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Sample records for enhances cell migration

  1. Endothelial cells enhance migration of meniscus cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xiaoning; Eng, George M.; Arkonac, Derya E.; Chao, Pen-hsiu Grace; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the interactions between vascular endothelial cells and meniscal fibrochondrocytes from the inner avascular and outer vascular regions of the meniscus, and identify angiogenic factors that enhance cell migration and integrative repair. Methods Bovine meniscal fibrochondrocytes (bMFCs) from the inner and outer regions of meniscus were cultured for seven days with and without human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a micropatterned three-dimensional hydrogel system for cell migration. Angiogenic factors secreted by HUVECs were probed for their role in paracrine mechanisms governing bMFC migration, and applied to a full-thickness defect model of meniscal repair in explants from the inner and outer regions over four weeks. Results Endothelial cells enhanced migration of inner and outer bMFCs in the micropatterned system via endothelin-1 (ET-1) signaling. Supplementation of ET-1 significantly enhanced integration strength of full-thickness defects in inner and outer explants, and cell migration at the macro-scale, compared to controls without ET-1 treatment. Conclusion We report for the first time that bMFCs from both the avascular and vascular regions respond to the presence of endothelial cells with increased migration. Paracrine signaling by endothelial cells regulates the bMFCs differentially by region, but we identify ET-1 as an angiogenic factor that stimulates migration of inner and outer cells at the micro-scale, and integrative repair of inner and outer explants at the macro-scale. These findings reveal the regional interactions between vasculature and MFCs, and suggest ET-1 as a potential new treatment modality for avascular meniscal injuries, in order to prevent the development of osteoarthritis. PMID:25307081

  2. Molecular mechanisms underlying progesterone-enhanced breast cancer cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui-Chen; Lee, Wen-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Progesterone (P4) was demonstrated to inhibit migration in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), but to enhance migration in T47D breast cancer cells. To investigate the mechanism responsible for this switch in P4 action, we examined the signaling pathway responsible for the P4-induced migration enhancement in breast cancer cell lines, T47D and MCF-7. Here, we demonstrated that P4 activated the cSrc/AKT signaling pathway, subsequently inducing RSK1 activation, which in turn increased phosphorylation of p27 at T198 and formation of the p27pT198-RhoA complex in the cytosol, thereby preventing RhoA degradation, and eventually enhanced migration in T47D cells. These findings were confirmed in the P4-treated MCF-7. Comparing the P4-induced molecular events in between breast cancer cells and VSMCs, we found that P4 increased p27 phosphorylation at T198 in breast cancer cells through RSK1 activation, while P4 increased p27 phosphorlation at Ser10 in VSMCs through KIS activation. P27pT198 formed the complex with RhoA and prevented RhoA degradation in T47D cells, whereas p-p27Ser10 formed the complex with RhoA and caused RhoA degradation in VSMCs. The results of this study highlight the molecular mechanism underlying P4-enhanced breast cancer cell migration, and suggest that RSK1 activation is responsible for the P4-induced migration enhancement in breast cancer cells. PMID:27510838

  3. Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Trepat, Xavier; Chen, Zaozao; Jacobson, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to establishing and maintaining the proper organization of multicellular organisms. Morphogenesis can be viewed as a consequence, in part, of cell locomotion, from large-scale migrations of epithelial sheets during gastrulation, to the movement of individual cells during development of the nervous system. In an adult organism, cell migration is essential for proper immune response, wound repair, and tissue homeostasis, while aberrant cell migration is found in various pathologies. Indeed, as our knowledge of migration increases, we can look forward to, for example, abating the spread of highly malignant cancer cells, retarding the invasion of white cells in the inflammatory process, or enhancing the healing of wounds. This article is organized in two main sections. The first section is devoted to the single-cell migrating in isolation such as occurs when leukocytes migrate during the immune response or when fibroblasts squeeze through connective tissue. The second section is devoted to cells collectively migrating as part of multicellular clusters or sheets. This second type of migration is prevalent in development, wound healing, and in some forms of cancer metastasis. PMID:23720251

  4. Senescent dermal fibroblasts enhance stem cell migration through CCL2/CCR2 axis.

    PubMed

    Ohgo, Shiro; Hasegawa, Seiji; Hasebe, Yuichi; Mizutani, Hiroshi; Nakata, Satoru; Akamatsu, Hirohiko

    2015-07-01

    During aging, increases in the number of senescent cells are seen in various tissues. On the other hand, stem cells play crucial roles in tissue repair and homeostasis. Therefore, it is likely that stem cells give rise to new cells that replace senescent cells. However, how stem cells contribute to homeostasis in the dermis has not been elucidated. Here, we investigated the effects of factors secreted from senescent fibroblasts on stem cells. We found that senescent human dermal fibroblast (HDF) conditioned medium (CM) significantly enhanced stem cell migration compared with young HDF CM. The senescent HDF CM strongly secreted chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2). Furthermore, CCL2 was found to enhance stem cell migration, and the inhibition of CCR2, a receptor for CCL2, reduced stem cell migration. These results suggest that senescent fibroblasts recruit stem cells by secreting various factors and that the CCL2/CCR2 axis is one of the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon.

  5. Aquaporins and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, M C; Saadoun, S; Verkman, A S

    2008-07-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) water channels are expressed primarily in cell plasma membranes. In this paper, we review recent evidence that AQPs facilitate cell migration. AQP-dependent cell migration has been found in a variety of cell types in vitro and in mice in vivo. AQP1 deletion reduces endothelial cell migration, limiting tumor angiogenesis and growth. AQP4 deletion slows the migration of reactive astrocytes, impairing glial scarring after brain stab injury. AQP1-expressing tumor cells have enhanced metastatic potential and local infiltration. Impaired cell migration has also been seen in AQP1-deficient proximal tubule epithelial cells, and AQP3-deficient corneal epithelial cells, enterocytes, and skin keratinocytes. The mechanisms by which AQPs enhance cell migration are under investigation. We propose that, as a consequence of actin polymerization/depolymerization and transmembrane ionic fluxes, the cytoplasm adjacent to the leading edge of migrating cells undergoes rapid changes in osmolality. AQPs could thus facilitate osmotic water flow across the plasma membrane in cell protrusions that form during migration. AQP-dependent cell migration has potentially broad implications in angiogenesis, tumor metastasis, wound healing, glial scarring, and other events requiring rapid, directed cell movement. AQP inhibitors may thus have therapeutic potential in modulating these events, such as slowing tumor growth and spread, and reducing glial scarring after injury to allow neuronal regeneration. PMID:17968585

  6. Cathepsin L knockdown enhances curcumin-mediated inhibition of growth, migration, and invasion of glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Fei, Yao; Xiong, Yajie; Zhao, Yifan; Wang, Wenjuan; Han, Meilin; Wang, Long; Tan, Caihong; Liang, Zhongqin

    2016-09-01

    Curcumin can be used to prevent and treat cancer. However, its exact underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Cathepsin L, a lysosomal cysteine protease, is overexpressed in several cancer types. This study aimed to determine the role of cathepsin L in curcumin-mediated inhibition of growth, migration, and invasion of glioma cells. Results revealed that the activity of cathepsin L was enhanced in curcumin-treated glioma cells. Cathepsin L knockdown induced by RNA interference significantly promoted curcumin-induced cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest. The knockdown also inhibited the migration and invasion of glioma cells. Our results suggested that the inhibition of cathepsin L can enhance the sensitivity of glioma cells to curcumin. Therefore, cathepsin L may be a new target to enhance the efficacy of curcumin against cancers. PMID:27373979

  7. Advanced Glycation End-Products Enhance Lung Cancer Cell Invasion and Migration.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Te-Chun; Yin, Mei-Chin; Mong, Mei-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Effects of carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pentosidine, two advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), upon invasion and migration in A549 and Calu-6 cells, two non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines were examined. CML or pentosidine at 1, 2, 4, 8 or 16 μmol/L were added into cells. Proliferation, invasion and migration were measured. CML or pentosidine at 4-16 μmol/L promoted invasion and migration in both cell lines, and increased the production of reactive oxygen species, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and transforming growth factor-β1. CML or pentosidine at 2-16 μmol/L up-regulated the protein expression of AGE receptor, p47(phox), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and fibronectin in test NSCLC cells. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 protein expression in A549 and Calu-6 cells was increased by CML or pentosidine at 4-16 μmol/L. These two AGEs at 2-16 μmol/L enhanced nuclear factor κ-B (NF-κ B) p65 protein expression and p38 phosphorylation in A549 cells. However, CML or pentosidine at 4-16 μmol/L up-regulated NF-κB p65 and p-p38 protein expression in Calu-6 cells. These findings suggest that CML and pentosidine, by promoting the invasion, migration and production of associated factors, benefit NSCLC metastasis. PMID:27517907

  8. Advanced Glycation End-Products Enhance Lung Cancer Cell Invasion and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Hsia, Te-Chun; Yin, Mei-Chin; Mong, Mei-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Effects of carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pentosidine, two advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), upon invasion and migration in A549 and Calu-6 cells, two non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines were examined. CML or pentosidine at 1, 2, 4, 8 or 16 μmol/L were added into cells. Proliferation, invasion and migration were measured. CML or pentosidine at 4–16 μmol/L promoted invasion and migration in both cell lines, and increased the production of reactive oxygen species, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and transforming growth factor-β1. CML or pentosidine at 2–16 μmol/L up-regulated the protein expression of AGE receptor, p47phox, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and fibronectin in test NSCLC cells. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 protein expression in A549 and Calu-6 cells was increased by CML or pentosidine at 4–16 μmol/L. These two AGEs at 2–16 μmol/L enhanced nuclear factor κ-B (NF-κ B) p65 protein expression and p38 phosphorylation in A549 cells. However, CML or pentosidine at 4–16 μmol/L up-regulated NF-κB p65 and p-p38 protein expression in Calu-6 cells. These findings suggest that CML and pentosidine, by promoting the invasion, migration and production of associated factors, benefit NSCLC metastasis. PMID:27517907

  9. Simultaneous loss of the DLC1 and PTEN tumor suppressors enhances breast cancer cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Heering, Johanna; Erlmann, Patrik; Olayioye, Monilola A.

    2009-09-10

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene is a tumor suppressor frequently deleted or mutated in sporadic tumors of the breast, prostate, endometrium and brain. The protein acts as a dual specificity phosphatase for lipids and proteins. PTEN loss confers a growth advantage to cells, protects from apoptosis and favors cell migration. The deleted in liver cancer 1 (DLC1) gene has emerged as a novel tumor suppressor downregulated in a variety of tumor types including those of the breast. DLC1 contains a Rho GTPase activating domain that is involved in the inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion. To investigate how simultaneous loss of PTEN and DLC1 contributes to cell transformation, we downregulated both proteins by RNA interference in the non-invasive MCF7 breast carcinoma cell line. Joint depletion of PTEN and DLC1 resulted in enhanced cell migration in wounding and chemotactic transwell assays. Interestingly, both proteins were found to colocalize at the plasma membrane and interacted physically in biochemical pulldowns and coimmunoprecipitations. We therefore postulate that the concerted local inactivation of signaling pathways downstream of PTEN and DLC1, respectively, is required for the tight control of cell migration.

  10. 10-Shogaol, an Antioxidant from Zingiber officinale for Skin Cell Proliferation and Migration Enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chung-Yi; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Chang, Andy Y; Lin, Ying-Ting; Hseu, You-Cheng; Wang, Hui-Min

    2012-01-01

    In this work, one of Zingiber officinale components, 10-shogaol, was tested with 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging, metal chelating ability, and reducing power to show antioxidant activity. 10-Shogaol promoted human normal epidermal keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts cell growths. 10-Shogaol enhanced growth factor production in transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), platelet derived growth factor-αβ (PDGF-αβ) and vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) of both cells. In the in vitro wound healing assay for 12 or 24 h, with 10-shogaol, the fibroblasts and keratinocytes migrated more rapidly than the vehicle control group. Thus, this study substantiates the target compound, 10-shogaol, as an antioxidant for human skin cell growth and a migration enhancer with potential to be a novel wound repair agent. PMID:22408422

  11. 10-Shogaol, an antioxidant from Zingiber officinale for skin cell proliferation and migration enhancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chung-Yi; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Chang, Andy Y; Lin, Ying-Ting; Hseu, You-Cheng; Wang, Hui-Min

    2012-01-01

    In this work, one of Zingiber officinale components, 10-shogaol, was tested with 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging, metal chelating ability, and reducing power to show antioxidant activity. 10-Shogaol promoted human normal epidermal keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts cell growths. 10-Shogaol enhanced growth factor production in transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), platelet derived growth factor-αβ (PDGF-αβ) and vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) of both cells. In the in vitro wound healing assay for 12 or 24 h, with 10-shogaol, the fibroblasts and keratinocytes migrated more rapidly than the vehicle control group. Thus, this study substantiates the target compound, 10-shogaol, as an antioxidant for human skin cell growth and a migration enhancer with potential to be a novel wound repair agent.

  12. Hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor enhances angiogenesis by promoting proliferation and migration of endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Qiangsong; Zheng Liduan; Li Bo; Wang Danming; Huang Chuanshu; Matuschak, George M.; Li Dechun . E-mail: dli2@slu.edu

    2006-11-01

    Our previous studies have indicated that hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor (HIMF) has angiogenic properties in an in vivo matrigel plug model and HIMF upregulates expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in mouse lungs and cultured lung epithelial cells. However, whether HIMF exerts angiogenic effects through modulating endothelial cell function remains unknown. In this study, mouse aortic rings cultured with recombinant HIMF protein resulted in enhanced vascular sprouting and increased endothelial cell spreading as confirmed by Dil-Ac-LDL uptake, von Willebrand factor and CD31 staining. In cultured mouse endothelial cell line SVEC 4-10, HIMF dose-dependently enhanced cell proliferation, in vitro migration and tubulogenesis, which was not attenuated by SU1498, a VEGFR2/Flk-1 receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Moreover, HIMF stimulation resulted in phosphorylation of Akt, p38 and ERK1/2 kinases in SVEC 4-10 cells. Treatment of mouse aortic rings and SVEC 4-10 cells with LY294002, but not SB203580, PD098059 or U0126, abolished HIMF-induced vascular sprouting and angiogenic responses. In addition, transfection of a dominant-negative mutant of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3K), {delta}p85, blocked HIMF-induced phosphorylation of Akt, endothelial activation and tubulogenesis. These results indicate that HIMF enhances angiogenesis by promoting proliferation and migration of endothelial cells via activation of the PI-3K/Akt pathways.

  13. Asiaticoside enhances normal human skin cell migration, attachment and growth in vitro wound healing model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Hyun; Kim, Hye-Lee; Lee, Mi Hee; You, Kyung Eun; Kwon, Byeong-Ju; Seo, Hyok Jin; Park, Jong-Chul

    2012-10-15

    Wound healing proceeds through a complex collaborative process involving many types of cells. Keratinocytes and fibroblasts of epidermal and dermal layers of the skin play prominent roles in this process. Asiaticoside, an active component of Centella asiatica, is known for beneficial effects on keloid and hypertrophic scar. However, the effects of this compound on normal human skin cells are not well known. Using in vitro systems, we observed the effects of asiaticoside on normal human skin cell behaviors related to healing. In a wound closure seeding model, asiaticoside increased migration rates of skin cells. By observing the numbers of cells attached and the area occupied by the cells, we concluded that asiaticoside also enhanced the initial skin cell adhesion. In cell proliferation assays, asiaticoside induced an increase in the number of normal human dermal fibroblasts. In conclusion, asiaticoside promotes skin cell behaviors involved in wound healing; and as a bioactive component of an artificial skin, may have therapeutic value.

  14. Endothelial Progenitor Cell Migration-Enhancing Factors in the Secretome of Placental-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kamprom, Witchayaporn; Kheolamai, Pakpoom; U-Pratya, Yaowalak; Supokawej, Aungkura; Wattanapanitch, Methichit; Laowtammathron, Chuti; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Issaragrisil, Surapol

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic potentials of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) depend largely on their ability to secrete cytokines or factors that modulate immune response, enhance cell survival, and induce neovascularization in the target tissues. We studied the secretome profile of gestational tissue-derived MSCs and their effects on functions of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), another angiogenic cell type that plays an important role during the neovascularization. MSCs derived from placental tissues (PL-MSCs) significantly enhanced EPC migration while BM-MSCs, which are the standard source of MSCs for various clinical applications, did not. By using protein fractionation and mass spectrometry analysis, we identified several novel candidates for EPC migration enhancing factor in PL-MSCs secretome that could be used to enhance neovascularization in the injured/ischemic tissues. We recommend that the strategy developed in our study could be used to systematically identify therapeutically useful molecules in the secretomes of other MSC sources for the clinical applications. PMID:26880942

  15. Cancer/testis antigen NY-SAR-35 enhances cell proliferation, migration, and invasion.

    PubMed

    Song, Myung-Ha; Kim, Ye-Rin; Lee, Jun-Won; Lee, Chang-Hun; Lee, Sang-Yull

    2016-02-01

    The cancer/testis antigen NY-SAR-35 is aberrantly expressed in various cancer tissues and cancer cell lines but not in normal tissues except for the testis. A previous study demonstrated that the expression of NY-SAR-35 is activated by hypomethylation in cancer cells. However, the functions of this antigen remain unexplored. In the present study, we investigated the role of NY-SAR‑35 in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells using exogenous expression system of the gene. NY-SAR‑35 was predominantly expressed at the cytoplasm and was mainly observed in spermatogonia and spermatocytes. Expression of NY-SAR-35 in stable HEK293 transfectant clones was 2-fold higher than the control cells promoting cell growth and proliferation. NY-SAR-35 overexpression also enhanced cell migration and invasion ~2-fold and 4-fold more than the control, respectively. In contrast, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of NY-SAR-35 suppressed cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in HEK293 stable transfectants. We concluded that NY-SAR-35 as a cancer/testis antigen enhanced cell proliferation and invasion.

  16. Loss of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-3 enhances cell migration in rat lung tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Mai; Okabe, Kyoko; Yamawaki, Yasuna; Teranishi, Miki; Honoki, Kanya; Mori, Toshio; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Loss of the Lpar3 expression due to aberrant DNA methylation occurred in rat lung tumor cells. {yields} The Lpar3 inhibited cell migration of rat lung tumor cells. {yields} The Lpar3 may act as a negative regulator of rat lung tumor cells. -- Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) indicates several biological effects, such as cell proliferation, differentiation and migration. LPA interacts with G protein-coupled transmembrane LPA receptors. In our previous report, we detected that loss of the LPA receptor-1 (Lpar1) expression is due to its aberrant DNA methylation in rat tumor cell lines. In this study, to assess an involvement of the other LPA receptor, Lpar3, in the pathogenesis of rat lung tumor cells, we measured the expression levels of the Lpar3 gene and its DNA methylation status by reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and bisulfite sequencing analyses, respectively. RLCNR lung adenocarcinoma cells showed reduced expression of the Lpar3, compared with normal lung tissues. In the 5' upstream region of the Lpar3, normal lung tissues were unmethylated. By contrast, RLCNR cells were highly methylated, correlating with reduced expressions of the Lpar3. Based on these results, we generated the Lpar3-expressing RLCNR-a3 cells and measured the cell migration ability. Interestingly, the cell migration of RLCNR-a3 cells was significantly lower than that of RLCNR cells. This study suggests that loss of the Lpar3 due to aberrant DNA methylation may be involved in the progression of rat lung tumor cells.

  17. Enhanced Migration of Neural Stem Cells by Microglia Grown on a Three-Dimensional Graphene Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ziyun; Song, Qin; Tang, Mingliang; Yang, Lingyan; Cheng, Yilin; Zhang, Min; Xu, Dongsheng; Cheng, Guosheng

    2016-09-28

    One of the key challenges in engineering neural tissues for cell-based therapies is to develop a biocompatible scaffold material to direct neural stem cell (NSC) behaviors. One great advantage for a scaffold would be to induce NSC migration toward pathological sites during regeneration and repair. In particular, the inflammatory responses in the pathological zone, which are mainly mediated by microglia in the central nervous system, affect the repair capacity of NSCs through NSC migration. Recently, graphene was used as a neural interface and scaffold material, but few studies have addressed the relationship between microglia and NSCs in a graphene culture system. In this study, we used a combination of immunofluorescence, Western blotting, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and scanning electron microscopy to investigate how conditioned medium (CM) produced from microglia grown on two-dimensional graphene (2D-G) films or three-dimensional graphene (3D-G) foams govern NSC migration. The results revealed that the CM produced by microglia grown in 3D-G cultures could promote neurosphere formation, facilitate NSC migration from the neurospheres, and increase single cell polarization by activating the stromal cell-derived factor 1 α (SDF-1α)/CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) signaling pathway and enhancing cell adhesion on the substrate. By contrast, the 2D-G CM failed to achieve these results. Our study suggests the great potential of 3D-G as a neural scaffold for NSC-based therapy in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:27589088

  18. PLEKHG3 enhances polarized cell migration by activating actin filaments at the cell front.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trang Thi Thu; Park, Wei Sun; Park, Byung Ouk; Kim, Cha Yeon; Oh, Yohan; Kim, Jin Man; Choi, Hana; Kyung, Taeyoon; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Lee, Gabsang; Hahn, Klaus M; Meyer, Tobias; Heo, Won Do

    2016-09-01

    Cells migrate by directing Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) and cell division control protein 42 (Cdc42) activities and by polymerizing actin toward the leading edge of the cell. Previous studies have proposed that this polarization process requires a local positive feedback in the leading edge involving Rac small GTPase and actin polymerization with PI3K likely playing a coordinating role. Here, we show that the pleckstrin homology and RhoGEF domain containing G3 (PLEKHG3) is a PI3K-regulated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (RhoGEF) for Rac1 and Cdc42 that selectively binds to newly polymerized actin at the leading edge of migrating fibroblasts. Optogenetic inactivation of PLEKHG3 showed that PLEKHG3 is indispensable both for inducing and for maintaining cell polarity. By selectively binding to newly polymerized actin, PLEKHG3 promotes local Rac1/Cdc42 activation to induce more local actin polymerization, which in turn promotes the recruitment of more PLEKHG3 to induce and maintain cell front. Thus, autocatalytic reinforcement of PLEKHG3 localization to the leading edge of the cell provides a molecular basis for the proposed positive feedback loop that is required for cell polarization and directed migration. PMID:27555588

  19. PLEKHG3 enhances polarized cell migration by activating actin filaments at the cell front

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trang Thi Thu; Park, Wei Sun; Park, Byung Ouk; Kim, Cha Yeon; Oh, Yohan; Kim, Jin Man; Choi, Hana; Kyung, Taeyoon; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Lee, Gabsang; Hahn, Klaus M.; Meyer, Tobias; Heo, Won Do

    2016-01-01

    Cells migrate by directing Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) and cell division control protein 42 (Cdc42) activities and by polymerizing actin toward the leading edge of the cell. Previous studies have proposed that this polarization process requires a local positive feedback in the leading edge involving Rac small GTPase and actin polymerization with PI3K likely playing a coordinating role. Here, we show that the pleckstrin homology and RhoGEF domain containing G3 (PLEKHG3) is a PI3K-regulated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (RhoGEF) for Rac1 and Cdc42 that selectively binds to newly polymerized actin at the leading edge of migrating fibroblasts. Optogenetic inactivation of PLEKHG3 showed that PLEKHG3 is indispensable both for inducing and for maintaining cell polarity. By selectively binding to newly polymerized actin, PLEKHG3 promotes local Rac1/Cdc42 activation to induce more local actin polymerization, which in turn promotes the recruitment of more PLEKHG3 to induce and maintain cell front. Thus, autocatalytic reinforcement of PLEKHG3 localization to the leading edge of the cell provides a molecular basis for the proposed positive feedback loop that is required for cell polarization and directed migration. PMID:27555588

  20. Enhancement of endothelial cell migration by constitutively active LPA{sub 1}-expressing tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kitayoshi, Misaho; Kato, Kohei; Tanabe, Eriko; Yoshikawa, Kyohei; Fukui, Rie; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutated LPA{sub 1} stimulates cell migration of endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF expressions are increased by mutated LPA{sub 1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LPA signaling via mutated LPA{sub 1} is involved in angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutated LPA{sub 1} promotes cancer cell progression. -- Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors belong to G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors (LPA receptors; LPA{sub 1} to LPA{sub 6}). They indicate a variety of cellular response by the interaction with LPA, including cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Recently, we have reported that constitutive active mutated LPA{sub 1} induced the strong biological effects of rat neuroblastoma B103 cells. In the present study, we examined the effects of mutated LPA{sub 1} on the interaction between B103 cells and endothelial F-2 cells. Each LPA receptor expressing B103 cells were maintained in serum-free DMEM and cell motility assay was performed with a Cell Culture Insert. When F-2 cells were cultured with conditioned medium from Lpar1 and Lpar3-expressing cells, the cell motility of F-2 cells was significantly higher than control cells. Interestingly, the motile activity of F-2 cells was strongly induced by mutated LPA{sub 1} than other cells, correlating with the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf)-A and Vegf-C. Pretreatment of LPA signaling inhibitors inhibited F-2 cell motility stimulated by mutated LPA{sub 1}. These results suggest that activation of LPA signaling via mutated LPA{sub 1} may play an important role in the promotion of angiogenesis in rat neuroblastoma cells.

  1. Wip1 knockout inhibits the proliferation and enhances the migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yiting; Liu, Lan; Sheng, Ming; Xiong, Kai; Huang, Lei; Gao, Qian; Wei, Jingliang; Wu, Tianwen; Yang, Shulin; Liu, Honglin; Mu, Yulian; Li, Kui

    2015-06-10

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), a unique population of multipotent adult progenitor cells originally found in bone marrow (BM), are extremely useful for multifunctional therapeutic approaches. However, the growth arrest and premature senescence of MSCs in vitro prevent the in-depth characterization of these cells. In addition, the regulatory factors involved in MSCs migration remain largely unknown. Given that protein phosphorylation is associated with the processes of MSCs proliferation and migration, we focused on wild-type p53-inducible phosphatase-1 (Wip1), a well-studied modulator of phosphorylation, in this study. Our results showed that Wip1 knockout significantly inhibited MSCs proliferation and induced G2-phase cell-cycle arrest by reducing cyclinB1 expression. Compared with WT-MSCs, Wip1{sup −/−} MSCs displayed premature growth arrest after six passages in culture. Transwell and scratch assays revealed that Wip1{sup −/−} MSCs migrate more effectively than WT-MSCs. Moreover, the enhanced migratory response of Wip1{sup −/−} MSCs may be attributed to increases in the induction of Rac1-GTP activity, the pAKT/AKT ratio, the rearrangement of filamentous-actin (f-actin), and filopodia formation. Based on these results, we then examined the effect of treatment with a PI3K/AKT and Rac1 inhibitor, both of which impaired the migratory activity of MSCs. Therefore, we propose that the PI3K/AKT/Rac1 signaling axis mediates the Wip1 knockout-induced migration of MSCs. Our findings indicate that the principal function of Wip1 in MSCs transformation is the maintenance of proliferative capacity. Nevertheless, knocking out Wip1 increases the migratory capacity of MSCs. This dual effect of Wip1 provides the potential for purposeful routing of MSCs. - Highlights: • Wip1 knockout inhibited MSCs proliferation through reducing cyclinB1 expression. • Wip1{sup −/−} MSCs displayed premature growth arrest in vitro after six passages. • Knocking out Wip1

  2. XPC inhibits NSCLC cell proliferation and migration by enhancing E-Cadherin expression

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Tiantian; Srivastava, Amit Kumar; Han, Chunhua; Yang, Linlin; Zhao, Ran; Zou, Ning; Qu, Meihua; Duan, Wenrui; Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Qi-En

    2015-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) protein is an important DNA damage recognition factor in nucleotide excision repair. Deletion of XPC is associated with early stages of human lung carcinogenesis, and reduced XPC mRNA levels predict poor patient outcome for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the mechanisms linking loss of XPC expression and poor prognosis in lung cancer are still unclear. Here, we report evidence that XPC silencing drives proliferation and migration of NSCLC cells by down-regulating E-Cadherin. XPC knockdown enhanced proliferation and migration while decreasing E-Cadherin expression in NSCLC cells with an epithelial phenotype. Restoration of E-Cadherin in these cells suppressed XPC knockdown-induced cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies showed that the loss of XPC repressed E-Cadherin expression by activating the ERK pathway and upregulating Snail expression. Our findings indicate that XPC silencing-induced reduction of E-Cadherin expression contributes, at least in part, to the poor outcome of NSCLC patients with low XPC expression. PMID:25871391

  3. Multiple scale model for cell migration in monolayers: Elastic mismatch between cells enhances motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, Benoit; Bresler, Yony; Wirtz, Denis; Grant, Martin

    2015-07-01

    We propose a multiscale model for monolayer of motile cells that comprise normal and cancer cells. In the model, the two types of cells have identical properties except for their elasticity; cancer cells are softer and normal cells are stiffer. The goal is to isolate the role of elasticity mismatch on the migration potential of cancer cells in the absence of other contributions that are present in real cells. The methodology is based on a phase-field description where each cell is modeled as a highly-deformable self-propelled droplet. We simulated two types of nearly confluent monolayers. One contains a single cancer cell in a layer of normal cells and the other contains normal cells only. The simulation results demonstrate that elasticity mismatch alone is sufficient to increase the motility of the cancer cell significantly. Further, the trajectory of the cancer cell is decorated by several speed “bursts” where the cancer cell quickly relaxes from a largely deformed shape and consequently increases its translational motion. The increased motility and the amplitude and frequency of the bursts are in qualitative agreement with recent experiments.

  4. Promotion of cell migration by neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is enhanced by PSA in a polysialyltransferase-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Guan, Feng; Wang, Xin; He, Fa

    2015-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecule 140 (NCAM-140) is a glycoprotein and always highly polysialylated in cancer. Functions of polysialic acid (PSA) that binds to N-glycan termini on NCAM remain unclear. ldlD-14 cells, a CHO cell mutant deficient in UDP-Gal 4-epimerase, are useful for structural and functional studies of Gal-containing glycoproteins because their abnormal glycosylation can be converted to normal status by exogenous addition of galactose (Gal). We cloned the genes for NCAM-140 and for polysialyltransferases STX and PST (responsible for PSA synthesis) from normal murine mammary gland epithelial (NMuMG) cells and transfected them into ldlD-14 and human breast cancer cells MCF-7. The effect of PSA on NCAM-mediated cell proliferation, motility, migration and adhesion was studied. We found that NCAM-140 significantly promoted cell proliferation, motility and migration, while polysialylation of NCAM-140 catalyzed by STX, but not by PST, enhanced NCAM-mediated cell migration, but not cell proliferation or motility. In addition, PSA catalyzed by different polysialyltransferases affected the adhesion of NCAM to different extracellular matrix (ECM) components. PMID:25885924

  5. Immature human dendritic cells enhance their migration through KCa3.1 channel activation.

    PubMed

    Crottès, David; Félix, Romain; Meley, Daniel; Chadet, Stéphanie; Herr, Florence; Audiger, Cindy; Soriani, Olivier; Vandier, Christophe; Roger, Sébastien; Angoulvant, Denis; Velge-Roussel, Florence

    2016-04-01

    Migration capacity is essential for dendritic cells (DCs) to present antigen to T cells for the induction of immune response. The DC migration is supposed to be a calcium-dependent process, while not fully understood. Here, we report a role of the KCa3.1/IK1/SK4 channels in the migration capacity of both immature (iDC) and mature (mDC) human CD14(+)-derived DCs. KCa3.1 channels were shown to control the membrane potential of human DC and the Ca(2+) entry, which is directly related to migration capacities. The expression of migration marker such as CCR5 and CCR7 was modified in both types of DCs by TRAM-34 (100nM). But, only the migration of iDC was decreased by use of both TRAM-34 and KCa3.1 siRNA. Confocal analyses showed a close localization of CCR5 with KCa3.1 in the steady state of iDC. Finally, the implication of KCa3.1 seems to be limited to the migration capacities as T cell activation of DCs appeared unchanged. Altogether, these results demonstrated that KCa3.1 channels have a pro-migratory effect on iDC migration. Our findings suggest that KCa3.1 in human iDC play a major role in their migration and constitute an attractive target for the cell therapy optimization.

  6. Rab5 is required in metastatic cancer cells for Caveolin-1-enhanced Rac1 activation, migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Jorge; Mendoza, Pablo; Ortiz, Rina; Díaz, Natalia; Leyton, Lisette; Stupack, Dwayne; Quest, Andrew F G; Torres, Vicente A

    2014-06-01

    Rab5 is a small GTPase that regulates early endosome trafficking and other cellular processes, including cell adhesion and migration. Specifically, Rab5 promotes Rac1 activation and cancer cell migration, but little is known about the upstream regulators of Rab5. We have previously shown that the scaffolding protein Caveolin-1 (CAV1) promotes Rac1 activation and migration of cancer cells. Here, we hypothesized that CAV1 stimulates Rab5 activation, leading to increased Rac1 activity and cell migration. Expression of CAV1 in B16-F10 mouse melanoma and HT-29(US) human colon adenocarcinoma cells increased the GTP loading of Rab5, whereas shRNA-mediated targeting of endogenous CAV1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells decreased Rab5-GTP levels. Accordingly, shRNA-mediated downregulation of Rab5 decreased CAV1-mediated Rac1 activation, cell migration and invasion in B16-F10 and HT-29(US) cells. Expression of CAV1 was accompanied by increased recruitment of Tiam1, a Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), to Rab5-positive early endosomes. Using the inhibitor NSC23766, Tiam1 was shown to be required for Rac1 activation and cell migration induced by CAV1 and Rab5. Mechanistically, we provide evidence implicating p85α (also known as PIK3R1), a Rab5 GTPase-activating protein (GAP), in CAV1-dependent effects, by showing that CAV1 recruits p85α, precluding p85α-mediated Rab5 inactivation and increasing cell migration. In summary, these studies identify a novel CAV1-Rab5-Rac1 signaling axis, whereby CAV1 prevents Rab5 inactivation, leading to increased Rac1 activity and enhanced tumor cell migration and invasion.

  7. Estradiol induces endothelial cell migration and proliferation through estrogen receptor-enhanced RhoA/ROCK pathway.

    PubMed

    Oviedo, Pilar J; Sobrino, Agua; Laguna-Fernandez, Andrés; Novella, Susana; Tarín, Juan J; García-Pérez, Miguel-Angel; Sanchís, Juan; Cano, Antonio; Hermenegildo, Carlos

    2011-03-30

    Migration and proliferation of endothelial cells are involved in re-endothelialization and angiogenesis, two important cardiovascular processes that are increased in response to estrogens. RhoA, a small GTPase which controls multiple cellular processes, is involved in the control of cell migration and proliferation. Our aim was to study the role of RhoA on estradiol-induced migration and proliferation and its dependence on estrogen receptors activity. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were stimulated with estradiol, in the presence or absence of ICI 182780 (estrogen receptors antagonist) and Y-27632 (Rho kinase inhibitor). Estradiol increased Rho GEF-1 gene expression and RhoA (gene and protein expression and activity) in an estrogen receptor-dependent manner. Cell migration, stress fiber formation and cell proliferation were increased in response to estradiol and were also dependent on the estrogen receptors and RhoA activation. Estradiol decreased p27 levels, and significantly raised the expression of cyclins and CDK. These effects were counteracted by the use of either ICI 182780 or Y-27632. In conclusion, estradiol enhances the RhoA/ROCK pathway and increases cell cycle-related protein expression by acting through estrogen receptors. This results in an enhanced migration and proliferation of endothelial cells.

  8. Galectin-3 Enhances Migration of Minature Pig Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Through Inhibition of RhoA-GTP Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qian; Xia, Ying; Liu, Lan; Huang, Lei; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Xue; Xu, Kui; Wei, Jingliang; Hu, Yanqing; Mu, Yulian; Li, Kui

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are used in tissue engineering because of their migration characters. However, BM-MSCs have limitations in terms of reaching injuries and self-renewal. Therefore, enhancement of BM-MSC migration is important for therapeutic applications. Here, we assessed whether galectin-3 (Gal-3) increases the migration of minature pig BM-MSCs. Gal-3 was knocked down by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) or overexpressed using a lentiviral vector in Wuzhishan minature pig BM-MSCs. Proliferation and migration assays showed that knockdown of Gal-3 impaired BM-MSC proliferation and migration, whereas Gal-3 overexpression promoted these behaviors. RhoA-GTP activity was upregulated in Gal-3 shRNA-transfected BM-MSCs, while Rac-1- and Cdc42-GTP showed no changes. Western blotting indicated downregulation of p-AKT (ser473) and p-Erk1/2 after serum starvation for 12 h in Gal-3-knockdown BM-MSCs. p-AKT (ser473) expression was upregulated after serum starvation for 6 h, and p-Erk1/2 expression was unchanged in Gal-3-overexpressing BM-MSCs. Treatment with C3 transferase or Y27632 enhanced migration, whereas Gal-3 knockdown impaired migration in treated cells. These results demonstrate that Gal-3 may enhance BM-MSC migration, mainly through inhibiting RhoA-GTP activity, increasing p-AKT (ser473) expression, and regulating p-Erk1/2 levels. Our study suggests a novel function of Gal-3 in regulating minature pig BM-MSC migration, which may be beneficial for therapeutic applications. PMID:27215170

  9. Galectin-3 Enhances Migration of Minature Pig Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Through Inhibition of RhoA-GTP Activity.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qian; Xia, Ying; Liu, Lan; Huang, Lei; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Xue; Xu, Kui; Wei, Jingliang; Hu, Yanqing; Mu, Yulian; Li, Kui

    2016-05-24

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are used in tissue engineering because of their migration characters. However, BM-MSCs have limitations in terms of reaching injuries and self-renewal. Therefore, enhancement of BM-MSC migration is important for therapeutic applications. Here, we assessed whether galectin-3 (Gal-3) increases the migration of minature pig BM-MSCs. Gal-3 was knocked down by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) or overexpressed using a lentiviral vector in Wuzhishan minature pig BM-MSCs. Proliferation and migration assays showed that knockdown of Gal-3 impaired BM-MSC proliferation and migration, whereas Gal-3 overexpression promoted these behaviors. RhoA-GTP activity was upregulated in Gal-3 shRNA-transfected BM-MSCs, while Rac-1- and Cdc42-GTP showed no changes. Western blotting indicated downregulation of p-AKT (ser473) and p-Erk1/2 after serum starvation for 12 h in Gal-3-knockdown BM-MSCs. p-AKT (ser473) expression was upregulated after serum starvation for 6 h, and p-Erk1/2 expression was unchanged in Gal-3-overexpressing BM-MSCs. Treatment with C3 transferase or Y27632 enhanced migration, whereas Gal-3 knockdown impaired migration in treated cells. These results demonstrate that Gal-3 may enhance BM-MSC migration, mainly through inhibiting RhoA-GTP activity, increasing p-AKT (ser473) expression, and regulating p-Erk1/2 levels. Our study suggests a novel function of Gal-3 in regulating minature pig BM-MSC migration, which may be beneficial for therapeutic applications.

  10. The Hippo pathway member YAP enhances human neural crest cell fate and migration

    PubMed Central

    Hindley, Christopher J.; Condurat, Alexandra Larisa; Menon, Vishal; Thomas, Ria; Azmitia, Luis M.; Davis, Jason A.; Pruszak, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo/YAP pathway serves as a major integrator of cell surface-mediated signals and regulates key processes during development and tumorigenesis. The neural crest is an embryonic tissue known to respond to multiple environmental cues in order to acquire appropriate cell fate and migration properties. Using multiple in vitro models of human neural development (pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells; LUHMES, NTERA2 and SH-SY5Y cell lines), we investigated the role of Hippo/YAP signaling in neural differentiation and neural crest development. We report that the activity of YAP promotes an early neural crest phenotype and migration, and provide the first evidence for an interaction between Hippo/YAP and retinoic acid signaling in this system. PMID:26980066

  11. Selected activities of Citrus maxima Merr. fruits on human endothelial cells: enhancing cell migration and delaying cellular aging.

    PubMed

    Buachan, Paiwan; Chularojmontri, Linda; Wattanapitayakul, Suvara K

    2014-04-21

    Endothelial injury and damage as well as accumulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) in aging play a significant role in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Recent studies show an association of high citrus fruit intake with a lower risk of CVD and stroke but the mechanisms involved are not fully understood. This study investigated the effects of pummelo (Citrus maxima Merr. var. Tubtim Siam, CM) fruit extract on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVECs) migration and aging. The freeze-dried powder of fruit extract was characterized for antioxidant capacity (FRAP assay) and certain natural antioxidants, including ascorbic acid, gallic acid, hesperidin, and naringin (HPLC). Short-term (48 h) co-cultivation of HUVECs with CM enhanced cell migration as evaluated by a scratch wound assay and Boyden chamber assay. A long-term treatment with CM for 35 days significantly increased HUVEC proliferation capability as indicated by population doubling level (PDL). CM also delayed the onset of aging phenotype shown by senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) staining. Furthermore, CM was able to attenuate increased ROS levels in aged cells when determined by 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCDHF) while eNOS mRNA expression was increased but the eNOS protein level was not changed. Thus, further in vivo and clinical studies are warranted to support the use of pummelo as a functional fruit for endothelial health and CVD risk reduction.

  12. Specific Intensity Direct Current (DC) Electric Field Improves Neural Stem Cell Migration and Enhances Differentiation towards βIII-Tubulin+ Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huiping; Steiger, Amanda; Nohner, Mitch; Ye, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Control of stem cell migration and differentiation is vital for efficient stem cell therapy. Literature reporting electric field–guided migration and differentiation is emerging. However, it is unknown if a field that causes cell migration is also capable of guiding cell differentiation—and the mechanisms for these processes remain unclear. Here, we report that a 115 V/m direct current (DC) electric field can induce directional migration of neural precursor cells (NPCs). Whole cell patching revealed that the cell membrane depolarized in the electric field, and buffering of extracellular calcium via EGTA prevented cell migration under these conditions. Immunocytochemical staining indicated that the same electric intensity could also be used to enhance differentiation and increase the percentage of cell differentiation into neurons, but not astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. The results indicate that DC electric field of this specific intensity is capable of promoting cell directional migration and orchestrating functional differentiation, suggestively mediated by calcium influx during DC field exposure. PMID:26068466

  13. Cross talk Initiated by Endothelial Cells Enhances Migration and Inhibits Anoikis of Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells through STAT3/Akt/ERK Signaling12

    PubMed Central

    Neiva, Kathleen G; Zhang, Zhaocheng; Miyazawa, Marta; Warner, Kristy A; Karl, Elisabeta; Nör, Jacques E

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that cancer cells secrete angiogenic factors to recruit and sustain tumor vascular networks. However, little is known about the effect of endothelial cell-secreted factors on the phenotype and behavior of tumor cells. The hypothesis underlying this study is that endothelial cells initiate signaling pathways that enhance tumor cell survival and migration. Here, we observed that soluble mediators from primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells induce phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), Akt, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in a panel of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells (OSCC-3, UM-SCC-1, UM-SCC-17B, UM-SCC-74A). Gene expression analysis demonstrated that interleukin-6 (IL- 6), interleukin-8 (CXCL8), and epidermal growth factor (EGF) are upregulated in endothelial cells cocultured with HNSCC. Blockade of endothelial cell-derived IL-6, CXCL8, or EGF by gene silencing or neutralizing antibodies inhibited phosphorylation of STAT3, Akt, and ERK in tumor cells, respectively. Notably, activation of STAT3, Akt, and ERK by endothelial cells enhanced migration and inhibited anoikis of tumor cells. We have previously demonstrated that Bcl-2 is upregulated in tumor microvessels in patients with HNSCC. Here, we observed that Bcl-2 signaling induces expression of IL-6, CXCL8, and EGF, providing a mechanism for the upregulation of these cytokines in tumor-associated endothelial cells. This study expands the contribution of endothelial cells to the pathobiology of tumor cells. It unveils a new mechanism in which endothelial cells function as initiators of molecular crosstalks that enhance survival and migration of tumor cells. PMID:19484147

  14. MIP-1α enhances Jurkat cell transendothelial migration by up-regulating endothelial adhesion molecules VCAM-1 and ICAM-1.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi-Ran; Ma, Ying-Huan

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α) in Jurkat cells and its effect on transendothelial migration. In the present study, human acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells (Jurkat cells) were used as a model of T cells in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), which demonstrated significantly higher MIP-1α expression compared with that in normal T-cell controls. The ability of Jurkat cells to cross a human brain microvascular endothelial cell (HBMEC) monolayer was almost completely abrogated by MIP-1α siRNA. In addition, the overexpression of MIP-1α resulted in the up-regulated expression of endothelial adhesion molecules, which enhanced the migration of Jurkat cells through a monolayer of HBMEC. MIP-1α levels in Jurkat cells appeared to be an important factor for its transendothelial migration, which may provide the theoretical basis to understand the mechanisms of brain metastases of T-ALL at cellular and molecular levels.

  15. Effector CD8^+ T cells migrate via chemokine-enhanced generalized L'evy walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banigan, Edward; Harris, Tajie; Christian, David; Liu, Andrea; Hunter, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    Chemokines play a central role in regulating processes essential to the immune function of T cells, such as their migration within lymphoid tissues and targeting of pathogens in sites of inflammation. In order to understand the role of the chemokine CXCL10 during chronic infection by the parasite T. gondii, we analyze tracks of migrating CD8^+ T cells in brain tissue. Surprisingly, we find that T cell motility is not described by a Brownian walk, but instead is consistent with a generalized L'evy walk consisting of L'evy-distributed runs alternating with pauses of L'evy-distributed durations. According to our model, this enables T cells to find rare targets more than an order of magnitude more efficiently than Brownian random walkers. The chemokine CXCL10 increases the migration speed without changing the character of the walk statistics. Thus, CD8^+ T cells use an efficient search strategy to facilitate an effective immune response, and CXCL10 aids them in shortening the average time to find rare targets.

  16. Lipocalin 2 Enhances Migration and Resistance against Cisplatin in Endometrial Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kashima, Hiroyasu; Yamada, Yasushi; Kobara, Hisanori; Asaka, Ryoichi; Ando, Hirofumi; Higuchi, Shotaro; Ida, Koichi; Mvunta, David Hamisi; Shiozawa, Tanri

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Lipocalin 2 (LCN2) is a secretory protein that is involved in various physiological processes including iron transport. We previously identified LCN2 as an up-regulated gene in endometrial carcinoma, and found that the overexpression of LCN2 and its receptor, SLC22A17, was associated with a poor prognosis. However, the functions and mechanism of action of LCN2 currently remain unclear. Methods The LCN2-overexpressing endometrial carcinoma cell lines, HHUA and RL95-2, and LCN2-low-expressing one, HEC1B, were used. The effects of LCN2 on cell migration, cell viability, and apoptosis under various stresses, including ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and cisplatin treatment, were examined using the scratch wound healing assay, WST-1 assay, and Apostrand assay, respectively. Results LCN2-silencing using shRNA method significantly reduced the migration ability of cells (p<0.05). Cytotoxic stresses significantly decreased the viability of LCN2-silenced cells more than that of control cells. In contrast, LCN2 overexpression was significantly increased cisplatin resistance. These effects were canceled by the addition of the iron chelator, deferoxamine. After UV irradiation, the expression of phosphorylated Akt (pAkt) was decreased in LCN2-silenced cells, and the PI3K inhibitor canceled the difference induced in UV sensitivity by LCN2. The cisplatin-induced expression of pAkt was not affected by LCN2; however, the expression of p53 and p21 was increased by LCN2-silencing. Conclusions These results indicated that LCN2 was involved in the migration and survival of endometrial carcinoma cells under various stresses in an iron-dependent manner. The survival function of LCN2 may be exerted through the PI3K pathway and suppression of the p53-p21 pathway. These functions of LCN2 may increase the malignant potential of endometrial carcinoma cells. PMID:27168162

  17. OXPHOS dysfunction regulates integrin-β1 modifications and enhances cell motility and migration.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Joana B; Peixoto, Joana; Soares, Paula; Maximo, Valdemar; Carvalho, Sandra; Pinho, Salome S; Vieira, Andre F; Paredes, Joana; Rego, Ana C; Ferreira, Ildete L; Gomez-Lazaro, Maria; Sobrinho-Simoes, Manuel; Singh, Keshav K; Lima, Jorge

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondria are central organelles for cellular metabolism. In cancer cells, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) dysfunction has been shown to promote migration, invasion, metastization and apoptosis resistance. With the purpose of analysing the effects of OXPHOS dysfunction in cancer cells and the molecular players involved, we generated cybrid cell lines harbouring either wild-type (WT) or mutant mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) [tRNAmut cybrids, which harbour the pathogenic A3243T mutation in the leucine transfer RNA gene (tRNAleu)]. tRNAmut cybrids exhibited lower oxygen consumption and higher glucose consumption and lactate production than WT cybrids. tRNAmut cybrids displayed increased motility and migration capacities, which were associated with altered integrin-β1 N-glycosylation, in particular with higher levels of β-1,6-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) branched N-glycans. This integrin-β1 N-glycosylation pattern was correlated with higher levels of membrane-bound integrin-β1 and also with increased binding to fibronectin. When cultured in vitro, tRNAmut cybrids presented lower growth rate than WT cybrids, however, when injected in nude mice, tRNAmut cybrids produced larger tumours and showed higher metastatic potential than WT cybrids. We conclude that mtDNA-driven OXPHOS dysfunction correlates with increased motility and migration capacities, through a mechanism that may involve the cross talk between cancer cell mitochondria and the extracellular matrix.

  18. Leptin enhances ICAM-1 expression, induces migration and cytokine synthesis, and prolongs survival of human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Suzukawa, Maho; Koketsu, Rikiya; Baba, Shintaro; Igarashi, Sayaka; Nagase, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Masao; Matsutani, Noriyuki; Kawamura, Masafumi; Shoji, Shunsuke; Hebisawa, Akira; Ohta, Ken

    2015-10-15

    There is rising interest in how obesity affects respiratory diseases, since epidemiological findings indicate a strong relationship between the two conditions. Leptin is a potent adipokine produced mainly by adipocytes. It regulates energy storage and expenditure and also induces inflammation. Previous studies have shown that leptin is able to activate inflammatory cells such as lymphocytes and granulocytes, but little is known about its effect on lung structural cells. The present study investigated the effects of leptin on human airway epithelial cells by using human primary airway epithelial cells and a human airway epithelial cell line, BEAS-2B. Flow cytometry showed enhanced ICAM-1 expression by both of those cells in response to leptin, and that effect was abrogated by dexamethasone or NF-κB inhibitor. Flow cytometry and quantitative PCR showed that airway epithelial cells expressed leptin receptor (Ob-R), whose expression level was downregulated by leptin itself. Multiplex cytokine analysis demonstrated enhanced production of CCL11, G-CSF, VEGF, and IL-6 by BEAS-2B cells stimulated with leptin. Furthermore, transfection of Ob-R small interference RNA decreased the effect of leptin on CCL11 production as assessed by quantitative PCR. Finally, leptin induced migration of primary airway epithelial cells toward leptin, suppressed BEAS-2B apoptosis induced with TNF-α and IFN-γ, and enhanced proliferation of primary airway epithelial cells. In summary, leptin was able to directly activate human airway epithelial cells by binding to Ob-R and by NF-κB activation, resulting in upregulation of ICAM-1 expression, induction of CCL11, VEGF, G-CSF, and IL-6 synthesis, induction of migration, inhibition of apoptosis, and enhancement of proliferation.

  19. Leptin enhances ICAM-1 expression, induces migration and cytokine synthesis, and prolongs survival of human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Suzukawa, Maho; Koketsu, Rikiya; Baba, Shintaro; Igarashi, Sayaka; Nagase, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Masao; Matsutani, Noriyuki; Kawamura, Masafumi; Shoji, Shunsuke; Hebisawa, Akira; Ohta, Ken

    2015-10-15

    There is rising interest in how obesity affects respiratory diseases, since epidemiological findings indicate a strong relationship between the two conditions. Leptin is a potent adipokine produced mainly by adipocytes. It regulates energy storage and expenditure and also induces inflammation. Previous studies have shown that leptin is able to activate inflammatory cells such as lymphocytes and granulocytes, but little is known about its effect on lung structural cells. The present study investigated the effects of leptin on human airway epithelial cells by using human primary airway epithelial cells and a human airway epithelial cell line, BEAS-2B. Flow cytometry showed enhanced ICAM-1 expression by both of those cells in response to leptin, and that effect was abrogated by dexamethasone or NF-κB inhibitor. Flow cytometry and quantitative PCR showed that airway epithelial cells expressed leptin receptor (Ob-R), whose expression level was downregulated by leptin itself. Multiplex cytokine analysis demonstrated enhanced production of CCL11, G-CSF, VEGF, and IL-6 by BEAS-2B cells stimulated with leptin. Furthermore, transfection of Ob-R small interference RNA decreased the effect of leptin on CCL11 production as assessed by quantitative PCR. Finally, leptin induced migration of primary airway epithelial cells toward leptin, suppressed BEAS-2B apoptosis induced with TNF-α and IFN-γ, and enhanced proliferation of primary airway epithelial cells. In summary, leptin was able to directly activate human airway epithelial cells by binding to Ob-R and by NF-κB activation, resulting in upregulation of ICAM-1 expression, induction of CCL11, VEGF, G-CSF, and IL-6 synthesis, induction of migration, inhibition of apoptosis, and enhancement of proliferation. PMID:26276826

  20. Leptin-mediated regulation of ICAM-1 is Rho/ROCK dependent and enhances gastric cancer cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Z; Fu, S; Xu, X; Yang, Y; Du, L; Li, W; Kan, S; Li, Z; Zhang, X; Wang, L; Li, J; Liu, H; Qu, X; Wang, C

    2014-01-01

    Background: Our previous study indicates that leptin enhances gastric cancer (GC) invasion. However, the exact effect of leptin on GC metastasis and its underlying mechanism remain unclear. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), a major molecule in stabilising cell–cell and cell–extracellular matrix interactions, is overexpressed and has crucial roles in tumour metastasis. Methods: Here, we investigated leptin and ICAM-1 expression in GC tissues. Furthermore, we characterised the influence of leptin on ICAM-1 expression in GC cells and elucidated the underlying mechanism. Results: Leptin and ICAM-1 were overexpressed in GC tissues, and a strong positive correlation was observed. They were also related with clinical stage or lymph node metastasis. Furthermore, leptin induced GC cell (AGS and MKN-45) migration by upregulating ICAM-1, and knockdown of ICAM-1 by small interference RNA (siRNA) blocked this process. Cell surface ICAM-1, as well as soluble ICAM-1 (sICAM-1), was also enhanced by leptin. Moreover, leptin increased ICAM-1 expression through Rho/ROCK pathway, which was attenuated by pharmacological inhibition of Rho (C3 transferase) or its downstream effector kinase Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) (Y-27632). Conclusions: Our findings indicate that leptin enhances GC cell migration by increasing ICAM-1 through Rho/ROCK pathway, which might provide new insight into the significance of leptin in GC. PMID:24548863

  1. Tracking of dendritic cell migration into lymph nodes using molecular imaging with sodium iodide symporter and enhanced firefly luciferase genes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho Won; Yoon, Seung Yun; Singh, Thoudam Debraj; Choi, Yoon Ju; Lee, Hong Je; Park, Ji Young; Jeong, Shin Young; Lee, Sang-Woo; Ha, Jeoung-Hee; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol; Jeon, Yong Hyun; Lee, Jaetae

    2015-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the feasibility of molecular imaging using the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene as a reporter, in addition to the enhanced firefly luciferase (effluc) gene, for tracking dendritic cell (DCs) migration in living mice. A murine dendritic cell line (DC2.4) co-expressing hNIS and effluc genes (DC/NF) was established. For the DC-tracking study, mice received either parental DCs or DC/NF cells in the left or right footpad, respectively, and combined I-124 PET/CT and bioluminescence imaging (BLI) were performed. In vivo PET/CT imaging with I-124 revealed higher activity of the radiotracer in the draining popliteal lymph nodes (DPLN) of the DC/NF injection site at day 1 than DC injection site (p < 0.05). The uptake value further increased at day 4 (p < 0.005). BLI also demonstrated migration of DC/NF cells to the DPLNs at day 1 post-injection, and signals at the DPLNs were much higher at day 4. These data support the feasibility of hNIS reporter gene imaging in the tracking of DC migration to lymphoid organs in living mice. DCs expressing the NIS reporter gene could be a useful tool to optimize various strategies of cell-based immunotherapy. PMID:25974752

  2. Increases in reactive oxygen species enhance vascular endothelial cell migration through a mechanism dependent on the transient receptor potential melastatin 4 ion channel.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento, Daniela; Montorfano, Ignacio; Cerda, Oscar; Cáceres, Mónica; Becerra, Alvaro; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Elorza, Alvaro A; Riedel, Claudia; Tapia, Pablo; Velásquez, Luis A; Varela, Diego; Simon, Felipe

    2015-03-01

    A hallmark of severe inflammation is reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction induced by increased inflammatory mediators secretion. During systemic inflammation, inflammation mediators circulating in the bloodstream interact with endothelial cells (ECs) raising intracellular oxidative stress at the endothelial monolayer. Oxidative stress mediates several pathological functions, including an exacerbated EC migration. Because cell migration critically depends on calcium channel-mediated Ca(2+) influx, the molecular identification of the calcium channel involved in oxidative stress-modulated EC migration has been the subject of intense investigation. The transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (TRPM4) protein is a ROS-modulated non-selective cationic channel that performs several cell functions, including regulating intracellular Ca(2+) overload and Ca(2+) oscillation. This channel is expressed in multiple tissues, including ECs, and contributes to the migration of certain immune cells. However, whether the TRPM4 ion channel participates in oxidative stress-mediated EC migration is not known. Herein, we investigate whether oxidative stress initiates or enhances EC migration and study the role played by the ROS-modulated TRPM4 ion channel in oxidative stress-mediated EC migration. We demonstrate that oxidative stress enhances, but does not initiate, EC migration in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, we demonstrate that the TRPM4 ion channel is critical in promoting H2O2-enhanced EC migration. These results show that TRPM4 is a novel pharmacological target for the possible treatment of severe inflammation and other oxidative stress-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  3. Increases in reactive oxygen species enhance vascular endothelial cell migration through a mechanism dependent on the transient receptor potential melastatin 4 ion channel.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento, Daniela; Montorfano, Ignacio; Cerda, Oscar; Cáceres, Mónica; Becerra, Alvaro; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Elorza, Alvaro A; Riedel, Claudia; Tapia, Pablo; Velásquez, Luis A; Varela, Diego; Simon, Felipe

    2015-03-01

    A hallmark of severe inflammation is reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction induced by increased inflammatory mediators secretion. During systemic inflammation, inflammation mediators circulating in the bloodstream interact with endothelial cells (ECs) raising intracellular oxidative stress at the endothelial monolayer. Oxidative stress mediates several pathological functions, including an exacerbated EC migration. Because cell migration critically depends on calcium channel-mediated Ca(2+) influx, the molecular identification of the calcium channel involved in oxidative stress-modulated EC migration has been the subject of intense investigation. The transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (TRPM4) protein is a ROS-modulated non-selective cationic channel that performs several cell functions, including regulating intracellular Ca(2+) overload and Ca(2+) oscillation. This channel is expressed in multiple tissues, including ECs, and contributes to the migration of certain immune cells. However, whether the TRPM4 ion channel participates in oxidative stress-mediated EC migration is not known. Herein, we investigate whether oxidative stress initiates or enhances EC migration and study the role played by the ROS-modulated TRPM4 ion channel in oxidative stress-mediated EC migration. We demonstrate that oxidative stress enhances, but does not initiate, EC migration in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, we demonstrate that the TRPM4 ion channel is critical in promoting H2O2-enhanced EC migration. These results show that TRPM4 is a novel pharmacological target for the possible treatment of severe inflammation and other oxidative stress-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:24518820

  4. Fabrication of three-dimensional multi-protein microstructures for cell migration and adhesion enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Da Sie, Yong; Li, Yi-Cheng; Chang, Nan-Shan; Campagnola, Paul J.; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, three-dimensional (3D) multi-component microstructures were precisely fabricated via multiphoton excited photochemistry using a femtosecond laser direct-writing system with proposed repetition positioning and vector scanning techniques. Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, such as fibronectin (FN), are difficult to stack and form 3D structures larger than several-hundred microns in height due to the nature of their protein structure. Herein, to fabricate complex 3D microstructures with FN, a 3D scaffold was designed and formed from bovine serum albumin (BSA), after which human FN was inserted at specific locations on the BSA scaffold; in this manner, the fabricated ECM microstructure can guide cells in a 3D environment. A human breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, was used to investigate the behavior of cell migration and adhesion on the fabricated human FN and BSA protein structures. Experimental results indicate that many cells are not able to attach or climb on a 3D structure’s inclined plane without FN support; hence, the influence of cell growth in a 3D context with FN should being taken into consideration. This 3D multi-protein fabrication technique holds potential for cell studies in designed complex 3D ECM scaffolds. PMID:25780738

  5. IAPs and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Dubrez, Laurence; Rajalingam, Krishnaraj

    2015-03-01

    Inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) constitute a family of cell signaling regulators controlling several fundamental biological processes such as innate immunity, inflammation, cell death, cell proliferation, and cell differentiation. Increasing evidence from in vivo and in vitro studies indicate a function for IAPs in the modulation of invasive and migratory properties of cells. Here, we present and discuss the mechanisms whereby IAPs can control cell migration.

  6. In-Vivo Imaging of Cell Migration Using Contrast Enhanced MRI and SVM Based Post-Processing

    PubMed Central

    Budinsky, Lubos; Fabry, Ben

    2015-01-01

    The migration of cells within a living organism can be observed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in combination with iron oxide nanoparticles as an intracellular contrast agent. This method, however, suffers from low sensitivity and specificty. Here, we developed a quantitative non-invasive in-vivo cell localization method using contrast enhanced multiparametric MRI and support vector machines (SVM) based post-processing. Imaging phantoms consisting of agarose with compartments containing different concentrations of cancer cells labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles were used to train and evaluate the SVM for cell localization. From the magnitude and phase data acquired with a series of T2*-weighted gradient-echo scans at different echo-times, we extracted features that are characteristic for the presence of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, in particular hyper- and hypointensities, relaxation rates, short-range phase perturbations, and perturbation dynamics. High detection quality was achieved by SVM analysis of the multiparametric feature-space. The in-vivo applicability was validated in animal studies. The SVM detected the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles in the imaging phantoms with high specificity and sensitivity with a detection limit of 30 labeled cells per mm3, corresponding to 19 μM of iron oxide. As proof-of-concept, we applied the method to follow the migration of labeled cancer cells injected in rats. The combination of iron oxide labeled cells, multiparametric MRI and a SVM based post processing provides high spatial resolution, specificity, and sensitivity, and is therefore suitable for non-invasive in-vivo cell detection and cell migration studies over prolonged time periods. PMID:26656497

  7. MRP4 knockdown enhances migration, suppresses apoptosis, and produces aggregated morphology in human retinal vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tagami, Mizuki; Kusuhara, Sentaro; Imai, Hisanori; Uemura, Akiyoshi; Honda, Shigeru; Tsukahara, Yasutomo; Negi, Akira

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Exogenous VEGF decreases MRP4 expression in a dose-dependent manner. {yields} MRP4 knockdown leads to enhanced cell migration. {yields} MRP4 knockdown suppresses caspase-3-mediated cell apoptosis. {yields} MRP4 knockdown produces cell assembly and cell aggregation. -- Abstract: The multidrug resistance protein (MRP) MRP4/ABCC4 is an ATP-binding cassette transporter that actively effluxes endogenous and xenobiotic substrates out of cells. In the rodent retina, Mrp4 mRNA and protein are exclusively expressed in vascular endothelial cells, but the angiogenic properties of Mrp4 are poorly understood so far. This study aims to explore the angiogenic properties of MRP4 in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRECs) utilizing the RNA interference (RNAi) technique. MRP4 expression was decreased at the mRNA and protein levels after stimulation with exogenous vascular endothelial growth factor in a dose-dependent manner. RNAi-mediated MRP4 knockdown in HRECs do not affect cell proliferation but enhances cell migration. Moreover, cell apoptosis induced by serum starvation was less prominent in MRP4 siRNA-treated HRECs as compared to control siRNA-treated HRECs. In a Matrigel-based tube-formation assay, although MRP4 knockdown did not lead to a significant change in the total tube length, MRP4 siRNA-treated HRECs assembled and aggregated into a massive tube-like structure, which was not observed in control siRNA-treated HRECs. These results suggest that MRP4 is uniquely involved in retinal angiogenesis.

