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Sample records for enhances clot susceptibility

  1. Duty cycle dependence of ultrasound enhanced thrombolysis in a human clot model.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Jason M; Holland, Christy K; Lindsell, Christopher J; Shaw, George J

    2007-04-01

    Combined ultrasound and tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) therapy, or ultrasound enhanced thrombolysis (UET), has been shown to improve recanalization in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We measured the effect of ultrasound duty cycle on the lytic efficacy of 120 kHz UET in an in vitro human clot model. The hypothesis was that an increase in duty cycle increases rt-PA lytic efficacy. Human whole blood clots were exposed to 120-kHz ultrasound and rt-PA for 30 min in human plasma. The duty cycle ranged from 0% to 80%, where 0% represents sham exposure. Clot lytic rate was measured by recording the clot width over time. The clot width after 30 min exposure to rt-PA and ultrasound decreases with increasing duty cycle. The initial lytic rate increased linearly with duty cycle.

  2. Blood clotting

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... the external bleeding stops. Clotting factors in the blood cause strands of blood-borne material, called fibrin, to stick together and ... the inside of the wound. Eventually, the cut blood vessel heals, and the blood clot dissolves after ...

  3. Blood Clots

    MedlinePlus

    ... or prevent blood clots from dissolving properly. Risk factors for excessive blood clotting include Certain genetic disorders Atherosclerosis Diabetes Atrial fibrillation Overweight, obesity, and metabolic syndrome Some medicines Smoking deep vein ...

  4. Kinetic Model Facilitates Analysis of Fibrin Generation and Its Modulation by Clotting Factors: Implications for Hemostasis-Enhancing Therapies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    investigating its potential as a hemostatic agent in trauma and surgery.6,7 These applications necessitate a detailed understanding of fibrin ...facilitates analysis of fibrin generation and its modulation by clotting factors: implications for hemostasis-enhancing therapies† Alexander Y...ability of the suggested molecular mechanisms to account for fibrin generation and degradation kinetics in diverse, physiologically relevant in vitro

  5. Localization of Short-Chain Polyphosphate Enhances its Ability to Clot Flowing Blood Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Yeon, Ju Hun; Mazinani, Nima; Schlappi, Travis S.; Chan, Karen Y. T.; Baylis, James R.; Smith, Stephanie A.; Donovan, Alexander J.; Kudela, Damien; Stucky, Galen D.; Liu, Ying; Morrissey, James H.; Kastrup, Christian J.

    2017-01-01

    Short-chain polyphosphate (polyP) is released from platelets upon platelet activation, but it is not clear if it contributes to thrombosis. PolyP has increased propensity to clot blood with increased polymer length and when localized onto particles, but it is unknown whether spatial localization of short-chain polyP can accelerate clotting of flowing blood. Here, numerical simulations predicted the effect of localization of polyP on clotting under flow, and this was tested in vitro using microfluidics. Synthetic polyP was more effective at triggering clotting of flowing blood plasma when localized on a surface than when solubilized in solution or when localized as nanoparticles, accelerating clotting at 10–200 fold lower concentrations, particularly at low to sub-physiological shear rates typical of where thrombosis occurs in large veins or valves. Thus, sub-micromolar concentrations of short-chain polyP can accelerate clotting of flowing blood plasma under flow at low to sub-physiological shear rates. However, a physiological mechanism for the localization of polyP to platelet or vascular surfaces remains unknown. PMID:28186112

  6. Localization of Short-Chain Polyphosphate Enhances its Ability to Clot Flowing Blood Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeon, Ju Hun; Mazinani, Nima; Schlappi, Travis S.; Chan, Karen Y. T.; Baylis, James R.; Smith, Stephanie A.; Donovan, Alexander J.; Kudela, Damien; Stucky, Galen D.; Liu, Ying; Morrissey, James H.; Kastrup, Christian J.

    2017-02-01

    Short-chain polyphosphate (polyP) is released from platelets upon platelet activation, but it is not clear if it contributes to thrombosis. PolyP has increased propensity to clot blood with increased polymer length and when localized onto particles, but it is unknown whether spatial localization of short-chain polyP can accelerate clotting of flowing blood. Here, numerical simulations predicted the effect of localization of polyP on clotting under flow, and this was tested in vitro using microfluidics. Synthetic polyP was more effective at triggering clotting of flowing blood plasma when localized on a surface than when solubilized in solution or when localized as nanoparticles, accelerating clotting at 10–200 fold lower concentrations, particularly at low to sub-physiological shear rates typical of where thrombosis occurs in large veins or valves. Thus, sub-micromolar concentrations of short-chain polyP can accelerate clotting of flowing blood plasma under flow at low to sub-physiological shear rates. However, a physiological mechanism for the localization of polyP to platelet or vascular surfaces remains unknown.

  7. Localization of Short-Chain Polyphosphate Enhances its Ability to Clot Flowing Blood Plasma.

    PubMed

    Yeon, Ju Hun; Mazinani, Nima; Schlappi, Travis S; Chan, Karen Y T; Baylis, James R; Smith, Stephanie A; Donovan, Alexander J; Kudela, Damien; Stucky, Galen D; Liu, Ying; Morrissey, James H; Kastrup, Christian J

    2017-02-10

    Short-chain polyphosphate (polyP) is released from platelets upon platelet activation, but it is not clear if it contributes to thrombosis. PolyP has increased propensity to clot blood with increased polymer length and when localized onto particles, but it is unknown whether spatial localization of short-chain polyP can accelerate clotting of flowing blood. Here, numerical simulations predicted the effect of localization of polyP on clotting under flow, and this was tested in vitro using microfluidics. Synthetic polyP was more effective at triggering clotting of flowing blood plasma when localized on a surface than when solubilized in solution or when localized as nanoparticles, accelerating clotting at 10-200 fold lower concentrations, particularly at low to sub-physiological shear rates typical of where thrombosis occurs in large veins or valves. Thus, sub-micromolar concentrations of short-chain polyP can accelerate clotting of flowing blood plasma under flow at low to sub-physiological shear rates. However, a physiological mechanism for the localization of polyP to platelet or vascular surfaces remains unknown.

  8. Blood Clots

    MedlinePlus

    ... your condition differs depending on the location and type of your blood clot. Your doctor will usually begin by obtaining your medical history, as this may provide information about factors that ...

  9. Macaque models of enhanced susceptibility to HIV.

    PubMed

    Henning, Tara R; McNicholl, Janet M; Vishwanathan, Sundaram A; Kersh, Ellen N

    2015-06-14

    There are few nonhuman primate models of enhanced HIV susceptibility. Such models can improve comprehension of HIV acquisition risk factors and provide rigorous testing platforms for preclinical prevention strategies. This paper reviews past, current, and proposed research on macaque HIV acquisition risk models and identifies areas where modeling is significantly lacking. We compare different experimental approaches and provide practical considerations for designing macaque susceptibility studies. Modifiable (mucosal and systemic coinfections, hormonal contraception, and rectal lubricants) and non-modifiable (hormonal fluctuations) risk factors are highlighted. Risk acquisition models via vaginal, rectal, and penile challenge routes are discussed. There is no consensus on the best statistical model for evaluating increased susceptibility, and additional research is required. The use of enhanced susceptibility macaque models would benefit multiple facets of the HIV research field, including basic acquisition and pathogenesis studies as well as the vaccine and other biomedical preventions pipeline.

  10. Fibrinolytic enzyme production by newly isolated Bacillus cereus SRM-001 with enhanced in-vitro blood clot lysis potential.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Manoj Kumar; Chandrasekaran, Muthukumaran; Rajesh, Mathur

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of plasmin-like microbial fibrinolytic enzymes having high specificity and negligible side effects is crucial for thrombolytic therapy. Herein, we report one such extra-cellular fibrinolytic enzyme producing Bacillus cereus SRM-001 isolated from the blood-laden soil of a chicken dump yard. The potency of the enzyme was established with fibrin plate assay and in-vitro blood clot lysis assay. The shake-flask operating parameters and media composition were optimized for maximizing the productivity of the enzyme. The operating parameters, pH 7, 37°C, 1% inoculum volume and 24 h inoculum age, were found to be the optimum. The levels of media components, corn flour (0.3% w/v), soyabean powder (1.9% w/v) and MnSO4 (11.5 mM) were optimized by statistical analysis using Box-Behnken design derived RSM. This resulted in an almost 1.8 fold increase in fibrinolytic enzyme productivity. The 3D response surface plots showed soyabean powder and MnSO4 to be the key ingredients for enhancing the enzyme productivity, whereas corn flour had a marginal effect. The in-vitro blood clot lysis assay conducted at near physiological pH 7 at 37°C showed the enzyme to be a potential therapeutic thrombolytic agent.

  11. Effect of dietary omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids on clotting activities of Factor V, VII and X in fatty liver haemorrhagic syndrome-susceptible laying hens.

    PubMed

    Yeh, E; Wood, R D; Leeson, S; Squires, E J

    2009-05-01

    1. The relationship between concentrations of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in plasma and Factor V, VII and X clotting activities was determined using a crossover feeding trial with diets supplemented with either soy oil or flax oil. 2. Laying hens on the soy diet, which is high in omega-6 fatty acids, had substantially higher clotting activity for all three factors compared to laying hens on the flax diet that was high in omega-3 fatty acids. 3. Positive associations were seen between liver haemorrhage score and the percentage of liver weight and between the percentage of liver weight and the severity of haemorrhagic and fatty changes seen on histology. 4. These results support the hypothesis that concentrations of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in plasma affect clotting activity; however, there was no relationship between the extent of liver haemorrhages and the composition of plasma fatty acids.

  12. Parasitism enhances tilapia susceptibility to Flavobacterium columnare

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavobacterium columnare, a Gram-negative bacterium, is the causative agent of columnaris disease. Many commercially important freshwater fish worldwide are susceptible to columnaris disease that can result in high fish mortality. Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) is a protozoan parasite in many ...

  13. National Blood Clot Alliance

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2017 Events Team Stop the Clot® 2017 NYC Marathon 2017 Marine Corps Marathon Highlights from Team Stop the Clot® Ways to ... New York, New York 22 Oct Marine Corps Marathon Arlington, Virginia 05 Nov TCS New York City ...

  14. Blood clot detection using magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Khurshid, Hafsa; Friedman, Bruce; Berwin, Brent; Shi, Yipeng; Ness, Dylan B.; Weaver, John B.

    2017-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis, the development of blood clots in the peripheral veins, is a very serious, life threatening condition that is prevalent in the elderly. To deliver proper treatment that enhances the survival rate, it is very important to detect thrombi early and at the point of care. We explored the ability of magnetic particle spectroscopy (MSB) to detect thrombus via specific binding of aptamer functionalized magnetic nanoparticles with the blood clot. MSB uses the harmonics produced by nanoparticles in an alternating magnetic field to measure the rotational freedom and, therefore, the bound state of the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles’ relaxation time for Brownian rotation increases when bound [A.M. Rauwerdink and J. B. Weaver, Appl. Phys. Lett. 96, 1 (2010)]. The relaxation time can therefore be used to characterize the nanoparticle binding to thrombin in the blood clot. For longer relaxation times, the approach to saturation is more gradual reducing the higher harmonics and the harmonic ratio. The harmonic ratios of nanoparticles conjugated with anti-thrombin aptamers (ATP) decrease significantly over time with blood clot present in the sample medium, compared with nanoparticles without ATP. Moreover, the blood clot removed from the sample medium produced a significant MSB signal, indicating the nanoparticles are immobilized on the clot. Our results show that MSB could be a very useful non-invasive, quick tool to detect blood clots at the point of care so proper treatment can be used to reduce the risks inherent in deep vein thrombosis. PMID:28289550

  15. Blood clot detection using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Khurshid, Hafsa; Friedman, Bruce; Berwin, Brent; Shi, Yipeng; Ness, Dylan B; Weaver, John B

    2017-05-01

    Deep vein thrombosis, the development of blood clots in the peripheral veins, is a very serious, life threatening condition that is prevalent in the elderly. To deliver proper treatment that enhances the survival rate, it is very important to detect thrombi early and at the point of care. We explored the ability of magnetic particle spectroscopy (MSB) to detect thrombus via specific binding of aptamer functionalized magnetic nanoparticles with the blood clot. MSB uses the harmonics produced by nanoparticles in an alternating magnetic field to measure the rotational freedom and, therefore, the bound state of the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles' relaxation time for Brownian rotation increases when bound [A.M. Rauwerdink and J. B. Weaver, Appl. Phys. Lett. 96, 1 (2010)]. The relaxation time can therefore be used to characterize the nanoparticle binding to thrombin in the blood clot. For longer relaxation times, the approach to saturation is more gradual reducing the higher harmonics and the harmonic ratio. The harmonic ratios of nanoparticles conjugated with anti-thrombin aptamers (ATP) decrease significantly over time with blood clot present in the sample medium, compared with nanoparticles without ATP. Moreover, the blood clot removed from the sample medium produced a significant MSB signal, indicating the nanoparticles are immobilized on the clot. Our results show that MSB could be a very useful non-invasive, quick tool to detect blood clots at the point of care so proper treatment can be used to reduce the risks inherent in deep vein thrombosis.

  16. Ischemic Strokes (Clots)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quiz 5 Things to Know About Stroke Ischemic Strokes (Clots) Updated:Nov 9,2016 Ischemic stroke accounts ... strokes. Read more about silent strokes . TIA and Stroke: Medical Emergencies When someone has shown symptoms of ...

  17. Enhanced nonlinear susceptibility via double-double electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alotaibi, Hessa M. M.; Sanders, Barry C.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the nonlinear optical susceptibility of an alkali-metal atom with tripod electronic configuration responsible for generating cross-phase modulation and self-phase modulation under the condition of double-double electromagnetically induced transparency. Our investigation demonstrates an enhancement in the nonlinear optical susceptibility of an alkali-metal atom by a factor of 1000 in the region of the second transparency window. This enhancement is in comparison with the atom's susceptibility in the first transparency window for the same parameters under the same conditions. Nonlinear-absorption enhancement arises by canceling Raman-gain generation, which arises when the probe and signal fields have equal intensities. At the center of the second transparency window, we obtain the condition required to attain a nonvanishing nonlinear optical susceptibility. In the bare-state picture, the coupling field must be off resonant from a bare-to-bare-state transition, while working in the semiclassical dressed picture required the signal field to be tuned off resonantly with a bare-to-dressed-state transition. The relation that governs the values of coupling- and signal-field detuning are also obtained. Our scheme exhibits the fact that the second transparency window has advantages over the first transparency window with respect to obtaining an enhanced Kerr effect, and our calculation includes simulation of both low-temperature and Doppler-broadened regimes.

  18. Origin of stationary domain wall enhanced ferroelectric susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shi; Cohen, R. E.

    2017-03-01

    Ferroelectrics usually adopt a multidomain state with domain walls separating domains with polarization axes oriented differently. It has long been recognized that domain walls can dramatically impact the properties of ferroelectric materials. The enhancement of low-field susceptibility/permittivity under subswitching conditions is usually attributed to reversible domain wall vibration. Recent experiments highlight the stationary domain wall contribution to the dielectric susceptibility irrespective of any lateral displacements or deformations of the wall. We study the effects of domain walls on the low-field permittivity of PbTiO3 with density functional theory and molecular dynamics simulations. The static dielectric constant is calculated as a function of increasing domain wall density and temperature. We find an increase of dielectric permittivity with increasing domain wall density, which is expected to occur at a low driving field where the lateral motion of domain walls is forbidden. Real-space decomposition of the dielectric response reveals that frustrated dipoles within the finite width of the domain walls are responsible for the enhanced low-field permittivity. We explain the 100 % enhancement of the dielectric susceptibility form domain walls, which arises from the softer potential wells within them.

  19. Preventing and Treating Blood Clots

    MedlinePlus

    ... of blood clots. Heparin is recommended to treat DVT and PE for the first five to ten days, as well as for preventing blood clots ... risk of bleeding. For patients who develop a deep vein thrombosis, and/or a ... blood clot prevention will be included in your overall treatment plan, ...

  20. Induction therapy alters plasma fibrin clot properties in multiple myeloma patients: association with thromboembolic complications.

    PubMed

    Undas, Anetta; Zubkiewicz-Usnarska, Lidia; Helbig, Grzegorz; Woszczyk, Dariusz; Kozińska, Justyna; Dmoszyńska, Anna; Dębski, Jakub; Podolak-Dawidziak, Maria; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz

    2015-09-01

    Induction therapy in patients with multiple myeloma increases the risk of thromboembolism. We have recently shown that multiple myeloma patients tend to form denser fibrin clots displaying poor lysability. We investigated the effect of induction therapy on fibrin clot properties in multiple myeloma patients. Ex-vivo plasma fibrin clot permeability, turbidity, susceptibility to lysis, thrombin generation, factor VIII and fibrinolytic proteins were compared in 48 multiple myeloma patients prior to and following 3 months of induction therapy, mainly with cyclophosphamide-thalidomide-dexamethasone regimen. Patients on thromboprophylaxis with aspirin or heparins were eligible. A 3-month induction therapy resulted in improved clot properties, that is higher clot permeability, compaction, shorter lag phase and higher final turbidity, along with shorter clot lysis time and higher rate of D-dimer release from fibrin clots than the baseline values. The therapy also resulted in lower thrombin generation, antiplasmin and thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI), but elevated factor VIII. Progressive disease was associated with lower posttreatment clot permeability and lysability. Despite thromboprophylaxis, two patients developed ischemic stroke and 10 had venous thromboembolism. They were characterized by pretreatment lower clot permeability, prolonged clot lysis time, longer lag phase, higher peak thrombin generation, TAFI and plasminogen activator inhibitor -1. Formation of denser plasma fibrin clots with reduced lysability and increased thrombin generation at baseline could predispose to thrombotic complications during induction treatment in multiple myeloma patients. We observed improved fibrin clot properties and thrombin generation in multiple myeloma patients except those with progressive disease.

  1. Kaolin clotting time.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Kottayam

    2013-01-01

    The kaolin clotting time (KCT) is a sensitive test used in the laboratory detection of lupus anticoagulants (LA) (Derksen and de Groot, Thromb Res 114:521-526, 2004). It is essentially an activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) test with no added phospholipid. Kaolin acts as the activator in the KCT. In the absence of additional phospholipid reagent, the quality of the test sample is extremely important since the generation of thrombin completely depends on the presence of residual cell membranes and plasma lipids (Derksen and de Groot, Thromb Res 114:521-526, 2004). Since the test contains no exogenous phospholipid, a confirmatory test using excess phospholipid is required to confirm the presence of lupus anticoagulant in the sample (Court, Br J Biomed Sci 54:287-298, 1997).

  2. Circulating Microparticles Alter Formation, Structure, and Properties of Fibrin Clots

    PubMed Central

    Zubairova, Laily D.; Nabiullina, Roza M.; Nagaswami, Chandrasekaran; Zuev, Yuriy F.; Mustafin, Ilshat G.; Litvinov, Rustem I.; Weisel, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of circulating microparticles in haemostasis and thrombosis, there is limited evidence for potential causative effects of naturally produced cell-derived microparticles on fibrin clot formation and its properties. We studied the significance of blood microparticles for fibrin formation, structure, and susceptibility to fibrinolysis by removing them from platelet-free plasma using filtration. Clots made in platelet-free and microparticle-depleted plasma samples from the same healthy donors were analyzed in parallel. Microparticles accelerate fibrin polymerisation and support formation of more compact clots that resist internal and external fibrinolysis. These variations correlate with faster thrombin generation, suggesting thrombin-mediated kinetic effects of microparticles on fibrin formation, structure, and properties. In addition, clots formed in the presence of microparticles, unlike clots from the microparticle-depleted plasma, contain 0.1–0.5-μm size granular and CD61-positive material on fibres, suggesting that platelet-derived microparticles attach to fibrin. Therefore, the blood of healthy individuals contains functional microparticles at the levels that have a procoagulant potential. They affect the structure and stability of fibrin clots indirectly through acceleration of thrombin generation and through direct physical incorporation into the fibrin network. Both mechanisms underlie a potential role of microparticles in haemostasis and thrombosis as modulators of fibrin formation, structure, and resistance to fibrinolysis. PMID:26635081

  3. Rapidly stopping hemorrhage by enhancing blood clotting at an opened wound using chitosan/polylactic acid/polycaprolactone wound dressing device.

    PubMed

    Boonkong, Wasinee; Petsom, Amorn; Thongchul, Nuttha

    2013-06-01

    Doxycycline and monosodium glutamate (MSG) loaded chitosan (CHI)/polylactic acid (PLA)/polycaprolactone (PCL) blend film was studied as a model device to deliver drug to targeted human organ which in this case was the skin with opened wound. The CHI/PLA/PCL blend film containing 60 % CHI, 28 % PLA, and 12 % PCL exhibited the good properties for making the dressing device. It was observed that doxycycline/MSG loaded CHI/PLA/PCL blend film could rapidly deliver both doxycycline and MSG at the high release percentage approaching 100 % loaded. MSG accelerated blood clotting and fibrin formation; thus, it exhibited the good hemostatic activity. The antibacterial activity of doxycycline loaded CHI/PLA/PCL blend film against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli as model bacteria was investigated. Doxycycline release played the crucial role in bacterial inhibition as observed from the lowest bacterial cell dry weight observed when compared with the control bacterial culture or the bacterial cultures with the presence of other films studied.

  4. 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine enhances kainic acid convulsive susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Abad, Sónia; Junyent, Fèlix; Auladell, Carme; Pubill, David; Pallàs, Mercè; Camarasa, Jorge; Escubedo, Elena; Camins, Antonio

    2014-10-03

    Kainic acid (KA) causes seizures and neuronal loss in the hippocampus. The present study investigated whether a recreational schedule of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) favours the development of a seizure state in a model of KA-induced epilepsy and potentiates the toxicity profile of KA (20 or 30mg/kg). Adolescent male C57BL/6 mice received saline or MDMA t.i.d. (s.c. every 3h), on 1day a week, for 4 consecutive weeks. Twenty-four hours after the last MDMA exposure, the animals were injected with saline or KA (20 or 30mg/kg). After this injection, we evaluated seizures, hippocampal neuronal cell death, microgliosis, astrogliosis, and calcium binding proteins. MDMA pretreatment, by itself, did not induce neuronal damage but increased seizure susceptibility in all KA treatments and potentiated the presence of Fluoro-Jade-positive cells in CA1. Furthermore, MDMA, like KA, significantly decreased parvalbumin levels in CA1 and dentate gyrus, where it potentiated the effects of KA. The amphetamine derivative also promoted a transient decrease in calbindin and calretinin levels, indicative of an abnormal neuronal discharge. In addition, treatment of cortical neurons with MDMA (10-50μM) for 6 or 48h significantly increased basal Ca(2+), reduced basal Na(+) levels and potentiated kainate response. These results indicate that MDMA potentiates KA-induced neurodegeneration and also increases KA seizure susceptibility. The mechanism proposed includes changes in Calcium Binding Proteins expression, probably due to the disruption of intracellular ionic homeostasis, or/and an indirect effect through glutamate release.

  5. Enhanced susceptibility of CA3 hippocampus to prenatal nicotine exposure.

    PubMed

    Kalejaiye, O O; Gondré-Lewis, M C

    2017-04-01

    The brain is highly susceptible to adverse effects of drugs of abuse during early phases of life. Prenatal nicotine exposure (PNE), a preventable cause of gestational and infant mortality, can alter neuron wiring and induce sustained deficits in attention and learning. Here, a rat model of PNE (embryonic days 7-21) was used to examine the maturing hippocampus, which encodes new memories and processes emotional memory. Components of synaptic signaling were evaluated at postnatal day 14 (P14), a period of prolific synaptogenesis in rats, to determine if glutamatergic transmission-associated molecules are regulated in subregions of hippocampus as early as P14. PNE resulted in reduced expression of GluN2B, GluA2 and CaMKIIα, but elevated SNAP25 proteins specifically in the CA3 but not CA1. Only CaMKIIα was regulated in dentate gyrus at this age. These results suggest that glutamatergic and synaptic dysregulation of learning and memory may occur in hippocampus in a temporally and subregionally specific manner.

  6. Enhanced brain susceptibility to negative stimuli in adolescents: ERP evidences

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jiajin; Ju, Enxia; Meng, Xianxin; Chen, Xuhai; Zhu, Siyu; Yang, Jiemin; Li, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies investigated neural substrates of emotional face processing in adolescents and its comparison with adults. As emotional faces elicit more of emotional expression recognition rather than direct emotional responding, it remains undetermined how adolescents are different from adults in brain susceptibility to emotionally stressful stimuli. Methods: Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) were recorded for highly negative (HN), moderately negative (MN), and neutral pictures in 20 adolescents and 20 adults while subjects performed a standard/deviant distinction task by pressing different keys, irrespective of the emotionality of deviant stimuli. Results: Adolescents exhibited more negative amplitudes for HN vs. neutral pictures in N1 (100–150 ms), P2 (130–190 ms), N2 (210–290 ms), and P3 (360–440 ms) components. In addition, adolescents showed more negative amplitudes for MN compared to neutral pictures in N1, P2, and N2 components. By contrast, adults exhibited significant emotion effects for HN stimuli in N2 and P3 amplitudes but not in N1 and P2 amplitudes, and they did not exhibit a significant emotion effect for MN stimuli at all these components. In the 210–290 ms time interval, the emotion effect for HN stimuli was significant across frontal and central regions in adolescents, while this emotion effect was noticeable only in the central region for adults. Conclusions: Adolescents are more emotionally sensitive to negative stimuli compared to adults, regardless of the emotional intensity of the stimuli, possibly due to the immature prefrontal control system over the limbic emotional inputs during adolescence. PMID:25972790

  7. Antisense downregulation of polyphenol oxidase results in enhanced disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Thipyapong, Piyada; Hunt, Michelle D; Steffens, John C

    2004-11-01

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs; EC 1.14.18.1 or EC 1.10.3.2) catalyze the oxidation of phenolics to quinones, highly reactive intermediates whose secondary reactions are responsible for much of the oxidative browning that accompanies plant senescence, wounding, and responses to pathogens. To assess the impact of PPO expression on resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato we introduced a chimeric antisense potato PPO cDNA into tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.). Oxidation of caffeic acid, the dominant o-diphenolic aglycone of tomato foliage, was decreased ca. 40-fold by antisense expression of PPO. All members of the PPO gene family were downregulated: neither immunoreactive PPO nor PPO-specific mRNA were detectable in the transgenic plants. In addition, the antisense PPO construct suppressed inducible increases in PPO activity. Downregulation of PPO in antisense plants did not affect growth, development, or reproduction of greenhouse-grown plants. However, antisense PPO expression dramatically increased susceptibility to P. syringae expressing the avirulence gene avrPto in both Pto and pto backgrounds. In a compatible (pto) interaction, plants constitutively expressing an antisense PPO construct exhibited a 55-fold increase in bacterial growth, three times larger lesion area, and ten times more lesions cm(-2) than nontransformed plants. In an incompatible (Pto) interaction, antisense PPO plants exhibited 100-fold increases in bacterial growth and ten times more lesions cm(-2) than nontransformed plants. Although it is not clear whether hypersusceptibility of antisense plants is due to low constitutive PPO levels or failure to induce PPO upon infection, these findings suggest a critical role for PPO-catalyzed phenolic oxidation in limiting disease development. As a preliminary effort to understand the role of induced PPO in limiting disease development, we also examined the response of PPO promoter::beta-glucuronidase constructs when plants are challenged with P

  8. Fluid Mechanics of Blood Clot Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogelson, Aaron L.; Neeves, Keith B.

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular blood clots form in an environment in which hydrodynamic forces dominate and in which fluid-mediated transport is the primary means of moving material. The clotting system has evolved to exploit fluid dynamic mechanisms and to overcome fluid dynamic challenges to ensure that clots that preserve vascular integrity can form over the wide range of flow conditions found in the circulation. Fluid-mediated interactions between the many large deformable red blood cells and the few small rigid platelets lead to high platelet concentrations near vessel walls where platelets contribute to clotting. Receptor-ligand pairs with diverse kinetic and mechanical characteristics work synergistically to arrest rapidly flowing cells on an injured vessel. Variations in hydrodynamic stresses switch on and off the function of key clotting polymers. Protein transport to, from, and within a developing clot determines whether and how fast it grows. We review ongoing experimental and modeling research to understand these and related phenomena.

  9. Fluid Mechanics of Blood Clot Formation.

    PubMed

    Fogelson, Aaron L; Neeves, Keith B

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular blood clots form in an environment in which hydrodynamic forces dominate and in which fluid-mediated transport is the primary means of moving material. The clotting system has evolved to exploit fluid dynamic mechanisms and to overcome fluid dynamic challenges to ensure that clots that preserve vascular integrity can form over the wide range of flow conditions found in the circulation. Fluid-mediated interactions between the many large deformable red blood cells and the few small rigid platelets lead to high platelet concentrations near vessel walls where platelets contribute to clotting. Receptor-ligand pairs with diverse kinetic and mechanical characteristics work synergistically to arrest rapidly flowing cells on an injured vessel. Variations in hydrodynamic stresses switch on and off the function of key clotting polymers. Protein transport to, from, and within a developing clot determines whether and how fast it grows. We review ongoing experimental and modeling research to understand these and related phenomena.

  10. ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY 1 and SALICYLIC ACID act redundantly to regulate resistance gene-mediated signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance (R) protein–associated pathways are well known to participate in defense against a variety of microbial pathogens. Salicylic acid (SA) and its associated proteinaceous signaling components, including enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1), non–race-specific disease resistance 1 (NDR1), ...

  11. Rapid bacterial antibiotic susceptibility test based on simple surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chia-Ying; Han, Yin-Yi; Shih, Po-Han; Lian, Wei-Nan; Wang, Huai-Hsien; Lin, Chi-Hung; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Wang, Juen-Kai; Wang, Yuh-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Rapid bacterial antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measurement are important to help reduce the widespread misuse of antibiotics and alleviate the growing drug-resistance problem. We discovered that, when a susceptible strain of Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli is exposed to an antibiotic, the intensity of specific biomarkers in its surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra drops evidently in two hours. The discovery has been exploited for rapid AST and MIC determination of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus and wild-type E. coli as well as clinical isolates. The results obtained by this SERS-AST method were consistent with that by the standard incubation-based method, indicating its high potential to supplement or replace existing time-consuming methods and help mitigate the challenge of drug resistance in clinical microbiology. PMID:26997474

  12. Rapid bacterial antibiotic susceptibility test based on simple surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chia-Ying; Han, Yin-Yi; Shih, Po-Han; Lian, Wei-Nan; Wang, Huai-Hsien; Lin, Chi-Hung; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Wang, Juen-Kai; Wang, Yuh-Lin

    2016-03-01

    Rapid bacterial antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measurement are important to help reduce the widespread misuse of antibiotics and alleviate the growing drug-resistance problem. We discovered that, when a susceptible strain of Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli is exposed to an antibiotic, the intensity of specific biomarkers in its surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra drops evidently in two hours. The discovery has been exploited for rapid AST and MIC determination of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus and wild-type E. coli as well as clinical isolates. The results obtained by this SERS-AST method were consistent with that by the standard incubation-based method, indicating its high potential to supplement or replace existing time-consuming methods and help mitigate the challenge of drug resistance in clinical microbiology.

  13. Increased Abundance of M Cells in the Gut Epithelium Dramatically Enhances Oral Prion Disease Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, David S; Sehgal, Anuj; Rios, Daniel; Williams, Ifor R; Mabbott, Neil A

    2016-12-01

    Many natural prion diseases of humans and animals are considered to be acquired through oral consumption of contaminated food or pasture. Determining the route by which prions establish host infection will identify the important factors that influence oral prion disease susceptibility and to which intervention strategies can be developed. After exposure, the early accumulation and replication of prions within small intestinal Peyer's patches is essential for the efficient spread of disease to the brain. To replicate within Peyer's patches, the prions must first cross the gut epithelium. M cells are specialised epithelial cells within the epithelia covering Peyer's patches that transcytose particulate antigens and microorganisms. M cell-development is dependent upon RANKL-RANK-signalling, and mice in which RANK is deleted only in the gut epithelium completely lack M cells. In the specific absence of M cells in these mice, the accumulation of prions within Peyer's patches and the spread of disease to the brain was blocked, demonstrating a critical role for M cells in the initial transfer of prions across the gut epithelium in order to establish host infection. Since pathogens, inflammatory stimuli and aging can modify M cell-density in the gut, these factors may also influence oral prion disease susceptibility. Mice were therefore treated with RANKL to enhance M cell density in the gut. We show that prion uptake from the gut lumen was enhanced in RANKL-treated mice, resulting in shortened survival times and increased disease susceptibility, equivalent to a 10-fold higher infectious titre of prions. Together these data demonstrate that M cells are the critical gatekeepers of oral prion infection, whose density in the gut epithelium directly limits or enhances disease susceptibility. Our data suggest that factors which alter M cell-density in the gut epithelium may be important risk factors which influence host susceptibility to orally acquired prion diseases.

  14. Increased Abundance of M Cells in the Gut Epithelium Dramatically Enhances Oral Prion Disease Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Anuj; Rios, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Many natural prion diseases of humans and animals are considered to be acquired through oral consumption of contaminated food or pasture. Determining the route by which prions establish host infection will identify the important factors that influence oral prion disease susceptibility and to which intervention strategies can be developed. After exposure, the early accumulation and replication of prions within small intestinal Peyer’s patches is essential for the efficient spread of disease to the brain. To replicate within Peyer’s patches, the prions must first cross the gut epithelium. M cells are specialised epithelial cells within the epithelia covering Peyer’s patches that transcytose particulate antigens and microorganisms. M cell-development is dependent upon RANKL-RANK-signalling, and mice in which RANK is deleted only in the gut epithelium completely lack M cells. In the specific absence of M cells in these mice, the accumulation of prions within Peyer’s patches and the spread of disease to the brain was blocked, demonstrating a critical role for M cells in the initial transfer of prions across the gut epithelium in order to establish host infection. Since pathogens, inflammatory stimuli and aging can modify M cell-density in the gut, these factors may also influence oral prion disease susceptibility. Mice were therefore treated with RANKL to enhance M cell density in the gut. We show that prion uptake from the gut lumen was enhanced in RANKL-treated mice, resulting in shortened survival times and increased disease susceptibility, equivalent to a 10-fold higher infectious titre of prions. Together these data demonstrate that M cells are the critical gatekeepers of oral prion infection, whose density in the gut epithelium directly limits or enhances disease susceptibility. Our data suggest that factors which alter M cell-density in the gut epithelium may be important risk factors which influence host susceptibility to orally acquired prion diseases

  15. Serratia odorifera a Midgut Inhabitant of Aedes aegypti Mosquito Enhances Its Susceptibility to Dengue-2 Virus

    PubMed Central

    Apte-Deshpande, Anjali; Paingankar, Mandar; Gokhale, Mangesh D.; Deobagkar, Dileep N.

    2012-01-01

    Mosquito midgut plays a crucial role in its vector susceptibility and pathogen interaction. Identification of the sustainable microflora of the midgut environment can therefore help in evaluating its contribution in mosquito-pathogen interaction and in turn vector competence. To understand the bacterial diversity in the midgut of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, we conducted a screening study of the gut microbes of these mosquitoes which were either collected from fields or reared in the laboratory “culture-dependent” approach. This work demonstrated that the microbial flora of larvae and adult Ae. aegypti midgut is complex and is dominated by Gram negative proteobacteria. Serratia odorifera was found to be stably associated in the midguts of field collected and laboratory reared larvae and adult females. The potential influence of this sustainable gut microbe on DENV-2 susceptibility of this vector was evaluated by co-feeding S. odorifera with DENV-2 to adult Ae. aegypti females (free of gut flora). The observations revealed that the viral susceptibility of these Aedes females enhanced significantly as compared to solely dengue-2 fed and another gut inhabitant, Microbacterium oxydans co-fed females. Based on the results of this study we proposed that the enhancement in the DENV-2 susceptibility of Ae. aegypti females was due to blocking of prohibitin molecule present on the midgut surface of these females by the polypeptide of gut inhabitant S. odorifera. PMID:22848375

  16. 21 CFR 173.150 - Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Microorganisms § 173.150 Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial. Milk-clotting enzyme produced by pure-culture... conditions: (a) Milk-clotting enzyme is derived from one of the following organisms by a...

  17. Zinc promotes clot stability by accelerating clot formation and modifying fibrin structure.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Sara J; Xia, Jing; Wu, Huayin; Stafford, Alan R; Leslie, Beverly A; Fredenburgh, James C; Weitz, David A; Weitz, Jeffrey I

    2016-03-01

    Zinc released from activated platelets binds fibrin(ogen) and attenuates fibrinolysis. Although zinc also affects clot formation, the mechanism and consequences are poorly understood. To address these gaps, the effect of zinc on clot formation and structure was examined in the absence or presence of factor (F) XIII. Zinc accelerated a) plasma clotting by 1.4-fold, b) fibrinogen clotting by 3.5- and 2.3-fold in the absence or presence of FXIII, respectively, c) fragment X clotting by 1.3-fold, and d) polymerisation of fibrin monomers generated with thrombin or batroxobin by 2.5- and 1.8-fold, respectively. Whereas absorbance increased up to 3.3-fold when fibrinogen was clotted in the presence of zinc, absorbance of fragment X clots was unaffected by zinc, consistent with reports that zinc binds to the αC-domain of fibrin(ogen). Scanning electron microscopic analysis revealed a two-fold increase in fibre diameter in the presence of zinc and in permeability studies, zinc increased clot porosity by 30-fold with or without FXIII. Whereas FXIII increased clot stiffness from 128 ± 19 Pa to 415 ± 27 Pa in rheological analyses, zinc reduced clot stiffness by 10- and 8.5-fold in the absence and presence of FXIII, respectively. Clots formed in the presence of zinc were more stable and resisted rupture with or without FXIII. Therefore, zinc accelerates clotting and reduces fibrin clot stiffness in a FXIII-independent manner, suggesting that zinc may work in concert with FXIII to modulate clot strength and stability.

  18. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing with electrokinetics enhanced biosensors for diagnosis of acute bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Lu, Yi; Gau, Vincent; Liao, Joseph C; Wong, Pak Kin

    2014-11-01

    Rapid pathogen detection and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) are required in diagnosis of acute bacterial infections to determine the appropriate antibiotic treatment. Molecular approaches for AST are often based on the detection of known antibiotic resistance genes. Phenotypic culture analysis requires several days from sample collection to result reporting. Toward rapid diagnosis of bacterial infection in non-traditional healthcare settings, we have developed a rapid AST approach that combines phenotypic culture of bacterial pathogens in physiological samples and electrochemical sensing of bacterial 16S rRNA. The assay determines the susceptibility of pathogens by detecting bacterial growth under various antibiotic conditions. AC electrokinetic fluid motion and Joule heating induced temperature elevation are optimized to enhance the sensor signal and minimize the matrix effect, which improve the overall sensitivity of the assay. The electrokinetics enhanced biosensor directly detects the bacterial pathogens in blood culture without prior purification. Rapid determination of the antibiotic resistance profile of Escherichia coli clinical isolates is demonstrated.

  19. Blood Clotting Inspired Polymer Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sing, Charles Edward

    The blood clotting process is one of the human body's masterpieces in targeted molecular manipulation, as it requires the activation of the clotting cascade at a specific place and a specific time. Recent research in the biological sciences have discovered that one of the protein molecules involved in the initial stages of the clotting response, von Willebrand Factor (vWF), exhibits counterintuitive and technologically useful properties that are driven in part by the physical environment in the bloodstream at the site of a wound. In this thesis, we take inspiration from initial observations of the vWF in experiments, and aim to describe the behaviors observed in this process within the context of polymer physics. By understanding these physical principles, we hope to harness nature's ability to both direct molecules in both spatial and conformational coordinates. This thesis is presented in three complementary sections. After an initial introduction describing the systems of interest, we first describe the behavior of collapsed Lennard-Jones polymers in the presence of an infinite medium. It has been shown that simple bead-spring homopolymer models describe vWF quite well in vitro. We build upon this previous work to first describe the behavior of a collapsed homopolymer in an elongational fluid flow. Through a nucleation-protrusion mechanism, scaling relationships can be developed to provide a clear picture of a first-order globule-stretch transition and its ramifications in dilute-solution rheology. The implications of this behavior and its relation to the current literature provides qualitative explanations for the physiological process of vasoconstriction. In an effort to generalize these observations, we present an entire theory on the behavior of polymer globules under influence of any local fluid flow. Finally, we investigate the internal dynamics of these globules by probing their pulling response in an analogous fashion to force spectroscopy. We elucidate

  20. Preventing Blood Clots After Orthopaedic Surgery

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... recovery from surgery. Warning Signs of Blood Clots Pain in your calf and leg, unrelated to your ... of Pulmonary Embolism Sudden shortness of breath Chest pain, particularly with breathing Notify your doctor immediately if ...

  1. Early life antibiotic-driven changes in microbiota enhance susceptibility to allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Shannon L; Gold, Matthew J; Hartmann, Martin; Willing, Benjamin P; Thorson, Lisa; Wlodarska, Marta; Gill, Navkiran; Blanchet, Marie-Renée; Mohn, William W; McNagny, Kelly M; Finlay, Brett B

    2012-01-01

    Allergic asthma rates have increased steadily in developed countries, arguing for an environmental aetiology. To assess the influence of gut microbiota on experimental murine allergic asthma, we treated neonatal mice with clinical doses of two widely used antibiotics—streptomycin and vancomycin—and evaluated resulting shifts in resident flora and subsequent susceptibility to allergic asthma. Streptomycin treatment had little effect on the microbiota and on disease, whereas vancomycin reduced microbial diversity, shifted the composition of the bacterial population and enhanced disease severity. Neither antibiotic had a significant effect when administered to adult mice. Consistent with the ‘hygiene hypothesis', our data support a neonatal, microbiota-driven, specific increase in susceptibility to experimental murine allergic asthma. PMID:22422004

  2. Reduced expression IRF7 in nasal epithelial cells from smokers as a potential mechanism mediating enhanced susceptibility to influenza

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Smokers are more susceptible to viral infections, including influenza virus, yet the mechanisms mediating this effect are not known. Methods: We have established an in vitro model of differentiated nasal epithelial cells from smokers, which maintain enhanced levels...

  3. High susceptibility of Bt maize to aphids enhances the performance of parasitoids of lepidopteran pests.

    PubMed

    Faria, Cristina A; Wäckers, Felix L; Pritchard, Jeremy; Barrett, David A; Turlings, Ted C J

    2007-07-11

    Concerns about possible undesired environmental effects of transgenic crops have prompted numerous evaluations of such crops. So-called Bt crops receive particular attention because they carry bacteria-derived genes coding for insecticidal proteins that might negatively affect non-target arthropods. Here we show a remarkable positive effect of Bt maize on the performance of the corn leaf aphid Rhopalosiphum maidis, which in turn enhanced the performance of parasitic wasps that feed on aphid honeydew. Within five out of six pairs that were evaluated, transgenic maize lines were significantly more susceptible to aphids than their near-isogenic equivalents, with the remaining pair being equally susceptible. The aphids feed from the phloem sieve element content and analyses of this sap in selected maize lines revealed marginally, but significantly higher amino acid levels in Bt maize, which might partially explain the observed increased aphid performance. Larger colony densities of aphids on Bt plants resulted in an increased production of honeydew that can be used as food by beneficial insects. Indeed, Cotesia marginiventris, a parasitoid of lepidopteran pests, lived longer and parasitized more pest caterpillars in the presence of aphid-infested Bt maize than in the presence of aphid-infested isogenic maize. Hence, depending on aphid pest thresholds, the observed increased susceptibility of Bt maize to aphids may be either a welcome or an undesirable side effect.

  4. Susceptibility to enhanced chemical migration from depression-focused preferential flow, High Plains aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gurdak, J.J.; Walvoord, M.A.; McMahon, P.B.

    2008-01-01

    Aquifer susceptibility to contamination is controlled in part by the inherent hydrogeologic properties of the vadose zone, which includes preferential-flow pathways. The purpose of this study was to investigate the importance of seasonal ponding near leaky irrigation wells as a mechanism for depression-focused preferential flow and enhanced chemical migration through the vadose zone of the High Plains aquifer. Such a mechanism may help explain the widespread presence of agrichemicals in recently recharged groundwater despite estimates of advective chemical transit times through the vadose zone from diffuse recharge that exceed the historical period of agriculture. Using a combination of field observations, vadose zone flow and transport simulations, and probabilistic neural network modeling, we demonstrated that vadose zone transit times near irrigation wells range from 7 to 50 yr, which are one to two orders of magnitude faster than previous estimates based on diffuse recharge. These findings support the concept of fast and slow transport zones and help to explain the previous discordant findings of long vadose zone transit times and the presence of agrichemicals at the water table. Using predictions of aquifer susceptibility from probabilistic neural network models, we delineated approximately 20% of the areal extent of the aquifer to have conditions that may promote advective chemical transit times to the water table of <50 yr if seasonal ponding and depression-focused flow exist. This aquifer-susceptibility map may help managers prioritize areas for groundwater monitoring or implementation of best management practices.

  5. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Quantitative Perfusion in Cerebral Cavernous Angiomas

    PubMed Central

    Mikati, Abdul Ghani; Tan, Huan; Shenkar, Robert; Li, Luying; Zhang, Lingjiao; Guo, Xiaodong; Shi, Changbin; Liu, Tian; Wang, Yi; Shah, Akash; Edelman, Robert; Christoforidis, Gregory; Awad, Issam

    2015-01-01

    Background Hyperpermeability and iron deposition are two central pathophysiological phenomena in human cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) disease. Here we used two novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to establish a relationship between these phenomena. Methods Subjects with CCM disease (4 sporadic and 18 familial) underwent MRI imaging using the Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Quantitative Perfusion (DCEQP) and Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM) techniques that measure hemodynamic factors of vessel leak and iron deposition respectively, previously demonstrated in CCM disease. Regions of interest encompassing the CCM lesions were analyzed using these techniques Results Susceptibility measured by QSM was positively correlated with permeability of lesions measured using DCEQP (r=0.49, p=<0.0001). The correlation was not affected by factors including familial predisposition, lesion volume, the contrast agent and the use of statin medication. Susceptibility was correlated with lesional blood volume (r=0.4, p=0.0001), but not with lesional blood flow. Conclusion The correlation between QSM and DCEQP suggests that the phenomena of permeability and iron deposition are related in CCM; hence “more leaky lesions” also manifest a more cumulative iron burden. These techniques might be used as biomarkers to monitor the course of this disease and the effect of therapy. PMID:24302484

  6. Spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome enhances infection susceptibility dependent on lesion level.

    PubMed

    Brommer, Benedikt; Engel, Odilo; Kopp, Marcel A; Watzlawick, Ralf; Müller, Susanne; Prüss, Harald; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J; Finkenstaedt, Felix W; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Liebscher, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas; Schwab, Jan M

    2016-03-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of death after acute spinal cord injury and is associated with poor neurological outcome. In contrast to the current understanding, attributing enhanced infection susceptibility solely to the patient's environment and motor dysfunction, we investigate whether a secondary functional neurogenic immune deficiency (spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome, SCI-IDS) may account for the enhanced infection susceptibility. We applied a clinically relevant model of experimental induced pneumonia to investigate whether the systemic SCI-IDS is functional sufficient to cause pneumonia dependent on spinal cord injury lesion level and investigated whether findings are mirrored in a large prospective cohort study after human spinal cord injury. In a mouse model of inducible pneumonia, high thoracic lesions that interrupt sympathetic innervation to major immune organs, but not low thoracic lesions, significantly increased bacterial load in lungs. The ability to clear the bacterial load from the lung remained preserved in sham animals. Propagated immune susceptibility depended on injury of central pre-ganglionic but not peripheral postganglionic sympathetic innervation to the spleen. Thoracic spinal cord injury level was confirmed as an independent increased risk factor of pneumonia in patients after motor complete spinal cord injury (odds ratio = 1.35, P < 0.001) independently from mechanical ventilation and preserved sensory function by multiple regression analysis. We present evidence that spinal cord injury directly causes increased risk for bacterial infection in mice as well as in patients. Besides obvious motor and sensory paralysis, spinal cord injury also induces a functional SCI-IDS ('immune paralysis'), sufficient to propagate clinically relevant infection in an injury level dependent manner.

  7. Spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome enhances infection susceptibility dependent on lesion level

    PubMed Central

    Brommer, Benedikt; Engel, Odilo; Kopp, Marcel A.; Watzlawick, Ralf; Müller, Susanne; Prüss, Harald; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J.; Finkenstaedt, Felix W.; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Liebscher, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of death after acute spinal cord injury and is associated with poor neurological outcome. In contrast to the current understanding, attributing enhanced infection susceptibility solely to the patient’s environment and motor dysfunction, we investigate whether a secondary functional neurogenic immune deficiency (spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome, SCI-IDS) may account for the enhanced infection susceptibility. We applied a clinically relevant model of experimental induced pneumonia to investigate whether the systemic SCI-IDS is functional sufficient to cause pneumonia dependent on spinal cord injury lesion level and investigated whether findings are mirrored in a large prospective cohort study after human spinal cord injury. In a mouse model of inducible pneumonia, high thoracic lesions that interrupt sympathetic innervation to major immune organs, but not low thoracic lesions, significantly increased bacterial load in lungs. The ability to clear the bacterial load from the lung remained preserved in sham animals. Propagated immune susceptibility depended on injury of central pre-ganglionic but not peripheral postganglionic sympathetic innervation to the spleen. Thoracic spinal cord injury level was confirmed as an independent increased risk factor of pneumonia in patients after motor complete spinal cord injury (odds ratio = 1.35, P < 0.001) independently from mechanical ventilation and preserved sensory function by multiple regression analysis. We present evidence that spinal cord injury directly causes increased risk for bacterial infection in mice as well as in patients. Besides obvious motor and sensory paralysis, spinal cord injury also induces a functional SCI-IDS (‘immune paralysis’), sufficient to propagate clinically relevant infection in an injury level dependent manner. PMID:26754788

  8. Potential blood clotting factors and anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ng Zhang; Gopinath, Subash C B

    2016-12-01

    Hemostasis initiates a wound healing process and stops bleeding of blood within a damaged tissue, an important process in human and animal systems. However, this process needs to revert temporarily during surgery and analyze the clotting mechanism. In the past decade, heparin has been used widely as an anticoagulant in surgery to prevent unwanted blood clotting as it is not expensive, not difficult to control, lack of suitable replacement as well as less harmful to the human. However, heparin has several disadvantages, which include thrombocytopenia and non-specific plasma binding. Moreover, using heparin it may lead dysfunction and platelet aggregation. In this overview, potential clotting factors and anticoagulants are reviewed and special focus was given to get more insights.

  9. Functional consequences of blood clotting in insects.

    PubMed

    Haine, Eleanor R; Rolff, Jens; Siva-Jothy, Michael T

    2007-01-01

    Recent in vitro studies have revealed several important aspects of the biochemical and cellular processes involved in insect blood clotting. However, in vivo empirical studies of the functional consequences of clotting are lacking, despite the role of coagulation in wound-healing, preventing infection, and its homology with vertebrate wound repair. Here we present results of the in vivo effects of haemolymph coagulation and its consequences on the spatial disposition of immune activity, in the American cockroach Periplaneta americana. Our results demonstrate that clotting: (1) localises immune effectors in the vicinity of a breach of the cuticle; (2) restricts the spread of invasive particles across the haemocoel, and (3) is greater when wounding is associated with non-self. Our results demonstrate that haemolymph coagulation has major functional consequences, the most important of which is the compartmentalisation of the open haemocoel.

  10. Cavitation damage in blood clots under HIFU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Hope; Ahadi, Golnaz; Hoelscher, Thilo; Szeri, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has been shown to accelerate thrombolysis, the dissolution of blood clots, in vitro and in vivo, for treatment of ischemic stroke. Cavitation in sonothrombolysis is thought to play an important role, although the mechanisms are not fully understood. The damage to a blood clot associated with bubble collapses in a HIFU field is studied. The region of damage caused by a bubble collapse on the fibrin network of the blood clot exposed to HIFU is estimated, and compared with experimental assessment of the damage. The mechanical damage to the network caused by a bubble is probed using two independent approaches, a strain based method and an energy based method. Immunoflourescent fibrin staining is used to assess the region of damage experimentally.

  11. Reduced Carbohydrate Availability Enhances the Susceptibility of Arabidopsis toward Colletotrichum higginsianum1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Engelsdorf, Timo; Horst, Robin J.; Pröls, Reinhard; Pröschel, Marlene; Dietz, Franziska; Hückelhoven, Ralph; Voll, Lars M.

    2013-01-01

    Colletotrichum higginsianum is a hemibiotrophic ascomycete fungus that is adapted to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). After breaching the host surface, the fungus establishes an initial biotrophic phase in the penetrated epidermis cell, before necrotrophic growth is initiated upon further host colonization. We observed that partitioning of major leaf carbohydrates was shifted in favor of sucrose and at the expense of starch during necrotrophic fungal growth. Arabidopsis mutants with impaired starch turnover were more susceptible toward C. higginsianum infection, exhibiting a strong negative correlation between diurnal carbohydrate accumulation and fungal proliferation for the tested genotypes. By altering the length of the light phase and employing additional genotypes impaired in nocturnal carbon mobilization, we revealed that reduced availability of carbon enhances susceptibility in the investigated pathosystem. Systematic starvation experiments resulted in two important findings. First, we showed that carbohydrate supply by the host is dispensable during biotrophic growth of C. higginsianum, while carbon deficiency was most harmful to the host during the necrotrophic colonization phase. Compared with the wild type, the increases in the total salicylic acid pool and camalexin accumulation were reduced in starch-free mutants at late interaction stages, while an increased ratio of free to total salicylic acid did not convey elevated pathogenesis-related gene expression in starch-free mutants. These observations suggest that reduced carbon availability dampens induced defense responses. In contrast, starch-free mutants were more resistant toward the fungal biotroph Erysiphe cruciferarum, indicating that reduced carbohydrate availability influences susceptibility differently in the interaction with the investigated hemibiotrophic and biotrophic fungal pathogens. PMID:23487433

  12. Interactions between ultrasound stimulated microbubbles and fibrin clots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acconcia, Christopher; Leung, Ben Y. C.; Hynynen, Kullervo; Goertz, David E.

    2013-07-01

    While it is well established that ultrasound stimulated microbubbles (USMBs) can potentiate blood clot lysis, the mechanisms are not well understood. Here we examine the interaction between USMBs and fibrin clots, which are comprised of fibrin networks that maintain the mechanical integrity of blood clots. High speed camera observations demonstrated that USMBs can penetrate fibrin clots. Two-photon microscopy revealed that penetrating bubbles can leave behind patent "tunnels" along their paths and that fluid can be transported into the clots. Finally, it is observed that primary radiation forces associated with USMBs can induce local deformation and macroscopic translation of clot boundaries.

  13. Exogenous tyrosol inhibits planktonic cells and biofilms of Candida species and enhances their susceptibility to antifungals.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Rossana de A; Teixeira, Carlos E C; Brilhante, Raimunda S N; Castelo-Branco, Débora S C M; Alencar, Lucas P; de Oliveira, Jonathas S; Monteiro, André J; Bandeira, Tereza J P G; Sidrim, José J C; Moreira, José Luciano Bezerra; Rocha, Marcos F G

    2015-06-01

    Tyrosol is a quorum-sensing molecule of Candida albicans able to induce hyphal development in the early and intermediate stages of biofilm growth. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of high concentrations of exogenous tyrosol on planktonic cells and biofilms of C. albicans (n = 10) and C. tropicalis (n = 10), and investigated whether tyrosol could be synergic to antifungals that target cellular ergosterol. Antifungal susceptibility and drug interaction against planktonic cells were investigated by the broth microdilution method. Tyrosol was able to inhibit planktonic cells, with MIC values ranging from 2.5 to 5.0 mM for both species. Synergism was observed between tyrosol/amphotericin B (11/20 strains), tyrosol/itraconazole (18/20 strains) and tyrosol/fluconazole (18/20 strains). Exogenous tyrosol alone or combined with antifungals at both 10 × MIC and 50 × MIC were able to reduce biofilm of both Candida species. Mature biofilms were susceptible to tyrosol alone at 50 × MIC or combined with amphotericin at both 10 × MIC and 50 × MIC. On the other hand, tyrosol plus azoles at both 10 × MIC and 50 × MIC enhanced biofilm growth.

  14. Correlation between the enhancement of flunitrazepam binding by GABA and seizure susceptibility in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, R.J.; Wehner, J.M.

    1987-06-08

    Various populations of mice exhibit differential sensitivity to seizure-inducing agents. The relationship of seizure susceptibility to alterations in the GABA receptor complex was investigated in six different populations of mice consisting of four inbred strains (C57BL, DBA, C3H, and BALB) and two selected lines (long sleep and short sleep). Seizure activity was induced by intraperitoneal administration of the GAD inhibitor, 3-mercaptopropionic acid, and latencies to seizure onset and tonus were measured. In naive mice of the same populations, GABA enhancement of TH-flunitrazepam binding was measured in extensively washed whole brain membranes at several GABA concentrations. Both differential seizure sensitivity to 3-mercaptopropionic acid and differential enhancement of TH-flunitrazepam binding by GABA were observed in these six populations of mice. Correlational analyses indicated a positive correlation between the degree of GABA enhancement of TH-flunitrazepam binding and resistance to the seizure-inducing properties of 3-mercaptopropionic acid. These data suggest that genetic differences in sensitivity to seizure-inducing agents that disrupt the GABAergic system may be related to differences in coupling between the various receptors associated with the GABA receptor complex.

  15. Stent Patients Face Higher Risk of Death After Bleeding, Clots

    MedlinePlus

    ... 164108.html Stent Patients Face Higher Risk of Death After Bleeding, Clots Prolonged treatment to prevent clots ... some patients are still at increased risk of death if they suffer either blockages or bleeding events, ...

  16. Folic acid induces salicylic acid-dependent immunity in Arabidopsis and enhances susceptibility to Alternaria brassicicola.

    PubMed

    Wittek, Finni; Kanawati, Basem; Wenig, Marion; Hoffmann, Thomas; Franz-Oberdorf, Katrin; Schwab, Wilfried; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Vlot, A Corina

    2015-08-01

    Folates are essential for one-carbon transfer reactions in all organisms and contribute, for example, to de novo DNA synthesis. Here, we detected the folate precursors 7,8-dihydropteroate (DHP) and 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate (ADC) in extracts from Arabidopsis thaliana plants by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry. The accumulation of DHP, but not ADC, was induced after infection of plants with Pseudomonas syringae delivering the effector protein AvrRpm1. Application of folic acid or the DHP precursor 7,8-dihydroneopterin (DHN) enhanced resistance in Arabidopsis to P. syringae and elevated the transcript accumulation of the salicylic acid (SA) marker gene pathogenesis-related1 in both the treated and systemic untreated leaves. DHN- and folic acid-induced systemic resistance was dependent on SA biosynthesis and signalling. Similar to SA, folic acid application locally enhanced Arabidopsis susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria brassicicola. Together, the data associate the folic acid pathway with innate immunity in Arabidopsis, simultaneously activating local and systemic SA-dependent resistance to P. syringae and suppressing local resistance to A. brassicicola.

  17. Upregulation of ANGPTL6 in mouse keratinocytes enhances susceptibility to psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Tanigawa, Hiroki; Miyata, Keishi; Tian, Zhe; Aoi, Jun; Kadomatsu, Tsuyoshi; Fukushima, Satoshi; Ogata, Aki; Takeda, Naoki; Zhao, Jiabin; Zhu, Shunshun; Terada, Kazutoyo; Endo, Motoyoshi; Morinaga, Jun; Sugizaki, Taichi; Sato, Michio; Morioka, Masaki Suimye; Manabe, Ichiro; Mashimo, Youichi; Hata, Akira; Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Yamamoto, Kei; Murakami, Makoto; Araki, Kimi; Jinnin, Masatoshi; Ihn, Hironobu; Oike, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease marked by aberrant tissue repair. Mutant mice modeling psoriasis skin characteristics have provided useful information relevant to molecular mechanisms and could serve to evaluate therapeutic strategies. Here, we found that epidermal ANGPTL6 expression was markedly induced during tissue repair in mice. Analysis of mice overexpressing ANGPTL6 in keratinocytes (K14-Angptl6 Tg mice) revealed that epidermal ANGPTL6 activity promotes aberrant epidermal barrier function due to hyperproliferation of prematurely differentiated keratinocytes. Moreover, skin tissues of K14-Angptl6 Tg mice showed aberrantly activated skin tissue inflammation seen in psoriasis. Levels of the proteins S100A9, recently proposed as therapeutic targets for psoriasis, also increased in skin tissue of K14-Angptl6 Tg mice, but psoriasis-like inflammatory phenotypes in those mice were not rescued by S100A9 deletion. This finding suggests that decreasing S100A9 levels may not ameliorate all cases of psoriasis and that diverse mechanisms underlie the condition. Finally, we observed enhanced levels of epidermal ANGPTL6 in tissue specimens from some psoriasis patients. We conclude that the K14-Angptl6 Tg mouse is useful to investigate psoriasis pathogenesis and for preclinical testing of new therapeutics. Our study also suggests that ANGPTL6 activation in keratinocytes enhances psoriasis susceptibility. PMID:27698489

  18. A PAX1 enhancer locus is associated with susceptibility to idiopathic scoliosis in females.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Swarkar; Londono, Douglas; Eckalbar, Walter L; Gao, Xiaochong; Zhang, Dongping; Mauldin, Kristen; Kou, Ikuyo; Takahashi, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Morio; Kamiya, Nobuhiro; Murphy, Karl K; Cornelia, Reuel; Herring, John A; Burns, Dennis; Ahituv, Nadav; Ikegawa, Shiro; Gordon, Derek; Wise, Carol A

    2015-03-18

    Idiopathic scoliosis (IS) is a common paediatric musculoskeletal disease that displays a strong female bias. By performing a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 3,102 individuals, we identify significant associations with 20p11.22 SNPs for females (P=6.89 × 10(-9)) but not males (P=0.71). This association with IS is also found in independent female cohorts from the United States of America and Japan (overall P=2.15 × 10(-10), OR=1.30 (rs6137473)). Unexpectedly, the 20p11.22 IS risk alleles were previously associated with protection from early-onset alopecia, another sexually dimorphic condition. The 174-kb associated locus is distal to PAX1, which encodes paired box 1, a transcription factor involved in spine development. We identify a sequence in the associated locus with enhancer activity in zebrafish somitic muscle and spinal cord, an activity that is abolished by IS-associated SNPs. We thus identify a sexually dimorphic IS susceptibility locus, and propose the first functionally defined candidate mutations in an enhancer that may regulate expression in specific spinal cells.

  19. Some repair-deficient mutants of Dictyostelium discoideum display enhanced susceptibilities to bleomycin.

    PubMed Central

    Deering, R A; Guyer, R B; Stevens, L; Watson-Thais, T E

    1996-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum, a soil eukaryote, is highly resistant to DNA-damaging agents; repair mutants are more susceptible. Susceptibility to bleomycin, produced by Streptomyces verticillus, is greater for mutants which are susceptible to other agents than for resistant strains. The high potential for DNA repair may result from the need to cope with chemicals produced by other soil microorganisms. PMID:8834899

  20. 21 CFR 173.150 - Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial. 173.150 Section... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.150 Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial. Milk-clotting enzyme produced by pure-culture fermentation process may be safely used in the...

  1. 21 CFR 173.150 - Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial. 173.150 Section... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.150 Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial. Milk-clotting enzyme produced by pure-culture fermentation process may be safely used in the...

  2. 21 CFR 173.150 - Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial. 173.150 Section... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.150 Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial. Milk-clotting enzyme produced by pure-culture fermentation process may be safely used in the...

  3. Molecular cloning and characterization of enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) from Gossypium barbadense.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaofeng; Qi, Xiliang; Cheng, Hongmei

    2014-06-01

    Arabidopsis enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) plays an important role in plant defense against biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens. The necrotrophic pathogen Verticillium dahliae infection of Gossypium barbadense could lead to Verticillium wilt which seriously reduces the cotton production. Here, we cloned and characterized a G. barbadense homolog of EDS1, designated as GbEDS1. The full-length cDNA of the GbEDS1 gene was obtained by the technique of rapid-amplification of cDNA ends. The open reading frame of the GbEDS1 gene was 1,647 bp long and encoded a protein of 548 amino acids residues. Comparison of the cDNA and genomic DNA sequence of GbEDS1 indicated that this gene contained a single intron and two exons. Like other EDS1s, GbEDS1 contained a conserved N-terminal lipase domain and an EDS1-specific KNEDT motif. Subcellular localization assay revealed that GbEDS1-green fluorescence protein fusion protein was localized in both cytosol and nucleus. Interestingly, the transcript levels of GbEDS1 were dramatically increased in response to pathogen V. dahliae infection. To investigate the role of GbEDS1 in plant resistance against V. dahliae, a conserved fragment derived from GbEDS1 was used to knockdown the endogenous EDS1 in Nicotiana benthamiana by heterologous virus-induced gene silencing. Our data showed that silencing of NbEDS1 resulted in increased susceptibility to V. dahliae infection in N. benthamiana, suggesting a possible involvement of the novelly isolated GbEDS1 in the regulation of plant defense against V. dahliae.

  4. G6PD Deficiency Does Not Enhance Susceptibility for Acquiring Helicobacter pylori Infection in Sardinian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dore, Maria Pina; Marras, Giuseppina; Rocchi, Chiara; Soro, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Background Subjects with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency may be more susceptible to infections due to impaired leukocyte bactericidal activity. The disorder is common in the Mediterranean area. The aim of this study was to investigate whether G6PD deficiency may be a risk factor for acquiring H. pylori infection. Methods We performed a retrospective study. Data from clinical records of 6565 patients (2278 men and 4287 women, median age 51, range 7‒94) who underwent upper endoscopy between 2002 and 2014 were collected. H. pylori status, assessed by histology plus rapid urease test or 13C-urea breath test, and G6PD status were also reported. A multiple logistic regression model was used to investigate the association between G6PD deficiency and H. pylori infection. Results Enzyme deficiency was detected in 12% (789/6565) of the entire cohort, and more specifically in 8.3% of men and in 14.0% of women. Overall, the proportion of patients positive for H. pylori was 50.6% and 51.5% among G6PD deficient and non-deficient patients (χ² = 0.271; p = 0.315). Moreover, among G6PD-deficient and normal patients the frequency of previous H. pylori infection was similar. After adjustment for age and gender the risk for acquiring H. pylori infection was similar in G6PD-deficient and normal patients. Only age was a strong statistically significant risk predictor. Conclusions These results demonstrate for the first time that G6PD deficiency does not enhance patients’ susceptibility to acquire H. pylori infection in Sardinia. PMID:27467818

  5. Argon laser radiation of human clots: differential photoabsorption in red cell rich and red cell poor clots

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, G.; Chan, M.C.; Seckinger, D.L.; Vazquez, A.; Rosenthal, P.K.; Lee, K.K.; Ikeda, R.M.; Reis, R.L.; Hanna, E.S.; Mason, D.T.

    1985-06-01

    Since argon laser radiation (454-514 nm) can vaporize human clots, the authors determined whether the absorption of laser energies can differ among different types of blood clots. Thus, they performed spectrophotometric studies and examined the ability of this laser to penetrate red cell rich and red cell poor clots. Fifty-four red cell rich and red cell poor clot samples, varying in depth from 1.8 to 5.0 mm, were subjected to 3, 5 and 7 watts from an argon laser beam. At a given power intensity, the deeper the red cell rich clot, the longer was the time needed to penetrate the clot. The higher the power used, the shorter was the red clot penetration time. In contrast, all power levels used up to 5 minutes did not penetrate any of the varying depths of red cell poor clots. Spectrophotometrically, the red cell rich clot had an absorption curve typical of hemoglobin pigment while the red cell poor clot, in the absence of hemoglobin, had poor absorption between 350 and 600 nm and was unable to absorb argon laser energies. Thus, the argon laser provides a therapeutic modality for human red cell rich clot dissolution but the present approach does not appear to be effective against red cell poor clots.

  6. Brillouin spectroscopy of clotting dynamics in a model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustamante-Lopez, Sandra C.; Traverso, Andrew J.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Meissner, Kenith E.

    2016-02-01

    Keys to successful treatment of disease include early diagnosis and timely treatment. It is hypothesized that early clotting events may contribute to a pro-thrombotic state that exacerbates atherothrombotic vascular disease. Brillouin spectroscopy involves inelastic coupling of light with phonons and enables viscoelastic characterization of samples at the microscale. In this work, we apply Brillouin spectroscopy to a model fibrinogen-thrombin clotting system with the goal of measuring clotting dynamics at the microscale and providing characterization that is not possible with standard rheometric techniques. Here, the clotting dynamics of the model clotting system are measured at various fibrinogen and thrombin concentrations.

  7. Ebstein Anomaly With Right Atrial Clot

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prakash; Singhal, Gaurav; Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Pandey, Umeshwar; Thakur, Ramesh; Varma, Chandra Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Ebstein anomaly (EA) is a rare congenital malformation of the tricuspid valve (TV), often associated with other cardiac malformations, especially atrial septal defect/patent foramen ovale (PFO) which is present in 80-90% of patients and predisposes to paradoxical embolization. We describe the case of a 17-year-old female, who presented with worsening exertional dyspnea, fatigue and pedal edema and atrial fibrillation (AF). Transthoracic echocardiography showed EA with severely dilated right atrium (RA), small functional right ventricle (RV), low velocity flow across TV with spontaneous echo contrast and giant clot in RA. Fortunately for the patient, contrast and transesophageal echocardiography revealed an intact interatrial septum with no PFO preventing any paradoxical embolism from large clot in RA, more so in the background of AF. Important differential diagnosis of congenitally unguarded TV orifice was ruled out due to presence of septal and anterior leaflets of TV and associated chordae. PMID:28197250

  8. Ebstein Anomaly With Right Atrial Clot.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prakash; Singhal, Gaurav; Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Pandey, Umeshwar; Thakur, Ramesh; Varma, Chandra Mohan

    2015-10-01

    Ebstein anomaly (EA) is a rare congenital malformation of the tricuspid valve (TV), often associated with other cardiac malformations, especially atrial septal defect/patent foramen ovale (PFO) which is present in 80-90% of patients and predisposes to paradoxical embolization. We describe the case of a 17-year-old female, who presented with worsening exertional dyspnea, fatigue and pedal edema and atrial fibrillation (AF). Transthoracic echocardiography showed EA with severely dilated right atrium (RA), small functional right ventricle (RV), low velocity flow across TV with spontaneous echo contrast and giant clot in RA. Fortunately for the patient, contrast and transesophageal echocardiography revealed an intact interatrial septum with no PFO preventing any paradoxical embolism from large clot in RA, more so in the background of AF. Important differential diagnosis of congenitally unguarded TV orifice was ruled out due to presence of septal and anterior leaflets of TV and associated chordae.

