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Sample records for enhanced serotonin transmission

  1. Enhanced serotonin and mesolimbic dopamine transmissions in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Sagheddu, Claudia; Aroni, Sonia; De Felice, Marta; Lecca, Salvatore; Luchicchi, Antonio; Melis, Miriam; Muntoni, Anna Lisa; Romano, Rosaria; Palazzo, Enza; Guida, Francesca; Maione, Sabatino; Pistis, Marco

    2015-10-01

    In humans, affective consequences of neuropathic pain, ranging from depression to anxiety and anhedonia, severely impair quality of life and are a major disease burden, often requiring specific medications. Depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors have also been observed in animal models of peripheral nerve injury. Dysfunctions in central nervous system monoamine transmission have been hypothesized to underlie depressive and anxiety disorders in neuropathic pain. To assess whether these neurons display early changes in their activity that in the long-term might lead to chronicization, maladaptive plasticity and affective consequences, we carried out in vivo extracellular single unit recordings from serotonin neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) and from dopamine neurons in ventral tegmental area (VTA) in the spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain in rats. Extracellular dopamine levels and the expression of dopamine D1, D2 receptors and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) were measured in the nucleus accumbens. We report that, two weeks following peripheral nerve injury, discharge rate of serotonin DRN neurons and burst firing of VTA dopamine cells are enhanced, when compared with sham-operated animals. We also observed higher extracellular dopamine levels and reduced expression of D2, but not D1, receptors and TH in the nucleus accumbens. Our study confirms that peripheral neuropathy induces changes in the serotonin and dopamine systems that might be the early result of chronic maladaptation to persistent pain. The allostatic activation of these neural systems, which mirrors that already described as a consequence of stress, might lead to depression and anxiety previously observed in neuropathic animals but also an attempt to cope positively with the negative experience.

  2. Antidepressant-like behavioral effects of IGF-I produced by enhanced serotonin transmission.

    PubMed

    Hoshaw, Brian A; Hill, Tiffany I; Crowley, James J; Malberg, Jessica E; Khawaja, Xavier; Rosenzweig-Lipson, Sharon; Schechter, Lee E; Lucki, Irwin

    2008-10-10

    Previous research has suggested that mobilization of neurotrophic factors, such as insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), can be involved in the effects of antidepressant treatments. The current experiments showed that IGF-I leads to antidepressant-like effects in the modified rat forced swim test when tested 3 days, but not 1 day, after i.c.v. administration. These effects were sustained longer than the antidepressants paroxetine and desipramine. In addition, blockade of the IGF-I receptor with the IGF-I antagonist JB1 30 min before IGF-I administration prevented the antidepressant-like effects of IGF-I. However, when JB1 was administered 3 days after IGF-I administration and 30 min prior to testing, the antidepressant-like effects of IGF-I were still present suggesting that IGF-1 produces a long-term activation of neural systems involved in the antidepressant response. Because the pattern of antidepressant-like effects of IGF-I resembled those of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, the role of serotonin in the behavioral effects of IGF-I was studied. Depletion of serotonin, by the tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor para-chlorophenylalanine, blocked the antidepressant-like effects of IGF-I. Administration of IGF-I increased basal serotonin levels in the ventral hippocampus and altered the effects of acute citalopram. IGF-I administration did not change hippocampal cell proliferation at the 3-day timepoint when behavioral effects were seen. In addition, IGF-I did not alter the expression of mRNA levels of tryptophan hydroxylase or SERT in the brain stem, or [3H] citalopram binding in the hippocampus or cortex. Thus, IGF-I administration initiates a long-lasting cascade of neurochemical effects involving increased serotonin levels that results in antidepressant-like behavioral effects.

  3. Differences in Anxiety-Like Behavior within a Batch of Wistar Rats Are Associated with Differences in Serotonergic Transmission, Enhanced by Acute SRI Administration, and Abolished By Serotonin Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Näslund, Jakob; Studer, Erik; Pettersson, Robert; Hagsäter, Melker; Nilsson, Staffan; Nissbrandt, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Background: The anxiety-reducing effect of long-term administration of serotonin reuptake inhibitors is usually seen only in subjects with anxiety disorders, and such patients are also abnormally inclined to experience a paradoxical anxiety-enhancing effect of acute serotonin reuptake inhibition. These unique responses to serotonin reuptake inhibitors in anxiety-prone subjects suggest, as do genetic association studies, that inter-individual differences in anxiety may be associated with differences in serotonergic transmission. Methods: The one-third of the animals within a batch of Wistar rats most inclined to spend time on open arms in the elevated plus maze were compared with the one-third most inclined to avoid them with respect to indices of brain serotonergic transmission and how their behavior was influenced by serotonin-modulating drugs. Results: “Anxious” rats displayed higher expression of the tryptophan hydroxylase-2 gene and higher levels of the tryptophan hydroxylase-2 protein in raphe and also higher levels of serotonin in amygdala. Supporting these differences to be important for the behavioral differences, serotonin depletion obtained by the tryptophan hydroxylase-2 inhibitor p-chlorophenylalanine eliminated them by reducing anxiety in “anxious” but not “non-anxious” rats. Acute administration of a serotonin reuptake inhibitor, paroxetine, exerted an anxiety-enhancing effect in “anxious” but not “non-anxious” rats, which was eliminated by long-term pretreatment with another serotonin reuptake inhibitor, escitalopram. Conclusions: Differences in an anxiogenic impact of serotonin, which is enhanced by acute serotonin reuptake inhibitor administration, may contribute to differences in anxiety-like behavior amongst Wistar rats. PMID:25716782

  4. Serotonin modulates glutamatergic transmission to neurons in the lateral habenula.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guiqin; Zuo, Wanhong; Wu, Liangzhi; Li, Wenting; Wu, Wei; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-04-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is bilaterally connected with serotoninergic raphe nuclei, and expresses high density of serotonin receptors. However, actions of serotonin on the excitatory synaptic transmission to LHb neurons have not been thoroughly investigated. The LHb contains two anatomically and functionally distinct regions: lateral (LHbl) and medial (LHbm) divisions. We compared serotonin's effects on glutamatergic transmission across the LHb in rat brains. Serotonin bi-directionally and differentially modulated glutamatergic transmission. Serotonin inhibited glutamatergic transmission in higher percentage of LHbl neurons but potentiated in higher percentage of LHbm neurons. Magnitude of potentiation was greater in LHbm than in LHbl. Type 2 and 3 serotonin receptor antagonists attenuated serotonin's potentiation. The serotonin reuptake blocker, and the type 2 and 3 receptor agonists facilitated glutamatergic transmission in both LHbl and LHbm neurons. Thus, serotonin via activating its type 2, 3 receptors, increased glutamate release at nerve terminals in some LHb neurons. Our data demonstrated that serotonin affects both LHbm and LHbl. Serotonin might play an important role in processing information between the LHb and its downstream-targeted structures during decision-making. It may also contribute to a homeostatic balance underlying the neural circuitry between the LHb and raphe nuclei.

  5. Serotonin modulates glutamatergic transmission to neurons in the lateral habenula

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guiqin; Zuo, Wanhong; Wu, Liangzhi; Li, Wenting; Wu, Wei; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is bilaterally connected with serotoninergic raphe nuclei, and expresses high density of serotonin receptors. However, actions of serotonin on the excitatory synaptic transmission to LHb neurons have not been thoroughly investigated. The LHb contains two anatomically and functionally distinct regions: lateral (LHbl) and medial (LHbm) divisions. We compared serotonin’s effects on glutamatergic transmission across the LHb in rat brains. Serotonin bi-directionally and differentially modulated glutamatergic transmission. Serotonin inhibited glutamatergic transmission in higher percentage of LHbl neurons but potentiated in higher percentage of LHbm neurons. Magnitude of potentiation was greater in LHbm than in LHbl. Type 2 and 3 serotonin receptor antagonists attenuated serotonin’s potentiation. The serotonin reuptake blocker, and the type 2 and 3 receptor agonists facilitated glutamatergic transmission in both LHbl and LHbm neurons. Thus, serotonin via activating its type 2, 3 receptors, increased glutamate release at nerve terminals in some LHb neurons. Our data demonstrated that serotonin affects both LHbm and LHbl. Serotonin might play an important role in processing information between the LHb and its downstream-targeted structures during decision-making. It may also contribute to a homeostatic balance underlying the neural circuitry between the LHb and raphe nuclei. PMID:27033153

  6. Serotonin inhibition of synaptic transmission: Galpha(0) decreases the abundance of UNC-13 at release sites.

    PubMed

    Nurrish, S; Ségalat, L; Kaplan, J M

    1999-09-01

    We show that serotonin inhibits synaptic transmission at C. elegans neuromuscular junctions, and we describe a signaling pathway that mediates this effect. Release of acetylcholine from motor neurons was assayed by measuring the sensitivity of intact animals to the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor aldicarb. By this assay, exogenous serotonin inhibited acetylcholine release, whereas serotonin antagonists stimulated release. The effects of serotonin on synaptic transmission were mediated by GOA-1 (a Galpha0 subunit) and DGK-1 (a diacylglycerol [DAG] kinase), both of which act in the ventral cord motor neurons. Mutants lacking goa-1 G(alpha)0 accumulated abnormally high levels of the DAG-binding protein UNC-13 at motor neuron nerve terminals, suggesting that serotonin inhibits synaptic transmission by decreasing the abundance of UNC-13 at release sites.

  7. Serotonin enhances the impact of health information on food choice.

    PubMed

    Vlaev, Ivo; Crockett, Molly J; Clark, Luke; Müller, Ulrich; Robbins, Trevor W

    2017-01-23

    Serotonin has been implicated in promoting self-control, regulation of hunger and physiological homeostasis, and regulation of caloric intake. However, it remains unclear whether the effects of serotonin on caloric intake reflect purely homeostatic mechanisms, or whether serotonin also modulates cognitive processes involved in dietary decision making. We investigated the effects of an acute dose of the serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram on choices between food items that differed along taste and health attributes, compared with placebo and the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine. Twenty-seven participants attended three sessions and received single doses of atomoxetine, citalopram, and placebo in a double-blind randomised cross-over design. Relative to placebo, citalopram increased choices of more healthy foods over less healthy foods. Citalopram also increased the emphasis on health considerations in decisions. Atomoxetine did not affect decision making relative to placebo. The results support the hypothesis that serotonin may influence food choice by enhancing a focus on long-term goals. The findings are relevant for understanding decisions about food consumption and also for treating health conditions such as eating disorders and obesity.

  8. Alterations of dopamine and serotonin transmission in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Remington, Gary

    2008-01-01

    The present chapter outlines current thinking regarding serotonin and dopamine in schizophrenia. Each has individually been linked to theories regarding the illness' pathophysiology although the focus here is on their interactive role, a model that has driven drug development in the field for the last 10-15 years. With clozapine as a prototype, a new class of 'atypical' antipsychotics entered the clinical market, hinged predominantly on the notion that these agents were superior to conventional antipsychotics through their ratio of serotonin 5-HT(2)/dopamine D(2) binding. This model has since been challenged both clinically and theoretically, but interest in serotonin-dopamine interactions remains high in the face of a broader conceptualization of schizophrenia's symptom domains, in combination with a shift in the perceived role of dopamine vis-à-vis these different clinical features. At present, there is particular interest in the 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(2C), 5-HT(6) and 5-HT(7) receptors as the search for improved pharmacological treatments for schizophrenia continues.

  9. Receptor mediation of exaggerated responses to serotonin-enhancing drugs in serotonin transporter (SERT)-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Fox, Meredith A; Jensen, Catherine L; Gallagher, Pamela S; Murphy, Dennis L

    2007-10-01

    Administration of serotonin-enhancing drugs induces a distinctive behavioral syndrome in rodents. We previously reported that mice with a targeted disruption of the serotonin transporter (SERT) display some of these behaviors spontaneously, in the absence of drug. In the current studies, we assessed the drug-induced serotonin syndrome in SERT wildtype (+/+), heterozygous (+/-) and knockout (-/-) mice. In SERT -/- mice, the monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) tranylcypromine (1mg/kg) or the serotonin precursor 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-HTP; 80 mg/kg) led to markedly exaggerated serotonin syndrome behaviors relative to SERT +/+ mice, with an intermediate phenotype in SERT +/- mice. SERT +/+ mice developed significant serotonin syndrome behaviors only with the combination of the MAO-A/B inhibitor tranylcypromine (0.5 or 1 mg/kg) or the MAO-A-selective inhibitor clorgyline (1.2 mg/kg) plus 5-HTP. In evaluations of underlying mechanisms, pretreatment with the Htr1a receptor antagonist WAY 100635 (1 mg/kg), but not the Htr7 antagonist SB 269970 (3 mg/kg) or the Htr2a antagonist MDL 11,939 (5 mg/kg), markedly decreased the exaggerated 5-HTP-induced behaviors in SERT -/- mice. Subsequent experiments showed that the Htr1a agonist 8-OH-DPAT (1 or 2 mg/kg) elicited serotonin syndrome behaviors in a dose-dependent manner, blocked by WAY 100635 (1 mg/kg), in mice of all three genotypes, confirming the role of Htr1a receptors. The current data document markedly enhanced behavioral sensitivity to serotonin-enhancing drugs in SERT-deficient mice. These studies also show that the exaggerated behavioral responses observed in SERT +/- and -/- mice are mediated by postsynaptic Htr1a receptors, and suggest intact postsynaptic Htr1a function in SERT -/- mice.

  10. Enhanced contextual fear memory in central serotonin-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jin-Xia; Han, Hui-Li; Tian, Meng; Cao, Jun; Xiu, Jian-Bo; Song, Ning-Ning; Huang, Ying; Xu, Tian-Le; Ding, Yu-Qiang; Xu, Lin

    2008-08-19

    Central serotonin (5-HT) dysregulation contributes to the susceptibility for mental disorders, including depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder, and learning and memory deficits. We report that the formation of hippocampus-dependent spatial memory is compromised, but the acquisition and retrieval of contextual fear memory are enhanced, in central 5-HT-deficient mice. Genetic deletion of serotonin in the brain was achieved by inactivating Lmx1b selectively in the raphe nuclei of the brainstem, resulting in a near-complete loss of 5-HT throughout the brain. These 5-HT-deficient mice exhibited no gross abnormality in brain structures and had normal locomotor activity. Spatial learning in the Morris water maze was unaffected, but the retrieval of spatial memory was impaired. In contrast, contextual fear learning and memory induced by foot-shock conditioning was markedly enhanced, but this enhancement could be prevented by intracerebroventricular administration of 5-HT. Foot shock impaired long-term potentiation and facilitated long-term depression in hippocampal slices in WT mice but had no effect in 5-HT-deficient mice. Furthermore, bath application of 5-HT in 5-HT-deficient mice restored foot shock-induced alterations of hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Thus, central 5-HT regulates hippocampus-dependent contextual fear memory, and 5-HT modulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity may be the underlying mechanism. The enhanced fear memory in 5-HT-deficient mice supports the notion that 5-HT deficiency confers susceptibility to posttraumatic stress disorder in humans.

  11. Bacillus licheniformis Isolated from Traditional Korean Food Resources Enhances the Longevity of Caenorhabditis elegans through Serotonin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi Ri; Oh, Sangnam; Son, Seok Jun; Park, Dong-June; Oh, Sejong; Kim, Sae Hun; Jeong, Do-Youn; Oh, Nam Su; Lee, Youngbok; Song, Minho; Kim, Younghoon

    2015-12-02

    In this study, we investigated potentially probiotic Bacillus licheniformis strains isolated from traditional Korean food sources for ability to enhance longevity using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a simple in vivo animal model. We first investigated whether B. licheniformis strains were capable of modulating the lifespan of C. elegans. Among the tested strains, preconditioning with four B. licheniformis strains significantly enhanced the longevity of C. elegans. Unexpectedly, plate counting and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results indicated that B. licheniformis strains were not more highly attached to the C. elegans intestine compared with Escherichia coli OP50 or Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG controls. In addition, qRT-PCR and an aging assay with mutant worms showed that the conditioning of B. licheniformis strain 141 directly influenced genes associated with serotonin signaling in nematodes, including tph-1 (tryptophan hydroxylase), bas-1 (serotonin- and dopamine-synthetic aromatic amino acid decarboxylase), mod-1 (serotonin-gated chloride channel), ser-1, and ser-7 (serotonin receptors) during C. elegans aging. Our findings suggest that B. licheniformis strain 141, which is isolated from traditional Korean foods, is a probiotic generally recognized as safe (GRAS) strain that enhances the lifespan of C. elegans via host serotonin signaling.

  12. The serotonin1A receptor partial agonist S15535 [4-(benzodioxan-5-yl)1-(indan-2-yl)piperazine] enhances cholinergic transmission and cognitive function in rodents: a combined neurochemical and behavioral analysis.

    PubMed

    Millan, Mark J; Gobert, Alain; Roux, Sylvain; Porsolt, Roger; Meneses, Alfredo; Carli, Mirjana; Di Cara, Benjamin; Jaffard, Robert; Rivet, Jean-Michel; Lestage, Pierre; Mocaer, Elisabeth; Peglion, Jean-Louis; Dekeyne, Anne

    2004-10-01

    These studies examined the influence of the selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) (5-HT)(1A) receptor partial agonist S15535 [4-(benzodioxan-5-yl)1-(indan-2-yl)piperazine] upon cholinergic transmission and cognitive function in rodents. In the absence of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, S15535 dose-dependently (0.04-5.0 mg/kg s.c.) elevated dialysis levels of acetylcholine in the frontal cortex and dorsal hippocampus of freely moving rats. In the cortex, the selective 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist WAY100,635 [(N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-(2-pyridinyl) cyclo-hexanecarboxamide) fumarate] dose-dependently (0.0025-0.63) blocked this action of S15535. By contrast, in dorsal hippocampus, WAY100,635 mimicked the induction of acetylcholine release by S15535. In a social recognition paradigm, S15535 dose-dependently (0.16-10.0) improved retention, an action blocked by WAY100,635 (0.16), which was ineffective alone. Furthermore, S15535 dose-dependently (0.04-2.5) and WAY100,635 reversibly abolished amnesic properties of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine (0.63) in this procedure. Cognitive deficits provoked by scopolamine in autoshaping and Morris water-maze procedures were likewise blocked by S15535 at doses of 0.63 to 10.0 and 0.16 to 2.5, respectively. In a two-platform spatial discrimination task, in which S15535 similarly abrogates cognitive deficits elicited by scopolamine, injection of S15535 (1.0 and 10.0 microg) into dorsal hippocampus blocked amnesic effects of the 5-HT(1A) agonist 8-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralin (0.5 microg). Finally, S15535 (0.16-0.63) improved performance in a spatial, delayed nonmatching to sample model in mice, and in an operant delayed nonmatching to sample model in old rats, S15535 (1.25-5.0 mg/kg p.o.) increased response accuracy and reduced latency to respond. In conclusion, S15535 reinforces frontocortical and hippocampal release of acetylcholine and displays a broad-based pattern of procognitive properties

  13. Neurochemical, behavioral and physiological effects of pharmacologically enhanced serotonin levels in serotonin transporter (SERT)-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Meredith A.; Jensen, Catherine L.; French, Helen T.; Stein, Alison R.; Huang, Su-Jan; Tolliver, Teresa J.; Murphy, Dennis L.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale Serotonin transporter (SERT) knockout (−/−) mice have an altered phenotype in adulthood, including high baseline anxiety and depressive-like behaviors, associated with increased baseline extracellular serotonin levels throughout life. Objectives To examine the effects of increases in serotonin following administration of the serotonin precursor 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-HTP) in SERT wildtype (+/+), heterozygous (+/−) and −/− mice. Results 5-HTP increased serotonin in all five brain areas examined, with ~2–5-fold increases in SERT +/+ and +/− mice, and greater 4.5–11.7-fold increases in SERT −/− mice. Behaviorally, 5-HTP induced exaggerated serotonin syndrome behaviors in SERT −/− mice, with similar effects in male and female mice. Studies suggest promiscuous serotonin uptake by the dopamine transporter (DAT) in SERT −/− mice, and here, the DAT blocker GBR 12909 enhanced 5-HTP-induced behaviors in SERT −/− mice. Physiologically, 5-HTP induced exaggerated temperature effects in SERT-deficient mice. The 5-HT1A antagonist WAY 100635 decreased 5-HTP-induced hypothermia in SERT +/+ and +/− mice, with no effect in SERT −/− mice, whereas the 5-HT7 antagonist SB 269970 decreased this exaggerated response in SERT −/− mice only. WAY 100635 and SB 269970 together completely blocked 5-HTP-induced hypothermia in SERT +/− and −/− mice. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that SERT −/− mice have exaggerated neurochemical, behavioral and physiological responses to further increases in serotonin, and provide the first evidence of intact 5-HT7 receptor function in SERT −/− mice, with interesting interactions between 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptors. As roles for 5-HT7 receptors in anxiety and depression were recently established, the current findings have implications for understanding the high anxiety and depressive-like phenotype of SERT-deficient mice. PMID:18712364

  14. Enhanced serotonin transporter function during depression in seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Willeit, Matthäus; Sitte, Harald H; Thierry, Nikolaus; Michalek, Klaus; Praschak-Rieder, Nicole; Zill, Peter; Winkler, Dietmar; Brannath, Werner; Fischer, Michael B; Bondy, Brigitta; Kasper, Siegfried; Singer, Ernst A

    2008-06-01

    Decreased synaptic serotonin during depressive episodes is a central element of the monoamine hypothesis of depression. The serotonin transporter (5-HTT, SERT) is a key molecule for the control of synaptic serotonin levels. Here we aimed to detect state-related alterations in the efficiency of 5-HTT-mediated inward and outward transport in platelets of drug-free depressed patients suffering from seasonal affective disorder (SAD). 5-HTT turnover rate, a measure for the number of inward transport events per minute, and tyramine-induced, 5-HTT-mediated outward transport were assessed at baseline, after 4 weeks of bright light therapy, and in summer using a case-control design in a consecutive sample of 73 drug-free depressed patients with SAD and 70 nonseasonal healthy controls. Patients were drug-naive or medication-free for at least 6 months prior to study inclusion, females patients were studied in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. All participants were genotyped for a 5-HTT-promoter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) to assess the influence of this polymorphism on 5-HTT parameters. Efficiency of 5-HTT-mediated inward (p=0.014) and outward (p=0.003) transport was enhanced in depressed patients. Both measures normalized toward control levels after therapy and in natural summer remission. Changes in outward transport showed a clear correlation with treatment response (rho=0.421, p=0.001). Changes in inward transport were mediated by changes in 5-HTT transport efficiency rather than affinity or density. 5-HTTLPR was not associated with any of the 5-HTT parameters. In sum, we conclude that the 5-HTT is in a hyperfunctional state during depression in SAD and normalizes after light therapy and in natural summer remission.

  15. Peripheral serotonin enhances lipid metabolism by accelerating bile acid turnover.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hitoshi; Akasaka, Daisuke; Ogasawara, Hideki; Sato, Kan; Miyake, Masato; Saito, Kazuki; Takahashi, Yu; Kanaya, Takashi; Takakura, Ikuro; Hondo, Tetsuya; Chao, Guozheng; Rose, Michael T; Ohwada, Shyuichi; Watanabe, Kouichi; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Aso, Hisashi

    2010-10-01

    Serotonin is synthesized by two distinct tryptophan hydroxylases, one in the brain and one in the periphery. The latter is known to be unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. These two serotonin systems have apparently independent functions, although the functions of peripheral serotonin have yet to be fully elucidated. In this study, we have investigated the physiological effect of peripheral serotonin on the concentrations of metabolites in the circulation and in the liver. After fasting, mice were ip injected with 1 mg serotonin. The plasma glucose concentration was significantly elevated between 60 and 270 min after the injection. In contrast, plasma triglyceride, cholesterol, and nonesterified fatty acid concentrations were decreased. The hepatic glycogen synthesis and concentrations were significantly higher at 240 min. At the same time, the hepatic triglyceride content was significantly lower than the basal levels noted before the serotonin injection, whereas the hepatic cholesterol content was significantly higher by 60 min after the injection. Furthermore, serotonin stimulated the contraction of the gallbladder and the excretion of bile. After the serotonin injection, there was a significant induction of apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter expression, resulting in a decrease in the concentration of bile acids in the feces. Additionally, data are presented to show that the functions of serotonin are mediated through diverse serotonin receptor subtypes. These data indicate that peripheral serotonin accelerates the metabolism of lipid by increasing the concentration of bile acids in circulation.

  16. Serotonin enhances platelet procoagulant properties and their activation induced during platelet tissue factor uptake.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Vilchez, Irene; Diaz-Ricart, Maribel; White, James G; Escolar, Gines; Galan, Ana M

    2009-11-01

    Circulating tissue factor (TF) has been linked to thrombus propagation. Our group demonstrated that platelets possess mechanisms to capture TF-rich microvesicles (TF-MVs). Serotonin facilitates the development of platelets with increased procoagulant activity. An enhanced platelet serotonin uptake has been identified with increased cardiovascular risk. We have investigated the involvement of serotonergic mechanisms facilitating the interaction of human platelets with TF-MVs. Inhibitory strategies aimed at blocking serotonin and coagulation mechanisms were also studied. Standard aggregometry, flow cytometry, electron microscopy, and thrombin generation assays were performed. TF-MVs induced platelet aggregation in heparinized platelet-rich plasma (PRP) samples; this aggregation was further accelerated by serotonin. In washed platelets, serotonin enhanced platelet aggregation to TF-MVs with a maximum peak of 55.9 +/- 1.8 vs. 48.7 +/- 2.1% (P < 0.05). Inhibitory strategies with a selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor and with lepirudin decreased these aggregations. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that serotonin induced platelet pseudopodia formation, thus facilitating the engulfment of TF-MVs. In general, serotonin significantly enhanced (P < 0.05) thrombin generation and the expression of activation markers and procoagulant activity in platelets measured for TF-MVs alone. Serotonin enhances the interaction of platelets with TF-MVs, increases platelet activation, and potentiates their overall procoagulant activity. The present results could have significant implications in thrombus formation and in the thrombogenic profile of pathological situations with increased cardiovascular risk.

  17. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, escitalopram, enhances inhibition of prepotent responding and spatial reversal learning.

    PubMed

    Brown, Holden D; Amodeo, Dionisio A; Sweeney, John A; Ragozzino, Michael E

    2012-11-01

    Previous findings indicate treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) facilitates behavioral flexibility when conditions require inhibition of a learned response pattern. The present experiment investigated whether acute treatment with the SSRI, escitalopram, affects behavioral flexibility when conditions require inhibition of a naturally biased response pattern (elevated conflict test) and/or reversal of a learned response pattern (spatial reversal learning). An additional experiment was carried out to determine whether escitalopram, at doses that affected behavioral flexibility, also reduced anxiety as tested in the elevated plus-maze. In each experiment, Long-Evans rats received an intraperitoneal injection of either saline or escitalopram (0.03, 0.3 or 1.0 mg/kg) 30 min prior to behavioral testing. Escitalopram, at all doses tested, enhanced acquisition in the elevated conflict test, but did not affect performance in the elevated plus-maze. Escitalopram (0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg) did not alter acquisition of the spatial discrimination, but facilitated reversal learning. In the elevated conflict and spatial reversal learning test, escitalopram enhanced the ability to maintain the relevant strategy after being initially selected. The present findings suggest that enhancing serotonin transmission with an SSRI facilitates inhibitory processes when conditions require a shift away from either a naturally biased response pattern or a learned choice pattern.

  18. Evidence of fast serotonin transmission in frog slowly adapting type 1 responses.

    PubMed

    Press, Daniel; Mutlu, Sevinç; Güçlü, Burak

    2010-01-01

    The Merkel cell-neurite (MCN) complex generates slowly adapting type 1 (SA1) response when mechanically stimulated. Both serotonin (5-HT) and glutamate have been implicated in the generation of normal SA1 responses, but previous studies have been inconclusive as to what their roles are or how synaptic transmission occurs. In this study, excised dorsal skin patches from common water frogs (Rana ridibunda) were stimulated by von Frey hairs during perfusion in a tissue bath, and single-unit spike activity was recorded from SA1 fibres. Serotonin had no significant effect on the SA1 response at low (10 µM) concentration, significantly increased activity in a force-independent manner at 100 µM, but decreased activity with reduced responsiveness to force at 1 mM. Glutamate showed no effect on the responsiveness to force at 100 µM. MDL 72222 (100 µM), an ionotropic 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, completely abolished the responsiveness to force, suggesting that serotonin is released from Merkel cells as a result of mechanical stimulation, and activated 5-HT3 receptors on the neurite. The metabotropic 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, ketanserin, greatly reduced the SA1 fibre's responsiveness to force, as did the non-specific glutamate receptor antagonist, kynurenic acid. This supports a role for serotonin and glutamate as neuromodulators in the MCN complex, possibly by activation and/or inhibition of signalling cascades in the Merkel cell associated with vesicle release. Additionally, it was observed that SA1 responses contained a force-independent component, similar to a dynamic response observed during mechanical vibrations.

  19. Thalamic synaptic transmission of sensory information modulated by synergistic interaction of adenosine and serotonin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Chin; Hu, Chun-Chang; Huang, Chen-Syuan; Chou, Pei-Yu

    2014-03-01

    The thalamic synapses relay peripheral sensory information to the cortex, and constitute an important part of the thalamocortical network that generates oscillatory activities responsible for different vigilance (sleep and wakefulness) states. However, the modulation of thalamic synaptic transmission by potential sleep regulators, especially by combination of regulators in physiological scenarios, is not fully characterized. We found that somnogen adenosine itself acts similar to wake-promoting serotonin, both decreasing synaptic strength as well as short-term depression, at the retinothalamic synapse. We then combined the two modulators considering the coexistence of them in the hypnagogic (sleep-onset) state. Adenosine plus serotonin results in robust synergistic inhibition of synaptic strength and dramatic transformation of short-term synaptic depression to facilitation. These synaptic effects are not achievable with a single modulator, and are consistent with a high signal-to-noise ratio but a low level of signal transmission through the thalamus appropriate for slow-wave sleep. This study for the first time demonstrates that the sleep-regulatory modulators may work differently when present in combination than present singly in terms of shaping information flow in the thalamocortical network. The major synaptic characters such as the strength and short-term plasticity can be profoundly altered by combination of modulators based on physiological considerations.

  20. Optogenetic activation of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons enhances patience for future rewards.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Kayoko W; Miyazaki, Katsuhiko; Tanaka, Kenji F; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Takahashi, Aki; Tabuchi, Sawako; Doya, Kenji

    2014-09-08

    Serotonin is a neuromodulator that is involved extensively in behavioral, affective, and cognitive functions in the brain. Previous recording studies of the midbrain dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) revealed that the activation of putative serotonin neurons correlates with the levels of behavioral arousal [1], rhythmic motor outputs [2], salient sensory stimuli [3-6], reward, and conditioned cues [5-8]. The classic theory on serotonin states that it opposes dopamine and inhibits behaviors when aversive events are predicted [9-14]. However, the therapeutic effects of serotonin signal-enhancing medications have been difficult to reconcile with this theory [15, 16]. In contrast, a more recent theory states that serotonin facilitates long-term optimal behaviors and suppresses impulsive behaviors [17-21]. To test these theories, we developed optogenetic mice that selectively express channelrhodopsin in serotonin neurons and tested how the activation of serotonergic neurons in the DRN affects animal behavior during a delayed reward task. The activation of serotonin neurons reduced the premature cessation of waiting for conditioned cues and food rewards. In reward omission trials, serotonin neuron stimulation prolonged the time animals spent waiting. This effect was observed specifically when the animal was engaged in deciding whether to keep waiting and was not due to motor inhibition. Control experiments showed that the prolonged waiting times observed with optogenetic stimulation were not due to behavioral inhibition or the reinforcing effects of serotonergic activation. These results show, for the first time, that the timed activation of serotonin neurons during waiting promotes animals' patience to wait for a delayed reward.

  1. Serotonin enhances urinary bladder nociceptive processing via a 5-HT3 receptor mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jason D; DeWitte, Cary; Ness, Timothy J; Robbins, Meredith T

    2015-09-14

    Serotonin from the descending pain modulatory pathway is critical to nociceptive processing. Its effects on pain modulation may either be inhibitory or facilitatory, depending on the type of pain and which receptors are involved. Little is known about the role of serotonergic systems in bladder nociceptive processing. These studies examined the effect of systemic administration of the serotonin precursor, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), on normal bladder and somatic sensation in rats. ELISA was used to quantify peripheral and central changes in serotonin and its major metabolite following 5-HTP administration, and the potential role of the 5-HT3 receptor on changes in bladder sensation elicited by 5-HTP was investigated. 5-HTP produced bladder hypersensitivity and somatic analgesia. The pro-nociceptive effect of 5-HTP was attenuated by intrathecal, but not systemic, ondansetron. Peripheral increases in serotonin, its metabolism and rate of turnover were detectable within 30min of 5-HTP administration. Significant enhancement of serotonin metabolism was observed centrally. These findings suggest that 5-HTP increases serotonin, which may then affect descending facilitatory systems to produce bladder hypersensitivity via activation of spinal 5-HT3 receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Enhanced Responsiveness to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors during Lactation

    PubMed Central

    Jury, Nicholas J.; McCormick, Betsy A.; Horseman, Nelson D.; Benoit, Stephen C.; Gregerson, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    The physiology of mood regulation in the postpartum is poorly understood despite the fact that postpartum depression (PPD) is a common pathology. Serotonergic mechanisms and their dysfunction are widely presumed to be involved, which has led us to investigate whether lactation induces changes in central or peripheral serotonin (5-HT) systems and related affective behaviors. Brain sections from lactating (day 10 postpartum) and age-matched nulliparous (non-pregnant) C57BL/6J mice were processed for 5-HT immunohistochemistry. The total number of 5-HT immunostained cells and optical density were measured. Lactating mice exhibited lower immunoreactive 5-HT and intensity in the dorsal raphe nucleus when compared with nulliparous controls. Serum 5-HT was quantified from lactating and nulliparous mice using radioimmunoassay. Serum 5-HT concentrations were higher in lactating mice than in nulliparous controls. Affective behavior was assessed in lactating and non-lactating females ten days postpartum, as well as in nulliparous controls using the forced swim test (FST) and marble burying task (MBT). Animals were treated for the preceding five days with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI, citalopram, 5mg/kg/day) or vehicle. Lactating mice exhibited a lower baseline immobility time during the FST and buried fewer marbles during the MBT as compared to nulliparous controls. Citalopram treatment changed these behaviors in lactating mice with further reductions in immobility during the FST and decreased marble burying. In contrast, the same regimen of citalopram treatment had no effect on these behaviors in either non-lactating postpartum or nulliparous females. Our findings demonstrate changes in both central and peripheral 5-HT systems associated with lactation, independent of pregnancy. They also demonstrate a significant interaction of lactation and responsiveness to SSRI treatment, which has important implications in the treatment of PPD. Although recent evidence

  3. Enhanced responsiveness to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors during lactation.

    PubMed

    Jury, Nicholas J; McCormick, Betsy A; Horseman, Nelson D; Benoit, Stephen C; Gregerson, Karen A

    2015-01-01

    The physiology of mood regulation in the postpartum is poorly understood despite the fact that postpartum depression (PPD) is a common pathology. Serotonergic mechanisms and their dysfunction are widely presumed to be involved, which has led us to investigate whether lactation induces changes in central or peripheral serotonin (5-HT) systems and related affective behaviors. Brain sections from lactating (day 10 postpartum) and age-matched nulliparous (non-pregnant) C57BL/6J mice were processed for 5-HT immunohistochemistry. The total number of 5-HT immunostained cells and optical density were measured. Lactating mice exhibited lower immunoreactive 5-HT and intensity in the dorsal raphe nucleus when compared with nulliparous controls. Serum 5-HT was quantified from lactating and nulliparous mice using radioimmunoassay. Serum 5-HT concentrations were higher in lactating mice than in nulliparous controls. Affective behavior was assessed in lactating and non-lactating females ten days postpartum, as well as in nulliparous controls using the forced swim test (FST) and marble burying task (MBT). Animals were treated for the preceding five days with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI, citalopram, 5mg/kg/day) or vehicle. Lactating mice exhibited a lower baseline immobility time during the FST and buried fewer marbles during the MBT as compared to nulliparous controls. Citalopram treatment changed these behaviors in lactating mice with further reductions in immobility during the FST and decreased marble burying. In contrast, the same regimen of citalopram treatment had no effect on these behaviors in either non-lactating postpartum or nulliparous females. Our findings demonstrate changes in both central and peripheral 5-HT systems associated with lactation, independent of pregnancy. They also demonstrate a significant interaction of lactation and responsiveness to SSRI treatment, which has important implications in the treatment of PPD. Although recent evidence

  4. Non-additive modulation of synaptic transmission by serotonin, adenosine, and cholinergic modulators in the sensory thalamus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Chin; Hu, Chun-Chang; Lai, Yi-Chen

    2015-01-01

    The thalamus relays sensory information to the cortex. Oscillatory activities of the thalamocortical network are modulated by monoamines, acetylcholine, and adenosine, and could be the key features characteristic of different vigilance states. Although the thalamus is almost always subject to the actions of more than just one neuromodulators, reports on the modulatory effect of coexisting neuromodulators on thalamic synaptic transmission are unexpectedly scarce. We found that, if present alone, monoamine or adenosine decreases retinothalamic synaptic strength and short-term depression, whereas cholinergic modulators generally enhance postsynaptic response to presynaptic activity. However, coexistence of different modulators tends to produce non-additive effect, not predictable based on the action of individual modulators. Acetylcholine, acting via nicotinic receptors, can interact with either serotonin or adenosine to abolish most short-term synaptic depression. Moreover, the coexistence of adenosine and monoamine, with or without acetylcholine, results in robustly decreased synaptic strength and transforms short-term synaptic depression to facilitation. These findings are consistent with a view that acetylcholine is essential for an "enriched" sensory flow through the thalamus, and the flow is trimmed down by concomitant monoamine or adenosine (presumably for the wakefulness and rapid-eye movement, or REM, sleep states, respectively). In contrast, concomitant adenosine and monoamine would lead to a markedly "deprived" (and high-pass filtered) sensory flow, and thus the dramatic decrease of monoamine may constitute the basic demarcation between non-REM and REM sleep. The collective actions of different neuromodulators on thalamic synaptic transmission thus could be indispensable for the understanding of network responsiveness in different vigilance states.

  5. Non-additive modulation of synaptic transmission by serotonin, adenosine, and cholinergic modulators in the sensory thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ya-Chin; Hu, Chun-Chang; Lai, Yi-Chen

    2015-01-01

    The thalamus relays sensory information to the cortex. Oscillatory activities of the thalamocortical network are modulated by monoamines, acetylcholine, and adenosine, and could be the key features characteristic of different vigilance states. Although the thalamus is almost always subject to the actions of more than just one neuromodulators, reports on the modulatory effect of coexisting neuromodulators on thalamic synaptic transmission are unexpectedly scarce. We found that, if present alone, monoamine or adenosine decreases retinothalamic synaptic strength and short-term depression, whereas cholinergic modulators generally enhance postsynaptic response to presynaptic activity. However, coexistence of different modulators tends to produce non-additive effect, not predictable based on the action of individual modulators. Acetylcholine, acting via nicotinic receptors, can interact with either serotonin or adenosine to abolish most short-term synaptic depression. Moreover, the coexistence of adenosine and monoamine, with or without acetylcholine, results in robustly decreased synaptic strength and transforms short-term synaptic depression to facilitation. These findings are consistent with a view that acetylcholine is essential for an “enriched” sensory flow through the thalamus, and the flow is trimmed down by concomitant monoamine or adenosine (presumably for the wakefulness and rapid-eye movement, or REM, sleep states, respectively). In contrast, concomitant adenosine and monoamine would lead to a markedly “deprived” (and high-pass filtered) sensory flow, and thus the dramatic decrease of monoamine may constitute the basic demarcation between non-REM and REM sleep. The collective actions of different neuromodulators on thalamic synaptic transmission thus could be indispensable for the understanding of network responsiveness in different vigilance states. PMID:25852468

  6. Glutamate Transmission Enhancement for Treatment of PTSD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    sessions or more of approximately 1h each to achieve significant beneficial effects. Thus, treatments that enhance the efficacy of extinction therapies...term medication. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that glutamate transmission in the amygdala is necessary for long term extinction of...fearmemories. Furthermore, d-cycloserine (DCS), a partial NMDA receptor agonist acting on the glycine modulator site, significantly enhances fear extinction

  7. Membrane cholesterol oxidation in live cells enhances the function of serotonin1A receptors.

    PubMed

    Jafurulla, Md; Nalli, Aswan; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2017-03-01

    The serotonin1A (5-HT1A) receptor is an important neurotransmitter receptor that belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. It is implicated in a variety of cognitive and behavioral functions and serves as an important drug target for neuropsychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression. Previous work from our laboratory has demonstrated that membrane cholesterol plays an important role in the function of the serotonin1A receptor. Our earlier results highlighted several structural features of cholesterol essential for receptor function. In order to explore the importance of the hydroxyl group of cholesterol in the function of the serotonin1A receptor, we utilized cholesterol oxidase to oxidize the hydroxyl group of cholesterol to keto group. Our results show that the oxidation of the hydroxyl group of cholesterol in live cells resulted in enhancement of agonist binding and G-protein coupling to the receptor with no appreciable change in overall membrane order. These results extend our understanding of the structural requirements of cholesterol for receptor function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Plasmonic quasicrystals with broadband transmission enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Kasture, Sachin; Ravishankar, Ajith P.; Yallapragada, V. J.; Patil, Raj; Valappil, Nikesh V.; Mulay, Gajendra; Achanta, Venu Gopal

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic quasicrystals (PlQCs), by integrating the properties of quasicrystals (rotational symmetry and long range ordering but lack translational symmetry) and surface plasmon polariton mediated effects, offer several advantages over plasmonic crystals (PlCs). For example, in PlQCs one could have broadband, polarization independent response. However, large area patterning by electron beam lithography requires precise lattice coordinates as well as a practical way to design the structures for specific spectral response. We demonstrate design and fabrication of large area quasicrystal air hole patterns of π/5 symmetry in metal film in which broadband, polarization and launch angle independent transmission enhancement is observed. We demonstrate bi-grating quasicrystals to show that designable transmission response is possible over visible to near infrared wavelength regions with about 15 times enhancement. These would be useful in many applications like energy harvesting, nonlinear optics and quantum plasmonics. PMID:24918659

  9. Plasmonic quasicrystals with broadband transmission enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasture, Sachin; Ravishankar, Ajith P.; Yallapragada, V. J.; Patil, Raj; Valappil, Nikesh V.; Mulay, Gajendra; Achanta, Venu Gopal

    2014-06-01

    Plasmonic quasicrystals (PlQCs), by integrating the properties of quasicrystals (rotational symmetry and long range ordering but lack translational symmetry) and surface plasmon polariton mediated effects, offer several advantages over plasmonic crystals (PlCs). For example, in PlQCs one could have broadband, polarization independent response. However, large area patterning by electron beam lithography requires precise lattice coordinates as well as a practical way to design the structures for specific spectral response. We demonstrate design and fabrication of large area quasicrystal air hole patterns of π/5 symmetry in metal film in which broadband, polarization and launch angle independent transmission enhancement is observed. We demonstrate bi-grating quasicrystals to show that designable transmission response is possible over visible to near infrared wavelength regions with about 15 times enhancement. These would be useful in many applications like energy harvesting, nonlinear optics and quantum plasmonics.

  10. cGMP-dependent protein kinase enhances Ca2+ current and potentiates the serotonin-induced Ca2+ current increase in snail neurones.

    PubMed

    Paupardin-Tritsch, D; Hammond, C; Gerschenfeld, H M; Nairn, A C; Greengard, P

    Protein phosphorylation catalysed by cyclic AMP-dependent, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent and Ca2+/diacylglycerol-dependent protein kinases is important both in the modulation of synaptic transmission and in the regulation of neuronal membrane permeability (for reviews see refs 5-7). However, there has previously been no evidence for the involvement of cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase (cGMP-PK) in the regulation of neuronal function. Serotonin induces an increase of Ca2+ current in a group of identified ventral neurones of the snail Helix aspersa. This effect is probably mediated by cGMP because it is mimicked by the intracellular injection of cGMP or the application of zaprinast, an inhibitor of cGMP-dependent phosphodiesterase. We have now found that the effect of either serotonin or zaprinast on the Ca2+ current is potentiated by the intracellular injection of cGMP-PK. Moreover, the intracellular injection of activated cGMP-PK (cGMP-PK + 1 microM cGMP) greatly enhances the Ca2+ current of the identified ventral neurones seen in the absence of serotonin. These results indicate that cGMP-PK has a physiological role in the control of the membrane permeability of these neurones.

  11. Escitalopram enhances the association of serotonin-1A autoreceptors to heteroreceptors in anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Andreas; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Spindelegger, Christoph; Moser, Uirike; Mien, Leonhard-Key; Mitterhauser, Markus; Kasper, Siegfried

    2010-10-27

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) represent one of the most common treatment options in major depression and anxiety disorders. By blocking the serotonin transporter, SSRIs modulate serotonergic neurotransmission as well as the function of autoreceptors and heteroreceptors. However, treatment-induced changes on a network level primarily remain unknown. Thus, we evaluated the association between serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) autoreceptors and heteroreceptors before and after SSRIs. Twenty-one patients with anxiety disorders underwent positron emission tomography using [carbonyl-11C]WAY-100635 before and after 12 weeks of escitalopram treatment; 15 of them completed the study protocol. Additionally, 36 drug-naive healthy controls were measured once. The 5-HT1A receptor binding potential (BPND) was quantified for the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) using a region-of-interest approach and for the entire brain by calculating parametric maps. Voxel-wise linear regression was applied between DRN autoreceptor and whole-brain heteroreceptor 5-HT1A BPND. Consistent with previous observations, healthy subjects showed widespread positive correlations of 5-HT1A BPND between autoreceptors and heteroreceptors. Comparing patients before versus after escitalopram treatment revealed enhanced associations of autoreceptor-to-heteroreceptor 5-HT1A BPND within the amygdala and hippocampus (R2=0.21-0.28 vs 0.49-0.81; p<0.05-0.001). In contrast, no significant SSRI-induced changes were found for correlations of heteroreceptor-to-heteroreceptor 5-HT1A BPND between several limbic regions. This interregional approach suggests a treatment-induced reinforcement of the association of 5-HT1A binding between autoreceptors and heteroreceptors specifically in areas involved in anxiety disorders. These findings provide complementary information about treatment effects on a network level and confirm the central role of the DRN as a prime regulatory area.

  12. Chronic Enhancement of Serotonin Facilitates Excitatory Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation-Induced Neuroplasticity.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Hsiao-I; Paulus, Walter; Batsikadze, Giorgi; Jamil, Asif; Kuo, Min-Fang; Nitsche, Michael A

    2016-04-01

    Serotonin affects memory formation via modulating long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression (LTD). Accordingly, acute selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) administration enhanced LTP-like plasticity induced by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in humans. However, it usually takes some time for SSRI to reduce clinical symptoms such as anxiety, negative mood, and related symptoms of depression and anxiety disorders. This might be related to an at least partially different effect of chronic serotonergic enhancement on plasticity, as compared with single-dose medication. Here we explored the impact of chronic application of the SSRI citalopram (CIT) on plasticity induced by tDCS in healthy humans in a partially double-blinded, placebo (PLC)-controlled, randomized crossover study. Furthermore, we explored the dependency of plasticity induction from the glutamatergic system via N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonism. Twelve healthy subjects received PLC medication, combined with anodal or cathodal tDCS of the primary motor cortex. Afterwards, the same subjects took CIT (20 mg/day) consecutively for 35 days. During this period, four additional interventions were performed (CIT and PLC medication with anodal/cathodal tDCS, CIT and dextromethorphan (150 mg) with anodal/cathodal tDCS). Plasticity was monitored by motor-evoked potential amplitudes elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation. Chronic application of CIT increased and prolonged the LTP-like plasticity induced by anodal tDCS for over 24 h, and converted cathodal tDCS-induced LTD-like plasticity into facilitation. These effects were abolished by dextromethorphan. Chronic serotonergic enhancement results in a strengthening of LTP-like glutamatergic plasticity, which might partially explain the therapeutic impact of SSRIs in depression and other neuropsychiatric diseases.

  13. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline enhances counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Nicole M.; Wilkinson, Charles W.; Taborsky, Gerald J.; Al-Noori, Salwa; Daumen, Wendi; Zavosh, Aryana; Figlewicz, Dianne P.

    2008-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely prescribed for patients with comorbid diabetes and depression. Clinical case studies in diabetic patients, however, suggest that SSRI therapy may exacerbate hypoglycemia. We hypothesized that SSRIs might increase the risk of hypoglycemia by impairing hormonal counterregulatory responses (CRR). We evaluated the effect of the SSRI sertraline on hormonal CRR to single or recurrent hypoglycemia in nondiabetic rats. Since there are time-dependent effects of SSRIs on serotonin neurotransmission that correspond with therapeutic action, we evaluated the effect of 6- or 20-day sertraline treatment on hypoglycemia CRR. We found that 6-day sertraline (SERT) treatment specifically enhanced the epinephrine response to a single bout of hypoglycemia vs. vehicle (VEH)-treated rats (t = 120: VEH, 2,573 ± 448 vs. SERT, 4,202 ± 545 pg/ml, P < 0.05). In response to recurrent hypoglycemia, VEH-treated rats exhibited the expected impairment in epinephrine secretion (t = 60: 678 ± 73 pg/ml) vs. VEH-treated rats experiencing first-time hypoglycemia (t = 60: 2,081 ± 436 pg/ml, P < 0.01). SERT treatment prevented the impaired epinephrine response in recurrent hypoglycemic rats (t = 60: 1,794 ± 276 pgl/ml). In 20-day SERT-treated rats, epinephrine, norepinephrine, and glucagon CRR were all significantly elevated above VEH-treated controls in response to hypoglycemia. Similarly to 6-day SERT treatment, 20-day SERT treatment rescued the impaired epinephrine response in recurrent hypoglycemic rats. Our data demonstrate that neither 6- nor 20-day sertraline treatment impaired hormonal CRR to hypoglycemia in nondiabetic rats. Instead, sertraline treatment resulted in an enhancement of hypoglycemia CRR and prevented the impaired adrenomedullary response normally observed in recurrent hypoglycemic rats. PMID:18334609

  14. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline enhances counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Nicole M; Wilkinson, Charles W; Taborsky, Gerald J; Al-Noori, Salwa; Daumen, Wendi; Zavosh, Aryana; Figlewicz, Dianne P

    2008-05-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely prescribed for patients with comorbid diabetes and depression. Clinical case studies in diabetic patients, however, suggest that SSRI therapy may exacerbate hypoglycemia. We hypothesized that SSRIs might increase the risk of hypoglycemia by impairing hormonal counterregulatory responses (CRR). We evaluated the effect of the SSRI sertraline on hormonal CRR to single or recurrent hypoglycemia in nondiabetic rats. Since there are time-dependent effects of SSRIs on serotonin neurotransmission that correspond with therapeutic action, we evaluated the effect of 6- or 20-day sertraline treatment on hypoglycemia CRR. We found that 6-day sertraline (SERT) treatment specifically enhanced the epinephrine response to a single bout of hypoglycemia vs. vehicle (VEH)-treated rats (t = 120: VEH, 2,573 +/- 448 vs. SERT, 4,202 +/- 545 pg/ml, P < 0.05). In response to recurrent hypoglycemia, VEH-treated rats exhibited the expected impairment in epinephrine secretion (t = 60: 678 +/- 73 pg/ml) vs. VEH-treated rats experiencing first-time hypoglycemia (t = 60: 2,081 +/- 436 pg/ml, P < 0.01). SERT treatment prevented the impaired epinephrine response in recurrent hypoglycemic rats (t = 60: 1,794 +/- 276 pgl/ml). In 20-day SERT-treated rats, epinephrine, norepinephrine, and glucagon CRR were all significantly elevated above VEH-treated controls in response to hypoglycemia. Similarly to 6-day SERT treatment, 20-day SERT treatment rescued the impaired epinephrine response in recurrent hypoglycemic rats. Our data demonstrate that neither 6- nor 20-day sertraline treatment impaired hormonal CRR to hypoglycemia in nondiabetic rats. Instead, sertraline treatment resulted in an enhancement of hypoglycemia CRR and prevented the impaired adrenomedullary response normally observed in recurrent hypoglycemic rats.

  15. Mutations in monoamine oxidase (MAO) genes in mice lead to hypersensitivity to serotonin-enhancing drugs: implications for drug side effects in humans

    PubMed Central

    Fox, MA; Panessiti, MG; Moya, PR; Tolliver, TJ; Chen, K; Shih, JC; Murphy, DL

    2012-01-01

    A possible side effect of serotonin-enhancing drugs is the serotonin syndrome, which can be lethal. Here we examined possible hypersensitivity to two such drugs, the serotonin precursor 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-HTP) and the atypical opioid tramadol, in mice lacking the genes for both monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) and MAOB. MAOA/B-knockout (KO) mice displayed baseline serotonin syndrome behaviors, and these behavioral responses were highly exaggerated following 5-HTP or tramadol versus baseline and wild-type (WT) littermates. Compared with MAOA/B-WT mice, baseline tissue serotonin levels were increased ~2.6–3.9-fold in MAOA/B-KO mice. Following 5-HTP, serotonin levels were further increased ~4.5–6.2-fold in MAOA/B-KO mice. These exaggerated responses are in line with the exaggerated responses following serotonin-enhancing drugs that we previously observed in mice lacking the serotonin transporter (SERT). These findings provide a second genetic mouse model suggestive of possible human vulnerability to the serotonin syndrome in individuals with lesser-expressing MAO or SERT polymorphisms that confer serotonergic system changes. PMID:22964922

  16. Adenosine preferentially suppresses serotonin2A receptor-enhanced excitatory postsynaptic currents in layer V neurons of the rat medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Stutzmann, G E; Marek, G J; Aghajanian, G K

    2001-01-01

    Serotonin induces 'spontaneous' (non-electrically evoked) excitatory postsynaptic currents in layer V pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal cortex. This is likely due to a serotonin2A receptor-mediated focal release of glutamate onto apical dendrites. In addition, activation of the serotonin2A receptor selectively enhances late components of electrically evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents. In this study, using in vitro intracellular and whole-cell recording in rat brain slices, we examined the role of adenosine in modulating serotonin2A-enhanced 'spontaneous' and electrically evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents in layer V pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex. Adenosine and N6-cyclopentyladenosine, an A1 adenosine agonist, markedly suppressed the serotonin2A-induced ('spontaneous') excitatory postsynaptic currents. However, adenosine had no effect on spontaneous miniature (tetrodotoxin-insensitive) postsynaptic potentials. Adenosine also blocked the late excitatory postsynaptic currents induced by the serotonin2A/2C agonist R(-)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine hydrochloride. Surprisingly, in contrast to other regions, adenosine had a relatively small effect on electrically evoked fast excitatory postsynaptic currents. These findings represent a novel demonstration of adenosine's ability to preferentially modulate serotonin2A-mediated synaptic events in the medial prefrontal cortex. As the serotonin2A receptor is closely linked with the effects of atypical antipsychotics and hallucinogens, further understanding of the modulators of this receptor such as adenosine may provide useful therapeutic applications.

  17. Enhanced optical transmission at the cutoff transition.

    PubMed

    Laux, E; Genet, C; Ebbesen, T W

    2009-04-27

    The phenomenon of extraordinary transmission in the optical regime for circular hole arrays in optically thick metal films is studied as a function of hole size and depth. In the limit of small holes compared to the depth, the transmission properties follow a waveguide type behavior. By describing the transmission process as resulting from the interference between a resonant and a non-resonant contribution, a transition is clearly revealed through the specific spectral variations of the resonance at a given hole depth. This transition is associated to a change in the attenuation through the hole as its size increases, and corresponds to the optimal condition for surface plasmon excitation.

  18. Effects of the selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor reboxetine on norepinephrine and serotonin transmission in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Szabo, S T; Blier, P

    2001-12-01

    Given that norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5-HT) neurons are implicated in the mechanisms of action of antidepressant drugs and both project to the hippocampus, the impact of acute and long-term administration of the selective NE inhibitor reboxetine was assessed on CA(3) pyramidal neuron firing in this postsynaptic structure. Cumulative injections of reboxetine (1-4 mg/kg, i.v.) dose-dependently increased the recovery time of the firing of these neurons following iontophoretic applications of NE, but not 5-HT. In rats treated with reboxetine for 2.5 mg/kg/day for 21 days, a robust increase in the recovery time following NE applications was observed, and a small but significant prolongation occurred following 5-HT applications. In controls and reboxetine-treated rats, 1 and 5 Hz stimulations of the afferent 5-HT bundle to the hippocampus, which allows determination of terminal 5-HT(1B) autoreceptor sensitivity, produced similar frequency-dependent decreases in pyramidal neuron firing in both groups. However, after low and high doses of clonidine (10 and 400 microg/kg, i.v.), which assesses alpha(2)-adrenergic auto- and heteroreceptor sensitivity, respectively, only the effect of the high dose of clonidine was attenuated. Interestingly, administration of the selective 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist WAY 100,635 induced a 140% increase in basal pyramidal neuron firing in reboxetine as compared to saline-treated rats. This increase in tonic activation of postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors might be attributable in part to a desensitization of alpha(2)-adrenergic heteroreceptors, presumably resulting from sustained NE reuptake inhibition. These results indicate that even a selective NE reuptake inhibitor can modulate 5-HT transmission.

  19. Serotonin Activates Bacterial Quorum Sensing and Enhances the Virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the Host.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Leslie D; O'Connor, Gregory; Mittal, Rahul; Liu, Xue Z; Daftarian, Pirouz; Deo, Sapna K; Daunert, Sylvia

    2016-07-01

    Bacteria in humans play an important role in health and disease. Considerable emphasis has been placed in understanding the role of bacteria in host-microbiome interkingdom communication. Here we show that serotonin, responsible for mood in the brain and motility in the gut, can also act as a bacterial signaling molecule for pathogenic bacteria. Specifically, we found that serotonin acts as an interkingdom signaling molecule via quorum sensing and that it stimulates the production of bacterial virulence factors and increases biofilm formation in vitro and in vivo in a novel mouse infection model. This discovery points out at roles of serotonin both in bacteria and humans, and at phenotypic implications not only manifested in mood behavior but also in infection processes in the host. Thus, regulating serotonin concentrations in the gut may provide with paradigm shifting therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The antidepressant 5-HT2A receptor antagonists pizotifen and cyproheptadine inhibit serotonin-enhanced platelet function.

    PubMed

    Lin, Olivia A; Karim, Zubair A; Vemana, Hari Priya; Espinosa, Enma V P; Khasawneh, Fadi T

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable interest in defining new agents or targets for antithrombotic purposes. The 5-HT2A receptor is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) expressed on many cell types, and a known therapeutic target for many disease states. This serotonin receptor is also known to regulate platelet function. Thus, in our FDA-approved drug repurposing efforts, we investigated the antiplatelet activity of cyproheptadine and pizotifen, two antidepressant 5-HT2A Receptor antagonists. Our results revealed that cyproheptadine and pizotifen reversed serotonin-enhanced ADP-induced platelet aggregation in vitro and ex vivo. And the inhibitory effects of these two agents were found to be similar to that of EMD 281014, a 5-HT2A Receptor antagonist under development. In separate experiments, our studies revealed that these 5-HT2A receptor antagonists have the capacity to reduce serotonin-enhanced ADP-induced elevation in intracellular calcium levels and tyrosine phosphorylation. Using flow cytometry, we also observed that cyproheptadine, pizotifen, and EMD 281014 inhibited serotonin-enhanced ADP-induced phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, P-selectin expression, and glycoprotein IIb-IIIa activation. Furthermore, using a carotid artery thrombosis model, these agents prolonged the time for thrombotic occlusion in mice in vivo. Finally, the tail-bleeding time was investigated to assess the effect of cyproheptadine and pizotifen on hemostasis. Our findings indicated prolonged bleeding time in both cyproheptadine- and pizotifen-treated mice. Notably, the increases in occlusion and bleeding times associated with these two agents were comparable to that of EMD 281014, and to clopidogrel, a commonly used antiplatelet drug, again, in a fashion comparable to clopidogrel and EMD 281014. Collectively, our data indicate that the antidepressant 5-HT2A antagonists, cyproheptadine and pizotifen do exert antiplatelet and thromboprotective effects, but similar to clopidogrel and EMD 281014, their

  1. Enhanced Optical Transmission with Coaxial Apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haftel, Michael; Schlockermann, Carl; Orbons, Shannon; Roberts, Ann; Jamieson, David; Freeman, Darren; Luther-Davies, Barry

    2007-03-01

    Recently it has been shown that ``cylindrical'' surface plasmons (CSP's) on cylindrical interfaces of coaxial ring apertures produce a new form of extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) that extends to ever increasing wavelengths as the dielectric ring narrows. Using analytic and FDTD calculations we present some of the consequences of CSP's on EOT as well as experimental confirmation of such effects. We find that EOT, even with cylindrical apertures, is aided by the increase in cutoff wavelength due to CSP's, which is a consequence of the mode structure of individual apertures. CSP effects also explain most of the long-wavelength features of transmission spectra measured for CR apertures. We also show that CSP's can be ``spoofed'' at low frequencies by coaxial apertures in metamaterials consisting of a (macroscopic) periodic dielectric structure embedded in a perfect conductor. F. I. Baida et al., Phys. Rev. B 67, 155314 (2003); M.I Haftel et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 193104 (2006).

  2. Serotonin2C receptors in the nucleus accumbens are involved in enhanced alcohol-drinking behavior

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimoto, Kanji; Watanabe, Yoshihisa; Tanaka, Masaki; Kimura, Minoru

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine and serotonin (5-HT) in the nucleus accumbens (ACC) and ventral tegmental area of the mesoaccumbens reward pathways have been implicated in the mechanisms underlying development of alcohol dependence. We used a C57BL/6J mouse model with increased voluntary alcohol-drinking behavior by exposing the mice to alcohol vapor for 20 consecutive days. In the alcohol-exposed mice, the expression of 5-HT2C receptor mRNA increased in the ACC, caudate nucleus and putamen, dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), hippocampus and lateral hypothalamus, while the protein level of 5-HT2C receptor significantly increased in the ACC. The expression of 5-HT7 receptor mRNA increased in the ACC and DRN. Contents of 5-HT decreased in the ACC shell (ACCS) and DRN of the alcohol-exposed mice. The basal extracellular releases of dopamine (DA) and 5-HT in the ACCS increased more in the alcohol-exposed mice than in alcohol-naïve mice. The magnitude of the alcohol-induced ACCS DA and 5-HT release in the alcohol-exposed mice was increased compared with the control mice. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration or local injection into ACCS of the 5-HT2C receptor antagonist, SB-242084, suppressed voluntary alcohol-drinking behavior in the alcohol-exposed mice. But the i.p. administration of the 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, SB-258719, did not have significant effects on alcohol-drinking behavior in the alcohol-exposed mice. The effects of the 5-HT2C receptor antagonist were not observed in the air-exposed control mice. These results suggest that adaptations of the 5-HT system, especially the upregulation of 5-HT2C receptors in the ACCS, are involved in the development of enhanced voluntary alcohol-drinking behavior. PMID:22512261

  3. Serotonin2C receptors in the nucleus accumbens are involved in enhanced alcohol-drinking behavior.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Kanji; Watanabe, Yoshihisa; Tanaka, Masaki; Kimura, Minoru

    2012-04-01

    Dopamine and serotonin (5-HT) in the nucleus accumbens (ACC) and ventral tegmental area of the mesoaccumbens reward pathways have been implicated in the mechanisms underlying development of alcohol dependence. We used a C57BL/6J mouse model with increased voluntary alcohol-drinking behavior by exposing the mice to alcohol vapor for 20 consecutive days. In the alcohol-exposed mice, the expression of 5-HT(2C) receptor mRNA increased in the ACC, caudate nucleus and putamen, dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), hippocampus and lateral hypothalamus, while the protein level of 5-HT(2C) receptor significantly increased in the ACC. The expression of 5-HT(7) receptor mRNA increased in the ACC and DRN. Contents of 5-HT decreased in the ACC shell (ACC(S) ) and DRN of the alcohol-exposed mice. The basal extracellular releases of dopamine (DA) and 5-HT in the ACC(S) increased more in the alcohol-exposed mice than in alcohol-naïve mice. The magnitude of the alcohol-induced ACC(S) DA and 5-HT release in the alcohol-exposed mice was increased compared with the control mice. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration or local injection into ACC(S) of the 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist, SB-242084, suppressed voluntary alcohol-drinking behavior in the alcohol-exposed mice. But the i.p. administration of the 5-HT(7) receptor antagonist, SB-258719, did not have significant effects on alcohol-drinking behavior in the alcohol-exposed mice. The effects of the 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist were not observed in the air-exposed control mice. These results suggest that adaptations of the 5-HT system, especially the upregulation of 5-HT(2C) receptors in the ACC(S) , are involved in the development of enhanced voluntary alcohol-drinking behavior.

  4. Intestinal serotonin acts as a paracrine substance to mediate vagal signal transmission evoked by luminal factors in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, J X; Wu, X Y; Owyang, C; Li, Y

    2001-01-01

    The vagus nerve conveys primary afferent information produced by a meal to the brainstem. Serotonin (5-HT), which abounds in intestinal enterochromaffin cells, is released in response to various stimuli. We have recently demonstrated that 5-HT released from intestinal enterochromaffin cells activates 5-HT3 receptors on vagal afferent fibres to mediate luminal non-cholecystokinin-stimulated pancreatic secretion. The present study was designed to evaluate the responses of vagal sensory neurons to intraluminal osmotic stimulation and luminal infusion of maltose, glucose or 5-HT. We investigated the role of endogenous 5-HT in signal transmission evoked by luminal stimuli to activate vagal sensory neurons. The discharges of vagal primary afferent neurons innervating the intestine were recorded from rat nodose ganglia. Luminal factors such as intestinal osmotic stimuli and perfusion of carbohydrates elicited powerful vagal nodose responses. Electrical subdiaphragmatic vagal stimulation activated 364 single units; 40 of these responded to intestinal mucosal stimuli. Of these 40, 30 responded to intraduodenal perfusion of hyperosmolar NaCl (500 mosmol l−1), 27 responded to tap water (5 mosmol l−1) and 20 and 19 responded to maltose (300 mM) and glucose (277.5 mM), respectively. The 5-HT3/4 antagonist tropisetron (ICS 205-930) or 5-HT3 antagonist granisetron abolished luminal stimuli-evoked nodose neuronal responses. Intraluminal infusion of 10−5 and 10−4 M 5-HT elicited increases in vagal afferent discharge in 25 and 31 units, respectively, by activating the 5-HT3 receptors. Acute subdiaphragmatic vagotomy, intestinal mucosal application of the local anaesthetic lidocaine (lignocaine) or administration of 5-HT3 antagonist each abolished the luminal 5-HT-induced nodose neuronal responses. In contrast, distension-sensitive neurons did not respond to duodenal infusion of 5-HT. Pharmacological depletion of 5-HT stores using p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA), a 5-HT

  5. Enhanced central serotonin release from slices of rat hypothalamus following repeated nialamide administration: evidence supporting the overactive serotonin receptor theory of depression

    SciTech Connect

    Offord, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    Researchers are suggesting unipolar affective disorders may be related to an abnormality in biogenic amine receptor-sensitivity. This abnormality may be a result of a dysfunction in central serotonin (5-HT) release mechanisms. 5-HT neurotransmission is modulated by presynaptic autoreceptors, which are members of the 5-HT/sub 1/ receptor subtype. The autoreceptor is thought to play an important role in the homeostasis of the central 5-HT synapse and could be a site at which some antidepressants mediate their therapeutic effect. The number of 5-HT/sub 1/ type receptor binding sites are reduced and behavior mediated by this receptor is abolished following repeated injections of monoamine oxidase inhibitor type antidepressants. These changes did not occur following a single injection. It was hypothesized that repeated treatment with a monoamine oxidase inhibitor would reduce the sensitivity of 5-HT autoreceptors and enhance 5-HT release. Rats were pretreated with single or repeated (twice daily for 7 days) intraperitoneal injections of nialamide (40 mg/kg) or chlorimipramine (10 mg/kg) and the ability of the autoreceptor agonist to inhibit potassium-induced /sup 3/H-5-HT release was evaluated using an in vitro superfusion system. These changes in 5-HT autoreceptor activity are consistent with other reports evaluating monoamine oxidase inhibitors on 5-HT/sub 1/ type receptors. It is hypothesized that the changes in 5-HT neurotransmission are related to the antidepressant mechanism of monoamine oxidase inhibitors.

  6. Effects of serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors on depressive- and impulsive-like behaviors and on monoamine transmission in experimental temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Udaya; Medel-Matus, Jesus-Servando; Redwine, Hannah M.; Shin, Don; Hensler, Julie G.; Sankar, Raman; Mazarati, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective Examine therapeutic potential of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (NERI) in an animal model of comorbidity between epilepsy, depression-like, and impulsive-like impairments. Methods Epilepsy was induced in male Wistar rats by LiCl and pilocarpine. An SSRI fluoxetine (FLX), and a NERI reboxetine (RBX) were administered either alone or as a combination over one week. Depressive-like and impulsive-like behaviors were examined using forced swim test. Fast scan cyclic voltammetry was used to analyze serotonergic transmission in the raphe nucleus (RN)-prefrontal cortex (PFC) pathway, and noradrenergic transmission in locus coeruleus (LC)-PFC, and LC-RN projections. Monoamine levels in PFC were measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Functional capacities of 5-HT1A receptors and α2A adrenoreceptors in PFC were analyzed by autoradiography. Results Epileptic rats showed behavioral signs of depression and hyper-impulsivity, suppressed serotonergic and noradrenergic tones, decreased levels of serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE); 5-HT1A receptor and α2A adrenoreceptors functions remained intact. FLX failed to improve behavioral deficits, but effectively raised 5-HT level and marginally improved RN-PFC serotonergic transmission. RBX reversed impulsive-like behavior, normalized content of NE and noradrenergic tone in LC-PFC and LC-RN. FLX-RBX combination fully reversed depressive-like behavior, and normalized RN-PFC serotonergic transmission. None of the treatment modified the function of 5-HT and NE receptors. Significance Depressive- and impulsive-like behaviors in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy stem respectively from dysfunctions of serotonergic and noradrenergic ascending pathways. At the same time, epilepsy-associated depression is SSRI-resistant. The finding that an SSRI-NERI combination exerts antidepressant effect, along with RBX-induced improvement of LC-RN noradrenergic

  7. Glutamate Transmission Enhancement for Treatment of PTSD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    and social phobia , who received DCS treatment during a type of extinction training (Norberg et al. 2008). DCS treatment significantly enhanced the... extinction therapy effects on measures of phobia -specific and generalized anxiety compared to placebo treatment. For example, those taking DCS...PTSD), extinction - based therapies require substantial time and investment for both the patient and provider, averaging 10 sessions or more of

  8. Graphene-ribbon-coupled tunable enhanced transmission through metallic grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yu-Xiang; He, Meng-Dong; Li, Ze-Jun; Wang, Kai-Jun; Li, Shui; Li, Jian-Bo; Liu, Jian-Qiang; Long, Mengqiu; Hu, Wei-Da; Chen, Xiaoshuang

    2017-01-01

    We report the tunable enhanced transmission of light through a hybrid metal-graphene structure, in which a graphene ribbon array is situated over a metallic grating. The graphene ribbon is employed to make the graphene-insulator-metal waveguide of finite length as a Fabry-Perot (F-P) cavity. When the slit of metallic grating is opened at the position with a maximal magnetic field in F-P resonant cavity, the transmission of light through metallic grating is greatly enhanced since the strongly localized magnetic field is effectively coupled to the slit. The transmission spectrum and the enhancement factor can be adjusted by changing geometrical parameters including the width and the length of slit, the width of graphene ribbon and the period of metallic grating. The transmission peaks exhibit a broad tuning range with a small change in the Fermi energy level of graphene. Moreover, the enhancement factor of transmission peak can be manipulated by the Fermi energy level and the carrier mobility of graphene, and an enhancement factor of 154 is obtained. The findings expand our understanding of hybrid metal-graphene plasmons and have potential applications in building active plasmonic devices.

  9. Broadband enhanced transmission of acoustic waves through serrated metal gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Dong-Xiang; Deng, Yu-Qiang; Xu, Di-Hu; Fan, Ren-Hao; Peng, Ru-Wen; Chen, Ze-Guo; Lu, Ming-Hui; Huang, X. R.; Wang, Mu

    2015-01-01

    In this letter, we have demonstrated that serrated metal gratings, which introduce gradient coatings, can give rise to broadband transmission enhancement of acoustic waves. Here, we have experimentally and theoretically studied the acoustic transmission properties of metal gratings with or without serrated boundaries. The average transmission is obviously enhanced for serrated metal gratings within a wide frequency range, while the Fabry-Perot resonance is significantly suppressed. An effective medium hypothesis with varying acoustic impedance is proposed to analyze the mechanism, which was verified through comparison with finite-element simulation. The serrated boundary supplies gradient mass distribution and gradient normal acoustic impedance, which could efficiently reduce the boundary reflection. Further, by increasing the region of the serrated boundary, we present a broadband high-transmission grating for wide range of incident angle. Our results may have potential applications to broadband acoustic imaging, acoustic sensing, and acoustic devices.

