, cancers may be multifocal and characterized by the presence of microscopic satellite lesions. Such microscopic foci represent a major reason for persistence of cancer, local recurrences, and metastatic spread and are usually impossible to visualize with currently available imaging technologies. An imaging method to reveal the tumor extent is desired clinically and surgically. Here we show the precise visualization of tumor margins, microscopic tumor invasion, and multifocal loco-regional tumor spread using a new generation of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) nanoparticles, which are termed here SERRS-nanostars. The SERRS-nanostars feature a star-shaped gold core, a Raman reporter resonant in the near-infrared spectrum, and a primer-free silication method. In mouse models of pancreatic cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, and sarcoma, SERRS-nanostars enabled accurate detection of macroscopic malignant lesions as well as microscopic disease, without the need for a targeting moiety. Moreover, the sensitivity (1.5 femtomolar limit of detection under in vivo Raman imaging conditions) of SERRS-nanostars allowed imaging of premalignant lesions of pancreatic and prostatic neoplasias. High sensitivity and broad applicability, in conjunction with their inert gold-silica composition, render SERRS-nanostars a promising imaging agent for more precise cancer imaging and resection. PMID:25609167

  2. Magnetic field enriched surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy for early malaria diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Clement; Liu, Quan

    2012-01-01

    Hemozoin is a by-product of malaria infection in erythrocytes, which has been explored as a biomarker for early malaria diagnosis. We report magnetic field-enriched surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) of β--hematin crystals, which are the equivalent of hemozoin biocrystals in spectroscopic features, by using magnetic nanoparticles with iron oxide core and silver shell (Fe3O4@Ag). The external magnetic field enriches β--hematin crystals and enhances the binding between β--hematin crystals and magnetic nanoparticles, which provides further improvement in SERRS signals. The magnetic field-enriched SERRS signal of β--hematin crystals shows approximately five orders of magnitude enhancement in the resonance Raman signal, in comparison to about three orders of magnitude improvement in the SERRS signal without the influence of magnetic field. The improvement has led to a β--hematin detection limit at a concentration of 5 nM (roughly equivalent to 30 parasites/μl at the early stages of malaria infection), which demonstrates the potential of magnetic field-enriched SERRS technique in early malaria diagnosis.

  3. Magnetic field enriched surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy for early malaria diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Clement; Liu, Quan

    2012-01-01

    Hemozoin is a by-product of malaria infection in erythrocytes, which has been explored as a biomarker for early malaria diagnosis. We report magnetic field-enriched surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) of β-hematin crystals, which are the equivalent of hemozoin biocrystals in spectroscopic features, by using magnetic nanoparticles with iron oxide core and silver shell (Fe(3)O(4)@Ag). The external magnetic field enriches β-hematin crystals and enhances the binding between β-hematin crystals and magnetic nanoparticles, which provides further improvement in SERRS signals. The magnetic field-enriched SERRS signal of β-hematin crystals shows approximately five orders of magnitude enhancement in the resonance Raman signal, in comparison to about three orders of magnitude improvement in the SERRS signal without the influence of magnetic field. The improvement has led to a β-hematin detection limit at a concentration of 5 nM (roughly equivalent to 30 parasites/μl at the early stages of malaria infection), which demonstrates the potential of magnetic field-enriched SERRS technique in early malaria diagnosis.

  4. Resonance enhancement of electronic Raman scattering from nitrogen defect levels in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, J. C.; Long, F. H.; Ferguson, I. T.

    1999-08-01

    Electronic Raman scattering from nitrogen defect levels in SiC is seen to be significantly enhanced with excitation by red (633 nm, 1.98 eV) or near-IR (785 nm, 1.58 eV) laser light at room temperature. Four nitrogen peaks are observed in 6H-SiC (380, 430, 510, and 638 cm-1) and three peaks in 4H-SiC (about 400, 530, and 570 cm-1). The peaks in the 4H-SiC spectrum are seen to shift to lower frequency with increasing nominal doping concentration. Raman spectra taken at low temperature in 6H-SiC reveal differences between wafers and Lely grown platelets by the appearance of several additional peaks. The origin of the resonant enhancement is the near-IR absorption band associated with the green color characteristic of n-type SiC. These results demonstrate that the laser wavelength is a key parameter in the characterization of SiC by Raman scattering.

  5. Identification of metalloporphyrins with high sensitivity using graphene-enhanced resonance Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo-Hyun; Kim, Daechul; Song, Sungho; Park, DongHyuk; Kang, Il-Suk; Jeong, Dae Hong; Jeon, Seokwoo

    2014-03-18

    Graphene-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (GERRS) was performed for the detection of three different metallo-octaethylporphyrins (M-OEPs; M = 2H, FeCl, and Pt) homogeneously thermal vapor deposited on a graphene surface. GERRS of M-OEPs were measured using three different excitation wavelengths, λ(ex) = 405, 532, and 633 nm, and characterized detail vibrational bands for the identification of M-OEPs. The GERRS spectra of Pt-OEP at λ(ex) = 532 nm showed ~29 and ~162 times signal enhancement ratio on graphene and on graphene with Ag nanoclusters, respectively, compared to the spectra from bare SiO2 substrate. This enhancement ratio, however, was varied with M-OEPs and excitation wavelengths. The characteristic peaks and band shapes of GERRS for each M-OEP were measured with high sensitivity (100 pmol of thermal vapor deposited Pt-OEP), and these facilitate the selectively recognition of molecules. Also, the peaks shift and broadening provide the evidence of the interaction between graphene and M-OEPs through the charge transfer and π-orbital interaction. The increase of graphene layer induced the decrease of signal intensity and GERRS effect was almost not observed on the thick graphite flakes. Further experiments with various substrates demonstrated that the interaction of single layer of graphene with molecule is the origin of the Raman signal enhancement of M-OEPs. In this experiment, we proved the graphene is a good alternative substrate of Raman spectroscopy for the selective detection of various metalloporphyrins with high sensitivity.

  6. Analysis of plasmon resonance and surface-enhanced Raman scattering on periodic silver structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, M.; Voges, E.

    2000-05-01

    Surface plasmon excitation and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) are investigated for periodic grating-type substrates such as binary silver gratings and silver gratings on silica. Electromagnetic near fields are calculated by an efficient implementation of a Rayleigh-expansion technique for rectangular-groove gratings. Far-field signals of Raman-active molecules adsorbed at the grating surface are determined by application of the Lorentz reciprocity theorem. SERS enhancement factors are considered for different types of gratings and for structures with different dimensions with respect to both the intensity and angular width of the emitted Stokes light. Thus, consideration of plasmon resonance widths leads to optimum structures for periodic SERS substrates if realistic experimental configurations involving a lens for detection are taken into account. For binary silver gratings, optimum grating depths of more than 80 nm are proposed for SERS measurements in a realistic experimental configuration, whereas maximum SERS signals are emitted into a single direction at shallow gratings with depths between 10 nm and 20 nm. Furthermore, silica gratings with isolated silver layers are superior to binary silver gratings. Due to both the large intensity and angular width of the emitted signals, SERS enhancement factors are additionally increased on such structures.

  7. Plasmon-resonant Raman spectroscopy in metallic nanoparticles: Surface-enhanced scattering by electronic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carles, R.; Bayle, M.; Benzo, P.; Benassayag, G.; Bonafos, C.; Cacciato, G.; Privitera, V.

    2015-11-01

    Since the discovery of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) 40 years ago, the origin of the "background" that is systematically observed in SERS spectra has remained questionable. To deeply analyze this phenomenon, plasmon-resonant Raman scattering was recorded under specific experimental conditions on a panel of composite multilayer samples containing noble metal (Ag and Au) nanoparticles. Stokes, anti-Stokes, and wide, including very low, frequency ranges have been explored. The effects of temperature, size (in the nm range), embedding medium (SiO2, Si3N4, or TiO2) or ligands have been successively analyzed. Both lattice (Lamb modes and bulk phonons) and electron (plasmon mode and electron-hole excitations) dynamics have been investigated. This work confirms that in Ag-based nanoplasmonics composite layers, only Raman scattering by single-particle electronic excitations accounts for the background. This latter appears as an intrinsic phenomenon independently of the presence of molecules on the metallic surface. Its spectral shape is well described by revisiting a model developed in the 1990s for analyzing electron scattering in dirty metals, and used later in superconductors. The gs factor, that determines the effective mean-free path of free carriers, is evaluated, gsexpt=0.33 ±0.04 , in good agreement with a recent evaluation based on time-dependent local density approximation gstheor=0.32 . Confinement and interface roughness effects at the nanometer range thus appear crucial to understand and control SERS enhancement and more generally plasmon-enhanced processes on metallic surfaces.

  8. One-dimensional plasmonic hotspots located between silver nanowire dimers evaluated by surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Tamitake; Yamamoto, Yuko S.; Kitahama, Yasutaka; Balachandran, Jeyadevan

    2017-03-01

    Hotspots of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) are localized within 1 nm at gaps or crevices of plasmonic nanoparticle dimers. We demonstrate SERRS hotspots with volumes that are extended in one dimension tens of thousand times compared to standard zero-dimensional hotspots using crevices of plasmonic nanowire dimers. According to the polarization measurements, a plasmon resonance in the direction along the dimer width generates SERRS hotspots. SERRS images show oscillating patterns between edges of the hotspot. The SERRS intensity becomes the strongest at the edges, indicating that Fabry-Perot-type resonance of surface plasmons is involved in the Raman enhancement. These optical properties of the SERRS hotspots are quantitatively reproduced by numerical calculations based on the electromagnetic (EM) mechanism. EM coupling energy between dye molecule excitons and plasmons is evaluated using spectral changes in plasmon resonance reflected in a loss of SERRS activity at the hotspots. The coupling energies are consistent with the calculated EM enhancement factors.

  9. Selective resonance enhancement of Raman scattering intensity in photoinduced nonradiative charge transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bairamov, B. Kh.

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports on the formation of complexes consisting of isolated free-standing crystalline semiconductor quantum dots, for example, nc-Si/SiO2, functionalized by short oligonucleotides, for example, the single-stranded system d(20G, 20T). Here, d are deoxyribonucleotides, G and T are guanine and thymine nucleotides, respectively. It has been found that these complexes are unique objects for the elucidation of the specific features in the manifestation of new quantum-size effects in biomacromolecules. It has been demonstrated that the possibility exists of detecting and recording, in such complexes of biomacromolecules, spectrally selective resonance enhancement of Raman scattering intensity in fluctuations of nucleotide molecules due to coherent nonradiative transfer of a photoexcited electron and a hole at the interface of the complex. This dynamic optical imaging of spectral responses can be of applied interest for the development of nanobiophotonic technologies.

  10. Polarization dependence of tip-enhanced Raman and plasmon-resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitahama, Yasutaka; Uemura, Shohei; Katayama, Ryota; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Itoh, Tamitake; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2017-06-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) spectroscopy has high sensitivity and high spatial resolution, although it shows low reproducibility due to the variable optical properties of the tips. In the present study, polarized scattering spectra of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) at the apex of the tip induced by conventional dark field illumination were compared with the corresponding TERS spectra, generated by excitation using polarization not only parallel and perpendicular to the tip, but also vertical to the sample plane (z-polarization). The polarization-dependence of LSPR was consistent with that of the TERS. Thus, the optical properties of the tip can be easily optimized before TERS measurement by excitation polarization that induces the largest LSPR signal.

  11. Microcavity Enhanced Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrak, Benjamin J.

    Raman scattering can accurately identify molecules by their intrinsic vibrational frequencies, but its notoriously weak scattering efficiency for gases presents a major obstacle to its practical application in gas sensing and analysis. This work explores the use of high finesse (≈50 000) Fabry-Perot microcavities as a means to enhance Raman scattering from gases. A recently demonstrated laser ablation method, which carves out a micromirror template on fused silica--either on a fiber tip or bulk substrates-- was implemented, characterized, and optimized to fabricate concave micromirror templates ˜10 mum diameter and radius of curvature. The fabricated templates were coated with a high-reflectivity dielectric coating by ion-beam sputtering and were assembled into microcavities ˜10 mum long and with a mode volume ˜100 mum 3. A novel gas sensing technique that we refer to as Purcell enhanced Raman scattering (PERS) was demonstrated using the assembled microcavities. PERS works by enhancing the pump laser's intensity through resonant recirculation at one longitudinal mode, while simultaneously, at a second mode at the Stokes frequency, the Purcell effect increases the rate of spontaneous Raman scattering by a change to the intra-cavity photon density of states. PERS was shown to enhance the rate of spontaneous Raman scattering by a factor of 107 compared to the same volume of sample gas in free space scattered into the same solid angle subtended by the cavity. PERS was also shown capable of resolving several Raman bands from different isotopes of CO2 gas for application to isotopic analysis. Finally, the use of the microcavity to enhance coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) from CO2 gas was demonstrated.

  12. Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering and Visible Extinction Spectroscopy of Copper Chlorophyllin: An Upper Level Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnitzer, Cheryl S.; Reim, Candace Lawson; Sirois, John J.; House, Paul G.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced chemistry students are introduced to surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) by studying how sodium copper chlorophyllin (CuChl) adsorbs onto silver colloids (CuChl/Ag) as a function of pH. Using both SERRS and visible extinction spectroscopy, the extent of CuChl adsorption and colloidal aggregation are monitored. Initially at…

  13. Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering and Visible Extinction Spectroscopy of Copper Chlorophyllin: An Upper Level Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnitzer, Cheryl S.; Reim, Candace Lawson; Sirois, John J.; House, Paul G.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced chemistry students are introduced to surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) by studying how sodium copper chlorophyllin (CuChl) adsorbs onto silver colloids (CuChl/Ag) as a function of pH. Using both SERRS and visible extinction spectroscopy, the extent of CuChl adsorption and colloidal aggregation are monitored. Initially at…

  14. Measurement of nitric oxide concentrations in flames by using electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Chai, Ning; Naik, Sameer V.; Laurendeau, Normand M.; Lucht, Robert P.; Kuehner, Joel P.; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.

    2006-11-01

    We have measured nitric oxide (NO) concentrations in flames by using electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (ERE-CARS). Visible pump and Stokes beams were tuned to a Q-branch vibrational Raman resonance of NO. A UV probe beam was tuned into resonance with specific rotational transitions in the (v″=1,v‧=0) vibrational band in the A2Σ+-X2Π electronic transition, thus providing a substantial electronic-resonance enhancement of the resulting CARS signal. NO concentrations were measured at levels down to 50 parts in 106 in H2/air flames at atmospheric pressure. NO was also detected in heavily sooting C2H2/air flames at atmospheric pressure with minimal background interference.

  15. Hollow Au/Ag nanostars displaying broad plasmonic resonance and high surface-enhanced Raman sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Leis, Adianez; Torreggiani, Armida; Garcia-Ramos, Jose Vicente; Sanchez-Cortes, Santiago

    2015-08-01

    Bimetallic Au/Ag hollow nanostar (HNS) nanoparticles with different morphologies were prepared in this work. These nanoplatforms were obtained by changing the experimental conditions (concentration of silver and chemical reductors, hydroxylamine and citrate) and by using Ag nanostars as template nanoparticles (NPs) through galvanic replacement. The goal of this research was to create bimetallic Au/Ag star-shaped nanoparticles with advanced properties displaying a broader plasmonic resonance, a cleaner exposed surface, and a high concentration of electromagnetic hot spots on the surface provided by the special morphology of nanostars. The size, shape, and composition of Ag as well as their optical properties were studied by extinction spectroscopy, hyperspectral dark field microscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Finally, the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity of these HNS was investigated by using thioflavin T, a biomarker of the β-amyloid fibril formation, responsible for Alzheimer's disease. Lucigenin, a molecule displaying different SERS activities on Au and Ag, was also used to explore the presence of these metals on the NP surface. Thus, a relationship between the morphology, plasmon resonance and SERS activity of these new NPs was made.Bimetallic Au/Ag hollow nanostar (HNS) nanoparticles with different morphologies were prepared in this work. These nanoplatforms were obtained by changing the experimental conditions (concentration of silver and chemical reductors, hydroxylamine and citrate) and by using Ag nanostars as template nanoparticles (NPs) through galvanic replacement. The goal of this research was to create bimetallic Au/Ag star-shaped nanoparticles with advanced properties displaying a broader plasmonic resonance, a cleaner exposed surface, and a high concentration of electromagnetic hot spots on the surface provided by the special morphology of nanostars

  16. Off Resonance Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy from Gold Nanorod Suspensions as a Function of Aspect Ratio: Not What We Thought

    PubMed Central

    Sivapalan, Sean T.; DeVetter, Brent M.; Yang, Timothy K.; van Dijk, Thomas; Schulmerich, Matthew V.; Carney, P. Scott; Bhargava, Rohit; Murphy, Catherine Jones

    2013-01-01

    The design of nanoparticles for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) within suspensions is more involved than simply maximizing the local field enhancement. The enhancement at the nanoparticle surface and the extinction of both the incident and scattered light during propagation act in concert to determine the observed signal intensity. Here we explore these critical aspects of signal generation and propagation through experiment and theory. We synthesized gold nanorods of six different aspect ratios in order to obtain longitudinal surface plasmon resonances that incrementally spanned 600-800 nm. The Raman reporter molecule methylene blue was trap-coated near the surface of each nanorod sample, generating SERS spectra, which were used to compare Raman signals. The average number of reporter molecules per nanorod was quantified against known standards using electrospray ionization liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. The magnitude of the observed Raman signal is reported for each aspect ratio along with the attenuation due to extinction in suspension. The highest Raman signal was obtained from the nanorod suspension with a plasmon resonance blue-shifted from the laser excitation wavelength. This finding is in contrast to SERS measurements obtained from molecules dried onto the surface of roughened or patterned metal substrates where the maximum observed signal is near or red-shifted from the laser excitation wavelength. We explain these results as a competition between SERS enhancement and extinction, at the excitation and scattered wavelengths, on propagation through the sample. PMID:23438342

  17. Resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Robert, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy may yield precise information on the conformation of, and on the interactions assumed by, the chromophores involved in the first steps of the photosynthetic process, whether isolated in solvents, embedded in soluble or membrane proteins, or, as shown recently, in vivo. By making use of this technique, it is possible, for instance, to relate the electronic properties of these molecules to their structure and/or the physical properties of their environment, or to determine subtle changes of their conformation associated with regulatory processes. After a short introduction to the physical principles that govern resonance Raman spectroscopy, the information content of resonance Raman spectra of chlorophyll and carotenoid molecules is described in this review, together with the experiments which helped in determining which structural parameter each Raman band is sensitive to. A selection of applications of this technique is then presented, in order to give a fair and precise idea of which type of information can be obtained from its use in the field of photosynthesis.

  18. Stimulated Raman spectroscopy and nanoscopy of molecules using near field photon induced forces without resonant electronic enhancement gain

    SciTech Connect

    Tamma, Venkata Ananth; Huang, Fei; Kumar Wickramasinghe, H.; Nowak, Derek

    2016-06-06

    We report on stimulated Raman spectroscopy and nanoscopy of molecules, excited without resonant electronic enhancement gain, and recorded using near field photon induced forces. Photon-induced interaction forces between the sharp metal coated silicon tip of an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and a sample resulting from stimulated Raman excitation were detected. We controlled the tip to sample spacing using the higher order flexural eigenmodes of the AFM cantilever, enabling the tip to come very close to the sample. As a result, the detection sensitivity was increased compared with previous work on Raman force microscopy. Raman vibrational spectra of azobenzene thiol and l-phenylalanine were measured and found to agree well with published results. Near-field force detection eliminates the need for far-field optical spectrometer detection. Recorded images show spatial resolution far below the optical diffraction limit. Further optimization and use of ultrafast pulsed lasers could push the detection sensitivity towards the single molecule limit.

  19. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering spectroscopy applied to phytochrome and its model compounds. 1. Biliverdin photoisomers

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, R.E.; Farrens, D.L.; Song, Pillsoon; Cotton, T.M. )

    1989-12-20

    The application of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) spectroscopy to the analysis of the configuration of biliverdin dimethyl ester (BVDE) is reported. SERRS spectra obtained by adsorption of the compounds onto an electrochemically roughened silver electrode and recorded at 7 K were intense and free of significant photodegradation. The similarity of the SERRS and resonance Raman (RR) spectra obtained under identical conditions suggests that no perturbation of the electronic structure of the BVDE occurs upon interaction with the silver surface, and that the distribution of conformers comprising the BVDE solution is not changed. SERRS spectra of the deuterated and monoprotonated Z,Z,Z isomer are also presented. To investigate the influence of configuration upon the Raman spectrum we have synthesized and purified the E,Z,A, and Z,Z,E isomers of BVDE. Excellent SERRS spectra were obtained from the solutions of the compounds eluted directly from the TLC plates.

  20. Sensitive molecular diagnostics using surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulds, Karen; Graham, Duncan; McKenzie, Fiona; MacRae, Douglas; Ricketts, Alastair; Dougan, Jennifer

    2009-02-01

    Surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) is an analytical technique with several advantages over competitive techniques in terms of improved sensitivity and multiplexing. We have made great progress in the development of SERRS as a quantitative analytical method, in particular for the detection of DNA. SERRS is an extremely sensitive and selective technique which when applied to the detection of labelled DNA sequences allows detection limits to be obtained which rival, and in most cases, are better than fluorescence. Here the conditions are explored which will enable the successful detection of DNA using SERRS. The enhancing surface which is used is crucial and in this case suspensions of nanoparticles were used as they allow quantitative behaviour to be achieved and allow analogous systems to current fluorescence based systems to be made. The aggregation conditions required to obtain SERRS of DNA are crucial and herein we describe the use of spermine as an aggregating agent. The nature of the label which is used, be it fluorescent, positively or negatively charged also effects the SERRS response and these conditions are again explored here. We have clearly demonstrated the ability to identify the components of a mixture of 5 analytes in solution by using two different excitation wavelengths and also of a 6-plex using data analysis techniques. These conditions will allow the use of SERRS for the detection of target DNA in a meaningful diagnostic assay.

  1. Uniaxially Stretched Flexible Surface Plasmon Resonance Film for Versatile Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kaichen; Wang, Zuyong; Tan, Chuan Fu; Kang, Ning; Chen, Lianwei; Ren, Lei; Thian, Eng San; Ho, Ghim Wei; Ji, Rong; Hong, Minghui

    2017-08-09

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy affords a rapid, highly sensitive, and nondestructive approach for label-free and fingerprint diagnosis of a wide range of chemicals. It is of great significance to develop large-area, uniform, and environmentally friendly SERS substrates for in situ identification of analytes on complex topological surfaces. In this work, we demonstrate a biodegradable flexible SERS film via irreversibly and longitudinally stretching metal deposited biocompatible poly(ε-caprolactone) film. This composite film after stretching shows surprising phenomena: three-dimensional and periodic wave-shaped microribbons array embedded with a high density of nanogaps functioning as hot-spots at an average gap size of 20 nm and nanogrooves array along the stretching direction. The stretched polymer surface plasmon resonance film gives rise to more than 10 times signal enhancement in comparison with that of the unstretched composite film. Furthermore, the SERS signals with high uniformity exhibit good temperature stability. The polymer SPR film with excellent flexibility and transparency can be conformally attached onto arbitrary nonplanar surfaces for in situ detection of various chemicals. Our results pave a new way for next-generation flexible SERS detection means, as well as enabling its huge potentials toward green wearable devices for point-of-care diagnostics.

  2. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman study of the photoreduction of methylviologen on a p-InP semiconductor electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Q.; Cotton, T.M.

    1986-03-13

    The redox reactions of methylviologen (MV) at a silver electrode and at a p-InP electrode have been studied by cyclic voltammetry and Raman spectroscopy. By deposition of a silver island overlayer onto a p-InP semiconductor electrode the surface enhancement effect was obtained, allowing the MV reduction products formed at the semiconductor electrode to be monitored in situ. The photovoltaic response on p-InP electrode was not perturbed by the presence of the silver overlayer. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman (SERR) spectroscopy has verified the adsorption of the products from the reduction reactions MV/sup 2 +/ + e/sup -/ ..-->.. MV/sup +/. and MV/sup +/. + e/sup -/ ..-->.. MV/sup 0/. The Raman spectrum of one-electron and two-electron (MV/sup 0/) reduced methylviologen was obtained by exhaustive electrolysis in acetonitrile solution to provide an assignment of the surface spectra. 31 references, 4 figures.

  3. A magnetic-field enriched surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy strategy towards the early diagnosis of malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Yuen; Liu, Quan

    2012-02-01

    Early malaria diagnosis is important because malaria disease can develop into fatal illness within hours upon the appearance of the first symptom. The low concentration of the diagnosis biomarker, hemozoin, at the early stage of malaria disease makes early diagnosis difficult. In this paper, we present a magnetic field-enriched surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) strategy for the sensitive detection of β - hematin crystals, which is equivalent to hemozoin in the characteristics of Raman spectrum, by using magnetic nanoparticles. We observe several orders of magnitude enhancement in the SERRS signal of enriched β - hematin in comparison to the Raman signal of β - hematin in the cases of SERRS alone or magnetic enrichment alone, showing the great potential of this method towards early malaria diagnosis.

  4. A magnetic-field enriched surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy strategy towards the early diagnosis of malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Clement; Liu, Quan

    2012-03-01

    Early malaria diagnosis is important because malaria disease can develop into fatal illness within hours upon the appearance of the first symptom. The low concentration of the diagnosis biomarker, hemozoin, at the early stage of malaria disease makes early diagnosis difficult. In this paper, we present a magnetic field-enriched surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) strategy for the sensitive detection of β - hematin crystals, which is equivalent to hemozoin in the characteristics of Raman spectrum, by using magnetic nanoparticles. We observe several orders of magnitude enhancement in the SERRS signal of enriched β - hematin in comparison to the Raman signal of β - hematin in the cases of SERRS alone or magnetic enrichment alone, showing the great potential of this method towards early malaria diagnosis.

  5. DNA sequence detection using surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy in a homogeneous multiplexed assay.

    PubMed

    MacAskill, Alexandra; Crawford, David; Graham, Duncan; Faulds, Karen

    2009-10-01

    Detection of specific DNA sequences is central to modern molecular biology and also to molecular diagnostics where identification of a particular disease is based on nucleic acid identification. Many methods exist, and fluorescence spectroscopy dominates the detection technologies employed with different assay formats. This study demonstrates the use of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) to detect specific DNA sequences when coupled with modified SERRS-active probes that have been designed to modify the affinity of double- and single-stranded DNA for the surface of silver nanoparticles resulting in discernible differences in the SERRS which can be correlated to the specific DNA hybridization event. The principle of the assay lies on the lack of affinity of double-stranded DNA for silver nanoparticle surfaces; therefore, hybridization of the probe to the target results in a reduction in the SERRS signal. Use of locked nucleic acid (LNA) residues in the DNA probes resulted in greater discrimination between exact match and mismatches when used in comparison to unmodified labeled DNA probes. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products were detected using this methodology, and ultimately a multiplex detection of sequences relating to a hospital-acquired infection, namely, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), demonstrated the versatility and applicability of this approach to real-life situations.

  6. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering of polyaniline on silver and gold colloids.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Celly M S; Andrade, Gustavo F S; Temperini, Marcia L A

    2008-12-25

    The interaction of emeraldine base (PANI-EB) with silver and gold colloids was probed by using Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering (SERRS) at 3 different exciting radiations. Due to the great sensitivity of SERRS technique the detection limit of PANI-EB concentration was ca. 2 x 10(-7) mol L(-1) in Ag and Au colloidal suspensions. The UV-vis-NIR spectra of metal colloids in function of PANI-EB concentrations showed that gold colloids present a higher degree of aggregation than silver colloids. SERRS of PANI-EB on metal colloids allowed the study of the polymeric species formed primarily on the metallic surface. The polymer formed after the adsorption of PANI-EB on metallic nanoparticles is strongly dependent on the nature of the metal colloids. The oxidation of PANI-EB to pernigraniline occurred for silver colloids, while a doping process of PANI-EB on Au nanoparticles was evidenced through the observation of the characteristic SERRS spectrum of emeraldine salt at 1064nm.

  7. Quadrupole-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Simon P; Swanglap, Pattanawit; Qian, Zhaoxia; Fang, Ying; Park, So-Jung; Link, Stephan; Engheta, Nader; Fakhraai, Zahra

    2014-09-23

    Dark, nonradiating plasmonic modes are important in the Raman enhancement efficiency of nanostructures. However, it is challenging to engineer such hotspots with predictable enhancement efficiency through synthesis routes. Here, we demonstrate that spiky nanoshells have designable quadrupole resonances that efficiently enhance Raman scattering with unprecedented reproducibility on the single particle level. The efficiency and reproducibility of Quadrupole Enhanced Raman Scattering (QERS) is due to their heterogeneous structure, which broadens the quadrupole resonance both spatially and spectrally. This spectral breadth allows for simultaneous enhancement of both the excitation and Stokes frequencies. The quadrupole resonance can be tuned by simple modifications of the nanoshell geometry. The combination of tunability, high efficiency, and reproducibility makes these nanoshells an excellent candidate for applications such as biosensing, nanoantennaes, and photovoltaics.

  8. Perturbative theory and modeling of electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy of nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehner, Joel P.; Naik, Sameer V.; Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Chai, Ning; Laurendeau, Normand M.; Lucht, Robert P.; Scully, Marlan O.; Roy, Sukesh; Patnaik, Anil K.; Gord, James R.

    2008-05-01

    A theory is developed for three-laser electronic-resonance-enhanced (ERE) coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy of nitric oxide (NO). A vibrational Q-branch Raman polarization is excited in the NO molecule by the frequency difference between visible Raman pump and Stokes beams. An ultraviolet probe beam is scattered from the induced Raman polarization to produce an ultraviolet ERE-CARS signal. The frequency of the ultraviolet probe beam is selected to be in electronic resonance with rotational transitions in the AΣ+2←XΠ2 (1,0) band of NO. This choice results in a resonance between the frequency of the ERE-CARS signal and transitions in the (0,0) band. The theoretical model for ERE-CARS NO spectra has been developed in the perturbative limit. Comparisons to experimental spectra are presented where either the probe laser was scanned with fixed Stokes frequency or the Stokes laser was scanned with fixed probe frequency. At atmospheric pressure and an NO concentration of 100ppm, good agreement is found between theoretical and experimental spectral peak locations and relative intensities for both types of spectra. Factors relating to saturation in the experiments are discussed, including implications for the theoretical predictions.

  9. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy as an ancillary high-performance liquid chromatography detector for nitrophenol compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, F.; Thomas, L.; Cotton, T.M. )

    1989-04-15

    In this study, the potential application of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) spectroscopy as an off-line secondary detector for HPLC has been evaluated. Four nitrophenol compounds, 2-nitrophenol, 4-nitrophenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, and 4,6-dinitrocresol were separated by isocratic reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and monitored with a conventional UV detector. Resonance Raman (RR) and SERRS spectroscopy were next used to provide the required specificity for distinguishing the nitrophenol compounds. The SERRS detection limit for both 2-nitrophenol and 4-nitrophenol was calculated to be 14 ppb and that for 2,4-dinitrophenol and 4,6-dinitrocresol was estimated to lie near the parts-per-billion level as well. This detection limit is 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than that obtained by RR spectroscopy.

  10. Quantitative evaluation of electromagnetic enhancement in surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering from plasmonic properties and morphologies of individual Ag nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Ken-Ichi; Itoh, Tamitake; Tamaru, Hiroharu; Biju, Vasudevanpillai; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2010-03-01

    The electromagnetic (EM) enhancement in surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) is quantitatively evaluated for rhodamine molecules adsorbed on Ag nanostructures. Polarization dependence of the plasma resonance (plasmon resonance) and the SERRS spectra from single isolated Ag nanostructures was evaluated to determine one-to-one relationship between optical anisotropy of plasma resonance, that of SERRS, and the morphology of the nanostructures. Experimental observations were compared with finite-difference time-domain calculations of the EM field induced by plasma resonance using individual morphology of the nanostructures. The experimental enhancement factor of SERRS ˜109 was consistent with that of the calculations within a factor of ˜2 for three excitation wavelengths. We conclusively fortify the indispensible importance of SERRS-EM theory with our results to design metal nanostructures generating strong EM enhancement.

  11. Dephasing and resonance electronic Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koningstein, J. A.

    1988-05-01

    The intensity of the resonance electronic Raman spectrum of terbium aluminum garnet is discussed in terms of radiative, non-radiative and pure electronic dephasing processes which govern the width of the resonating excited electronic state. As a result of fast electronic dephasing in comparison to the other processes, the enhancement of the intensity of the electronic Raman band of the terbium ion is suppressed.

  12. Resonant Raman scattering from CdS nanocrystals enhanced by interstitial Mn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P. Q.; Liu, L. Z.; Xue, H. T.; Wu, X. L.; Shen, J. C.; Chu, Paul K.

    2013-02-01

    Different Raman scattering effects are observed from CdS and Mn-doped CdS nanocrystals (NCs) with an average size of 5.1 nm synthesized by the reverse-micelle method. The intensity of the longitudinal optical (LO) phonon spectrum acquired from the Mn-doped CdS NCs is more than 20 times larger than that from the undoped CdS NCs. Spectroscopic and theoretical analyses reveal that the enhancement is caused by the interstitial Mn dopants, which decrease the NC surface deformation potential due to the small dielectric constant of the metal resulting in enhanced coupling between the LO phonon and surface plasmon.

  13. Magnetic immunoassay for cancer biomarker detection based on surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering from coupled plasmonic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Rong, Zhen; Wang, Chongwen; Wang, Junfeng; Wang, Donggen; Xiao, Rui; Wang, Shengqi

    2016-10-15

    A surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) sensor was developed for the ultrasensitive detection of cancer biomarkers. Capture antibody-coated silver shell magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4@Ag MNPs) were utilized as the CEA enrichment platform and the SERRS signal amplification substrate. Gold nanorods (AuNRs) were coated with a thin silver shell to be in resonance with the resonant Raman dye diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTC) and the excitation wavelength at 785nm. The silver-coated AuNRs (Au@Ag NRs) were then modified with detection antibody as the SERRS tags. Sandwich immune complexes formed in the presence of the target biomarker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and this formation induced the plasmonic coupling between the Au@Ag NRs and Fe3O4@Ag MNPs. The SERRS signal of DTTC molecules located in the coupled plasmonic nanostructures was significantly enhanced. As a result, the proposed SERRS sensor was able to detect CEA with a low limit of detection of 4.75fg/mL and a wide dynamic linear range from 10fg/mL to 100ng/mL. The sensor provides a novel SERRS strategy for trace analyte detection and has a potential for clinical applications.

  14. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering spectroscopy applied to phytochrome and its model compounds. 2. Phytochrome and phycocyanin chromophores

    SciTech Connect

    Farrens, D.L.; Holt, R.E.; Rospendowski, B.N.; Song, Pillsoon; Cotton, T.M. )

    1989-12-20

    Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) spectra of phytochrome at 77 K are reported. The spectra reveal significant differences between Pr and Pfr forms of phytochrome. SERRS spectra of C-phycocyanin Z,Z,Z- and Z,Z,E-chromopeptide isomers at 77 K are also reported. The phycocyanin chromopeptide studies are used to provide a basis for interpreting the phytochrome SERRS spectra. The spectra indicate that photoisomerization of chromophores from C-phycocyanin chromopeptides (from a Z,Z,Z to a Z,Z,E configuration) is detectable with SERRS.

  15. Resonant surface enhancement of Raman scattering of Ag nanoparticles on silicon substrates fabricated by dc sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Yingcui; Li Xiaxi; Blinn, Kevin; Mahmoud, Mahmoud A.; Liu Meilin

    2012-09-15

    Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) were deposited onto silicon substrates by direct current (dc) magnetron sputtering. The influences of sputtering power and sputtering time on the AgNP film morphology were studied using atomic force microscopy. The particle size was successfully tuned from 19 nm to 53 nm by varying the sputtering time at a dc power of 10 W. When Rhodamine 6 G (R6G) was used as the probe molecule, the AgNP films showed significant surface enhanced Raman scattering effect. In particular, it is found that larger particles show stronger enhancement for lower concentrations of R6G while smaller particles display stronger enhancement for higher concentrations of R6G.

  16. Electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering of nitric oxide: Saturation and Stark effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Ning; Lucht, Robert P.; Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.

    2010-08-01

    A theoretical analysis of electronic-resonance-enhanced (ERE) coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) of NO is described. The time-dependent density-matrix equations for the nonlinear ERE-CARS process are derived and manipulated into a form suitable for direct numerical integration. In the ERE-CARS configuration considered in this paper, the pump and Stokes beams are far from electronic-resonance. The visible 532 and 591 nm laser beams are used to excite Q-branch Raman resonances in the vibrational bands of the X Π2 electronic state of NO. An ultraviolet probe beam at 236 nm is used to excite P-, Q-, or R-branch transitions in the (v '=0, v″=1) band of the A Σ2+-X Π2 electronic system of NO molecule. Experimental spectra are obtained either by scanning the ultraviolet probe beam while keeping the Stokes frequency fixed (probe scans) or by scanning the Stokes frequency while keeping the probe frequency fixed (Stokes scans). The calculated NO ERE-CARS spectra are compared with experimental spectra, and good agreement is observed between theory and experiment in terms of spectral peak locations and relative intensities. The effects of saturation of the two-photon Raman-resonant Q-branch transitions, the saturation of a one-photon electronic-resonant P-, Q-, or R-branch transitions in the A Σ2+-X Π2 electronic system, and the coupling of these saturation processes are investigated. The coupling of the saturation processes for the probe and Raman transitions is complex and exhibits behavior similar to that observed in the electromagnetic induced transparency process. The probe scan spectra are significantly affected by Stark broadening due to the interaction of the pump and Stokes radiation with single-photon resonances between the upper vibration-rotation probe level in the A Σ2+ electronic levels and vibration-rotation levels in higher lying electronic levels. The ERE-CARS signal intensity is found to be much less sensitive to variations in the

  17. Nitric oxide concentration measurements in atmospheric pressure flames using electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, N.; Kulatilaka, W. D.; Naik, S. V.; Laurendeau, N. M.; Lucht, R. P.; Kuehner, J. P.; Roy, S.; Katta, V. R.; Gord, J. R.

    2007-06-01

    We report the application of electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (ERE-CARS) for measurements of nitric oxide concentration ([NO]) in three different atmospheric pressure flames. Visible pump (532 nm) and Stokes (591 nm) beams are used to probe the Q-branch of the Raman transition. A significant resonance enhancement is obtained by tuning an ultraviolet probe beam (236 nm) into resonance with specific rotational transitions in the (v’=0, v”=1) vibrational band of the A2Σ+-X2Π electronic system of NO. ERE-CARS spectra are recorded at various heights within a hydrogen-air flame producing relatively low concentrations of NO over a Hencken burner. Good agreement is obtained between NO ERE-CARS measurements and the results of flame computations using UNICORN, a two-dimensional flame code. Excellent agreement between measured and calculated NO spectra is also obtained when using a modified version of the Sandia CARSFT code for heavily sooting acetylene-air flames (φ=0.8 to φ=1.6) on the same Hencken burner. Finally, NO concentration profiles are measured using ERE-CARS in a laminar, counter-flow, non-premixed hydrogen-air flame. Spectral scans are recorded by probing the Q1 (9.5), Q1 (13.5) and Q1 (17.5) Raman transitions. The measured shape of the [NO] profile is in good agreement with that predicted using the OPPDIF code, even without correcting for collisional effects. These comparisons between [NO] measurements and predictions establish the utility of ERE-CARS for detection of NO in flames with large temperature and concentration gradients as well as in sooting environments.

  18. Magnetic assistance highly sensitive protein assay based on surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Hong, Wonjin; Guo, Zhinan; Sa, Youngjo; Wang, Xu; Jung, Young Mee; Zhao, Bing

    2012-02-15

    A simple and effective surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based protocol for the detection of protein-small molecule interactions has been developed. We employed silver-coated magnetic particles (AgMNPs), which can provide high SERS activity as a protein carrier to capture a small molecule. Combining magnetic separation and the SERS method for protein detection, highly reproducible SERS spectra of a protein-small molecule complex can be obtained with high sensitivity. This time-saving method employs an external magnetic field to induce the AgMNPs to aggregate to increase the amount of atto610-biotin/avidin complex in a unit area with the SERS enhancement. Because of the contribution of the AgMNP aggregation to the SERS, this protocol has great potential for practical high-throughput detection of the protein-small molecule complex and the antigen-antibody immunocomplex.

  19. Theoretical studies of Resonance Enhance Stimulated Raman Scattering (RESRS) of frequency doubled Alexandrite laser wavelengths in cesium vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.

    1986-01-01

    It is well known that the presence of a real atomic level which is nearly resonant with the pump field can greatly enhance the Raman emission cross section. In order to accurately calculate the Raman gain in systems where resonance enhancement plays a dominant role, expressions for the pump and signal susceptibilities must be derived. These expressions should be valid for arbitrary field strengths in order to allow for pump and signal saturation. In addition, the theory should allow for arbitrary longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates. This latter point is extremely vital for three level atomic systems such as the alkali earth metals since they do not have population reservoirs and can have widely varying spontaneous lifetimes on the three pertinent transitions. Moreover, the dephasing rates are strong functions of electron states and are therefore also different for the three coupled pairs of levels. These considerations are not as important when molecular systems are concerned since the large reservoir of rotational states serve to produce essentially equal longitudinal recovery rates for the population of the three levels. The three level system with three arbitrary longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates was solved. There is no need for setting either pair of rates equal and the expressions are valid for arbitrarily strong fields.

  20. Theoretical studies of resonance enhance stimulated raman scattering (RESRS) of frequency doubled Alexandrite laser wavelengths in cesium vapor. Semiannual report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawandy, N.M.

    1986-01-01

    It is well known that the presence of a real atomic level which is nearly resonant with the pump field can greatly enhance the Raman emission cross section. In order to accurately calculate the Raman gain in systems where resonance enhancement plays a dominant role, expressions for the pump and signal susceptibilities must be derived. These expressions should be valid for arbitrary field strengths in order to allow for pump and signal saturation. In addition, the theory should allow for arbitrary longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates. This latter point is extremely vital for three level atomic systems such as the alkali earth metals since they do not have population reservoirs and can have widely varying spontaneous lifetimes on the three pertinent transitions. Moreover, the dephasing rates are strong functions of electron states and are therefore also different for the three coupled pairs of levels. These considerations are not as important when molecular systems are concerned since the large reservoir of rotational states serve to produce essentially equal longitudinal recovery rates for the population of the three levels. The three level system with three arbitrary longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates was solved. There is no need for setting either pair of rates equal and the expressions are valid for arbitrarily strong fields.

  1. Analysis of structure-function relationships in cytochrome c oxidase and its biomimetic analogs via resonance Raman and surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Weidinger, Inez M

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the four electron reduction of molecular oxygen to water while avoiding the formation of toxic peroxide; a quality that is of high relevance for the development of oxygen-reducing catalysts. Resonance Raman spectroscopy has been used since many years as a technique to identify electron transfer pathways in cytochrome c oxidase and to identify the key intermediates in the catalytic cycle. This information can be compared to artificial systems such as modified heme-copper enzymes, molecular heme-copper catalysts or CcO/electrode complexes in order to shed light into the reaction mechanism of these non-natural systems. Understanding the structural commonalities and differences of CcO with its non-natural analogs is of great value for designing efficient oxygen-reducing catalysts. In this review therefore Raman spectroscopic measurements on artificial heme-copper enzymes and model complexes are summarized and compared to the natural enzyme cytochrome c oxidase. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vibrational spectroscopies and bioenergetic systems.

  2. Enhanced Raman spectrum of pyrazine with the aid of resonant electron dynamics in a nearby cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Masashi; Yasuike, Tomokazu; Nobusada, Katsuyuki; Hayashi, Michitoshi

    2012-10-01

    Considerable enhancement of the electric dipole excitation in a pyrazine molecule is computationally demonstrated even under the nonresonant condition with the aid of resonant electron dynamics in a nearby linear Na4 cluster. A real-time and real-space electron dynamics simulation based on time-dependent density functional theory illustrates the details of the enhanced electric dipole excitation through analysis of the time-dependent dipole moment induced in the pyrazine molecule. Specific vibrational normal modes in the molecular plane of pyrazine are found to effectively couple with the photoinduced electronic oscillation of Na4.

  3. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering of cytochrome P450-2D6 on coated silver hydrosols.

    PubMed

    Bonifacio, Alois; Keizers, Peter H J; Vermeulen, Nico P E; Commandeur, Jan N M; Gooijer, Cees; van der Zwan, Gert

    2007-02-13

    Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) from dilute solutions (down to nanomolar concentrations) of human mono-oxygenase CYP2D6 is observed using aqueous dispersions of Ag nanoparticles (hydrosol) coated with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of mercaptoalkanoic acids of two different lengths. From a direct comparison with its resonance Raman spectrum in solution, CYP2D6 appears to fully retain its native structure upon adsorption on coated hydrosol through electrostatic interaction, while a structural change in the active site is observed when uncoated citrate-reduced hydrosol is used. Using SERRS on these biocompatible coated hydrosols, the effects of dextromethorphan on the enzyme's active site can be observed, demonstrating that CYP2D6 ability of binding substrates is preserved. Moreover, by tuning the wavelength of the exciting laser away from the main absorption band of the heme, the vibrational bands of the SAM coating are observed and analyzed to see how the presence of the protein affects the SAM structure.

  4. The double-resonance enhancement of stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering in silver-capped nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, A. N.; Butsen, A. V.; Ionin, A. A.; Ivanova, A. K.; Kuchmizhak, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Kudryavtseva, A. D.; Levchenko, A. O.; Rudenko, A. A.; Saraeva, I. N.; Strokov, M. A.; Tcherniega, N. V.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2017-09-01

    Hybrid plasmonic-dielectric nano- and (sub)microparticles exhibit magnetic and electrical dipolar Mie-resonances, which makes them useful as efficient basic elements in surface-enhanced spectroscopy, non-linear light conversion and nanoscale light control. We report the stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering (SLFRS) of a nanosecond ruby laser radiation (central wavelength λ = 694.3 nm (full-width at half-maximum ≈ 0.015 cm-1), gaussian 1/e-intensity pulsewidth τ ≈ 20 ns, TEM00-mode pulse energy Emax ≈ 0.3 J) in nanodiamond (R ≈ 120 nm) hydrosols, induced via optomechanical coherent excitation of fundamental breathing eigen-modes, and the two-fold enhancement of SLFRS in Ag-decorated nanodiamonds, characterized by hybrid dipolar resonances of electrical (silver) and magnetic (diamond) nature. Hybrid metal-dielectric particles were prepared by means of nanosecond IR-laser ablation of solid silver target in diamond hydrosols with consecutive Ag-capping of diamonds, and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, UV-vis, photoluminescence and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Intensities of the SLFR-scattered components and their size-dependent spectral shifts were measured in the highly sensitive stimulated scattering regime, indicating the high (≈ 30%) SLFRS conversion efficiency and the resonant character of the scattering species.

  5. Detection and imaging of quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm communities by surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodelón, Gustavo; Montes-García, Verónica; López-Puente, Vanesa; Hill, Eric H.; Hamon, Cyrille; Sanz-Ortiz, Marta N.; Rodal-Cedeira, Sergio; Costas, Celina; Celiksoy, Sirin; Pérez-Juste, Ignacio; Scarabelli, Leonardo; La Porta, Andrea; Pérez-Juste, Jorge; Pastoriza-Santos, Isabel; Liz-Marzán, Luis M.

    2016-11-01

    Most bacteria in nature exist as biofilms, which support intercellular signalling processes such as quorum sensing (QS), a cell-to-cell communication mechanism that allows bacteria to monitor and respond to cell density and changes in the environment. As QS and biofilms are involved in the ability of bacteria to cause disease, there is a need for the development of methods for the non-invasive analysis of QS in natural bacterial populations. Here, by using surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering spectroscopy, we report rationally designed nanostructured plasmonic substrates for the in situ, label-free detection of a QS signalling metabolite in growing Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and microcolonies. The in situ, non-invasive plasmonic imaging of QS in biofilms provides a powerful analytical approach for studying intercellular communication on the basis of secreted molecules as signals.

  6. Detection and imaging of quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm communities by surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering

    PubMed Central

    Bodelón, Gustavo; Montes-García, Verónica; López-Puente, Vanesa; Hill, Eric H.; Hamon, Cyrille; Sanz-Ortiz, Marta N.; Rodal-Cedeira, Sergio; Costas, Celina; Celiksoy, Sirin; Pérez-Juste, Ignacio; Scarabelli, Leonardo; Porta, Andrea La; Pérez-Juste, Jorge; Pastoriza-Santos, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Most bacteria in nature exist as biofilms, which support intercellular signaling processes such as quorum sensing (QS), a cell-to-cell communication mechanism that allows bacteria to monitor and respond to cell density and changes in the environment. Because QS and biofilms are involved in the ability of bacteria to cause disease, there is a need for the development of methods for the non-invasive analysis of QS in natural bacterial populations. Here, by using surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering spectroscopy, we report rationally designed nanostructured plasmonic substrates for the in-situ, label-free detection of a QS signaling metabolite in growing Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and microcolonies. The in situ, non-invasive plasmonic imaging of QS in biofilms provides a powerful analytical approach for studying intercellular communication on the basis of secreted molecules as signals. PMID:27500808

  7. Effects of quenching on electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering of nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sukesh; Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Naik, Sameer V.; Laurendeau, Normand M.; Lucht, Robert P.; Gord, James R.

    2006-09-01

    We investigate the effects of gas-mixture composition on the electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (ERE-CARS) signals of nitric oxide (NO). From previous laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) studies, quenching rates are known to change drastically, by factors of 400-800, in mixtures of CO2/O2/N2. The observed ERE-CARS signal remains constant to within 30% whereas LIF signals from NO are predicted to decrease by more than two orders of magnitudes in the same environments. This is very significant for using NO ERE-CARS in high-pressure combustion environments where the electronic quenching rate can vary rapidly as a function of both space and time.

  8. Characterization and identification of contraband using UV resonant Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, Richard J.; Hayward, Ian P.; Sands, H. S.; Batchelder, David N.

    1997-02-01

    A range of explosives and narcotics have been examined using Raman spectroscopy with 244 nm excitation. This wavelength of excitation eliminates the fluorescence problems associated with excitation at visible wavelengths. Comparison with spectra obtained using visible excitation reveals that resonance Raman scattering is occurring. This results in simplified spectra, and enhanced Raman scattering efficiencies.

  9. Rapid analysis of malachite green and leucomalachite green in fish muscles with surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Wansong; Pei, Lu; Lai, Keqiang; Rasco, Barbara A; Huang, Yiqun

    2015-02-15

    Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) coupled with gold nanospheres was applied for rapid analysis of the hazardous substances malachite green (MG) and leucomalachite green (LMG) in fish muscle tissues. The lowest concentration of MG that could be detected was 0.5ngmL(-1) with high linear correlation (R(2)=0.970-0.998) between MG concentration and intensities of characteristic Raman peaks. A simplified sample preparation method taking less than 1h for recovering MG and LMG in fish fillets was developed for SERRS analysis, and 4-8 samples could be handled in parallel. MG and LMG could be detected in extracts of tilapia fish fillets at as low as 2ngg(-1) with SERRS and a simple principle component analysis method. For six other fish species, the lowest detectable concentration of MG ranged from 1ngg(-1) to 10ngg(-1). This study provides a new sensitive approach for the detection of trace amounts of the prohibited drugs MG and LMG in muscle food, which has the potential for rapidly screening a large number of samples.

  10. Effects of collisions on electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering of nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patnaik, Anil K.; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.; Lucht, Robert P.; Settersten, Thomas B.

    2009-06-01

    A six-level model is developed and used to study the effects of collisional energy transfer and dephasing on electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (ERE-CARS) in nitric oxide. The model includes the three levels that are coherently coupled by the three applied lasers as well as three additional bath levels that enable inclusion of the effects of electronic quenching and rotational energy transfer. The density-matrix equations that describe the evolution of the relevant populations and coherences are presented. The parametric dependencies of the ERE-CARS signal on collisional energy transfer and dephasing processes are described in terms of both a steady-state analytical solution and the numerical solutions to the governing equations. In the weak-field limit, the ERE-CARS signal scales inversely with the square of the dephasing rates for the electronic and Raman coherences. In accord with published experimental observations [Roy et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 104105 (2006)], the ERE-CARS signal is shown to be insensitive to the collisional quenching rate. Parametric dependencies on quenching, rotational energy transfer, and pure electronic dephasing are presented, demonstrating reduced collisional dependence for saturating laser fields.

  11. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering on silvered porous alumina templates: role of multipolar surface plasmon resonant modes.

    PubMed

    Terekhov, S N; Kachan, S M; Panarin, A Yu; Mojzes, P

    2015-12-21

    Nanostructured silver films with different thicknesses were prepared by vapor deposition onto the surface of the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template to be used as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) active substrates. Both the peak position of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band and SERS enhancement of silvered AAO samples displayed non-monotonous dependence on Ag layer thickness. Using 441.6 nm excitation and a water-soluble cationic porphyrin, Cu(ii)-tetrakis(4-N-methylpyridyl) (CuTMPyP4), as a SERS-reporting analyte, two maxima of the SERS enhancement were obtained for Ag layers of 15 and 120 nm thickness. Thickness dependencies have been analyzed taking into account the type of SPR modes identified by means of quasicrystalline approximation (QCA) of statistical theory of multiple scattering of waves and multi-Lorentzian deconvolution. The analysis revealed that SERS enhancement is related to the absolute magnitude of the distance between excitation wavelength and spectral position of collective SPR mode. It was shown that matching of excitation wavelength and the most intensive SPR modes with non-radiative decay, generated mainly by coherent interaction of higher-order plasmon resonant modes (quadrupole and octupole), plays a dominate role in SERS performance. Besides, it has been observed that more intense SERS signal can be obtained when the analyte deposited on the Ag/AAO substrate was excited through the AAO template rather than from the silvered side. Our results demonstrate that appropriate excitation geometry and fine-tuning of the optical properties of the Ag/AAO substrate by adjusting the thickness of the Ag layer with respect to particular excitation wavelength can contribute to more effective SERS enhancement.

  12. Third-order nonlinearities in molecular hydrogen - Two-photon resonance enhanced third-harmonic generation and Raman scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, C.-L.; She, C.-Y.; Fairbank, W. M., Jr.; Billman, K. W.

    1977-01-01

    Effects of quantum mechanical interferences on third-order susceptibilities in molecules are studied. First principle calculations for molecular hydrogen are presented and shown to agree with results derived from experimental stimulated Raman gain and spontaneous Raman cross-section data. 10 percent third-harmonic conversion efficiency in H2 at 1 atm without phase matching should require a 150 MW per sq cm at 4.81 microns. As little as 5.9-MW power is sufficient when the beam is properly focused. Resonance Raman scattering (RRS) is proposed for experimentally investigating the interference effects, which tend to reduce the strength of third-order nonlinear susceptibilities.

  13. Avoiding Ethanol Presence in DNA Samples Enhances the Performance of Ultraviolet Resonance Raman Spectroscopy Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cammisuli, Francesca; Pascolo, Lorella; Morgutti, Marcello; Gessini, Alessandro; Masciovecchio, Claudio; D'Amico, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Ethanol is an essential chemical reagent in DNA preparation as its use increases the yield of extraction. All methodologies for DNA isolation involve the use of ethanol in order to prevent DNA dissolution in water and to optimize the binding of DNA to chromatographic membranes. In this note, we show how the presence of ethanol traces in DNA aqueous solution affects ultraviolet Raman spectra, leading to possible misinterpretations. We report a simple method to remove the ethanol Raman features from the spectra, based on heating the DNA sample at 80 ℃, followed by a slow cooling procedure.

  14. Resonant Cavity Enhanced On-Chip Raman Spectrometer Array with Precisely Positioned Metallic Nano-Gaps for Single Molecule Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-22

    fabricated multi-segment gold nanowires with different diameters using electroplating, and formed nanogaps from 5nm to 50nm by sacrificial chemical etching...electroplating, and formed nanogaps from 5nm to 50nm by sacrificial chemical etching. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) characterization using these...nanowires with different diameters using electroplating, and formed nanogaps from 5nm to 50nm by sacrificial chemical etching. Surface enhanced Raman

  15. Electride Mediated Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An electride may provide surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The electride, a compound where the electrons serve as anions, may be a ceramic electride, such as a conductive ceramic derived from mayenite, or an organic electride, for example. The textured electride surface or electride particles may strongly enhance the Raman scattering of organic or other Raman active analytes. This may also provide a sensitive method for monitoring the chemistry and electronic environment at the electride surface. The results are evidence of a new class of polariton (i.e., a surface electride-polariton resonance mechanism) that is analogous to the surface plasmon-polariton resonance that mediates conventional SERS.

  16. Near-field and confocal surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Anger, P; Feltz, A; Berghaus, T; Meixner, A J

    2003-03-01

    For laser spectroscopy at variable temperatures with high spatial resolution a combined scanning near-field optical and confocal microscope was developed. Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye molecules dispersed on silver nano-particles or nano-clusters were investigated. For optical excitation of the molecules, either an aperture probe or a focused laser spot in confocal arrangement were employed. Raman spectra in the wavenumber range between 300 cm-1 and 3000 cm-1 at room temperatures down to 8.5 K were recorded. Many of the observed Raman lines can be associated with the structure of the adsorbed molecule. Intensity fluctuations in spectral sequences were observed down to 77 K and are indicative of single molecule sensitivity.

  17. Multiple relaxation and inhomogeneous broadening in resonance enhanced Raman scattering - Application to tunable infrared generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. C.; Lawandy, N. M.

    1989-01-01

    The solutions for the imaginary susceptibility of the Raman field transition with arbitrary relaxation rates and field strengths are examined for differing sets of relaxation rates with emphasis on alkali metal vapors which have spontaneous emission dominated relaxation. The model is further expanded to include Doppler broadening and used to predict the peak gain as a function of detuning for a frequency doubled alexandrite laser-pumped cesium vapor gain cell.

  18. Multiple relaxation and inhomogeneous broadening in resonance enhanced Raman scattering - Application to tunable infrared generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. C.; Lawandy, N. M.

    1989-01-01

    The solutions for the imaginary susceptibility of the Raman field transition with arbitrary relaxation rates and field strengths are examined for differing sets of relaxation rates with emphasis on alkali metal vapors which have spontaneous emission dominated relaxation. The model is further expanded to include Doppler broadening and used to predict the peak gain as a function of detuning for a frequency doubled alexandrite laser-pumped cesium vapor gain cell.

  19. Strong dependence of surface plasmon resonance and surface enhanced Raman scattering on the composition of Au-Fe nanoalloys.