  9. Effects of exercise and conditioning on clotting and fibrinolytic activity in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Earl W.; Bernier, Lani L.; Banta, Guy R.; Yu-Yahiro, Janet; Schoomaker, Eric B.

    1987-01-01

    Blood clotting and fibrinolytic activity in three groups of nonsmoking, nonobese, healthy men ranging from 19 to 59 years are studied. The groups consisted of (1) marathoners (men running more than 50 miles/week); (2) joggers (men running 5-15 miles/week; and (3) sedentary subjects (men who did not exercise routinely). It is observed that the rate of blood clotting is accelerated by exercise; marathoners had greater increases in fibrinolytic activity than the other two groups; and fibrin degradation products increased with exercise. The data reveal that the changes in clotting assays with exercise do not correlate with changes in whole blood lactate, blood pyruvate, or rectal temperatures. It is noted that the level of acceleration for fibrinolytic activity is directly related to the maximum aerobic capacity and work load of the individual, and that conditioning enhances the fibrinolytic response to exercise.

  10. Combination treatment with decitabine and ionizing radiation enhances tumor cells susceptibility of T cells

    PubMed Central

    Son, Cheol-Hun; Lee, Hong-Rae; Koh, Eun-Kyoung; Shin, Dong-Yeok; Bae, Jae-Ho; Yang, Kwangmo; Park, You-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Decitabine has been found to have anti-metabolic and anti-tumor activities in various tumor cells. Recently, the use of decitabine in combination with other conventional therapies reportedly resulted in improved anti-tumor activity against various tumors. Ionizing radiation (IR) is widely used as a cancer treatment. Decitabine and IR improve immunogenicity and susceptibility of tumor cells to immune cells by up-regulating the expression of various molecules such as major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I; natural-killer group 2, member D (NKG2D) ligands; and co-stimulatory molecules. However, the effects of combining decitabine and IR therapies are largely unknown. Our results indicate that decitabine or IR treatment upregulates MHC class I, along with various co-stimulatory molecules in target tumor cells. Furthermore, decitabine and IR combination treatment further upregulates MHC class I, along with the co-stimulatory molecules, when compared to the effect of each treatment alone. Importantly, decitabine treatment further enhanced T cell-mediated cytotoxicity and release of IFN- γ against target tumor cells which is induced by IR. Interestingly, decitabine did not affect NKG2D ligand expression or NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity in target tumor cells. These observations suggest that decitabine may be used as a useful immunomodulator to sensitize tumor cells in combination with other tumor therapies. PMID:27671170

  11. Human Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Antibiotic Susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Persister Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Geetika S.; Yao, Xiangyu; Wang, Jing; Peng, Bo; Bader, Rebecca A.; Ren, Dacheng

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial persister cells are highly tolerant to antibiotics and cause chronic infections. However, little is known about the interaction between host immune systems with this subpopulation of metabolically inactive cells, and direct effects of host immune factors (in the absence of immune cells) on persister cells have not been studied. Here we report that human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can sensitize the persister cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to multiple antibiotics including ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, tetracycline, and gentamicin. GM-CSF also sensitized the biofilm cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to tobramycin in the presence of biofilm matrix degrading enzymes. The DNA microarray and qPCR results indicated that GM-CSF induced the genes for flagellar motility and pyocin production in the persister cells, but not the normal cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Consistently, the supernatants from GM-CSF treated P. aeruginosa PAO1 persister cell suspensions were found cidal to the pyocin sensitive strain P. aeruginosa PAK. Collectively, these findings suggest that host immune factors and bacterial persisters may directly interact, leading to enhanced susceptibility of persister cells to antibiotics. PMID:26616387

  12. How glyphosate affects plant disease development: it is more than enhanced susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Hammerschmidt, Ray

    2017-01-09

    Glyphosate has been shown to affect the development of plant disease in several ways. Plants utilize phenolic and other shikimic acid pathway-derived compounds as part of their defense against pathogens, and glyphosate inhibits the biosynthesis of these compounds via its mode of action. Several studies have shown a correlation between enhanced disease and suppression of phenolic compound production after glyphosate. Glyphosate-resistant crop plants have also been studied for changes in resistance as a result of carrying the glyphosate resistance trait. The evidence indicates that neither the resistance trait nor application of glyphosate to glyphosate-resistant plants increases susceptibility to disease. The only exceptions to this are cases where glyphosate has been shown to reduce rust diseases on glyphosate-resistant crops, supporting a fungicidal role for this chemical. Finally, glyphosate treatment of weeds or volunteer crops can cause a temporary increase in soil-borne pathogens that may result in disease development if crops are planted too soon after glyphosate application. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Molecular determinants of phospholipid synergy in blood clotting.

    PubMed

    Tavoosi, Narjes; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L; Pogorelov, Taras V; Ohkubo, Y Zenmei; Arcario, Mark J; Clay, Mary C; Rienstra, Chad M; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Morrissey, James H

    2011-07-01

    Many regulatory processes in biology involve reversible association of proteins with membranes. Clotting proteins bind to phosphatidylserine (PS) on cell surfaces, but a clear picture of this interaction has yet to emerge. We present a novel explanation for membrane binding by GLA domains of clotting proteins, supported by biochemical studies, solid-state NMR analyses, and molecular dynamics simulations. The model invokes a single "phospho-L-serine-specific" interaction and multiple "phosphate-specific" interactions. In the latter, the phosphates in phospholipids interact with tightly bound Ca(2+) in GLA domains. We show that phospholipids with any headgroup other than choline strongly synergize with PS to enhance factor X activation. We propose that phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin (the major external phospholipids of healthy cells) are anticoagulant primarily because their bulky choline headgroups sterically hinder access to their phosphates. Following cell damage or activation, exposed PS and phosphatidylethanolamine collaborate to bind GLA domains by providing phospho-L-serine-specific and phosphate-specific interactions, respectively.

  14. Antiplatelet Usage Impacts Clot Density in Acute Anterior Circulation Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Pikija, Slaven; Magdic, Jozef; Lukic, Anita; Schreiber, Catharina; Mutzenbach, Johannes Sebastian; McCoy, Mark R.; Sellner, Johann

    2016-01-01

    We explored whether clot density in middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion is related to clinical variables, stroke etiology, blood constituents, and prestroke medication. We performed a retrospective chart review of patients with acute ischemic stroke of the anterior circulation admitted to two Central European stroke centers. The acquisition of non-contrast enhanced CT (NECT) and CT angiography (CTA) within 4.5 h of symptom onset was obligatory. We assessed the site of MCA occlusion as well as density, area, and length of the clot in 150 patients. The Hounsfield unit values for the clot were divided with contralateral MCA segment to yield relative Hounsfield Unit ratio (rHU). The site of the vessel occlusion (M1 vs. M2) and antiplatelet usage, but not stroke etiology, significantly influenced rHU. We found an inverse correlation of rHU with erythrocyte count (p < 0.001). The multivariate analysis revealed that a higher rHU (i.e., clot being more hyperdense) was more likely with the use of antiplatelets (OR 4.24, CI 1.10–16.31, p = 0.036). Erythrocyte (OR 0.18, CI 0.05–0.55, p = 0.003), and thrombocyte counts (OR 0.99, CI 0.98–0.99, p = 0.029) were associated with odds for more hypodense clots (lower rHU). Our study disclosed that antiplatelet therapy impacts the composition of intracranial clots of the anterior circulation. PMID:27563874

  15. FXIa and platelet polyphosphate as therapeutic targets during human blood clotting on collagen/tissue factor surfaces under flow

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shu; Travers, Richard J.; Morrissey, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Factor XIIa (FXIIa) and factor XIa (FXIa) contribute to thrombosis in animal models, whereas platelet-derived polyphosphate (polyP) may potentiate contact or thrombin-feedback pathways. The significance of these mediators in human blood under thrombotic flow conditions on tissue factor (TF) –bearing surfaces remains inadequately resolved. Human blood (corn trypsin inhibitor treated [4 μg/mL]) was tested by microfluidic assay for clotting on collagen/TF at TF surface concentration ([TF]wall) from ∼0.1 to 2 molecules per μm2. Anti-FXI antibodies (14E11 and O1A6) or polyP-binding protein (PPXbd) were used to block FXIIa-dependent FXI activation, FXIa-dependent factor IX (FIX) activation, or platelet-derived polyP, respectively. Fibrin formation was sensitive to 14E11 at 0 to 0.1 molecules per µm2 and sensitive to O1A6 at 0 to 0.2 molecules per µm2. However, neither antibody reduced fibrin generation at ∼2 molecules per µm2 when the extrinsic pathway became dominant. Interestingly, PPXbd reduced fibrin generation at low [TF]wall (0.1 molecules per µm2) but not at zero or high [TF]wall, suggesting a role for polyP distinct from FXIIa activation and requiring low extrinsic pathway participation. Regardless of [TF]wall, PPXbd enhanced fibrin sensitivity to tissue plasminogen activator and promoted clot retraction during fibrinolysis concomitant with an observed PPXbd-mediated reduction of fibrin fiber diameter. This is the first detection of endogenous polyP function in human blood under thrombotic flow conditions. When triggered by low [TF]wall, thrombosis may be druggable by contact pathway inhibition, although thrombolytic susceptibility may benefit from polyP antagonism regardless of [TF]wall. PMID:26136249

  16. FXIa and platelet polyphosphate as therapeutic targets during human blood clotting on collagen/tissue factor surfaces under flow.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu; Travers, Richard J; Morrissey, James H; Diamond, Scott L

    2015-09-17

    Factor XIIa (FXIIa) and factor XIa (FXIa) contribute to thrombosis in animal models, whereas platelet-derived polyphosphate (polyP) may potentiate contact or thrombin-feedback pathways. The significance of these mediators in human blood under thrombotic flow conditions on tissue factor (TF) -bearing surfaces remains inadequately resolved. Human blood (corn trypsin inhibitor treated [4 μg/mL]) was tested by microfluidic assay for clotting on collagen/TF at TF surface concentration ([TF]wall) from ∼0.1 to 2 molecules per μm(2). Anti-FXI antibodies (14E11 and O1A6) or polyP-binding protein (PPXbd) were used to block FXIIa-dependent FXI activation, FXIa-dependent factor IX (FIX) activation, or platelet-derived polyP, respectively. Fibrin formation was sensitive to 14E11 at 0 to 0.1 molecules per µm(2) and sensitive to O1A6 at 0 to 0.2 molecules per µm(2). However, neither antibody reduced fibrin generation at ∼2 molecules per µm(2) when the extrinsic pathway became dominant. Interestingly, PPXbd reduced fibrin generation at low [TF]wall (0.1 molecules per µm(2)) but not at zero or high [TF]wall, suggesting a role for polyP distinct from FXIIa activation and requiring low extrinsic pathway participation. Regardless of [TF]wall, PPXbd enhanced fibrin sensitivity to tissue plasminogen activator and promoted clot retraction during fibrinolysis concomitant with an observed PPXbd-mediated reduction of fibrin fiber diameter. This is the first detection of endogenous polyP function in human blood under thrombotic flow conditions. When triggered by low [TF]wall, thrombosis may be druggable by contact pathway inhibition, although thrombolytic susceptibility may benefit from polyP antagonism regardless of [TF]wall.

  17. Experiment on the factors for enhancing the susceptibility of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drug by ultrasound microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Gao, Hui-Sheng; Zhou, Zhi-Cai; Tang, Qin-Qin; Lu, Cui-Tao; Jin, Zhuo; Tian, Ji-Lai; Xu, Yan-Yan; Tian, Xin-Qiao; Wang, Lee; Kong, Fan-Lei; Li, Xiao-Kun; Huang, Pin-Tong; He, Hui-Liao; Wu, Yan

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the factors for enhancing the susceptibility of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drug by ultrasound microbubbles. Ultrasound (US) combined with phospholipid-based microbubbles (MB) was used to enhance the susceptibility of colon cancer cell line SWD-620 to anticancer drugs Topotecan hydrochloride (TOP). Experiments were designed to investigate the influence of main factors on cell viability and cell inhibition, such as US intensity, MB concentration, drug combination with MB, asynchronous action between US triggered cavitation and drug entering cell, MB particle size. US exposure for 10 sec with US probe power at 0.6 W/cm(2) had satisfied cell viability. Treated with US combined with 15% MB, cell viability maintained more than 85% and cell inhibition 86.16%. Under optimal US combined with MB, TOP showed much higher cell inhibition than that of only TOP group. Cell inhibition under short delayed time (<2 h) for TOP addition did not show obvious difference. In terms of MB particle size, the order of cell inhibition was: Mixture > Micron bubble part > Nanometer bubble part. US combined with MB can enhance the susceptibility of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drug, which may provide a potential method for US-mediated tumor chemotherapy.

  18. Homocysteine influences blood clot properties alone and in combination with total fibrinogen but not with fibrinogen γ' in Africans.

    PubMed

    Nienaber-Rousseau, Cornelie; de Lange, Zelda; Pieters, Marlien

    2015-06-01

    Simultaneously increased fibrinogen and homocysteine (Hcy) in blood are believed to elevate the risk of cardiovascular disease mortality. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms involved are unknown. We sought to determine whether Hcy or its genetic determinants influence blood clot properties alone or in combination with fibrinogen. In addition, we investigated, for the first time, the gamma prime (γ') isoform of fibrinogen with Hcy in relation to clot architecture and lysis. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms, Hcy and hemostatic variables, including clot lysis, determined with a global fibrinolytic assay [giving lag time, slope, maximum absorbance and clot lysis time (CLT)], were measured in 1867 healthy black South Africans and cross-sectionally analyzed. Increasing Hcy did not affect fiber cross-sectional area (maximum absorbance). However, it decreased the time needed to initiate the coagulation cascade and for fibrin fibers to grow (lag time), it increased the tempo of lateral aggregation (slope) and reduced CLT. None of the single-nucleotide polymorphisms measured had effects on clot properties. Combined effects were observed between Hcy and total fibrinogen in predicting CLT. Fibrinogen γ', which affected markers of the fibrinolytic assay, did not have conjoint effects with Hcy. We believe that there is value in recognizing the combined effects of Hcy and fibrinogen, but not its γ' isoform in relation to clot structure and lysis. The enhanced fibrinolysis rate observed in patients with low fibrinogen and high Hcy may have adverse consequences for health if it disturbs hemostasis and results in a bleeding tendency.

  19. A defect in iron uptake enhances the susceptibility of Cryptococcus neoformans to azole antifungal drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongmi; Cho, Yong-Joon; Do, Eunsoo; Choi, Jaehyuk; Hu, Guanggan; Cadieux, Brigitte; Chun, Jongsik; Lee, Younghoon; Kronstad, James W.; Jung, Won Hee

    2015-01-01

    The high-affinity reductive iron uptake system that includes a ferroxidase (Cfo1) and an iron permease (Cft1) is critical for the pathogenesis of Cryptococcus neoformans. In addition, a mutant lacking CFO1 or CFT1 not only has reduced iron uptake but also displays a markedly increased susceptibility to azole antifungal drugs. Altered antifungal susceptibility of the mutants was of particular interest because the iron uptake system has been proposed as an alternative target for antifungal treatment. In this study, we used transcriptome analysis to begin exploring the molecular mechanisms of altered antifungal susceptibility in a cfo1 mutant. The wild-type strain and the cfo1 mutant were cultured with or without the azole antifungal drug fluconazole and their transcriptomes were compared following sequencing with Illumina Genome Analyzer IIx (GAIIx) technology. As expected, treatment of both strains with fluconazole caused elevated expression of genes in the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway that includes the target enzyme Erg11. Additionally, genes differentially expressed in the cfo1 mutant were involved in iron uptake and homeostasis, mitochondrial functions and respiration. The cfo1 mutant also displayed phenotypes consistent with these changes including a reduced ratio of NAD+/NADH and down-regulation of Fe-S cluster synthesis. Moreover, combination treatment of the wild-type strain with fluconazole and the respiration inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium dramatically increased susceptibility to fluconazole. This result supports the hypothesis that down-regulation of genes required for respiration contributed to the altered fluconazole susceptibility of the cfo1 mutant. Overall, our data suggest that iron uptake and homeostasis play a key role in antifungal susceptibility and could be used as novel targets for combination treatment of cryptococcosis. Indeed, we found that iron chelation in combination with fluconazole treatment synergistically inhibited the growth of C

  20. A Synthetic Fibrin-Crosslinking Polymer for Modulating Clot Properties and Inducing Hemostasis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Leslie W.-G.; Wang, Xu; Wei, Hua; Pozzo, Lilo D.; White, Nathan J.; Pun, Suzie H.

    2015-01-01

    Clotting factor replacement is the standard management of acute bleeding in congenital and acquired bleeding disorders. We present a synthetic approach to hemostasis using an engineered hemostatic polymer (PolySTAT) that circulates innocuously in the blood, identifies sites of vascular injury, and promotes clot formation to stop bleeding. PolySTAT induces hemostasis by crosslinking the fibrin matrix within clots, mimicking the function of the transglutaminase Factor XIII. Furthermore, synthetic PolySTAT binds specifically to fibrin monomers and is uniformly integrated into fibrin fibers during fibrin polymerization, resulting in a fortified, hybrid polymer network with enhanced resistance to enzymatic degradation. In vivo hemostatic activity was confirmed in a rat model of trauma and fluid resuscitation in which intravenous administration of PolySTAT improved survival by reducing blood loss and resuscitation fluid requirements. PolySTAT-induced fibrin crosslinking is a novel approach to hemostasis utilizing synthetic polymers for non-invasive modulation of clot architecture with potentially wide-ranging therapeutic applications. PMID:25739763

  1. Alteration of blood clot structures by interleukin-1 beta in association with bone defects healing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Friis, Thor E.; Masci, Paul P.; Crawford, Ross W.; Liao, Wenbo; Xiao, Yin

    2016-01-01

    The quality of hematomas are crucial for successful early bone defect healing, as the structure of fibrin clots can significantly influence the infiltration of cells, necessary for bone regeneration, from adjacent tissues into the fibrin network. This study investigated if there were structural differences between hematomas from normal and delayed healing bone defects and whether such differences were linked to changes in the expression of IL-1β. Using a bone defect model in rats, we found that the hematomas in the delayed healing model had thinner fibers and denser clot structures. Moreover, IL-1β protein levels were significantly higher in the delayed healing hematomas. The effects of IL-1β on the structural properties of human whole blood clots were evaluated by thrombelastograph (TEG), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), compressive study, and thrombolytic assays. S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) was applied to modulate de novo hematoma structure and the impact on bone healing was evaluated in the delayed healing model. We found that GSNO produced more porous hematomas with thicker fibers and resulted in significantly enhanced bone healing. This study demonstrated that IL-1β and GSNO had opposing effects on clot architecture, the structure of which plays a pivotal role in early bone healing. PMID:27767056

  2. Cardiovascular Disease as a Risk Factor for Enhanced Susceptibility to Air Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse health effects caused by airborne particular matter (PM) are restricted primarily to susceptible populations. The actual risk of anyone individual is quite small, but because of the large number of exposed people, the overall population risk is significant. Ferreting out ...

  3. Fluoxetine Hydrochloride Enhances In Vitro Susceptibility to Chloroquine in Resistant Plasmodium falciparum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    chloroquine- (12), ketotifen (1), tetrandrine (20, 21), and cyproheptadine susceptible clone D6 (50% inhibitory concentration [IC 5o], (16). !s3 ng/ml). IC... CYPROHEPTADINE KETOTIFEN N OCN3 HICO N ’IN ~~OCH3 NN H 0 OCH.3 TETRANDRINE FIG. 1. Structures of fluoxetine and other drugs that have been reported to

  4. Enhanced susceptibility of hybrid tilapia to Flavobacterium columnare after parasitism by Ichthyophthirius multifiliis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterium Flavobacterium columnare and protozoan Ichthyophthirius multifiliis are two common pathogens of cultured fish. The objective of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility of hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis spp.) to the bacterium F. columnare, including fish mortality and bacterial loads in ...

  5. Osmotic stress-induced polyamine oxidation mediates defence responses and reduces stress-enhanced grapevine susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Hatmi, Saloua; Trotel-Aziz, Patricia; Villaume, Sandra; Couderchet, Michel; Clément, Christophe; Aziz, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Abiotic factors inducing osmotic stress can influence the plant immune response and resistance to pathogen infections. In this study, the effect of polyethylene glycol (PEG)- and sucrose-induced osmotic stress on polyamine (PA) homeostasis and the basal immune response in grapevine plantlets before and after Botrytis cinerea infection was determined. Pharmacological approaches were also addressed to assess the contribution of osmotic stress-induced PA oxidation to the regulation of defence responses and the susceptibility of grapevine to B. cinerea. Following osmotic stress or pathogen infection, PA homeostasis was linked to enhanced activity of diamine oxidases (CuAO) and PA oxidases (PAO) and the production of 1,3-diaminopropane. These responses paralleled the accumulation of the main stilbenic phytoalexins, resveratrol and ε-viniferin and upregulation of gene transcripts including STS (a stilbene synthase), PR-2 (a β-1,3-glucanase), PR3-4c (acidic chitinase IV), and PR-5 (a thaumatin-like protein), as well as NCED2 involved in abscisic acid biosynthesis. It was also demonstrated that leaves pre-exposed to osmotic stress and later inoculated with B. cinerea showed enhanced PA accumulation and attenuation of CuAO and PAO activities. This was consistent with the impaired production of phytoalexins and transcript levels of defence- and stress-related genes following infection, and the enhanced susceptibility to B. cinerea. Pharmacological experiments revealed that, under osmotic stress conditions, CuAO and PAO were involved in PA homeostasis and in the regulation of defence responses. Specific inhibition of CuAO and PAO in osmotically stressed leaves strongly attenuated the induction of defence responses triggered by B. cinerea infection and enhanced susceptibility to the pathogen. Taken together, this study reveals a contribution of PA catabolism to the resistance state through modulation of immune response in grapevine following osmotic stress and/or after B

  6. A somatic-mutational process recurrently duplicates germline susceptibility loci and tissue-specific super-enhancers in breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Glodzik, Dominik; Morganella, Sandro; Davies, Helen; Simpson, Peter T; Li, Yilong; Zou, Xueqing; Diez-Perez, Javier; Staaf, Johan; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Smid, Marcel; Brinkman, Arie B; Rye, Inga Hansine; Russnes, Hege; Raine, Keiran; Purdie, Colin A; Lakhani, Sunil R; Thompson, Alastair M; Birney, Ewan; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; van de Vijver, Marc J; Martens, John W M; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Richardson, Andrea L; Kong, Gu; Viari, Alain; Easton, Douglas; Evan, Gerard; Campbell, Peter J; Stratton, Michael R; Nik-Zainal, Serena

    2017-03-01

    Somatic rearrangements contribute to the mutagenized landscape of cancer genomes. Here, we systematically interrogated rearrangements in 560 breast cancers by using a piecewise constant fitting approach. We identified 33 hotspots of large (>100 kb) tandem duplications, a mutational signature associated with homologous-recombination-repair deficiency. Notably, these tandem-duplication hotspots were enriched in breast cancer germline susceptibility loci (odds ratio (OR) = 4.28) and breast-specific 'super-enhancer' regulatory elements (OR = 3.54). These hotspots may be sites of selective susceptibility to double-strand-break damage due to high transcriptional activity or, through incrementally increasing copy number, may be sites of secondary selective pressure. The transcriptomic consequences ranged from strong individual oncogene effects to weak but quantifiable multigene expression effects. We thus present a somatic-rearrangement mutational process affecting coding sequences and noncoding regulatory elements and contributing a continuum of driver consequences, from modest to strong effects, thereby supporting a polygenic model of cancer development.

  7. Blood Thinners: Can I Still Get Blood Clots?

    MedlinePlus

    ... get blood clots? If you're taking a blood thinner, is it still possible to get a blood clot? Answers from Rekha Mankad, M.D. Yes. Medications that are commonly called blood thinners — such as aspirin, warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven), dabigatran ( ...

  8. Acousto-mechanical and thermal properties of clotted blood.

    PubMed

    Nahirnyak, Volodymyr M; Yoon, Suk Wang; Holland, Christy K

    2006-06-01

    The efficacy of ultrasound-assisted thrombolysis as an adjunct treatment of ischemic stroke is being widely investigated. To determine the role of ultrasound hyperthermia in the process of blood clot disruption, the acousto-mechanical and thermal properties of clotted blood were measured in vitro, namely, density, speed of sound, frequency-dependent attenuation, specific heat, and thermal conductivity. The amplitude coefficient of attenuation of the clots was determined for 120 kHz, 1.0 MHz, and 3.5 MHz ultrasound at room temperature (20 +/- 2 degrees C). The attenuation coefficient ranged from 0.10 to 0.30 Np/cm in porcine clots and from 0.09 to 0.23 Np/cm in human clots. The experimentally determined values of specific heat and thermal conductivity for porcine clotted blood are (3.2 +/- 0.5) x 10(3) J/kg x K and 0.55 +/- 0.13 W/m x K, respectively, and for human clotted blood are (3.5 +/- 0.8) x 10(3) J/kg x K and 0.59 +/- 0.11 W/m x K, respectively. Measurements of the acousto-mechanical and thermal properties of clotted blood can be helpful in theoretical modeling of ultrasound hyperthermia in ultrasound-assisted thrombolysis and other high-intensity focused ultrasound applications.

  9. Delayed ethanol elimination and enhanced susceptibility to ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis after liver resection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xu; Hakucho, Ayako; Liu, Jinyao; Fujimiya, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    hepatocytes, the higher increases in their hepatic triglyceride and blood alanine aminotransferase and blood aspartate aminotransferase levels after the 28-d pair-feeding period. The Sham-ethanol rats, not the PH-ethanol rats, demonstrated the up-regulation of Srebp-1 and the down-regulation of Ppar-α mRNA expression levels after the 28-d pair-feeding period. The 28-d ethanol administration induced the up-regulation of Pai-1 gene expression level and an overproduction of TNF-α in the Sham and the PH rats; however, the effect was more significant in the PH rats. The PH-ethanol rats (n = 4) showed higher residual blood ethanol concentrations than did the Sham-ethanol rats (n = 6) after a 5-h fast (0.66 ± 0.4 mg/mL vs 0.2 ± 0.1 mg/mL, P < 0.05); these effects manifested without up-regulation of Adh1 gene expression, which was present in the Sham-ethanol group after the 28-d pair-feeding period. One week after the liver resection, the liver weight, function, the gene expression levels of Fas, Srebp-1, Ppar-α, Pai-1 and Tnf-α recovered; however, the Adh1 gene expression did not recover in rats. CONCLUSION: Desensitization to post-hepatectomy ethanol treatment and slow recovery from PH in Adh1 gene expression enhanced the susceptibility to ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis after PH in rats. PMID:25561792

  10. Platelet factor XIII increases the fibrinolytic resistance of platelet-rich clots by accelerating the crosslinking of alpha 2-antiplasmin to fibrin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, G. L.; Matsueda, G. R.; Haber, E.

    1992-01-01

    Platelet clots resist fibrinolysis by plasminogen activators. We hypothesized that platelet factor XIII may enhance the fibrinolytic resistance of platelet-rich clots by catalyzing the crosslinking of alpha 2-antiplasmin (alpha 2AP) to fibrin. Analysis of plasma clot structure by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting revealed accelerated alpha 2AP-fibrin crosslinking in platelet-rich compared with platelet-depleted plasma clots. A similar study of clots formed with purified fibrinogen (depleted of factor XIII activity), isolated platelets, and specific factor XIII inhibitors indicated that this accelerated crosslinking was due to the catalytic activity of platelet factor XIII. Moreover, when washed platelets were aggregated by thrombin, there was evidence of platelet factor XIII-mediated crosslinking between platelet alpha 2AP and platelet fibrin(ogen). Specific inhibition (by a monoclonal antibody) of the alpha 2AP associated with washed platelet aggregates accelerated the fibrinolysis of the platelet aggregate. Thus in platelet-rich plasma clots, and in thrombin-induced platelet aggregates, platelet factor XIII actively formed alpha 2AP-fibrin crosslinks, which appeared to enhance the resistance of platelet-rich clots to fibrinolysis.

  11. A new device for measurement of fibrin clot lysis: application to the Euglobulin Clot Lysis Time

    PubMed Central

    Boudjeltia, K Zouaoui; Cauchie, Ph; Remacle, Cl; Guillaume, M; Brohée, D; Hubert, JL; Vanhaeverbeek, M

    2002-01-01

    Background Determination of clot lysis times on whole blood, diluted whole blood, plasma or plasma fraction has been used for many years to assess the overall activity of the fibrinolytic system. We designed a completely computerised semi-automatic 8-channel device for measurement and determination of fibrin clot lysis. The lysis time is evaluated by a mathematical analysis of the lysis curve and the results are expressed in minute (range: 5 to 9999). We have used this new device for Euglobulin Clot Lysis Time (ECLT) determination, which is the most common test used in laboratories to estimate plasma fibrinolytic capacity. Results The correlation between ECLT and manual method is very tight : R = 0,99; p < 10-6. The efficiency scores of the method are <4% in intra-assay and <7% in inter-assay. It allows to achieve the tests on hyperlipaemic samples. This new device has been easily integrated in laboratory routine and allows to achieve several ECLT every day without disturbance of laboratory workflow. Conclusions The routine use of this new device could be useful in various situations such as assessment in atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis associated diseases, coagulation survey of liver transplantations, cardiovascular surgery or pharmacological research. It has already provided highly promising results in preliminary studies on the relation between fibrinolysis and cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:11985782

  12. Anomalously large spin susceptibility enhancement in n-doped CdMnTe quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Cheikh, Z.; Cronenberger, S.; Vladimirova, M.; Scalbert, D.; Boujdaria, K.; Baboux, F.; Perez, F.

    2013-12-04

    We report on time-resolved Kerr rotation (TRKR) experiments done on n-doped CdMnTe quantum wells (QWs), in the regime where strong coupling between the electron and the Mn spin-flip excitations shows up. It has been proposed previously to deduce the 2D electron gas spin susceptibility from the coupling energy between these spin excitations. Here we measure the coupling energy on a high mobility sample down to very low excitation density, and compare the results with spin-flip Raman scattering (SFRS) on the same sample. The electron spin polarizations measured by TRKR and SFRS are found in relatively good agreement. However the spin susceptibility measured by TRKR exceeds systematically the values predicted by many-body theory. This could be an indication that the two-oscillator model used to describe mixed electron-Mn spin excitations needs to be improved.

  13. Observation of a Strongly Enhanced Magnetic Susceptibility of Pd in Au-Pd-Au Sandwiches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, M. B.; Freeman, A. J.

    1980-07-01

    Exceptionally large increases in the magnetic susceptibility (indicating nearly magnetic ordering) of thin films of Pd sandwiched between thicker Au films have been observed at low temperatures-presumably due to the expansion of the Pd average lattice constant by the Au. The large resultant Stoner factors and the modified paramagnon model of Levin and Valls indicate the possibility of observing p-wave superconductivity in Pd structures with reduced proximity effects.

  14. A natural Anopheles-associated Penicillium chrysogenum enhances mosquito susceptibility to Plasmodium infection

    PubMed Central

    Angleró-Rodríguez, Yesseinia I.; Blumberg, Benjamin J.; Dong, Yuemei; Sandiford, Simone L.; Pike, Andrew; Clayton, April M.; Dimopoulos, George

    2016-01-01

    Whereas studies have extensively examined the ability of bacteria to influence Plasmodium infection in the mosquito, the tripartite interactions between non-entomopathogenic fungi, mosquitoes, and Plasmodium parasites remain largely uncharacterized. Here we report the isolation of a common mosquito-associated ascomycete fungus, Penicillium chrysogenum, from the midgut of field-caught Anopheles mosquitoes. Although the presence of Pe. chrysogenum in the Anopheles gambiae midgut does not affect mosquito survival, it renders the mosquito significantly more susceptible to Plasmodium infection through a secreted heat-stable factor. We further provide evidence that the mechanism of the fungus-mediated modulation of mosquito susceptibility to Plasmodium involves an upregulation of the insect’s ornithine decarboxylase gene, which sequesters arginine for polyamine biosynthesis. Arginine plays an important role in the mosquito’s anti-Plasmodium defense as a substrate of nitric oxide production, and its availability therefore has a direct impact on the mosquito’s susceptibility to the parasite. While this type of immunomodulatory mechanism has already been demonstrated in other host-pathogen interaction systems, this is the first report of a mosquito-associated fungus that can suppress the mosquito’s innate immune system in a way that would favor Plasmodium infection and possibly malaria transmission. PMID:27678168

  15. Influence of Interleukin-1 Beta on Platelet-Poor Plasma Clot Formation: A Potential Impact on Early Bone Healing

    PubMed Central

    Masci, Paul P.; Crawford, Ross; Xiao, Yin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Hematoma quality (especially the fibrin matrix) plays an important role in the bone healing process. Here, we investigated the effect of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) on fibrin clot formation from platelet-poor plasma (PPP). Methods Five-milliliter of rat whole-blood samples were collected from the hepatic portal vein. All blood samples were firstly standardized via a thrombelastograph (TEG), blood cell count, and the measurement of fibrinogen concentration. PPP was prepared by collecting the top two-fifths of the plasma after centrifugation under 400 × g for 10 min at 20°C. The effects of IL-1β cytokines on artificial fibrin clot formation from PPP solutions were determined by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), confocal microscopy (CM), turbidity, and clot lysis assays. Results The lag time for protofibril formation was markedly shortened in the IL-1β treatment groups (243.8 ± 76.85 in the 50 pg/mL of IL-1β and 97.5 ± 19.36 in the 500 pg/mL of IL-1β) compared to the control group without IL-1β (543.8 ± 205.8). Maximal turbidity was observed in the control group. IL-1β (500 pg/mL) treatment significantly decreased fiber diameters resulting in smaller pore sizes and increased density of the fibrin clot structure formed from PPP (P < 0.05). The clot lysis assay revealed that 500 pg/mL IL-1β induced a lower susceptibility to dissolution due to the formation of thinner and denser fibers. Conclusion IL-1β can significantly influence PPP fibrin clot structure, which may affect the early bone healing process. PMID:26909757

  16. Removal of Chronic Intravascular Blood Clots using Liquid Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jae-Chul; Choi, Myeong; Koo, Il; Yu, Zengqi; Collins, George

    2011-10-01

    An electrical embolectomy device for removing chronic intravascular blood clots using liquid plasma under saline environment was demonstrated. We employed a proxy experimental blood clot model of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and actual equine blood clot. Thermal damage to contiguous tissue and the collagen denaturing via the plasma irradiation were investigated by histological analysis using birefringence of the tissue and verified by FT-IR spectroscopic study, respectively, which showed the high removal rate up to 2 mm per minute at room temperature and small thermal damage less than 200 μm.

  17. Enhanced meta-analysis and replication studies identify five new psoriasis susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Tsoi, Lam C; Spain, Sarah L; Ellinghaus, Eva; Stuart, Philip E; Capon, Francesca; Knight, Jo; Tejasvi, Trilokraj; Kang, Hyun M; Allen, Michael H; Lambert, Sylviane; Stoll, Stefan; Weidinger, Stephan; Gudjonsson, Johann E; Koks, Sulev; Kingo, Külli; Esko, Tonu; Das, Sayantan; Metspalu, Andres; Weichenthal, Michael; Enerback, Charlotta; Krueger, Gerald G.; Voorhees, John J; Chandran, Vinod; Rosen, Cheryl F; Rahman, Proton; Gladman, Dafna D; Reis, Andre; Nair, Rajan P; Franke, Andre; Barker, Jonathan NWN; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Trembath, Richard C; Elder, James T

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune disease with complex genetic architecture. Previous genomewide association studies (GWAS) and a recent meta-analysis using Immunochip data have uncovered 36 susceptibility loci. Here, we extend our previous meta-analysis of European ancestry by refined genotype calling and imputation and by the addition of 5,033 cases and 5,707 controls. The combined analysis, consisting of over 15,000 cases and 27,000 controls, identifies five new psoriasis susceptibility loci at genomewide significance (p < 5 × 10−8). The newly identified signals include two that reside in intergenic regions (1q31.1 and 5p13.1) and three residing near PLCL2 (3p24.3), NFKBIZ (3q12.3), and CAMK2G (10q22.2). We further demonstrate that NFKBIZ is a TRAF3IP2–dependent target of IL-17 signaling in human skin keratinocytes, thereby functionally linking two strong candidate genes. These results further integrate the genetics and immunology of psoriasis, suggesting new avenues for functional analysis and improved therapies. PMID:25939698

  18. Mutation of a NCKX Eliminates Glial Microdomain Calcium Oscillations and Enhances Seizure Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Melom, Jan E.; Littleton, J. Troy

    2013-01-01

    Glia exhibit spontaneous and activity-dependent fluctuations in intracellular Ca2+, yet it is unclear whether glial Ca2+ oscillations are required during neuronal signaling. Somatic glial Ca2+ waves are primarily mediated by the release of intracellular Ca2+ stores, and their relative importance in normal brain physiology has been disputed. Recently, near-membrane microdomain Ca2+ transients were identified in fine astrocytic processes and found to arise via an intracellular store-independent process. Here, we describe the identification of rapid, near-membrane Ca2+ oscillations in Drosophila cortex glia of the CNS. In a screen for temperature-sensitive conditional seizure mutants, we identified a glial-specific Na+/Ca2+, K+ exchanger (zydeco) that is required for microdomain Ca2+ oscillatory activity. We found that zydeco mutant animals exhibit increased susceptibility to seizures in response to a variety of environmental stimuli, and that zydeco is required acutely in cortex glia to regulate seizure susceptibility. We also found that glial expression of calmodulin is required for stress-induced seizures in zydeco mutants, suggesting a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent glial signaling pathway underlies glial–neuronal communication. These studies demonstrate that microdomain glial Ca2+ oscillations require NCKX-mediated plasma membrane Ca2+ flux, and that acute dysregulation of glial Ca2+ signaling triggers seizures. PMID:23325253

  19. The History of Clotting Factor Concentrates Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Morfini, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Clotting factor concentrates (CFCs) underwent tremendous modifications during the last forty years. Plasma-derived concentrates made the replacement therapy feasible not only in the hospital but also at patients’ home by on-demand or prophylactic regimen. Virucidal methods, implemented soon after hepatitis and AIDS outbreak, and purification by Mabs made the plasma-derived concentrates safer and purer. CFCs were considered equivalent to the other drugs and general rules and methods of pharmacokinetics (PK) were applied to their study. After the first attempts by graphical methods and calculation of In Vivo Recovery, compartment and non-compartment methods were applied also to the study of PK of CFCs. The bioequivalence of the new concentrates produced by means of recombinant DNA biotechnology was evaluated in head-to-head PK studies. Since the beginning, the large inter-patient variability of dose/response of replacement therapy was realized. PK allowed tailoring haemophilia therapy and PK driven prophylaxis resulted more cost effective. Unfortunately, the need of several blood samples and logistic difficulties made the PK studies very demanding. Recently, population PK (PopPK) has been applied to the prediction of CFCs dosing by Bayesian methodology. By PopPK also sparse data may allow evaluating the appropriateness of replacement therapy. PMID:28335525

  20. Enhanced cardiac perception is associated with increased susceptibility to framing effects.

    PubMed

    Sütterlin, Stefan; Schulz, Stefan M; Stumpf, Theresa; Pauli, Paul; Vögele, Claus

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies suggest in line with dual process models that interoceptive skills affect controlled decisions via automatic or implicit processing. The "framing effect" is considered to capture implicit effects of task-irrelevant emotional stimuli on decision-making. We hypothesized that cardiac awareness, as a measure of interoceptive skills, is positively associated with susceptibility to the framing effect. Forty volunteers performed a risky-choice framing task in which the effect of loss versus gain frames on decisions based on identical information was assessed. The results show a positive association between cardiac awareness and the framing effect, accounting for 24% of the variance in the framing effect. These findings demonstrate that good interoceptive skills are linked to poorer performance in risky choices based on ambivalent information when implicit bias is induced by task-irrelevant emotional information. These findings support a dual process perspective on decision-making and suggest that interoceptive skills mediate effects of implicit bias on decisions.

  1. Cotrimoxazole enhances the in vitro susceptibility of Coccidioides posadasii to antifungals.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Astete-Medrano, Delia Jessica; Marques, Francisca Jakelyne de Farias; Andrade, Heuziwanne Tavares Leite; Perdigão Neto, Lauro Vieira; Tavares, Juliane Lira; de Lima, Rita Amanda Chaves; Patoilo, Kharla Kharolyni Nobre Rabelo; Monteiro, Andre Jalles; Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of cotrimoxazole on the in vitro susceptibility of Coccidioides posadasii strains to antifungals. A total of 18 strains of C. posadasii isolated in Brazil were evaluated in this study. The assays were performed in accordance with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines and the combinations were tested using the checkerboard method. The minimum inhibitory concentrations were reduced by 11, 2.4, 4.3 and 3.5 times for amphotericin B, itraconazole, fluconazole and voriconazole, respectively. Moreover, it was seen that cotrimoxazole itself inhibited C. posadasii strains in vitro. The impairment of folic acid synthesis may be a potential antifungal target for C. posadasii.

  2. Blood-clotting-inspired reversible polymer-colloid composite assembly in flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsieh; Fallah, Mohammad A.; Huck, Volker; Angerer, Jennifer I.; Reininger, Armin J.; Schneider, Stefan W.; Schneider, Matthias F.; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Blood clotting is a process by which a haemostatic plug is assembled at the site of injury. The formation of such a plug, which is essentially a (bio)polymer-colloid composite, is believed to be driven by shear flow in its initial phase, and contrary to our intuition, its assembly is enhanced under stronger flowing conditions. Here, inspired by blood clotting, we show that polymer-colloid composite assembly in shear flow is a universal process that can be tailored to obtain different types of aggregates including loose and dense aggregates, as well as hydrodynamically induced ‘log’-type aggregates. The process is highly controllable and reversible, depending mostly on the shear rate and the strength of the polymer-colloidbinding potential. Our results have important implications for the assembly of polymer-colloid composites, an important challenge of immense technological relevance. Furthermore, flow-driven reversible composite formation represents a new paradigm in non-equilibrium self-assembly.

  3. The vulnerable blood. Coagulation and clot structure in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hess, K

    2015-01-01

    Patients with diabetes are at increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. While arteriosclerotic lesions have long been recognized as the underlying cause more recent studies suggest that alterations of the blood are also critically involved. Following plaque rupture, adherence of platelets is followed by the formation of a cross-linked fibrin clot. Patients with diabetes exhibit a prothrombotic milieu consisting of hyper reactive platelets, a tight and rigid clot structure which is due to up-regulation of coagulation factors and prolongation of clot lysis. Metabolic alterations as well as inflammatory processes, which are up-regulated in diabetes, are thought to be the main underlying causes. More recently, the complement cascade has emerged as a potential new player in this context with several complement components directly influencing both platelet function and coagulation. This review provides an overview concerning the changes that lead to alterations of platelet function and clot structure in diabetes.

  4. Testosterone Therapy May Be Linked to Serious Blood Clots

    MedlinePlus

    ... testosterone pills, gels or injections, hoping that the male hormone will boost their sex drive, stamina and strength. It's been known for a while that the estrogen in birth control pills increases a woman's risk of blood clots, ...

  5. Taking a Holiday Trip? Protect Yourself from Blood Clots

    MedlinePlus

    ... periods puts you at risk for potentially deadly deep vein thrombosis To use the sharing features on ... limit blood circulation and cause a condition called deep vein thrombosis (DVT). In DVT, blood clots form ...

  6. Drinking Peroxide as 'Natural' Cure Leads to Dangerous Blood Clots

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_163513.html Drinking Peroxide as 'Natural' Cure Leads to Dangerous Blood Clots So-called ' ... suddenly releases more than 1.5 quarts of gas into the stomach, it's not surprising that there ...

  7. Characterization of Enhancing MS Lesions by Dynamic Texture Parameter Analysis of Dynamic Susceptibility Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajeev K.; Slotboom, Johannes; Locher, Cäcilia; Heldner, Mirjam R.; Weisstanner, Christian; Abela, Eugenio; Kellner-Weldon, Frauke; Zbinden, Martin; Kamm, Christian P.; Wiest, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to investigate statistical differences with MR perfusion imaging features that reflect the dynamics of Gadolinium-uptake in MS lesions using dynamic texture parameter analysis (DTPA). Methods. We investigated 51 MS lesions (25 enhancing, 26 nonenhancing lesions) of 12 patients. Enhancing lesions (n = 25) were prestratified into enhancing lesions with increased permeability (EL+; n = 11) and enhancing lesions with subtle permeability (EL−; n = 14). Histogram-based feature maps were computed from the raw DSC-image time series and the corresponding texture parameters were analyzed during the inflow, outflow, and reperfusion time intervals. Results. Significant differences (p < 0.05) were found between EL+ and EL− and between EL+ and nonenhancing inactive lesions (NEL). Main effects between EL+ versus EL− and EL+ versus NEL were observed during reperfusion (mainly in mean and standard deviation (SD): EL+ versus EL− and EL+ versus NEL), while EL− and NEL differed only in their SD during outflow. Conclusion. DTPA allows grading enhancing MS lesions according to their perfusion characteristics. Texture parameters of EL− were similar to NEL, while EL+ differed significantly from EL− and NEL. Dynamic texture analysis may thus be further investigated as noninvasive endogenous marker of lesion formation and restoration. PMID:26885524

  8. Weight reduction is associated with increased plasma fibrin clot lysis.

    PubMed

    Brzezińska-Kolarz, Beata; Kolarz, Marek; Wałach, Angelika; Undas, Anetta

    2014-11-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of vascular thrombotic events. We sought to investigate how obesity and weight loss affect plasma fibrin clot properties. A total of 29 obese patients were studied before and after 3-month low-fat diet. Plasma fibrin clot parameters, including fibrin clot permeation coefficient (Ks), the lag phase of the turbidity curve, clot lysis time (t 50%), maximum rate of increase in D-dimer levels, and maximum D-dimer concentrations, were determined. Low-fat diet resulted in the reduction of body weight (P < .0001), body mass index (P < .0001), fat mass (P < .0001), total cholesterol (P < .0001), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P = .0005), triglycerides (P = .008), and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (P = .02), but not in fibrinogen or C-reactive protein. The only change in fibrin clot variables was shorter t 50% (P = .02). Baseline t 50%, but not posttreatment, correlated with waist circumference (r = .44, p = .02). This study demonstrates that weight loss in obese people can increase the efficiency of fibrin clot lysis.

  9. Enhancing Asphalt Binder's Rheological Behavior and Aging Susceptibility Using Nano-Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Renaldo C.

    The life expectancy of Asphalt Binder (AB) has been negatively impacted by the harsh bombardment of UV rays. UV rays cause asphalt to oxidize faster which results in deterioration of asphalt rheological characteristics that can lead to pavement distresses. This study investigates the impact that nano-particles and bio modification have on the aging susceptibility of asphalt binder. As such, the following hypothesis was investigated: Introduction of nano particles to asphalt binder will reduce asphalt oxidation aging by increasing the inter layer spacing of the nano particles. Two nano scale materials were used for this study, nano-clay and bio-char as well as one micro scale material, silica fume. Nano-clay (Cloisite 30B) is a naturally occurring inorganic mineral. Bio-char is the waste product from bio-binder production. Bio-binder is produced from swine manure using a thermochemical conversion process. This process is then followed by a filtration procedure where the bio-char is produced. Chemical and physical properties of bio-char showed a significant presence of carbon which could in turn reduce the rate of asphalt oxidation. Silica Fume is an ultra-fine powder collected as a by-product of silicon and ferrosilicon alloy production and consists of spherical particles. In this study several mixtures are designed and evaluated using RV testing (Rotational Viscometer), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Nano-clay is blended at 2% and 4% by weight of dry mass, with and without bio-binder (5% by weight of dry mass). Bio-char is grinded to nano scale and added to the virgin asphalt binder (PG 64-22) at 2%, 5% and 10% by weight of dry mass. Silica Fume is added to virgin asphalt binder (PG 64-22) at 2%, 4% and 8% by weight of dry mass. The optimum percent of nano scale material that is added to virgin asphalt binder is expected to reduce aging susceptibility of asphalt binder, extending its service life.

  10. Isolation of Salmonella typhi from Standard Whole Blood Culture versus Blood-Clot Cultures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    The use of 10% oxgall and bile broth medium, both supplemented with freshly prepared 100 u/ml streptokinase, for isolating Salmonella typhi by clot...significantly better rate of isolation than the clot culture methods. Keywords: Cultures biology; Clot cultures; Salmonella typhi ; Isolation of S. typhi; Whole blood culture; Blood-clot culture; Reprints.

  11. A somatic-mutational process recurrently duplicates germline susceptibility loci and tissue-specific super-enhancers in breast cancers

    DOE PAGES

    Glodzik, Dominik; Morganella, Sandro; Davies, Helen; ...

    2017-01-23

    Somatic rearrangements contribute to the mutagenized landscape of cancer genomes. Here, we systematically interrogated rearrangements in 560 breast cancers by using a piecewise constant fitting approach. We identified 33 hotspots of large (>100 kb) tandem duplications, a mutational signature associated with homologous-recombination-repair deficiency. Notably, these tandem-duplication hotspots were enriched in breast cancer germline susceptibility loci (odds ratio (OR) = 4.28) and breast-specific 'super-enhancer' regulatory elements (OR = 3.54). These hotspots may be sites of selective susceptibility to double-strand-break damage due to high transcriptional activity or, through incrementally increasing copy number, may be sites of secondary selective pressure. Furthermore, the transcriptomicmore » consequences ranged from strong individual oncogene effects to weak but quantifiable multigene expression effects. We thus present a somatic-rearrangement mutational process affecting coding sequences and noncoding regulatory elements and contributing a continuum of driver consequences, from modest to strong effects, thereby supporting a polygenic model of cancer development.« less

  12. Medroxyprogesterone acetate and levonorgestrel increase genital mucosal permeability and enhance susceptibility to genital herpes simplex virus type 2 infection.

    PubMed

    Quispe Calla, N E; Vicetti Miguel, R D; Boyaka, P N; Hall-Stoodley, L; Kaur, B; Trout, W; Pavelko, S D; Cherpes, T L

    2016-11-01

    Depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) is a hormonal contraceptive especially popular in areas with high prevalence of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI). Although observational studies identify DMPA as an important STI risk factor, mechanisms underlying this connection are undefined. Levonorgestrel (LNG) is another progestin used for hormonal contraception, but its effect on STI susceptibility is much less explored. Using a mouse model of genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection, we herein found that DMPA and LNG similarly reduced genital expression of the desmosomal cadherin desmoglein-1α (DSG1α), enhanced access of inflammatory cells to genital tissue by increasing mucosal epithelial permeability, and increased susceptibility to viral infection. Additional studies with uninfected mice revealed that DMPA-mediated increases in mucosal permeability promoted tissue inflammation by facilitating endogenous vaginal microbiota invasion. Conversely, concomitant treatment of mice with DMPA and intravaginal estrogen restored mucosal barrier function and prevented HSV-2 infection. Evaluating ectocervical biopsy tissue from women before and 1 month after initiating DMPA remarkably revealed that inflammation and barrier protection were altered by treatment identically to changes seen in progestin-treated mice. Together, our work reveals DMPA and LNG diminish the genital mucosal barrier; a first-line defense against all STI, but may offer foundation for new contraceptive strategies less compromising of barrier protection.

  13. Medroxyprogesterone acetate and levonorgestrel increase genital mucosal permeability and enhance susceptibility to genital herpes simplex virus type 2 infection

    PubMed Central

    Calla, Nirk E Quispe; Miguel, Rodolfo D Vicetti; Boyaka, Prosper N; Hall-Stoodley, Luanne; Kaur, Balveen; Trout, Wayne; Pavelko, Stephen D; Cherpes, Thomas L

    2016-01-01

    Depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) is a hormonal contraceptive especially popular in areas with high prevalence of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI). While observational studies identify DMPA as an important STI risk factor, mechanisms underlying this connection are undefined. Levonorgestrel (LNG) is another progestin used for hormonal contraception, but its effect on STI susceptibility is much less explored. Using a mouse model of genital HSV-2 infection, we herein found DMPA and LNG similarly reduced genital expression of the desmosomal cadherin desmoglein-1α (DSG1α), enhanced access of inflammatory cells to genital tissue by increasing mucosal epithelial permeability, and increased susceptibility to viral infection. Additional studies with uninfected mice revealed DMPA-mediated increases in mucosal permeability promoted tissue inflammation by facilitating endogenous vaginal microbiota invasion. Conversely, concomitant treatment of mice with DMPA and intravaginal estrogen restored mucosal barrier function and prevented HSV-2 infection. Evaluating ectocervical biopsy tissue from women before and 1 month after initiating DMPA remarkably revealed inflammation and barrier protection were altered by treatment identically to changes seen in progestin-treated mice. Together, our work reveals DMPA and LNG diminish the genital mucosal barrier; a first-line defense against all STI, but may offer foundation for new contraceptive strategies less compromising of barrier protection. PMID:27007679

  14. Enhancement of nonlinear optical susceptibility of CuPc films by ITO layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, V.; Zahran, H. Y.; Yahia, I. S.; Shkir, Mohd; AlFaify, S.

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, the Copper Phthalocyanine (CuPc)/ITO thin film was fabricated using thermal evaporation method. The structural property was analyzed by X-ray diffraction study and confirms that the thin film has been preferentially grown along (200) plane. The atomic force microscope study was carried out on deposited film and quality of thin films is assessed by calculating the roughness of the films. The direct and indirect band gap, linear and nonlinear optical characteristics of grown films were calculated by using UV-Vis-NIR spectrometer studies. The calculated values of the first direct and indirect band gaps (Eg1(d) &Eg1(ind)) are 1.879 and 1.644 eV as a fundamental gap, while the values of second direct and indirect band gap (Eg2(d) &Eg2(ind)) are 1.660 and 1.498 eV as an onset gap for CuPc. The values of nonlinear refractive index (n2) and third order nonlinear optical susceptibility (χ3) are found to be 5 × 10-8 and 8 × 10-9 (theoretical) and 5.2 × 10-8 and 1.56 × 10-7 (experimental) respectively. The optical band and third order nonlinear properties suggest that the as-prepared films are may be applied in optoelectronic and nonlinear applications.

  15. Antifolates inhibit Cryptococcus biofilms and enhance susceptibility of planktonic cells to amphotericin B.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar Cordeiro, R; Mourão, C I; Rocha, M F G; de Farias Marques, F J; Teixeira, C E C; de Oliveira Miranda, D F; Neto, L V P; Brilhante, R S N; de Jesus Pinheiro Gomes Bandeira, T; Sidrim, J J C

    2013-04-01

    The Cryptococcus neoformans species complex contains the most important agents of fungal meningoencephalitis. Therapeutic choices are limited and issues related to toxicity and resistance to antifungals have been described. The present study evaluated the inhibitory effect of the antifolate combinations sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (SMX/TMP) and sulfadiazine-pyrimethamine (SDZ/PYR) against planktonic cells and biofilms of C. neoformans and C. gattii. The influence of the antifolate combinations on the amphotericin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of planktonic cells was also investigated. In addition, the effect of these combinations on the cellular ergosterol content of planktonic cells was studied. Strains of C. neoformans (n = 15) and C. gattii (n = 15) obtained from environmental or clinical sources were evaluated by the broth microdilution method. SMX/TMP and SDZ/PYR showed antifungal activity against free living cells and sessile cells of Cryptococcus spp. Moreover, planktonic cells showed increased susceptibility to amphotericin B after pre-incubation with sub-inhibitory concentrations of SMX/TMP or SDZ/PYR. The drug combinations SMX/TMP and SDZ/PYR were able to prevent the biofilm formation and showed inhibitory effect against mature biofilms of both species. Additionally, the study showed that antifolate drugs reduced the ergosterol content in C. neoformans and C. gattii planktonic cells. Our results highlight the antifungal potential of antifolate drugs.

  16. Effect of Cold Storage on Shear-induced Platelet Aggregation and Clot Strength

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    the kinetics of clot formation and strength were measured using turbidity and dynamic mechanical analysis, respectively. RESULTS: PLTaggregation was...to quantify the changes in clot strength due to storage temperature.22 During dynamic mechanical analysis, a steady constant strain of 0.5% is applied...compared with RT storage. Clot Rheology During dynamic mechanical analysis, the viscoelastic properties of the clot, namely, clot strength (G’, elastic

  17. Clotting Mimicry from Robust Hemostatic Bandages Based on Self-Assembling Peptides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled bleeding from traumatic wounds is a major factor in deaths resulting from military conflict, accidents, disasters and crime. Self-assembling peptide nanofibers have shown superior hemostatic activity, and herein, we elucidate their mechanism by visualizing the formation of nanofiber-based clots that aggregate blood components with a similar morphology to fibrin-based clots. Furthermore, to enhance its direct application to a wound, we developed layer-by-layer assembled thin film coatings onto common materials used for wound dressings—gauze and gelatin sponges. We find these nanofibers elute upon hydration under physiological conditions and generate nanofiber-based clots with blood. After exposure to a range of harsh temperature conditions (−80 to 60 °C) for a week and even 5 months at 60 °C, these hemostatic bandages remain capable of releasing active nanofibers. In addition, the application of these nanofiber-based films from gauze bandages was found to accelerate hemostasis in porcine skin wounds as compared to plain gauze. The thermal robustness, in combination with the self-assembling peptide’s potent hemostatic activity, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and low cost of production, makes this a promising approach for a cheap yet effective hemostatic bandage. PMID:26284753

  18. Specialized proresolving lipid mediators in patients with coronary artery disease and their potential for clot remodeling.

    PubMed

    Elajami, Tarec K; Colas, Romain A; Dalli, Jesmond; Chiang, Nan; Serhan, Charles N; Welty, Francine K

    2016-08-01

    Inflammation in arterial walls leads to coronary artery disease (CAD). Because specialized proresolving lipid mediators (SPMs; lipoxins, resolvins, and protectins) stimulate resolution of inflammation in animal models, we tested whether n-3 fatty acids impact SPM profiles in patients with CAD and promote clot remodeling. Six patients with stable CAD were randomly assigned to either treatment with daily 3.36 g Lovaza for 1 yr or without. Targeted lipid mediator-metabololipidomics showed that both groups had absence of resolvin D1 (RvD1), RvD2, RvD3, RvD5 and resolvin E1-all of which are present in healthy patients. Those not taking Lovaza had an absence of aspirin-triggered resolvin D3 (AT-RvD3) and aspirin-triggered lipoxin B4 (AT-LXB4). Lovaza treatment restored AT-RvD3 and AT-LXB4 and gave levels of RvD6 and aspirin-triggered protectin D1 (AT-PD1) twice as high (resolvin E2 ∼5 fold) as well as lower prostaglandins. Principal component analysis indicated positive relationships for patients with CAD who were receiving Lovaza with increased AT-RvD3, RvD6, AT-PD1, and AT-LXB4 SPMs identified in Lovaza-treated patients with CAD enhanced ∼50% at 1 nM macrophage uptake of blood clots. These results indicate that patients with CAD have lower levels and/or absence of specific SPMs that were restored with Lovaza; these SPMs promote macrophage phagocytosis of blood clots. Together, they suggest that low vascular SPMs may enable progression of chronic vascular inflammation predisposing to coronary atherosclerosis and to thrombosis.-Elajami, T. K., Colas, R. A., Dalli, J., Chiang, N., Serhan, C. N., Welty, F. K. Specialized proresolving lipid mediators in patients with coronary artery disease and their potential for clot remodeling.

  19. Effect of von Willebrand factor on clot structure and lysis.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Rita; Rojas, Héctor

    2015-07-01

    Von Willebrand Factor (vWF) is constitutively secreted by the endothelium and incorporated in the fibrin clots under slow clotting conditions. The aim of the present work was to study the effect of vWF on clot structure and lysis. Purified fibrinogen was mixed with vWF or Tris-buffered saline and clotted with thrombin - activated factor XIII. Fibrin polymerization was followed by turbidity at 350 nm during 2.5 h. After this time, plasmin was added on the top of the clots, and the optical density (OD) was read until baseline values. vWF effect on network[Combining Acute Accent]s porosity was evaluated by permeation using the same clotting conditions as for fibrin polymerization. Clot structure was visualized and analyzed by laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM). The rate of fibrin polymerization was 1.47 mOD/s in the presence of vWF and 0.5 mOD/s when vWF was not added (P < 0.05). The fibrin lysis rate was approximately four times faster when vWF was added to fibrinogen. The fibrin network porosity was (20.4 ± 1.6) × 10 cm with vWF and (8.3 ± 1.2) × 10 cm without external vWF (P < 0.05). The analysis of LSCM images showed that vWF increased fibrin fibers diameter and the networks[Combining Acute Accent] pores size. In conclusion, vWF covalently crosslinked to fibrin modify its structure (increases fibrin diameter and the pores filling space of the meshwork) that accelerates the fibrin lysis rate.

  20. Diabetes Enhances Dental Caries and Apical Periodontitis in Caries-Susceptible WBN/KobSlc Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Yasushi; Matsuura, Masahiro; Sano, Tomoya; Nakahara, Yutaka; Ozaki, Kiyokazu; Narama, Isao; Matsuura, Tetsuro

    2011-01-01

    Many epidemiologic studies have suggested that diabetes may be an important risk factor for periodontal disease. To determine whether diabetes induces or enhances periodontal disease or dental caries, dental tissue from diabetic male and nondiabetic female WBN/KobSlc rats and male and female age-matched nondiabetic F344 rats was analyzed morphologically and morphometrically for these 2 types of lesions. Soft X-ray examination revealed that the incidence and severity of both molar caries and alveolar bone resorption were much higher in male WBN/KobSlc rats with chronic diabetes than in nondiabetic female rats of the same strain. Histopathologic examination showed that dental caries progressed from acute to subacute inflammation due to bacterial infections and necrosis in the pulp when the caries penetrated the dentin. In the most advanced stage of dental caries, inflammatory changes caused root abscess and subsequent apical periodontitis, with the formation of granulation tissue around the dental root. Inflammatory changes resulted in resorption of alveolar bone and correlated well with the severity of molar caries. Our results suggest that diabetic conditions enhance dental caries in WBN/KobSlc rats and that periodontal lesions may result from the apical periodontitis that is secondary to dental caries. PMID:21819682

  1. C1q Deficiency Promotes Pulmonary Vascular Inflammation and Enhances the Susceptibility of the Lung Endothelium to Injury.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Zhu, Ying; Duong, Michelle; Sun, Jianxin; Walsh, Kenneth; Summer, Ross

    2015-12-04

    The collectin proteins are innate immune molecules found in high concentrations on the epithelial and endothelial surfaces of the lung. While these proteins are known to have important anti-inflammatory actions in the airways of the lung little is known of their functional importance in the pulmonary circulation. We recently demonstrated that the circulating collectin protein adiponectin has potent anti-inflammatory effects on the lung endothelium, leading us to reason that other structurally related proteins might have similar effects. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the anti-inflammatory actions of C1q in lung endothelial homeostasis and the pulmonary vascular response to LPS or HCl injury. We show that lung endothelium from C1q-deficient (C1q(-/-)) mice expresses higher baseline levels of the vascular adhesion markers ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin when compared with wild-type mice. Further, we demonstrate that these changes are associated with enhanced susceptibility of the lung to injury as evident by increased expression of adhesion markers, enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and augmented neutrophil recruitment. Additionally, we found that C1q(-/-) mice also exhibited enhanced endothelial barrier dysfunction after injury as manifested by decreased expression of junctional adherens proteins and enhanced vascular leakage. Mechanistically, C1q appears to mediate its effects by inhibiting phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and blocking nuclear translocation of the P65 subunit of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. In summary, our findings indicate a previously unrecognized role for C1q in pulmonary vascular homeostasis and provide added support for the hypothesis that circulating collectin proteins have protective effects on the lung endothelium.

  2. Fine mapping of type 1 diabetes susceptibility loci and evidence for colocalization of causal variants with lymphoid gene enhancers.

    PubMed

    Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Chen, Wei-Min; Burren, Oliver; Cooper, Nick J; Quinlan, Aaron R; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C; Farber, Emily; Bonnie, Jessica K; Szpak, Michal; Schofield, Ellen; Achuthan, Premanand; Guo, Hui; Fortune, Mary D; Stevens, Helen; Walker, Neil M; Ward, Lucas D; Kundaje, Anshul; Kellis, Manolis; Daly, Mark J; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Cooper, Jason D; Deloukas, Panos; Todd, John A; Wallace, Chris; Concannon, Patrick; Rich, Stephen S

    2015-04-01

    Genetic studies of type 1 diabetes (T1D) have identified 50 susceptibility regions, finding major pathways contributing to risk, with some loci shared across immune disorders. To make genetic comparisons across autoimmune disorders as informative as possible, a dense genotyping array, the Immunochip, was developed, from which we identified four new T1D-associated regions (P < 5 × 10(-8)). A comparative analysis with 15 immune diseases showed that T1D is more similar genetically to other autoantibody-positive diseases, significantly most similar to juvenile idiopathic arthritis and significantly least similar to ulcerative colitis, and provided support for three additional new T1D risk loci. Using a Bayesian approach, we defined credible sets for the T1D-associated SNPs. The associated SNPs localized to enhancer sequences active in thymus, T and B cells, and CD34(+) stem cells. Enhancer-promoter interactions can now be analyzed in these cell types to identify which particular genes and regulatory sequences are causal.

  3. How it all starts: initiation of the clotting cascade

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephanie A.; Travers, Richard J.; Morrissey, James H.

    2016-01-01

    The plasma coagulation system in mammalian blood consists of a cascade of enzyme activation events in which serine proteases activate the proteins (proenzymes and procofactors) in the next step of the cascade via limited proteolysis. The ultimate outcome is the polymerization of fibrin and the activation of platelets, leading to a blood clot. This process is protective, as it prevents excessive blood loss following injury (normal hemostasis). Unfortunately, the blood clotting system can also lead to unwanted blood clots inside blood vessels (pathologic thrombosis), which is a leading cause of disability and death in the developed world. There are two main mechanisms for triggering the blood clotting, termed the tissue factor pathway and the contact pathway. Only one of these pathways (the tissue factor pathway) functions in normal hemostasis. Both pathways, however, are thought to contribute to thrombosis. An emerging concept is that the contact pathway functions in host pathogen-defenses. This review focuses on how the initiation phase of the blood clotting cascade is regulated in both pathways, with a discussion of the contributions of these pathways to hemostasis versus thrombosis. PMID:26018600

  4. Transcranial Clot Lysis Using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölscher, Thilo; Zadicario, Eyal; Fisher, David J.; Bradley, William G.

    2010-03-01

    Stroke is the third common cause of death worldwide. The majority of strokes are caused by sudden vessel occlusion, due to a blood clot. Vessel recanalization is the primary goal of all acute stroke treatment strategies. Initial data using ultrasound in combination with a therapeutic agent for clot lysis in stroke are promising. However, sound absorption and defocusing of the ultrasound beam occur during transskull insonation, limiting the efficiency of this approach to high extent. Using a transskull High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) head system we were able to lyse blood clots within seconds and in absence of further lytic agents. We could show that any correction for the distortion might be negligible to focus the ultrasound beam after transskull insonation. The use of transskull HIFU for immediate clot lysis in the human brain without the need of further drugs and disregarding individual skull bone characteristics could become a successful strategy in early stroke treatment. Using magnetic resonance tomography for neuronavigation MRI Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound has the potential to open new avenues for therapeutic applications in the brain including Stroke, Intracranial Hemorrhages, Braintumors, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Thalamic Pain, BBB opening, and local drug delivery. First results in transcranial clot lysis will be presented in this paper.

  5. Shear wave elastography quantification of blood elasticity during clotting.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Miguel; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Flaud, Patrice; Tanter, Mickael

    2012-12-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) affects millions of people worldwide. A fatal complication occurs when the thrombi detach and create a pulmonary embolism. The diagnosis and treatment of DVT depends on clot's age. The elasticity of thrombi is closely related to its age. Blood was collected from pigs and anticoagulated using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Coagulation was initiated using calcium ions. Supersonic shear wave imaging was used to generate shear waves using 100 μs tone bursts of 8 MHz. Tracking of the shear waves was done by ultrafast imaging. Postprocessing of the data was done using Matlab(®). Two-dimensional (2-D) maps of elasticity were obtained by calculating the speed of shear wave propagation. Elasticity varied with time from around 50 Pa at coagulation to 1600 Pa at 120 min after which the elasticity showed a natural decreased (17%) because of thrombolytic action of plasmin. Ejection of the serum from the clot showed a significant decrease in the elasticity of the clot next to the liquid pool (65% decrease), corresponding to the detachment of the clot from the beaker wall. The use of a thrombolytic agent (Urokinase) on the coagulated blood decreased the shear elasticity close to the point of injection, which varied with time and distance. Supersonic imaging proved to be useful mapping the 2-D clot's elasticity. It allowed the visualization of the heterogeneity of mechanical properties of thrombi and has potential use in predicting thrombi breakage as well as in monitoring thrombolytic therapy.