  8. The use of biomaterials for cell function enhancement: acceleration of fibroblast migration and promotion of stem cell proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Sisi

    Wound healing and tissue regeneration proceed via fibroblast migration along three dimensional scaffolds composed of fibers with different diameters, spacing, and junction angles. In order to understand how each of these factors influences fibroblast migration, a technique for preparation of three dimensional fibrillar scaffolds was developed where the fiber diameters and the angles between adjacent fiber layers could be precisely controlled. In order to study the en-mass migration process, the agarose droplet method was chosen since it enabled accurate determinations of the dependence of the migration speed, focal adhesion distribution, and nuclear deformation on the fiber structures. Results showed that on oriented single fiber layers, if the fiber diameters exceeded 1microm, large focal adhesion complexes formed in a linear arrangement along the fiber axis and cell motion was highly correlated. For fibers 1microm or less, some cell alignment along the fiber direction was measured, but no correlation between the distribution of focal adhesion points and fiber orientation was found. On multi layered scaffolds the focal adhesion sites were found to concentrate at the junction points and the migration speed followed a parabolic function with a distinct minimum at 35°. When compared to fibroblasts plated on 90° fibers, fibroblasts plated on 30° fibers showed a decrease of 25% in the degree of nuclear deformation and an increase of 25% in the number of focal adhesion sites, indicating that cell migration speed was correlated to the angle and distance of approach to the junction point. The time dependence of the migration velocity on oriented fibers was measured for four days and compared to the value measured on flat surfaces. After the initial 24 hour incubation period, the cells on both the 8microm fibers and flat surfaces migrated with a similar speed. During the next three days the migration speed for the cells on the fibrillar surfaces doubled in magnitude

  9. Activation of the Inflammasome and Enhanced Migration of Microparticle-Stimulated Dendritic Cells to the Draining Lymph Node

    PubMed Central

    Meraz, Ismail M.; Melendez, Brenda; Gu, Jianhua; Wong, Stephen T.C.; Liu, Xuewu; Andersson, Helen A.; Serda, Rita E.

    2012-01-01

    Porous silicon microparticles presenting pathogen-associated molecular patterns mimic pathogens, enhancing internalization of the microparticles and activation of antigen presenting dendritic cells. We demonstrate abundant uptake of microparticles bound by the TLR-4 ligands LPS and MPL by murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC). Labeled microparticles induce concentration-dependent production of IL-1β, with inhibition by the caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK supporting activation of the NLRP3-dependent inflammasome. Inoculation of BALB/c mice with ligand-bound microparticles induces a significant increase in circulating levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6. Stimulation of BMDC with ligand-bound microparticles increases surface expression of co-stimulatory and MHC molecules, and enhances migration of BMDC to the draining lymph node. LPS-microparticles stimulate in vivo C57BL/6 BMDC and OT-1 transgenic T cell interactions in the presence of OVA SIINFEKL peptide in lymph nodes, with intact nodes imaged using two-photon microscopy. Formation of in vivo and in vitro immunological synapses between BMDC, loaded with OVA peptide and LPS-microparticles, and OT-1 T cells are presented, as well as elevated intracellular interferon gamma levels in CD8+ T cells stimulated by BMDC carrying peptide-loaded microparticles. In short, ligand-bound microparticles enhance 1) phagocytosis of microparticles; 2) BMDC inflammasome activation and up-regulation of co-stimulatory and MHC molecules; 3) cellular migration of BMDC to lymphatic tissue; and 4) cellular interactions leading to T cell activation in the presence of antigen. PMID:22680980

  10. Upregulated MicroRNA-29a by Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Enhances Hepatoma Cell Migration by Targeting PTEN in Cell Culture Model

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Guangyao; Zhang, Junping; Zhang, Shuai; Shan, Changliang; Ye, Lihong; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) plays important roles in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) contribute to cancer development by acting as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. Previously, we reported that HBx was able to promote the migration of hepatoma HepG2 cells. However, the regulation of miRNAs in the development of HBV-related HCC is poorly understood. In the present study, we reported that miR-29a was a novel regulator of migration of hepatoma cells mediated by HBx. Our data showed that the expression of miR-29a was dramatically increased in p21-HBx transgenic mice, HBx-transfected hepatoma HepG2-X (or H7402-X) cells and HepG2.2.15 cells that constitutively replicate HBV. However, our data showed that miR-29a was upregulated in 4 of the 11 clinical HCC samples. We found that the overexpression of miR-29a promoted the migration of HepG2 cells, while a specific miR-29a inhibitor could partially abolish the enhanced migration of HepG2-X cells. Moreover, we identified PTEN was one of the target genes of miR-29a in HepG2 cells. The deletion of the miR-29a-binding site was able to abolish the role of miR-29a in suppression of luciferase activity of the PTEN 3′UTR reporter. Meanwhile, the overexpression of PTEN was able to reverse the promoted migration of HepG2 cells mediated by miR-29a. Moreover, our data showed that the modulation of Akt phosphorylation, a downstream factor of PTEN, was involved in the cell migration enhanced by miR-29a, suggesting that miR-29a is responsible for the cell migration through its target gene PTEN. Thus, we conclude that miR-29a is involved in the regulation of migration of hepatoma cells mediated by HBx through PTEN in cell culture model. PMID:21573166

  11. Oncogenic functions of IGF1R and INSR in prostate cancer include enhanced tumor growth, cell migration and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Isabel; Kern, Johann; Ofer, Philipp; Klocker, Helmut; Massoner, Petra

    2014-05-15

    We scrutinized the effect of insulin receptor (INSR) in addition to IGF1R in PCa using in vitro and in vivo models. In-vitro overexpression of IGF1R and INSRA, but not INSRB increased cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, invasion and resistance to apoptosis in prostate cancer cells (DU145, LNCaP, PC3). Opposite effects were induced by downregulation of IGF1R and total INSR, but not INSRB. In contrast to tumor cells, non-cancerous epithelial cells of the prostate (EP156T, RWPE-1) were inhibited on overexpression and stimulated by knockdown of receptors. In-vivo analyses using the chicken allantoic membrane assay confirmed the tumorigenic effects of IGF1R and INSR. Apart of promoting tumor growth, IGF1R and INSR overexpression also enhanced angiogenesis indicated by higher vessel density and increased number of desmin-immunoreactive pericytes. Our study underscores the oncogenic impact of IGF1R including significant effects on tumor growth, cell migration, sensitivity to apoptotic/chemotherapeutic agents and angiogenesis, and characterizes the INSR, in particular the isoform INSRA, as additional cancer-promoting receptor in prostate cancer. Both, the insulin-like growth factor receptor 1 and the insulin receptor exert oncogenic functions, thus proposing that both receptors need to be considered in therapeutic settings.

  12. [Sodium nitrite enhanced the potentials of migration and invasion of human hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cells through induction of mitophagy].

    PubMed

    Gui, Guan; Meng, Shan-shan; Li, Lu-juan; Liu, Bin; Liang, Hong-xia; Huangfu, Chao-shen

    2016-01-01

    Nitrites play multiple characteristic functions in invasion and metastasis of hepatic cancer cells, but the exact mechanism is not yet known. Cancer cells can maintain the malignant characteristics via clearance of excess mitochondria by mitophagy. The purpose of this article was to determine the roles of nitrite, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hypoxia inducing factor 1 alpha (HIF-1 α) in mitophagy of hepatic cancer cells. After exposure of human hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cells to a serial concentrations of sodium nitrite for 24 h under normal oxygen, the maximal cell vitality was increased by 16 mg x (-1) sodium nitrite. In addition, the potentials of migration and invasion for SMMC-7721 cells were increased significantly at the same time. Furthermore, sodium nitrite exposure displayed an increase of stress fibers, lamellipodum and perinuclear mitochondrial distribution by cell staining with Actin-Tracker Green and Mito-Tracker Red, which was reversed by N-acetylcysteine (NAC, a reactive oxygen scavenger). DCFH-DA staining with fluorescent microscopy showed that the intracellular level of ROS concentration was increased by the sodium nitrite treatment. LC3 immunostaining and Western blot results showed that sodium nitrite enhanced cell autophagy flux. Under the transmission electron microscopy (TEM), more autolysosomes formed after sodium nitrite treatment and NAC could prevent autophagosome degradation. RT-PCR results indicated that the expression levels of COX I and COXIV mRNA were decreased significantly after sodium nitrite treatment. Meanwhile, laser scanning confocal microscopy showed that sodium nitrite significantly reduced mitochondrial mass detected by Mito-Tracker Green staining. The expression levels of HIF-1α, Beclin-1 and Bnip3 (mitophagy marker molecular) increased remarkably after sodium nitrite treatment, which were reversed by NAC. Our results demonstrated that sodium nitrite (16 mg x L(-1)) increased the potentials of invasion and

  13. Increased cellular apoptosis susceptibility (CSE1L/CAS) protein expression promotes protrusion extension and enhances migration of MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Shen, Shing-Chuan; Lee, Woan-Ruoh; Liao, Ching-Fong; Deng, Win-Ping; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Hsieh, Cheng-I; Tung, Jai-Nien; Chen, Ching-Shyang; Chiou, Jeng-Fong; Li, Li-Tzu; Lin, Chuang-Yu; Hsu, Chung-Huei; Jiang, Ming-Chung

    2010-10-15

    Microtubules are part of cell structures that play a role in regulating the migration of cancer cells. The cellular apoptosis susceptibility (CSE1L/CAS) protein is a microtubule-associated protein that is highly expressed in cancer. We report here that CSE1L regulates the association of {alpha}-tubulin with {beta}-tubulin and promotes the migration of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. CSE1L was associated with {alpha}-tubulin and {beta}-tubulin in GST (glutathione S-transferase) pull-down and immunoprecipitation assays. CSE1L-GFP (green fluorescence protein) fusion protein experiments showed that the N-terminal of CSE1L interacted with microtubules. Increased CSE1L expression resulted in decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of {alpha}-tubulin and {beta}-tubulin, increased {alpha}-tubulin and {beta}-tubulin association, and enhanced assembly of microtubules. Cell protrusions or pseudopodia are temporary extensions of the plasma membrane and are implicated in cancer cell migration and invasion. Increased CSE1L expression increased the extension of MCF-7 cell protrusions. In vitro migration assay showed that enhanced CSE1L expression increased the migration of MCF-7 cells. Our results indicate that CSE1L plays a role in regulating the extension of cell protrusions and promotes the migration of cancer cells.

  14. Heat shock protein 90β stabilizes focal adhesion kinase and enhances cell migration and invasion in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Xiangyang; Wang, Yao; Liu, Chengmei; Lu, Quqin; Liu, Tao; Chen, Guoan; Rao, Hai; Luo, Shiwen

    2014-08-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) acts as a regulator of cellular signaling and may promote cell spreading, motility, invasion and survival in malignancy. Elevated expression and activity of FAK frequently correlate with tumor cell metastasis and poor prognosis in breast cancer. However, the mechanisms by which the turnover of FAK is regulated remain elusive. Here we report that heat shock protein 90β (HSP90β) interacts with FAK and the middle domain (amino acids 233–620) of HSP90β is mainly responsible for this interaction. Furthermore, we found that HSP90β regulates FAK stability since HSP90β inhibitor 17-AAG triggers FAK ubiquitylation and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation. Moreover, disrupted FAK-HSP90β interaction induced by 17-AAG contributes to attenuation of tumor cell growth, migration, and invasion. Together, our results reveal how HSP90β regulates FAK stability and identifies a potential therapeutic strategy to breast cancer. - Highlights: • HSP90β protects FAK from degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK attenuates tumorigenesis of breast cancer cells. • Genetic repression of HSP90β or FAK inhibits tumor cell migration and proliferation. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK interferes cell invasion and cytoskeleton.

  15. SMYD3 stimulates EZR and LOXL2 transcription to enhance proliferation, migration, and invasion in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Zhu, Meng-Xiao; Zhang, Xiao-Dan; Xu, Xiu-E; Wu, Zhi-Yong; Liao, Lian-Di; Li, Li-Yan; Xie, Yang-Min; Wu, Jian-Yi; Zou, Hai-Ying; Xie, Jian-Jun; Li, En-Min; Xu, Li-Yan

    2016-06-01

    Epigenetic alterations, including DNA methylation and histone modifications, are involved in the regulation of cancer initiation and progression. SET and MYND domain-containing protein 3 (SMYD3), a methyltransferase, plays an important role in transcriptional regulation during human cancer progression. However, SMYD3 expression and its function in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remain unknown. In this study, SMYD3 expression was studied by immunohistochemistry in a tumor tissue microarray from 131 cases of ESCC patients. Statistical analysis showed that overall survival of patients with high SMYD3 expressing in primary tumors was significantly lower than that of patients with low SMYD3-expressing tumors (P = .008, log-rank test). Increased expression of SMYD3 was found to be associated with lymph node metastasis in ESCC (P = .036) and was an independent prognostic factor for poor overall survival (P = .025). RNAi-mediated knockdown of SMYD3 suppressed ESCC cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro and inhibited local tumor invasion in vivo. SMYD3 regulated transcription of EZR and LOXL2 by directly binding to the sequences of the promoter regions of these target genes, as demonstrated by a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Immunohistochemical staining of ESCC tissues also confirmed that protein levels of EZR and LOXL2 positively correlated with SMYD3 expression, and the Spearman correlation coefficients (rs) were 0.78 (n = 81; P < .01) and 0.637 (n = 103; P < .01), respectively. These results indicate that SMYD3 enhances tumorigenicity in ESCC through enhancing transcription of genes involved in proliferation, migration, and invasion. PMID:26980013

  16. SMYD3 stimulates EZR and LOXL2 transcription to enhance proliferation, migration, and invasion in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Zhu, Meng-Xiao; Zhang, Xiao-Dan; Xu, Xiu-E; Wu, Zhi-Yong; Liao, Lian-Di; Li, Li-Yan; Xie, Yang-Min; Wu, Jian-Yi; Zou, Hai-Ying; Xie, Jian-Jun; Li, En-Min; Xu, Li-Yan

    2016-06-01

    Epigenetic alterations, including DNA methylation and histone modifications, are involved in the regulation of cancer initiation and progression. SET and MYND domain-containing protein 3 (SMYD3), a methyltransferase, plays an important role in transcriptional regulation during human cancer progression. However, SMYD3 expression and its function in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remain unknown. In this study, SMYD3 expression was studied by immunohistochemistry in a tumor tissue microarray from 131 cases of ESCC patients. Statistical analysis showed that overall survival of patients with high SMYD3 expressing in primary tumors was significantly lower than that of patients with low SMYD3-expressing tumors (P = .008, log-rank test). Increased expression of SMYD3 was found to be associated with lymph node metastasis in ESCC (P = .036) and was an independent prognostic factor for poor overall survival (P = .025). RNAi-mediated knockdown of SMYD3 suppressed ESCC cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro and inhibited local tumor invasion in vivo. SMYD3 regulated transcription of EZR and LOXL2 by directly binding to the sequences of the promoter regions of these target genes, as demonstrated by a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Immunohistochemical staining of ESCC tissues also confirmed that protein levels of EZR and LOXL2 positively correlated with SMYD3 expression, and the Spearman correlation coefficients (rs) were 0.78 (n = 81; P < .01) and 0.637 (n = 103; P < .01), respectively. These results indicate that SMYD3 enhances tumorigenicity in ESCC through enhancing transcription of genes involved in proliferation, migration, and invasion.

  17. Mosquito Saliva Increases Endothelial Permeability in the Skin, Immune Cell Migration, and Dengue Pathogenesis during Antibody-Dependent Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Michael A.; Glasner, Dustin R.; Shah, Sanjana; Michlmayr, Daniela; Kramer, Laura D.; Harris, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Dengue remains the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral disease in humans. While probing for blood vessels, Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes transmit the four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV1-4) by injecting virus-containing saliva into the skin. Even though arthropod saliva is known to facilitate transmission and modulate host responses to other pathogens, the full impact of mosquito saliva on dengue pathogenesis is still not well understood. Inoculating mice lacking the interferon-α/β receptor intradermally with DENV revealed that mosquito salivary gland extract (SGE) exacerbates dengue pathogenesis specifically in the presence of enhancing serotype-cross-reactive antibodies—when individuals already carry an increased risk for severe disease. We further establish that SGE increases viral titers in the skin, boosts antibody-enhanced DENV infection of dendritic cells and macrophages in the dermis, and amplifies dendritic cell migration to skin-draining lymph nodes. We demonstrate that SGE directly disrupts endothelial barrier function in vitro and induces endothelial permeability in vivo in the skin. Finally, we show that surgically removing the site of DENV transmission in the skin after 4 hours rescued mice from disease in the absence of SGE, but no longer prevented lethal antibody-enhanced disease when SGE was present. These results indicate that SGE accelerates the dynamics of dengue pathogenesis after virus transmission in the skin and induces severe antibody-enhanced disease systemically. Our study reveals novel aspects of dengue pathogenesis and suggests that animal models of dengue and pre-clinical testing of dengue vaccines should consider mosquito-derived factors as well as enhancing antibodies. PMID:27310141

  18. Mosquito Saliva Increases Endothelial Permeability in the Skin, Immune Cell Migration, and Dengue Pathogenesis during Antibody-Dependent Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Michael A; Glasner, Dustin R; Shah, Sanjana; Michlmayr, Daniela; Kramer, Laura D; Harris, Eva

    2016-06-01

    Dengue remains the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral disease in humans. While probing for blood vessels, Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes transmit the four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV1-4) by injecting virus-containing saliva into the skin. Even though arthropod saliva is known to facilitate transmission and modulate host responses to other pathogens, the full impact of mosquito saliva on dengue pathogenesis is still not well understood. Inoculating mice lacking the interferon-α/β receptor intradermally with DENV revealed that mosquito salivary gland extract (SGE) exacerbates dengue pathogenesis specifically in the presence of enhancing serotype-cross-reactive antibodies-when individuals already carry an increased risk for severe disease. We further establish that SGE increases viral titers in the skin, boosts antibody-enhanced DENV infection of dendritic cells and macrophages in the dermis, and amplifies dendritic cell migration to skin-draining lymph nodes. We demonstrate that SGE directly disrupts endothelial barrier function in vitro and induces endothelial permeability in vivo in the skin. Finally, we show that surgically removing the site of DENV transmission in the skin after 4 hours rescued mice from disease in the absence of SGE, but no longer prevented lethal antibody-enhanced disease when SGE was present. These results indicate that SGE accelerates the dynamics of dengue pathogenesis after virus transmission in the skin and induces severe antibody-enhanced disease systemically. Our study reveals novel aspects of dengue pathogenesis and suggests that animal models of dengue and pre-clinical testing of dengue vaccines should consider mosquito-derived factors as well as enhancing antibodies. PMID:27310141

  19. Vitisin B, a resveratrol tetramer, inhibits migration through inhibition of PDGF signaling and enhancement of cell adhesiveness in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, Eng-Thaim; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Huang, Yu-Ling; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Wu, Wen-Bin

    2011-10-15

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) play an important role in normal vessel formation and in the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. Grape plants contain resveratrol monomer and oligomers and drinking of wine made from grape has been linked to 'French Paradox'. In this study we evaluated the effect of vitisin B, a resveratrol tetramer, on VSMC behaviors. Vitisin B inhibited basal and PDGF-induced VSMC migration. Strikingly, it did not inhibit VSMC proliferation but inversely enhanced cell cycle progression and proliferation. Among the tested resveratrol oligomers, vitisin B showed an excellent inhibitory activity and selectivity on PDGF signaling. The anti-migratory effect by vitisin B was due to direct inhibition on PDGF signaling but was independent of interference with PDGF binding to VSMCs. Moreover, the enhanced VSMC adhesiveness to matrix contributed to the anti-migratory effect by vitisin B. Fluorescence microscopy revealed an enhanced reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and redistribution of activated focal adhesion proteins from cytosol to the peripheral edge of the cell membrane. This was confirmed by the observation that enhanced adhesiveness was repressed by the Src inhibitor. Finally, among the effects elicited by vitisin B, only the inhibitory effect toward basal migration was partially through estrogen receptor activation. We have demonstrated here that a resveratrol tetramer exhibited dual but opposite actions on VSMCs, one is to inhibit VSMC migration and the other is to promote VSMC proliferation. The anti-migratory effect was through a potent inhibition on PDGF signaling and novel enhancement on cell adhesion. - Highlights: > Several resveratrol oligomers from grape plants are examined on VSMC behaviors. > Tetraoligomer vitisin B shows excellent inhibitory activity and selectivity. > It exerts dual but opposing actions: anti-migratory and pro-proliferative effects. > The anti-migratory effect results from anti-PDGF signaling

  20. A novel strategy to enhance mesenchymal stem cell migration capacity and promote tissue repair in an injury specific fashion.

    PubMed

    Xinaris, C; Morigi, M; Benedetti, V; Imberti, B; Fabricio, A S; Squarcina, E; Benigni, A; Gagliardini, E; Remuzzi, G

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) of bone marrow origin appear to be an attractive candidate for cell-based therapies. However, the major barrier to the effective implementation of MSC-based therapies is the lack of specific homing of exogenously infused cells and overall the inability to drive them to the diseased or damaged tissue. In order to circumvent these limitations, we developed a preconditioning strategy to optimize MSC migration efficiency and potentiate their beneficial effect at the site of injury. Initially, we screened different molecules by using an in vitro injury-migration setting, and subsequently, we evaluated the effectiveness of the different strategies in mice with acute kidney injury (AKI). Our results showed that preconditioning of MSCs with IGF-1 before infusion improved cell migration capacity and restored normal renal function after AKI. The present study demonstrates that promoting migration of MSCs could increase their therapeutic potential and indicates a new therapeutic paradigm for organ repair.

  1. Atezolizumab in combination with bevacizumab enhances antigen-specific T-cell migration in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wallin, Jeffrey J; Bendell, Johanna C; Funke, Roel; Sznol, Mario; Korski, Konstanty; Jones, Suzanne; Hernandez, Genevive; Mier, James; He, Xian; Hodi, F Stephen; Denker, Mitchell; Leveque, Vincent; Cañamero, Marta; Babitski, Galina; Koeppen, Hartmut; Ziai, James; Sharma, Neeraj; Gaire, Fabien; Chen, Daniel S; Waterkamp, Daniel; Hegde, Priti S; McDermott, David F

    2016-01-01

    Anti-tumour immune activation by checkpoint inhibitors leads to durable responses in a variety of cancers, but combination approaches are required to extend this benefit beyond a subset of patients. In preclinical models tumour-derived VEGF limits immune cell activity while anti-VEGF augments intra-tumoral T-cell infiltration, potentially through vascular normalization and endothelial cell activation. This study investigates how VEGF blockade with bevacizumab could potentiate PD-L1 checkpoint inhibition with atezolizumab in mRCC. Tissue collections are before treatment, after bevacizumab and after the addition of atezolizumab. We discover that intra-tumoral CD8(+) T cells increase following combination treatment. A related increase is found in intra-tumoral MHC-I, Th1 and T-effector markers, and chemokines, most notably CX3CL1 (fractalkine). We also discover that the fractalkine receptor increases on peripheral CD8(+) T cells with treatment. Furthermore, trafficking lymphocyte increases are observed in tumors following bevacizumab and combination treatment. These data suggest that the anti-VEGF and anti-PD-L1 combination improves antigen-specific T-cell migration. PMID:27571927

  2. Atezolizumab in combination with bevacizumab enhances antigen-specific T-cell migration in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wallin, Jeffrey J.; Bendell, Johanna C.; Funke, Roel; Sznol, Mario; Korski, Konstanty; Jones, Suzanne; Hernandez, Genevive; Mier, James; He, Xian; Hodi, F. Stephen; Denker, Mitchell; Leveque, Vincent; Cañamero, Marta; Babitski, Galina; Koeppen, Hartmut; Ziai, James; Sharma, Neeraj; Gaire, Fabien; Chen, Daniel S.; Waterkamp, Daniel; Hegde, Priti S.; McDermott, David F.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-tumour immune activation by checkpoint inhibitors leads to durable responses in a variety of cancers, but combination approaches are required to extend this benefit beyond a subset of patients. In preclinical models tumour-derived VEGF limits immune cell activity while anti-VEGF augments intra-tumoral T-cell infiltration, potentially through vascular normalization and endothelial cell activation. This study investigates how VEGF blockade with bevacizumab could potentiate PD-L1 checkpoint inhibition with atezolizumab in mRCC. Tissue collections are before treatment, after bevacizumab and after the addition of atezolizumab. We discover that intra-tumoral CD8+ T cells increase following combination treatment. A related increase is found in intra-tumoral MHC-I, Th1 and T-effector markers, and chemokines, most notably CX3CL1 (fractalkine). We also discover that the fractalkine receptor increases on peripheral CD8+ T cells with treatment. Furthermore, trafficking lymphocyte increases are observed in tumors following bevacizumab and combination treatment. These data suggest that the anti-VEGF and anti-PD-L1 combination improves antigen-specific T-cell migration. PMID:27571927

  3. Proteomic analysis of acquired tamoxifen resistance in MCF-7 cells reveals expression signatures associated with enhanced migration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    tamoxifen resistant breast cancer cells are characterized by down-regulated ER signaling, activation of alternative survival pathways, and enhanced cell motility through regulation of the actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Evidence also emerged that S100P mediates acquired tamoxifen resistance and migration capacity. PMID:22417809

  4. BIOMIMETIC STOCHASTIC TOPOGRAPHY AND ELECTRIC FIELDS SYNERGISTICALLY ENHANCE DIRECTIONAL MIGRATION OF CORNEAL EPITHELIAL CELLS IN A MMP-3 DEPENDENT MANNER

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jing; Raghunathan, Vijay Krishna; Reid, Brian; Wei, Dongguang; Diaz, Rodney C.; Russell, Paul; Murphy, Christopher J; Zhao, Min

    2014-01-01

    Directed migration of corneal epithelial cells (CECs) is critical for maintenance of corneal homeostasis as well as wound healing. Soluble cytoactive factors and the intrinsic chemical attributes of the underlying extracellularmatrix (ECM) participate in stimulating and directing migration. Additionally, numerous publications document the central importance of the intrinsic biophysical attributes of the microenvironment of the cell in modulating an array of fundamental epithelial behaviors including migration. Among the best studies of these attributes are the intrinsic topography and stiffness of the ECM and electric fields (EF). How cells integrate these multiple simultaneous inputs is not well understood. Here, we present a method that combines the use of 1. topographically patterned substrates (mean pore diameter of 800 nm) possessing features that approximate those found in the native corneal basement membrane and 2. EF (0–150 mV/mm) mimicking those at corneal epithelial wounds that the cells experience in vivo. We found that topographic cues and EFs synergistically regulated directional migration of human CECs and that this was associated with upregulation of MMP-3. MMP3 expression and activity were significantly elevated with 150 mV/mm applied-EF while MMP2/9 remained unaltered. MMP3 expression was elevated in cells cultured on patterned-surfaces against planar-surfaces. Maximum single cell migration rate was observed with 150 mV/mm applied EF on patterned and planar surfaces. When cultured as a confluent sheet, EFs induced collective cell migration on stochastically patterned surfaces compared with dissociated single cell migration on planar surfaces. These results suggest significant interaction of biophysical cues in regulating cell behaviors and will help define design parameters for corneal prosthetics and help to better understand corneal woundhealing. PMID:25311684

  5. Connexin 32 and its derived homotypic gap junctional intercellular communication inhibit the migration and invasion of transfected HeLa cells via enhancement of intercellular adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Liu, Bing; Wang, Qin; Yuan, Dongdong; Hong, Xiaoting; Yang, Yan; Tao, Liang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of connexin (Cx) and its derived homotypic gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) between tumor cells on the invasion of metastatic cancers and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the influence of Cx32 and the homotypic GJIC mediated by this Cx on the migration, invasion and intercellular adhesion of transfected HeLa cells. The expression of Cx32 significantly increased cell adhesion and inhibited migration and invasion. The inhibition of GJIC by oleamide, a widely used GJIC inhibitor, reduced the enhanced adhesion and partly reversed the decreased migration and invasion that had been induced by Cx32 expression. Blockage of the p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1/2 MAPKs) pathways using their specific inhibitors attenuated the effects of Cx32, but not those of GJIC, on cell adhesion, migration and invasion. These results indicate that the homotypic GJIC mediated by Cx32, as well as the Cx itself, inhibit cell migration and invasion, most likely through the elevation of intercellular adhesion. The suppressive effect of Cx32 on the migration and invasion of cancer cells, but not that of its derived homotypic GJIC, partly depends on the activation of the p38 and the ERK1/2 MAPKs pathways.

  6. Multiscale Cues Drive Collective Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Peter; Wood, David K.; Kwon, Sunghoon; Provenzano, Paolo P.; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-07-01

    To investigate complex biophysical relationships driving directed cell migration, we developed a biomimetic platform that allows perturbation of microscale geometric constraints with concomitant nanoscale contact guidance architectures. This permits us to elucidate the influence, and parse out the relative contribution, of multiscale features, and define how these physical inputs are jointly processed with oncogenic signaling. We demonstrate that collective cell migration is profoundly enhanced by the addition of contract guidance cues when not otherwise constrained. However, while nanoscale cues promoted migration in all cases, microscale directed migration cues are dominant as the geometric constraint narrows, a behavior that is well explained by stochastic diffusion anisotropy modeling. Further, oncogene activation (i.e. mutant PIK3CA) resulted in profoundly increased migration where extracellular multiscale directed migration cues and intrinsic signaling synergistically conspire to greatly outperform normal cells or any extracellular guidance cues in isolation.

  7. Multiscale Cues Drive Collective Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Peter; Wood, David K.; Kwon, Sunghoon; Provenzano, Paolo P.; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-01-01

    To investigate complex biophysical relationships driving directed cell migration, we developed a biomimetic platform that allows perturbation of microscale geometric constraints with concomitant nanoscale contact guidance architectures. This permits us to elucidate the influence, and parse out the relative contribution, of multiscale features, and define how these physical inputs are jointly processed with oncogenic signaling. We demonstrate that collective cell migration is profoundly enhanced by the addition of contract guidance cues when not otherwise constrained. However, while nanoscale cues promoted migration in all cases, microscale directed migration cues are dominant as the geometric constraint narrows, a behavior that is well explained by stochastic diffusion anisotropy modeling. Further, oncogene activation (i.e. mutant PIK3CA) resulted in profoundly increased migration where extracellular multiscale directed migration cues and intrinsic signaling synergistically conspire to greatly outperform normal cells or any extracellular guidance cues in isolation. PMID:27460294

  8. The neurotrophin-3 receptor TrkC directly phosphorylates and activates the nucleotide exchange factor Dbs to enhance Schwann cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Junji; Chan, Jonah R.; Miyamoto, Yuki; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Shooter, Eric M.

    2005-01-01

    During the development of the peripheral nervous system, Schwann cells, the myelin-forming glia, migrate along axons before initiating myelination. We previously demonstrated that endogenous neurotrophin-3 (NT3) acting through the TrkC tyrosine kinase receptor enhances migration of premyelinating Schwann cells. This signaling pathway is mediated by the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) cascade regulated by the Rho GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42. However, missing is the link between TrkC and the GTPases. Here, we show that a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), Dbl's big sister (Dbs), couples with TrkC to activate Cdc42 in Schwann cells. Furthermore, TrkC directly phosphorylates Dbs, thereby inducing the Cdc42-GEF activity. Taken together, activation of TrkC triggers Schwann cell migration by regulating Dbs upon direct tyrosine phosphorylation, providing a mechanism whereby a membrane receptor tyrosine kinase can induce the activation of Rho GTPase-GEFs. PMID:15758069

  9. Coxsackievirus group B type 3 infection upregulates expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 in cardiac myocytes, which leads to enhanced migration of mononuclear cells in viral myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; Xu, Wei; Chu, Yi-Wei; Wang, Ying; Liu, Quan-Sheng; Xiong, Si-Dong

    2004-11-01

    Coxsackievirus group B type 3 (CVB3) is an important cause of viral myocarditis. The infiltration of mononuclear cells into the myocardial tissue is one of the key events in viral myocarditis. Immediately after CVB3 infects the heart, the expression of chemokine(s) by infected myocardial cells may be the first trigger for inflammatory infiltration and immune response. However, it is unknown whether CVB3 can induce the chemokine expression in cardiac myocytes. Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) is a potent chemokine that stimulates the migration of mononuclear cells. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of CVB3 infection on MCP-1 expression in murine cardiac myocytes and the role of MCP-1 in migration of mononuclear cells in viral myocarditis. Our results showed that the expression of MCP-1 was significantly increased in cardiac myocytes after wild-type CVB3 infection in a time- and dose-dependent manner, which resulted in enhanced migration of mononuclear cells in mice with viral myocarditis. The migration of mononuclear cells was partially abolished by antibodies specific for MCP-1 in vivo and in vitro. Administration of anti-MCP-1 antibody prevented infiltration of mononuclear cells bearing the MCP-1 receptor CCR2 in mice with viral myocarditis. Infection by UV-irradiated CVB3 induced rapid and transient expression of MCP-1 in cardiac myocytes. In conclusion, our results indicate that CVB3 infection stimulates the expression of MCP-1 in myocardial cells, which subsequently leads to migration of mononuclear cells in viral myocarditis. PMID:15507642

  10. TRIP6 Enhances Lysophosphatidic Acid-induced Cell Migration by Interacting with the Lysophosphatidic Acid 2 Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Lai, Yun-Ju; Lin, Weei-Chin; Lin, Fang-Tsyr

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) induces actin rearrangement, focal adhesion assembly, and cell migration through the activation of small G protein Rho and its downstream effectors. These diverse cellular responses are mediated by its associated G protein-coupled receptors. However, the mechanisms and specificity by which these LPA receptors mediate LPA actions are still poorly understood. Here we show that LPA stimulation promotes the interaction of the LPA2 receptor with a focal adhesion molecule, TRIP6 (thyroid receptor interacting protein 6)/ZRP-1 (zyxin-related protein 1). TRIP6 directly binds to the carboxyl-terminal tail of the LPA2 receptor through its LIM domains. LPA-dependent recruitment of TRIP6 to the plasma membrane promotes its targeting to focal adhesions and co-localization with actin stress fibers. In addition, TRIP6 associates with the components of focal complexes including paxillin, focal adhesion kinase, c-Src, and p130cas in an agonist-dependent manner. Overexpression of TRIP6 augments LPA-induced cell migration; in contrast, suppression of endogenous TRIP6 expression by a TRIP6-specific small interfering RNA reduces it in SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells. Strikingly, the association with TRIP6 is specific to the LPA2 receptor but not LPA1 or LPA3 receptor, indicating a specific role for TRIP6 in regulating LPA2 receptor-mediated signaling. Taken together, our results suggest that TRIP6 functions at a point of convergence between the activated LPA2 receptor and downstream signals involved in cell adhesion and migration. PMID:14688263

  11. Platelets enhance neutrophil transendothelial migration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Platelets are increasingly recognized as important mediators of inflammation in addition to thrombosis. While platelets have been shown to promote neutrophil (PMN) adhesion to endothelium in various inflammatory models, it is unclear whether platelets enhance neutrophil transmigration across inflame...

  12. Enhancing cell migration in shape-memory alginate-collagen composite scaffolds: In vitro and ex vivo assessment for intervertebral disc repair.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, Olivier; Naqvi, Syeda Masooma; Lennon, Kerri; Buckley, Conor Timothy

    2015-04-01

    weeks. Taken together, these findings illustrate the advantages of incorporating collagen as a means to enhance cell migration and proliferation in porous scaffolds which could be used to augment tissue repair strategies.

  13. Patient derived mutation W257G of PPP2R1A enhances cancer cell migration through SRC-JNK-c-Jun pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ae Lee; Han, Sora; Lee, Sunyi; Su Park, Jeong; Lu, Yiling; Yu, Shuangxing; Li, Jane; Chun, Kyung-Hee; Mills, Gordon B.; Yang, Young

    2016-01-01

    Mutation of PPP2R1A has been observed at high frequency in endometrial serous carcinomas but at low frequency in ovarian clear cell carcinoma. However, the biological role of mutation of PPP2R1A in ovarian and endometrial cancer progression remains unclear. In this study, we found that PPP2R1A expression is elevated in high-grade primary tumor patients with papillary serous tumors of the ovary. To determine whether increased levels or mutation of PPP2R1A might contribute to cancer progression, the effects of overexpression or mutation of PPP2R1A on cell proliferation, migration, and PP2A phosphatase activity were investigated using ovarian and endometrial cancer cell lines. Among the mutations, PPP2R1A-W257G enhanced cell migration in vitro through activating SRC-JNK-c-Jun pathway. Overexpression of wild type (WT) PPP2R1A increased its binding ability with B56 regulatory subunits, whereas PPP2R1A-mutations lost the ability to bind to most B56 subunits except B56δ. Total PP2A activity and PPP2R1A-associated PP2Ac activity were significantly increased in cells overexpressing PPP2R1A-WT. In addition, overexpression of PPP2R1A-WT increased cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. PMID:27272709

  14. Transcription factor activity of estrogen receptor α activation upon nonylphenol or bisphenol A treatment enhances the in vitro proliferation, invasion, and migration of neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongda; Yao, Yao; Wang, Changli; Zhang, Liyu; Cheng, Long; Wang, Yiren; Wang, Tao; Liang, Erguang; Jia, Hui; Ye, Qinong; Hou, Mingxiao; Feng, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Many kinds of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), for example, the environmental estrogens bisphenol A and nonylphenol, may regulate the activity of estrogen receptor α (ERα) and therefore induce potential disruption of normal endocrine function. However, the involvement of EDCs in human cancers, especially in endocrine-related cancer neuroblastoma regulation, is not very clear. In this work, results showed that upon bisphenol A or nonylphenol treatment, the transcription factor activity of ERα was significantly increased in neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. Bisphenol A and nonylphenol could enhance ERα activity via recruiting it to the target gene promoter. Furthermore, treatment of bisphenol A and nonylphenol enhanced the in vitro proliferation, invasion, and migration ability of neuroblastoma cells. By investigating the role of EDC-induced ERα upregulation, our data extend the understanding of the function of EDCs and further suggest that ERα might be a potential therapeutic target in human neuroblastoma treatment. PMID:27366082

  15. Transcription factor activity of estrogen receptor α activation upon nonylphenol or bisphenol A treatment enhances the in vitro proliferation, invasion, and migration of neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongda; Yao, Yao; Wang, Changli; Zhang, Liyu; Cheng, Long; Wang, Yiren; Wang, Tao; Liang, Erguang; Jia, Hui; Ye, Qinong; Hou, Mingxiao; Feng, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Many kinds of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), for example, the environmental estrogens bisphenol A and nonylphenol, may regulate the activity of estrogen receptor α (ERα) and therefore induce potential disruption of normal endocrine function. However, the involvement of EDCs in human cancers, especially in endocrine-related cancer neuroblastoma regulation, is not very clear. In this work, results showed that upon bisphenol A or nonylphenol treatment, the transcription factor activity of ERα was significantly increased in neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. Bisphenol A and nonylphenol could enhance ERα activity via recruiting it to the target gene promoter. Furthermore, treatment of bisphenol A and nonylphenol enhanced the in vitro proliferation, invasion, and migration ability of neuroblastoma cells. By investigating the role of EDC-induced ERα upregulation, our data extend the understanding of the function of EDCs and further suggest that ERα might be a potential therapeutic target in human neuroblastoma treatment.

  16. A Discrete Cell Migration Model

    SciTech Connect

    Nutaro, James J; Kruse, Kara L; Ward, Richard C; O'Quinn, Elizabeth; Woerner, Matthew M; Beckerman, Barbara G

    2007-01-01

    Migration of vascular smooth muscle cells is a fundamental process in the development of intimal hyperplasia, a precursor to development of cardiovascular disease and a potential response to injury of an arterial wall. Boyden chamber experiments are used to quantify the motion of cell populations in response to a chemoattractant gradient (i.e., cell chemotaxis). We are developing a mathematical model of cell migration within the Boyden chamber, while simultaneously conducting experiments to obtain parameter values for the migration process. In the future, the model and parameters will be used as building blocks for a detailed model of the process that causes intimal hyperplasia. The cell migration model presented in this paper is based on the notion of a cell as a moving sensor that responds to an evolving chemoattractant gradient. We compare the results of our three-dimensional hybrid model with results from a one-dimensional continuum model. Some preliminary experimental data that is being used to refine the model is also presented.

  17. Human Umbilical Cord Perivascular Cells Exhibited Enhanced Migration Capacity towards Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Comparison with Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: A Role for Autocrine Motility Factor Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Aquino, Jorge B.; Malvicini, Mariana; Bolontrade, Marcela; Podhajcer, Osvaldo; Garcia, Mariana G.; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Unfortunately, the incidence and mortality associated with HCC are increasing. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed and the use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) as carrier of therapeutic genes is emerging as a promising option. Different sources of MSCs are being studied for cell therapy and bone marrow-derived cells are the most extensively explored; however, birth associated-tissues represent a very promising source. The aim of this work was to compare the in vitro and in vivo migration capacity between bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) and human umbilical cord perivascular cells (HUCPVCs) towards HCC. We observed that HUCPVCs presented higher in vitro and in vivo migration towards factors released by HCC. The expression of autocrine motility factor (AMF) receptor, genes related with the availability of the receptor on the cell surface (caveolin-1 and -2) and metalloproteinase 3, induced by the receptor activation and important for cell migration, was increased in HUCPVCs. The chemotactic response towards recombinant AMF was increased in HUCPVCs compared to BM-MSCs, and its inhibition in the conditioned medium from HCC induced higher decrease in HUCPVC migration than in BM-MSC. Our results indicate that HUCPVCs could be a useful cellular source to deliver therapeutic genes to HCC. PMID:25147818

  18. Human umbilical cord perivascular cells exhibited enhanced migration capacity towards hepatocellular carcinoma in comparison with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells: a role for autocrine motility factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Bayo, Juan; Fiore, Esteban; Aquino, Jorge B; Malvicini, Mariana; Rizzo, Manglio; Peixoto, Estanislao; Alaniz, Laura; Piccioni, Flavia; Bolontrade, Marcela; Podhajcer, Osvaldo; Garcia, Mariana G; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Unfortunately, the incidence and mortality associated with HCC are increasing. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed and the use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) as carrier of therapeutic genes is emerging as a promising option. Different sources of MSCs are being studied for cell therapy and bone marrow-derived cells are the most extensively explored; however, birth associated-tissues represent a very promising source. The aim of this work was to compare the in vitro and in vivo migration capacity between bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) and human umbilical cord perivascular cells (HUCPVCs) towards HCC. We observed that HUCPVCs presented higher in vitro and in vivo migration towards factors released by HCC. The expression of autocrine motility factor (AMF) receptor, genes related with the availability of the receptor on the cell surface (caveolin-1 and -2) and metalloproteinase 3, induced by the receptor activation and important for cell migration, was increased in HUCPVCs. The chemotactic response towards recombinant AMF was increased in HUCPVCs compared to BM-MSCs, and its inhibition in the conditioned medium from HCC induced higher decrease in HUCPVC migration than in BM-MSC. Our results indicate that HUCPVCs could be a useful cellular source to deliver therapeutic genes to HCC.

  19. MiR-100 Inhibits Osteosarcoma Cell Proliferation, Migration, and Invasion and Enhances Chemosensitivity by Targeting IGFIR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Zhu, Shu-Tao; Wang, Xiao; Deng, Jun; Li, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Bing-Shan

    2016-10-01

    MicroRNAs are highly conserved noncoding RNA that negatively modulate protein expression at a posttranscriptional and/or translational level. MicroRNAs play an important role in the development and progression of human cancers, including osteosarcoma. Recent studies have shown that miR-100 was downregulated in many cancers; however, the role of miR-100 in human osteosarcoma has not been totally elucidated. In this study, we demonstrate that the expression of miR-100 was significantly downregulated in human osteosarcoma tissues compared to the adjacent tissues. Enforced expression of miR-100 inhibited cell proliferation, migration, and invasion abilities of osteosarcoma cells, U-2OS, and MG-63. Additionally, miR-100 also sensitized osteosarcoma cells to cisplatin and promoted apoptosis. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-100 decreased the expression of insulin-like growth factor I receptor and inhibited PI3K/AKT and MAPK/ERK signaling. In human clinical specimens, insulin-like growth factor I receptor was inversely correlated with miR-100 in osteosarcoma tissues. Collectively, our results demonstrate that miR-100 is a tumor suppressor microRNA and indicate its potential application for the treatment of osteosarcoma in future.

  20. Capsaicin-mediated tNOX (ENOX2) up-regulation enhances cell proliferation and migration in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nei-Chi; Hsieh, Pei-Fang; Hsieh, Ming-Kun; Zeng, Zih-Ming; Cheng, Hsiao-Ling; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Chueh, Pin Ju

    2012-03-14

    Cancer chemoprevention is employed to block or reverse the progression of malignancies. To date, several thousands of agents have been found to possess chemopreventative activity, one of which is capsaicin, a component of chili peppers that exhibits antigrowth activity against various cancer cell lines. However, the role of capsaicin in tumorigenesis remains controversial because both cancer prevention and promotion have been proposed. Here, we made the unexpected discovery that treatment with low concentrations of capsaicin up-regulates tNOX (tumor-associated NADH oxidase) expression in HCT116 human colon carcinoma cells in association with enhanced cell proliferation and migration, as evidenced by down-regulation of epithelial markers and up-regulation of mesenchymal markers. Importantly, tNOX-knockdown in HCT116 cells by RNA interference reversed capsaicin-induced cell proliferation and migration in vitro and decreased tumor growth in vivo. Collectively, these findings provide a basis for explaining the tumor-promoting effect of capsaicin and might imply that caution should be taken when using capsaicin as a chemopreventive agent. PMID:22353011

  1. Loss of PTPN12 Stimulates Progression of ErbB2-Dependent Breast Cancer by Enhancing Cell Survival, Migration, and Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Davidson, Dominique; Martins Souza, Cleiton; Zhong, Ming-Chao; Wu, Ning; Park, Morag; Muller, William J; Veillette, André

    2015-12-01

    PTPN12 is a cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) reported to be a tumor suppressor in breast cancer, through its capacity to dephosphorylate oncogenic receptor protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs), such as ErbB2. However, the precise molecular and cellular impact of PTPN12 deficiency in breast cancer progression remains to be fully clarified. Here, we addressed this issue by examining the effect of PTPN12 deficiency on breast cancer progression in vivo, in a mouse model of ErbB2-dependent breast cancer using a conditional PTPN12-deficient mouse. Our studies showed that lack of PTPN12 in breast epithelial cells accelerated breast cancer development and lung metastases in vivo. PTPN12-deficient breast cancer cells displayed enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of the adaptor Cas, the adaptor paxillin, and the kinase Pyk2. They exhibited no detectable increase in ErbB2 tyrosine phosphorylation. PTPN12-deficient cells were more resistant to anoikis and had augmented migratory and invasive properties. Enhanced migration was corrected by inhibiting Pyk2. PTPN12-deficient breast cancer cells also acquired partial features of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a feature of more aggressive forms of breast cancer. Hence, loss of PTPN12 promoted tumor progression in a mouse model of breast cancer, supporting the notion that PTPN12 is a tumor suppressor in human breast cancer. This function was related to the ability of PTPN12 to suppress cell survival, migration, invasiveness, and EMT and to inhibit tyrosine phosphorylation of Cas, Pyk2, and paxillin. These findings enhance our understanding of the role and mechanism of action of PTPN12 in the control of breast cancer progression.

  2. Hexachlorobenzene modulates the crosstalk between the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and transforming growth factor-β1 signaling, enhancing human breast cancer cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Miret, Noelia; Pontillo, Carolina; Ventura, Clara; Carozzo, Alejandro; Chiappini, Florencia; Kleiman de Pisarev, Diana; Fernández, Natalia; Cocca, Claudia; Randi, Andrea

    2016-07-29

    Given the number of women affected by breast cancer, considerable interest has been raised in understanding the relationships between environmental chemicals and disease onset. Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is a dioxin-like compound that is widely distributed in the environment and is a weak ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We previously demonstrated that HCB acts as an endocrine disruptor capable of stimulating cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and metastasis in different breast cancer models. In addition, increasing evidence indicates that transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) can contribute to tumor maintenance and progression. In this context, this work investigated the effect of HCB (0.005, 0.05, 0.5, and 5μM) on TGF-β1 signaling and AhR/TGF-β1 crosstalk in the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and analyzed whether TGF-β1 pathways are involved in HCB-induced cell migration and invasion. RT-qPCR results indicated that HCB reduces AhR mRNA expression through TGF-β1 signaling but enhances TGF-β1 mRNA levels involving AhR signaling. Western blot analysis demonstrated that HCB could increase TGF-β1 protein levels and activation, as well as Smad3, JNK, and p38 phosphorylation. In addition, low and high doses of HCB were determined to exert differential effects on AhR protein levels, localization, and activation, with a high dose (5μM) inducing AhR nuclear translocation and AhR-dependent CYP1A1 expression. These findings also revealed that c-Src and AhR are involved in HCB-mediated activation of Smad3. HCB enhances cell migration (scratch motility assay) and invasion (Transwell assay) through the Smad, JNK, and p38 pathways, while ERK1/2 is only involved in HCB-induced cell migration. These results demonstrate that HCB modulates the crosstalk between AhR and TGF-β1 and consequently exacerbates a pro-migratory phenotype in MDA-MB-231 cells, which contributes to a high degree of malignancy. Taken together, our findings help to

  3. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β inhibition enhanced proliferation, migration and functional re-endothelialization of endothelial progenitor cells in hypercholesterolemia microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Bin; Jin, Jun; Ding, Xiaohan; Deng, Mengyang; Yu, Shiyong; Song, MingBao; Yu, Yang; Zhao, Xiaohui; Chen, Jianfei

    2015-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia impairs the quantity and function of endothelial progenitor cell. We hypothesized that glycogen synthase kinase 3β activity is involved in regulating biological function of endothelial progenitor cells in hypercholesterolemia microenvironment. For study, endothelial progenitor cells derived from apolipoprotein E-deficient mice fed with high-fat diet were used. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β activity was interfered with glycogen synthase kinase 3β inhibitor lithium chloride or transduced with replication defective adenovirus vector expressing catalytically inactive glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β-KM). Functions of endothelial progenitor cells, proliferation, migration, secretion and network formation of endothelial progenitor cells were assessed in vitro. The expression of phospho-glycogen synthase kinase 3β, β-catenin and cyclinD1 in endothelial progenitor cells was detected by Western blot. The in vivo function re-endothelialization and vasodilation were also analyzed by artery injury model transplanted with glycogen synthase kinase 3β-inhibited endothelial progenitor cells. We demonstrated that while the proliferation, migration, network formation as well as VEGF and NO secretion were impaired in apolipoprotein E-deficient endothelial progenitor cells, glycogen synthase kinase 3β inhibition significantly improved all these functions. Apolipoprotein E-deficient endothelial progenitor cells showed decreased phospho-glycogen synthase kinase 3β, β-catenin and cyclinD1 expression, whereas these signals were enhanced by glycogen synthase kinase 3β inhibition and accompanied with β-catenin nuclear translocation. Our in vivo model showed that glycogen synthase kinase 3β inhibition remarkably increased re-endothelial and vasodilation. Taken together, our data suggest that inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β is associated with endothelial progenitor cell biological functions both in vitro and in vivo. It might be an important

  4. Zebrafish germ cells: motility and guided migration.

    PubMed

    Paksa, Azadeh; Raz, Erez

    2015-10-01

    In the course of embryonic development, the process of cell migration is critical for establishment of the embryonic body plan, for morphogenesis and for organ function. Investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying cell migration is thus crucial for understanding developmental processes and clinical conditions resulting from abnormal cell migration such as cancer metastasis. The long-range migration of primordial germ cells toward the region at which the gonad develops occurs in embryos of various species and thus constitutes a useful in vivo model for single-cell migration. Recent studies employing zebrafish embryos have greatly contributed to the understanding of the mechanisms facilitating the migration of these cells en route to their target.

  5. Conditionally immortalized human pancreatic stellate cell lines demonstrate enhanced proliferation and migration in response to IGF-I

    SciTech Connect

    Rosendahl, Ann H.; Gundewar, Chinmay; Said Hilmersson, Katarzyna; Ni, Lan; Saleem, Moin A.; Andersson, Roland

    2015-01-15

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a key role in the dense desmoplastic stroma associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Studies on human PSCs have been minimal due to difficulty in maintaining primary PSC in culture. We have generated the first conditionally immortalized human non-tumor (NPSC) and tumor-derived (TPSC) pancreatic stellate cells via transformation with the temperature-sensitive SV40 large T antigen and human telomerase (hTERT). These cells proliferate at 33°C. After transfer to 37°C, the SV40LT is switched off and the cells regain their primary PSC phenotype and growth characteristics. NPSC contained cytoplasmic vitamin A-storing lipid droplets, while both NPSC and TPSC expressed the characteristic markers αSMA, vimentin, desmin and GFAP. Proteome array analysis revealed that of the 55 evaluated proteins, 27 (49%) were upregulated ≥3-fold in TPSC compared to NPSC, including uPA, pentraxin-3, endoglin and endothelin-1. Two insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) were inversely expressed. Although discordant IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 levels, IGF-I was found to stimulate proliferation of both NPSC and TPSC. Both basal and IGF-I stimulated motility was significantly enhanced in TPSC compared to NPSC. In conclusion, these cells provide a unique resource that will facilitate further study of the active stroma compartment associated with pancreatic cancer. - Highlights: • Generation of human conditionally immortalized human pancreatic stellate cell lines. • Temperature-sensitive SV40LT allows switch to primary PSC phenotype characteristics. • Proteome profiling revealed distinct expression patterns between TPSC and NPSC. • Enhanced IGF-I-stimulated proliferation and motility by TPSC compared to NPSC.

  6. Upregulation of p72 Enhances Malignant Migration and Invasion of Glioma Cells by Repressing Beclin1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenxing; Tian, He; Miao, Ye; Feng, Xu; Li, Yang; Wang, Honglei; Song, Xiaofeng

    2016-06-01

    p72 is the member of the DEAD-box RNA helicase family, which can unwind double-stranded RNA and is efficient for microRNA (miRNA, miR) processing. However, its specific role in glioma has not been elucidated. First, the expression of p72 in glioma cell lines and tissues was explored using Western blot. To explore the role of p72 on glioma progression, adenovirus inhibiting p72 was transfected into A172 and T98G cells. Cell autophagy was determined using GFP-LC3 dots, and cell apoptosis was determined using flow cytometry. The effect of Beclin1 was explored using GFP-LC3 dots, flow cytometry, and colony formation. The possible miRNAs that target the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of Beclin1 were predicted using TargetScan. Dual luciferase reporter assay was applied to determine whether these miRNAs bind to the 3'-UTR of Beclin1. The expression of p72 was significantly increased in glioma cell lines and tissues. Autophagy-related protein Beclin1 was found to be significantly enhanced when p72 was inhibited. The accumulation of GFP-LC3 dots was significant in cells transfected with ad-sh-p72 compared with ad-con. Colony formation capacity and cell apoptosis were also found to be significantly decreased with p72 inhibition. Furthermore, upregulation of Beclin1 contributes to A172 cell autophagy, invasion, and apoptosis. Overexpression of p72 induces increased miR-34-5p and miR-5195-3p expression in A172 and T98G cells. Beclin1 was the target gene of miR-34-5p and miR-5195-3p. In conclusion, we found for the first time that overexpression of p72 decreased Beclin1 expression partially by increasing miR-34-5p and miR-5195-3p expression in A172 and T98G cells. PMID:27301285

  7. MicroRNA-106b-25 cluster targets β-TRCP2, increases the expression of Snail and enhances cell migration and invasion in H1299 (non small cell lung cancer) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Savita, Udainiya; Karunagaran, Devarajan

    2013-05-17

    Highlights: •miR-106b-25 cluster directly targets the 3′UTR of the β-TRCP2 transcript. •β-TRCP2 mRNA was lower in H1299 cells stably expressing miR-106b-25 cluster. •miR-106b-25 cluster increased the expression of Snail. •miR-106b-25 cluster promoted the migration, colony formation and invasion. •miR-106b-25 cluster enhanced endothelial tube formation. -- Abstract: Lung cancer causes high mortality without a declining trend and non small cell lung cancer represents 85% of all pulmonary carcinomas. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) serve as fine regulators of proliferation, migration, invasion/metastasis and angiogenesis of normal and cancer cells. Using TargetScan6.2, we predicted that the ubiquitin ligase, β-TRCP2, could be a target for two of the constituent miRNAs of the miR-106b-25 cluster (miR-106b and miR-93). We generated a stable clone of miR-106b-25 cluster (CL) or the empty vector (EV) in H1299 (non small cell lung cancer) cells. The expression of β-TRCP2 mRNA was significantly lower in CL than that in EV cells. Transient expression of miR-93 but not antimiR-93 decreased the expression of β-TRCP2 mRNA in H1299 cells. β-TRCP2-3′UTR reporter assay revealed that its activity in CL cells was only 60% of that in EV cells. Snail protein expression was higher in CL than that in EV cells and H1299 cells exhibited an increase in the expression of Snail upon transient transfection with miR-93. miR-106b-25 cluster-induced migration of CL measured by scratch assay was more than that in EV cells and no significant difference in migration was observed between antimiR-93-transfected H1299 cells and the corresponding control-oligo-transfected cells. miR-106b-25 cluster-induced migration of CL cells was again confirmed in a Boyden chamber assay without the matrigel. CL cells were more invasive than EV cells when assessed using Boyden chambers with matrigel but there were no significant changes in the cell viabilities between EV and CL cells. Colony formation assay

  8. NFκB activation by modified vaccinia virus as a novel strategy to enhance neutrophil migration and HIV-specific T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Di Pilato, Mauro; Mejías-Pérez, Ernesto; Zonca, Manuela; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Gómez, Carmen Elena; Trakala, Marianna; Nieto, Jacobo; Nájera, José Luis; Sorzano, Carlos Oscar S; Combadière, Christophe; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Planelles, Lourdes; Esteban, Mariano

    2015-03-17

    Neutrophils are antigen-transporting cells that generate vaccinia virus (VACV)-specific T-cell responses, yet how VACV modulates neutrophil recruitment and its significance in the immune response are unknown. We generated an attenuated VACV strain that expresses HIV-1 clade C antigens but lacks three specific viral genes (A52R, K7R, and B15R). We found that these genes act together to inhibit the NFκB signaling pathway. Triple ablation in modified virus restored NFκB function in macrophages. After virus infection of mice, NFκB pathway activation led to expression of several cytokines/chemokines that increased the migration of neutrophil populations (Nα and Nβ) to the infection site. Nβ cells displayed features of antigen-presenting cells and activated virus-specific CD8 T cells. Enhanced neutrophil trafficking to the infection site correlated with an increased T-cell response to HIV vector-delivered antigens. These results identify a mechanism for poxvirus-induced immune response and alternatives for vaccine vector design.

  9. Chondroitinase ABC combined with neural stem/progenitor cell transplantation enhances graft cell migration and outgrowth of growth-associated protein-43-positive fibers after rat spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Takeshi; Nakamura, Masaya; Yamane, Junichi; Katoh, Hiroyuki; Okada, Seiji; Iwanami, Akio; Watanabe, Kota; Ishii, Ken; Kato, Fumikazu; Fujita, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Toyomi; Okano, Hirotaka James; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Okano, Hideyuki

    2005-12-01

    We previously reported that the transplantation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) can contribute to the repair of injured spinal cord in adult rats and monkeys. In some cases, however, most of the transplanted cells adhered to the cavity wall and failed to migrate and integrate into the host spinal cord. In this study we focused on chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG), a known constituent of glial scars that is strongly expressed after spinal cord injury (SCI), as a putative inhibitor of NSPC migration in vivo. We hypothesized that the digestion of CSPG by chondroitinase ABC (C-ABC) might promote the migration of transplanted cells and neurite outgrowth after SCI. An in vitro study revealed that the migration of NSPC-derived cells was inhibited by CSPG and that this inhibitory effect was attenuated by C-ABC pre-treatment. Consistently, an in vivo study of C-ABC treatment combined with NSPC transplantation into injured spinal cord revealed that C-ABC pre-treatment promoted the migration of the transplanted cells, whereas CSPG-immunopositive scar tissue around the lesion cavity prevented their migration into the host spinal cord in the absence of C-ABC pre-treatment. Furthermore, this combined treatment significantly induced the outgrowth of a greater number of growth-associated protein-43-positive fibers at the lesion epicentre, compared with NSPC transplantation alone. These findings suggested that the application of C-ABC enhanced the benefits of NSPC transplantation for SCI by reducing the inhibitory effects of the glial scar, indicating that this combined treatment may be a promising strategy for the regeneration of injured spinal cord.

  10. Characterization of Collective Cell Migration Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Rachel; Yue, Haicen; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Losert, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    During cancer progression, tumor cells invade the surrounding tissue and migrate throughout the body, forming clinically dangerous secondary tumors. This metastatic process begins when cells leave the primary tumor, either as individual cells or collectively migrating groups. Here we present data on the migration dynamics of epithelial sheets composed of many cells. Using quantitative image analysis techniques, we are able to extract motion information from time-lapse images of cell lines with varying malignancy. Adapting metrics originally used to study fluid flows we are able to characterize the migration dynamics of these cell lines. By describing the migration dynamics in great detail, we are able to make a clear comparison of our results to a simulation of collective cell migration. Specifically, we explore whether leader cells are required to describe our expanding sheets of cells and whether the answer depends on individual cell activity.

  11. Schwann cells promote endothelial cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Tiago; Ahmed, Maqsood; Wieringa, Paul; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Directed cell migration is a crucial orchestrated process in embryonic development, wound healing, and immune response. The underlying substrate can provide physical and/or chemical cues that promote directed cell migration. Here, using electrospinning we developed substrates of aligned poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanofibres to study the influence of glial cells on endothelial cells (ECs) in a 3-dimensional (3D) co-culture model. ECs build blood vessels and regulate their plasticity in coordination with neurons. Likewise, neurons construct nerves and regulate their circuits in coordination with ECs. In our model, the neuro-vascular cross-talk was assessed using a direct co-culture model of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and rat Schwann cells (rSCs). The effect of rSCs on ECs behavior was demonstrated by earlier and higher velocity values and genetic expression profiles different of those of HUVECs when seeded alone. We observed 2 different gene expression trends in the co-culture models: (i) a later gene expression of angiogenic factors, such as interleukin-8 (IL-8) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and (ii) an higher gene expression of genes involved in actin filaments rearrangement, such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 13 (MAPKAPK13), Vinculin (VCL), and Profilin (PROF). These results suggested that the higher ECs migration is mainly due to proteins involved in the actin filaments rearrangement and in the directed cell migration rather than the effect of angiogenic factors. This co-culture model provides an approach to enlighten the neurovascular interactions, with particular focus on endothelial cell migration. PMID:26491999

  12. Factors controlling cardiac neural crest cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Hutson, Mary R

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac neural crest cells originate as part of the postotic caudal rhombencephalic neural crest stream. Ectomesenchymal cells in this stream migrate to the circumpharyngeal ridge and then into the caudal pharyngeal arches where they condense to form first a sheath and then the smooth muscle tunics of the persisting pharyngeal arch arteries. A subset of the cells continues migrating into the cardiac outflow tract where they will condense to form the aorticopulmonary septum. Cell signaling, extracellular matrix and cell-cell contacts are all critical for the initial migration, pauses, continued migration and condensation of these cells. This Review elucidates what is currently known about these factors. PMID:20890117

  13. DAP12 deficiency in liver allografts results in enhanced donor DC migration, augmented effector T cell responses and abrogation of transplant tolerance.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, O; Kimura, S; Dou, L; Matta, B M; Yokota, S; Ross, M A; Geller, D A; Thomson, A W

    2014-08-01

    Liver interstitial dendritic cells (DC) have been implicated in immune regulation and tolerance induction. We found that the transmembrane immuno-adaptor DNAX-activating protein of 12 kDa (DAP12) negatively regulated conventional liver myeloid (m) DC maturation and their in vivo migratory and T cell allostimulatory ability. Livers were transplanted from C57BL/6(H2(b) ) (B6) WT or DAP12(-/-) mice into WT C3H (H2(k) ) recipients. Donor mDC (H2-K(b+) CD11c(+) ) were quantified in spleens by flow cytometry. Anti-donor T cell reactivity was evaluated by ex vivo carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester-mixed leukocyte reaction and delayed-type hypersensitivity responses, while T effector and regulatory T cells were determined by flow analysis. A threefold to fourfold increase in donor-derived DC was detected in spleens of DAP12(-/-) liver recipients compared with those given WT grafts. Moreover, pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression in the graft, interferon gamma (IFNγ) production by graft-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells and systemic levels of IFNγ were all elevated significantly in DAP12(-/-) liver recipients. DAP12(-/-) grafts also exhibited reduced incidences of CD4(+) Foxp3(+) cells and enhanced CD8(+) T cell IFNγ secretion in response to donor antigen challenge. Unlike WT grafts, DAP12(-/-) livers failed to induce tolerance and were rejected acutely. Thus, DAP12 expression in liver grafts regulates donor mDC migration to host lymphoid tissue, alloreactive T cell responses and transplant tolerance.