  10. Serotonin receptor subtypes required for ventilatory long-term facilitation and its enhancement after chronic intermittent hypoxia in awake rats.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Michelle; Zhang, Yi; White, David P; Ling, Liming

    2004-02-01

    Respiratory long-term facilitation (LTF), a serotonin-dependent, persistent augmentation of respiratory activity after episodic hypoxia, is enhanced by pretreatment of chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH; 5 min 11-12% O2-5 min air, 12 h/night for 7 nights). The present study examined the effects of methysergide (serotonin 5-HT1,2,5,6,7 receptor antagonist), ketanserin (5-HT2 antagonist), or clozapine (5-HT2,6,7 antagonist) on both ventilatory LTF and the CIH effect on ventilatory LTF in conscious male adult rats to determine which specific receptor subtype(s) is involved. In untreated rats (i.e., animals not exposed to CIH), LTF, induced by five episodes of 5-min poikilocapnic hypoxia (10% O2) separated by 5-min normoxic intervals, was measured twice by plethysmography. Thus the measurement was conducted 1-2 days before (as control) and approximately 1 h after systemic injection of methysergide (1 mg/kg ip), ketanserin (1 mg/kg), or clozapine (1.5 mg/kg). Resting ventilation, metabolic rate, and hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) were unchanged, but LTF ( approximately 18% above baseline) was eliminated by each drug. In CIH-treated rats, LTF was also measured twice, before and approximately 8 h after CIH. Vehicle, methysergide, ketanserin, or clozapine was injected approximately 1 h before the second measurement. Neither resting ventilation nor metabolic rate was changed after CIH and/or any drug. HVR was unchanged after methysergide and ketanserin but reduced in four of seven clozapine rats. The CIH-enhanced LTF ( approximately 28%) was abolished by methysergide and clozapine but only attenuated by ketanserin (to approximately 10%). Collectively, these data suggest that ventilatory LTF requires 5-HT2 receptors and that the CIH effect on LTF requires non-5-HT2 serotonin receptors, probably 5-HT6 and/or 5-HT7 subtype(s).

  11. Imperfect Vaccination Can Enhance the Transmission of Highly Virulent Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Read, Andrew F.; Baigent, Susan J.; Powers, Claire; Kgosana, Lydia B.; Blackwell, Luke; Smith, Lorraine P.; Kennedy, David A.; Walkden-Brown, Stephen W.; Nair, Venugopal K.

    2015-01-01

    Could some vaccines drive the evolution of more virulent pathogens? Conventional wisdom is that natural selection will remove highly lethal pathogens if host death greatly reduces transmission. Vaccines that keep hosts alive but still allow transmission could thus allow very virulent strains to circulate in a population. Here we show experimentally that immunization of chickens against Marek's disease virus enhances the fitness of more virulent strains, making it possible for hyperpathogenic strains to transmit. Immunity elicited by direct vaccination or by maternal vaccination prolongs host survival but does not prevent infection, viral replication or transmission, thus extending the infectious periods of strains otherwise too lethal to persist. Our data show that anti-disease vaccines that do not prevent transmission can create conditions that promote the emergence of pathogen strains that cause more severe disease in unvaccinated hosts. PMID:26214839

  12. Hitchhiking of host biology by beneficial symbionts enhances transmission

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Brittany M.; Cruciger, Michael; Dacks, Andrew M.; Rio, Rita V. M.

    2014-01-01

    Transmission plays a key role in the evolution of symbiosis. Mixed mode transmission combines horizontal and vertical mechanisms for symbiont acquisition. However, features that enable mixed transmission are poorly understood. Here, we determine the mechanistic basis for the recruitment of the beneficial bacterium, Aeromonas veronii by the leech, Hirudo verbana. We demonstrate that host mucosal secretions complement imperfect symbiont vertical transmission. First, we show that the A. veronii population within secretions originates from the host digestive tract and proliferates synchronously with shedding frequency, demonstrating the coupling of partner biology. Furthermore, leeches are attracted to these castings with oral contact proving sufficient for symbiont transmission. Leech attraction to mucus is not affected by the symbiont state of either the host or mucus, suggesting that A. veronii exploits preexisting host behavior and physiological traits. A dual transmission mode, integrating multiple layers of host contributions, may prove evolutionarily advantageous for a wide range of symbioses. Using such a strategy, host infection is ensured, while also providing access to a higher genetic diversity of symbionts. Countless host-associated microbes exhibit mixed mode transmission, supporting the use of the leech symbiosis as a model for enhancing our understanding of the specificity, establishment and persistence of microbiotas. PMID:25059557

  13. Reconfigurable terahertz grating with enhanced transmission of TE polarized light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J. W.; Wang, X. K.; Xie, Z. W.; Xue, Y. Z.; Wang, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate an optically reconfigurable grating with enhanced transmission of TE-polarized waves in the terahertz (THz) waveband. This kind of grating is realized by projecting a grating image onto a thin Si wafer with a digital micromirror device (DMD). The enhanced transmission is caused by a resonance of the electromagnetic fields between the photoexcited strips. The position of the transmission peak shifts with the variation of the period and duty cycle of the photoinduced grating, which can be readily controlled by the DMD. Furthermore, a flattened Gaussian model was applied to describe the distribution of the photoexcited free carriers in the Si wafer, and the simulated transmittance spectra are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results. In future, the photoexcited carriers could also be used to produce THz diffractive elements with reconfigurable functionality.

  14. An extraordinary transmission analogue for enhancing microwave antenna performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushpakaran, Sarin V.; Purushothaman, Jayakrishnan M.; Chandroth, Aanandan; Pezholil, Mohanan; Kesavath, Vasudevan

    2015-10-01

    The theory of diffraction limit proposed by H.A Bethe limits the total power transfer through a subwavelength hole. Researchers all over the world have gone through different techniques for boosting the transmission through subwavelength holes resulting in the Extraordinary Transmission (EOT) behavior. We examine computationally and experimentally the concept of EOT nature in the microwave range for enhancing radiation performance of a stacked dipole antenna working in the S band. It is shown that the front to back ratio of the antenna is considerably enhanced without affecting the impedance matching performance of the design. The computational analysis based on Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method reveals that the excitation of Fabry-Perot resonant modes on the slots is responsible for performance enhancement.

  15. An extraordinary transmission analogue for enhancing microwave antenna performance

    SciTech Connect

    Pushpakaran, Sarin V.; Purushothaman, Jayakrishnan M.; Chandroth, Aanandan; Pezholil, Mohanan; Kesavath, Vasudevan

    2015-10-15

    The theory of diffraction limit proposed by H.A Bethe limits the total power transfer through a subwavelength hole. Researchers all over the world have gone through different techniques for boosting the transmission through subwavelength holes resulting in the Extraordinary Transmission (EOT) behavior. We examine computationally and experimentally the concept of EOT nature in the microwave range for enhancing radiation performance of a stacked dipole antenna working in the S band. It is shown that the front to back ratio of the antenna is considerably enhanced without affecting the impedance matching performance of the design. The computational analysis based on Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method reveals that the excitation of Fabry-Perot resonant modes on the slots is responsible for performance enhancement.

  16. Impulsive-aggressive traits, serotonin function, and alcohol-enhanced aggression.

    PubMed

    Fulwiler, Carl; Eckstine, Joy; Kalsy, Sapna

    2005-01-01

    Although alcohol consumption is involved in most acts of violence, most people do not become violent when they drink. Individuals also respond differently to alcohol on laboratory measures of aggression. The objective of this study was to determine whether individual differences in the effects of alcohol on a laboratory measure of aggression are related to specific personality traits and/or serotonin function, as measured by prolactin response to pharmacochallenge. Psychometric scales for impulsiveness, aggression, and anger, as well as a probe for suspiciousness, were administered to 10 healthy male social drinkers. Trait serotonin function was determined by citalopram challenge. The effect of alcohol on the Point Subtraction Aggression Paradigm was determined by comparing aggression scores with and without 1 g/kg alcohol. Impulsivity scores were significantly correlated with the change in aggressive responding after alcohol. Aggression, anger, and suspiciousness scores were not. Prolactin response did not predict the effect of alcohol on aggressive responding. The results suggest that trait impulsiveness may mediate the effects of alcohol on aggression in normal males.

  17. Enhanced noradrenergic transmission in the spontaneously hypertensive rat anococcygeus muscle

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Altayó, Francesc; Giraldo, Jesús; McGrath, John C; Vila, Elisabet

    2003-01-01

    There is a long-known hyper-responsiveness of vascular adrenergic transmission in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) that is uncovered specifically in the presence of cocaine and attributed to blockade of the neuronal monoamine transporter. We have now used the rat anococcygeus muscle to investigate whether this phenomenon is generic to sympathetic transmission to smooth muscle rather than a purely vascular phenomenon. We sought the origin of the effect by successively blocking the buffering effects of the neuronal monoamine transporter, prejunctional α2-adrenoceptors and NO from nitrergic nerves with desipramine (0.1 μM), rauwolscine (0.01 μM) and L-NG-nitro-arginine (100 μM). In the presence of desipramine, contractile responses to electrical field stimulation but not to noradrenaline (1 nM–100 μM) were greater in SHR than in Wistar–Kyoto (WKY). Neither inhibition of prejunctional α2-adrenoceptors nor the blockade of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) accounted for the differential enhancement of response in SHR. The enhanced effectiveness of motor neurotransmission in SHR becomes most apparent when all known major buffering mechanisms are removed. When nitrergic responses were isolated pharmacologically (phentolamine 1 μM and guanethidine 30 μM; tone raised with carbachol 50 μM), they were not different between SHR and WKY. Western blots showed that both nNOS and tyrosine hydroxylase are expressed to a similar extent in anococcygeus muscle from SHR and WKY, suggesting similar adrenergic and nitrergic innervations in the two strains. This suggests that enhanced motor transmission is due to increased transmitter release per varicosity rather than there being normal transmission from a greater number of sites. We conclude that there is a generic enhancement of sympathetic transmission in SHR rather than this being a vascular phenomenon. PMID:14504140

  18. Does reservoir host mortality enhance transmission of West Nile virus?

    PubMed Central

    Foppa, Ivo M; Spielman, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Background Since its 1999 emergence in New York City, West Nile virus (WNV) has become the most important and widespread cause of mosquito-transmitted disease in North America. Its sweeping spread from the Atlantic to the Pacific coast was accompanied by widespread mortality among wild birds, especially corvids. Only sporadic avian mortality had previously been associated with this infection in the Old World. Here, we examine the possibility that reservoir host mortality may intensify transmission, both by concentrating vector mosquitoes on remaining hosts and by preventing the accumulation of "herd immunity". Results Inspection of the Ross-Macdonald expression of the basic reproductive number (R0) suggests that this quantity may increase with reservoir host mortality. Computer simulation confirms this finding and indicates that the level of virulence is positively associated with the numbers of infectious mosquitoes by the end of the epizootic. The presence of reservoir incompetent hosts in even moderate numbers largely eliminated the transmission-enhancing effect of host mortality. Local host die-off may prevent mosquitoes to "waste" infectious blood meals on immune host and may thus facilitate perpetuation and spread of transmission. Conclusion Under certain conditions, host mortality may enhance transmission of WNV and similarly maintained arboviruses and thus facilitate their emergence and spread. The validity of the assumptions upon which this argument is built need to be empirically examined. PMID:17498307

  19. Broadband enhanced transmission of acoustic waves through serrated metal gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Dong-Xiang; Fan, Ren-Hao; Deng, Yu-Qiang; Peng, Ru-Wen; Wang, Mu; Jiangnan University Collaboration

    In this talk, we present our studies on broadband properties of acoustic waves through metal gratings. We have demonstrated that serrated metal gratings, which introduce gradient coatings, can give rise to broadband transmission enhancement of acoustic waves. Here, we have experimentally and theoretically studied the acoustic transmission properties of metal gratings with or without serrated boundaries. The average transmission is obviously enhanced for serrated metal gratings within a wide frequency range, while the Fabry-Perot resonance is significantly suppressed. An effective medium hypothesis with varying acoustic impedance is proposed to analyze the mechanism, which was verified through comparison with finite-element simulation. The serrated boundary supplies gradient mass distribution and gradient normal acoustic impedance, which could efficiently reduce the boundary reflection. Further, by increasing the region of the serrated boundary, we present a broadband high-transmission grating for wide range of incident angle. Our results may have potential applications to broadband acoustic imaging, acoustic sensing and new acoustic devices. References: [1] Dong-Xiang Qi, Yu-Qiang Deng, Di-Hu Xu, Ren-Hao Fan, Ru-Wen Peng, Ze-Guo Chen, Ming-Hui Lu, X. R. Huang and Mu Wang, Appl. Phys. Lett. 106, 011906 (2015); [2] Dong-Xiang Qi, Ren-Hao Fan, Ru-Wen Peng, Xian-Rong Huang, Ming-Hui Lu, Xu Ni, Qing Hu, and Mu Wang, Applied Physics Letters 101, 061912 (2012).

  20. ENHANCEMENT OF CELL BOUNDARIES IN TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY IMAGES

    PubMed Central

    Tasdizen, Tolga; Whitaker, Ross; Marc, Robert; Jones, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is an important modality for the analysis of cellular structures in neurobiology. The computational analysis of neurons entail their segmentation and reconstruction from TEM images. This problem is complicated by the heavily textured nature of cellular TEM images and typically low signal-to-noise ratios. In this paper, we propose a new partial differential equation for enhancing the contrast and continuity of cell membranes in TEM images. PMID:19169423

  1. Heightened serotonin influences contest outcome and enhances expression of high-intensity aggressive behaviors.

    PubMed

    Bubak, Andrew N; Renner, Kenneth J; Swallow, John G

    2014-02-01

    The outcome of behavioral interactions between organisms can have significant fitness implications. Therefore, it is of great theoretical and practical importance to understand the mechanisms that modify different agonistic behaviors. Changes in central monoamines, such as serotonin (5-HT), contribute to modifying the expression of aggressive encounters in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In several invertebrate groups, neural 5-HT has been linked to heightened aggression and conflict escalation. The male stalk-eyed fly (Teleopsis dalmanni) competes with conspecifics daily over access to resources such as food and mates. Because encounters escalate in a stereotypical manner, stalk-eyed flies provide an excellent model system to study behavioral syndromes. We hypothesized that noninvasive, pharmacological augmentation of brain 5-HT by administration of the precursor, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), would increase stereotypic behavioral escalation and the probability of winning a conflict over food. Size-matched male 5-HTP-treated and untreated flies were placed in a forced-fight paradigm and their aggressive behaviors scored. Individuals with higher brain 5-HT levels had a markedly higher probability of winning the contests, displayed greater levels of high-intensity aggressive behaviors and fewer retreats. Pretreatment with 5-HTP did not significantly alter octopamine or tyramine, suggesting that central 5-HT may modulate aggression in these organisms and play a role in determining reproductive success and resource attainment.

  2. Enhanced Wireless Power Transmission Using Strong Paramagnetic Response.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Dukju; Kiani, Mehdi; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2014-03-01

    A method of quasi-static magnetic resonant coupling has been presented for improving the power transmission efficiency (PTE) in near-field wireless power transmission, which improves upon the state of the art. The traditional source resonator on the transmitter side is equipped with an additional resonator with a resonance frequency that is tuned substantially higher than the magnetic field excitation frequency. This additional resonator enhances the magnetic dipole moment and the effective permeability of the power transmitter, owing to a phenomenon known as the strong paramagnetic response. Both theoretical calculations and experimental results show increased PTE due to amplification of the effective permeability. In measurements, the PTE was improved from 57.8% to 64.2% at the nominal distance of 15 cm when the effective permeability was 2.6. The power delivered to load was also improved significantly, with the same 10 V excitation voltage, from 0.38 to 5.26 W.

  3. Intergenerational Transmission of Enhanced Seizure Susceptibility after Febrile Seizures.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dengchang; Feng, Bo; Dai, Yunjian; Wu, Xiaohua; Chen, Bin; Xu, Cenglin; Tang, Yangshun; Wang, Kang; Zhang, Shihong; Wang, Shuang; Luo, Benyan; Chen, Zhong

    2017-03-01

    Environmental exposure early in development plays a role in susceptibility to disease in later life. Here, we demonstrate that prolonged febrile seizures induced by exposure of rat pups to a hyperthermic environment enhance seizure susceptibility not only in these hyperthermia-treated rats but also in their future offspring, even if the offspring never experience febrile seizures. This transgenerational transmission was intensity-dependent and was mainly from mothers to their offspring. The transmission was associated with DNA methylation. Thus, our study supports a "Lamarckian"-like mechanism of pathogenesis and the crucial role of epigenetic factors in neurological conditions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A role for the extended amygdala in the fear-enhancing effects of acute selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ravinder, S; Burghardt, N S; Brodsky, R; Bauer, E P; Chattarji, S

    2013-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are reported to exacerbate symptoms of anxiety when treatment is initiated. These clinical findings have been extended to animal models wherein SSRIs also potentiate anxiety and fear learning, which depend on the amygdala. Yet, little is known about the role of specific amygdalar circuits in these acute effects of SSRIs. Here, we first confirmed that a single injection of fluoxetine 1 h before auditory fear conditioning potentiated fear memory in rats. To probe the neural substrates underlying this enhancement, we analyzed the expression patterns of the immediate early gene, Arc (activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein). Consistent with previous reports, fear conditioning induced Arc protein expression in the lateral and basal amygdala. However, this was not enhanced further by pre-treatment with fluoxetine. Instead, fluoxetine significantly enhanced expression of Arc in the central amygdala (CeA) and the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST). Next, we tested whether direct targeted infusions of fluoxetine into the CeA, or BNST, leads to the same fear-potentiating effect. Strikingly, direct infusion of fluoxetine into the BNST, but not the CeA, was sufficient to enhance fear memory. Moreover, this behavioral effect was also accompanied by robust Arc expression in the CeA, similar to the systemic injection. Our results identify a novel role for the BNST in the acute fear-enhancing effects of SSRIs. These findings highlight the need to look beyond the traditional focus on input nuclei of the amygdala and add to accumulating evidence implicating these microcircuits in gating fear and anxiety. PMID:23321806

  5. 5-HT7 receptor modulates GABAergic transmission in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus and controls cortical release of serotonin.

    PubMed

    Kusek, Magdalena; Sowa, Joanna; Kamińska, Katarzyna; Gołembiowska, Krystyna; Tokarski, Krzysztof; Hess, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    The 5-HT7 receptor is one of the several serotonin (5-HT) receptor subtypes that are expressed in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). Some earlier findings suggested that 5-HT7 receptors in the DRN were localized on GABAergic interneurons modulating the activity of 5-HT projection neurons. The aim of the present study was to find out how the 5-HT7 receptor modulates the GABAergic synaptic input to putative 5-HT DRN neurons, and whether blockade of the 5-HT7 receptor would affect the release of 5-HT in the target structure. Male Wistar rats with microdialysis probes implanted in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) received injections of the 5-HT7 receptor antagonist (2R)-1-[(3-hydroxyphenyl)sulfonyl]-2-[2-(4-methyl-1-piperidinyl)ethyl]pyrrolidine hydrochloride (SB 269970), which induced an increase in the levels of 5-HT and its metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the PFC. In another set of experiments whole-cell recordings from presumed projection neurons were carried out using DRN slices. SB 269970 application resulted in depolarization and in an increase in the firing frequency of the cells. In order to activate 5-HT7 receptors, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) was applied in the presence of N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-2-pyridinylcyclohexanecarboxamide (WAY100635). Hyperpolarization of cells and a decrease in the firing frequency were observed after activation of the 5-HT7 receptor. Blockade of 5-HT7 receptors caused a decrease in the mean frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs), while its activation induced an increase. The mechanism of these effects appears to involve tonically-active 5-HT7 receptors modulating firing and/or GABA release from inhibitory interneurons which regulate the activity of DRN serotonergic projection neurons.

  6. Polarization dependent enhanced infrared transmission through complementary nanostructured gold films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, Gangadhar; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2016-05-01

    A pair of complementary-structured gold films, with periodic rectangular nanoscale patches and rectangular holes in the complementary layer arranged in a stretched hexagonal lattice and spaced apart by 200 nm of a photoresist film, were fabricated by laser interference lithography and subsequent physical vapor deposition of gold. The pair of complementary films showed a polarization-dependent extraordinary transmission (EOT) at mid-infrared frequencies, evidenced by a resonant dip in reflectance and strong enhancement of the transmittance for light polarized perpendicular to the long axis of the rectangular structures. Numerical simulations confirm the enhanced transmission and indicate the involvement of the TE01 wave-guide mode resonance of the rectangular structures in the resonant transmittance. The enhanced transmittance in the complementary pair of structured films separated by sub-wavelength distances, which is otherwise be expected to be opaque, is surprising. The Poynting vector maps show that the energy flow weaves across the openings in the two structured films. Dependence on the metal thickness and period of the structures have been investigated. Sensitivity of the EOT peak to the surrounding medium's refractive index is studied by simulations to reveal its potential for sensor applications.

  7. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 enhances bioavailability of serotonin in gut tissues through modulation of synthesis and clearance

    PubMed Central

    Nzakizwanayo, Jonathan; Dedi, Cinzia; Standen, Guy; Macfarlane, Wendy M.; Patel, Bhavik A.; Jones, Brian V.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows indigenous gut microbes can interact with the human host through modulation of serotonin (5-HT) signaling. Here we investigate the impact of the probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) on 5-HT signalling in gut tissues. Ex-vivo mouse ileal tissue sections were treated with either EcN or the human gut commensal MG1655, and effects on levels of 5-HT, precursors, and metabolites, were evaluated using amperometry and high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-EC). Exposure of tissue to EcN cells, but not MG1655 cells, was found to increase levels of extra-cellular 5-HT. These effects were not observed when tissues were treated with cell-free supernatant from bacterial cultures. In contrast, when supernatant recovered from untreated ileal tissue was pre-incubated with EcN, the derivative cell-free supernatant was able to elevate 5-HT overflow when used to treat fresh ileal tissue. Measurement of 5-HT precursors and metabolites indicated EcN also increases intracellular 5-HTP and reduces 5-HIAA. The former pointed to modulation of tryptophan hydroxylase-1 to enhance 5-HT synthesis, while the latter indicates an impact on clearance into enterocytes through SERT. Taken together, these findings show EcN is able to enhance 5-HT bioavailability in ileal tissues through interaction with compounds secreted from host tissues. PMID:26616662

  8. Enhanced serotonin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in membranes from adult guinea pig hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Shenker, A; Maayani, S; Weinstein, H; Green, J P

    1983-05-16

    We have developed an assay for serotonin (5-HT) stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity in membranes from adult guinea pig hippocampus. The response to 5-HT is concentration-dependent, with an EC50 of 0.01 microM, a shallow slope, and mean maximal stimulation of 90% over basal activity. The response to 5-HT is GTP-dependent and additive to the maximal stimulation by histamine. Micromolar concentrations of the known 5-HT receptor agonists, tryptamine and 5-methoxytryptamine, also stimulate cAMP production in this system, and their effect is not additive to that elicited by a maximal concentration of 5-HT. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the response to 5-HT is elicited through a distinct receptor coupled to adenylate cyclase; the magnitude and the reproducibility of the 5-HT response in this system should make it useful for receptor classification. To examine the effect of prior exposure to endogenous 5-HT on the responsiveness of the system, we assayed 5-HT stimulation of enzyme activity in membranes prepared from animals 25-27 hrs after treatment with a single injection of reserpine (5 mg/kg, i.p.). The mean maximal stimulation of adenylate cyclase by 5-HT was increased to 150% over basal activity with no effect on the EC50 or slope of the 5-HT concentration-response curve. Reserpine pretreatment did not affect basal activity or histamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. These results are discussed in the context of a hypothesis that endogenous 5-HT normally exerts a desensitizing effect on its receptors in situ.

  9. Enhanced reliable transmission control protocol for spatial information networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhihong; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Junfeng

    2009-12-01

    Satellites channels are generally featured by high bit error rate (BER), long propagation delay, large bandwidth-delay product (BDP) and so on. This tends to make the traditional TCP suffer from serious performance degradation in satellite networks. Therefore, a TCP-compatible reliable transmission protocol (i.e., TCP-AX) for spatial information networks is proposed in this paper. And a bandwidth probing mechanism is designed to distinguish network congestion and link error. Simulation results show that TCP-AX has better performance than some popular enhanced TCP protocols.

  10. Enhanced hygiene measures and norovirus transmission during an outbreak.

    PubMed

    Heijne, Janneke C M; Teunis, Peter; Morroy, Gabriella; Wijkmans, Clementine; Oostveen, Sandy; Duizer, Erwin; Kretzschmar, Mirjam; Wallinga, Jacco

    2009-01-01

    Control of norovirus outbreaks relies on enhanced hygiene measures, such as handwashing, surface cleaning, using disposable paper towels, and using separate toilets for sick and well persons. However, little is known about their effectiveness in limiting further spread of norovirus infections. We analyzed norovirus outbreaks in 7 camps at an international scouting jamboree in the Netherlands during 2004. Implementation of hygiene measures coincided with an 84.8% (95% predictive interval 81.2%-86.6%) reduction in reproduction number. This reduction was unexpectedly large but still below the reduction needed to contain a norovirus outbreak. Even more stringent control measures are required to break the chain of transmission of norovirus.

  11. Prior fear conditioning does not impede enhanced active avoidance in serotonin transporter knockout rats.

    PubMed

    Schipper, Pieter; Henckens, Marloes J A G; Borghans, Bart; Hiemstra, Marlies; Kozicz, Tamas; Homberg, Judith R

    2017-03-07

    Stressors can be actively or passively coped with, and adequate adaption of the coping response to environmental conditions can reduce their potential deleterious effects. One major factor influencing stress coping behaviour is serotonin transporter (5-HTT) availability. Abolishment of 5-HTT is known to impair fear extinction but facilitates acquisition of signalled active avoidance (AA), a behavioural task in which an animal learns to avoid an aversive stimulus that is predicted by a cue. Flexibility in adapting coping behaviour to the nature of the stressor shapes resilience to stress-related disorders. Therefore, we investigated the relation between 5-HTT expression and ability to adapt a learned coping response to changing environmental conditions. To this end, we first established and consolidated a cue-conditioned passive fear response in 5-HTT(-/-) and wildtype rats. Next, we used the conditioned stimulus (CS) to signal oncoming shocks during signalled AA training in 5-HTT(-/-) and wildtype rats to study their capability to acquire an active coping response to the CS following fear conditioning. Finally, we investigated the behavioural response to the CS in a novel environment and measured freezing, exploration and self-grooming, behaviours reflective of stress coping strategy. We found that fear conditioned and sham conditioned 5-HTT(-/-) animals acquired the signalled AA response faster than wildtypes, while prior conditioning briefly delayed AA learning similarly in both genotypes. Subsequent exposure to the CS in the novel context reduced freezing and increased locomotion in 5-HTT(-/-) compared to wildtype rats. This indicates that improved AA performance in 5-HTT(-/-) rats resulted in a weaker residual passive fear response to the CS in a novel context. Fear conditioning prior to AA training did not affect freezing upon re-encountering the CS, although it did reduce locomotion in 5-HTT(-/-) rats. We conclude that independent of 5-HTT signalling, prior

  12. Serotonin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this website will be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? ... Lab Tests Online. AACC is a not-for-profit organization and does not endorse non-AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Serotonin Share ...

  13. Enhanced APOE2 transmission rates in families with autistic probands.

    PubMed

    Persico, A M; D'Agruma, L; Zelante, L; Militerni, R; Bravaccio, C; Schneider, C; Melmed, R; Trillo, S; Montecchi, F; Elia, M; Palermo, M; Rabinowitz, D; Pascucci, T; Puglisi-Allegra, S; Reichelt, K-L; Muscarella, L; Guarnieri, V; Melgari, J-M; Conciatori, M; Keller, F

    2004-06-01

    We have previously described linkage/association between reelin gene polymorphisms and autistic disorder. APOE also participates in the Reelin signaling pathway, by competitively antagonizing Reelin binding to APOE receptor 2 and to very-low-density lipoprotein receptors. The APOE2 protein variant displays the lowest receptor binding affinity compared with APOE3 and APOE4. In this study, we assess linkage/association between primary autism and APOE alleles in 223 complete trios, from 119 simplex Italian families and 44 simplex and 29 multiplex Caucasian-American families. Statistically significant disequilibrium favors the transmission of epsilon2 alleles to autistic offspring, over epsilon3 and epsilon4 (allele-wise transmission/disequilibrium test [TDT], chi2 = 6.16, 2 degrees of freedom [d.f.], P<0.05; genotype-wise TDT, chi2 = 10.68, 3 d.f., P<0.05). A novel epsilon3r allele was also discovered in an autistic child and his mother. Autistic patients do not differ significantly from unaffected siblings (allele-wise TDT comparing autistic patients versus unaffected sibs, chi2 = 1.83, 2 d.f., P<0.40, not significant). The major limitation of this study consists of our small sample size of trios including one unaffected sibling, currently not possessing the statistical power necessary to conclusively discriminate a specific association of epsilon2 with autism, from a distorted segregation pattern characterized by enhanced epsilon2 transmission rates both to affected and unaffected offspring. Our findings are thus compatible with either (a) pathogenetic contributions by epsilon2 alleles to autism spectrum vulnerability, requiring additional environmental and/or genetic factors to yield an autistic syndrome, and/or (b) a protective effect of epsilon2 alleles against the enhanced risk of miscarriage and infertility previously described among parents of autistic children.

  14. Antidepressant Potential of Chlorogenic Acid-Enriched Extract from Eucommia ulmoides Oliver Bark with Neuron Protection and Promotion of Serotonin Release through Enhancing Synapsin I Expression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianming; Chen, Haixia; Li, Hua; Tang, Yong; Yang, Le; Cao, Shousong; Qin, Dalian

    2016-02-25

    Eucommia ulmoides Oliver (E. ulmoides) is a traditional Chinese medicine with many beneficial effects, used as a tonic medicine in China and other countries. Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is an important compound in E. ulmoides with neuroprotective, cognition improvement and other pharmacological effects. However, it is unknown whether chlorogenic acid-enriched Eucommia ulmoides Oliver bark has antidepressant potential through neuron protection, serotonin release promotion and penetration of blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. In the present study, we demonstrated that CGA could stimulate axon and dendrite growth and promote serotonin release through enhancing synapsin I expression in the cells of fetal rat raphe neurons in vitro. More importantly, CGA-enriched extract of E. ulmoides (EUWE) at 200 and 400 mg/kg/day orally administered for 7 days showed antidepressant-like effects in the tail suspension test of KM mice. Furthermore, we also found CGA could be detected in the the cerebrospinal fluid of the rats orally treated with EUWE and reach the level of pharmacological effect for neuroprotection by UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS. The findings indicate CGA is able to cross the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier to exhibit its neuron protection and promotion of serotonin release through enhancing synapsin I expression. This is the first report of the effect of CGA on promoting 5-HT release through enhancing synapsin I expression and CGA-enriched EUWE has antidepressant-like effect in vivo. EUWE may be developed as the natural drugs for the treatment of depression.

  15. Fluoxetine (Prozac) and Serotonin Act on Excitatory Synaptic Transmission to Suppress Single Layer 2/3 Pyramidal Neuron-Triggered Cell Assemblies in the Human Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Komlósi, Gergely; Molnár, Gábor; Rózsa, Márton; Oláh, Szabolcs; Barzó, Pál

    2012-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the most widely prescribed drugs targeting the CNS with acute and chronic effects in cognitive, emotional and behavioral processes. This suggests that microcircuits of the human cerebral cortex are powerfully modulated by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, however, direct measurements of serotonergic regulation on human synaptic interactions are missing. Using multiple whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from neurons in acute cortical slices derived from nonpathological human samples of the prefrontal cortex, we show that neuronal assemblies triggered by single action potentials of individual neurons in the human cortex are suppressed by therapeutic doses of fluoxetine (Prozac). This effect is boosted and can be mimicked by physiological concentrations of serotonin through 5HT-2A and 5HT-1A receptors. Monosynaptic excitatory connections from pyramidal cells to interneurons were suppressed by application of serotonin leaving the monosynaptic output of GABAergic cells unaffected. Changes in failure rate, in paired-pulse ratio, and in the coefficient of variation of the amplitude of EPSPs suggest a presynaptic action of serotonin. In conclusion, activation of neuronal assemblies, which were suggested as building blocks of high order cognitive processes, are effectively downregulated by the acute action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or serotonin at the site of pyramidal output in human microcircuits. PMID:23152619

  16. Unpredictable neonatal stress enhances adult anxiety and alters amygdala gene expression related to serotonin and GABA

    PubMed Central

    Sarro, Emma C; Sullivan, Regina M; Barr, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety-related disorders are among the most common psychiatric illnesses, thought to have both genetic and environmental causes. Early-life trauma, such as abuse from a caregiver, can be predictable or unpredictable, each resulting in increased prevalence and severity of a unique set of disorders. In this study, we examined the influence of early unpredictable trauma on both the behavioral expression of adult anxiety and gene expression within the amygdala. Neonatal rats were exposed to unpaired odor-shock conditioning for 5 days, which produces deficits in adult behavior and amygdala dysfunction. In adulthood, we used the Light/Dark box test to measure anxiety-related behaviors, measuring the latency to enter the lit area and quantified urination and defecation. The amygdala was then dissected and a microarray analysis was performed to examine changes in gene expression. Animals that had received early unpredictable trauma displayed significantly longer latencies to enter the lit area and more defecation and urination. The microarray analysis revealed over-represented genes related to learning and memory, synaptic transmission and trans-membrane transport. Gene ontology and pathway analysis identified highly represented disease states related to anxiety phenotypes, including social anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorders, PTSD and bipolar disorder. Addiction related genes were also overrepresented in this analysis. Unpredictable shock during early development increased anxiety-like behaviors in adulthood with concomitant changes in genes related to neurotransmission, resulting in gene expression patterns similar to anxiety-related psychiatric disorders. PMID:24240029

  17. TRPV4 channel contributes to serotonin-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction and the enhanced vascular reactivity in chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yang; Fu, Zhenzhen; Hu, Jinxing; Huang, Chun; Paudel, Omkar; Cai, Shaoxi; Liedtke, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is a mechanosensitive channel in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Its upregulation by chronic hypoxia is associated with enhanced myogenic tone, and genetic deletion of trpv4 suppresses the development of chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (CHPH). Here we further examine the roles of TRPV4 in agonist-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction and in the enhanced vasoreactivity in CHPH. Initial evaluation of TRPV4-selective antagonists HC-067047 and RN-1734 in KCl-contracted pulmonary arteries (PAs) of trpv4−/− mice found that submicromolar HC-067047 was devoid of off-target effect on pulmonary vasoconstriction. Inhibition of TRPV4 with 0.5 μM HC-067047 significantly reduced the sensitivity of serotonin (5-HT)-induced contraction in wild-type (WT) PAs but had no effect on endothelin-1 or phenylephrine-activated response. Similar shift in the concentration-response curve of 5-HT was observed in trpv4−/− PAs, confirming specific TRPV4 contribution to 5-HT-induced vasoconstriction. 5-HT-induced Ca2+ response was attenuated by HC-067047 in WT PASMCs but not in trpv4−/− PASMCs, suggesting TRPV4 is a major Ca2+ pathway for 5-HT-induced Ca2+ mobilization. Nifedipine also attenuated 5-HT-induced Ca2+ response in WT PASMCs but did not cause further reduction in the presence of HC-067047, suggesting interdependence of TRPV4 and voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in the 5-HT response. Chronic exposure (3–4 wk) of WT mice to 10% O2 caused significant increase in 5-HT-induced maximal contraction, which was partially reversed by HC-067047. In concordance, the enhancement of 5-HT-induced contraction was significantly reduced in PAs of CH trpv4−/− mice and HC-067047 had no further effect on the 5-HT induced response. These results suggest unequivocally that TRPV4 contributes to 5-HT-dependent pharmaco-mechanical coupling and plays a major role in the enhanced pulmonary vasoreactivity to 5-HT in CHPH. PMID

  18. Serotonin and suicidality: the impact of acute fluoxetine administration. I: Serotonin and suicide.

    PubMed

    King, R A; Segman, R H; Anderson, G M

    1994-01-01

    The general enhancement of central serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission following long-term administration of serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) appears to play an important role in these drugs' anti-depressant efficacy. Because suicide and/or aggression appear linked to diminished levels of brain 5-HT and its metabolites, it has been suggested that SSRIs may be particularly effective in reducing suicidality. Case reports of increased or new suicidal ideation following administration of fluoxetine and other SSRIs, however, raise questions about how these potential side effects may relate to the SSRI's acute effects on 5-HT transmission. Part I of this review examines fluoxetine's effects on suicidality and related behaviors and reviews the relationship of suicidality to serotonergic dysregulation.

  19. Up-regulation of tryptophan hydroxylase expression and serotonin synthesis by sertraline.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong Who; Park, So Yeon; Hwang, Onyou

    2002-04-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin is involved in a variety of brain functions, and abnormal changes in serotonin neurotransmission are associated with an array of psychiatric disorders, including depression. Sertraline is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and an effective antidepressant. Sertraline increases the serotonin concentration in the synaptic cleft by a short-term action; however, clinical improvement is observed only after several weeks, suggesting that the therapeutic effect may be caused by long-term alterations in serotonin transmission. We determined the effects of sertraline on serotonin synthesis in vivo and in vitro. Long-term treatment of rats with sertraline up-regulated mRNA and protein levels of the serotonin-synthesizing enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), as determined by in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry, respectively. In vitro studies using RBL-2H3 cells also showed an increase in mRNA and protein levels of TPH by sertraline, as determined by Northern blot and immunoblot analyses, respectively. This was accompanied by increases in the levels of TPH enzymatic activity and total serotonin. These data demonstrate that in addition to the known short-term action as an uptake blocker, sertraline also exerts a long-term effect on the serotonin neurotransmission by enhancing serotonin synthesis. A similar effect was observed with another SSRI, fluoxetine, but not with the non-SSRI chlorpromazine. The up-regulation of TPH gene expression by sertraline was attenuated by the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor N-[2-(p-bromocinnamylamine)-ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamine, suggesting that a mechanism involving the PKA signaling pathway might at least in part mediate the long-term therapeutic action.

  20. Enhancement transmission filter using a two-dimensional subwavelength periodic membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianyu; Sang, Tian; Li, Junlang; Wang, Rui; Wang, La; Gao, Jian

    2017-06-01

    Enhancement transmission filter using a two-dimensional (2-D) subwavelength periodic membrane is proposed. It can be found that strong refractive-index modulation of the silicon periodic membrane can support the excitation of multiple guided-mode resonances (GMRs) in a reflection band, and every GMR relates a transmission peak on its edge, therefore the overlapping of the edges of these resonances can be tailored to create enhancement transmission. Thelocation of the transmission peak is shifted linearly with a slop of 1.51 as the period is varied. Enhancement transmission with multiple channels near 1310 nm can also be achieved using the interaction of the nondegenerate GMRs at oblique incidence.

  1. Prenatal nicotine exposure enhances the trigeminocardiac reflex via serotonin receptor facilitation in brainstem pathways.

    PubMed

    Gorini, C; Jameson, H; Woerman, A L; Perry, D C; Mendelowitz, D

    2013-08-15

    In this study we used a rat model for prenatal nicotine exposure to test whether clinically relevant concentrations of brain nicotine and cotinine are passed from dams exposed to nicotine to her pups, whether this changes the trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR), and whether serotonergic function in the TCR brainstem circuitry is altered. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley dams were exposed to 6 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) of nicotine via osmotic minipumps for the duration of pregnancy. Following birth dams and pups were killed, blood was collected, and brain nicotine and cotinine levels were measured. A separate group of prenatal nicotine-exposed pups was used for electrophysiological recordings. A horizontal brainstem slice was obtained by carefully preserving the trigeminal nerve with fluorescent identification of cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) in the nucleus ambiguus. Stimulation of the trigeminal nerve evoked excitatory postsynaptic current in CVNs. Our data demonstrate that prenatal nicotine exposure significantly exaggerates both the TCR-evoked changes in heart rate in conscious unrestrained pups, and the excitatory neurotransmission to CVNs upon trigeminal afferent nerve stimulation within this brainstem reflex circuit. Application of the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY 100635 (100 μM) and 5-HT2A/C receptor antagonist ketanserin (10 μM)significantly decreased neurotransmission, indicating an increased facilitation of 5-HT function in prenatal nicotine-exposed animals. Prenatal nicotine exposure enhances activation of 5-HT receptors and exaggerates the trigeminocardiac reflex.

  2. Prenatal nicotine exposure enhances the trigeminocardiac reflex via serotonin receptor facilitation in brainstem pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gorini, C.; Jameson, H.; Woerman, A. L.; Perry, D. C.

    2013-01-01

    In this study we used a rat model for prenatal nicotine exposure to test whether clinically relevant concentrations of brain nicotine and cotinine are passed from dams exposed to nicotine to her pups, whether this changes the trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR), and whether serotonergic function in the TCR brainstem circuitry is altered. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley dams were exposed to 6 mg·kg−1·day−1 of nicotine via osmotic minipumps for the duration of pregnancy. Following birth dams and pups were killed, blood was collected, and brain nicotine and cotinine levels were measured. A separate group of prenatal nicotine-exposed pups was used for electrophysiological recordings. A horizontal brainstem slice was obtained by carefully preserving the trigeminal nerve with fluorescent identification of cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) in the nucleus ambiguus. Stimulation of the trigeminal nerve evoked excitatory postsynaptic current in CVNs. Our data demonstrate that prenatal nicotine exposure significantly exaggerates both the TCR-evoked changes in heart rate in conscious unrestrained pups, and the excitatory neurotransmission to CVNs upon trigeminal afferent nerve stimulation within this brainstem reflex circuit. Application of the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY 100635 (100 μM) and 5-HT2A/C receptor antagonist ketanserin (10 μM)significantly decreased neurotransmission, indicating an increased facilitation of 5-HT function in prenatal nicotine-exposed animals. Prenatal nicotine exposure enhances activation of 5-HT receptors and exaggerates the trigeminocardiac reflex. PMID:23766497

  3. Serotonin and beyond: therapeutics for major depression

    PubMed Central

    Blier, Pierre; El Mansari, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT, 5-hydroxytryptamine) system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder (MDD). The case for its contribution to the therapeutic efficacy of a wide variety of antidepressant treatments is, however, much stronger. All antidepressant strategies have been shown to enhance 5-HT transmission in the brain of laboratory animals. Catecholamines, norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) can also play a pivotal role in the mechanism of action of certain antidepressant strategies. The enhancement of 5-HT transmission by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, which leads to a dampening of the activity of NE and DA neurons, may account in part for the low remission rate achieved with these medications and/or the residuals symptoms after remission is achieved. The functional connectivity between the 5-HT, NE and DA systems can be used to understand the mechanism of action of a wide variety of augmentation strategies in treatment-resistant MDD. Proof-of-concept studies have shown that antidepressant medications with complementary mechanisms of action on monoaminergic systems can double the remission rate achieved in a trial of standard duration. Novel approaches are also being used to treat MDD, which also appear to involve the monoaminergic system(s) to a varying extent. PMID:23440470

  4. An evolutionary role for HIV latency in enhancing viral transmission.

    PubMed

    Rouzine, Igor M; Weinberger, Ariel D; Weinberger, Leor S

    2015-02-26

    HIV latency is the chief obstacle to eradicating HIV but is widely believed to be an evolutionary accident providing no lentiviral fitness advantage. However, findings of latency being "hardwired" into HIV's gene-regulatory circuitry appear inconsistent with latency being an evolutionary accident, given HIV's rapid mutation rate. Here, we propose that latency is an evolutionary "bet-hedging" strategy whose frequency has been optimized to maximize lentiviral transmission by reducing viral extinction during mucosal infections. The model quantitatively fits the available patient data, matches observations of high-frequency latency establishment in cell culture and primates, and generates two counterintuitive but testable predictions. The first prediction is that conventional CD8-depletion experiments in SIV-infected macaques increase latent cells more than viremia. The second prediction is that strains engineered to have higher replicative fitness—via reduced latency—will exhibit lower infectivity in animal-model mucosal inoculations. Therapeutically, the theory predicts treatment approaches that may substantially enhance "activate-and-kill" HIV-cure strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Separate serotonin and dopamine receptors modulate the duration of post-tetanic potentiation at an Aplysia synapse without affecting other aspects of synaptic transmission.

    PubMed

    Newlin, S A; Schlapfer, W T; Barondes, S H

    1980-01-06

    We have studied the effect of the biogenic amines, serotonin and dopamine, on post-tetanic potentiation (PTP) at an identified synapse in the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia californica. We found that: (1) 10(-7) M perfused serotonin doubles the rate constant of decay of PTP. The effect is specific in that neither the size of the non-potentiated (isolated) EPSP nor the amplitude of PTP is affected. As reported previously, higher doses of serotonin will also increase the amplitude of PTP and decrease the size of the isolated EPSP; (2) 5 X 10(-7) M dopamine in the perfusate increases the rate constant of decay of PTP by about 50%. The effect is also specific in that neither PTP amplitude nor the size of the isolated EPSP is affected; (3) SQ10,631, a serotonin antagonist, blocks the effect of perfused serotonin on PTP decay rate. It does not antagonize the dopamine effect. SQ10,631 also slows the endogenous decay of PTP in some preparations which exhibit an unusually fast PTP decay rate, suggesting a naturally occurring source of serotonin within the ganglion capable of affecting the rate constant of PTP decay; (4) (+)-butaclamol, a dopamine antagonist, blocks the effect of dopamine on the rate constant of PTP decay, whereas (-)-butaclamol has little effect. Butaclamol does not block the effect of serotonin on the rate constant of PTP decay; (5) phosphodiesterase inhibitors potentiate the effect of serotonin on the rate constant of PTP decay, and cyclic AMP analogues mimic the effect of the biogenic amines, suggesting that the aminergic modulation of the rate of decay of PTP is coupled with activation of adenylate cyclase and accumulation of cyclic AMP; and (6) the evidence presented is consistent with the hypothesis that serotonin and dopamine are capable of specifically modifying the rate of change in the efficacy of transmitter release which underlies PTP. It also suggests that the two biogenic amines operate separately and in parallel via presynaptic receptor

  6. Enhanced millimeter-wave transmission through subwavelength hole arrays.

    PubMed

    Beruete, M; Sorolla, M; Campillo, I; Dolado, J S; Martín-Moreno, L; Bravo-Abad, J; García-Vidal, F J

    2004-11-01

    We explore, both experimentally and theoretically, the existence in the millimeter-wave range of the phenomenon of extraordinary light transmission through arrays of subwavelength holes. We have measured the transmission spectra of several samples made on aluminum wafers by use of an AB Millimetre quasi-optical vector network analyzer in the wavelength range 4.2-6.5 mm. Clear signals of the existence of resonant light transmission at wavelengths close to the period of the array appear in the spectra.

  7. Transmission enhancement based on strong interference in metal-semiconductor layered film for energy harvesting.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Du, Kaikai; Mao, Kening; Fang, Xu; Zhao, Ding; Ye, Hui; Qiu, Min

    2016-07-12

    A fundamental strategy to enhance optical transmission through a continuous metallic film based on strong interference dominated by interface phase shift is developed. In a metallic film coated with a thin semiconductor film, both transmission and absorption are simultaneously enhanced as a result of dramatically reduced reflection. For a 50-nm-thick Ag film, experimental transmission enhancement factors of 4.5 and 9.5 are realized by exploiting Ag/Si non-symmetric and Si/Ag/Si symmetric geometries, respectively. These planar layered films for transmission enhancement feature ultrathin thickness, broadband and wide-angle operation, and reduced resistance. Considering one of their potential applications as transparent metal electrodes in solar cells, a calculated 182% enhancement in the total transmission efficiency relative to a single metallic film is expected. This strategy relies on no patterned nanostructures and thereby may power up a wide spectrum of energy-harvesting applications such as thin-film photovoltaics and surface photocatalysis.

  8. Transmission enhancement based on strong interference in metal-semiconductor layered film for energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Du, Kaikai; Mao, Kening; Fang, Xu; Zhao, Ding; Ye, Hui; Qiu, Min

    2016-07-01

    A fundamental strategy to enhance optical transmission through a continuous metallic film based on strong interference dominated by interface phase shift is developed. In a metallic film coated with a thin semiconductor film, both transmission and absorption are simultaneously enhanced as a result of dramatically reduced reflection. For a 50-nm-thick Ag film, experimental transmission enhancement factors of 4.5 and 9.5 are realized by exploiting Ag/Si non-symmetric and Si/Ag/Si symmetric geometries, respectively. These planar layered films for transmission enhancement feature ultrathin thickness, broadband and wide-angle operation, and reduced resistance. Considering one of their potential applications as transparent metal electrodes in solar cells, a calculated 182% enhancement in the total transmission efficiency relative to a single metallic film is expected. This strategy relies on no patterned nanostructures and thereby may power up a wide spectrum of energy-harvesting applications such as thin-film photovoltaics and surface photocatalysis.

  9. SDF-1α/CXCL12 enhances GABA and glutamate synaptic activity at serotonin neurons in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Heinisch, Silke; Kirby, Lynn G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) system has a well-characterized role in depression. Recent reports describe comorbidities of mood-immune disorders, suggesting an immunological component may contribute to the pathogenesis of depression as well. Chemokines, immune proteins which mediate leukocyte trafficking, and their receptors are widely distributed in the brain, mediate neuronal patterning, and modulate various neuropathologies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the neuroanatomical relationship and functional impact of the chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1α/CXCL12 and its receptor, CXCR4, on the serotonin dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) system in the rat using anatomical and electrophysiological techniques. Immunohistochemical analysis indicates that over 70% of 5-HT neurons colocalize with CXCL12 and CXCR4. At a subcellular level, CXCL12 localizes throughout the cytoplasm whereas CXCR4 concentrates to the outer membrane and processes of 5-HT neurons. CXCL12 and CXCR4 also colocalize on individual DRN cells. Furthermore, electrophysiological studies demonstrate CXCL12 depolarization of 5-HT neurons indirectly via glutamate synaptic inputs. CXCL12 also enhances the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory and excitatory postsynaptic currents (sIPSC and sEPSC). CXCL12 concentration-dependently increases evoked IPSC amplitude and decreases evoked IPSC paired-pulse ratio selectively in 5-HT neurons, effects blocked by the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100. These data indicate presynaptic enhancement of GABA and glutamate release at 5-HT DRN neurons by CXCL12. Immunohistochemical analysis further shows CXCR4 localization to DRN GABA neurons, providing an anatomical basis for CXCL12 effects on GABA release. Thus, CXCL12 indirectly modulates 5-HT neurotransmission via GABA and glutamate synaptic afferents. Future therapies targeting CXCL12 and other chemokines may treat serotonin related mood disorders, particularly depression experienced by immune

  10. The presence of a serotonin uptake inhibitor alters pharmacological manipulations of serotonin release.

    PubMed

    Kreiss, D S; Wieland, S; Lucki, I

    1993-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of the presence of the serotonin uptake inhibitor citalopram in the perfusion medium on pharmacological manipulations which increased and decreased striatal serotonin release using in vivo microdialysis. A high performance liquid chromatography detection system equipped with a microbore column was used which reduced the detection limit to 0.5 fmol serotonin/5 microliters sample and enabled basal striatal serotonin release to be measured without the addition of a serotonin uptake inhibitor to the perfusion medium. Although serotonin uptake inhibitors have frequently been used to enhance the serotonin content of dialysate samples, the effects of the presence of serotonin uptake inhibitors on pharmacological manipulations which increased and decreased the release of serotonin have not yet been characterized. Serotonin release was reduced by the systemic administration of the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT). Although 5-HT release was reduced by 8-OH-DPAT after the addition of citalopram, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist did not reduce absolute levels of extracellular serotonin below basal values of serotonin measured in the absence of citalopram. In addition, citalopram dramatically prevented the four-fold increase in the release of serotonin produced by the systemic administration of the serotonin-releasing agent fenfluramine. The blockade of fenfluramine's effects by citalopram supports the hypothesis that transport of fenfluramine into serotonergic neurons is necessary to increase serotonin release. This study demonstrates that the use of an HPLC detection system equipped with a microbore column can reliably measure basal serotonin release using in vivo microdialysis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Transmission grating stretcher for contrast enhancement of high power lasers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yunxin; Hooker, Chris; Chekhlov, Oleg; Hawkes, Steve; Collier, John; Rajeev, P P

    2014-12-01

    We propose, for the first time, a transmission grating stretcher for high power lasers and demonstrate its superiority over conventional, reflective gold grating stretchers in terms of pulse temporal quality. We show that, compared to a conventional stretcher with the same stretching factor, the transmission-grating based stretcher yields more than an order of magnitude improvement in the contrast pedestal. We have also quantitatively characterized the roughness of the grating surfaces and estimated its impact on the contrast pedestal.

  12. Modes and nodes explain the mechanism of action of vortioxetine, a multimodal agent (MMA): enhancing serotonin release by combining serotonin (5HT) transporter inhibition with actions at 5HT receptors (5HT1A, 5HT1B, 5HT1D, 5HT7 receptors).

    PubMed

    Stahl, Stephen M

    2015-04-01

    Vortioxetine is an antidepressant that targets multiple pharmacologic modes of action at sites--or nodes--where serotonergic neurons connect to various brain circuits. These multimodal pharmacologic actions of vortioxetine lead to enhanced release of various neurotransmitters, including serotonin, at various nodes within neuronal networks.

  13. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor and Substance P Antagonist Enhancement of Natural Killer Cell Innate Immunity in Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Dwight L.; Lynch, Kevin G.; Benton, Tami; Dubé, Benoit; Gettes, David R.; Tustin, Nancy B.; Lai, Jian Ping; Metzger, David; Douglas, Steven D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in innate immunity and are involved in the host defense against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This study examines the potential role of three underlying regulatory systems that have been under investigation in central nervous system research as well as immune and viral research: serotonin, neurokinin, and glucocorticoid systems. Methods Fifty-one HIV-seropositive subjects were recruited to achieve a representative sample of depressed and nondepressed women. The effects of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), a substance P (SP) antagonist, and a glucocorticoid antagonist on NK cell function were assessed in a series of ex vivo experiments of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from each HIV-seropositive subject. Results Natural killer cell cytolytic activity was significantly increased by the SSRI citalopram and by the substance P antagonist CP-96345 relative to control conditions; the glucocorticoid antagonist, RU486, showed no effect on NK cytotoxicity. Our results suggest that the effects of the three agents did not differ as a function of depression. Conclusions Our findings provide evidence that NK cell function in HIV infection may be enhanced by serotonin reuptake inhibition and by substance P antagonism. It remains to be determined if HIV-related impairment in not only NK cytolytic activity but also NK noncytolytic activity can be improved by an SSRI or an SP antagonist. Clinical studies are warranted to address these questions and the potential roles of serotonergic agents and SP antagonists in improving NK cell immunity, delaying HIV disease progression, and extending survival with HIV infection. PMID:17945197

  14. Enhancement of transmission rates in quantum memory channels with damping.

    PubMed

    Benenti, Giuliano; D'Arrigo, Antonio; Falci, Giuseppe

    2009-07-10

    We consider the transfer of quantum information down a single-mode quantum transmission line. Such a quantum channel is modeled as a damped harmonic oscillator, the interaction between the information carriers -a train of N qubits- and the oscillator being of the Jaynes-Cummings kind. Memory effects appear if the state of the oscillator is not reset after each channel use. We show that the setup without resetting is convenient in order to increase the transmission rates, both for the transfer of quantum and classical private information. Our results can be applied to the micromaser.

  15. Enhanced transmission in rolled-up hyperlenses utilizing Fabry-Pérot resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerbst, Jochen; Schwaiger, Stephan; Rottler, Andreas; Koitmäe, Aune; Bröll, Markus; Ehlermann, Jens; Stemmann, Andrea; Heyn, Christian; Heitmann, Detlef; Mendach, Stefan

    2011-11-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that the transmission through rolled-up metal/semiconductor hyperlenses can be enhanced at desired frequencies utilizing Fabry-Pérot resonances. By means of finite difference time domain simulations, we prove that hyperlensing occurs at frequencies of high transmission.

  16. Hedgehog subwavelength hole arrays: control over the THz enhanced transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Cía, M.; Rodriguez-Ulibarri, Pablo; Beruete, M.

    2013-01-01

    By backing or sandwiching a holey metal layer with or between isotropic dielectric slabs, additional peaks of transmission within the long-wavelength regime arise as a result of the induced transverse magnetic (TM) or transverse electric (TE) grounded dielectric modes. A similar control of the complex surface wave modes, and thus of the extraordinary transmission (ET) peaks, is demonstrated here via anisotropic slabs in the form of a fakir's bed of nails. However, it is shown that those ET peaks formed from TE modes are suppressed because of the inherent dispersion characteristics of the free-standing grounded pins. This allows the red-shifting of the ET for the polarization parallel to the larger in-plane period of the hole array, but unlike the dielectric isotropic slab configuration, the orthogonal polarization remains inhibited. In memoriam Professor Mario Sorolla.

  17. Enhanced terahertz transmission through a periodic array of tapered rectangular apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Koijam Monika; Sarma, Amarendra K.; Kumar, Gagan

    2016-10-01

    We numerically analyze extraordinary terahertz transmission properties of an array of rectangular shaped apertures perforated periodically on a thin metal film. The apertures are tapered at different angles to achieve higher field concentration at the tapered end. The periodic sub-wavelength scale apertures ensure plasmonic behavior giving rise to the enhanced transmission of a specific frequency mode decided by the periodicity. We compare results of transmission with the rectangular shaped apertures of same parameters and observe a significant increase in the transmission. We have compared results of our numerical simulations with theory and have found them consistent.

  18. Photonic nanojet assisted enhancement in transmission of light through hollow pyramid shaped near field probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, H. S.; Kushwaha, P. K.; Swami, M. K.; Gupta, P. K.

    2015-05-01

    We report the use of sub-wavelength confinement of light using dielectric microspheres for enhancing transmission through the cantilever-based hollow probes used in a near-field scanning optical microscope. With an appropriate choice of the dielectric microsphere, an order of magnitude enhancement was achieved in transmission through the probe. In addition, transmission through such a tip was also found to be less sensitive to the axial and lateral offset between the beam waist and symmetry axis of the probe tip.

  19. Textile artificial magnetic conductor jacket for transmission enhancement between antennas under bending and wetness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamardin, Kamilia; Rahim, Mohamad Kamal A.; Hall, Peter S.; Samsuri, Noor Asmawati; Latef, Tarik Abdul; Ullah, Mohammad Habib

    2016-04-01

    Textile artificial magnetic conductor (AMC) waveguide jacket for transmission enhancement between on-body antennas is proposed. Transmission characteristics between antennas with different orientations and placements are studied. Significant transmission enhancement is observed for all tested positions. Bending and wetness measurements are also conducted. Bending is found not to give significant effect to the antennas and AMC performance, while wetness yields severe performance distortion. However, the original performance is retrieved once the antennas and AMC dried. The proposed AMC jacket will act as a new approach for efficient wearable body-centric communications.

  20. Enhanced sound transmission from water to air at low frequencies.

    PubMed

    McDonald, B Edward; Calvo, David C

    2007-12-01

    Excitation of acoustic radiation into the air from a low-frequency point source under water is investigated using plane wave expansion of the source spectrum and Rayleigh reflection/transmission coefficients. Expressions are derived for the acoustic power radiated into air and water as a function of source depth and given to lowest order in the air/water density ratio. Near zero source depth, the radiation into the water is quenched by the source's acoustic image, while the power radiated into air reaches about 1% of the power that would be radiated into unbounded water.

  1. Augmentation of serotonin enhances pleasant and suppresses unpleasant cortical electrophysiological responses to visual emotional stimuli in humans.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Andrew H; Gray, Marcus A; Silberstein, Richard B; Armstrong, Stuart M; Nathan, Pradeep J

    2004-07-01

    The serotonergic system is one of the major systems targeted in the pharmacological treatment of a wide range of mood disorders including depression; however, little is known about the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the effects of serotonin (5-HT) on affective phenomena including emotional behaviours, mood and emotional processing. The aim of the current study was to investigate how 5-HT acutely modulates steady-state visually evoked potentials (SSVEP), heart rate (HR) and verbal ratings associated with the viewing of differently valent emotional images. In a randomised double-blind, placebo-controlled design, 17 healthy subjects were tested under two acute treatment conditions: placebo and citalopram (20 mg) (a selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor, or SSRI). Participants were tested 2 h post treatment whilst viewing 75 images (categorised as pleasant, neutral or unpleasant). Results indicate that under placebo treatment, processing of unpleasant valence [unpleasant (-) neutral images] was associated with decreases in SSVEP amplitude and latency in frontal and occipital cortices, whereas processing of pleasant valence [pleasant (-) neutral images] was associated with amplitude decreases and latency increases within frontal and left temporoparietal cortices. Decreases in both amplitude and latency are both interpreted as surrogate measures of cortical activation or excitation. Citalopram relative to placebo attenuated the electrophysiological activation to unpleasant valence within frontal and occipital cortices, but potentiated electrophysiological activation (amplitude only) to pleasant valence within parietooccipital cortices. Citalopram relative to placebo also suppressed differences in heart rate associated with the viewing of pleasant and unpleasant images, but did not alter subject's subjective responses to emotional images. Results suggest that responsiveness to pleasant and unpleasant stimuli following neurochemical modulation may vary across

  2. Microfluidic transmission surface plasmon resonance enhancement for biosensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lertvachirapaiboon, Chutiparn; Baba, Akira; Ekgasit, Sanong; Shinbo, Kazunari; Kato, Keizo; Kaneko, Futao

    2017-01-01

    The microfluidic transmission surface plasmon resonance (MTSPR) constructed by assembling a gold-coated grating substrate with a microchannel was employed for biosensor application. The transmission surface plasmon resonance spectrum obtained from the MTSPR sensor chip showed a strong and narrow surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak located between 650 and 800 nm. The maximum SPR excitation was observed at an incident angle of 35°. The MTSPR sensor chip was employed for glucose sensor application. Gold-coated grating substrates were functionalized using 3-mercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid sodium salt and subsequently functionalized using a five-bilayer poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) to facilitate the coupling/decoupling of the surface plasmon and to prepare a uniform surface for sensing. The detection limit of our developed system for glucose was 2.31 mM. This practical platform represents a high possibility of further developing several biomolecules, multiplex systems, and a point-of-care assay for practical biosensor applications.

  3. Circulating serotonin in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Maurer-Spurej, E

    2005-08-01

    The role of circulating serotonin is unclear and whether or not serotonin is present in the blood of non-mammalian species is not known. This study provides the first evidence for the presence of serotonin in thrombocytes of birds and three reptilian species, the endothermic leatherback sea turtle, the green sea turtle and the partially endothermic American alligator. Thrombocytes from a fresh water turtle, American bullfrog, Yellowfin tuna, and Chinook salmon did not contain serotonin. Serotonin is a vasoactive substance that regulates skin blood flow, a major mechanism for endothermic body temperature regulation, which could explain why circulating serotonin is present in warm-blooded species. The temperature sensitivity of human blood platelets with concomitant changes in serotonin content further supports a link between circulating serotonin and thermoregulation. Phylogenetic comparison of the presence of circulating serotonin indicated an evolutionary divergence within reptilian species that might coincide with the emergence of endothermy.

  4. Sexual attraction enhances glutamate transmission in mammalian anterior cingulate cortex.

    PubMed

    Wu, Long-Jun; Kim, Susan S; Li, Xiangyao; Zhang, Fuxing; Zhuo, Min

    2009-05-06

    Functional human brain imaging studies have indicated the essential role of cortical regions, such as the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), in romantic love and sex. However, the neurobiological basis of how the ACC neurons are activated and engaged in sexual attraction remains unknown. Using transgenic mice in which the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) is controlled by the promoter of the activity-dependent gene c-fos, we found that ACC pyramidal neurons are activated by sexual attraction. The presynaptic glutamate release to the activated neurons is increased and pharmacological inhibition of neuronal activities in the ACC reduced the interest of male mice to female mice. Our results present direct evidence of the critical role of the ACC in sexual attraction, and long-term increases in glutamate mediated excitatory transmission may contribute to sexual attraction between male and female mice.

  5. Role of protein kinase C in the induction and maintenance of serotonin-dependent enhancement of the glutamate response in isolated siphon motor neurons of Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Villareal, Greg; Li, Quan; Cai, Diancai; Fink, Ann E; Lim, Travis; Bougie, Joanna K; Sossin, Wayne S; Glanzman, David L

    2009-04-22

    Serotonin (5-HT) mediates learning-related facilitation of sensorimotor synapses in Aplysia californica. Under some circumstances 5-HT-dependent facilitation requires the activity of protein kinase C (PKC). One critical site of PKC's contribution to 5-HT-dependent synaptic facilitation is the presynaptic sensory neuron. Here, we provide evidence that postsynaptic PKC also contributes to synaptic facilitation. We investigated the contribution of PKC to enhancement of the glutamate-evoked potential (Glu-EP) in isolated siphon motor neurons in cell culture. A 10 min application of either 5-HT or phorbol ester, which activates PKC, produced persistent (> 50 min) enhancement of the Glu-EP. Chelerythrine and bisindolylmaleimide-1 (Bis), two inhibitors of PKC, both blocked the induction of 5-HT-dependent enhancement. An inhibitor of calpain, a calcium-dependent protease, also blocked 5-HT's effect. Interestingly, whereas chelerythrine blocked maintenance of the enhancement, Bis did not. Because Bis has greater selectivity for conventional and novel isoforms of PKC than for atypical isoforms, this result implicates an atypical isoform in the maintenance of 5-HT's effect. Although induction of enhancement of the Glu-EP requires protein synthesis (Villareal et al., 2007), we found that maintenance of the enhancement does not. Maintenance of 5-HT-dependent enhancement appears to be mediated by a PKM-type fragment generated by calpain-dependent proteolysis of atypical PKC. Together, our results suggest that 5-HT treatment triggers two phases of PKC activity within the motor neuron, an early phase that may involve conventional, novel or atypical isoforms of PKC, and a later phase that selectively involves an atypical isoform.

  6. Nootropic dipeptide noopept enhances inhibitory synaptic transmission in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Povarov, I S; Kondratenko, R V; Derevyagin, V I; Ostrovskaya, R U; Skrebitskii, V G

    2015-01-01

    Application of nootropic agent Noopept on hippocampal slices from Wistar rats enhanced the inhibitory component of total current induced by stimulation of Shaffer collaterals in CA1 pyramidal neurons, but did not affect the excitatory component. A direct correlation between the increase in the amplitude of inhibitory current and agent concentration was found. The substance did not affect the release of inhibitory transmitters from terminals in the pyramidal neurons, which indicated changes in GABAergic interneurons.

  7. HBK-14 and HBK-15 with antidepressant-like and/or memory-enhancing properties increase serotonin levels in the hippocampus after chronic treatment in mice.

    PubMed

    Pytka, Karolina; Gawlik, Katarzyna; Pawlica-Gosiewska, Dorota; Witalis, Jadwiga; Waszkielewicz, Anna

    2017-04-01

    5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptor ligands might have antidepressant-like properties and improve cognitive function. We previously reported significant antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like effects of two dual 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptor antagonists in various behavioral tests in rodents. As a continuation of our previous experiments, in this study we aimed to investigate whether chronic administration of 1-[(2,6-dimethylphenoxy)ethoxyethyl]-4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine hydrochloride (HBK-14) and 1-[(2-chloro-6-methylphenoxy)ethoxyethyl]-4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine hydrochloride (HBK-15) caused antidepressant-like effects and elevated serotonin levels in the murine hippocampus. We also evaluated cholinolytic properties and the influence of acute administration of both compounds on cognitive function in mice. To assess antidepressant-like properties and the influence on learning and memory we used forced swim test and step-through passive avoidance task in mice, respectively. Both compounds showed antidepressant-like properties and significantly elevated serotonin levels in the hippocampus after chronic treatment (HBK-14 - 2.5 mg/kg; HBK-15 - 0.625 and 1.25 mg/kg). HBK-15 administered chronically antidepressant-like activity at lower dose (0.625 mg/kg) than the dose active after acute treatment (1.25 mg/kg). None of the compounds affected locomotor activity of mice. HBK-15 possessed very weak cholinolytic properties, whereas HBK-14 did not show any effect on muscarinic receptors. Only HBK-15 (0.625 mg/kg) presented memory-enhancing properties and ameliorated cognitive impairments caused by scopolamine (1 mg/kg). Our results indicate that 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 antagonists might have potential in the treatment of depression and possess positive influence on cognitive function.

  8. How serotonin shapes moral judgment and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Jenifer Z; Crockett, Molly J

    2013-01-01

    Neuroscientists are now discovering how hormones and brain chemicals shape social behavior, opening potential avenues for pharmacological manipulation of ethical values. Here, we review recent studies showing how altering brain chemistry can alter moral judgment and behavior, focusing in particular on the neuromodulator serotonin and its role in shaping values related to harm and fairness. We synthesize previous findings and consider the potential mechanisms through which serotonin could increase the aversion to harming others. We present a process model whereby serotonin influences social behavior by shifting social preferences in the positive direction, enhancing the value people place on others’ outcomes. This model may explain previous findings relating serotonin function to prosocial behavior, and makes new predictions regarding how serotonin may influence the neural computation of value in social contexts. PMID:25627116

  9. An experimental verification of metamaterial coupled enhanced transmission for antenna applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushpakaran, Sarin V.; Raj, Rohith K.; Pradeep, Anju; Ouseph, Lindo; Hari, Mridula; Chandroth, Aanandan; Pezholil, Mohanan; Kesavath, Vasudevan

    2014-02-01

    Inspired by the work of Bethe on electromagnetic transmission through subwavelength hole, there has been immense interest on the extraordinary transmission through subwavelength slot/slit on metal plates. The invention of metamaterials has boosted the extra ordinary transmission through subwavelength slots. We examine computationally and experimentally the concept of metamaterial cover using an array of split ring resonators (SRRs), for enhancing the transmission in a stacked dipole antenna working in the S band. The front to back ratio is considerably improved by enhancing the magnetic resonant strength in close proximity of the slit of the upper parasitic dipole. The effect of stacking height of the SRR monolayer on the resonant characteristics of the split ring resonators and its effect on antenna radiation characteristics has been studied.

  10. An experimental verification of metamaterial coupled enhanced transmission for antenna applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pushpakaran, Sarin V.; Raj, Rohith K.; Pradeep, Anju; Ouseph, Lindo; Hari, Mridula; Chandroth, Aanandan; Pezholil, Mohanan; Kesavath, Vasudevan

    2014-02-10

    Inspired by the work of Bethe on electromagnetic transmission through subwavelength hole, there has been immense interest on the extraordinary transmission through subwavelength slot/slit on metal plates. The invention of metamaterials has boosted the extra ordinary transmission through subwavelength slots. We examine computationally and experimentally the concept of metamaterial cover using an array of split ring resonators (SRRs), for enhancing the transmission in a stacked dipole antenna working in the S band. The front to back ratio is considerably improved by enhancing the magnetic resonant strength in close proximity of the slit of the upper parasitic dipole. The effect of stacking height of the SRR monolayer on the resonant characteristics of the split ring resonators and its effect on antenna radiation characteristics has been studied.

  11. Enhanced calcium responses to serotonin receptor stimulation in T-lymphocytes from schizophrenic patients--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Genius, J; Schellenberg, A; Tchana-Duope, L; Hartmann, N; Giegling, I; Hartmann, A; Benninghoff, J; Rujescu, D

    2015-03-04

    Even if more extensively investigated in affective disorders, the serotonergic system is likely to be also implicated in modulating the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, where it closely interacts with the dopaminergic and glutamatergic system. To substantiate this notion, we studied the intensity and dynamics of cellular Ca(2+) responses to serotonin (5-hydoxytryptamine, 5-HT) in peripheral lymphocytes taken from currently non-psychotic schizophrenic patients. To this aim, peripheral lymphocytes were freshly obtained from healthy controls and a naturalistic collective of patients with schizophrenia in remission. Intracellular Ca(2+) responses were recorded in real-time by ratiometric fluorometry after 5-HT or phythaemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation, which served as an internal reference for Ca(2+) responsivity to non-specific stimulation. The intracellular Ca(2+) peak early after applying the 5-HT trigger was significantly elevated in schizophrenic patients. No significant differences of Ca(2+) peak levels were seen in response to stimulation with the mitogenic agent PHA, although responses to 5-HT and PHA were positively correlated in individual patients or controls. In conclusion, the serotonergic response patterns in peripheral lymphocytes from schizophrenic patients seem to be elevated, if employing sensitive tools like determination of intracellular Ca(2+) responses. Our observations suggest that the participation of serotonergic neurotransmitter system in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia may deserve more interest, even if it should only act as a modulator on the main pathology in the dopaminergic and glutamatergic systems. We hope that this pilot study will prompt further studies with larger patient collectives to revisit this question.

  12. Serotonin blood test

    MedlinePlus

    5-HT level; 5-hydroxytryptamine level; Serotonin test ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) - serum or blood. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. St Louis, MO: Elsevier ...

  13. Enhancement of below gap transmission of InAs single crystal via suppression of native defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Guiying; Zhao, Youwen; Dong, Zhiyuan; Liu, Jingming; Xie, Hui; Bai, Yongbiao; Chen, Xiaoyu

    2017-03-01

    As-grown and annealed undoped n type InAs single crystals have been studied by Hall effect measurement, infrared transmission (IR) spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) and glow discharge mass spectroscopy (GDMS). After annealing, below-gap infrared transmittance of the InAs single crystal increases significantly with the annihilation of a 0.383 eV PL peak related defect. Mechanism of the transmission enhancement and the attribution of the defect is discussed based on the experimental results.

  14. Modes and nodes explain the mechanism of action of vortioxetine, a multimodal agent (MMA): blocking 5HT3 receptors enhances release of serotonin, norepinephrine, and acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Stephen M

    2015-10-01

    Vortioxetine is an antidepressant with multiple pharmacologic modes of action at targets where serotonin neurons connect with other neurons. 5HT3 receptor antagonism is one of these actions, and this leads to increased release of norepinephrine (NE), acetylcholine (ACh), and serotonin (5HT) within various brain circuits.

  15. Intermittent, chronic fenfluramine administration to rats repeatedly suppresses food intake despite substantial brain serotonin reductions.