  6. Dephosphorylation of neurofilament proteins enhances their susceptibility to degradation by calpain.

    PubMed Central

    Pant, H C

    1988-01-01

    The degradation of phosphorylated and dephosphorylated neurofilament proteins by the Ca2+-activated neutral proteinase calpain was studied. Neurofilaments were isolated from bovine spinal cord, dephosphorylated by alkaline phosphatase (from Escherichia coli) and radioiodinated with [125I]-Bolton-Hunter reagent. The radioiodinated neurofilament proteins (untreated and dephosphorylated) were incubated in the presence and absence of calpain from rabbit skeletal muscle, and the degradation rates of large (NF-H), mid-sized (NF-M) and small (NF-L) neurofilament polypeptides were analysed by SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. The degradation of dephosphorylated neurofilament proteins occurred at a higher rate, and to a greater extent, than did that of the phosphorylated (untreated) neurofilament proteins. The dephosphorylated high-molecular-mass neurofilament (NF-HD) was proteolyzed 6 times more quickly than the untreated NF-H. The degradation rate of the NF-M and NF-L neurofilament proteins was also enhanced after dephosphorylation, but less than that of NF-H. This indicates that the dephosphorylation of neurofilament proteins can increase their sensitivity to calpain degradation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:2851997

  7. C60(Nd) nanoparticles enhance chemotherapeutic susceptibility of cancer cells by modulation of autophagy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Pengfei; Zhang, Li; Lu, Yang; Man, Na; Wen, Longping

    2010-12-01

    Autophagy, an evolutionally conserved intracellular process degrading cytoplasmic proteins and organelles for recycling, has become one of the most remarkable strategies applied in cancer research. The fullerene C60 nanoparticle (nC60) has been shown to induce autophagy and sensitize chemotherapeutic killing of cancer cells, but the details still remain unknown. Here we show that a water-dispersed nanoparticle solution of derivatized fullerene C60, C60(Nd) nanoparticles (nC60(Nd)), has greater potential in inducing autophagy and sensitizing chemotherapeutic killing of both normal and drug-resistant cancer cells than nC60 does in an autophagy-dependent fashion. Additionally we further demonstrated that autophagy induced by nC60/C60(Nd) and Rapamycin had completely different roles in cancer chemotherapy. Our results, for the first time, revealed a novel and more potent derivative of the C60 nanoparticle in enhancing the cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic agents and reducing drug resistance through autophagy modulation, which may ultimately lead to novel therapeutic strategies in cancer therapy.

  8. Enhancement of cancer stem cell susceptibility to conventional treatments through complementary yoga therapy: possible cellular and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bhargav, Hemant; Metri, Kashinath; Raghuram, Nagarathna; Ramarao, Nagendra Hongasandra; Koka, Prasad S

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are stem-like tumor populations that are reported to contribute towards tumor growth, maintenance and recurrence after therapy. Hypoxia increases CSC fraction and promotes acquisition of a stem-cell-like state. Cancer stem cells are critically dependant on the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) for survival, self-renewal, tumor growth and maintenance of their undifferentiated phenotype. Recent researches show that stage of differentiation of the tumor cells is predictive of their susceptibility to natural killer cell (NK) cell mediated cytotoxicity and cancer stem cells are significant targets of NK cell cytotoxicity. Studies also show that reversion of tumor cells to a less-differentiated phenotype can be achieved by blocking NFκB. Yoga therapy (yogic lifestyle modifications encompassing physical postures, breathing practices, relaxation techniques and meditations) is known to modulate neural, endocrine and immune functions at the cellular level through influencing cell cycle control, aging, oxidative stress, apoptosis and several pathways of stress signaling molecules. Yoga therapy has also been shown to enhance natural killer cell activity and modulate stress and DNA damage in breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy. Recent study found that brief daily yogic meditation may reverse the pattern of increased NFκB-related transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines in leukocytes. Thus, yoga therapy has the potential to reduce cancer stem cell survival, self -renewal and tumor growth by modifying the tumor micro-environment through various mechanisms such as; 1) reducing HIF-1 activity by enhanced oxygenation, 2) promoting NK cell activity directly (or indirectly through down regulating NFκB expression), thereby enhancing NK cell mediated CSC lysis, and 3) by minimizing the aberrant expressions or activities of various hormones, cytokines, chemokines and tumor signaling pathways. Yoga therapy may have a synergistic effect with

  9. European Corn Borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) Induced Responses Enhance Susceptibility in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Dafoe, Nicole J.; Thomas, James D.; Shirk, Paul D.; Legaspi, Michelle E.; Vaughan, Martha M.; Huffaker, Alisa; Teal, Peter E.; Schmelz, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    Herbivore-induced plant responses have been widely described following attack on leaves; however, less attention has been paid to analogous local processes that occur in stems. Early studies of maize (Zea mays) responses to stem boring by European corn borer (ECB, Ostrinianubilalis) larvae revealed the presence of inducible acidic diterpenoid phytoalexins, termed kauralexins, and increases in the benzoxazinoid 2-hydroxy-4,7-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one-glucose (HDMBOA-Glc) after 24 h of herbivory. Despite these rapidly activated defenses, larval growth was not altered in short-term feeding assays. Unexpectedly, ECB growth significantly improved in assays using stem tissue preconditioned by 48 h of larval tunneling. Correspondingly, measures of total soluble protein increased over 2.6-fold in these challenged tissues and were accompanied by elevated levels of sucrose and free linoleic acid. While microarray analyses revealed up-regulation of over 1100 transcripts, fewer individual protein increases were demonstrable. Consistent with induced endoreduplication, both wounding and ECB stem attack resulted in similar significant expansion of the nucleus, nucleolus and levels of extractable DNA from challenged tissues. While many of these responses are triggered by wounding alone, biochemical changes further enhanced in response to ECB may be due to larval secreted effectors. Unlike other Lepidoptera examined, ECB excrete exceedingly high levels of the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in their frass which is likely to contact and contaminate the surrounding feeding tunnel. Stem exposure to a metabolically stable auxin, such as 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), promoted significant protein accumulation above wounding alone. As a future testable hypothesis, we propose that ECB-associated IAA may function as a candidate herbivore effector promoting the increased nutritional content of maize stems. PMID:24023868

  10. European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) induced responses enhance susceptibility in maize.

    PubMed

    Dafoe, Nicole J; Thomas, James D; Shirk, Paul D; Legaspi, Michelle E; Vaughan, Martha M; Huffaker, Alisa; Teal, Peter E; Schmelz, Eric A

    2013-01-01

    Herbivore-induced plant responses have been widely described following attack on leaves; however, less attention has been paid to analogous local processes that occur in stems. Early studies of maize (Zea mays) responses to stem boring by European corn borer (ECB, Ostrinianubilalis) larvae revealed the presence of inducible acidic diterpenoid phytoalexins, termed kauralexins, and increases in the benzoxazinoid 2-hydroxy-4,7-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one-glucose (HDMBOA-Glc) after 24 h of herbivory. Despite these rapidly activated defenses, larval growth was not altered in short-term feeding assays. Unexpectedly, ECB growth significantly improved in assays using stem tissue preconditioned by 48 h of larval tunneling. Correspondingly, measures of total soluble protein increased over 2.6-fold in these challenged tissues and were accompanied by elevated levels of sucrose and free linoleic acid. While microarray analyses revealed up-regulation of over 1100 transcripts, fewer individual protein increases were demonstrable. Consistent with induced endoreduplication, both wounding and ECB stem attack resulted in similar significant expansion of the nucleus, nucleolus and levels of extractable DNA from challenged tissues. While many of these responses are triggered by wounding alone, biochemical changes further enhanced in response to ECB may be due to larval secreted effectors. Unlike other Lepidoptera examined, ECB excrete exceedingly high levels of the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in their frass which is likely to contact and contaminate the surrounding feeding tunnel. Stem exposure to a metabolically stable auxin, such as 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), promoted significant protein accumulation above wounding alone. As a future testable hypothesis, we propose that ECB-associated IAA may function as a candidate herbivore effector promoting the increased nutritional content of maize stems.

  11. EEG Oscillation Evidences of Enhanced Susceptibility to Emotional Stimuli during Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xianxin; Liu, Wenwen; Zhang, Ling; Li, Xiang; Yao, Bo; Ding, Xinsheng; Yuan, JiaJin; Yang, Jiemin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Our recent event-related potential (ERP) study showed that adolescents are more emotionally sensitive to negative events compared to adults, regardless of the valence strength of the events. The current work aimed to confirm this age-related difference in response to emotional stimuli of diverse intensities by examining Electroencephalography (EEG) oscillatory power in time-frequency analysis. Methods: Time-frequency analyses were performed on the EEG data recorded for highly negative (HN), moderately negative (MN) and Neutral pictures in 20 adolescents and 20 adults during a covert emotional task. The results showed a significant age by emotion interaction effect in the theta and beta oscillatory power during the 500–600 ms post stimulus. Results: Adolescents showed significantly less pronounced theta synchronization (ERS, 5.5–7.5 Hz) for HN stimuli, and larger beta desynchronization (ERD; 18–20 Hz) for both HN and MN stimuli, in comparison with neutral stimuli. By contrast, adults exhibited no significant emotion effects in theta and beta frequency bands. In addition, the analysis of the alpha spectral power (10.5–12 Hz; 850–950 ms) showed a main effect of emotion, while the emotion by age interaction was not significant. Irrespective of adolescents or adults, HN and MN stimuli elicited enhanced alpha suppression compared to Neutral stimuli, while the alpha power was similar across HN and MN conditions. Conclusions: These results confirmed prior findings that adolescents are more sensitive to emotionally negative stimuli compared to adults, regardless of emotion intensity, possibly due to the developing prefrontal control system during adolescence. PMID:27242568

  12. HPV16E7 silencing enhances susceptibility of CaSki cells to natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huimin; Hu, Ruili; Guan, Xinlei; Guo, Fang; Zhao, Shuzhen; Zhang, Xueying

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the cytotoxicity of natural killer (NK) cells to CaSki cells following knockdown of the E7 protein of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16E7). Recombinant adenovirus-short hairpin-E7 protein of the human panillomavirus type 16 (Ad‑sh‑HPV16E7) was constructed and used to infect CaSki cells. The expression of HPV16E7 in CaSki cells was assessed using western blot analysis. The expression of cell surface molecule major histocompatibility complex‑I (MHC‑I) in CaSki cells infected with Ad‑sh‑HPV16E7 was examined using flow cytometry. The cytotoxicity of NK cells isolated and expanded from healthy volunteers on Ad‑sh‑HPV16E7‑infected CaSki cells was assessed using the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay. Ad‑sh‑HPV16E7 was successfully constructed and able to inhibit HPV16E7 the expression in CaSki cells. The expression of major histocompa-tibility complex I (MHC‑I), a surface molecule, in CaSki cells was increased after infection with Ad‑sh‑HPV16E7. Compared with the controls, the cytotoxicity of NK cells on CaSki cells, which were infected with Ad‑sh‑HPV16E7, was decreased (p<0.05). In conclusion, HPV16E7 suppresses the expression of MHC‑I on CaSki cells to evade cytotoxic T‑cell (CTL) response. However, it was possible to enhance the cytotoxicity of expanded NK cells to cervical cancer cells or HPV16‑infected cells in vitro, indicating that NK cells may be used for immunotherapy of cervical cancer.

  13. Reducing CBC Clotting Rates in the Neonatal Patient Care Areas

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Jennifer; Tichon, Tanya; Narvey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Performing a complete blood count (CBC) is a common test performed in neonatal intensive care. Samples reported as “clotted” are not able to be analyzed and require redraw. A perceived “high” clotting rate elicits frustration among team members and has negative effects on patient flow and patient satisfaction. Process mapping and a root cause analysis determined that an educational intervention was required to optimize blood collection skills of front-line nurses. Through four rapid PDSA cycles over a three year period, the neonatal patient care areas were able to decrease their CBC clotting rates from 30% (monthly rate when the problem was identified) to 16% (yearly average at the end of the project). The CBC clotting rates continue to decease over time due to the integration of a multi-faceted educational plan into biannual education days designed for current staff nurses, as well as into the orientation plan for newly hired and student nurses. PMID:27493749

  14. Ligand binding to an allergenic lipid transfer protein enhances conformational flexibility resulting in an increase in susceptibility to gastroduodenal proteolysis

    DOE PAGES

    Abdullah, Syed Umer; Alexeev, Yuri; Johnson, Philip E.; ...

    2016-07-26

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are a family of lipid-binding molecules that are widely distributed across flowering plant species, many of which have been identified as allergens. They are highly resistant to simulated gastroduodenal proteolysis, a property that may play a role in determining their allergenicity and it has been suggested that lipid binding may further increase stability to proteolysis. It is demonstrated that LTPs from wheat and peach bind a range of lipids in a variety of conditions, including those found in the gastroduodenal tract. Both LTPs are initially cleaved during gastroduodenal proteolysis at three major sites between residuesmore » 39–40, 56–57 and 79–80, with wheat LTP being more resistant to cleavage than its peach ortholog. The susceptibility of wheat LTP to proteolyic cleavage increases significantly upon lipid binding. This enhanced digestibility is likely to be due to the displacement of Tyr79 and surrounding residues from the internal hydrophobic cavity upon ligand binding to the solvent exposed exterior of the LTP, facilitating proteolysis. As a result, such knowledge contributes to our understanding as to how resistance to digestion can be used in allergenicity risk assessment of novel food proteins, including GMOs.« less

  15. Genetic variation at the 8q24.21 renal cancer susceptibility locus affects HIF binding to a MYC enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Grampp, Steffen; Platt, James L.; Lauer, Victoria; Salama, Rafik; Kranz, Franziska; Neumann, Viviana K.; Wach, Sven; Stöhr, Christine; Hartmann, Arndt; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Mole, David R.; Schödel, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is characterized by loss of function of the von Hippel–Lindau tumour suppressor (VHL) and unrestrained activation of hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs). Genetic and epigenetic determinants have an impact on HIF pathways. A recent genome-wide association study on renal cancer susceptibility identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in an intergenic region located between the oncogenes MYC and PVT1. Here using assays of chromatin conformation, allele-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation and genome editing, we show that HIF binding to this regulatory element is necessary to trans-activate MYC and PVT1 expression specifically in cells of renal tubular origins. Moreover, we demonstrate that the risk-associated polymorphisms increase chromatin accessibility and activity as well as HIF binding to the enhancer. These findings provide further evidence that genetic variation at HIF-binding sites modulates the oncogenic transcriptional output of the VHL–HIF axis and provide a functional explanation for the disease-associated effects of SNPs in ccRCC. PMID:27774982

  16. Piezoelectric Field Enhanced Second-Order Nonlinear Optical Susceptibilities in Wurtzite GaN/AlGaN Quantum Wells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Ansheng; Chuang, S.-L.; Ning, C. Z.; Woo, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Second-order nonlinear optical processes including second-harmonic generation, optical rectification, and difference-frequency generation associated with intersubband transitions in wurtzite GaN/AlGaN quantum well (QW) are investigated theoretically. Taking into account the strain-induced piezoelectric (PZ) effects, we solve the electronic structure of the QW from coupled effective-mass Schrodinger equation and Poisson equation including the exchange-correlation effect under the local-density approximation. We show that the large PZ field in the QW breaks the symmetry of the confinement potential profile and leads to large second-order susceptibilities. We also show that the interband optical pump-induced electron-hole plasma results in an enhancement in the maximum value of the nonlinear coefficients and a redshift of the peak position in the nonlinear optical spectrum. By use of the difference-frequency generation, THz radiation can be generated from a GaN/Al(0.75)Ga(0.25)N with a pump laser of 1.55 micron.

  17. Ligand binding to an Allergenic Lipid Transfer Protein Enhances Conformational Flexibility resulting in an Increase in Susceptibility to Gastroduodenal Proteolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Syed Umer; Alexeev, Yuri; Johnson, Philip E.; Rigby, Neil M.; Mackie, Alan R.; Dhaliwal, Balvinder; Mills, E. N. Clare

    2016-07-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are a family of lipid-binding molecules that are widely distributed across flowering plant species, many of which have been identified as allergens. They are highly resistant to simulated gastroduodenal proteolysis, a property that may play a role in determining their allergenicity and it has been suggested that lipid binding may further increase stability to proteolysis. It is demonstrated that LTPs from wheat and peach bind a range of lipids in a variety of conditions, including those found in the gastroduodenal tract. Both LTPs are initially cleaved during gastroduodenal proteolysis at three major sites between residues 39–40, 56–57 and 79–80, with wheat LTP being more resistant to cleavage than its peach ortholog. The susceptibility of wheat LTP to proteolyic cleavage increases significantly upon lipid binding. This enhanced digestibility is likely to be due to the displacement of Tyr79 and surrounding residues from the internal hydrophobic cavity upon ligand binding to the solvent exposed exterior of the LTP, facilitating proteolysis. Such knowledge contributes to our understanding as to how resistance to digestion can be used in allergenicity risk assessment of novel food proteins, including GMOs.

  18. Ligand binding to an Allergenic Lipid Transfer Protein Enhances Conformational Flexibility resulting in an Increase in Susceptibility to Gastroduodenal Proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Syed Umer; Alexeev, Yuri; Johnson, Philip E.; Rigby, Neil M.; Mackie, Alan R.; Dhaliwal, Balvinder; Mills, E. N. Clare

    2016-01-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are a family of lipid-binding molecules that are widely distributed across flowering plant species, many of which have been identified as allergens. They are highly resistant to simulated gastroduodenal proteolysis, a property that may play a role in determining their allergenicity and it has been suggested that lipid binding may further increase stability to proteolysis. It is demonstrated that LTPs from wheat and peach bind a range of lipids in a variety of conditions, including those found in the gastroduodenal tract. Both LTPs are initially cleaved during gastroduodenal proteolysis at three major sites between residues 39–40, 56–57 and 79–80, with wheat LTP being more resistant to cleavage than its peach ortholog. The susceptibility of wheat LTP to proteolyic cleavage increases significantly upon lipid binding. This enhanced digestibility is likely to be due to the displacement of Tyr79 and surrounding residues from the internal hydrophobic cavity upon ligand binding to the solvent exposed exterior of the LTP, facilitating proteolysis. Such knowledge contributes to our understanding as to how resistance to digestion can be used in allergenicity risk assessment of novel food proteins, including GMOs. PMID:27458082

  19. GABAergic Neuron-Specific Loss of Ube3a Causes Angelman Syndrome-Like EEG Abnormalities and Enhances Seizure Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Judson, Matthew C; Wallace, Michael L; Sidorov, Michael S; Burette, Alain C; Gu, Bin; van Woerden, Geeske M; King, Ian F; Han, Ji Eun; Zylka, Mark J; Elgersma, Ype; Weinberg, Richard J; Philpot, Benjamin D

    2016-04-06

    Loss of maternal UBE3A causes Angelman syndrome (AS), a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with severe epilepsy. We previously implicated GABAergic deficits onto layer (L) 2/3 pyramidal neurons in the pathogenesis of neocortical hyperexcitability, and perhaps epilepsy, in AS model mice. Here we investigate consequences of selective Ube3a loss from either GABAergic or glutamatergic neurons, focusing on the development of hyperexcitability within L2/3 neocortex and in broader circuit and behavioral contexts. We find that GABAergic Ube3a loss causes AS-like increases in neocortical EEG delta power, enhances seizure susceptibility, and leads to presynaptic accumulation of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs)-all without decreasing GABAergic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. Conversely, glutamatergic Ube3a loss fails to yield EEG abnormalities, seizures, or associated CCV phenotypes, despite impairing tonic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. These results substantiate GABAergic Ube3a loss as the principal cause of circuit hyperexcitability in AS mice, lending insight into ictogenic mechanisms in AS.

  20. High-level expression of alternative oxidase protein sequences enhances the spread of viral vectors in resistant and susceptible plants.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Alex M; Gilliland, Androulla; York, Caroline J; Hyman, Belinda; Carr, John P

    2004-12-01

    The alternative oxidase (AOX) is the terminal oxidase of the cyanide-resistant alternative respiratory pathway in plants and has been implicated in resistance to viruses. When tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) vectors were used to drive very high levels of expression of either AOX or AOX mutated in its active site (AOX-E), virus spread was enhanced. This was visualized as the induction of larger hypersensitive-response lesions after inoculation onto NN-genotype tobacco than those produced by vectors bearing sequences of comparable length [the green fluorescent protein (gfp) gene sequence or antisense aox] or the 'empty' viral vector. Also, in the highly susceptible host Nicotiana benthamiana, systemic movement of TMV vectors expressing AOX or AOX-E was faster than that of TMV constructs bearing gfp or antisense aox sequences. Notably, in N. benthamiana, TMV.AOX and TMV.AOX-E induced symptoms that were severe and ultimately included cell death, whereas the empty vector, TMV.GFP and the TMV vector expressing antisense aox sequences never induced necrosis. The results show that, if expressed at sufficiently high levels, active and inactive AOX proteins can affect virus spread and symptomology in plants.

  1. Ligand binding to an Allergenic Lipid Transfer Protein Enhances Conformational Flexibility resulting in an Increase in Susceptibility to Gastroduodenal Proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Syed Umer; Alexeev, Yuri; Johnson, Philip E; Rigby, Neil M; Mackie, Alan R; Dhaliwal, Balvinder; Mills, E N Clare

    2016-07-26

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are a family of lipid-binding molecules that are widely distributed across flowering plant species, many of which have been identified as allergens. They are highly resistant to simulated gastroduodenal proteolysis, a property that may play a role in determining their allergenicity and it has been suggested that lipid binding may further increase stability to proteolysis. It is demonstrated that LTPs from wheat and peach bind a range of lipids in a variety of conditions, including those found in the gastroduodenal tract. Both LTPs are initially cleaved during gastroduodenal proteolysis at three major sites between residues 39-40, 56-57 and 79-80, with wheat LTP being more resistant to cleavage than its peach ortholog. The susceptibility of wheat LTP to proteolyic cleavage increases significantly upon lipid binding. This enhanced digestibility is likely to be due to the displacement of Tyr79 and surrounding residues from the internal hydrophobic cavity upon ligand binding to the solvent exposed exterior of the LTP, facilitating proteolysis. Such knowledge contributes to our understanding as to how resistance to digestion can be used in allergenicity risk assessment of novel food proteins, including GMOs.

  2. Ligand binding to an allergenic lipid transfer protein enhances conformational flexibility resulting in an increase in susceptibility to gastroduodenal proteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, Syed Umer; Alexeev, Yuri; Johnson, Philip E.; Rigby, Neil M.; Mackie, Alan R.; Dhaliwal, Balvinder; Mills, E. N. Clare

    2016-07-26

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are a family of lipid-binding molecules that are widely distributed across flowering plant species, many of which have been identified as allergens. They are highly resistant to simulated gastroduodenal proteolysis, a property that may play a role in determining their allergenicity and it has been suggested that lipid binding may further increase stability to proteolysis. It is demonstrated that LTPs from wheat and peach bind a range of lipids in a variety of conditions, including those found in the gastroduodenal tract. Both LTPs are initially cleaved during gastroduodenal proteolysis at three major sites between residues 39–40, 56–57 and 79–80, with wheat LTP being more resistant to cleavage than its peach ortholog. The susceptibility of wheat LTP to proteolyic cleavage increases significantly upon lipid binding. This enhanced digestibility is likely to be due to the displacement of Tyr79 and surrounding residues from the internal hydrophobic cavity upon ligand binding to the solvent exposed exterior of the LTP, facilitating proteolysis. As a result, such knowledge contributes to our understanding as to how resistance to digestion can be used in allergenicity risk assessment of novel food proteins, including GMOs.

  3. Increased Blood Clotting, Microvascular Density, and Inflammation in Eotaxin-Secreting Tumors Implanted into Mice

    PubMed Central

    Samoszuk, Michael; Deng, Tom; Hamamura, Mark J.; Su, Min-Ying; Asbrock, Nicholas; Nalcioglu, Orhan

    2004-01-01

    An important theme that is emerging in cancer research is the interaction between tumor cells and the host stroma. Because many types of human cancer are infiltrated by eosinophils that are believed to mediate an anti-tumor cytotoxic effect, we developed and studied a transfected B16 murine melanoma cell line that secretes high levels (510 pg/ml/100,000 cells/day) of eotaxin, a chemokine that recruits and activates primarily eosinophils. Here we report that there was increased inflammation (eosinophils, mast cells, mononuclear cells), blood clotting, and microvascular density within the tumors produced by subcutaneous implants of eotaxin-secreting tumor cells in 10 C57BL/6 compared to tumors produced by wild-type tumor cells. The extensive blood clotting in the eotaxin-transfected tumors was associated with significantly decreased blood flow to the tumors as measured by magnetic resonance imaging [(mean maximum signal enhancement of eotaxin-secreting tumors, 147 ± 57 (n = 7) compared to 202 ± 36 signal enhancement units (n = 8) for the wild-type melanoma cells; P = 0.04 by two-tailed, unpaired t-test]. Surprisingly, there was no significant difference between the growth rates or mean masses of the eotaxin-secreting tumors (750 ± 280 mg, n = 10) and the wild-type tumors (780 ± 290, n = 10) after 20 days of growth in vivo, despite the significantly slower growth rate in vitro of the eotaxin-secreting tumor cells. We conclude that eotaxin and the resultant tumor-infiltrating inflammatory cells are not likely to mediate a significant anti-tumor effect in vivo. Instead, elevated eotaxin is associated with increased inflammation, microvascular density, and blood clotting. Thus, eotaxin and eosinophils may play a more complex role in modulating the growth of tumors than the simple, anti-tumor cytotoxic effect that has been previously proposed. PMID:15277219

  4. Molecular mechanisms of the effect of ultrasound on the fibrinolysis of clots

    PubMed Central

    Chernysh, Irina N.; Everbach, E. Carr; Purohit, Prashant K.; Weisel, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Ultrasound accelerates tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA)-induced fibrinolysis of clots in vitro and in vivo. Objective To identify mechanisms for the enhancement of t-PA-induced fibrinolysis of clots. Methods Turbidity is an accurate and convenient method, not previously used, to follow the effects of ultrasound. Deconvolution microscopy was used to determine changes in structure, while fluorescence recovery after photobleaching was used to characterize the kinetics of binding/unbinding and transport. Results The ultrasound pulse repetition frequency affected clot lysis times, but there were no thermal effects. Ultrasound in the absence of t-PA produced a slight but consistent decrease in turbidity, suggesting a decrease in fibrin diameter due solely to the action of the ultrasound, likely caused by an increase in protofibril tension because of vibration from ultrasound. Changes in fibrin network structure during lysis with ultrasound were visualized in real time by deconvolution microscopy, revealing that the network becomes unstable when 30–40% of the protein in the network was digested, whereas without ultrasound, the fibrin network was digested gradually and retained structural integrity. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching during lysis revealed that the off-rate of oligomers from digesting fibers was not much affected but the number of binding/unbinding sites was increased. Conclusions Ultrasound causes a decrease in the diameter of the fibers due to tension as a result of vibration, leading to increased binding sites for plasmin(ogen)/t-PA. The positive feedback of this structural change together with increased mixing/transport of t-PA/plasmin(ogen) is likely to account for the observed enhancement of fibrinolysis by ultrasound. PMID:25619618

  5. An optical approach for non-invasive blood clot testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchenko, Vyacheslav; Brill, Alexander; Fine, Ilya; Harmelin, Alon

    2007-02-01

    Physiological blood coagulation is an essential biological process. Current tests for plasma coagulation (clotting) need to be performed ex vivo and require fresh blood sampling for every test. A recently published work describes a new, noninvasive, in vivo approach to assess blood coagulation status during mechanical occlusion1. For this purpose, we have tested this approach and applied a controlled laser beam to blood micro-vessels of the mouse ear during mechanical occlusion. Standard setup for intravital transillumination videomicroscopy and laser based imaging techniques were used for monitoring the blood clotting process. Temporal mechanical occlusion of blood vessels in the observed area was applied to ensure blood flow cessation. Subsequently, laser irradiation was used to induce vascular micro-injury. Changes in the vessel wall, as well as in the pattern of blood flow, predispose the area to vascular thrombosis, according to the paradigm of Virchow's triad. In our experiments, two elements of Virchow's triad were used to induce the process of clotting in vivo, and to assess it optically. We identified several parameters that can serve as markers of the blood clotting process in vivo. These include changes in light absorption in the area of illumination, as well as changes in the pattern of the red blood cells' micro-movement in the vessels where blood flow is completely arrested. Thus, our results indicate that blood coagulation status can be characterized by non-invasive, in vivo methodologies.

  6. Right Atrial Clot Formation Early after Percutaneous Mitral Balloon Valvuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ateş, Ahmet Hakan; Aksakal, Aytekin; Yücel, Huriye; Atasoy Günaydın, İlksen; Ekbul, Adem; Yaman, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Mitral balloon valvuloplasty which has been used for the treatment of rheumatic mitral stenosis (MS) for several decades can cause serious complications. Herein, we presented right atrial clot formation early after percutaneous mitral balloon valvuloplasty which was treated successfully with unfractioned heparin infusion. PMID:28105049

  7. Photoacoustic monitoring of clot formation during surgery and tumor surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juratli, Mazen A.; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Suen, James Y.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2013-03-01

    When a blood vessel is injured, the normal physiological response of the body is to form a clot (thrombus) to prevent blood loss. Alternatively, even without injury to the blood vessel, the pathological condition called thromboembolism may lead to the formation of circulating blood clots (CBCs), also called emboli, which can clog blood vessels throughout the body. Veins of the extremities (venous thromboembolism), lungs (pulmonary embolism ), brain (embolic stroke), heart (myocardial infarction), kidneys, and gastrointestinal tract are often affected. Emboli are also common complications of infection, inflammation, cancer, surgery, radiation and coronary artery bypass grafts. Despite the clear medical significance of CBCs, however, little progress has been made in the development of methods for real-time detection and identification of CBCs. To overcome these limitations, we developed a new modification of in vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) for real-time detection of white, red, and mixed clots through a transient decrease, increase or fluctuation of PA signal amplitude, respectively. In this work, using PAFC and mouse models, we present for the first time direct evidence that some medical procedures, such as conventional or cancer surgery may initiate the formation of CBCs. In conclusion, the PA diagnostic platform can be used in real-time to define risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, assist in the prognosis and potential prevention of stroke by using a well-timed therapy or as a clot count as a marker of therapy efficacy.

  8. Alignment of the Fibrin Network Within an Autologous Plasma Clot.

    PubMed

    Gessmann, Jan; Seybold, Dominik; Peter, Elvira; Schildhauer, Thomas Armin; Köller, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Autologous plasma clots with longitudinally aligned fibrin fibers could serve as a scaffold for longitudinal axonal regrowth in cases of traumatic peripheral nerve injuries. Three different techniques for assembling longitudinally oriented fibrin fibers during the fibrin polymerization process were investigated as follows: fiber alignment was induced by the application of either a magnetic field or-as a novel approach-electric field or by the induction of orientated flow. Fiber alignment was characterized by scanning electron microscopy analysis followed by image processing using fast Fourier transformation (FFT). Besides FFT output images, area xmin to xmax, as well as full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the FFT graph plot peaks, was calculated to determine the relative degree of fiber alignment. In addition, fluorescently labeled human fibrinogen and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were used to visualize fibrin and cell orientation in aligned and nonaligned plasma clots. Varying degrees of fiber alignment were achieved by the three different methods, with the electric field application producing the highest degree of fiber alignment. The embedded MSCs showed a longitudinal orientation in the electric field-aligned plasma clots. The key feature of this study is the ability to produce autologous plasma clots with aligned fibrin fibers using physical techniques. This orientated internal structure of an autologous biomaterial is promising for distinct therapeutic applications, such as a guiding structure for cell migration and growth dynamics.

  9. Measurement of Plasma Clotting Using Shear Horizontal Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, Tatsuya; Kondoh, Jun; Oonishi, Tomoko; Hosokawa, Kazuya

    2013-07-01

    The monitoring of blood coagulation is important during operation. In this study, a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensor is applied to monitor plasma clotting. An SH-SAW sensor with a metallized surface for mechanical perturbation detection can detect plasma clotting. As plasma clotting is a gel formation reaction, the SH-SAW sensor detects viscoelastic property changes. On the other hand, an SH-SAW sensor with a free surface for electrical perturbation detection detects only the liquid mixing effect. No electrical property changes due to plasma clotting are obtained using this sensor. A planar electrochemical sensor is also used to monitor plasma clotting. In impedance spectral analysis, plasma clotting is measured. However, in the measurement of time responses, no differences between clotting and nonclotting are obtained. Therefore, the SH-SAW sensor is useful for monitoring plasma clotting.

  10. A French National Survey on Clotting Disorders in Mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Carvalhosa, Ana B.; Aouba, Achille; Damaj, Gandhi; Canioni, Danielle; Brouzes, Chantal; Gyan, Emmanuel; Durupt, Stéphane; Durieu, Isabelle; Cathebras, Pascal; Costédoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Launay, David; Pilmis, Benoit; Barete, Stephane; Frenzel, Laurent; Lortholary, Olivier; Hermine, Olivier; Hermans, Cedric; Chandesris, Marie-Olivia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mastocytosis is characterized by a clonal mast cell proliferation with organ infiltration and uncontrolled degranulation. Although not characteristic and poorly explained, some patients develop clotting abnormalities. We retrospectively identified patients with established diagnosis of mastocytosis and related clotting abnormalities (clinical and/or biological) using the national French Reference Centre for Mastocytosis database. From our cohort of 14 adult patients with clotting abnormalities (median age 46 years [range 26–75]), 4 had a presentation suggestive of a primary hemostasis disorder alone (by their symptoms and/or abnormal clotting tests [PFA, von Willebrand's disease [vWD] screening]) and 10 had a laboratory impairment of secondary hemostasis. Among these, 7 had bleeds characteristic of a coagulation cascade disorder (severe/life-threatening in 5 and mild in 2 patients). Clotting abnormalities were of variable severity, typically related to intense crisis of degranulation, such as anaphylactic reactions, and/or to severe organ infiltration by mast cells. Importantly, classical hemostatic management with platelet transfusion, fresh frozen plasma, or vitamin K infusions was unsuccessful, as opposed to the use of agents inhibiting mast cell activity, particularly steroids. This illustrates the crucial role of mast cell mediators such as tryptase and heparin, which interfere both with primary (mainly via inhibition of von Willebrand factor) and secondary hemostasis. There was interestingly an unusually high number of aggressive mastocytosis (particularly mast cell leukemia) and increased mortality in the group with secondary hemostasis disorders (n = 5, 36% of the whole cohort). Mast cell degranulation and/or high tumoral burden induce both specific biologic antiaggregant and anticoagulant states with a wide clinical spectrum ranging from asymptomatic to life-threatening bleeds. Hemostatic control is achieved by mast cell inhibitors such as

  11. Altered plasma fibrin clot properties in essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Małecki, Rafał; Gacka, Małgorzata; Kuliszkiewicz-Janus, Małgorzata; Jakobsche-Policht, Urszula; Kwiatkowski, Jacek; Adamiec, Rajmund; Undas, Anetta

    2016-01-01

    Patients with increased thromboembolic risk tend to form denser fibrin clots which are relatively resistant to lysis. We sought to investigate whether essential thrombocythemia (ET) is associated with altered fibrin clot properties in plasma. Ex vivo plasma fibrin clot permeability coefficient (Ks), turbidimetry and clot lysis time (CLT) were measured in 43 consecutive patients with ET (platelet count from 245 to 991 × 10(3)/µL) and 50 control subjects matched for age, sex and comorbidities. Fibrinolysis proteins and inhibitors together with platelet activation markers were determined. Reduced Ks (-38%, p < 0.0001) and prolonged CLT (+34%, p < 0.0001) were observed in ET. The differences remained significant after adjustment for fibrinogen and platelet count. ET was associated with a slightly shorter lag phase (-5%, p = 0.01) and higher maximum absorbency of the turbidimetric curve (+6%, p < 0.001). The ET patients had higher plasma P-selectin by 193% (p < 0.00001) and platelet factor 4 (PF4) by 173% (p < 0.00001), with higher P-selectin observed in 19 (44%) patients with JAK-2 gene V617F mutation. Higher t-PA (+20%, p < 0.001), 23% higher plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, PAI-1 (+23%, p < 0.01) and unaltered thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor, plasminogen and α2-antiplasmin activity were found in the ET group. Ks inversely correlated with fibrinogen, PF4 and C-reactive protein. CLT positively correlated only with PAI-1. Patients with ET display prothrombotic plasma fibrin clot phenotype including impaired fibrinolysis, which represents a new prothrombotic mechanism in this disease.

  12. A French National Survey on Clotting Disorders in Mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Carvalhosa, Ana B; Aouba, Achille; Damaj, Gandhi; Canioni, Danielle; Brouzes, Chantal; Gyan, Emmanuel; Durupt, Stéphane; Durieu, Isabelle; Cathebras, Pascal; Costédoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Launay, David; Pilmis, Benoit; Barete, Stephane; Frenzel, Laurent; Lortholary, Olivier; Hermine, Olivier; Hermans, Cedric; Chandesris, Marie-Olivia

    2015-10-01

    Mastocytosis is characterized by a clonal mast cell proliferation with organ infiltration and uncontrolled degranulation. Although not characteristic and poorly explained, some patients develop clotting abnormalities. We retrospectively identified patients with established diagnosis of mastocytosis and related clotting abnormalities (clinical and/or biological) using the national French Reference Centre for Mastocytosis database. From our cohort of 14 adult patients with clotting abnormalities (median age 46 years [range 26-75]), 4 had a presentation suggestive of a primary hemostasis disorder alone (by their symptoms and/or abnormal clotting tests [PFA, von Willebrand's disease [vWD] screening]) and 10 had a laboratory impairment of secondary hemostasis. Among these, 7 had bleeds characteristic of a coagulation cascade disorder (severe/life-threatening in 5 and mild in 2 patients). Clotting abnormalities were of variable severity, typically related to intense crisis of degranulation, such as anaphylactic reactions, and/or to severe organ infiltration by mast cells. Importantly, classical hemostatic management with platelet transfusion, fresh frozen plasma, or vitamin K infusions was unsuccessful, as opposed to the use of agents inhibiting mast cell activity, particularly steroids. This illustrates the crucial role of mast cell mediators such as tryptase and heparin, which interfere both with primary (mainly via inhibition of von Willebrand factor) and secondary hemostasis. There was interestingly an unusually high number of aggressive mastocytosis (particularly mast cell leukemia) and increased mortality in the group with secondary hemostasis disorders (n = 5, 36% of the whole cohort). Mast cell degranulation and/or high tumoral burden induce both specific biologic antiaggregant and anticoagulant states with a wide clinical spectrum ranging from asymptomatic to life-threatening bleeds. Hemostatic control is achieved by mast cell inhibitors such as steroids.

  13. NLRP3 Deficiency Reduces Macrophage Interleukin-10 Production and Enhances the Susceptibility to Doxorubicin-induced Cardiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Motoi; Usui, Fumitake; Karasawa, Tadayoshi; Kawashima, Akira; Kimura, Hiroaki; Mizushina, Yoshiko; Shirasuna, Koumei; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Kasahara, Tadashi; Hasebe, Naoyuki; Takahashi, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    NLRP3 inflammasomes recognize non-microbial danger signals and induce release of proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β, leading to sterile inflammation in cardiovascular disease. Because sterile inflammation is involved in doxorubicin (Dox)-induced cardiotoxicity, we investigated the role of NLRP3 inflammasomes in Dox-induced cardiotoxicity. Cardiac dysfunction and injury were induced by low-dose Dox (15 mg/kg) administration in NLRP3-deficient (NLRP3−/−) mice but not in wild-type (WT) and IL-1β−/− mice, indicating that NLRP3 deficiency enhanced the susceptibility to Dox-induced cardiotoxicity independent of IL-1β. Although the hearts of WT and NLRP3−/− mice showed no significant difference in inflammatory cell infiltration, macrophages were the predominant inflammatory cells in the hearts, and cardiac IL-10 production was decreased in Dox-treated NLRP3−/− mice. Bone marrow transplantation experiments showed that bone marrow-derived cells contributed to the exacerbation of Dox-induced cardiotoxicity in NLRP3−/− mice. In vitro experiments revealed that NLRP3 deficiency decreased IL-10 production in macrophages. Furthermore, adeno-associated virus-mediated IL-10 overexpression restored the exacerbation of cardiotoxicity in the NLRP3−/− mice. These results demonstrated that NLRP3 regulates macrophage IL-10 production and contributes to the pathophysiology of Dox-induced cardiotoxicity, which is independent of IL-1β. Our findings identify a novel role of NLRP3 and provided new insights into the mechanisms underlying Dox-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:27225830

  14. Arabidopsis ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 promotes systemic acquired resistance via azelaic acid and its precursor 9-oxo nonanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Wittek, Finni; Hoffmann, Thomas; Kanawati, Basem; Bichlmeier, Marlies; Knappe, Claudia; Wenig, Marion; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Parker, Jane E; Schwab, Wilfried; Vlot, A Corina

    2014-11-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a form of inducible disease resistance that depends on salicylic acid and its upstream regulator ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1). Although local Arabidopsis thaliana defence responses activated by the Pseudomonas syringae effector protein AvrRpm1 are intact in eds1 mutant plants, SAR signal generation is abolished. Here, the SAR-specific phenotype of the eds1 mutant is utilized to identify metabolites that contribute to SAR. To this end, SAR bioassay-assisted fractionation of extracts from the wild type compared with eds1 mutant plants that conditionally express AvrRpm1 was performed. Using high-performance liquid chromatography followed by mass spectrometry, systemic immunity was associated with the accumulation of 60 metabolites, including the putative SAR signal azelaic acid (AzA) and its precursors 9-hydroperoxy octadecadienoic acid (9-HPOD) and 9-oxo nonanoic acid (ONA). Exogenous ONA induced SAR in systemic untreated leaves when applied at a 4-fold lower concentration than AzA. The data suggest that in planta oxidation of ONA to AzA might be partially responsible for this response and provide further evidence that AzA mobilizes Arabidopsis immunity in a concentration-dependent manner. The AzA fragmentation product pimelic acid did not induce SAR. The results link the C9 lipid peroxidation products ONA and AzA with systemic rather than local resistance and suggest that EDS1 directly or indirectly promotes the accumulation of ONA, AzA, or one or more of their common precursors possibly by activating one or more pathways that either result in the release of these compounds from galactolipids or promote lipid peroxidation.

  15. Erythrocytic Iron Deficiency Enhances Susceptibility to Plasmodium chabaudi Infection in Mice Carrying a Missense Mutation in Transferrin Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Lelliott, Patrick M.; McMorran, Brendan J.; Foote, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of iron deficiency in areas of high malaria transmission is complicated by evidence which suggests that iron deficiency anemia protects against malaria, while iron supplementation increases malaria risk. Iron deficiency anemia results in an array of pathologies, including reduced systemic iron bioavailability and abnormal erythrocyte physiology; however, the mechanisms by which these pathologies influence malaria infection are not well defined. In the present study, the response to malaria infection was examined in a mutant mouse line, TfrcMRI24910, identified during an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) screen. This line carries a missense mutation in the gene for transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1). Heterozygous mice exhibited reduced erythrocyte volume and density, a phenotype consistent with dietary iron deficiency anemia. However, unlike the case in dietary deficiency, the erythrocyte half-life, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and intraerythrocytic ferritin content were unchanged. Systemic iron bioavailability was also unchanged, indicating that this mutation results in erythrocytic iron deficiency without significantly altering overall iron homeostasis. When infected with the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi adami, mice displayed increased parasitemia and succumbed to infection more quickly than their wild-type littermates. Transfusion of fluorescently labeled erythrocytes into malaria parasite-infected mice demonstrated an erythrocyte-autonomous enhanced survival of parasites within mutant erythrocytes. Together, these results indicate that TFR1 deficiency alters erythrocyte physiology in a way that is similar to dietary iron deficiency anemia, albeit to a lesser degree, and that this promotes intraerythrocytic parasite survival and an increased susceptibility to malaria in mice. These findings may have implications for the management of iron deficiency in the context of malaria. PMID:26303393

  16. Wound-induced pectin methylesterases enhance banana (Musa spp. AAA) susceptibility to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Jiang, Shuang; Lin, Guimei; Cai, Jianghua; Ye, Xiaoxi; Chen, Houbin; Li, Minhui; Li, Huaping; Takác, Tomás; Samaj, Jozef; Xu, Chunxiang

    2013-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that plant pectin methylesterases (PMEs) are directly involved in plant defence besides their roles in plant development. However, the molecular mechanisms of PME action on pectins are not well understood. In order to understand how PMEs modify pectins during banana (Musa spp.)-Fusarium interaction, the expression and enzyme activities of PMEs in two banana cultivars, highly resistant or susceptible to Fusarium, were compared with each other. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of PMEs and their effect on pectin methylesterification of 10 individual homogalacturonan (HG) epitopes with different degrees of methylesterification (DMs) were also examined. The results showed that, before pathogen treatment, the resistant cultivar displayed higher PME activity than the susceptible cultivar, corresponding well to the lower level of pectin DM. A significant increase in PME expression and activity and a decrease in pectin DM were observed in the susceptible cultivar but not in the resistant cultivar when plants were wounded, which was necessary for successful infection. With the increase of PME in the wounded susceptible cultivar, the JIM5 antigen (low methyestrified HGs) increased. Forty-eight hours after pathogen infection, the PME activity and expression in the susceptible cultivar were higher than those in the resistant cultivar, while the DM was lower. In conclusion, the resistant and the susceptible cultivars differ significantly in their response to wounding. Increased PMEs and thereafter decreased DMs acompanied by increased low methylesterified HGs in the root vascular cylinder appear to play a key role in determination of banana susceptibility to Fusarium.

  17. 21 CFR 864.7140 - Activated whole blood clotting time tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Activated whole blood clotting time tests. 864....7140 Activated whole blood clotting time tests. (a) Identification. An activated whole blood clotting... pulmonary embolism by measuring the coagulation time of whole blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  18. 21 CFR 864.7140 - Activated whole blood clotting time tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Activated whole blood clotting time tests. 864....7140 Activated whole blood clotting time tests. (a) Identification. An activated whole blood clotting... pulmonary embolism by measuring the coagulation time of whole blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  19. 21 CFR 864.7140 - Activated whole blood clotting time tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Activated whole blood clotting time tests. 864....7140 Activated whole blood clotting time tests. (a) Identification. An activated whole blood clotting... pulmonary embolism by measuring the coagulation time of whole blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  20. 21 CFR 864.7140 - Activated whole blood clotting time tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Activated whole blood clotting time tests. 864....7140 Activated whole blood clotting time tests. (a) Identification. An activated whole blood clotting... pulmonary embolism by measuring the coagulation time of whole blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  1. Capture of Lipopolysaccharide (Endotoxin) by the Blood Clot: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Margaret T.; Rickles, Frederick R.; Armstrong, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    In vertebrates and arthropods, blood clotting involves the establishment of a plug of aggregated thrombocytes (the cellular clot) and an extracellular fibrillar clot formed by the polymerization of the structural protein of the clot, which is fibrin in mammals, plasma lipoprotein in crustaceans, and coagulin in the horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus. Both elements of the clot function to staunch bleeding. Additionally, the extracellular clot functions as an agent of the innate immune system by providing a passive anti-microbial barrier and microbial entrapment device, which functions directly at the site of wounds to the integument. Here we show that, in addition to these passive functions in immunity, the plasma lipoprotein clot of lobster, the coagulin clot of Limulus, and both the platelet thrombus and the fibrin clot of mammals (human, mouse) operate to capture lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin). The lipid A core of LPS is the principal agent of gram-negative septicemia, which is responsible for more than 100,000 human deaths annually in the United States and is similarly toxic to arthropods. Quantification using the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) test shows that clots capture significant quantities of LPS and fluorescent-labeled LPS can be seen by microscopy to decorate the clot fibrils. Thrombi generated in the living mouse accumulate LPS in vivo. It is suggested that capture of LPS released from gram-negative bacteria entrapped by the blood clot operates to protect against the disease that might be caused by its systemic dispersal. PMID:24282521

  2. 21 CFR 864.7140 - Activated whole blood clotting time tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Activated whole blood clotting time tests. 864....7140 Activated whole blood clotting time tests. (a) Identification. An activated whole blood clotting... pulmonary embolism by measuring the coagulation time of whole blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  3. Enhancement by Nalidixic Acid of the Thermal Susceptibility of the Ts-7 Mutant of Escherichia Coli TAU-Bar

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Mikio; Mishima, Yukio; Kawada, Jun; Yielding, K. Lemone

    1975-01-01

    Nadilidixic acid at 5 × 10−6 M produced a substantial increase in thermal susceptibility of Ts-7, suggesting either that the thermal and nalidixic acid targets are identical or closely interdependent. PMID:1101825

  4. ON THE NATURE OF FORCES OPERATING IN BLOOD CLOTTING

    PubMed Central

    Mommaerts, W. F. H. M.

    1945-01-01

    It is found that clotting of fibrinogen by thrombin does not occur on the acid side of the isoelectric point of the fibrinogen. At such pH values, however, a primary reaction between thrombin and fibrinogen takes place, leading to the formation of profibrin, a compound of thrombin and fibrinogen. At pH values at which clotting is possible, fibrinogen is negatively, thrombin positively charged, whereas profibrin has a pattern of positive and negative charges. The primary reaction, the formation of profibrin by combination of thrombin and fibrinogen, is inhibited by urea but not by neutral salts. The combination of thrombin with fibrinogen most probably takes place by hydrogen bonds. The second reaction, the polymerisation of profibrin to fibrin, is inhibited by neutral salts in the same way as complex or autocomplex coacervates. It is caused therefore by electrostatic attraction between the positive and the negative charges of the profibrin. PMID:19873444

  5. Aggregation of red blood cells: From rouleaux to clot formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Christian; Steffen, Patrick; Svetina, Saša

    2013-06-01

    Red blood cells are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux. This aggregation process is believed to be reversible, but there is still no full understanding on the adhesion mechanism. There are at least two competing models, based either on bridging or on depletion. We review recent experimental results on the single cell level and theoretical analyses of the depletion model and of the influence of the cell shape on the adhesion strength. Another important aggregation mechanism is caused by activation of platelets. This leads to clot formation which is life-saving in the case of wound healing, but also a major cause of death in the case of a thrombus induced stroke. We review historical and recent results on the participation of red blood cells in clot formation.

  6. Momordica charantia seed extract exhibits strong anticoagulant effect by specifically interfering in intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation and dissolves fibrin clot.

    PubMed

    Manjappa, Bhagyalakshmi; Gangaraju, Sowmyashree; Girish, Kesturu S; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Gonchigar, Sathish J; Shankar, Rohit L; Shinde, Manohar; Sannaningaiah, Devaraja

    2015-03-01

    The current study explores the anticoagulant and fibrin clot-hydrolyzing properties of Momordica charantia seed extract (MCSE). MCSE hydrolyzed casein with the specific activity of 0.780 units/mg per min. Interestingly, it enhanced the clot formation process of citrated human plasma from control 146 to 432 s. In addition, the intravenous injection of MCSE significantly prolonged the bleeding time in a dose-dependent manner from control 150 to more than 800 s, and strengthened its anticoagulant activity. Interestingly, MCSE specifically prolonged the clotting time of only activated partial thromboplastin time, but not prothrombin time, and revealed the participation of MCSE in the intrinsic pathway of the blood coagulation cascade. Furthermore, MCSE completely hydrolyzed both Aα and Bβ chains of the human fibrinogen and partially hydrolyzed the γ chain. However, it hydrolyzed all the chains (α polymer, α chain, β chain and γ-γ dimmers) of partially cross-linked human fibrin clot. The proteolytic activity followed by the anticoagulant effect of the MCSE was completely abolished by the 1,10-phenanthroline and phenyl methyl sulphonyl fluoride, but iodoacetic acid, EDTA, and ethylene glycol-N,N,N',N'-tetra acetic acid did not. Curiously, MCSE did not hydrolyze any other plasma proteins except the plasma fibrinogen. Moreover, MCSE was devoid of RBC lysis, edema and hemorrhagic properties, suggesting its nontoxic nature. Taken together, MCSE may be a valuable candidate in the treatment of blood clot/thrombotic disorders.

  7. Mesoscopic Modeling of Blood Clotting: Coagulation Cascade and Platelets Adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Alireza; Li, Zhen; Karniadakis, George

    2015-11-01

    The process of clot formation and growth at a site on a blood vessel wall involve a number of multi-scale simultaneous processes including: multiple chemical reactions in the coagulation cascade, species transport and flow. To model these processes we have incorporated advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) of multiple species into an extended version of Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method which is considered as a coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics method. At the continuum level this is equivalent to the Navier-Stokes equation plus one advection-diffusion equation for each specie. The chemistry of clot formation is now understood to be determined by mechanisms involving reactions among many species in dilute solution, where reaction rate constants and species diffusion coefficients in plasma are known. The role of blood particulates, i.e. red cells and platelets, in the clotting process is studied by including them separately and together in the simulations. An agonist-induced platelet activation mechanism is presented, while platelets adhesive dynamics based on a stochastic bond formation/dissociation process is included in the model.

  8. Why Do Grafts Clot Despite Access Blood Flow Surveillance?

    SciTech Connect

    Arbabzadeh, Massoud; Mepani, Bhupendra; Murray, Brian M.

    2002-12-15

    Purpose: To look in more detail at those grafts that clot despite access blood flow (ABF) surveillance and the outcome of radiological thrombectomy in those grafts. Methods: Retrospective review was carried out of all polytetrafluoroethylene grafts that clotted from September 1, 1998 to October 30, 2000. During this period, each graft had ABF measured monthly and was referred for prophylactic angioplasty if flow fell below 600 ml/min or by 25%. Results: Thirty-one of 62 monitored grafts clotted (0.44 episodes per patient per month). Five were surgically thrombectomized and 19 were radiologically thrombectomized. The last available ABF prior to graft thrombosis averaged 804 {+-} 108 ml/min and ranged from 215 to 2497 ml/min.Nine of the 23 grafts failed to trigger either of the ABF criteria prior to initial thrombosis. All but one of the 17 grafts throbolysedradiologically showed evidence of significant (>50%) venous stenoses,though additional lesions were found in nine. Thrombolysis was successful in 14 grafts, with ABF rising from 693 {+-} 96 to 941 {+-} 135 ml/min (p <0.05). Six additional grafts reclotted and were lost (6-month graft survival 37%). Conclusion: (1) A significant proportion (40%)of graft thromboses that occur despite ABF surveillance occur in grafts with preserved ABF (>600 ml/min); (2) over 70% can be successfully thrombectomized /angioplastied with about 35% long-term (6 months)survival.

  9. Analysis of clot formation with acoustic radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Francesco; Longo, Diane M.; Lawrence, Michael B.; Walker, William F.

    2002-04-01

    Inappropriate blood coagulation plays an important role in diseases including stroke, heart attack, and deep vein thrombosis (DVT). DVT arises when a blood clot forms in a large vein of the leg. DVT is detrimental because the blood flow may be partially or completely obstructed. More importantly, a potentially fatal situation may arise if part of the clot travels to the arteries in the lungs, forming a pulmonary embolism (PE). Characterization of the mechanical properties of DVT could improve diagnosis and suggest appropriate treatment. We are developing a technique to assess mechanical properties of forming thrombi. The technique uses acoustic radiation force as a means to produce small, localized displacements within the sample. Returned ultrasound echoes are processed to estimate the time dependent displacement of the sample. Appropriate mechanical modeling and signal processing produce plots depicting relative mechanical properties (relative elasticity and relative viscosity) and force-free parameters (time constant, damping ratio, and natural frequency). We present time displacement curves of blood samples obtained during coagulation, and show associated relative and force-free parameter plots. These results show that the Voigt model with added mass accurately characterizes blood behavior during clot formation.

  10. Grow with the Flow: A Dynamic Tale of Blood Clot Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiderman, Karin; Fogelson, Aaron

    2008-11-01

    The body heals injured blood vessels and prevents bleeding by clotting the blood. Clots are primarily made of blood-borne cells and a fibrous material that is assembled at the site of injury in flowing blood. Clot composition and structure change with local chemistry and fluid dynamics, which in turn alter the flow. To better understand this fluid-structure coupling, we have created a mathematical model to simulate the formation of a blood clot in a dynamic fluid environment. The growing clot is represented as a mixed porous medium whose permeability is dependent on the coagulation chemistry within it. The flow field resulting from a clot with specific calculated permeability and size can then be recovered by solving the Navier-Stokes equations with an added friction term. We report on how this complex fluid-structure interaction affects the limiting factor(s) of blood clot growth.

  11. Selective Light-Triggered Release of DNA from Gold Nanorods Switches Blood Clotting On and Off

    PubMed Central

    de Puig, Helena; Cifuentes Rius, Anna; Flemister, Dorma; Baxamusa, Salmaan H.; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    Blood clotting is a precise cascade engineered to form a clot with temporal and spatial control. Current control of blood clotting is achieved predominantly by anticoagulants and thus inherently one-sided. Here we use a pair of nanorods (NRs) to provide a two-way switch for the blood clotting cascade by utilizing their ability to selectively release species on their surface under two different laser excitations. We selectively trigger release of a thrombin binding aptamer from one nanorod, inhibiting blood clotting and resulting in increased clotting time. We then release the complementary DNA as an antidote from the other NR, reversing the effect of the aptamer and restoring blood clotting. Thus, the nanorod pair acts as an on/off switch. One challenge for nanobiotechnology is the bio-nano interface, where coronas of weakly adsorbed proteins can obscure biomolecular function. We exploit these adsorbed proteins to increase aptamer and antidote loading on the nanorods. PMID:23894311

  12. Time as An Important Soil-Forming Factor Influencing Modern and Ancient Magnetic Susceptibility Enhancement Along the Delaware River Valley, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinchcomb, G. E.; Peppe, D. J.; Driese, S. G.

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic susceptibility is an increasingly popular low-cost method for rapidly assessing paleoclimate and paleoenvironmental impact on buried soils. The goal of this study is to determine the primary influence(s) on soil magnetic susceptibility along floodplain, terrace and upland soils in the middle Delaware River Valley, USA, using environmental magnetic, pedologic, and stratigraphic techniques. Two-hundred thirty samples were collected from age-constrained sandy, quartz-rich, floodplain, terrace, and upland soils (Entisols, Inceptisols). A Kruskal-Wallis (K-W) and post-hoc Tukey-Kramer (T-K) (α=0.05) multiple comparisons analysis on 176 mass-specific low-field susceptibility (Xlf) assays show that A and B horizons are magnetically enhanced compared to C and E horizons (p<0.0001). Results of descriptive soil micromorphology show that A and B horizons contain anywhere from 10-50% more amorphous organic matter and clay films along pores than do C and E horizons. Enhanced Xlf values also correlate positively (R^2=0.63) with the soil molecular weathering ratio of Alumina/Bases, suggesting that increased weathering likely results in the formation of pedogenic magnetic minerals and enhanced magnetic susceptibility signal. Additional K-W and T-K testing show that Xlf results, when grouped by floodplain-terrace designation (i.e., chronofunction) are significantly different (p<0.0001). The older T3 terrace and upland Xlf values (0.34±0.14 10^-6 m^3 kg^-1) are greater than the younger T2 terrace (0.18±0.06 10^-6 m^3 kg^-1) values, which are greater than modern floodplain (0.09±0.01 10^-6 m^3 kg^-1) Xlf values. These data suggest that longer intervals of soil formation enhance the Χlf value. This hypothesis is further supported when 159 Xlf values are plotted vs. age for the entire Holocene. A locally-weighted regression smoothing curve (LOESS) shows two distinct intervals of magnetic enhancement during previously established dry intervals, the early and late

  13. Enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization and intrinsic excitability of NAc medium spiny neurons in adult but not adolescent rats susceptible to diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Oginsky, Max F.; Maust, Joel D.; Corthell, John T.; Ferrario, Carrie R.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Basal and diet-induced differences in mesolimbic function, particularly within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), may contribute to human obesity; these differences may be more pronounced in susceptible populations. Objectives We determined whether there are differences in cocaine-induced behavioral plasticity in rats that are susceptible vs. resistant to diet-induced obesity, and basal differences in the striatal neuron function in adult and adolescent obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats. Methods Susceptible and resistant outbred rats were identified based on “junk-food” diet-induced obesity. Then, the induction and expression of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization, which is mediated by enhanced striatal function and is associated with increased motivation for rewards and reward-paired cues, were evaluated. Basal differences in mesolimbic function were examined in selectively bred obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats (P70-80 and P30-40) using both cocaine induced locomotion and whole-cell patch clamping approaches in NAc core medium spiny neurons (MSNs). Results In rats that became obese after eating “junk-food”, the expression of locomotor sensitization was enhanced compared to non-obese rats, with similarly strong responses to 7.5 and 15 mg/kg cocaine. Without diet manipulation, obesity-prone rats were hyper-responsive to the acute locomotor-activating effects of cocaine, and the intrinsic excitability of NAc core MSNs was enhanced by ~60% at positive and negative potentials. These differences were present in adult, but not adolescent rats. Post-synaptic glutamatergic transmission was similar between groups. Conclusions Mesolimbic systems, particularly NAc MSNs, are hyper-responsive in obesity-prone individuals; and interactions between predisposition and experience influence neurobehavioral plasticity in ways that may promote weight gain and hamper weight loss in susceptible rats. PMID:26612617

  14. Extended half-life clotting factor concentrates: results from published clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Young, G; Mahlangu, J N

    2016-07-01

    Extended half-life clotting factor concentrates have been recently introduced into the armamentarium of treatments for patients with haemophilia A and B. In general, the data from published studies have demonstrated these products to be safe with no inhibitors reported in previously treated patients and efficacious with the advantage of a longer half-life allowing for less frequent intravenous infusions of factor. This enhanced convenience has led to some patients not previously on prophylaxis to begin prophylaxis while for others, especially children, has led to the ability to provide prophylaxis with reduced use of central venous catheters. The extended half-life factor IX products are now allowing patients to dose every 1-2 weeks while maintaining higher trough levels while the extended half-life factor VIII products have reduced the frequency of administration for patients on prophylaxis to as infrequent as once per week for some patients and to twice per week for all patients including younger children. It is important to note that data from previously untreated patients have not been published yet and the incidence for inhibitors in this patient population is as of yet unknown. The era of extended half-life clotting factor products has begun and the challenge for the haemophilia community will be how to best integrate these products into haemophilia clinical practice.

  15. Interference of silica nanoparticles with the traditional Limulus amebocyte lysate gel clot assay.

    PubMed

    Kucki, Melanie; Cavelius, Christian; Kraegeloh, Annette

    2014-04-01

    Endotoxin contaminations of engineered nanomaterials can be responsible for observed biological responses, especially for misleading results in in vitro test systems, as well as in vivo studies. Therefore, endotoxin testing of nanomaterials is necessary to benchmark their influence on cells. Here, we tested the traditional Limulus amebocyte lysate gel clot assay for the detection of endotoxins in nanoparticle suspensions with a focus on possible interference of the particles with the test system. We systematically investigated the effects of nanomaterials made of, or covered by, the same material. Different types of bare or PEGylated silica nanoparticles, as well as iron oxide-silica core shell nanoparticles, were tested. Detailed inhibition/enhancement controls revealed enhanced activity in the Limulus coagulation cascade for all particles with bare silica surface. In comparison, PEGylation led to a lower degree of enhancement. These results indicate that the protein-particle interactions are the basis for the observed inhibition and enhancement effects. The enhancement activity of a particle type was positively related to the calculated particle surface area. For most silica particles tested, a dilution of the sample within the maximum valid dilution was sufficient to overcome non-valid enhancement, enabling semi-quantification of the endotoxin contamination.

  16. An automated method for fibrin clot permeability assessment.

    PubMed

    Ząbczyk, Michał; Piłat, Adam; Awsiuk, Magdalena; Undas, Anetta

    2015-01-01

    The fibrin clot permeability coefficient (Ks) is a useful measure of porosity of the fibrin network, which is determined by a number of genetic and environmental factors. Currently available methods to evaluate Ks are time-consuming, require constant supervision and provide only one parameter. We present an automated method in which drops are weighed individually, buffer is dosed by the pump and well defined clot washing is controlled by the software. The presence of a straight association between drop mass and their dripping time allows to shorten the measurement time twice. In 40 healthy individuals, Ks, the number of drops required to reach the plateau (DTP), the time to achieve the plateau (TTP) and the DTP/TTP ratio (DTR) were calculated. There was a positive association between Ks (r = 0.69, P < 0.0001) evaluated by using the manual [median of 4.17 (3.60-5.18) ·10⁻⁹ cm²) and the automated method [median of 4.35 (3.74-5.38) ·10⁻⁹ cm²]. The correlation was stronger (r = 0.85, P < 0.001) in clots with DTP of 7 or less (n = 12). DTP was associated with total homocysteine (tHcy) (r = 0.35, P < 0.05) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) (r = -0.34, P < 0.05), TTP with Ks (r = -0.55, P < 0.01 for the manual method and r = -0.44, P < 0.01 for the automated method) and DTP (r = 0.75, P < 0.0001), and DTR with Ks (r = 0.70, P < 0.0001 for the manual method and r = 0.76, P < 0.0001 for the automated method), fibrinogen (r = -0.58, P < 0.0001) and C-reactive protein (CRP) (r = -0.47, P < 0.01). The automated method might be a suitable tool for research and clinical use and may offer more additional parameters describing fibrin clot structure.

  17. Transgenerational inheritance of enhanced susceptibility to radiation-induced medulloblastoma in newborn Ptch1+/− mice after paternal irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Tanno, Barbara; Meschini, Roberta; Cordelli, Eugenia; Benassi, Barbara; Longobardi, Maria Grazia; Izzotti, Alberto; Pulliero, Alessandra; Mancuso, Mariateresa; Pacchierotti, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis of transgenerational induction of increased cancer susceptibility after paternal radiation exposure has long been controversial because of inconsistent results and the lack of a mechanistic interpretation. Here, exploiting Ptch1 heterozygous knockout mice, susceptible to spontaneous and radiation-induced medulloblastoma, we show that exposure of paternal germ cells to 1 Gy X-rays, at the spermatogonial stage, increased by a considerable 1.4-fold the offspring susceptibility to medulloblastoma induced by neonatal irradiation. This effect gained further biological significance thanks to a number of supporting data on the immunohistochemical characterization of the target tissue and preneoplastic lesions (PNLs). These results altogether pointed to increased proliferation of cerebellar granule cell precursors and PNLs cells, which favoured the development of frank tumours. The LOH analysis of tumor DNA showed Ptch1 biallelic loss in all tumor samples, suggesting that mechanisms other than interstitial deletions, typical of radiation-induced medulloblastoma, did not account for the observed increased cancer risk. This data was supported by comet analysis showing no differences in DNA damage induction and repair in cerebellar cells as a function of paternal irradiation. Finally, we provide biological plausibility to our results offering evidence of a possible epigenetic mechanism of inheritance based on radiation-induced changes of the microRNA profile of paternal sperm. PMID:26452034

  18. Successful Removal of Endobronchial Blood Clots Using Bronchoscopic Cryotherapy at Bedside in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hongyeul; Leem, Cho Sun; Lee, Jae Ho; Lee, Choon-Taek

    2014-01-01

    Acute airway obstruction after hemoptysis occurs due to the presence of blood clots. These conditions may result in life-threatening ventilation impairment. We report a case of obstruction of the large airway by endobronchial blood clots which were removed using bronchoscopic cryotherapy at the bedside of intensive care unit. A 66-year-old female with endometrial cancer who had undergone chemotherapy, was admitted to the intensive care unit due to neutropenic fever. During mechanical ventilation, the minute ventilation dropped to inadequately low levels and chest radiography showed complete opacification of the left hemithorax. Flexible bronchoscopy revealed large blood clots obstructing the proximal left main bronchus. After unsuccessful attempts to remove the clots with bronchial lavage and forceps extraction, blood clots were removed using bronchoscopic cryotherapy. This report shows that cryotherapy via flexible bronchoscopy at the bedside in the intensive of intensive care unit is a simple and effective alternative for the removal of endobronchial blood clots. PMID:25368667

  19. Fibrin Clots Are Equilibrium Polymers That Can Be Remodeled Without Proteolytic Digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernysh, Irina N.; Nagaswami, Chandrasekaran; Purohit, Prashant K.; Weisel, John W.

    2012-11-01

    Fibrin polymerization is a necessary part of hemostasis but clots can obstruct blood vessels and cause heart attacks and strokes. The polymerization reactions are specific and controlled, involving strong knob-into-hole interactions to convert soluble fibrinogen into insoluble fibrin. It has long been assumed that clots and thrombi are stable structures until proteolytic digestion. On the contrary, using the technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we demonstrate here that there is turnover of fibrin in an uncrosslinked clot. A peptide representing the knobs involved in fibrin polymerization can compete for the holes and dissolve a preformed fibrin clot, or increase the fraction of soluble oligomers, with striking rearrangements in clot structure. These results imply that in vivo clots or thrombi are more dynamic structures than previously believed that may be remodeled as a result of local environmental conditions, may account for some embolization, and suggest a target for therapeutic intervention.

  20. Quantitative photoacoustic characterization of blood clot in blood: A mechanobiological assessment through spectral information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Deblina; Vasudevan, Srivathsan; Chen, George C. K.; Sharma, Norman

    2017-02-01

    Formation of blood clots, called thrombus, can happen due to hyper-coagulation of blood. Thrombi, while moving through blood vessels can impede blood flow, an important criterion for many critical diseases like deep vein thrombosis and heart attacks. Understanding mechanical properties of clot formation is vital for assessment of severity of thrombosis and proper treatment. However, biomechanics of thrombus is less known to clinicians and not very well investigated. Photoacoustic (PA) spectral response, a non-invasive technique, is proposed to investigate the mechanism of formation of blood clots through elasticity and also differentiate clots from blood. Distinct shift (increase in frequency) of the PA response dominant frequency during clot formation is reported. In addition, quantitative differentiation of blood clots from blood has been achieved through parameters like dominant frequency and spectral energy of PA spectral response. Nearly twofold increases in dominant frequency in blood clots compared to blood were found in the PA spectral response. Significant changes in energy also help in quantitatively differentiating clots from blood, in the blood. Our results reveal that increase in density during clot formation is reflected in the PA spectral response, a significant step towards understanding the mechanobiology of thrombus formation. Hence, the proposed tool, in addition to detecting thrombus formation, could reveal mechanical properties of the sample through quantitative photoacoustic spectral parameters.

  1. Clot contraction: compression of erythrocytes into tightly packed polyhedra and redistribution of platelets and fibrin.