    PubMed

    Amendola, Vincenzo; Scaramuzza, Stefano; Agnoli, Stefano; Polizzi, Stefano; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2014-01-01

    Nanoalloys of noble metals with transition metals are crucial components for the integration of plasmonics with magnetic and catalytic properties, as well as for the production of low-cost photonic devices. However, due to synthetic challenges in the realization of nanoscale solid solutions of noble metals and transition metals, very little is known about the composition dependence of plasmonic response in nanoalloys. Here we demonstrate for the first time that the elemental composition of Au-Fe nanoalloys obtained by laser ablation in liquid solution can be tuned by varying the liquid environment. Due to surface passivation and reaction with thiolated ligands, the nanoalloys obtained by our synthetic protocol are structurally and colloidally stable. Hence, we studied the dependence of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) on the iron fraction and, for the first time, we observed surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) in Au-Fe nanoalloys. SPR and SERS performances are strongly affected by the iron content and are investigated using analytical and numerical models. By demonstrating the strong modification of plasmonic properties on the composition, our results provide important insights into the exploitation of Au-Fe nanoalloys in photonics, nanomedicine, magneto-plasmonic and plasmon-enhanced catalysis. Moreover, our findings show that several other plasmonic materials exist beyond gold and silver nanostructures.

  20. Long-range surface plasmon resonance and surface-enhanced Raman scattering on X-shaped gold plasmonic nanohole arrays.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chao; Galvan, Daniel David; Meng, Guowen; Yu, Qiuming

    2017-09-13

    A multilayered architecture including a thin Au film supporting an X-shaped nanohole array and a thick continuous Au film separated by a Cytop dielectric layer is reported in this work. Long-range surface plasmon resonance (LR-SPR) was generated at the top Au/water interface, which also resulted in a long-range surface-enhanced Raman scattering (LR-SERS) effect. LR-SPR originates from the coupling of surface plasmons (SPs) propagating along the opposite sides of the thin Au film embedded in a symmetric refractive index environment with Cytop (n = 1.34) and water (n = 1.33). The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation method was used to investigate the optimal dimensions of the substrate by studying the reflectance spectra and electric field profiles. The calculated optimal structure was then fabricated via electron beam lithography, and its LR-SERS performance was demonstrated by detecting rhodamine 6G and 4-mercaptobenzoic acid in the refractive index-matched environment. We believe that this structure as a LR-SPR or LR-SERS substrate can have broad applications in biosensing.

  1. Microanalysis of organic pigments and glazes in polychrome works of art by surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering

    PubMed Central

    Leona, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Scientific studies of works of art are usually limited by severe sampling restrictions. The identification of organic colorants, a class of compounds relevant for attribution and provenance studies, is further complicated by the low concentrations at which these compounds are used and by the interference of the protein-, gum-, or oil-binding media present in pigment and glaze samples. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) was successfully used to identify natural organic colorants in archaeological objects, polychrome sculptures, and paintings from samples smaller than 25 μm in diameter. The key factors in achieving the necessary sensitivity were a highly active stabilized silver colloid, obtained by the reproducible microwave-supported reduction of silver sulfate with glucose and sodium citrate, and a non-extractive hydrolysis sample treatment procedure that maximizes dye adsorption on the colloid. Among the examples presented are the earliest so far found occurrence of madder lake (in a 4,000 years old Egyptian object dating to the Middle Kingdom period), and the earliest known occurrence in Europe of the South Asian dyestuff lac (in the Morgan Madonna, a 12th century polychrome sculpture from Auvergne, France). PMID:19667181

  2. Microanalysis of organic pigments and glazes in polychrome works of art by surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Leona, Marco

    2009-09-01

    Scientific studies of works of art are usually limited by severe sampling restrictions. The identification of organic colorants, a class of compounds relevant for attribution and provenance studies, is further complicated by the low concentrations at which these compounds are used and by the interference of the protein-, gum-, or oil-binding media present in pigment and glaze samples. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) was successfully used to identify natural organic colorants in archaeological objects, polychrome sculptures, and paintings from samples smaller than 25 microm in diameter. The key factors in achieving the necessary sensitivity were a highly active stabilized silver colloid, obtained by the reproducible microwave-supported reduction of silver sulfate with glucose and sodium citrate, and a non-extractive hydrolysis sample treatment procedure that maximizes dye adsorption on the colloid. Among the examples presented are the earliest so far found occurrence of madder lake (in a 4,000 years old Egyptian object dating to the Middle Kingdom period), and the earliest known occurrence in Europe of the South Asian dyestuff lac (in the Morgan Madonna, a 12th century polychrome sculpture from Auvergne, France).

  3. Effects of pressure variations on electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering of nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Chai, Ning; Naik, Sameer V.; Roy, Sukesh; Laurendeau, Normand M.; Lucht, Robert P.; Kuehner, Joel P.; Gord, James R.

    2007-06-01

    The effects of pressure variations on the electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (ERE-CARS) signal of nitric oxide (NO) were studied at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 8 bar. ERE-CARS signals were recorded in a gas cell filled with a mixture of 300 ppm NO in N 2 buffer gas at room temperature. The ERE-CARS signal was found to increase with rising pressure up to 2 bar and to remain nearly constant thereafter. The spectra recorded at different cell pressures were modeled using a modified version of the Sandia CARSFT code. Laser-saturation effects were accounted for by systematically varying the theoretical ultraviolet probe-laser linewidth. Excellent agreement was obtained between theory and experiment for the pressure-scaling behavior of the ERE-CARS signal of NO. This finding, along with a negligible influence of electronic quenching on the ERE-CARS signal, provides strong incentive for the application of ERE-CARS to measurements of NO concentrations in high-pressure combustion environments.

  4. Detection of DNA Sequences Refractory to PCR Amplification Using a Biophysical SERRS Assay (Surface Enhanced Resonant Raman Spectroscopy)

    PubMed Central

    Feuillie, Cécile; Merheb, Maxime M.; Gillet, Benjamin; Montagnac, Gilles; Daniel, Isabelle; Hänni, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of ancient or processed DNA samples is often a great challenge, because traditional Polymerase Chain Reaction – based amplification is impeded by DNA damage. Blocking lesions such as abasic sites are known to block the bypass of DNA polymerases, thus stopping primer elongation. In the present work, we applied the SERRS-hybridization assay, a fully non-enzymatic method, to the detection of DNA refractory to PCR amplification. This method combines specific hybridization with detection by Surface Enhanced Resonant Raman Scattering (SERRS). It allows the detection of a series of double-stranded DNA molecules containing a varying number of abasic sites on both strands, when PCR failed to detect the most degraded sequences. Our SERRS approach can quickly detect DNA molecules without any need for DNA repair. This assay could be applied as a pre-requisite analysis prior to enzymatic reparation or amplification. A whole new set of samples, both forensic and archaeological, could then deliver information that was not yet available due to a high degree of DNA damage. PMID:25502338

  5. Sensitive marker bands for the detection of spin states of heme in surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering spectra of metmyoglobin.

    PubMed

    Kitahama, Yasutaka; Egashira, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Tanabe, Ichiro; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2014-12-21

    Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) spectra of myoglobin (Mb) with various ligands were measured. In the resonance Raman scattering (RRS) spectra, peaks at around 1610 and 1640 cm(-1) have so far been used to discriminate between the heme iron in a high or low spin state. In the SERRS spectra, however, the spin state cannot be distinguished by the corresponding peaks. Alternatively, the intensity ratio of the SERRS peak at 1560 cm(-1) to that at 1620 cm(-1) was applied to detect the spin states sensitively (1.5 × 10(5) times compared with the RRS); namely, a high ratio was obtained from met-Mb in the high spin state at pH ≤ 7 except for in a strong acid solution. The different marker bands between the SERRS and RRS spectra may be due to the enhancement order from the surface selection rule.

  6. Electronic resonances in broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batignani, G.; Pontecorvo, E.; Giovannetti, G.; Ferrante, C.; Fumero, G.; Scopigno, T.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy is a formidable tool to probe molecular vibrations. Under electronic resonance conditions, the cross section can be selectively enhanced enabling structural sensitivity to specific chromophores and reaction centers. The addition of an ultrashort, broadband femtosecond pulse to the excitation field allows for coherent stimulation of diverse molecular vibrations. Within such a scheme, vibrational spectra are engraved onto a highly directional field, and can be heterodyne detected overwhelming fluorescence and other incoherent signals. At variance with spontaneous resonance Raman, however, interpreting the spectral information is not straightforward, due to the manifold of field interactions concurring to the third order nonlinear response. Taking as an example vibrational spectra of heme proteins excited in the Soret band, we introduce a general approach to extract the stimulated Raman excitation profiles from complex spectral lineshapes. Specifically, by a quantum treatment of the matter through density matrix description of the third order nonlinear polarization, we identify the contributions which generate the Raman bands, by taking into account for the cross section of each process.

  7. Perspective: Two-dimensional resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molesky, Brian P.; Guo, Zhenkun; Cheshire, Thomas P.; Moran, Andrew M.

    2016-11-01

    Two-dimensional resonance Raman (2DRR) spectroscopy has been developed for studies of photochemical reaction mechanisms and structural heterogeneity in complex systems. The 2DRR method can leverage electronic resonance enhancement to selectively probe chromophores embedded in complex environments (e.g., a cofactor in a protein). In addition, correlations between the two dimensions of the 2DRR spectrum reveal information that is not available in traditional Raman techniques. For example, distributions of reactant and product geometries can be correlated in systems that undergo chemical reactions on the femtosecond time scale. Structural heterogeneity in an ensemble may also be reflected in the 2D spectroscopic line shapes of both reactive and non-reactive systems. In this perspective article, these capabilities of 2DRR spectroscopy are discussed in the context of recent applications to the photodissociation reactions of triiodide and myoglobin. We also address key differences between the signal generation mechanisms for 2DRR and off-resonant 2D Raman spectroscopies. Most notably, it has been shown that these two techniques are subject to a tradeoff between sensitivity to anharmonicity and susceptibility to artifacts. Overall, recent experimental developments and applications of the 2DRR method suggest great potential for the future of the technique.

  8. Raman enhancement by individual silver hemispheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babich, Ekaterina S.; Redkov, Alexey V.; Reduto, Igor V.; Scherbak, Sergey A.; Kamenskii, Aleksandr N.; Lipovskii, Andrey A.

    2017-03-01

    A study of Raman scattering enhancement by single hemispheroidal silver nanoislands grown on a glass surface via out-diffusion technique combined with thermal poling of the glass is presented. It was demonstrated in the experiments and confirmed by numerical modeling that maximal enhancement of Raman signal occurs when the diameter of a silver nanoisland fell between 90 and 115 nm, and the thickness of the Rhodamine 6G dye analyte layer was ∼3 nm. In this case the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in the silver hemispheroid corresponded to the wavelength of the laser used to excite Raman scattering, 532 nm, and maximal enhancement by an single hemispheroidal nanoisland, ∼5 × 107, was close to one provided by a typical silver nanoisland film. Varying lateral diameter of the silver hemispheroid allowed us shifting the SPR wavelength and enhancing particular lines in R6G Raman spectra.

  9. Sensitive Trimodal Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering-Fluorescence Detection of Cancer Cells with Stable Magneto-Plasmonic Nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Carrouée, Ambre; Allard-Vannier, Emilie; Même, Sandra; Szeremeta, Frederic; Beloeil, Jean-Claude; Chourpa, Igor

    2015-11-17

    Novel magneto-plasmonic nanoprobes were designed for multimodal diagnosis of cancer by combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS), and fluorescence emission in the very near infrared (VNIR). A controlled electrostatic assembly of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), VNIR dye Nile Blue (NB), and biopolymer chitosan (Chi) was used to formulate the AgIONs-Chi nanoprobes. The formulation protocol did not involve organic solvents and was rapid and efficient as confirmed by magnetic sorting. The SERRS response of the nanoprobes was very intense and constant for days. It decreased linearly upon 1000-fold dilution and was still recognizable at 0.1 nM NB concentration. After 30 days of storage, the SERRS loss was less than 30% and the hydrodynamic size of the AgIONs-Chi in PBS remained below 200 nm. The gradual decrease of the ratio SERRS/fluorescence allowed one to monitor the release of the fluorescent molecule upon long-term nanoprobe dissociation. The AgIONs-Chi exhibited 2-fold higher MRI contrast than that of commercially available SPION suspensions. Finally, the nanoprobes were actively uptaken by HeLa cancer cells and ensured trimodal MRI-SERRS-fluorescence detection of 10 μL cell inclusions in cm-sized agarose gels used here as phantom models of microtumors. The above results show that the magneto-plasmonic AgIONs-Chi are promising substrates for SERRS analysis in solution and for multimodal imaging of cancer cells.

  10. UV Resonant Raman Spectrometer with Multi-Line Laser Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L.; Kohel, James M.; Kirby, James P.; Morookian, John Michael; Pelletier, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    A Raman spectrometer employs two or more UV (ultraviolet) laser wavel engths to generate UV resonant Raman (UVRR) spectra in organic sampl es. Resonant Raman scattering results when the laser excitation is n ear an electronic transition of a molecule, and the enhancement of R aman signals can be several orders of magnitude. In addition, the Ra man cross-section is inversely proportional to the fourth power of t he wavelength, so the UV Raman emission is increased by another fact or of 16, or greater, over visible Raman emissions. The Raman-scatter ed light is collected using a high-resolution broadband spectrograph . Further suppression of the Rayleigh-scattered laser light is provi ded by custom UV notch filters.

  11. Theoretical studies of Resonance Enhanced Stimulated Raman Scattering (RESRS) of frequency doubled Alexandrite laser wavelengths in cesium vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.

    1986-01-01

    This work focused on understanding the effects of arbitrary transverse and longitudinal relaxation rates on the susceptibilities of coherently driven three-level systems. The approximation of a single relaxation rate often made in previous work is strongly invalidated by the variation in the spontaneous emission lifetime between various atomic level pairs in systems such as cesium. It is of great importance to the problem of nonlinear infrared generation to determine the dependence of both real and imaginary susceptibility on relaxation rates. The imaginary susceptibility on the pump transition determines the absorption of pump photons and the imaginary susceptibility on the laser transition determines the spectral dependence of the gain. This is of particular importance for pure Raman emission (i.e., absorption at linecenter of the gain transition) as it determines the tunability characteristics we are aiming to predict. The real susceptibility is important when cavities are used at the signal field as this will determine the loaded resonance of the Raman oscillator. Researchers show that in some cases which result from having different relaxation rates mode splitting may result, allowing more than one frequency to have the same Raman wavelength, possibly resulting in a temporal instability.

  12. Theoretical studies of resonance enhanced stimulated raman scattering (RESRS) of frequency doubled Alexandrite laser wavelengths in cesium vapor. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawandy, N.M.

    1986-10-01

    This work focused on understanding the effects of arbitrary transverse and longitudinal relaxation rates on the susceptibilities of coherently driven three-level systems. The approximation of a single relaxation rate often made in previous work is strongly invalidated by the variation in the spontaneous emission lifetime between various atomic level pairs in systems such as cesium. It is of great importance to the problem of nonlinear infrared generation to determine the dependence of both real and imaginary susceptibility on relaxation rates. The imaginary susceptibility on the pump transition determines the absorption of pump photons and the imaginary susceptibility on the laser transition determines the spectral dependence of the gain. This is of particular importance for pure Raman emission (i.e., absorption at linecenter of the gain transition) as it determines the tunability characteristics we are aiming to predict. The real susceptibility is important when cavities are used at the signal field as this will determine the loaded resonance of the Raman oscillator. Researchers show that in some cases which result from having different relaxation rates mode splitting may result, allowing more than one frequency to have the same Raman wavelength, possibly resulting in a temporal instability.

  13. Sensitive Detection of Rhodamine B in Condiments Using Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering (SERRS) Silver Nanowires as Substrate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lixia; Li, Peng; Luo, Lan; Bu, Xiangfeng; Wang, Xiaolei; Zhao, Bing; Tian, Yuan

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a facile large-scale preparation of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) substrates for the determination of Rhodamine B (RhB) based on silver nanowires (Ag NWs) has been developed. The morphology, structure, and properties of as-prepared Ag NWs are characterized using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. Ag NWs were assembled onto glass slides through a self-assembly method. Moreover, in our experiment, as-prepared Ag NWs@glass were used as a SERRS substrate to detect RhB at the excitation wavelength of 532 nm. Experimental conditions such as pH value and soaking time on SERRS performance were studied and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the SERRS intensity at 1648 cm(-1) exhibited a linear relationship with the concentration of RhB in the range of 1.0 × 10(-9)-1.0 × 10(-5 )mol L(-1) and detection limit (signal-to-noise ratio [S/N] = 3) is as low as 0.3 nmol L(-1). The corresponding correlation coefficient of the linear equation was 0.996. This method based on Ag NWs@glass for the detection of RhB in three kinds of condiment was investigated. The limits of detection (LODs) for RhB were 0.35 µg/g in chili powder, 0.14 µg/g in chili sauce, and 0.02 µg/g in Chinese prickly ash. The relative standard deviations (RSD) were between 2.18% and 4.56% (n = 3) and recoveries at three levels were in the range of 80.0-98.7% for different spiked food products. Moreover, the results showed that the proposed method was sensitive, convenient, and feasible for the determination of RhB in condiments.

  14. Application of resonance Raman LIDAR for chemical species identification

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.L.; Heglund, D.L.; Ray, M.D.; Harder, D.; Dobert, R.; Leung, K.P.; Wu, M.; Sedlacek, A.

    1997-07-01

    BNL has been developing a remote sensing technique for the detection of atmospheric pollutants based on the phenomenon of resonance Raman LIDAR that has also incorporated a number of new techniques/technologies designed to extend it`s performance envelope. When the excitation frequency approaches an allowed electronic transition of the molecule, an enormous enhancement of the inelastic scattering cross-section can occur, often up to 2 to 4 orders-of-magnitude, and is referred to as resonance Raman (RR), since the excitation frequency is in resonance with an allowed electronic transition. Exploitation of this enhancement along with new techniques such as pattern recognition algorithms to take advantage of the spectral fingerprint and a new laser frequency modulation technique designed to suppress broadband fluorescence, referred to as Frequency modulated Excitation Raman Spectroscopy (FreMERS) and recent developments in liquid edge filter technology, for suppression of the elastic channel, all help increase the overall performance of Raman LIDAR.

  15. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiles, Paul L.; Dieringer, Jon A.; Shah, Nilam C.; van Duyne, Richard P.

    2008-07-01

    The ability to control the size, shape, and material of a surface has reinvigorated the field of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Because excitation of the localized surface plasmon resonance of a nanostructured surface or nanoparticle lies at the heart of SERS, the ability to reliably control the surface characteristics has taken SERS from an interesting surface phenomenon to a rapidly developing analytical tool. This article first explains many fundamental features of SERS and then describes the use of nanosphere lithography for the fabrication of highly reproducible and robust SERS substrates. In particular, we review metal film over nanosphere surfaces as excellent candidates for several experiments that were once impossible with more primitive SERS substrates (e.g., metal island films). The article also describes progress in applying SERS to the detection of chemical warfare agents and several biological molecules.

  16. Resonant surface-enhanced Raman scattering by optical phonons in a monolayer of CdSe nanocrystals on Au nanocluster arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milekhin, Alexander G.; Sveshnikova, Larisa L.; Duda, Tatyana A.; Rodyakina, Ekaterina E.; Dzhagan, Volodymyr M.; Sheremet, Evgeniya; Gordan, Ovidiu D.; Himcinschi, Cameliu; Latyshev, Alexander V.; Zahn, Dietrich R. T.

    2016-05-01

    Here we present the results on an investigation of resonant Stokes and anti- Stokes surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) by optical phonons in colloidal CdSe nanocrystals (NCs) homogeneously deposited on arrays of Au nanoclusters using the Langmuir-Blodgett technology. The thickness of deposited NCs, determined by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, amounts to approximately 1 monolayer. Special attention is paid to the determination of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) energy in the arrays of Au nanoclusters as a function of the nanocluster size by means of micro-ellipsometry. SERS by optical phonons in CdSe NCs shows a significant enhancement factor with a maximal value of 2 × 103 which depends resonantly on the Au nanocluster size and thus on the LSPR energy. The deposition of CdSe NCs on the arrays of Au nanocluster dimers enabled us to study the polarization dependence of SERS. It was found that a maximal SERS signal is observed for the light polarization along the dimer axis. Finally, SERS by optical phonons was observed for CdSe NCs deposited on the structures with a single Au dimer. A difference of the LO phonon energy is observed for CdSe NCs on different single dimers. This effect is explained as the confinement-induced shift which depends on the CdSe nanocrystal size and indicates quasi-single NC Raman spectra being obtained.

  17. Near-resonance enhanced O2 detection for dual-broadband pure rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering with an ultraviolet-visible setup at 266 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, Martin; Seeger, Thomas; Leipertz, Alfred

    2005-07-01

    Broadband and dual-broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) are widely established tools for nonintrusive gas diagnostics. Up to now the investigations have been mainly performed for electronic nonresonant conditions of the gas species of interest. We report on the enhancement of the O2-N2 detection limit of dual-broadband pure rotational CARS by shifting the wavelength of the narrowband pump laser from the commonly used 532-266 nm. This enhancement is caused when the Schumann-Runge absorption band is approached near 176 nm. The principal concept of this experiment, i.e., covering the Raman resonance with a single- or dual-broadband combination of lasers in the visible range and moving only the narrowband probe laser near or directly into electronic resonant conditions in the UV range, should also be applicable to broadband CARS experiments to directly exploit electronic resonance effects for the purpose of single-shot concentration measurements of minority species. To quantify the enhancement in O2 sensitivity, comparative measurements at both a 266 and a 532 nm narrowband pump laser wavelength are presented, employing a 4-dicyanomethylene-2-methyl-6-(p-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyram (DCM) dye laser as a broadband laser source at 635 nm. An increase of approximately 13% in the ratio of the rotational CARS cross sections of O2 and N2 was obtained. The broad spectral width of the CARS excitation profile was approximately equal for both setups. Further enhancement should be achievable by shifting the narrowband pump laser closer toward 176 nm, for example, with a frequency-doubled optical parametric oscillator or an excimer laser. The principal concept of this experiment should also be applicable to broadband CARS experiments to directly exploit electronic resonance effects of the narrowband pump laser with electronic transitions of minority species for the purpose of single-shot concentration measurements of those species.

  18. Pre-resonance enhancement of exceptional intensity in Aggregation-Induced Raman Optical Activity (AIROA) spectra of lutein derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajac, G.; Lasota, J.; Dudek, M.; Kaczor, A.; Baranska, M.

    2017-02-01

    Recently reported new phenomenon of Aggregation-Induced Raman Optical Activity is demonstrated here for the first time in the pre-resonance conditions for lutein diacetate and 3‧-epi-lutein supramolecular self-assembles. We demonstrate that minor alterations in the lutein structure (e.g. acetylation of hydroxyl groups or different configuration at one of the chiral center) can lead to definitely different spectral profiles and optical properties due to formation of aggregates of different structure and type. Lutein forms only H-aggregates, lutein diacetate only J-aggregates, while 3‧-epi-lutein can occur in both forms simultaneously. Variety of aggregates' structures is so large that not only the type of aggregation is different, but also their chirality. It is remarkable that even in the pre-resonance conditions, aggregation of lutein derivatives can lead to the intense ROA signal, and moreover, 3‧-epi-lutein demonstrated the highest resonance ROA CID ratio that has ever been reported.

  19. Laser crater enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lednev, Vasily N; Sdvizhenskii, Pavel A; Grishin, Mikhail Ya; Filippov, Mikhail N; Shchegolikhin, Alexander N; Pershin, Sergey M

    2017-02-01

    Raman signal enhancement by multiple scattering inside laser crater cones was observed for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. Laser crater enhanced Raman spectroscopy (LCERS) yielded a 14-fold increase in the Raman spectra bands due to efficient multiple scattering of laser irradiation within the laser crater walls. The same pulsed Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 10 ns) was used for both laser crater formation and Raman scattering experiments by varying the output pulse energy. First, powerful pulses are used to produce the laser crater; then low-energy pulses are used to perform Raman scattering measurements. The laser crater profile and its alignment with the laser beam waist were found to be the key parameters for the optimization of the Raman spectrum intensity enhancement. Raman intensity enhancement resulted from increased surface scattering area at the crater walls, rather than spatially offset Raman scattering. The increased signal-to-noise ratio resulted in limits of detection improvement for quantitative analysis using LCERS.

  20. Water in the hydration shell of halide ions has significantly reduced Fermi resonance and moderately enhanced Raman cross section in the OH stretch regions.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohammed; Singh, Ajay K; Mondal, Jahur A; Sarkar, Sisir K

    2013-08-22

    Water in the presence of electrolytes plays an important role in biological and industrial processes. The properties of water, such as the intermolecular coupling, Fermi resonance (FR), hydrogen-bonding, and Raman cross section were investigated by measuring the Raman spectra in the OD and OH stretch regions in presence of alkali halides (NaX; X = F, Cl, Br, I). It is observed that the changes in spectral characteristics by the addition of NaX in D2O are similar to those obtained by the addition of H2O in D2O. The spectral width decreases significantly by the addition of NaX in D2O (H2O) than that in the isotopically diluted water. Quantitative estimation, on the basis of integrated Raman intensity, revealed that the relative Raman cross section, σ(H)/σ(b) (σ(H) and σ(b) are the average Raman cross section of water in the first hydration shell of X(-) and in bulk, respectively), in D2O and H2O is higher than those in the respective isotopically diluted water. These results suggest that water in the hydration shell has reduced FR and intermolecular coupling compared to those in bulk. In the isotopically diluted water, the relative Raman cross section increases with increase in size of the halide ions (σ(H)/σ(b) = 0.6, 1.1, 1.5, and 1.9 for F(-), Cl(-), Br(-), and I(-), respectively), which is assignable to the enhancement of Raman cross section by charge transfer from halide ions to the hydrating water. Nevertheless, the experimentally determined σ(H)/σ(b) is lower than the calculated values obtained on the basis of the energy of the charge transfer state of water. The weak enhancement of σ(H)/σ(b) signifies that the charge transfer transition in the hydration shell of halide ions causes little change in the OD (OH) bond lengths of hydrating water.

  1. Potential-dependent surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy at nanostructured TiO2 : a case study on cytochrome b5.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiao Xia; Köhler, Christopher; Kozuch, Jacek; Kuhlmann, Uwe; Paasche, Lars; Sivanesan, Arumugam; Weidinger, Inez M; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2013-12-20

    Nanostructured titanium dioxide (TiO2 ) electrodes, prepared by anodization of titanium, are employed to probe the electron-transfer process of cytochrome b5 (cyt b5 ) by surface-enhanced resonance Raman (SERR) spectroscopy. Concomitant with the increased nanoscopic surface roughness of TiO2 , achieved by raising the anodization voltage from 10 to 20 V, the enhancement factor increases from 2.4 to 8.6, which is rationalized by calculations of the electric field enhancement. Cyt b5 is immobilized on TiO2 under preservation of its native structure but it displays a non-ideal redox behavior due to the limited conductivity of the electrode material. The electron-transfer efficiency which depends on the crystalline phase of TiO2 has to be improved by appropriate doping for applications in bioelectrochemistry. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Resonance Raman and time-resolved resonance Raman evidence for enhanced localization in the [sup 3]MLCT states of ruthenium(II) complexes with the inherently asymmetric ligand 2-(2-pyridyl)pyrazine

    SciTech Connect

    Danzer, G.D.; Golus, J.A.; Kincaid, J.R. )

    1993-09-22

    The resonance Raman (RR) and time-resolved resonance Raman (TR[sup 3]) spectra of ruthenium(II) complexes containing the inherently asymmetric 2-(2-pyridyl)pyrazine (pypz) and its selectively deuteriated analogue are reported. The spectrum of the ground-state species is interpretable in terms of vibrationally isolated fragments with the exception of several modes which involve the interring and adjacent bonds. More importantly, the TR[sup 3] spectra of the (triplet) metal-to-ligand-charge-transfer state are shown to be consistent with the presence of a coordinated pypz in which the electronic charge is polarized toward the pyrazine fragment. A detailed discussion of the spectral analysis which leads to this conclusion is provided, and the potential implication of the effect for the design of practical devices is discussed. 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Surface enhanced Raman scattering with metal nanoshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Joseph Bryan

    A systematic investigation of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was performed using metal nanoshells as the substrate. Nanoshells are a dielectric sphere coated with a thin metal shell, which have a well understood, geometrically tunable plasmon resonance. This tunability allows for the engineering of the optical near field for SERS. A simple model connecting the nanoshell electromagnetic near field at the incident frequency to that at the Raman shifted frequency is discussed. This theory is compared to the measured SERS response of the nonresonant molecule para-mercaptoaniline (pMA) adsorbed on silver and gold nanoshells. Using a solution of silver nanoshells, at an excitation wavelength of 1064 nm enhancements on the order of 106 to 108 were observed. Accounting for reabsorption of the Raman scattered light as it traverses the solution suggests enhancements of 1012. To mitigate the reabsorption, film geometries were investigated. For film measurements a 782 nm excitation laser was used. The SERS response of a dense film of silver nanoshells followed the calculated single nanoshell response of the nanoshells whose plasmon resonance was tuned near the excitation wavelength. In contrast, for nanoshells blue shifted from the excitation laser, the film Raman response followed an estimated dimer response. The Raman response as a function of nanoshell density was studied using films of gold nanoshells dispersed on the surface of polyvinylpyridine (PVP) coated glass slides. A linear dependence of the Raman modes on the nanoshell density was observed confirming that the single nanoshell plasmon dominates the SERS response. The SERS enhancements for nanoshell films calculated by direct comparison to an unenhanced measurement were on the order of 10 10 to 1012. The Raman response as a function of incident intensity was measured for dense silver nanoshell films. An optical pumping model allowing for stimulation of the Raman emission is proposed. Using this model, an

  4. Predictive value of the surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering-based MTT assay: a rapid and ultrasensitive method for cell viability in situ.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhu; Liu, Zhuo; Chen, Lei; Yang, Jin; Zhao, Bing; Jung, Young Mee; Wang, Xu; Zhao, Chun

    2013-08-06

    SERRS (surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering) has been used to develop and optimize a novel and quantitative MTT assay for living cell viability. This highly sensitive method derives from two factors for formazan signal enhancing: the addition of Au nanoparticles and the resonance effect by 632.8 nm of excitation. The results show that the background elements, such as excessive MTT residues, serum, and the drug, did not interfere with the detection of formazan. Moreover, the detection limit of formazan is as low as 1 ng/mL. With the use of this method to quantify metabolically viable cells, dose-response curves of treated and untreated cells with the drug were constructed on the human lung cancer cell A549. The results also show that the Raman signal generated is dependent on the degree of activation of the cells. In comparison to the traditional method, the main advantages of this method are its rapidity (30 min), high-selectivity, high-precision, and cost-effectiveness (0.1 mg/mL MTT) without time-consuming steps and any modifying or labeling procedure. This work reports on an improved research tool that may help researchers apply this method for in situ cell assays.

  5. Resonance Raman spectroscopy study of protonated porphyrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorski, A.; Starukhin, A.; Stavrov, S.; Gawinkowski, S.; Waluk, J.

    2017-02-01

    Resonance Raman microscopy was used to study the resonance Raman scattering of the diacid (diprotonated form) of free-base porphyrin (21H,23H-porphine) in a crystal powder and KBr pellets. Intensive lines in the spectral range between 100 ÷ 1000 cm- 1 have been detected and assigned as spectral manifestation of out-of-plane modes. The Raman spectra were simulated by means of DFT methods and compared with the experimental data. It is evident from experimental and theoretical results that the activation of out-of-plane modes arises from saddle distortion of the porphyrin macrocycle upon formation of its diprotonated form.

  6. Optimization of Fe3O4@Ag nanoshells in magnetic field-enriched surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering for malaria diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Clement; Liu, Quan

    2013-11-07

    The great potential of magnetic field enriched surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) for early malaria diagnosis has been demonstrated previously. This technique is able to detect β-hematin, which is equivalent to a malaria biomarker (hemozoin) in Raman features, at a concentration of 5 nM. In this study, we present the optimization of nanoparticles used in the magnetic field enriched SERRS by tuning the core size and shell thickness of nanoparticles with an iron oxide core and a silver shell (Fe3O4@Ag). The discrete dipole approximation (DDA) model was introduced to investigate the localized electromagnetic field distributions and extinction efficiencies of the aggregate of Fe3O4@Ag and β-hematin, in correlation with their magnetic field enriched SERRS performance. We find that the optimal core-shell size of Fe3O4@Ag leading to the effective aggregation of Fe3O4@Ag and β-hematin under an external magnetic field with superior extinction efficiencies is the key to realize highly augmented Raman signals in this strategy. Furthermore, it is noted that the optimized result differs from the case without the external magnetic field to that with the external magnetic field. Therefore, this work demonstrates experimentally and theoretically the potential of tuning the core-shell Fe3O4@Ag for achieving the efficient magnetic field-enriched SERRS detection of β-hematin for early malaria diagnosis.

  7. Silicon nanoparticles as Raman scattering enhancers.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, I; Shi, L; Lu, X; Korgel, B A; Alvarez-Puebla, R A; Meseguer, F

    2014-06-07

    In this communication we demonstrate the large amplification values of the Raman signal of organic molecules attached to silicon nanoparticles (SiNPs). Light induced Mie resonances of high refractive index particles generate strong evanescent electromagnetic (EM) fields, thus boosting the Raman signal of species attached to the nanoparticles. The interest of this process is justified by the wide range of experimental configurations that can be implemented including photonic crystals, the sharp spectral resonances easily tuneable with the particle size, the biocompatibility and biodegradability of silicon, and the possibility of direct analysis of molecules that do not contain functional groups with high affinity for gold and silver. Additionally, silicon nanoparticles present stronger field enhancement due to Mie resonances at larger sizes than gold.

  8. Direct demonstration for changes in surface plasmon resonance induced by surface-enhanced Raman scattering quenching of dye molecules adsorbed on single Ag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Tamitake; Hashimoto, Kazuhiro; Ikehata, Akifumi; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2003-12-01

    Changes in surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands induced by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) quenching of rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules adsorbed on single Ag nanoparticles were investigated by light scattering microspectroscopy. It was found that SPR bands show a peak shift to a higher-energy side and that their intensities increase after SERS quenching. It was also revealed that these SPR bands are accompanied by an enhanced absorption band of R6G and that it has the same anisotropy as SERS and SPR bands. Assuming that the changes in the SPR bands are caused by the desorption of R6G molecules, we compared our experimental findings with calculation results obtained based on Rayleigh scattering theory.

  9. Exploitation of resonance Raman spectroscopy as a remote chemical sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Chen, C.L.

    1995-08-01

    We have discussed recent experimental results using a resonance-Raman-based LIDAR system as a remote chemical sensor. This spectroscopy has the fundamental advantage that it is based on optical fingerprints that are insensitive to environmental perturbations. By taking advantage of resonance enhancement, which 6 orders-of-magnitude, can be as large as 4 to an increased sensing range for a given chemical concentration or lower detection limit for a given stand-off distance can be realized. The success discussed above can in part be traced back to the use of new state-of-the-art technologies which, only recently, have allowed the phenomenon of resonance-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to be fully exploited as a remote chemical sensor platform. Since many chemicals have electronic transitions in the UV/IS, it is expected that many will have pronounced resonance enhancements.

  10. Localized surface plasmon resonance and surface enhanced Raman scattering responses of Au@Ag core-shell nanorods with different thickness of Ag shell.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanan; Zhou, Jun; Zou, Weibo; Jia, Zhenhong; Petti, Lucia; Mormile, Pasquale

    2014-06-01

    The properties of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of the core-shell bimetallic nanostructures, that is the monodisperse Au@Ag core-shell nanorods with different thickness of Ag shell, are theoretically and experimental researched. The UV-vis-NIR absorption spectra of the Au@Ag core-shell nanorods are measured and displayed their blue-shifts of the longitudinal plasmon resonance peaks with increasing of Ag concentrations in the colloidal solution. And the absorption spectra of the Au@Ag core-shell nanorods are simulated by the Finite Element Method (FEM), which are in agreement with the experimental measurements and reveal their LSPR mechanism as the varying structures. In addition, Rhodamine 6G, as a Raman reporter molecule, is used to investigate SERS of gold nanorods and Au@Ag core-shell nanorods. It is found that Au@Ag core-shell nanorods have better SERS responses, comparing with those of Au nanorods, and their SERS intensities are increased with the increases of the Ag shell thickness, which demonstrate that the chemisorptive bond effect and the morphology of the nanoparticle play key roles to the SERS signals. It is significant to design the biosensor based on the properties of Au@Ag core-shell nanorods.

  11. Theoretical studies of Resonance Enhanced Stimulated Raman Scattering (RESRS) of frequency doubled Alexandrite laser wavelength in cesium vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, Nabil M.

    1987-01-01

    The third phase of research will focus on the propagation and energy extraction of the pump and SERS beams in a variety of configurations including oscillator structures. In order to address these questions a numerical code capable of allowing for saturation and full transverse beam evolution is required. The method proposed is based on a discretized propagation energy extraction model which uses a Kirchoff integral propagator coupled to the three level Raman model already developed. The model will have the resolution required by diffraction limits and will use the previous density matrix results in the adiabatic following limit. Owing to its large computational requirements, such a code must be implemented on a vector array processor. One code on the Cyber is being tested by using previously understood two-level laser models as guidelines for interpreting the results. Two tests were implemented: the evolution of modes in a passive resonator and the evolution of a stable state of the adiabatically eliminated laser equations. These results show mode shapes and diffraction losses for the first case and relaxation oscillations for the second one. Finally, in order to clarify the computing methodology used to exploit the speed of the Cyber's computational speed, the time it takes to perform both of the computations previously mentioned to run on the Cyber and VAX 730 must be measured. Also included is a short description of the current laser model (CAVITY.FOR) and a flow chart of the test computations.

  12. Silicon nanoparticles as Raman scattering enhancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, I.; Shi, L.; Lu, X.; Korgel, B. A.; Alvarez-Puebla, R. A.; Meseguer, F.

    2014-05-01

    In this communication we demonstrate the large amplification values of the Raman signal of organic molecules attached to silicon nanoparticles (SiNPs). Light induced Mie resonances of high refractive index particles generate strong evanescent electromagnetic (EM) fields, thus boosting the Raman signal of species attached to the nanoparticles. The interest of this process is justified by the wide range of experimental configurations that can be implemented including photonic crystals, the sharp spectral resonances easily tuneable with the particle size, the biocompatibility and biodegradability of silicon, and the possibility of direct analysis of molecules that do not contain functional groups with high affinity for gold and silver. Additionally, silicon nanoparticles present stronger field enhancement due to Mie resonances at larger sizes than gold.In this communication we demonstrate the large amplification values of the Raman signal of organic molecules attached to silicon nanoparticles (SiNPs). Light induced Mie resonances of high refractive index particles generate strong evanescent electromagnetic (EM) fields, thus boosting the Raman signal of species attached to the nanoparticles. The interest of this process is justified by the wide range of experimental configurations that can be implemented including photonic crystals, the sharp spectral resonances easily tuneable with the particle size, the biocompatibility and biodegradability of silicon, and the possibility of direct analysis of molecules that do not contain functional groups with high affinity for gold and silver. Additionally, silicon nanoparticles present stronger field enhancement due to Mie resonances at larger sizes than gold. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00593g

  13. Intensity enhancement and selective detection of proximate solvent molecules by molecular near-field effect in resonance hyper-Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Rintaro; Kano, Hideaki; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o.

    2008-07-01

    A new molecular phenomenon associated with resonance hyper-Raman (HR) scattering in solution has been discovered. Resonance HR spectra of all-trans-β-carotene and all-trans-lycopene in various solvents exhibited several extra bands that were not assignable to the solute but were unequivocally assigned to the solvents. Neat solvents did not show detectable HR signals under the same experimental conditions. Similar experiments with all-trans-retinal did not exhibit such enhancement either. All-trans-β-carotene and all-trans-lycopene have thus been shown to induce enhanced HR scattering of solvent molecules through a novel molecular effect that is not associated with all-trans-retinal. We call this new effect the "molecular near-field effect." In order to explain this newly found effect, an extended vibronic theory of resonance HR scattering is developed where the vibronic interaction including the proximate solvent molecule (intermolecular vibronic coupling) is explicitly introduced in the solute hyperpolarizability tensor. The potential of "molecular near-field HR spectroscopy," which selectively detects molecules existing in the close vicinity of a HR probe in complex chemical or biological systems, is discussed.

  14. Theoretical studies of Resonance Enhanced Stimulated Raman Scattering (RESRS) of frequency-doubled Alexandrite laser wavelength in cesium vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, Nabil M.

    1987-01-01

    The solutions for the imaginary susceptibility of the Raman field transition with arbitrary relaxation rates and field strengths are examined for three different sets of relaxation rates. These rates correspond to: (1) Far Infrared (FIR) Raman lasers in the diabatic collision regime without consideration of coupled population decay in a closed system, (2) Raman FIR lasers in the diabatic collision regime with coupled population conserving decay, and (3) IR Raman gain in cesium vapor. The model is further expanded to include Doppler broadening and used to predict the peak gain as a function of detuning for a frequency doubled Alexandrite laser-pumped cesium vapor gain cell.

  15. Proliferation detection using a remote resonance Raman chemical sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Chen, C.L.; Dougherty, D.R.

    1993-08-01

    The authors discussed the potential of the resonance Raman chemical sensor as a remote sensor that can be used for gases, liquids or solids. This spectroscopy has the fundamental advantage that it is based on optical fingerprints that are insensitive to environmental perturbations or excitation frequency. By taking advantage of resonance enhancement, the inelastic scattering cross-section can increase anywhere from 4 to 6 orders of magnitude which translates into increased sensing range or lower detection limits. It was also shown that differential cross-sections as small as 10{sup {minus}27} cm{sup 2}/sr do not preclude the use of this technique as being an important component in one`s remote-sensing arsenal. The results obtained in the early 1970s on various pollutants and the more recent work on atmospheric water cast a favorable light on the prospects for the successful development of a resonance Raman remote sensor. Currently, of the 20 CW agent-related {open_quotes}signature{close_quotes} chemicals that the authors have investigated, 18 show enhancements ranging from 3 to 6 orders of magnitude. The absolute magnitudes of the measured resonance enhanced Raman cross-sections for these 18 chemicals suggest that detection and identification of trace quantities of the {open_quotes}signature{close_quotes} chemicals, through a remote resonance Raman chemical sensor, could be achieved.

  16. Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic investigation on Lamiaceae plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rösch, P.; Popp, J.; Kiefer, W.

    1999-05-01

    The essential oils of Thymus vulgaris and Origanum vulgaris are studied by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy. The containing monoterpenes can be identified by their Raman spectra. Further the essential oils are investigated in their natural environment, the so-called oil cells of these Lamiaceae plants, with surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). This method has the advantage to enhance Raman signals and furthermore the SERS effect leads to fluorescence quenching.

  17. Resonant Raman spectroscopy of twisted multilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiang-Bin; Zhang, Xin; Ijäs, Mari; Han, Wen-Peng; Qiao, Xiao-Fen; Li, Xiao-Li; Jiang, De-Sheng; Ferrari, Andrea C.; Tan, Ping-Heng

    2014-11-01

    Graphene and other two-dimensional crystals can be combined to form various hybrids and heterostructures, creating materials on demand with properties determined by the interlayer interaction. This is the case even for a single material, where multilayer stacks with different relative orientation have different optical and electronic properties. Probing and understanding the interface coupling is thus of primary importance for fundamental science and applications. Here we study twisted multilayer graphene flakes with multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy. We find a significant intensity enhancement of the interlayer coupling modes (C peaks) due to resonance with new optically allowed electronic transitions, determined by the relative orientation of the layers. The interlayer coupling results in a Davydov splitting of the C peak in systems consisting of two equivalent graphene multilayers. This allows us to directly quantify the interlayer interaction, which is much smaller compared with Bernal-stacked interfaces. This paves the way to the use of Raman spectroscopy to uncover the interface coupling of two-dimensional hybrids and heterostructures.

  18. Effective approach to strengthen plasmon resonance localized on top surfaces of Ag nanoparticles and application in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Zhibing; Xu, Rui; Zheng, Xianzheng; Fu, Qun; Wu, Minghong; Lei, Yong

    2016-11-01

    The spatial distribution of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) plays a key role in many plasmonic applications. Based on the thermal stability of alumina templates, this work reports a novel approach to manipulate the distribution of LSPR and exhibits its significance for an important plasmonic application, the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). A suitable thermal annealing sharpens the edges in top surfaces (far from the substrates) of Ag nanoparticles, which significantly strengthens the distal mode (DM) with the LSPR excited on the top surfaces. Because the top surface is the major place to adsorb probe molecules, this manipulation greatly improves the detection sensitivity of SERS. Our research provides a new way to improve the sensitivity of SERS, which also indicates that great care has to be taken on special LSPR mode which is largely responsible for a certain plasmonic application (e.g., the DM for SERS although it is not the major mode).

  19. Single-laser-shot detection of nitric oxide in reacting flows using electronic resonance enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Ning; Naik, Sameer V.; Laurendeau, Normand M.; Lucht, Robert P.; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.

    2008-09-01

    Single-laser-shot electronic resonance enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (ERE-CARS) spectra of nitric oxide (NO) were generated using the 532 nm output of an injection-seeded Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser as the pump beam, a broadband dye laser at approximately 591 nm as the Stokes beam, and a 236 nm narrowband ultraviolet probe beam. Single-laser-shot ERE-CARS spectra of NO were acquired in an atmospheric-pressure hydrogen/air counterflow diffusion flame. The single-shot detection limit in this flame was found to be approximately 30 ppm, and the standard deviation of the measured NO concentration was found to be approximately 20% of the mean.

  20. Investigation of magnetic field enriched surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering performance using Fe3O4@Ag nanoparticles for malaria diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Clement; Liu, Quan

    2014-03-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated the magnetic field-enriched surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) of β-hematin by using nanoparticles with iron oxide core and silver shell (Fe3O4@Ag) for the potential application in the early malaria diagnosis. In this study, we investigate the dependence of the magnetic field-enriched SERRS performance of β-hematin on the different core and shell sizes of the Fe3O4@Ag nanoparticles. We note that the core and shell parameters are critical in the realization of the optimal magnetic field-enrich SERRS β-hematin signal. These results are consistent with our simulations that will guide the optimization of the magnetic SERRS performance for the potential early diagnosis in the malaria disease.

  1. Towards combined electrochemistry and surface-enhanced resonance Raman of heme proteins: Improvement of diffusion electrochemistry of cytochrome c at silver electrodes chemically modified with 4-mercaptopyridine.

    PubMed

    Millo, Diego; Ranieri, Antonio; Koot, Wynanda; Gooijer, Cees; van der Zwan, Gert

    2006-08-01

    To date, a successful combination of surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) and electrochemistry to study heme proteins is inhibited by the problems raised by the prerequisite to use silver as electrode metal. This paper indicates an approach to overcome these problems. It describes a quick and reproducible procedure to prepare silver electrodes chemically modified with 4-mercaptopyridine suitable to perform diffusion electrochemistry of cytochrome c (cyt c). The method involves the employment of a mechanical and a chemical treatment and avoids the use of alumina slurries and any electrochemical pretreatment. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was used to test the electrochemical response of cyt c, and the CV signals were found identical with those obtained on gold electrodes under the same experimental conditions. Compared to previous literature, a significant improvement of the CV signal of cyt c at silver electrodes was achieved. Preliminary results show that this treatment can be also successfully employed for the preparation of SERRS-active electrodes.

  2. Structure-dependent localized surface plasmon resonance characteristics and surface enhanced Raman scattering performances of quasi-periodic nanoarrays: Measurements and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Dong; Zhou, Jun; Rippa, Massimo; Petti, Lucia

    2015-10-28

    A set of periodic and quasi-periodic Au nanoarrays with different morphologies have been fabricated by using electron beam lithography technique, and their optical properties have been examined experimentally and analyzed theoretically by scanning near-field optical microscope and finite element method, respectively. Results present that the localized surface plasmon resonance of the as-prepared Au nanoarrays exhibit the structure-depended characteristics. Comparing with the periodic nanoarrays, the quasi-periodic ones demonstrate stronger electric field enhancement, especially for Thue-Morse nanoarray. Meanwhile, the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid molecular labeled nanoarrays show that the quasi-periodic nanoarrays exhibit distinct SERS enhancement, for example, a higher enhancement factor of ∼10{sup 7} is obtained for the Thue-Morse nanoarray consisted of square pillars of 100 nm size. Therefore, it is significant to optimally design and fabricate the chip-scale quasi-periodic nanoarrays with high localized electric field enhancement for SERS applications in biosensing field.

  3. Angle-resolved surface-enhanced Raman scattering on metallic nanostructured plasmonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Baumberg, Jeremy J; Kelf, Timothy A; Sugawara, Yoshihiro; Cintra, Suzanne; Abdelsalam, Mamdouh E; Bartlett, Phillip N; Russell, Andrea E

    2005-11-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering is an ideal tool for identifying molecules from the "fingerprint" of their molecular bonds; unfortunately, this process lacks a full microscopic understanding and, practically, is plagued with irreproducibility. Using nanostructured metal surfaces, we demonstrate strong correlations between plasmon resonances and Raman enhancements. Evidence for simultaneous ingoing and outgoing resonances in wavelength and angle sheds new light on the Raman enhancement process, allowing optimization of a new generation of reproducible Raman substrates.

  4. Redox induced protonation of heme propionates in cytochrome c oxidase: Insights from surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy and QM/MM calculations.

    PubMed

    Sezer, Murat; Woelke, Anna-Lena; Knapp, Ernst Walter; Schlesinger, Ramona; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Weidinger, Inez M

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the coupling between heme reduction and proton translocation in cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is still an open problem. The propionic acids of heme a3 have been proposed to act as a proton loading site (PLS) in the proton pumping pathway, yet this proposal could not be verified by experimental data so far. We have set up an experiment where the redox states of the two hemes in CcO can be controlled via external electrical potential. Surface enhanced resonance Raman (SERR) spectroscopy was applied to simultaneously monitor the redox state of the hemes and the protonation state of the heme propionates. Simulated spectra based on QM/MM calculations were used to assign the resonant enhanced CH2 twisting modes of the propionates to the protonation state of the individual heme a and heme a3 propionates respectively. The comparison between calculated and measured H2OD2O difference spectra allowed a sound band assignment. In the fully reduced enzyme at least three of the four heme propionates were found to be protonated whereas in the presence of a reduced heme a and an oxidized heme a3 only protonation of one heme a3 propionates was observed. Our data supports the postulated scenario where the heme a3 propionates are involved in the proton pathway.

  5. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrell, Robin L.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the basis for the technique and its experimental requirements. Describes a few examples of the analytical problems to which surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been and can be applied. Provides a perspective on the current limitations and frontiers in developing SERS as an analytical technique. (MVL)

  6. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrell, Robin L.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the basis for the technique and its experimental requirements. Describes a few examples of the analytical problems to which surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been and can be applied. Provides a perspective on the current limitations and frontiers in developing SERS as an analytical technique. (MVL)

  7. Determination of resonance Raman cross-sections for use in biological SERS sensing with femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Silva, W Ruchira; Keller, Emily L; Frontiera, Renee R

    2014-08-05

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a promising technique for in vivo bioanalyte detection, but accurate characterization of SERS biosensors can be challenging due to difficulties in differentiating resonance and surface enhancement contributions to the Raman signal. Here, we quantitate the resonance Raman cross-sections for a commonly used near-infrared SERS dye, 3,3'-diethylthiatricarbocyanine (DTTC). It is typically challenging to measure resonance Raman cross-sections for fluorescent dye molecules due to the overwhelming isoenergetic fluorescence signal. To overcome this issue, we used etalon-based femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy, which is intrinsically designed to acquire a stimulated Raman signal without strong fluorescence or interference from signals resulting from other four-wave mixing pathways. Using this technique, we found that the cross-sections for most of the resonantly enhanced modes in DTTC exceed 10(-25) cm(2)/molecule. These cross-sections lead to high signal magnitude SERS signals from even weakly enhancing SERS substrates, as much of what appears to be a SERS signal is actually coming from the intrinsically strong resonance Raman signal. Our work will lead to a more accurate determination of SERS enhancement factors and SERS substrate characterization in the biologically relevant near-infrared region, ultimately leading to a more widespread use of SERS for biosensing and bioimaging applications.

  8. Enhanced Raman Monitor Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westenskow, Dwayne

    1996-01-01

    Monitoring of gaseous contaminants stems from the need to ensure a healthy and safe environment. NASA/Ames needs sensors that are able to monitor common atmospheric gas concentrations as well as trace amounts of contaminant gases. To provide an accurate assessment of air quality, a monitoring system would need to be continuous and on-line with full spectrum capabilities, allowing simultaneous detection of all gas components in a sample, including both combustible and non-combustible gases. The system demands a high degree of sensitivity to detect low gas concentrations in the low-ppm and sub-ppm regions. For clean and healthy air ('good' category), criteria established by the EPA requires that contaminant concentrations not exceed 4 ppm of carbon monoxide (CO) in an 8 hour period, 60 ppb of ozone(O3) in a one hour period and 30 ppb of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in a 24 hour period. One step below this is the National Ambient Air Quality Standard ('moderate' category) which requires that contaminant concentrations not exceed 9 ppm of carbon monoxide (CO), 120 ppb of ozone (O3) and 140 ppb of sulfur dioxide (SO2) for their respective time periods. Ideally a monitor should be able to detect the concentrations specified in the 'good' category. To benchmark current abilities of Raman technology in gas phase analysis, laboratory experiments were performed to evaluate the RASCAL II anesthetic gas monitor.

  9. UV resonance Raman analysis of trishomocubane and diamondoid dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, Reinhard; Richter, Robert; Merli, Andrea; Fokin, Andrey A.; Koso, Tetyana V.; Rodionov, Vladimir N.; Schreiner, Peter R.; Thomsen, Christian; Maultzsch, Janina

    2014-01-01

    We present resonance Raman measurements of crystalline trishomocubane and diamantane dimers containing a C=C double bond. Raman spectra were recorded with excitation energies between 2.33 eV and 5.42 eV. The strongest enhancement is observed for the C=C stretch vibration and a bending mode involving the two carbon atoms of the C=C bond, corresponding to the B2g wagging mode of ethylene. This is associated with the localization of the π-HOMO and LUMO and the elongation of the C=C bond length and a pyramidalization of the two sp2-hybridized carbon atoms at the optical excitation. The observed Raman resonance energies of the trishomocubane and diamantane dimers are significantly lower than the HOMO-LUMO gaps of the corresponding unmodified diamondoids.

  10. UV resonance Raman analysis of trishomocubane and diamondoid dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Meinke, Reinhard Thomsen, Christian; Maultzsch, Janina; Richter, Robert; Merli, Andrea; Fokin, Andrey A.; Koso, Tetyana V.; Schreiner, Peter R.; Rodionov, Vladimir N.

    2014-01-21

    We present resonance Raman measurements of crystalline trishomocubane and diamantane dimers containing a C=C double bond. Raman spectra were recorded with excitation energies between 2.33 eV and 5.42 eV. The strongest enhancement is observed for the C=C stretch vibration and a bending mode involving the two carbon atoms of the C=C bond, corresponding to the B{sub 2g} wagging mode of ethylene. This is associated with the localization of the π-HOMO and LUMO and the elongation of the C=C bond length and a pyramidalization of the two sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon atoms at the optical excitation. The observed Raman resonance energies of the trishomocubane and diamantane dimers are significantly lower than the HOMO-LUMO gaps of the corresponding unmodified diamondoids.

  11. UV resonance Raman analysis of trishomocubane and diamondoid dimers.

    PubMed

    Meinke, Reinhard; Richter, Robert; Merli, Andrea; Fokin, Andrey A; Koso, Tetyana V; Rodionov, Vladimir N; Schreiner, Peter R; Thomsen, Christian; Maultzsch, Janina

    2014-01-21

    We present resonance Raman measurements of crystalline trishomocubane and diamantane dimers containing a C=C double bond. Raman spectra were recorded with excitation energies between 2.33 eV and 5.42 eV. The strongest enhancement is observed for the C=C stretch vibration and a bending mode involving the two carbon atoms of the C=C bond, corresponding to the B2g wagging mode of ethylene. This is associated with the localization of the π-HOMO and LUMO and the elongation of the C=C bond length and a pyramidalization of the two sp(2)-hybridized carbon atoms at the optical excitation. The observed Raman resonance energies of the trishomocubane and diamantane dimers are significantly lower than the HOMO-LUMO gaps of the corresponding unmodified diamondoids.

  12. Citrate-reduced silver hydrosol modified with omega-mercaptoalkanoic acids self-assembled monolayers as a substrate for surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering. A study with cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Bonifacio, Alois; van der Sneppen, Lineke; Gooijer, Cees; van der Zwan, Gert

    2004-07-06

    A new citrate-reduced silver hydrosol coated with omega-mercaptoalkanoic acids (mercaptopropionic and mercaptoundecanoic acids) self-assembled monolayers was prepared and characterized with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The structure and the quality of the coating monolayers are discussed and compared to similar coated and uncoated silver hydrosols previously developed. As an application, the new hydrosol was used as a biocompatible and efficient metal substrate for a surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) study of cytochrome c. The high-quality SERRS spectra reported of cytochrome c (obtained using only 1 microL of a micromolar cytochrome solution) are discussed and compared with data available from literature studies.

  13. Tip enhanced Raman scattering: plasmonic enhancements for nanoscale chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Zachary D.; Marr, James M.; Wang, Hao

    2014-04-01

    Tip enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) is an emerging technique that uses a metalized scanning probe microscope tip to spatially localize electric fields that enhances Raman scattering enabling chemical imaging on nanometer dimensions. Arising from the same principles as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), TERS offers unique advantages associated with controling the size, shape, and location of the enhancing nanostructure. In this article we discuss the correlations between current understanding of SERS and how this relates to TERS, as well as how TERS provides new understanding and insights. The relationship between plasmon resonances and Raman enhancements is emphasized as the key to obtaining optimal TERS results. Applications of TERS, including chemical analysis of carbon nanotubes, organic molecules, inorganic crystals, nucleic acids, proteins, cells and organisms, are used to illustrate the information that can be gained. Under ideal conditions TERS is capable of single molecule sensitivity and sub-nanometer spatial resolution. The ability to control plasmonic enhancements for chemical analysis suggests new experiments and opportunities to understand molecular composition and interactions on the nanoscale.

  14. Ultrafast saturation of electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and comparison for pulse durations in the nanosecond to femtosecond regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patnaik, Anil K.; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.

    2016-02-01

    The saturation threshold of a probe pulse in an ultrafast electronic-resonance-enhanced (ERE) coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) configuration is calculated. We demonstrate that while the underdamping condition is a sufficient condition for saturation of ERE-CARS with the long-pulse excitations, a transient gain must be achieved to saturate the ERE-CARS signal for the ultrafast probe regime. We identify that the area under the probe pulse can be used as a definitive parameter to determine the criterion for a saturation threshold for ultrafast ERE-CARS. From a simplified analytical solution and a detailed numerical calculation based on density-matrix equations, the saturation threshold of ERE-CARS is compared for a wide range of probe-pulse durations from the 10-ns to the 10-fs regime. The theory explains both qualitatively and quantitatively the saturation thresholds of resonant transitions and also gives a predictive capability for other pulse duration regimes. The presented criterion for the saturation threshold will be useful in establishing the design parameters for ultrafast ERE-CARS.

