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Sample records for enhances cell migration

  1. Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Trepat, Xavier; Chen, Zaozao; Jacobson, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to establishing and maintaining the proper organization of multicellular organisms. Morphogenesis can be viewed as a consequence, in part, of cell locomotion, from large-scale migrations of epithelial sheets during gastrulation, to the movement of individual cells during development of the nervous system. In an adult organism, cell migration is essential for proper immune response, wound repair, and tissue homeostasis, while aberrant cell migration is found in various pathologies. Indeed, as our knowledge of migration increases, we can look forward to, for example, abating the spread of highly malignant cancer cells, retarding the invasion of white cells in the inflammatory process, or enhancing the healing of wounds. This article is organized in two main sections. The first section is devoted to the single-cell migrating in isolation such as occurs when leukocytes migrate during the immune response or when fibroblasts squeeze through connective tissue. The second section is devoted to cells collectively migrating as part of multicellular clusters or sheets. This second type of migration is prevalent in development, wound healing, and in some forms of cancer metastasis. PMID:23720251

  2. S-Fms signalobody enhances myeloid cell growth and migration.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Masahiro; Hitomi, Azusa; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2014-07-01

    Since receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) control various cell fates in many types of cells, mimicry of RTK functions is promising for artificial control of cell fates. We have previously developed single-chain Fv (scFv)/receptor chimeras named signalobodies that can mimic receptor signaling in response to a specific antigen. While the RTK-based signalobodies enabled us to control cell growth and migration, further extension of applicability in another cell type would underlie the impact of the RTK-based signalobodies. In this study, we applied the scFv-c-Fms (S-Fms) signalobody in a murine myeloid progenitor cell line, FDC-P1. S-Fms transduced a fluorescein-conjugated BSA (BSA-FL)-dependent growth signal and activated downstream signaling molecules including MEK, ERK, Akt, and STAT3, which are major constituents of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/Akt, and JAK/STAT signaling pathways. In addition, S-Fms transduced a migration signal as demonstrated by the transwell-based migration assay. Direct real-time observation of the cells further confirmed that FDC/S-Fms cells underwent directional cell migration toward a positive gradient of BSA-FL. These results demonstrated the utility of the S-Fms signalobody for controlling growth and migration of myeloid cells. Further extension of our approach includes economical large-scale production of practically relevant blood cells as well as artificial control of cell migration for tissue regeneration and immune response.

  3. Continual Cell Deformation Induced via Attachment to Oriented Fibers Enhances Fibroblast Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Sisi; Ricotta, Vincent; Simon, Marcia; Clark, Richard A. F.; Rafailovich, Miriam H.

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast migration is critical to the wound healing process. In vivo, migration occurs on fibrillar substrates, and previous observations have shown that a significant time lag exists before the onset of granulation tissue. We therefore conducted a series of experiments to understand the impact of both fibrillar morphology and migration time. Substrate topography was first shown to have a profound influence. Fibroblasts preferentially attach to fibrillar surfaces, and orient their cytoplasm for maximal contact with the fiber edge. In the case of en-mass cell migration out of an agarose droplet, fibroblasts on flat surfaces emerged with an enhanced velocity, v = 52μm/h, that decreases to the single cell value, v = 28μm/h within 24 hours and remained constant for at least four days. Fibroblasts emerging on fibrillar surfaces emerged with the single cell velocity, which remained constant for the first 24 hours and then increased reaching a plateau with more than twice the initial velocity within the next three days. The focal adhesions were distributed uniformly in cells on flat surfaces, while on the fibrillar surface they were clustered along the cell periphery. Furthermore, the number of focal adhesions for the cells on the flat surfaces remained constant, while it decreased on the fibrillar surface during the next three days. The deformation of the cell nuclei was found to be 50% larger on the fiber surfaces for the first 24 hours. While the mean deformation remained constant on the flat surface, it increased for the next three days by 24% in cells on fibers. On the fourth day, large actin/myosin fibers formed in cells on fibrillar surfaces only and coincided with a change from the standard migration mechanism involving extension of lamellipodia, and retraction of the rear, to one involving strong contractions oriented along the fibers and centered about the nucleus. PMID:25774792

  4. Bioelectric Field Enhancement: The Influence on Membrane Potential and Cell Migration In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Purnell, Marcy C.; Skrinjar, Terence J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The extracellular matrix consists of critical components that affect fibroblast polarization and migration. The existence of both intrinsic and extrinsic electrical signals that play essential roles in the development, physiology, regeneration, and pathology of cells was discovered over a century ago. In this study, we study how the Bioelectric Field Enhancement (BEFE) device and its generated electromagnetic field (EMF) by continuous direct current (DC) significantly affect the membrane potential and cell migration of fibroblasts in vitro. Approach: This is an experimental analysis of membrane potential and cell migration of murine fibroblasts when grown in treated media that has been reconstituted with an aqueous solution that has been exposed to an EMF, which is generated by this device versus fibroblasts grown in identically prepared control media that has not been exposed to the EMF. Results: The growth of fibroblasts in the treated media shows a strong percent change in polarization of the plasma membrane and significant increase in cell migration compared to control groups. Innovation: These experiments show the potential for an adjunct wound care therapy using a continuous DC EMF application through a medium of water. Conclusion: Growth media that was reconstituted with an aqueous solution that had been exposed to this DC derived EMF shows significant changes in cell polarity and cell migration of fibroblasts in vitro. The BEFE device has shown enhanced chronic wound healing in anecdotal reports from patients globally for decades when used as a footbath/bath and could lead to a novel EMF application in wound healing. PMID:28078187

  5. Simultaneous loss of the DLC1 and PTEN tumor suppressors enhances breast cancer cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Heering, Johanna; Erlmann, Patrik; Olayioye, Monilola A.

    2009-09-10

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene is a tumor suppressor frequently deleted or mutated in sporadic tumors of the breast, prostate, endometrium and brain. The protein acts as a dual specificity phosphatase for lipids and proteins. PTEN loss confers a growth advantage to cells, protects from apoptosis and favors cell migration. The deleted in liver cancer 1 (DLC1) gene has emerged as a novel tumor suppressor downregulated in a variety of tumor types including those of the breast. DLC1 contains a Rho GTPase activating domain that is involved in the inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion. To investigate how simultaneous loss of PTEN and DLC1 contributes to cell transformation, we downregulated both proteins by RNA interference in the non-invasive MCF7 breast carcinoma cell line. Joint depletion of PTEN and DLC1 resulted in enhanced cell migration in wounding and chemotactic transwell assays. Interestingly, both proteins were found to colocalize at the plasma membrane and interacted physically in biochemical pulldowns and coimmunoprecipitations. We therefore postulate that the concerted local inactivation of signaling pathways downstream of PTEN and DLC1, respectively, is required for the tight control of cell migration.

  6. 10-Shogaol, an Antioxidant from Zingiber officinale for Skin Cell Proliferation and Migration Enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chung-Yi; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Chang, Andy Y; Lin, Ying-Ting; Hseu, You-Cheng; Wang, Hui-Min

    2012-01-01

    In this work, one of Zingiber officinale components, 10-shogaol, was tested with 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging, metal chelating ability, and reducing power to show antioxidant activity. 10-Shogaol promoted human normal epidermal keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts cell growths. 10-Shogaol enhanced growth factor production in transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), platelet derived growth factor-αβ (PDGF-αβ) and vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) of both cells. In the in vitro wound healing assay for 12 or 24 h, with 10-shogaol, the fibroblasts and keratinocytes migrated more rapidly than the vehicle control group. Thus, this study substantiates the target compound, 10-shogaol, as an antioxidant for human skin cell growth and a migration enhancer with potential to be a novel wound repair agent. PMID:22408422

  7. Macrophages Enhance Migration in Inflammatory Breast Cancer Cells via RhoC GTPase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Steven G.; Chen, Yu-Chih; Madden, Julie M.; Fournier, Chelsea L.; Altemus, Megan A.; Hiziroglu, Ayse B.; Cheng, Yu-Heng; Wu, Zhi Fen; Bao, Liwei; Yates, Joel A.; Yoon, Euisik; Merajver, Sofia D.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most lethal form of breast cancer. All IBC patients have lymph node involvement and one-third of patients already have distant metastasis at diagnosis. This propensity for metastasis is a hallmark of IBC distinguishing it from less lethal non-inflammatory breast cancers (nIBC). Genetic profiling studies have been conducted to differentiate IBC from nIBC, but no IBC cancer-cell-specific gene signature has been identified. We hypothesized that a tumor-extrinsic factor, notably tumor-associated macrophages, promotes and contributes to IBC’s extreme metastatic phenotype. To this end, we studied the effect of macrophage-conditioned media (MCM) on IBC. We show that two IBC cell lines are hyper-responsive to MCM as compared to normal-like breast and aggressive nIBC cell lines. We further interrogated IBC’s hyper-responsiveness to MCM using a microfluidic migration device, which permits individual cell migration path tracing. We found the MCM “primes” the IBC cells’ cellular machinery to become extremely migratory in response to a chemoattractant. We determined that interleukins −6, −8, and −10 within the MCM are sufficient to stimulate this enhanced IBC migration effect, and that the known metastatic oncogene, RhoC GTPase, is necessary for the enhanced migration response. PMID:27991524

  8. Mitomycin C treatment induces resistance and enhanced migration via phosphorylated Akt in aggressive lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Liang-Chuan; Chuang, Eric Y.; Tsai, Mong-Hsun

    2016-01-01

    Since 1984, mitomycin C (MMC) has been applied in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). MMC-based chemotherapeutic regimens are still under consideration owing to the efficacy and low cost as compared with other second-line regimens in patients with advanced NSCLC. Hence, it is important to investigate whether MMC induces potential negative effects in NSCLC. Here, we found that the malignant lung cancer cells, CL1-2 and CL1-5, were more resistant to MMC than were the parental CL1-0 cells and pre-malignant CL1-1 cells. CL1-2 and CL1-5 cells consistently showed lower sub-G1 fractions post MMC treatment. DNA repair-related proteins were not induced more in CL1-5 than in CL1-0 cells, but the levels of endogenous and MMC-induced phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt) were higher in CL1-5 cells. Administering a p-Akt inhibitor reduced the MMC resistance, demonstrating that p-Akt is important in the MMC resistance of CL1-5 cells. Furthermore, we revealed that cell migration was enhanced by MMC but lowered by a p-Akt inhibitor in CL1-5 cells. This study suggests that in CL1-5 cells, the activity of p-Akt, rather than DNA repair mechanisms, may underlie the resistance to MMC and enhance the cells' migration abilities after MMC treatment. PMID:27833080

  9. Hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor enhances angiogenesis by promoting proliferation and migration of endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Qiangsong; Zheng Liduan; Li Bo; Wang Danming; Huang Chuanshu; Matuschak, George M.; Li Dechun . E-mail: dli2@slu.edu

    2006-11-01

    Our previous studies have indicated that hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor (HIMF) has angiogenic properties in an in vivo matrigel plug model and HIMF upregulates expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in mouse lungs and cultured lung epithelial cells. However, whether HIMF exerts angiogenic effects through modulating endothelial cell function remains unknown. In this study, mouse aortic rings cultured with recombinant HIMF protein resulted in enhanced vascular sprouting and increased endothelial cell spreading as confirmed by Dil-Ac-LDL uptake, von Willebrand factor and CD31 staining. In cultured mouse endothelial cell line SVEC 4-10, HIMF dose-dependently enhanced cell proliferation, in vitro migration and tubulogenesis, which was not attenuated by SU1498, a VEGFR2/Flk-1 receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Moreover, HIMF stimulation resulted in phosphorylation of Akt, p38 and ERK1/2 kinases in SVEC 4-10 cells. Treatment of mouse aortic rings and SVEC 4-10 cells with LY294002, but not SB203580, PD098059 or U0126, abolished HIMF-induced vascular sprouting and angiogenic responses. In addition, transfection of a dominant-negative mutant of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3K), {delta}p85, blocked HIMF-induced phosphorylation of Akt, endothelial activation and tubulogenesis. These results indicate that HIMF enhances angiogenesis by promoting proliferation and migration of endothelial cells via activation of the PI-3K/Akt pathways.

  10. Loss of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-3 enhances cell migration in rat lung tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Mai; Okabe, Kyoko; Yamawaki, Yasuna; Teranishi, Miki; Honoki, Kanya; Mori, Toshio; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Loss of the Lpar3 expression due to aberrant DNA methylation occurred in rat lung tumor cells. {yields} The Lpar3 inhibited cell migration of rat lung tumor cells. {yields} The Lpar3 may act as a negative regulator of rat lung tumor cells. -- Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) indicates several biological effects, such as cell proliferation, differentiation and migration. LPA interacts with G protein-coupled transmembrane LPA receptors. In our previous report, we detected that loss of the LPA receptor-1 (Lpar1) expression is due to its aberrant DNA methylation in rat tumor cell lines. In this study, to assess an involvement of the other LPA receptor, Lpar3, in the pathogenesis of rat lung tumor cells, we measured the expression levels of the Lpar3 gene and its DNA methylation status by reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and bisulfite sequencing analyses, respectively. RLCNR lung adenocarcinoma cells showed reduced expression of the Lpar3, compared with normal lung tissues. In the 5' upstream region of the Lpar3, normal lung tissues were unmethylated. By contrast, RLCNR cells were highly methylated, correlating with reduced expressions of the Lpar3. Based on these results, we generated the Lpar3-expressing RLCNR-a3 cells and measured the cell migration ability. Interestingly, the cell migration of RLCNR-a3 cells was significantly lower than that of RLCNR cells. This study suggests that loss of the Lpar3 due to aberrant DNA methylation may be involved in the progression of rat lung tumor cells.

  11. PLEKHG3 enhances polarized cell migration by activating actin filaments at the cell front

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trang Thi Thu; Park, Wei Sun; Park, Byung Ouk; Kim, Cha Yeon; Oh, Yohan; Kim, Jin Man; Choi, Hana; Kyung, Taeyoon; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Lee, Gabsang; Hahn, Klaus M.; Meyer, Tobias; Heo, Won Do

    2016-01-01

    Cells migrate by directing Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) and cell division control protein 42 (Cdc42) activities and by polymerizing actin toward the leading edge of the cell. Previous studies have proposed that this polarization process requires a local positive feedback in the leading edge involving Rac small GTPase and actin polymerization with PI3K likely playing a coordinating role. Here, we show that the pleckstrin homology and RhoGEF domain containing G3 (PLEKHG3) is a PI3K-regulated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (RhoGEF) for Rac1 and Cdc42 that selectively binds to newly polymerized actin at the leading edge of migrating fibroblasts. Optogenetic inactivation of PLEKHG3 showed that PLEKHG3 is indispensable both for inducing and for maintaining cell polarity. By selectively binding to newly polymerized actin, PLEKHG3 promotes local Rac1/Cdc42 activation to induce more local actin polymerization, which in turn promotes the recruitment of more PLEKHG3 to induce and maintain cell front. Thus, autocatalytic reinforcement of PLEKHG3 localization to the leading edge of the cell provides a molecular basis for the proposed positive feedback loop that is required for cell polarization and directed migration. PMID:27555588

  12. Enhancement of endothelial cell migration by constitutively active LPA{sub 1}-expressing tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kitayoshi, Misaho; Kato, Kohei; Tanabe, Eriko; Yoshikawa, Kyohei; Fukui, Rie; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutated LPA{sub 1} stimulates cell migration of endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF expressions are increased by mutated LPA{sub 1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LPA signaling via mutated LPA{sub 1} is involved in angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutated LPA{sub 1} promotes cancer cell progression. -- Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors belong to G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors (LPA receptors; LPA{sub 1} to LPA{sub 6}). They indicate a variety of cellular response by the interaction with LPA, including cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Recently, we have reported that constitutive active mutated LPA{sub 1} induced the strong biological effects of rat neuroblastoma B103 cells. In the present study, we examined the effects of mutated LPA{sub 1} on the interaction between B103 cells and endothelial F-2 cells. Each LPA receptor expressing B103 cells were maintained in serum-free DMEM and cell motility assay was performed with a Cell Culture Insert. When F-2 cells were cultured with conditioned medium from Lpar1 and Lpar3-expressing cells, the cell motility of F-2 cells was significantly higher than control cells. Interestingly, the motile activity of F-2 cells was strongly induced by mutated LPA{sub 1} than other cells, correlating with the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf)-A and Vegf-C. Pretreatment of LPA signaling inhibitors inhibited F-2 cell motility stimulated by mutated LPA{sub 1}. These results suggest that activation of LPA signaling via mutated LPA{sub 1} may play an important role in the promotion of angiogenesis in rat neuroblastoma cells.

  13. Wip1 knockout inhibits the proliferation and enhances the migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yiting; Liu, Lan; Sheng, Ming; Xiong, Kai; Huang, Lei; Gao, Qian; Wei, Jingliang; Wu, Tianwen; Yang, Shulin; Liu, Honglin; Mu, Yulian; Li, Kui

    2015-06-10

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), a unique population of multipotent adult progenitor cells originally found in bone marrow (BM), are extremely useful for multifunctional therapeutic approaches. However, the growth arrest and premature senescence of MSCs in vitro prevent the in-depth characterization of these cells. In addition, the regulatory factors involved in MSCs migration remain largely unknown. Given that protein phosphorylation is associated with the processes of MSCs proliferation and migration, we focused on wild-type p53-inducible phosphatase-1 (Wip1), a well-studied modulator of phosphorylation, in this study. Our results showed that Wip1 knockout significantly inhibited MSCs proliferation and induced G2-phase cell-cycle arrest by reducing cyclinB1 expression. Compared with WT-MSCs, Wip1{sup −/−} MSCs displayed premature growth arrest after six passages in culture. Transwell and scratch assays revealed that Wip1{sup −/−} MSCs migrate more effectively than WT-MSCs. Moreover, the enhanced migratory response of Wip1{sup −/−} MSCs may be attributed to increases in the induction of Rac1-GTP activity, the pAKT/AKT ratio, the rearrangement of filamentous-actin (f-actin), and filopodia formation. Based on these results, we then examined the effect of treatment with a PI3K/AKT and Rac1 inhibitor, both of which impaired the migratory activity of MSCs. Therefore, we propose that the PI3K/AKT/Rac1 signaling axis mediates the Wip1 knockout-induced migration of MSCs. Our findings indicate that the principal function of Wip1 in MSCs transformation is the maintenance of proliferative capacity. Nevertheless, knocking out Wip1 increases the migratory capacity of MSCs. This dual effect of Wip1 provides the potential for purposeful routing of MSCs. - Highlights: • Wip1 knockout inhibited MSCs proliferation through reducing cyclinB1 expression. • Wip1{sup −/−} MSCs displayed premature growth arrest in vitro after six passages. • Knocking out Wip1

  14. Electrical stimulation enhances cell migration and integrative repair in the meniscus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiaoning; Arkonac, Derya E.; Chao, Pen-Hsiu Grace; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Electrical signals have been applied towards the repair of articular tissues in the laboratory and clinical settings for over seventy years. We focus on healing of the meniscus, a tissue essential to knee function with limited innate repair potential, which has been largely unexplored in the context of electrical stimulation. Here we demonstrate for the first time that electrical stimulation enhances meniscus cell migration and integrative tissue repair. We optimize pulsatile direct current electrical stimulation parameters on cells at the micro-scale, and apply these to healing of full-thickness defects in explants at the macro-scale. We report increased expression of the adenosine A2b receptor in meniscus cells after stimulation at the micro- and macro-scale, and propose a role for A2bR in meniscus electrotransduction. Taken together, these findings advance our understanding of the effects of electrical signals and their mechanisms of action, and contribute to developing electrotherapeutic strategies for meniscus repair.

  15. Immature human dendritic cells enhance their migration through KCa3.1 channel activation.

    PubMed

    Crottès, David; Félix, Romain; Meley, Daniel; Chadet, Stéphanie; Herr, Florence; Audiger, Cindy; Soriani, Olivier; Vandier, Christophe; Roger, Sébastien; Angoulvant, Denis; Velge-Roussel, Florence

    2016-04-01

    Migration capacity is essential for dendritic cells (DCs) to present antigen to T cells for the induction of immune response. The DC migration is supposed to be a calcium-dependent process, while not fully understood. Here, we report a role of the KCa3.1/IK1/SK4 channels in the migration capacity of both immature (iDC) and mature (mDC) human CD14(+)-derived DCs. KCa3.1 channels were shown to control the membrane potential of human DC and the Ca(2+) entry, which is directly related to migration capacities. The expression of migration marker such as CCR5 and CCR7 was modified in both types of DCs by TRAM-34 (100nM). But, only the migration of iDC was decreased by use of both TRAM-34 and KCa3.1 siRNA. Confocal analyses showed a close localization of CCR5 with KCa3.1 in the steady state of iDC. Finally, the implication of KCa3.1 seems to be limited to the migration capacities as T cell activation of DCs appeared unchanged. Altogether, these results demonstrated that KCa3.1 channels have a pro-migratory effect on iDC migration. Our findings suggest that KCa3.1 in human iDC play a major role in their migration and constitute an attractive target for the cell therapy optimization.

  16. Low Concentration Microenvironments Enhance the Migration of Neonatal Cells of Glial Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Able, Richard A.; Ngnabeuye, Celestin; Beck, Cade; Holland, Eric C.; Vazquez, Maribel

    2013-01-01

    Glial tumors have demonstrated abilities to sustain growth via recruitment of glial progenitor cells (GPCs), which is believed to be driven by chemotactic cues. Previous studies have illustrated that mouse GPCs of different genetic backgrounds are able to replicate the dispersion pattern seen in the human disease. How GPCs with genetic backgrounds transformed by tumor paracrine signaling respond to extracellular cues via migration is largely unexplored, and remains a limiting factor in utilizing GPCs as therapeutic targets. In this study, we utilized a microfluidic device to examine the chemotaxis of three genetically-altered mouse GPC populations towards tumor conditioned media, as well as towards three growth factors known to initiate the chemotaxis of cells excised from glial tumors: Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF), Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-BB (PDGF-BB), and Transforming Growth Factor-α (TGF-α). Our results illustrate that GPC types studied exhibited chemoattraction and chemorepulsion by different concentrations of the same ligand, as well as enhanced migration in the presence of ultra-low ligand concentrations within environments of high concentration gradient. These findings contribute towards our understanding of the causative and supportive roles that GPCs play in tumor growth and reoccurrence, and also point to GPCs as potential therapeutic targets for glioma treatment. PMID:24285985

  17. Direct contact with perivascular tumor cells enhances integrin αvβ3 signaling and migration of endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Burgett, Monica E.; Lathia, Justin D.; Roth, Patrick; Nowacki, Amy S.; Galileo, Deni S.; Pugacheva, Elena; Huang, Ping; Vasanji, Amit; Li, Meizhang; Byzova, Tatiana; Mikkelsen, Tom; Bao, Shideng; Rich, Jeremy N.; Weller, Michael; Gladson, Candece L.

    2016-01-01

    The secretion of soluble pro-angiogenic factors by tumor cells and stromal cells in the perivascular niche promotes the aggressive angiogenesis that is typical of glioblastoma (GBM). Here, we show that angiogenesis also can be promoted by a direct interaction between brain tumor cells, including tumor cells with cancer stem-like properties (CSCs), and endothelial cells (ECs). As shown in vitro, this direct interaction is mediated by binding of integrin αvβ3 expressed on ECs to the RGD-peptide in L1CAM expressed on CSCs. It promotes both EC network formation and enhances directed migration toward basic fibroblast growth factor. Activation of αvβ3 and bone marrow tyrosine kinase on chromosome X (BMX) is required for migration stimulated by direct binding but not for migration stimulated by soluble factors. RGD-peptide treatment of mice with established intracerebral GBM xenografts significantly reduced the percentage of Sox2-positive tumor cells and CSCs in close proximity to ECs, decreased integrin αvβ3 and BMX activation and p130CAS phosphorylation in the ECs, and reduced the vessel surface area. These results reveal a previously unrecognized aspect of the regulation of angiogenesis in GBM that can impact therapeutic anti-angiogenic targeting. PMID:27270311

  18. Estradiol induces endothelial cell migration and proliferation through estrogen receptor-enhanced RhoA/ROCK pathway.

    PubMed

    Oviedo, Pilar J; Sobrino, Agua; Laguna-Fernandez, Andrés; Novella, Susana; Tarín, Juan J; García-Pérez, Miguel-Angel; Sanchís, Juan; Cano, Antonio; Hermenegildo, Carlos

    2011-03-30

    Migration and proliferation of endothelial cells are involved in re-endothelialization and angiogenesis, two important cardiovascular processes that are increased in response to estrogens. RhoA, a small GTPase which controls multiple cellular processes, is involved in the control of cell migration and proliferation. Our aim was to study the role of RhoA on estradiol-induced migration and proliferation and its dependence on estrogen receptors activity. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were stimulated with estradiol, in the presence or absence of ICI 182780 (estrogen receptors antagonist) and Y-27632 (Rho kinase inhibitor). Estradiol increased Rho GEF-1 gene expression and RhoA (gene and protein expression and activity) in an estrogen receptor-dependent manner. Cell migration, stress fiber formation and cell proliferation were increased in response to estradiol and were also dependent on the estrogen receptors and RhoA activation. Estradiol decreased p27 levels, and significantly raised the expression of cyclins and CDK. These effects were counteracted by the use of either ICI 182780 or Y-27632. In conclusion, estradiol enhances the RhoA/ROCK pathway and increases cell cycle-related protein expression by acting through estrogen receptors. This results in an enhanced migration and proliferation of endothelial cells.

  19. FOXP1 enhances tumor cell migration by repression of NFAT1 transcriptional activity in MDA-MB-231 cells.

    PubMed

    Oskay Halacli, Sevil

    2017-01-01

    Until now, forkhead box P1 (FOXP1) has been identified as a tumor suppressor in several correlation studies in breast cancer. Although FOXP1 is defined as a transcriptional repressor that interacts with other transcription factors in various mechanistic studies, there is no study that explains its repressor functions in breast cancer biology. This study demonstrated the repressor function of FOXP1 on nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT1) and the migratory effect of this repression in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments were performed for the investigation of protein-protein interaction between two transcription factors. Protein-protein interaction on DNA was investigated with EMSA and transcriptional effects of FOXP1 on NFAT1, luciferase reporter assay was performed. Wound healing assay was used to analyze the effects of overexpression of FOXP1 on tumor cell migration. This study showed that FOXP1 has protein-protein interaction with NFAT1 on DNA and enhances breast cancer cell migration by repressing NFAT1 transcriptional activity and FOXP1 shows oncogenic function by regulating breast cancer cell motility.

  20. Balancing Cell Migration with Matrix Degradation Enhances Gene Delivery to Cells Cultured Three-Dimensionally Within Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Jaclyn A.; Huang, Alyssa; Shikanova, Ariella; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2010-01-01

    In regenerative medicine, hydrogels are employed to fill defects and support the infiltration of cells that can ultimately regenerate tissue. Gene delivery within hydrogels targeting infiltrating cells has the potential to promote tissue formation, but the delivery efficiency of nonviral vectors within hydrogels is low hindering their applicability in tissue regeneration. To improve their functionality, we have conducted a mechanistic study to investigate the contribution of cell migration and matrix degradation on gene delivery. In this report, lipoplexes were entrapped within hydrogels based on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) crosslinked with peptides containing matrix metalloproteinase degradable sequences. The mesh size of these hydrogels is substantially less than the size of the entrapped lipoplexes, which can function to retain vectors. Cell migration and transfection were simultaneously measured within hydrogels with varying density of cell adhesion sites (Arg-Gly-Asp peptides) and solids content. Increasing RGD density increased expression levels up to 100-fold, while greater solids content sustained expression levels for 16 days. Increasing RGD density and decreasing solids content increased cell migration, which indicates expression levels increase with increased cell migration. Initially exposing cells to vector resulted in transient expression that declined after 2 days, verifying the requirement of migration to sustain expression. Transfected cells were predominantly located within the population of migrating cells for hydrogels that supported cell migration. Although the small mesh size retained at least 70% of the lipoplexes in the absence of cells after 32 days, the presence of cells decreased retention to 10% after 16 days. These results indicate that vectors retained within hydrogels contact migrating cells, and that persistent cell migration can maintain elevated expression levels. Thus matrix degradation and cell migration are fundamental design

  1. The Hippo pathway member YAP enhances human neural crest cell fate and migration.

    PubMed

    Hindley, Christopher J; Condurat, Alexandra Larisa; Menon, Vishal; Thomas, Ria; Azmitia, Luis M; Davis, Jason A; Pruszak, Jan

    2016-03-16

    The Hippo/YAP pathway serves as a major integrator of cell surface-mediated signals and regulates key processes during development and tumorigenesis. The neural crest is an embryonic tissue known to respond to multiple environmental cues in order to acquire appropriate cell fate and migration properties. Using multiple in vitro models of human neural development (pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells; LUHMES, NTERA2 and SH-SY5Y cell lines), we investigated the role of Hippo/YAP signaling in neural differentiation and neural crest development. We report that the activity of YAP promotes an early neural crest phenotype and migration, and provide the first evidence for an interaction between Hippo/YAP and retinoic acid signaling in this system.

  2. Selected activities of Citrus maxima Merr. fruits on human endothelial cells: enhancing cell migration and delaying cellular aging.

    PubMed

    Buachan, Paiwan; Chularojmontri, Linda; Wattanapitayakul, Suvara K

    2014-04-21

    Endothelial injury and damage as well as accumulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) in aging play a significant role in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Recent studies show an association of high citrus fruit intake with a lower risk of CVD and stroke but the mechanisms involved are not fully understood. This study investigated the effects of pummelo (Citrus maxima Merr. var. Tubtim Siam, CM) fruit extract on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVECs) migration and aging. The freeze-dried powder of fruit extract was characterized for antioxidant capacity (FRAP assay) and certain natural antioxidants, including ascorbic acid, gallic acid, hesperidin, and naringin (HPLC). Short-term (48 h) co-cultivation of HUVECs with CM enhanced cell migration as evaluated by a scratch wound assay and Boyden chamber assay. A long-term treatment with CM for 35 days significantly increased HUVEC proliferation capability as indicated by population doubling level (PDL). CM also delayed the onset of aging phenotype shown by senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) staining. Furthermore, CM was able to attenuate increased ROS levels in aged cells when determined by 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCDHF) while eNOS mRNA expression was increased but the eNOS protein level was not changed. Thus, further in vivo and clinical studies are warranted to support the use of pummelo as a functional fruit for endothelial health and CVD risk reduction.

  3. Blocking Junctional Adhesion Molecule C Enhances Dendritic Cell Migration and Boosts the Immune Responses against Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Ballet, Romain; Emre, Yalin; Jemelin, Stéphane; Charmoy, Mélanie; Tacchini-Cottier, Fabienne; Imhof, Beat A.

    2014-01-01

    The recruitment of dendritic cells to sites of infections and their migration to lymph nodes is fundamental for antigen processing and presentation to T cells. In the present study, we showed that antibody blockade of junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C) on endothelial cells removed JAM-C away from junctions and increased vascular permeability after L. major infection. This has multiple consequences on the output of the immune response. In resistant C57BL/6 and susceptible BALB/c mice, we found higher numbers of innate immune cells migrating from blood to the site of infection. The subsequent migration of dendritic cells (DCs) from the skin to the draining lymph node was also improved, thereby boosting the induction of the adaptive immune response. In C57BL/6 mice, JAM-C blockade after L. major injection led to an enhanced IFN-γ dominated T helper 1 (Th1) response with reduced skin lesions and parasite burden. Conversely, anti JAM-C treatment increased the IL-4-driven T helper 2 (Th2) response in BALB/c mice with disease exacerbation. Overall, our results show that JAM-C blockade can finely-tune the innate cell migration and accelerate the consequent immune response to L. major without changing the type of the T helper cell response. PMID:25474593

  4. Enhanced attachment, growth and migration of smooth muscle cells on microcarriers produced using thermally induced phase separation.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, R; Mordan, N; Forbes, A; Day, R M

    2011-04-01

    Microcarriers are widely used for the expansion of cells in vitro, but also offer an approach for combining cell transplantation and tissue bulking for regenerative medicine in a minimally invasive manner. This could be beneficial in conditions associated with muscle damage or atrophy, such as faecal incontinence, where the use of bulking materials or cell transplantation alone has proven to be ineffective. Microcarriers currently available have not been designed for this purpose and are likely to be suboptimal due to their physical and biochemical properties. The aim of this study was to investigate macroporous microspheres of polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA), prepared using a thermally induced phase separation technique, for their suitability as cell microcarriers for the transplantation of smooth muscle cells. Cell attachment, growth and migration were studied and compared with commercially available porcine gelatin microcarriers (Cultispher-S) in suspension culture. Smooth muscle cells attached more rapidly to the PLGA microcarriers, which also significantly enhanced the rate of cell growth compared with Cultispher-S microcarriers. The majority of smooth muscle cells attached to the PLGA microcarriers in suspension culture were able to migrate away over a 15 day period of static culture, unlike Cultispher-S microcarriers which retained the majority of cells. The ability of PLGA microcarriers to enhance cell growth combined with their capacity to release cells at the sites of delivery are features that make them ideally suited for use as a cell transplantation delivery device in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  5. Increased Migration of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells by Autocrine Motility Factor (AMF) Resulted in Enhanced Recruitment towards Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Aquino, Jorge B.; Malvicini, Mariana; Rizzo, Manglio; Peixoto, Estanislao; Andriani, Oscar; Alaniz, Laura; Piccioni, Flavia; Bolontrade, Marcela; Podhajcer, Osvaldo

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Several reports described the migration of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) towards tumor-released factors. Autocrine motility factor (AMF) is produced by several tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this study was to analyze AMF involvement on MSC migration towards human HCC. Methods Production of AMF by HCC tumors was evaluated by western analysis. The effects of AMF on MSCs from different sources (bone marrow, adipose tissue and perivascular cells from umbilical cord) were analyzed using in vitro migration assay; metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) activity and expression of critical genes were studied by zymography and qRT-PCR, respectively. To assess AMF involvement on the in vivo MSC migration, noninvasive fluorescence imaging was performed. To test the effect of AMF-primed MSCs on tumor development, in vitro proliferation and spheroids growth and in vivo tumor volume were evaluated. Results AMF produced by HCC was found to induce migration of different MSCs in vitro and to enhance their MMP2 activity. Stimulation of MSCs with recombinant AMF (rAMF) also induced the in vitro adhesion to endothelial cells in coincidence with changes in the expression levels of MMP3, AMF receptor, caveolin-1, and -2 and GDI-2. Importantly, stimulation of MSCs with rAMF increased the in vivo migration of MSCs towards experimental HCC tumors. AMF-priming of MSCs did not induce a pro-tumorigenic effect on HCC cells neither in vivo nor in vitro. Conclusion AMF plays a role in MSC recruitment towards HCC. However, its ability to increase MSC migration to HCC for therapeutic purposes merits further evaluation. PMID:24736611

  6. MIP-1α enhances Jurkat cell transendothelial migration by up-regulating endothelial adhesion molecules VCAM-1 and ICAM-1.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi-Ran; Ma, Ying-Huan

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α) in Jurkat cells and its effect on transendothelial migration. In the present study, human acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells (Jurkat cells) were used as a model of T cells in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), which demonstrated significantly higher MIP-1α expression compared with that in normal T-cell controls. The ability of Jurkat cells to cross a human brain microvascular endothelial cell (HBMEC) monolayer was almost completely abrogated by MIP-1α siRNA. In addition, the overexpression of MIP-1α resulted in the up-regulated expression of endothelial adhesion molecules, which enhanced the migration of Jurkat cells through a monolayer of HBMEC. MIP-1α levels in Jurkat cells appeared to be an important factor for its transendothelial migration, which may provide the theoretical basis to understand the mechanisms of brain metastases of T-ALL at cellular and molecular levels.

  7. Effector CD8^+ T cells migrate via chemokine-enhanced generalized L'evy walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banigan, Edward; Harris, Tajie; Christian, David; Liu, Andrea; Hunter, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    Chemokines play a central role in regulating processes essential to the immune function of T cells, such as their migration within lymphoid tissues and targeting of pathogens in sites of inflammation. In order to understand the role of the chemokine CXCL10 during chronic infection by the parasite T. gondii, we analyze tracks of migrating CD8^+ T cells in brain tissue. Surprisingly, we find that T cell motility is not described by a Brownian walk, but instead is consistent with a generalized L'evy walk consisting of L'evy-distributed runs alternating with pauses of L'evy-distributed durations. According to our model, this enables T cells to find rare targets more than an order of magnitude more efficiently than Brownian random walkers. The chemokine CXCL10 increases the migration speed without changing the character of the walk statistics. Thus, CD8^+ T cells use an efficient search strategy to facilitate an effective immune response, and CXCL10 aids them in shortening the average time to find rare targets.

  8. Cripto-1-induced increase in vimentin expression is associated with enhanced migration of human Caski cervical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ebert, A D; Wechselberger, C; Nees, M; Clair, T; Schaller, G; Martinez-Lacaci, I; Wallace-Jones, B; Bianco, C; Weitzel, H K; Salomon, D S

    2000-05-25

    Cripto-1 (CR-1), a member of the EGF-CFC peptide family, plays an essential role during mesoderm formation in vertebrates as well as in cancer development. Using cDNA gene expression array, Western blot, and indirect immunofluorescence, an increase in vimentin expression was demonstrated in CR-1-transfected human Caski cervical carcinoma cells compared to control vector-transfected cells. In parental Caski cells, recombinant CR-1 induced a dose-dependent increase of vimentin protein expression within 24 h. Since vimentin expression has been demonstrated to correlate with a more aggressive phenotype in human cervical cancer, the migration capacity of CR-1-transfected or CR-1-treated Caski cells was studied in the Boyden chamber assay. Compared to the vector-transfected or untreated Caski cells, CR-1-transfected cells or cells treated with recombinant CR-1 exhibit enhanced migration, both through collagen- and through gelatin-coated membranes. Additionally, CR-1 can function as a chemoattractant for Caski cells. These findings are of biological significance since CR-1 is overexpressed in several types of human carcinomas. The present data demonstrate that CR-1 can increase vimentin expression and modulate migration in human cervical carcinoma cells.

  9. The enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain) enhances human tongue carcinoma cells gelatinase production, migration and metastasis formation.

    PubMed

    Laaksonen, Matti; Suojanen, Juho; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Läärä, Esa; Sorsa, Timo; Salo, Tuula

    2008-08-01

    Enamel matrix derivative Emdogain (EMD) is widely used in periodontal treatment to regenerate lost connective tissue and to improve the attachment of the teeth. Gelatinases (MMP-2 and -9) have an essential role in the promotion and progression of oral cancer growth and metastasis formation. We studied the effects of EMD on human tongue squamous cell carcinoma (HSC-3) cells in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, EMD (100 microg/ml and 200 microg/ml) remarkably induced the MMP-2 and -9 production from HSC-3 cells analysed by zymography and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. EMD also slightly induced the MMP-2 and -9 production from benign human mucosal keratinocytes (HMK). Furthermore, EMD clearly induced the transmigration of HSC-3 cells but had no effect on the HMK migration in transwell assays. The in vitro wound closure of HSC-3 cells was notably accelerated by EMD, whereas it had only minor effect on the wound closure of HMKs. The migration of both cell lines was inhibited by a selective cyclic anti-gelatinolytic peptide CTT-2. EMD had no effect on HSC-3 cell proliferation or apoptosis and only a limited effect on cell attachment to various extracellular matrix components. The in vivo mice experiment revealed that EMD substantially induced HSC-3 xenograft metastasis formation. Our results suggest that the use of EMD for patients with oral mucosal carcinomas or premalignant lesions should be carefully considered, possibly avoided.

  10. Tetraspanins in Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xupin; Zhang, Jiaping; Huang, Yuesheng

    2015-01-01

    Tetraspanins are a superfamily of small transmembrane proteins that are expressed in almost all eukaryotic cells. Through interacting with one another and with other membrane and intracellular proteins, tetraspanins regulate a wide range of proteins such as integrins, cell surface receptors, and signaling molecules, and thereby engage in diverse cellular processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to proliferation and differentiation. In particular, tetraspanins modulate the function of proteins involved in all determining factors of cell migration including cell–cell adhesion, cell–ECM adhesion, cytoskeletal protrusion/contraction, and proteolytic ECM remodeling. We herein provide a brief overview of collective in vitro and in vivo studies of tetraspanins to illustrate their regulatory functions in the migration and trafficking of cancer cells, vascular endothelial cells, skin cells (keratinocytes and fibroblasts), and leukocytes. We also discuss the involvement of tetraspanins in various pathologic and remedial processes that rely on cell migration and their potential value as targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26091149

  11. Cell migration, freshly squeezed.

    PubMed

    Welch, Matthew D

    2015-02-12

    Migrating cells exhibit distinct motility modes and can switch between modes based on chemical or physical cues. Liu et al. and Ruprecht et al. now describe how confinement and contractility influence motility mode plasticity and instigate a mode termed stable bleb migration in embryonic and tumor cells.

  12. Combined paclitaxel, cisplatin and fluorouracil therapy enhances ionizing radiation effects, inhibits migration and induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in oral carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Elias, Silvia Taveira; Borges, Gabriel Alvares; Rêgo, Daniela Fortunato; E Silva, Luis Felipe Oliveira; Avelino, Samuel; DE Matos Neto, João Nunes; Simeoni, Luiz Alberto; Guerra, Eliete Neves Silva

    2015-09-01

    Although taxels (in particular paclitaxel), cisplatin and fluorouracil (TPF) chemotherapy has been approved for use in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), little is known with regard to the cellular mechanisms of this novel drug association. In order to investigate the reaction of cells to this novel treatment, the present study aimed to examine the cytotoxic effect of TPF in HNSCC cell lines in combination with irradiation, to analyze its effect on cell cycle progression and cell death, and to evaluate its ability to alter cell migration. An MTT assay was used to determine cell viability following TPF and cisplatin treatments in two human HNSCC cell lines (FaDu and SCC-9) and one keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). The concurrent use of TPF or cisplatin and irradiation was also analyzed. Flow cytometric analysis was utilized to determine the cell cycle distribution and to verify the induction of apoptosis. The capacity of the drugs to alter oral cancer cell migration was also evaluated using a Transwell migration assay. The results indicated that TPF and cisplatin were cytotoxic to all cell lines, and enhanced the effects of ionizing radiation. FaDu cells were significantly more sensitive to the two treatments, and TPF was more cytotoxic than cisplatin for all cells. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that TPF increased the number of cells in G0/G1 phase in the SCC-9 cell line, and indicated apoptotic cell death. The results of the Transwell assay demonstrated that TPF inhibited migration in oral carcinoma cell lines. The results of the present study indicated that TPF functions in oral carcinoma cell lines through the enhancement of ionizing radiation effects, inducing cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 and apoptosis, in addition to inhibiting migration.

  13. Elevated Na(+)/H(+) exchanger-1 expression enhances the metastatic collective migration of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kaminota, Teppei; Yano, Hajime; Shiota, Kohei; Nomura, Noriko; Yaguchi, Haruna; Kirino, Yui; Ohara, Kentaro; Tetsumura, Issei; Sanada, Tomoyoshi; Ugumori, Toru; Tanaka, Junya; Hato, Naohito

    2017-04-22

    Cancer cells can migrate as collectives during invasion and/or metastasis; however, the precise molecular mechanisms of this form of migration are less clear compared with single cell migration following epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Elevated Na(+)/H(+) exchanger1 (NHE1) expression has been suggested to have malignant roles in a number of cancer cell lines and in vivo tumor models. Furthermore, a metastatic human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell line (SASL1m) that was isolated based on its increased metastatic potential also exhibited higher NHE1 expression than its parental line SAS. Time-lapse video recordings indicated that both cell lines migrate as collectives, although with different features, e.g., SASL1m was much more active and changed the direction of migration more frequently than SAS cells, whereas locomotive activities were comparable. SASL1m cells also exhibited higher invasive activity than SAS in Matrigel invasion assays. shRNA-mediated NHE1 knockdown in SASL1m led to reduced locomotive and invasive activities, suggesting a critical role for NHE1 in the collective migration of SASL1m cells. SASL1m cells also exhibited a higher metastatic rate than SAS cells in a mouse lymph node metastasis model, while NHE1 knockdown suppressed in vivo SASL1m metastasis. Finally, elevated NHE1 expression was observed in human HNSCC tissue, and Cariporide, a specific NHE1 inhibitor, reduced the invasive activity of SASL1m cells, implying NHE1 could be a target for anti-invasion/metastasis therapy.

  14. Leptin-mediated regulation of ICAM-1 is Rho/ROCK dependent and enhances gastric cancer cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Z; Fu, S; Xu, X; Yang, Y; Du, L; Li, W; Kan, S; Li, Z; Zhang, X; Wang, L; Li, J; Liu, H; Qu, X; Wang, C

    2014-01-01

    Background: Our previous study indicates that leptin enhances gastric cancer (GC) invasion. However, the exact effect of leptin on GC metastasis and its underlying mechanism remain unclear. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), a major molecule in stabilising cell–cell and cell–extracellular matrix interactions, is overexpressed and has crucial roles in tumour metastasis. Methods: Here, we investigated leptin and ICAM-1 expression in GC tissues. Furthermore, we characterised the influence of leptin on ICAM-1 expression in GC cells and elucidated the underlying mechanism. Results: Leptin and ICAM-1 were overexpressed in GC tissues, and a strong positive correlation was observed. They were also related with clinical stage or lymph node metastasis. Furthermore, leptin induced GC cell (AGS and MKN-45) migration by upregulating ICAM-1, and knockdown of ICAM-1 by small interference RNA (siRNA) blocked this process. Cell surface ICAM-1, as well as soluble ICAM-1 (sICAM-1), was also enhanced by leptin. Moreover, leptin increased ICAM-1 expression through Rho/ROCK pathway, which was attenuated by pharmacological inhibition of Rho (C3 transferase) or its downstream effector kinase Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) (Y-27632). Conclusions: Our findings indicate that leptin enhances GC cell migration by increasing ICAM-1 through Rho/ROCK pathway, which might provide new insight into the significance of leptin in GC. PMID:24548863

  15. Tracking of dendritic cell migration into lymph nodes using molecular imaging with sodium iodide symporter and enhanced firefly luciferase genes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho Won; Yoon, Seung Yun; Singh, Thoudam Debraj; Choi, Yoon Ju; Lee, Hong Je; Park, Ji Young; Jeong, Shin Young; Lee, Sang-Woo; Ha, Jeoung-Hee; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol; Jeon, Yong Hyun; Lee, Jaetae

    2015-05-14

    We sought to evaluate the feasibility of molecular imaging using the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene as a reporter, in addition to the enhanced firefly luciferase (effluc) gene, for tracking dendritic cell (DCs) migration in living mice. A murine dendritic cell line (DC2.4) co-expressing hNIS and effluc genes (DC/NF) was established. For the DC-tracking study, mice received either parental DCs or DC/NF cells in the left or right footpad, respectively, and combined I-124 PET/CT and bioluminescence imaging (BLI) were performed. In vivo PET/CT imaging with I-124 revealed higher activity of the radiotracer in the draining popliteal lymph nodes (DPLN) of the DC/NF injection site at day 1 than DC injection site (p < 0.05). The uptake value further increased at day 4 (p < 0.005). BLI also demonstrated migration of DC/NF cells to the DPLNs at day 1 post-injection, and signals at the DPLNs were much higher at day 4. These data support the feasibility of hNIS reporter gene imaging in the tracking of DC migration to lymphoid organs in living mice. DCs expressing the NIS reporter gene could be a useful tool to optimize various strategies of cell-based immunotherapy.

  16. AEG-1 knockdown in colon cancer cell lines inhibits radiation-enhanced migration and invasion in vitro and in a novel in vivo zebrafish model

    PubMed Central

    Gnosa, Sebastian; Capodanno, Alessandra; Murthy, Raghavendra Vasudeva; Ejby Jensen, Lasse Dahl; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy is a well-established anti-cancer treatment. Although radiotherapy has been shown to significantly decrease the local relapse in rectal cancer patients, the rate of distant metastasis is still very high. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether AEG-1 is involved in radiation-enhanced migration and invasion in vitro and in a novel in vivo zebrafish model. Results Migration and invasion were decreased in all the AEG-1 knockdown cell lines. Furthermore, we observed that radiation enhanced migration and invasion, while AEG-1 knockdown abolished this effect. The results from the zebrafish embryo model confirmed the results obtained in vitro. MMP-9 secretion and expression were decreased in AEG-1 knockdown cells. Materials and Methods We evaluated the involvement of AEG-1 in migration and invasion and, radiation-enhanced migration and invasion by Boyden chamber assay in three colon cancer cell lines and respective stable AEG-1 knockdown cell lines. Furthermore, we injected those cells into zebrafish embryos and evaluated the amount of disseminated cells into the tail. Conclusion AEG-1 knockdown inhibits migration and invasion, as well as radiation-enhanced invasion both in vitro and in vivo. We speculate that this is done via the downregulation of the intrinsic or radiation-enhanced MMP-9 expression by AEG-1 in the cancer cells. This study also shows, for the first time, that the zebrafish is a great model to study the early events in radiation-enhanced invasion. PMID:27835571

  17. Ror2 Enhances Polarity and Directional Migration of Primordial Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kissner, Michael D.; Zhou, Xin; Anderson, Kathryn V.

    2011-01-01

    The trafficking of primordial germ cells (PGCs) across multiple embryonic structures to the nascent gonads ensures the transmission of genetic information to the next generation through the gametes, yet our understanding of the mechanisms underlying PGC migration remains incomplete. Here we identify a role for the receptor tyrosine kinase-like protein Ror2 in PGC development. In a Ror2 mouse mutant we isolated in a genetic screen, PGC migration and survival are dysregulated, resulting in a diminished number of PGCs in the embryonic gonad. A similar phenotype in Wnt5a mutants suggests that Wnt5a acts as a ligand to Ror2 in PGCs, although we do not find evidence that WNT5A functions as a PGC chemoattractant. We show that cultured PGCs undergo polarization, elongation, and reorientation in response to the chemotactic factor SCF (secreted KitL), whereas Ror2 PGCs are deficient in these SCF-induced responses. In the embryo, migratory PGCs exhibit a similar elongated geometry, whereas their counterparts in Ror2 mutants are round. The protein distribution of ROR2 within PGCs is asymmetric, both in vitro and in vivo; however, this asymmetry is lost in Ror2 mutants. Together these results indicate that Ror2 acts autonomously to permit the polarized response of PGCs to KitL. We propose a model by which Wnt5a potentiates PGC chemotaxis toward secreted KitL by redistribution of Ror2 within the cell. PMID:22216013

  18. Increases in reactive oxygen species enhance vascular endothelial cell migration through a mechanism dependent on the transient receptor potential melastatin 4 ion channel.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento, Daniela; Montorfano, Ignacio; Cerda, Oscar; Cáceres, Mónica; Becerra, Alvaro; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Elorza, Alvaro A; Riedel, Claudia; Tapia, Pablo; Velásquez, Luis A; Varela, Diego; Simon, Felipe

    2015-03-01

    A hallmark of severe inflammation is reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction induced by increased inflammatory mediators secretion. During systemic inflammation, inflammation mediators circulating in the bloodstream interact with endothelial cells (ECs) raising intracellular oxidative stress at the endothelial monolayer. Oxidative stress mediates several pathological functions, including an exacerbated EC migration. Because cell migration critically depends on calcium channel-mediated Ca(2+) influx, the molecular identification of the calcium channel involved in oxidative stress-modulated EC migration has been the subject of intense investigation. The transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (TRPM4) protein is a ROS-modulated non-selective cationic channel that performs several cell functions, including regulating intracellular Ca(2+) overload and Ca(2+) oscillation. This channel is expressed in multiple tissues, including ECs, and contributes to the migration of certain immune cells. However, whether the TRPM4 ion channel participates in oxidative stress-mediated EC migration is not known. Herein, we investigate whether oxidative stress initiates or enhances EC migration and study the role played by the ROS-modulated TRPM4 ion channel in oxidative stress-mediated EC migration. We demonstrate that oxidative stress enhances, but does not initiate, EC migration in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, we demonstrate that the TRPM4 ion channel is critical in promoting H2O2-enhanced EC migration. These results show that TRPM4 is a novel pharmacological target for the possible treatment of severe inflammation and other oxidative stress-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  19. Fabrication of three-dimensional multi-protein microstructures for cell migration and adhesion enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Da Sie, Yong; Li, Yi-Cheng; Chang, Nan-Shan; Campagnola, Paul J.; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, three-dimensional (3D) multi-component microstructures were precisely fabricated via multiphoton excited photochemistry using a femtosecond laser direct-writing system with proposed repetition positioning and vector scanning techniques. Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, such as fibronectin (FN), are difficult to stack and form 3D structures larger than several-hundred microns in height due to the nature of their protein structure. Herein, to fabricate complex 3D microstructures with FN, a 3D scaffold was designed and formed from bovine serum albumin (BSA), after which human FN was inserted at specific locations on the BSA scaffold; in this manner, the fabricated ECM microstructure can guide cells in a 3D environment. A human breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, was used to investigate the behavior of cell migration and adhesion on the fabricated human FN and BSA protein structures. Experimental results indicate that many cells are not able to attach or climb on a 3D structure’s inclined plane without FN support; hence, the influence of cell growth in a 3D context with FN should being taken into consideration. This 3D multi-protein fabrication technique holds potential for cell studies in designed complex 3D ECM scaffolds. PMID:25780738

  20. In-Vivo Imaging of Cell Migration Using Contrast Enhanced MRI and SVM Based Post-Processing.

    PubMed

    Weis, Christian; Hess, Andreas; Budinsky, Lubos; Fabry, Ben

    2015-01-01

    The migration of cells within a living organism can be observed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in combination with iron oxide nanoparticles as an intracellular contrast agent. This method, however, suffers from low sensitivity and specificty. Here, we developed a quantitative non-invasive in-vivo cell localization method using contrast enhanced multiparametric MRI and support vector machines (SVM) based post-processing. Imaging phantoms consisting of agarose with compartments containing different concentrations of cancer cells labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles were used to train and evaluate the SVM for cell localization. From the magnitude and phase data acquired with a series of T2*-weighted gradient-echo scans at different echo-times, we extracted features that are characteristic for the presence of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, in particular hyper- and hypointensities, relaxation rates, short-range phase perturbations, and perturbation dynamics. High detection quality was achieved by SVM analysis of the multiparametric feature-space. The in-vivo applicability was validated in animal studies. The SVM detected the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles in the imaging phantoms with high specificity and sensitivity with a detection limit of 30 labeled cells per mm3, corresponding to 19 μM of iron oxide. As proof-of-concept, we applied the method to follow the migration of labeled cancer cells injected in rats. The combination of iron oxide labeled cells, multiparametric MRI and a SVM based post processing provides high spatial resolution, specificity, and sensitivity, and is therefore suitable for non-invasive in-vivo cell detection and cell migration studies over prolonged time periods.

  1. MRP4 knockdown enhances migration, suppresses apoptosis, and produces aggregated morphology in human retinal vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tagami, Mizuki; Kusuhara, Sentaro; Imai, Hisanori; Uemura, Akiyoshi; Honda, Shigeru; Tsukahara, Yasutomo; Negi, Akira

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Exogenous VEGF decreases MRP4 expression in a dose-dependent manner. {yields} MRP4 knockdown leads to enhanced cell migration. {yields} MRP4 knockdown suppresses caspase-3-mediated cell apoptosis. {yields} MRP4 knockdown produces cell assembly and cell aggregation. -- Abstract: The multidrug resistance protein (MRP) MRP4/ABCC4 is an ATP-binding cassette transporter that actively effluxes endogenous and xenobiotic substrates out of cells. In the rodent retina, Mrp4 mRNA and protein are exclusively expressed in vascular endothelial cells, but the angiogenic properties of Mrp4 are poorly understood so far. This study aims to explore the angiogenic properties of MRP4 in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRECs) utilizing the RNA interference (RNAi) technique. MRP4 expression was decreased at the mRNA and protein levels after stimulation with exogenous vascular endothelial growth factor in a dose-dependent manner. RNAi-mediated MRP4 knockdown in HRECs do not affect cell proliferation but enhances cell migration. Moreover, cell apoptosis induced by serum starvation was less prominent in MRP4 siRNA-treated HRECs as compared to control siRNA-treated HRECs. In a Matrigel-based tube-formation assay, although MRP4 knockdown did not lead to a significant change in the total tube length, MRP4 siRNA-treated HRECs assembled and aggregated into a massive tube-like structure, which was not observed in control siRNA-treated HRECs. These results suggest that MRP4 is uniquely involved in retinal angiogenesis.

  2. Analysing immune cell migration.

    PubMed

    Beltman, Joost B; Marée, Athanasius F M; de Boer, Rob J

    2009-11-01

    The visualization of the dynamic behaviour of and interactions between immune cells using time-lapse video microscopy has an important role in modern immunology. To draw robust conclusions, quantification of such cell migration is required. However, imaging experiments are associated with various artefacts that can affect the estimated positions of the immune cells under analysis, which form the basis of any subsequent analysis. Here, we describe potential artefacts that could affect the interpretation of data sets on immune cell migration. We propose how these errors can be recognized and corrected, and suggest ways to prevent the data analysis itself leading to biased results.

  3. The use of biomaterials for cell function enhancement: acceleration of fibroblast migration and promotion of stem cell proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Sisi

    Wound healing and tissue regeneration proceed via fibroblast migration along three dimensional scaffolds composed of fibers with different diameters, spacing, and junction angles. In order to understand how each of these factors influences fibroblast migration, a technique for preparation of three dimensional fibrillar scaffolds was developed where the fiber diameters and the angles between adjacent fiber layers could be precisely controlled. In order to study the en-mass migration process, the agarose droplet method was chosen since it enabled accurate determinations of the dependence of the migration speed, focal adhesion distribution, and nuclear deformation on the fiber structures. Results showed that on oriented single fiber layers, if the fiber diameters exceeded 1microm, large focal adhesion complexes formed in a linear arrangement along the fiber axis and cell motion was highly correlated. For fibers 1microm or less, some cell alignment along the fiber direction was measured, but no correlation between the distribution of focal adhesion points and fiber orientation was found. On multi layered scaffolds the focal adhesion sites were found to concentrate at the junction points and the migration speed followed a parabolic function with a distinct minimum at 35°. When compared to fibroblasts plated on 90° fibers, fibroblasts plated on 30° fibers showed a decrease of 25% in the degree of nuclear deformation and an increase of 25% in the number of focal adhesion sites, indicating that cell migration speed was correlated to the angle and distance of approach to the junction point. The time dependence of the migration velocity on oriented fibers was measured for four days and compared to the value measured on flat surfaces. After the initial 24 hour incubation period, the cells on both the 8microm fibers and flat surfaces migrated with a similar speed. During the next three days the migration speed for the cells on the fibrillar surfaces doubled in magnitude

  4. Oncogenic functions of IGF1R and INSR in prostate cancer include enhanced tumor growth, cell migration and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Isabel; Kern, Johann; Ofer, Philipp; Klocker, Helmut; Massoner, Petra

    2014-05-15

    We scrutinized the effect of insulin receptor (INSR) in addition to IGF1R in PCa using in vitro and in vivo models. In-vitro overexpression of IGF1R and INSRA, but not INSRB increased cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, invasion and resistance to apoptosis in prostate cancer cells (DU145, LNCaP, PC3). Opposite effects were induced by downregulation of IGF1R and total INSR, but not INSRB. In contrast to tumor cells, non-cancerous epithelial cells of the prostate (EP156T, RWPE-1) were inhibited on overexpression and stimulated by knockdown of receptors. In-vivo analyses using the chicken allantoic membrane assay confirmed the tumorigenic effects of IGF1R and INSR. Apart of promoting tumor growth, IGF1R and INSR overexpression also enhanced angiogenesis indicated by higher vessel density and increased number of desmin-immunoreactive pericytes. Our study underscores the oncogenic impact of IGF1R including significant effects on tumor growth, cell migration, sensitivity to apoptotic/chemotherapeutic agents and angiogenesis, and characterizes the INSR, in particular the isoform INSRA, as additional cancer-promoting receptor in prostate cancer. Both, the insulin-like growth factor receptor 1 and the insulin receptor exert oncogenic functions, thus proposing that both receptors need to be considered in therapeutic settings.

  5. Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle-Mediated Forces Enhance the Migration of Schwann Cells Across the Astrocyte-Schwann Cell Boundary In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Liangliang; Xia, Bing; Liu, Zhongyang; Cao, Quanliang; Huang, Jinghui; Luo, Zhuojing

    2017-01-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) are one of the most promising cellular candidates for the treatment of spinal cord injury. However, SCs show poor migratory ability within the astrocyte-rich central nervous system (CNS) environment and exhibit only limited integration with host astrocytes. Our strategy for improving the therapeutic potential of SCs was to magnetically drive SCs to migrate across the astrocyte-SC boundary to intermingle with astrocytes. SCs were firstly magnetized with poly-L-lysine-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). Internalization of SPIONs showed no effect upon the migration of SCs in the absence of a magnetic field (MF). In contrast, magnetized SCs exhibited enhanced migration along the direction of force in the presence of a MF. An inverted coverslip assay showed that a greater number of magnetized SCs migrated longer distances onto astrocytic monolayers under the force of a MF compared to other test groups. More importantly, a confrontation assay demonstrated that magnetized SCs intermingled with astrocytes under an applied MF. Furthermore, inhibition of integrin activation reduced the migration of magnetized SCs within an astrocyte-rich environment under an applied MF. Thus, SPION-mediated forces could act as powerful stimulants to enhance the migration of SCs across the astrocyte-SC boundary, via integrin-mediated mechanotransduction, and could represent a vital way of improving the therapeutic potential of SCs for spinal cord injuries.

  6. [Sodium nitrite enhanced the potentials of migration and invasion of human hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cells through induction of mitophagy].