  14. Migration of turkey muscle satellite cells is enhanced by the syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain through the activation of RhoA.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jonghyun; McFarland, Douglas C; Velleman, Sandra G

    2013-03-01

    Syndecan-4 (S4) is a cell membrane-associated heparan sulfate proteoglycan that forms oligomers in muscle satellite cells. The S4 oligomers activate protein kinase Cα (PKCα) through the S4 cytoplasmic domain and may regulate the activation of ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA), a signal transduction molecule down-stream of PKCα which is thought to influence cell migration. However, little is known about the function of the S4 cytoplasmic domain in satellite cell migration and RhoA activation. The objective of the current study was to determine the function of S4 and its cytoplasmic domain in cell migration and RhoA activation. To study the objective, clones of S4 and S4 without the cytoplasmic domain (S4C) were used in overexpression studies, and small interference RNAs targeting S4 or RhoA were used in knockdown studies. Satellite cell migration was increased by S4 overexpression, but decreased by the knockdown or deletion of the S4 cytoplasmic domain. The RhoA protein was activated by the overexpression of S4, but not with the deletion of the S4 cytoplasmic domain. The treatment of Rho activator II or the knockdown of RhoA also modulated satellite cell migration. Finally, co-transfection (S4 overexpression and RhoA knockdown) and rescue (the knockdown of S4 and the treatment with Rho activator II) studies demonstrated that S4-mediated satellite cell migration was regulated through the activation of RhoA. The cytoplasmic domain of S4 is required for cell migration and RhoA activation which will affect muscle fiber formation. PMID:23212449

  15. Dynamic contact guidance of migrating cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losert, Wolfgang; Sun, Xiaoyu; Guven, Can; Driscoll, Meghan; Fourkas, John

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the effects of nanotopographical surfaces on the cell migration and cell shape dynamics of the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. Amoeboid motion exhibits significant contact guidance along surfaces with nanoscale ridges or grooves. We show quantitatively that nanoridges spaced 1.5 μm apart exhibit the greatest contact guidance efficiency. Using principal component analysis, we characterize the dynamics of the cell shape modulated by the coupling between the cell membrane and ridges. We show that motion parallel to the ridges is enhanced, while the turning, at the largest spatial scales, is suppressed. Since protrusion dynamics are principally governed by actin dynamics, we imaged the actin polymerization of cells on ridges. We found that actin polymerization occurs preferentially along nanoridges in a ``monorail'' like fashion. The ridges then provide us with a tool to study actin dynamics in an effectively reduced dimensional system.

  16. BAG-1 enhances cell-cell adhesion, reduces proliferation and induces chaperone-independent suppression of hepatocyte growth factor-induced epidermal keratinocyte migration

    SciTech Connect

    Hinitt, C.A.M.; Wood, J.; Lee, S.S.; Williams, A.C.; Howarth, J.L.; Glover, C.P.; Uney, J.B.; Hague, A.

    2010-08-01

    Cell motility is important in maintaining tissue homeostasis, facilitating epithelial wound repair and in tumour formation and progression. The aim of this study was to determine whether BAG-1 isoforms regulate epidermal cell migration in in vitro models of wound healing. In the human epidermal cell line HaCaT, endogenous BAG-1 is primarily nuclear and increases with confluence. Both transient and stable p36-Bag-1 overexpression resulted in increased cellular cohesion. Stable transfection of either of the three human BAG-1 isoforms p36-Bag-1 (BAG-1S), p46-Bag-1 (BAG-1M) and p50-Bag-1 (BAG-1L) inhibited growth and wound closure in serum-containing medium. However, in response to hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in serum-free medium, BAG-1S/M reduced communal motility and colony scattering, but BAG-1L did not. In the presence of HGF, p36-Bag-1 transfectants retained proliferative response to HGF with no change in ERK1/2 activation. However, the cells retained E-cadherin localisation at cell-cell junctions and exhibited pronounced cortical actin. Point mutations in the BAG domain showed that BAG-1 inhibition of motility is independent of its function as a chaperone regulator. These findings are the first to suggest that BAG-1 plays a role in regulating cell-cell adhesion and suggest an important function in epidermal cohesion.

  17. Transplantation stimulates interstitial cell migration in hydra

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, T.; David, C.N.; Bosch, T.C. )

    1990-04-01

    Migration of interstitial cells and nerve cell precursors was analyzed in Hydra magnipapillata and Hydra vulgaris (formerly Hydra attenuata). Axial grafts were made between ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled donor and unlabeled host tissue. Migration of labeled cells into the unlabeled half was followed for 4 days. The results indicate that the rate of migration was initially high and then slowed on Days 2-4. Regrafting fresh donor tissue on Days 2-4 maintained high levels of migration. Thus, migration appears to be stimulated by the grafting procedure itself.

  18. Enhanced Healing of Rat Calvarial Bone Defects with Hypoxic Conditioned Medium from Mesenchymal Stem Cells through Increased Endogenous Stem Cell Migration via Regulation of ICAM-1 Targeted-microRNA-221.

    PubMed

    Chang, Woochul; Kim, Ran; Park, Sang In; Jung, Yu Jin; Ham, Onju; Lee, Jihyun; Kim, Ji Hyeong; Oh, Sekyung; Lee, Min Young; Kim, Jongmin; Park, Moon-Seo; Chung, Yong-An; Hwang, Ki-Chul; Maeng, Lee-So

    2015-07-01

    The use of conditioned medium from mesenchymal stem cells may be a feasible approach for regeneration of bone defects through secretion of various components of mesenchymal stem cells such as cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Mesenchymal stem cells secrete and accumulate multiple factors in conditioned medium under specific physiological conditions. In this study, we investigated whether the conditioned medium collected under hypoxic condition could effectively influence bone regeneration through enhanced migration and adhesion of endogenous mesenchymal stem cells. Cell migration and adhesion abilities were increased through overexpression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in hypoxic conditioned medium treated group. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 was upregulated by microRNA-221 in mesenchymal stem cells because microRNAs are key regulators of various biological functions via gene expression. To investigate the effects in vivo, evaluation of bone regeneration by computed tomography and histological assays revealed that osteogenesis was enhanced in the hypoxic conditioned medium group relative to the other groups. These results suggest that behavioral changes of endogenous mesenchymal stem cells through microRNA-221 targeted-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression under hypoxic conditions may be a potential treatment for patients with bone defects.

  19. Screening of genes involved in cell migration in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Nagasaki, Akira; Uyeda, Taro Q P

    2008-03-10

    A single cell of wild-type Dictyostelium discoideum forms a visible colony on a plastic dish in several days, but due to enhanced cell migration, amiB-null mutant cells scatter over a large area and do not form noticeable colonies. Here, with an aim to identify genes involved in cell migration, we isolated suppresser mutants of amiB-null mutants that restore the ability to form colonies. From REMI (restriction enzyme-mediated integration)-mutagenized pool of double-mutants, we identified 18 responsible genes from them. These genes can be categorized into several biological processes. One cell line, Sab16 (Suppressor of amiB) was chosen for further analysis, which had a disrupted phospholipase D pldB gene. To confirm the role of pldB gene in cell migration, we knocked out the pldB gene and over-expressed gfp-pldB in wild-type cells. GFP-PLDB localized to plasma membrane and on vesicles, and in migrating cells, at the protruding regions of pseudopodia. Migration speed of vegetative pldB-null cells was reduced to 73% of that of the wild-type. These results suggest that PLDB plays an important role in migration in Dictyostelium cells, and that our screening system is useful for the identification of genes involved in cell migration. PMID:18164290

  20. Osteoactivin Promotes Migration of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Arosarena, Oneida A; Dela Cadena, Raul A; Denny, Michael F; Bryant, Evan; Barr, Eric W; Thorpe, Ryan; Safadi, Fayez F

    2016-08-01

    Nearly 50% of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) die of metastases or locoregional recurrence. Metastasis is mediated by cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Osteoactivin (OA) overexpression plays a role in metastases in several malignancies. The aims were to determine how integrin interactions modulate OA-induced OSCC cell migration; and to investigate OA effects on cell survival and proliferation. We confirmed OA mRNA and protein overexpression in OSCC cell lines. We assessed OA's interactions with integrins using adhesion inhibition assays, fluorescent immunocytochemistry and co-immunoprecipitation. We investigated OA-mediated activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and cell survival. Integrin inhibition effects on OA-mediated cell migration were determined. We assessed effects of OA knock-down on cell migration and proliferation. OA is overexpressed in OSCC cell lines, and serves as a migration-promoting adhesion molecule. OA co-localized with integrin subunits, and co-immunoprecipitated with the subunits. Integrin blocking antibodies, especially those directed against the β1 subunit, inhibited cell adhesion (P = 0.03 for SCC15 cells). Adhesion to OA activated MAPKs in UMSCC14a cells and OA treatment promoted survival of SCC15 cells. Integrin-neutralizing antibodies enhanced cell migration with OA in the extracellular matrix. OA knock-down resulted in decreased proliferation of SCC15 and SCC25 cells, but did not inhibit cell migration. OA in the extracellular matrix promotes OSCC cell adhesion and migration, and may be a novel target in the prevention of HNSCC spread. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1761-1770, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26636434

  1. Osteoactivin Promotes Migration of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Arosarena, Oneida A; Dela Cadena, Raul A; Denny, Michael F; Bryant, Evan; Barr, Eric W; Thorpe, Ryan; Safadi, Fayez F

    2016-08-01

    Nearly 50% of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) die of metastases or locoregional recurrence. Metastasis is mediated by cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Osteoactivin (OA) overexpression plays a role in metastases in several malignancies. The aims were to determine how integrin interactions modulate OA-induced OSCC cell migration; and to investigate OA effects on cell survival and proliferation. We confirmed OA mRNA and protein overexpression in OSCC cell lines. We assessed OA's interactions with integrins using adhesion inhibition assays, fluorescent immunocytochemistry and co-immunoprecipitation. We investigated OA-mediated activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and cell survival. Integrin inhibition effects on OA-mediated cell migration were determined. We assessed effects of OA knock-down on cell migration and proliferation. OA is overexpressed in OSCC cell lines, and serves as a migration-promoting adhesion molecule. OA co-localized with integrin subunits, and co-immunoprecipitated with the subunits. Integrin blocking antibodies, especially those directed against the β1 subunit, inhibited cell adhesion (P = 0.03 for SCC15 cells). Adhesion to OA activated MAPKs in UMSCC14a cells and OA treatment promoted survival of SCC15 cells. Integrin-neutralizing antibodies enhanced cell migration with OA in the extracellular matrix. OA knock-down resulted in decreased proliferation of SCC15 and SCC25 cells, but did not inhibit cell migration. OA in the extracellular matrix promotes OSCC cell adhesion and migration, and may be a novel target in the prevention of HNSCC spread. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1761-1770, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Activation of sonic hedgehog signaling enhances cell migration and invasion by induction of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 via the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/AKT signaling pathway in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Chang, Liang; Zhao, Dan; Liu, Hui-Bin; Wang, Qiu-Shi; Zhang, Ping; Li, Chen-Long; Du, Wen-Zhong; Wang, Hong-Jun; Liu, Xing; Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Jiang, Chuan-Lu

    2015-11-01

    Aberrant hedgehog signaling contributes to the development of various malignancies, including glioblastoma (GBM). However, the potential mechanism of hedgehog signaling in GBM migration and invasion has remained to be elucidated. The present study showed that enhanced hedgehog signaling by recombinant human sonic hedgehog N‑terminal peptide (rhSHH) promoted the adhesion, invasion and migration of GBM cells, accompanied by increases in mRNA and protein levels of matrix metalloproteinase‑2 (MMP‑2) and MMP‑9. However, inhibition of hedgehog signaling with cyclopamine suppressed the adhesion, invasion and migration of GBM cells, accompanied by decreases in mRNA and protein levels of MMP‑2 and ‑9. Furthermore, it was found that MMP‑2- and MMP‑9-neutralizing antibodies or GAM6001 reversed the inductive effects of rhSHH on cell migration and invasion. In addition, enhanced hedgehog signaling by rhSHH increased AKT phosphorylation, whereas blockade of hedgehog signaling decreased AKT phosphorylations. Further experiments showed that LY294002, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K), decreased rhSHH‑induced upregulation of MMP‑2 and ‑9. Finally, the protein expression of glioblastoma-associated oncogene 1 was positively correlated with levels of phosphorylated AKT as well as protein expressions of MMP‑2 and ‑9 in GBM tissue samples. In conclusion, the present study indicated that the hedgehog pathway regulates GBM-cell migration and invasion by increasing MMP-2 and MMP-9 production via the PI3K/AKT pathway. PMID:26299938

  3. Rho GTPase signalling in cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Ridley, Anne J

    2015-01-01

    Cells migrate in multiple different ways depending on their environment, which includes the extracellular matrix composition, interactions with other cells, and chemical stimuli. For all types of cell migration, Rho GTPases play a central role, although the relative contribution of each Rho GTPase depends on the environment and cell type. Here, I review recent advances in our understanding of how Rho GTPases contribute to different types of migration, comparing lamellipodium-driven versus bleb-driven migration modes. I also describe how cells migrate across the endothelium. In addition to Rho, Rac and Cdc42, which are well known to regulate migration, I discuss the roles of other less-well characterized members of the Rho family. PMID:26363959

  4. Mast cell heparin stimulates migration of capillary endothelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Migration of capillary endothelial cells is an important component of angiogenesis in vivo. Increased numbers of mast cells have been associated with several types of angiogenesis. We have used a quantitative assay in vitro to demonstrate that mast cells release a factor that significantly increases bovine capillary endothelial cell migration. The factor is present in medium conditioned by mast cells as well as lysates of mast cells. The stimulatory effect of mast cells on migration is specific for capillary endothelial cells. Furthermore, mast cells have no mitogenic activity for capillary endothelial cells. Of all the secretory products of mast cells tested, only heparin stimulated capillary endothelial cell migration in vitro. Heparin preparations from a variety of sources stimulated capillary endothelial cell migration to the same degree but did not stimulate migration of several other cell types. The migration activity of heparin and mast cell conditioned medium was blocked by specific antagonists of heparin (protamine and heparinase), but not by chondroitinase ABC. The migration activity of mast cell conditioned medium was resistant to heat (100 degrees C) and incubation with proteolytic enzymes. These results suggest that the role of mast cells in angiogenesis may be to enhance migration of the endothelial cells of growing capillaries. PMID:7420025

  5. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Maneet; McGrath, Kelly L; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Shah, Fenil; King, Mallory M; Clarke, Frank M; Tonissen, Kathryn F

    2016-08-01

    Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1) in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS) or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration.

  6. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Maneet; McGrath, Kelly L; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Shah, Fenil; King, Mallory M; Clarke, Frank M; Tonissen, Kathryn F

    2016-08-01

    Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1) in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS) or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration. PMID:26760912

  7. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Maneet; McGrath, Kelly L.; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Shah, Fenil; King, Mallory M.; Clarke, Frank M.; Tonissen, Kathryn F.

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1) in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS) or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration. PMID:26760912

  8. Dynamic cell adhesion and migration on nanoscale grooved substrates.

    PubMed

    Lamers, E; te Riet, J; Domanski, M; Luttge, R; Figdor, C G; Gardeniers, J G E; Walboomers, X F; Jansen, J A

    2012-01-01

    Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to initiate and increase cell locomotion and coverage with cells, and thus achieve an enhanced wound healing response around an implantable material. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate how MC3T3-E1 osteoblast initial adhesion and directional migration are influenced by nanogrooves with pitches ranging from 150 nm up to 1000 nm. In this study, we used a multi-patterned substrate with five different groove patterns and a smooth area with either a concentric or radial orientation. Initial cell adhesion measurements after 10 s were performed using atomic force spectroscopy-assisted single-cell force spectroscopy, and demonstrated that nascent cell adhesion was highly induced by a 600 nm pitch and reduced by a 150 nm pitch. Addition of RGD peptide significantly reduced adhesion, indicating that integrins and cell adhesive proteins (e.g. fibronectin or vitronectin) are key factors in specific cell adhesion on nanogrooved substrates. Also, cell migration was highly dependent on the groove pitch; the highest directional migration parallel to the grooves was observed on a 600 nm pitch, whereas a 150 nm pitch restrained directional cell migration. From this study, we conclude that grooves with a pitch of 600 nm may be favourable to enhance fast wound closure, thereby promoting tissue regeneration.

  9. Enhanced cell migration and apoptosis resistance may underlie the association between high SERPINE1 expression and poor outcome in head and neck carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Téllez-Gabriel, Marta; León, Xavier; Virós, David; López, Montserrat; Gallardo, Alberto; Céspedes, Maria Virtudes; Casanova, Isolda; López-Pousa, Antonio; Mangues, Maria Antonia; Quer, Miquel; Barnadas, Agustí; Mangues, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    High SERPINE1 expression is a common event in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC); however, whether it plays a role in determining clinical outcome remains still unknown. We studied SERPINE1 as a prognostic marker in two HNSCC patient cohorts. In a retrospective study (n = 80), high expression of SERPINE1 was associated with poor progression-free (p = 0.022) and cancer-specific (p = 0.040) survival. In a prospective study (n = 190), high SERPINE1 expression was associated with poor local recurrence-free (p = 0.022), progression-free (p = 0.002) and cancer-specific (p = 0.006) survival. SERPINE1 expression was identified as an independent risk factor for progression-free survival in patients treated with chemo-radiotherapy or radiotherapy (p = 0.043). In both patient cohorts, high SERPINE1 expression increased the risk of metastasis spread (p = 0.045; p = 0.029). The association between SERPINE1 expression and survival was confirmed using the HNSCC cohort included in The Cancer Genome Atlas project (n = 507). Once again, patients showing high expression had a poorer survival (p < 0.001). SERPINE1 over-expression in HNSCC cells reduced cell proliferation and enhanced migration. It also protected cells from cisplatin-induced apoptosis, which was accompanied by PI3K/AKT pathway activation. Downregulation of SERPINE1 expression had the opposite effect. We propose SERPINE1 expression as a prognostic marker that could be used to stratify HNSCC patients according to their risk of recurrence. PMID:26359694

  10. Nanotopography guides and directs cell migration in amoeboid and epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Rachel; Das, Satarupa; Hourwitz, Matthew; Sun, Xiaoyu; Parent, Carole; Fourkas, John; Losert, Wolfgang

    Cell migration plays a critical role in development, angiogenesis, immune response, wound healing, and cancer metastasis. In many cases, cells also move in the context of a matrix of collagen fibers, and the alignment of these fibers can both affect the migration phenotype and guide cells. Here we show that both fast and slow migrating cells - amoeboid HL-60 and epithelial MCF10A - are affected in similar ways by micro/nanostructures with dimensions similar to those of collagen fibers. Cell alignment enhances the efficiency of migration by increasing directional persistence.

  11. Exendin-4 enhances the migration of adipose-derived stem cells to neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocyte-derived conditioned medium via the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt-stromal cell-derived factor-1α/CXC chemokine receptor 4 pathway

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, HAO; YANG, JUNJIE; XIN, TING; ZHANG, TAO; HU, SHUNYIN; ZHOU, SHANSHAN; CHEN, GUANGHUI; CHEN, YUNDAI

    2015-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are considered a suitable source of cells for the repair of tissue following acute myocardial infarction (AMI); however, the transplantation efficiency of ADSCs remains low. Therefore, identification of an efficient method to enhance the migration of engrafted cells to the target site is required. The present study used exendin-4 (Ex-4), a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, to optimize the migratory capacity of ADSCs. The aim was to determine the effect and mechanisms of Ex-4 on the migration of ADSCs to neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocyte-derived conditioned medium (NRVC-CM). The ADSCs and cardiomyocytes were cultured in vitro. Following incubation of the ADSCs with Ex-4, cell proliferation was measured using an MTT assay and the expression levels of CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) were investigated by reverse transctiption quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), western blot analysis and flow cytometry. In addition, the expression levels of stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) were evaluated in the NRVC-CM treated with Ex-4 by ELISA, RT-qPCR and western blot analysis. The migration of the ADSCs to the NRVC-CM was examined using a Transwell assay. Changes in the protein expression levels of phosphorylated (p−)Akt were examined in the two types of cell by western blot analysis. The results suggested that Ex-4 promoted the proliferation and expression of CXCR4 in the ADSCs, increased the secretion of SDF-1α in the cardiomyocytes and increased the expression levels of p-Akt in both cells. However, the alterations to the SDF-1α/C XC R4 cascade in the cells were abrogated following pretreatment with LY-294002, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase(PI3K) inhibitor. Furthermore, a Transwell migration assay revealed marked translocation of the ADSCs through the membranes, towards the NRVC-CM, following treatment with Ex-4. However, these effects were reduced significantly by pretreatment of the cells with the SDF-1

  12. Single cell migration dynamics mediated by geometric confinement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Hou, Ruixia; Xiao, Peng; Xing, Rubo; Chen, Tao; Han, Yanchun; Ren, Penggang; Fu, Jun

    2016-09-01

    The migration dynamics of cells plays a key role in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Previous studies mostly focus on regulating stem cell fate and phenotype by biophysical cues. In contrast, less is known about how the geometric cues mediate the migration dynamics of cells. Here, we fabricate graphene oxide (GO) microstripes on cell non-adhesive PEG substrate by using micromolding in capillary (MIMIC) method. Such micropatterns with alternating cell adhesion and cell resistance enable an effective control of selective adhesion and migration of single cells. The sharp contrast in cell adhesion minimizes the invasion of cells into the PEG patterns, and thereby strongly confines the cells on GO microstripes. As a result, the cells are forced to adapt highly polarized, elongated, and oriented geometry to fit the patterns. A series of pattern widths have been fabricated to modulate the extent of cell deformation and polarization. Under strong confinement, the cytoskeleton contractility, intracellular traction, and actin filament elongation are highly promoted, which result in enhanced cell migration along the patterns. This work provides an important insight into developing combinatorial graphene-based patterns for the control of cell migration dynamics, which is of great significance for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:27137805

  13. Cyclin D1 functions in cell migration.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiping; Wang, Chenguang; Prendergast, George C; Pestell, Richard G

    2006-11-01

    Cell migration is essential for developmental morphogenesis, tissue repair, and tumor metastasis. A recent study reveals that cyclin D1 acts to promote cell migration by inhibiting Rho/ROCK signaling and expression of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), an extracellular matrix protein that regulates cell migration in many settings including cancer. Given the frequent overexpression of cyclin D1 in cancer cells, due to its upregulation by Ras, Rho, Src, and other genes that drive malignant development, the new findings suggest that cyclin D1 may have a central role in mediating invasion and metastasis of cancer cells by controlling Rho/ROCK signaling and matrix deposition of TSP-1.

  14. Centrosome Positioning in 1D Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adlerz, Katrina; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    During cell migration, the positioning of the centrosome and nucleus define a cell's polarity. For a cell migrating on a two-dimensional substrate the centrosome is positioned in front of the nucleus. Under one-dimensional confinement, however, the centrosome is positioned behind the nucleus in 60% of cells. It is known that the centrosome is positioned by CDC42 and dynein for cells moving on a 2D substrate in a wound-healing assay. It is currently unknown, however, if this is also true for cells moving under 1D confinement, where the centrosome position is often reversed. Therefore, centrosome positioning was studied in cells migrating under 1D confinement, which mimics cells migrating through 3D matrices. 3 to 5 μm fibronectin lines were stamped onto a glass substrate and cells with fluorescently labeled nuclei and centrosomes migrated on the lines. Our results show that when a cell changes directions the centrosome position is maintained. That is, when the centrosome is between the nucleus and the cell's trailing edge and the cell changes direction, the centrosome will be translocated across the nucleus to the back of the cell again. A dynein inhibitor did have an influence on centrosome positioning in 1D migration and change of directions.

  15. Glutamate involvement in calcium–dependent migration of astrocytoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Astrocytoma are known to have altered glutamate machinery that results in the release of large amounts of glutamate into the extracellular space but the precise role of glutamate in favoring cancer processes has not yet been fully established. Several studies suggested that glutamate might provoke active killing of neurons thereby producing space for cancer cells to proliferate and migrate. Previously, we observed that calcium promotes disassembly of integrin-containing focal adhesions in astrocytoma, thus providing a link between calcium signaling and cell migration. The aim of this study was to determine how calcium signaling and glutamate transmission cooperate to promote enhanced astrocytoma migration. Methods The wound-healing model was used to assay migration of human U87MG astrocytoma cells and allowed to monitor calcium signaling during the migration process. The effect of glutamate on calcium signaling was evaluated together with the amount of glutamate released by astrocytoma during cell migration. Results We observed that glutamate stimulates motility in serum-starved cells, whereas in the presence of serum, inhibitors of glutamate receptors reduce migration. Migration speed was also reduced in presence of an intracellular calcium chelator. During migration, cells displayed spontaneous Ca2+ transients. L-THA, an inhibitor of glutamate re-uptake increased the frequency of Ca2+ oscillations in oscillating cells and induced Ca2+ oscillations in quiescent cells. The frequency of migration-associated Ca2+ oscillations was reduced by prior incubation with glutamate receptor antagonists or with an anti-β1 integrin antibody. Application of glutamate induced increases in internal free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). Finally we found that compounds known to increase [Ca2+]i in astrocytomas such as thapsigagin, ionomycin or the metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist t-ACPD, are able to induce glutamate release. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that

  16. Salivary trefoil factor 3 enhances migration of oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Storesund, Trond; Hayashi, Katsuhiko; Kolltveit, Kristin M; Bryne, Magne; Schenck, Karl

    2008-04-01

    Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) is a member of the mammalian TFF family. Trefoil factors are secreted onto mucosal surfaces of the entire body and exert different effects according to tissue location. Trefoil factors may enhance mucosal healing by modulating motogenic activity, inhibiting apoptosis, and promoting angiogenesis. Trefoil factor 3 is secreted from the submandibular gland and is present in whole saliva. The aim of this study was to assess the migratory and proliferative effects of TFF3 on primary oral human keratinocytes and oral cancer cell lines. The addition of TFF3 increased the migration of both normal oral keratinocytes and the cancer cell line D12, as evaluated by a two-dimensional scratch assay. By contrast, no increase in proliferation or energy metabolism was observed after stimulation with TFF3. Trefoil factor 3-enhanced migration was found to be driven partly by the extracellular signal-related kinase (Erk1/2) pathway, as shown by addition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor PD 98059. Previous functional studies on trefoil peptides have all been based on cells from monolayered epithelium like the intestinal mucosa; this is the first report to show that normal and cancerous keratinocytes from stratified epithelium respond to TFF stimuli. Taken together, salivary TFF3 is likely to contribute to oral wound healing. PMID:18353006

  17. Salivary trefoil factor 3 enhances migration of oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Storesund, Trond; Hayashi, Katsuhiko; Kolltveit, Kristin M; Bryne, Magne; Schenck, Karl

    2008-04-01

    Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) is a member of the mammalian TFF family. Trefoil factors are secreted onto mucosal surfaces of the entire body and exert different effects according to tissue location. Trefoil factors may enhance mucosal healing by modulating motogenic activity, inhibiting apoptosis, and promoting angiogenesis. Trefoil factor 3 is secreted from the submandibular gland and is present in whole saliva. The aim of this study was to assess the migratory and proliferative effects of TFF3 on primary oral human keratinocytes and oral cancer cell lines. The addition of TFF3 increased the migration of both normal oral keratinocytes and the cancer cell line D12, as evaluated by a two-dimensional scratch assay. By contrast, no increase in proliferation or energy metabolism was observed after stimulation with TFF3. Trefoil factor 3-enhanced migration was found to be driven partly by the extracellular signal-related kinase (Erk1/2) pathway, as shown by addition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor PD 98059. Previous functional studies on trefoil peptides have all been based on cells from monolayered epithelium like the intestinal mucosa; this is the first report to show that normal and cancerous keratinocytes from stratified epithelium respond to TFF stimuli. Taken together, salivary TFF3 is likely to contribute to oral wound healing.

  18. Migration of Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gerthoffer, William T.

    2008-01-01

    Migration of smooth muscle cells is a process fundamental to development of hollow organs, including blood vessels and the airways. Migration is also thought to be part of the response to tissue injury. It has also been suggested to contribute to airways remodeling triggered by chronic inflammation. In both nonmuscle and smooth muscle cells numerous external signaling molecules and internal signal transduction pathways contribute to cell migration. The review includes evidence for the functional significance of airway smooth muscle migration, a summary of promigratory and antimigratory agents, and summaries of important signaling pathways mediating migration. Important signaling pathways and effector proteins described include small G proteins, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3-K), Rho activated protein kinase (ROCK), p21-activated protein kinases (PAK), Src family tyrosine kinases, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). These signaling modules control multiple critical effector proteins including actin nucleating, capping and severing proteins, myosin motors, and proteins that remodel microtubules. Actin filament remodeling, focal contact remodeling and propulsive force of molecular motors are all coordinated to move cells along gradients of chemical cues, matrix adhesiveness, or matrix stiffness. Airway smooth muscle cell migration can be modulated in vitro by drugs commonly used in pulmonary medicine including β-adrenergic agonists and corticosteroids. Future studies of airway smooth muscle cell migration may uncover novel targets for drugs aimed at modifying airway remodeling. PMID:18094091

  19. Emergence of oligarchy in collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Linus; Maini, Philip; Baker, Ruth

    Identifying the principles of collective cell migration has the potential to help prevent birth defects, improve regenerative therapies and develop model systems for cancer metastasis. In collaboration with experimental biologists, we use computational simulations of a hybrid model, comprising individual-based stochastic cell movement coupled to a reaction-diffusion equation for a chemoattractant, to explore the role of cell specialisation in the guidance of collective cell migration. In the neural crest, an important migratory cell population in vertebrate embryo development, we present evidence that just a few cells are guiding group migration in a cell-induced chemoattractant gradient that determines the switch between ``leader'' and ``follower'' behaviour in individual cells. This leads us to more generally consider under what conditions cell specialisation might become advantageous for collective migration. Alternatively, individual cell responses to locally different microenvironmental conditions could create the (artefactual) appearance of heterogeneity in a population of otherwise identical cellular agents. We explore these questions using a self-propelled particle model as a minimal description for collective cell migration in two and three dimensions.

  20. Hedgehog does not guide migrating Drosophila germ cells

    PubMed Central

    Renault, Andrew D.; Ricardo, Sara; Kunwar, Prabhat S.; Santos, Ana; Starz-Gaiano, Michelle; Stein, Jennifer; Lehmann, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    In many species, the germ cells, precursors of sperm and egg, migrate during embryogenesis. The signals that regulate this migration are thus essential for fertility. In flies, lipid signals have been shown to affect germ cell guidance. In particular, the synthesis of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate through the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A reductase (Hmgcr) pathway is critical for attracting germ cells to their target tissue. In a genetic analysis of signaling pathways known to affect cell migration of other migratory cells, we failed to find a role for the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway in germ cell migration. However, previous reports had implicated Hh as a germ cell attractant in flies and suggested that Hh signaling is enhanced through the action of the Hmgcr pathway. We therefore repeated several critical experiments and carried out further experiments to test specifically whether Hh is a germ cell attractant in flies. In contrast to previously reported findings and consistent with findings in zebrafish our data do not support the notion that Hh has a direct role in the guidance of migrating germ cells in flies. PMID:19389345

  1. Epac Activation Regulates Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Migration and Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiao-Le; Deng, Ruixia; Chung, Sookja K; Chan, Godfrey Chi-Fung

    2016-04-01

    How to enhance the homing of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to the target tissues remains a clinical challenge nowadays. To overcome this barrier, the mechanism responsible for the hMSCs migration and engraftment has to be defined. Currently, the exact mechanism involved in migration and adhesion of hMSCs remains unknown. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), a novel protein discovered in cAMP signaling pathway, may have a potential role in regulating cells adhesion and migration by triggering the downstream Rap family signaling cascades. However, the exact role of Epac in cells homing is elusive. Our study evaluated the role of Epac in the homing of hMSCs. We confirmed that hMSCs expressed functional Epac and its activation enhanced the migration and adhesion of hMSCs significantly. The Epac activation was further found to be contributed directly to the chemotactic responses induced by stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) which is a known chemokine in regulating hMSCs homing. These findings suggested Epac is connected to the SDF-1 signaling cascades. In conclusion, our study revealed that Epac plays a role in hMSCs homing by promoting adhesion and migration. Appropriate manipulation of Epac may enhance the homing of hMSCs and facilitate their future clinical applications. PMID:26727165

  2. Entropy measures of collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitby, Ariadne; Parrinello, Simona; Faisal, Aldo

    2015-03-01

    Collective cell migration is a critical process during tissue formation and repair. To this end there is a need to develop tools to quantitatively measure the dynamics of collective cell migration obtained from microscopy data. Drawing on statistical physics we use entropy of velocity fields derived from dense optic flow to quantitatively measure collective migration. Using peripheral nerve repair after injury as experimental system, we study how Schwann cells, guided by fibroblasts, migrate in cord-like structures across the cut, paving a highway for neurons. This process of emergence of organised behaviour is key for successful repair, yet the emergence of leader cells and transition from a random to ordered state is not understood. We find fibroblasts induce correlated directionality in migrating Schwann cells as measured by a decrease in the entropy of motion vector. We show our method is robust with respect to image resolution in time and space, giving a principled assessment of how various molecular mechanisms affect macroscopic features of collective cell migration. Finally, the generality of our method allows us to process both simulated cell movement and microscopic data, enabling principled fitting and comparison of in silico to in vitro. ICCS, Imperial College London & MRC Clinical Sciences Centre.

  3. Cell density determines epithelial migration in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, P; Misfeldt, D S

    1980-01-01

    The dog kidney epithelial cell line (MDCK) has been shown to exhibit a density-correlated inhibition of growth at approxmately 6.6 X 10(5) cells per cm2. When a confluent monolayer at its maximal density was wounded by removal of a wide swath of cells, migration of the cell sheet into the denuded area occurred. Precise measurements of the rate of migration for 5 day showed that the cells accelerated at a uniform rate of 0.24 micrometer . hr-2 and, by extrapolation, possessed an apparent initial velocity of 2.8 micrometer . hr-1 at the time of wounding. The apparent initial velocity was considered to be the result of a brief (< 10 hr) and rapid acceleration dependent on cell density. To verify this, wounds were made at different densities below the maximum. In these experiments, the cells did not migrate until a "threshold" density of 2.0 X 10(5) cells per cm2 was reached regardless of the density at the time of wounding. At the threshold density, the cell sheet began to accelerate at the previously measured rate (0.24 micrometer . hr-2). Any increase in density by cell division was balanced by cell migration, so that the same threshold density was maintained by the migrating cells. Each migrating cell sustained the movement of the cell sheet at a constant rate of acceleration. It is proposed that an acceleration is, in general, characteristic of the vectorial movement of an epithelial cell sheet. Images PMID:6933523

  4. 4-Hydroxytamoxifen-stimulated processing of cyclin E is mediated via G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) and accompanied by enhanced migration in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Chen, Yan; Zhu, Zhu-Xia; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Yang, Li; Wan, Lei; Lei, Ting-Wen; Wang, Xu-Dong

    2013-07-01

    Over-expression of cleaved cyclin E in breast tumors is closely associated with tumor progression and resistance to antiestrogens. 17β-Estradiol (E2) has been recently shown to induce cyclin E processing in breast cancer cells. Tamoxifen has been used in patients with estrogen-sensitive breast cancer, yet resistance to antiestrogens and recurrence will appear in some of the patients after its continued use. We therefore addressed possible effects of tamoxifen on the generation of cleaved cyclin E and its signal mechanism(s) in estrogen-responsive MCF-7 breast cancer cells that express both G protein-coupled protein (GPR) 30 and estrogen receptor α (ERα). 4-Hydroxytamoxifen (OHT, tamoxifen's active form) failed to prevent E2-induced proteolysis of cyclin E and migration, but rather triggered cyclin E cleavage coincident with augmented migration. OHT-induced cyclin E truncation also occurred in SK-BR-3 cells that express GPR30 and lack ERα, but not in MDA-MB-231 cells that express neither GPR30 nor ERα. G1, a specific GPR 30 agonist, caused dramatic proteolysis of cyclin E and enhanced migration. Furthermore, OHT-stimulated cleavage of cyclin E and migration were tremendously attenuated by G15, a GPR30 antagonist, or siRNA against GPR30. In addition, inhibitors for EGFR or ERK1/2 remarkably suppressed OHT-induced truncation of cyclin E, suggesting involvement of EGFR signaling. Collectively, our data indicate that OHT contributes to the production of proteolyzed cyclin E via GPR30 with augmented migration in MCF-7 cells.

  5. Chemistry and biology of the compounds that modulate cell migration.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Etsu; Imoto, Masaya

    2016-03-01

    Cell migration is a fundamental step for embryonic development, wound repair, immune responses, and tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Extensive studies have attempted to reveal the molecular mechanisms behind cell migration; however, they remain largely unclear. Bioactive compounds that modulate cell migration show promise as not only extremely powerful tools for studying the mechanisms behind cell migration but also as drug seeds for chemotherapy against tumor metastasis. Therefore, we have screened cell migration inhibitors and analyzed their mechanisms for the inhibition of cell migration. In this mini-review, we introduce our chemical and biological studies of three cell migration inhibitors: moverastin, UTKO1, and BU-4664L.

  6. Cell migration in the postnatal subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Menezes, J R L; Marins, M; Alves, J A J; Froes, M M; Hedin-Pereira, C

    2002-12-01

    New neurons are constantly added to the olfactory bulb of rodents from birth to adulthood. This accretion is not only dependent on sustained neurogenesis, but also on the migration of neuroblasts and immature neurons from the cortical and striatal subventricular zone (SVZ) to the olfactory bulb. Migration along this long tangential pathway, known as the rostral migratory stream (RMS), is in many ways opposite to the classical radial migration of immature neurons: it is faster, spans a longer distance, does not require radial glial guidance, and is not limited to postmitotic neurons. In recent years many molecules have been found to be expressed specifically in this pathway and to directly affect this migration. Soluble factors with inhibitory, attractive and inductive roles in migration have been described, as well as molecules mediating cell-to-cell and cell-substrate interactions. However, it is still unclear how the various molecules and cells interact to account for the special migratory behavior in the RMS. Here we will propose some candidate mechanisms for roles in initiating and stopping SVZ/RMS migration.

  7. Visualizing T Cell Migration in situ

    PubMed Central

    Benechet, Alexandre P.; Menon, Manisha; Khanna, Kamal M.

    2014-01-01

    Mounting a protective immune response is critically dependent on the orchestrated movement of cells within lymphoid tissues. The structure of secondary lymphoid organs regulates immune responses by promoting optimal cell–cell and cell–extracellular matrix interactions. Naïve T cells are initially activated by antigen presenting cells in secondary lymphoid organs. Following priming, effector T cells migrate to the site of infection to exert their functions. Majority of the effector cells die while a small population of antigen-specific T cells persists as memory cells in distinct anatomical locations. The persistence and location of memory cells in lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues is critical to protect the host from re-infection. The localization of memory T cells is carefully regulated by several factors including the highly organized secondary lymphoid structure, the cellular expression of chemokine receptors and compartmentalized secretion of their cognate ligands. This balance between the anatomy and the ordered expression of cell surface and soluble proteins regulates the subtle choreography of T cell migration. In recent years, our understanding of cellular dynamics of T cells has been advanced by the development of new imaging techniques allowing in situ visualization of T cell responses. Here, we review the past and more recent studies that have utilized sophisticated imaging technologies to investigate the migration dynamics of naïve, effector, and memory T cells. PMID:25120547

  8. Phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II at T286 enhances invasion and migration of human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Mengna; Evans, Hamish; Gilchrist, Jackson; Mayhew, Jack; Hoffman, Alexander; Pearsall, Elizabeth Ann; Jankowski, Helen; Brzozowski, Joshua Stephen; Skelding, Kathryn Anne

    2016-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a multi-functional kinase that controls a range of cellular functions, including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. The biological properties of CaMKII are regulated by multi-site phosphorylation. However, the role that CaMKII phosphorylation plays in cancer cell metastasis has not been examined. We demonstrate herein that CaMKII expression and phosphorylation at T286 is increased in breast cancer when compared to normal breast tissue, and that increased CAMK2 mRNA is associated with poor breast cancer patient prognosis (worse overall and distant metastasis free survival). Additionally, we show that overexpression of WT, T286D and T286V forms of CaMKII in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells increases invasion, migration and anchorage independent growth, and that overexpression of the T286D phosphomimic leads to a further increase in the invasive, migratory and anchorage independent growth capacity of these cells. Pharmacological inhibition of CaMKII decreases MDA-MB-231 migration and invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that overexpression of T286D, but not WT or T286V-CaMKII, leads to phosphorylation of FAK, STAT5a, and Akt. These results demonstrate a novel function for phosphorylation of CaMKII at T286 in the control of breast cancer metastasis, offering a promising target for the development of therapeutics to prevent breast cancer metastasis. PMID:27605043

  9. Phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II at T286 enhances invasion and migration of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chi, Mengna; Evans, Hamish; Gilchrist, Jackson; Mayhew, Jack; Hoffman, Alexander; Pearsall, Elizabeth Ann; Jankowski, Helen; Brzozowski, Joshua Stephen; Skelding, Kathryn Anne

    2016-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a multi-functional kinase that controls a range of cellular functions, including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. The biological properties of CaMKII are regulated by multi-site phosphorylation. However, the role that CaMKII phosphorylation plays in cancer cell metastasis has not been examined. We demonstrate herein that CaMKII expression and phosphorylation at T286 is increased in breast cancer when compared to normal breast tissue, and that increased CAMK2 mRNA is associated with poor breast cancer patient prognosis (worse overall and distant metastasis free survival). Additionally, we show that overexpression of WT, T286D and T286V forms of CaMKII in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells increases invasion, migration and anchorage independent growth, and that overexpression of the T286D phosphomimic leads to a further increase in the invasive, migratory and anchorage independent growth capacity of these cells. Pharmacological inhibition of CaMKII decreases MDA-MB-231 migration and invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that overexpression of T286D, but not WT or T286V-CaMKII, leads to phosphorylation of FAK, STAT5a, and Akt. These results demonstrate a novel function for phosphorylation of CaMKII at T286 in the control of breast cancer metastasis, offering a promising target for the development of therapeutics to prevent breast cancer metastasis. PMID:27605043

  10. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell accelerated stress testing

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Andrew M.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L.; Spernjak, Dusan; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2016-01-01

    Cerium is a radical scavenger which improves polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell durability. During operation, however, cerium rapidly migrates in the PEM and into the catalyst layers (CLs). In this work, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were subjected to accelerated stress tests (ASTs) under different humidity conditions. Cerium migration was characterized in the MEAs after ASTs using X-ray fluorescence. During fully humidified operation, water flux from cell inlet to outlet generated in-plane cerium gradients. Conversely, cerium profiles were flat during low humidity operation, where in-plane water flux was negligible, however, migration from the PEM into the CLs was enhanced. Humidity cycling resulted in both in-plane cerium gradients due to water flux during the hydration component of the cycle, and significant migration into the CLs. Fluoride and cerium emissions into effluent cell waters were measured during ASTs and correlated, which signifies that ionomer degradation products serve as possible counter-ions for cerium emissions. Fluoride emission rates were also correlated to final PEM cerium contents, which indicates that PEM degradation and cerium migration are coupled. Lastly, it is proposed that cerium migrates from the PEM due to humidification conditions and degradation, and is subsequently stabilized in the CLs by carbon catalyst supports.

  11. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell accelerated stress testing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baker, Andrew M.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L.; Spernjak, Dusan; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2016-01-01

    Cerium is a radical scavenger which improves polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell durability. During operation, however, cerium rapidly migrates in the PEM and into the catalyst layers (CLs). In this work, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were subjected to accelerated stress tests (ASTs) under different humidity conditions. Cerium migration was characterized in the MEAs after ASTs using X-ray fluorescence. During fully humidified operation, water flux from cell inlet to outlet generated in-plane cerium gradients. Conversely, cerium profiles were flat during low humidity operation, where in-plane water flux was negligible, however, migration from the PEM into the CLs was enhanced. Humiditymore » cycling resulted in both in-plane cerium gradients due to water flux during the hydration component of the cycle, and significant migration into the CLs. Fluoride and cerium emissions into effluent cell waters were measured during ASTs and correlated, which signifies that ionomer degradation products serve as possible counter-ions for cerium emissions. Fluoride emission rates were also correlated to final PEM cerium contents, which indicates that PEM degradation and cerium migration are coupled. Lastly, it is proposed that cerium migrates from the PEM due to humidification conditions and degradation, and is subsequently stabilized in the CLs by carbon catalyst supports.« less

  12. miR-29a/b enhances cell migration and invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma progression by regulating SPARC and COL3A1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Feifei; Sun, Rui; Deng, Ning; Guo, Tianyu; Cao, Yange; Yu, Ying; Wang, Xuejun; Zou, Bingcheng; Zhang, Songmei; Jing, Tao; Ling, Tao; Xie, Jun; Zhang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a malignant tumor associated with a genetic predisposition, Epstein-Barr virus infection and chromosomal abnormalities. Recently, several miRNAs have been shown to target specific mRNAs to regulate NPC development and progression. However, the involvement of miRNAs in processes leading to NPC migration and invasion remains to be elucidated. We predicted that miR-29a/b are associated with dysregulated genes controlling NPC through an integrated interaction network of miRNAs and genes. miR-29a/b over-expression in NPC cell lines had no significant effect on proliferation, whereas miR-29b mildly increased the percentage of cells in the G1 phase with a concomitant decrease in the percentage of cells in S phase. Furthermore, we demonstrated that miR-29a/b might be responsible for increasing S18 cell migration and invasion, and only COL3A1 was identified as a direct target of miR-29b despite the fact that both SPARC and COL3A1 were inhibited by miR-29a/b over-expression. Meanwhile, SPARC proteins were increased in metastatic NPC tissue and are involved in NPC progression. Unexpectedly, we identified that miRNA-29b expression was elevated in the serum of NPC patients with a high risk of metastasis. The 5-year actuarial overall survival rates in NPC patients with high serum miR-29b expression was significantly shorter than those with low serum miR-29b expression; therefore, serum miR-29b expression could be a promising prognostic marker. PMID:25786138

  13. Primordial Germ Cell Specification and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Marlow, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Primordial germ cells are the progenitor cells that give rise to the gametes. In some animals, the germline is induced by zygotic transcription factors, whereas in others, primordial germ cell specification occurs via inheritance of maternally provided gene products known as germ plasm. Once specified, the primordial germ cells of some animals must acquire motility and migrate to the gonad in order to survive. In all animals examined, perinuclear structures called germ granules form within germ cells. This review focuses on some of the recent studies, conducted by several groups using diverse systems, from invertebrates to vertebrates, which have provided mechanistic insight into the molecular regulation of germ cell specification and migration. PMID:26918157

  14. Inhibition of REST Suppresses Proliferation and Migration in Glioblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dianbao; Li, Ying; Wang, Rui; Li, Yunna; Shi, Ping; Kan, Zhoumi; Pang, Xining

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor, with poor prognosis and a lack of effective therapeutic options. The aberrant expression of transcription factor REST (repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor) had been reported in different kinds of tumors. However, the function of REST and its mechanisms in GBM remain elusive. Here, REST expression was inhibited by siRNA silencing in U-87 and U-251 GBM cells. Then CCK-8 assay showed significantly decreased cell proliferation, and the inhibition of migration was verified by scratch wound healing assay and transwell assay. Using cell cycle analysis and Annexin V/PI straining assay, G1 phase cell cycle arrest was found to be a reason for the suppression of cell proliferation and migration upon REST silencing, while apoptosis was not affected by REST silencing. Further, the detection of REST-downstream genes involved in cytostasis and migration inhibition demonstrated that CCND1 and CCNE1 were reduced; CDK5R1, BBC3, EGR1, SLC25A4, PDCD7, MAPK11, MAPK12, FADD and DAXX were enhanced, among which BBC3 and DAXX were direct targets of REST, as verified by ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) and Western blotting. These data suggested that REST is a master regulator that maintains GBM cells proliferation and migration, partly through regulating cell cycle by repressing downstream genes, which might represent a potential target for GBM therapy. PMID:27153061

  15. Inhibition of REST Suppresses Proliferation and Migration in Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dianbao; Li, Ying; Wang, Rui; Li, Yunna; Shi, Ping; Kan, Zhoumi; Pang, Xining

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor, with poor prognosis and a lack of effective therapeutic options. The aberrant expression of transcription factor REST (repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor) had been reported in different kinds of tumors. However, the function of REST and its mechanisms in GBM remain elusive. Here, REST expression was inhibited by siRNA silencing in U-87 and U-251 GBM cells. Then CCK-8 assay showed significantly decreased cell proliferation, and the inhibition of migration was verified by scratch wound healing assay and transwell assay. Using cell cycle analysis and Annexin V/PI straining assay, G1 phase cell cycle arrest was found to be a reason for the suppression of cell proliferation and migration upon REST silencing, while apoptosis was not affected by REST silencing. Further, the detection of REST-downstream genes involved in cytostasis and migration inhibition demonstrated that CCND1 and CCNE1 were reduced; CDK5R1, BBC3, EGR1, SLC25A4, PDCD7, MAPK11, MAPK12, FADD and DAXX were enhanced, among which BBC3 and DAXX were direct targets of REST, as verified by ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) and Western blotting. These data suggested that REST is a master regulator that maintains GBM cells proliferation and migration, partly through regulating cell cycle by repressing downstream genes, which might represent a potential target for GBM therapy. PMID:27153061

  16. The effects of acoustic vibration on fibroblast cell migration.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Taybia; Murphy, Mark F; Lilley, Francis; Burton, David R; Bezombes, Frederic

    2016-12-01

    Cells are known to interact and respond to external mechanical cues and recent work has shown that application of mechanical stimulation, delivered via acoustic vibration, can be used to control complex cell behaviours. Fibroblast cells are known to respond to physical cues generated in the extracellular matrix and it is thought that such cues are important regulators of the wound healing process. Many conditions are associated with poor wound healing, so there is need for treatments/interventions, which can help accelerate the wound healing process. The primary aim of this research was to investigate the effects of mechanical stimulation upon the migratory and morphological properties of two different fibroblast cells namely; human lung fibroblast cells (LL24) and subcutaneous areolar/adipose mouse fibroblast cells (L929). Using a speaker-based system, the effects of mechanical stimulation (0-1600Hz for 5min) on the mean cell migration distance (μm) and actin organisation was investigated. The results show that 100Hz acoustic vibration enhanced cell migration for both cell lines whereas acoustic vibration above 100Hz was found to decrease cell migration in a frequency dependent manner. Mechanical stimulation was also found to promote changes to the morphology of both cell lines, particularly the formation of lamellipodia and filopodia. Overall lamellipodia was the most prominent actin structure displayed by the lung cell (LL24), whereas filopodia was the most prominent actin feature displayed by the fibroblast derived from subcutaneous areolar/adipose tissue. Mechanical stimulation at all the frequencies used here was found not to affect cell viability. These results suggest that low-frequency acoustic vibration may be used as a tool to manipulate the mechanosensitivity of cells to promote cell migration. PMID:27612824

  17. Bursts of activity in collective cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Chepizhko, Oleksandr; Giampietro, Costanza; Mastrapasqua, Eleonora; Nourazar, Mehdi; Ascagni, Miriam; Sugni, Michela; Fascio, Umberto; Leggio, Livio; Malinverno, Chiara; Scita, Giorgio; Santucci, Stéphane; Alava, Mikko J.; Zapperi, Stefano; La Porta, Caterina A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Dense monolayers of living cells display intriguing relaxation dynamics, reminiscent of soft and glassy materials close to the jamming transition, and migrate collectively when space is available, as in wound healing or in cancer invasion. Here we show that collective cell migration occurs in bursts that are similar to those recorded in the propagation of cracks, fluid fronts in porous media, and ferromagnetic domain walls. In analogy with these systems, the distribution of activity bursts displays scaling laws that are universal in different cell types and for cells moving on different substrates. The main features of the invasion dynamics are quantitatively captured by a model of interacting active particles moving in a disordered landscape. Our results illustrate that collective motion of living cells is analogous to the corresponding dynamics in driven, but inanimate, systems. PMID:27681632

  18. Networking galore: intermediate filaments and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Chung, Byung-Min; Rotty, Jeremy D; Coulombe, Pierre A

    2013-10-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) are assembled from a diverse group of evolutionarily conserved proteins and are specified in a tissue-dependent, cell type-dependent, and context-dependent fashion in the body. IFs are involved in multiple cellular processes that are crucial for the maintenance of cell and tissue integrity and the response and adaptation to various stresses, as conveyed by the broad array of crippling clinical disorders caused by inherited mutations in IF coding sequences. Accordingly, the expression, assembly, and organization of IFs are tightly regulated. Migration is a fitting example of a cell-based phenomenon in which IFs participate as both effectors and regulators. With a particular focus on vimentin and keratin, we here review how the contributions of IFs to the cell's mechanical properties, to cytoarchitecture and adhesion, and to regulatory pathways collectively exert a significant impact on cell migration.

  19. SIRT1 regulates lamellipodium extension and migration of melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kunimoto, Risa; Jimbow, Kowichi; Tanimura, Akihiko; Sato, Masahiro; Horimoto, Kouhei; Hayashi, Takashi; Hisahara, Shin; Sugino, Toshiya; Hirobe, Tomohisa; Yamashita, Toshiharu; Horio, Yoshiyuki

    2014-06-01

    Melanoma is highly metastatic, but the mechanism of melanoma cell migration is still unclear. We found that melanoma cells expressed the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent protein deacetylase SIRT1 in the cytoplasm. Cell membrane extension and migration of melanoma cells were inhibited by SIRT1 inhibitors or SIRT1 knockdown, whereas SIRT1 activators enhanced elongation of protrusion and cellular motility. In B16F1 cells, growth factor stimulation induced lamellipodium extension, a characteristic feature at the leading edge of migrating cells, and SIRT1 was found in the lamellipodium. SIRT1 inhibitor nicotinamide (NAM) or SIRT1 small interfering RNAs suppressed the lamellipodium extension by serum or platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). The lamellipodium formation by dominant-active Rac1 was also inhibited by NAM, a SIRT1 inhibitor. NAM inhibited the accumulation of phosphorylated Akt at the submembrane by serum or PDGF. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer, we found that NAM impaired PDGF-dependent increase in the phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate level at the leading edge. NAM inhibited the abdominal metastasis of transplanted B16F1 melanoma cells in C57BL6/J mice and improved survival. Finally, SIRT1-knockdown B16F1 cells showed significantly reduced metastasis in transplanted mice compared with that in control B16F1 cells. These results indicate that SIRT1 inhibition is a strategy to suppress metastasis of melanoma cells. PMID:24480879

  20. Impact of jamming on collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nnetu, Kenechukwu David; Knorr, Melanie; Pawlizak, Steve; Fuhs, Thomas; Zink, Mareike; KäS, Josef A.

    2012-02-01

    Multi-cellular migration plays an important role in physiological processes such as embryogenesis, cancer metastasis and tissue repair. During migration, single cells undergo cycles of extension, adhesion and retraction resulting in morphological changes. In a confluent monolayer, there are inter-cellular interactions and crowding, however, the impact of these interactions on the dynamics and elasticity of the monolayer at the multi-cellular and single cell level is not well understood. Here we study the dynamics of a confluent epithelial monolayer by simultaneously measuring cell motion at the multi-cellular and single cell level for various cell densities and tensile elasticity. At the multi-cellular level, the system exhibited spatial kinetic transitions from isotropic to anisotropic migration on long times and the velocity of the monolayer decreased with increasing cell density. Moreover, the dynamics was spatially and temporally heterogeneous. Interestingly, the dynamics was also heterogeneous in wound-healing assays and the correlation length was fitted by compressed exponential. On the single cell scale, we observed transient caging effects with increasing cage rearrangement times as the system age due to an increase in density. Also, the density dependent elastic modulus of the monolayer scaled as a weak power law. Together, these findings suggest that caging effects at the single cell level initiates a slow and heterogeneous dynamics at the multi-cellular level which is similar to the glassy dynamics of deformable colloidal systems.

  1. H enhancement of N vacancy migration in GaN.

    SciTech Connect

    Wixom, Ryan R.; Wright, Alan Francis

    2005-06-01

    We have used density functional theory to investigate diffusion of V{sub N}{sup +} in the presence of H{sup +}. Optimal migration pathways were determined using the climbing image nudged elastic band and directed dimer methods. Our calculations indicate that the rate-limiting barrier for VN{sub N}{sup +} migration will be reduced by 0.58 eV by interplay with H{sup +}, which will enhance migration by more than an order of magnitude at typical GaN growth temperatures.

  2. Collective dynamics of cell migration and cell rearrangements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabla, Alexandre

    Understanding multicellular processes such as embryo development or cancer metastasis requires to decipher the contributions of local cell autonomous behaviours and long range interactions with the tissue environment. A key question in this context concerns the emergence of large scale coordination in cell behaviours, a requirement for collective cell migration or convergent extension. I will present a few examples where physical and mechanical aspects play a significant role in driving tissue scale dynamics.

  1. Flow-Driven Cell Migration under External Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yizeng; Mori, Yoichiro; Sun, Sean X.

    2015-12-01

    Electric fields influence many aspects of cell physiology, including various forms of cell migration. Many cells are sensitive to electric fields, and they can migrate toward a cathode or an anode, depending on the cell type. In this Letter, we examine an actomyosin-independent mode of cell migration under electrical fields. Our theory considers a one-dimensional cell with water and ionic fluxes at the cell boundary. Water fluxes through the membrane are governed by the osmotic pressure difference across the cell membrane. Fluxes of cations and anions across the cell membrane are determined by the properties of the ion channels as well as the external electric field. Results show that without actin polymerization and myosin contraction, electric fields can also drive cell migration, even when the cell is not polarized. The direction of migration with respect to the electric field direction is influenced by the properties of ion channels, and are cell-type dependent.

  2. Migrating Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cells Swell Prior to Soma Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Happel, Patrick; Möller, Kerstin; Schwering, Nina K.; Dietzel, Irmgard D.

    2013-01-01

    The migration of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) to the white matter is an indispensable requirement for an intact brain function. The mechanism of cell migration in general is not yet completely understood. Nevertheless, evidence is accumulating that besides the coordinated rearrangement of the cytoskeleton, a finetuned interplay of ion and water fluxes across the cell membrane is essential for cell migration. One part of a general hypothesis is that a local volume increase towards the direction of movement triggers a mechano-activated calcium influx that regulates various procedures at the rear end of a migrating cell. Here, we investigated cell volume changes of migrating OPCs using scanning ion conductance microscopy. We found that during accelerated migration OPCs undergo an increase in the frontal cell body volume. These findings are supplemented with time lapse calcium imaging data that hint an increase in calcium content the frontal part of the cell soma. PMID:23657670

  3. Mechanisms guiding primordial germ cell migration: strategies from different organisms

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Brian E.; Lehmann, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Preface The regulated migration of cells is essential for development and tissue homeostasis, and aberrant cell migration can lead to an impaired immune response and the progression of cancer. Primordial germ cells (PGCs), precursors to sperm and eggs, have to migrate across the embryo to reach somatic gonadal precursors (SGPs) and fulfill their function. Studies of model organisms have revealed that, despite important differences, several features of PGC migration are conserved. PGCs require both an intrinsic motility program and external guidance cues to survive and successfully migrate. Proper guidance involves both attractive and repulsive cues mediated by protein and lipid signalling. PMID:20027186

  4. Light activated cell migration in synthetic extracellular matrices.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiongyu; Wang, Xiaobo; Tibbitt, Mark W; Anseth, Kristi S; Montell, Denise J; Elisseeff, Jennifer H

    2012-11-01

    Synthetic extracellular matrices provide a framework in which cells can be exposed to defined physical and biological cues. However no method exists to manipulate single cells within these matrices. It is desirable to develop such methods in order to understand fundamental principles of cell migration and define conditions that support or inhibit cell movement within these matrices. Here, we present a strategy for manipulating individual mammalian stem cells in defined synthetic hydrogels through selective optical activation of Rac, which is an intracellular signaling protein that plays a key role in cell migration. Photoactivated cell migration in synthetic hydrogels depended on mechanical and biological cues in the biomaterial. Real-time hydrogel photodegradation was employed to create geometrically defined channels and spaces in which cells could be photoactivated to migrate. Cell migration speed was significantly higher in the photo-etched channels and cells could easily change direction of movement compared to the bulk hydrogels.

  5. Microfluidic Assay To Study the Combinatorial Impact of Substrate Properties on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Menon, Nishanth V; Chuah, Yon Jin; Phey, Samantha; Zhang, Ying; Wu, Yingnan; Chan, Vincent; Kang, Yuejun

    2015-08-12

    As an alternative to complex and costly in vivo models, microfluidic in vitro models are being widely used to study various physiological phenomena. It is of particular interest to study cell migration in a controlled microenvironment because of its vital role in a large number of physiological processes, such as wound healing, disease progression, and tissue regeneration. Cell migration has been shown to be affected by variations in the biochemical and physical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM). To study the combinatorial impact of the ECM physical properties on cell migration, we have developed a microfluidic assay to induce migration of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates with varying combinatorial properties (hydrophobicity, stiffness, and roughness). The results show that although the initial cell adhesion and viability appear similar on all PDMS samples, the cell spreading and migration are enhanced on PDMS samples exhibiting intermediate levels of hydrophobicity, stiffness, and roughness. This study suggests that there is a particular range of substrate properties for optimal cell spreading and migration. The influence of substrate properties on hBMSC migration can help understand the physical cues that affect cell migration, which may facilitate the development of optimized engineered scaffolds with desired properties for tissue regeneration applications. PMID:26186177

  6. Enhancement of anammox by the excretion of diel vertical migrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Daniele; Babbin, Andrew R.; Galbraith, Eric D.

    2014-11-01

    Measurements show that anaerobic ammonium oxidation with nitrite (anammox) is a major pathway of fixed nitrogen removal in the anoxic zones of the open ocean. Anammox requires a source of ammonium, which under anoxic conditions could be supplied by the breakdown of sinking organic matter via heterotrophic denitrification. However, at many locations where anammox is measured, denitrification rates are small or undetectable. Alternative sources of ammonium have been proposed to explain this paradox, for example through dissimilatory reduction of nitrate to ammonium and transport from anoxic sediments. However, the relevance of these sources in open-ocean anoxic zones is debated. Here, we bring to attention an additional source of ammonium, namely, the daytime excretion by zooplankton and micronekton migrating from the surface to anoxic waters. We use a synthesis of acoustic data to show that, where anoxic waters occur within the water column, most migrators spend the daytime within them. Although migrators export only a small fraction of primary production from the surface, they focus excretion within a confined depth range of anoxic water where particle input is small. Using a simple biogeochemical model, we suggest that, at those depths, the source of ammonium from organisms undergoing diel vertical migrations could exceed the release from particle remineralization, enhancing in situ anammox rates. The contribution of this previously overlooked process, and the numerous uncertainties surrounding it, call for further efforts to evaluate the role of animals in oxygen minimum zone biogeochemistry.

  7. Differential migration and proliferation of geometrical ensembles of cell clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Girish; Chen, Bo; Co, Carlos C.; Ho, Chia-Chi

    2011-06-10

    Differential cell migration and growth drives the organization of specific tissue forms and plays a critical role in embryonic development, tissue morphogenesis, and tumor invasion. Localized gradients of soluble factors and extracellular matrix have been shown to modulate cell migration and proliferation. Here we show that in addition to these factors, initial tissue geometry can feedback to generate differential proliferation, cell polarity, and migration patterns. We apply layer by layer polyelectrolyte assembly to confine multicellular organization and subsequently release cells to demonstrate the spatial patterns of cell migration and growth. The cell shapes, spreading areas, and cell-cell contacts are influenced strongly by the confining geometry. Cells within geometric ensembles are morphologically polarized. Symmetry breaking was observed for cells on the circular pattern and cells migrate toward the corners and in the direction parallel to the longest dimension of the geometric shapes. This migration pattern is disrupted when actomyosin based tension was inhibited. Cells near the edge or corner of geometric shapes proliferate while cells within do not. Regions of higher rate of cell migration corresponded to regions of concentrated growth. These findings demonstrate that multicellular organization can result in spatial patterns of migration and proliferation.