  15. Nano-Raman Scattering Microscopy: Resolution and Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Kawata, Satoshi; Ichimura, Taro; Taguchi, Atsushi; Kumamoto, Yasuaki

    2017-03-24

    Raman scattering microscopy is becoming one of the hot topics in analytical microscopy as a tool for analyzing advanced nanomaterials, such as biomolecules in a live cell for the study of cellular dynamics, semiconductor devices for characterizing strain distribution and contamination, and nanocarbons and nano-2D materials. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the development of Raman scattering microscopy from the viewpoint of spatial resolution and scattering efficiency. To overcome the extremely small cross section of Raman scattering, we discuss three approaches for the enhancement of scattering efficiency and show that the scattering enhancement synergistically increases the spatial resolution. We discuss the mechanisms of tip-enhanced Raman scattering, deep-UV resonant Raman scattering, and coherent nonlinear Raman scattering for micro- and nanoscope applications. The combinations of these three approaches are also shown as nanometer-resolution Raman scattering microscopy. The critical issues of the structures, materials, and reproducibility of tips and three-dimensionality for TERS; photodegradation for resonant Raman scattering; and laser availability for coherent nonlinear Raman scattering are also discussed.

  16. Raman-assisted Rabi resonances in two-mode cavity QED

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenwald, P.; Singh, S. K.; Vogel, W.

    2011-06-15

    The dynamics of a vibronic system in a lossy two-mode cavity is studied, with the first mode being resonant to the electronic transition and the second one being nearly resonant due to Raman transitions. We derive analytical solutions for the dynamics of this system. For a properly chosen detuning of the second mode from the exact Raman resonance, we obtain conditions that are closely related to the phenomenon of Rabi resonance as it is well known in laser physics. Such resonances can be observed in the spontaneous emission spectra, where the spectrum of the second mode in the case of weak Raman coupling is enhanced substantially.

  17. Rational Design of a Chalcogenopyrylium-Based Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering-Nanoprobe with Attomolar Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Matthew A.; Huang, Ruimin; Detty, Michael R.; Kircher, Moritz F.

    2015-01-01

    High sensitivity and specificity are two desirable features in biomedical imaging. Raman imaging has surfaced as a promising optical modality that offers both. Here, we report the design and synthesis of a group of near infrared absorbing 2-thienyl-substituted chalcogenopyrylium dyes tailored to have high affinity for gold. When adsorbed onto gold nanoparticles, these dyes produce biocompatible SERRS-nanoprobes with attomolar limits of detection amenable to ultrasensitive in vivo multiplexed tumor and disease marker detection. PMID:25800697

  18. Raman and surface-enhanced Raman study of asymmetrically substituted viologens

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, T.; Cotton, T.M.; Hurst, J.K.; Thompson, D.H.P.

    1988-12-01

    The normal Raman (NR), resonance Raman (RR), surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) spectra of the three redox forms of several asymmetric viologens, N-octyl-N'-methylviologen (C/sub 8/MV), N-dodecyl-N'-methylviologen (C/sub 12/MV), and N-hexadecyl-N'-methylviologen (C/sub 16/MV), have been characterized and compared with the corresponding spectra of the three redox forms of methylviologen (MV). It was observed that the substituents of the two N atoms of the viologen do not affect its overall symmetry. Only the Raman bands near 1200 cm/sup /minus/1/, containing major contributions from the N-alkyl stretching vibrations, are affected by the asymmetric substitution. The RR spectra of both the monomer and dimer forms of the cation radicals were obtained by varying the experimental conditions used in their preparation. As previously observed for MV, dimerization of the asymmetric viologen radicals produces splitting of certain RR bands. Resonance Raman spectra of the fully reduced viologens were also obtained and used to monitor the disproportionation reaction between the dication and fully reduced form of the viologen. Surface-enhanced Raman and SERRS spectra of the different asymmetric viologens were found to vary slightly due to changes in their adsorption behavior with increasing chain length of the alkyl substituent.

  19. Pre-Resonance Raman Spectroscopy-Based Explosives Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Kumar, A.; Gambhir, V.; Reddy, M. N.

    2017-01-01

    A pre-resonance Raman spectroscopy based explosives detection system has been developed using UV laser at wavelength 266 nm having pulse energy of 30 mJ and repetition rate of 20 Hz. A 4-inch UV-enhanced collection optics and back-thinned UV-enhanced charged coupled device (CCD) coupled spectrometer has been used for analysis of the Raman signal. Spectral peak matching software has been developed indigenously for identification of explosives. A compact, tripod mounted and man-portable Raman system is developed for field applications. The system has capability to detect explosives and explosive derivatives over a range up to 40 m and has a sensitivity of 0.1% weight/volume.

  20. X-ray resonant Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, P.L.; LeBrun, T.; Deslattes, R.D.

    1995-08-01

    X-ray resonant Raman scattering presents great promise as a high-resolution spectroscopic probe of the electronic structure of matter. Unlike other methods, the technique avoids the loss of energy resolution resulting from the lifetime broadening of short-lived core-excited states. In addition, measurements of polarization and angular anisotropies yield information on the symmetries of electronic states of atoms and molecules. We studied the L{sub 3} edge of xenon, where the lifetime broadening is a major feature of the spectra recorded previously. X-ray fluorescence spectra were taken of both the L{alpha}{sub l,2} and L{beta}{sub 2,15} peaks over a range of energies from 10 eV below the edge to 40 eV above. These spectra show the evolution of resonant Raman scattering into characteristic fluorescence as the photon energy is scanned across the edge, and confirm several features of these spectra such as asymmetries in resonant peak shapes due to the onset of the ionization continuum. These results constitute the most comprehensive study of X-ray resonant Raman scattering to date, and were submitted for publication. Studies of other cases are under way, and new instruments that would match the unique characteristics of the APS - and thus render a new range of experiments possible - are under consideration.

  1. Nanoparticle Based Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Talley, C E; Huser, T R; Hollars, C W; Jusinski, L; Laurence, T; Lane, S M

    2005-01-03

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering is a powerful tool for the investigation of biological samples. Following a brief introduction to Raman and surface-enhanced Raman scattering, several examples of biophotonic applications of SERS are discussed. The concept of nanoparticle based sensors using SERS is introduced and the development of these sensors is discussed.

  2. Intricate Resonant Raman Response in Anisotropic ReS2.

    PubMed

    McCreary, Amber; Simpson, Jeffrey R; Wang, Yuanxi; Rhodes, Daniel; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Balicas, Luis; Dubey, Madan; Crespi, Vincent H; Terrones, Mauricio; Hight Walker, Angela R

    2017-09-12

    The strong in-plane anisotropy of rhenium disulfide (ReS2) offers an additional physical parameter that can be tuned for advanced applications such as logic circuits, thin-film polarizers, and polarization-sensitive photodetectors. ReS2 also presents advantages for optoelectronics, as it is both a direct-gap semiconductor for few-layer thicknesses (unlike MoS2 or WS2) and stable in air (unlike black phosphorus). Raman spectroscopy is one of the most powerful characterization techniques to nondestructively and sensitively probe the fundamental photophysics of a 2D material. Here, we perform a thorough study of the resonant Raman response of the 18 first-order phonons in ReS2 at various layer thicknesses and crystal orientations. Remarkably, we discover that, as opposed to a general increase in intensity of all of the Raman modes at excitonic transitions, each of the 18 modes behave differently relative to each other as a function of laser excitation, layer thickness, and orientation in a manner that highlights the importance of electron-phonon coupling in ReS2. In addition, we correct an unrecognized error in the calculation of the optical interference enhancement of the Raman signal of transition metal dichalcogenides on SiO2/Si substrates that has propagated through various reports. For ReS2, this correction is critical to properly assessing the resonant Raman behavior. We also implemented a perturbation approach to calculate frequency-dependent Raman intensities based on first-principles and demonstrate that, despite the neglect of excitonic effects, useful trends in the Raman intensities of monolayer and bulk ReS2 at different laser energies can be accurately captured. Finally, the phonon dispersion calculated from first-principles is used to address the possible origins of unexplained peaks observed in the Raman spectra, such as infrared-active modes, defects, and second-order processes.

  3. Resonance Raman studies of the purple membrane.

    PubMed

    Aton, B; Doukas, A G; Callender, R H; Becher, B; Ebrey, T G

    1977-06-28

    The individual resonance Raman spectra of the PM568 and M412 forms of light-adapted purple membrane from Halobacterium halobium have been measured using the newly developed flow technique. For comparison purposes, the Raman spectra of the model chromophores, all-trans- and 13-cis retinal n-butylamine, both as protonated and unprotonated Schiff bases, have also been obtained. In agreement with previous work, the Raman data indicate that the retinal chromophore is linked to the purple membrane protein via a protonated. Schiff base in the case of the PM568 and an unprotonated Schiff base for the M412 form. The basic mechanism for color regulation in both forms appears to be electron delocalization. The spectral features of the two forms are different from each other and different from the model compound spectra.

  4. Raman spectroscopy: Enhanced by organic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, John R.

    2017-09-01

    Nanostructured films of organic semiconductors are now shown to enhance the Raman signal of probe molecules, paving the way to the realization of substrates for Raman spectroscopy with molecular selectivity.

  5. Multiconfigurational Effects in Theoretical Resonance Raman Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yingjin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We analyze resonance Raman spectra of the nucleobase uracil in the short‐time approximation calculated with multiconfigurational methods. We discuss the importance of static electron correlation by means of density‐matrix renormalization group self‐consistent field (DMRG‐SCF) calculations. Our DMRG‐SCF results reveal that a minimal active orbital space that leads to a qualitatively correct description of the resonance Raman spectrum of uracil should encompass parts of the σ/σ* bonding/anti‐bonding orbitals of the pyrimidine ring. We trace these findings back to the considerable entanglement between the σ/σ* bonding/anti‐bonding as well as valence π/π* orbitals in the excited‐state electronic structure of uracil, which indicates non‐negligible non‐dynamical correlation effects that are less pronounced in the electronic ground state. PMID:27933695

  6. Resonance Raman spectroscopy in twisted bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righi, A.; Venezuela, P.; Chacham, H.; Costa, S. D.; Fantini, C.; Ruoff, R. S.; Colombo, L.; Bacsa, W. S.; Pimenta, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    In this work we study the Raman spectra of twisted bilayer graphene samples, with different twisting angles, by changing the incident laser energy between 2.54 and 4.14 eV. The spectra exhibit a number of extra peaks, classified in different families, each one associated with bilayer graphenes with different twisting rotational angles. We theoretically analyze the laser energy dependence of these extra peaks considering a set of discrete wavevectors within the interior of the Brillouin zone of graphene, which activate special double-resonance Raman processes. Our result show a nice qualitative agreement between the experimental and simulated spectra, demonstrating that these extra peaks are indeed ascribed to an umklapp double-resonance process in graphene systems.

  7. Unusual Raman spectra of para-nitroaniline by sequential Fermi resonances.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jiarui; Zhu, Ling; Feng, Yanting; Li, Yongqing; Zhang, Zhenglong; Xia, Lixin; Liu, Liwei; Ma, Fengcai

    2014-01-01

    In this communication, we report the unusual Raman spectra of para-nitroaniline (PNA) by sequential Fermi resonances. The combinational mode 1292 cm(-1) in the experimental Raman spectrum indirectly gains the initial spectral weight at 1392 cm(-1) by three sequential Fermi resonances. These Fermi resonances result in the strong interaction between the donor group of NH2 and the acceptor group of NO2. Our theoretical calculations provide reasonable interpretation for the abnormal Raman spectra of PNA. Experimental surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrum of PNA further confirmed our conclusion, where the strongest Raman peak at 1292 cm(-1) is very weak, while the Raman peak at 1392 cm(-1) becoming the strongest Raman peak, which is consistent with the theoretical simulations.

  8. Raman microspectroscopy, surface-enhanced Raman scattering microspectroscopy, and stable-isotope Raman microspectroscopy for biofilm characterization.

    PubMed

    Ivleva, Natalia P; Kubryk, Patrick; Niessner, Reinhard

    2017-07-01

    Biofilms represent the predominant form of microbial life on our planet. These aggregates of microorganisms, which are embedded in a matrix formed by extracellular polymeric substances, may colonize nearly all interfaces. Detailed knowledge of microorganisms enclosed in biofilms as well as of the chemical composition, structure, and functions of the complex biofilm matrix and their changes at different stages of the biofilm formation and under various physical and chemical conditions is relevant in different fields. Important research topics include the development and improvement of antibiotics and medical devices and the optimization of biocides, antifouling strategies, and biological wastewater treatment. Raman microspectroscopy is a capable and nondestructive tool that can provide detailed two-dimensional and three-dimensional chemical information about biofilm constituents with the spatial resolution of an optical microscope and without interference from water. However, the sensitivity of Raman microspectroscopy is rather limited, which hampers the applicability of Raman microspectroscopy especially at low biomass concentrations. Fortunately, the resonance Raman effect as well as surface-enhanced Raman scattering can help to overcome this drawback. Furthermore, the combination of Raman microspectroscopy with other microscopic techniques, mass spectrometry techniques, or particularly with stable-isotope techniques can provide comprehensive information on monospecies and multispecies biofilms. Here, an overview of different Raman microspectroscopic techniques, including resonance Raman microspectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering microspectroscopy, for in situ detection, visualization, identification, and chemical characterization of biofilms is given, and the main feasibilities and limitations of these techniques in biofilm research are presented. Future possibilities of and challenges for Raman microspectroscopy alone and in combination with other

  9. Au-Ag-Au double shell nanoparticles-based localized surface plasmon resonance and surface-enhanced Raman scattering biosensor for sensitive detection of 2-mercapto-1-methylimidazole.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xue; Chen, Yanhua; Qin, Meihong; Chen, Yang; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Hanqi; Tian, Yuan

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, Au-Ag-Au double shell nanoparticles were prepared based on the reduction of the metal salts HAuCl4 and AgNO3 at the surface of seed particles. Due to the synergistic effect between Au and Ag, the hybrid nanoparticles are particularly stable and show excellent performances on the detection of 2-mercapto-1-methylimidazole (methimazole). The binding of target molecule at the surface of Au-Ag-Au double shell nanoparticles was demonstrated based on both localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra. The LSPR intensity is directly proportional to the methimazole concentration in the range of 0.10-3.00×10(-7) mol L(-1). The SERS spectrum can be applied in identification of methimazole molecule. The LSPR coupled with SERS based on the Au-Ag-Au double shell nanoparticles would be very attractive for the quantitative determination and qualitative analysis of the analytes in medicines.

  10. Pre-resonance Raman spectra of some simple gases. [sulfur oxides, hydrogen sulfide, and nitrogen oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. W.

    1974-01-01

    The pre-resonance Raman spectra of SO2, N2O, and H2S were investigated using the 4880 A, 4727 A, and 4579 A lines of the argon ion laser. Although these molecules have electronic absorption bands in the near ultraviolet, none exhibit any pre-resonance enhancement within our experimental error of + or - 10%. Possible explanations taking into account the current theories for resonance Raman are discussed.

  11. UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy of amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhl, Martin; Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Schmitt, Heike; Lenarz, Thomas; Morgner, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Resonant enhancement of Raman signals is a useful method to increase sensitivity in samples with low concentration such as biological tissue. The investigation of resonance profiles shows the optimal excitation wavelength and yields valuable information about the molecules themselves. However careful characterization and calibration of all experimental parameters affecting quantum yield is required in order to achieve comparability of the single spectra recorded. We present an experimental technique for measuring the resonance profiles of different amino acids. The absorption lines of these molecules are located in the ultraviolet (UV) wavelength range. One limitation for broadband measurement of resonance profiles is the limited availability of Raman filters in certain regions of the UV for blocking the Rayleigh scattered light. Here, a wavelength range from 244.8 nm to 266.0 nm was chosen. The profiles reveal the optimal wavelength for recording the Raman spectra of amino acids in aqueous solutions in this range. This study provides the basis for measurements on more complex molecules such as proteins in the human perilymph. The composition of this liquid in the inner ear is essential for hearing and cannot be analyzed non-invasively so far. The long term aim is to implement this technique as a fiber based endoscope for non-invasive measurements during surgeries (e. g. cochlear implants) making it available as a diagnostic tool for physicians. This project is embedded in the interdisciplinary cluster of excellence "Hearing for all" (H4A).

  12. Enhanced Raman scattering of biological molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Joseph R.

    The results presented in this thesis, originate from the aspiration to develop an identification algorithm for Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis (S. enterica), Escherichia coli (E. coli), Bacillus globigii ( B. globigii), and Bacillus megaterium ( B. megaterium) using "enhanced" Raman scattering. We realized our goal, with a method utilizing an immunoassay process in a spectroscopic technique, and the direct use of the enhanced spectral response due to bacterial surface elements. The enhanced Raman signal originates from Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) and/or Morphological Dependent Resonances (MDR's). We utilized a modified Lee-Meisel colloidal production method to produce a SERS active substrate, which was applied to a SERS application for the amino acid Glycine. The comparison indicates that the SERS/FRACTAL/MDR process can produce an increase of 107 times more signal than the bulk Raman signal from Glycine. In the extension of the Glycine results, we studied the use of SERS related to S. enterica, where we have shown that the aromatic amino acid contribution from Phenylalanine, Tyrosine, and Tryptophan produces a SERS response that can be used to identify the associated SERS vibrational modes of a S. enterica one or two antibody complexes. The "fingerprint" associated with the spectral signature in conjunction with an enhanced Raman signal allows conclusions to be made: (1) about the orientation of the secondary structure on the metal; (2) whether bound/unbound antibody can be neglected; (3) whether we can lower the detection limit. We have lowered the detection limit of S. enterica to 106 bacteria/ml. We also show a profound difference between S. enterica and E. coli SERS spectra even when there exists non-specific binding on E. coli indicating a protein conformation change induced by the addition of the antigen S. enterica. We confirm TEM imagery data, indicating that the source of the aromatic amino acid SERS response is originating from

  13. Resonant Raman Scattering Studies of Iii-V Semiconductor Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaney, Malcolm Emil

    1991-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy, an inelastic light scattering technique, explores III-V semiconductors by conveying crystal lattice structural information and by probing carrier dynamics both directly and via the electron-phonon interaction. We have examined three physical systems accentuating three aspects of Raman utility. Al_{rm x}Ga_{rm 1-x} As alloy work emphasizes electronic behavior, migration enhanced epitaxy (MEE) studies highlight structural results, and a phonon-assisted lasing project underscores electron -phonon interaction. The disorder-induced frequency difference between the dipole-forbidden and dipole-allowed longitudinal optic (LO) modes in Al_{rm x} Ga_{rm 1-x}As alloys has been investigated as a function of laser photon energy, aluminum mole fraction x, and the indirect versus direct nature of the electronic band gap. For the indirect gap alloy, the intermediate resonant state is an X-valley electron effectively localized because of its short inelastic lifetime. Raman scattering via this state is described by a calculation of the Raman susceptibility that considers the random alloy potential generated by local concentration fluctuations. MEE is a new growth technology that can order these materials in two spatial directions. In a GaSb/AlSb system we show Raman evidence of this ordering via observation of zone folded acoustic modes and compare to AlAs/GaAs results. In other work resonant Raman documents the effects on the dipole-forbidden interface mode of a periodic corrugation introduced in AlAs barrier GaAs single quantum wells. Finally, we investigate "phonon-assisted" lasing in photopumped quantum well heterostructure lasers. Resonant Raman is the natural choice to probe this system purported to have an enhanced electron-phonon interaction. For both the AlGaAs/GaAs and AlGaAs/GaAs/InGaAs structures examined, we provide evidence that indicates first order "phonon -assisted" lasing is actually renormalized band gap luminescence filtered by absorption from

  14. Resonance and Variable Temperature Raman Studies of Chloroperoxidase and Methemoglobin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remba, Ronald David

    1980-12-01

    Raman spectra of the heme proteins chloroperoxidase and methemoglobin, chemically and temperature modified, are obtained for laser excitation near the Soret absorption band. Numerous biochemical and physical results are obtained. The following observations for chloroperoxidase have been made. The scattered intensity for resonance (406.7 nm) excitation is at least twenty times that for near resonance (457.9 nm) excitation. In resonance only totally symmetric modes are enhanced. The positions of marker band I ((TURN) 1370 cm(' -1)) for both the native and reduced enzymes are lower than expected for high-spin heme proteins indicating a strongly electron donating axial ligand. From shifts in spin-sensitive Raman peaks as the temperature is lowered, a high-spin to low-spin transition of the heme iron is inferred. Raman spectra of chloroperoxidase liganded with small ions indicate that there is a second anion binding site near the heme. Photo-dissociation of CO from reduced chloroperoxidase is observed. The position of marker band I in the CO complex indicates that electron density is transferred from the heme onto the CO. The resonance Raman spectra of chloroperoxidase and cytochrome P-450 are nearly identical and are very different from those of horseradish peroxidase and cytochrome c. These results, particularly for the reduced enzymes, indicate that the heme sites in chloroperoxidase and P -450 are essentially the same. Raman spectra of a number of methemoglobins complexed with various small ions are obtained as a function of temperature in the region of spin-sensitive marker band (II) ((TURN) 1500 cm('-1)) for laser excitation near the Soret absorption band. For certain ligands, H(,2)O, N(,3)('-), OCN('-), OH('-) and SCN('-), the iron spin state changes from high spin to low spin with decreasing temperature. The relative spin concentrations are monitored by measuring the Raman intensity ratio, I(,h)/I(,1), of the high-spin and low -spin versions of marker band (II

  15. The resonance Raman excitation profile of lutein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskins, L. C.

    The resonance Raman excitation profiles for the ν 1, ν 2 and ν 3 vibrations of lutein in acetone, toluene and carbon disulfide solvents have been measured. The results are interpreted in terms of a three-mode vibrational theory which includes both homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening effects. Excellent agreement between calculated and observed excitation profiles and visible spectra was found in acetone and toluene, but the results in carbon disulfide indicate a possible breakdown in the three-mode model. The major broadening mechanism is homogeneous, with about a 25% contribution from inhomogeneous broadening.

  16. The resonance Raman excitation profile of fucoxanthin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, L. J.; Glasgow, L. A.; Hoskins, L. C.; Krohe, T.

    1989-01-01

    The resonance Raman excitation profiles (RREPs) of the ν 1 and ν 2 vibrations of fucoxanthin in acetone and toluene solvents have been studied. Fucoxanthin, which is a predominant pigment in marine seaweed and phytoplankton, has several structural differences from carotenoids for which excitation profiles have been determined. The RREPs for fucoxanthin are interpreted in terms of a two-mode model and show a B2 value which is approximately 20% lower than for carotenoids like β-carotene and lutein which occur in higher plants. Excellent fits between experimental data and the theoretical model were observed in both solvents.

  17. Resonance Raman of BCC and normal skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-hui; Sriramoju, Vidyasagar; Boydston-White, Susie; Wu, Binlin; Zhang, Chunyuan; Pei, Zhe; Sordillo, Laura; Beckman, Hugh; Alfano, Robert R.

    2017-02-01

    The Resonance Raman (RR) spectra of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and normal human skin tissues were analyzed using 532nm laser excitation. RR spectral differences in vibrational fingerprints revealed skin normal and cancerous states tissues. The standard diagnosis criterion for BCC tissues are created by native RR biomarkers and its changes at peak intensity. The diagnostic algorithms for the classification of BCC and normal were generated based on SVM classifier and PCA statistical method. These statistical methods were used to analyze the RR spectral data collected from skin tissues, yielding a diagnostic sensitivity of 98.7% and specificity of 79% compared with pathological reports.

  18. Surface-Enhanced Raman and Surface-Enhanced Hyper-Raman Scattering of Thiol-Functionalized Carotene

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A thiol-modified carotene, 7′-apo-7′-(4-mercaptomethylphenyl)-β-carotene, was used to obtain nonresonant surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of carotene at an excitation wavelength of 1064 nm, which were compared with resonant SERS spectra at an excitation wavelength of 532 nm. These spectra and surface-enhanced hyper-Raman scattering (SEHRS) spectra of the functionalized carotene were compared with the spectra of nonmodified β-carotene. Using SERS, normal Raman, and SEHRS spectra, all obtained for the resonant case, the interaction of the carotene molecules with silver nanoparticles, as well as the influence of the resonance enhancement and the SERS enhancement on the spectra, were investigated. The interaction with the silver surface occurs for both functionalized and nonfunctionalized β-carotene, but only the stronger functionalization-induced interaction enables the acquisition of nonresonant SERS spectra of β-carotene at low concentrations. The resonant SEHRS and SERS spectra are very similar. Nevertheless, the SEHRS spectra contain additional bands of infrared-active modes of carotene. Increased contributions from bands that experience low resonance enhancement point to a strong interaction between silver nanoparticles and electronic levels of the molecules, thereby giving rise to a decrease in the resonance enhancement in SERS and SEHRS. PMID:28077983

  19. Highly Selective and Repeatable Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering Detection for Epinephrine in Serum Based on Interface Self-Assembled 2D Nanoparticles Arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Binbin; Li, Xiaoyun; Tang, Xianghu; Li, Pan; Yang, Liangbao; Liu, Jinhuai

    2017-03-01

    Target analyte detection in complex systems with high selectivity and repeatability is crucial to analytical technology and science. Here we present a two-dimensional (2D) surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) platform, which takes advantages of the high selectivity of the SERRS sensor as well as the sensitivity and reproducibility of the interfacial SERS platform, for detecting trace epinephrine (EP) in the serum. To realize sensitive and selective detection of EP in a complex system, Au NPs are modified with α,β-nitriloacetic acid and Fe(NO3)3 to form the Au NP-(Fe-NTA) sensor, and as a consequence, EP can be rapidly captured by the sensor on the surface of Au NPs and then delivered at the cyclohexane/water interface. More importantly, we synthesized the extremely stable Au NPs (PVP-stabilized Au NPs), where the presence of PVP prevents aggregation of Au NPs during the self-assembly process and then makes a more uniform distribution of Au NPs with analytes at the cyclohexane/water interface, approximately 2 nm interparticle distance between the Au NPs, which has been proved by synchrotron radiation grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (SR-GISAXS) experiments. The self-assembly method not only effectively avoids the aggregation of Au NPs and decreases the influence of the background signal but also can capture and enrich EP molecules in the cyclohexane/water interface, realizing the sensitive and selective detection of EP in complex serum sample. This strategy overcomes the difficulty of bringing nanostructures together to form efficient interparticle distance with simple fabrication and maximum uniformity and also provides a powerful nanosensor for tracing amounts of analyte molecules in a complex system with the advantages of capturing and enriching of target molecules in the liquid/liquid interface during the self-assembly process. Our SERRS platform opens vast possibilities for repeatability, sensitivity, and selectivity detection of

  20. Plasmon enhanced Raman scattering effect for an atom near a carbon nanotube

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarev, I. V.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum electrodynamics theory of the resonance Raman scattering is developed for an atom in a close proximity to a carbon nanotube. The theory predicts a dramatic enhancement of the Raman intensity in the strong atomic coupling regime to nanotube plasmon near-fields. This resonance scattering is a manifestation of the general electromagnetic surface enhanced Raman scattering effect, and can be used in designing efficient nanotube based optical sensing substrates for single atom detection, precision spontaneous emission control, and manipulation.

  1. Wavelength dependent resonance Raman band intensity of broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy of malachite green in ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Qiongyan; He, Yuhan; Xu, Mei; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zhaohui

    2015-03-01

    Resonance broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy of malachite green in ethanol has been performed. With a tuning picosecond visible laser source and a broadband Raman probe, the Raman gain and loss spectra have been measured simultaneously. By scanning the Raman pump across the first absorption band of the molecule, we found that the resonant Raman bands could be only seen when the pump laser tuned in the range of the red edge of the S1←S0 transition. Dispersive lineshapes of resonant Raman bands have been observed in the Raman loss spectra, while the line shape is normal (same as spontaneous Raman) in the Raman gain spectra. Although, the resonant bands in the loss spectrum are usually stronger than that in the gain spectrum, the band intensities of both loss and gain linearly increase with the pump energy. The relative magnitude of each corresponding resonant band in the Raman loss and gain varies with the pump wavelength. Mode specified Raman excitation profiles have been obtained through broadband stimulated Raman measurement.

  2. Graphene-Enhanced Raman Scattering from the Adenine Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgov, Leonid; Pidhirnyi, Denys; Dovbeshko, Galyna; Lebedieva, Tetiana; Kiisk, Valter; Heinsalu, Siim; Lange, Sven; Jaaniso, Raivo; Sildos, Ilmo

    2016-04-01

    An enhanced Raman scattering from a thin layer of adenine molecules deposited on graphene substrate was detected. The value of enhancement depends on the photon energy of the exciting light. The benzene ring in the structure of adenine molecule suggests π-stacking of adenine molecule on top of graphene. So, it is proposed that the enhancement in the adenine Raman signal is explained by the resonance electron transfer from the Fermi level of graphene to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level of adenine.

  3. Preventing Raman Lasing in High-Q WGM Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    A generic design has been conceived to suppress the Raman effect in whispering- gallery-mode (WGM) optical resonators that have high values of the resonance quality factor (Q). Although it is possible to exploit the Raman effect (even striving to maximize the Raman gain to obtain Raman lasing), the present innovation is intended to satisfy a need that arises in applications in which the Raman effect inhibits the realization of the full potential of WGM resonators as frequency-selection components. Heretofore, in such applications, it has been necessary to operate high-Q WGM resonators at unattractively low power levels to prevent Raman lasing. (The Raman-lasing thresholds of WGM optical resonators are very low and are approximately proportional to Q(sup -2)). Heretofore, two ways of preventing Raman lasting at high power levels have been known, but both entail significant disadvantages: A resonator can be designed so that the optical field is spread over a relatively large mode volume to bring the power density below the threshold. For any given combination of Q and power level, there is certain mode volume wherein Raman lasing does not start. Unfortunately, a resonator that has a large mode volume also has a high spectral density, which is undesirable in a typical photonic application. A resonator can be cooled to the temperature of liquid helium, where the Raman spectrum is narrower and, therefore, the Raman gain is lower. However, liquid-helium cooling is inconvenient. The present design overcomes these disadvantages, making it possible to operate a low-spectral-density (even a single-mode) WGM resonator at a relatively high power level at room temperature, without risk of Raman lasing.

  4. Deep ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy: A resonance-absorption trade-off illustrated by diluted liquid benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, C. T.; Willitsford, A. H.; Philbrick, C. R.; Hallen, H. D.

    2015-12-01

    The magnitude of resonance Raman intensity, in terms of the real signal level measured on-resonance compared to the signal level measured off-resonance for the same sample, is investigated using a tunable laser source. Resonance Raman enhancements, occurring as the excitation energy is tuned through ultraviolet absorption lines, are used to examine the 1332 cm-1 vibrational mode of diamond and the 992 cm-1 ring-breathing mode of benzene. Competition between the wavelength dependent optical absorption and the magnitude of the resonance enhancement is studied using measured signal levels as a function of wavelength. Two system applications are identified where the resonance Raman significantly increases the real signal levels despite the presence of strong absorption: characterization of trace species in laser remote sensing and spectroscopy of the few molecules in the tiny working volumes of near-field optical microscopy.

  5. Nanopillars array for surface enhanced Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    S.P. Chang, A; Bora, M; Nguyen, H T; Behymer, E M; Larson, C C; Britten, J A; Carter, J C; Bond, T C

    2011-04-14

    The authors present a new class of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates based on lithographically-defined two-dimensional rectangular array of nanopillars. Two types of nanopillars within this class are discussed: vertical pillars and tapered pillars. For the vertical pillars, the gap between each pair of nanopillars is small enough (< 50 nm) such that highly confined plasmonic cavity resonances are supported between the pillars when light is incident upon them, and the anti-nodes of these resonances act as three-dimensional hotspots for SERS. For the tapered pillars, SERS enhancement arises from the nanofocusing effect due to the sharp tip on top. SERS experiments were carried out on these substrates using various concentrations of 1,2 bis-(4-pyridyl)-ethylene (BPE), benzenethiol (BT) monolayer and toluene vapor. The results show that SERS enhancement factor of over 0.5 x 10{sup 9} can be achieved, and BPE can be detected down to femto-molar concentration level. The results also show promising potential for the use of these substrates in environmental monitoring of gases and vapors such as volatile organic compounds.

  6. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milekhin, A. G.; Sveshnikova, L. L.; Duda, T. A.; Yeryukov, N. A.; Rodyakina, E. E.; Gutakovskii, A. K.; Batsanov, S. A.; Latyshev, A. V.; Zahn, D. R. T.

    2016-01-01

    We review our recent results concerning surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) by confined optical and surface optical phonons in semiconductor nanostructures including CdS, CuS, GaN, and ZnO nanocrystals, GaN and ZnO nanorods, and AlN nanowires. Enhancement of Raman scattering by confined optical phonons as well as appearance of new Raman modes with the frequencies different from those in ZnO bulk attributed to surface optical modes is observed in a series of nanostructures having different morphology located in the vicinity of metal nanoclusters (Ag, Au, and Pt). Assignment of surface optical modes is based on calculations performed in the frame of the dielectric continuum model. It is established that SERS by phonons has a resonant character. A maximal enhancement by optical phonons as high as 730 is achieved for CdS nanocrystals in double resonant conditions at the coincidence of laser energy with that of electronic transitions in semiconductor nanocrystals and localized surface plasmon resonance in metal nanoclusters. Even a higher enhancement is observed for SERS by surface optical modes in ZnO nanocrystals (above 104). Surface enhanced Raman scattering is used for studying phonon spectrum in nanocrystal ensembles with an ultra-low areal density on metal plasmonic nanostructures.

  7. Mapping Chemical and Structural Composition of Pharmaceutical and Biological Samples by Raman, Surface-Enhanced Raman and Fluorescence Spectral Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chourpa, Igor; Cohen-Jonathan, Simone; Dubois, Pierre

    Raman spectroscopy is an analytical technique recognised for its structural and conformational specificity. The efficient discrimination of molecular species by Raman is particularly potent for multidimensional microscopic imaging of complex biological environment, as demonstrated in the present book. The commonly admitted problem of Raman, low sensitivity, can often be circumvented due to high output instruments and via approaches like RRS (resonance Raman scattering), SERS (surface-enhanced Raman scattering), TERS (tip-enhanced Raman scattering) or CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering). In contrast to the latter, RRS and SERS are realizable with less sophisticated set-up based on common Raman systems. Although more invasive than RRS, SERS provides better sensitivity and quenching of fluorescence. SERRS (surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering) spectroscopy can be used in coupling with fluorescence and competes in selectivity and sensitivity with spectrofluorimetry. In the chapter below, we use recent applications made in our group to illustrate the use of Raman and SERRS spectral imaging for characterization of biological samples (animal subcutaneous tissue, human cancer cells) and pharmaceutical samples (microparticles for drug delivery, fibres for wound dressing). After a brief description of experimental details on spectral imaging, the chapter will focus on results concerning (i) biocompatible pharmaceutical materials made of alginates and (ii) anticancer drugs in pharmaceutical forms and in biological systems.

  8. Deep-UV resonance Raman imaging of a cell (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumamoto, Yasuaki

    2016-09-01

    Raman microscopy enables a sensitive, label-free molecular imaging of cells. Employing deep-UV (DUV) light for Raman excitation allows selective measurement of nucleotide bases and aromatic amino acids in a cell, without spectral overlapping of components with a large quantity (i.e. lipid, peptide), because their Raman scattering are specifically enhanced due to the resonance effect. To implement DUV resonance Raman imaging of cells, I previously established a home-built Raman microscope equipped with a DUV laser (λ = 257.2 nm). Raman image representing the distribution of cellular nucleic acid can be reconstructed with the intensity of a Raman band selectively assigned to adenine and guanine. Unfortunately, DUV resonance Raman imaging of cells is severely hindered by molecular photodegradation that occurs after a molecule absorbs DUV light during Raman measurement, precluding a high signal-to-noise ratio and repetitive measurement. To address this issue, I developed a technique for molecular protection under DUV exposure; the trivalent ions of lanthanide group including terbium, europium, and thulium could significantly suppress the molecular photodegradation by relaxing the DUV-excited molecules. The buffer solution containing any of these lanthanide ions with the concentration of 100 µM or higher could provide less destruction of the cellular structures, including nucleotide bases, than the one without the ions, under DUV exposure. Utilizing such protective effects of the lanthanide ions, I successfully achieved a twice higher signal-to-noise ratio and repetitive DUV Raman imaging of cells.

  9. Brain metastasis detection by resonant Raman optical biopsy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; Cheng, Gangge; Zhou, Lixin; Zhang, Chunyuan; Pu, Yang; Li, Zhongwu; Liu, Yulong; Li, Qingbo; Wang, Wei; Alfano, Robert R.

    2014-03-01

    Resonant Raman (RR) spectroscopy provides an effective way to enhance Raman signal from particular bonds associated with key molecules due to changes on a molecular level. In this study, RR is used for detection of human brain metastases of five kinds of primary organs of lung, breast, kidney, rectal and orbital in ex-vivo. The RR spectra of brain metastases cancerous tissues were measured and compared with those of normal brain tissues and the corresponding primary cancer tissues. The differences of five types of brain metastases tissues in key bio-components of carotene, tryptophan, lactate, alanine and methyl/methylene group were investigated. The SVM-KNN classifier was used to categorize a set of RR spectra data of brain metastasis of lung cancerous tissues from normal brain tissue, yielding diagnostic sensitivity and specificity at 100% and 75%, respectively. The RR spectroscopy may provide new moleculebased optical probe tools for diagnosis and classification of brain metastatic of cancers.

  10. Finding electromagnetic and chemical enhancement factors of surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Dvoynenko, Mykhaylo M; Wang, Juen-Kai

    2007-12-15

    The authors report two methods to determine electromagnetic and chemical enhancement factors in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), which are based on saturation property and decay dynamics of photoluminescence and concurrent measurements of photoluminescence and resonance Raman scattering intensities. Considerations for experimental implementation are discussed. This study is expected to facilitate the understanding of SERS mechanisms and the advancement of the usage of SERS in chemical and biological sensor applications.

  11. Observation of the Auger resonant Raman effect

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.S.; Chen, M.H.; Crasemann, B.; Ice, G.E.

    1980-11-01

    Monochromatized synchrotron radiation near the photoionization threshold was used to produce the (2p/sub 3/2/) vacancy state in atomic Xe. Deexcitation of the state through L/sub 3/-M/sub 4/M/sub 5/(/sup 1/G/sub 4/) Auger-electron emission was measured. The 5d spectator-electron Auger satellite was observed. The satellite energy exhibits linear dispersion. The observed width of the /sup 1/G diagram line decreases by approx. 40% when the exciting photon energy reaches the vicinity of the Xe L/sub 3/ binding energy. This radiationless process can thus be construed as the Auger analog of the x-ray resonant Raman effect. The /sup 1/G diagram line is shifted by -+3 eV due to post-collision interaction; this shift varies with excitation energy.

  12. Resonance Raman excitation profiles of lycopene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskins, L. C.

    1981-01-01

    The resonance Raman spectrum of lycopene has been examined in acetone solvent and excitation profiles of the three fundamentals ν1, ν2, and ν3 have been determined. The excitation data and the visible spectrum have been analyzed using two-mode and three-mode vibrational models, with the two-mode model involving virtual states of ν1 and ν2 giving the best fit to the data. This mode mixing or Duskinsky effect was not observed for β-carotene. The single-mode and three-mode theories which have been used to explain the corresponding data for β-carotene are shown to be inconsistent with the experimental data of lycopene. Equations for calculating excitation profiles and visible spectra are given.

  13. Coherent control through near-resonant Raman transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Xingcan; Lerch, Eliza-Beth W.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2006-02-15

    The phase of an electronic wave function is shown to play an important role in coherent control experiments. By using a pulse shaping system with a femtosecond laser, we explore the phase relationships among resonant and off-resonant Raman transitions in Li{sub 2} by measuring the phases of the resulting wave packets, or quantum beats. Specific pixels in a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator are used to isolate the resonant and off-resonant portions of the Raman transitions in Li{sub 2}. The off-resonant Raman transitions have an approximately 90 degree sign phase shift with respect to the resonant Raman transition, and there is an approximately 180 degree sign phase shift between the blue-detuned and the red-detuned off-resonant Raman transitions. Calculations using second-order time-dependent perturbation theory for the electronic transitions agree with the experimental results for the laser pulse intensities used here. Interferences between the off-resonant Raman transitions as a function of detuning are used to demonstrate coherent control of the Raman quantum wave packet.

  14. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Matthew W.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include the inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.

  15. Resonance Raman Probes for Organelle-Specific Labeling in Live Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, Andrey N.; Pliss, Artem; Lim, Chang-Keun; Heo, Jeongyun; Kim, Sehoon; Rzhevskii, Alexander; Gu, Bobo; Yong, Ken-Tye; Wen, Shangchun; Prasad, Paras N.

    2016-06-01

    Raman microspectroscopy provides for high-resolution non-invasive molecular analysis of biological samples and has a breakthrough potential for dissection of cellular molecular composition at a single organelle level. However, the potential of Raman microspectroscopy can be fully realized only when novel types of molecular probes distinguishable in the Raman spectroscopy modality are developed for labeling of specific cellular domains to guide spectrochemical spatial imaging. Here we report on the design of a next generation Raman probe, based on BlackBerry Quencher 650 compound, which provides unprecedentedly high signal intensity through the Resonance Raman (RR) enhancement mechanism. Remarkably, RR enhancement occurs with low-toxic red light, which is close to maximum transparency in the biological optical window. The utility of proposed RR probes was validated for targeting lysosomes in live cultured cells, which enabled identification and subsequent monitoring of dynamic changes in this organelle by Raman imaging.

  16. Resonance Raman Probes for Organelle-Specific Labeling in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmin, Andrey N.; Pliss, Artem; Lim, Chang-Keun; Heo, Jeongyun; Kim, Sehoon; Rzhevskii, Alexander; Gu, Bobo; Yong, Ken-Tye; Wen, Shangchun; Prasad, Paras N.

    2016-01-01

    Raman microspectroscopy provides for high-resolution non-invasive molecular analysis of biological samples and has a breakthrough potential for dissection of cellular molecular composition at a single organelle level. However, the potential of Raman microspectroscopy can be fully realized only when novel types of molecular probes distinguishable in the Raman spectroscopy modality are developed for labeling of specific cellular domains to guide spectrochemical spatial imaging. Here we report on the design of a next generation Raman probe, based on BlackBerry Quencher 650 compound, which provides unprecedentedly high signal intensity through the Resonance Raman (RR) enhancement mechanism. Remarkably, RR enhancement occurs with low-toxic red light, which is close to maximum transparency in the biological optical window. The utility of proposed RR probes was validated for targeting lysosomes in live cultured cells, which enabled identification and subsequent monitoring of dynamic changes in this organelle by Raman imaging. PMID:27339882

  17. Continuous-wave deep ultraviolet sources for resonance Raman explosive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellampalle, Balakishore; Martin, Robert; Sluch, Mikhail; McCormick, William; Ice, Robert; Lemoff, Brian

    2015-05-01

    A promising approach to stand-off detection of explosive traces is using resonance Raman spectroscopy with Deepultraviolet (DUV) light. The DUV region offers two main advantages: strong explosive signatures due to resonant and λ- 4 enhancement of Raman cross-section, and lack of fluorescence and solar background. For DUV Raman spectroscopy, continuous-wave (CW) or quasi-CW lasers are preferable to high peak powered pulsed lasers because Raman saturation phenomena and sample damage can be avoided. In this work we present a very compact DUV source that produces greater than 1 mw of CW optical power. The source has high optical-to-optical conversion efficiency, greater than 5 %, as it is based on second harmonic generation (SHG) of a blue/green laser source using a nonlinear crystal placed in an external resonant enhancement cavity. The laser system is extremely compact, lightweight, and can be battery powered. Using two such sources, one each at 236.5 nm and 257.5 nm, we are building a second generation explosive detection system called Dual-Excitation-Wavelength Resonance-Raman Detector (DEWRRED-II). The DEWRRED-II system also includes a compact dual-band high throughput DUV spectrometer, and a highly-sensitive detection algorithm. The DEWRRED technique exploits the DUV excitation wavelength dependence of Raman signal strength, arising from complex interplay of resonant enhancement, self-absorption and laser penetration depth. We show sensor measurements from explosives/precursor materials at different standoff distances.

  18. Ultrafast surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Keller, Emily L; Brandt, Nathaniel C; Cassabaum, Alyssa A; Frontiera, Renee R

    2015-08-07

    Ultrafast surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) with pico- and femtosecond time resolution has the ability to elucidate the mechanisms by which plasmons mediate chemical reactions. Here we review three important technological advances in these new methodologies, and discuss their prospects for applications in areas including plasmon-induced chemistry and sensing at very low limits of detection. Surface enhancement, arising from plasmonic materials, has been successfully incorporated with stimulated Raman techniques such as femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). These techniques are capable of time-resolved measurement on the femtosecond and picosecond time scale and can be used to follow the dynamics of molecules reacting near plasmonic surfaces. We discuss the potential application of ultrafast SERS techniques to probe plasmon-mediated processes, such as H2 dissociation and solar steam production. Additionally, we discuss the possibilities for high sensitivity SERS sensing using these stimulated Raman spectroscopies.

  19. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    thick films of an acrylic adhesive spin-coated onto silver were identical to normal Raman spectra of salts , 20. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY OF ABSTRACT 21...spectra obtained from thick films of an acrylic adhesive sin-coated onto silver were identical to normal Raman spectra of salts of saccharin, a...the sodium salt of o-benzoic sulfimide (saccharin) were also obtained from Aldrich. A model acrylic adhesive system consisting of the monomer

  20. Insights into Protein Structure and Dynamics by Ultraviolet and Visible Resonance Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    López-Peña, Ignacio; Leigh, Brian S; Schlamadinger, Diana E; Kim, Judy E

    2015-08-11

    Raman spectroscopy is a form of vibrational spectroscopy based on inelastic scattering of light. In resonance Raman spectroscopy, the wavelength of the incident light falls within an absorption band of a chromophore, and this overlap of excitation and absorption energy greatly enhances the Raman scattering efficiency of the absorbing species. The ability to probe vibrational spectra of select chromophores within a complex mixture of molecules makes resonance Raman spectroscopy an excellent tool for studies of biomolecules. In this Current Topic, we discuss the type of molecular insights obtained from steady-state and time-resolved resonance Raman studies of a prototypical photoactive protein, rhodopsin. We also review recent efforts in ultraviolet resonance Raman investigations of soluble and membrane-associated biomolecules, including integral membrane proteins and antimicrobial peptides. These examples illustrate that resonance Raman is a sensitive, selective, and practical method for studying the structures of biological molecules, and the molecular bonding, geometry, and environments of protein cofactors, the backbone, and side chains.

  1. Remote sensing of the atmosphere by resonance Raman LIDAR

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Harder, D.; Leung, K.P.; Zuhoski, P.B. Jr.; Burr, D.; Chen, C.L.

    1995-01-01

    With the increased environmental awareness has come the need for technologies that can detect, identify and monitor pollutants and, where necessary, verify their destruction. This need is evidenced by the recent creation of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), of which the Title 3-Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP) amendments mandate the complete revision and expansion of the earlier Clean Air Act (CAA), section 112. As was pointed out by Grant, Kagann and McClenny, optical remote sensing technologies are expected to play a very important role in insuring that various facilities are in compliance with the Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards for the reduction of HAP emissions that are called for in section 301 of Title 3. Unfortunately, however, many of these technologies have varying detection and applicability characteristics which often dictate the conditions under which one can use the sensor to detect, identify or monitor a chemical species. Some of the advantages that a Raman-based pollution sensor possess are: (1) very high selectivity (chemical specific fingerprints), (2) independence from the excitation wavelength (ability to monitor in the solar blind region), (3) chemical mixture fingerprints are the sum of its individual components (no spectral cross-talk), (4) near independence of the Raman fingerprint to its physical state (very similar spectra for gas, liquid, solid and solutions), and (5) insensitivity of the Raman signature to environmental conditions (no quenching, or interference from water). Early investigations were not able to take advantage of near-resonance enhancement of the Raman cross-section which occurs when the excitation frequency approaches an electronically excited state of the molecule. The enhancement of the scattering cross-section can be quite large, often approaching 4 to 6 orders of magnitude.

  2. Resonant Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectra: Theory and Simulations.

    PubMed

    Rao, B Jayachander; Gelin, Maxim F; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2016-05-19

    We present a description of resonant femtosecond stimulated Raman spectra, which is based on the solution of the nonperturbative equation of motion of the chromophore in the laser fields. The theory is applicable for arbitrary shapes and durations of the Raman pulses, accounts for excited-state absorption, and describes nonstationary preparation of the system by an actinic pulse. The method is illustrated by the calculation of femtosecond stimulated Raman spectra of a model system with a conical intersection.

  3. Transform analysis of the resonance Raman excitation profile of lycopene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskins, L. C.

    1992-10-01

    The resonance Raman excitation profiles (RREPs) of the ν 1, ν 2 and ν 3 vibrations of lycopene in acetone, ethyl alcohol, toluene and carbon disulphide solvents have been analyzed using the transform method for calculating resonance Raman excitation profiles. The tests show excellent agreement between the calculated and observed profiles for the ν 2 and ν 3 RREPs, but greater difference between experiment and theory occurs for the ν 1 RREP, especially in carbon disulphide solvent.

  4. Surface-Enhanced Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Frontiera, Renee R; Henry, Anne-Isabelle; Gruenke, Natalie L; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2011-05-19

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) have revolutionized the Raman spectroscopy field. SERS provides spectroscopic detection of single molecules, and FSRS enables the acquisition of Raman spectra on the ultrafast time scale of molecular motion. Here, we present the first successful combination of these two techniques, demonstrating surface-enhanced femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (SE-FSRS) using gold nanoantennas with embedded reporter molecules. Using a picosecond Raman and femtosecond probe pulse, the time- and ensemble-averaged enhancement factor is estimated to be in the range of 10(4)-10(6). We report the line shapes, power dependence, and magnitude of the SE-FSRS signal and discuss contributions to sample degradation on the minute time scale. With these first successful proof-of-principle experiments, time-resolved SE-FSRS techniques can now be rationally attempted with the goals of investigating the dynamics of plasmonic materials as well as examining the contributions of environmental heterogeneities by probing more homogeneous molecular subsets.

  5. Nonresonant surface enhanced Raman optical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinson, Bruce E.

    Nanoshells (NS) and nanoparticles (NP) are tunable plasmonic particles that can be precisely engineered for specific applications including surface enhanced spectroscopies. A new, general method for the synthesis of core-shell and solid nanoparticles has been developed and is presented. Based on the CO reduction of Au3+, this new process yields the highest quality gold nanoshells synthesized to date. The constraints on precursor lifetime have been relaxed and post-synthesis purification has been eliminated. Nonresonant surface enhanced Raman optical activity (SEROA) has been investigated using biomolecular analytes deposited on Au nanoshell or nanoparticle substrates. The first, and currently the only, near-infrared (780 nm) excited scattered circular polarization Raman optical activity spectrometer (NIROAS) has been constructed. Surface enhanced Raman optical activity spectroscopy has been validated by the collection of symmetrical, surface enhanced, signed circular polarization intensity difference spectra from several test molecules including, (S)- and (R)-tryptophan, and (SS)- and (RR)-phenylalanine-cysteine.

  6. Human brain cancer studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-Hui; Sun, Yi; Pu, Yang; Boydston-White, Susie; Liu, Yulong; Alfano, Robert R.

    2012-11-01

    The resonance Raman (RR) spectra of six types of human brain tissues are examined using a confocal micro-Raman system with 532-nm excitation in vitro. Forty-three RR spectra from seven subjects are investigated. The spectral peaks from malignant meningioma, stage III (cancer), benign meningioma (benign), normal meningeal tissues (normal), glioblastoma multiforme grade IV (cancer), acoustic neuroma (benign), and pituitary adenoma (benign) are analyzed. Using a 532-nm excitation, the resonance-enhanced peak at 1548 cm-1 (amide II) is observed in all of the tissue specimens, but is not observed in the spectra collected using the nonresonance Raman system. An increase in the intensity ratio of 1587 to 1605 cm-1 is observed in the RR spectra collected from meningeal cancer tissue as compared with the spectra collected from the benign and normal meningeal tissue. The peak around 1732 cm-1 attributed to fatty acids (lipids) are diminished in the spectra collected from the meningeal cancer tumors as compared with the spectra from normal and benign tissues. The characteristic band of spectral peaks observed between 2800 and 3100 cm-1 are attributed to the vibrations of methyl (-CH3) and methylene (-CH2-) groups. The ratio of the intensities of the spectral peaks of 2935 to 2880 cm-1 from the meningeal cancer tissues is found to be lower in comparison with that of the spectral peaks from normal, and benign tissues, which may be used as a distinct marker for distinguishing cancerous tissues from normal meningeal tissues. The statistical methods of principal component analysis and the support vector machine are used to analyze the RR spectral data collected from meningeal tissues, yielding a diagnostic sensitivity of 90.9% and specificity of 100% when two principal components are used.

  7. Resonance Raman Scattering Studies of Gallium - - Aluminum-Arsenide Superlattices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gant, Thomas Andrew

    We have made resonance Raman scattering studies of folded LA phonons and quantized LO phonons in several GaAs-AlAs superlattices. The motivation for this work was to study the electronic structure and the electron -phonon interaction in these structures. The samples were not intentionally doped. The Raman spectra of optic phonons were usually taken at a temperature of 10 K or less. The folded acoustic phonon work was taken at temperatures ranging from 200-300 K in order to enhance the scattering by the thermal factor. Two samples in particular have received very close attention: sample 2292 (50 A GaAs- 20 A AlAs) and sample 3250 (20 A GaAs- 50 A AlAs). In sample 2292 we have made resonance studies of the folded LA phonons and the GaAs -like confined LO_2 mode near the second heavy hole exciton. The results on the folded acoustic phonons show a very strong resonance enhancement for the second order folded phonons, but very little for the first order. An interference between two different scattering channels (the n = 1 light hole and the n = 2 heavy hole subbands) seems to be responsible for this effect. The resonance profile for the LO_2 confined optic phonon in sample 2292 shows 4 peaks in the region from 1.8 eV to 2.05 eV. We have studied the dependence of this resonance profile on the power density. A higher power density was achieved by using the same laser power with a tighter focus. At the higher power density the peak at 1.93 eV (formerly the strongest peak present) vanished. This "bleaching" effect is related to screening due to the higher carrier density. In sample 3250 we have studied the polarization dependence of the resonance profiles of four peaks (LO _2, LO_4, LO_6, and an interface mode) near the lowest direct gap. The A_1 symmetry confined LO modes are seen in both polarized and depolarized geometries, in violation of the usual selection rule (polarized). A mechanism is proposed to explain this result, which has been previously observed by other

  8. Characterization of the Electrochemical Interface by Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Dipankar

    The electronic and structural properties of an enhanced raman sensitive interface are investigated. As a model system, the Ag (polycrystalline) electrode/electrolyte interface is chosen. Electrochemical control of the interface is used to establish and influence the conditions for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The molecule and site specific electronic component of SERS is studied under experimental control. This resonance is responsible for enhancement beyond that caused by electromagnetic effects at the surface and is promoted by the presence of the so -called "SERS active sites" (surface defect sites of atomic scale roughness). The results suggest that, these sites are positively charged, resonant Raman active Ag clusters, most likely with the identity of Ag(,4)('+). A partial contribution to the observed electronic enhancement comes from the intrinsic resonance of the clusters. At a given SERS sensitive Ag electrode, this contribution is superimposed on that from the photon driven charge transfer excitation (CTE) resonance, provided the latter is operative in that particular case. In SERS of Cl('-) (a prototypical probe) on Ag, the internal resonance of Ag(,4)('+) appears to be the primary source of the electronic enhancement detected. By noting the known importance of Ag(,4)('+) in silver-halide photography, it is possible to explain the "photoactivation effect" in SERS in terms of the Ag(,4)('+) identity of SERS active sites. These observations indicate how, by SERS, it may be possible to bridge the gap between the catalytic and optical aspects of small metal clusters. The chemisorbed anions which coexist with the active sites at a SERS sensitive interface, are tested for their effects in SERS from Cl('-) and I('-) on Ag. Evidence is presented for mutual "depolarization" effect of the adsorbates. Under voltage control of these interfaces, this depolarization process dominates the Stark effect and bond perturbation. The results point out how the

  9. Isotopic gas analysis through Purcell cavity enhanced Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Petrak, B.; Konthasinghe, K.; Peiris, M.; Muller, A.; Cooper, J.; Hopkins, A. J.; Djeu, N.

    2016-02-29

    Purcell enhanced Raman scattering (PERS) by means of a doubly resonant Fabry-Perot microcavity (mode volume ≈ 100 μm{sup 3} and finesse ≈ 30 000) has been investigated as a technique for isotopic ratio gas analysis. At the pump frequency, the resonant cavity supports a buildup of circulating power while simultaneously enabling Purcell spontaneous emission rate enhancement at the resonant Stokes frequency. The three most common isotopologues of CO{sub 2} gas were quantified, and a signal was obtained from {sup 13}C{sup 16}O{sub 2} down to a partial pressure of 2 Torr. Due to its small size and low pump power needed (∼10 mW) PERS lends itself to miniaturization. Furthermore, since the cavity is resonant with the emission frequency, future improvements could allow it to serve as its own spectral analyzer and no separate spectroscopic device would be needed.

  10. Raman enhancement on a broadband meta-surface.

    PubMed

    Ayas, Sencer; Güner, Hasan; Türker, Burak; Ekiz, Okan Öner; Dirisaglik, Faruk; Okyay, Ali Kemal; Dâna, Aykutlu

    2012-08-28

    Plasmonic metamaterials allow confinement of light to deep subwavelength dimensions, while allowing for the tailoring of dispersion and electromagnetic mode density to enhance specific photonic properties. Optical resonances of plasmonic molecules have been extensively investigated; however, benefits of strong coupling of dimers have been overlooked. Here, we construct a plasmonic meta-surface through coupling of diatomic plasmonic molecules which contain a heavy and light meta-atom. Presence and coupling of two distinct types of localized modes in the plasmonic molecule allow formation and engineering of a rich band structure in a seemingly simple and common geometry, resulting in a broadband and quasi-omni-directional meta-surface. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering benefits from the simultaneous presence of plasmonic resonances at the excitation and scattering frequencies, and by proper design of the band structure to satisfy this condition, highly repeatable and spatially uniform Raman enhancement is demonstrated. On the basis of calculations of the field enhancement distribution within a unit cell, spatial uniformity of the enhancement at the nanoscale is discussed. Raman scattering constitutes an example of nonlinear optical processes, where the wavelength conversion during scattering may be viewed as a photonic transition between the bands of the meta-material.