    PubMed

    Gui, Guan; Meng, Shan-shan; Li, Lu-juan; Liu, Bin; Liang, Hong-xia; Huangfu, Chao-shen

    2016-01-01

    Nitrites play multiple characteristic functions in invasion and metastasis of hepatic cancer cells, but the exact mechanism is not yet known. Cancer cells can maintain the malignant characteristics via clearance of excess mitochondria by mitophagy. The purpose of this article was to determine the roles of nitrite, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hypoxia inducing factor 1 alpha (HIF-1 α) in mitophagy of hepatic cancer cells. After exposure of human hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cells to a serial concentrations of sodium nitrite for 24 h under normal oxygen, the maximal cell vitality was increased by 16 mg x (-1) sodium nitrite. In addition, the potentials of migration and invasion for SMMC-7721 cells were increased significantly at the same time. Furthermore, sodium nitrite exposure displayed an increase of stress fibers, lamellipodum and perinuclear mitochondrial distribution by cell staining with Actin-Tracker Green and Mito-Tracker Red, which was reversed by N-acetylcysteine (NAC, a reactive oxygen scavenger). DCFH-DA staining with fluorescent microscopy showed that the intracellular level of ROS concentration was increased by the sodium nitrite treatment. LC3 immunostaining and Western blot results showed that sodium nitrite enhanced cell autophagy flux. Under the transmission electron microscopy (TEM), more autolysosomes formed after sodium nitrite treatment and NAC could prevent autophagosome degradation. RT-PCR results indicated that the expression levels of COX I and COXIV mRNA were decreased significantly after sodium nitrite treatment. Meanwhile, laser scanning confocal microscopy showed that sodium nitrite significantly reduced mitochondrial mass detected by Mito-Tracker Green staining. The expression levels of HIF-1α, Beclin-1 and Bnip3 (mitophagy marker molecular) increased remarkably after sodium nitrite treatment, which were reversed by NAC. Our results demonstrated that sodium nitrite (16 mg x L(-1)) increased the potentials of invasion and

  7. Increased cellular apoptosis susceptibility (CSE1L/CAS) protein expression promotes protrusion extension and enhances migration of MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Shen, Shing-Chuan; Lee, Woan-Ruoh; Liao, Ching-Fong; Deng, Win-Ping; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Hsieh, Cheng-I; Tung, Jai-Nien; Chen, Ching-Shyang; Chiou, Jeng-Fong; Li, Li-Tzu; Lin, Chuang-Yu; Hsu, Chung-Huei; Jiang, Ming-Chung

    2010-10-15

    Microtubules are part of cell structures that play a role in regulating the migration of cancer cells. The cellular apoptosis susceptibility (CSE1L/CAS) protein is a microtubule-associated protein that is highly expressed in cancer. We report here that CSE1L regulates the association of {alpha}-tubulin with {beta}-tubulin and promotes the migration of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. CSE1L was associated with {alpha}-tubulin and {beta}-tubulin in GST (glutathione S-transferase) pull-down and immunoprecipitation assays. CSE1L-GFP (green fluorescence protein) fusion protein experiments showed that the N-terminal of CSE1L interacted with microtubules. Increased CSE1L expression resulted in decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of {alpha}-tubulin and {beta}-tubulin, increased {alpha}-tubulin and {beta}-tubulin association, and enhanced assembly of microtubules. Cell protrusions or pseudopodia are temporary extensions of the plasma membrane and are implicated in cancer cell migration and invasion. Increased CSE1L expression increased the extension of MCF-7 cell protrusions. In vitro migration assay showed that enhanced CSE1L expression increased the migration of MCF-7 cells. Our results indicate that CSE1L plays a role in regulating the extension of cell protrusions and promotes the migration of cancer cells.

  8. B-cell antigen receptor signaling enhances chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell migration and survival: specific targeting with a novel spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor, R406

    PubMed Central

    Quiroga, Maite P.; Balakrishnan, Kumudha; Kurtova, Antonina V.; Sivina, Mariela; Keating, Michael J.; Wierda, William G.; Gandhi, Varsha

    2009-01-01

    Antigenic stimulation through the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) is considered to promote the expansion of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B cells. The spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), a key component of BCR signaling, can be blocked by R406, a small-molecule Syk inhibitor, that displayed activity in CLL patients in a first clinical trial. In this study, we investigated the effects of BCR stimulation and R406 on CLL cell survival and migration. The prosurvival effects promoted by anti-IgM stimulation and nurselike cells were abrogated by R406. BCR triggering up-regulated adhesion molecules, and increased CLL cell migration toward the chemokines CXCL12 and CXCL13. BCR activation also enhanced CLL cell migration beneath marrow stromal cells. These responses were blocked by R406, which furthermore abrogated BCR-dependent secretion of T-cell chemokines (CCL3 and CCL4) by CLL cells. Finally, R406 inhibited constitutive and BCR-induced activation of Syk, extracellular signal-regulated kinases, and AKT, and blocked BCR-induced calcium mobilization. These findings suggest that BCR activation favors CLL cell homing, retention, and survival in tissue microenvironments. R406 effectively blocks these BCR-dependent responses in CLL cells, providing an explanation for the activity of R406 in patients with CLL. PMID:19491390

  9. B-cell antigen receptor signaling enhances chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell migration and survival: specific targeting with a novel spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor, R406.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, Maite P; Balakrishnan, Kumudha; Kurtova, Antonina V; Sivina, Mariela; Keating, Michael J; Wierda, William G; Gandhi, Varsha; Burger, Jan A

    2009-07-30

    Antigenic stimulation through the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) is considered to promote the expansion of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B cells. The spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), a key component of BCR signaling, can be blocked by R406, a small-molecule Syk inhibitor, that displayed activity in CLL patients in a first clinical trial. In this study, we investigated the effects of BCR stimulation and R406 on CLL cell survival and migration. The prosurvival effects promoted by anti-IgM stimulation and nurselike cells were abrogated by R406. BCR triggering up-regulated adhesion molecules, and increased CLL cell migration toward the chemokines CXCL12 and CXCL13. BCR activation also enhanced CLL cell migration beneath marrow stromal cells. These responses were blocked by R406, which furthermore abrogated BCR-dependent secretion of T-cell chemokines (CCL3 and CCL4) by CLL cells. Finally, R406 inhibited constitutive and BCR-induced activation of Syk, extracellular signal-regulated kinases, and AKT, and blocked BCR-induced calcium mobilization. These findings suggest that BCR activation favors CLL cell homing, retention, and survival in tissue microenvironments. R406 effectively blocks these BCR-dependent responses in CLL cells, providing an explanation for the activity of R406 in patients with CLL.

  10. Olanzapine inhibits proliferation, migration and anchorage-independent growth in human glioblastoma cell lines and enhances temozolomide's antiproliferative effect.

    PubMed

    Karpel-Massler, Georg; Kast, Richard Eric; Westhoff, Mike-Andrew; Dwucet, Annika; Welscher, Nathalie; Nonnenmacher, Lisa; Hlavac, Michal; Siegelin, Markus David; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Halatsch, Marc-Eric

    2015-03-01

    The poor prognosis of patients with glioblastoma fuels the search for more effective therapeutic compounds. We previously hypothesised that the neuroleptic olanzapine may enhance antineoplastic effects of temozolomide the standard chemotherapeutic agent used in this disease. This study tested this hypothesis. The anti-proliferative effect of olanzapine was examined by MTT assays and cell count analysis. Soft-agar assays were performed to examine colony-forming ability. In addition, the inhibitory effect of olanzapine on the migratory capacity of U87MG and A172 cells was analyzed by Transwell(®) assays. Moreover, staining for annexin V/propidium iodide or carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester was performed prior to flow cytometric analysis in order to better understand the subjacent cellular mechanism. Our initial hypothesis that olanzapine may enhance temozolomide's anti-tumor activity could be confirmed in U87MG and A172 glioblastoma cell lines. Moreover, treatment with olanzapine alone resulted in a marked anti-proliferative effect on U87MG, A172 and two glioma stem-like cells with IC50 values ranging from 25 to 79.9 µM. In U87MG cells, anchorage-independent growth was dose-dependently inhibited. In A172 cells, migration was also shown to be inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, olanzapine was shown to exert a cell line-dependent pleomorphism with respect to the induction of apoptosis, necrosis and/or cytostasis. Our data show that the neuroleptic olanzapine enhances the anti-tumor activity of temozolomide against glioblastoma cell lines. Moreover, this is the first study to show that olanzapine provides on its own anti-cancer activity in glioblastoma and thus may have potential for repurposing.

  11. Adenovirus-Mediated CCR7 and BTLA Overexpression Enhances Immune Tolerance and Migration in Immature Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Haiming; Zhu, Jinhong; Miao, Hongcheng; Gong, Zhenyu; Jiang, Xiaochen; Feng, Xiaoyan

    2017-01-01

    Our previous report revealed that immature dendritic cells (imDCs) with adenovirus-mediated CCR7 overexpression acquired an enhanced migratory ability but also exhibited the lower immune tolerance observed in more mature cells. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether BTLA overexpression was sufficient to preserve immune tolerance in imDCs with exogenous CCR7 overexpression. Scanning electron microscopy and surface antigens analysis revealed that BTLA overexpression suppressed DC maturation, an effect further potentiated in CCR7 and BTLA cooverexpressing cells. Correspondingly, in vitro chemotaxis assays and mixed lymphocyte reactions demonstrated increased migratory potential and immune tolerance in CCR7 and BTLA coexpressing cells. Furthermore, CCR7 and BTLA cooverexpressed imDCs suppressed IFN-γ and IL-17 expression and promoted IL-4 and TGF-beta expression of lymphocyte, indicating an increase of T helper 2 (Th2) regulatory T cell (Treg). Thus, these data indicate that CCR7 and BTLA cooverexpression imparts an intermediate immune phenotype in imDCs when compared to that in CCR7- or BTLA-expressing counterparts that show a more immunocompetent or immunotolerant phenotype, respectively. All these results indicated that adenovirus-mediated CCR7 and BTLA overexpression could enhance immune tolerance and migration of imDCs. Our study provides a basis for further studies on imDCs in immune tolerance, with the goal of developing effective cellular immunotherapies for transplant recipients. PMID:28393074

  12. Heat shock protein 90β stabilizes focal adhesion kinase and enhances cell migration and invasion in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Xiangyang; Wang, Yao; Liu, Chengmei; Lu, Quqin; Liu, Tao; Chen, Guoan; Rao, Hai; Luo, Shiwen

    2014-08-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) acts as a regulator of cellular signaling and may promote cell spreading, motility, invasion and survival in malignancy. Elevated expression and activity of FAK frequently correlate with tumor cell metastasis and poor prognosis in breast cancer. However, the mechanisms by which the turnover of FAK is regulated remain elusive. Here we report that heat shock protein 90β (HSP90β) interacts with FAK and the middle domain (amino acids 233–620) of HSP90β is mainly responsible for this interaction. Furthermore, we found that HSP90β regulates FAK stability since HSP90β inhibitor 17-AAG triggers FAK ubiquitylation and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation. Moreover, disrupted FAK-HSP90β interaction induced by 17-AAG contributes to attenuation of tumor cell growth, migration, and invasion. Together, our results reveal how HSP90β regulates FAK stability and identifies a potential therapeutic strategy to breast cancer. - Highlights: • HSP90β protects FAK from degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK attenuates tumorigenesis of breast cancer cells. • Genetic repression of HSP90β or FAK inhibits tumor cell migration and proliferation. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK interferes cell invasion and cytoskeleton.

  13. MRP4 knockdown enhances migration, suppresses apoptosis, and produces aggregated morphology in human retinal vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tagami, Mizuki; Kusuhara, Sentaro; Imai, Hisanori; Uemura, Akiyoshi; Honda, Shigeru; Tsukahara, Yasutomo; Negi, Akira

    2010-10-01

    The multidrug resistance protein (MRP) MRP4/ABCC4 is an ATP-binding cassette transporter that actively effluxes endogenous and xenobiotic substrates out of cells. In the rodent retina, Mrp4 mRNA and protein are exclusively expressed in vascular endothelial cells, but the angiogenic properties of Mrp4 are poorly understood so far. This study aims to explore the angiogenic properties of MRP4 in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRECs) utilizing the RNA interference (RNAi) technique. MRP4 expression was decreased at the mRNA and protein levels after stimulation with exogenous vascular endothelial growth factor in a dose-dependent manner. RNAi-mediated MRP4 knockdown in HRECs do not affect cell proliferation but enhances cell migration. Moreover, cell apoptosis induced by serum starvation was less prominent in MRP4 siRNA-treated HRECs as compared to control siRNA-treated HRECs. In a Matrigel-based tube-formation assay, although MRP4 knockdown did not lead to a significant change in the total tube length, MRP4 siRNA-treated HRECs assembled and aggregated into a massive tube-like structure, which was not observed in control siRNA-treated HRECs. These results suggest that MRP4 is uniquely involved in retinal angiogenesis.

  14. Vitisin B, a resveratrol tetramer, inhibits migration through inhibition of PDGF signaling and enhancement of cell adhesiveness in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, Eng-Thaim; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Huang, Yu-Ling; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Wu, Wen-Bin

    2011-10-15

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) play an important role in normal vessel formation and in the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. Grape plants contain resveratrol monomer and oligomers and drinking of wine made from grape has been linked to 'French Paradox'. In this study we evaluated the effect of vitisin B, a resveratrol tetramer, on VSMC behaviors. Vitisin B inhibited basal and PDGF-induced VSMC migration. Strikingly, it did not inhibit VSMC proliferation but inversely enhanced cell cycle progression and proliferation. Among the tested resveratrol oligomers, vitisin B showed an excellent inhibitory activity and selectivity on PDGF signaling. The anti-migratory effect by vitisin B was due to direct inhibition on PDGF signaling but was independent of interference with PDGF binding to VSMCs. Moreover, the enhanced VSMC adhesiveness to matrix contributed to the anti-migratory effect by vitisin B. Fluorescence microscopy revealed an enhanced reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and redistribution of activated focal adhesion proteins from cytosol to the peripheral edge of the cell membrane. This was confirmed by the observation that enhanced adhesiveness was repressed by the Src inhibitor. Finally, among the effects elicited by vitisin B, only the inhibitory effect toward basal migration was partially through estrogen receptor activation. We have demonstrated here that a resveratrol tetramer exhibited dual but opposite actions on VSMCs, one is to inhibit VSMC migration and the other is to promote VSMC proliferation. The anti-migratory effect was through a potent inhibition on PDGF signaling and novel enhancement on cell adhesion. - Highlights: > Several resveratrol oligomers from grape plants are examined on VSMC behaviors. > Tetraoligomer vitisin B shows excellent inhibitory activity and selectivity. > It exerts dual but opposing actions: anti-migratory and pro-proliferative effects. > The anti-migratory effect results from anti-PDGF signaling

  15. A novel strategy to enhance mesenchymal stem cell migration capacity and promote tissue repair in an injury specific fashion.

    PubMed

    Xinaris, C; Morigi, M; Benedetti, V; Imberti, B; Fabricio, A S; Squarcina, E; Benigni, A; Gagliardini, E; Remuzzi, G

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) of bone marrow origin appear to be an attractive candidate for cell-based therapies. However, the major barrier to the effective implementation of MSC-based therapies is the lack of specific homing of exogenously infused cells and overall the inability to drive them to the diseased or damaged tissue. In order to circumvent these limitations, we developed a preconditioning strategy to optimize MSC migration efficiency and potentiate their beneficial effect at the site of injury. Initially, we screened different molecules by using an in vitro injury-migration setting, and subsequently, we evaluated the effectiveness of the different strategies in mice with acute kidney injury (AKI). Our results showed that preconditioning of MSCs with IGF-1 before infusion improved cell migration capacity and restored normal renal function after AKI. The present study demonstrates that promoting migration of MSCs could increase their therapeutic potential and indicates a new therapeutic paradigm for organ repair.

  16. Poly-L-ornithine enhances migration of neural stem/progenitor cells via promoting α-Actinin 4 binding to actin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Hongfei; Yu, Anyong; Chen, Jingyu; Yuan, Jichao; Yin, Yi; Duanmu, Wangsheng; Tan, Liang; Yang, Yang; Lan, Chuan; Chen, Weixiang; Feng, Hua; Hu, Rong

    2016-01-01

    The recruitment of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) for brain restoration after injury is a promising regenerative therapeutic strategy. This strategy involves enhancing proliferation, migration and neuronal differentation of NSPCs. To date, the lack of biomaterials, which facilitate these processes to enhance neural regeneration, is an obstacle for the cell replacement therapies. Our previous study has shown that NSPCs grown on poly-L-ornithine (PO) could proliferate more vigorously and differentiate into more neurons than that on Poly-L-Lysine (PLL) and Fibronectin (FN). Here, we demonstrate that PO could promote migration of NSPCs in vitro, and the underlying mechanism is PO activates α-Actinins 4 (ACTN4), which is firstly certified to be expessed in NSPCs, to promote filopodia formation and therefore enhances NSPCs migration. Taken together, PO might serve as a better candidate for transplanted biomaterials in the regenerative therapeutic strategy, compared with PLL and FN. PMID:27874083

  17. Inhibition of Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 (EZH2) expression is associated with decreased tumor cell proliferation, migration and invasion in endometrial cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Eskander, Ramez N.; Ji, Tao; Huynh, Be; Wardeh, Rooba; Randall, Leslie M; Hoang, Bang

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 (EZH2) expression on endometrial cancer cell line behavior. Methods/materials EZH2 expression levels were compared between the non-malignant endometrial cell line T-HESC, and 3 endometrial cancer cell lines, ECC-1, RL95-2 and HEC1-A. Stable EZH2 knockdown cell lines were created and the impact on cellular proliferation, migration and invasion were determined. Fluorescent activated cell sorting was used to examine effects of EZH2 silencing on cell cycle progression. EZH2 expression in endometrial cancer tissue specimens was examined using immunohistochemistry. Comparison of differences between control and shEZH2 cell lines was performed using student's t test and Fischer's exact test. Results EZH2 protein expression was increased in all 3 cancer cell lines, and human endometrial cancer tissue specimens relative to control. RNA interference of EZH2 expression in ECC-1, RL95-2, and HEC1-A significantly decreased cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Down regulation of EZH2 expression resulted in a significant increase in the proportion of cells arrested in G2/M. RNA interference of EZH2 expression was associated with an increase in the expression of Wnt pathway inhibitors sFRP1 and DKK3, and a concomitant decrease in β-catenin. EZH2 expression in human tissue samples was significantly associated with increased stage, grade, depth of invasion and nodal metastasis. Conclusions EZH2 expression is associated with tumor cell proliferation, migration and invasion in 3 endometrial cancer cell lines, as well as increased stage, grade, depth of invasion and nodal metastasis in human cancer tissue specimens. Further investigation into this potential therapeutic target is warranted. PMID:23792601

  18. Atezolizumab in combination with bevacizumab enhances antigen-specific T-cell migration in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wallin, Jeffrey J.; Bendell, Johanna C.; Funke, Roel; Sznol, Mario; Korski, Konstanty; Jones, Suzanne; Hernandez, Genevive; Mier, James; He, Xian; Hodi, F. Stephen; Denker, Mitchell; Leveque, Vincent; Cañamero, Marta; Babitski, Galina; Koeppen, Hartmut; Ziai, James; Sharma, Neeraj; Gaire, Fabien; Chen, Daniel S.; Waterkamp, Daniel; Hegde, Priti S.; McDermott, David F.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-tumour immune activation by checkpoint inhibitors leads to durable responses in a variety of cancers, but combination approaches are required to extend this benefit beyond a subset of patients. In preclinical models tumour-derived VEGF limits immune cell activity while anti-VEGF augments intra-tumoral T-cell infiltration, potentially through vascular normalization and endothelial cell activation. This study investigates how VEGF blockade with bevacizumab could potentiate PD-L1 checkpoint inhibition with atezolizumab in mRCC. Tissue collections are before treatment, after bevacizumab and after the addition of atezolizumab. We discover that intra-tumoral CD8+ T cells increase following combination treatment. A related increase is found in intra-tumoral MHC-I, Th1 and T-effector markers, and chemokines, most notably CX3CL1 (fractalkine). We also discover that the fractalkine receptor increases on peripheral CD8+ T cells with treatment. Furthermore, trafficking lymphocyte increases are observed in tumors following bevacizumab and combination treatment. These data suggest that the anti-VEGF and anti-PD-L1 combination improves antigen-specific T-cell migration. PMID:27571927

  19. Proteomic analysis of acquired tamoxifen resistance in MCF-7 cells reveals expression signatures associated with enhanced migration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    tamoxifen resistant breast cancer cells are characterized by down-regulated ER signaling, activation of alternative survival pathways, and enhanced cell motility through regulation of the actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Evidence also emerged that S100P mediates acquired tamoxifen resistance and migration capacity. PMID:22417809

  20. Biomimetic stochastic topography and electric fields synergistically enhance directional migration of corneal epithelial cells in a MMP-3-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; Raghunathan, Vijay Krishna; Reid, Brian; Wei, Dongguang; Diaz, Rodney C; Russell, Paul; Murphy, Christopher J; Zhao, Min

    2015-01-01

    Directed migration of corneal epithelial cells (CECs) is critical for maintenance of corneal homeostasis as well as wound healing. Soluble cytoactive factors and the intrinsic chemical attributes of the underlying extracellular matrix (ECM) participate in stimulating and directing migration. The central importance of the intrinsic biophysical attributes of the microenvironment of the cell in modulating an array of fundamental epithelial behaviors including migration has been widely documented. Among the best measures of these attributes are the intrinsic topography and stiffness of the ECM and electric fields (EFs). How cells integrate these multiple simultaneous inputs is not well understood. Here, we present a method that combines the use of (i) topographically patterned substrates (mean pore diameter 800nm) possessing features that approximate those found in the native corneal basement membrane; and (ii) EFs (0-150mVmm(-1)) mimicking those at corneal epithelial wounds that the cells experience in vivo. We found that topographic cues and EFs synergistically regulated directional migration of human CECs and that this was associated with upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3). MMP3 expression and activity were significantly elevated with 150mVmm(-1) applied-EF while MMP2/9 remained unaltered. MMP3 expression was elevated in cells cultured on patterned surfaces against planar surfaces. The highest single-cell migration rate was observed with 150mVmm(-1) applied EF on patterned and planar surfaces. When cultured as a confluent sheet, EFs induced collective cell migration on stochastically patterned surfaces compared with dissociated single-cell migration on planar surfaces. These results suggest significant interaction of biophysical cues in regulating cell behaviors and will help define design parameters for corneal prosthetics and help to better understand corneal wound healing.

  1. BIOMIMETIC STOCHASTIC TOPOGRAPHY AND ELECTRIC FIELDS SYNERGISTICALLY ENHANCE DIRECTIONAL MIGRATION OF CORNEAL EPITHELIAL CELLS IN A MMP-3 DEPENDENT MANNER

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jing; Raghunathan, Vijay Krishna; Reid, Brian; Wei, Dongguang; Diaz, Rodney C.; Russell, Paul; Murphy, Christopher J; Zhao, Min

    2014-01-01

    Directed migration of corneal epithelial cells (CECs) is critical for maintenance of corneal homeostasis as well as wound healing. Soluble cytoactive factors and the intrinsic chemical attributes of the underlying extracellularmatrix (ECM) participate in stimulating and directing migration. Additionally, numerous publications document the central importance of the intrinsic biophysical attributes of the microenvironment of the cell in modulating an array of fundamental epithelial behaviors including migration. Among the best studies of these attributes are the intrinsic topography and stiffness of the ECM and electric fields (EF). How cells integrate these multiple simultaneous inputs is not well understood. Here, we present a method that combines the use of 1. topographically patterned substrates (mean pore diameter of 800 nm) possessing features that approximate those found in the native corneal basement membrane and 2. EF (0–150 mV/mm) mimicking those at corneal epithelial wounds that the cells experience in vivo. We found that topographic cues and EFs synergistically regulated directional migration of human CECs and that this was associated with upregulation of MMP-3. MMP3 expression and activity were significantly elevated with 150 mV/mm applied-EF while MMP2/9 remained unaltered. MMP3 expression was elevated in cells cultured on patterned-surfaces against planar-surfaces. Maximum single cell migration rate was observed with 150 mV/mm applied EF on patterned and planar surfaces. When cultured as a confluent sheet, EFs induced collective cell migration on stochastically patterned surfaces compared with dissociated single cell migration on planar surfaces. These results suggest significant interaction of biophysical cues in regulating cell behaviors and will help define design parameters for corneal prosthetics and help to better understand corneal woundhealing. PMID:25311684

  2. Human enhancer of filamentation 1-induced colorectal cancer cell migration: Role of serine phosphorylation and interaction with the breast cancer anti-estrogen resistance 3 protein.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Rama; Lemoine, Antoinette; Bertoglio, Jacques; Raingeaud, Joël

    2015-07-01

    Human enhancer of filamentation 1 (HEF1) is a member of the p130Cas family of docking proteins involved in integrin-mediated cytoskeleton reorganization associated with cell migration. Elevated expression of HEF1 promotes invasion and metastasis in multiple cancer cell types. To date, little is known on its role in CRC tumor progression. HEF1 is phosphorylated on several Ser/Thr residues but the effects of these post-translational modifications on the functions of HEF1 are poorly understood. In this manuscript, we investigated the role of HEF1 in migration of colorectal adeno-carcinoma cells. First, we showed that overexpression of HEF1 in colo-carcinoma cell line HCT116 increases cell migration. Moreover, in these cells, HEF1 increases Src-mediated phosphorylation of FAK on Tyr-861 and 925. We then showed that HEF1 mutation on Ser-369 enhances HEF1-induced migration and FAK phosphorylation as a result of protein stabilization. We also, for the first time characterized a functional mutation of HEF1 on Arg-367 which mimics the effect of Ser-369 to Ala mutation. Finally through mass spectrometry experiments, we identified BCAR3 as an essential interactor and mediator of HEF1-induced migration. We demonstrated that single amino acid mutations that prevent formation of the HEF1-BCAR3 complex impair HEF1-mediated migration. Therefore, amino-acid substitutions that impede Ser-369 phosphorylation stabilize HEF1 which increases the migration of CRC cells and this latter effect requires the interaction of HEF1 with the NSP family adaptor protein BCAR3. Collectively, these data reveal the importance of HEF1 expression level in cancer cell motility and then support the utilization of HEF1 as a biomarker of tumor progression.

  3. Multiscale Cues Drive Collective Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Peter; Wood, David K.; Kwon, Sunghoon; Provenzano, Paolo P.; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-01-01

    To investigate complex biophysical relationships driving directed cell migration, we developed a biomimetic platform that allows perturbation of microscale geometric constraints with concomitant nanoscale contact guidance architectures. This permits us to elucidate the influence, and parse out the relative contribution, of multiscale features, and define how these physical inputs are jointly processed with oncogenic signaling. We demonstrate that collective cell migration is profoundly enhanced by the addition of contract guidance cues when not otherwise constrained. However, while nanoscale cues promoted migration in all cases, microscale directed migration cues are dominant as the geometric constraint narrows, a behavior that is well explained by stochastic diffusion anisotropy modeling. Further, oncogene activation (i.e. mutant PIK3CA) resulted in profoundly increased migration where extracellular multiscale directed migration cues and intrinsic signaling synergistically conspire to greatly outperform normal cells or any extracellular guidance cues in isolation. PMID:27460294

  4. Multiscale Cues Drive Collective Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Peter; Wood, David K.; Kwon, Sunghoon; Provenzano, Paolo P.; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-07-01

    To investigate complex biophysical relationships driving directed cell migration, we developed a biomimetic platform that allows perturbation of microscale geometric constraints with concomitant nanoscale contact guidance architectures. This permits us to elucidate the influence, and parse out the relative contribution, of multiscale features, and define how these physical inputs are jointly processed with oncogenic signaling. We demonstrate that collective cell migration is profoundly enhanced by the addition of contract guidance cues when not otherwise constrained. However, while nanoscale cues promoted migration in all cases, microscale directed migration cues are dominant as the geometric constraint narrows, a behavior that is well explained by stochastic diffusion anisotropy modeling. Further, oncogene activation (i.e. mutant PIK3CA) resulted in profoundly increased migration where extracellular multiscale directed migration cues and intrinsic signaling synergistically conspire to greatly outperform normal cells or any extracellular guidance cues in isolation.

  5. Bradykinin enhances invasion of malignant glioma into the brain parenchyma by inducing cells to undergo amoeboid migration

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Stefanie; Sontheimer, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The molecular and cellular mechanisms governing cell motility and directed migration in response to the neuropeptide bradykinin are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that human glioma cells whose migration is guided by bradykinin generate bleb-like protrusions. We found that activation of the B2 receptor leads to a rise in free Ca2+ from internal stores that activates actomyosin contraction and subsequent cytoplasmic flow into protrusions forming membrane blebs. Furthermore Ca2+ activates Ca2+-dependent K+ and Cl− channels, which participate in bleb regulation. Treatment of gliomas with bradykinin in situ increased glioma growth by increasing the speed of cell migration at the periphery of the tumour mass. To test if bleb formation is related to bradykinin-promoted glioma invasion we blocked glioma migration with blebbistatin, a blocker of myosin kinase II, which is necessary for proper bleb retraction. Our findings suggest a pivotal role of bradykinin during glioma invasion by stimulating amoeboid migration of glioma cells. PMID:25194042

  6. How do voltage-gated sodium channels enhance migration and invasiveness in cancer cells?

    PubMed

    Besson, Pierre; Driffort, Virginie; Bon, Émeline; Gradek, Frédéric; Chevalier, Stéphan; Roger, Sébastien

    2015-10-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are abnormally expressed in tumors, often as neonatal isoforms, while they are not expressed, or only at a low level, in the matching normal tissue. The level of their expression and their activity is related to the aggressiveness of the disease and to the formation of metastases. A vast knowledge on the regulation of their expression and functioning has been accumulated in normal excitable cells. This helped understand their regulation in cancer cells. However, how voltage-gated sodium channels impose a pro-metastatic behavior to cancer cells is much less documented. This aspect will be addressed in the review. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  7. Overexpression of miR-664 is associated with enhanced osteosarcoma cell migration and invasion ability via targeting SOX7.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yongzheng; Chen, Bin; Wu, Qiang; Hu, Konghe; Xi, Xinhua; Zhu, Wengang; Zhong, Xueren; Chen, Jianting

    2017-02-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is one of the most common types of primary sarcoma of bone in children and young adults, and the long-term prognosis for OS patients still remains dismal due to the lack of effective early diagnostic biomarkers. Identifying sensitive and specific biomarkers in carcinogenesis may improve diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for this malignancy. The expression of miR-664 in osteosarcoma cell lines and osteosarcoma tissues was examined using real-time PCR. The effects of miR-664 on osteosarcoma cell migration and invasion were evaluated by cell invasion assays, migration assays, and three-dimension spheroid invasion assay. The effect of miR-664 on SOX7 was determined by luciferase assays and Western blot assay. The clinical association between miR-664 and SOX7 was analyzed by real-time PCR and Western blot assay. Expression of miR-664 was found to be upregulated in OS cell lines and tissues. Overexpression of miR-664 was associated with increased migration and invasive abilities of OS cells in vitro, whereas downregulation of miR-664 appeared to inhibit their migration and invasive potential. Furthermore, using biological approaches, we showed that miR-664 directly targeted and suppressed expression of the tumor suppressor SOX7. Additionally, the expression of miR-664 was negatively correlated with SOX7 expression in OS clinical tissues. Our findings suggest that miR-664 functions as an oncogene miRNA and has an important role in promoting human OS cell invasion and migration by suppressing SOX7 expression. Consequently, miR-664 may have potential as a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target of osteosarcoma.

  8. Migration-prone glioma cells show curcumin resistance associated with enhanced expression of miR-21 and invasion/anti-apoptosis-related proteins

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chiung-Yin; Huang, Bor-Ren; Lin, Chingju; Lu, Dah-Yuu; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2015-01-01

    In study, the expression patterns and functional differences between an original glioma cell population (U251 and U87) and sublines (U251-P10, U87-P10) that were selected to be migration-prone were investigated. The expressions levels of VEGF and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were increased in the migration-prone sublines as well as in samples from patients with high-grade glioma when compared to those with low-grade glioma. In addition, cells of the migration-prone sublines showed increased expression of the oncogenic microRNA. miR-21, which was also associated with more advanced clinical pathological stages in the patient tissue specimens. Treatment of U251 cells with an miR-21 mimic dramatically enhanced the migratory activity and expression of anti-apoptotic proteins. Furthermore, treatment with curcumin decreased the miR-21 level and anti-apoptotic protein expression, and increased the expression of pro-apoptosis proteins and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3-II (LC3-II) in U251 cells. The migration-prone sublines showed decreased induction of cell death markers in response to curcumin treatment. Finally, U251-P10 cells showed resistance against curcumin treatment. These results suggest that miR-21 is associated with regulation of the migratory ability and survival in human glioma cells. These findings suggest novel mechanisms of malignancy and new potential combinatorial strategies for the management of malignant glioma. PMID:26473373

  9. Dasatinib enhances migration of monocyte-derived dendritic cells by reducing phosphorylation of inhibitory immune receptors Siglec-9 and Siglec-3.

    PubMed

    Nerreter, Thomas; Köchel, Christoph; Jesper, Daniel; Eichelbrönner, Irina; Putz, Evelyn; Einsele, Hermann; Seggewiss-Bernhardt, Ruth

    2014-09-01

    The SRC family of kinases (SFKs) is crucial to malignant growth, but also important for signaling in immune cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). These specialized antigen-presenting cells are essential for inducing and boosting specific T-cell responses against pathogens and malignancies. Targeted therapy with SFK inhibitors holds great promise as a direct anti-cancer treatment, but potentially also as an indirect treatment via immunomodulation. Here, we investigated whether the BCR-ABL/SRC inhibitor dasatinib would modulate the major effector functions of DCs, especially their migration, a prerequisite to interaction with lymphocytes in secondary lymphoid organs. We report for the first time that dasatinib more than doubled the number of mature human monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs) migrating toward a CCL19 gradient despite unchanged CCR7 expression when used for pretreatment. These effects were caused by dephosphorylation of SFKs, as confirmed by the specific SFK inhibitor SRC inhibitor 1, leading to dephosphorylation of the inhibitory immunoreceptors Siglec-9 and Siglec-3. The specific blocking of the latter also enhanced migration and underlined the importance of these SFK-dependent receptor systems for migration of moDCs. Dasatinib hampered the secretion of interleukin-12 by moDCs at clinically relevant concentrations. In contrast, endocytosis or boosting of cytomegalovirus-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses remained unaltered when applying dasatinib-pretreated moDCs, in line with minor effects on the expression of co-stimulatory molecules essential for DC-T cell interaction. The induction of enhanced migration of moDCs may potentially be useful in chemo-immunotherapeutic applications. Thus, the use of dasatinib or blocking Siglec antibodies as adjuvants in this setting to induce stronger immune responses is worthy of further study.

  10. Substance P enhances the proliferation and migration potential of murine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell-like cell lines.

    PubMed

    Dubon, Maria Jose; Park, Ki-Sook

    2015-04-01

    Due to the therapeutic characteristics of bone marrow (BM)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), clinical trials are testing the use of autologous or allogeneic MSCs for the treatment of several conditions. These therapies require large numbers of MSCs and numerous studies are attempting to find substances that could enhance the egression of endogenous MSCs from the BM into the periphery and increase their proliferation in vivo and in vitro. It has been reported that substance P (SP) has the potential to increase the expansion of MSCs in vivo and to induce their mobilization from the BM into the periphery. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of SP on the migration and proliferation potential of two BM-derived MSC-like cell lines, ST2 and OP9. SP was found to induce the migration potential of ST2 cells in vitro. Furthermore, SP increased the proliferation of the MSCs cell line, OP9 cell line. Cyclin D1 expression was observed to increase in the OP9 cells, indicating the activation of the cell cycle in response to SP. The upstream signals involved in these phenomena have yet to be elucidated, although previous studies have proposed the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 and Wingless/β-catenin pathways as possible mediators of the cellular proliferation of human MSCs in response to SP. The present results therefore suggest that SP would facilitate the obtainment of higher numbers of endogenous MSCs from patients or donors and/or shorten the process of in vitro expansion that could cause the MSCs to undergo changes in their innate therapeutic characteristics prior to their use in therapy.

  11. Cell migration in the forebrain.

    PubMed

    Marín, Oscar; Rubenstein, John L R

    2003-01-01

    The forebrain comprises an intricate set of structures that are required for some of the most complex and evolved functions of the mammalian brain. As a reflection of its complexity, cell migration in the forebrain is extremely elaborated, with widespread dispersion of cells across multiple functionally distinct areas. Two general modes of migration are distinguished in the forebrain: radial migration, which establishes the general cytoarchitectonical framework of the different forebrain subdivisions; and tangential migration, which increases the cellular complexity of forebrain circuits by allowing the dispersion of multiple neuronal types. Here, we review the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying each of these types of migrations and discuss how emerging concepts in neuronal migration are reshaping our understanding of forebrain development in normal and pathological situations.

  12. PRRX2 as a novel TGF-β-induced factor enhances invasion and migration in mammary epithelial cell and correlates with poor prognosis in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Juang, Yu-Lin; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Chen, Chi-Long; Lien, Huang-Chun

    2016-12-01

    TGF-β and cancer progression share a multifaceted relationship. Despite the knowledge of TGF-β biology in the development of cancer, several factors that mediate the cancer-promoting role of TGF-β continue to be identified. This study aimed to identify and characterise novel factors potentially related to TGF-β-mediated tumour aggression in breast cells. We treated the human mammary epithelial cell line MCF10A with TGF-β and identified TGF-β-dependent upregulation of PRRX2, the gene encoding paired-related homeobox 2 transcription factor. Overexpression of PRRX2 enhanced migration, invasion and anchorage-independent growth of MCF10A cells and induced partial epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), as determined by partial fibroblastoid morphology of cells, upregulation of EMT markers and partially disrupted acinar structure in a three-dimensional culture. We further identified PLAT, the gene encoding tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), as the highest differentially expressed gene in PRRX2-overexpressing MCF10A cells, and demonstrated direct binding and transactivation of the PLAT promoter by PRRX2. Furthermore, PLAT knockdown inhibited PRRX2-mediated enhanced migration and invasion, suggesting that tPA may mediate PRRX2-induced migration and invasion. Finally, the significant correlation of PRRX2 expression with poor survival in 118 primary breast tumour samples (P = 0.027) and the increased PRRX2 expression in metaplastic breast carcinoma samples, which is pathogenetically related to EMT, validated the biological importance of PRRX2-enhanced migration and invasion and PRRX2-induced EMT. Thus, our data suggest that upregulation of PRRX2 may be a mechanism contributing to TGF-β-induced invasion and EMT in breast cancer. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. CXCL14 enhances proliferation and migration of NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells overexpressing the glycoproteins containing heparan sulfate or sialic acid.

    PubMed

    Park, Cho Rong; You, Dong-Joo; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Moon, Mi Jin; Lee, Cheolju; Oh, Seung-Hyun; Ahn, Curie; Seong, Jae Young; Hwang, Jong-Ik

    2013-05-01

    CXCL14 is a chemokine family member that is involved in various cellular responses in addition to immune cell activation. Although constitutive CXCL14 expression in normal epithelial cells may help protect against infection by activating immune systems, its expression in cancer cells has raised controversy regarding its possible role in tumorigenesis. However, the underlying mechanisms for this disparity remain unknown. Investigation of cellular CXCL14 binding properties might increase our understanding of the peptide's roles in tumorigenesis. In the present study, we found that CXCL14 binds to various cell types. Interestingly, binding to NCI-H460 cells was prevented by heparan sulfate and N-acetyl neuraminic acid. Next, we examined effect of CXCL14 binding in NCI-H460 and NCI-H23. CXCL14 enhanced proliferation and migration in NCI-H460 but had no effect on NCI-H23. A reporter gene assay with various transcription factor response elements revealed that only nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling was activated by CXCL14 in NCI-H460 cells, which was blocked by BAPTA-AM, TPCA-1, and brefeldin A. Exogenous expression of some glycoproteins such as syndecan-4, podoplanin, and CD43 in these cells enhanced CXCL14 binding and NF-κB activity. Collectively, these results demonstrate that CXCL14 binding to glycoproteins harboring heparan sulfate proteoglycans and sialic acids leads proliferation and migration of some cancer cells.

  14. Androgen receptor enhances cell adhesion and decreases cell migration via modulating β1-integrin-AKT signaling in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wen-Lung; Jeng, Long-Bin; Lai, Hsueh-Chou; Liao, Pei-Yin; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-08-28

    The androgen receptor (AR) has been shown to promote the initiation and development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during the early stage of the disease process and to suppress HCC cell invasion during the later stages of the disease. The mechanisms governing these dual yet opposite roles have yet to be elucidated. Using carcinogen-induced HCC in vivo mouse models and the in vitro human HCC cell line SKhep1, we found that knockout of AR in primary HCC cells led to a decrease in HCC cell focal adhesion capacity compared to cells from wildtype mice. Similar results were obtained after adding functional AR into human HCC SKhep1 cells. Further analysis revealed that the role AR plays in adhesion of HCC cells is governed, at least in part, by its ability to up-regulate β1-integrin and activate the PI3K/AKT pathway. We also found that AR-β1-integrin-mediated cell adhesion suppresses cell migration. Those findings indicate that the AR-β1-integrin-PI3K/AKT signaling pathway might play a role in the bimodal function of AR on cell adhesion and migration at the cellular level.

  15. TGF-β1 enhances SDF-1-induced migration and tube formation of choroid-retinal endothelial cells by up-regulating CXCR4 and CXCR7 expression.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yi-fan; Yuan, Fei; Guo, Hua; Wu, Wei-zhong

    2014-12-01

    Stromal derived factor (SDF)-1 has been confirmed to regulate angiogenesis in choroidal neovascularization formation via its two receptors, CXC chemokine receptors 4 (CXCR4) and 7 (CXCR7). Previous studies found that there is cross-talk between the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and SDF-1 pathways in some types of immune or tumor cells, but much less is known about this interaction in endothelial cells. This study investigated the effects of TGF-β1 on CXCR4 and CXCR7 expression as well as SDF-1-induced migration and tube formation in choroid-retinal endothelial (RF/6A) cells. RF/6A cells were treated with recombinant TGF-β1 at various concentrations and time points. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to examine the mRNA and protein levels of CXCR4 and CXCR7. In addition, transwell migration and Matrigel tube formation analyses were performed to investigate the role of TGF-β1 pretreatment in SDF-1-induced RF/6A cell migration and tube formation. Our results showed that treatment with recombinant human TGF-β1 enhanced the CXCR4 and CXCR7 levels in time- and dose-dependent manners. The increased CXCR4 and CXCR7 expression resulted in increased SDF-1-induced RF/6A cell migration and tube formation. In addition, the transcriptional regulation of CXCR4 and CXCR7 by TGF-β1 was found to be mediated by phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-related kinase1/2 pathway. Altogether, these results demonstrate that a cross-talk exists between the TGF-β1 and SDF-1 pathways in choroid-retinal endothelial cells, reflecting a novel molecular mechanism that explains the pro-angiogenic effects of TGF-β1 and possibly provides new perspectives for the treatment of CNV-associated diseases.

  16. Ovarian cancer ascites enhance the migration of patient-derived peritoneal mesothelial cells via cMet pathway through HGF-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Matte, Isabelle; Lane, Denis; Laplante, Claude; Garde-Granger, Perrine; Rancourt, Claudine; Piché, Alain

    2015-07-15

    Ovarian cancer ascites consist of a proinflammatory environment that is characterized by the presence of abundant human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMCs). Cytokines and growth factors in ascites modulate cell activities of tumor cells. The expression of proinflammatory cytokines in ascites is associated with a more aggressive tumor phenotype. The effect of ascites on HPMCs is for the most part unknown but this interplay is thought to be important for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) progression. Here, we examine the components of ascites, which stimulate patient-derived HPMC migration, from women with advanced EOC. We show that ovarian cancer ascites enhanced the migration of HPMCs. This effect was inhibited by heat treatment, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) blocking antibodies and a HGF receptor (cMet) inhibitor. In ovarian cancer ascites, HGF is present at high concentration compared to benign fluids. Ascites-mediated activation of cMet was associated with Akt and EKR1/2 phosphorylation. This response was partly inhibited by heat treatment and cMet inhibitor. Ascites-induced migration and a cMet phosphorylation were strongly inhibited by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor PD153035, suggesting the transactivation of cMet by EGFR. Our study suggests that HGF and ligands of EGFR are factors that mediate ovarian cancer ascites-mediated migration of HPMCs by activating cMet and possibly downstream ERK1/2 and Akt pathways. The study provides evidence for the first time that ascites not only support tumor growth but also enhance the migratory potential of cancer-associated mesothelial cells, which in turn may support cancer progression.

  17. Platelets enhance neutrophil transendothelial migration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Platelets are increasingly recognized as important mediators of inflammation in addition to thrombosis. While platelets have been shown to promote neutrophil (PMN) adhesion to endothelium in various inflammatory models, it is unclear whether platelets enhance neutrophil transmigration across inflame...

  18. Enhancing cell migration in shape-memory alginate-collagen composite scaffolds: In vitro and ex vivo assessment for intervertebral disc repair.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, Olivier; Naqvi, Syeda Masooma; Lennon, Kerri; Buckley, Conor Timothy

    2015-04-01

    weeks. Taken together, these findings illustrate the advantages of incorporating collagen as a means to enhance cell migration and proliferation in porous scaffolds which could be used to augment tissue repair strategies.

  19. Cell migration in confined environments.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We describe a protocol for measuring the speed of human neutrophils migrating through small channels, in conditions of mechanical confinement comparable to those experienced by neutrophils migrating through tissues. In such conditions, we find that neutrophils move persistently, at constant speed for tens of minutes, enabling precise measurements at single cells resolution, for large number of cells. The protocol relies on microfluidic devices with small channels in which a solution of chemoattractant and a suspension of isolated neutrophils are loaded in sequence. The migration of neutrophils can be observed for several hours, starting within minutes after loading the neutrophils in the devices. The protocol is divided into four main steps: the fabrication of the microfluidic devices, the separation of neutrophils from whole blood, the preparation of the assay and cell loading, and the analysis of data. We discuss the practical steps for the implementation of the migration assays in biology labs, the adaptation of the protocols to various cell types, including cancer cells, and the supplementary device features required for precise measurements of directionality and persistence during migration.

  20. Patient derived mutation W257G of PPP2R1A enhances cancer cell migration through SRC-JNK-c-Jun pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ae Lee; Han, Sora; Lee, Sunyi; Su Park, Jeong; Lu, Yiling; Yu, Shuangxing; Li, Jane; Chun, Kyung-Hee; Mills, Gordon B.; Yang, Young

    2016-01-01

    Mutation of PPP2R1A has been observed at high frequency in endometrial serous carcinomas but at low frequency in ovarian clear cell carcinoma. However, the biological role of mutation of PPP2R1A in ovarian and endometrial cancer progression remains unclear. In this study, we found that PPP2R1A expression is elevated in high-grade primary tumor patients with papillary serous tumors of the ovary. To determine whether increased levels or mutation of PPP2R1A might contribute to cancer progression, the effects of overexpression or mutation of PPP2R1A on cell proliferation, migration, and PP2A phosphatase activity were investigated using ovarian and endometrial cancer cell lines. Among the mutations, PPP2R1A-W257G enhanced cell migration in vitro through activating SRC-JNK-c-Jun pathway. Overexpression of wild type (WT) PPP2R1A increased its binding ability with B56 regulatory subunits, whereas PPP2R1A-mutations lost the ability to bind to most B56 subunits except B56δ. Total PP2A activity and PPP2R1A-associated PP2Ac activity were significantly increased in cells overexpressing PPP2R1A-WT. In addition, overexpression of PPP2R1A-WT increased cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. PMID:27272709

  1. Transcription factor activity of estrogen receptor α activation upon nonylphenol or bisphenol A treatment enhances the in vitro proliferation, invasion, and migration of neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongda; Yao, Yao; Wang, Changli; Zhang, Liyu; Cheng, Long; Wang, Yiren; Wang, Tao; Liang, Erguang; Jia, Hui; Ye, Qinong; Hou, Mingxiao; Feng, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Many kinds of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), for example, the environmental estrogens bisphenol A and nonylphenol, may regulate the activity of estrogen receptor α (ERα) and therefore induce potential disruption of normal endocrine function. However, the involvement of EDCs in human cancers, especially in endocrine-related cancer neuroblastoma regulation, is not very clear. In this work, results showed that upon bisphenol A or nonylphenol treatment, the transcription factor activity of ERα was significantly increased in neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. Bisphenol A and nonylphenol could enhance ERα activity via recruiting it to the target gene promoter. Furthermore, treatment of bisphenol A and nonylphenol enhanced the in vitro proliferation, invasion, and migration ability of neuroblastoma cells. By investigating the role of EDC-induced ERα upregulation, our data extend the understanding of the function of EDCs and further suggest that ERα might be a potential therapeutic target in human neuroblastoma treatment. PMID:27366082

  2. SIRT1 induces EMT by cooperating with EMT transcription factors and enhances prostate cancer cell migration and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Byles, V; Zhu, L; Lovaas, J D; Chmilewski, L K; Wang, J; Faller, D V; Dai, Y

    2012-10-25

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial program for the invasion and metastasis of epithelial tumors that involves loss of cell-cell adhesion and increased cell mobility; however, mechanisms underlying this transition are not fully elucidated. Here, we propose a novel mechanism through which the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent histone deacetylase SIRT1 regulates EMT in prostate cancer cells through cooperation with the EMT inducing transcription factor ZEB1. We found that forced expression of SIRT1 in non-transformed PZ-HPV-7 prostate epithelial cells disrupts the epithelial morphology concomitant with decreased expression of the epithelial marker, E-cadherin, and increased expression of mesenchymal markers. In contrast, silencing SIRT1 in metastatic prostate tumor cells restores cell-cell adhesion and induces a shift toward an epithelial morphology concomitant with increased expression of E-cadherin and decreased expression of mesenchymal markers. We also found that SIRT1 has a physiologically relevant role in endogenous EMT induced by EGF signaling in prostate cancer cells. We propose that the regulation of EMT by SIRT1 involves modulation of, and cooperation with, the EMT inducing transcription factor ZEB1. Specifically, we show that SIRT1 silencing reduces expression of ZEB1 and that SIRT1 is recruited to the E-cadherin proximal promoter by ZEB1 to deacetylate histone H3 and to reduce binding of RNA polymerase II, ultimately suppressing E-cadherin transcription. We thus identify a necessary role for ZEB1 in SIRT1-mediated EMT. Finally, we show that reduction of SIRT1 decreases prostate cancer cell migration in vitro and metastasis in vivo in immunodeficient mice, which is largely independent of any general effects of SIRT1 on prostate cancer growth and survival. We therefore identify SIRT1 as a positive regulator of EMT and metastatic growth of prostate cancer cells and our findings implicate overexpressed SIRT1 as a potential

  3. A Discrete Cell Migration Model

    SciTech Connect

    Nutaro, James J; Kruse, Kara L; Ward, Richard C; O'Quinn, Elizabeth; Woerner, Matthew M; Beckerman, Barbara G

    2007-01-01

    Migration of vascular smooth muscle cells is a fundamental process in the development of intimal hyperplasia, a precursor to development of cardiovascular disease and a potential response to injury of an arterial wall. Boyden chamber experiments are used to quantify the motion of cell populations in response to a chemoattractant gradient (i.e., cell chemotaxis). We are developing a mathematical model of cell migration within the Boyden chamber, while simultaneously conducting experiments to obtain parameter values for the migration process. In the future, the model and parameters will be used as building blocks for a detailed model of the process that causes intimal hyperplasia. The cell migration model presented in this paper is based on the notion of a cell as a moving sensor that responds to an evolving chemoattractant gradient. We compare the results of our three-dimensional hybrid model with results from a one-dimensional continuum model. Some preliminary experimental data that is being used to refine the model is also presented.

  4. Human umbilical cord perivascular cells exhibited enhanced migration capacity towards hepatocellular carcinoma in comparison with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells: a role for autocrine motility factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Bayo, Juan; Fiore, Esteban; Aquino, Jorge B; Malvicini, Mariana; Rizzo, Manglio; Peixoto, Estanislao; Alaniz, Laura; Piccioni, Flavia; Bolontrade, Marcela; Podhajcer, Osvaldo; Garcia, Mariana G; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Unfortunately, the incidence and mortality associated with HCC are increasing. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed and the use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) as carrier of therapeutic genes is emerging as a promising option. Different sources of MSCs are being studied for cell therapy and bone marrow-derived cells are the most extensively explored; however, birth associated-tissues represent a very promising source. The aim of this work was to compare the in vitro and in vivo migration capacity between bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) and human umbilical cord perivascular cells (HUCPVCs) towards HCC. We observed that HUCPVCs presented higher in vitro and in vivo migration towards factors released by HCC. The expression of autocrine motility factor (AMF) receptor, genes related with the availability of the receptor on the cell surface (caveolin-1 and -2) and metalloproteinase 3, induced by the receptor activation and important for cell migration, was increased in HUCPVCs. The chemotactic response towards recombinant AMF was increased in HUCPVCs compared to BM-MSCs, and its inhibition in the conditioned medium from HCC induced higher decrease in HUCPVC migration than in BM-MSC. Our results indicate that HUCPVCs could be a useful cellular source to deliver therapeutic genes to HCC.

  5. Human Umbilical Cord Perivascular Cells Exhibited Enhanced Migration Capacity towards Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Comparison with Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: A Role for Autocrine Motility Factor Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Aquino, Jorge B.; Malvicini, Mariana; Bolontrade, Marcela; Podhajcer, Osvaldo; Garcia, Mariana G.; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Unfortunately, the incidence and mortality associated with HCC are increasing. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed and the use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) as carrier of therapeutic genes is emerging as a promising option. Different sources of MSCs are being studied for cell therapy and bone marrow-derived cells are the most extensively explored; however, birth associated-tissues represent a very promising source. The aim of this work was to compare the in vitro and in vivo migration capacity between bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) and human umbilical cord perivascular cells (HUCPVCs) towards HCC. We observed that HUCPVCs presented higher in vitro and in vivo migration towards factors released by HCC. The expression of autocrine motility factor (AMF) receptor, genes related with the availability of the receptor on the cell surface (caveolin-1 and -2) and metalloproteinase 3, induced by the receptor activation and important for cell migration, was increased in HUCPVCs. The chemotactic response towards recombinant AMF was increased in HUCPVCs compared to BM-MSCs, and its inhibition in the conditioned medium from HCC induced higher decrease in HUCPVC migration than in BM-MSC. Our results indicate that HUCPVCs could be a useful cellular source to deliver therapeutic genes to HCC. PMID:25147818

  6. Loss of PTPN12 Stimulates Progression of ErbB2-Dependent Breast Cancer by Enhancing Cell Survival, Migration, and Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Davidson, Dominique; Martins Souza, Cleiton; Zhong, Ming-Chao; Wu, Ning; Park, Morag; Muller, William J; Veillette, André

    2015-12-01

    PTPN12 is a cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) reported to be a tumor suppressor in breast cancer, through its capacity to dephosphorylate oncogenic receptor protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs), such as ErbB2. However, the precise molecular and cellular impact of PTPN12 deficiency in breast cancer progression remains to be fully clarified. Here, we addressed this issue by examining the effect of PTPN12 deficiency on breast cancer progression in vivo, in a mouse model of ErbB2-dependent breast cancer using a conditional PTPN12-deficient mouse. Our studies showed that lack of PTPN12 in breast epithelial cells accelerated breast cancer development and lung metastases in vivo. PTPN12-deficient breast cancer cells displayed enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of the adaptor Cas, the adaptor paxillin, and the kinase Pyk2. They exhibited no detectable increase in ErbB2 tyrosine phosphorylation. PTPN12-deficient cells were more resistant to anoikis and had augmented migratory and invasive properties. Enhanced migration was corrected by inhibiting Pyk2. PTPN12-deficient breast cancer cells also acquired partial features of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a feature of more aggressive forms of breast cancer. Hence, loss of PTPN12 promoted tumor progression in a mouse model of breast cancer, supporting the notion that PTPN12 is a tumor suppressor in human breast cancer. This function was related to the ability of PTPN12 to suppress cell survival, migration, invasiveness, and EMT and to inhibit tyrosine phosphorylation of Cas, Pyk2, and paxillin. These findings enhance our understanding of the role and mechanism of action of PTPN12 in the control of breast cancer progression.

  7. Environmental enrichment brings a beneficial effect on beam walking and enhances the migration of doublecortin-positive cells following striatal lesions in rats.

    PubMed

    Urakawa, S; Hida, H; Masuda, T; Misumi, S; Kim, T-S; Nishino, H

    2007-02-09

    Rats raised in an enriched environment (enriched rats) have been reported to show less motor dysfunction following brain lesions, but the neuronal correlates of this improvement have not been well clarified. The present study aimed to elucidate the effect of chemical brain lesions and environmental enrichment on motor function and lesion-induced neurogenesis. Three week-old, recently weaned rats were divided into two groups: one group was raised in an enriched environment and the other group was raised in a standard cage for 5 weeks. Striatal damage was induced at an age of 8 weeks by injection of the neuro-toxins 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or quinolinic acid (QA) into the striatum, or by injection of 6-OHDA into the substantia nigra (SN), which depleted nigrostriatal dopaminergic innervation. Enriched rats showed better performance on beam walking compared with those raised in standard conditions, but both groups showed similar forelimb use asymmetry in a cylinder test. The number of bromodeoxyuridine-labeled proliferating cells in the subventricular zone was increased by a severe striatal lesion induced by QA injection 1 week after the lesion, but decreased by injection of 6-OHDA into the SN. Following induction of lesions by striatal injection of 6-OHDA or QA, the number of cells positive for doublecortin (DCX) was strongly increased in the striatum; however, there was no change in the number of DCX-positive cells following 6-OHDA injection into the SN. Environmental enrichment enhanced the increase of DCX-positive cells with migrating morphology in the dorsal striatum. In enriched rats, DCX-positive cells traversed the striatal parenchyma far from the corpus callosum and lateral ventricle. DCX-positive cells co-expressed an immature neuronal marker, polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule, but were negative for a glial marker. These data suggest that environmental enrichment improves motor performance on beam walking and enhances neuronal migration toward

  8. Platelet lysate coating on scaffolds directly and indirectly enhances cell migration, improving bone and blood vessel formation.

    PubMed

    Leotot, Julie; Coquelin, Laura; Bodivit, Gwellaouen; Bierling, Philippe; Hernigou, Philippe; Rouard, Helene; Chevallier, Nathalie

    2013-05-01

    Suitable colonization and vascularization of tissue-engineered constructs after transplantation represent critical steps for the success of bone repair. Human platelet lysate (hPL) is composed of numerous growth factors known for their proliferative, differentiative and chemo-attractant effects on various cells involved in wound healing and bone growth. The aim of this study was to determine whether the delivery of human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC) seeded on hPL-coated hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate (HA/β-TCP) scaffolds could enhance vascularization and bone formation, as well as to investigate the mechanisms by which hMSC participate in tissue regeneration. Our study demonstrates that hPL can be coated on HA/β-TCP scaffolds, which play direct and indirect effects on implanted and/or resident stem cells. Effectively, we show that hPL coating directly increases chemo-attraction to and adhesion of hMSC and endothelial cells on the scaffold. Moreover, we show that hPL coating induces hMSC to produce and secrete pro-angiogenic proteins (placental growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor) which allow the proliferation and specific chemo-attraction of endothelial cells in vitro, thus improving in vivo neovascularization and new bone formation. This study highlights the potential of functionalizing biomaterials with hPL and shows that this growth factor combination can have synergistic effects leading to enhanced bone and blood vessel formation.

  9. MiR-106b promotes migration and invasion through enhancing EMT via downregulation of Smad 7 in Kazakh's esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dai, Fang; Liu, Tao; Zheng, Shutao; Liu, Qing; Yang, Chenchen; Zhou, Jian; Chen, Yumei; Sheyhidin, Ilyar; Lu, Xiaomei

    2016-11-01

    Accumulated evidence suggests that miR-106b played a key role in the promotion of the metastases of cancer; however, little is known about miR-106b in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). To investigate expression level of miR-106b in ESCC tissues, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was used to detect miR-106b expression in 35 Kazakh's ESCC and paired normal adjacent tissues (NATs). To evaluate the role mediated by miR-106b in the proliferation, migration, and invasion, MTT, wound healing, and transwell assays were employed, respectively. Luciferase reporter assay was used to identify the downstream target through miR-106b. To understand the regulation between miR-106b and Smad 7, qRT-PCR and western blot were performed. The present study showed that miR-106b was pronouncedly upregulated in ESCC relative to paired NAT and that upregulated miR-106b was significantly associated with lymph node metastases. MiR-106b was found to be able to promote proliferation, migration, and invasion of ESCC cells in vitro. Smad 7 was confirmed as a downstream target of miR-106b in our experimental setting. Smad 7 was remarkably downregulated in ESCC compared with paired NAT. In addition, upregulation of miR-106b can promote epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) in ESCC cell in vitro. Our results indicated that miR-106b can promote migration and invasion of ESCC cells through enhancing EMT process via downregulation of Smad 7, suggesting that miR-106b can be a potential molecular phenotype in ESCC metastases.

  10. Conditionally immortalized human pancreatic stellate cell lines demonstrate enhanced proliferation and migration in response to IGF-I

    SciTech Connect

    Rosendahl, Ann H.; Gundewar, Chinmay; Said Hilmersson, Katarzyna; Ni, Lan; Saleem, Moin A.; Andersson, Roland

    2015-01-15

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a key role in the dense desmoplastic stroma associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Studies on human PSCs have been minimal due to difficulty in maintaining primary PSC in culture. We have generated the first conditionally immortalized human non-tumor (NPSC) and tumor-derived (TPSC) pancreatic stellate cells via transformation with the temperature-sensitive SV40 large T antigen and human telomerase (hTERT). These cells proliferate at 33°C. After transfer to 37°C, the SV40LT is switched off and the cells regain their primary PSC phenotype and growth characteristics. NPSC contained cytoplasmic vitamin A-storing lipid droplets, while both NPSC and TPSC expressed the characteristic markers αSMA, vimentin, desmin and GFAP. Proteome array analysis revealed that of the 55 evaluated proteins, 27 (49%) were upregulated ≥3-fold in TPSC compared to NPSC, including uPA, pentraxin-3, endoglin and endothelin-1. Two insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) were inversely expressed. Although discordant IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 levels, IGF-I was found to stimulate proliferation of both NPSC and TPSC. Both basal and IGF-I stimulated motility was significantly enhanced in TPSC compared to NPSC. In conclusion, these cells provide a unique resource that will facilitate further study of the active stroma compartment associated with pancreatic cancer. - Highlights: • Generation of human conditionally immortalized human pancreatic stellate cell lines. • Temperature-sensitive SV40LT allows switch to primary PSC phenotype characteristics. • Proteome profiling revealed distinct expression patterns between TPSC and NPSC. • Enhanced IGF-I-stimulated proliferation and motility by TPSC compared to NPSC.

  11. Nerve growth factor enhances voltage-gated Na+ channel activity and Transwell migration in Mat-LyLu rat prostate cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Brackenbury, William J; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2007-03-01

    The highly dynamic nature of voltage-gated Na+ channel (VGSC) expression and its controlling mechanism(s) are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the possible involvement of nerve growth factor (NGF) in regulating VGSC activity in the strongly metastatic Mat-LyLu cell model of rat prostate cancer (PCa). NGF increased peak VGSC current density in a time- and dose-dependent manner. NGF also shifted voltage to peak and the half-activation voltage to more positive potentials, and produced currents with faster kinetics of activation; sensitivity to the VGSC blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX) was not affected. The NGF-induced increase in peak VGSC current density was suppressed by both the pan-trk antagonist K252a, and the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT5720. NGF did not affect the Nav1.7 mRNA level, but the total VGSC alpha-subunit protein level was upregulated. NGF potentiated the cells' migration in Transwell assays, and this was not affected by TTX. We concluded that NGF upregulated functional VGSC expression in Mat-LyLu cells, with PKA as a signaling intermediate, but enhancement of migration by NGF was independent of VGSC activity.