    PubMed

    Cines, Douglas B; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Nagaswami, Chandrasekaran; Hayes, Vincent; Massefski, Walter; Litvinov, Rustem I; Rauova, Lubica; Lowery, Thomas J; Weisel, John W

    2014-03-06

    Contraction of blood clots is necessary for hemostasis and wound healing and to restore flow past obstructive thrombi, but little is known about the structure of contracted clots or the role of erythrocytes in contraction. We found that contracted blood clots develop a remarkable structure, with a meshwork of fibrin and platelet aggregates on the exterior of the clot and a close-packed, tessellated array of compressed polyhedral erythrocytes within. The same results were obtained after initiation of clotting with various activators and also with clots from reconstituted human blood and mouse blood. Such close-packed arrays of polyhedral erythrocytes, or polyhedrocytes, were also observed in human arterial thrombi taken from patients. The mechanical nature of this shape change was confirmed by polyhedrocyte formation from the forces of centrifugation of blood without clotting. Platelets (with their cytoskeletal motility proteins) and fibrin(ogen) (as the substrate bridging platelets for contraction) are required to generate the forces necessary to segregate platelets/fibrin from erythrocytes and to compress erythrocytes into a tightly packed array. These results demonstrate how contracted clots form an impermeable barrier important for hemostasis and wound healing and help explain how fibrinolysis is greatly retarded as clots contract.

  2. Effects of shear rate on propagation of blood clotting determined using microfluidics and numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Runyon, Matthew K; Kastrup, Christian J; Johnson-Kerner, Bethany L; Ha, Thuong G Van; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2008-03-19

    This paper describes microfluidic experiments with human blood plasma and numerical simulations to determine the role of fluid flow in the regulation of propagation of blood clotting. We demonstrate that propagation of clotting can be regulated by different mechanisms depending on the volume-to-surface ratio of a channel. In small channels, propagation of clotting can be prevented by surface-bound inhibitors of clotting present on vessel walls. In large channels, where surface-bound inhibitors are ineffective, propagation of clotting can be prevented by a shear rate above a threshold value, in agreement with predictions of a simple reaction-diffusion mechanism. We also demonstrate that propagation of clotting in a channel with a large volume-to-surface ratio and a shear rate below a threshold shear rate can be slowed by decreasing the production of thrombin, an activator of clotting. These in vitro results make two predictions, which should be experimentally tested in vivo. First, propagation of clotting from superficial veins to deep veins may be regulated by shear rate, which might explain the correlation between superficial thrombosis and the development of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Second, nontoxic thrombin inhibitors with high binding affinities could be locally administered to prevent recurrent thrombosis after a clot has been removed. In addition, these results demonstrate the utility of simplified mechanisms and microfluidics for generating and testing predictions about the dynamics of complex biochemical networks.

  3. Susceptibility Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Also known as: Sensitivity Testing; Drug Resistance Testing; Culture and Sensitivity; C & S; Antimicrobial Susceptibility Formal name: Bacterial and Fungal Susceptibility Testing Related tests: Urine Culture ; Blood Culture ; Bacterial Wound Culture ; AFB Testing ; MRSA ; ...

  4. Seamless particle-based modeling of blood clotting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Alireza; Karniadakis, George

    2016-11-01

    We propose a new multiscale framework that seamlessly integrate four key components of blood clotting namely, blood rheology, cell mechanics, coagulation kinetics and transport of species and platelet adhesive dynamics. We use transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) which is an extended form of original DPD as the base solver to model both blood flow and the reactive transport of chemical species in the coagulation cascade. Further, we use a coarse-grained representation of blood cell's membrane that accounts for its mechanics; both red blood cells and platelets are resolved at sub-cellular resolution, and stochastic bond formation/dissociation are included to account for platelet adhesive dynamics at the site of injury. Our results show good qualitative agreement with in vivo experiments. The numerical framework allows us to perform systematic analysis on different mechanisms of blood clotting. In addition, this new multiscale particle-based methodology can open new directions in addressing different biological processes from sub-cellular to macroscopic scales. NIH Grant No. U01HL116323.

  5. Blood Management Issues: Getting Clots Together When You Want Them

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Darryl; Potger, Kieron; Southwell, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: Coagulation is a complex process that allows whole blood to form clots at tissue and vessel sites where damage has occurred. Activation of the hemostasis system causes platelets and fibrin-containing clot to stop the bleeding. Perfusionists must find ways to preserve the coagulation system if we are to avoid bleeding in the cardiopulmonary bypass patient. It is still unclear what techniques are best to continue maintaining hemostasis and avoiding transfusion in patients requiring cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). There are numerous factors that come into play with the use of CPB including deactivating the coagulation system with anticoagulants, hemodilution of the circulating blood volume, inflammatory response, and a possible pro-coagulant response from protamine with heparin reversal once the surgical procedure has been completed and CPB terminated. All these factors make achieving hemostasis post CPB extremely difficult. This review attempts to assess what is currently being discussed in the literature, which may improve hemostasis with cardiopulmonary bypass. There is still no one technique that will improve hemostasis post CPB. Perhaps the answer may lie in a combination of reported techniques that may in some way lead to the preserving of coagulation factors during CPB. PMID:21449241

  6. Correlation between clotting and collagen metabolism markers in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gabazza, E C; Osamu, T; Yamakami, T; Ibata, H; Sato, T; Sato, Y; Shima, T

    1994-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused essentially by an immune-mediated mechanism. However, abnormalities of the clotting system have also been incriminated as having an important role in the pathogenesis of this disease. This study aims at assessing the clotting system and collagen metabolism alterations and the relationship between perturbances of the hemostatic pathway and the destructive and fibroproliferative processes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The coagulation system was evaluated by measuring thrombin-antithrombin III complex (TAT), prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and antithrombin III (AT-III). The fibrinolysis system was assessed by measuring fibrin degradation products (FDP), fibrinogen (FBG), alpha 2-antiplasmin (alpha 2-PI), D-dimer (DD) and plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin complex (PAP). As markers of collagen metabolism, the type III procollagen peptide (PIIIP) and the 7S domain of type IV collagen (7S-collagen) were determined. Blood concentrations of DD, PAP, TAT, PIIIP, and 7S-collagen were significantly higher in rheumatoid arthritis patients compared to controls. Serum levels of PIIIP were significantly correlated with PT, APTT, AT-III, FDP, and DD. 7S-collagen levels were inversely related to AT-III and FBG values. This study demonstrated the occurrence of a subclinical intravascular coagulation in rheumatoid arthritis and suggested the important role of blood coagulation in the alteration of the extracellular matrix metabolism in this disease.

  7. Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus: Clotting time in tick-infested skin varies according to local inflammation and gene expression patterns in tick salivary glands

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Wanessa Araújo; Maruyama, Sandra Regina; Franzin, Alessandra Mara; Abatepaulo, Antônio Roberto Rodrigues; Anderson, Jennifer M.; Ferreira, Beatriz Rossetti; Ribeiro, José Marcos Chaves; Moré, Daniela Dantas; Maia, Antonio Augusto Mendes; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Garcia, Gustavo Rocha; de Miranda Santos, Isabel K. Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    Ticks deposit saliva at the site of their attachment to a host in order to inhibit haemostasis, inflammation and innate and adaptive immune responses. The anti-haemostatic properties of tick saliva have been described by many studies, but few show that tick infestations or its anti-haemostatic components exert systemic effects in vivo. In the present study, we extended these observations and show that, compared with normal skin, bovine hosts that are genetically susceptible to tick infestations present an increase in the clotting time of blood collected from the immediate vicinity of haemorrhagic feeding pools in skin infested with different developmental stages of Rhipicepahlus microplus; conversely, we determined that clotting time of tick-infested skin from genetically resistant bovines was shorter than that of normal skin. Coagulation and inflammation have many components in common and we determined that in resistant bovines, eosinophils and basophils, which are known to contain tissue factor, are recruited in greater numbers to the inflammatory site of tick bites than in susceptible hosts. Finally, we correlated the observed differences in clotting times with the expression profiles of transcripts for putative anti-haemostatic proteins in different developmental stages of R. microplus fed on genetically susceptible and resistant hosts: we determined that transcripts coding for proteins similar to these molecules are overrepresented in salivary glands from nymphs and males fed on susceptible bovines. Our data indicate that ticks are able to modulate their host’s local haemostatic reactions. In the resistant phenotype, larger amounts of inflammatory cells are recruited and expression of anti-coagulant molecules is decreased tick salivary glands, features that can hamper the tick’s blood meal. PMID:20045690

  8. Transgenic expression of CXCR3 on T cells enhances susceptibility to cutaneous Leishmania major infection by inhibiting monocyte maturation and promoting a Th2 response.

    PubMed

    Oghumu, Steve; Stock, James C; Varikuti, Sanjay; Dong, Ran; Terrazas, Cesar; Edwards, Jessica A; Rappleye, Chad A; Holovatyk, Ariel; Sharpe, Arlene; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis, caused mainly by Leishmania major, an obligate intracellular parasite, is a disfiguring disease characterized by large skin lesions and is transmitted by a sand fly vector. We previously showed that the chemokine receptor CXCR3 plays a critical role in mediating resistance to cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major. Furthermore, T cells from L. major-susceptible BALB/c but not L. major-resistant C57BL/6 mice fail to efficiently upregulate CXCR3 upon activation. We therefore examined whether transgenic expression of CXCR3 on T cells would enhance resistance to L. major infection in susceptible BALB/c mice. We generated BALB/c and C57BL/6 transgenic mice, which constitutively overexpressed CXCR3 under a CD2 promoter, and then examined the outcomes with L. major infection. Contrary to our hypothesis, transgenic expression of CXCR3 (CXCR3(Tg)) on T cells of BALB/c mice resulted in increased lesion sizes and parasite burdens compared to wild-type (WT) littermates after L. major infection. Restimulated lymph node cells from L. major-infected BALB/c-CXCR3(Tg) mice produced more interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-10 and less gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Cells in draining lymph nodes from BALB/c-CXCR3(Tg) mice showed enhanced Th2 and reduced Th1 cell accumulation associated with increased neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes. However, monocytes displayed an immature phenotype which correlated with increased parasite burdens. Interestingly, transgenic expression of CXCR3 on T cells did not impact the outcome of L. major infection in C57BL/6 mice, which mounted a predominantly Th1 response and spontaneously resolved their infection similar to WT littermates. Our findings demonstrate that transgenic expression of CXCR3 on T cells increases susceptibility of BALB/c mice to L. major.

  9. Effects of vancomycin versus nafcillin in enhancing killing of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus causing bacteremia by human cathelicidin LL-37.

    PubMed

    Le, J; Dam, Q; Schweizer, M; Thienphrapa, W; Nizet, V; Sakoulas, G

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that anti-staphylococcal beta-lactam antibiotics, like nafcillin, render methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) more susceptible to killing by innate host defense peptides (HDPs), such as cathelicidin LL-37. We compared the effects of growth in 1/4 minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of nafcillin or vancomycin on the LL-37 killing of 92 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates. For three randomly selected strains among these, we examined the effects of nafcillin, vancomycin, daptomycin, or linezolid on LL-37 killing and autolysis. Growth in the presence of subinhibitory nafcillin significantly enhanced LL-37 killing of MSSA compared to vancomycin and antibiotic-free controls. Nafcillin also reduced MSSA production of the golden staphylococcal pigment staphyloxanthin in 39 % of pigmented strains vs. 14 % for vancomycin. Among the antibiotics tested, only nafcillin resulted in significantly increased MSSA autolysis. These studies point to additional mechanisms of anti-staphylococcal activity of nafcillin beyond direct bactericidal activity, properties that vancomycin and other antibiotic classes do not exhibit. The ability of nafcillin to enhance sensitivity to innate HDPs may contribute to its superior effectiveness against MSSA, as suggested by studies comparing clinical outcomes to vancomycin treatment.

  10. The Plant Membrane-Associated REMORIN1.3 Accumulates in Discrete Perihaustorial Domains and Enhances Susceptibility to Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Tolga O; Richardson, Annis; Dagdas, Yasin F; Mongrand, Sébastien; Kamoun, Sophien; Raffaele, Sylvain

    2014-07-01

    Filamentous pathogens such as the oomycete Phytophthora infestans infect plants by developing specialized structures termed haustoria inside the host cells. Haustoria are thought to enable the secretion of effector proteins into the plant cells. Haustorium biogenesis, therefore, is critical for pathogen accommodation in the host tissue. Haustoria are enveloped by a specialized host-derived membrane, the extrahaustorial membrane (EHM), which is distinct from the plant plasma membrane. The mechanisms underlying the biogenesis of the EHM are unknown. Remarkably, several plasma membrane-localized proteins are excluded from the EHM, but the remorin REM1.3 accumulates around P. infestans haustoria. Here, we used overexpression, colocalization with reporter proteins, and superresolution microscopy in cells infected by P. infestans to reveal discrete EHM domains labeled by REM1.3 and the P. infestans effector AVRblb2. Moreover, SYNAPTOTAGMIN1, another previously identified perihaustorial protein, localized to subdomains that are mainly not labeled by REM1.3 and AVRblb2. Functional characterization of REM1.3 revealed that it is a susceptibility factor that promotes infection by P. infestans. This activity, and REM1.3 recruitment to the EHM, require the REM1.3 membrane-binding domain. Our results implicate REM1.3 membrane microdomains in plant susceptibility to an oomycete pathogen.

  11. Three phase partitioning of zingibain, a milk-clotting enzyme from Zingiber officinale Roscoe rhizomes.

    PubMed

    Gagaoua, Mohammed; Hoggas, Naouel; Hafid, Kahina

    2015-02-01

    The present work describes for the first time an elegant non-chromatographic method, the three phase partitioning for the purification and recovery of zingibain, a milk-clotting enzyme, from Zingiber officinale rhizomes. Factors affecting partitioning efficiency such as (NH4)2SO4 saturation, crude extract to t-butanol ratio and pH on zingibain partitioning were investigated. Optimal purification parameters were 50% (NH4)2SO4 saturation with 1.0:1.0 ratio of crude extract:t-butanol at pH 7.0, which gave 14.91 purification fold with 215% recovery of zingibain. The enzyme was found to be exclusively partitioned in the aqueous phase. The enzyme showed a prominent single band on SDS-PAGE. It is a monomeric protein of 33.8 kDa and its isoelectric point is 4.38. The enzyme exhibited maximal proteolytic activity at a temperature of 60 °C and pH 7.0. It was found to be stable at 40-65 °C during 2 h. The enzyme was found to be highly stable against numerous metal ions and its activity was enhanced by Ca(2+), K(+) and Na(+). It was completely inhibited by heavy metal ions such as Cu(2+) and Hg(2+) and partially by Cd(+). Zingibain milk-clotting activity (MCA) was found to be highly stable when stored under freezing (-20 °C) for 30 days compared at 4 °C.

  12. Enhancement of third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility of Alq3 in polar aprotic solvents.

    PubMed

    Derkowska-Zielinska, Beata

    2017-02-01

    The influence of solvent polarity on nonlinear optical properties of tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)-aluminum (Alq3) was investigated by the degenerate four-wave mixing method at the 532 nm. It was obtained that the effective values of the third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility (χeff⟨3⟩) and the second-order hyperpolarizability (γeff) of Alq3 depend on the solvent polarity. Additionally, it was found that Alq3 dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide has the highest values of χeff⟨3⟩ and γeff. Furthermore, two Stegeman's figures of merit were also calculated. The obtained results suggest that Alq3 is also promising material for application in all-optical signal processing devices.

  13. 42 CFR 410.63 - Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors... Other Health Services § 410.63 Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors: Conditions. Notwithstanding the exclusion from coverage of vaccines (see § 405.310 of this chapter) and...

  14. 42 CFR 410.63 - Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors... Other Health Services § 410.63 Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors: Conditions. Notwithstanding the exclusion from coverage of vaccines (see § 405.310 of this chapter) and...

  15. 42 CFR 410.63 - Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors... Other Health Services § 410.63 Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors: Conditions. Notwithstanding the exclusion from coverage of vaccines (see § 405.310 of this chapter) and...

  16. 42 CFR 410.63 - Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors... Other Health Services § 410.63 Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors: Conditions. Notwithstanding the exclusion from coverage of vaccines (see § 405.310 of this chapter) and...

  17. 42 CFR 410.63 - Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors... Other Health Services § 410.63 Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors: Conditions. Notwithstanding the exclusion from coverage of vaccines (see § 405.310 of this chapter) and...

  18. [Influence of temperature on spatial fibrin clot formation process in thrombodynamics].

    PubMed

    Shcherbina, I A; Lipets, E N; Abaeva, A A; Balandina, A N; Ataullakhanov, F I

    2014-01-01

    In this study we have investigated the process of spatial fibrin clot formation in non-steered platelet-free plasma at the temperatures from 20°C to 43°C using thrombodynamics - the novel in vitro hemostasis assay, which imitates the process of hemostatic clot growth in vivo. During data processing the following parameters were calculated: initial (V i ) and stationary (V st ) rates of clot growth which characterize initiation and propagation phases of clotting process, and clot size on the 30 th minute. The temperature dependence of extrinsic and intrinsic tenase activities, which determine values of the initial and stationary clot growth rates, respectively, have been also measured. It was established that the temperature lowering from 37°C to 24°C extends mainly on the initiation phase of clot growth, while the stationary rate of clot growth changes insignificantly. Meanwhile none of the thrombodynamics parameters shows the dramatic change of plasma coagulation system condition at the temperature of 24°C (acute hypothermia). Using the thrombodynamics assay an assumption, that the temperature lowering does not change the state of plasma hemostasis system significantly has been confirmed.

  19. Modelling of platelet-fibrin clot formation in flow with a DPD-PDE method.

    PubMed

    Tosenberger, A; Ataullakhanov, F; Bessonov, N; Panteleev, M; Tokarev, A; Volpert, V

    2016-02-01

    The paper is devoted to mathematical modelling of clot growth in blood flow. Great complexity of the hemostatic system dictates the need of usage of the mathematical models to understand its functioning in the normal and especially in pathological situations. In this work we investigate the interaction of blood flow, platelet aggregation and plasma coagulation. We develop a hybrid DPD-PDE model where dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) is used to model plasma flow and platelets, while the regulatory network of plasma coagulation is described by a system of partial differential equations. Modelling results confirm the potency of the scenario of clot growth where at the first stage of clot formation platelets form an aggregate due to weak inter-platelet connections and then due to their activation. This enables the formation of the fibrin net in the centre of the platelet aggregate where the flow velocity is significantly reduced. The fibrin net reinforces the clot and allows its further growth. When the clot becomes sufficiently large, it stops growing due to the narrowed vessel and the increase of flow shear rate at the surface of the clot. Its outer part is detached by the flow revealing the inner part covered by fibrin. This fibrin cap does not allow new platelets to attach at the high shear rate, and the clot stops growing. Dependence of the final clot size on wall shear rate and on other parameters is studied.

  20. Coagulopathy in critically ill patients: part 2-soluble clotting factors and hemostatic testing.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Arthur P; Rice, Todd W

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript provides an overview of how to interpret in vitro clotting studies and how to select studies to evaluate patients with bleeding disorders in the ICU. It provides a practical approach to understanding the complex subject of clotting factor abnormalities, including the most common problems of preanalytical error and anticoagulation therapy. Limitations and pitfalls of diagnostic testing are highlighted.

  1. 7 CFR 58.436 - Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. 58.436 Section 58.436 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. Enzyme preparations used in the manufacture of cheese shall be...

  2. 7 CFR 58.436 - Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. 58.436 Section 58.436 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. Enzyme preparations used in the manufacture of cheese shall be...

  3. 7 CFR 58.436 - Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. 58.436 Section 58.436 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. Enzyme preparations used in the manufacture of cheese shall be...

  4. 7 CFR 58.436 - Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. 58.436 Section 58.436 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. Enzyme preparations used in the manufacture of cheese shall be...

  5. 7 CFR 58.436 - Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. 58.436 Section 58.436 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. Enzyme preparations used in the manufacture of cheese shall be...

  6. Integration of acoustic radiation force and optical imaging for blood plasma clot stiffness measurement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Caroline W; Perez, Matthew J; Helmke, Brian P; Viola, Francesco; Lawrence, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    Despite the life-preserving function blood clotting serves in the body, inadequate or excessive blood clot stiffness has been associated with life-threatening diseases such as stroke, hemorrhage, and heart attack. The relationship between blood clot stiffness and vascular diseases underscores the importance of quantifying the magnitude and kinetics of blood's transformation from a fluid to a viscoelastic solid. To measure blood plasma clot stiffness, we have developed a method that uses ultrasound acoustic radiation force (ARF) to induce micron-scaled displacements (1-500 μm) on microbeads suspended in blood plasma. The displacements were detected by optical microscopy and took place within a micro-liter sized clot region formed within a larger volume (2 mL sample) to minimize container surface effects. Modulation of the ultrasound generated acoustic radiation force allowed stiffness measurements to be made in blood plasma from before its gel point to the stage where it was a fully developed viscoelastic solid. A 0.5 wt % agarose hydrogel was 9.8-fold stiffer than the plasma (platelet-rich) clot at 1 h post-kaolin stimulus. The acoustic radiation force microbead method was sensitive to the presence of platelets and strength of coagulation stimulus. Platelet depletion reduced clot stiffness 6.9 fold relative to platelet rich plasma. The sensitivity of acoustic radiation force based stiffness assessment may allow for studying platelet regulation of both incipient and mature clot mechanical properties.

  7. Thermal Blood Clot Formation and use in Microfluidic Device Valving Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Shi, Wendian (Inventor); Guo, Luke (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of forming a blood-clot microvalve by heating blood in a capillary tube of a microfluidic device. Also described are methods of modulating liquid flow in a capillary tube by forming and removing a blood-clot microvalve.

  8. Endothelial Cells Organize Fibrin Clots into Structures That Are More Resistant to Lysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray Jerome, W.; Handt, Stefan; Hantgan, Roy R.

    2005-06-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is a major cause of death and disability in the United States. Introducing thrombolytic agents into the clot to dissolve occlusive coronary artery thrombi is one method of treatment. However, despite advances in our knowledge of thrombosis and thrombolysis, survival rates following thrombolytic therapy have not improved substantially. This failure highlights the need for further study of the factors mediating clot stabilization. Using laser scanning confocal microscopy of clots formed from fluorescein-labeled fibrinogen, we investigated what effect binding of fibrin to the endothelial surface has on clot structure and resistance to lysis. Fluorescent fibrin clots were produced over human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and the clot structure analyzed. In the presence of HUVEC, fibrin near the endothelial surface was more organized and occurred in tighter bundles compared to fibrin just 50 [mu]m above. The HUVEC influence on fibrin architecture was blocked by inhibitory concentrations of antibodies to [alpha]V or [beta]3 integrin subunits. The regions of the clots associated with endothelial cells were more resistant to lysis than the more homogenous regions distal to endothelium. Thus, our data show that binding of fibrin to integrins on endothelial surfaces produces clots that are more resistant to lysis.

  9. An Enzymatic Method to Rescue Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Clotted Bone Marrow Samples

    PubMed Central

    Malonzo, Cherry; Poetzel, Tobias; Baur, Martin; Steffen, Frank; Stoyanov, Jivko

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) - usually obtained from bone marrow - often require expansion culture. Our protocol uses clinical grade urokinase to degrade clots in the bone marrow and release MSCs for further use. This protocol provides a rapid and inexpensive alternative to bone marrow resampling. Bone marrow is a major source of MSCs, which are interesting for tissue engineering and autologous stem cell therapies. Upon withdrawal bone marrow may clot, as it comprises all of the hematopoietic system. The resulting clots contain also MSCs that are lost for expansion culture or direct stem cell therapy. We experienced that 74% of canine bone marrow samples contained clots and yielded less than half of the stem cell number expected from unclotted samples. Thus, we developed a protocol for enzymatic digestion of those clots to avoid labor-intense and costly bone marrow resampling. Urokinase - a clinically approved and readily available thrombolytic drug – clears away the bone marrow clots almost completely. As a consequence, treated bone marrow aspirates yield similar numbers of MSCs as unclotted samples. Also, after urokinase treatment the cells kept their metabolic activity and the ability to differentiate into chondrogenic, osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. Our protocol salvages clotted blood and bone marrow samples without affecting the quality of the cells. This obsoletes resampling, considerably reduces sampling costs and enables the use of clotted samples for research or therapy. PMID:25938767

  10. Clot Formation in the Sipunculid Worm Themiste petricola: A Haemostatic and Immune Cellular Response

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Tomás; Blanco, Guillermo A.

    2012-01-01

    Clot formation in the sipunculid Themiste petricola, a coelomate nonsegmented marine worm without a circulatory system, is a cellular response that creates a haemostatic mass upon activation with sea water. The mass with sealing properties is brought about by homotypic aggregation of granular leukocytes present in the coelomic fluid that undergo a rapid process of fusion and cell death forming a homogenous clot or mass. The clot structure appears to be stabilized by abundant F-actin that creates a fibrous scaffold retaining cell-derived components. Since preservation of fluid within the coelom is vital for the worm, clotting contributes to rapidly seal the body wall and entrap pathogens upon injury, creating a matrix where wound healing can take place in a second stage. During formation of the clot, microbes or small particles are entrapped. Phagocytosis of self and non-self particles shed from the clot occurs at the clot neighbourhood, demonstrating that clotting is the initial phase of a well-orchestrated dual haemostatic and immune cellular response. PMID:22550489

  11. Integration of Acoustic Radiation Force and Optical Imaging for Blood Plasma Clot Stiffness Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Caroline W.; Perez, Matthew J.; Helmke, Brian P.; Viola, Francesco; Lawrence, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the life-preserving function blood clotting serves in the body, inadequate or excessive blood clot stiffness has been associated with life-threatening diseases such as stroke, hemorrhage, and heart attack. The relationship between blood clot stiffness and vascular diseases underscores the importance of quantifying the magnitude and kinetics of blood’s transformation from a fluid to a viscoelastic solid. To measure blood plasma clot stiffness, we have developed a method that uses ultrasound acoustic radiation force (ARF) to induce micron-scaled displacements (1-500 μm) on microbeads suspended in blood plasma. The displacements were detected by optical microscopy and took place within a micro-liter sized clot region formed within a larger volume (2 mL sample) to minimize container surface effects. Modulation of the ultrasound generated acoustic radiation force allowed stiffness measurements to be made in blood plasma from before its gel point to the stage where it was a fully developed viscoelastic solid. A 0.5 wt % agarose hydrogel was 9.8-fold stiffer than the plasma (platelet-rich) clot at 1 h post-kaolin stimulus. The acoustic radiation force microbead method was sensitive to the presence of platelets and strength of coagulation stimulus. Platelet depletion reduced clot stiffness 6.9 fold relative to platelet rich plasma. The sensitivity of acoustic radiation force based stiffness assessment may allow for studying platelet regulation of both incipient and mature clot mechanical properties. PMID:26042775

  12. Rheometrical Studies of Blood Clot Formation by Oscillatory Shear, Thromboelastography, Sonoclot Analysis and Free Oscillation Rheometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, P. Adrian; Hawkins, Karl M.; Lawrence, Matthew J.; Williams, P. Rhodri; Williams, Rhodri L.

    2008-07-01

    We report studies of the coagulation of samples of whole human blood by oscillatory shear techniques, including Fourier Transform Mechanical Spectroscopy (FTMS). These techniques are used herein to identify the Gel Point of coagulating blood in terms of the Chambon-Winter Gel Point criterion which provides a rheometrical basis for detecting the establishment of an incipient clot. A comparison of the results of FTMS with those obtained from measurements involving a Thromboelastograph (TEG), a Sonoclot Analyzer and a Free Oscillation Rheometer (FOR) indicate that the latter techniques are not capable of detecting the incipient clot, whose establishment occurs several minutes prior to TEG or FOR-based assessments of clot formation time. The results of the present study suggest that FTMS is a useful tool in blood clotting research, being capable of providing a global coagulation profile in addition to detecting the instant of incipient clot formation.

  13. Plastic containers and the whole-blood clotting test: glass remains the best option.

    PubMed

    Stone, Richard; Seymour, Jamie; Marshall, Oliver

    2006-12-01

    This is the first study to identify normal whole-blood clotting times in various plastic containers and to identify the effect of the addition of various concentrations of Pseudechis australis (Mulga snake) venom on the clotting time in glass and plastic. Polycarbonate was identified as a potential alternative to glass as a testing container owing to a whole-blood clotting time within acceptable limits for a bedside test (mean 29.5 min) and equivalent performance to glass in the presence of P. australis venom. Other plastic containers (such as polypropylene and polyethylene) were found to be unsuitable owing to very prolonged clotting times (>60 min) or impaired performance in the presence of venom. Overall, owing to the variation between the performance of different plastics and the difficulty in differentiating between them, plastic containers cannot be recommended as an alternative to glass when performing the whole-blood clotting test for envenomed patients.

  14. Enhancement of spin susceptibility of low-density two-dimensional electrons in a high quality Si/SiGe quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tzu-Ming; Shi, Xiaoyan; Pan, Wei; Huang, Shi-Hsien; Liu, Cheewee; Li, Jiun-Yun

    2015-03-01

    We report magneto-transport measurement results of two-dimensional electrons in a high quality Si/SiGe quantum well under tilted magnetic fields. The electron peak mobility reaches 2 x 106 cm2/Vs and the density is varied from 0.8 to 2.1 x 1011 cm-2. Under tilted magnetic fields, two Landau levels with opposite spins are brought into energetic coincidence. From the coincidence angles we determine the effective spin susceptibility g*m*. At n =2.1 x 1011 cm-2, g*m* ~ 4 (in units of mbgb) , consistent with previous work [Lai et al, PRL 96, 076805 (2006)]. Our results further show that the spin susceptibility is enhanced by 20% at 0.8 x 1011 cm-2 from its high density value. Surprisingly, unlike previous results in modulation doped Si/SiGe quantum wells, a resistance peak is observed at nu =3 when Landau level coincidence occurs in our undoped Si/SiGe field-effect transistor sample. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. Autophagy-deficiency in hepatic progenitor cells leads to the defects of stemness and enhances susceptibility to neoplastic transformation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Feng; Hu, Lei; Ge, Ruiliang; Yang, Lixue; Liu, Kai; Li, Yunyun; Sun, Yanfu; Wang, Kui

    2016-02-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved and lysosome-dependent degradation process which assists in cell survival and tissue homeostasis. Although previous reports have shown that deletion of the essential autophagy gene disturbs stem cell maintenance in some cell types such as hematopoietic and neural cells, it remains unclear how autophagy-deficiency influences hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs). Here we report that Atg5-deficiency in HPCs delays HPC-mediated rat liver regeneration in vivo. In vitro researches further demonstrate that loss of autophagy decreases the abilities of colony and spheroid formations, and disrupts the induction of hepatic differentiation in HPCs. Meanwhile, autophagy-deficiency increases the accumulations of damaged mitochondria and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) and suppresses homologous recombination (HR) pathway of DNA damage repair in HPCs. Moreover, in both diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and CCl4 models, autophagy-deficiency accelerates neoplastic transformation of HPCs. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that autophagy contributes to stemness maintenance and reduces susceptibility to neoplastic transformation in HPCs.

  16. Western diet induces a shift in microbiota composition enhancing susceptibility to Adherent-Invasive E. coli infection and intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Agus, Allison; Denizot, Jérémy; Thévenot, Jonathan; Martinez-Medina, Margarita; Massier, Sébastien; Sauvanet, Pierre; Bernalier-Donadille, Annick; Denis, Sylvain; Hofman, Paul; Bonnet, Richard; Billard, Elisabeth; Barnich, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances have shown that the abnormal inflammatory response observed in CD involves an interplay among intestinal microbiota, host genetics and environmental factors. The escalating consumption of fat and sugar in Western countries parallels an increased incidence of CD during the latter 20th century. The impact of a HF/HS diet in mice was evaluated for the gut micro-inflammation, intestinal microbiota composition, function and selection of an E. coli population. The HF/HS diet created a specific inflammatory environment in the gut, correlated with intestinal mucosa dysbiosis characterized by an overgrowth of pro-inflammatory Proteobacteria such as E. coli, a decrease in protective bacteria, and a significantly decreased of SCFA concentrations. The expression of GPR43, a SCFA receptor was reduced in mice treated with a HF/HS diet and reduced in CD patients compared with controls. Interestingly, mice treated with an agonist of GPR43 were protected against DSS-induced colitis. Finally, the transplantation of feces from HF/HS treated mice to GF mice increased susceptibility to AIEC infection. Together, our results demonstrate that a Western diet could aggravate the inflammatory process and that the activation of the GPR43 receptor pathway could be used as a new strategy to treat CD patients. PMID:26742586

  17. Identification of differentially expressed genes associated with the enhancement of X-ray susceptibility by RITA in a hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma cell line (FaDu)

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Jinwei; Li, Xianglan; Guo, Rutao; Liu, Shanshan; Luo, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Next generation sequencing and bio-informatic analyses were conducted to investigate the mechanism of reactivation of p53 and induction of tumor cell apoptosis (RITA)-enhancing X-ray susceptibility in FaDu cells. Materials and methods The cDNA was isolated from FaDu cells treated with 0 X-ray, 8 Gy X-ray, or 8 Gy X-ray + RITA. Then, cDNA libraries were created and sequenced using next generation sequencing, and each assay was repeated twice. Subsequently, differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using Cuffdiff in Cufflinks and their functions were predicted by pathway enrichment analyses. Genes that were constantly up- or down-regulated in 8 Gy X-ray-treated FaDu cells and 8 Gy X-ray + RITA-treated FaDu cells were obtained as RITA genes. Afterward, the protein-protein interaction (PPI) relationships were obtained from the STRING database and a PPI network was constructed using Cytoscape. Furthermore, ClueGO was used for pathway enrichment analysis of genes in the PPI network. Results Total 2,040 and 297 DEGs were identified in FaDu cells treated with 8 Gy X-ray or 8 Gy X-ray + RITA, respectively. PARP3 and NEIL1 were enriched in base excision repair, and CDK1 was enriched in p53 signaling pathway. RFC2 and EZH2 were identified as RITA genes. In the PPI network, many interaction relationships were identified (e.g., RFC2-CDK1, EZH2-CDK1 and PARP3-EZH2). ClueGO analysis showed that RFC2 and EZH2 were related to cell cycle. Conclusions RFC2, EZH2, CDK1, PARP3 and NEIL1 may be associated, and together enhance the susceptibility of FaDu cells treated with RITA to the deleterious effects of X-ray. PMID:27247549

  18. Inhibition of SlMPK1, SlMPK2, and SlMPK3 Disrupts Defense Signaling Pathways and Enhances Tomato Fruit Susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yanyan; Yang, Yang; Liu, Can; Chen, Lin; Sheng, Jiping; Shen, Lin

    2015-06-10

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are major components of defense signaling pathways that transduce extracellular stimuli into intracellular responses in plants. Our previous study indicated that SlMPK1/2/3 were associated with nitric oxide-induced defense response in tomato fruit. In this study, we determine whether SlMPK1/2/3 influence the tomato fruit's innate immunity and whether plant hormones and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in SlMPK1/2/3 defense signaling pathways. Treatment with 10 μM U0126 significantly inhibited the relative expression of SlMPK1, SlMPK2, and SlMPK3 (P < 0.05). U0126-treated fruit showed higher concentrations of auxin indole acetic acid (IAA), abscisic acid (ABA), and gibberellic acid (GA), but a lower concentration of methyl jasmonate (MeJA). The activities of defense enzymes, including β-1,3-glucanases (GLU), chitinase (CHI), phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), and polyphenol oxidase (PPO), decreased after U0126 treatment. Meanwhile, H2O2 content increased, and catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and peroxidase (POD) activities decreased after U0126 treatment. U0126 treatment enhanced the susceptibility of tomato fruit to Botrytis cinerea and resulted in more severe gray mold rot. These results demonstrate that inhibition of SlMPK1/2/3 disrupts tomato fruit defense signaling pathways and enhances the susceptibility to B. cinerea and also that plant hormones and ROS are associated with SlMPK1/2/3 defense signaling pathways.

  19. Fibrin clot properties and haemostatic function in men and women with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, Sara; Jörneskog, Gun; Ågren, Anna; Lins, Per-Eric; Wallén, Håkan; Antovic, Aleksandra

    2015-02-01

    The increased risk of vascular complications in type 1 diabetes may in part be explained by changes in haemostatic function. In the present study, we investigated the fibrin clot properties in patients with type 1 diabetes in relation to sex and microvascular complications. The study included 236 patients (107 women) aged between 20-70 years and without any history of cardiovascular disease. Fibrin clot properties, assessed by determination of the permeability coefficient (Ks) and turbidimetric clotting and lysis assays, did not differ between men and women. Compared with men, women had worse glycaemic control as well as higher levels of prothrombin fragment 1+2 and peak thrombin generation in vitro, indicating increased thrombin generation both in vivo and in vitro. Subgroup analyses of patients younger than 30 years revealed less permeable fibrin clots and prolonged lysis time in females compared with age-matched men. Patients with microvascular complications had higher fibrinogen concentrations and denser and less permeable fibrin clots. Thus, we conclude that in vitro fibrin clot properties in patients with type 1 diabetes without cardiovascular disease are not different between the sexes, but associate with prevalence of microvascular complications. Tighter fibrin clot formation in younger women, as suggested by our results, may affect their future cardiovascular risk and should be investigated in a larger population.

  20. Heat transfer analysis on peristaltically induced motion of particle-fluid suspension with variable viscosity: Clot blood model.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, M M; Zeeshan, A; Ellahi, R

    2016-12-01

    In this article, heat transfer analysis on clot blood model of the particle-fluid suspension through a non-uniform annulus has been investigated. The blood propagating along the whole length of the annulus was induced by peristaltic motion. The effects of variable viscosity and slip condition are also taken into account. The governing flow problem is modeled using lubrication approach by taking the assumption of long wavelength and creeping flow regime. The resulting equation for fluid phase and particle phase is solved analytically and closed form solutions are obtained. The physical impact of all the emerging parameters is discussed mathematically and graphically. Particularly, we considered the effects of particle volume fraction, slip parameter, the maximum height of clot, viscosity parameter, average volume flow rate, Prandtl number, Eckert number and fluid parameter on temperature profile, pressure rise and friction forces for outer and inner tube. Numerical computations have been used to determine the behavior of pressure rise and friction along the whole length of the annulus. The present study is also presented for an endoscope as a special case of our study. It is observed that greater influence of clot tends to rise the pressure rise significantly. It is also found that temperature profile increases due to the enhancement in Prandtl number, Eckert number, and fluid parameter. The present study reveals that friction forces for outer tube have higher magnitude as compared to the friction forces for an inner tube. In fact, the results for present study can also be reduced to the Newtonian fluid by taking ζ → ∞.

  1. Polyphosphate and RNA Differentially Modulate the Contact Pathway of Blood Clotting.

    PubMed

    Gajsiewicz, Joshua M; Smith, Stephanie A; Morrissey, James H

    2017-02-03

    The contact pathway of the plasma clotting cascade is dispensable for normal hemostasis, but contributes to thrombosis and serves as a bridge between inflammation and coagulation. This pathway is triggered upon exposure of plasma to certain anionic polymers and artificial surfaces. Recently, extracellular nucleic acids and inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) have been implicated as being important (patho)physiologically relevant activators of this pathway. However, mechanistic details regarding how nucleic acids or polyP modulate the individual reactions of the contact pathway have been lacking. In this study, we investigate the ability of RNA homopolymers and polyP to bind the primary constituents of the contact pathway: factor XIa, factor XIIa, and plasma kallikrein, in the presence and absence of high molecular weight kininogen (HK), an important cofactor in this pathway. We examine seven proteolytic activation reactions within the contact pathway and report that polyP greatly enhances the rate of all seven, while RNA is effective in supporting only a subset of these reactions. HK both enhances and suppresses these proteolytic activation reactions, depending on the specific reaction evaluated. Overall, we find that polyP is a potent mediator of contact pathway activation reactions in general, that RNA secondary structure may be important to its procoagulant activity, and that nucleic acids versus polyP may differentially modulate specific enzyme activation events within the contact pathway.

  2. Potential for Differentiation of Pseudoprogression From True Tumor Progression With Dynamic Susceptibility-Weighted Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Ferumoxytol vs. Gadoteridol: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gahramanov, Seymur; Raslan, Ahmed M.; Muldoon, Leslie L.; Hamilton, Bronwyn E.; Rooney, William D.; Varallyay, Csanad G.; Njus, Jeffrey M.; Haluska, Marianne; Neuwelt, Edward A.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: We evaluated dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) using gadoteridol in comparison to the iron oxide nanoparticle blood pool agent, ferumoxytol, in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) who received standard radiochemotherapy (RCT). Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients with GBM received standard RCT and underwent 19 MRI sessions that included DSC-MRI acquisitions with gadoteridol on Day 1 and ferumoxytol on Day 2. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) values were calculated from DSC data obtained from each contrast agent. T1-weighted acquisition post-gadoteridol administration was used to identify enhancing regions. Results: In seven MRI sessions of clinically presumptive active tumor, gadoteridol-DSC showed low rCBV in three and high rCBV in four, whereas ferumoxytol-DSC showed high rCBV in all seven sessions (p = 0.002). After RCT, seven MRI sessions showed increased gadoteridol contrast enhancement on T1-weighted scans coupled with low rCBV without significant differences between contrast agents (p = 0.9). Based on post-gadoteridol T1-weighted scans, DSC-MRI, and clinical presentation, four patterns of response to RCT were observed: regression, pseudoprogression, true progression, and mixed response. Conclusion: We conclude that DSC-MRI with a blood pool agent such as ferumoxytol may provide a better monitor of tumor rCBV than DSC-MRI with gadoteridol. Lesions demonstrating increased enhancement on T1-weighted MRI coupled with low ferumoxytol rCBV are likely exhibiting pseudoprogression, whereas high rCBV with ferumoxytol is a better marker than gadoteridol for determining active tumor. These interesting pilot observations suggest that ferumoxytol may differentiate tumor progression from pseudoprogression and warrant further investigation.

  3. Erythrocyte migration and gap formation in rabbit blood clots in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ueki, T; Yazama, F; Horiuchi, T; Yamada, M

    2008-04-01

    Thrombolytic agents must be carried by the blood circulation to thrombi to exert their functions. Structural gaps exist between blood vessels and thrombi or in the area surrounding thrombi. Therefore, information about fundamental gap formation at thrombotic areas is critically important for thrombolytic therapy. We previously reported that t-PA accelerates the activities of bovine erythrocytes and hemoglobin (Hb) towards bovine plasminogen activation. Here, we examined gap generation by observing morphological changes during thrombolytic processes in rabbit blood clots deformation of erythrocytes from blood clots and Hb transfer from erythrocytes to serum in vitro. Rabbit venous blood samples (1 ml) were stored under sterile conditions in glass tubes at 37 degrees C for 2, 24, 48 h, 1, and 2 weeks. We examined clot diameter, erythrocyte diameter and number as well as Hb volume in the serum, as well as histological changes in the clots. The diameter of blood clots did not change until 2 weeks after sampling. Erythrocyte diameter decreased within 48 h and at 2 weeks after sampling at the clot surface (p < 0.001) and interior (p < 0.001). The number of erythrocytes in the serum started to increase starting from 24 h after sampling (p < 0.01). Serum Hb volume also gradually increased from 24 h until 2 weeks after sampling (p < 0.01). The erythrocyte envelope became disrupted and cytoplasm started to flow through pores into the serum at 24 h. The results indicated that blood clots are reduced due to clot retraction, erythrocyte dissociation and cytoplasm leakage without a distinct fibrinolytic reaction. These results indicated that gaps start to form between 2 and 24 h after blood clotting.

  4. Dynamic evaluation and control of blood clotting using a microfluidic platform for high-throughput diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combariza, Miguel E.; Yu, Xinghuo; Nesbitt, Warwick; Tovar-Lopez, Francisco; Rabus, Dominik G.; Mitchell, Arnan

    2015-12-01

    Microfluidic technology has the potential to revolutionise blood-clotting diagnostics by incorporating key physiological blood flow conditions like shear rate. In this paper we present a customised dynamic microfluidic system, which evaluates the blood clotting response to multiple conditions of shear rate on a single microchannel. The system can achieve high-throughput testing through use of an advanced fluid control system, which provides with rapid and precise regulation of the blood flow conditions in the platform. We present experimental results that demonstrate the potential of this platform to develop into a high-throughput, low-cost, blood-clotting diagnostics device.

  5. Identification of the major lipoproteins in crayfish hemolymph as proteins involved in immune recognition and clotting.

    PubMed

    Hall, M; van Heusden, M C; Söderhäll, K

    1995-11-22

    Lipid-containing hemolymph proteins from males of the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus were isolated by density gradient ultracentrifugation. Two major lipoproteins, one high density lipoprotein (HDL) and one very high density lipoprotein (VHDL), were characterized. The HDL and the VHDL were found to be identical to two proteins previously studied for their roles in immune recognition and hemolymph clotting, namely the beta-1,3-glucan binding protein and the clotting protein. These results imply that crayfish lipoproteins have dual functions, and that they are involved in immunity, hemolymph clotting, and lipid transport in these animals. Also, the oxygen-transporting protein hemocyanin was found to have a small lipid content.

  6. Correlation of a clot-weight and radial immunodiffusion method for estimation of plasma fibrinogen concentration.

    PubMed

    Reid, H L; Onwuameze, I C

    1984-03-01

    A clot-weight and radial immunodiffusion method for estimating fibrinogen concentration were compared using plasma from 58 pregnant women and diabetic patients. The two methods gave a correlation coefficient, r = 0.53 (p less than 0.005). There was no significant variation between the mean fibrinogen concentrations as determined by both methods. The coefficient of variation for the clot-weight and immunodiffusion methods were 1.54% and 2.9%, respectively. It is concluded that the clot-weight method is more readily applicable than the radial immunodiffusion method to fibrinogen measurements, especially in patients when rapid results are required.

  7. Increased cellular apoptosis susceptibility (CSE1L/CAS) protein expression promotes protrusion extension and enhances migration of MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Shen, Shing-Chuan; Lee, Woan-Ruoh; Liao, Ching-Fong; Deng, Win-Ping; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Hsieh, Cheng-I; Tung, Jai-Nien; Chen, Ching-Shyang; Chiou, Jeng-Fong; Li, Li-Tzu; Lin, Chuang-Yu; Hsu, Chung-Huei; Jiang, Ming-Chung

    2010-10-15

    Microtubules are part of cell structures that play a role in regulating the migration of cancer cells. The cellular apoptosis susceptibility (CSE1L/CAS) protein is a microtubule-associated protein that is highly expressed in cancer. We report here that CSE1L regulates the association of {alpha}-tubulin with {beta}-tubulin and promotes the migration of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. CSE1L was associated with {alpha}-tubulin and {beta}-tubulin in GST (glutathione S-transferase) pull-down and immunoprecipitation assays. CSE1L-GFP (green fluorescence protein) fusion protein experiments showed that the N-terminal of CSE1L interacted with microtubules. Increased CSE1L expression resulted in decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of {alpha}-tubulin and {beta}-tubulin, increased {alpha}-tubulin and {beta}-tubulin association, and enhanced assembly of microtubules. Cell protrusions or pseudopodia are temporary extensions of the plasma membrane and are implicated in cancer cell migration and invasion. Increased CSE1L expression increased the extension of MCF-7 cell protrusions. In vitro migration assay showed that enhanced CSE1L expression increased the migration of MCF-7 cells. Our results indicate that CSE1L plays a role in regulating the extension of cell protrusions and promotes the migration of cancer cells.

  8. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase-mediated upregulation of NKG2D ligands on leukemia cells by resveratrol results in enhanced natural killer cell susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Luis Espinoza, J; Takami, Akiyoshi; Trung, Ly Q; Nakao, Shinji

    2013-06-01

    The powerful activating receptor NKG2D is expressed by natural killer (NK) cells and promotes cytotoxic lysis of cancer cells expressing NKG2D ligands (NKG2D-Ls). We report the effective induction of NKG2D-Ls, achieved with the naturally occurring polyphenol resveratrol, in a broad range of leukemia cells. In this study, resveratrol upregulated the NKG2D-Ls MHC class I chain-related proteins MICA and MICB, and UL16-binding proteins ULBP1, ULBP2, and ULBP3 in most of the leukemia cells analyzed. Ligand upregulation induced by resveratrol was impaired by pharmacological and genetic disruption of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase, the main regulator of NKG2D-L expression. Leukemia cells treated with resveratrol were more susceptible to killing by NK cells than untreated cells, and the enhanced cytotoxicity of NK cells was blocked by treatment of NK cells with anti-NKG2D mAbs. Interestingly, resveratrol consistently upregulated the NKG2D receptor expression and enhanced NKG2D-mediated functions in resting NK cells obtained from healthy individuals. Therefore, resveratrol has attractive immunotherapeutic potential.

  9. Polymorphism of clotting factors in Hungarian patients with Raynaud's phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Shemirani, Amir-Houshang; Szomják, Edit; Balogh, Emese; András, Csilla; Kovács, Dóra; Acs, Judit; Csiki, Zoltán

    2011-01-01

    Patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon may have a genetically determined risk for clotting factors that predispose them to aberrant microvascular thrombosis. We investigated the prevalence of factor V substitution of G to A at position 1691 (FVLeiden), prothrombin G20210A, and methyltetrahydrofolate reductase C677T mutations in these patients. Two hundred (158 women, 42 men, mean age of 42.4 ± 13.7 years) consecutive patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon and 200 age-sex-matched healthy controls of Hungarian origin were included in a case-control study. The prevalence of methyltetrahydrofolate reductase C677T homozygous among patients was significantly lower than in the control group (odds ratio 0.4, 95% confidence interval 0.2-0.9, P < 0.05). The prevalence of other thrombosis-associated alleles did not differ between patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon and control subjects. FVLeiden, prothrombin G20210A, and polymorphism, prothrombin G20210A mutations have no apparent effect on the etiology of primary Raynaud's phenomenon.

  10. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Enhance CD4 T Cell Susceptibility to NK Cell Killing but Reduce NK Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Pace, Matthew; Williams, James; Kurioka, Ayako; Gerry, Andrew B; Jakobsen, Bent; Klenerman, Paul; Nwokolo, Nneka; Fox, Julie; Fidler, Sarah; Frater, John

    2016-08-01

    In the search for a cure for HIV-1 infection, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are being investigated as activators of latently infected CD4 T cells to promote their targeting by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL). However, HDACi may also inhibit CTL function, suggesting different immunotherapy approaches may need to be explored. Here, we study the impact of different HDACi on both Natural Killer (NK) and CTL targeting of HIV-1 infected cells. We found HDACi down-regulated HLA class I expression independently of HIV-1 Nef which, without significantly compromising CTL function, led to enhanced targeting by NK cells. HDACi-treated HIV-1-infected CD4 T cells were also more effectively cleared than untreated controls during NK co-culture. However, HDACi impaired NK function, reducing degranulation and killing capacity. Depending on the HDACi and dose, this impairment could counteract the benefit gained by treating infected target cells. These data suggest that following HDACi-induced HLA class I down-regulation NK cells kill HIV-1-infected cells, although HDACi-mediated NK cell inhibition may negate this effect. Our data emphasize the importance of studying the effects of potential interventions on both targets and effectors.

  11. HTLV-1-associated adult T cell leukemia is highly susceptible to Navitoclax due to enhanced Bax expression.

    PubMed

    Witzens-Harig, Mathias; Giaisi, Marco; Köhler, Rebecca; Krammer, Peter H; Li-Weber, Min

    2016-01-15

    Over-expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Bcl-w is frequently associated with cancer resistance to chemotherapy. Navitoclax (ABT-263), an orally bio-available small-molecule mimetic of the Bcl-2 homology domain 3, specifically inhibits Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Bcl-w. Despite promising results obtained from the clinical trials, the use of Navitoclax in patients is dose-limited due to induction of death of platelets via inhibition of Bcl-xL and subsequent thrombocytopenia. This side effect limits the use of Navitoclax in low doses and to very sensitive tumors. In this study, we show that HTLV-1-associated adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) cells, which over-express Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Bcl-w, show a 10- to 20-fold higher sensitivity (EC50 = ∼ 25-50 nM) to Navitoclax compared to non-HTLV-1-associated leukemic cells (EC50 = ∼ 1 μM). Investigation of the molecular mechanisms revealed that the HTLV-1 oncogenic protein Tax up-regulates expression of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax which enhances the therapeutic efficacy of Navitoclax. In addition, we show that agents that inhibit the transcription elongation or translation initiation such as Wogonin and Roc-A can further decrease the effective dose of Navitoclax. Our study suggests that HTLV-1 ATL may be a good candidate disease for low dose Navitoclax therapy and probably with less risk of thrombocytopenia.

  12. Increased hepatic CD36 expression with age is associated with enhanced susceptibility to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Sheedfar, Fareeba; Sung, Miranda MY; Aparicio-Vergara, Marcela; Kloosterhuis, Niels J; Miquilena-Colina, Maria Eugenia; Vargas-Castrillón, Javier; Febbraio, Maria; Jacobs, René L; de Bruin, Alain; Vinciguerra, Manlio; García-Monzón, Carmelo; Hofker, Marten H; Dyck, Jason RB; Koonen, Debby PY

    2014-01-01

    CD36 has been associated with obesity and diabetes in human liver diseases, however, its role in age-associated nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is unknown. Therefore, liver biopsies were collected from individuals with histologically normal livers (n=30), and from patients diagnosed with simple steatosis (NAS; n=26). Patients were divided into two groups according to age and liver biopsy samples were immunostained for CD36. NAFLD parameters were examined in young (12-week) and middle-aged (52-week) C57BL/6J mice, some fed with chow-diet and some fed with low-fat (LFD; 10% kcal fat) or high-fat diet (HFD; 60% kcal fat) for 12-weeks. CD36 expression was positively associated with age in individuals with normal livers but not in NAS patients. However, CD36 was predominantly located at the plasma membrane of hepatocytes in aged NAS patients as compared to young. In chow-fed mice, aging, despite an increase in hepatic CD36 expression, was not associated with the development of NAFLD. However, middle-aged mice did exhibit the development of HFD-induced NAFLD, mediated by an increase of CD36 on the membrane. Enhanced CD36-mediated hepatic fat uptake may contribute to an accelerated progression of NAFLD in mice and humans. Therapies to prevent the increase in CD36 expression and/or CD36 from anchoring at the membrane may prevent the development of NAFLD. PMID:24751397

  13. Enhanced susceptibility of mice to combinations of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol and live or killed gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, S G; Munson, A E; Dewey, W L; Harris, L S

    1977-01-01

    Combinations of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC) and bacterial endotoxin were shown to be hyperadditively toxic for mice. A variety of purified lipopolysaccharide (LPS) preparations elicted enhanced mortality in combination with delta 9-THC. Escherichia coli O26:B6 LPS (Boivin preparation) at an essentially nonlethal dose of 2.5 mg/kg reduced the dose of delta 9-THC required to kill 50% of the treated mice from ca. 350 to 150 mg/kg. Inbred BALB, DBA, and C3H/HeCr mice, noninbred ICR mice, and hybrid CDF1 and BDF1 mice were hyperreactive to combinations of delta 9-THC and LPS. Moreover, a variety of heat-killed intestinal and gram-negative bacteria, live E. coli, and complexes of lipid A with a variety of proteins substituted for LPS in the synergistic toxicity of LPS and delta 9-THC. Extracts of marijuana also elicited hyperreactivity to LPS. The hyperadditive lethality of combinations of delta 9-THC and LPS was markedly less in mice rendered refractory to LPS or delta 9-THC by repeated administration of LPS or delta 9-THC, respectively. PMID:330405

  14. The biofilm matrix destabilizers, EDTA and DNaseI, enhance the susceptibility of nontypeable Hemophilus influenzae biofilms to treatment with ampicillin and ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Cavaliere, Rosalia; Ball, Jessica L; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B

    2014-08-01

    Nontypeable Hemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that causes chronic biofilm infections of the ears and airways. The biofilm matrix provides structural integrity to the biofilm and protects biofilm cells from antibiotic exposure by reducing penetration of antimicrobial compounds into the biofilm. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has been found to be a major matrix component of biofilms formed by many species of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including NTHi. Interestingly, the cation chelator ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid (EDTA) has been shown to reduce the matrix strength of biofilms of several bacterial species as well as to have bactericidal activity against various pathogens. EDTA exerts its antimicrobial activity by chelating divalent cations necessary for growth and membrane stability and by destabilizing the matrix thus enhancing the detachment of bacterial cells from the biofilm. In this study, we have explored the role of divalent cations in NTHi biofilm development and stability. We have utilized in vitro static and continuous flow models of biofilm development by NTHi to demonstrate that magnesium cations enhance biofilm formation by NTHi. We found that the divalent cation chelator EDTA is effective at both preventing NTHi biofilm formation and at treating established NTHi biofilms. Furthermore, we found that the matrix destablilizers EDTA and DNaseI increase the susceptibility of NTHi biofilms to ampicillin and ciprofloxacin. Our observations indicate that DNaseI and EDTA enhance the efficacy of antibiotic treatment of NTHi biofilms. These observations may lead to new strategies that will improve the treatment options available to patients with chronic NTHi infections.

  15. Silencing OsHI-LOX makes rice more susceptible to chewing herbivores, but enhances resistance to a phloem feeder.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guoxin; Qi, Jinfeng; Ren, Nan; Cheng, Jiaan; Erb, Matthias; Mao, Bizeng; Lou, Yonggen

    2009-11-01

    The jasmonic acid (JA) pathway plays a central role in plant defense responses against insects. Some phloem-feeding insects also induce the salicylic acid (SA) pathway, thereby suppressing the plant's JA response. These phenomena have been well studied in dicotyledonous plants, but little is known about them in monocotyledons. We cloned a chloroplast-localized type 2 13-lipoxygenase gene of rice, OsHI-LOX, whose transcripts were up-regulated in response to feeding by the rice striped stem borer (SSB) Chilo suppressalis and the rice brown planthopper (BPH) Niaparvata lugens, as well as by mechanical wounding and treatment with JA. Antisense expression of OsHI-LOX (as-lox) reduced SSB- or BPH-induced JA and trypsin protease inhibitor (TrypPI) levels, improved the larval performance of SBB as well as that of the rice leaf folder (LF) Cnaphalocrocis medinalis, and increased the damage caused by SSB and LF larvae. In contrast, BPH, a phloem-feeding herbivore, showed a preference for settling and ovipositing on WT plants, on which they consumed more and survived better than on as-lox plants. The enhanced resistance of as-lox plants to BPH infestation correlated with higher levels of BPH-induced H(2)O(2) and SA, as well as with increased hypersensitive response-like cell death. These results imply that OsHI-LOX is involved in herbivore-induced JA biosynthesis, and plays contrasting roles in controlling rice resistance to chewing and phloem-feeding herbivores. The observation that suppression of JA activity results in increased resistance to an insect indicates that revision of the generalized plant defense models in monocotyledons is required, and may help develop novel strategies to protect rice against insect pests.

  16. [Results of fibrin clot application for acceleration of regeneration of the damaged mandible in experiment].

    PubMed

    Maĭborodin, I V; Kolesnikov, I S; Shevela, A I; Sheplev, B V; Drovosekov, M N; Toder, M S

    2011-01-01

    The processes of regeneration of the damaged rat bottom jaw bone after application of enriched thrombocytes a fibrin clot were studied by morphological and radiovisiographic methods. At a natural course of regeneration the artificial aperture of bone was filled with blood and there the blood clot was formed. After 1 week the separate bone islets of a young tissue occurred in bone defect. In 2-3 weeks the aperture in a bottom jaw bone was completely closed by a young bone tissue. After operation with filling of bone bottom jaw defect by fibrin clot there was no formation of a blood clot. Already after 1 week the bone tissue defect was filled by the merged islets of again generated bone. By second week after fibrin use the further formation of bone tissue in defect and formation of a bone callosity was noted.

  17. Micro-elastometry on whole blood clots using actuated surface-attached posts (ASAPs)

    PubMed Central

    Judith, Robert M.; Fisher, Jay K.; Spero, Richard Chasen; Fiser, Briana L.; Turner, Adam; Oberhardt, Bruce; Taylor, R.M.; Falvo, Michael R.; Superfine, Richard

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel technology for microfluidic elastometry and demonstrate its ability to measure stiffness of blood clots as they form. A disposable micro-capillary strip draws small volumes (20 μL) of whole blood into a chamber containing a surface-mounted micropost array. The posts are magnetically actuated, thereby applying a shear stress to the blood clot. The posts’ response to magnetic field changes as the blood clot forms; this response is measured by optical transmission. We show that a quasi-static model correctly predicts the torque applied to the microposts. We experimentally validate the ability of the system to measure clot stiffness by correlating our system with a commercial thromboelastograph. We conclude that actuated surface-attached post (ASAP) technology addresses a clinical need for point-of-care and small-volume elastic haemostatic assays. PMID:25592158

  18. Factor XIIIa-dependent retention of red blood cells in clots is mediated by fibrin α-chain crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, James R; Duval, Cédric; Wang, Yiming; Hansen, Caroline E; Ahn, Byungwook; Mooberry, Micah J; Clark, Martha A; Johnsen, Jill M; Lord, Susan T; Lam, Wilbur A; Meijers, Joost C M; Ni, Heyu; Ariëns, Robert A S; Wolberg, Alisa S

    2015-10-15

    Factor XIII(a) [FXIII(a)] stabilizes clots and increases resistance to fibrinolysis and mechanical disruption. FXIIIa also mediates red blood cell (RBC) retention in contracting clots and determines venous thrombus size, suggesting FXIII(a) is a potential target for reducing thrombosis. However, the mechanism by which FXIIIa retains RBCs in clots is unknown. We determined the effect of FXIII(a) on human and murine clot weight and composition. Real-time microscopy revealed extensive RBC loss from clots formed in the absence of FXIIIa activity, and RBCs exhibited transient deformation as they exited the clots. Fibrin band-shift assays and flow cytometry did not reveal crosslinking of fibrin or FXIIIa substrates to RBCs, suggesting FXIIIa does not crosslink RBCs directly to the clot. RBCs were retained in clots from mice deficient in α2-antiplasmin, thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor, or fibronectin, indicating RBC retention does not depend on these FXIIIa substrates. RBC retention in clots was positively correlated with fibrin network density; however, FXIIIa inhibition reduced RBC retention at all network densities. FXIIIa inhibition reduced RBC retention in clots formed with fibrinogen that lacks γ-chain crosslinking sites, but not in clots that lack α-chain crosslinking sites. Moreover, FXIIIa inhibitor concentrations that primarily block α-, but not γ-, chain crosslinking decreased RBC retention in clots. These data indicate FXIIIa-dependent retention of RBCs in clots is mediated by fibrin α-chain crosslinking. These findings expose a newly recognized, essential role for fibrin crosslinking during whole blood clot formation and consolidation and establish FXIIIa activity as a key determinant of thrombus composition and size.

  19. Stripes of increased diamagnetic susceptibility in underdoped superconducting Ba(Fe[subscript 1−x]Co[subscript x])[subscript 2]As[subscript 2] single crystals: Evidence for an enhanced superfluid density at twin boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Kalisky, B.; Kirtley, J.R.; Analytis, J.G.; Chu, Jiun-Haw; Vailionis, A.; Fisher, I.R.; Moler, K.A.

    2010-10-22

    Superconducting quantum interference device microscopy shows stripes of increased diamagnetic susceptibility in the superconducting state of twinned, orthorhombic, underdoped crystals of Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2}, but not in tetragonal overdoped crystals. These stripes are consistent with enhanced superfluid density on twin boundaries.

  20. MECHANISMS INVOLVED IN THE ENHANCED SUSCEPTIBILITY OF SENESCENT RATS TO THE HEPATOCARCINOGENIC EFFECT OF PEROXISOME PROLIFERATORS: ROLE OF PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR ALPHA (PPARA), CELL PROLIFERATION AND OXIDATIVE STRESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mechanisms involved in the ENHANCED SUSCEPTIBILITY of SENESCENT Rats TO THE HEPATOCARCINOGENIC EFFECT OF PEROXISOME PROLIFERATORS: Role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa), cell proliferation and oxidative stress

    Jihan A. Youssef1, Pierre Ammann2, B...

  1. An Antimicrobial Susceptibility Management System

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, James J.; O'Donnell, Edward D.

    1981-01-01

    A computerized system is described which is used to store, manipulate and retrieve antimicrobial susceptibility data in the clinical microbiology lab. Features include facilitated input of susceptibility data, rapid generation of reports, realtime access to data, and enhanced retrieval of information for Infection Control.

  2. Unusual clotted haemothorax caused by spontaneous intramural haematoma of the oesophagus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chenglin; Mei, Jiandong; Guan, Pujun; Lin, Feng; Pu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intramural haematoma of the oesophagus (SIHO) is a relatively rare event with benign courses. Most of the patients with SIHO may experience spontaneous healing without complications. We report a case of SIHO with clotted haemothorax. Uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) was successfully applied as a diagnostic and therapeutic method. Although conservative treatment is adequate for the majority of patients with SIHO, uniportal VATS may be a suitable option if there was clotted haemothorax. PMID:28149589

  3. Effects of endurance exercise training on heart rate variability and susceptibility to sudden cardiac death: protection is not due to enhanced cardiac vagal regulation.

    PubMed

    Billman, George E; Kukielka, Monica

    2006-03-01

    Low heart rate variability (HRV) is associated with an increased susceptibility to ventricular fibrillation (VF). Exercise training can increase HRV (an index of cardiac vagal regulation) and could, thereby, decrease the risk for VF. To test this hypothesis, a 2-min coronary occlusion was made during the last min of a 18-min submaximal exercise test in dogs with healed myocardial infarctions; 20 had VF (susceptible), and 13 did not (resistant). The dogs then received either a 10-wk exercise program (susceptible, n=9; resistant, n=8) or an equivalent sedentary period (susceptible, n=11; resistant, n=5). HRV was evaluated at rest, during exercise, and during a 2-min occlusion at rest and before and after the 10-wk period. Pretraining, the occlusion provoked significantly (P<0.01) greater increases in HR (susceptible, 54.9+/-8.3 vs. resistant, 25.0+/-6.1 beats/min) and greater reductions in HRV (susceptible, -6.3+/-0.3 vs. resistant, -2.8+/-0.8 ln ms2) in the susceptible dogs compared with the resistant animals. Similar response differences between susceptible and resistant dogs were noted during submaximal exercise. Training significantly reduced the HR and HRV responses to the occlusion (HR, 17.9+/-11.5 beats/min; HRV, -1.2+/-0.8, ln ms2) in the susceptible dogs; similar response reductions were noted during exercise. In contrast, these variables were not altered in the sedentary susceptible dogs. Posttraining, VF could no longer be induced in the susceptible dogs, whereas four sedentary susceptible dogs died during the 10-wk control period, and the remaining seven animals still had VF when tested. Atropine decreased HRV but only induced VF in one of eight trained susceptible dogs. Thus exercise training increased cardiac vagal activity, which was not solely responsible for the training-induced VF protection.

  4. Acute toxicity of diphacinone in Northern bobwhite: Effects on survival and blood clotting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, Barnett A.; Horak, Katherine E.; Warner, Sarah E.; Johnston, John J.

    2010-01-01

    The anticoagulant rodenticide diphacinone was slightly toxic (acute oral LD50 2014 mg/kg) to Northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) in a 14-day acute toxicity trial. Precise and sensitive assays of blood clotting (prothrombin time, Russell?s Viper venom time, and thrombin clotting time) were adapted for use in quail, and this combination of assays is recommended to measure the effects of anticoagulant rodenticides. A single oral sublethal dose of diphacinone (434 mg/kg body weight) prolonged clotting time at 48 h post-dose compared to controls. At 783 mg/kg (approximate LD02), clotting time was prolonged at both 24 and 48 h post-dose. Prolongation of in vitro clotting time reflects impaired coagulation complex activity, and was detected before overt signs of toxicity were apparent at the greatest dosages (2868 and 3666 mg/kg) in the acute toxicity trial. These clotting time assays and toxicity data will assist in the development of a pharmacodynamic model to predict toxicity, and also facilitate rodenticide hazard and risk assessments in avian species.

  5. Partial purification of new milk-clotting enzyme produced by Nocardiopsis sp.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, M T H; Teixeira, M F S; Lima Filho, J L; Porto, A L F

    2004-05-01

    Numerous attempts have been made to replace calf rennet with other milk clotting proteases because of limited supply and increasingly high prices. The aim of this work was to investigate the characteristic of the milk-clotting enzyme from Nocardiopsis sp. The partial purification extract was obtained by fractional precipitation with ammonium sulphate. Of the fractions obtained by precipitation, 40-60% possessed the milk-clotting activity (156.25 U/mg). The chromatography of 40-100% ammonium sulphate fraction in DEAE-cellulose yielded four fractions (F4, F5, F6, F7) with milk-clotting activity. The F5 yielded the best milk-clotting activity (20 U/ml). Both crude and partially purified extract were active at the range pH 4.5-11.0, however, optimum activity was displayed at pH 11.0 and pH 7.5, respectively. The milk-clotting activity was highest at 55 degrees C for both crude and partially purified extract. The crude and partial purification extract were inactivated at 65 and 75 degrees C after 30 min.

  6. Experimental and Imaging Techniques for Examining Fibrin Clot Structures in Normal and Diseased States

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Natalie K.; Keegan, Philip M.; Platt, Manu O.; Averett, Rodney D.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrin is an extracellular matrix protein that is responsible for maintaining the structural integrity of blood clots. Much research has been done on fibrin in the past years to include the investigation of synthesis, structure-function, and lysis of clots. However, there is still much unknown about the morphological and structural features of clots that ensue from patients with disease. In this research study, experimental techniques are presented that allow for the examination of morphological differences of abnormal clot structures due to diseased states such as diabetes and sickle cell anemia. Our study focuses on the preparation and evaluation of fibrin clots in order to assess morphological differences using various experimental assays and confocal microscopy. In addition, a method is also described that allows for continuous, real-time calculation of lysis rates in fibrin clots. The techniques described herein are important for researchers and clinicians seeking to elucidate comorbid thrombotic pathologies such as myocardial infarctions, ischemic heart disease, and strokes in patients with diabetes or sickle cell disease. PMID:25867016

  7. A Fictitious Domain Method for Resolving the Interaction of Blood Flow with Clot Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Debanjan; Shadden, Shawn

    2016-11-01

    Thrombosis and thrombo-embolism cause a range of diseases including heart attack and stroke. Closer understanding of clot and blood flow mechanics provides valuable insights on the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of thrombotic diseases. Such mechanics are complicated, however, by the discrete and multi-scale phenomena underlying thrombosis, and the complex interactions of unsteady, pulsatile hemodynamics with a clot of arbitrary shape and microstructure. We have developed a computational technique, based on a fictitious domain based finite element method, to study these interactions. The method can resolve arbitrary clot geometries, and dynamically couple fluid flow with static or growing clot boundaries. Macroscopic thrombus-hemodynamics interactions were investigated within idealized vessel geometries representative of the common carotid artery, with realistic unsteady flow profiles as inputs. The method was also employed successfully to resolve micro-scale interactions using a model driven by in-vivo morphology data. The results provide insights into the flow structures and hemodynamic loading around an arbitrarily grown clot at arterial length-scales, as well as flow and transport within the interstices of platelet aggregates composing the clot. The work was supported by AHA Award No: 16POST27500023.