  11. Cavity-Enhanced Room-Temperature Broadband Raman Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, D. J.; Munns, J. H. D.; Champion, T. F. M.; Qiu, C.; Kaczmarek, K. T.; Poem, E.; Ledingham, P. M.; Walmsley, I. A.; Nunn, J.

    2016-03-01

    Broadband quantum memories hold great promise as multiplexing elements in future photonic quantum information protocols. Alkali-vapor Raman memories combine high-bandwidth storage, on-demand readout, and operation at room temperature without collisional fluorescence noise. However, previous implementations have required large control pulse energies and have suffered from four-wave-mixing noise. Here, we present a Raman memory where the storage interaction is enhanced by a low-finesse birefringent cavity tuned into simultaneous resonance with the signal and control fields, dramatically reducing the energy required to drive the memory. By engineering antiresonance for the anti-Stokes field, we also suppress the four-wave-mixing noise and report the lowest unconditional noise floor yet achieved in a Raman-type warm vapor memory, (15 ±2 )×10-3 photons per pulse, with a total efficiency of (9.5 ±0.5 )%.

  12. Theoretical studies of resonance enhanced stimulated raman scattering (RESRS) of frequency doubled Alexandrite laser wavelength in cesium vapor. Progress report, July-December 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Lawandy, N.M.

    1987-01-01

    The third phase of research will focus on the propagation and energy extraction of the pump and SERS beams in a variety of configurations including oscillator structures. In order to address these questions a numerical code capable of allowing for saturation and full transverse beam evolution is required. The method proposed is based on a discretized propagation energy extraction model which uses a Kirchoff integral propagator coupled to the three level Raman model already developed. The model will have the resolution required by diffraction limits and will use the previous density matrix results in the adiabatic following limit. Owing to its large computational requirements, such a code must be implemented on a vector array processor. One code on the Cyber is being tested by using previously understood two-level laser models as guidelines for interpreting the results. Two tests were implemented: the evolution of modes in a passive resonator and the evolution of a stable state of the adiabatically eliminated laser equations. These results show mode shapes and diffraction losses for the first case and relaxation oscillations for the second one. Finally, in order to clarify the computing methodology used to exploit the speed of the Cyber's computational speed, the time it takes to perform both of the computations previously mentioned to run on the Cyber and VAX 730 must be measured. Also included is a short description of the current laser model (CAVITY.FOR) and a flow chart of the test computations.

  13. Identification of individual isotopes in a polymer blend using tip enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Agapov, Rebecca L.; Scherger, Jacob D.; Sokolov, Alexei P.; Foster, Mark D.

    2015-03-11

    We use tip enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) blinking measurements to identify the individual isotopes of non-Raman resonant polystyrene in a miscible, binary blend. Thus it demonstrates the sensitivity and selectivity required for nanoscale chemical imaging and broadens the types of surface components potentially identifiable with TERS.

  14. Identification of individual isotopes in a polymer blend using tip enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Agapov, Rebecca L.; Scherger, Jacob D.; Sokolov, Alexei P.; ...

    2015-03-11

    We use tip enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) blinking measurements to identify the individual isotopes of non-Raman resonant polystyrene in a miscible, binary blend. Thus it demonstrates the sensitivity and selectivity required for nanoscale chemical imaging and broadens the types of surface components potentially identifiable with TERS.

  15. Enhancement of Raman scattering from molecules placed near metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbiellini, B.

    2017-01-01

    Large Raman scattering cross sections from molecules on surfaces of metallic nanoparticles are described within a renormalization-group theory. In this approach the valence electrons of the molecules are embedded in an effective medium described by a dielectric function, which integrates out the effect of the plasmonic excitations of the metallic nanoparticles. The source of the enhanced photon inelastic scattering is produced by the resonant excitation of surface plasmons at the metallic nanoparticles. A similar theory has been successfully used to explain the resonant x-ray inelastic scattering and the behavior of nonlinear susceptibilities at the x-ray edges.

  16. Detection Of Biochips By Raman And Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantarovich, Keren; Tsarfati, Inbal; Gheber, Levi A.; Haupt, Karsten; Bar, Ilana

    2010-08-01

    Biochips constitute a rapidly increasing research field driven by the versatility of sensing devices and the importance of their applications in the bioanalytical field, drug development, environmental monitoring, food analysis, etc. Common strategies used for creating biochips and for reading them have extensive limitations, motivating development of miniature biochips and label-free formats. To achieve these goals we combined the nano fountain pen method, for printing microscale features with Raman spectroscopy or surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for reading droplets of synthetic receptors. These receptors include molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs), which are obtained by polymerization of suitable functional and cross-linking monomers around molecular templates. MIPs are characterized by higher physical and chemical stability than biomacromolecules, and therefore are potentially very suitable as recognition elements for biosensors, or biochips. The monitored bands in the Raman and SERS spectra could be related to the taken up compound, allowing direct detection of the template, i.e., the β-blocking drug propranolol in the imprinted droplets, as well as imaging of individual and multiple dots in an array. This study shows that the combination of nanolithography techniques with SERS might open the possibility of miniaturized arrayed MIP sensors with label-free, specific and quantitative detection.

  17. Theoretical studies of Resonance Enhanced Stimulated Raman Scattering (RESRS) of frequency-doubled Alexandrite laser wavelength in cesium vapor. Progress report, January-June 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Lawandy, N.M.

    1987-01-01

    The solutions for the imaginary susceptibility of the Raman field transition with arbitrary relaxation rates and field strengths are examined for three different sets of relaxation rates. These rates correspond to: (1) Far Infrared (FIR) Raman lasers in the diabatic collision regime without consideration of coupled population decay in a closed system, (2) Raman FIR lasers in the diabatic collision regime with coupled population conserving decay, and (3) IR Raman gain in cesium vapor. The model is further expanded to include Doppler broadening and used to predict the peak gain as a function of detuning for a frequency doubled Alexandrite laser-pumped cesium vapor gain cell.

  18. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering molecular nanoprobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wabuyele, Musundi B.; Yan, Fei; Griffin, Guy D.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2005-04-01

    Nanoparticles are increasingly finding a wide application in the biological studies due to their unique physical and chemical properties. Colloidal nanoparticles are efficient substrate that exhibit surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) phenomenon by enhancing the scattering cross-sections of conjugated Raman active molecules thus enabling highly sensitive biological probes. However, biological and medical applications would require nanoparticles to be conjugated to biomolecules. A universal approach for conjugation of mercarptoacetic acid-capped silver nanoparticles to biomolecules is described. The surface functionalized silver colloids were labeled with a Raman active dye and used for cellular imaging. We also described the use of silver nanoparticle to develop a new class of SERS nanoprobes for molecular recognition and detection of specific nucleic acid sequences.

  19. Optical antennas for tunable enhancement in tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maouli, Imad; Taguchi, Atsushi; Saito, Yuika; Kawata, Satoshi; Verma, Prabhat

    2015-03-01

    The use of optical antennas in tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) makes it a powerful optical analysis and imaging technique at the nanoscale. Optical antennas can work as nano-light sources in the visible region. The plasmonic resonance of an antenna depends on its length; thus, by varying the length, one can control the enhancement in TERS. In this study, we demonstrated a fabrication method based on focused ion beam milling to realize optical antennas with desired lengths. We then measured the resonances of these fabricated antennas and performed TERS imaging of carbon nanotubes to demonstrate the antenna length dependence on plasmonic resonance.

  20. Applications of ultraviolet resonance raman spectroscopy to proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiro, Thomas G.; Grygon, Christine A.

    Recent developments in instrumentation for ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy and its application to proteins are reviewed. With excitation near the ˜ 195 nm amide π-π* transition strong enhancement is seen of the amide vibrational modes, particularly amide II, whose intensity is sensitive to secondary structure. With measurements at 200 and 192 nm one can calculate the fractions of α-helix, β sheet and unordered segments from the known cross sections of these structures. The proline imide II band at ˜ 1460 cm -1 is strongly enhanced with 218 nm excitation and its frequency can be used to monitor cis-trans isomerization. Aromatic residues give rise to strong UVRR bands. Phenylalanine (Phe) and tyrosine (Tyr) show scattering patterns typical of substituted benzenes: enhancement of vibronic modes, especially ν 8a and ν 8b in resonance with the quasi-forbidden L a transition (˜ 205 and ˜ 223 nm for Phe and Tyr), and of breathing modes in resonance with the allowed B a,b transitions (˜ 188 and ˜ 193 nm for Phe and Tyr). Tyrosine, and especially tyrosinate, also show strong enhancement of ν 8a and ν 8b in the B a,b-resonant region, behavior attributed to electronic mixing of L a with B a via the OH (or O -) substituent. In proteins the Tyr ν 8a and ν 8b bands are most readily observed with 229 nm excitation, where the Phe contributions are minimal. The ν 8b frequency is sensitive to Tyr H-bonding and has been calibrated in terms of the H-bond strength. The Tyr 830/850 cm -1 Fermi doublet intensity ratio, which can be monitored at 200 nm is sensitive to H-bonding, but also to other environmental influences. With 218 nm excitation protein spectra are dominated by tryptophan (Trp) contributions. The 1340/1360 cm -1 Trp Fermi doublet is sensitive to solvent exposure, while the ˜ 880 cm -1 band frequency is sensitive to H-bonding. Histidine (His) excitation profiles show π-π* resonances at ˜ 218 and ˜ 204 nm. The UVRR bands are sensitive to

  1. Fabrication of Annealed Gold Nanostructures on Pre-Treated Glow-Discharge Cleaned Glasses and Their Used for Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR) and Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) Detection of Adsorbed (Bio)molecules

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Rodica Elena; Aybeke, Ece Neslihan; Bourillot, Eric; Lacroute, Yvon; Lesniewska, Eric; Adam, Pierre-Michel; Bijeon, Jean-Louis

    2017-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles are considered as active supports in the development of specific chemical or biological biosensors. Well-organized nanoparticles can be prepared either through expensive (e.g., electron beam lithography) or inexpensive (e.g., thermal synthesis) approaches where different shapes of nanoparticles are easily obtained over large solid surfaces. Herein, the authors propose a low-cost thermal synthesis of active plasmonic nanostructures on thin gold layers modified glass supports after 1 h holding on a hot plate (~350 °C). The resulted annealed nanoparticles proved a good reproducibility of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) optical responses and where used for the detection of low concentrations of two model (bio)chemical molecules, namely the human cytochrome b5 (Cyt-b5) and trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene (BPE). PMID:28134754

  2. Periodontitis diagnostics using resonance Raman spectroscopy on saliva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S.; Sukhinina, A.; Bakhmutov, D.; Biryukova, T.; Tsvetkov, M.; Bagratashvily, V.

    2013-07-01

    In view of its wealth of molecular information, Raman spectroscopy has been the subject of active biomedical research. The aim of this work is Raman spectroscopy (RS) application for the determination of molecular biomarkers in saliva with the objective of early periodontitis detection. As was shown in our previous study, carotenoids contained in saliva can be molecular fingerprint information for the periodontitis level. It is shown here that the carotenoid RS lines at wavenumbers of 1156 and 1524 cm-1 can be easily detected and serve as reliable biomarkers of periodontitis using resonance Raman spectroscopy of dry saliva.

  3. Directional surface enhanced Raman scattering on gold nano-gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillibert, Raymond; Sarkar, Mitradeep; Bryche, Jean-François; Yasukuni, Ryohei; Moreau, Julien; Besbes, Mondher; Barbillon, Grégory; Bartenlian, Bernard; Canva, Michael; Lamy de la Chapelle, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Directional plasmon excitation and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) emission were demonstrated for 1D and 2D gold nanostructure arrays deposited on a flat gold layer. The extinction spectrum of both arrays exhibits intense resonance bands that are redshifted when the incident angle is increased. Systematic extinction analysis of different grating periods revealed that this band can be assigned to a propagated surface plasmon of the flat gold surface that fulfills the Bragg condition of the arrays (Bragg mode). Directional SERS measurements demonstrated that the SERS intensity can be improved by one order of magnitude when the Bragg mode positions are matched with either the excitation or the Raman wavelengths. Hybridized numerical calculations with the finite element method and Fourier modal method also proved the presence of the Bragg mode plasmon and illustrated that the enhanced electric field of the Bragg mode is particularly localized on the nanostructures regardless of their size.

  4. Remote detection of trace effluents using Resonance Raman spectroscopy: Field results and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Chen, C.L.

    1995-10-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) possesses many characteristics that are important for detecting, identifying and monitoring chemical effluents. Raman scattering is a coherent, inelastic, two-photon scattering process where an exciting photon of energy h{nu} promotes a molecule to a virtual level and the subsequently emitted photon is shifted in frequency in accordance with the rotational-vibrational structure of the irradiated species, thereby providing a unique fingerprint of the molecule. Under resonance enhancement, the Raman scattering cross-sections have been observed to increase up to 6 orders of magnitude above the normal scattering cross-sections, thereby providing the practical basis for a remote chemical sensor. Some of the other advantages that a Raman sensor possesses are: (1) very high selectivity (chemical specific fingerprints), (2) independence of the spectral fingerprint on the excitation wavelength (ability to monitor in the solar blind region), (3) chemical mixture fingerprints are the sum of its individual components (no spectral cross-talk), (4) near independence of the Raman fingerprint to its physical state (very similar spectra for gas, liquid, solid or solutions), (5) no absolute calibration is necessary because all Raman signals observed from a given species can be compared with the Raman signal for N{sub 2}, whose concentration is known very accurately, and (6) insensitivity of the Raman signature to environmental conditions (no quenching, or interference from water vapor). In this presentation, the technology of resonance Raman spectroscopy as applied to the detection of narcotics production activities will be presented along with some recent experimental results.

  5. Whispering-gallery nanocavity plasmon-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Jinxing; Tang, Shiwei; Fang, Yangfu; Wang, Jiao; Huang, Gaoshan; Liu, Ran; Zheng, Lirong; Cui, Xugao; Mei, Yongfeng

    2015-01-01

    The synergy effect in nature could enable fantastic improvement of functional properties and associated effects. The detection performance of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) can be highly strengthened under the cooperation with other factors. Here, greatly-enhanced SERS detection is realized based on rolled-up tubular nano-resonators decorated with silver nanoparticles. The synergy effect between whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) and surface plasmon leads to an extra enhancement at the order of 105 compared to non-resonant flat SERS substrates, which can be well tuned by altering the diameter of micron- and nanotubes and the excitation laser wavelengths. Such synchronous and coherent coupling between plasmonics and photonics could lead to new principle and design for various sub-wavelength optical devices, e.g. plasmonic waveguides and hyperbolic metamaterials. PMID:26443526

  6. Interferences in and lifetime measurement of a resonance electronic Raman effect using tunable pulsed laser techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicollin, D.; Koningstein, J. A.

    1980-07-01

    The excitation profile for the intensity of electronic Raman transitions of terbium aluminum garnet (TbAlG) in the spectral range of 483.0-680.0 nm is reported. The electronic Raman transitions take place between the crystal field levels of the split 7F 6 ground manifold of TbAlG with shifts of 73 cm -1 and 83 cm -1 and the electronic Raman process is induced with tunable pulsed and fixed wavelength cw lasers. The tunability of the former was employed to obtain detailed information of the behaviour of the Raman intensity if the wavelength of the exciting source is tuned throughout the region of 483.0-490.0 nm where 5Da 4 ← 7F 6 absorptions of TbAlG occur and the data reveal the occurrence of interference effects. We also report measurements of the shape of the pulse — due to resonance enhanced electronic Raman scattered light — in real time. These studies reveal that the lifetime of the resonating state (which is responsible for the enhancement of the Raman intensity) as determined from the tailing end of the said pulse is within experimental error equal to the lifetime τ = 33.5 ± 1 μs of this state measured in a direct way from the intensity decay of an appropriate fluorescence transition of TbAlG.

  7. UV resonance Raman finds peptide bond-Arg side chain electronic interactions.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhavya; Asher, Sanford A

    2011-05-12

    We measured the UV resonance Raman excitation profiles and Raman depolarization ratios of the arginine (Arg) vibrations of the amino acid monomer as well as Arg in the 21-residue predominantly alanine peptide AAAAA(AAARA)(3)A (AP) between 194 and 218 nm. Excitation within the π → π* peptide bond electronic transitions result in UVRR spectra dominated by amide peptide bond vibrations. The Raman cross sections and excitation profiles indicate that the Arg side chain electronic transitions mix with the AP peptide bond electronic transitions. The Arg Raman bands in AP exhibit Raman excitation profiles similar to those of the amide bands in AP which are conformation specific. These Arg excitation profiles distinctly differ from the Arg monomer. The Raman depolarization ratios of Arg in monomeric solution are quite simple with ρ = 0.33 indicating enhancement by a single electronic transition. In contrast, we see very complex depolarization ratios of Arg in AP that indicate that the Arg residues are resonance enhanced by multiple electronic transitions.

  8. Atmospheric absorption versus deep ultraviolet (pre-)resonance in Raman lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallen, Hans D.; Willitsford, Adam H.; Neely, Ryan R.; Chadwick, C. Todd; Philbrick, C. Russell

    2016-05-01

    The Raman scattering of several liquids and solid materials has been investigated near the deep ultraviolet absorption features corresponding to the electron energy states of the chemical species present. It is found to provide significant enhancement, but is always accompanied by absorption due to that or other species along the path. We investigate this trade-off for water vapor, although the results for liquid water and ice will be quantitatively very similar. An optical parametric oscillator (OPO) was pumped by the third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser, and the output frequency doubled to generate a tunable excitation beam in the 215-600 nm range. We use the tunable laser excitation beam to investigate pre-resonance and resonance Raman spectroscopy near an absorption band of ice. A significant enhancement in the Raman signal was observed. The A-term of the Raman scattering tensor, which describes the pre-resonant enhancement of the spectra, is also used to find the primary observed intensities as a function of incident beam energy, although a wide resonance structure near the final-state-effect related absorption in ice is also found. The results suggest that use of pre-resonant or resonant Raman LIDAR could increase the sensitivity to improve spatial and temporal resolution of atmospheric water vapor measurements. However, these shorter wavelengths also exhibit higher ozone absorption. These opposing effects are modeled using MODTRAN for several configurations relevant for studies of boundary layer water and in the vicinity of clouds. Such data could be used in studies of the measurement of energy flow at the water-air and cloud-air interface, and may help with understanding some of the major uncertainties in current global climate models.

  9. A tunable single-monochromator Raman system based on the supercontinuum laser and tunable filters for resonant Raman profile measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.-L.; Liu, H.-N.; Tan, P.-H.

    2017-08-01

    Resonant Raman spectroscopy requires that the wavelength of the laser used is close to that of an electronic transition. A tunable laser source and a triple spectrometer are usually necessary for resonant Raman profile measurements. However, such a system is complex with low signal throughput, which limits its wide application by scientific community. Here, a tunable micro-Raman spectroscopy system based on the supercontinuum laser, transmission grating, tunable filters, and single-stage spectrometer is introduced to measure the resonant Raman profile. The supercontinuum laser in combination with transmission grating makes a tunable excitation source with a bandwidth of sub-nanometer. Such a system exhibits continuous excitation tunability and high signal throughput. Its good performance and flexible tunability are verified by resonant Raman profile measurement of twisted bilayer graphene, which demonstrates its potential application prospect for resonant Raman spectroscopy.

  10. Resonance-Enhanced Raman Scattering of Ring-Involved Vibrational Modes in the (1)B(2u) Absorption Band of Benzene, Including the Kekule Vibrational Modes ν(9) and ν(10).

    PubMed

    Willitsford, Adam H; Chadwick, C Todd; Kurtz, Stewart; Philbrick, C Russell; Hallen, Hans

    2016-02-04

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy provides much stronger Raman signal levels than its off-resonant counterpart and adds selectivity by excitation tuning. Raman preresonance of benzene has been well studied. On-resonance studies, especially at phonon-allowed absorptions, have received less attention. In this case, we observe resonance of many of the vibration modes associated motion of the carbons in the ring while tuning over the (1)B2u absorption, including the related ν9 (CC stretch Herzberg notation, ν14 Wilson notation) and ν10 (CH-parallel bend Herzberg notation, ν15 Wilson notation) vibrational modes along with the ν2 (CC-stretch or ring-breathing Herzberg notation, ν1 Wilson notation) mode and multiples of the ν18 (CCC-parallel bend Herzberg notation, ν6 Wilson notation) vibrational mode. The ring-breathing mode is found to mix with the b2u modes creating higher frequency composites. Through the use of an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to tune through the (1)B2u absorption band of liquid benzene, a stiffening (increase in energy) of the vibrational modes is observed as the excitation wavelength nears the (1)B2u absorption peak of the isolated molecule (vapor) phase. The strongest resonance amplitude observed is in the 2 × ν18 (e2g) mode, with nearly twice the intensity of the ring-breathing mode, ν2. Several overtones and combination modes, especially with ν2 (a1g), are also observed to resonate. Raman resonances on phonon-allowed excitations are narrow and permit the measurement of vibrations not Raman-active in the ground state.

  11. Pressure-induced depolarization and resonance in Raman scattering of single-crystalline boron carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Junjie; Zhang Ling; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen Mingwei; Goto, Takashi

    2010-02-01

    We report polarized and resonant Raman scattering of single-crystal boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) at high pressures. Significant intensity enhancements of 270 and 1086 cm{sup -1} Raman bands of B{sub 4}C have been observed at quasihydrostatic pressures higher than approx20 GPa. The pressure-induced intensity change of the 1086 cm{sup -1} band is mainly due to the resonance between excitation energy and electronic transition, whereas the intensity change of 270 cm{sup -1} band is caused by the depolarization effect. Importantly, the first-order phase transition has not been found at high quasihydrostatic pressures and all the Raman intensity changes along with the corresponding high-pressure lattice distortion can be recovered during unloading.

  12. Surface-enhanced coherent Raman scattering (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potma, Eric O.; Fast, Alex; Syme, Christropher D.

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a coherent Raman scattering microscope that combines total internal reflection illumination with surface plasmon resonance. The excitation geometry is based on an objective-type Kretschmann configuration, which allows widefield excitation of surface plasmon polariton modes in a thin gold film on a glass substrate. The surface plasmon fields enhance the excitation efficiency, enabling image acquisition at 10 frames/s. Since the evanescent field extends only over a length scale of ~100 nm, structures close the substrate surface are observed while bulk contributions are suppressed. We discuss the operational principles of this microscope in detail and point out its applications in cell biology.

  13. Resonance raman spectroscopy of an ultraviolet-sensitive insect rhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, C.; Deng, H.; Rath, P.; Callender, R.H.; Schwemer, J.

    1987-11-17

    The authors present the first visual pigment resonance Raman spectra from the UV-sensitive eyes of an insect, Ascalaphus macaronius (owlfly). This pigment contains 11-cis-retinal as the chromophore. Raman data have been obtained for the acid metarhodopsin at 10/sup 0/C in both H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O. The C=N stretching mode at 1660 cm/sup -1/ in H/sub 2/O shifts to 1631 cm/sup -1/ upon deuteriation of the sample, clearly showing a protonated Schiff base linkage between the chromophore and the protein. The structure-sensitive fingerprint region shows similarities to the all-trans-protonated Schiff base of model retinal chromophores, as well as to the octopus acid metarhodopsin and bovine metarhodopsin I. Although spectra measured at -100/sup 0/C with 406.7-nm excitation, to enhance scattering from rhodopsin (lambda/sub max/ 345 nm), contain a significant contribution from a small amount of contaminants (cytochrome(s) and/or accessory pigment) in the sample, the C=N stretch at 1664 cm/sup -1/ suggests a protonated Schiff base linkage between the chromophore and the protein in rhodopsin as well. For comparison, this mode also appears at approx. 1660 cm/sup -1/ in both the vertebrate (bovine) and the invertebrate (octopus) rhodopsins. These data are particularly interesting since the absorption maximum of 345 nm for rhodopsin might be expected to originate from an unprotonated Schiff base linkage. That the Schiff base linkage in the owlfly rhodopsin, like in bovine and in octopus, is protonated suggests that a charged chromophore is essential to visual transduction.

  14. Monitoring and trace detection of hazardous waste and toxic chemicals using resonance Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J. III; Dougherty, D.R.; Chen, C.L.

    1993-01-01

    Raman scattering is a coherent, inelastic, two-photon process, which shifts the frequency of an outgoing photon according to the vibrational structure of the irradiated species, thereby providing a unique fingerprint of the molecule. When involving an allowed electronic transition (resonance Raman), this scattering cross section can be enhanced by 10[sup 4] to 10[sup 6] and provides the basis for a viable technique that can monitor and detect trace quantities of hazardous wastes and toxic chemicals. Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) possesses many of the ideal characteristics for monitoring and detecting of hazardous waste and toxic chemicals. Some of these traits are: (1) very high selectivity (chemical specific fingerprints); (2) independence from the excitation wavelength (ability to monitor in the solar blind region); (3) chemical mixture fingerprints are the sum of its individual components (no spectral cross-talk); (4) near independence of the Raman fingerprint to its physical state (very similar spectra for gas, liquid, solid and solutions -- either bulk or aerosols); and (5) insensitivity of the Raman signature to environmental conditions (no quenching). Data from a few chemicals will be presented which illustrate these features. In cases where background fluorescence accompanies the Raman signals, an effective frequency modulation technique has been developed, which can completely eliminate this interference.

  15. Monitoring and trace detection of hazardous waste and toxic chemicals using resonance Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J. III; Dougherty, D.R.; Chen, C.L.

    1993-04-01

    Raman scattering is a coherent, inelastic, two-photon process, which shifts the frequency of an outgoing photon according to the vibrational structure of the irradiated species, thereby providing a unique fingerprint of the molecule. When involving an allowed electronic transition (resonance Raman), this scattering cross section can be enhanced by 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 6} and provides the basis for a viable technique that can monitor and detect trace quantities of hazardous wastes and toxic chemicals. Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) possesses many of the ideal characteristics for monitoring and detecting of hazardous waste and toxic chemicals. Some of these traits are: (1) very high selectivity (chemical specific fingerprints); (2) independence from the excitation wavelength (ability to monitor in the solar blind region); (3) chemical mixture fingerprints are the sum of its individual components (no spectral cross-talk); (4) near independence of the Raman fingerprint to its physical state (very similar spectra for gas, liquid, solid and solutions -- either bulk or aerosols); and (5) insensitivity of the Raman signature to environmental conditions (no quenching). Data from a few chemicals will be presented which illustrate these features. In cases where background fluorescence accompanies the Raman signals, an effective frequency modulation technique has been developed, which can completely eliminate this interference.

  16. Ultraviolet resonant Raman spectroscopy of nucleic acid components.

    PubMed

    Blazej, D C; Peticolas, W L

    1977-07-01

    The first resonant Raman excitation profile using UV as well as visible radiation is presented. Measurements of the intensity of the Raman spectrum of adenosine 5'-monophosphate as a function of the frequency of the incident laser light are presented in the range from 20 to 38 kK (1000 cm-1). The scattering intensity per molecule increases by about 10(5) as the laser is tuned from low to high frequencies. The Raman excitation profile has been calculated by using a simple form of the vibronic theory of Raman scattering. The theoretical curves are found to adequately fit the data using only the frequencies of the excited electronic states of AMP and their corresponding vibronic linewidths as adjustable parameters. The Raman bands at 1484 cm-1 and 1583 cm-1 appear to obtain virtually all of their intensity from a weak electronic transition at 276 nm. The set of Raman bands in the range 1300 cm-1-1400 cm-1 appear to derive at least part of their intensity from an electronic band whose 0-0 transition is in the 269-259 nm region although the possibility of some intensity arising from the vibronic mixing between these two electronic states cannot as yet be ruled out.

  17. Resonance electronic Raman scattering in rare earth crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G.M.

    1988-11-10

    The intensities of Raman scattering transitions between electronic energy levels of trivalent rare earth ions doped into transparent crystals were measured and compared to theory. A particle emphasis was placed on the examination of the effect of intermediate state resonances on the Raman scattering intensities. Two specific systems were studied: Ce/sup 3 +/(4f/sup 1/) in single crystals of LuPO/sub 4/ and Er/sup 3 +/(4f/sup 11/) in single crystals of ErPO/sub 4/. 134 refs., 92 figs., 33 tabs.

  18. The Use of Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering for Detecting Molecular Evidence of Life in Rocks, Sediments, and Sedimentary Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Stephen A.; Wilson, Rab; Cooper, Jonathan M.; Parnell, John

    2010-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a versatile analytical technique capable of characterizing the composition of both inorganic and organic materials. Consequently, it is frequently suggested as a payload on many planetary landers. Only approximately 1 in every 106 photons are Raman scattered; therefore, the detection of trace quantities of an analyte dispersed in a sample matrix can be much harder to achieve. To overcome this, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) both provide greatly enhanced signals (enhancements between 10

  19. Multimodal plasmon coupling in low symmetry gold nanoparticle pairs detected in surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreaden, Erik C.; Near, Rachel D.; Abdallah, Tamer; Talaat, M. Hassan; El-Sayed, Mostafa A.

    2011-05-01

    We report on surface-enhanced Raman scattering of silicon phonon vibrations from arrays of gold nanoprism pairs fabricated by electron beam lithography. We found that resonant excitation of the quadrupolar surface plasmon mode of the nanoprisms increases Raman scattering intensity from the substrate as the distance between the nanoparticle pairs decreases. Finite element modeling and plasmon coupling theory indicate that symmetry is reduced as the nanoparticles approach, resulting in increased dipole-quadrupole coupling. Plasmonic enhancement of the incident and Raman-scattered photons results from the dipolar component of the mixed plasmonic field. This effect is expected to be largest in assemblies/aggregates of nanoparticles.

  20. Fourier Transform Infrared and Resonance Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Bacteriorhodopsin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earnest, Thomas Nixon

    Fourier transform infrared and resonance Raman spectroscopy were used to investigate the structure and function of the light-activated, transmembrane proton pump, bacteriorhodopsin, from the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium. Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is a 27,000 dalton integral membrane protein consisting of 248 amino acids with a retinylidene chromophore. Absorption of a photon leads to the translocation of one or two protons from the inside of the cell to the outside. Resonance Raman spectroscopy allows for the study of the configuration of retinal in bR and its photointermediates by the selective enhancement of vibrational modes of the chromophore. This technique was used to determine that the chromophore is attached to lysine-216 in both the bR _{570} and the M _{412} intermediates. In bR with tyrosine-64 selectively nitrated or aminated, the chromophore appears to have the same configuration in that bR _{570} (all- trans) and M _{412} (13- cis) states as it does in unmodified bR. Polarized Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) permits the study of the direction of transition dipole moments arising from molecular vibrations of the protein and the retinal chromophore. The orientation of alpha helical and beta sheet components was determined for bR with the average helical tilt found to lie mostly parallel to the membrane normal. The beta sheet structures also exhibit an IR linear dichroism for the amide I and amide II bands which suggest that the peptide backbone is mostly perpendicular to the membrane plane although it is difficult to determine whether the bands originate from sheet or turn components. The orientation of secondary structure components of the C-1 (residues 72-248) and C-2 (residues 1-71) fragments were also investigated to determine the structure of these putative membrane protein folding intermediates. Polarized, low temperature FTIR -difference spectroscopy was then used to investigate the structure of bR as it undergoes

  1. Core-Shell Nanoparticle-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Feng; Zhang, Yue-Jiao; Ding, Song-Yuan; Panneerselvam, Rajapandiyan; Tian, Zhong-Qun

    2017-03-08

    Core-shell nanoparticles are at the leading edge of the hot research topics and offer a wide range of applications in optics, biomedicine, environmental science, materials, catalysis, energy, and so forth, due to their excellent properties such as versatility, tunability, and stability. They have attracted enormous interest attributed to their dramatically tunable physicochemical features. Plasmonic core-shell nanomaterials are extensively used in surface-enhanced vibrational spectroscopies, in particular, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), due to the unique localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) property. This review provides a comprehensive overview of core-shell nanoparticles in the context of fundamental and application aspects of SERS and discusses numerous classes of core-shell nanoparticles with their unique strategies and functions. Further, herein we also introduce the concept of shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS) in detail because it overcomes the long-standing limitations of material and morphology generality encountered in traditional SERS. We then explain the SERS-enhancement mechanism with core-shell nanoparticles, as well as three generations of SERS hotspots for surface analysis of materials. To provide a clear view for readers, we summarize various approaches for the synthesis of core-shell nanoparticles and their applications in SERS, such as electrochemistry, bioanalysis, food safety, environmental safety, cultural heritage, materials, catalysis, and energy storage and conversion. Finally, we exemplify about the future developments in new core-shell nanomaterials with different functionalities for SERS and other surface-enhanced spectroscopies.

  2. Raman Scattering at Resonant or Near-Resonant Conditions: A Generalized Short-Time Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Abdelsalam; Sun, Yu-Ping; Miao, Quan; Ågren, Hans; Gel'mukhanov, Faris

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the dynamics of resonant Raman scattering in the course of the frequency detuning. The dephasing in the time domain makes the scattering fast when the photon energy is tuned from the absorption resonance. This makes frequency detuning to act as a camera shutter with a regulated scattering duration and provides a practical tool of controlling the scattering time in ordinary stationary measurements. The theory is applied to resonant Raman spectra of a couple of few-mode model systems and to trans-1,3,5-hexatriene and guanine-cytosine (G-C) Watson-Crick base pairs (DNA) molecules. Besides some particular physical effects, the regime of fast scattering leads to a simplification of the spectrum as well as to the scattering theory itself. Strong overtones appear in the Raman spectra when the photon frequency is tuned in the resonant region, while in the mode of fast scattering, the overtones are gradually quenched when the photon frequency is tuned more than one vibrational quantum below the first absorption resonance. The detuning from the resonant region thus leads to a strong purification of the Raman spectrum from the contamination by higher overtones and soft modes and purifies the spectrum also in terms of avoidance of dissociation and interfering fluorescence decay of the resonant state. This makes frequency detuning a very useful practical tool in the analysis of the resonant Raman spectra of complex systems and considerably improves the prospects for using the Raman effect for detection of foreign substances at ultra-low concentrations.

  3. Surface enhanced Raman scattering of light by ZnO nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milekhin, A. G.; Yeryukov, N. A.; Sveshnikova, L. L.; Duda, T. A.; Zenkevich, E. I.; Kosolobov, S. S.; Latyshev, A. V.; Himcinski, C.; Surovtsev, N. V.; Adichtchev, S. V.; Feng, Zhe Chuan; Wu, Chia Cheng; Wuu, Dong Sing; Zahn, D. R. T.

    2011-12-01

    Raman scattering (including nonresonant, resonant, and surface enhanced scattering) of light by optical and surface phonons of ZnO nanocrystals and nanorods has been investigated. It has been found that the nonresonant and resonant Raman scattering spectra of the nanostructures exhibit typical vibrational modes, E 2(high) and A 1(LO), respectively, which are allowed by the selection rules. The deposition of silver nanoclusters on the surface of nanostructures leads either to an abrupt increase in the intensity (by a factor of 103) of Raman scattering of light by surface optical phonons or to the appearance of new surface modes, which indicates the observation of the phenomenon of surface enhanced Raman light scattering. It has been demonstrated that the frequencies of surface optical phonon modes of the studied nanostructures are in good agreement with the theoretical values obtained from calculations performed within the effective dielectric function model.

  4. Surface enhanced Raman scattering of light by ZnO nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Milekhin, A. G. Yeryukov, N. A.; Sveshnikova, L. L.; Duda, T. A.; Zenkevich, E. I.; Kosolobov, S. S.; Latyshev, A. V.; Himcinski, C.; Surovtsev, N. V.; Adichtchev, S. V.; Feng, Zhe Chuan; Wu, Chia Cheng; Wuu, Dong Sing; Zahn, D. R. T.

    2011-12-15

    Raman scattering (including nonresonant, resonant, and surface enhanced scattering) of light by optical and surface phonons of ZnO nanocrystals and nanorods has been investigated. It has been found that the nonresonant and resonant Raman scattering spectra of the nanostructures exhibit typical vibrational modes, E{sub 2}(high) and A{sub 1}(LO), respectively, which are allowed by the selection rules. The deposition of silver nanoclusters on the surface of nanostructures leads either to an abrupt increase in the intensity (by a factor of 10{sup 3}) of Raman scattering of light by surface optical phonons or to the appearance of new surface modes, which indicates the observation of the phenomenon of surface enhanced Raman light scattering. It has been demonstrated that the frequencies of surface optical phonon modes of the studied nanostructures are in good agreement with the theoretical values obtained from calculations performed within the effective dielectric function model.

  5. Raman beam combining for laser brightness enhancement

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, Jay W.; Allen, Graham S.; Pax, Paul H.; Heebner, John E.; Sridharan, Arun K.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Barty, Chrisopher B. J.

    2015-10-27

    An optical source capable of enhanced scaling of pulse energy and brightness utilizes an ensemble of single-aperture fiber lasers as pump sources, with each such fiber laser operating at acceptable pulse energy levels. Beam combining involves stimulated Raman scattering using a Stokes' shifted seed beam, the latter of which is optimized in terms of its temporal and spectral properties. Beams from fiber lasers can thus be combined to attain pulses with peak energies in excess of the fiber laser self-focusing limit of 4 MW while retaining the advantages of a fiber laser system of high average power with good beam quality.

  6. Collective Theory for Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Vidal, F. J.; Pendry, J. B.

    1996-08-01

    We present an implementation of Maxwell's equations on adaptive meshes in order to study interaction of light with metal surfaces. For the first time it is possible to handle surfaces consisting of complex particles close enough to interact strongly. A fully retarded implementation allows treatment of large particles as well as small. By way of example we model a rough silver surface as an array of half-cylinders embedded in a silver surface. Very localized plasmon modes, created by strong electromagnetic coupling between touching metallic objects, dominate the surface enhanced Raman scattering response.

  7. Theoretical study of enhanced Raman scattering for stratified concentric silicon-silver nanocylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y. B.; Wang, Y. F.; Cao, X. W.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents calculations of Raman enhancement for stratified concentric silicon-silver nanocylinders. The Raman enhancement factors of double-layer and triple-layer structures have been determined. Calculations have been performed for the following two-layer cylinders: Ag/Si(core), hollow silicon tube, and Si/Ag(core), and the following three-layer cylinders: Ag/Si/Ag(core), Si/Ag/Si(core), Si/vacuum/Ag(core), Si/vacuum/Si(core), and Si/Ag/vacuum(core). The results indicate that strong Raman enhancements can be obtained in stratified concentric silicon-silver nanocylinders in suitable conditions. These enhancements are sensitive to the excitation wavelength, the radius of the central material, the layer number, and the thickness of each layer of the stratified concentric silicon-silver nanocylinders. They are mainly attributed to the resonant excitations of the silicon cylinder, the resonant excitations of the silicon shell, the localized surface plasmon resonant excitations of silver, and the mirror effect of silver or silicon. The strongest Raman enhancement is about 1013 in two-layer and 1020 in three-layer concentric silicon-silver nanocylinders. The results indicate that the large Raman enhancement appears when the thin silicon layer is close to the silver.

  8. Chromophore conformational analysis in phycocyanin and in related chromopeptides by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Debreczeny, M; Gombos, Z; Csizmadia, V; Várkonyi, Z; Szalontai, B

    1989-03-31

    Chromopeptides got from phycocyanin by proteolytic digestion do not preserve the extended chromophore conformations characteristic to the native protein. Chromophore conformations in the chromopeptides showed heterogenity varying between completely folded and semi-extended states. Indications were found that the silver sol-phycocyanin interaction involves the UV electronic transition of the biliprotein which may explain why the visible excited surface enhanced Raman spectra were similar not to the visible excited but to the UV-excited resonance Raman spectrum of phycocyanin.

  9. Resonant electronic Raman scattering: A BCS-like system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Leonarde N.; Arantes, A.; Schüller, C.; Bell, M. J. V.; Anjos, V.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we investigate the resonant intersubband Raman scattering of two-dimensional electron systems in GaAs-AlGaAs single quantum wells. Self-consistent calculations of the polarized and depolarized Raman cross sections show that the appearance of excitations at the unrenormalized single-particle energy are related to three factors: the extreme resonance regime, the existence of degeneracy in intersubband excitations of the electron gas, and, finally, degeneracy in the interactions between pairs of excitations. It is demonstrated that the physics that governs the problem is similar to the one that gives rise to the formation of the superconducting state in the BCS theory of normal metals. Comparison between experiment and theory shows an excellent agreement.

  10. Enhancement of Raman light scattering in dye-labeled cell membrane on metal-containing conducting polymer film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grushevskaya, H. V.; Krylova, N. G.; Lipnevich, I. V.; Orekhovskaja, T. I.; Egorova, V. P.; Shulitski, B. G.

    2016-03-01

    An enhanced Raman spectroscopy method based on a plasmon resonance in ultrathin metal-containing LB-film deposited on nanoporous anodic alumina supports has been proposed. This material has been utilized to enhance Raman scattering of light in fluorescent-labeled subcellular membrane structures. It has been shown that the plasmon resonance between vibrational modes of the organometallic complexes monolayers and dye-labeled subcellular structures happens. It makes possible to detect interactions between living cell monolayers and an extracellular matrix.

  11. Tissue Oxygenation Monitoring using Resonance Raman Spectroscopy during Hemorrhage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-27

    saturation measurements using resonance Raman intravital micros- copy. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2005;289:H488 H495. 14. Ward KR, Ivatury RR, Barbee...Nighswander-Rempel SP, Kupriyanov VV, Shaw RA. Relative contribu- tions of hemoglobin and myoglobin to near-infrared spectroscopic images of cardiac tissue...DC, Shapiro NI. The microcirculation image quality score: development and preliminary evaluation of a proposed approach to grading quality of image

  12. Raman and Surface Enhanced Raman of Biological Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    peaks being identified that were previously masked by the background. 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 Raman Shift (cm-1) Yersinia rhodei Pantoea ... Pantoea agglomerans, Brucella neotomae, and Yersinia rhodei. The highlighted regions show characteristic biological vibrations consisting of Amide I, II...Raman Shift (cm-1) 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 Amide I, II, & III vibrations Phenyl vibrations CH vibrations Pantoea agglomerans Brucella neotomae

  13. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering from finite arrays of gold nano-patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenti, M. A.; Grande, M.; Bianco, G. V.; de Ceglia, D.; Stomeo, T.; De Vittorio, M.; Petruzzelli, V.; Bruno, G.; D'Orazio, A.; Scalora, M.

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) response of a 2D-periodic array of square gold nano-patches, functionalized by means of a conjugated, rigid thiol. We measure a Raman signal enhancement up to 200 times more intense compared to other plasmon-based nanostructures functionalized with the same molecule, and show that the enhancement is not strictly correlated to the presence of plasmonic resonances. The agreement between experimental and theoretical results reveals the importance of a full-wave analysis based on the inclusion of the actual scattering cross section of the molecule. The proposed numerical approach may serve not only as a tool to predict the enhancement of Raman signal scattered from strongly resonant nanostructure but also as an effective instrument to engineer SERS platforms that target specific molecules.

  14. Cavity-enhanced Raman microscopy of individual carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hümmer, Thomas; Noe, Jonathan; Hofmann, Matthias S; Hänsch, Theodor W; Högele, Alexander; Hunger, David

    2016-07-12

    Raman spectroscopy reveals chemically specific information and provides label-free insight into the molecular world. However, the signals are intrinsically weak and call for enhancement techniques. Here, we demonstrate Purcell enhancement of Raman scattering in a tunable high-finesse microcavity, and utilize it for molecular diagnostics by combined Raman and absorption imaging. Studying individual single-wall carbon nanotubes, we identify crucial structural parameters such as nanotube radius, electronic structure and extinction cross-section. We observe a 320-times enhanced Raman scattering spectral density and an effective Purcell factor of 6.2, together with a collection efficiency of 60%. Potential for significantly higher enhancement, quantitative signals, inherent spectral filtering and absence of intrinsic background in cavity-vacuum stimulated Raman scattering render the technique a promising tool for molecular imaging. Furthermore, cavity-enhanced Raman transitions involving localized excitons could potentially be used for gaining quantum control over nanomechanical motion and open a route for molecular cavity optomechanics.

  15. Cavity-enhanced Raman microscopy of individual carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hümmer, Thomas; Noe, Jonathan; Hofmann, Matthias S.; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Högele, Alexander; Hunger, David

    2016-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy reveals chemically specific information and provides label-free insight into the molecular world. However, the signals are intrinsically weak and call for enhancement techniques. Here, we demonstrate Purcell enhancement of Raman scattering in a tunable high-finesse microcavity, and utilize it for molecular diagnostics by combined Raman and absorption imaging. Studying individual single-wall carbon nanotubes, we identify crucial structural parameters such as nanotube radius, electronic structure and extinction cross-section. We observe a 320-times enhanced Raman scattering spectral density and an effective Purcell factor of 6.2, together with a collection efficiency of 60%. Potential for significantly higher enhancement, quantitative signals, inherent spectral filtering and absence of intrinsic background in cavity-vacuum stimulated Raman scattering render the technique a promising tool for molecular imaging. Furthermore, cavity-enhanced Raman transitions involving localized excitons could potentially be used for gaining quantum control over nanomechanical motion and open a route for molecular cavity optomechanics.

  16. Quantitative resonance Raman spectroscopy of N-acetylpyrrolidine in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Harhay, G.P.; Hudson, B.S. )

    1993-08-05

    The resonance Raman spectra of aqueous solutions of N-acetylpyrrolidine are determined at seven excitation frequencies from 40 660 to 53 130 cm[sup [minus]1] spanning the first strong absorption band which is broad and diffuse The resonance Raman spectra are dominated by the single amide II[prime]-like vibration at 1485 cm[sup [minus]1] and its overtones of up to five quanta. Absolute resonance Raman cross sections are determined for these fundamental and overtone transitions at each excitation wavelength by reference to an internal standard of sodium perchlorate. A quantitative analysis of these data and the broad absorption spectrum is made on the basis of a model for the electronic excitation that includes the effects of inhomogeneous broadening. The observation of only a single enhanced vibrational normal mode, with the assumption that there is no Duschinsky rotation upon electronic excitation, makes this a particularly simple case for detailed analysis. A reasonably good fit to the experimental data is obtained using standard assumptions of Lorentzian inhomogeneous broadening and A-term (Condom) Raman scattering. In this fitting procedure, the integrated absorption spectrum determines the transition dipole length. 43 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Raman resonance in the strained Ge quantum dot array.

    PubMed

    Talochkin, A B; Markov, V A

    2008-07-09

    We study the Raman resonance of a Ge quantum dot (QD) array grown pseudomorphically to a Si matrix using low-temperature molecular-beam epitaxy. A change of the resonance energy and the shape of the resonance curve in comparison with bulk Ge are observed. These features are shown to be explained by taking into account QD strain and the quasistationary character of the electronic states responsible for the observed resonance. Application of a model of the two-dimensional critical point of the interband density of states allows us to estimate the damping parameter and localization size of these states. It is shown that the observed enhancement of the resonance amplitude in a QD array as compared to the bulk case is related to transformation of the interband density of states into the δ-function due to quantization of the electron-hole spectrum.

  18. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of double-shell hollow nanoparticles: electromagnetic and chemical enhancements.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Mahmoud A

    2013-05-28

    Enhancements of the Raman signal by the newly prepared gold-palladium and gold-platinum double-shell hollow nanoparticles were examined and compared with those using gold nanocages (AuNCs). The surface-enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) of thiophenol adsorbed on the surface of AuNCs assembled into a Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer were 10-fold stronger than AuNCs with an inner Pt or Pd shell. The chemical and electromagnetic enhancement mechanisms for these hollow nanoparticles were further proved by comparing the Raman enhancement of nitrothiophenol and nitrotoulene. Nitrothiophenol binds to the surface of the nanoparticles by covalent interaction, and Raman enhancement by both the two mechanisms is possible, while nitrotoulene does not form any chemical bond with the surface of the nanoparticles and hence no chemical enhancement is expected. Based on discrete dipole approximation (DDA) calculations and the experimental SERS results, AuNCs introduced a high electromagnetic enhancement, while the nanocages with inner Pt or Pd shell have a strong chemical enhancement. The optical measurements of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the nanocages with an outer Au shell and an inner Pt or Pd shell were found, experimentally and theoretically, to be broad compared with AuNCs. The possible reason could be due to the decrease of the coherence time of Au oscillated free electrons and fast damping of the plasmon energy. This agreed well with the fact that a Pt or Pd inner nanoshell decreases the electromagnetic field of the outer Au nanoshell while increasing the SERS chemical enhancement.

  19. Time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy: exploring reactive intermediates.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Sangram Keshari; Umapathy, Siva; Parker, Anthony W

    2011-10-01

    The study of reaction mechanisms involves systematic investigations of the correlation between structure, reactivity, and time. The challenge is to be able to observe the chemical changes undergone by reactants as they change into products via one or several intermediates such as electronic excited states (singlet and triplet), radicals, radical ions, carbocations, carbanions, carbenes, nitrenes, nitrinium ions, etc. The vast array of intermediates and timescales means there is no single "do-it-all" technique. The simultaneous advances in contemporary time-resolved Raman spectroscopic techniques and computational methods have done much towards visualizing molecular fingerprint snapshots of the reactive intermediates in the microsecond to femtosecond time domain. Raman spectroscopy and its sensitive counterpart resonance Raman spectroscopy have been well proven as means for determining molecular structure, chemical bonding, reactivity, and dynamics of short-lived intermediates in solution phase and are advantageous in comparison to commonly used time-resolved absorption and emission spectroscopy. Today time-resolved Raman spectroscopy is a mature technique; its development owes much to the advent of pulsed tunable lasers, highly efficient spectrometers, and high speed, highly sensitive multichannel detectors able to collect a complete spectrum. This review article will provide a brief chronological development of the experimental setup and demonstrate how experimentalists have conquered numerous challenges to obtain background-free (removing fluorescence), intense, and highly spectrally resolved Raman spectra in the nanosecond to microsecond (ns-μs) and picosecond (ps) time domains and, perhaps surprisingly, laid the foundations for new techniques such as spatially offset Raman spectroscopy. © 2011 Society for Applied Spectroscopy

  20. Near-infrared excited surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of rhodamine 6G on colloidal silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneipp, K.; Roth, E.; Engert, C.; Kiefer, W.

    1993-05-01

    1064 nm excited surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) of rhodamine 6G (Rh 6G) on NaCl-activated silver sol is reported performed with a scanning Raman spectrometer. The present study gives the opportunity to compare directly the enhancement factors for excitation in the near-infrared (NIR) and in the visible region and shows that for the case of Rh 6G these factors are of the same order of magnitude. This result can be explained by a growing electromagnetic contribution to the enhancement at 1064 nm which compensates the loss of resonance Raman enhancement by the change of excitation wavelength from about 500 to 1064 nm. An additional enhancement factor ascribed to the local mechanism of a Rh 6G-adatom—anion surface complex gives an essential contribution to SERS. This specific enhancement due to Cl-activated sites results in similar contributions in the visible and in the NIR.

  1. Atypical Exciton-Phonon Interactions in WS2 and WSe2 Monolayers Revealed by Resonance Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Del Corro, E; Botello-Méndez, A; Gillet, Y; Elias, A L; Terrones, H; Feng, S; Fantini, C; Rhodes, Daniel; Pradhan, N; Balicas, L; Gonze, X; Charlier, J-C; Terrones, M; Pimenta, M A

    2016-04-13

    Resonant Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for providing information about excitons and exciton-phonon coupling in two-dimensional materials. We present here resonant Raman experiments of single-layered WS2 and WSe2 using more than 25 laser lines. The Raman excitation profiles of both materials show unexpected differences. All Raman features of WS2 monolayers are enhanced by the first-optical excitations (with an asymmetric response for the spin-orbit related XA and XB excitons), whereas Raman bands of WSe2 are not enhanced at XA/B energies. Such an intriguing phenomenon is addressed by DFT calculations and by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation. These two materials are very similar. They prefer the same crystal arrangement, and their electronic structure is akin, with comparable spin-orbit coupling. However, we reveal that WS2 and WSe2 exhibit quite different exciton-phonon interactions. In this sense, we demonstrate that the interaction between XC and XA excitons with phonons explains the different Raman responses of WS2 and WSe2, and the absence of Raman enhancement for the WSe2 modes at XA/B energies. These results reveal unusual exciton-phonon interactions and open new avenues for understanding the two-dimensional materials physics, where weak interactions play a key role coupling different degrees of freedom (spin, optic, and electronic).

  2. Resonant Raman scattering in self-assembled quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Menendez-Proupin, E.; Trallero-Giner, C.; Ulloa, S. E.

    1999-12-15

    A theoretical treatment for first-order resonant Raman scattering in self-assembled quantum dots (SAQD's) of different materials is presented. The dots are modeled as cylindrical disks with elliptical cross section, to simulate shape and confinement anisotropies obtained from the SAQD growth conditions. Coulomb interaction between electron and hole is considered in an envelope function Hamiltonian approach and the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions are obtained by a matrix diagonalization technique. By including excitonic intermediate states in the Raman process, the scattering efficiency and cross section are calculated for long-range Froehlich exciton-phonon interaction. The Froehlich interaction in the SAQD is considered in an approach in which both the mechanical and electrostatic matching boundary conditions are fulfilled at the SAQD interfaces. Exciton and confined phonon selection rules are derived for Raman processes. Characteristic results for SAQD's are presented, including InAs dots in GaAs, as well as CdSe dots in ZnSe substrates. We analyze how Raman spectroscopy would give information on carrier masses, confinement anisotropy effects, and SAQD geometry. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  3. Raman Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrard, Donald L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature on Raman spectroscopy from late 1981 to late 1983. Topic areas include: instrumentation and sampling; liquids and solutions; gases and matrix isolation; biological molecules; polymers; high-temperature and high-pressure studies; Raman microscopy; thin films and surfaces; resonance-enhanced and surface-enhanced spectroscopy; and…

  4. Raman Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrard, Donald L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature on Raman spectroscopy from late 1981 to late 1983. Topic areas include: instrumentation and sampling; liquids and solutions; gases and matrix isolation; biological molecules; polymers; high-temperature and high-pressure studies; Raman microscopy; thin films and surfaces; resonance-enhanced and surface-enhanced spectroscopy; and…

  5. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering of Ethyl carbamate adsorbed on Ag20 cluster: Enhancement mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Junmei; Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Hui; Chen, Yuanzheng; Guo, Chunsheng; Gan, Liyong; Du, Muying

    2017-03-01

    The normal and surface-enhanced Raman scattering of EC are studied by using the M06-2X functional. Different contributions to Raman enhancements of EC adsorbed on Ag20 cluster are analyzed in detail to explore the enhancement mechanism. The adsorption of EC on Ag20 cluster involves the static chemical enhancement with enhancements factor (EF) of 10 by forming a new EC-Ag20 complex. The charge-transfer enhancement with EF of 104 is found when a 352 nm wavelength, corresponding to the absorption maximum of EC-Ag20 complex, is taken as an incident light. The electromagnetic enhancement EF of 3.6 × 106 due to the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of Ag nanosphere at the same excitation wavelength are acquired by the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) method. The combined effect of the chemical and electromagnetic enhancement results in the total relative enhancements factor up to 3.6 × 1010. The enhancement mechanisms are successfully explained by the combination of ab initio calculation and discrete dipole appropriation method.

  6. Nonadiabaticity in a Jahn-Teller system probed by absorption and resonance Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Pae, K; Hizhnyakov, V

    2013-03-14

    A theory of absorption and resonance Raman scattering of impurity centers in crystals with E⊗e-type Jahn-Teller effect in the excited state is presented. The vibronic interaction with non-totally symmetric local or pseudolocal modes and with a continuum of bath modes (phonons) is considered. A number of specific quantum effects, such as the nonadiabaticity-induced enhancement of the Raman scattering at high-energy excitation, the size effect of the final state, the interference of different channels of scattering, the Fermi resonances in the conical intersection, and others, were shown to become apparent in the calculated spectra. The vibronic interaction with phonons essentially determines the structure of the spectra.

  7. Cascade correlation-enhanced Raman scattering in atomic vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hong-Mei; Chen, Li-Qing; Yuan, Chun-Hua

    2016-12-01

    A new Raman process can be used to realize efficient Raman frequency conversion by coherent feedback at low light intensity [Chen B, Zhang K, Bian C L, Qiu C, Yuan C H, Chen L Q, Ou Z Y, and Zhang W P 2013 Opt. Express 21, 10490]. We present a theoretical model to describe this enhanced Raman process, termed as cascade correlation-enhanced Raman scattering, which is a Raman process injected by a seeded light field. It is correlated with the initially prepared atomic spin excitation and driven by the quasi-standing-wave pump fields, and the processes are repeated until the Stokes intensities are saturated. Such an enhanced Raman scattering may find applications in quantum information, nonlinear optics, and optical metrology due to its simplicity. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474095, 11274118, and 91536114).

  8. Surface enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopic waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Lascola, Robert J; McWhorter, Christopher S; Murph, Simona H

    2015-04-14

    A waveguide for use with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is provided that includes a base structure with an inner surface that defines a cavity and that has an axis. Multiple molecules of an analyte are capable of being located within the cavity at the same time. A base layer is located on the inner surface of the base structure. The base layer extends in an axial direction along an axial length of an excitation section. Nanoparticles are carried by the base layer and may be uniformly distributed along the entire axial length of the excitation section. A flow cell for introducing analyte and excitation light into the waveguide and a method of applying nanoparticles may also be provided.

  9. Urinalysis by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Lee, Yuan-Hsiang; Kwon, Hyeog; Shahriari, Mahmoud; Rainey, Petrie

    2000-01-01

    The overall objective of this Small Business Technology Transfer Research program is the development of a fiber optic sensor suitable for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy that provides reversible, reproducible, quantitative measurements of trace chemicals. The sensor is intended to benefit NASA and the International Space Station in several areas. For example, the sensor could provide real-time measurements for space-based research in the areas of chemistry and biotechnology, it could provide continuous water quality monitoring in the life support systems, or it could provide astronaut health monitoring through urine and blood chemical analysis. This paper describes the development of the SERS based sensor and its application to astronaut health monitoring through urinalysis. .

  10. [Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy analysis of thiabendazole pesticide].

    PubMed

    Lin, Lei; Wu, Rui-mei; Liu, Mu-hua; Wang, Xiao-bin; Yan, Lin-yuan

    2015-02-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technique was used to analyze the Raman peaks of thiabendazole pesticides in the present paper. Surface enhanced substrates of silver nanoparticle were made based on microwave technology. Raman signals of thiabendazole were collected by laser Micro-Raman spectrometer with 514. 5 and 785 nm excitation wavelengths, respectively. The Raman peaks at different excitation wavelengths were analyzed and compared. The Raman peaks 782 and 1 012 at 785 nm excitation wavelength were stronger, which were C--H out-of-plane vibrations. While 1284, 1450 and 1592 cm(-1) at 514.5 nm excitation wavelength were stronger, which were vng and C==N stretching. The study results showed that the intensity of Raman peak and Raman shift at different excitation wavelengths were different And strong Raman signals were observed at 782, 1012, 1284, 1450 and 1592 cm(-1) at 514.5 and 785 nm excitation wavelengths. These characteristic vibrational modes are characteristic Raman peaks of carbendazim pesticide. The results can provide basis for the rapid screening of pesticide residue in agricultural products and food based on Raman spectrum.