  12. MicroRNA-106b-25 cluster targets β-TRCP2, increases the expression of Snail and enhances cell migration and invasion in H1299 (non small cell lung cancer) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Savita, Udainiya; Karunagaran, Devarajan

    2013-05-17

    Highlights: •miR-106b-25 cluster directly targets the 3′UTR of the β-TRCP2 transcript. •β-TRCP2 mRNA was lower in H1299 cells stably expressing miR-106b-25 cluster. •miR-106b-25 cluster increased the expression of Snail. •miR-106b-25 cluster promoted the migration, colony formation and invasion. •miR-106b-25 cluster enhanced endothelial tube formation. -- Abstract: Lung cancer causes high mortality without a declining trend and non small cell lung cancer represents 85% of all pulmonary carcinomas. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) serve as fine regulators of proliferation, migration, invasion/metastasis and angiogenesis of normal and cancer cells. Using TargetScan6.2, we predicted that the ubiquitin ligase, β-TRCP2, could be a target for two of the constituent miRNAs of the miR-106b-25 cluster (miR-106b and miR-93). We generated a stable clone of miR-106b-25 cluster (CL) or the empty vector (EV) in H1299 (non small cell lung cancer) cells. The expression of β-TRCP2 mRNA was significantly lower in CL than that in EV cells. Transient expression of miR-93 but not antimiR-93 decreased the expression of β-TRCP2 mRNA in H1299 cells. β-TRCP2-3′UTR reporter assay revealed that its activity in CL cells was only 60% of that in EV cells. Snail protein expression was higher in CL than that in EV cells and H1299 cells exhibited an increase in the expression of Snail upon transient transfection with miR-93. miR-106b-25 cluster-induced migration of CL measured by scratch assay was more than that in EV cells and no significant difference in migration was observed between antimiR-93-transfected H1299 cells and the corresponding control-oligo-transfected cells. miR-106b-25 cluster-induced migration of CL cells was again confirmed in a Boyden chamber assay without the matrigel. CL cells were more invasive than EV cells when assessed using Boyden chambers with matrigel but there were no significant changes in the cell viabilities between EV and CL cells. Colony formation assay

  13. Cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Moutasim, Karwan A; Nystrom, Maria L; Thomas, Gareth J

    2011-01-01

    A number of in vitro assays have been developed to study tumor cell motility. Historically, assays have been mainly monocellular, where carcinoma cells are studied in isolation. Scratch assays can be used to study the collective and directional movement of populations of cells, whereas two chamber assays lend themselves to the analysis of chemotactic/haptotactic migration and cell invasion. However, an inherent disadvantage of these assays is that they grossly oversimplify the complex process of invasion, lacking the tumor structural architecture and stromal components. Organotypic assays, where tumor cells are grown at an air/liquid interface on gels populated with stromal cells, are a more physiologically relevant method for studying 3-dimensional tumor invasion.

  14. Force transmission in migrating cells

    PubMed Central

    Sauser, Roger; Ambrosi, Davide; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Verkhovsky, Alexander B.

    2010-01-01

    During cell migration, forces generated by the actin cytoskeleton are transmitted through adhesion complexes to the substrate. To investigate the mechanism of force generation and transmission, we analyzed the relationship between actin network velocity and traction forces at the substrate in a model system of persistently migrating fish epidermal keratocytes. Front and lateral sides of the cell exhibited much stronger coupling between actin motion and traction forces than the trailing cell body. Further analysis of the traction–velocity relationship suggested that the force transmission mechanisms were different in different cell regions: at the front, traction was generated by a gripping of the actin network to the substrate, whereas at the sides and back, it was produced by the network’s slipping over the substrate. Treatment with inhibitors of the actin–myosin system demonstrated that the cell body translocation could be powered by either of the two different processes, actomyosin contraction or actin assembly, with the former associated with significantly larger traction forces than the latter. PMID:20100912

  15. Characterization of Collective Cell Migration Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Rachel; Yue, Haicen; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Losert, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    During cancer progression, tumor cells invade the surrounding tissue and migrate throughout the body, forming clinically dangerous secondary tumors. This metastatic process begins when cells leave the primary tumor, either as individual cells or collectively migrating groups. Here we present data on the migration dynamics of epithelial sheets composed of many cells. Using quantitative image analysis techniques, we are able to extract motion information from time-lapse images of cell lines with varying malignancy. Adapting metrics originally used to study fluid flows we are able to characterize the migration dynamics of these cell lines. By describing the migration dynamics in great detail, we are able to make a clear comparison of our results to a simulation of collective cell migration. Specifically, we explore whether leader cells are required to describe our expanding sheets of cells and whether the answer depends on individual cell activity.

  16. Migration in action: profiling border cells.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Heinrich

    2006-04-01

    Acquiring the ability to migrate is essential for cells taking part in many developmental and disease processes. Two studies in this issue of Developmental Cell use gene expression profiling of purified border cells from the Drosophila ovary to characterize the molecular changes required in cells to initiate migration in vivo. Their results offer interesting new insights into a moving cell's physiology.

  17. IDH1 R132H Mutation Enhances Cell Migration by Activating AKT-mTOR Signaling Pathway, but Sensitizes Cells to 5-FU Treatment as NADPH and GSH Are Reduced

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jiangdong; Huang, Keting; Wu, Mindan; Xia, Chunlin

    2017-01-01

    Aim of study Mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) gene were recently discovered in vast majority of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II/III gliomas. This study is to understand the effects of IDH1 R132H mutation in gliomagenesis and to develop new strategies to treat glioma with IDH1 R132H mutation. Materials and methods Over expression of IDH1 R132H in U87MG cells was done by transfecting cells with IDH1 R132H plasmid. MTT assay, scratch repair assay and western blot were performed to study effects of IDH1 R132H mutation on cell proliferation, migration, regulating AKT-mTOR signaling pathway and cell death respectively. NADP+/NADPH and GSH quantification assays were performed to evaluate effects of IDH1 R132H mutation on the production of antioxidant NADPH and GSH. Results We found that over expression of IDH1 R132H mutation decreased cell proliferation consistent with previous reports; however, it increased cell migration and enhanced AKT-mTOR signaling pathway activation. Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 also change the function of the enzymes and cause them to produce 2-hydroxyglutarate and not produce NADPH. We tested the level of NADPH and GSH and demonstrated that IDH1 R132H mutant stable cells had significantly low NADPH and GSH level compared to control or IDH1 wild type stable cells. The reduced antioxidants (NADPH and GSH) sensitized U87MG cells with IDH R132H mutant to 5-FU treatment. Conclusion Our study highlights the important role of IHD1 R132H mutant in up- regulating AKT-mTOR signaling pathway and enhancing cell migration. Furthermore, we demonstrate that IDH1 R132H mutation affects cellular redox status and sensitizes gliomas cells with IDH1 R132H mutation to 5FU treatment. PMID:28052098

  18. Focal Adhesion-Independent Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Paluch, Ewa K; Aspalter, Irene M; Sixt, Michael

    2016-10-06

    Cell migration is central to a multitude of physiological processes, including embryonic development, immune surveillance, and wound healing, and deregulated migration is key to cancer dissemination. Decades of investigations have uncovered many of the molecular and physical mechanisms underlying cell migration. Together with protrusion extension and cell body retraction, adhesion to the substrate via specific focal adhesion points has long been considered an essential step in cell migration. Although this is true for cells moving on two-dimensional substrates, recent studies have demonstrated that focal adhesions are not required for cells moving in three dimensions, in which confinement is sufficient to maintain a cell in contact with its substrate. Here, we review the investigations that have led to challenging the requirement of specific adhesions for migration, discuss the physical mechanisms proposed for cell body translocation during focal adhesion-independent migration, and highlight the remaining open questions for the future.

  19. Dynamic contact guidance of migrating cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losert, Wolfgang; Sun, Xiaoyu; Guven, Can; Driscoll, Meghan; Fourkas, John

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the effects of nanotopographical surfaces on the cell migration and cell shape dynamics of the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. Amoeboid motion exhibits significant contact guidance along surfaces with nanoscale ridges or grooves. We show quantitatively that nanoridges spaced 1.5 μm apart exhibit the greatest contact guidance efficiency. Using principal component analysis, we characterize the dynamics of the cell shape modulated by the coupling between the cell membrane and ridges. We show that motion parallel to the ridges is enhanced, while the turning, at the largest spatial scales, is suppressed. Since protrusion dynamics are principally governed by actin dynamics, we imaged the actin polymerization of cells on ridges. We found that actin polymerization occurs preferentially along nanoridges in a ``monorail'' like fashion. The ridges then provide us with a tool to study actin dynamics in an effectively reduced dimensional system.

  20. BAG-1 enhances cell-cell adhesion, reduces proliferation and induces chaperone-independent suppression of hepatocyte growth factor-induced epidermal keratinocyte migration

    SciTech Connect

    Hinitt, C.A.M.; Wood, J.; Lee, S.S.; Williams, A.C.; Howarth, J.L.; Glover, C.P.; Uney, J.B.; Hague, A.

    2010-08-01

    Cell motility is important in maintaining tissue homeostasis, facilitating epithelial wound repair and in tumour formation and progression. The aim of this study was to determine whether BAG-1 isoforms regulate epidermal cell migration in in vitro models of wound healing. In the human epidermal cell line HaCaT, endogenous BAG-1 is primarily nuclear and increases with confluence. Both transient and stable p36-Bag-1 overexpression resulted in increased cellular cohesion. Stable transfection of either of the three human BAG-1 isoforms p36-Bag-1 (BAG-1S), p46-Bag-1 (BAG-1M) and p50-Bag-1 (BAG-1L) inhibited growth and wound closure in serum-containing medium. However, in response to hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in serum-free medium, BAG-1S/M reduced communal motility and colony scattering, but BAG-1L did not. In the presence of HGF, p36-Bag-1 transfectants retained proliferative response to HGF with no change in ERK1/2 activation. However, the cells retained E-cadherin localisation at cell-cell junctions and exhibited pronounced cortical actin. Point mutations in the BAG domain showed that BAG-1 inhibition of motility is independent of its function as a chaperone regulator. These findings are the first to suggest that BAG-1 plays a role in regulating cell-cell adhesion and suggest an important function in epidermal cohesion.

  1. Transplantation stimulates interstitial cell migration in hydra

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, T.; David, C.N.; Bosch, T.C. )

    1990-04-01

    Migration of interstitial cells and nerve cell precursors was analyzed in Hydra magnipapillata and Hydra vulgaris (formerly Hydra attenuata). Axial grafts were made between ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled donor and unlabeled host tissue. Migration of labeled cells into the unlabeled half was followed for 4 days. The results indicate that the rate of migration was initially high and then slowed on Days 2-4. Regrafting fresh donor tissue on Days 2-4 maintained high levels of migration. Thus, migration appears to be stimulated by the grafting procedure itself.

  2. Random versus directionally persistent cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Ryan J.; Doyle, Andrew D.; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2009-01-01

    Directional migration is an important component of cell motility. Although the basic mechanisms of random cell movement are well characterized, no single model explains the complex regulation of directional migration. Multiple factors operate at each step of cell migration to stabilize lamellipodia and maintain directional migration. Factors such as topography of the extracellular matrix, the cellular polarity machinery, receptor signalling, integrin trafficking and co-receptors, and actin–myosin contraction converge on regulation of the Rho family of GTPases and control of lamellipodial protrusions to promote directional migration. PMID:19603038

  3. Enhanced Healing of Rat Calvarial Bone Defects with Hypoxic Conditioned Medium from Mesenchymal Stem Cells through Increased Endogenous Stem Cell Migration via Regulation of ICAM-1 Targeted-microRNA-221

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Woochul; Kim, Ran; Park, Sang In; Jung, Yu Jin; Ham, Onju; Lee, Jihyun; Kim, Ji Hyeong; Oh, Sekyung; Lee, Min Young; Kim, Jongmin; Park, Moon-Seo; Chung, Yong-An; Hwang, Ki-Chul; Maeng, Lee-So

    2015-01-01

    The use of conditioned medium from mesenchymal stem cells may be a feasible approach for regeneration of bone defects through secretion of various components of mesenchymal stem cells such as cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Mesenchymal stem cells secrete and accumulate multiple factors in conditioned medium under specific physiological conditions. In this study, we investigated whether the conditioned medium collected under hypoxic condition could effectively influence bone regeneration through enhanced migration and adhesion of endogenous mesenchymal stem cells. Cell migration and adhesion abilities were increased through overexpression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in hypoxic conditioned medium treated group. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 was upregulated by microRNA-221 in mesenchymal stem cells because microRNAs are key regulators of various biological functions via gene expression. To investigate the effects in vivo, evaluation of bone regeneration by computed tomography and histological assays revealed that osteogenesis was enhanced in the hypoxic conditioned medium group relative to the other groups. These results suggest that behavioral changes of endogenous mesenchymal stem cells through microRNA-221 targeted-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression under hypoxic conditions may be a potential treatment for patients with bone defects. PMID:26062554

  4. Microdroplet chain array for cell migration assays.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Pan, Jian-Zhang; Zhao, Shi-Ping; Lou, Qi; Zhu, Ying; Fang, Qun

    2016-11-29

    Establishing cell migration assays in multiple different microenvironments is important in the study of tissue repair and regeneration, cancer progression, atherosclerosis, and arthritis. In this work, we developed a miniaturized and massive parallel microfluidic platform for multiple cell migration assays combining the traditional membrane-based cell migration technique and the droplet-based microfluidic technique. Nanoliter-scale droplets are flexibly assembled as building blocks based on a porous membrane to form microdroplet chains with diverse configurations for different assay modes. Multiple operations including in-droplet 2D/3D cell culture, cell co-culture and cell migration induced by a chemoattractant concentration gradient in droplet chains could be flexibly performed with reagent consumption in the nanoliter range for each assay and an assay scale-up to 81 assays in parallel in one microchip. We have applied the present platform to multiple modes of cell migration assays including the accurate cell migration assay, competitive cell migration assay, biomimetic chemotaxis assay, and multifactor cell migration assay based on the organ-on-a-chip concept, for demonstrating its versatility, applicability, and potential in cell migration-related research.

  5. Low molecular weight fucoidan increases VEGF165-induced endothelial cell migration by enhancing VEGF165 binding to VEGFR-2 and NRP1.

    PubMed

    Lake, Andrew C; Vassy, Roger; Di Benedetto, Mélanie; Lavigne, Damien; Le Visage, Catherine; Perret, Gérard Y; Letourneur, Didier

    2006-12-08

    Therapeutic induction of angiogenesis is a potential treatment for chronic ischemia. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans are known to play an important role by their interactions with proangiogenic growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Low molecular weight fucoidan (LMWF), a sulfated polysaccharide from brown seaweeds that mimic some biological activities of heparin, has been shown recently to promote revascularization in rat critical hindlimb ischemia. In this report, we first used cultured human endothelial cells (ECs) to investigate the possible ability of LMWF to enhance the actions of VEGF(165). Data showed that LMWF greatly enhances EC tube formation in growth factor reduced matrigel. LMWF is a strong enhancer of VEGF(165)-induced EC chemotaxis, but not proliferation. In addition, LMWF has no effect on VEGF(121)-induced EC migration, a VEGF isoform that does not bind to heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Then, with binding studies using (125)I-VEGF(165), we observed that LMWF enhances the binding of VEGF(165) to recombinant VEGFR-2 and Neuropilin-1 (NRP1), but not to VEGFR-1. Surface plasmon resonance analysis showed that LMWF binds with high affinity to VEGF(165) (1.2 nm) and its receptors (5-20 nm), but not to VEGF(121). Pre-injection of LMWF on immobilized receptors shows that VEGF(165) has the highest affinity for VEGFR-2 and NRP1, as compared with VEGFR-1. Overall, the effects of LMWF were much more pronounced than those of LMW heparin. These findings suggested an efficient mechanism of action of LMWF by promoting VEGF(165) binding to VEGFR-2 and NRP1 on ECs that could help in stimulating therapeutic revascularization.

  6. Dual function of Slit2 in repulsion and enhanced migration of trunk, but not vagal, neural crest cells.

    PubMed

    De Bellard, Maria Elena; Rao, Yi; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2003-07-21

    Neural crest precursors to the autonomic nervous system form different derivatives depending upon their axial level of origin; for example, vagal, but not trunk, neural crest cells form the enteric ganglia of the gut. Here, we show that Slit2 is expressed at the entrance of the gut, which is selectively invaded by vagal, but not trunk, neural crest. Accordingly, only trunk neural crest cells express Robo receptors. In vivo and in vitro experiments demonstrate that trunk, not vagal, crest cells avoid cells or cell membranes expressing Slit2, thereby contributing to the differential ability of neural crest populations to invade and innervate the gut. Conversely, exposure to soluble Slit2 significantly increases the distance traversed by trunk neural crest cells. These results suggest that Slit2 can act bifunctionally, both repulsing and stimulating the motility of trunk neural crest cells.

  7. Activation of sonic hedgehog signaling enhances cell migration and invasion by induction of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 via the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/AKT signaling pathway in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Chang, Liang; Zhao, Dan; Liu, Hui-Bin; Wang, Qiu-Shi; Zhang, Ping; Li, Chen-Long; Du, Wen-Zhong; Wang, Hong-Jun; Liu, Xing; Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Jiang, Chuan-Lu

    2015-11-01

    Aberrant hedgehog signaling contributes to the development of various malignancies, including glioblastoma (GBM). However, the potential mechanism of hedgehog signaling in GBM migration and invasion has remained to be elucidated. The present study showed that enhanced hedgehog signaling by recombinant human sonic hedgehog N‑terminal peptide (rhSHH) promoted the adhesion, invasion and migration of GBM cells, accompanied by increases in mRNA and protein levels of matrix metalloproteinase‑2 (MMP‑2) and MMP‑9. However, inhibition of hedgehog signaling with cyclopamine suppressed the adhesion, invasion and migration of GBM cells, accompanied by decreases in mRNA and protein levels of MMP‑2 and ‑9. Furthermore, it was found that MMP‑2- and MMP‑9-neutralizing antibodies or GAM6001 reversed the inductive effects of rhSHH on cell migration and invasion. In addition, enhanced hedgehog signaling by rhSHH increased AKT phosphorylation, whereas blockade of hedgehog signaling decreased AKT phosphorylations. Further experiments showed that LY294002, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K), decreased rhSHH‑induced upregulation of MMP‑2 and ‑9. Finally, the protein expression of glioblastoma-associated oncogene 1 was positively correlated with levels of phosphorylated AKT as well as protein expressions of MMP‑2 and ‑9 in GBM tissue samples. In conclusion, the present study indicated that the hedgehog pathway regulates GBM-cell migration and invasion by increasing MMP-2 and MMP-9 production via the PI3K/AKT pathway.

  8. Effect of Static Magnetic Field on Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Yuichiro; Kawasumi, Masashi; Saito, Masao

    The effect of magnetic field on cell has long been investigated, but there are few quantitative investigations of the migration of cells. Cell-migration is important as one of the fundamental activities of the cell. This study proposes a method to evaluate quantitatively the cell-diffusion constant and the effect of static magnetic field on cell migration. The cell-lines are neuroblastoma (NG108-15), fibroblastoma (NIH/3T3) and osteoblastoma (MC3T3-E1). The static magnetic field of 30 mT or 120 mT is impressed by a permanent magnet in vertical or horizontal direction to the dish. It is shown that the cell-diffusion constant can represent the cell migration as the cell activity. It is found that the cell migration is enhanced by exposure to the magnetic field, depending on the kind of cell. It is conjectured that the effect of static magnetic field affects the cell migration, which is at the downstream of the information transmission.

  9. The planar polarity pathway promotes coordinated cell migration during Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bastock, Rebecca; Strutt, David

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Cell migration is fundamental in both animal morphogenesis and disease. The migration of individual cells is relatively well-studied, however in vivo cells often remain joined by cell-cell junctions and migrate in cohesive groups. How such groups of cells coordinate their migration is poorly understood. The planar polarity pathway coordinates the polarity of non-migrating cells in epithelial sheets and is required for cell rearrangements during vertebrate morphogenesis. It is therefore a good candidate to play a role in collective migration of groups of cells. Drosophila border cell migration is a well-characterised and genetically tractable model of collective cell migration, during which a group of about 6-10 epithelial cells detaches from the anterior end of the developing egg chamber and migrates invasively towards the oocyte. We find that the planar polarity pathway promotes this invasive migration, acting both in the migrating cells themselves and in the non-migratory polar follicle cells they carry along. Disruption of planar polarity signalling causes abnormalities in actin rich processes on the cell surface and leads to less efficient migration. This is apparently due in part to loss of regulation of Rho GTPase activity by the planar polarity receptor Frizzled, which itself becomes localised to the migratory edge of the border cells. We conclude that during collective cell migration the planar polarity pathway can mediate communication between motile and non-motile cells, which enhances the efficiency of migration via the modulation of actin dynamics. PMID:17652348

  10. Collective cell migration during inflammatory response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di; Stroka, Kimberly; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Wound scratch healing assays of endothelial cell monolayers is a simple model to study collective cell migration as a function of biological signals. A signal of particular interest is the immune response, which after initial wounding in vivo causes the release of various inflammatory factors such as tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α). TNF-α is an innate inflammatory cytokine that can induce cell growth, cell necrosis, and change cell morphology. We studied the effects of TNF-α on collective cell migration using the wound healing assays and measured several migration metrics, such as rate of scratch closure, velocities of leading edge and bulk cells, closure index, and velocity correlation functions between migrating cells. We observed that TNF-α alters all migratory metrics as a function of the size of the scratch and TNF-α content. The changes observed in migration correlate with actin reorganization upon TNF-α exposure.

  11. Targeting Epithelial Cell Migration to Accelerate Wound Healing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    the protein kinase C (PKC) family and the process can be enhanced or inhibited by modulating the levels of the RIPP complex proteins as well by...HACAT cells indicates that PKC may modulate migration on two-dimensional surface. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Wound healing, cell migration, protein kinase C ...ABSTRACT U c . THIS PAGE U UU 11 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18

  12. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Maneet; McGrath, Kelly L; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Shah, Fenil; King, Mallory M; Clarke, Frank M; Tonissen, Kathryn F

    2016-08-01

    Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1) in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS) or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration.

  13. Reduced expression of the chromatin remodeling gene ARID1A enhances gastric cancer cell migration and invasion via downregulation of E-cadherin transcription.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hai-Bo; Wang, Xue-Fei; Zhang, Qian; Tang, Zhao-Qing; Jiang, Ying-Hua; Fan, Hui-Zhi; Sun, Yi-hong; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Liu, Feng

    2014-04-01

    The chromatin remodeling gene AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein 1A (ARID1A) encodes the protein BAF250a, a subunit of human SWI/SNF-related complexes. Recent studies have identified ARID1A as a tumor suppressor. Here, we show that ARID1A expression is reduced in gastric cancer (GC) tissues, which are significantly associated with local lymph node metastasis, tumor infiltration and poor patient prognosis. ARID1A silencing enforces the migration and invasion of GC cells, whereas ectopic expression of ARID1A inhibits migration. The adhesive protein E-cadherin is remarkably downregulated in response to ARID1A silencing, but it is upregulated by ARID1A overexpression. E-cadherin overexpression significantly inhibits GC cell migration and invasion, whereas CDH1 (coded E-cadherin) silencing promotes migration. Restored expression of CDH1 in ARID1A-silenced cell lines restores the inhibition of cell migration. Luciferase reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation indicate that the ARID1A-associated SWI/SNF complex binds to the CDH1 promoter and modulates CDH1 transcription. ARID1A knockdown induces evident morphological changes of GC cells with increased expression of mesenchymal markers, indicating an epithelial-mesenchymal transition. ARID1A silencing does not alter the level of β-catenin but induces a subcellular redistribution of β-catenin from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasm and nucleus. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrate that reduced expression of E-cadherin is associated with local lymph node metastasis, tumor infiltration and poor clinical prognosis. ARID1A and E-cadherin expression show a strong correlation in 75.4% of the analyzed GC tissues. They are synergistically downregulated in 23.5% of analyzed GC tissues. In conclusion, ARID1A targets E-cadherin during the modulation of GC cell migration and invasion.

  14. Enhanced cell migration and apoptosis resistance may underlie the association between high SERPINE1 expression and poor outcome in head and neck carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Téllez-Gabriel, Marta; León, Xavier; Virós, David; López, Montserrat; Gallardo, Alberto; Céspedes, Maria Virtudes; Casanova, Isolda; López-Pousa, Antonio; Mangues, Maria Antonia; Quer, Miquel; Barnadas, Agustí; Mangues, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    High SERPINE1 expression is a common event in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC); however, whether it plays a role in determining clinical outcome remains still unknown. We studied SERPINE1 as a prognostic marker in two HNSCC patient cohorts. In a retrospective study (n = 80), high expression of SERPINE1 was associated with poor progression-free (p = 0.022) and cancer-specific (p = 0.040) survival. In a prospective study (n = 190), high SERPINE1 expression was associated with poor local recurrence-free (p = 0.022), progression-free (p = 0.002) and cancer-specific (p = 0.006) survival. SERPINE1 expression was identified as an independent risk factor for progression-free survival in patients treated with chemo-radiotherapy or radiotherapy (p = 0.043). In both patient cohorts, high SERPINE1 expression increased the risk of metastasis spread (p = 0.045; p = 0.029). The association between SERPINE1 expression and survival was confirmed using the HNSCC cohort included in The Cancer Genome Atlas project (n = 507). Once again, patients showing high expression had a poorer survival (p < 0.001). SERPINE1 over-expression in HNSCC cells reduced cell proliferation and enhanced migration. It also protected cells from cisplatin-induced apoptosis, which was accompanied by PI3K/AKT pathway activation. Downregulation of SERPINE1 expression had the opposite effect. We propose SERPINE1 expression as a prognostic marker that could be used to stratify HNSCC patients according to their risk of recurrence. PMID:26359694

  15. Nanotopography guides and directs cell migration in amoeboid and epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Rachel; Das, Satarupa; Hourwitz, Matthew; Sun, Xiaoyu; Parent, Carole; Fourkas, John; Losert, Wolfgang

    Cell migration plays a critical role in development, angiogenesis, immune response, wound healing, and cancer metastasis. In many cases, cells also move in the context of a matrix of collagen fibers, and the alignment of these fibers can both affect the migration phenotype and guide cells. Here we show that both fast and slow migrating cells - amoeboid HL-60 and epithelial MCF10A - are affected in similar ways by micro/nanostructures with dimensions similar to those of collagen fibers. Cell alignment enhances the efficiency of migration by increasing directional persistence.

  16. Pyk2 and Src-family protein-tyrosine kinases compensate for the loss of FAK in fibronectin-stimulated signaling events but Pyk2 does not fully function to enhance FAK- cell migration.

    PubMed Central

    Sieg, D J; Ilić, D; Jones, K C; Damsky, C H; Hunter, T; Schlaepfer, D D

    1998-01-01

    The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) protein-tyrosine kinase (PTK) links transmembrane integrin receptors to intracellular signaling pathways. We show that expression of the FAK-related PTK, Pyk2, is elevated in fibroblasts isolated from murine fak-/- embryos (FAK-) compared with cells from fak+/+ embryos (FAK+). Pyk2 was localized to perinuclear regions in both FAK+ and FAK- cells. Pyk2 tyrosine phosphorylation was enhanced by fibronectin (FN) stimulation of FAK- but not FAK+ cells. Increased Pyk2 tyrosine phosphorylation paralleled the time-course of Grb2 binding to Shc and activation of ERK2 in FAK- cells. Pyk2 in vitro autophosphorylation activity was not enhanced by FN plating of FAK- cells. However, Pyk2 associated with active Src-family PTKs after FN but not poly-L-lysine replating of the FAK- cells. Overexpression of both wild-type (WT) and kinase-inactive (Ala457), but not the autophosphorylation site mutant (Phe402) Pyk2, enhanced endogenous FN-stimulated c-Src in vitro kinase activity in FAK- cells, but only WT Pyk2 overexpression enhanced FN-stimulated activation of co-transfected ERK2. Interestingly, Pyk2 overexpression only weakly augmented FAK- cell migration to FN whereas transient FAK expression promoted FAK- cell migration to FN efficiently compared with FAK+ cells. Significantly, repression of endogenous Src-family PTK activity by p50(csk) overexpression inhibited FN-stimulated cell spreading, Pyk2 tyrosine phosphorylation, Grb2 binding to Shc, and ERK2 activation in the FAK- but not in FAK+ cells. These studies show that Pyk2 and Src-family PTKs combine to promote FN-stimulated signaling events to ERK2 in the absence of FAK, but that these signaling events are not sufficient to overcome the FAK- cell migration defects. PMID:9774338

  17. Quantifying modes of 3D cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Meghan K.; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-01-01

    Although it is widely appreciated that cells migrate in a variety of diverse environments in vivo, we are only now beginning to use experimental workflows that yield images with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution to study the molecular processes governing cell migration in 3D environments. Since cell migration is a dynamic process, it is usually studied via microscopy, but 3D movies of 3D processes are difficult to interpret by visual inspection. In this review, we discuss the technologies required to study the diversity of 3D cell migration modes with a focus on the visualization and computational analysis tools needed to study cell migration quantitatively at a level comparable to the analyses performed today on cells crawling on flat substrates. PMID:26603943

  18. Quantifying Modes of 3D Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Meghan K; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-12-01

    Although it is widely appreciated that cells migrate in a variety of diverse environments in vivo, we are only now beginning to use experimental workflows that yield images with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution to study the molecular processes governing cell migration in 3D environments. Since cell migration is a dynamic process, it is usually studied via microscopy, but 3D movies of 3D processes are difficult to interpret by visual inspection. In this review, we discuss the technologies required to study the diversity of 3D cell migration modes with a focus on the visualization and computational analysis tools needed to study cell migration quantitatively at a level comparable to the analyses performed today on cells crawling on flat substrates.

  19. beta-Chemokine production by neural and glial progenitor cells is enhanced by HIV-1 Tat: effects on microglial migration.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Yun Kyung; Vo, Phu; Fitting, Sylvia; Block, Michelle L; Hauser, Kurt F; Knapp, Pamela E

    2010-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 neuropathology results from collective effects of viral proteins and inflammatory mediators on several cell types. Significant damage is mediated indirectly through inflammatory conditions promulgated by glial cells, including microglia that are productively infected by HIV-1, and astroglia. Neural and glial progenitors exist in both developing and adult brains. To determine whether progenitors are targets of HIV-1, a multi-plex assay was performed to assess chemokine/cytokine expression after treatment with viral proteins transactivator of transcription (Tat) or glycoprotein 120 (gp120). In the initial screen, ten analytes were basally released by murine striatal progenitors. The beta-chemokines CCL5/regulated upon activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted, CCL3/macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha, and CCL4/macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta were increased by 12-h exposure to HIV-1 Tat. Secreted factors from Tat-treated progenitors were chemoattractive towards microglia, an effect blocked by 2D7 anti-CCR5 antibody pre-treatment. Tat and opiates have interactive effects on astroglial chemokine secretion, but this interaction did not occur in progenitors. gp120 did not affect chemokine/cytokine release, although both CCR5 and CXCR4, which serve as gp120 co-receptors, were detected in progenitors. We postulate that chemokine production by progenitors may be a normal, adaptive process that encourages immune inspection of newly generated cells. Pathogens such as HIV might usurp this function to create a maladaptive state, especially during development or regeneration, when progenitors are numerous.

  20. Centrosome Positioning in 1D Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adlerz, Katrina; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    During cell migration, the positioning of the centrosome and nucleus define a cell's polarity. For a cell migrating on a two-dimensional substrate the centrosome is positioned in front of the nucleus. Under one-dimensional confinement, however, the centrosome is positioned behind the nucleus in 60% of cells. It is known that the centrosome is positioned by CDC42 and dynein for cells moving on a 2D substrate in a wound-healing assay. It is currently unknown, however, if this is also true for cells moving under 1D confinement, where the centrosome position is often reversed. Therefore, centrosome positioning was studied in cells migrating under 1D confinement, which mimics cells migrating through 3D matrices. 3 to 5 μm fibronectin lines were stamped onto a glass substrate and cells with fluorescently labeled nuclei and centrosomes migrated on the lines. Our results show that when a cell changes directions the centrosome position is maintained. That is, when the centrosome is between the nucleus and the cell's trailing edge and the cell changes direction, the centrosome will be translocated across the nucleus to the back of the cell again. A dynein inhibitor did have an influence on centrosome positioning in 1D migration and change of directions.

  1. The Galvanotactic Migration of Keratinocytes is Enhanced by Hypoxic Preconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaowei; Jiang, Xupin; Ren, Xi; Sun, Huanbo; Zhang, Dongxia; Zhang, Qiong; Zhang, Jiaping; Huang, Yuesheng

    2015-01-01

    The endogenous electric field (EF)-directed migration of keratinocytes (galvanotaxis) into wounds is an essential step in wound re-epithelialization. Hypoxia, which occurs immediately after injury, acts as an early stimulus to initiate the healing process; however, the mechanisms for this effect, remain elusive. We show here that the galvanotactic migration of keratinocytes was enhanced by hypoxia preconditioning as a result of the increased directionality rather than the increased motility of keratinocytes. This enhancement was both oxygen tension- and preconditioning time-dependent, with the maximum effects achieved using 2% O2 preconditioning for 6 hours. Hypoxic preconditioning (2% O2, 6 hours) decreased the threshold voltage of galvanotaxis to < 25 mV/mm, whereas this value was between 25 and 50 mV/mm in the normal culture control. In a scratch-wound monolayer assay in which the applied EF was in the default healing direction, hypoxic preconditioning accelerated healing by 1.38-fold compared with the control conditions. Scavenging of the induced ROS by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) abolished the enhanced galvanotaxis and the accelerated healing by hypoxic preconditioning. Our data demonstrate a novel and unsuspected role of hypoxia in supporting keratinocyte galvanotaxis. Enhancing the galvanotactic response of cells might therefore be a clinically attractive approach to induce improved wound healing. PMID:25988491

  2. Propagating Waves of Directionality and Coordination Orchestrate Collective Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Zaritsky, Assaf; Kaplan, Doron; Hecht, Inbal; Natan, Sari; Wolf, Lior; Gov, Nir S.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Tsarfaty, Ilan

    2014-01-01

    The ability of cells to coordinately migrate in groups is crucial to enable them to travel long distances during embryonic development, wound healing and tumorigenesis, but the fundamental mechanisms underlying intercellular coordination during collective cell migration remain elusive despite considerable research efforts. A novel analytical framework is introduced here to explicitly detect and quantify cell clusters that move coordinately in a monolayer. The analysis combines and associates vast amount of spatiotemporal data across multiple experiments into transparent quantitative measures to report the emergence of new modes of organized behavior during collective migration of tumor and epithelial cells in wound healing assays. First, we discovered the emergence of a wave of coordinated migration propagating backward from the wound front, which reflects formation of clusters of coordinately migrating cells that are generated further away from the wound edge and disintegrate close to the advancing front. This wave emerges in both normal and tumor cells, and is amplified by Met activation with hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor. Second, Met activation was found to induce coinciding waves of cellular acceleration and stretching, which in turn trigger the emergence of a backward propagating wave of directional migration with about an hour phase lag. Assessments of the relations between the waves revealed that amplified coordinated migration is associated with the emergence of directional migration. Taken together, our data and simplified modeling-based assessments suggest that increased velocity leads to enhanced coordination: higher motility arises due to acceleration and stretching that seems to increase directionality by temporarily diminishing the velocity components orthogonal to the direction defined by the monolayer geometry. Spatial and temporal accumulation of directionality thus defines coordination. The findings offer new insight and suggest a basic

  3. A Customizable Chamber for Measuring Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Aniqa N; Vo, Huu Tri; Olang, Sharon; Mappus, Elliott; Peterson, Brian; Hlavac, Nora; Harvey, Tyler; Dean, Delphine

    2017-03-12

    Cell migration is a vital part of immune responses, growth, and wound healing. Cell migration is a complex process that involves interactions between cells, the extracellular matrix, and soluble and non-soluble chemical factors (e.g., chemoattractants). Standard methods for measuring the migration of cells, such as the Boyden chamber assay, work by counting cells on either side of a divider. These techniques are easy to use; however, they offer little geometric modification for different applications. In contrast, microfluidic devices can be used to observe cell migration with customizable concentration gradients of soluble factors(1)(,)(2). However, methods for making microfluidics based assays can be difficult to learn. Here, we describe an easy method for creating cell culture chambers to measure cell migration in response to chemical concentration gradients. Our cell migration chamber method can create different linear concentration gradients in order to study cell migration for a variety of applications. This method is relatively easy to use and is typically performed by undergraduate students. The microchannel chamber was created by placing an acrylic insert in the shape of the final microchannel chamber well into a Petri dish. After this, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) was poured on top of the insert. The PDMS was allowed to harden and then the insert was removed. This allowed for the creation of wells in any desired shape or size. Cells may be subsequently added to the microchannel chamber, and soluble agents can be added to one of the wells by soaking an agarose block in the desired agent. The agarose block is added to one of the wells, and time-lapse images can be taken of the microchannel chamber in order to quantify cell migration. Variations to this method can be made for a given application, making this method highly customizable.

  4. Rho GTPases and cancer cell transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Nicolas; Riou, Philippe; Ridley, Anne J

    2012-01-01

    Small Rho GTPases are major regulators of actin cytoskeleton dynamics and influence cell shape and migration. The expression of several Rho GTPases is often up-regulated in tumors and this frequently correlates with a poor prognosis for patients. Migration of cancer cells through endothelial cells that line the blood vessels, called transendothelial migration or extravasation, is a critical step during the metastasis process. The use of siRNA technology to target specifically each Rho family member coupled with imaging techniques allows the roles of individual Rho GTPases to be investigated. In this chapter we describe methods to assess how Rho GTPases affect the different steps of cancer cell transendothelial cell migration in vitro.

  5. SB-T-121205, a next-generation taxane, enhances apoptosis and inhibits migration/invasion in MCF-7/PTX cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaowei; Wang, Changwei; Xing, Yuanming; Chen, Siying; Meng, Ti; You, Haisheng; Ojima, Iwao; Dong, Yalin

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among women. Paclitaxel, a mitotic inhibitor, is highly effective in the treatment of breast cancer. However, development of resistance to paclitaxel limits its clinical use. Identifying new compounds and new strategies that are effective against breast cancer, in particular drug-resistant cancer, is of great importance. the aim of the present study was to explore the potential of a next-generation taxoid, SB-T-121205, in modulating the proliferation, migration and invasion of paclitaxel-resistant human breast cancer cells (MCF-7/PTX) and further evaluate the underlying molecular mechanisms. The results of MTT assay showed that SB-T-121205 has much higher potency to human breast cancer cells (MCF-7/S, MCF-7/PTX and MDA-MB-453 cells) than paclitaxel, while that the non-tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) were slightly less sensitive to SB-T-121205 than paclitaxel. Flow cytometry and western blot methods revealed that SB-T-121205 induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and apoptosis in MCF-7/PTX cells through accelerating mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, resulting in reduction of Bcl-2/Bax ratio, as well as elevation of caspase-3, caspase-9, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) levels. Moreover, SB-T-121205 changed epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) property, and suppressed migration and invasion abilities of MCF-7/PTX cells. Additionally, SB-T-121205 exerted antitumor activity by inhibiting the transgelin 2 and PI3K/Akt pathway. These findings indicate that SB-T-121205 is a potent antitumor agent that promotes apoptosis and also recedes migration/invasion abilities of MCF-7/PTX cells by restraining the activity of transgelin 2 and PI3K/Akt, as well as mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Such results suggest a potential clinical value of SB-T-121205 in breast cancer treatment.

  6. SB-T-121205, a next-generation taxane, enhances apoptosis and inhibits migration/invasion in MCF-7/PTX cells

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaowei; Wang, Changwei; Xing, Yuanming; Chen, Siying; Meng, Ti; You, Haisheng; Ojima, Iwao; Dong, Yalin

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among women. Paclitaxel, a mitotic inhibitor, is highly effective in the treatment of breast cancer. However, development of resistance to paclitaxel limits its clinical use. Identifying new compounds and new strategies that are effective against breast cancer, in particular drug-resistant cancer, is of great importance. The aim of the present study was to explore the potential of a next-generation taxoid, SB-T-121205, in modulating the proliferation, migration and invasion of paclitaxel-resistant human breast cancer cells (MCF-7/PTX) and further evaluate the underlying molecular mechanisms. The results of MTT assay showed that SB-T-121205 has much higher potency to human breast cancer cells (MCF-7/S, MCF-7/PTX and MDA-MB-453 cells) than paclitaxel, while that the non-tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) were slightly less sensitive to SB-T-121205 than paclitaxel. Flow cytometry and western blot methods revealed that SB-T-121205 induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and apoptosis in MCF-7/PTX cells through accelerating mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, resulting in reduction of Bcl-2/Bax ratio, as well as elevation of caspase-3, caspase-9, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) levels. Moreover, SB-T-121205 changed epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) property, and suppressed migration and invasion abilities of MCF-7/PTX cells. Additionally, SB-T-121205 exerted antitumor activity by inhibiting the transgelin 2 and PI3K/Akt pathway. These findings indicate that SB-T-121205 is a potent antitumor agent that promotes apoptosis and also recedes migration/invasion abilities of MCF-7/PTX cells by restraining the activity of transgelin 2 and PI3K/Akt, as well as mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Such results suggest a potential clinical value of SB-T-121205 in breast cancer treatment. PMID:28197640

  7. RNase L is a negative regulator of cell migration.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Shuvojit; Li, Geqiang; Li, Yize; Gaughan, Christina; Baskar, Danika; Parker, Yvonne; Lindner, Daniel J; Weiss, Susan R; Silverman, Robert H

    2015-12-29

    RNase L is a regulated endoribonuclease that functions in the interferon antiviral response. Activation of RNase L by 2', 5'-oligoadenylates has been linked to apoptosis, autophagy and inflammation. Genetic studies have also suggested the possible involvement of the RNase L gene (RNASEL) on chromosome 1q25.3 in several types of cancer. Here we report that ablation of RNase L in human prostate cancer PC3 cells by CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technology enhanced cell migration as determined both by transwell assays and scratch wound healing assays. In addition, RNase L knockdown by means of RNAi increased migration of PC3 and DU145 cells in response to either fibronectin or serum stimulation, as did homozygous disruption of the RNase L gene in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Serum or fibronectin stimulation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) autophosphorylation on tyrosine-397 was increased by either knockdown or ablation of RNase L. In contrast, a missense mutant RNase L (R667A) lacking catalytic activity failed to suppress cell migration in PC3 cells. However, a nuclease-inactive mutant mouse RNase L (W630A) was able to partially inhibit migration of mouse fibroblasts. Consistent with a role for the catalytic activity of RNase L, transfection of PC3 cells with the RNase L activator, 2', 5'-oligoadenylate, suppressed cell migration. RNase L knockdown in PC3 cells enhanced tumor growth and metastasis following implantation in the mouse prostate. Our results suggest that naturally occurring mutations in the RNase L gene might promote enhanced cell migration and metastasis.

  8. RNase L is a negative regulator of cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Shuvojit; Li, Geqiang; Li, Yize; Gaughan, Christina; Baskar, Danika; Parker, Yvonne; Lindner, Daniel J.; Weiss, Susan R.; Silverman, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    RNase L is a regulated endoribonuclease that functions in the interferon antiviral response. Activation of RNase L by 2′, 5′-oligoadenylates has been linked to apoptosis, autophagy and inflammation. Genetic studies have also suggested the possible involvement of the RNase L gene (RNASEL) on chromosome 1q25.3 in several types of cancer. Here we report that ablation of RNase L in human prostate cancer PC3 cells by CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technology enhanced cell migration as determined both by transwell assays and scratch wound healing assays. In addition, RNase L knockdown by means of RNAi increased migration of PC3 and DU145 cells in response to either fibronectin or serum stimulation, as did homozygous disruption of the RNase L gene in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Serum or fibronectin stimulation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) autophosphorylation on tyrosine-397 was increased by either knockdown or ablation of RNase L. In contrast, a missense mutant RNase L (R667A) lacking catalytic activity failed to suppress cell migration in PC3 cells. However, a nuclease-inactive mutant mouse RNase L (W630A) was able to partially inhibit migration of mouse fibroblasts. Consistent with a role for the catalytic activity of RNase L, transfection of PC3 cells with the RNase L activator, 2′, 5′-oligoadenylate, suppressed cell migration. RNase L knockdown in PC3 cells enhanced tumor growth and metastasis following implantation in the mouse prostate. Our results suggest that naturally occurring mutations in the RNase L gene might promote enhanced cell migration and metastasis. PMID:26517238

  9. Cell Shape Dynamics: From Waves to Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Meghan; McCann, Colin; Kopace, Rael; Homan, Tess; Fourkas, John; Parent, Carole; Losert, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    We analyzed the dynamic shape of migrating Dictyostelium discoideum cells. We found that regions of high boundary curvature propagate from the front to the back of cells in an organized fashion. These waves of high curvature are stabilized by surface contact, and so, at the sides of cells, are stationary relative to the surface. The initiation of curvature waves, though, which usually occurs at the front of cells, is associated with protrusive motion. The protrusion location shifts rapidly in a ballistic manner at speeds nearly double that of cellular migration. To examine curvature waves in the absence of surface contact, we guided cells to extend over the edge of micro-cliffs. The curvature wave speed of cells extended over a cliff was triple the wave speed of cells migrating on a surface, which is consistent with the higher wave speeds observed near the non-adherent leading edge of cells.

  10. Emergence of oligarchy in collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Linus; Maini, Philip; Baker, Ruth

    Identifying the principles of collective cell migration has the potential to help prevent birth defects, improve regenerative therapies and develop model systems for cancer metastasis. In collaboration with experimental biologists, we use computational simulations of a hybrid model, comprising individual-based stochastic cell movement coupled to a reaction-diffusion equation for a chemoattractant, to explore the role of cell specialisation in the guidance of collective cell migration. In the neural crest, an important migratory cell population in vertebrate embryo development, we present evidence that just a few cells are guiding group migration in a cell-induced chemoattractant gradient that determines the switch between ``leader'' and ``follower'' behaviour in individual cells. This leads us to more generally consider under what conditions cell specialisation might become advantageous for collective migration. Alternatively, individual cell responses to locally different microenvironmental conditions could create the (artefactual) appearance of heterogeneity in a population of otherwise identical cellular agents. We explore these questions using a self-propelled particle model as a minimal description for collective cell migration in two and three dimensions.

  11. In vitro cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Justus, Calvin R; Leffler, Nancy; Ruiz-Echevarria, Maria; Yang, Li V

    2014-06-01

    Migration is a key property of live cells and critical for normal development, immune response, and disease processes such as cancer metastasis and inflammation. Methods to examine cell migration are very useful and important for a wide range of biomedical research such as cancer biology, immunology, vascular biology, cell biology and developmental biology. Here we use tumor cell migration and invasion as an example and describe two related assays to illustrate the commonly used, easily accessible methods to measure these processes. The first method is the cell culture wound closure assay in which a scratch is generated on a confluent cell monolayer. The speed of wound closure and cell migration can be quantified by taking snapshot pictures with a regular inverted microscope at several time intervals. More detailed cell migratory behavior can be documented using the time-lapse microscopy system. The second method described in this paper is the transwell cell migration and invasion assay that measures the capacity of cell motility and invasiveness toward a chemo-attractant gradient. It is our goal to describe these methods in a highly accessible manner so that the procedures can be successfully performed in research laboratories even just with basic cell biology setup.

  12. Epac Activation Regulates Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Migration and Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiao-Le; Deng, Ruixia; Chung, Sookja K; Chan, Godfrey Chi-Fung

    2016-04-01

    How to enhance the homing of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to the target tissues remains a clinical challenge nowadays. To overcome this barrier, the mechanism responsible for the hMSCs migration and engraftment has to be defined. Currently, the exact mechanism involved in migration and adhesion of hMSCs remains unknown. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), a novel protein discovered in cAMP signaling pathway, may have a potential role in regulating cells adhesion and migration by triggering the downstream Rap family signaling cascades. However, the exact role of Epac in cells homing is elusive. Our study evaluated the role of Epac in the homing of hMSCs. We confirmed that hMSCs expressed functional Epac and its activation enhanced the migration and adhesion of hMSCs significantly. The Epac activation was further found to be contributed directly to the chemotactic responses induced by stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) which is a known chemokine in regulating hMSCs homing. These findings suggested Epac is connected to the SDF-1 signaling cascades. In conclusion, our study revealed that Epac plays a role in hMSCs homing by promoting adhesion and migration. Appropriate manipulation of Epac may enhance the homing of hMSCs and facilitate their future clinical applications.

  13. Entropy measures of collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitby, Ariadne; Parrinello, Simona; Faisal, Aldo

    2015-03-01

    Collective cell migration is a critical process during tissue formation and repair. To this end there is a need to develop tools to quantitatively measure the dynamics of collective cell migration obtained from microscopy data. Drawing on statistical physics we use entropy of velocity fields derived from dense optic flow to quantitatively measure collective migration. Using peripheral nerve repair after injury as experimental system, we study how Schwann cells, guided by fibroblasts, migrate in cord-like structures across the cut, paving a highway for neurons. This process of emergence of organised behaviour is key for successful repair, yet the emergence of leader cells and transition from a random to ordered state is not understood. We find fibroblasts induce correlated directionality in migrating Schwann cells as measured by a decrease in the entropy of motion vector. We show our method is robust with respect to image resolution in time and space, giving a principled assessment of how various molecular mechanisms affect macroscopic features of collective cell migration. Finally, the generality of our method allows us to process both simulated cell movement and microscopic data, enabling principled fitting and comparison of in silico to in vitro. ICCS, Imperial College London & MRC Clinical Sciences Centre.

  14. Cell density determines epithelial migration in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, P; Misfeldt, D S

    1980-01-01

    The dog kidney epithelial cell line (MDCK) has been shown to exhibit a density-correlated inhibition of growth at approxmately 6.6 X 10(5) cells per cm2. When a confluent monolayer at its maximal density was wounded by removal of a wide swath of cells, migration of the cell sheet into the denuded area occurred. Precise measurements of the rate of migration for 5 day showed that the cells accelerated at a uniform rate of 0.24 micrometer . hr-2 and, by extrapolation, possessed an apparent initial velocity of 2.8 micrometer . hr-1 at the time of wounding. The apparent initial velocity was considered to be the result of a brief (< 10 hr) and rapid acceleration dependent on cell density. To verify this, wounds were made at different densities below the maximum. In these experiments, the cells did not migrate until a "threshold" density of 2.0 X 10(5) cells per cm2 was reached regardless of the density at the time of wounding. At the threshold density, the cell sheet began to accelerate at the previously measured rate (0.24 micrometer . hr-2). Any increase in density by cell division was balanced by cell migration, so that the same threshold density was maintained by the migrating cells. Each migrating cell sustained the movement of the cell sheet at a constant rate of acceleration. It is proposed that an acceleration is, in general, characteristic of the vectorial movement of an epithelial cell sheet. Images PMID:6933523

  15. MicroRNA-106b-25 cluster targets β-TRCP2, increases the expression of Snail and enhances cell migration and invasion in H1299 (non small cell lung cancer) cells.

    PubMed

    Savita, Udainiya; Karunagaran, Devarajan

    2013-05-17

    Lung cancer causes high mortality without a declining trend and non small cell lung cancer represents 85% of all pulmonary carcinomas. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) serve as fine regulators of proliferation, migration, invasion/metastasis and angiogenesis of normal and cancer cells. Using TargetScan6.2, we predicted that the ubiquitin ligase, β-TRCP2, could be a target for two of the constituent miRNAs of the miR-106b-25 cluster (miR-106b and miR-93). We generated a stable clone of miR-106b-25 cluster (CL) or the empty vector (EV) in H1299 (non small cell lung cancer) cells. The expression of β-TRCP2 mRNA was significantly lower in CL than that in EV cells. Transient expression of miR-93 but not antimiR-93 decreased the expression of β-TRCP2 mRNA in H1299 cells. β-TRCP2-3'UTR reporter assay revealed that its activity in CL cells was only 60% of that in EV cells. Snail protein expression was higher in CL than that in EV cells and H1299 cells exhibited an increase in the expression of Snail upon transient transfection with miR-93. miR-106b-25 cluster-induced migration of CL measured by scratch assay was more than that in EV cells and no significant difference in migration was observed between antimiR-93-transfected H1299 cells and the corresponding control-oligo-transfected cells. miR-106b-25 cluster-induced migration of CL cells was again confirmed in a Boyden chamber assay without the matrigel. CL cells were more invasive than EV cells when assessed using Boyden chambers with matrigel but there were no significant changes in the cell viabilities between EV and CL cells. Colony formation assay revealed that the CL cells formed more number of colonies than EV cells but they were smaller in size than those formed by EV cells. The supernatant from CL cells was more effective than that from EV cells in inducing tube formation in endothelial cells. Taken together, our data indicate that miR-106b-25 cluster may play an important role in the metastasis of human non-small cell

  16. Alk1 controls arterial endothelial cell migration in lumenized vessels.

    PubMed

    Rochon, Elizabeth R; Menon, Prahlad G; Roman, Beth L

    2016-07-15

    Heterozygous loss of the arterial-specific TGFβ type I receptor, activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1; ACVRL1), causes hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). HHT is characterized by development of fragile, direct connections between arteries and veins, or arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). However, how decreased ALK1 signaling leads to AVMs is unknown. To understand the cellular mis-steps that cause AVMs, we assessed endothelial cell behavior in alk1-deficient zebrafish embryos, which develop cranial AVMs. Our data demonstrate that alk1 loss has no effect on arterial endothelial cell proliferation but alters arterial endothelial cell migration within lumenized vessels. In wild-type embryos, alk1-positive cranial arterial endothelial cells generally migrate towards the heart, against the direction of blood flow, with some cells incorporating into endocardium. In alk1-deficient embryos, migration against flow is dampened and migration in the direction of flow is enhanced. Altered migration results in decreased endothelial cell number in arterial segments proximal to the heart and increased endothelial cell number in arterial segments distal to the heart. We speculate that the consequent increase in distal arterial caliber and hemodynamic load precipitates the flow-dependent development of downstream AVMs.

  17. Cell migration in the postnatal subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Menezes, J R L; Marins, M; Alves, J A J; Froes, M M; Hedin-Pereira, C

    2002-12-01

    New neurons are constantly added to the olfactory bulb of rodents from birth to adulthood. This accretion is not only dependent on sustained neurogenesis, but also on the migration of neuroblasts and immature neurons from the cortical and striatal subventricular zone (SVZ) to the olfactory bulb. Migration along this long tangential pathway, known as the rostral migratory stream (RMS), is in many ways opposite to the classical radial migration of immature neurons: it is faster, spans a longer distance, does not require radial glial guidance, and is not limited to postmitotic neurons. In recent years many molecules have been found to be expressed specifically in this pathway and to directly affect this migration. Soluble factors with inhibitory, attractive and inductive roles in migration have been described, as well as molecules mediating cell-to-cell and cell-substrate interactions. However, it is still unclear how the various molecules and cells interact to account for the special migratory behavior in the RMS. Here we will propose some candidate mechanisms for roles in initiating and stopping SVZ/RMS migration.

  18. Attraction rules: germ cell migration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Raz, Erez; Reichman-Fried, Michal

    2006-08-01

    The migration of zebrafish primordial germ cell towards the region where the gonad develops is guided by the chemokine SDF-1a. Recent studies show that soon after their specification, the cells undergo a series of morphological alterations before they become motile and are able to respond to attractive cues. As migratory cells, primordial germ cells move towards their target while correcting their path upon exiting a cyclic phase in which morphological cell polarity is lost. In the following stages, the cells gather at specific locations and move as cell clusters towards their final target. In all of these stages, zebrafish germ cells respond as individual cells to alterations in the shape of the sdf-1a expression domain, by directed migration towards their target - the position where the gonad develops.

  19. Phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II at T286 enhances invasion and migration of human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Mengna; Evans, Hamish; Gilchrist, Jackson; Mayhew, Jack; Hoffman, Alexander; Pearsall, Elizabeth Ann; Jankowski, Helen; Brzozowski, Joshua Stephen; Skelding, Kathryn Anne

    2016-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a multi-functional kinase that controls a range of cellular functions, including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. The biological properties of CaMKII are regulated by multi-site phosphorylation. However, the role that CaMKII phosphorylation plays in cancer cell metastasis has not been examined. We demonstrate herein that CaMKII expression and phosphorylation at T286 is increased in breast cancer when compared to normal breast tissue, and that increased CAMK2 mRNA is associated with poor breast cancer patient prognosis (worse overall and distant metastasis free survival). Additionally, we show that overexpression of WT, T286D and T286V forms of CaMKII in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells increases invasion, migration and anchorage independent growth, and that overexpression of the T286D phosphomimic leads to a further increase in the invasive, migratory and anchorage independent growth capacity of these cells. Pharmacological inhibition of CaMKII decreases MDA-MB-231 migration and invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that overexpression of T286D, but not WT or T286V-CaMKII, leads to phosphorylation of FAK, STAT5a, and Akt. These results demonstrate a novel function for phosphorylation of CaMKII at T286 in the control of breast cancer metastasis, offering a promising target for the development of therapeutics to prevent breast cancer metastasis. PMID:27605043

  20. Dissecting mesenchymal stem cell movement: migration assays for tracing and deducing cell migration.

    PubMed

    Spaeth, Erika L; Marini, Frank C

    2011-01-01

    Targeted migration is a necessary attribute for any gene delivery vehicle. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been used as effective delivery vehicles for treatments against cancer, graft versus host disease, -arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and many other diseases. MSC migrate toward sites of inflammation, however, the true migratory mechanism has yet to be elucidated. There are several receptors and respective chemokines known to be involved in the migration of the MSC. Further insight to MSC migration will be revealed both in vivo and in vitro through the application of migration assays from the most simple, to the more technologically demanding.

  1. Putting the brakes on cancer cell migration: JAM-A restrains integrin activation.

    PubMed

    Naik, Ulhas P; Naik, Meghna U

    2008-01-01

    Junctional Adhesion Molecule A (JAM-A) is a member of the Ig superfamily of membrane proteins expressed in platelets, leukocytes, endothelial cells and epithelial cells. We have previously shown that in endothelial cells, JAM-A regulates basic fibroblast growth factor, (FGF-2)-induced angiogenesis via augmenting endothelial cell migration. Recently, we have revealed that in breast cancer cells, downregulation of JAM-A enhances cancer cell migration and invasion. Further, ectopic expression of JAM-A in highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells attenuates cell migration, and downregulation of JAM-A in low-metastatic T47D cells enhance migration. Interestingly, JAM-A expression is greatly diminished as breast cancer disease progresses. The molecular mechanism of this function of JAM-A is beyond its well-characterized barrier function at the tight junction. Our results point out that JAM-A differentially regulates migration of endothelial and cancer cells.

  2. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell accelerated stress testing

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Andrew M.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L.; Spernjak, Dusan; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2016-01-01

    Cerium is a radical scavenger which improves polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell durability. During operation, however, cerium rapidly migrates in the PEM and into the catalyst layers (CLs). In this work, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were subjected to accelerated stress tests (ASTs) under different humidity conditions. Cerium migration was characterized in the MEAs after ASTs using X-ray fluorescence. During fully humidified operation, water flux from cell inlet to outlet generated in-plane cerium gradients. Conversely, cerium profiles were flat during low humidity operation, where in-plane water flux was negligible, however, migration from the PEM into the CLs was enhanced. Humidity cycling resulted in both in-plane cerium gradients due to water flux during the hydration component of the cycle, and significant migration into the CLs. Fluoride and cerium emissions into effluent cell waters were measured during ASTs and correlated, which signifies that ionomer degradation products serve as possible counter-ions for cerium emissions. Fluoride emission rates were also correlated to final PEM cerium contents, which indicates that PEM degradation and cerium migration are coupled. Lastly, it is proposed that cerium migrates from the PEM due to humidification conditions and degradation, and is subsequently stabilized in the CLs by carbon catalyst supports.

  3. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell accelerated stress testing

    DOE PAGES

    Baker, Andrew M.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L.; ...

    2016-01-01

    Cerium is a radical scavenger which improves polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell durability. During operation, however, cerium rapidly migrates in the PEM and into the catalyst layers (CLs). In this work, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were subjected to accelerated stress tests (ASTs) under different humidity conditions. Cerium migration was characterized in the MEAs after ASTs using X-ray fluorescence. During fully humidified operation, water flux from cell inlet to outlet generated in-plane cerium gradients. Conversely, cerium profiles were flat during low humidity operation, where in-plane water flux was negligible, however, migration from the PEM into the CLs was enhanced. Humiditymore » cycling resulted in both in-plane cerium gradients due to water flux during the hydration component of the cycle, and significant migration into the CLs. Fluoride and cerium emissions into effluent cell waters were measured during ASTs and correlated, which signifies that ionomer degradation products serve as possible counter-ions for cerium emissions. Fluoride emission rates were also correlated to final PEM cerium contents, which indicates that PEM degradation and cerium migration are coupled. Lastly, it is proposed that cerium migrates from the PEM due to humidification conditions and degradation, and is subsequently stabilized in the CLs by carbon catalyst supports.« less

  4. A Novel Collagen Dot Assay for Monitoring Cancer Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Alford, Vincent M; Roth, Eric; Zhang, Qian; Cao, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is a critical determinant of cancer invasion and metastasis. Drugs targeting cancer cell migration have been hindered due to the lack of effective assays for monitoring cancer cell migration. Here we describe a novel method to microscopically monitor cell migration in a quantitative fashion. This assay can be used to study genes involved in cancer cell migration, as well as screening anticancer drugs that target this cellular process.

  5. Study of cell migration in microfabricated channels.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Pablo; Terriac, Emmanuel; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria; Piel, Matthieu

    2014-02-21

    The method described here allows the study of cell migration under confinement in one dimension. It is based on the use of microfabricated channels, which impose a polarized phenotype to cells by physical constraints. Once inside channels, cells have only two possibilities: move forward or backward. This simplified migration in which directionality is restricted facilitates the automatic tracking of cells and the extraction of quantitative parameters to describe cell movement. These parameters include cell velocity, changes in direction, and pauses during motion. Microchannels are also compatible with the use of fluorescent markers and are therefore suitable to study localization of intracellular organelles and structures during cell migration at high resolution. Finally, the surface of the channels can be functionalized with different substrates, allowing the control of the adhesive properties of the channels or the study of haptotaxis. In summary, the system here described is intended to analyze the migration of large cell numbers in conditions in which both the geometry and the biochemical nature of the environment are controlled, facilitating the normalization and reproducibility of independent experiments.