    PubMed

    Choi, SuJean; Jonak, Elizabeth M; Simpson, Lynn; Patil, Vaishali; Fernstrom, John D

    2002-02-22

    The mechanisms by which fenfluramine suppresses food intake and body weight have been linked to its ability to enhance transmission across serotonin synapses in brain. This drug initially lowers body weight and suppresses food intake, yet after repeated administration food intake soon returns to normal and body weight no longer decreases. Fenfluramine also causes rapid and prolonged reductions in brain serotonin concentrations, which might account for its loss of appetite suppression. This possibility has been evaluated in rats by assessing if intermittent, chronic fenfluramine administration could suppress food intake during each treatment period, and if so, whether such an effect occurs in the presence of reduced brain serotonin levels. Rats were injected once daily with 10 mg/kg D,L-fenfluramine for 5 days, and then received no injections for the next 5 days. Control rats received only vehicle injections. This 10-day sequence was repeated five more times. During each period of fenfluramine administration, daily food intake dropped markedly the first 1-2 days of treatment, but returned to pretreatment values by day 5. Daily food intake was normal or slightly above normal during non-injection periods. Body weight dropped modestly during each period of fenfluramine administration, and rose during each subsequent period when injections had ceased. Serotonin concentrations and synthesis rates in several brain regions were markedly reduced at early, middle, and late periods of the experiment. Despite the long-term reduction in brain serotonin pools produced by fenfluramine, the drug continues to reduce food intake and body weight. Several possible interpretations of these findings are considered, based on the multiple mechanisms through which this drug has been proposed to modify synaptic serotonin transmission.

  16. The Serotonin 2C Receptor Agonist Lorcaserin Attenuates Intracranial Self-Stimulation and Blocks the Reward-Enhancing Effects of Nicotine.

    PubMed

    Zeeb, Fiona D; Higgins, Guy A; Fletcher, Paul J

    2015-07-15

    Lorcaserin, a serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) 2C receptor agonist, was recently approved for the treatment of obesity. We previously suggested that 5-HT2C receptor agonists affect reward processes and reduce the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. Here, we determined whether lorcaserin (1) decreases responding for brain stimulation reward (BSR) and (2) prevents nicotine from enhancing the efficacy of BSR. Rats were trained on the intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) paradigm to nosepoke for BSR of either the dorsal raphé nucleus or left medial forebrain bundle. In Experiment 1, lorcaserin (0.3-1.0 mg/kg) dose-dependently reduced the efficacy of BSR. This effect was blocked by prior administration of the 5-HT2C receptor antagonist SB242084. In Experiment 2, separate groups of rats received saline or nicotine (0.4 mg/kg) for eight sessions prior to testing. Although thresholds were unaltered in saline-treated rats, nicotine reduced reward thresholds. An injection of lorcaserin (0.3 mg/kg) prior to nicotine prevented the reward-enhancing effect of nicotine across multiple test sessions. These results demonstrated that lorcaserin reduces the rewarding value of BSR and also prevents nicotine from facilitating ICSS. Hence, lorcaserin may be effective in treating psychiatric disorders, including obesity and nicotine addiction, by reducing the value of food or drug rewards.

  17. Enhanced offspring production in Daphnia magna clones exposed to serotonin reuptake inhibitors and 4-nonylphenol. Stage- and food-dependent effects.

    PubMed

    Campos, B; Piña, B; Fernández-Sanjuán, M; Lacorte, S; Barata, C

    2012-03-01

    Risk assessment of emerging pollutants requires the development of bioassays able to detect and understand novel mechanisms of action. This study tested the hypothesis that the increase of offspring production in Daphnia magna induced by certain pollutants may be mediated through different mechanisms, depending on development stages, clones and food rations The study included two selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), fluoxetine and fluvoxamine, and the detergent metabolite 4-nonylphenol. Organisms were exposed from birth to adulthood or only during adulthood at low and high food ration levels. Results indicated that low exposure levels of the three studied substances increased offspring production and/or juvenile developmental rates similarly for all studied clones, but the responses differed among life-stages and food rations. When individuals were exposed to the studied chemicals from birth, enhanced offspring production per female was observed only at low and intermediate food rations. On the contrary, when exposures started in gravid females most treatments increased offspring production. Results obtained with SSRIs support previous findings, where it was stated that these compounds may amplify serotoninergic signaling in D. magna. Nonylphenol effects may be related to the reported alteration of this compound in Daphnia ecdysteroid metabolism. Further investigations are necessary to resolve the biochemical mechanism of SSRI and nonylphenol enhancing offspring production.

  18. Enhanced Information Transmission in the Crayfish Caudal Photoreceptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, Sonya; Moss, Frank

    2002-03-01

    The crayfish possesses two light-sensitive neurons in its abdominal 6th ganglion ("caudal photoreceptors", or CPRs). The CPRs are also mechanosensory interneurons. Pei et al. (1996) showed that light enhances the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of weak, periodic hydrodynamic stimuli. This has been interpreted as a stochastic resonance effect, in which added light increases the noise intensity in the input signal to the photoreceptor. Here, we examine this effect from the vantage point of stochastic phase synchronization. Various locking regions (Arnol'd tongues) are observed as the stimulus frequency is varied. The 1:1 synchronization index increases as the SNR of the periodic drive. We also observe a novel "second harmonic effect", in which the SNR of the second higher harmonic of the hyndrodynamic input is increased by light. This effect correlates with an increase in the 1:2 synchronization index, and may be explained, effectively rectifying the input signal. We will discuss an interpretation of this effect as a full-wave rectification of the input signal.

  19. Enhancing data exploitation through DTN-based data transmission protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daglis, Ioannis A.; Tsaoussidis, Vassilis; Rontogiannis, Athanasios; Balasis, Georgios; Keramitsoglou, Iphigenia; Paronis, Dimitrios; Sykioti, Olga; Tsinganos, Antonios

    2014-05-01

    Data distribution and data access are major issues in space sciences and geosciences as they strongly influence the degree of data exploitation. Processing and analysis of large volumes of Earth observation and space/planetary data face two major impediments: limited access capabilities due to narrow connectivity windows between spacecraft and ground receiving stations and lack of sufficient communication and dissemination mechanisms between space data receiving centres and the end-user community. Real-time data assimilation that would be critical in a number of forecasting capabilities is particularly affected by such limitations. The FP7-Space project "Space-Data Routers" (SDR) has the aim of allowing space agencies, academic institutes and research centres to disseminate/share space data generated by single or multiple missions, in an efficient, secure and automated manner. The approach of SDR relies on space internetworking - and in particular on Delay-Tolerant Networking (DTN), which marks the new era in space communications, unifies space and earth communication infrastructures and delivers a set of tools and protocols for space-data exploitation. The project includes the definition of limitations imposed by typical space mission scenarios in which the National Observatory of Athens is currently involved, including space and planetary exploration, as well as satellite-supported geoscience applications. In this paper, we present the mission scenarios, the SDR-application and the evaluation of the associated impact from the space-data router enhancements. The work leading to this paper has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7-SPACE-2010-1) under grant agreement no. 263330 for the SDR (Space-Data Routers for Exploiting Space Data) collaborative research project. This paper reflects only the authors' views and the Union is not liable for any use that may be made of the information contained therein.

  20. Serotonin: A New Hope in Alzheimer's Disease?

    PubMed

    Claeysen, Sylvie; Bockaert, Joël; Giannoni, Patrizia

    2015-07-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia affecting 35 million individuals worldwide. Current AD treatments provide only brief symptomatic relief. It is therefore urgent to replace this symptomatic approach with a curative one. Increasing serotonin signaling as well as developing molecules that enhance serotonin concentration in the synaptic cleft have been debated as possible therapeutic strategies to slow the progression of AD. In this Viewpoint, we discuss exciting new insights regarding the modulation of serotonin signaling for AD prevention and therapy.

  1. The vigilance promoting drug modafinil modulates serotonin transmission in the rat prefrontal cortex and dorsal raphe nucleus. Possible relevance for its postulated antidepressant activity.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Luca; Antonelli, Tiziana; Beggiato, Sarah; Cristina Tomasini, Maria; Fuxe, Kjell; Tanganelli, Sergio

    2013-04-01

    Modafinil, (RS)-2-(diphenylmethylsulfinyl)acetamide derivative (Modiodal, Provigil), is a vigilance-promoting agent which reduces sleep episodes by improving wakefulness. It is approved by the USA FDA for narcolepsy, shiftwork sleep disorder and obstructive sleep apnoea with residual excessive sleepiness despite optimal use of continuous positive airway pressure. Unlike classical psychostimulants such as amphetamine and amphetamine-like compounds, the awaking effect of modafinil is not associated with a disturbance of nighttime sleep, tolerance, and sensitization. Its precise mechanism of action is still unclear. In animal studies, modafinil and its analogues have been shown to modify dopaminergic, noradrenergic, glutamatergic, GABAergic, serotoninergic, orexinergic, and histaminergic pathways. Besides the approved use in sleep disorders, modafinil has been investigated for the treatment of fatigue, impaired cognition and some symptoms in a number of other disorders. In particular, clinical studies seem to indicate that the drug could be particularly successful in the treatment of depression and its use in major depressive and bipolar disorders, has been suggested. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this possible effect are still unknown. The present review firstly summarizes the structure-activity relationship studies and the mechanism of action of modafinil and its related compounds. Then, it focuses on data demonstrating that modafinil interacts with serotonin neuronal activity in rat frontal cortex and dorsal raphe nucleus, two brain areas linked together and involved in depression. Preclinical and clinical evidence of a positive interaction between modafinil and classical antidepressant drugs, is also summarized.

  2. Enhanced Optical Transmission Mediated by Localized Plasmons in Anisotropic, 3D Nanohole Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiun-Chan; Gao, Hanwei; Suh, Jae Yong; Zhou, Wei; Lee, Min Hyung; Odom, Teri W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes 3D nanohole arrays whose high optical transmission is mediated more by localized surface plasmon (LSP) excitations than by surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). First, LSPs on 3D hole arrays lead to optical transmission an order of magnitude higher than 2D planar hole arrays. Second, LSP-mediated transmission is broadband and more tunable than SPP-enhanced transmission which is restricted by Bragg coupling. Third, for the first time, two types of surface plasmons can be selectively excited and manipulated on the same plasmonic substrate. This new plasmonic substrate fabricated by high-throughput nanolithography techniques paves the way for cutting-edge optoelectronic and biomedical applications. PMID:20698633

  3. Enhanced Transmissions Through Three-dimensional Cascade Sharp Waveguide Bends Using C-slit Diaphragms

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rui; Hu, Bowei; Zhang, Aofang; Gao, Dongxing; Wang, Hui; Shi, Ayuan; Lei, Zhenya; Yang, Pei

    2017-01-01

    Transmission properties through sharp rectangular waveguide bends are investigated to determine the cut-off bending angles of the wave propagation. We show that a simple metallic diaphragm at the bending corner with properly devised sub-wavelength defect apertures of C-slits would be readily to turn on the transmissions with scarce reflections of the propagating modes, while preserving the integrity of the transmitting fields soon after the bends. In particularly, our design also demonstrates the capability of eliminating all the unwanted cavity resonant transmissions that exist in the three-dimensional cascade sharp waveguide bends, and solely let the desired signals travel along the whole passage of the waveguide. The present approach, using C-slit diaphragms to support the sharp bending behaviors of the guided waves with greatly enhanced transmissions, would be especially effective in constructing novel waveguides and pave the way for the development of more compact and miniaturized electromagnetic systems that exploit these waveguide bends. PMID:28322344

  4. Enhanced Transmissions Through Three-dimensional Cascade Sharp Waveguide Bends Using C-slit Diaphragms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Hu, Bowei; Zhang, Aofang; Gao, Dongxing; Wang, Hui; Shi, Ayuan; Lei, Zhenya; Yang, Pei

    2017-03-21

    Transmission properties through sharp rectangular waveguide bends are investigated to determine the cut-off bending angles of the wave propagation. We show that a simple metallic diaphragm at the bending corner with properly devised sub-wavelength defect apertures of C-slits would be readily to turn on the transmissions with scarce reflections of the propagating modes, while preserving the integrity of the transmitting fields soon after the bends. In particularly, our design also demonstrates the capability of eliminating all the unwanted cavity resonant transmissions that exist in the three-dimensional cascade sharp waveguide bends, and solely let the desired signals travel along the whole passage of the waveguide. The present approach, using C-slit diaphragms to support the sharp bending behaviors of the guided waves with greatly enhanced transmissions, would be especially effective in constructing novel waveguides and pave the way for the development of more compact and miniaturized electromagnetic systems that exploit these waveguide bends.

  5. Immune response and insulin signalling alter mosquito feeding behaviour to enhance malaria transmission potential

    PubMed Central

    Cator, Lauren J.; Pietri, Jose E.; Murdock, Courtney C.; Ohm, Johanna R.; Lewis, Edwin E.; Read, Andrew F.; Luckhart, Shirley; Thomas, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria parasites alter mosquito feeding behaviour in a way that enhances parasite transmission. This is widely considered a prime example of manipulation of host behaviour to increase onward transmission, but transient immune challenge in the absence of parasites can induce the same behavioural phenotype. Here, we show that alterations in feeding behaviour depend on the timing and dose of immune challenge relative to blood ingestion and that these changes are functionally linked to changes in insulin signalling in the mosquito gut. These results suggest that altered phenotypes derive from insulin signalling-dependent host resource allocation among immunity, blood feeding, and reproduction in a manner that is not specific to malaria parasite infection. We measured large increases in mosquito survival and subsequent transmission potential when feeding patterns are altered. Leveraging these changes in physiology, behaviour and life history could promote effective and sustainable control of female mosquitoes responsible for transmission. PMID:26153094

  6. Tunable nonreciprocal terahertz transmission and enhancement based on metal/magneto-optic plasmonic lens.

    PubMed

    Fan, Fei; Chen, Sai; Wang, Xiang-Hui; Chang, Sheng-Jiang

    2013-04-08

    A tunable metal/magneto-optic plasmonic lens for terahertz isolator is demonstrated. Based on the magneto-optical effect of the semiconductor material and non-symmetrical structure, this plasmonic lens has not only the focusing feature but also nonreciprocal transmission property. Moreover, a transmission enhancement through this device greatly larger than that of the ordinary metallic slit arrays is contributed by the extraordinary optical transmission effect of the magneto surface plasmon polaritons. The results show that the proposed isolator has an isolation bandwidth of larger than 0.4THz and the maximum isolation of higher than 110dB, and its operating frequency also can be broadly tuned by changing the external magnetic field or temperature. This low-loss, high isolation, broadband tunable nonreciprocal terahertz transmission mechanism has a great potential for terahertz application systems.

  7. Enhanced Transmissions Through Three-dimensional Cascade Sharp Waveguide Bends Using C-slit Diaphragms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Rui; Hu, Bowei; Zhang, Aofang; Gao, Dongxing; Wang, Hui; Shi, Ayuan; Lei, Zhenya; Yang, Pei

    2017-03-01

    Transmission properties through sharp rectangular waveguide bends are investigated to determine the cut-off bending angles of the wave propagation. We show that a simple metallic diaphragm at the bending corner with properly devised sub-wavelength defect apertures of C-slits would be readily to turn on the transmissions with scarce reflections of the propagating modes, while preserving the integrity of the transmitting fields soon after the bends. In particularly, our design also demonstrates the capability of eliminating all the unwanted cavity resonant transmissions that exist in the three-dimensional cascade sharp waveguide bends, and solely let the desired signals travel along the whole passage of the waveguide. The present approach, using C-slit diaphragms to support the sharp bending behaviors of the guided waves with greatly enhanced transmissions, would be especially effective in constructing novel waveguides and pave the way for the development of more compact and miniaturized electromagnetic systems that exploit these waveguide bends.

  8. Immune response and insulin signalling alter mosquito feeding behaviour to enhance malaria transmission potential.

    PubMed

    Cator, Lauren J; Pietri, Jose E; Murdock, Courtney C; Ohm, Johanna R; Lewis, Edwin E; Read, Andrew F; Luckhart, Shirley; Thomas, Matthew B

    2015-07-08

    Malaria parasites alter mosquito feeding behaviour in a way that enhances parasite transmission. This is widely considered a prime example of manipulation of host behaviour to increase onward transmission, but transient immune challenge in the absence of parasites can induce the same behavioural phenotype. Here, we show that alterations in feeding behaviour depend on the timing and dose of immune challenge relative to blood ingestion and that these changes are functionally linked to changes in insulin signalling in the mosquito gut. These results suggest that altered phenotypes derive from insulin signalling-dependent host resource allocation among immunity, blood feeding, and reproduction in a manner that is not specific to malaria parasite infection. We measured large increases in mosquito survival and subsequent transmission potential when feeding patterns are altered. Leveraging these changes in physiology, behaviour and life history could promote effective and sustainable control of female mosquitoes responsible for transmission.

  9. Transmission enhancement of ultraslow light in an atom shelved model of spectral hole burning solids.

    PubMed

    Ham, Byoung S; Hahn, Joonsung

    2009-05-25

    We present transmission enhancement of ultraslow light in an inhomogeneously broadened spectral hole-burning solid medium by using precedent dummy light. The function of the dummy light is to burn a half-depth narrow spectral hole in an optically shelved solid system and to maintain the system optically transparent to the probe light, where the probe must experiences ultraslow group velocity due to the narrow spectral hole. The observed transmission increase is as high as 7 times compared with self-induced ultraslow light [J. Hahn and B. S. Ham, Opt. Express 16, 16723 (2008)], where the transmission enhancement is equivalent to 10(5) amplification considering an optical depth of d = 10.

  10. Enhanced and reduced transmission of acoustic waves with bubble meta-screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretagne, Alice; Tourin, Arnaud; Leroy, Valentin

    2011-11-01

    We present a class of sonic meta-screens for manipulating air-borne acoustic waves at ultrasonic or audible frequencies. Our screens consist of periodic arrangements of air bubbles in water or possibly embedded in a soft elastic matrix. They can be used for soundproofing but also for exalting transmission at an air/water interface or even to achieve enhanced absorption.

  11. Social Subordination and Polymorphisms in the Gene Encoding the Serotonin Transporter Enhance Estradiol Inhibition of Luteinizing Hormone Secretion in Female Rhesus Monkeys1

    PubMed Central

    Michopoulos, Vasiliki; Berga, Sarah L.; Kaplan, Jay R.; Wilson, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    Psychosocial factors, particularly social stress, may compromise reproduction. However, some individuals may be more susceptible to socially induced infertility. The present study used group-housed, adult, ovariectomized rhesus monkeys to test the hypothesis that exposure to psychosocial stress, imposed by social subordination, would enhance estradiol (E2)-negative feedback inhibition of LH. Because polymorphisms in the gene encoding the serotonin transporter (SLC6A4) may contribute to individual differences in response to adverse environments, we determined whether subordinate females with the short-promoter-length allele (s-variant) would show greater suppression of LH. Subordinate females, particularly those with the s-variant SLC6A4 genotype, received significantly higher rates of noncontact aggression from more dominant cage mates and had consistently lower body weights. Serum LH was not influenced by social status in the absence of E2. In contrast, subordinate females were hypersensitive to E2-negative feedback inhibition of LH. Furthermore, serum LH in subordinate females with s-variant SLC6A4 genotype was maximally suppressed by Day 4 of treatment, whereas nadir concentrations were not reached until later in treatment in other females. Finally, pharmacological elevation of serum cortisol potentiated E2-negative feedback inhibition in all females. The current data suggest that infertility induced by psychosocial stressors may be mediated by hypersensitivity to E2-negative feedback and that polymorphisms in the SLC6A4 gene may contribute to differences in reproductive compromise in response to chronic stress. PMID:19605783

  12. Enhanced optical transmission through ridge nanoapertures for near-field applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xuhui

    It is of great importance to manipulate light in a small spatial scale in order to fulfill the continuous miniaturization of electronic, optical and optoelectronic devices. A subwavelength hole is often used to achieve the optical resolution beyond the diffraction limit. However, a small hole suffers the low light transmission due to the waveguide cutoff effect. In this thesis, a new type of nanoapertures in metal films, i.e., ridge nanoapertures in H and bowtie shapes, is proposed, and their unique optical properties of concentrating light into a nanometer-sized spot combined with enhanced optical transmission are studied. Finite difference time domain numerical computations and waveguide cutoff analyses are conducted to understand the transmission mechanism through ridge nanoapertures. The TE10 waveguide propagation mode confined in the nanometer-sized gap between the ridges enables the unique optical transmission properties of ridge nanoapertures. Surface plasmon excitation of ridge nanoapertures in noble metals further enhances the transmission but destroys the collimated optical near-field from the H-shaped ridge nanoapertures. However, the resonant excitation of localized surface plasmon in a bowtie nanoaperture with sharp tips can be utilized to achieve super confined light spot with strongly enhanced local electrical field. Optimization guidelines for the design of ridge nanoapertures are also provided. A near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) is developed from a commercial atomic force microscope and FIB-micromachined cantilever aperture probes are used to achieve high optical resolution as small as 60 nm. The optical near-field from ridge nanoapertures fabricated in various metal thin films was characterized using the home-built NSOM system. Nanoscale light spots with transmission enhancement of orders of magnitude higher than that of regular nanoapertures were achieved by these ridge nanoapertures. Far-field transmission measurements were

  13. Projections and interconnections of genetically defined serotonin neurons in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Sun Jung; Jensen, Patricia; Dymecki, Susan M; Commons, Kathryn G.

    2012-01-01

    Brain serotonin neurons are heterogeneous and can be distinguished by several anatomical and physiological characteristics. Toward resolving this heterogeneity into classes of functional relevance, subtypes of mature serotonin neurons were previously identified based on gene expression differences initiated during development in different rhombomeric (r) segments of the hindbrain. This redefinition of mature serotonin neuron subtypes based on the criteria of genetic lineage, along with the enabling genetic fate mapping tools, now allows various functional properties, such as axonal projections, to be allocated onto these identified subtypes. Furthermore, our approach uniquely enables interconnections between the different serotonin neuron subtypes to be determined; this is especially relevant because serotonin neuron activity is regulated by several feedback mechanisms. We used intersectional and subtractive genetic fate mapping tools to generate three independent lines of mice in which serotonin neurons arising in different rhombomeric segments, either r1, r2 or both r3 and r5, were uniquely distinguished from all other serotonin neurons by their expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein. Each of these subgroups of serotonergic neurons had a unique combination of forebrain projection targets. Typically more than one subgroup innervated an individual target area. Unique patterns of interconnections between the different groups of serotonin neurons were also observed and these pathways could subserve feedback regulatory circuits. Overall, the current findings suggest that activation of subsets of serotonin neurons could result in topographic serotonin release in the forebrain coupled with feedback inhibition of serotonin neurons with alternative projection targets. PMID:22151329

  14. Transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Sugano, K.

    1988-12-27

    A transmission is described which consists of: an input shaft; an output shaft; a first planetary gear set including a first sun gear selectively connectable by a first clutch to the input shaft, a first carrier selectively connectable by a second clutch to the input shaft and a first ring gear connected to the output shaft. The first sun gear selectively held stationary by a first brake, the first carrier is allowed to rotate in the same forward direction as the input shaft when the second clutch is engaged, but prevented from rotating in a reverse direction opposite to the forward direction by a first one-way clutch, the first carrier being selectively held stationary by a second brake; a second planetary gear set including a second sun gear connected to the input shaft, a second carrier connected to the first ring gear and also the the output shaft, and a second ring gear.

  15. Loss-induced Enhanced Transmission in Anisotropic Density-near-zero Acoustic Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chen; Jing, Yun

    2016-11-25

    Anisotropic density-near-zero (ADNZ) acoustic metamaterials are investigated theoretically and numerically in this paper and are shown to exhibit extraordinary transmission enhancement when material loss is induced. The enhanced transmission is due to the enhanced propagating and evanescent wave modes inside the ADNZ medium thanks to the interplay of near-zero density, material loss, and high wave impedance matching in the propagation direction. The equi-frequency contour (EFC) is used to reveal whether the propagating wave mode is allowed in ADNZ metamaterials. Numerical simulations based on plate-type acoustic metamaterials with different material losses were performed to demonstrate collimation and subwavelength imaging enabled by the induced loss in ADNZ media. This work provides a different way for manipulating acoustic waves.

  16. Loss-induced Enhanced Transmission in Anisotropic Density-near-zero Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chen; Jing, Yun

    2016-11-01

    Anisotropic density-near-zero (ADNZ) acoustic metamaterials are investigated theoretically and numerically in this paper and are shown to exhibit extraordinary transmission enhancement when material loss is induced. The enhanced transmission is due to the enhanced propagating and evanescent wave modes inside the ADNZ medium thanks to the interplay of near-zero density, material loss, and high wave impedance matching in the propagation direction. The equi-frequency contour (EFC) is used to reveal whether the propagating wave mode is allowed in ADNZ metamaterials. Numerical simulations based on plate-type acoustic metamaterials with different material losses were performed to demonstrate collimation and subwavelength imaging enabled by the induced loss in ADNZ media. This work provides a different way for manipulating acoustic waves.

  17. Loss-induced Enhanced Transmission in Anisotropic Density-near-zero Acoustic Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chen; Jing, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Anisotropic density-near-zero (ADNZ) acoustic metamaterials are investigated theoretically and numerically in this paper and are shown to exhibit extraordinary transmission enhancement when material loss is induced. The enhanced transmission is due to the enhanced propagating and evanescent wave modes inside the ADNZ medium thanks to the interplay of near-zero density, material loss, and high wave impedance matching in the propagation direction. The equi-frequency contour (EFC) is used to reveal whether the propagating wave mode is allowed in ADNZ metamaterials. Numerical simulations based on plate-type acoustic metamaterials with different material losses were performed to demonstrate collimation and subwavelength imaging enabled by the induced loss in ADNZ media. This work provides a different way for manipulating acoustic waves. PMID:27885268

  18. Enhanced Heterosexual Transmission Hypothesis for the Origin of Pandemic HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa, João Dinis; Alvarez, Carolina; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Müller, Viktor

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 M originated from SIVcpz endemic in chimpanzees from southeast Cameroon or neighboring areas, and it started to spread in the early 20th century. Here we examine the factors that may have contributed to simian-to-human transmission, local transmission between humans, and export to a city. The region had intense ape hunting, social disruption, commercial sex work, STDs, and traffic to/from Kinshasa in the period 1899–1923. Injection treatments increased sharply around 1930; however, their frequency among local patients was far lower than among modern groups experiencing parenteral HIV-1 outbreaks. Recent molecular datings of HIV-1 M fit better the period of maximal resource exploitation and trade links than the period of high injection intensity. We conclude that although local parenteral outbreaks might have occurred, these are unlikely to have caused massive transmission. World War I led to additional, and hitherto unrecognized, risks of HIV-1 emergence. We propose an Enhanced Heterosexual Transmission Hypothesis for the origin of HIV-1 M, featuring at the time and place of its origin a coincidence of favorable co-factors (ape hunting, social disruption, STDs, and mobility) for both cross-species transmission and heterosexual spread. Our hypothesis does not exclude a role for parenteral transmission in the initial viral adaptation. PMID:23202448

  19. Activation of serotonin2A receptors in the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca complex enhanced working memory in the hemiparkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Bo; Zhang, Li; Sun, Yi-Na; Han, Ling-Na; Wu, Zhong-Heng; Zhang, Qiao-Jun; Liu, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Serotonin2A (5-HT2A) receptors are highly expressed in the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca complex (MS-DB), especially in parvalbumin (PV)-positive neurons linked to hippocampal theta rhythm, which is involved in cognition. Cognitive impairments commonly occur in Parkinson's disease. Here we performed behavioral, electrophysiological, neurochemical and immunohistochemical studies in rats with complete unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) to assess the importance of dopamine (DA) depletion and MS-DB 5-HT2A receptors for working memory. The MFB lesions resulted in working memory impairment and decreases in firing rate and density of MS-DB PV-positive neurons, peak frequency of hippocampal theta rhythm, and DA levels in septohippocampal system and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) compared to control rats. Intra-MS-DB injection of high affinity 5-HT2A receptor agonist TCB-2 enhanced working memory, increased firing rate of PV-positive neurons and peak frequency of hippocampal theta rhythm, elevated DA levels in the hippocampus and mPFC, and decreased 5-HT level in the hippocampus in control and lesioned rats. Compared to control rats, the duration of the excitatory effect produced by TCB-2 on the firing rate of PV-positive neurons was markedly shortened in lesioned rats, indicating dysfunction of 5-HT2A receptors. These findings suggest that unilateral lesions of the MFB in rats induced working memory deficit, and activation of MS-DB 5-HT2A receptors enhanced working memory, which may be due to changes in the activity of septohippocampal network and monoamine levels in the hippocampus and mPFC.

  20. Enhanced coherent OTDR for long span optical transmission lines containing optical fiber amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Shin-Ichi; Tanaka, Kuniaki; Koyamada, Yahei; Sumida, Masatoyo

    1995-05-01

    We have newly constructed an enhanced coherent optical time domain reflectometer (C-OTDR) for use in testing optical cable spans in transmission lines containing erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA's), which is based on heterodyne detection using acousto-optic (AO) switches. In order to avoid any optical surges in the EDFA's in the transmission lines, optical dummy pulses were added between the signal pulses by an AO switch to keep the probe power from the C-OTDR as uniform as possible. We achieved a large single-way dynamic range of 42 dB with 5 dBm less probe power. The measurable portion of the fiber spans was more than 80 km in optical transmission lines containing EDFA's. This is twice the previously reported value.

  1. Oral Transmissibility of Prion Disease Is Enhanced by Binding to Soil Particles

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Christopher J; Pedersen, Joel A; Chappell, Rick J; McKenzie, Debbie; Aiken, Judd M

    2007-01-01

    Soil may serve as an environmental reservoir for prion infectivity and contribute to the horizontal transmission of prion diseases (transmissible spongiform encephalopathies [TSEs]) of sheep, deer, and elk. TSE infectivity can persist in soil for years, and we previously demonstrated that the disease-associated form of the prion protein binds to soil particles and prions adsorbed to the common soil mineral montmorillonite (Mte) retain infectivity following intracerebral inoculation. Here, we assess the oral infectivity of Mte- and soil-bound prions. We establish that prions bound to Mte are orally bioavailable, and that, unexpectedly, binding to Mte significantly enhances disease penetrance and reduces the incubation period relative to unbound agent. Cox proportional hazards modeling revealed that across the doses of TSE agent tested, Mte increased the effective infectious titer by a factor of 680 relative to unbound agent. Oral exposure to Mte-associated prions led to TSE development in experimental animals even at doses too low to produce clinical symptoms in the absence of the mineral. We tested the oral infectivity of prions bound to three whole soils differing in texture, mineralogy, and organic carbon content and found soil-bound prions to be orally infectious. Two of the three soils increased oral transmission of disease, and the infectivity of agent bound to the third organic carbon-rich soil was equivalent to that of unbound agent. Enhanced transmissibility of soil-bound prions may explain the environmental spread of some TSEs despite the presumably low levels shed into the environment. Association of prions with inorganic microparticles represents a novel means by which their oral transmission is enhanced relative to unbound agent. PMID:17616973

  2. Recent Enhancements to the NASA Langley Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Allen, Albert R.

    2013-01-01

    The Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility at the NASA Langley Research Center is comprised of an anechoic room and a reverberant room, and may act as a transmission loss suite when test articles are mounted in a window connecting the two rooms. In the latter configuration, the reverberant room acts as the noise source side and the anechoic room as the receiver side. The noise generation system used for qualification testing in the reverberant room was previously shown to achieve a maximum overall sound pressure level of 141 dB. This is considered to be marginally adequate for generating sound pressure levels typically required for launch vehicle payload qualification testing. Recent enhancements to the noise generation system increased the maximum overall sound pressure level to 154 dB, through the use of two airstream modulators coupled to 35 Hz and 160 Hz horns. This paper documents the acoustic performance of the enhanced noise generation system for a variety of relevant test spectra. Additionally, it demonstrates the capability of the SALT facility to conduct transmission loss and absorption testing in accordance with ASTM and ISO standards, respectively. A few examples of test capabilities are shown and include transmission loss testing of simple unstiffened and built up structures and measurement of the diffuse field absorption coefficient of a fibrous acoustic blanket.

  3. Enhanced transmission and beaming via a zero-index photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Hajian, Hodjat; Ozbay, Ekmel; Caglayan, Humeyra

    2016-07-18

    Certain types of photonic crystals with Dirac cones at the Γ point of their band structure have a zero effective index of refraction at Dirac cone frequency. Here, by an appropriate design of the photonic structure, we obtain a strong coupling between modes around the Dirac cone frequency of an all-dielectric zero-index photonic crystal and the guided ones supported by a photonic crystal waveguide. Consequently, we experimentally demonstrate that the presence of the zero-index photonic crystal at the inner side of the photonic crystal waveguide leads to an enhancement in the transmission of some of the guided waves passing through this hybrid system. Moreover, those electromagnetic waves extracted from the structure with enhanced transmission exhibit high directional beaming due to the presence of the zero-index photonic crystal at the outer side of the photonic crystal waveguide.

  4. Power Supply Reliability Assessment in UPFC-installed Transmission System for ATC Enhancement Considering Transient Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuta, Taisuke; Yokoyama, Akihiko

    With recent development of power electronics technology, power system stability enhancement and optimal power flow control by using Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS) devices have so far been studied. The FACTS devices to relieve multiple constraints can also make it possible to enhance Available Transfer Capability (ATC) without construction of new transmission lines. The previous research revealed that ATC is expanded by avoiding multiple constraints in OPF using Unified Power Flow Controller (UPFC). For long-term operation of such ATC-expanded power system, it is necessary to evaluate power system reliability. In this paper, the evaluation method of supply reliability for UPFC-installed power system is proposed. Both thermal capacity and transient stability constraints are considered. The effectiveness of the proposed method is shown by numerical examples for IEEJ East10-machine test system.

  5. Enhanced GABA Transmission Drives Bradykinesia Following Loss of Dopamine D2 Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Julia C; Friend, Danielle M; Kaplan, Alanna R; Shin, Jung Hoon; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Kravitz, Alexxai V; Alvarez, Veronica A

    2016-05-18

    Bradykinesia is a prominent phenotype of Parkinson's disease, depression, and other neurological conditions. Disruption of dopamine (DA) transmission plays an important role, but progress in understanding the exact mechanisms driving slowness of movement has been impeded due to the heterogeneity of DA receptor distribution on multiple cell types within the striatum. Here we show that selective deletion of DA D2 receptors (D2Rs) from indirect-pathway medium spiny neurons (iMSNs) is sufficient to impair locomotor activity, phenocopying DA depletion models of Parkinson's disease, despite this mouse model having intact DA transmission. There was a robust enhancement of GABAergic transmission and a reduction of in vivo firing in striatal and pallidal neurons. Mimicking D2R signaling in iMSNs with Gi-DREADDs restored the level of tonic GABAergic transmission and rescued the motor deficit. These findings indicate that DA, through D2R activation in iMSNs, regulates motor output by constraining the strength of GABAergic transmission.

  6. Water deficit enhances the transmission of plant viruses by insect vectors

    PubMed Central

    Yvon, Michel; Vile, Denis; Dader, Beatriz; Fereres, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Drought is a major threat to crop production worldwide and is accentuated by global warming. Plant responses to this abiotic stress involve physiological changes overlapping, at least partially, the defense pathways elicited both by viruses and their herbivore vectors. Recently, a number of theoretical and empirical studies anticipated the influence of climate changes on vector-borne viruses of plants and animals, mainly addressing the effects on the virus itself or on the vector population dynamics, and inferring possible consequences on virus transmission. Here, we directly assess the effect of a severe water deficit on the efficiency of aphid-transmission of the Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) or the Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV). For both viruses, our results demonstrate that the rate of vector-transmission is significantly increased from water-deprived source plants: CaMV transmission reproducibly increased by 34% and that of TuMV by 100%. In both cases, the enhanced transmission rate could not be explained by a higher virus accumulation, suggesting a more complex drought-induced process that remains to be elucidated. The evidence that infected plants subjected to drought are much better virus sources for insect vectors may have extensive consequences for viral epidemiology, and should be investigated in a wide range of plant-virus-vector systems. PMID:28467423

  7. Theoretical Potential of Passerine Filariasis to Enhance the Enzootic Transmission of West Nile Virus

    PubMed Central

    VAUGHAN, JEFFERSON A.; MEHUS, JOSEPH O.; BREWER, CHRISTINA M.; KVASAGER, DANIELLE K.; BAUER, SARINA; VAUGHAN, JESSICA L.; HASSAN, HASSAN K.; UNNASCH, THOMAS R.; BELL, JEFFREY A.

    2013-01-01

    Vertebrate reservoirs of arboviruses are often infected with microfilariae (MF). Laboratory studies have shown that MF can enhance the infectivity of arboviruses to mosquitoes. Soon after being ingested, MF penetrate the mosquito midgut. If the host blood also contains virus (i.e., vertebrate is dually infected), penetrating MF may introduce virus into the hemocoel. This can transform otherwise virus-incompetent mosquito species into virus-competent species and simultaneously accelerate viral development, allowing mosquitoes to transmit virus sooner than normal. This phenomenon is termed microfilarial enhancement of arboviral transmission. The prevalence of MF is very high in many passerine populations in North America. Therefore, we investigated if microfilarial enhancement could have facilitated the establishment and rapid spread of West Nile virus (WNV) across the mid-western United States. Our investigations revealed that mosquitoes, WNV, and passerine MF do interact in nature because; 1) 17% of 54 common grackles (Quiscalus quiscula L.), 8% of 26 American robins (Turdus migratorius L.), and 33% of three eastern kingbirds (Tyrannus tyrannus L.) were concurrently microfilaremic and seropositive to WNV; 2) feeding activities of mosquitoes overlapped temporally with the appearance of MF in the blood of common grackles; 3) mosquitoes fed on common grackles and American robins in nature; and 4) mosquito ingestion of two taxonomically distant species of passerine MF (i.e., Chandlerella quiscali and Eufilaria spp.) resulted in penetration of mosquito midguts. To estimate the theoretical effect that MF enhancement could have on WNV transmission in areas of high MF prevalence, vectorial capacity values were calculated for Culex mosquitoes feeding on common grackles, whereby MF enhancement was either invoked or ignored. For Cx. pipiens, vectorial capacity increased over three-fold when potential effects of MF were included in the calculations. For Cx. tarsalis, the

  8. Adjunctive modafinil at initiation of treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor enhances the degree and onset of therapeutic effects in patients with major depressive disorder and fatigue.

    PubMed

    Ninan, Philip T; Hassman, Howard A; Glass, Steven J; McManus, Frank C

    2004-03-01

    Benefit from selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment in major depressive disorder (MDD) usually takes several weeks. Typically, a third of patients achieve remission and roughly half achieve response with acute treatment. This open-label study evaluated the efficacy and safety of modafinil treatment initiated with an SSRI in patients with MDD and fatigue. Twenty-nine patients with DSM-IV MDD, free from antidepressant therapy (> or = 4 weeks), were administered modafinil (titrated to 200 mg/day) and fluoxetine or paroxetine (20 mg/day) for 6 weeks. Assessments included the 21-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D), Structured Interview Guide for the HAM-D (SIGH-D), Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). The SIGH-D ratings were videotaped and rated by an independent rater masked to the visit schedule. Data were collected from August 2002 through March 2003. Modafinil combined with an SSRI at treatment initiation significantly improved mean total SIGH-D scores within 1 week (-9.3, p <.001), and this improvement was progressive throughout the study (-21.2 at week 6, p <.001). Forty-two percent (11 of 26) and 79% (19 of 24) of patients were responders, and 39% (10 of 26) and 58% (14 of 24) of patients were remitters (HAM-D) by week 2 and week 6, respectively. Adjunct modafinil rapidly and significantly reduced fatigue (FSS score reduction from baseline = 0.7 at week 1, p <.01) and improved wakefulness (ESS score reduction from baseline = 3.6 at week 1, p <.01). The combination caused few adverse events, with nausea and headache being the most common. Modafinil combined with an SSRI at treatment initiation may enhance the onset and degree of symptom benefit in patients with MDD and fatigue. Treatment with adjunct modafinil was generally well tolerated, with most adverse effects being mild or moderate in severity.

  9. Transmission-type plasmonic sensor for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Masahiro; Saito, Mikiko; Kunimoto, Masahiro; Homma, Takayuki

    2016-12-01

    We present a novel optical device for the analysis of chemical surface properties utilizing surface-enhanced Raman scattering. The device, a transmission-type plasmonic sensor (TPS), offers the advantages of high sensitivity, nondestructive sample characterization, simple setup, and low-cost fabrication. The TPS is composed of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) deposited on a convex quartz glass substrate. The enhanced Raman spectrum is acquired by focusing a laser beam perpendicular to the sample surface through the substrate. The laser beam generates plasmon polarization in droplet-shaped Ag NPs at the sensor/sample interface. Our results indicate the potential of the device as a versatile surface-analytical tool.

  10. Acute selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors regulate the dorsal raphe nucleus causing amplification of terminal serotonin release.

    PubMed

    Dankoski, Elyse C; Carroll, Susan; Wightman, Robert Mark

    2016-01-09

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were designed to treat depression by increasing serotonin levels throughout the brain via inhibition of clearance from the extracellular space. Although increases in serotonin levels are observed after acute SSRI exposure, 3-6 weeks of continuous use is required for relief from the symptoms of depression. Thus, it is now believed that plasticity in multiple brain systems that are downstream of serotonergic inputs contributes to the therapeutic efficacy of SSRIs. The onset of antidepressant effects also coincides with desensitization of somatodendritic serotonin autoreceptors in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), suggesting that disrupting inhibitory feedback within the serotonin system may contribute to the therapeutic effects of SSRIs. Previously, we showed that chronic SSRI treatment caused a frequency-dependent facilitation of serotonin signaling that persisted in the absence of uptake inhibition. In this work, we use in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in mice to investigate a similar facilitation after a single treatment of the SSRI citalopram hydrobromide. Acute citalopram hydrobromide treatment resulted in frequency-dependent increases of evoked serotonin release in the substantia nigra pars reticulata. These increases were independent of changes in uptake velocity, but required SERT expression. Using microinjections, we show that the frequency-dependent enhancement in release is because of SERT inhibition in the DRN, demonstrating that SSRIs can enhance serotonin release by inhibiting uptake in a location distal to the terminal release site. The novel finding that SERT inhibition can disrupt modulatory mechanisms at the level of the DRN to facilitate serotonin release will help future studies investigate serotonin's role in depression and motivated behavior. In this work, stimulations of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) evoke serotonin release that is recorded in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr) using

  11. Activity patterns of serotonin neurons underlying cognitive flexibility.

    PubMed

    Matias, Sara; Lottem, Eran; Dugué, Guillaume P; Mainen, Zachary F

    2017-03-21

    Serotonin is implicated in mood and affective disorders. However, growing evidence suggests that a core endogenous role is to promote flexible adaptation to changes in the causal structure of the environment, through behavioral inhibition and enhanced plasticity. We used long-term photometric recordings in mice to study a population of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons, whose activity we could link to normal reversal learning using pharmacogenetics. We found that these neurons are activated by both positive and negative prediction errors, and thus report signals similar to those proposed to promote learning in conditions of uncertainty. Furthermore, by comparing the cue responses of serotonin and dopamine neurons, we found differences in learning rates that could explain the importance of serotonin in inhibiting perseverative responding. Our findings show how the activity patterns of serotonin neurons support a role in cognitive flexibility, and suggest a revised model of dopamine-serotonin opponency with potential clinical implications.

  12. Auditory stimuli enhance MDMA-conditioned reward and MDMA-induced nucleus accumbens dopamine, serotonin and locomotor responses.

    PubMed

    Feduccia, Allison A; Duvauchelle, Christine L

    2008-10-22

    MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine), also known as ecstasy, is a popular drug often taken in environments rich in audio and visual stimulation, such as clubs and dance parties. The present experiments were conducted to test the notion that auditory stimulation influences the rewarding effects of MDMA. In Experiment 1, a conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure was conducted in which rats received MDMA (1.5mg/kg, s.c.) in a distinctive environment accompanied by music (65-75dB), white noise (70dB), or no added sound. Animals were pretreated with saline on alternating days in an alternate environment. Results revealed CPP in animals exposed to white noise during MDMA trials. For Experiment 2, rats from Experiment 1 had access to operant levers that delivered intravenous MDMA (0.5mg/kg/inj) or saline (0.1ml) on alternate days in the presence or absence of the same types of auditory stimuli as previously experienced. After three each of MDMA and non-reinforced (saline) sessions, animals were tested for NAcc DA and 5-HT responses to MDMA (1.5mg/kg) or saline under the same stimulus conditions. Findings revealed that NAcc DA and 5-HT increased after an MDMA injection, and both DA and 5-HT were significantly highest in animals exposed to music during the test session. These results indicate that paired sensorial stimuli can engage the same systems activated during drug use and enhance neurochemical and behavioral responses to MDMA administration.

  13. Ketanserin and Naftopidil Enhance the Potentiating Effect of Alpha-Methyl-Serotonin on the Neurally-Induced Contraction of Human Isolated Urinary Bladder Muscle Strips

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the potential involvement of a specific subtype of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), 5HT2 receptors in neurally-induced contractions of the human detrusor. Methods Contractile responses to electrical field stimulation (EFS) were examined in human isolated urinary bladder muscle strips. The potentiation of EFS-induced detrusor contraction was examined by adding cumulative concentrations of a 5-HT and 5-HT2 receptor agonist, α-methyl-serotonin (α-Me-5-HT) (1nM–100μM) in the presence or absence of a 5-HT2 antagonist, ketanserin (5-HT2A>5-HT2C) or naftopidil (5-HT2B>5-HT2A) (0.3–3μM). Results 5-HT and α-Me-5-HT potentiated EFS-induced contraction with a maximal effect (Emax) of 37.6% and 38.6%, respectively, and with pEC50 (negative logarithm of the concentration required for a half-maximal response to an agonist) values of 8.3 and 6.8, respectively. Neither ketanserin nor naftopidil at any concentration produced a rightward displacement of the α-Me-5-HT concentration response curve. Instead, the Emax of α-Me-5-HT increased in the presence of ketanserin at 0.3–1μM and in the presence of naftopidil at 1μM to 51% and 56%, respectively, while the Emax in the presence of vehicle alone was 36%. The highest concentration (3μM) of either drug, however, fully reversed the enhancement. Conclusions The potentiating effect of α-Me-5-HT on neurally-induced contraction of human urinary bladder muscle strips was not found to be mediated via any 5-HT2 receptor subtypes. The underlying mechanism for the enhancement of the α-Me-5-HT potentiating effect on detrusor contractility by ketanserin and naftopidil remains unknown; however, our results suggest that these drugs may be useful for treating contractile dysfunction of the detrusor, as manifested in conditions such as underactive bladder. PMID:28361518

  14. Chlamydia trachomatis Infection of Endocervical Epithelial Cells Enhances Early HIV Transmission Events.

    PubMed

    Buckner, Lyndsey R; Amedee, Angela M; Albritton, Hannah L; Kozlowski, Pamela A; Lacour, Nedra; McGowin, Chris L; Schust, Danny J; Quayle, Alison J

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis causes a predominantly asymptomatic, but generally inflammatory, genital infection that is associated with an increased risk for HIV acquisition. Endocervical epithelial cells provide the major niche for this obligate intracellular bacterium in women, and the endocervix is also a tissue in which HIV transmission can occur. The mechanism by which CT infection enhances HIV susceptibility at this site, however, is not well understood. Utilizing the A2EN immortalized endocervical epithelial cell line grown on cell culture inserts, we evaluated the direct role that CT-infected epithelial cells play in facilitating HIV transmission events. We determined that CT infection significantly enhanced the apical-to-basolateral migration of cell-associated, but not cell-free, HIVBaL, a CCR5-tropic strain of virus, across the endocervical epithelial barrier. We also established that basolateral supernatants from CT-infected A2EN cells significantly enhanced HIV replication in peripheral mononuclear cells and a CCR5+ T cell line. These results suggest that CT infection of endocervical epithelial cells could facilitate both HIV crossing the mucosal barrier and subsequent infection or replication in underlying target cells. Our studies provide a mechanism by which this common STI could potentially promote the establishment of founder virus populations and the maintenance of local HIV reservoirs in the endocervix. Development of an HIV/STI co-infection model also provides a tool to further explore the role of other sexually transmitted infections in enhancing HIV acquisition.

  15. Chlamydia trachomatis Infection of Endocervical Epithelial Cells Enhances Early HIV Transmission Events

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Lyndsey R.; Amedee, Angela M.; Albritton, Hannah L.; Kozlowski, Pamela A.; Lacour, Nedra; McGowin, Chris L.; Schust, Danny J.; Quayle, Alison J.

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis causes a predominantly asymptomatic, but generally inflammatory, genital infection that is associated with an increased risk for HIV acquisition. Endocervical epithelial cells provide the major niche for this obligate intracellular bacterium in women, and the endocervix is also a tissue in which HIV transmission can occur. The mechanism by which CT infection enhances HIV susceptibility at this site, however, is not well understood. Utilizing the A2EN immortalized endocervical epithelial cell line grown on cell culture inserts, we evaluated the direct role that CT-infected epithelial cells play in facilitating HIV transmission events. We determined that CT infection significantly enhanced the apical-to-basolateral migration of cell-associated, but not cell-free, HIVBaL, a CCR5-tropic strain of virus, across the endocervical epithelial barrier. We also established that basolateral supernatants from CT-infected A2EN cells significantly enhanced HIV replication in peripheral mononuclear cells and a CCR5+ T cell line. These results suggest that CT infection of endocervical epithelial cells could facilitate both HIV crossing the mucosal barrier and subsequent infection or replication in underlying target cells. Our studies provide a mechanism by which this common STI could potentially promote the establishment of founder virus populations and the maintenance of local HIV reservoirs in the endocervix. Development of an HIV/STI co-infection model also provides a tool to further explore the role of other sexually transmitted infections in enhancing HIV acquisition. PMID:26730599

  16. Influenza A Virus Acquires Enhanced Pathogenicity and Transmissibility after Serial Passages in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Kai; Sun, Honglei; Sun, Zhenhong; Sun, Yipeng; Kong, Weili; Pu, Juan; Ma, Guangpeng; Yin, Yanbo; Yang, Hanchun; Guo, Xin; Chang, Kin-Chow

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genetic and phylogenetic analyses suggest that the pandemic H1N1/2009 virus was derived from well-established swine influenza lineages; however, there is no convincing evidence that the pandemic virus was generated from a direct precursor in pigs. Furthermore, the evolutionary dynamics of influenza virus in pigs have not been well documented. Here, we subjected a recombinant virus (rH1N1) with the same constellation makeup as the pandemic H1N1/2009 virus to nine serial passages in pigs. The severity of infection sequentially increased with each passage. Deep sequencing of viral quasispecies from the ninth passage found five consensus amino acid mutations: PB1 A469T, PA 1129T, NA N329D, NS1 N205K, and NEP T48N. Mutations in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein, however, differed greatly between the upper and lower respiratory tracts. Three representative viral clones with the five consensus mutations were selected for functional evaluation. Relative to the parental virus, the three viral clones showed enhanced replication and polymerase activity in vitro and enhanced replication, pathogenicity, and transmissibility in pigs, guinea pigs, and ferrets in vivo. Specifically, two mutants of rH1N1 (PB1 A469T and a combination of NS1 N205K and NEP T48N) were identified as determinants of transmissibility in guinea pigs. Crucially, one mutant viral clone with the five consensus mutations, which also carried D187E, K211E, and S289N mutations in its HA, additionally was able to infect ferrets by airborne transmission as effectively as the pandemic virus. Our findings demonstrate that influenza virus can acquire viral characteristics that are similar to those of the pandemic virus after limited serial passages in pigs. IMPORTANCE We demonstrate here that an engineered reassortant swine influenza virus, with the same gene constellation pattern as the pandemic H1N1/2009 virus and subjected to only nine serial passages in pigs, acquired greatly enhanced virulence and

  17. Serotonin is a facilitatory neuromodulator of synaptic transmission and "reinforces" long-term potentiation induction in the vertical lobe of Octopus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Shomrat, T; Feinstein, N; Klein, M; Hochner, B

    2010-08-11

    The modern cephalopod mollusks (coleoids) are considered the most behaviorally advanced invertebrate, yet little is known about the neurophysiological basis of their behaviors. Previous work suggested that the vertical lobe (VL) of cephalopods is a crucial site for the learning and memory components of these behaviors. We are therefore studying the neurophysiology of the VL in Octopus vulgaris and have discovered a robust activity-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) of the synaptic input to the VL. Moreover, we have shown that the VL and its LTP are involved in behavioral long-term memory acquisition. To advance our understanding of the VL as a learning neural network we explore the possible involvement of neuromodulation in VL function. Here we examine whether the well studied serotonergic modulation in simple models of learning in gastropods mollusks is conserved in the octopus VL. We demonstrate histochemically that the VL is innervated by afferent terminals containing 5-HT immunoreactivity (5-HT-IR). Physiologically, 5-HT has a robust facilitatory effect on synaptic transmission and activity-dependent LTP induction. These results suggest that serotonergic neuromodulation is a part of a reinforcing/reward signaling system conserved in both simple and complex learning systems of mollusks. However, there are notable functional differences. First, the effective concentration of 5-HT in the VL is rather high (100 microM); secondly, only neuropilar regions but not cell bodies in the VL are innervated by terminals containing 5-HT-IR. Thirdly, repetitive or long exposures to 5-HT do not lead to a clear long-term facilitation. We propose that in the octopus VL, while the basic facilitatory properties of molluscan 5-HT system are conserved, the system has adapted to convey signals from other brain areas to reinforce the activity-dependent associations at specific sites in the large connections matrix in the VL. Copyright (c) 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  18. Effect of clozapine on the metabolism of serotonin in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ruch, W; Asper, H; Bürki, H R

    1976-01-01

    Clozapine, but not chlorpromazine, haloperidol, thioridazine, or loxapine, increases the concentrations of tryptophan, serotonin, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in the brain of the rat. This effect of clozapine is due to an increased serotonin synthesis as demonstrated by an enhanced accumulation of 3H-serotonin in the brain after i.v. infusion of 3H-tryptophan. Clozapine also elevates the plasma concentration of free tryptophan, and reduces the plasma concentration of total tryptophan. Therefore, clozapine may increase the brain serotonin concentration by enhancing the availability of tryptophan in the brain, thereby promoting serotonin synthesis. Measurement of the rate of disappearance from the brain of 3H-serotonin or of endogenous serotonin after synthesis inhibition with 6-fluorotryptophan shows that clozapine has no direct effect on the release and degradation of serotonin. The effect of clozapine on brain serotonergic systems may possibly be related to the pronounced sedative and sleep-inducing properties of this drug.

  19. Enhanced light element imaging in atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Findlay, S D; Kohno, Y; Cardamone, L A; Ikuhara, Y; Shibata, N

    2014-01-01

    We show that an imaging mode based on taking the difference between signals recorded from the bright field (forward scattering region) in atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy provides an enhancement of the detectability of light elements over existing techniques. In some instances this is an enhancement of the visibility of the light element columns relative to heavy element columns. In all cases explored it is an enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio of the image at the light column site. The image formation mechanisms are explained and the technique is compared with earlier approaches. Experimental data, supported by simulation, are presented for imaging the oxygen columns in LaAlO₃. Case studies looking at imaging hydrogen columns in YH₂ and lithium columns in Al₃Li are also explored through simulation, particularly with respect to the dependence on defocus, probe-forming aperture angle and detector collection aperture angles. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Enhanced strongly modulated spin transmission of Fano-Rashba mesoscopic ring structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P.; Liu, Z. X.; Zhang, X. H.

    2010-09-01

    One-dimensional Rashba quantum ring structure with two leads subjected to a weak external magnetic field is proposed as a possible candidate for spintronic current modulators. By tuning spin-orbit coupling and magnitude of external magnetic field, resonance and antiresonance behavior can be found in our investigation. Comparing with results in other structures like quantum wires with local or periodic Rashba interaction, the T-shaped structure, more broader energy range of vanishing small transmission and larger on/off transmission ratio can be found in the structure and Fano-Rashba interference behaviors of the quantum ring model. Moreover, it is found the enhanced robustness of these interference against random Anderson-type disorder of device, which may conduce to the real application of this device.

  1. Dual-band-enhanced Transmission through a Subwavelength Aperture by Coupled Metamaterial Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yunsheng; Zhou, Ji

    2015-01-01

    In classical mechanics, it is well known that a system consisting of two identical pendulums connected by a spring will steadily oscillate with two modes: one at the fundamental frequency of a single pendulum and one in which the frequency increases with the stiffness of the spring. Inspired by this physical concept, we present an analogous approach that uses two metamaterial resonators to realize dual-band-enhanced transmission of microwaves through a subwavelength aperture. The metamaterial resonators are formed by the periodically varying and strongly localized fields that occur in the two metal split-ring resonators, which are placed gap-to-gap on either side of the aperture. The dual-band frequency separation is determined by the coupling strength between the two resonators. Measured transmission spectra, simulated field distributions, and theoretical analyses verify our approach. PMID:25634496

  2. Optical transmission enhancement through chemically tuned two-dimensional bismuth chalcogenide nanoplates.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jie; Koski, Kristie J; Luo, Weidong; Cha, Judy J; Hu, Liangbing; Kong, Desheng; Narasimhan, Vijay Kris; Huo, Kaifu; Cui, Yi

    2014-11-28

    Layer-structured two-dimensional nanomaterials are a family of materials with strong covalent bonding within layers and weak van der Waals interaction between layers, whose vertical thickness can be thinned down to few nanometer and even single atomic layer. Bismuth chalcogenides are examples of such two-dimensional materials. Here, we present our discovery of significant enhancement of light transmission through thin nanoplates of layered bismuth chalcogenides by intercalation of copper atoms, which is on the contrary to most bulk materials in which doping reduces the light transmission. This surprising behaviour results from two mechanisms: chemical tuning effect of substantial reduction of material absorption after intercalation and nanophotonic effect of zero-wave anti-reflection unique to ultra-small thickness of nanoplates. We demonstrate that the synergy of these two effects in two-dimensional nanostructures can be exploited for various optoelectronic applications including transparent electrode. The intercalation mechanism allows potential dynamic tuning capability.

  3. Dual-band-enhanced Transmission through a Subwavelength Aperture by Coupled Metamaterial Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yunsheng; Zhou, Ji

    2015-01-01

    In classical mechanics, it is well known that a system consisting of two identical pendulums connected by a spring will steadily oscillate with two modes: one at the fundamental frequency of a single pendulum and one in which the frequency increases with the stiffness of the spring. Inspired by this physical concept, we present an analogous approach that uses two metamaterial resonators to realize dual-band-enhanced transmission of microwaves through a subwavelength aperture. The metamaterial resonators are formed by the periodically varying and strongly localized fields that occur in the two metal split-ring resonators, which are placed gap-to-gap on either side of the aperture. The dual-band frequency separation is determined by the coupling strength between the two resonators. Measured transmission spectra, simulated field distributions, and theoretical analyses verify our approach.

  4. Serotonin Receptors in Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Berumen, Laura Cristina; Rodríguez, Angelina; Miledi, Ricardo; García-Alcocer, Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin is an ancient molecular signal and a recognized neurotransmitter brainwide distributed with particular presence in hippocampus. Almost all serotonin receptor subtypes are expressed in hippocampus, which implicates an intricate modulating system, considering that they can be localized as autosynaptic, presynaptic, and postsynaptic receptors, even colocalized within the same cell and being target of homo- and heterodimerization. Neurons and glia, including immune cells, integrate a functional network that uses several serotonin receptors to regulate their roles in this particular part of the limbic system. PMID:22629209

  5. Evidence that coded-wire-tagging procedures can enhance transmission of Renibacterium salmoninarum in chinook salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, D.G.; Pascho, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    Binary coded wire tags (CWTs) are used extensively for identification and management of anadromous salmonid populations. A study of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in two brood year groups of hatchery-reared spring chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha provided strong evidence that horizontal transmission of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of BKD, might be enhanced by CWT-marking procedures. About 4 months after CWTs were implanted in the snouts of juvenile fish, 14-16 different tissues were sampled from each of 60 fish per brood year group for histological analysis. Of the fish that were positive for R. salmoninarum by histological examination, 41% (7 of 17) of the 1988 brood year fish and 24% (10 of 42) of the 1989 brood year fish had BKD lesions confined to the head near the site of tag implantation. These lesions often resulted in the destruction of tissues of one or both olfactory organs. No focal snout infections were observed in fish that had not been marked with CWTs. Further data obtained from tissue analyses by use of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a fluorescent antibody test for detection of R. salmoninarum supported the hypothesis that infections of R. salmoninarum can be initiated in the snout tissues of CWT-marked fish and then spread to other organs. The tagging procedures might promote transmission of the pathogen among fish via contaminated tagging needles, by facilitating the entry of pathogens through the injection wound, or both. Limited evidence from this study suggested that implantation of passive integrated transponder tags in the peritoneal cavities of fish might also promote the transmission of R. salmoninarum or exacerbate existing infections. The results indicated a need for strict sanitary procedures during the tagging of fish in populations positive for R. salmoninarum to reduce the probability of enhanced horizontal transmission of the pathogen.

  6. Enhanced synaptic transmission at the squid giant synapse by artificial seawater based on physically modified saline

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Rabello, Guilherme; Merlo, Suelen; Zemmar, Ajmal; Walton, Kerry D.; Moreno, Herman; Moreira, Jorge E.; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinás, Rodolfo R.

    2014-01-01

    Superfusion of the squid giant synapse with artificial seawater (ASW) based on isotonic saline containing oxygen nanobubbles (RNS60 ASW) generates an enhancement of synaptic transmission. This was determined by examining the postsynaptic response to single and repetitive presynaptic spike activation, spontaneous transmitter release, and presynaptic voltage clamp studies. In the presence of RNS60 ASW single presynaptic stimulation elicited larger postsynaptic potentials (PSP) and more robust recovery from high frequency stimulation than in control ASW. Analysis of postsynaptic noise revealed an increase in spontaneous transmitter release with modified noise kinetics in RNS60 ASW. Presynaptic voltage clamp demonstrated an increased EPSP, without an increase in presynaptic ICa++ amplitude during RNS60 ASW superfusion. Synaptic release enhancement reached stable maxima within 5–10 min of RNS60 ASW superfusion and was maintained for the entire recording time, up to 1 h. Electronmicroscopic morphometry indicated a decrease in synaptic vesicle density and the number at active zones with an increase in the number of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCV) and large endosome-like vesicles near junctional sites. Block of mitochondrial ATP synthesis by presynaptic injection of oligomycin reduced spontaneous release and prevented the synaptic noise increase seen in RNS60 ASW. After ATP block the number of vesicles at the active zone and CCV was reduced, with an increase in large vesicles. The possibility that RNS60 ASW acts by increasing mitochondrial ATP synthesis was tested by direct determination of ATP levels in both presynaptic and postsynaptic structures. This was implemented using luciferin/luciferase photon emission, which demonstrated a marked increase in ATP synthesis following RNS60 administration. It is concluded that RNS60 positively modulates synaptic transmission by up-regulating ATP synthesis, thus leading to synaptic transmission enhancement. PMID:24575037

  7. Enhanced synaptic transmission at the squid giant synapse by artificial seawater based on physically modified saline.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Rabello, Guilherme; Merlo, Suelen; Zemmar, Ajmal; Walton, Kerry D; Moreno, Herman; Moreira, Jorge E; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2014-01-01

    Superfusion of the squid giant synapse with artificial seawater (ASW) based on isotonic saline containing oxygen nanobubbles (RNS60 ASW) generates an enhancement of synaptic transmission. This was determined by examining the postsynaptic response to single and repetitive presynaptic spike activation, spontaneous transmitter release, and presynaptic voltage clamp studies. In the presence of RNS60 ASW single presynaptic stimulation elicited larger postsynaptic potentials (PSP) and more robust recovery from high frequency stimulation than in control ASW. Analysis of postsynaptic noise revealed an increase in spontaneous transmitter release with modified noise kinetics in RNS60 ASW. Presynaptic voltage clamp demonstrated an increased EPSP, without an increase in presynaptic ICa(++) amplitude during RNS60 ASW superfusion. Synaptic release enhancement reached stable maxima within 5-10 min of RNS60 ASW superfusion and was maintained for the entire recording time, up to 1 h. Electronmicroscopic morphometry indicated a decrease in synaptic vesicle density and the number at active zones with an increase in the number of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCV) and large endosome-like vesicles near junctional sites. Block of mitochondrial ATP synthesis by presynaptic injection of oligomycin reduced spontaneous release and prevented the synaptic noise increase seen in RNS60 ASW. After ATP block the number of vesicles at the active zone and CCV was reduced, with an increase in large vesicles. The possibility that RNS60 ASW acts by increasing mitochondrial ATP synthesis was tested by direct determination of ATP levels in both presynaptic and postsynaptic structures. This was implemented using luciferin/luciferase photon emission, which demonstrated a marked increase in ATP synthesis following RNS60 administration. It is concluded that RNS60 positively modulates synaptic transmission by up-regulating ATP synthesis, thus leading to synaptic transmission enhancement.

  8. Transient Enhancement of Inhibitory Synaptic Transmission in Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neurons after Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Rui; Pang, Zhi-Ping; Deng, Ping; Xu, Zao C.

    2009-01-01

    Pyramidal neurons in hippocampal CA1 regions are highly sensitive to cerebral ischemia. Alterations of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission may contribute to the ischemia-induced neuronal degeneration. However, little is known about the changes of GABAergic synaptic transmission in the hippocampus following reperfusion. We examined the GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in CA1 pyramidal neurons 12 hours and 24 hours after transient forebrain ischemia. The amplitudes of evoked IPSCs (eIPSCs) were increased significantly 12 hours after ischemia and returned to control levels 24 hours following reperfusion. The potentiation of eIPSCs was accompanied by an increase of miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs) amplitude, and an enhanced response to exogenous application of GABA, indicating the involvement of postsynaptic mechanisms. Furthermore, there was no obvious change of the paired-pulse ratio (PPR) of eIPSCs and the frequency of mIPSCs, suggesting that the potentiation of eIPSCs might not be due to the increased presynaptic release. Blockade of adenosine A1 receptors led to a decrease of eIPSCs amplitude in post-ischemic neurons but not in control neurons, without affecting the frequency of mIPSCs and the PPR of eIPSCs. Thus, tonic activation of adenosine A1 receptors might, at least in part, contribute to the enhancement of inhibitory synaptic transmission in CA1 neurons after forebrain ischemia. The transient enhancement of inhibitory neurotransmission might temporarily protect CA1 pyramidal neurons, and delay the process of neuronal death after cerebral ischemia. PMID:19258028

  9. Long-lasting enhancement of corticostriatal transmission by taurine: role of dopamine and acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Chepkova, A N; Sergeeva, O A; Haas, H L

    2005-06-01

    1. Taurine applied to mouse brain slices evokes a long-lasting enhancement (LLE) of corticostriatal synaptic transmission, LLE(TAU). 2. The occurrence of LLE(TAU) was significantly decreased in the presence of the specific antagonists at either D1 (SCH23390) or D2 (raclopride) dopamine (DA) receptors. 3. LLE(TAU) was prevented by scopolamine, a muscarinic antagonist, and significantly suppressed by the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine. 4. Thus, dopaminergic and cholinergic mechanisms, in concert with the taurine transporter and glycine receptors, contribute critically to the induction of corticostriatal LLE(TAU).

  10. Complementary chiral metasurface with strong broadband optical activity and enhanced transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Yan-Peng; Zhang, Yong-Liang; Dong, Xian-Zi E-mail: xmduan@mail.ipc.ac.cn; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Li, Jing; Liu, Jie; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng; Duan, Xuan-Ming E-mail: xmduan@mail.ipc.ac.cn

    2014-01-06

    We present the design and realization of ultra-thin chiral metasurfaces with giant broadband optical activity in the infrared wavelength. The chiral metasurfaces consisting of periodic hole arrays of complementary asymmetric split ring resonators are fabricated by femtosecond laser two-photon polymerization. Enhanced transmission with strong polarization conversion up to 97% is observed owing to the chiral surface plasmons resulting from mirror symmetry broken. The dependence of optical activity on the degree of structural asymmetry is investigated. This simple planar metasurface is expected to be useful for designing ultra-thin active devices and tailoring the polarization behavior of complex metallic nanostructures.

  11. Resonance surface plasmon spectroscopy by tunable enhanced light transmission through nanostructured gratings and thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Wei-Hsun

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a powerful tool in probing interfacial events in that any changes of effective refractive index in the interface directly impact the behavior of surface plasmons, an electromagnetic wave, travelling along the interface. Surface plasmons (SPs) are generated only if the momemtum of incident light matches that of SPs in the interface. This thesis focuses on tuning the behavior of SPs by changing the topology of diffraction gratings, monitoring the thickness of thin films by diffraction gratings, and use of dispersion images to analyze complex optical responses of SPs through diffraction gratings. Chapter 1 covers the background/principle of SPR, comprehensive literature review, sensor applications, control of SPR spectral responses, and sensitivity of SPR. In Chapter 2, we illustrate a chirped grating with varying surface topology along its spatial position. We demonstrated that the features of nanostructure such as pitch and amplitude significantly impact the behavior of enhanced transmission. In addition, we also illustrate the sensing application of chirped grating and the results indicate that the chirped grating is a sensitive and information rich SPR platform. In chapter 3, we used a commercial DVD diffraction grating as a SPR coupler. A camera-mounted microscope with Bertrend lens attachment is used to observe the enhanced transmission. We demonstrate that this system can monitor the SPR responses and track the thickness of a silicon monoxide film without using a spectrophotometer. Surface plasmons are a result of collective oscillation of free electrons in the metal/dielectric interface. Thus, the interaction of SPs with delocalized electrons from molecular resonance is complex. In chapter 4, we perform both experimental and simulation works to address this complex interaction. Detailed examination and analysis show nontypical SPR responses. For p-polarized light, a branch of dispersion curve and quenching of SPs in the Q

  12. Enhancement of transmission of laser and other radiation by soft turbid physical and biological media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askar'yan, G. A.

    1982-07-01

    An analysis is made and experimental results are reported of studies of the transmission of laser and other radiation by turbid physical and biological media, such as layers of a scattering medium or human tissue of thickness much greater than the characteristic attenuation length. It is reported that the transmission increases strongly as a result of depression and piercing of soft scattering media. A local pressure applied to a biological tissue produces a transmission enhancement considerably greater than compression of a layer of a physically turbid medium: this is due to the displacement of blood and of muscle out of the compressed region. A reduction in the scattering and absorption is expected to occur also in the case of rf and ionizing radiations, such as charged particles, x rays, gamma rays, etc. It is pointed out that this could be useful in deep irradiation carried out with the aim of inhibiting internal morbid processes (for example, in the spinal cord) and in treatment of neuroinfectious diseases (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, poliomyelitis, etc.), as well as in oncological conditions, ulcers, etc.

  13. Enhancement of the field modulation of light transmission through films of binary ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting-Zhen; Li, Jian; Miao, Hua; Zhang, Qing-Mei; Fu, Jun; Wen, Bang-Cai

    2010-08-01

    CoFe2O4 nanoparticles are ferrimagnetic and p-MgFe2O4 nanoparticles are paramagnetic. Binary ferrofluids can be synthesized by mixing CoFe2O4 ferrofluids and p-MgFe2O4 fluids in such a way that the magnetic interaction of the CoFe2O4 particles is large enough to form field-induced chainlike aggregates. The field modulation of light transmission through films of CoFe{2}O{4}-p-MgFe2O4 binary ferrofluids with different values of applied magnetic field is compared with pure CoFe2O4 ferrofluids. The experimental results revealed that the light transmission coefficient of binary ferrofluids can be more intensely modulated by an external magnetic field than pure CoFe2O4 ferrofluids. These show that in the binary ferrofluids, the field-induced structure mainly arises from the CoFe2O4 nanoparticle system and the p-MgFe2O4 nanoparticles introduce a nonlinear modulation effect, even though the microstructure of p-MgFe2O4 fluids is not affected by an applied magnetic field. Using a model of magnetic bidispersal, the enhanced field modulation of the light transmission through binary ferrofluids is explained by the coupling of geometric shadowing effects from both the CoFe2O4 and p-MgFe2O4 particle systems.

  14. 1 Tuning gold nanorod-nanoparticle hybrids into plasmonic Fano resonance for enhanced lightening and transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhang-Kai; Su, Xiong-Rui Su; Peng, Xiao-Niu; Wang, Qu-Quan; Zhang, Qing; Shan, Xin-Yan; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the optical response of a gold nanorod (NR) array coupled with a gold nanoparticle (NP) film. We show that, as the NP density is increased to the percolating regime, the NR-NP hybrids are tuned into plasmonic Fano resonance, characterized by the coherent coupling of the discrete plasmonic modes of the NR array with the continuous plasmonic modes of the NP film. As a consequence, the optical transmission of the NP film is substantially enhanced. Even more strikingly, the electromagnetic fields around the NR array become much stronger, as reflected by the two orders of magnitude enhancement in the avalanche photoluminescence. These findings may prove instrumental in the design of various plasmonic nanodevices.

  15. Study on Zeeman-split spoof surface plasmon polaritons by use of spin-sensitive enhanced electromagnetic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Li-Ting; Guo, Rui-Peng; Guo, Tian-Jing; Yang, Mu; Cui, Hai-Xu; Cao, Xue-Wei; Chen, Jing

    2014-12-21

    Structured metal surfaces could support spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), the dispersion of which is determined by the cutoff condition of guided modes in the nanostructures. We show that we can achieve split spoof SPPs by breaking the degeneracy of guided helical modes in concentric nanostructures via the classic analogue of the Zeeman effect. This split effect is shown to be observable from the spectra of enhanced electromagnetic transmission. Spin-sensitive enhanced electromagnetic transmission and the associated characteristics of field are investigated. Transmission branches versus parallel wavevector can be satisfactorily fitted by using the dispersion of spoof SPPs.

  16. Slanted annular aperture arrays as enhanced-transmission metamaterials: Excitation of the plasmonic transverse electromagnetic guided mode

    SciTech Connect

    Ndao, Abdoulaye; Salut, Roland; Baida, Fadi I.; Belkhir, Abderrahmane

    2013-11-18

    We present here the fabrication and the optical characterization of slanted annular aperture arrays engraved into silver film. An experimental enhanced transmission based on the excitation of the cutoff-less plasmonic guided mode of the nano-waveguides (the transmission electron microscopy mode) is demonstrated and agrees well with the theoretical predicted results. By the way, even if it is less efficient (70% → 20%), an enhanced transmission can occur at larger wavelength value (720 nm–930 nm) compared to conventional annular aperture arrays structure by correctly setting the metal thickness.