  8. Mathematical Modeling of Blood Clot Fragmentation During Flow-Mediated Thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    Bajd, Franci; Serša, Igor

    2013-01-01

    A microscale mathematical model of blood clot dissolution based on coarse-grained molecular dynamics is presented. In the model, a blood clot is assumed to be an assembly of blood cells interconnected with elastic fibrin bonds, which are cleaved either biochemically (bond degradation) or mechanically (bond overstretching) during flow-mediated thrombolysis. The effect of a thrombolytic agent on biochemical bond degradation was modeled phenomenologically by assuming that the decay rate of an individual bond is a function of the remaining noncleaved bonds in the vicinity of that bond (spatial corrosion) and the relative stretching of the bond (deformational corrosion). The results of simulations indicate that the blood clot dissolution process progresses by a blood-flow-promoted removal of clot fragments, the sizes of which are flow-dependent. These findings are in good agreement with the results of our recent optical-microscopy experimental studies on a model of blood clot dissolution, as well as with clinical observations. The findings of this study may contribute to a better understanding of the clot fragmentation process and may therefore also help in designing new, safer thrombolytic approaches. PMID:23473501

  9. Mechanical stability and fibrinolytic resistance of clots containing fibrin, DNA, and histones.

    PubMed

    Longstaff, Colin; Varjú, Imre; Sótonyi, Péter; Szabó, László; Krumrey, Michael; Hoell, Armin; Bóta, Attila; Varga, Zoltán; Komorowicz, Erzsébet; Kolev, Krasimir

    2013-03-08

    Neutrophil extracellular traps are networks of DNA and associated proteins produced by nucleosome release from activated neutrophils in response to infection stimuli and have recently been identified as key mediators between innate immunity, inflammation, and hemostasis. The interaction of DNA and histones with a number of hemostatic factors has been shown to promote clotting and is associated with increased thrombosis, but little is known about the effects of DNA and histones on the regulation of fibrin stability and fibrinolysis. Here we demonstrate that the addition of histone-DNA complexes to fibrin results in thicker fibers (increase in median diameter from 84 to 123 nm according to scanning electron microscopy data) accompanied by improved stability and rigidity (the critical shear stress causing loss of fibrin viscosity increases from 150 to 376 Pa whereas the storage modulus of the gel increases from 62 to 82 pascals according to oscillation rheometric data). The effects of DNA and histones alone are subtle and suggest that histones affect clot structure whereas DNA changes the way clots are lysed. The combination of histones + DNA significantly prolongs clot lysis. Isothermal titration and confocal microscopy studies suggest that histones and DNA bind large fibrin degradation products with 191 and 136 nM dissociation constants, respectively, interactions that inhibit clot lysis. Heparin, which is known to interfere with the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps, appears to prolong lysis time at a concentration favoring ternary histone-DNA-heparin complex formation, and DNase effectively promotes clot lysis in combination with tissue plasminogen activator.

  10. Inhibition of heat-shock protein 90 enhances the susceptibility to antifungals and reduces the virulence of Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii species complex.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Evangelista, Antonio José de Jesus; Serpa, Rosana; Marques, Francisca Jakelyne de Farias; de Melo, Charlline Vládia Silva; de Oliveira, Jonathas Sales; Franco, Jônatas da Silva; de Alencar, Lucas Pereira; Bandeira, Tereza de Jesus Pinheiro Gomes; Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa; Rocha, Marcos Fébio Gadelha

    2016-02-01

    Heat-shock proteins (Hsps) are chaperones required for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis in different fungal pathogens, playing an important role in the infectious process. This study investigated the effect of pharmacological inhibition of Hsp90 by radicicol on the Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii species complex--agents of the most common life-threatening fungal infection amongst immunocompromised patients. The influence of Hsp90 inhibition was investigated regarding in vitro susceptibility to antifungal agents of planktonic and sessile cells, ergosterol concentration, cell membrane integrity, growth at 37 °C, production of virulence factors in vitro, and experimental infection in Caenorhabditis elegans. Hsp90 inhibition inhibited the in vitro growth of planktonic cells of Cryptococcus spp. at concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 2 μg ml(-1) and increased the in vitro inhibitory effect of azoles, especially fluconazole (FLC) (P < 0.05). Inhibition of Hsp90 also increased the antifungal activity of azoles against biofilm formation and mature biofilms of Cryptococcus spp., notably for Cryptococcus gattii. Furthermore, Hsp90 inhibition compromised the permeability of the cell membrane, and reduced planktonic growth at 37 °C and the capsular size of Cryptococcus spp. In addition, Hsp90 inhibition enhanced the antifungal activity of FLC during experimental infection using Caenorhabditis elegans. Therefore, our results indicate that Hsp90 inhibition can be an important strategy in the development of new antifungal drugs.

  11. Overexpression of cotton GhMKK4 enhances disease susceptibility and affects abscisic acid, gibberellin and hydrogen peroxide signalling in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuzhen; Zhang, Liang; Lu, Wenjing; Wang, Xiuling; Wu, Chang-Ai; Guo, Xingqi

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are involved in plant development, stress responses and hormonal signal transduction. MAPK kinases (MAPKKs), as the key nodes in these cascades, link MAPKs and MAPKK kinases (MAPKKKs). In this study, GhMKK4, a novel group C MAPKK gene from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum), was isolated and identified. Its expression can be induced by various stresses and signalling molecules. The overexpression of GhMKK4 in Nicotiana benthamiana enhanced its susceptibility to bacterial and fungal pathogens, but had no significant effects on salt or drought tolerance. Notably, the overexpressing plants showed increased sensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellin A3 (GA3), and ABA and gibberellin (GA) signalling were affected on infection with Ralstonia solanacearum bacteria. Furthermore, the overexpressing plants showed more reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and stronger inhibition of catalase (CAT), a ROS-scavenging enzyme, than control plants after salicylic acid (SA) treatment. Interestingly, two genes encoding ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC), the key enzymes in polyamine synthesis, exhibited reduced R. solanacearum-induced expression in overexpressing plants. These findings broaden our knowledge about the functions of MAPKKs in diverse signalling pathways and the negative regulation of disease resistance in the cotton crop.

  12. NH4+ rather than NO3- production and retention processes are susceptible to enhanced NH4+ deposition in a subtropical plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wenlong; Kou, Liang; Yang, Hao; Zhang, Jinbo; Muller, Christoph; Li, Shenggong

    2016-04-01

    It remains largely unknown how increasing N depositions may alter soil N cycling and N retention capacity of subtropical/tropical forest ecosystem functions. Here we report results from a 15N tracing study on soil from a subtropical forest plantation in China. Nitrogen fertilizer was applied monthly for more than 2.5 years at a rate of 40 (low) and 120 (high) kg NH4Cl-N hm-2 yr-1, respectively. High NH4+ input significantly retarded gross N mineralization, with a greater inhibition on mineralization of recalcitrant organic N than labile organic N which can possibly be related to a decreased fungal biomass. With increasing NH4+ inputs, rates of NH4+ immobilization into recalcitrant organic-N showed a trend of rise first and then fall. Interestingly, microbial NH4+ cycling moved toward to be a more open N cycling under low NH4+ input conditions, but was driven to be a tightly coupled N cycling under high NH4+ input conditions. On the contrary, microbial NO3- production (heterotrophic nitrification and autotrophic nitrification) and retention (NO3- immobilization and DNRA) processes showed insensitivity to elevated NH4+ input. Our results highlight that in acid subtropical/tropical forest soil, NH4+ rather than NO3- production and retention processes are susceptible to enhanced NH4+ deposition.

  13. AEG-1/MTDH-activated autophagy enhances human malignant glioma susceptibility to TGF-β1-triggered epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Meijuan; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Li; Shi, Lei; Gao, Rui; Ou, Yingwei; Chen, Xuguan; Wang, Zhongchang; Jiang, Aiqin; Liu, Kunmei; Xiao, Ming; Ni, Ping; Wu, Dandan; He, Wenping; Sun, Geng; Li, Ping; Zhai, Sulan; Wang, Xuerong; Hu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a tightly regulated process activated in response to metabolic stress and other microenvironmental changes. Astrocyte elevated gene 1 (AEG-1) reportedly induces protective autophagy. Our results indicate that AEG-1 also enhances the susceptibility of malignant glioma cells to TGF-β1-triggered epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through induction of autophagy. TGF-β1 induced autophagy and activated AEG-1 via Smad2/3 phosphorylation in malignant glioma cells. Also increased was oncogene cyclin D1 and EMT markers, which promoted tumor progression. Inhibition of autophagy using siRNA-BECN1 and siRNA-AEG-1 suppressed EMT. In tumor samples from patients with malignant glioma, immunohistochemical assays showed that expression levels of TGF-β1, AEG-1, and markers of autophagy and EMT, all gradually increase with glioblastoma progression. In vivo siRNA-AEG-1 administration to rats implanted with C6 glioma cells inhibited tumor growth and increased the incidence of apoptosis among tumor cells. These findings shed light on the mechanisms underlying the invasiveness and progression of malignant gliomas. PMID:26909607

  14. PWSCC susceptibility evaluation of mill annealed Alloy 600 SG tubings using mock-up specimens in lithium enhanced 360 C water

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuruta, T.; Okamoto, S.; Kitera, T.; Takamatsu, H.; Matsunaga, T.

    1995-12-31

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) behavior of Alloy 600 steam generator (SG) tubing in pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environments, or so called PWSCC, has been investigated since the first report by Coriou in 1959. The acceleration of PWSCC by elevating the test temperature up to 365 C, was first reported in 1980 by Bulischeck et al.. Since then, many results of PWSCC phenomena have been reported. It is important for preventive maintenance planning, to predict the life expectation at the operating temperature for a specific structural design. PWSCC susceptibility of mill annealed alloy 600 (MA 600) SG tubing was investigated using mock-up specimens, such as tube sheet expansion specimens and dent shape deformed specimens in lithium enhanced 360 C water (500ppm as B, 20ppm as Li, 45ccH{sub 2}/kgH{sub 2}O). Uniaxial constant load (UCL) tests were carried out for MA 600, thermally treated (TT) Alloy 600, and TT 690 to evaluate the effect of stress, and to evaluate the acceleration factor of the environment compared with the results in normal 360 C reactor coolant system (RCS) water (500ppm as B, 2ppm as Li, 30ccH{sub 2}/kgH{sub 2}O).

  15. MR Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI) Complements Conventional Contrast Enhanced T1 Weighted MRI in Characterizing Brain Abnormalities of Sturge-Weber Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiani; Yu, Yingjian; Juhasz, Csaba; Kou, Zhifeng; Xuan, Yang; Latif, Zahid; Kudo, Kohsuke; Chugani, Harry T.; Haacke, E. Mark

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the efficacy of susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) in comparison to standard T1 weighted post gadolinium contrast (T1-Gd) MRI in patients with Sturge-Weber Syndrome (SWS). MATERIALS AND METHODS Twelve children (mean age 5.6 years) with the diagnosis of SWS and unilateral hemispheric involvement were recruited prospectively and examined with high resolution 3D SWI and conventional T1-Gd. Both SWI and T1-Gd images were evaluated using a four-grade scoring system according to six types of imaging findings (enlargement of transmedullary veins, periventricular veins and choroid plexus, as well as leptomeningeal abnormality, cortical gyriform abnormality, and gray matter/white matter junctional abnormality). The scores of SWI vs. T1-Gd images were then compared for each type of abnormality. RESULTS SWI was superior to T1-Gd in identifying the enlarged transmedullary veins (p=0.0020), abnormal periventricular veins (p=0.0078), cortical gyriform abnormalities (p=0.0020), and grey matter/white matter junction abnormalities (p=0.0078). Conversely, T1-Gd was better than SWI in identifying enlarged choroid plexus (p=0.0050) and leptomeningeal abnormalities (p=0.0050). CONCLUSION SWI can provide useful and unique information complementary to conventional contrast enhanced T1 weighted MRI for characterizing SWS. Therefore, SWI should be integrated into routine clinical MRI protocols for suspected SWS. PMID:18666142

  16. The identification of an ESCC susceptibility SNP rs920778 that regulates the expression of lncRNA HOTAIR via a novel intronic enhancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojiao; Zhou, Liqing; Fu, Guobin; Sun, Fang; Shi, Juan; Wei, Jinyu; Lu, Chao; Zhou, Changchun; Yuan, Qipeng; Yang, Ming

    2014-09-01

    Long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR), which could induce genome-wide retargeting of polycomb-repressive complex 2, trimethylates histone H3 lysine-27 (H3K27me3) and deregulation of multiple downstream genes, is involved in development and progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). We hypothesized that the functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in HOTAIR may affect HOTAIR expression and/or its function and, thus, ESCC risk. Therefore, we examined the association between three haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNP) across the whole HOTAIR locus and ESCC risk as well as the functional relevance of an ESCC susceptibility SNP rs920778. Genotypes were determined in three independent case-control sets consisted of 2098 ESCC patients and 2150 controls. The allele-specific regulation on HOTAIR expression by the rs920778 SNP was investigated in vitro and in vivo. We found that the HOTAIR rs920778 TT carriers had a 1.37-fold, 1.78-fold and 2.08-fold increased ESCC risk in Jinan, Shijiazhuang and Huaian populations, respectively, compared with the CC carriers (P = 0.003, 7.7 × 10(-4) and 5.9 × 10(-4)). During inspecting functional relevance of the rs920778 SNP, we identified a novel intronic HOTAIR enhancer locating between +1719bp and +2353bp from the transcriptional start site through reporter assays. Moreover, there is an allelic regulation of rs920778 on HOTAIR expression via this enhancer in both ESCC cell lines and normal esophageal tissue specimens, with higher HOTAIR expression among T allele carriers. These results demonstrate that functional genetic variants influencing lncRNA regulation may explain a fraction of ESCC genetic basis.

  17. Quantification of intraventricular blood clot in MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Maggie; Looi, Thomas; Lasso, Andras; Fichtinger, Gabor; Drake, James

    2015-03-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) affects nearly 15% of preterm infants. It can lead to ventricular dilation and cognitive impairment. To ablate IVH clots, MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) is investigated. This procedure requires accurate, fast and consistent quantification of ventricle and clot volumes. We developed a semi-autonomous segmentation (SAS) algorithm for measuring changes in the ventricle and clot volumes. Images are normalized, and then ventricle and clot masks are registered to the images. Voxels of the registered masks and voxels obtained by thresholding the normalized images are used as seed points for competitive region growing, which provides the final segmentation. The user selects the areas of interest for correspondence after thresholding and these selections are the final seeds for region growing. SAS was evaluated on an IVH porcine model. SAS was compared to ground truth manual segmentation (MS) for accuracy, efficiency, and consistency. Accuracy was determined by comparing clot and ventricle volumes produced by SAS and MS, and comparing contours by calculating 95% Hausdorff distances between the two labels. In Two-One-Sided Test, SAS and MS were found to be significantly equivalent (p < 0.01). SAS on average was found to be 15 times faster than MS (p < 0.01). Consistency was determined by repeated segmentation of the same image by both SAS and manual methods, SAS being significantly more consistent than MS (p < 0.05). SAS is a viable method to quantify the IVH clot and the lateral brain ventricles and it is serving in a large-scale porcine study of MRgFUS treatment of IVH clot lysis.

  18. The Contribution of Pin End-Cup Interactions to Clot Strength Assessed with Thrombelastography.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Vance G

    2016-01-01

    Viscoelastic methods have been developed to assess the contribution of plasma proteins and platelets to coagulation in vitro to guide clinical transfusion therapy. One of the cardinal precepts of determining clot strength is making sure that the viscoelastic technique includes complete exposure of the plastic pin in the testing chamber with the fluid analyzed so as to assure maximal interaction of the cup wall with the pin surface. However, the various contributions of the pin surface area to final clot strength have not been investigated. That is, it is not clear what is more important in the in vitro determination of clot strength, the surface area shared between the cup and pin filled with fluid or the final viscoelastic resistance of the gel matrix formed. Thus, the purpose of this investigation was to determine the clot strength when only the tip of the pin was engaged with plasma thrombus and to compare these values with clot strength values obtained when the pin was completely in plasma. After determining the minimal amount of plasma required to cover a pin tip in a thrombelastographic system (30 μL), clot strength (elastic modulus, G) was determined in plasma samples of 30 or 360 μL final volume (n = 12 per condition) after tissue factor activation. The G value with 30 μL volume was 1057 ± 601 dynes/cm (mean ± SD; 95% confidence interval, 675-1439 dynes/cm), which was (P = 0.0015) smaller than the G value associated with 360-μL sample volumes, that was 1712 ± 48 dynes/cm (confidence interval, 1681-1742 dynes/cm). In conclusion, these data demonstrate that clot strength is not determined by a simple ratio of surface area of pin and cup to volume of sample, but rather strength is importantly influenced by the viscoelastic resistance of the fluid assessed.

  19. Pulsed Focused Ultrasound Induced Displacements in Confined In Vitro Blood Clots

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Cameron C.; Hynynen, Kullervo; Goertz, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound has been shown to potentiate the effects of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) to improve clot lysis in a range of in vitro and in vivo studies as well as in clinical trials. One possible mechanism of action is acoustic radiation force induced clot displacements. In this study we investigate the temporal and spatial dynamics of clot displacements and strain initiated by focused ultrasound pulses. Displacements were produced by a 1.51 MHz f-number 1 transducer over a range of acoustic powers (1–85 W) in clots constrained within an agar vessel phantom channel. Displacements were tracked during and after a 5.45 ms therapy pulse using a 20 MHz high frequency ultrasound imaging probe. Peak thrombus displacements were found to be linear as a function of acoustic power up to 60 W before leveling off near 128 μm for the highest transmit powers. The time to peak displacement and recovery time of blood clots were largely independent of acoustic powers with measured values near 2 ms. A linear relationship between peak axial strain and transmit power was observed, reaching a peak value of 11% at 35 W. The peak strain occurred ~0.75 mm from the focal zone for all powers investigated in both lateral and axial directions. These results indicate that substantial displacements can be induced by focused ultrasound in confined blood clots, and that the spatial and temporal displacement patterns are complex and highly dependant on exposure conditions, which has implications for future work investigating their link to clot lysis and for developing approaches to exploit these effects. PMID:22194235

  20. Development of a recalcitrant, large clot burden, bifurcation occlusion model for mechanical thrombectomy.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Visish M; Chen, Stephen R; Camstra, Kevin M; Chintalapani, Gouthami; Kan, Peter

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Stroke is a major cause of disability and death in adults. Several large randomized clinical trials have shown the significant benefit of mechanical thrombectomy with modern stent retrievers in the treatment of large-vessel occlusions. However, large clots located at bifurcations remain challenging to treat. An in vivo model of these recalcitrant clots needs to be developed to test future generations of devices. METHODS Autologous blood was drawn from anesthetized swine via a femoral sheath. Blood was then mixed with thrombin, calcium chloride, and saline, and injected into silicone tubing to form cylindrical clots in the standard fashion. Matured clots were then delivered in an unfragmented fashion directly into the distal extracranial vasculature, at branch points where vessel sizes mimic the human middle cerebral artery, by using Penumbra aspiration tubing and the Penumbra ACE68 reperfusion catheter. RESULTS A total of 5 adult swine were used to develop the model. The techniques evolved during experiments in the first 3 animals, and the last 2 were used to establish the final model. In these 2 swine, a total of 8 autologous clots, 15-20 mm, were injected directly into 8 distal extracranial vessels at branch points to mimic a bifurcation occlusion in a human. All clots were delivered directly at a distal bifurcation or trifurcation in an unfragmented fashion to cause an occlusion. Ten revascularization attempts were made, and none of the branch-point occlusions were fully revascularized on the first attempt. CONCLUSIONS Using novel large-bore distal access catheters, large unfragmented clots can be delivered into distal extracranial vessels in a swine occlusion model. The model mimics the clinical situation of a recalcitrant bifurcation occlusion and will be valuable in the study of next-generation stroke devices and in training settings.

  1. Susceptibility to viral infection is enhanced by stable expression of 3A or 3AB proteins from foot-and-mouth disease virus

    SciTech Connect

    Rosas, Maria F.; Vieira, Yuri A.; Postigo, Raul; Martin-Acebes, Miguel A.; Armas-Portela, Rosario; Martinez-Salas, Encarnacion; Sobrino, Francisco

    2008-10-10

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 3A protein is involved in virulence and host range. A distinguishing feature of FMDV 3B among picornaviruses is that three non-identical copies are encoded in the viral RNA and required for optimal replication in cell culture. Here, we have studied the involvement of the 3AB region on viral infection using constitutive and transient expression systems. BHK-21 stably transformed clones expressed low levels of FMDV 3A or 3A(B) proteins in the cell cytoplasm. Transformed cells stably expressing these proteins did not exhibit inner cellular rearrangements detectable by electron microscope analysis. Upon FMDV infection, clones expressing either 3A alone or 3A(B) proteins showed a significant increase in the percentage of infected cells, the number of plaque forming units and the virus yield. The 3A-enhancing effect was specific for FMDV as no increase in viral multiplication was observed in transformed clones infected with another picornavirus, encephalomyocarditis virus, or the negative-strand RNA virus vesicular stomatitis virus. A potential role of 3A protein in viral RNA translation was discarded by the lack of effect on FMDV IRES-dependent translation. Increased viral susceptibility was not caused by a released factor; neither the supernatant of transformed clones nor the addition of purified 3A protein to the infection medium was responsible for this effect. Unlike stable expression, high levels of 3A or 3A(B) protein transient expression led to unspecific inhibition of viral infection. Therefore, the effect observed on viral yield, which inversely correlated with the intracellular levels of 3A protein, suggests a transacting role operating on the FMDV multiplication cycle.

  2. Quantitative assessment of regional cerebral blood flow by dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced MRI, without the need for arterial blood signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enmi, Jun-ichiro; Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Hayashi, Takuya; Yamamoto, Akihide; Iguchi, Satoshi; Moriguchi, Tetsuaki; Hori, Yuki; Koshino, Kazuhiro; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Shah, Nadim Jon; Yamada, Naoaki; Iida, Hidehiro

    2012-12-01

    In dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI), an arterial input function (AIF) is usually obtained from a time-concentration curve (TCC) of the cerebral artery. This study was aimed at developing an alternative technique for reconstructing AIF from TCCs of multiple brain regions. AIF was formulated by a multi-exponential function using four parameters, and the parameters were determined so that the AIF curves convolved with a model of tissue response reproduced the measured TCCs for 20 regions. Systematic simulations were performed to evaluate the effects of possible error sources. DSC-MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) studies were performed on 14 patients with major cerebral artery occlusion. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) images were calculated from DSC-MRI data, using our novel method alongside conventional AIF estimations, and compared with those from 15O-PET. Simulations showed that the calculated CBF values were sensitive to variations in the assumptions regarding cerebral blood volume. Nevertheless, AIFs were reasonably reconstructed for all patients. The difference in CBF values between DSC-MRI and PET was -2.2 ± 7.4 ml/100 g/min (r = 0.55, p < 0.01) for our method, versus -0.2 ± 8.2 ml/100 g/min (r = 0.47, p = 0.01) for the conventional method. The difference in the ratio of affected to unaffected hemispheres between DSC-MRI and PET was 0.07 ± 0.09 (r = 0.82, p < 0.01) for our method, versus 0.07 ± 0.09 (r = 0.83, p < 0.01) for the conventional method. The contrasts in CBF images from our method were the same as those from the conventional method. These findings suggest the feasibility of assessing CBF without arterial blood signals.

  3. Functional analysis of rice NPR1-like genes reveals that OsNPR1/NH1 is the rice orthologue conferring disease resistance with enhanced herbivore susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuexing; Zhong, Sihui; Li, Qun; Zhu, Zengrong; Lou, Yonggen; Wang, Linyou; Wang, Jianjun; Wang, Muyang; Li, Qiaoli; Yang, Donglei; He, Zuhua

    2007-03-01

    The key regulator of salicylic acid (SA)-mediated resistance, NPR1, is functionally conserved in diverse plant species, including rice (Oryza sativa L.). Investigation in depth is needed to provide an understanding of NPR1-mediated resistance and a practical strategy for the improvement of disease resistance in the model crop rice. The rice genome contains five NPR1-like genes. In our study, three rice homologous genes, OsNPR1/NH1, OsNPR2/NH2 and OsNPR3, were found to be induced by rice bacterial blight Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and rice blast Magnaporthe grisea, and the defence molecules benzothiadiazole, methyl jasmonate and ethylene. We confirmed that OsNPR1 is the rice orthologue by complementing the Arabidopsis npr1 mutant. Over-expression of OsNPR1 conferred disease resistance to bacterial blight, but also enhanced herbivore susceptibility in transgenic plants. The OsNPR1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein was localized in the cytoplasm and moved into the nucleus after redox change. Mutations in its conserved cysteine residues led to the constitutive localization of OsNPR1(2CA)-GFP in the nucleus and also abolished herbivore hypersensitivity in transgenic rice. Different subcellular localizations of OsNPR1 antagonistically regulated SA- and jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive genes, but not SA and JA levels, indicating that OsNPR1 might mediate antagonistic cross-talk between the SA- and JA-dependent pathways in rice. This study demonstrates that rice has evolved an SA-mediated systemic acquired resistance similar to that in Arabidopsis, and also provides a practical approach for the improvement of disease resistance without the penalty of decreased herbivore resistance in rice.

  4. RNA Interference of Soybean Isoflavone Synthase Genes Leads to Silencing in Tissues Distal to the Transformation Site and to Enhanced Susceptibility to Phytophthora sojae1

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Senthil; Graham, Madge Y.; Yu, Oliver; Graham, Terrence L.

    2005-01-01

    Isoflavones are thought to play diverse roles in plant-microbe interactions and are also potentially important to human nutrition and medicine. Isoflavone synthase (IFS) is a key enzyme for the formation of the isoflavones. Here, we examined the consequences of RNAi silencing of genes for this enzyme in soybean (Glycine max). Soybean cotyledon tissues were transformed with Agrobacterium rhizogenes carrying an RNAi silencing construct designed to silence expression of both copies of IFS genes. Approximately 50% of emerging roots were transformed with the RNAi construct, and most transformed roots exhibited >95% silencing of isoflavone accumulation. Silencing of IFS was also demonstrated throughout the entire cotyledon (in tissues distal to the transformation site) both by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of isoflavones and by real-time reverse transcription-PCR. This distal silencing led to a nearly complete suppression of mRNA accumulation for both the IFS1 and IFS2 genes and of isoflavone accumulations induced by wounding or treatment with the cell wall glucan elicitor from Phytophthora sojae. Preformed isoflavone conjugates were not reduced in distal tissues, suggesting little turnover of these stored isoflavone pools. Distal silencing was established within just 5 d of transformation and was highly efficient for a 3- to 4-d period, after which it was no longer apparent in most experiments. Silencing of IFS was effective in at least two genotypes and led to enhanced susceptibility to P. sojae, disrupting both R gene-mediated resistance in roots and nonrace-specific resistance in cotyledon tissues. The soybean cotyledon system, already a model system for defense signal-response and cell-to-cell signaling, may provide a convenient and effective system for functional analysis of plant genes through gene silencing. PMID:15778457

  5. Contrasting Roles of the Apoplastic Aspartyl Protease APOPLASTIC, ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1-DEPENDENT1 and LEGUME LECTIN-LIKE PROTEIN1 in Arabidopsis Systemic Acquired Resistance.

    PubMed

    Breitenbach, Heiko H; Wenig, Marion; Wittek, Finni; Jordá, Lucia; Maldonado-Alconada, Ana M; Sarioglu, Hakan; Colby, Thomas; Knappe, Claudia; Bichlmeier, Marlies; Pabst, Elisabeth; Mackey, David; Parker, Jane E; Vlot, A Corina

    2014-06-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is an inducible immune response that depends on ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1). Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) EDS1 is required for both SAR signal generation in primary infected leaves and SAR signal perception in systemic uninfected tissues. In contrast to SAR signal generation, local resistance remains intact in eds1 mutant plants in response to Pseudomonas syringae delivering the effector protein AvrRpm1. We utilized the SAR-specific phenotype of the eds1 mutant to identify new SAR regulatory proteins in plants conditionally expressing AvrRpm1. Comparative proteomic analysis of apoplast-enriched extracts from AvrRpm1-expressing wild-type and eds1 mutant plants led to the identification of 12 APOPLASTIC, EDS1-DEPENDENT (AED) proteins. The genes encoding AED1, a predicted aspartyl protease, and another AED, LEGUME LECTIN-LIKE PROTEIN1 (LLP1), were induced locally and systemically during SAR signaling and locally by salicylic acid (SA) or its functional analog, benzo 1,2,3-thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid S-methyl ester. Because conditional overaccumulation of AED1-hemagglutinin inhibited SA-induced resistance and SAR but not local resistance, the data suggest that AED1 is part of a homeostatic feedback mechanism regulating systemic immunity. In llp1 mutant plants, SAR was compromised, whereas the local resistance that is normally associated with EDS1 and SA as well as responses to exogenous SA appeared largely unaffected. Together, these data indicate that LLP1 promotes systemic rather than local immunity, possibly in parallel with SA. Our analysis reveals new positive and negative components of SAR and reinforces the notion that SAR represents a distinct phase of plant immunity beyond local resistance.

  6. Clearance of Subarachnoid Clots after GDC Embolization for Acutely Ruptured Cerebral Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, S.; Satoh, A.; Koguchi, Y.; Wada, M.; Tokunaga, H.; Miyata, A.; Nakamura, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Yagishita, T.

    2001-01-01

    Summary It is apparent that subarachnoid clots play an important role in the development of delayed vasospasm that is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity in patients with acutely ruptured cerebral aneurysm. The purpose of this study is to compare the clearance of subarachnoid clots in the acute stage after the treatment with Guglielmi detachable coils (GDC) and after treatment with direct surgery. Forty-nine patients were treated by GDC embolization within four days of the ictus. After GDC embolization, adjunctive therapies, such as ventricular and/or spinal drainage (67%), intrathecal administration of urokinase (41%), continuous cisternal irrigation (16%), and external decompression (16%), were performed. Seventy-four surgically treated patients were subsequently treated by continuous cisternal irrigation with mock-CSF containing ascorbic acid for ten days. The clearance of subarachnoid clots was assessed by the Hounsfield number serial changes on the CT scans taken on days 0, 4, 7,10 after subarachnoid hemorrhage. The incidence of symptomatic vasospasm was lower in the GDC group (6%) than in the surgery group (12%). The clearance of subarachnoid clots from both the basal cistern and the Sylvian fissure was more rapid in the GDC cases than in the surgery cases in the first four days. Intrathecal administration of urokinase accelerated the clearance significantly. GDC embolization followed by intrathecal administration of thrombolytic agents accelerates the reduction of subarachnoid clots and favorably acts to prevent delayed vasospasm. PMID:20663379

  7. Effect of thiol derivatives on mixed mucus and blood clots in vitro.

    PubMed

    Risack, L E; Vandevelde, M E; Gobert, J G

    1978-01-01

    The disintegrating effect of three reducing thiol derivatives: [sodium mercaptoethane sulphonate (Mesna), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and dithio-1,4-threitol (DTT)] was investigated in vitro upon blood clots formed in the absence or in the presence of tracheobronchial secretions and compared with the effect of iso-osmotic saline solution. The amounts of haemoglobin released from the clots after 30 min incubation and the initial rates of haemoglobin release were compared for the different products at different concentrations. All three reducing agents showed some ability to disintegrate mixed clots to an extent depending on their concentration. After 30 min incubation, statistical analysis showed a highly significant difference in favour of Mesna at the three concentrations used, i.e. 0.1, 1.0 and 10 mmol/1. The initial rate of haemoglobin release in presence of Mesna was at all concentrations significantly higher than that of NAC or DTT. The effects on normal blood clots were much less pronounced. The effectiveness of Mesna in splitting up mixed blood and mucus clots in the management of patients who had inhaled blood is discussed.

  8. Discovery of an uncovered region in fibrin clots and its clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Hisada, Yohei; Yasunaga, Masahiro; Hanaoka, Shingo; Saijou, Shinji; Sugino, Takashi; Tsuji, Atsushi; Saga, Tsuneo; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Manabe, Shino; Kuroda, Jun-ichiro; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi; Matsumura, Yasuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Despite the pathological importance of fibrin clot formation, little is known about the structure of these clots because X-ray and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses are not applicable to insoluble proteins. In contrast to previously reported anti-fibrin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), our anti-fibrin clot mAb (clone 102–10) recognises an uncovered region that is exposed only when a fibrin clot forms. The epitope of the 102–10 mAb was mapped to a hydrophobic region on the Bβ chain that interacted closely with a counterpart region on the γ chain in a soluble state. New anti-Bβ and anti-γ mAbs specific to peptides lining the discovered region appeared to bind exclusively to fibrin clots. Furthermore, the radiolabelled 102–10 mAb selectively accumulated in mouse spontaneous tumours, and immunohistochemistry using this mAb revealed greater fibrin deposition in World Health Organization (WHO) grade 4 glioma than in lower-grade gliomas. Because erosive tumours are apt to cause micro-haemorrhages, even early asymptomatic tumours detected with a radiolabelled 102-10 mAb may be aggressively malignant. PMID:24008368

  9. Blood clot initiation by mesocellular foams: dependence on nanopore size and enzyme immobilization.

    PubMed

    Baker, Sarah E; Sawvel, April M; Fan, Jie; Shi, Qihui; Strandwitz, Nicholas; Stucky, Galen D

    2008-12-16

    Porous silica materials are attractive for hemorrhage control because of their blood clot promoting surface chemistry, the wide variety of surface topologies and porous structures that can be created, and the potential ability to achieve high loading of therapeutic proteins within the silica support. We show that silica cell-window size variation in the nanometers to tens of nanometers range greatly affects the rate at which blood clots are formed in human plasma, indicating that window sizes in this size range directly impact the accessibility and diffusion of clotting-promoting proteins to and from the interior surfaces and pore volume of mesocellular foams (MCFs). These studies point toward a critical window size at which the clotting speed is minimized and serve as a model for the design of more effective wound-dressing materials. We demonstrate that the clotting times of plasma exposed to MCF materials are dramatically reduced by immobilizing thrombin in the pores of the MCF, validating the utility of enzyme-immobilized mesoporous silicas in biomedical applications.

  10. Immunoreactions involving platelets. III. Quantitative aspects of platelet agglutination, inhibition of clot retraction, and other reactions caused by the antibody of quinidine purpura.

    PubMed

    SHULMAN, N R

    1958-05-01

    Quantitative aspects of platelet agglutination and inhibition of clot retraction by the antibody of quinidine purpura were described. The reactions appeared to depend on formation of types of antibody-quinidine-platelet complexes which could fix complement but complement was not necessary for these reactions. Complement fixation was at least 10 times more sensitive than platelet agglutination or inhibition of clot retraction for measurement and detection of antibody activity. Although it has been considered that antibodies of drug purpura act as platelet lysins in the presence of complement and that direct lysis of platelets accounts for development of thrombocytopenia in drug purpura, the present study suggests that attachment of antibody produces a change in platelets which is manifested in vitro only by increased susceptibility to non-specific factors which can alter the stability of platelets in the absence of antibody. The attachment of antibody to platelets in vivo may only indirectly affect platelet survival. In contrast to human platelets, dog, rabbit, and guinea pig platelets, and normal or trypsin-treated human red cells did not agglutinate, fix complement, or adsorb antibody; and intact human endothelial cells did not fix complement or adsorb antibody. Rhesus monkey platelets were not agglutinated by the antibody but did adsorb antibody and fix complement although their activity in these reactions differed quantitatively from that of human platelets. Cinchonine could be substituted for quinidine in agglutination and inhibition of clot retraction reactions but quinine and cinchonidine could not. Attempts to cause passive anaphylaxis in guinea pigs with the antibody of quinidine purpura were not successful.

  11. Dynamic susceptibility contrast and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI characteristics to distinguish microcystic meningiomas from traditional Grade I meningiomas and high-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Namath S; Moisi, Marc D; Keogh, Bart; McCullough, Brendan J; Rostad, Steven; Newell, David; Gwinn, Ryder; Foltz, Gregory; Mayberg, Marc; Aguedan, Brian; Good, Valerie; Fouke, Sarah J

    2016-06-10

    OBJECTIVE Microcystic meningioma (MM) is a meningioma variant with a multicystic appearance that may mimic intrinsic primary brain tumors and other nonmeningiomatous tumor types. Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI techniques provide imaging parameters that can differentiate these tumors according to hemodynamic and permeability characteristics with the potential to aid in preoperative identification of tumor type. METHODS The medical data of 18 patients with a histopathological diagnosis of MM were identified through a retrospective review of procedures performed between 2008 and 2012; DSC imaging data were available for 12 patients and DCE imaging data for 6. A subcohort of 12 patients with Grade I meningiomas (i.e., of meningoepithelial subtype) and 54 patients with Grade IV primary gliomas (i.e., astrocytomas) was also included, and all preoperative imaging sequences were analyzed. Clinical variables including patient sex, age, and surgical blood loss were also included in the analysis. Images were acquired at both 1.5 and 3.0 T. The DSC images were acquired at a temporal resolution of either 1500 msec (3.0 T) or 2000 msec (1.5 T). In all cases, parameters including normalized cerebral blood volume (CBV) and transfer coefficient (kTrans) were calculated with region-of-interest analysis of enhancing tumor volume. The normalized CBV and kTrans data from the patient groups were analyzed with 1-way ANOVA, and post hoc statistical comparisons among groups were conducted with the Bonferroni adjustment. RESULTS Preoperative DSC imaging indicated mean (± SD) normalized CBVs of 5.7 ± 2.2 ml for WHO Grade I meningiomas of the meningoepithelial subtype (n = 12), 4.8 ± 1.8 ml for Grade IV astrocytomas (n = 54), and 12.3 ± 3.8 ml for Grade I meningiomas of the MM subtype (n = 12). The normalized CBV measured within the enhancing portion of the tumor was significantly higher in the MM subtype than in typical meningiomas and Grade

  12. Fibrin clot structure remains unaffected in young, healthy individuals after transient exposure to diesel exhaust

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to urban particulate matter has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and thrombosis. We studied the effects of transient exposure to diesel particles on fibrin clot structure of 16 healthy individuals (age 21- 44). The subjects were randomly exposed to diesel exhaust and filtered air on two separate occasions. Blood samples were collected before exposure, and 2 and 6 hours after exposure. There were no significant changes on clot permeability, maximum turbidity, lag time, fibre diameter, fibre density and fibrinogen level between samples taken after diesel exhaust exposure and samples taken after filtered air exposure. These data show that there are no prothrombotic changes in fibrin clot structure in young, healthy individuals exposed to diesel exhaust. PMID:20565709

  13. Effect of carryover of clot activators on coagulation tests during phlebotomy.

    PubMed

    Fukugawa, Yoko; Ohnishi, Hiroaki; Ishii, Takahiro; Tanouchi, Ayako; Sano, Junko; Miyawaki, Haruko; Kishino, Tomonori; Ohtsuka, Kouki; Yoshino, Hideaki; Watanabe, Takashi

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the effect of clot activators carried over from the serum tube on major coagulation tests during phlebotomy. First, blood specimens from 30 normal subjects were mixed with small amounts of fluid containing clot activators, and their effects on various coagulation tests were determined. Only the value of fibrin monomer complex displayed a remarkable change when thrombin-containing fluid was added to the blood specimens. Subsequently, 100 paired blood specimens (taken from 75 healthy volunteers and 25 patients taking warfarin) were collected in coagulation tubes before and after the serum tube using standard phlebotomy procedures. Various coagulation tests were performed to determine the effect of contamination of thrombin-containing blood on coagulation parameters. Differences between the 2 tubes were minimal but significant for some of the coagulation tests. Therefore, we conclude that the effect of clot activators in the serum tube on coagulation tests is minimal when standard phlebotomy procedures are used.

  14. Probing the coagulation pathway with aptamers identifies combinations that synergistically inhibit blood clot formation.

    PubMed

    Bompiani, Kristin M; Lohrmann, Jens L; Pitoc, George A; Frederiksen, James W; Mackensen, George B; Sullenger, Bruce A

    2014-08-14

    Coordinated enzymatic reactions regulate blood clot generation. To explore the contributions of various coagulation enzymes in this process, we utilized a panel of aptamers against factors VIIa, IXa, Xa, and prothrombin. Each aptamer dose-dependently inhibited clot formation, yet none was able to completely impede this process in highly procoagulant settings. However, several combinations of two aptamers synergistically impaired clot formation. One extremely potent aptamer combination was able to maintain human blood fluidity even during extracorporeal circulation, a highly procoagulant setting encountered during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. Moreover, this aptamer cocktail could be rapidly reversed with antidotes to restore normal hemostasis, indicating that even highly potent aptamer combinations can be rapidly controlled. These studies highlight the potential utility of using sets of aptamers to probe the functions of proteins in molecular pathways for research and therapeutic ends.

  15. An alternate method for DNA and RNA extraction from clotted blood.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Z; Umi, S H; Mokhtar, S S; Mokhtar, U; Zaiharina, M Z; Aziz, A T A; Hoh, B P

    2013-02-04

    We developed an alternative method to extract DNA and RNA from clotted blood for genomic and molecular investigations. A combination of the TRIzol method and the QIAamp spin column were used to extract RNA from frozen clotted blood. Clotted blood was sonicated and then the QIAamp DNA Blood Mini Kit was used for DNA extraction. Extracted DNA and RNA were adequate for gene expression analysis and copy number variation (CNV) genotyping, respectively. The purity of the extracted RNA and DNA was in the range of 1.8-2.0, determined by absorbance ratios of A(260):A(280). Good DNA and RNA integrity were confirmed using gel electrophoresis and automated electrophoresis. The extracted DNA was suitable for qPCR and microarrays for CNV genotyping, while the extracted RNA was adequate for gene analysis using RT-qPCR.

  16. Honey Bee Venom (Apis mellifera) Contains Anticoagulation Factors and Increases the Blood-clotting Time

    PubMed Central

    Zolfagharian, Hossein; Mohajeri, Mohammad; Babaie, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Bee venom (BV) is a complex mixture of proteins and contains proteins such as phospholipase and melittin, which have an effect on blood clotting and blood clots. The mechanism of action of honey bee venom (HBV, Apis mellifera) on human plasma proteins and its anti-thrombotic effect were studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-coagulation effect of BV and its effects on blood coagulation and purification. Methods: Crude venom obtained from Apis mellifera was selected. The anti-coagulation factor of the crude venom from this species was purified by using gel filtration chromatography (sephadex G-50), and the molecular weights of the anti-coagulants in this venom estimated by using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Blood samples were obtained from 10 rabbits, and the prothrombin time (PT) and the partial thromboplastin time (PTT) tests were conducted. The approximate lethal dose (LD) values of BV were determined. Results: Crude BV increased the blood clotting time. For BV concentrations from 1 to 4 mg/mL, clotting was not observed even at more than 300 seconds, standard deviations (SDs) = ± 0.71; however, clotting was observed in the control group 13.8 s, SDs = ± 0.52. Thus, BV can be considered as containing anti-coagulation factors. Crude BV is composed 4 protein bands with molecular weights of 3, 15, 20 and 41 kilodalton (kDa), respectively. The LD50 of the crude BV was found to be 177.8 μg/mouse. Conclusion: BV contains anti-coagulation factors. The fraction extracted from the Iranian bees contains proteins that are similar to anti-coagulation proteins, such as phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and melittin, and that can increase the blood clotting times in vitro. PMID:26998384

  17. Pilot production of recombinant human clotting factor IX from transgenic sow milk.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-ling; Chang, Yuo-sheng; Lin, Yin-shen; Yen, Chon-ho

    2012-06-01

    Valuable pharmaceutical proteins produced from the mammary glands of transgenic livestock have potential use in the biomedical industry. In this study, recombinant human clotting factor IX (rhFIX) produced from transgenic sow milk for preclinical animal studies have been established. The transgenic sow milk was skimmed and treated with sodium phosphate buffer to remove abundant casein protein. Then, the γ-carboxylated rhFIX fraction was segregated through the Q Sepharose chromatography from uncarboxylated one. For safety issue, the process included virus inactivation by solvent/detergent (S/D) treatment. Subsequently, the S/D treated sample was loaded into the Heparin Sepharose column to recover the rhFIX fraction, which was then reapplied to the Heparin Sepharose column to enhance rhFIX purity and lower the ratio of activated form rhFIX (rhFIXa) easily. This was possible due to the higher affinity of the Heparin affinity sorbent for rhFIXa than for the rhFIX zymogen. Furthermore, an IgA removal column was used to eliminate porcine IgA in purified rhFIX. Finally, nanofiltration was performed for viral clearance. Consequently, a high-quality rhFIX product was produced (approximately 700 mg per batch). Other values for final rhFIX preparation were as follows: purity, >99%; average specific activity, 415.6±57.7 IU/mL and total milk impurity, <0.5 ng/mg. This is the first report that described the whole process and stable production of bioactive rhFIX from transgenic sow milk. The overall manufacturing process presented here has the potential for industrial production of rhFIX for treatment of hemophilia B patients.

  18. Acute intracranial hemorrhage secondary to thrombocytopenia: CT appearances unaffected by absence of clot retraction

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, J.N.; Taber, K.H.; Hayman, L.A. )

    1994-02-01

    To describe the in vivo CT appearance of acute intracerebral blood clots formed from anemic platelet-depleted blood. Three patients with intracerebral hemorrhage secondary only to thrombocytopenia were examined with CT within 2 1/2 hours after the onset of clinical symptoms. There were no unusual CT features found in the intracerebral hemorrhages of patients with only thrombocytopenia. Specifically, a hyperdense zone(s) surrounded by areas of decreased density was identified. Clot retraction (which cannot occur in patients with severe thrombocytopenia) is not necessary for the CT appearance of acute intracerebral hemorrhage. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Lysophosphatidylcholine enhances susceptibility in signaling pathway against pathogen infection through biphasic production of reactive oxygen species and ethylene in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Wi, Soo Jin; Seo, So yeon; Cho, Kyoungwon; Nam, Myung Hee; Park, Ky Young

    2014-08-01

    It was previously reported that the amounts of lysophosphatidylcholines (lysoPCs), which are naturally occurring bioactive lipid molecules, significantly increase following pathogen inoculation, as determined using ultraperformance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight/mass spectrometry analyses. Here, real-time quantitative RT-PCR was performed for the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) genes, Nt1PLA2 and Nt2PLA2, which are responsible for LysoPCs generation. The transcription level of Nt2PLA2 in pathogen-infected tobacco plants transiently peaked at 1h and 36 h, whereas induction of Nt1PLA2 transcription peaked at 36 h. A prominent biphasic ROS accumulation in lysoPC (C18:1(9Z))-treated tobacco leaves was also observed. Transcription of NtRbohD, a gene member of NADPH oxidase, showed biphasic kinetics upon lysoPC 18:1 treatment, as evidenced by an early transient peak in phase I at 1h and a massive peak in phase II at 12h. Each increase in NtACS2 and NtACS4 transcription, gene members of the ACC synthase family, was followed by biphasic peaks of ethylene production after lysoPC 18:1 treatment. This suggested that lysoPC (C18:1)-induced ethylene production was regulated at the transcriptional level of time-dependent gene members. LysoPC 18:1 treatment also rapidly induced cell damage. LysoPC 18:1-induced cell death was almost completely abrogated in ROS generation-impaired transgenic plants (rbohD-as and rbohF-as), ethylene production-impaired transgenic plants (CAS-AS and CAO-AS), and ethylene signaling-impaired transgenic plants (Ein3-AS), respectively. Taken together, pathogen-induced lysoPCs enhance pathogen susceptibility accompanied by ROS and ethylene biosynthesis, resulting in chlorophyll degradation and cell death. Expression of PR genes (PR1-a, PR-3, and PR-4b) and LOX3 was strongly induced in lysoPC 18:1-treated leaves, indicating the involvement of lysoPC 18:1 in the defense response. However, lysoPC 18:1 treatment eventually resulted in cell death, as

  20. Blood clot disruption in vitro using shockwaves delivered by an extracorporeal generator after pre-exposure to lytic agent.

    PubMed

    Goldenstedt, Cedric; Birer, Alain; Cathignol, Dominique; Lafon, Cyril

    2009-06-01

    The standard methods for recanalyzing thrombosed vessels are vascular stenting or administration of thrombolytic drugs. However, these methods suffer from uncertain success rate and side-effects. Therefore, minimally-invasive ultrasound methods have been investigated. In this article, we propose to use shockwaves after pre-exposure to fibrinolytic agent for disrupting thrombus. Shockwaves were delivered by an extracorporeal piezocomposite generator (120 mm in diameter, focused at 97 mm, pulse length = 1.4 micros). In vitro blood clots, made from human blood, were placed at the focal point of the generator. The clots were exposed to shockwaves either with or without prior immersion in a solution of streptokinase. The percentage of lysed clot was determined by weighing the clot before and after treatment. The proportion of lysed clot increased with the pressure at the focus and with the number of shocks. A mean clot reduction of 91% was obtained for 42 MPa in 4-min treatment duration only, without using streptokinase. For a treatment of 2 min at 29 MPa, the clot reduction increased significantly (p < 0.01) from 47% without streptokinase to 82% when streptokinase was used prior to shockwaves. These results also showed no significant damage to streptokinase due to exposure to shockwaves. This study suggests that extracorporeal shockwaves combined with streptokinase is a promising pharmaco-mechanical method for treating occlusive thrombus, and should be confirmed by in vivo trials. Additional studies must also be conducted with other fibrinolytic agents, whose abilities to penetrate clots are different.

  1. Training-induced changes in clotting parameters of athletic horses

    PubMed Central

    Bazzano, Marilena; Giannetto, Claudia; Marafioti, Simona; Fazio, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of training on prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and fibrinogen (Fb) concentrations in horses to assess potential adaptive response to training. Fifteen clinically healthy horses were enrolled in the present study and equally divided into three groups. Group A completed an intense training program, group B participated in a light training program, and group C included sedentary horses. After 5 weeks, group B was subjected to the same training program completed by group A and renamed group B1. Blood samples were collected by jugular venipuncture from each animal at rest and analyzed within 2 h after sampling. A two-way ANOVA for repeated measures showed a significant effect of training (p < 0.05) on Fb concentrations in group B1 alone during the first week after changing the training program. Our findings demonstrated that Fb is a parameter susceptible to training. Fb plasma levels increase with a more intense training program. However, Fb plasma levels decreased after the first week and returned to basel levels, suggesting that the horses had adapted to the new training program. PMID:24136203

  2. Diagnostic yield of blood clot culture in the accurate diagnosis of enteric fever and human brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Mantur, Basappa G; Bidari, Laxman H; Akki, Aravind S; Mulimani, Mallanna S; Tikare, Nitin V

    2007-01-01

    Culture of blood is the most frequent, accurate means of diagnosing bacteremia in enteric fever and brucellosis. However, conventional blood culturing is slow in isolating bacteria causing these diseases. In this work, we evaluated the performance of blood clot culture and conventional whole blood cultures in the accurate diagnosis of enteric fever (253 cases) and human brucellosis (71cases). The blood clot culture was found to be much more sensitive for both Salmonella (more by 34.4%, P< 0.001) and Brucella (more by 22.6%, P<0.001) than whole blood culture. Bacterial growth was significantly faster in cultures of blood clot compared to whole blood (1.1 versus 2.6 days for Salmonella, 3.1 versus 8.2 days for Brucella melitensis, respectively). The rapid confirmation of the etiological agent would facilitate an early institution of appropriate antimicrobial therapy, thereby reducing clinical morbidity especially in an endemic population. It is worthwile practicing blood clot culture for the accurate diagnosis of enteric fever and brucellosis in developing countries where diagnostic facilities by advanced technologies like automated culture systems and PCR are not available.

  3. Analysis of the spatial and temporal characteristics of platelet-delivered factor VIII-based clots.

    PubMed

    Neyman, Michael; Gewirtz, Jamie; Poncz, Mortimer

    2008-08-15

    Normally factor (F) VIII is not expressed in megakaryocytes, but when human FVIII was transgenically expressed in murine megakaryocytes, it was stored in platelet alpha-granules and released at sites of injury. This platelet FVIII (pFVIII) is effective in correcting hemostasis, even in the presence of circulating inhibitors, so it offers a potential gene therapy strategy for hemophilia A. To understand clot development by pFVIII, we have examined clot response to laser injury in both cremaster arterioles and venules in FVIII(null) mice either infused with FVIII or transgenic for pFVIII. In both sets of vessels, pFVIII is at least as effective as infused FVIII. However, there are temporal and spatial differences in fibrin and platelet accumulation within clots depending on how FVIII is delivered. These differences may be related to the temporal and spatial distribution of the alpha-granular-released FVIII within the developing clot, and may explain the increased frequency and size of embolic events seen with pFVIII. These observations may not only have implications for the use of pFVIII in gene therapy for hemophilia A, but may also have physiologic consequences, explaining why many procoagulant factors are delivered both in the plasma and in platelet alpha-granules.

  4. Purification and identification of a clotting protein from the hemolymph of Chinese shrimp ( Fenneropenaeus chinensis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baojie; Peng, Hongni; Liu, Mei; Jiang, Keyong; Zhang, Guofan; Wang, Lei

    2013-09-01

    The clotting protein (CP) plays important and diverse roles in crustaceans, such as coagulation and lipid transportation. A clotting protein was purified from the hemolymph of Chinese shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis (named as Fc-CP) with Q sepharose HP anion-exchange chromatography and phenyl sepharose HP hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Fc-CP was able to form stable clots in vitro in the presence of hemocyte lysate and Ca2+, suggesting that the clotting reaction is catalyzed by a Ca2+-dependent transglutaminase in shrimp hemocytes. The molecular mass of Fc-CP was 380 kDa under non-reducing conditions and 190 kDa under reducing conditions as was determined with SDS-PAGE. CP exists as disulfide-linked homodimers and oligomers. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of Fc-CP was identical to that of shrimps including Penaeus monodon, Farfantepenaeus paulensis and Litopenaeus vannamei; and similar to that of other decapods. The purified Fc-CP was digested with trypsin and verified on an ABI 4700 matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) mass spectrometry. Our results will aid to better understanding the coagulation mechanism of shrimp hemolymph.

  5. Fibronectin provides a conduit for fibroblast transmigration from collagenous stroma into fibrin clot provisional matrix.

    PubMed

    Greiling, D; Clark, R A

    1997-04-01

    After injury, the wound space is filled with a fibrin/fibronectin clot containing growth factors released by platelets and monocytes. In response to these factors, fibroblasts migrate into the fibrin clot and contribute to the formation of granulation tissue. The functional mechanisms allowing fibroblasts to leave the collagenous matrix of normal connective tissue and invade the provisional matrix of the fibrin clot have not been fully defined. To investigate these mechanisms we established a new in vitro model which simulates specific aspects of early wound healing, that is, the migration of fibroblasts from a three-dimensional collagen matrix into a fibrin clot. This transmigration could be induced by physiological concentrations of platelet releasate or platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) in a concentration-dependent manner. At 24 hours irradiated fibroblasts invaded the fibrin gel almost as well as non-irradiated cells, indicating that transmigration was independent of proliferation. Plasminogen and its activators appear to be necessary for invasion of the fibrin clot since protease inhibitors decreased the amount of migration. These serine proteases, however, were not necessary for exit from the collagen gel as fibroblasts migrated out of the collagen gel onto a surface coated with fibrin fibrils even in the presence of inhibitors. Removal of fibronectin (FN) from either the collagen gel or the fibrin gel markedly decreased the number of migrating cells, suggesting that FN provides a conduit for transmigration. Cell movement in the in vitro model was inhibited by RGD peptide, and by monoclonal antibodies against the subunits of the alpha5 beta1 and alpha v beta3 integrin receptor. Thus, the functional requirements for fibroblast transmigration from collagen-rich to fibrin-rich matrices, such as occurs in early wound healing, have been partially defined using an in vitro paradigm of this important biologic process.

  6. Effect of haematocrit on fibrin-based clot firmness in the FIBTEM test

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Cristina; Rahe-Meyer, Niels; Schöchl, Herbert; Ranucci, Marco; Görlinger, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Background Point-of-care thromboelastometry (ROTEM®) can be used to assess coagulation in whole blood. In the ROTEM® FIBTEM test, cytochalasin D eliminates the contribution of platelets to the whole blood clot; hence, only the remaining elements, including fibrinogen/fibrin, red blood cells and factor XIII, contribute to clot strength. We investigated the relationships between FIBTEM maximum clot firmness (MCF), whole blood fibrinogen concentration and plasma fibrinogen concentration to determine the impact of haematocrit on these parameters during cardiac surgery. Materials and methods The relationships between FIBTEM MCF and both whole blood fibrinogen concentration and plasma fibrinogen concentration (Clauss assay) were evaluated pre-operatively and after cardiopulmonary bypass/protamine administration in haematocrit-based subgroups. Results The study included 157 patients. The correlation coefficient rho between FIBTEM MCF and plasma fibrinogen concentration was 0.68 at baseline and 0.70 after protamine, while that between FIBTEM MCF and whole blood fibrinogen concentration was 0.74 at baseline and 0.72 after protamine (all P <0.001). In subgroup analyses based on haematocrit levels, pre-operative FIBTEM MCF and whole blood fibrinogen concentration were both significantly higher (P <0.05) for the lowest haematocrit subgroup, but plasma fibrinogen concentration was similar in all groups. After protamine, no significant differences were observed between the lowest haematocrit group and the other groups for any of the three parameters. Conclusions The effect of haematocrit on blood clotting is not reflected by plasma fibrinogen concentration, in contrast to FIBTEM MCF which incorporates the contribution of haematocrit to whole blood clot firmness. This effect does, however, appear to be negligible in haemodiluted patients. PMID:23245708

  7. The presence of monocytes enhances the susceptibility of B cells to highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus possibly through the increased expression of α2,3 SA receptor.

    PubMed

    Lersritwimanmaen, Patharapan; Na-Ek, Prasit; Thanunchai, Maytawan; Thewsoongnoen, Jutarat; Sa-Ard-Iam, Noppadol; Wiboon-ut, Suwimon; Mahanonda, Rangsini; Thitithanyanont, Arunee

    2015-08-28

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus causes severe systemic infection in avian and mammalian species, including humans by first targeting immune cells. This subsequently renders the innate and adaptive immune responses less active, thus allowing dissemination of the virus to systemic organs. To gain insight into the pathogenesis of H5N1, this study aims to determine the susceptibility of human PBMCs to the H5N1 virus and explore the factors which influence this susceptibility. We found that PBMCs were a target of H5N1 infection, and that monocytes and B cells were populations which were clearly the most susceptible. Analysis of PBMC subpopulations showed that isolated monocytes and monocytes residing in whole PBMCs had comparable percentages of infection (28.97 ± 5.54% vs 22.23 ± 5.14%). In contrast, isolated B cells were infected to a much lower degree than B cells residing in a mixture of whole PBMCs (0.88 ± 0.34% vs 34.87 ± 4.63%). Different susceptibility levels of B cells for these tested conditions spurred us to explore the B cell-H5N1 interaction mechanisms. Here, we first demonstrated that monocytes play a crucial role in the enhancement of B cell susceptibility to H5N1 infection. Although the actual mechanism by which this enhancement occurs remains in question, α2,3-linked sialic acid (SA), known for influenza virus receptors, could be a responsible factor for the greater susceptibility of B cells, as it was highly expressed on the surface of B cells upon H5N1 infection of B cell/monocyte co-cultures. Our findings reveal some of the factors involved with the permissiveness of human immune cells to H5N1 virus and provide a better understanding of the tropism of H5N1 in immune cells.

  8. Aprotinin prolongs activated and nonactivated whole blood clotting time and potentiates the effect of heparin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Despotis, G J; Filos, K S; Levine, V; Alsoufiev, A; Spitznagel, E

    1996-06-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of aprotinin on activated versus nonactivated whole blood clotting time using two different on-site methods and to quantify these anticoagulant properties when compared to heparin in a controlled, in vitro environment. Blood specimens were obtained prior to heparin administration from 56 patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Specimens obtained from the first consecutive 20 patients were mixed with either normal saline (NS) or aprotinin (400 kallikrein inhibiting units (KIU)/mL), inserted into Hemochron tubes containing either NS or heparin (0.3 or 0.6 U/mL) and then used to measure celite-activated (celite ACT) and nonactivated whole blood clotting time (WBCT1) using four Hemochron instruments. Accordingly, specimens obtained from the second consecutive 20 patients were mixed with either NS or aprotinin, inserted into Automated Clot Timer cartridges containing either NS or heparin (0.06, 0.13, or 0.25 U/mL) and then used to measure kaolin-activated (kaolin ACT) or nonactivated whole blood clotting times (WBCT2) using four Automated Clot Timer instruments. Specimens obtained from the last 16 patients were mixed with either incrementally larger doses of aprotinin (0, 100, 200, 300, or 400 KIU/mL) or heparin (0, 0.12, 0.24, 0.36, 0.48, or 0.72 U/mL) and were then used for measurement of whole blood clotting time (WBCT2) using six Automated Clot Timer instruments. Aprotinin significantly prolonged activated or nonactivated whole blood clotting time and potentiated the prolongation of whole blood clotting time by heparin. The linear relationship between whole blood clotting time and either heparin concentration (WBCT2 = H x 357 + 280, mean adjusted r2 = 0.88) or aprotinin concentration (WBCT2 = A x 0.97 + 300, mean adjusted r2 = 0.94) was variable among patients. On average, 200 KIU/mL of aprotinin prolonged WBCT2 to the same extent as 0.69 +/- 0.28 U/mL of heparin using linear regression models within each patient

  9. Kinetics and mechanics of clot contraction are governed by the molecular and cellular composition of the blood.

    PubMed

    Tutwiler, Valerie; Litvinov, Rustem I; Lozhkin, Andrey P; Peshkova, Alina D; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I; Spiller, Kara L; Cines, Douglas B; Weisel, John W

    2016-01-07

    Platelet-driven blood clot contraction (retraction) is thought to promote wound closure and secure hemostasis while preventing vascular occlusion. Notwithstanding its importance, clot contraction remains a poorly understood process, partially because of the lack of methodology to quantify its dynamics and requirements. We used a novel automated optical analyzer to continuously track in vitro changes in the size of contracting clots in whole blood and in variously reconstituted samples. Kinetics of contraction was complemented with dynamic rheometry to characterize the viscoelasticity of contracting clots. This combined approach enabled investigation of the coordinated mechanistic impact of platelets, including nonmuscle myosin II, red blood cells (RBCs), fibrin(ogen), factor XIIIa (FXIIIa), and thrombin on the kinetics and mechanics of the contraction process. Clot contraction is composed of 3 sequential phases, each characterized by a distinct rate constant. Thrombin, Ca(2+), the integrin αIIbβ3, myosin IIa, FXIIIa cross-linking, and platelet count all promote 1 or more phases of the clot contraction process. In contrast, RBCs impair contraction and reduce elasticity, while increasing the overall contractile stress generated by the platelet-fibrin meshwork. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which blood cells, fibrin(ogen), and platelet-fibrin interactions modulate clot contraction may generate novel approaches to reveal and to manage thrombosis and hemostatic disorders.

  10. MicroRNA Biomarkers and Platelet Reactivity: The Clot Thickens.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Nicholas; Skroblin, Philipp; Barwari, Temo; Huntley, Rachael P; Lu, Ruifang; Joshi, Abhishek; Lovering, Ruth C; Mayr, Manuel

    2017-01-20

    Over the last few years, several groups have evaluated the potential of microRNAs (miRNAs) as biomarkers for cardiometabolic disease. In this review, we discuss the emerging literature on the role of miRNAs and other small noncoding RNAs in platelets and in the circulation, and the potential use of miRNAs as biomarkers for platelet activation. Platelets are a major source of miRNAs, YRNAs, and circular RNAs. By harnessing multiomics approaches, we may gain valuable insights into their potential function. Because not all miRNAs are detectable in the circulation, we also created a gene ontology annotation for circulating miRNAs using the gene ontology term extracellular space as part of blood plasma. Finally, we share key insights for measuring circulating miRNAs. We propose ways to standardize miRNA measurements, in particular by using platelet-poor plasma to avoid confounding caused by residual platelets in plasma or by adding RNase inhibitors to serum to reduce degradation. This should enhance comparability of miRNA measurements across different cohorts. We provide recommendations for future miRNA biomarker studies, emphasizing the need for accurate interpretation within a biological and methodological context.

  11. Clotting profile in cattle showing chronic enzootic haematuria (CEH) and bladder neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Di Loria, A; Piantedosi, D; Cortese, L; Roperto, S; Urraro, C; Paciello, O; Guccione, J; Britti, D; Ciaramella, P

    2012-08-01

    Primary haemostasis (bleeding and blood clotting time), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), antithrombin III (ATIII), protein C, protein S, fibrinogen and D-dimer were determined in 13 cattle affected by chronic enzootic haematuria (CEH) and bladder neoplasms and 10 healthy cattle (control group). Increases in antithrombin III and protein S activities (P<0.01) and protein C and fibrinogen plasma levels (P<0.05) were observed in sick animals, while activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, and D-dimer did not show significant differences when compared to healthy animals. The clotting profile observed does not seem responsible for the chronic bleeding typical of CEH. The observed modification of some coagulation markers may derive from multiple interactions among cancer, inflammation and viral infection status typical of this syndrome.

  12. A very-high-density lipoprotein with clotting ability from hemolymph of sand crayfish, Ibacus ciliatus.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, M; Ando, S

    1998-03-01

    A very-high-density lipoprotein (VHDL) with a density of 1.27-1.29 g/ml was the most abundant lipoprotein in the hemolymph of the sand crayfish Ibacus ciliatus. The VHDL isolated by a density gradient ultracentrifugation consisted of 94% protein and 6% lipid reflecting its high density, and phospholipid was a predominant lipid component. The VHDL had an apolipoprotein of molecular mass 195 kDa and its N-terminal amino acid sequence was identified as follows: LQPGLEYQYRYNGRVAA. This sequence was similar to those of clotting proteins from the spiny lobster Panulirus interruptus and the freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus. Transglutaminase and Ca2+ also induced the VHDL to clot. Considering large amounts of VHDL in the hemolymph of sand crayfish, the VHDL not only functions as lipid carrier but plays an important role in the defense process of crustacea.

  13. Nitric oxide added to the sweep gas infusion reduces local clotting formation in adult blood oxygenators.

    PubMed

    Tevaearai, H T; Mueller, X M; Tepic, S; Cotting, J; Boone, Y; Montavon, P M; von Segesser, L K

    2000-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an inhibitor of platelet aggregation. We analyzed the effect of direct infusion of NO into adult blood oxygenators on local clot formation. Nonheparinized calves in a control group (n = 3) and NO group (n = 4) were connected to a jugulocarotid cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB; centrifugal pump) for 6 hours. The venous line and pumphead were heparin coated, whereas the oxygenator, the heat exchanger, and the arterial line were not. A total of 80 ppm of NO was mixed with the sweep gas infusion in the NO group. The pressure gradient through the oxygenator (deltaP.Ox.) was monitored, and its evolution was compared between groups. Oxygenators membranes were analyzed and photographed, allowing for calculation of the percentage of surface area covered with clots by using a computer image analysis program. The deltaP.Ox. reached a plateau of 193 +/- 26% of the basal value in the NO group after 120 minutes, whereas a similar plateau of 202 +/- 22% was reached after only 20 minutes in the control group (p < 0.05). The surface area of the oxygenator covered with clots was significantly reduced in the NO group (0.54 +/- 0.41%) compared with the control group (5.78 +/- 3.80%, p < 0.05). However, general coagulation parameters were not modified by local NO administration. The activated coagulation time remained stable between 110 and 150 seconds in both groups (p = not significant [ns]), and there were no differences in hematocrit, thrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, or fibrinogen between groups during the 6 hours of CPB. Thus, the mixed infusion of a continuous low dose of NO into adult oxygenators during prolonged CPB prevented local clot formation, whereas the general coagulation pattern remained unchanged.

  14. Investigation of adverse effects of interactions between herbal drugs and natural blood clotting mechanism.

    PubMed

    Adhyapak, M S; Kachole, M S

    2016-05-01

    Throughout the world, herbal medicines are consumed by most of the patients without considering their adverse effects. Many herbal medicines/plant extracts have been reported to interact with the natural blood clotting system. In continuation to this effort, thirty medicinal plant extracts were allowed to interact with citrated human blood and the clotting time was measured after re-calcification in vitro using Lee and White method. The aq. leaf ext. of Syzygium cumini and Camellia sinensis significantly prolonged the clotting time. In response to the prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time tests, the ext. of C. sinensis showed normal APTT and marginally prolonged the PT to 16.7 s (control-15.2 s) while S. cumini showed normal PT but significantly prolonged the APTT to 66.9 s (control-20.7 s). This suggests that, C. sinensis acts on the extrinsic pathway while S. cumini on the intrinsic pathway. There are some common herbal formulations that are frequently used by the patients which contain above plant materials, like, Syzygium cumin in anti-diabetic formulations, while the ext. of C. sinensis is consumed frequently as beverage in many part of the world. Hence, patients having known bleeding tendency or haemophilia disease should take into account the interaction potential of these plants with the natural blood clotting system while taking herbal formulations containing above plants; specially, the patients suffering from intrinsic pathway factor deficiency should keep a limit on the consumption of S. cumini while extrinsic pathway factor deficiency patients should limit C. sinensis. Also, the medical practitioners should consider the patient's food consumption history before doing any major surgical procedures.