  8. Water permeation drives tumor cell migration in confined microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Stroka, Kimberly M; Jiang, Hongyuan; Chen, Shih-Hsun; Tong, Ziqiu; Wirtz, Denis; Sun, Sean X; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-04-24

    Cell migration is a critical process for diverse (patho)physiological phenomena. Intriguingly, cell migration through physically confined spaces can persist even when typical hallmarks of 2D planar migration, such as actin polymerization and myosin II-mediated contractility, are inhibited. Here, we present an integrated experimental and theoretical approach ("Osmotic Engine Model") and demonstrate that directed water permeation is a major mechanism of cell migration in confined microenvironments. Using microfluidic and imaging techniques along with mathematical modeling, we show that tumor cells confined in a narrow channel establish a polarized distribution of Na+/H+ pumps and aquaporins in the cell membrane, which creates a net inflow of water and ions at the cell leading edge and a net outflow of water and ions at the trailing edge, leading to net cell displacement. Collectively, this study presents an alternate mechanism of cell migration in confinement that depends on cell-volume regulation via water permeation. PMID:24726433

  9. Water Permeation Drives Tumor Cell Migration in Confined Microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Stroka, Kimberly M.; Jiang, Hongyuan; Chen, Shih-Hsun; Tong, Ziqiu; Wirtz, Denis; Sun, Sean X.; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cell migration is a critical process for diverse (patho) physiological phenomena. Intriguingly, cell migration through physically confined spaces can persist even when typical hallmarks of 2D planar migration, such as actin polymerization and myosin II-mediated contractility, are inhibited. Here, we present an integrated experimental and theoretical approach (“Osmotic Engine Model”) and demonstrate that directed water permeation is a major mechanism of cell migration in confined microenvironments. Using microfluidic and imaging techniques along with mathematical modeling, we show that tumor cells confined in a narrow channel establish a polarized distribution of Na+/H+ pumps and aquaporins in the cell membrane, which creates a net inflow of water and ions at the cell leading edge and a net outflow of water and ions at the trailing edge, leading to net cell displacement. Collectively, this study presents an alternate mechanism of cell migration in confinement that depends on cell-volume regulation via water permeation. PMID:24726433

  10. Texture sensing of cytoskeletal dynamics in cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Satarupa; Lee, Rachel; Hourwitz, Matthew J.; Sun, Xiaoyu; Parent, Carole; Fourkas, John T.; Losert, Wolfgang

    Migrating cells can be directed towards a target by gradients in properties such as chemical concentration or mechanical properties of the surrounding microenvironment. In previous studies we have shown that micro/nanotopographical features on scales comparable to those of natural collagen fibers can guide fast migrating amoeboid cells by aligning actin polymerization waves to such nanostructures. We find that actin microfilaments and microtubules are aligned along the nanoridge topographies, modulating overall cell polarity and directional migration in epithelial cells. This work shows that topographic features on a biologically relevant length scale can modulate migration outcomes by affecting the texture sensing property of the cytoskeleton.

  11. Systems microscopy approaches to understand cancer cell migration and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Le Dévédec, Sylvia E.; Yan, Kuan; de Bont, Hans; Ghotra, Veerander; Truong, Hoa; Danen, Erik H.; Verbeek, Fons

    2010-01-01

    Cell migration is essential in a number of processes, including wound healing, angiogenesis and cancer metastasis. Especially, invasion of cancer cells in the surrounding tissue is a crucial step that requires increased cell motility. Cell migration is a well-orchestrated process that involves the continuous formation and disassembly of matrix adhesions. Those structural anchor points interact with the extra-cellular matrix and also participate in adhesion-dependent signalling. Although these processes are essential for cancer metastasis, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that regulate adhesion dynamics during tumour cell migration. In this review, we provide an overview of recent advanced imaging strategies together with quantitative image analysis that can be implemented to understand the dynamics of matrix adhesions and its molecular components in relation to tumour cell migration. This dynamic cell imaging together with multiparametric image analysis will help in understanding the molecular mechanisms that define cancer cell migration. PMID:20556632

  12. Extravillous trophoblast cells-derived exosomes promote vascular smooth muscle cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Carlos; Yee, Sarah; Scholz-Romero, Katherin; Kobayashi, Miharu; Vaswani, Kanchan; Kvaskoff, David; Illanes, Sebastian E.; Mitchell, Murray D.; Rice, Gregory E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) migration is a critical process during human uterine spiral artery (SpA) remodeling and a successful pregnancy. Extravillous trophoblast cells (EVT) interact with VSMC and enhance their migration, however, the mechanisms by which EVT remodel SpA remain to be fully elucidated. We hypothesize that exosomes released from EVT promote VSMC migration. Methods: JEG-3 and HTR-8/SVneo cell lines were used as models for EVT. Cells were cultured at 37°C and humidified under an atmosphere of 5% CO2-balanced N2 to obtain 8% O2. Cell-conditioned media were collected, and exosomes (exo-JEG-3 and exo- HTR-8/SVneo) isolated by differential and buoyant density centrifugation. The effects of exo-EVT on VSMC migration were established using a real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte™). Exosomal proteins where identified by mass spectrometry and submitted to bioinformatic pathway analysis (Ingenuity software). Results: HTR-8/SVneo cells were significantly more (~30%) invasive than JEG-3 cells. HTR-8/SVneo cells released 2.6-fold more exosomes (6.39 × 108 ± 2.5 × 108 particles/106 cells) compared to JEG-3 (2.86 × 108 ± 0.78 × 108 particles/106 cells). VSMC migration was significantly increased in the presence of exo-JEG-3 and exo-HTR-8/SVneo compared to control (−exosomes) (21.83 ± 0.49 h and 15.57 ± 0.32, respectively, vs. control 25.09 ± 0.58 h, p < 0.05). Sonication completely abolished the effect of exosomes on VSMC migration. Finally, mass spectrometry analysis identified unique exosomal proteins for each EVT cell line-derived exosomes. Conclusion: The data obtained in this study are consistent with the hypothesis that the release, content, and bioactivity of exosomes derived from EVT-like cell lines is cell origin-dependent and differentially regulates VSMC migration. Thus, an EVT exosomal signaling pathway may contribute to SpA remodeling by promoting the migration of VSMC out of the vessel walls. PMID:25157233

  13. Lutein inhibits the migration of retinal pigment epithelial cells via cytosolic and mitochondrial Akt pathways (lutein inhibits RPE cells migration).

    PubMed

    Su, Ching-Chieh; Chan, Chi-Ming; Chen, Han-Min; Wu, Chia-Chun; Hsiao, Chien-Yu; Lee, Pei-Lan; Lin, Victor Chia-Hsiang; Hung, Chi-Feng

    2014-08-08

    During the course of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells will de-differentiate, proliferate, and migrate onto the surfaces of the sensory retina. Several studies have shown that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) can induce migration of RPE cells via an Akt-related pathway. In this study, the effect of lutein on PDGF-BB-induced RPE cells migration was examined using transwell migration assays and Western blot analyses. We found that both phosphorylation of Akt and mitochondrial translocation of Akt in RPE cells induced by PDGF-BB stimulation were suppressed by lutein. Furthermore, the increased migration observed in RPE cells with overexpressed mitochondrial Akt could also be suppressed by lutein. Our results demonstrate that lutein can inhibit PDGF-BB induced RPE cells migration through the inhibition of both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Akt activation.

  14. Cell migration does not produce membrane flow

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    We have previously reported that rearward migration of surface particles on slowly moving cells is not driven by membrane flow (Sheetz, M. P., S. Turney, H. Qian, and E. L. Elson. 1989. Nature (Lond.). 340:284-288) and recent photobleaching measurements have ruled out any rapid rearward lipid flow (Lee, J., M. Gustafsson, D. E. Magnussen, and K. Jacobson. 1990. Science (Wash. DC.) 247:1229-1233). It was not possible, however, to conclude from those studies that a slower or tank-tread membrane lipid flow does not occur. Therefore, we have used the technology of single particle tracking to examine the movements of diffusing particles on rapidly locomoting fish keratocytes where the membrane current is likely to be greatest. The keratocytes had a smooth lamellipodial surface on which bound Con A-coated gold particles were observed either to track toward the nuclear region (velocity of 0.35 +/- 0.15 micron/s) or to diffuse randomly (apparent diffusion coefficient of [3.5 +/- 2.0] x 10(-10) cm2/s). We detected no systematic drift relative to the cell edge of particles undergoing random diffusion even after the cell had moved many micrometers. The average net particle displacement was 0.01 +/- 2.7% of the cell displacement. These results strongly suggest that neither the motions of membrane proteins driven by the cytoskeleton nor other possible factors produce a bulk flow of membrane lipid. PMID:2211827

  15. Correlation between cell migration and reactive oxygen species under electric field stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shang-Ying; Hou, Hsien-San; Sun, Yung-Shin; Cheng, Ji-Yen; Lo, Kai-Yin

    2015-09-01

    Cell migration is an essential process involved in the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Electric fields (EFs) are one of the many physical and chemical factors known to affect cell migration, a phenomenon termed electrotaxis or galvanotaxis. In this paper, a microfluidics chip was developed to study the migration of cells under different electrical and chemical stimuli. This chip is capable of providing four different strengths of EFs in combination with two different chemicals via one simple set of agar salt bridges and Ag/AgCl electrodes. NIH 3T3 fibroblasts were seeded inside this chip to study their migration and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in response to different EF strengths and the presence of β-lapachone. We found that both the EF and β-lapachone level increased the cell migration rate and the production of ROS in an EF-strength-dependent manner. A strong linear correlation between the cell migration rate and the amount of intracellular ROS suggests that ROS are an intermediate product by which EF and β-lapachone enhance cell migration. Moreover, an anti-oxidant, α-tocopherol, was found to quench the production of ROS, resulting in a decrease in the migration rate. PMID:26487906

  16. GMP-grade platelet lysate enhances proliferation and migration of tenon fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Carducci, Augusto; Scafetta, Gaia; Siciliano, Camilla; Carnevale, Roberto; Rosa, Paolo; Coccia, Andrea; Mangino, Giorgio; Bordin, Antonella; Vingolo, Enzo Maria; Pierelli, Luca; Lendaro, Eugenio; Ragona, Giuseppe; Frati, Giacomo; De Falco, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Tenon's fibroblasts (TFs), widely employed as in vitro model for many ophthalmological studies, are routinely cultured with FBS. Platelet Lysate (PL), a hemoderivate enriched with growth factors and cytokines has been largely tested in several clinical applications and as substitute of FBS in culture. Here, we investigate whether PL can exert biological effects on TF populations similarly to other cell types. Results show that PL significantly enhances cell proliferation and migration vs. FBS, without influencing cell size/granularity. Upregulation of EGF, VEGF, KDR, MMP2-9, FAK mRNA levels also occurs and phosphorylation of AKT but not of ERK1/2 is significantly enhanced. The inhibition of the PI3kinase/AKT pathway with the specific inhibitor wortmannin, decreases PL-induced cell migration but not proliferation. Condition supernatants containing PL show increased bioavailability of Nitric Oxide and reduced levels of 8-Iso-PGF2-alpha, correlating with cell proliferation and migration. Pro-angiogenic/inflammatory soluble factors (GRO, Angiogenin, EGF, I-309, PARC) are exclusively or greater expressed in media containing PL than FBS. GMP-grade PL preparations positively influence in vitro biological effects of TFs representing a suitable and safer alternative to FBS. PMID:26709648

  17. Microfluidics-based devices: New tools for studying cancer and cancer stem cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu; Agrawal, Basheal; Sun, Dandan; Kuo, John S.; Williams, Justin C.

    2011-01-01

    Cell movement is highly sensitive to stimuli from the extracellular matrix and media. Receptors on the plasma membrane in cells can activate signal transduction pathways that change the mechanical behavior of a cell by reorganizing motion-related organelles. Cancer cells change their migration mechanisms in response to different environments more robustly than noncancer cells. Therefore, therapeutic approaches to immobilize cancer cells via inhibition of the related signal transduction pathways rely on a better understanding of cell migration mechanisms. In recent years, engineers have been working with biologists to apply microfluidics technology to study cell migration. As opposed to conventional cultures on dishes, microfluidics deals with the manipulation of fluids that are geometrically constrained to a submillimeter scale. Such small scales offer a number of advantages including cost effectiveness, low consumption of reagents, high sensitivity, high spatiotemporal resolution, and laminar flow. Therefore, microfluidics has a potential as a new platform to study cell migration. In this review, we summarized recent progress on the application of microfluidics in cancer and other cell migration researches. These studies have enhanced our understanding of cell migration and cancer invasion as well as their responses to subtle variations in their microenvironment. We hope that this review will serve as an interdisciplinary guidance for both biologists and engineers as they further develop the microfluidic toolbox toward applications in cancer research. PMID:21522502

  18. Leader Cells Define Directionality of Trunk, but Not Cranial, Neural Crest Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Jo; Gauert, Anton; Briones Montecinos, Luis; Fanlo, Lucía; Alhashem, Zainalabdeen Mohmammed; Assar, Rodrigo; Marti, Elisa; Kabla, Alexandre; Härtel, Steffen; Linker, Claudia

    2016-05-31

    Collective cell migration is fundamental for life and a hallmark of cancer. Neural crest (NC) cells migrate collectively, but the mechanisms governing this process remain controversial. Previous analyses in Xenopus indicate that cranial NC (CNC) cells are a homogeneous population relying on cell-cell interactions for directional migration, while chick embryo analyses suggest a heterogeneous population with leader cells instructing directionality. Our data in chick and zebrafish embryos show that CNC cells do not require leader cells for migration and all cells present similar migratory capacities. In contrast, laser ablation of trunk NC (TNC) cells shows that leader cells direct movement and cell-cell contacts are required for migration. Moreover, leader and follower identities are acquired before the initiation of migration and remain fixed thereafter. Thus, two distinct mechanisms establish the directionality of CNC cells and TNC cells. This implies the existence of multiple molecular mechanisms for collective cell migration.

  19. HIF-1α Promotes A Hypoxia-Independent Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Li, Liyuan; Madu, Chikezie O; Lu, Andrew; Lu, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is known as a transactivator for VEGF gene promoter. It can be induced by hypoxia. However, no study has been done so far to dissect HIF-1α-mediated effects from hypoxia or VEGF-mediated effects. By using a HIF-1α knockout (HIF-1α KO) cell system in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells, this study analyzes cell migration and HIF-1α, hypoxia and VEGF activation. A hypoxia-mediated HIF-1α induction and VEGF transactivation were observed: both HIF-1α WT lines had significantly increased VEGF transactivation, as an indicator for HIF-1α induction, in hypoxia compared to normoxia; in contrast, HIF-1α KO line had no increased VEGF transactivation under hypoxia. HIF-1α promotes cell migration: HIF-1α-KO cells had a significantly reduced migration compared to that of the HIF-1α WT cells under both normoxia and hypoxia. The significantly reduced cell migration in HIF-1α KO cells can be partially rescued by the restoration of WT HIF-1α expression mediated by adenoviral-mediated gene transfer. Interestingly, hypoxia has no effect on cell migration: the cells had a similar cell migration rate under hypoxic and normoxic conditions for both HIF-1α WT and HIF-1α KO lines, respectively. Collectively, these data suggest that HIF-1α plays a role in MEF cell migration that is independent from hypoxia-mediated effects.

  20. HIF-1α Promotes A Hypoxia-Independent Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liyuan; Madu, Chikezie O.; Lu, Andrew; Lu, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is known as a transactivator for VEGF gene promoter. It can be induced by hypoxia. However, no study has been done so far to dissect HIF-1α-mediated effects from hypoxia or VEGF-mediated effects. By using a HIF-1α knockout (HIF-1α KO) cell system in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells, this study analyzes cell migration and HIF-1α, hypoxia and VEGF activation. A hypoxia-mediated HIF-1α induction and VEGF transactivation were observed: both HIF-1α WT lines had significantly increased VEGF transactivation, as an indicator for HIF-1α induction, in hypoxia compared to normoxia; in contrast, HIF-1α KO line had no increased VEGF transactivation under hypoxia. HIF-1α promotes cell migration: HIF-1α-KO cells had a significantly reduced migration compared to that of the HIF-1α WT cells under both normoxia and hypoxia. The significantly reduced cell migration in HIF-1α KO cells can be partially rescued by the restoration of WT HIF-1α expression mediated by adenoviral-mediated gene transfer. Interestingly, hypoxia has no effect on cell migration: the cells had a similar cell migration rate under hypoxic and normoxic conditions for both HIF-1α WT and HIF-1α KO lines, respectively. Collectively, these data suggest that HIF-1α plays a role in MEF cell migration that is independent from hypoxia-mediated effects. PMID:20882121

  1. 3D cancer cell migration in a confined matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alobaidi, Amani; Sun, Bo

    Cancer cell migration is widely studied in 2D motion, which does not mimic the invasion processes in vivo. More recently, 3D cell migration studies have been performed. The ability of cancer cells to migrate within the extracellular matrix depends on the physical and biochemical features of the extracellular matrix. We present a model of cell motility in confined matrix geometry. The aim of the study is to study cancer migration in collagen matrix, as a soft tissue, to investigate their motility within the confined and surrounding collagen environment. Different collagen concentrations have been used to show the ability of these cancer cells to move through such a complex structure by measuring Cancer cell migration velocity as well as the displacement. Graduate student physics department.

  2. Physical role for the nucleus in cell migration.

    PubMed

    Fruleux, Antoine; Hawkins, Rhoda J

    2016-09-14

    Cell migration is important for the function of many eukaryotic cells. Recently the nucleus has been shown to play an important role in cell motility. After giving an overview of cell motility mechanisms we review what is currently known about the mechanical properties of the nucleus and the connections between it and the cytoskeleton. We also discuss connections to the extracellular matrix and mechanotransduction. We identify key physical roles of the nucleus in cell migration.

  3. Physical role for the nucleus in cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruleux, Antoine; Hawkins, Rhoda J.

    2016-09-01

    Cell migration is important for the function of many eukaryotic cells. Recently the nucleus has been shown to play an important role in cell motility. After giving an overview of cell motility mechanisms we review what is currently known about the mechanical properties of the nucleus and the connections between it and the cytoskeleton. We also discuss connections to the extracellular matrix and mechanotransduction. We identify key physical roles of the nucleus in cell migration.

  4. Physical role for the nucleus in cell migration.

    PubMed

    Fruleux, Antoine; Hawkins, Rhoda J

    2016-09-14

    Cell migration is important for the function of many eukaryotic cells. Recently the nucleus has been shown to play an important role in cell motility. After giving an overview of cell motility mechanisms we review what is currently known about the mechanical properties of the nucleus and the connections between it and the cytoskeleton. We also discuss connections to the extracellular matrix and mechanotransduction. We identify key physical roles of the nucleus in cell migration. PMID:27406341

  5. Neurotrophins regulate Schwann cell migration by activating divergent signaling pathways dependent on Rho GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Junji; Chan, Jonah R.; Shooter, Eric M.

    2004-01-01

    Neurotrophins are recognized widely as essential factors in the developing nervous system. Previously, we demonstrated that neurotrophin 3 activation of TrkC inhibits Schwann cell myelination and enhances the migration of primary Schwann cells through the signaling pathway regulated by the Rho GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42. Here, we show that neurotrophins activate divergent signaling pathways to promote or inhibit Schwann cell migration. Endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor acting through p75NTR inhibits Schwann cell migration dramatically by Src kinase-dependent activation of the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor Vav2 and RhoA. Together, these results suggest that neurotrophins and their receptors differentially regulate Schwann cell migration through the signaling pathways that depend on Rho GTPases. PMID:15161978

  6. How does cancer cell metabolism affect tumor migration and invasion?

    PubMed

    Han, Tianyu; Kang, De; Ji, Daokun; Wang, Xiaoyu; Zhan, Weihua; Fu, Minggui; Xin, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jian-Bin

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis is the major cause of cancer-associated death. Accordingly, identification of the regulatory mechanisms that control whether or not tumor cells become "directed walkers" is a crucial issue of cancer research. The deregulation of cell migration during cancer progression determines the capacity of tumor cells to escape from the primary tumors and invade adjacent tissues to finally form metastases. The ability to switch from a predominantly oxidative metabolism to glycolysis and the production of lactate even when oxygen is plentiful is a key characteristic of cancer cells. This metabolic switch, known as the Warburg effect, was first described in 1920s, and affected not only tumor cell growth but also tumor cell migration. In this review, we will focus on the recent studies on how cancer cell metabolism affects tumor cell migration and invasion. Understanding the new aspects on molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways controlling tumor cell migration is critical for development of therapeutic strategies for cancer patients.

  7. Follow-the-leader cell migration requires biased cell-cell contact and local microenvironmental signals.

    PubMed

    Wynn, Michelle L; Rupp, Paul; Trainor, Paul A; Schnell, Santiago; Kulesa, Paul M

    2013-06-01

    Directed cell migration often involves at least two types of cell motility that include multicellular streaming and chain migration. However, what is unclear is how cell contact dynamics and the distinct microenvironments through which cells travel influence the selection of one migratory mode or the other. The embryonic and highly invasive neural crest (NC) are an excellent model system to study this question since NC cells have been observed in vivo to display both of these types of cell motility. Here, we present data from tissue transplantation experiments in chick and in silico modeling that test our hypothesis that cell contact dynamics with each other and the microenvironment promote and sustain either multicellular stream or chain migration. We show that when premigratory cranial NC cells (at the pre-otic level) are transplanted into a more caudal region in the head (at the post-otic level), cells alter their characteristic stream behavior and migrate in chains. Similarly, post-otic NC cells migrate in streams after transplantation into the pre-otic hindbrain, suggesting that local microenvironmental signals dictate the mode of NC cell migration. Simulations of an agent-based model (ABM) that integrates the NC cell behavioral data predict that chain migration critically depends on the interplay of biased cell-cell contact and local microenvironment signals. Together, this integrated modeling and experimental approach suggests new experiments and offers a powerful tool to examine mechanisms that underlie complex cell migration patterns.

  8. Modulation of cell spreading and migration by pp125FAK phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, S.; Mahooti-Brooks, N.; Hu, G.; Madri, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    We provide evidence for both matrix-dependent and pp60v-src tyrosine kinase-dependent modulation of cell migration via tyrosine phosphorylation of pp125FAK, a focal adhesion kinase, thought to be involved in integrin-mediated signaling. Enhanced pp125FAK tyrosine phosphorylation and cell spreading was associated with decreased migration. Cells plated on type I collagen were less spread and exhibited lower levels of pp125FAK tyrosine phosphorylation and faster migration rates compared with cells on fibronectin that were well spread, which exhibited enhanced levels of pp125FAK tyrosine phosphorylation and slower migration rates. Inside-out signaling via expression of pp60v-src or its kinase-negative mutant caused a decrease in cell migration by changing the extent of pp125FAK tyrosine phosphorylation to above or below the levels obtained with control cells plated on fibronectin. Hence, pp125FAK tyrosine phosphorylation appears to play a role in the signaling cascade pathway involved in regulation of extracellular matrix-modulated, integrin-mediated cell migration. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7677174

  9. A rapid photoelectric method for reading cell migration from agarose microdroplets.

    PubMed

    Gauthier-Rahman, S; Morlat, J L; Leca, G; Bouin, M

    1982-08-27

    A rapid photoelectric method for reading cell migration from agarose microdroplets is described. Practically instantaneous, the method eliminates drawing and planimetry and makes feasible the use of a wide range of antigen concentrations. The results obtained are similar to those obtained by planimetry, but the photoelectric method is more sensitive. Enhancement of migration as well as inhibition were significantly demonstrated by this method. Migration inhibition of immune mouse spleen cells was found to be bizonal, with 2 peaks, one at very low antigen concentrations (10(-3) microgram/ml ovalbumin) and one at 10 microgram/ml.

  10. An open data ecosystem for cell migration research.

    PubMed

    Masuzzo, Paola; Martens, Lennart; Ampe, Christophe; Anderson, Kurt I; Barry, Joseph; De Wever, Olivier; Debeir, Olivier; Decaestecker, Christine; Dolznig, Helmut; Friedl, Peter; Gaggioli, Cedric; Geiger, Benjamin; Goldberg, Ilya G; Horn, Elias; Horwitz, Rick; Kam, Zvi; Le Dévédec, Sylvia E; Vignjevic, Danijela Matic; Moore, Josh; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Sahai, Erik; Sansone, Susanna A; Sanz-Moreno, Victoria; Strömblad, Staffan; Swedlow, Jason; Textor, Johannes; Van Troys, Marleen; Zantl, Roman

    2015-02-01

    Cell migration research has recently become both a high content and a high throughput field thanks to technological, computational, and methodological advances. Simultaneously, however, urgent bioinformatics needs regarding data management, standardization, and dissemination have emerged. To address these concerns, we propose to establish an open data ecosystem for cell migration research.

  11. The oncoprotein HBXIP promotes migration of breast cancer cells via GCN5-mediated microtubule acetylation.

    PubMed

    Li, Leilei; Liu, Bowen; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ye, Lihong

    2015-03-13

    We have documented that the oncoprotein hepatitis B X-interacting protein (HBXIP) is able to promote migration of breast cancer cells. A subset of acetylated microtubules that accumulates in the cell leading edge is necessary for cell polarization and directional migration. In this study, we explored the hypothesis that HBXIP contributes to migration of breast cancer cells by supporting microtubule acetylation in breast cancer cells. We found that HBXIP could induce acetylated microtubules accumulating into the leading protrusion in wound-induced directional migration in breast cancer cells by immunofluorescence staining analysis. Interestingly, HBXIP was able to increase the acetylation of α-tubulin in the cells by immunofluorescence staining and Western blot analysis. Furthermore, we observed that acetyltransferase GCN5 was involved in the event that HBXIP induced increase of acetylated microtubules and their expansion in protrusions in breast cancer cells by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining. Moreover, GCN5 was required for the HBXIP-enhanced migration of breast cancer cells by wound healing assay. Thus, we conclude that HBXIP promotes the migration of breast cancer cells through modulating microtubule acetylation mediated by GCN5. Therapeutically, HBXIP may serve as a novel target in breast cancer.

  12. Glycation of extracellular matrix proteins impairs migration of immune cells.

    PubMed

    Haucke, Elisa; Navarrete-Santos, Alexander; Simm, Andreas; Silber, Rolf-Edgar; Hofmann, Britt

    2014-01-01

    The immune response during aging and diabetes is disturbed and may be due to the altered migration of immune cells in an aged tissue. Our study should prove the hypothesis that age and diabetes-related advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have an impact on the migration and adhesion of human T-cells. To achieve our purpose, we used in vitro AGE-modified proteins (soluble albumin and fibronectin [FN]), as well as human collagen obtained from bypass graft. A Boyden chamber was used to study cell migration. Migrated Jurkat T-cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and cell adhesion by crystal violet staining. Actin polymerization was determined by phalloidin-Alexa-fluor 488-labeled antibody and fluorescence microscopy. We found that significantly fewer cells (50%, p = 0.003) migrated through methylglyoxal modified FN. The attachment to FN in the presence of AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA) was also reduced (p < 0.05). In ex vivo experiments, isolated collagen from human vein graft material negatively affected the migration of the cells depending on the grade of AGE modification of the collagen. Collagen with a low AGE level reduced the cell migration by 30%, and collagen with a high AGE level by 60%. Interaction of the cells with an AGE-modified matrix, but not with soluble AGEs like BSA-AGE per se, was responsible for a disturbed migration. The reduced migration was accompanied by an impaired actin polymerization. We conclude that AGEs-modified matrix protein inhibits cell migration and adhesion of Jurkat T-cells. PMID:24635174

  13. Glycation of extracellular matrix proteins impairs migration of immune cells.

    PubMed

    Haucke, Elisa; Navarrete-Santos, Alexander; Simm, Andreas; Silber, Rolf-Edgar; Hofmann, Britt

    2014-01-01

    The immune response during aging and diabetes is disturbed and may be due to the altered migration of immune cells in an aged tissue. Our study should prove the hypothesis that age and diabetes-related advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have an impact on the migration and adhesion of human T-cells. To achieve our purpose, we used in vitro AGE-modified proteins (soluble albumin and fibronectin [FN]), as well as human collagen obtained from bypass graft. A Boyden chamber was used to study cell migration. Migrated Jurkat T-cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and cell adhesion by crystal violet staining. Actin polymerization was determined by phalloidin-Alexa-fluor 488-labeled antibody and fluorescence microscopy. We found that significantly fewer cells (50%, p = 0.003) migrated through methylglyoxal modified FN. The attachment to FN in the presence of AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA) was also reduced (p < 0.05). In ex vivo experiments, isolated collagen from human vein graft material negatively affected the migration of the cells depending on the grade of AGE modification of the collagen. Collagen with a low AGE level reduced the cell migration by 30%, and collagen with a high AGE level by 60%. Interaction of the cells with an AGE-modified matrix, but not with soluble AGEs like BSA-AGE per se, was responsible for a disturbed migration. The reduced migration was accompanied by an impaired actin polymerization. We conclude that AGEs-modified matrix protein inhibits cell migration and adhesion of Jurkat T-cells.

  14. Impaired SIRT1 promotes the migration of vascular smooth muscle cell-derived foam cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Jie; Zhou, Yi; Chen, Lei; Wang, Xu; Pi, Yan; Long, Chun-Yan; Sun, Meng-Jiao; Chen, Xue; Gao, Chang-Yue; Li, Jing-Cheng; Zhang, Li-Li

    2016-07-01

    The formation of fat-laden foam cells, contributing to the fatty streaks of the plaques of atheroma, is the critical early process in atherosclerosis. The previous study demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contain a much larger burden of the excess cholesterol in comparison with monocyte-derived macrophages in human coronary atherosclerosis, as the main origin of foam cells. It is noteworthy that VSMC-derived foam cells are deposited in subintima but not media, where VSMCs normally deposit in. Therefore, migration from media to intima is an indispensable step for a VSMC to accrue neutral lipids and form foam cell. Whether this migration occurs paralleled with or prior to the formation of foam cell is still unclear. Herein, the present study was designed to test the VSMC migratory capability in the process of foam cell formation induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). In conclusion, we provide evidence that oxLDL induces the VSMC-derived foam cells formation with increased migration ability and MMP-9 expression, which were partly attributed to the impaired SIRT1 and enhanced nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activity. As activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) has been reported to have anti-atherosclerotic effects, we investigated its role in oxLDL-treated VSMC migration. It is found that activating TRPV1 by capsaicin inhibits VSMC foam cell formation and the accompanied migration through rescuing the SIRT1 and suppressing NF-κB signaling. The present study provides evidence that SIRT1 may be a promising intervention target of atherosclerosis, and raises the prospect of TRPV1 in prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis.

  15. Cerebellar granule cell migration and the effects of alcohol.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yulan; Kumada, Tatsuro; Cameron, D Bryant; Komuro, Hitoshi

    2008-01-01

    In the developing brain the majority of neurons migrate from their birthplace to their final destination. This active movement is essential for the formation of cortical layers and nuclei. The impairment of migration does not affect the viability of neurons but often results in abnormal differentiation. The proper migration of neurons requires the orchestrated activities of multiple cellular and molecular events, such as pathway selection, the activation of specific receptors and channels, and the assembly and disassembly of cytoskeletal components. The migration of neurons is very vulnerable to exposure to environmental toxins, such as alcohol. In this article, we will focus on recent developments in the migration of cerebellar granule cells. First, we will describe when, where and how granule cells migrate through different cortical layers to reach their final destination. Second, we will present how internal programs control the sequential changes in granule cell migration. Third, we will review the roles of external guidance cues and transmembrane signals in granule cell migration. Finally, we will reveal mechanisms by which alcohol exposure impairs granule cell migration. PMID:18075250

  16. Transforming potential and matrix stiffness co-regulate confinement sensitivity of tumor cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Amit

    2013-01-01

    It is now well established that tumor cell invasion through tissue is strongly regulated by the microstructural and mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, it remains unclear how these physical microenvironmental inputs are jointly processed with oncogenic lesions to drive invasion. In this study, we address this open question by combining a microfabricated polyacrylamide channel (μPAC) platform that enables independent control of ECM stiffness and confinement with an isogenically-matched breast tumor progression series in which the oncogenes ErbB2 and 14-3-3ζ are overexpressed independently or in tandem. We find that increasing channel confinement and overexpressing ErbB2 both promote cell migration to a similar degree when other parameters are kept constant. In contrast, 14-3-3ζ overexpression slows migration speed, and does so in a fashion that dwarfs effects of ECM confinement and stiffness. We also find that ECM stiffness dramatically enhances cell motility when combined with ErbB2 overexpression, demonstrating that biophysical cues and cell-intrinsic parameters promote cell invasion in an integrative manner. Morphometric analysis of cells inside the μPAC platform reveals that the rapid cell migration induced by narrow channels and ErbB2 overexpression both are accompanied by increased cell polarization. Disruption of this polarization by pharmacological inhibition of Rac GTPase phenocopies 14-3-3ζ overexpression by reducing cell polarization and slowing migration. By systematically measuring migration speed as a function of matrix stiffness and confinement, we also quantify for the first time the sensitivity of migration speed to microchannel properties and transforming potential. These results demonstrate that oncogenic lesions and ECM biophysical properties can synergistically interact to drive invasive migration, and that both inputs may act through common molecular mechanisms to enhance migration speed. PMID:23832051

  17. IL-17A promotes migration and tumor killing capability of B cells in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lin; Weng, Chengyin; Mao, Haibo; Fang, Xisheng; Liu, Xia; Wu, Yong; Cao, Xiaofei; Li, Baoxiu; Chen, Xiaojun; Gan, Qinquan; Xia, Jianchuan; Liu, Guolong

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported that the accumulation of IL-17-producing cells could mediate tumor protective immunity by promoting the migration of NK cells, T cells and dendritic cells in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients. However, there were no reports concerning the effect of IL-17A on tumor infiltrating B cells. In this study, we investigated the accumulation of CD20+ B cells in the ESCC tumor nests and further addressed the effect of IL-17A on the migration and cytotoxicity of B cells. There was positive correlation between the levels of CD20+ B cells and IL-17+ cells. IL-17A could promote the ESCC tumor cells to produce more chemokines CCL2, CCL20 and CXCL13, which were associated with the migration of B cells. In addition, IL-17A enhanced the IgG-mediated antibody and complement mediated cytotoxicity of B cells against tumor cells. IL-17A-stimulated B cells gained more effective direct killing capability through enhanced expression of Granzyme B and FasL. The effect of IL-17A on the migration and cytotoxicity of B cells was IL-17A pathway dependent, which could be inhibited by IL-17A inhibitor. This study provides further understanding of the roles of IL-17A in humoral response, which may contribute to the development of novel tumor immunotherapy strategy. PMID:26942702

  18. IL-17A promotes migration and tumor killing capability of B cells in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lin; Weng, Chengyin; Mao, Haibo; Fang, Xisheng; Liu, Xia; Wu, Yong; Cao, Xiaofei; Li, Baoxiu; Chen, Xiaojun; Gan, Qinquan; Xia, Jianchuan; Liu, Guolong

    2016-04-19

    We have previously reported that the accumulation of IL-17-producing cells could mediate tumor protective immunity by promoting the migration of NK cells, T cells and dendritic cells in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients. However, there were no reports concerning the effect of IL-17A on tumor infiltrating B cells. In this study, we investigated the accumulation of CD20+ B cells in the ESCC tumor nests and further addressed the effect of IL-17A on the migration and cytotoxicity of B cells. There was positive correlation between the levels of CD20+ B cells and IL-17+ cells. IL-17A could promote the ESCC tumor cells to produce more chemokines CCL2, CCL20 and CXCL13, which were associated with the migration of B cells. In addition, IL-17A enhanced the IgG-mediated antibody and complement mediated cytotoxicity of B cells against tumor cells. IL-17A-stimulated B cells gained more effective direct killing capability through enhanced expression of Granzyme B and FasL. The effect of IL-17A on the migration and cytotoxicity of B cells was IL-17A pathway dependent, which could be inhibited by IL-17A inhibitor. This study provides further understanding of the roles of IL-17A in humoral response, which may contribute to the development of novel tumor immunotherapy strategy.

  19. Neuronal Neuregulin 1 type III directs Schwann cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Perlin, Julie R.; Lush, Mark E.; Stephens, W. Zac; Piotrowski, Tatjana; Talbot, William S.

    2011-01-01

    During peripheral nerve development, each segment of a myelinated axon is matched with a single Schwann cell. Tight regulation of Schwann cell movement, proliferation and differentiation is essential to ensure that these glial cells properly associate with axons. ErbB receptors are required for Schwann cell migration, but the operative ligand and its mechanism of action have remained unknown. We demonstrate that zebrafish Neuregulin 1 (Nrg1) type III, which signals through ErbB receptors, controls Schwann cell migration in addition to its previously known roles in proliferation and myelination. Chimera analyses indicate that ErbB receptors are required in all migrating Schwann cells, and that Nrg1 type III is required in neurons for migration. Surprisingly, expression of the ligand in a few axons is sufficient to induce migration along a chimeric nerve constituted largely of nrg1 type III mutant axons. These studies also reveal a mechanism that allows Schwann cells to fasciculate axons regardless of nrg1 type III expression. Time-lapse imaging of transgenic embryos demonstrated that misexpression of human NRG1 type III results in ectopic Schwann cell migration, allowing them to aberrantly enter the central nervous system. These results demonstrate that Nrg1 type III is an essential signal that controls Schwann cell migration to ensure that these glia are present in the correct numbers and positions in developing nerves. PMID:21965611

  20. Regulation of C6 glioma cell migration by thymol

    PubMed Central

    LEE, KANG PA; KIM, JAI-EUN; PARK, WON-HWAN; HONG, HEEOK

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cell motility exhibits a crucial role in tumor development. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate whether thymol could reduce C6 glioma cell migration. Cell viability was determined using the EZ-Cytox Cell Viability kit. The scratch wound healing and Boyden chamber assays were performed to test C6 glioma cell migration in the presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS). Additionally, the study investigated whether signaling proteins relevant to C6 glioma cell migration, i.e., extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2, protein kinase Cα (PKCα), matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)9 and MMP2, were affected by thymol treatment. Up to 30 µM, thymol did not alter cell viability, whereas 100 µM thymol induced the death of ~20% of the cells. Furthermore, thymol (30 µM) significantly reduced FBS-induced migration. In the FBS-stimulated C6 glioma cells, thymol (30 µM) suppressed PKCα and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. MMP9 and MMP2 production was also significantly reduced by treatment with 30 µM thymol in the C6 glioma cells. Taken together, these results indicate that thymol attenuates C6 glioma cell migration. Additionally, the study suggests that the effect of thymol on the FBS-induced migration of C6 glioma cells affects PKCα and ERK1/2 signaling, and suppresses MMP9 and MMP2 production. PMID:27073528

  1. Silk Film Topography Directs Collective Epithelial Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblatt, Mark I.

    2012-01-01

    The following study provides new insight into how surface topography dictates directed collective epithelial cell sheet growth through the guidance of individual cell movement. Collective cell behavior of migrating human corneal limbal-epithelial cell sheets were studied on highly biocompatible flat and micro-patterned silk film surfaces. The silk film edge topography guided the migratory direction of individual cells making up the collective epithelial sheet, which resulted in a 75% increase in total culture elongation. This was due to a 3-fold decrease in cell sheet migration rate efficiency for movement perpendicular to the topography edge. Individual cell migration direction is preferred in the parallel approach to the edge topography where localization of cytoskeletal proteins to the topography’s edge region is reduced, which results in the directed growth of the collective epithelial sheet. Findings indicate customized biomaterial surfaces may be created to direct both the migration rate and direction of tissue epithelialization. PMID:23185573

  2. Distribution of fibroblast growth factors and their roles in skin fibroblast cell migration.

    PubMed

    Song, Yong Huan; Zhu, Yu Ting; Ding, Jian; Zhou, Fei Ya; Xue, Ji Xin; Jung, Jin Hee; Li, Zhi Jie; Gao, Wei Yang

    2016-10-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)2/basic FGF is a member of the fibroblast growth factor family. Its function in skin wound healing has been well-characterized. However, the function of other FGFs in skin tissues remains to be elucidated. In the present study, FGF expression patterns in heart, liver, skin and kidney tissues were analyzed. Notably, in contrast to other tissues, only four FGFs, FGF2, 7, 10 and 21, were dominant in the skin. To examine FGF function in the wound healing process, mouse NIH3T3 fibroblast cells were treated with FGF2, FGF10 and FGF21, and cell migration was monitored. The results revealed that FGF treatment promoted cell migration, which is an important step in wound healing. In addition, FGF treatment enhanced the activity of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), a key regulator of fibroblast cell migration. To analyze its role in cell migration, FGF7 was overexpressed in fibroblast cells via a lentivirus system; however, this did not change cell migration speed. FGF2, 7, 10 and 21 were highly expressed in skin tissue, and all except FGF7 regulated fibroblast cell migration and activated JNK. The results of the present study increase our understanding of the role of FGFs in skin wound healing. PMID:27572477

  3. Carbon Ion Irradiation Inhibits Glioma Cell Migration Through Downregulation of Integrin Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Wuerth, Lena; Brons, Stephan; Mohr, Angela; Lindel, Katja; Weber, Klaus; Haberer, Thomas; Debus, Juergen; Combs, Stephanie E.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of carbon ion irradiation on glioma cell migration. Methods and Materials: U87 and Ln229 glioma cells were irradiated with photons and carbon ions. Migration was analyzed 24 h after irradiation. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis was performed in order to quantify surface expression of integrins. Results: Single photon doses of 2 Gy and 10 Gy enhanced {alpha}{sub {nu}}{beta}{sub 3} and {alpha}{sub {nu}}{beta}{sub 5} integrin expression and caused tumor cell hypermigration on both vitronectin (Vn) and fibronectin (Fn). Compared to integrin expression in unirradiated cells, carbon ion irradiation caused decreased integrin expression and inhibited cell migration on both Vn and Fn. Conclusion: Photon radiotherapy (RT) enhances the risk of tumor cell migration and subsequently promotes locoregional spread via photon induction of integrin expression. In contrast to photon RT, carbon ion RT causes decreased integrin expression and suppresses glioma cell migration on both Vn and Fn, thus promising improved local control.

  4. Enhanced Keratinocyte Proliferation and Migration in Co-culture with Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenxiang; Wang, Ying; Farhangfar, Farhang; Zimmer, Monica; Zhang, Yongxin

    2012-01-01

    Wound healing is primarily controlled by the proliferation and migration of keratinocytes and fibroblasts as well as the complex interactions between these two cell types. To investigate the interactions between keratinocytes and fibroblasts and the effects of direct cell-to-cell contact on the proliferation and migration of keratinocytes, keratinocytes and fibroblasts were stained with different fluorescence dyes and co-cultured with or without transwells. During the early stage (first 5 days) of the culture, the keratinocytes in contact with fibroblasts proliferated significantly faster than those not in contact with fibroblasts, but in the late stage (11th to 15th day), keratinocyte growth slowed down in all cultures unless EGF was added. In addition, keratinocyte migration was enhanced in co-cultures with fibroblasts in direct contact, but not in the transwells. Furthermore, the effects of the fibroblasts on keratinocyte migration and growth at early culture stage correlated with heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF), IL-1α and TGF-β1 levels in the cultures where the cells were grown in direct contact. These effects were inhibited by anti-HB-EGF, anti-IL-1α and anti-TGF-β1 antibodies and anti-HB-EGF showed the greatest inhibition. Co-culture of keratinocytes and IL-1α and TGF-β1 siRNA-transfected fibroblasts exhibited a significant reduction in HB-EGF production and keratinocyte proliferation. These results suggest that contact with fibroblasts stimulates the migration and proliferation of keratinocytes during wound healing, and that HB-EGF plays a central role in this process and can be up-regulated by IL-1α and TGF-β1, which also regulate keratinocyte proliferation differently during the early and late stage. PMID:22911722

  5. Cell migration in the normal and pathological postnatal mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Canoll, Peter; Goldman, James E.

    2009-01-01

    In the developing brain, cell migration is a crucial process for structural organization, and is therefore highly regulated to allow the correct formation of complex networks, wiring neurons, and glia. In the early postnatal brain, late developmental processes such as the production and migration of astrocyte and oligodendrocyte progenitors still occur. Although the brain is completely formed and structured few weeks after birth, it maintains a degree of plasticity throughout life, including axonal remodeling, synaptogenesis, but also neural cell birth, migration and integration. The subventricular zone (SVZ) and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus (DG) are the two main neurogenic niches in the adult brain. Neural stem cells reside in these structures and produce progenitors that migrate toward their ultimate location: the olfactory bulb and granular cell layer of the DG respectively. The aim of this review is to synthesize the increasing information concerning the organization, regulation and function of cell migration in a mature brain. In a normal brain, protein involved in cell-cell or cell-matrix interactions together with secreted proteins acting as chemoattractant or chemorepellant play key roles in the regulation of neural progenitor cell migration. In addition, recent data suggest that gliomas arise from the transformation of neural stem cells or progenitor cells and that glioma cell infiltration recapitulates key aspects of glial progenitor migration. Thus, we will consider glioma migration in the context of progenitor migration. Finally, many observations show that brain lesions and neurological diseases trigger neural stem/progenitor cell activation and migration towards altered structures. The factors involved in such cell migration/recruitment are just beginning to be understood. Inflammation which has long been considered as thoroughly disastrous for brain repair is now known to produce some positive effects on stem/progenitor cell recruitment via

  6. Glass-like dynamics in collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelini, Thomas; Weitz, David

    2011-03-01

    The collective movement of tissue cells is essential to fundamental biological processes in both health and disease, and occurs throughout embryonic development, during wound healing, and in cancerous tumor invasion. Most knowledge of cell migration, however, comes from single cell studies. Single cells migrate by executing cyclic processes of extension, adhesion, and retraction, during which the cell body fluctuates dramatically and the cell changes direction erratically. These sub-cellular motions must be coupled between neighbors in confluent layers, yet the influence of this coupling on collective migration is not known. In this talk we present a study of motion in confluent epithelial cell sheets. We measure collective migration and sub-cellular motions, covering a broad range of length-scales, time-scales, and cell densities. We find that that collective cell migration exhibits many behaviors characteristic of classical supercooled particulate fluids, including growing dynamic heterogeneities in the migration velocity field, non-Arrhenius relaxation behavior, and peaks in the density of states analogous to the Boson peak. These results provide a suggestive analogy between collective cell motion and the dynamics of supercooled fluids approaching a glass transition.

  7. Neural cell adhesion molecule modulates mesenchymal stromal cell migration via activation of MAPK/ERK signaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yu; Xia, Yin-Yan; Wang, Lei; Liu, Rui; Khoo, King-Shung; Feng, Zhi-Wei

    2012-10-15

    Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs) represent promising tools for cellular therapy owing to their multipotentiality and ability to localize to injured, inflamed sites and tumor. Various approaches to manipulate expression of MSC surface markers, including adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors, have been explored to enhance homing of MSCs. Recently, Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM) has been found to be expressed on MSCs yet its function remains largely elusive. Herein, we show that bone marrow-derived MSCs from NCAM deficient mice exhibit defective migratory ability and significantly impaired adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potential. We further explore the mechanism governing NCAM mediated migration of MSCs by showing the interplay between NCAM and Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR) induces activation of MAPK/ERK signaling, thereby the migration of MSCs. In addition, re-expression of NCAM180, but not NCAM140, could restore the defective MAPK/ERK signaling thereby the migration of NCAM deficient MSCs. Finally, we demonstrate that NCAM180 expression level could be manipulated by pro-inflammatory cytokine Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-α treatment. Overall, our data reveal the vital function of NCAM in MSCs migration and differentiation thus raising the possibility of manipulating NCAM expression to enhance homing and therapeutic potential of MSCs in cellular therapy.

  8. Intraperitoneal Mesenchymal Cells Promote the Development of Peritoneal Metastasis Partly by Supporting Long Migration of Disseminated Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Joji; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishigami, Hironori; Matsuzaki, Keisuke; Sata, Naohiro

    2016-01-01

    The human peritoneal cavity contains a small number of free cells of mesenchymal cell lineage. Intraperitoneal mesenchymal cells (PMC) play supportive roles in metastasis formation on the peritoneum. In this study, we found that PMC, when co-cultuerd with human gastric cancer cells, MKN45, enhanced the proliferation of MKN45 when cultured at low, but not high, cellular density. Also, PMC suppressed apoptotic cell death of MKN45 only under low density culture conditions. Time-lapse videoanalysis clearly demonstrated that PMC randomly migrated more vigorously than did MKN45, and strongly enhanced the migration behavior of co-cultured MKN45. In fact, the majority of MKN45 migrated together in direct physical contact with PMC, and the sum of migration lengths from original position of co-cultured MKN45 for 48 hours was approximately 10 times longer than that of MKN45 cultured alone. Our data suggest that enhanced migration can increase the chance of direct contact or positional proximity among sparcely distributed MKN45, which may bring survival advantages to tumor cells. This may be one of the important mechanisms of peritoneal metastasis, since only a small number of tumor cells are considered to be disseminated in the early step of metastasis formation on the peritoneum. PMID:27136922

  9. Intraperitoneal Mesenchymal Cells Promote the Development of Peritoneal Metastasis Partly by Supporting Long Migration of Disseminated Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishigami, Hironori; Matsuzaki, Keisuke; Sata, Naohiro

    2016-01-01

    The human peritoneal cavity contains a small number of free cells of mesenchymal cell lineage. Intraperitoneal mesenchymal cells (PMC) play supportive roles in metastasis formation on the peritoneum. In this study, we found that PMC, when co-cultuerd with human gastric cancer cells, MKN45, enhanced the proliferation of MKN45 when cultured at low, but not high, cellular density. Also, PMC suppressed apoptotic cell death of MKN45 only under low density culture conditions. Time-lapse videoanalysis clearly demonstrated that PMC randomly migrated more vigorously than did MKN45, and strongly enhanced the migration behavior of co-cultured MKN45. In fact, the majority of MKN45 migrated together in direct physical contact with PMC, and the sum of migration lengths from original position of co-cultured MKN45 for 48 hours was approximately 10 times longer than that of MKN45 cultured alone. Our data suggest that enhanced migration can increase the chance of direct contact or positional proximity among sparcely distributed MKN45, which may bring survival advantages to tumor cells. This may be one of the important mechanisms of peritoneal metastasis, since only a small number of tumor cells are considered to be disseminated in the early step of metastasis formation on the peritoneum. PMID:27136922

  10. Effect of Lumican on the Migration of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Endothelial Progenitor Cells: Involvement of Matrix Metalloproteinase-14

    PubMed Central

    Perreau, Corinne; Boguslawski, Mateusz; Decot, Véronique; Stoltz, Jean-François; Vallar, Laurent; Niewiarowska, Jolanta; Cierniewski, Czeslaw; Maquart, François-Xavier; Wegrowski, Yanusz; Brézillon, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    Background Increasing number of evidence shows that soluble factors and extracellular matrix (ECM) components provide an optimal microenvironment controlling human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) functions. Successful in vivo administration of stem cells lies in their ability to migrate through ECM barriers and to differentiate along tissue-specific lineages, including endothelium. Lumican, a protein of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan (SLRP) family, was shown to impede cell migration and angiogenesis. The aim of the present study was to analyze the role of lumican in the control of MSC migration and transition to functional endothelial progenitor cell (EPC). Methodology/Principal Findings Lumican inhibited tube-like structures formation on Matrigel® by MSC, but not EPC. Since matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), in particular MMP-14, play an important role in remodelling of ECM and enhancing cell migration, their expression and activity were investigated in the cells grown on different ECM substrata. Lumican down-regulated the MMP-14 expression and activity in MSC, but not in EPC. Lumican inhibited MSC, but not EPC migration and invasion. The inhibition of MSC migration and invasion by lumican was reversed by MMP-14 overexpression. Conclusion/Significance Altogether, our results suggest that lumican inhibits MSC tube-like structure formation and migration via mechanisms that involve a decrease of MMP-14 expression and activity. PMID:23236386

  11. Bioengineering Paradigms for Cell Migration in Confined Microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Stroka, Kimberly M.; Gu, Zhizhan; Sun, Sean X.; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration is a fundamental process underlying diverse (patho)physiological phenomena. The classical understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cell migration has been based on in vitro studies on two-dimensional substrates. More recently, mounting evidence from intravital studies has shown that during metastasis, tumor cells must navigate complex microenvironments in vivo, including narrow, pre-existing microtracks created by anatomical structures. It is becoming apparent that unraveling the mechanisms of confined cell migration in this context requires a multi-disciplinary approach through integration of in vivo and in vitro studies, along with sophisticated bioengineering techniques and mathematical modeling. Here, we highlight such an approach that has led to discovery of a new model for cell migration in confined microenvironments (i.e., the Osmotic Engine Model). PMID:24973724

  12. Bioengineering paradigms for cell migration in confined microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Stroka, Kimberly M; Gu, Zhizhan; Sun, Sean X; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-10-01

    Cell migration is a fundamental process underlying diverse (patho)physiological phenomena. The classical understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cell migration has been based on in vitro studies on two-dimensional substrates. More recently, mounting evidence from intravital studies has shown that during metastasis, tumor cells must navigate complex microenvironments in vivo, including narrow, pre-existing microtracks created by anatomical structures. It is becoming apparent that unraveling the mechanisms of confined cell migration in this context requires a multi-disciplinary approach through integration of in vivo and in vitro studies, along with sophisticated bioengineering techniques and mathematical modeling. Here, we highlight such an approach that has led to discovery of a new model for cell migration in confined microenvironments (i.e., the Osmotic Engine Model). PMID:24973724

  13. Migration of adhesive glioma cells: Front propagation and fingering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khain, Evgeniy; Katakowski, Mark; Charteris, Nicholas; Jiang, Feng; Chopp, Michael

    2012-07-01

    We investigate the migration of glioma cells as a front propagation phenomenon both theoretically (by using both discrete lattice modeling and a continuum approach) and experimentally. For small effective strength of cell-cell adhesion q, the front velocity does not depend on q. When q exceeds a critical threshold, a fingeringlike front propagation is observed due to cluster formation in the invasive zone. We show that the experiments correspond to the transient regime, before the regime of front propagation is established. We performed an additional experiment on cell migration. A detailed comparison with experimental observations showed that the theory correctly predicts the maximal migration distance but underestimates the migration of the main mass of cells.

  14. Fundulus deep cells: directional migration in response to epithelial wounding.

    PubMed

    Fink, R D; Trinkaus, J P

    1988-09-01

    During the normal embryogenesis of the killifish Fundulus heteroclitus deep cells migrate in an apparently random fashion throughout the subepithelial space of the yolk sac. These cells migrate by blebbing locomotion, and individual cells show tendencies for persistence in the directionality of their movement. Immediately after the wounding of the yolk sac epithelium (the enveloping layer), these deep cells reorient and migrate directionally toward the site of wound closure. This directional migration results in the aggregation of a large number of cells at the wound site. The response is both rapid and widespread; cells as far away as 800 micron respond as quickly as those nearby, and by 100 min after wounding up to 90% of the blebbing deep cells within this radius have clustered about the wound site. Then, cells begin to disperse, and by 150 min after wounding, it is almost impossible to tell where the wound had been made. Because of the transparency of the Fundulus yolk sac, this phenomenon can be utilized as a model system for observing details of in vivo directional cell movements. Time-lapse video micrography has revealed that the modes, rates, and overall cell morphologies during locomotion are identical for cells migrating in both unwounded and wounded embryos. What is different in the wounded embryos is that a single directionality is imposed upon a large population of cells, resulting in aggregation. Several aspects of the aggregation phenomenon suggest that a possible attractant originating at the wound site may travel through the subepithelial space by diffusion.

  15. Cell Growth Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Exogene Corporation uses advanced technologies to enhance production of bio-processed substances like proteins, antibiotics and amino acids. Among them are genetic modification and a genetic switch. They originated in research for Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Extensive experiments in cell growth through production of hemoglobin to improve oxygen supply to cells were performed. By improving efficiency of oxygen use by cells, major operational expenses can be reduced. Greater product yields result in decreased raw material costs and more efficient use of equipment. A broad range of applications is cited.

  16. Live Imaging of Border Cell Migration in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wei; Montell, Denise J

    2016-01-01

    Border cells are a cluster of cells that migrate from the anterior tip of the Drosophila egg chamber to the border of the oocyte in stage 9. They serve as a useful model to study collective cell migration in a native tissue environment. Here we describe a protocol for preparing ex vivo egg chamber cultures from transgenic flies expressing fluorescent proteins in the border cells, and using confocal microscopy to take a multi-positional time-lapse movie. We include an image analysis method for tracking border cell cluster dynamics as well as tracking individual cell movements. PMID:27271901

  17. Live Imaging of Border Cell Migration in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wei; Montell, Denise J

    2016-01-01

    Border cells are a cluster of cells that migrate from the anterior tip of the Drosophila egg chamber to the border of the oocyte in stage 9. They serve as a useful model to study collective cell migration in a native tissue environment. Here we describe a protocol for preparing ex vivo egg chamber cultures from transgenic flies expressing fluorescent proteins in the border cells, and using confocal microscopy to take a multi-positional time-lapse movie. We include an image analysis method for tracking border cell cluster dynamics as well as tracking individual cell movements.

  18. A Sensitized PiggyBac-Based Screen for Regulators of Border Cell Migration in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Juliette; Sung, Hsin-Ho; Pugieux, Céline; Soetaert, Jan; Rorth, Pernille

    2007-01-01

    Migration of border cells during Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis is a good model system for investigating the genetic requirements for cell migration in vivo. We present a sensitized loss-of-function screen used to identify new genes required in border cells for their migration. Chromosomes bearing FRTs on all four major autosomal arms were mutagenized by insertions of the transposable element PiggyBac, allowing multiple parallel clonal screens and easy identification of the mutated gene. For border cells, we analyzed homozygous mutant clones positively marked with lacZ and sensitized by expression of dominant-negative PVR, the guidance receptor. We identified new alleles of genes already known to be required for border cell migration, including aop/yan, DIAP1, and taiman as well as a conserved Slbo-regulated enhancer downstream of shg/DE–cadherin. Mutations in genes not previously described to be required in border cells were also uncovered: hrp48, vir, rme-8, kismet, and puckered. puckered was unique in that the migration defects were observed only when PVR signaling was reduced. We present evidence that an excess of JNK signaling is deleterious for migration in the absence of PVR activity at least in part through Fos transcriptional activity and possibly through antagonistic effects on DIAP1. PMID:17483425

  19. Cell migration and division in amoeboid-like fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Flor-Parra, Ignacio; Bernal, Manuel; Zhurinsky, Jacob; Daga, Rafael R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Yeast cells are non-motile and are encased in a cell wall that supports high internal turgor pressure. The cell wall is also essential for cellular morphogenesis and cell division. Here, we report unexpected morphogenetic changes in a Schizosaccharomyces pombe mutant defective in cell wall biogenesis. These cells form dynamic cytoplasmic protrusions caused by internal turgor pressure and also exhibit amoeboid-like cell migration resulting from repeated protrusive cycles. The cytokinetic ring responsible for cell division in wild-type yeast often fails in these cells; however, they were still able to divide using a ring-independent alternative mechanism relying on extrusion of the cell body through a hole in the cell wall. This mechanism of cell division may resemble an ancestral mode of division in the absence of cytokinetic machinery. Our findings highlight how a single gene change can lead to the emergence of different modes of cell growth, migration and division. PMID:24357230

  20. Overexpression of CD99 Increases the Migration and Invasiveness of Human Malignant Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Seol, Ho Jun; Chang, Jong Hee; Yamamoto, Junkoh; Romagnuolo, Rocco; Suh, Youngchul; Weeks, Adrienne; Agnihotri, Sameer; Smith, Christian A; Rutka, James T

    2012-09-01

    The malignant glioma is the most common primary human brain tumor, and its migration and invasiveness away from the primary tumor mass are considered a leading cause of tumor recurrence and treatment failure. Recently, gene expression profiling revealed that the transmembrane glycoprotein CD99 is more highly expressed in malignant glioma than in normal brain. Although its function is not completely understood, CD99 is implicated in cell adhesion and migration in a variety of different cell types. CD99 has wild-type and splice variant isoforms. Previous studies have shown that wild-type CD99 may be an oncosuppressor in some tumors, distinct from the role of the splice variant isoform. In this study, our data reveal that only wild-type CD99 is expressed in human glioma cells and tissues. Using a tissue microarray, we validated that gliomas demonstrate higher expression of CD99 compared with nonneoplastic brain. To assess the role of CD99 in glioma migration and invasion, we inhibited CD99 expression by siRNA and demonstrated decreased glioma migration and invasion. In contrast, when CD99 was overexpressed in glioma cells, we observed enhancement of cell migration and invasiveness. An orthotopic brain tumor model demonstrates that CD99 overexpression significantly increases invasiveness and decreases survival rate. Interestingly, Rac activity was decreased and Rho activity was increased in CD99 overexpressing glioma cells, and the proportion of amoeboid cells to mesenchymal cells was significantly increased. Taken together, our findings suggest that CD99 may play an important role in the migration and invasion of human gliomas independent of Akt, ERK, or JNK signaling pathways. Moreover, CD99 might be involved in amoeboid-mesenchymal transition in glioma migration. CD99 may be an important future target to inhibit migration and invasion, especially in CD99-expressing gliomas. PMID:23486730

  1. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell assembly and operation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Andrew M.; Torraco, Dennis; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Spernjak, Dusan; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rod L.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2015-10-02

    Cerium migration between PEM fuel cell components is influenced by potential-driven mobility, ionic diffusion, and gradients in water content. These factors were investigated in ex situ experiments and in operating fuel cells. Potential-induced migration was measured ex situ in hydrated window cells. Cerium-containing MEAs were also fabricated and tested under ASTs. MEA disassembly and subsequent XRF analysis were used to observe rapid cerium migration during cell assembly and operation. During MEA hot pressing, humidification, and low RH operation at OCV, ionic diffusion causes uniform migration from the membrane into the catalyst layers. During high RH operation at OCV, in-plane cerium gradients arise due to variations in water content. These gradients may diminish the scavenging efficacy of cerium by reducing its proximity to generated radicals.

  2. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell assembly and operation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baker, Andrew M.; Torraco, Dennis; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Spernjak, Dusan; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rod L.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2015-09-14

    Cerium migration between PEM fuel cell components is influenced by potential-driven mobility, ionic diffusion, and gradients in water content. These factors were investigated in ex situ experiments and in operating fuel cells. Potential-induced migration was measured ex situ in hydrated window cells. Cerium-containing MEAs were also fabricated and tested under ASTs. MEA disassembly and subsequent XRF analysis were used to observe rapid cerium migration during cell assembly and operation. During MEA hot pressing, humidification, and low RH operation at OCV, ionic diffusion causes uniform migration from the membrane into the catalyst layers. During high RH operation at OCV, in-plane ceriummore » gradients arise due to variations in water content. These gradients may diminish the scavenging efficacy of cerium by reducing its proximity to generated radicals.« less

  3. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell assembly and operation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Andrew M.; Torraco, Dennis; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Spernjak, Dusan; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rod L.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2015-09-14

    Cerium migration between PEM fuel cell components is influenced by potential-driven mobility, ionic diffusion, and gradients in water content. These factors were investigated in ex situ experiments and in operating fuel cells. Potential-induced migration was measured ex situ in hydrated window cells. Cerium-containing MEAs were also fabricated and tested under ASTs. MEA disassembly and subsequent XRF analysis were used to observe rapid cerium migration during cell assembly and operation. During MEA hot pressing, humidification, and low RH operation at OCV, ionic diffusion causes uniform migration from the membrane into the catalyst layers. During high RH operation at OCV, in-plane cerium gradients arise due to variations in water content. These gradients may diminish the scavenging efficacy of cerium by reducing its proximity to generated radicals.

  4. Phosphorylation of actopaxin regulates cell spreading and migration

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Dominic M.; Brown, Michael C.; LaLonde, David P.; Turner, Christopher E.

    2004-01-01

    Actopaxin is an actin and paxillin binding protein that localizes to focal adhesions. It regulates cell spreading and is phosphorylated during mitosis. Herein, we identify a role for actopaxin phosphorylation in cell spreading and migration. Stable clones of U2OS cells expressing actopaxin wild-type (WT), nonphosphorylatable, and phosphomimetic mutants were developed to evaluate actopaxin function. All proteins targeted to focal adhesions, however the nonphosphorylatable mutant inhibited spreading whereas the phosphomimetic mutant cells spread more efficiently than WT cells. Endogenous and WT actopaxin, but not the nonphosphorylatable mutant, were phosphorylated in vivo during cell adhesion/spreading. Expression of the nonphosphorylatable actopaxin mutant significantly reduced cell migration, whereas expression of the phosphomimetic increased cell migration in scrape wound and Boyden chamber migration assays. In vitro kinase assays demonstrate that extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase phosphorylates actopaxin, and treatment of U2OS cells with the MEK1 inhibitor UO126 inhibited adhesion-induced phosphorylation of actopaxin and also inhibited cell migration. PMID:15353548

  5. Interior decoration: tropomyosin in actin dynamics and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Lees, Justin G; Bach, Cuc T T; O'Neill, Geraldine M

    2011-01-01

    Cell migration and invasion requires the precise temporal and spatial orchestration of a variety of biological processes. Filaments of polymerized actin are critical players in these diverse processes, including the regulation of cell anchorage points (both cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix), the uptake and delivery of molecules via endocytic pathways and the generation of force for both membrane protrusion and retraction. How the actin filaments are specialized for each of these discrete functions is yet to be comprehensively elucidated. The cytoskeletal tropomyosins are a family of actin associating proteins that form head-to-tail polymers which lay in the major groove of polymerized actin filaments. In the present review we summarize the emerging isoform-specific functions of tropomyosins in cell migration and invasion and discuss their potential roles in the specialization of actin filaments for the diverse cellular processes that together regulate cell migration and invasion.