  17. Nicotine uses neuron-glia communication to enhance hippocampal synaptic transmission and long-term memory.

    PubMed

    López-Hidalgo, Mónica; Salgado-Puga, Karla; Alvarado-Martínez, Reynaldo; Medina, Andrea Cristina; Prado-Alcalá, Roberto A; García-Colunga, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Nicotine enhances synaptic transmission and facilitates long-term memory. Now it is known that bi-directional glia-neuron interactions play important roles in the physiology of the brain. However, the involvement of glial cells in the effects of nicotine has not been considered until now. In particular, the gliotransmitter D-serine, an endogenous co-agonist of NMDA receptors, enables different types of synaptic plasticity and memory in the hippocampus. Here, we report that hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity induced by nicotine was annulled by an enzyme that degrades endogenous D-serine, or by an NMDA receptor antagonist that acts at the D-serine binding site. Accordingly, both effects of nicotine: the enhancement of synaptic transmission and facilitation of long-term memory were eliminated by impairing glial cells with fluoroacetate, and were restored with exogenous D-serine. Together, these results show that glial D-serine is essential for the long-term effects of nicotine on synaptic plasticity and memory, and they highlight the roles of glial cells as key participants in brain functions.

  18. Nicotine Uses Neuron-Glia Communication to Enhance Hippocampal Synaptic Transmission and Long-term Memory

    PubMed Central

    López-Hidalgo, Mónica; Salgado-Puga, Karla; Alvarado-Martínez, Reynaldo; Medina, Andrea Cristina; Prado-Alcalá, Roberto A.; García-Colunga, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Nicotine enhances synaptic transmission and facilitates long-term memory. Now it is known that bi-directional glia-neuron interactions play important roles in the physiology of the brain. However, the involvement of glial cells in the effects of nicotine has not been considered until now. In particular, the gliotransmitter D-serine, an endogenous co-agonist of NMDA receptors, enables different types of synaptic plasticity and memory in the hippocampus. Here, we report that hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity induced by nicotine was annulled by an enzyme that degrades endogenous D-serine, or by an NMDA receptor antagonist that acts at the D-serine binding site. Accordingly, both effects of nicotine: the enhancement of synaptic transmission and facilitation of long-term memory were eliminated by impairing glial cells with fluoroacetate, and were restored with exogenous D-serine. Together, these results show that glial D-serine is essential for the long-term effects of nicotine on synaptic plasticity and memory, and they highlight the roles of glial cells as key participants in brain functions. PMID:23185511

  19. TRPA1-like channels enhance glycinergic transmission in medullary dorsal horn neurons.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jin-Hwa; Jeong, Moon-Young; Choi, In-Sun; Lee, Heon-Jin; Jang, Il-Sung

    2012-08-01

    The effect of icilin, a potent agonist of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and TRPM8, on glycinergic transmission was examined in mechanically isolated rat medullary dorsal horn neurons by use of the conventional whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Icilin increased the frequency of glycinergic spontaneous miniature inhibitory post-synaptic currents (mIPSCs) in a dose-dependent manner. Either allyl isothiocyanate(AITC) or cinnamaldehyde, other TRPA1 agonists, also increased mIPSC frequency, but the extent of facilitation induced by AITC or cinnamaldehyde was less than that induced by icilin. However, menthol, a TRPM8 agonist, had no facilitatory effect on glycinergic mIPSCs. The icilin-induced increase in mIPSC frequency was significantly inhibited by either HC030031, a selective TRPA1 antagonist, or ruthenium red, a non-selective transient receptor potential channel blocker. Icilin failed to increase glycinergic mIPSC frequency in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), suggesting that the icilin-induced increase in mIPSC frequency is mediated by the Ca(2+) influx from the extracellular space. In contrast, icilin still increased mIPSC frequency either in the Na(+) -free external solution or in the presence of Cd(2+), a general voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel blocker. The present results suggest that icilin acts on pre-synaptic TRPA1-like ion channels, which are permeable to Ca(2+), to enhance glycinergic transmission onto medullary dorsal horn neurons. The TRPA1-like channel-mediated enhancement of glycinergic transmission in medullary dorsal horn neurons would contribute to the regulation of pain information from the peripheral tissues.

  20. VIP enhances both pre- and postsynaptic GABAergic transmission to hippocampal interneurones leading to increased excitatory synaptic transmission to CA1 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Cunha-Reis, Diana; Sebastião, Ana M; Wirkner, Kerstin; Illes, Peter; Ribeiro, Joaquim Alexandre

    2004-11-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is present in the hippocampus in three subtypes of GABAergic interneurones, two of which innervate preferentially other interneurones, responsible for pyramidal cell inhibition. We investigated how pre- and postsynaptic modulation of GABAergic transmission (to both pyramidal cells and interneurones) by VIP could influence excitatory synaptic transmission in the CA1 area of the hippocampus. VIP (0.1-100 nM) increased [(3)H]GABA release from hippocampal synaptosomes (maximum effect at 1 nM VIP; 63.8 +/- 4.0%) but did not change [(3)H]glutamate release. VIP (0.3-30 nM) enhanced synaptic transmission in hippocampal slices (maximum effect at 1 nM VIP; field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (epsp) slope: 23.7 +/- 1.1%; population spike amplitude: 20.3 +/- 1.7%). The action on field epsp slope was fully dependent on GABAergic transmission since it was absent in the presence of picrotoxin (50 microM) plus CGP55845 (1 microM). VIP (1 nM) did not change paired-pulse facilitation but increased paired-pulse inhibition in CA1 pyramidal cells (16.0 +/- 0.9%), reinforcing the involvement of GABAergic transmission in the action of VIP. VIP (1 nM) increased muscimol-evoked inhibitory currents by 36.4 +/- 8.7% in eight out of ten CA1 interneurones in the stratum radiatum. This suggests that VIP promotes increased inhibition of interneurones that control pyramidal cells, leading to disinhibition of synaptic transmission to pyramidal cell dendrites. In conclusion, concerted pre- and postsynaptic actions of VIP lead to disinhibition of pyramidal cell dendrites causing an enhancement of synaptic transmission.

  1. A single dose of the serotonin neurotransmission agonist paroxetine enhances motor output: double-blind, placebo-controlled, fMRI study in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Loubinoux, Isabelle; Pariente, Jérémie; Boulanouar, Kader; Carel, Christophe; Manelfe, Claude; Rascol, Olivier; Celsis, Pierre; Chollet, François

    2002-01-01

    Since serotonin (5-HT) stimulates motor function, pharmacological potentiation of 5-HT neurotransmission may improve motor function in healthy subjects and, possibly, recovery in post-stroke patients. Indeed, fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), increased activation in executive motor areas of healthy subjects as fenozolone, a releaser of monoamines (including noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin) from intracellular stores. This study is intended to test the hypothesis that paroxetine can likewise modulate brain motor activity in a dose-dependent manner in healthy subjects. In a double-blind counterbalanced study, six subjects underwent functional MRI examinations on three sessions 1 week apart (E1, E2, and E3) at the time of peak plasma concentrations (5 h after drug intake, i.e., either 20 or 60 mg of paroxetine or placebo) with a complex sequential opposition task. Rest and activation alternated in a block design. During activation, subjects performed, with the right hand, a 1-Hz-paced task that alternated two fist closings with a sequential opposition task. Paroxetine elicited effects similar to those reported for fluoxetine; notable changes were hyperactivation in the contralateral S1/M1, and posterior SMA and widespread hypoactivation of basal ganglia and cerebellum. There was an inverse correlation between dose and effect: significantly greater effects were observed with the 20-mg dose compared with 60 mg. Paroxetine dose-dependently modulates activation of the entire motor pathway in a way that favors motor output. Thus, a single dose of the SSRI paroxetine reorganized motor processing.

  2. Multispectral optical enhanced transmission of a continuous metal film coated with a plasmonic core-shell nanoparticle array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gui-qiang; Hu, Ying; Liu, Zheng-qi; Cai, Zheng-jie; Zhang, Xiang-nan; Chen, Yuan-hao; Huang, Kuan

    2014-04-01

    We propose and show multispectral optical enhanced transmission in the visible and near-infrared region in a continuous metal film coated with a two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal non-close-packed plasmonic array. The plasmonic array consists of metal/dielectric multilayer core-shell nanoparticles. The excitation of near-field plasmon resonance coupling between adjacent core-shell nanoparticles, plasmon resonance coupling between adjacent metal layers in the nanoparticle, and surface plasmon (SP) waves on the metal film are mainly responsible for the multispectral optical enhanced transmission behavior. The multispectral optical enhanced transmission response could be highly modified in the wavelength range, transparent bandwidth and transmission intensity by varying the geometry parameters including the gap distance between adjacent plasmonic nanoparticles, the size of metal core and the thickness of dielectric layer between the metal layers. In addition, the number of optical enhanced transmission bands increases with the number of metal layers in the plasmonic nanoparticle. The proposed structure shows many merits such as the deep sub-wavelength size, multispectral optical enhanced transmission bands as well as fully retained electric and mechanical properties of the natural metal. These merits may provide promising applications for highly integrated optoelectronic devices including plasmonic filters, nanoscale multiplexers, and nonlinear optics.

  3. Synapsins Differentially Control Dopamine and Serotonin Release

    PubMed Central

    Kile, Brian M.; Guillot, Thomas S.; Venton, B. Jill; Wetsel, William C.; Augustine, George J.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2010-01-01

    Synapsins are a family of synaptic vesicle proteins that are important for neurotransmitter release. Here we have used triple knockout (TKO) mice lacking all three synapsin genes to determine the roles of synapsins in the release of two monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine and serotonin. Serotonin release evoked by electrical stimulation was identical in substantia nigra pars reticulata slices prepared from TKO and wild-type mice. In contrast, release of dopamine in response to electrical stimulation was approximately doubled in striatum of TKO mice, both in vivo and in striatal slices, in comparison to wild-type controls. This was due to loss of synapsin III, because deletion of synapsin III alone was sufficient to increase dopamine release. Deletion of synapsins also increased the sensitivity of dopamine release to extracellular calcium ions. Although cocaine did not affect the release of serotonin from nigral tissue, this drug did enhance dopamine release. Cocaine-induced facilitation of dopamine release was a function of external calcium, an effect that was reduced in TKO mice. We conclude that synapsins play different roles in the control of release of dopamine and serotonin, with release of dopamine being negatively regulated by synapsins, specifically synapsin III, while serotonin release appears to be relatively independent of synapsins. These results provide further support for the concept that synapsin function in presynaptic terminals varies according to the neurotransmitter being released. PMID:20660258

  4. Synapsins differentially control dopamine and serotonin release.

    PubMed

    Kile, Brian M; Guillot, Thomas S; Venton, B Jill; Wetsel, William C; Augustine, George J; Wightman, R Mark

    2010-07-21

    Synapsins are a family of synaptic vesicle proteins that are important for neurotransmitter release. Here we have used triple knock-out (TKO) mice lacking all three synapsin genes to determine the roles of synapsins in the release of two monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine and serotonin. Serotonin release evoked by electrical stimulation was identical in substantia nigra pars reticulata slices prepared from TKO and wild-type mice. In contrast, release of dopamine in response to electrical stimulation was approximately doubled in striatum of TKO mice, both in vivo and in striatal slices, in comparison to wild-type controls. This was due to loss of synapsin III, because deletion of synapsin III alone was sufficient to increase dopamine release. Deletion of synapsins also increased the sensitivity of dopamine release to extracellular calcium ions. Although cocaine did not affect the release of serotonin from nigral tissue, this drug did enhance dopamine release. Cocaine-induced facilitation of dopamine release was a function of external calcium, an effect that was reduced in TKO mice. We conclude that synapsins play different roles in the control of release of dopamine and serotonin, with release of dopamine being negatively regulated by synapsins, specifically synapsin III, while serotonin release appears to be relatively independent of synapsins. These results provide further support for the concept that synapsin function in presynaptic terminals varies according to the neurotransmitter being released.

  5. Influenza A virus acquires enhanced pathogenicity and transmissibility after serial passages in swine.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kai; Sun, Honglei; Sun, Zhenhong; Sun, Yipeng; Kong, Weili; Pu, Juan; Ma, Guangpeng; Yin, Yanbo; Yang, Hanchun; Guo, Xin; Chang, Kin-Chow; Liu, Jinhua

    2014-10-01

    Genetic and phylogenetic analyses suggest that the pandemic H1N1/2009 virus was derived from well-established swine influenza lineages; however, there is no convincing evidence that the pandemic virus was generated from a direct precursor in pigs. Furthermore, the evolutionary dynamics of influenza virus in pigs have not been well documented. Here, we subjected a recombinant virus (rH1N1) with the same constellation makeup as the pandemic H1N1/2009 virus to nine serial passages in pigs. The severity of infection sequentially increased with each passage. Deep sequencing of viral quasispecies from the ninth passage found five consensus amino acid mutations: PB1 A469T, PA 1129T, NA N329D, NS1 N205K, and NEP T48N. Mutations in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein, however, differed greatly between the upper and lower respiratory tracts. Three representative viral clones with the five consensus mutations were selected for functional evaluation. Relative to the parental virus, the three viral clones showed enhanced replication and polymerase activity in vitro and enhanced replication, pathogenicity, and transmissibility in pigs, guinea pigs, and ferrets in vivo. Specifically, two mutants of rH1N1 (PB1 A469T and a combination of NS1 N205K and NEP T48N) were identified as determinants of transmissibility in guinea pigs. Crucially, one mutant viral clone with the five consensus mutations, which also carried D187E, K211E, and S289N mutations in its HA, additionally was able to infect ferrets by airborne transmission as effectively as the pandemic virus. Our findings demonstrate that influenza virus can acquire viral characteristics that are similar to those of the pandemic virus after limited serial passages in pigs. Importance: We demonstrate here that an engineered reassortant swine influenza virus, with the same gene constellation pattern as the pandemic H1N1/2009 virus and subjected to only nine serial passages in pigs, acquired greatly enhanced virulence and transmissibility

  6. Transmission enhancement of THz pulse through Ag2O-Ag layer detected by THz-TDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua; Li, Wang

    2008-12-01

    We used terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) to probe the enhancement transmission of Ag2O-Ag compound. Using a 500μm- GaAs substrate attaching to the sample, the evanescent wave is coupled to the far field. And the transmitted amplitude is enhanced, corresponding to the frequent shift and spectra broadening.

  7. Presynaptic α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Enhance Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Glutamatergic Transmission via PKA Activation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are expressed widely in the CNS, and mediate both synaptic and perisynaptic activities of endogenous cholinergic inputs and pharmacological actions of exogenous compounds (e.g., nicotine and choline). Behavioral studies indicate that nicotine improves such cognitive functions as learning and memory. However, the mechanism of nicotine's action on cognitive function remains elusive. We performed patch-clamp recordings from hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons to determine the effect of nicotine on mossy fiber glutamatergic synaptic transmission. We found that nicotine in combination with NS1738, an α7 nAChR-positive allosteric modulator, strongly potentiated the amplitude of evoked EPSCs (eEPSCs), and reduced the EPSC paired-pulse ratio. The action of nicotine and NS1738 was mimicked by PNU-282987 (an α7 nAChR agonist), and was absent in α7 nAChR knock-out mice. These data indicate that activation of α7 nAChRs was both necessary and sufficient to enhance the amplitude of eEPSCs. BAPTA applied postsynaptically failed to block the action of nicotine and NS1738, suggesting again a presynaptic action of the α7 nAChRs. We also observed α7 nAChR-mediated calcium rises at mossy fiber giant terminals, indicating the presence of functional α7 nAChRs at presynaptic terminals. Furthermore, the addition of PNU-282987 enhanced action potential-dependent calcium transient at these terminals. Last, the potentiating effect of PNU-282987 on eEPSCs was abolished by inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA). Our findings indicate that activation of α7 nAChRs at presynaptic sites, via a mechanism involving PKA, plays a critical role in enhancing synaptic efficiency of hippocampal mossy fiber transmission. PMID:24381273

  8. Extracts and constituents of Leontopodium alpinum enhance cholinergic transmission: Brain ACh increasing and memory improving properties

    PubMed Central

    Hornick, Ariane; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M.; Vo, Nguyen Phung; Prast, Helmut; Stuppner, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    Leontopodium alpinum (‘Edelweiss’) was phytochemically investigated for constituents that might enhance cholinergic neurotransmission. The potency to increase synaptic availability of acetylcholine (ACh) in rat brain served as key property for the bioguided isolation of cholinergically active compounds using different chromatographic techniques. The dichlormethane (DCM) extract of the root, fractions and isolated constituents were injected i.c.v. and the effect on brain ACh was detected via the push–pull technique. The DCM extract enhanced extracellular ACh concentration in rat brain and inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in vitro. The extracellular level of brain ACh was significantly increased by the isolated sesquiterpenes, isocomene and 14-acetoxyisocomene, while silphiperfolene acetate and silphinene caused a small increasing tendency. Only silphiperfolene acetate showed in vitro AChE inhibitory activity, thus suggesting the other sesquiterpenes to stimulate cholinergic transmission by an alternative mechanism of action. Isocomene was further investigated with behavioural tasks in mice. It restored object recognition in scopolamine-impaired mice and showed nootropic effects in the T-maze alternation task in normal and scopolamine-treated mice. Additionally, this sesquiterpene reduced locomotor activity of untreated mice in the open field task, while the activity induced by scopolamine was abolished. The enhancement of synaptic availability of ACh, the promotion of alternation, and the amelioration of scopolamine-induced deficit are in accordance with a substance that amplifies cholinergic transmission. Whether the mechanism of action is inhibition of AChE or another pro-cholinergic property remains to be elucidated. Taken together, isocomene and related constituents of L. alpinum deserve further interest as potential antidementia agents in brain diseases associated with cholinergic deficits. PMID:18541221

  9. SEROTONIN BINDING TO PREPARATIONS FROM RAT BRAIN,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    BRAIN , SEROTONIN, SEROTONIN, OXIDOREDUCTASES, LYSERGIC ACIDS, RESERPINE, CHLORPROMAZINE, ACETYLCHOLINE, FATTY ACIDS, NOREPINEPHRINE, LEARNING, PERMEABILITY, MITOCHONDRIA, MORPHOLOGY(BIOLOGY), DRUGS, PHYSIOLOGY.

  10. Oxytocin enhances hippocampal spike transmission by modulating fast-spiking interneurons.

    PubMed

    Owen, Scott F; Tuncdemir, Sebnem N; Bader, Patrick L; Tirko, Natasha N; Fishell, Gord; Tsien, Richard W

    2013-08-22

    Neuromodulatory control by oxytocin is essential to a wide range of social, parental and stress-related behaviours. Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are associated with deficiencies in oxytocin levels and with genetic alterations of the oxytocin receptor (OXTR). Thirty years ago, Mühlethaler et al. found that oxytocin increases the firing of inhibitory hippocampal neurons, but it remains unclear how elevated inhibition could account for the ability of oxytocin to improve information processing in the brain. Here we describe in mammalian hippocampus a simple yet powerful mechanism by which oxytocin enhances cortical information transfer while simultaneously lowering background activity, thus greatly improving the signal-to-noise ratio. Increased fast-spiking interneuron activity not only suppresses spontaneous pyramidal cell firing, but also enhances the fidelity of spike transmission and sharpens spike timing. Use-dependent depression at the fast-spiking interneuron-pyramidal cell synapse is both necessary and sufficient for the enhanced spike throughput. We show the generality of this novel circuit mechanism by activation of fast-spiking interneurons with cholecystokinin or channelrhodopsin-2. This provides insight into how a diffusely delivered neuromodulator can improve the performance of neural circuitry that requires synapse specificity and millisecond precision.

  11. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs)

    MedlinePlus

    ... dangerous reactions when combined with certain medications or herbal supplements. Serotonin syndrome. Rarely, an antidepressant can cause high ... antidepressants, certain pain or headache medications, and the herbal supplement St. John's wort. Signs and symptoms of serotonin ...

  12. Enhanced assymetrical noradrenergic transmission in the olfactory bulb of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Abramoff, Tamara; Guil, María J; Morales, Vanina P; Hope, Sandra I; Soria, Celeste; Bianciotti, Liliana G; Vatta, Marcelo S

    2013-10-01

    The ablation of olfactory bulb induces critical changes in dopamine, and monoamine oxidase activity in the brain stem. Growing evidence supports the participation of this telencephalic region in the regulation blood pressure and cardiovascular activity but little is known about its contribution to hypertension. We have previously reported that in the olfactory bulb of normotensive rats endothelins enhance noradrenergic activity by increasing tyrosine hydroxylase activity and norepinephrine release. In the present study we sought to establish the status of noradrenergic activity in the olfactory bulb of deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt hypertensive rats. Different steps in norepinephrine transmission including tyrosine hydroxylase activity, neuronal norepinephrine release and uptake were assessed in the left and right olfactory bulb of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. Increased tyrosine hydroxylase activity, and decreased neuronal norepinephrine uptake were observed in the olfactory bulb of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. Furthermore the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase and its phosphorylated forms were also augmented. Intriguingly, asymmetrical responses between the right and left olfactory bulb of normotensive and hypertensive rats were observed. Neuronal norepinephrine release was increased in the right but not in the left olfactory bulb of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats, whereas non asymmetrical differences were observed in normotensive animals. Present findings indicate that the olfactory bulb of hypertensive rats show an asymmetrical increase in norepinephrine activity. The observed changes in noradrenergic transmission may likely contribute to the onset and/or progression of hypertension in this animal model.

  13. Host manipulation by parasites in the world of dead-end predators: adaptation to enhance transmission?

    PubMed Central

    Seppälä, Otto; Valtonen, E. Tellervo; Benesh, Daniel P

    2008-01-01

    Trophically transmitted parasites often alter their intermediate host's phenotype, thereby predisposing the hosts to increased predation. This is generally considered a parasite strategy evolved to enhance transmission to the next hosts. However, the adaptive value of host manipulation is not clear as it may be associated with costs, such as increased susceptibility to predators that are unsuitable next hosts for the parasites. We examined the ratio between the benefits and costs of host manipulation for transmission success of Acanthocephalus lucii (Acanthocephala), a parasite that alters the hiding behaviour and pigmentation of its isopod hosts. We experimentally compared the susceptibility of infected and uninfected isopods to predation by perch (Perca fluvialis; definitive host of the parasite) and dragonfly larvae (dead end). We found that the parasite predisposed the isopods to predation by both predators. However, the increased predation vulnerability of the infected isopods was higher towards perch. This suggests that, despite the costs due to non-host predation, host manipulation may still be advantageous for the parasite. PMID:18430644

  14. Enhanced transmission of drug-resistant parasites to mosquitoes following drug treatment in rodent malaria.

    PubMed

    Bell, Andrew S; Huijben, Silvie; Paaijmans, Krijn P; Sim, Derek G; Chan, Brian H K; Nelson, William A; Read, Andrew F

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of drug resistant Plasmodium parasites is a major challenge to effective malaria control. In theory, competitive interactions between sensitive parasites and resistant parasites within infections are a major determinant of the rate at which parasite evolution undermines drug efficacy. Competitive suppression of resistant parasites in untreated hosts slows the spread of resistance; competitive release following treatment enhances it. Here we report that for the murine model Plasmodium chabaudi, co-infection with drug-sensitive parasites can prevent the transmission of initially rare resistant parasites to mosquitoes. Removal of drug-sensitive parasites following chemotherapy enabled resistant parasites to transmit to mosquitoes as successfully as sensitive parasites in the absence of treatment. We also show that the genetic composition of gametocyte populations in host venous blood accurately reflects the genetic composition of gametocytes taken up by mosquitoes. Our data demonstrate that, at least for this mouse model, aggressive chemotherapy leads to very effective transmission of highly resistant parasites that are present in an infection, the very parasites which undermine the long term efficacy of front-line drugs.

  15. Toluene decreases Purkinje cell output by enhancing inhibitory synaptic transmission in the cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Gmaz, Jimmie M; McKay, Bruce E

    2014-02-07

    Toluene belongs to a class of psychoactive drugs known as inhalants. Found in common household products such as adhesives, paint products, and aerosols, toluene is inhaled for its intoxicating and euphoric properties. Additionally, exposure to toluene disrupts motor behaviors in a manner consistent with impairments to cerebellar function. Previous work has suggested a role of GABA in mediating toluene's neurobehavioral effects, but how this manifests in the cerebellar cortex is not yet understood. In the present study, we examined the effects of toluene on cerebellar Purkinje cell action potential output and inhibitory synaptic transmission onto Purkinje cells using patch clamp electrophysiology in acute rat cerebellar slices. Toluene (1mM) reduced the frequency of Purkinje cell action potential output without affecting input resistance. Furthermore, toluene dose-dependently enhanced inhibitory synaptic transmission onto Purkinje cells, increasing the amplitude and frequency of inhibitory postsynaptic currents; no change in the frequency of action potentials from molecular layer interneurons was noted. The observed decreases in Purkinje cell action potential output could contribute to toluene-evoked impairments in cerebellar and motor functions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Enhanced biofilm formation and multi-host transmission evolve from divergent genetic backgrounds in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Ben; Méric, Guillaume; Murray, Susan; Yahara, Koji; Mageiros, Leonardos; Bowen, Ryan; Jones, Nathan H; Jeeves, Rose E; Lappin-Scott, Hilary M; Asakura, Hiroshi; Sheppard, Samuel K

    2015-11-01

    Multicellular biofilms are an ancient bacterial adaptation that offers a protective environment for survival in hostile habitats. In microaerophilic organisms such as Campylobacter, biofilms play a key role in transmission to humans as the bacteria are exposed to atmospheric oxygen concentrations when leaving the reservoir host gut. Genetic determinants of biofilm formation differ between species, but little is known about how strains of the same species achieve the biofilm phenotype with different genetic backgrounds. Our approach combines genome-wide association studies with traditional microbiology techniques to investigate the genetic basis of biofilm formation in 102 Campylobacter jejuni isolates. We quantified biofilm formation among the isolates and identified hotspots of genetic variation in homologous sequences that correspond to variation in biofilm phenotypes. Thirteen genes demonstrated a statistically robust association including those involved in adhesion, motility, glycosylation, capsule production and oxidative stress. The genes associated with biofilm formation were different in the host generalist ST-21 and ST-45 clonal complexes, which are frequently isolated from multiple host species and clinical samples. This suggests the evolution of enhanced biofilm from different genetic backgrounds and a possible role in colonization of multiple hosts and transmission to humans.

  17. Subwavelength acoustic focusing by surface-wave-resonance enhanced transmission in doubly negative acoustic metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Badreddine Assouar, M. Oudich, Mourad

    2014-11-21

    We present analytical and numerical analyses of a yet unseen lensing paradigm that is based on a solid metamaterial slab in which the wave excitation source is attached. We propose and demonstrate sub-diffraction-limited acoustic focusing induced by surface resonant states in doubly negative metamaterials. The enhancement of evanescent waves across the metamaterial slab produced by their resonant coupling to surface waves is evidenced and quantitatively determined. The effect of metamaterial parameters on surface states, transmission, and wavenumber bandwidth is clearly identified. Based on this concept consisting of a wave source attached on the metamaterial, a high resolution of λ/28.4 is obtained with the optimum effective physical parameters, opening then an exciting way to design acoustic metamaterials for ultrasonic focused imaging.

  18. Taurine-Induced Long-Lasting Enhancement of Synaptic Transmission in Mice: Role of Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Sergeeva, O A; Chepkova, A N; Doreulee, N; Eriksson, K S; Poelchen, W; Mönnighoff, I; Heller-Stilb, B; Warskulat, U; Häussinger, D; Haas, H L

    2003-01-01

    Taurine, a major osmolyte in the brain evokes a long-lasting enhancement (LLETAU) of synaptic transmission in hippocampal and cortico-striatal slices. Hippocampal LLETAU was abolished by the GABA uptake blocker nipecotic acid (NPA) but not by the taurine-uptake inhibitor guanidinoethyl sulphonate (GES). Striatal LLETAU was sensitive to GES but not to NPA. Semiquantitative PCR analysis and immunohistochemistry revealed that taurine transporter expression is significantly higher in the striatum than in the hippocampus. Taurine transporter-deficient mice displayed very low taurine levels in both structures and a low ability to develop LLETAU in the striatum, but not in the hippocampus. The different mechanisms of taurine-induced synaptic plasticity may reflect the different vulnerabilities of these brain regions under pathological conditions that are accompanied by osmotic changes such as hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:12824447

  19. Optical nonlinearities and enhanced light transmission in soft-matter systems with tunable polarizabilities.

    PubMed

    Man, Weining; Fardad, Shima; Zhang, Ze; Prakash, Jai; Lau, Michael; Zhang, Peng; Heinrich, Matthias; Christodoulides, Demetrios N; Chen, Zhigang

    2013-11-22

    We demonstrate a new class of synthetic colloidal suspensions capable of exhibiting negative polarizabilities, and observe for the first time robust propagation and enhanced transmission of self-trapped light over long distances that would have been otherwise impossible in conventional suspensions with positive polarizabilities. Such light penetration through the strong scattering environment is attributed to the interplay between optical forces and self-activated transparency effects while no thermal effect is involved. By judiciously mixing colloidal particles of both negative and positive polarizabilities, we show that the resulting nonlinear response of these systems can be fine-tuned. Our experimental observations are in agreement with theoretical analysis based on a thermodynamic model that takes into account particle-particle interactions. These results may open up new opportunities in developing soft-matter systems with engineered optical nonlinearities.

  20. Presynaptic CRF1 Receptors Mediate the Ethanol Enhancement of GABAergic Transmission in the Mouse Central Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Zhiguo; Zorrilla, Eric P.; Madamba, Samuel G.; Rice, Kenner C.; Roberto, Marisa; Siggins, George Robert

    2011-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is a 41-amino-acid neuropeptide involved in stress responses initiated from several brain areas, including the amygdala formation. Research shows a strong relationship between stress, brain CRF, and excessive alcohol consumption. Behavioral studies suggest that the central amygdala (CeA) is significantly involved in alcohol reward and dependence. We recently reported that the ethanol augmentation of GABAergic synaptic transmission in rat CeA involves CRF1 receptors, because both CRF and ethanol significantly enhanced the amplitude of evoked GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in CeA neurons from wild-type (WT) and CRF2 knockout (KO) mice, but not in neurons of CRF1 KO mice. The present study extends these findings using selective CRF receptor ligands, gene KO models, and miniature IPSC (mIPSC) analysis to assess further a presynaptic role for the CRF receptors in mediating ethanol effects in the CeA. In whole-cell patch recordings of pharmacologically isolated GABAAergic IPSCs from slices of mouse CeA, both CRF and ethanol augmented evoked IPSCs in a concentration-dependent manner, with low EC50s. A CRF1 (but not CRF2) KO construct and the CRF1-selective nonpeptide antagonist NIH-3 (LWH-63) blocked the augmenting effect of both CRF and ethanol on evoked IPSCs. Furthermore, the new selective CRF1 agonist stressin1, but not the CRF2 agonist urocortin 3, also increased evoked IPSC amplitudes. Both CRF and ethanol decreased paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) of evoked IPSCs and significantly enhanced the frequency, but not the amplitude, of spontaneous miniature GABAergic mIPSCs in CeA neurons of WT mice, suggesting a presynaptic site of action. The PPF effect of ethanol was abolished in CeA neurons of CRF1 KO mice. The CRF1 antagonist NIH-3 blocked the CRF- and ethanol-induced enhancement of mIPSC frequency in CeA neurons. These data indicate that presynaptic CRF1 receptors play a critical role in permitting or

  1. 5-HT3 receptors antagonists reduce serotonin-induced scratching in mice.

    PubMed

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Kordjazy, Nastaran; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Mansouri, Parvin; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2015-06-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) acts as a pruritogen in humans and animals, but the mechanisms of action through that serotonin induces itch response have not been extensively discovered. In our study, we attempted to investigate the role of 5-HT3 receptors in scratching behavior due to intradermal serotonin injection. Intradermal injection of serotonin (14.1-235 nmol/site) into the nape of the neck of mice was performed to elicit itch. Scratching behavior was evaluated by measuring the number of bouts during 60 min after injection. We evaluated the effect of intraperitoneal pretreatment with ondansetron and tropisetron (0.1, 0.3, and 1 mg/kg) on itch induced by serotonin. Also, intradermal ondansetron and tropisetron at doses 50, 100, and 200 nmol/site were concurrently administrated with serotonin. Serotonin produced a significant enhancement in scratching at dose 141 nmol/site. Concurrent administration of ondansetron (50, 100, and 200 nmol/site) and tropisetron (100 and 200 nmol/site) with serotonin reduced scratching activity compared to the animals that only received serotonin. Also, pretreatment with intraperitoneal ondansetron and tropisetron (0.3 and 1 mg/kg) 30 min before serotonin attenuated the itch response. We showed that the scratching induced by intradermal serotonin is mediated by 5-HT3 receptors subtype. It can be concluded that 5-HT3 may play a role in mediating serotonin-associated itch responses, and we introduce 5-HT3 receptors as possible targets for antipruritic agents.

  2. The serotonin transporter: Examination of the changes in transporter affinity induced by ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    The plasmalemmal serotonin transporter uses transmembrane gradients of Na{sup +}, Cl{sup {minus}} and K{sup +} to accumulate serotonin within blood platelets. Transport is competitively inhibited by the antidepressant imipramine. Like serotonin transport, imipramine binding requires Na{sup +}. Unlike serotonin, however, imipramine does not appear to be transported. To gain insight into the mechanism of serotonin transport the author have analyzed the influences of Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}}, the two ions cotransported with serotonin, on both serotonin transport and the interaction of imipramine and other antidepressant drugs with the plasmalemmal serotonin transporter of human platelets. Additionally, the author have synthesized, purified and characterized the binding of 2-iodoimipramine to the serotonin transporter. Finally, the author have conducted a preliminary study of the inhibition of serotonin transport and imipramine binding produced by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. My results reveal many instances of positive heterotropic cooperativity in ligand binding to the serotonin transporter. Na{sup +} binding enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine and several other antidepressant drugs, and also increases the affinity for Cl{sup {minus}}. Cl{sup {minus}} enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine, as well as for Na{sup +}. At concentrations in the range of its K{sub M} for transport serotonin is a competitive inhibitor of imipramine binding. At much higher concentrations, however, serotonin also inhibits imipramines dissociation rate constant. This latter effect which is Na{sup +}-independent and species specific, is apparently produced by serotonin binding at a second, low affinity site on, or near, the transporter complex. Iodoimipramine competitively inhibit both ({sup 3}H)imipramine binding and ({sup 3}H)serotonin transport.

  3. Serotonin levels in the dorsal raphe nuclei of both chipmunks and mice are enhanced by long photoperiod, but brain dopamine level response to photoperiod is species-specific.

    PubMed

    Goda, Ryosei; Otsuka, Tsuyoshi; Iwamoto, Ayaka; Kawai, Misato; Shibata, Satomi; Furuse, Mitsuhiro; Yasuo, Shinobu

    2015-04-23

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a subtype of major depressive or bipolar disorders associated with the shortened photoperiod in winter. This depressive disorder is integrally tied to the seasonal regulation of the brain's serotonergic system. Recently, we found that C57BL/6J mice subjected to a forced-swim test exhibited immobility, a photoperiod-dependent depression-associated behavior, and suppression of brain serotonin levels. However, mice are nocturnal animals, and it is unclear whether the brain serotonergic system responds similarly to photoperiod in nocturnal and diurnal species. This study compared the responses of brain serotonergic and dopaminergic systems to photoperiod in diurnal chipmunks and nocturnal C57BL/6J mice. In both species, serotonin levels in the dorsal raphe nuclei were higher under long-day conditions than short-day conditions, suggesting a similarity in the photoperiod responses of the serotonergic systems. However, photoperiod affected dopamine levels in various brain regions differently in the two species. Some chipmunk brain regions exhibited stronger photoperiod-induced changes in dopamine levels than those of C57BL/6J mice, and the direction of the changes in the hypothalamus was opposite. In conclusion, photoperiod may regulate the brain serotonergic system through similar mechanisms, regardless of whether the animals are diurnal or nocturnal, but photoperiod-dependent regulation of brain dopamine is species-specific.

  4. Serotonin syndrome: fentanyl and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor interactions.

    PubMed

    Greenier, Ewa; Lukyanova, Valentina; Reede, Lynn

    2014-10-01

    Serotonin syndrome is a rare but potentially fatal adverse drug reaction associated with increased serotonergic activity in the central nervous system. It is characterized by a triad of symptoms, which include altered mental status, neuromuscular hyperactivity, and autonomic instability or hyperactivity. Due to the potential of rapid onset, it is important for clinicians to recognize the signs and symptoms of serotonin syndrome. Serotonin syndrome symptoms may resemble other conditions. Although this article focuses on serotonin syndrome as a result of an adverse interaction of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and fentanyl, it is important for not only anesthesia professionals, but all clinicians--such as those in emergency medicine and critical care--to be aware of this syndrome and its management. This article discusses the clinical manifestations of the serotonin syndrome and highlights reported cases of serotonin syndrome specifically related to an interaction between SSRIs and fentanyl, a commonly used opioid in anesthesia practice.

  5. Serotonin and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Serena-Lynn; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Decreased serotonin function has consistently been shown to be highly correlated with impulsive aggression across a number of different experimental paradigms. Such lowered serotonergic indices appear to correlate with the dimension of aggression dyscontrol and/or impulsivity rather than with psychiatric diagnostic categories per se. Implications…

  6. Calmodulin enhances ribbon replenishment and shapes filtering of synaptic transmission by cone photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Parmelee, Caitlyn M.; Chen, Minghui; Cork, Karlene M.; Curto, Carina; Thoreson, Wallace B.

    2014-01-01

    At the first synapse in the vertebrate visual pathway, light-evoked changes in photoreceptor membrane potential alter the rate of glutamate release onto second-order retinal neurons. This process depends on the synaptic ribbon, a specialized structure found at various sensory synapses, to provide a supply of primed vesicles for release. Calcium (Ca2+) accelerates the replenishment of vesicles at cone ribbon synapses, but the mechanisms underlying this acceleration and its functional implications for vision are unknown. We studied vesicle replenishment using paired whole-cell recordings of cones and postsynaptic neurons in tiger salamander retinas and found that it involves two kinetic mechanisms, the faster of which was diminished by calmodulin (CaM) inhibitors. We developed an analytical model that can be applied to both conventional and ribbon synapses and showed that vesicle resupply is limited by a simple time constant, τ = 1/(Dρδs), where D is the vesicle diffusion coefficient, δ is the vesicle diameter, ρ is the vesicle density, and s is the probability of vesicle attachment. The combination of electrophysiological measurements, modeling, and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of single synaptic vesicles suggested that CaM speeds replenishment by enhancing vesicle attachment to the ribbon. Using electroretinogram and whole-cell recordings of light responses, we found that enhanced replenishment improves the ability of cone synapses to signal darkness after brief flashes of light and enhances the amplitude of responses to higher-frequency stimuli. By accelerating the resupply of vesicles to the ribbon, CaM extends the temporal range of synaptic transmission, allowing cones to transmit higher-frequency visual information to downstream neurons. Thus, the ability of the visual system to encode time-varying stimuli is shaped by the dynamics of vesicle replenishment at photoreceptor synaptic ribbons. PMID:25311636

  7. Calmodulin enhances ribbon replenishment and shapes filtering of synaptic transmission by cone photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Van Hook, Matthew J; Parmelee, Caitlyn M; Chen, Minghui; Cork, Karlene M; Curto, Carina; Thoreson, Wallace B

    2014-11-01

    At the first synapse in the vertebrate visual pathway, light-evoked changes in photoreceptor membrane potential alter the rate of glutamate release onto second-order retinal neurons. This process depends on the synaptic ribbon, a specialized structure found at various sensory synapses, to provide a supply of primed vesicles for release. Calcium (Ca(2+)) accelerates the replenishment of vesicles at cone ribbon synapses, but the mechanisms underlying this acceleration and its functional implications for vision are unknown. We studied vesicle replenishment using paired whole-cell recordings of cones and postsynaptic neurons in tiger salamander retinas and found that it involves two kinetic mechanisms, the faster of which was diminished by calmodulin (CaM) inhibitors. We developed an analytical model that can be applied to both conventional and ribbon synapses and showed that vesicle resupply is limited by a simple time constant, τ = 1/(Dρδs), where D is the vesicle diffusion coefficient, δ is the vesicle diameter, ρ is the vesicle density, and s is the probability of vesicle attachment. The combination of electrophysiological measurements, modeling, and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of single synaptic vesicles suggested that CaM speeds replenishment by enhancing vesicle attachment to the ribbon. Using electroretinogram and whole-cell recordings of light responses, we found that enhanced replenishment improves the ability of cone synapses to signal darkness after brief flashes of light and enhances the amplitude of responses to higher-frequency stimuli. By accelerating the resupply of vesicles to the ribbon, CaM extends the temporal range of synaptic transmission, allowing cones to transmit higher-frequency visual information to downstream neurons. Thus, the ability of the visual system to encode time-varying stimuli is shaped by the dynamics of vesicle replenishment at photoreceptor synaptic ribbons.

  8. Platelet serotonin modulates immune functions.

    PubMed

    Mauler, M; Bode, C; Duerschmied, D

    2016-01-01

    This short review addresses immune functions of platelet serotonin. Platelets transport serotonin at a high concentration in dense granules and release it upon activation. Besides haemostatic, vasotonic and developmental modulation, serotonin also influences a variety of immune functions (mediated by different serotonin receptors). First, platelet serotonergic effects are directed against invading pathogens via activation and proliferation of lymphocytes, modulation of cytokine release, and recruitment of neutrophils to sites of acute inflammation by induction of selectin expression on endothelial cells. Second, serotonin levels are elevated in autoimmune diseases, such as asthma or rheumatoid arthritis, and during tissue regeneration after ischemia of myocardium or brain. Specific antagonism of serotonin receptors appears to improve survival after myocardial infarction or sepsis and to attenuate asthmatic attacks in animal models. It will be of great clinical relevance if these findings can be translated into human applications. In conclusion, targeting immune modulatory effects of platelet serotonin may provide novel therapeutic options for common health problems.

  9. Serotonin receptors involved in antidepressant effects.

    PubMed

    Artigas, Francesc

    2013-01-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hdroxytryptamine; 5-HT) has been implicated in the pathophysiology and treatment of major depression since the serendipitous discovery of antidepressant drugs in the 1950s. However, despite the generalised use of serotonin-enhancing drugs, such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and the dual serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), the exact neurobiological mechanisms involved in the therapeutic action of these drugs are poorly understood. Better knowledge of these mechanisms may help to identify new therapeutic targets and to overcome the two main limitations of current treatments: reduced efficacy and slowness of action. Here I review the preclinical and clinical evidence supporting the involvement of different 5-HT receptors in the therapeutic action of antidepressant drugs. Presynaptic 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(1B) autoreceptors play a major detrimental role in antidepressant treatments, as their activation by the excess of the active (extracellular) 5-HT fraction produced by serotonin transporter (SERT) blockade reduces presynaptic serotonergic function. Conversely, stimulation of postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors in corticolimbic networks appears beneficial for the antidepressant action. The 5-HT(2) receptor family is also involved as 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor blockade improves the antidepressant action of SSRIs, and recent data suggest that 5-HT(2B) receptor activation enhances serotonergic activity. Less is known from the rest of postsynaptic 5-HT receptors. However, 5-HT(3) receptor blockade augments the 5-HT increase evoked by SERT inhibition, and 5-HT(4) receptor activation may have antidepressant effects on its own. Finally, blockade of 5-HT(6) and 5-HT(7) receptors appears also to augment the antidepressant effects of SERT inhibition.

  10. [Tyramine and serotonin syndromes. Pharmacological, medical and legal remarks].

    PubMed

    Toro-Martínez, Esteban

    2005-01-01

    The tyramine syndrome and the serotonin syndrome are a complex of signs and symptoms that are thought to be largely attributable to drug - drug interactions or drug - food interactions that enhances norepinephrine o serotonin activity. This article reviews: pharmacological basis of those syndromes; clinical features; forbidden foods, drug-drug interactions, and treatment options. Finally a set of legal recommendations are proposed to avoid liability litigations.

  11. Serotonin and pituitary-adrenal function. [in rat under stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, P. A.; Barchas, J. D.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation is conducted to evaluate the response of the pituitary-adrenal system to a stress stimulus in the rat. In the investigation brain serotonin synthesis was inhibited with p-chlorophenylalanine. In other tests the concentration of serotonin was enhanced with precursors such as tryptophan or 5-hydroxytryptophan. On the basis of the results obtained in the study it is speculated that in some disease states there is a defect in serotonergic neuronal processes which impairs pituitary-adrenal feedback mechanisms.

  12. Enhanced efficiency of female-to-male HIV transmission in core groups in developing countries: the need to target men.

    PubMed

    O'Farrell, N

    2001-02-01

    The spread of heterosexual HIV in developing countries is heterogeneous. Factors that explain the wide diversity of HIV prevalences in different countries are undetermined. International aid organizations currently appear to be focusing activities mainly on women rather than on men. To identify critical determinants contributing to the high rates of heterosexual HIV transmission in developing countries through a review of studies investigating HIV per-act transmission rates, and to discuss how these factors might be prioritized through HIV-prevention interventions. Studies investigating the per-act HIV transmission rate were identified through a MEDLINE search and a review of the abstracts of the Annual International AIDS Conferences. When the summary mean per-act HIV transmission rates were calculated, the ratio of female-to-male HIV transmission in developing countries compared with that in the developed world was 341, whereas that for male-to-female transmission was 2.9. Enhanced female-to-male HIV transmission in male core groups is a critical determinant of high-prevalence HIV epidemics among heterosexuals in developing countries. In addition to condom promotion, there is a need for an increased emphasis on HIV-prevention activities in men to decrease their susceptibility in developing countries, particularly in the countries most affected by the epidemic.

  13. [The role of serotonin in behavior modulation].

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, H G; Grozdanovic, Z

    1995-06-01

    The central projection systems represent an expansive and important component of the brainstem reticular core which provide modulatory input into multiple target networks throughout the entire vertebrate neuraxis. Most of the afferent input into the cranial raphe originates within sensory uni- and polymodal, associative and limbic cortices suggesting that serotonin modulates preprocessed information. The serotonergic neurons discharge in a remarkably stable and tonic fashion during wakefulness. Some 5-HT neurons increase their discharge rate phasically in association with the activation of central rhythmic pattern generators involved in consummatory and grooming behaviour. In concert with enhancing motor functions, the serotonergic systems discretely deamplify sensory attentiveness and pain processing, thereby establishing an essential and protective filter mechanism against distracting and irritating noise effects of sensory afferent input level. In addition, serotonin restrains the latency to responding, i.e. impulsivity. These effects of serotonin are mediated by multiple receptor subtypes with distinct pre- and postsynaptic localisation and regional distribution pattern, acting via amplifying (5-HT2 receptors) or desamplifying (5-HT1 receptors) G-protein-dependent transduction mechanisms. The breakdown of these protective and adaptive functions of 5-HT in complex behaviour and in basic aspects of sensorimotor integration may have a pathogenetic role in disorders of impulse control (e.g. bulimia nervosa and OCD) which have been found to respond to high-dose, long-term treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

  14. Graphene-assisted resonant transmission and enhanced Goos-Hänchen shift in a frustrated total internal reflection configuration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Ban, Yue; Zhu, Qi-Biao; Chen, Xi

    2016-10-01

    Graphene-assisted resonant transmission and enhanced Goos-Hänchen shift are investigated in a two-prism frustrated total internal reflection configuration. Due to the excitation of surface plasmons induced by graphene in a low terahertz frequency range, there exist the resonant transmission and anomalous Goos-Hänchen shifts in such an optical tunneling configuration. As compared to the case of the quantum well, a graphene sheet with unique optical properties can enhance the resonant transmission with a relatively low loss and modulate the large negative and positive Goos-Hänchen shifts by adjusting the chemical potential or electron relaxation time. These intriguing phenomena may lead to some potential applications in graphene-based electro-optic devices.

  15. Association between salivary serotonin and the social sharing of happiness.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Ishii, Keiko; Ohtsubo, Yohsuke; Noguchi, Yasuki; Ochi, Misaki; Yamasue, Hidenori

    2017-01-01

    Although human saliva contains the monoamine serotonin, which plays a key role in the modulation of emotional states, the association between salivary serotonin and empathic ability remains unclear. In order to elucidate the associations between salivary serotonin levels, trait empathy, and the sharing effect of emotions (i.e., sharing emotional experiences with others), we performed a vignette-based study. Participants were asked to evaluate their happiness when they experience several hypothetical life events, whereby we manipulated the valence of the imagined event (positive, neutral, or negative), as well as the presence of a friend (absent, positive, or negative). Results indicated that the presence of a happy friend significantly enhanced participants' happiness. Correlation analysis demonstrated that salivary serotonin levels were negatively correlated with happiness when both the self and friend conditions were positive. Correlation analysis also indicated a negative relationship between salivary serotonin levels and trait empathy (particularly in perspective taking), which was measured by the Interpersonal Reactivity Index. Furthermore, an exploratory multiple regression analysis suggested that mothers' attention during childhood predicted salivary serotonin levels. Our findings indicate that empathic abilities and the social sharing of happiness decreases as a function of salivary serotonin levels.

  16. UV epoxy bonding for enhanced SAW transmission and microscale acoustofluidic integration.

    PubMed

    Langelier, Sean M; Yeo, Leslie Y; Friend, James

    2012-08-21

    Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are appealing as a means to manipulate fluids within lab-on-a-chip systems. However, current acoustofluidic devices almost universally rely on elastomeric materials, especially PDMS, that are inherently ill-suited for conveyance of elastic energy due to their strong attenuation properties. Here, we explore the use of a low-viscosity UV epoxy resin for room temperature bonding of lithium niobate (LiNbO(3)), the most widely used anisotropic piezoelectric substrate used in the generation of SAWs, to standard micromachined superstrates such as Pyrex® and silicon. The bonding methodology is straightforward and allows for reliable production of sub-micron bonds that are capable of enduring the high surface strains and accelerations needed for conveyance of SAWs. Devices prepared with this approach display as much as two orders of magnitude, or 20 dB, improvement in SAW transmission compared to those fabricated using the standard PDMS elastomer. This enhancement enables a broad range of applications in acoustofluidics that are consistent with the low power requirements of portable battery-driven circuits and the development of genuinely portable lab-on-a-chip devices. The method is exemplified in the fabrication of a closed-loop bidirectional SAW pumping concept with applications in micro-scale flow control, and represents the first demonstration of closed channel SAW pumping in a bonded glass/LiNbO(3) device.

  17. Experimental verification of enhanced sound transmission from water to air at low frequencies.

    PubMed

    Calvo, David C; Nicholas, Michael; Orris, Gregory J

    2013-11-01

    Laboratory measurements of enhanced sound transmission from water to air at low frequencies are presented. The pressure at a monitoring hydrophone is found to decrease for shallow source depths in agreement with the classical theory of a monopole source in proximity to a pressure release interface. On the other hand, for source depths below 1/10 of an acoustic wavelength in water, the radiation pattern in the air measured by two microphones becomes progressively omnidirectional in contrast to the classical geometrical acoustics picture in which sound is contained within a cone of 13.4° half angle. The measured directivities agree with wavenumber integration results for a point source over a range of frequencies and source depths. The wider radiation pattern owes itself to the conversion of evanescent waves in the water into propagating waves in the air that fill the angular space outside the cone. A ratio of pressure measurements made using an on-axis microphone and a near-axis hydrophone are also reported and compared with theory. Collectively, these pressure measurements are consistent with the theory of anomalous transparency of the water-air interface in which a large fraction of acoustic power emitted by a shallow source is radiated into the air.

  18. Dispersion-enhanced phase noise effects on reduced-guard-interval CO-OFDM transmission.

    PubMed

    Zhuge, Qunbi; Chen, Chen; Plant, David V

    2011-02-28

    Unlike conventional CO-OFDM systems, we show in this paper that reduced-guard-interval (RGI) CO-OFDM systems experience subcarrier-dependent phase noise (PN) from the local oscillator laser. This phenomenon manifests in RGI-CO-COFM systems because the chromatic dispersion (CD) induced walk-off becomes comparable to the OFDM symbol length. We term this phenomenon the dispersion enhanced PN (DEPN). In this work an analytical study of the impact of DEPN on CO-OFDM transmission is conducted. We develop a system-level analytical model and calculate the variance of the dispersion-induced subcarrier-dependent phase rotation term (PRT) using two different distribution patterns of pilot subcarriers (PS). Moreover, we present a bit error rate (BER) estimator to quantify the system performance degradation due to PRT. Numerical simulations are then performed to verify the analytical model. Finally, we propose a grouped maximum-likelihood (GML) phase estimation approach to mitigate the DEPN impairment, and demonstrate a 0.7-1.7 dB SNR improvement at BER=10⁻³ for typical 100 Gb/s RGI CO-OFDM systems.

  19. Enhancement of synaptic transmission induced by BDNF in cultured cortical neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun; Li, Yanling; Luo, Qingming

    2005-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), like other neurotrophins, has long-term effects on neuronal survival and differentiation; furthermore, BDNF has been reported to exert an acute potentiation of synaptic activity and are critically involved in long-term potentiation (LTP). We found that BDNF rapidly induced potentiation of synaptic activity and an increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in cultured cortical neurons. Within minutes of BDNF application to cultured cortical neurons, spontaneous firing rate was dramatically increased as were the frequency and amplitude of excitatory spontaneous postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). Fura-2 recordings showed that BDNF acutely elicited an increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]c). This effect was partially dependent on [Ca2+]o; The BDNF-induced increase in [Ca2+]c can not be completely blocked by Ca2+-free solution. It was completely blocked by K252a and partially blocked by Cd2+ and TTX. The results demonstrate that BDNF can enhances synaptic transmission and that this effect is accompanied by a rise in [Ca2+]c that requires two route: the release of Ca2+ from intracellular calcium stores and influx of extracellular Ca2+ through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in cultured cortical neurons.

  20. Enhanced optical transmission through sub-wavelength centered-polygonal hole arrays in silver thin film on silica substrate.

    PubMed

    Arabi, Hesam Edin; Park, Minkyu; Pournoury, Marzieh; Oh, Kyunghwan

    2011-04-25

    We numerically investigated the enhanced optical transmission through sub-wavelength centered-polygonal hole arrays (CPHA) in a thin Ag film deposited on the silica substrate. In octagonal and decagonal-CPHAs, we observed new hybrid transmission characteristics that were inherited from both crystalline and quasi-crystalline hole arrays. This peculiar nature was attributed to the unique arrangement of CPHAs which can be covered with copies of a single unit cell as in crystalline arrays, and their rotational symmetry as observed in quasi-crystalline arrays. Hybrid natures in CPHAs were further investigated in the transmission spectra and Fourier space representations of the arrays. Contributions from the nearest neighbor hole-to-hole distance to enhanced transmission were analyzed in order to quantify the plasmonic contributions from the Air/Ag interface and Silica/Ag interface. We also investigated the impact of layer structure, Air/Ag/Air versus Air/Ag/Silica in the transmissions and found that in CPHAs in Air/Ag/Silica structures, contributions from the Air/Ag interface became dominant in contrast to crystalline hole arrays with lower fold symmetry.

  1. Two-Stage Design Method for Enhanced Inductive Energy Transmission with Q-Constrained Planar Square Loops.

    PubMed

    Eteng, Akaa Agbaeze; Abdul Rahim, Sharul Kamal; Leow, Chee Yen; Chew, Beng Wah; Vandenbosch, Guy A E

    2016-01-01

    Q-factor constraints are usually imposed on conductor loops employed as proximity range High Frequency Radio Frequency Identification (HF-RFID) reader antennas to ensure adequate data bandwidth. However, pairing such low Q-factor loops in inductive energy transmission links restricts the link transmission performance. The contribution of this paper is to assess the improvement that is reached with a two-stage design method, concerning the transmission performance of a planar square loop relative to an initial design, without compromise to a Q-factor constraint. The first stage of the synthesis flow is analytical in approach, and determines the number and spacing of turns by which coupling between similar paired square loops can be enhanced with low deviation from the Q-factor limit presented by an initial design. The second stage applies full-wave electromagnetic simulations to determine more appropriate turn spacing and widths to match the Q-factor constraint, and achieve improved coupling relative to the initial design. Evaluating the design method in a test scenario yielded a more than 5% increase in link transmission efficiency, as well as an improvement in the link fractional bandwidth by more than 3%, without violating the loop Q-factor limit. These transmission performance enhancements are indicative of a potential for modifying proximity HF-RFID reader antennas for efficient inductive energy transfer and data telemetry links.

  2. Two-Stage Design Method for Enhanced Inductive Energy Transmission with Q-Constrained Planar Square Loops

    PubMed Central

    Eteng, Akaa Agbaeze; Abdul Rahim, Sharul Kamal; Leow, Chee Yen; Chew, Beng Wah; Vandenbosch, Guy A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Q-factor constraints are usually imposed on conductor loops employed as proximity range High Frequency Radio Frequency Identification (HF-RFID) reader antennas to ensure adequate data bandwidth. However, pairing such low Q-factor loops in inductive energy transmission links restricts the link transmission performance. The contribution of this paper is to assess the improvement that is reached with a two-stage design method, concerning the transmission performance of a planar square loop relative to an initial design, without compromise to a Q-factor constraint. The first stage of the synthesis flow is analytical in approach, and determines the number and spacing of turns by which coupling between similar paired square loops can be enhanced with low deviation from the Q-factor limit presented by an initial design. The second stage applies full-wave electromagnetic simulations to determine more appropriate turn spacing and widths to match the Q-factor constraint, and achieve improved coupling relative to the initial design. Evaluating the design method in a test scenario yielded a more than 5% increase in link transmission efficiency, as well as an improvement in the link fractional bandwidth by more than 3%, without violating the loop Q-factor limit. These transmission performance enhancements are indicative of a potential for modifying proximity HF-RFID reader antennas for efficient inductive energy transfer and data telemetry links. PMID:26890878

  3. [Neuroleptics and serotonin].

    PubMed

    Hery, F; Hamon, M

    1993-01-01

    To date, there is no doubt that dopamine plays a key role in the behavioural disorders associated with schizophrenia. However, dopamine is not the only neurotransmitter involved in this syndrome, as it interacts with many neuronal systems in brain. Of special interest is the interaction between dopaminergic and serotoninergic systems with evidence from pharmacological data in animals that each of these systems may exert an inhibitory influence on the other. Furthermore, the psychotomimetic effects of drugs affecting serotoninergic neurotransmission such as LSD, psilocybin, N,N-dimethyltryptamine and 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine also contributed to draw attention onto a possible involvement of serotoninergic systems in at least some of the disorders typical of schizophrenia. This idea received strong support from recent studies on the multiple receptors for serotonin in the central nervous system. These studies not only demonstrate the existence of several classes of serotonin receptors called 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT1C, 5-HT1D, 5-HT2, 5-HT3 and 5-HT4, but led also to the development of novel agonists and antagonists for the stimulation or blockade of each of them. Pharmacological investigations with these ligands revealed that serotonin is probably involved in the behavioural disorders associated with schizophrenia through its binding to three distinct classes of receptors: 5-HT1A, 5-HT2 (or the closely related class 5-HT1C) and 5-HT3.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Serotonin and brain development.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Monsheel S K; Sanders-Bush, Elaine

    2004-01-01

    The role of the serotonergic system in the neuroplastic events that create, repair, and degenerate the brain has been explored. Synaptic plasticity occurs throughout life and is critical during brain development. Evidence from biochemical, pharmacological, and clinical studies demonstrates the huge importance of an intact serotonergic system for normal central nervous system (CNS)function. Serotonin acts as a growth factor during embryogenesis, and serotonin receptor activity forms a crucial part of the cascade of events leading to changes in brain structure. The serotonergic system interacts with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), S100beta, and other chemical messengers, in addition to ts cross talk with the GABAergic, glutamatergic, and dopaminergic neurotransmitter systems. Disruption of these processes may contribute to CNS disorders that have been associated with impaired development. Furthermore, many psychiatric drugs alter serotonergic activity and have been shown to create changes in brain structure with long-term treatment. However, the mechanisms for their therapeutic efficacy are still unclear. Treatments for psychiatric illness are usually chronic and alleviate psychiatric symptoms, rather than cure these diseases. Therefore, greater exploration of the serotonin system during brain development and growth could lead to real progress in the discovery of treatments for mental disorders.

  5. Action potential broadening induced by lithium may cause a presynaptic enhancement of excitatory synaptic transmission in neonatal rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Colino, A; García-Seoane, J J; Valentín, A

    1998-07-01

    Lithium enhances excitatory synaptic transmission in CA1 pyramidal cells, but the mechanisms remain unclear. The present study demonstrates that lithium enhances the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptor-mediated components of the excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC). Lithium decreased the magnitude of paired-pulse facilitation and presented an inverse correlation between the lithium-induced enhancement of synaptic transmission and initial paired-pulse facilitation, which is consistent with a presynaptic mode of action. The enhancement of synaptic strength is likely to act, at least in part, by increasing the amplitude of the presynaptic Ca2+ transient. One mechanism which could account for this change of the presynaptic Ca2+ transient is an increase in the duration of the action potential. We investigated action potential in hippocampal pyramidal neurons and found that lithium (0.5-6 mM) increased the half-amplitude duration and reduced the rate of repolarization, whereas the rate of depolarization remained similar. To find out whether the lithium synaptic effects might be explained by spike broadening, we investigated the field recording of the excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) in hippocampal slices and found three lines of evidence. First, the prolongation of the presynaptic action potential with 4-aminopyridine and tetraethylammonium blocked or reduced the synaptic effects of lithium. Second, the lithium-induced synaptic enhancement was modulated when presynaptic Ca2+ influx was varied by changing the external Ca2+ concentration. Finally, both effects, the synaptic transmission increment and the action potential broadening, were independent of inositol depletion. These results suggest that lithium enhances synaptic transmission in the hippocampus via a presynaptic site of action: the mechanism underlying the potentiating effect may be attributable to an increased Ca2+ influx consequent

  6. Breaking the symmetry: immune enhancement increases persistence of dengue viruses in the presence of asymmetric transmission rates.

    PubMed

    Mier-y-Teran-Romero, Luis; Schwartz, Ira B; Cummings, Derek A T

    2013-09-07

    The dengue viruses exist as four antigenically distinct serotypes. These four serotypes co-circulate and interact with each other through multiple immune-mediated mechanisms. Though the majority of previous efforts to understand the transmission dynamics of dengue have assumed identical characteristics for these four serotypes, empirical data suggests that they differ from one another in important ways. Here, we examine dynamics and persistence in models that do not assume symmetry between the dengue viruses. We find that for serotype transmission rates that are only slightly asymmetric, increased transmissibility of secondary infections through immune enhancement increases the persistence of all dengue viruses in opposition to findings in symmetric models. We identify an optimal magnitude of immune enhancement that maximizes the probability of persistence of all four serotypes. In contrast to other pathogen systems where heterogeneity between serotypes in transmissibility facilitates competitive exclusion (Bremmermann and Thieme, 1989), here we find that in the presence of Antibody Dependent Enhancement (ADE) heterogeneity can increase the persistence of multiple serotypes of dengue.

  7. Serotonin blockade delays learning performance in a cooperative fish.

    PubMed

    Soares, Marta C; Paula, José R; Bshary, Redouan

    2016-09-01

    Animals use learning and memorizing to gather information that will help them to make ecologically relevant decisions. Neuro-modulatory adjustments enable them to make associations between stimuli and appropriate behavior. A key candidate for the modulation of cooperative behavior is serotonin. Previous research has shown that modulation of the serotonergic system spontaneously affects the behavior of the cleaner wrasse Labroides dimidiatus during interactions with so-called 'client' reef fish. Here, we asked whether shifts in serotonin function affect the cleaners' associative learning abilities when faced with the task to distinguish two artificial clients that differ in their value as a food source. We found that the administration of serotonin 1A receptor antagonist significantly slowed learning speed in comparison with saline treated fish. As reduced serotonergic signaling typically enhances fear, we discuss the possibility that serotonin may affect how cleaners appraise, acquire information and respond to client-derived stimuli via manipulation of the perception of danger.

  8. Serotonin syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Likasitwattanakul, Surachai

    2005-07-01

    Serotonin syndrome is a rare but potentially fatal complication of drugs that have effects on central nervous system serotonin. It is characterized by sudden onset of altered mental status, increased neuromuscular activity and autonomic instability. The author reports a child with suprasellar region tumor who presented with depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder and received a combination of sertaline (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) and clomipramine (tricyclic antidepressant). Symptoms of serotonin syndrome occurred within 24 hours after increasing the dose of sertaline. The patient's symptoms resolved rapidly with discontinuation of the offending drugs and supportive care.

  9. Serotonin involvement in pituitary-adrenal function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Kellar, K. J.; Kent, D.; Gonzales, C.; Berger, P. A.; Barchas, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments clarifying the effects of serotonin (5-HT) in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical system are surveyed. Lesion experiments which seek to determine functional maps of serotonergic input to areas involved in regulation are reported. Investigations of the effects of 5-HT levels on the plasma ACTH response to stress and the diurnal variation in basal plasma corticosterone are summarized, and the question of whether serotonergic transmission is involved in the regulation of all aspects of pituitary-adrenal function is considered with attention to the stimulatory and inhibitory action of 5-HT.

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells enhance GABAergic transmission in co-cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Mauri, Mario; Lentini, Daniela; Gravati, Marta; Foudah, Dana; Biella, Gerardo; Costa, Barbara; Toselli, Mauro; Parenti, Marco; Coco, Silvia

    2012-04-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells endowed with neurotrophic potential combined with immunological properties, making them a promising therapeutic tool for neurodegenerative disorders. However, the mechanisms through which MSCs promote the neurological recovery following injury or inflammation are still largely unknown, although cell replacement and paracrine mechanisms have been hypothesized. In order to find out what are the mechanisms of the trophic action of MSCs, as compared to glial cells, on CNS neurons, we set up a co-culture system where rat MSCs (or cortical astrocytes) were used as a feeding layer for hippocampal neurons without any direct contact between the two cell types. The analysis of hippocampal synaptogenesis, synaptic vesicle recycling and electrical activity show that MSCs were capable to support morphological and functional neuronal differentiation. The proliferation of hippocampal glial cells induced by the release of bioactive substance(s) from MSCs was necessary for neuronal survival. Furthermore, MSCs selectively increased hippocampal GABAergic pre-synapses. This effect was paralleled with a higher expression of the potassium/chloride KCC2 co-transporter and increased frequency and amplitude of mIPSCs and sIPSCs. The enhancement of GABA synapses was impaired by the treatment with K252a, a Trk/neurotrophin receptor blocker, and by TrkB receptor bodies hence suggesting the involvement of BDNF as a mediator of such effects. The results obtained here indicate that MSC-secreted factors induce glial-dependent neuronal survival and trigger an augmented GABAergic transmission in hippocampal cultures, highlighting a new effect by which MSCs could promote CNS repair. Our results suggest that MSCs may be useful in those neurological disorders characterized by an impairment of excitation versus inhibition balance.

  11. Hydralazine-enhanced selective heating of transmissible venereal tumor implants in dogs.

    PubMed

    Voorhees, W D; Babbs, C F

    1982-10-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that vasodilator drugs can enhance selective heating of solid tumors by producing a favorable redistribution of blood flow between tumor and normal tissues. Subcutaneous transmissible venereal tumor implants were heated by inductive diathermy using Helmholtz coils in 8 dogs. The temperature rise in tumor and adjacent muscle was measured before and after giving hydralazine (0.5 mg/kg i.v.). Blood flow to the tumors and underlying muscle was measured with radioactive tracer microspheres. Before hydralazine treatment mean muscle blood flow was about one-third tumor blood flow (0.11 +/- 0.02 vs 0.28 +/- 0.09 ml/min/g), and tumor and normal muscle temperatures were not significantly different (40.0 +/- 0.6 vs 39.7 +/- 0.1 degrees C). After hydralazine tumor blood flow decreased and muscle blood flow increased in every dog, and selective heating of the tumors became possible. Muscle blood flow averaged 0.67 +/- 0.13 ml/min/g, 17 times greater than tumor blood flow, which decreased to 0.04 +/- 0.02 ml/min/g. Core tumor temperature was 48.0 +/- 0.9 vs 38.5 +/- 0.5 degrees C for underlying muscle. Blood pressure was maintained at 80 +/- 5.7 mmHg. These results demonstrate that adjuvant treatment with vasodilators is a promising technique to increase the temperature difference between tumors and surrounding normal tissues during local heat therapy.

  12. Enhanced Novelty-Induced Corticosterone Spike and Upregulated Serotonin 5-HT1A and Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors in Adolescent BTBR Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Georgianna G.; Burke, Teresa F.; Osorio, Miguel D.; Smolik, Corey M.; Zhang, Wynne Q.; Onaivi, Emmanuel S.; Gu, Ting-Ting; DeSilva, Mauris N.; Hensler, Julie G.

    2013-01-01

    Hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis responses to change and social challenges during adolescence can influence mental health and behavior into adulthood. To examine how HPA tone in adolescence may contribute to psychopathology, we challenged male adolescent (5 wk) and adult (16 wk) BTBR T+tf/J (BTBR) and 129S1/SvImJ (129S) mice with novelty in sociability tests. In prior studies these strains had exaggerated or altered HPA stress responses and low sociability relative to C57BL/6J mice in adulthood. In adolescence these strains already exhibited similar or worse sociability deficits than adults or age-matched C57 mice. Yet BTBR adolescents were less hyperactive and buried fewer marbles than adults. Novelty-induced corticosterone (CORT) spikes in adolescent BTBR were double adult levels, and higher than 129S or C57 mice at either age. Due to their established role in HPA feedback, we hypothesized that hippocampal Gαi/o-coupled serotonin 5-HT1A and cannabioid CB1 receptor function might be upregulated in BTBR mice. Adolescent BTBR mice had higher hippocampal 5-HT1A density as measured by [3H]8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) binding than C57 mice, and adult BTBR 8-OH-DPAT-stimulated GTPγS binding was higher than in either C57 or 129S mice in this region. Further, BTBR hippocampal CB1 density measured by [3H]CP55,940 binding was 15-20% higher than in C57. CP55,940-stimulated GTPγS binding in adult BTBR dentate gyrus was 30% higher then 129S (p<0.05), but was not a product of greater neuronal or cell density defined by NeuN and DAPI staining. Hence hyperactive HPA responsiveness during adolescence may underlie 5-HT1A and CB1 receptor up-regulation and behavioral phenotype of BTBR mice. PMID:24126181

  13. Milnacipran inhibits itch-related responses in mice through the enhancement of noradrenergic transmission in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Tsugunobu; Gotoh, Yoshikazu; Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether milnacipran, a serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, exhibits an antipruritic effect through the spinal action in mice. Intrathecal injections of milnacipran (0.1 - 10 μg/site) significantly suppressed serotonin-induced biting, which is an itch-related response. However, such an effect was not observed with fluvoxamine (10 μg/site), which is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. Furthermore, an intraperitoneal injection of milnacipran (10 mg/kg) inhibited serotonin-induced biting. When phentolamine (1.0 μg/site), a non-selective α-adrenoceptor antagonist, was intrathecally injected, it inhibited the above response of milnacipran. These results suggest that milnacipran suppresses itching through the inhibition of noradrenaline reuptake in the spinal cord.

  14. Enhanced extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) through arrays of bridged nanohole pairs and their sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Weisheng; Wang, Zhihong; Yang, Yang; Li, Jingqi; Wu, Ying; Chen, Longqing; Ooi, Boon; Wang, Xianbin; Zhang, Xi-Xiang

    2014-06-01

    Extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) through arrays of gold nanoholes was studied with light across the visible to the near-infrared spectrum. The EOT effect was found to be improved by bridging pairs of nanoholes due to the concentration of the electromagnetic field in the slit between the holes. The geometrical shape and separation of the holes in these pairs of nanoholes affected the intensity of the transmission and the wavelength of resonance. Changing the geometrical shapes of these nanohole pairs from triangles to circles to squares leads to increased transmission intensity as well as red-shifting resonance wavelengths. The performance of bridged nanohole pairs as a plasmonic sensor was investigated. The bridged nanohole pairs were able to distinguish methanol, olive oil and microscope immersion oil for the different surface plasmon resonance in transmission spectra. Numerical simulation results were in agreement with experimental observations.

  15. Radioenzymatic microassay for picogram quantities of serotonin or acetylserotonin in biological fluids and tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, M.N.; Benedict, C.R.

    1987-06-01

    This paper describes several modifications of the original radioenzymatic assay for serotonin which increase the sensitivity of the assay 20-fold as well as enhance its reliability. Using this method serotonin concentrations can be directly measured in biological examples without precleaning the sample. When compared to currently available methods this assay is specific and sensitive to approximately 1 pg of serotonin and can be used to measure serotonin levels in individual brain nuclei or microliter quantities of biological fluids. This assay can be easily adapted for the direct measurement of N-acetylserotonin. A large number of samples can be assayed in a single working day.

  16. Activity patterns of serotonin neurons underlying cognitive flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Matias, Sara; Lottem, Eran; Dugué, Guillaume P; Mainen, Zachary F

    2017-01-01

    Serotonin is implicated in mood and affective disorders. However, growing evidence suggests that a core endogenous role is to promote flexible adaptation to changes in the causal structure of the environment, through behavioral inhibition and enhanced plasticity. We used long-term photometric recordings in mice to study a population of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons, whose activity we could link to normal reversal learning using pharmacogenetics. We found that these neurons are activated by both positive and negative prediction errors, and thus report signals similar to those proposed to promote learning in conditions of uncertainty. Furthermore, by comparing the cue responses of serotonin and dopamine neurons, we found differences in learning rates that could explain the importance of serotonin in inhibiting perseverative responding. Our findings show how the activity patterns of serotonin neurons support a role in cognitive flexibility, and suggest a revised model of dopamine–serotonin opponency with potential clinical implications. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20552.001 PMID:28322190

  17. Enhanced novelty-induced corticosterone spike and upregulated serotonin 5-HT1A and cannabinoid CB1 receptors in adolescent BTBR mice.