  15. Real-time visual/near-infrared analysis of milk-clotting parameters for industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Leitner, G; Merin, U; Lemberskiy-Kuzin, L; Bezman, D; Katz, G

    2012-07-01

    The economical profitability of the dairy industry is based on the quality of the bulk milk collected in the farms, therefore it was based on the herd level rather than on the individual animals at real time. Udder infection and stage of lactation are directly related to the quality of milk produced on the herd level. However, improvement of milk quality requires testing each animal's milk separately and continuously. Recently, it was postulated that online equipment can estimate milk quality according to its clotting parameters, and thus result in better economical return for cheese making. This study further investigated the potential application of the AfiLab™ equipment to provide real-time analysis of milk-clotting parameters for cheese manufacture and cheese yield on quarter (1018) and individual cow (277) levels. Days in milk, lactose, log SCC and udder infection were found to have a significant effect on curd firmness and cheese properties and yield. The results clearly indicate that: (a) the parameter Afi-CF determined with the AfiLab™ is suitable for assessing milk quality for its clotting parameters, a value which is not provided by merely measuring fat and protein content on the gland and the cow levels; (b) bacterial type is the single major cause of reduced milk quality, with variations depending on the bacterial species; and (c) early and late lactation also had negative effects on milk-clotting parameters. Cheese made from the various milk samples that were determined by the Afilab™ to be of higher quality for cheese making resulted in higher yield and better texture, which were related mainly to the bacterial species and stage of lactation.

  16. Improvement of fibrin clot structure after factor VIII injection in haemophilia A patients treated on demand.

    PubMed

    Antovic, Aleksandra; Mikovic, Danijela; Elezovic, Ivo; Zabczyk, Michael; Hutenby, Kjell; Antovic, Jovan P

    2014-04-01

    Patients with haemophilia A have seriously impaired thrombin generation due to an inherited deficiency of factor (F)VIII, making them form unstable fibrin clots that are unable to maintain haemostasis. Data on fibrin structure in haemophilia patients remain limited. Fibrin permeability, assessed by a flow measurement technique, was investigated in plasma from 20 patients with severe haemophilia A treated on demand, before and 30 minutes after FVIII injection. The results were correlated with concentrations of fibrinogen, FVIII and thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI), and global haemostatic markers: endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) and overall haemostatic potential (OHP). Fibrin structure was visualised using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The permeability coefficient Ks decreased significantly after FVIII treatment. Ks correlated significantly with FVIII levels and dosage, and with ETP, OHP and levels of TAFI. SEM images revealed irregular, porous fibrin clots composed of thick and short fibers before FVIII treatment. The clots had recovered after FVIII replacement almost to levels in control samples, revealing compact fibrin with smaller intrinsic pores. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of fibrin porosity and structure before and after FVIII treatment of selected haemophilia patients. It seems that thrombin generation is the main determinant of fibrin structure in haemophilic plasma.

  17. Clotting factor VIII (FVIII) and thrombin generation in camel plasma: A comparative study with humans

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Gader, Abdel Galil M.; Al Momen, Abdul Karim M.; Alhaider, Abdulqader; Brooks, Marjory B.; Catalfamo, James L.; Al Haidary, Ahmed A.; Hussain, Mansour F.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the highly elevated levels of clotting factor VIII (FVIII) in camel plasma. Whole blood was collected from healthy camels and factor VIII clotting activity (FVIII:C) assays were conducted using both the clotting and the chromogenic techniques. The anticoagulant citrate phosphate dextrose adenine (CPDA) produced the highest harvest of FVIII:C, the level of plasma factor VIII, compared to heparin:saline and heparin:CPDA anticoagulants. Camel FVIII can be concentrated 2 to 3 times in cryoprecipitate. There was a significant loss of camel FVIII when comparing levels of FVIII in camel plasma after 1 h of incubation at 37°C (533%), 40°C (364%), and 50°C (223%). Thrombin generation of camel plasma is comparable to that of human plasma. It was concluded that camel plasma contains very elevated levels of FVIII:C, approaching 8 times the levels in human plasma, and that these elevated levels could not be attributed to excessive thrombin generation. Unlike human FVIII:C, camel FVIII:C is remarkably heat stable. Taken together, these unique features of camel FVIII could be part of the physiological adaptation of hemostasis of the Arabian camel in order to survive in the hot desert environment. PMID:24082408

  18. Bioinformatic Characterization of Genes and Proteins Involved in Blood Clotting in Lampreys.

    PubMed

    Doolittle, Russell F

    2015-10-01

    Lampreys and hagfish are the earliest diverging of extant vertebrates and are obvious targets for investigating the origins of complex biochemical systems found in mammals. Currently, the simplest approach for such inquiries is to search for the presence of relevant genes in whole genome sequence (WGS) assemblies. Unhappily, in the past a high-quality complete genome sequence has not been available for either lampreys or hagfish, precluding the possibility of proving gene absence. Recently, improved but still incomplete genome assemblies for two species of lamprey have been posted, and, taken together with an extensive collection of short sequences in the NCBI trace archive, they have made it possible to make reliable counts for specific gene families. Particularly, a multi-source tactic has been used to study the lamprey blood clotting system with regard to the presence and absence of genes known to occur in higher vertebrates. As was suggested in earlier studies, lampreys lack genes for coagulation factors VIII and IX, both of which are critical for the "intrinsic" clotting system and responsible for hemophilia in humans. On the other hand, they have three each of genes for factors VII and X, participants in the "extrinsic" clotting system. The strategy of using raw trace sequence "reads" together with partial WGS assemblies for lampreys can be used in studies on the early evolution of other biochemical systems in vertebrates.

  19. Real-time monitoring of human blood clotting using a lateral excited film bulk acoustic resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Da; Wang, Jingjng; Wang, Peng; Guo, Qiuquan; Zhang, Zhen; Ma, Jilong

    2017-04-01

    Frequent assay of hemostatic status is an essential issue for the millions of patients using anticoagulant drugs. In this paper, we presented a micro-fabricated film bulk acoustic sensor for the real-time monitoring of blood clotting and the measurement of hemostatic parameters. The device was made of an Au/ZnO/Si3N4 film stack and excited by a lateral electric field. It operated under a shear mode resonance with the frequency of 1.42 GHz and had a quality factor of 342 in human blood. During the clotting process of blood, the resonant frequency decreased along with the change of blood viscosity and showed an apparent step-ladder curve, revealing the sequential clotting stages. An important hemostatic parameter, prothrombin time, was quantitatively determined from the frequency response for different dilutions of the blood samples. The effect of a typical anticoagulant drug (heparin) on the prothrombin time was exemplarily shown. The proposed sensor displayed a good consistency and clinical comparability with the standard coagulometric methods. Thanks to the availability of direct digital signals, excellent potentials of miniaturization and integration, the proposed sensor has promising application for point-of-care coagulation technologies.

  20. Continuous production of cheese by immobilized milk-clotting protease from aspergillus niger MC4

    PubMed

    Channe; Shewale

    1998-11-01

    Milk clotting protease from Aspergillus niger MC4 immobilized on glycidyl methacrylate-pentaerythritol triacrylate copolymer GP4 was used for continuous production of cheese using a packed bed reactor. Factors affecting the hydrolysis of kappa-casein and clot formation were studied. Acidified milk (pH 5.8) preincubated at 37 degreesC when passed through the column at a flow rate of 80 mL/min attained the required degree of hydrolysis of kappa-casein for the coagulation in a single pass. Fortification of the hydrolyzed milk with CaCl2 and FeCl3 to a final concentration of 0.01 and 0.02 M, respectively, and incubation of fortified milk at 60 degreesC for 2 h resulted in a hard cake of cheese. The yield of raw cheese was 28 g/100 mL of milk. The immobilized milk-clotting protease was used for 60 days (8 h/day) without any loss in productivity.

  1. The Plant Membrane-Associated REMORIN1.3 Accumulates in Discrete Perihaustorial Domains and Enhances Susceptibility to Phytophthora infestans1[W

    PubMed Central

    Bozkurt, Tolga O.; Richardson, Annis; Dagdas, Yasin F.; Mongrand, Sébastien; Kamoun, Sophien; Raffaele, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous pathogens such as the oomycete Phytophthora infestans infect plants by developing specialized structures termed haustoria inside the host cells. Haustoria are thought to enable the secretion of effector proteins into the plant cells. Haustorium biogenesis, therefore, is critical for pathogen accommodation in the host tissue. Haustoria are enveloped by a specialized host-derived membrane, the extrahaustorial membrane (EHM), which is distinct from the plant plasma membrane. The mechanisms underlying the biogenesis of the EHM are unknown. Remarkably, several plasma membrane-localized proteins are excluded from the EHM, but the remorin REM1.3 accumulates around P. infestans haustoria. Here, we used overexpression, colocalization with reporter proteins, and superresolution microscopy in cells infected by P. infestans to reveal discrete EHM domains labeled by REM1.3 and the P. infestans effector AVRblb2. Moreover, SYNAPTOTAGMIN1, another previously identified perihaustorial protein, localized to subdomains that are mainly not labeled by REM1.3 and AVRblb2. Functional characterization of REM1.3 revealed that it is a susceptibility factor that promotes infection by P. infestans. This activity, and REM1.3 recruitment to the EHM, require the REM1.3 membrane-binding domain. Our results implicate REM1.3 membrane microdomains in plant susceptibility to an oomycete pathogen. PMID:24808104

  2. Influenza infection suppresses NADPH oxidase-dependent phagocytic bacterial clearance and enhances susceptibility to secondary methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Keer; Metzger, Dennis W

    2014-04-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a leading contributor to mortality during recent influenza pandemics. The mechanism for this influenza-induced susceptibility to secondary S. aureus infection is poorly understood. In this study, we show that innate antibacterial immunity was significantly suppressed during the recovery stage of influenza infection, even though MRSA superinfection had no significant effect on viral burdens. Compared with mice infected with bacteria alone, postinfluenza MRSA-infected mice exhibited impaired bacterial clearance, which was not due to defective phagocyte recruitment, but rather coincided with reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species levels in alveolar macrophages and neutrophils. NADPH oxidase is responsible for reactive oxygen species production during phagocytic bacterial killing, a process also known as oxidative burst. We found that gp91(phox)-containing NADPH oxidase activity in macrophages and neutrophils was essential for optimal bacterial clearance during respiratory MRSA infections. In contrast to wild-type animals, gp91(phox-/-) mice exhibited similar defects in MRSA clearance before and after influenza infection. Using gp91(phox+/-) mosaic mice, we further demonstrate that influenza infection inhibits a cell-intrinsic contribution of NADPH oxidase to phagocyte bactericidal activity. Taken together, our results establish that influenza infection suppresses NADPH oxidase-dependent bacterial clearance and leads to susceptibility to secondary MRSA infection.

  3. Segmentation of blood clot from CT pulmonary angiographic images using a modified seeded region growing algorithm method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Bumwoo; Furlan, Alessandro; Patil, Amol; Bae, Kyongtae T.

    2010-03-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a medical condition defined as the obstruction of pulmonary arteries by a blood clot, usually originating in the deep veins of the lower limbs. PE is a common but elusive illness that can cause significant disability and death if not promptly diagnosed and effectively treated. CT Pulmonary Angiography (CTPA) is the first line imaging study for the diagnosis of PE. While clinical prediction rules have been recently developed to associate short-term risks and stratify patients with acute PE, there is a dearth of objective biomarkers associated with the long-term prognosis of the disease. Clot (embolus) burden is a promising biomarker for the prognosis and recurrence of PE and can be quantified from CTPA images. However, to our knowledge, no study has reported a method for segmentation and measurement of clot from CTPA images. Thus, the purpose of this study was to develop a semi-automated method for segmentation and measurement of clot from CTPA images. Our method was based on Modified Seeded Region Growing (MSRG) algorithm which consisted of two steps: (1) the observer identifies a clot of interest on CTPA images and places a spherical seed over the clot; and (2) a region grows around the seed on the basis of a rolling-ball process that clusters the neighboring voxels whose CT attenuation values are within the range of the mean +/- two standard deviations of the initial seed voxels. The rollingball propagates iteratively until the clot is completely clustered and segmented. Our experimental results revealed that the performance of the MSRG was superior to that of the conventional SRG for segmenting clots, as evidenced by reduced degrees of over- or under-segmentation from adjacent anatomical structures. To assess the clinical value of clot burden for the prognosis of PE, we are currently applying the MSRG for the segmentation and volume measurement of clots from CTPA images that are acquired in a large cohort of patients with PE in an on

  4. Blood Clots

    MedlinePlus

    ... DL, et al., eds. Bleeding and thrombosis. In: Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. 19th ed. New York, ... et al., eds. Arterial and venous thrombosis. In: Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. 19th ed. New York, ...

  5. Blood clots

    MedlinePlus

    ... the finger Deep venous thrombosis, iliofemoral References Schafer AI. Thrombotic disorders: hypercoagulable states. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  6. Blood Clots

    MedlinePlus

    ... Correspondence Addressing Sickle Cell Disease View all Support Medical Research Urge your members of Congress to support continued medical research funding Take Action Meetings 2017 Highlights of ASH ...

  7. Factors influencing susceptibility to metals.

    PubMed Central

    Gochfeld, M

    1997-01-01

    Although the long-neglected field of human susceptibility to environmental toxicants is currently receiving renewed attention, there is only scant literature on factors influencing susceptibility to heavy metals. Genetic factors may influence the availability of sulfhydryl-containing compounds such as glutathione and metallothionein, which modify the distribution and toxicity of certain metals. Age and gender play a role in modifying uptake and distribution, although the mechanisms are often obscure. Concurrent exposure to divalent cations may enhance or reduce the toxicity of certain metals through competition for receptor-mediated transport or targets. Increasing use of biomarkers of exposure should greatly increase our understanding of the underlying distribution of susceptibility to various environmental agents. PMID:9255566

  8. Inherited susceptibility and radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Little, J.B.

    1997-03-01

    There is continuing concern that some people in the general population may have genetic makeups that place them at particularly high risk for radiation-induced cancer. The existence of such a susceptible subpopulation would have obvious implications for the estimation of risks of radiation exposure. Although it has been long known that familial aggregations of cancer do sometimes occur, recent evidence suggests that a general genetic predisposition to cancer does not exist; most cancers occur sporadically. On the other hand, nearly 10% of the known Mendelian genetic disorders are associated with cancer. A number of these involve a familial predisposition to cancer, and some are characterized by an enhanced susceptibility to the induction of cancer by various physical and chemical carcinogens, including ionizing radiation. Such increased susceptibility will depend on several factors including the frequency of the susceptibility gene in the population and its penetrance, the strength of the predisposition, and the degree to which the cancer incidence in susceptible individuals may be increased by the carcinogen. It is now known that these cancer-predisposing genes may be responsible not only for rare familial cancer syndromes, but also for a proportion of the common cancers. Although the currently known disorders can account for only a small fraction of all cancers, they serve as models for genetic predisposition to carcinogen-induced cancer in the general population. In the present report, the author describes current knowledge of those specific disorders that are associated with an enhanced predisposition to radiation-induced cancer, and discusses how this knowledge may bear on the susceptibility to radiation-induced cancer in the general population and estimates of the risk of radiation exposure.

  9. Susceptibility to natural killer cell-mediated lysis of colon cancer cells is enhanced by treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors through UL16-binding protein-1 induction.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jae-Ho; Kim, So-Jung; Kim, Mi-Ju; Oh, Sae-Ock; Chung, Joo-Seop; Kim, Sun-Hee; Kang, Chi-Dug

    2012-01-01

    We have previously shown that inhibition of intracellular signaling pathways by treatment with quercetin induced the expression of natural killer cell group 2D (NKG2D) ligands on cancer cells and made the cells sensitive to natural killer (NK)-cell mediated cytotoxicity. In the present study, we investigated whether epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors could induce the expression of NKG2D ligands in colon cancer cells. Treatment with EGFR inhibitors predominantly increased the levels of mRNA transcripts and surface protein of UL16-binding protein-1 (ULBP1) in various colon cancer cells, including KM12, Caco-2, HCT-15, and HT-29, which express EGFR, and increased susceptibility of these colon cancer cells to NK-92 cells. The expression of ULBP1 was not induced by inhibitors of nuclear factor-κB, phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase, and MAPK, but was induced by inhibitors of PKC, and the induction of ULBP1 expression with EGFR inhibitors was prevented by treatment with PMA in colon cancer cells. A transcription factor, activator protein-2 alpha (AP-2α), which has a suppressive effect on ULBP1 transcription, was prevented from binding to the ULBP1 promoter by treatment with EGFR inhibitors. The present study suggests that EGFR inhibitors can enhance the susceptibility to NK cell-mediated lysis of colon cancer cells by induction of ULBP1 via inhibition of the PKC pathway.

  10. Purification and characterization of a novel C-type hemolytic lectin for clot lysis from the fresh water clam Villorita cyprinoides: a possible natural thrombolytic agent against myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, G R Learnal; Vincent, S G Prakash

    2014-02-01

    Villorita cyprinoides (black clam) is a fresh water clam that belongs as a bivalve to the group of mollusc. The saline extracts from the muscle reveal high titers of agglutination potency on trypsin-treated rabbit erythrocytes. With the help of affinity chromatography a hemolytic protein with lectin activity which could all be inhibited by D-galactose were isolated. The lectins were separated on DEAE-cellulose and the main component was purified after an additional step of gel filtration on sephadex G-75. The main component is a non-glycosylated protein with a molecular weight of 96,560 Da determined by MALDI-ToF, consisting of a single protein chain and characterized by the lack of polymers and intermediate disulfide bonds. The pure main lectin with clot lytic feature shows two bands at molecular weights 36,360 and 26, 520 Da. Optimal inhibition of the pure lectin is achieved by D-galactose containing oligo- and polysaccharides. The lectin activity decreased above 40 °C and was lost at 62 °C, the stability over the pH range between 7.0 and 8.0 and requires divalent cations for their activity. The novel C-type hemolytic lectin for clot lysis from the clam Villorita cyprinoides was identified and evaluated, the purified hemolytic lectin (0.35 mg/ml and 0.175 mg/ml) enhanced clot lysis activity when compared to the different concentration (5 mg/ml and 1 mg/ml) of commercial streptokinase. In the present study identified hemolytic lectin was a rapid and effective clot lytic molecule and could be developed as new drug molecule in future.

  11. Influence of residual milk-clotting enzyme on alpha(s1) casein hydrolysis during ripening of Reggianito Argentino cheese.

    PubMed

    Hynes, E R; Aparo, L; Candioti, M C

    2004-03-01

    Milk-clotting enzyme is considered largely denatured after the cooking step in hard cheeses. Nevertheless, typical hydrolysis products derived from rennet action on alpha(s1)-casein have been detected during the ripening of hard cheeses. The aim of the present work was to investigate the influence of residual milk-clotting enzyme on alpha(s1)-casein hydrolysis in Reggianito cheeses. For that purpose, we studied the influence of cooking temperature (45, 52, and 60 degrees C) on milk-clotting enzyme residual activity and alpha(s1)-casein hydrolysis during ripening. Milk-clotting enzyme residual activity in cheeses was assessed using a chromatographic method, and the hydrolysis of alpha(s1)-casein was determined by electrophoresis and high performance liquid chromatography. Milk-clotting enzyme activity was very low or undetectable in 60 degrees C- and 52 degrees C-cooked cheeses at the beginning of the ripening, but it increased afterwards, particularly in 52 degrees C-cooked cheeses. Cheese curds that were cooked at 45 degrees C had higher initial milk clotting activity, but also in this case, there was a later increase. Hydrolysis of alpha(s1)-casein was detected early in cheeses made at 45 degrees C, and later in those made at higher temperatures. The peptide alpha(s1)-I was not detected in 60 degrees C-cooked cheeses. The results suggest that residual milk-clotting enzyme can contribute to proteolysis during ripening of hard cheeses, because it probably renatures partially after the cooking step. Consequently, the production of peptides derived from alpha(s1)-casein in hard cheeses may be at least, partially due to this proteolytic agent.

  12. Exposure of beta H-crystallin to hydroxyl radicals enhances the transglutaminase-susceptibility of its existing amine-donor and amine-acceptor sites.

    PubMed Central

    Groenen, P J; Seccia, M; Smulders, R H; Gravela, E; Cheeseman, K H; Bloemendal, H; de Jong, W W

    1993-01-01

    beta H-crystallin was exposed to radiolytically generated hydroxyl radicals at defined radical concentrations, and its capacity to act as an amine-acceptor substrate and as an amine-donor substrate for transglutaminase were investigated. [14C]Methylamine was used as a probe for labelling amine-acceptor sites; a novel biotinylated hexapeptide was used to label amine-donor sites. The results demonstrate that both primary amine incorporation and hexapeptide incorporation by transglutaminase are considerably increased after oxidative attack on the crystallin. The identity of the labelled subunits was established, and it is shown that, in both cases, this increased incorporation is not due to the production of new substrates, but that the existing incorporation sites become more susceptible. Moreover, using the newly developed probe, we could identify, for the first time, the major crystallin subunits active as amine-donor substrates (both before and after treatment) to be beta B1-, beta A3- and beta A4-crystallin. These data support the proposal that oxidative stress and transglutaminase activity may be jointly involved in the changes found in lens crystallins with age and in the development of cataract. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7902086

  13. Acquisition of multidrug resistance by L1210 leukemia cells decreases their tumorigenicity and enhances their susceptibility to the host immune response.

    PubMed

    Martín-Orozco, Elena; Ferragut, José Antonio; Garcia-Peñarrubia, Pilar; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio

    2005-04-01

    The use of antineoplastic drugs for cancer treatment is frequently associated with the acquisition of a multidrug-resistant (MDR) phenotype that renders tumoural cells insensitive to antineoplastics. It remains elusive whether the acquisition of the MDR phenotype alters immunological parameters that could influence the cell sensitivity to an eventual host immune response. We report that immunisation of syngeneic mice with gamma-irradiated L1210S (parental line) and L1210R (MDR phenotype) cells results in a significant rejection of subsequently implanted L1210R-based tumours, but not of the L1210S ones. Notably, L1210R tumours display a twofold reduction in vivo proliferative capacity and are less aggressive in terms of mouse survival than their sensitive counterparts. Also, analysis of surface expression of molecules involved in antigen presentation and cytokine activity revealed a slight increase in IFN-gamma receptor expression, a decrease of Fas molecule, and a fourfold up-regulation of MHC class I molecules in L1210R cells. Nonetheless, both cell lines were able to induce a cytotoxic response in syngeneic mice and were equally susceptible to cytotoxicity by splenic cells. Together, these findings indicate that acquisition of drug resistance by L1210 cells is accompanied by pleiotropic changes that result in reduced tumour proliferative capacity and tumorigenicity in syngeneic mice. Hence, immunological studies of MDR tumours may assist in the design of specific therapeutic strategies that complement current chemotherapy treatments.

  14. The value of resting-state functional MRI in subacute ischemic stroke: comparison with dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ling; Li, Jingwei; Li, Weiping; Zhou, Fei; Wang, Fangfang; Schwarz, Christopher G; Liu, Renyuan; Zhao, Hui; Wu, Wenbo; Zhang, Xin; Li, Ming; Yu, Haiping; Zhu, Bin; Villringer, Arno; Zang, Yufeng; Zhang, Bing; Lv, Yating; Xu, Yun

    2017-01-31

    To evaluate the potential clinical value of the time-shift analysis (TSA) approach for resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) data in detecting hypoperfusion of subacute stroke patients through comparison with dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion weighted imaging (DSC-PWI). Forty patients with subacute stroke (3-14 days after neurological symptom onset) underwent MRI examination. Cohort A: 31 patients had MRA, DSC-PWI and BOLD data. Cohort B: 9 patients had BOLD and MRA data. The time delay between the BOLD time course in each voxel and the mean signal of global and contralateral hemisphere was calculated using TSA. Time to peak (TTP) was employed to detect hypoperfusion. Among cohort A, 14 patients who had intracranial large-vessel occlusion/stenosis with sparse collaterals showed hypoperfusion by both of the two approaches, one with abundant collaterals showed neither TTP nor TSA time delay. The remaining 16 patients without obvious MRA lesions showed neither TTP nor TSA time delay. Among cohort B, eight patients showed time delay areas. The TSA approach was a promising alternative to DSC-PWI for detecting hypoperfusion in subacute stroke patients who had obvious MRA lesions with sparse collaterals, those with abundant collaterals would keep intact local perfusion.

  15. The value of resting-state functional MRI in subacute ischemic stroke: comparison with dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Ling; Li, Jingwei; Li, Weiping; Zhou, Fei; Wang, Fangfang; Schwarz, Christopher G.; Liu, Renyuan; Zhao, Hui; Wu, Wenbo; Zhang, Xin; Li, Ming; Yu, Haiping; Zhu, Bin; Villringer, Arno; Zang, Yufeng; Zhang, Bing; Lv, Yating; Xu, Yun

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the potential clinical value of the time-shift analysis (TSA) approach for resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) data in detecting hypoperfusion of subacute stroke patients through comparison with dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion weighted imaging (DSC-PWI). Forty patients with subacute stroke (3–14 days after neurological symptom onset) underwent MRI examination. Cohort A: 31 patients had MRA, DSC-PWI and BOLD data. Cohort B: 9 patients had BOLD and MRA data. The time delay between the BOLD time course in each voxel and the mean signal of global and contralateral hemisphere was calculated using TSA. Time to peak (TTP) was employed to detect hypoperfusion. Among cohort A, 14 patients who had intracranial large-vessel occlusion/stenosis with sparse collaterals showed hypoperfusion by both of the two approaches, one with abundant collaterals showed neither TTP nor TSA time delay. The remaining 16 patients without obvious MRA lesions showed neither TTP nor TSA time delay. Among cohort B, eight patients showed time delay areas. The TSA approach was a promising alternative to DSC-PWI for detecting hypoperfusion in subacute stroke patients who had obvious MRA lesions with sparse collaterals, those with abundant collaterals would keep intact local perfusion. PMID:28139701

  16. Regional right ventricular dysfunction in acute pulmonary embolism: relationship with clot burden and biomarker profile.

    PubMed

    Tuzovic, Mirela; Adigopula, Sasikanth; Amsallem, Myriam; Kobayashi, Yukari; Kadoch, Michael; Boulate, David; Krishnan, Gomathi; Liang, David; Schnittger, Ingela; Fleischmann, Dominik; McConnell, Michael V; Haddad, François

    2016-03-01

    Regional right ventricular (RV) dysfunction (RRVD) is an echocardiographic feature in acute pulmonary embolism (PE), primarily reported in patients with moderate-to-severe RV dysfunction. This study investigated the clinical importance of RRVD by assessing its relationship with clot burden and biomarkers. We identified consecutive patients admitted to the emergency department between 1999 and 2014 who underwent computed tomographic angiography, echocardiography, and biomarker testing (troponin and NT-proBNP) for suspected acute PE. RRVD was defined as normal excursion of the apex contrasting with hypokinesis of the mid-free wall segment. RV assessment included measurements of ventricular dimensions, fractional area change, free-wall longitudinal strain and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion. Clot burden was assessed using the modified Miller score. Of 82 patients identified, 51 had acute PE (mean age 66 ± 17 years, 43% male). No patient had RV myocardial infarction. RRVD was present in 41% of PEs and absent in all patients without PE. Among patients with PE, 86% of patients with RRVD had central or multi-lobar PE. Patients with RRVD had higher prevalence of moderate-to-severe RV dilation (81 vs. 30%, p < 0.01) and dysfunction (86 vs. 23%, p < 0.01). There was a strong trend for higher troponin level in PE patients with RRVD (38 vs. 13% in PE patients without RRVD, p = 0.08), while there was no significant difference for NT-proBNP (67 vs. 73%, p = 0.88). RRVD showed good concordance between readers (87%). RRVD is associated with an increased clot burden in acute PE and is more prevalent among patients with moderate-to-severe RV enlargement and dysfunction.

  17. Free Fatty Acids Modulate Thrombin Mediated Fibrin Generation Resulting in Less Stable Clots

    PubMed Central

    Tanka-Salamon, Anna; Komorowicz, Erzsébet; Szabó, László; Tenekedjiev, Kiril

    2016-01-01

    Upon platelet activation, free fatty acids are released at the stage of thrombus formation, but their effects on fibrin formation are largely unexplored. Our objective was to characterize the kinetic effects of fatty acids on thrombin activity, as well as the structural and mechanical properties of the resultant fibrin clots. Thrombin activity on fibrinogen was followed by turbidimetry and detailed kinetic characterization was performed using a fluorogenic short peptide substrate. The viscoelastic properties of fibrin were measured with rotatory oscillation rheometer, whereas its structure was analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In turbidimetric assays of fibrin generation, oleate and stearate at physiologically relevant concentrations (60–600 μM) produced a bell-shaped inhibitory dose response, increasing 10- to 30-fold the time to half-maximal clotting. Oleate inhibited thrombin activity on a short peptide substrate according to a mixed-type inhibitor pattern (a 9-fold increase of the Michaelis constant, Km and a 20% decrease of the catalytic constant), whereas stearate resulted in only a minor (15%) drop in the catalytic constant without any change in the Km. Morphometric analysis of SEM images showed a 73% increase in the median fiber diameter in the presence of stearate and a 20% decrease in the presence of oleate. Concerning the viscoelastic parameters of the clots, storage and loss moduli, maximal viscosity and critical shear stress decreased by 32–65% in the presence of oleate or stearate, but loss tangent did not change indicating decreased rigidity, higher deformability and decreased internal resistance to shear stress. Our study provides evidence that free fatty acids (at concentrations comparable to those reported in thrombi) reduce the mechanical stability of fibrin through modulation of thrombin activity and the pattern of fibrin assembly. PMID:27942000

  18. Assessment of Actin FS and Actin FSL sensitivity to specific clotting factor deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Lawrie, A S; Kitchen, S; Purdy, G; Mackie, I J; Preston, F E; Machin, S J

    1998-06-01

    We present a two centre study designed to assess the sensitivity of Actin FS and Actin FSL to deficiencies of factor VIII, IX, XI or XII. The study was undertaken at two centres to avoid bias due to the investigations being undertaken on one analyser. Samples from patients with a factor VIII (n = 36, F VIII = < 1.0-50 iu/dl), factor IX (n = 22, F IX = 2-48 iu/dl), factor XI (n = 23, F XI = 5-50 u/dl) or a factor XII (n = 18, F XII = 1-50 u/dl) deficient state were studied. Activated partial thromboplastin times (APTT) were determined using two batches of Actin FS and of Actin FSL; comparison of APTT results between centres was facilitated by the conversion of clotting times to ratios (test divided by geometric mean normal clotting time). APTT ratios were considered to be elevated if greater than two standard deviations above the mean normal. The factor deficient status of each sample was verified by assaying all samples for factors VIII, IX, XI and XII. Clotting factor assays were performed on a Sysmex CA-1000 fitted with research software, which permitted the auto-dilution and testing of three serial dilution of both a reference preparation and each patient's sample. Assay results were calculated using parallel-line Bioassay principles. This procedure allowed for variation in clotting times due to the effect of temporal drift of any of the reagents within the assay system. Actin FS and Actin FSL demonstrate acceptable sensitivity to factor VIII deficiency, however, both reagents failed to detect a large proportion of factor XI (17.4% and 30.4% of samples, respectively) and factor XII (66.7% and 72.2%, respectively) deficiencies. The detection rate with Actin FSL for factor IX deficiency was also poor (36.4% not detected). As factor IX and XI deficiencies are both associated with haemorrhagic disorders, the inability of these reagents to detect such abnormalities gave cause for concern.

  19. I223R Mutation in Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Neuraminidase Confers Reduced Susceptibility to Oseltamivir and Zanamivir and Enhanced Resistance with H275Y

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Jaoudé, Georges; Scemla, Anne; Ribaud, Patricia; Mercier-Delarue, Séverine; Caro, Valérie; Enouf, Vincent; Simon, François; Molina, Jean-Michel; van der Werf, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    Background Resistance of pandemic A(H1N1)2009 (H1N1pdm09) virus to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) has remained limited. A new mutation I223R in the neuraminidase (NA) of H1N1pdm09 virus has been reported along with H275Y in immunocompromised patients. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of I223R on oseltamivir and zanamivir susceptibility. Methods The NA enzymatic characteristics and susceptibility to NAIs of viruses harbouring the mutations I223R and H275Y alone or in combination were analyzed on viruses produced by reverse genetics and on clinical isolates collected from an immunocompromised patient with sustained influenza H1N1pdm09 virus shedding and treated by oseltamivir (days 0–15) and zanamivir (days 15–25 and 70–80). Results Compared with the wild type, the NA of recombinant viruses and clinical isolates with H275Y or I223R mutations had about two-fold reduced affinity for the substrate. The H275Y and I223R isolates showed decreased susceptibility to oseltamivir (246-fold) and oseltamivir and zanamivir (8.9- and 4.9-fold), respectively. Reverse genetics assays confirmed these results and further showed that the double mutation H275Y and I223R conferred enhanced levels of resistance to oseltamivir and zanamivir (6195- and 15.2-fold). In the patient, six days after initiation of oseltamivir therapy, the mutation H275Y conferring oseltamivir resistance and the I223R mutation were detected in the NA. Mutations were detected concomitantly from day 6–69 but molecular cloning did not show any variant harbouring both mutations. Despite cessation of NAI treatment, the mutation I223R persisted along with additional mutations in the NA and the hemagglutinin. Conclusions Reduced susceptibility to both oseltamivir and zanamivir was conferred by the I223R mutation which potentiated resistance to both NAIs when associated with the H275Y mutation in the NA. Concomitant emergence of the I223R and H275Y mutations under oseltamivir treatment underlines

  20. Island Cotton Enhanced Disease Susceptibility 1 Gene Encoding a Lipase-Like Protein Plays a Crucial Role in Response to Verticillium dahliae by Regulating the SA Level and H2O2 Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhang; Xingfen, Wang; Wei, Rong; Jun, Yang; Zhiying, Ma

    2016-01-01

    Cotton is one of the most economically important crops, but most cultivated varieties lack adequate innate immunity or resistance to Verticillium wilt. This results in serious losses to both yield and fiber quality. To identify the genetic resources for innate immunity and understand the pathways for pathogen defenses in this crop, here we focus on orthologs of the central Arabidopsis thaliana defense regulator Enhanced Disease Susceptibility 1 (EDS1). The full-length cDNA of GbEDS1 was obtained by screening the full-length cDNA library of Gossypium barbadense combining with RACE strategy. Its open reading frame is 1848 bp long, encoding 615 amino acid residues. Sequence analysis showed that GbEDS1 contains a conserved N-terminal lipase domain and an EDS1-specific KNEDT motif. Expression profiling indicated that the gene is induced by Verticillium dahliae as well as salicylic acid (SA) treatment. Subcellular localization assays revealed that GbEDS1 is located in the cell cytoplasm and nucleus. Overexpression of GbEDS1 in Arabidopsis dramatically up-regulated SA and H2O2 production, resulting in enhanced disease resistance to V. dahliae. Silencing of GbEDS1 in G. barbadense significantly decreased SA and H2O2 accumulation, leading to the cotton more susceptibility. Moreover, combining the gene expression results from transgenic Arabidopsis and silenced-GbEDS1 cotton, it indicated that GbEDS1 could activate GbNDR1 and GbBAK1 expression. These findings not only broaden our knowledge about the biological role of GbEDS1, but also provide new insights into the defense mechanisms of GbEDS1 against V. dahliae in cotton. PMID:28018374

  1. Shaken and stirred: mechanisms of ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Bader, Kenneth B; Gruber, Matthew J; Holland, Christy K

    2015-01-01

    The use of ultrasound and microbubbles as an effective adjuvant to thrombolytics has been reported in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. However, the specific mechanisms underlying ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis have yet to be elucidated. We present visual observations illustrating two mechanisms of ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis: acoustic cavitation and radiation force. An in vitro flow model was developed to observe human whole blood clots exposed to human fresh-frozen plasma, recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (0, 0.32, 1.58 or 3.15 μg/mL) and the ultrasound contrast agent Definity (2 μL/mL). Intermittent, continuous-wave ultrasound (120 kHz, 0.44 MPa peak-to-peak pressure) was used to insonify the perfusate. Ultraharmonic emissions indicative of stable cavitation were monitored with a passive cavitation detector. The clot was observed with an inverted microscope, and images were recorded with a charge-coupled device camera. The images were post-processed to determine the time-dependent clot diameter and root-mean-square velocity of the clot position. Clot lysis occurred preferentially surrounding large, resonant-sized bubbles undergoing stable oscillations. Ultraharmonic emissions from stable cavitation were found to correlate with the lytic rate. Clots were observed to translate synchronously with the initiation and cessation of the ultrasound exposure. The root-mean-square velocity of the clot correlated with the lytic rate. These data provide visual documentation of stable cavitation activity and radiation force during sub-megahertz sonothrombolysis. The observations of this study suggest that the process of clot lysis is complex, and both stable cavitation and radiation force are mechanistically responsible for this beneficial bio-effect in this in vitro model.

  2. Disruption of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Lipid Transfer Protein Gene Altered Cuticular Lipid Composition, Increased Plastoglobules, and Enhanced Susceptibility to Infection by the Fungal Pathogen Alternaria brassicicola1[W

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Saet Buyl; Go, Young Sam; Bae, Hyun-Jong; Park, Jong Ho; Cho, Sung Ho; Cho, Hong Joo; Lee, Dong Sook; Park, Ohkmae K.; Hwang, Inhwan; Suh, Mi Chung

    2009-01-01

    All aerial parts of vascular plants are covered with cuticular waxes, which are synthesized by extensive export of intracellular lipids from epidermal cells to the surface. Although it has been suggested that plant lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are involved in cuticular lipid transport, the in planta evidence is still not clear. In this study, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored LTP (LTPG1) showing higher expression in epidermal peels of stems than in stems was identified from an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome-wide microarray analysis. The expression of LTPG1 was observed in various tissues, including the epidermis, stem cortex, vascular bundles, mesophyll cells, root tips, pollen, and early-developing seeds. LTPG1 was found to be localized in the plasma membrane. Disruption of the LTPG1 gene caused alterations of cuticular lipid composition, but no significant changes on total wax and cutin monomer loads were seen. The largest reduction (10 mass %) in the ltpg1 mutant was observed in the C29 alkane, which is the major component of cuticular waxes in the stems and siliques. The reduced content was overcome by increases of the C29 secondary alcohols and C29 ketone wax loads. The ultrastructure analysis of ltpg1 showed a more diffuse cuticular layer structure, protrusions of the cytoplasm into the vacuole in the epidermis, and an increase of plastoglobules in the stem cortex and leaf mesophyll cells. Furthermore, the ltpg1 mutant was more susceptible to infection by the fungus Alternaria brassicicola than the wild type. Taken together, these results indicated that LTPG1 contributed either directly or indirectly to cuticular lipid accumulation. PMID:19321705

  3. The clot gene of Drosophila melanogaster encodes a conserved member of the thioredoxin-like protein superfamily.

    PubMed

    Giordano, E; Peluso, I; Rendina, R; Digilio, A; Furia, M

    2003-02-01

    The conversion of pyruvoyl-H(4)-pterin to pyrimidodiazepine (PDA), which is an essential step in the biosynthesis of the red components of Drosophila eye pigments known as drosopterins, requires the products of the genes sepia and clot. While the product of sepia has been shown to correspond to the enzyme PDA-synthase, the role of clot remains unknown, although the clot(1) allele was one of the first eye-color mutants to be isolated in Drosophila melanogaster,and much genetic and biochemical data has become available since. Here we report the cloning of the clot gene, describe its molecular organization and characterize the sequence alterations associated with the alleles cl(1) and cl(2). The coding properties of the gene show that it encodes a protein related to the Glutaredoxin class of the Thioredoxin-like enzyme superfamily, conserved members of which are found in human, mouse and plants. We suggest that the Clot protein is an essential component of a glutathione redox system required for the final step in the biosynthetic pathway for drosopterins.

  4. Ultrastructural characteristics of fibrin clots from canine and feline platelet concentrates activated with calcium gluconate or calcium gluconate plus batroxobin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to use transmission electron microscopy to describe the ultrastructural characteristics of clots obtained from canine and feline platelet concentrates (PC) that had been activated with calcium gluconate (CG) or CG plus batroxobin (CGB). Platelets from fibrin clots were classified according their morphological changes. The area of the intercellular space (μm2), the area of the fibrin fibers (μm2), and the width of the fibrin fibers (μm) were determined for the dog clots. The platelet area (μm2), the area of fibrin fibers (μm2), the ratio of the minor and major axes of platelets, the ratio of the major and minor axes of platelets, and the number of α-granules found within platelets were measured for the cat clots. Results Cat platelets displayed full activation. Dog platelets displayed lysis with loss of normal architecture. In both species, a statistically significant difference was found (P < 0.01) between the fibrin fiber measurements in the PC clots activated with CG and CGB. Conclusions The findings suggest that activation with CG caused platelet alpha granules to release their contents. In cats, fibrin production was greater when the PC was activated with CG. In dogs, activation with CG produced thick fibrin fibers. PMID:23587176

  5. Excess selenium increases Ca sup ++ -induced clotting times in chicks and rats

    SciTech Connect

    Herz, W.C.; Combs, G.F. Jr. )

    1991-03-11

    Calcium (Ca{sup ++})-induced clotting times (i.e., prothrombin times, PT times) in young White Leghorn chickens and male weanling Sprague Dawley rats were shown to be elevated in animals fed diets for 20-30 days containing excess Se. Clotting times of chicks were prolonged from those of controls in animals fed either deficient or excess Se, although all dietary treatment groups showed comparable concentrations of total plasma protein. Rats showed significantly prolonged PT times when fed Se at either 5 ppm or 10 ppm. The plasma activities of certain enzymes of hepatic origin (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase) in rats fed excess Se were comparable to those of controls, despite the increase in the PT times. Body weights and liver weights were significantly depressed in those animals only at the 10 ppm Se level. These results demonstrate increased PT times in both chicks and rats. In each species, this effect is independent of feed intake and body weight, and is apparent at levels of Se intake that do not affect other indicators of hepatic damage. Therefore, prolonged PT time may be an early indicator of sub-acute selenosis.

  6. Enzymic dephosphorylation of bovine casein to improve acid clotting properties and digestibility for infant formula.

    PubMed

    Li-Chan, E; Nakai, S

    1989-01-01

    To improve acid clotting properties, enzymic dephosphorylation of caseins with calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase (CAP) or potato acid phosphatase (PAP) was investigated. Greater dephosphorylation was achieved using alpha s1- or beta-casein as substrates, compared to whole casein or skim milk. Electrophoresis of PAP-modified caseins revealed bands with lower mobility and a multibanded pattern in the beta-casein region which was similar to that of human beta-casein. On the other hand, CAP modification produced electrophoretic bands having lower mobility of the beta-casein component, but with higher mobility in the alpha s1-casein component as well as increased net negative charge in the CAP-casein. PAP-casein formed a fine dispersion upon acidification to pH 4, with a microstructure similar to that of acidified human casein. Greater initial rates of hydrolysis by pepsin at pH 4 were observed for both CAP- and PAP-modified caseins, compared to bovine and human caseins. The rate and extent of hydrolysis remained high for CAP-casein but tended to level off with PAP-casein during sequential digestion with pepsin and pancreatin. There may be advantages in the use of partial dephosphorylation to improve acid clotting and digestibility properties of bovine casein for infant feeding.

  7. Purification and characterization of a milk-clotting aspartic proteinase from globe artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.).

    PubMed

    Llorente, Berta E; Brutti, Cristina B; Caffini, Néstor O

    2004-12-29

    The study of proteinase expression in crude extracts from different organs of the globe artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) disclosed that enzymes with proteolytic and milk-clotting activity are mainly located in mature flowers. Maximum proteolytic activity was recorded at pH 5.0, and inhibition studies showed that only pepstatin, specific for aspartic proteinases, presented a significant inhibitory effect. Such properties, in addition to easy enzyme inactivation by moderate heating, make this crude protease extract potentially useful for cheese production. Adsorption with activated carbon, together with anion exchange and affinity chromatography, led to the isolation of a heterodimeric milk-clotting proteinase consisting of 30- and 15-kDa subunits. MALDI-TOF MS of the 15-kDa chain determined a 15.358-Da mass, and the terminal amino sequence presented 96% homology with the smaller cardosin A subunit. The amino terminal sequence of the 30-kDa chain proved to be identical to the larger cardosin A subunit. Electrophoresis evidenced proteinase self-processing that was confirmed by immunoblots presenting 62-, 30-, and 15-kDa bands.

  8. Platelet factor 4 (CXCL4) seals blood clots by altering the structure of fibrin.

    PubMed

    Amelot, Aymeric A; Tagzirt, Madjid; Ducouret, Guylaine; Kuen, René Lai; Le Bonniec, Bernard F

    2007-01-05

    Platelet factor-4 (PF4/CXCL4) is an orphan chemokine released in large quantities in the vicinity of growing blood clots. Coagulation of plasma supplemented with a matching amount of PF4 results in a translucent jelly-like clot. Saturating amounts of PF4 reduce the porosity of the fibrin network 4.4-fold and decrease the values of the elastic and loss moduli by 31- and 59-fold, respectively. PF4 alters neither the cleavage of fibrinogen by thrombin nor the cross-linking of protofibrils by activated factor XIII but binds to fibrin and dramatically transforms the structure of the ensuing network. Scanning electron microscopy showed that PF4 gives rise to a previously unreported pattern of polymerization where fibrin assembles to form a sealed network. The subunits constituting PF4 form a tetrahedron having at its corners a RPRH motif that mimics (in reverse orientation) the Gly-His-Arg-Pro-amide peptides that co-crystallize with fibrin. Molecular modeling showed that PF4 could be docked to fibrin with remarkable complementarities and absence of steric clashes, allowing the assembly of irregular polymers. Consistent with this hypothesis, as little as 50 microm the QVRPRHIT peptide derived from PF4 affects the polymerization of fibrin.

  9. Association of Cortical Vein Filling with Clot Location and Clinical Outcomes in Acute Ischaemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskar, Sonu; Bivard, Andrew; Stanwell, Peter; Attia, John R.; Parsons, Mark; Nilsson, Michael; Levi, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Delay in cortical vein filling during the late-venous phase (delayed-LCVF) is characterized by opacification of cerebral veins despite contrast clearance from contralateral veins on dynamic computed tomography angiography (dCTA) in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients. The aim of the study was to investigate the associations of delayed-LCVF with clot location, reperfusion status at 24 hours, and 90-days functional outcome in AIS patients who received reperfusion therapy. A prospective cohort of AIS patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis was studied. Groupwise comparison, univariate, and multivariate regression analyses were used to study the association of delayed-LCVF with clot location and clinical outcomes. Of 93 patients (mean age = 72 ± 12 years) with hemispheric AIS included in the study, 46 (49%) demonstrated delayed-LCVF. Patients with delayed-LCVF demonstrated a significantly higher proportion of proximal occlusion (72% vs 13%, P =< 0.0001), and poor reperfusion at 24 hours (41% vs 11%, P = 0.001). The proportion of poor functional outcome at 90 days was not significantly different (22/56 (48%) vs 17/61 (36%), P = 0.297). The appearance of delayed-LCVF on baseline dCTA may be a surrogate for large vessel occlusion, and an early marker for poor 24-hour angiographic reperfusion. PMID:27917948

  10. Microglial reaction in focal cerebral ischaemia induced by intra-carotid homologous clot injection.

    PubMed

    Ng, Y K; Ling, E A

    2001-01-01

    This study examined the microglial reaction in a simulated thrombo-embolus ischaemia in rats given an intracarotid injection of a suspension of homologous blood clot. All rats including the controls receiving vehicle injection were perfused at 5 hours, and 1, 3 and 7 days post-operation. The brains were removed and processed for immunohistochemistry using a panel of monoclonal antibodies: OX-42, OX-18 and OX-6 for labeling of microglia. In rats given saline injection OX-42 immunoreactive microglial cells were observed to be distributed quite evenly throughout the whole brain. When injection of clot suspension was given, microglial cells responded vigorously, particularly in the ipsilateral hippocampus. Microglial reaction was also detected in the ipsilateral cerebral cortex, caudate as well as septal nuclei. The majority of the detected reactive microglial cells were hypertrophied showing thick or stout processes. Some rod-like and amoeboid microglia were also observed. Rarely did the reactive microglia express OX-6 immunoreactivity. All microglial cells were unreactive for OX-18. The actual mechanisms leading to the microglial activation as well as functions of reactive microglia in focal cerebral ischaemia remain speculative. In the absence of direct evidence, it could only be suggested that they may act as sensor cells for detection of subtle alterations in the microenvironment, probably in response to focal ischaemia and/or leakage of serum-derived factors induced by thrombo-embolus stroke.

  11. Effects of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 on erythrocytes, platelets and clot viscoelasticity

    PubMed Central

    Bester, Janette; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2016-01-01

    Complex interactions exist between cytokines, and the interleukin family plays a fundamental role in inflammation. Particularly circulating IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 are unregulated in systemic and chronic inflammatory conditions. Hypercoagulability is an important hallmark of inflammation, and these cytokines are critically involved in abnormal clot formation, erythrocyte pathology and platelet hyper-activation, and these three cytokines have known receptors on platelets. Although these cytokines are always unregulated in inflammation, we do not know how the individual cytokines act upon the structure of erythrocytes and platelets, and which of the viscoelastic clot parameters are changed. Here we study the effects of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 at low physiological levels, representative of chronic inflammation, by using scanning electron microscopy and thromboelastography. All three interleukins caused the viscoelastic properties to display an increased hypercoagulability of whole blood and pathology of both erythrocytes and platelets. The most pronounced changes were noted where all three cytokines caused platelet hyper-activation and spreading. Erythrocyte structure was notably affected in the presence of IL-8, where the morphological changes resembled that typically seen in eryptosis (programmed cell death). We suggest that erythrocytes and platelets are particularly sensitive to cytokine presence, and that they are excellent health indicators. PMID:27561337

  12. Closed cycle MHD generator with nonuniform gas-plasma flow driving recombinated plasma clots

    SciTech Connect

    Slavin, V.S.; Danilov, V.V.; Sokolov, V.S.

    1996-12-31

    A new concept of a closed cycle MHD generator without alkali seed has been suggested. The essence of it is the phenomenon of frozen conductivity for recombined plasma which appears for noble gas at T{sub e} > 4,000 K. At the inlet of the MHD channel in supersonic flow of noble gas (He or Ar) the plasma clots with electron density about 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}3} are formed by pulsed intense electron beam with energy about 300 keV. Gas flow drives these clots in a cross magnetic field along the MHD channel which has electrodes connected with the load by Faraday scheme. The gas flow pushes plasma layers and produces electric power at the expense of enthalpy extraction. The numerical simulation has shown that a supersonic gas flow, containing about 4 plasma layers in the MHD channel simultaneously, is braked without shock waves creation. This type of the MHD generator can provide more than 30% enthalpy extraction ratio and about 80% isentropic efficiency. The advantages of the new concept are the following: (a) possibility of working at higher pressure and lower temperature, (b) operation with alkali seed.

  13. Clot Lysis and Antimitotic Study of Ficus glomerata Roxb Fruit Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Shivasharanappa, Kirankumar; Londonkar, Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the thrombolytic and antimitotic potentiality of various extracts of fruits of Ficus glomerata, a traditional medicinal plant, using an in vitro assay method. Three crude extracts such as petroleum ether (FGPE), chloroform (FGCE), and methanol (FGME) were used for the study, with a standard (streptokinase) and negative control (sterile distilled water) to validate the method. The thrombolytic nature of the plant was found significant with methanol extract and chloroform and petroleum ether extracts have recorded mild activity, when compared with the negative control (sterile distilled water). The extracts have shown mild clot lysis, that is, 2.16%, 23.06%, 27.60%, and 47.74% of sterile distilled water, FGPE, FGCE, and FGME, respectively, while the standard (streptokinase) has shown 74.22% clot lysis. FGME inhibited the root growth in number as well as length effectively, followed by FGPE, while FGCE exhibited moderate antimitotic activity and it was supported by mitotic index. Therefore, the obtained results suggest that among all the extracts of plant the methanolic extract has shown highest thrombolytic and antimitotic activity. PMID:25006495

  14. Methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin enhances the susceptibility of human breast cancer cells to carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil: Involvement of Akt, NF-{kappa}B and Bcl-2

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Ankur Kumar; Singh, Sandeep; Chhipa, Rishi Raj; Vijayakumar, Maleppillil Vavachan; Ajay, Amrendra Kumar; Bhat, Manoj Kumar . E-mail: manojkbhat@nccs.res.in

    2006-10-15

    The response rates of extensively used chemotherapeutic drugs, carboplatin (Carb) or 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) are relatively disappointing because of considerable side effects associated with their high-dose regimen. In the present study, we determined whether treatment with a cholesterol depleting agent, methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin (MCD), enhances the weak efficacy of low doses of Carb or 5-FU in human breast cancer cells. Data demonstrate that pretreatment with MCD significantly potentiates the cytotoxic activity of Carb and 5-FU in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. Furthermore, we explored the molecular basis of enhanced cytotoxicity, and our data revealed that low-dose treatment with these drugs in MCD pretreated cells exhibited significantly decreased Akt phosphorylation, NF-{kappa}B activity and down-regulation in expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. In addition, MCD pretreated cells demonstrated an increased intracellular drug accumulation as compared to cells treated with drugs alone. Taken together, our data provide the basis for potential therapeutic application of MCD in combination with other conventional cytotoxic drugs to facilitate reduction of drug dosage that offers a better chemotherapeutic approach with low toxicity.

  15. A Model Incorporating Some of the Mechanical and Biochemical Factors Underlying Clot Formation and Dissolution in Flowing Blood

    DOE PAGES

    Anand, M.; Rajagopal, K.; Rajagopal, K. R.

    2003-01-01

    Multiple interacting mechanisms control the formation and dissolution of clots to maintain blood in a state of delicate balance. In addition to a myriad of biochemical reactions, rheological factors also play a crucial role in modulating the response of blood to external stimuli. To date, a comprehensive model for clot formation and dissolution, that takes into account the biochemical, medical and rheological factors, has not been put into place, the existing models emphasizing either one or the other of the factors. In this paper, after discussing the various biochemical, physiologic and rheological factors at some length, we develop a modelmore » for clot formation and dissolution that incorporates many of the relevant crucial factors that have a bearing on the problem. The model, though just a first step towards understanding a complex phenomenon, goes further than previous models in integrating the biochemical, physiologic and rheological factors that come into play.« less

  16. Recurring Extracorporeal Circuit Clotting During Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy Resolved after Single-Session Therapeutic Plasma Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Fülöp, Tibor; Cosmin, Adrian; Juncos, Luis A.

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of a 17 year old white male with multiple fractures and multi-organ failure who developed oliguric acute renal failure requiring continuous renal replacement therapy. Repeated clotting of the extracorporeal circuit (ECC) prevented delivery of a minimally acceptable dose of renal replacement therapy despite adequate anticoagulation and dialysis catheter exchanges. Evaluation for a primary hypercoagulable state was negative, but his fibrinogen was elevated (1,320 mg/dL, normal range: 150–400 mg/dL), likely induced by his severe inflammatory state. A single session of therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) with albumin and normal saline replacement was performed with subsequent drop in fibrinogen to 615 mg/dL. No further episodes of premature ECC clotting occurred, suggesting plasma factor(s) removed may have contributed to the clinical hypercoagulable state. TPE may play an adjunctive role in select cases of recurrent ECC clotting refractory to current anticoagulation techniques. PMID:21618596

  17. Acute small bowel obstruction due to a large intraluminal blood clot after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jessica; Ikuine, Tomoko; Hacker, Shoshana; Urrego, Hernan; Tuggle, Karleena

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel obstructions (SBOs) are a known perioperative complication of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and common etiologies include internal hernia, port site hernia, jejunojejunostomy stricture, ileus and adhesions. Less commonly, SBO can be caused by superior mesenteric artery syndrome, intussusception and intraluminal blood clot. We present a case of SBO caused by intraluminal blood clot from jejunojejunostomy staple line bleeding in a patient with a normal coagulation profile. Computed tomography was used to elucidate the cause of perioperative SBO, and diagnostic laparoscopy was used to both diagnose and treat the complication. In this case, the intraluminal clot was evacuated laparoscopically by enterotomy, thrombectomy and primary closure without anastomotic revision since there was no evidence of continued bleeding. Administration of enoxaparin and Toradol post-operatively may have exacerbated mild intraluminal bleeding occurring at the stapled jejunojejunal anastomosis. Prompt recognition and treatment of perioperative SBO can prevent catastrophic consequences related to bowel perforation. PMID:27554828

  18. Incorporation of marine lipids into mitochondrial membranes increases susceptibility to damage by calcium and reactive oxygen species: evidence for enhanced activation of phospholipase A2 in mitochondria enriched with n-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Malis, C D; Weber, P C; Leaf, A; Bonventre, J V

    1990-01-01

    Experiments were designed to evaluate the susceptibility of mitochondrial membranes enriched with n-3 fatty acids to damage by Ca2+ and reactive oxygen species. Fatty acid content and respiratory function were assessed in renal cortical mitochondria isolated from fish-oil- and beef-tallow-fed rats. Dietary fish oils were readily incorporated into mitochondrial membranes. After exposure to Ca2+ and reactive oxygen species, mitochondria enriched in n-3 fatty acids, and using pyruvate and malate as substrates, had significantly greater changes in state 3 and uncoupled respirations, when compared with mitochondria from rats fed beef tallow. Mitochondrial site 1 (NADH coenzyme Q reductase) activity was reduced to 45 and 85% of control values in fish-oil- and beef-tallow-fed groups, respectively. Exposure to Ca2+ and reactive oxygen species enhance the release of polyunsaturated fatty acids enriched at the sn-2 position of phospholipids from mitochondria of fish-oil-fed rats when compared with similarly treated mitochondria of beef-tallow-fed rats. This release of fatty acids was partially inhibited by dibucaine, the phospholipase A2 inhibitor, which we have previously shown to protect mitochondria against damage associated with Ca2+ and reactive oxygen species. The results indicate that phospholipase A2 is activated in mitochondria exposed to Ca2+ and reactive oxygen species and is responsible, at least in part, for the impairment of respiratory function. Phospholipase A2 activity and mitochondrial damage are enhanced when mitochondrial membranes are enriched with n-3 fatty acids. PMID:2123344

  19. Accuracy of percentage of signal intensity recovery and relative cerebral blood volume derived from dynamic susceptibility-weighted, contrast-enhanced MRI in the preoperative diagnosis of cerebral tumours

    PubMed Central

    Steel, Timothy; Chaganti, Joga

    2015-01-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for diagnosis of cerebral tumours, and has become an increasingly powerful tool for their evaluation; however, the diagnosis of common contrast-enhancing lesions can be challenging, as it is sometimes impossible to differentiate them using conventional imaging. Histopathological analysis of biopsy specimens is the gold standard for diagnosis; however, there are significant risks associated with the invasive procedure and definitive diagnosis is not always achieved. Early accurate diagnosis is important, as management differs accordingly. Advanced MRI techniques have increasing utility for aiding diagnosis in a variety of clinical scenarios. Dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced (DSC) MRI is a perfusion imaging technique and a potentially important tool for the characterisation of cerebral tumours. The percentage of signal intensity recovery (PSR) and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) derived from DSC MRI provide information about tumour capillary permeability and neoangiogenesis, which can be used to characterise tumour type and grade, and distinguish tumour recurrence from treatment-related effects. Therefore, PSR and rCBV potentially represent a non-invasive means of diagnosis; however, the clinical utility of these parameters has yet to be established. We present a review of the literature to date. PMID:26475485

  20. Hemostatic, milk clotting and blood stain removal potential of cysteine proteases from Calotropis gigantea (L.) R. Br. Latex

    PubMed Central

    Bindhu, Omana Sukumaran; Singh, Maheshwari Kumari

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Plant latex is a natural source of biologically active compounds and several hydrolytic enzymes responsible for their diverse health benefits. Recent past has witnessed substantial progress in understanding their supplementary industrial and pharmaceutical utility. Calotropis gigantea is one of the important latex producing plants belonging to asclepediaceae family with wide ethnopharmacological applications and is rich in proteolytic enzymes. Present study investigates hemostatic, milk clotting and blood stain removal potential of C. gigantea latex proteases. Materials and Methods: The protease activity of crude enzyme (CE), obtained by centrifugation followed by ammonium sulphate precipitation and dialysis, was assayed using casein as the substrate. Effect of pH, temperature and specific inhibitors on protease activity was determined. Native PAGE and in gel protease activity of CE was performed. Hemostatic (Fibrinogen polymerization, fibrinogen agarose plate and blood clot lysis assays), milk clotting and blood stain removal efficacies of CE were determined. Results: CE exhibited high caseinolytic activity. Enzyme activity was optimum at 37-50ºC and pH 8.0. Fibrinogen polymerization assay showed concentration dependent increase in turbidity indicating thrombin like activity which was further confirmed by fibrinogen agarose plate assays. Clot lysis assay indicated 92.41% thrombolysis by CE in 90 min. CE also revealed significantly high ratio of milk clotting to protease activity (Milk Clotting Index, MCI = 827.59 ± 1.52). Complete destaining of blood stained fabric was observed when incubated with 1% detergent incorporated with 0.1mg/ml CE. The study highlights and validates the compound application potential of latex cysteine proteases from C. gigantea. PMID:24991114

  1. Saliva-Induced Clotting Captures Streptococci: Novel Roles for Coagulation and Fibrinolysis in Host Defense and Immune Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Tirthankar; Karlsson, Christofer; Mörgelin, Matthias; Frick, Inga-Maria; Malmström, Johan; Björck, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcal pharyngitis is among the most common bacterial infections, but the molecular mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. Here we investigate the interactions among three major players in streptococcal pharyngitis: streptococci, plasma, and saliva. We find that saliva activates the plasma coagulation system through both the extrinsic and the intrinsic pathways, entrapping the bacteria in fibrin clots. The bacteria escape the clots by activating host plasminogen. Our results identify a potential function for the intrinsic pathway of coagulation in host defense and a corresponding role for fibrinolysis in streptococcal immune evasion. PMID:27456827

  2. Depletion of Dendritic Cells Enhances Susceptibility to Cell-Free Infection of Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 in CD11c-Diphtheria Toxin Receptor Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Saifur; Manuel, Sharrón L.; Khan, Zafar K.; Wigdahl, Brian; Acheampong, Edward; Tangy, Frederic; Jain, Pooja

    2010-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is associated with two immunologically distinct diseases: HTLV-1–associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis and adult T cell leukemia. The genesis of these diseases is believed to be associated with the route (mucosa versus blood) and mode (cell-free versus cell-associated) of primary infection as well as the modulation of dendritic cell (DC) functions. To explore the role of DCs during early HTLV-1 infection invivo, we used a chimeric HTLV-1 with a replaced envelope gene from Moloney murine leukemia virus to allow HTLV-1 to fuse with murine cells, which are generally not susceptible to infection with human retroviruses. We also used a CD11c-diphtheria toxin receptor transgenic mouse model system that permits conditional transient depletion of CD11c+ DCs. We infected these transgenic mice with HTLV-1 using both cell-free and cell-associated infection routes in the absence and presence of DCs. The ablation of DCs led to an enhanced susceptibility to infection with cell-free but not cell-associated HTLV-1 in both CD4 and non-CD4 fractions, as measured by the proviral load. Infection with cell-free virus in the absence of DCs was also found to have increased levels of Tax mRNA in the non-CD4 fraction. Moreover, depletion of DCs significantly dampened the cellular immune response (IFN-γ+CD8+ T cells) against both cell-free and cell-associated virus. These results uniquely differentiate the involvement of DCs in early cell-free versus late cell-associated infection of HTLV-1 and highlight a significant aspect of viral immunopathogenesis related to the progression of adult T cell leukemia and HTLV-1–associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis after the initial infection. PMID:20382884

  3. Inhibition of constitutively activated phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT pathway enhances antitumor activity of chemotherapeutic agents in breast cancer susceptibility gene 1-defective breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yi, Yong Weon; Kang, Hyo Jin; Kim, Hee Jeong; Hwang, Jae Seok; Wang, Antai; Bae, Insoo

    2013-09-01

    Loss or decrease of wild type BRCA1 function, by either mutation or reduced expression, has a role in hereditary and sporadic human breast and ovarian cancers. We report here that the PI3K/AKT pathway is constitutively active in BRCA1-defective human breast cancer cells. Levels of phospho-AKT are sustained even after serum starvation in breast cancer cells carrying deleterious BRCA1 mutations. Knockdown of BRCA1 in MCF7 cells increases the amount of phospho-AKT and sensitizes cells to small molecule protein kinase inhibitors (PKIs) targeting the PI3K/AKT pathway. Restoration of wild type BRCA1 inhibits the activated PI3K/AKT pathway and de-sensitizes cells to PKIs targeting this pathway in BRCA1 mutant breast cancer cells, regardless of PTEN mutations. In addition, clinical PI3K/mTOR inhibitors, PI-103, and BEZ235, showed anti-proliferative effects on BRCA1 mutant breast cancer cell lines and synergism in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs, cisplatin, doxorubicin, topotecan, and gemcitabine. BEZ235 synergizes with the anti-proliferative effects of gemcitabine by enhancing caspase-3/7 activity. Our results suggest that the PI3K/AKT pathway can be an important signaling pathway for the survival of BRCA1-defective breast cancer cells and pharmacological inhibition of this pathway is a plausible treatment for a subset of breast cancers.

  4. Blocking miRNA Biogenesis in Adult Forebrain Neurons Enhances Seizure Susceptibility, Fear Memory, and Food Intake by Increasing Neuronal Responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Fiorenza, Anna; Lopez-Atalaya, Jose P; Rovira, Victor; Scandaglia, Marilyn; Geijo-Barrientos, Emilio; Barco, Angel

    2016-04-01

    The RNase Dicer is essential for the maturation of most microRNAs, a molecular system that plays an essential role in fine-tuning gene expression. To gain molecular insight into the role of Dicer and the microRNA system in brain function, we conducted 2 complementary RNA-seq screens in the hippocampus of inducible forebrain-restricted Dicer1 mutants aimed at identifying the microRNAs primarily affected by Dicer loss and their targets, respectively. Functional genomics analyses predicted the main biological processes and phenotypes associated with impaired microRNA maturation, including categories related to microRNA biology, signal transduction, seizures, and synaptic transmission and plasticity. Consistent with these predictions, we found that, soon after recombination, Dicer-deficient mice exhibited an exaggerated seizure response, enhanced induction of immediate early genes in response to different stimuli, stronger and more stable fear memory, hyperphagia, and increased excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons. In the long term, we also observed slow and progressive excitotoxic neurodegeneration. Overall, our results indicate that interfering with microRNA biogenesis causes an increase in neuronal responsiveness and disrupts homeostatic mechanisms that protect the neuron against overactivation, which may explain both the initial and late phenotypes associated with the loss of Dicer in excitatory neurons.

  5. Shaken and stirred: mechanisms of ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Kenneth B.; Gruber, Matthew J.; Holland, Christy K.

    2014-01-01

    The use of ultrasound and microbubbles as an effective adjuvant to thrombolytics has been demonstrated in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo. However, the specific mechanisms of ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis (UET) have yet to be elucidated. We present visual observations illustrating two mechanisms of UET: acoustic cavitation and radiation force. An in vitro flow model was developed to observe human whole blood clots exposed to human fresh-frozen plasma, rt-PA (0, 0.32, 1.58, or 3.15 μg/mL), and the ultrasound contrast agent Definity® (2 μL/mL). Intermittent, continuous-wave, ultrasound (120 kHz, 0.44 MPa peak-to-peak pressure) was used to insonify the perfusate. Ultraharmonic (UH) emissions indicative of stable cavitation were monitored with a passive cavitation detector. The clot was observed with an inverted microscope, and images were recorded with a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The images were post processed to determine the time-dependent clot diameter and root-mean-square velocity of the clot position. Clot lysis occurred preferentially surrounding large, resonant-sized bubbles undergoing stable oscillations. UH emissions from stable cavitation were found to correlate with the lytic rate. Clots were observed to translate synchronously with the initiation and cessation of the ultrasound exposure. The root-mean-square velocity of the clot correlated with the lytic rate. These data provide visual documentation of stable cavitation activity and radiation force during sub-megahertz sonothrombolysis. The observations of this study suggest that the process of clot lysis is complex, and both stable cavitation and radiation force are mechanistically responsible for this beneficial bioeffect in this in vitro model. PMID:25438846

  6. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility: Measurement schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham John; Stupavsky, Mike

    The precision of AMS determination is enhanced by measuring susceptibility in directions with a uniform orientation distribution that include the four body diagonals. Some standard 10.5 cm³ samples with mean susceptibility < 100µSI possess too few “magnetic” grains for reliable petrofabric interpretation whatever the measurement strategy. We should only interpret their AMS if they pass fabric homogeneity tests.

  7. Blood Clotting-Inspired Control of Single-Chain Molecules in Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sing, Charles; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2011-03-01

    Recent experimental evidence has demonstrated a clear link between mechanical stimuli and the activation of von Willebrand Factor (vWF), a protein that plays a critical role in the blood clotting cascade. This protein exhibits counter-intuitive conformational and adsorption responses that suggest novel ways of controlling the single-chain dynamics of polymer chains. Specifically, we are using simulation and theoretical approaches to elucidate the fundamental physics that govern globule-stretch transitions in collapsed polymers due to the effect of fluid flows. We begin to extend this general approach to the case of globule adsorption-desorption transitions in the presence of fluid flows, and demonstrate how kinetic considerations must be taken into account to describe the basic features of these transitions. We expect that these results will both allow the development of novel techniques for single-chain targeting and assembly and offer insight into the physiological behavior of vWF.

  8. Spirulan from blue-green algae inhibits fibrin and blood clots: its potent antithrombotic effects.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Hui; Kim, Seung; Kim, Sung-Jun

    2015-05-01

    We investigated in vitro and in vivo fibrinolytic and antithrombotic activity of spirulan and analyzed its partial biochemical properties. Spirulan, a sulfated polysaccharide from the blue-green alga Arthrospira platensis, exhibits antithrombotic potency. Spirulan showed a strong fibrin zymogram lysis band corresponding to its molecular mass. It specifically cleaved Aα and Bβ, the major chains of fibrinogen. Spirulan directly decreased the activity of thrombin and factor X activated (FXa), procoagulant proteins. In vitro assays using human fibrin and mouse blood clots showed fibrinolytic and hemolytic activities of spirulan. Spirulan (2 mg/kg) showed antithrombotic effects in the ferric chloride (FeCl3 )-induced carotid arterial thrombus model and collagen and epinephrine-induced pulmonary thromboembolism mouse model. These results may be attributable to the prevention of thrombus formation and partial lysis of thrombus. Therefore, we suggest that spirulan may be a potential antithrombotic agent for thrombosis-related diseases.