  11. Enhanced Raman scattering of graphene by silver nanoparticles with different densities and locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hai-Bin; Fu, Can; Xia, Yan-Jie; Zhang, Chong-Wu; Du, Jiang-Hui; Yang, Wen-Chao; Guo, Peng-Fei; Xu, Jun-Qi; Wang, Chun-Lei; Jia, Yong-Lei; Liu, Jiang-Feng

    2017-02-01

    Graphene–metal nanoparticle heterojunctions greatly improve the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) by strong light–graphene interactions. In this work, to enhance the Raman scattering, Ag nanoparticles (NPs) underneath and on top of the graphene were used. Then, Raman scattering of graphene is significantly enhanced approximately 67-fold, and the enhancement factor of the graphene G peak increases with the Ag NP density at the same location. In addition, an obvious red-shift and broadening of the resonance peak of Ag NPs is presented, which may be correlated to the strength of Raman enhancement, the coupling of the deposited Ag NPs and the graphene. Further, graphene–Ag NP heterojunctions can be used as SERS substrates to obtain the strongest Raman signals of the rhodamine (R6G) molecules and the weakest photoluminescence (PL) background from the Ag NPs. Based on the tunable Raman enhancement, graphene–Ag NPs offer a promising platform for engineering SERS substrates to obtain highly sensitive detection of trace levels of analyte molecules.

  12. Graphene as a substrate to suppress fluorescence in resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Liming; Ling, Xi; Fang, Yuan; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Zhongfan

    2009-07-29

    We have measured resonance Raman spectra with greatly suppressed fluorescence (FL) background from rhodamine 6G (R6G) and protoporphyrin IX (PPP) adsorbed on graphene. The FL suppression is estimated to be approximately 10(3) times for R6G. The successful observation of resonance Raman peaks demonstrates that graphene can be used as a substrate to suppress FL in resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS), which has potential applications in low-concentration detection and RRS study of fluorescent molecules.

  13. Enhanced Raman scattering of single nanoparticles in a high-Q whispering-gallery microresonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rui-Shan; Jin, Wei-Liang; Yu, Xiao-Chong; Liu, Yong-Chun; Xiao, Yun-Feng

    2015-04-01

    We study Raman scattering of single nanoparticles coupled to a high-Q whispering-gallery microresonator. It is found that cavity resonances greatly enhance the Raman signal, and the enhancement factor is as high as 108. Unlike the noncavity case, the signal power exhibits a nonmonotonic dependence on particle size, and it reaches the maximum when the Rayleigh scattering loss and the cavity intrinsic loss are comparable. We further analyze how the Raman signal intensity is influenced by different parameters including cavity quality factors and taper-cavity coupling strength. The detection limit of observing single-nanoparticle Raman signal is discussed finally. As a potential application, this mechanism may provide an alternative way to detect specific biological targets without the need of precovered biorecognitions.

  14. Multimodality Raman and photoacoustic imaging of surface-enhanced-Raman-scattering-targeted tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Paproski, Robert J.; Shao, Peng; Forbrich, Alexander; Lewis, John D.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2016-02-01

    A multimodality Raman and photoacoustic imaging system is presented. This system has ultralow background and can detect tumor cells labeled with modified surface-enhanced-Raman-scattering (SERS) nanoparticles in vivo. Photoacoustic imaging provides microvascular context and can potentially be used to guide magnetic trapping of circulating tumor cells for SERS detection in animal models.

  15. Resonant impulsive-stimulated Raman scattering on malachite green

    SciTech Connect

    Chesnoy, J.; Mokhtari, A.

    1988-10-01

    We have studied in the femtosecond regime the transient dynamics of dichroism (anisotropic absorption), birefringence, and frequency shift induced by an intense femtosecond pump beam in the dye malachite green in solution. Vibrational quantum beats were observed superimposed on the saturated absorption and dispersion signals and quantitatively explained in terms of impulsive-stimulated Raman scattering close to an electronic resonance. The selectivity for observation of the vibrations in the two electronic states is described for the different experimental schemes. We discuss the access to vibrational and electronic dynamics in both ground and excited electronic states and compare the possibilities to those of previous techniques.

  16. Photodissociation dynamics of dimethylnitrosamine studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenderink, Egbert; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    1994-02-01

    The initial molecular dynamics in the dissociative S 1 (n, π *) state of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) is investigated using resonance Raman spectroscopy. We find that photochemical N-N bond cleavage in DMN proceeds via a bent conformation around the amine N atom, which supports the outcome of ab initio and classical trajectory calculations [M. Persico, I. Cacelli and A. Ferretti, J. Chem. Phys. 94 (1991) 5508]. Additional information is obtained about the other motions that accompany the photodissociation: a stretch of the N-N bond and a change of the NNO angle.

  17. Gold Nanostructures for Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy, Prepared by Electrodeposition in Porous Silicon.

    PubMed

    Fukami, Kazuhiro; Chourou, Mohamed L; Miyagawa, Ryohei; Muñoz Noval, Álvaro; Sakka, Tetsuo; Manso-Silván, Miguel; Martín-Palma, Raúl J; Ogata, Yukio H

    2011-04-14

    Electrodeposition of gold into porous silicon was investigated. In the present study, porous silicon with ~100 nm in pore diameter, so-called medium-sized pores, was used as template electrode for gold electrodeposition. The growth behavior of gold deposits was studied by scanning electron microscope observation of the gold deposited porous silicon. Gold nanorod arrays with different rod lengths were prepared, and their surface-enhanced Raman scattering properties were investigated. We found that the absorption peak due to the surface plasmon resonance can be tuned by changing the length of the nanorods. The optimum length of the gold nanorods was ~600 nm for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy using a He-Ne laser. The reason why the optimum length of the gold nanorods was 600 nm was discussed by considering the relationship between the absorption peak of surface plasmon resonance and the wavelength of the incident laser for Raman scattering.

  18. Active-site structure, binding and redox activity of the heme–thiolate enzyme CYP2D6 immobilized on coated Ag electrodes: a surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering study

    PubMed Central

    Bonifacio, Alois; Millo, Diego; Keizers, Peter H. J.; Boegschoten, Roald; Commandeur, Jan N. M.; Vermeulen, Nico P. E.; Gooijer, Cees

    2007-01-01

    Surface-enhance resonance Raman scattering spectra of the heme–thiolate enzyme cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) adsorbed on Ag electrodes coated with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) were obtained in various experimental conditions. An analysis of these spectra, and a comparison between them and the RR spectra of CYP2D6 in solution, indicated that the enzyme’s active site retained its nature of six-coordinated low-spin heme upon immobilization. Moreover, the spectral changes detected in the presence of dextromethorphan (a CYP2D6 substrate) and imidazole (an exogenous heme axial ligand) indicated that the immobilized enzyme also preserved its ability to reversibly bind a substrate and form a heme–imidazole complex. The reversibility of these processes could be easily verified by flowing alternately solutions of the various compounds and the buffer through a home-built spectroelectrochemical flow cell which contained a sample of immobilized protein, without the need to disassemble the cell between consecutive spectral data acquisitions. Despite immobilized CYP2D6 being effectively reduced by a sodium dithionite solution, electrochemical reduction via the Ag electrode was not able to completely reduce the enzyme, and led to its extensive inactivation. This behavior indicated that although the enzyme’s ability to exchange electrons is not altered by immobilization per se, MUA-coated electrodes are not suited to perform direct electrochemistry of CYP2D6. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00775-007-0303-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:17899220

  19. Monitoring LED-induced carotenoid increase in grapes by Transmission Resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzálvez, Alicia G.; Martínez, Nerea L.; Telle, Helmut H.; Ureña, Ángel González

    2013-02-01

    Transmission Resonance Raman (TRR) spectroscopy combines increased signal-to-noise ratio with enhanced analytical sensibility. TRR was applied to directly monitor, without any sample preparation, the enhancement of β-carotene content in table grapes when they are irradiated by low power UV-LEDs. It was shown that, with respect to control samples, the carotenoid content in the grapes increased about five-fold, using UV-LED irradiation doses being two orders of magnitude lower than the maximum limit allowed by United States Food and Drug Administration. These promising results may pave the way for the development of easy, non-invasive techniques to improve food quality.

  20. Efficient Heterostructures for Combined Interference and Plasmon Resonance Raman Amplification.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Fraga, Leo; Climent-Pascual, Esteban; Aguilar-Pujol, Montserrat; Ramírez-Jiménez, Rafael; Jiménez-Villacorta, Félix; Prieto, Carlos; de Andrés, Alicia

    2017-02-01

    The detection, identification, and quantification of different types of molecules and the optical imaging of, for example, cellular processes are important challenges. Here, we present how interference-enhanced Raman scattering (IERS) in adequately designed heterostructures can provide amplification factors relevant for both detection and imaging. Calculations demonstrate that the key factor is maximizing the absolute value of the refractive indices' difference between dielectric and metal layers. Accordingly, Si/Al/Al2O3/graphene heterostructures have been fabricated by optimizing the thickness and roughness and reaching enhancement values up to 700 for 488 nm excitation. The deviation from the calculated enhancement, 1200, is mainly due to reflectivity losses and roughness of the Al layer. The IERS platforms are also demonstrated to improve significantly the quality of white light images of graphene and are foreseen to be adequate to reveal the morphology of 2D and biological materials. A graphene top layer is adequate for most organic molecule deposition and often quenches possible fluorescence, permitting Raman signal detection, which, for a rhodamine 6G (R6G) monolayer, presents a gain of 400. Without graphene, the nonquenched R6G fluorescence is similarly amplified. The wavelength dependence of the involved refractive indices predicts much higher amplification (around 10(4)) for NIR excitation. These interference platforms can therefore be used to gain contrast and intensity in white light, Raman, and fluorescence imaging. We also demonstrate that surface-enhanced Raman scattering and IERS amplifications can be efficiently combined, leading to a gain of >10(5) (at 488 nm) by depositing a Ag nanostructured transparent film on the IERS platform. When the plasmonic structures deposited on the IERS platforms are optimized, single-molecule detection can be actively envisaged.

  1. Plasmonic photoluminescence for recovering native chemical information from surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kai-Qiang; Yi, Jun; Zhong, Jin-Hui; Hu, Shu; Liu, Bi-Ju; Liu, Jun-Yang; Zong, Cheng; Lei, Zhi-Chao; Wang, Xiang; Aizpurua, Javier; Esteban, Rubén; Ren, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy has attracted tremendous interests as a highly sensitive label-free tool. The local field produced by the excitation of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) dominates the overall enhancement of SERS. Such an electromagnetic enhancement is unfortunately accompanied by a strong modification in the relative intensity of the original Raman spectra, which highly distorts spectral features providing chemical information. Here we propose a robust method to retrieve the fingerprint of intrinsic chemical information from the SERS spectra. The method is established based on the finding that the SERS background originates from the LSPR-modulated photoluminescence, which contains the local field information shared also by SERS. We validate this concept of retrieval of intrinsic fingerprint information in well controlled single metallic nanoantennas of varying aspect ratios. We further demonstrate its unambiguity and generality in more complicated systems of tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) and SERS of silver nanoaggregates. PMID:28348368

  2. Lipid-cell interactions in human monocytes investigated by doubly-resonant coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, Tyler; Schie, Iwan; den Hartigh, Laura J.; Rutledge, John C.; Huser, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that doubly-resonant coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering can provide enhanced and highly specific contrast for molecules containing unique Raman-active small molecular groups. This combination provides contrast for molecules that can otherwise be difficult to discriminate by Raman spectroscopy. Here, human monocytes were incubated with either deuterated oleic acid or 17-octadecynoic acid (a fatty acid with an end terminal acetylene group). The carbon-deuterium stretching vibration of the deuterated fatty acid, as well as the unique alkyne stretching vibration of the alkyne-containing fatty acid, were used to provide contrast for these exogenous free fatty acids. The combination of these unique modes with the common aliphatic carbon-hydrogen stretching vibration inherent to all fatty acid allowed for doubly-resonant detection of these unique molecules and enabled us to detect the presence of these lipids in areas within a cell where each molecular resonance by itself did not generate sufficient signal. PMID:21361680

  3. Spatial resolution of tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy - DFT assessment of the chemical effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latorre, Federico; Kupfer, Stephan; Bocklitz, Thomas; Kinzel, Daniel; Trautmann, Steffen; Gräfe, Stefanie; Deckert, Volker

    2016-05-01

    Experimental evidence of extremely high spatial resolution of tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) has been recently demonstrated. Here, we present a full quantum chemical description (at the density functional level of theory) of the non-resonant chemical effects on the Raman spectrum of an adenine molecule mapped by a tip, modeled as a single silver atom or a small silver cluster. We show pronounced changes in the Raman pattern and its intensities depending on the conformation of the nanoparticle-substrate system, concluding that the spatial resolution of the chemical contribution of TERS can be in the sub-nm range.Experimental evidence of extremely high spatial resolution of tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) has been recently demonstrated. Here, we present a full quantum chemical description (at the density functional level of theory) of the non-resonant chemical effects on the Raman spectrum of an adenine molecule mapped by a tip, modeled as a single silver atom or a small silver cluster. We show pronounced changes in the Raman pattern and its intensities depending on the conformation of the nanoparticle-substrate system, concluding that the spatial resolution of the chemical contribution of TERS can be in the sub-nm range. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00093b

  4. Gold nanoshells for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barhoumi, Aoune

    Gold nanoshells are tunable plasmonic nanostructures consisting of spherical silica cores wrapped with thin layer of Au. Based on the size of the Au layer with respect to the silica core, gold nanoshells can resonantly absorb or scatter light at any wavelength on the visible or infrared. On resonance, gold nanoshells interact strongly with light to give rise to collective oscillations of the free electrons against the background of the ionic core, phenomena known as localized surface plasmons. The free electron oscillation creates surface plasmon multimodes of various orders. As a result, the average local near field surrounding the Au nanoshell is enhanced. The local field enhancement has been extensively used in different applications. In this work, the local near-field is used to enhance the Raman spectroscopy of DNA and explore the different modes attributed to the base composition and structure of the DNA sequence. We showed that urface enhanced Raman spectroscopy of DNA is dominated by the adenine modes regardless of the base composition of the DNA sequence, a property that we have used to develop a DNA label-free detection system. As absorbers, plasmon-resonant Au nanoshells can convert absorbed light into heat. As a consequence, the temperature on the Au nanoshell surface increases dramatically. This property is used to light-trigger the release of variety of therapeutic molecules such as single stranded DNA, siRNA and small molecules. We demonstrated that the local heat can be used to dehybridize double stranded DNA attached to the Au surface via a thiol moiety on one of the DNA strands. The complementary sequence (therapeutic sequence) is released at temperature lower than the standard melting temperature of same DNA sequence. Moreover, small molecules (DAPI) which were initially intercalated on the double stranded DNA attached to the Au surface were successfully released due to the heat generated around the nanoshell surface. Finally, siRNA molecules

  5. Application of resonance Raman spectroscopy as a nuclear proliferation detection technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J. III; Chen, C.L.; Dougherty, D.R.

    1993-03-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) potentially possesses many of the characteristics of an ideal verification technology. Some of these ideal traits are: very high selectivity and specificity to allow the deconvolution of a mixture of the chemicals of interest, high sensitivity in order to measure a species at trace levels, high reliability and long-term durability, applicability to a wide range of chemicals capability for sensing in a variety of environmental conditions, independence of the physical state of the chemical capability for quantitative analysis, and finally, but no less important capability for full signal development within seconds. In this presentation, the potential of RRS as a detection/identification technology for chemicals pertinent to nuclear materials production and processing will be assessed. A review of the basic principles behind this technique, both theoretical and experimental, will be discussed along with some recent results obtained in this laboratory. Raman scattering is a coherent, inelastic, two-photon scattering process where an exciting photon of energy hv promotes a molecule to a virtual level and the subsequently emitted photon is shifted in frequency in accordance with the rotational-vibrational structure of the irradiated species, therefore providing a unique fingerprint of the molecule. The enhancement of a Raman signal occurs when the excitation frequency is isoenergetic with an allowed electronic transition. Under resonance conditions, scattering cross-sections have been enhanced up to 6 orders of magnitude, thereby allowing the measurement of resonance Raman spectra from concentrations as dilute as 20 ppb for PAHs (with the potential of pptr). In detection/verification programs, this condition translates to increased sensitivity (ppm/ppb) and increased probing distance (m/km).

  6. Application of resonance Raman spectroscopy as a nuclear proliferation detection technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J. III; Chen, C.L.; Dougherty, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) potentially possesses many of the characteristics of an ideal verification technology. Some of these ideal traits are: very high selectivity and specificity to allow the deconvolution of a mixture of the chemicals of interest, high sensitivity in order to measure a species at trace levels, high reliability and long-term durability, applicability to a wide range of chemicals capability for sensing in a variety of environmental conditions, independence of the physical state of the chemical capability for quantitative analysis, and finally, but no less important capability for full signal development within seconds. In this presentation, the potential of RRS as a detection/identification technology for chemicals pertinent to nuclear materials production and processing will be assessed. A review of the basic principles behind this technique, both theoretical and experimental, will be discussed along with some recent results obtained in this laboratory. Raman scattering is a coherent, inelastic, two-photon scattering process where an exciting photon of energy hv promotes a molecule to a virtual level and the subsequently emitted photon is shifted in frequency in accordance with the rotational-vibrational structure of the irradiated species, therefore providing a unique fingerprint of the molecule. The enhancement of a Raman signal occurs when the excitation frequency is isoenergetic with an allowed electronic transition. Under resonance conditions, scattering cross-sections have been enhanced up to 6 orders of magnitude, thereby allowing the measurement of resonance Raman spectra from concentrations as dilute as 20 ppb for PAHs (with the potential of pptr). In detection/verification programs, this condition translates to increased sensitivity (ppm/ppb) and increased probing distance (m/km).

  7. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Sensors From Nanobiosilica With Self-Assembled Plasmonic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Fanghui; Campbell, Jeremy; Rorrer, Gregory L.; Wang, Alan X.

    2014-01-01

    We present an innovative surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) sensor based on a biological-plasmonic hybrid nanostructure by self-assembling silver (Ag) nanoparticles into diatom frustules. The photonic-crystal-like diatom frustules provide a spatially confined electric field with enhanced intensity that can form hybrid photonic-plasmonic modes through the optical coupling with Ag nanoparticles. The experimental results demonstrate 4–6× and 9–12× improvement of sensitivities to detect the Raman dye for resonance and nonresonance SERS sensing, respectively. Such low-cost and high-sensitivity SERS sensors have significant potentials for label-free biosensing. PMID:25309113

  8. Resonance Raman Studies of Bovine and OCTOPUS Visual Pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liewen

    1995-01-01

    We have regenerated bovine and octopus visual pigments with retinals containing isotopic labels at three positions, i.e., 8-^{13}C -11,12-D_2, 10-^{13 }C-11,12-D_2, 11- ^{13}C-11,12-D_2 , 14-^{13}C-11,12 -D_2, for the studies of bound chromophore ethylenic and Schiff base vibrational modes by resonance Raman spectroscopy. Also regenerated were octopus visual pigments with singly or doubly ^{13 }C labeled retinals, i.e., 9-^ {13}C, 10,11-^{13 }C_2, 12,13- ^{13}C_2, 13-^{13}C, 14,15- ^{13}C_2, 14,15-^{13}C_2 -ND, for the studies of vibrational modes in the fingerprint region. We have analyzed the resonance Raman spectra based upon the observation of the response of individual bands in the spectrum of rhodopsin, isorhodopsin, or bathorhodopsin to a particular label. The observed peaks in the fingerprint and ethylenic regions have been tentatively assigned to specific C-C and C=C stretches. We have also studied a model retinal protonated Schiff base analog and its isotopically labeled derivatives as well as calculations using ab initio methods. Based on the vibrational analysis, new criteria to determine the Schiff base C=N configuration from Raman spectroscopy have been developed, and the C=N configuration in octopus rhodopsin, isorhodopsin and bathorhodopsin has been determined. We have continued the resonance Raman study of the Schiff base hydrogen/deuterium exchange for rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin by employing the continuous-flow experiment. The exchange of a deuteron on the Schiff base with a proton is very fast, with half-times of 6.9 +/- 0.9 and 1.3 +/- 0.3 ms for rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin, respectively, faster than the proton-deuteron exchange rate of a protonated Schiff base in aqueous solution (16 +/- 2 ms). This anomalous result can be understand if a structural water molecule (or molecules) is present next to the protonated Schiff base in the two pigments.

  9. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) study of anthocyanidins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaffino, Chiara; Russo, Bianca; Bruni, Silvia

    2015-10-01

    Anthocyanins are an important class of natural compounds responsible for the red, purple and blue colors in a large number of flowers, fruits and cereal grains. They are polyhydroxy- and polymethoxy-derivatives of 2-phenylbenzopyrylium (flavylium) salts, which are present in nature as glycosylated molecules. The aim of the present study is to assess the identification of anthocyanidins, i.e. anthocyanins without the glycosidic moiety, by means of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), a very chemically-specific technique which is moreover sensitive to subtle changes in molecular structures. These features can lead to elect SERS, among the spectroscopic tools currently at disposal of scientists, as a technique of choice for the identification of anthocyanidins, since: (1) anthocyanidins structurally present the same benzopyrylium moiety and differentiate only for the substitution pattern on their phenyl ring, (2) different species are present in aqueous solution depending on the pH. It will be demonstrated that, while resonance Raman spectra of anthocyanidins are very similar to one another, SER spectra show greater differences, leading to a further step in the identification of such important compounds in diluted solutions by means of vibrational spectroscopy. Moreover, the dependence on the pH of the six most common anthocyanidins, i.e. cyanidin, delphinidin, pelargonidin, peonidin, malvidin and petunidin, is studied. To the best of the authors' knowledge, a complete SERS study of such important molecules is reported in the present work for the first time.

  10. Single-site surface-enhanced Raman scattering beyond spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takase, Mai; Yasuda, Satoshi; Murakoshi, Kei

    2016-04-01

    Recent progress in the observation of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is reviewed to examine the possibility of finding a novel route for the effective photoexcitation of materials. The importance of well-controlled SERS experiments on a single molecule at a single site is discussed based on the difference in the information obtained from ensemble SERS measurements using multiple active sites with an uncontrolled number of molecules. A single-molecule SERS observation performed at a mechanically controllable breaking junction with a simultaneous conductivity measurement provides clear evidence of the drastic changes both in the intensity and in the Raman mode selectivity of the electromagnetic field generated by localized surface plasmon resonance. Careful control of the field at a few-nanometer-wide gap of a metal nanodimer results in the modification of the selection rule of electronic excitation of an isolated single-walled carbon nanotube. The examples shown in this review suggest that a single-site SERS observation could be used as a novel tool to find, develop, and implement applications of plasmon-induced photoexcitation of materials.

  11. Raman Excitation Profile of the G-band Enhancement in Twisted Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliel, G. S. N.; Ribeiro, H. B.; Sato, K.; Saito, R.; Lu, Chun-Chieh; Chiu, Po-Wen; Fantini, C.; Righi, A.; Pimenta, M. A.

    2017-08-01

    A resonant Raman study of twisted bilayer graphene (TBG) samples with different twisting angles using many different laser lines in the visible range is presented. The samples were fabricated by CVD technique and transferred to Si/SiO2 substrates. The Raman excitation profiles of the huge enhancement of the G-band intensity for a group of different TBG flakes were obtained experimentally, and the analysis of the profiles using a theoretical expression for the Raman intensities allowed us to obtain the energies of the van Hove singularities generated by the Moiré patterns and the lifetimes of the excited state of the Raman process. Our results exhibit a good agreement between experimental and calculated energies for van Hove singularities and show that the lifetime of photoexcited carrier does not depend significantly on the twisting angle in the range intermediate angles (𝜃 between 10∘ and 15∘). We observed that the width of the resonance window (Γ ≈ 250 meV) is much larger than the REP of the Raman modes of carbon nanotubes, which are also enhanced by resonances with van Hove singularities.

  12. Enhanced Raman scattering by fractal clusters: Scale-invariant theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockman, Mark I.; Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Moskovits, Martin; Botet, Robert; George, Thomas F.

    1992-08-01

    A scale-invariant theory of Raman scattering of light by fractal clusters is developed. The enhancement factor GRS of Raman scattering is shown to scale in terms of a properly chosen spectral variable X. The critical indices of the enhancement factor are found to be determined by the optical spectral dimension of the fractal. Numerical modeling is carried out and shown to support the analytical results obtained. The theory, which does not contain any adjustable parameters, agrees well with experimental data on surface-enhanced Raman scattering over a wide spectral range.

  13. Synthesis, characterization, Raman, and surface enhanced Raman studies of semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yi

    The major contributions and discoveries of the dissertation include: (1) Homogeneous nucleation processes for the formation of nanocrystals can occur at low temperature and do not need to proceed at high temperature to overcome a high energy barrier. Monodisperse PbS quantum dots (QDs) obtained with nucleation and growth at 45°C support this finding. (2) Monodisperse single elemental Se QDs can be produced by simple solution crystallization from TDE (1-tetradecene) or ODE (1-octadecene). (3) TDE is a better non-coordinating solvent compare to ODE. STDE (S dissolved in TDE) and SeTDE (Se dissolved in TDE) are stable reagents with long storage time. They can be used as universal precursors for S-containing and Se-containing QDs. (4) QDs synthesis can be carried out at low temperature and relatively short reaction time using the simple, non-injection, one-pot synthetic method. (5) The one-pot method can be extended for the synthesis of QDs and graphene oxide nanocomposites and metal and graphene oxide nanocomposites. (6) PbCl2-OLA (oleylamine) is a universal system for the synthesis of Pb-chaclogenides QDs. (7) Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is used to probe both size and wave length dependent quantum confinement effects (QCEs) of PbS QDs. (8) Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool to elucidate crystal structure of Se nanoclusters with size of 1--2 nm. Semiconductor QDs have attracted considerable attention due to their potential for energy-efficient materials in optoelectronic and solar cell applications. When the radius of a QD is decreased to that of the exciton Bohr radius, the valence and conduction bands are known to split into narrower bands due to QCEs. QCEs are both size and wave length dependent. We have developed, synthesized and characterized a series of Pb-chaclogenide QDs, which all the sizes of the QDs are monodisperse and smaller than their respective exciton Bohr radius, to study the QCEs of these QDs. SERS is used as a crucial tool to

  14. Resonance Raman spectroscopy and quantum-chemical calculations of push-pull molecules: 4-hydroxy-4'-nitroazobenzene and its anion.

    PubMed

    Ando, Rômulo A; Rodríguez-Redondo, José L; Sastre-Santos, A; Fernandez-Lazaro, Fernando; Azzellini, Gianluca C; Borin, Antonio C; Santos, Paulo S

    2007-12-27

    The deprotonation of the push-pull molecule 4-hydroxy-4'-nitroazobenzene leads to a substantial variation in the charge distribution over the donor and acceptor moieties in the D-pi-azo-pi-A system. The extra charge stabilizes the excited state, leading to a drastic red shift of ca. 100 nm in the lambda max of the electronic transition and consequently causes significant changes in the resonance Raman enhancement profiles. In the neutral species the chromophore involves several modes, as nu(CN), nu(NN), and nu s(NO2), while in the anion the selective enhancement of the nu s(NO2) and nu(CO-) modes indicates a greater geometric variation of the NO2 and CO- moieties in the resonant excited electronic state. The interpretation of the electronic transitions and the vibrational assignment are supported by quantum-mechanical calculations, allowing a consistent analysis of the enhancement patterns observed in the resonance Raman spectra.

  15. Carotenoid analysis of halophilic archaea by resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Craig P; Leuko, Stefan; Coyle, Candace M; Walter, Malcolm R; Burns, Brendan P; Neilan, Brett A

    2007-08-01

    Recently, halite and sulfate evaporate rocks have been discovered on Mars by the NASA rovers, Spirit and Opportunity. It is reasonable to propose that halophilic microorganisms could have potentially flourished in these settings. If so, biomolecules found in microorganisms adapted to high salinity and basic pH environments on Earth may be reliable biomarkers for detecting life on Mars. Therefore, we investigated the potential of Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy to detect biomarkers derived from microorganisms adapted to hypersaline environments. RR spectra were acquired using 488.0 and 514.5 nm excitation from a variety of halophilic archaea, including Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1, Halococcus morrhuae, and Natrinema pallidum. It was clearly demonstrated that RR spectra enhance the chromophore carotenoid molecules in the cell membrane with respect to the various protein and lipid cellular components. RR spectra acquired from all halophilic archaea investigated contained major features at approximately 1000, 1152, and 1505 cm(-1). The bands at 1505 cm(-1) and 1152 cm(-1) are due to in-phase C=C (nu(1) ) and C-C stretching ( nu(2) ) vibrations of the polyene chain in carotenoids. Additionally, in-plane rocking modes of CH(3) groups attached to the polyene chain coupled with C-C bonds occur in the 1000 cm(-1) region. We also investigated the RR spectral differences between bacterioruberin and bacteriorhodopsin as another potential biomarker for hypersaline environments. By comparison, the RR spectrum acquired from bacteriorhodopsin is much more complex and contains modes that can be divided into four groups: the C=C stretches (1600-1500 cm(-1)), the CCH in-plane rocks (1400-1250 cm(-1)), the C-C stretches (1250-1100 cm(-1)), and the hydrogen out-of-plane wags (1000-700 cm(-1)). RR spectroscopy was shown to be a useful tool for the analysis and remote in situ detection of carotenoids from halophilic archaea without the need for large sample sizes and complicated

  16. Carotenoid Analysis of Halophilic Archaea by Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Craig P.; Leuko, Stefan; Coyle, Candace M.; Walter, Malcolm R.; Burns, Brendan P.; Neilan, Brett A.

    2007-08-01

    Recently, halite and sulfate evaporate rocks have been discovered on Mars by the NASA rovers, Spirit and Opportunity. It is reasonable to propose that halophilic microorganisms could have potentially flourished in these settings. If so, biomolecules found in microorganisms adapted to high salinity and basic pH environments on Earth may be reliable biomarkers for detecting life on Mars. Therefore, we investigated the potential of Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy to detect biomarkers derived from microorganisms adapted to hypersaline environments. RR spectra were acquired using 488.0 and 514.5 nm excitation from a variety of halophilic archaea, including Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1, Halococcus morrhuae, and Natrinema pallidum. It was clearly demonstrated that RR spectra enhance the chromophore carotenoid molecules in the cell membrane with respect to the various protein and lipid cellular components. RR spectra acquired from all halophilic archaea investigated contained major features at approximately 1000, 1152, and 1505 cm-1. The bands at 1505 cm-1 and 1152 cm-1 are due to in-phase C=C (ν1 ) and C-C stretching ( ν2 ) vibrations of the polyene chain in carotenoids. Additionally, in-plane rocking modes of CH3 groups attached to the polyene chain coupled with C-C bonds occur in the 1000 cm-1 region. We also investigated the RR spectral differences between bacterioruberin and bacteriorhodopsin as another potential biomarker for hypersaline environments. By comparison, the RR spectrum acquired from bacteriorhodopsin is much more complex and contains modes that can be divided into four groups: the C=C stretches (1600-1500 cm-1), the CCH in-plane rocks (1400-1250 cm-1), the C-C stretches (1250-1100 cm-1), and the hydrogen out-of-plane wags (1000-700 cm-1). RR spectroscopy was shown to be a useful tool for the analysis and remote in situ detection of carotenoids from halophilic archaea without the need for large sample sizes and complicated extractions, which are

  17. Strongly enhanced Raman scattering of graphene by a single gold nanorod

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yingbo; Shen, Hongming; Cheng, Yuqing; Lu, Guowei Gong, Qihuang

    2015-08-03

    Individual gold nanorods (AuNRs) and monolayer graphene hybrid system is investigated experimentally. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal of the graphene is observed due to a single AuNR with enhancement factor up to ∼1000-fold. The SERS intensity is strongly polarization dependent and the enhancement effect varies with the detuning between the excitation laser and the AuNR resonance. The SERS effect is highest when the resonant wavelength of the AuNRs matches well with the excitation light. By correlating the scattering and photoluminescence, it is demonstrated that the conventional background in SERS ascribes to the photon emission of metallic nanostructures.

  18. Plasmonic ladder-like structure and graphene assisted high surface enhanced Raman scattering detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, P.; Mondal, Samir; Behera, Gangadhar; Sharma, Sudesh; Parmar, K. P. S.

    2016-11-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) study is an interesting active area of research, where periodically patterned plasmonic substrates play a key role in SERS enhancement. Surface plasmon resonance excitation generates tremendous electromagnetic near-fields (E) in the form of localized or propagating near-fields contributing to the Raman signal (E4 process) to a great extent and overall enhancement is reported to be as high as 1010 or even more. Independently, graphene alone can enhance the Raman signal due to chemical enhancement. In the present study, we have attempted to achieve high SERS from the R6G Raman active probe using plasmonic patterned substrates in the presence and absence of graphene oxide. Plasmonic ladder-like patterned substrates are fabricated using laser interference lithography, which is cost effective, simple to operate, and has potential for large scale nanofabrication. By combining graphene oxide with R6G, we have found additional two time enhancement compared to that obtain from R6G alone on the plasmonic patterned substrate. Further, we have also attempted to understand the underlying mechanism to correlate the uniform and reproducible SERS through Raman mapping and Finite difference time domain computation. Our finding can potentially be applied for SERS investigation at a low molecular concentration.

  19. Demonstration of surface-enhanced Raman scattering by tunable, plasmonic gallium nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Pae C; Khoury, Christopher G.; Kim, Tong-Ho; Yang, Yang; Losurdo, Maria; Bianco, Giuseppe V.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Brown, April S.; Everitt, Henry O.

    2009-01-01

    Size-controlled gallium nanoparticles deposited on sapphire are explored as alternative substrates to enhance Raman spectral signatures. Gallium’s resilience following oxidation is inherently advantageous compared to silver for practical ex vacuo, non-solution applications. Ga nanoparticles are grown using a simple, molecular beam epitaxy-based fabrication protocol, and by monitoring their corresponding surface plasmon resonance energy through in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry, the nanoparticles are easily controlled for size. Raman spectroscopy performed on cresyl fast violet (CFV) deposited on substrates of differing mean nanoparticle size represents the first demonstration of enhanced Raman signals from reproducibly tunable self-assembled Ga nanoparticles. Non-optimized aggregate enhancement factors of ~80 were observed from the substrate with the smallest Ga nanoparticles for CFV dye solutions down to a dilution of 10 ppm. PMID:19655747

  20. Resonance Raman detection of carotenoid antioxidants in living human tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Sharifzadeh, M.; Ermakova, Maia; Gellermann, W.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to the beneficial effects of carotenoid antioxidants in the human body. Several studies, for example, support the protective role of lutein and zeaxanthin in the prevention of age-related eye diseases. If present in high concentrations in the macular region of the retina, lutein and zeaxanthin provide pigmentation in this most light sensitive retinal spot, and as a result of light filtering and/or antioxidant action, delay the onset of macular degeneration with increasing age. Other carotenoids, such as lycopene and beta-carotene, play an important role as well in the protection of skin from UV and short-wavelength visible radiation. Lutein and lycopene may also have protective function for cardiovascular health, and lycopene may play a role in the prevention of prostate cancer. Motivated by the growing importance of carotenoids in health and disease, and recognizing the lack of any accepted noninvasive technology for the detection of carotenoids in living human tissue, we explore resonance Raman spectroscopy as a novel approach for noninvasive, laser optical carotenoid detection. We review the main results achieved recently with the Raman detection approach. Initially we applied the method to the detection of macular carotenoid pigments, and more recently to the detection of carotenoids in human skin and mucosal tissues. Using skin carotenoid Raman instruments, we measure the carotenoid response from the stratum corneum layer of the palm of the hand for a population of 1375 subjects and develope a portable skin Raman scanner for field studies. These experiments reveal that carotenoids are a good indicator of antioxidant status. They show that people with high oxidative stress, like smokers, and subjects with high sunlight exposure, in general, have reduced skin carotenoid levels, independent of their dietary carotenoid consumption. We find the Raman technique to be precise, specific, sensitive, and well suitable for clinical as well as

  1. Resonance Raman detection of carotenoid antioxidants in living human tissue.

    PubMed

    Ermakov, Igor V; Sharifzadeh, M; Ermakova, Maia; Gellermann, W

    2005-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to the beneficial effects of carotenoid antioxidants in the human body. Several studies, for example, support the protective role of lutein and zeaxanthin in the prevention of age-related eye diseases. If present in high concentrations in the macular region of the retina, lutein and zeaxanthin provide pigmentation in this most light sensitive retinal spot, and as a result of light filtering and/or antioxidant action, delay the onset of macular degeneration with increasing age. Other carotenoids, such as lycopene and beta-carotene, play an important role as well in the protection of skin from UV and short-wavelength visible radiation. Lutein and lycopene may also have protective function for cardiovascular health, and lycopene may play a role in the prevention of prostate cancer. Motivated by the growing importance of carotenoids in health and disease, and recognizing the lack of any accepted noninvasive technology for the detection of carotenoids in living human tissue, we explore resonance Raman spectroscopy as a novel approach for noninvasive, laser optical carotenoid detection. We review the main results achieved recently with the Raman detection approach. Initially we applied the method to the detection of macular carotenoid pigments, and more recently to the detection of carotenoids in human skin and mucosal tissues. Using skin carotenoid Raman instruments, we measure the carotenoid response from the stratum corneum layer of the palm of the hand for a population of 1375 subjects and develop a portable skin Raman scanner for field studies. These experiments reveal that carotenoids are a good indicator of antioxidant status. They show that people with high oxidative stress, like smokers, and subjects with high sunlight exposure, in general, have reduced skin carotenoid levels, independent of their dietary carotenoid consumption. We find the Raman technique to be precise, specific, sensitive, and well suitable for clinical as well as

  2. Tip Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy and Imaging: an Apical Illumination Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Zachary D.; Stranick, Stephan J.; Levin, Ira W.

    2009-01-01

    Results are presented illustrating the use of tip enhanced Raman spectroscopy and imaging in a top-illumination geometry. A radially polarized beam is used to generate an electric field component in the direction of beam propagation, normal to the surface, resulting in a 5× increased enhancement compared to a linearly polarized beam. This multiplicative enhancement facilitates a discrimination of the near field signal from the far field Raman background. The top illumination configuration facilitates the application of TERS for investigating molecules on a variety of surfaces, such as Au, glass, and Si. The near field Raman spectrum is presented of Si(100), rhodamine B, brilliant cresyl blue, and single wall carbon nanotubes. Sufficient enhancement is obtained to permit a sub-diffraction limited resolution Raman imaging of the surface distribution of large bundles of carbon nanotubes of various diameters. PMID:19007457

  3. UV resonance Raman investigation of the aqueous solvation dependence of primary amide vibrations.

    PubMed

    Punihaole, David; Jakubek, Ryan S; Dahlburg, Elizabeth M; Hong, Zhenmin; Myshakina, Nataliya S; Geib, Steven; Asher, Sanford A

    2015-03-12

    We investigated the normal mode composition and the aqueous solvation dependence of the primary amide vibrations of propanamide. Infrared, normal Raman, and UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy were applied in conjunction with density functional theory (DFT) to assign the vibrations of crystalline propanamide. We examined the aqueous solvation dependence of the primary amide UVRR bands by measuring spectra in different acetonitrile/water mixtures. As previously observed in the UVRR spectra of N-methylacetamide, all of the resonance enhanced primary amide bands, except for the Amide I (AmI), show increased UVRR cross sections as the solvent becomes water-rich. These spectral trends are rationalized by a model wherein the hydrogen bonding and the high dielectric constant of water stabilizes the ground state dipolar (-)O-C═NH2(+) resonance structure over the neutral O═C-NH2 resonance structure. Thus, vibrations with large C-N stretching show increased UVRR cross sections because the C-N displacement between the electronic ground and excited state increases along the C-N bond. In contrast, vibrations dominated by C═O stretching, such as the AmI, show a decreased displacement between the electronic ground and excited state, which result in a decreased UVRR cross section upon aqueous solvation. The UVRR primary amide vibrations can be used as sensitive spectroscopic markers to study the local dielectric constant and hydrogen bonding environments of the primary amide side chains of glutamine (Gln) and asparagine (Asn).

  4. The confinement induced resonance in spin-orbit coupled cold atoms with Raman coupling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Cai; Song, Shu-Wei; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    The confinement induced resonance provides an indispensable tool for the realization of the low-dimensional strongly interacting quantum system. Here, we investigate the confinement induced resonance in spin-orbit coupled cold atoms with Raman coupling. We find that the quasi-bound levels induced by the spin-orbit coupling and Raman coupling result in the Feshbach-type resonances. For sufficiently large Raman coupling, the bound states in one dimension exist only for sufficiently strong attractive interaction. Furthermore, the bound states in quasi-one dimension exist only for sufficient large ratio of the length scale of confinement to three dimensional s-wave scattering length. The Raman coupling substantially changes the confinement-induced resonance position. We give a proposal to realize confinement induced resonance through increasing Raman coupling strength in experiments. PMID:24862314

  5. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Purple Membrane from Halobacterium Halobium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argade, Pramod Vasant

    Purple membrane from the halophilic bacteria, Halobacterium halobium, contains the protein, bacteriorhodopsin, which functions as a light transducing proton pump. Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying the functioning of bacteriorhodopsin is a key problem in membrane biophysics. After absorbing a photon, this protein cycles through a series of characteristic intermeidate states and pumps H('+) ions across the membrane. In this way, the energy of the absorbed photon is stored in the electrochemical potential gradient formed across the membrane. This energy is subsequently available for metabolism by the bacterium. Bacteriorhodopsin consists of a retinal chromophore (which is responsible for the purple color) bound to the protein, bacterioopsin, whose sequence is known and consists of 248 amino acid residues. There is evidence that conformational changes in the chromophore may contribute to the proton pumping action. Resonance Raman light scattering provides a selective tool to monitor the conformational changes in the chromophore during the proton pumping cycle. This dissertation consists of applying resonance Raman light scattering in conjunction with a variety of newly developed experimental techniques to gain information about the mode of action of bacteriorhodopsin. By selective isotopic labelling of (epsilon)-amino nitrogen of the lysine residues of the protein, the site of attachment of the chromophore with the protein was verified by in situ measurements. Also, a model proposing a secondary interaction of the chromophore with a lysine residue other than the binding site of the chromophore was tested using this method. Furthermore, by selective isotopic labelling of only a part of the protein the location of the lysine on the protein to which the chromophore is bound, was found by in situ measurements to be the fragment consisting of amino acid residues 72 through 248 of the protein. This is inconsistent with the previously reported binding site at

  6. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) dosimeter and probe

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1995-01-01

    A dosimeter and probe for measuring exposure to chemical and biological compounds is disclosed. The dosimeter or probe includes a collector which may be analyzed by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The collector comprises a surface-enhanced Raman scattering-active material having a coating applied thereto to improve the adsorption properties of the collector. The collector may also be used in automated sequential devises, in probe array devices.

  7. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) dosimeter and probe

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1995-03-21

    A dosimeter and probe for measuring exposure to chemical and biological compounds is disclosed. The dosimeter or probe includes a collector which may be analyzed by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The collector comprises a surface-enhanced Raman scattering-active material having a coating applied thereto to improve the adsorption properties of the collector. The collector may also be used in automated sequential devices, in probe array devices. 10 figures.

  8. Visualizing resonances in the complex plane with vibrational phase contrast coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Jurna, Martin; Garbacik, Erik T; Korterik, Jeroen P; Herek, Jennifer L; Otto, Cees; Offerhaus, Herman L

    2010-09-15

    In coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), the emitted signal carries both amplitude and phase information of the molecules in the focal volume. Most CARS experiments ignore the phase component, but its detection allows for two advantages over intensity-only CARS. First, the pure resonant response can be determined, and the nonresonant background rejected, by extracting the imaginary component of the complex response, enhancing the sensitivity of CARS measurements. Second, selectivity is increased via determination of the phase and amplitude, allowing separation of individual molecular components of a sample even when their vibrational bands overlap. Here, using vibrational phase contrast CARS (VPC-CARS), we demonstrate enhanced sensitivity in quantitative measurements of ethanol/methanol mixtures and increased selectivity in a heterogeneous mixture of plastics and water. This powerful technique opens a wide range of possibilities for studies of complicated systems where overlapping resonances limit standard methodologies.

  9. Chemical mechanism of surface-enhanced Raman scattering via charge transfer in fluorenone-Ag complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Li, Yafei; Wu, Shiwei; Song, Peng; Xia, Lixin

    2016-06-01

    The intermolecular interaction between fluorenone (FN) and silver surfaces was investigated experimentally and theoretically. The structural, electronic and optical properties of the FN-Ag complex indicate that the carbonyl group O atom in FN molecules is the adsorbed position site to attach the silver substrate through the weak bond O…Ag. The analysis of vibrational modes and Raman activity of the largely enhanced Raman peaks using two FN-Ag4-x (x  =  l, s) complex models reveals that only the a1 vibrational modes with C 2v symmetry are selectively enhanced, from the point view of the change of dipole moment and polarizability induced by the interaction between FN and Ag4 substrate. Furthermore, the direct visualized evidence of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) chemical enhancement mechanism for the FN-Ag complex is presented. The results reveal that only the intermolecular charge transfer with π-π transition characterization between FN and an Ag4 cluster facilitates the resonance Raman process and is directly responsible for chemical enhancement of Raman scattering of the FN-Ag complex.

  10. Origin invariance in vibrational resonance Raman optical activity.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Luciano N; Egidi, Franco; Barone, Vincenzo; Cappelli, Chiara

    2015-05-07

    A theoretical investigation on the origin dependence of the vibronic polarizabilities, isotropic and anisotropic rotational invariants, and scattering cross sections in Resonance Raman Optical Activity (RROA) spectroscopy is presented. Expressions showing the origin dependence of these polarizabilities were written in the resonance regime using the Franck-Condon (FC) and Herzberg-Teller (HT) approximations for the electronic transition moments. Differently from the far-from-resonance scattering regime, where the origin dependent terms cancel out when the rotational invariants are calculated, RROA spectrum can exhibit some origin dependence even for eigenfunctions of the electronic Hamiltonian. At the FC level, the RROA spectrum is completely origin invariant if the polarizabilities are calculated using a single excited state or for a set of degenerate states. Otherwise, some origin effects can be observed in the spectrum. At the HT level, RROA spectrum is origin dependent even when the polarizabilities are evaluated from a single excited state but the origin effect is expected to be small in this case. Numerical calculations performed for (S)-methyloxirane, (2R,3R)-dimethyloxirane, and (R)-4-F-2-azetidinone at both FC and HT levels using the velocity representation of the electric dipole and quadrupole transition moments confirm the predictions of the theory and show the extent of origin effects and the effectiveness of suggested ways to remove them.

  11. Resonant femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy with an intense actinic pump pulse: Application to conical intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, B. Jayachander; Gelin, Maxim F.; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    We theoretically investigate the feasibility of characterizing conical intersections with time-resolved resonant femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) using an intense actinic pump pulse. We perform nonperturbative numerical simulations of FSRS signals for a three-electronic-state two-vibrational-mode model, which is inspired by the S 2 ( π π * )- S 1 ( n π * ) conical intersection in pyrazine. Our results show that moderately strong actinic pulses increase the intensity of vibrational fingerprint lines in FSRS transients. They facilitate the extraction of useful spectroscopic information by enhancing peaks revealing the coupling and tuning modes of the conical intersection.

  12. Al-doped MgB2 materials studied using electron paramagnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateni, Ali; Erdem, Emre; Repp, Sergej; Weber, Stefan; Somer, Mehmet

    2016-05-01

    Undoped and aluminum (Al) doped magnesium diboride (MgB2) samples were synthesized using a high-temperature solid-state synthesis method. The microscopic defect structures of Al-doped MgB2 samples were systematically investigated using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance. It was found that Mg-vacancies are responsible for defect-induced peculiarities in MgB2. Above a certain level of Al doping, enhanced conductive properties of MgB2 disappear due to filling of vacancies or trapping of Al in Mg-related vacancy sites.

  13. Resonant femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy with an intense actinic pump pulse: Application to conical intersections.

    PubMed

    Rao, B Jayachander; Gelin, Maxim F; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2017-02-28

    We theoretically investigate the feasibility of characterizing conical intersections with time-resolved resonant femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) using an intense actinic pump pulse. We perform nonperturbative numerical simulations of FSRS signals for a three-electronic-state two-vibrational-mode model, which is inspired by the S2(ππ(*))-S1(nπ(*)) conical intersection in pyrazine. Our results show that moderately strong actinic pulses increase the intensity of vibrational fingerprint lines in FSRS transients. They facilitate the extraction of useful spectroscopic information by enhancing peaks revealing the coupling and tuning modes of the conical intersection.

  14. Electromagnetic contributions to single-molecule sensitivity in surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongxing; Aizpurua, Javier; Käll, Mikael; Apell, Peter

    2000-09-01

    We examine whether single molecule sensitivity in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) can be explained in the framework of classical electromagnetic theory. The influence of colloid particle shape and size, composition (Ag or Au) and interparticle separation distance on the wavelength-dependent SERS enhancement factor is reported. Our calculations indicate that the maximum enhancement factor achievable through electromagnetics is of the order 1011. This is obtained only under special circumstances, namely at interstitial sites between particles and at locations outside sharp surface protrusions. The comparative rarity of such sites, together with the extreme spatial localization of the enhancement they provide, can qualitatively explain why only very few surface sites seem to contribute to the measured signal in single-molecule SERS experiments. Enhancement factors of the order 1014-1015, which have been reported in recent experiments, are likely to involve additional enhancement mechanisms such as chemisorption induced resonance Raman effects.

  15. Ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy of explosives in solution and the solid state.

    PubMed

    Emmons, Erik D; Tripathi, Ashish; Guicheteau, Jason A; Fountain, Augustus W; Christesen, Steven D

    2013-05-23

    Resonance Raman cross sections of common explosives have been measured by use of excitation wavelengths in the deep-UV from 229 to 262 nm. These measurements were performed both in solution and in the native solid state for comparison. While measurements of UV Raman cross sections in solution with an internal standard are straightforward and commonly found in the literature, measurements on the solid phase are rare. This is due to the difficulty in preparing a solid sample in which the molecules of the internal standard and absorbing analyte/explosive experience the same laser intensity. This requires producing solid samples that are mixtures of strongly absorbing explosives and an internal standard transparent at the UV wavelengths used. For the solid-state measurements, it is necessary to use nanostructured mixtures of the explosive and the internal standard in order to avoid this bias due to the strong UV absorption of the explosive. In this study we used a facile spray-drying technique where the analyte of interest was codeposited with the nonresonant standard onto an aluminum-coated microscope slide. The generated resonance enhancement profiles and quantitative UV-vis absorption spectra were then used to plot the relative Raman return as a function of excitation wavelength and particle size.

  16. Elucidation of Chemical Reactions by Two-Dimensional Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Andrew

    Two-dimensional (2D) Raman spectroscopies were proposed by Mukamel and Loring in1985 as a method for resolving line broadening mechanisms of vibrational motions in liquids. Significant technical issues challenged the development of both five- and seven-pulse 2D Raman spectroscopies. For this reason, 2D Raman experiments were largely abandoned in 2002 following the first demonstrations of 2D infrared spectroscopies (i.e., an alternate approach for obtaining similar information). We have recently shown that 2D Raman experiments conducted under electronically resonant conditions are much less susceptible to the problems encountered in the earlier 2D Raman work, which was carried out off-resonance. In effect, Franck-Condon activity obviates the problematic selection rules encountered under electronically off-resonant conditions. In this presentation, I will discuss applications of 2D resonance Raman spectroscopies to photodissocation reactions of triiodide and myoglobin. It will be shown that vibrational resonances of the reactants and products can be displayed in separate dimensions of a 2D resonance Raman spectrum when the photo-dissociation reaction is fast compared to the vibrational period. Such 2D spectra expose correlations between the nonequilibrium geometry of the reactant and the distribution of vibrational quanta in the product, thereby yielding insight in the photo-dissociation mechanism. Our results suggest that the ability of 2D resonance Raman spectroscopy to detect correlations between reactants and products will generalize to other ultrafast processes such as electron transfer and energy transfer.

  17. Resonance Raman spectroscopy of octopus rhodopsin and its photoproducts

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, C.; Pande, A.; Yue, K.T.; Callender, R.; Ebrey, T.G.; Tsuda, M.

    1987-08-11

    The authors report here the resonance Raman spectra of octopus rhodopsin and its photoproducts, bathorhodopsin and acid metarhodopsin. These studies were undertaken in order to make comparisons with the well-studied bovine pigments, so as to understand the similarities and the differences in pigment structure and photochemical processes between vertebrates and invertebrates. The flow method was used to obtain the Raman spectrum of rhodopsin at 13 /sup 0/C. The bathorhodopsin spectrum was obtained by computer subtraction of the spectra containing different photostationary mixtures of rhodopsin, isorhodopsin, hypsorhodopsin, and bathorhodopsin, obtained at 12 K using the pump-probe technique and from measurements at 80 K. Like their bovine counterparts, the Schiff base vibrational mode appears at approx. 1660 cm/sup -1/ in octopus rhodopsin and the photoproducts, bathorhodopsin and acid metarhodopsin, suggesting a proteonated Schiff base linkage between the chromophore and the protein. Differences between the Raman spectra of octopus rhodopsin and bathorhodopsin indicate that the formation of bathorhodopsin is associated with chromophore isomerization. This inference is substantiated by the chromophore chemical extraction data which show that, like the bovine system, octopus rhodopsin is an 11-cis pigment, while the photoproducts contain an all-trans pigment, in agreement with the previous work. The octopus rhodopsin and bathorhodopsin spectra show marked differences from their bovine counterparts in other respects, however. The differences are most dramatic in the structure-sensitive fingerprint and the HOOP regions. Thus, it appears that although the two species differ in the specific nature of the chromophore-protein interactions, the general process of visual transduction is the same.

  18. Probing the spatial extension of light trapping-induced enhanced Raman scattering in high-density Si nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bontempi, Nicolò; Salmistraro, Marco; Ferroni, Matteo; Depero, Laura E.; Alessandri, Ivano

    2014-11-01

    This paper reports an experimental investigation of surface-enhanced Raman scattering in high-density Si nanowire arrays obtained by electroless etching. A direct relationship between light trapping capabilities of Si nanowires and enhanced Raman scattering was demonstrated. Optimized arrays allowed for a remarkable increase of Raman sensitivity in comparison to reference planar samples. As a result, the detection limit of molecular probes under resonant excitation (e.g. methylene blue) can be extended by three orders of magnitude. In addition, continuous ultrathin films, that cannot be analyzed in conventional Raman experiments, are made detectable. In the case of anatase thin films, the detection limit of 5 nm was reached. Raman spectra of Si/TiO2 core/shell heterostructures demonstrate that the enhanced field resulting from surface multiple scattering is characterized by a large spatial extension (about fifty nanometers), making these materials a potential alternative to plasmonic metals for SERS experiments.

  19. Suspended graphene with periodic dimer nanostructure on Si cavities for surface-enhanced Raman scattering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Hsin-Chia; Nien, Li-Wei; Li, Jia-Han; Hsueh, Chun-Hway

    2017-04-01

    Periodic gold dimer nanoantennas on a one-atomic-layer graphene sheet elevated above Si cavities were fabricated to systematically study the effects of the cavity depth on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The periodic trend of Raman intensity as a function of the cavity depth resulting from the interference effect between the plasmonic resonance of the gold dimer and the cavity resonance of the underlying Si cavity was observed, and the electric field was greatly enhanced compared with the non-suspended system. The finite-difference time-domain method was used to simulate the interaction between the electromagnetic wave and the suspended system and to verify the observed SERS response in experiments. Our work has the advantages of combining the superior properties of graphene with suspended metallic nanostructures to result in the enhanced electric field for SERS applications.

  20. Temperature dependence of resonance Raman spectra of carotenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, A.; Apostolova, I.; Velitchkova, M.

    2011-04-01

    To understand the mechanism of the photoprotective and antioxidative functions of carotenoids, it is essential to have a profound knowledge of their excited electronic and vibronic states. In the present study we investigate the most powerful antioxidants: β-carotene and lutein by means of resonance Raman spectroscopy. The aim was to study in detail their Raman spectra in solution at room temperature and their changes as a function of temperature. To measure the spectra in their natural environment pyridine has been used as a solvent. It has been chosen because of its polarizability ( n = 1.5092) which is close to that of membrane lipids and proteins. The temperature dependence of the most intensive ν1 band in the range from 77 K to 295 K at 514.5 nm excitation has been obtained. It was found that in pyridine the C dbnd C stretching frequency, its intensity, line shape, and line width are very sensitive to the temperature (the sensitivity being different for the two studied carotenoids). The observed linear temperature dependence of the C dbnd C stretching frequency is explained by a mechanism involving changes of the vibronic coupling and the extent of π-electron delocalization. The different behavior of the temperature-induced broadening of the ν1 band and its intensity for the two studied carotenoids can be associated with the different nature of their solid matrices: glassy for β-carotene and crystalline-like for lutein, owing to their different chemical structures.

  1. Charge Transfer Effect on Raman and Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Furfural Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Fu; Shi, Haiyang; Chen, Weigen; Gu, Zhaoliang; Du, Lingling; Wang, Pinyi; Wang, Jianxin

    2017-01-01

    The detection of furfural in transformer oil through surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is one of the most promising online monitoring techniques in the process of transformer aging. In this work, the Raman of individual furfural molecules and SERS of furfural-Mx (M = Ag, Au, Cu) complexes are investigated through density functional theory (DFT). In the Raman spectrum of individual furfural molecules, the vibration mode of each Raman peak is figured out, and the deviation from experimental data is analyzed by surface charge distribution. In the SERS of furfural-Mx complexes, the influence of atom number and species on SERS chemical enhancement factors (EFs) are studied, and are further analyzed by charge transfer effect. Our studies strengthen the understanding of charge transfer effect in the SERS of furfural molecules, which is important in the online monitoring of the transformer aging process through SERS. PMID:28767053

  2. Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for renal condition monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingting; Li, Ming; Du, Yong; Santos, Greggy M.; Mohan, Chandra; Shih, Wei-Chuan

    2016-03-01

    Non- and minimally-invasive techniques can provide advantages in the monitoring and clinical diagnostics in renal diseases. Although renal biopsy may be useful in establishing diagnosis in several diseases, it is an invasive approach and impractical for longitudinal disease monitoring. To address this unmet need, we have developed two techniques based on Raman spectroscopy. First, we have investigated the potential of diagnosing and staging nephritis by analyzing kidney tissue Raman spectra using multivariate techniques. Secondly, we have developed a urine creatinine sensor based on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy with performance near commercial assays which require relatively laborious sample preparation and longer time.