    PubMed

    Gould, Georgianna G; Burke, Teresa F; Osorio, Miguel D; Smolik, Corey M; Zhang, Wynne Q; Onaivi, Emmanuel S; Gu, Ting-Ting; DeSilva, Mauris N; Hensler, Julie G

    2014-01-01

    Hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis responses to change and social challenges during adolescence can influence mental health and behavior into adulthood. To examine how HPA tone in adolescence may contribute to psychopathology, we challenged male adolescent (5 weeks) and adult (16 weeks) BTBR T(+)tf/J (BTBR) and 129S1/SvImJ (129S) mice with novelty in sociability tests. In prior studies these strains had exaggerated or altered HPA stress responses and low sociability relative to C57BL/6J mice in adulthood. In adolescence these strains already exhibited similar or worse sociability deficits than adults or age-matched C57 mice. Yet BTBR adolescents were less hyperactive and buried fewer marbles than adults. Novelty-induced corticosterone (CORT) spikes in adolescent BTBR were double adult levels, and higher than 129S or C57 mice at either age. Due to their established role in HPA feedback, we hypothesized that hippocampal Gαi/o-coupled serotonin 5-HT1A and cannabinoid CB1 receptor function might be upregulated in BTBR mice. Adolescent BTBR mice had higher hippocampal 5-HT1A density as measured by [(3)H] 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) binding than C57 mice, and adult BTBR 8-OH-DPAT-stimulated GTPγS binding was higher than in either C57 or 129S mice in this region. Further, BTBR hippocampal CB1 density measured by [(3)H]CP55,940 binding was 15-20% higher than in C57. CP55,940-stimulated GTPγS binding in adult BTBR dentate gyrus was 30% higher then 129S (p<0.05), but was not a product of greater neuronal or cell density defined by NeuN and DAPI staining. Hence hyperactive HPA responsiveness during adolescence may underlie 5-HT1A and CB1 receptor up-regulation and behavioral phenotype of BTBR mice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic linkage study of bipolar disorder and the serotonin transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsoe, J.R.; Morison, M.; Mroczkowski-Parker, Z.; Bergesch, P.; Rapaport, M.H.; Mirow, A.L.

    1996-04-09

    The serotonin transporter (HTT) is an important candidate gene for the genetic transmission of bipolar disorder. It is the site of action of many antidepressants, and plays a key role in the regulation of serotonin neurotransmission. Many studies of affectively ill patients have found abnormalities in serotonin metabolism, and dysregulation of the transporter itself. The human serotonin transporter has been recently cloned and mapped to chromosome 17. We have identified a PstI RFLP at the HTT locus, and here report our examination of this polymorphism for possible linkage to bipolar disorder. Eighteen families were examined from three populations: the Old Order Amish, Iceland, and the general North American population. In addition to HTT, three other microsatellite markers were examined, which span an interval known to contain HTT. Linkage analyses were conducted under both dominant and recessive models, as well as both narrow (bipolar only) and broad (bipolar + recurrent unipolar) diagnostic models. Linkage could be excluded to HTT under all models examined. Linkage to the interval spanned by the microsatellites was similarly excluded under the dominant models. In two individual families, maximum lod scores of 1.02 and 0.84 were obtained at D17S798 and HTT, respectively. However, these data overall do not support the presence of a susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder near the serotonin transporter. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. Giant-enhancement of extraordinary optical transmission through nanohole arrays blocked by plasmonic gold mushroom caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing; Hu, Pidong; Liu, Chengpu

    2015-01-01

    An improved plasmonic hole array nanostructure model with the holes blocked by gold mushroom caps is proposed and it can realize a giant transmission with efficiency up to 65%, 182% larger than the unblocked nanohole array, due to the strong coupling between caps and holes, which plays the role of a cavity antenna. Moreover, the numerical investigation confirms that it provides more consistency with the practical experimental situations, than the nanodisk model instead. As expected, the light transmission sensitively depends on the geometric parameters of this new nanostructure; as the cap-hole's gap or cap's diameter vary, there always exists an optimal transmission efficiency. More interesting is that the corresponding optimal wavelength decreases with the gap's increment or the diameter's decrement, particularly in an exponential decaying way, and the decay rate is obviously influenced by the cap's parameters.

  20. Equalization enhanced phase noise in Nyquist-spaced superchannel transmission systems using multi-channel digital back-propagation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tianhua; Liga, Gabriele; Lavery, Domaniç; Thomsen, Benn C; Savory, Seb J; Killey, Robert I; Bayvel, Polina

    2015-09-14

    Superchannel transmission spaced at the symbol rate, known as Nyquist spacing, has been demonstrated for effectively maximizing the optical communication channel capacity and spectral efficiency. However, the achievable capacity and reach of transmission systems using advanced modulation formats are affected by fibre nonlinearities and equalization enhanced phase noise (EEPN). Fibre nonlinearities can be effectively compensated using digital back-propagation (DBP). However EEPN which arises from the interaction between laser phase noise and dispersion cannot be efficiently mitigated, and can significantly degrade the performance of transmission systems. Here we report the first investigation of the origin and the impact of EEPN in Nyquist-spaced superchannel system, employing electronic dispersion compensation (EDC) and multi-channel DBP (MC-DBP). Analysis was carried out in a Nyquist-spaced 9-channel 32-Gbaud DP-64QAM transmission system. Results confirm that EEPN significantly degrades the performance of all sub-channels of the superchannel system and that the distortions are more severe for the outer sub-channels, both using EDC and MC-DBP. It is also found that the origin of EEPN depends on the relative position between the carrier phase recovery module and the EDC (or MC-DBP) module. Considering EEPN, diverse coding techniques and modulation formats have to be applied for optimizing different sub-channels in superchannel systems.

  1. Equalization enhanced phase noise in Nyquist-spaced superchannel transmission systems using multi-channel digital back-propagation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tianhua; Liga, Gabriele; Lavery, Domaniç; Thomsen, Benn C.; Savory, Seb J.; Killey, Robert I.; Bayvel, Polina

    2015-01-01

    Superchannel transmission spaced at the symbol rate, known as Nyquist spacing, has been demonstrated for effectively maximizing the optical communication channel capacity and spectral efficiency. However, the achievable capacity and reach of transmission systems using advanced modulation formats are affected by fibre nonlinearities and equalization enhanced phase noise (EEPN). Fibre nonlinearities can be effectively compensated using digital back-propagation (DBP). However EEPN which arises from the interaction between laser phase noise and dispersion cannot be efficiently mitigated, and can significantly degrade the performance of transmission systems. Here we report the first investigation of the origin and the impact of EEPN in Nyquist-spaced superchannel system, employing electronic dispersion compensation (EDC) and multi-channel DBP (MC-DBP). Analysis was carried out in a Nyquist-spaced 9-channel 32-Gbaud DP-64QAM transmission system. Results confirm that EEPN significantly degrades the performance of all sub-channels of the superchannel system and that the distortions are more severe for the outer sub-channels, both using EDC and MC-DBP. It is also found that the origin of EEPN depends on the relative position between the carrier phase recovery module and the EDC (or MC-DBP) module. Considering EEPN, diverse coding techniques and modulation formats have to be applied for optimizing different sub-channels in superchannel systems. PMID:26365422

  2. Equalization enhanced phase noise in Nyquist-spaced superchannel transmission systems using multi-channel digital back-propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tianhua; Liga, Gabriele; Lavery, Domaniç; Thomsen, Benn C.; Savory, Seb J.; Killey, Robert I.; Bayvel, Polina

    2015-09-01

    Superchannel transmission spaced at the symbol rate, known as Nyquist spacing, has been demonstrated for effectively maximizing the optical communication channel capacity and spectral efficiency. However, the achievable capacity and reach of transmission systems using advanced modulation formats are affected by fibre nonlinearities and equalization enhanced phase noise (EEPN). Fibre nonlinearities can be effectively compensated using digital back-propagation (DBP). However EEPN which arises from the interaction between laser phase noise and dispersion cannot be efficiently mitigated, and can significantly degrade the performance of transmission systems. Here we report the first investigation of the origin and the impact of EEPN in Nyquist-spaced superchannel system, employing electronic dispersion compensation (EDC) and multi-channel DBP (MC-DBP). Analysis was carried out in a Nyquist-spaced 9-channel 32-Gbaud DP-64QAM transmission system. Results confirm that EEPN significantly degrades the performance of all sub-channels of the superchannel system and that the distortions are more severe for the outer sub-channels, both using EDC and MC-DBP. It is also found that the origin of EEPN depends on the relative position between the carrier phase recovery module and the EDC (or MC-DBP) module. Considering EEPN, diverse coding techniques and modulation formats have to be applied for optimizing different sub-channels in superchannel systems.

  3. Enhanced acoustic transmission into dissipative solid materials through the use of inhomogeneous plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, D. C.; Bolton, J. S.; Rhoads, J. F.

    2016-09-01

    A number of applications, for instance ultrasonic imaging and nondestructive testing, involve the transmission of acoustic energy across fluid-solid interfaces into dissipative solids. However, such transmission is generally hindered by the large impedance mismatch at the interface. In order to address this problem, inhomogeneous plane waves were investigated in this work for the purpose of improving the acoustic energy transmission. To this end, under the assumption of linear hysteretic damping, models for fluid-structure interaction were developed that allow for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous incident waves. For low-loss solids, the results reveal that, at the Rayleigh angle, a unique value of the wave inhomogeneity can be found which minimizes the reflection coefficient, and consequently maximizes the transmission. The results also reveal that with sufficient dissipation levels in the solid material, homogeneous incident waves yield lower reflection values than inhomogeneous waves, due to the large degrees of inhomogeneity inherent in the transmitted waves. Analytical conditions have also been derived which predict the dependence of the optimal incident wave type on the dissipation level and wave speeds in the solid medium. Finally, implications related to the use of acoustic beams of limited spatial extent are discussed.

  4. Combination therapy counteracts the enhanced transmission of drug-resistant malaria parasites to mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Hallett, Rachel L; Sutherland, Colin J; Alexander, Neal; Ord, Rosalynn; Jawara, Musa; Drakeley, Chris J; Pinder, Margaret; Walraven, Gijs; Targett, Geoffrey A T; Alloueche, Ali

    2004-10-01

    Malaria parasites carrying genes conferring resistance to antimalarials are thought to have a selective advantage which leads to higher rates of transmissibility from the drug-treated host. This is a likely mechanism for the increasing prevalence of parasites with resistance to chloroquine (CQ) and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine in sub-Saharan Africa. Combination therapy is the key strategy being implemented to reduce the impact of resistance, but its effect on the transmission of genetically resistant parasites from treated patients to mosquito vectors has not been measured directly. In a trial comparing CQ monotherapy to the combination CQ plus artesunate (AS) in Gambian children with uncomplicated falciparum malaria, we measured transmissibility by feeding Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes with blood from 43 gametocyte-positive patients through a membrane. In the CQ-treated group, gametocytes from patients carrying parasites with the CQ resistance-associated allele pfcrt-76T prior to treatment produced infected mosquitoes with 38 times higher Plasmodium falciparum oocyst burdens than mosquitoes fed on gametocytes from patients infected with sensitive parasites (P < 0.001). Gametocytes from parasites carrying the resistance-associated allele pfmdr1-86Y produced 14-fold higher oocyst burdens than gametocytes from patients infected with sensitive parasites (P = 0.011). However, parasites carrying either of these resistance-associated alleles pretreatment were not associated with higher mosquito oocyst burdens in the CQ-AS-treated group. Thus, combination therapy overcomes the transmission advantage enjoyed by drug-resistant parasites.

  5. Enhancing sound absorption and transmission through flexible multi-layer micro-perforated structures.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Teresa; Maury, Cédric; Pinhède, Cédric

    2013-11-01

    Theoretical and experimental results are presented into the sound absorption and transmission properties of multi-layer structures made up of thin micro-perforated panels (ML-MPPs). The objective is to improve both the absorption and insulation performances of ML-MPPs through impedance boundary optimization. A fully coupled modal formulation is introduced that predicts the effect of the structural resonances onto the normal incidence absorption coefficient and transmission loss of ML-MPPs. This model is assessed against standing wave tube measurements and simulations based on impedance translation method for two double-layer MPP configurations of relevance in building acoustics and aeronautics. Optimal impedance relationships are proposed that ensure simultaneous maximization of both the absorption and the transmission loss under normal incidence. Exhaustive optimization of the double-layer MPPs is performed to assess the absorption and/or transmission performances with respect to the impedance criterion. It is investigated how the panel volumetric resonances modify the excess dissipation that can be achieved from non-modal optimization of ML-MPPs.

  6. Process window enhancement for 45-nm node using alterable transmission phase-shifting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Hans; Renno, Markus; Hess, Guenter; Buttgereit, Ute; Koepernik, Corinna; Nedelmann, Lorenz; Irmscher, Mathias; Birkner, Robert; Zibold, Axel; Scheruebl, Thomas

    2006-10-01

    A case study was carried out investigating the influence of different transmission and phase shift materials on lithographic performance at 45 nm node. The bilayer approach for embedded attenuated Phase Shift Masks (EAPSM) offers the advantages to adjust phase shift and transmission independently. The transmission of Ta/SiO2 can be tuned up to 40% depending on the required application. Three different PSM blank types with the stacks Ta/SiO2-6%, Ta/SiO2-30% and Ta/SiON-30% have been manufactured and characterized. Afterwards, an identical line pattern, consisting of different feature sizes and duty cycles, has been patterned in each of the three PSM types as well as in the MoSi-6% for reference. Using the AIMS TM 45-193i tool we have evaluated the lithographic performance of the four PSM in terms of contrast and process latitude using unpolarized and TE polarized illumination. The case study showed that the process window for Ta/SiO2-6% is comparable to standard MoSi-6%. For dense line application a 6% EAPSM is preferable. The Ta/SiO2-30% EAPSM provides a significantly larger process window for higher duty cycles compared to MoSi-6%. This means a 50% increase in depth of focus (DOF) at 10% exposure latitude (EL). Therefore for logic application with higher duty cycles a EAPSM material with 30% transmission is preferable.

  7. Ozone Exposure Alters Serotonin and Serotonin Receptor Expression in the Developing Lung

    PubMed Central

    Van Winkle, Laura S.

    2013-01-01

    Ozone, a pervasive environmental pollutant, adversely affects functional lung growth in children. Animal studies demonstrate that altered lung development is associated with modified signaling within the airway epithelial mesenchymal trophic unit, including mediators that can change nerve growth. We hypothesized that ozone exposure alters the normal pattern of serotonin, its transporter (5-HTT), and two key receptors (5-HT2A and 5-HT4), a pathway involved in postnatal airway neural, epithelial, and immune processes. We exposed monkeys to acute or episodic ozone during the first 2 or 6 months of life. There were three exposure groups/age: (1) filtered air, (2) acute ozone challenge, and (3) episodic ozone + acute ozone challenge. Lungs were prepared for compartment-specific qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and stereology. Airway epithelial serotonin immunopositive staining increased in all exposure groups with the most prominent in 2-month midlevel and 6-month distal airways. Gene expression of 5-HTT, 5-HT2AR, and 5-HT4R increased in an age-dependent manner. Overall expression was greater in distal compared with midlevel airways. Ozone exposure disrupted both 5-HT2AR and 5-HT4R protein expression in airways and enhanced immunopositive staining for 5-HT2AR (2 months) and 5-HT4R (6 months) on smooth muscle. Ozone exposure increases serotonin in airway epithelium regardless of airway level, age, and exposure history and changes the spatial pattern of serotonin receptor protein (5-HT2A and 5-HT4) and 5-HTT gene expression depending on compartment, age, and exposure history. Understanding how serotonin modulates components of reversible airway obstruction exacerbated by ozone exposure sets the foundation for developing clinically relevant therapies for airway disease. PMID:23570994

  8. Tramadol and another atypical opioid meperidine have exaggerated serotonin syndrome behavioural effects, but decreased analgesic effects, in genetically deficient serotonin transporter (SERT) mice.

    PubMed

    Fox, Meredith A; Jensen, Catherine L; Murphy, Dennis L

    2009-09-01

    The serotonin syndrome is a potential side-effect of serotonin-enhancing drugs, including antidepressants such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). We recently reported a genetic mouse model for the serotonin syndrome, as serotonin transporter (SERT)-deficient mice have exaggerated serotonin syndrome behavioural responses to the MAOI tranylcypromine and the serotonin precursor 5-hydroxy-l-tryptophan (5-HTP). As numerous case reports implicate the atypical opioids tramadol and meperidine in the development of the human serotonin syndrome, we examined tramadol and meperidine as possible causative drugs in the rodent model of the serotonin syndrome in SERT wild-type (+/+), heterozygous (+/-) and knockout (-/-) mice. Comparisons were made with SERT mice treated with either vehicle or morphine, an opioid not implicated in the serotonin syndrome in humans. Here we show that tramadol and meperidine, but not morphine, induce serotonin syndrome-like behaviours in mice, and we show that this response is exaggerated in mice lacking one or two copies of SERT. The exaggerated response to tramadol in SERT-/- mice was blocked by pretreatment with the 5-HT1A antagonist WAY 100635. Further, we show that morphine-, meperidine- and tramadol-induced analgesia is markedly decreased in SERT-/- mice. These studies suggest that caution seems warranted in prescribing or not warning patients receiving SSRIs or MAOIs that dangerous side-effects may occur during concurrent use of tramadol and similar agents. These findings suggest that it is conceivable that there might be increased vulnerability in individuals with SERT polymorphisms that may reduce SERT by more than 50%, the level in SERT+/- mice.

  9. Serotonin transporter and memory.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Alfredo; Perez-Garcia, Georgina; Ponce-Lopez, Teresa; Tellez, Ruth; Castillo, Carlos

    2011-09-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) has been associated to diverse functions and diseases, though seldom to memory. Therefore, we made an attempt to summarize and discuss the available publications implicating the involvement of the SERT in memory, amnesia and anti-amnesic effects. Evidence indicates that Alzheimer's disease and drugs of abuse like d-methamphetamine (METH) and (+/-)3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") have been associated to decrements in the SERT expression and memory deficits. Several reports have indicated that memory formation and amnesia affected the SERT expression. The SERT expression seems to be a reliable neural marker related to memory mechanisms, its alterations and potential treatment. The pharmacological, neural and molecular mechanisms associated to these changes are of great importance for investigation.

  10. Chronoamperometry to determine differential reductions in uptake in brain synaptosomes from serotonin transporter knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Perez, Xiomara A; Andrews, Anne M

    2005-02-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) is a neuronal plasma membrane protein whose primary function is to take up the neurotransmitter serotonin from the extracellular space, thereby controlling the spatial and temporal aspects of serotonergic signaling in the brain. In humans, a commonly expressed genetic variant of the serotonin transporter gene results in 40% reductions in SERT expression that have been linked to increases in anxiety-related personality traits and susceptibility to stress-associated depression. Mice have been engineered to express similar reductions in SERT expression to investigate transporter-mediated control of serotonin neurotransmission and behavior. We employed carbon fiber microelectrode voltammetry (chronoamperometry) to examine serotonin clearance rates in brain liposomes (synaptosomes) prepared from mice with 50% (SERT(+/)(-)) or complete (SERT(-)(/)(-)) loss of SERT expression. Initial characterization of uptake showed that transport of serotonin was enhanced in the presence of oxygen and abolished when synaptosomes were stirred. Additionally, uptake was prevented by inclusion of the serotonin-selective reuptake inhibiting drug paroxetine in the incubation medium. Most notably, unlike prior studies using established radiochemical methods in synaptosomes, we determined 60% reductions in serotonin uptake rates in SERT(+/)(-) mice in two different brain regions-striatum and frontal cortex. Serotonin uptake was not detected in either brain region in SERT(-)(/)(-) mice. Thus, electroanalytical methods offer distinct advantages stemming from excellent temporal resolution for determining transporter kinetics. Moreover, these appear necessary for delineating moderate but biologically important changes in neurotransmitter transporter function.

  11. Nutrient-induced glucagon like peptide-1 release is modulated by serotonin.

    PubMed

    Ripken, Dina; van der Wielen, Nikkie; Wortelboer, Heleen M; Meijerink, Jocelijn; Witkamp, Renger F; Hendriks, Henk F J

    2016-06-01

    Glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and serotonin are both involved in food intake regulation. GLP-1 release is stimulated upon nutrient interaction with G-protein coupled receptors by enteroendocrine cells (EEC), whereas serotonin is released from enterochromaffin cells (ECC). The central hypothesis for the current study was that nutrient-induced GLP-1 release from EECs is modulated by serotonin through a process involving serotonin receptor interaction. This was studied by assessing the effects of serotonin reuptake inhibition by fluoxetine on nutrient-induced GLP-1, PYY and CCK release from isolated pig intestinal segments. Next, serotonin-induced GLP-1 release was studied in enteroendocrine STC-1 cells, where effects of serotonin receptor inhibition were studied using specific and non-specific antagonists. Casein (1% w/v), safflower oil (3.35% w/v), sucrose (50mM) and rebaudioside A (12.5mM) stimulated GLP-1 release from intestinal segments, whereas casein only stimulated PYY and CCK release. Combining nutrients with fluoxetine further increased nutrient-induced GLP-1, PYY and CCK release. Serotonin release from intestinal tissue segments was stimulated by casein and safflower oil while sucrose and rebaudioside A had no effect. The combination with fluoxetine (0.155μM) further enhanced casein and safflower oil induced-serotonin release. Exposure of ileal tissue segments to serotonin (30μM) stimulated GLP-1 release whereas it did not induce PYY and CCK release. Serotonin (30 and 100μM) also stimulated GLP-1 release from STC-1 cells, which was inhibited by the non-specific 5HT receptor antagonist asenapine (1 and 10μM). These data suggest that nutrient-induced GLP-1 release is modulated by serotonin through a receptor mediated process.

  12. Enhanced ability of TRPV1 channels in regulating glutamatergic transmission after repeated morphine exposure in the nucleus accumbens of rat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haitao; Jia, Dong; Wang, Yuan; Qu, Liang; Wang, Xuelian; Song, Jian; Heng, Lijun; Gao, Guodong

    2017-04-01

    Glutamatergic projections to nucleus accumbens (NAc) drive drug-seeking behaviors during opioids withdrawal. Modulating glutamatergic neurotransmission provides a novel pharmacotherapeutic avenue for treatment of opioids dependence. Great deals of researches have verified that transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels alters synaptic transmitter release and regulate neural plasticity. In the present study, whole-cell patch clamp recordings were adopted to examine the activity of TRPV1 Channels in regulating glutamate-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in NAc of rat during morphine withdrawal for 3days and 3weeks. The data showed that the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) and the amplitudes of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) were increased during morphine withdrawal after applied with capsaicin (TRPV1 agonist). Capsaicin decreased the paired pulse ratio (PPR) and increased sEPSCs frequency but not their amplitudes suggesting a presynaptic locus of action during morphine withdrawal. All these effects were fully blocked by the TRPV1 antagonist Capsazepine. Additionally, In the presence of AM251 (CB1 receptor antagonist), depolarization-induced release of endogenous cannabinoids activated TRPV1 channels to enhance glutamatergic neurotransmission during morphine withdrawal. The functional enhancement of TRPV1 Channels in facilitating glutamatergic transmission was not recorded in dorsal striatum. Our findings demonstrate the ability of TRPV1 in regulating excitatory glutamatergic transmission is enhanced during morphine withdrawal in NAc, which would deepen our understanding of glutamatergic modulation during opioids withdrawal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Reboxetine enhances the olanzapine-induced antipsychotic-like effect, cortical dopamine outflow and NMDA receptor-mediated transmission.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Monica M; Jardemark, Kent; Malmerfelt, Anna; Björkholm, Carl; Svensson, Torgny H

    2010-08-01

    Preclinical data have shown that addition of the selective norepinephrine transporter (NET) inhibitor reboxetine increases the antipsychotic-like effect of the D(2/3) antagonist raclopride and, in parallel, enhances cortical dopamine output. Subsequent clinical results suggested that adding reboxetine to stable treatments with various antipsychotic drugs (APDs) may improve positive, negative and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia. In this study, we investigated in rats the effects of adding reboxetine to the second-generation APD olanzapine on: (i) antipsychotic efficacy, using the conditioned avoidance response (CAR) test, (ii) extrapyramidal side effect (EPS) liability, using a catalepsy test, (iii) dopamine efflux in the medial prefrontal cortex and the nucleus accumbens, using in vivo microdialysis in freely moving animals and (iv) cortical N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated transmission, using intracellular electrophysiological recording in vitro. Reboxetine (6 mg/kg) enhanced the suppression of CAR induced by a suboptimal dose (1.25 mg/kg), but not an optimal (2.5 mg/kg) dose of olanzapine without any concomitant catalepsy. Addition of reboxetine to the low dose of olanzapine also markedly increased cortical dopamine outflow and facilitated prefrontal NMDA receptor-mediated transmission. Our data suggest that adjunctive treatment with a NET inhibitor may enhance the therapeutic effect of low-dose olanzapine in schizophrenia without increasing EPS liability and add an antidepressant action, thus in principle allowing for a dose reduction of olanzapine with a concomitant reduction of dose-related side effects, such as EPS and weight gain.

  14. Two Distinct Central Serotonin Receptors with Different Physiological Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Lebovitz, Richard M.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1981-05-01

    Two distinct serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) receptors designated serotonin 1 and serotonin 2 bind tritium-labeled serotonin and tritium-labeled spiroperidol, respectively. Drug potencies at serotonin 2 sites, but not at serotonin 1 sites, predict their effects on the ``serotonin behavioral syndrome,'' indicating that serotonin 2 sites mediate these behaviors. The limited correlation of drug effects with regulation by guanine nucleotides suggests that serotonin 1 sites might be linked to adenylate cyclase. Drug specificities of serotonin-elicited synaptic inhibition and excitation may reflect serotonin 1 and serotonin 2 receptor interactions, respectively.

  15. Epigenetic Mechanisms of Serotonin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Terrell; González-Maeso, Javier

    2015-07-15

    Histone modifications and DNA methylation represent central dynamic and reversible processes that regulate gene expression and contribute to cellular phenotypes. These epigenetic marks have been shown to play fundamental roles in a diverse set of signaling and behavioral outcomes. Serotonin is a monoamine that regulates numerous physiological responses including those in the central nervous system. The cardinal signal transduction mechanisms via serotonin and its receptors are well established, but fundamental questions regarding complex interactions between the serotonin system and heritable epigenetic modifications that exert control on gene function remain a topic of intense research and debate. This review focuses on recent advances and contributions to our understanding of epigenetic mechanisms of serotonin receptor-dependent signaling, with focus on psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression.

  16. A Robust Control for Engine and Transmission Systems:Enhancement of Shift Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kyung-Jinn; Hong, Keum-Shik; Cho, Dong-Il “Dan”

    In this paper, a robust integrated control for engine and automatic transmission systems is investigated. The modeling of powertrain system is split into five subparts including an engine, a torque converter, an automatic transmission, clutch torque generation, and a drivetrain. For improving the ride quality, a two-stage control strategy, torque phase and inertia phase, is proposed. During the torque phase, the slip in first gear is maintained to near zero, while the reaction carrier speed and turbine speed during the inertia phase are controlled to track their desired speeds. The reaction carrier speed is adjusted by the second clutch torque, and the turbine speed is controlled by engine throttle angle and spark advance. Due to the uncertainty and unmodelled dynamics of the system, the uniform ultimate boundedness of the error signals is assured by applying the Lyapunov stability analysis. Simulation results are provided.

  17. Scrambled coherent superposition for enhanced optical fiber communication in the nonlinear transmission regime.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Chandrasekhar, S; Winzer, P J; Chraplyvy, A R; Tkach, R W; Zhu, B; Taunay, T F; Fishteyn, M; DiGiovanni, D J

    2012-08-13

    Coherent superposition of light waves has long been used in various fields of science, and recent advances in digital coherent detection and space-division multiplexing have enabled the coherent superposition of information-carrying optical signals to achieve better communication fidelity on amplified-spontaneous-noise limited communication links. However, fiber nonlinearity introduces highly correlated distortions on identical signals and diminishes the benefit of coherent superposition in nonlinear transmission regime. Here we experimentally demonstrate that through coordinated scrambling of signal constellations at the transmitter, together with appropriate unscrambling at the receiver, the full benefit of coherent superposition is retained in the nonlinear transmission regime of a space-diversity fiber link based on an innovatively engineered multi-core fiber. This scrambled coherent superposition may provide the flexibility of trading communication capacity for performance in future optical fiber networks, and may open new possibilities in high-performance and secure optical communications.

  18. Surface plasmon enhanced absorption and suppressed transmission in periodic arrays of graphene ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, A. Yu.; Guinea, F.; Garcia-Vidal, F. J.; Martin-Moreno, L.

    2012-02-01

    Resonance diffraction in the periodic array of graphene microribbons is theoretically studied following a recent experiment [L. Ju , Nature Nanotech.1748-338710.1038/nnano.2011.146 6, 630 (2011)]. Systematic studies over a wide range of parameters are presented. It is shown that a much richer resonant picture would be observable for higher relaxation times of charge carriers: More resonances appear and transmission can be totally suppressed. The comparison with the absorption cross-section of a single ribbon shows that the resonant features of the periodic array are associated with leaky plasmonic modes. The longest-wavelength resonance provides the highest visibility of the transmission dip and has the strongest spectral shift and broadening with respect to the single-ribbon resonance, due to collective effects.

  19. UV and Visible Harmonic Generation Through Enhanced Transmission from GaAs-filled Nanocavities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c . THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 length of the dielectric...Salomon, F. Grillot, A. V. Zayats, and F. de Fornel , Near-field distribution of optical transmission through sub-wavelength hole arrays, Phys. Rev...Lett. Vol. 86, 1110 (2001). [3] D. Krause, C . W. Teplin, and C . T. Rogers, Optical surface second harmonic measurements of isotropic thin-film

  20. Tunable 3D extended self-assembled gold metamaterials with enhanced light transmission.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Stefano; Demetriadou, Angela; Vignolini, Silvia; Oh, Sang Soon; Wuestner, Sebastian; Yufa, Nataliya A; Stefik, Morgan; Wiesner, Ulrich; Baumberg, Jeremy J; Hess, Ortwin; Steiner, Ullrich

    2013-05-21

    The optical properties of metamaterials made by block copolymer self-assembly are tuned by structural and environmental variations. The plasma frequency red-shifts with increasing lattice constant and blue-shifts as the network filling fraction increases. Infiltration with dielectric liquids leads also to a red-shift of the plasma edge. A 300 nm-thick slab of gyroid-structured gold has a remarkable transmission of 20%.

  1. Enhanced protocol for real-time transmission of echocardiograms over wireless channels.

    PubMed

    Cavero, Eva; Alesanco, Alvaro; García, Jose

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents a methodology to transmit clinical video over wireless networks in real-time. A 3-D set partitioning in hierarchical trees compression prior to transmission is proposed. In order to guarantee the clinical quality of the compressed video, a clinical evaluation specific to each video modality has to be made. This evaluation indicates the minimal transmission rate necessary for an accurate diagnosis. However, the channel conditions produce errors and distort the video. A reliable application protocol is therefore proposed using a hybrid solution in which either retransmission or retransmission combined with forward error correction (FEC) techniques are used, depending on the channel conditions. In order to analyze the proposed methodology, the 2-D mode of an echocardiogram has been assessed. A bandwidth of 200 kbps is necessary to guarantee its clinical quality. The transmission using the proposed solution and retransmission and FEC techniques working separately have been simulated and compared in high-speed uplink packet access (HSUPA) and worldwide interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX) networks. The proposed protocol achieves guaranteed clinical quality for bit error rates higher than with the other protocols, being for a mobile speed of 60 km/h up to 3.3 times higher for HSUPA and 10 times for WiMAX.

  2. Estimating enhanced prevaccination measles transmission hotspots in the context of cross-scale dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Alexander D.; Birger, Ruthie B.; Teillant, Aude; Gastanaduy, Paul A.; Wallace, Gregory S.; Grenfell, Bryan T.

    2016-01-01

    A key question in clarifying human–environment interactions is how dynamic complexity develops across integrative scales from molecular to population and global levels. Apart from its public health importance, measles is an excellent test bed for such an analysis. Simple mechanistic models have successfully illuminated measles dynamics at the city and country levels, revealing seasonal forcing of transmission as a major driver of long-term epidemic behavior. Seasonal forcing ties closely to patterns of school aggregation at the individual and community levels, but there are few explicit estimates of school transmission due to the relative lack of epidemic data at this scale. Here, we use data from a 1904 measles outbreak in schools in Woolwich, London, coupled with a stochastic Susceptible-Infected-Recovered model to analyze measles incidence data. Our results indicate that transmission within schools and age classes is higher than previous population-level serological data would suggest. This analysis sheds quantitative light on the role of school-aged children in measles cross-scale dynamics, as we illustrate with references to the contemporary vaccination landscape. PMID:27872300

  3. Enhancement of the optical transmission by mixing the metallic and dielectric nanoparticles atop the silicon substrate.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yung-Ming; Wang, Yu-Sheng; Li, Jia-Han

    2011-03-14

    We propose a structure with the metallic and dielectric nanoparticles on the surface of the silicon material and study its optical transmission properties. The structure with the radiuses of the silver and silica nanoparticles as 50 nm and 100 nm, respectively, with the gap as 8 nm between silver and silica nanoparticles is found to have the largest optical transmission into the silicon material in our simulations. The largest field intensities are on the bottom of the silver nanoparticles and these can result strong field scattering into the silicon material. From the plotting of the average power densities around the gaps and the air regions between the silver and silica nanoparticles, the light power can go thorough these regions and flow downward to the silicon material. It is also found that the light energy rotates around the bottom of the silver nanoparticles due to the strong localized surface plasmons. The rectangular arrangement of the nanoparticle structures with mixing metallic and dielectric nanoparticles are studied, and the cases for the structures with only the metallic nanoparticles or only the dielectric nanoparticles are also simulated and compared. The rectangular or hexagonal structures with mixing metallic and dielectric nanoparticles on the surface of the silicon substrate can have better optical transmission than the cases of the rectangular arrangement with only metallic or dielectric nanoparticles.

  4. Oral branched-chain amino acid supplements that reduce brain serotonin during exercise in rats also lower brain catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sujean; Disilvio, Briana; Fernstrom, Madelyn H; Fernstrom, John D

    2013-11-01

    Exercise raises brain serotonin release and is postulated to cause fatigue in athletes; ingestion of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), by competitively inhibiting tryptophan transport into brain, lowers brain tryptophan uptake and serotonin synthesis and release in rats, and reputedly in humans prevents exercise-induced increases in serotonin and fatigue. This latter effect in humans is disputed. But BCAA also competitively inhibit tyrosine uptake into brain, and thus catecholamine synthesis and release. Since increasing brain catecholamines enhances physical performance, BCAA ingestion could lower catecholamines, reduce performance and thus negate any serotonin-linked benefit. We therefore examined in rats whether BCAA would reduce both brain tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis. Sedentary and exercising rats received BCAA or vehicle orally; tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis rates were measured 1 h later in brain. BCAA reduced brain tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations, and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis. These reductions in tyrosine concentrations and catecholamine synthesis, but not tryptophan or serotonin synthesis, could be prevented by co-administering tyrosine with BCAA. Complete essential amino acid mixtures, used to maintain or build muscle mass, were also studied, and produced different effects on brain tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis. Since pharmacologically increasing brain catecholamine function improves physical performance, the finding that BCAA reduce catecholamine synthesis may explain why this treatment does not enhance physical performance in humans, despite reducing serotonin synthesis. If so, adding tyrosine to BCAA supplements might allow a positive action on performance to emerge.

  5. Elimination of Mother-To-Child Transmission of HIV Infection: The Drug Resource Enhancement against AIDS and Malnutrition Model

    PubMed Central

    Liotta, Giuseppe; Marazzi, Maria Cristina; Mothibi, Khethimipilo E.; Zimba, Ines; Amangoua, Evelyne E.; Bonje, Esther K.; Bossiky, Bernard N. B.; Robinson, Precious A.; Scarcella, Paola; Musokotwane, Kebby; Palombi, Leonardo; Germano, Paola; Narciso, Pasquale; de Luca, Andrea; Alumando, Elard; Mamary, Sangare H.; Magid, Nurja A.; Guidotti, Giovanni; Mancinelli, Sandro; Orlando, Stefano; Peroni, Marco; Buonomo, Ersilia; Nielsen-Saines, Karin

    2015-01-01

    The Drug Resource Enhancement against AIDS and Malnutrition Program (DREAM) gathered professionals in the field of Elimination of HIV-Mother-To-Child Transmission (EMTCT) in Maputo in 2013 to discuss obstacles and solutions for the elimination of HIV vertical transmission in sub-Saharan Africa. During this workshop, the benefits of administrating combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) to HIV positive women from pregnancy throughout breastfeeding were reviewed. cART is capable of reducing vertical transmission to less than 5% at 24 months of age, as well as maternal mortality and infant mortality in both HIV infected and exposed populations to levels similar to those of uninfected individuals. The challenge for programs targeting eMTCT in developing countries is retention in care and treatment adherence. Both are intrinsically related to the model of care. The drop-out from eMTCT programs before cART initiation ranges from 33%–88% while retention rates at 18–24 months are less than 50%. Comprehensive strategies including peer-to-peer education, social support and laboratory monitoring can reduce refusals to less than 5% and attain retention rates approaching 90%. Several components of the model of care for reduction of HIV-1 MTCT are feasible and implementable in scale-up strategies. A review of this model of care for HIV eMTCT is provided. PMID:26506365

  6. Enhancing immunogenicity and transmission-blocking activity of malaria vaccines by fusing Pfs25 to IMX313 multimerization technology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanyuan; Leneghan, Darren B.; Miura, Kazutoyo; Nikolaeva, Daria; Brian, Iona J.; Dicks, Matthew D. J.; Fyfe, Alex J.; Zakutansky, Sarah E.; de Cassan, Simone; Long, Carole A.; Draper, Simon J.; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Hill, Fergal; Biswas, Sumi

    2016-01-01

    Transmission-blocking vaccines (TBV) target the sexual-stages of the malaria parasite in the mosquito midgut and are widely considered to be an essential tool for malaria elimination. High-titer functional antibodies are required against target antigens to achieve effective transmission-blocking activity. We have fused Pfs25, the leading malaria TBV candidate antigen to IMX313, a molecular adjuvant and expressed it both in ChAd63 and MVA viral vectors and as a secreted protein-nanoparticle. Pfs25-IMX313 expressed from viral vectors or as a protein-nanoparticle is significantly more immunogenic and gives significantly better transmission-reducing activity than monomeric Pfs25. In addition, we demonstrate that the Pfs25-IMX313 protein-nanoparticle leads to a qualitatively improved antibody response in comparison to soluble Pfs25, as well as to significantly higher germinal centre (GC) responses. These results demonstrate that antigen multimerization using IMX313 is a very promising strategy to enhance antibody responses against Pfs25, and that Pfs25-IMX313 is a highly promising TBV candidate vaccine. PMID:26743316

  7. Analytical BER performance in differential n-PSK coherent transmission system influenced by equalization enhanced phase noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tianhua; Jacobsen, Gunnar; Popov, Sergei; Li, Jie; Sergeyev, Sergey; Friberg, Ari T.; Zhang, Yimo

    2015-01-01

    Long-haul high speed optical transmission systems are significantly distorted by the interplay between the electronic chromatic dispersion (CD) equalization and the local oscillator (LO) laser phase noise, which leads to an effect of equalization enhanced phase noise (EEPN). The EEPN degrades the performance of optical communication systems severely with the increment of fiber dispersion, LO laser linewidth, symbol rate, and modulation format. In this paper, we present an analytical model for evaluating the performance of bit-error-rate (BER) versus signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the n-level phase shift keying (n-PSK) coherent transmission system employing differential carrier phase estimation (CPE), where the influence of EEPN is considered. Theoretical results based on this model have been investigated for the differential quadrature phase shift keying (DQPSK), the differential 8-PSK (D8PSK), and the differential 16-PSK (D16PSK) coherent transmission systems. The influence of EEPN on the BER performance in term of the fiber dispersion, the LO phase noise, the symbol rate, and the modulation format are analyzed in detail. The BER behaviors based on this analytical model achieve a good agreement with previously reported BER floors influenced by EEPN. Further simulations have also been carried out in the differential CPE considering EEPN. The results indicate that this analytical model can give an accurate prediction for the DQPSK system, and a leading-order approximation for the D8PSK and the D16PSK systems.

  8. Elimination of Mother-To-Child Transmission of HIV Infection: The Drug Resource Enhancement against AIDS and Malnutrition Model.

    PubMed

    Liotta, Giuseppe; Marazzi, Maria Cristina; Mothibi, Khethimipilo E; Zimba, Ines; Amangoua, Evelyne E; Bonje, Esther K; Bossiky, Bernard N B; Robinson, Precious A; Scarcella, Paola; Musokotwane, Kebby; Palombi, Leonardo; Germano, Paola; Narciso, Pasquale; de Luca, Andrea; Alumando, Elard; Mamary, Sangare H; Magid, Nurja A; Guidotti, Giovanni; Mancinelli, Sandro; Orlando, Stefano; Peroni, Marco; Buonomo, Ersilia; Nielsen-Saines, Karin

    2015-10-21

    The Drug Resource Enhancement against AIDS and Malnutrition Program (DREAM) gathered professionals in the field of Elimination of HIV-Mother-To-Child Transmission (EMTCT) in Maputo in 2013 to discuss obstacles and solutions for the elimination of HIV vertical transmission in sub-Saharan Africa. During this workshop, the benefits of administrating combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) to HIV positive women from pregnancy throughout breastfeeding were reviewed. cART is capable of reducing vertical transmission to less than 5% at 24 months of age, as well as maternal mortality and infant mortality in both HIV infected and exposed populations to levels similar to those of uninfected individuals. The challenge for programs targeting eMTCT in developing countries is retention in care and treatment adherence. Both are intrinsically related to the model of care. The drop-out from eMTCT programs before cART initiation ranges from 33%-88% while retention rates at 18-24 months are less than 50%. Comprehensive strategies including peer-to-peer education, social support and laboratory monitoring can reduce refusals to less than 5% and attain retention rates approaching 90%. Several components of the model of care for reduction of HIV-1 MTCT are feasible and implementable in scale-up strategies. A review of this model of care for HIV eMTCT is provided.

  9. Enhancing immunogenicity and transmission-blocking activity of malaria vaccines by fusing Pfs25 to IMX313 multimerization technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanyuan; Leneghan, Darren B; Miura, Kazutoyo; Nikolaeva, Daria; Brian, Iona J; Dicks, Matthew D J; Fyfe, Alex J; Zakutansky, Sarah E; de Cassan, Simone; Long, Carole A; Draper, Simon J; Hill, Adrian V S; Hill, Fergal; Biswas, Sumi

    2016-01-08

    Transmission-blocking vaccines (TBV) target the sexual-stages of the malaria parasite in the mosquito midgut and are widely considered to be an essential tool for malaria elimination. High-titer functional antibodies are required against target antigens to achieve effective transmission-blocking activity. We have fused Pfs25, the leading malaria TBV candidate antigen to IMX313, a molecular adjuvant and expressed it both in ChAd63 and MVA viral vectors and as a secreted protein-nanoparticle. Pfs25-IMX313 expressed from viral vectors or as a protein-nanoparticle is significantly more immunogenic and gives significantly better transmission-reducing activity than monomeric Pfs25. In addition, we demonstrate that the Pfs25-IMX313 protein-nanoparticle leads to a qualitatively improved antibody response in comparison to soluble Pfs25, as well as to significantly higher germinal centre (GC) responses. These results demonstrate that antigen multimerization using IMX313 is a very promising strategy to enhance antibody responses against Pfs25, and that Pfs25-IMX313 is a highly promising TBV candidate vaccine.

  10. Surface-enhanced transmission mode desorption electrospray ionization: increasing the specificity of ambient ionization mass spectrometric analyses.

    PubMed

    Chipuk, Joseph E; Gelb, Michael H; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2010-01-01

    Fabrication and utilization of mesh materials specifically designed to capture analytes from solution facilitates the direct coupling of affinity capture and ambient ionization mass spectrometry via surface-enhanced transmission mode desorption electrospray ionization (TM-DESI). Incorporation of photolabile groups within the linkage between the mesh surface and the covalently modified reactive probe affords facile release of mass tagged analytes directly to mesh surfaces that have been rinsed free of matrix interferences. The approach introduces increased specificity to the already rapid TM-DESI analysis technique, resulting in a powerful tool for high-throughput screening of targeted analytes. Specific capture of thiols is discussed herein, but the surface-enhanced TM-DESI technique can be readily extended to other functional groups by alteration of the capture agent.

  11. Enhanced GABAergic synaptic transmission at VLPAG neurons and potent modulation by oxycodone in a bone cancer pain model

    PubMed Central

    Takasu, Keiko; Ogawa, Koichi; Nakamura, Atsushi; Kanbara, Tomoe; Ono, Hiroko; Tomii, Takako; Morioka, Yasuhide; Hasegawa, Minoru; Shibasaki, Masahiro; Mori, Tomohisa; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Sakaguchi, Gaku

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose We demonstrated previously that oxycodone has potent antinociceptive effects at supraspinal sites. In this study, we investigated changes in neuronal function and antinociceptive mechanisms of oxycodone at ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (VLPAG) neurons, which are a major site of opioid action, in a femur bone cancer (FBC) model with bone cancer-related pain. Experimental Approach We characterized the supraspinal antinociceptive profiles of oxycodone and morphine on mechanical hypersensitivity in the FBC model. Based on the disinhibition mechanism underlying supraspinal opioid antinociception, the effects of oxycodone and morphine on GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in VLPAG neurons were evaluated in slices from the FBC model. Key Results The supraspinal antinociceptive effects of oxycodone, but not morphine, were abolished by blocking G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium1 (Kir3.1) channels. In slices from the FBC model, GABAergic synaptic transmission at VLPAG neurons was enhanced, as indicated by a leftward shift of the input–output relationship curve of evoked IPSCs, the increased paired-pulse facilitation and the enhancement of miniature IPSC frequency. Following treatment with oxycodone and morphine, IPSCs were reduced in the FBC model, and the inhibition of presynaptic GABA release by oxycodone, but not morphine was enhanced and dependent on Kir3.1 channels. Conclusion and Implications Our results demonstrate that Kir3.1 channels are important for supraspinal antinociception and presynaptic GABA release inhibition by oxycodone in the FBC model. Enhanced GABAergic synaptic transmission at VLPAG neurons in the FBC model is an important site of supraspinal antinociception by oxycodone via Kir3.1 channel activation. PMID:25521524

  12. Neonatal Propofol and Etomidate Exposure Enhance Inhibitory Synaptic Transmission in Hippocampal Cornus Ammonis 1 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia-Qiang; Xu, Wan-Ying; Xu, Chang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background: Propofol and etomidate are the most important intravenous general anesthetics in the current clinical use and that mediate gamma-aminobutyric acid's (GABAergic) synaptic transmission. However, their long-term effects on GABAergic synaptic transmission induced by neonatal propofol or etomidate exposure remain unclear. We investigated the long-term GABAergic neurotransmission alterations, following neonatal propofol and etomidate administration. Methods: Sprague-Dawley rat pups at postnatal days 4–6 were underwent 6-h-long propofol-induced or 5-h-long etomidate-induced anesthesia. We performed whole-cell patch-clamp recording from pyramidal cells in the cornus ammonis 1 area of acute hippocampal slices of postnatal 80–90 days. Spontaneous and miniature inhibitory GABAergic currents (spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents [sIPSCs] and miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents [mIPSCs]) and their kinetic characters were measured. The glutamatergic tonic effect on inhibitory transmission and the effect of bumetanide on neonatal propofol exposure were also examined. Results: Neonatal propofol exposure significantly increased the frequency of mIPSCs (from 1.87 ± 0.35 Hz to 3.43 ± 0.51 Hz, P < 0.05) and did not affect the amplitude of mIPSCs and sIPSCs. Both propofol and etomidate slowed the decay time of mIPSCs kinetics (168.39 ± 27.91 ms and 267.02 ± 100.08 ms vs. 68.18 ± 12.43 ms; P < 0.05). Bumetanide significantly blocked the frequency increase and reversed the kinetic alteration of mIPSCs induced by neonatal propofol exposure (3.01 ± 0.45 Hz and 94.30 ± 32.56 ms). Conclusions: Neonatal propofol and etomidate exposure has long-term effects on inhibitory GABAergic transmission. Propofol might act at pre- and post-synaptic GABA receptor A (GABAA) receptors within GABAergic synapses and impairs the glutamatergic tonic input to GABAergic synapses; etomidate might act at the postsynaptic site. PMID:27824005

  13. Modulation of serotonin transporter function by kappa-opioid receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Sundaramurthy, Santhanalakshmi; Annamalai, Balasubramaniam; Samuvel, Devadoss J; Shippenberg, Toni S; Jayanthi, Lankupalle D; Ramamoorthy, Sammanda

    2017-02-01

    Kappa opioid receptor (KOR) agonists produce dysphoria and psychotomimesis. While KOR agonists produce pro-depressant-like effects, KOR antagonists produce anti-depressant-like effects in rodent models. The cellular mechanisms and downstream effector(s) by which KOR ligands produce these effects are not clear. KOR agonists modulate serotonin (5-HT) transmission in the brain regions implicated in mood and motivation regulation. Presynaptic serotonin transporter (SERT) activity is critical in the modulation of synaptic 5-HT and, subsequently, in mood disorders. Detailing the molecular events of KOR-linked SERT regulation is important for examining the postulated role of this protein in mood disorders. In this study, we used heterologous expression systems and native tissue preparations to determine the cellular signaling cascades linked to KOR-mediated SERT regulation. KOR agonists U69,593 and U50,488 produced a time and concentration dependent KOR antagonist-reversible decrease in SERT function. KOR-mediated functional down-regulation of SERT is sensitive to CaMKII and Akt inhibition. The U69,593-evoked decrease in SERT activity is associated with a decreased transport Vmax, reduced SERT cell surface expression, and increased SERT phosphorylation. Furthermore, KOR activation enhanced SERT internalization and decreased SERT delivery to the membrane. These data demonstrate that KOR activation decreases 5-HT uptake by altering SERT trafficking mechanisms and phosphorylation status to reduce the functional availability of surface SERT.

  14. Synaptic facilitation by reflected action potentials: Enhancement of transmission when nerve impulses reverse direction at axon branch points

    PubMed Central

    Baccus, Stephen A.

    1998-01-01

    A rapid, reversible enhancement of synaptic transmission from a sensory neuron is reported and explained by impulses that reverse direction, or reflect, at axon branch points. In leech mechanosensory neurons, where one can detect reflection because it is possible simultaneously to study electrical activity in separate branches, action potentials reflected from branch points within the central nervous system under physiological conditions. Synapses adjacent to these branch points were activated twice in rapid succession, first by an impulse arriving from the periphery and then by its reflection. This fast double-firing facilitated synaptic transmission, increasing it to more than twice its normal level. Reflection occurred within a range of resting membrane potentials, and electrical activity produced by mechanical stimulation changed membrane potential so as to produce and cease reflection. A compartmental model was used to investigate how branch-point morphology and electrical activity contribute to produce reflection. The model shows that mechanisms that hyperpolarize the membrane so as to impair action potential propagation can increase the range of structures that can produce reflection. This suggests that reflection is more likely to occur in other structures where impulses fail, such as in axons and dendrites in the mammalian brain. In leech sensory neurons, reflection increased transmission from central synapses only in those axon branches that innervate the edges of the receptive field in the skin, thereby sharpening spatial contrast. Reflection thus allows a neuron to amplify synaptic transmission from a selected group of its branches in a way that can be regulated by electrical activity. PMID:9653189

  15. DC-SIGN-mediated infectious synapse formation enhances X4 HIV-1 transmission from dendritic cells to T cells.

    PubMed

    Arrighi, Jean-François; Pion, Marjorie; Garcia, Eduardo; Escola, Jean-Michel; van Kooyk, Yvette; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B; Piguet, Vincent

    2004-11-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are essential for the early events of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Model systems of HIV sexual transmission have shown that DCs expressing the DC-specific C-type lectin DC-SIGN capture and internalize HIV at mucosal surfaces and efficiently transfer HIV to CD4+ T cells in lymph nodes, where viral replication occurs. Upon DC-T cell clustering, internalized HIV accumulates on the DC side at the contact zone (infectious synapse), between DCs and T cells, whereas HIV receptors and coreceptors are enriched on the T cell side. Viral concentration at the infectious synapse may explain, at least in part, why DC transmission of HIV to T cells is so efficient.Here, we have investigated the role of DC-SIGN on primary DCs in X4 HIV-1 capture and transmission using small interfering RNA-expressing lentiviral vectors to specifically knockdown DC-SIGN. We demonstrate that DC-SIGN- DCs internalize X4 HIV-1 as well as DC-SIGN+ DCs, although binding of virions is reduced. Strikingly, DC-SIGN knockdown in DCs selectively impairs infectious synapse formation between DCs and resting CD4+ T cells, but does not prevent the formation of DC-T cells conjugates. Our results demonstrate that DC-SIGN is required downstream from viral capture for the formation of the infectious synapse between DCs and T cells. These findings provide a novel explanation for the role of DC-SIGN in the transfer and enhancement of HIV infection from DCs to T cells, a crucial step for HIV transmission and pathogenesis.

  16. The LetE Protein Enhances Expression of Multiple LetA/LetS-Dependent Transmission Traits by Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Bachman, Michael A.; Swanson, Michele S.

    2004-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila colonizes freshwater amoebae and can also replicate within alveolar macrophages. When their nutrient supply is exhausted, replicating bacteria become cytotoxic, motile, and infectious, which is thought to promote transmission to a new amoeba. The differentiation of L. pneumophila is coordinated by the sigma factors RpoS and FliA and the two-component regulator LetA/LetS and is enhanced by the letE locus. Here we demonstrate that letE promotes motility by increasing expression of the flagellin gene flaA but has little impact on the transcription of fliA, the flagellar sigma factor gene. In addition to promoting motility, letE induces the characteristic shape, pigment, and heat resistance of stationary-phase L. pneumophila. To gain insight into how letE promotes the expression of the transmission phenotype, we designed molecular genetic experiments to discriminate between the following three models: letE mutations are polar on milX; letE encodes a small novel protein; or, by analogy to csrB, letE encodes a regulatory RNA that sequesters CsrA to relieve repression. We report that letE encodes an activator protein, as it does not complement an Escherichia coli csrB mutant, it directs the synthesis of an ∼12-kDa polypeptide, and a letE nonsense mutation eliminates function. A monocistronic letE RNA is abundant during the exponential phase, and its decay during the stationary phase requires RpoS and LetA/LetS. We also discuss how the LetE protein may interact with LetA/LetS and CsrA to enhance L. pneumophila differentiation to a transmissible form. PMID:15155631

  17. Enhanced Mammalian Transmissibility of Seasonal Influenza A/H1N1 Viruses Encoding an Oseltamivir-Resistant Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Rahmat, Saad; Pica, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Between 2007 and 2009, oseltamivir resistance developed among seasonal influenza A/H1N1 (sH1N1) virus isolates at an exponential rate, without a corresponding increase in oseltamivir usage. We hypothesized that the oseltamivir-resistant neuraminidase (NA), in addition to being relatively insusceptible to the antiviral effect of oseltamivir, might confer an additional fitness advantage on these viruses by enhancing their transmission efficiency among humans. Here we demonstrate that an oseltamivir-resistant clinical isolate, an A/Brisbane/59/2007(H1N1)-like virus isolated in New York State in 2008, transmits more efficiently among guinea pigs than does a highly similar, contemporaneous oseltamivir-sensitive isolate. With reverse genetics reassortants and point mutants of the two clinical isolates, we further show that expression of the oseltamivir-resistant NA in the context of viral proteins from the oseltamivir-sensitive virus (a 7:1 reassortant) is sufficient to enhance transmissibility. In the guinea pig model, the NA is the critical determinant of transmission efficiency between oseltamivir-sensitive and -resistant Brisbane/59-like sH1N1 viruses, independent of concurrent drift mutations that occurred in other gene products. Our data suggest that the oseltamivir-resistant NA (specifically, one or both of the companion mutations, H275Y and D354G) may have allowed resistant Brisbane/59-like viruses to outtransmit sensitive isolates. These data provide in vivo evidence of an evolutionary mechanism that would explain the rapidity with which oseltamivir resistance achieved fixation among sH1N1 isolates in the human reservoir. PMID:22532693

  18. Long-term enhancement of synaptic transmission between antennal lobe and mushroom body in cultured Drosophila brain.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Kohei; Naganos, Shintaro; Hirano, Yukinori; Horiuchi, Junjiro; Saitoe, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    In Drosophila, the mushroom body (MB) is a critical brain structure for olfactory associative learning. During aversive conditioning, the MBs are thought to associate odour signals, conveyed by projection neurons (PNs) from the antennal lobe (AL), with shock signals conveyed through ascending fibres of the ventral nerve cord (AFV). Although synaptic transmission between AL and MB might play a crucial role for olfactory associative learning, its physiological properties have not been examined directly. Using a cultured Drosophila brain expressing a Ca(2+) indicator in the MBs, we investigated synaptic transmission and plasticity at the AL-MB synapse. Following stimulation with a glass micro-electrode, AL-induced Ca(2+) responses in the MBs were mediated through Drosophila nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (dnAChRs), while AFV-induced Ca(2+) responses were mediated through Drosophila NMDA receptors (dNRs). AL-MB synaptic transmission was enhanced more than 2 h after the simultaneous 'associative-stimulation' of AL and AFV, and such long-term enhancement (LTE) was specifically formed at the AL-MB synapses but not at the AFV-MB synapses. AL-MB LTE was not induced by intense stimulation of the AL alone, and the LTE decays within 60 min after subsequent repetitive AL stimulation. These phenotypes of associativity, input specificity and persistence of AL-MB LTE are highly reminiscent of olfactory memory. Furthermore, similar to olfactory aversive memory, AL-MB LTE formation required activation of the Drosophila D1 dopamine receptor, DopR, along with dnAChR and dNR during associative stimulations. These physiological and genetic analogies indicate that AL-MB LTE might be a relevant cellular model for olfactory memory.

  19. Long-term enhancement of synaptic transmission between antennal lobe and mushroom body in cultured Drosophila brain

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Kohei; Naganos, Shintaro; Hirano, Yukinori; Horiuchi, Junjiro; Saitoe, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    In Drosophila, the mushroom body (MB) is a critical brain structure for olfactory associative learning. During aversive conditioning, the MBs are thought to associate odour signals, conveyed by projection neurons (PNs) from the antennal lobe (AL), with shock signals conveyed through ascending fibres of the ventral nerve cord (AFV). Although synaptic transmission between AL and MB might play a crucial role for olfactory associative learning, its physiological properties have not been examined directly. Using a cultured Drosophila brain expressing a Ca2+ indicator in the MBs, we investigated synaptic transmission and plasticity at the AL–MB synapse. Following stimulation with a glass micro-electrode, AL-induced Ca2+ responses in the MBs were mediated through Drosophila nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (dnAChRs), while AFV-induced Ca2+ responses were mediated through Drosophila NMDA receptors (dNRs). AL–MB synaptic transmission was enhanced more than 2 h after the simultaneous ‘associative-stimulation’ of AL and AFV, and such long-term enhancement (LTE) was specifically formed at the AL–MB synapses but not at the AFV–MB synapses. AL–MB LTE was not induced by intense stimulation of the AL alone, and the LTE decays within 60 min after subsequent repetitive AL stimulation. These phenotypes of associativity, input specificity and persistence of AL–MB LTE are highly reminiscent of olfactory memory. Furthermore, similar to olfactory aversive memory, AL–MB LTE formation required activation of the Drosophila D1 dopamine receptor, DopR, along with dnAChR and dNR during associative stimulations. These physiological and genetic analogies indicate that AL–MB LTE might be a relevant cellular model for olfactory memory. PMID:23027817

  20. Mechanism of Paroxetine (Paxil) Inhibition of the Serotonin Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Bruce A.; Nagarajan, Anu; Forrest, Lucy R.; Singh, Satinder K.

    2016-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) is an integral membrane protein that exploits preexisting sodium-, chloride-, and potassium ion gradients to catalyze the thermodynamically unfavorable movement of synaptic serotonin into the presynaptic neuron. SERT has garnered significant clinical attention partly because it is the target of multiple psychoactive agents, including the antidepressant paroxetine (Paxil), the most potent selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor known. However, the binding site and orientation of paroxetine in SERT remain controversial. To provide molecular insight, we constructed SERT homology models based on the Drosophila melanogaster dopamine transporter and docked paroxetine to these models. We tested the predicted binding configurations with a combination of radioligand binding and flux assays on wild-type and mutant SERTs. Our data suggest that the orientation of paroxetine, specifically its fluorophenyl ring, in SERT’s substrate binding site directly depends on this pocket’s charge distribution, and thereby provide an avenue toward understanding and enhancing high-affinity antidepressant activity. PMID:27032980

  1. The Effect of Antibody-Dependent Enhancement on the Transmission Dynamics and Persistence of Multiple-Strain Pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Neil; Anderson, Roy; Gupta, Sunetra

    1999-01-01

    Cross-reactive antibodies produced by a mammalian host during infection by a particular microparasitic strain usually have the effect of reducing the probability of the host being infected by a different, but closely related, pathogen strain. Such cross-reactive immunological responses thereby induce between-strain competition within the pathogen population. However, in some cases such as dengue virus, evidence suggests that cross-reactive antibodies act to enhance rather than restrict the severity of a subsequent infection by another strain. This cooperative mechanism is thought to explain why pre-existing immunity to dengue virus is an important risk factor for the development of severe disease (i.e., dengue shock syndrome and dengue hemorrhagic fever). In this paper, we explore the effect of antibody-dependent enhancement on the transmission dynamics of multistrain pathogen populations. We show that enhancement frequently may generate complex and persistent cyclical or chaotic epidemic behavior. Furthermore, enhancement acts to permit the coexistence of all strains where in its absence only one or a subset would persist.

  2. Ethanol produces corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-dependent enhancement of spontaneous glutamatergic transmission in the mouse central amygdala.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Yuval; Fetterly, Tracy L; Awad, Elias K; Milano, Elana J; Usdin, Ted B; Winder, Danny G

    2015-11-01

    Ethanol (EtOH) modulation of central amygdala (CeA) neurocircuitry plays a key role in the development of alcoholism via activation of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor (CRFR) system. Previous work has predominantly focused on EtOH × CRF interactions on the CeA GABA circuitry; however, our laboratory recently showed that CRF enhances CeA glutamatergic transmission. Therefore, this study sought to determine whether EtOH modulates CeA glutamate transmission via activation of CRF signaling. The effects of EtOH on spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) and basal resting membrane potentials were examined via standard electrophysiology methods in adult male C57BL/6J mice. Local ablation of CeA CRF neurons (CRF(CeAhDTR) ) was achieved by targeting the human diphtheria toxin receptor (hDTR) to CeA CRF neurons with an adeno-associated virus. Ablation was quantified post hoc with confocal microscopy. Genetic targeting of the diphtheria toxin active subunit to CRF neurons (CRF(DTA) mice) ablated CRF neurons throughout the central nervous system, as assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction quantification of CRF mRNA. Acute bath application of EtOH significantly increased sEPSC frequency in a concentration-dependent manner in CeA neurons, and this effect was blocked by pretreatment of co-applied CRFR1 and CRFR2 antagonists. In experiments utilizing a CRF-tomato reporter mouse, EtOH did not significantly alter the basal membrane potential of CeA CRF neurons. The ability of EtOH to enhance CeA sEPSC frequency was not altered in CRF(CeAhDTR) mice despite a ~78% reduction in CeA CRF cell counts. The ability of EtOH to enhance CeA sEPSC frequency was also not altered in the CRF(DTA) mice despite a 3-fold reduction in CRF mRNA levels. These findings demonstrate that EtOH enhances spontaneous glutamatergic transmission in the CeA via a CRFR-dependent mechanism. Surprisingly, our data suggest that this action may not

  3. Ethanol produces corticotropin releasing factor receptor-dependent enhancement of spontaneous glutamatergic transmission in the mouse central amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Silberman, Yuval; Fetterly, Tracy L.; Awad, Elias K.; Milano, Elana J.; Usdin, Ted B.; Winder, Danny G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ethanol modulation of Central Amygdala (CeA) neurocircuitry plays a key role in the development of alcoholism via activation of the corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) receptor system. Previous work has predominantly focused on ethanol/CRF interactions on the CeA GABA circuitry; however our lab recently showed that CRF enhances CeA glutamatergic transmission. Therefore, this study sought to determine if ethanol modulates CeA glutamate transmission via activation of CRF signaling. Methods The effects of ethanol on spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) and basal resting membrane potentials were examined via standard electrophysiology methods in adult male C57BL/6J mice. Local ablation of CeA CRF neurons (CRFCeAhDTR) was achieved by targeting the human diphtheria toxin receptor (hDTR) to CeA CRF neurons with an adeno-associated virus. Ablation was quantified post-hoc with confocal microscopy. Genetic targeting of the diphtheria toxin active subunit to CRF neurons (CRFDTA mice) ablated CRF neurons throughout the CNS, as assessed by qRT-PCR quantification of CRF mRNA. Results Acute bath application of ethanol significantly increased sEPSC frequency in a concentration dependent manner in CeA neurons, and this effect was blocked by pretreatment of co-applied CRF receptor 1 and CRF receptor 2 antagonists. In experiments utilizing a CRF-tomato reporter mouse, ethanol did not significantly alter the basal membrane potential of CeA CRF neurons. The ability of ethanol to enhance CeA sEPSC frequency was not altered in CRFCeAhDTR mice despite a ~78% reduction in CeA CRF cell counts. The ability of ethanol to enhance CeA sEPSC frequency was also not altered in the CRFDTA mice despite a three-fold reduction in CRF mRNA levels. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that ethanol enhances spontaneous glutamatergic transmission in the CeA via a CRF receptor dependent mechanism. Surprisingly, our data suggest that this action may not require endogenous CRF

  4. Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus Infection Enhances SGLT1 and GLUT2 Expression to Increase Glucose Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Lei; Hu, Wei Wei; Xia, Lu; Xia, Mi; Yang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) is a coronavirus that causes villus atrophy, followed by crypt hyperplasia, reduces the activities of intestinal digestive enzymes, and disrupts the absorption of intestinal nutrients. In vivo, TGEV primarily targets and infects intestinal epithelial cells, which play an important role in glucose absorption via the apical and basolateral transporters Na+-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1) and facilitative glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2), respectively. In this study, we therefore sought to evaluate the effects of TGEV infection on glucose uptake and SGLT1 and GLUT2 expression. Our data demonstrate that infection with TGEV resulted in increased glucose uptake and augmented expression of EGFR, SGLT1 and GLUT2. Moreover, inhibition studies showed that EGFR modulated glucose uptake in control and TGEV infected cells. Finally, high glucose absorption was subsequently found to promote TGEV replication. PMID:27851758

  5. Paramecium caudatum enhances transmission and infectivity of Mycobacterium marinum and Mycobacterium chelonae in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Tracy S.; Ferguson, Jayde A.; Watral, Virginia G.; Mutoji, K. Nadine; Ennis, Don G.; Kent, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterial infections in laboratory zebrafish (Danio rerio) are common and widespread in research colonies. Mycobacteria within free living amoebae have been shown to be transmission vectors for mycobacteriosis. Paramecium caudatum are commonly used as a first food for zebrafish, and we investigated this ciliate’s potential to serve as a vector of Mycobacterium marinum and M. chelonae. The ability of live P. caudatum to transmit these mycobacteria to larval, juvenile and adult zebrafish was evaluated. Infections were defined by histologic observation of granulomas containing acid-fast bacteria in extraintestinal locations. In both experiments, fish fed paramecia containing mycobacteria became infected at a higher incidence than controls. Larvae (exposed at 4 days post hatch) fed paramecia with M. marinum exhibited an incidence of 30% (24/80) and juveniles (exposed at 21 days post hatch) showed 31% incidence (14/45). Adult fish fed a gelatin food matrix containing mycobacteria within paramecia or mycobacteria alone for 2 wk resulted in infections when examined 8 wk after exposure as follows: M. marinum OSU 214 47% (21/45), M. marinum CH 47% (9/19), M. chelonae 38% (5/13). In contrast, fish feed mycobacteria alone in this diet did not become infected, except for 2 fish (5%) in the M. marinum OSU 214 low dose group. These results demonstrate that Paramecium caudatum can act as a vector for mycobacteria. This provides a useful animal model for evaluation of natural mycobacterial infections and demonstrates the possibility of mycobacterial transmission in zebrafish facilities via contaminated paramecia cultures. PMID:24192000

  6. Paramecium caudatum enhances transmission and infectivity of Mycobacterium marinum and M. chelonae in zebrafish Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Tracy S; Ferguson, Jayde A; Watral, Virginia G; Mutoji, K Nadine; Ennis, Don G; Kent, Michael L

    2013-11-06

    Mycobacterial infections in laboratory zebrafish Danio rerio are common and widespread in research colonies. Mycobacteria within free-living amoebae have been shown to be transmission vectors for mycobacteriosis. Paramecium caudatum are commonly used as a first food for zebrafish, and we investigated this ciliate's potential to serve as a vector of Mycobacterium marinum and M. chelonae. The ability of live P. caudatum to transmit these mycobacteria to larval, juvenile and adult zebrafish was evaluated. Infections were defined by histologic observation of granulomas containing acid-fast bacteria in extraintestinal locations. In both experiments, fish fed paramecia containing mycobacteria became infected at a higher incidence than controls. Larvae (exposed at 4 d post hatch) fed paramecia with M. marinum exhibited an incidence of 30% (24/80) and juveniles (exposed at 21 d post hatch) showed 31% incidence (14/45). Adult fish fed a gelatin food matrix containing mycobacteria within paramecia or mycobacteria alone for 2 wk resulted in infections when examined 8 wk after exposure as follows: M. marinum OSU 214 47% (21/45), M. marinum CH 47% (9/19), and M. chelonae 38% (5/13). In contrast, fish feed mycobacteria alone in this diet did not become infected, except for 2 fish (5%) in the M. marinum OSU 214 low-dose group. These results demonstrate that P. caudatum can act as a vector for mycobacteria. This provides a useful animal model for evaluation of natural mycobacterial infections and demonstrates the possibility of mycobacterial transmission in zebrafish facilities via contaminated paramecia cultures.

  7. A Plant Virus Manipulates the Behavior of Its Whitefly Vector to Enhance Its Transmission Efficiency and Spread

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Delafuente, Ana; Garzo, Elisa; Moreno, Aranzazu; Fereres, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Plant viruses can produce direct and plant-mediated indirect effects on their insect vectors, modifying their life cycle, fitness and behavior. Viruses may benefit from such changes leading to enhanced transmission efficiency and spread. In our study, female adults of Bemisia tabaci were subjected to an acquisition access period of 72 h in Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV)-infected and non-infected tomato plants to obtain viruliferous and non-viruliferous whiteflies, respectively. Insects that were exposed to virus-infected plants were checked by PCR to verify their viruliferous status. Results of the Ethovision video tracking bioassays indicated that TYLCV induced an arrestant behavior of B. tabaci, as viruliferous whitefly adults remained motionless for more time and moved slower than non-viruliferous whiteflies after their first contact with eggplant leaf discs. In fact, Electrical Penetration Graphs showed that TYLCV-viruliferous B. tabaci fed more often from phloem sieve elements and made a larger number of phloem contacts (increased number of E1, E2 and sustained E2 per insect, p<0.05) in eggplants than non-viruliferous whiteflies. Furthermore, the duration of the salivation phase in phloem sieve elements (E1) preceding sustained sap ingestion was longer in viruliferous than in non-viruliferous whiteflies (p<0.05). This particular probing behavior is known to significantly enhance the inoculation efficiency of TYLCV by B. tabaci. Our results show evidence that TYLCV directly manipulates the settling, probing and feeding behavior of its vector B. tabaci in a way that enhances virus transmission efficiency and spread. Furthermore, TYLCV-B. tabaci interactions are mutually beneficial to both the virus and its vector because B. tabaci feeds more efficiently after acquisition of TYLCV. This outcome has clear implications in the epidemiology and management of the TYLCV-B. tabaci complex. PMID:23613872

  8. Reboxetine Enhances the Olanzapine-Induced Antipsychotic-Like Effect, Cortical Dopamine Outflow and NMDA Receptor-Mediated Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Monica M; Jardemark, Kent; Malmerfelt, Anna; Björkholm, Carl; Svensson, Torgny H

    2010-01-01

    Preclinical data have shown that addition of the selective norepinephrine transporter (NET) inhibitor reboxetine increases the antipsychotic-like effect of the D2/3 antagonist raclopride and, in parallel, enhances cortical dopamine output. Subsequent clinical results suggested that adding reboxetine to stable treatments with various antipsychotic drugs (APDs) may improve positive, negative and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia. In this study, we investigated in rats the effects of adding reboxetine to the second-generation APD olanzapine on: (i) antipsychotic efficacy, using the conditioned avoidance response (CAR) test, (ii) extrapyramidal side effect (EPS) liability, using a catalepsy test, (iii) dopamine efflux in the medial prefrontal cortex and the nucleus accumbens, using in vivo microdialysis in freely moving animals and (iv) cortical N-methyl--aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated transmission, using intracellular electrophysiological recording in vitro. Reboxetine (6 mg/kg) enhanced the suppression of CAR induced by a suboptimal dose (1.25 mg/kg), but not an optimal (2.5 mg/kg) dose of olanzapine without any concomitant catalepsy. Addition of reboxetine to the low dose of olanzapine also markedly increased cortical dopamine outflow and facilitated prefrontal NMDA receptor-mediated transmission. Our data suggest that adjunctive treatment with a NET inhibitor may enhance the therapeutic effect of low-dose olanzapine in schizophrenia without increasing EPS liability and add an antidepressant action, thus in principle allowing for a dose reduction of olanzapine with a concomitant reduction of dose-related side effects, such as EPS and weight gain. PMID:20463659

  9. Enhancement of synaptic transmission and nociceptive behaviour in HPC-1/syntaxin 1A knockout mice following peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Takasusuki, T; Fujiwara, T; Yamaguchi, S; Fukushima, T; Akagawa, K; Hori, Y

    2007-10-01

    Our previous analysis of HPC-1/syntaxin 1A knockout (KO) mice indicated that HPC-1/syntaxin 1A plays an important role in the synaptic plasticity of the hippocampus in vitro and learning behaviour in vivo. In order to gain further insights into the physiological functions of HPC-1/syntaxin 1A, we studied the changes in the plasticity of synaptic transmission in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord following a peripheral nerve injury in HPC-1/syntaxin 1A KO and wild-type (WT) mice. The von Frey filament test revealed that partial ligation of the sciatic nerve caused neuropathic pain in both WT and KO mice. However, KO mice showed significant enhancement of mechanical allodynia as compared with WT mice. Tight-seal whole-cell recordings were obtained from neurons in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord slices. Electrical stimulus-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs), asynchronous EPSCs (aEPSCs) in the presence of strontium, and spontaneously occurring miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs) were analysed. Prior to peripheral nerve ligation, no significant differences were observed in the properties of evoked EPSCs, aEPSCs and mEPSCs in KO and WT mice. Seven-14 days after partial ligation, the amplitude of evoked EPSCs and the frequency of aEPSCs and mEPSCs in KO mice were significantly greater than those in WT mice; however, the amplitude of aEPSCs and mEPSCs remained unchanged in both groups. Enhanced allodynia behaviour and significant enhancement of excitatory synaptic transmission following peripheral nerve ligation in KO mice suggest that HPC-1/syntaxin 1A might play a role in synaptic plasticity in the nociceptive pathway.