  9. Estimates of utility weights in hemophilia: implications for cost-utility analysis of clotting factor prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, Scott D; Chaugule, Shraddha S; Hay, Joel W

    2015-01-01

    Estimates of preference-weighted health outcomes or health state utilities are needed to assess improvements in health in terms of quality-adjusted life-years. Gains in quality-adjusted life-years are used to assess the cost–effectiveness of prophylactic use of clotting factor compared with on-demand treatment among people with hemophilia, a congenital bleeding disorder. Published estimates of health utilities for people with hemophilia vary, contributing to uncertainty in the estimates of cost–effectiveness of prophylaxis. Challenges in estimating utility weights for the purpose of evaluating hemophilia treatment include selection bias in observational data, difficulty in adjusting for predictors of health-related quality of life and lack of preference-based data comparing adults with lifetime or primary prophylaxis versus no prophylaxis living within the same country and healthcare system. PMID:25585817

  10. Proton NMR study of the state of water in fibrin gels, plasma, and blood clots

    SciTech Connect

    Blinc, A.; Lahajnar, G.; Blinc, R.; Zidansek, A.; Sepe, A. )

    1990-04-01

    A proton NMR relaxation and pulsed field gradient self-diffusion study of water in fibrin gels, plasma, and blood clots has been performed with special emphasis on the effect of the sol-gel and shrinkage transitions. Deuteron NMR in fibrin gels was also studied to supplement the proton data. It is shown that a measurement of the water proton or deuteron T1/T2 ratio allows for a determination of the bound water fraction in all these systems. The change in the T1/T2 ratio at the shrinkage transition further allows for a determination of the surface fractal dimension of the gel if the change in the volume of the gel is known. The self-diffusion coefficient of water in these systems, which determines the transport properties of the gel, is found to be proportional to the free water fraction in both the nonshrunken and shrunken state.

  11. Plasma clot-promoting effect of collagen in relation to collagen-platelet interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, P.A.; Schneider, M.D.; Miller, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    The hemostatic function of several acid-soluble collagen preparations and a fibrillar-form collagen preparation have been compared. Pepsin-treated acid-soluble collagen isolated from burro and horse aortic tissue and acid-soluble colagen isolated from human umbilical cord readily promoted platelet aggregation, but failed to activate the coagulation mechanism even after prolonged incubation with plasma at 37 C. By contrast, fibrillar-form collagen isolated from burro aorta was both an efficient stimulant for the induction of platelet aggregation and a potent clot-promoting agent. Similar results were found for all the collagen preparations irrespective of whether the studies were conducted with sheep or with burro plasma. Heat denaturation studies showed that the hemostatic functon of the fibrillar-form colagen was dependent on an intact tirple-helical structure.

  12. The euglobulin clot lysis time to assess the impact of nanoparticles on fibrinolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minet, Valentine; Alpan, Lutfiye; Mullier, François; Toussaint, Olivier; Lucas, Stéphane; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Laloy, Julie

    2015-07-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are developed for many applications in various fields, including nanomedicine. The NPs used in nanomedicine may disturb homeostasis in blood. Secondary hemostasis (blood coagulation) and fibrinolysis are complex physiological processes regulated by activators and inhibitors. An imbalance of this system can either lead to the development of hemorrhages or thrombosis. No data are currently available on the impact of NPs on fibrinolysis. The objectives of this study are (1) to select a screening test to study ex vivo the impact of NPs on fibrinolysis and (2) to test NPs with different physicochemical properties. Euglobulin clot lysis time test was selected to screen the impact of some NPs on fibrinolysis using normal pooled plasma. A dose-dependent decrease in the lysis time was observed with silicon dioxide and silver NPs without disturbing the fibrin network. Carbon black, silicon carbide, and copper oxide did not affect the lysis time at the tested concentrations.

  13. Purification and characterization of a novel milk-clotting metalloproteinase from Paenibacillus spp. BD3526.

    PubMed

    Hang, Feng; Wang, Qinbo; Hong, Qing; Liu, Peiyi; Wu, Zhengjun; Liu, Zhenmin; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a milk-clotting enzyme (MCE) isolated from Paenibacillus spp. BD3526 was purified and characterized. The MCE was purified 8.9-fold with a 10.11% recovery using ammonium sulfate precipitation and anion-exchange chromatography and the specific milk-clotting activity (MCA) reached 6791.73 SU/mg. The enzyme was characterized as a 35kDa metalloproteinase, and the zymogen of which was encoded by a 1671 bp gene named zinc metalloproteinase precursor (zmp) with a predicted molecular weight of 59.6 kDa. The optimal temperature for MCA and proteolytic activity (PA) was 65°C and 60°C, respectively. The enzyme was stable over a pH range of 5.0-9.0 and at temperatures below 50°C. The MCA was completely inactivated when the enzyme was heated at 60°C for 30 min, and the PA was totally inactivated for 20 and 10 min when the enzyme was heated at 55°C and 60°C, respectively. The BD3526 enzyme was preferentially active towards κ-casein (κ-CN) and β-casein (β-CN), as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels (SDS-PAGE), whereas the hydrolysis of αs-casein (αs-CN) was slow and comparable to that caused by chymosin and asparatic acid proteinase from Rhizomucor miehei. The cleavage site of the metalloproteinase in κ-CN was located at the Met106-Ala107 bond, as determined by mass spectrometry analysis.

  14. A portable blood plasma clot micro-elastometry device based on resonant acoustic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, C. R.; Li, Ling; Wolberg, Alisa S.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal blood clot stiffness is an important indicator of coagulation disorders arising from a variety of cardiovascular diseases and drug treatments. Here, we present a portable instrument for elastometry of microliter volume blood samples based upon the principle of resonant acoustic spectroscopy, where a sample of well-defined dimensions exhibits a fundamental longitudinal resonance mode proportional to the square root of the Young’s modulus. In contrast to commercial thromboelastography, the resonant acoustic method offers improved repeatability and accuracy due to the high signal-to-noise ratio of the resonant vibration. We review the measurement principles and the design of a magnetically actuated microbead force transducer applying between 23 pN and 6.7 nN, providing a wide dynamic range of elastic moduli (3 Pa–27 kPa) appropriate for measurement of clot elastic modulus (CEM). An automated and portable device, the CEMport, is introduced and implemented using a 2 nm resolution displacement sensor with demonstrated accuracy and precision of 3% and 2%, respectively, of CEM in biogels. Importantly, the small strains (<0.13%) and low strain rates (<1/s) employed by the CEMport maintain a linear stress-to-strain relationship which provides a perturbative measurement of the Young’s modulus. Measurements of blood plasma CEM versus heparin concentration show that CEMport is sensitive to heparin levels below 0.050 U/ml, which suggests future applications in sensing heparin levels of post-surgical cardiopulmonary bypass patients. The portability, high accuracy, and high precision of this device enable new clinical and animal studies for associating CEM with blood coagulation disorders, potentially leading to improved diagnostics and therapeutic monitoring. PMID:26233406

  15. Pathogen inactivation and removal methods for plasma-derived clotting factor concentrates.

    PubMed

    Klamroth, Robert; Gröner, Albrecht; Simon, Toby L

    2014-05-01

    Pathogen safety is crucial for plasma-derived clotting factor concentrates used in the treatment of bleeding disorders. Plasma, the starting material for these products, is collected by plasmapheresis (source plasma) or derived from whole blood donations (recovered plasma). The primary measures regarding pathogen safety are selection of healthy donors donating in centers with appropriate epidemiologic data for the main blood-transmissible viruses, screening donations for the absence of relevant infectious blood-borne viruses, and release of plasma pools for further processing only if they are nonreactive for serologic markers and nucleic acids for these viruses. Despite this testing, pathogen inactivation and/or removal during the manufacturing process of plasma-derived clotting factor concentrates is required to ensure prevention of transmission of infectious agents. Historically, hepatitis viruses and human immunodeficiency virus have posed the greatest threat to patients receiving plasma-derived therapy for treatment of hemophilia or von Willebrand disease. Over the past 30 years, dedicated virus inactivation and removal steps have been integrated into factor concentrate production processes, essentially eliminating transmission of these viruses. Manufacturing steps used in the purification of factor concentrates have also proved to be successful in reducing potential prion infectivity. In this review, current techniques for inactivation and removal of pathogens from factor concentrates are discussed. Ideally, production processes should involve a combination of complementary steps for pathogen inactivation and/or removal to ensure product safety. Finally, potential batch-to-batch contamination is avoided by stringent cleaning and sanitization methods as part of the manufacturing process.

  16. A portable blood plasma clot micro-elastometry device based on resonant acoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krebs, C. R.; Li, Ling; Wolberg, Alisa S.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2015-07-01

    Abnormal blood clot stiffness is an important indicator of coagulation disorders arising from a variety of cardiovascular diseases and drug treatments. Here, we present a portable instrument for elastometry of microliter volume blood samples based upon the principle of resonant acoustic spectroscopy, where a sample of well-defined dimensions exhibits a fundamental longitudinal resonance mode proportional to the square root of the Young's modulus. In contrast to commercial thromboelastography, the resonant acoustic method offers improved repeatability and accuracy due to the high signal-to-noise ratio of the resonant vibration. We review the measurement principles and the design of a magnetically actuated microbead force transducer applying between 23 pN and 6.7 nN, providing a wide dynamic range of elastic moduli (3 Pa-27 kPa) appropriate for measurement of clot elastic modulus (CEM). An automated and portable device, the CEMport, is introduced and implemented using a 2 nm resolution displacement sensor with demonstrated accuracy and precision of 3% and 2%, respectively, of CEM in biogels. Importantly, the small strains (<0.13%) and low strain rates (<1/s) employed by the CEMport maintain a linear stress-to-strain relationship which provides a perturbative measurement of the Young's modulus. Measurements of blood plasma CEM versus heparin concentration show that CEMport is sensitive to heparin levels below 0.050 U/ml, which suggests future applications in sensing heparin levels of post-surgical cardiopulmonary bypass patients. The portability, high accuracy, and high precision of this device enable new clinical and animal studies for associating CEM with blood coagulation disorders, potentially leading to improved diagnostics and therapeutic monitoring.

  17. Numerical investigation into blood clotting at the bone-dental implant interface in the presence of an electrical stimulus.

    PubMed

    Vanegas-Acosta, J C; Garzón-Alvarado, D A; Lancellotti, V

    2013-12-01

    The insertion of a dental implant activates a sequence of wound healing events ending with bone formation and implant osseointegration. This sequence starts with the blood coagulation process and the formation of a fibrin network that detains spilt blood. Fibrin formation can be simplified as the kinetic reaction between thrombin and fibrinogen preceding the conversion of fibrinogen into fibrin. Based on experimental observations of the electrical properties of these molecules, we present a hypothesis for the mechanism of a static electrical stimulus in controlling the formation of the blood clot. Specifically, the electrical stimulus increases the fibrin network formation in such a way that a preferential region of higher fibrin density is obtained. This hypothesis is validated by means of a numerical model for the blood clot formation at the bone-dental implant interface. Numerical results compare favorably to experimental observations for blood clotting with and without the static electrical stimulus. It is concluded that the density of the fibrin network depends on the strength of the static electrical stimulus, and that the blood clot formation has a preferential direction of formation in the presence of the electrical signal.

  18. Upregulation of CD54 and downregulation of HLA‑ABC contribute to the novel enhancement of the susceptibility of HL-60 cells to NK cell-mediated cytolysis induced by ATRA plus VPA.

    PubMed

    Zou, Huijuan; Li, Lianlian; Han, Yang; Ma, Ruiping; Liao, Qiong; Tian, Jing; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Ren, Xia; Song, Guanhua; Guo, Qiang; Li, Xia; Ding, Huifang; Jiang, Guosheng

    2017-01-01

    Enhancement of the susceptibility of HL-60 cells to NK cell-mediated cytolysis induced by all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) plus valproate (VPA) was evaluated. In addition to the synergistic effect of ATRA plus VPA on HL-60 cells, the optimal concentration of 1 mM VPA plus 0.5 µM ATRA increased the cytotoxic sensitivity of HL-60 cells to NK cells. The expression of the activated receptors NKp30 and NKG2D on NK-92 cells was higher compared with the levels noted for the other receptors, and the expression of NKG2D ligands MICA/B on HL-60 cells was not significantly upregulated in the ATRA plus VPA goup compared with the control. Moreover, it was observed that the ligands of NKp30 on HL-60 cells presented the same variation trend. As to the co-stimulatory and adhesion molecules on NK-92 and their ligands on HL-60 cells post exposure to ATRA and VPA alone or their combination, there was no obvious change in the expression of CD112, CD48 and CD70 on the HL-60 cells. However, the expression of CD54 on HL-60 cells was significantly upregulated. In contrast, the expression of NKG2A ligands HLA-ABC on HL-60 cells was obviously downregulated. In addition, the expression of HLA-E on the HL-60 cells in the group treated with ATRA plus VPA was not significantly increased. In conclusion, the combination of VPA and ATRA not only induced the differentiation of HL-60 cells, but also induced enhancement of the sensitivity of HL-60 cells to NK cells by downregulating the expression of HLA-ABC and upregulating the expression of CD54, but not MICA/MICB. The results provide experimental and theoretical basis for the clinical combination of a low-dose of ATRA plus VPA for the treatment of leukemia.

  19. Assessment of in-vitro cholinesterase inhibitory and thrombolytic potential of bark and seed extracts of Tamarindus indica (L.) relevant to the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and clotting disorders

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Kushal; Azad, A K; Sultana, Taposhi; Khan, Farzana; Hossain, Saiyara; Alam, Sanzida; Chowdhary, Rayhan; Khatun, Yasmin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Low level of acetylcholine (ACh) is an important hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a common type of progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Effective treatment strategies rely mostly on either enhancing the cholinergic function of the brain by improving the level of ACh from being a breakdown by cholinesterase enzymes. Again atherothrombosis is major life-threatening cerebral diseases. Traditionally Tamarindus indica (L.) has widely known for its medicinal values. Our aim is to investigate the cholinesterase inhibitory activities as well as thrombolytic activities of the bark and seeds crude methanolic extracts (CMEs) in the treatment of AD and clotting disorder. Materials and Methods: The crude methanol extract was prepared by cold extraction method and was assessed for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) inhibitory activities by the Ellman’s method. For thrombolytic activity clot lysis method was applied. Results: To compare both the fractions, extracts from the bark got more AChE inhibitory activity than the seed with the inhibitory concentration 50% IC50 values of 268.09 and 287.15 µg/ml, respectively. The inhibitory activity of BuChE was quiet similar to that of AChE as IC50 values of both the fractions were 201.25 and 254.71 µg/ml. Again in-vitro thrombolytic activity of bark was 30.17% and of seed it was 22.53%. Conclusion: The results revealed that the CME of bark and seed both have moderate cholinesterases inhibitory activities as well as thrombolytic activities, worth of further investigations to identify the promising molecule(s) potentially useful in the treatment of AD as well as in clotting disorders. PMID:28163969

  20. Streptococcus sanguis-Induced Platelet Clotting in Rabbits and Hemodynamic and Cardiopulmonary Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Maurice W.; Gong, Ke; Herzberg, Mark C.

    1998-01-01

    By mimicking hemostatic structural domains of collagen, Streptococcus sanguis (aggregation-positive phenotype; Agg+) induces platelets to aggregate in vitro. To test the hypothesis that aggregation occurs in vivo, S. sanguis (Agg+ or Agg− suspension) was infused intravenously into rabbits. The extent of hemodynamic and cardiopulmonary changes and the fate of circulating platelets were Agg+ strain dose dependent. Within 45 to 50 s of the start of infusion, 40 × 108 CFU of the Agg+ strain caused increased blood pressure. Thirty seconds after infusion, other changes occurred. Intermittent electrocardiographic abnormalities (13 of 15 rabbits), ST-segment depression (10 of 15 rabbits), and preventricular contractions (7 of 15 rabbits) manifested at 3 to 7 min, with frequencies dose dependent. Respiratory rate and cardiac contractility increased during this phase. Blood catecholamine concentration, thrombocytopenia, accumulation of 111Indium-labeled platelets in the lungs, and ventricular axis deviation also showed dose dependency. Rabbits were unaffected by inoculation of an Agg− strain. Therefore, Agg+ S. sanguis induced platelet aggregation in vitro. Platelet clots caused hemodynamic changes, acute pulmonary hypertension, and cardiac abnormalities, including ischemia. PMID:9826372

  1. High Milk-Clotting Activity Expressed by the Newly Isolated Paenibacillus spp. Strain BD3526.

    PubMed

    Hang, Feng; Liu, Peiyi; Wang, Qinbo; Han, Jin; Wu, Zhengjun; Gao, Caixia; Liu, Zhenmin; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-12

    Paenibacillus spp. BD3526, a bacterium exhibiting a protein hydrolysis circle surrounded with an obvious precipitation zone on skim milk agar, was isolated from raw yak (Bos grunniens) milk collected in Tibet, China. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA and whole genome sequence comparison indicated the isolate belong to the genus Paenibacillus. The strain BD3526 demonstrated strong ability to produce protease with milk clotting activity (MCA) in wheat bran broth. The protease with MCA was predominantly accumulated during the late-exponential phase of growth. The proteolytic activity (PA) of the BD3526 protease was 1.33-fold higher than that of the commercial R. miehei coagulant. A maximum MCA (6470 ± 281 SU mL(-1)) of the strain BD3526 was reached under optimal cultivation conditions. The protease with MCA was precipitated from the cultivated supernatant of wheat bran broth with ammonium sulfate and purified by anion-exchange chromatography. The molecular weight of the protease with MCA was determined as 35 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and gelatin zymography. The cleavage site of the BD3526 protease with MCA in κ-casein was located at the Met106-Ala107 bond, as determined by mass spectrometry analysis.

  2. Effect of warfarin on the kinetics of the vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in rats.

    PubMed

    Vainieri, H; Wingard, L B

    1977-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the time course of activities and rates of synthesis of activities for the separate clotting factors II, VII, IX, and X and to relate the rate of synthesis of activity of each factor to the plasma concentration of warfarin in individual rats after acute and chronic dosing with warfarin. Sequences of blood samples were obtained from each rat for 50 to 70 hours after an acute dose of warfarin or for 120 hours after a chronic loading dose plus 12-hour maintenance doses of warfarin and assayed for factor activities and warfarin concentration. The half-lives for degradation of factor activities ranged from 2.6 to 9.0 hours for the four factors. During periods of changing warfarin concentration (acute dosing) factor VII and X activities and rates of synthesis of activity showed large rapid changes, while factors II and IX responded more slowly. As the warfarin concentration diminished, the factor X rate of synthesis of activity appeared to exceed predrug values in all rats. During chronic dosing with warfarin the factor II activity and rate of synthesis of activity was depressed the most. The percent depression of the rate of synthesis of activity for each factor was related linearly to the logarithm of the plasma concentration of warfarin for the range 0 to 80% depression with acute dosing. However, this relationship was not suitable to explain the apparent overshoot in factor X rate of synthesis of activity.

  3. Simulation of intrathrombus fluid and solute transport using in vivo clot structures with single platelet resolution

    PubMed Central

    Voronov, Roman S.; Stalker, Timothy J.; Brass, Lawrence F.; Diamond, Scott L.

    2013-01-01

    The mouse laser injury thrombosis model provides up to 0.22 μm-resolved voxel information about the pore architecture of the dense inner core and loose outer shell regions of an in-vivo arterial thrombus. Computational studies were conducted on this 3D structure to quantify transport within and around the clot: Lattice Boltzmann method defined vessel hemodynamics, while passive Lagrangian Scalar Tracking with Brownian motion contribution simulated diffusive-convective transport of various inert solutes (released from lumen or the injured wall). For an input average lumen blood velocity of 0.478 cm/s (measured by Doppler velocimetry), a 0.2 mm/s mean flow rate was obtained within the thrombus structure, most of which occurred in the 100-fold more permeable outer shell region (calculated permeability of the inner core was 10−11 cm2). Average wall shear stresses were 80–100 dyne/cm2 (peak values > 200 dyne/cm2) on the outer rough surface of the thrombus. Within the thrombus, small molecule tracers (0.1 kDa) experienced ~70,000 collisions/sec and penetrated/exited it in about 1 sec, whereas proteins (~50 kDa) had ~9,000 collisions/sec and required about 10 sec (tortuosity ~ 2 to 2.5). These simulations help define physical processes during thrombosis and constraints for drug delivery to the thrombus. PMID:23423707

  4. Prolonged clot lysis time increases the risk of a first but not recurrent venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Karasu, Alev; Baglin, Trevor P; Luddington, Roger; Baglin, Caroline A; van Hylckama Vlieg, Astrid

    2016-03-01

    The role of the fibrinolytic system in the development of venous thrombosis (VT) is unclear. We studied the risk of first and recurrent VT associated with reduced fibrinolysis, as measured by clot lysis time (CLT). We also studied the relationship between CLT and thrombin generation to determine if any relationship between CLT and VT was affected by thrombin generation. Analyses were performed in the Thrombophilia Hypercoagulability Environmental risk for Venous Thromboembolism Study, a two-centre population-based case-control study, including 579 patients and 338 controls, with patients followed from the event to determine incidence of recurrent VT. Hypofibrinolysis was associated with a 1·8-fold increased risk of a first VT [95% confidence interval (CI) 1·2-2·7]. Adjustment for sex, age, study location and Endogenous Thrombin Potential (ETP) did not change the result. The risk of VT was 2·9-fold increased when the 90th percentiles of prolonged CLT and high ETP were combined, with the highest risk for unprovoked first events (Odds Ratio = 4·2, 95% CI 1·3-13·5). In the follow-up study the Hazard Ratio for a recurrent VT associated with hypofibrinolysis was 1·5 (95% CI 0·9-2·6). A weak dose response effect was observed in relation to prolongation of CLT and recurrent VT. Although hypofibrinolysis constitutes a risk factor for a first VT, an association with recurrence is, at best, weak.

  5. Impaired clot retraction in factor XIII A subunit-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Kohji; Souri, Masayoshi; Kaneda, Mizuho; Miki, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Naomasa; Ichinose, Akitada

    2010-02-11

    Factor XIII (FXIII) is a plasma transglutaminase that cross-links fibrin monomers, alpha(2)-plasmin inhibitor, and so forth. Congenital FXIII deficiency causes lifelong bleeding symptoms. To understand the molecular pathology of FXIII deficiency in vivo, its knockout mice have been functionally analyzed. Because prolonged bleeding times, a sign of defective/abnormal primary hemostasis, were commonly observed in 2 separate lines of FXIII A subunit (FXIII-A) knockout mice, a possible role or roles of FXIII in platelet-related function was investigated in the present study. Although platelet aggregation induced by adenosine diphosphate or collagen was normal, clot retraction (CR) was lost in the platelet-rich plasma (PRP) of FXIII-A knockout mice. In contrast, there was no CR impairment in the PRP of tissue transglutaminase-knockout mice compared with that of wild-type mice. Furthermore, a transglutaminase inhibitor, cystamine, halted CR in the PRP of wild-type mice. These results indicate that the enzymatic activity of FXIII is necessary for CR, at least in mice.

  6. Purification and characterization of a milk-clotting aspartic protease from Withania coagulans fruit.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Mahmoud; Aghamaali, Mahmoud Reza; Sajedi, Reza H; Asghari, S Mohsen; Jorjani, Eisa

    2017-05-01

    Withania coagulans fruit has traditionally been used as milk coagulant. The present study reports the purification and characterization of an aspartic protease from W. coagulans fruit. The enzyme was purified via fractional ammonium sulfate precipitation and cation exchange chromatography. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed the presence of a monomeric protein with molecular weight of 31kDa. Proteolytic activity (PA) of the protease was evaluated using casein, and the milk-clotting activity (MCA) was analyzed by skim milk. The Km and Vmax values of the enzyme for casein were obtained to be 1.29mg/ml and 0.035μmol Tyr/min, respectively. Optimal temperature and pH were 65°C and 5.5, respectively. After incubation of enzyme at 65°C for 1h, 73% of PA was remained which demonstrated high thermal stability of the enzyme. Mass spectrometry analysis of the purified protease and enzyme assays in the presence of protease inhibitors indicated that aspartic protease was the only responsible enzyme in milk coagulation. Furthermore, by investigating the effect of salts on enzyme activity, it was observed that both NaCl and CaCl2 reduced enzyme activity. These characteristics of the protease suggest that the enzyme may be suitable for producing low salt content cheeses.

  7. Inhibition of serine proteinases from human blood clotting system by squash inhibitor mutants.

    PubMed

    Grzesiak, A; Buczek, O; Petry, I; Szewczuk, Z; Otlewski, J

    2000-05-23

    A series of six CMTI I variants mutated in the P(2)-P(4)' region of the canonical binding loop were used to probe the role of single amino acid substitutions on binding to the following human proteinases involved in blood clotting: plasmin, plasma kallikrein, factors X(a) and XII(a). The mutants were expressed as fusion proteins with the LE1413 hydrophobic polypeptide in Escherichia coli, purified from inclusion bodies, followed by cyanobromide cleavage and refolding. The mutants inhibited the proteinases with the association constants in the range 10(3)-10(9) M(-1). Inhibition of plasma kallikrein and factors X(a) and XII(a) could be improved up to 30-fold by single mutations. In contrast, neither of the introduced mutations increased inhibitory properties of CMTI I against plasmin. Additionally, using two inhibitors of natural origin, CMTI I (P(1) Arg) and CPTI II (P(1) Lys), we determined the effect of Lys-->Arg on binding to four proteinases. With the exception of plasmin (no effect), P(1) Arg resulted in up to 30-fold stronger binding than P(1) Lys.

  8. Use of proteomics for validation of the isolation process of clotting factor IX from human plasma.

    PubMed

    Clifton, James; Huang, Feilei; Gaso-Sokac, Dajana; Brilliant, Kate; Hixson, Douglas; Josic, Djuro

    2010-01-03

    The use of proteomic techniques in the monitoring of different production steps of plasma-derived clotting factor IX (pd F IX) was demonstrated. The first step, solid-phase extraction with a weak anion-exchange resin, fractionates the bulk of human serum albumin (HSA), immunoglobulin G, and other non-binding proteins from F IX. The proteins that strongly bind to the anion-exchange resin are eluted by higher salt concentrations. In the second step, anion-exchange chromatography, residual HSA, some proteases and other contaminating proteins are separated. In the last chromatographic step, affinity chromatography with immobilized heparin, the majority of the residual impurities are removed. However, some contaminating proteins still remain in the eluate from the affinity column. The next step in the production process, virus filtration, is also an efficient step for the removal of residual impurities, mainly high molecular weight proteins, such as vitronectin and inter-alpha inhibitor proteins. In each production step, the active component, pd F IX and contaminating proteins are monitored by biochemical and immunochemical methods and by LC-MS/MS and their removal documented. Our methodology is very helpful for further process optimization, rapid identification of target proteins with relatively low abundance, and for the design of subsequent steps for their removal or purification.

  9. Confinement regulates complex biochemical networks: initiation of blood clotting by "diffusion acting".

    PubMed

    Shen, Feng; Pompano, Rebecca R; Kastrup, Christian J; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2009-10-21

    This study shows that environmental confinement strongly affects the activation of nonlinear reaction networks, such as blood coagulation (clotting), by small quantities of activators. Blood coagulation is sensitive to the local concentration of soluble activators, initiating only when the activators surpass a threshold concentration, and therefore is regulated by mass transport phenomena such as flow and diffusion. Here, diffusion was limited by decreasing the size of microfluidic chambers, and it was found that microparticles carrying either the classical stimulus, tissue factor, or a bacterial stimulus, Bacillus cereus, initiated coagulation of human platelet-poor plasma only when confined. A simple analytical argument and numerical model were used to describe the mechanism for this phenomenon: confinement causes diffusible activators to accumulate locally and surpass the threshold concentration. To interpret the results, a dimensionless confinement number, Cn, was used to describe whether a stimulus was confined, and a Damköhler number, Da(2), was used to describe whether a subthreshold stimulus could initiate coagulation. In the context of initiation of coagulation by bacteria, this mechanism can be thought of as "diffusion acting", which is distinct from "diffusion sensing". The ability of confinement and diffusion acting to change the outcome of coagulation suggests that confinement should also regulate other biological "on" and "off" processes that are controlled by thresholds.

  10. Is Intraoperative Use of QuikClot Combat Gauze Effective for Hemostasis after Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Woo; Nam, Young Joon; Choi, Ki Yong

    2017-01-01

    Background To assess the hemostatic effect of QuikClot Combat Gauze (QCG) compared to that of standard gauze during cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods Sixty knees underwent TKA using a pneumatic tourniquet in this prospective randomized study. After implantation of the femoral and tibial components and hardening of the bone cement, the tourniquet was deflated and QCG (group 1) or standard gauze (group 2) was packed into the joint cavity for 5 minutes for hemostasis. Perioperative bleeding volume and blood transfusion volume were compared between two groups. Results The mean intraoperative bleeding volume was 64.7 ± 12.7 mL in group 1 and 63.9 ± 9.2 mL in group 2 (p = 0.808). The mean postoperative blood drainage was 349.0 ± 170.6 mL in group 1 and 270.1 ± 136.3 mL in group 2 (p = 0.057). The average postoperative blood transfusion volume was 323.7 ± 325.9 mL in group 1 and 403.6 ± 274.8 mL in group 2 (p = 0.314). Conclusions QCG was not significantly effective for reducing perioperative bleeding volume or the blood transfusion rate compared with standard gauze during TKA. PMID:28261426

  11. Labeling of human clots in vitro with an active-site mutant of t-PA

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, E.T.; Mack, D.L.; Monge, J.C.; Billadello, J.J.; Sobel, B.E. )

    1990-02-01

    Prompt detection of acute thrombosis and its response to treatment with thrombolytic agents generally require angiography. Scintigraphic approaches with labeled antibodies to or components of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems have been disappointing because of prolonged circulating half-lives of tracers and relatively slow or limited binding to thrombi. Accordingly, we developed and characterized a thrombolytically inactive, active-site mutant (Ser-478----Thr) of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) designed to detect thrombi in vivo. Binding of iodine-125-({sup 125}I) labeled Ser----Thr t-PA to thrombi in vitro was time- and concentration-dependent, and specific judging from inhibition by pre-incubation with anti-t-PA IgG. Clearance of 125I-labeled mutant t-PA in rabbits was rapid and biexponential (alpha t1/2 = 1.9 +/- 0.4 min, beta t1/2 = 39.8 +/- 11.2 min). Thus, the amidolytically inactive mutant of t-PA designed binds rapidly and specifically to human thrombi in vitro and is cleared rapidly from the circulation in vivo--properties rendering it attractive as a potentially useful clot imaging agent.

  12. Antifungal susceptibility testing.

    PubMed Central

    Rex, J H; Pfaller, M A; Rinaldi, M G; Polak, A; Galgiani, J N

    1993-01-01

    Unlike antibacterial susceptibility testing, reliable antifungal susceptibility testing is still largely in its infancy. Many methods have been described, but they produce widely discrepant results unless such factors as pH, inoculum size, medium formulation, incubation time, and incubation temperature are carefully controlled. Even when laboratories agree upon a common method, interlaboratory agreement may be poor. As a result of numerous collaborative projects carried out both independently and under the aegis of the Subcommittee on Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards, the effects of varying these factors have been extensively studied and a standard method which minimizes interlaboratory variability during the testing of Candida spp. and Cryptococcus neoformans has been proposed. This review summarizes this work, reviews the strengths and weaknesses of the proposed susceptibility testing standard, and identifies directions for future work. PMID:8269392

  13. MR Susceptibility Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Duyn, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    This work reviews recent developments in the use of magnetic susceptibility contrast for human MRI, with a focus on the study of brain anatomy. The increase in susceptibility contrast with modern high field scanners has led to novel applications and insights into the sources and mechanism contributing to this contrast in brain tissues. Dedicated experiments have demonstrated that in most of healthy brain, iron and myelin dominate tissue susceptibility variations, although their relative contribution varies substantially. Local variations in these compounds can affect both amplitude and frequency of the MRI signal. In white matter, the myelin sheath introduces an anisotropic susceptibility that has distinct effects on the water compartments inside the axons, between the myelin sheath, and the axonal space, and renders their signals dependent on the angle between the axon and the magnetic field. This offers opportunities to derive tissue properties specific to these cellular compartments. PMID:23273840

  14. Calculate waveguide aperture susceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, J.-K.; Ishii, T. K.

    1982-12-01

    A method is developed for calculating aperture susceptance which makes use of the distribution of an aperture's local fields. This method can be applied to the computation of the aperture susceptance of irises, as well as the calculation of the susceptances of waveguide filters, aperture antennas, waveguide cavity coupling, waveguide junctions, and heterogeneous boundaries such as inputs to ferrite or dielectric loaded waveguides. This method assumes a local field determined by transverse components of the incident wave in the local surface of the cross section in the discontinuity plane which lies at the aperture. The aperture susceptance is calculated by the use of the local fields, the law of energy conservation, and the principles of continuity of the fields. This method requires that the thickness of the aperture structure be zero, but this does not limit the practical usefulness of this local-field method.

  15. Susceptibility-weighted imaging and quantitative susceptibility mapping in the brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunlei; Li, Wei; Tong, Karen A; Yeom, Kristen W; Kuzminski, Samuel

    2015-07-01

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that enhances image contrast by using the susceptibility differences between tissues. It is created by combining both magnitude and phase in the gradient echo data. SWI is sensitive to both paramagnetic and diamagnetic substances which generate different phase shift in MRI data. SWI images can be displayed as a minimum intensity projection that provides high resolution delineation of the cerebral venous architecture, a feature that is not available in other MRI techniques. As such, SWI has been widely applied to diagnose various venous abnormalities. SWI is especially sensitive to deoxygenated blood and intracranial mineral deposition and, for that reason, has been applied to image various pathologies including intracranial hemorrhage, traumatic brain injury, stroke, neoplasm, and multiple sclerosis. SWI, however, does not provide quantitative measures of magnetic susceptibility. This limitation is currently being addressed with the development of quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and susceptibility tensor imaging (STI). While QSM treats susceptibility as isotropic, STI treats susceptibility as generally anisotropic characterized by a tensor quantity. This article reviews the basic principles of SWI, its clinical and research applications, the mechanisms governing brain susceptibility properties, and its practical implementation, with a focus on brain imaging.

  16. High-intensity focused ultrasound sonothrombolysis: the use of perfluorocarbon droplets to achieve clot lysis at reduced acoustic power.

    PubMed

    Pajek, Daniel; Burgess, Alison; Huang, Yuexi; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate use of intravascular perfluorocarbon droplets to reduce the sonication power required to achieve clot lysis with high-intensity focused ultrasound. High-intensity focused ultrasound with droplets was initially applied to blood clots in an in vitro flow apparatus, and inertial cavitation thresholds were determined. An embolic model for ischemic stroke was used to illustrate the feasibility of this technique in vivo. Recanalization with intravascular droplets was achieved in vivo at 24 ± 5% of the sonication power without droplets. Recanalization occurred in 71% of rabbits that received 1-ms pulsed sonications during continuous intravascular droplet infusion (p = 0.041 vs controls). Preliminary experiments indicated that damage was confined to the ultrasonic focus, suggesting that tolerable treatments would be possible with a more tightly focused hemispheric array that allows the whole focus to be placed inside of the main arteries in the human brain.

  17. Inhibition of clot formation in deterministic lateral displacement arrays for processing large volumes of blood for rare cell capture.

    PubMed

    D'Silva, Joseph; Austin, Robert H; Sturm, James C

    2015-05-21

    Microfluidic deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) arrays have been applied for fractionation and analysis of cells in quantities of ~100 μL of blood, with processing of larger quantities limited by clogging in the chip. In this paper, we (i) demonstrate that this clogging phenomenon is due to conventional platelet-driven clot formation, (ii) identify and inhibit the two dominant biological mechanisms driving this process, and (iii) characterize how further reductions in clot formation can be achieved through higher flow rates and blood dilution. Following from these three advances, we demonstrate processing of 14 mL equivalent volume of undiluted whole blood through a single DLD array in 38 minutes to harvest PC3 cancer cells with ~86% yield. It is possible to fit more than 10 such DLD arrays on a single chip, which would then provide the capability to process well over 100 mL of undiluted whole blood on a single chip in less than one hour.

  18. New clotting disorders that cast new light on blood coagulation and may play a role in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Girolami, A; Cosi, E; Ferrari, S; Lombardi, A M; Girolami, B

    2017-03-01

    Recently several variants of clotting factors have shown a peculiar behavior so that they appear as new defects. The factors involved are FII, FV and FIX. Prothrombin deficiency is usually associated with bleeding. Recently a few prothrombin abnormalities involving Arg396 mutations, have been demonstrated to show antithrombin resistance with the consequent appearance of a thrombophilic state and venous thromboses in young age. The same is true for an abnormal FIX (FIX Padua). The thrombotic manifestations in the latter condition are also venous. The abnormal FIX (FIX Padua) is characterized by a great increase in FIX activity whereas FIX antigen is only slightly increased. The condition is due to an Arg338Lys mutation. The increased intrinsic clotting activity of this abnormal FIX is being investigated as a useful therapeutic approach in homophile B patients. Another new clotting disorder is represented by two abnormal FV (FV East Texas and FV Amsterdam). These are characterized by a deletion of part of the B domain of FV resulting in a "short" FV. The condition is characterized by a mild bleeding tendency due to high levels of Tissue Factor pathway inhibitor. The "short" factor V is in fact resistant to the action of Tissue Factor pathway inhibitor which is sharply increased in these patients. These new clotting entities have again demonstrated that the study of patients who show a tendency to venous thrombosis or a mild bleeding condition that cannot be explained on the basis of our current concepts of blood coagulation, may represent "new" coagulation disorders. All persons interested in thrombotic or hemorrhagic disorders should be informed about these new clinical and laboratory conditions.

  19. The function of the milk-clotting enzymes bovine and camel chymosin studied by a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jesper Langholm; Jacobsen, Jonas; Moss, Marcia L; Rasmussen, Fred; Qvist, Karsten Bruun; Larsen, Sine; van den Brink, Johannes M

    2015-05-01

    Enzymatic coagulation of bovine milk can be divided in 2 steps: an enzymatic step, in which the Phe105-Met106 bond of the milk protein bovine κ-casein is cleaved, and an aggregation step. The aspartic peptidases bovine and camel chymosin (EC 3.4.23.4) are typically used to catalyze the enzymatic step. The most commonly used method to study chymosin activity is the relative milk-clotting activity test that measures the end point of the enzymatic and aggregation step. This method showed that camel chymosin has a 2-fold higher milk-clotting activity toward bovine milk than bovine chymosin. To enable a study of the enzymatic step independent of the aggregation step, a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay has been developed using a peptide substrate derived from the 98-108 sequence of bovine κ-casein. This assay and Michaelis-Menten kinetics were employed to determine the enzymatic activity of camel and bovine chymosin under milk clotting-like conditions (pH 6.65, ionic strength 80 mM). The results obtained show that the catalytic efficiency of camel chymosin is 3-fold higher than bovine chymosin. The substrate affinity and catalytic activity of bovine and camel chymosin increase at lower pH (6.00 and 5.50). The glycosylation of bovine and camel chymosin did not affect binding of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer substrate, but doubly glycosylated camel chymosin seems to have slightly higher catalytic efficiency. In the characterization of the enzymes, the developed assay is easier and faster to use than the traditionally used relative milk-clotting activity test method.

  20. Dynamics of Thrombin Generation and Flux from Clots during Whole Human Blood Flow over Collagen/Tissue Factor Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu; Lu, Yichen; Sinno, Talid; Diamond, Scott L

    2016-10-28

    Coagulation kinetics are well established for purified blood proteases or human plasma clotting isotropically. However, less is known about thrombin generation kinetics and transport within blood clots formed under hemodynamic flow. Using microfluidic perfusion (wall shear rate, 200 s(-1)) of corn trypsin inhibitor-treated whole blood over a 250-μm long patch of type I fibrillar collagen/lipidated tissue factor (TF; ∼1 TF molecule/μm(2)), we measured thrombin released from clots using thrombin-antithrombin immunoassay. The majority (>85%) of generated thrombin was captured by intrathrombus fibrin as thrombin-antithrombin was largely undetectable in the effluent unless Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro (GPRP) was added to block fibrin polymerization. With GPRP present, the flux of thrombin increased to ∼0.5 × 10(-12) nmol/μm(2)-s over the first 500 s of perfusion and then further increased by ∼2-3-fold over the next 300 s. The increased thrombin flux after 500 s was blocked by anti-FXIa antibody (O1A6), consistent with thrombin-feedback activation of FXI. Over the first 500 s, ∼92,000 molecules of thrombin were generated per surface TF molecule for the 250-μm-long coating. A single layer of platelets (obtained with αIIbβ3 antagonism preventing continued platelet deposition) was largely sufficient for thrombin production. Also, the overall thrombin-generating potential of a 1000-μm-long coating became less efficient on a per μm(2) basis, likely due to distal boundary layer depletion of platelets. Overall, thrombin is robustly generated within clots by the extrinsic pathway followed by late-stage FXIa contributions, with fibrin localizing thrombin via its antithrombin-I activity as a potentially self-limiting hemostatic mechanism.

  1. Optical aggregometry of red blood cells associated with the blood-clotting reaction in extracorporeal circulation support.

    PubMed

    Sakota, Daisuke; Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu

    2016-09-01

    The aggregability of red blood cell (RBCs) is associated with the contribution of plasma proteins, such as fibrinogen and lipoproteids, to blood-clotting. Hence, we hypothesized that RBC aggregability reflects the blood-clotting reaction. A noninvasive optical monitoring method to measure RBC aggregability for the assessment of blood-clotting stage during mechanical circulatory support was developed. An in vitro thrombogenic test was conducted with a rotary blood pump using heparinized fresh porcine blood. Near-infrared laser light at a wavelength of 785 nm was guided by an optical fiber. The fibers for detecting incident, forward-, and backward-scattered light were fixed on the circuit tubing with an inner diameter of 1/4 inch. Because there is substantial RBC aggregation at low shear flow rates, a pulsatile flow was generated by controlling the pump rotational speed. The flow rate was changed from 0 to 8.5 L/min at a period of 40 s. The intensities of forward- and backward-scattered light changed dramatically when the flow stopped. The aggregability was evaluated by the increase ratio of the transmitted light intensity from the flow stopping in the low-flow condition. The experiment started when the anticoagulation was stopped by the addition of protamine into the circulating blood. Reduction in RBC aggregability was associated with a decrease in the amount of fibrinogen and the number of platelets. Continuous, noninvasive monitoring of thrombosis risk is possible using optical measurements combining pulsatile flow control of a rotary blood pump. RBC aggregometry is a potential label-free method for evaluating blood-clotting risk.

  2. Clinically relevant HOCl concentrations reduce clot retraction rate via the inhibition of energy production in platelet mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Misztal, T; Rusak, T; Tomasiak, M

    2014-12-01

    Using porcine blood, we examined the impact of hypochlorite, product of activated inflammatory cells, on clot retraction (CR), an important step of hemostasis. We found that, in vitro, HOCl is able to reduce CR rate and enlarge final clot size in whole blood (t.c. 100 μM), platelet-rich plasma (PRP) threshold concentration (t.c. 50 μM), and an artificial system (washed platelets and fibrinogen) (t.c. 25 nM). Combination of low HOCl and peroxynitrite concentrations resulted in synergistic inhibition of CR by these stressors. Concentrations of HOCl completely inhibiting CR failed to affect the kinetics of coagulation measured in PRP and in platelet-free plasma. Concentrations of HOCl reducing CR rate in PRP augmented production of lactate, inhibited consumption of oxygen by platelets, and decreased total adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content in PRP-derived clots. In an artificial system, concentrations of HOCl resulting in inhibition of CR (25-100 nM) reduced mitochondrial transmembrane potential and did not affect actin polymerization in thrombin-stimulated platelets. These concentrations of HOCl failed to affect the adhesion of washed platelets to fibrinogen and to evoke sustained calcium signal, thus excluding stressor action on glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptors. Exogenously added Mg-ATP almost completely recovered HOCl-mediated retardation of CR. Concentrations of HOCl higher than those affecting CR reduced thromboelastometric variables (maximum clot firmness and α angle). We conclude that low clinically relevant HOCl concentrations may evoke the inhibition of CR via the reduction of platelet contractility resulted from malfunction of platelet mitochondria. At the inflammatory conditions, CR may be the predominant HOCl target.

  3. Clot formation is associated with fibrinogen and platelet forces in a cohort of severely-injured Emergency Department trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    White, Nathan J.; Newton, Jason C.; Martin, Erika J.; Mohammed, Bassem M.; Contaifer, Daniel; Bostic, Jessica L.; Brophy, Gretchen M.; Spiess, Bruce D.; Pusateri, Anthony E.; Ward, Kevin R.; Brophy, Donald F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Anticoagulation, fibrinogen consumption, fibrinolytic activation, and platelet dysfunction all interact to produce different clot formation responses after trauma. However, the relative contributions of these coagulation components to overall clot formation remains poorly defined. We examined for sources of heterogeneity in clot formation responses after trauma. Methods Blood was sampled in the Emergency Department from patients meeting trauma team activation criteria at an urban trauma center. Plasma prothrombin time (PT) ≥ 18 sec was used to define traumatic coagulopathy. Mean kaolin-activated thrombelastography (TEG) parameters were calculated and tested for heterogeneity using Analysis of Means (ANOM). Discriminant analysis and forward stepwise variable selection with linear regression were used to determine if PT, fibrinogen, platelet contractile force (PCF), and D-Dimer concentration, representing key mechanistic components of coagulopathy, each contribute to heterogeneous TEG responses after trauma. Results Of 95 subjects, 16% met criteria for coagulopathy. Coagulopathic subjects were more severely injured with greater shock, and received more blood products in the first 8 hours compared to non-coagulopathic subjects. Mean (SD) TEG maximal amplitude (MA) was significantly decreased in the coagulopathic group=57.5 (4.7) mm, vs. 62.7 (4.7), T test p<0.001. The MA also exceeded the ANOM predicted upper decision limit for the non-coagulopathic group and the lower decision limit for the coagulopathic group at alpha=0.05, suggesting significant heterogeneity from the overall cohort mean. Fibrinogen and PCF best discriminated TEG MA using discriminant analysis. Fibrinogen, PCF, and D-Dimer were primary covariates for TEG MA using regression analysis. Conclusion Heterogeneity in TEG-based clot formation in Emergency Department trauma patients was linked to changes in MA. Individual parameters representing fibrin polymerization, platelet contractile

  4. Interaction of hirudin with thrombin: Identification of a minimal binding domain of hirudin that inhibits clotting activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, S.J.T.; Yates, M.T.; Owen, T.J.; Krstenansky, J.L. )

    1988-10-18

    Hirudin, isolated from the European leech Hirudo medicinalis, is a potent inhibitor of thrombin, forming an almost irreversible thrombin-hirudin complex. Previously, the authors have shown that the carboxyl terminus of hirudin (residues 45-65) inhibits clotting activity and without binding to the catalytic site of thrombin. In the present study, a series of peptides corresponding to this carboxyl-terminal region of hirudin have been synthesized, and their anticoagulant activity and binding properties to thrombin were examined. Binding was assessed by their ability to displace {sup 125}I-hirudin 45-65 from Sepharose-immobilized thrombin and by isolation of peptide-thrombin complexes. They show that the carboxyl-terminal 10 amino acid residues 56-65 (Phe-Glu-Glu-Ile-Pro-Glu-Glu-Tyr-Leu-Gln) are minimally required for binding to thrombin and inhibition of clotting. Phe-56 was critical for maintaining anticoagulant activity as demonstrated by the loss of activity when Phe-56 was substituted with D-Phe, Glu, or Leu. In addition, they found that the binding of the carboxyl-terminal peptide of hirudin with thrombin was associated with a significant conformational change of thrombin as judged by circular dichroism. This conformational change might be responsible for the loss of clotting activity of thrombin.

  5. Fibrinolytic Activity and Dose-Dependent Effect of Incubating Human Blood Clots in Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester: In Vitro Assays

    PubMed Central

    Elnager, Abuzar; Hassan, Rosline; Idris, Zamzuri; Mustafa, Zulkifli; Wan-Arfah, Nadiah; Sulaiman, S. A.; Gan, Siew Hua; Abdullah, Wan Zaidah

    2015-01-01

    Background. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) has been reported to possess time-dependent fibrinolytic activity by in vitro assay. This study is aimed at investigating fibrinolytic dose-dependent activity of CAPE using in vitro assays. Methods. Standardized human whole blood (WB) clots were incubated in either blank controls or different concentrations of CAPE (3.75, 7.50, 15.00, 22.50, and 30.00 mM). After 3 hours, D-dimer (DD) levels and WB clot weights were measured for each concentration. Thromboelastography (TEG) parameters were recorded following CAPE incubation, and fibrin morphology was examined under a confocal microscope. Results. Overall, mean DD (μg/mL) levels were significantly different across samples incubated with different CAPE concentrations, and the median pre- and postincubation WB clot weights (grams) were significantly decreased for each CAPE concentration. Fibrin removal was observed microscopically and indicated dose-dependent effects. Based on the TEG test, the Ly30 fibrinolytic parameter was significantly different between samples incubated with two different CAPE concentrations (15.0 and 22.50 mM). The 50% effective dose (ED50) of CAPE (based on DD) was 1.99 mg/mL. Conclusions. This study suggests that CAPE possesses fibrinolytic activity following in vitro incubation and that it has dose-dependent activities. Therefore, further investigation into CAPE as a potential alternative thrombolytic agent should be conducted. PMID:25664321

  6. Enhancement of Platelet Aggregation by Ursolic Acid and Oleanolic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mikyung; Han, Chang-ho; Lee, Moo-Yeol

    2014-01-01

    The pentacyclic triterpenoid ursolic acid (UA) and its isomer oleanolic acid (OA) are ubiquitous in food and plant medicine, and thus are easily exposed to the population through natural contact or intentional use. Although they have diverse health benefits, reported cardiovascular protective activity is contentious. In this study, the effect of UA and OA on platelet aggregation was examined on the basis that alteration of platelet activity is a potential process contributing to cardiovascular events. Treatment of UA enhanced platelet aggregation induced by thrombin or ADP, which was concentration-dependent in a range of 5–50 μM. Quite comparable results were obtained with OA, in which OA-treated platelets also exhibited an exaggerated response to either thrombin or ADP. UA treatment potentiated aggregation of whole blood, while OA failed to increase aggregation by thrombin. UA and OA did not affect plasma coagulation assessed by measuring prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time. These results indicate that both UA and OA are capable of making platelets susceptible to aggregatory stimuli, and platelets rather than clotting factors are the primary target of them in proaggregatory activity. These compounds need to be used with caution, especially in the population with a predisposition to cardiovascular events. PMID:25009707

  7. Individual susceptibility to toxicity.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, P

    1992-12-01

    Individual variation in susceptibility to chemical toxicity may be due to differences in toxicokinetic patterns or effect modification. Well-documented interspecies genetic differences in susceptibility to chemicals had lead to studies of such variation also within species. Epidemiological evidence now suggests that common variations, particularly in the P-450 enzymes, may play a major role in determining individual susceptibility to chemically-induced disease. Physiologic factors are involved in the particular susceptibility of the fetus, the newborn, and the old. Constitutional susceptibility is also affected by acquired conditions, including chronic disease, such as diabetes mellitus. Perhaps the most complex area relates to the increase in vulnerability caused by previous or contemporary exposure to other factors, thus eliciting, e.g., synergistic effects. Although amply demonstrated by experimental studies, epidemiological or clinical confirmation is generally lacking. One hypothesis suggests that a chemical exposure may affect the reserve capacity of the body, though not resulting in any immediate adverse effect. Subsequently, the body becomes unable to compensate for an additional stress, and toxicity then develops. Epidemiological approaches are available and need to be expanded. Research in this area has potential ethical implications which should be dealt with in an open, informed forum.

  8. Idiotypes of murine monoclonal antibodies to clotting factor VIII:C

    SciTech Connect

    Pechet, L.; Tiarks, C.Y.; Ghalili, K.; Humphreys, R.E.

    1986-03-05

    The authors goal is to study idiotypic immunoregulation of inhibitors to clotting factor VIII:C. To this end, they used monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against VIII:C: Synbiotics, C7F7, and C5, directed against epitopes on the C terminal fragment of VIII:C; C2, C6, C8 directed against epitopes on the N terminal fragment of VIII:C; C10, directed against a non-functional epitope; IB3, Chemicon and Hybritech, to undetermined epitopes. Anti-idiotypic antibodies against C7F7, C8, Synbiotics and Hybritech were produced in rabbits. Competitive radioimmunoassays (RIA) tested cross-reactivity between each immunogen and the other MoAbs. Synbiotics cross-reacted with Chemicon and IB3, indicating they were directed against the same epitope on the C terminal fragment of VIII:C. They did not cross-react with Hybritech, C7F7, C2, C5, C6, C8, or C10. C7F7 showed no cross-reactivities. C8 cross-reacted with C6 but not with C2, C5, C10, C7F7, Synbiotics, or Hybritech. Hybritech did not did not cross-react with any of the other MoAbs. In conclusion, with four anti-idiotypic antibodies and ten MoAbs to VIII:C, they defined at least five functional epitopes and one non-functional epitope on the factor VIII:C molecule to which inhibitors may develop: C2, C6-C8 (N terminal), C7F7, C5, Synbiotics (C terminal), Hybritech (undetermined epitope) and C10 (non-functional).

  9. Mathematical model and numerical method for studying platelet adhesion and aggregation during blood clotting

    SciTech Connect

    Fogelson, A.L.

    1984-10-01

    The repair of small blood vessels and the pathological growth of internal blood clots involve the formation of platelet aggregates adhering to portions of the vessel wall. Our microscopic model represents blood by a suspension of discrete massless platelets in a viscous incompressible fluid. Platelets are initially noncohesive; however, if stimulated by an above-threshold concentration of the chemical ADP or by contact with the adhesive injured region of the vessel wall, they become cohesive and secrete more ADP into the fluid. Cohesion between platelets and adhesion of a platelet to the injured wall are modeled by creating elastic links. Repulsive forces prevent a platelet from coming too close to another platelet or to the wall. The forces affect the fluid motion in the neighborhood of an aggregate. The platelets and secreted ADP both move by fluid advection and diffusion. The equations of the model are studied numerically in two dimensions. The platelet forces are calculated implicitly by minimizing a nonlinear energy function. Our minimization scheme merges Gill and Murray's (Math. Programming 7 (1974), 311) modified Newton's method with elements of the Yale sparse matix package. The stream-function formulation of the Stokes' equations for the fluid motion under the influence of platelet forces is solved using Bjorstad's biharmonic solver (''Numerical Solution of the Biharmonic Equation,'' Ph.D. Thesis, Stanford University, 1980). The ADP transport equation is solved with an alternating-direction implicit scheme. A linked-list data structure is introduced to keep track of changing platelet states and changing configurations of interplatelet links.

  10. Magnetic Orientation in Biology:. Virus Structure - Blood Clot Assembly - Cell Guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbet, J.

    2005-07-01

    Our childhood games with permanent magnets leave us with the impression that matter, in general, does not respond to a magnetic field. In reality, virtually everything is subjected to minute forces of attraction, repulsion or orientation. Strong fields combined with better understanding allow us to exploit these effects to tackle biological problems. In particular, the very weak diamagnetic anisotropy associated with individual molecules can give rise to high orientation of well organized structures such as crystals, liquid-crystals, semi-rigid polymers and individual cells. High orientation is often accompanied by better data and superior properties. In some circumstances, such as in crystallization, the orientating torque might induce effects over and above simple orientation. Magnetic field orientation has a number of advantages over other orienting techniques. Drawing or spinning produce fibers and can alter structure or cause damage while template methods invariable work only over a short range. The application of an electric field can cause heating and electrophoresis. In contrast, a magnetic field acts at a distance allowing uniform orientation in bulk and the creation of composites with components having different orientations. The contribution that magnetic orientation has made to a range of biological topics is illustrated by briefly describing a number of examples. For example, it has been a boon to x-ray studies of some non-crystalline filamentous complexes (e.g. fibrin, actin, microtubules, bacterial flagella and filamentous viruses) and is being vigorously exploited in NMR. The blood-clot polymer, fibrin, forms highly oriented gels when polymerized in a strong field and a number of its properties have been elucidated as a result. Magnetically oriented scaffolds of collagen, the major connective tissue protein, and fibrin are being used to study cell contact guidance. Oriented biomaterials might eventually be incorporated into specialized wound

  11. Dynamics of motion of a clot through an arterial bifurcation: a finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolfazli, Ehsan; Fatouraee, Nasser; Vahidi, Bahman

    2014-10-01

    Although arterial embolism is important as a major cause of brain infarction, little information is available about the hemodynamic factors which govern the path emboli tend to follow. A method which predicts the trajectory of emboli in carotid arteries would be of a great value in understanding ischemic attack mechanisms and eventually devising hemodynamically optimal techniques for prevention of strokes. In this paper, computational models are presented to investigate the motion of a blood clot in a human carotid artery bifurcation. The governing equations for blood flow are the Navier-Stokes formulations. To achieve large structural movements, the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation (ALE) with an adaptive mesh method was employed for the fluid domain. The problem was solved by simultaneous solution of the fluid and the structure equations. In this paper, the phenomenon was simulated under laminar and Newtonian flow conditions. The measured stress-strain curve obtained from ultrasound elasticity imaging of the thrombus was set to a Sussman-Bathe material model representing embolus material properties. Shear stress magnitudes in the inner wall of the internal carotid artery (ICA) were measured. High magnitudes of wall shear stress (WSS) occurred in the areas in which the embolus and arterial are in contact with each other. Stress distribution in the embolus was also calculated and areas prone to rapture were identified. Effects of embolus size and embolus density on its motion velocity were investigated and it was observed that an increase in either embolus size or density led to a reduction in movement velocity of the embolus. Embolus trajectory and shear stress from a simulation of embolus movement in a three-dimensional model with patient-specific carotid artery bifurcation geometry are also presented.

  12. Response of the blood clotting system of the American horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus, to a novel form of lipopolysaccharide from a green alga.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Mara L; Pardy, R L; Wainwright, Norman; Child, Alice; Armstrong, Peter B

    2006-08-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) is a component of Gram-negative bacteria and is the principal indicator to the innate immune systems of higher animals of a Gram-negative bacterial invasion. LPS activates the blood clotting system of the American horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus. By stimulating blood cell degranulation, LPS triggers the release of the proteins of the clotting system from the cells, and by activating a protease cascade that converts coagulogen, a soluble zymogen, to coagulin, the structural protein of the clot, LPS triggers the production of the fibrillar coagulin blood clot. Although originally thought to be restricted to the Gram-negative bacteria and the cyanobacteria, LPS, or a very similar molecule, has recently been described from a eukaryotic green alga, Chlorella. Here we show that, like LPS from Gram-negative bacteria, the algal molecule stimulates exocytosis of the Limulus blood cell and the clotting of coagulin. The coagulin clot efficiently entraps the cells of Chlorella in a network of fibrils. Invasion and erosion of the carapace by green algae is an important cause of mortality of Limulus, and it is suggested that the cellular response to aLPS may contribute to defense against this pathogen.

  13. Cow Dung Is a Novel Feedstock for Fibrinolytic Enzyme Production from Newly Isolated Bacillus sp. IND7 and Its Application in In Vitro Clot Lysis

    PubMed Central

    Vijayaraghavan, Ponnuswamy; Arun, Arumugaperumal; Vincent, Samuel Gnana Prakash; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial fibrinolytic enzymes find great applications to treat and prevent cardiovascular diseases. The novel fibrinolytic enzymes from food grade organisms are useful for thrombolytic therapy. This study reports fibrinolytic enzyme production by Bacillus sp. IND7 in solid-state fermentation (SSF). In this study, cow dung was used as the cheap substrate for the production of fibrinolytic enzyme. Enzyme production was primarily improved by optimizing the nutrient and physical factors by one-variable-at-a-time approach. A statistical method (two-level full factorial design) was applied to investigate the significant variables. Of the different variables, pH, starch, and beef extract significantly influenced on the production of fibrinolytic enzyme (p < 0.05). The optimum levels of these significant factors were further investigated using response surface methodology. The optimum conditions for enhanced fibrinolytic enzyme production were 1.23% (w/w) starch and 0.3% (w/w) beef extract with initial medium pH 9.0. Under the optimized conditions, cow dung substrate yielded 8,345 U/g substrate, and an overall 2.5-fold improvement in fibrinolytic enzyme production was achieved due to its optimization. This is the first report of fibrinolytic enzyme production using cow dung substrate from Bacillus sp. in SSF. The crude enzyme displayed potent activity on zymography and digested goat blood clot completely in in vitro condition. PMID:27065952

  14. Light scalar susceptibilities and isospin breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Andres, R. Torres; Nicola, A. Gomez

    2010-12-28

    Making a thermal analysis in the context of NLO SU(3) Chiral Perturbation Theory we see that isospin breaking (IB) corrections (both electromagnetic and QCD ones) to quark condensates are of order O(e{sup 2}) and O({epsilon}), with {epsilon} the {pi}{sup 0}-{eta} mixing angle. However the combination {chi}{sub uu}-{chi}{sub ud} of flavour breaking susceptibilities, which vanishes in the isospin limit and can be identified essentially with the connected susceptibility, has an order O(1) contribution enhanced with T because of the {pi}{sup 0}-{eta}) mixing. Finally we present a thermal sum rule that relates quark condensate ratios and the light scalar susceptibility without IB, {chi}(T)-{chi}(0).

  15. Introduction to cancer genetic susceptibility syndromes.

    PubMed

    McGee, Rose B; Nichols, Kim E

    2016-12-02

    The last 30 years have witnessed tremendous advances in our understanding of the cancer genetic susceptibility syndromes, including those that predispose to hematopoietic malignancies. The identification and characterization of families affected by these syndromes is enhancing our knowledge of the oncologic and nononcologic manifestations associated with predisposing germ line mutations and providing insights into the underlying disease mechanisms. Here, we provide an overview of the cancer genetic susceptibility syndromes, focusing on aspects relevant to the evaluation of patients with leukemia and lymphoma. Guidance is provided to facilitate recognition of these syndromes by hematologists/oncologists, including descriptions of the family history features, tumor genotype, and physical or developmental findings that should raise concern for an underlying cancer genetic syndrome. The clinical implications and management challenges associated with cancer susceptibility syndromes are also discussed.

  16. Alterations of platelet function and clot formation kinetics following in vitro exposure to anti-A and -B antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Refaai, Majed A.; Carter, Jessie; Henrichs, Kelly F.; Davidson, Donna C.; Pollock, Stephen J.; Casey, Ann E.; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Phipps, Richard P.; Francis, Charles W.; Blumberg, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Background ABO mismatched platelets are commonly transfused despite reported complications. We hypothesized that because platelets possess A and B antigens on their surface, ABO mismatched transfused or recipient platelets could become activated and/or dysfunctional after exposure to anti-A or -B antibodies in the transfused or recipient plasma. We present here in vitro modeling data on the functional effects of exposure of platelets to ABO antibodies. Methods Platelet functions of normal platelets of all ABO types were assessed before and after incubation with normal saline, ABO identical plasmas, or O plasmas with varying titers of anti-A and anti-B (anti-A/B) antibodies. Assays used for this assessment include: platelet aggregation, clot kinetics, thrombin generation, platelet cytoskeletal function, and mediator release. Results Exposure of antigen bearing platelets to O plasma with moderate to high titers of anti-A/B antibodies significantly inhibits aggregation, prolongs PFA-100 epinephrine closure time, disrupts clot formation kinetics, accelerates thrombin generation, reduces total thrombin production, alters platelet cytoskeletal function, and influences pro-inflammatory and pro-thrombotic mediator release. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate a wide range of effects that anti-A/B antibodies have on platelet function, clot formation, thrombin generation, platelet cytoskeletal function, and mediator release. These data provide potential explanations for clinical observations of increased red cell utilization in trauma and surgical patients receiving ABO non-identical blood products. Impaired hemostasis caused by anti-A/B antibodies interacting with A and B antigens on platelets, soluble proteins, and perhaps even endothelial cells is a potential contributing factor to hemorrhage in patients receiving larger volumes of ABO non-identical transfusions. PMID:22624532

  17. Magnetic Susceptibility of Wet vs. Dry Sediment and Mass Normalized vs. Volume Normalized Magnetic Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletetschka, G.; Hruba, J.; Nabelek, L.

    2015-12-01

    The measurement of magnetic susceptibility in sediments represents a fast and non-destructive technique that can be used to deduce the concentration of magnetic minerals [1, 2]. Magnetic minerals change their magnetic properties with temperature [3]. Heating (during a fire, laboratory, with the purpose of manufacturing a product, etc.) can modify a number of sediment properties [4, 5]. Heat-induced sediment mineralogical changes may cause irreversible changes in the sediment mineral structure and composition, and they occur at a wide range of temperature [6]. We provided measurements of magnetic susceptibility on samples from the Stara Jimka (SJ) paleo lacustrine site in the Bohemian Forest using magnetic susceptibility meter MS-30. Sediment samples of approximately 0.2 cm thickness were weighed and put into plastic containers. First, measurements of magnetic susceptibility were taken on wet samples. Then the containers were put into the oven and sediment was dried at temperature of 110°C. After drying and cooling to room temperature, measurements of magnetic susceptibility were repeated. Dry samples were also weighed. Comparison of magnetic susceptibility of dry versus wet samples showed higher values of magnetic susceptibility of dry samples. This enhancement was probably caused during oven-drying, when constituents of sediment (mainly clays) underwent heat-induced changes. We also compared volume normalized values of magnetic susceptibility with mass normalized values. Mass normalized magnetic susceptibility was burdened by greater noise. References: [1] QUIJANO, L. et al. 2001. Magnetic Susceptibilty in Topsoils and Bulk Cores of Cultivated Calcisols. [2] DEARING, J. A. 1994. Environmental Magnetic Susceptibility. [3] HANESCH, M. and SCHOLGER, R. 2005. The Influence of Soil Type on the Magnetic Susceptibility Measured throughout Soil Profiles. [4] FARWIG, V. J. et al. 2004. The Effects of Heating on Mineral Magnetic Enhancement of Soils. [5] KLETETSCHKA, G

  18. α(1,3)-Fucosyltransferases FUT4 and FUT7 control murine susceptibility to thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huili; Morales-Levy, Maria; Rose, Jason; Mackey, Lantz C; Bodary, Peter; Eitzman, Daniel; Homeister, Jonathon W

    2013-06-01

    The α(1,3)-fucosyltransferases, types IV and VII (FUT4 and FUT7, respectively), are required for the synthesis of functional selectin-type leukocyte adhesion molecule ligands. The selectins and their ligands modulate leukocyte trafficking, and P-selectin and its ligand, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1, can modulate hemostasis and thrombosis. Regulation of thrombosis by FUT4 and/or FUT7 activity was examined in mouse models of carotid artery thrombosis and collagen/epinephrine-induced thromboembolism. Mice lacking both FUT4 and FUT7 (Fut(-/-) mice) had a shorter time to occlusive thrombus formation in the injured carotid artery and a higher mortality due to collagen/epinephrine-induced pulmonary thromboemboli. Mice lacking P-selectin or P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 did not have a prothrombotic phenotype. Whole blood platelet aggregation was enhanced, and plasma fibrinogen content, clot weight, and clot strength were increased in Fut(-/-) mice, and in vitro clot lysis was reduced compared with wild type. Fut4(-/-), but not Fut7(-/-), mice had increased pulmonary thromboembolism-induced mortality and decreased thromboemboli dissolution in vivo. These data show that FUT4 and FUT7 activity regulates thrombosis in a P-selectin- and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1-independent manner and suggest that FUT4 activity is important for thrombolysis.

  19. High-density cholesterol and apolipoprotein AI as modifiers of plasma fibrin clot properties in apparently healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Ząbczyk, Michał; Hońdo, Łukasz; Krzek, Marzena; Undas, Anetta

    2013-01-01

    Low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) increases cardiovascular risk, whereas its high levels protect against atherosclerosis via multiple beneficial effects. Dense and poorly lysable fibrin clot formation is observed in cardiovascular disease. We sought to investigate whether HDL-C and its major component apolipoprotein A (Apo A)-I affect fibrin clot properties. In 136 apparently healthy individuals (99 men, 37 women, aged 49-69 years) we determined plasma fibrin clot permeability (Ks coefficient) and lysis time (t50%) together with Apo A-I and lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] levels. The median HDL-C level was 1.33  mmol/l (range from 0.77 to 2.19  mmol/l). HDL-C was positively associated with Apo A-I (r = 0.62, P < 0.00001). HDL-C and Apo A-I were positively correlated with Ks (r = 0.52, P < 0.00001 and r = 0.44, P < 0.00001, respectively) and inversely with t50% (r = -0.44, P < 0.00001 and r = -0.35, P = 0.00003, respectively). No such associations were seen for other lipid variables. Ks and t50% were associated with Lp(a) (r = -0.42, P < 0.00001 and r = 0.42, P < 0.00001, respectively) and fibrinogen (r = -0.31, P = 0.00024 and r = 0.39, P < 0.00001, respectively). Individuals with HDL-C at least 1.4 mmol/l (n = 54) had 19% higher Ks (P = 0.00016) and 17% shorter t50% (P = 0.0012) than the remainder. After adjustment for age, fibrinogen, and Lp(a), HDL-C was the independent predictor of Ks (β = 0.7, P < 0.00001) and t50% (β = -0.62, P < 0.00001). This study shows that elevated HDL-C levels are associated with improved fibrin clot permeability and lysis, indicating a novel antithrombotic mechanism underlying the postulated beneficial effects of therapy targeted at HDL-C.

  20. Design and Testing of a Minimally Invasive Blood Clot Removal Device ConstructedWith Elements of Superelastic Nitinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puffer, Andrew J.