  6. Estrogen Stimulation of Cell Migration Involves Multiple Signaling Pathway Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Ping; Santen, Richard J.; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Park, Hoyong; Fan, Ping; Yue, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Hormone-dependent breast cancers respond to inhibitors of estrogen synthesis or action with tumor regression and with a reduction of new metastases. The mechanisms underlying the effects of estrogen on metastasis likely differ from those on tumor regression. Cell migration is a key first step in the metastatic process. Based on our prior work and other published data, we designed and tested a working model that suggested that estrogen receptor α, epidermal growth factor receptor, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin, phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase, p60 Src tyrosine kinase (c-Src), c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and MAPK interact to facilitate estradiol (E2)-induced cell migration. Accordingly, we examined the effect of E2 on activation of these pathways and demonstrated mechanistic effects by blocking each component and assessing cell migration as a biologic endpoint. Initial studies validated a robust cell migration assay characterized by highly reproducible, dose-dependent responses to E2. Examining various mechanisms involved in migration, we showed that E2 induced activation of c-Src, FAK, and paxillin with early peaks within 5–30 min and later peaks at 24 h. ERK and protein kinase B phosphorylation exhibited only early peaks. Blockade of various steps in these signaling pathways with use of small interfering RNA or specific inhibitors demonstrated mechanistic effects of these signaling molecules on cell migration. Our results suggest that the effects of E2 on cell migration involve multiple, interacting signaling pathways. Important effects are mediated by the MAPK, phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathways and use FAK, paxillin, and c-Src for activation. Each pathway represents a potential target for blocking cell migration and metastasis of breast cancer cells. PMID:20861240

  7. Displacement measurement of the depth migration of transparent cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Makoto; Ishimaru, Ichirou; Ishizaki, Katsumi; Yasokawa, Toshiki; Kuriyama, Shigeki; Masaki, Tsutomu; Nakai, Seiji; Takegawa, Kaoru; Tanaka, Naoyuki

    2006-12-11

    This letter reports a method for displacement measurement of the depth migration of transparent cells. This proposed optical spatial filtering method allows visualization of the transparent cells and determination of depth migration as a horizontal displacement positive or negative first order diffracted light on the detector surface. When the sample is displaced upward or downward from the focal plane, first and negative first order diffracted light form images at a different point as a light circle. The coordinates of these two light circles on the detector surface change places when the displacement of depth migration moves to the opposite direction.

  8. Fluid shear stress modulates cell migration induced by sphingosine 1-phosphate and vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Shannon K; Wacker, Bradley K; Kaneda, Megan M; Elbert, Donald L

    2005-08-01

    The rational design of drug delivery systems requires the ability to predict the environment-specific responses of target cells to the delivered drug. Here we describe the in vitro effects of fluid shear stress, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) on the migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Endothelial cell migration into a scrape wound was enhanced in S1P- or VEGF-stimulated HUVEC by the addition of fluid shear stress. In both cases, scrape wound closure rates were near a maximal value that was not exceeded when cells were exposed to all three factors. We also found that cell migration into a scrape wound due to S1P stimulation was correlated with the S1P1 mRNA concentration, in systems where cell migration was not already near maximal. The present work represents our initial steps toward predicting cell migration based upon the activation state of the receptors and enzymes involved in the chemokinetic response. These results also illustrate the importance of context-dependent analysis of cell signaling cascades.

  9. Membrane nanowaves in single and collective cell migration.

    PubMed

    Zouani, Omar F; Gocheva, Veronika; Durrieu, Marie-Christine

    2014-01-01

    We report the characterization of three-dimensional membrane waves for migrating single and collective cells and describe their propagation using wide-field optical profiling technique with nanometer resolution. We reveal the existence of small and large membrane waves the amplitudes of which are in the range of ∼ 3-7 nm to ∼ 16-25 nm respectively, through the cell. For migrating single-cells, the amplitude of these waves is about 30 nm near the cell edge. Two or more different directions of propagation of the membrane nanowaves inside the same cell can be observed. After increasing the migration velocity by BMP-2 treatment, only one wave direction of propagation exists with an increase in the average amplitude (more than 80 nm near the cell edge). Furthermore for collective-cell migration, these membrane nanowaves are attenuated on the leader cells and poor transmission of these nanowaves to follower cells was observed. After BMP-2 treatment, the membrane nanowaves are transmitted from the leader cell to several rows of follower cells. Surprisingly, the vast majority of the observed membrane nanowaves is shared between the adjacent cells. These results give a new view on how single and collective-cells modulate their motility. This work has significant implications for the therapeutic use of BMPs for the regeneration of skin tissue. PMID:24846182

  10. Cell-permeable p38 MAP kinase promotes migration of adult neural stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Hamanoue, Makoto; Morioka, Kazuhito; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Ohsawa, Keiko; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Tsuburaya, Kayo; Akasaka, Yoshikiyo; Mikami, Tetsuo; Ogata, Toru; Takamatsu, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) can migrate toward sites of injury, but the migration activity of NPCs is insufficient to regenerate damaged brain tissue. In this study, we showed that p38 MAP kinase (p38) is expressed in doublecortin-positive adult NPCs. Experiments using the p38 inhibitor SB203580 revealed that endogenous p38 participates in NPC migration. To enhance NPC migration, we generated a cell-permeable wild-type p38 protein (PTD-p38WT) in which the HIV protein transduction domain (PTD) was fused to the N-terminus of p38. Treatment with PTD-p38WT significantly promoted the random migration of adult NPCs without affecting cell survival or differentiation; this effect depended on the cell permeability and kinase activity of the fusion protein. These findings indicate that PTD-p38WT is a novel and useful tool for unraveling the roles of p38, and that this protein provides a reasonable approach for regenerating the injured brain by enhancing NPC migration. PMID:27067799

  11. [MIP-1α promotes the migration ability of Jurkat cell through human brain microvascular endothelial cell monolayer].

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi-Ran; Zhang, Shuang; Sun, Ying; Liu, Yi-Yang; Song, Qian; Hao, Yi-Wen

    2014-02-01

    This study was purposed to explore the mechanism of central nervous system (CNS) leukemia resulting from brain metastasis of human acute T-cell leukemia (T-ALL) cells and the role of MIP-1α in migration of Jurkat cells through human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). The real-time PCR, siRNA test, transendothelial migration test, endothelial permeability assay and cell adhesion assay were used to detect MIP-1α expression, penetration and migration ability as well as adhesion capability respectively. The results showed that the MIP-1α expression in Jurkat cells was higher than that in normal T cells and CCRF-HSB2, CCRF-CEM , SUP-T1 cells. The MIP-1α secreted from Jurkat cells enhanced the ability of Jurkat cells to penetrate through HBMEC, the ability of Jurkat cells treated by MIP-1α siRNA to adhere to HBMEC and to migrate trans endothelial cells decreased. It is concluded that the MIP-1α secreted from Jurkat cells participates in process of penetrating the Jurkat cells through HBMEC monolayer.

  12. Exogenous expression of N-cadherin in breast cancer cells induces cell migration, invasion, and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hazan, R B; Phillips, G R; Qiao, R F; Norton, L; Aaronson, S A

    2000-02-21

    E- and N-cadherin are calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecules that mediate cell-cell adhesion and also modulate cell migration and tumor invasiveness. The loss of E-cadherin-mediated adhesion has been shown to play an important role in the transition of epithelial tumors from a benign to an invasive state. However, recent evidence indicates that another member of the cadherin family, N-cadherin, is expressed in highly invasive tumor cell lines that lacked E-cadherin expression. These findings have raised the possibility that N-cadherin contributes to the invasive phenotype. To determine whether N-cadherin promotes invasion and metastasis, we transfected a weakly metastatic and E-cadherin-expressing breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, with N-cadherin and analyzed the effects on cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Transfected cells expressed both E- and N-cadherin and exhibited homotypic cell adhesion from both molecules. In vitro, N-cadherin-expressing cells migrated more efficiently, showed an increased invasion of Matrigel, and adhered more efficiently to monolayers of endothelial cells. All cells produced low levels of the matrix metalloproteinase MMP-9, which was dramatically upregulated by treatment with FGF-2 only in N-cadherin-expressing cells. Migration and invasion of Matrigel were also greatly enhanced by this treatment. When injected into the mammary fat pad of nude mice, N-cadherin-expressing cells, but not control MCF-7 cells, metastasized widely to the liver, pancreas, salivary gland, omentum, lung, lymph nodes, and lumbar spinal muscle. The expression of both E- and N-cadherin was maintained both in the primary tumors and metastatic lesions. These results demonstrate that N-cadherin promotes motility, invasion, and metastasis even in the presence of the normally suppressive E-cadherin. The increase in MMP-9 production by N-cadherin-expressing cells in response to a growth factor may endow them with a greater ability to penetrate matrix protein

  13. Using a co-culture microsystem for cell migration under fluid shear stress.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chia-Hsien; Tsai, Shen-Hsing; Wu, Li-Wha; Lin, Yu-Cheng

    2011-08-01

    We have successfully developed a microsystem to co-cultivate two types of cells with a minimum defined gap of 50 μm, and to quantitatively study the impact of fluid shear stress on the mutual influence of cell migration velocity and distance. We used the hydrostatic pressure to seed two different cells, endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs), on opposite sides of various gap sizes (500 μm, 200 μm, 100 μm, and 50 μm). After cultivating the cells for 12 h and peeling the co-culture microchip from the culture dish, we studied the impacts of gap size on the migration of either cell type in the absence or presence of fluid shear stress (7 dyne cm(-2) and 12 dyne cm(-2)) influence. We found that both gap size and shear stress have profound influence on cell migration. Smaller gap sizes (100 μm and 50 μm) significantly enhanced cell migration, suggesting a requirement of an effective concentration of released factor(s) by either cell type in the gap region. Flow-induced shear stress delayed the migration onset of either cell type in a dose-dependent manner regardless of the gap size. Moreover, shear stress-induced decrease of cell migration becomes evident when the gap size was 500 μm. We have developed a co-culture microsystem for two kinds of cells and overcome the conventional difficulties in observation and mixed culture, and it would have more application for bio-manipulation and tissue repair engineering.

  14. Using a co-culture microsystem for cell migration under fluid shear stress.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chia-Hsien; Tsai, Shen-Hsing; Wu, Li-Wha; Lin, Yu-Cheng

    2011-08-01

    We have successfully developed a microsystem to co-cultivate two types of cells with a minimum defined gap of 50 μm, and to quantitatively study the impact of fluid shear stress on the mutual influence of cell migration velocity and distance. We used the hydrostatic pressure to seed two different cells, endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs), on opposite sides of various gap sizes (500 μm, 200 μm, 100 μm, and 50 μm). After cultivating the cells for 12 h and peeling the co-culture microchip from the culture dish, we studied the impacts of gap size on the migration of either cell type in the absence or presence of fluid shear stress (7 dyne cm(-2) and 12 dyne cm(-2)) influence. We found that both gap size and shear stress have profound influence on cell migration. Smaller gap sizes (100 μm and 50 μm) significantly enhanced cell migration, suggesting a requirement of an effective concentration of released factor(s) by either cell type in the gap region. Flow-induced shear stress delayed the migration onset of either cell type in a dose-dependent manner regardless of the gap size. Moreover, shear stress-induced decrease of cell migration becomes evident when the gap size was 500 μm. We have developed a co-culture microsystem for two kinds of cells and overcome the conventional difficulties in observation and mixed culture, and it would have more application for bio-manipulation and tissue repair engineering. PMID:21695290

  15. Energy barriers and cell migration in confluent tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Dapeng; Lopez, J. H.; Schwarz, J. M.; Manning, M. Lisa

    2014-03-01

    Biological processes such as embryogensis, tumorigenesis and wound healing require cells to move within a tissue. While the migration of single cells has been extensively studied, it has remained unclear how single cell properties control migration through a confluent tissue. We develop numerical and theoretical models to calculate energy barriers to cell rearrangements, which govern cell motility. In contrast to sheared foams where energy barriers are power-law distributed, energy barriers in tissues are exponentially distributed and depend systematically on the cell's number of neighbors. Using simple extensions of `trap' and `Soft Glassy Rheology' models, we demonstrate that these energy barrier distributions give rise to glassy behavior and use the models to make testable predictions for two-time correlation functions and caging times. We incorporate these ideas into a continuum model that combines glassy rheology with active polarization to better understand collective migration in epithelial sheets.

  16. Modelling Rho GTPase biochemistry to predict collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merchant, Brian; Feng, James

    The collective migration of cells, due to individual cell polarization and intercellular contact inhibition of locomotion, features prominently in embryogenesis and metastatic cancers. Existing methods for modelling collectively migrating cells tend to rely either on highly abstracted agent-based models, or on continuum approximations of the group. Both of these frameworks represent intercellular interactions such as contact inhibition of locomotion as hard-coded rules defining model cells. In contrast, we present a vertex-dynamics framework which predicts polarization and contact inhibition of locomotion naturally from an underlying model of Rho GTPase biochemistry and cortical mechanics. We simulate the interaction between many such model cells, and study how modulating Rho GTPases affects migratory characteristics of the group, in the context of long-distance collective migration of neural crest cells during embryogenesis.

  17. Laser-photophoretic migration and fractionation of human blood cells.

    PubMed

    Monjushiro, Hideaki; Tanahashi, Yuko; Watarai, Hitoshi

    2013-05-13

    Laser photophoretic migration behavior of human blood cells in saline solution was investigated under the irradiation of Nd:YAG laser beam (532 nm) in the absence and the presence of the flow in a fused silica capillary. Red blood cells (RBC) were migrated faster than white blood cells (WBC) and blood pellets to the direction of propagation of laser light. The observed photophoretic velocity of RBC was about 11 times faster than those of others. This was understood from the larger photophoretic efficiency of RBC than that of WBC, which was simulated based on the Mie scattering theory. Furthermore, it was found that, during the photophoretic migration, RBCs spontaneously orientated parallel to the migration direction so as to reduce the drag force. Finally, it was demonstrated that RBC and WBC were separated in a micro-channel flow system by the laser photophoresis.

  18. Cell migration in confinement: a micro-channel-based assay.

    PubMed

    Heuzé, Mélina L; Collin, Olivier; Terriac, Emmanuel; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria; Piel, Matthieu

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes a method to study cells migrating in micro-channels, a confining environment of well-defined geometry. This assay is a complement to more complex 3D migration systems and provides several advantages even if it does not recapitulate the full complexity of 3D migration. Important parameters such as degree of adhesion, degree of confinement, mechanical properties, and geometry can be varied independently of each other. The device is fully compatible with almost any type of light microscopy and the simple geometry makes automated analysis very easy to perform, which allows screening strategy. The chapters is divided into five parts describing the design of different types of migration chambers, the fabrication of a mold by photolithography, the assembly of the chamber, the loading of cells, and finally the imaging on live or fixed cells. PMID:21748692

  19. Timosaponin AIII inhibits melanoma cell migration by suppressing COX-2 and in vivo tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Mo; Im, A-Rang; Kim, Seung Hyung; Hyun, Jin Won; Chae, Sungwook

    2016-02-01

    Melanoma is the leading cause of death from skin disease, due in large part to its propensity to metastasize. We examined the effects of timosaponin AIII, a compound isolated from Anemarrhena asphodeloides Bunge, on melanoma cancer cell migration and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects using B16-F10 and WM-115 melanoma cells lines. Overexpression of COX-2, its metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and PGE2 receptors (EP2 and EP4) promoted cell migration in vitro. Exposure to timosaponin AIII resulted in concentration-dependent inhibition of cell migration, which was associated with reduced levels of COX-2, PGE2, and PGE2 receptors. Transient transfection of COX-2 siRNA also inhibited cell migration. Exposure to 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbal-13-acetate enhanced cell migration, whereas timosaponin AIII inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbal-13-acetate-induced cell migration and reduced basal levels of EP2 and EP4. Moreover, timosaponin AIII inhibited activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), an upstream regulator of COX-2 in B16-F10 cells. Consistent with our in vitro findings, in vivo studies showed that timosaponin AIII treatment significantly reduced the total number of metastatic nodules in the mouse lung and improved histological alterations in B16-F10-injected C57BL/6 mice. In addition, C57BL/6 mice treated with timosaponin AIII showed reduced expression of COX-2 and NF-κB in the lung. Together, these results indicate that timosaponin AIII has the capacity to inhibit melanoma cell migration, an essential step in the process of metastasis, by inhibiting expression of COX-2, NF-κB, PGE2, and PGE2 receptors.

  20. Syndecan-4 regulates the bFGF-induced chemotactic migration of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ran; Wu, Han; Xie, Jun; Li, Guannan; Gu, Rong; Kang, Lina; Wang, Lian; Xu, Biao

    2016-10-01

    Chemotactic migration of endothelial cells (ECs) guided by extracellular attractants is essential for blood vessel formation. Synd4 is a ubiquitous heparin sulfate proteoglycan receptor on the cell surface that has been identified to promote angiogenesis during tissue repair. Here, the role synd4 played in chemotactic migration of ECs was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were transfected with Lenti-synd4-RNAi or Lenti-null. Cell migration was observed in a 2D-chemotaxis slide with a stable gradient of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) for 18 h using time-lapse microscopy. Synd4 knockdown HUVECs showed reduced mobility compared with the control. In animal studies, Matrigel premixed with bFGF was used to induce the migration of ECs. The cells migrated less distance from the skin in the Matrigel plugs of synd4 null mice compared with the control mice. Then recombinant adenoviruses containing the synd4 gene (Ad-synd4) or null (Ad-null) were constructed to enhance the synd4 expression of migratory cells in Matrigel plugs of wild-type mice. Migratory cells with synd4 overexpression did not invade further in the Matrigel plugs of wild-type mice, but showed a high ability to proliferate. PMID:27541034

  1. Syndecan-4 regulates the bFGF-induced chemotactic migration of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ran; Wu, Han; Xie, Jun; Li, Guannan; Gu, Rong; Kang, Lina; Wang, Lian; Xu, Biao

    2016-10-01

    Chemotactic migration of endothelial cells (ECs) guided by extracellular attractants is essential for blood vessel formation. Synd4 is a ubiquitous heparin sulfate proteoglycan receptor on the cell surface that has been identified to promote angiogenesis during tissue repair. Here, the role synd4 played in chemotactic migration of ECs was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were transfected with Lenti-synd4-RNAi or Lenti-null. Cell migration was observed in a 2D-chemotaxis slide with a stable gradient of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) for 18 h using time-lapse microscopy. Synd4 knockdown HUVECs showed reduced mobility compared with the control. In animal studies, Matrigel premixed with bFGF was used to induce the migration of ECs. The cells migrated less distance from the skin in the Matrigel plugs of synd4 null mice compared with the control mice. Then recombinant adenoviruses containing the synd4 gene (Ad-synd4) or null (Ad-null) were constructed to enhance the synd4 expression of migratory cells in Matrigel plugs of wild-type mice. Migratory cells with synd4 overexpression did not invade further in the Matrigel plugs of wild-type mice, but showed a high ability to proliferate.

  2. Mechanics in Mechanosensitivity of Cell Adhesion and its Roles in Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yuan; He, Shijie; Ji, Baohua

    2012-12-01

    Cells sense and respond to external stimuli and properties of their environment through focal adhesion complexes (FACs) to regulate a broad range of physiological and pathological processes, including cell migration. Currently, the basic principles in mechanics of the mechanosensitivity of cell adhesion and migration have not been fully understood. In this paper, an FEM-based mechano-chemical coupling model is proposed for studying the cell migration behaviors in which the dynamics of stability of FACs and the effect of cell shape on cell traction force distribution are considered. We find that the driving force of cell migration is produced by the competition of stability of cell adhesion between the cell front and cell rear, which consequently controls the speed of cell migration. We show that the rigidity gradient of matrix can bias this competition which allows cell to exhibit a durotaxis behavior, i.e. the larger the gradient, the higher the cell speed.

  3. Commensal bacteria promote migration of mast cells into the intestine.

    PubMed

    Kunii, Junichi; Takahashi, Kyoko; Kasakura, Kazumi; Tsuda, Masato; Nakano, Kou; Hosono, Akira; Kaminogawa, Shuichi

    2011-06-01

    Mast cells differentiate from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow and migrate via the circulation to peripheral tissues, where they play a pivotal role in induction of both innate and adaptive immune responses. In this study, the effect of intestinal commensal bacteria on the migration of mast cells into the intestine was investigated. Histochemical analyses showed that germ-free (GF) mice had lower mast cell densities in the small intestine than normal mice. It was also shown that GF mice had lower mast cell proportion out of lamina propria leukocytes in the small intestine and higher mast cell percentages in the blood than normal mice by flow cytometry. These results indicate that migration of mast cells from the blood to the intestine is promoted by intestinal commensal bacteria. In addition, MyD88⁻/⁻ mice had lower densities of intestinal mast cells than CV mice, suggesting that the promotive effect of commensals is, at least in part, TLR-dependent. The ligands of CXC chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2), which is critical for homing of mast cells to the intestine, were expressed higher in intestinal tissues and in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) of normal mice than in those of GF or MyD88⁻/⁻ mice. Collectively, it is suggested that commensals promote migration of mast cells into the intestine through the induction of CXCR2 ligands from IECs in a TLR-dependent manner.

  4. Dentin Matrix Protein-1 Isoforms Promote Differential Cell Attachment and Migration*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    von Marschall, Zofia; Fisher, Larry W.

    2008-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP1), bone sialoprotein (BSP), and osteopontin (OPN) are three SIBLINGs (small integrin-binding ligand, N-linked glycoproteins) co-expressed/secreted by skeletal and active ductal epithelial cells. Although etiological mechanisms remain unclear, DMP1 is the only one of these three genes currently known to have mutations resulting in human disease, and yet it remains the least studied. All three contain the highly conserved integrin-binding tripeptide, RGD, and experiments comparing the cell attachment and haptotactic migration-enhancing properties of DMP1 to BSP and OPN were performed using human skeletal (MG63 and primary dental pulp cells) and salivary gland (HSG) cells. Mutation of any SIBLING's RGD destroyed all attachment and migration activity. Using itsαVβ5 integrin, HSG cells attached to BSP but not to DMP1 or OPN. However, HSG cells could not migrate onto BSP in a modified Boyden chamber assay. Expression of αVβ3 integrin enhanced HSG attachment to DMP1 and OPN and promoted haptotactic migration onto all three proteins. Interchanging the first four coding exons or the conserved amino acids adjacent to the RGD of DMP1 with corresponding sequences of BSP did not enhance the ability of DMP1 to bindαVβ5. For αVβ3-expressing cells, intact DMP1, its BMP1-cleaved C-terminal fragment, and exon six lacking all post-translational modifications worked equally well but the proteoglycan isoform of DMP1 had greatly reduced ability for cell attachment and migration. The sequence specificity of the proposed BMP1-cleavage site of DMP1 was verified by mutation analysis. Direct comparison of the three proteins showed that cells discriminate among these SIBLINGs and among DMP1 isoforms. PMID:18819913

  5. Nuclear stiffening inhibits migration of invasive melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Alexandre J.S.; Khanna, Payal; Sukumar, Aishwarya; Dong, Cheng; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2014-01-01

    During metastasis, melanoma cells must be sufficiently deformable to squeeze through extracellular barriers with small pore sizes. We visualize and quantify deformability of single cells using micropipette aspiration and examine the migration potential of a population of melanoma cells using a flow migration apparatus. We artificially stiffen the nucleus with recombinant overexpression of Δ50 lamin A, which is found in patients with Hutchison Gilford progeria syndrome and in aged individuals. Melanoma cells, both WM35 and Lu1205, both show reduced nuclear deformability and reduced cell invasion with the expression of Δ50 lamin A. These studies suggest that cellular aging including expression of Δ50 lamin A and nuclear stiffening may reduce the potential for metastatic cancer migration. Thus, the pathway of cancer metastasis may be kept in check by mechanical factors in addition to known chemical pathway regulation. PMID:25544862

  6. Benzyl isothiocyanate inhibits HNSCC cell migration and invasion, and sensitizes HNSCC cells to cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Wolf, M Allison; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis and chemoresistance represent two detrimental events that greatly hinder the outcome for those suffering with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Herein, we investigated benzyl isothiocyanate's (BITC) ability to inhibit HNSCC migration and invasion and enhance chemotherapy. Our data suggests that treatment with BITC 1) induced significant reductions in the viability of multiple HNSCC cell lines tested (HN12, HN8, and HN30) after 24 and 48 h, 2) decreased migration and invasion of the HN12 cells in a dose dependent manner, and 3) inhibited expression and altered localization of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) marker, vimentin. We also observed that a pretreatment of BITC followed by cisplatin treatment 1) induced a greater decrease in HN12, HN30, and HN8 cell viability and total cell count than either treatment alone and 2) significantly increased apoptosis when compared to either treatment alone. Taken together these data suggest that BITC has the capacity to inhibit processes involved in metastasis and enhance the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Consequently, the results indicate that further investigation, including in vivo studies, are warranted.

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Eukaryotic Cell Migration: Insights Beyond Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Danuser, Gaudenz; Allard, Jun; Mogilner, Alex

    2014-01-01

    A migrating cell is a molecular machine made of tens of thousands of short-lived and interacting parts. Understanding migration means understanding the self-organization of these parts into a system of functional units. This task is one of tackling complexity: First, the system integrates numerous chemical and mechanical component processes. Second, these processes are connected in feedback interactions and over a large range of spatial and temporal scales. Third, many processes are stochastic, which leads to heterogeneous migration behaviors. Early on in the research of cell migration it became evident that this complexity exceeds human intuition. Thus, the cell migration community has led the charge to build mathematical models that could integrate the diverse experimental observations and measurements in consistent frameworks, first in conceptual and more recently in molecularly explicit models. The main goal of this review is to sift through a series of important conceptual and explicit mathematical models of cell migration and to evaluate their contribution to the field in their ability to integrate critical experimental data. PMID:23909278

  8. Chemokine-Mediated Migration of Mesencephalic Neural Crest Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rezzoug, Francine; Seelan, Ratnam S.; Bhattacherjee, Vasker; Greene, Robert M.; Pisano, M. Michele

    2011-01-01

    Clefts of the lip and/or palate are among the most prevalent birth defects affecting approximately 7000 newborns in the United States annually. Disruption of the developmentally programmed migration of neural crest cells (NCCs) into the orofacial region is thought to be one of the major causes of orofacial clefting. Signaling of the chemokine SDF-1 (Stromal Derived Factor-1) through its specific receptor, CXCR4, is required for the migration of many stem cell and progenitor cell populations from their respective sites of emergence to the regions where they differentiate into complex cell types, tissues and organs. In the present study, “transwell” assays of chick embryo mesencephalic (cranial) NCC migration and ex ovo whole embryo “bead implantation” assays were utilized to determine whether SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling mediates mesencephalic NCC migration. Results from this study demonstrate that attenuation of SDF-1 signaling, through the use of specific CXCR4 antagonists (AMD3100 and TN14003), disrupts the migration of mesencephalic NCCs into the orofacial region, suggesting a novel role for SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling in the directed migration of mesencephalic NCCs in the early stage embryo. PMID:22015108

  9. Ocular albinism type 1-induced melanoma cell migration is mediated through the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jun; Xie, Xin; Lei, Yun; An, Gaili; He, Li; Lv, Xiaopeng

    2014-07-01

    Malignant melanoma has the highest risk of mortality among all types of skin cancer due to its highly metastatic potential. The ocular albinism type 1 (OA1) protein is a pigment cell‑specific glycoprotein, which shares significant structural and functional features with G protein‑coupled receptors. However, the role of OA1 in melanoma has yet to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate whether OA1 is involved in melanoma cell migration. OA1 was found to stimulate cell migration in a dose‑dependent manner in cultured human melanoma cells. Furthermore, knockdown of OA1 using small interfering RNA was observed to significantly inhibit melanoma cell migration. In addition, the mechanism underlying OA1‑induced melanoma cell migration was investigated. Stimulation of the RAS/RAF/mitogen activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK) pathway using growth factors enhanced OA1 expression and melanoma cell migration, whereas inhibition of this pathway using U0126 was observed to markedly decrease OA1 expression and the number of migrated cells. These findings indicate that OA1 is involved in melanoma cell migration and that OA1‑induced melanoma cell migration is mediated through the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK signaling pathway. Therefore, OA1 may serve as a novel therapeutic target for melanoma. PMID:24736838

  10. Cell collectivity regulation within migrating cell cluster during Kupffer's vesicle formation in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Takaaki; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Bessho, Yasumasa

    2015-01-01

    Although cell adhesion is thought to fasten cells tightly, cells that adhere to each other can migrate directionally. This group behavior, called “collective cell migration,” is observed during normal development, wound healing, and cancer invasion. Loss-of-function of cell adhesion molecules in several model systems of collective cell migration results in delay or inhibition of migration of cell groups but does not lead to dissociation of the cell groups, suggesting that mechanisms of cells staying assembled as a single cell cluster, termed as “cell collectivity,” remain largely unknown. During the formation of Kupffer's vesicle (KV, an organ of laterality in zebrafish), KV progenitors form a cluster and migrate together toward the vegetal pole. Importantly, in this model system of collective cell migration, knockdown of cell adhesion molecules or signal components leads to failure of cell collectivity. In this review, we summarize recent findings in cell collectivity regulation during collective migration of KV progenitor cells and describe our current understanding of how cell collectivity is regulated during collective cell migration. PMID:26000276

  11. Phototherapy promotes cell migration in the presence of hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    Zungu, I L; Mbene, A B; Hawkins Evans, D H; Houreld, N N; Abrahamse, H

    2009-03-01

    Phototherapy has been shown to cause an increase in cell proliferation and migration. This study focused on viability (trypan blue), proliferation [sodium 3'-(1-(phenylaminocarbonyl)-3,4-tetrazolium)-bis(4-methoxy-6-nitro)-benzene sulphonic acid hydrate (XTT) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)] and migration of WS1 cells following irradiation in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU), which is an inhibitor of proliferation. Wounded cells were irradiated on days 1 and 4 with a fluence of 5 J/cm(2) with a helium-neon (He-Ne) laser at 632.8 nm. After a repair time of 24 h, cellular responses were assessed. Wounded irradiated cells without HU showed an increase in cell viability and proliferation, which was confirmed by complete wound closure by day 4. Although wounded irradiated cells treated with 5 mM HU showed incomplete wound closure, these cells showed increased migration compared with that of control cells. This study showed that laser irradiation using an He-Ne laser with a fluence of 5 J/cm(2) stimulates cell viability. The HU results confirmed that laser irradiation promotes cell migration and proliferation. PMID:18214574

  12. Protrusive waves guide 3D cell migration along nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Guetta-Terrier, Charlotte; Monzo, Pascale; Zhu, Jie; Long, Hongyan; Venkatraman, Lakshmi; Zhou, Yue; Wang, PeiPei; Chew, Sing Yian; Mogilner, Alexander; Ladoux, Benoit; Gauthier, Nils C

    2015-11-01

    In vivo, cells migrate on complex three-dimensional (3D) fibrous matrices, which has made investigation of the key molecular and physical mechanisms that drive cell migration difficult. Using reductionist approaches based on 3D electrospun fibers, we report for various cell types that single-cell migration along fibronectin-coated nanofibers is associated with lateral actin-based waves. These cyclical waves have a fin-like shape and propagate up to several hundred micrometers from the cell body, extending the leading edge and promoting highly persistent directional movement. Cells generate these waves through balanced activation of the Rac1/N-WASP/Arp2/3 and Rho/formins pathways. The waves originate from one major adhesion site at leading end of the cell body, which is linked through actomyosin contractility to another site at the back of the cell, allowing force generation, matrix deformation and cell translocation. By combining experimental and modeling data, we demonstrate that cell migration in a fibrous environment requires the formation and propagation of dynamic, actin based fin-like protrusions.

  13. Protrusive waves guide 3D cell migration along nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Guetta-Terrier, Charlotte; Monzo, Pascale; Zhu, Jie; Long, Hongyan; Venkatraman, Lakshmi; Zhou, Yue; Wang, PeiPei; Chew, Sing Yian; Mogilner, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In vivo, cells migrate on complex three-dimensional (3D) fibrous matrices, which has made investigation of the key molecular and physical mechanisms that drive cell migration difficult. Using reductionist approaches based on 3D electrospun fibers, we report for various cell types that single-cell migration along fibronectin-coated nanofibers is associated with lateral actin-based waves. These cyclical waves have a fin-like shape and propagate up to several hundred micrometers from the cell body, extending the leading edge and promoting highly persistent directional movement. Cells generate these waves through balanced activation of the Rac1/N-WASP/Arp2/3 and Rho/formins pathways. The waves originate from one major adhesion site at leading end of the cell body, which is linked through actomyosin contractility to another site at the back of the cell, allowing force generation, matrix deformation and cell translocation. By combining experimental and modeling data, we demonstrate that cell migration in a fibrous environment requires the formation and propagation of dynamic, actin based fin-like protrusions. PMID:26553933

  14. In-vivo cell tracking to quantify endothelial cell migration during zebrafish angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Prahlad G.; Rochon, Elizabeth R.; Roman, Beth L.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanism of endothelial cell migration as individual cells or collectively while remaining an integral component of a functional blood vessel has not been well characterized. In this study, our overarching goal is to define an image processing workflow to facilitate quantification of how endothelial cells within the first aortic arch and are proximal to the zebrafish heart behave in response to the onset of flow (i.e. onset of heart beating). Endothelial cell imaging was conducted at this developmental time-point i.e. ~24-28 hours post fertilization (hpf) when flow first begins, using 3D+time two-photon confocal microscopy of a live, wild-type, transgenic, zebrafish expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in endothelial cell nuclei. An image processing pipeline comprised of image signal enhancement, median filtering for speckle noise reduction, automated identification of the nuclei positions, extraction of the relative movement of nuclei between consecutive time instances, and finally tracking of nuclei, was designed for achieving the tracking of endothelial cell nuclei and the identification of their movement towards or away from the heart. Pilot results lead to a hypothesis that upon the onset of heart beat and blood flow, endothelial cells migrate collectively towards the heart (by 21.51+/-10.35 μm) in opposition to blood flow (i.e. subtending 142.170+/-21.170 with the flow direction).

  15. Correlation between substratum roughness and wettability, cell adhesion, and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Lampin, M; Warocquier-Clérout; Legris, C; Degrange, M; Sigot-Luizard, M F

    1997-07-01

    Cell adhesion and spreading of chick embryo vascular and corneal explants grown on rough and smooth poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) were analyzed to test the cell response specificity to substratum surface properties. Different degrees of roughness were obtained by sand-blasting PMMA with alumina grains. Hydrophilic and hydrophobic components of the surface free energy (SFE) were calculated according to Good-van Oss's model. Contact angles were determined using a computerized angle meter. The apolar component of the SFE gamma s(LW), increased with a slight roughness whereas the basic component, gamma s-, decreased. The acido-basic properties disappeared as roughness increased. Incubation of PMMA in culture medium, performed to test the influence if the biological environment, allowed surface adsorption of medium proteins which annihilated roughness effect and restored hydrophilic properties. An organotypic culture assay was carried out in an attempt to relate the biocompatibility to substratum surface state. Cell migration was calculated from the area of cell layer. Cellular adhesion was determined by measuring the kinetic of release of enzymatically dissociated cells. A slight roughness raised the migration are to an upper extent no matter which cell type. Enhancement of the cell adhesion potential was related to the degree of roughness and the hydrophobicity.

  16. Hedgehog inhibitors selectively target cell migration and adhesion of mantle cell lymphoma in bone marrow microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Han; Chen, Zheng; Neelapu, Sattva S.; Romaguera, Jorge; McCarty, Nami

    2016-01-01

    The clinical benefits of a Hedgehog (Hh) inhibitor, LDE225 (NPV-LDE-225, Erismodegib), have been unclear in hematological cancers. Here, we report that LDE225 selectively inhibited migration and adhesion of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) to bone marrows via very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) mediated inactivation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling. LDE225 treatment not only affected MCL cells, but also modulated stromal cells within the bone marrow microenvironment by decreasing their production of SDF-1, IL-6 and VCAM-1, the ligand for VLA-4. Surprisingly, LDE225 treatment alone did not suppress cell proliferation due to increased CXCR4 expression mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The increased ROS/CXCR4 further stimulated autophagy formation. The combination of LDE225 with the autophagy inhibitors further enhanced MCL cell death. Our data, for the first time, revealed LDE225 selectively targets MCL cells migration and adhesion to bone marrows. The ineffectiveness of LDE225 in MCL is due to autophagy formation, which in turn increases cell viability. Inhibiting autophagy will be an effective adjuvant therapy for LDE225 in MCL, especially for advanced MCL patients with bone marrow involvement. PMID:26885608

  17. Hedgehog inhibitors selectively target cell migration and adhesion of mantle cell lymphoma in bone marrow microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; Chen, Zheng; Neelapu, Sattva S; Romaguera, Jorge; McCarty, Nami

    2016-03-22

    The clinical benefits of a Hedgehog (Hh) inhibitor, LDE225 (NPV-LDE-225, Erismodegib), have been unclear in hematological cancers. Here, we report that LDE225 selectively inhibited migration and adhesion of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) to bone marrows via very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) mediated inactivation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling. LDE225 treatment not only affected MCL cells, but also modulated stromal cells within the bone marrow microenvironment by decreasing their production of SDF-1, IL-6 and VCAM-1, the ligand for VLA-4. Surprisingly, LDE225 treatment alone did not suppress cell proliferation due to increased CXCR4 expression mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The increased ROS/CXCR4 further stimulated autophagy formation. The combination of LDE225 with the autophagy inhibitors further enhanced MCL cell death. Our data, for the first time, revealed LDE225 selectively targets MCL cells migration and adhesion to bone marrows. The ineffectiveness of LDE225 in MCL is due to autophagy formation, which in turn increases cell viability. Inhibiting autophagy will be an effective adjuvant therapy for LDE225 in MCL, especially for advanced MCL patients with bone marrow involvement. PMID:26885608

  18. Multidisciplinary approaches to understanding collective cell migration in developmental biology.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Linus J; Kulesa, Paul M; McLennan, Rebecca; Baker, Ruth E; Maini, Philip K

    2016-06-01

    Mathematical models are becoming increasingly integrated with experimental efforts in the study of biological systems. Collective cell migration in developmental biology is a particularly fruitful application area for the development of theoretical models to predict the behaviour of complex multicellular systems with many interacting parts. In this context, mathematical models provide a tool to assess the consistency of experimental observations with testable mechanistic hypotheses. In this review, we showcase examples from recent years of multidisciplinary investigations of neural crest cell migration. The neural crest model system has been used to study how collective migration of cell populations is shaped by cell-cell interactions, cell-environmental interactions and heterogeneity between cells. The wide range of emergent behaviours exhibited by neural crest cells in different embryonal locations and in different organisms helps us chart out the spectrum of collective cell migration. At the same time, this diversity in migratory characteristics highlights the need to reconcile or unify the array of currently hypothesized mechanisms through the next generation of experimental data and generalized theoretical descriptions. PMID:27278647

  19. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, N. R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-02-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development.

  20. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, N.R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development. PMID:26887292

  1. Mechano-growth factor induces migration of rat mesenchymal stem cells by altering its mechanical properties and activating ERK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jiamin; Wu, Kewen; Lin, Feng; Luo, Qing; Yang, Li; Shi, Yisong; Song, Guanbin; Sung, Kuo-Li Paul

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •MGF induced the migration of rat MSC in a concentration-dependent manner. •MGF enhanced the mechanical properties of rMSC in inducing its migration. •MGF activated the ERK 1/2 signaling pathway of rMSC in inducing its migration. •rMSC mechanics may synergy with ERK 1/2 pathway in MGF-induced rMSC migration. -- Abstract: Mechano-growth factor (MGF) generated by cells in response to mechanical stimulation has been identified as a mechano effector molecule, playing a key role in regulating mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) function, including proliferation and migration. However, the mechanism(s) underlying how MGF-induced MSC migration occurs is still unclear. In the present study, MGF motivated migration of rat MSCs (rMSCs) in a concentration-dependent manner and optimal concentration of MGF at 50 ng/mL (defined as MGF treatment in this paper) was demonstrated. Notably, enhancement of mechanical properties that is pertinent to cell migration, such as cell traction force and cell stiffness were found to respond to MGF treatment. Furthermore, MGF increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), ERK inhibitor (i.e., PD98059) suppressed ERK phosphorylation, and abolished MGF-induced rMSC migration were found, demonstrating that ERK is involved molecule for MGF-induced rMSC migration. These in vitro evidences of MGF-induced rMSC migration and its direct link to altering rMSC mechanics and activating the ERK pathway, uncover the underlying biomechanical and biological mechanisms of MGF-induced rMSC migration, which may help find MGF-based application of MSC in clinical therapeutics.

  2. Junctional communication is induced in migrating capillary endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Using an in vitro model in which a confluent monolayer of capillary endothelial cells is mechanically wounded, gap junction-mediated intercellular communication has been studied by loading the cells with the fluorescent dye, Lucifer Yellow. Approximately 40-50% of the cells in a nonwounded confluent monolayer were coupled in groups of four to five cells (basal level). Basal levels of communication were also observed in sparse and preconfluent cultures, but were reduced in postconfluent monolayers. 30 min after wounding, coupling was markedly reduced between cells lining the wound. Communication at the wound was partially reestablished by 2 h, exceeded basal levels after 6 h and reached a maximum after 24 h, at which stage approximately 90% of the cells were coupled in groups of six to seven cells. When the wound had closed (after 8 d), the increase in communication was no longer observed. Induction of wound-associated communication was unaffected by exposure of the cells to the DNA synthesis inhibitor mitomycin C, but was prevented by the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. The induction of wound-associated communication was also inhibited when migration was prevented by placing the cells immediately after wounding at 22 degrees C or after exposure to cytochalasin D, suggesting that the increase in communication is dependent on cells migrating into the wound area. In contrast, migration was not prevented when coupling was blocked by exposure of the cells to retinoic acid, although this agent did disrupt the characteristic sheet-like pattern of migration typically seen during endothelial repair. These results suggest that junctional communication may play an important role in wound repair, possibly by coordinating capillary endothelial cell migration. PMID:2592412

  3. Cellular Polarization and Contractility in Collective Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utuje, Kazage J. Christophe; Notbohm, Jacob; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Gweon, Bomi; Jang, Hwanseok; Park, Yongdoo; Shin, Jennifer; Butler, James P.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    Collective cell migration drives many biological processes such as metastasis, morphogenesis and wound healing. These coordinated motions are driven by active forces. The physical nature of these forces and the mechanisms by which they generate collective cell migration are still not fully understood. We have developed a minimum physical model of a cell monolayer as an elastic continuum whose deformation field is coupled to two internal degrees of freedom: the concentration of a chemical signal, controlling cell Contractility, and the polarization field controlling the direction of local cell motion. By combining theory with experiments, we show that these two internal variables account for the sloshing waves and the systematic deviations of the direction of cell polarization from that of local cell velocity observed in confined cell monolayers. KJCU and MCM were supported by the Simons Foundation.

  4. Paxillin controls endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis by altering neuropilin 2 expression

    PubMed Central

    German, Alexandra E.; Mammoto, Tadanori; Jiang, Elisabeth; Ingber, Donald E.; Mammoto, Akiko

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although a number of growth factors and receptors are known to control tumor angiogenesis, relatively little is known about the mechanism by which these factors influence the directional endothelial cell migration required for cancer microvessel formation. Recently, it has been shown that the focal adhesion protein paxillin is required for directional migration of fibroblasts in vitro. Here, we show that paxillin knockdown enhances endothelial cell migration in vitro and stimulates angiogenesis during normal development and in response to tumor angiogenic factors in vivo. Paxillin produces these effects by decreasing expression of neuropilin 2 (NRP2). Moreover, soluble factors secreted by tumors that stimulate vascular ingrowth, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), also decrease endothelial cell expression of paxillin and NRP2, and overexpression of NRP2 reverses these effects. These results suggest that the VEGF–paxillin–NRP2 pathway could represent a new therapeutic target for cancer and other angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:24522185

  5. Controlled architectural and chemotactic studies of 3D cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Tayalia, Prakriti; Mazur, Eric; Mooney, David

    2010-01-01

    Chemotaxis plays a critical role in tissue development and wound repair, and is widely studied using ex vivo model systems in applications such as immunotherapy. However, typical chemotactic models employ 2D systems that are less physiologically relevant or use end-point assays, that reveal little about the stepwise dynamics of the migration process. To overcome these limitations, we developed a new model system using microfabrication techniques, sustained drug delivery approaches, and theoretical modeling of chemotactic agent diffusion. This model system allows us to study the effects of 3D architecture and chemotactic agent gradient on immune cell migration in real time. We find that dendritic cell migration is characterized by a strong interplay between matrix architecture and chemotactic gradients, and migration is also influenced dramatically by the cell activation state. Our results indicate that Lipopolysaccharide-activated dendritic cells studied in a traditional transwell system actually exhibit anomalous migration behavior. Such a 3D ex vivo system lends itself for analyzing cell migratory behavior in response to single or multiple competitive cues and could prove useful in vaccine development. PMID:21237507

  6. Amyloid precursor protein regulates migration and metalloproteinase gene expression in prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Inoue, Satoshi

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • APP knockdown reduced proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells. • APP knockdown reduced expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes. • APP overexpression promoted LNCaP cell migration. • APP overexpression increased expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes. - Abstract: Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a type I transmembrane protein, and one of its processed forms, β-amyloid, is considered to play a central role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. We previously showed that APP is a primary androgen-responsive gene in prostate cancer and that its increased expression is correlated with poor prognosis for patients with prostate cancer. APP has also been implicated in several human malignancies. Nevertheless, the mechanism underlying the pro-proliferative effects of APP on cancers is still not well-understood. In the present study, we explored a pathophysiological role for APP in prostate cancer cells using siRNA targeting APP (siAPP). The proliferation and migration of LNCaP and DU145 prostate cancer cells were significantly suppressed by siAPP. Differentially expressed genes in siAPP-treated cells compared to control siRNA-treated cells were identified by microarray analysis. Notably, several metalloproteinase genes, such as ADAM10 and ADAM17, and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related genes, such as VIM, and SNAI2, were downregulated in siAPP-treated cells as compared to control cells. The expression of these genes was upregulated in LNCaP cells stably expressing APP when compared with control cells. APP-overexpressing LNCaP cells exhibited enhanced migration in comparison to control cells. These results suggest that APP may contribute to the proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells by modulating the expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes.

  7. Live cell imaging analysis of the epigenetic regulation of the human endothelial cell migration at single-cell resolution.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chunhong; Yu, Zhilong; Zhou, Ying; Tao, Louis; Pang, Yuhong; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Xiannian; Qiu, Haiwei; Zhou, Hongwei; Chen, Zitian; Huang, Yanyi

    2012-09-01

    Epigenetic regulation plays an important role in cell migration. Although many methods have been developed to measure the motility of mammalian cells, accurate quantitative assessments of the migration speed of individual cells remain a major challenge. It is difficult for conventional scratch assays to differentiate proliferation from migration during the so-called wound-healing processes because of the long experimental time required. In addition, it is also challenging to create identical conditions for evaluating cell migration by conventional methods. We developed a microfluidic device with precisely created blanks allowing for robust and reproducible cell migration inside accurately-controlled microenvironments to study the regulatory effect of the epigenetic regulator histone deacetylase 7 (HDAC7) on cell migration. Through analyzing time-lapse imaging of the cells migrating into individual blank regions, we can measure the migration speed parameter for human primary cells within a few hours, eliminating the confounding effect of cell proliferation. We also developed an automatic image analysis and a numeric model-based data fitting to set up an integrated cell migration analysis system at single-cell resolution. Using this system, we measured the motility of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and the migration speed reduction due to the silencing of HDAC7 and various other genes. We showed that the migration behaviour of these human primary cells are clearly regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, demonstrating the great potential of this accurate and robust assay in the fields of quantitatively migration studies and high-throughput screening.

  8. Analyzing In Vivo Cell Migration using Cell Transplantations and Time-lapse Imaging in Zebrafish Embryos.

    PubMed

    Giger, Florence A; Dumortier, Julien G; David, Nicolas B

    2016-04-29

    Cell migration is key to many physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer metastasis. The cellular and molecular bases of cell migration have been thoroughly analyzed in vitro. However, in vivo cell migration somehow differs from in vitro migration, and has proven more difficult to analyze, being less accessible to direct observation and manipulation. This protocol uses the migration of the prospective prechordal plate in the early zebrafish embryo as a model system to study the function of candidate genes in cell migration. Prechordal plate progenitors form a group of cells which, during gastrulation, undergoes a directed migration from the embryonic organizer to the animal pole of the embryo. The proposed protocol uses cell transplantation to create mosaic embryos. This offers the combined advantages of labeling isolated cells, which is key to good imaging, and of limiting gain/loss of function effects to the observed cells, hence ensuring cell-autonomous effects. We describe here how we assessed the function of the TORC2 component Sin1 in cell migration, but the protocol can be used to analyze the function of any candidate gene in controlling cell migration in vivo.

  9. Flow and Diffusion in Channel-Guided Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Marel, Anna-Kristina; Zorn, Matthias; Klingner, Christoph; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland; Frey, Erwin; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2014-01-01

    Collective migration of mechanically coupled cell layers is a notable feature of wound healing, embryonic development, and cancer progression. In confluent epithelial sheets, the dynamics have been found to be highly heterogeneous, exhibiting spontaneous formation of swirls, long-range correlations, and glass-like dynamic arrest as a function of cell density. In contrast, the flow-like properties of one-sided cell-sheet expansion in confining geometries are not well understood. Here, we studied the short- and long-term flow of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells as they moved through microchannels. Using single-cell tracking and particle image velocimetry (PIV), we found that a defined averaged stationary cell current emerged that exhibited a velocity gradient in the direction of migration and a plug-flow-like profile across the advancing sheet. The observed flow velocity can be decomposed into a constant term of directed cell migration and a diffusion-like contribution that increases with density gradient. The diffusive component is consistent with the cell-density profile and front propagation speed predicted by the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation. To connect diffusion-mediated transport to underlying cellular motility, we studied single-cell trajectories and occurrence of vorticity. We discovered that the directed large-scale cell flow altered fluctuations in cellular motion at short length scales: vorticity maps showed a reduced frequency of swirl formation in channel flow compared with resting sheets of equal cell density. Furthermore, under flow, single-cell trajectories showed persistent long-range, random-walk behavior superimposed on drift, whereas cells in resting tissue did not show significant displacements with respect to neighboring cells. Our work thus suggests that active cell migration manifests itself in an underlying, spatially uniform drift as well as in randomized bursts of short-range correlated motion that lead to a diffusion-mediated transport

  10. Transendothelial migration enhances integrin-dependent human neutrophil chemokinesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transendothelial migration of neutrophils induces phenotypic changes that influence the interactions of neutrophils with extravascular tissue components. To assess the influence of transmigration on neutrophil chemokinetic motility, we used polyethylene glycol hydrogels covalently modified with spec...

  11. Leukotrienes induce the migration of Th17 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonyong; Su Kim, Hyeong; Lee, Gap Ryol

    2015-01-01

    Th17 cell trafficking in response to leukotriene signaling is poorly understood. Here we showed that Th17 cells express high levels of leukotriene B4 receptor 1 (LTB4R1) and cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 (CysLTR1). Th17 cells migrated under the guidance of leukotriene B4 and D4. The migration of Th17 cells was more efficient than that of Th1 and Th2 cells, and it was blocked by specific inhibitors of LTB4R1 or CysLTR1. Studies in an animal model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis revealed that treatment with montelukast alleviated disease symptoms and inhibited the recruitment of Th17 cells to the central nervous system. Thus, leukotrienes may act as chemoattractants for Th17 cells. PMID:25512344

  12. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) deficiency enhances immune response to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Janet V.; Conrad, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Infections with helminth parasites are endemic in the developing world and are a target for intervention with new therapies. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a cytokine with pleiotropic effects in inflammation and immune responses. We investigated the role of MIF in a naturally cleared model of helminth infection in rodents, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. At day 7 post infection MIF-deficient (MIF−/−) mice had reduced parasite burden and mounted an enhanced type 2 immune response (Th2), including increased Gata3 expression and IL-13 production in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs). Bone marrow reconstitution demonstrated that MIF produced from hematopoietic cells was crucial and Rag1−/− reconstitution provided direct evidence that MIF−/− CD4+ T cells were responsible for the augmented parasite clearance. MIF−/− CD4+ T cells produced less IL-6 post infection, which correlated with enhanced Th2 responses. MIF−/− CD4+ T cells exhibited lower NF-kB activation, potentially explaining the reduction in IL-6. Finally, we demonstrated enhanced clearance of the parasite and Th2 response in WT mice treated with the MIF tautomerase inhibitor, sulforaphane, a compound found naturally found in cruciferous vegetables, These results are the first to describe the importance of the tautomerase enzyme activity in MIF function in N. brasiliensis infection. PMID:27049059

  13. Knockdown of SVCT2 impairs in-vitro cell attachment, migration and wound healing in bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Sangani, Rajnikumar; Pandya, Chirayu D; Bhattacharyya, Maryka H; Periyasamy-Thandavan, Sudharsan; Chutkan, Norman; Markand, Shanu; Hill, William D; Hamrick, Mark; Isales, Carlos; Fulzele, Sadanand

    2014-03-01

    Bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) adhesion and migration are fundamental to a number of pathophysiologic processes, including fracture and wound healing. Vitamin C is beneficial for bone formation, fracture repair and wound healing. However, the role of the vitamin C transporter in BMSC adhesion, migration and wound healing is not known. In this study, we knocked-down the sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter, SVCT2, the only known transporter of vitamin C in BMSCs, and performed cell adhesion, migration, in-vitro scratch wound healing and F-actin re-arrangement studies. We also investigated the role of oxidative stress on the above processes. Our results demonstrate that both oxidative stress and down-regulation of SVCT2 decreased cell attachment and spreading. A trans-well cell migration assay showed that vitamin C helped in BMSC migration and that knockdown of SVCT2 decreased cell migration. In the in-vitro scratch wound healing studies, we established that oxidative stress dose-dependently impairs wound healing. Furthermore, the supplementation of vitamin C significantly rescued the BMSCs from oxidative stress and increased wound closing. The knockdown of SVCT2 in BMSCs strikingly decreased wound healing, and supplementing with vitamin C failed to rescue cells efficiently. The knockdown of SVCT2 and induction of oxidative stress in cells produced an alteration in cytoskeletal dynamics. Signaling studies showed that oxidative stress phosphorylated members of the MAP kinase family (p38) and that vitamin C inhibited their phosphorylation. Taken together, these results indicate that both the SVCT2 transporter and oxidative stress play a vital role in BMSC attachment, migration and cytoskeletal re-arrangement. BMSC-based cell therapy and modulation of SVCT2 could lead to a novel therapeutic approach that enhances bone remodeling, fracture repair and wound healing in chronic disease conditions.

  14. Multidisciplinary approaches to understanding collective cell migration in developmental biology

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Linus J.; Kulesa, Paul M.; McLennan, Rebecca; Baker, Ruth E.; Maini, Philip K.

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical models are becoming increasingly integrated with experimental efforts in the study of biological systems. Collective cell migration in developmental biology is a particularly fruitful application area for the development of theoretical models to predict the behaviour of complex multicellular systems with many interacting parts. In this context, mathematical models provide a tool to assess the consistency of experimental observations with testable mechanistic hypotheses. In this review, we showcase examples from recent years of multidisciplinary investigations of neural crest cell migration. The neural crest model system has been used to study how collective migration of cell populations is shaped by cell–cell interactions, cell–environmental interactions and heterogeneity between cells. The wide range of emergent behaviours exhibited by neural crest cells in different embryonal locations and in different organisms helps us chart out the spectrum of collective cell migration. At the same time, this diversity in migratory characteristics highlights the need to reconcile or unify the array of currently hypothesized mechanisms through the next generation of experimental data and generalized theoretical descriptions. PMID:27278647

  15. High Glucose-Mediated Oxidative Stress Impairs Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Lamers, Marcelo L.; Almeida, Maíra E. S.; Vicente-Manzanares, Miguel; Horwitz, Alan F.; Santos, Marinilce F.

    2011-01-01

    Deficient wound healing in diabetic patients is very frequent, but the cellular and molecular causes are poorly defined. In this study, we evaluate the hypothesis that high glucose concentrations inhibit cell migration. Using CHO.K1 cells, NIH-3T3 fibroblasts, mouse embryonic fibroblasts and primary skin fibroblasts from control and diabetic rats cultured in 5 mM D-glucose (low glucose, LG), 25 mM D-glucose (high glucose, HG) or 25 mM L-glucose medium (osmotic control - OC), we analyzed the migration speed, protrusion stability, cell polarity, adhesion maturation and the activity of the small Rho GTPase Rac1. We also analyzed the effects of reactive oxygen species by incubating cells with the antioxidant N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC). We observed that HG conditions inhibited cell migration when compared to LG or OC. This inhibition resulted from impaired cell polarity, protrusion destabilization and inhibition of adhesion maturation. Conversely, Rac1 activity, which promotes protrusion and blocks adhesion maturation, was increased in HG conditions, thus providing a mechanistic basis for the HG phenotype. Most of the HG effects were partially or completely rescued by treatment with NAC. These findings demonstrate that HG impairs cell migration due to an increase in oxidative stress that causes polarity loss, deficient adhesion and protrusion. These alterations arise, in large part, from increased Rac1 activity and may contribute to the poor wound healing observed in diabetic patients. PMID:21826213

  16. Cell migration in paediatric glioma; characterisation and potential therapeutic targeting

    PubMed Central

    Cockle, J V; Picton, S; Levesley, J; Ilett, E; Carcaboso, A M; Short, S; Steel, L P; Melcher, A; Lawler, S E; Brüning-Richardson, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Paediatric high grade glioma (pHGG) and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) are highly aggressive brain tumours. Their invasive phenotype contributes to their limited therapeutic response, and novel treatments that block brain tumour invasion are needed. Methods: Here, we examine the migratory characteristics and treatment effect of small molecule glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors, lithium chloride (LiCl) and the indirubin derivative 6-bromoindirubin-oxime (BIO), previously shown to inhibit the migration of adult glioma cells, on two pHGG cell lines (SF188 and KNS42) and one patient-derived DIPG line (HSJD-DIPG-007) using 2D (transwell membrane, immunofluorescence, live cell imaging) and 3D (migration on nanofibre plates and spheroid invasion in collagen) assays. Results: All lines were migratory, but there were differences in morphology and migration rates. Both LiCl and BIO reduced migration and instigated cytoskeletal rearrangement of stress fibres and focal adhesions when viewed by immunofluorescence. In the presence of drugs, loss of polarity and differences in cellular movement were observed by live cell imaging. Conclusions: Ours is the first study to demonstrate that it is possible to pharmacologically target migration of paediatric glioma in vitro using LiCl and BIO, and we conclude that these agents and their derivatives warrant further preclinical investigation as potential anti-migratory therapeutics for these devastating tumours. PMID:25628092

  17. Intermediate filaments in cell migration and invasion: the unusual suspects.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Cécile; Etienne-Manneville, Sandrine

    2015-02-01

    Cell migration is a multistep process which relies on the coordination of cytoskeletal structures in space and time. While the roles of actin and microtubules have been investigated in great details, the lack of inhibitors and visualizing tools and the large number of proteins forming intermediate filaments (IFs) have delayed the characterization of IF functions during migration. However, a large body of evidence has progressively pointed to changes in IF composition as an important parameter in the regulation of cell migratory properties both during development and tumor invasion. More recent in-depth analyses show that IFs are dynamically reorganized to participate, together with microfilaments and microtubules, to the key steps leading to cell migration.

  18. Modeling keratinocyte wound healing dynamics: Cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained collective migration.

    PubMed

    Nardini, John T; Chapnick, Douglas A; Liu, Xuedong; Bortz, David M

    2016-07-01

    The in vitro migration of keratinocyte cell sheets displays behavioral and biochemical similarities to the in vivo wound healing response of keratinocytes in animal model systems. In both cases, ligand-dependent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activation is sufficient to elicit collective cell migration into the wound. Previous mathematical modeling studies of in vitro wound healing assays assume that physical connections between cells have a hindering effect on cell migration, but biological literature suggests a more complicated story. By combining mathematical modeling and experimental observations of collectively migrating sheets of keratinocytes, we investigate the role of cell-cell adhesion during in vitro keratinocyte wound healing assays. We develop and compare two nonlinear diffusion models of the wound healing process in which cell-cell adhesion either hinders or promotes migration. Both models can accurately fit the leading edge propagation of cell sheets during wound healing when using a time-dependent rate of cell-cell adhesion strength. The model that assumes a positive role of cell-cell adhesion on migration, however, is robust to changes in the leading edge definition and yields a qualitatively accurate density profile. Using RNAi for the critical adherens junction protein, α-catenin, we demonstrate that cell sheets with wild type cell-cell adhesion expression maintain migration into the wound longer than cell sheets with decreased cell-cell adhesion expression, which fails to exhibit collective migration. Our modeling and experimental data thus suggest that cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained migration as cells pull neighboring cells into the wound during wound healing.

  19. Modeling keratinocyte wound healing dynamics: Cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained collective migration.

    PubMed

    Nardini, John T; Chapnick, Douglas A; Liu, Xuedong; Bortz, David M

    2016-07-01

    The in vitro migration of keratinocyte cell sheets displays behavioral and biochemical similarities to the in vivo wound healing response of keratinocytes in animal model systems. In both cases, ligand-dependent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activation is sufficient to elicit collective cell migration into the wound. Previous mathematical modeling studies of in vitro wound healing assays assume that physical connections between cells have a hindering effect on cell migration, but biological literature suggests a more complicated story. By combining mathematical modeling and experimental observations of collectively migrating sheets of keratinocytes, we investigate the role of cell-cell adhesion during in vitro keratinocyte wound healing assays. We develop and compare two nonlinear diffusion models of the wound healing process in which cell-cell adhesion either hinders or promotes migration. Both models can accurately fit the leading edge propagation of cell sheets during wound healing when using a time-dependent rate of cell-cell adhesion strength. The model that assumes a positive role of cell-cell adhesion on migration, however, is robust to changes in the leading edge definition and yields a qualitatively accurate density profile. Using RNAi for the critical adherens junction protein, α-catenin, we demonstrate that cell sheets with wild type cell-cell adhesion expression maintain migration into the wound longer than cell sheets with decreased cell-cell adhesion expression, which fails to exhibit collective migration. Our modeling and experimental data thus suggest that cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained migration as cells pull neighboring cells into the wound during wound healing. PMID:27105673

  20. Collisions of deformable cells lead to collective migration

    SciTech Connect

    Löber, Jakob; Ziebert, Falko; Aranson, Igor S.

    2015-03-17

    Collective migration of eukaryotic cells plays a fundamental role in tissue growth, wound healing and immune response. The motion, arising spontaneously or in response to chemical and mechanical stimuli, is also important for understanding life-threatening pathologies, such as cancer and metastasis formation. We present a phase-field model to describe the movement of many self-organized, interacting cells. The model takes into account the main mechanisms of cell motility – acto-myosin dynamics, as well as substrate-mediated and cell-cell adhesion. It predicts that collective cell migration emerges spontaneously as a result of inelastic collisions between neighboring cells: collisions lead to a mutual alignment of the cell velocities and to the formation of coherently-moving multi-cellular clusters. Small cell-to-cell adhesion, in turn, reduces the propensity for large-scale collective migration, while higher adhesion leads to the formation of moving bands. Our study provides valuable insight into biological processes associated with collective cell motility.

  1. Collisions of deformable cells lead to collective migration

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Löber, Jakob; Ziebert, Falko; Aranson, Igor S.

    2015-03-17

    Collective migration of eukaryotic cells plays a fundamental role in tissue growth, wound healing and immune response. The motion, arising spontaneously or in response to chemical and mechanical stimuli, is also important for understanding life-threatening pathologies, such as cancer and metastasis formation. We present a phase-field model to describe the movement of many self-organized, interacting cells. The model takes into account the main mechanisms of cell motility – acto-myosin dynamics, as well as substrate-mediated and cell-cell adhesion. It predicts that collective cell migration emerges spontaneously as a result of inelastic collisions between neighboring cells: collisions lead to a mutual alignmentmore » of the cell velocities and to the formation of coherently-moving multi-cellular clusters. Small cell-to-cell adhesion, in turn, reduces the propensity for large-scale collective migration, while higher adhesion leads to the formation of moving bands. Our study provides valuable insight into biological processes associated with collective cell motility.« less

  2. Single-cell Migration Chip for Chemotaxis-based Microfluidic Selection of Heterogeneous Cell Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Allen, Steven G.; Ingram, Patrick N.; Buckanovich, Ronald; Merajver, Sofia D.; Yoon, Euisik

    2015-05-01

    Tumor cell migration toward and intravasation into capillaries is an early and key event in cancer metastasis, yet not all cancer cells are imbued with the same capability to do so. This heterogeneity within a tumor is a fundamental property of cancer. Tools to help us understand what molecular characteristics allow a certain subpopulation of cells to spread from the primary tumor are thus critical for overcoming metastasis. Conventional in vitro migration platforms treat populations in aggregate, which leads to a masking of intrinsic differences among cells. Some migration assays reported recently have single-cell resolution, but these platforms do not provide for selective retrieval of the distinct migrating and non-migrating cell populations for further analysis. Thus, to study the intrinsic differences in cells responsible for chemotactic heterogeneity, we developed a single-cell migration platform so that individual cells’ migration behavior can be studied and the heterogeneous population sorted based upon chemotactic phenotype. Furthermore, after migration, the highly chemotactic and non-chemotactic cells were retrieved and proved viable for later molecular analysis of their differences. Moreover, we modified the migration channel to resemble lymphatic capillaries to better understand how certain cancer cells are able to move through geometrically confining spaces.