  10. Interactions of β-lactoglobulin with serotonin and arachidonyl serotonin.

    PubMed

    Taheri-Kafrani, Asghar; Choiset, Yvan; Faizullin, Dzhigangir A; Zuev, Yuri F; Bezuglov, Vladimir V; Chobert, Jean-Marc; Bordbar, Abdol-Khalegh; Haertlé, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    β-Lactoglobulin (β-LG) is a lipocalin, which is the major whey protein of cow's milk and the milk of other mammals. However, it is absent from human milk. The biological function of β-LG is not clear, but its potential role in carrying fatty acids through the digestive tract has been suggested. β-LG has been found in complexes with lipids such as butyric and oleic acids and has a high affinity for a wide variety of compounds. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), an important compound found in animals and plants, has various functions, including the regulation of mood, appetite, sleep, muscle contraction, and some cognitive functions such as memory and learning. In this study, the interaction of serotonin and one of its derivatives, arachidonyl serotonin (AA-5HT), with β-LG was investigated using circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence intensity measurements. These two ligands interact with β-LG forming equimolar complexes. The binding constant for the serotonin/β-LG interaction is between 10⁵ and 10⁶ M(-1) , whereas for the AA-5HT/β-LG complex it is between 10⁴ and 10⁵ M(-1) as determined by measurements of either protein or ligand fluorescence. The observed binding affinities were higher in hydroethanolic media (25% EtOH). The interactions between serotonin/β-LG and AA-5HT/β-LG may compete with self-association (micellization) of both the ligand and the protein. According to far- and near-UV CD results, these ligands have no apparent influence on β-LG secondary structure, however they partially destabilize its tertiary structure. Their binding by β-LG may be one of the peripheral mechanisms of the regulation of the content of serotonin and its derivatives in the bowel of milk-fed animals.

  11. Serotonin, Inhibition, and Negative Mood

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Peter; Huys, Quentin J. M

    2008-01-01

    Pavlovian predictions of future aversive outcomes lead to behavioral inhibition, suppression, and withdrawal. There is considerable evidence for the involvement of serotonin in both the learning of these predictions and the inhibitory consequences that ensue, although less for a causal relationship between the two. In the context of a highly simplified model of chains of affectively charged thoughts, we interpret the combined effects of serotonin in terms of pruning a tree of possible decisions, (i.e., eliminating those choices that have low or negative expected outcomes). We show how a drop in behavioral inhibition, putatively resulting from an experimentally or psychiatrically influenced drop in serotonin, could result in unexpectedly large negative prediction errors and a significant aversive shift in reinforcement statistics. We suggest an interpretation of this finding that helps dissolve the apparent contradiction between the fact that inhibition of serotonin reuptake is the first-line treatment of depression, although serotonin itself is most strongly linked with aversive rather than appetitive outcomes and predictions. PMID:18248087

  12. Serotonin neurotransmission in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Haleem, Darakhshan Jabeen

    2012-09-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) show extreme dieting weight loss, hyperactivity, depression/anxiety, self-control, and behavioral impulsivity. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) is involved in almost all the behavioral changes observed in AN patients. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute toward the pathogenesis of AN. It is a frequent disorder among adolescent girls and young women and starts as an attempt to lose weight to look beautiful and attractive. Failure to see the turning point when fasting becomes unreasonable leads to malnutrition and AN. Tryptophan, the precursor of serotonin and an essential amino acid, is only available in the diet. It is therefore likely that excessive diet restriction and malnutrition decrease brain serotonin stores because the precursor is less available to the rate-limiting enzyme of 5-HT biosynthesis, which normally exists unsaturated with its substrate. Evidence shows that diet restriction-induced exaggerated feedback control over 5-HT synthesis and the smaller availability of tryptophan decreases serotonin neurotransmission at postsynaptic sites, leading to hyperactivity, depression, and behavioral impulsivity. A compensatory upregulation of postsynaptic 5-HT-1A receptors and hypophagic serotonin receptors may be involved in anxiety and suppression of appetite. It is suggested that tryptophan supplementation may improve pharmacotherapy in AN.

  13. Oscillatory Serotonin Function in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Ronald M.; Cowan, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    Oscillations in brain activities with periods of minutes to hours may be critical for normal mood behaviors. Ultradian (faster than circadian) rhythms of mood behaviors and associated central nervous system activities are altered in depression. Recent data suggest that ultradian rhythms in serotonin (5HT) function also change in depression. In two separate studies, 5HT metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were measured every 10 m for 24 h before and after chronic antidepressant treatment. Antidepressant treatments were associated with enhanced ultradian amplitudes of CSF metabolite levels. Another study used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)to measure amplitudes of dorsal raphé activation cycles following sham or active dietary depletions of the 5HT precursor (tryptophan). During depletion, amplitudes of dorsal raphé activation cycles increased with rapid 6 s periods (about 0.18 Hz)while functional connectivity weakened between dorsal raphé and thalamus at slower periods of 20 s (0.05 Hz). A third approach studied MDMA (ecstasy) users because of their chronically diminished 5HT function compared to non-MDMA polysubstance users (Karageorgiou et al., 2009). Compared to a non-MDMA using cohort, MDMA users showed diminished fMRI intra-regional coherence in motor regions along with altered functional connectivity, again suggesting effects of altered 5HT oscillatory function. These data support a hypothesis that qualities of ultradian oscillations in 5HT function may critically influence moods and behaviors. Dysfunctional 5HT rhythms in depression may be a common endpoint and biomarker for depression, linking dysfunction of slow brain network oscillators to 5HT mechanisms affected by commonly available treatments. 5HT oscillatory dysfunction may define illness subtypes and predict responses to serotonergic agents. Further studies of 5HT oscillations in depression are indicated. PMID:23592367

  14. Perinatal vs Genetic Programming of Serotonin States Associated with Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Altieri, Stefanie C; Yang, Hongyan; O'Brien, Hannah J; Redwine, Hannah M; Senturk, Damla; Hensler, Julie G; Andrews, Anne M

    2015-01-01

    Large numbers of women undergo antidepressant treatment during pregnancy; however, long-term consequences for their offspring remain largely unknown. Rodents exposed to serotonin transporter (SERT)-inhibiting antidepressants during development show changes in adult emotion-like behavior. These changes have been equated with behavioral alterations arising from genetic reductions in SERT. Both models are highly relevant to humans yet they vary in their time frames of SERT disruption. We find that anxiety-related behavior and, importantly, underlying serotonin neurotransmission diverge between the two models. In mice, constitutive loss of SERT causes life-long increases in anxiety-related behavior and hyperserotonemia. Conversely, early exposure to the antidepressant escitalopram (ESC; Lexapro) results in decreased anxiety-related behavior beginning in adolescence, which is associated with adult serotonin system hypofunction in the ventral hippocampus. Adult behavioral changes resulting from early fluoxetine (Prozac) exposure were different from those of ESC and, although somewhat similar to SERT deficiency, were not associated with changes in hippocampal serotonin transmission in late adulthood. These findings reveal dissimilarities in adult behavior and neurotransmission arising from developmental exposure to different widely prescribed antidepressants that are not recapitulated by genetic SERT insufficiency. Moreover, they support a pivotal role for serotonergic modulation of anxiety-related behavior. PMID:25523893

  15. Reduced serotonin synthesis and regional cerebral blood flow after anxiolytic treatment of social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Frick, Andreas; Åhs, Fredrik; Appel, Lieuwe; Jonasson, My; Wahlstedt, Kurt; Bani, Massimo; Merlo Pich, Emilio; Bettica, Paolo; Långström, Bengt; Lubberink, Mark; Fredrikson, Mats; Furmark, Tomas

    2016-11-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is associated with increased fear-related neural activity in the amygdala and we recently found enhanced serotonin synthesis rate in the same region. Anxiolytic agents like selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) antagonists reduce amygdala activity and may attenuate serotonin formation according to animal studies. Here, we examined the effects of SSRI pharmacotherapy, NK1R antagonism, and placebo on serotonin synthesis rate in relation to neural activity, measured as regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), and symptom improvement in SAD. Eighteen SAD patients were randomized to receive daily double-blind treatment for six weeks either with the SSRI citalopram (n=6; 40mg), the NK1R antagonist GR205171 (n=6; 5mg; 4 weeks following 2 weeks of placebo), or placebo (n=6). Serotonin synthesis rate at rest and rCBF during stressful public speaking were assessed, before and after treatment, using positron emission tomography with the tracers [(11)C]5-hydroxytryptophan and [(15)O]water respectively. The Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS-SR) indexed symptom severity. All groups exhibited attenuated amygdala serotonin synthesis rate after treatment, which was associated with reduced amygdala rCBF during public speaking and accompanied by symptom improvement. These results are consistent with the notion that serotonin in the amygdala exerts an anxiogenic influence and, conversely, that anxiolysis is achieved through decreased serotonin formation in the amygdala.

  16. Plasmon resonance enhanced optical transmission and magneto-optical Faraday effects in nanohole arrays blocked by metal antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Chengxin; Tang, Zhixiong; Wang, Sihao; Li, Daoyong; Chen, Leyi; Tang, Shaolong; Du, Youwei

    2017-07-01

    The properties of the optical and magneto-optical effects of an improved plasmonic nanohole arrays blocked by gold mushroom caps are investigated by using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. It is most noteworthy that the strongly enhanced Faraday rotation along with high transmittance has been achieved simultaneously by optimizing the parameters of nanostructure in a broad spectrum spanning visible to near-infrared frequencies, which is very important in practical application for designing novel optical and magneto-optical devices. In our designed structure, we obtained two extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) resonant peaks along with enhanced Faraday rotation and two peaks of the figure of merit (FOM). By optimizing the geometrical parameters of the structure, we can obtain an almost 10-fold enhancement of Faraday rotation with a corresponding transmittance 50%, and the FOM of 0.752 at the same wavelength. As expected, the optical and magneto-optical effects sensitively depends on the geometrical parameters of our structure, which can be simply tailored by the height of pillar, the diameter of mushroom cap, and the period of the structure, and so on. The physical mechanism of these physical phenomena in the paper has been explained in detail. These research findings are of great theoretical significance in developing the novel magneto-optical devices in the future.

  17. Resolution enhancement in transmission electron microscopy with 60-kV monochromated electron source

    SciTech Connect

    Morishita, Shigeyuki; Mukai, Masaki; Sawada, Hidetaka; Suenaga, Kazutomo

    2016-01-04

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at low accelerating voltages is useful to obtain images with low irradiation damage. For a low accelerating voltage, linear information transfer, which determines the resolution for observation of single-layered materials, is largely limited by defocus spread, which improves when a narrow energy spread is used in the electron source. In this study, we have evaluated the resolution of images obtained at 60 kV by TEM performed with a monochromated electron source. The defocus spread has been evaluated by comparing diffractogram tableaux from TEM images obtained under nonmonochromated and monochromated illumination. The information limits for different energy spreads were precisely measured by using diffractograms with a large beam tilt. The result shows that the information limit reaches 0.1 nm with an energy width of 0.10 eV. With this monochromated source and a higher-order aberration corrector, we have obtained images of single carbon atoms in a graphene sheet by TEM at 60 kV.

  18. Challenging Transmission Modes of Teaching in Science Classrooms: Enhancing Learner-Centredness through Dialogicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehesvuori, Sami; Ramnarain, Umesh; Viiri, Jouni

    2017-04-01

    There is an ongoing reform towards more inquiry-based teaching in school curriculum policy in South Africa. Reform towards more inquiry-based approaches is already integrated in pre-service teacher education programmes. As inquiry-based approaches have been gaining momentum worldwide, there is an increasing concern that dialogic interaction in classroom communication is being neglected. This is especially within teacher-orchestrated classroom interactions that should foster greater learner centredness and thus authentic scientific inquiry. In learner-centred teaching approaches, student contributions should be explicitly taken into account as part of classroom interactions in science. Learner-centred approaches provide the rationale for improved interaction, especially when student contributions should be considered within teacher-orchestrated communications. The aim of this study is to bring forth indicators that are connected to different forms of interactions and complement the dialogic-authoritative categorization through in-depth analysis of two lesson transcript examples. Even though over-authoritative and even transmission modes of communication seemed to prevail in South African classrooms, it is through finding building blocks for dialogicity this status can be challenged towards more learner-centred interaction. The explicitness of dialogicity and fundamentally contrasting differences between examples of dialogic and authoritative approaches are presented through the in-depth analysis of classroom interactions of two case episodes. Implications for teaching and teacher education are discussed.

  19. Speech enhancement in discontinuous transmission systems using the constrained-stability least-mean-squares algorithm.

    PubMed

    Górriz, J M; Ramírez, J; Cruces-Alvarez, S; Erdogmus, D; Puntonet, C G; Lang, E W

    2008-12-01

    In this paper a novel constrained-stability least-mean-squares (LMS) algorithm for filtering speech sounds is proposed in the adaptive noise cancellation (ANC) problem. It is based on the minimization of the squared Euclidean norm of the weight vector change under a stability constraint over the a posteriori estimation errors. To this purpose, the Lagrangian methodology has been used in order to propose a nonlinear adaptation in terms of the product of differential input and error. Convergence analysis is also studied in terms of the evolution of the natural modes to the optimal Wiener-Hopf solution so that the stability performance depends exclusively on the adaptation parameter mu and the eigenvalues of the difference matrix DeltaR(1). The algorithm shows superior performance over the referenced algorithms in the ANC problem of speech discontinuous transmission systems, which are characterized by rapid transitions of the desired signal. The experimental analysis carried out on the AURORA 3 speech databases provides an extensive performance evaluation together with an exhaustive comparison to the standard LMS algorithms, i.e., the normalized LMS (NLMS), and other recently reported LMS algorithms such as the modified NLMS, the error nonlinearity LMS, or the normalized data nonlinearity LMS adaptation.

  20. Design and Development of Layered Security: Future Enhancements and Directions in Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Shahzad, Aamir; Lee, Malrey; Kim, Suntae; Kim, Kangmin; Choi, Jae-Young; Cho, Younghwa; Lee, Keun-Kwang

    2016-01-01

    Today, security is a prominent issue when any type of communication is being undertaken. Like traditional networks, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems suffer from a number of vulnerabilities. Numerous end-to-end security mechanisms have been proposed for the resolution of SCADA-system security issues, but due to insecure real-time protocol use and the reliance upon open protocols during Internet-based communication, these SCADA systems can still be compromised by security challenges. This study reviews the security challenges and issues that are commonly raised during SCADA/protocol transmissions and proposes a secure distributed-network protocol version 3 (DNP3) design, and the implementation of the security solution using a cryptography mechanism. Due to the insecurities found within SCADA protocols, the new development consists of a DNP3 protocol that has been designed as a part of the SCADA system, and the cryptographically derived security is deployed within the application layer as a part of the DNP3 stack. PMID:26751443

  1. Design and Development of Layered Security: Future Enhancements and Directions in Transmission.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Aamir; Lee, Malrey; Kim, Suntae; Kim, Kangmin; Choi, Jae-Young; Cho, Younghwa; Lee, Keun-Kwang

    2016-01-06

    Today, security is a prominent issue when any type of communication is being undertaken. Like traditional networks, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems suffer from a number of vulnerabilities. Numerous end-to-end security mechanisms have been proposed for the resolution of SCADA-system security issues, but due to insecure real-time protocol use and the reliance upon open protocols during Internet-based communication, these SCADA systems can still be compromised by security challenges. This study reviews the security challenges and issues that are commonly raised during SCADA/protocol transmissions and proposes a secure distributed-network protocol version 3 (DNP3) design, and the implementation of the security solution using a cryptography mechanism. Due to the insecurities found within SCADA protocols, the new development consists of a DNP3 protocol that has been designed as a part of the SCADA system, and the cryptographically derived security is deployed within the application layer as a part of the DNP3 stack.

  2. Enhanced transmission of malaria parasites to mosquitoes in a murine model of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pakpour, Nazzy; Cheung, Kong Wai; Luckhart, Shirley

    2016-04-21

    More than half of the world's population is at risk of malaria and simultaneously, many malaria-endemic regions are facing dramatic increases in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes. Studies in murine malaria models have examined the impact of malaria infection on type 2 diabetes pathology, it remains unclear how this chronic metabolic disorder impacts the transmission of malaria. In this report, the ability type 2 diabetic rodents infected with malaria to transmit parasites to Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes is quantified. The infection prevalence and intensity of An. stephensi mosquitoes that fed upon control or type 2 diabetic C57BL/6 db/db mice infected with either lethal Plasmodium berghei NK65 or non-lethal Plasmodium yoelii 17XNL murine malaria strains were determined. Daily parasitaemias were also recorded. A higher percentage of mosquitoes (87.5 vs 61.5 % for P. yoelii and 76.9 vs 50 % for P. berghei) became infected following blood feeding on Plasmodium-infected type 2 diabetic mice compared to mosquitoes that fed on infected control animals, despite no significant differences in circulating gametocyte levels. These results suggest that type 2 diabetic mice infected with malaria are more efficient at infecting mosquitoes, raising the question of whether a similar synergy exists in humans.

  3. Enhanced detection of gametocytes by magnetic deposition microscopy predicts higher potential for Plasmodium falciparum transmission

    PubMed Central

    Karl, Stephan; David, Makindi; Moore, Lee; Grimberg, Brian T; Michon, Pascal; Mueller, Ivo; Zborowski, Maciej; Zimmerman, Peter A

    2008-01-01

    Background Aggregated haemozoin crystals within malaria-infected erythrocytes confer susceptibility of parasitized cells to a magnetic field. Here the utility of this method for diagnosis of human malaria is evaluated in a malaria-endemic region of Papua New Guinea (PNG). Methods and findings Individuals with Plasmodium falciparum malaria symptoms (n = 55) provided samples for conventional blood smear (CBS) and magnetic deposition microscopy (MDM) diagnosis. Standard Giemsa staining and light microscopy was performed to evaluate all preparations. Plasmodium falciparum parasitaemia observed on MDM slides was consistently higher than parasitaemia observed by (CBS) for ring (CBS = 2.6 vs. MDM = 3.4%; t-test P-value = 0.13), trophozoite (CBS = 0.5 vs. MDM = 1.6%; t-test P-value = 0.01), schizont (CBS = 0.003 vs. MDM = 0.1%; t-test P-value = 0.08) and gametocyte (CBS = 0.001 vs. MDM = 0.4%; t-test P-value = 0.0002) parasitaemias. Gametocyte prevalence determined by CBS compared to MDM increased from 7.3% to 45%, respectively. Conclusion MDM increased detection sensitivity of P. falciparum-infected, haemozoin-containing erythrocytes from infected humans while maintaining detection of ring-stage parasites. Gametocyte prevalence five-fold higher than observed by CBS suggests higher malaria transmission potential in PNG endemic sites compared to previous estimates. PMID:18439240

  4. On an aerodynamic mechanism to enhance ion transmission and sensitivity of FAIMS for nano-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Satendra; Belford, Michael W; Dunyach, Jean-Jacques; Purves, Randy W

    2014-12-01

    Simulations show that significant ion losses occur within the commercial electrospray ionization-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometer (ESI-FAIMS) interface owing to an angular desolvation gas flow and because of the impact of the FAIMS carrier gas onto the inner rf (radio frequency) electrode. The angular desolvation gas flow diverts ions away from the entrance plate orifice while the carrier gas annihilates ions onto the inner rf electrode. A novel ESI-FAIMS interface is described that optimizes FAIMS gas flows resulting in large improvements in transmission. Simulations with the bromochloroacetate anion showed an improvement of ~9-fold to give ~70% overall transmission). Comparable transmission improvements were attained experimentally for six peptides (2+) in the range of m/z 404.2 to 653.4 at a chromatographic flow rate of 300 nL/min. Selected ion chromatograms (SIC) from nano-LC-FAIMS-MS analyses showed 71% (HLVDEPQNLIK, m/z 653.4, 2+) to 95% (LVNELTEFAK, m/z 582.3, 2+) of ion signal compared with ion signal in the SIC from LC-MS analysis. IGSEVYHNLK (580.3, 2+) showed 24% more ion signal compared with LC-MS and is explained by enhanced desolvation in FAIMS. A 3-10 times lower limits of quantitation (LOQ) (<15% RSD) was achieved for chemical noise limited peaks with FAIMS. Peaks limited by ion statistics showed subtle improvement in RSD and yielded comparable LOQ to that attained with nano-LC-MS (without FAIMS). These improvements were obtained using a reduced FAIMS separation gap (from 2.5 to 1.5 mm) that results in a shorter residence time (13.2 ms ± 3.9 ms) and enables the use of a helium free transport gas (100% nitrogen).

  5. On an Aerodynamic Mechanism to Enhance Ion Transmission and Sensitivity of FAIMS for Nano-Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Satendra; Belford, Michael W.; Dunyach, Jean-Jacques; Purves, Randy W.

    2014-12-01

    Simulations show that significant ion losses occur within the commercial electrospray ionization-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometer (ESI-FAIMS) interface owing to an angular desolvation gas flow and because of the impact of the FAIMS carrier gas onto the inner rf (radio frequency) electrode. The angular desolvation gas flow diverts ions away from the entrance plate orifice while the carrier gas annihilates ions onto the inner rf electrode. A novel ESI-FAIMS interface is described that optimizes FAIMS gas flows resulting in large improvements in transmission. Simulations with the bromochloroacetate anion showed an improvement of ~9-fold to give ~70% overall transmission). Comparable transmission improvements were attained experimentally for six peptides (2+) in the range of m/z 404.2 to 653.4 at a chromatographic flow rate of 300 nL/min. Selected ion chromatograms (SIC) from nano-LC-FAIMS-MS analyses showed 71% (HLVDEPQNLIK, m/z 653.4, 2+) to 95% (LVNELTEFAK, m/z 582.3, 2+) of ion signal compared with ion signal in the SIC from LC-MS analysis. IGSEVYHNLK (580.3, 2+) showed 24% more ion signal compared with LC-MS and is explained by enhanced desolvation in FAIMS. A 3-10 times lower limits of quantitation (LOQ) (<15% RSD) was achieved for chemical noise limited peaks with FAIMS. Peaks limited by ion statistics showed subtle improvement in RSD and yielded comparable LOQ to that attained with nano-LC-MS (without FAIMS). These improvements were obtained using a reduced FAIMS separation gap (from 2.5 to 1.5 mm) that results in a shorter residence time (13.2 ms ± 3.9 ms) and enables the use of a helium free transport gas (100% nitrogen).

  6. Application of LC and LC-MS to the analysis of melatonin and serotonin in edible plants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Mazza, Giuseppe

    2011-04-01

    Melatonin is a neurohormone produced by the pineal gland of animals. Serotonin is a monoamine neurotransmitter and one of the precursors of melatonin biosynthesis. These two indoleamines have recently been reported to have widespread occurrence in many edible plants. Consuming foodstuffs containing melatonin and serotonin could raise their physiologic concentrations in blood and enhance human health. Literature concerning analytical methods suitable for determination of melatonin and serotonin in edible plants is limited, although several liquid chromatographic (LC) techniques have been used for their quantification. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) methods combine selectivity, sensitivity, and high precision, and enable the simultaneous determination of melatonin and serotonin. This work reviews LC and LC-MS techniques used to determine melatonin and serotonin, and the available data on melatonin and serotonin levels in edible plants. © 2011 Crown Copyright

  7. Enhanced thermal stability of a polymer solar cell blend induced by electron beam irradiation in the transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Bäcke, Olof; Lindqvist, Camilla; de Zerio Mendaza, Amaia Diaz; Gustafsson, Stefan; Wang, Ergang; Andersson, Mats R; Müller, Christian; Kristiansen, Per Magnus; Olsson, Eva

    2017-05-01

    We show by in situ microscopy that the effects of electron beam irradiation during transmission electron microscopy can be used to lock microstructural features and enhance the structural thermal stability of a nanostructured polymer:fullerene blend. Polymer:fullerene bulk-heterojunction thin films show great promise for use as active layers in organic solar cells but their low thermal stability is a hindrance. Lack of thermal stability complicates manufacturing and influences the lifetime of devices. To investigate how electron irradiation affects the thermal stability of polymer:fullerene films, a model bulk-heterojunction film based on a thiophene-quinoxaline copolymer and a fullerene derivative was heat-treated in-situ in a transmission electron microscope. In areas of the film that exposed to the electron beam the nanostructure of the film remained stable, while the nanostructure in areas not exposed to the electron beam underwent large phase separation and nucleation of fullerene crystals. UV-vis spectroscopy shows that the polymer:fullerene films are stable for electron doses up to 2000kGy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Enhanced thermal stability of a polymer solar cell blend induced by electron beam irradiation in the transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Bäcke, Olof; Lindqvist, Camilla; de Zerio Mendaza, Amaia Diaz; Gustafsson, Stefan; Wang, Ergang; Andersson, Mats R; Müller, Christian; Kristiansen, Per Magnus; Olsson, Eva

    2017-02-01

    We show by in situ microscopy that the effects of electron beam irradiation during transmission electron microscopy can be used to lock microstructural features and enhance the structural thermal stability of a nanostructured polymer:fullerene blend. Polymer:fullerene bulk-heterojunction thin films show great promise for use as active layers in organic solar cells but their low thermal stability is a hindrance. Lack of thermal stability complicates manufacturing and influences the lifetime of devices. To investigate how electron irradiation affects the thermal stability of polymer:fullerene films, a model bulk-heterojunction film based on a thiophene-quinoxaline copolymer and a fullerene derivative was heat-treated in-situ in a transmission electron microscope. In areas of the film that exposed to the electron beam the nanostructure of the film remained stable, while the nanostructure in areas not exposed to the electron beam underwent large phase separation and nucleation of fullerene crystals. UV-vis spectroscopy shows that the polymer:fullerene films are stable for electron doses up to 2000kGy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Blockade of NR2B-Containing NMDA Receptors Prevents BDNF Enhancement of Glutamatergic Transmission in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Crozier, Robert A.; Black, Ira B.; Plummer, Mark R.

    1999-01-01

    Application of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to hippocampal neurons has profound effects on glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Both pre- and postsynaptic actions have been identified that depend on the age and type of preparation. To understand the nature of this diversity, we have begun to examine the mechanisms of BDNF action in cultured dissociated embryonic hippocampal neurons. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording during iontophoretic application of glutamate revealed that BDNF doubled the amplitude of induced inward current. Coexposure to BDNF and the NMDA receptor antagonist AP-5 markedly reduced, but did not entirely prevent, the increase in current. Coexposure to BDNF and ifenprodil, an NR2B subunit antagonist, reproduced the response observed with AP-5, suggesting BDNF primarily enhanced activity of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors with a lesser effect on non-NMDA receptors. Protein kinase involvement was confirmed with the broad spectrum inhibitor staurosporine, which prevented the response to BDNF. PKCI19-31 and H-89, selective antagonists of PKC and PKA, had no effect on the response to BDNF, whereas autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide, an antagonist of CaM kinase II, reduced response magnitude by 60%. These results demonstrate the predominant role of a specific NMDA receptor subtype in BDNF modulation of hippocampal synaptic transmission. PMID:10492007

  10. First experimental proof for aberration correction in XPEEM: resolution, transmission enhancement, and limitation by space charge effects.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Th; Sala, A; Marchetto, H; Umbach, E; Freund, H-J

    2013-03-01

    The positive effect of double aberration correction in x-ray induced Photoelectron Emission Microscopy (XPEEM) has been successfully demonstrated for both, the lateral resolution and the transmission, using the Au 4f XPS peak for element specific imaging at a kinetic energy of 113 eV. The lateral resolution is improved by a factor of four, compared to a non-corrected system, whereas the transmission is enhanced by a factor of 5 at a moderate resolution of 80 nm. With an optimized system setting, a lateral resolution of 18 nm could be achieved, which is up to now the best value reported for energy filtered XPEEM imaging. However, the absolute resolution does not yet reach the theoretical limit of 2 nm, which is due to space charge limitation. This occurs along the entire optical axis up to the contrast aperture. In XPEEM the pulsed time structure of the exciting soft x-ray light source causes a short and highly intense electron pulse, which results in an image blurring. In contrast, the imaging with elastically reflected electrons in the low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) mode yields a resolution clearly below 5 nm. Technical solutions to reduce the space charge effect in an aberration-corrected spectro-microscope are discussed.

  11. Investigation of acoustic changes resulting from contrast enhancement in through-transmission ultrasonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, Tamara; Gaitini, Diana; Gallimidi, Zahava; Azhari, Haim

    2010-09-01

    Through-transmitted ultrasonic waves can be used for computed projection imaging of the breast. The goal of this research was to analyze the acoustic properties changes associated with the propagation of ultrasonic waves through media before and after ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) injection and to study the feasibility of a new imaging method combining projection imaging and UCA. Two transmission techniques were examined: Gaussian pulses and pulse inversion. In the latter, three different double inverted pulses were studied: double Gaussian, double square and double sine. A computerized automatic ultrasonic scanning system was used for imaging. To simulate blood vessels, a phantom, consisting of a latex tube through which saline was circulated, was assembled. The phantom was placed within the scanner and sets of acoustic projection images were acquired. Then, a suspension of the UCA Definitely was added to the saline and a new set of images was obtained. The pre and postcontrast images were quantitatively compared in terms of amplitude and time-of-flight (TOF). In addition, nonlinearity was evaluated by comparing the relative alteration of the positive and negative parts of the signal. Statistically significant (p < 0.001) changes in the projection images resulting from the UCA injection were observed in wave amplitude (22% +/- 13%), TOF (7.9 ns +/- 6.3 ns) and nonlinear properties (35% +/- 32% and 56% +/- 17% for Gausian pulses and pulse inversion, respectively). One in vivo study of a female breast is also presented and its preliminary outcomes discussed. Together, these results indicate the technical feasibility of the suggested method and its potential to detect breast tumors.

  12. Slowly emerging glycinergic transmission enhances inhibition in the sound localization pathway of the avian auditory system

    PubMed Central

    Fischl, Matthew J.; Weimann, Sonia R.; Kearse, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    Localization of low-frequency acoustic stimuli is processed in dedicated neural pathways where coincidence-detecting neurons compare the arrival time of sound stimuli at the two ears, or interaural time disparity (ITD). ITDs occur in the submillisecond range, and vertebrates have evolved specialized excitatory and inhibitory circuitry to compute these differences. Glycinergic inhibition is a computationally significant and prominent component of the mammalian ITD pathway. However, evidence for glycinergic transmission is limited in birds, where GABAergic inhibition has been thought to be the dominant or exclusive inhibitory transmitter. Indeed, previous work showed that GABA antagonists completely eliminate inhibition in avian nuclei specialized for processing temporal features of sound, nucleus magnocellularis (NM) and nucleus laminaris (NL). However, more recent work shows that glycine is coexpressed with GABA in synaptic terminals apposed to neurons in both nuclei (Coleman WL, Fischl MJ, Weimann SR, Burger RM. J Neurophysiol 105: 2405–2420, 2011; Kuo SP, Bradley LA, Trussell LO. J Neurosci 29: 9625–9634, 2009). Here we show complementary evidence of functional glycine receptor (GlyR) expression in NM and NL. Additionally, we show that glycinergic input can be evoked under particular stimulus conditions. Stimulation at high but physiologically relevant rates evokes a slowly emerging glycinergic response in NM and NL that builds over the course of the stimulus. Glycinergic response magnitude was stimulus rate dependent, representing 18% and 7% of the total inhibitory current in NM and NL, respectively, at the end of the 50-pulse, 200-Hz stimulus. Finally, we show that the glycinergic component is functionally relevant, as its elimination reduced inhibition of discharges evoked by current injection into NM neurons. PMID:24198323

  13. Enhancement of ion transmission and reduction of background and interferences in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ke

    1992-06-01

    An inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) (four stages of differential pumping) is described. The large sampling orifice (1.31 mm dia.) improves signals for metal ions and resists plugging. The ion lens deflects ions off center and then back on center into the differential pumping orifice; there is no photon stop in the center. Ion trajectories calculations SIMION show that only those ions that leave the skimmer on center are transmitted, whereas most other lenses used in ICP-MS transmit only ions that leave the skimmer off axis. Background with the Daly detector is 4 counts s(exp -1). This ICP-MS yields low levels of many troublesome polyatomic ions. Signals from refractory metal oxide ions are about 1 percent of the corresponding metal ion signals. Grounding the first electrode of the ion lens reduces matrix effects to approximately less than 20 percent loss in signal for Co(+), Y(+), or Cs(+) in presence of 10 mM Sr, Tm, or Pb. This latter lens setting causes only 30 percent loss in sensitivity compared to biassing the first lens. Matrix effects can also be mitigated by re-adjusting the voltage on the first lens with matrix present. Floating the metal cones at various potentials can improve the ion transmission by a factor of at least four to six. Also, floating the cones extends the upper end of linearity. Net result is more sensitivity and higher ion beam intensity than with a grounded skimmer and sampler. Furthermore, mass discrimination can be reduced.

  14. Slowly emerging glycinergic transmission enhances inhibition in the sound localization pathway of the avian auditory system.

    PubMed

    Fischl, Matthew J; Weimann, Sonia R; Kearse, Michael G; Burger, R Michael

    2014-02-01

    Localization of low-frequency acoustic stimuli is processed in dedicated neural pathways where coincidence-detecting neurons compare the arrival time of sound stimuli at the two ears, or interaural time disparity (ITD). ITDs occur in the submillisecond range, and vertebrates have evolved specialized excitatory and inhibitory circuitry to compute these differences. Glycinergic inhibition is a computationally significant and prominent component of the mammalian ITD pathway. However, evidence for glycinergic transmission is limited in birds, where GABAergic inhibition has been thought to be the dominant or exclusive inhibitory transmitter. Indeed, previous work showed that GABA antagonists completely eliminate inhibition in avian nuclei specialized for processing temporal features of sound, nucleus magnocellularis (NM) and nucleus laminaris (NL). However, more recent work shows that glycine is coexpressed with GABA in synaptic terminals apposed to neurons in both nuclei (Coleman WL, Fischl MJ, Weimann SR, Burger RM. J Neurophysiol 105: 2405-2420, 2011; Kuo SP, Bradley LA, Trussell LO. J Neurosci 29: 9625-9634, 2009). Here we show complementary evidence of functional glycine receptor (GlyR) expression in NM and NL. Additionally, we show that glycinergic input can be evoked under particular stimulus conditions. Stimulation at high but physiologically relevant rates evokes a slowly emerging glycinergic response in NM and NL that builds over the course of the stimulus. Glycinergic response magnitude was stimulus rate dependent, representing 18% and 7% of the total inhibitory current in NM and NL, respectively, at the end of the 50-pulse, 200-Hz stimulus. Finally, we show that the glycinergic component is functionally relevant, as its elimination reduced inhibition of discharges evoked by current injection into NM neurons.

  15. Serotonin Synthesis and Reuptake in Social Anxiety Disorder: A Positron Emission Tomography Study.

    PubMed

    Frick, Andreas; Åhs, Fredrik; Engman, Jonas; Jonasson, My; Alaie, Iman; Björkstrand, Johannes; Frans, Örjan; Faria, Vanda; Linnman, Clas; Appel, Lieuwe; Wahlstedt, Kurt; Lubberink, Mark; Fredrikson, Mats; Furmark, Tomas

    2015-08-01

    < .05 corrected), supporting an enhanced serotonin synthesis rate. Increased serotonin transporter availability in the patients with SAD relative to healthy controls was reflected by elevated [11C]DASB binding potential in the raphe nuclei region, caudate nucleus, putamen, thalamus, and insula cortex (P < .05 corrected). Neurotransmission in SAD is characterized by an overactive presynaptic serotonin system, with increased serotonin synthesis and transporter availability. Our findings could provide important new insights into the etiology of anxiety disorders.

  16. Association between serotonin transporter gene polymorphism and recurrent aphthous stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Manchanda, Aastha; Iyengar, Asha R.; Patil, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anxiety-related traits have been attributed to sequence variability in the genes coding for serotonin transmission in  the brain. Two alleles, termed long (L) and short (S) differing by 44 base pairs, are found in a polymorphism identified in the promoter region of serotonin transporter gene. The presence of the short allele  and SS and LS genotypes is found to be associated with the reduced expression of this gene decreasing the uptake of serotonin in the brain leading to various anxiety-related traits. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is an oral mucosal disease with varied etiology including the presence of stress, anxiety, and genetic influences. The present study aimed to determine this serotonin transporter gene polymorphism in patients with RAS and compare it with normal individuals. Materials and Methods: This study included 20 subjects with various forms of RAS and 20 normal healthy age- and gender-matched individuals. Desquamated oral mucosal cells were collected for DNA extraction and subjected to polymerase chain reaction for studying insertion/deletion in the 5-HTT gene-linked polymorphic region. Cross tabulations followed by Chi-square tests were performed to compare the significance of findings, P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The LS genotype was the most common genotype found in the subjects with aphthous stomatitis (60%) and controls (40%). The total percentage of LS and SS genotypes and the frequency of S allele were found to be higher in the subjects with aphthous stomatitis as compared to the control group although a statistically significant correlation could not be established, P = 0.144 and 0.371, respectively. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, occurrence of RAS was not found to be associated with polymorphic promoter region in serotonin transporter gene. PMID:27274339

  17. Association between serotonin transporter gene polymorphism and recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Manchanda, Aastha; Iyengar, Asha R; Patil, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety-related traits have been attributed to sequence variability in the genes coding for serotonin transmission in  the brain. Two alleles, termed long (L) and short (S) differing by 44 base pairs, are found in a polymorphism identified in the promoter region of serotonin transporter gene. The presence of the short allele  and SS and LS genotypes is found to be associated with the reduced expression of this gene decreasing the uptake of serotonin in the brain leading to various anxiety-related traits. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is an oral mucosal disease with varied etiology including the presence of stress, anxiety, and genetic influences. The present study aimed to determine this serotonin transporter gene polymorphism in patients with RAS and compare it with normal individuals. This study included 20 subjects with various forms of RAS and 20 normal healthy age- and gender-matched individuals. Desquamated oral mucosal cells were collected for DNA extraction and subjected to polymerase chain reaction for studying insertion/deletion in the 5-HTT gene-linked polymorphic region. Cross tabulations followed by Chi-square tests were performed to compare the significance of findings, P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The LS genotype was the most common genotype found in the subjects with aphthous stomatitis (60%) and controls (40%). The total percentage of LS and SS genotypes and the frequency of S allele were found to be higher in the subjects with aphthous stomatitis as compared to the control group although a statistically significant correlation could not be established, P = 0.144 and 0.371, respectively. Within the limitations of this study, occurrence of RAS was not found to be associated with polymorphic promoter region in serotonin transporter gene.

  18. Exercise and sleep in aging: emphasis on serotonin.

    PubMed

    Melancon, M O; Lorrain, D; Dionne, I J

    2014-10-01

    Reductions in central serotonin activity with aging might be involved in sleep-related disorders in later life. Although the beneficial effects of aerobic exercise on sleep are not new, sleep represents a complex recurring state of unconsciousness involving many lines of transmitters which remains only partly clear despite intense ongoing research. It is known that serotonin released into diencephalon and cerebrum might play a key inhibitory role to help promote sleep, likely through an active inhibition of supraspinal neural networks. Several lines of evidence support the stimulatory effects of exercise on higher serotonergic pathways. Hence, exercise has proved to elicit acute elevations in forebrain serotonin concentrations, an effect that waned upon cessation of exercise. While adequate exercise training might lead to adaptations in higher serotonergic networks (desensitization of forebrain receptors), excessive training has been linked to serious brain serotonergic maladaptations accompanied by insomnia. Dietary supplementation of tryptophan (the only serotonin precursor) is known to stimulate serotonergic activity and promote sleep, whereas acute tryptophan depletion causes deleterious effects on sleep. Regarding sleep-wake regulation, exercise has proved to accelerate resynchronization of the biological clock to new light-dark cycles following imposition of phase shifts in laboratory animals. Noteworthy, the effect of increased serotonergic transmission on wake state appears to be biphasic, i.e. promote wake and thereafter drowsiness. Therefore, it might be possible that acute aerobic exercise would act on sleep by increasing activity of ascending brain serotonergic projections, though additional work is warranted to better understand the implication of serotonin in the exercise-sleep axis.

  19. Activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors persistently enhances hippocampal synaptic transmission and prevents Aß-mediated inhibition of LTP in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ondrejcak, Tomas; Wang, Qinwen; Kew, James N C; Virley, David J; Upton, Neil; Anwyl, Roger; Rowan, Michael J

    2012-02-29

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors mediate fast cholinergic modulation of glutamatergic transmission and synaptic plasticity. Here we investigated the effects of subtype selective activation of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on hippocampal transmission and the inhibition of synaptic long-term potentiation by the Alzheimer's disease associated amyloid ß-protein (Aß). The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist "compound A" ((R)-N-(1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl)(5-(2-pyridyl))thiophene-2-carboxamide) induced a rapid-onset persistent enhancement of synaptic transmission in the dentate gyrus in vitro. Consistent with a requirement for activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, the type II α7-selective positive allosteric modulator PheTQS ((3aR, 4S, 9bS)-4-(4-methylphenyl)-3a,4,5,9b-tetrahydro-3H-cyclopenta[c]quinoline-8-sulfonamide) potentiated, and the antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) prevented the persistent enhancement. Systemic injection of the agonist also induced a similar MLA-sensitive persistent enhancement of synaptic transmission in the CA1 area in vivo. Remarkably, although compound A did not affect control long-term potentiation (LTP) in vitro, it prevented the inhibition of LTP by Aß1-42 and this effect was inhibited by MLA. These findings strongly indicate that activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors is sufficient to persistently enhance hippocampal synaptic transmission and to overcome the inhibition of LTP by Aß.

  20. UWA-121, a mixed dopamine and serotonin re-uptake inhibitor, enhances L-DOPA anti-parkinsonian action without worsening dyskinesia or psychosis-like behaviours in the MPTP-lesioned common marmoset.

    PubMed

    Huot, Philippe; Johnston, Tom H; Lewis, Katie D; Koprich, James B; Reyes, M Gabriela; Fox, Susan H; Piggott, Matthew J; Brotchie, Jonathan M

    2014-07-01

    L-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) is the most effective treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD), but its long-term administration is complicated by wearing-off and dyskinesia. UWA-101, a dual, equipotent inhibitor of dopamine (DAT) and serotonin (SERT) transporters, has previously been shown to successfully extend duration of anti-parkinsonian benefit of L-DOPA (ON-time), without exacerbating dyskinesia, in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-lesioned marmoset. However, UWA-101 is racemic and it is unclear whether one or both enantiomers contribute to its actions, and whether a better therapeutic effect might be attained by using a single antipode. In the current study, we synthesised the two enantiomers of UWA-101, R-101 (UWA-121) and S-101 (UWA-122), characterised their pharmacological profiles and administered them to MPTP-lesioned marmosets. Parkinsonism, dyskinesia, psychosis-like behaviours and duration of ON-time were evaluated. UWA-121 is a dual DAT > SERT inhibitor, with an approximate 10:1 DAT:SERT affinity ratio (inhibitory constants (Ki) of 307 and 3830 nM, respectively). In combination with L-DOPA, UWA-121 extended duration of ON-time when compared to L-DOPA/vehicle treatment (by 40%, P < 0.01). UWA-121 also extended duration of ON-time without dyskinesia (by 215%, P < 0.05) and ON-time without psychosis-like behaviours when compared to L-DOPA/vehicle treatment (by 345%, P < 0.01). UWA-121 did not worsen the severity of dyskinesia or psychosis-like behaviours (P > 0.05). UWA-122 is a selective SERT inhibitor (Ki 120 nM, Ki at DAT > 50 μM) and, in combination with L-DOPA, had no effect on ON-time, dyskinesia or psychosis-like behaviours (P > 0.05). These data indicate that dual DAT and SERT inhibitors effectively enhance L-DOPA anti-parkinsonian action without worsening dyskinesia and that compounds with such a pharmacological profile represent promising agents against wearing-off in PD.

  1. Serotonin and Blood Pressure Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Shaun F.; Davis, Robert Patrick; Barman, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) was discovered more than 60 years ago as a substance isolated from blood. The neural effects of 5-HT have been well investigated and understood, thanks in part to the pharmacological tools available to dissect the serotonergic system and the development of the frequently prescribed selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors. By contrast, our understanding of the role of 5-HT in the control and modification of blood pressure pales in comparison. Here we focus on the role of 5-HT in systemic blood pressure control. This review provides an in-depth study of the function and pharmacology of 5-HT in those tissues that can modify blood pressure (blood, vasculature, heart, adrenal gland, kidney, brain), with a focus on the autonomic nervous system that includes mechanisms of action and pharmacology of 5-HT within each system. We compare the change in blood pressure produced in different species by short- and long-term administration of 5-HT or selective serotonin receptor agonists. To further our understanding of the mechanisms through which 5-HT modifies blood pressure, we also describe the blood pressure effects of commonly used drugs that modify the actions of 5-HT. The pharmacology and physiological actions of 5-HT in modifying blood pressure are important, given its involvement in circulatory shock, orthostatic hypotension, serotonin syndrome and hypertension. PMID:22407614

  2. Serotonin and GI clinical disorders.

    PubMed

    Spiller, Robin

    2008-11-01

    Serotonin is widely distributed throughout the gut within both the enteric nerves and enterochromaffin (EC) cells. EC cells are located in the gut mucosa with maximal numbers in the duodenum and rectum where they act as signal transducers, responding to pressure and luminal substances both bacterial and dietary. Activation leads to serotonin release which acts on a range of receptors on mucosal afferent and myenteric interneurones to initiate secretomotor reflexes. These cause nausea and vomiting as well as intestinal secretion, propulsion and if pronounced, diarrhoea. Inflammation in animal models acts via T lymphocytes to increase EC cell numbers and mucosal serotonin (5-HT) content while inflammatory cytokines decrease serotonin transporter (SERT) function. Inflammation due to coeliac disease and following gastrointestinal infection increases mucosal 5-HT availability by a combination of increased EC cells and depressed SERT. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) developing after gastrointestinal infection and IBS with diarrhoea is associated with excess 5-HT. The associated diarrhoeal symptoms respond well to 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists. These drugs also inhibit the nausea and vomiting occurring in patients undergoing chemotherapy which cause a marked increase in release of 5-HT as well as other mediators. Other conditions including IBS-C and constipation may have inadequate 5-HT release and benefit from both 5-HT(3) and 5-HT(4) receptor agonists.

  3. Serotonin and Aggressiveness in Chickens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Serotonin (5-HT) regulates aggressive behavior in animals. This study examined if 5-HT regulation of aggressiveness is gene-dependent. Chickens from two divergently selected lines KGB and MBB (Kind Gentle Birds and Mean Bad Birds displaying low and high aggressiveness, respectively) and DXL (Dekalb ...

  4. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposure.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C

    2013-02-01

    Many antidepressants inhibit serotonin or norepinephrine reuptake or both to achieve their clinical effect. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class of antidepressants (SSRIs) includes citalopram, escitalopram (active enantiomer of citalopram), fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline. The SSRIs are as effective as tricyclic antidepressants in treatment of major depression with less significant side effects. As a result, they have become the largest class of medications prescribed to humans for depression. They are also used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorders, alcoholism, obesity, migraines, and chronic pain. An SSRI (fluoxetine) has been approved for veterinary use in treatment of canine separation anxiety. SSRIs act specifically on synaptic serotonin concentrations by blocking its reuptake in the presynapse and increasing levels in the presynaptic membrane. Clinical signs of SSRI overdose result from excessive amounts of serotonin in the central nervous system. These signs include nausea, vomiting, mydriasis, hypersalivation, and hyperthermia. Clinical signs are dose dependent and higher dosages may result in the serotonin syndrome that manifests itself as ataxia, tremors, muscle rigidity, hyperthermia, diarrhea, and seizures. Current studies reveal no increase in appearance of any specific clinical signs of serotonin toxicity with regard to any SSRI medication. In people, citalopram has been reported to have an increased risk of electrocardiographic abnormalities. Diagnosis of SSRI poisoning is based on history, clinical signs, and response to therapy. No single clinical test is currently available to confirm SSRI toxicosis. The goals of treatment in this intoxication are to support the animal, prevent further absorption of the drug, support the central nervous system, control hyperthermia, and halt any seizure activity. The relative safety of the SSRIs in overdose despite the occurrence of serotonin syndrome makes them

  5. Enhanced phase contrast transfer using ptychography combined with a pre-specimen phase plate in a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hao; Ercius, Peter; Nellist, Peter D; Ophus, Colin

    2016-12-01

    The ability to image light elements in both crystalline and noncrystalline materials at near atomic resolution with an enhanced contrast is highly advantageous to understand the structure and properties of a wide range of beam sensitive materials including biological specimens and molecular hetero-structures. This requires the imaging system to have an efficient phase contrast transfer at both low and high spatial frequencies. In this work we introduce a new phase contrast imaging method in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) using a pre-specimen phase plate in the probe forming aperture, combined with a fast pixelated detector to record diffraction patterns at every probe position, and phase reconstruction using ptychography. The phase plate significantly enhances the contrast transfer of low spatial frequency information, and ptychography maximizes the extraction of the phase information at all spatial frequencies. In addition, the STEM probe with the presence of the phase plate retains its atomic resolution, allowing simultaneous incoherent Z-contrast imaging to be obtained along with the ptychographic phase image. An experimental image of Au nanoparticles on a carbon support shows high contrast for both materials. Multislice image simulations of a DNA molecule shows the capability of imaging soft matter at low dose conditions, which implies potential applications of low dose imaging of a wide range of beam sensitive materials. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Protein-nanoparticle interaction in bioconjugated silver nanoparticles: A transmission electron microscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reymond-Laruinaz, Sébastien; Saviot, Lucien; Potin, Valérie; Marco de Lucas, María del Carmen

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of interaction between proteins and noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) is crucial to extend the use of NPs in biological applications and nanomedicine. We report the synthesis of Ag-NPs:protein bioconjugates synthesized in total absence of citrates or other stabilizing agents in order to study the NP-protein interaction. Four common proteins (lysozyme, bovine serum albumin, cytochrome-C and hemoglobin) were used in this work. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) were mainly used to study these bioconjugated NPs. TEM images showed Ag NPs with sizes in the 5-40 nm range. The presence of a protein layer surrounding the Ag NPs was also observed by TEM. Moreover, the composition at different points of single bioconjugated NPs was probed by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The thickness of the protein layer varies in the 3-15 nm range and the Ag NPs are a few nanometers away. This allowed to obtain an enhancement of the Raman signal of the proteins in the analysis of water suspensions of bioconjugates. SERS results showed a broadening of the Raman bands of the proteins which we attribute to the contribution of different configurations of the proteins adsorbed on the Ag NPs surface. Moreover, the assignment of an intense and sharp peak in the low-frequency range to Ag-N vibrations points to the chemisorption of the proteins on the Ag-NPs surface.

  7. Serotonin selectively influences moral judgment and behavior through effects on harm aversion

    PubMed Central

    Crockett, Molly J.; Clark, Luke; Hauser, Marc D.; Robbins, Trevor W.

    2010-01-01

    Aversive emotional reactions to real or imagined social harms infuse moral judgment and motivate prosocial behavior. Here, we show that the neurotransmitter serotonin directly alters both moral judgment and behavior through increasing subjects’ aversion to personally harming others. We enhanced serotonin in healthy volunteers with citalopram (a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) and contrasted its effects with both a pharmacological control treatment and a placebo on tests of moral judgment and behavior. We measured the drugs' effects on moral judgment in a set of moral 'dilemmas' pitting utilitarian outcomes (e.g., saving five lives) against highly aversive harmful actions (e.g., killing an innocent person). Enhancing serotonin made subjects more likely to judge harmful actions as forbidden, but only in cases where harms were emotionally salient. This harm-avoidant bias after citalopram was also evident in behavior during the ultimatum game, in which subjects decide to accept or reject fair or unfair monetary offers from another player. Rejecting unfair offers enforces a fairness norm but also harms the other player financially. Enhancing serotonin made subjects less likely to reject unfair offers. Furthermore, the prosocial effects of citalopram varied as a function of trait empathy. Individuals high in trait empathy showed stronger effects of citalopram on moral judgment and behavior than individuals low in trait empathy. Together, these findings provide unique evidence that serotonin could promote prosocial behavior by enhancing harm aversion, a prosocial sentiment that directly affects both moral judgment and moral behavior. PMID:20876101

  8. Serotonin selectively influences moral judgment and behavior through effects on harm aversion.

    PubMed

    Crockett, Molly J; Clark, Luke; Hauser, Marc D; Robbins, Trevor W

    2010-10-05

    Aversive emotional reactions to real or imagined social harms infuse moral judgment and motivate prosocial behavior. Here, we show that the neurotransmitter serotonin directly alters both moral judgment and behavior through increasing subjects' aversion to personally harming others. We enhanced serotonin in healthy volunteers with citalopram (a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) and contrasted its effects with both a pharmacological control treatment and a placebo on tests of moral judgment and behavior. We measured the drugs' effects on moral judgment in a set of moral 'dilemmas' pitting utilitarian outcomes (e.g., saving five lives) against highly aversive harmful actions (e.g., killing an innocent person). Enhancing serotonin made subjects more likely to judge harmful actions as forbidden, but only in cases where harms were emotionally salient. This harm-avoidant bias after citalopram was also evident in behavior during the ultimatum game, in which subjects decide to accept or reject fair or unfair monetary offers from another player. Rejecting unfair offers enforces a fairness norm but also harms the other player financially. Enhancing serotonin made subjects less likely to reject unfair offers. Furthermore, the prosocial effects of citalopram varied as a function of trait empathy. Individuals high in trait empathy showed stronger effects of citalopram on moral judgment and behavior than individuals low in trait empathy. Together, these findings provide unique evidence that serotonin could promote prosocial behavior by enhancing harm aversion, a prosocial sentiment that directly affects both moral judgment and moral behavior.

  9. Serotonin release varies with brain tryptophan levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    This study examines directly the effects on serotonin release of varying brain tryptophan levels within the physiologic range. It also addresses possible interactions between tryptophan availability and the frequency of membrane depolarization in controlling serotonin release. We demonstrate that reducing tryptophan levels in rat hypothalamic slices (by superfusing them with medium supplemented with 100 microM leucine) decreases tissue serotonin levels as well as both the spontaneous and the electrically-evoked serotonin release. Conversely, elevating tissue tryptophan levels (by superfusing slices with medium supplemented with 2 microM tryptophan) increases both the tissue serotonin levels and the serotonin release. Serotonin release was found to be affected independently by the tryptophan availability and the frequency of electrical field-stimulation (1-5 Hz), since increasing both variables produced nearly additive increases in release. These observations demonstrate for the first time that both precursor-dependent elevations and reductions in brain serotonin levels produce proportionate changes in serotonin release, and that the magnitude of the tryptophan effect is unrelated to neuronal firing frequency. The data support the hypothesis that serotonin release is proportionate to intracellular serotonin levels.

  10. Serotonin release varies with brain tryptophan levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    This study examines directly the effects on serotonin release of varying brain tryptophan levels within the physiologic range. It also addresses possible interactions between tryptophan availability and the frequency of membrane depolarization in controlling serotonin release. We demonstrate that reducing tryptophan levels in rat hypothalamic slices (by superfusing them with medium supplemented with 100 microM leucine) decreases tissue serotonin levels as well as both the spontaneous and the electrically-evoked serotonin release. Conversely, elevating tissue tryptophan levels (by superfusing slices with medium supplemented with 2 microM tryptophan) increases both the tissue serotonin levels and the serotonin release. Serotonin release was found to be affected independently by the tryptophan availability and the frequency of electrical field-stimulation (1-5 Hz), since increasing both variables produced nearly additive increases in release. These observations demonstrate for the first time that both precursor-dependent elevations and reductions in brain serotonin levels produce proportionate changes in serotonin release, and that the magnitude of the tryptophan effect is unrelated to neuronal firing frequency. The data support the hypothesis that serotonin release is proportionate to intracellular serotonin levels.

  11. Role of serotonin in fish reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Parvathy; Ogawa, Satoshi; Parhar, Ishwar S.

    2015-01-01

    The neuroendocrine mechanism regulates reproduction through the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis which is evolutionarily conserved in vertebrates. The HPG axis is regulated by a variety of internal as well as external factors. Serotonin, a monoamine neurotransmitter, is involved in a wide range of reproductive functions. In mammals, serotonin regulates sexual behaviors, gonadotropin release and gonadotropin-release hormone (GnRH) secretion. However, the serotonin system in teleost may also play unique role in the control of reproduction as the mechanism of reproductive control in teleosts is not always the same as in the mammalian models. In fish, the serotonin system is also regulated by natural environmental factors as well as chemical substances. In particular, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly detected as pharmaceutical contaminants in the natural environment. Those factors may influence fish reproductive functions via the serotonin system. This review summarizes the functional significance of serotonin in the teleosts reproduction. PMID:26097446

  12. Role of serotonin in fish reproduction.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Parvathy; Ogawa, Satoshi; Parhar, Ishwar S

    2015-01-01

    The neuroendocrine mechanism regulates reproduction through the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis which is evolutionarily conserved in vertebrates. The HPG axis is regulated by a variety of internal as well as external factors. Serotonin, a monoamine neurotransmitter, is involved in a wide range of reproductive functions. In mammals, serotonin regulates sexual behaviors, gonadotropin release and gonadotropin-release hormone (GnRH) secretion. However, the serotonin system in teleost may also play unique role in the control of reproduction as the mechanism of reproductive control in teleosts is not always the same as in the mammalian models. In fish, the serotonin system is also regulated by natural environmental factors as well as chemical substances. In particular, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly detected as pharmaceutical contaminants in the natural environment. Those factors may influence fish reproductive functions via the serotonin system. This review summarizes the functional significance of serotonin in the teleosts reproduction.

  13. Platelet-Derived Serotonin Mediates Liver Regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesurtel, Mickael; Graf, Rolf; Aleil, Boris; Walther, Diego J.; Tian, Yinghua; Jochum, Wolfram; Gachet, Christian; Bader, Michael; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2006-04-01

    The liver can regenerate its volume after major tissue loss. In a mouse model of liver regeneration, thrombocytopenia, or impaired platelet activity resulted in the failure to initiate cellular proliferation in the liver. Platelets are major carriers of serotonin in the blood. In thrombocytopenic mice, a serotonin agonist reconstituted liver proliferation. The expression of 5-HT2A and 2B subtype serotonin receptors in the liver increased after hepatectomy. Antagonists of 5-HT2A and 2B receptors inhibited liver regeneration. Liver regeneration was also blunted in mice lacking tryptophan hydroxylase 1, which is the rate-limiting enzyme for the synthesis of peripheral serotonin. This failure of regeneration was rescued by reloading serotonin-free platelets with a serotonin precursor molecule. These results suggest that platelet-derived serotonin is involved in the initiation of liver regeneration.

  14. Space-Data Routers: Enhancing Deep Space communications for scientific data transmission and exploitation from Mars through Space Internetworking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykioti, Olga; Daglis, Ioannis; Rontogiannis, Athanasios; Tsaoussidis, Vassilis; Diamantopoulos, Sotirios

    2014-05-01

    Dissemination and exploitation of data from Deep Space missions, such as planetary missions, face two major impediments: limited access capabilities due to narrow connectivity window via satellites (thus, resulting to confined scientific capacity) and lack of sufficient communication and dissemination mechanisms between deep space missions such the current missions to Mars, space data receiving centers, space-data collection centers and the end-user community. Although large quantities of data have to be transferred from deep space to the operation centers and then to the academic foundations and research centers, due to the aforementioned impediments more and more stored space data volumes remain unexploited, until they become obsolete or useless and are consequently removed. In the near future, these constraints on space and ground segment resources will rapidly increase due to the launch of new missions. The Space-Data Routers (SDR) project aims into boosting collaboration and competitiveness between the European Space Agency, the European Space Industry and the European Academic Institutions towards meeting these new challenges through Space Internetworking. Space internetworking gradually replaces or assists traditional telecommunication protocols. Future deep space operations, such as those to Mars, are scheduled to be more dynamic and flexible; many of the procedures, which are now human-operated, will become automated, interoperable and collaborative. As a consequence, space internetworking will bring a revolution in space communications. For this purpose, one of the main scientific objectives of the project is, through the examination of a specific scenario, the enhanced transmission and dissemination of Deep Space data from Mars, through unified communication channels. Specifically, the scenario involves enhanced data transmission acquired by the OMEGA sensor on-board ESA's Mars Express satellite. We consider two separate issues considering the

  15. Noise in any frequency range can enhance information transmission in a sensory neuron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Jacob E.

    1997-05-01

    The effect of noise on the neural encoding of broadband signals was investigated in the cricket cercal system, a mechanosensory system sensitive to small near-field air particle disturbances. Known air current stimuli were presented to the cricket through audio speakers in a controlled environment in a variety of background noise conditions. Spike trains from the second layer of neuronal processing, the primary sensory interneurons, were recorded with intracellular Electrodes and the performance of these neurons characterized with the tools of information theory. SNR, mutual information rates, and other measures of encoding accuracy were calculated for single frequency, narrowband, and broadband signals over the entire amplitude sensitivity range of the cells, in the presence of uncorrelated noise background also spanning the cells' frequency and amplitude sensitivity range. Significant enhancements of transmitted information through the addition of external noise were observed regardless of the frequency range of either the signal or noise waveforms, provided both were within the operating range of the cell. Considerable improvements in signal encoding were observed for almost an entire order of magnitude of near-threshold signal amplitudes. This included sinusoidal signals embedded in broadband white noise, broadband signals in broadband noise, and even broadband signals presented with narrowband noise in a completely non-overlapping frequency range. The noise related increases in mutual information rate for broadband signals were as high as 150%, and up to 600% increases in SNR were observed for sinusoidal signals. Additionally, it was shown that the amount of information about the signal carried, on average, by each spike was INCREASED for small signals when presented with noise—implying that added input noise can, in certain situations, actually improve the accuracy of the encoding process itself.

  16. Presynaptic BK Channels Modulate Ethanol-Induced Enhancement of GABAergic Transmission in the Rat Central Amygdala Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Madison, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium BK channels are widely expressed in the brain and are involved in the regulation of neuronal functions such as neurotransmitter release. However, their possible role in mediating ethanol-induced GABA release is still unknown. We assessed the role of BK channels in modulating the action of ethanol on inhibitory synaptic transmission mediated via GABAA receptors in the rat central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA). Evoked IPSCs (eIPSCs) mediated by GABAA receptors were isolated from CeA neurons under whole-cell voltage clamp, and their response to selective BK channel antagonists, channel activators, or ethanol was analyzed. Blocking BK channels with the specific BK channel antagonist paxilline significantly increased the mean amplitude of eIPSCs, whereas the activation of BK channels with the channel opener NS1619 reversibly attenuated the mean amplitude of eIPSCs. Ethanol (50 mm) alone enhanced the amplitude of eIPSCs but failed to further enhance eIPSCs in the slices pretreated with paxilline. Bath application of either BK channel blockers significantly increased the frequency of miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs). Similarly, 50 mm ethanol alone also enhanced mIPSC frequency. Increases in mIPSC frequency by either selective BK channel antagonists or ethanol were not accompanied with changes in the amplitude of mIPSCs. Furthermore, following bath application of BK channel blockers for 10 min, ethanol failed to further increase mIPSC frequency. Together, these results suggest that blocking BK channels mimics the effects of ethanol on GABA release and that presynaptic BK channels could serve as a target for ethanol effects in CeA. PMID:25297098

  17. A physiologic role for serotonergic transmission in adult rat taste buds.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Luc; Zhao, Fang-li; Kolli, Tamara; Herness, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Of the multiple neurotransmitters and neuropeptides expressed in the mammalian taste bud, serotonin remains both the most studied and least understood. Serotonin is expressed in a subset of taste receptor cells that form synapses with afferent nerve fibers (type III cells) and was once thought to be essential to neurotransmission (now understood as purinergic). However, the discovery of the 5-HT1A serotonin receptor in a subset of taste receptor cells paracrine to type III cell suggested a role in cell-to-cell communication during the processing of taste information. Functional data describing this role are lacking. Using anatomical and neurophysiological techniques, this study proposes a modulatory role for serotonin during the processing of taste information. Double labeling immunocytochemical and single cell RT-PCR technique experiments documented that 5-HT1A-expressing cells co-expressed markers for type II cells, cells which express T1R or T2R receptors and release ATP. These cells did not co-express type III cells markers. Neurophysiological recordings from the chorda tympani nerve, which innervates anterior taste buds, were performed prior to and during intravenous injection of a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. These experiments revealed that serotonin facilitates processing of taste information for tastants representing sweet, sour, salty, and bitter taste qualities. On the other hand, injection of ondansetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, was without effect. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that serotonin is a crucial element in a finely-tuned feedback loop involving the 5-HT1A receptor, ATP, and purinoceptors. It is hypothesized that serotonin facilitates gustatory signals by regulating the release of ATP through ATP-release channels possibly through phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate resynthesis. By doing so, 5-HT1A activation prevents desensitization of post-synaptic purinergic receptors expressed on afferent nerve fibers and enhances the

  18. A Physiologic Role for Serotonergic Transmission in Adult Rat Taste Buds

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Luc; Zhao, Fang-li; Kolli, Tamara; Herness, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Of the multiple neurotransmitters and neuropeptides expressed in the mammalian taste bud, serotonin remains both the most studied and least understood. Serotonin is expressed in a subset of taste receptor cells that form synapses with afferent nerve fibers (type III cells) and was once thought to be essential to neurotransmission (now understood as purinergic). However, the discovery of the 5-HT1A serotonin receptor in a subset of taste receptor cells paracrine to type III cell suggested a role in cell-to-cell communication during the processing of taste information. Functional data describing this role are lacking. Using anatomical and neurophysiological techniques, this study proposes a modulatory role for serotonin during the processing of taste information. Double labeling immunocytochemical and single cell RT-PCR technique experiments documented that 5-HT1A-expressing cells co-expressed markers for type II cells, cells which express T1R or T2R receptors and release ATP. These cells did not co-express type III cells markers. Neurophysiological recordings from the chorda tympani nerve, which innervates anterior taste buds, were performed prior to and during intravenous injection of a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. These experiments revealed that serotonin facilitates processing of taste information for tastants representing sweet, sour, salty, and bitter taste qualities. On the other hand, injection of ondansetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, was without effect. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that serotonin is a crucial element in a finely-tuned feedback loop involving the 5-HT1A receptor, ATP, and purinoceptors. It is hypothesized that serotonin facilitates gustatory signals by regulating the release of ATP through ATP-release channels possibly through phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate resynthesis. By doing so, 5-HT1A activation prevents desensitization of post-synaptic purinergic receptors expressed on afferent nerve fibers and enhances the

  19. Enhanced resolution of soft-materials spectroscopic imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, Sergey

    The quantitative analysis of soft-materials morphology at nano lengths is an important scientific and technical challenge. Imaging based on spatially resolved Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) enables both real-space morphological measurements and the quantitative determination of local composition without assuming a particular model as is done by scattering approaches. EELS imaging is being increasingly used in a variety of hard-materials applications. However, its application to soft materials, such as synthetic polymers and biological tissue, remains challenging because of the resolution limits imposed by the radiation sensitivity of most soft materials. This thesis explores the factors that affect the dose-limited resolution of soft materials, and it develops new approaches to improve this resolution. We show that the accuracy of compositional analysis can be compromised in order to enhance the resolution, and we successfully apply this approach to a semi-quantitative analysis of alkane-based coatings on nanosized poly(amine) nanoparticles. More generally, however, one would like to preserve compositional accuracy while using the higher electron doses required to achieve high resolution. To this end, we have discovered that the effects of radiation-induced evolution of hydrogen---a damage mechanism known to be a significant limitation in EELS studies of frozen-hydrated soft materials---can be completely avoided if very thin TEM sections are studied. We illustrate the thickness dependence of hydrogen evolution in solvated Nafion, a perflourinated ionomer, and in hydrated porcine skin. Then, working with thin sections of frozen-hydrated skin, we develop and apply a method to extract from an experimental spectrum dataset a reference spectrum that accurately represents the hydrated skin's protein component under conditions where the protein has suffered significant radiation damage. Using such an extracted reference spectrum virtually eliminates the error

  20. Enhancing acoustic signal quality by rapidly switching between pulse-echo and through-transmission using diplexers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valencia, Juan D.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Tucker, Brian J.

    2008-03-01

    The increase of terrorism and its global impact has made the screening of the contents of liquid-filled containers a necessity. The ability to evaluate the contents of a container rapidly and accurately is a critical tool in maintaining global safety and security. Due to the immense quantities and large variety of containers shipped worldwide, there is a need for a technology that enables rapid and effective ways of conducting non-intrusive container inspections. Such inspections can be performed utilizing "through-transmission" or "pulse-echo" acoustic techniques, in combination with multiple frequency excitation pulses or waveforms. The challenge is combining and switching between the different acoustic techniques without distorting the excitation pulse or waveform, degrading or adding noise to the receive signal; while maintaining a portable, low-power, low-cost, and easy to use system. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed a methodology and prototype device focused on this challenge. The prototype relies on an advanced diplexer circuit capable of rapidly switching between both "through-transmission" and "pulse-echo" detection modes. This type of detection requires the prototype to isolate the pulsing circuitry from the receiving circuitry to prevent damage and reduce noise. The results of this work demonstrate that an advanced diplexer circuit can be effective; however, some bandwidth issues exist. This paper focuses on laboratory measurements and test results acquired with the PNNL prototype device as applied to several types of liquid-filled containers. Results of work conducted in the laboratory will be presented and future measurement platform enhancements will be discussed.

  1. A neurobiological hypothesis of treatment-resistant depression - mechanisms for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor non-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Coplan, Jeremy D; Gopinath, Srinath; Abdallah, Chadi G; Berry, Benjamin R

    2014-01-01

    First-line treatment of major depression includes administration of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), yet studies suggest that remission rates following two trials of an SSRI are <50%. The authors examine the putative biological substrates underlying "treatment resistant depression (TRD)" with the goal of elucidating novel rationales to treat TRD. We look at relevant articles from the preclinical and clinical literature combined with clinical exposure to TRD patients. A major focus was to outline pathophysiological mechanisms whereby the serotonin system becomes impervious to the desired enhancement of serotonin neurotransmission by SSRIs. A complementary focus was to dissect neurotransmitter systems, which serve to inhibit the dorsal raphe. We propose, based on a body of translational studies, TRD may not represent a simple serotonin deficit state but rather an excess of midbrain peri-raphe serotonin and subsequent deficit at key fronto-limbic projection sites, with ultimate compromise in serotonin-mediated neuroplasticity. Glutamate, serotonin, noradrenaline, and histamine are activated by stress and exert an inhibitory effect on serotonin outflow, in part by "flooding" 5-HT1A autoreceptors by serotonin itself. Certain factors putatively exacerbate this scenario - presence of the short arm of the serotonin transporter gene, early-life adversity and comorbid bipolar disorder - each of which has been associated with SSRI-treatment resistance. By utilizing an incremental approach, we provide a system for treating the TRD patient based on a strategy of rescuing serotonin neurotransmission from a state of SSRI-induced dorsal raphe stasis. This calls for "stacked" interventions, with an SSRI base, targeting, if necessary, the glutamatergic, serotonergic, noradrenergic, and histaminergic systems, thereby successively eliminating the inhibitory effects each are capable of exerting on serotonin neurons. Future studies are recommended to test this

  2. A Neurobiological Hypothesis of Treatment-Resistant Depression – Mechanisms for Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Non-Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Coplan, Jeremy D.; Gopinath, Srinath; Abdallah, Chadi G.; Berry, Benjamin R.

    2014-01-01

    First-line treatment of major depression includes administration of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), yet studies suggest that remission rates following two trials of an SSRI are <50%. The authors examine the putative biological substrates underlying “treatment resistant depression (TRD)” with the goal of elucidating novel rationales to treat TRD. We look at relevant articles from the preclinical and clinical literature combined with clinical exposure to TRD patients. A major focus was to outline pathophysiological mechanisms whereby the serotonin system becomes impervious to the desired enhancement of serotonin neurotransmission by SSRIs. A complementary focus was to dissect neurotransmitter systems, which serve to inhibit the dorsal raphe. We propose, based on a body of translational studies, TRD may not represent a simple serotonin deficit state but rather an excess of midbrain peri-raphe serotonin and subsequent deficit at key fronto-limbic projection sites, with ultimate compromise in serotonin-mediated neuroplasticity. Glutamate, serotonin, noradrenaline, and histamine are activated by stress and exert an inhibitory effect on serotonin outflow, in part by “flooding” 5-HT1A autoreceptors by serotonin itself. Certain factors putatively exacerbate this scenario – presence of the short arm of the serotonin transporter gene, early-life adversity and comorbid bipolar disorder – each of which has been associated with SSRI-treatment resistance. By utilizing an incremental approach, we provide a system for treating the TRD patient based on a strategy of rescuing serotonin neurotransmission from a state of SSRI-induced dorsal raphe stasis. This calls for “stacked” interventions, with an SSRI base, targeting, if necessary, the glutamatergic, serotonergic, noradrenergic, and histaminergic systems, thereby successively eliminating the inhibitory effects each are capable of exerting on serotonin neurons. Future studies are recommended to test

  3. Developmental enhancement of alpha2-adrenoceptor-mediated suppression of inhibitory synaptic transmission onto mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Hirono, M; Matsunaga, W; Chimura, T; Obata, K

    2008-09-22

    Noradrenaline (NA) modulates glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission in various areas of the brain. It is reported that some alpha2-adrenoceptor subtypes are expressed in the cerebellar cortex and alpha2-adrenoceptors may play a role in motor coordination. Our previous study demonstrated that the selective alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine partially depresses spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs). Here we found that the inhibitory effect of clonidine on sIPSCs was enhanced during postnatal development. The activation of alpha2-adrenoceptors by clonidine did not affect sIPSCs in PCs at postnatal days (P) 8-10, when PCs showed a few sIPSCs and interneurons in the molecular layer (MLIs) did not cause action potential (AP). In the second postnatal week, the frequency of sIPSCs increased temporarily and reached a plateau at P14. By contrast, MLIs began to fire at P11 with the firing rate gradually increasing thereafter and reaching a plateau at P21. In parallel with this rise in the rate of firing, the magnitude of the clonidine-mediated inhibition of sIPSCs increased during postnatal development. Furthermore, the magnitude of the clonidine-mediated firing suppression in MLIs, which seemed to be mediated by a reduction in amplitude of the hyperpolarization-activated nonselective cation current, I(h), was constant across development. Both alpha2A- and alpha2B-, but not alpha2C-, adrenoceptors were strongly expressed in MLIs at P13, and P31. Therefore, the developmental enhancement of the clonidine-mediated inhibition of sIPSCs is attributed to an age-dependent increase in AP-derived sIPSCs, which can be blocked by clonidine. Thus, presynaptic activation of alpha2-adrenoceptors inhibits cerebellar inhibitory synaptic transmission after the second postnatal week, leading to a restriction of NA signaling, which is mainly mediated by alpha1- and beta2-adrenoceptors in the adult cerebellar neuronal circuit.