  6. Seeds of Locally Aligned Motion and Stress Coordinate a Collective Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Zaritsky, Assaf; Welf, Erik S.; Tseng, Yun-Yu; Angeles Rabadán, M.; Serra-Picamal, Xavier; Trepat, Xavier; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-01-01

    We find how collective migration emerges from mechanical information transfer between cells. Local alignment of cell velocity and mechanical stress orientation—a phenomenon dubbed “plithotaxis”—plays a crucial role in inducing coordinated migration. Leader cells at the monolayer edge better align velocity and stress to migrate faster toward the open space. Local seeds of enhanced motion then generate stress on neighboring cells to guide their migration. Stress-induced motion propagates into the monolayer as well as along the monolayer boundary to generate increasingly larger clusters of coordinately migrating cells that move faster with enhanced alignment of velocity and stress. Together, our analysis provides a model of long-range mechanical communication between cells, in which plithotaxis translates local mechanical fluctuations into globally collective migration of entire tissues. PMID:26682808

  7. Collective cell migration: guidance principles and hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Haeger, Anna; Wolf, Katarina; Zegers, Mirjam M; Friedl, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Collective cell migration results from the establishment and maintenance of collective polarization, mechanocoupling, and cytoskeletal kinetics. The guidance of collective cell migration depends on a reciprocal process between cell-intrinsic multicellular organization with leader-follower cell behavior and results in mechanosensory integration of extracellular guidance cues. Important guidance mechanisms include chemotaxis, haptotaxis, durotaxis, and strain-induced mechanosensing to move cell groups along interfaces and paths of least resistance. Additional guidance mechanisms steering cell groups during specialized conditions comprise electrotaxis and passive drift. To form higher-order cell and tissue structures during morphogenesis and cancer invasion, these guidance principles act in parallel and are integrated for collective adaptation to and shaping of varying tissue environments. We review mechanochemical and electrical inputs and multiparameter signal integration underlying collective guidance, decision making, and outcome.

  8. miR-29a/b Enhances Cell Migration and Invasion in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Progression by Regulating SPARC and COL3A1 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ning; Guo, Tianyu; Cao, Yange; Yu, Ying; Wang, Xuejun; Zou, Bingcheng; Zhang, Songmei; Jing, Tao; Ling, Tao; Xie, Jun; Zhang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a malignant tumor associated with a genetic predisposition, Epstein-Barr virus infection and chromosomal abnormalities. Recently, several miRNAs have been shown to target specific mRNAs to regulate NPC development and progression. However, the involvement of miRNAs in processes leading to NPC migration and invasion remains to be elucidated. We predicted that miR-29a/b are associated with dysregulated genes controlling NPC through an integrated interaction network of miRNAs and genes. miR-29a/b over-expression in NPC cell lines had no significant effect on proliferation, whereas miR-29b mildly increased the percentage of cells in the G1 phase with a concomitant decrease in the percentage of cells in S phase. Furthermore, we demonstrated that miR-29a/b might be responsible for increasing S18 cell migration and invasion, and only COL3A1 was identified as a direct target of miR-29b despite the fact that both SPARC and COL3A1 were inhibited by miR-29a/b over-expression. Meanwhile, SPARC proteins were increased in metastatic NPC tissue and are involved in NPC progression. Unexpectedly, we identified that miRNA-29b expression was elevated in the serum of NPC patients with a high risk of metastasis. The 5-year actuarial overall survival rates in NPC patients with high serum miR-29b expression was significantly shorter than those with low serum miR-29b expression; therefore, serum miR-29b expression could be a promising prognostic marker. PMID:25786138

  9. In vitro cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Nina; Walzl, Angelika; Unger, Christine; Rosner, Margit; Krupitza, Georg; Hengstschläger, Markus; Dolznig, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Determining the migratory and invasive capacity of tumor and stromal cells and clarifying the underlying mechanisms is most relevant for novel strategies in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, drug development and treatment. Here we shortly summarize the different modes of cell travelling and review in vitro methods, which can be used to evaluate migration and invasion. We provide a concise summary of established migration/invasion assays described in the literature, list advantages, limitations and drawbacks, give a tabular overview for convenience and depict the basic principles of the assays graphically. In many cases particular research problems and specific cell types do not leave a choice for a broad variety of usable assays. However, for most standard applications using adherent cells, based on our experience we suggest to use exclusion zone assays to evaluate migration/invasion. We substantiate our choice by demonstrating that the advantages outbalance the drawbacks e.g. the simple setup, the easy readout, the kinetic analysis, the evaluation of cell morphology and the feasibility to perform the assay with standard laboratory equipment. Finally, innovative 3D migration and invasion models including heterotypic cell interactions are discussed. These methods recapitulate the in vivo situation most closely. Results obtained with these assays have already shed new light on cancer cell spreading and potentially will uncover unknown mechanisms.

  10. Engineered Models of Confined Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Colin D.; Hung, Wei-Chien; Wirtz, Denis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Cells in the body are physically confined by neighboring cells, tissues, and the extracellular matrix. Although physical confinement modulates intracellular signaling and the underlying mechanisms of cell migration, it is difficult to study in vivo. Furthermore, traditional two-dimensional cell migration assays do not recapitulate the complex topographies found in the body. Therefore, a number of experimental in vitro models that confine and impose forces on cells in well-defined microenvironments have been engineered. We describe the design and use of microfluidic microchannel devices, grooved substrates, micropatterned lines, vertical confinement devices, patterned hydrogels, and micropipette aspiration assays for studying cell responses to confinement. Use of these devices has enabled the delineation of changes in cytoskeletal reorganization, cell–substrate adhesions, intracellular signaling, nuclear shape, and gene expression that result from physical confinement. These assays and the physiologically relevant signaling pathways that have been elucidated are beginning to have a translational and clinical impact. PMID:27420571

  11. Glial chain migration requires pioneer cells.

    PubMed

    Aigouy, Benoît; Lepelletier, Léa; Giangrande, Angela

    2008-11-05

    The migration of glial chains along the nerve entails directional and coordinated movement. Despite its importance in the formation of the nervous system, this process remains poorly understood, because of the difficulty of manipulating identified cells. Using confocal time-lapse and cell ablation in the whole animal, we provide direct evidence for a discrete number of Drosophila peripheral glial cells acting as pioneers and guiding the rest of the migratory chain. These cells are in direct contact with several follower cells through a very long and stable cytoplasmic extension. The presence of pioneer cells and homotypic interactions at the tip of the chain allows coordinated movement and the formation of a continuous sheath around the nerve. These in vivo data open novel perspectives for understanding the cellular bases of vertebrate glial migration in physiological and pathological conditions.

  12. Chemokine Oligomerization in Cell Signaling and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Sharp, Joshua S.; Handel, Tracy M.; Prestegard, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines are small proteins best known for their role in controlling the migration of diverse cells, particularly leukocytes. Upon binding to their G-protein-coupled receptors on the leukocytes, chemokines stimulate the signaling events that cause cytoskeletal rearrangements involved in cell movement, and migration of the cells along chemokine gradients. Depending on the cell type, chemokines also induce many other types of cellular responses including those related to defense mechanisms, cell proliferation, survival, and development. Historically, most research efforts have focused on the interaction of chemokines with their receptors, where monomeric forms of the ligands are the functionally relevant state. More recently, however, the importance of chemokine interactions with cell surface glycosaminoglycans has come to light, and in most cases appears to involve oligomeric chemokine structures. This review summarizes existing knowledge relating to the structure and function of chemokine oligomers, and emerging methodology for determining structures of complex chemokine assemblies in the future. PMID:23663982

  13. Tumor cell migration is a superstatistical process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabry, Ben

    2014-03-01

    Over short time scales, cell migration can be well described as a homogeneous correlated random walk with a fixed average step length and a certain degree of directional persistence. On time scales of up to 24 h, however, the migration process is highly inhomogeneous. Superstatistical fluctuations of step length and directional persistence lead to ``anomalous'' features, such as an exponential step width distribution (SWD) and a superdiffusive mean squared displacement (MSD). These features are quantitatively reproduced by a correlated random walk with temporally varying persistence. By comparing cell migration on planar substrates and in a 3D collagen matrix, we demonstrate that the globally averaged MSD and SWD are not sensitive to the microscopic migration mechanism of the cells and can therefore yield identical results in these different environments. By contrast, the temporal fluctuations of step length and directional persistence, and their mutual correlations, provide a characteristic fingerprint of the migration process in different environments. In collaboration with Julian Steinwachs and Claus Metzner, Department of Physics, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg.

  14. Sphingolipids inhibit vimentin-dependent cell migration.

    PubMed

    Hyder, Claire L; Kemppainen, Kati; Isoniemi, Kimmo O; Imanishi, Susumu Y; Goto, Hidemasa; Inagaki, Masaki; Fazeli, Elnaz; Eriksson, John E; Törnquist, Kid

    2015-06-01

    The sphingolipids, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC), can induce or inhibit cellular migration. The intermediate filament protein vimentin is an inducer of migration and a marker for epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Given that keratin intermediate filaments are regulated by SPC, with consequences for cell motility, we wanted to determine whether vimentin is also regulated by sphingolipid signalling and whether it is a determinant for sphingolipid-mediated functions. In cancer cells where S1P and SPC inhibited migration, we observed that S1P and SPC induced phosphorylation of vimentin on S71, leading to a corresponding reorganization of vimentin filaments. These effects were sphingolipid-signalling-dependent, because inhibition of either the S1P2 receptor (also known as S1PR2) or its downstream effector Rho-associated kinase (ROCK, for which there are two isoforms ROCK1 and ROCK2) nullified the sphingolipid-induced effects on vimentin organization and S71 phosphorylation. Furthermore, the anti-migratory effect of S1P and SPC could be prevented by expressing S71-phosphorylation-deficient vimentin. In addition, we demonstrated, by using wild-type and vimentin-knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, that the sphingolipid-mediated inhibition of migration is dependent on vimentin. These results imply that this newly discovered sphingolipid-vimentin signalling axis exerts brake-and-throttle functions in the regulation of cell migration.

  15. H enhancement of N vacancy migration in GaN.

    SciTech Connect

    Wixom, Ryan R.; Wright, Alan Francis

    2005-06-01

    We have used density functional theory to investigate diffusion of V{sub N}{sup +} in the presence of H{sup +}. Optimal migration pathways were determined using the climbing image nudged elastic band and directed dimer methods. Our calculations indicate that the rate-limiting barrier for VN{sub N}{sup +} migration will be reduced by 0.58 eV by interplay with H{sup +}, which will enhance migration by more than an order of magnitude at typical GaN growth temperatures.

  16. The effects of acoustic vibration on fibroblast cell migration.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Taybia; Murphy, Mark F; Lilley, Francis; Burton, David R; Bezombes, Frederic

    2016-12-01

    Cells are known to interact and respond to external mechanical cues and recent work has shown that application of mechanical stimulation, delivered via acoustic vibration, can be used to control complex cell behaviours. Fibroblast cells are known to respond to physical cues generated in the extracellular matrix and it is thought that such cues are important regulators of the wound healing process. Many conditions are associated with poor wound healing, so there is need for treatments/interventions, which can help accelerate the wound healing process. The primary aim of this research was to investigate the effects of mechanical stimulation upon the migratory and morphological properties of two different fibroblast cells namely; human lung fibroblast cells (LL24) and subcutaneous areolar/adipose mouse fibroblast cells (L929). Using a speaker-based system, the effects of mechanical stimulation (0-1600Hz for 5min) on the mean cell migration distance (μm) and actin organisation was investigated. The results show that 100Hz acoustic vibration enhanced cell migration for both cell lines whereas acoustic vibration above 100Hz was found to decrease cell migration in a frequency dependent manner. Mechanical stimulation was also found to promote changes to the morphology of both cell lines, particularly the formation of lamellipodia and filopodia. Overall lamellipodia was the most prominent actin structure displayed by the lung cell (LL24), whereas filopodia was the most prominent actin feature displayed by the fibroblast derived from subcutaneous areolar/adipose tissue. Mechanical stimulation at all the frequencies used here was found not to affect cell viability. These results suggest that low-frequency acoustic vibration may be used as a tool to manipulate the mechanosensitivity of cells to promote cell migration.

  17. Cell migration on ridges and cliffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Meghan; McCann, Colin; Kopace, Rael; Watts, John; Homan, Tess; Losert, Wolfgang

    2009-03-01

    The amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum is a model system for the study of cellular migration, an important physiological process that occurs in embryonic development, wound healing, and cancer metastasis. We study the motion of D. discoideum on surfaces with various topographies, particularly those that affect the direction of cellular migration. Topographical features, such as ridges and cliffs, were fabricated using multiphoton absorption polymerization. As the cells encountered these topographical features, we tracked their overall motions and shapes, as well as the locations and intensities of certain intracellular signals. We found that when cells undergoing chemokinesis, random migration in response to a chemical signal, encounter a ridge, they tend to move along that ridge, even if the ridge is shorter than the cell. When cells undergoing chemotaxis, directed migration in response to a chemical signal, are directed off of a cliff, they do not fall off the cliff. Instead, they search for new attachment points, eventually change direction, and continue moving along the edge of the cliff. Both ridges and cliffs affect more than just the motion of a cell; they also affect its shape.

  18. The Cytosolic Domain of Protein-tyrosine Kinase 7 (PTK7), Generated from Sequential Cleavage by a Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 17 (ADAM17) and γ-Secretase, Enhances Cell Proliferation and Migration in Colon Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hye-Won; Shin, Won-Sik; Ludwig, Andreas; Lee, Seung-Taek

    2012-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine kinase 7 (PTK7) is a member of the defective receptor protein-tyrosine kinases and is known to function as a regulator of planar cell polarity during development. Its expression is up-regulated in some cancers including colon carcinomas. A 100-kDa fragment of PTK7 was detected in the culture media from colon cancer cells and HEK293 cells. The shed fragment was named sPTK7-Ig1–7 because its molecular mass was very similar to that of the entire extracellular domain of PTK7 that contains immunoglobulin-like loops 1 to 7 (Ig1–7). The shedding of sPTK7-Ig1–7 was enhanced by treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. In addition to the sPTK7-Ig1–7 found in the culture medium, two C-terminal fragments of PTK7 were detected in the cell lysates: PTK7-CTF1, which includes a transmembrane segment and a cytoplasmic domain, and PTK7-CTF2, which lacks most of the transmembrane segment from PTK7-CTF1. Analysis of PTK7 processing in the presence of various protease inhibitors or after knockdown of potential proteases suggests that shedding of PTK7 into sPTK7-Ig1–7 and PTK7-CTF1 is catalyzed by ADAM17, and further cleavage of PTK7-CTF1 into PTK7-CTF2 is mediated by the γ-secretase complex. PTK7-CTF2 localizes to the nucleus and enhances proliferation, migration, and anchorage-independent colony formation. Our findings demonstrate a novel role for PTK7 in the tumorigenesis via generation of PTK7-CTF2 by sequential cleavage of ADAM17 and γ-secretase. PMID:22665490

  19. Bursts of activity in collective cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Chepizhko, Oleksandr; Giampietro, Costanza; Mastrapasqua, Eleonora; Nourazar, Mehdi; Ascagni, Miriam; Sugni, Michela; Fascio, Umberto; Leggio, Livio; Malinverno, Chiara; Scita, Giorgio; Santucci, Stéphane; Alava, Mikko J.; Zapperi, Stefano; La Porta, Caterina A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Dense monolayers of living cells display intriguing relaxation dynamics, reminiscent of soft and glassy materials close to the jamming transition, and migrate collectively when space is available, as in wound healing or in cancer invasion. Here we show that collective cell migration occurs in bursts that are similar to those recorded in the propagation of cracks, fluid fronts in porous media, and ferromagnetic domain walls. In analogy with these systems, the distribution of activity bursts displays scaling laws that are universal in different cell types and for cells moving on different substrates. The main features of the invasion dynamics are quantitatively captured by a model of interacting active particles moving in a disordered landscape. Our results illustrate that collective motion of living cells is analogous to the corresponding dynamics in driven, but inanimate, systems. PMID:27681632

  20. Impact of jamming on collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nnetu, Kenechukwu David; Knorr, Melanie; Pawlizak, Steve; Fuhs, Thomas; Zink, Mareike; KäS, Josef A.

    2012-02-01

    Multi-cellular migration plays an important role in physiological processes such as embryogenesis, cancer metastasis and tissue repair. During migration, single cells undergo cycles of extension, adhesion and retraction resulting in morphological changes. In a confluent monolayer, there are inter-cellular interactions and crowding, however, the impact of these interactions on the dynamics and elasticity of the monolayer at the multi-cellular and single cell level is not well understood. Here we study the dynamics of a confluent epithelial monolayer by simultaneously measuring cell motion at the multi-cellular and single cell level for various cell densities and tensile elasticity. At the multi-cellular level, the system exhibited spatial kinetic transitions from isotropic to anisotropic migration on long times and the velocity of the monolayer decreased with increasing cell density. Moreover, the dynamics was spatially and temporally heterogeneous. Interestingly, the dynamics was also heterogeneous in wound-healing assays and the correlation length was fitted by compressed exponential. On the single cell scale, we observed transient caging effects with increasing cage rearrangement times as the system age due to an increase in density. Also, the density dependent elastic modulus of the monolayer scaled as a weak power law. Together, these findings suggest that caging effects at the single cell level initiates a slow and heterogeneous dynamics at the multi-cellular level which is similar to the glassy dynamics of deformable colloidal systems.

  1. Signal Relay During Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guven, Can; Rericha, Erin; Ott, Edward; Losert, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    We developed a signal relay model to quantify the effect of intercellular communication in presence of an external signal, during the motion of groups of Dictyostelium discoideum cells. A key parameter is the ratio of amplitude of the cAMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate) a signaling chemical secreted from individual cells versus the external cAMP field, which defines a time scale. Another time scale is set by the degradation rate of the cAMP. In our simulations, the competition between these two time scales results rich dynamics including uniform motion, as well as streaming and clustering instabilities. The simulations are compared to experiments for a wide range of different external signal strengths for both cells that secrete cAMP and a mutant which cannot relay cAMP. Under different strength of external linear cAMP gradient, the wild type cells form streams and exhibit clustering due to the intercellular signaling through individual cAMP secretion. In contrast, cells lacking signal relay move relatively straight. We find that the model captures both independent motion and the formation of aggregates when cells relay the signal.

  2. Collective dynamics of cell migration and cell rearrangements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabla, Alexandre

    Understanding multicellular processes such as embryo development or cancer metastasis requires to decipher the contributions of local cell autonomous behaviours and long range interactions with the tissue environment. A key question in this context concerns the emergence of large scale coordination in cell behaviours, a requirement for collective cell migration or convergent extension. I will present a few examples where physical and mechanical aspects play a significant role in driving tissue scale dynamics.

  1. Endothelial cell migration on surfaces modified with immobilized adhesive peptides.

    PubMed

    Kouvroukoglou, S; Dee, K C; Bizios, R; McIntire, L V; Zygourakis, K

    2000-09-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) migration has been studied on aminophase surfaces with covalently bound RGDS and YIGSRG cell adhesion peptides. The fluorescent marker dansyl chloride was used to quantify the spatial distribution of the peptides on the modified surfaces. Peptides appeared to be distributed in uniformly dispersed large clusters separated by areas of lower peptide concentrations. We employed digital time-lapse video microscopy and image analysis to monitor EC migration on the modified surfaces and to reconstruct the cell trajectories. The persistent random walk model was then applied to analyze the cell displacement data and compute the mean root square speed, the persistence time, and the random motility coefficient of EC. We also calculated the time-averaged speed of cell locomotion. No differences in the speed of cell locomotion on the various substrates were noted. Immobilization of the cell adhesion peptides (RGDS and YIGSRG), however, significantly increased the persistence of cell movement and, thus, the random motility coefficient. These results suggest that immobilization of cell adhesion peptides on the surface of implantable biomaterials may lead to enhanced endothelization rates.

  2. Co-culture with Sertoli cells promotes proliferation and migration of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fenxi; Hong, Yan; Liang, Wenmei; Ren, Tongming; Jing, Suhua; Lin, Juntang

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-culture of Sertoli cells (SCs) with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of SCs dramatically increased proliferation and migration of UCMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of SCs stimulated expression of Mdm2, Akt, CDC2, Cyclin D, CXCR4, MAPKs. -- Abstract: Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) have been recently used in transplant therapy. The proliferation and migration of MSCs are the determinants of the efficiency of MSC transplant therapy. Sertoli cells are a kind of 'nurse' cells that support the development of sperm cells. Recent studies show that Sertoli cells promote proliferation of endothelial cells and neural stem cells in co-culture. We hypothesized that co-culture of UCMSCs with Sertoli cells may also promote proliferation and migration of UCMSCs. To examine this hypothesis, we isolated UCMSCs from human cords and Sertoli cells from mouse testes, and co-cultured them using a Transwell system. We found that UCMSCs exhibited strong proliferation ability and potential to differentiate to other cell lineages such as osteocytes and adipocytes. The presence of Sertoli cells in co-culture significantly enhanced the proliferation and migration potential of UCMSCs (P < 0.01). Moreover, these phenotypic changes were accompanied with upregulation of multiple genes involved in cell proliferation and migration including phospho-Akt, Mdm2, phospho-CDC2, Cyclin D1, Cyclin D3 as well as CXCR4, phospho-p44 MAPK and phospho-p38 MAPK. These findings indicate that Sertoli cells boost UCMSC proliferation and migration potential.

  3. EGF receptor signalling is essential for electric-field-directed migration of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jin; McCaig, Colin D; Cao, Lin; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Segall, Jeffrey E; Zhao, Min

    2007-10-01

    The mechanisms by which cancer cells migrate to metastasise are not fully understood. Breast cancers are accompanied by electrical depolarisation of tumour epithelial cells. The electrical changes can be detected on the skin and are used to differentiate malignant from benign breast tumours. Could the electrical signals play a role in metastasis by promoting tumour cell migration? We report that electric fields stimulate and direct migration of human breast cancer cells. Importantly, these effects were more significant in highly metastatic tumour cells than in low metastatic tumour cells. Electric-field-enhanced directional migration correlates well with the expression level of EGF receptor (EGFR/ErbB1). To confirm this, we transfected low metastatic clone MTC cells with human ErbB1, which significantly increased the electrotactic response. Inhibition of ErbB1 completely abolished the directional response of MTLn3 cells to an electric field. Transfection of MTLn3 cells and MDA-MB-435 cells with expression vectors for ErbB family members ErbB1, ErbB2 and ErbB3 also significantly enhanced EF-induced migration. These results suggest that electric signals might play a role in metastasis of breast cancers by enhancing cell migration through the ErbB-signalling pathway.

  4. Endometrial stromal fibroblasts from women with polycystic ovary syndrome have impaired progesterone-mediated decidualization, aberrant cytokine profiles and promote enhanced immune cell migration in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Piltonen, T.T.; Chen, J.C.; Khatun, M.; Kangasniemi, M.; Liakka, A.; Spitzer, T.; Tran, N.; Huddleston, H.; Irwin, J.C.; Giudice, L.C.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Do endometrial stromal fibroblasts (eSF) in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) (eSFpcos) exhibit altered estrogen and/or progesterone (P4) responses, which may explain some of the adverse reproductive outcomes and endometrial pathologies in these women? SUMMARY ANSWER In vitro, eSF from women with PCOS exhibit an aberrant decidualization response and concomitant changes in pro-inflammatory cytokine, chemokine and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) release and immune cell chemoattraction. In vivo these aberrations may result in suboptimal implantation and predisposition to endometrial cancer. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY The endometrium in women with PCOS has several abnormalities including progesterone (P4) resistance at the gene expression level, likely contributing to subfertility, pregnancy complications and increased endometrial cancer risk in PCOS women. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION Prospective, university-based, case–control, in vitro study. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Cultures of eSFPCOS (n = 12, Rotterdam and NIH criteria) and eSFControl (Ctrl) (n = 6, regular cycle length, no signs of hyperandrogenism) were treated with vehicle, estradiol (E2, 10 nM) or E2P4 (10 nM/1 μM) for 14 days. Progesterone receptor (PGR) mRNA was assessed with quantitative real-time PCR (qRT–PCR) and eSF decidualization was confirmed by insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) transcript and protein expression. Fractalkine (CX3CL1), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin (IL) 6, 8 and 11, macrophage chemoattractant protein (MCP) 1 and 3, CCL5 (RANTES) and MMPs (MMP1, 2, 3, 7, 9, 10 and 12) were measured in conditioned media by Luminex multiplex assays, and chemotactic activity of the conditioned media was tested in a migration assay using CD14+ monocyte and CD4+ T-cell migration assay. Effects of IL-6 (0.02, 0.2, 2 or 20 ng/ml) or IL-8 (0.04, 0.4, 4, or 40 ng/ml) or combination (0.2 ng/ml IL-6 and 4.0 ng

  5. Cell Shape Dynamics: From Waves to Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Meghan; McCann, Colin; Sun, Xiaoyu; Fourkas, John; Parent, Carole; Losert, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    We observe and quantify wave-like characteristics of amoeboid migration. Using the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, a model system for the study of chemotaxis, we demonstrate that cell shape changes in a wave-like manner. Cells have regions of high boundary curvature that propagate from the leading edge toward the back, usually along alternating sides of the cell. Curvature waves are easily seen in cells that do not adhere to a surface, such as cells that are electrostatically repelled from surfaces or cells that extend over the edge of micro-fabricated cliffs. Without surface contact, curvature waves travel from the leading edge to the back of a cell at ˜35 μm/min. Non-adherent myosin II null cells do not exhibit these curvature waves. At the leading edge of adherent cells, curvature waves are associated with protrusive activity. Like regions of high curvature, protrusive activity travels along the boundary in a wave-like manner. Upon contact with a surface, the waves stop moving relative to the surface, and the boundary shape thus reflects the history of protrusive motion. The wave-like character of protrusions provides a plausible mechanism for the ability of cells to both swim in viscous fluids and to navigate complex 3-D topography.

  6. Cell Shape Dynamics: From Waves to Migration

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Meghan K.; McCann, Colin; Kopace, Rael; Homan, Tess; Fourkas, John T.; Parent, Carole; Losert, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    We observe and quantify wave-like characteristics of amoeboid migration. Using the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, a model system for the study of chemotaxis, we demonstrate that cell shape changes in a wave-like manner. Cells have regions of high boundary curvature that propagate from the leading edge toward the back, usually along alternating sides of the cell. Curvature waves are easily seen in cells that do not adhere to a surface, such as cells that are electrostatically repelled from surfaces or cells that extend over the edge of micro-fabricated cliffs. Without surface contact, curvature waves travel from the leading edge to the back of a cell at ∼35 µm/min. Non-adherent myosin II null cells do not exhibit these curvature waves. At the leading edge of adherent cells, curvature waves are associated with protrusive activity. Like regions of high curvature, protrusive activity travels along the boundary in a wave-like manner. Upon contact with a surface, the protrusions stop moving relative to the surface, and the boundary shape thus reflects the history of protrusive motion. The wave-like character of protrusions provides a plausible mechanism for the zig-zagging of pseudopods and for the ability of cells both to swim in viscous fluids and to navigate complex three dimensional topography. PMID:22438794

  7. Force mapping in epithelial cell migration

    PubMed Central

    du Roure, Olivia; Saez, Alexandre; Buguin, Axel; Austin, Robert H.; Chavrier, Philippe; Siberzan, Pascal; Ladoux, Benoit

    2005-01-01

    We measure dynamic traction forces exerted by epithelial cells on a substrate. The force sensor is a high-density array of elastomeric microfabricated pillars that support the cells. Traction forces induced by cell migration are deduced from the measurement of the bending of these pillars and are correlated with actin localization by fluorescence microscopy. We use a multiple-particle tracking method to estimate the mechanical activity of cells in real time with a high-spatial resolution (down to 2 μm) imposed by the periodicity of the post array. For these experiments, we use differentiated Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells. Our data provide definite information on mechanical forces exerted by a cellular assembly. The maximum intensity of the forces is localized on the edge of the epithelia. Hepatocyte growth factor promotes cell motility and induces strong scattering activity of MDCK cells. Thus, we compare forces generated by MDCK cells in subconfluent epithelia versus isolated cells after hepatocyte growth factor treatment. Maximal-traction stresses at the edge of a monolayer correspond to higher values than those measured for a single cell and may be due to a collective behavior. PMID:15695588

  8. Modeling cell migration in 3D: Status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, Rajagopal; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2008-01-01

    Cell migration is a multi-scale process that integrates signaling, mechanics and biochemical reaction kinetics. Various mathematical models accurately predict cell migration on 2D surfaces, but are unable to capture the complexities of 3D migration. Additionally, quantitative 3D cell migration models have been few and far between. In this review we look and characterize various mathematical models available in literature to predict cell migration in 3D matrices and analyze their strengths and possible changes to these models that could improve their predictive capabilities.

  9. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Dayal, Shubham; Zhou, Jun; Manivannan, Praveen; Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Ahmad, Omaima Farid; Clark, Matthew; Awadia, Sahezeel; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Shemshedini, Lirim; Malathi, Krishnamurthy

    2017-03-01

    The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1) to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src) pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase) activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene.

  10. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dayal, Shubham; Zhou, Jun; Manivannan, Praveen; Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Ahmad, Omaima Farid; Clark, Matthew; Awadia, Sahezeel; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Shemshedini, Lirim; Malathi, Krishnamurthy

    2017-01-01

    The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1) to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src) pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase) activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene. PMID:28257035

  11. Alignment of cell division axes in directed epithelial cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marel, Anna-Kristina; Podewitz, Nils; Zorn, Matthias; Oskar Rädler, Joachim; Elgeti, Jens

    2014-11-01

    Cell division is an essential dynamic event in tissue remodeling during wound healing, cancer and embryogenesis. In collective migration, tensile stresses affect cell shape and polarity, hence, the orientation of the cell division axis is expected to depend on cellular flow patterns. Here, we study the degree of orientation of cell division axes in migrating and resting epithelial cell sheets. We use microstructured channels to create a defined scenario of directed cell invasion and compare this situation to resting but proliferating cell monolayers. In experiments, we find a strong alignment of the axis due to directed flow while resting sheets show very weak global order, but local flow gradients still correlate strongly with the cell division axis. We compare experimental results with a previously published mesoscopic particle based simulation model. Most of the observed effects are reproduced by the simulations.

  12. Flow-driven cell migration under external electric fields

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yizeng; Mori, Yoichiro; Sun, Sean X.

    2016-01-01

    Electric fields influence many aspects of cell physiology, including various forms of cell migration. Many cells are sensitive to electric fields, and can migrate toward a cathode or an anode, depending on the cell type. In this paper, we examine an actomyosin-independent mode of cell migration under electrical fields. Our theory considers a one-dimensional cell with water and ionic fluxes at the cell boundary. Water fluxes through the membrane are governed by the osmotic pressure difference across the cell membrane. Fluxes of cations and anions across the cell membrane are determined by the properties of the ion channels as well as the external electric field. Results show that without actin polymerization and myosin contraction, electric fields can also drive cell migration, even when the cell is not polarized. The direction of migration with respect to the electric field direction is influenced by the properties of ion channels, and are cell-type dependent. PMID:26765031

  13. Flow-Driven Cell Migration under External Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yizeng; Mori, Yoichiro; Sun, Sean X.

    2015-12-01

    Electric fields influence many aspects of cell physiology, including various forms of cell migration. Many cells are sensitive to electric fields, and they can migrate toward a cathode or an anode, depending on the cell type. In this Letter, we examine an actomyosin-independent mode of cell migration under electrical fields. Our theory considers a one-dimensional cell with water and ionic fluxes at the cell boundary. Water fluxes through the membrane are governed by the osmotic pressure difference across the cell membrane. Fluxes of cations and anions across the cell membrane are determined by the properties of the ion channels as well as the external electric field. Results show that without actin polymerization and myosin contraction, electric fields can also drive cell migration, even when the cell is not polarized. The direction of migration with respect to the electric field direction is influenced by the properties of ion channels, and are cell-type dependent.

  14. Migrating Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cells Swell Prior to Soma Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Happel, Patrick; Möller, Kerstin; Schwering, Nina K.; Dietzel, Irmgard D.

    2013-01-01

    The migration of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) to the white matter is an indispensable requirement for an intact brain function. The mechanism of cell migration in general is not yet completely understood. Nevertheless, evidence is accumulating that besides the coordinated rearrangement of the cytoskeleton, a finetuned interplay of ion and water fluxes across the cell membrane is essential for cell migration. One part of a general hypothesis is that a local volume increase towards the direction of movement triggers a mechano-activated calcium influx that regulates various procedures at the rear end of a migrating cell. Here, we investigated cell volume changes of migrating OPCs using scanning ion conductance microscopy. We found that during accelerated migration OPCs undergo an increase in the frontal cell body volume. These findings are supplemented with time lapse calcium imaging data that hint an increase in calcium content the frontal part of the cell soma. PMID:23657670

  15. Enhancement of anammox by the excretion of diel vertical migrators

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Daniele; Babbin, Andrew R.; Galbraith, Eric D.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements show that anaerobic ammonium oxidation with nitrite (anammox) is a major pathway of fixed nitrogen removal in the anoxic zones of the open ocean. Anammox requires a source of ammonium, which under anoxic conditions could be supplied by the breakdown of sinking organic matter via heterotrophic denitrification. However, at many locations where anammox is measured, denitrification rates are small or undetectable. Alternative sources of ammonium have been proposed to explain this paradox, for example through dissimilatory reduction of nitrate to ammonium and transport from anoxic sediments. However, the relevance of these sources in open-ocean anoxic zones is debated. Here, we bring to attention an additional source of ammonium, namely, the daytime excretion by zooplankton and micronekton migrating from the surface to anoxic waters. We use a synthesis of acoustic data to show that, where anoxic waters occur within the water column, most migrators spend the daytime within them. Although migrators export only a small fraction of primary production from the surface, they focus excretion within a confined depth range of anoxic water where particle input is small. Using a simple biogeochemical model, we suggest that, at those depths, the source of ammonium from organisms undergoing diel vertical migrations could exceed the release from particle remineralization, enhancing in situ anammox rates. The contribution of this previously overlooked process, and the numerous uncertainties surrounding it, call for further efforts to evaluate the role of animals in oxygen minimum zone biogeochemistry. PMID:25288743

  16. Enhancement of anammox by the excretion of diel vertical migrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Daniele; Babbin, Andrew R.; Galbraith, Eric D.

    2014-11-01

    Measurements show that anaerobic ammonium oxidation with nitrite (anammox) is a major pathway of fixed nitrogen removal in the anoxic zones of the open ocean. Anammox requires a source of ammonium, which under anoxic conditions could be supplied by the breakdown of sinking organic matter via heterotrophic denitrification. However, at many locations where anammox is measured, denitrification rates are small or undetectable. Alternative sources of ammonium have been proposed to explain this paradox, for example through dissimilatory reduction of nitrate to ammonium and transport from anoxic sediments. However, the relevance of these sources in open-ocean anoxic zones is debated. Here, we bring to attention an additional source of ammonium, namely, the daytime excretion by zooplankton and micronekton migrating from the surface to anoxic waters. We use a synthesis of acoustic data to show that, where anoxic waters occur within the water column, most migrators spend the daytime within them. Although migrators export only a small fraction of primary production from the surface, they focus excretion within a confined depth range of anoxic water where particle input is small. Using a simple biogeochemical model, we suggest that, at those depths, the source of ammonium from organisms undergoing diel vertical migrations could exceed the release from particle remineralization, enhancing in situ anammox rates. The contribution of this previously overlooked process, and the numerous uncertainties surrounding it, call for further efforts to evaluate the role of animals in oxygen minimum zone biogeochemistry.

  17. Differential migration and proliferation of geometrical ensembles of cell clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Girish; Chen, Bo; Co, Carlos C.; Ho, Chia-Chi

    2011-06-10

    Differential cell migration and growth drives the organization of specific tissue forms and plays a critical role in embryonic development, tissue morphogenesis, and tumor invasion. Localized gradients of soluble factors and extracellular matrix have been shown to modulate cell migration and proliferation. Here we show that in addition to these factors, initial tissue geometry can feedback to generate differential proliferation, cell polarity, and migration patterns. We apply layer by layer polyelectrolyte assembly to confine multicellular organization and subsequently release cells to demonstrate the spatial patterns of cell migration and growth. The cell shapes, spreading areas, and cell-cell contacts are influenced strongly by the confining geometry. Cells within geometric ensembles are morphologically polarized. Symmetry breaking was observed for cells on the circular pattern and cells migrate toward the corners and in the direction parallel to the longest dimension of the geometric shapes. This migration pattern is disrupted when actomyosin based tension was inhibited. Cells near the edge or corner of geometric shapes proliferate while cells within do not. Regions of higher rate of cell migration corresponded to regions of concentrated growth. These findings demonstrate that multicellular organization can result in spatial patterns of migration and proliferation.

  18. Fine Tuning Cell Migration by a Disintegrin and Metalloproteinases

    PubMed Central

    Theodorou, K.

    2017-01-01

    Cell migration is an instrumental process involved in organ development, tissue homeostasis, and various physiological processes and also in numerous pathologies. Both basic cell migration and migration towards chemotactic stimulus consist of changes in cell polarity and cytoskeletal rearrangement, cell detachment from, invasion through, and reattachment to their neighboring cells, and numerous interactions with the extracellular matrix. The different steps of immune cell, tissue cell, or cancer cell migration are tightly coordinated in time and place by growth factors, cytokines/chemokines, adhesion molecules, and receptors for these ligands. This review describes how a disintegrin and metalloproteinases interfere with several steps of cell migration, either by proteolytic cleavage of such molecules or by functions independent of proteolytic activity. PMID:28260841

  19. Water permeation drives tumor cell migration in confined microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Stroka, Kimberly M; Jiang, Hongyuan; Chen, Shih-Hsun; Tong, Ziqiu; Wirtz, Denis; Sun, Sean X; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-04-24

    Cell migration is a critical process for diverse (patho)physiological phenomena. Intriguingly, cell migration through physically confined spaces can persist even when typical hallmarks of 2D planar migration, such as actin polymerization and myosin II-mediated contractility, are inhibited. Here, we present an integrated experimental and theoretical approach ("Osmotic Engine Model") and demonstrate that directed water permeation is a major mechanism of cell migration in confined microenvironments. Using microfluidic and imaging techniques along with mathematical modeling, we show that tumor cells confined in a narrow channel establish a polarized distribution of Na+/H+ pumps and aquaporins in the cell membrane, which creates a net inflow of water and ions at the cell leading edge and a net outflow of water and ions at the trailing edge, leading to net cell displacement. Collectively, this study presents an alternate mechanism of cell migration in confinement that depends on cell-volume regulation via water permeation.

  20. Guided migration of neural stem cells derived from human embryonic stem cells by an electric field.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun-Feng; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Xiu-Zhen; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Ji-Yao; Nolta, Jan; Zhao, Min

    2012-02-01

    Small direct current (DC) electric fields (EFs) guide neurite growth and migration of rodent neural stem cells (NSCs). However, this could be species dependent. Therefore, it is critical to investigate how human NSCs (hNSCs) respond to EF before any possible clinical attempt. Aiming to characterize the EF-stimulated and guided migration of hNSCs, we derived hNSCs from a well-established human embryonic stem cell line H9. Small applied DC EFs, as low as 16 mV/mm, induced significant directional migration toward the cathode. Reversal of the field polarity reversed migration of hNSCs. The galvanotactic/electrotactic response was both time and voltage dependent. The migration directedness and distance to the cathode increased with the increase of field strength. (Rho-kinase) inhibitor Y27632 is used to enhance viability of stem cells and has previously been reported to inhibit EF-guided directional migration in induced pluripotent stem cells and neurons. However, its presence did not significantly affect the directionality of hNSC migration in an EF. Cytokine receptor [C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4)] is important for chemotaxis of NSCs in the brain. The blockage of CXCR4 did not affect the electrotaxis of hNSCs. We conclude that hNSCs respond to a small EF by directional migration. Applied EFs could potentially be further exploited to guide hNSCs to injured sites in the central nervous system to improve the outcome of various diseases.

  1. Texture sensing of cytoskeletal dynamics in cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Satarupa; Lee, Rachel; Hourwitz, Matthew J.; Sun, Xiaoyu; Parent, Carole; Fourkas, John T.; Losert, Wolfgang

    Migrating cells can be directed towards a target by gradients in properties such as chemical concentration or mechanical properties of the surrounding microenvironment. In previous studies we have shown that micro/nanotopographical features on scales comparable to those of natural collagen fibers can guide fast migrating amoeboid cells by aligning actin polymerization waves to such nanostructures. We find that actin microfilaments and microtubules are aligned along the nanoridge topographies, modulating overall cell polarity and directional migration in epithelial cells. This work shows that topographic features on a biologically relevant length scale can modulate migration outcomes by affecting the texture sensing property of the cytoskeleton.

  2. Dectin-1 activation induces proliferation and migration of human keratinocytes enhancing wound re-epithelialization.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Linda M; Zijlstra-Willems, Esther M; Richters, Cornelia D; Ulrich, Magda M W; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H

    2014-01-01

    Beta-glucans in temporary wound dressings have immuno-stimulatory capacities and have been shown to enhance wound healing in burn patients. Curdlan is a 1,3-linked bacterial/fungal derived beta-glucan that induces inflammatory responses via the C-type lectin receptor dectin-1 on dendritic cells (DCs). Here we investigated the effect of beta-glucan curdlan and the role of dectin-1 expressed by keratinocytes (KCs) in wound healing. Curdlan enhanced migration, proliferation and wound closure of human KCs in a dectin-1 dependent manner, both in vitro and ex vivo. Our data suggest that curdlan induces human KC proliferation and migration and could therefore be used in creams to enhance wound healing.

  3. XB130 translocation to microfilamentous structures mediates NNK-induced migration of human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qifei; Nadesalingam, Jeya; Moodley, Serisha; Bai, Xiaohui; Liu, Mingyao

    2015-07-20

    Cigarette smoking contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. Nicotine-derived nitrosamine ketone (NNK) is the most potent carcinogen among cigarette smoking components, and is known to enhance migration of cancer cells. However, the effect of NNK on normal human bronchial epithelial cells is not well studied. XB130 is a member of actin filament associated protein family and is involved in cell morphology changes, cytoskeletal rearrangement and outgrowth formation, as well as cell migration. We hypothesized that XB130 mediates NNK-induced migration of normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Our results showed that, after NNK stimulation, XB130 was translocated to the cell periphery and enriched in cell motility-associated structures, such as lamellipodia, in normal human bronchial epithelial BEAS2B cells. Moreover, overexpression of XB130 significantly enhanced NNK-induced migration, which requires both the N- and C-termini of XB130. Overexpression of XB130 enhanced NNK-induced protein tyrosine phosphorylation and promoted matrix metalloproteinase-14 translocation to cell motility-associated cellular structures after NNK stimulation. XB130-mediated NNK-induced cell migration may contribute to airway epithelial repair; however, it may also be involved in cigarette smoking-related chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer.

  4. Lutein Inhibits the Migration of Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells via Cytosolic and Mitochondrial Akt Pathways (Lutein Inhibits RPE Cells Migration)

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ching-Chieh; Chan, Chi-Ming; Chen, Han-Min; Wu, Chia-Chun; Hsiao, Chien-Yu; Lee, Pei-Lan; Lin, Victor Chia-Hsiang; Hung, Chi-Feng

    2014-01-01

    During the course of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells will de-differentiate, proliferate, and migrate onto the surfaces of the sensory retina. Several studies have shown that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) can induce migration of RPE cells via an Akt-related pathway. In this study, the effect of lutein on PDGF-BB-induced RPE cells migration was examined using transwell migration assays and Western blot analyses. We found that both phosphorylation of Akt and mitochondrial translocation of Akt in RPE cells induced by PDGF-BB stimulation were suppressed by lutein. Furthermore, the increased migration observed in RPE cells with overexpressed mitochondrial Akt could also be suppressed by lutein. Our results demonstrate that lutein can inhibit PDGF-BB induced RPE cells migration through the inhibition of both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Akt activation. PMID:25110866

  5. Chemotactic Migration of T Cells towards Dendritic Cells Promotes the Detection of Rare Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Vroomans, Renske M. A.; Marée, Athanasius F. M.; de Boer, Rob J.; Beltman, Joost B.

    2012-01-01

    In many immunological processes chemoattraction is thought to play a role in guiding cells to their sites of action. However, based on in vivo two-photon microscopy experiments in the absence of cognate antigen, T cell migration in lymph nodes (LNs) has been roughly described as a random walk. Although it has been shown that dendritic cells (DCs) carrying cognate antigen in some circumstances attract T cells chemotactically, it is currently still unclear whether chemoattraction of T cells towards DCs helps or hampers scanning. Chemoattraction towards DCs could on the one hand help T cells to rapidly find DCs. On the other hand, it could be deleterious if DCs become shielded by a multitude of attracted yet non-specific T cells. Results from a recent simulation study suggested that the deleterious effect dominates. We re-addressed the question whether T cell chemoattraction towards DCs is expected to promote or hamper the detection of rare antigens using the Cellular Potts Model, a formalism that allows for dynamic, flexible cellular shapes and cell migration. Our simulations show that chemoattraction of T cells enhances the DC scanning efficiency, leading to an increased probability that rare antigen-specific T cells find DCs carrying cognate antigen. Desensitization of T cells after contact with a DC further improves the scanning efficiency, yielding an almost threefold enhancement compared to random migration. Moreover, the chemotaxis-driven migration still roughly appears as a random walk, hence fine-tuned analysis of cell tracks will be required to detect chemotaxis within microscopy data. PMID:23166480

  6. Chemotactic migration of T cells towards dendritic cells promotes the detection of rare antigens.

    PubMed

    Vroomans, Renske M A; Marée, Athanasius F M; de Boer, Rob J; Beltman, Joost B

    2012-01-01

    In many immunological processes chemoattraction is thought to play a role in guiding cells to their sites of action. However, based on in vivo two-photon microscopy experiments in the absence of cognate antigen, T cell migration in lymph nodes (LNs) has been roughly described as a random walk. Although it has been shown that dendritic cells (DCs) carrying cognate antigen in some circumstances attract T cells chemotactically, it is currently still unclear whether chemoattraction of T cells towards DCs helps or hampers scanning. Chemoattraction towards DCs could on the one hand help T cells to rapidly find DCs. On the other hand, it could be deleterious if DCs become shielded by a multitude of attracted yet non-specific T cells. Results from a recent simulation study suggested that the deleterious effect dominates. We re-addressed the question whether T cell chemoattraction towards DCs is expected to promote or hamper the detection of rare antigens using the Cellular Potts Model, a formalism that allows for dynamic, flexible cellular shapes and cell migration. Our simulations show that chemoattraction of T cells enhances the DC scanning efficiency, leading to an increased probability that rare antigen-specific T cells find DCs carrying cognate antigen. Desensitization of T cells after contact with a DC further improves the scanning efficiency, yielding an almost threefold enhancement compared to random migration. Moreover, the chemotaxis-driven migration still roughly appears as a random walk, hence fine-tuned analysis of cell tracks will be required to detect chemotaxis within microscopy data.

  7. The planar cell polarity pathway directs parietal endoderm migration.

    PubMed

    LaMonica, Kristi; Bass, Maya; Grabel, Laura

    2009-06-01

    Parietal endoderm (PE) contributes to the yolk sac and is the first migratory cell type in the mammalian embryo. We can visualize PE migration in vitro using the F9 teratocarcinoma derived embryoid body outgrowth system and, show here that PE migration is directed by the non-canonical Wnt planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway via Rho/ROCK. Based on golgi apparatus localization and microtubule orientation, 68.6% of cells in control outgrowths are oriented in the direction of migration. Perturbation of Wnt signaling via sFRP treatment results in a loss of orientation coupled with an increase in cell migration. Inhibition of the PCP pathway at the level of Daam1 also results in a loss of cell orientation along with an increase in cell migration, as seen with sFRP treatment. Constitutively active Daam can inhibit the loss of orientation that occurs with sFRP treatment. We previously demonstrated that ROCK inhibition leads to an increase in cell migration, and we now show that these cells also lack oriented migration. Canonical Wnt signaling or the Rac arm of the PCP pathway does not appear to play a role in PE oriented migration. These data suggest the PCP pathway via Rho/ROCK modulates migration of PE.

  8. Correlation between cell migration and reactive oxygen species under electric field stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shang-Ying; Hou, Hsien-San; Sun, Yung-Shin; Cheng, Ji-Yen; Lo, Kai-Yin

    2015-09-01

    Cell migration is an essential process involved in the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Electric fields (EFs) are one of the many physical and chemical factors known to affect cell migration, a phenomenon termed electrotaxis or galvanotaxis. In this paper, a microfluidics chip was developed to study the migration of cells under different electrical and chemical stimuli. This chip is capable of providing four different strengths of EFs in combination with two different chemicals via one simple set of agar salt bridges and Ag/AgCl electrodes. NIH 3T3 fibroblasts were seeded inside this chip to study their migration and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in response to different EF strengths and the presence of β-lapachone. We found that both the EF and β-lapachone level increased the cell migration rate and the production of ROS in an EF-strength-dependent manner. A strong linear correlation between the cell migration rate and the amount of intracellular ROS suggests that ROS are an intermediate product by which EF and β-lapachone enhance cell migration. Moreover, an anti-oxidant, α-tocopherol, was found to quench the production of ROS, resulting in a decrease in the migration rate.

  9. Correlation between cell migration and reactive oxygen species under electric field stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shang-Ying; Hou, Hsien-San; Sun, Yung-Shin; Cheng, Ji-Yen; Lo, Kai-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is an essential process involved in the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Electric fields (EFs) are one of the many physical and chemical factors known to affect cell migration, a phenomenon termed electrotaxis or galvanotaxis. In this paper, a microfluidics chip was developed to study the migration of cells under different electrical and chemical stimuli. This chip is capable of providing four different strengths of EFs in combination with two different chemicals via one simple set of agar salt bridges and Ag/AgCl electrodes. NIH 3T3 fibroblasts were seeded inside this chip to study their migration and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in response to different EF strengths and the presence of β-lapachone. We found that both the EF and β-lapachone level increased the cell migration rate and the production of ROS in an EF-strength-dependent manner. A strong linear correlation between the cell migration rate and the amount of intracellular ROS suggests that ROS are an intermediate product by which EF and β-lapachone enhance cell migration. Moreover, an anti-oxidant, α-tocopherol, was found to quench the production of ROS, resulting in a decrease in the migration rate. PMID:26487906

  10. GMP-grade platelet lysate enhances proliferation and migration of tenon fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Carducci, Augusto; Scafetta, Gaia; Siciliano, Camilla; Carnevale, Roberto; Rosa, Paolo; Coccia, Andrea; Mangino, Giorgio; Bordin, Antonella; Vingolo, Enzo Maria; Pierelli, Luca; Lendaro, Eugenio; Ragona, Giuseppe; Frati, Giacomo; De Falco, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Tenon's fibroblasts (TFs), widely employed as in vitro model for many ophthalmological studies, are routinely cultured with FBS. Platelet Lysate (PL), a hemoderivate enriched with growth factors and cytokines has been largely tested in several clinical applications and as substitute of FBS in culture. Here, we investigate whether PL can exert biological effects on TF populations similarly to other cell types. Results show that PL significantly enhances cell proliferation and migration vs. FBS, without influencing cell size/granularity. Upregulation of EGF, VEGF, KDR, MMP2-9, FAK mRNA levels also occurs and phosphorylation of AKT but not of ERK1/2 is significantly enhanced. The inhibition of the PI3kinase/AKT pathway with the specific inhibitor wortmannin, decreases PL-induced cell migration but not proliferation. Condition supernatants containing PL show increased bioavailability of Nitric Oxide and reduced levels of 8-Iso-PGF2-alpha, correlating with cell proliferation and migration. Pro-angiogenic/inflammatory soluble factors (GRO, Angiogenin, EGF, I-309, PARC) are exclusively or greater expressed in media containing PL than FBS. GMP-grade PL preparations positively influence in vitro biological effects of TFs representing a suitable and safer alternative to FBS.

  11. Development of three-dimensional collagen scaffolds with controlled architecture for cell migration studies using breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jonathan J; Husmann, Anke; Hume, Robert D; Watson, Christine J; Cameron, Ruth E

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is characterized by cell heterogeneity and the development of 3D in vitro assays that can distinguish more invasive or migratory phenotypes could enhance diagnosis or drug discovery. 3D collagen scaffolds have been used to develop analogues of complex tissues in vitro and are suited to routine biochemical and immunological assays. We sought to increase 3D model tractability and modulate the migration rate of seeded cells using an ice-templating technique to create either directional/anisotropic or non-directional/isotropic porous architectures within cross-linked collagen scaffolds. Anisotropic scaffolds supported the enhanced migration of an invasive breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 with an altered spatial distribution of proliferative cells in contrast to invasive MDA-MB-468 and non-invasive MCF-7 cells lines. In addition, MDA-MB-468 showed increased migration upon epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in anisotropic scaffolds. The provision of controlled architecture in this system may act both to increase assay robustness and as a tuneable parameter to capture detection of a migrated population within a set time, with consequences for primary tumour migration analysis. The separation of invasive clones from a cancer biomass with in vitro platforms could enhance drug development and diagnosis testing by contributing assay metrics including migration rate, as well as modelling cell-cell and cell-matrix interaction in a system compatible with routine histopathological testing.

  12. Heterologous cells cooperate to augment stem cell migration, homing, and engraftment.

    PubMed

    Adams, Gregor B; Chabner, Karissa T; Foxall, Russell B; Weibrecht, Kathryn W; Rodrigues, Neil P; Dombkowski, David; Fallon, Robert; Poznansky, Mark C; Scadden, David T

    2003-01-01

    T-lymphocyte depletion of bone marrow grafts compromises engraftment, suggesting a facilitating mechanism provided by the T cells that has been shown to associate with CD8(+) but not CD4(+) T cells. Explanations for this phenomenon have focused on immune targeting of residual host cells or cytokine production. We provide evidence for an alternative mechanism based on cooperative effects on cell motility. We observed that engraftment of CD34(+) cells in a beta(2)-microglobulin-deficient nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (beta(2)m(-/-) NOD/SCID) mouse model paralleled clinical observations in humans, with an enhancing effect noted from the addition of CD8(+) cells but not CD4(+) cells. This correlated with CD8(+) augmentation of CD34(+) cell homing to the bone marrow in vivo and CD8(+) cell-associated increases of CD34(+) cell transmigration through a bone marrow endothelial cell line in vitro. The cooperative interaction was not sensitive to brefeldin A inhibition of protein secretion. However, cytochalasin D-induced inhibition of CD8(+) cytoskeletal rearrangements abrogated CD34(+) transendothelial migration and impaired CD34(+) cell homing in vivo. CD8(+) cells did not migrate in tandem with CD34(+) cells or alter endothelial barrier integrity; rather, they affected phosphotyrosine-mediated signaling in CD34(+) cells in response to the chemokine stromal derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1alpha). These data demonstrate cell-cell cooperativity between different cell types in mediating chemotactic events and provide one potential explanation for the clinically observed effect of CD8(+) cells on bone marrow transplantation. This modification of cell migration by neighboring cells provides broad possibilities for combinatorial effects between cells of different types to influence cell localization.

  13. Nuclear Membrane-Targeted Gold Nanoparticles Inhibit Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Ali, Moustafa R K; Wu, Yue; Ghosh, Deepraj; Do, Brian H; Chen, Kuangcai; Dawson, Michelle R; Fang, Ning; Sulchek, Todd A; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2017-03-27

    Most cancer patients die from metastasis. Recent studies have shown that gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can slow down the migration/invasion speed of cancer cells and suppress metastasis. Since nuclear stiffness of the cell largely decreases cell migration, our hypothesis is that targeting AuNPs to the cell nucleus region could enhance nuclear stiffness, and therefore inhibit cell migration and invasion. Our results showed that upon nuclear targeting of AuNPs, the ovarian cancer cell motilities decrease significantly, compared with nontargeted AuNPs. Furthermore, using atomic force microscopy, we observed an enhanced cell nuclear stiffness. In order to understand the mechanism of cancer cell migration/invasion inhibition, the exact locations of the targeted AuNPs were clearly imaged using a high-resolution three-dimensional imaging microscope, which showed that the AuNPs were trapped at the nuclear membrane. In addition, we observed a greatly increased expression level of lamin A/C protein, which is located in the inner nuclear membrane and functions as a structural component of the nuclear lamina to enhance nuclear stiffness. We propose that the AuNPs that are trapped at the nuclear membrane both (1) add to the mechanical stiffness of the nucleus and (2) stimulate the overexpression of lamin A/C located around the nuclear membrane, thus increasing nuclear stiffness and slowing cancer cell migration and invasion.

  14. A ring barrier-based migration assay to assess cell migration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Das, Asha M; Eggermont, Alexander M M; ten Hagen, Timo L M

    2015-06-01

    Cell migration is a key feature of virtually every biological process, and it can be studied in a variety of ways. Here we outline a protocol for the in vitro study of cell migration using a ring barrier-based assay. A 'barrier' is inserted in the culture chamber, which prevents cells from entering a defined area. Cells of interest are seeded around this barrier, and after the formation of a peripheral monolayer the barrier is removed and migration into the cell-free area is monitored. This assay is highly reproducible and convenient to perform, and it allows the deduction of several parameters of migration, including total and effective migration, velocity and cell polarization. An advantage of this assay over the conventional scratch assay is that the cells move over an unaltered and virgin surface, and thus the effect of matrix components on cell migration can be studied. In addition, the cells are not harmed at the onset of the assay. Through computer automation, four individual barrier assays can be monitored at the same time. The procedure can be used in a 12-well standard plate allowing higher throughput, or it can be modified to perform invasion assays. The basic procedure takes 2-3 d to complete.

  15. Y-27632 Increases Sensitivity of PANC-1 Cells to EGCG in Regulating Cell Proliferation and Migration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing; Bi, Yongyi

    2016-10-03

    BACKGROUND The study aimed to investigate the inhibitory effect of (1R,4r)-4-((R)-1-aminoethyl)-N-(pyridin-4-yl) cyclohexanecarboxamide (Y-27632) and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on the proliferation and migration of PANC-1 cells. EGCG, found in green tea, has been previously shown to be one of the most abundant and powerful catechins in cancer prevention and treatment. Y-27632, a selective inhibitor of rho-associated protein kinase 1, is widely used in treating cardiovascular disease, inflammation, and cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS PANC-1 cells, maintained in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium, were treated with dimethyl sulfoxide (control) as well as different concentrations (20, 40, 60, and 80 μg/mL) of EGCG for 48 h. In addition, PANC-1 cells were treated separately with 60 μg/mL EGCG, 20 μM Y-27632, and EGCG combined with Y-27632 (60 μg/mL EGCG + 20 μM Y-27632) for 48 h. The effect of EGCG and Y-27632 on the proliferation and migration of PANC-1 cells was evaluated using Cell Counting Kit-8 and transwell migration assays. The expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) and Caspase-3 mRNA was determined by Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). RESULTS EGCG (20-80 μg/mL) inhibited cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Y-27632 enhanced the sensitivity of PANC-1 cells to EGCG (by increasing the expression of PPARa and Caspase-3 mRNA) and suppressed cell proliferation. PANC-1 cell migration was inhibited by treatment with a combination of EGCG and Y-27632. CONCLUSIONS Y-27632 increases the sensitivity of PANC-1 cells to EGCG in regulating cell proliferation and migration, which is likely to be related to the expression of PPARa mRNA and Caspase-3 mRNA.

  16. Type-specific roles of histone deacetylase (HDAC) overexpression in ovarian carcinoma: HDAC1 enhances cell proliferation and HDAC3 stimulates cell migration with downregulation of E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Akiko; Horiuchi, Akiko; Kikuchi, Norihiko; Hayashi, Takuma; Fuseya, Chiho; Suzuki, Akihisa; Konishi, Ikuo; Shiozawa, Tanri

    2010-09-01

    Histone acetylation/deacetylation controls chromatin activity and subsequent gene transcription. Recent studies demonstrated the activation of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in various human malignancies; however, the expression and function of HDACs in ovarian tumors are not fully understood. In this study, we examined the immunohistochemical expression of HDAC1, HDAC2 and HDAC3 using tissues obtained from 115 cases of ovarian tumors and compared it with that of Ki-67 (a growth marker), p21, and E-cadherin and clinicopathological parameters. In addition, we analyzed the effect of specific siRNA for HDAC1, HDAC2 and HDAC3 on the expression of cell cycle-related molecules and E-cadherin to clarify the functional difference among the 3 HDACs. The results indicated that the immunohistochemical expression of nuclear HDAC1, HDAC2 and HDAC3 proteins increased stepwise in benign, borderline and malignant tumors. The expression of HDAC1 and HDAC2 was correlated with Ki-67 expression and that of HDAC3 was inversely correlated with E-cadherin expression. Among the HDACs examined, only HDAC1 was associated with a poor outcome, when overexpressed. Treatment with HDAC inhibitors suppressed the proliferation of ovarian cancer cells in association with apoptosis. A specific siRNA for HDAC1 significantly reduced the proliferation of ovarian carcinoma cells via downregulation of cyclin A expression, but siRNA for HDAC3 reduced the cell migration with elevated E-cadherin expression. Our results suggested that HDAC1 plays an important role in the proliferation of ovarian cancer cells, whereas HDAC3 functions in cell adhesion and migration. Therefore, specific therapeutic approaches should be considered according to the HDAC subtypes.

  17. 3D cancer cell migration in a confined matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alobaidi, Amani; Sun, Bo

    Cancer cell migration is widely studied in 2D motion, which does not mimic the invasion processes in vivo. More recently, 3D cell migration studies have been performed. The ability of cancer cells to migrate within the extracellular matrix depends on the physical and biochemical features of the extracellular matrix. We present a model of cell motility in confined matrix geometry. The aim of the study is to study cancer migration in collagen matrix, as a soft tissue, to investigate their motility within the confined and surrounding collagen environment. Different collagen concentrations have been used to show the ability of these cancer cells to move through such a complex structure by measuring Cancer cell migration velocity as well as the displacement. Graduate student physics department.

  18. Leader Cells Define Directionality of Trunk, but Not Cranial, Neural Crest Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Jo; Gauert, Anton; Briones Montecinos, Luis; Fanlo, Lucía; Alhashem, Zainalabdeen Mohmammed; Assar, Rodrigo; Marti, Elisa; Kabla, Alexandre; Härtel, Steffen; Linker, Claudia

    2016-05-31

    Collective cell migration is fundamental for life and a hallmark of cancer. Neural crest (NC) cells migrate collectively, but the mechanisms governing this process remain controversial. Previous analyses in Xenopus indicate that cranial NC (CNC) cells are a homogeneous population relying on cell-cell interactions for directional migration, while chick embryo analyses suggest a heterogeneous population with leader cells instructing directionality. Our data in chick and zebrafish embryos show that CNC cells do not require leader cells for migration and all cells present similar migratory capacities. In contrast, laser ablation of trunk NC (TNC) cells shows that leader cells direct movement and cell-cell contacts are required for migration. Moreover, leader and follower identities are acquired before the initiation of migration and remain fixed thereafter. Thus, two distinct mechanisms establish the directionality of CNC cells and TNC cells. This implies the existence of multiple molecular mechanisms for collective cell migration.