  3. Pre-processing of ultraviolet resonance Raman spectra.

    PubMed

    Simpson, John V; Oshokoya, Olayinka; Wagner, Nicole; Liu, Jing; JiJi, Renee D

    2011-03-21

    The application of UV excitation sources coupled with resonance Raman have the potential to offer information unavailable with the current inventory of commonly used structural techniques including X-ray, NMR and IR analysis. However, for ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy to become a mainstream method for the determination of protein secondary structure content and monitoring protein dynamics, the application of multivariate data analysis methodologies must be made routine. Typically, the application of higher order data analysis methods requires robust pre-processing methods in order to standardize the data arrays. The application of such methods can be problematic in UVRR datasets due to spectral shifts arising from day-to-day fluctuations in the instrument response. Additionally, the non-linear increases in spectral resolution in wavenumbers (increasing spectral data points for the same spectral region) that results from increasing excitation wavelengths can make the alignment of multi-excitation datasets problematic. Last, a uniform and standardized methodology for the subtraction of the water band has also been a systematic issue for multivariate data analysis as the water band overlaps the amide I mode. Here we present a two-pronged preprocessing approach using correlation optimized warping (COW) to alleviate spectra-to-spectra and day-to-day alignment errors coupled with a method whereby the relative intensity of the water band is determined through a least-squares determination of the signal intensity between 1750 and 1900 cm(-1) to make complex multi-excitation datasets more homogeneous and usable with multivariate analysis methods.

  4. A comparative study of Raman enhancement in capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftekhari, Fatemeh; Irizar, Juan; Hulbert, Laila; Helmy, Amr S.

    2011-06-01

    This work reports on the comparative studies of Raman enhancement in liquid core waveguides (LCWs). The theoretical considerations that describe Raman enhancement in LCWs is adapted to analyze and compare the performance of hollow core photonic crystal fibers (HCPCFs) to conventional Teflon capillary tubes. The optical losses in both platforms are measured and used to predict their performance for different lengths. The results show that for an optimal waveguide length, two orders of magnitude enhancement in the Raman signal can be achieved for aqueous solutions using HCPCFs. This length, however, cannot be achieved using normal capillary effects. By integrating the interface of the fluidic pump and the HCPCF into a microfluidic chip, we are able to control fluid transport and fill longer lengths of HCPCFs regardless of the viscosity of the sample. The long-term stability and reproducibility of Raman spectra attained through this platform are demonstrated for naphthalenethiol, which is a well-studied organic compound. Using the HCPCF platform, the detection limit of normal Raman scattering in the range of micro-molars has been achieved. In addition to the higher signal-to-noise ratio of the Raman signal from the HCPCF-platform, more Raman modes of naphthalenethiol are revealed using this platform.

  5. Plasmonic Nanogap-Enhanced Raman Scattering with Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jwa-Min; Oh, Jeong-Wook; Lee, Haemi; Suh, Yung Doug

    2016-12-20

    Plasmonic coupling-based electromagnetic field localization and enhancement are becoming increasingly important in chemistry, nanoscience, materials science, physics, and engineering over the past decade, generating a number of new concepts and applications. Among the plasmonically coupled nanostructures, metal nanostructures with nanogaps have been of special interest due to their ultrastrong electromagnetic fields and controllable optical properties that can be useful for a variety of signal enhancements such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The Raman scattering process is highly inefficient, with a very small cross-section, and Raman signals are often poorly reproducible, meaning that very strong, controllable SERS is needed to obtain reliable Raman signals with metallic nanostructures and thus open up new avenues for a variety of Raman-based applications. More specifically, plasmonically coupled metallic nanostructures with ultrasmall (∼1 nm or smaller) nanogaps can generate very strong and tunable electromagnetic fields that can generate strong SERS signals from Raman dyes in the gap, and plasmonic nanogap-enhanced Raman scattering can be defined as Raman signal enhancement from plasmonic nanogap particles with ∼1 nm gaps. However, these promising nanostructures with extraordinarily strong optical signals have shown limited use for practical applications, largely due to the lack of design principles, high-yield synthetic strategies with nanometer-level structural control and reproducibility, and systematic, reliable single-molecule/single-particle-level studies on their optical properties. All these are extremely important challenges because even small changes (<1 nm) in the structure of the coupled plasmonic nanogaps can significantly affect the plasmon mode and signal intensity. In this Account, we examine and summarize recent breakthroughs and advances in plasmonic nanogap-enhanced Raman scattering with metal nanogap particles with respect

  6. Cavity-enhanced Raman microscopy of individual carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Hümmer, Thomas; Noe, Jonathan; Hofmann, Matthias S.; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Högele, Alexander; Hunger, David

    2016-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy reveals chemically specific information and provides label-free insight into the molecular world. However, the signals are intrinsically weak and call for enhancement techniques. Here, we demonstrate Purcell enhancement of Raman scattering in a tunable high-finesse microcavity, and utilize it for molecular diagnostics by combined Raman and absorption imaging. Studying individual single-wall carbon nanotubes, we identify crucial structural parameters such as nanotube radius, electronic structure and extinction cross-section. We observe a 320-times enhanced Raman scattering spectral density and an effective Purcell factor of 6.2, together with a collection efficiency of 60%. Potential for significantly higher enhancement, quantitative signals, inherent spectral filtering and absence of intrinsic background in cavity-vacuum stimulated Raman scattering render the technique a promising tool for molecular imaging. Furthermore, cavity-enhanced Raman transitions involving localized excitons could potentially be used for gaining quantum control over nanomechanical motion and open a route for molecular cavity optomechanics. PMID:27402165

  7. Visible wavelength surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy from In-InP nanopillars for biomolecule detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdoch, B. J.; Portoles, J. F.; Tardio, S.; Barlow, A. J.; Fletcher, I. W.; Cumpson, P. J.

    2016-12-01

    Visible wavelength surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been observed from bovine serum albumin (BSA) using In-InP nanopillars synthesised by Ar gas cluster ion beam sputtering of InP wafers. InP provides a high local refractive index for plasmonic In structures, which increases the wavelength of the In surface plasmon resonance. The Raman scattering signal was determined to be up to 285 times higher for BSA deposited onto In-InP nanopillars when compared with Si wafer substrates. These substrates demonstrate the label-free detection of biomolecules by visible wavelength SERS, without the use of noble metal particles.

  8. Molecule-surface interactions probed by optimized surface-enhanced coherent Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronine, Dmitri; Sinyukov, Alexander; Hua, Xia; Zhang, Guowan; Yang, Wenlong; Wang, Kai; Jha, Pankaj; Welch, George; Sokolov, Alexei; Scully, Marlan

    2012-06-01

    Nanoscale molecular sensing is carried out using a time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy with optimized laser pulse configurations. This novel technique combines the advantages of an improved spectral resolution, suppressed non-resonant background and near-field surface enhancement of the Raman signal. We detect two species of pyridine in a vicinity of aggregated gold nanoparticles and measure their vibrational dephasing times which reveal the effects of surface environment and molecule-surface interactions on the ultrafast molecular dynamics. This technique may be applied to a variety of artificial and biological systems and complex molecular mixtures and has a potential for nanophotonic sensing applications.

  9. UV Resonance Raman and DFT Studies of Arginine Side Chains in Peptides: Insights into Arginine Hydration

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Zhenmin; Wert, Jonathan; Asher, Sanford A.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectra of four models of the arg side chain, guanidinium (gdn), ethylguanidinium (EG), arginine (arg) and Ac-arg-OMe (AAO) in H2O and D2O, in order to identify spectral markers that report on the environment of the arg side chain. To elucidate the resonance Raman enhancement mechanism of the arg side chain, we used DFT to calculate the equilibrium geometries of the electronic ground state and the first excited state. We determined the vibrational mode frequencies of the ground state and the first derivative of the first electronic excited state potential energy with respect to each vibrational normal mode of the electronic ground state at the electronic ground state equilibrium geometry. The DFT calculations and the potential energy distributions reveal that, in addition to the gdn group C-N stretching vibrations, the C-N bond stretching vibration of the gdn group-methylene linkage is also strongly resonance enhanced in EG, arg and AAO. From the UVRR spectra, we find that the Raman cross section and frequency of the ~1170 cm−1 vibration of the arg side chain depends on its hydration state and can be used to determine the hydration state of the arg side chain in peptides and proteins. We examined the hydration of the arg side chain in two polyala peptides and found that in the α-helical conformation the arg side chain in the AEP peptide (sequence: A9RA3EA4RA2) is less hydrated than that in the AP peptide (sequence: A8RA4RA4RA2). PMID:23676082

  10. [Preparation, characterization and surface-enhanced Raman properties of agarose gel/gold nanoparticles hybrid].

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-yuan; Liu, Ying; Wang, Zhou-ping

    2014-08-01

    Agarose gel/gold nanoparticles hybrid was prepared by adding gold nanoparticles to preformed agarose gel. Naniocomposite structures and properties were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and UV-Vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy. Experimental data indicated a uniform distribution of gold nanoparticles adsorbed on agarose gel network And the excellent optical absorption properties were shown. Based on the swelling-contraction characteristics of agarose gel and the adjustable localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the gold nanoparticles, the nano-composites were used as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate to detect the Raman signal molecules Nile blue A. Results revealed that the porous structure of the agarose gel provided a good carrier for the enrichment of the gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles dynamic hot-spot effect arising from the agarose gel contraction loss of water in the air greatly enhanced the Raman signal.

  11. Origin of negative and dispersive features in anti-Stokes and resonance femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frontiera, Renee R.; Shim, Sangdeok; Mathies, Richard A.

    2008-08-01

    Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy is extended to probe ground state anti-Stokes vibrational features. Off resonance, negative anti-Stokes features are seen that are the mirror image of the positive Stokes side spectra. On resonance, the observed dispersive lineshapes are dramatically dependent on the frequencies of the picosecond pump and femtosecond probe pulses used to generate the stimulated Raman spectra. These observations are explained by the contributions of the inverse Raman and hot luminescence four-wave mixing processes discussed by Sun et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 128, 144114 (2008)], which contribute to the overall femtosecond stimulated Raman signal.

  12. Absorption and resonance Raman spectra of Pb2, Pb3, and Pb4 in xenon matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stranz, D. D.; Khanna, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    Matrix isolation techniques are used to investigate the spectra of lead molecules and, in particular, to obtain resonance Raman spectra of lead vapors isolated in solid xenon matrices. The presence of Pb2 is confirmed by the visible adsorption, and Raman spectra yield a vibrational frequency for the ground state of 108 per cm and a dissociation energy of 8200 per cm. A second resonance Raman progression indicates a Pb3 species of D3h symmetry. Finally, two additional Raman features at approximately 111 per cm spacing are evidence for a third species, tentatively identified as Pb4.

  13. Exploring the potential of Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopy for quantitative analysis of duplex DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, H. G.; Bass, A.; Addison, C.; Hughesman, C.; So, A. P.; Haynes, C. A.; Blades, M. W.; Turner, R. F. B.

    2005-09-01

    Advances in DNA microarray fabrication technologies, expanding probe libraries, and new bioinformatics methods and resources have firmly established array-based techniques as mainstream bioanalytical tools and the application space is proliferating rapidly. However, the capability of these tools to yield truly quantitative information remains limited, primarily due to problems inherent to the use of fluorescence imaging for reading the hybridized arrays. The obvious advantages of fluorescence are the unrivaled sensitivity and simplicity of the instrumentation. There are disadvantages of this approach, however, such as difficulties in achieving optimal labeling of targets and reproducible signals (due to quenching, resonance energy transfer, photobleaching effects, etc.) that undermine precision. We are exploring alternative approaches, based mainly on Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopy, that in principle permit direct analysis of structural differences between hybridized and unhybridized probes, thereby eliminating the need for labeling the target analytes. We report here on the status of efforts to evaluate the potential of these methods based on a combination of measured data and simulated experiments involving short (12-mer) ssDNA oligomer probes with varying degrees of hybridized target DNA. Preliminary results suggest that it may be possible to determine the fraction of duplex probes within a single register on a DNA microarray from 100% down to 10% (or possibly less) with a precision of +/-2 5%. Details of the methods used, their implementation, and their potential advantages and limitations are presented, along with discussion of the utility of using 2DCOS methods to emphasize small spectral changes sensitive to interstrand H bonding, backbone flexibility, hypochromicity due to base-stacking in duplex structures and solvation effects.

  14. Resonance Raman spectroscopy of red blood cells using near-infrared laser excitation.

    PubMed

    Wood, Bayden R; Caspers, Peter; Puppels, Gerwin J; Pandiancherri, Shveta; McNaughton, Don

    2007-03-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of oxygenated and deoxygenated functional erythrocytes recorded using 785 nm laser excitation are presented. The high-quality spectra show a mixture of enhanced A(1g), A(2g), B(1g), B(2g), E(u) and vinyl modes. The high sensitivity of the Raman system enabled spectra from four oxygenation and deoxygenation cycles to be recorded with only 18 mW of power at the sample over a 60-minute period. This low power prevented photo-/thermal degradation and negated protein denaturation leading to heme aggregation. The large database consisting of 210 spectra from the four cycles was analyzed with principal components analysis (PCA). The PC1 loadings plot provided exquisite detail on bands associated with the oxygenated and deoxygenated states. The enhancement of a band at 567 cm(-1), observed in the spectra of oxygenated cells and the corresponding PC1 loadings plot, was assigned to the Fe-O(2) stretching mode, while a band appearing at 419 cm(-1) was assigned to the Fe-O-O bending mode based on previous studies. For deoxygenated cells, the enhancement of B(1g) modes at 785 nm excitation is consistent with vibronic coupling between band III and the Soret transition. In the case of oxygenated cells, the enhancement of iron-axial out-of-plane modes and non-totally symmetric modes is consistent with enhancement into the y,z-polarized transition a(iu)(pi)-->d(xz)+O(2)(pi(g)) centered at 785 nm. The enhancement of non-totally symmetric B(1g) modes in oxygenated cells suggests vibronic coupling between band IV and the Soret band. This study provides new insights into the vibrational dynamics, electronic structure and resonant enhancement of heme moieties within functional erythrocytes at near-IR excitation wavelengths.

  15. Characterization method for relative Raman enhancement for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy using gold nanoparticle dimer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugano, Koji; Ikegami, Kohei; Isono, Yoshitada

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a characterization method for Raman enhancement for highly sensitive and quantitative surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is reported. A particle dimer shows a marked electromagnetic enhancement when the particle connection direction is matched to the polarization direction of incident light. In this study, dimers were arrayed by nanotrench-guided self-assembly for a marked total Raman enhancement. By measuring acetonedicarboxylic acid, the fabricated structures were characterized for SERS depending on the polarization angle against the particle connection direction. This indicates that the fabricated structures cause an effective SERS enhancement, which is dominated by the electromagnetic enhancement. Then, we measured 4,4‧-bipyridine, which is a pesticide material, for quantitative analysis. In advance, we evaluated the enhancement of the particle structure by the Raman measurement of acetonedicarboxylic acid. Finally, we compared the Raman intensities of acetonedicarboxylic acid and 4,4‧-bipyridine. Their intensities showed good correlation. The advantage of this method for previously evaluating the enhancement of the substrate was demonstrated. This developed SERS characterization method is expected to be applied to various quantitative trace analyses of molecules with high sensitivity.

  16. Numerical investigation of the enhancement factor of Raman scattering using plasmonic properties of gold nanorhomb arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrvar, L.; Dizaji, Z. V.; Tavassoli, S. H.

    2017-03-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures with sharp tips like nanorhomb array provide strong electric field enhancement and consequently meaningful Raman signal enhancement. In this study, the near-field electromagnetic enhancement of the gold nanorhomb array formed by a new proposed approach has been investigated using the finite element method (FEM). Feasibility and ease of fabrication, which are very important in practical applications, are intended in this approach. This nanorhomb array is achieved by arranging holes tangentially together in a square lattice. In other words, nanorhombs are formed by transition from nanohole to nanoparticle array. Optimization of this structure for a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrate is performed by sweeping through the geometric parameters. The most privileged nanorhomb array substrate with highest hot spot density and EM field enhancement is obtained by calculating the enhancement factor (EF) and normalized EF (EFN) for Raman lines of pyridine. Our simulations indicate that the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) mode of such nanorhomb array leads to high electromagnetic enhancement factor (EMEF) and average surface integral of field enhancement factor (\\overlineEF), which are hundreds of times greater than the nanohole arrays. It is found that this LSPR mode is thickness-dependent besides being periodicity-dependent. Finally, accurate EF is calculated by considering local incident field enhancement in terms of the excitation process and local density of states (LDOS) enhancements on emission process and then the best structure with highest EF is obtained.

  17. Residual pesticide detection on food with particle-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Bikas; Huang, LiChuan; Masui, Kyoko; Saito, Yuika; Verma, Prabhat

    2014-08-01

    Modern farming relies highly on pesticides to protect agricultural food items from insects for high yield and better quality. Increasing use of pesticide has raised concern about its harmful effects on human health and hence it has become very important to detect even small amount of pesticide residues. Raman spectroscopy is a suitable nondestructive method for pesticide detection, however, it is not very effective for low concentration of pesticide molecules. Here, we report an approach based on plasmonic enhancement, namely, particle enhanced Raman spectroscopy (PERS), which is rapid, nondestructive and sensitive. In this technique, Raman signals are enhanced via the resonance excitation of localized plasmons in metallic nanoparticles. Gold nanostructures are promising materials that have ability to tune surface plasmon resonance frequency in visible to near-IR, which depends on shape and size of nanostructures. We synthesized gold nanorods (GNRs) with desired shape and size by seed mediated growth method, and successfully detected very tiny amount of pesticide present on food items. We also conformed that the detection of pesticide was not possible by usual Raman spectroscopy.

  18. Boosting the Quantitative Inorganic Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Sensing to the Limit: The Case of Nitrite/Nitrate Detection.

    PubMed

    Correa-Duarte, Miguel A; Pazos Perez, Nicolas; Guerrini, Luca; Giannini, Vincenzo; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon A

    2015-03-05

    A high-performance ionic-sensing platform has been developed by an interdisciplinary approach, combining the classical colorimetric Griess reaction and new concepts of nanotechnology, such as plasmonic coupling of nanoparticles and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. This approach exploits the advantages of combined SERS/surface-enhanced resonant Raman Scattering (SERRS) by inducing the formation of homogeneous hot spots and a colored complex in resonance with the laser line, to yield detection limits for nitrite down to the subpicomolar level. The performance of this new method was compared with the classical Griess reaction and ionic chromatography showing detection limits about 6 and 3 orders of magnitude lower, respectively.

  19. Identification of heme propionate vibrational modes in the resonance Raman spectra of cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Tsuyoshi; Lee, Hyun Ju; Ji, Hong; Gennis, Robert B; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Rousseau, Denis L

    2009-11-01

    The propionate groups of heme a and a(3) in cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) have been postulated to mediate both the electron and proton transfer within the enzyme. To establish structural markers for the propionate groups, their associated vibrational modes were identified in the resonance Raman spectra of CcO from bovine (bCcO) and Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RsCcO). The distinction between the modes from the propionates of heme a and heme a(3), as well as those from the propionates on the pyrrole rings A and D in each heme, was made on the basis of H2O-D2O isotope substitution experiments combined with wavelength-selective resonance enhancement (for bCcO) or mutagenesis studies (for RsCcO).

  20. Resonance Raman spectroscopy for human cancer detection of key molecules with clinical diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; Li, Jiyou; Zhou, Lixin; He, Jingsheng; Sun, Yi; Pu, Yang; Zhu, Ke; Liu, Yulong; Li, Qingbo; Cheng, Gangge; Alfano, Robert R.

    2013-03-01

    Resonance Raman (RR) has the potential to reveal the differences between cancerous and normal breast and brain tissues in vitro. This differences caused by the changes of specific biomolecules in the tissues were displayed in resonance enhanced of vibrational fingerprints. It observed that the changes of reduced collagen contents and the number of methyl may show the sub-methylation of DNA in cancer cells. Statistical theoretical models of Bayesian, principal component analysis (PCA) and support vector machine (SVM) were used for distinguishing cancer from normal based on the RR spectral data of breast and meninges tissues yielding the diagnostic sensitivity of 80% and 90.9%, and specificity of 100% and 100%, respectively. The results demonstrated that the RR spectroscopic technique could be applied as clinical optical pathology tool with a high accuracy and reliability.

  1. Near-field enhanced Raman spectroscopy using side illumination optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayazawa, Norihiko; Tarun, Alvarado; Inouye, Yasushi; Kawata, Satoshi

    2002-12-01

    We demonstrate near-field enhanced Raman spectroscopy with the use of a metallized cantilever tip and highly p-polarized light directed onto the tip with side illumination optics using a long working distance objective lens. The highly p-polarized light field excites surface plasmon polaritons localized at the tip apex, which results in the enhanced near-field Raman scattering. In this article, we achieved an enhancement factor of 4000 for Rhodamine 6G molecules adsorbed on a silver island film. The side illumination is also applicable to an opaque sample and to near-field photolithography.

  2. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering as a higher-order Raman process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Niclas S.; Heeg, Sebastian; Reich, Stephanie

    2016-08-01

    We propose to understand surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) as a higher-order Raman process that contains the plasmonic excitation. The SERS amplitudes are calculated with third- and fourth-order perturbation theory. Treating the plasmonic excitation as a quasiparticle, we derive analytic expressions for all coupling matrix elements. This leads to a general theory of plasmonic enhancement in SERS that can be applied to arbitrary plasmonic nanostructures. We obtain the plasmon eigenvectors of a gold nanosphere and a nanosphere dimer. They are used to calculate the enhancement of the Raman cross section of a molecule coupled to the dipole plasmon mode. The enhancement of the cross section is up to three orders of magnitude stronger than predicted by the theory of electromagnetic enhancement. The difference is most pronounced in vacuum and decreases with increasing dielectric constant of the embedding medium. The predictions from understanding SERS as a higher-order Raman process agree well with recent experiments; they highlight the dominance of plasmonic enhancement in SERS.

  3. Enhanced Raman Scattering on In-plane Anisotropic Layered Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Liang, Liangbo; Meunier, Vincent; Sumpter, Bobby G.; ...

    2015-11-19

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) on two-dimensional (2D) layered materials has provided a unique platform to study the chemical mechanism (CM) of the enhancement due to its natural separation from electromagnetic enhancement. The CM stems from the basic charge interactions between the substrate and molecules. Despite the extensive studies of the energy alignment between 2D materials and molecules, an understanding of how the electronic properties of the substrate are explicitly involved in the charge interaction is still unclear. Lately, a new group of 2D layered materials with anisotropic structure, including orthorhombic black phosphorus (BP) and triclinic rhenium disulphide (ReS2), has attractedmore » great interest due to their unique anisotropic electrical and optical properties. Herein, we report a unique anisotropic Raman enhancement on few-layered BP and ReS2 using copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules as a Raman probe, which is absent on isotropic graphene and h-BN. According to detailed Raman tensor analysis and density functional theory calculations, anisotropic charge interactions due to the anisotropic carrier mobilities of the 2D materials are responsible for the angular dependence of the Raman enhancement. Our findings not only provide new insights into the CM process in SERS, but also open up new avenues for the exploration and application of the electronic properties of anisotropic 2D layered materials.« less

  4. Enhanced Raman Scattering on In-plane Anisotropic Layered Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Liangbo; Meunier, Vincent; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Ling, Xi; Lin, Jingjing; Zhang, Shuqing; Mao, Nannan; Zhang, Na; Tong, Lianming; Zhang, Jin

    2015-11-19

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) on two-dimensional (2D) layered materials has provided a unique platform to study the chemical mechanism (CM) of the enhancement due to its natural separation from electromagnetic enhancement. The CM stems from the basic charge interactions between the substrate and molecules. Despite the extensive studies of the energy alignment between 2D materials and molecules, an understanding of how the electronic properties of the substrate are explicitly involved in the charge interaction is still unclear. Lately, a new group of 2D layered materials with anisotropic structure, including orthorhombic black phosphorus (BP) and triclinic rhenium disulphide (ReS2), has attracted great interest due to their unique anisotropic electrical and optical properties. Herein, we report a unique anisotropic Raman enhancement on few-layered BP and ReS2 using copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules as a Raman probe, which is absent on isotropic graphene and h-BN. According to detailed Raman tensor analysis and density functional theory calculations, anisotropic charge interactions due to the anisotropic carrier mobilities of the 2D materials are responsible for the angular dependence of the Raman enhancement. Our findings not only provide new insights into the CM process in SERS, but also open up new avenues for the exploration and application of the electronic properties of anisotropic 2D layered materials.

  5. Enhanced Raman Scattering on In-Plane Anisotropic Layered Materials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jingjing; Liang, Liangbo; Ling, Xi; Zhang, Shuqing; Mao, Nannan; Zhang, Na; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent; Tong, Lianming; Zhang, Jin

    2015-12-16

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) on two-dimensional (2D) layered materials has provided a unique platform to study the chemical mechanism (CM) of the enhancement due to its natural separation from electromagnetic enhancement. The CM stems from the charge interactions between the substrate and molecules. Despite the extensive studies of the energy alignment between 2D materials and molecules, an understanding of how the electronic properties of the substrate are explicitly involved in the charge interaction is still unclear. Lately, a new group of 2D layered materials with anisotropic structures, including orthorhombic black phosphorus (BP) and triclinic rhenium disulfide (ReS2), has attracted great interest due to their unique anisotropic electrical and optical properties. Herein, we report a unique anisotropic Raman enhancement on few-layered BP and ReS2 using copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules as a Raman probe, which is absent on isotropic graphene and h-BN. According to detailed Raman tensor analysis and density functional theory calculations, anisotropic charge interactions between the 2D materials and molecules are responsible for the angular dependence of the Raman enhancement. Our findings not only provide new insights into the CM process in SERS, but also open up new avenues for the exploration and application of the electronic properties of anisotropic 2D layered materials.

  6. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering at cryogenic substrate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, R.; Leung, P. T.; Lin, S. H.; Tse, W. S.

    2000-08-01

    The recent speculation on the possibility of achieving gigantic enhancement for surface-enhanced Raman scattering at cryogenic substrate temperatures is examined using a simple theoretical model. The surface-plasmon enhancement mechanism is modeled using the Fermi-electron gas approach instead of the Drude model as used previously in the literature. Due to the diminution of substrate polarizability from quantum effects, it is concluded that dramatic enhancement is unlikely to be achieved by just cooling the surface to such low temperatures.

  7. Status of miniature integrated UV resonance fluorescence and Raman sensors for detection and identification of biochemical warfare agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hug, William F.; Bhartia, Rohit; Taspin, Alexandre; Lane, Arthur; Conrad, Pamela; Sijapati, Kripa; Reid, Ray D.

    2005-11-01

    Laser induced native fluorescence (LINF) is the most sensitive method of detection of biological material including microorganisms, virus', and cellular residues. LINF is also a sensitive method of detection for many non-biological materials as well. The specificity with which these materials can be classified depends on the excitation wavelength and the number and location of observation wavelengths. Higher levels of specificity can be obtained using Raman spectroscopy but a much lower levels of sensitivity. Raman spectroscopy has traditionally been employed in the IR to avoid fluorescence. Fluorescence rarely occurs at wavelength below about 270nm. Therefore, when excitation occurs at a wavelength below 250nm, no fluorescence background occurs within the Raman fingerprint region for biological materials. When excitation occurs within electronic resonance bands of the biological target materials, Raman signal enhancement over one million typically occurs. Raman sensitivity within several hundred times fluorescence are possible in the deep UV where most biological materials have strong absorption. Since the Raman and fluorescence emissions occur at different wavelength, both spectra can be observed simultaneously, thereby providing a sensor with unique sensitivity and specificity capability. We will present data on our integrated, deep ultraviolet, LINF/Raman instruments that are being developed for several applications including life detection on Mars as well as biochemical warfare agents on Earth. We will demonstrate the ability to discriminate organic materials based on LINF alone. Together with UV resonance Raman, higher levels of specificity will be demonstrated. In addition, these instruments are being developed as on-line chemical sensors for industrial and municipal waste streams and product quality applications.

  8. Shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian Feng; Huang, Yi Fan; Ding, Yong; Yang, Zhi Lin; Li, Song Bo; Zhou, Xiao Shun; Fan, Feng Ru; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Zhi You; Wu, De Yin; Ren, Bin; Wang, Zhong Lin; Tian, Zhong Qun

    2010-03-18

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a powerful spectroscopy technique that can provide non-destructive and ultra-sensitive characterization down to single molecular level, comparable to single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy. However, generally substrates based on metals such as Ag, Au and Cu, either with roughened surfaces or in the form of nanoparticles, are required to realise a substantial SERS effect, and this has severely limited the breadth of practical applications of SERS. A number of approaches have extended the technique to non-traditional substrates, most notably tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) where the probed substance (molecule or material surface) can be on a generic substrate and where a nanoscale gold tip above the substrate acts as the Raman signal amplifier. The drawback is that the total Raman scattering signal from the tip area is rather weak, thus limiting TERS studies to molecules with large Raman cross-sections. Here, we report an approach, which we name shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, in which the Raman signal amplification is provided by gold nanoparticles with an ultrathin silica or alumina shell. A monolayer of such nanoparticles is spread as 'smart dust' over the surface that is to be probed. The ultrathin coating keeps the nanoparticles from agglomerating, separates them from direct contact with the probed material and allows the nanoparticles to conform to different contours of substrates. High-quality Raman spectra were obtained on various molecules adsorbed at Pt and Au single-crystal surfaces and from Si surfaces with hydrogen monolayers. These measurements and our studies on yeast cells and citrus fruits with pesticide residues illustrate that our method significantly expands the flexibility of SERS for useful applications in the materials and life sciences, as well as for the inspection of food safety, drugs, explosives and environment pollutants.

  9. Optical nanoantennas for multiband surface-enhanced infrared and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Cristiano; Bochterle, Jörg; Toma, Andrea; Huck, Christian; Neubrech, Frank; Messina, Elena; Fazio, Barbara; Maragò, Onofrio M; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Lamy de La Chapelle, Marc; Gucciardi, Pietro G; Pucci, Annemarie

    2013-04-23

    In this article we show that linear nanoantennas can be used as shared substrates for surface-enhanced Raman and infrared spectroscopy (SERS and SEIRS, respectively). This is done by engineering the plasmonic properties of the nanoantennas, so to make them resonant in both the visible (transversal resonance) and the infrared (longitudinal resonance), and by rotating the excitation field polarization to selectively take advantage of each resonance and achieve SERS and SEIRS on the same nanoantennas. As a proof of concept, we have fabricated gold nanoantennas by electron beam lithography on calcium difluoride (1-2 μm long, 60 nm wide, 60 nm high) that exhibit a transverse plasmonic resonance in the visible (640 nm) and a particularly strong longitudinal dipolar resonance in the infrared (tunable in the 1280-3100 cm(-1) energy range as a function of the length). SERS and SEIRS detection of methylene blue molecules adsorbed on the nanoantenna's surface is accomplished, with signal enhancement factors of 5×10(2) for SERS (electromagnetic enhancement) and up to 10(5) for SEIRS. Notably, we find that the field enhancement provided by the transverse resonance is sufficient to achieve SERS from single nanoantennas. Furthermore, we show that by properly tuning the nanoantenna length the signals of a multitude of vibrational modes can be enhanced with SEIRS. This simple concept of plasmonic nanosensor is highly suitable for integration on lab-on-a-chip schemes for label-free chemical and biomolecular identification with optimized performances.

  10. Semi-quantification of surface-enhanced Raman scattering using a handheld Raman spectrometer: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jinkai; Pang, Shintaro; Labuza, Theodore P; He, Lili

    2013-12-07

    The feasibility of utilizing a handheld Raman spectrometer for surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection was evaluated on the pesticide ferbam. A layman's "answer box" was established for semi-quantifying the risk level of ferbam. This study advanced the application of a handheld Raman spectrometer to on-site evaluation of trace amounts of analytes.

  11. Nanoscale Analysis of Interwall Interaction in a Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube by Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaunchaiyakul, Songpol; Yano, Takeshi; Khoklang, Kamonchanok; Krukowski, Pawel; Akai-Kasaya, Megumi; Saito, Akira; Kuwahara, Yuji

    Raman spectroscopy is a useful tool for the study of carbon materials, but its spatial resolution is limited by the optical diffraction limit. Recently, we constructed a scanning tunneling microscope-based tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (STM-TERS) system in ultrahigh vacuum, which overcomes the optical diffraction limit, and enables the investigation of single-molecular Raman spectra simultaneously with topographic imaging. We have investigated position-sensitive Raman spectra along the tube axis of an isolated multiwalled carbon nanotube, which is a result of the different number of nanotube walls at each location. We found that the intensity ratio between the 2D to the G band increases with the number of walls. This indicates that the quantum interference between Raman scattering pathways affects each Raman mode differently. The interaction between nanotube walls induces splitting of the π and π* bands which increases the number of the 2D band scattering pathways owing to double resonance, eventually increasing the probability of scattering for the 2D band relative to the G band. These results provide a deeper understanding of the single-molecule interaction of carbon materials in the nanoscale.

  12. Enhanced responsivity resonant RF photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Liu, R; Dev, S; Zhong, Y; Lu, R; Streyer, W; Allen, J W; Allen, M S; Wenner, B R; Gong, S; Wasserman, D

    2016-11-14

    The responsivity of room-temperature, semiconductor-based photodetectors consisting of resonant RF circuits coupled to microstrip buslines is investigated. The dependence of the photodetector response on the semiconductor material and RF circuit geometry is presented, as is the detector response as a function of the spatial position of the incident light. We demonstrate significant improvement in detector response by choice of photoconductive material, and for a given material, by positioning our optical signal to overlap with positions of RF field enhancement. Design of RF circuits with strong field enhancement are demonstrated to further improve detector response. The improved detector response demonstrated offers opportunities for applications in RF photonics, materials metrology, or single read-out multiplexed detector arrays.

  13. Doubly resonant Raman electron paramagnetic transitions of Cr{sup 3+} in ruby (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Cr{sup 3+}).

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, X.; Venugopalan, S.; Kim, H.; Grimsditch, M.; Rodriguez, S.; Ramdas, A. K.; Materials Science Division; Purdue Univ.; State Univ. of New York at Binghamton; Sogang Univ.

    2009-06-01

    We report the Raman electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of Cr{sup 3+} in ruby (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Cr{sup 3+}) in the {sup 4}A{sub 2} (ground) and E{sup -} (excited) states of its well-known R{sub 1} emission line. Using tunable dye laser excitation within the range of the Zeeman components of R{sub 1}, we observe highly selective doubly resonant enhancements of the Raman EPR lines. The double resonances confirm the assignments of the Raman EPR lines, and they underscore the simultaneous occurrence of both 'in resonance' and 'out resonance' as visualized in the Kramers-Heisenberg quantum-mechanical picture of inelastic light scattering. The g factors of the {sup 4}A{sub 2} and E{sup -} states are consistent with the observed magnetic field dependence of the Raman EPR shifts. Through the interplay of Raman effect and the sharp Zeeman components of R{sub 1}, the results provide clear insights into the underlying microscopic mechanism of these resonant Raman EPR spectra of ruby.

  14. Imaging EGFR distribution using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, L.; Chen, X. K.; Smith, A.; Korbelik, M.; Zeng, H.; Lee, P. W. K.; Hewitt, K. C.

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the feasibility of using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) to image the distribution of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) in cells. To accomplish this task, 30 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) tagged with antibodies to EGFR (1012 per ml) are incubated with cells (106 per ml) of the A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cell line and normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells. Using the 632.8 nm excitation line of a He-Ne laser, Raman spectroscopy measurements are performed using a point mapping scheme. SERS signals are observed with an overall enhancement of 4-7 orders of magnitude. Raman intensity maps of the 1480 and 1583 cm-1 peaks correlate well with the expected distribution of AuNPs and EGFR. Normal cells show little to no enhancement. The results therefore present a simple yet effective means to image EGFR over-expression.

  15. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    González-Solís, JL; Luévano-Colmenero, GH; Vargas-Mancilla, J

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims: Raman spectroscopy is a vibrational technique which provides information about the chemical structure. Nevertheless, since many chemicals are present in a cell at very low concentration, the Raman signal observed from a single cell is extremely weak. In surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), Raman signals can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude when nanoparticles are incorporated into the cell. Materials (subjects) and methods: The tumor biopsies were obtained from 5 patients who were clinically diagnosed with breast cancer. Breast cancer cells isolated from the biopsy were washed, centrifuged and seeded out. Cultivation took place in DMEM at 37°C in a humidified of 5% CO2 in air with addition of colloidal silver nanoparticles of 40 nm into the cell by sonication. Immediately, the washed cells were analyzed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at pH 7. Raman analysis was carried out on the Jobin-Yvon LabRAM HR800 microscope system, with a NIR 830 nm laser excitation source. Results: The strongly enhanced Raman signals allow Raman measurements of a single cell in the 200–1800 cm−1 range in relatively short collection times (5 second) using 17 mW near-infrared excitation. Observed spectral features differed across the cell, but chemical constituents in the cell nucleus and cytoplasm, such as DNA, RNA, and amino acids tyrosine and phenylalanine can be identified. Conclusions: Particularly strong field enhancement can be observed when nanoparticles form colloidal clusters. The results suggest that SERS could be a new technique for the identification of breast cancer cell. PMID:24155548

  16. Theoretical study of the resonance Raman spectra for meso-tetrakis(3,5-di-tertiarybutylphenyl)-porphyrin.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ren-hui; Wei, Wen-mei; Zhu, Li-li; Shi, Qiang

    2014-12-10

    Applying time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), we study the resonance Raman spectra for the Q and B bands of the meso-tetrakis(3,5-di-tertiarybutylphenyl)-porphyrin (H2TBPP) molecule including both Raman A term (Franck-Condon term) and Raman B term (Herzberg-Teller term) contributions. It is found that Raman B term can be one order of magnitude larger than Raman A term and dominates resonance Raman for the Q band resonance. In comparison with the recent experimental Raman spectra of H2TBPP with incident light frequency 532nm, we predict the absence of 1580cm(-1) band in the resonance Raman spectra which agrees well with the experimental results, whereas the previous theoretical calculation using non-resonance strategy failed to do so.

  17. Resonance Raman spectra of the anion and cation radicals of bacterial photosynthetic pigments

    SciTech Connect

    Diers, J.R.; Bocian, D.F. )

    1994-12-08

    Resonance Raman (RR) spectra are reported for the radical ions of the bacterial photosynthetic pigments bacteriochlorophyll a (BCh) and its metal-free analog bacteriopheophytin a (BPh). The radical anions, BCh[sup [minus

  18. Vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque detection by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-hui; Boydston-White, Susie; Weisberg, Arel; Wang, Wubao; Sordillo, Laura A.; Perotte, Adler; Tomaselli, Vincent P.; Sordillo, Peter P.; Pei, Zhe; Shi, Lingyan; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-12-01

    A clear correlation has been observed between the resonance Raman (RR) spectra of plaques in the aortic tunica intimal wall of a human corpse and three states of plaque evolution: fibrolipid plaques, calcified and ossified plaques, and vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques (VPs). These three states of atherosclerotic plaque lesions demonstrated unique RR molecular fingerprints from key molecules, rendering their spectra unique with respect to one another. The vibrational modes of lipids, cholesterol, carotenoids, tryptophan and heme proteins, the amide I, II, III bands, and methyl/methylene groups from the intrinsic atherosclerotic VPs in tissues were studied. The salient outcome of the investigation was demonstrating the correlation between RR measurements of VPs and the thickness measurements of fibrous caps on VPs using standard histopathology methods, an important metric in evaluating the stability of a VP. The RR results show that VPs undergo a structural change when their caps thin to 66 μm, very close to the 65-μm empirical medical definition of a thin cap fibroatheroma plaque, the most unstable type of VP.

  19. Plasmonics for surface-enhanced Raman scattering: from classical to quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenqi

    Metallic nanostructures that employ localized surface plasmon resonances to capture or radiate electromagnetic waves at optical frequencies are termed "plasmonic optical antennas". These structures enhance light-matter interactions in an efficient manner, enabling unique linear and nonlinear optical applications. One such application is surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), which employs plasmonic antennas to enhance Raman cross-section of molecules by orders of magnitude. SERS has attracted a significant amount of research attention since it enables molecules to be identified through their characteristic vibrational spectra, even at the single molecule level. In this thesis, we investigate the mechanisms underlying electromagnetic enhancement in SERS, and optimize plasmonic optical antenna designs to allow efficient SERS detection. We first demonstrate a top-down fabrication procedure to reproducibly fabricate plasmonic dimers with controllable gap widths that can be as small as 3 nm. We experimentally demonstrate that SERS enhancements increase as the gap size is reduced. The method we introduce is capable of routinely delivering reproducible SERS substrates with high enhancement factors. We then investigate a technique termed "energy-momentum spectroscopy" to measure Raman emission patterns, i.e. the angular distribution of Raman scattering. In particular, we demonstrate how they are modified by plasmonic optical antennas. It is found that the Raman scattering from molecules on plasmonic dimers (pairs of gold rods) forms two beams into the substrate which supports the dimers. This would normally necessitate the use of an objective lens with a large numerical aperture for efficient collection. We investigate the abilities of two alternative optical antenna designs to modify the angular distribution of Raman scattering. We term this effect "beamed Raman scattering". The first antenna design is that of Yagi-Uda antennas. The second design consists of plasmonic

  20. A semi-colloidal substrate for surface enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardari, Behzad; Özcan, Meriç

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we utilize the electrolysis effect to prepare a semi-colloidal substrate for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) applications in which the nanoparticles created on the anode surface act as an active medium for SERS. The experiments carried out with copper (Cu) as the electrode and Rhodamine B (RhB) as the electrolyte. The measured enhancement factor (EF) of the Raman peaks of RhB is more than five orders of magnitude. The proposed method has some key advantages: it is a very simple and low cost technique and also can be used in real time since it is a quite fast process.

  1. Plasmonic-enhanced Raman scattering of graphene on growth substrates and its application in SERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuan; Chen, Guanxiong; Du, Yuanxin; Xu, Jin; Wu, Shuilin; Qu, Yan; Zhu, Yanwu

    2014-10-01

    We detail a facile method for enhancing the Raman signals of as-grown graphene on Cu foils by depositing gold nanoislands (Au Nis) onto the surface of graphene. It is found that an enhancement of up to 49 fold in the graphene Raman signal has been achieved by depositing a 4 nm thick Au film. The enhancement is considered to be related to the coupling between graphene and the plasmon modes of Au Nis, as confirmed by the finite element simulations. The plasmonic effect of the Au/graphene/Cu hybrid platform leads to a strong absorption at the resonant wavelength whose position shifts from visible light (640 nm) to near-infrared (1085 nm) when the thickness of Au films is increased from 2 nm to 18 nm. Finally, we demonstrate that hybrid substrates are reliable surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) systems, showing an enhancement factor of ~106 for dye molecules Rhodamine B and Rhodamine 6G with uniform and stable response and a detection limit of as low as 0.1 nM for Sudan III and Sudan IV.We detail a facile method for enhancing the Raman signals of as-grown graphene on Cu foils by depositing gold nanoislands (Au Nis) onto the surface of graphene. It is found that an enhancement of up to 49 fold in the graphene Raman signal has been achieved by depositing a 4 nm thick Au film. The enhancement is considered to be related to the coupling between graphene and the plasmon modes of Au Nis, as confirmed by the finite element simulations. The plasmonic effect of the Au/graphene/Cu hybrid platform leads to a strong absorption at the resonant wavelength whose position shifts from visible light (640 nm) to near-infrared (1085 nm) when the thickness of Au films is increased from 2 nm to 18 nm. Finally, we demonstrate that hybrid substrates are reliable surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) systems, showing an enhancement factor of ~106 for dye molecules Rhodamine B and Rhodamine 6G with uniform and stable response and a detection limit of as low as 0.1 nM for Sudan III and

  2. Improving resolution in quantum subnanometre-gap tip-enhanced Raman nanoimaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingchao; Voronine, Dmitri V.; Qiu, Shangran; Sinyukov, Alexander M.; Hamilton, Mary; Liege, Zachary; Sokolov, Alexei V.; Zhang, Zhenrong; Scully, Marlan O.

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials beyond graphene such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have unique mechanical, optical and electronic properties with promising applications in flexible devices, catalysis and sensing. Optical imaging of TMDs using photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy can reveal the effects of structure, strain, doping, edge states, and surface functionalization from materials to bioscience. However, Raman signals are inherently weak and so far have been limited in spatial resolution in TMDs to a few hundred nanometres which is much larger than the intrinsic scale of these effects. Here we overcome the diffraction limit by using resonant tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) of few-layer MoS2, and obtain nanoscale optical images with ~20 nm spatial resolution. This becomes possible due to electric field enhancement in an optimized subnanometre-gap resonant tip-substrate configuration. We investigate the limits of signal enhancement by varying the tip-sample gap with sub-Angstrom precision and observe a quantum quenching behavior, as well as a Schottky-Ohmic transition, for subnanometre gaps, which enable surface mapping based on this new contrast mechanism. This quantum regime of plasmonic gap-mode enhancement with a few nanometre thick MoS2 junction may be used for designing new quantum optoelectronic devices and sensors with a wide range of applications. PMID:27220882

  3. Improving resolution in quantum subnanometre-gap tip-enhanced Raman nanoimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yingchao; Voronine, Dmitri V.; Qiu, Shangran; Sinyukov, Alexander M.; Hamilton, Mary; Liege, Zachary; Sokolov, Alexei V.; Zhang, Zhenrong; Scully, Marlan O.

    2016-05-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials beyond graphene such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have unique mechanical, optical and electronic properties with promising applications in flexible devices, catalysis and sensing. Optical imaging of TMDs using photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy can reveal the effects of structure, strain, doping, edge states, and surface functionalization from materials to bioscience. However, Raman signals are inherently weak and so far have been limited in spatial resolution in TMDs to a few hundred nanometres which is much larger than the intrinsic scale of these effects. Here we overcome the diffraction limit by using resonant tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) of few-layer MoS2, and obtain nanoscale optical images with ~20 nm spatial resolution. This becomes possible due to electric field enhancement in an optimized subnanometre-gap resonant tip-substrate configuration. We investigate the limits of signal enhancement by varying the tip-sample gap with sub-Angstrom precision and observe a quantum quenching behavior, as well as a Schottky-Ohmic transition, for subnanometre gaps, which enable surface mapping based on this new contrast mechanism. This quantum regime of plasmonic gap-mode enhancement with a few nanometre thick MoS2 junction may be used for designing new quantum optoelectronic devices and sensors with a wide range of applications.

  4. Improving resolution in quantum subnanometre-gap tip-enhanced Raman nanoimaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingchao; Voronine, Dmitri V; Qiu, Shangran; Sinyukov, Alexander M; Hamilton, Mary; Liege, Zachary; Sokolov, Alexei V; Zhang, Zhenrong; Scully, Marlan O

    2016-05-25

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials beyond graphene such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have unique mechanical, optical and electronic properties with promising applications in flexible devices, catalysis and sensing. Optical imaging of TMDs using photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy can reveal the effects of structure, strain, doping, edge states, and surface functionalization from materials to bioscience. However, Raman signals are inherently weak and so far have been limited in spatial resolution in TMDs to a few hundred nanometres which is much larger than the intrinsic scale of these effects. Here we overcome the diffraction limit by using resonant tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) of few-layer MoS2, and obtain nanoscale optical images with ~20 nm spatial resolution. This becomes possible due to electric field enhancement in an optimized subnanometre-gap resonant tip-substrate configuration. We investigate the limits of signal enhancement by varying the tip-sample gap with sub-Angstrom precision and observe a quantum quenching behavior, as well as a Schottky-Ohmic transition, for subnanometre gaps, which enable surface mapping based on this new contrast mechanism. This quantum regime of plasmonic gap-mode enhancement with a few nanometre thick MoS2 junction may be used for designing new quantum optoelectronic devices and sensors with a wide range of applications.

  5. Momentum angular mapping of enhanced Raman scattering of single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Padmnabh; Singh, Tapender; Brulé, Thibault; Bouhelier, Alexandre; Finot, Eric

    2017-07-01

    We perform momentum mapping of the Raman scattering of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) or thin ropes of SWNTs enhanced by surface plasmons sustained by either a linear chain of nanoantennas or flower-shaped nanoparticles. The momentum spectroscopy of Raman scattering of the carbon nanotube (CNT) demonstrates the direct verification of momentum selection rules and identifies the characteristic bands of the molecules or the nanomaterials under scrutiny. The characteristic vibrational signatures of the D, G-, and G bands provide an isotropic response in k-space irrespective of the arrangement of the enhancing platform. However, other dispersive or double resonance bands, such as D-, D+, D', M, and iTOLA bands appear as a dipolar emission oriented towards the long axis of the CNT regardless of the CNT orientation but strongly depend on the patterning of enhancement of the electromagnetic field.

  6. High enhancement factor of Au nano triangular prism structure for surface enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zuyin; Song, Guofeng

    2017-02-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy (CARS) is a well-known detecting tool in biosensing and nonlinear spectroscopy. It can provide a non-invasive alternative without the need for exogenous labels, while the enhancement factor for surface plasmon resonances (SPR) are extensively used to increase the local field close to the oscillators and which can obtain high enhancement. In this work, we investigate the enhancement factor of our structure for surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. The absorption spectrum of the structure has been studied, a wide range of absorption has been realized. The enhancement can be as high as 10{16} over standard CARS. Our design is very useful for improving the enhancement factor of surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. Project supported by the National Key Research Program of China (No. 2011ZX01015-001) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Nos. 2011CBA00608, 2012CB619203, 2015CB351902, 2015CB932402).

  7. Enhanced noise and Raman scattering in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A.; Short, R. W.

    1987-04-01

    Observations of Raman scattering from laser-produced plasma have shown a number of puzzling features. These can be explained by assuming the presence of a bump-on-tail electron distribution created by pulses of fast electrons arising from instabilities at the critical (n sub c) or the quarter-critical (n sub c 4) surface. Experiments using thin foils, in which the target density drops below n sub c and even n sub c 4 early in the laser pulse, have continued to show the same agreement as is seen for thick targets between the observed Raman spectrum and the predictions of this theory. This raises the issue of the time scale on which such directed pulses of fast electrons can continue to exist in the plasma after their source at n sub c or n sub c 4 disappears. We show that the classical degradation process is quite slow (of the order of 100 ps or more). Collective processes would appear to broaden and flatten the beam on a faster time scale. However, inclusion of finite spatial size strongly reduces the effect. Furthermore, we will show that broadening of the beam has little effect on the predicted spectrum.

  8. Coherent Raman scattering with incoherent light for a multiply resonant mixture: Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkwood, Jason C.; Ulness, Darin J.; Stimson, Michael J.; Albrecht, A. C.

    1998-02-01

    The theory for coherent Raman scattering (CRS) with broadband incoherent light is presented for a multiply resonant, multicomponent mixture of molecules that exhibits simultaneous multiple resonances with the frequencies of the driving fields. All possible pairwise hyperpolarizability contributions to the signal intensity are included in the theoretical treatment-(resonant-resonant, resonant-nonresonant, and nonresonant-nonresonant correlations between chromophores) and it is shown how the different types of correlations manifest themselves as differently behaved components of the signal intensity. The Raman resonances are modeled as Lorentzians in the frequency domain, as is the spectral density of the incoherent light. The analytic results for this multiply resonant mixture are presented and applied to a specific binary mixture. These analytic results will be used to recover frequencies and dephasing times in a series of experiments on multiply resonant mixtures.

  9. Nanoparticle Properties and Synthesis Effects on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Enhancement Factor: An Introduction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has enabled researchers to map the specific chemical makeup of surfaces, solutions, and even cells. However, the inherent insensitivity of the technique makes it difficult to use and statistically complicated. When Raman active molecules are near gold or silver nanoparticles, the Raman intensity is significantly amplified. This phenomenon is referred to as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The extent of SERS enhancement is due to a variety of factors such as nanoparticle size, shape, material, and configuration. The choice of Raman reporters and protective coatings will also influence SERS enhancement. This review provides an introduction to how these factors influence signal enhancement and how to optimize them during synthesis of SERS nanoparticles. PMID:25884017

  10. Identifying the Elusive Framework Niobium in NbS-1 Zeolite by UV Resonance Raman.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Wang, Xinping; Zhang, Lejian

    2017-09-14

    It was found that bands at 739, 963 and 1107 cm-1 in resonant Raman spectra are characteristics of framework penta-coordinated NbV-OH species, and that band at 1336 cm-1 in UV Raman spectra excited by 320 nm is a sensitive detector to identify extraframework niobium species. The change of framework penta-coordinated NbV-OH species into Nb+ and NbO- species due to dehydration was definitively confirmed based on UV resonance Raman and UV/Vis results. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of human brain metastasis of lung cancer analyzed by blind source separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-Hui; Pu, Yang; Cheng, Gangge; Yu, Xinguang; Zhou, Lixin; Lin, Dongmei; Zhu, Ke; Alfano, Robert R.

    2017-02-01

    Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy offers a novel Optical Biopsy method in cancer discrimination by a means of enhancement in Raman scattering. It is widely acknowledged that the RR spectrum of tissue is a superposition of spectra of various key building block molecules. In this study, the Resonance Raman (RR) spectra of human metastasis of lung cancerous and normal brain tissues excited by a visible selected wavelength at 532 nm are used to explore spectral changes caused by the tumor evolution. The potential application of RR spectra human brain metastasis of lung cancer was investigated by Blind Source Separation such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA). PCA is a statistical procedure that uses an orthogonal transformation to convert a set of observations of possibly correlated variables into a set of values of linearly uncorrelated variables called principal components (PCs). The results show significant RR spectra difference between human metastasis of lung cancerous and normal brain tissues analyzed by PCA. To evaluate the efficacy of for cancer detection, a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier is utilized to calculate the sensitivity, and specificity and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves are used to evaluate the performance of this criterion. Excellent sensitivity of 0.97, specificity (close to 1.00) and the Area Under ROC Curve (AUC) of 0.99 values are achieved under best optimal circumstance. This research demonstrates that RR spectroscopy is effective for detecting changes of tissues due to the development of brain metastasis of lung cancer. RR spectroscopy analyzed by blind source separation may have potential to be a new armamentarium.

  12. Enhanced Raman scattering at dielectric surfaces. 2. Molecular orientations from polarized surface Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Walls, D.J.; Bohn, P.W. )

    1990-03-08

    The ability to obtain polarized Raman scattering for monolayer adsorbates deposited on oxide covered noble-metal island film structures has been closely examined. The relationship of the relative intensities of the in-plane enhanced electric field components to the depolarization ratios of the totally symmetric Raman vibrational modes of p-nitrobenzoic acid and phthalazine was found to indicate a constant depolarization of the in-plane electric field components induced by the island film particles themselves. With this information and with polarized Raman scattering information from nontotally symmetric phthalazine vibrations, we report a quantitative determination of the average surface molecular orientation of phthalazine monolayers at sputtered SiO{sub 2} surfaces.

  13. Rapid monitoring of benzylpenicillin sodium using Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xin; Qin, Xiaoyu; Yin, Di; Gong, Mengdi; Yang, Libin; Zhao, Bing; Ruan, Weidong

    2015-04-01

    At present, fluorescence spectroscopy, ultraviolet spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy are usually used to detect drug molecules, however the information about using Raman spectroscopy to detect drug molecules is very few. In this work normal Raman spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy were utilized to study benzylpenicillin sodium (NaBP). The results show that NaBP is close to the surface of silver substrate through the carboxyl group, and the detection limit of NaBP is reduced to 1 × 10-7 mol/L. Accordingly, the quantitative analysis of NaBP can be carried out in the range of 1 × 10-4-1 × 10-7 mol/L concentration. And it is proved that NaBP is not stable in acid and alkali conditions and the decomposition reaction is very complex.

  14. Rapid monitoring of benzylpenicillin sodium using Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xin; Qin, Xiaoyu; Yin, Di; Gong, Mengdi; Yang, Libin; Zhao, Bing; Ruan, Weidong

    2015-04-05

    At present, fluorescence spectroscopy, ultraviolet spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy are usually used to detect drug molecules, however the information about using Raman spectroscopy to detect drug molecules is very few. In this work normal Raman spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy were utilized to study benzylpenicillin sodium (NaBP). The results show that NaBP is close to the surface of silver substrate through the carboxyl group, and the detection limit of NaBP is reduced to 1×10(-7) mol/L. Accordingly, the quantitative analysis of NaBP can be carried out in the range of 1×10(-4)-1×10(-7) mol/L concentration. And it is proved that NaBP is not stable in acid and alkali conditions and the decomposition reaction is very complex. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Alkyne-Modulated Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering-Palette for Optical Interference-Free and Multiplex Cellular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Ren, Jia-Qiang; Zhang, Xia-Guang; Wu, De-Yin; Shen, Ai-Guo; Hu, Ji-Ming

    2016-06-21

    The alkyne tags possess unique interference-free Raman emissions but are still hindered for further application in the field of biochemical labels due to its extremely weak spontaneous Raman scattering. With the aid of computational chemistry, herein, an alkyne-modulated surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) palette is constructed based on rationally designed 4-ethynylbenzenethiol derivatives for spectroscopic signature, Au@Ag core for optical enhancement and an encapsulating polyallylamine shell for protection and conjugation. Even for the pigment rich plant cell (e.g., pollen), the alkyne-coded SERS tag can be highly discerned on two-dimension distribution impervious to strong organic interferences originating from resonance-enhanced Raman scattering or autofluorescence. In addition, the alkynyl-containing Raman reporters contribute especially narrow emission, band shift-tunable (2100-2300 cm(-1)) and tremendously enhanced Raman signals when the alkynyl group locates at para position of mercaptobenzene ring. Depending on only single Raman band, the suggested alkyne-modulated SERS-palette potentially provides a more effective solution for multiplex cellular imaging with vibrant colors, when the hyperspectral and fairly intense optical noises originating from lower wavenumber region (<1800 cm(-1)) are inevitable under complex ambient conditions.

  16. Power Budget Analysis for Waveguide-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zilong; Pearce, Stuart J; Lin, Yung-Chun; Zervas, Michalis N; Bartlett, Philip N; Wilkinson, James S

    2016-08-01

    Waveguide-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (WERS) is emerging as an attractive alternative to plasmonic surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy approaches as it can provide more reproducible quantitative spectra on a robust chip without the need for nanostructured plasmonic materials. Realizing portable WERS systems with high sensitivity using low-cost laser diodes and compact spectrometers requires a detailed analysis of the power budget from laser to spectrometer chip. In this paper, we describe theoretical optimization of planar waveguides for maximum Raman excitation efficiency, demonstrate WERS for toluene on a silicon process compatible high index contrast tantalum pentoxide waveguide, measure the absolute conversion efficiency from pump power to received power in an individual Raman line, and compare this with a power budget analysis of the complete system including collection with an optical fiber and interfacing to a compact spectrometer. Optimized 110 nm thick Ta2O5 waveguides on silica substrates excited at a wavelength of 637 nm are shown experimentally to yield overall system power conversion efficiency of ∼0.5 × 10(-12) from the pump power in the waveguide to the collected Raman power in the 1002 cm(-1) Raman line of toluene, in comparison with a calculated efficiency of 3.9 × 10(-12) Collection efficiency is dictated by the numerical and physical apertures of the spectral detection system but may be improved by further engineering the spatial and angular Raman scattering distributions. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Microscopic theory of surface-enhanced Raman scattering in noble-metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustovit, Vitaliy N.; Shahbazyan, Tigran V.