  4. Serotonin syndrome after concomitant treatment with linezolid and meperidine.

    PubMed

    Das, Prabodh K; Warkentin, Dawn I; Hewko, Robert; Forrest, Donna L

    2008-01-15

    Serotonin syndrome has been reported with administration of linezolid and serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Meperidine blocks the neuronal reuptake of serotonin. Serotonin syndrome after concomitant linezolid and meperidine therapy has not been described. We describe serotonin syndrome after concomitant use of linezolid and meperidine in a 27-year-old man with acute leukemia.

  5. Phototherapy-mediated syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone in an in utero selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor-exposed newborn infant.

    PubMed

    Vanhaesebrouck, Piet; De Bock, Freia; Zecic, Alexandra; De Praeter, Claudine; Smets, Koenraad; De Coen, Kris; Goossens, Linde

    2005-05-01

    Although selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have gained wide acceptance in the off-label treatment of mental disorders in pregnant women, there seems to be an increased risk for serotonergic adverse effects in newborn infants who are exposed to SSRIs during late pregnancy. Hyponatremia as a result of the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) is a relatively common serious side effect of the use of SSRIs in (mostly elderly) adults. Severe hyponatremia as a result of an SIADH is proposed here as part of a neonatal serotonin toxicity syndrome in a newborn infant who was exposed prenatally to an SSRI. The definite reversal to normal serum sodium levels after fluid restriction, the lack of any alternative cause for the SIADH, and the positive temporal relation with a high score on a widely used adverse drug reaction probability scale offer solid support for the hypothesis of a causal relationship between the SIADH and the prenatal sertraline exposure in our neonate. Moreover, accumulative data on the acute enhancement of serotonergic transmission by intense illumination led us to hypothesize that phototherapy used to treat hyperbilirubinemia in the newborn infant could have been the ultimate environmental trigger for this proposed new cause of iatrogenic neonatal SIADH. The speculative role of phototherapy as a physical trigger for this drug-related adverse event should be confirmed in other cases by thorough study of the serotonin metabolism, assay of SSRI levels in cord blood, and serial measurement of plasma levels in exposed neonates. As phototherapy is used frequently in jaundiced neonates and an apparently increasing number of infants are born to mothers who take SSRIs, serotonin toxicity in neonates deserves increased attention.

  6. Serotonin and Serotonin Transporter Gene Variant in Rotating Shift Workers

    PubMed Central

    Sookoian, Silvia; Gemma, Carolina; Gianotti, Tomas Fernández; Burgueño, Adriana; Alvarez, Azucena; González, Claudio Daniel; Pirola, Carlos Jose

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives: Because serotonin (5-HT) is a neurotransmitter associated with circadian rhythm regulation, we explored a possible relation among 5-HT, serotonin metabolite, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA), and the functional polymorphism of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) promoter with rotating shift work. Design and Participants: 683 men were included in this study: 437 day workers were compared with 246 rotating shift workers. Results: Platelet 5-HT content differed significantly (P = 0.002) between day workers (41.28±1.99 pg/mg) and rotating shift workers (37.91±4.16 pg/mg); 5-HIAA content was also significantly (P = 0.00004) higher in day workers (11.40±0.82 pg/mg) than in rotating shift workers (9.33±1.02 pg/mg). We looked for further differences in SLC6A4 promoter (5-HTTLPR, 44 bp insertion: long (L)/deletion: short (S) alleles). We found a significant (P = 0.016) difference in genotype distribution between day workers LL: 126 (28.8%), LS: 202 (46.2%), and SS: 109 (24.9%), and rotating shift workers LL: 47 (19.1%), LS: 124 (50.4%), and SS: 75 (30.5%). When we divided the subjects between workers with less and more than 60 month rotating shift-work exposure, the difference in SLC6A4 genotypes frequency was only significant in the group with ≥60 months (P = 0.011). In addition, there was a significantly lower content of platelet 5-HIM in S allele carriers in comparison with the other genotypes (SS: 9.2±1.0 pg/mg vs. SL/LL: 11.0±0.8 pg/mg, P <0.02). Conclusions: Platelet 5-HT and 5-HIM contents were significantly lower in rotating shift workers than day workers, and there was a significant association between the S variant of SLC6A4 promoter and shift work. These findings may be important for targeting effective therapeutic strategies to ameliorate the associated comorbidities and behavioral problems in rotating shift workers. Citation: Sookoian S; Gemma C; Gianotti TF; Burgueño A; Alvarez A; Gonzalez CD; Pirola CJ. Serotonin and serotonin

  7. Exaggerated aggression and decreased anxiety in mice deficient in brain serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Mosienko, V; Bert, B; Beis, D; Matthes, S; Fink, H; Bader, M; Alenina, N

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin is a major neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS). Dysregulation of serotonin transmission in the CNS is reported to be related to different psychiatric disorders in humans including depression, impulsive aggression and anxiety disorders. The most frequently prescribed antidepressants and anxiolytics target the serotonergic system. However, these drugs are not effective in 20–30% of cases. The causes of this failure as well as the molecular mechanisms involved in the origin of psychological disorders are poorly understood. Biosynthesis of serotonin in the CNS is initiated by tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2). In this study, we used Tph2-deficient (Tph2−/−) mice to evaluate the impact of serotonin depletion in the brain on mouse behavior. Tph2−/− mice exhibited increased depression-like behavior in the forced swim test but not in the tail suspension test. In addition, they showed decreased anxiety-like behavior in three different paradigms: elevated plus maze, marble burying and novelty-suppressed feeding tests. These phenotypes were accompanied by strong aggressiveness observed in the resident–intruder paradigm. Despite carrying only one copy of the gene, heterozygous Tph2+/− mice showed only 10% reduction in brain serotonin, which was not sufficient to modulate behavior in the tested paradigms. Our findings provide unequivocal evidence on the pivotal role of central serotonin in anxiety and aggression. PMID:22832966

  8. Serotonin in fear conditioning processes.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Elizabeth P

    2015-01-15

    This review describes the latest developments in our understanding of how the serotonergic system modulates Pavlovian fear conditioning, fear expression and fear extinction. These different phases of classical fear conditioning involve coordinated interactions between the extended amygdala, hippocampus and prefrontal cortices. Here, I first define the different stages of learning involved in cued and context fear conditioning and describe the neural circuits underlying these processes. The serotonergic system can be manipulated by administering serotonin receptor agonists and antagonists, as well as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and these can have significant effects on emotional learning and memory. Moreover, variations in serotonergic genes can influence fear conditioning and extinction processes, and can underlie differential responses to pharmacological manipulations. This research has considerable translational significance as imbalances in the serotonergic system have been linked to anxiety and depression, while abnormalities in the mechanisms of conditioned fear contribute to anxiety disorders.

  9. The enhancement of arbovirus transmission and disease by mosquito saliva is associated with modulation of the host immune response

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Bradley S.; Higgs, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Arthropod-borne viruses have emerged as a major human health concern. Viruses transmitted by mosquitoes are the cause of the most serious and widespread arbovirus diseases worldwide and are ubiquitous in both feral and urban settings. Arboviruses, including dengue and West Nile virus are injected into vertebrates within mosquito saliva during mosquito feeding. Mosquito saliva contains anti-haemostatic, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory molecules that facilitate the acquisition of a blood-meal. Collectively, studies investigating the effects of mosquito saliva on the vertebrate immune response suggest that at high concentrations salivary proteins are immmunosuppressive, whereas lower concentrations modulate the immune response; specifically, TH1 and antiviral cytokines are down-regulated, while TH2 cytokines are unaffected or amplified. As a consequence, mosquito saliva can impair the anti-viral immune response thus affecting viral infectiousness and host survival. Mounting evidence suggests that this is a mechanism whereby arbovirus pathogenicity is enhanced. In a range of disease models, including various hosts, mosquito species, and arthropod-borne viruses, mosquito saliva and/or feeding is associated with a potentiation of virus infection. Compared to arbovirus infection initiated in absence of the mosquito or its saliva, infection including mosquito saliva leads to an increase in virus transmission, host susceptibility, viraemia, disease progression, and mortality. PMID:18342898

  10. Enhancement of negligible transmission band using hybrid periodic/Fibonacci photonic crystal in near infrared and microwave domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouldi, Abir; Kanzari, Mounir

    2012-06-01

    A hybrid structure of the type Bragg mirror-(Fibonacci)S is proposed to enhance the zero transmission band through the one dimensional photonic crystal in microwave domain and in the infrared. The efficiency of the configuration is proved in microwave domain for angles below 57°. In the infrared, the use of the configuration exhibits a large photonic band gap at any angle of incidence and for both polarizations. The proposed structure is a quarter wavelength omnidirectional mirror of 37 layers with a bandwidth larger than that of the periodic structure with an increasing ratio 3.7 and it covers all the optical telecommunication wavelengths 0.85, 1.3 and 1.55 μm. Unlike the previous devices, the structure is simple to fabricate and it shows interesting optical properties. The configuration Bragg mirror-(Fibonacci)S-Bragg mirror is also investigated to more extend the photonic band gap. Since different physical phenomena have their own appropriate physical scales, we exploited the physical properties of the proposed hybrid structure in different wavelength domains.

  11. Glucocorticoid-Mediated Enhancement of Glutamatergic Transmission May Outweigh Anti-Inflammatory Effects under Conditions of Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Le Coz, Glenn-Marie; Anton, Fernand; Hanesch, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    At the clinical level comorbidity between chronic pain and dysfunctional hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is well established. We aimed to identify causal relationships in a model of neuropathic pain (chronic constriction injury, CCI) by studying the effects of glucocorticoid receptor agonist (dexamethasone) and antagonist (RU-486) administration on pain behavior and spinal biochemical mediators. Daily injections were performed in Sprague Dawley rats. Weight, plasma corticosterone levels and mechanical pain thresholds were assessed before and during 21 days post-CCI. At days four and 21 we investigated the mRNA expression of spinal mediators. In the dexamethasone-injected group, we observed a diminution of body weight and plasma corticosterone levels during the 21 days post surgery period and a more pronounced pain sensitivity until day 7 post-CCI. This enhanced pain sensitivity in the early period following nerve injury was accompanied by a transient increase of the glutamate receptors mGluR5 and NMDA at day 4. However, at this time point we did not observe any effect of the agonist/antagonist injections on the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The RU-486-injected rats showed a slight mechanical hypoalgesia until 7 days post-CCI, but without any significant correlation with the expression of the measured markers. Our results indicate that glucocorticoid-related modulations of neuropathic pain processing may rather depend on a modification of glutamatergic transmission than on a change in pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. PMID:24618816

  12. Silver Enhancement for Transmission Electron Microscopy Imaging of Antibody Fragment-Gold Nanoparticles Conjugates Immobilized on Ordered Mesoporous Silica.

    PubMed

    Piludu, Marco; Medda, Luca; Cugia, Francesca; Monduzzi, Maura; Salis, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    Ordered mesoporous silica (OMS) materials are receiving great attention as possible carriers for valuable but unstable drugs as, for example, therapeutic proteins. A key issue is to prove that the therapeutic protein is effectively able to penetrate the pores of OMS during the adsorption step. Here, we immobilized an antibody fragment [F(ab')GAMIgG] conjugated with ultrasmall gold nanoparticles (GNPs) onto amino-functionalized SBA-15 (SBA-NH2) mesoporous silica. The aim of this work is the visualization of the location of the conjugates adsorbed onto SBA-NH2 with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Because of the ultrasmall size of GNPs (<1 nm), we use the silver enhancement procedure to amplify their size. In this procedure, ultrathin sections of conjugate-loaded SBA-NH2 particles are prepared by a ultramicrotome sectioning technique. The ultrasmall GNPs located on the top side of the 70-90 nm thick slices act as microcrystallization nucleation sites for the deposition of reduced metallic silver. Consequently, the ultrasmall GNPs increase their size. This allows for the direct imaging of the conjugates adsorbed. We clearly localize the F(ab')GAMIgG-GNPs conjugates either on the external surface of the particles or inside the mesopores of SBA-NH2 through TEM.

  13. Serotonergic transmission after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Thomschewski, Aljoscha; Höller, Peter; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Golaszewski, Stefan; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-02-01

    Changes in descending serotonergic innervation of spinal neural activity have been implicated in symptoms of paralysis, spasticity, sensory disturbances and pain following spinal cord injury (SCI). Serotonergic neurons possess an enhanced ability to regenerate or sprout after many types of injury, including SCI. Current research suggests that serotonine (5-HT) release within the ventral horn of the spinal cord plays a critical role in motor function, and activation of 5-HT receptors mediates locomotor control. 5-HT originating from the brain stem inhibits sensory afferent transmission and associated spinal reflexes; by abolishing 5-HT innervation SCI leads to a disinhibition of sensory transmission. 5-HT denervation supersensitivity is one of the key mechanisms underlying the increased motoneuron excitability that occurs after SCI, and this hyperexcitability has been demonstrated to underlie the pathogenesis of spasticity after SCI. Moreover, emerging evidence implicates serotonergic descending facilitatory pathways from the brainstem to the spinal cord in the maintenance of pathologic pain. There are functional relevant connections between the descending serotonergic system from the rostral ventromedial medulla in the brainstem, the 5-HT receptors in the spinal dorsal horn, and the descending pain facilitation after tissue and nerve injury. This narrative review focussed on the most important studies that have investigated the above-mentioned effects of impaired 5-HT-transmission in humans after SCI. We also briefly discussed the promising therapeutical approaches with serotonergic drugs, monoclonal antibodies and intraspinal cell transplantation.

  14. Serotonin Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors: A Pharmacological Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are a family of antidepressants that inhibit the reuptake of both serotonin and norepinephrine. While these drugs are traditionally considered a group of inter-related antidepressants based upon reuptake inhibition, they generally display different chemical structures as well as different pharmacological properties. In this article, we discuss these and other differences among the serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, including the year of approval by the United States Food and Drug Administration, generic availability, approved clinical indications, half-lives, metabolism and excretion, presence or not of active metabolites, dosing schedules, proportionate effects on serotonin and norepinephrine, and the timing of serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake (i.e., sequential or simultaneous). Again, while serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are grouped as a family of antidepressants, they exhibit a surprising number of differences— differences that may ultimately relate to clinical nuances in patient care. PMID:24800132

  15. Serotonin 1A receptors alter expression of movement representations.

    PubMed

    Scullion, Kathleen; Boychuk, Jeffery A; Yamakawa, Glenn R; Rodych, Justin T G; Nakanishi, Stan T; Seto, Angela; Smith, Victoria M; McCarthy, Ryan W; Whelan, Patrick J; Antle, Michael C; Pittman, Quentin J; Teskey, G Campbell

    2013-03-13

    Serotonin has a myriad of central functions involving mood, appetite, sleep, and memory and while its release within the spinal cord is particularly important for generating movement, the corresponding role on cortical movement representations (motor maps) is unknown. Using adult rats we determined that pharmacological depletion of serotonin (5-HT) via intracerebroventricular administration of 5,7 dihydroxytryptamine resulted in altered movements of the forelimb in a skilled reaching task as well as higher movement thresholds and smaller maps derived using high-resolution intracortical microstimulation (ICMS). We ruled out the possibility that reduced spinal cord excitability could account for the serotonin depletion-induced changes as we observed an enhanced Hoffman reflex (H-reflex), indicating a hyperexcitable spinal cord. Motor maps derived in 5-HT1A receptor knock-out mice also showed higher movement thresholds and smaller maps compared with wild-type controls. Direct cortical application of the 5-HT1A/7 agonist 8-OH-DPAT lowered movement thresholds in vivo and increased map size in 5-HT-depleted rats. In rats, electrical stimulation of the dorsal raphe lowered movement thresholds and this effect could be blocked by direct cortical application of the 5-HT1A antagonist WAY-100135, indicating that serotonin is primarily acting through the 5-HT1A receptor. Next we developed a novel in vitro ICMS preparation that allowed us to track layer V pyramidal cell excitability. Bath application of WAY-100135 raised the ICMS current intensity to induce action potential firing whereas the agonist 8-OH-DPAT had the opposite effect. Together our results demonstrate that serotonin, acting through 5-HT1A receptors, plays an excitatory role in forelimb motor map expression.

  16. Facilitation of Serotonin Signaling by SSRIs is Attenuated by Social Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Dankoski, Elyse C; Agster, Kara L; Fox, Megan E; Moy, Sheryl S; Wightman, R Mark

    2014-01-01

    Hypofunction of the serotonergic system is often associated with major depression and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly prescribed to treat these disorders, and require 3–6 weeks of chronic treatment before improvements in the symptoms are observed. SSRIs inhibit serotonin's transporter, and in doing so, increase extracellular serotonin concentrations. Thus, efficacy of SSRIs likely depends upon the brain's adaptive response to sustained increases in serotonin levels. Individual responsiveness to SSRI treatment may depend on a variety of factors that influence these changes, including ongoing stress. Social isolation is a passive, naturalistic form of chronic mild stress that can model depression in rodents. In this study, we examined how 20-day treatment with the SSRI citalopram (CIT) alters marble-burying (MB), open field behavior, and serotonin signaling in single- vs pair-housed animals. We used in vivo voltammetry to measure electrically evoked serotonin, comparing release rate, net overflow, and clearance. Pair-housed mice were significantly more responsive to CIT treatment, exhibiting reduced MB and facilitation of serotonin release that positively correlated with the frequency of electrical stimulation. These effects of CIT treatment were attenuated in single-housed mice. Notably, although CIT treatment enhanced serotonin release in pair-housed mice, it did not significantly alter uptake rate. In summary, we report that chronic SSRI treatment facilitates serotonin release in a frequency-dependent manner, and this effect is blocked by social isolation. These findings suggest that the efficacy of SSRIs in treating depression and OCD may depend on ongoing stressors during treatment. PMID:24981046

  17. Facilitation of serotonin signaling by SSRIs is attenuated by social isolation.

    PubMed

    Dankoski, Elyse C; Agster, Kara L; Fox, Megan E; Moy, Sheryl S; Wightman, R Mark

    2014-12-01

    Hypofunction of the serotonergic system is often associated with major depression and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly prescribed to treat these disorders, and require 3-6 weeks of chronic treatment before improvements in the symptoms are observed. SSRIs inhibit serotonin's transporter, and in doing so, increase extracellular serotonin concentrations. Thus, efficacy of SSRIs likely depends upon the brain's adaptive response to sustained increases in serotonin levels. Individual responsiveness to SSRI treatment may depend on a variety of factors that influence these changes, including ongoing stress. Social isolation is a passive, naturalistic form of chronic mild stress that can model depression in rodents. In this study, we examined how 20-day treatment with the SSRI citalopram (CIT) alters marble-burying (MB), open field behavior, and serotonin signaling in single- vs pair-housed animals. We used in vivo voltammetry to measure electrically evoked serotonin, comparing release rate, net overflow, and clearance. Pair-housed mice were significantly more responsive to CIT treatment, exhibiting reduced MB and facilitation of serotonin release that positively correlated with the frequency of electrical stimulation. These effects of CIT treatment were attenuated in single-housed mice. Notably, although CIT treatment enhanced serotonin release in pair-housed mice, it did not significantly alter uptake rate. In summary, we report that chronic SSRI treatment facilitates serotonin release in a frequency-dependent manner, and this effect is blocked by social isolation. These findings suggest that the efficacy of SSRIs in treating depression and OCD may depend on ongoing stressors during treatment.

  18. Serotonin produces monoamine oxidase-dependent oxidative stress in human heart valves

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jordan D.; Chu, Yi; Heistad, Donald D.

    2009-01-01

    Heart valve disease and pulmonary hypertension, in patients with carcinoid tumors and people who used the fenfluramine-phentermine combination for weight control, have been associated with high levels of serotonin in blood. The mechanism by which serotonin induces valvular changes is not well understood. We recently reported that increased oxidative stress is associated with valvular changes in aortic valve stenosis in humans and mice. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that serotonin induces oxidative stress in human heart valves, and examined mechanisms by which serotonin may increase reactive oxygen species. Superoxide (O2·−) was measured in heart valves from explanted human hearts that were not used for transplantation. O2·− levels (lucigenin-enhanced chemoluminescence) were increased in homogenates of cardiac valves and blood vessels after incubation with serotonin. A nonspecific inhibitor of flavin-oxidases (diphenyliodonium), or inhibitors of monoamine oxidase [MAO (tranylcypromine and clorgyline)], prevented the serotonin-induced increase in O2·−. Dopamine, another MAO substrate that is increased in patients with carcinoid syndrome, also increased O2·− levels in heart valves, and this effect was attenuated by clorgyline. Apocynin [an inhibitor of NAD(P)H oxidase] did not prevent increases in O2·− during serotonin treatment. Addition of serotonin to recombinant human MAO-A generated O2·−, and this effect was prevented by an MAO inhibitor. In conclusion, we have identified a novel mechanism whereby MAO-A can contribute to increased oxidative stress in human heart valves and pulmonary artery exposed to serotonin and dopamine. PMID:19666839

  19. Serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms and hyperserotonemia in autistic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Betancur, Catalina; Corbex, Marylis; Spielewoy, Cécile; Philippe, Anne; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Launay, Jean-Marie; Gillberg, Christopher; Mouren-Simeoni, Marie-Christine; Hamon, Michel; Giros, Bruno; Nosten-Bertrand, Marika; Leboyer, Marion

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have provided conflicting evidence regarding the association of the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene with autism. Two polymorphisms have been identified in the human 5-HTT gene, a VNTR in intron 21 and a functional deletion/insertion in the promoter region (5-HTTLPR) with short and long variants.2 Positive associations of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism with autism have been reported by two family-based studies, but one found preferential transmission of the short allele3 and the other of the long allele.4 Two subsequent studies failed to find evidence of transmission disequilibrium at the 5-HTTLPR locus.5,6 These conflicting results could be due to heterogeneity of clinical samples with regard to serotonin (5-HT) blood levels, which have been found to be elevated in some autistic subjects.7–9 Thus, we examined the association of the 5-HTTLPR and VNTR polymorphisms of the 5-HTT gene with autism, and we investigated the relationship between 5-HTT variants and whole-blood 5-HT. The transmission/disequilibrium test (TDT) revealed no linkage disequilibrium at either loci in a sample of 96 families comprising 43 trios and 53 sib pairs. Furthermore, no significant relationship between 5-HT blood levels and 5-HTT gene polymorphisms was found. Our results suggest that the 5-HTT gene is unlikely to play a major role as a susceptibility factor in autism. PMID:11803447

  20. An optimised multi-host trematode life cycle: fishery discards enhance trophic parasite transmission to scavenging birds.

    PubMed

    Born-Torrijos, Ana; Poulin, Robert; Pérez-Del-Olmo, Ana; Culurgioni, Jacopo; Raga, Juan Antonio; Holzer, Astrid Sibylle

    2016-10-01

    Overlapping distributions of hosts and parasites are critical for successful completion of multi-host parasite life cycles and even small environmental changes can impact on the parasite's presence in a host or habitat. The generalist Cardiocephaloides longicollis was used as a model for multi-host trematode life cycles in marine habitats. This parasite was studied to quantify parasite dispersion and transmission dynamics, effects of biological changes and anthropogenic impacts on life cycle completion. We compiled the largest host dataset to date, by analysing 3351 molluscs (24 species), 2108 fish (25 species) and 154 birds (17 species) and analysed the resultant data based on a number of statistical models. We uncovered extremely low host specificity at the second intermediate host level and a preference of the free-swimming larvae for predominantly demersal but also benthic fish. The accumulation of encysted larvae in the brain with increasing fish size demonstrates that parasite numbers level off in fish larger than 140mm, consistent with parasite-induced mortality at these levels. The highest infection rates were detected in host species and sizes representing the largest fraction of Mediterranean fishery discards (up to 67% of the total catch), which are frequently consumed by seabirds. Significantly higher parasite densities were found in areas with extensive fishing activity than in those with medium and low activity, and in fish from shallow lagoons than in fish from other coastal areas. For the first time, C. longicollis was also detected in farmed fish in netpens. Fishing generally drives declines in parasite abundance, however, our study suggests an enhanced transmission of generalist parasites such as C. longicollis, an effect that is further amplified by the parasite's efficient host-finding mechanisms and its alteration of fish host behaviour by larvae encysted in the brain. The anthropogenic impact on the distribution of trophically

  1. Modulation of motoneuron activity by serotonin.

    PubMed

    Perrier, Jean-François

    2016-02-01

    Serotonin is a major neuromodulator in the central nervous system involved in most physiological functions including appetite regulation, sexual arousal, sleep regulation and motor control. The activity of neurons from the raphe spinal tract, which release serotonin on motoneurons, is positively correlated with motor behaviour. During moderate physical activity, serotonin is released from synaptic terminals onto the dendrites and cell bodies of motoneurons. Serotonin increases the excitability of motoneurons and thereby facilitate muscle contraction by acting on several parallel intracellular pathways. By activating 5-HT1A receptors, serotonin inhibits TWIK-related acid-sensitive potassium channels and small conductance calcium-activated potassium channels. In parallel, serotonin binds to 5-HT2 receptors, which promotes the low-threshold L-type Ca(2+) channels. During intense physical activity, more serotonin is released. The reuptake systems saturate and serotonin spills over to reach extrasynaptic 5-HT1A receptors located on the axon initial segment of motoneurons. This in turn induces the inhibition of the Na(+) channels responsible for the initiation of action potentials. Fewer nerve impulses are generated and muscle contraction becomes weaker. By decreasing the gain of motoneurons, serotonin triggers central fatigue.

  2. Short-term repeated corticosterone administration enhances glutamatergic but not GABAergic transmission in the rat motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Kula, Joanna; Blasiak, Anna; Czerw, Anna; Tylko, Grzegorz; Sowa, Joanna; Hess, Grzegorz

    2016-04-01

    It has been demonstrated that stress impairs performance of skilled reaching and walking tasks in rats due to the action of glucocorticoids involved in the stress response. Skilled reaching and walking are controlled by the primary motor cortex (M1); however, it is not known whether stress-related impairments in skilled motor tasks are related to functional and/or structural alterations within the M1. We studied the effects of single and repeated injections of corticosterone (twice daily for 7 days) on spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and sIPSCs) recorded from layer II/III pyramidal neurons in ex vivo slices of the M1, prepared 2 days after the last administration of the hormone. We also measured the density of dendritic spines on pyramidal cells and the protein levels of selected subunits of AMPA, NMDA, and GABAA receptors after repeated corticosterone administration. Repeatedly administered corticosterone induced an increase in the frequency but not in the amplitude of sEPSCs, while a single administration had no effect on the recorded excitatory currents. The frequency and amplitude of sIPSCs as well as the excitability of pyramidal cells were changed neither after single nor after repeated corticosterone administration. Treatment with corticosterone for 7 days did not modify the density of dendritic spines on pyramidal neurons. Corticosterone influenced neither the protein levels of GluA1, GluA2, GluN1, GluN2A, and GluN2B subunits of glutamate receptors nor those of α1, β2, and γ2 subunits of the GABAA receptor. The increase in sEPSCs frequency induced by repeated corticosterone administration faded out within 7 days. These data indicate that prolonged administration of exogenous corticosterone selectively and reversibly enhances glutamatergic, but not GABAergic transmission in the rat motor cortex. Our results suggest that corticosterone treatment results in an enhancement of spontaneous glutamate release from presynaptic

  3. Unifying concept of serotonin transporter-associated currents.

    PubMed

    Schicker, Klaus; Uzelac, Zeljko; Gesmonde, Joan; Bulling, Simon; Stockner, Thomas; Freissmuth, Michael; Boehm, Stefan; Rudnick, Gary; Sitte, Harald H; Sandtner, Walter

    2012-01-02

    Serotonin (5-HT) uptake by the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) is driven by ion gradients. The stoichiometry of transported 5-HT and ions is predicted to result in electroneutral charge movement. However, hSERT mediates a current when challenged with 5-HT. This discrepancy can be accounted for by an uncoupled ion flux. Here, we investigated the mechanistic basis of the uncoupled currents and its relation to the conformational cycle of hSERT. Our observations support the conclusion that the conducting state underlying the uncoupled ion flux is in equilibrium with an inward facing state of the transporter with K+ bound. We identified conditions associated with accumulation of the transporter in inward facing conformations. Manipulations that increased the abundance of inward facing states resulted in enhanced steady-state currents. We present a comprehensive kinetic model of the transport cycle, which recapitulates salient features of the recorded currents. This study provides a framework for exploring transporter-associated currents.

  4. Divergent Roles of Central Serotonin in Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ning-Ning; Huang, Ying; Yu, Xin; Lang, Bing; Ding, Yu-Qiang; Zhang, Lei

    2017-01-01

    The central serotonin (5-HT) system is the main target of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), the first-line antidepressants widely used in current general practice. One of the prominent features of chronic SSRI treatment in rodents is the enhanced adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus, which has been proposed to contribute to antidepressant effects. Therefore, tremendous effort has been made to decipher how central 5-HT regulates adult hippocampal neurogenesis. In this paper, we review how changes in the central serotonergic system alter adult hippocampal neurogenesis. We focus on data obtained from three categories of genetically engineered mouse models: (1) mice with altered central 5-HT levels from embryonic stages, (2) mice with deletion of 5-HT receptors from embryonic stages, and (3) mice with altered central 5-HT system exclusively in adulthood. These recent findings provide unique insights to interpret the multifaceted roles of central 5-HT on adult hippocampal neurogenesis and its associated effects on depression. PMID:28713247

  5. Color filters based on enhanced optical transmission of subwavelength-structured metallic film for multicolor organic light-emitting diode display.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao; Zhan, Li; Xia, Yuxing

    2008-08-10

    Using metallic film perforated with a subwavelength periodic structure, a novel concept of a color filter for multicolor organic light-emitting diode (OLED) display is proposed. Based on the phase-matching condition for extraordinary optical transmission, three primary color emissions can be obtained by optimizing the structure's periodicity. Two periodic structures, an array of one-dimensional periodic slits and a two-dimensional periodic hole array, are studied using coupled mode theory. Also, the feasibility of applying these structures as color filters is analyzed. The relative intensity at the unwanted wavelength, which is generated by higher resonant transmission, had been calculated to eliminate its effect on the purity of these filters. It is important that this type of color filter simultaneously solves the low emission efficiency problem for OLEDs with the aid of enhanced transmission of metal film.

  6. Serotonin receptor-mediated stimulation of bovine smooth muscle cell prostacyclin synthesis and its modulation by platelet-derived growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Coughlin, S R; Moskowitz, M A; Antoniades, H N; Levine, L

    1981-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 0.5 microM and above) stimulated the synthesis of prostacyclin (as measured by radioimmunoassay of 6-ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha) by bovine aortic smooth muscle cells in culture. This effect was structurally specific; a similar response was not elicited by the other indoles (tryptophan, n-acetylserotonin, 5-hydroxytryptophan, melatonin, or 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid) or by the amines phenylephrine, isoproterenol, dopamine, or histamine). The response was reversible and was saturable at serotonin concentrations of 10 microM or higher. An increase in prostacyclin synthesis was elicited by the addition of a serotonin agonist, quipazine (1 microM and above), and antagonized by the serotonin receptor blockers cyproheptadine, methysergide, or methiothepin but not by other aminergic receptor-blocking drugs (e.g., phentolamine or propranolol). This effect was selective for cell type because serotonin or quipazine (100 microM) did not increase prostacyclin synthesis by bovine aortic endothelial cells. The addition of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) to cultures of smooth muscle cells dramatically enhanced prostacyclin synthesis in response to the coadministration of serotonin. PDGF greatly increased the maximum response to serotonin without altering the half-maximal effective concentration for serotonin. This synergistic interaction was blocked by the addition of a serotonin-receptor blocking agent. Taken together, these data suggest that serotonin stimulates smooth muscle prostacyclin synthesis through a specific receptor-mediated mechanism that can be modulated by PDGF. Images PMID:7031670

  7. The capsaicin analog nonivamide decreases total energy intake from a standardized breakfast and enhances plasma serotonin levels in moderately overweight men after administered in an oral glucose tolerance test: a randomized, crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Hochkogler, Christina M; Rohm, Barbara; Hojdar, Karin; Pignitter, Marc; Widder, Sabine; Ley, Jakob P; Krammer, Gerhard E; Somoza, Veronika

    2014-06-01

    Since bolus administration of capsaicin has been shown to reduce appetite and ad libitum energy intake, this study elucidated the satiating effect of the less pungent capsaicin analog, nonivamide, on subjective feelings of hunger, ad libitum food intake, and satiating hormones in moderately overweight male subjects. Following a randomized, crossover design, 24 male subjects (BMI 27.5 ± 1.53 kg/m(2) ) received either 75 g glucose in 300 mL water (control treatment, CT) or the same glucose solution supplemented with 0.15 mg nonivamide (nonivamide treatment, NT). Ratings of hunger were assessed before and 2 h after each intervention by means of visual analog scales. Ad libitum energy and macronutrient intakes from a standardized breakfast 2 h postintervention were calculated. Plasma glucose, insulin, peptide YY (3-36), glucagon-like peptide 1, and serotonin were quantified in blood samples drawn before and 15, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min after each intervention. NT reduced subjective feelings of hunger and ad libitum energy and carbohydrate intakes from a standardized breakfast compared to CT. Plasma analysis revealed higher mean plasma glucagon-like peptide 1 and serotonin concentrations after NT versus CT. Addition of 0.15 mg nonivamide to a glucose solution reduced ad libitum energy intake from a standardized breakfast in moderately overweight men. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Serotonin modulates insect hemocyte phagocytosis via two different serotonin receptors

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yi-xiang; Huang, Jia; Li, Meng-qi; Wu, Ya-su; Xia, Ren-ying; Ye, Gong-yin

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) modulates both neural and immune responses in vertebrates, but its role in insect immunity remains uncertain. We report that hemocytes in the caterpillar, Pieris rapae are able to synthesize 5-HT following activation by lipopolysaccharide. The inhibition of a serotonin-generating enzyme with either pharmacological blockade or RNAi knock-down impaired hemocyte phagocytosis. Biochemical and functional experiments showed that naive hemocytes primarily express 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptors. The blockade of 5-HT1B significantly reduced phagocytic ability; however, the blockade of 5-HT2B increased hemocyte phagocytosis. The 5-HT1B-null Drosophila melanogaster mutants showed higher mortality than controls when infected with bacteria, due to their decreased phagocytotic ability. Flies expressing 5-HT1B or 5-HT2B RNAi in hemocytes also showed similar sensitivity to infection. Combined, these data demonstrate that 5-HT mediates hemocyte phagocytosis through 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptors and serotonergic signaling performs critical modulatory functions in immune systems of animals separated by 500 million years of evolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12241.001 PMID:26974346

  9. Serotonin modulates insect hemocyte phagocytosis via two different serotonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yi-Xiang; Huang, Jia; Li, Meng-Qi; Wu, Ya-Su; Xia, Ren-Ying; Ye, Gong-Yin

    2016-03-14

    Serotonin (5-HT) modulates both neural and immune responses in vertebrates, but its role in insect immunity remains uncertain. We report that hemocytes in the caterpillar, Pieris rapae are able to synthesize 5-HT following activation by lipopolysaccharide. The inhibition of a serotonin-generating enzyme with either pharmacological blockade or RNAi knock-down impaired hemocyte phagocytosis. Biochemical and functional experiments showed that naive hemocytes primarily express 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptors. The blockade of 5-HT1B significantly reduced phagocytic ability; however, the blockade of 5-HT2B increased hemocyte phagocytosis. The 5-HT1B-null Drosophila melanogaster mutants showed higher mortality than controls when infected with bacteria, due to their decreased phagocytotic ability. Flies expressing 5-HT1B or 5-HT2B RNAi in hemocytes also showed similar sensitivity to infection. Combined, these data demonstrate that 5-HT mediates hemocyte phagocytosis through 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptors and serotonergic signaling performs critical modulatory functions in immune systems of animals separated by 500 million years of evolution.

  10. Serotonin: Modulator of a Drive to Withdraw

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tops, Mattie; Russo, Sascha; Boksem, Maarten A. S.; Tucker, Don M.

    2009-01-01

    Serotonin is a fundamental neuromodulator in both vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems, with a suspected role in many human mental disorders. Yet, because of the complexity of serotonergic function, researchers have been unable to agree on a general theory. One function suggested for serotonin systems is the avoidance of threat. We propose…

  11. [Increased spontaneous uterine motility with serotonin].

    PubMed

    Lechner, W; Sölder, E; Sölder, B; Kölle, D; Huter, O

    1992-01-01

    The influence of serotonine, a vasoactive neurotransmitter, on the spontaneous motility of uterine strips was investigated. A highly significant (p less than 0.001) increase of uterine activity was observed when serotonine 10(-6) M was added to the perfusing medium.

  12. Serotonin: Modulator of a Drive to Withdraw

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tops, Mattie; Russo, Sascha; Boksem, Maarten A. S.; Tucker, Don M.

    2009-01-01

    Serotonin is a fundamental neuromodulator in both vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems, with a suspected role in many human mental disorders. Yet, because of the complexity of serotonergic function, researchers have been unable to agree on a general theory. One function suggested for serotonin systems is the avoidance of threat. We propose…

  13. Serotonin research: contributions to understanding psychoses.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Mark A; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2008-09-01

    The history of serotonin research is closely related to the study of hallucinogenic drugs that function as agonists at serotonin-2A receptors. The fundamental idea that psychotic states seen in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia might be attributable, in part, to abnormalities in serotonergic systems began with the almost simultaneous discovery of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), psilocybin and serotonin. Sixty years of study have confirmed early speculations regarding the important relationship between serotonin and both drug-induced and disorder-based psychotic states. Now, modern biochemical, pharmacological, behavioral, neuroimaging, genetic and molecular biological sciences are converging to understand how serotonergic systems interact with other monoaminergic and glutamatergic systems to modulate states of consciousness and contribute to psychotic disorders such as the group of schizophrenias. This review summarizes experimental assessments of the serotonergic hallucinogen model psychosis in relation to the serotonin hypothesis of schizophrenia.

  14. TH-9 (a theophylline derivative) induces long-lasting enhancement in excitatory synaptic transmission in the rat hippocampus that is occluded by frequency-dependent plasticity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nashawi, H; Bartl, T; Bartl, P; Novotny, L; Oriowo, M A; Kombian, S B

    2012-09-18

    Dementia, especially Alzheimer's disease, is a rapidly increasing medical condition that presents with enormous challenge for treatment. It is characterized by impairment in memory and cognitive function often accompanied by changes in synaptic transmission and plasticity in relevant brain regions such as the hippocampus. We recently synthesized TH-9, a conjugate racetam-methylxanthine compound and tested if it had potential for enhancing synaptic function and possibly, plasticity, by examining its effect on hippocampal fast excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) were recorded in the CA1 hippocampal area of naïve juvenile male Sprague-Dawley rats using conventional electrophysiological recording techniques. TH-9 caused a concentration-dependent, long-lasting enhancement in fEPSPs. This effect was blocked by adenosine A1, acetylcholine (muscarinic and nicotinic) and glutamate (N-methyl-d-aspartate) receptor antagonists but not by a γ-aminobutyric acid receptor type B (GABA(B)) receptor antagonist. The TH-9 effect was also blocked by enhancing intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate and inhibiting protein kinase A. Pretreatment with TH-9 did not prevent the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) or long-term depression (LTD). Conversely, induction of LTP or LTD completely occluded the ability of TH-9 to enhance fEPSPs. Thus, TH-9 utilizes cholinergic and adenosinergic mechanisms to cause long-lasting enhancement in fEPSPs which were occluded by LTP and LTD. TH-9 may therefore employ similar or convergent mechanisms with frequency-dependent synaptic plasticities to produce the observed long-lasting enhancement in synaptic transmission and may thus, have potential for use in improving memory.

  15. [ROLE OF SEROTONIN IN THE REGULATION OF RESPIRATION AND BILE SECRETORY FUNCTION OF THE LIVER].

    PubMed

    Yanchuk, P I; Athamnah, S M; Reshetnik, E M; Levadyanska, J A; Nikitina, N O; Veselsky, S P

    2015-01-01

    In acute experiments on laboratory male rats we have shown that serotonin (10 mkg/kg, intraportal) increased the oxygen consumption of by liver on 28.8% (P < 0.001) and reduced oxygen tension levels on 19.3% (P < 0.001). The action of serotonin on tissue respiration in liver realized through 5-HT(2) receptors because previous blockade by ketanserin (3 mg/kg) led to remove the effects of exogenous serotonin and inhibition of the action of endogenous autacoid. Serotonin reduced the amount of secreted bile on 13.5% (P < 0.05), and increases the concentration of conjugated bile acids and decreases the content of free cholate, indicating enhanced conjugation with taurine and glycine in the liver cells. However, serotonin didn't stimulate synthesis of primary bile acids. Introduction of serotonin in the conditions of 5-HT2 receptors blockade by ketanserin also led to speed decrease of bile secretion, but in this case stimulating effect of autacoid on bile acid conjugation with taurine and glycine wasn't manifested and content of free cholate wasn't reduced.

  16. On the role of brain serotonin in expression of genetic predisposition to catalepsy in animal models

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, N.K.; Kulikov, A.V.

    1995-06-19

    The activity of the rate-limiting enzyme of serotonin biosynthesis, tryptophan hydroxylase, in the striatum but not in the hippocampus and midbrain of rats bred for predisposition to catalepsy was higher than in nonselected rats. Mice of the highly susceptible to catalepsy CBA strain also differed from other noncataleptic mouse strains by the highest tryptophan hydroxylase activity in the striatum. Inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase with p-chlorophenylalanine and p-chloromethamphetamine drastically decreased immobility time in hereditary predisposed to catalepsy animals. A decrease in the {sup 3}H-ketanserin specific binding in the striatum of cataleptic rats and CBA mice was found. It was suggested that this decrease in 5-HT2A serotonin receptor density represented a down regulation of the receptors due to an activation of serotonergic transmission in striatum. It is suggested that hereditary catalepsy may be resulted from genetic changes in the regulation of serotonin metabolism in striatum. 32 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Activation of α₁-adrenoceptors enhances excitatory synaptic transmission via a pre- and postsynaptic protein kinase C-dependent mechanism in the medial prefrontal cortex of rats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fei; Tang, Hua; Li, Bao-ming; Li, Si-hai

    2014-04-01

    The physiological effects of α₁-adrenoceptors (α₁-ARs) have been examined in many brain regions. However, little is known about the mechanism of modulation on synaptic transmission by α₁-ARs in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The present study investigated how α₁-AR activation regulates glutamatergic synaptic transmission in layer V/VI pyramidal cells of the rat mPFC. We found that the α₁-AR agonist phenylephrine (Phe) induced a significant enhancement of the amplitude and frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs). The facilitation effect of Phe on the frequency of mEPSCs involved a presynaptic protein kinase C-dependent pathway. Phe produced a significant enhancement on the amplitude of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPA-R)- and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDA-R)-mediated evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs). Phe enhanced inward currents evoked by puff application of glutamate or NMDA. The Phe-induced facilitation of AMPA-R- and NMDA-R-mediated eEPSCs required, in part, postsynaptic Gq , phospholipase C and PKC. These findings suggest that α₁-AR activation facilitates excitatory synaptic transmission in mPFC pyramidal cells via both pre- and post-synaptic PKC-dependent mechanisms.

  18. Effects of fentanyl on serotonin syndrome-like behaviors in rats.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Sonoe; Kawano, Takashi; Kaminaga, Satomi; Yamanaka, Daiki; Tateiwa, Hiroki; Locatelli, Fabricio M; Yokoyama, Masataka

    2016-02-01

    Emerging evidence from case reports suggests that fentanyl may precipitate potentially life-threatening serotonin syndrome in patients taking serotonergic drugs. However, the underlying mechanism of the association between serotonin syndrome and fentanyl remains under investigation. We therefore investigated the pharmacological effects of an analgesic dose of fentanyl (0.2 mg/kg) injected subcutaneously (s.c.) on serotonergic toxicity-like responses in rats. Rats were s.c. injected with 0.75 mg/kg 8-OH-DPAT, a full 5-HT1A agonist, as an animal model of serotonin syndrome. The 8-OH-DPAT-treated rats showed well-characterized serotonin syndrome-like behaviors (low body posture, forepaw treading), hyperlocomotion, and decreased body temperature. Rats injected s.c. with fentanyl alone showed no significant changes in any of the parameters measured, while concomitant administration of fentanyl + 8-OH-DPAT resulted in exaggerated 8-OH-DPAT-induced serototoxic responses. A separate dose-response experiment showed that the serototoxic effect of fentanyl was dose-dependent. Pretreatment with naloxone [2.0 mg/kg, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection], an opioid receptor antagonist, failed to antagonize the fentanyl-induced exaggerated serotonin syndrome-like behaviors. In contrast, pretreatment with WAY-100653, a serotonin 5-HT1A receptor antagonist (0.5 mg/kg, i.p. injection) completely inhibited all responses. Our findings provide preclinical proof-of-concept that an analgesic dose of fentanyl enhances serotonin toxicity, likely via its serotonin-reuptake inhibitory activity, independently of interaction with the opioid receptors.

  19. Serotonin, neural markers, and memory.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Diverse neuropsychiatric disorders present dysfunctional memory and no effective treatment exits for them; likely as result of the absence of neural markers associated to memory. Neurotransmitter systems and signaling pathways have been implicated in memory and dysfunctional memory; however, their role is poorly understood. Hence, neural markers and cerebral functions and dysfunctions are revised. To our knowledge no previous systematic works have been published addressing these issues. The interactions among behavioral tasks, control groups and molecular changes and/or pharmacological effects are mentioned. Neurotransmitter receptors and signaling pathways, during normal and abnormally functioning memory with an emphasis on the behavioral aspects of memory are revised. With focus on serotonin, since as it is a well characterized neurotransmitter, with multiple pharmacological tools, and well characterized downstream signaling in mammals' species. 5-HT1A, 5-HT4, 5-HT5, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors as well as SERT (serotonin transporter) seem to be useful neural markers and/or therapeutic targets. Certainly, if the mentioned evidence is replicated, then the translatability from preclinical and clinical studies to neural changes might be confirmed. Hypothesis and theories might provide appropriate limits and perspectives of evidence.

  20. Serotonin, neural markers, and memory

    PubMed Central

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Diverse neuropsychiatric disorders present dysfunctional memory and no effective treatment exits for them; likely as result of the absence of neural markers associated to memory. Neurotransmitter systems and signaling pathways have been implicated in memory and dysfunctional memory; however, their role is poorly understood. Hence, neural markers and cerebral functions and dysfunctions are revised. To our knowledge no previous systematic works have been published addressing these issues. The interactions among behavioral tasks, control groups and molecular changes and/or pharmacological effects are mentioned. Neurotransmitter receptors and signaling pathways, during normal and abnormally functioning memory with an emphasis on the behavioral aspects of memory are revised. With focus on serotonin, since as it is a well characterized neurotransmitter, with multiple pharmacological tools, and well characterized downstream signaling in mammals' species. 5-HT1A, 5-HT4, 5-HT5, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors as well as SERT (serotonin transporter) seem to be useful neural markers and/or therapeutic targets. Certainly, if the mentioned evidence is replicated, then the translatability from preclinical and clinical studies to neural changes might be confirmed. Hypothesis and theories might provide appropriate limits and perspectives of evidence. PMID:26257650

  1. In Vitro Evolution of Bovine Foamy Virus Variants with Enhanced Cell-Free Virus Titers and Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Qiuying; Hipp, Michaela; Hugo, Annette; Lei, Janet; Liu, Yang; Kehl, Timo; Hechler, Torsten; Löchelt, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Virus transmission is essential for spreading viral infections and is a highly coordinated process which occurs by cell-free transmission or cell–cell contact. The transmission of Bovine Foamy Virus (BFV) is highly cell-associated, with undetectable cell-free transmission. However, BFV particle budding can be induced by overexpression of wild-type (wt) BFV Gag and Env or artificial retargeting of Gag to the plasma membrane via myristoylation membrane targeting signals, closely resembling observations in other foamy viruses. Thus, the particle release machinery of wt BFV appears to be an excellent model system to study viral adaption to cell-free transmission by in vitro selection and evolution. Using selection for BFV variants with high cell-free infectivity in bovine and non-bovine cells, infectivity dramatically increased from almost no infectious units to about 105–106 FFU (fluorescent focus forming units)/mL in both cell types. Importantly, the selected BFV variants with high titer (HT) cell-free infectivity could still transmit via cell-cell contacts and were neutralized by serum from naturally infected cows. These selected HT–BFV variants will shed light into virus transmission and potential routes of intervention in the spread of viral infections. It will also allow the improvement or development of new promising approaches for antiretroviral therapies. PMID:26569290

  2. In Vitro Evolution of Bovine Foamy Virus Variants with Enhanced Cell-Free Virus Titers and Transmission.

    PubMed

    Bao, Qiuying; Hipp, Michaela; Hugo, Annette; Lei, Janet; Liu, Yang; Kehl, Timo; Hechler, Torsten; Löchelt, Martin

    2015-11-11

    Virus transmission is essential for spreading viral infections and is a highly coordinated process which occurs by cell-free transmission or cell-cell contact. The transmission of Bovine Foamy Virus (BFV) is highly cell-associated, with undetectable cell-free transmission. However, BFV particle budding can be induced by overexpression of wild-type (wt) BFV Gag and Env or artificial retargeting of Gag to the plasma membrane via myristoylation membrane targeting signals, closely resembling observations in other foamy viruses. Thus, the particle release machinery of wt BFV appears to be an excellent model system to study viral adaption to cell-free transmission by in vitro selection and evolution. Using selection for BFV variants with high cell-free infectivity in bovine and non-bovine cells, infectivity dramatically increased from almost no infectious units to about 105-106 FFU (fluorescent focus forming units)/mL in both cell types. Importantly, the selected BFV variants with high titer (HT) cell-free infectivity could still transmit via cell-cell contacts and were neutralized by serum from naturally infected cows. These selected HT-BFV variants will shed light into virus transmission and potential routes of intervention in the spread of viral infections. It will also allow the improvement or development of new promising approaches for antiretroviral therapies.

  3. Acute pharmacologically induced shifts in serotonin availability abolish emotion-selective responses to negative face emotions in distinct brain networks.

    PubMed

    Grady, Cheryl L; Siebner, Hartwig R; Hornboll, Bettina; Macoveanu, Julian; Paulson, Olaf B; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2013-05-01

    Pharmacological manipulation of serotonin availability can alter the processing of facial expressions of emotion. Using a within-subject design, we measured the effect of serotonin on the brain's response to aversive face emotions with functional MRI while 20 participants judged the gender of neutral, fearful and angry faces. In three separate and counterbalanced sessions, participants received citalopram (CIT) to raise serotonin levels, underwent acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) to lower serotonin, or were studied without pharmacological challenge (Control). An analysis designed to identify distributed brain responses identified two brain networks with modulations of activity related to face emotion and serotonin level. The first network included the left amygdala, bilateral striatum, and fusiform gyri. During the Control session this network responded only to fearful faces; increasing serotonin decreased this response to fear, whereas reducing serotonin enhanced the response of this network to angry faces. The second network involved bilateral amygdala and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, and these regions also showed increased activity to fear during the Control session. Both drug challenges enhanced the neural response of this set of regions to angry faces, relative to Control, and CIT also enhanced activity for neutral faces. The net effect of these changes in both networks was to abolish the selective response to fearful expressions. These results suggest that a normal level of serotonin is critical for maintaining a differentiated brain response to threatening face emotions. Lower serotonin leads to a broadening of a normally fear-specific response to anger, and higher levels reduce the differentiated brain response to aversive face emotions.

  4. Reducing central serotonin in adulthood promotes hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Song, Ning-Ning; Jia, Yun-Fang; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Qiong; Huang, Ying; Liu, Xiao-Zhen; Hu, Ling; Lan, Wei; Chen, Ling; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Chen, Xiaoyan; Xu, Lin; Ding, Yu-Qiang

    2016-02-03

    Chronic administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which up-regulates central serotonin (5-HT) system function, enhances adult hippocampal neurogenesis. However, the relationship between central 5-HT system and adult neurogenesis has not fully been understood. Here, we report that lowering 5-HT level in adulthood is also able to enhance adult hippocampal neurogenesis. We used tamoxifen (TM)-induced Cre in Pet1-CreER(T2) mice to either deplete central serotonergic (5-HTergic) neurons or inactivate 5-HT synthesis in adulthood and explore the role of central 5-HT in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. A dramatic increase in hippocampal neurogenesis is present in these two central 5-HT-deficient mice and it is largely prevented by administration of agonist for 5-HTR2c receptor. In addition, the survival of new-born neurons in the hippocampus is enhanced. Furthermore, the adult 5-HT-deficient mice showed reduced depression-like behaviors but enhanced contextual fear memory. These findings demonstrate that lowering central 5-HT function in adulthood can also enhance adult hippocampal neurogenesis, thus revealing a new aspect of central 5-HT in regulating adult neurogenesis.

  5. Selective blockade of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)7 receptors enhances 5-HT transmission, antidepressant-like behavior, and rapid eye movement sleep suppression induced by citalopram in rodents.

    PubMed

    Bonaventure, Pascal; Kelly, Lisa; Aluisio, Leah; Shelton, Jonathan; Lord, Brian; Galici, Ruggero; Miller, Kirsten; Atack, John; Lovenberg, Timothy W; Dugovic, Christine

    2007-05-01

    Evidence has accumulated supporting a role for 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)7 receptors in circadian rhythms, sleep, and mood disorders, presumably as a consequence of the modulation of 5-HT-mediated neuronal activity. We hypothesized that a selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, (2R)-1-[(3-hydroxyphenyl)sulfonyl]-2-[2-(4-methyl-1-piperidinyl)ethyl]-pyrrolidine (SB-269970), should increase activity of 5-HT neurons and potentiate the effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (citalopram). In rats, administration of 3 mg/kg s.c. citalopram alone increased the extracellular concentration of 5-HT. This effect of citalopram on extracellular 5-HT concentration was significantly enhanced by an ineffective dose of SB-269970. Combining this dose of SB-269970 with a low dose of citalopram also resulted in a significant increase in extracellular concentration of 5-HT, suggesting a potentiation of neurochemical effects. In mice, citalopram and SB-269970 dose-dependently decreased immobility time in the tail suspension test. The dose-effect curve of citalopram was shifted leftward by coadministration of an effective dose of SB-269970. Furthermore, combining ineffective doses of citalopram and SB-269970 also resulted in a significant decrease of immobility time in the tail suspension test, suggesting potentiation of antidepressant-like effects. In rats, SB-269970 potentiated the increase of rapid eye movement (REM) latency and the REM sleep decrease induced by citalopram. SB-269970 also reversed the increase in sleep fragmentation induced by citalopram. Rat plasma and brain concentrations of citalopram were not affected by coadministration of SB-269970, arguing for a pharmacodynamic rather than a pharmacokinetic mechanism. Overall, these results indicate that selective blockade of 5-HT7 receptors may enhance the antidepressant efficacy of citalopram and may provide a novel therapy to alleviate sleep disturbances associated with depression.

  6. Interaction Between Brain Histamine and Serotonin, Norepinephrine, and Dopamine Systems: In Vivo Microdialysis and Electrophysiology Study.

    PubMed

    Flik, Gunnar; Folgering, Joost H A; Cremers, Thomas I H F; Westerink, Ben H C; Dremencov, Eliyahu

    2015-06-01

    Brain monoamines (serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine, and histamine) play an important role in emotions, cognition, and pathophysiology and treatment of mental disorders. The interactions between serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine were studied in numerous works; however, histamine system received less attention. The aim of this study was to investigate the interactions between histamine and other monoamines, using in vivo microdialysis and electrophysiology. It was found that the inverse agonist of histamine-3 receptors, thioperamide, increased the firing activity of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area. Selective agonist of histamine-3 receptors, immepip, reversed thiperamide-induced stimulation of firing activity of dopamine neurons. The firing rates of serotonin and norpeinephrine neurons were not attenuated by immepip or thioperamide. Thioperamide robustly and significantly increased extracellular concentrations of serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine in the rat prefrontal cortex and slightly increased norepinephrine and dopamine levels in the tuberomammillary nucleus of the hypothalamus. It can be concluded that histamine stimulates serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine transmission in the brain. Modulation of firing of dopamine neurons is a key element in functional interactions between histamine and other monoamines. Antagonists of histamine-3 receptors, because of their potential ability to stimulate monoamine neurotransmission, might be beneficial in the treatment of mental disorders.

  7. Chronic effects of antidepressants on serotonin release in rat raphe slice cultures: high potency of milnacipran in the augmentation of serotonin release.

    PubMed

    Nagayasu, Kazuki; Kitaichi, Maiko; Nishitani, Naoya; Asaoka, Nozomi; Shirakawa, Hisashi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji

    2013-11-01

    Most clinically-used antidepressants acutely increase monoamine levels in synaptic clefts, while their therapeutic effects often require several weeks of administration. Slow neuroadaptive changes in serotonergic neurons are considered to underlie this delayed onset of beneficial actions. Recently, we reported that sustained exposure of rat organotypic raphe slice cultures containing abundant serotonergic neurons to selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (citalopram, fluoxetine and paroxetine) caused the augmentation of exocytotic serotonin release. However, the ability of other classes of antidepressants to evoke a similar outcome has not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the sustained actions of two tricyclic antidepressants (imipramine and desipramine), one tetracyclic antidepressant (mianserin), three 5-HT and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (milnacipran, duloxetine and venlafaxine) and one noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (mirtazapine) on serotonin release in the slice cultures. For seven of nine antidepressants, sustained exposure to the agents at concentrations of 0.1-100 μ m augmented the level of increase in extracellular serotonin. The rank order of their potency was as follows: milnacipran>duloxetine>citalopram>venlafaxine>imipramine>fluoxetine>desipramine. Neither mirtazapine nor mianserin caused any augmentation. The highest augmentation by sustained exposure to milnacipran was partially attenuated by an α 1-adrenoceptor antagonist, benoxathian, while the duloxetine-, venlafaxine- and citalopram-mediated increases were not affected. These results suggest that inhibition of the 5-HT transporter is required for the enhancement of serotonin release. Furthermore, the potent augmentation by milnacipran is apparently due to the accompanied activation of the α 1-adrenoceptor.

  8. Enhancement of noradrenergic neural transmission: an effective therapy of myasthenia gravis: a report on 52 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Lechin, F; van der Dijs, B; Pardey-Maldonado, B; John, E; Jimenez, V; Orozco, B; Baez, S; Lechin, M E

    2000-01-01

    Neurochemical, neuroautonomic and neuropharmacological assessments carried out on all our myasthenia gravis (MG) patients showed that they presented a neural sympathetic deficit plus excessive adrenal-sympathetic activity. These abnormalities were registered during the basal (supine-resting) state, as well as after several stress tests (orthostasis, exercise, oral glucose and buspirone). In addition, MG patients showed increased levels of free-serotonin (f5HT) in the plasma, supposedly associated with the increased platelet aggregability which we found in all MG patients. As the above trio of neurochemical disorders (low noradrenergic-activity + high adrenergic-activity + increased f-5HT plasma levels) is known to favor Th-1 immunosuppression + Th-2 predominance, we outlined a neuropharmacological strategy for reverting the above neurochemical disorder. This treatment provoked sudden (acute), and late sustained improvements. Acute effects have been attributed to the increase of alpha-1 activity at the spinal motoneuron level. Late improvements always paralleled a significant normalization of immunological disorders. Complete normalization was registered only in non-thymectomized MG patients.

  9. Carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine, but not eslicarbazepine, enhance excitatory synaptic transmission onto hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells through an antagonist action at adenosine A1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Booker, Sam A; Pires, Nuno; Cobb, Stuart; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício; Vida, Imre

    2015-06-01

    This study assessed the anticonvulsant and seizure generation effects of carbamazepine (CBZ), oxcarbazepine (OXC) and eslicarbazepine (S-Lic) in wild-type mice. Electrophysiological recordings were made to discriminate potential cellular and synaptic mechanisms underlying anti- and pro-epileptic actions. The anticonvulsant and pro-convulsant effects were evaluated in the MES, the 6-Hz and the Irwin tests. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were used to investigate the effects on fast excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission in hippocampal area CA1. The safety window for CBZ, OXC and eslicarbazepine (ED50 value against the MES test and the dose that produces grade 5 convulsions in all mice), was 6.3, 6.0 and 12.5, respectively. At high concentrations the three drugs reduced synaptic transmission. CBZ and OXC enhanced excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) at low, therapeutically-relevant concentrations. These effects were associated with no change in inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) resulting in altered balance between excitation and inhibition. S-Lic had no effect on EPSC or IPSC amplitudes over the same concentration range. The CBZ mediated enhancement of EPSCs was blocked by DPCPX, a selective antagonist, and occluded by CCPA, a selective agonist of the adenosine A1 receptor. Furthermore, reduction of endogenous adenosine by application of the enzyme adenosine deaminase also abolished the CBZ- and OXC-induced increase of EPSCs, indicating that the two drugs act as antagonists at native adenosine receptors. In conclusion, CBZ and OXC possess pro-epileptic actions at clinically-relevant concentrations through the enhancement of excitatory synaptic transmission. S-Lic by comparison has no such effect on synaptic transmission, explaining its lack of seizure exacerbation.

  10. Serotonin and brain function: a tale of two receptors

    PubMed Central

    Carhart-Harris, RL; Nutt, DJ

    2017-01-01

    Previous attempts to identify a unified theory of brain serotonin function have largely failed to achieve consensus. In this present synthesis, we integrate previous perspectives with new and older data to create a novel bipartite model centred on the view that serotonin neurotransmission enhances two distinct adaptive responses to adversity, mediated in large part by its two most prevalent and researched brain receptors: the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors. We propose that passive coping (i.e. tolerating a source of stress) is mediated by postsynaptic 5-HT1AR signalling and characterised by stress moderation. Conversely, we argue that active coping (i.e. actively addressing a source of stress) is mediated by 5-HT2AR signalling and characterised by enhanced plasticity (defined as capacity for change). We propose that 5-HT1AR-mediated stress moderation may be the brain’s default response to adversity but that an improved ability to change one’s situation and/or relationship to it via 5-HT2AR-mediated plasticity may also be important – and increasingly so as the level of adversity reaches a critical point. We propose that the 5-HT1AR pathway is enhanced by conventional 5-HT reuptake blocking antidepressants such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), whereas the 5-HT2AR pathway is enhanced by 5-HT2AR-agonist psychedelics. This bipartite model purports to explain how different drugs (SSRIs and psychedelics) that modulate the serotonergic system in different ways, can achieve complementary adaptive and potentially therapeutic outcomes. PMID:28858536

  11. [Serum serotonin in patients with tension headaches].

    PubMed

    Karaulova, Iu V; Shutov, A A

    2005-01-01

    Tension headache (TH) is one of the most frequent types of idiopathic headaches. The leading role in its pathogenesis is played by depression and dysmetabolism of the neurotransmitter serotonin. The subjects were 100 patients with TH. The examination included study of headache intensity, complex psychometric testing, and immune-enzyme measurement of serotonin serum level, performed before and after treatment with the anti-depressant prodep. All the patients had moderate pain syndrome, depression, and moderate or severe anxiety, which demonstrated negative correlation with serotonin serum level. In particular, the intensity of episodic THs (n = 24) was 52 mm visual analogue scale, reactive anxiety level was as high as 51.08 +/- 4.2, the level of depression was moderate (12.9 Beck scale); serotonin blood level showed a tendency to fall (205.72 +/- 6.74 ng/ml). In 76 patients, suffering from chronic THs with a cephalgia intensity of 62 mm visual analogue scale, high indexes of reactive and personal anxiety (46.81 -/+ 2.68 and 54.2 +/- 3.64, respectively), and high depression level were associated with a prominent decrease of serotonin blood concentration (119.38 +/- 9.42 ng/ml). A course of treatment with prodep led to significant decrease of headache intensity and improved depression, while an increase of serum serotonin level was observed. Thus, serotonin serum level may be used as a marker of pain intensity and the level of depression, and an objective indicator of anti-depressive therapy.

  12. Enhancement of resident education in sonography using high-speed PACS/ATM image transmission: work in progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerinckx, Andre J.; Grant, Edward G.; Melany, Michelle; Narin, Sherelle L.; Hayrapetian, Alek S.; Valentino, Daniel J.

    1996-05-01

    Transmission of high quality images between hospitals would be of value by exposing residents at individual institutions to a greater mix of disease processes. This problem is particularly serious in ultrasound where individual hospitals may not perform the entire range of examinations. We undertook this study to assess the effectiveness of image transmission via a PACS/ATM global network in improving ultrasound education among residents at affiliated hospitals. Image management was performed by AGFA PACS; global network was Asynchronous Transfer Mode. Selected cases from the two hospitals (OB/GYN cases at one, vascular at the other) were transmitted. Readout/teaching sessions included cases performed at base hospital and those received via network. Evaluation forms were collected from participants at both institutions. No image degradation occurred with transmission. Residents' exposure to ultrasound cases increased at the two hospitals. The system was considered an excellent teaching tool by all faculty and residents surveyed.

  13. Serotonin Syndrome With Fluoxetine: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dipen Dineshkumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Serotonin syndrome is a rare but serious complication of treatment with serotonergic agents. In its severe manifestations, death can ensue. Early recognition and aggressive management are crucial to mitigating the syndrome. Often the presentation can be subtle and easy to miss. Case Reports: We present 2 cases of serotonin syndrome seen in the psychiatric consultation service of a busy academic hospital. Both patients had favorable outcomes because of early recognition and aggressive management. Conclusion: Physicians should carefully consider and rule out the clinical diagnosis of serotonin syndrome when presented with an agitated or confused patient who is taking serotonergic agents. PMID:27999518

  14. Metoclopramide-induced Serotonin Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Harada, Taku; Hirosawa, Takanobu; Morinaga, Kouhei; Shimizu, Taro

    2017-01-01

    A 40-year-old woman with bipolar disorder who was taking mirtazapine presented with mydriasis, abnormal diaphoresis, myoclonus and muscle rigidity after taking metocloplamide. Her medical history, which included the use of serotonergic agents, and the presence of symptoms including myoclonus and muscle rigidity were consistent with a diagnosis of serotonin syndrome (SS) according to the Hunter criteria. The symptoms diminished following three days of treatment with oral lorazepam and cyproheptadine and a reduced dose of mirtazapine. Metoclopramide is frequently used to various gastric symptom. Metoclopramide is not widely known to induce SS. This potentially fatal condition should be avoided by exercising care in the use of drugs that have the potential to cause drug-drug interactions.

  15. Metoclopramide-induced Serotonin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Taku; Hirosawa, Takanobu; Morinaga, Kouhei; Shimizu, Taro

    2017-01-01

    A 40-year-old woman with bipolar disorder who was taking mirtazapine presented with mydriasis, abnormal diaphoresis, myoclonus and muscle rigidity after taking metocloplamide. Her medical history, which included the use of serotonergic agents, and the presence of symptoms including myoclonus and muscle rigidity were consistent with a diagnosis of serotonin syndrome (SS) according to the Hunter criteria. The symptoms diminished following three days of treatment with oral lorazepam and cyproheptadine and a reduced dose of mirtazapine. Metoclopramide is frequently used to various gastric symptom. Metoclopramide is not widely known to induce SS. This potentially fatal condition should be avoided by exercising care in the use of drugs that have the potential to cause drug-drug interactions. PMID:28321081

  16. Human Alpha-Defensin HNP1 Increases HIV Traversal of the Epithelial Barrier: A Potential Role in STI-Mediated Enhancement of HIV Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Valere, Kimyata; Rapista, Aprille; Eugenin, Eliseo; Lu, Wuyuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Alpha-defensins, including human neutrophil peptides 1-3 (HNP1-3) and human defensin 5 (HD5), are elevated at the genital mucosa in individuals with sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The presence of STIs is associated with an increased risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission, suggesting there may be a role for defensins in early events of HIV transmission. HD5 has been demonstrated to contribute to STI-mediated increased HIV infectivity in vitro. HNPs exhibit anti-HIV activity in vitro. However, increased levels of HNPs have been associated with enhanced HIV acquisition and higher viral load in breast milk. This study found that HNP1, but not HD5, significantly disrupted epithelial integrity and promoted HIV traversal of epithelial barriers. Linear HNP1 with the same charges did not affect epithelial permeability, indicating that the observed effect of HNP1 on the epithelial barrier was structure dependent. These results suggest a role for HNP1 in STI-mediated enhancement of HIV transmission. PMID:26379091

  17. Decreased Serotonin Levels and Serotonin-Mediated Osteoblastic Inhibitory Signaling in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Klavdianou, Kalliopi; Liossis, Stamatis-Nick; Papachristou, Dionysios J; Theocharis, Georgios; Sirinian, Chaido; Kottorou, Anastasia; Filippopoulou, Alexandra; Andonopoulos, Andrew P; Daoussis, Dimitrios

    2016-03-01

    Evidence suggests that serotonin is an inhibitor of bone formation. We aimed to assess: 1) serum serotonin levels in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), a prototype bone-forming disease, compared with patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and healthy subjects; 2) the effect(s) of TNFα blockers on serum serotonin levels in patients with AS and RA; and 3) the effect(s) of serum of AS patients on serotonin signaling. Serum serotonin levels were measured in 47 patients with AS, 28 patients with RA, and 40 healthy subjects by radioimmunoassay; t test was used to assess differences between groups. The effect of serum on serotonin signaling was assessed using the human osteoblastic cell line Saos2, evaluating levels of phospho-CREB by Western immunoblots. Serotonin serum levels were significantly lower in patients with AS compared with healthy subjects (mean ± SEM ng/mL 122.9 ± 11.6 versus 177.4 ± 24.58, p = 0.038) and patients with RA (mean ± SEM ng/mL 244.8 ± 37.5, p = 0.0004). Patients with AS receiving TNFα blockers had significantly lower serotonin levels compared with patients with AS not on such treatment (mean ± SEM ng/mL 95.8 ± 14.9 versus 149.2 ± 16.0, p = 0.019). Serotonin serum levels were inversely correlated with pCREB induction in osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells. Serotonin levels are low in patients with AS and decrease even further during anti-TNFα treatment. Differences in serotonin levels are shown to have a functional impact on osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells. Therefore, serotonin may be involved in new bone formation in AS.

  18. Serotonin hypothesis of autism: implications for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Rebecca A; Lee, Li-Ching; Crum, Rosa M; Zimmerman, Andrew W; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2013-06-01

    Serotonin, a neurotransmitter found throughout the brain and body, has long been of interest in autism. Repeated findings of elevated platelet serotonin levels in approximately one third of children with autism has led some to believe that dysfunctional serotonin signaling may be a causal mechanism for the disorder. Because serotonin is critical to fetal brain development, concerns have arisen regarding prenatal exposure to substances that manipulate serotonin levels, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). This review examines evidence regarding the serotonin system and autism spectrum disorders (ASD), as well as what the literature has reported thus far on developmental effects of prenatal exposure to SSRIs. Possible mechanisms by which SSRIs could affect the fetus during pregnancy and clinical implications are also discussed. Though the majority of studies conducted in infants and children suggest prenatal exposure to SSRIs does not affect neurodevelopment, interpretation must be tempered given small sample sizes. The only published study that focused on prenatal SSRI exposure and ASD found an increased risk with exposure to SSRIs, especially during the first trimester. Obstacles that will be faced in future research are isolating medication effects from maternal depression and, given the infrequent occurrence of exposure and outcome, obtaining an adequate sample size. Whether serotonin is an etiologic factor in ASD, and what it points to as a marker for subgrouping, remains unclear. Understanding how the development of ASD might be affected by prenatal factors that influence serotonin levels, such as SSRIs, could identify modifiable targets for prevention.

  19. Enhanced model of gear transmission dynamics for condition monitoring applications: Effects of torque, friction and bearing clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-del-Rincon, A.; Garcia, P.; Diez-Ibarbia, A.; de-Juan, A.; Iglesias, M.; Viadero, F.

    2017-02-01

    Gear transmissions remain as one of the most complex mechanical systems from the point of view of noise and vibration behavior. Research on gear modeling leading to the obtaining of models capable of accurately reproduce the dynamic behavior of real gear transmissions has spread out the last decades. Most of these models, although useful for design stages, often include simplifications that impede their application for condition monitoring purposes. Trying to filling this gap, the model presented in this paper allows us to simulate gear transmission dynamics including most of these features usually neglected by the state of the art models. This work presents a model capable of considering simultaneously the internal excitations due to the variable meshing stiffness (including the coupling among successive tooth pairs in contact, the non-linearity linked with the contacts between surfaces and the dissipative effects), and those excitations consequence of the bearing variable compliance (including clearances or pre-loads). The model can also simulate gear dynamics in a realistic torque dependent scenario. The proposed model combines a hybrid formulation for calculation of meshing forces with a non-linear variable compliance approach for bearings. Meshing forces are obtained by means of a double approach which combines numerical and analytical aspects. The methodology used provides a detailed description of the meshing forces, allowing their calculation even when gear center distance is modified due to shaft and bearing flexibilities, which are unavoidable in real transmissions. On the other hand, forces at bearing level were obtained considering a variable number of supporting rolling elements, depending on the applied load and clearances. Both formulations have been developed and applied to the simulation of the vibration of a sample transmission, focusing the attention on the transmitted load, friction meshing forces and bearing preloads.