  19. IGF-I redirects doublecortin-positive cell migration in the normal adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Maucksch, C; McGregor, A L; Yang, M; Gordon, R J; Yang, M; Connor, B

    2013-06-25

    The migration of subventricular zone (SVZ)-derived neural precursor cells through the rostral migratory stream (RMS) to the olfactory bulb is tightly regulated by local micro-environmental cues. Insulin-like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I) can stimulate the migration of several neuronal cell types and acts as a 'departure' factor in the avian SVZ. To establish whether IGF-I can also act as a migratory factor for adult neuronal precursor cells in vivo, in addition to its well established role in precursor cell proliferation and differentiation, we used AAV2-mediated gene transfer to produce ectopic expression of IGF-I in the normal adult rat striatum. We then assessed whether the expression of IGF-I would recruit SVZ-derived neuronal precursor cells from the RMS into the striatum. Ectopic expression of IGF-I in the normal adult rat brain significantly increased the number of doublecortin (Dcx)-positive cells and the extent of their migration into the striatum 4 and 8 weeks after AAV2-IGF-I injection but did not promote neuronal differentiation. In vitro migration assays confirmed that IGF-I is an inducer of migration and directs SVZ-derived adult neuronal precursor cell migration by both chemotaxis and chemokinesis. These results demonstrate that overexpression of IGF-I in the normal adult rat brain can override the normal cues directing precursor cell migration along the RMS and can redirect precursor cell migration into a non-neurogenic region. Enhanced expression of IGF-I following brain injury may therefore act as a diffusible factor mediating precursor cell migration to areas of neuronal cell damage.

  20. Modulation of cell spreading and migration by pp125FAK phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, S.; Mahooti-Brooks, N.; Hu, G.; Madri, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    We provide evidence for both matrix-dependent and pp60v-src tyrosine kinase-dependent modulation of cell migration via tyrosine phosphorylation of pp125FAK, a focal adhesion kinase, thought to be involved in integrin-mediated signaling. Enhanced pp125FAK tyrosine phosphorylation and cell spreading was associated with decreased migration. Cells plated on type I collagen were less spread and exhibited lower levels of pp125FAK tyrosine phosphorylation and faster migration rates compared with cells on fibronectin that were well spread, which exhibited enhanced levels of pp125FAK tyrosine phosphorylation and slower migration rates. Inside-out signaling via expression of pp60v-src or its kinase-negative mutant caused a decrease in cell migration by changing the extent of pp125FAK tyrosine phosphorylation to above or below the levels obtained with control cells plated on fibronectin. Hence, pp125FAK tyrosine phosphorylation appears to play a role in the signaling cascade pathway involved in regulation of extracellular matrix-modulated, integrin-mediated cell migration. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7677174

  1. Quantitative analysis of cell migration using optical flow.

    PubMed

    Boric, Katica; Orio, Patricio; Viéville, Thierry; Whitlock, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Neural crest cells exhibit dramatic migration behaviors as they populate their distant targets. Using a line of zebrafish expressing green fluorescent protein (sox10:EGFP) in neural crest cells we developed an assay to analyze and quantify cell migration as a population, and use it here to characterize in detail the subtle defects in cell migration caused by ethanol exposure during early development. The challenge was to quantify changes in the in vivo migration of all Sox10:EGFP expressing cells in the visual field of time-lapse movies. To perform this analysis we used an Optical Flow algorithm for motion detection and combined the analysis with a fit to an affine transformation. Through this analysis we detected and quantified significant differences in the cell migrations of Sox10:EGFP positive cranial neural crest populations in ethanol treated versus untreated embryos. Specifically, treatment affected migration by increasing the left-right asymmetry of the migrating cells and by altering the direction of cell movements. Thus, by applying this novel computational analysis, we were able to quantify the movements of populations of cells, allowing us to detect subtle changes in cell behaviors. Because cranial neural crest cells contribute to the formation of the frontal mass these subtle differences may underlie commonly observed facial asymmetries in normal human populations.

  2. The oncoprotein HBXIP promotes migration of breast cancer cells via GCN5-mediated microtubule acetylation.

    PubMed

    Li, Leilei; Liu, Bowen; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ye, Lihong

    2015-03-13

    We have documented that the oncoprotein hepatitis B X-interacting protein (HBXIP) is able to promote migration of breast cancer cells. A subset of acetylated microtubules that accumulates in the cell leading edge is necessary for cell polarization and directional migration. In this study, we explored the hypothesis that HBXIP contributes to migration of breast cancer cells by supporting microtubule acetylation in breast cancer cells. We found that HBXIP could induce acetylated microtubules accumulating into the leading protrusion in wound-induced directional migration in breast cancer cells by immunofluorescence staining analysis. Interestingly, HBXIP was able to increase the acetylation of α-tubulin in the cells by immunofluorescence staining and Western blot analysis. Furthermore, we observed that acetyltransferase GCN5 was involved in the event that HBXIP induced increase of acetylated microtubules and their expansion in protrusions in breast cancer cells by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining. Moreover, GCN5 was required for the HBXIP-enhanced migration of breast cancer cells by wound healing assay. Thus, we conclude that HBXIP promotes the migration of breast cancer cells through modulating microtubule acetylation mediated by GCN5. Therapeutically, HBXIP may serve as a novel target in breast cancer.

  3. Follow-the-leader cell migration requires biased cell-cell contact and local microenvironmental signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynn, Michelle L.; Rupp, Paul; Trainor, Paul A.; Schnell, Santiago; Kulesa, Paul M.

    2013-06-01

    Directed cell migration often involves at least two types of cell motility that include multicellular streaming and chain migration. However, what is unclear is how cell contact dynamics and the distinct microenvironments through which cells travel influence the selection of one migratory mode or the other. The embryonic and highly invasive neural crest (NC) are an excellent model system to study this question since NC cells have been observed in vivo to display both of these types of cell motility. Here, we present data from tissue transplantation experiments in chick and in silico modeling that test our hypothesis that cell contact dynamics with each other and the microenvironment promote and sustain either multicellular stream or chain migration. We show that when premigratory cranial NC cells (at the pre-otic level) are transplanted into a more caudal region in the head (at the post-otic level), cells alter their characteristic stream behavior and migrate in chains. Similarly, post-otic NC cells migrate in streams after transplantation into the pre-otic hindbrain, suggesting that local microenvironmental signals dictate the mode of NC cell migration. Simulations of an agent-based model (ABM) that integrates the NC cell behavioral data predict that chain migration critically depends on the interplay of biased cell-cell contact and local microenvironment signals. Together, this integrated modeling and experimental approach suggests new experiments and offers a powerful tool to examine mechanisms that underlie complex cell migration patterns.

  4. Dictyostelium cells migrate similarly on surfaces of varying chemical composition.

    PubMed

    McCann, Colin P; Rericha, Erin C; Wang, Chenlu; Losert, Wolfgang; Parent, Carole A

    2014-01-01

    During cell migration, cell-substrate binding is required for pseudopod anchoring to move the cell forward, yet the interactions with the substrate must be sufficiently weak to allow parts of the cell to de-adhere in a controlled manner during typical protrusion/retraction cycles. Mammalian cells actively control cell-substrate binding and respond to extracellular conditions with localized integrin-containing focal adhesions mediating mechanotransduction. We asked whether mechanotransduction also occurs during non-integrin mediated migration by examining the motion of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, which is thought to bind non-specifically to surfaces. We discovered that Dictyostelium cells are able to regulate forces generated by the actomyosin cortex to maintain optimal cell-surface contact area and adhesion on surfaces of various chemical composition and that individual cells migrate with similar speed and contact area on the different surfaces. In contrast, during collective migration, as observed in wound healing and metastasis, the balance between surface forces and protrusive forces is altered. We found that Dictyostelium collective migration dynamics are strongly affected when cells are plated on different surfaces. These results suggest that the presence of cell-cell contacts, which appear as Dictyostelium cells enter development, alter the mechanism cells use to migrate on surfaces of varying composition.

  5. Impaired SIRT1 promotes the migration of vascular smooth muscle cell-derived foam cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Jie; Zhou, Yi; Chen, Lei; Wang, Xu; Pi, Yan; Long, Chun-Yan; Sun, Meng-Jiao; Chen, Xue; Gao, Chang-Yue; Li, Jing-Cheng; Zhang, Li-Li

    2016-07-01

    The formation of fat-laden foam cells, contributing to the fatty streaks of the plaques of atheroma, is the critical early process in atherosclerosis. The previous study demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contain a much larger burden of the excess cholesterol in comparison with monocyte-derived macrophages in human coronary atherosclerosis, as the main origin of foam cells. It is noteworthy that VSMC-derived foam cells are deposited in subintima but not media, where VSMCs normally deposit in. Therefore, migration from media to intima is an indispensable step for a VSMC to accrue neutral lipids and form foam cell. Whether this migration occurs paralleled with or prior to the formation of foam cell is still unclear. Herein, the present study was designed to test the VSMC migratory capability in the process of foam cell formation induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). In conclusion, we provide evidence that oxLDL induces the VSMC-derived foam cells formation with increased migration ability and MMP-9 expression, which were partly attributed to the impaired SIRT1 and enhanced nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activity. As activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) has been reported to have anti-atherosclerotic effects, we investigated its role in oxLDL-treated VSMC migration. It is found that activating TRPV1 by capsaicin inhibits VSMC foam cell formation and the accompanied migration through rescuing the SIRT1 and suppressing NF-κB signaling. The present study provides evidence that SIRT1 may be a promising intervention target of atherosclerosis, and raises the prospect of TRPV1 in prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis.

  6. Regulation of cell migration via the EGFR signaling pathway in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Yuichi; Yasui, Hiroki; Kakudo, Kenji; Nozaki, Masami

    2017-01-01

    Cell migration potency is essential in cancer metastasis and is often regulated by extracellular stimuli. Oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines include those that are sensitive, as well as resistant, to the effects of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor cetuximab on cell migration. In the present study, the molecular differences in the EGFR response to cell migration between the SAS cetuximab-sensitive and HSC4 cetuximab-resistant cell lines was examined. Treatment with the EGFR inhibitors AG1478 and cetuximab reduced the migration potency of SAS cells, but not HSC4 cells. The migration of the two cell lines was inhibited under serum-free culture conditions, and the addition of EGF to the serum-free medium promoted the migration of SAS cells, but not HSC4 cells. In addition, SAS cell migration was reduced by the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase and protein kinase B (Akt) inhibitors PD98059 and MK2206, whereas HSC4 cell migration was only inhibited by MK2206. EGF induced an increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation levels in HSC4 cells, and stimulated Akt phosphorylation levels in SAS cells. Furthermore, the staining of actin filaments with phalloidin was significantly increased by the inhibition of EGFR in SAS cells, but was not observed as altered in HSC4 cells. Conversely, the addition of EGF to the culture medium decreased the accumulation of actin filaments in SAS cells. The results suggest that the EGF-EGFR signaling pathway has an important role in SAS cell migration via the modulation of actin dynamics, and that HSC4 cell migration is regulated by a serum component other than EGFR.

  7. Functional transcriptomics of a migrating cell in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Erich M; Kato, Mihoko; Sternberg, Paul W

    2012-10-02

    In both metazoan development and metastatic cancer, migrating cells must carry out a detailed, complex program of sensing cues, binding substrates, and moving their cytoskeletons. The linker cell in Caenorhabditis elegans males undergoes a stereotyped migration that guides gonad organogenesis, occurs with precise timing, and requires the nuclear hormone receptor NHR-67. To better understand how this occurs, we performed RNA-seq of individually staged and dissected linker cells, comparing transcriptomes from linker cells of third-stage (L3) larvae, fourth-stage (L4) larvae, and nhr-67-RNAi-treated L4 larvae. We observed expression of 8,000-10,000 genes in the linker cell, 22-25% of which were up- or down-regulated 20-fold during development by NHR-67. Of genes that we tested by RNAi, 22% (45 of 204) were required for normal shape and migration, suggesting that many NHR-67-dependent, linker cell-enriched genes play roles in this migration. One unexpected class of genes up-regulated by NHR-67 was tandem pore potassium channels, which are required for normal linker-cell migration. We also found phenotypes for genes with human orthologs but no previously described migratory function. Our results provide an extensive catalog of genes that act in a migrating cell, identify unique molecular functions involved in nematode cell migration, and suggest similar functions in humans.

  8. Molecular signatures of cell migration in C. elegans Q neuroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Guangshuo

    2009-01-01

    Metazoan cell movement has been studied extensively in vitro, but cell migration in living animals is much less well understood. In this report, we have studied the Caenorhabditis elegans Q neuroblast lineage during larval development, developing live animal imaging methods for following neuroblast migration with single cell resolution. We find that each of the Q descendants migrates at different speeds and for distinct distances. By quantitative green fluorescent protein imaging, we find that Q descendants that migrate faster and longer than their sisters up-regulate protein levels of MIG-2, a Rho family guanosine triphosphatase, and/or down-regulate INA-1, an integrin α subunit, during migration. We also show that Q neuroblasts bearing mutations in either MIG-2 or INA-1 migrate at reduced speeds. The migration defect of the mig-2 mutants, but not ina-1, appears to result from a lack of persistent polarization in the direction of cell migration. Thus, MIG-2 and INA-1 function distinctly to control Q neuroblast migration in living C. elegans. PMID:19349580

  9. Analysis of primary cilia in directional cell migration in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Søren T; Veland, Iben R; Schwab, Albrecht; Cammer, Michael; Satir, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Early studies of migrating fibroblasts showed that primary cilia orient in front of the nucleus and point toward the leading edge. Recent work has shown that primary cilia coordinate a series of signaling pathways critical to fibroblast cell migration during development and in wound healing. In particular, platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα) is compartmentalized to the primary cilium to activate signaling pathways that regulate reorganization of the cytoskeleton required for lamellipodium formation and directional migration in the presence of a specific ligand gradient. We summarize selected methods in analyzing ciliary function in directional cell migration, including immunofluorescence microscopy, scratch assay, and chemotaxis assay by micropipette addition of PDGFRα ligands to cultures of fibroblasts. These methods should be useful not only in studying cell migration but also more generally in delineating response pathways in cells with primary cilia.

  10. Cancer cell motility: lessons from migration in confined spaces

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Colin D.; Mistriotis, Panagiotis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Time-lapse, deep-tissue imaging made possible by advances in intravital microscopy has demonstrated the importance of tumour cell migration through confining tracks in vivo. These tracks may either be endogenous features of tissues or be created by tumour or tumour-associated cells. Importantly, migration mechanisms through confining microenvironments are not predicted by 2D migration assays. Engineered in vitro models have been used to delineate the mechanisms of cell motility through confining spaces encountered in vivo. Understanding cancer cell locomotion through physiologically relevant confining tracks could be useful in developing therapeutic strategies to combat metastasis. PMID:27909339

  11. Cancer cell motility: lessons from migration in confined spaces.

    PubMed

    Paul, Colin D; Mistriotis, Panagiotis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2017-02-01

    Time-lapse, deep-tissue imaging made possible by advances in intravital microscopy has demonstrated the importance of tumour cell migration through confining tracks in vivo. These tracks may either be endogenous features of tissues or be created by tumour or tumour-associated cells. Importantly, migration mechanisms through confining microenvironments are not predicted by 2D migration assays. Engineered in vitro models have been used to delineate the mechanisms of cell motility through confining spaces encountered in vivo. Understanding cancer cell locomotion through physiologically relevant confining tracks could be useful in developing therapeutic strategies to combat metastasis.

  12. Microgrooved Polymer Substrates Promote Collective Cell Migration To Accelerate Fracture Healing in an in Vitro Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Dong, Hua; Li, Yuli; Zhu, Ye; Zeng, Lei; Gao, Huichang; Yuan, Bo; Chen, Xiaofeng; Mao, Chuanbin

    2015-10-21

    Surface topography can affect cell adhesion, morphology, polarity, cytoskeleton organization, and osteogenesis. However, little is known about the effect of topography on the fracture healing in repairing nonunion and large bone defects. Microgrooved topography on the surface of bone implants may promote cell migration into the fracture gap to accelerate fracture healing. To prove this hypothesis, we used an in vitro fracture (wound) healing assay on the microgrooved polycaprolactone substrates to study the effect of microgroove widths and depths on the osteoblast-like cell (MG-63) migration and the subsequent healing. We found that the microgrooved substrates promoted MG-63 cells to migrate collectively into the wound gap, which serves as a fracture model, along the grooves and ridges as compared with the flat substrates. Moreover, the groove widths did not show obvious influence on the wound healing whereas the smaller groove depths tended to favor the collective cell migration and thus subsequent healing. The microgrooved substrates accelerated the wound healing by facilitating the collective cell migration into the wound gaps but not by promoting the cell proliferation. Furthermore, microgrooves were also found to promote the migration of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to heal the fracture model. Though osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs was not improved on the microgrooved substrate, collagen I and minerals deposited by hMSCs were organized in a way similar to those in the extracellular matrix of natural bone. These findings suggest the necessity in using microgrooved implants in enhancing fracture healing in bone repair.

  13. Carbon Ion Irradiation Inhibits Glioma Cell Migration Through Downregulation of Integrin Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Wuerth, Lena; Brons, Stephan; Mohr, Angela; Lindel, Katja; Weber, Klaus; Haberer, Thomas; Debus, Juergen; Combs, Stephanie E.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of carbon ion irradiation on glioma cell migration. Methods and Materials: U87 and Ln229 glioma cells were irradiated with photons and carbon ions. Migration was analyzed 24 h after irradiation. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis was performed in order to quantify surface expression of integrins. Results: Single photon doses of 2 Gy and 10 Gy enhanced {alpha}{sub {nu}}{beta}{sub 3} and {alpha}{sub {nu}}{beta}{sub 5} integrin expression and caused tumor cell hypermigration on both vitronectin (Vn) and fibronectin (Fn). Compared to integrin expression in unirradiated cells, carbon ion irradiation caused decreased integrin expression and inhibited cell migration on both Vn and Fn. Conclusion: Photon radiotherapy (RT) enhances the risk of tumor cell migration and subsequently promotes locoregional spread via photon induction of integrin expression. In contrast to photon RT, carbon ion RT causes decreased integrin expression and suppresses glioma cell migration on both Vn and Fn, thus promising improved local control.

  14. Analysis of Shape Dynamics and Actin Polymerization of Collectively Migrating Streams of Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenlu; Parent, Carole A.; Losert, Wolfgang

    We use Princiapl Component Analysis (PCA) to investigate cell-cell coupling during collective cell migration of Dictyostelium discoideun, and explore the underlying mechanisms that regulate the coupling. From PCA of the cell boundary motion obtained from time-lapse images of multicellular streams, we find that cells in streams exhibit more localized anterior protrusions than individually migrating cells. We also find that traveling protrusion waves along cell boundaries connect from cell to cell with high correlation. Further analysis of actin polymerization indicates that actin polymerization is significantly enhanced at the leading edge of cells at cell-cell contacts. The coupling of waves disappears when reducing F-actin polymerization with Latrunculin A.

  15. Protein kinase Cepsilon is important for migration of neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Stensman, Helena; Larsson, Christer

    2008-01-01

    Background Migration is important for the metastatic capacity and thus for the malignancy of cancer cells. There is limited knowledge on regulatory factors that promote the migration of neuroblastoma cells. This study investigates the hypothesis that protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms regulate neuroblastoma cell motility. Methods PKC isoforms were downregulated with siRNA or modulated with activators and inhibitors. Migration was analyzed with scratch and transwell assays. Protein phosphorylation and expression levels were measured with Western blot. Results Stimulation with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) induced migration of SK-N-BE(2)C neuroblastoma cells. Treatment with the general protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF109203X and the inhibitor of classical isoforms Gö6976 inhibited migration while an inhibitor of PKCβ isoforms did not have an effect. Downregulation of PKCε, but not of PKCα or PKCδ, with siRNA led to a suppression of both basal and TPA-stimulated migration. Experiments using PD98059 and LY294002, inhibitors of the Erk and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways, respectively, showed that PI3K is not necessary for TPA-induced migration. The Erk pathway might be involved in TPA-induced migration but not in migration driven by PKCε. TPA induced phosphorylation of the PKC substrate myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) which was suppressed by the PKC inhibitors. Treatment with siRNA oligonucleotides against different PKC isoforms before stimulation with TPA did not influence the phosphorylation of MARCKS. Conclusion PKCε is important for migration of SK-N-BE(2)C neuroblastoma cells. Neither the Erk pathway nor MARCKS are critical downstream targets of PKCε but they may be involved in TPA-mediated migration. PMID:19077250

  16. Ordered Patterns of Cell Shape and Orientational Correlation during Spontaneous Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Iwaya, Suguru; Sano, Masaki

    2008-01-01

    Background In the absence of stimuli, most motile eukaryotic cells move by spontaneously coordinating cell deformation with cell movement in the absence of stimuli. Yet little is known about how cells change their own shape and how cells coordinate the deformation and movement. Here, we investigated the mechanism of spontaneous cell migration by using computational analyses. Methodology We observed spontaneously migrating Dictyostelium cells in both a vegetative state (round cell shape and slow motion) and starved one (elongated cell shape and fast motion). We then extracted regular patterns of morphological dynamics and the pattern-dependent systematic coordination with filamentous actin (F-actin) and cell movement by statistical dynamic analyses. Conclusions/Significance We found that Dictyostelium cells in both vegetative and starved states commonly organize their own shape into three ordered patterns, elongation, rotation, and oscillation, in the absence of external stimuli. Further, cells inactivated for PI3-kinase (PI3K) and/or PTEN did not show ordered patterns due to the lack of spatial control in pseudopodial formation in both the vegetative and starved states. We also found that spontaneous polarization was achieved in starved cells by asymmetric localization of PTEN and F-actin. This breaking of the symmetry of protein localization maintained the leading edge and considerably enhanced the persistence of directed migration, and overall random exploration was ensured by switching among the different ordered patterns. Our findings suggest that Dictyostelium cells spontaneously create the ordered patterns of cell shape mediated by PI3K/PTEN/F-actin and control the direction of cell movement by coordination with these patterns even in the absence of external stimuli. PMID:19011688

  17. Class 3 semaphorins induce F-actin reorganization in human dendritic cells: Role in cell migration.

    PubMed

    Curreli, Sabrina; Wong, Bin Sheng; Latinovic, Olga; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Stamatos, Nicholas M

    2016-12-01

    Class 3 semaphorins (Semas) are soluble proteins that are well recognized for their role in guiding axonal migration during neuronal development. In the immune system, Sema3A has been shown to influence murine dendritic cell (DC) migration by signaling through a neuropilin (NRP)-1/plexin-A1 coreceptor axis. Potential roles for class 3 Semas in human DCs have yet to be described. We tested the hypothesis that Sema3A, -3C, and -3F, each with a unique NRP-1 and/or NRP-2 binding specificity, influence human DC migration. In this report, we find that although NRP-1 and NRP-2 are expressed in human immature DCs (imDCs), NRP-2 expression increases as cells mature further, whereas expression of NRP-1 declines dramatically. Elevated levels of RNA encoding plexin-A1 and -A3 are present in both imDCs and mature DC (mDCs), supporting the relevance of Sema/NRP/plexin signaling pathways in these cells. Sema3A, -3C, and -3F bind to human DCs, with Sema3F binding predominantly through NRP-2. The binding of these Semas leads to reorganization of actin filaments at the plasma membrane and increased transwell migration in the absence or presence of chemokine CCL19. Microfluidic chamber assays failed to demonstrate consistent changes in speed of Sema3C-treated DCs, suggesting increased cell deformability as a possible explanation for enhanced transwell migration. Although monocytes express RNA encoding Sema3A, -3C, and -3F, only RNA encoding Sema3C increases robustly during DC differentiation. These data suggest that Sema3A, -3C, and -3F, likely with coreceptors NRP-1, NRP-2, and plexin-A1 and/or -A3, promote migration and possibly other activities of human DCs during innate and adaptive immune responses.

  18. Proliferating cells in suborbital tissue drive eye migration in flatfish.

    PubMed

    Bao, Baolong; Ke, Zhonghe; Xing, Jubin; Peatman, Eric; Liu, Zhanjiang; Xie, Caixia; Xu, Bing; Gai, Junwei; Gong, Xiaoling; Yang, Guimei; Jiang, Yan; Tang, Wenqiao; Ren, Daming

    2011-03-01

    The left/right asymmetry of adult flatfishes (Pleuronectiformes) is remarkable given the external body symmetry of the larval fish. The best-known change is the migration of their eyes: one eye migrates from one side to the other. Two extinct primitive pleuronectiformes with incomplete orbital migration have again attracted public attention to the mechanism of eye migration, a subject of speculation and research for over a century. Cranial asymmetry is currently believed to be responsible for eye migration. Contrary to that hypothesis, we show here that the initial migration of the eye is caused by cell proliferation in the suborbital tissue of the blind side and that the twist of frontal bone is dependent on eye migration. The inhibition of cell proliferation in the suborbital area of the blind side by microinjected colchicine was able to prevent eye migration and, thereafter, cranial asymmetry in juvenile Solea senegalensis (right sideness, Soleidae), Cynoglossus semilaevis (left sideness, Cynoglossidae), and Paralichthys olivaceus (left sideness, Paralichthyidae) with a bottom-dwelling lifestyle. Our results correct the current misunderstanding that eye migration is driven by the cranial asymmetry and simplify the explanation for broken left/right eye-symmetry. Our findings should help to focus the search on eye migration-related genes associated with cell proliferation. Finally, a novel model is proposed in this research which provides a reasonable explanation for differences in the migrating eye between, and sometimes within, different species of flatfish and which should aid in our overall understanding of eye migration in the ontogenesis and evolution of Pleuronectiformes.

  19. MIEN1 drives breast tumor cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal-focal adhesion dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Van Treuren, Timothy; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K.

    2016-01-01

    Migration and invasion enhancer 1 (MIEN1) is an important regulator of cell migration and invasion. MIEN1 overexpression represents an oncogenic event that promotes tumor cell dissemination and metastasis. The underlying mechanism by which MIEN1 regulates migration and invasion has yet to be deciphered. Here, we demonstrate that MIEN1 acts as a cytoskeletal-signaling adapter protein to drive breast cancer cell migration. MIEN1 localization is concentrated underneath the actin-enriched protrusive structures of the migrating breast cancer cells. Depletion of MIEN1 led to the loss of actin-protrusive structures whereas the over-expression of MIEN1 resulted in rich and thick membrane extensions. Knockdown of MIEN1 also decreased the cell-substratum adhesion, suggesting a role for MIEN1 in actin cytoskeletal dynamics. Our results show that MIEN1 supports the transition of G-actin to F-actin polymerization and stabilizes F-actin polymers. Additionally, MIEN1 promotes cellular adhesion and actin dynamics by inducing phosphorylation of FAK at Tyr-925 and reducing phosphorylation of cofilin at Ser-3, which results in breast cancer cell migration. Collectively, our data show that MIEN1 plays an essential role in maintaining the plasticity of the dynamic membrane-associated actin cytoskeleton, which leads to an increase in cell motility. Hence, targeting MIEN1 might represent a promising means to prevent breast tumor metastasis. PMID:27462783

  20. Complete repair of dystrophic skeletal muscle by mesoangioblasts with enhanced migration ability.

    PubMed

    Galvez, Beatriz G; Sampaolesi, Maurilio; Brunelli, Silvia; Covarello, Diego; Gavina, Manuela; Rossi, Barbara; Constantin, Gabriela; Costantin, Gabriela; Torrente, Yvan; Cossu, Giulio

    2006-07-17

    Efficient delivery of cells to target tissues is a major problem in cell therapy. We report that enhancing delivery of mesoangioblasts leads to a complete reconstitution of downstream skeletal muscles in a mouse model of severe muscular dystrophy (alpha-sarcoglycan ko). Mesoangioblasts, vessel-associated stem cells, were exposed to several cytokines, among which stromal- derived factor (SDF) 1 or tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha were the most potent in enhancing transmigration in vitro and migration into dystrophic muscle in vivo. Transient expression of alpha4 integrins or L-selectin also increased several fold migration both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, combined pretreatment with SDF-1 or TNF-alpha and expression of alpha4 integrin leads to massive colonization (>50%) followed by reconstitution of >80% of alpha-sarcoglycan-expressing fibers, with a fivefold increase in efficiency in comparison with control cells. This study defines the requirements for efficient engraftment of mesoangioblasts and offers a new potent tool to optimize future cell therapy protocols for muscular dystrophies.

  1. Bioengineering paradigms for cell migration in confined microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Stroka, Kimberly M; Gu, Zhizhan; Sun, Sean X; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-10-01

    Cell migration is a fundamental process underlying diverse (patho)physiological phenomena. The classical understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cell migration has been based on in vitro studies on two-dimensional substrates. More recently, mounting evidence from intravital studies has shown that during metastasis, tumor cells must navigate complex microenvironments in vivo, including narrow, pre-existing microtracks created by anatomical structures. It is becoming apparent that unraveling the mechanisms of confined cell migration in this context requires a multi-disciplinary approach through integration of in vivo and in vitro studies, along with sophisticated bioengineering techniques and mathematical modeling. Here, we highlight such an approach that has led to discovery of a new model for cell migration in confined microenvironments (i.e., the Osmotic Engine Model).

  2. Emerging role for nuclear rotation and orientation in cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Maninová, Miloslava; Iwanicki, Marcin P; Vomastek, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Nucleus movement, positioning, and orientation is precisely specified and actively regulated within cells, and it plays a critical role in many cellular and developmental processes. Mutation of proteins that regulate the nucleus anchoring and movement lead to diverse pathologies, laminopathies in particular, suggesting that the nucleus correct positioning and movement is essential for proper cellular function. In motile cells that polarize toward the direction of migration, the nucleus undergoes controlled rotation promoting the alignment of the nucleus with the axis of migration. Such spatial organization of the cell appears to be optimal for the cell migration. Nuclear reorientation requires the cytoskeleton to be anchored to the nuclear envelope, which exerts pulling or pushing torque on the nucleus. Here we discuss the possible molecular mechanisms regulating the nuclear rotation and reorientation and the significance of this type of nuclear movement for cell migration. PMID:24589621

  3. Cell-cell interactions stabilize emerging collective migration modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Joshua; Guven, Can; Wang, Chenlu; Ott, Ed; Losert, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    We propose a coarse-grained mechanistic model for simulating the dynamics of the biological model organism Dictyostelium discoideum, incorporating gradient sensing, random motility via actin protrusions, persistent random motion and signal relay. We demonstrate that our simple cell model does result in the macroscopic group migration patterns seen in no-flow gradient chambers, namely a transition from individual motion to multi-cell ``streaming'' to aggregation as the external signal is decreased. We also find that cell-cell adhesion further stabilizes the contact network independent of chemical signaling, suggesting no indirect feedback between mechanical forces and gradient sensing. We discuss further modifications to the model and as well as further applications to quantifying dynamics using spatio-temporal contact networks. Co-first author

  4. Bimodal Analysis of Mammary Epithelial Cell Migration in Two Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Potdar, Alka A.; Lu, Jenny; Jeon, Junhwan; Weaver, Alissa M.; Cummings, Peter T.

    2013-01-01

    Cell migration paths of mammary epithelial cells (expressing different versions of the promigratory tyrosine kinase receptor Her2/Neu) were analyzed within a bimodal framework that is a generalization of the run-and-tumble description applicable to bacterial migration. The mammalian cell trajectories were segregated into two types of alternating modes, namely, the “directional-mode” (mode I, the more persistent mode, analogous to the bacterial run phase) and the “re-orientation-mode” (mode II, the less persistent mode, analogous to the bacterial tumble phase). Higher resolution (more pixel information, relative to cell size) and smaller sampling intervals (time between images) were found to give a better estimate of the deduced single cell dynamics (such as directional-mode time and turn angle distribution) of the various cell types from the bimodal analysis. The bimodal analysis tool permits the deduction of short-time dynamics of cell motion such as the turn angle distributions and turn frequencies during the course of cell migration compared to standard methods of cell migration analysis. We find that the two-hour mammalian cell tracking data do not fall into the diffusive regime implying that the often-used random motility expressions for mammalian cell motion (based on assuming diffusive motion) are invalid over the time steps (fraction of minute) typically used in modeling mammalian cell migration. PMID:18982450

  5. [Overexpression of inhibitor of β-catenin and T cell factor (ICAT) promotes proliferation and migration of cervical cancer Caski cells].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yayun; Wang, Ting; Wang, Jinshu; Xia, Jing; Gou, Liyao; Liu, Mengyao; Zhang, Yan

    2016-11-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of overexpressed inhibitor of β-catenin and T cell factor (ICAT) on the proliferation and migration of human cervical cancer Caski cells. Methods Caski cells were transfected with ICAT recombinant adenovirus (AdICAT). The levels of ICAT mRNA and protein were detected by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting, respectively. Effect of ICAT overexpression on proliferation, cell cycle and migration in Caski cells was respectively evaluated by MTT assay, flow cytometry and Transwell(TM) migration assays. Results The expression of ICAT remarkably increased in Caski cells after AdICAT infection. Overexpression of ICAT promoted Caski cells' proliferation, arrested the cell cycle in the S phase and enhanced cell migration. Conclusion Overexpression of ICAT can promote the proliferation and migration of Caski cervical cancer cells.

  6. EphrinB3 restricts endogenous neural stem cell migration after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Kirsty J; Mier, Jose; Gajavelli, Shyam; Turbic, Alisa; Bullock, Ross; Turnley, Ann M; Liebl, Daniel J

    2016-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to a series of pathological events that can have profound influences on motor, sensory and cognitive functions. Conversely, TBI can also stimulate neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation leading to increased numbers of neuroblasts migrating outside their restrictive neurogenic zone to areas of damage in support of tissue integrity. Unfortunately, the factors that regulate migration are poorly understood. Here, we examine whether ephrinB3 functions to restrict neuroblasts from migrating outside the subventricular zone (SVZ) and rostral migratory stream (RMS). We have previously shown that ephrinB3 is expressed in tissues surrounding these regions, including the overlying corpus callosum (CC), and is reduced after controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury. Our current study takes advantage of ephrinB3 knockout mice to examine the influences of ephrinB3 on neuroblast migration into CC and cortex tissues after CCI injury. Both injury and/or ephrinB3 deficiency led to increased neuroblast numbers and enhanced migration outside the SVZ/RMS zones. Application of soluble ephrinB3-Fc molecules reduced neuroblast migration into the CC after injury and limited neuroblast chain migration in cultured SVZ explants. Our findings suggest that ephrinB3 expression in tissues surrounding neurogenic regions functions to restrict neuroblast migration outside the RMS by limiting chain migration.

  7. Quantitative evaluation of the transplanted lin(-) hematopoietic cell migration kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kašėta, Vytautas; Vaitkuvienė, Aida; Liubavičiūtė, Aušra; Maciulevičienė, Rūta; Stirkė, Arūnas; Biziulevičienė, Genė

    2016-02-01

    Stem cells take part in organogenesis, cell maturation and injury repair. The migration is necessary for each of these functions to occur. The aim of this study was to investigate the kinetics of transplanted hematopoietic lin(-) cell population (which consists mainly of the stem and progenitor cells) in BALB/c mouse contact hypersensitivity model and quantify the migration to the site of inflammation in the affected foot and other healthy organs. Quantitative analysis was carried out with the real-time polymerase chain reaction method. Spleen, kidney, bone marrow, lung, liver, damaged and healthy foot tissue samples at different time points were collected for analysis. The quantitative data normalization was performed according to the comparative quantification method. The analysis of foot samples shows the significant migration of transplanted cells to the recipient mice affected foot. The quantity was more than 1000 times higher, as compared with that of the untreated foot. Due to the inflammation, the number of donor origin cells migrating to the lungs, liver, spleen and bone marrow was found to be decreased. Our data shows that transplanted cells selectively migrated into the inflammation areas of the foot edema. Also, the inflammation caused a secondary migration in ectopic spleen of hematopoietic stem cell niches and re-homing from the spleen to the bone marrow took place.

  8. Migrational changes of mesenchymal stem cells in response to cytokines, growth factors, hypoxia, and aging.

    PubMed

    Naaldijk, Yahaira; Johnson, Adiv A; Ishak, Stefan; Meisel, Hans Jörg; Hohaus, Christian; Stolzing, Alexandra

    2015-10-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are non-immunogenic, multipotent cells with at least trilineage differentiation potential. They promote wound healing, improve regeneration of injured tissue, and mediate numerous other health effects. MSCs migrate to sites of injury and stimulate repair either through direct differentiation or indirectly through the stimulation of endogenous repair mechanisms. Using the in vitro scratch assay, we show that the inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors TNF-α, SDF-1, PDGF, and bFGF enhance migration of rat MSCs under normoxic conditions, while TNF-α, IFN-γ, PDGF, and bFGF promote MSC migration under hypoxic conditions. This indicates that the oxygen concentration affects how MSCs will migrate in response to specific factors and, consistent with this, differential expression of cytokines was observed under hypoxic versus normoxic conditions. Using the transwell migration assay, we find that TNF-α, IFN-γ, bFGF, IGF-1, PDGF, and SDF-1 significantly increase transmigration of rat MSCs compared to unstimulated medium. MSCs derived from aged rats exhibited comparable migration to MSCs derived from young rats under hypoxic and normoxic conditions, even after application with specific factors. Similarly, migration in MSCs from aged, human donors did not statistically differ compared to migration in MSCs derived from human umbilical cord tissue or younger donors.

  9. Microscopy assays for evaluation of mast cell migration and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Bambousková, Monika; Hájková, Zuzana; Dráber, Pavel; Dráber, Petr

    2014-01-01

    A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to mast cell migration and chemotaxis is the long-term goal in mast cell research and is essential for comprehension of mast cell function in health and disease. Various techniques have been developed in recent decades for in vitro and in vivo assessment of mast cell motility and chemotaxis. In this chapter three microscopy assays facilitating real-time quantification of mast cell chemotaxis and migration are described, focusing on individual cell tracking and data analysis.

  10. GOLPH3 drives cell migration by promoting Golgi reorientation and directional trafficking to the leading edge

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Mengke; Peterman, Marshall C.; Davis, Robert L.; Oegema, Karen; Shiau, Andrew K.; Field, Seth J.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of directional cell migration remains an important problem, with relevance to cancer invasion and metastasis. GOLPH3 is a common oncogenic driver of human cancers, and is the first oncogene that functions at the Golgi in trafficking to the plasma membrane. Overexpression of GOLPH3 is reported to drive enhanced cell migration. Here we show that the phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate/GOLPH3/myosin 18A/F-actin pathway that is critical for Golgi–to–plasma membrane trafficking is necessary and limiting for directional cell migration. By linking the Golgi to the actin cytoskeleton, GOLPH3 promotes reorientation of the Golgi toward the leading edge. GOLPH3 also promotes reorientation of lysosomes (but not other organelles) toward the leading edge. However, lysosome function is dispensable for migration and the GOLPH3 dependence of lysosome movement is indirect, via GOLPH3’s effect on the Golgi. By driving reorientation of the Golgi to the leading edge and driving forward trafficking, particularly to the leading edge, overexpression of GOLPH3 drives trafficking to the leading edge of the cell, which is functionally important for directional cell migration. Our identification of a novel pathway for Golgi reorientation controlled by GOLPH3 provides new insight into the mechanism of directional cell migration with important implications for understanding GOLPH3’s role in cancer. PMID:27708138

  11. Cell Growth Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Exogene Corporation uses advanced technologies to enhance production of bio-processed substances like proteins, antibiotics and amino acids. Among them are genetic modification and a genetic switch. They originated in research for Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Extensive experiments in cell growth through production of hemoglobin to improve oxygen supply to cells were performed. By improving efficiency of oxygen use by cells, major operational expenses can be reduced. Greater product yields result in decreased raw material costs and more efficient use of equipment. A broad range of applications is cited.

  12. Exploration of molecular pathways mediating electric field-directed Schwann cell migration by RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Li; Li, Yongchao; Knapp, Jennifer; Smith, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In peripheral nervous systems, Schwann cells wrap around axons of motor and sensory neurons to form the myelin sheath. Following spinal cord injury, Schwann cells regenerate and migrate to the lesion and are involved in the spinal cord regeneration process. Transplantation of Schwann cells into injured neural tissue results in enhanced spinal axonal regeneration. Effective directional migration of Schwann cells is critical in the neural regeneration process. In this study, we report that Schwann cells migrate anodally in an applied electric field (EF). The directedness and displacement of anodal migration increased significantly when the strength of the EF increased from 50 mV/mm to 200 mV/mm. The EF did not significantly affect the cell migration speed. To explore the genes and signaling pathways that regulate cell migration in EFs, we performed a comparative analysis of differential gene expression between cells stimulated with an EF (100 mV/mm) and those without using next-generation RNA sequencing, verified by RT-qPCR. Based on the cut-off criteria (FC > 1.2, q < 0.05), we identified 1,045 up-regulated and 1,636 down-regulated genes in control cells versus EF-stimulated cells. A Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis found that compared to the control group, 21 pathways are down-regulated, while 10 pathways are up-regulated. Differentially expressed genes participate in multiple cellular signaling pathways involved in the regulation of cell migration, including pathways of regulation of actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, and PI3K-Akt. PMID:25557037

  13. Long-Term Live Cell Imaging of Cell Migration: Effects of Pathogenic Fungi on Human Epithelial Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Wöllert, Torsten; Langford, George M

    2016-01-01

    Long-term live cell imaging was used in this study to determine the responses of human epithelial cells to pathogenic biofilms formed by Candida albicans. Epithelial cells of the skin represent the front line of defense against invasive pathogens such as C. albicans but under certain circumstances, especially when the host's immune system is compromised, the skin barrier is breached. The mechanisms by which the fungal pathogen penetrates the skin and invade the deeper layers are not fully understood. In this study we used keratinocytes grown in culture as an in vitro model system to determine changes in host cell migration and the actin cytoskeleton in response to virulence factors produced by biofilms of pathogenic C. albicans. It is clear that changes in epithelial cell migration are part of the response to virulence factors secreted by biofilms of C. albicans and the actin cytoskeleton is the downstream effector that mediates cell migration. Our goal is to understand the mechanism by which virulence factors hijack the signaling pathways of the actin cytoskeleton to alter cell migration and thereby invade host tissues. To understand the dynamic changes of the actin cytoskeleton during infection, we used long-term live cell imaging to obtain spatial and temporal information of actin filament dynamics and to identify signal transduction pathways that regulate the actin cytoskeleton and its associated proteins. Long-term live cell imaging was achieved using a high resolution, multi-mode epifluorescence microscope equipped with specialized light sources, high-speed cameras with high sensitivity detectors, and specific biocompatible fluorescent markers. In addition to the multi-mode epifluorescence microscope, a spinning disk confocal long-term live cell imaging system (Olympus CV1000) equipped with a stage incubator to create a stable in vitro environment for long-term real-time and time-lapse microscopy was used. Detailed descriptions of these two long-term live

  14. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell assembly and operation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Andrew M.; Torraco, Dennis; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Spernjak, Dusan; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rod L.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2015-09-14

    Cerium migration between PEM fuel cell components is influenced by potential-driven mobility, ionic diffusion, and gradients in water content. These factors were investigated in ex situ experiments and in operating fuel cells. Potential-induced migration was measured ex situ in hydrated window cells. Cerium-containing MEAs were also fabricated and tested under ASTs. MEA disassembly and subsequent XRF analysis were used to observe rapid cerium migration during cell assembly and operation. During MEA hot pressing, humidification, and low RH operation at OCV, ionic diffusion causes uniform migration from the membrane into the catalyst layers. During high RH operation at OCV, in-plane cerium gradients arise due to variations in water content. These gradients may diminish the scavenging efficacy of cerium by reducing its proximity to generated radicals.

  15. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell assembly and operation

    DOE PAGES

    Baker, Andrew M.; Torraco, Dennis; Judge, Elizabeth J.; ...

    2015-09-14

    Cerium migration between PEM fuel cell components is influenced by potential-driven mobility, ionic diffusion, and gradients in water content. These factors were investigated in ex situ experiments and in operating fuel cells. Potential-induced migration was measured ex situ in hydrated window cells. Cerium-containing MEAs were also fabricated and tested under ASTs. MEA disassembly and subsequent XRF analysis were used to observe rapid cerium migration during cell assembly and operation. During MEA hot pressing, humidification, and low RH operation at OCV, ionic diffusion causes uniform migration from the membrane into the catalyst layers. During high RH operation at OCV, in-plane ceriummore » gradients arise due to variations in water content. These gradients may diminish the scavenging efficacy of cerium by reducing its proximity to generated radicals.« less

  16. Migration of epithelial cells on laminins: RhoA antagonizes directionally persistent migration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhigang; Chometon, Gretel; Wen, Tingting; Qu, Haiyan; Mauch, Cornelia; Krieg, Thomas; Aumailley, Monique

    2011-01-01

    Spatial and temporal expression of laminin isoforms is assumed to provide specific local information to neighboring cells. Here, we report the remarkably selective presence of LM-111 at the very tip of hair follicles where LM-332 is absent, suggesting that epithelial cells lining the dermal-epidermal junction at this location may receive different signals from the two laminins. This hypothesis was tested in vitro by characterizing with functional and molecular assays the comportment of keratinocytes exposed to LM-111 and LM-332. The two laminins induced morphologically distinct focal adhesions, and LM-332, but not LM-111, elicited persistent migration of keratinocytes. The different impact on cellular behavior was associated with distinct activation patterns of Rho GTPases and other signaling intermediates. In particular, while LM-111 triggered a robust activation of Cdc42, LM-332 provoked a strong and sustained activation of FAK. Interestingly, activation of Rac1 was necessary but not sufficient to promote migration because there was no directed migration on LM-111 despite Rac1 activation. In contrast, RhoA antagonized directional migration, since silencing of RhoA by RNA interference boosted unidirectional migration on LM-332. Molecular analysis of the role of RhoA strongly suggested that the mechanisms involve disassembly of cell-cell contacts, loss of the cortical actin network, mobilization of α6β4 integrin out of stable adhesions, and displacement of the integrin from its association with the insoluble pool of intermediate filaments.

  17. Role of interleukin-5 in enhanced migration of eosinophils from airways of immunized guinea-pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Coëffier, E; Joseph, D; Vargaftig, B B

    1994-01-01

    1. Platelet activating factor (PAF), leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and interleukin-5 (IL-5) are potent chemoattractants for guinea-pig eosinophils, which may be involved in eosinophil recruitment and up-regulation in allergic diseases. Eosinophils from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of ovalbumin-sensitized guinea-pigs were collected 24 h after antigen provocation and migration induced by PAF, LTB4 and rhIL-5 was studied. 2. Total BALF content and distribution of eosinophils were greater in immunized, ovalbumin-challenged guinea-pigs (5.0 +/- 0.8 x 10(6)/guinea-pig; 12 +/- 1%) than in immunized, saline-challenged animals (3.0 +/- 0.7 x 10(6)/guinea-pig; 7 +/- 1%). 3. The chemoattraction of eosinophils isolated on a metrizamide gradient was studied in micro-Boyden chambers, results being expressed as the number of migrating cells (mean +/- s.e. mean). PAF and LTB4-induced migration of eosinophils from immunized and OA-challenged guinea-pigs were significantly enhanced, as compared to immunized and saline-challenged animals (170 +/- 36 vs 35 +/- 9 migrating eosinophils for 10 nM PAF; 271 +/- 60 vs 110 +/- 19 for 1 nM LTB4). 4. The IL-5 antibody TRFK-5, in vivo, reduced eosinophil recruitment in BALF of antigen-challenged immunized animals as well as the enhanced responsiveness of eosinophils from the challenged animals, suggesting a role for IL-5 in the priming of eosinophils in vivo. 5. In contrast to TRFK-5, nedocromil sodium reduced to a similar extent eosinophil, macrophage and lymphocyte recruitment into the BALF of antigen-challenged, but failed to down-regulate the enhanced responsiveness of eosinophils from the challenged animals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7858864

  18. Targeting Epithelial Cell Migration to Accelerate Wound Healing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    consisting of the proteins Rsu1, Integrin Linked Kinase (ILK), PINCH, and Parvin. The correct association of these proteins in a functional complex...impacting integrin function and actin polymerization. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Wound healing, cell migration, protein kinase C, protein kinase A 16. SECURITY...epithelial cell migration in wound healing. In addition, the correct association of these proteins in a functional complex depends on their phosphorylation

  19. Gradient biomaterials and their influences on cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jindan; Mao, Zhengwei; Tan, Huaping; Han, Lulu; Ren, Tanchen; Gao, Changyou

    2012-01-01

    Cell migration participates in a variety of physiological and pathological processes such as embryonic development, cancer metastasis, blood vessel formation and remoulding, tissue regeneration, immune surveillance and inflammation. The cells specifically migrate to destiny sites induced by the gradually varying concentration (gradient) of soluble signal factors and the ligands bound with the extracellular matrix in the body during a wound healing process. Therefore, regulation of the cell migration behaviours is of paramount importance in regenerative medicine. One important way is to create a microenvironment that mimics the in vivo cellular and tissue complexity by incorporating physical, chemical and biological signal gradients into engineered biomaterials. In this review, the gradients existing in vivo and their influences on cell migration are briefly described. Recent developments in the fabrication of gradient biomaterials for controlling cellular behaviours, especially the cell migration, are summarized, highlighting the importance of the intrinsic driving mechanism for tissue regeneration and the design principle of complicated and advanced tissue regenerative materials. The potential uses of the gradient biomaterials in regenerative medicine are introduced. The current and future trends in gradient biomaterials and programmed cell migration in terms of the long-term goals of tissue regeneration are prospected. PMID:23741610

  20. Effects of SOX2 on Proliferation, Migration and Adhesion of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengfei; Cai, Jinglei; Dong, Delu; Chen, Yaoyu; Liu, Xiaobo; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Yulai

    2015-01-01

    As a key factor for cell pluripotent and self-renewing phenotypes, SOX2 has attracted scientists' attention gradually in recent years. However, its exact effects in dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are still unclear. In this study, we mainly investigated whether SOX2 could affect some biological functions of DPSCs. DPSCs were isolated from the dental pulp of human impacted third molar. SOX2 overexpressing DPSCs (DPSCs-SOX2) were established through retroviral infection. The effect of SOX2 on cell proliferation, migration and adhesion ability was evaluated with CCK-8, trans-well system and fibronectin-induced cell attachment experiment respectively. Whole genome expression of DPSCs-SOX2 was analyzed with RNA microarray. Furthermore, a rescue experiment was performed with SOX2-siRNA in DPSC-SOX2 to confirm the effect of SOX2 overexpression in DPSCs. We found that SOX2 overexpression could result in the enhancement of cell proliferation, migration, and adhesion in DPSCs obviously. RNA microarray analysis indicated that some key genes in the signal pathways associated with cell cycle, migration and adhesion were upregulated in different degree, and the results were further confirmed with qPCR and western-blot. Finally, DPSC-SOX2 transfected with SOX2-siRNA showed a decrease of cell proliferation, migration and adhesion ability, which further confirmed the biological effect of SOX2 in human DPSCs. This study indicated that SOX2 could improve the cell proliferation, migration and adhesion ability of DPSCs through regulating gene expression about cell cycle, migration and adhesion, and provided a novel strategy to develop seed cells with strong proliferation, migration and adhesion ability for tissue engineering.

  1. 3D printing of biomimetic microstructures for cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tina Qing; Qu, Xin; Liu, Justin; Chen, Shaochen

    2014-02-01

    To understand the physical behavior and migration of cancer cells, a 3D in vitro micro-chip in hydrogel was created using 3D projection printing. The micro-chip has a honeycomb branched structure, aiming to mimic 3D vascular morphology to test, monitor, and analyze differences in the behavior of cancer cells (i.e. HeLa) vs. non-cancerous cell lines (i.e. 10 T1/2). The 3D Projection Printing system can fabricate complex structures in seconds from user-created designs. The fabricated microstructures have three different channel widths of 25, 45, and 120 microns wide to reflect a range of blood vessel diameters. HeLa and 10 T1/2 cells seeded within the micro-chip were then analyzed for morphology and cell migration speed. 10 T1/2 cells exhibited greater changes in morphology due to channel size width than HeLa cells; however, channel width had a limited effect on 10 T1/2 cell migration while HeLa cancer cell migration increased as channel width decreased. This physiologically relevant 3D cancer tissue model has the potential to be a powerful tool for future drug discoveries and cancer migration studies.

  2. 3D printing of biomimetic microstructures for cancer cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tina Qing; Qu, Xin; Liu, Justin; Chen, Shaochen

    2013-01-01

    To understand the physical behavior and migration of cancer cells, a 3D in vitro micro-chip in hydrogel was created using 3D projection printing. The micro-chip has a honeycomb branched structure, aiming to mimic 3D vascular morphology to test, monitor, and analyze differences in the behavior of cancer cells (i.e. HeLa) vs. non-cancerous cell lines (i.e. 10T1/2). The 3D Projection Printing system can fabricate complex structures in seconds from user-created designs. The fabricated microstructures have three different channel widths of 25, 45, and 120 microns wide to reflect a range of blood vessel diameters. HeLa and 10T1/2 cells seeded within the micro-chip were then analyzed for morphology and cell migration speed. 10T1/2 cells exhibited greater changes in morphology due to channel size width than HeLa cells; however, channel width had a limited effect on 10T1/2 cell migration while HeLa cancer cell migration increased as channel width decreased. This physiologically relevant 3D cancer tissue model has the potential to be a powerful tool for future drug discoveries and cancer migration studies PMID:24150602

  3. Cell-permeable p38 MAP kinase promotes migration of adult neural stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Hamanoue, Makoto; Morioka, Kazuhito; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Ohsawa, Keiko; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Tsuburaya, Kayo; Akasaka, Yoshikiyo; Mikami, Tetsuo; Ogata, Toru; Takamatsu, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) can migrate toward sites of injury, but the migration activity of NPCs is insufficient to regenerate damaged brain tissue. In this study, we showed that p38 MAP kinase (p38) is expressed in doublecortin-positive adult NPCs. Experiments using the p38 inhibitor SB203580 revealed that endogenous p38 participates in NPC migration. To enhance NPC migration, we generated a cell-permeable wild-type p38 protein (PTD-p38WT) in which the HIV protein transduction domain (PTD) was fused to the N-terminus of p38. Treatment with PTD-p38WT significantly promoted the random migration of adult NPCs without affecting cell survival or differentiation; this effect depended on the cell permeability and kinase activity of the fusion protein. These findings indicate that PTD-p38WT is a novel and useful tool for unraveling the roles of p38, and that this protein provides a reasonable approach for regenerating the injured brain by enhancing NPC migration. PMID:27067799

  4. Laser-photophoretic migration and fractionation of human blood cells.

    PubMed

    Monjushiro, Hideaki; Tanahashi, Yuko; Watarai, Hitoshi

    2013-05-13

    Laser photophoretic migration behavior of human blood cells in saline solution was investigated under the irradiation of Nd:YAG laser beam (532 nm) in the absence and the presence of the flow in a fused silica capillary. Red blood cells (RBC) were migrated faster than white blood cells (WBC) and blood pellets to the direction of propagation of laser light. The observed photophoretic velocity of RBC was about 11 times faster than those of others. This was understood from the larger photophoretic efficiency of RBC than that of WBC, which was simulated based on the Mie scattering theory. Furthermore, it was found that, during the photophoretic migration, RBCs spontaneously orientated parallel to the migration direction so as to reduce the drag force. Finally, it was demonstrated that RBC and WBC were separated in a micro-channel flow system by the laser photophoresis.

  5. Energy barriers and cell migration in confluent tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Dapeng; Lopez, J. H.; Schwarz, J. M.; Manning, M. Lisa

    2014-03-01

    Biological processes such as embryogensis, tumorigenesis and wound healing require cells to move within a tissue. While the migration of single cells has been extensively studied, it has remained unclear how single cell properties control migration through a confluent tissue. We develop numerical and theoretical models to calculate energy barriers to cell rearrangements, which govern cell motility. In contrast to sheared foams where energy barriers are power-law distributed, energy barriers in tissues are exponentially distributed and depend systematically on the cell's number of neighbors. Using simple extensions of `trap' and `Soft Glassy Rheology' models, we demonstrate that these energy barrier distributions give rise to glassy behavior and use the models to make testable predictions for two-time correlation functions and caging times. We incorporate these ideas into a continuum model that combines glassy rheology with active polarization to better understand collective migration in epithelial sheets.

  6. Modelling Rho GTPase biochemistry to predict collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merchant, Brian; Feng, James

    The collective migration of cells, due to individual cell polarization and intercellular contact inhibition of locomotion, features prominently in embryogenesis and metastatic cancers. Existing methods for modelling collectively migrating cells tend to rely either on highly abstracted agent-based models, or on continuum approximations of the group. Both of these frameworks represent intercellular interactions such as contact inhibition of locomotion as hard-coded rules defining model cells. In contrast, we present a vertex-dynamics framework which predicts polarization and contact inhibition of locomotion naturally from an underlying model of Rho GTPase biochemistry and cortical mechanics. We simulate the interaction between many such model cells, and study how modulating Rho GTPases affects migratory characteristics of the group, in the context of long-distance collective migration of neural crest cells during embryogenesis.

  7. CCN1: a novel inflammation-regulated biphasic immune cell migration modulator.

    PubMed

    Löbel, Madlen; Bauer, Sandra; Meisel, Christian; Eisenreich, Andreas; Kudernatsch, Robert; Tank, Juliane; Rauch, Ursula; Kühl, Uwe; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Poller, Wolfgang; Scheibenbogen, Carmen

    2012-09-01

    In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the effect of CCN1 on the migration of human immune cells. The molecule CCN1, produced by fibroblasts and endothelial cells, is considered as an important matrix protein promoting tissue repair and immune cell adhesion by binding various integrins. We recently reported that CCN1 therapy is able to suppress acute inflammation in vivo. Here, we show that CCN1 binds to various immune cells including T cells, B cells, NK cells, and monocytes. The addition of CCN1 in vitro enhances both actin polymerization and transwell migration. Prolonged incubation with CCN1, however, results in the inhibition of migration of immune cells by a mechanism that involves downregulation of PI3Kγ, p38, and Akt activation. Furthermore, we observed that immune cells themselves produce constitutively CCN1 and secretion is induced by pro-inflammatory stimuli. In line with this finding, patients suffering from acute inflammation had enhanced serum levels of CCN1. These findings extend the classical concept of CCN1 as a locally produced cell matrix adhesion molecule and suggest that CCN1 plays an important role in regulating immune cell trafficking by attracting and locally immobilizing immune cells.

  8. Syndecan-4 regulates the bFGF-induced chemotactic migration of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ran; Wu, Han; Xie, Jun; Li, Guannan; Gu, Rong; Kang, Lina; Wang, Lian; Xu, Biao

    2016-10-01

    Chemotactic migration of endothelial cells (ECs) guided by extracellular attractants is essential for blood vessel formation. Synd4 is a ubiquitous heparin sulfate proteoglycan receptor on the cell surface that has been identified to promote angiogenesis during tissue repair. Here, the role synd4 played in chemotactic migration of ECs was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were transfected with Lenti-synd4-RNAi or Lenti-null. Cell migration was observed in a 2D-chemotaxis slide with a stable gradient of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) for 18 h using time-lapse microscopy. Synd4 knockdown HUVECs showed reduced mobility compared with the control. In animal studies, Matrigel premixed with bFGF was used to induce the migration of ECs. The cells migrated less distance from the skin in the Matrigel plugs of synd4 null mice compared with the control mice. Then recombinant adenoviruses containing the synd4 gene (Ad-synd4) or null (Ad-null) were constructed to enhance the synd4 expression of migratory cells in Matrigel plugs of wild-type mice. Migratory cells with synd4 overexpression did not invade further in the Matrigel plugs of wild-type mice, but showed a high ability to proliferate.

  9. FNDC3B promotes cell migration and tumor metastasis in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chin-Hui; Lin, Yao-Wen; Chen, Ying-Chun; Liao, Chen-Chung; Jou, Yuh-Shan; Hsu, Ming-Ta; Chen, Chian-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Recurrence and metastasis are common in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and correlate with poor prognosis. We investigated the role of fibronectin type III domain containing 3B (FNDC3B) in HCC metastasis. Overexpression of FNDC3B in HCC cell lines enhanced cell migration and invasion. On the other hand, knockdown of FNDC3B using short-hairpin RNA reduced tumor nodule formation in both intra- and extra-hepatic metastasis. High levels of FNDC3B were observed in metastatic HCCs and correlated with poor patient survival and shorter recurrence time. Mutagenesis and LC-MS/MS analyses showed that FNDC3B promotes cell migration by cooperating with annexin A2 (ANXA2). Furthermore, FNDC3B and ANXA2 expression correlated negatively with patient survival. Our results indicate that FNDC3B behaves like an oncogene by promoting cell migration. This suggests FNDC3B could serve as a biomarker and therapeutic target for HCC metastasis. PMID:27385217

  10. Cell density and actomyosin contractility control the organization of migrating collectives within an epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Loza, Andrew J.; Koride, Sarita; Schimizzi, Gregory V.; Li, Bo; Sun, Sean X.; Longmore, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying collective migration are important for understanding development, wound healing, and tumor invasion. Here we focus on cell density to determine its role in collective migration. Our findings show that increasing cell density, as might be seen in cancer, transforms groups from broad collectives to small, narrow streams. Conversely, diminishing cell density, as might occur at a wound front, leads to large, broad collectives with a distinct leader–follower structure. Simulations identify force-sensitive contractility as a mediator of how density affects collectives, and guided by this prediction, we find that the baseline state of contractility can enhance or reduce organization. Finally, we test predictions from these data in an in vivo epithelium by using genetic manipulations to drive collective motion between predicted migratory phases. This work demonstrates how commonly altered cellular properties can prime groups of cells to adopt migration patterns that may be harnessed in health or exploited in disease. PMID:27605707

  11. Cell density and actomyosin contractility control the organization of migrating collectives within an epithelium.

    PubMed

    Loza, Andrew J; Koride, Sarita; Schimizzi, Gregory V; Li, Bo; Sun, Sean X; Longmore, Gregory D

    2016-11-07

    The mechanisms underlying collective migration are important for understanding development, wound healing, and tumor invasion. Here we focus on cell density to determine its role in collective migration. Our findings show that increasing cell density, as might be seen in cancer, transforms groups from broad collectives to small, narrow streams. Conversely, diminishing cell density, as might occur at a wound front, leads to large, broad collectives with a distinct leader-follower structure. Simulations identify force-sensitive contractility as a mediator of how density affects collectives, and guided by this prediction, we find that the baseline state of contractility can enhance or reduce organization. Finally, we test predictions from these data in an in vivo epithelium by using genetic manipulations to drive collective motion between predicted migratory phases. This work demonstrates how commonly altered cellular properties can prime groups of cells to adopt migration patterns that may be harnessed in health or exploited in disease.