  3. Electrolytic cell stack with molten electrolyte migration control

    DOEpatents

    Kunz, H.R.; Guthrie, R.J.; Katz, M.

    1987-03-17

    An electrolytic cell stack includes inactive electrolyte reservoirs at the upper and lower end portions thereof. The reservoirs are separated from the stack of the complete cells by impermeable, electrically conductive separators. Reservoirs at the negative end are initially low in electrolyte and the reservoirs at the positive end are high in electrolyte fill. During stack operation electrolyte migration from the positive to the negative end will be offset by the inactive reservoir capacity. In combination with the inactive reservoirs, a sealing member of high porosity and low electrolyte retention is employed to limit the electrolyte migration rate. 5 figs.

  4. Electrolytic cell stack with molten electrolyte migration control

    DOEpatents

    Kunz, H. Russell; Guthrie, Robin J.; Katz, Murray

    1988-08-02

    An electrolytic cell stack includes inactive electrolyte reservoirs at the upper and lower end portions thereof. The reservoirs are separated from the stack of the complete cells by impermeable, electrically conductive separators. Reservoirs at the negative end are initially low in electrolyte and the reservoirs at the positive end are high in electrolyte fill. During stack operation electrolyte migration from the positive to the negative end will be offset by the inactive reservoir capacity. In combination with the inactive reservoirs, a sealing member of high porosity and low electrolyte retention is employed to limit the electrolyte migration rate.

  5. Nuclear envelope rupture and repair during cancer cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Denais, Celine M.; Gilbert, Rachel M.; Isermann, Philipp; McGregor, Alexandra L.; te Lindert, Mariska; Weigelin, Bettina; Davidson, Patricia M.; Friedl, Peter; Wolf, Katarina; Lammerding, Jan

    2016-01-01

    During cancer metastasis, tumor cells penetrate tissues through tight interstitial spaces, requiring extensive deformation of the cell and its nucleus. Here, we investigated tumor cell migration in confining microenvironments in vitro and in vivo. Nuclear deformation caused localized loss of nuclear envelope (NE) integrity, which led to the uncontrolled exchange of nucleo-cytoplasmic content, herniation of chromatin across the NE, and DNA damage. The incidence of NE rupture increased with cell confinement and with depletion of nuclear lamins, NE proteins that structurally support the nucleus. Cells restored NE integrity using components of the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport-III (ESCRT-III) machinery. Our findings indicate that cell migration incurs substantial physical stress on the NE and its content, requiring efficient NE and DNA damage repair for survival. PMID:27013428

  6. Cell surface syndecan-1 contributes to binding and function of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) on epithelial tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Pasqualon, Tobias; Lue, Hongqi; Groening, Sabine; Pruessmeyer, Jessica; Jahr, Holger; Denecke, Bernd; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Ludwig, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Surface expressed proteoglycans mediate the binding of cytokines and chemokines to the cell surface and promote migration of various tumor cell types including epithelial tumor cells. We here demonstrate that binding of the chemokine-like inflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) to epithelial lung and breast tumor cell lines A549 and MDA-MB231 is sensitive to enzymatic digestion of heparan sulphate chains and competitive inhibition with heparin. Moreover, MIF interaction with heparin was confirmed by chromatography and a structural comparison indicated a possible heparin binding site. These results suggested that proteoglycans carrying heparan sulphate chains are involved in MIF binding. Using shRNA-mediated gene silencing, we identified syndecan-1 as the predominant proteoglycan required for the interaction with MIF. MIF binding was decreased by induction of proteolytic shedding of syndecan-1, which could be prevented by inhibition of the metalloproteinases involved in this process. Finally, MIF induced the chemotactic migration of A549 cells, wound closure and invasion into matrigel without affecting cell proliferation. These MIF-induced responses were abrogated by heparin or by silencing of syndecan-1. Thus, our study indicates that syndecan-1 on epithelial tumor cells promotes MIF binding and MIF-mediated cell migration. This may represent a relevant mechanism through which MIF enhances tumor cell motility and metastasis.

  7. Jin Fu Kang Oral Liquid Inhibits Lymphatic Endothelial Cells Formation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan; Tang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Jin Fu Kang (JFK), an oral liquid prescription of Chinese herbal drugs, has been clinically available for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Lymphangiogenesis is a primary event in the process of cancer development and metastasis, and the formation and migration of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) play a key role in the lymphangiogenesis. To assess the activity of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and the coeffect of SDF-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) on the formation and migration of LECs and clarify the inhibitory effects of JFK on the LECs, the LECs were differentiated from CD34+/VEGFR-3+ endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), and JFK-containing serums were prepared from rats. SDF-1 and VEGF-C both induced the differentiation of CD34+/VEGFR-3+ EPCs towards LECs and enhanced the LECs migration. Couse of SDF-1 and VEGF-C displayed an additive effect on the LECs formation but not on their migration. JFK inhibited the formation and migration of LECs, and the inhibitory effects were most probably via regulation of the SDF-1/CXCR4 and VEGF-C/VEGFR-3 axes. The current finding suggested that JFK might inhibit NSCLC through antilymphangiogenesis and also provided a potential to discover antilymphangiogenesis agents from natural resources. PMID:27698675

  8. Jin Fu Kang Oral Liquid Inhibits Lymphatic Endothelial Cells Formation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan; Tang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Jin Fu Kang (JFK), an oral liquid prescription of Chinese herbal drugs, has been clinically available for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Lymphangiogenesis is a primary event in the process of cancer development and metastasis, and the formation and migration of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) play a key role in the lymphangiogenesis. To assess the activity of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and the coeffect of SDF-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) on the formation and migration of LECs and clarify the inhibitory effects of JFK on the LECs, the LECs were differentiated from CD34+/VEGFR-3+ endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), and JFK-containing serums were prepared from rats. SDF-1 and VEGF-C both induced the differentiation of CD34+/VEGFR-3+ EPCs towards LECs and enhanced the LECs migration. Couse of SDF-1 and VEGF-C displayed an additive effect on the LECs formation but not on their migration. JFK inhibited the formation and migration of LECs, and the inhibitory effects were most probably via regulation of the SDF-1/CXCR4 and VEGF-C/VEGFR-3 axes. The current finding suggested that JFK might inhibit NSCLC through antilymphangiogenesis and also provided a potential to discover antilymphangiogenesis agents from natural resources.

  9. Molecular analysis of cell surface beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase function during cell migration.

    PubMed Central

    Appeddu, P A; Shur, B D

    1994-01-01

    Despite the identification and characterization of cell surface receptors for the extracellular matrix, it is unknown how their relative expression and cytoskeletal association regulate cell migration. Previous studies have identified beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase (GalTase; EC 2.4.1.38) on the surface of migrating cells, where it mediates cell migration on basal lamina matrices by associating with the cytoskeleton and binding to N-linked oligosaccharides in the E8 domain of laminin. In this study, the function of GalTase during cell migration was examined directly by analyzing the migration rate of stably transfected cell lines in which the relative level of surface GalTase and its ability to associate with the cytoskeleton were altered. We show here that the cytoskeleton contains a limiting, saturable, number of binding sites for surface GalTase. Furthermore, the rate of cell migration was inversely related to the ability of surface GalTase to associate with the cytoskeleton. Elevating surface GalTase in excess of the number of cytoskeleton-binding sites reduced the rate of cell migration, whereas decreasing the amount of surface GalTase available to bind the cytoskeleton increased migration rates. These results show that the rate of cell migration on basal lamina is directly dependent upon the expression of surface GalTase and the ability of this protein to associate with a limiting number of cytoskeleton-binding sites. Images PMID:8134355

  10. Study of dendritic cell migration using micro-fabrication.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Pablo; Chabaud, Mélanie; Thiam, Hawa-Racine; Lankar, Danielle; Piel, Matthieu; Lennon-Dumenil, Ana-Maria

    2016-05-01

    Cell migration is a hallmark of dendritic cells (DCs) function. It is needed for DCs to scan their environment in search for antigens as well as to reach lymphatic organs in order to trigger T lymphocyte's activation. Such interaction leads to tolerance in the case of DCs migrating under homeostatic conditions or to immunity in the case of DCs migrating upon encounter with pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Cell migration is therefore essential for DCs to transfer information from peripheral tissues to lymphoid organs, thereby linking innate to adaptive immunity. This stresses the need to unravel the molecular mechanisms involved. However, the tremendous complexity of the tissue microenvironment as well as the limited spatio-temporal resolution of in vivo imaging techniques has made this task difficult. To bypass this problem, we have developed microfabrication-based experimental tools that are compatible with high-resolution imaging. Here, we will discuss how such devices can be used to study DC migration under controlled conditions that mimic their physiological environment in a robust quantitative manner.

  11. Heading off with the herd: How cancer cells might maneuver supernumerary centrosomes for directional migration

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, Angela; Rida, Padmashree CG; Aneja, Ritu

    2012-01-01

    The complicity of centrosomes in carcinogenesis is unmistakable. Mounting evidence clearly implicates a robust correlation between centrosome amplification (CA) and malignant transformation in diverse tissue types. Furthermore, CA has been suggested as a marker of cancer aggressiveness, in particular the invasive phenotype, in breast and prostate cancers. One means by which CA promotes malignancy is through induction of transient spindle multipolarity during mitosis, which predisposes the cell to karyotypic changes arising from low-grade chromosome mis-segregation. It is well recognized that during cell migration in interphase, centrosome-mediated nucleation of a radial microtubule array is crucial for establishing a polarized Golgi apparatus, without which directionality is precluded. The question of how cancer cells maneuver their supernumerary centrosomes to achieve directionality during cell migration is virtually uncharted territory. Given CA is a hallmark of cancers and has been correlated with cancer aggressiveness, malignant cells are presumably competent in managing their centrosome surfeit during directional migration, although the cellular logistics of this process remain unexplored. Thus, another key angle worth pondering is whether an overabundance of centrosomes confers some advantage on cancer cells in terms of their migratory and invasive capabilities. Recent studies have uncovered a remarkable strategy that cancer cells employ to deal with the problem of excess centrosomes and ensure bipolar mitoses, viz., centrosome clustering. This review aims to change the narrative by exploring how an increased centrosome complement may, via aneuploidy-independent modulation of the microtubule cytoskeleton, enhance directional migration and invasion of malignant cells. We postulate that CA imbues cancer cells with cytoskeletal advantages that enhance cell polarization, Golgi-dependent vesicular trafficking, stromal invasion and other aspects of metastatic

  12. Glucocorticoid receptor beta increases migration of human bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    McBeth, Lucien; Nwaneri, Assumpta C; Grabnar, Maria; Demeter, Jonathan; Nestor-Kalinoski, Andrea; Hinds, Terry D

    2016-05-10

    Bladder cancer is observed worldwide having been associated with a host of environmental and lifestyle risk factors. Recent investigations on anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid signaling point to a pathway that may impact bladder cancer. Here we show an inverse effect on the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) isoform signaling that may lead to bladder cancer. We found similar GRα expression levels in the transitional uroepithelial cancer cell lines T24 and UMUC-3. However, the T24 cells showed a significant (p < 0.05) increased expression of GRβ compared to UMUC-3, which also correlated with higher migration rates. Knockdown of GRβ in the T24 cells resulted in a decreased migration rate. Mutational analysis of the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of human GRβ revealed that miR144 might positively regulate expression. Indeed, overexpression of miR144 increased GRβ by 3.8 fold. In addition, miR144 and GRβ were upregulated during migration. We used a peptide nucleic acid conjugated to a cell penetrating-peptide (Sweet-P) to block the binding site for miR144 in the 3'UTR of GRβ. Sweet-P effectively prevented miR144 actions and decreased GRβ expression, as well as the migration of the T24 human bladder cancer cells. Therefore, GRβ may have a significant role in bladder cancer, and possibly serve as a therapeutic target for the disease. PMID:27036026

  13. A lateral signalling pathway coordinates shape volatility during cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Luga, Valbona; Armitage, Sarah K.; Musiol, Martin; Won, Amy; Yip, Christopher M.; Plotnikov, Sergey V.; Wrana, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental for both physiological and pathological processes. Migrating cells usually display high dynamics in morphology, which is orchestrated by an integrative array of signalling pathways. Here we identify a novel pathway, we term lateral signalling, comprised of the planar cell polarity (PCP) protein Pk1 and the RhoGAPs, Arhgap21/23. We show that the Pk1–Arhgap21/23 complex inhibits RhoA, is localized on the non-protrusive lateral membrane cortex and its disruption leads to the disorganization of the actomyosin network and altered focal adhesion dynamics. Pk1-mediated lateral signalling confines protrusive activity and is regulated by Smurf2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase in the PCP pathway. Furthermore, we demonstrate that dynamic interplay between lateral and protrusive signalling generates cyclical fluctuations in cell shape that we quantify here as shape volatility, which strongly correlates with migration speed. These studies uncover a previously unrecognized lateral signalling pathway that coordinates shape volatility during productive cell migration. PMID:27226243

  14. Glucocorticoid receptor beta increases migration of human bladder cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    McBeth, Lucien; Nwaneri, Assumpta C.; Grabnar, Maria; Demeter, Jonathan; Nestor-Kalinoski, Andrea; Hinds, Terry D.

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is observed worldwide having been associated with a host of environmental and lifestyle risk factors. Recent investigations on anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid signaling point to a pathway that may impact bladder cancer. Here we show an inverse effect on the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) isoform signaling that may lead to bladder cancer. We found similar GRα expression levels in the transitional uroepithelial cancer cell lines T24 and UMUC-3. However, the T24 cells showed a significant (p < 0.05) increased expression of GRβ compared to UMUC-3, which also correlated with higher migration rates. Knockdown of GRβ in the T24 cells resulted in a decreased migration rate. Mutational analysis of the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of human GRβ revealed that miR144 might positively regulate expression. Indeed, overexpression of miR144 increased GRβ by 3.8 fold. In addition, miR144 and GRβ were upregulated during migration. We used a peptide nucleic acid conjugated to a cell penetrating-peptide (Sweet-P) to block the binding site for miR144 in the 3′UTR of GRβ. Sweet-P effectively prevented miR144 actions and decreased GRβ expression, as well as the migration of the T24 human bladder cancer cells. Therefore, GRβ may have a significant role in bladder cancer, and possibly serve as a therapeutic target for the disease. PMID:27036026

  15. Optimal chemotaxis in intermittent migration of animal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanczuk, P.; Salbreux, G.

    2015-04-01

    Animal cells can sense chemical gradients without moving and are faced with the challenge of migrating towards a target despite noisy information on the target position. Here we discuss optimal search strategies for a chaser that moves by switching between two phases of motion ("run" and "tumble"), reorienting itself towards the target during tumble phases, and performing persistent migration during run phases. We show that the chaser average run time can be adjusted to minimize the target catching time or the spatial dispersion of the chasers. We obtain analytical results for the catching time and for the spatial dispersion in the limits of small and large ratios of run time to tumble time and scaling laws for the optimal run times. Our findings have implications for optimal chemotactic strategies in animal cell migration.

  16. Optimal chemotaxis in intermittent migration of animal cells.

    PubMed

    Romanczuk, P; Salbreux, G

    2015-04-01

    Animal cells can sense chemical gradients without moving and are faced with the challenge of migrating towards a target despite noisy information on the target position. Here we discuss optimal search strategies for a chaser that moves by switching between two phases of motion ("run" and "tumble"), reorienting itself towards the target during tumble phases, and performing persistent migration during run phases. We show that the chaser average run time can be adjusted to minimize the target catching time or the spatial dispersion of the chasers. We obtain analytical results for the catching time and for the spatial dispersion in the limits of small and large ratios of run time to tumble time and scaling laws for the optimal run times. Our findings have implications for optimal chemotactic strategies in animal cell migration.

  17. Designer self-assembling hydrogel scaffolds can impact skin cell proliferation and migration

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Michael; Ho, Diwei; Fear, Mark W.; Gelain, Fabrizio; Wood, Fiona M.; Iyer, K. Swaminathan

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to develop economical, efficient and widely available therapeutic approaches to enhance the rate of skin wound healing. The optimal outcome of wound healing is restoration to the pre-wound quality of health. In this study we investigate the cellular response to biological stimuli using functionalized nanofibers from the self-assembling peptide, RADA16. We demonstrate that adding different functional motifs to the RADA16 base peptide can influence the rate of proliferation and migration of keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts. Relative to unmodified RADA16; the Collagen I motif significantly promotes cell migration, and reduces proliferation. PMID:25384420

  18. Designer self-assembling hydrogel scaffolds can impact skin cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Michael; Ho, Diwei; Fear, Mark W; Gelain, Fabrizio; Wood, Fiona M; Iyer, K Swaminathan

    2014-11-11

    There is a need to develop economical, efficient and widely available therapeutic approaches to enhance the rate of skin wound healing. The optimal outcome of wound healing is restoration to the pre-wound quality of health. In this study we investigate the cellular response to biological stimuli using functionalized nanofibers from the self-assembling peptide, RADA16. We demonstrate that adding different functional motifs to the RADA16 base peptide can influence the rate of proliferation and migration of keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts. Relative to unmodified RADA16; the Collagen I motif significantly promotes cell migration, and reduces proliferation.

  19. Designer self-assembling hydrogel scaffolds can impact skin cell proliferation and migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Michael; Ho, Diwei; Fear, Mark W.; Gelain, Fabrizio; Wood, Fiona M.; Iyer, K. Swaminathan

    2014-11-01

    There is a need to develop economical, efficient and widely available therapeutic approaches to enhance the rate of skin wound healing. The optimal outcome of wound healing is restoration to the pre-wound quality of health. In this study we investigate the cellular response to biological stimuli using functionalized nanofibers from the self-assembling peptide, RADA16. We demonstrate that adding different functional motifs to the RADA16 base peptide can influence the rate of proliferation and migration of keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts. Relative to unmodified RADA16; the Collagen I motif significantly promotes cell migration, and reduces proliferation.

  20. Short-Lived, Transitory Cell-Cell Interactions Foster Migration-Dependent Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Melissa D.; Asthagiri, Anand R.

    2012-01-01

    During embryonic development, motile cells aggregate into cohesive groups, which give rise to tissues and organs. The role of cell migration in regulating aggregation is unclear. The current paradigm for aggregation is based on an equilibrium model of differential cell adhesivity to neighboring cells versus the underlying substratum. In many biological contexts, however, dynamics is critical. Here, we provide evidence that multicellular aggregation dynamics involves both local adhesive interactions and transport by cell migration. Using time-lapse video microscopy, we quantified the duration of cell-cell contacts among migrating cells that collided and adhered to another cell. This lifetime of cell-cell interactions exhibited a monotonic decreasing dependence on substratum adhesivity. Parallel quantitative measurements of cell migration speed revealed that across the tested range of adhesive substrata, the mean time needed for cells to migrate and encounter another cell was greater than the mean adhesion lifetime, suggesting that aggregation dynamics may depend on cell motility instead of the local differential adhesivity of cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, aggregate size exhibited a biphasic dependence on substratum adhesivity, matching the trend we observed for cell migration speed. Our findings suggest a new role for cell motility, alongside differential adhesion, in regulating developmental aggregation events and motivate new design principles for tuning aggregation dynamics in tissue engineering applications. PMID:22912835

  1. Knockdown of Legumain Suppresses Cervical Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fei; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second leading type of cancer in women living in less developed countries. The pathological and molecular mechanisms of cervical cancer are not comprehensively known. Though legumain has been found to be highly expressed in various types of solid tumors, its expression and biological function in cervical cancer remain unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate legumain expression and functions in cervical cancer. We found that legumain was highly expressed in cervical cancer cells. When knocked down, legumain expression in HeLa and SiHa cells significantly reduced its migration and invasion abilities compared with control cells. Furthermore, legumain silencing suppressed the activation of matrix metalloproteases (MMP2 and MMP3) in cervical cancer cells. This study indicates that legumain might play an important role in cervical cancer cell migration and invasion. Legumain might be a potential therapeutic target for cervical cancer therapy.

  2. Fascin Regulates Nuclear Movement and Deformation in Migrating Cells.

    PubMed

    Jayo, Asier; Malboubi, Majid; Antoku, Susumu; Chang, Wakam; Ortiz-Zapater, Elena; Groen, Christopher; Pfisterer, Karin; Tootle, Tina; Charras, Guillaume; Gundersen, Gregg G; Parsons, Maddy

    2016-08-22

    Fascin is an F-actin-bundling protein shown to stabilize filopodia and regulate adhesion dynamics in migrating cells, and its expression is correlated with poor prognosis and increased metastatic potential in a number of cancers. Here, we identified the nuclear envelope protein nesprin-2 as a binding partner for fascin in a range of cell types in vitro and in vivo. Nesprin-2 interacts with fascin through a direct, F-actin-independent interaction, and this binding is distinct and separable from a role for fascin within filopodia at the cell periphery. Moreover, disrupting the interaction between fascin and nesprin-2 C-terminal domain leads to specific defects in F-actin coupling to the nuclear envelope, nuclear movement, and the ability of cells to deform their nucleus to invade through confined spaces. Together, our results uncover a role for fascin that operates independently of filopodia assembly to promote efficient cell migration and invasion. PMID:27554857

  3. Stretching Fibroblasts Remodels Fibronectin and Alters Cancer Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Mingfang; Brewer, Bryson M.; Yang, Lijie; Franco Coronel, Omar E.; Hayward, Simon W.; Webb, Donna J.; Li, Deyu

    2015-02-01

    Most investigations of cancer-stroma interactions have focused on biochemical signaling effects, with much less attention being paid to biophysical factors. In this study, we investigated the role of mechanical stimuli on human prostatic fibroblasts using a microfluidic platform that was adapted for our experiments and further developed for both repeatable performance among multiple assays and for compatibility with high-resolution confocal microscopy. Results show that mechanical stretching of normal tissue-associated fibroblasts (NAFs) alters the structure of secreted fibronectin. Specifically, unstretched NAFs deposit and assemble fibronectin in a random, mesh-like arrangement, while stretched NAFs produce matrix with a more organized, linearly aligned structure. Moreover, the stretched NAFs exhibited an enhanced capability for directing co-cultured cancer cell migration in a persistent manner. Furthermore, we show that stretching NAFs triggers complex biochemical signaling events through the observation of increased expression of platelet derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα). A comparison of these behaviors with those of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) indicates that the observed phenotypes of stretched NAFs are similar to those associated with CAFs, suggesting that mechanical stress is a critical factor in NAF activation and CAF genesis.

  4. Chordin-Like 1 Suppresses Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4-Induced Breast Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Cyr-Depauw, Chanèle; Northey, Jason J.; Tabariès, Sébastien; Annis, Matthew G.; Dong, Zhifeng; Cory, Sean; Hallett, Michael; Rennhack, Jonathan P.; Andrechek, Eran R.

    2016-01-01

    ShcA is an important mediator of ErbB2- and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)-induced breast cancer cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. We show that in the context of reduced ShcA levels, the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist chordin-like 1 (Chrdl1) is upregulated in numerous breast cancer cells following TGF-β stimulation. BMPs have emerged as important modulators of breast cancer aggressiveness, and we have investigated the ability of Chrdl1 to block BMP-induced increases in breast cancer cell migration and invasion. Breast cancer-derived conditioned medium containing elevated concentrations of endogenous Chrdl1, as well as medium containing recombinant Chrdl1, suppresses BMP4-induced signaling in multiple breast cancer cell lines. Live-cell migration assays reveal that BMP4 induces breast cancer migration, which is effectively blocked by Chrdl1. We demonstrate that BMP4 also stimulated breast cancer cell invasion and matrix degradation, in part, through enhanced metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and MMP9 activity that is antagonized by Chrdl1. Finally, high Chrdl1 expression was associated with better clinical outcomes in patients with breast cancer. Together, our data reveal that Chrdl1 acts as a negative regulator of malignant breast cancer phenotypes through inhibition of BMP signaling. PMID:26976638

  5. Transcription factor 3 controls cell proliferation and migration in glioblastoma multiforme cell lines.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruiting; Li, Yinghui; Hu, Xin; Lian, Haiwei; Wang, Lei; Fu, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Transcription factor 3 (TCF3) is a member of the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) transcription factor family. Recent studies have demonstrated its potential carcinogenic properties. Here we show that TCF3 was upregulated in glioma tissues compared with normal brain tissues. This upregulation of the TCF3 gene probably has functional significance in brain-tumor progression. Our studies on glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell lines show that knock-down of TCF3 induced apoptosis and inhibited cell migration. Further analysis revealed that down-regulation of TCF3 gene expression inhibits Akt and Erk1/2 activation, suggesting that the carcinogenic properties of TCF3 in GBM are partially mediated by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt and MAPK-Erk signaling pathways. Considered together, the results of this study demonstrate that high levels of TCF3 in gliomas potentially promote glioma development through the Akt and Erk pathways. PMID:27105323

  6. Quantification of hydrodynamic factors influencing cell lateral migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nix, Stephanie; Imai, Yohsuke; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2015-11-01

    The study of the migration of blood cells perpendicular to the direction of blood flow, or lateral migration, is motivated by the differing behavior of the various types of blood cells. In vivo, red blood cells are observed to flow in the central region of the blood vessel, particularly in the microcirculation, while other types of cells in the blood, including white blood cells and platelets, are observed to flow disproportionately near the vessel wall. However, the specifics regarding the effect of hydrodynamic and biological factors are still unknown. Thus, in this study, we aim to quantify the effect of hydrodynamic factors on a cell model numerically using the boundary integral method. By using the boundary integral method, we can isolate the effect of a single hydrodynamic factor, such as a wall or given flow distribution, in an otherwise infinite flow. Then, we can use the obtained numerical results to develop a semi-analytical model describing the cell lateral migration dependent on only the flow geometry and the viscosity ratio between the cell and external fluid.

  7. Syndecan-1 Regulates Cell Migration and Fibronectin Fibril Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Stepp, Mary Ann; Daley, William P.; Bernstein, Audrey M.; Pal-Ghosh, Sonali; Tadvalkar, Gauri; Shashurin, Alexey; Palsen, Sarah; Jurjus, Rosalyn A.; Larsen, Melinda

    2011-01-01

    Corneal scarring is a major cause of blindness worldwide and can result from the deposition of abnormal amounts of collagen fibers lacking the correct size and spacing required to produce a clear cornea. Collagen fiber formation requires a preformed fibronectin (FN) matrix. We demonstrate that the loss of syndecan1 (sdc1) in corneal stromal cells (CSC) impacts cell migration rates, the sizes and composition of focal and fibrillar adhesions, the activation of integrins, and the assembly of fibronectin into fibrils. Integrin and fibronectin expression are not altered on sdc1 null CSCs. Cell adhesion, spreading, and migration studies using low compared to high concentrations of FN and collagen I (CNI) or vitronectin (VN) with and without activation of integrins by manganese chloride show that the impact of sdc1 depletion on integrin activation varies depending on the integrin-mediated activity evaluated. Differences in FN-fibrillogenesis and migration in sdc1 null CSCs are reversed by addition of manganese chloride but cell spreading differences remain. To determine if our findings on sdc1 were specific to the cornea, we compared the phenotypes of sdc1 null dermal fibroblasts with those of CSCs. We found that without sdc1, both cell types migrate faster; however, cell-type specific differences in FN expression and its assembly into fibrils exist between these two cell types. Together, our data demonstrate that sdc1 functions to regulate integrin activity in multiple cell types. Loss of sdc1-mediated integrin function results in cell-type specific differences in matrix assembly. A better understanding of how different cell types regulate FN fibril formation via syndecans and integrins will lead to better treatments for scarring and fibrosis. PMID:20580707

  8. Probing cell migration in confined environments by plasma lithography.

    PubMed

    Junkin, Michael; Wong, Pak Kin

    2011-03-01

    Cellular processes are regulated by various mechanical and physical factors in their local microenvironment such as geometric confinements, cell-substrate interactions, and cell-cell contact. Systematic elucidation of these regulatory mechanisms is crucial for fundamental understanding of cell biology and for rational design of biomedical devices and regenerative medicine. Here, we report a generally applicable plasma lithography technique, which performs selective surface functionalization on large substrate areas, for achieving long-term, stable confinements with length scales from 100 nm to 1 cm toward the investigation of cell-microenvironment interactions. In particular, we applied plasma lithography for cellular confinement of neuroblastomas, myoblasts, endothelial cells, and mammary gland epithelial cells, and examined the motion of mouse embryonic fibroblasts in directionality-confined environments for studying the effect of confinements on migratory behavior. In conjunction with live cell imaging, the distance traveled, velocity, and angular motion of individual cells and collective cell migration behaviors were measured in confined environments with dimensions comparable to a cell. A critical length scale that a cell could conceivably occupy and migrate to was also identified by investigating the behaviors of cells using confined environments with subcellular length scales.

  9. A new role for GABA: inhibition of tumor cell migration.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Arturo

    2003-04-01

    GABA, the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate brain, participates outside the CNS in diverse functions such as platelet aggregation and the acrosomal reaction in spermatozoa. A recent study now demonstrates that GABA inhibits the migration of colon carcinoma cells, paving the way to the development of specific pharmacological agents that delay or inhibit invasion and metastasis of various cancer types.

  10. Describing Directional Cell Migration with a Characteristic Directionality Time

    PubMed Central

    Loosley, Alex J.; O’Brien, Xian M.; Reichner, Jonathan S.; Tang, Jay X.

    2015-01-01

    Many cell types can bias their direction of locomotion by coupling to external cues. Characteristics such as how fast a cell migrates and the directedness of its migration path can be quantified to provide metrics that determine which biochemical and biomechanical factors affect directional cell migration, and by how much. To be useful, these metrics must be reproducible from one experimental setting to another. However, most are not reproducible because their numerical values depend on technical parameters like sampling interval and measurement error. To address the need for a reproducible metric, we analytically derive a metric called directionality time, the minimum observation time required to identify motion as directionally biased. We show that the corresponding fit function is applicable to a variety of ergodic, directionally biased motions. A motion is ergodic when the underlying dynamical properties such as speed or directional bias do not change over time. Measuring the directionality of nonergodic motion is less straightforward but we also show how this class of motion can be analyzed. Simulations are used to show the robustness of directionality time measurements and its decoupling from measurement errors. As a practical example, we demonstrate the measurement of directionality time, step-by-step, on noisy, nonergodic trajectories of chemotactic neutrophils. Because of its inherent generality, directionality time ought to be useful for characterizing a broad range of motions including intracellular transport, cell motility, and animal migration. PMID:25992908

  11. Endogenous electric fields as guiding cue for cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Richard H. W.

    2015-01-01

    This review covers two topics: (1) “membrane potential of low magnitude and related electric fields (bioelectricity)” and (2) “cell migration under the guiding cue of electric fields (EF).”Membrane potentials for this “bioelectricity” arise from the segregation of charges by special molecular machines (pumps, transporters, ion channels) situated within the plasma membrane of each cell type (including eukaryotic non-neural animal cells). The arising patterns of ion gradients direct many cell- and molecular biological processes such as embryogenesis, wound healing, regeneration. Furthermore, EF are important as guiding cues for cell migration and are often overriding chemical or topographic cues. In osteoblasts, for instance, the directional information of EF is captured by charged transporters on the cell membrane and transferred into signaling mechanisms that modulate the cytoskeleton and motor proteins. This results in a persistent directional migration along an EF guiding cue. As an outlook, we discuss questions concerning the fluctuation of EF and the frequencies and mapping of the “electric” interior of the cell. Another exciting topic for further research is the modeling of field concepts for such distant, non-chemical cellular interactions. PMID:26029113

  12. Interleukin-4 improves the migration of human myogenic precursor cells in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Lafreniere, J.F.; Mills, P.; Bouchentouf, M.; Tremblay, J.P. . E-mail: Jacques-P.Tremblay@crchul.ulaval.ca

    2006-04-15

    Different molecules are available to recruit new neighboring myogenic cells to the site of regeneration. Formerly called B cell stimulatory factor-1, IL-4 can now be included in the list of motogenic factors. The present report demonstrates that human IL-4 is not required for fusion between mononucleated myoblasts but is required for myotube maturation. In identifying IL-4 as a pro-migratory agent for myogenic cells, these results provide a mechanism which partly explains IL-4 demonstrated activity during differentiation. Among the different mechanisms by which IL-4 might enhance myoblast migration processes, our results indicate that there are implications of some integrins and of three major components of the fibrinolytic system. Indeed, increases in the amount of active urokinase plasminogen activator and its receptor were observed following an IL-4 treatment, while the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 decreased. Finally, IL-4 did not modify the amount of cell surface {alpha}5 integrin but increased the presence of {beta}3 and {beta}1 integrins. This integrin modulation might favor myogenic cell migration and its interaction with newly formed myotubes. Therefore, IL-4 co-injection with transplanted myoblasts might be an approach to enhance the migration of transplanted cells for the treatment of a damaged myocardium or of a Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy patient.

  13. Divergent behaviors and underlying mechanisms of cell migration and invasion in non-metastatic T24 and its metastatic derivative T24T bladder cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Jin, Honglei; Yu, Yonghui; Hu, Young; Lu, Chris; Li, Jingxia; Gu, Jiayan; Zhang, Liping; Huang, Haishan; Zhang, Dongyun; Wu, Xue-Ru; Gao, Jimin; Huang, Chuanshu

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on cancer cell invasion were primarily focused on its migration because these two events were often considered biologically equivalent. Here we found that T24T cells exhibited higher invasion but lower migration abilities than T24 cells. Expression of Rho-GDPases was much lower and expression of SOD2 was much higher in T24T cells than those in T24 cells. Indeed, knockdown of SOD2 in T24T cells can reverse the cell migration but without affecting cell invasion. We also found that SOD2 inhibited the JNK/c-Jun cascade, and the inhibition of c-Jun activation by ectopic expression of TAM67 impaired Rho-GDPases expression and cell migration in T24T shSOD2 cells. Further, we found that Sp1 can upregulate SOD2 transcription in T24T cells. Importantly, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) was overexpressed in T24T and participated in increasing its invasion, and MMP-2 overexpression was mediated by increasing nuclear transport of nucleolin, which enhanced mmp-2 mRNA stability. Taken together, our study unravels an inverse relationship between cell migration and invasion in human bladder cancer T24T cells and suggests a novel mechanism underlying the divergent roles of SOD2 and MMP-2 in regulating metastatic behaviors of human bladder T24T in cell migration and invasion. PMID:25402510

  14. Exo70 Generates Membrane Curvature for Morphogenesis and Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuting; Liu, Jianglan; Yang, Changsong; Capraro, Benjamin R.; Baumgart, Tobias; Bradley, Ryan P.; Ramakrishnan, N.; Xu, Xiaowei; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Svitkina, Tatyana; Guo, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic shape changes of the plasma membrane are fundamental to many processes ranging from morphogenesis and cell migration to phagocytosis and viral propagation. Here we demonstrate that Exo70, a component of the exocyst complex, induces tubular membrane invaginations towards the lumen of synthetic vesicles in vitro and generates protrusions on the surface of cells. Biochemical analyses using Exo70 mutants and independent molecular dynamics simulations based on Exo70 structure demonstrate that Exo70 generates negative membrane curvature through an oligomerization-based mechanism. In cells, the membrane-deformation function of Exo70 is required for protrusion formation and directional cell migration. Exo70 thus represents a membrane-bending protein that may couple actin dynamics and plasma membrane remodeling for morphogenesis. PMID:23948253

  15. Y-27632 Increases Sensitivity of PANC-1 Cells to Epigallocatechin Gallate (EGCG) in Regulating Cell Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xing; Bi, Yongyi

    2016-01-01

    Background The study aimed to investigate the inhibitory effect of (1R,4r)-4-((R)-1-aminoethyl)-N-(pyridin-4-yl) cyclohexanecarboxamide (Y-27632) and (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on the proliferation and migration of PANC-1 cells. EGCG, found in green tea, has been previously shown to be one of the most abundant and powerful catechins in cancer prevention and treatment. Y-27632, a selective inhibitor of rho-associated protein kinase 1, is widely used in treating cardiovascular disease, inflammation, and cancer. Material/Methods PANC-1 cells, maintained in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium, were treated with dimethyl sulfoxide (control) as well as different concentrations (20, 40, 60, and 80 μg/mL) of EGCG for 48 h. In addition, PANC-1 cells were treated separately with 60 μg/mL EGCG, 20 μM Y-27632, and EGCG combined with Y-27632 (60 μg/mL EGCG + 20 μM Y-27632) for 48 h. The effect of EGCG and Y-27632 on the proliferation and migration of PANC-1 cells was evaluated using Cell Counting Kit-8 and transwell migration assays. The expression of peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor alpha (PPARα) and Caspase-3 mRNA was determined by Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Results EGCG (20–80 μg/mL) inhibited cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Y-27632 enhanced the sensitivity of PANC-1 cells to EGCG (by increasing the expression of PPARα and Caspase-3 mRNA) and suppressed cell proliferation. PANC-1 cell migration was inhibited by treatment with a combination of EGCG and Y-27632. Conclusions Y-27632 increases the sensitivity of PANC-1 cells to EGCG in regulating cell proliferation and migration, which is likely to be related to the expression of PPARα mRNA and Caspase-3 mRNA. PMID:27694793

  16. Thymosin {beta}4 promotes the migration of endothelial cells without intracellular Ca{sup 2+} elevation

    SciTech Connect

    Selmi, Anna; Malinowski, Mariusz; Brutkowski, Wojciech; Bednarek, Radoslaw; Cierniewski, Czeslaw S.

    2012-08-15

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the effects of T{beta}4 on cell migration, proliferation, apoptosis and inflammation after exogenous treatment, but the mechanism by which T{beta}4 functions is still unclear. Previously, we demonstrated that incubation of endothelial cells with T{beta}4 induced synthesis and secretion of various proteins, including plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and matrix metaloproteinases. We also showed that T{beta}4 interacts with Ku80, which may operate as a novel receptor for T{beta}4 and mediates its intracellular activity. In this paper, we provide evidence that T{beta}4 induces cellular processes without changes in the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration. External treatment of HUVECs with T{beta}4 and its mutants deprived of the N-terminal tetrapeptide AcSDKP (T{beta}4{sub AcSDKPT/4A}) or the actin-binding sequence KLKKTET (T{beta}4{sub KLKKTET/7A}) resulted in enhanced cell migration and formation of tubular structures in Matrigel. Surprisingly, the increased cell motility caused by T{beta}4 was not associated with the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} elevation monitored with Fluo-4 NW or Fura-2 AM. Therefore, it is unlikely that externally added T{beta}4 induces HUVEC migration via the surface membrane receptors known to generate Ca{sup 2+} influx. Our data confirm the concept that externally added T{beta}4 must be internalized to induce intracellular mechanisms supporting endothelial cell migration.

  17. IAP proteins: regulators of cell migration and development.

    PubMed

    Kenneth, Niall S; Duckett, Colin S

    2012-12-01

    The cytoprotective properties of vertebrate inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins have been the subject of much study. These proteins have, however, emerged as key signaling intermediates modulating a variety of cellular functions through their ability to act as E3 ubiquitin ligases. This review will focus on the cell death-independent roles of the IAP proteins, focusing on recent reports indicating that c-IAPs and XIAP are key molecules involved in modulating cell migration and development.

  18. p63 Inhibits Extravillous Trophoblast Migration and Maintains Cells in a Cytotrophoblast Stem Cell-Like State

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingchun; Moretto-Zita, Matteo; Leon-Garcia, Sandra; Parast, Mana M.

    2015-01-01

    Proper differentiation of placental epithelial cells, called trophoblast, is required for implantation. Early during placentation, trophoblast cell columns help anchor the developing embryo in the uterine wall. Although proximally continuous with villous cytotrophoblast (CTB) distally, these cells differentiate into invasive extravillous trophoblast. We previously reported that p63, a p53 family member, is highly expressed in proliferative villous CTB and required for induction of the trophoblast lineage in human pluripotent stem cells. We now further explore its function in human trophoblast by using both primary CTB from the early placenta and established trophoblast cell lines. We show that p63 is expressed in epidermal growth factor receptor-positive CTB and that its expression decreases with differentiation into HLA-G+ extravillous trophoblast. In trophoblast cell lines, p63 is expressed in JEG3 cells but absent from HTR8 cells. Overexpression of p63 in both cell lines enhances cell proliferation and significantly reduces cell migration; conversely, down-regulation of p63 in JEG3 cells reduces cell proliferation and restores cell migration. Analysis of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, cell adhesion, and matrix degradation pathways shows that p63 blocks epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, promotes a CTB-specific cell adhesion profile, and inhibits expression of matrix metalloproteinases. Taken together, these data show that p63 maintains the proliferative CTB state, at least partially through regulation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, cell adhesion, and matrix degradation pathways. PMID:25307348

  19. Migration of amoeba cells in an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guido, Isabella; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2015-03-01

    Exogenous and endogenous electric fields play a role in cell physiology as a guiding mechanism for the orientation and migration of cells. Electrotaxis of living cells has been observed for several cell types, e.g. neurons, fibroblasts, leukocytes, neural crest cells, cancer cells. Dictyostelium discoideum (Dd), an intensively investigated chemotactic model organism, also exhibits a strong electrotactic behavior moving toward the cathode under the influence of electric fields. Here we report experiments on the effects of DC electric fields on the directional migration of Dd cells. We apply the electric field to cells seeded into microfluidic devices equipped with agar bridges to avoid any harmful effects of the electric field on the cells (ions formation, pH changes, etc.) and a constant flow to prevent the build-up of chemical gradient that elicits chemotaxis. Our results show that the cells linearly increase their speed over time when a constant electric field is applied for a prolonged duration (2 hours). This novel phenomenon cannot be attributed to mechanotaxis as the drag force of the electroosmotic flow is too small to produce shear forces that can reorient cells. It is independent of the cellular developmental stage and to our knowledge, it was not observed in chemotaxis. This work is supported by MaxSynBio project of the Max Planck Society.

  20. Enhancement of the migrated results with the deblurring filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Li; Takahashi, Kazunori; Sato, Motoyuki

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we introduce a method that uses the deblurring filter to further improve the migrated GPR results. While applying migration to near range radar systems such as GPR, we may suffer from the imaging artifacts or low resolution due to the limited aperture size or coarsely sampled data. In order to solve this problem, least square approach can be applied. It can be presented with the following equations: The forward modelling can be presented as a linear calculation as (1) d = Lm (1) The real inverse processing should be (2) m = L‑1d (2) Here d is the acquired GPR data, L is the forward modelling matrix and m is the reflectivity model of the survey area. Since the inverse matrix L‑1 PIC is almost impossible to determine, we normally use the simplified method that use the adjoint matrix as the estimation of the inverse matrix. And it is proved that migration is just the adjoint matrix of the forward modelling matrix. Hence the migration processing can be written as (3) m* = LTd (3) The analytic least square solution can be given as (4) m* = (LTL + μI)‑1 LTd (4) The least square results give much higher resolution and most of the artifacts can be eliminated. But this method requires extremely large computation so it is not really practical. Here we propose another approach, by combining (1) and (3) we can also get (5) m = (LTL)‑1 m* (5) It indicates that we may further improve the migrated results with an inverse filter (LTL)‑1. Actually, this is known as the deblurring processing for imaging problem. This deblurring filter is still very difficult to solve for the whole imaging area, but we can use the local filters at different position instead of a whole filter. In order to realize this method, a dictionary needs to be reconstructed correspond to the antenna configuration and the background velocity first. At each local window we put a point scatter in the middle and calculate the forward modelling result and the migrated result of this local

  1. Enhancement of the migrated results with the deblurring filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Li; Takahashi, Kazunori; Sato, Motoyuki

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we introduce a method that uses the deblurring filter to further improve the migrated GPR results. While applying migration to near range radar systems such as GPR, we may suffer from the imaging artifacts or low resolution due to the limited aperture size or coarsely sampled data. In order to solve this problem, least square approach can be applied. It can be presented with the following equations: The forward modelling can be presented as a linear calculation as (1) d = Lm (1) The real inverse processing should be (2) m = L-1d (2) Here d is the acquired GPR data, L is the forward modelling matrix and m is the reflectivity model of the survey area. Since the inverse matrix L-1 PIC is almost impossible to determine, we normally use the simplified method that use the adjoint matrix as the estimation of the inverse matrix. And it is proved that migration is just the adjoint matrix of the forward modelling matrix. Hence the migration processing can be written as (3) m* = LTd (3) The analytic least square solution can be given as (4) m* = (LTL + μI)-1 LTd (4) The least square results give much higher resolution and most of the artifacts can be eliminated. But this method requires extremely large computation so it is not really practical. Here we propose another approach, by combining (1) and (3) we can also get (5) m = (LTL)-1 m* (5) It indicates that we may further improve the migrated results with an inverse filter (LTL)-1. Actually, this is known as the deblurring processing for imaging problem. This deblurring filter is still very difficult to solve for the whole imaging area, but we can use the local filters at different position instead of a whole filter. In order to realize this method, a dictionary needs to be reconstructed correspond to the antenna configuration and the background velocity first. At each local window we put a point scatter in the middle and calculate the forward modelling result and the migrated result of this local window. Then

  2. T-cell Migration, Search Strategies and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Krummel, Matthew F; Bartumeus, Frederic; Gérard, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    T cell migration is essential for T cell responses, allowing for detection of cognate antigen at the surface of an Antigen-Presenting Cell (APC) and for interactions with other cells involved in the immune response. Although appearing random, growing evidence supports that T cell motility patterns are strategic and governed by mechanisms that are optimized for both activation-stage and environment-specific attributes. In this Opinion Article, we will discuss how to understand the combined effects of T cell- intrinsic and -extrinsic forces upon these motility patterns when viewed in highly complex tissues filled with other cells involved in parallel motility. In particular, we will examine how insights from ‘search theory’ describe T cell movement across exploitation-exploration gradients, in the context of activation versus effector function and in the context of lymph nodes versus peripheral tissues. PMID:26852928

  3. Chemokine-guided cell migration and motility in zebrafish development.

    PubMed

    Bussmann, Jeroen; Raz, Erez

    2015-05-12

    Chemokines are vertebrate-specific, structurally related proteins that function primarily in controlling cell movements by activating specific 7-transmembrane receptors. Chemokines play critical roles in a large number of biological processes and are also involved in a range of pathological conditions. For these reasons, chemokines are at the focus of studies in developmental biology and of clinically oriented research aimed at controlling cancer, inflammation, and immunological diseases. The small size of the zebrafish embryos, their rapid external development, and optical properties as well as the large number of eggs and the fast expansion in genetic tools available make this model an extremely useful one for studying the function of chemokines and chemokine receptors in an in vivo setting. Here, we review the findings relevant to the role that chemokines play in the context of directed single-cell migration, primarily in neutrophils and germ cells, and compare it to the collective cell migration of the zebrafish lateral line. We present the current knowledge concerning the formation of the chemokine gradient, its interpretation within the cell, and the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular response to chemokine signals during directed migration.

  4. Optogenetic approaches to cell migration and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Weitzman, Matthew; Hahn, Klaus M.

    2014-01-01

    Optogenetics, the use of genetically encoded tools to control protein function with light, can generate localized changes in signaling within living cells and animals. For years it has been focused on channel proteins for neurobiology, but has recently expanded to cover many different types of proteins, using a broad array of different protein engineering approaches. These methods have largely been directed at proteins involved in motility, cytoskeletal regulation and gene expression. This review provides a survey of non-channel proteins that have been engineered for optogenetics. Existing molecules are used to illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of the many imaginative new approaches that the reader can use to create light-controlled proteins. PMID:25216352

  5. Trihydrophobin 1 Phosphorylation by c-Src Regulates MAPK/ERK Signaling and Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weibin; Sun, Zhichao; Wu, Jingwen; Peng, Xiaomin; Gan, Huacheng; Zhang, Chunyi; Ji, Lingling; Xie, Jianhui; Zhu, Haiyan; Ren, Shifang

    2012-01-01

    c-Src activates Ras-MAPK/ERK signaling pathway and regulates cell migration, while trihydrophobin 1 (TH1) inhibits MAPK/ERK activation and cell migration through interaction with A-Raf and PAK1 and inhibiting their kinase activities. Here we show that c-Src interacts with TH1 by GST-pull down assay, coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy assay. The interaction leads to phosphorylation of TH1 at Tyr-6 in vivo and in vitro. Phosphorylation of TH1 decreases its association with A-Raf and PAK1. Further study reveals that Tyr-6 phosphorylation of TH1 reduces its inhibition on MAPK/ERK signaling, enhances c-Src mediated cell migration. Moreover, induced tyrosine phosphorylation of TH1 has been found by EGF and estrogen treatments. Taken together, our findings demonstrate a novel mechanism for the comprehensive regulation of Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signaling and cell migration involving tyrosine phosphorylation of TH1 by c-Src. PMID:22238675

  6. Anandamide inhibits adhesion and migration of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grimaldi, Claudia; Pisanti, Simona; Laezza, Chiara; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Santoro, Antonietta; Vitale, Mario; Caruso, Maria Gabriella; Notarnicola, Maria; Iacuzzo, Irma; Portella, Giuseppe; Di Marzo, Vincenzo . E-mail: vdimarzo@icmib.na.cnr.it; Bifulco, Maurizio . E-mail: maubiful@unina.it

    2006-02-15

    The endocannabinoid system regulates cell proliferation in human breast cancer cells. We reasoned that stimulation of cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors could induce a non-invasive phenotype in breast mtastatic cells. In a model of metastatic spreading in vivo, the metabolically stable anandamide analogue, 2-methyl-2'-F-anandamide (Met-F-AEA), significantly reduced the number and dimension of metastatic nodes, this effect being antagonized by the selective CB{sub 1} antagonist SR141716A. In MDA-MB-231 cells, a highly invasive human breast cancer cell line, and in TSA-E1 cells, a murine breast cancer cell line, Met-F-AEA inhibited adhesion and migration on type IV collagen in vitro without modifying integrin expression: both these effects were antagonized by SR141716A. In order to understand the molecular mechanism involved in these processes, we analyzed the phosphorylation of FAK and Src, two tyrosine kinases involved in migration and adhesion. In Met-F-AEA-treated cells, we observed a decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of both FAK and Src, this effect being attenuated by SR141716A. We propose that CB{sub 1} receptor agonists inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis by modulating FAK phosphorylation, and that CB{sub 1} receptor activation might represent a novel therapeutic strategy to slow down the growth of breast carcinoma and to inhibit its metastatic diffusion in vivo.

  7. The Origin And Migration Of Primordial Germ Cells In Sturgeons

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Taiju; Pšenička, Martin; Goto, Rie; Adachi, Shinji; Inoue, Kunio; Arai, Katsutoshi; Yamaha, Etsuro

    2014-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) arise elsewhere in the embryo and migrate into developing gonadal ridges during embryonic development. In several model animals, formation and migration patterns of PGCs have been studied, and it is known that these patterns vary. Sturgeons (genus Acipenser) have great potential for comparative and evolutionary studies of development. Sturgeons belong to the super class Actinoptergii, and their developmental pattern is similar to that of amphibians, although their phylogenetic position is an out-group to teleost fishes. Here, we reveal an injection technique for sturgeon eggs allowing visualization of germplasm and PGCs. Using this technique, we demonstrate that the PGCs are generated at the vegetal pole of the egg and they migrate on the yolky cell mass toward the gonadal ridge. We also provide evidence showing that PGCs are specified by inheritance of maternally supplied germplasm. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the migratory mechanism is well-conserved between sturgeon and other remotely related teleosts, such as goldfish, by a single PGCs transplantation (SPT) assay. The mode of PGCs specification in sturgeon is similar to that of anurans, but the migration pattern resembles that of teleosts. PMID:24505272

  8. Cell migration and antigen capture are antagonistic processes coupled by myosin II in dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Chabaud, Mélanie; Heuzé, Mélina L.; Bretou, Marine; Vargas, Pablo; Maiuri, Paolo; Solanes, Paola; Maurin, Mathieu; Terriac, Emmanuel; Le Berre, Maël; Lankar, Danielle; Piolot, Tristan; Adelstein, Robert S.; Zhang, Yingfan; Sixt, Michael; Jacobelli, Jordan; Bénichou, Olivier; Voituriez, Raphaël; Piel, Matthieu; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2015-01-01

    The immune response relies on the migration of leukocytes and on their ability to stop in precise anatomical locations to fulfil their task. How leukocyte migration and function are coordinated is unknown. Here we show that in immature dendritic cells, which patrol their environment by engulfing extracellular material, cell migration and antigen capture are antagonistic. This antagonism results from transient enrichment of myosin IIA at the cell front, which disrupts the back-to-front gradient of the motor protein, slowing down locomotion but promoting antigen capture. We further highlight that myosin IIA enrichment at the cell front requires the MHC class II-associated invariant chain (Ii). Thus, by controlling myosin IIA localization, Ii imposes on dendritic cells an intermittent antigen capture behaviour that might facilitate environment patrolling. We propose that the requirement for myosin II in both cell migration and specific cell functions may provide a general mechanism for their coordination in time and space. PMID:26109323

  9. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, inhibits melanoma cancer cell migration by reducing the expressions of cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E2 and prostaglandin E2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Tripti; Vaid, Mudit; Katiyar, Nandan; Sharma, Samriti; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2011-01-01

    Melanoma is the leading cause of death from skin disease due, in large part, to its propensity to metastasize. We have examined the effect of berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, on human melanoma cancer cell migration and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects using melanoma cell lines, A375 and Hs294. Using an in vitro cell migration assay, we show that over expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, its metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and PGE2 receptors promote the migration of cells. We found that treatment of A375 and Hs294 cells with berberine resulted in concentration-dependent inhibition of migration of these cells, which was associated with a reduction in the levels of COX-2, PGE2 and PGE2 receptors (EP2 and EP4). Treatment of cells with celecoxib, a COX-2 inhibitor, or transient transfection of cells with COX-2 small interfering RNA, also inhibited cell migration. Treatment of the cells with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), an inducer of COX-2 or PGE2, enhanced cell migration, whereas berberine inhibited TPA- or PGE2-promoted cell migration. Berberine reduced the basal levels as well as PGE2-stimulated expression levels of EP2 and EP4. Treatment of the cells with the EP4 agonist stimulated cell migration and berberine blocked EP4 agonist-induced cell migration activity. Moreover, berberine inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), an upstream regulator of COX-2, in A375 cells, and treatment of cells with caffeic acid phenethyl ester, an inhibitor of NF-κB, inhibited cell migration. Together, these results indicate for the first time that berberine inhibits melanoma cell migration, an essential step in invasion and metastasis, by inhibition of COX-2, PGE2 and PGE2 receptors. PMID:20974686

  10. CD81 regulates cell migration through its association with Rac GTPase

    PubMed Central

    Tejera, Emilio; Rocha-Perugini, Vera; López-Martín, Soraya; Pérez-Hernández, Daniel; Bachir, Alexia I.; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Vázquez, Jesús; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Yáñez-Mo, María

    2013-01-01

    CD81 is a member of the tetraspanin family that has been described to have a key role in cell migration of tumor and immune cells. To unravel the mechanisms of CD81-regulated cell migration, we performed proteomic analyses that revealed an interaction of the tetraspanin C-terminal domain with the small GTPase Rac. Direct interaction was confirmed biochemically. Moreover, microscopy cross-correlation analysis demonstrated the in situ integration of both molecules into the same molecular complex. Pull-down experiments revealed that CD81-Rac interaction was direct and independent of Rac activation status. Knockdown of CD81 resulted in enhanced protrusion rate, altered focal adhesion formation, and decreased cell migration, correlating with increased active Rac. Reexpression of wild-type CD81, but not its truncated form lacking the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain, rescued these effects. The phenotype of CD81 knockdown cells was mimicked by treatment with a soluble peptide with the C-terminal sequence of the tetraspanin. Our data show that the interaction of Rac with the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of CD81 is a novel regulatory mechanism of the GTPase activity turnover. Furthermore, they provide a novel mechanism for tetraspanin-dependent regulation of cell motility and open new avenues for tetraspanin-targeted reagents by the use of cell-permeable peptides. PMID:23264468

  11. Regulation of Cell Migration and β1 Integrin Trafficking by the Endosomal Adaptor GGA3.

    PubMed

    Ratcliffe, Colin D H; Sahgal, Pranshu; Parachoniak, Christine A; Ivaska, Johanna; Park, Morag

    2016-06-01

    The integrin family of cell adhesion receptors link extracellular matrices to intracellular signaling pathways and the actin cytoskeleton; and regulate cell migration, proliferation and survival in normal and diseased tissues. The subcellular location of integrin receptors is critical for their function and deregulated trafficking is implicated in various human diseases. Here we identify a role for Golgi-localized gamma-ear containing Arf-binding protein 3 (GGA3), in regulating trafficking of β1 integrin. GGA3 knockdown reduces cell surface and total levels of α2, α5 and β1 integrin subunits, inhibits cell spreading, reduces focal adhesion number, as well as cell migration. In the absence of GGA3, integrins are increasingly retained inside the cell, traffic toward the perinuclear lysosomal compartment and their degradation is enhanced. Integrin traffic and maintenance of integrin levels are dependent on the integrity of the Arf binding site of GGA3. Furthermore, sorting nexin 17 (SNX17), a critical regulator of integrin recycling, becomes mislocalized to enlarged late endosomes upon GGA3 depletion. These data support a model whereby GGA3, through its ability to regulate SNX17 endosomal localization and through interaction with Arf6 diverts integrins from the degradative pathway supporting cell migration. PMID:26935970

  12. Nuclear translocation of phosphorylated STAT3 regulates VEGF-A-induced lymphatic endothelial cell migration and tube formation

    SciTech Connect

    Okazaki, Hideki; Tokumaru, Sho; Hanakawa, Yasushi; Shiraishi, Ken; Shirakata, Yuji; Dai, Xiuju; Yang, Lijun; Tohyama, Mikiko; Hashimoto, Koji; Sayama, Koji

    2011-09-02

    Highlights: {yields} VEGF-A enhanced lymphatic endothelial cell migration and increased tube formation. {yields} VEGF-A treated lymphatic endothelial cell showed activation of STAT3. {yields} Dominant-negative STAT3 inhibited VEGF-A-induced lymphatic endothelial cell migration and tube formation. -- Abstract: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endothelial cell-specific growth factor that regulates endothelial functions, and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) are known to be important during VEGF receptor signaling. The aim of this study was to determine whether STAT3 regulates VEGF-induced lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) migration and tube formation. VEGF-A (33 ng/ml) enhanced LEC migration by 2-fold and increased tube length by 25% compared with the control, as analyzed using a Boyden chamber and Matrigel assay, respectively. Western blot analysis and immunostaining revealed that VEGF-A induced the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated STAT3 in LECs, and this translocation was blocked by the transfection of LECs with an adenovirus vector expressing a dominant-negative mutant of STAT3 (Ax-STAT3F). Transfection with Ax-STAT3F also almost completely inhibited VEGF-A-induced LEC migration and tube formation. These results indicate that STAT3 is essential for VEGF-A-induced LEC migration and tube formation and that STAT3 regulates LEC functions.

  13. Actein Inhibits Cell Proliferation and Migration in Human Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi; Wu, Jingdong; Guo, Qinghao

    2016-01-01

    Background Osteosarcoma is one of the most common malignant bone cancers worldwide. Although the traditional chemotherapies have made some progression in the past decades, the mortality of osteosarcoma in children and adolescent is very high. Herein, the role of actein in osteosarcoma was explored. Material/Methods Cell viability assay was performed in osteosarcoma cell lines 143B and U2OS. Colony formation analysis was included when cells were treated with different doses of actin. Cell cycle assay was conducted to further examine the role of actein. Cell apoptotic rate and the relative activities of caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9 were detected in 143B and U2OS osteosarcoma cells. Moreover, transwell assays were used to explore the effects of actein on cell metastasis. Results Actein significantly inhibited osteosarcoma cell viability in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Actein also dramatically suppressed the colony formation ability in osteosarcoma143B and U2OS cells. It was revealed that osteosarcoma cells were arrested in G0/G1 phase in the cell cycle progression and induced to apoptosis by administration of actein. The activities of pro-apoptotic factors such as caspase-3 and caspase-9 were significantly increased by actein. Furthermore, administration of actein decreased cell migrated and invasive abilities in both 143B and U2OS cell lines. Conclusions Actein inhibits tumor growth by inducing cell apoptosis in osteosarcoma. The inhibitive roles of actein in cell proliferation, migration and invasion suggest that actein may serve as a potential therapeutic agent in the treatment of osteosarcoma. PMID:27173526

  14. Migration of Drosophila intestinal stem cells across organ boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Shigeo; Paul, Manash; Aghajanian, Patrick; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2013-01-01

    All components of the Drosophila intestinal tract, including the endodermal midgut and ectodermal hindgut/Malpighian tubules, maintain populations of dividing stem cells. In the midgut and hindgut, these stem cells originate from within larger populations of intestinal progenitors that proliferate during the larval stage and form the adult intestine during metamorphosis. The origin of stem cells found in the excretory Malpighian tubules (‘renal stem cells’) has not been established. In this paper, we investigate the migration patterns of intestinal progenitors that take place during metamorphosis. Our data demonstrate that a subset of adult midgut progenitors (AMPs) move posteriorly to form the adult ureters and, consecutively, the renal stem cells. Inhibiting cell migration by AMP-directed expression of a dominant-negative form of Rac1 protein results in the absence of stem cells in the Malpighian tubules. As the majority of the hindgut progenitor cells migrate posteriorly and differentiate into hindgut enterocytes, a group of the progenitor cells, unexpectedly, invades anteriorly into the midgut territory. Consequently, these progenitor cells differentiate into midgut enterocytes. The midgut determinant GATAe is required for the differentiation of midgut enterocytes derived from hindgut progenitors. Wingless signaling acts to balance the proportion of hindgut progenitors that differentiate as midgut versus hindgut enterocytes. Our findings indicate that a stable boundary between midgut and hindgut/Malpighian tubules is not established during early embryonic development; instead, pluripotent progenitor populations cross in between these organs in both directions, and are able to adopt the fate of the organ in which they come to reside. PMID:23571215

  15. Nifedipine Promotes the Proliferation and Migration of Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong-Qing; Zhang, Hao; Tan, Sheng-Jiang; Gu, Yu-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Nifedipine is widely used as a calcium channel blocker (CCB) to treat angina and hypertension,but it is controversial with respect the risk of stimulation of cancers. In this study, we demonstrated that nifedipine promoted the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells both invivo and invitro. However, verapamil, another calcium channel blocker, didn’t exert the similar effects. Nifedipine and high concentration KCl failed to alter the [Ca2+]i in MDA-MB-231 cells, suggesting that such nifedipine effect was not related with calcium channel. Moreover, nifedipine decreased miRNA-524-5p, resulting in the up-regulation of brain protein I3 (BRI3). Erk pathway was consequently activated and led to the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells. Silencing BRI3 reversed the promoting effect of nifedipine on the breast cancer. In a summary, nifedipine stimulated the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells via the axis of miRNA-524-5p-BRI3–Erk pathway independently of its calcium channel-blocking activity. Our findings highlight that nifedipine but not verapamil is conducive for breast cancer growth and metastasis, urging that the caution should be taken in clinic to prescribe nifedipine to women who suffering both hypertension and breast cancer, and hypertension with a tendency in breast cancers. PMID:25436889

  16. SENP1 regulates cell migration and invasion in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Xiang-Ming, Yan; Zhi-Qiang, Xu; Ting, Zhang; Jian, Wang; Jian, Pan; Li-Qun, Yuan; Ming-Cui, Fu; Hong-Liang, Xia; Xu, Cao; Yun, Zhou

    2016-05-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is an embryonic solid tumor derived from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system, and accounts for 11% of childhood cancers and around 15% of cancer deaths in children. SUMOylation and deSUMOylation are dynamic mechanisms regulating a spectrum of protein activities. The SUMO proteases (SENP) remove SUMO conjugate from proteins, and their expression is deregulated in diverse cancers. However, nothing is known about the role of SENPs in NBL. In the present study, we found that SENP1 expression was significantly high in metastatic NB tissues compared with primary NB tissues. Overexpression of SENP1 promoted NB cells migration and invasion. Inhibition of SENP1 could significantly suppress NB cell migration and invasion. Moreover, we found that SENP1 could regulate the expression of CDH1, MMP9, and MMP2. In summary, the data presented here indicate a significant role of SENP1 in the regulation of cell migration and invasion in NB and suppress SENP1 expression as promising candidates for novel treatment strategies of NB.