  20. Serotonin increases synaptic activity in olfactory bulb glomeruli.

    PubMed

    Brill, Julia; Shao, Zuoyi; Puche, Adam C; Wachowiak, Matt; Shipley, Michael T

    2016-03-01

    Serotoninergic fibers densely innervate olfactory bulb glomeruli, the first sites of synaptic integration in the olfactory system. Acting through 5HT2A receptors, serotonin (5HT) directly excites external tufted cells (ETCs), key excitatory glomerular neurons, and depolarizes some mitral cells (MCs), the olfactory bulb's main output neurons. We further investigated 5HT action on MCs and determined its effects on the two major classes of glomerular interneurons: GABAergic/dopaminergic short axon cells (SACs) and GABAergic periglomerular cells (PGCs). In SACs, 5HT evoked a depolarizing current mediated by 5HT2C receptors but did not significantly impact spike rate. 5HT had no measurable direct effect in PGCs. Serotonin increased spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and sIPSCs) in PGCs and SACs. Increased sEPSCs were mediated by 5HT2A receptors, suggesting that they are primarily due to enhanced excitatory drive from ETCs. Increased sIPSCs resulted from elevated excitatory drive onto GABAergic interneurons and augmented GABA release from SACs. Serotonin-mediated GABA release from SACs was action potential independent and significantly increased miniature IPSC frequency in glomerular neurons. When focally applied to a glomerulus, 5HT increased MC spontaneous firing greater than twofold but did not increase olfactory nerve-evoked responses. Taken together, 5HT modulates glomerular network activity in several ways: 1) it increases ETC-mediated feed-forward excitation onto MCs, SACs, and PGCs; 2) it increases inhibition of glomerular interneurons; 3) it directly triggers action potential-independent GABA release from SACs; and 4) these network actions increase spontaneous MC firing without enhancing responses to suprathreshold sensory input. This may enhance MC sensitivity while maintaining dynamic range.

  1. The influence of serotonin on fear learning.

    PubMed

    Hindi Attar, Catherine; Finckh, Barbara; Büchel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Learning of associations between aversive stimuli and predictive cues is the basis of Pavlovian fear conditioning and is driven by a mismatch between expectation and outcome. To investigate whether serotonin modulates the formation of such aversive cue-outcome associations, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and dietary tryptophan depletion to reduce brain serotonin (5-HT) levels in healthy human subjects. In a Pavlovian fear conditioning paradigm, 5-HT depleted subjects compared to a non-depleted control group exhibited attenuated autonomic responses to cues indicating the upcoming of an aversive event. These results were closely paralleled by reduced aversive learning signals in the amygdala and the orbitofrontal cortex, two prominent structures of the neural fear circuit. In agreement with current theories of serotonin as a motivational opponent system to dopamine in fear learning, our data provide first empirical evidence for a role of serotonin in representing formally derived learning signals for aversive events.

  2. Serotonin Syndrome: Prophylactic Treatment With Cyproheptadine.

    PubMed

    Deardorff, O Greg; Khan, Talha; Kulkarni, Gaurav; Doisy, Richard; Loehr, Colleen

    2016-08-25

    Despite the numerous advantages of linezolid therapy, one disadvantage continuing to hinder its use is the risk of serotonin syndrome when coadministered with other serotonergic agents. Developing a better understanding of serotonin syndrome is essential for the prevention and management of this potentially life-threatening condition. This report describes a patient with schizophrenia, depression, and severe, acute osteomyelitis. The patient was taking multiple serotonergic agents and required the use of linezolid without the possibility of a sufficient washout period. The severity of the patient's condition in conjunction with increased risk for serotonin syndrome warranted prophylactic treatment with cyproheptadine. The complex pathophysiology of prophylactic treatment of serotonin syndrome with cyproheptadine is worthy of discussion.

  3. Serotonin and Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors (SNRIs)

    MedlinePlus

    Serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) Antidepressant SNRIs help relieve depression symptoms, such as irritability and sadness, but some are also used for anxiety disorders and nerve pain. Here's ...

  4. Enhancement of magneto-optical Faraday effects and extraordinary optical transmission in a tri-layer structure with rectangular annular arrays.

    PubMed

    Lei, Chengxin; Chen, Leyi; Tang, Zhixiong; Li, Daoyong; Cheng, Zhenzhi; Tang, Shaolong; Du, Youwei

    2016-02-15

    The properties of optics and magneto-optical Faraday effects in a metal-dielectric tri-layer structure with subwavelength rectangular annular arrays are investigated. It is noteworthy that we obtained the strongly enhanced Faraday rotation of the desired sign along with high transmittance by optimizing the parameters of the nanostructure in the visible spectral ranges. In this system, we obtained two extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) resonant peaks with enhanced Faraday rotations, whose signs are opposite, which may provide the possibility of designing multi-channel magneto-optical devices. Study results show that the maximum of the figure of merit (FOM) of the structure can be obtained between two EOT resonant peaks accompanied by an enhanced Faraday rotation. The positions of the maximum value of the FOM and resonant peaks of transmission along with a large Faraday rotation can be tailored by simply adjusting the geometric parameters of our models. These research findings are of great importance for future applications of magneto-optical devices.

  5. The role of serotonin in cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    Oostland, M; van Hooft, J A

    2013-09-17

    In adult animals, the cerebellum is richly innervated by serotonin: serotonergic fibres are the third main afferent fibres into the cerebellum. However, the physiology of the serotonergic system and its functional significance are not fully known during development in the cerebellum. In this review we will focus on the serotonergic regulation of the cerebellum during postnatal development. We hypothesize a powerful role for serotonin in the physiology of the developing cerebellum. A presumably tonic activation of serotonin receptors by binding of serotonin becomes specific by temporally and spatially restricted expression of different serotonin receptors, each with their own (sometimes antagonizing) functions. During the first postnatal week, activation of 5-HT₁ receptors expressed by both granule cells and Purkinje cells stimulates dendritic growth and synapse formation. Later, activation of 5-HT₃ receptors expressed by granule cells limits dendritic growth of Purkinje cells via mediating the secretion of reelin, influences physiological maturation of Purkinje cells, modulates synaptic plasticity at parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses and thereby affects competition with the climbing fibres on Purkinje cell dendrites resulting in proper climbing fibre elimination. Last, activation of 5-HT₂ receptors expressed by granule cells and Purkinje cells both during late postnatal development and in the mature cerebellum promotes the stability of synaptic activity. Thus, we propose that serotonin controls cerebellar development in three phases: (1) stimulation of dendritic growth and formation of synapses, (2) hard-wiring of neuronal connections with limits to dendritic growth but ensuring synaptic plasticity, and (3) stabilization of synapses. Taken together, serotonin receptors expressed by different cells in the cerebellum have a specialized role during postnatal development, but with some similar main effects. Distinct spatial and temporal expression of these

  6. Variations of dopamine, serotonin, and amino acid concentrations in Noda epileptic rat (NER) retina.

    PubMed

    Chanut, Evelyne; Labarthe, Benoît; Lacroix, Brigitte; Noda, Atsuhi; Gasdeblay, Sylvie; Bondier, Jean-Robert; Versaux-Botteri, Claudine

    2006-01-27

    Noda epileptic rats (NER) exhibit frequent spontaneous tonic-clonic convulsions which represent a valuable model of human epilepsy. If implication of brain neurotransmitters was largely reported, little is known about retina. However, it has been reported that human epilepsy syndrome varies not only with the location of seizure foci but also according to rhythmic patterns, for which retina has a major role in the transmission of external light-dark cycle information. The purpose of this work was to evaluate dopamine (DA), DA metabolites, serotonin (5-HT), and amino acid [glutamate, aspartate, glycine, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), and taurine] level variations in retina from NER, at two different nycthemeral periods (11 a.m. and 11 p.m.) and at different ages (2, 6, and 12 months). In NER, retinal dopaminergic function was decreased as soon as 2 months, whereas GABA levels were increased, even if no differences among the different ages could be distinguished. These variations were associated to a slight increase in 5-HT. Other amino acids tested were not affected by epilepsy, whereas taurine decreased with aging in NER as well as in control rats. Retinal 5-HT occurs principally as a precursor of melatonin (MEL). A triangular interaction may be hypothesized: MEL could decrease DA synthesis or release by enhancing GABA activity. Taken together, these results suggest that the retinal physiology is affected by the epileptic status and that information transmitted from retina to the brain should be affected by epilepsy in NER.

  7. Enhanced cellular responses and environmental sampling within inner foreskin explants: implications for the foreskin's role in HIV transmission.

    PubMed

    Fahrbach, K M; Barry, S M; Anderson, M R; Hope, T J

    2010-07-01

    The decrease in HIV acquisition after circumcision suggests a role for the foreskin in HIV transmission. However, the mechanism leading to protection remains undefined. Using tissue explant cultures we found that Langerhans cells (LCs) in foreskin alter their cellular protein expression in response to external stimuli. Furthermore, we observe that upon treatment with TNF-alpha, tissue-resident LCs became activated and that stimulatory cytokines can specifically cause an influx of CD4+ T-cells into the epithelial layer. Importantly, both of these changes are significant in the inner, but not outer, foreskin. In addition, we find that LCs in the inner foreskin have increased ability to sample environmental proteins. These results suggest differences in permeability between the inner and outer foreskin and indicate that HIV target cells in the inner foreskin have increased interaction with external factors. This increased responsiveness and sampling provides novel insights into the underlying mechanism of how circumcision can decrease HIV transmission.

  8. Effect of serotonin on paired associative stimulation-induced plasticity in the human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Batsikadze, Giorgi; Paulus, Walter; Kuo, Min-Fang; Nitsche, Michael A

    2013-10-01

    Serotonin modulates diverse brain functions. Beyond its clinical antidepressant effects, it improves motor performance, learning and memory formation. These effects might at least be partially caused by the impact of serotonin on neuroplasticity, which is thought to be an important foundation of the respective functions. In principal accordance, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors enhance long-term potentiation-like plasticity induced by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in humans. As other neuromodulators have discernable effects on different kinds of plasticity in humans, here we were interested to explore the impact of serotonin on paired associative stimulation (PAS)-induced plasticity, which induces a more focal kind of plasticity, as compared with tDCS, shares some features with spike timing-dependent plasticity, and is thought to be relative closely related to learning processes. In this single-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized crossover study, we administered a single dose of 20 mg citalopram or placebo medication and applied facilitatory- and excitability-diminishing PAS to the left motor cortex of 14 healthy subjects. Cortico-spinal excitability was explored via single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation-elicited MEP amplitudes up to the next evening after plasticity induction. After citalopram administration, inhibitory PAS-induced after-effects were abolished and excitatory PAS-induced after-effects were enhanced trendwise, as compared with the respective placebo conditions. These results show that serotonin modulates PAS-induced neuroplasticity by shifting it into the direction of facilitation, which might help to explain mechanism of positive therapeutic effects of serotonin in learning and medical conditions characterized by enhanced inhibitory or reduced facilitatory plasticity, including depression and stroke.

  9. Effect of Serotonin on Paired Associative Stimulation-Induced Plasticity in the Human Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Batsikadze, Giorgi; Paulus, Walter; Kuo, Min-Fang; Nitsche, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin modulates diverse brain functions. Beyond its clinical antidepressant effects, it improves motor performance, learning and memory formation. These effects might at least be partially caused by the impact of serotonin on neuroplasticity, which is thought to be an important foundation of the respective functions. In principal accordance, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors enhance long-term potentiation-like plasticity induced by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in humans. As other neuromodulators have discernable effects on different kinds of plasticity in humans, here we were interested to explore the impact of serotonin on paired associative stimulation (PAS)-induced plasticity, which induces a more focal kind of plasticity, as compared with tDCS, shares some features with spike timing-dependent plasticity, and is thought to be relative closely related to learning processes. In this single-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized crossover study, we administered a single dose of 20 mg citalopram or placebo medication and applied facilitatory- and excitability-diminishing PAS to the left motor cortex of 14 healthy subjects. Cortico-spinal excitability was explored via single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation-elicited MEP amplitudes up to the next evening after plasticity induction. After citalopram administration, inhibitory PAS-induced after-effects were abolished and excitatory PAS-induced after-effects were enhanced trendwise, as compared with the respective placebo conditions. These results show that serotonin modulates PAS-induced neuroplasticity by shifting it into the direction of facilitation, which might help to explain mechanism of positive therapeutic effects of serotonin in learning and medical conditions characterized by enhanced inhibitory or reduced facilitatory plasticity, including depression and stroke. PMID:23680943

  10. Low melatonin production by suppression of either serotonin N-acetyltransferase or N-acetylserotonin methyltransferase in rice causes seedling growth retardation with yield penalty, abiotic stress susceptibility, and enhanced coleoptile growth under anoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Yeong; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2016-04-01

    Serotonin N-acetyltransferase (SNAT) and N-acetylserotonin methyltransferase (ASMT) are the last two key enzymes for melatonin biosynthesis in living organisms. In this study, we demonstrated that transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants, in which expression of either endogenous SNAT or ASMT was suppressed, had reduced melatonin synthesis, confirming that both SNAT and ASMT are functionally involved in melatonin synthesis. The melatonin-deficient SNAT rice had retarded seedling growth, which was partially restored by exogenous melatonin application, suggesting melatonin's role in seedling growth. In addition, the plants were more sensitive to various abiotic stresses, including salt and cold, compared with the wild type. Melatonin-deficient SNAT rice had increased coleoptile growth under anoxic conditions, indicating that melatonin also inversely regulates plant growth under anaerobic conditions with the concomitant high expression of alcohol dehydrogenase genes. Similarly, the melatonin-deficient ASMT rice exhibited accelerated senescence in detached flag leaves, as well as significantly reduced yield. These loss-of-function studies on the melatonin biosynthetic genes confirmed most previous pharmacological reports that melatonin not only promotes plant growth but also mitigates various abiotic stresses.

  11. A Randomized, Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial of Oral Creatine Monohydrate Augmentation for Enhanced Response to a Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor in Women With Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Suk; Hwang, Jaeuk; Kim, Jieun E.; Won, Wangyoun; Bae, Sujin; Renshaw, Perry F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Antidepressants targeting monoaminergic neurotransmitter systems, despite their immediate effects at the synaptic level, usually require several weeks of administration to achieve clinical efficacy. The authors propose a strategy of adding creatine monohydrate (creatine) to a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) in the treatment of patients with major depressive disorder. Such augmentation may lead to a more rapid onset of antidepressant effects and a greater treatment response, potentially by restoring brain bioenergetics at the cellular level. Method Fifty-two women with major depressive disorder were enrolled in an 8-week double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial and randomly assigned to receive escitalopram in addition to either creatine (5 g/day, N=25) or placebo (N=27). Efficacy was primarily assessed by changes in the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) score. Results In comparison to the placebo augmentation group, patients receiving creatine augmentation showed significantly greater improvements in HAM-D score, as early as week 2 of treatment. This differential improvement favoring creatine was maintained at weeks 4 and 8. There were no differences between treatment groups in the proportion of patients who discontinued treatment prematurely (creatine: N=8, 32.0%; placebo: N=5, 18.5%) or in the overall frequency of all reported adverse events (creatine: 36 events; placebo: 45 events). Conclusions The current study suggests that creatine augmentation of SSRI treatment may be a promising therapeutic approach that exhibits more rapid and efficacious responses in women with major depressive disorder. PMID:22864465

  12. [Behavioral functions of serotonin and octopamine: some paradoxes of comparative physiology].

    PubMed

    D'iakonova, V E

    2007-01-01

    Evaluation of recent data on monoaminergic control of invertebrate behavior suggests that behavioral functions of serotonin in molluscs and octopamine in insects are remarkably similar. Specifically, in the respective taxa, these monoamines are responsible for activation of food searching and intense locomotion, increase in food consumption and general activity, enhancement of cardial and respiratory rhythms, facilitation of learning, sensitization of sensory circuits. At the same time, in insects, behavioral effects of serotonin are opposite to those of octopamine. It seems thus that two monoamines have exchanged their behavioral roles in the two major invertebrate taxa. Possible reasons of this paradoxical inversion touches inevitably upon basic questions of signal molecular evolution.

  13. Dopamine and Serotonin Modulate Human GABAρ1 Receptors Expressed in Xenopus laevis Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    GABAρ1 receptors are highly expressed in bipolar neurons of the retina and to a lesser extent in several areas of the central nervous system (CNS), and dopamine and serotonin are also involved in the modulation of retinal neural transmission. Whether these biogenic amines have a direct effect on ionotropic GABA receptors was not known. Here, we report that GABAρ1 receptors, expressed in X. laevis oocytes, were negatively modulated by dopamine and serotonin and less so by octopamine and tyramine. Interestingly, these molecules did not have effects on GABAA receptors. 5-Carboxamido-tryptamine and apomorphine did not exert evident effects on any of the receptors. Schild plot analyses of the inhibitory actions of dopamine and serotonin on currents elicited by GABA showed slopes of 2.7 ± 0.3 and 6.1 ± 1.8, respectively, indicating a noncompetitive mechanism of inhibition. The inhibition of GABAρ1 currents was independent of the membrane potential and was insensitive to picrotoxin, a GABA receptor channel blocker and to the GABAρ-specific antagonist (1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridine-4-yl)methyl phosphinic acid (TPMPA). Dopamine and serotonin changed the sensitivity of GABAρ1 receptors to the inhibitory actions of Zn2+. In contrast, La3+ potentiated the amplitude of the GABA currents generated during negative modulation by dopamine (EC50 146 μM) and serotonin (EC50 196 μM). The functional role of the direct modulation of GABAρ receptors by dopamine and serotonin remains to be elucidated; however, it may represent an important modulatory pathway in the retina, where GABAρ receptors are highly expressed and where these biogenic amines are abundant. PMID:22860179

  14. Can the Lateral Habenula Crack the Serotonin Code?

    PubMed Central

    Tchenio, Anna; Valentinova, Kristina; Mameli, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) and the serotonergic system both contribute to motivational states by encoding rewarding and aversive signals. Converging evidence suggests that perturbation of these systems is critical for the pathophysiology of mood disorders. Anatomical and functional studies indicate that the serotonergic system and the LHb are interconnected in a forward-feedback loop. However, how serotonin release modifies the synaptic and cellular properties of LHb neurons and whether this has any behavioral repercussions remain poorly investigated. In this review article, we discuss insights gained from rodents and humans regarding the implications of the serotonin system and the LHb in aversion encoding and related disorders. We then describe the type, properties and pharmacology of serotonergic receptors expressed throughout the LHb. Finally, we discuss physiological data reporting how serotonergic signaling modifies synaptic transmission and neuronal activity within the LHb. Altogether, we combine a mechanistic- and circuit-level knowledge to provide an overview on how the LHb integrates serotonergic signals, a process potentially contributing to LHb-dependent encoding of valenced external stimuli. PMID:27822183

  15. Analysis of chromatic dispersion compensation and carrier phase recovery in long-haul optical transmission system influenced by equalization enhanced phase noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tianhua; Jacobsen, Gunnar; Popov, Sergei; Li, Jie; Sergeyev, Sergey; Friberg, Ari T.; Liu, Tiegen; Zhang, Yimo

    2017-06-01

    The performance of long-haul coherent optical fiber transmission system is significantly affected by the equalization enhanced phase noise (EEPN), due to the interaction between the electronic dispersion compensation (EDC) and the laser phase noise. In this paper, we present a comprehensive study on different chromatic dispersion (CD) compensation and carrier phase recovery (CPR) approaches, in the n-level phase shift keying (n-PSK) and the n-level quadrature amplitude modulation (n-QAM) coherent optical transmission systems, considering the impacts of EEPN. Four CD compensation methods are considered: the time-domain equalization (TDE), the frequency-domain equalization (FDE), the least mean square (LMS) adaptive equalization are applied for EDC, and the dispersion compensating fiber (DCF) is employed for optical dispersion compensation (ODC). Meanwhile, three carrier phase recovery methods are also involved: a one-tap normalized least mean square (NLMS) algorithm, a block-wise average (BWA) algorithm, and a Viterbi-Viterbi (VV) algorithm. Numerical simulations have been carried out in a 28-Gbaud dual-polarization quadrature phase shift keying (DP-QPSK) coherent transmission system, and the results indicate that the origin of EEPN depends on the choice of chromatic dispersion compensation methods, and the effects of EEPN also behave moderately different in accordance to different carrier phase recovery scenarios.

  16. Turn-On Near-Infrared Fluorescent Sensor for Selectively Imaging Serotonin.

    PubMed

    Hettie, Kenneth S; Glass, Timothy E

    2016-01-20

    A molecular imaging tool that provides for the direct visualization of serotonin would significantly aid in the investigation of neuropsychiatric disorders that are attributed to its neuronal dysregulation. Here, the design, synthesis, and evaluation of NeuroSensor 715 (NS715) is presented. NS715 is the first molecular sensor that exhibits a turn-on near-infrared fluorescence response toward serotonin. Density functional theory calculations facilitated the design of a fluorophore based on a coumarin-3-aldehyde scaffold that derives from an electron-rich 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoxaline framework, which provides appropriate energetics to prevent the hydroxyindole moiety of serotonin from quenching its fluorescence emission. Spectroscopic studies revealed that NS715 produces an 8-fold fluorescence enhancement toward serotonin with an emission maximum at 715 nm. Accompanying binding studies indicated NS715 displays a 19-fold selective affinity for serotonin and a modest affinity for catecholamines over other primary-amine neurotransmitters. The utility of NS715 toward neuroimaging applications was validated by selectively labeling and directly imaging norepinephrine within secretory vesicles using live chromaffin cells, which serve as a model system for specialized neurons that synthesize, package, and release only a single, unique type of neurotransmitter. In addition, NS715 effectively differentiated between cell populations that express distinct neurotransmitter phenotypes.

  17. VEGF-induced antidepressant effects involve modulation of norepinephrine and serotonin systems.

    PubMed

    Udo, Hiroshi; Hamasu, Kousuke; Furuse, Mitsuhiro; Sugiyama, Hiroyuki

    2014-12-15

    Throughout life, we are exposed to a variety of stresses, which may be inevitable and noxious sometimes. During evolution, animals must have acquired some physiological means to counteract stress. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an angiogenic and neurogenic factor, which has been shown to elicit antidepressant-like effects in response to different external stimuli, potentially functioning as an anti-stress molecule. However, it remains largely unknown how VEGF modulates mood-related behaviors. To investigate molecular correlates, we analyzed monoaminergic systems of VEGF transgenic mice that display antidepressant-like behavior. Immunostaining showed that overall morphologies of monoaminergic nuclei and their processes were normal. However, we found imbalances in brain monoamine contents, in which the levels of norepinephrine and serotonin, but not dopamine, were decreased exclusively in the regions where VEGF was expressed. The turnover of norepinephrine showed a marked increase and serotonin turnover showed a modest reduction, whereas dopamine turnover was not affected. The protein levels of tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzymes of catecholamine and serotonin synthesis, remained constant. The mRNA levels of monoamine receptors were generally similar but adrenergic receptors of ADRα1A and ADRβ1 were down-regulated. Behavioral tests showed that serotonin- or norepinephrine-selective antidepressant drugs failed to additively enhance antidepressant-like behaviors, whereas monoamine depleting drugs attenuated VEGF-mediated antidepressant-like effect. These data suggest that VEGF-induced antidepressant-like effects involve modulation of norepinephrine and serotonin systems.

  18. Increased release of brain serotonin reduces vulnerability to ventricular fibrillation in the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehnert, Hendrik; Lombardi, Federico; Raeder, Ernst A.; Lorenzo, Antonio V.; Verrier, Richard L.; Lown, Bernard; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of administering the serotonin precursor 5-l-hydroxytryptophan, in conjunction with a monamine oxidase inhibitor phenelzine and a l-amino acid decarboxylase inhibitor carbidopa, on neurochemical changes in the concentrations of serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the cerebrospinal fluid of the cat were investigated. Results showed that this drug regimen led to increases of serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid by 330 and 830 percent, respectively. Concomitantly, the threshold of ventricular fibrillation was found to be elevated by 42 percent and the effective refractory period was prolonged by 7 percent; the efferent sympathetic neural activity was suppressed in the normal heart. The results indicate that the enhancement of central serotoninergic neurotransmission can reduce the susceptibility of the heart to ventricular fibrillation mediated through a decline in sympathetic neural traffic to the heart.

  19. Increased release of brain serotonin reduces vulnerability to ventricular fibrillation in the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehnert, Hendrik; Lombardi, Federico; Raeder, Ernst A.; Lorenzo, Antonio V.; Verrier, Richard L.; Lown, Bernard; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of administering the serotonin precursor 5-l-hydroxytryptophan, in conjunction with a monamine oxidase inhibitor phenelzine and a l-amino acid decarboxylase inhibitor carbidopa, on neurochemical changes in the concentrations of serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the cerebrospinal fluid of the cat were investigated. Results showed that this drug regimen led to increases of serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid by 330 and 830 percent, respectively. Concomitantly, the threshold of ventricular fibrillation was found to be elevated by 42 percent and the effective refractory period was prolonged by 7 percent; the efferent sympathetic neural activity was suppressed in the normal heart. The results indicate that the enhancement of central serotoninergic neurotransmission can reduce the susceptibility of the heart to ventricular fibrillation mediated through a decline in sympathetic neural traffic to the heart.

  20. Immunomodulatory effects mediated by serotonin.

    PubMed

    Arreola, Rodrigo; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Cruz-Fuentes, Carlos; Velasco-Velázquez, Marco Antonio; Garcés-Alvarez, María Eugenia; Hurtado-Alvarado, Gabriela; Quintero-Fabian, Saray; Pavón, Lenin

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) induces concentration-dependent metabolic effects in diverse cell types, including neurons, entherochromaffin cells, adipocytes, pancreatic beta-cells, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, epithelial cells, and leukocytes. Three classes of genes regulating 5-HT function are constitutively expressed or induced in these cells: (a) membrane proteins that regulate the response to 5-HT, such as SERT, 5HTR-GPCR, and the 5HT3-ion channels; (b) downstream signaling transduction proteins; and (c) enzymes controlling 5-HT metabolism, such as IDO and MAO, which can generate biologically active catabolites, including melatonin, kynurenines, and kynurenamines. This review covers the clinical and experimental mechanisms involved in 5-HT-induced immunomodulation. These mechanisms are cell-specific and depend on the expression of serotonergic components in immune cells. Consequently, 5-HT can modulate several immunological events, such as chemotaxis, leukocyte activation, proliferation, cytokine secretion, anergy, and apoptosis. The effects of 5-HT on immune cells may be relevant in the clinical outcome of pathologies with an inflammatory component. Major depression, fibromyalgia, Alzheimer disease, psoriasis, arthritis, allergies, and asthma are all associated with changes in the serotonergic system associated with leukocytes. Thus, pharmacological regulation of the serotonergic system may modulate immune function and provide therapeutic alternatives for these diseases.

  1. Immunomodulatory Effects Mediated by Serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Arreola, Rodrigo; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Cruz-Fuentes, Carlos; Velasco-Velázquez, Marco Antonio; Garcés-Alvarez, María Eugenia; Hurtado-Alvarado, Gabriela; Quintero-Fabian, Saray; Pavón, Lenin

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) induces concentration-dependent metabolic effects in diverse cell types, including neurons, entherochromaffin cells, adipocytes, pancreatic beta-cells, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, epithelial cells, and leukocytes. Three classes of genes regulating 5-HT function are constitutively expressed or induced in these cells: (a) membrane proteins that regulate the response to 5-HT, such as SERT, 5HTR-GPCR, and the 5HT3-ion channels; (b) downstream signaling transduction proteins; and (c) enzymes controlling 5-HT metabolism, such as IDO and MAO, which can generate biologically active catabolites, including melatonin, kynurenines, and kynurenamines. This review covers the clinical and experimental mechanisms involved in 5-HT-induced immunomodulation. These mechanisms are cell-specific and depend on the expression of serotonergic components in immune cells. Consequently, 5-HT can modulate several immunological events, such as chemotaxis, leukocyte activation, proliferation, cytokine secretion, anergy, and apoptosis. The effects of 5-HT on immune cells may be relevant in the clinical outcome of pathologies with an inflammatory component. Major depression, fibromyalgia, Alzheimer disease, psoriasis, arthritis, allergies, and asthma are all associated with changes in the serotonergic system associated with leukocytes. Thus, pharmacological regulation of the serotonergic system may modulate immune function and provide therapeutic alternatives for these diseases. PMID:25961058

  2. Bilobalide modulates serotonin-controlled behaviors in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Brown, Marishka K; Luo, Yuan

    2009-06-22

    Dysfunctions in the serotonergic system have been implicated in several neurological disorders such as depression. Elderly individuals who have been diagnosed with clinical depression show elevated cases of neurodegenerative diseases. This has led to suggestions that modulating the serotonin (5-HT) system could provide an alternative method to current therapies for alleviating these pathologies. The neuroprotective effects of bilobalide in vitro have been documented. We aim to determine whether bilobalide affects the 5-HT system in the nematode C. elegans. The wild type worms, as well as well-characterized 5-HT mutants, were fed with bilobalide in a range of concentrations, and several 5-HT controlled behaviors were tested. We observed that bilobalide significantly inhibited 5-HT-controlled egg-laying behavior in a dose-dependent manner, which was blocked in the 5-HT receptor mutants (ser-4, mod-1), but not in the 5-HT transporter (mod-5) or synthesis (tph-1) mutants. Bilobalide also potentiated a 5-HT-controlled, experience-dependent locomotory behavior, termed the enhanced slowing response in the wild type animals. However, this effect was fully blocked in 5-HT receptor mod-1 and dopamine defective cat-2 mutants, but only partially blocked in ser-4 mutants. We also demonstrated that acetylcholine transmission was inhibited in a transgenic C. elegans strain that constitutively expresses Abeta, and bilobalide did not significantly affect this inhibition. These results suggest that bilobalide may modulate specific 5-HT receptor subtypes, which involves interplay with dopamine transmission. Additional studies for the function of bilobalide in neurotransmitter systems could aid in our understanding of its neuroprotective properties.

  3. Zingerone enhances glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory transmission by activating TRPA1 but not TRPV1 channels in the adult rat substantia gelatinosa.

    PubMed

    Yue, Hai-Yuan; Jiang, Chang-Yu; Fujita, Tsugumi; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2013-08-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are thought to play a role in regulating nociceptive transmission to spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons. It remains to be unveiled whether the TRP channels in the central nervous system are different in property from those involved in receiving nociceptive stimuli in the peripheral nervous system. We examined the effect of the vanilloid compound zingerone, which activates TRPV1 channels in the cell body of a primary afferent neuron, on glutamatergic excitatory transmission in the SG neurons of adult rat spinal cord slices by using the whole cell patch-clamp technique. Bath-applied zingerone reversibly and concentration-dependently increased spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) frequency. This effect was accompanied by an inward current at -70 mV that was resistant to glutamate receptor antagonists. These zingerone effects were repeated and persisted in Na(+)-channel blocker tetrodotoxin-, La(3+)-, or IP3-induced Ca(2+)-release inhibitor 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate-containing or Ca(2+)-free Krebs solution. Zingerone activity was resistant to the selective TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine but sensitive to the nonselective TRP antagonist ruthenium red, the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031, and the Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+)-release inhibitor dantrolene. TRPA1 agonist allyl isothiocyanate but not capsaicin inhibited the facilitatory effect of zingerone. On the other hand, zingerone reduced monosynaptically evoked EPSC amplitudes, as did TRPA1 agonists. Like allyl isothiocyanate, zingerone enhanced GABAergic spontaneous inhibitory transmission in a manner sensitive to tetrodotoxin. We conclude that zingerone presynaptically facilitates spontaneous excitatory transmission, probably through Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+)-release mechanisms, and produces a membrane depolarization in SG neurons by activating TRPA1 but not TRPV1 channels.

  4. Role of melatonin, serotonin 2B, and serotonin 2C receptors in modulating the firing activity of rat dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Chenu, Franck; Shim, Stacey; El Mansari, Mostafa; Blier, Pierre

    2014-02-01

    Melatonin has been widely used for the management of insomnia, but is devoid of antidepressant effect in the clinic. In contrast, agomelatine which is a potent melatonin receptor agonist is an effective antidepressant. It is, however, a potent serotonin 2B (5-HT(2B)) and serotonin 2C (5-HT(2C)) receptor antagonist as well. The present study was aimed at investigating the in vivo effects of repeated administration of melatonin (40 mg/kg/day), the 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist SB 242084 (0.5 mg/kg/day), the selective 5-HT(2B) receptor antagonist LY 266097 (0.6 mg/kg/day) and their combination on ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA), locus coeruleus (LC) norepinephrine (NE), and dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) serotonin (5-HT) firing activity. Administration of melatonin twice daily increased the number of spontaneously active DA neurons but left the firing of NE neurons unaltered. Long-term administration of melatonin and SB 242084, by themselves, had no effect on the firing rate and burst parameters of 5-HT and DA neurons. Their combination, however, enhanced only the number of spontaneously active DA neurons, while leaving the firing of 5-HT neurons unchanged. The addition of LY 266097, which by itself is devoid of effect, to the previous regimen increased for DA neurons the number of bursts per minute and the percentage of spikes occurring in bursts. In conclusion, the combination of melatonin receptor activation as well as 5-HT(2C) receptor blockade resulted in a disinhibition of DA neurons. When 5-HT(2B) receptors were also blocked, the firing and the bursting activity of DA neurons were both enhanced, thus reproducing the effect of agomelatine.

  5. Reactive oxygen species enhance excitatory synaptic transmission in rat spinal dorsal horn neurons by activating TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels.

    PubMed

    Nishio, N; Taniguchi, W; Sugimura, Y K; Takiguchi, N; Yamanaka, M; Kiyoyuki, Yasukuni; Yamada, H; Miyazaki, N; Yoshida, M; Nakatsuka, T

    2013-09-05

    Central neuropathic pain (CNP) in the spinal cord, such as chronic pain after spinal cord injury (SCI), is an incurable ailment. However, little is known about the spinal cord mechanisms underlying CNP. Recently, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been recognized to play an important role in CNP of the spinal cord. However, it is unclear how ROS affect synaptic transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. To clarify how ROS impact on synaptic transmission, we investigated the effects of ROS on synaptic transmission in rat spinal cord substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. Administration of tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BOOH), an ROS donor, into the spinal cord markedly increased the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in SG neurons. This t-BOOH-induced enhancement was not suppressed by the Na(+) channel blocker tetrodotoxin. However, in the presence of a non-N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor antagonist, 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione, t-BOOH did not generate any sEPSCs. Furthermore, in the presence of a transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel antagonist (HC-030031) or a transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel antagonist (capsazepine or AMG9810), the t-BOOH-induced increase in the frequency of sEPSCs was inhibited. These results indicate that ROS enhance the spontaneous release of glutamate from presynaptic terminals onto SG neurons through TRPA1 and TRPV1 channel activation. Excessive activation of these ion channels by ROS may induce central sensitization in the spinal cord and result in chronic pain such as that following SCI.

  6. Sentinel site-enhanced near-real time surveillance documenting West Nile virus circulation in two Culex mosquito species indicating different transmission characteristics, Djibouti City, Djibouti.

    PubMed

    Faulde, Michael K; Spiesberger, Michael; Abbas, Babiker

    2012-08-01

    The Horn of Africa represents a region formerly known to be highly susceptible to mosquito-borne infectious diseases. In order to investigate whether autochthonous WNV transmission occurs in the Djibouti City area, in how far, and which of, the endemic Culex mosquito species are involved in WNV circulation activity,and whether sentinel site-enhanced near-real time surveillance (SSE-NRTS) may increase WNV detection sensitivity, mosquito vector monitoring was conducted from January 2010 to June 2012. Six monitoring locations, including two identified sentinel sites, considered most probable for potential anthroponotic and zoonotic virus circulation activity, have been continuously employed. Among the 20431 mosquitoes collected, 19069 (93.4%) were Cx. quinquefasciatus, and 1345 (6.6%) Cx. pipiens ssp. torridus. WNV lineage 2 circulation activity was detected between December 20th, 2010 and January 7th, 2011. Overall, 19 WNV RNA-positive mosquito pools were detected. Generally, urban environment-specific WNV-RNA circulation took place in Cx. pipiens ssp. torridus, whereas periurban and rural area-linked circulation was detected only in Cx. quinquefasciatus. Serological investigation data from 10 volunteers employed at the dislocated zoonotic WNV transmission sentinel site suggest that six persons (60%) had an acute, or recent, WNV infection. Results show that WNV should be considered endemic for Djibouti and sentinel site-enhanced near-real time surveillance is an elegant and highly effective epidemiological tool. In Djibouti, the endemicity level, public health impact and transmission modes of vector-borne diseases in concordance with locally optimized monitoring and control regimen deserve further investigation.

  7. Acetyl-l-carnitine restores synaptic transmission and enhances the inducibility of stable LTP after oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, Kitti; Frank, Rita; Szabó, József; Knapp, Levente; Kis, Zsolt; Farkas, Tamás; Vécsei, László; Toldi, József

    2016-09-22

    Hypoxic circumstances result in functional and structural impairments of the brain. Oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) on hippocampal slices is a technique widely used to investigate the consequences of ischemic stroke and the potential neuroprotective effects of different drugs. Acetyl-l-carnitine (ALC) is a naturally occurring substance in the body, and it can therefore be administered safely even in relatively high doses. In previous experiments, ALC pretreatment proved to be effective against global hypoperfusion. In the present study, we investigated whether ALC can be protective in an OGD model. We are not aware of any earlier study in which the long-term potentiation (LTP) function on hippocampal slices was measured after OGD. Therefore, we set out to determine whether an effective ALC concentration has an effect on synaptic plasticity after OGD in the hippocampal CA1 subfield of rats. A further aim was to investigate the mechanism underlying the protective effect of this compound. The experiments revealed that ALC is neuroprotective against OGD in a dose-dependent manner, which is manifested not only in the regeneration of the impaired synaptic transmission after the OGD, but also in the inducibility and stability of the LTP. In the case of the most effective concentration of ALC (500μM), use of a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor (LY294002) revealed that the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway has a key role in the restoration of the synaptic transmission and plasticity reached by ALC treatment.

  8. Effects of calcium antagonists on serotonin-dependent aggregation and serotonin transport in platelets of patients with migraine.

    PubMed

    Pukhal'skaya, T G; Kolosova, O A; Men'shikov, M Y; Vein, A M

    2000-07-01

    Flunarizine and cinnarizine (IC50 6.8x10(-6) and 2.8x10(-5) M, respectively) inhibited 3H-serotonin uptake by platelets. In higher doses, they blocked serotonin-induced platelet aggregation and stimulated 3H-serotonin release from these cells. Imipramine did not affect serotonin-releasing effects of preparations. In all patients cinnarizine was more potent in inhibiting serotonin uptake, and in half of the patients cinnarizine displayed higher activity as an inductor of serotonin release.

  9. The role of serotonin in axon and dendrite growth.

    PubMed

    Trakhtenberg, Ephraim F; Goldberg, Jeffrey L

    2012-01-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) plays multiple roles in the enteric, peripheral, and central nervous systems (CNS). Although its most prominent biological function is as a signal transmission messenger from pre- to postsynaptic neurons, other roles such as shaping brain development and regulating neurite growth have also been described. Here, we review the less well-studied role of 5-HT as a modulator of neurite growth. 5-HT has been shown to regulate neurite growth in multiple systems and species, including in the mammalian CNS. 5-HT predominantly appears to suppress neurite growth, but depending on the model system and 5-HT receptor subtype, in rare cases, it may promote neurite outgrowth and elongation. Failure of axon regeneration in the adult mammalian CNS is a major problem in multiple diseases, and understanding how 5-HT receptors signal opposing effects on neurite growth may lead to novel neuroregenerative therapies, by targeting either 5-HT receptors or their downstream signaling pathways.

  10. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, fluoxetine and paroxetine, attenuate the expression of the established behavioral sensitization induced by methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yujiro; Kashiwa, Atsushi; Ito, Takashi; Ishii, Sumikazu; Umino, Asami; Nishikawa, Toru

    2007-03-01

    To obtain an insight into the development of a new pharmacotherapy that prevents the treatment-resistant relapse of psychostimulant-induced psychosis and schizophrenia, we have investigated in the mouse the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), fluoxetine (FLX) and paroxetine (PRX), on the established sensitization induced by methamphetamine (MAP), a model of the relapse of these psychoses, because the modifications of the brain serotonergic transmission have been reported to antagonize the sensitization phenomenon. In agreement with previous reports, repeated MAP treatment (1.0 mg/kg a day, subcutaneously (s.c.)) for 10 days induced a long-lasting enhancement of the increasing effects of a challenge dose of MAP (0.24 mg/kg, s.c.) on motor activity on day 12 or 29 of withdrawal. The daily injection of FLX (10 mg/kg, s.c.) or PRX (8 mg/kg, s.c.) from 12 to 16 days of withdrawal of repeated MAP administration markedly attenuated the ability of the MAP pretreatment to augment the motor responses to the challenge dose of the stimulant 13 days after the SSRI injection. The repeated treatment with FLX or PRX alone failed to affect the motor stimulation following the challenge of saline and MAP 13 days later. These results suggest that the intermittent and repetitive elevation of serotonergic tone may inhibit the expression of the motor sensitization induced by pretreatment with MAP. It is proposed that clinically available serotonin reuptake inhibitors could be useful for preventing the recurrence of hallucinatory-paranoid state in drug-induced psychosis and schizophrenia.

  11. Convulsive ergotism: epidemics of the serotonin syndrome?

    PubMed

    Eadie, Mervyn J

    2003-07-01

    Between 1085 and 1927, epidemics of "convulsive ergotism" were widespread east of the Rhine in Europe due to consumption of grain contaminated with ergot, which is produced by the fungus Claviceps purpurea. West of the Rhine, consumption of ergot-contaminated food caused epidemics of gangrenous ergotism. The clinical features of convulsive ergotism--muscle twitching and spasms, changes in mental state, hallucinations, sweating, and fever lasting for several weeks--suggest serotonergic overstimulation of the CNS (ie, the serotonin syndrome). The ergot alkaloids are serotonin agonists. Dihydroergotamine binds to serotonin receptors in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, which is the site of neuropathological changes in convulsive ergotism. Dihydroergotamine given to human beings can cause the serotonin syndrome. Ergots produced by different strains of Claviceps purpurea, and those growing in different soils, may have different ergot alkaloid compositions. An alkaloid, present in high concentrations in ergots from east of the Rhine, may have caused convulsive ergotism at a circulating concentration insufficient to produce peripheral ischaemia. The serotonin syndrome may, therefore, have been a public-health problem long before it was recognised as a complication of modern psychopharmacology.

  12. Ascending serotonin neuron diversity under two umbrellas.

    PubMed

    Commons, Kathryn G

    2016-09-01

    Forebrain serotonin relevant for many psychological disorders arises in the hindbrain, primarily within the dorsal and median raphe nuclei (DR and MR). These nuclei are heterogeneous, containing several distinct groups of serotonin neurons. Here, new insight into the afferent and efferent connectivity of these areas is reviewed in correlation with their developmental origin. These data suggest that the caudal third of the DR, the area originally designated B6, may be misidentified as part of the DR as it shares many features of connectivity with the MR. By considering the rostral DR independently and affiliating the B6 to the MR, the diverse subgroups of serotonin neurons can be arranged with more coherence into two umbrella groups, each with distinctive domains of influence. Serotonin neurons within the rostral DR are uniquely interconnected with brain areas associated with emotion and motivation such as the amygdala, accumbens and ventral pallidum. In contrast serotonin neurons in the B6 and MR are characterized by their dominion over the septum and hippocampus. This distinction between the DR and B6/MR parallels their developmental origin and likely impacts their role in both behavior and psychopathology. Implications and further subdivisions within these areas are discussed.

  13. Organizational effects of oxytocin on serotonin innervation.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Jennifer L; Roache, Laura; Nguyen, Khanhbao N; Cushing, Bruce S; Troyer, Emma; Papademetriou, Eros; Raghanti, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    Oxytocin (OT) has an organizational effect within the central nervous system and can have long-lasting effects on the expression of social behavior. OT has recently been implicated in modulating the release of serotonin through activation of receptors in the raphe nuclei. Here we test the hypothesis that OT can have an organizational effect on the serotonergic system. Male prairie voles received an intraperitoneal injection on postnatal day 1 with 3.0 or .3 µg OT, an OT antagonist, or a saline control. Brains were collected on day 21 and immunostained for serotonin. Serotonin axons were quantified in the anterior hypothalamus, cortical amygdala, medial amygdala, paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, and ventromedial hypothalamus. Males treated with 3.0 µg OT displayed significantly higher serotonin axon length densities in the anterior hypothalamus, cortical amygdala, and the ventromedial hypothalamus than control males. These results support the hypothesis that OT has an organizational effect on the serotonin system during the neonatal period, and that these effects are site-specific.

  14. Carvacrol presynaptically enhances spontaneous excitatory transmission and produces outward current in adult rat spinal substantia gelatinosa neurons.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qing-Tian; Fujita, Tsugumi; Jiang, Chang-Yu; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2014-12-10

    Carvacrol, which is abundantly contained in oregano essential oils, has various pharmacological actions including antinociception. Although the oral administration of carvacrol results in antinociception, cellular mechanisms for this action have not been examined yet. We investigated the action of carvacrol on glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory transmission in substantia gelatinosa neurons which play a pivotal role in regulating nociceptive transmission from the periphery by using the patch-clamp technique in adult rat spinal cord slices. Carvacrol superfused for 2 min produced either spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current frequency increase or outward current at −70 mV, or both of them in many of the neurons tested. The frequency increase and outward current had the EC(50) values of 0.69 mM and 0.55 mM, respectively. The former action was inhibited by a selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 but not a selective TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine, while the latter action was unaffected by their antagonists. The current–voltage relationship for the outward current indicated an involvement in the current of a change in the membrane permeability of K(+) and its outward rectification. The outward current was inhibited in 10 mM-K((+) 0but not K(+)-channel blockers [tetraethylammonium and Ba(2+)]-containing and 11.0 mM-Cl- Krebs solution. These results indicate that carvacrol increases the spontaneous release of l-glutamate from nerve terminals by activating TRPA1 but not TRPV1 channels and produces membrane hyperpolarization, which is possibly mediated by tetraethylammonium- and Ba(2+)-insensitive K(+) channels, in substantia gelatinosa neurons. It is suggested that the hyperpolarizing effect of carvacrol could contribute to its antinociceptive action.

  15. Brain neurochemistry and macronutrient selection: a role for serotonin feedback?

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    Experimental manipulations that clearly affected brain serotonin concentrations had no effect on diet selection. These findings challenge the importance of serotonin as part of a negative-feedback loop modulating macronutrient selection.

  16. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Suppression of HIV Infectivity and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Tami; Lynch, Kevin; Dubé, Benoit; Gettes, David R.; Tustin, Nancy B.; Lai, Jian Ping; Metzger, David S.; Blume, Joshua; Douglas, Steven D.; Evans, Dwight L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram would down regulate HIV infectivity and that the greatest effects would be seen in people with depression. Depression is a risk factor for morbidity and mortality in HIV/AIDS. Serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission has been implicated in the pathobiology of depression, and pharmacologic therapies for depression target this system. The 5-HT transporter and 5-HT receptors are widely distributed throughout the central nervous and immune systems. Depression has been associated with suppression of natural killer cells (NK) cells and CD8+ lymphocytes, key regulators of HIV infection. Methods Ex-vivo models for acute and chronic HIV infection were used to study the effects of citalopram on HIV viral infection and replication, in 48 depressed and non-depressed women. For both the acute and chronic infection models, HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) activity was measured in the citalopram treatment condition and the control condition. Results The SSRI significantly downregulated the RT response in both the acute and chronic infection models. Specifically, citalopram significantly decreased the acute HIV infectivity of macrophages. Citalopram also significantly decreased HIV viral replication in the latently infected T-cell line and in the latently infected macrophage cell line. There was no difference in down-regulation by depression status. Conclusions These studies suggest that an SSRI enhances NK/CD8 non-cytolytic HIV suppression in HIV/AIDS and decreases HIV viral infectivity of macrophages, ex vivo, suggesting the need for in vivo studies to determine a potential role for agents targeting serotonin in the host defense against HIV. PMID:20947783

  17. Future directions for serotonin and antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Artigas, Francesc

    2013-01-16

    Despite the widespread use of antidepressant medications that block serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) and/or norepinephrine (NE) transporters, such as SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) or SNRIs (serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors), the underlying neurobiological basis of action of these agents is poorly understood. Increases in serotonergic function are hypothesized to have beneficial effects on depressive symptoms. However, which of the 14 different neuronal receptors sensitive to 5-HT accounts for the therapeutic effects of SSRIs and SNRIs remains undetermined. The development of drugs that activate or block specific 5-HT receptors may help to circumvent the two main limitations of current antidepressants: low efficacy and delayed onset of therapeutic action. What follows is a short summary of the author's views on this matter.

  18. Future Directions for Serotonin and Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of antidepressant medications that block serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) and/or norepinephrine (NE) transporters, such as SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) or SNRIs (serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors), the underlying neurobiological basis of action of these agents is poorly understood. Increases in serotonergic function are hypothesized to have beneficial effects on depressive symptoms. However, which of the 14 different neuronal receptors sensitive to 5-HT accounts for the therapeutic effects of SSRIs and SNRIs remains undetermined. The development of drugs that activate or block specific 5-HT receptors may help to circumvent the two main limitations of current antidepressants: low efficacy and delayed onset of therapeutic action. What follows is a short summary of the author’s views on this matter. PMID:23336036

  19. Enhancing active and passive remote sensing in the ocean using broadband acoustic transmissions and coherent hydrophone arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Duong Duy

    The statistics of broadband acoustic signal transmissions in a random continental shelf waveguide are characterized for the fully saturated regime. The probability distribution of broadband signal energies after saturated multi-path propagation is derived using coherence theory. The frequency components obtained from Fourier decomposition of a broadband signal are each assumed to be fully saturated, where the energy spectral density obeys the exponential distribution with 5.6 dB standard deviation and unity scintillation index. When the signal bandwidth and measurement time are respectively larger than the correlation bandwidth and correlation time of its energy spectral density components, the broadband signal energy obtained by integrating the energy spectral density across the signal bandwidth then follows the Gamma distribution with standard deviation smaller than 5.6 dB and scintillation index less than unity. The theory is verified with broadband transmissions in the Gulf of Maine shallow water waveguide in the 300-1200 Hz frequency range. The standard deviations of received broadband signal energies range from 2.7 to 4.6 dB for effective bandwidths up to 42 Hz, while the standard deviations of individual energy spectral density components are roughly 5.6 dB. The energy spectral density correlation bandwidths of the received broadband signals are found to be larger for signals with higher center frequency. Sperm whales in the New England continental shelf and slope were passively localized, in both range and bearing using a single low-frequency (< 2500 Hz), densely sampled, towed horizontal coherent hydrophone array system. Whale bearings were estimated using time-domain beamforming that provided high coherent array gain in sperm whale click signal-to-noise ratio. Whale ranges from the receiver array center were estimated using the moving array triangulation technique from a sequence of whale bearing measurements. The dive profile was estimated for a sperm

  20. Association between serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms and childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Farjadian, Shirin; Moghtaderi, Mozhgan; Fakhraei, Bahareh; Nasiri, Mahboubeh; Farjam, Mojtaba

    2013-12-01

    Asthma is a common chronic inflammatory disease of the airways in which genetic factors play a major role in its pathogenesis. High serotonin serum levels in patients with asthma suggest that serotonin is involved in the pathophysiology of the disease. Serotonin clearance is mediated by the serotonin reuptake transporter, and functional polymorphisms in this gene lead to altered serotonin reuptake efficiency. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms and asthma. Serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms (5-HTTLPR, rs35521 and STin2.VNTR) were assessed by PCR-based methods in 100 children with mild to moderate persistent asthma and compared with 100 healthy controls. There were no significant differences in allele, genotype or haplotype frequencies between patients and controls. No association was observed between SERT gene polymorphisms after stratification of patients for sex, age, spirometry indices, family history, passive smoking behavior and concomitant allergic rhinitis. Significant differences were observed in the distribution of 5-HTTLPR alleles (p = 0.025) and genotypes (p = 0.021) between patients with and without atopic dermatitis. Despite strong evidence suggesting the role of serotonin in the pathophysiology of asthma, we found no association between serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms and mild to moderate persistent asthma. Further serotonin transporter gene analyses in patients with severe asthma may open up new horizons in the utilization of common serotonin regulators to treat asthma, based on their pharmacogenetic effects. However, serotonin may also be indirectly influenced by emotional stress during asthma attacks.

  1. Serotonin Signal Transduction in Two Groups of Autistic Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: TITLE: Serotonin Signal Transduction in Two Groups of Autistic ...Serotonin Signal Transduction in Two Groups of Autistic Patients 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0820 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...Furthermore, while treatment with selective serotonin uptake inhibitors (SSRI) is routine for autistic patients, therapeutic benefit is variable and

  2. [Serotonin and its receptors in the cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Nadeev, A D; Zharkikh, I L; Avdonin, P V; Goncharov, N V

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin in cardiovascular system plays an important role in blood coagulation, allergy, and inflammation, as well as in blood vessel tone regulation. In this review, the mechanisms of serotonin effects upon the cells of blood vessels are considered and the list of main agonists and antagonists is presented. The signaling pathways activated by serotonin and their interaction in normal and pathological states are described.

  3. Role of peripheral serotonin in glucose and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hitoshi; Rose, Michael T; Aso, Hisashi

    2011-06-01

    Two independent serotonin systems exist, one in the brain and the other in the periphery. Serotonin is a well known monoaminergic neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and it is known to regulate feeding behavior, meal size, and body weight. On the other hand, there is much less evidence for the role of serotonin as a gastrointestinal hormone, particularly with respect to its effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of peripheral serotonin on glucose and lipid metabolism and the implications of this for further research. The enterochromaffin cells of the gastrointestinal tract produce peripheral serotonin postprandially. In mice, it induces a decrease in the concentration of circulating lipids as well as hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia through its action on several serotonin receptors. Further, serotonin metabolites act as endogenous agonists for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and serotonin accelerates adipocyte differentiation via serotonin receptor 2A and 2C. Studies of serotonin are likely to provide new insights into the field of lipid accumulation and metabolism. Recent studies show new physiological functions of peripheral serotonin, linked to glucose and lipid metabolism. Peripheral serotonin may serve as an attractive new therapeutic target for the treatment of metabolic disorders in the near future.

  4. Serotonin-Labeled CdSe Nanocrystals: Applications for Neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kippeny, Tadd; Adkins, Erika; Adams, Scott; Thomlinson, Ian; Schroeter, Sally; Defelice, Louis; Blakely, Randy; Rosenthal, Sandra

    2000-03-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter which has been linked to the regulation of critical behaviors including sleep, appetite, and mood. The serotonin transporter (SERT) is a 12-transmembrane domain protein responsible for clearance of serotonin from extracellular spaces following release. In order to assess the potential for use of ligand-conjugated nanocrystals to target cell surface receptors, ion channels, and transporters we have measured the ability of serotonin-labeled CdSe nanocrystals (SNACs) to block the uptake of tritiated serotonin by the human and Drosophila serotonin transporters (hSERT and dSERT). Estimated Ki values, the SNAC concentration at which half of the serotonin transport activity is blocked, were determined by nonlinear regression to be Ki (hSERT ) = 74uM and Ki (dSERT ) = 29uM. These values and our inability to detect free serotonin indicate that SNACs selectively interact with the serotonin recognition site of the transporter. We have also exposed the SNACs to cells containing ionotropic serotonin receptors and have measured the electrical response of the cell using a two microelectrode voltage clamp. We find that serotonin receptors do respond to the SNACs and we measure currents similar to the free serotonin response. These results indicate that ligand-conjugated nanocrystals can be used to label both receptor and transporter proteins. Initial fluorescence labeling experiments will be discussed.

  5. Adjunctive alpha2-adrenoceptor blockade enhances the antipsychotic-like effect of risperidone and facilitates cortical dopaminergic and glutamatergic, NMDA receptor-mediated transmission.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Monica M; Wiker, Charlotte; Frånberg, Olivia; Konradsson-Geuken, Asa; Langlois, Xavier; Jardemark, Kent; Svensson, Torgny H

    2010-08-01

    Compared to both first- and second-generation antipsychotic drugs (APDs), clozapine shows superior efficacy in treatment-resistant schizophrenia. In contrast to most APDs clozapine possesses high affinity for alpha2-adrenoceptors, and clinical and preclinical studies provide evidence that the alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist idazoxan enhances the antipsychotic efficacy of typical D2 receptor antagonists as well as olanzapine. Risperidone has lower affinity for alpha2-adrenoceptors than clozapine but higher than most other APDs. Here we examined, in rats, the effects of adding idazoxan to risperidone on antipsychotic effect using the conditioned avoidance response (CAR) test, extrapyramidal side-effect (EPS) liability using the catalepsy test, brain dopamine efflux using in-vivo microdialysis in freely moving animals, cortical N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated transmission using intracellular electrophysiological recording in vitro, and ex-vivo autoradiography to assess the in-vivo alpha2A- and alpha2C-adrenoceptor occupancies by risperidone. The dose of risperidone needed for antipsychotic effect in the CAR test was approximately 0.4 mg/kg, which produced 11% and 17% in-vivo receptor occupancy at alpha2A- and alpha2C-adrenoceptors, respectively. Addition of idazoxan (1.5 mg/kg) to a low dose of risperidone (0.25 mg/kg) enhanced the suppression of CAR, but did not enhance catalepsy. Both cortical dopamine release and NMDA receptor-mediated responses were enhanced. These data propose that the therapeutic effect of risperidone in schizophrenia can be enhanced and its EPS liability reduced by adjunctive treatment with an alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist, and generally support the notion that the potent alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonistic action of clozapine may be highly important for its unique efficacy in schizophrenia.

  6. The effect of the electronic transmission of prescriptions on dispensing errors and prescription enhancements made in English community pharmacies: a naturalistic stepped wedge study

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Bryony Dean; Reynolds, Matthew; Sadler, Stacey; Hibberd, Ralph; Avery, Anthony J; Armstrong, Sarah J; Mehta, Rajnikant; Boyd, Matthew J; Barber, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare prevalence and types of dispensing errors and pharmacists’ labelling enhancements, for prescriptions transmitted electronically versus paper prescriptions. Design Naturalistic stepped wedge study. Setting 15 English community pharmacies. Intervention Electronic transmission of prescriptions between prescriber and pharmacy. Main outcome measures Prevalence of labelling errors, content errors and labelling enhancements (beneficial additions to the instructions), as identified by researchers visiting each pharmacy. Results Overall, we identified labelling errors in 5.4% of 16 357 dispensed items, and content errors in 1.4%; enhancements were made for 13.6%. Pharmacists also edited the label for a further 21.9% of electronically transmitted items. Electronically transmitted prescriptions had a higher prevalence of labelling errors (7.4% of 3733 items) than other prescriptions (4.8% of 12 624); OR 1.46 (95% CI 1.21 to 1.76). There was no difference for content errors or enhancements. The increase in labelling errors was mainly accounted for by errors (mainly at one pharmacy) involving omission of the indication, where specified by the prescriber, from the label. A sensitivity analysis in which these cases (n=158) were not considered errors revealed no remaining difference between prescription types. Conclusions We identified a higher prevalence of labelling errors for items transmitted electronically, but this was predominantly accounted for by local practice in a single pharmacy, independent of prescription type. Community pharmacists made labelling enhancements to about one in seven dispensed items, whether electronically transmitted or not. Community pharmacists, prescribers, professional bodies and software providers should work together to agree how items should be dispensed and labelled to best reap the benefits of electronically transmitted prescriptions. Community pharmacists need to ensure their computer systems are promptly updated

  7. The effect of the electronic transmission of prescriptions on dispensing errors and prescription enhancements made in English community pharmacies: a naturalistic stepped wedge study.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Bryony Dean; Reynolds, Matthew; Sadler, Stacey; Hibberd, Ralph; Avery, Anthony J; Armstrong, Sarah J; Mehta, Rajnikant; Boyd, Matthew J; Barber, Nick

    2014-08-01

    To compare prevalence and types of dispensing errors and pharmacists' labelling enhancements, for prescriptions transmitted electronically versus paper prescriptions. Naturalistic stepped wedge study. 15 English community pharmacies. Electronic transmission of prescriptions between prescriber and pharmacy. Prevalence of labelling errors, content errors and labelling enhancements (beneficial additions to the instructions), as identified by researchers visiting each pharmacy. Overall, we identified labelling errors in 5.4% of 16,357 dispensed items, and content errors in 1.4%; enhancements were made for 13.6%. Pharmacists also edited the label for a further 21.9% of electronically transmitted items. Electronically transmitted prescriptions had a higher prevalence of labelling errors (7.4% of 3733 items) than other prescriptions (4.8% of 12,624); OR 1.46 (95% CI 1.21 to 1.76). There was no difference for content errors or enhancements. The increase in labelling errors was mainly accounted for by errors (mainly at one pharmacy) involving omission of the indication, where specified by the prescriber, from the label. A sensitivity analysis in which these cases (n=158) were not considered errors revealed no remaining difference between prescription types. We identified a higher prevalence of labelling errors for items transmitted electronically, but this was predominantly accounted for by local practice in a single pharmacy, independent of prescription type. Community pharmacists made labelling enhancements to about one in seven dispensed items, whether electronically transmitted or not. Community pharmacists, prescribers, professional bodies and software providers should work together to agree how items should be dispensed and labelled to best reap the benefits of electronically transmitted prescriptions. Community pharmacists need to ensure their computer systems are promptly updated to help reduce errors. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to

  8. Role of serotonin in seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Sharma, P K; Garg, V K; Singh, A K; Mondal, S C

    2013-01-01

    This review was prepared with an aim to show role of serotonin in seasonal affective disorder. Seasonal affective disorder, which is also called as winter depression or winter blues, is mood disorder in which persons with normal mental health throughout most of the year will show depressive symptoms in the winter or, less commonly, in the summer. Serotonin is an important endogenous neurotransmitter which also acts as neuromodulator. The least invasive, natural, and researched treatment of seasonal affective disorder is natural or otherwise is light therapy. Negative air ionization, which acts by liberating charged particles on the sleep environment, has also become effective in treatment of seasonal affective disorder.  

  9. [Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and gastrointestinal hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takatsugu; Abe, Koichiro; Kuyama, Yasushi

    2013-04-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are widely used antidepressants characterized by less-frequent adverse effects compared with classical anti-depressive agents. On the other hand, SSRI can cause hemorrhagic events more due to impaired platelet aggregation induced by a depletion of serotonin in the peripheral platelet. Epidemiological studies have indicated that patients taking SSRI are predisposed to gastrointestinal hemorrhage, especially in case that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are prescribed concomitantly. Here we describe a risk of the gastrointestinal hemorrhage in patients taking SSRI.

  10. Cocaine Enhances DC to T-cell HIV-1 Transmission by Activating DC-SIGN/LARG/LSP1 Complex and Facilitating Infectious Synapse Formation

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Anil; Kulkarni, Rutuja; Jiang, Shuxian; Groopman, Jerome E.

    2017-01-01

    DC-SIGN is a dendritic cell surface structure which participates in binding and transmission of HIV-1. Here, for the first time we demonstrate that cocaine induces over expression of DC-SIGN and significantly enhances virus transfer from DCs to T-cells by increasing the binding and internalization of HIV-1 in DCs. We found that cocaine activates a DC-SIGN mediated ‘signalosome’ complex by enhancing its association with LARG and LSP1. Further, LARG was observed to participate in DC-SIGN mediated internalization of HIV-1 in DCs. Intracellular trafficking studies of HIV-1 in cocaine treated DCs revealed increased co-localization of HIV-1 with endosomal or multi vesicular body (MVB) markers such as CD81 and VPS4 and decreased co-localization with the phagolysomal marker LAMP1; this signified altered intracellular trafficking and decreased degradation of HIV-1 in cocaine treated DCs. Furthermore, we found that cocaine induced activation of LARG which in turn activated Rho A and the focal adhesion molecules FAK, Pyk2 and paxillin. This signaling cascade enhanced the formation of an infectious synapse between DCs and T-cells. Our study provides insight into the molecular mechanisms of cocaine’s contribution to key components in HIV pathogenesis and highlights novel targets for interrupting the virus life cycle in substance using hosts. PMID:28094782

  11. Enhanced sensitivity of hippocampal pyramidal neurons from mdx mice to hypoxia-induced loss of synaptic transmission.

    PubMed Central

    Mehler, M F; Haas, K Z; Kessler, J A; Stanton, P K

    1992-01-01

    The gene at the Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy locus encodes dystrophin, a member of a protein superfamily that links the actin cytoskeleton to transmembrane plasmalemmal proteins. In mature skeletal myocytes, the absence of dystrophin is associated with decreased membrane stability, altered kinetics of several calcium channels, and increased intracellular calcium concentration. In the central nervous system, dystrophin is restricted to specific neuronal populations that show heightened susceptibility to excitotoxic damage and is localized in proximal dendrites and the neuronal somata. We report that CA1 pyramidal neurons in a hippocampal slice preparation from a dystrophin-deficient mouse genetic model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (the mdx mouse) exhibit significant increased susceptibility to hypoxia-induced damage to synaptic transmission. This selective vulnerability was substantially ameliorated by pretreatment with diphenylhydantoin, an anticonvulsant that blocks both sodium-dependent action potentials and low-threshold transient calcium conductances. These findings suggest that dystrophin deficiency could predispose susceptible neuronal populations to cumulative hypoxic insults that may contribute to the development of cognitive deficits in Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy patients and that the effects of such periods of hypoxia may be pharmacologically remediable. PMID:1549609

  12. Interface and process for enhanced transmission of non-circular ion beams between stages at unequal pressure

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Keqi; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-03-04

    The invention discloses a new interface with non-circular conductance limit aperture(s) useful for effective transmission of non-circular ion beams between stages with different gas pressure. In particular, the invention provides an improved coupling of field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) analyzers of planar or side-to-side geometry to downstream stages such as mass spectrometry or ion mobility spectrometry. In this case, the non-circular aperture is rectangular; other geometries may be optimum in other applications. In the preferred embodiment, the non-circular aperture interface is followed by an electrodynamic ion funnel that may focus wide ion beams of any shape into tight circular beams with virtually no losses. The jet disrupter element of the funnel may also have a non-circular geometry, matching the shape of arriving ion beam. The improved sensitivity of planar FAIMS/MS has been demonstrated in experiments using a non-contiguous elongated aperture but other embodiments (e.g., with a contiguous slit aperture) may be preferable, especially in conjunction with an ion funnel operated at high pressures.

  13. The evolution of prestige: freely conferred deference as a mechanism for enhancing the benefits of cultural transmission.

    PubMed

    Henrich, J; Gil-White, F J.

    2001-05-01

    This paper advances an "information goods" theory that explains prestige processes as an emergent product of psychological adaptations that evolved to improve the quality of information acquired via cultural transmission. Natural selection favored social learners who could evaluate potential models and copy the most successful among them. In order to improve the fidelity and comprehensiveness of such ranked-biased copying, social learners further evolved dispositions to sycophantically ingratiate themselves with their chosen models, so as to gain close proximity to, and prolonged interaction with, these models. Once common, these dispositions created, at the group level, distributions of deference that new entrants may adaptively exploit to decide who to begin copying. This generated a preference for models who seem generally "popular." Building on social exchange theories, we argue that a wider range of phenomena associated with prestige processes can more plausibly be explained by this simple theory than by others, and we test its predictions with data from throughout the social sciences. In addition, we distinguish carefully between dominance (force or force threat) and prestige (freely conferred deference).

  14. Controlled water vapor transmission rate promotes wound-healing via wound re-epithelialization and contraction enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rui; Xia, Hesheng; He, Weifeng; Li, Zhichao; Zhao, Jian; Liu, Bo; Wang, Yuzhen; Lei, Qiang; Kong, Yi; Bai, Yang; Yao, Zhihui; Yan, Rongshuai; Li, Haisheng; Zhan, Rixing; Yang, Sisi; Luo, Gaoxing; Wu, Jun

    2016-04-01

    A desirable microenvironment is essential for wound healing, in which an ideal moisture content is one of the most important factors. The fundamental function and requirement for wound dressings is to keep the wound at an optimal moisture. Here, we prepared serial polyurethane (PU) membrane dressings with graded water vapor transmission rates (WVTRs), and the optimal WVTR of the dressing for wound healing was identified by both in vitro and in vivo studies. It was found that the dressing with a WVTR of 2028.3 ± 237.8 g/m2·24 h was able to maintain an optimal moisture content for the proliferation and regular function of epidermal cells and fibroblasts in a three-dimensional culture model. Moreover, the dressing with this optimal WTVR was found to be able to promote wound healing in a mouse skin wound model. Our finds may be helpful in the design of wound dressing for wound regeneration in the future.

  15. Controlled water vapor transmission rate promotes wound-healing via wound re-epithelialization and contraction enhancement.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rui; Xia, Hesheng; He, Weifeng; Li, Zhichao; Zhao, Jian; Liu, Bo; Wang, Yuzhen; Lei, Qiang; Kong, Yi; Bai, Yang; Yao, Zhihui; Yan, Rongshuai; Li, Haisheng; Zhan, Rixing; Yang, Sisi; Luo, Gaoxing; Wu, Jun

    2016-04-18

    A desirable microenvironment is essential for wound healing, in which an ideal moisture content is one of the most important factors. The fundamental function and requirement for wound dressings is to keep the wound at an optimal moisture. Here, we prepared serial polyurethane (PU) membrane dressings with graded water vapor transmission rates (WVTRs), and the optimal WVTR of the dressing for wound healing was identified by both in vitro and in vivo studies. It was found that the dressing with a WVTR of 2028.3 ± 237.8 g/m(2)·24 h was able to maintain an optimal moisture content for the proliferation and regular function of epidermal cells and fibroblasts in a three-dimensional culture model. Moreover, the dressing with this optimal WTVR was found to be able to promote wound healing in a mouse skin wound model. Our finds may be helpful in the design of wound dressing for wound regeneration in the future.

  16. The serotonin transporter plays an important role in male sexual behavior: a study in serotonin transporter knockout rats.

    PubMed

    Chan, Johnny S W; Snoeren, Eelke M S; Cuppen, Edwin; Waldinger, Marcel D; Olivier, Berend; Oosting, Ronald S

    2011-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter for sexual behaviors. Heterozygous (+/-) serotonin transporter (SERT) rats and SERT knockout rats (-/-) have serotonergic disturbances with significant elevations of basal extracellular 5-HT levels. To investigate the putative role of the SERT in male sexual behavior. After extensive sexual training, the effects of the 5-HT(1A/7) receptor agonist ± 8-OH-DPAT, the 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist WAY100 635 and a combination of both on sexual behaviors of SERT(-/-) and SERT(+/-) knockout and wildtype (SERT(+/+) ) male Wistar rats were examined. Male rat sexual behaviors of mounts, intromissions, and ejaculations. SERT(-/-) had lower basal ejaculation frequencies than SERT(+/-) and SERT(+/+) animals. ± 8-OH-DPAT enhanced sexual performance in all three genotypes to the same extent. WAY100635 dose-dependently inhibited sexual behavior in all three genotypes with significant dose to genotype interactions. WAY100635 exerted the strongest effects in SERT(-/-) animals. The combination of a dose range of ± 8-OH-DPAT and a selected dose of WAY100635 revealed only partial antagonism by ± 8-OH-DPAT of the sexual inhibitory effects of WAY100635. Absence of the serotonin transporter reduces basal ejaculatory performance in male rats. Pharmacological experiments suggest that separate pools of 5-HT(1A) receptors regulate different aspects of sexual performance in male rats. 5-HT(7) receptors may play a minor role in the partial recovery of sexual behavior after combination of ± 8-OH-DPAT and WAY100635. The SERT(-/-) rat may be a model for chronic SSRI treatment, delayed ejaculation, anorgasmia, and/or low libido. © 2010 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  17. Attenuated methamphetamine-induced locomotor sensitization in serotonin transporter knockout mice is restored by serotonin 1B receptor antagonist treatment.

    PubMed

    Igari, Moe; Shen, Hao-Wei; Hagino, Yoko; Fukushima, Setsu; Kasahara, Yoshiyuki; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Murphy, Dennis L; Hall, Frank Scott; Uhl, George R; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Sora, Ichiro

    2015-02-01

    Repeated administration of methamphetamine (METH) enhances acute locomotor responses to METH administered in the same context, a phenomenon termed as 'locomotor sensitization'. Although many of the acute effects of METH are mediated by its influences on the compartmentalization of dopamine, serotonin systems have also been suggested to influence the behavioral effects of METH in ways that are not fully understood. The present experiments examined serotonergic roles in METH-induced locomotor sensitization by assessing: (a) the effect of serotonin transporter (SERT; Slc6A4) knockout (KO) on METH-induced locomotor sensitization; (b) extracellular monoamine levels in METH-treated animals as determined by in-vivo microdialysis; and (c) effects of serotonin (5-HT) receptor antagonists on METH-induced behavioral sensitization, with focus on effects of the 5-HT1B receptor antagonist SB 216641 and a comparison with the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist ketanserin. Repeated METH administration failed to induce behavioral sensitization in homozygous SERT KO (SERT-/-) mice under conditions that produced substantial sensitization in wild-type or heterozygous SERT KO (SERT+/-) mice. The selective 5-HT1B antagonist receptor SB 216641 restored METH-induced locomotor sensitization in SERT-/- mice, whereas ketanserin was ineffective. METH-induced increases in extracellular 5-HT (5-HTex) levels were substantially reduced in SERT-/- mice, although SERT genotype had no effect on METH-induced increases in extracellular dopamine. These experiments demonstrate that 5-HT actions, including those