  12. Effects of TNF-alpha on Endothelial Cell Collective Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Desu; Wu, Di; Helim Aranda-Espinoza, Jose; Losert, Wolfgang

    2013-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) is a small cell-signaling protein usually released by monocytes and macrophages during an inflammatory response. Previous work had shown the effects of TNF-alpha on single cell morphology, migration, and biomechanical properties. However, the effect on collective migrations remains unexplored. In this work, we have created scratches on monolayers of human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs) treated with 25ng/mL TNF-alpha on glass substrates. The wound healing like processes were imaged with phase contrast microscopy. Quantitative analysis of the collective migration of cells treated with TNF-alpha indicates that these cells maintain their persistent motion and alignment better than untreated cells. In addition, the collective migration was characterized by measuring the amount of non-affine deformations of the wound healing monolayer. We found a lower mean non-affinity and narrower distribution of non-affinities upon TNF-alpha stimulation. These results suggest that TNF-alpha introduces a higher degree of organized cell collective migration.

  13. Multiscale mechanisms of cell migration during development: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    McLennan, Rebecca; Dyson, Louise; Prather, Katherine W; Morrison, Jason A; Baker, Ruth E; Maini, Philip K; Kulesa, Paul M

    2012-08-01

    Long-distance cell migration is an important feature of embryonic development, adult morphogenesis and cancer, yet the mechanisms that drive subpopulations of cells to distinct targets are poorly understood. Here, we use the embryonic neural crest (NC) in tandem with theoretical studies to evaluate model mechanisms of long-distance cell migration. We find that a simple chemotaxis model is insufficient to explain our experimental data. Instead, model simulations predict that NC cell migration requires leading cells to respond to long-range guidance signals and trailing cells to short-range cues in order to maintain a directed, multicellular stream. Experiments confirm differences in leading versus trailing NC cell subpopulations, manifested in unique cell orientation and gene expression patterns that respond to non-linear tissue growth of the migratory domain. Ablation experiments that delete the trailing NC cell subpopulation reveal that leading NC cells distribute all along the migratory pathway and develop a leading/trailing cellular orientation and gene expression profile that is predicted by model simulations. Transplantation experiments and model predictions that move trailing NC cells to the migratory front, or vice versa, reveal that cells adopt a gene expression profile and cell behaviors corresponding to the new position within the migratory stream. These results offer a mechanistic model in which leading cells create and respond to a cell-induced chemotactic gradient and transmit guidance information to trailing cells that use short-range signals to move in a directional manner.

  14. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi.

    PubMed

    Parker, Aimee; Maclaren, Oliver J; Fletcher, Alexander G; Muraro, Daniele; Kreuzaler, Peter A; Byrne, Helen M; Maini, Philip K; Watson, Alastair J M; Pin, Carmen

    2017-02-01

    The functional integrity of the intestinal epithelial barrier relies on tight coordination of cell proliferation and migration, with failure to regulate these processes resulting in disease. It is not known whether cell proliferation is sufficient to drive epithelial cell migration during homoeostatic turnover of the epithelium. Nor is it known precisely how villus cell migration is affected when proliferation is perturbed. Some reports suggest that proliferation and migration may not be related while other studies support a direct relationship. We used established cell-tracking methods based on thymine analog cell labeling and developed tailored mathematical models to quantify cell proliferation and migration under normal conditions and when proliferation is reduced and when it is temporarily halted. We found that epithelial cell migration velocities along the villi are coupled to cell proliferation rates within the crypts in all conditions. Furthermore, halting and resuming proliferation results in the synchronized response of cell migration on the villi. We conclude that cell proliferation within the crypt is the primary force that drives cell migration along the villus. This methodology can be applied to interrogate intestinal epithelial dynamics and characterize situations in which processes involved in cell turnover become uncoupled, including pharmacological treatments and disease models.-Parker, A., Maclaren, O. J., Fletcher, A. G., Muraro, D., Kreuzaler, P. A., Byrne, H. M., Maini, P. K., Watson, A. J. M., Pin, C. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi.

  15. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Aimee; Maclaren, Oliver J.; Fletcher, Alexander G.; Muraro, Daniele; Kreuzaler, Peter A.; Byrne, Helen M.; Maini, Philip K.; Watson, Alastair J. M.; Pin, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    The functional integrity of the intestinal epithelial barrier relies on tight coordination of cell proliferation and migration, with failure to regulate these processes resulting in disease. It is not known whether cell proliferation is sufficient to drive epithelial cell migration during homoeostatic turnover of the epithelium. Nor is it known precisely how villus cell migration is affected when proliferation is perturbed. Some reports suggest that proliferation and migration may not be related while other studies support a direct relationship. We used established cell-tracking methods based on thymine analog cell labeling and developed tailored mathematical models to quantify cell proliferation and migration under normal conditions and when proliferation is reduced and when it is temporarily halted. We found that epithelial cell migration velocities along the villi are coupled to cell proliferation rates within the crypts in all conditions. Furthermore, halting and resuming proliferation results in the synchronized response of cell migration on the villi. We conclude that cell proliferation within the crypt is the primary force that drives cell migration along the villus. This methodology can be applied to interrogate intestinal epithelial dynamics and characterize situations in which processes involved in cell turnover become uncoupled, including pharmacological treatments and disease models.—Parker, A., Maclaren, O. J., Fletcher, A. G., Muraro, D., Kreuzaler, P. A., Byrne, H. M., Maini, P. K., Watson, A. J. M., Pin, C. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi. PMID:27811059

  16. HeLa human cervical cancer cell migration is inhibited by treatment with dibutyryl-cAMP.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Wook; Lee, Jiyoung; Moon, Eun-Yi

    2014-07-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) activates both protein kinase A (PKA) and guanine-nucleotide exchange factor exchange protein directly activated by CAMP (EPAC)-mediated Ras-related Protein1 (RAP1) GTPase that regulates various cellular functions including cell migration. Herein, we investigated whether cAMP-mediated PKA and EPAC1/RAP1 pathways differentially control HeLa cervical cancer cell migration. Although HeLa cell migration was reduced by dibutyryl-cAMP, we observed an increase in cAMP/PKA, cAMP/EPAC1/RAP1-GTPase, and RAC1-GTPase. HeLa cell migration and RAC1-GTPase were increased by treatment with 8-(4-chloro-phenylthio)-2'-O-methyladenosine-3',5'-cAMP analogue to activate EPAC-specific signaling pathways. When HeLa cells were treated with H-89, a PKA inhibitor, cell migration was enhanced but RAC1-GTPase was inhibited. In addition, cell migration induced by dibutyryl-cAMP was reversed but the activity of Rac1-GTPase was inhibited by H-89 treatment. Taken together, these data demonstrate that cAMP/PKA and cAMP/EPAC1/RAP1-GTPase might inversely control cervical cancer cell migration, although both signaling pathways may up-regulate RAC1-GTPase. It also suggests that cAMP-mediated cancer cell migration was independent of RAC1-GTPase activation.

  17. Ocular albinism type 1-induced melanoma cell migration is mediated through the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jun; Xie, Xin; Lei, Yun; An, Gaili; He, Li; Lv, Xiaopeng

    2014-07-01

    Malignant melanoma has the highest risk of mortality among all types of skin cancer due to its highly metastatic potential. The ocular albinism type 1 (OA1) protein is a pigment cell‑specific glycoprotein, which shares significant structural and functional features with G protein‑coupled receptors. However, the role of OA1 in melanoma has yet to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate whether OA1 is involved in melanoma cell migration. OA1 was found to stimulate cell migration in a dose‑dependent manner in cultured human melanoma cells. Furthermore, knockdown of OA1 using small interfering RNA was observed to significantly inhibit melanoma cell migration. In addition, the mechanism underlying OA1‑induced melanoma cell migration was investigated. Stimulation of the RAS/RAF/mitogen activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK) pathway using growth factors enhanced OA1 expression and melanoma cell migration, whereas inhibition of this pathway using U0126 was observed to markedly decrease OA1 expression and the number of migrated cells. These findings indicate that OA1 is involved in melanoma cell migration and that OA1‑induced melanoma cell migration is mediated through the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK signaling pathway. Therefore, OA1 may serve as a novel therapeutic target for melanoma.

  18. Mathematical Modeling of Eukaryotic Cell Migration: Insights Beyond Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Danuser, Gaudenz; Allard, Jun; Mogilner, Alex

    2014-01-01

    A migrating cell is a molecular machine made of tens of thousands of short-lived and interacting parts. Understanding migration means understanding the self-organization of these parts into a system of functional units. This task is one of tackling complexity: First, the system integrates numerous chemical and mechanical component processes. Second, these processes are connected in feedback interactions and over a large range of spatial and temporal scales. Third, many processes are stochastic, which leads to heterogeneous migration behaviors. Early on in the research of cell migration it became evident that this complexity exceeds human intuition. Thus, the cell migration community has led the charge to build mathematical models that could integrate the diverse experimental observations and measurements in consistent frameworks, first in conceptual and more recently in molecularly explicit models. The main goal of this review is to sift through a series of important conceptual and explicit mathematical models of cell migration and to evaluate their contribution to the field in their ability to integrate critical experimental data. PMID:23909278

  19. Benzyl isothiocyanate inhibits HNSCC cell migration and invasion, and sensitizes HNSCC cells to cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Wolf, M Allison; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis and chemoresistance represent two detrimental events that greatly hinder the outcome for those suffering with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Herein, we investigated benzyl isothiocyanate's (BITC) ability to inhibit HNSCC migration and invasion and enhance chemotherapy. Our data suggests that treatment with BITC 1) induced significant reductions in the viability of multiple HNSCC cell lines tested (HN12, HN8, and HN30) after 24 and 48 h, 2) decreased migration and invasion of the HN12 cells in a dose dependent manner, and 3) inhibited expression and altered localization of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) marker, vimentin. We also observed that a pretreatment of BITC followed by cisplatin treatment 1) induced a greater decrease in HN12, HN30, and HN8 cell viability and total cell count than either treatment alone and 2) significantly increased apoptosis when compared to either treatment alone. Taken together these data suggest that BITC has the capacity to inhibit processes involved in metastasis and enhance the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Consequently, the results indicate that further investigation, including in vivo studies, are warranted.

  20. Ionizing Radiation and Glioblastoma Exosomes: Implications in Tumor Biology and Cell Migration12

    PubMed Central

    Arscott, W Tris; Tandle, Anita T; Zhao, Shuping; Shabason, Jacob E; Gordon, Ira K; Schlaff, Cody D; Zhang, Guofeng; Tofilon, Philip J; Camphausen, Kevin A

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are nanometer-sized lipid vesicles released ubiquitously by cells, which have been shown to have a normal physiological role, as well as influence the tumor microenvironment and aid metastasis. Recent studies highlight the ability of exosomes to convey tumor-suppressive and oncogenic mRNAs, microRNAs, and proteins to a receiving cell, subsequently activating downstream signaling pathways and influencing cellular phenotype. Here, we show that radiation increases the abundance of exosomes released by glioblastoma cells and normal astrocytes. Exosomes derived from irradiated cells enhanced the migration of recipient cells, and their molecular profiling revealed an abundance of molecules related to signaling pathways important for cell migration. In particular, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) mRNA and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 (IGFBP2) protein levels were elevated, and coculture of nonirradiated cells with exosomes isolated from irradiated cells increased CTGF protein expression in the recipient cells. Additionally, these exosomes enhanced the activation of neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 1 (TrkA), focal adhesion kinase, Paxillin, and proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase Src (Src) in recipient cells, molecules involved in cell migration. Collectively, our data suggest that radiation influences exosome abundance, specifically alters their molecular composition, and on uptake, promotes a migratory phenotype. PMID:24466366

  1. Nanog regulates primordial germ cell migration through Cxcr4b.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sánchez, Ana Virginia; Camp, Esther; Leal-Tassias, Aránzazu; Atkinson, Stuart P; Armstrong, Lyle; Díaz-Llopis, Manuel; Mullor, José L

    2010-09-01

    Gonadal development in vertebrates depends on the early determination of primordial germ cells (PGCs) and their correct migration to the sites where the gonads develop. Several genes have been implicated in PGC specification and migration in vertebrates. Additionally, some of the genes associated with pluripotency, such as Oct4 and Nanog, are expressed in PGCs and gonads, suggesting a role for these genes in maintaining pluripotency of the germ lineage, which may be considered the only cell type that perpetually maintains stemness properties. Here, we report that medaka Nanog (Ol-Nanog) is expressed in the developing PGCs. Depletion of Ol-Nanog protein causes aberrant migration of PGCs and inhibits expression of Cxcr4b in PGCs, where it normally serves as the receptor of Sdf1a to guide PGC migration. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrates that Ol-Nanog protein binds to the promoter region of Cxcr4b, suggesting a direct regulation of Cxcr4b by Ol-Nanog. Simultaneous overexpression of Cxcr4b mRNA and depletion of Ol-Nanog protein in PGCs rescues the migration defective phenotype induced by a loss of Ol-Nanog, whereas overexpression of Sdf1a, the ligand for Cxcr4b, does not restore proper PGC migration. These results indicate that Ol-Nanog mediates PGC migration by regulating Cxcr4b expression.

  2. Protrusive waves guide 3D cell migration along nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Guetta-Terrier, Charlotte; Monzo, Pascale; Zhu, Jie; Long, Hongyan; Venkatraman, Lakshmi; Zhou, Yue; Wang, PeiPei; Chew, Sing Yian; Mogilner, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In vivo, cells migrate on complex three-dimensional (3D) fibrous matrices, which has made investigation of the key molecular and physical mechanisms that drive cell migration difficult. Using reductionist approaches based on 3D electrospun fibers, we report for various cell types that single-cell migration along fibronectin-coated nanofibers is associated with lateral actin-based waves. These cyclical waves have a fin-like shape and propagate up to several hundred micrometers from the cell body, extending the leading edge and promoting highly persistent directional movement. Cells generate these waves through balanced activation of the Rac1/N-WASP/Arp2/3 and Rho/formins pathways. The waves originate from one major adhesion site at leading end of the cell body, which is linked through actomyosin contractility to another site at the back of the cell, allowing force generation, matrix deformation and cell translocation. By combining experimental and modeling data, we demonstrate that cell migration in a fibrous environment requires the formation and propagation of dynamic, actin based fin-like protrusions. PMID:26553933

  3. Protrusive waves guide 3D cell migration along nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Guetta-Terrier, Charlotte; Monzo, Pascale; Zhu, Jie; Long, Hongyan; Venkatraman, Lakshmi; Zhou, Yue; Wang, PeiPei; Chew, Sing Yian; Mogilner, Alexander; Ladoux, Benoit; Gauthier, Nils C

    2015-11-09

    In vivo, cells migrate on complex three-dimensional (3D) fibrous matrices, which has made investigation of the key molecular and physical mechanisms that drive cell migration difficult. Using reductionist approaches based on 3D electrospun fibers, we report for various cell types that single-cell migration along fibronectin-coated nanofibers is associated with lateral actin-based waves. These cyclical waves have a fin-like shape and propagate up to several hundred micrometers from the cell body, extending the leading edge and promoting highly persistent directional movement. Cells generate these waves through balanced activation of the Rac1/N-WASP/Arp2/3 and Rho/formins pathways. The waves originate from one major adhesion site at leading end of the cell body, which is linked through actomyosin contractility to another site at the back of the cell, allowing force generation, matrix deformation and cell translocation. By combining experimental and modeling data, we demonstrate that cell migration in a fibrous environment requires the formation and propagation of dynamic, actin based fin-like protrusions.

  4. Regulator of calcineurin 1 modulates cancer cell migration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Allan V; Shinohara, Motoo; Porchia, Leonardo M; Chung, Yun Jae; McCarty, Samantha; Saji, Motoyasu; Ringel, Matthew D

    2009-01-01

    Metastasis suppressors and other regulators of cell motility play an important role in tumor invasion and metastases. We previously identified that activation of the G protein coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) by the metastasis suppressor metastin inhibits cell migration in association with overexpression of Regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1), an endogenous regulator of calcineurin. Calcineurin inhibitors also blocked cell migration in vitro and RCAN1 protein levels were reduced in nodal metastases in thyroid cancer. The purpose of the current study was to determine directly if RCAN1 functions as a motility suppressor in vitro. Several cancer cell lines derived from different cancer types with different motility rates were evaluated for RCAN1 expression levels. Using these systems we determined that reduction of endogenous RCAN1 using siRNA resulted in an increase in cancer cell motility while expression of exogenous RCAN1 reduced cell motility. In one cell line with a high migratory rate, the stability of exogenously expressed RCAN1 protein was reduced and was rescued by treatment with a proteasome inhibitor. Finally, overexpression of RCAN1 was associated with an increase in cell adhesion to collagen IV and reduced calcineurin activity. In summary, we have demonstrated that the expression of exogenous RCAN1 reduces migration and alters adhesion; and that the loss of endogenous RCAN1 leads to an increase in migration in the examined cancer cell lines. These results are consistent with a regulatory role for RCAN1 in cancer cell motility in vitro.

  5. Cell collectivity regulation within migrating cell cluster during Kupffer's vesicle formation in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Takaaki; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Bessho, Yasumasa

    2015-01-01

    Although cell adhesion is thought to fasten cells tightly, cells that adhere to each other can migrate directionally. This group behavior, called “collective cell migration,” is observed during normal development, wound healing, and cancer invasion. Loss-of-function of cell adhesion molecules in several model systems of collective cell migration results in delay or inhibition of migration of cell groups but does not lead to dissociation of the cell groups, suggesting that mechanisms of cells staying assembled as a single cell cluster, termed as “cell collectivity,” remain largely unknown. During the formation of Kupffer's vesicle (KV, an organ of laterality in zebrafish), KV progenitors form a cluster and migrate together toward the vegetal pole. Importantly, in this model system of collective cell migration, knockdown of cell adhesion molecules or signal components leads to failure of cell collectivity. In this review, we summarize recent findings in cell collectivity regulation during collective migration of KV progenitor cells and describe our current understanding of how cell collectivity is regulated during collective cell migration. PMID:26000276

  6. Parecoxib inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation, migration and invasion by upregulating miRNA-29c

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin-Yong; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glioblastoma (GBM) is one of the most lethal brain cancers worldwide, and there is an urgent need for development of novel therapeutic approaches. Parecoxib is a well-known cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, and had already been developed for postoperative analgesia with high efficacy and low adverse reaction. A recent study has suggested that parecoxib potently enhances immunotherapeutic efficacy of GBM, but its effects on GBM growth, migration and invasion have not previously been studied. In the present study, MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] and BrdU (5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine) incorporation assays were used to evaluate the cell proliferation of GBM cells. Wound-healing and transwell assays were preformed to analyze GBM cell migration and invasion, respectively. The results suggested that parecoxib inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion of GBM cells in a dose-dependent manner. RT-qPCR (real-time quantitative PCR) analysis demonstrated that miRNA-29c can be significantly induced by parecoxib. Furthermore, our data suggests that a miRNA-29c inhibitor can significantly attenuate parecoxib's effect on proliferation, migration and invasion of GBM. In conclusion, the present study suggests that parecoxib inhibits GBM cell proliferation, migration and invasion by upregulating miRNA-29c. PMID:27895048

  7. Upregulation of heat shock protein 70 and the differential protein expression induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha enhances migration and inhibits apoptosis of hepatocellular carcinoma cell HepG2

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bee-Piao; Lin, Chun-Shiang; Wang, Chau-Jong; Kao, Shao-Hsuan

    2017-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) plays diverse roles in liver damage and hepatocarcinogenesis with its multipotent bioactivity. However, the influence of TNFα on protein expression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is incompletely understood. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the differential protein expression of HCC in response to TNFα stimulus. We observed that HepG2 cell revealed a higher resistance to TNFα-induced apoptosis as compared to the non-tumorigenic hepatocyte THLE-2. By using a label-free quantitative proteomic analysis, we found that 520 proteins were differentially expressed in the HepG2 cells exposed to TNFα, including 211 up-regulated and 309 down-regulated proteins. We further confirmed several proteins with significant expression change (TNFα/control ratio>2.0 or <0.5) by immunoblotting using specific antibodies. We also analyzed the differential expressed proteins using Gene ontology and KEGG annotations, and the results implicated that TNFα might regulate ribosome, spliceosome, antigen processing and presentation, and energy metabolism in HepG2 cells. Moreover, we demonstrated that upregulation of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was involved in both the promoted migration and the inhibited apoptosis of HepG2 cells in response to TNFα. Collectively, these findings indicate that TNFα alters protein expression such as HSP70, which triggering specific molecular processes and signaling cascades that promote migration and inhibit apoptosis of HepG2 cells. PMID:28367089

  8. Multidisciplinary approaches to understanding collective cell migration in developmental biology.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Linus J; Kulesa, Paul M; McLennan, Rebecca; Baker, Ruth E; Maini, Philip K

    2016-06-01

    Mathematical models are becoming increasingly integrated with experimental efforts in the study of biological systems. Collective cell migration in developmental biology is a particularly fruitful application area for the development of theoretical models to predict the behaviour of complex multicellular systems with many interacting parts. In this context, mathematical models provide a tool to assess the consistency of experimental observations with testable mechanistic hypotheses. In this review, we showcase examples from recent years of multidisciplinary investigations of neural crest cell migration. The neural crest model system has been used to study how collective migration of cell populations is shaped by cell-cell interactions, cell-environmental interactions and heterogeneity between cells. The wide range of emergent behaviours exhibited by neural crest cells in different embryonal locations and in different organisms helps us chart out the spectrum of collective cell migration. At the same time, this diversity in migratory characteristics highlights the need to reconcile or unify the array of currently hypothesized mechanisms through the next generation of experimental data and generalized theoretical descriptions.

  9. Mechano-growth factor induces migration of rat mesenchymal stem cells by altering its mechanical properties and activating ERK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jiamin; Wu, Kewen; Lin, Feng; Luo, Qing; Yang, Li; Shi, Yisong; Song, Guanbin; Sung, Kuo-Li Paul

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •MGF induced the migration of rat MSC in a concentration-dependent manner. •MGF enhanced the mechanical properties of rMSC in inducing its migration. •MGF activated the ERK 1/2 signaling pathway of rMSC in inducing its migration. •rMSC mechanics may synergy with ERK 1/2 pathway in MGF-induced rMSC migration. -- Abstract: Mechano-growth factor (MGF) generated by cells in response to mechanical stimulation has been identified as a mechano effector molecule, playing a key role in regulating mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) function, including proliferation and migration. However, the mechanism(s) underlying how MGF-induced MSC migration occurs is still unclear. In the present study, MGF motivated migration of rat MSCs (rMSCs) in a concentration-dependent manner and optimal concentration of MGF at 50 ng/mL (defined as MGF treatment in this paper) was demonstrated. Notably, enhancement of mechanical properties that is pertinent to cell migration, such as cell traction force and cell stiffness were found to respond to MGF treatment. Furthermore, MGF increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), ERK inhibitor (i.e., PD98059) suppressed ERK phosphorylation, and abolished MGF-induced rMSC migration were found, demonstrating that ERK is involved molecule for MGF-induced rMSC migration. These in vitro evidences of MGF-induced rMSC migration and its direct link to altering rMSC mechanics and activating the ERK pathway, uncover the underlying biomechanical and biological mechanisms of MGF-induced rMSC migration, which may help find MGF-based application of MSC in clinical therapeutics.

  10. The Rho family GEF Asef2 regulates cell migration in three dimensional (3D) collagen matrices through myosin II.

    PubMed

    Jean, Léolène; Yang, Lijie; Majumdar, Devi; Gao, Yandong; Shi, Mingjian; Brewer, Bryson M; Li, Deyu; Webb, Donna J

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to a variety of physiological processes, including tissue development, homeostasis, and regeneration. Migration has been extensively studied with cells on 2-dimensional (2D) substrates, but much less is known about cell migration in 3D environments. Tissues and organs are 3D, which is the native environment of cells in vivo, pointing to a need to understand migration and the mechanisms that regulate it in 3D environments. To investigate cell migration in 3D environments, we developed microfluidic devices that afford a controlled, reproducible platform for generating 3D matrices. Using these devices, we show that the Rho family guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Asef2 inhibits cell migration in 3D type I collagen (collagen I) matrices. Treatment of cells with the myosin II (MyoII) inhibitor blebbistatin abolished the decrease in migration by Asef2. Moreover, Asef2 enhanced MyoII activity as shown by increased phosphorylation of serine 19 (S19). Furthermore, Asef2 increased activation of Rac, which is a Rho family small GTPase, in 3D collagen I matrices. Inhibition of Rac activity by treatment with the Rac-specific inhibitor NSC23766 abrogated the Asef2-promoted increase in S19 MyoII phosphorylation. Thus, our results indicate that Asef2 regulates cell migration in 3D collagen I matrices through a Rac-MyoII-dependent mechanism.

  11. In-vivo cell tracking to quantify endothelial cell migration during zebrafish angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Prahlad G.; Rochon, Elizabeth R.; Roman, Beth L.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanism of endothelial cell migration as individual cells or collectively while remaining an integral component of a functional blood vessel has not been well characterized. In this study, our overarching goal is to define an image processing workflow to facilitate quantification of how endothelial cells within the first aortic arch and are proximal to the zebrafish heart behave in response to the onset of flow (i.e. onset of heart beating). Endothelial cell imaging was conducted at this developmental time-point i.e. ~24-28 hours post fertilization (hpf) when flow first begins, using 3D+time two-photon confocal microscopy of a live, wild-type, transgenic, zebrafish expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in endothelial cell nuclei. An image processing pipeline comprised of image signal enhancement, median filtering for speckle noise reduction, automated identification of the nuclei positions, extraction of the relative movement of nuclei between consecutive time instances, and finally tracking of nuclei, was designed for achieving the tracking of endothelial cell nuclei and the identification of their movement towards or away from the heart. Pilot results lead to a hypothesis that upon the onset of heart beat and blood flow, endothelial cells migrate collectively towards the heart (by 21.51+/-10.35 μm) in opposition to blood flow (i.e. subtending 142.170+/-21.170 with the flow direction).

  12. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, N. R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-02-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development.

  13. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, N.R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development. PMID:26887292

  14. The Autophagy Machinery: A New Player in Chemotactic Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Coly, Pierre-Michaël; Gandolfo, Pierrick; Castel, Hélène; Morin, Fabrice

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved self-degradative process that plays a key role in diverse cellular processes such as stress response or differentiation. A growing body of work highlights the direct involvement of autophagy in cell migration and cancer metastasis. Specifically, autophagy has been shown to be involved in modulating cell adhesion dynamics as well as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. After providing a general overview of the mechanisms controlling autophagosome biogenesis and cell migration, we discuss how chemotactic G protein-coupled receptors, through the repression of autophagy, may orchestrate membrane trafficking and compartmentation of specific proteins at the cell front in order to support the critical steps of directional migration. PMID:28261054

  15. Bystander cells enhance NK cytotoxic efficiency by reducing search time.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao; Zhao, Renping; Schwarz, Karsten; Mangeat, Matthieu; Schwarz, Eva C; Hamed, Mohamed; Bogeski, Ivan; Helms, Volkhard; Rieger, Heiko; Qu, Bin

    2017-03-13

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a central role during innate immune responses by eliminating pathogen-infected or tumorigenic cells. In the microenvironment, NK cells encounter not only target cells but also other cell types including non-target bystander cells. The impact of bystander cells on NK killing efficiency is, however, still elusive. In this study we show that the presence of bystander cells, such as P815, monocytes or HUVEC, enhances NK killing efficiency. With bystander cells present, the velocity and persistence of NK cells were increased, whereas the degranulation of lytic granules remained unchanged. Bystander cell-derived H2O2 was found to mediate the acceleration of NK cell migration. Using mathematical diffusion models, we confirm that local acceleration of NK cells in the vicinity of bystander cells reduces their search time to locate target cells. In addition, we found that integrin β chains (β1, β2 and β7) on NK cells are required for bystander-enhanced NK migration persistence. In conclusion, we show that acceleration of NK cell migration in the vicinity of H2O2-producing bystander cells reduces target cell search time and enhances NK killing efficiency.

  16. Bystander cells enhance NK cytotoxic efficiency by reducing search time

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao; Zhao, Renping; Schwarz, Karsten; Mangeat, Matthieu; Schwarz, Eva C.; Hamed, Mohamed; Bogeski, Ivan; Helms, Volkhard; Rieger, Heiko; Qu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a central role during innate immune responses by eliminating pathogen-infected or tumorigenic cells. In the microenvironment, NK cells encounter not only target cells but also other cell types including non-target bystander cells. The impact of bystander cells on NK killing efficiency is, however, still elusive. In this study we show that the presence of bystander cells, such as P815, monocytes or HUVEC, enhances NK killing efficiency. With bystander cells present, the velocity and persistence of NK cells were increased, whereas the degranulation of lytic granules remained unchanged. Bystander cell-derived H2O2 was found to mediate the acceleration of NK cell migration. Using mathematical diffusion models, we confirm that local acceleration of NK cells in the vicinity of bystander cells reduces their search time to locate target cells. In addition, we found that integrin β chains (β1, β2 and β7) on NK cells are required for bystander-enhanced NK migration persistence. In conclusion, we show that acceleration of NK cell migration in the vicinity of H2O2-producing bystander cells reduces target cell search time and enhances NK killing efficiency. PMID:28287155

  17. HMGCR positively regulated the growth and migration of glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhihua; Yuan, Wen; Chen, Tao; Zhou, Chenzhi; Liu, Chao; Huang, Yongkai; Han, Deqing; Huang, Qinghui

    2016-01-15

    The metabolic program of cancer cells is significant different from the normal cells, which makes it possible to develop novel strategies targeting cancer cells. Mevalonate pathway and its rate-limiting enzyme HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR) have shown important roles in the progression of several cancer types. However, their roles in glioblastoma cells remain unknown. In this study, up-regulation of HMGCR in the clinical glioblastoma samples was observed. Forced expression of HMGCR promoted the growth and migration of U251 and U373 cells, while knocking down the expression of HMGCR inhibited the growth, migration and metastasis of glioblastoma cells. Molecular mechanism studies revealed that HMGCR positively regulated the expression of TAZ, an important mediator of Hippo pathway, and the downstream target gene connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), suggesting HMGCR might activate Hippo pathway in glioblastoma cells. Taken together, our study demonstrated the oncogenic roles of HMGCR in glioblastoma cells and HMGCR might be a promising therapeutic target.

  18. Transendothelial migration enhances integrin-dependent human neutrophil chemokinesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transendothelial migration of neutrophils induces phenotypic changes that influence the interactions of neutrophils with extravascular tissue components. To assess the influence of transmigration on neutrophil chemokinetic motility, we used polyethylene glycol hydrogels covalently modified with spec...

  19. Controlled architectural and chemotactic studies of 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Tayalia, Prakriti; Mazur, Eric; Mooney, David J

    2011-04-01

    Chemotaxis plays a critical role in tissue development and wound repair, and is widely studied using ex vivo model systems in applications such as immunotherapy. However, typical chemotactic models employ 2D systems that are less physiologically relevant or use end-point assays, that reveal little about the stepwise dynamics of the migration process. To overcome these limitations, we developed a new model system using microfabrication techniques, sustained drug delivery approaches, and theoretical modeling of chemotactic agent diffusion. This model system allows us to study the effects of 3D architecture and chemotactic agent gradient on immune cell migration in real time. We find that dendritic cell migration is characterized by a strong interplay between matrix architecture and chemotactic gradients, and migration is also influenced dramatically by the cell activation state. Our results indicate that Lipopolysaccharide-activated dendritic cells studied in a traditional transwell system actually exhibit anomalous migration behavior. Such a 3D ex vivo system lends itself for analyzing cell migratory behavior in response to single or multiple competitive cues and could prove useful in vaccine development.

  20. Metformin Inhibits Migration and Invasion of Cholangiocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed

    Trinh, Son Xuan; Nguyen, Huyen Thi Bich; Saimuang, Kween; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Chan On, Waraporn

    2017-02-01

    Background: Metformin is an oral anti-diabetic agent that has been widely prescribed for treatment of type II diabetes. Anti-cancer properties of metformin have been revealed for numerous human malignancies including cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) with anti-proliferative effects in vitro. However, effects on CCA cell migration and invasion have not been fully investigated. The present study aimed to explore the inhibitory effects of metformin on motility, migration and invasion of the CCA cell line HuCCT1, and examine molecular mechanisms underlying metformin effects. Methods: HuCCT1 cells were exposed to increasing doses of metformin. Viability and growth of HuCCT1 cells were assessed by MTS and colony formation assays, respectively. Motility, migration and invasion of metformin-treated HuCCT1 cells were determined in vitro using wound healing, transwell migration and matrigel invasion assays. Expression of signaling molecules and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers was assessed by Western blotting. Results: It was observed that metformin significantly decreased HuCCT1 cell viability and colony formation. The agent also markedly reduced wound closure, migration and invasion of HuCCT1 cells. Furthermore, metformin exposure resulted in decreased STAT3 activation and down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 expression. In addition, it upregulated the expression of E-cadherin, while downregulating that of N-cadherin, Snail, and MMP-2. Conclusion: These results demonstrated inhibitory effects of metformin on CCA cell migration and invasion, possibly involving the STAT3 pathway and reversal of EMT markers expression. They further suggest that metformin may be useful for CCA management.

  1. Microtopography and flow modulate the direction of endothelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Uttayarat, P; Chen, M; Li, M; Allen, F D; Composto, R J; Lelkes, P I

    2008-02-01

    The migration of vascular endothelial cells under flow can be modulated by the addition of chemical or mechanical stimuli. The aim of this study was to investigate how topographic cues derived from a substrate containing three-dimensional microtopography interact with fluid shear stress in directing endothelial cell migration. Subconfluent bovine aortic endothelial cells were seeded on fibronectin-coated poly(dimethylsiloxane) substrates patterned with a combinatorial array of parallel and orthogonal microgrooves ranging from 2 to 5 microm in width at a constant depth of 1 microm. During a 4-h time-lapse observation in the absence of flow, the majority of the prealigned cells migrated parallel to the grooves with the distribution of their focal adhesions (FAs) depending on the groove width. No change in this migratory pattern was observed after the cells were exposed to moderate shear stress (13.5 dyn/cm(2)), irrespective of groove direction with respect to flow. After 4-h exposure to high shear stress (58 dyn/cm(2)) parallel to the grooves, the cells continued to migrate in the direction of both grooves and flow. By contrast, when microgrooves were oriented perpendicular to flow, most cells migrated orthogonal to the grooves and downstream with flow. Despite the change in the migration direction of the cells under high shear stress, most FAs and actin microfilaments maintained their original alignment parallel to the grooves, suggesting that topographic cues were more effective than those derived from shear stress in guiding the orientation of cytoskeletal and adhesion proteins during the initial exposure to flow.

  2. Quantitative 3D analysis of complex single border cell behaviors in coordinated collective cell migration.

    PubMed

    Cliffe, Adam; Doupé, David P; Sung, HsinHo; Lim, Isaac Kok Hwee; Ong, Kok Haur; Cheng, Li; Yu, Weimiao

    2017-04-04

    Understanding the mechanisms of collective cell migration is crucial for cancer metastasis, wound healing and many developmental processes. Imaging a migrating cluster in vivo is feasible, but the quantification of individual cell behaviours remains challenging. We have developed an image analysis toolkit, CCMToolKit, to quantify the Drosophila border cell system. In addition to chaotic motion, previous studies reported that the migrating cells are able to migrate in a highly coordinated pattern. We quantify the rotating and running migration modes in 3D while also observing a range of intermediate behaviours. Running mode is driven by cluster external protrusions. Rotating mode is associated with cluster internal cell extensions that could not be easily characterized. Although the cluster moves slower while rotating, individual cells retain their mobility and are in fact slightly more active than in running mode. We also show that individual cells may exchange positions during migration.

  3. Inhibitor of growth 4 suppresses cell spreading and cell migration by interacting with a novel binding partner, liprin alpha1

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jiang-Cheng; Unoki, Motoko; Ythier, Damien; Duperray, Alain; Varticovski, Lyuba; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Pedeux, Remy; Harris, Curtis C.

    2007-01-01

    ING4 is a candidate tumor suppressor that plays a major role in gene regulation, cell cycle control, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. ING4 expression is downregulated in glioblastoma cells, and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Here, we identified liprin α1/PPFIA1, a cytoplasmic protein necessary for focal adhesion formation and axon guidance, as a novel interacting protein with ING4. ING4 and liprin α1 colocalized at lamellipodia in the vicinity of vinculin. Overexpressed ING4 suppressed cell spreading and cell migration. In contrast, overexpressed liprin α1 enhanced cell spreading and cell migration. Knockdown of endogenous ING4 with RNA interference induced cell motility, whereas knockdown of endogenous liprin α1 suppressed cell motility. ING4 also suppressed cell motility that was enhanced by liprin α1. However, ING4 did not further suppress cell motility when liprin α1 was suppressed with RNA interference, suggesting a functional and mechanistic interdependence between these proteins. In addition to its nuclear functions, cytoplasmic ING4 interacts with liprin α1 to regulate cell migration, and with its known anti-angiogenic function, may prevent invasion and metastasis. PMID:17363573

  4. Paxillin-kinase-linker tyrosine phosphorylation regulates directional cell migration.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianxin A; Deakin, Nicholas O; Turner, Christopher E

    2009-11-01

    Directed cell migration requires the coordination of growth factor and cell adhesion signaling and is of fundamental importance during embryonic development, wound repair, and pathological conditions such as tumor metastasis. Herein, we demonstrate that the ArfGAP, paxillin-kinase-linker (PKL/GIT2), is tyrosine phosphorylated in response to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulation, in an adhesion dependent manner and is necessary for directed cell migration. Using a combination of pharmacological inhibitors, knockout cells and kinase mutants, FAK, and Src family kinases were shown to mediate PDGF-dependent PKL tyrosine phosphorylation. In fibroblasts, expression of a PKL mutant lacking the principal tyrosine phosphorylation sites resulted in loss of wound-induced cell polarization as well as directional migration. PKL phosphorylation was necessary for PDGF-stimulated PKL binding to the focal adhesion protein paxillin and expression of paxillin or PKL mutants defective in their respective binding motifs recapitulated the polarization defects. RNA interference or expression of phosphorylation mutants of PKL resulted in disregulation of PDGF-stimulated Rac1 and PAK activities, reduction of Cdc42 and Erk signaling, as well as mislocalization of betaPIX. Together these studies position PKL as an integral component of growth factor and cell adhesion cross-talk signaling, controlling the development of front-rear cell polarity and directional cell migration.

  5. Amyloid precursor protein regulates migration and metalloproteinase gene expression in prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Inoue, Satoshi

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • APP knockdown reduced proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells. • APP knockdown reduced expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes. • APP overexpression promoted LNCaP cell migration. • APP overexpression increased expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes. - Abstract: Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a type I transmembrane protein, and one of its processed forms, β-amyloid, is considered to play a central role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. We previously showed that APP is a primary androgen-responsive gene in prostate cancer and that its increased expression is correlated with poor prognosis for patients with prostate cancer. APP has also been implicated in several human malignancies. Nevertheless, the mechanism underlying the pro-proliferative effects of APP on cancers is still not well-understood. In the present study, we explored a pathophysiological role for APP in prostate cancer cells using siRNA targeting APP (siAPP). The proliferation and migration of LNCaP and DU145 prostate cancer cells were significantly suppressed by siAPP. Differentially expressed genes in siAPP-treated cells compared to control siRNA-treated cells were identified by microarray analysis. Notably, several metalloproteinase genes, such as ADAM10 and ADAM17, and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related genes, such as VIM, and SNAI2, were downregulated in siAPP-treated cells as compared to control cells. The expression of these genes was upregulated in LNCaP cells stably expressing APP when compared with control cells. APP-overexpressing LNCaP cells exhibited enhanced migration in comparison to control cells. These results suggest that APP may contribute to the proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells by modulating the expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes.

  6. Role of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase in myeloma cell migration and induction of bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Bam, Rakesh; Ling, Wen; Khan, Sharmin; Pennisi, Angela; Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Li, Xin; van Rhee, Frits; Usmani, Saad; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John; Epstein, Joshua; Yaccoby, Shmuel

    2014-01-01

    Myeloma cells typically grow in bone, recruit osteoclast precursors and induce their differentiation and activity in areas adjacent to tumor foci. Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK), of the TEC family, is expressed in hematopoietic cells and is particularly involved in B-lymphocyte function and osteoclastogenesis. We demonstrated BTK expression in clinical myeloma plasma cells, interleukin (IL) –6– or stroma–dependent cell lines and osteoclasts. SDF-1 induced BTK activation in myeloma cells and BTK inhibition by small hairpin RNA or the small molecule inhibitor, LFM-A13, reduced their migration toward stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1). Pretreatment with LFM-A13 also reduced in vivo homing of myeloma cells to bone using bioluminescence imaging in the SCID-rab model. Enforced expression of BTK in myeloma cell line enhanced cell migration toward SDF-1 but had no effect on short-term growth. BTK expression was correlated with cell-surface CXCR4 expression in myeloma cells (n = 33, r = 0.81, P < 0.0001), and BTK gene and protein expression was more profound in cell-surface CXCR4-expressing myeloma cells. BTK was not upregulated by IL-6 while its inhibition had no effect on IL-6 signaling in myeloma cells. Human osteoclast precursors also expressed BTK and cell-surface CXCR4 and migrated toward SDF-1. LFM-A13 suppressed migration and differentiation of osteoclast precursors as well as bone-resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts. In primary myeloma-bearing SCID-rab mice, LFM-A13 inhibited osteoclast activity, prevented myeloma-induced bone resorption and moderately suppressed myeloma growth. These data demonstrate BTK and cell-surface CXCR4 association in myeloma cells and that BTK plays a role in myeloma cell homing to bone and myeloma-induced bone disease. PMID:23456977

  7. MicroRNA-224 inhibits proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells by down-regulating Fizzled 5 expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Liu, Yang; Shen, Jingling; Zhang, Guoqiang; Han, Jiguang

    2016-08-02

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling is crucial for the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells. However, the expression of microRNA-224 (miR-224) in the different types of breast cancers and its role in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling and the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells are poorly understood. In this study, the levels of miR-224 in different types of breast cancer tissues and cell lines were examined by quantitative RT-PCR and the potential targets of miR-224 in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling were investigated. The effects of altered miR-224 expression on the frequency of CD44+CD24- cancer stem-like cells (CSC), proliferation and migration of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells were examined by flow cytometry, MTT and transwell migration. We found that the levels of miR-224 expression in different types of breast cancer tissues and cell lines were associated inversely with aggressiveness of breast cancers. Enhanced miR-224 expression significantly reduced the fizzled 5-regulated luciferase activity in 293T cells, fizzled 5 expression in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, the β-dependent luciferase activity in MCF-7 cells, and the nuclear translocation of β-catenin in MDA-MB-231 cells. miR-224 inhibition significantly increased the percentages of CSC in MCF-7 cells and enhanced proliferation and migration of MCF-7 cells. Enhanced miR-224 expression inhibited proliferation and migration of MDA-MB-231 cells, and the growth of implanted breast cancers in vivo. Induction of Frizzled 5 over-expression mitigated the miR-224-mediated inhibition of breast cancer cell proliferation. Collectively, these data indicated that miR-224 down-regulated the Wnt/β-catenin signaling possibly by binding to Frizzled 5 and inhibited proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells.

  8. Flow and Diffusion in Channel-Guided Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Marel, Anna-Kristina; Zorn, Matthias; Klingner, Christoph; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland; Frey, Erwin; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2014-01-01

    Collective migration of mechanically coupled cell layers is a notable feature of wound healing, embryonic development, and cancer progression. In confluent epithelial sheets, the dynamics have been found to be highly heterogeneous, exhibiting spontaneous formation of swirls, long-range correlations, and glass-like dynamic arrest as a function of cell density. In contrast, the flow-like properties of one-sided cell-sheet expansion in confining geometries are not well understood. Here, we studied the short- and long-term flow of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells as they moved through microchannels. Using single-cell tracking and particle image velocimetry (PIV), we found that a defined averaged stationary cell current emerged that exhibited a velocity gradient in the direction of migration and a plug-flow-like profile across the advancing sheet. The observed flow velocity can be decomposed into a constant term of directed cell migration and a diffusion-like contribution that increases with density gradient. The diffusive component is consistent with the cell-density profile and front propagation speed predicted by the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation. To connect diffusion-mediated transport to underlying cellular motility, we studied single-cell trajectories and occurrence of vorticity. We discovered that the directed large-scale cell flow altered fluctuations in cellular motion at short length scales: vorticity maps showed a reduced frequency of swirl formation in channel flow compared with resting sheets of equal cell density. Furthermore, under flow, single-cell trajectories showed persistent long-range, random-walk behavior superimposed on drift, whereas cells in resting tissue did not show significant displacements with respect to neighboring cells. Our work thus suggests that active cell migration manifests itself in an underlying, spatially uniform drift as well as in randomized bursts of short-range correlated motion that lead to a diffusion-mediated transport

  9. Analyzing In Vivo Cell Migration using Cell Transplantations and Time-lapse Imaging in Zebrafish Embryos.

    PubMed

    Giger, Florence A; Dumortier, Julien G; David, Nicolas B

    2016-04-29

    Cell migration is key to many physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer metastasis. The cellular and molecular bases of cell migration have been thoroughly analyzed in vitro. However, in vivo cell migration somehow differs from in vitro migration, and has proven more difficult to analyze, being less accessible to direct observation and manipulation. This protocol uses the migration of the prospective prechordal plate in the early zebrafish embryo as a model system to study the function of candidate genes in cell migration. Prechordal plate progenitors form a group of cells which, during gastrulation, undergoes a directed migration from the embryonic organizer to the animal pole of the embryo. The proposed protocol uses cell transplantation to create mosaic embryos. This offers the combined advantages of labeling isolated cells, which is key to good imaging, and of limiting gain/loss of function effects to the observed cells, hence ensuring cell-autonomous effects. We describe here how we assessed the function of the TORC2 component Sin1 in cell migration, but the protocol can be used to analyze the function of any candidate gene in controlling cell migration in vivo.

  10. Leukotrienes induce the migration of Th17 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonyong; Su Kim, Hyeong; Lee, Gap Ryol

    2015-01-01

    Th17 cell trafficking in response to leukotriene signaling is poorly understood. Here we showed that Th17 cells express high levels of leukotriene B4 receptor 1 (LTB4R1) and cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 (CysLTR1). Th17 cells migrated under the guidance of leukotriene B4 and D4. The migration of Th17 cells was more efficient than that of Th1 and Th2 cells, and it was blocked by specific inhibitors of LTB4R1 or CysLTR1. Studies in an animal model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis revealed that treatment with montelukast alleviated disease symptoms and inhibited the recruitment of Th17 cells to the central nervous system. Thus, leukotrienes may act as chemoattractants for Th17 cells.

  11. Knockdown of SVCT2 impairs in-vitro cell attachment, migration and wound healing in bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Sangani, Rajnikumar; Pandya, Chirayu D; Bhattacharyya, Maryka H; Periyasamy-Thandavan, Sudharsan; Chutkan, Norman; Markand, Shanu; Hill, William D; Hamrick, Mark; Isales, Carlos; Fulzele, Sadanand

    2014-03-01

    Bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) adhesion and migration are fundamental to a number of pathophysiologic processes, including fracture and wound healing. Vitamin C is beneficial for bone formation, fracture repair and wound healing. However, the role of the vitamin C transporter in BMSC adhesion, migration and wound healing is not known. In this study, we knocked-down the sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter, SVCT2, the only known transporter of vitamin C in BMSCs, and performed cell adhesion, migration, in-vitro scratch wound healing and F-actin re-arrangement studies. We also investigated the role of oxidative stress on the above processes. Our results demonstrate that both oxidative stress and down-regulation of SVCT2 decreased cell attachment and spreading. A trans-well cell migration assay showed that vitamin C helped in BMSC migration and that knockdown of SVCT2 decreased cell migration. In the in-vitro scratch wound healing studies, we established that oxidative stress dose-dependently impairs wound healing. Furthermore, the supplementation of vitamin C significantly rescued the BMSCs from oxidative stress and increased wound closing. The knockdown of SVCT2 in BMSCs strikingly decreased wound healing, and supplementing with vitamin C failed to rescue cells efficiently. The knockdown of SVCT2 and induction of oxidative stress in cells produced an alteration in cytoskeletal dynamics. Signaling studies showed that oxidative stress phosphorylated members of the MAP kinase family (p38) and that vitamin C inhibited their phosphorylation. Taken together, these results indicate that both the SVCT2 transporter and oxidative stress play a vital role in BMSC attachment, migration and cytoskeletal re-arrangement. BMSC-based cell therapy and modulation of SVCT2 could lead to a novel therapeutic approach that enhances bone remodeling, fracture repair and wound healing in chronic disease conditions.

  12. Fibrin glue inhibits migration of ocular surface epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yeung, A M; Faraj, L A; McIntosh, O D; Dhillon, V K; Dua, H S

    2016-10-01

    PurposeFibrin glue has been used successfully in numerous ophthalmic surgical procedures. Recently, fibrin glue has been used in limbal stem cell transplantation to reduce both operative time and to negate the need for sutures. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of fibrin glue on epithelial cell migration in vitro.MethodsCorneoscleral rims were split to retain the epithelial layer, Bowman's layer, and anterior stroma. Rims were cut into eight equal-sized pieces and were placed directly on culture plates or affixed with fibrin glue. Rims were maintained in culture for 25 days and epithelial cell growth was monitored. Cells were photographed to measure area or growth and immunofluorescence staining of explants for fibrin was performed.ResultsExplants that were glued demonstrated significantly delayed epithelial cell growth and migration as compared with explants without glue. By day 16, all fibrin glue had dissolved and coincided with onset of cell growth from glued explants. Cell growth commenced between days 3 and 4 for control explants without glue and around days 14-16 for explants with fibrin glue.ConclusionsFibrin glue delays epithelial cell migration by acting as a physical barrier and can potentially interfere with explant-derived limbal epithelial cell migration on to the corneal surface. We propose that glue should be used to attach the conjunctival frill of the limbal explant but care should be taken to ensure that the glue does not wrap around the explant if used to secure the explant as well. Strategic use of glue, to attach the recessed conjunctiva, can be advantageous in delaying conjunctival cell migration and reducing the need for sequential sector conjunctival epitheliectomy.

  13. Multidisciplinary approaches to understanding collective cell migration in developmental biology

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Linus J.; Kulesa, Paul M.; McLennan, Rebecca; Baker, Ruth E.; Maini, Philip K.

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical models are becoming increasingly integrated with experimental efforts in the study of biological systems. Collective cell migration in developmental biology is a particularly fruitful application area for the development of theoretical models to predict the behaviour of complex multicellular systems with many interacting parts. In this context, mathematical models provide a tool to assess the consistency of experimental observations with testable mechanistic hypotheses. In this review, we showcase examples from recent years of multidisciplinary investigations of neural crest cell migration. The neural crest model system has been used to study how collective migration of cell populations is shaped by cell–cell interactions, cell–environmental interactions and heterogeneity between cells. The wide range of emergent behaviours exhibited by neural crest cells in different embryonal locations and in different organisms helps us chart out the spectrum of collective cell migration. At the same time, this diversity in migratory characteristics highlights the need to reconcile or unify the array of currently hypothesized mechanisms through the next generation of experimental data and generalized theoretical descriptions. PMID:27278647

  14. Collisions of deformable cells lead to collective migration

    SciTech Connect

    Löber, Jakob; Ziebert, Falko; Aranson, Igor S.

    2015-03-17

    Collective migration of eukaryotic cells plays a fundamental role in tissue growth, wound healing and immune response. The motion, arising spontaneously or in response to chemical and mechanical stimuli, is also important for understanding life-threatening pathologies, such as cancer and metastasis formation. We present a phase-field model to describe the movement of many self-organized, interacting cells. The model takes into account the main mechanisms of cell motility – acto-myosin dynamics, as well as substrate-mediated and cell-cell adhesion. It predicts that collective cell migration emerges spontaneously as a result of inelastic collisions between neighboring cells: collisions lead to a mutual alignment of the cell velocities and to the formation of coherently-moving multi-cellular clusters. Small cell-to-cell adhesion, in turn, reduces the propensity for large-scale collective migration, while higher adhesion leads to the formation of moving bands. Our study provides valuable insight into biological processes associated with collective cell motility.

  15. Collisions of deformable cells lead to collective migration

    DOE PAGES

    Löber, Jakob; Ziebert, Falko; Aranson, Igor S.

    2015-03-17

    Collective migration of eukaryotic cells plays a fundamental role in tissue growth, wound healing and immune response. The motion, arising spontaneously or in response to chemical and mechanical stimuli, is also important for understanding life-threatening pathologies, such as cancer and metastasis formation. We present a phase-field model to describe the movement of many self-organized, interacting cells. The model takes into account the main mechanisms of cell motility – acto-myosin dynamics, as well as substrate-mediated and cell-cell adhesion. It predicts that collective cell migration emerges spontaneously as a result of inelastic collisions between neighboring cells: collisions lead to a mutual alignmentmore » of the cell velocities and to the formation of coherently-moving multi-cellular clusters. Small cell-to-cell adhesion, in turn, reduces the propensity for large-scale collective migration, while higher adhesion leads to the formation of moving bands. Our study provides valuable insight into biological processes associated with collective cell motility.« less

  16. Migration and invasion of drug-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells are dependent on mitochondrial activity

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Ji Hoon; Kim, Dong Keon; Shin, Youngmi; Kim, Hee Yeon; Song, Bomin; Lee, Eun Young; Kim, Jong Kwang; You, Hye Jin; Cheong, Heesun; Shin, Dong Hoon; Kim, Seong-Tae; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Kim, Soo Youl; Jang, Hyonchol

    2016-01-01

    A small proportion of cancer cells have stem-cell-like properties, are resistant to standard therapy and are associated with a poor prognosis. The metabolism of such drug-resistant cells differs from that of nearby non-resistant cells. In this study, the metabolism of drug-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells was investigated. The expression of genes associated with oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondrial membrane was negatively correlated with the prognosis of lung adenocarcinoma. Because the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) reflects the functional status of mitochondria and metastasis is the principal cause of death due to cancer, the relationship between MMP and metastasis was evaluated. Cells with a higher MMP exhibited greater migration and invasion than those with a lower MMP. Cells that survived treatment with cisplatin, a standard chemotherapeutic drug for lung adenocarcinoma, exhibited increased MMP and enhanced migration and invasion compared with parental cells. Consistent with these findings, inhibition of mitochondrial activity significantly impeded the migration and invasion of cisplatin-resistant cells. RNA-sequencing analysis indicated that the expression of mitochondrial complex genes was upregulated in cisplatin-resistant cells. These results suggested that drug-resistant cells have a greater MMP and that inhibition of mitochondrial activity could be used to prevent metastasis of drug-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells. PMID:27932791

  17. Modeling keratinocyte wound healing dynamics: Cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained collective migration.

    PubMed

    Nardini, John T; Chapnick, Douglas A; Liu, Xuedong; Bortz, David M

    2016-07-07

    The in vitro migration of keratinocyte cell sheets displays behavioral and biochemical similarities to the in vivo wound healing response of keratinocytes in animal model systems. In both cases, ligand-dependent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activation is sufficient to elicit collective cell migration into the wound. Previous mathematical modeling studies of in vitro wound healing assays assume that physical connections between cells have a hindering effect on cell migration, but biological literature suggests a more complicated story. By combining mathematical modeling and experimental observations of collectively migrating sheets of keratinocytes, we investigate the role of cell-cell adhesion during in vitro keratinocyte wound healing assays. We develop and compare two nonlinear diffusion models of the wound healing process in which cell-cell adhesion either hinders or promotes migration. Both models can accurately fit the leading edge propagation of cell sheets during wound healing when using a time-dependent rate of cell-cell adhesion strength. The model that assumes a positive role of cell-cell adhesion on migration, however, is robust to changes in the leading edge definition and yields a qualitatively accurate density profile. Using RNAi for the critical adherens junction protein, α-catenin, we demonstrate that cell sheets with wild type cell-cell adhesion expression maintain migration into the wound longer than cell sheets with decreased cell-cell adhesion expression, which fails to exhibit collective migration. Our modeling and experimental data thus suggest that cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained migration as cells pull neighboring cells into the wound during wound healing.

  18. Single-cell Migration Chip for Chemotaxis-based Microfluidic Selection of Heterogeneous Cell Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Allen, Steven G.; Ingram, Patrick N.; Buckanovich, Ronald; Merajver, Sofia D.; Yoon, Euisik

    2015-05-01

    Tumor cell migration toward and intravasation into capillaries is an early and key event in cancer metastasis, yet not all cancer cells are imbued with the same capability to do so. This heterogeneity within a tumor is a fundamental property of cancer. Tools to help us understand what molecular characteristics allow a certain subpopulation of cells to spread from the primary tumor are thus critical for overcoming metastasis. Conventional in vitro migration platforms treat populations in aggregate, which leads to a masking of intrinsic differences among cells. Some migration assays reported recently have single-cell resolution, but these platforms do not provide for selective retrieval of the distinct migrating and non-migrating cell populations for further analysis. Thus, to study the intrinsic differences in cells responsible for chemotactic heterogeneity, we developed a single-cell migration platform so that individual cells’ migration behavior can be studied and the heterogeneous population sorted based upon chemotactic phenotype. Furthermore, after migration, the highly chemotactic and non-chemotactic cells were retrieved and proved viable for later molecular analysis of their differences. Moreover, we modified the migration channel to resemble lymphatic capillaries to better understand how certain cancer cells are able to move through geometrically confining spaces.

  19. Immune complexes stimulate CCR7-dependent dendritic cell migration to lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Clatworthy, Menna R.; Aronin, Caren E. Petrie; Mathews, Rebeccah J.; Morgan, Nicole; Smith, Kenneth G.C.; Germain, Ronald N.

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are critical for defence against a variety of microbes but may also be pathogenic in some autoimmune diseases. Many effector functions of antibody are mediated by Fcγ receptors (FcγRs), which are found on most immune cells, including dendritic cells (DCs). DCs are important antigen presenting cells and play a central role in inducing antigen-specific tolerance or immunity1,2. Following antigen acquisition in peripheral tissues, DCs migrate to draining lymph nodes via lymphatics to present antigen to T cells. In this study we demonstrate that FcγR engagement by IgG immune complexes (IC) stimulates DC migration from peripheral tissues to the paracortex of draining lymph nodes. In vitro, IC-stimulated murine and human DCs showed enhanced directional migration in a CCL19 gradient and increased CCR7 expression. Using intravital two-photon microscopy, we observed that local administration of IC resulted in dermal DC mobilisation. We confirmed that dermal DC migration to lymph nodes was CCR7-dependent and increased in the absence of the inhibitory receptor, FcγRIIb. These observations have relevance to autoimmunity, because autoantibody-containing serum from mice and humans with SLE also increased dermal DC migration to lymph nodes in vivo, suggesting that this process may occur in lupus, potentially driving the inappropriate localisation of autoantigen-bearing DCs. PMID:25384086

  20. Jin Fu Kang Oral Liquid Inhibits Lymphatic Endothelial Cells Formation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan; Tang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Jin Fu Kang (JFK), an oral liquid prescription of Chinese herbal drugs, has been clinically available for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Lymphangiogenesis is a primary event in the process of cancer development and metastasis, and the formation and migration of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) play a key role in the lymphangiogenesis. To assess the activity of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and the coeffect of SDF-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) on the formation and migration of LECs and clarify the inhibitory effects of JFK on the LECs, the LECs were differentiated from CD34+/VEGFR-3+ endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), and JFK-containing serums were prepared from rats. SDF-1 and VEGF-C both induced the differentiation of CD34+/VEGFR-3+ EPCs towards LECs and enhanced the LECs migration. Couse of SDF-1 and VEGF-C displayed an additive effect on the LECs formation but not on their migration. JFK inhibited the formation and migration of LECs, and the inhibitory effects were most probably via regulation of the SDF-1/CXCR4 and VEGF-C/VEGFR-3 axes. The current finding suggested that JFK might inhibit NSCLC through antilymphangiogenesis and also provided a potential to discover antilymphangiogenesis agents from natural resources. PMID:27698675

  1. Cell migration is regulated by AGE-RAGE interaction in human oral cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ko, Shun-Yao; Ko, Hshin-An; Shieh, Tzong-Ming; Chang, Weng-Cheng; Chen, Hong-I; Chang, Shu-Shing; Lin, I-Hsuan

    2014-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are produced in an irreversible non-enzymatic reaction of carbohydrates and proteins. Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) are known to have elevated AGE levels, which is viewed as a risk factor of diabetes-related complications. In a clinical setting, it has been shown that patients with oral cancer in conjunction with DM have a higher likelihood of cancer metastasis and lower cancer survival rates. AGE-RAGE (a receptor of AGEs) is also correlated with metastasis and angiogenesis. Recent studies have suggested that the malignancy of cancer may be enhanced by glyceraldehyde-derived AGEs; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study examined the apparently close correlation between AGE-RAGE and the malignancy of SAS oral cancer cell line. In this study, AGEs increased ERK phosphorylation, enhanced cell migration, and promoted the expression of RAGE, MMP2, and MMP9. Using PD98059, RAGE antibody, and RAGE RNAi to block RAGE pathway resulted in the inhibition of ERK phosphorylation. Cell migration, MMP2 and MMP9 expression were also reduced by this treatment. Our findings demonstrate the importance of AGE-RAGE with regard to the malignancy of oral cancer, and help to explain the poor prognosis of DM subjects with oral cancer.

  2. Electrolytic cell stack with molten electrolyte migration control

    DOEpatents

    Kunz, H.R.; Guthrie, R.J.; Katz, M.

    1987-03-17

    An electrolytic cell stack includes inactive electrolyte reservoirs at the upper and lower end portions thereof. The reservoirs are separated from the stack of the complete cells by impermeable, electrically conductive separators. Reservoirs at the negative end are initially low in electrolyte and the reservoirs at the positive end are high in electrolyte fill. During stack operation electrolyte migration from the positive to the negative end will be offset by the inactive reservoir capacity. In combination with the inactive reservoirs, a sealing member of high porosity and low electrolyte retention is employed to limit the electrolyte migration rate. 5 figs.

  3. Electrolytic cell stack with molten electrolyte migration control

    DOEpatents

    Kunz, H. Russell; Guthrie, Robin J.; Katz, Murray

    1988-08-02

    An electrolytic cell stack includes inactive electrolyte reservoirs at the upper and lower end portions thereof. The reservoirs are separated from the stack of the complete cells by impermeable, electrically conductive separators. Reservoirs at the negative end are initially low in electrolyte and the reservoirs at the positive end are high in electrolyte fill. During stack operation electrolyte migration from the positive to the negative end will be offset by the inactive reservoir capacity. In combination with the inactive reservoirs, a sealing member of high porosity and low electrolyte retention is employed to limit the electrolyte migration rate.