  17. Extensive cell migration, axon regeneration and improved function with polysialic acid-modified Schwann cells after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Mousumi; Tuesta, Luis M.; Puentes, Rocio; Patel, Samik; Melendez, Kiara; Maarouf, Abderrahman El; Rutishauser, Urs; Pearse, Damien Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Schwann cells (SC) implantation after spinal cord injury (SCI) promotes axonal regeneration, remyelination repair and functional recovery. Reparative efficacy, however, may be limited due to the inability of SCs to migrate outward from the lesion-implant site. Altering SC cell surface properties by over-expressing polysialic acid (PSA) has been shown to promote SC migration. In the current study, a SCI contusion was used to evaluate the migration, supraspinal axon growth support and functional recovery associated with polysialyltransferase (PST)-over-expressing SCs (PST-GFP SCs) or controls (GFP SCs). Compared to GFP SCs, which remained confined to the injection site at the injury center, PST-GFP SCs migrated across the lesion:host cord interface for distances of up to 4.4 mm within adjacent host tissue. In addition, with PST-GFP SCs, there was extensive serotonergic and corticospinal axon in-growth within the implants that was limited in the GFP SC controls. The enhanced migration of PST-GFP SCs was accompanied by significant growth of these axons caudal to lesion. Animals receiving PST-GFP SCs exhibited improved functional outcome, both in the open-field and on the gridwalk test, over modest improvements provided by GFP SC controls. The current study for the first time demonstrates that a lack of migration by SC may hinder their reparative benefits and that cell surface overexpression of PSA enhances the ability of implanted SCs to associate with and support the growth of corticospinal axons. These results provide further promise that PSA modified SCs will be a potent reparative approach for SCI. PMID:22460918

  18. Extensive cell migration, axon regeneration, and improved function with polysialic acid-modified Schwann cells after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Mousumi; Tuesta, Luis M; Puentes, Rocio; Patel, Samik; Melendez, Kiara; El Maarouf, Abderrahman; Rutishauser, Urs; Pearse, Damien Daniel

    2012-05-01

    Schwann cell (SC) implantation after spinal cord injury (SCI) promotes axonal regeneration, remyelination repair, and functional recovery. Reparative efficacy, however, may be limited because of the inability of SCs to migrate outward from the lesion-implant site. Altering SC cell surface properties by overexpressing polysialic acid (PSA) has been shown to promote SC migration. In this study, a SCI contusion model was used to evaluate the migration, supraspinal axon growth support, and functional recovery associated with polysialyltransferase (PST)-overexpressing SCs [PST-green fluorescent protein (GFP) SCs] or controls (GFP SCs). Compared with GFP SCs, which remained confined to the injection site at the injury center, PST-GFP SCs migrated across the lesion:host cord interface for distances of up to 4.4 mm within adjacent host tissue. In addition, with PST-GFP SCs, there was extensive serotonergic and corticospinal axon in-growth within the implants that was limited in the GFP SC controls. The enhanced migration of PST-GFP SCs was accompanied by significant growth of these axons caudal to lesion. Animals receiving PST-GFP SCs exhibited improved functional outcome, both in the open-field and on the gridwalk test, beyond the modest improvements provided by GFP SC controls. This study for the first time demonstrates that a lack of migration by SCs may hinder their reparative benefits and that cell surface overexpression of PSA enhances the ability of implanted SCs to associate with and support the growth of corticospinal axons. These results provide further promise that PSA-modified SCs will be a potent reparative approach for SCI. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Extensive cell migration, axon regeneration, and improved function with polysialic acid-modified Schwann cells after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Mousumi; Tuesta, Luis M; Puentes, Rocio; Patel, Samik; Melendez, Kiara; El Maarouf, Abderrahman; Rutishauser, Urs; Pearse, Damien Daniel

    2012-05-01

    Schwann cell (SC) implantation after spinal cord injury (SCI) promotes axonal regeneration, remyelination repair, and functional recovery. Reparative efficacy, however, may be limited because of the inability of SCs to migrate outward from the lesion-implant site. Altering SC cell surface properties by overexpressing polysialic acid (PSA) has been shown to promote SC migration. In this study, a SCI contusion model was used to evaluate the migration, supraspinal axon growth support, and functional recovery associated with polysialyltransferase (PST)-overexpressing SCs [PST-green fluorescent protein (GFP) SCs] or controls (GFP SCs). Compared with GFP SCs, which remained confined to the injection site at the injury center, PST-GFP SCs migrated across the lesion:host cord interface for distances of up to 4.4 mm within adjacent host tissue. In addition, with PST-GFP SCs, there was extensive serotonergic and corticospinal axon in-growth within the implants that was limited in the GFP SC controls. The enhanced migration of PST-GFP SCs was accompanied by significant growth of these axons caudal to lesion. Animals receiving PST-GFP SCs exhibited improved functional outcome, both in the open-field and on the gridwalk test, beyond the modest improvements provided by GFP SC controls. This study for the first time demonstrates that a lack of migration by SCs may hinder their reparative benefits and that cell surface overexpression of PSA enhances the ability of implanted SCs to associate with and support the growth of corticospinal axons. These results provide further promise that PSA-modified SCs will be a potent reparative approach for SCI. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22460918

  20. Navigator-3, a modulator of cell migration, may act as a suppressor of breast cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Dvashi, Hadas; Ben-Chetrit, Nir; Russell, Roslin; Carvalho, Silvia; Lauriola, Mattia; Nisani, Sophia; Mancini, Maicol; Nataraj, Nishanth; Kedmi, Merav; Roth, Lee; Köstler, Wolfgang; Zeisel, Amit; Yitzhaky, Assif; Zylberg, Jacques; Tarcic, Gabi; Eilam, Raya; Wigelman, Yoav; Will, Rainer; Lavi, Sara; Porat, Ziv; Wiemann, Stefan; Ricardo, Sara; Schmitt, Fernando; Caldas, Carlos; Yarden, Yosef

    2015-01-01

    Dissemination of primary tumor cells depends on migratory and invasive attributes. Here, we identify Navigator-3 (NAV3), a gene frequently mutated or deleted in human tumors, as a regulator of epithelial migration and invasion. Following induction by growth factors, NAV3 localizes to the plus ends of microtubules and enhances their polarized growth. Accordingly, NAV3 depletion trimmed microtubule growth, prolonged growth factor signaling, prevented apoptosis and enhanced random cell migration. Mathematical modeling suggested that NAV3-depleted cells acquire an advantage in terms of the way they explore their environment. In animal models, silencing NAV3 increased metastasis, whereas ectopic expression of the wild-type form, unlike expression of two, relatively unstable oncogenic mutants from human tumors, inhibited metastasis. Congruently, analyses of > 2,500 breast and lung cancer patients associated low NAV3 with shorter survival. We propose that NAV3 inhibits breast cancer progression by regulating microtubule dynamics, biasing directionally persistent rather than random migration, and inhibiting locomotion of initiated cells. PMID:25678558

  1. Capturing relevant extracellular matrices for investigating cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Keely, Patricia; Nain, Amrinder

    2015-01-01

    Much progress in understanding cell migration has been determined by using classic two-dimensional (2D) tissue culture platforms. However, increasingly, it is appreciated that certain properties of cell migration in vivo are not represented by strictly 2D assays. There is much interest in creating relevant three-dimensional (3D) culture environments and engineered platforms to better represent features of the extracellular matrix and stromal microenvironment that are not captured in 2D platforms. Important to this goal is a solid understanding of the features of the extracellular matrix—composition, stiffness, topography, and alignment—in different tissues and disease states and the development of means to capture these features PMID:26918156

  2. Capsaicin modulates proliferation, migration, and activation of hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Bitencourt, Shanna; Mesquita, Fernanda; Basso, Bruno; Schmid, Júlia; Ferreira, Gabriela; Rizzo, Lucas; Bauer, Moises; Bartrons, Ramon; Ventura, Francesc; Rosa, Jose Luis; Mannaerts, Inge; van Grunsven, Leo Adrianus; Oliveira, Jarbas

    2014-03-01

    Capsaicin, the active component of chili pepper, has been reported to have antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory effects on a variety of cell lines. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the effects of capsaicin during HSC activation and maintenance. Activated and freshly isolated HSCs were treated with capsaicin. Proliferation was measured by incorporation of EdU. Cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were investigated using flow cytometry. The migratory response to chemotactic stimuli was evaluated by a modified Boyden chamber assay. Activation markers and inflammatory cytokines were determined by qPCR, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry. Our results show that capsaicin reduces HSC proliferation, migration, and expression of profibrogenic markers of activated and primary mouse HSCs. In conclusion, the present study shows that capsaicin modulates proliferation, migration, and activation of HSC in vitro. PMID:23955514

  3. Epithelial bridges maintain tissue integrity during collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Sri Ram Krishna; Hirata, Hiroaki; Nai, Mui Hoon; Brugués, Agustí; Toyama, Yusuke; Trepat, Xavier; Lim, Chwee Teck; Ladoux, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    The ability of skin to act as a barrier is primarily determined by the efficiency of skin cells to maintain and restore its continuity and integrity. In fact, during wound healing keratinocytes migrate collectively to maintain their cohesion despite heterogeneities in the extracellular matrix. Here, we show that monolayers of human keratinocytes migrating along functionalized micropatterned surfaces comprising alternating strips of extracellular matrix (fibronectin) and non-adherent polymer form suspended multicellular bridges over the non-adherent areas. The bridges are held together by intercellular adhesion and are subjected to considerable tension, as indicated by the presence of prominent actin bundles. We also show that a model based on force propagation through an elastic material reproduces the main features of bridge maintenance and tension distribution. Our findings suggest that multicellular bridges maintain tissue integrity during wound healing when cell-substrate interactions are weak and may prove helpful in the design of artificial scaffolds for skin regeneration.

  4. Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) regulates cell migration in a myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Tao, Tao; Wen, Cheng; He, Wei-Qi; Qiao, Yan-Ning; Gao, Yun-Qian; Chen, Xin; Wang, Pei; Chen, Cai-Ping; Zhao, Wei; Chen, Hua-Qun; Ye, An-Pei; Peng, Ya-Jing; Zhu, Min-Sheng

    2014-10-10

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) has long been implicated in the myosin phosphorylation and force generation required for cell migration. Here, we surprisingly found that the deletion of MLCK resulted in fast cell migration, enhanced protrusion formation, and no alteration of myosin light chain phosphorylation. The mutant cells showed reduced membrane tether force and fewer membrane F-actin filaments. This phenotype was rescued by either kinase-dead MLCK or five-DFRXXL motif, a MLCK fragment with potent F-actin-binding activity. Pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that the absence of MLCK led to attenuated formation of transmembrane complexes, including myosin II, integrins and fibronectin. We suggest that MLCK is not required for myosin phosphorylation in a migrating cell. A critical role of MLCK in cell migration involves regulating the cell membrane tension and protrusion necessary for migration, thereby stabilizing the membrane skeleton through F-actin-binding activity. This finding sheds light on a novel regulatory mechanism of protrusion during cell migration.

  5. Pancreatic Tumor Cell Secreted CCN1/Cyr61 Promotes Endothelial cell migration and Aberrant Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Maity, Gargi; Mehta, Smita; Haque, Inamul; Dhar, Kakali; Sarkar, Sandipto; Banerjee, Sushanta K.; Banerjee, Snigdha

    2014-01-01

    The complex signaling networks between cancer cells and adjacent endothelial cells make it challenging to unravel how cancer cells send extracellular messages to promote aberrant vascularization or tumor angiogenesis. Here, in vitro and in vivo models show that pancreatic cancer cell generated unique microenvironments can underlie endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis. Mechanistically, we find that pancreatic cancer cell secreted CCN1/Cyr61 matricellular protein rewires the microenvironment to promote endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis. This event can be overcome by Sonic Hedgehog (SHh) antibody treatment. Collectively, these studies identify a novel CCN1 signaling program in pancreatic cancer cells which activates SHh through autocrine-paracrine circuits to promote endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis and suggests that CCN1 signaling of pancreatic cancer cells is vital for the regulation of tumor angiogenesis. Thus CCN1 signaling could be an ideal target for tumor vascular disruption in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24833309

  6. Iodine Affects Differentiation and Migration Process in Trophoblastic Cells.

    PubMed

    Olivo-Vidal, Zendy Evelyn; Rodríguez, Roció Coutiño; Arroyo-Helguera, Omar

    2016-02-01

    Iodine deficiency is associated with oxidative stress increase and preeclampsia during gestation, suggesting that iodine concentration plays an important role in the normal placenta physiology. The question raised is to analyze the effect of iodine deficiency on oxidative stress, viability, differentiation, and migration process and changes in the expression of differentiation and migration markers. Iodine deprivation was done using potassium perchlorate (KCLO4) to block sodium iodide symporter (NIS) transporter and 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid DIDS to inhibit pendrine (PEN) transport for 3-48 h. Then trophoblast cells were treated with low iodine doses of 5-500 μM and high iodine doses of 100-5000 μM. Oxidative stress, viability, and human chorionic gonadotropin (hGC) were measured by colorimetric methods. Migration throphoblast cells were evaluated by both wound healing and Boyden chamber assays. Changes in mRNA expression were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. Iodine deprivation induces a significant increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS), viability, and migration process vs control cells. We found a significant overregulation in the mRNA's peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-gamma), Snail, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) mRNA's in cells deprived of iodine, as well as a down glial cell missing-1 (GCM-1) regulation, hGC, pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A), and E-cadherin mRNA expression. The expression of hypoxic induction factor alpha (HIFα) mRNA does not change with iodine deprivation. In cells deprived of iodine, supplementing low iodine doses (5-500 μM) does not induce any significant changes in viability. However, ROS and migration process were decreased, although we found an increased human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) secretion as a differentiation marker. In addition, we found that PPAR-gamma, Snail, and MPP-9 mRNAs expression are downregulated with low iodine doses, in contrast with GCM-1, PAPP

  7. Directional Collective Cell Migration Emerges as a Property of Cell Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Mae L.; Carmona-Fontaine, Carlos; Barnes, Chris P.; Couzin, Iain D.; Mayor, Roberto; Page, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    Collective cell migration is a fundamental process, occurring during embryogenesis and cancer metastasis. Neural crest cells exhibit such coordinated migration, where aberrant motion can lead to fatality or dysfunction of the embryo. Migration involves at least two complementary mechanisms: contact inhibition of locomotion (a repulsive interaction corresponding to a directional change of migration upon contact with a reciprocating cell), and co-attraction (a mutual chemoattraction mechanism). Here, we develop and employ a parameterized discrete element model of neural crest cells, to investigate how these mechanisms contribute to long-range directional migration during development. Motion is characterized using a coherence parameter and the time taken to reach, collectively, a target location. The simulated cell group is shown to switch from a diffusive to a persistent state as the response-rate to co-attraction is increased. Furthermore, the model predicts that when co-attraction is inhibited, neural crest cells can migrate into restrictive regions. Indeed, inhibition of co-attraction in vivo and in vitro leads to cell invasion into restrictive areas, confirming the prediction of the model. This suggests that the interplay between the complementary mechanisms may contribute to guidance of the neural crest. We conclude that directional migration is a system property and does not require action of external chemoattractants. PMID:25181349

  8. Novel interactions between erythroblast macrophage protein and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Javan, Gulnaz T; Can, Ismail; Yeboah, Fred; Lee, Youngil; Soni, Shivani

    2016-09-01

    Erythroblast macrophage protein is a novel protein known to mediate attachment of erythroid cells to macrophages to form erythroblastic islands in bone marrow during erythropoiesis. Emp-null macrophages are small with round morphologies, and lack cytoplasmic projections which imply immature structure. The role of Emp in macrophage development and function is not fully elucidated. Macrophages perform varied functions (e.g. homeostasis, erythropoiesis), and are implicated in numerous pathophysiological conditions such as cellular malignancy. The objective of the current study is to investigate the interaction of Emp with cytoskeletal- and cell migration-associated proteins involved in macrophage functions. A short hairpin RNA lentiviral system was use to down-regulate the expression of Emp in macrophage cells. A cell migration assay revealed that the relocation of macrophages was significantly inhibited when Emp expression was decreased. To further analyze changes in gene expression related to cell motility, PCR array was performed by down-regulating Emp expression. The results indicated that expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 and thymoma viral proto-oncogene 1 were significantly higher when Emp was down-regulated. The results implicate Emp in abnormal cell motility, thus, warrants to assess its role in cancer where tumor cell motility is required for invasion and metastasis. PMID:27519940

  9. Novel interactions between erythroblast macrophage protein and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Javan, Gulnaz T; Can, Ismail; Yeboah, Fred; Lee, Youngil; Soni, Shivani

    2016-09-01

    Erythroblast macrophage protein is a novel protein known to mediate attachment of erythroid cells to macrophages to form erythroblastic islands in bone marrow during erythropoiesis. Emp-null macrophages are small with round morphologies, and lack cytoplasmic projections which imply immature structure. The role of Emp in macrophage development and function is not fully elucidated. Macrophages perform varied functions (e.g. homeostasis, erythropoiesis), and are implicated in numerous pathophysiological conditions such as cellular malignancy. The objective of the current study is to investigate the interaction of Emp with cytoskeletal- and cell migration-associated proteins involved in macrophage functions. A short hairpin RNA lentiviral system was use to down-regulate the expression of Emp in macrophage cells. A cell migration assay revealed that the relocation of macrophages was significantly inhibited when Emp expression was decreased. To further analyze changes in gene expression related to cell motility, PCR array was performed by down-regulating Emp expression. The results indicated that expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 and thymoma viral proto-oncogene 1 were significantly higher when Emp was down-regulated. The results implicate Emp in abnormal cell motility, thus, warrants to assess its role in cancer where tumor cell motility is required for invasion and metastasis.

  10. Transient receptor potential melastatin 4 channel contributes to migration of androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kilch, Tatiana; Jochum, Marcus Martin; Urban, Sabine Katharina; Jung, Volker; Stöckle, Michael; Rother, Karen; Greiner, Markus; Peinelt, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Impaired Ca2+ signaling in prostate cancer contributes to several cancer hallmarks, such as enhanced proliferation and migration and a decreased ability to induce apoptosis. Na+ influx via transient receptor potential melastatin 4 channel (TRPM4) can reduce store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) by decreasing the driving force for Ca2+. In patients with prostate cancer, gene expression of TRPM4 is elevated. Recently, TRPM4 was identified as a cancer driver gene in androgen-insensitive prostate cancer. We investigated TRPM4 protein expression in cancer tissue samples from 20 patients with prostate cancer. We found elevated TRPM4 protein levels in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and prostate cancer tissue compared to healthy tissue. In primary human prostate epithelial cells (hPEC) from healthy tissue and in the androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and PC3, TRPM4 mediated large Na+ currents. We demonstrated significantly increased SOCE after siRNA targeting of TRPM4 in hPEC and DU145 cells. In addition, knockdown of TRPM4 reduced migration but not proliferation of DU145 and PC3 cells. Taken together, our data identify TRPM4 as a regulator of SOCE in hPEC and DU145 cells, demonstrate a role for TRPM4 in cancer cell migration and suggest that TRPM4 is a promising potential therapeutic target. PMID:26496025

  11. Lysophosphatidic acid induces cell migration through the selective activation of Akt1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Kyoung; Yun, Sung Ji; Do, Kee Hun; Kim, Min Sung; Cho, Mong; Suh, Dong-Soo; Kim, Chi Dae; Kim, Jae Ho; Birnbaum, Morris J.

    2008-01-01

    Akt plays pivotal roles in many physiological responses including growth, proliferation, survival, metabolism, and migration. In the current studies, we have evaluated the isoform-specific role of akt in lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced cell migration. Ascites from ovarian cancer patients (AOCP) induced mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cell migration in a dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, ascites from liver cirrhosis patients (ALCP) did not induce MEF cell migration. AOCP-induced MEF cell migration was completely blocked by pre-treatment of cells with LPA receptor antagonist, Ki16425. Both LPA- and AOCP-induced MEF cell migration was completely attenuated by PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. Furthermore, cells lacking Akt1 displayed defect in LPA-induced cell migration. Re-expression of Akt1 in DKO (Akt1-/-Akt2-/-) cells restored LPA-induced cell migration, whereas re-expression of Akt2 in DKO cells could not restore the LPA-induced cell migration. Finally, Akt1 was selectively phosphorylated by LPA and AOCP stimulation. These results suggest that LPA is a major factor responsible for AOCP-induced cell migration and signaling specificity of Akt1 may dictate LPA-induced cell migration. PMID:18779657

  12. Salmonella typhimurium infection triggers dendritic cells and macrophages to adopt distinct migration patterns in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunfang; Wood, Michael W; Galyov, Edouard E; Höpken, Uta E; Lipp, Martin; Bodmer, Helen C; Tough, David F; Carter, Robert W

    2006-11-01

    The presence of an anti-bacterial T cell response and evidence of bacterial products in inflamed joints of reactive arthritis patients suggests an antigen transportation role in this disease for macrophages and dendritic cells. We have investigated the functional properties and in vivo migration of macrophages and DC after infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium). BM-derived macrophages and DC displayed enhanced expression of costimulatory molecules (CD40 and CD86) and increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-12p40) and nitric oxide after infection. Upon adoptive transfer into mice, infected DC migrated to lymphoid tissues and induced an anti-Salmonella T cell response, whereas infected macrophages did not. Infection of DC with S. typhimurium was associated with strong up-regulation of the chemokine receptor CCR7 and acquisition of responsiveness to chemokines acting through this receptor. Moreover, S. typhimurium-infected CCR7-deficient DC were unable to migrate to lymph nodes after adoptive transfer, although they did reach the spleen. Our data demonstrate distinct roles for macrophages and DC as antigen transporters after S. typhimurium infection and a dependence on CCR7 for migration of DC to lymph nodes after bacterial infection. PMID:17048271

  13. Interleukin-8 promotes cell migration through integrin αvβ6 upregulation in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi; Sun, Fengkai; Wang, Ben; Liu, Song; Niu, Weibo; Liu, Enyu; Peng, Cheng; Wang, Jiayong; Gao, Huijie; Liang, Benjia; Niu, Zhengchuan; Zou, Xueqing; Niu, Jun

    2014-11-28

    Colorectal cancer (CRC), which is notorious for high morbidity and mortality around the world, shows a predilection for metastasis to liver. Interleukin-8 (IL-8), a chemokine with a defining CXC amino acid motif, has been reported to promote CRC cell migration and is associated with poor prognosis of CRC. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of IL-8-mediated migration remains obscure. In this study, we first demonstrated the cross talk between IL-8 and integrin αvβ6. We analyzed 139 human CRC samples, and found that the immunohistochemical expression of αvβ6 was significantly correlated with expression of IL-8. Furthermore, IL-8 increased the migration through integrin αvβ6 in human CRC cells, and both CXCR1 and CXCR2 were primarily involved during the process. IL-8 upregulated αvβ6 expression in a dose-dependent manner through activation of ERK and Ets-1 signaling pathway. Taken together, our results indicated that IL-8 enhances the migration of CRC cells by increasing αvβ6 integrin expression through the ERK/Ets-1 pathway. Targeting integrin αvβ6 in IL-8 expressing tumors might be a potential therapeutic strategy for CRC patients.

  14. Serotonin induces pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Day, Regina M.; Agyeman, Abena S.; Segel, Michael J.; Chévere, Rubén D.; Angelosanto, Jill M.; Suzuki, Yuichiro J.; Fanburg, Barry L.

    2007-01-01

    The chronic phase of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is associated with vascular remodeling, especially thickening of the smooth muscle layer of large pulmonary arteries and muscularization of small pulmonary vessels, which normally have no associated smooth muscle. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) has been shown to induce proliferation and hypertrophy of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC), and may be important for in vivo pulmonary vascular remodeling. Here, we show that 5-HT stimulates migration of pulmonary artery PASMC. Treatment with 5-HT for 16 h increased migration of PASMC up to four-fold as monitored in a modified Boyden chamber assay. Increased migratory responses were associated with cellular morphological changes and reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. 5-HT-induced alterations in morphology were previously shown in our laboratory to require cAMP [Lee SL, Fanburg BL. Serotonin produces a configurational change of cultured smooth muscle cells that is associated with elevation of intracellular cAMP. J Cell Phys 1992;150(2):396–405], and the 5-HT4 receptor was pharmacologically determined to be the primary activator of cAMP in bovine PASMC [Becker BN, Gettys TW, Middleton JP, Olsen CL, Albers FJ, Lee SL, et al. 8-Hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin-responsive 5-hydroxytryptamine4-like receptor expressed in bovine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Mol Pharmacol 1992;42(5):817–25]. We examined the role of the 5-HT4 receptor and cAMP in 5-HT-induced bovine PASMC migration. PASMC express 5-HT4 receptor mRNA, and a 5-HT4 receptor antagonist and a cAMP antagonist completely blocked 5-HT-induced cellular migration. Consistent with our previous report that a cAMP-dependent Cl− channel is required for 5-HT-induced morphological changes in PASMC, phenylanthranilic acid, a Cl− channel blocker, inhibited actin cytoskeletal reorganization and migration produced by 5-HT. We conclude that 5-HT stimulates PASMC migration and

  15. Alterations in cell migration and cell viability of wounded human skin fibroblasts following visible red light exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Bola Sadashiva S.; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2014-02-01

    The present study intended to examine the effect of visible red light on structural and cellular parameters on wounded skin fibroblast cells. To achieve the stated objective, uniform scratch was created on confluent monolayered human skin fibroblast cells, and were exposed to single dose of He-Ne laser (15 mm spot, 6.6808 mWcm-2) at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 Jcm-2 in the presence and absence of 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Beam profile measurements of the expanded laser beam were conducted to ensure the beam uniformity. The influence of laser dose on the change in temperature was recorded using sensitive temperature probe. Additionally, following laser exposure cell migration and cell survival were documented at different time intervals on wounded human skin fibroblast cells grown in vitro. Beam profile measurements indicated more or less uniform power distribution over the whole beam area. Temperature monitoring of sham irradiated control and laser treatment groups displayed negligible temperature change indicating the absence of thermal effect at the tested laser doses. In the absence of 10% FBS, single exposure of different laser doses failed to produce any significant effects on cell migration or cell survival. However, in the presence of serum single exposure of 5 J/cm2 on wounded skin fibroblasts significantly enhanced the cell migration (P<0.05) compared to the other tested doses (1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 7 J/cm2) and sham irradiated controls. In conclusion, the LLLT acts by improving cell migration and cell proliferation to produce measurable changes in wounded fibroblast cells.

  16. Promotion of PDGF-induced endothelial cell migration by phosphorylated VASP depends on PKA anchoring via AKAP.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Deling; Ouyang, Jingping; Wang, Nian; Zhang, Yahui; Bie, Jinghua; Zhang, Yemin

    2010-02-01

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), an important substrate of PKA, plays a critical role in remodeling of actin cytoskeleton and actin-based cell motility. However, how PKA accurately transfers extracellular signals to VASP and then how phosphorylation of VASP regulates endothelial cell migration have not been clearly defined. Protein kinase A anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are considered to regulate intracellular-specific signal targeting of PKA via AKAP-mediated PKA anchoring. Thus, our study investigated the relationship among AKAP anchoring of PKA, PKA activity, and VASP phosphorylation, which is to clarify the exact role of VASP and its upstream regulatory mechanism in PKA-dependent migration. Our results show that chemotactic factor PDGF activated PKA, increased phosphorylation of VASP at Ser157, and enhanced ECV304 endothelial cell migration. However, phosphorylation site-directed mutation of VASP at Ser157 attenuated the chemotactic effect of PDGF on endothelial cells, suggesting phosphorylation of VASP at Ser157 promotes PKA-mediated endothelial cell migration. Furthermore, disrupting PKA anchoring to AKAP or PKA activity significantly attenuated the PKA activity, VASP phosphorylation, and subsequent cell migration. Meanwhile, disrupting PKA anchoring to AKAP abolished PDGF-induced lamellipodia formation and special VASP accumulation at leading edge of lamellipodia. These results indicate that PKA activation and PKA-mediated substrate responses in VASP phosphorylation and localization depend on PKA anchoring via AKAP in PDGF-induced endothelial cell migration. In conclusion, AKAP anchoring of PKA is an essential upstream event in regulation of PKA-mediated VASP phosphorylation and subsequent endothelial cell migration, which contributes to explore new methods for controlling endothelial cell migration related diseases and angiogenesis.

  17. Vascular smooth muscle cell glycocalyx modulates shear-induced proliferation, migration, and NO production responses.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hongyan; Fan, Yubo; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2011-01-01

    The endothelial cell glycocalyx, a structure coating the luminal surface of the vascular endothelium, and its related mechanotransduction have been studied by many over the last decade. However, the role of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) glycocalyx in cell mechanotransduction has triggered little attention. This study addressed the role of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), a major component of the glycocalyx, in the shear-induced proliferation, migration, and nitric oxide (NO) production of the rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMCs). A parallel plate flow chamber and a peristaltic pump were employed to expose RASMC monolayers to a physiological level of shear stress (12 dyn/cm(2)). Heparinase III (Hep.III) was applied to selectively degrade heparan sulfate on the SMC surface. Cell proliferation, migration, and NO production rates were determined and compared among the following four groups of cells: 1) untreated with no flow, 2) Hep.III treatment with no flow, 3) untreated with flow of 12 dyn/cm(2) exposure, and 4) Hep.III treatment with flow of 12 dyn/cm(2) exposure. It was observed that flow-induced shear stress significantly suppressed SMC proliferation and migration, whereas cells preferred to aligning along the direction of flow and NO production were enhanced substantially. However, those responses were not found in the cells with Hep.III treatment. Under flow condition, the heparinase III-treated cells remained randomly oriented and proliferated as if there were no flow presence. Disruption of HSPG also enhanced wound closure and inhibited shear-induced NO production significantly. This study suggests that HSPG may play a pivotal role in mechanotransduction of SMCs. PMID:21037235

  18. SCF increases in utero-labeled stem cells migration and improves wound healing.

    PubMed

    Zgheib, Carlos; Xu, Junwang; Mallette, Andrew C; Caskey, Robert C; Zhang, Liping; Hu, Junyi; Liechty, Kenneth W

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic skin wounds lack the ability to heal properly and constitute a major and significant complication of diabetes. Nontraumatic lower extremity amputations are the number one complication of diabetic skin wounds. The complexity of their pathophysiology requires an intervention at many levels to enhance healing and wound closure. Stem cells are a promising treatment for diabetic skin wounds as they have the ability to correct abnormal healing. Stem cell factor (SCF), a chemokine expressed in the skin, can induce stem cells migration, however the role of SCF in diabetic skin wound healing is still unknown. We hypothesize that SCF would correct the impairment and promote the healing of diabetic skin wounds. Our results show that SCF improved wound closure in diabetic mice and increased HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression levels in these wounds. SCF treatment also enhanced the migration of red fluorescent protein (RFP)-labeled skin stem cells via in utero intra-amniotic injection of lenti-RFP at E8. Interestingly these RFP+ cells are present in the epidermis, stain negative for K15, and appear to be distinct from the already known hair follicle stem cells. These results demonstrate that SCF improves diabetic wound healing in part by increasing the recruitment of a unique stem cell population present in the skin.

  19. High mobility group box 1 induced human lung myofibroblasts differentiation and enhanced migration by activation of MMP-9.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chen-Chen; Wang, Chien-Neng; Lee, Yueh-Lun; Tsai, Yi-Ru; Liu, Jau-Jin

    2015-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear protein that involves the binding with DNA and influences chromatin regulation and transcription. HMGB1 is also a cytokine that can activate monocytes and neutrophils involved in inflammation. In this study, we investigated the role of HMGB1 on cellular activation using human fibroblast cell line WI-38. After treatment with 1, 10, and 100 ng/mL of HMGB1 for 24 h, we did not find obviously cytotoxicity and cellular proliferation of WI-38 cells by MTT and BrdU incorporation assay, respectively. However, we found that treatment with 10 and 100 ng/mL of HMGB1 induced the differentiation of lung fibroblasts into myofibroblasts and myofibroblasts showed higher migration ability through activation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 activation. To delineate the mechanism underlying HMGB1-induced cellular migration, we examined HMGB1-induced mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs), including extracellular signal related kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38) phosphorylation, as well as nuclear factor (NF)-κB nuclear translocation. Using specific inhibitors and shRNAs of protein kinases, we observed that repression of ERK, JNK, p38, and NF-κB all inhibited HMGB1-induced cellular differentiation, migration and MMP-9 activation in WI-38 cells. In addition, knocking down of RAGE but not TLR2 and TLR4 by shRNAs attenuated HMGB1-induced myofibroblast differentiation and migration. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that HMGB1 induced lung fibroblasts' differentiation into myofibroblasts and enhanced cell migration through induction of MMP-9 activation and the RAGE-MAPK and NF-κB interaction signaling pathways. Targeting HMGB1 might be a potential therapeutic approach for alleviation of airway remodeling seen in chronic airway inflammatory diseases.

  20. Genome-wide analysis of Musashi-2 targets reveals novel functions in governing epithelial cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Christopher G.; Riemondy, Kent; Chapnick, Douglas A.; Bunker, Eric; Liu, Xuedong; Kuersten, Scott; Yi, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The Musashi-2 (Msi2) RNA-binding protein maintains stem cell self-renewal and promotes oncogenesis by enhancing cell proliferation in hematopoietic and gastrointestinal tissues. However, it is unclear how Msi2 recognizes and regulates mRNA targets in vivo and whether Msi2 primarily controls cell growth in all cell types. Here we identified Msi2 targets with HITS-CLIP and revealed that Msi2 primarily recognizes mRNA 3′UTRs at sites enriched in multiple copies of UAG motifs in epithelial progenitor cells. RNA-seq and ribosome profiling demonstrated that Msi2 promotes targeted mRNA decay without affecting translation efficiency. Unexpectedly, the most prominent Msi2 targets identified are key regulators that govern cell motility with a high enrichment in focal adhesion and extracellular matrix-receptor interaction, in addition to regulators of cell growth and survival. Loss of Msi2 stimulates epithelial cell migration, increases the number of focal adhesions and also compromises cell growth. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of Msi2's recognition and repression of targets and uncover a key function of Msi2 in restricting epithelial cell migration. PMID:27034466

  1. Genome-wide analysis of Musashi-2 targets reveals novel functions in governing epithelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Christopher G; Riemondy, Kent; Chapnick, Douglas A; Bunker, Eric; Liu, Xuedong; Kuersten, Scott; Yi, Rui

    2016-05-01

    The Musashi-2 (Msi2) RNA-binding protein maintains stem cell self-renewal and promotes oncogenesis by enhancing cell proliferation in hematopoietic and gastrointestinal tissues. However, it is unclear how Msi2 recognizes and regulates mRNA targets in vivo and whether Msi2 primarily controls cell growth in all cell types. Here we identified Msi2 targets with HITS-CLIP and revealed that Msi2 primarily recognizes mRNA 3'UTRs at sites enriched in multiple copies of UAG motifs in epithelial progenitor cells. RNA-seq and ribosome profiling demonstrated that Msi2 promotes targeted mRNA decay without affecting translation efficiency. Unexpectedly, the most prominent Msi2 targets identified are key regulators that govern cell motility with a high enrichment in focal adhesion and extracellular matrix-receptor interaction, in addition to regulators of cell growth and survival. Loss of Msi2 stimulates epithelial cell migration, increases the number of focal adhesions and also compromises cell growth. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of Msi2's recognition and repression of targets and uncover a key function of Msi2 in restricting epithelial cell migration. PMID:27034466

  2. Cu Migration in Polycrystalline CdTe Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Da; Akis, Richard; Brinkman, Daniel; Sankin, Igor; Fang, Tian; Vasileska, Dragica; Ringhofer, Christian

    2014-03-12

    An impurity reaction-diffusion model is applied to Cu defects and related intrinsic defects in polycrystalline CdTe for a better understanding of Cu’s role in the cell level reliability of CdTe PV devices. The simulation yields transient Cu distributions in polycrystalline CdTe during solar cell processing and stressing. Preliminary results for Cu migration using available diffusivity and solubility data show that Cu accumulates near the back contact, a phenomena that is commonly observed in devices after back-contact processing or stress conditions.

  3. Functional screening with a live cell imaging-based random cell migration assay.

    PubMed

    van Roosmalen, Wies; Le Dévédec, Sylvia E; Zovko, Sandra; de Bont, Hans; van de Water, Bob

    2011-01-01

    Cell migration, essential in cancer progression, is a complex process comprising a number of spatiotemporally regulated and well-coordinated mechanisms. In order to study (random) cell migration in the context of responses to various external cues (such as growth factors) or intrinsic cell signaling, a number of different tools and approaches have been developed. In order to unravel the key pathways and players involved in the regulation of (cancer) cell migration, a systematical mapping of the players/pathways is required. For this purpose, we developed a cell migration assay based on automatic high-throughput microscopy screen. This approach allows for screening of hundreds of genes, e.g., those encoding various kinases and phosphatases but can also be used for screening of drugs libraries. Moreover, we have developed an automatic analysis pipeline comprising of (a) automatic data acquisition (movie) and (b) automatic analysis of the acquired movies of the migrating cells. Here, we describe various facets of this approach. Since cell migration is essential in progression of cancer metastasis, we describe two examples of experiments performed on highly motile (metastatic) cancer cells.

  4. Cell traction in collective cell migration and morphogenesis: The chase and run mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, András; Mayor, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Directional collective cell migration plays an important role in development, physiology, and disease. An increasing number of studies revealed key aspects of how cells coordinate their movement through distances surpassing several cell diameters. While physical modeling and measurements of forces during collective cell movements helped to reveal key mechanisms, most of these studies focus on tightly connected epithelial cultures. Less is known about collective migration of mesenchymal cells. A typical example of such behavior is the migration of the neural crest cells, which migrate large distances as a group. A recent study revealed that this persistent migration is aided by the interaction between the neural crest and the neighboring placode cells, whereby neural crest chase the placodes via chemotaxis, but upon contact both populations undergo contact inhibition of locomotion and a rapid reorganization of cellular traction. The resulting asymmetric traction field of the placodes forces them to run away from the chasers. We argue that this chase and run interaction may not be specific only to the neural crest system, but could serve as the underlying mechanism for several morphogenetic processes involving collective cell migration. PMID:26267782

  5. A correlation between altered O-GlcNAcylation, migration and with changes in E-cadherin levels in ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Feng-zhen; Yu, Chao; Zhao, De-zhang; Wu, Ming-jun; Yang, Zhu

    2013-06-10

    O-GlcNAcylation is a dynamic and reversible posttranslational modification of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins. In recent years, the roles of O-GlcNAcylation in several human malignant tumors have been investigated, and O-GlcNAcylation was found to be linked to cellular features relevant to metastasis. In this study, we modeled four diverse ovarian cancer cells and investigated the effects of O-GlcNAcylation on ovarian cancer cell migration. We found that total O-GlcNAcylation level was elevated in HO-8910PM cells compared to OVCAR3 cells. Additionally, through altering the total O-GlcNAcylation level by OGT silencing or OGA inhibition, we found that the migration of OVCAR3 cells was dramatically enhanced by PUGNAc and Thiamet G treatment, and the migration ability of HO-8910PM cells was significantly inhibited by OGT silencing. Furthermore, we also found that the expression of E-cadherin, an O-GlcNAcylated protein in ovarian cancer cells, was reduced by OGA inhibition in OVCAR3 cells and elevated by OGT silencing in HO-8910PM cells. These results indicate that O-GlcNAcylation could enhance ovarian cancer cell migration and decrease the expression of E-cadherin. Our studies also suggest that O-GlcNAcylation might become another potential target for the therapy of ovarian cancer. -- Highlights: • We examine the migration potential of diverse ovarian cancer cells. • We examine the total O-GlcNAcylation level of diverse ovarian cancer cells. • Increasing O-GlcNAcylation level will enhance the migration of ovarian cancer cells. • Reducing O-GlcNAcylation level will inhibit the migration of ovarian cancer cells. • The mechanism explains O-GlcNAcylation enhance ovarian cancer cell migration.

  6. Electrospinning of unidirectionally and orthogonally aligned thermoplastic polyurethane nanofibers: fiber orientation and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Mi, Hao-Yang; Salick, Max R; Jing, Xin; Crone, Wendy C; Peng, Xiang-Fang; Turng, Lih-Sheng

    2015-02-01

    Unidirectionally and orthogonally aligned thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) nanofibers were electrospun using a custom-built electrospinning device. The unidirectionally aligned fibers were collected using two parallel copper plates, and the orthogonally aligned fibers were collected using two orthogonal sets of parallel copper plates with alternate negative connections. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and polyacrylic acid (PAA) were added to modify the polymer solution. It was found that both CNT and PAA were capable of increasing solution conductivity. The TPU/PAA fiber showed the highest degree of fiber orientation with more than 90% of the fibers having an orientation angle between -10° and 10° for unidirectionally aligned fibers, and for orthogonally aligned fibers, the orientation angle of 50% fibers located between -10° and 10° and 48% fibers located between 80° and 100°. Viability assessment of 3T3 fibroblasts cultured on TPU/PAA fibers suggested that the material was cytocompatible. The cells' orientation and migration direction closely matched the fibers' orientation. The cell migration velocity and distance were both enhanced with the guidance of fibers compared with cells cultured on random fibers and common tissue culture plastic. Controlling cell migration velocity and directionality may provide ways to influence differentiation and gene expression and systems that would allow further exploration of wound repair and metastatic cell behavior. PMID:24771704

  7. Directing cell migration and organization via nanocrater-patterned cell-repellent interfaces.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hojeong; Koo, Sangmo; Reese, Willie Mae; Loskill, Peter; Grigoropoulos, Costas P; Healy, Kevin E

    2015-09-01

    Although adhesive interactions between cells and nanostructured interfaces have been studied extensively, there is a paucity of data on how nanostructured interfaces repel cells by directing cell migration and cell-colony organization. Here, by using multiphoton ablation lithography to pattern surfaces with nanoscale craters of various aspect ratios and pitches, we show that the surfaces altered the cells' focal-adhesion size and distribution, thus affecting cell morphology, migration and ultimately localization. We also show that nanocrater pitch can disrupt the formation of mature focal adhesions to favour the migration of cells towards higher-pitched regions, which present increased planar area for the formation of stable focal adhesions. Moreover, by designing surfaces with variable pitch but constant nanocrater dimensions, we were able to create circular and striped cellular patterns. Our surface-patterning approach, which does not involve chemical treatments and can be applied to various materials, represents a simple method to control cell behaviour on surfaces. PMID:26213899

  8. Mechanobiology of cell migration in the context of dynamic two-way cell-matrix interactions.

    PubMed

    Kurniawan, Nicholas A; Chaudhuri, Parthiv Kant; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-05-24

    Migration of cells is integral in various physiological processes in all facets of life. These range from embryonic development, morphogenesis, and wound healing, to disease pathology such as cancer metastasis. While cell migratory behavior has been traditionally studied using simple assays on culture dishes, in recent years it has been increasingly realized that the physical, mechanical, and chemical aspects of the matrix are key determinants of the migration mechanism. In this paper, we will describe the mechanobiological changes that accompany the dynamic cell-matrix interactions during cell migration. Furthermore, we will review what is to date known about how these changes feed back to the dynamics and biomechanical properties of the cell and the matrix. Elucidating the role of these intimate cell-matrix interactions will provide not only a better multi-scale understanding of cell motility in its physiological context, but also a more holistic perspective for designing approaches to regulate cell behavior.

  9. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Morphology and Migration on Microtextured Titanium

    PubMed Central

    Banik, Brittany L.; Riley, Thomas R.; Platt, Christina J.; Brown, Justin L.

    2016-01-01

    The implant used in spinal fusion procedures is an essential component to achieving successful arthrodesis. At the cellular level, the implant impacts healing and fusion through a series of steps: first, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) need to adhere and proliferate to cover the implant; second, the MSCs must differentiate into osteoblasts; third, the osteoid matrix produced by the osteoblasts needs to generate new bone tissue, thoroughly integrating the implant with the vertebrate above and below. Previous research has demonstrated that microtextured titanium is advantageous over smooth titanium and PEEK implants for both promoting osteogenic differentiation and integrating with host bone tissue; however, no investigation to date has examined the early morphology and migration of MSCs on these surfaces. This study details cell spreading and morphology changes over 24 h, rate and directionality of migration 6–18 h post-seeding, differentiation markers at 10 days, and the long-term morphology of MSCs at 7 days, on microtextured, acid-etched titanium (endoskeleton), smooth titanium, and smooth PEEK surfaces. The results demonstrate that in all metrics, the two titanium surfaces outperformed the PEEK surface. Furthermore, the rough acid-etched titanium surface presented the most favorable overall results, demonstrating the random migration needed to efficiently cover a surface in addition to morphologies consistent with osteoblasts and preosteoblasts. PMID:27243001

  10. Exploring the control circuit of cell migration by mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Satulovsky, Javier; Lui, Roger; Wang, Yu-li

    2008-05-01

    We have developed a top-down, rule-based mathematical model to explore the basic principles that coordinate mechanochemical events during animal cell migration, particularly the local-stimulation-global-inhibition model suggested originally for chemotaxis. Cells were modeled as a shape machine that protrudes or retracts in response to a combination of local protrusion and global retraction signals. Using an optimization algorithm to identify parameters that generate specific shapes and migration patterns, we show that the mechanism of local stimulation global inhibition can readily account for the behavior of Dictyostelium under a large collection of conditions. Within this collection, some parameters showed strong correlation, indicating that a normal phenotype may be maintained by complementation among functional modules. In addition, comparison of parameters for control and nocodazole-treated Dictyostelium identified the most prominent effect of microtubules as regulating the rates of retraction and protrusion signal decay, and the extent of global inhibition. Other changes in parameters can lead to profound transformations from amoeboid cells into cells mimicking keratocytes, neurons, or fibroblasts. Thus, a simple circuit of local stimulation-global inhibition can account for a wide range of cell behaviors. A similar top-down approach may be applied to other complex problems and combined with molecular manipulations to define specific protein functions.

  11. The effects of laser immunotherapy on cancer cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahavar, Cody F.; Zhou, Feifan; Hasanjee, Aamr M.; Layton, Elivia; Lam, Anh; Chen, Wei R.; Vaughan, Melville B.

    2016-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) uses laser irradiation and immunological stimulation to target all types of metastases and creates a long-term tumor resistance. Glycated chitosan (GC) is the immunological stimulant used in LIT. Interestingly, GC can act as a surfactant for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to immunologically modify SWNTs. SWNT-GC retains the optical properties of SWNTs and the immunological functions of GC to help increase the selectivity of the laser and create a more optimal immune response. One essential aspect of understanding this immune response is knowing how laser irradiation affects cancer cells' ability to metastasize. In this experiment, a cell migration assay was performed. A 2mm circular elastomer plugs were placed at the bottom of multi-well dishes. Pre-cancerous keratinocytes, different tumor cells, and fibroblasts were then plated separately in treated wells. Once the cells reached 100% confluence, they were irradiated by either a 980nm or 805nm wavelength laser. The goal was to determine the effects of laser irradiation and immunological stimulation on cancer cell migration in vitro, paying the way to understand the mechanism of LIT in treating metastatic tumors in cancer patients.

  12. Automated time-lapse microscopy and high-resolution tracking of cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Fotos, Joseph S.; Vivek, Patel P.; Karin, Norm J.; Temburni, Murali; Koh, John T.; Galileo, Deni S.

    2006-08-09

    The study of cell motility is greatly enhanced by using a fully-automated high-throughput time-lapse microscopy system that is capable of collecting and analyzing data (1) from closely-spaced time points (seconds to minutes), (2) over long periods (hours to days), (3) from multiple areas of interest, (4) under several different experimental conditions simultaneously. Time-lapse video images collected under phase contrast and fluorescent illumination were analyzed using parameters of migration velocity, total accumulated distance (path length), and directionality for individual cells or for averaged cell populations. Quantitation of ''scratch'' or ''wound healing'' assays revealed unique motility dynamics of drug-treated and adhesion molecule-transfected cells with high resolution and, thus, is a vast distinct improvement of current methods. Several fluorescent vital labeling methods commonly used for end-point analyses, including GFP expression, were evaluated and most were useful for time-lapse studies under specific conditions. For example, fluorescently-labeled tumor cells were seeded onto cell monolayers expressing ectopic adhesion molecules displayed altered migration velocities compared to tumor cells plated directly onto culture dishes. The techniques described here revealed cell motility behavior not discernable by previously-used methods. We propose that quantitative time-lapse video analysis will foster the creation new cell motility assays, and increase the resolution and accuracy of existing assays.

  13. Effects of Exendin-4 on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao; Li, Dandan; Shi, Chen; Xin, Ting; Yang, Junjie; Zhou, Ying; Hu, Shunyin; Tian, Feng; Wang, Jing; Chen, Yundai

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are regarded as an attractive source of therapeutic stem cells for myocardial infarction. However, their limited self-renewal capacity, low migration capacity and poor viability after transplantation hamper the clinical use of MSC; thus, a strategy to enhance the biological functions of MSC is required. Exendin-4 (Ex-4), a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, exerts cell-protective effects on many types of cells. However, little information is available regarding the influence of Ex-4 on MSC. In our study, MSC were isolated from bone marrow and cultured in vitro. After treatment with Ex-4, MSC displayed a higher proliferative capacity, increased C-X-C motif receptor 4 (CXCR4) expression and an enhanced migration response. Moreover, in H2O2-induced apoptosis, Ex-4 preserved mitochondrial function through scavenging ROS and balancing the expression of anti- and pro-apoptotic proteins, leading to the inhibition of the mitochondria-dependent cell death pathways and increased cell survival. Moreover, higher phospho-Akt (p-Akt) expression was observed after Ex-4 intervention. However, blockade of the PI3K/Akt pathway with inhibitors suppressed the above cytoprotective effects of Ex-4, suggesting that the PI3K/Akt pathway is partly responsible for Ex-4-mediated MSC growth, mobilization and survival. These findings provide an attractive method of maximizing the effectiveness of MSC-based therapies in clinical applications. PMID:26250571

  14. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-11-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils.

  15. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Andrew D; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils. PMID:26548801

  16. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils. PMID:26548801

  17. miR-145 suppresses breast cancer cell migration by targeting FSCN-1 and inhibiting epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong; Kang, Xing; Xia, Xuefeng; Wo, Like; Gu, Xidong; Hu, Yuanyuan; Xie, Xiaohong; Chang, Helena; Lou, Lihua; Shen, Xuning

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding RNAs, regulate fundamental cellular and developmental processes such as cell growth, apoptosis, migration, and invasion. In our present study, we investigated the inhibitory role of miR-145 on breast cancer cell migration as well as its underlying mechanism. Wound healing assay and transwell migration assay showed that ectopic expression of miR-145 significantly inhibited breast cancer cell migration. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that FSCN-1 was a putative target of miR-145. The expression of FSCN-1 varied among four different breast cancer cells, and inversely correlated with miR-145 levels. Moreover, miR-145 mimic transfection enhanced the expression of FSCN-1 in Bcap-37 and HCC-1937 cells. We also found that siRNA- mediated down-regulation of FSCN-1 inhibited cell motility in breast cancer cells. In addition, we found that up-regulation of miR-145 blocked EMT and decreased the expression of MMP-2/9 in breast cancer cells. These results reveal a new link between miR-145, FSCN-1 and EMT in the regulation of breast cancer migration. PMID:27508031

  18. miR-145 suppresses breast cancer cell migration by targeting FSCN-1 and inhibiting epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong; Kang, Xing; Xia, Xuefeng; Wo, Like; Gu, Xidong; Hu, Yuanyuan; Xie, Xiaohong; Chang, Helena; Lou, Lihua; Shen, Xuning

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding RNAs, regulate fundamental cellular and developmental processes such as cell growth, apoptosis, migration, and invasion. In our present study, we investigated the inhibitory role of miR-145 on breast cancer cell migration as well as its underlying mechanism. Wound healing assay and transwell migration assay showed that ectopic expression of miR-145 significantly inhibited breast cancer cell migration. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that FSCN-1 was a putative target of miR-145. The expression of FSCN-1 varied among four different breast cancer cells, and inversely correlated with miR-145 levels. Moreover, miR-145 mimic transfection enhanced the expression of FSCN-1 in Bcap-37 and HCC-1937 cells. We also found that siRNA- mediated down-regulation of FSCN-1 inhibited cell motility in breast cancer cells. In addition, we found that up-regulation of miR-145 blocked EMT and decreased the expression of MMP-2/9 in breast cancer cells. These results reveal a new link between miR-145, FSCN-1 and EMT in the regulation of breast cancer migration. PMID:27508031

  19. Vimentin contributes to human mammary epithelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Gilles, C; Polette, M; Zahm, J M; Tournier, J M; Volders, L; Foidart, J M; Birembaut, P

    1999-12-01

    Vimentin expression in human mammary epithelial MCF10A cells was examined as a function of their migratory status using an in vitro wound-healing model. Analysis of the trajectories of the cells and their migratory speeds by time lapse-video microscopy revealed that vimentin mRNA and protein expression were exclusively induced in cells at the wound's edge which were actively migrating towards the center of the lesion. Actin labeling showed the reorganization of actin filaments in cells at the wound's edge which confirmed the migratory phenotype of this cell subpopulation. Moreover, the vimentin protein disappeared when the cells became stationary after wound closure. Using cells transfected with the vimentin promoter controlling the green fluorescent protein gene, we also demonstrated the specific activation of the vimentin promoter in the migratory cells at the wound's edge. Transfection of the antisense vimentin cDNA into MCF10A cells clearly reduced both their ability to express vimentin and their migratory speed. Taken together, these observations demonstrate that vimentin is transiently associated with, and could be functionally involved in, the migratory status of human epithelial cells.

  20. Argininosuccinate synthetase 1 suppression and arginine restriction inhibit cell migration in gastric cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shan, Yan-Shen; Hsu, Hui-Ping; Lai, Ming-Derg; Yen, Meng-Chi; Chen, Wei-Ching; Fang, Jung-Hua; Weng, Tzu-Yang; Chen, Yi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer metastasis remains a major cause of cancer-related deaths. There is an urgent need to develop new therapeutic approaches targeting metastatic gastric cancer. Argininosuccinate synthetase 1 (ASS1) expression is increased in gastric cancer. We detected the protein expression of ASS1 in human gastric cancer cell lines (AGS, NCI-N87, and MKN45) and in murine gastric cancer cell lines (3I and 3IB2). We used vector-mediated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression to silence ASS1 expression in the MKN45 and 3IB2 cell lines, and analyzed the effects of this protein on cell migration and metastasis. We demonstrated that ASS1 silencing suppressed cell migration in the MKN45 and 3IB2 cell lines. ASS1 knockdown significantly reduced liver metastasis in mice after the intrasplenic implantation of 3IB2 cancer cell clones. To determine whether arginine restriction may represent a therapeutic approach to treat gastric cancer, the sensitivity of tumor cells to arginine depletion was determined in gastric cancer cells. Arginine depletion significantly inhibited cell migration in the gastric cancer cell line. The silencing of ASS1 expression in MKN45 and 3IB2 gastric cancer cells markedly decreased STAT3 protein expression. In conclusion, our results indicate that the ASS1 protein is required for cell migration in gastric cancer cell lines. PMID:25928182

  1. Anabolic androgens affect the competitive interactions in cell migration and adhesion between normal mouse urothelial cells and urothelial carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Ping; Hsieh, Teng-Fu; Chen, Chi-Cheng; Hung, Xiao-Fan; Yu, Ai-Lin; Chang, Chawnshang; Shyr, Chih-Rong

    2014-09-26

    The urothelium is constantly rebuilt by normal urothelial cells to regenerate damaged tissues caused by stimuli in urine. However, the urothelial carcinoma cells expand the territory by aberrant growth of tumor cells, which migrate and occupy the damaged tissues to spread outside and disrupt the normal cells and organized tissues and form a tumor. Therefore, the interaction between normal urothelial cells and urothelial carcinoma cells affect the initiation and progression of urothelial tumors if normal urothelial cells fail to migrate and adhere to the damages sites to regenerate the tissues. Here, comparing normal murine urothelial cells with murine urothelial carcinoma cells (MBT-2), we found that normal cells had less migration ability than carcinoma cells. And in our co-culture system we found that carcinoma cells had propensity migrating toward normal urothelial cells and carcinoma cells had more advantages to adhere than normal cells. To reverse this condition, we used anabolic androgen, dihyrotestosterone (DHT) to treat normal cells and found that DHT treatment increased the migration ability of normal urothelial cells toward carcinoma cells and the adhesion capacity in competition with carcinoma cells. This study provides the base of a novel therapeutic approach by using anabolic hormone-enforced normal urothelial cells to regenerate the damage urothelium and defend against the occupancy of carcinoma cells to thwart cancer development and recurrence.

  2. Collective migration and cell jamming in asthma, cancer and development.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Ah; Atia, Lior; Mitchel, Jennifer A; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Butler, James P

    2016-09-15

    Collective cellular migration within the epithelial layer impacts upon development, wound healing and cancer invasion, but remains poorly understood. Prevailing conceptual frameworks tend to focus on the isolated role of each particular underlying factor - taken one at a time or at most a few at a time - and thus might not be tailored to describe a cellular collective that embodies a wide palette of physical and molecular interactions that are both strong and complex. To bridge this gap, we shift the spotlight to the emerging concept of cell jamming, which points to only a small set of parameters that govern when a cellular collective might jam and rigidify like a solid, or instead unjam and flow like a fluid. As gateways to cellular migration, the unjamming transition (UJT) and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) share certain superficial similarities, but their congruence - or lack thereof - remains unclear. In this Commentary, we discuss aspects of cell jamming, its established role in human epithelial cell layers derived from the airways of non-asthmatic and asthmatic donors, and its speculative but emerging roles in development and cancer cell invasion. PMID:27550520

  3. Quantitative measurement of changes in adhesion force involving focal adhesion kinase during cell attachment, spread, and migration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Ching; Su, Hsiao-Wen; Lee, Chen-Chen; Tang, Ming-Jer; Su, Fong-Chin

    2005-04-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a critical protein for the regulation of integrin-mediated cellular functions and it can enhance cell motility in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) induction. We utilized optical trapping and cytodetachment techniques to measure the adhesion force between pico-Newton and nano-Newton (nN) for quantitatively investigating the effects of FAK on adhesion force during initial binding (5 s), beginning of spreading (30 min), spreadout (12 h), and migration (induced by HGF) in MDCK cells with overexpressed FAK (FAK-WT), FAK-related non-kinase (FRNK), as well as normal control cells. Optical tweezers was used to measure the initial binding force between a trapped cell and glass coverslide or between a trapped bead and a seeded cell. In cytodetachment, the commercial atomic force microscope probe with an appropriate spring constant was used as a cyto-detacher to evaluate the change of adhesion force between different FAK expression levels of cells in spreading, spreadout, and migrating status. The results demonstrated that FAK-WT significantly increased the adhesion forces as compared to FRNK cells throughout all the different stages of cell adhesion. For cells in HGF-induced migration, the adhesion force decreased to almost the same level (approximately 600 nN) regardless of FAK levels indicating that FAK facilitates cells to undergo migration by reducing the adhesion force. Our results suggest FAK plays a role of enhancing cell adhesive ability in the binding and spreading, but an appropriate level of adhesion force is required for HGF-induced cell migration.

  4. Probing Leader Cells in Endothelial Collective Migration by Plasma Lithography Geometric Confinement

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongliang; Jamilpour, Nima; Yao, Baoyin; Dean, Zachary S.; Riahi, Reza; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-01-01

    When blood vessels are injured, leader cells emerge in the endothelium to heal the wound and restore the vasculature integrity. The characteristics of leader cells during endothelial collective migration under diverse physiological conditions, however, are poorly understood. Here we investigate the regulation and function of endothelial leader cells by plasma lithography geometric confinement generated. Endothelial leader cells display an aggressive phenotype, connect to follower cells via peripheral actin cables and discontinuous adherens junctions, and lead migrating clusters near the leading edge. Time-lapse microscopy, immunostaining, and particle image velocimetry reveal that the density of leader cells and the speed of migrating clusters are tightly regulated in a wide range of geometric patterns. By challenging the cells with converging, diverging and competing patterns, we show that the density of leader cells correlates with the size and coherence of the migrating clusters. Collectively, our data provide evidence that leader cells control endothelial collective migration by regualting the migrating clusters. PMID:26936382

  5. Probing Leader Cells in Endothelial Collective Migration by Plasma Lithography Geometric Confinement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongliang; Jamilpour, Nima; Yao, Baoyin; Dean, Zachary S; Riahi, Reza; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-03-03

    When blood vessels are injured, leader cells emerge in the endothelium to heal the wound and restore the vasculature integrity. The characteristics of leader cells during endothelial collective migration under diverse physiological conditions, however, are poorly understood. Here we investigate the regulation and function of endothelial leader cells by plasma lithography geometric confinement generated. Endothelial leader cells display an aggressive phenotype, connect to follower cells via peripheral actin cables and discontinuous adherens junctions, and lead migrating clusters near the leading edge. Time-lapse microscopy, immunostaining, and particle image velocimetry reveal that the density of leader cells and the speed of migrating clusters are tightly regulated in a wide range of geometric patterns. By challenging the cells with converging, diverging and competing patterns, we show that the density of leader cells correlates with the size and coherence of the migrating clusters. Collectively, our data provide evidence that leader cells control endothelial collective migration by regualting the migrating clusters.

  6. Probing Leader Cells in Endothelial Collective Migration by Plasma Lithography Geometric Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongliang; Jamilpour, Nima; Yao, Baoyin; Dean, Zachary S.; Riahi, Reza; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-03-01

    When blood vessels are injured, leader cells emerge in the endothelium to heal the wound and restore the vasculature integrity. The characteristics of leader cells during endothelial collective migration under diverse physiological conditions, however, are poorly understood. Here we investigate the regulation and function of endothelial leader cells by plasma lithography geometric confinement generated. Endothelial leader cells display an aggressive phenotype, connect to follower cells via peripheral actin cables and discontinuous adherens junctions, and lead migrating clusters near the leading edge. Time-lapse microscopy, immunostaining, and particle image velocimetry reveal that the density of leader cells and the speed of migrating clusters are tightly regulated in a wide range of geometric patterns. By challenging the cells with converging, diverging and competing patterns, we show that the density of leader cells correlates with the size and coherence of the migrating clusters. Collectively, our data provide evidence that leader cells control endothelial collective migration by regualting the migrating clusters.

  7. Electrospinning of unidirectionally and orthogonally aligned thermoplastic polyurethane nanofibers: Fiber orientation and cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Hao-Yang; Salick, Max R.; Jing, Xin; Crone, Wendy C.; Peng, Xiang-Fang; Turng, Lih-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Unidirectionally and orthogonally aligned thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) nanofibers were electrospun using a custom-built electrospinning device. The unidirectionally aligned fibers were collected using two parallel copper plates, and the orthogonally aligned fibers were collected using two orthogonal sets of parallel copper plates with alternate negative connections. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and polyacrylic acid (PAA) were added to modify the polymer solution. It was found that both CNT and PAA were capable of increasing solution conductivity. The TPU/PAA fiber showed the highest degree of fiber orientation with more than 90% of the fibers having an orientation angle between −10° and 10° for unidirectionally aligned fibers, and for orthogonally aligned fibers, the orientation angle of 50% fibers located between −10° and 10° and 48% fibers located between 80° and 100°. Viability assessment of 3T3 fibroblasts cultured on TPU/PAA fibers suggested that the material was cytocompatible. The cells’ orientation and migration direction closely matched the fibers’ orientation. The cell migration velocity and distance were both enhanced with the guidance of fibers compared with cells cultured on random fibers and common tissue culture plastic. Controlling cell migration velocity and directionality may provide ways to influence differentiation and gene expression and systems that would allow further exploration of wound repair and metastatic cell behavior. PMID:24771704

  8. AEBP2 as a transcriptional activator and its role in cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hana; Ekram, Muhammad B; Bakshi, Arundhati; Kim, Joomyeong

    2015-02-01

    Aebp2 encodes an evolutionarily conserved zinc finger protein that has not been well studied so far, yet recent studies indicated that this gene is closely associated with the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2). Thus, the current study characterized the basic aspects of this gene, including alternative promoters and protein isoforms. According to the results, Aebp2 is controlled through three alternative promoters, deriving three different transcripts encoding the embryonic (32 kDa) and somatic (52 kDa) forms. Chromatin Immuno-Precipitation (ChIP) experiments revealed that AEBP2 binds to its own promoter as well as the promoters of Jarid2 and Snai2. While the embryonic form acts as a transcriptional repressor for Snai2, the somatic form functions as a transcriptional activator for Jarid2, Aebp2 and Snai2. Cell migration assays also demonstrated that the Aebp2 somatic form has an enhancing activity in cell migration. This is consistent with the functional association of Aebp2 with migratory neural crest cells. These results suggest that the two protein isoforms of AEBP2 may have opposite functions for the PcG target genes, and may play significant roles in cell migration during development.