    2006-02-01

    We present a microscopic model for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) from molecules adsorbed on small noble-metal nanoparticles. In the absence of direct overlap of molecular orbitals and electronic states in the metal, the main enhancement source is the strong electric field of the surface plasmon resonance in a nanoparticle acting on a molecule near the surface. In small particles, the electromagnetic enhancement is strongly modified by quantum-size effects. We show that, in nanometer-sized particles, SERS magnitude is determined by a competition between several quantum-size effects such as the Landau damping of surface plasmon resonance and reduced screening near the nanoparticle surface. Using time-dependent local density approximation, we calculate spatial distribution of local fields near the surface and enhancement factor for different nanoparticles sizes.

  18. Enhancement of Raman scattering signal of a few molecules using photonic nanojet mediated SERS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, G. M.; Parit, M. K.; Laha, R.; Dantham, V. R.

    2016-05-01

    Now a days, single molecule surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SMSERS) has become a fascinating tool for studying the structural properties, static and dynamic events of single molecules (instead of ensemble average), with the help of efficient plasmonic nanostructures. This is extremely useful in the field of proteomics because the structural properties of protein molecules are heterogeneous. Even though, SMSERS provides wealthy information about single molecules, it demands high quality surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates. So far, a very few researchers succeeded in demonstrating the single molecule Raman scattering using conventional SERS technique. However, the experimental S/N of the Raman signal has been found to be very poor. Recently, with the help of photonic nanojet of an optical microsphere, we were able to enhance the SERS signal of a few molecules adsorbed on the SERS substrates (gold symmetric and asymmetric nanodimers and trimers dispersed on a glass slide). Herein, we report a few details about photonic nanojet mediated SERS technique, a few experimental results and a detailed theoretical study on symmetric and asymmetric nanosphere dimers to understand the dependence of localised surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) wavelength of a nanodimer on the nanogap size and polarization of the excitation light.

  19. Enhancement of Raman scattering signal of a few molecules using photonic nanojet mediated SERS technique

    SciTech Connect

    Das, G. M.; Parit, M. K.; Laha, R.; Dantham, V. R.

    2016-05-06

    Now a days, single molecule surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SMSERS) has become a fascinating tool for studying the structural properties, static and dynamic events of single molecules (instead of ensemble average), with the help of efficient plasmonic nanostructures. This is extremely useful in the field of proteomics because the structural properties of protein molecules are heterogeneous. Even though, SMSERS provides wealthy information about single molecules, it demands high quality surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates. So far, a very few researchers succeeded in demonstrating the single molecule Raman scattering using conventional SERS technique. However, the experimental S/N of the Raman signal has been found to be very poor. Recently, with the help of photonic nanojet of an optical microsphere, we were able to enhance the SERS signal of a few molecules adsorbed on the SERS substrates (gold symmetric and asymmetric nanodimers and trimers dispersed on a glass slide). Herein, we report a few details about photonic nanojet mediated SERS technique, a few experimental results and a detailed theoretical study on symmetric and asymmetric nanosphere dimers to understand the dependence of localised surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) wavelength of a nanodimer on the nanogap size and polarization of the excitation light.

  20. Electromagnetic theories of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Song-Yuan; You, En-Ming; Tian, Zhong-Qun; Moskovits, Martin

    2017-07-07

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and related spectroscopies are powered primarily by the concentration of the electromagnetic (EM) fields associated with light in or near appropriately nanostructured electrically-conducting materials, most prominently, but not exclusively high-conductivity metals such as silver and gold. This field concentration takes place on account of the excitation of surface-plasmon (SP) resonances in the nanostructured conductor. Optimizing nanostructures for SERS, therefore, implies optimizing the ability of plasmonic nanostructures to concentrate EM optical fields at locations where molecules of interest reside, and to enhance the radiation efficiency of the oscillating dipoles associated with these molecules and nanostructures. This review summarizes the development of theories over the past four decades pertinent to SERS, especially those contributing to our current understanding of SP-related SERS. Special emphasis is given to the salient strategies and theoretical approaches for optimizing nanostructures with hotspots as efficient EM near-field concentrating and far-field radiating substrates for SERS. A simple model is described in terms of which the upper limit of the SERS enhancement can be estimated. Several experimental strategies that may allow one to approach, or possibly exceed this limit, such as cascading the enhancement of the local and radiated EM field by the multiscale EM coupling of hierarchical structures, and generating hotspots by hybridizing an antenna mode with a plasmonic waveguide cavity mode, which would result in an increased local field enhancement, are discussed. Aiming to significantly broaden the application of SERS to other fields, and especially to material science, we consider hybrid structures of plasmonic nanostructures and other material phases and strategies for producing strong local EM fields at desired locations in such hybrid structures. In this vein, we consider some of the numerical

  1. Asphaltene detection using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS).

    PubMed

    Alabi, O O; Edilbi, A N F; Brolly, C; Muirhead, D; Parnell, J; Stacey, R; Bowden, S A

    2015-04-28

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy using a gold substrate and excitation at 514 nm can detect sub parts per million quantities of asphaltene and thereby petroleum. This simple format and sensitivity make it transformative for applications including sample triage, flow assurance, environmental protection and analysis of unique one of a kind materials.

  2. Near-Ir surface-enhanced Raman spectrum of lignin

    Treesearch

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Richard S. Reiner

    2009-01-01

    Compacted powders of commercially available nano- and microparticles of silver were used to successfully induce the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect in spruce milled-wood lignin (MWL). For the two silver particle sizes used in this investigation, the spectra were mostly similar. Some general characteristics of the lignin SERS spectrum are described. The...

  3. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOEpatents

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2014-07-22

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  4. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOEpatents

    Bond, Tiziana C; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James; Liu, Gang Logan

    2015-11-03

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  5. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOEpatents

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2015-07-14

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  6. Genesis of enhanced Raman bands in SERS spectra of 2-mercaptoimidazole: FTIR, Raman, DFT, and SERS.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Subhendu; Chowdhury, Joydeep; Ghosh, Manash; Talapatra, G B

    2012-11-15

    The surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of biologically and industrially significant, 2-mercaptoimidazole (2-MI) molecule have been investigated. The SERS spectra of the molecule at different concentrations of the adsorbate are compared with its Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and normal Raman spectra (NRS) in varied environments. The optimized molecular structures and vibrational wavenumbers of the various forms (ca. cationic, neutral, ylidic, anionic) of the molecule have been estimated from the density functional theory (DFT). The vibrational signatures of the molecule have been assigned for the first time from the potential energy distributions (PEDs). The analyses of the Raman vibrational signatures reveal the coexistence of all the different forms of the molecule in the solid state and in aqueous solution. Concentration dependent SERS spectra of the molecule at neutral pH of the medium together with the multivariate data analyses techniques also suggest the concomitance of all the probable forms of the molecule in the surface adsorbed state. The genesis of selective enhancements of the Raman bands in the SERS spectra emanating from the cationic, neutral, ylidic and anionic forms of the molecule have been divulged from the view of the Albretcht's "A" and Herzberg-Teller (HT) charge transfer (CT) contribution.

  7. [Current views on surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy in microbiology].

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaoxiao; Li, Jing; Qin, Tian; Deng, Aihua; Liu, Wenjun

    2015-05-01

    Raman spectroscopy has generated many branches during the development for more than 90 years. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) improves SNR by using the interaction between tested materials and the surface of rough metal, as to quickly get higher sensitivity and precision spectroscopy without sample pretreatment. This article describes the characteristic and classification of SERS, and updates the theory and clinical application of SERS. It also summarizes the present status and progress of SERS in various disciplines and illustrates the necessity and urgency of its research, which provides rationale for the application for SERS in microbiology.

  8. Surface-enhanced Raman sensor for nitroexplosive vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, John W., III; Sylvia, James M.; Spencer, Kevin M.; Johnston, Thomas M.; Clauson, Susan L.

    1998-09-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering has been measured for solutions of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), trinitrotoluene (TNT), and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-s-triazine (RDX) adsorbed onto metal foils, island films, coated microspheres, and colloids. The wavelength selectivity of the method was also investigated for lasers which potentially may be used in a field instrument. Preliminary room temperature vapor-phase SERS detection of 2,4-DNT adsorbed on gold foil has been achieved. The results demonstrate the potential of SERS as a detector of buried landmines when coupled to compact man- portable Raman instrumentation.

  9. Surface enhanced Raman study of cubic boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu

    2003-05-01

    Surface enhancement for Raman scattering of single crystal cubic boron nitride (c-BN) (1 1 1) and polycrystalline cubic BN was observed by depositing silver nanoparticles on the substrate surface. The c-BN samples were subjected to hydrogen plasma, as well as deuterium plasma treatment to observe the isotopic shift of surface binding species. Characteristic Raman peaks corresponding to the molecular vibrational modes of surface chemisorbed hydrogen and deuterium could be observed for the first time and were assigned according to ab initio molecular orbital calculations.

  10. Surface-enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for Astrobiology Exploration on Mars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    oxalates and perhaps acetatemay have been formed on the sur- face of Mars through oxidation of meteorite-delivered organics and these are largely...invisible to the analytic instruments onboard Viking lander. Salts of these or- ganic acids are resistant to further oxidation and may be present in...as described in the following section. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS): The surface-enhancing effect was discovered by Fleischmann et

  11. High directivity optical antenna substrates for surface enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongxing; Zhu, Wenqi; Chu, Yizhuo; Crozier, Kenneth B

    2012-08-22

    A two-dimensional array of gold optical antennas integrated with a one-dimensional array of gold strips and mirrors is introduced and fabricated. The experimental results show that this design achieves average surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factors as high as 1.2 × 10(10) , which is more than two orders of magnitude larger than optical antennas without the gold strips and gold mirror.

  12. Tuning localized plasmon cavities for optimized surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perney, N. M. B.; García de Abajo, F. J.; Baumberg, J. J.; Tang, A.; Netti, M. C.; Charlton, M. D. B.; Zoorob, M. E.

    2007-07-01

    Mesostructured metallic substrates composed of square pyramidal pits are shown to confine localized plasmons. Plasmon frequency tuning is demonstrated using white light reflection spectroscopy with a wide range of structure dimensions from 400to3000nm . Using a simple plasmon cavity model, we demonstrate how the individual pit morphology and not their periodicity controls the resonance frequencies. By measuring the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals from monolayers of benzenethiol on the same range of mesostructures, we extract a quantitative connection between absorption, field enhancement, and SERS signals. The match between theory and experiment enables effective design of plasmon devices tailored for particular applications, such as optimizing SERS substrates.

  13. Plasmonic Enhancement of Raman Signal using Complex Metallic Nanostructures based on DNA Origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, Gleb

    2015-03-01

    DNA-based nanostructures, such as ``DNA origami,'' have recently emerged as one of the leading techniques for precise positioning of nanoscale materials in fields ranging from computer science to biomedical engineering. The origami is composed of a single scaffold DNA strand to which smaller ``staple`` strands are attached through DNA complementarity. The staples help to fold the scaffold strand into the designed structure of a predetermined shape. The resulting templates are highly addressable and have proven to be versatile tools for site-specific placement of various nanocomponents, such as metallic nanoparticles, quantum dots, fluorophores, etc. Building upon massively paralleled assembly mechanism of the origami and its ability to position nanocomponents, one may hope to utilize it for biosensing purposes. One attractive goal is the Raman spectroscopy, which provides a highly specific chemical fingerprint. Unfortunately, the Raman scattering cross section is small; Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) enhances the otherwise weak Raman signal by trapping the analyte molecules in the regions of intense electric field produced near rough metallic surfaces. These ``hot spots`` can be understood as resulting from localized surface plasmon modes resonantly exited by the incident laser excitation. We have earlier shown that metallic nanoparticles controllably attached to DNA origami can be further enlarged via an in-solution metallization; this technique allowed us to build metallic structures of complex topology. Recently, we have performed Raman spectroscopy of molecules attached to these metallic assemblies. Specifically, DNA origami is first used to organize the metallic structures, followed by a covalent attachment of Raman-active molecules to the metal. We found that the substrates with four nanoparticles per origami produce a strongly enhanced Raman signal compared to the control samples with only one nanoparticle per origami for the same particle

  14. Revisiting Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering on Realistic Lithographic Gold Nanostripes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) efficiency of methylene blue (MB) molecules deposited on gold nanostripes which, due to their fabrication by electron beam lithography and thermal evaporation, present various degrees of crystallinity and nanoscale surface roughness (NSR). By comparing gold nanostructures with different degrees of roughness and crystallinity, we show that the NSR has a strong effect on the SERS intensity of MB probe molecules. In particular, the NSR features of the lithographic structures significantly enhance the Raman signal of MB molecules, even when the excitation wavelength lies far from the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the stripes. These results are in very good agreement with numerical calculations of the SERS gain obtained using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA). The influence of NSR on the optical near-field response of lithographic structures thus appears crucial since they are widely used in the context of nano-optics or/and molecular sensing. PMID:24340104

  15. Small cavities as major active sites for surface enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, H.; Chuang, T. J.; Escobar, J. F.; Morawitz, H.; Albano, E. V.

    1985-07-01

    Recently it has been proposed that extremely small cavities or pores may be important active sites for the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) process on coldly deposited silver films in UHV. There is an interesting correlation between the temperature for annealing out these small cavities and the temperature at which the high-temperature anneal in SERS occurs. In order to further investigate this high-temperature anneal in terms of the cavity site model, experiments have been carried out in which varying amounts of very thin silver films are deposited over the substrate just before the Raman signal reaches a maximum by the high-temperature anneal. Further enhancements are observed when the average thickness of the silver overlayer is about 20 Å. These results are discussed in relation to theoretical considerations based on collective electronic resonances of a small spherical void in the metal near a surface.

  16. Normal and Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Carbon Electrode Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan

    This thesis discusses the relationship between the microstructure and the electrochemical properties of carbon electrodes. First, a near infrared Raman spectrometer with a diode laser coupled to a charge coupled device was developed to overcome intrinsic limitations in the Raman scattering process. The spectrometer was evaluated in sensitivity, limit of detection, dynamic range, and fluorescence rejection ability. The experimental results indicate that this spectrometer is more sensitive than the existing FT -Raman technique and provides a viable alternative for near infrared region Raman techniques. This system was then applied in a comprehensive Raman study of the vibrational microstructure of several carbon electrodes over a wide incident laser wavelength region. Based on a lattice dynamics model, a wide range of experimental data were used to clarify the controversy of the Raman feature at ca. 1350 cm^{ -1} (D band). It has been attributed to an intrinsic lattice vibration mode which becomes active if the wavevector selection rule breakdowns. Further, the laser wavelength dependent effect of the D band position and relative intensity was investigated. Four vibrational modes were discovered and assigned to lattice vibration modes. The assignment was assisted by their laser wavelength position dependence. Finally, to better understand the relationship between the surface microstructure and the electrochemical properties, a surface enhanced Raman scattering technique was developed and applied. In this technique, the carbon surfaces were studied through electrochemically depositing silver in situ on the carbon electrode surface. The technique was proven to be surface sensitive and applied to the study of many modified carbon electrodes. The experimental results provide strong evidence to link electrochemical activity of carbon electrodes with grain boundaries or defects in the microstructure of the electrodes. With this knowledge a better understanding of carbon

  17. Ultraviolet surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy using aluminum plasmonic gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Adam T.; Butun, Serkan; Aydin, Koray; Everitt, Henry O.; Bloemer, Mark; D'Aguanno, Giuseppe; Mattiucci, Nadia

    2013-03-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been widely studied both theoretically and experimentally for chemical and biological sensing, primarily in the visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Although in the ultraviolet (UV) plasmonic behavior is limited by metallic dampening, we have theoretically shown that SERS enhancement factors as large as 105 can be achieved when the laser is tuned to the plasmonic band edge of an Al metallic grating grown on a sapphire substrate. Using electron beam lithography, aluminum gratings were fabricated whose pitch (150-300 nm), slit widths (64 nm), and thickness (50 nm) were chosen to produce large enhancement factors at wavelengths in the UV. Analytes such as thiophenol were then deposited on the gratings, and UV-SERS spectroscopy was performed to measure the enhancement factors and compare with theoretical estimates. Enhancement factors were measured by comparing the strength of the Raman signal from the grating region with the strength of the Raman signal from adjacent regions without a grating. The dependence of the enhancement factor on laser wavelength relative to the plasmonic band edge for a given grating pitch was explored, as was the effect of using a tapered slit geometry that focuses the local field on the nanoscale.

  18. Structural Raman enhancement in graphite nano-discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, J. F.; Chakarov, D.; Kasemo, B.

    2016-04-01

    Raman scattering in disc-shaped graphite nanostructures, etched out of bulk HOPG, are investigated using an excitation wavelength of 532 nm at different laser power. The G-band is fitted using two Lorentzian functions, GL and GH. The difference of Raman shift between the two Lorentzian functions increase with laser power as a consequence of selective absorption and heating of the discs. Further, the G-band from the nanostructured HOPG reveal a Raman enhancement (RE) of ~2.2 and ~1.5 for the components associated with the discs (GL) and the supporting substrate (GH), respectively. The quantitative agreement between the experimental results and performed finite difference time domain calculations make possible to conclude that electromagnetic energy penetrates considerably into the discs from the circular periphery probably due to multiple scattering. In addition, the dependence of RE of the GL component on the laser power is attributed to a temperature dependent electron-phonon coupling.

  19. Resonant Raman scattering in Mn:ZnO dilute magnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleize, J.; Chikoidze, E.; Dumont, Y.; Rzepka, E.; Gorochov, O.

    2007-07-01

    We report on micro-Raman measurements performed under various visible excitations on wurtzite Zn 1- xMn xO thin films grown by MOCVD, for a wide range of Mn content (0resonantly enhanced by the absorption of the incident laser light by internal transitions of the Mn 2+ ions.

  20. High-resolution inverse Raman and resonant-wave-mixing spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rahn, L.A.

    1993-12-01

    These research activities consist of high-resolution inverse Raman spectroscopy (IRS) and resonant wave-mixing spectroscopy to support the development of nonlinear-optical techniques for temperature and concentration measurements in combustion research. Objectives of this work include development of spectral models of important molecular species needed to perform coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements and the investigation of new nonlinear-optical processes as potential diagnostic techniques. Some of the techniques being investigated include frequency-degenerate and nearly frequency-degenerate resonant four-wave-mixing (DFWM and NDFWM), and resonant multi-wave mixing (RMWM).

  1. Rich variety of substrates for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Bich Ha; Hieu Nguyen, Van; Nhung Tran, Hong

    2016-09-01

    The efficiency of the application of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technique to each specified purpose significantly depends on the choice of the SERS substrate with an appropriate structure as well as on its performance. Until the present time a rich variety of SERS substrates was fabricated. They can be classified according to their structures. The present work is a review of main types of SERS substrates for using in the trace analysis application. They can be classified into 4 groups: (1) Substrates using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with spherical shape such as colloidal AuNPs, AuNPs fabricated by pulsed laser deposition, by sputtering or by capillary force assembly (CFA), substrates fabricated by electrospinning technique, substrates using metallic nanoparticle arrays fabricated by electron beam lithography combined with CFA method, substrates using silver nanoparticle (AgNP) arrays grain by chemical seeded method, substrates with tunable surface plasmon resonance, substrates based on precies subnanometer plasmonic junctions within AuNP assemblies, substrates fabricated by simultaneously immobilizing both AuNPs and AgNPs on the same glass sides etc. (2) Substrates using nanostructures with non-spherical shapes such as gold nanowire (NW), or highly anisotropic nickel NW together with large area, free-standing carpets, substrates with obviously angular, quasi-vertically aligned cuboid-shaped TiO2 NW arrays decorated with AgNPs, substrates using gold nanoprism monolayer films, substrates using silver nanocube dimmers or monodisperse close-packed gold nanotriangle monolayers. (3) Substrates using multiparticle complex nanostructure such as nanoparticle cluster arrays, gold nanoflowers and nanodendrites. (4) Flexible substrate such as paper-based swab with gold nanorods, adhesive polymer tapes fabricated by inkjet printing method and flexible and adhesive SERS tapes fabricated by decorating AuNPs via the conventional drop-dry method.

  2. Finite-size effects in surface-enhanced Raman scattering in noble-metal nanoparticles: a semiclassical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustovit, Vitaliy N.; Shahbazyan, Tigran V.

    2006-06-01

    We study finite-size effects in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) from molecules adsorbed on small metal particles. Within an electromagnetic description of SERS, the enhancement of the Raman signal originates from the local field of the surface plasmon resonance in a nanoparticle. With decreasing particle sizes, this enhancement is reduced due to the size-dependent Landau damping of the surface plasmon. We show that, in small noble-metal particles, the reduction of interband screening in the surface layer leads to an additional increase in the local field acting on a molecule close to the metal surface. The overall size dependence of Raman signal enhancement is determined by the interplay between Landau damping and underscreening effects. Our calculations, based on a two-region model, show that the role of the surface layer increases for smaller nanoparticle sizes due to a larger volume fraction of the underscreened region.

  3. Finite-size effects in surface-enhanced Raman scattering in noble-metal nanoparticles: a semiclassical approach.

    PubMed

    Pustovit, Vitaliy N; Shahbazyan, Tigran V

    2006-06-01

    We study finite-size effects in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) from molecules adsorbed on small metal particles. Within an electromagnetic description of SERS, the enhancement of the Raman signal originates from the local field of the surface plasmon resonance in a nanoparticle. With decreasing particle sizes, this enhancement is reduced due to the size-dependent Landau damping of the surface plasmon. We show that, in small noble-metal particles, the reduction of interband screening in the surface layer leads to an additional increase in the local field acting on a molecule close to the metal surface. The overall size dependence of Raman signal enhancement is determined by the interplay between Landau damping and underscreening effects. Our calculations, based on a two-region model, show that the role of the surface layer increases for smaller nanoparticle sizes due to a larger volume fraction of the underscreened region.

  4. Quantum-mechanical calculation of the intensity distribution in Raman and resonance Raman spectra of a phenylalanine aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burova, T. G.; Shcherbakov, R. S.

    2017-03-01

    Quantum-mechanical calculations of the intensity distribution in the resonance Raman spectrum of an aqueous solution of phenylalanine, excited by light with wavelengths of 193, 204, 218, and 235 nm, and in the nonresonant Raman spectrum excited at a wavelength of 488 nm have been performed. The calculation results are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data in the literature. Spectral lines characteristic of phenylalanine are observed, which can be used as markers when analyzing the peptide structure. It is noted that the contribution of highly excited electronic states (spaced by less than 10 eV from the resonant lines) to the scattering tensor components must be taken into account. The important role of the Herzberg-Teller effect in the description of spectral intensity distribution is demonstrated.

  5. Surface- and Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy in Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Surface- and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS and TERS) techniques exhibit highly localized chemical sensitivity, making them ideal for studying chemical reactions, including processes at catalytic surfaces. Catalyst structures, adsorbates, and reaction intermediates can be observed in low quantities at hot spots where electromagnetic fields are the strongest, providing ample opportunities to elucidate reaction mechanisms. Moreover, under ideal measurement conditions, it can even be used to trigger chemical reactions. However, factors such as substrate instability and insufficient signal enhancement still limit the applicability of SERS and TERS in the field of catalysis. By the use of sophisticated colloidal synthesis methods and advanced techniques, such as shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, these challenges could be overcome. PMID:27075515

  6. Time-dependent picture of the charge-transfer contributions to surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, John R; Birke, Ronald L

    2007-06-28

    We reexamine the Herzberg-Teller theory of charge-transfer contributions to the theory of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In previous work, the Kramers-Heisenberg-Dirac framework was utilized to explain many of the observed features in SERS. However, recent experimental and theoretical developments suggest that we revise the theory to take advantage of the time-dependent picture of Raman scattering. Results are obtained for molecular adsorption on nanoparticles in both the strong confinement limit and the weak confinement limit. We show that the Herzberg-Teller contributions to the charge-transfer effect in SERS display a resonance at the molecule-to-metal or metal-to-molecule transition while retaining the selection rules associated with normal Raman spectroscopy (i.e., harmonic oscillator, as opposed to Franck-Condon overlaps). The charge-transfer contribution to the enhancement factor scales as Gamma(-4), where Gamma is the homogeneous linewidth of the charge-transfer transition, and thus is extremely sensitive to the magnitude of this parameter. We show that the Herzberg-Teller coupling term may be associated with the polaron-coupling constant of the surface phonon-electron interaction. A time-dependent expression for the Raman amplitude is developed, and we discuss the implications of these results for both metal and semiconductor nanoparticle surfaces.

  7. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: substrate-related issues.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiu-Mei; Cui, Yan; Xu, Yan-Hui; Ren, Bin; Tian, Zhong-Qun

    2009-08-01

    After over 30 years of development, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is now facing a very important stage in its history. The explosive development of nanoscience and nanotechnology has assisted the rapid development of SERS, especially during the last 5 years. Further development of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is mainly limited by the reproducible preparation of clean and highly surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) active substrates. This review deals with some substrate-related issues. Various methods will be introduced for preparing SERS substrates of Ag and Au for analytical purposes, from SERS substrates prepared by electrochemical or vacuum methods, to well-dispersed Au or Ag nanoparticle sols, to nanoparticle thin film substrates, and finally to ordered nanostructured substrates. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of the advantages and weaknesses of different methods in preparing SERS substrates. Closely related to the application of SERS in the analysis of trace sample and unknown systems, the existing cleaning methods for SERS substrates are analyzed and a combined chemical adsorption and electrochemical oxidation method is proposed to eliminate the interference of contaminants. A defocusing method is proposed to deal with the laser-induced sample decomposition problem frequently met in SERS measurement to obtain strong signals. The existing methods to estimate the surface enhancement factor, a criterion to characterize the SERS activity of a substrate, are analyzed and some guidelines are proposed to obtain the correct enhancement factor.

  8. Large-area, reproducible and sensitive plasmonic MIM substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kuanguo; Wang, Yong; Jiang, Kang; Ren, Yuan; Dai, Yanqiu; Lu, Yonghua; Wang, Pei

    2016-12-01

    Vertically coupled plasmonic structure is of great interest for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this paper, a large-area reproducible SERS substrate is fabricated and demonstrated by a vertically coupled structure composed of Ag triangle arrays on Ag films separated by a nanometric dielectric layer. This metal-insulator-metal (MIM) nanostructure has broadband resonance covering both the laser excitation and Stokes frequencies. Thanks to the convenience of controlling the gap distance by thin dielectric film, the SERS substrate is optimized to yield the best enhancement. The SERS enhancement factor is estimated to be 5.8 × 106 for on-resonant pumping with a 532 nm laser. The uniformity and reproducibility of the SERS substrate are also demonstrated. Our results pave the way for rational design of sensitive SERS substrates and harmless exciting SERS signals.

  9. Theoretical calculation (DFT), Raman and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) study of ponceau 4R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yunfei; Li, Yan; Sun, Yingying; Wang, Heya; Qian, He; Yao, Weirong

    2012-10-01

    Ponceau 4R is used as a coloring agent in many different products, such as food, drinks, medicines, cosmetics and tobacco. However, ponceau 4R also shows carcinogenic, teratogenic and mutagenic behavior in high doses. In this work, standard Raman, theoretical Raman and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra have been used to investigate ponceau 4R. More specifically, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been used to calculate the optimized Raman spectrum of ponceau 4R at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. This has provided a better understanding of the optimized geometry and vibrational frequencies of this dye. In addition, the experimental spectrum of ponceau 4R has been compared with the theoretical spectrum; good agreement was obtained. Finally, it has shown that using SERS the detection limit of the ponceau 4R solution can be as low as 5 μg/mL. This has been achieved by SERS measurements of ponceau 4R on a substrate of gold nanoparticles. The SERS peaks at 1030, 1236, 1356 and 1502 cm-1 were chosen as index for semi-quantitative analysis, showing that the SERS technique provided a useful ultrasensitive method for the detection of ponceau 4R.

  10. Role of Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Cerys A; Lewis, Paul D; Dunstan, Peter R; Harris, Dean A

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most common cancer in the United Kingdom and is the second largest cause of cancer related death in the United Kingdom after lung cancer. Currently in the United Kingdom there is not a diagnostic test that has sufficient differentiation between patients with cancer and those without cancer so the current referral system relies on symptomatic presentation in a primary care setting. Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) are forms of vibrational spectroscopy that offer a non-destructive method to gain molecular information about biological samples. The techniques offer a wide range of applications from in vivo or in vitro diagnostics using endoscopic probes, to the use of micro-spectrometers for analysis of biofluids. The techniques have the potential to detect molecular changes prior to any morphological changes occurring in the tissue and therefore could offer many possibilities to aid the detection of CRC. The purpose of this review is to look at the current state of diagnostic technology in the United Kingdom. The development of Raman spectroscopy and SERS in clinical applications relation for CRC will then be discussed. Finally, future areas of research of Raman/SERS as a clinical tool for the diagnosis of CRC are also discussed. PMID:27190582

  11. The effects of Au aggregate morphology on surface-enhanced Raman scattering enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sztainbuch, Isaac W.

    2006-09-01

    We have identified empirically a relationship between the surface morphology of small individual aggregates (<100 Au nanoparticles) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement. We have found that multilayer aggregates generated greater SERS enhancement than aggregates limited to two-dimensional (2D) or one-dimensional structures, independent of the number of particles. SERS intensity was measured using the 730cm-1 vibrational mode of the adsorbed adenine molecule on 75nm Au particles, at an excitation wavelength of 632.8nm. To gain insight into these relationships and its mechanism, we developed a qualitative model that considers the collections of interacting Au nanoparticles of an individual aggregate as a continuous single entity that retains its salient features. We found the dimensions of the modeled surface features to be comparable with those found in rough metal surfaces, known to sustain surface plasmon resonance and generate strong SERS enhancement. Among the aggregates that we have characterized, a three 75nm nanoparticle system was the smallest to generate strong SERS enhancement. However, we also identified single individual Au nanoparticles as SERS active at the same wavelength, but with a diameter twice in size. For example, we observed a symmetric SERS-active particle of 180nm in diameter. Such individual nanoparticles generated SERS enhancement on the same order of magnitude as the small monolayer Au aggregates, an intensity value significantly stronger than predicted in recent theoretical studies. We also found that an aspect of our model that relates the dimensions of its features to SERS enhancement is also applicable to single individual Au particles. We conclude that the size of the nanoparticle itself, or the size of a protrusion of an irregularly shaped single Au particle, will contribute to SERS enhancement provided that its dimensions satisfy the conditions for plasmon resonance. In addition, by considering the ratio of the

  12. Resonance Raman scattering from Cd1-xZnxS nanoparticles dispersed in oxide glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Akhilesh K.; Rajalakshmi, M.

    2000-11-01

    Resonance Raman scattering from 1 and 2 LO phonons is investigated from Cd1-xZnxS nanoparticles dispersed in oxide glass before and after annealing. The resonance profiles are found to exhibit asymmetry which is attributed to the interference effects arising from a nonresonant contribution to the polarizability. The energies of the resonances are found to be consistent with the direct interband transition energies estimated from the reported optical data.

  13. Elevated gold ellipse nanoantenna dimers as sensitive and tunable surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jubb, A. M.; Jiao, Y.; Eres, G.; Retterer, S. T.; Gu, B.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate large area arrays of elevated gold ellipse dimers with precisely controlled gaps for use as sensitive and highly controllable surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates. The enhanced Raman signal observed with SERS arises from both localized and long range plasmonic effects. By controlling the geometry of a SERS substrate, in this case the size and aspect ratio of individual ellipses, the plasmon resonance can be tuned in a broad wavelength range, providing a method for designing the response of SERS substrates at different excitation wavelengths. Plasmon effects exhibited by the elevated gold ellipse dimer substrates are also demonstrated and confirmed through finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. A plasmon resonance red shift with an increase of the ellipse aspect ratio is observed, allowing systematic control of the resulting SERS signal intensity. Optimized elevated ellipse dimer substrates with 10 +/- 2 nm gaps exhibit uniform SERS enhancement factors on the order of 109 for adsorbed p-mercaptoaniline molecules.We demonstrate large area arrays of elevated gold ellipse dimers with precisely controlled gaps for use as sensitive and highly controllable surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates. The enhanced Raman signal observed with SERS arises from both localized and long range plasmonic effects. By controlling the geometry of a SERS substrate, in this case the size and aspect ratio of individual ellipses, the plasmon resonance can be tuned in a broad wavelength range, providing a method for designing the response of SERS substrates at different excitation wavelengths. Plasmon effects exhibited by the elevated gold ellipse dimer substrates are also demonstrated and confirmed through finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. A plasmon resonance red shift with an increase of the ellipse aspect ratio is observed, allowing systematic control of the resulting SERS signal intensity. Optimized elevated ellipse

  14. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy in the structural studies of biomolecules: the state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabiev, Igor R.; Sokolov, Konstantin V.; Efremov, R. G.; Chumanov, George D.

    1991-05-01

    It has been recently demonstrated'3 that very large (in some cases up to iOn) enhancement of Raman crosssection for molecules in the close vicinity of a metal surface results from superposition of two main mechanisms: electromagnetic and so-called molecular (or "chemical"). Enhancement of the local electromagnetic field near a "rough" metal surface induces the electromagnetic mechanism, while the "molecular" mechanism is connected with the appearance of new excited states for the molecule/metal complexes in the process of chemisorption. The techniques of surface-enhanced Raman (SER) and surface-enhanced resonance Raman (SERR) spectroscopy are based on these mechanisms and widely used in investigations ofbiological molecules.27 The three main questions of applicability of SERS and SERRS for resolving sophisticated problems in molecular biology, bioorganic and physical chemistry are the following: (i) What are the molecular mechanisms of interaction of the biomolecules with a metal surface in the experimental conditions typical of SERS appearance and is it possible to take measurements while preserving the native conformation of the molecule? (ii) What is the exact relationship between the Raman cross-section enhancement and the distance between the metal and the molecule? Is the mechanism for enhancement short-range or long-range and is it be possible to detect all normal vibrations of macromolecules or only vibrations of groups which directly contact the surface? (iii) What are the lowest concentrations for the detection of SER spectra of biomolecules in different experimental systems (electrodes, hydrosols, surfaces with regular roughness)? Is it possible to detect high-quality SER spectra of subpicogram amounts of different classes of biomolecules for successful competition with the traditional techniques in biotechnology and genetic engineering? This paper deals with applications of SERS to the study of membrane proteins and nucleic acids.

  15. Plasmonic tooth-multilayer structure with high enhancement field for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Chung; Wang, Zhiyu; Clark, J Kenji; Ho, Ya-Lun; Delaunay, Jean-Jacques

    2017-03-24

    The significant enhancement seen in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) heavily relies on the ability of plasmonic structures to strongly confine light. Current techniques used to fabricate plasmonic nanostructures have been limited in their reproducibility for bottom-up techniques or their feature size for top-down techniques. Here, we propose a tooth multilayer structure that can be fabricated by using physical vapor deposition and selective wet etching, achieving extremely small feature sizes and high reproducibility. A multilayer structure composed of two alternating materials whose thicknesses can be controlled accurately in the nanometer range is deposited on a flat substrate using ion-beam sputtering. Subsequent selective wet etching is used to form nanogaps in one of the materials constituting the multilayer, with the depth of the nanogaps being controlled by the wet etching time. Combining both techniques can allow the nanogap dimensions to be controlled at sub 10 nm length scale, thus achieving a tooth multilayer structure with high enhancement and tunability of the resonance mode over a broad range, ideal for SERS applications.

  16. Plasmonic tooth-multilayer structure with high enhancement field for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Li-Chung; Wang, Zhiyu; Clark, J. Kenji; Ho, Ya-Lun; Delaunay, Jean-Jacques

    2017-03-01

    The significant enhancement seen in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) heavily relies on the ability of plasmonic structures to strongly confine light. Current techniques used to fabricate plasmonic nanostructures have been limited in their reproducibility for bottom-up techniques or their feature size for top-down techniques. Here, we propose a tooth multilayer structure that can be fabricated by using physical vapor deposition and selective wet etching, achieving extremely small feature sizes and high reproducibility. A multilayer structure composed of two alternating materials whose thicknesses can be controlled accurately in the nanometer range is deposited on a flat substrate using ion-beam sputtering. Subsequent selective wet etching is used to form nanogaps in one of the materials constituting the multilayer, with the depth of the nanogaps being controlled by the wet etching time. Combining both techniques can allow the nanogap dimensions to be controlled at sub 10 nm length scale, thus achieving a tooth multilayer structure with high enhancement and tunability of the resonance mode over a broad range, ideal for SERS applications.

  17. Elementary excitations in charge-tunable InGaAs quantum dots studied by resonant Raman and resonant photoluminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köppen, Tim; Franz, Dennis; Schramm, Andreas; Heyn, Christian; Gutjahr, Johann; Pfannkuche, Daniela; Heitmann, Detlef; Kipp, Tobias

    2011-04-01

    We report on resonant optical spectroscopy of self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots in which the number of electrons can accurately be tuned to N=0,1,2 by an external gate voltage. Polarization, wave vector, and magnetic field dependent measurements enable us to clearly distinguish between resonant Raman and resonant photoluminescence processes. The Raman spectra for N=1 and 2 electrons considerably differ from each other. In particular, for N=2, the quantum-dot He, the spectra exhibit both singlet and triplet transitions reflecting the elementary many-particle interaction. Also the resonant photoluminescence spectra are significantly changed by varying the number of electrons in the QDs. For N=1 we observe complex spectra possibly induced by strong polaronic effects that are suppressed for N=2.

  18. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering from silver-coated opals.

    PubMed

    Mu, Weiqiang; Hwang, Dae-Kue; Chang, Robert P H; Sukharev, Maxim; Tice, Daniel B; Ketterson, John B

    2011-03-28

    We describe surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurements from a benzenethiol monolayer adsorbed on a silver-coated film that is, in turn, deposited on an artificial opal, where the latter is a close-packed three-dimensional dielectric lattice formed from polystyrene spheres. Data for a range of sphere sizes, silver film thicknesses, and laser excitation wavelengths are obtained. Enhancement factors can be in the range of 10(7). To partially explain these large enhancements, we have performed model finite-difference time domain simulations of the position-dependent electric fields generated at the opal surfaces for several experimentally studied laser wavelengths and sphere diameters.

  19. Direct excitation of microwave-spin dressed states using a laser-excited resonance Raman interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahriar, M. S.; Hemmer, P. R.

    1990-10-01

    We have used a laser-induced resonance Raman transition between the ground-state hyperfine sublevels in a sodium atomic beam to excite individual dressed states of the microwave-spin hyperfine transition. In addition, we have used the microwave interaction to excite the Raman trapped state. Extension of this technique to mm waves or to the far infrared may lead to applications such as mm-wave-beam steering and holographic image conversion.

  20. Spatial correlation between chemical and topological defects in vitreous silica: UV-resonance Raman study

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, M. D’Amico, F.; Bencivenga, F.; Cucini, R.; Gessini, A.; Principi, E.; Masciovecchio, C.

    2014-06-28

    A spatial correlation between chemical and topological defects in the tetrahedron network in vitreous silica produced by a fusion process of natural quartz crystals was found by synchrotron-based UV resonance Raman experiments. Furthermore, a quantitative correlation between these defects was obtained by comparing visible Raman and UV absorption spectra. These results indicate that in vitreous silica produced by the fusion process the topological defects disturb the surrounding tetrahedral silica network and induce further disorder regions with sub nanometric sizes.

  1. Fano resonance of Li-doped KTa1−xNbxO3 single crystals studied by Raman scattering

    PubMed Central

    Rahaman, M. M.; Imai, T.; Sakamoto, T.; Tsukada, S.; Kojima, S.

    2016-01-01

    The enhancement of functionality of perovskite ferroelectrics by local structure is one of current interests. By the Li-doping to KTa1−xNbxO3 (KTN), the large piezoelectric and electro-optic effects were reported. In order to give new insights into the mechanism of doping, the microscopic origin of the Fano resonance induced by the local structure was investigated in 5%Li-doped KTN single crystals by Raman scattering. The coupling between the continuum states and the transverse optical phonon near 196 cm−1 (Slater mode) caused a Fano resonance. In the vicinity of the cubic-tetragonal phase transition temperature, TC-T = 31 °C, the almost disappearance of the Fano resonance and the remarkable change of the central peak (CP) intensity were observed upon heating. The local symmetry of the polar nanoregions (PNRs), which was responsible for the symmetry breaking in the cubic phase, was determined to E(x, y) symmetry by the angular dependence of Raman scattering. The electric field induced the significant change in the intensity of both CP and Fano resonance. From these experimental results, it is concluded that the origin of the Fano resonance in Li-doped KTN crystals is the coupling between polarization fluctuations of PNRs and the Slater mode, both belong to the E(x, y) symmetry. PMID:27049847

  2. Raman scattering enhanced within the plasmonic gap between an isolated Ag triangular nanoplate and Ag film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kuanguo; Jiang, Kang; Zhang, Lan; Wang, Yong; Mao, Lei; Zeng, Jie; Lu, Yonghua; Wang, Pei

    2016-04-01

    Enhanced electromagnetic field in the tiny gaps between metallic nanostructures holds great promise in optical applications. Herein, we report novel out-of-plane nanogaps composed of micrometer-sized Ag triangular nanoplates (AgTN) on Ag films. Notably, the new coupled plasmonic structure can dramatically enhance the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) by visible laser excitation, although the micrometer-sized AgTN has localized plasmon resonance at infrared wavelength. This enhancement is derived from the gap plasmon polariton between the AgTN and Ag film, which is excited via the antenna effect of the corner and edge of the AgTN. Systematic SERS studies indicated that the plasmon enhancement was on the order of corner > edge > face. These results were further verified by theoretical simulations. Our device paves the way for rational design of sensitive SERS substrates by judiciously choosing appropriate nanoparticles and optimizing the gap distance.

  3. Performance comparison of single and dual-excitation-wavelength resonance-Raman explosives detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellampalle, Balakishore; Martin, Robert; Witt, Kenneth; McCormick, William; Wu, Hai-Shan; Sluch, Mikhail; Ice, Robert; Lemoff, Brian

    2017-05-01

    Deep-ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy is a very useful approach for standoff detection of explosive traces. Using two simultaneous excitation wavelengths improves the specificity and sensitivity to standoff explosive detection. The High Technology Foundation developed a highly compact prototype of resonance Raman explosives detector. In this work, we discuss the relative performance of a dual-excitation sensor compared to a single-excitation sensor. We present trade space analysis comparing three representative Raman systems with similar size, weight, and power. The analysis takes into account, cost, spectral resolution, detection/identification time and the overall system benefit.

  4. Graphene Moiré patterns observed by umklapp double-resonance Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righi, A.; Costa, S. D.; Chacham, H.; Fantini, C.; Venezuela, P.; Magnuson, C.; Colombo, L.; Bacsa, W. S.; Ruoff, R. S.; Pimenta, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    This work reports a Raman study of graphene bilayer samples grown by chemical vapor deposition on a copper foil, using laser lines in the UV range. The Raman spectra show a number of extra peaks, classified in different families, which appear nonuniformly across the Cu surface, in regions with sizes of several μm. We interpret these new extra modes as due to Moiré patterns of twisted layers of graphene, each family of peaks being associated with different twist rotational angles. We theoretically analyze the results, introducing the concept of umklapp double-resonance Raman processes associated with reciprocal lattice vectors of the Moiré pattern supercells.

  5. Toward Surface-Enhanced Raman Imaging of Latent Fingerprints

    SciTech Connect

    Connatser, Raynella M; Prokes, Sharka M.; Glembocki, Orest; Schuler, Rebecca A.; Gardner, Charles W.; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Lewis, Linda A

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to light or heat, or simply a dearth of fingerprint material, renders some latent fingerprints undetectable using conventional methods. We begin to address such elusive fingerprints using detection targeting photo- and thermally stable fingerprint constituents: surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). SERS can give descriptive vibrational spectra of amino acids, among other robust fingerprint constituents, and good sensitivity can be attained by improving metal-dielectric nanoparticle substrates. With SERS chemical imaging, vibrational bands intensities recreate a visual of fingerprint topography. The impact of nanoparticle synthesis route, dispersal methodology-deposition solvent, and laser wavelength are discussed, as are data from enhanced vibrational spectra of fingerprint components. SERS and Raman chemical images of fingerprints and realistic contaminants are shown. To our knowledge, this represents the first SERS imaging of fingerprints. In conclusion, this work progresses toward the ultimate goal of vibrationally detecting latent prints that would otherwise remain undetected using traditional development methods.

  6. Surface-Enhanced Raman Optical Data Storage system

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1991-03-12

    A method and apparatus for a Surface-Enhanced Raman Optical Data Storage (SERODS) System are disclosed. A medium which exhibits the Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) phenomenon has data written onto its surface of microenvironment by means of a write-on procedure which disturbs the surface or microenvironment of the medium and results in the medium having a changed SERS emission when excited. The write-on procedure is controlled by a signal that corresponds to the data to be stored so that the disturbed regions on the storage device (e.g., disk) represent the data. After the data is written onto the storage device it is read by exciting the surface of the storage device with an appropriate radiation source and detecting changes in the SERS emission to produce a detection signal. The data is then reproduced from the detection signal. 5 figures.

  7. Surface-enhanced raman optical data storage system

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for a Surface-Enhanced Raman Optical Data Storage (SERODS) System is disclosed. A medium which exhibits the Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) phenomenon has data written onto its surface of microenvironment by means of a write-on procedure which disturbs the surface or microenvironment of the medium and results in the medium having a changed SERS emission when excited. The write-on procedure is controlled by a signal that corresponds to the data to be stored so that the disturbed regions on the storage device (e.g., disk) represent the data. After the data is written onto the storage device it is read by exciting the surface of the storage device with an appropriate radiation source and detecting changes in the SERS emission to produce a detection signal. The data is then reproduced from the detection signal.

  8. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy applied to food safety.

    PubMed

    Craig, Ana Paula; Franca, Adriana S; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is an advanced Raman technique that enhances the vibrational spectrum of molecules adsorbed on or in the vicinity of metal particles and/or surfaces. Because of its readiness, sensitivity, and minimum sample preparation requirements, SERS is being considered as a powerful technique for food inspection. Key aspects of food-safety assurance, spectroscopy methods, and SERS are briefly discussed in an extended introduction of this review. The recent and potential advances in SERS are highlighted in sections that deal with the (a) detection of food-borne pathogenic microorganisms and (b) the detection of food contaminants and adulteration, concentrated specifically on antibiotics, drugs, hormones, melamine, and pesticides. This review provides an outlook of the work done and a perspective on the future directions of SERS as a reliable tool for food-safety assessment.

  9. Determination of nicotine by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, T.E.; List, M.S.; Haas, J.W. III; Wachter, E.A. )

    1994-11-01

    The analytical application of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to the determination of nicotine is demonstrated. A simple spectroelectrochemical method using a copper or silver electrode as the SERS substrate has been developed, consisting of three steps: polishing a working electrode to a mirror finish; roughening the electrode in an electrolyte solution; and, finally, depositing the nicotine analyte onto the roughened electrode after immersion in a sample solution. During the reduction cycle, a large enhancement in nicotine Raman scattering is observed at the electrode surface. The intensity of the SERS signal on a silver electrode is linear with concentration from 10 to 900 ppb, with an estimated detection limit of 7 ppb. The total analysis time per sample is approximately five minutes. This procedure has been used to analyze the extract from a cigarette side-stream smoke sample (environmental tobacco smoke); the SERS results agree well with those of conventional gas chromatographic analysis.

  10. Surface-enhanced Raman for monitoring toxins in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Kevin M.; Sylvia, James M.; Clauson, Susan L.; Bertone, Jane F.; Christesen, Steven D.

    2004-02-01

    Protection of the drinking water supply from a terrorist attack is of critical importance. Since the water supply is vast, contamination prevention is difficult. Therefore, rapid detection of contaminants, whether a military chemical/biological threat, a hazardous chemical spill, naturally occurring toxins, or bacterial build-up is a priority. The development of rapid environmentally portable and stable monitors that allow continuous monitoring of the water supply is ideal. EIC Laboratories has been developing Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) to detect chemical agents, toxic industrial chemicals (TICs), viruses, cyanotoxins and bacterial agents. SERS is an ideal technique for the Joint Service Agent Water Monitor (JSAWM). SERS uses the enhanced Raman signals observed when an analyte adsorbs to a roughened metal substrate to enable trace detection. Proper development of the metal substrate will optimize the sensitivity and selectivity towards the analytes of interest.

  11. Site-Selective Surface-Enhanced Raman Detection of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Matteini, Paolo; Cottat, Maximilien; Tavanti, Francesco; Panfilova, Elizaveta; Scuderi, Mario; Nicotra, Giuseppe; Menziani, Maria Cristina; Khlebtsov, Nikolai; de Angelis, Marella; Pini, Roberto

    2017-01-24

    Strategies for protein detection via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) currently exploit the formation of randomly generated hot spots at the interfaces of metal colloidal nanoparticles, which are clustered together by intrusive chemical or physical processes in the presence of the target biomolecule. We propose a different approach based on selective and quantitative gathering of protein molecules at regular hot spots generated on the corners of individual silver nanocubes in aqueous medium at physiological pH. Here, the protein, while keeping its native configuration, experiences an intense local E-field, which boosts SERS efficiency and detection sensitivity. Uncontrolled signal fluctuations caused by variable molecular adsorption to different particle areas or inside clustered nanoparticles are circumvented. Advanced electron microscopy analyses and computational simulations outline a strategy relying on a site-selective mechanism with superior Raman signal enhancement, which offers the perspective of highly controlled and reproducible routine SERS detection of proteins.

  12. Portable fiber sensors based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuan; Tanaka, Zuki; Newhouse, Rebecca; Xu, Qiao; Chen, Bin; Chen, Shaowei; Zhang, Jin Z; Gu, Claire

    2010-12-01

    Two portable molecular sensing systems based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) have been experimentally demonstrated using either a tip-coated multimode fiber (TCMMF) or a liquid core photonic crystal fiber (LCPCF) as the SERS probe. With Rhodamine 6G as a test molecule, the TCMMF-portable SERS system achieved 2-3 times better sensitivity than direct sampling (focusing the laser light directly into the sample without the fiber probe), and a highly sensitive LCPCF-portable SERS system reached a sensitivity up to 59 times that of direct sampling, comparable to the sensitivity enhancement achieved using fiber probes in the bulky Renishaw system. These fiber SERS probes integrated with a portable Raman spectrometer provide a promising scheme for a compact and flexible molecular sensing system with high sensitivity and portability.

  13. Towards field malaria diagnosis using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Keren; Xiong, Aoli; Yuen, Clement; Preiser, Peter; Liu, Quan

    2016-04-01

    We report three strategies of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for β-hematin and hemozoin detection in malaria infected human blood, which can be potentially developed for field malaria diagnosis. In the first strategy, we used silver coated magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4@Ag) in combination with an external magnetic field to enhance the Raman signal of β-hematin. Then we developed two SERS methods without the requirement of magnetic field for malaria infection diagnosis. In Method 1, silver nanoparticles were synthesized separately and then mixed with lysed blood just like in traditional SERS measurements; while in Method 2, we developed an ultrasensitive SERS method by synthesizing silver nanoparticles directly inside the parasites of Plasmodium falciparum. Method 2 can be also used to detect single parasites in the ring stage.

  14. Toward surface-enhanced Raman imaging of latent fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Connatser, R Maggie; Prokes, Sharka M; Glembocki, Orest J; Schuler, Rebecca L; Gardner, Charles W; Lewis, Samuel A; Lewis, Linda A

    2010-11-01

    Exposure to light or heat, or simply a dearth of fingerprint material, renders some latent fingerprints undetectable using conventional methods. We begin to address such elusive fingerprints using detection targeting photo- and thermally stable fingerprint constituents: surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). SERS can give descriptive vibrational spectra of amino acids, among other robust fingerprint constituents, and good sensitivity can be attained by improving metal-dielectric nanoparticle substrates. With SERS chemical imaging, vibrational bands' intensities recreate a visual of fingerprint topography. The impact of nanoparticle synthesis route, dispersal methodology-deposition solvent, and laser wavelength are discussed, as are data from enhanced vibrational spectra of fingerprint components. SERS and Raman chemical images of fingerprints and realistic contaminants are shown. To our knowledge, this represents the first SERS imaging of fingerprints. In conclusion, this work progresses toward the ultimate goal of vibrationally detecting latent prints that would otherwise remain undetected using traditional development methods.

  15. Resonance Raman microspectroscopy of myeloperoxidase and cytochrome b558 in human neutrophilic granulocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sijtsema, N M; Otto, C; Segers-Nolten, G M; Verhoeven, A J; Greve, J

    1998-01-01

    With (resonance) Raman microscospectroscopy, it is possible to investigate the chemical constitution of a very small volume (0.5 fl) in a living cell. We have measured resonance Raman spectra in the cytoplasm of living normal, myeloperoxidase (MPO)-deficient, and cytochrome b558-deficient neutrophils and in isolated specific and azurophilic granule fractions, using an excitation wavelength of 413.1 nm. Similar experiments were performed after reduction of the redox centers by the addition of sodium dithionite. The specific and azurophilic granules in both redox states appeared to have clearly distinguishable Raman spectra when exciting at a wavelength of 413.1 nm. The azurophilic granules and the cytochrome b558-deficient neutrophils showed Raman spectra similar to that of the isolated MPO. The spectra of the specific granules and the MPO-deficient neutrophils corresponded very well to published cytochrome b558 spectra. The resonance Raman spectrum of the cytoplasmic region of normal neutrophilic granulocytes could be fitted with a combination of the spectra of the specific and azurophilic granules, which shows that the Raman signal of neutrophilic granulocytes mainly originates from MPO and cytochrome b558, at an excitation wavelength of 413.1 nm. PMID:9635778

  16. Identifying or measuring selected substances or toxins in a subject using resonant raman signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Methods and systems of the present invention identify the presence of and/or the concentration of a selected analyte in a subject by: (a) illuminating a selected region of the eye of a subject with an optical excitation beam, wherein the excitation beam wavelength is selected to generate a resonant Raman spectrum of the selected analyte with a signal strength that is at least 100 times greater than Raman spectrums generated by non-resonant wavelengths and/or relative to signals of normal constituents present in the selected region of the eye; (b) detecting a resonant Raman spectrum corresponding to the selected illuminated region of the eye; and (c) identifying the presence, absence and/or the concentration of the selected analyte in the subject based on said detecting step. The apparatus may also be configured to be able to obtain biometric data of the eye to identify (confirm the identity of) the subject.

  17. Multi-wavelength resonance Raman spectroscopy of bacteria to study the effects of growth condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunapareddy, Nagapratima; Grun, Jacob; Lunsford, Robert; Gillis, David; Nikitin, Sergei; Wang, Zheng

    2012-06-01

    We will examine the use of multi-wavelength UV resonance-Raman signatures to identify the effects of growth phase on different types of bacteria. Gram positive and gram-negative species, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Citrobacter koseri and Citrobacter braakii were grown to logarithmic and stationary phases in different culture media. Raman spectra of bacteria were obtained by sequential illumination of samples between 220 and 260 nm; a range which encompasses the resonance frequencies of cellular components. In addition to the information contained in the single spectrum, this two-dimensional signature contains information reflecting variations in resonance cross sections with illumination wavelength. Results of our algorithms in identifying the differences between these germs are discussed. Preliminary results indicate that growth affects the Raman signature, but not to an extent that would negate identification of the species.

  18. NONLINEAR OPTICS: Stimulated resonant hyper-Raman scattering of light by polaritons in alkali metal vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galaĭchuk, Yu A.; Yashkir, Yu N.

    1989-12-01

    A theory is developed for the calculation of the gain g due to stimulated resonant hyper-Raman scattering of light by polaritons in gaseous media. It is shown that throughout the tuning range of the pump frequency (including one- and two-photon resonances) a maximum of g corresponds to a dispersion curve of polaritons plotted ignoring attenuation. Theoretical results are used to analyze characteristics of hyper-Raman scattering in sodium vapor. It is shown that under normal experimental conditions the splitting of polariton branches is considerable (amounting to tens of reciprocal centimeters on the frequency scale and several angular degrees). The value of g is estimated for two-photon resonances in the case when the pump frequency is tunable in a wide range. The optimal conditions for stimulated hyper-Raman scattering are identified.

  19. Resonance Raman Spectra of Hemoglobin and Cytochrome c: Inverse Polarization and Vibronic Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Spiro, Thomas G.; Strekas, Thomas C.

    1972-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of hemoglobin and cytochrome c in dilute solution contain prominent bands that exhibit inverse polarization, i.e., the polarization vector of the incident radiation is rotated through 90° for 90° scattering, giving infinite depolarization ratios. This phenomenon is shown to require an antisymmetric molecular-scattering tensor. The antisymmetry, which is characteristic of resonance scattering, is associated with the form of a particular class of vibrations, A20, of the tetragonal heme chromophores. The dependence of the resonance Raman spectra on the wavelength of the exciting radiation, as well as their polarization properties, demonstrates that the prominent bands correspond to vibronically active modes of the first electronic transition of the heme proteins, and provide confirmation of Albrecht's vibronic theory of Raman intensities. PMID:4506783

  20. Multiwavelength Resonance Raman Characterization of the Effect of Growth Phase and Culture Medium on Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kunapareddy, Nagapratima; Grun, Jacob; Lunsford, Robert; Nikitin, Sergei; Wang, Zheng; Gillis, David

    2015-08-01

    We examine the use of multiwavelength ultraviolet (UV) resonance-Raman signatures to identify the effects of growth phase and growth medium on gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Escherichia coli (E. coli), Citrobacter koseri (C. koseri), Citrobacter braakii (C. braakii), and Bacillus cereus (B. cereus) were grown to logarithmic and stationary phases in nutrient broth and brain heart infusion broth. Resonance Raman spectra of bacteria were obtained at multiple wavelengths between 220 and 260 nm; a range that encompasses the resonance frequencies of cellular constituents. We find that spectra of the same bacterial species exhibit differences due to both growth condition and growth phase, but the larger differences reflect changes due to growth phase. The differences in the Raman spectra correlate with genetic differences among the species. Using a Pearson correlation based algorithm, we achieve successful identification of these bacteria in 83% of the cases.