  4. Adhesion and migration of cells responding to microtopography.

    PubMed

    Estévez, Maruxa; Martínez, Elena; Yarwood, Stephen J; Dalby, Matthew J; Samitier, Josep

    2015-05-01

    It is known that cells respond strongly to microtopography. However, cellular mechanisms of response are unclear. Here, we study wild-type fibroblasts responding to 25 µm(2) posts and compare their response to that of FAK(-/-) fibroblasts and fibroblasts with PMA treatment to stimulate protein kinase C (PKC) and the small g-protein Rac. FAK knockout cells modulated adhesion number and size in a similar way to cells on topography; that is, they used more, smaller adhesions, but migration was almost completely stalled demonstrating the importance of FAK signaling in contact guidance and adhesion turnover. Little similarity, however, was observed to PKC stimulated cells and cells on the topography. Interestingly, with PKC stimulation the cell nuclei became highly deformable bringing focus on these surfaces to the study of metastasis. Surfaces that aid the study of cellular migration are important in developing understanding of mechanisms of wound healing and repair in aligned tissues such as ligament and tendon.

  5. Cell surface syndecan-1 contributes to binding and function of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) on epithelial tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Pasqualon, Tobias; Lue, Hongqi; Groening, Sabine; Pruessmeyer, Jessica; Jahr, Holger; Denecke, Bernd; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Ludwig, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Surface expressed proteoglycans mediate the binding of cytokines and chemokines to the cell surface and promote migration of various tumor cell types including epithelial tumor cells. We here demonstrate that binding of the chemokine-like inflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) to epithelial lung and breast tumor cell lines A549 and MDA-MB231 is sensitive to enzymatic digestion of heparan sulphate chains and competitive inhibition with heparin. Moreover, MIF interaction with heparin was confirmed by chromatography and a structural comparison indicated a possible heparin binding site. These results suggested that proteoglycans carrying heparan sulphate chains are involved in MIF binding. Using shRNA-mediated gene silencing, we identified syndecan-1 as the predominant proteoglycan required for the interaction with MIF. MIF binding was decreased by induction of proteolytic shedding of syndecan-1, which could be prevented by inhibition of the metalloproteinases involved in this process. Finally, MIF induced the chemotactic migration of A549 cells, wound closure and invasion into matrigel without affecting cell proliferation. These MIF-induced responses were abrogated by heparin or by silencing of syndecan-1. Thus, our study indicates that syndecan-1 on epithelial tumor cells promotes MIF binding and MIF-mediated cell migration. This may represent a relevant mechanism through which MIF enhances tumor cell motility and metastasis.

  6. Invasive breast carcinoma cells from patients exhibit MenaINV- and macrophage-dependent transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Pignatelli, Jeanine; Goswami, Sumanta; Jones, Joan G; Rohan, Thomas E; Pieri, Evan; Chen, Xiaoming; Adler, Esther; Cox, Dianne; Maleki, Sara; Bresnick, Anne; Gertler, Frank B; Condeelis, John S; Oktay, Maja H

    2014-11-25

    Metastasis is a complex, multistep process of cancer progression that has few treatment options. A critical event is the invasion of cancer cells into blood vessels (intravasation), through which cancer cells disseminate to distant organs. Breast cancer cells with increased abundance of Mena [an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-responsive cell migration protein] are present with macrophages at sites of intravasation, called TMEM sites (for tumor microenvironment of metastasis), in patient tumor samples. Furthermore, the density of these intravasation sites correlates with metastatic risk in patients. We found that intravasation of breast cancer cells may be prevented by blocking the signaling between cancer cells and macrophages. We obtained invasive breast ductal carcinoma cells of various subtypes by fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsies from patients and found that, in an in vitro transendothelial migration assay, cells that migrated through a layer of human endothelial cells were enriched for the transcript encoding Mena(INV), an invasive isoform of Mena. This enhanced transendothelial migration required macrophages and occurred with all of the breast cancer subtypes. Using mouse macrophages and the human cancer cells from the FNAs, we identified paracrine and autocrine activation of colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R). The paracrine or autocrine nature of the signal depended on the breast cancer cell subtype. Knocking down Mena(INV) or adding an antibody that blocks CSF-1R function prevented transendothelial migration. Our findings indicate that Mena(INV) and TMEM frequency are correlated prognostic markers and CSF-1 and Mena(INV) may be therapeutic targets to prevent metastasis of multiple breast cancer subtypes.

  7. Study of dendritic cell migration using micro-fabrication.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Pablo; Chabaud, Mélanie; Thiam, Hawa-Racine; Lankar, Danielle; Piel, Matthieu; Lennon-Dumenil, Ana-Maria

    2016-05-01

    Cell migration is a hallmark of dendritic cells (DCs) function. It is needed for DCs to scan their environment in search for antigens as well as to reach lymphatic organs in order to trigger T lymphocyte's activation. Such interaction leads to tolerance in the case of DCs migrating under homeostatic conditions or to immunity in the case of DCs migrating upon encounter with pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Cell migration is therefore essential for DCs to transfer information from peripheral tissues to lymphoid organs, thereby linking innate to adaptive immunity. This stresses the need to unravel the molecular mechanisms involved. However, the tremendous complexity of the tissue microenvironment as well as the limited spatio-temporal resolution of in vivo imaging techniques has made this task difficult. To bypass this problem, we have developed microfabrication-based experimental tools that are compatible with high-resolution imaging. Here, we will discuss how such devices can be used to study DC migration under controlled conditions that mimic their physiological environment in a robust quantitative manner.

  8. Intravital characterization of tumor cell migration in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beerling, Evelyne; Oosterom, Ilse; Voest, Emile; Lolkema, Martijn; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Curing pancreatic cancer is difficult as metastases often determine the poor clinical outcome. To gain more insight into the metastatic behavior of pancreatic cancer cells, we characterized migratory cells in primary pancreatic tumors using intravital microscopy. We visualized the migratory behavior of primary tumor cells of a genetically engineered pancreatic cancer mouse model and found that pancreatic tumor cells migrate with a mesenchymal morphology as single individual cells or collectively as a stream of non-cohesive single motile cells. These findings may improve our ability to conceive treatments that block metastatic behavior. PMID:28243522

  9. Uveal melanoma cells utilize a novel route for transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Onken, Michael D; Li, Jinmei; Cooper, John A

    2014-01-01

    Uveal melanoma arises in the eye, and it spreads to distant organs in almost half of patients, leading to a fatal outcome. To metastasize, uveal melanoma cells must transmigrate into and out of the microvasculature, crossing the monolayer of endothelial cells that separates the vessel lumen from surrounding tissues. We investigated how human uveal melanoma cells cross the endothelial cell monolayer, using a cultured cell system with primary human endothelial cell monolayers on hydrogel substrates. We found that uveal melanoma cells transmigrate by a novel and unexpected mechanism. Uveal melanoma cells intercalate into the endothelial cell monolayer and flatten out, assuming a shape and geometry similar to those of endothelial cells in the monolayer. After an extended period of time in the intercalated state, the uveal melanoma cells round up and migrate underneath the monolayer. VCAM is present on endothelial cells, and anti-VCAM antibodies slowed the process of intercalation. Depletion of BAP1, a known suppressor of metastasis in patients, increased the amount of transmigration of uveal melanoma cells in transwell assays; but BAP1 depletion did not affect the rate of intercalation, based on movies of living cells. Our results reveal a novel route of transendothelial migration for uveal melanoma cells, and they provide insight into the mechanism by which loss of BAP1 promotes metastasis.

  10. Designer self-assembling hydrogel scaffolds can impact skin cell proliferation and migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Michael; Ho, Diwei; Fear, Mark W.; Gelain, Fabrizio; Wood, Fiona M.; Iyer, K. Swaminathan

    2014-11-01

    There is a need to develop economical, efficient and widely available therapeutic approaches to enhance the rate of skin wound healing. The optimal outcome of wound healing is restoration to the pre-wound quality of health. In this study we investigate the cellular response to biological stimuli using functionalized nanofibers from the self-assembling peptide, RADA16. We demonstrate that adding different functional motifs to the RADA16 base peptide can influence the rate of proliferation and migration of keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts. Relative to unmodified RADA16; the Collagen I motif significantly promotes cell migration, and reduces proliferation.

  11. A lateral signalling pathway coordinates shape volatility during cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Luga, Valbona; Armitage, Sarah K.; Musiol, Martin; Won, Amy; Yip, Christopher M.; Plotnikov, Sergey V.; Wrana, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental for both physiological and pathological processes. Migrating cells usually display high dynamics in morphology, which is orchestrated by an integrative array of signalling pathways. Here we identify a novel pathway, we term lateral signalling, comprised of the planar cell polarity (PCP) protein Pk1 and the RhoGAPs, Arhgap21/23. We show that the Pk1–Arhgap21/23 complex inhibits RhoA, is localized on the non-protrusive lateral membrane cortex and its disruption leads to the disorganization of the actomyosin network and altered focal adhesion dynamics. Pk1-mediated lateral signalling confines protrusive activity and is regulated by Smurf2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase in the PCP pathway. Furthermore, we demonstrate that dynamic interplay between lateral and protrusive signalling generates cyclical fluctuations in cell shape that we quantify here as shape volatility, which strongly correlates with migration speed. These studies uncover a previously unrecognized lateral signalling pathway that coordinates shape volatility during productive cell migration. PMID:27226243

  12. Optimal chemotaxis in intermittent migration of animal cells.

    PubMed

    Romanczuk, P; Salbreux, G

    2015-04-01

    Animal cells can sense chemical gradients without moving and are faced with the challenge of migrating towards a target despite noisy information on the target position. Here we discuss optimal search strategies for a chaser that moves by switching between two phases of motion ("run" and "tumble"), reorienting itself towards the target during tumble phases, and performing persistent migration during run phases. We show that the chaser average run time can be adjusted to minimize the target catching time or the spatial dispersion of the chasers. We obtain analytical results for the catching time and for the spatial dispersion in the limits of small and large ratios of run time to tumble time and scaling laws for the optimal run times. Our findings have implications for optimal chemotactic strategies in animal cell migration.

  13. Optimal chemotaxis in intermittent migration of animal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanczuk, P.; Salbreux, G.

    2015-04-01

    Animal cells can sense chemical gradients without moving and are faced with the challenge of migrating towards a target despite noisy information on the target position. Here we discuss optimal search strategies for a chaser that moves by switching between two phases of motion ("run" and "tumble"), reorienting itself towards the target during tumble phases, and performing persistent migration during run phases. We show that the chaser average run time can be adjusted to minimize the target catching time or the spatial dispersion of the chasers. We obtain analytical results for the catching time and for the spatial dispersion in the limits of small and large ratios of run time to tumble time and scaling laws for the optimal run times. Our findings have implications for optimal chemotactic strategies in animal cell migration.

  14. Surface topography during neural stem cell differentiation regulates cell migration and cell morphology.

    PubMed

    Czeisler, Catherine; Short, Aaron; Nelson, Tyler; Gygli, Patrick; Ortiz, Cristina; Catacutan, Fay Patsy; Stocker, Ben; Cronin, James; Lannutti, John; Winter, Jessica; Otero, José Javier

    2016-12-01

    We sought to determine the contribution of scaffold topography to the migration and morphology of neural stem cells by mimicking anatomical features of scaffolds found in vivo. We mimicked two types of central nervous system scaffolds encountered by neural stem cells during development in vitro by constructing different diameter electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) fiber mats, a substrate that we have shown to be topographically similar to brain scaffolds. We compared the effects of large fibers (made to mimic blood vessel topography) with those of small-diameter fibers (made to mimic radial glial process topography) on the migration and differentiation of neural stem cells. Neural stem cells showed differential migratory and morphological reactions with laminin in different topographical contexts. We demonstrate, for the first time, that neural stem cell biological responses to laminin are dependent on topographical context. Large-fiber topography without laminin prevented cell migration, which was partially reversed by treatment with rock inhibitor. Cell morphology complexity assayed by fractal dimension was inhibited in nocodazole- and cytochalasin-D-treated neural precursor cells in large-fiber topography, but was not changed in small-fiber topography with these inhibitors. These data indicate that cell morphology has different requirements on cytoskeletal proteins dependent on the topographical environment encountered by the cell. We propose that the physical structure of distinct scaffolds induces unique signaling cascades that regulate migration and morphology in embryonic neural precursor cells. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3485-3502, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Stimulus-dependent dissociation between XB130 and Tks5 scaffold proteins promotes airway epithelial cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Moodley, Serisha; Derouet, Mathieu; Bai, Xiao Hui; Xu, Feng; Kapus, Andras; Yang, Burton B.; Liu, Mingyao

    2016-01-01

    Repair of airway epithelium after injury requires migration of neighboring epithelial cells to injured areas. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating airway epithelial cell migration is not well defined. We have previously shown that XB130, a scaffold protein, is required for airway epithelial repair and regeneration in vivo, and interaction between XB130 and another scaffold protein, Tks5, regulates cell proliferation and survival in human bronchial epithelial cells. The objective of the present study was to determine the role of XB130 and Tks5 interaction in airway epithelial cell migration. Interestingly, we found that XB130 only promotes lateral cell migration, whereas, Tks5 promotes cell migration/invasion via proteolysis of extracellular matrix. Upon stimulation with EGF, PKC activator phorbol 12, 13-dibutyrate or a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligand, XB130 and Tks5 translocated to the cell membrane in a stimulus-dependent manner. The translocation and distribution of XB130 is similar to lamellipodial marker, WAVE2; whereas Tks5 is similar to podosome marker, N-WASP. Over-expression of XB130 or Tks5 alone enhances cell migration, whereas co-expression of both XB130 and Tks5 inhibits cell migration processes and signaling. Furthermore, XB130 interacts with Rac1 whereas Tks5 interacts with Cdc42 to promote Rho GTPase activity. Our results suggest that dissociation between XB130 and Tks5 may facilitate lateral cell migration via XB130/Rac1, and vertical cell migration via Tks5/Cdc42. These molecular mechanisms will help our understanding of airway epithelial repair and regeneration. PMID:27835612

  16. Stretching Fibroblasts Remodels Fibronectin and Alters Cancer Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Mingfang; Brewer, Bryson M.; Yang, Lijie; Franco Coronel, Omar E.; Hayward, Simon W.; Webb, Donna J.; Li, Deyu

    2015-02-01

    Most investigations of cancer-stroma interactions have focused on biochemical signaling effects, with much less attention being paid to biophysical factors. In this study, we investigated the role of mechanical stimuli on human prostatic fibroblasts using a microfluidic platform that was adapted for our experiments and further developed for both repeatable performance among multiple assays and for compatibility with high-resolution confocal microscopy. Results show that mechanical stretching of normal tissue-associated fibroblasts (NAFs) alters the structure of secreted fibronectin. Specifically, unstretched NAFs deposit and assemble fibronectin in a random, mesh-like arrangement, while stretched NAFs produce matrix with a more organized, linearly aligned structure. Moreover, the stretched NAFs exhibited an enhanced capability for directing co-cultured cancer cell migration in a persistent manner. Furthermore, we show that stretching NAFs triggers complex biochemical signaling events through the observation of increased expression of platelet derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα). A comparison of these behaviors with those of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) indicates that the observed phenotypes of stretched NAFs are similar to those associated with CAFs, suggesting that mechanical stress is a critical factor in NAF activation and CAF genesis.

  17. Exit Strategies: S1P Signaling and T Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Baeyens, Audrey; Fang, Victoria; Chen, Cynthia; Schwab, Susan R

    2015-12-01

    Whereas the role of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) in T cell egress and the regulation of S1P gradients between lymphoid organs and circulatory fluids in homeostasis are increasingly well understood, much remains to be learned about S1P signaling and distribution during an immune response. Recent data suggest that the role of S1PR1 in directing cells from tissues into circulatory fluids is reprised again and again, particularly in guiding activated T cells from non-lymphoid tissues into lymphatics. Conversely, S1P receptor 2 (S1PR2), which antagonizes migration towards chemokines, confines cells within tissues. Here we review the current understanding of the roles of S1P signaling in activated T cell migration. In this context, we outline open questions, particularly regarding the shape of S1P gradients in different tissues in homeostasis and inflammation, and discuss recent strategies to measure S1P.

  18. The MRL proteins: adapting cell adhesion, migration and growth.

    PubMed

    Coló, Georgina P; Lafuente, Esther M; Teixidó, Joaquin

    2012-01-01

    MIG-10, RIAM and Lamellipodin (Lpd) are the founding members of the MRL family of multi-adaptor molecules. These proteins have common domain structures but display distinct functions in cell migration and adhesion, signaling, and in cell growth. The binding of RIAM with active Rap1 and with talin provides these MRL molecules with important regulatory roles on integrin-mediated cell adhesion and migration. Furthermore, RIAM and Lpd can regulate actin dynamics through their binding to actin regulatory Ena/VASP proteins. Recent data generated with the Drosophila MRL ortholog called Pico and with RIAM in melanoma cells indicate that these proteins can also regulate cell growth. As MRL proteins represent a relatively new family, many questions on their structure-function relationships remain unanswered, including regulation of their expression, post-translational modifications, new interactions, involvement in signaling and their knockout mice phenotype.

  19. S1P differentially regulates migration of human ovarian cancer and human ovarian surface epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongmei; Zhao, Zhenwen; Caperell-Grant, Andrea; Yang, Gong; Mok, Samuel C.; Liu, Jinsong; Bigsby, Robert M.; Xu, Yan

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) arises from the epithelial layer covering the surface of ovaries and intra-peritoneal metastasis is commonly observed at diagnosis. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive lipid signaling molecule, is potentially involved in EOC tumorigenesis. We have found that S1P is elevated in human EOC ascites. We show that physiologically relevant concentrations of S1P stimulate migration and invasion of EOC cells, but inhibit migration of human ovarian surface epithelial (HOSE) cells. In addition, S1P inhibits lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced cell migration in HOSE, but not in EOC cells. We have provided the first line of evidence that the expression levels of S1P receptor subtypes are not the only determinants for how cells respond to S1P. Even though S1P1 is expressed and functional in HOSE cells, the inhibitory effect mediated by S1P2 is dominant in those cells. The cellular pre-existing stress fibers are also important determinants for the migratory response to S1P. Differential S1P-induced morphology changes are noted in EOC and HOSE cells. Pre-existing stress fibers in HOSE cells are further enhanced by S1P treatment, resulting in the negative migratory response to S1P. By contrast, EOC cells lost stress fibers and S1P treatment induces filopodium-like structures at cell edges, which correlates with increased cell motility. In addition, inhibition of the protein kinase C pathway is likely to be involved in the inhibitory effect of S1P on LPA-induced cell migration in HOSE cells. These findings are important for the development of new therapeutics targeting S1P and LPA in EOC. PMID:18645009

  20. Genistein affects proliferation and migration of bovine oviductal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    García, Daniela C; Valdecantos, Pablo A; Miceli, Dora C; Roldán-Olarte, Mariela

    2017-03-08

    Genistein is one of the most abundant isoflavones in soybean. This molecule induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in different normal and cancer cells. Genistein has been of considerable interest due to its adverse effects on bovine reproduction, altering estrous cycle, implantation and fetal development and producing subfertility or infertility. The objective of this work was to study the effects of genistein on the expression of selected genes involved in the regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis. Primary cultures of bovine oviductal epithelial cells (BOEC) were treated with different genistein concentrations (0.2, 2 and 10μM) to analyze CYCLIN B1, BCL-2 and BAX gene expression by Real-time RT-PCR. Results showed that genistein down-regulated CYCLIN B1 expression, affecting cell cycle progression, and caused a decrease in the BCL-2/BAX ratio starting at 2μM of genistein. In addition, in order to determine if genistein affects BOEC migration, in vitro wound healing assays were performed. A significant reduction in cell migration after 12h of culture was observed at both 0.2 and 10μM genistein concentrations. Also, in the presence of genistein the percentage of mitotic cells decreased, although apoptotic cells percentages were not affected. These findings indicate that genistein has an inhibitory effect on BOEC proliferation and migration, suggesting that it could influence the normal physiology of the oviductal epithelium.

  1. Quantification of hydrodynamic factors influencing cell lateral migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nix, Stephanie; Imai, Yohsuke; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2015-11-01

    The study of the migration of blood cells perpendicular to the direction of blood flow, or lateral migration, is motivated by the differing behavior of the various types of blood cells. In vivo, red blood cells are observed to flow in the central region of the blood vessel, particularly in the microcirculation, while other types of cells in the blood, including white blood cells and platelets, are observed to flow disproportionately near the vessel wall. However, the specifics regarding the effect of hydrodynamic and biological factors are still unknown. Thus, in this study, we aim to quantify the effect of hydrodynamic factors on a cell model numerically using the boundary integral method. By using the boundary integral method, we can isolate the effect of a single hydrodynamic factor, such as a wall or given flow distribution, in an otherwise infinite flow. Then, we can use the obtained numerical results to develop a semi-analytical model describing the cell lateral migration dependent on only the flow geometry and the viscosity ratio between the cell and external fluid.

  2. Plectin deficiency in liver cancer cells promotes cell migration and sensitivity to sorafenib treatment.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chiung-Chi; Chao, Wei-Ting; Liao, Chen-Chun; Tseng, Yu-Hui; Lai, Yen-Chang Clark; Lai, Yih-Shyong; Hsu, Yung-Hsiang; Liu, Yi-Hsiang

    2017-02-17

    Plectin involved in activation of kinases in cell signaling pathway and plays important role in cell morphology and migration. Plectin knockdown promotes cell migration by activating focal adhesion kinase and Rac1-GTPase activity in liver cells. Sorafenib is a multi-targeting tyrosine kinase inhibitor that improves patient survival on hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between the expression of plectin and cell migration as well as the sensitivity of hepatoma cell lines exposing to sorafenib. Hepatoma cell lines PLC/PRF/5 and HepG2 were used to examine the level of plectin expression and cell migration in comparison with Chang liver cell line. In addition, sensitivity of the 3 cell lines to sorafenib treatment was also measured. Expression of plectin was lower in PLC/PRF/5 and HepG2 hepatoma cells than that of Chang liver cells whereas HepG2 and PLC/PRF/5 cells exhibit higher rate of cell migration in trans-well migration assay. Immunohistofluorecent staining on E-cadherin revealed the highest rate of collective cell migration in HepG2 cells and the lowest was found in Chang liver cells. Likewise, HepG2 cell line was most sensitive to sorafenib treatment and Chang liver cells exhibited the least sensitivity. The drug sensitivity to sorafenib treatment showed inverse correlation with the expression of plectin. We suggest that plectin deficiency and increased E-cadherin in hepatoma cells were associated with higher rates of cell motility, collective cell migration as well as higher drug sensitivity to sorafenib treatment.

  3. MED28 regulates MEK1-dependent cellular migration in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Yin; Chou, Yu-Hsuan; Hsieh, Nien-Tsu; Chen, Hsin-Hung; Lee, Ming-Fen

    2012-12-01

    MED28, a mammalian Mediator subunit, exhibits several cellular roles, including a merlin, Grb2, and cytoskeleton-associated protein (magicin), a repressor of smooth muscle cell differentiation, and an endothelial-derived gene (EG-1). Overexpression of MED28 may stimulate cell proliferation which presumably results from the transcriptional activation of the Mediator function. Additionally, several tumors, including breast cancer, highly express MED28. We have found recently that MED28 potentiated epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced migration in human breast cancer cells. Therefore, the objective of this study is to identify the role of MED28 in the aspect of cellular migration and invasion in human breast cancer cells. Suppression of MED28 blocked cellular migration and invasion with concomitant reduced expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MAP2K1; MEK1); overexpression of MED28 enhanced cellular migration and upregulated MMP2 and MEK1 expression. Moreover, suppression of MEK1, by dominant-negative, kinase-dead MEK1 cDNA construct or MEK1-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) as well as MEK1 inhibitors, blocked MED28-induced MMP2 activation, cellular migration, and invasion in breast cancer cells. Furthermore, ectopic expression of MEK1 rescued the inhibitory effect of MED28 knockdown on invasion, and exogenous MMP2 recombinant protein recovered the suppression on invasion upon MED28 or MEK1 knockdown. Our data indicate that MED28 regulates cellular migration in a MEK1-dependent manner in human breast cancer cells, reinforcing the important cellular roles of MED28.

  4. Guidance signalling regulates leading edge behaviour during collective cell migration of cardiac cells in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Raza, Qanber; Jacobs, J Roger

    2016-11-15

    Collective cell migration is the coordinated movement of cells, which organize tissues during morphogenesis, repair and some cancers. The motile cell membrane of the advancing front in collective cell migration is termed the Leading Edge. The embryonic development of the vertebrate and Drosophila hearts are both characterized by the coordinated medial migration of a bilateral cluster of mesodermal cells. In Drosophila, the cardioblasts form cohesive bilateral rows that migrate collectively as a unit towards the dorsal midline to form the dorsal vessel. We have characterized the collective cell migration of cardioblasts as an in vivo quantitative model to study the behaviour of the Leading Edge. We investigated whether guidance signalling through Slit and Netrin pathways plays a role in cell migration during heart development. Through time-lapse imaging and quantitative assessment of migratory behaviour of the cardioblasts in loss-of-function mutants, we demonstrate that both Slit and Netrin mediated signals are autonomously and concomitantly required to maximize migration velocity, filopodial and lamellipodial activities. Additionally, we show that another Slit and Netrin receptor, Dscam1, the role of which during heart development was previously unknown, is required for both normal migration of cardioblasts and luminal expansion. Leading edge behaviour analysis revealed a dosage dependent genetic interaction between Slit and Netrin receptors suggesting that downstream signalling through these receptors converge on a common output that increases leading edge activity of the cardioblasts. Finally, we found that guidance signalling maintains the balance between epithelial and mesenchymal characteristics of the migrating cardioblasts.

  5. CalpB modulates border cell migration in Drosophila egg chambers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Calpains are calcium regulated intracellular cysteine proteases implicated in a variety of physiological functions and pathological conditions. The Drosophila melanogaster genome contains only two genes, CalpA and CalpB coding for canonical, active calpain enzymes. The movement of the border cells in Drosophila egg chambers is a well characterized model of the eukaryotic cell migration. Using this genetically pliable model we can investigate the physiological role of calpains in cell motility. Results We demonstrate at the whole organism level that CalpB is implicated in cell migration, while the structurally related CalpA paralog can not fulfill the same function. The downregulation of the CalpB gene by mutations or RNA interference results in a delayed migration of the border cells in Drosophila egg chambers. This phenotype is significantly enhanced when the focal adhesion complex genes encoding for α-PS2 integrin ( if), β-PS integrin ( mys) and talin ( rhea) are silenced. The reduction of CalpB activity diminishes the release of integrins from the rear end of the border cells. The delayed migration and the reduced integrin release phenotypes can be suppressed by expressing wild-type talin-head in the border cells but not talin-headR367A, a mutant form which is not able to bind β-PS integrin. CalpB can cleave talin in vitro, and the two proteins coimmunoprecipitate from Drosophila extracts. Conclusions The physiological function of CalpB in border cell motility has been demonstrated in vivo. The genetic interaction between the CalpB and the if, mys, as well as rhea genes, the involvement of active talin head-domains in the process, and the fact that CalpB and talin interact with each other collectively suggest that the limited proteolytic cleavage of talin is one of the possible mechanisms through which CalpB regulates cell migration. PMID:22827336

  6. Enhanced transverse migration of bacteria by chemotaxis in porous T-sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, T.; Ford, R. M.

    2008-05-01

    Subsurface bioremediation is often hindered by the inability to achieve good mixing between injected bacteria and residual contaminants. Chemotaxis, which is the ability of bacteria to migrate preferentially towards the higher concentration of certain chemical attractants, could potentially increase bacterial transport into the contaminated zone. To observe and quantify this chemotactic enhancement to bacterial dispersion transverse to groundwater flow, a microfluidic device porous T-sensor was created. It allowed two streams of equal flow rate to enter side by side into a porous channel, and the transverse mixing of the two streams were primarily controlled by dispersion. When chemotactic bacteria Escherichia coli HCB1 and chemical attractant methylaspartate were injected as the two incoming streams, enhanced bacterial migration into the attractant stream was observed. In control studies where no attractant was present, such enhanced migration was not observed. This study provided direct visualization of bacterial chemotactic transverse migration in flow through porous media.

  7. Urokinase type plasminogen activator mediates Interleukin-17-induced peripheral blood mesenchymal stem cell motility and transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Krstić, Jelena; Obradović, Hristina; Jauković, Aleksandra; Okić-Đorđević, Ivana; Trivanović, Drenka; Kukolj, Tamara; Mojsilović, Slavko; Ilić, Vesna; Santibañez, Juan F; Bugarski, Diana

    2015-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the potential to migrate toward damaged tissues increasing tissue regeneration. Interleukin-17 (IL-17) is a proinflammatory cytokine with pleiotropic effects associated with many inflammatory diseases. Although IL-17 can modulate MSC functions, its capacity to regulate MSC migration is not well elucidated so far. Here, we studied the role of IL-17 on peripheral blood (PB) derived MSC migration and transmigration across endothelial cells. IL-17 increased PB-MSC migration in a wound healing assay as well as cell mobilization from collagen gel. Concomitantly IL-17 induced the expression of urokinase type plasminogen activator (uPA) without affecting matrix metalloproteinase expression. The incremented uPA expression mediated the capacity of IL-17 to enhance PB-MSC migration in a ERK1,2 MAPK dependent way. Also, IL-17 induced PB-MSC migration alongside with changes in cell polarization and uPA localization in cell protrusions. Moreover, IL-17 increased PB-MSC adhesion to endothelial cells and transendothelial migration, as well as increased the capacity of PB-MSC adhesion to fibronectin, in an uPA-dependent fashion. Therefore, our data suggested that IL-17 may act as chemotropic factor for PB-MSCs by incrementing cell motility and uPA expression during inflammation development.

  8. Microfluidic assay of endothelial cell migration in 3D interpenetrating polymer semi-network HA-Collagen hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Gi Seok; Kwon, Gu Han; Kang, Ah Ran; Jung, Bo Young; Park, Yongdoo; Chung, Seok; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2011-08-01

    Cell migration through the extracellular matrix (ECM) is one of the key features for physiological and pathological processes such as angiogenesis, cancer metastasis, and wound healing. In particular, the quantitative assay of endothelial cell migration under the well-defined three dimensional (3D) microenvironment is important to analyze the angiogenesis mechanism. In this study, we report a microfluidic assay of endothelial cell sprouting and migration into an interpenetrating polymer semi-network HA-Collagen (SIPNs CH) hydrogel as ECM providing an enhanced in vivo mimicking 3D microenvironment to cells. The microfluidic chip could provide a well-controlled gradient of growth factor to cells, whereas the hydrogel could mimic a well-defined 3D microenvironment in vivo. (In addition/Furthermore, the microfluidic chip gives a well-controlled gradient of growth factor to cells) For this reason, three types of hydrogel, composed of semi-interpenetrating networks of collagen and hyaluronic acid were prepared, and firstly we proved the role of the hydrogel in endothelial cell migration. The diffusion property and swelling ratio of the hydrogel were characterized. It modulated the migration of endothelial cells in quantified manner, also being influenced by additional synthesis of Matrix metalloproteinase(MMP)-sensitive remodeling peptides and Arginine-glycine-lycinee (RGD) cell adhesion peptides. We successfully established a novel cell migration platform by changing major determinants such as ECM material under biochemical synthesis and under growth factor gradients in a microfluidic manner.

  9. Cell-Substrate Interactions Feedback to Direct Cell Migration along or against Morphological Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Girish; Ho, Chia-Chi; Co, Carlos C.

    2015-01-01

    In response to external stimuli, cells polarize morphologically into teardrop shapes prior to moving in the direction of their blunt leading edge through lamellipodia extension and retraction of the rear tip. This textbook description of cell migration implies that the initial polarization sets the direction of cell migration. Using microfabrication techniques to control cell morphologies and the direction of migration without gradients, we demonstrate that after polarization, lamelipodia extension and attachment can feedback to change and even reverse the initial morphological polarization. Cells do indeed migrate faster in the direction of their morphologically polarization. However, feedback from subsequent lamellipodia extension and attachment can be so powerful as to induce cells to reverse and migrate against their initial polarization, albeit at a slower speed. Constitutively active mutants of RhoA show that RhoA stimulates cell motility when cells are guided either along or against their initial polarization. Cdc42 activation and inhibition, which results in loss of directional motility during chemotaxis, only reduces the speed of migration without altering the directionality of migration on the micropatterns. These results reveal significant differences between substrate directed cell migration and that induced by chemotactic gradients. PMID:26186588

  10. Endogenous electric fields as guiding cue for cell migration.

    PubMed

    Funk, Richard H W

    2015-01-01

    This review covers two topics: (1) "membrane potential of low magnitude and related electric fields (bioelectricity)" and (2) "cell migration under the guiding cue of electric fields (EF)."Membrane potentials for this "bioelectricity" arise from the segregation of charges by special molecular machines (pumps, transporters, ion channels) situated within the plasma membrane of each cell type (including eukaryotic non-neural animal cells). The arising patterns of ion gradients direct many cell- and molecular biological processes such as embryogenesis, wound healing, regeneration. Furthermore, EF are important as guiding cues for cell migration and are often overriding chemical or topographic cues. In osteoblasts, for instance, the directional information of EF is captured by charged transporters on the cell membrane and transferred into signaling mechanisms that modulate the cytoskeleton and motor proteins. This results in a persistent directional migration along an EF guiding cue. As an outlook, we discuss questions concerning the fluctuation of EF and the frequencies and mapping of the "electric" interior of the cell. Another exciting topic for further research is the modeling of field concepts for such distant, non-chemical cellular interactions.

  11. Testosterone promotes vascular endothelial cell migration via upregulation of ROCK-2/moesin cascade.

    PubMed

    Liao, Weiyong; Huang, Wenjun; Guo, Yanhong; Xin, Min; Fu, Xiaodong

    2013-12-01

    Cross-sectional studies have demonstrated a reverse relationship between serum level of testosterone (T) and the incidence rate of cardiovascular disease in men, indicating that T exerts beneficial effects in cardiovascular system. However, the endothelial effects of T are poorly understood. Actin remodeling is essential for endothelial cell movement and vascular repair and this process is controlled by the actin-binding protein moesin. In the present study, we studied the effects of T on actin remodeling, moesin expression and phosphorylation, as well as cell migration in cultured human umbilical endothelial cells (hUVECs). We found that T provoked the formation of cortical actin complexes and membrane protrusions in endothelial cells. Treatment with T induced dose- and time-dependent increase of moesin expression and phosphorylation, which was inhibited by the addition of androgen receptor antagonist hydroxyflutamide (HF). Moreover, T enhanced ROCK-2 activity. The ROCK-2 inhibitor Y27632 or the transfection of ROCK-2 siRNA largely inhibited T-induced moesin expression and phosphorylation, indicating that ROCK-2 pathway is crucial for these effects. T promoted endothelial cell migration, which was inhibited by the addition of HF or Y27632. In conclusion, T induces actin cytoskeleton remodeling by regulating moesin expression and activation, resulting in enhanced endothelial cell migration. Our work adds new insights into endothelial mechanisms of T, which is relevant for its vascular actions.

  12. Interleukin-4 improves the migration of human myogenic precursor cells in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Lafreniere, J.F.; Mills, P.; Bouchentouf, M.; Tremblay, J.P. . E-mail: Jacques-P.Tremblay@crchul.ulaval.ca

    2006-04-15

    Different molecules are available to recruit new neighboring myogenic cells to the site of regeneration. Formerly called B cell stimulatory factor-1, IL-4 can now be included in the list of motogenic factors. The present report demonstrates that human IL-4 is not required for fusion between mononucleated myoblasts but is required for myotube maturation. In identifying IL-4 as a pro-migratory agent for myogenic cells, these results provide a mechanism which partly explains IL-4 demonstrated activity during differentiation. Among the different mechanisms by which IL-4 might enhance myoblast migration processes, our results indicate that there are implications of some integrins and of three major components of the fibrinolytic system. Indeed, increases in the amount of active urokinase plasminogen activator and its receptor were observed following an IL-4 treatment, while the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 decreased. Finally, IL-4 did not modify the amount of cell surface {alpha}5 integrin but increased the presence of {beta}3 and {beta}1 integrins. This integrin modulation might favor myogenic cell migration and its interaction with newly formed myotubes. Therefore, IL-4 co-injection with transplanted myoblasts might be an approach to enhance the migration of transplanted cells for the treatment of a damaged myocardium or of a Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy patient.

  13. Enhancement of the migrated results with the deblurring filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Li; Takahashi, Kazunori; Sato, Motoyuki

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we introduce a method that uses the deblurring filter to further improve the migrated GPR results. While applying migration to near range radar systems such as GPR, we may suffer from the imaging artifacts or low resolution due to the limited aperture size or coarsely sampled data. In order to solve this problem, least square approach can be applied. It can be presented with the following equations: The forward modelling can be presented as a linear calculation as (1) d = Lm (1) The real inverse processing should be (2) m = L-1d (2) Here d is the acquired GPR data, L is the forward modelling matrix and m is the reflectivity model of the survey area. Since the inverse matrix L-1 PIC is almost impossible to determine, we normally use the simplified method that use the adjoint matrix as the estimation of the inverse matrix. And it is proved that migration is just the adjoint matrix of the forward modelling matrix. Hence the migration processing can be written as (3) m* = LTd (3) The analytic least square solution can be given as (4) m* = (LTL + μI)-1 LTd (4) The least square results give much higher resolution and most of the artifacts can be eliminated. But this method requires extremely large computation so it is not really practical. Here we propose another approach, by combining (1) and (3) we can also get (5) m = (LTL)-1 m* (5) It indicates that we may further improve the migrated results with an inverse filter (LTL)-1. Actually, this is known as the deblurring processing for imaging problem. This deblurring filter is still very difficult to solve for the whole imaging area, but we can use the local filters at different position instead of a whole filter. In order to realize this method, a dictionary needs to be reconstructed correspond to the antenna configuration and the background velocity first. At each local window we put a point scatter in the middle and calculate the forward modelling result and the migrated result of this local window. Then

  14. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induce Directional Migration of Invasive Breast Cancer Cells through TGF-β

    PubMed Central

    McAndrews, Kathleen M.; McGrail, Daniel J.; Ravikumar, Nithin; Dawson, Michelle R.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are recruited to the tumor microenvironment and influence tumor progression; however, how MSCs induce the invasion of cancer cells is not completely understood. Here, we used a 3D coculture model to determine how MSCs affect the migration of invasive breast cancer cells. Coculture with MSCs increases the elongation, directional migration, and traction generation of breast cancer cells. MSC-induced directional migration directly correlates with traction generation and is mediated by transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and the migratory proteins rho-associated kinase, focal adhesion kinase, and matrix metalloproteinases. Treatment with MSC conditioned media or recombinant TGF-β1 elicits a similar migration response to coculture. Taken together, this work suggests TGF-β is secreted by MSCs, leading to force-dependent directional migration of invasive breast cancer cells. These pathways may be potential targets for blocking cancer cell invasion and subsequent metastasis. PMID:26585689

  15. Mapping forces and kinematics during collective cell migration.

    PubMed

    Serra-Picamal, Xavier; Conte, Vito; Sunyer, Raimon; Muñoz, José J; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental biological processes including morphogenesis and tissue repair require cells to migrate collectively. In these processes, epithelial or endothelial cells move in a cooperative manner coupled by intercellular junctions. Ultimately, the movement of these multicellular systems occurs through the generation of cellular forces, exerted either on the substrate via focal adhesions (cell-substrate forces) or on neighboring cells through cell-cell junctions (cell-cell forces). Quantitative measurements of multicellular forces and kinematics with cellular or subcellular resolution have become possible only in recent years. In this chapter, we describe some of these techniques, which include particle image velocimetry to map cell velocities, traction force microscopy to map forces exerted by cells on the substrate, and monolayer stress microscopy to map forces within and between cells. We also describe experimental protocols to perform these measurements. The combination of these techniques with high-resolution imaging tools and molecular perturbations will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying collective cell migration in health and disease.

  16. G protein-coupled receptors stimulation and the control of cell migration.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Mathieu; Claing, Audrey

    2009-07-01

    Cell migration is a fundamental biological process involved in normal physiology. Altered motile phenotypes are however often associated with the development and progression of diseases such as cancer and atherosclerosis. Remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton is required for cell shape changes and is controlled by a broad variety of cellular proteins. Interestingly, several extracellular stimuli can promote actin reorganization and result in enhanced cell migration. Namely, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are activated by factors ranging from small amines, to hormones, and chemokines, initiate signalling cascades resulting in cell shape changes, formation of a migrating front (leading edge) and altered adhesion. GPCRs are heptahelical membrane proteins, which classically transmit signal via the activation of heterotrimeric G proteins. Sustained stimulation leads to the activation of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) and the recruitment of arrestin proteins, which engage alternative signalling pathways. In this review, we will discuss the role of GPCR mediated signal transduction and review their importance in the regulation of actin remodeling leading to cell migration.

  17. Regulation of Cell Migration in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    fluorescence using TRlTC-phalloidin, caveolin and integrin antibodies. Nuclei were counterstained with DAPL Task 2.Determine the effect of Rsu-1 and the IPP...phalloidin. Cells were also costained with TRITC phalloidin and viinculin antibodies. Nuclei were counterstained with DAPl . 5 Task 3. Determine the

  18. USP2 promotes cell migration and invasion in triple negative breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Qu, Qing; Mao, Yan; Xiao, Gang; Fei, Xiaochun; Wang, Jinglong; Zhang, Yuzi; Liu, Junjun; Cheng, Guangcun; Chen, Xiaosong; Wang, Jianhua; Shen, Kunwei

    2015-07-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive subtype of breast cancer that is often associated with a poor prognosis. The aim of our study was to identify biomarkers predictive of TNBC progression. Primary TNBC breast tissue samples including four with metastasis and six without metastasis were subjected to Affymetrix GeneChip® analysis (human genome U133). Ubiquitin-specific protease 2 (USP2) was identified as an upregulated gene in the metastatic group, and its expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 121 primary breast cancers, 13 paired normal tissues, and 13 paired metastatic lesions. Survival analysis was performed using the log-rank test and Cox regression hazard model. Matrigel migration and invasion assays in USP2-silenced and USP2-overexpressed breast cancer cell lines were used to investigate the mechanisms of USP2 in vitro. Positive immunostaining for USP2 was detected in breast tumors and was correlated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) statuses and TNBC subtype. USP2 was overexpressed in distant metastatic lesions compared with primary breast cancers. Survival analyses demonstrated that positive USP2 is a poor prognostic factor for disease-free survival. Silencing of USP2 expression decreased migration and invasion in LM2-4175 and SCP46 cells in association with the downregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) expression, whereas overexpression of USP2 in MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-231 cells enhanced migration and invasion and upregulated the expression of MMP2. The present study showed that USP2 expression is associated with TNBC cell line's invasiveness and poor survival of breast cancer patients and may serve as a prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for TNBC.

  19. DNA aptamers against exon v10 of CD44 inhibit breast cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Iida, Joji; Clancy, Rebecca; Dorchak, Jesse; Somiari, Richard I; Somiari, Stella; Cutler, Mary Lou; Mural, Richard J; Shriver, Craig D

    2014-01-01

    CD44 adhesion molecules are expressed in many breast cancer cells and have been demonstrated to play a key role in regulating malignant phenotypes such as growth, migration, and invasion. CD44 is an integral transmembrane protein encoded by a single 20-exon gene. The diversity of the biological functions of CD44 is the result of the various splicing variants of these exons. Previous studies suggest that exon v10 of CD44 plays a key role in promoting cancer invasion and metastasis, however, the molecular mechanisms are not clear. Given the fact that exon v10 is in the ectodomain of CD44, we hypothesized that CD44 forms a molecular complex with other cell surface molecules through exon v10 in order to promote migration of breast cancer cells. In order to test this hypothesis, we selected DNA aptamers that specifically bound to CD44 exon v10 using Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX). We selected aptamers that inhibited migration of breast cancer cells. Co-immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that EphA2 was co-precipitated with CD44. Pull-down studies demonstrated that recombinant CD44 exon v10 bound to EphA2 and more importantly aptamers that inhibited migration also prevented the binding of EphA2 to exon v10. These results suggest that CD44 forms a molecular complex with EphA2 on the breast cancer cell surface and this complex plays a key role in enhancing breast cancer migration. These results provide insight not only for characterizing mechanisms of breast cancer migration but also for developing target-specific therapy for breast cancers and possibly other cancer types expressing CD44 exon v10.

  20. Live-cell migration and adhesion turnover assays.

    PubMed

    Lacoste, J; Young, K; Brown, Claire M

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy has revolutionized the way live-cell imaging is achieved. At the same time, it is also potentially harmful to a living specimen. Therefore, the specimen must be monitored for viability and health before, during, and after imaging sessions. Methods for monitoring cell viability and health will be discussed in this chapter. Another key to successful live-cell imaging is to minimize light exposure as much as possible. A summary of strategies for minimizing light exposure including maximizing the light throughput of the microscope and the sensitivity of light detection is presented. Various fluorescence microscopy techniques are presented with a focus on how the light is delivered to the sample (i.e., light density) and pros and cons for use with living specimens. The reader is also directed to other publications that go into these topics in more detail. Methods are described on how to prepare samples for single cell migration assays, how to measure cell migration rates (e.g., bright-field, semi-automated, and automated), and how to measure focal adhesion turnover rates. Details of how to correct images for background intensity and field-illumination uniformity artifacts for quantitative imaging are also described. Overall, this chapter will be helpful to scientists who are interested in imaging live specimens using fluorescence microscopy techniques. It will be of particular interest to anyone wanting to perform quantitative fluorescence imaging, and wanting to measure cell migration rates, and focal adhesion dynamics.

  1. Mutant huntingtin impairs immune cell migration in Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Wanda; Träger, Ulrike; Davalos, Dimitrios; Chou, Austin; Bouchard, Jill; Andre, Ralph; Miller, Aaron; Weiss, Andreas; Giorgini, Flaviano; Cheah, Christine; Möller, Thomas; Stella, Nephi; Akassoglou, Katerina; Tabrizi, Sarah J.; Muchowski, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    In Huntington disease (HD), immune cells are activated before symptoms arise; however, it is unclear how the expression of mutant huntingtin (htt) compromises the normal functions of immune cells. Here we report that primary microglia from early postnatal HD mice were profoundly impaired in their migration to chemotactic stimuli, and expression of a mutant htt fragment in microglial cell lines was sufficient to reproduce these deficits. Microglia expressing mutant htt had a retarded response to a laser-induced brain injury in vivo. Leukocyte recruitment was defective upon induction of peritonitis in HD mice at early disease stages and was normalized upon genetic deletion of mutant htt in immune cells. Migration was also strongly impaired in peripheral immune cells from pre-manifest human HD patients. Defective actin remodeling in immune cells expressing mutant htt likely contributed to their migration deficit. Our results suggest that these functional changes may contribute to immune dysfunction and neurodegeneration in HD, and may have implications for other polyglutamine expansion diseases in which mutant proteins are ubiquitously expressed. PMID:23160193

  2. Migration of amoeba cells in an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guido, Isabella; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2015-03-01

    Exogenous and endogenous electric fields play a role in cell physiology as a guiding mechanism for the orientation and migration of cells. Electrotaxis of living cells has been observed for several cell types, e.g. neurons, fibroblasts, leukocytes, neural crest cells, cancer cells. Dictyostelium discoideum (Dd), an intensively investigated chemotactic model organism, also exhibits a strong electrotactic behavior moving toward the cathode under the influence of electric fields. Here we report experiments on the effects of DC electric fields on the directional migration of Dd cells. We apply the electric field to cells seeded into microfluidic devices equipped with agar bridges to avoid any harmful effects of the electric field on the cells (ions formation, pH changes, etc.) and a constant flow to prevent the build-up of chemical gradient that elicits chemotaxis. Our results show that the cells linearly increase their speed over time when a constant electric field is applied for a prolonged duration (2 hours). This novel phenomenon cannot be attributed to mechanotaxis as the drag force of the electroosmotic flow is too small to produce shear forces that can reorient cells. It is independent of the cellular developmental stage and to our knowledge, it was not observed in chemotaxis. This work is supported by MaxSynBio project of the Max Planck Society.

  3. Targeting Epithelial Cell Migration to Accelerate Wound Healing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    protein kinase C (PKC) family and the process can be enhanced or inhibited by modulating the levels of the RIPP complex proteins as well by regulating...migration, protein kinase C 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: U 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON...USAMRMC a. REPORT U b. ABSTRACT U c . THIS PAGE U UU 10 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed

  4. The RNA‐binding protein LARP4 regulates cancer cell migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Seetharaman, Shailaja; Flemyng, Ella; Shen, Jiazhen; Conte, Maria R.

    2016-01-01

    LARP4 is a La‐related RNA‐binding protein implicated in regulating mRNA translation, which interacts with poly(A)‐binding protein (PABP). We previously identified LARP4 in an RNAi screen as one of several genes that regulate the shape of PC3 prostate cancer cells. Here we show that LARP4 depletion induces cell elongation in PC3 cells and MDA‐MB‐231 breast cancer cells. LARP4 depletion increases cell migration and invasion, as well as inducing invasive cell protrusions in 3D Matrigel. Conversely, LARP4 over‐expression reduces cell elongation and increases cell circularity. LARP4 mutations are found in a variety of cancers. Introduction of some of these cancer‐associated mutations, including a truncation mutant, into LARP4 enhances its effects on cell morphology. The truncation mutant shows enhanced interaction with PABP. We propose that LARP4 inhibits migration and invasion of cancer cells, and that some cancer‐associated mutations stimulate these effects of LARP4. © 2016 The Authors. Cytoskeleton Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27615744

  5. Cell migration and invasion assays as tools for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Hulkower, Keren I; Herber, Renee L

    2011-03-11

    Cell migration and invasion are processes that offer rich targets for intervention in key physiologic and pathologic phenomena such as wound healing and cancer metastasis. With the advent of high-throughput and high content imaging systems, there has been a movement towards the use of physiologically relevant cell-based assays earlier in the testing paradigm. This allows more effective identification of lead compounds and recognition of undesirable effects sooner in the drug discovery screening process. This article will review the effective use of several principle formats for studying cell motility: scratch assays, transmembrane assays, microfluidic devices and cell exclusion zone assays.

  6. Cell proliferation and migration in silk fibroin 3D scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Biman B; Kundu, Subhas C

    2009-05-01

    Pore architecture in 3D polymeric scaffolds is known to play a critical role in tissue engineering as it provides the vital framework for the seeded cells to organize into a functioning tissue. In this report, we investigated the effects of different freezing temperature regimes on silk fibroin protein 3D scaffold pore microstructure. The fabricated scaffolds using freeze-dry technique were used as a 3D model to monitor cell proliferation and migration. Pores of 200-250microm diameter were formed by slow cooling at temperatures of -20 and -80 degrees C but were found to be limited in porosity and pore interconnectivity as observed through scanning electron microscopic images. In contrast, highly interconnected pores with 96% porosity were observed when silk solutions were rapidly frozen at -196 degrees C. A detailed study was conducted to assess the affect of pore size, porosity and interconnectivity on human dermal fibroblast cell proliferation and migration on these 3D scaffolds using confocal microscopy. The cells were observed to migrate within the scaffold interconnectivities and were found to reach scaffold periphery within 28 days of culture. Confocal images further confirmed normal cell attachment and alignment of actin filaments within the porous scaffold matrix with well-developed nuclei. This study indicates rapid freeze-drying technique as an alternative method to fabricate highly interconnected porous scaffolds for developing functional 3D silk fibroin matrices for potential tissue engineering, biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  7. Muc1 promotes migration and lung metastasis of melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoli; Lan, Hongwen; Li, Jun; Su, Yushu; Xu, Lijun

    2015-01-01

    Early stages of melanoma can be successfully treated by surgical resection of the tumor, but there is still no effective treatment once it is progressed to metastatic phases. Although growing family of both melanoma metastasis promoting and metastasis suppressor genes have been reported be related to metastasis, the molecular mechanisms governing melanoma metastatic cascade are still not completely understood. Therefore, defining the molecules that govern melanoma metastasis may aid the development of more effective therapeutic strategies for combating melanoma. In the present study, we found that muc1 is involved in the metastasis of melanoma cells and demonstrated that muc1 disruption impairs melanoma cells migration and metastasis. The requirement of muc1 in the migration of melanoma cells was further confirmed by gene silencing in vitro. In corresponding to this result, over-expression of muc1 significantly promoted the migratory of melanoma cells. Moreover, down-regulation of muc1 expression strikingly inhibits melanoma cellular metastasis in vivo. Finally, we found that muc1 promotes melanoma migration through the protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathway. To conclude, our findings suggest a novel mechanism underlying the metastasis of melanoma cells which might serve as a new intervention target for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:26609470

  8. T-cell Migration, Search Strategies and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Krummel, Matthew F; Bartumeus, Frederic; Gérard, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    T cell migration is essential for T cell responses, allowing for detection of cognate antigen at the surface of an Antigen-Presenting Cell (APC) and for interactions with other cells involved in the immune response. Although appearing random, growing evidence supports that T cell motility patterns are strategic and governed by mechanisms that are optimized for both activation-stage and environment-specific attributes. In this Opinion Article, we will discuss how to understand the combined effects of T cell- intrinsic and -extrinsic forces upon these motility patterns when viewed in highly complex tissues filled with other cells involved in parallel motility. In particular, we will examine how insights from ‘search theory’ describe T cell movement across exploitation-exploration gradients, in the context of activation versus effector function and in the context of lymph nodes versus peripheral tissues. PMID:26852928

  9. Cell volume regulatory ion transport in the regulation of cell migration.

    PubMed

    Jakab, M; Ritter, M

    2006-01-01

    Cell migration is typically accomplished by the generation of protrusive mechanical forces and is achieved by repeated spatially and temporally coordinated cycles including the formation of a leading edge, the formation of new and disruption of older adhesions to the substratum, actomyosin based contractions and retraction of the trailing edge. Beside the well-described roles of the cytoskeleton and cell adhesions during these processes, a growing body of evidence indicates that the precise regulation of the cell volume is an indispensable prerequisite for coordinated cell migration. On the one hand during cell migration cell volume is continuously tormented by mechanical and morphological alterations, which pose changes to the intracellular hydrostatic pressure, metabolic changes and the formation or degradation of macromolecules like actin, which distort the osmotic equilibrium and the action of chemoattractants, hormones and transmitters, which frequently alter the electrical properties of a cell and thus cause cell swelling or shrinkage, respectively. On the other hand, a migrating cell actively has to govern cell volume regulatory ion transport mechanisms in order to create the appropriate micro- or even nanoenvironment in the intra- and/or extracellular space, which is necessary to guarantee the correct polarity and hence direction of movement of a migrating cell. This chapter will focus on the role of the cell volume regulatory ion transport mechanisms as they participate in the regulation of cell migration and special emphasis is given to their interplay with the cytoskeleton, their meaning for substrate adhesion and to the polarized fashion of their subcellular distribution.

  10. Ion channels in control of pancreatic stellate cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Storck, Hannah; Hild, Benedikt; Schimmelpfennig, Sandra; Sargin, Sarah; Nielsen, Nikolaj; Zaccagnino, Angela; Budde, Thomas; Novak, Ivana; Kalthoff, Holger; Schwab, Albrecht

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a critical role in the progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Once activated, PSCs support proliferation and metastasis of carcinoma cells. PSCs even co-metastasise with carcinoma cells. This requires the ability of PSCs to migrate. In recent years, it has been established that almost all “hallmarks of cancer” such as proliferation or migration/invasion also rely on the expression and function of ion channels. So far, there is only very limited information about the function of ion channels in PSCs. Yet, there is growing evidence that ion channels in stromal cells also contribute to tumor progression. Here we investigated the function of KCa3.1 channels in PSCs. KCa3.1 channels are also found in many tumor cells of different origin. We revealed the functional expression of KCa3.1 channels by means of Western blot, immunofluorescence and patch clamp analysis. The impact of KCa3.1 channel activity on PSC function was determined with live-cell imaging and by measuring the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). KCa3.1 channel blockade or knockout prevents the stimulation of PSC migration and chemotaxis by reducing the [Ca2+]i and calpain activity. KCa3.1 channels functionally cooperate with TRPC3 channels that are upregulated in PDAC stroma. Knockdown of TRPC3 channels largely abolishes the impact of KCa3.1 channels on PSC migration. In summary, our results clearly show that ion channels are crucial players in PSC physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:27903970

  11. cAMP Promotes Cell Migration Through Cell Junctional Complex Dynamics and Actin Cytoskeleton Remodeling: Implications in Skin Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Ok; Ryu, Jung Min; Suh, Han Na; Park, Soo Hyun; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang Hun; Han, Ho Jae

    2015-11-01

    Stem cells have attracted great interest for their therapeutic capacity in tissue regeneration. Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP), existing in high concentration at wound sites, mediated various signaling pathways such as cytoskeleton dynamics, cell adhesion, and cell migration in stem cells, which suggest the critical roles of cAMP in the wound healing process through functional regulation of stem cells. However, the mechanisms behind the effect of cAMP on mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) motility and its roles on skin wound healing remain to be fully elucidated. In the present study, 8-Bromo cAMP-treated mESCs showed significant wound closure and improved neovascularization. Moreover, 8-Bromo cAMP stimulated mESC migration into the wound bed. 8-Bromo cAMP also increased ESC motility in in vitro migration assay. 8-Bromo cAMP induced myosin light chain phosphorylation through Rac1 and Cdc42 signaling, which were involved in 8-Bromo cAMP-induced decrease in expression of junction proteins (connexin 43, E-cadherin, and occludin) at the plasma membrane. Subsequently, 8-Bromo cAMP induced the disruption of cell junctions (including gap junctions, adherens junctions, and tight junctions), which reduced the function of the gap junctions and cell adhesion. In addition, 8-Bromo cAMP-induced Rac1 and Cdc42 activation increased Arp3, TOCA, PAK, and N-WASP expression, but decreased cofilin phosphorylation level, which elicited actin cytoskeleton remodeling. In contrast to the control, 8-Bromo cAMP evoked a substantial migration of cells into the denuded area, which was blocked by the small interfering RNAs of the signaling pathway-related molecules or by inhibitors. In conclusion, cAMP enhanced the migration of mESCs through effective coordination of junctional disruption and actin cytoskeleton remodeling, which increased the wound healing capacity of ESCs.

  12. Anandamide inhibits adhesion and migration of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grimaldi, Claudia; Pisanti, Simona; Laezza, Chiara; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Santoro, Antonietta; Vitale, Mario; Caruso, Maria Gabriella; Notarnicola, Maria; Iacuzzo, Irma; Portella, Giuseppe; Di Marzo, Vincenzo . E-mail: vdimarzo@icmib.na.cnr.it; Bifulco, Maurizio . E-mail: maubiful@unina.it

    2006-02-15

    The endocannabinoid system regulates cell proliferation in human breast cancer cells. We reasoned that stimulation of cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors could induce a non-invasive phenotype in breast mtastatic cells. In a model of metastatic spreading in vivo, the metabolically stable anandamide analogue, 2-methyl-2'-F-anandamide (Met-F-AEA), significantly reduced the number and dimension of metastatic nodes, this effect being antagonized by the selective CB{sub 1} antagonist SR141716A. In MDA-MB-231 cells, a highly invasive human breast cancer cell line, and in TSA-E1 cells, a murine breast cancer cell line, Met-F-AEA inhibited adhesion and migration on type IV collagen in vitro without modifying integrin expression: both these effects were antagonized by SR141716A. In order to understand the molecular mechanism involved in these processes, we analyzed the phosphorylation of FAK and Src, two tyrosine kinases involved in migration and adhesion. In Met-F-AEA-treated cells, we observed a decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of both FAK and Src, this effect being attenuated by SR141716A. We propose that CB{sub 1} receptor agonists inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis by modulating FAK phosphorylation, and that CB{sub 1} receptor activation might represent a novel therapeutic strategy to slow down the growth of breast carcinoma and to inhibit its metastatic diffusion in vivo.

  13. Nuclear translocation of phosphorylated STAT3 regulates VEGF-A-induced lymphatic endothelial cell migration and tube formation

    SciTech Connect

    Okazaki, Hideki; Tokumaru, Sho; Hanakawa, Yasushi; Shiraishi, Ken; Shirakata, Yuji; Dai, Xiuju; Yang, Lijun; Tohyama, Mikiko; Hashimoto, Koji; Sayama, Koji

    2011-09-02

    Highlights: {yields} VEGF-A enhanced lymphatic endothelial cell migration and increased tube formation. {yields} VEGF-A treated lymphatic endothelial cell showed activation of STAT3. {yields} Dominant-negative STAT3 inhibited VEGF-A-induced lymphatic endothelial cell migration and tube formation. -- Abstract: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endothelial cell-specific growth factor that regulates endothelial functions, and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) are known to be important during VEGF receptor signaling. The aim of this study was to determine whether STAT3 regulates VEGF-induced lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) migration and tube formation. VEGF-A (33 ng/ml) enhanced LEC migration by 2-fold and increased tube length by 25% compared with the control, as analyzed using a Boyden chamber and Matrigel assay, respectively. Western blot analysis and immunostaining revealed that VEGF-A induced the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated STAT3 in LECs, and this translocation was blocked by the transfection of LECs with an adenovirus vector expressing a dominant-negative mutant of STAT3 (Ax-STAT3F). Transfection with Ax-STAT3F also almost completely inhibited VEGF-A-induced LEC migration and tube formation. These results indicate that STAT3 is essential for VEGF-A-induced LEC migration and tube formation and that STAT3 regulates LEC functions.