  9. The migrations of Drosophila muscle founders and primordial germ cells are interdependent.

    PubMed

    Stepanik, Vincent; Dunipace, Leslie; Bae, Young-Kyung; Macabenta, Frank; Sun, Jingjing; Trisnadi, Nathanie; Stathopoulos, Angelike

    2016-09-01

    Caudal visceral mesoderm (CVM) cells migrate from posterior to anterior of the Drosophila embryo as two bilateral streams of cells to support the specification of longitudinal muscles along the midgut. To accomplish this long-distance migration, CVM cells receive input from their environment, but little is known about how this collective cell migration is regulated. In a screen we found that wunen mutants exhibit CVM cell migration defects. Wunens are lipid phosphate phosphatases known to regulate the directional migration of primordial germ cells (PGCs). PGC and CVM cell types interact while PGCs are en route to the somatic gonadal mesoderm, and previous studies have shown that CVM impacts PGC migration. In turn, we found here that CVM cells exhibit an affinity for PGCs, localizing to the position of PGCs whether mislocalized or trapped in the endoderm. In the absence of PGCs, CVM cells exhibit subtle changes, including more cohesive movement of the migrating collective, and an increased number of longitudinal muscles is found at anterior sections of the larval midgut. These data demonstrate that PGC and CVM cell migrations are interdependent and suggest that distinct migrating cell types can coordinately influence each other to promote effective cell migration during development. PMID:27578182

  10. To The Abercrombie Meeting and back again: a journey into the world of cell migration.

    PubMed

    Makowska, Katarzyna Anna

    2013-01-01

    The 7th Abercrombie Meeting took place in Oxford this past summer. It was organized by The Royal Microscopical Society with the support of The British Society for Cell Biology. Michael Abercrombie was a pioneer in the field of investigating cell behavior using time-lapse microscopy. The meeting was focused on "multi-dimensional cell migration in development and disease" and it brought together many of the world's leading researchers in the area, providing an opportunity to discuss the very latest advances and possible future developments in the field. The meeting sessions included Invasive Migration, Invasive Adhesions in Migrating Cells, Signaling in Migration, Immune Cell Migration, Migrations during Morphogenesis and Migration and Disease. As with all Abercrombie meetings, the conference delegates were treated to a staggering array of live cell imaging, in vivo imaging and images generated by the latest developments in microscopy.

  11. Critical Role of Spns2, a Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Transporter, in Lung Cancer Cell Survival and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Eric; Dasgupta, Somsankar; Jiang, Xue; Zhao, Xiaying; Zhu, Gu; He, Qian; Dinkins, Michael; Bieberich, Erhard; Wang, Guanghu

    2014-01-01

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) transporter Spns2 regulates myocardial precursor migration in zebrafish and lymphocyte trafficking in mice. However, its function in cancer has not been investigated. We show here that ectopic Spns2 expression induced apoptosis and its knockdown enhanced cell migration in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Metabolically, Spns2 expression increased the extracellular S1P level while its knockdown the intracellular. Pharmacological inhibition of S1P synthesis abolished the augmented cell migration mediated by Spns2 knockdown, indicating that intracellular S1P plays a key role in this process. Cell signaling studies indicated that Spns2 expression impaired GSK-3β and Stat3 mediated pro-survival pathways. Conversely, these pathways were activated by Spns2 knockdown, which explains the increased cell migration since they are also crucial for migration. Alterations of Spns2 were found to affect several enzymes involved in S1P metabolism, including sphingosine kinases, S1P phosphatases, and S1P lyase 1. Genetically, Spns2 mRNA level was found to be reduced in advanced lung cancer (LC) patients as quantified by using a small scale qPCR array. These data show for the first time that Spns2 plays key roles in regulating the cellular functions in NSCLC cells, and that its down-regulation is a potential risk factor for LC. PMID:25330231

  12. Time-lapse microscopy and image processing for stem cell research: modeling cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, Tomas; Althoff, Karin; Degerman, Johan; Olsson, Torsten; Thoreson, Ann-Catrin; Thorlin, Thorleif; Eriksson, Peter

    2003-05-01

    This paper presents hardware and software procedures for automated cell tracking and migration modeling. A time-lapse microscopy system equipped with a computer controllable motorized stage was developed. The performance of this stage was improved by incorporating software algorithms for stage motion displacement compensation and auto focus. The microscope is suitable for in-vitro stem cell studies and allows for multiple cell culture image sequence acquisition. This enables comparative studies concerning rate of cell splits, average cell motion velocity, cell motion as a function of cell sample density and many more. Several cell segmentation procedures are described as well as a cell tracking algorithm. Statistical methods for describing cell migration patterns are presented. In particular, the Hidden Markov Model (HMM) was investigated. Results indicate that if the cell motion can be described as a non-stationary stochastic process, then the HMM can adequately model aspects of its dynamic behavior.

  13. The Long Noncoding RNA MALAT-1 Is Highly Expressed in Ovarian Cancer and Induces Cell Growth and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanqing; Xu, Xiaying; Lv, Huabing; Wen, Qirong; Li, Juan; Tan, Linyu; Li, Jianqi; Sheng, Xiujie

    2016-01-01

    Background Metastasis associated in lung adenocarcinoma transcript-1 (MALAT-1) is overexpressed during cancer progression and promotes cell migration and invasion in many solid tumors. However, its role in ovarian cancer remains poorly understood. Methods Expressions of MALAT-1 were detected in 37 normal ovarian tissues and 45 ovarian cancer tissues by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Cell proliferation was observed by CCK-8 assay; Flow cytometry was used to measure cell cycle and apoptosis; Cell migration was detected by transwell migration and invasion assay. In order to evaluate the function of MALAT-1, shRNA combined with DNA microarray and Functional enrichment analysis were performed to determine the transcriptional effects of MALAT-1 silencing in OVCAR3 cells. RNA and protein expression were measured by qRT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Results We found that upregulation of MALAT-1 mRNA in ovarian cancer tissues and enhanced MALAT-1 expression was associated with FIGO stage. Knockdown of MALAT-1 expression in OVCAR3 cells inhibited cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, leading to G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Overexpressed MALAT-1 expression in SKOV3 cells promoted cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Downregulation of MALAT-1 resulted in significant change of gene expression (at least 2-fold) in 449 genes, which regulate proliferation, cell cycle, and adhesion. As a consequence of MALAT-1 knockdown, MMP13 protein expression decreased, while the expression of MMP19 and ADAMTS1 was increased. Conclusions The present study found that MALAT-1 is highly expressed in ovarian tumors. MALAT-1 promotes the growth and migration of ovarian cancer cells, suggesting that MALAT-1 may be an important contributor to ovarian cancer development. PMID:27227769

  14. Interplay of RhoA and mechanical forces in collective cell migration driven by leader cells.

    PubMed

    Reffay, M; Parrini, M C; Cochet-Escartin, O; Ladoux, B; Buguin, A; Coscoy, S; Amblard, F; Camonis, J; Silberzan, P

    2014-03-01

    The leading front of a collectively migrating epithelium often destabilizes into multicellular migration fingers where a cell initially similar to the others becomes a leader cell while its neighbours do not alter. The determinants of these leader cells include mechanical and biochemical cues, often under the control of small GTPases. However, an accurate dynamic cartography of both mechanical and biochemical activities remains to be established. Here, by mapping the mechanical traction forces exerted on the surface by MDCK migration fingers, we show that these structures are mechanical global entities with the leader cells exerting a large traction force. Moreover, the spatial distribution of RhoA differential activity at the basal plane strikingly mirrors this force cartography. We propose that RhoA controls the development of these fingers through mechanical cues: the leader cell drags the structure and the peripheral pluricellular acto-myosin cable prevents the initiation of new leader cells.

  15. Tre1, a G Protein-Coupled Receptor, Directs Transepithelial Migration of Drosophila Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    In most organisms, germ cells are formed distant from the somatic part of the gonad and thus have to migrate along and through a variety of tissues to reach the gonad. Transepithelial migration through the posterior midgut (PMG) is the first active step during Drosophila germ cell migration. Here we report the identification of a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), Tre1, that is essential for this migration step. Maternal tre1 RNA is localized to germ cells, and tre1 is required cell autonomously in germ cells. In tre1 mutant embryos, most germ cells do not exit the PMG. The few germ cells that do leave the midgut early migrate normally to the gonad, suggesting that this gene is specifically required for transepithelial migration and that mutant germ cells are still able to recognize other guidance cues. Additionally, inhibiting small Rho GTPases in germ cells affects transepithelial migration, suggesting that Tre1 signals through Rho1. We propose that Tre1 acts in a manner similar to chemokine receptors required during transepithelial migration of leukocytes, implying an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of transepithelial migration. Recently, the chemokine receptor CXCR4 was shown to direct migration in vertebrate germ cells. Thus, germ cells may more generally use GPCR signaling to navigate the embryo toward their target. PMID:14691551

  16. Glioma migration: clues from the biology of neural progenitor cells and embryonic CNS cell migration.

    PubMed

    Dirks, P B

    2001-06-01

    Neural stem cells have recently come to the forefront in neurobiology because of the possibilities for CNS repair by transplantation. Further understanding of the biology of these cells is critical for making their use in CNS repair possible. It is likely that these discoveries will also have spin-offs for neuro-oncology as primary brain tumors may arise from a CNS progenitor cell. An understanding of the normal migratory ability of these cells is also likely to have a very important impact on the knowledge of brain tumor invasion.

  17. Notch1-Dll4 signalling and mechanical force regulate leader cell formation during collective cell migration.

    PubMed

    Riahi, Reza; Sun, Jian; Wang, Shue; Long, Min; Zhang, Donna D; Wong, Pak Kin

    2015-03-13

    At the onset of collective cell migration, a subset of cells within an initially homogenous population acquires a distinct 'leader' phenotype with characteristic morphology and motility. However, the factors driving the leader cell formation as well as the mechanisms regulating leader cell density during the migration process remain to be determined. Here we use single-cell gene expression analysis and computational modelling to show that the leader cell identity is dynamically regulated by Dll4 signalling through both Notch1 and cellular stress in a migrating epithelium. Time-lapse microscopy reveals that Dll4 is induced in leader cells after the creation of the cell-free region and leader cells are regulated via Notch1-Dll4 lateral inhibition. Furthermore, mechanical stress inhibits Dll4 expression and leader cell formation in the monolayer. Collectively, our findings suggest that a reduction of mechanical force near the boundary promotes Notch1-Dll4 signalling to dynamically regulate the density of leader cells during collective cell migration.

  18. Adipocyte differentiation influences the proliferation and migration of normal and tumoral breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Creydt, Virginia Pistone; Sacca, Paula Alejandra; Tesone, Amelia Julieta; Vidal, Luciano; Calvo, Juan Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Stromal tissue regulates the development and differentiation of breast epithelial cells, with adipocytes being the main stromal cell type. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of adipocyte differentiation on proliferation and migration, as well as to assess the activity of heparanase and metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), in normal (NMuMG) and tumoral (LM3) murine breast epithelial cells. NMuMG and LM3 cells were grown on irradiated 3T3-L1 cells (stromal support, SS) at various degrees of differentiation [preadipocytes (preA), poorly differentiated adipocytes (pDA) and mature adipocytes (MA)] and/or were incubated in the presence of conditioned medium (CM) derived from each of these three types of differentiated cells. Cells grown on a plastic support or in fresh medium served as the controls. Cell proliferation was measured with a commercial colorimetric kit, and the motility of the epithelial cells was evaluated by means of a wound-healing assay. Heparanase activity was assessed by quantifying heparin degradation, and the expression of MMP-9 was determined using Western blotting. The results indicate that cell proliferation was increased after 24 and 48 h in the NMuMG and LM3 cells grown on preA, pDA and MA SS. In the NMuMG cells cultured on SS in the presence of all three types of CM, proliferation was enhanced. LM3 cell migration was increased in the presence of all three types of CM and in cells grown on preA SS. Heparanase activity was increased in the NMuMG cells incubated with all three types of CM, and in the LM3 cells incubated with the CM from pDA and MA. Both the NMuMG and LM3 cell lines presented basal expression of MMP-9; however, a significant increase in MMP-9 expression was observed in the LM3 cells incubated with each of the three types of CM. In conclusion, adipocyte differentiation influences normal and tumoral breast epithelial cell proliferation and migration. Heparanase and MMP-9 appear to be involved in this regulation. The

  19. Retinoic acid regulates Schwann cell migration via NEDD9 induction by transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Latasa, Maria-Jesus; Jiménez-Lara, Ana María; Cosgaya, Jose Miguel

    2016-07-01

    Schwann cell migration is essential during the regenerative response to nerve injury, however, the factors that regulate this phenomenon are not yet clear. Here we describe that retinoic acid (RA), whose production and signaling activity are greatly enhanced during nerve regeneration, increases Schwann cell migration. This is accompanied by the up-regulation of NEDD9, a member of the CAS family of scaffold proteins previously implicated in migratory and invasive behavior in gliomas, melanomas and the neural crest cells from which Schwann cells derive. This RA-induced NEDD9 accumulation is due to augmented mRNA levels, as well as an increase of NEDD9 protein stability. Although all NEDD9 phospho-isoforms present in Schwann cells are induced by the retinoid, the hormone also changes its phosphorylation status, thus altering the ratio between the different isoforms. Silencing NEDD9 in Schwann cells had no effect on basal migratory ability, but completely abrogated RA-induced enhanced migration. Collectively, our results indicate that RA could be a major regulator of Schwann cell migration after nerve injury, thus offering a new insight into peripheral nerve repair. PMID:27085739

  20. A new technique for studying directional cell migration in a hydrogel-based three-dimensional matrix for tissue engineering model systems.

    PubMed

    Topman, Gil; Shoham, Naama; Sharabani-Yosef, Orna; Lin, Feng-Huei; Gefen, Amit

    2013-08-01

    Cell migration has a key role in biological processes, e.g. malignancy, wound healing, immune response and morphogenesis. Studying migration and factors that influence it is beneficial, e.g. for developing drugs to suppress metastasis, heal wounds faster or enhance the response to infection. Though the majority of the literature describes two-dimensional (2D) migration studies in culture dishes, a more realistic approach is to study migration in three-dimensional (3D) constructs. However, simple-to-implement, straight-forward standardized quantitative techniques for analysis of migration rates of cell colonies in 3D are still required in the field. Here, we describe a new model system for quantifying directional migration of colonies in a hyaluronic acid (oxi-HA) and adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) hydrogel-based 3D matrix. We further demonstrate that our previously reported image processing technique for measuring migration in 2D (Topman et al., 2011, 2012) is extendable for analyzing the rates of migration of cells that directionally migrate in the hydrogel and are fluorescently stained with a 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) nuclear stain. Together, the present experimental setup and image processing algorithm provide a standard test bench for measuring migration rates in a fully automated, robust assay which is useful for high-throughput screening in large-scale drug evaluations, where effects on migration in a 3D matrix are sought. PMID:23896652

  1. Neurotransplantation of magnetically labeled oligodendrocyte progenitors: Magnetic resonance tracking of cell migration and myelination

    PubMed Central

    Bulte, J. W. M.; Zhang, S.-C.; van Gelderen, P.; Herynek, V.; Jordan, E. K.; Duncan, I. D.; Frank, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Demyelination is a common pathological finding in human neurological diseases and frequently persists as a result of failure of endogenous repair. Transplanted oligodendrocytes and their precursor cells can (re)myelinate axons, raising the possibility of therapeutic intervention. The migratory capacity of transplanted cells is of key importance in determining the extent of (re)myelination and can, at present, be evaluated only by using invasive and irreversible procedures. We have exploited the transferrin receptor as an efficient intracellular delivery device for magnetic nanoparticles, and transplanted tagged oligodendrocyte progenitor cells into the spinal cord of myelin-deficient rats. Cell migration could be easily detected by using three-dimensional magnetic resonance microscopy, with a close correlation between the areas of contrast enhancement and the achieved extent of myelination. The present results demonstrate that magnetic resonance tracking of transplanted oligodendrocyte progenitors is feasible; this technique has the potential to be easily extended to other neurotransplantation studies involving different precursor cell types. PMID:10611372

  2. Early Passage Dependence of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Mechanics Influences Cellular Invasion and Migration.

    PubMed

    Spagnol, Stephen T; Lin, Wei-Chun; Booth, Elizabeth A; Ladoux, Benoit; Lazarus, Hillard M; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2016-07-01

    The cellular structures and mechanical properties of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) vary significantly during culture and with differentiation. Previously, studies to measure mechanics have provided divergent results using different quantitative parameters and mechanical models of deformation. Here, we examine hMSCs prepared for clinical use and subject them to mechanical testing conducive to the relevant deformability associated with clinical injection procedures. Micropipette aspiration of hMSCs shows deformation as a viscoelastic fluid, with little variation from cell to cell within a population. After two passages, hMSCs deform as viscoelastic solids. Further, for clinical applicability during stem cell migration in vivo, we investigated the ability of hMSCs to invade into micropillar arrays of increasing confinement from 12 to 8 μm spacing between adjacent micropillars. We find that hMSC samples with reduced deformability and cells that are more solid-like with passage are more easily able to enter the micropillar arrays. Increased cell fluidity is an advantage for injection procedures and optimization of cell selection based on mechanical properties may enhance efficacy of injected hMSC populations. However, the ability to invade and migrate within tight interstitial spaces appears to be increased with a more solidified cytoskeleton, likely from increased force generation and contractility. Thus, there may be a balance between optimal injection survival and in situ tissue invasion.

  3. MicroRNA-383 expression regulates proliferation, migration, invasion, and apoptosis in human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dawei; Ma, Pengju; Gao, Guojun; Gui, Yongkun; Niu, Xiaolu; Jin, Baozhe

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate microRNA-383 (miR-383) expression level in glioma cells and its influences on proliferation, migration, invasion, apoptosis, and cell cycle in glioma cells. miR-383 expression levels were determined by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Thirty BALB/c-nu mice were randomly assigned into three groups: U87-miR-383 group, vector-control group, and blank group. Tumorigenicity experiment was conducted to confirm the function of miR-383. U251 and U87 glioma cells were divided into three groups: non-transfected control cells (NT group), glioma cells transfected with miR-383 (miR-383 group), and glioma cells transfected with negative sequence (NC group). Transfection efficiency was measured by qRT-PCR. Cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay was used to detect cell proliferation. Cell migration and invasion were examined by utilizing a Transwell chamber. Cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. The qRT-PCR results revealed that miR-383 expression was down-regulated in human glioma cells, and was negatively related to the pathological grading of glioma. The rates of tumor growth in vector-control group and blank group were significantly faster than that in U87-miR-383 group, and the average tumor volume and weight in vector-control group and blank group were increased as compared with U87-miR-383 group. Additionally, miR-383 levels in miR-383 group were higher than those in NT group and NC group. CCK-8 assay indicated lower cell viability in miR-383 group as compared with NT group and NC group. Flow cytometry implied that the percentages of cells in miR-383 group reduced, while the cell apoptosis rate enhanced compared with NT group and NC group. In conclusion, our findings suggest that miR-383 expression is down-regulated in glioma cells, inhibiting cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, affecting the cell cycle, and inducing cell apoptosis.

  4. MicroRNA-383 expression regulates proliferation, migration, invasion, and apoptosis in human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dawei; Ma, Pengju; Gao, Guojun; Gui, Yongkun; Niu, Xiaolu; Jin, Baozhe

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate microRNA-383 (miR-383) expression level in glioma cells and its influences on proliferation, migration, invasion, apoptosis, and cell cycle in glioma cells. miR-383 expression levels were determined by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Thirty BALB/c-nu mice were randomly assigned into three groups: U87-miR-383 group, vector-control group, and blank group. Tumorigenicity experiment was conducted to confirm the function of miR-383. U251 and U87 glioma cells were divided into three groups: non-transfected control cells (NT group), glioma cells transfected with miR-383 (miR-383 group), and glioma cells transfected with negative sequence (NC group). Transfection efficiency was measured by qRT-PCR. Cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay was used to detect cell proliferation. Cell migration and invasion were examined by utilizing a Transwell chamber. Cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. The qRT-PCR results revealed that miR-383 expression was down-regulated in human glioma cells, and was negatively related to the pathological grading of glioma. The rates of tumor growth in vector-control group and blank group were significantly faster than that in U87-miR-383 group, and the average tumor volume and weight in vector-control group and blank group were increased as compared with U87-miR-383 group. Additionally, miR-383 levels in miR-383 group were higher than those in NT group and NC group. CCK-8 assay indicated lower cell viability in miR-383 group as compared with NT group and NC group. Flow cytometry implied that the percentages of cells in miR-383 group reduced, while the cell apoptosis rate enhanced compared with NT group and NC group. In conclusion, our findings suggest that miR-383 expression is down-regulated in glioma cells, inhibiting cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, affecting the cell cycle, and inducing cell apoptosis. PMID:25936342

  5. Migration of Langerhans cells and gammadelta dendritic cells from UV-B-irradiated sheep skin.

    PubMed

    Dandie, G W; Clydesdale, G J; Radcliff, F J; Muller, H K

    2001-02-01

    Depletion of dendritic cells from UV-B-irradiated sheep skin was investigated by monitoring migration of these cells towards regional lymph nodes. By creating and cannulating pseudoafferent lymphatic vessels draining a defined region of skin, migrating cells were collected and enumerated throughout the response to UV-B irradiation. In the present study, the effects of exposing sheep flank skin to UV-B radiation clearly demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in the migration of Langerhans cells (LC) from the UV-B-exposed area to the draining lymph node. The range of UV-B doses assessed in this study included 2.7 kJ/m2, a suberythemal dose; 8 kJ/m2, 1 minimal erythemal dose (MED); 20.1 kJ/m2; 40.2 kJ/m2; and 80.4 kJ/m2, 10 MED. The LC were the cells most sensitive to UV-B treatment, with exposure to 8 kJ/m2 or greater reproducibly causing a significant increase in migration. Migration of gammadelta+ dendritic cells (gammadelta+ DC) from irradiated skin was also triggered by exposure to UV-B radiation, but dose dependency was not evident within the range of UV-B doses examined. This, in conjunction with the lack of any consistent correlation between either the timing or magnitude of migration peaks of these two cell types, suggests that different mechanisms govern the egress of LC and gammadelta+ DC from the skin. It is concluded that the depression of normal immune function in the skin after exposure to erythemal doses of UV-B radiation is associated with changes in the migration patterns of epidermal dendritic cells to local lymph nodes. PMID:11168622

  6. Angiopoietin-1 promotes endothelial cell proliferation and migration through AP-1-dependent autocrine production of interleukin-8.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Malak, Nelly A; Srikant, Coimbatore B; Kristof, Arnold S; Magder, Sheldon A; Di Battista, John A; Hussain, Sabah N A

    2008-04-15

    Angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1), ligand for the endothelial cell-specific Tie-2 receptors, promotes migration and proliferation of endothelial cells, however, whether these effects are promoted through the release of a secondary mediator remains unclear. In this study, we assessed whether Ang-1 promotes endothelial cell migration and proliferation through the release of interleukin-8 (IL-8). Ang-1 elicited in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) a dose- and time-dependent increase in IL-8 production as a result of induction of mRNA and enhanced mRNA stability of IL-8 transcripts. IL-8 production is also elevated in HUVECs transduced with retroviruses expressing Ang-1. Neutralization of IL-8 in these cells with a specific antibody significantly attenuated proliferation and migration and induced caspase-3 activation. Exposure to Ang-1 triggered a significant increase in DNA binding of activator protein-1 (AP-1) to a relatively short fragment of IL-8 promoter. Upstream from the AP-1 complex, up-regulation of IL-8 transcription by Ang-1 was mediated through the Erk1/2, SAPK/JNK, and PI-3 kinase pathways, which triggered c-Jun phosphorylation on Ser63 and Ser73. These results suggest that promotion of endothelial migration and proliferation by Ang-1 is mediated, in part, through the production of IL-8, which acts in an autocrine fashion to suppress apoptosis and facilitate cell proliferation and migration.

  7. THE ACTIN BUNDLING PROTEIN PALLADIN IS AN AKT1-SPECIFIC SUBSTRATE THAT REGULATES BREAST CANCER CELL MIGRATION

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Y. Rebecca; Toker, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Summary The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-K) signaling pathway is frequently deregulated in cancer. Downstream of PI 3-K, Akt1 and Akt2 have opposing roles in breast cancer invasive migration leading to metastatic dissemination. Here we identify palladin, an actin-associated protein, as an Akt1-specific substrate that modulates breast cancer cell invasive migration. Akt1, but not Akt2, phosphorylates palladin at S507 in a domain that is critical for F-actin bundling. Downregulation of palladin enhances migration and invasion of breast cancer cells and induces abnormal branching morphogenesis in 3D cultures. Palladin phosphorylation at S507 is required for Akt1-mediated inhibition of breast cancer cell migration and also for F-actin bundling leading to the maintenance of an organized actin cytoskeleton. These findings identify palladin as an Akt1-specific substrate that regulates cell motility and provide a molecular mechanism that accounts for the functional distinction between Akt isoforms in breast cancer cell signaling to cell migration. PMID:20471940

  8. Actin-Based Feedback Circuits in Cell Migration and Endocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinxin

    In this thesis, we study the switch and pulse functions of actin during two important cellular processes, cell migration and endocytosis. Actin is an abundant protein that can polymerize to form a dendritic network. The actin network can exert force to push or bend the cell membrane. During cell migration, the actin network behaves like a switch, assembling mostly at one end or at the other end. The end with the majority of the actin network is the leading edge, following which the cell can persistently move in the same direction. The other end, with the minority of the actin network, is the trailing edge, which is dragged by the cell as it moves forward. When subjected to large fluctuations or external stimuli, the leading edge and the trailing edge can interchange and change the direction of motion, like a motion switch. Our model of the actin network in a cell reveals that mechanical force is crucial for forming the motion switch. We find a transition from single state symmetric behavior to switch behavior, when tuning parameters such as the force. The model is studied by both stochastic simulations, and a set of rate equations that are consistent with the simulations. Endocytosis is a process by which cells engulf extracellular substances and recycle the cell membrane. In yeast cells, the actin network is transiently needed to overcome the pressure difference across the cell membrane caused by turgor pressure. The actin network behaves like a pulse, which assembles and then disassembles within about 30 seconds. Using a stochastic model, we reproduce the pulse behaviors of the actin network and one of its regulatory proteins, Las17. The model matches green fluorescence protein (GFP) experiments for wild-type cells. The model also predicts some phenotypes that modify or diminish the pulse behavior. The phenotypes are verified with both experiments performed at Washington University and with other groups' experiments. We find that several feedback mechanisms are

  9. Selective migration of neuralized embryonic stem cells to stem cell factor and media conditioned by glioma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Serfozo, Peter; Schlarman, Maggie S; Pierret, Chris; Maria, Bernard L; Kirk, Mark D

    2006-01-01

    Background Pluripotent mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells can be induced in vitro to become neural progenitors. Upon transplantation, neural progenitors migrate toward areas of damage and inflammation in the CNS. We tested whether undifferentiated and neuralized mouse ES cells migrate toward media conditioned by glioma cell lines (C6, U87 & N1321) or Stem Cell Factor (SCF). Results Cell migration assays revealed selective migration by neuralized ES cells to conditioned media as well as to synthetic SCF. Migration of undifferentiated ES cells was extensive, but not significantly different from that of controls (Unconditioned Medium). RT-PCR analysis revealed that all the three tumor cell lines tested synthesized SCF and that both undifferentiated and neuralized ES cells expressed c-kit, the receptor for SCF. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that undifferentiated ES cells are highly mobile and that neural progenitors derived from ES cells are selectively attracted toward factors produced by gliomas. Given that the glioma cell lines synthesize SCF, SCF may be one of several factors that contribute to the selective migration observed. PMID:16436212

  10. Migration of bone marrow progenitor cells in the adult brain of rats and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Dennie, Donnahue; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Strayer, David S

    2016-04-26

    transduced by SV40 vectors migrating to the hippocampus, and these cells were seen at earlier time points in the DG. We show that the cell membrane chemokine receptor, CCR5, and its ligands, enhance CNS inflammation and seizure activity in a model of neuronal excitotoxicity. SV40-based gene delivery of RNAi targeting CCR5 to the BM results in downregulating CCR5 in circulating cells, suggesting that CCR5 plays an important role in regulating traffic of BM-derived cells into the CNS, both in the basal state and in response to injury. Furthermore, reduction in CCR5 expression in circulating cells provides profound neuroprotection from excitotoxic neuronal injury, reduces neuroinflammation, and increases neuronal regeneration following this type of insult. These results suggest that BM-derived, transgene-expressing, cells can migrate to the brain and that they become neurons, at least in part, by differentiating into neuron precursors and subsequently developing into mature neurons. PMID:27114746

  11. Migration of bone marrow progenitor cells in the adult brain of rats and rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Dennie, Donnahue; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Strayer, David S

    2016-01-01

    transduced by SV40 vectors migrating to the hippocampus, and these cells were seen at earlier time points in the DG. We show that the cell membrane chemokine receptor, CCR5, and its ligands, enhance CNS inflammation and seizure activity in a model of neuronal excitotoxicity. SV40-based gene delivery of RNAi targeting CCR5 to the BM results in downregulating CCR5 in circulating cells, suggesting that CCR5 plays an important role in regulating traffic of BM-derived cells into the CNS, both in the basal state and in response to injury. Furthermore, reduction in CCR5 expression in circulating cells provides profound neuroprotection from excitotoxic neuronal injury, reduces neuroinflammation, and increases neuronal regeneration following this type of insult. These results suggest that BM-derived, transgene-expressing, cells can migrate to the brain and that they become neurons, at least in part, by differentiating into neuron precursors and subsequently developing into mature neurons. PMID:27114746

  12. Role of medullary progenitor cells in epithelial cell migration and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong; Chen, Zhiyong; Zhang, Yuning; Park, Chanyoung; Al-Omari, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed at characterizing medullary interstitial progenitor cells and to examine their capacity to induce tubular epithelial cell migration and proliferation. We have isolated a progenitor cell side population from a primary medullary interstitial cell line. We show that the medullary progenitor cells (MPCs) express CD24, CD44, CXCR7, CXCR4, nestin, and PAX7. MPCs are CD34 negative, which indicates that they are not bone marrow-derived stem cells. MPCs survive >50 passages, and when grown in epithelial differentiation medium develop phenotypic characteristics of epithelial cells. Inner medulla collecting duct (IMCD3) cells treated with conditioned medium from MPCs show significantly accelerated cell proliferation and migration. Conditioned medium from PGE2-treated MPCs induce tubule formation in IMCD3 cells grown in 3D Matrigel. Moreover, most of the MPCs express the pericyte marker PDGFR-b. Our study shows that the medullary interstitium harbors a side population of progenitor cells that can differentiate to epithelial cells and can stimulate tubular epithelial cell migration and proliferation. The findings of this study suggest that medullary pericyte/progenitor cells may play a critical role in collecting duct cell injury repair. PMID:24808539

  13. Lamellipodin promotes invasive 3D cancer cell migration via regulated interactions with Ena/VASP and SCAR/WAVE

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Guillaume; Perera, Upamali; Gillett, Cheryl; Naba, Alexandra; Law, Ah-Lai; Sharma, Ved P.; Wang, Jian; Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Balsamo, Michele; Mosis, Fuad; De Piano, Mario; Monypenny, James; Woodman, Natalie; McConnell, Russell E.; Mouneimne, Ghassan; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke; Cao, Yihai; Condeelis, John; Hynes, Richard O.; Gertler, Frank B.; Krause, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Cancer invasion is a hallmark of metastasis. The mesenchymal mode of cancer cell invasion is mediated by elongated membrane protrusions driven by the assembly of branched F-actin networks. How deregulation of actin regulators promotes cancer cell invasion is still enigmatic. We report that increased expression and membrane localization of the actin regulator Lamellipodin correlates with reduced metastasis-free survival and poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. In agreement we find that Lamellipodin depletion reduced lung metastasis in an orthotopic mouse breast cancer model. Invasive 3D cancer cell migration as well as invadopodia formation, and matrix degradation were impaired upon Lamellipodin depletion. Mechanistically, we show that Lamellipodin promotes invasive 3D cancer cell migration via both actin-elongating Ena/VASP proteins and the Scar/WAVE complex, which stimulates actin branching. In contrast, Lamellipodin interaction with Scar/WAVE but not Ena/VASP is required for random 2D cell migration. We identify a phosphorylation-dependent mechanism that regulates selective recruitment of these effectors to Lamellipodin: Abl-mediated Lamellipodin phosphorylation promotes its association with both Scar/WAVE and Ena/VASP, while Src-dependent phosphorylation enhances binding to Scar/WAVE but not Ena/VASP. Through these selective, regulated interactions Lamellipodin mediates directional sensing of EGF gradients and invasive 3D migration of breast cancer cells. Our findings imply that increased Lamellipodin levels enhance Ena/VASP and Scar/WAVE activities at the plasma membrane to promote 3D invasion and metastasis. PMID:26996666

  14. Dual inhibition of histone deacetylases and phosphoinositide 3-kinases: effects on Burkitt lymphoma cell growth and migration.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Carolina dos Santos; de-Freitas-Junior, Julio Cesar Madureira; Morgado-Díaz, Jose Andres; Ridley, Anne J; Klumb, Claudete Esteves

    2016-04-01

    Burkitt lymphoma is a highly aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma that is characterized by MYC deregulation. Recently, the PI3K pathway has emerged as a cooperative prosurvival mechanism in Burkitt lymphoma. Despite the highly successful results of treatment that use high-dose chemotherapy regimens in pediatric Burkitt lymphoma patients, the survival rate of pediatric patients with progressive or recurrent disease is low. PI3Ks are also known to regulate cell migration, and abnormal cell migration may contribute to cancer progression and dissemination in Burkitt lymphoma. Little is known about Burkitt lymphoma cell migration, but the cooperation between MYC and PI3K in Burkitt lymphoma pathogenesis suggests that a drug combination could be used to target the different steps involved in Burkitt lymphoma cell dissemination and disease progression. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid combined with the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 on Burkitt lymphoma cell growth and migration. The combination enhanced the cell growth inhibition and cell-cycle arrest induced by the PI3K inhibitor or histone deacetylase inhibitor individually. Moreover, histone deacetylase inhibitor/PI3K inhibitor cotreatment suppressed Burkitt lymphoma cell migration and decreased cell polarization, Akt and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and leads to RhoB induction. In summary, the histone deacetylase inhibitor/PI3Ki combination inhibits cell proliferation and migration via alterations in PI3K signaling and histone deacetylase activity, which is involved in the acetylation of α-tubulin and the regulation of RhoB expression. PMID:26561567

  15. Cadherin-11 mediates contact inhibition of locomotion during Xenopus neural crest cell migration.

    PubMed

    Becker, Sarah F S; Mayor, Roberto; Kashef, Jubin

    2013-01-01

    Collective cell migration is an essential feature both in embryonic development and cancer progression. The molecular mechanisms of these coordinated directional cell movements still need to be elucidated. The migration of cranial neural crest (CNC) cells during embryogenesis is an excellent model for collective cell migration in vivo. These highly motile and multipotent cells migrate directionally on defined routes throughout the embryo. Interestingly, local cell-cell interactions seem to be the key force for directionality. CNC cells can change their migration direction by a repulsive cell response called contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL). Cell protrusions collapse upon homotypic cell-cell contact and internal repolarization leads to formation of new protrusions toward cell-free regions. Wnt/PCP signaling was shown to mediate activation of small RhoGTPase RhoA and inhibition of cell protrusions at the contact side. However, the mechanism how a cell recognizes the contact is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that Xenopus cadherin-11 (Xcad-11) mediated cell-cell adhesion is necessary in CIL for directional and collective migration of CNC cells. Reduction of Xcad-11 adhesive function resulted in higher invasiveness of CNC due to loss of CIL. Additionally, transplantation analyses revealed that CNC migratory behaviour in vivo is non-directional and incomplete when Xcad-11 adhesive function is impaired. Blocking Wnt/PCP signaling led to similar results underlining the importance of Xcad-11 in the mechanism of CIL and directional migration of CNC.

  16. Iodine Migration and its Effect on Hysteresis in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng; Tscheuschner, Steffen; Paulus, Fabian; Hopkinson, Paul E; Kießling, Johannes; Köhler, Anna; Vaynzof, Yana; Huettner, Sven

    2016-03-23

    The migration and accumulation of iodide ions create a modulation of the respective interfacial barriers causing the hysteresis in solar cells based on methylammonium lead iodide perovskites. Iodide ions are identified as the migrating species by measuring temperature dependent current-transients and photoelectron spectroscopy. The involved changes in the built-in potential due to ion migration are directly measured by electroabsorption spectroscopy.

  17. NME2 reduces proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells to limit metastasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-fei; Yang, Aijun; Liu, Wei; Wang, Chenyu; Wang, Min; Zhang, Lihan; Wang, Dongcang; Dong, Jing-fei; Li, Min

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies and has a high rate of metastasis. We hypothesize that NME2 (Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinase 2), which has previously been considered as an anti-metastatic gene, plays a role in the invasiveness of gastric cancer cells. Using a tissue chip technology and immunohistochemistry, we demonstrated that NME2 expression was associated with levels of differentiation of gastric cancer cells and their metastasis into the lymph nodes. When the NME2 gene product was over-expressed by ;in vitro stable transfection, cells from BGC823 and MKN45 gastric cancer cell lines had reduced rates of proliferation, migration, and invasion through the collagen matrix, suggesting an inhibitory activity of NME2 in the propagation and invasion of gastric cancer. NME2 could, therefore, severe as a risk marker for gastric cancer invasiveness and a potential new target for gene therapy to enhance or induce NME2 expression. PMID:25700270

  18. Spatial proteomic and phospho-proteomic organization in three prototypical cell migration modes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tight spatio-temporal signaling of cytoskeletal and adhesion dynamics is required for localized membrane protrusion that drives directed cell migration. Different ensembles of proteins are therefore likely to get recruited and phosphorylated in membrane protrusions in response to specific cues. Results Here, we use an assay that allows to biochemically purify extending protrusions of cells migrating in response to three prototypical receptors: integrins, recepor tyrosine kinases and G-coupled protein receptors. Using quantitative proteomics and phospho-proteomics approaches, we provide evidence for the existence of cue-specific, spatially distinct protein networks in the different cell migration modes. Conclusions The integrated analysis of the large-scale experimental data with protein information from databases allows us to understand some emergent properties of spatial regulation of signaling during cell migration. This provides the cell migration community with a large-scale view of the distribution of proteins and phospho-proteins regulating directed cell migration. PMID:24987309

  19. Polydatin induces bone marrow stromal cells migration by activation of ERK1/2.

    PubMed

    Chen, ZhenQiu; Wei, QiuShi; Hong, GuoJu; Chen, Da; Liang, Jiang; He, Wei; Chen, Mei Hui

    2016-08-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have proven to be useful for the treatment of numerous human diseases. However, the reparative ability of BMSCs is limited by their poor migration. Polydatin, widely used in traditional Chinese remedies, has proven to exert protective effects to BMSCs. However, little is known about its role in BMSCs migration. In this study, we studied the effects of polydatin on rat BMSCs migration using the scratch wound healing and transwell migration assays. Our results showed polydatin could promote BMSCs migration. Further experiments showed activation of ERK 1/2, but not JNK, was required for polydatin-induced BMSCs migration, suggesting that polydatin may promote BMSCs migration via the ERK 1/2 signaling pathways. Taken together, our results indicate that polydatin might be beneficial for stem cell replacement therapy by improving BMSCs migration.

  20. Necrotic cells influence migration and invasion of glioblastoma via NF-κB/AP-1-mediated IL-8 regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, So-Hee; Park, Hyunju; Ahn, Young-Ho; Kim, Sewha; Cho, Min-Sun; Kang, Jihee Lee; Choi, Youn-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary intracranial tumor in adults and has poor prognosis. Diffuse infiltration into normal brain parenchyma, rapid growth, and the presence of necrosis are remarkable hallmarks of GBM. However, the effect of necrotic cells on GBM growth and metastasis is poorly understood at present. In this study, we examined the biological significance of necrotic tissues by exploring the molecular mechanisms underlying the signaling network between necrotic tissues and GBM cells. The migration and invasion of the GBM cell line CRT-MG was significantly enhanced by treatment with necrotic cells, as shown by assays for scratch wound healing and spheroid invasion. Incubation with necrotic cells induced IL-8 secretion in CRT-MG cells in a dose-dependent manner. In human GBM tissues, IL-8 positive cells were mainly distributed in the perinecrotic region, as seen in immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analysis. Necrotic cells induced NF-κB and AP-1 activation and their binding to the IL-8 promoter, leading to enhanced IL-8 production and secretion in GBM cells. Our data demonstrate that when GBM cells are exposed to and stimulated by necrotic cells, the migration and invasion of GBM cells are enhanced and facilitated via NF-κB/AP-1 mediated IL-8 upregulation. PMID:27076368

  1. MAPKAPK-2-mediated LIM-kinase activation is critical for VEGF-induced actin remodeling and cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Miho; Nishita, Michiru; Mishima, Toshiaki; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Mizuno, Kensaku

    2006-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) induces actin reorganization and migration of endothelial cells through a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. LIM-kinase 1 (LIMK1) induces actin remodeling by phosphorylating and inactivating cofilin, an actin-depolymerizing factor. In this study, we demonstrate that activation of LIMK1 by MAPKAPK-2 (MK2; a downstream kinase of p38 MAPK) represents a novel signaling pathway in VEGF-A-induced cell migration. VEGF-A induced LIMK1 activation and cofilin phosphorylation, and this was inhibited by the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580. Although p38 phosphorylated LIMK1 at Ser-310, it failed to activate LIMK1 directly; however, MK2 activated LIMK1 by phosphorylation at Ser-323. Expression of a Ser-323-non-phosphorylatable mutant of LIMK1 suppressed VEGF-A-induced stress fiber formation and cell migration; however, expression of a Ser-323-phosphorylation-mimic mutant enhanced these processes. Knockdown of MK2 by siRNA suppressed VEGF-A-induced LIMK1 activation, stress fiber formation, and cell migration. Expression of kinase-dead LIMK1 suppressed VEGF-A-induced tubule formation. These findings suggest that MK2-mediated LIMK1 phosphorylation/activation plays an essential role in VEGF-A-induced actin reorganization, migration, and tubule formation of endothelial cells. PMID:16456544

  2. Contact inhibition of locomotion probabilities drive solitary versus collective cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Ravi A.; Gopal, Smitha B.; Chen, Sophia; Chen, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    Contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL) is the process whereby cells collide, cease migrating in the direction of the collision, and repolarize their migration machinery away from the collision. Quantitative analysis of CIL has remained elusive because cell-to-cell collisions are infrequent in traditional cell culture. Moreover, whereas CIL predicts mutual cell repulsion and ‘scattering’ of cells, the same cells in vivo are observed to undergo CIL at some developmental times and collective cell migration at others. It remains unclear whether CIL is simply absent during collective cell migration, or if the two processes coexist and are perhaps even related. Here, we used micropatterned stripes of extracellular matrix to restrict cell migration to linear paths such that cells polarized in one of two directions and collisions between cells occurred frequently and consistently, permitting quantitative and unbiased analysis of CIL. Observing repolarization events in different contexts, including head-to-head collision, head-to-tail collision, collision with an inert barrier, or no collision, and describing polarization as a two-state transition indicated that CIL occurs probabilistically, and most strongly upon head-to-head collisions. In addition to strong CIL, we also observed ‘trains’ of cells moving collectively with high persistence that appeared to emerge from single cells. To reconcile these seemingly conflicting observations of CIL and collective cell migration, we constructed an agent-based model to simulate our experiments. Our model quantitatively predicted the emergence of collective migration, and demonstrated the sensitivity of such emergence to the probability of CIL. Thus CIL and collective migration can coexist, and in fact a shift in CIL probabilities may underlie transitions between solitary cell migration and collective cell migration. Taken together, our data demonstrate the emergence of persistently polarized, collective cell movement

  3. Potential role of CXCL9 induced by endothelial cells/CD133+ liver cancer cells co-culture system in tumor transendothelial migration

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Qiang; Xia, Yujia; Ding, Shuping; Lu, Panpan; Sun, Liang; Fan, Yuhui; Li, Xin; Wang, Ying; Tian, De-an; Liu, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Transendothelial migration is a pivotal step before the dissemination of tumor cells into the blood circulation. Related researches about the crosstalk between tumor cells and endothelial cells could contribute to understanding the mechanism of transendothelial migration. Cumulative studies showed that CD133 was an important marker for cancer stem cells. In our research, a co-culture system was developed to study the interaction between CD133+ liver cancer cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The results showed that the direct co-cultured supernatants promoted the migration and invasion of CD133+ liver cancer cells. It was further investigated that the expression level of chemokine CXCL9 was significantly elevated in the culture supernatants of direct co-culture system by activating the NF-kB, rather than in the indirect co-culture system or mono-culture system. High expression of CXCL9 in the direct co-cultured supernatants played a significant role in enhancing the migration and invasion of CD133+ liver cancer cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that chemokine CXCL9 may function as a potential target during the process of transendothelial migration. PMID:27738495

  4. Mammary collective cell migration involves transient loss of epithelial features and individual cell migration within the epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Ewald, Andrew J.; Huebner, Robert J.; Palsdottir, Hildur; Lee, Jessie K.; Perez, Melissa J.; Jorgens, Danielle M.; Tauscher, Andrew N.; Cheung, Kevin J.; Werb, Zena; Auer, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Normal mammary morphogenesis involves transitions between simple and multilayered epithelial organizations. We used electron microscopy and molecular markers to determine whether intercellular junctions and apico-basal polarity were maintained in the multilayered epithelium. We found that multilayered elongating ducts had polarized apical and basal tissue surfaces both in three-dimensional culture and in vivo. However, individual cells were only polarized on surfaces in contact with the lumen or extracellular matrix. The basolateral marker scribble and the apical marker atypical protein kinase C zeta localized to all interior cell membranes, whereas PAR3 displayed a cytoplasmic localization, suggesting that the apico-basal polarity was incomplete. Despite membrane localization of E-cadherin and β-catenin, we did not observe a defined zonula adherens connecting interior cells. Instead, interior cells were connected through desmosomes and exhibited complex interdigitating membrane protrusions. Single-cell labeling revealed that individual cells were both protrusive and migratory within the epithelial multilayer. Inhibition of Rho kinase (ROCK) further reduced intercellular adhesion on apical and lateral surfaces but did not disrupt basal tissue organization. Following morphogenesis, segregated membrane domains were re-established and junctional complexes re-formed. We observed similar epithelial organization during mammary morphogenesis in organotypic culture and in vivo. We conclude that mammary epithelial morphogenesis involves a reversible, spatially limited, reduction in polarity and intercellular junctions and active individualistic cell migration. Our data suggest that reductions in polarity and adhesion during breast cancer progression might reflect partial recapitulation of a normal developmental program. PMID:22344263

  5. miR-1 Inhibits Cell Growth, Migration, and Invasion by Targeting VEGFA in Osteosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Junjie; Guo, Qiaoge; Niu, Dongju; Liu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs and have been shown to play a crucial role in the osteosarcoma (OS) tumorigenesis and progression. VEGFA is a key regulator of angiogenesis and plays an important role in regulation of tumor metastasis. The objective of this study was to determine whether VEGFA was involved in miR-1-mediated suppression of proliferation, migration, and invasion of OS cells. The expression levels of miR-1 were significantly lower in OS tumor tissues than those in adjacent normal tissues and in SAOS-2 and U2OS cell lines compared to a normal osteoblast (NHOst) cell line. VEGFA was upregulated in OS tumor tissues and SAOS-2 and U2OS cell lines. The results of CCK-8 assay and transwell assay showed that miR-1 acted as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in U2OS cells. Dual luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that VEGFA was a direct and functional target gene of miR-1. miR-1 directly inhibits the protein expression of VEGFA via its 3′-UTR. Knockdown of VEGFA by siRNA inhibited proliferation, migration, and invasion of U2OS cells. Our study suggested the potential inhibitory function of miR-1 in OS cell proliferation, migration, and invasion via inhibiting VEGFA. PMID:27777493

  6. Cell crawling mediates collective cell migration to close undamaged epithelial gaps

    PubMed Central

    Anon, Ester; Serra-Picamal, Xavier; Hersen, Pascal; Gauthier, Nils C.; Sheetz, Michael P.; Trepat, Xavier; Ladoux, Benoît

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental biological processes such as morphogenesis and wound healing involve the closure of epithelial gaps. Epithelial gap closure is commonly attributed either to the purse-string contraction of an intercellular actomyosin cable or to active cell migration, but the relative contribution of these two mechanisms remains unknown. Here we present a model experiment to systematically study epithelial closure in the absence of cell injury. We developed a pillar stencil approach to create well-defined gaps in terms of size and shape within an epithelial cell monolayer. Upon pillar removal, cells actively respond to the newly accessible free space by extending lamellipodia and migrating into the gap. The decrease of gap area over time is strikingly linear and shows two different regimes depending on the size of the gap. In large gaps, closure is dominated by lamellipodium-mediated cell migration. By contrast, closure of gaps smaller than 20 μm was affected by cell density and progressed independently of Rac, myosin light chain kinase, and Rho kinase, suggesting a passive physical mechanism. By changing the shape of the gap, we observed that low-curvature areas favored the appearance of lamellipodia, promoting faster closure. Altogether, our results reveal that the closure of epithelial gaps in the absence of cell injury is governed by the collective migration of cells through the activation of lamellipodium protrusion. PMID:22711834

  7. Cell crawling mediates collective cell migration to close undamaged epithelial gaps.

    PubMed

    Anon, Ester; Serra-Picamal, Xavier; Hersen, Pascal; Gauthier, Nils C; Sheetz, Michael P; Trepat, Xavier; Ladoux, Benoît

    2012-07-01

    Fundamental biological processes such as morphogenesis and wound healing involve the closure of epithelial gaps. Epithelial gap closure is commonly attributed either to the purse-string contraction of an intercellular actomyosin cable or to active cell migration, but the relative contribution of these two mechanisms remains unknown. Here we present a model experiment to systematically study epithelial closure in the absence of cell injury. We developed a pillar stencil approach to create well-defined gaps in terms of size and shape within an epithelial cell monolayer. Upon pillar removal, cells actively respond to the newly accessible free space by extending lamellipodia and migrating into the gap. The decrease of gap area over time is strikingly linear and shows two different regimes depending on the size of the gap. In large gaps, closure is dominated by lamellipodium-mediated cell migration. By contrast, closure of gaps smaller than 20 μm was affected by cell density and progressed independently of Rac, myosin light chain kinase, and Rho kinase, suggesting a passive physical mechanism. By changing the shape of the gap, we observed that low-curvature areas favored the appearance of lamellipodia, promoting faster closure. Altogether, our results reveal that the closure of epithelial gaps in the absence of cell injury is governed by the collective migration of cells through the activation of lamellipodium protrusion. PMID:22711834

  8. A Macroscopic Mathematical Model for Cell Migration Assays Using a Real-Time Cell Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Claudia; Carfora, Maria Francesca; Carriero, Maria Vincenza; Natalini, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Experiments of cell migration and chemotaxis assays have been classically performed in the so-called Boyden Chambers. A recent technology, xCELLigence Real Time Cell Analysis, is now allowing to monitor the cell migration in real time. This technology measures impedance changes caused by the gradual increase of electrode surface occupation by cells during the course of time and provide a Cell Index which is proportional to cellular morphology, spreading, ruffling and adhesion quality as well as cell number. In this paper we propose a macroscopic mathematical model, based on advection-reaction-diffusion partial differential equations, describing the cell migration assay using the real-time technology. We carried out numerical simulations to compare simulated model dynamics with data of observed biological experiments on three different cell lines and in two experimental settings: absence of chemotactic signals (basal migration) and presence of a chemoattractant. Overall we conclude that our minimal mathematical model is able to describe the phenomenon in the real time scale and numerical results show a good agreement with the experimental evidences. PMID:27680883

  9. Neuropilin2 expressed in gastric cancer endothelial cells increases the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells in response to VEGF

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Woo Ho; Lee, Sun Hee; Jung, Myung Hwan; Seo, Ji Heun; Kim, Jin; Kim, Min A; Lee, You Mie

    2009-08-01

    The structure and characteristics of the tumor vasculature are known to be different from those of normal vessels. Neuropilin2 (Nrp2), which is expressed in non-endothelial cell types, such as neuronal or cancer cells, functions as a receptor for both semaphorin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). After isolating tumor and normal endothelial cells from advanced gastric cancer tissue and normal gastric mucosa tissues, respectively, we identified genes that were differentially expressed in gastric tumor endothelial (TEC) and normal endothelial cells (NEC) using DNA oligomer chips. Using reverse transcriptase-PCR, we confirmed the chip results by showing that Nrp2 gene expression is significantly up-regulated in TEC. Genes that were found to be up-regulated in TEC were also observed to be up-regulated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) that were co-cultured with gastric cancer cells. In addition, HUVECs co-cultured with gastric cancer cells showed an increased reactivity to VEGF-induced proliferation and migration. Moreover, overexpression of Nrp2 in HUVECs significantly enhanced the proliferation and migration induced by VEGF. Observation of an immunohistochemical analysis of various human tumor tissue arrays revealed that Nrp2 is highly expressed in the tumor vessel lining and to a lesser extent in normal tissue microvessels. From these results, we suggest that Nrp2 may function to increase the response to VEGF, which is more significant in TEC than in NEC given the differential expression, leading to gastric TEC with aggressive angiogenesis phenotypes.

  10. Tamarind Seed Xyloglucans Promote Proliferation and Migration of Human Skin Cells through Internalization via Stimulation of Proproliferative Signal Transduction Pathways.

    PubMed

    Nie, W; Deters, A M

    2013-01-01

    Xyloglucans (XGs) of Tamarindus indica L. Fabaceae are used as drug vehicles or as ingredients of cosmetics. Two xyloglucans were extracted from T. indica seed with cold water (TSw) and copper complex precipitation (TSc). Both were analyzed in regard to composition and influence on cell viability, proliferation, cell cycle progression, migration, MAPK phosphorylation, and gene expression of human skin keratinocytes (NHEK and HaCaT) and fibroblasts (NHDF) in vitro. TSw and TSc differed in molecular weight, rhamnose content, and ratios of xylose, arabinose, galactose, and glucose. Both XGs improved keratinocytes and fibroblast proliferation, promoted the cell cycle, and stimulated migration and intracellular enzyme activity of NHDF after endosomal uptake. Only TSw significantly enhanced HaCaT migration and extracellular enzyme activity of NHDF and HaCaT. TSw and TSc predominantly enhanced the phosphorylation of molecules that referred to Erk signaling in NHEK. In NHDF parts of the integrin signaling and SAPK/JNK pathway were affected. Independent of cell type TSw marginally regulated the expression of genes, which referred to membrane proteins, cytoskeleton, cytokine signaling, and ECM as well as to processes of metabolism and transcription. Results show that T. indica xyloglucans promote skin regeneration by a direct influence on cell proliferation and migration.

  11. Tamarind Seed Xyloglucans Promote Proliferation and Migration of Human Skin Cells through Internalization via Stimulation of Proproliferative Signal Transduction Pathways.

    PubMed

    Nie, W; Deters, A M

    2013-01-01

    Xyloglucans (XGs) of Tamarindus indica L. Fabaceae are used as drug vehicles or as ingredients of cosmetics. Two xyloglucans were extracted from T. indica seed with cold water (TSw) and copper complex precipitation (TSc). Both were analyzed in regard to composition and influence on cell viability, proliferation, cell cycle progression, migration, MAPK phosphorylation, and gene expression of human skin keratinocytes (NHEK and HaCaT) and fibroblasts (NHDF) in vitro. TSw and TSc differed in molecular weight, rhamnose content, and ratios of xylose, arabinose, galactose, and glucose. Both XGs improved keratinocytes and fibroblast proliferation, promoted the cell cycle, and stimulated migration and intracellular enzyme activity of NHDF after endosomal uptake. Only TSw significantly enhanced HaCaT migration and extracellular enzyme activity of NHDF and HaCaT. TSw and TSc predominantly enhanced the phosphorylation of molecules that referred to Erk signaling in NHEK. In NHDF parts of the integrin signaling and SAPK/JNK pathway were affected. Independent of cell type TSw marginally regulated the expression of genes, which referred to membrane proteins, cytoskeleton, cytokine signaling, and ECM as well as to processes of metabolism and transcription. Results show that T. indica xyloglucans promote skin regeneration by a direct influence on cell proliferation and migration. PMID:24106497

  12. Tamarind Seed Xyloglucans Promote Proliferation and Migration of Human Skin Cells through Internalization via Stimulation of Proproliferative Signal Transduction Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Nie, W.; Deters, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Xyloglucans (XGs) of Tamarindus indica L. Fabaceae are used as drug vehicles or as ingredients of cosmetics. Two xyloglucans were extracted from T. indica seed with cold water (TSw) and copper complex precipitation (TSc). Both were analyzed in regard to composition and influence on cell viability, proliferation, cell cycle progression, migration, MAPK phosphorylation, and gene expression of human skin keratinocytes (NHEK and HaCaT) and fibroblasts (NHDF) in vitro. TSw and TSc differed in molecular weight, rhamnose content, and ratios of xylose, arabinose, galactose, and glucose. Both XGs improved keratinocytes and fibroblast proliferation, promoted the cell cycle, and stimulated migration and intracellular enzyme activity of NHDF after endosomal uptake. Only TSw significantly enhanced HaCaT migration and extracellular enzyme activity of NHDF and HaCaT. TSw and TSc predominantly enhanced the phosphorylation of molecules that referred to Erk signaling in NHEK. In NHDF parts of the integrin signaling and SAPK/JNK pathway were affected. Independent of cell type TSw marginally regulated the expression of genes, which referred to membrane proteins, cytoskeleton, cytokine signaling, and ECM as well as to processes of metabolism and transcription. Results show that T. indica xyloglucans promote skin regeneration by a direct influence on cell proliferation and migration. PMID:24106497

  13. The effects of cold atmospheric plasma on cell adhesion, differentiation, migration, apoptosis and drug sensitivity of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dehui; Luo, Xiaohui; Xu, Yujing; Cui, Qingjie; Yang, Yanjie; Liu, Dingxin; Chen, Hailan; Kong, Michael G

    2016-05-13

    Cold atmospheric plasma was shown to induce cell apoptosis in numerous tumor cells. Recently, some other biological effects, such as induction of membrane permeation and suppression of migration, were discovered by plasma treatment in some types of tumor cells. In this study, we investigated the biological effects of plasma treatment on multiple myeloma cells. We detected the detachment of adherent myeloma cells by plasma, and the detachment area was correlated with higher density of hydroxyl radical in the gas phase of the plasma. Meanwhile, plasma could promote myeloma differentiation by up-regulating Blimp-1 and XBP-1 expression. The migration ability was suppressed by plasma treatment through decreasing of MMP-2 and MMP-9 secretion. In addition, plasma could increase bortezomib sensitivity and induce myeloma cell apoptosis. Taking together, combination with plasma treatment may enhance current chemotherapy and probably improve the outcomes. PMID:27067049

  14. The effects of cold atmospheric plasma on cell adhesion, differentiation, migration, apoptosis and drug sensitivity of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dehui; Luo, Xiaohui; Xu, Yujing; Cui, Qingjie; Yang, Yanjie; Liu, Dingxin; Chen, Hailan; Kong, Michael G

    2016-05-13

    Cold atmospheric plasma was shown to induce cell apoptosis in numerous tumor cells. Recently, some other biological effects, such as induction of membrane permeation and suppression of migration, were discovered by plasma treatment in some types of tumor cells. In this study, we investigated the biological effects of plasma treatment on multiple myeloma cells. We detected the detachment of adherent myeloma cells by plasma, and the detachment area was correlated with higher density of hydroxyl radical in the gas phase of the plasma. Meanwhile, plasma could promote myeloma differentiation by up-regulating Blimp-1 and XBP-1 expression. The migration ability was suppressed by plasma treatment through decreasing of MMP-2 and MMP-9 secretion. In addition, plasma could increase bortezomib sensitivity and induce myeloma cell apoptosis. Taking together, combination with plasma treatment may enhance current chemotherapy and probably improve the outcomes.

  15. Smurf1 regulation of DAB2IP controls cell proliferation and migration

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Lixin; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Sun, Liankun; North, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cell proliferation, survival and migration are regulated by the deletion of ovarian carcinoma 2/disabled homolog 2 (DOC-2/DAB2) interacting protein (DAB2IP), a tumor suppressor that serves as a scaffold protein for H-Ras and TRAF2. Importantly, the oncogenic histone methyl-transferase EZH2 epigenetically down-regulates DAB2IP in a variety of tumors. Recently, we demonstrated that DAB2IP is negatively regulated by Akt-dependent phosphorylation and SCFFbw7-mediated degradation. Here, we further identify the oncoprotein Smurf1, an E3-ubiquitin ligase, as a novel negative regulator of DAB2IP. Smurf1-mediated cellular proliferation and migration are largely dependent on the presence of DAB2IP, suggesting that DAB2IP is a key effector molecule of Smurf1 oncogenic function. Additionally, we identify that similar to DAB2IP, Smurf1 is also a target of phosphorylation by both Akt1 and Akt2 kinases, which enhances Smurf1 abundance, leading to a reduction in DAB2IP. Given the role of DAB2IP in tumorigenesis and metastasis, our data identify Smurf1 as an upstream oncogenic factor that negatively regulates DAB2IP to govern aberrant cell growth and migration. PMID:27036023

  16. Plasmonic enhanced fs-laser optoporation of human melanoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, J.; Humbert, L.; St.-Louis Lalonde, B.; Lebrun, J.-J.; Meunier, M.

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we present the results of in vitro gene transfer by plasmonic enhanced optoporation of human melanoma cells. The fs-laser based optoporation is a gentle and efficient method for transfection. An optimum perforation rate with efficient dye or DNA uptake and high viability of the cells (~90%) was found for different types of nanostructures, spherical and rod shaped. The technique offers a very high selectivity and the low damage induced to the cell leads to a high transfection efficiency. The cell selectivity of this technique on the one hand is realized by using bioconjugated nanostructures, that couple selectively to a special cell type, and on the other hand, the spatial selectivity is due to the fact that only irradiated cells are perforated. In many biological applications a virus free and efficient transfection method is needed, especially in terms of its use in vivo. In cancer cells, the aggressiveness of the cells is shown in the migration and invasion velocity. The laser based and nanostructure enhanced transfection of cells offers the possibility to directly compare the treated and untreated cells. The treatment for migration and invasion assays can be performed by laser-scraping and laser transfection, resulting in a fully non-contact and therefore sterile method where the shape and the size of the scrape is well defined and reproducible. The laser based scrape test therefore offers less uncertainty due to scrape variations, high transfection efficiency, as well as direct comparison of treated and control cells in the same dish.

  17. Lumican induces human corneal epithelial cell migration and integrin expression via ERK 1/2 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Seomun, Young; Joo, Choun-Ki

    2008-07-18

    Lumican is a major proteoglycans of the human cornea. Lumican knock-out mice have been shown to lose corneal transparency and to display delayed wound healing. The purpose of this study was to define the role of lumican in corneal epithelial cell migration. Over-expression of lumican in human corneal epithelial (HCE-T) cells increased both cell migration and proliferation, and increased levels of integrins {alpha}2 and {beta}1. ERK 1/2 was also activated in lumican over-expressed cells. When we treated HCE-T cells with the ERK-specific inhibitor U0126, cell migration and the expression of integrin {beta}1 were completely blocked. These data provide evidence that lumican stimulates cell migration in the corneal epithelium by activating ERK 1/2, and point to a novel signaling pathway implicated in corneal epithelial cell migration.

  18. Analysis of Cell Migration within a Three-dimensional Collagen Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Rommerswinkel, Nadine; Niggemann, Bernd; Keil, Silvia; Zänker, Kurt S.; Dittmar, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The ability to migrate is a hallmark of various cell types and plays a crucial role in several physiological processes, including embryonic development, wound healing, and immune responses. However, cell migration is also a key mechanism in cancer enabling these cancer cells to detach from the primary tumor to start metastatic spreading. Within the past years various cell migration assays have been developed to analyze the migratory behavior of different cell types. Because the locomotory behavior of cells markedly differs between a two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) environment it can be assumed that the analysis of the migration of cells that are embedded within a 3D environment would yield in more significant cell migration data. The advantage of the described 3D collagen matrix migration assay is that cells are embedded within a physiological 3D network of collagen fibers representing the major component of the extracellular matrix. Due to time-lapse video microscopy real cell migration is measured allowing the determination of several migration parameters as well as their alterations in response to pro-migratory factors or inhibitors. Various cell types could be analyzed using this technique, including lymphocytes/leukocytes, stem cells, and tumor cells. Likewise, also cell clusters or spheroids could be embedded within the collagen matrix concomitant with analysis of the emigration of single cells from the cell cluster/ spheroid into the collagen lattice. We conclude that the 3D collagen matrix migration assay is a versatile method to analyze the migration of cells within a physiological-like 3D environment. PMID:25350138