  1. Surface enhanced Raman scattering for detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrift, Will; Bhattacharjee, Arunima; Darvishzadeh-Varcheie, Mahsa; Lu, Ying; Hochbaum, Allon; Capolino, Filippo; Whiteson, Katrine; Ragan, Regina

    2015-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA), a biofilm forming bacterium, commonly affects cystic fibrosis, burn victims, and immunocompromised patients. PA produces pyocyanin, an aromatic, redox active, secondary metabolite as part of its quorum sensing signaling system activated during biofilm formation. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors composed of Au nanospheres chemically assembled into clusters on diblock copolymer templates were fabricated and the ability to detect pyocyanin to monitor biofilm formation was investigated. Electromagnetic full wave simulations of clusters observed in scanning electron microcopy images show that the localized surface plasmon resonance wavelength is 696 nm for a dimer with a gap spacing of 1 nm in an average dielectric environment of the polymer and analyte; the local electric field enhancement is on the order of 400 at resonance, relative to free space. SERS data acquired at 785 nm excitation from a monolayer of benzenethiol on fabricated samples was compared with Raman data of pure benzenethiol and enhancement factors as large as 8×109 were calculated that are consistent with simulated field enhancements. Using this system, the limit of detection of pyocyanin in pure gradients was determined to be 10 parts per billion. In SERS data of the supernatant from the time dependent growth of PA shaking cultures, pyocyanin vibrational modes were clearly observable during the logarithmic growth phase corresponding to activation of genes related to biofilm formation. These results pave the way for the use of SERS sensors for the early detection of biofilm formation, leading to reduced healthcare costs and better patient outcomes.

  2. Solvatochromism of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone: An electronic and resonance Raman spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Ravi Kumar, Venkatraman; Rajkumar, Nagappan; Umapathy, Siva

    2015-01-14

    Solvent effects play a vital role in various chemical, physical, and biological processes. To gain a fundamental understanding of the solute-solvent interactions and their implications on the energy level re-ordering and structure, UV-VIS absorption, resonance Raman spectroscopic, and density functional theory calculation studies on 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (PQ) in different solvents of diverse solvent polarity has been carried out. The solvatochromic analysis of the absorption spectra of PQ in protic dipolar solvents suggests that the longest (1n-π{sup 1}*; S{sub 1} state) and the shorter (1π-π{sup 1}*; S{sub 2} state) wavelength band undergoes a hypsochromic and bathochromic shift due to intermolecular hydrogen bond weakening and strengthening, respectively. It also indicates that hydrogen bonding plays a major role in the differential solvation of the S{sub 2} state relative to the ground state. Raman excitation profiles of PQ (400–1800 cm{sup −1}) in various solvents followed their corresponding absorption spectra therefore the enhancements on resonant excitation are from single-state rather than mixed states. The hyperchromism of the longer wavelength band is attributed to intensity borrowing from the nearby allowed electronic transition through vibronic coupling. Computational calculation with C{sub 2ν} symmetry constraint on the S{sub 2} state resulted in an imaginary frequency along the low-frequency out-of-plane torsional modes involving the C=O site and therefore, we hypothesize that this mode could be involved in the vibronic coupling.

  3. Rapid quantitative analysis of Dimethoate pesticide using surface enhanced raman spectroscopy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A method for rapid quantitative detection of dimethoate pesticide by using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been described. Significantly enhanced Raman signals of pesticide in low concentrations of 0.5 ~ 10 ug/mL were acquired by confocal raman micro-spectrometry with renishaw diagno...

  4. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for homeland defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Kevin M.; Sylvia, James M.; Marren, Peter J.; Bertone, Jane F.; Christesen, Steven D.

    2004-03-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a spectroscopic technique that enables trace detection of analytes of relevance using fieldable equipment. SERS uses the enhanced Raman signals observed when an analyte adsorbs to a roughened metal substrate, generally gold, silver, or copper. Coupled to a microscope, single molecule detection has been demonstrated. With a fieldable instrument, enhancements of 108 compared to unenhanced Raman spectroscopy are expected, allowing trace detection in the field. Proper development of the metal substrate will optimize the sensitivity and selectivity towards the analytes of interest. In this presentation, we will discuss applications under development at EIC Laboratories that are of importance to Homeland Defense. We will review the capabilities of SERS to detect buried explosives, explosives associated with nuclear weaponry and chemicals involved in the nuclear enrichment process. We will discuss the detection of chemical and biological warfare agents in the water supply in research performed under the Joint Service Agent Water Monitor. We will demonstrate the current detection limits, the reproducibility of the signal, and results collected using actual chemical warfare agents, and show how the results can be extended to vapor detection. We will also discuss the current state-of-the art for fieldable instrumentation. The emphasis on portability and speed will be stressed; SERS acquisitions are restricted to 30 s or less.

  5. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of bacteria coated by silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efrima, Schlomo; Bronk, Burt V.; Czege, Jozsef

    1999-05-01

    We present a novel method to measure Raman spectra from whole bacteria cells by using Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS). We deposit a silver coat on Escherichia coli and Bacillus megaterium bacteria and measure strongly enhanced (greater than 400,000 fold) and highly reproducible Raman spectra. The spectra are rich but not overly congested, as the surface enhancement is selective to the precise chemical nature of the biochemical molecules, and their proximity to the silver particulate matter. The main bands we observe can be associated with peptides and polysaccharides in the cell- wall and its membrane. The spectra from E. coli (a Gram- negative bacterium) and B. megaterium (a Gram-positive bacterium) are similar in their general form, but differ in detail. The spectrum from a commercial yeast extract is vastly different. This approach can be extended to probe the internal chemical environment within bacteria and applied to the identification of micro-organisms also applied to studying other biochemical problems and phenomena, such as biomineralization, heavy metal toxicity, cell-wall structure and others.

  6. Surface enhanced Raman scattering as a probe of the cholesterol oxidase enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnarowska, R.; Polit, J.; Broda, D.; Gonchar, M.; Sheregii, E. M.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we present a sensitive method for the determination of the enzyme concentration of cholesterol oxidase, which is one of the most important analytical enzymes. Although the method is affected by sensitivity limitations, recently the Raman scattering experimental data carried out on cholesterol oxidase conjugated via a 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid organic linker with gold nanoparticles due to the surface plasmon resonance confirmed the observation of surface enhanced Raman scattering, which enables us to detect the vibrational lines belonging to PO and C=C bonds assigned to the flavin prosthetic group. This means there is a stable binding of the enzyme with nanoparticles as well as the enzyme remaining active and substantiates the possibility that prepared bio-nanosystems can be used for analytical purposes as a sensing element.

  7. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering of crystal violets from periodic array of gold nanocylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Gang; Wang, Li; Cai, Chunfeng; Ueno, Kosei; Misawa, Hiroaki; Qiu, Jianrong

    2014-09-01

    The periodic arrays of gold nanocylinder with 121 nm in diameter, 6.3 nm in gap, and 34 nm in thickness are fabricated on glass by electron-beam lithography and lift-off techniques. Some crystal violet molecules are coated on the array by using the dipping and drawing method. In addition, the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of these samples with and without gold nanocylinder arrays are characterized specifically. The largest enhancement factor is obtained when the excitation wavelength corresponds to the peak wavelength of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). The density functional theory and the finite-difference time-domain method are used for the calculations of the extinction spectrum of the arrays and Raman spectra of the crystal violet, respectively. These results unambiguously demonstrate that the periodic arrays of gold nanocylinder have good and effective surface-enhanced properties for Raman scattering of crystal violets, and they also show that the excitation wavelength corresponding to the peak one of the LSPR is one of the major reasons causing SERS.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of surface-enhanced Raman-scattered gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kalmodia, Sushma; Harjwani, Jaidev; Rajeswari, Raguraman; Yang, Wenrong; Barrow, Colin J; Ramaprabhu, Sundara; Krishnakumar, Subramanian; Elchuri, Sailaja V

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report a simple, rapid, and robust method to synthesize surface-enhanced Raman-scattered gold nanoparticles (GNPs) based on green chemistry. Vitis vinifera L. extract was used to synthesize noncytotoxic Raman-active GNPs. These GNPs were characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, dynamic light-scattering, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman spectroscopy. The characteristic surface plasmon-resonance band at ~ 528 nm is indicative of spherical particles, and this was confirmed by TEM. The N–H and C–O stretches in FTIR spectroscopy indicated the presence of protein molecules. The predominant XRD plane at (111) and (200) indicated the crystalline nature and purity of GNPs. GNPs were stable in the buffers used for biological studies, and exhibited no cytotoxicity in noncancerous MIO-M1 (Müller glial) and MDA-MB-453 (breast cancer) cell lines. The GNPs exhibited Raman spectral peaks at 570, 788, and 1,102 cm−1. These new GNPs have potential applications in cancer diagnosis, therapy, and ultrasensitive biomarker detection. PMID:24235830

  9. High Resolution Analysis of Selected Organic Compounds in Icy Terrains, Using Surface-enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnell, J.; Bowden, S. A.; Phillips, S. J.; Wilson, R.; Cooper, J. M.

    2008-03-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy will increase sensitivity by several orders of magnitude over conventional Raman, and should be considered for future missions. We demonstrate detection of organic pigments from ice containing snow algae.

  10. Effects of inhomogeneous broadening on the resonance Raman excitation profile of lycopene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotting, J. E.; Hoskins, L. C.; Levan, M. E.

    1982-08-01

    The resonance Raman excitation profiles for the ν1, ν2, and ν3 vibrations of lycopene in ethyl alcohol, toluene, and carbon disulfide solvents have been measured. The results are interpreted in terms of a three-mode vibrational theory which includes both homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening effects. Excellent agreement between calculated and observed excitation profiles and visible spectra was found, thus emphasizing the need to interpret resonance Raman data using a multimode vibrational model. The results indicate that the major broadening mechanism is homogeneous broadening, with about a 25% contribution from inhomogeneous broadening. The excitation profiles in carbon disulfide gave the largest inhomogeneous broadening.

  11. Plasmonic Enhancement of Raman Scattering for Metal-Analyte Sandwich Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulakovich, O. S.; Shabunya-Klyachkovskaya, E. V.; Matsukovich, A. S.; Trotsiuk, L. L.; Gaponenko, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    The effect of the mutual positions of plasmonic gold fi lms and a layer of analyte (malachite green and mitoxantrone molecules) on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was investigated. When the excitation emission in the plasmon resonance region (531 nm and 632.8 nm) was used the SERS intensity of the analyte in a sandwich configuration was up to five times higher compared with the "analyte under gold film" arrangement and up to 60 times higher than for the "analyte on gold fi lm" case.

  12. Raman scattering enhanced by plasmonic clusters and its application to single-molecule imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuike, Tomokazu; Nobusada, Katsuyuki

    2015-12-31

    The optical response of the linear Au{sub 8} cluster is investigated by the linear response theory based on the density functional theory. It is revealed that the observed many peaks in the visible region originate from the interaction of the ideal plasmonic excitation along the molecular axis with the background d-electron excitations, i.e., the Landau damping. In spite of the existence of the damping, the Raman scattering is shown to be enhanced remarkably by the incident light resonant to the visible excitations. The novel imaging experiment with the atomic resolution is proposed by utilizing a plasmonic cluster as the probing tip.

  13. Polarized surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of suspended carbon nanotubes by Pt-Re nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäuml, Christian; Korn, Tobias; Lange, Christoph; Schüller, Christian; Strunk, Christoph; Paradiso, Nicola

    2017-07-01

    We present optical nanoantennas designed for applications that require processing temperatures larger than 800 ∘C . The antennas consist of arrays of Re/Pt bilayer strips fabricated with a lift-off-free technique on top of etched trenches. Reflectance measurements show a clear plasmonic resonance at approximately 670 nm for light polarized orthogonal to the strip axis. The functionality of the antennas is demonstrated by growing single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on top of the antenna arrays and measuring the corresponding Raman signal enhancement of selected CNTs. The results of the measurements are quantitatively discussed in light of numerical simulations which highlight the impact of the substrate.

  14. Plasmonic band-edge modulated surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Lie-rong; Qin, Kang; Tan, Jun; Bao, Peng; Cui, Guo-xin; Wang, Qian-jin; Evans, Stephen D.; Lu, Yan-qing; Zhu, Yong-yuan; Zhang, Xue-jin

    2017-07-01

    The band structure of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on the Ag surface in the presence of gratings and SPP-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) are investigated theoretically and experimentally. The SPP bandgap position can be tuned by geometric parameters. The SPP band edge dominates the SERS behavior. The template stripping process is introduced to reduce SPP propagation losses, improving SERS sensitivity by ˜40. Apart from flexibility and a moderate SERS enhancement factor of the order of 105-106, the SPP band structure is highly reproducible with a relative standard deviation of 10.9%. Our results open opportunities for SPP band structures to serve as SERS substrates.

  15. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra of tomato epidermis on gold/ silver sol active substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Zhenyi; Chen, Na; Hu, Ling; Zhu, Hongfei; Liu, Shupeng; Guo, Qiang

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, tomato epidermis' surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra were measured on gold and silver active substrates and analyzed. Preparing and using gold sol and silver sol in similar particle diameters (about 50-60nm), three comparable Raman spectra were obtained. Silver sol and gold sol can both increase Raman scattering signal of tomato epidermis. Through the Raman spectra, silver sol has greater enhancement ability than gold sol to tomato epidermis.

  16. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy of organic molecules deposited on gold sputtered substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlen, A.; Gadenne, V.; Romann, J.; Chevallier, V.; Patrone, L.; Valmalette, J. C.

    2009-05-01

    Aggregates of Au nanoparticles have been extremely easily obtained on glass substrates by physical sputtering under primary vacuum. With such a protocol, we demonstrate that it is possible to control the surface plasmon band absorption. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) experiments were performed with methylene blue, zinc octacarboxyphthalocyanine, 4-aminothiophenol and cysteamine. The correlation between the absorption band and the wavelength giving the highest SERS intensity is clearly observed for methylene blue, in accordance with the electromagnetic enhancement theory. For the other molecules, effects of the chemical enhancement are also observed. In addition, we noticed a strong influence of the nature of the adsorbed molecule on the enhancement factor for a given wavelength. The origin of this feature is discussed in terms of resonant effects or multipolar surface plasmon modes.

  17. Resonance Raman investigation of the photoreduction of methylviologen with Ru(bpy) 2+3 and proflavine as sensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, Martin; Hester, Ronald E.

    1982-01-01

    Reduced methylviologen (MV +) is detected by conventional resonance Raman spectroscopy in photoreactions of Ru(bpy) 2+3 or proflavine (PFH +) with MV 2+ Using apparatus for modulated excitation resonance Raman (MERR) spectroscopy, the irreversible MV + production with PFH + as sensitizer is traced back to triplet-triplet annihilation with simultaneous destruction of PFH +.

  18. Magnetic-Polaron-Induced Enhancement of Surface Raman Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Qi; Liao, Fan; Ruotolo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The studies of the effects of magnetic field on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) have been so far limited to the case of ferromagnetic/noble-metal, core/shell nano-particles, where the influence was always found to be negative. In this work, we investigate the influence of magnetic field on a diluted magnetic semiconductor/metal SERS system. Guided by three dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulations, a high efficient SERS substrate was obtained by diluting Mn into Au-capped ZnO, which results in an increase of the dielectric constant and, therefore, an enhancement of Raman signals. More remarkably, an increase of intensities as well as a reduction of the relative standard deviation (RSD) of Raman signals have been observed as a function of the external magnetic strength. We ascribe these positive influences to magnetic-field induced nucleation of bound magnetic polarons in the Mn doped ZnO. The combination of diluted magnetic semiconductors and SERS may open a new avenue for future magneto-optical applications. PMID:26754049

  19. A detailed resonance Raman spectrum of Nickel(II)-substituted Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin.

    PubMed

    Czernuszewicz, Roman S; Fraczkiewicz, Grazyna; Zareba, Adelajda A

    2005-08-08

    Nickel(II) and cobalt(II) derivatives of the blue copper protein Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin have been studied by resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy at liquid-nitrogen temperatures. Vibrational assignments for the observed RR bands of Ni(II)-azurin have been made through a study of (62)Ni-substituted azurin. A comparison of Ni(II)-azurin RR spectra with those of the wild type (Cu-containing) protein showed Ni(II)-S(Cys) stretching vibrations, nu(Ni-S)(Cys), at substantially lower frequencies (approximately 360 versus approximately 400 cm(-1), respectively), indicating that the Ni(II)-S(Cys) bond is much weaker than the corresponding Cu(II)-S(Cys) bond. Resonance enhanced predominantly nu(Ni-N)(His) modes indicate that the metal-N(His) bond distances in the Ni(II) derivative are the same as those in native azurin. The vibrational data also confirm a tetrahedral disposition of ligands about the metal in Ni(II)-azurin found in the protein crystallographic structures. As expected, excitation profile measurements on Ni(II)-azurin show that the nu(Ni-S)(Cys) assignable modes give maxima at the 440-nm absorption band, which confirms a S(Cys) --> Ni(II) charge-transfer origin of the 440-nm electronic transition in Ni(II)-substituted azurin.

  20. Elevated gold ellipse nanoantenna dimers as sensitive and tunable surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Jubb, A. M.; Jiao, Y.; Eres, Gyula; Retterer, Scott T.; Gu, Baohua

    2016-02-15

    Here we demonstrate large area arrays of elevated gold ellipse dimers with precisely controlled gaps for use as sensitive and highly controllable surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates. The significantly enhanced Raman signal observed with SERS arises from both localized and long range plasmonic effects. By controlling the geometry of a SERS substrate, in this case the size and aspect ratio of individual ellipses, the plasmon resonance can be tuned in a broad wavelength range, providing a method for designing the response of SERS substrates at different excitation wavelengths. Plasmon effects exhibited by the elevated gold ellipse dimer substrates are also demonstrated and confirmed through finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. A plasmon resonance red shift with an increase of the ellipse aspect ratio is observed, allowing systematic control of the resulting SERS signal intensity. Optimized elevated ellipse dimer substrates with 10±2 nm gaps exhibit uniform SERS enhancement factors on the order of 109 for adsorbed p-mercaptoaniline molecules.

  1. Elevated gold ellipse nanoantenna dimers as sensitive and tunable surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy substrates

    DOE PAGES

    Jubb, A. M.; Jiao, Y.; Eres, Gyula; ...

    2016-02-15

    Here we demonstrate large area arrays of elevated gold ellipse dimers with precisely controlled gaps for use as sensitive and highly controllable surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates. The significantly enhanced Raman signal observed with SERS arises from both localized and long range plasmonic effects. By controlling the geometry of a SERS substrate, in this case the size and aspect ratio of individual ellipses, the plasmon resonance can be tuned in a broad wavelength range, providing a method for designing the response of SERS substrates at different excitation wavelengths. Plasmon effects exhibited by the elevated gold ellipse dimer substrates aremore » also demonstrated and confirmed through finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. A plasmon resonance red shift with an increase of the ellipse aspect ratio is observed, allowing systematic control of the resulting SERS signal intensity. Optimized elevated ellipse dimer substrates with 10±2 nm gaps exhibit uniform SERS enhancement factors on the order of 109 for adsorbed p-mercaptoaniline molecules.« less

  2. Applications of Raman and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering to the Analysis of Eukaryotic Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Franziska; Joseph, Virginia; Panne, Ulrich; Kneipp, Janina

    In this chapter, we discuss Raman scattering and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for the analysis of cellular samples of plant and animal origin which are several tens to hundreds of microns in size. As was shown in the past several years, the favorable properties of noble metal nanostructures can be used to generate SERS signals in very complex biological samples such as cells, and result in an improved sensitivity and spatial resolution. Pollen grains, the physiological containers that produce the male gametes of seed plants, consist of a few vegetative cells and one generative cell, surrounded by a biopolymer shell. Their chemical composition has been a subject of research of plant physiologists, biochemists [1, 2], and lately even materials scientists [3, 4] for various reasons. In spite of a multitude of applied analytical approaches it could not be elucidated in its entirety yet. Animal cells from cell cultures have been a subject of intense studies due to their application in virtually all fields of biomedical research, ranging from studies of basic biological mechanisms to models for pharmaceutical and diagnostic research. Many aspects of all kinds of cellular processes including signalling, transport, and gene regulation have been elucidated, but many more facts about cell biology will need to be understood in order to efficiently address issues such as cancer, viral infection or genetic disorder. Using the information from spectroscopic methods, in particular combining normal Raman spectroscopy and SERS may open up new perspectives on cellular biochemistry. New sensitive Raman-based tools are being developed for the biochemical analysis of cellular processes [5-8].

  3. Fiber sensors for molecular detection using Raman and surface enhanced raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xuan

    In this dissertation, highly sensitive optical fiber sensors based on Raman spectroscopy (RS) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) are studied with focus on applications in various chemical and biological detections. In particular, two main categories of optical fibers have been used as the sensing platforms: one is the conventional multimode optical fiber and the other is the hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF). For the conventional multimode optical fiber, we've developed two types of probes using SERS techniques: the first is based on a double substrate "sandwich" structure with colloidal metal nanoparticles, and the second is based on interference lithography-defined nanopillar array structure on the fiber facet with the metal film deposition. For the HCPCF, the photonic bandgap guiding mechanism provides an ideal sensing platform because the confinement of both light and sample inside the fiber enables direct interaction between the propagating wave and the analyte. We demonstrate that by filling up the air channel(s) of the fiber with gas or liquid samples, it can significantly increase the sensitivity of the sensors in either regular Raman or SERS applications. For RS applications, these fiber sensors were tested with ambient gases, organic vapors, and biomedically important glucose molecule. For SERS application, these fiber sensors were evaluated with Rhodamine 6G, trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)-ethylene, toluene vapor, 2,4-dinitrotoluene vapor, proteins and bacteria. We also demonstrate that these fiber sensors can be integrated with the portable Raman spectrometer in order to make it practical for out-of-laboratory applications. The techniques developed in this study are expected to have significant impact in chemical, biological, environmental, national security, and other applications.

  4. Spectroscopic characterization of biological agents using FTIR, normal Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna-Pineda, Tatiana; Soto-Feliciano, Kristina; De La Cruz-Montoya, Edwin; Pacheco Londoño, Leonardo C.; Ríos-Velázquez, Carlos; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2007-04-01

    FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) requires a minimum of sample allows fast identification of microorganisms. The use of this technique for characterizing the spectroscopic signatures of these agents and their stimulants has recently gained considerable attention due to the fact that these techniques can be easily adapted for standoff detection from considerable distances. The techniques also show high sensitivity and selectivity and offer near real time detection duty cycles. This research focuses in laying the grounds for the spectroscopic differentiation of Staphylococcus spp., Pseudomonas spp., Bacillus spp., Salmonella spp., Enterobacter aerogenes, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and E. coli, together with identification of their subspecies. In order to achieve the proponed objective, protocols to handle, cultivate and analyze the strains have been developed. Spectroscopic similarities and marked differences have been found for Spontaneous or Normal Raman spectra and for SERS using silver nanoparticles have been found. The use of principal component analysis (PCA), discriminate factor analysis (DFA) and a cluster analysis were used to evaluate the efficacy of identifying potential threat bacterial from their spectra collected on single bacteria. The DFA from the bacteria Raman spectra show a little discrimination between the diverse bacterial species however the results obtained from the SERS demonstrate to be high discrimination technique. The spectroscopic study will be extended to examine the spores produced by selected strains since these are more prone to be used as Biological Warfare Agents due to their increased mobility and possibility of airborne transport. Micro infrared spectroscopy as well as fiber coupled FTIR will also be used as possible sensors of target compounds.

  5. Enhanced Raman scattering from aromatic dithiols electrosprayed into plasmonic nanojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Johnson, Grant E.; Novikova, Irina V.; Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; Evans, James E.; Zamkov, Mikhail; Laskin, Julia; Hess, Wayne P.

    2015-01-01

    We describe surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) experiments in which molecular coverage is systematically varied from 3.8 x 105 to 3.8 x 102 to 0.38 molecules/μm2 using electrospray deposition of ethanolic 4,4’-dimercaptostilbene (DMS) solutions. The plasmonic SERS substrate used herein consists of a well-characterized 2-dimensional (2D) array of silver nanospheres [see El-Khoury et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2014, 141, 214308], previously shown to feature uniform topography and plasmonic response, as well as intense SERS activity. When compared to their ensemble averaged analogues, the spatially and temporally averaged spectra of a single molecule exhibit several unique features including: (i) distinct relative intensities of the observable Raman-active vibrational states, (ii) more pronounced SERS backgrounds, and (iii) broader Raman lines indicative of faster vibrational dephasing. The first observation may be understood on the basis of an intuitive physical picture in which removal of averaging over multiple molecules exposes the tensorial nature of Raman scattering. When an oriented single molecule gives rise to the recorded SERS spectra, the relative orientation of the molecule with respect to vector components of the local electric field determines the relative intensities of the observable vibrational states. Using a single molecule SERS framework described herein, we derive a unique molecular orientation in which a single DMS molecule is isolated at a nanojunction formed between two silver nanospheres in the 2D array. The DMS molecule is found lying nearly flat with respect to the metal surface. The derived orientation of a single molecule at a plasmonic nanojunction is consistent with observations (ii) and (iii). In particular, a careful inspection of the temporal spectral variations along the recorded single molecule SERS time sequences reveals that the time-averaged SERS backgrounds arise from individual molecular events, marked by broadened SERS

  6. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering in Molecular Junctions.

    PubMed

    Iwane, Madoka; Fujii, Shintaro; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2017-08-18

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a surface-sensitive vibrational spectroscopy that allows Raman spectroscopy on a single molecular scale. Here, we present a review of SERS from molecular junctions, in which a single molecule or molecules are made to have contact from the top to the bottom of metal surfaces. The molecular junctions are nice platforms for SERS as well as transport measurement. Electronic characterization based on the transport measurements of molecular junctions has been extensively studied for the development of miniaturized electronic devices. Simultaneous SERS and transport measurement of the molecular junctions allow both structural (geometrical) and electronic information on the single molecule scale. The improvement of SERS measurement on molecular junctions open the door toward new nanoscience and nanotechnology in molecular electronics.

  7. Surface enhanced raman spectroscopy studies on triglycine sulphate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parameswari, A.; Mohamed Asath, R.; Premkumar, R.; Milton Franklin Benial, A.

    2017-01-01

    Adsorption characteristics of triglycine sulphate (TGS) on silver (Ag) surface were investigated based on density functional theory calculations and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technique. The single crystals of TGS were grown by slow evaporation method. Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were prepared by solution combustion method and characterized. The calculated and observed structural parameters of TGS molecule were compared. Raman and SERS spectra for TGS single crystal were studied experimentally and validated theoretically. Frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) analysis was carried out for TGS and TGS adsorbed on Ag surface. The second harmonic generation measurements confirm the nonlinear optical (NLO) activity of the TGS molecule. SERS spectral analysis reveals that the TGS adsorbed as tilted orientation on the silver surface. The theoretical and experimental results evidence the suitability of the grown TGS single crystal for optoelectronic applications.

  8. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: From concepts to practical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Kurouski, Dmitry; Pozzi, Eric A.; Chiang, Naihao; Hersam, Mark C.; Van Duyne, Richard P.

    2016-08-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) is a powerful technique that integrates the vibrational fingerprinting of Raman spectroscopy and the sub-nanometer resolution of scanning probe microscopy (SPM). As a result, TERS is capable of obtaining chemical maps of analyzed specimens with exceptional lateral resolution. This is extremely valuable for the study of interactions between molecules and substrates, in addition to structural characterization of biological objects, such as viruses and amyloid fibrils, 2D polymeric materials, and monitoring electrochemical and photo-catalytic processes. In this mini-review, we discuss the most significant advances of TERS, including: super high resolution chemical imaging, monitoring of catalytic processes, incorporation of pulsed-excitation techniques, single-site electrochemistry, biosensing, and art conservation. We begin with a short overview of TERS, comparing it with other surface analytical techniques, followed by an overview of recent developments and future applications in TERS.

  9. Characterization of the pigment xanthomonadin in the bacterial genus Xanthomonas using micro- and resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paret, Mathews L.; Sharma, Shiv K.; Misra, Anupam K.; Acosta, Tayro; deSilva, Asoka S.; Vowell, Tomie; Alvarez, Anne M.

    2012-06-01

    We used micro- and resonance Raman spectroscopy with 785 nm and 514.5 nm laser excitation, respectively, to characterize a plant pathogenic bacteria, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae D150. The bacterial genus Xathomonas is closely related to bacterial genus Stenotrophomonas that causes an infection in humans. This study has identified for the first time the unique Raman spectra of the carotenoid-like pigment xanthomonadin of the Xanthomonas strain. Xanthomonadin is a brominated aryl-polyene pigment molecule similar to carotenoids. Further studies were conducted using resonance Raman spectroscopy with 514.5 nm laser excitation on several strains of the bacterial genus Xanthomonas isolated from numerous plants from various geographical locations. The current study revealed that the Raman bands representing the vibrations (v1, v2, v3) of the polyene chain of xanthomonadin are 1003-1005 (v3), 1135-1138 (v2), and 1530 (v1). Overtone bands representing xanthomonadin were identified as 2264-2275 (2v2), and combinational bands at 2653-2662 (v1+ v2). The findings from this study validate our previous finding that the Raman fingerprints of xanthomonadin are unique for the genus Xanthomonas. This facilitates rapid identification (~5 minutes) of Xanthomonas spp. from bacterial culture plates. The xanthomonadin marker is different from Raman markers of many other bacterial genus including Agrobacterium, Bacillus, Clavibacter, Enterobacter, Erwinia, Microbacterium, Paenibacillus, and Ralstonia. This study also identified Xanthomonas spp. from bacterial strains isolated from a diseased wheat sample on a culture plate.

  10. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Extreme Nanowires and Other 1D Systems

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David C.; Spencer, Joseph H.; Sloan, Jeremy; McDonnell, Liam P.; Trewhitt, Harrison; Kashtiban, Reza J.; Faulques, Eric

    2016-01-01

    This paper briefly describes how nanowires with diameters corresponding to 1 to 5 atoms can be produced by melting a range of inorganic solids in the presence of carbon nanotubes. These nanowires are extreme in the sense that they are the limit of miniaturization of nanowires and their behavior is not always a simple extrapolation of the behavior of larger nanowires as their diameter decreases. The paper then describes the methods required to obtain Raman spectra from extreme nanowires and the fact that due to the van Hove singularities that 1D systems exhibit in their optical density of states, that determining the correct choice of photon excitation energy is critical. It describes the techniques required to determine the photon energy dependence of the resonances observed in Raman spectroscopy of 1D systems and in particular how to obtain measurements of Raman cross-sections with better than 8% noise and measure the variation in the resonance as a function of sample temperature. The paper describes the importance of ensuring that the Raman scattering is linearly proportional to the intensity of the laser excitation intensity. It also describes how to use the polarization dependence of the Raman scattering to separate Raman scattering of the encapsulated 1D systems from those of other extraneous components in any sample. PMID:27168195

  11. Probing of local structures of thermal and photoinduced phases in rubidium manganese hexacyanoferrate by resonant Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fukaya, Ryo; Asahara, Akifumi; Ishige, Shun; Nakajima, Makoto; Tokoro, Hiroko; Ohkoshi, Shin-ichi; Suemoto, Tohru

    2013-08-28

    Resonant couplings of the electronic states and the stretching vibrations of CN(-) ligands, which bridges metal ions, is investigated by resonance Raman spectroscopy for Rb(0.94)Mn[Fe(CN)6](0.98)·0.2H2O. Large excitation wavelength dependences over one order of magnitude were found for Raman peaks corresponding to different valence pairs of metal ions in the excitation wavelength range between 350 and 632 nm. In the thermal low-temperature phase, the CN(-) stretching modes due to the low-temperature-phase configuration (Fe(2+)-Mn(3+)) and the phase-boundary configuration (Fe(3+)-Mn(3+)) are coupled to the Fe(2+)-to-Mn(3+) intervalence transfer band and Jahn-Teller distorted Mn(3+) d-d transition band, respectively. In the photoinduced low-temperature phase, the Fe(3+)-Mn(3+) mode shows strong resonant enhancement with the CN(-)-to-Fe(3+) charge-transfer band, which exists in the high-temperature phase with a cubic structure. From these resonance behaviors, we conclude that the local lattice symmetry of the photoinduced phase is cubic in contrast with the tetragonal symmetry in the thermal low-temperature phase.

  12. Smart surface-enhanced Raman scattering traceable drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Tang, Yonghong; Dai, Sheng; Kleitz, Freddy; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2016-06-01

    A novel smart nanoparticle-based system has been developed for tracking intracellular drug delivery through surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This new drug delivery system (DDS) shows targeted cytotoxicity towards cancer cells via pH-cleavable covalent carboxylic hydrazone links and the SERS tracing capability based on gold@silica nanocarriers. Doxorubicin, as a model anticancer drug, was employed to compare SERS with conventional fluorescence tracing approaches. It is evident that SERS demonstrates higher sensitivity and resolution, revealing intracellular details, as the strengths of the original Raman signals can be amplified by SERS. Importantly, non-destructive SERS will provide the designed DDS with great autonomy and potential to study the dynamic procedures of non-fluorescent drug delivery into living cells.A novel smart nanoparticle-based system has been developed for tracking intracellular drug delivery through surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This new drug delivery system (DDS) shows targeted cytotoxicity towards cancer cells via pH-cleavable covalent carboxylic hydrazone links and the SERS tracing capability based on gold@silica nanocarriers. Doxorubicin, as a model anticancer drug, was employed to compare SERS with conventional fluorescence tracing approaches. It is evident that SERS demonstrates higher sensitivity and resolution, revealing intracellular details, as the strengths of the original Raman signals can be amplified by SERS. Importantly, non-destructive SERS will provide the designed DDS with great autonomy and potential to study the dynamic procedures of non-fluorescent drug delivery into living cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03869g

  13. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy with High Spatial Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Huser, T R

    2003-02-04

    The identification of individual molecules and the determination of how these interact with their local environment are critical steps toward a better understanding of complex organic systems. Optical detection techniques have always played a key role in the nondestructive and noninvasive analysis of complex materials. Until recently, however, optical microscopy has lacked the sensitivity to study processes on the molecular scale. This has changed with the recent development of new schemes that limit the optical detection volume, and the advent of new, highly quantum-efficient photon detectors. These inventions have enabled researchers to optically probe biomolecular processes at the single molecule level by observing the fluorescence of specific marker molecules. The requirement to specifically label biomolecules and the fact, that fluorescence emission is prone to photodecomposition of the marker molecules, however, have limited this approach to a few, well-characterized case studies. Raman scattering, is one of few optical techniques that can identify atomic species and in addition determine their chemical bonds by observing their distinct vibrational fingerprints; but it is orders of magnitude weaker than fluorescence. In this project, we have developed new optical probes that allow for the non-destructive characterization and identification of organic and inorganic matter at the single molecule level by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Our approach combines confocal Raman microscopy with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) generated by coating scanning probe microscope (SPM) tips with thin (30-40 nm) gold and silver films. The scanning SERS probe generates an image of the physical structure of a sample together with detailed chemical information about its composition. In a complementary approach, we have also used gold or silver nanoparticles to generate SER spectra from single molecules adsorbed to these particles. This project has led to the

  14. Magnetic Resonance Image Wavelet Enhancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    1Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica , UAM Iztapalapa, Mexico−DF, 09340, Mexico email:arog@xanum.uam.mx. Magnetic Resonance Centre, School of Physics...Number Task Number Work Unit Number Performing Organization Name(s) and Address(es) Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica , UAM Iztapalapa, Mexico-DF

  15. Sample Modulated Raman Spectroscopy and Frequency Modulated Visible Light: Resonance Raman Spectrum of a Polydiacetylene Fiber.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-20

    Raman Spectrum of a / / Polydiacetylene Fiber, j—, " WSSSSSSSfcSSSu Azinis, JUy^aughman, TYPE OF REPORT a PERIOD COVERED Surinder K/Bahl...Spectrum of a Polydiacetylene Fiber Costas Tzlnis, Surinder K. Bahl Paula Davidson and William M. Risen, Jr. Department of Chemistry Brown

  16. Resonance-Enhanced Nonlinear Optical Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xuan

    Nonlinear optical processes, which manifest as many interesting phenomena such as nonlinear wave mixing, optical rectification, intensity-dependent refractive index change, harmonic generation, etc., have found very broad applications. Unfortunately, most optical media exhibit rather weak optical nonlinearities and a majority of nonlinear optical processes have to rely on substantial optical powers to support nonlinear wave interactions, which becomes a major challenge for nonlinear photonic application. This thesis is devoted to exploring enhanced nonlinear optical phenomena, by taking advantage of a certain type of resonance to enhance the nonlinear wave interactions. For this purpose, we employed both natural atomic resonances via electron transition and engineered optical resonances in micro/nanophotonic device structures, for different applications. These two types of resonances, although distinctive in their physical natures, both are able to significantly increase the strength and elongate the time of optical wave interactions, thus leading to dramatic enhancement of nonlinear optical effects. On one hand, we utilized unique energy-level structures in alkali vapor plasmas to dramatically enhance the electron tunneling ionization process and to produce significant resonance-enhanced four-wave mixing for efficient terahertz (THz) wave generation that is crucial for long-wave application. On the other hand, we utilized the enhancement offered by high-Q optical resonances inside microresonators to produce significant photothermal backaction to dramatically suppress the fundamental temperature fluctuations of microresonators, which is essential for sensing and metrology applications. With such cavity-resonance enhancement, we revealed a new regime of nonlinear optical oscillation dynamics in lithium niobate microresonators that results from unique competition between the thermo-optic nonlinear effect and the photorefractive effect, which is inaccessible to

  17. Suppression of two-photon resonantly enhanced nonlinear processes in extended media

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, W.R.; Moore, M.A.; Payne, M.G.; Wunderlich, R.K.

    1988-11-01

    On the basis of combined experimental and theoretical studies of nonlinear processes associated with two-photon excitations near 3d and 4d states in Na, we show how resonantly enhanced stimulated hyper-Raman emission, parametric four-wave mixing processes and total resonant two-photon absorption can become severely suppressed through the actions of internally generated fields on the total atomic response in extended media. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Atomic-layer-deposited silver and dielectric nanostructures for plasmonic enhancement of Raman scattering from nanoscale ultrathin films.

    PubMed

    Ko, Chung-Ting; Yang, Po-Shuan; Han, Yin-Yi; Wang, Wei-Cheng; Huang, Jhih-Jie; Lee, Yen-Hui; Tsai, Yi-Jen; Shieh, Jay; Chen, Miin-Jang

    2015-07-03

    Plasmonic silver nanostructures and a precise ZnO cover layer prepared by capacitively coupled plasma atomic layer deposition (ALD) were exploited to enhance the Raman scattering from nanoscale ultrathin films on a Si substrate. The plasmonic activity was supported by a nanostructured Ag (nano-Ag) layer, and a ZnO cover layer was introduced upon the nano-Ag layer to spectrally tailor the localized surface plasmon resonance to coincide with the laser excitation wavelength. Because of the optimized dielectric environment provided by the precise growth of ZnO cover layer using ALD, the intensity of Raman scattering from nanoscale ultrathin films was significantly enhanced by an additional order of magnitude, leading to the observation of the monoclinic and tetragonal phases in the nanoscale ZrO2 high-K gate dielectric as thin as ∼6 nm on Si substrate. The excellent agreement between the finite-difference time-domain simulation and experimental measurement further confirms the so-called [absolute value]E(->)[absolute value](4) dependence of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering. This technique of plasmonic enhancement of Raman spectroscopy, assisted by the nano-Ag layer and optimized dielectric environment prepared by ALD, can be applied to characterize the structures of ultrathin films in a variety of nanoscale materials and devices, even on a Si substrate with overwhelming Raman background.

  19. Dielectric-substrate-induced surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glembocki, O. J.; Rendell, R. W.; Alexson, D. A.; Prokes, S. M.; Fu, A.; Mastro, M. A.

    2009-08-01

    It is shown through experimental mapping of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) from dielectric core nanowires exposed to benzene thiol that any dielectric substrate plays a critical role in the SERS enhancement. Theoretical calculations of the plasmonic enhancement using finite element methods confirms the role that the substrate plays in increasing the intensity and spatial extent of the SERS enhancement. It is shown that because of the cylindrical shape of the nanowires, significant SERS hot spots form not only between crossed nanowires but also at the point of contact between the nanowires and the substrate on which they are placed. This result also applies to any structure whose geometry results in a point or line contact with an underlying substrate.

  20. Resonance Raman and UV-visible spectroscopy of black dyes on textiles.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Laurence C; Batchelor, Stephen N; Smith, John R Lindsay; Moore, John N

    2010-10-10

    Resonance Raman and UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectra were recorded from samples of cotton, viscose, polyester, nylon, and acrylic textile swatches dyed black with one of seven single dyes, a mixture of two dyes, or one of seven mixtures of three dyes. The samples generally gave characteristic Raman spectra of the dyes, demonstrating that the technique is applicable for the forensic analysis of dyed black textiles. Survey studies of the widely used dye Reactive Black 5 show that essentially the same Raman spectrum is obtained on bulk sampling from the dye in solution, on viscose, on cotton at different uptakes, and on microscope sampling from the dye in cotton threads and single fibres. The effects of laser irradiation on the Raman bands and emission backgrounds from textile samples with and without dye are also reported. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. In vivo macular pigment measurements: a comparison of resonance Raman spectroscopy and heterochromatic flicker photometry

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, R E; Anderson, R S; Stevenson, M R; Zlatkova, M B; Chakravarthy, U

    2007-01-01

    Aim To investigate whether two methods of measuring macular pigment—namely, heterochromatic flicker photometry (HFP) and resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS)—yield comparable data. Methods Macular pigment was measured using HFP and RRS in the right eye of 107 participants aged 20–79 years. Correlations between methods were sought and regression models generated. RRS was recorded as Raman counts and HFP as macular pigment optical density (MPOD). The average of the top three of five Raman counts was compared with MPOD obtained at 0.5° eccentricity, and an integrated measure (spatial profile; MPODsp) computed from four stimulus sizes on HFP. Results The coefficient of variation was 12.0% for MPODsp and 13.5% for Raman counts. MPODsp exhibited significant correlations with Raman counts (r = 0.260, p = 0.012), whereas MPOD at 0.5° did not correlate significantly (r = 0.163, p = 0.118). MPODsp was not significantly correlated with age (p = 0.062), whereas MPOD at 0.5° was positively correlated (p = 0.011). Raman counts showed a significant decrease with age (p = 0.002) and were significantly lower when pupil size was smaller (p = 0.015). Conclusions Despite a statistically significant correlation, the correlations were weak, with those in excess of 90% of the variance between MPODsp and Raman counts remaining unexplained, meriting further research. PMID:16825281

  2. In vivo macular pigment measurements: a comparison of resonance Raman spectroscopy and heterochromatic flicker photometry.

    PubMed

    Hogg, R E; Anderson, R S; Stevenson, M R; Zlatkova, M B; Chakravarthy, U

    2007-04-01

    To investigate whether two methods of measuring macular pigment-namely, heterochromatic flicker photometry (HFP) and resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS)--yield comparable data. Macular pigment was measured using HFP and RRS in the right eye of 107 participants aged 20-79 years. Correlations between methods were sought and regression models generated. RRS was recorded as Raman counts and HFP as macular pigment optical density (MPOD). The average of the top three of five Raman counts was compared with MPOD obtained at 0.5 degrees eccentricity, and an integrated measure (spatial profile; MPODsp) computed from four stimulus sizes on HFP. The coefficient of variation was 12.0% for MPODsp and 13.5% for Raman counts. MPODsp exhibited significant correlations with Raman counts (r = 0.260, p = 0.012), whereas MPOD at 0.5 degrees did not correlate significantly (r = 0.163, p = 0.118). MPODsp was not significantly correlated with age (p = 0.062), whereas MPOD at 0.5 degrees was positively correlated (p = 0.011). Raman counts showed a significant decrease with age (p = 0.002) and were significantly lower when pupil size was smaller (p = 0.015). Despite a statistically significant correlation, the correlations were weak, with those in excess of 90% of the variance between MPODsp and Raman counts remaining unexplained, meriting further research.

  3. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering of Silicon Nanocrystals in a Silica Film

    PubMed Central

    Novikov, Sergei; Khriachtchev, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is an intriguing effect, efficiency of which depends on many factors and whose applicability to a given system is not obvious before the experiment. The motivation of the present work is to demonstrate the SERS effect on silicon nanocrystals (Si-nc) embedded in silica, the material of high technological importance. Using the Ag overlayer method, we have found the SERS effect for this material. The best result is obtained for Ag layers of a weight thickness of 12 nm, whose surface plasmons are in a resonance with the laser wavelength (488 nm). The enhancement obtained for the Raman signal from 3–4-nm Si-nc in a 40-nm SiOx film is above 100. The SERS effect is about twice stronger for ultra-small Si-nc (~1 nm) and/or disordered silicon compared to Si-nc with sizes of 3–4 nm. The SERS measurements with an Ag overlayer allow detecting silicon crystallization for ultra-thin SiOx films and/or for very low Si excess and suppress the Raman signal from the substrate and the photoluminescence of the film. PMID:27256615

  4. Photoacoustic imaging and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy using dual modal contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sungjo; Lee, Seunghyun; Cha, Myeonggeun; Jeong, Cheolhwan; Kang, Homan; Park, So Yeon; Lee, Yoon-sik; Jeong, Daehong; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    Recently, photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has emerged as a remarkable non-invasive imaging modality that provides a strong optical absorption contrast, high ultrasonic resolution, and great penetration depth. Thus, PAT has been widely used as an in vivo preclinical imaging tool. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is another attractive sensing technology in biological research because it offers highly sensitive chemical analyses and multiplexed detection. By performing dual-modal imaging of SERS and PAT, high-resolution structural PAT imaging and high-sensitivity SERS sensing can be achieved. At the same time, it is equally important to develop a dual modal contrast agent for this purpose. To perform both PAT and SERS, we synthesized PEGylated silver bumpy nanoshells (AgBSs). The AgBSs generate strong PA signals owing to their strong optical absorption properties as well as sensitive SERS signals because of the surface plasmon resonance effect. Then, multiplexed Raman chemicals were synthesized to enhance the sensitivity of Raman. We have photoacoustically imaged the sentinel lymph nodes of small animals after intradermal injection of multiplexed agents. Furthermore, the chemical composition of each agent has been distinguished through SERS.

  5. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering of Silicon Nanocrystals in a Silica Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Sergei; Khriachtchev, Leonid

    2016-06-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is an intriguing effect, efficiency of which depends on many factors and whose applicability to a given system is not obvious before the experiment. The motivation of the present work is to demonstrate the SERS effect on silicon nanocrystals (Si-nc) embedded in silica, the material of high technological importance. Using the Ag overlayer method, we have found the SERS effect for this material. The best result is obtained for Ag layers of a weight thickness of 12 nm, whose surface plasmons are in a resonance with the laser wavelength (488 nm). The enhancement obtained for the Raman signal from 3-4-nm Si-nc in a 40-nm SiOx film is above 100. The SERS effect is about twice stronger for ultra-small Si-nc (~1 nm) and/or disordered silicon compared to Si-nc with sizes of 3-4 nm. The SERS measurements with an Ag overlayer allow detecting silicon crystallization for ultra-thin SiOx films and/or for very low Si excess and suppress the Raman signal from the substrate and the photoluminescence of the film.

  6. Al-doped MgB{sub 2} materials studied using electron paramagnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bateni, Ali; Somer, Mehmet E-mail: msomer@ku.edu.tr; Erdem, Emre E-mail: msomer@ku.edu.tr; Repp, Sergej; Weber, Stefan

    2016-05-16

    Undoped and aluminum (Al) doped magnesium diboride (MgB{sub 2}) samples were synthesized using a high-temperature solid-state synthesis method. The microscopic defect structures of Al-doped MgB{sub 2} samples were systematically investigated using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance. It was found that Mg-vacancies are responsible for defect-induced peculiarities in MgB{sub 2}. Above a certain level of Al doping, enhanced conductive properties of MgB{sub 2} disappear due to filling of vacancies or trapping of Al in Mg-related vacancy sites.

  7. Microsystem light source at 488 nm for shifted excitation resonance Raman difference spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maiwald, Martin; Schmidt, Heinar; Sumpf, Bernd; Güther, Reiner; Erbert, Götz; Kronfeldt, Heinz-Detlef; Tränkle, Günther

    2009-11-01

    A microsystem light source emitting at 488 nm was tested and applied as a light source for shifted excitation resonance Raman difference spectroscopy (SERRDS). A nonlinear frequency conversion using a distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser emission at 976 nm and a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide crystal was realized on a micro-optical bench with a footprint of 25 mm x 5 mm. Joint temperature management via the microbench is used for wavelength tuning. Two emission lines at 487.61 nm and 487.91 nm are used for the SERRDS experiments. The Raman spectra of the test sample polystyrene demonstrate that a laser bandpass filter did not need to be implemented. Resonance Raman spectra of Tartrazine (FD&C Yellow 5, E 102) in distilled water are presented to demonstrate the suitability of this light source for SERRDS in, e.g., food safety control.

  8. Resonance enhanced dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Plum, Markus A; Menges, Bernhard; Fytas, George; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Steffen, Werner

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel light scattering setup that enables probing of dynamics near solid surfaces. An evanescent wave generated by a surface plasmon resonance in a metal layer is the incident light field in the dynamic light scattering experiment. The combination of surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering leads to a spatiotemporal resolution extending a few hundred nanometers from the surface and from microseconds to seconds. The comparison with evanescent wave dynamic light scattering identifies the advantages of the presented technique, e.g., surface monitoring, use of metal surfaces, and biorelevant systems. For both evanescent wave geometries, we define the scattering wave vector necessary for the analysis of the experimental relaxation functions.

  9. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Beta-Carotene and Lycopene: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoskins, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the theory of resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy as it applies to beta-carotene and lycopene pigments (found in tomatoes and carrots, respectively). Also discusses an experiment which demonstrates the theoretical principles involved. The experiment has been tested over a three-year period and has received excellent acceptance by physical…

  10. Ab initio calculation of resonance Raman cross sections based on excited state geometry optimization.

    PubMed

    Gaff, J F; Franzen, S; Delley, B

    2010-11-04

    A method for the calculation of resonance Raman cross sections is presented on the basis of calculation of structural differences between optimized ground and excited state geometries using density functional theory. A vibrational frequency calculation of the molecule is employed to obtain normal coordinate displacements for the modes of vibration. The excited state displacement relative to the ground state can be calculated in the normal coordinate basis by means of a linear transformation from a Cartesian basis to a normal coordinate one. The displacements in normal coordinates are then scaled by root-mean-square displacement of zero point motion to calculate dimensionless displacements for use in the two-time-correlator formalism for the calculation of resonance Raman spectra at an arbitrary temperature. The method is valid for Franck-Condon active modes within the harmonic approximation. The method was validated by calculation of resonance Raman cross sections and absorption spectra for chlorine dioxide, nitrate ion, trans-stilbene, 1,3,5-cycloheptatriene, and the aromatic amino acids. This method permits significant gains in the efficiency of calculating resonance Raman cross sections from first principles and, consequently, permits extension to large systems (>50 atoms).

  11. Resonance Raman spectroscopic evaluation of skin carotenoids as a biomarker of carotenoid status for human studies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Resonance Raman Spectroscopy (RRS) is a non-invasive method that has been developed to assess carotenoid status in human tissues including human skin in vivo. Skin carotenoid status, as assessed by RRS, has been suggested as a promising biomarker for use in human studies. This manuscript describes...

  12. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Beta-Carotene and Lycopene: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoskins, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the theory of resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy as it applies to beta-carotene and lycopene pigments (found in tomatoes and carrots, respectively). Also discusses an experiment which demonstrates the theoretical principles involved. The experiment has been tested over a three-year period and has received excellent acceptance by physical…

  13. Simulation of the resonance Raman spectra for 5-halogenated (F, Cl, and Br) uracils.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuai; Brown, Alex

    2015-04-30

    The resonance Raman spectra of the 5-halogenated (F, Cl, and Br) uracils are simulated via the Herzberg-Teller (HT) short-time dynamics formalism. The gradient of the S1 excited state is computed at the CAMB3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory in the conductor-like polarizable continuum model for water (C-PCM, H2O), based on the equilibrium geometry determined using PBE0/aug-cc-pVTZ in H2O (C-PCM). The simulated resonance Raman spectra show good agreement with the experimental spectra in terms of both peak positions and intensities. The differences between the resonance Raman spectra of the three 5-halogenated uracils, caused by the effect of halogen substitution, are examined in terms of ground-state normal-mode eigenvectors and excited-state Cartesian gradients, according to the HT formalism. The differences in the normal-mode eigenvectors and excited-state Cartesian gradients between 5-fluorouracil and 5-chlorouracil are used to interpret the dissimilarity between their resonance Raman spectra. Meanwhile, the similarity between the spectra of 5-chlorouracil and 5-bromouracil is explained by the correspondence between their normal modes and excited-state gradients.

  14. On the Increasing Fragility of Human Teeth with Age: ADeep-Ultraviolet Resonance Raman Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ager III, J.W.; Nalla, R.K.; Balooch, G.; Kim, G.; Pugach, M.; Habelitz, S.; Marshall, G.W.; Kinney, J.H.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2006-07-14

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRRS) using 244nm excitation was used to investigate the impact of aging on humandentin. The intensity of a spectroscopic feature from the peptide bondsin the collagen increases with tissue age, similar to a finding reportedpreviously for human cortical bone.

  15. Near-infrared active metamaterials and their applications in tunable surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xinglin; Zhang, Qing; Chai, Jianwei; Wong, Lai Mun; Wang, Shijie; Xiong, Qihua

    2014-02-10

    By utilizing the phase change properties of vanadium dioxide (VO2), we have demonstrated the tuning of the electric and magnetic modes of split ring resonators (SRRs) simultaneously within the near IR range. The electric resonance wavelength is blue-shift about 73 nm while the magnetic resonance mode is red-shifted about 126 nm during the phase transition from insulating to metallic phases. Due to the hysteresis phenomenon of VO2 phase transition, both the electric and magnetic modes shifts are hysteretic. In addition to the frequency shift, the magnetic mode has a trend to vanish due to the fact that the metallic phase VO2 has the tendency to short the gap of SRR. We have also demonstrated the application of this active metamaterials in tunable surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), for a fixed excitation laser wavelength, the Raman intensity can be altered significantly by tuning the electric mode frequency of SRR, which is accomplished by controlling the phase of VO2 with an accurate temperature control.

  16. Bandwidth enhancement of dielectric resonator antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Simons, Rainee N.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation of bandwidth enhancement of dielectric resonator antennas (DRA) using parasitic elements is reported. Substantial bandwidth enhancement for the HE(sub 11delta) mode of the stacked geometry and for the HE(sub 13delta) mode of the coplanar collinear geometry was demonstrated. Excellent radiation patterns for the HE(sub 11delta) mode were also recorded.

  17. Tip-enhanced Raman scattering of bacillus subtilis spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusciano, G.; Zito, G.; Pesce, G.; Sasso, A.; Isticato, R.; Ricca, E.

    2015-07-01

    Understanding of the complex interactions of molecules at biological interfaces is a fundamental issue in biochemistry, biotechnology as well as biomedicine. A plethora of biological processes are ruled by the molecular texture of cellular membrane: cellular communications, drug transportations and cellular recognition are just a few examples of such chemically-mediated processes. Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering (TERS) is a novel, Raman-based technique which is ideally suited for this purpose. TERS relies on the combination of scanning probe microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The basic idea is the use of a metalled tip as a sort of optical nano-antenna, which gives place to SERS effect close to the tip end. Herein, we present the application of TERS to analyze the surface of Bacillus subtilis spores. The choice of this biological systems is related to the fact that a number of reasons support the use of spores as a mucosal delivery system. The remarkable and well-documented resistance of spores to various environmental and toxic effects make them clear potentials as a novel, surface-display system. Our experimental outcomes demonstrate that TERS is able to provide a nano-scale chemical imaging of spore surface. Moreover, we demonstrate that TERS allows differentiation between wilde-type spore and genetically modified strains. These results hold promise for the characterization and optimization of spore surface for drug-delivery applications.

  18. Rapid surface enhanced Raman scattering detection method for chloramphenicol residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Yao, Weirong

    2015-06-01

    Chloramphenicol (CAP) is a widely used amide alcohol antibiotics, which has been banned from using in food producing animals in many countries. In this study, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) coupled with gold colloidal nanoparticles was used for the rapid analysis of CAP. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were conducted with Gaussian 03 at the B3LYP level using the 3-21G(d) and 6-31G(d) basis sets to analyze the assignment of vibrations. Affirmatively, the theoretical Raman spectrum of CAP was in complete agreement with the experimental spectrum. They both exhibited three strong peaks characteristic of CAP at 1104 cm-1, 1344 cm-1, 1596 cm-1, which were used for rapid qualitative analysis of CAP residues in food samples. The use of SERS as a method for the measurements of CAP was explored by comparing use of different solvents, gold colloidal nanoparticles concentration and absorption time. The method of the detection limit was determined as 0.1 μg/mL using optimum conditions. The Raman peak at 1344 cm-1 was used as the index for quantitative analysis of CAP in food samples, with a linear correlation of R2 = 0.9802. Quantitative analysis of CAP residues in foods revealed that the SERS technique with gold colloidal nanoparticles was sensitive and of a good stability and linear correlation, and suited for rapid analysis of CAP residue in a variety of food samples.

  19. Raman scattering enhancement characteristic of Nb-doped silica fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Chen, Zhenyi; Chen, Na; Guo, Qiang; Bai, Hua; Pang, Fufei; Wang, Tingyun

    2010-12-01

    Raman scattering enhancement characteristic of a new kind of Nb-doped silica fiber has been studied in this paper. This Nb-doped special silica optical fiber is fabricated on Modified Chemical Vapor Deposition (MCVD) (which is the traditional fiber preform fabrication technologies) combined with Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). Meanwhile, Raman spectrum of different length Nb-doped special silica optical fiber samples has been measured with the 785nm exciting light. Then, it develops the measurement comparison between Nb-doped special silica optical fiber and conventional single-mode optical fiber in the wavelength range from 820nm to 920nm. The measuring results indicate that the new Nb-doped special silica optical fiber shows higher Raman scattering intensity compared with conventional single-mode optical fiber. On the other hand, the inferred spectrum of the new Nb-doped special silica optical fiber is also measured, and its measurement wavenumber range is from 400 cm-1 to 4000 cm-1. Finally, the loss spectrum of the Nb-doped special silica optical fiber is measured and its loss at 1550nm is 0.01dB/m.

  20. Conjugated Polymer with Intrinsic Alkyne Units for Synergistically Enhanced Raman Imaging in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengliang; Chen, Tao; Wang, Yunxia; Liu, Libing; Lv, Fengting; Li, Zhiliang; Huang, Yanyi; Schanze, Kirk S; Wang, Shu

    2017-08-29

    Development of Raman-active materials with enhanced and distinctive Raman vibrations in the Raman-silent region (1800-2800 cm(-1) ) is highly required for specific molecular imaging of living cells with high spatial resolution. Herein, water-soluble cationic conjugated polymers (CCPs), poly(phenylene ethynylene) (PPE) derivatives, are explored for use as alkyne-state-dependent Raman probes for living cell imaging due to synergetic enhancement effect of alkyne vibrations in Raman-silent region compared to alkyne-containing small molecules. The enhanced alkyne signals result from the integration of alkyne groups into the rigid backbone and the delocalized π-conjugated structure. PPE-based conjugated polymer nanoparticles (CPNs) were also prepared as Raman-responsive nanomaterials for distinct imaging application. This work opens a new way into the development of conjugated polymer materials for enhanced Raman imaging. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.