  14. CD81 regulates cell migration through its association with Rac GTPase

    PubMed Central

    Tejera, Emilio; Rocha-Perugini, Vera; López-Martín, Soraya; Pérez-Hernández, Daniel; Bachir, Alexia I.; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Vázquez, Jesús; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Yáñez-Mo, María

    2013-01-01

    CD81 is a member of the tetraspanin family that has been described to have a key role in cell migration of tumor and immune cells. To unravel the mechanisms of CD81-regulated cell migration, we performed proteomic analyses that revealed an interaction of the tetraspanin C-terminal domain with the small GTPase Rac. Direct interaction was confirmed biochemically. Moreover, microscopy cross-correlation analysis demonstrated the in situ integration of both molecules into the same molecular complex. Pull-down experiments revealed that CD81-Rac interaction was direct and independent of Rac activation status. Knockdown of CD81 resulted in enhanced protrusion rate, altered focal adhesion formation, and decreased cell migration, correlating with increased active Rac. Reexpression of wild-type CD81, but not its truncated form lacking the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain, rescued these effects. The phenotype of CD81 knockdown cells was mimicked by treatment with a soluble peptide with the C-terminal sequence of the tetraspanin. Our data show that the interaction of Rac with the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of CD81 is a novel regulatory mechanism of the GTPase activity turnover. Furthermore, they provide a novel mechanism for tetraspanin-dependent regulation of cell motility and open new avenues for tetraspanin-targeted reagents by the use of cell-permeable peptides. PMID:23264468

  15. Progesterone and Src Family Inhibitor PP1 Synergistically Inhibit Cell Migration and Invasion of Human Basal Phenotype Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li; Chen, Xi; Gainey, Lindsey O.; Xiao, Jian; Nanes, Mark S.; Hou, Anji; You, Shaojin; Chen, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    Basal phenotype breast cancer is one of the most aggressive breast cancers that frequently metastasize to brain. The role of sex hormones and their receptors in development of this disease is largely unclear. We demonstrated that mPRα was expressed at a moderate level in a brain metastatic BPBC cell line MB231Br, which was derived from the parent mPRα undetectable MB231 cells. It functioned as an essential mediator for progesterone induced inhibitory effects on cell migration of MB231Br and, when coincubated with PP1, synergistically enhanced the progesterone's inhibitory effect on cell migration and invasion in vitro. Progesterone and PP1 cotreatment induced a cascade of molecular signaling events, such as dephosphorylation of FAK, downregulation of MMP9, VEGF, and KCNMA1 expressions. Our in vitro study demonstrated that mPRα was expressed and functioned as an essential mediator for progesterone induced inhibitory effects on cell migration and invasion in BPBC cells. This inhibitory effect was enhanced by PP1 via FAK dephosphorylation, MMP9, VEGF, and KCNMA1 downregulation mechanisms. Our study provides a new clue toward the development of novel promising agents and pathways for inhibiting nuclear hormonal receptor-negative and endocrine-resistant breast cancers. PMID:26075237

  16. Control of glioma cell migration and invasiveness by GDF-15.

    PubMed

    Codó, Paula; Weller, Michael; Kaulich, Kerstin; Schraivogel, Daniel; Silginer, Manuela; Reifenberger, Guido; Meister, Gunter; Roth, Patrick

    2016-02-16

    Growth and differentiation factor (GDF)-15 is a member of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β family of proteins. GDF-15 levels are increased in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of glioblastoma patients. Using a TCGA database interrogation, we demonstrate that high GDF-15 expression levels are associated with poor survival of glioblastoma patients. To elucidate the role of GDF-15 in glioblastoma in detail, we confirmed that glioma cells express GDF-15 mRNA and protein in vitro. To allow for a detailed functional characterization, GDF-15 expression was silenced using RNA interference in LNT-229 and LN-308 glioma cells. Depletion of GDF-15 had no effect on cell viability. In contrast, GDF-15-deficient cells displayed reduced migration and invasion, in the absence of changes in Smad2 or Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation. Conversely, exogenous GDF-15 stimulated migration and invasiveness. Large-scale expression profiling revealed that GDF-15 gene silencing resulted in minor changes in the miRNA profile whereas several genes, including members of the plasminogen activator/inhibitor complex, were deregulated at the mRNA level. One of the newly identified genes induced by GDF-15 gene silencing was the serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade E nexin group 1 (serpine1) which is induced by TGF-β and known to inhibit migration and invasiveness. However, serpine1 down-regulation alone did not mediate GDF-15-induced promotion of migration and invasiveness. Our findings highlight the complex contributions of GDF-15 to the invasive phenotype of glioma cells and suggest anti-GDF-15 approaches as a promising therapeutic strategy.

  17. Control of glioma cell migration and invasiveness by GDF-15

    PubMed Central

    Codó, Paula; Weller, Michael; Kaulich, Kerstin; Schraivogel, Daniel; Silginer, Manuela; Reifenberger, Guido; Meister, Gunter; Roth, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Growth and differentiation factor (GDF)-15 is a member of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β family of proteins. GDF-15 levels are increased in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of glioblastoma patients. Using a TCGA database interrogation, we demonstrate that high GDF-15 expression levels are associated with poor survival of glioblastoma patients. To elucidate the role of GDF-15 in glioblastoma in detail, we confirmed that glioma cells express GDF-15 mRNA and protein in vitro. To allow for a detailed functional characterization, GDF-15 expression was silenced using RNA interference in LNT-229 and LN-308 glioma cells. Depletion of GDF-15 had no effect on cell viability. In contrast, GDF-15-deficient cells displayed reduced migration and invasion, in the absence of changes in Smad2 or Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation. Conversely, exogenous GDF-15 stimulated migration and invasiveness. Large-scale expression profiling revealed that GDF-15 gene silencing resulted in minor changes in the miRNA profile whereas several genes, including members of the plasminogen activator/inhibitor complex, were deregulated at the mRNA level. One of the newly identified genes induced by GDF-15 gene silencing was the serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade E nexin group 1 (serpine1) which is induced by TGF-β and known to inhibit migration and invasiveness. However, serpine1 down-regulation alone did not mediate GDF-15-induced promotion of migration and invasiveness. Our findings highlight the complex contributions of GDF-15 to the invasive phenotype of glioma cells and suggest anti-GDF-15 approaches as a promising therapeutic strategy. PMID:26741507

  18. HMG-CoA reductase guides migrating primordial germ cells.

    PubMed

    Van Doren, M; Broihier, H T; Moore, L A; Lehmann, R

    1998-12-03

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is best known for catalysing a rate-limiting step in cholesterol biosynthesis, but it also participates in the production of a wide variety of other compounds. Some clinical benefits attributed to inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase are now thought to be independent of any serum cholesterol-lowering effect. Here we describe a new cholesterol-independent role for HMG-CoA reductase, in regulating a developmental process: primordial germ cell migration. We show that in Drosophila this enzyme is highly expressed in the somatic gonad and that it is necessary for primordial germ cells to migrate to this tissue. Misexpression of HMG-CoA reductase is sufficient to attract primordial germ cells to tissues other than the gonadal mesoderm. We conclude that the regulated expression of HMG-CoA reductase has a critical developmental function in providing spatial information to guide migrating primordial germ cells.

  19. Forces, waves and emergent dynamics during collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trepat, Xavier

    2013-03-01

    A broad range of biological processes such as morphogenesis, tissue regeneration, and cancer invasion depend on the collective motion of cell groups. For a group of cells to migrate cohesively, it has long been suspected that each constituent cell must exert physical forces not only upon its extracellular matrix but also upon neighboring cells. I will present novel techniques to measure these distinct force components. Using these techniques, we unveiled an unexpectedly rich physical picture in which the distribution of physical forces is dominated by heterogeneity, cooperativity, and jamming. I will show, moreover, that these essential features of inter-cellular force transmission enable the propagation of a new type of mechanical wave during tissue growth. Finally, I will demonstrate that both in epithelial and endothelial cell sheets, forces and waves are mechanically linked to cell velocities through a newly discovered emergent mechanism of innately collective cell guidance: plithotaxis.

  20. Navigator-3, a modulator of cell migration, may act as a suppressor of breast cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Dvashi, Hadas; Ben-Chetrit, Nir; Russell, Roslin; Carvalho, Silvia; Lauriola, Mattia; Nisani, Sophia; Mancini, Maicol; Nataraj, Nishanth; Kedmi, Merav; Roth, Lee; Köstler, Wolfgang; Zeisel, Amit; Yitzhaky, Assif; Zylberg, Jacques; Tarcic, Gabi; Eilam, Raya; Wigelman, Yoav; Will, Rainer; Lavi, Sara; Porat, Ziv; Wiemann, Stefan; Ricardo, Sara; Schmitt, Fernando; Caldas, Carlos; Yarden, Yosef

    2015-01-01

    Dissemination of primary tumor cells depends on migratory and invasive attributes. Here, we identify Navigator-3 (NAV3), a gene frequently mutated or deleted in human tumors, as a regulator of epithelial migration and invasion. Following induction by growth factors, NAV3 localizes to the plus ends of microtubules and enhances their polarized growth. Accordingly, NAV3 depletion trimmed microtubule growth, prolonged growth factor signaling, prevented apoptosis and enhanced random cell migration. Mathematical modeling suggested that NAV3-depleted cells acquire an advantage in terms of the way they explore their environment. In animal models, silencing NAV3 increased metastasis, whereas ectopic expression of the wild-type form, unlike expression of two, relatively unstable oncogenic mutants from human tumors, inhibited metastasis. Congruently, analyses of > 2,500 breast and lung cancer patients associated low NAV3 with shorter survival. We propose that NAV3 inhibits breast cancer progression by regulating microtubule dynamics, biasing directionally persistent rather than random migration, and inhibiting locomotion of initiated cells. PMID:25678558

  1. Studying Neutrophil Migration In Vivo Using Adoptive Cell Transfer.

    PubMed

    Miyabe, Yoshishige; Kim, Nancy D; Miyabe, Chie; Luster, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer experiments can be used to study the roles of cell trafficking molecules on the migratory behavior of specific immune cell populations in vivo. Chemoattractants and their G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane-spanning receptors regulate migration of cells in vivo, and dysregulated expression of chemoattractants and their receptors is implicated in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Inflammatory arthritides, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), are characterized by the recruitment of inflammatory cells into joints. The K/BxN serum transfer mouse model of inflammatory arthritis shares many similar features with RA. In this autoantibody-induced model of arthritis, neutrophils are the critical immune cells necessary for the development of joint inflammation and damage. We have used adoptive neutrophil transfer to define the contributions of chemoattractant receptors, cytokines, and activation receptors expressed on neutrophils that critically regulate their entry into the inflamed joint. In this review, we describe the procedure of neutrophil adoptive transfer to study the influence of neutrophil-specific receptors or mediators upon the their recruitment into the joint using the K/BxN model of inflammatory arthritis as a model of how adoptive cell transfer studies can be used to study immune cell migration in vivo.

  2. Intermediate filament reorganization dynamically influences cancer cell alignment and migration

    PubMed Central

    Holle, Andrew W.; Kalafat, Melih; Ramos, Adria Sales; Seufferlein, Thomas; Kemkemer, Ralf; Spatz, Joachim P.

    2017-01-01

    The interactions between a cancer cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) have been the focus of an increasing amount of investigation. The role of the intermediate filament keratin in cancer has also been coming into focus of late, but more research is needed to understand how this piece fits in the puzzle of cytoskeleton-mediated invasion and metastasis. In Panc-1 invasive pancreatic cancer cells, keratin phosphorylation in conjunction with actin inhibition was found to be sufficient to reduce cell area below either treatment alone. We then analyzed intersecting keratin and actin fibers in the cytoskeleton of cyclically stretched cells and found no directional correlation. The role of keratin organization in Panc-1 cellular morphological adaptation and directed migration was then analyzed by culturing cells on cyclically stretched polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates, nanoscale grates, and rigid pillars. In general, the reorganization of the keratin cytoskeleton allows the cell to become more ‘mobile’- exhibiting faster and more directed migration and orientation in response to external stimuli. By combining keratin network perturbation with a variety of physical ECM signals, we demonstrate the interconnected nature of the architecture inside the cell and the scaffolding outside of it, and highlight the key elements facilitating cancer cell-ECM interactions. PMID:28338091

  3. The NANIVID: a new device for cancer cell migration studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Waseem K.; Cady, Nathaniel C.; Castracane, James; Gligorijevic, Bojana; van Rheenen, Jacobus W.; Condeelis, John S.

    2008-02-01

    Cancerous tumors are dynamic microenvironments that require unique analytical tools for their study. Better understanding of tumor microenvironments may reveal mechanisms behind tumor progression and generate new strategies for diagnostic marker development, which can be used routinely in histopathological analysis. Previous studies have shown that cell invasion and intravasation are related to metastatic potential and have linked these activities to gene expression patterns seen in migratory and invasive tumor cells in vivo. Existing analytical methods for tumor microenvironments include collection of tumor cells through a catheter needle loaded with a chemical or protein attractant (chemoattractant). This method has some limitations and restrictions, including time constraints of cell collection, long term anesthetization, and in vivo imaging inside the catheter. In this study, a novel implantable device was designed to replace the catheter-based method. The 1.5mm x 0.5mm x 0.24mm device is designed to controllably release chemoattractants for stimulation of tumor cell migration and subsequent cell capture. Devices were fabricated using standard microfabrication techniques and have been shown to mediate controlled release of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Optically transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes have been incorporated into the device for impedance-based measurement of cell density and have been shown to be compatible with in vivo multi-photon imaging of cell migration.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide promotes adhesion and migration of murine dental papilla-derived MDPC-23 cells via TLR4.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Hwan; Kwon, Seong-Min; Yoon, Hyo-Eun; Kim, Soo-A; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2011-02-01

    Odontoblasts and/or dental pulp cells are responsible for tooth repair and dentin formation. Furthermore, adhesion and migration are critical processes for tissue regeneration. This study was performed to clarify whether lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modulates adhesion and migration of the murine odontoblast-like cell line MDPC-23, and whether Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling is engaged in this process. TLR4 expression in MDPC-23 cells was examined by RT-PCR. Adhesion assay was performed using type I collagen-coated plates. Migration ability was determined by a commercial assay kit. Phosphorylation of IκB-α, FAK, AKT, and ERK was examined by Western blot analysis. TLR4 was functionally expressed in MDPC-23 cells. LPS treatment enhanced adhesion and migration of MDPC-23 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Blockade of TLR4 using its antibody restored LPS-induced adhesion and migration of MDPC-23 cells. These findings indicate that LPS, an immune activator from Gram-negative bacteria, can promote the adhesion and migration ability of MDPC-23 cells via TLR4.

  5. Critical role of aquaporin-3 in epidermal growth factor-induced migration of colorectal carcinoma cells and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Li, Ang; Lu, Dehong; Zhang, Yupeng; Li, Jia; Fang, Yu; Li, Fei; Sun, Jiabang

    2013-02-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are a family of small, integral membrane proteins that have been shown to play an important role in tumor development and metastasis. Several studies have demonstrated that expression of AQP3 contributes to the enhanced migration of epithelial cells and is related to differentiation, metastasis and vascular invasion in lung and gastric cancer. Therefore, we investigated whether AQP3 could enhance human colorectal carcinoma cell migration and we examined the role of AQP3 in the prognosis of colorectal carcinoma. Our results showed that human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) increased the expression of AQP3 and, subsequently, the migration ability of human colorectal carcinoma cells HCT116 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The enhanced migration ability of HCT116 cells was blocked by the AQP3 inhibitor, CuSO(4). Overexpression of AQP3 induced by hEGF was inhibited by a PI3K/AKT inhibitor, LY294002, but the ERK inhibitor U0126 had a minor effect on the hEGF-induced AQP3 upregulation. Immunohistochemical staining of the cancer tissues and corresponding normal tissues showed that AQP3 expression in cancer tissue was higher compared to that in normal tissue. The expression intensity of AQP3 was associated with the differentiation, lymph node and distant metastasis of colorectal carcinoma patients. Our results suggest that AQP3 overexpression could facilitate colorectal carcinoma cell migration and AQP3 may be considered a potential indicator and therapeutic target for colon tumor metastasis and prognosis.

  6. Atorvastatin Promotes Cytotoxicity and Reduces Migration and Proliferation of Human A172 Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Karen A; Dal-Cim, Tharine; Lopes, Flávia G; Ludka, Fabiana K; Nedel, Cláudia B; Tasca, Carla I

    2017-02-08

    Malignant gliomas have resistance mechanisms to chemotherapy that enable tumor invasiveness and aggressiveness. Alternative therapies in cancer treatment, as statins, have been suggested to decrease proliferation, inhibit cell migration, and induce cell death. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of atorvastatin (ATOR) on cell viability, migration, proliferation, apoptosis, and autophagy in A172 human glioma cells. Temozolomide (TMZ), a chemotherapic used to glioma treatment, was tested as a comparison to cytotoxic effects on gliomas. Cell viability was also assessed in primary culture of cortical astrocytes. ATOR treatment (0.1 to 20 μM) did not alter astrocytic viability. However, in glioma cells, ATOR showed cytotoxic effect at 10 and 20 μM concentrations. TMZ (500 μM) reduced cell viability similarly to ATOR, and drug association did not show additive effect on cell viability. ATOR, TMZ, and their association decreased cell migration. ATOR also decreased glioma cell proliferation. ATOR increased apoptosis, and TMZ association showed a potentiation effect, enhancing it. ATOR and TMZ treatment increased acidic vesicular organelle (AVO) presence in A172 cells, an indicative of autophagy. ATOR effect of reducing A172 cell viability did not alter glutamate transport and glutamine synthetase activity, but it was partially prevented through antagonism of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. Our data shows a cytotoxic effect of ATOR on glioma cells, whereas no toxicity was observed to astrocytes. ATOR showed similar cytotoxic effect as TMZ to glioma cells, and it may be a safer drug, regarding side effect induction, than chemotherapic agents.

  7. FH535 inhibited migration and growth of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Iida, Joji; Dorchak, Jesse; Lehman, John R; Clancy, Rebecca; Luo, Chunqing; Chen, Yaqin; Somiari, Stella; Ellsworth, Rachel E; Hu, Hai; Mural, Richard J; Shriver, Craig D

    2012-01-01

    There is substantial evidence indicating that the WNT signaling pathway is activated in various cancer cell types including breast cancer. Previous studies reported that FH535, a small molecule inhibitor of the WNT signaling pathway, decreased growth of cancer cells but not normal fibroblasts, suggesting this pathway plays a role in tumor progression and metastasis. In this study, we tested FH535 as a potential inhibitor for malignant phenotypes of breast cancer cells including migration, invasion, and growth. FH535 significantly inhibited growth, migration, and invasion of triple negative (TN) breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB231 and HCC38) in vitro. We demonstrate that FH535 was a potent growth inhibitor for TN breast cancer cell lines (HCC38 and MDA-MB-231) but not for other, non-TN breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D or SK-Br3) when cultured in three dimensional (3D) type I collagen gels. Western blotting analyses suggest that treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with FH535 markedly inhibited the expression of NEDD9 but not activations of FAK, Src, or downstream targets such as p38 and Erk1/2. We demonstrated that NEDD9 was specifically associated with CSPG4 but not with β1 integrin or CD44 in MDA-MB-231 cells. Analyses of gene expression profiles in breast cancer tissues suggest that CSPG4 expression is higher in Basal-type breast cancers, many of which are TN, than any other subtypes. These results suggest not only a mechanism for migration and invasion involving the canonical WNT-signaling pathways but also novel strategies for treating patients who develop TN breast cancer.

  8. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Regulates Cell Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Clarissa Coelho; Florentino, Rodrigo Machado; França, Andressa; Matias, Eveline; Guimarães, Paola Bianchi; Batista, Carolina; Freire, Valder; Carmona, Adriana Karaoglanovic; Pesquero, João Bosco; de Paula, Ana Maria; Foureaux, Giselle; Leite, Maria de Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Background The angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) plays a central role in the renin-angiotensin system, acting by converting the hormone angiotensin-I to the active peptide angiotensin-II (Ang-II). More recently, ACE was shown to act as a receptor for Ang-II, and its expression level was demonstrated to be higher in melanoma cells compared to their normal counterparts. However, the function that ACE plays as an Ang-II receptor in melanoma cells has not been defined yet. Aim Therefore, our aim was to examine the role of ACE in tumor cell proliferation and migration. Results We found that upon binding to ACE, Ang-II internalizes with a faster onset compared to the binding of Ang-II to its classical AT1 receptor. We also found that the complex Ang-II/ACE translocates to the nucleus, through a clathrin-mediated process, triggering a transient nuclear Ca2+ signal. In silico studies revealed a possible interaction site between ACE and phospholipase C (PLC), and experimental results in CHO cells, demonstrated that the β3 isoform of PLC is the one involved in the Ca2+ signals induced by Ang-II/ACE interaction. Further studies in melanoma cells (TM-5) showed that Ang-II induced cell proliferation through ACE activation, an event that could be inhibited either by ACE inhibitor (Lisinopril) or by the silencing of ACE. In addition, we found that stimulation of ACE by Ang-II caused the melanoma cells to migrate, at least in part due to decreased vinculin expression, a focal adhesion structural protein. Conclusion ACE activation regulates melanoma cell proliferation and migration. PMID:27992423

  9. Epithelial bridges maintain tissue integrity during collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Sri Ram Krishna; Hirata, Hiroaki; Nai, Mui Hoon; Brugués, Agustí; Toyama, Yusuke; Trepat, Xavier; Lim, Chwee Teck; Ladoux, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    The ability of skin to act as a barrier is primarily determined by the efficiency of skin cells to maintain and restore its continuity and integrity. In fact, during wound healing keratinocytes migrate collectively to maintain their cohesion despite heterogeneities in the extracellular matrix. Here, we show that monolayers of human keratinocytes migrating along functionalized micropatterned surfaces comprising alternating strips of extracellular matrix (fibronectin) and non-adherent polymer form suspended multicellular bridges over the non-adherent areas. The bridges are held together by intercellular adhesion and are subjected to considerable tension, as indicated by the presence of prominent actin bundles. We also show that a model based on force propagation through an elastic material reproduces the main features of bridge maintenance and tension distribution. Our findings suggest that multicellular bridges maintain tissue integrity during wound healing when cell-substrate interactions are weak and may prove helpful in the design of artificial scaffolds for skin regeneration.

  10. Capturing relevant extracellular matrices for investigating cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Keely, Patricia; Nain, Amrinder

    2015-01-01

    Much progress in understanding cell migration has been determined by using classic two-dimensional (2D) tissue culture platforms. However, increasingly, it is appreciated that certain properties of cell migration in vivo are not represented by strictly 2D assays. There is much interest in creating relevant three-dimensional (3D) culture environments and engineered platforms to better represent features of the extracellular matrix and stromal microenvironment that are not captured in 2D platforms. Important to this goal is a solid understanding of the features of the extracellular matrix—composition, stiffness, topography, and alignment—in different tissues and disease states and the development of means to capture these features PMID:26918156

  11. Migration and Tissue Tropism of Innate Lymphoid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang H.; Hashimoto-Hill, Seika; Kim, Myunghoo

    2016-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cell (ILCs) subsets differentially populate various barrier and non-barrier tissues, where they play important roles in tissue homeostasis and tissue-specific responses to pathogen attack. Recent findings have provided insight into the molecular mechanisms that guide ILC migration into peripheral tissues, revealing common features among different ILC subsets as well as important distinctions. Recent studies have also highlighted the impact of tissue-specific cues on ILC migration, and the importance of the local immunological milieu. We review these findings here and discuss how the migratory patterns and tissue tropism of different ILC subsets relate to the development and differentiation of these cells, and to ILC-mediated tissue-specific regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. In this context we outline open questions and important areas of future research. PMID:26708278

  12. Cathepsin L derived from skeletal muscle cells transfected with bFGF promotes endothelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ji Hyung; Im, Eun Kyoung; Jin, Tae Won; Lee, Seung-Min; Kim, Soo Hyuk; Choi, Eun Young; Shin, Min-Jeong; Lee, Kyung Hye; Jang, Yangsoo

    2011-04-30

    Gene transfer of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) has been shown to induce significant endothelial migration and angiogenesis in ischemic disease models. Here, we investigate what factors are secreted from skeletal muscle cells (SkMCs) transfected with bFGF gene and whether they participate in endothelial cell migration. We constructed replication-defective adenovirus vectors containing the human bFGF gene (Ad/bFGF) or a control LacZ gene (Ad/LacZ) and obtained conditioned media, bFGF-CM and LacZ-CM, from SkMCs infected by Ad/bFGF or Ad/LacZ, respectively. Cell migration significantly increased in HUVECs incubated with bFGF-CM compared to cells incubated with LacZ-CM. Interestingly, HUVEC migration in response to bFGF-CM was only partially blocked by the addition of bFGF-neutralizing antibody, suggesting that bFGF-CM contains other factors that stimulate endothelial cell migration. Several proteins, matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and cathepsin L, increased in bFGF-CM compared to LacZ-CM; based on 1-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Their increased mRNA and protein levels were confirmed by RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis. The recombinant human bFGF protein induced MMP-1, PAI-1, and cathepsin L expression in SkMCs. Endothelial cell migration was reduced in groups treated with bFGF-CM containing neutralizing antibodies against MMP-1 or PAI-1. In particular, HUVECs treated with bFGF-CM containing cell-impermeable cathepsin L inhibitor showed the most significant decrease in cell migration. Cathepsin L protein directly promotes endothelial cell migration through the JNK pathway. These results indicate that cathepsin L released from SkMCs transfected with the bFGF gene can promote endothelial cell migration.

  13. Analysis of individual cell trajectories in lattice-gas cellular automaton models for migrating cell populations.

    PubMed

    Mente, Carsten; Voss-Böhme, Anja; Deutsch, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Collective dynamics of migrating cell populations drive key processes in tissue formation and maintenance under normal and diseased conditions. Collective cell behavior at the tissue level is typically characterized by considering cell density patterns such as clusters and moving cell fronts. However, there are also important observables of collective dynamics related to individual cell behavior. In particular, individual cell trajectories are footprints of emergent behavior in populations of migrating cells. Lattice-gas cellular automata (LGCA) have proven successful to model and analyze collective behavior arising from interactions of migrating cells. There are well-established methods to analyze cell density patterns in LGCA models. Although LGCA dynamics are defined by cell-based rules, individual cells are not distinguished. Therefore, individual cell trajectories cannot be analyzed in LGCA so far. Here, we extend the classical LGCA framework to allow labeling and tracking of individual cells. We consider cell number conserving LGCA models of migrating cell populations where cell interactions are regulated by local cell density and derive stochastic differential equations approximating individual cell trajectories in LGCA. This result allows the prediction of complex individual cell trajectories emerging in LGCA models and is a basis for model-experiment comparisons at the individual cell level.

  14. Periostin mediates cigarette smoke extract-induced proliferation and migration in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Dong; Li, Fang; Ma, Dong-Bo; Deng, Xiang; Zhang, Hui; Gao, Jia; Hao, Li; Liu, Dan-Dan; Wang, Jing

    2016-10-01

    Cigarette smoking is an important risk factor for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of PAH-associated arterial remodeling. This study was done to explore the expression and biological roles of periostin in PASMCs following exposure to cigarette smoke extract (CSE). PASMCs were exposed to different concentrations of CSE and tested for gene expression and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. PASMCs were incubated with recombinant periostin protein or transfected with small interfering RNA targeting periostin before CSE exposure and then examined for cell proliferation and migration. Compared to control cells, exposure to CSE led to a significant upregulation of periostin. Pretreatment with 5mM N-acetyl-l-cysteine (an inhibitor of ROS formation) or 10μM U0126 (an inhibitor of ERK1/2) significantly prevented the induction of periostin in CSE-treated PASMCs. The addition of recombinant periostin protein significantly enhanced the proliferation and migration of PASMCs. In contrast, knockdown of endogenous periostin counteracted the proliferation and migration of PASMCs induced by CSE treatment. In conclusion, CSE induces the expression of periostin in PASMCs via promotion of ROS and activation of ERK1/2. Periostin mediates the effects of CSE on PASMC proliferation and migration. These findings warrant further exploration of the roles of periostin in cigarette smoking-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling.

  15. Homing and migration assays of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    He, Xi C; Li, Zhenrui; Sugimura, Rio; Ross, Jason; Zhao, Meng; Li, Linheng

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) reside mainly in bone marrow; however, under homeostatic and stressed conditions, HSPCs dynamically change their location-either egressing from bone marrow and getting into circulation, a process of mobilization; or coming back to the bone marrow, the homing process. How to analyze these two processes will be critical for understanding the behavior of HSPCs. Here we provide an experimental protocol to monitor and analyze homing and migration of HSPCs.

  16. Transient receptor potential melastatin 4 channel contributes to migration of androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kilch, Tatiana; Jochum, Marcus Martin; Urban, Sabine Katharina; Jung, Volker; Stöckle, Michael; Rother, Karen; Greiner, Markus; Peinelt, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Impaired Ca2+ signaling in prostate cancer contributes to several cancer hallmarks, such as enhanced proliferation and migration and a decreased ability to induce apoptosis. Na+ influx via transient receptor potential melastatin 4 channel (TRPM4) can reduce store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) by decreasing the driving force for Ca2+. In patients with prostate cancer, gene expression of TRPM4 is elevated. Recently, TRPM4 was identified as a cancer driver gene in androgen-insensitive prostate cancer. We investigated TRPM4 protein expression in cancer tissue samples from 20 patients with prostate cancer. We found elevated TRPM4 protein levels in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and prostate cancer tissue compared to healthy tissue. In primary human prostate epithelial cells (hPEC) from healthy tissue and in the androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and PC3, TRPM4 mediated large Na+ currents. We demonstrated significantly increased SOCE after siRNA targeting of TRPM4 in hPEC and DU145 cells. In addition, knockdown of TRPM4 reduced migration but not proliferation of DU145 and PC3 cells. Taken together, our data identify TRPM4 as a regulator of SOCE in hPEC and DU145 cells, demonstrate a role for TRPM4 in cancer cell migration and suggest that TRPM4 is a promising potential therapeutic target. PMID:26496025

  17. Lysophosphatidic acid induces cell migration through the selective activation of Akt1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Kyoung; Yun, Sung Ji; Do, Kee Hun; Kim, Min Sung; Cho, Mong; Suh, Dong-Soo; Kim, Chi Dae; Kim, Jae Ho; Birnbaum, Morris J.

    2008-01-01

    Akt plays pivotal roles in many physiological responses including growth, proliferation, survival, metabolism, and migration. In the current studies, we have evaluated the isoform-specific role of akt in lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced cell migration. Ascites from ovarian cancer patients (AOCP) induced mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cell migration in a dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, ascites from liver cirrhosis patients (ALCP) did not induce MEF cell migration. AOCP-induced MEF cell migration was completely blocked by pre-treatment of cells with LPA receptor antagonist, Ki16425. Both LPA- and AOCP-induced MEF cell migration was completely attenuated by PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. Furthermore, cells lacking Akt1 displayed defect in LPA-induced cell migration. Re-expression of Akt1 in DKO (Akt1-/-Akt2-/-) cells restored LPA-induced cell migration, whereas re-expression of Akt2 in DKO cells could not restore the LPA-induced cell migration. Finally, Akt1 was selectively phosphorylated by LPA and AOCP stimulation. These results suggest that LPA is a major factor responsible for AOCP-induced cell migration and signaling specificity of Akt1 may dictate LPA-induced cell migration. PMID:18779657

  18. Pancreatic tumor cell secreted CCN1/Cyr61 promotes endothelial cell migration and aberrant neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Maity, Gargi; Mehta, Smita; Haque, Inamul; Dhar, Kakali; Sarkar, Sandipto; Banerjee, Sushanta K; Banerjee, Snigdha

    2014-05-16

    The complex signaling networks between cancer cells and adjacent endothelial cells make it challenging to unravel how cancer cells send extracellular messages to promote aberrant vascularization or tumor angiogenesis. Here, in vitro and in vivo models show that pancreatic cancer cell generated unique microenvironments can underlie endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis. Mechanistically, we find that pancreatic cancer cell secreted CCN1/Cyr61 matricellular protein rewires the microenvironment to promote endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis. This event can be overcome by Sonic Hedgehog (SHh) antibody treatment. Collectively, these studies identify a novel CCN1 signaling program in pancreatic cancer cells which activates SHh through autocrine-paracrine circuits to promote endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis and suggests that CCN1 signaling of pancreatic cancer cells is vital for the regulation of tumor angiogenesis. Thus CCN1 signaling could be an ideal target for tumor vascular disruption in pancreatic cancer.

  19. Common mechanisms regulating cell cortex properties during cell division and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Roubinet, Chantal; Tran, Phong T; Piel, Matthieu

    2012-11-01

    Single cell morphogenesis results from a balance of forces involving internal pressure (also called turgor pressure in plants and fungi) and the plastic and dynamic outer shell of the cell. Dominated by the cell wall in plants and fungi, mechanical properties of the outer shell of animal cells arise from the cell cortex, which is mostly composed of the plasma membrane (and membrane proteins) and the underlying meshwork of actin filaments and myosin motors (and associated proteins). In this review, following Bray and White [1988; Science 239:883-889], we draw a parallel between the regulation of the cell cortex during cell division and cell migration in animal cells. Starting from the similarities in shape changes and underlying mechanical properties, we further propose that the analogy between cell division and cell migration might run deeper, down to the basic molecular mechanisms driving cell cortex remodeling. We focus our attention on how an heterogeneous and dynamic cortex can be generated to allow cell shape changes while preserving cell integrity.

  20. N-cadherin as a key regulator of collective cell migration in a 3D environment.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wenting; Yamada, Soichiro

    2012-01-01

    Cell migration is a critical step of normal developmental processes and disease progression. Often, migrating cells interact and maintain contact with neighboring cells. However, the precise roles of cell-cell adhesion in cell migration have thus far been poorly defined. Often in aggressive cancers, N-cadherin is prominently upregulated, yet, these highly motile cells have limited cell-cell adhesion when plated on a stiff 2D substrate. But, the same cells in a 3D matrix migrate as a multicellular cluster. This new observation suggests that N-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion supports cell interactions between migrating cells in a more physiologically relevant 3D matrix, but not on a 2D substrate. While N-cadherin is an integral part of neural synapses, the ectopic expression of N-cadherin in transformed epithelial cells plays an equally important part in initiating pro-migratory signaling, and providing strong yet flexible cell cohesion essential for persistent cell migration in a 3D matrix. The 3D cell migration analysis for studying cell-to-cell interactions exposes the roles of N-cadherin in multicellular migration, and reveals novel insights into cell migration-dependent normal and pathological processes.

  1. Cellular automata model for human articular chondrocytes migration, proliferation and cell death: An in vitro validation.

    PubMed

    Vaca-González, J J; Gutiérrez, M L; Guevara, J M; Garzón-Alvarado, D A

    2016-01-07

    Articular cartilage is characterized by low cell density of only one cell type, chondrocytes, and has limited self-healing properties. When articular cartilage is affected by traumatic injuries, a therapeutic strategy such as autologous chondrocyte implantation is usually proposed for its treatment. This approach requires in vitro chondrocyte expansion to yield high cell number for cell transplantation. To improve the efficiency of this procedure, it is necessary to assess cell dynamics such as migration, proliferation and cell death during culture. Computational models such as cellular automata can be used to simulate cell dynamics in order to enhance the result of cell culture procedures. This methodology has been implemented for several cell types; however, an experimental validation is required for each one. For this reason, in this research a cellular automata model, based on random-walk theory, was devised in order to predict articular chondrocyte behavior in monolayer culture during cell expansion. Results demonstrated that the cellular automata model corresponded to cell dynamics and computed-accurate quantitative results. Moreover, it was possible to observe that cell dynamics depend on weighted probabilities derived from experimental data and cell behavior varies according to the cell culture period. Thus, depending on whether cells were just seeded or proliferated exponentially, culture time probabilities differed in percentages in the CA model. Furthermore, in the experimental assessment a decreased chondrocyte proliferation was observed along with increased passage number. This approach is expected to having other uses as in enhancing articular cartilage therapies based on tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  2. Methylene blue modulates transendothelial migration of peripheral blood cells.

    PubMed

    Werner, Isabella; Guo, Fengwei; Bogert, Nicolai V; Stock, Ulrich A; Meybohm, Patrick; Moritz, Anton; Beiras-Fernandez, Andres

    2013-01-01

    Vasoplegia is a severe complication after cardiac surgery. Within the last years the administration of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor methylene blue (MB) became a new therapeutic strategy. Our aim was to investigate the role of MB on transendothelial migration of circulating blood cells, the potential role of cyclic cGMP, eNOS and iNOS in this process, and the influence of MB on endothelial cell apoptosis. Human vascular endothelial cells (HuMEC-1) were treated for 30 minutes or 2 hours with different concentrations of MB. Inflammation was mimicked by LPS stimulation prior and after MB. Transmigration of PBMCs and T-Lymphocytes through the treated endothelial cells was investigated. The influence of MB upon the different subsets of PBMCs (Granulocytes, T- and B-Lymphocytes, and Monocytes) was assessed after transmigration by means of flow-cytometry. The effect of MB on cell apoptosis was evaluated using Annexin-V and Propidium Iodide stainings. Analyses of the expression of cyclic cGMP, eNOS and iNOS were performed by means of RT-PCR and Western Blot. Results were analyzed using unpaired Students T-test. Analysis of endothelial cell apoptosis by MB indicated a dose-dependent increase of apoptotic cells. We observed time- and dose-dependent effects of MB on transendothelial migration of PBMCs. The prophylactic administration of MB led to an increase of transendothelial migration of PBMCs but not Jurkat cells. Furthermore, HuMEC-1 secretion of cGMP correlated with iNOS expression after MB administration but not with eNOS expression. Expression of these molecules was reduced after MB administration at protein level. This study clearly reveals that endothelial response to MB is dose- and especially time-dependent. MB shows different effects on circulating blood cell-subtypes, and modifies the release patterns of eNOS, iNOS, and cGMP. The transendothelial migration is modulated after treatment with MB. Furthermore, MB provokes apoptosis of endothelial cells in a dose

  3. STRIPAK components determine mode of cancer cell migration and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Chris D.; Hooper, Steven; Tozluoglu, Melda; Bruckbauer, Andreas; Fletcher, Georgina; Erler, Janine T.; Bates, Paul A.; Thompson, Barry; Sahai, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The contractile actomyosin cytoskeleton and its connection to the plasma membrane are critical for control of cell shape and migration. We identify three STRIPAK complex components, FAM40A, FAM40B, and STRN3, as regulators of the actomyosin cortex. We show that FAM40A negatively regulates the MST3 and MST4 kinases, which promote the co-localisation of the contractile actomyosin machinery with the Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin family proteins by phosphorylating the inhibitors of PPP1CB, PPP1R14A-D. Using computational modelling, in vitro cell migration assays and in vivo breast cancer metastasis assays we demonstrate that co-localisation of contractile activity and actin-plasma membrane linkage reduces cell speed on planar surfaces, but favours migration in confined environments similar to those observed in vivo. We further show that FAM40B mutations found in human tumours uncouple it from PP2A and enable it to drive a contractile phenotype, which may underlie its role in human cancer. PMID:25531779

  4. The Sal-like 4 - integrin α6β1 network promotes cell migration for metastasis via activation of focal adhesion dynamics in basal-like breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Itou, Junji; Tanaka, Sunao; Li, Wenzhao; Iida, Atsuo; Sehara-Fujisawa, Atsuko; Sato, Fumiaki; Toi, Masakazu

    2017-01-01

    During metastasis, cancer cell migration is enhanced. However, the mechanisms underlying this process remain elusive. Here, we addressed this issue by functionally analyzing the transcription factor Sal-like 4 (SALL4) in basal-like breast cancer cells. Loss-of-function studies of SALL4 showed that this transcription factor is required for the spindle-shaped morphology and the enhanced migration of cancer cells. SALL4 also up-regulated integrin gene expression. The impaired cell migration observed in SALL4 knockdown cells was restored by overexpression of integrin α6 and β1. In addition, we clarified that integrin α6 and β1 formed a heterodimer. At the molecular level, loss of the SALL4 - integrin α6β1 network lost focal adhesion dynamics, which impairs cell migration. Over-activation of Rho is known to inhibit focal adhesion dynamics. We observed that SALL4 knockdown cells exhibited over-activation of Rho. Aberrant Rho activation was suppressed by integrin α6β1 expression, and pharmacological inhibition of Rho activity restored cell migration in SALL4 knockdown cells. These results indicated that the SALL4 - integrin α6β1 network promotes cell migration via modulation of Rho activity. Moreover, our zebrafish metastasis assays demonstrated that this gene network enhances cell migration in vivo. Our findings identify a potential new therapeutic target for the prevention of metastasis, and provide an improved understanding of cancer cell migration.

  5. Promotion of PDGF-induced endothelial cell migration by phosphorylated VASP depends on PKA anchoring via AKAP.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Deling; Ouyang, Jingping; Wang, Nian; Zhang, Yahui; Bie, Jinghua; Zhang, Yemin

    2010-02-01

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), an important substrate of PKA, plays a critical role in remodeling of actin cytoskeleton and actin-based cell motility. However, how PKA accurately transfers extracellular signals to VASP and then how phosphorylation of VASP regulates endothelial cell migration have not been clearly defined. Protein kinase A anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are considered to regulate intracellular-specific signal targeting of PKA via AKAP-mediated PKA anchoring. Thus, our study investigated the relationship among AKAP anchoring of PKA, PKA activity, and VASP phosphorylation, which is to clarify the exact role of VASP and its upstream regulatory mechanism in PKA-dependent migration. Our results show that chemotactic factor PDGF activated PKA, increased phosphorylation of VASP at Ser157, and enhanced ECV304 endothelial cell migration. However, phosphorylation site-directed mutation of VASP at Ser157 attenuated the chemotactic effect of PDGF on endothelial cells, suggesting phosphorylation of VASP at Ser157 promotes PKA-mediated endothelial cell migration. Furthermore, disrupting PKA anchoring to AKAP or PKA activity significantly attenuated the PKA activity, VASP phosphorylation, and subsequent cell migration. Meanwhile, disrupting PKA anchoring to AKAP abolished PDGF-induced lamellipodia formation and special VASP accumulation at leading edge of lamellipodia. These results indicate that PKA activation and PKA-mediated substrate responses in VASP phosphorylation and localization depend on PKA anchoring via AKAP in PDGF-induced endothelial cell migration. In conclusion, AKAP anchoring of PKA is an essential upstream event in regulation of PKA-mediated VASP phosphorylation and subsequent endothelial cell migration, which contributes to explore new methods for controlling endothelial cell migration related diseases and angiogenesis.

  6. HOXA10 controls proliferation, migration and invasion in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Manoela; Bitu, Carolina C; de Oliveira, Carine Ervolino; Cervigne, Nilva K; Graner, Edgard; Manninen, Aki; Salo, Tuula; Coletta, Ricardo D

    2015-01-01

    Although HOX genes are best known for acting in the regulation of important events during embryogenesis, including proliferation, differentiation and migration, alterations in their expression patterns have been frequently described in cancers. In previous studies we analyzed the expression profile of the members of the HOX family of homeobox genes in oral samples of normal mucosa and squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and identified differently expressed genes such as HOXA10. The present study aimed to validate the increased expression of HOXA10 in OSCCs, and to investigate the effects arising from its knockdown in OSCC cells. The levels of HOXA10 mRNA were determined in human OSCC samples and cell lines by quantitative PCR, and HOXA10-mediated effects on proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), migration and invasion were studied in HSC-3 tongue carcinoma cells by using retrovirus-mediated RNA interference. Higher expression of HOXA10 mRNA was observed in OSCC cell lines and in tumor tissues compared to normal controls. HOXA10 knockdown significantly reduced the proliferation of the tumor cells which was accompanied by increased levels of p21. HOXA10 silencing also significantly induced the expression of EMT markers and enhanced the adhesion, migration and invasion of HSC-3 cells. No effects on cell death were observed after HOXA10 knockdown. The results of the current study confirm the overexpression of HOXA10 in OSCCs, and further demonstrate that its expression is functionally associated with several important biological processes related to oral tumorigenesis, such as proliferation, migration and invasion. PMID:26097543

  7. Relative rigidity of cell-substrate effects on hepatic and hepatocellular carcinoma cell migration.

    PubMed

    Yangben, Yanzi; Wang, Hongbing; Zhong, Li; Chiang, Martin Y M; Tan, Qiaoyan; Singh, Gurinder K; Li, Song; Yang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Polyacrylamide gels with different stiffness and glass were employed as substrates to investigate how substrate stiffness affects the cellular stiffness of adherent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCCLM3) and hepatic (L02) cells. The interaction of how cell-substrate stiffness influences cell migration was also explored. An atom force microscope measured the stiffness of HCCLM3 and L02 cells on different substrates. Further, F-actin assembly was analyzed using immunofluorescence and Western blot. Finally, cell-surface expression of integrin β1 was quantified by flow cytometry. The results show that, while both HCCLM3 and L02 cells adjusted their cell stiffness to comply with the stiffness of the substrate they were adhered to, their tuning capabilities were different. HCCLM3 cell stiffness complied when substrate stiffness was between 1.1 and 33.7 kPa, whereas the analogous stiffness for L02 cells occurred at a higher substrate stiffness, 3.6 kPa up to glass. These ranges correlated with F-actin filament assembly and integrin β1 expression. In a migration assay, HCCLM3 cells migrated faster on a relatively soft substrate, while L02 cells migrated faster on substrates that were relatively rigid. These findings indicate that different tuning capabilities of HCCLM3 and L02 cells may influence cell migration velocity on substrates with different stiffness by regulating cy- toskeleton remodeling and integrin β1 expression.

  8. SCF increases in utero-labeled stem cells migration and improves wound healing.

    PubMed

    Zgheib, Carlos; Xu, Junwang; Mallette, Andrew C; Caskey, Robert C; Zhang, Liping; Hu, Junyi; Liechty, Kenneth W

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic skin wounds lack the ability to heal properly and constitute a major and significant complication of diabetes. Nontraumatic lower extremity amputations are the number one complication of diabetic skin wounds. The complexity of their pathophysiology requires an intervention at many levels to enhance healing and wound closure. Stem cells are a promising treatment for diabetic skin wounds as they have the ability to correct abnormal healing. Stem cell factor (SCF), a chemokine expressed in the skin, can induce stem cells migration, however the role of SCF in diabetic skin wound healing is still unknown. We hypothesize that SCF would correct the impairment and promote the healing of diabetic skin wounds. Our results show that SCF improved wound closure in diabetic mice and increased HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression levels in these wounds. SCF treatment also enhanced the migration of red fluorescent protein (RFP)-labeled skin stem cells via in utero intra-amniotic injection of lenti-RFP at E8. Interestingly these RFP+ cells are present in the epidermis, stain negative for K15, and appear to be distinct from the already known hair follicle stem cells. These results demonstrate that SCF improves diabetic wound healing in part by increasing the recruitment of a unique stem cell population present in the skin.

  9. BMP2 rescues deficient cell migration in Tgfbr3(-/-) epicardial cells and requires Src kinase.

    PubMed

    Allison, Patrick; Espiritu, Daniella; Camenisch, Todd D

    2016-05-03

    During embryogenesis, the epicardium undergoes proliferation, migration, and differentiation into several cardiac cell types which contribute to the coronary vessels. The type III transforming growth factor-β receptor (TGFβR3) is required for epicardial cell invasion and development of coronary vasculature in vivo. Bone Morphogenic Protein-2 (BMP2) is a driver of epicardial cell migration. Utilizing a primary epicardial cell line derived from Tgfbr3(+/+) and Tgfbr3(-/-) mouse embryos, we show that Tgfbr3(-/-) epicardial cells are deficient in BMP2 mRNA expression. Tgfbr3(-/-) epicardial cells are deficient in 2-dimensional migration relative to Tgfbr3(+/+) cells; BMP2 induces cellular migration to Tgfbr3(+/+) levels without affecting proliferation. We further demonstrate that Src kinase activity is required for BMP2 driven Tgfbr3(-/-) migration. BMP2 also requires Src for filamentous actin polymerization in Tgfbr3(-/-) epicardial cells. Taken together, our data identifies a novel pathway in epicardial cell migration required for development of the coronary vessels.

  10. Reconciling the discrepancies on the involvement of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K channels in glioblastoma cell migration.

    PubMed

    Catacuzzeno, Luigi; Caramia, Martino; Sforna, Luigi; Belia, Silvia; Guglielmi, Luca; D'Adamo, Maria Cristina; Pessia, Mauro; Franciolini, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor, and is notable for spreading so effectively through the brain parenchyma to make complete surgical resection virtually impossible, and prospect of life dismal. Several ion channels have been involved in GBM migration and invasion, due to their critical role in supporting volume changes and Ca(2+) influx occuring during the process. The large-conductance, Ca(2+)-activated K (BK) channels, markedly overexpressed in biopsies of patients with GBMs and in GBM cell lines, have attracted much interest and have been suggested to play a central role in cell migration and invasion as candidate channels for providing the ion efflux and consequent water extrusion that allow cell shrinkage during migration. Available experimental data on the role of BK channel in migration and invasion are not consistent though. While BK channels block typically resulted in inhibition of cell migration or in no effect, their activation would either enhance or inhibit the process. This short review reexamines the relevant available data on the topic, and presents a unifying paradigm capable of reconciling present discrepancies. According to this paradigm, BK channels would not contribute to migration under conditions where the [Ca(2+)] i is too low for their activation. They will instead positively contribute to migration for intermediate [Ca(2+)] i , insufficient as such to activate BK channels, but capable of predisposing them to cyclic activation following oscillatory [Ca(2+)] i increases. Finally, steadily active BK channels because of prolonged high [Ca(2+)] i would inhibit migration as their steady activity would be unsuitable to match the cyclic cell volume changes needed for proper cell migration.

  11. Combinative in vitro studies and computational model to predict 3D cell migration response to drug insult.

    PubMed

    Maffei, Joseph S; Srivastava, Jaya; Fallica, Brian; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2014-10-01

    The development of drugs to counter diseases related to cell migration has resulted in a multi-billion dollar endeavor. Unfortunately, few drugs have emerged from this effort highlighting the need for new methods to enhance assays to study, analyze and control cell migration. In response to this complex process, computational models have emerged as potent tools to describe migration providing a high throughput and low cost method. However, most models are unable to predict migration response to drug with direct application to in vitro experiments. In addition to this, no model to date has attempted to describe migration in response to drugs while incorporating simultaneously protein signaling, proteolytic activity, and 3D culture. In this paper, we describe an integrated computational approach, in conjunction with in vitro observations, to serve as a platform to accurately predict migration in 3D matrices incorporating the function of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their interaction with the Extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) signaling pathway. Our results provide biological insight into how matrix density, MMP activity, integrin adhesions, and p-ERK expression all affect speed and persistence in 3D. Predictions from the model provide insight toward improving drug combinations to more effectively reduce both speed and persistence during migration and the role of integrin adhesions in motility. In this way our integrated platform provides future potential to streamline and improve throughput toward the testing and development of migration targeting drugs with tangible application to current in vitro assays.

  12. Tumor treating fields inhibit glioblastoma cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Ho; Song, Hyo Sook; Yoo, Seung Hoon; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2016-01-01

    Treatment with alternating electric fields at an intermediate frequency (100–300 kHz), referred to as tumor treating fields (TTF) therapy, inhibits cancer cell proliferation. In the present study, we demonstrated that TTF application suppressed the metastatic potential of U87 and U373 glioblastoma cell lines via the NF-kB, MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. Wound-healing and transwell assays showed that TTF suppressed cell migration and invasion compared with controls. Soft agar and three-dimensional culture assays showed that TTF inhibited both anchorage-dependent (cell proliferation) and anchorage-independent (colony formation) GBM cell growth. TTF dysregulated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-related genes, such as vimentin and E-cadherin, which partially accounted for TTF inhibition of cell migration and invasion. We further demonstrated that TTF application suppressed angiogenesis by downregulating VEGF, HIF1α and matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9. TTF also inhibited NF-kB transcriptional activity. Collectively, our findings show that TTF represents a promising novel anti-invasion and anti-angiogenesis therapeutic strategy for use in GBM patients. PMID:27556184

  13. Sensitivity of edge detection methods for quantifying cell migration assays.

    PubMed

    Treloar, Katrina K; Simpson, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative imaging methods to analyze cell migration assays are not standardized. Here we present a suite of two-dimensional barrier assays describing the collective spreading of an initially-confined population of 3T3 fibroblast cells. To quantify the motility rate we apply two different automatic image detection methods to locate the position of the leading edge of the spreading population after 24, 48 and 72 hours. These results are compared with a manual edge detection method where we systematically vary the detection threshold. Our results indicate that the observed spreading rates are very sensitive to the choice of image analysis tools and we show that a standard measure of cell migration can vary by as much as 25% for the same experimental images depending on the details of the image analysis tools. Our results imply that it is very difficult, if not impossible, to meaningfully compare previously published measures of cell migration since previous results have been obtained using different image analysis techniques and the details of these techniques are not always reported. Using a mathematical model, we provide a physical interpretation of our edge detection results. The physical interpretation is important since edge detection algorithms alone do not specify any physical measure, or physical definition, of the leading edge of the spreading population. Our modeling indicates that variations in the image threshold parameter correspond to a consistent variation in the local cell density. This means that varying the threshold parameter is equivalent to varying the location of the leading edge in the range of approximately 1-5% of the maximum cell density.

  14. A correlation between altered O-GlcNAcylation, migration and with changes in E-cadherin levels in ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Feng-zhen; Yu, Chao; Zhao, De-zhang; Wu, Ming-jun; Yang, Zhu

    2013-06-10

    O-GlcNAcylation is a dynamic and reversible posttranslational modification of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins. In recent years, the roles of O-GlcNAcylation in several human malignant tumors have been investigated, and O-GlcNAcylation was found to be linked to cellular features relevant to metastasis. In this study, we modeled four diverse ovarian cancer cells and investigated the effects of O-GlcNAcylation on ovarian cancer cell migration. We found that total O-GlcNAcylation level was elevated in HO-8910PM cells compared to OVCAR3 cells. Additionally, through altering the total O-GlcNAcylation level by OGT silencing or OGA inhibition, we found that the migration of OVCAR3 cells was dramatically enhanced by PUGNAc and Thiamet G treatment, and the migration ability of HO-8910PM cells was significantly inhibited by OGT silencing. Furthermore, we also found that the expression of E-cadherin, an O-GlcNAcylated protein in ovarian cancer cells, was reduced by OGA inhibition in OVCAR3 cells and elevated by OGT silencing in HO-8910PM cells. These results indicate that O-GlcNAcylation could enhance ovarian cancer cell migration and decrease the expression of E-cadherin. Our studies also suggest that O-GlcNAcylation might become another potential target for the therapy of ovarian cancer. -- Highlights: • We examine the migration potential of diverse ovarian cancer cells. • We examine the total O-GlcNAcylation level of diverse ovarian cancer cells. • Increasing O-GlcNAcylation level will enhance the migration of ovarian cancer cells. • Reducing O-GlcNAcylation level will inhibit the migration of ovarian cancer cells. • The mechanism explains O-GlcNAcylation enhance ovarian cancer cell migration.

  15. Cu Migration in Polycrystalline CdTe Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Da; Akis, Richard; Brinkman, Daniel; Sankin, Igor; Fang, Tian; Vasileska, Dragica; Ringhofer, Christian

    2014-03-12

    An impurity reaction-diffusion model is applied to Cu defects and related intrinsic defects in polycrystalline CdTe for a better understanding of Cu’s role in the cell level reliability of CdTe PV devices. The simulation yields transient Cu distributions in polycrystalline CdTe during solar cell processing and stressing. Preliminary results for Cu migration using available diffusivity and solubility data show that Cu accumulates near the back contact, a phenomena that is commonly observed in devices after back-contact processing or stress conditions.

  16. Comparative mechanisms of cancer cell migration through 3D matrix and physiological microtracks.

    PubMed

    Carey, Shawn P; Rahman, Aniqua; Kraning-Rush, Casey M; Romero, Bethsabe; Somasegar, Sahana; Torre, Olivia M; Williams, Rebecca M; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2015-03-15

    Tumor cell invasion through the stromal extracellular matrix (ECM) is a key feature of cancer metastasis, and understanding the cellular mechanisms of invasive migration is critical to the development of effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Since cancer cell migration is highly adaptable to physiochemical properties of the ECM, it is critical to define these migration mechanisms in a context-specific manner. Although extensive work has characterized cancer cell migration in two- and three-dimensional (3D) matrix environments, the migration program employed by cells to move through native and cell-derived microtracks within the stromal ECM remains unclear. We previously reported the development of an in vitro model of patterned type I collagen microtracks that enable matrix metalloproteinase-independent microtrack migration. Here we show that collagen microtracks closely resemble channel-like gaps in native mammary stroma ECM and examine the extracellular and intracellular mechanisms underlying microtrack migration. Cell-matrix mechanocoupling, while critical for migration through 3D matrix, is not necessary for microtrack migration. Instead, cytoskeletal dynamics, including actin polymerization, cortical tension, and microtubule turnover, enable persistent, polarized migration through physiological microtracks. These results indicate that tumor cells employ context-specific mechanisms to migrate and suggest that selective targeting of cytoskeletal dynamics, but not adhesion, proteolysis, or cell traction forces, may effectively inhibit cancer cell migration through preformed matrix microtracks within the tumor stroma.

  17. Activin Type 2 Receptor Restoration in MSI-H Colon Cancer Suppresses Growth and Enhances Migration With Activin

    PubMed Central

    JUNG, BARBARA H.; BECK, STAYCE E.; CABRAL, JENNIFER; CHAU, EDDY; CABRERA, BETTY L.; FIORINO, ANTONIO; SMITH, E. JULIETA; BOCANEGRA, MELANIE; CARETHERS, JOHN M.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Colon cancers with high-frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H) develop frameshift mutations in tumor suppressors as part of their pathogenesis. ACVR2 is mutated at its exon 10 polyadenine tract in >80% of MSI-H colon cancers, coinciding with loss of protein. ACVR2 transmits the growth effects of activin via phosphorylation of SMAD proteins to affect gene transcription. The functional effect of activin in colon cancers has not been studied. We developed and characterized a cell model in which we studied how activin signaling affects growth. Methods hMLH1 and ACVR2 mutant HCT116 cells were previously stably transferred with chromosome 2 (HCT116+chr2), restoring a single regulated copy of wild-type ACVR2 but not hMLH1. Both HCT116+chr2 and parental HCT116 cells (as well as HEC59 and ACVR2 and hMSH2 complemented HEC59+chr2 cells) were assessed for genetic complementation and biologic function. Results HCT116+chr2 cells and HEC59+chr2 cells, but not ACVR2-mutant HCT116 or HEC59 cells, acquired wild-type ACVR2 as well as expression of ACVR2 wild-type messenger RNA. Complemented ACVR2 protein complexed with ACVR1 with activin treatment, generating nuclear phosphoSMAD2 and activin-specific gene transcription. ACVR2-restored cells showed decreased growth and reduced S phase but increased cellular migration following activin treatment. ACVR2 small interfering RNA reversed these effects in complemented cells. Conclusions ACVR2-complemented MSI-H colon cancers restore activin-SMAD signaling, decrease growth, and slow their cell cycle following ligand stimulation but show increased cellular migration. Activin is growth suppressive and enhances migration similar to transforming growth factor β in colon cancer, indicating that abrogation of the effects of activin contribute to the pathogenesis of MSI-H colon cancers. PMID:17258738

  18. Functional screening with a live cell imaging-based random cell migration assay.

    PubMed

    van Roosmalen, Wies; Le Dévédec, Sylvia E; Zovko, Sandra; de Bont, Hans; van de Water, Bob

    2011-01-01

    Cell migration, essential in cancer progression, is a complex process comprising a number of spatiotemporally regulated and well-coordinated mechanisms. In order to study (random) cell migration in the context of responses to various external cues (such as growth factors) or intrinsic cell signaling, a number of different tools and approaches have been developed. In order to unravel the key pathways and players involved in the regulation of (cancer) cell migration, a systematical mapping of the players/pathways is required. For this purpose, we developed a cell migration assay based on automatic high-throughput microscopy screen. This approach allows for screening of hundreds of genes, e.g., those encoding various kinases and phosphatases but can also be used for screening of drugs libraries. Moreover, we have developed an automatic analysis pipeline comprising of (a) automatic data acquisition (movie) and (b) automatic analysis of the acquired movies of the migrating cells. Here, we describe various facets of this approach. Since cell migration is essential in progression of cancer metastasis, we describe two examples of experiments performed on highly motile (metastatic) cancer cells.

  19. Cell traction in collective cell migration and morphogenesis: The chase and run mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, András; Mayor, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Directional collective cell migration plays an important role in development, physiology, and disease. An increasing number of studies revealed key aspects of how cells coordinate their movement through distances surpassing several cell diameters. While physical modeling and measurements of forces during collective cell movements helped to reveal key mechanisms, most of these studies focus on tightly connected epithelial cultures. Less is known about collective migration of mesenchymal cells. A typical example of such behavior is the migration of the neural crest cells, which migrate large distances as a group. A recent study revealed that this persistent migration is aided by the interaction between the neural crest and the neighboring placode cells, whereby neural crest chase the placodes via chemotaxis, but upon contact both populations undergo contact inhibition of locomotion and a rapid reorganization of cellular traction. The resulting asymmetric traction field of the placodes forces them to run away from the chasers. We argue that this chase and run interaction may not be specific only to the neural crest system, but could serve as the underlying mechanism for several morphogenetic processes involving collective cell migration. PMID:26267782

  20. The core planar cell polarity gene, Vangl2, directs adult corneal epithelial cell alignment and migration

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, Amy S.; Panzica, D. Alessio; Walczysko, Petr; Holt, Amy B.; Henderson, Deborah J.; West, John D.; Rajnicek, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    This study shows that the core planar cell polarity (PCP) genes direct the aligned cell migration in the adult corneal epithelium, a stratified squamous epithelium on the outer surface of the vertebrate eye. Expression of multiple core PCP genes was demonstrated in the adult corneal epithelium. PCP components were manipulated genetically and pharmacologically in human and mouse corneal epithelial cells in vivo and in vitro. Knockdown of VANGL2 reduced the directional component of migration of human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells without affecting speed. It was shown that signalling through PCP mediators, dishevelled, dishevelled-associated activator of morphogenesis and Rho-associated protein kinase directs the alignment of HCE cells by affecting cytoskeletal reorganization. Cells in which VANGL2 was disrupted tended to misalign on grooved surfaces and migrate across, rather than parallel to the grooves. Adult corneal epithelial cells in which Vangl2 had been conditionally deleted showed a reduced rate of wound-healing migration. Conditional deletion of Vangl2 in the mouse corneal epithelium ablated the normal highly stereotyped patterns of centripetal cell migration in vivo from the periphery (limbus) to the centre of the cornea. Corneal opacity owing to chronic wounding is a major cause of degenerative blindness across the world, and this study shows that Vangl2 activity is required for directional corneal epithelial migration. PMID:27853583

  1. Hint1 suppresses migration and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro by modulating girdin activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xue-Song; Bao, Tian-Hao; Ke, Yang; Sun, De-Yun; Shi, Zhi-Tian; Tang, Hao-Ran; Wang, Lin

    2016-11-01

    Histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (Hint1) is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor gene. Its role in cancer cell migration has not been previously speculated. In the current study, we examined the expression of Hint1 in metastatic and non-metastatic lymph nodes of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and further elucidated the effect of Hint1 expression on girdin expression and phosphorylation of AKT and ERK1/2 and on the migration of HCC cells in vitro. Expression of Hint1 and girdin in primary HCC tissues and metastatic and non-metastatic lymph nodes was determined by RT-PCR assays. HepG2 cells were transfected with plasmid vectors overexpressing Hint1 or small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting Hint1, girdin, Hint1 plus girdin, or the scrambled RNA. Migration and invasion of HCC cells were examined by wound and Transwell assays. Protein expression was detected by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting assays. RT-PCR assays revealed that the messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript levels of Hint1 were markedly lower than those of primary HCC tissues and non-metastatic lymph nodes (P < 0.01). By contrast, the mRNA transcript levels of girdin were significantly higher than non-metastatic lymph nodes (P < 0.05). Furthermore, siRNA knockdown of HINT1 resulted in a significant increase in the mRNA transcript levels of girdin in HepG2 cells (P < 0.05). Wound assays and Transwell assays showed that Hint1 knockdown by siRNA significantly enhanced the migration and invasion of HepG2 ce