    Many vascular system problems stem from insufficient blood return flow to the heart. One of the main causes is a blockage within veins or arteries known as a blood clot, or thrombus. This can occur after trauma, surgery, or other phenomenological reasons. Each year in the U.S. more than 175,000 bypass procedures and more than 160,000 amputations resulting from peripheral vessel disease are performed. Clinical data indicates that clot removal devices and procedures can reduce the need for an amputation by 80 percent. Percutaneous thrombectomy refers to the removal of thrombus using catheter based non-surgical methods. The ultimate goal of any modality to treat these conditions of the arterial or venous system is to restore patency, quickly, safely, and cost effectively. Catheter directed thrombectomy and thrombolysis is less traumatic and avoids the morbidity and mortality associated with conventional surgical technique. As a result, there has been a push recently for the use of percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (PMT) devices. However, all devices have their own set of drawbacks: distal embolization, vessel wall trauma, hemolysis, to name a few. Ongoing efforts have been made to create a prototype thrombectomy device that uses elements of superelastic nitinol (a type of shape memory alloy), that seeks to address some of the drawbacks of current devices. The prototype was designed and tested in a simulated human circulatory system along side a commercially available device (The DiverCE Clot Extraction Catheter). The test evaluated how well the devices minimized distal embolization of a human blood clot created in vitro.. Results of the testing showed that the prototype device created significantly less embolization when compared to the DiverCE particles greater than 102mum (p = 0.0332). Means were statistically not different for particles between 25mum and 102mum (p = 0.2454), and particles between 5mum and 25mum (p = 0.6524). In addition the prototype was shown

  1. Marijuana Usage and Hypnotic Susceptibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franzini, Louis R.; McDonald, Roy D.

    1973-01-01

    Anonymous self-reported drug usage data and hypnotic susceptibility scores were obtained from 282 college students. Frequent marijuana users (more than 10 times) showed greater susceptibility to hypnosis than nonusers. (Author)

  2. Partial deletion of the αC-domain in the Fibrinogen Perth variant is associated with thrombosis, increased clot strength and delayed fibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    Westbury, Sarah K; Duval, Cédric; Philippou, Helen; Brown, Rebecca; Lee, Kurtis R; Murden, Sherina L; Phillips, Emma; Reilly-Stitt, Christopher; Whalley, Daniel; Ariëns, Robert A; Mumford, Andrew D

    2013-12-01

    Genetic fibrinogen (FGN) variants that are associated with bleeding or thrombosis may be informative about fibrin polymerisation, structure and fibrinolysis. We report a four generation family with thrombosis and heritable dysfibrinogenaemia segregating with a c.[1541delC];[=] variation in FGA (FGN-Perth). This deletion predicts a truncated FGN αC-domain with an unpaired terminal Cys at residue 517 of FGN-Aα. In keeping with this, SDS-PAGE of purified FGN-Perth identified a truncated FGN-Aα chain with increased co-purification of albumin, consistent with disulphide bonding to the terminal Cys of the variant FGN-Aα. Clot visco-elastic strength in whole blood containing FGN-Perth was greater than controls and tPA-mediated fibrinolysis was delayed. In FGN-Perth plasma and in purified FGN-Perth, there was markedly reduced final turbidity after thrombin-mediated clot generation. Consistent with this, FGN-Perth formed tighter, thinner fibrin fibres than controls indicating defective lateral aggregation of protofibrils. Clots generated with thrombin in FGN-Perth plasma were resistant to tPA-mediated fibrinolysis. FGN-Perth clot also displayed impaired tPA-mediated plasmin generation but incorporated α2-antiplasmin at a similar rate to control. Impaired fibrinolysis because of defective plasmin generation potentially explains the FGN-Perth clinical phenotype. These findings highlight the importance of the FGN αC-domain in the regulation of clot formation and fibrinolysis.

  3. The Rapid Induction Susceptibility Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Roger A.; Handley, George W.

    1989-01-01

    Developed Rapid Induction Susceptibility Scale using Chiasson induction to produce hypnotic susceptibility scale which is quickly administered and yields scores comparable to the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (SHSS:C). Found that validation study with college students (N=100) produced a correlation of .88 with the SHSS:C and…

  4. Persistent expression of human clotting factor IX from mouse liver after intravenous injection of adeno-associated virus vectors

    PubMed Central

    Koeberl, Dwight D.; Alexander, Ian E.; Halbert, Christine L.; Russell, David W.; Miller, A. Dusty

    1997-01-01

    We previously found that gene transduction by adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors in cell culture can be stimulated over 100-fold by treatment of the target cells with agents that affect DNA metabolism, such as irradiation or topoisomerase inhibitors. Here we show that previous γ-irradiation increased the transduction rate in mouse liver by up to 900-fold, and the topoisomerase inhibitor etoposide increased transduction by about 20-fold. Similar rates of hepatic transduction were obtained by direct injection of the liver or by systemic delivery via tail vein injection. Hepatocytes were much more efficiently transduced than other cells after systemic delivery, and up to 3% of all hepatocytes could be transduced after one vector injection. The presence of wild-type AAV, which contaminates many AAV vector preparations, was required to observe a full response to γ-irradiation. Injection of mice with AAV vectors encoding human clotting factor IX after γ-irradiation resulted in synthesis of low levels of human clotting factor IX for the 5-month period of observation. These studies show the potential of targeted gene transduction of the liver by AAV vectors for treatment of various hematological or metabolic diseases. PMID:9037069

  5. In vitro Ca(2+)-dependent maturation of milk-clotting recombinant Epr: minor extracellular protease: from Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Ageitos, José Manuel; Vallejo, Juan Andrés; Serrat, Manuel; Sánchez-Pérez, Angeles; Villa, Tomás G

    2013-06-01

    The minor extracellular protease (Epr) is secreted into the culture medium during Bacillus licheniformis, strain USC13, stationary phase of growth. Whereas, B. subtilis Epr has been reported to be involved in swarming; the B. licheniformis protease is also involved in milk-clotting as shown by the curd forming ability of culture broths expressing this protein. The objectives of this study are the characterization of recombinant B. licheniformis Epr (minor extracellular protease) and the determination of its calcium-dependent activation process. In this work, we have cloned and expressed B. licheniformis Epr in Escherichia coli. We were also able to construct a tridimensional model for Epr based on its homology to Thermococcus kodakarensis pro-tk-subtilisin 2e1p, fervidolysin from Fervidobacterium pennivorans 1rv6, and B. lentus 1GCI subtilisin. Recombinant Epr was accumulated into inclusion bodies; after protein renaturation, Epr undergoes an in vitro calcium-dependent activation, similar to that described for tk protease. The recombinant Epr is capable of producing milk curds with the same clotting activity previously described for the native B. licheniformis Epr enzyme although further rheological and industrial studies should be carried out to confirm its real applicability. This work represents for the first time that Epr may be successfully expressed in a non-bacilli microorganism.

  6. 'I don't want to hurt him.' Parents' experiences of learning to administer clotting factor to their child.

    PubMed

    Furmedge, J; Lima, S; Monagle, P; Barnes, C; Newall, F

    2013-03-01

    To explore the experiences and educational needs of parents learning to use an Implanted Central Venous Access Device (IVAD) to administer clotting factor to their child with haemophilia. Parents of children with haemophilia who had learnt to administer clotting factor via IVAD attended focus groups to discuss their experiences of the learning process. Data were transcribed and analyzed thematically. Parents described distress and trauma in dealing with the diagnosis and treatment of their child's haemophilia. It was within this context that parents began the IVAD education process. Four major themes emerged from the data: dealing with fear and anxiety; a supportive learning environment; establishing a ritual and empowerment and liberation. Parents identified a supportive learning environment as their critical need rather than a specific learning process. In addition, the concept of ritual emerged both as a mechanism for increasing the child's comfort with the procedure and as a valuable learning tool for their parents. This study highlights the importance of consulting consumers to understand their experience of illness and their educational needs. Patient and family education programs should not be limited to the provision of information, but must establish and incorporate the needs of the learner.

  7. Purification and characterisation of κ-casein specific milk-clotting metalloprotease from Termitomyces clypeatus MTCC 5091.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Rajib; Banik, Samudra Prosad; Khowala, Suman

    2015-04-15

    Milk-clotting enzymes are valued as chymosin-like protease substitutes for cheese making industries. An extracellular metalloprotease (AcPs) with high milk-clotting activity was purified from edible mushroom Termitomyces clypeatus and characterised. AcPs was preferentially active towards κ-casein, analysed by Urea-PAGE and LC-ESI-MS, whereas the degradation of α and β-casein components by AcPs proceeded slowly justifying its suitability for cheese making. RP-HPLC peptide profiling revealed that the AcPs activity on milk casein was similar to that of a commercial milk coagulant. The enzyme exhibited pH and temperature optima at 5.0 and 45 °C, respectively and showed a pI value of 4.6. One- and two dimensional zymographies revealed a single polypeptide band with proteolytic signal. The MALDI-TOF/MS followed by peptide mass fingerprinting revealed homology with a predicted protein of Populus trichocarpa. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a metalloprotease from T. clypeatus, and the results indicate that this enzyme can be considered as a potential substitute for chymosin in cheese manufacturing.

  8. Thrombin generation in Cushing's Syndrome: do the conventional clotting indices tell the whole truth?

    PubMed

    Koutroumpi, S; Spiezia, L; Albiger, N; Barbot, M; Bon, M; Maggiolo, S; Gavasso, S; Simioni, P; Frigo, A; Mantero, F; Scaroni, C

    2014-02-01

    Cushing's Syndrome (CS) is associated with an increased mortality, where hypercoagulability seems to have a crucial role in both arterial and venous thrombosis. Parameters of in vitro thrombin generation (TG) such as lag time, peak thrombin and endogenous thrombin potential (ETP), that describe the time until thrombin burst, the peak amount of TG and the total amount of thrombin generated, respectively as well as classical clotting markers were evaluated in 33 CS patients compared to both a group of 28 patients matched for the features of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) and 31 healthy individuals. CS and MetS patients had shorter lag time (p < 0.0001), higher peak and ETP (p < 0.0001) than healthy controls, though lag time was less shortened in CS (p < 0.0001) respect to MetS group. Prothrombin time (PT) was increased (p < 0.0001) in both CS and MetS patients, while partial thromboplastin time (PTT) was shorter (p < 0.0001) in CS compared to both MetS and healthy group (p < 0.0001). Factor VIII (FVIII), Antithrombin (AT), protein C and S were increased only in CS patients (p < 0.0001). lag time, AT and FVIII correlated to night salivary cortisol (r = + 0.59; p = 0.0005, r = + 0.40; p = 0.003, r = + 0.40; p = 0.04, respectively); PTT correlated inversely to urinary free cortisol (r = -0.45; p = 0.009). BMI correlated negatively to lag time (r = -0.40; p = 0.0001) and positively to peak and ETP (r = + 0.34; p = 0.001, r = + 0.28; p = 0.008, respectively). Obese and diabetic patients had shorter lag time (p = 0.0005; p = 0.0002, respectively), higher ETP (p = 0.0006; p = 0.007, respectively) and peak (p = 0.0003; p = 0.0005, respectively) as well as a more prolonged PT (p = 0.04; p = 0.009, respectively). Hypertensive individuals had higher ETP (p = 0.004), peak (p = 0.0008) and FVIII (p = 0.001). Our findings confirm a prothrombotic state in both CS and MetS patients, though lag time was less shortened in

  9. [Antimicrobial susceptibility of probiotics].

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Liu, Xiumei; Yang, Baolan; Li, Zhigang

    2008-05-01

    The aim of our study was to analyse the antibiotic susceptibility of 31 probiotics strains, including 9 Bifidobacterium and 22 Lactobacillus used for the manufacture of various fermented foods in China. Probiotics are tested for minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 24 kinds of antibiotics by broth dilution method on cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth with lysed horse blood. 31 strains of probiotics were sensitive to ampicillin, penicillin, imipenem, gentamicine, amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, gatifloxacin, erythromycin, clindamycin, and resistant to nalidixic acid, vancomycine, fosfomycin.

  10. Clot lysis time in platelet-rich plasma: method assessment, comparison with assays in platelet-free and platelet-poor plasmas, and response to tranexamic acid.

    PubMed

    Panes, Olga; Padilla, Oslando; Matus, Valeria; Sáez, Claudia G; Berkovits, Alejandro; Pereira, Jaime; Mezzano, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Fibrinolysis dysfunctions cause bleeding or predisposition to thrombosis. Platelets contain several factors of the fibrinolytic system, which could up or down regulate this process. However, the temporal relationship and relative contributions of plasma and platelet components in clot lysis are mostly unknown. We developed a clot lysis time (CLT) assay in platelet-rich plasma (PRP-CLT, with and without stimulation) and compared it to a similar one in platelet-free plasma (PFP) and to another previously reported test in platelet-poor plasma (PPP). We also studied the differential effects of a single dose of tranexamic acid (TXA) on these tests in healthy subjects. PFP- and PPP-CLT were significantly shorter than PRP-CLT, and the three assays were highly correlated (p < 0.0001). PFP- and PPP-, but more significantly PRP-CLT, were positively correlated with age and plasma PAI-1, von Willebrand factor, fibrinogen, LDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides (p < 0.001). All these CLT assays had no significant correlations with platelet aggregation/secretion, platelet counts, and pro-coagulant tests to explore factor X activation by platelets, PRP clotting time, and thrombin generation in PRP. Among all the studied variables, PFP-CLT was independently associated with plasma PAI-1, LDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides and, additionally, stimulated PRP-CLT was also independently associated with plasma fibrinogen. A single 1 g dose of TXA strikingly prolonged all three CLTs, but in contrast to the results without the drug, the lysis times were substantially shorter in non-stimulated or stimulated PRP than in PFP and PPP. This standardized PRP-CLT may become a useful tool to study the role of platelets in clot resistance and lysis. Our results suggest that initially, the platelets enmeshed in the clot slow down the fibrinolysis process. However, the increased clot resistance to lysis induced by TXA is overcome earlier in platelet-rich clots than in PFP or PPP clots. This is

  11. Alate susceptibility in ants

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Eddie K H; Frederickson, Megan E

    2014-01-01

    Pathogens are predicted to pose a particular threat to eusocial insects because infections can spread rapidly in colonies with high densities of closely related individuals. In ants, there are two major castes: workers and reproductives. Sterile workers receive no direct benefit from investing in immunity, but can gain indirect fitness benefits if their immunity aids the survival of their fertile siblings. Virgin reproductives (alates), on the other hand, may be able to increase their investment in reproduction, rather than in immunity, because of the protection they receive from workers. Thus, we expect colonies to have highly immune workers, but relatively more susceptible alates. We examined the survival of workers, gynes, and males of nine ant species collected in Peru and Canada when exposed to the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana. For the seven species in which treatment with B. bassiana increased ant mortality relative to controls, we found workers were significantly less susceptible compared with both alate sexes. Female and male alates did not differ significantly in their immunocompetence. Our results suggest that, as with other nonreproductive tasks in ant colonies like foraging and nest maintenance, workers have primary responsibility for colony immunity, allowing alates to specialize on reproduction. We highlight the importance of colony-level selection on individual immunity in ants and other eusocial organisms. PMID:25540683

  12. Magnetic susceptibilities of minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenblum, Sam; Brownfield, I.K.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic separation of minerals is a topic that is seldom reported in the literature for two reasons. First, separation data generally are byproducts of other projects; and second, this study requires a large amount of patience and is unusually tedious. Indeed, we suspect that most minerals probably are never investigated for this property. These data are timesaving for mineralogists who concentrate mono-mineralic fractions for chemical analysis, age dating, and for other purposes. The data can certainly be used in the ore-beneficiation industries. In some instances, magnetic-susceptibility data may help in mineral identification, where other information is insufficient. In past studies of magnetic separation of minerals, (Gaudin and Spedden, 1943; Tille and Kirkpatrick, 1956; Rosenblum, 1958; Rubinstein and others, 1958; Flinter, 1959; Hess, 1959; Baker, 1962; Meric and Peyre, 1963; Rojas and others, 1965; and Duchesne, 1966), the emphasis has been on the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic ranges of extraction. For readers interested in the history of magnetic separation of minerals, Krumbein and Pettijohn (1938, p. 344-346) indicated nine references back to 1848. The primary purpose of this paper is to report the magnetic-susceptibility data on as many minerals as possible, similar to tables of hardness, specific gravity, refractive indices, and other basic physical properties of minerals. A secondary purpose is to demonstrate that the total and best extraction ranges are influenced by the chemistry of the minerals. The following notes are offered to help avoid problems in separating a desired mineral concentrate from mixtures of mineral grains.

  13. Unstable trigger waves induce various intricate dynamic regimes in a reaction-diffusion system of blood clotting.

    PubMed

    Lobanova, E S; Ataullakhanov, F I

    2003-09-26

    In this work we demonstrate that the unstable trigger waves, connecting stable and unstable spatially uniform steady states, can create intricate dynamic regimes in one-dimensional three-component reaction-diffusion model describing blood clotting. Among the most interesting regimes are the composite and replicating waves running at a constant velocity. The front part of the running composite wave remains constant, while its rear part oscillates in a complex manner. The rear part of the running replicating wave periodically gives rise to new daughter waves, which propagate in the direction opposite the parent wave. The domain of these intricate regimes in parameter space lies in the region of monostability near the region of bistability.

  14. Data in support of three phase partitioning of zingibain, a milk-clotting enzyme from Zingiber officinale Roscoe rhizomes.

    PubMed

    Gagaoua, Mohammed; Hafid, Kahina; Hoggas, Naouel

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes data related to a research article titled "Three Phase Partitioning of zingibain, a milk-clotting enzyme from Zingiber officinale Roscoe rhizomes" (Gagaoua et al., 2015) [1]. Zingibain (EC 3.4.22.67), is a coagulant cysteine protease and a meat tenderizer agent that have been reported to produce satisfactory final products in dairy and meat technology, respectively. Zingibains were exclusively purified using chromatographic techniques with very low yield purification. This paper includes data of the effect of temperature, usual salts and organic solvents on the efficiency of the three phase partitioning (TPP) system. Also it includes data of the kinetic activity characterization of the purified zingibain using TPP purification approach.

  15. In Vitro Evaluation of a Rheolytic Thrombectomy System for Clot Removal from Five Different Temporary Vena Cava Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Buecker, Arno; Neuerburg, Joerg; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Vorwerk, Dierk; Guenther, Rolf W.

    1997-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of thrombus removal from temporary vena cava filters using a rheolytic thrombectomy device and to assess the embolization rate of this procedure. Methods: Five temporary vena cava filters together with porcine thrombi were placed in a vena cava flow model (semitranslucent silicone tube of 23 mm diameter, pulsatile flow at a mean flow rate of 4 L/min). A rheolytic thrombectomy system (Hydrolyser) was used with a 9 Fr guiding catheter to remove the clots. The effluent was passed through filters of different size and the amount of embolized particles as well as the remaining thrombus were measured. Results: Thrombus removal rates ranged from 85% to 100%. Embolization rates between 47% and 60% were calculated for the different filters. Conclusion: The Hydrolyser is able to remove sufficiently high amounts of thrombus from temporary vena cava filters. However, the amount of embolized particles makes it impossible to utilize this method without special precautions against embolization.

  16. Network susceptibilities: Theory and applications.

    PubMed

    Manik, Debsankha; Rohden, Martin; Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Zhang, Xiaozhu; Hallerberg, Sarah; Witthaut, Dirk; Timme, Marc

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the concept of network susceptibilities quantifying the response of the collective dynamics of a network to small parameter changes. We distinguish two types of susceptibilities: vertex susceptibilities and edge susceptibilities, measuring the responses due to changes in the properties of units and their interactions, respectively. We derive explicit forms of network susceptibilities for oscillator networks close to steady states and offer example applications for Kuramoto-type phase-oscillator models, power grid models, and generic flow models. Focusing on the role of the network topology implies that these ideas can be easily generalized to other types of networks, in particular those characterizing flow, transport, or spreading phenomena. The concept of network susceptibilities is broadly applicable and may straightforwardly be transferred to all settings where networks responses of the collective dynamics to topological changes are essential.

  17. Network susceptibilities: Theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manik, Debsankha; Rohden, Martin; Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Zhang, Xiaozhu; Hallerberg, Sarah; Witthaut, Dirk; Timme, Marc

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the concept of network susceptibilities quantifying the response of the collective dynamics of a network to small parameter changes. We distinguish two types of susceptibilities: vertex susceptibilities and edge susceptibilities, measuring the responses due to changes in the properties of units and their interactions, respectively. We derive explicit forms of network susceptibilities for oscillator networks close to steady states and offer example applications for Kuramoto-type phase-oscillator models, power grid models, and generic flow models. Focusing on the role of the network topology implies that these ideas can be easily generalized to other types of networks, in particular those characterizing flow, transport, or spreading phenomena. The concept of network susceptibilities is broadly applicable and may straightforwardly be transferred to all settings where networks responses of the collective dynamics to topological changes are essential.

  18. Local quantum thermal susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    De Pasquale, Antonella; Rossini, Davide; Fazio, Rosario; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamics relies on the possibility to describe systems composed of a large number of constituents in terms of few macroscopic variables. Its foundations are rooted into the paradigm of statistical mechanics, where thermal properties originate from averaging procedures which smoothen out local details. While undoubtedly successful, elegant and formally correct, this approach carries over an operational problem, namely determining the precision at which such variables are inferred, when technical/practical limitations restrict our capabilities to local probing. Here we introduce the local quantum thermal susceptibility, a quantifier for the best achievable accuracy for temperature estimation via local measurements. Our method relies on basic concepts of quantum estimation theory, providing an operative strategy to address the local thermal response of arbitrary quantum systems at equilibrium. At low temperatures, it highlights the local distinguishability of the ground state from the excited sub-manifolds, thus providing a method to locate quantum phase transitions. PMID:27681458

  19. [Antimicrobial susceptibility cumulative reports].

    PubMed

    Canut-Blasco, Andrés; Calvo, Jorge; Rodríguez-Díaz, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2016-10-01

    Cumulative reports on antimicrobial susceptibility tests data are important for selecting empirical treatments, as an educational tool in programs on antimicrobial use, and for establishing breakpoints defining clinical categories. These reports should be based on data validated by clinical microbiologists using diagnostic samples (not surveillance samples). In order to avoid a bias derived from including several isolates obtained from the same patient, it is recommended that, for a defined period, only the first isolate is counted. A minimal number of isolates per species should be presented: a figure of >=30 isolates is statistically acceptable. The report is usually presented in a table format where, for each cell, information on clinically relevant microorganisms-antimicrobial agents is presented. Depending on particular needs, multiple tables showing data related to patients, samples, services or special pathogens can be prepared.

  20. Topological susceptibility from slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang; de Forcrand, Philippe; Gerber, Urs

    2015-12-01

    In quantum field theories with topological sectors, a non-perturbative quantity of interest is the topological susceptibility χ t. In principle it seems straightforward to measure χ t by means of Monte Carlo simulations. However, for local update algorithms and fine lattice spacings, this tends to be difficult, since the Monte Carlo history rarely changes the topological sector. Here we test a method to measure χ t even if data from only one sector are available. It is based on the topological charges in sub-volumes, which we denote as slabs. Assuming a Gaussian distribution of these charges, this method enables the evaluation of χ t, as we demonstrate with numerical results for non-linear σ-models.

  1. Minimum wound size for clotting: flowing blood coagulates on a single collagen fiber presenting tissue factor and von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu; Tomaiuolo, Maurizio; Diamond, Scott L

    2016-08-08

    It is unknown if a lower size limit exists for human blood coagulation under flow over physiological vessel wall triggers as small as a single collagen fiber. Prior determinations of the smallest sized surface stimuli necessary for clotting of human blood, defined as the patch size threshold, have not deployed whole blood, hemodynamic flow, and platelet adhesive stimuli. For whole blood perfused in microfluidic devices, we report that steady venous flow (wall shear rate, 100 s(-1)) was sufficient to drive platelet deposition on 20 micron long zones of collagen fibers or on a single fiber. With tissue factor (TF)-coated collagen, flowing blood generated robust platelet deposits, platelet-localized thrombin, and fibrin on a single collagen fiber, thus demonstrating the absence of a physiological patch size threshold under venous flow. In contrast, at arterial wall shear rate (1000 s(-1)) with TF present, essentially no platelet or fibrin deposition occurred on 20 micron collagen zones or on a single collagen fiber, demonstrating a patch threshold, which was overcome by pre-coating the collagen with von Willebrand factor (vWF). For venous flows, human blood can clot on one of the smallest biological units of a single collagen fiber presenting TF. For arterial flows, vWF together with TF allows human blood to generate thrombin and fibrin on a patch stimulus as limited as a single collagen fiber. vWF-dependent platelet adhesion represents a particle-based sensing mechanism of micron-scale stimuli that then allows amplification of the molecular components of TF-driven thrombin and fibrin production under arterial flow.

  2. The Safety of Using High Frequency, Low Intensity Ultrasound to Enhance Thrombolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Soltani, Azita

    2006-05-08

    The EKOS Ultrasound Infusion Systems (EKOS Corporation, Bothell, WA) use high frequency, low intensity ultrasound to accelerate thrombolysis by enhancing clot permeability and lytic drug penetration into thrombus. These systems are designed to provide efficacious catheter-directed treatment for the management of stroke, peripheral arterial occlusion and deep vein thrombosis. The in vitro and in vivo results of investigating the stability of therapeutic and diagnostic compounds used in combination with EKOS devices, the potential for adverse biological effects and the clot fragmentation confirmed the safety of EKOS ultrasound infusion systems in thrombolysis treatment.

  3. Classroom Seating and Hypnotic Susceptibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sackeim, Harold A.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether people who differ in behavioral and self-report measures of lateralized seating preferences also differ in hypnotic susceptibility. Only right-handed subjects were used, and the associations between hypnotic susceptibility and seating preference were examined separately for males and females.…

  4. Genetic Susceptibility to Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Skibola, Christine F.; Curry, John D.; Nieters, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genetic susceptibility studies of lymphoma may serve to identify at risk populations and to elucidate important disease mechanisms. METHODS This review considered all studies published through October 2006 on the contribution of genetic polymorphisms in the risk of lymphoma. RESULTS Numerous studies implicate the role of genetic variants that promote B-cell survival and growth with increased risk of lymphoma. Several reports including a large pooled study by InterLymph, an international consortium of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) case-control studies, found positive associations between variant alleles in TNF -308G>A and IL10 -3575T>A genes and risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Four studies reported positive associations between a GSTT1 deletion and risk of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Genetic studies of folate-metabolizing genes implicate folate in NHL risk, but further studies that include folate and alcohol assessments are needed. Links between NHL and genes involved in energy regulation and hormone production and metabolism may provide insights into novel mechanisms implicating neuro- and endocrine-immune cross-talk with lymphomagenesis, but will need replication in larger populations. CONCLUSIONS Numerous studies suggest that common genetic variants with low penetrance influence lymphoma risk, though replication studies will be needed to eliminate false positive associations. PMID:17606447

  5. Overview of quantitative susceptibility mapping.

    PubMed

    Deistung, Andreas; Schweser, Ferdinand; Reichenbach, Jürgen R

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic susceptibility describes the magnetizability of a material to an applied magnetic field and represents an important parameter in the field of MRI. With the recently introduced method of quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and its conceptual extension to susceptibility tensor imaging (STI), the non-invasive assessment of this important physical quantity has become possible with MRI. Both methods solve the ill-posed inverse problem to determine the magnetic susceptibility from local magnetic fields. Whilst QSM allows the extraction of the spatial distribution of the bulk magnetic susceptibility from a single measurement, STI enables the quantification of magnetic susceptibility anisotropy, but requires multiple measurements with different orientations of the object relative to the main static magnetic field. In this review, we briefly recapitulate the fundamental theoretical foundation of QSM and STI, as well as computational strategies for the characterization of magnetic susceptibility with MRI phase data. In the second part, we provide an overview of current methodological and clinical applications of QSM with a focus on brain imaging. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Genetic susceptibility to occupational exposures

    PubMed Central

    Christiani, D C; Mehta, A J; Yu, C-L

    2013-01-01

    Because of their high prevalence in the general population, genetic variants that determine susceptibility to environmental exposures may contribute greatly to the development of occupational diseases in the setting of specific exposures occurring in the workplace. Studies investigating genetic susceptibilities in the workplace may: (1) provide mechanistic insight into the aetiology of disease, in particular the determination of environmentally responsive genes; (2) identify susceptible subpopulations with respect to exposure; and (3) provide valuable input in setting occupational exposure limits by taking genetic susceptibility into account. Polymorphisms in the NAT2 and the HLA-DPB1Glu69 genes provide classic examples of how genetic susceptibility markers have a clear role in identifying disease risk in bladder cancer and chronic beryllium disease, respectively. For diseases with more complex and multifactorial aetiology such as occupational asthma and chronic airways disease, susceptibility studies for selected genetic polymorphisms provide additional insight into the biological mechanisms of disease. Even when polymorphisms for genetic susceptibility have a clear role in identifying disease risk, the value of wide scale genetic screening in occupational settings remains limited due to primarily ethical and social concerns. Thus, large scale genetic screening in the workplace is not currently recommended. PMID:18487431

  7. [Antimicrobial susceptibility in Chile 2012].

    PubMed

    Cifuentes-D, Marcela; Silva, Francisco; García, Patricia; Bello, Helia; Briceño, Isabel; Calvo-A, Mario; Labarca, Jaime

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria antimicrobial resistance is an uncontrolled public health problem that progressively increases its magnitude and complexity. The Grupo Colaborativo de Resistencia, formed by a join of experts that represent 39 Chilean health institutions has been concerned with bacteria antimicrobial susceptibility in our country since 2008. In this document we present in vitro bacterial susceptibility accumulated during year 2012 belonging to 28 national health institutions that represent about 36% of hospital discharges in Chile. We consider of major importance to report periodically bacteria susceptibility so to keep the medical community updated to achieve target the empirical antimicrobial therapies and the control measures and prevention of the dissemination of multiresistant strains.

  8. Susceptibility of p27 kip1 knockout mice to urinary bladder carcinogenesis induced by N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine may not simply be due to enhanced proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hikosaka, Atsuya; Ogawa, Kumiko; Sugiura, Satoshi; Asamoto, Makoto; Takeshita, Fumitaka; Sato, Shin-Ya; Nakanishi, Makoto; Kohri, Kenjiro; Shirai, Tomoyuki

    2008-03-15

    Deregulated proliferation is one of the fundamental characteristics of carcinogenesis. p27 is one of the most well characterized negative cell cycle regulator. In our previous study, expression of p27 protein was found to be dramatically suppressed on stimulation of cell proliferation by calculi in the rodent urinary bladder, withdrawal of the insult resulting in re-expression of p27 and regression of urothelial hyperplastic lesions. In the present study, to evaluate how loss of function impacts on urinary bladder carcinogenesis, N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN), a bladder carcinogen was given to p27 knockout mice. Males and females with either null, hetero or wild-type p27 alleles were divided into 2 groups, one given drinking water containing 0.05% BBN for 10 weeks and the other receiving distilled water, then, killed at week 20. The experiment was repeated for confirmation of the outcome. In the second experiment, performed with a larger number of animals, the incidence of urinary bladder carcinomas was significantly higher in female p27-null mice than in their wild-type counterparts. p27 deficiency also resulted in their increase of relative weights of urinary bladders and section areas of carcinomas in BBN-treated mice. Interestingly, while BrdU labeling indices generally increased with progression of mucosal proliferative lesions, from normal epithelium, through hyperplasia to carcinoma, there was no significant variation with the p27 genotype, in tumors as well as normal urothelium. These findings suggest that p27 deficient mice have elevated susceptibility to BBN-induction of urinary bladder carcinogenesis through a mechanism which might be independent of acceleration of cell cycling.

  9. Thrombin bound to a fibrin clot confers angiogenic and haemostatic properties on endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Smadja, David M; Basire, Agnès; Amelot, Aymeric; Conte, Aurélie; Bièche, Ivan; Le Bonniec, Bernard F; Aiach, Martine; Gaussem, Pascale

    2008-06-01

    Recent data suggest that endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are involved in recanalizing venous thrombi. We examined the impact of a fibrin network, and particularly of adsorbed thrombin, on EPCs derived from cord blood CD34(+) cells. Fibrin networks generated in microplates by adding CaCl(2) to platelet-depleted plasma retained adsorbed thrombin at the average concentration of 4.2 nM per well. EPCs expressed high levels of endothelial cell protein C receptor and thrombomodulin, allowing the generation of activated protein C on the fibrin matrix in the presence of exogenous human protein C. The fibrin matrix induced significant EPC proliferation and, when placed in the lower chamber of a Boyden device, strongly enhanced EPC migration. These effects were partly inhibited by hirudin by 41% and 66%, respectively), which suggests that fibrin-adsorbed thrombin interacts with EPCs via the thrombin receptor PAR-1. Finally, spontaneous lysis of the fibrin network, studied by measuring D-dimer release into the supernatant, was inhibited by EPCs but not by control mononuclear cells. Such an effect was associated with a 10-fold increase in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) secretion by EPCs cultivated in fibrin matrix. Overall, our data show that EPCs, in addition to their angiogenic potential, have both anticoagulant and antifibrinolytic properties. Thrombin may modulate these properties and contribute to thrombus recanalization by EPCs.

  10. Thrombin bound to a fibrin clot confers angiogenic and haemostatic properties on endothelial progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Smadja, David M; Basire, Agnès; Amelot, Aymeric; Conte, Aurélie; Bièche, Ivan; Le Bonniec, Bernard F; Aiach, Martine; Gaussem, Pascale

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Recent data suggest that endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are involved in recanalizing venous thrombi. We examined the impact of a fibrin network, and particularly of adsorbed thrombin, on EPCs derived from cord blood CD34+ cells. Fibrin networks generated in microplates by adding CaCl2 to platelet-depleted plasma retained adsorbed thrombin at the average concentration of 4.2 nM per well. EPCs expressed high levels of endothelial cell protein C receptor and thrombomodulin, allowing the generation of activated protein C on the fibrin matrix in the presence of exogenous human protein C. The fibrin matrix induced significant EPC proliferation and, when placed in the lower chamber of a Boyden device, strongly enhanced EPC migration. These effects were partly inhibited by hirudin by 41% and 66%, respectively), which suggests that fibrin-adsorbed thrombin interacts with EPCs via the thrombin receptor PAR-1. Finally, spontaneous lysis of the fibrin network, studied by measuring D-dimer release into the supernatant, was inhibited by EPCs but not by control mononuclear cells. Such an effect was associated with a 10-fold increase in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) secretion by EPCs cultivated in fibrin matrix. Overall, our data show that EPCs, in addition to their angiogenic potential, have both anticoagulant and antifibrinolytic properties. Thrombin may modulate these properties and contribute to thrombus recanalization by EPCs. PMID:18494938

  11. Cognitive Factors in Hypnotic Susceptibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Robert D.; Field, Peter B.

    1971-01-01

    This research explored the influence of cognitive variables on susceptibility to hypnosis. The three variables of concern in the present study are automatization, attention, and body experience. The results are summarized. (Author)

  12. An evaluation of the effect of clotting on the relationship between copper and caeruloplasmin in bovine blood.

    PubMed

    Laven, R A; Livesey, C T

    2007-09-01

    The ratio of caeruloplasmin activity to copper concentration (CP:Cu) has been suggested as a more accurate determinant of the requirement for additional copper than plasma or liver copper concentrations. Although this test has no peer-reviewed evidence of efficacy, it has been used by a large number of UK veterinarians. However, the available test uses a serum caeruloplasmin (sCP) activity to plasma copper (pCu) concentration ratio which, because of the preferential loss of caeruloplasmin during clotting, is likely to underestimate the true CP:Cu, although it has been suggested that the marginal range accounts for this. This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of using serum copper (sCu) rather than pCu concentrations in calculating CP:Cu. Using sCu rather than pCu increased CP:Cu by more than was accounted for by the marginal range. Of 48 cattle which were reported as 'low' using sCP:pCu, 22 were 'normal' when sCu was used instead of pCu. All herds with 'marginal' or 'low' mean CP:Cu when the sCP:pCu concentration ratio was used had 'normal' ratios when sCu was used instead of pCu.

  13. Multiple Ligands of von Willebrand Factor-binding Protein (vWbp) Promote Staphylococcus aureus Clot Formation in Human Plasma*

    PubMed Central

    Thomer, Lena; Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus secretes coagulase (Coa) and von Willebrand factor-binding protein (vWbp) to activate host prothrombin and form fibrin cables, thereby promoting the establishment of infectious lesions. The D1-D2 domains of Coa and vWbp associate with, and non-proteolytically activate prothrombin. Moreover, Coa encompasses C-terminal tandem repeats for binding to fibrinogen, whereas vWbp has been reported to associate with von Willebrand factor and fibrinogen. Here we used affinity chromatography with non-catalytic Coa and vWbp to identify the ligands for these virulence factors in human plasma. vWbp bound to prothrombin, fibrinogen, fibronectin, and factor XIII, whereas Coa co-purified with prothrombin and fibrinogen. vWbp association with fibrinogen and factor XIII, but not fibronectin, required prothrombin and triggered the non-proteolytic activation of FXIII in vitro. Staphylococcus aureus coagulation of human plasma was associated with the recruitment of prothrombin, FXIII, and fibronectin as well as the formation of cross-linked fibrin. FXIII activity in staphylococcal clots could be attributed to thrombin-dependent proteolytic activation as well as vWbp-mediated non-proteolytic activation of FXIII zymogen. PMID:23960083

  14. Alpha-2-macroglobulin functions as an inhibitor of fibrinolytic, clotting, and neutrophilic proteinases in sepsis: studies using a baboon model.

    PubMed

    de Boer, J P; Creasey, A A; Chang, A; Abbink, J J; Roem, D; Eerenberg, A J; Hack, C E; Taylor, F B

    1993-12-01

    Alpha-2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) may function as a proteinase inhibitor in vivo. Levels of this protein are decreased in sepsis, but the reason these levels are low is unknown. Therefore, we analyzed the behavior of alpha 2M in a baboon model for sepsis. Upon challenge with a lethal (4 baboons) or a sublethal (10 baboons) dose of Escherichia coli, levels of inactivated alpha 2M (i alpha 2M) steadily increased, the changes being more pronounced in the animals that received the lethal dose. The rise in i alpha 2M significantly correlated with the increase of thrombin-antithrombin III, plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin, and, to a lesser extent, with that of elastase-alpha 1-antitrypsin complexes, raising the question of involvement of fibrinolytic, clotting, and neutrophilic proteinases in the inactivation of alpha 2M. Experiments with chromogenic substrates confirmed that thrombin, plasmin, elastase, and cathepsin G indeed had formed complexes with alpha 2M. Changes in alpha 2M similar to those observed in the animals that received E. coli occurred in baboons challenged with Staphylococcus aureus, indicating that alpha 2M formed complexes with the proteinases just mentioned in gram-positive sepsis as well. We conclude that alpha 2M in this baboon model for sepsis is inactivated by formation of complexes with proteinases, derived from activated neutrophils and from fibrinolytic and coagulation cascades. We suggest that similar mechanisms may account for the decreased alpha 2M levels in clinical sepsis.

  15. Cloning, expression, and characterization of a milk-clotting aspartic protease gene (Po-Asp) from Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chaomin; Zheng, Liesheng; Chen, Liguo; Tan, Qi; Shang, Xiaodong; Ma, Aimin

    2014-02-01

    An aspartic protease gene from Pleurotus ostreatus (Po-Asp) had been cloned based on the 3' portion of cDNA in our previous work. The Po-Asp cDNA contained 1,324 nucleotides with an open reading frame (ORF) of 1,212 bp encoding 403 amino acid residues. The putative amino acid sequence included a signal peptide, an activation peptide, two most possible N-glycosylation sites and two conserved catalytic active site. The mature polypeptide with 327 amino acid residues had a calculated molecular mass of 35.3 kDa and a theoretical isoelectric point of 4.57. Basic Local Alignment Search Tool analysis showed 68-80 % amino acid sequence identical to other basidiomycetous aspartic proteases. Sequence comparison and evolutionary analysis revealed that Po-Asp is a member of fungal aspartic protease family. The DNA sequence of Po-Asp is 1,525 bp in length without untranslated region, consisting of seven exons and six introns. The Po-Asp cDNA without signal sequence was expressed in Pichia pastoris and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated the molecular mass of recombinant Po-Asp was about 43 kDa. The crude recombinant aspartic protease had milk-clotting activity.

  16. Intra-arterial thrombolysis in acute ischaemic stroke: experience with a superselective catheter embedded in the clot.

    PubMed Central

    Casto, L; Caverni, L; Camerlingo, M; Censori, B; Moschini, L; Servalli, M C; Partziguian, T; Belloni, G; Mamoli, A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To report experience of intra-arterial thrombolysis for acute stroke, performed with a microcatheter navigated into the intracranial circulation to impale the clot. METHODS--Patients were selected on the following criteria: (1) clinical examination suggesting a large vessel occlusion in stroke patients between 18 and 75 years; (2) no radiographic signs of large actual ischaemia on CT at admission; (3) angiographically documented occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) stem or of the basilar artery (BA), without occlusion of the ipsilateral extracranial internal carotid artery or of both the vertebral arteries; (4) end of the entire procedure within six hours of stroke. 12 patients with acute stroke were recruited, eight of whom had occlusion of the MCA stem and four of the BA. Urokinase was used as the thrombolytic agent. RESULTS--Complete recanalisation in six MCA stem and in two BA occurred, and partial recanalisation in two MCA stem and one BA. There was no recanalisation in one BA. A clinically silent haemorrhage occurred in two patients, and a parenchymal haematoma in one patient, all in MCA occlusions. At four months five patients achieved self sufficiency (four with MCA and one with BA occlusion). Six patients were dependent (three totally), and one died. CONCLUSIONS--The strict criteria of eligibility allowing the enrollment of very few patients and the procedure itself, requiring particular neuroradiological expertise, make this procedure not routine. Nevertheless, the approach can be considered a possible option for patients with acute ischaemic stroke. Images PMID:8648335

  17. Expression of active human blood clotting factor IX in transgenic mice: use of a cDNA with complete mRNA sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Choo, K H; Raphael, K; McAdam, W; Peterson, M G

    1987-01-01

    Haemophilia B is a bleeding disorder caused by a functional deficiency of the clotting factor IX. A full length human factor IX complementary DNA clone containing all the natural mRNA sequences plus some flanking intron sequences was constructed with a metallothionein promoter and introduced into transgenic mice by microinjection into the pronuclei of fertilised eggs. The transgenic mice expressed high levels of messenger RNA, gamma-carboxylated and glycosylated protein, and biological clotting activity that are indistinguishable from normal human plasma factor IX. This study demonstrates the feasibility of expressing highly complex heterologous proteins in transgenic mice. It also provides the groundwork for the production of large amounts of human factor IX in larger transgenic livestock for therapeutic use, and the investigation of alternative genetic therapies for haemophilia B. Images PMID:3029708

  18. Enzymatic milk clotting activity in artichoke (Cynara scolymus) leaves and alpine thistle (Carduus defloratus) flowers. Immobilization of alpine thistle aspartic protease.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Marilena; Di Pierro, Prospero; Dejonghe, Winnie; Mariniello, Loredana; Porta, Raffaele

    2016-08-01

    Two different milk clotting enzymes, belonging to the aspartic protease family, were extracted from both artichoke leaves and alpine thistle flowers, and the latter was covalently immobilized by using a polyacrylic support containing polar epoxy groups. Our findings showed that the alpine thistle aspartic protease was successfully immobilized at pH 7.0 on Immobeads IB-150P beads and that, under these experimental conditions, an immobilization yield of about 68% and a recovery of about 54% were obtained. Since the enzyme showed an optimal pH of 5.0, a value very similar to the one generally used for milk clotting during cheese making, and exhibited a satisfactory stability over time, the use of such immobilized vegetable rennet for the production of novel dairy products is suggested.

  19. Comparative Effect of Quercetin and Quercetin-3-O-β-d-Glucoside on Fibrin Polymers, Blood Clots, and in Rodent Models.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Hui; Kim, Kyung-Je; Kim, Seung

    2016-11-01

    The present study evaluates the in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo antithrombotic and anticoagulant effect of two flavonoids: quercetin and quercetin-3-O-β-d-glucoside (isoquercetin). The present results have shown that quercetin and isoquercetin inhibit the enzymatic activity of thrombin and FXa and suppress fibrin clot formation and blood clotting. The prolongation effect of quercetin and isoquercetin against epinephrine and collagen-induced platelet activation may have been caused by intervention in intracellular signaling pathways including coagulation cascade and aggregation response on platelets and blood. The in vivo and ex vivo anticoagulant efficacy of quercetin and isoquercetin was evaluated in thrombin-induced acute thromboembolism model and in ICR mice. Our findings showed that in vitro and in vivo inhibitory effects of quercetin were slightly higher than that of quercetin glucoside, whereas in vitro and ex vivo anticoagulant effects of quercetin were weaker than that of quercetin glucoside because of their structural characteristics.

  20. Early clinical experience of the safety and efficacy of EndoClot in the management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Beg, Sabina; Al-Bakir, Ibrahim; Bhuva, Meha; Patel, Jay; Fullard, Mark; Leahy, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: EndoClot is a novel topical hemostatic powder approved for use in non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. This study examines its impact as rescue therapy in the management of gastrointestinal bleeding for which standard endoscopic therapy failed to achieve hemostasis. Methods: This observational study covered a 24-month period. Data were collated from patients treated with EndoClot for comparison with a cohort of patients managed with standard endoscopic therapy. End points of this study included immediate hemostasis, 30-day rebleed rate, 30-day mortality rate, and adverse events. Results: Between April 1, 2012, and March 31, 2014, gastroscopic procedures were performed in 1009 patients, of whom 173 required endoscopic therapy. EndoClot was used in 21 patients, with immediate hemostasis achieved in all cases, a 30-day rebleed rate of 4.8 % (95 % confidence interval [95 %CI] – 4.34 % to 3.94 %), and a 30-day mortality rate of 19.0 % (95 %CI 2.29 % – 35.91 %). Despite higher risk bleeds in this cohort of patients, Fisher's exact test demonstrated no significant difference between their 30-day mortality rate (P = 0.51) and rebleed rate (P = 0.31) and those of the patients treated with standard endoscopic hemostatic techniques. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that EndoClot can be used both safely and effectively in the management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26716120

  1. On-Chip Titration of an Anticoagulant Argatroban and Determination of the Clotting Time within Whole Blood or Plasma Using a Plug-Based Microfluidic System

    PubMed Central

    Song, Helen; Li, Hung-Wing; Munson, Matthew S.; Van Ha, Thuong G.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes extending plug-based microfluidics to handling complex biological fluids such as blood, solving the problem of injecting additional reagents into plugs, and applying this system to measuring of clotting time in small volumes of whole blood and plasma. Plugs are droplets transported through microchannels by fluorocarbon fluids. A plug-based microfluidic system was developed to titrate an anticoagulant (argatroban) into blood samples and to measure the clotting time using the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) test. To carry out these experiments, the following techniques were developed for a plug-based system: (i) using Teflon AF coating on the microchannel wall to enable formation of plugs containing blood and transport of the solid fibrin clots within plugs, (ii) using a hydrophilic glass capillary to enable reliable merging of a reagent from an aqueous stream into plugs, (iii) using bright-field microscopy to detect the formation of a fibrin clot within plugs and using fluorescent microscopy to detect the production of thrombin using a fluorogenic substrate, and (iv) titration of argatroban (0–1.5 μg/mL) into plugs and measurement of the resulting APTTs at room temperature (23 °C) and physiological temperature (37 °C). APTT measurements were conducted with normal pooled plasma (platelet-poor plasma) and with donor’s blood samples (both whole blood and platelet-rich plasma). APTT values and APTT ratios measured by the plug-based microfluidic device were compared to the results from a clinical laboratory at 37 °C. APTT obtained from the on-chip assay were about double those from the clinical laboratory but the APTT ratios from these two methods agreed well with each other. PMID:16841902

  2. A Reduction in Clot Formation Rate and Strength Assessed by Thrombelastography Is Indicative of Transfusion Requirements in Patients With Penetrating Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    by currently used labora- tory values.4,9 Because it is known which blood components are responsible for the phases of clot formation, irregularity in...a specific portion of the TEG serves a diagnostic purpose. These values may direct transfusion of appropriate blood components and drugs, including...in the first 24 hours after admission included all blood components (units of packed red blood cells fresh frozen plasma fresh whole blood). Fresh

  3. On-chip titration of an anticoagulant argatroban and determination of the clotting time within whole blood or plasma using a plug-based microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Song, Helen; Li, Hung-Wing; Munson, Matthew S; Van Ha, Thuong G; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2006-07-15

    This paper describes extending plug-based microfluidics to handling complex biological fluids such as blood, solving the problem of injecting additional reagents into plugs, and applying this system to measuring of clotting time in small volumes of whole blood and plasma. Plugs are droplets transported through microchannels by fluorocarbon fluids. A plug-based microfluidic system was developed to titrate an anticoagulant (argatroban) into blood samples and to measure the clotting time using the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) test. To carry out these experiments, the following techniques were developed for a plug-based system: (i) using Teflon AF coating on the microchannel wall to enable formation of plugs containing blood and transport of the solid fibrin clots within plugs, (ii) using a hydrophilic glass capillary to enable reliable merging of a reagent from an aqueous stream into plugs, (iii) using bright-field microscopy to detect the formation of a fibrin clot within plugs and using fluorescent microscopy to detect the production of thrombin using a fluorogenic substrate, and (iv) titration of argatroban (0-1.5 microg/mL) into plugs and measurement of the resulting APTTs at room temperature (23 degrees C) and physiological temperature (37 degrees C). APTT measurements were conducted with normal pooled plasma (platelet-poor plasma) and with donor's blood samples (both whole blood and platelet-rich plasma). APTT values and APTT ratios measured by the plug-based microfluidic device were compared to the results from a clinical laboratory at 37 degrees C. APTT obtained from the on-chip assay were about double those from the clinical laboratory but the APTT ratios from these two methods agreed well with each other.

  4. Transamidase Reactions Involved in the Enzymic Coagulation of Semen: Isolation of γ-Glutamyl-ε-Lysine Dipeptide from Clotted Secretion Protein of Guinea Pig Seminal Vesicle

    PubMed Central

    Williams-Ashman, H. G.; Notides, A. C.; Pabalan, S. S.; Lorand, L.

    1972-01-01

    New supportive evidence is advanced in favor of the hypothesis that the enzymic coagulation of guinea pig semen involves transamidase reactions that result in the formation of γ-glutamyl-ε-lysine intermolecular cross linkages between molecules of a basic protein in seminal vesicle secretion. The dipeptide γ-glutamyl-ε-lysine was isolated in large quantities from proteolytic digests of the coagulated basic vesicular secretion protein that comprises the seminal clot. Images PMID:4506101

  5. Transamidase reactions involved in the enzymic coagulation of semen: isolation of -glutamyl- -lysine dipeptide from clotted secretion protein of guinea pig seminal vesicle.

    PubMed

    Williams-Ashman, H G; Notides, A C; Pabalan, S S; Lorand, L

    1972-08-01

    New supportive evidence is advanced in favor of the hypothesis that the enzymic coagulation of guinea pig semen involves transamidase reactions that result in the formation of gamma-glutamyl-epsilon-lysine intermolecular cross linkages between molecules of a basic protein in seminal vesicle secretion. The dipeptide gamma-glutamyl-epsilon-lysine was isolated in large quantities from proteolytic digests of the coagulated basic vesicular secretion protein that comprises the seminal clot.

  6. A comparative evaluation of the blood clot, platelet-rich plasma, and platelet-rich fibrin in regeneration of necrotic immature permanent teeth: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Narang, Isha; Mittal, Neelam; Mishra, Navin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study was designed as a clinical trial to evaluate and compare the regenerative potential of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF), platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and blood clot in immature necrotic permanent teeth with or without associated apical periodontitis. Methods: Access preparation was done under rubber dam isolation. Copious irrigation was done with 2.5% NaOCl and triple antibiotic paste was placed as an intracanal medicament. After 4 weeks, the cases were divided into four groups with five patients in each group. The study design had three test arms and one control arm. Group I in which mineral trioxide aggregate apexification was carried out and it was kept as control group to evaluate the regenerative potential of blood clot and platelet concentrates, Group II in which blood clot was used as scaffold in the canal, Group III in PRF was used as scaffold, and Group IV in which PRP carried on collagen was used as a scaffold. Results: The clinical and radiographic evaluation after 6 and 18 months was done by two independent observers who were blinded from the groups. The scoring was done as: None score was denoted by, Fair by 1, Good by 2, and Excellent by 3. The data were then analyzed statistically by Fisher's exact test using Statistics and Data 11.1(PRP Using harvest Smart PReP2) which showed statistically significant values in Group III as compared to other Groups. Conclusion: PRF has huge potential to accelerate the growth characteristics in immature necrotic permanent teeth as compared to PRP and blood clot. PMID:25684914

  7. Biochemical and milk-clotting properties and mapping of catalytic subsites of an extracellular aspartic peptidase from basidiomycete fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ronivaldo Rodrigues; de Oliveira, Lilian Caroline Gonçalves; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Juliano, Luiz; de Oliveira, Arthur H C; Rosa, Jose C; Cabral, Hamilton

    2017-06-15

    For a long time, proteolytic enzymes have been employed as key tools of industrial processes, especially in the dairy industry. In the present work, we used Phanerochaete chrysosporium for biochemical characterization and analysis of catalytic specificity of an aspartic peptidase. Our results revealed an aspartic peptidase with molecular mass ∼38kDa, maximal activity at pH 4.5 and 50°C, and stability above 80% in the pH range of 3-8 and temperature up to 55°C for 1h. In a milk-clotting assay, this peptidase showed maximal milk clotting activity at 60-65°C and maintenance of enzymatic activity above 80% in the presence of 20mM CaCl2. In a specificity assay, we observed stronger restriction of catalysis at the S1 subsite, with a preference for lysine, arginine, leucine, tyrosine, and phenylalanine residues. The restricted proteolysis and milk-clotting potential are attractive properties for the use in cheese production.

  8. Viscoelasticity as a measurement of clot structure in poorly controlled type 2 diabetes patients: towards a precision and personalized medicine approach

    PubMed Central

    Pretorius, Etheresia; Bester, Janette

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Type 2 diabetes patients (T2D) have a considerably higher cardiovascularrisk, which is closely associated with systemic inflammation, and an accompanying pathologic coagulation system. Due to the complexity of the diabetic profile, we suggest that we need to look at each patient individually and particularly at his or her clotting profile; as the healthiness of the coagulation system gives us an indication of the success of clinical intervention. Results T2D coagulability varied markedly, although there were no clear difference in medication use and the standards of HbA1c levels. Research design and methods Our sample consisted of 90 poorly controlled T2D and 71 healthy individuals. We investigated the medication use and standards of HbA1c levels of T2D and we used thromboelastography (TEG) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to study their clot formation. Conclusion The latest NIH guidelines suggest that clinical medicine should focus on precision medicine, and the current broad understanding is that precision medicine may in future, provide personalized targets for preventative and therapeutic interventions. Here we suggest a practical example where TEG can be used as an easily accessible point-of-care tool to establish a comprehensive clotting profile analysis for T2D patients; and additionally may provide valuable information that may be used in the envisaged precision medicine approach. Only by closely following each individual patient's progress and healthiness and thereby managing systemic inflammation, will we be able to reduce this pandemic. PMID:27447972

  9. Structure-Based Design of Mucor pusillus Pepsin for the Improved Ratio of Clotting Activity/Proteolytic Activity in Cheese Manufacture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Sun, Yonghai; Li, Zhuolin; Luo, Quan; Li, Tiezhu; Wang, Tuoyi

    2015-01-01

    Previous theoretical studies have determined the intermolecular interactions between Mucor pusillus pepsin (MPP) and the key domain of κ-casein, with the aim to understand the mechanism of milk clotting in the specific hydrolysis of κ-casein by MPP for cheese making. Here, we combined the docking model with site-directed mutagenesis to further investigate the functional roles of amino acid residues in the active site of MPP. T218S replacement caused a low thermostability and moderate increase in the clotting activity. Mutations of three amino acid residues, T218A and T218S in S2 region and L287G in S4 region, led to a significant decrease in proteolytic activity. For T218S and L287G, an increase in the ratio of clotting activity to proteolytic activity (C/P) was observed, in particular 3.34-fold increase was found for T218S mutants. Structural analysis of the binding mode of MPP and chymosin splitting domain (CSD) of κ-casein indicated that T218S plays a critical role in forming a hydrogen bond with the hydroxyl group of Ser(104) around the MPP-sensitive Phe(105)-Met(106) peptide bond of κ- casein and L287G is partially responsible for CSD accommodation in a suitable hydrophobic environment. These data suggested that T218S mutant could serve as a promising milk coagulant that contributes to an optimal flavor development in mature cheese.

  10. Development of haemostatic decontaminants for the treatment of wounds contaminated with chemical warfare agents. 1: evaluation of in vitro clotting efficacy in the presence of certain contaminants.

    PubMed

    Hall, Charlotte A; Lydon, Helen L; Dalton, Christopher H; Chipman, J K; Graham, John S; Chilcott, Robert P

    2015-05-01

    The treatment of penetrating, haemorrhaging injuries sustained within a hazardous environment may be complicated by contamination with toxic chemicals. There are currently no specific medical countermeasures for such injuries. Haemostats with an absorbent mechanism of action have the potential to simultaneously stop bleeding and decontaminate wounds. However, a primary requirement of a 'haemostatic decontaminant' is the retention of clotting function in the presence of chemical contaminants. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the haemostatic efficacy of seven commercially available haemostats in the presence of toxic chemicals (soman, VX, sulphur mustard, petrol, aviation fuel and motor oil). Clot viscosity was assessed ex vivo using thrombelastography following treatment of pig blood with: (i) toxic chemical; (ii) haemostat; or (iii) haemostat in combination with toxic chemical. Several contaminants (VX, petrol and GD) were found to be pro-haemostatic and none had an adverse effect on the rate with which the test products attained haemostasis. However, the total clot strength for blood treated with certain haemostats in the presence of sulphur mustard, soman and petrol was significantly decreased. Three test products failed to demonstrate haemostatic function in this ex vivo (thrombelastography) model; this was tentatively ascribed to the products achieving haemostasis through a tamponade mechanism of action, which can only be replicated using in vivo models. Overall, this study has identified a number of commercial products that may have potential as haemostatic decontaminants and warrant further investigation to establish their decontaminant efficacy.

  11. Antimicrobial susceptibility and susceptibility testing of Mycoplasma hominis: a review.

    PubMed

    Bygdeman, S M; Mårdh, P A

    1983-01-01

    The determination of the minimal growth-inhibiting concentration (MIC), the minimal metabolism-inhibiting concentration (MMC), and the minimal mycoplasmacidal concentration (MCC) of various antimicrobial compounds for Mycoplasma hominis is influenced by the pH of the test media, the inoculum size, and the incubation time, although each of these factors generally do not affect the minimal concentration more than fourfold. M. hominis is resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics, vancomycin, sulfonamides, trimethoprim, and polymyxin B. There are great differences in the susceptibility of M. hominis to various macrolide antibiotics. Thus the organism is resistant to erythromycin and oleandomycin, moderately resistant to tylosin and spiramycin, susceptible to josamycin as well as to another macrolide drug, labelled M-4365G. M. hominis is also highly susceptible to the macrolide-like compound rosaramicin and to the tetracyclines (although resistant strains occur). It is susceptible to lincomycin and clindamycin, and moderately susceptible to chloramphenicol and rifampicin. The aminoglycosides have limited activity against M. hominis.

  12. Differential Susceptibility to the Environment: Are Developmental Models Compatible with the Evidence from Twin Studies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Giudice, Marco

    2016-01-01

    According to models of differential susceptibility, the same neurobiological and temperamental traits that determine increased sensitivity to stress and adversity also confer enhanced responsivity to the positive aspects of the environment. Differential susceptibility models have expanded to include complex developmental processes in which genetic…

  13. Life style factors and acquired susceptibility to environmental disease.

    PubMed

    Au, W W

    2001-10-01

    Multifactorial risk factors are responsible for many diseases. They can be broadly categorized as environmental, genetic and life style factors. Much attention has been focused on the first two categories, e.g. the identification of environmental toxicants/carcinogens and the elucidation of genetic susceptibility to disease. Life style risk factors such as aging, poor nutrition, infection and exposure to toxicants can also increase susceptibility to illnesses. These life style factors can therefore be considered to cause acquired susceptibility for increased risk for environmental disease. Among Egyptians, infection with the parasite, Schistosoma, is the primary risk factor for bladder cancer and the risk is enhanced by exposure to mutagenic chemicals. We have shown that inheritance of susceptible metabolizing genes that can increase body burden of mutagenic chemicals enhances the risk. We have also hypothesized that chronic exposure to mutagenic chemicals causes cellular abnormalities that can reduce the capacity of cells to repair DNA damage and thus increase the risk for environmental disease. We have used a challenge assay to show that cells from cigarette smokers and from populations exposed to uranium, butadiene and pesticides have abnormal DNA repair responses compared to matched controls. On the other hand, the response is normal in workers exposed to very low concentrations of butadiene and benzene, and in mothers who had children with birth defects. This suggests that exposure to high enough concentrations of certain mutagens can cause acquired susceptibility in human populations. The acquired susceptibility is expected to interact with environmental factors and with genetic susceptibility to increase risk for environmental disease.

  14. Magnetic susceptibility, petrofabrics and strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham John

    1988-12-01

    Magnetic susceptibility is a non-destructive technique for quantifying the average fabric of a small sample of rock. The interpretation of the magnetic fabric is not always straightforward. However, the principal directions of the magnitude ellipsoid of susceptibility commonly show orientations consistent with the kinematic interpretations of folds, shear zones and other structural features. The directions may correspond with the orientations of strained objects or with the planar-linear mineral orientations. There will usually be multiple mineralogical sources of susceptibility, often involving silicates. If the sources are known, or if the susceptibility can be attributed to a single mineral species, it may be possible to establish a correlation between the strain ellipsoid and the susceptibility ellipsoid. This correlation will be of principal directions in many instances and occasionally there may be a weak correlation of strain magnitudes as well. In other circumstances it may be possible to establish a correlation between changes in susceptibility and the strain. Nevertheless magnetic fabric studies are not routine substitutes for strain analysis. Even where information on strain is not provided, the magnetic fabrics (and subfabrics) yield a measure of the preferred crystallographic orientation or preferred dimensional orientation of the minerals that may be integrated profitably with other petrofabric data. Experimental deformation of certain synthetic aggregates indicates that directions of magnetic susceptibility spin rapidly with advancing strain, especially where the matrix grains undergo crystal-plastic deformation. In certain experiments, simple shear appears to change the intensity of magnetic fabric more effectively than pure shear. Experiments indicate also that the initial anisotropy of a rock-like material is not easily overprinted by deformation whereas field studies are equivocal.

  15. Predictive Validity of the Expanded Susceptibility to Smoke Index

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Sheri J.; Nodora, Jesse; Messer, Karen; James, Lisa; White, Martha; Portnoy, David B.; Choiniere, Conrad J.; Vullo, Genevieve C.; Pierce, John

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The susceptibility to smoking index can be improved as it only identifies one third of future adult smokers. Adding curiosity to this index may increase the identification of future smokers and improve the identification of effective prevention messages. Methods: Analyses used data from the California Longitudinal Study of Smoking Transitions in Youth, for whom tobacco use behaviors, attitudes, and beliefs were assessed at 3 time points from age 12 through early adulthood. Logistic regressions were used to evaluate whether baseline curiosity about smoking was predictive of smoking during the 6-year follow-up period and whether curiosity about smoking provided evidence of incremental validity over existing measures of susceptibility to smoking. Results: Compared to those who were classified as definitely not curious about smoking, teens who were classified as probably not curious (OR adj = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.28–2.81) and those classified as definitely curious (OR adj = 2.38, 95% CI= 1.49–3.79) had an increase in the odds of becoming a young adult smoker. Adding curiosity to the original susceptibility to smoking index increased the sensitivity of the enhanced susceptibility index to 78.9% compared to 62.2% identified by the original susceptibility index. However, a loss of specificity meant there was no improvement in the positive predictive value. Conclusions: The enhanced susceptibility index significantly improves identification of teens at risk for becoming young adult smokers. Thus, this enhanced index is preferred for identifying and testing potentially effective prevention messages. PMID:25481915

  16. Susceptibility Genes in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Yoshiyuki; Tomer, Yaron

    2005-01-01

    The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are complex diseases which are caused by an interaction between susceptibility genes and environmental triggers. Genetic susceptibility in combination with external factors (e.g. dietary iodine) is believed to initiate the autoimmune response to thyroid antigens. Abundant epidemiological data, including family and twin studies, point to a strong genetic influence on the development of AITD. Various techniques have been employed to identify the genes contributing to the etiology of AITD, including candidate gene analysis and whole genome screening. These studies have enabled the identification of several loci (genetic regions) that are linked with AITD, and in some of these loci, putative AITD susceptibility genes have been identified. Some of these genes/loci are unique to Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and some are common to both the diseases, indicating that there is a shared genetic susceptibility to GD and HT. The putative GD and HT susceptibility genes include both immune modifying genes (e.g. HLA, CTLA-4) and thyroid specific genes (e.g. TSHR, Tg). Most likely, these loci interact and their interactions may influence disease phenotype and severity. PMID:15712599

  17. Chondrogenic Regeneration Using Bone Marrow Clots and a Porous Polycaprolactone-Hydroxyapatite Scaffold by Three-Dimensional Printing

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Qingqiang; Wei, Bo; Liu, Nancy; Li, Chenshuang; Guo, Yang; Shamie, Arya Nick; Chen, James; Tang, Cheng; Jin, Chengzhe; Xu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Scaffolds play an important role in directing three-dimensional (3D) cartilage regeneration. Our recent study reported the potential advantages of bone marrow clots (MC) in promoting extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold chondrogenic regeneration. The aim of this study is to build a new scaffold for MC, with improved characteristics in mechanics, shaping, and biodegradability, compared to our previous study. To address this issue, this study prepared a 3D porous polycaprolactone (PCL)-hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffold combined with MC (Group A), while the control group (Group B) utilized a bone marrow stem cell seeded PCL-HA scaffold. The results of in vitro cultures and in vivo implantation demonstrated that although an initial obstruction of nutrient exchange caused by large amounts of fibrin and erythrocytes led to a decrease in the ratio of live cells in Group A, these scaffolds also showed significant improvements in cell adhesion, proliferation, and chondrogenic differentiation with porous recanalization in the later culture, compared to Group B. After 4 weeks of in vivo implantation, Group A scaffolds have a superior performance in DNA content, Sox9 and RunX2 expression, cartilage lacuna-like cell and ECM accumulation, when compared to Group B. Furthermore, Group A scaffold size and mechanics were stable during in vitro and in vivo experiments, unlike the scaffolds in our previous study. Our results suggest that the combination with MC proved to be a highly efficient, reliable, and simple new method that improves the biological performance of 3D PCL-HA scaffold. The MC-PCL-HA scaffold is a candidate for future cartilage regeneration studies. PMID:25530453

  18. Does Elimination of a Laboratory Sample Clotting Stage Requirement Reduce Overall Turnaround Times for Emergency Department Stat Biochemical Testing?

    PubMed Central

    Compeau, Sarah; Howlett, Michael; Matchett, Stephanie; Shea, Jennifer; Fraser, Jacqueline; McCloskey, Rose

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Laboratory turnaround times (TAT) influence length of stay for emergency department (ED) patients. We studied biochemistry TATs around the implementation of a plasma separating tube (PST) that omitted a 20-minute clotting step in processing when compared to the standard serum separating tubes (SST). Methods: We compared laboratory TATs using PST vs SST in a prospective before-and-after study with a washout period. TATs for creatinine, urea, electrolytes, troponin, and N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), as well as hemolysis rates, were collected for all ED patients. Results were excluded if the TAT was four minutes or less (data entry error). We recorded the 90th percentile response times (TAT90; the time for 90% of the tests to be completed). Statistical analysis used survival analyses, Mann-Whitney U tests, and Chi-square tests of independence. Results: SST and PST groups were matched for days of the week, critical values, or hemolysis. There was a statistically significant reduction in median TAT and proportion completed by 60 minutes. However, the effect size was only two to four minutes in the In-Lab-TAT90 with the PST tubes for all tests, except B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP). Conclusions: Reducing the machine processing time for stat blood work with PST tubes did not produce a clinically meaningful reduction of TAT. Clinically important improvement for Lab TAT requires process analysis and intervention that is inclusive of the entire system. Fractile response times at a 90th percentile for TAT within 60 minutes may be an accurate benchmark for analysis. PMID:27843737

  19. Evaluation of the Q analyzer, a new cap-piercing fully automated coagulometer with clotting, chromogenic, and immunoturbidometric capability.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Steve; Woolley, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The Q analyzer is a recently launched fully automated photo-optical analyzer equipped with primary tube cap-piercing and capable of clotting, chromogenic, and immunoturbidometric tests. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the performance characteristics of the Q analyzer with reagents from the instrument manufacturer. We assessed precision and throughput when performing coagulation screening tests, prothrombin time (PT)/international normalized ratio (INR), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and fibrinogen assay by Clauss assay. We compared results with established reagent instrument combinations in widespread use. Precision of PT/INR and APTT was acceptable as indicated by total precision of around 3%. The time to first result was 3  min for an INR and 5  min for PT/APTT. The system produced 115 completed samples per hour when processing only INRs and 60 samples (120 results) per hour for PT/APTT combined. The sensitivity of the DG-APTT Synth/Q method to mild deficiency of factor VIII (FVIII), IX, and XI was excellent (as indicated by APTTs being prolonged above the upper limit of the reference range). The Q analyzer was associated with high precision, acceptable throughput, and good reliability. When used in combination with DG-PT reagent and manufacturer's instrument-specific international sensitivity index, the INRs obtained were accurate. The Q analyzer with DG-APTT Synth reagent demonstrated good sensitivity to isolated mild deficiency of FVIII, IX, and XI and had the advantage of relative insensitivity to mild FXII deficiency. Taken together, our data indicate that the Q hemostasis analyzer was suitable for routine use in combination with the reagents evaluated.

  20. The effects of QuikClot Combat Gauze on hemorrhage control in the presence of hemodilution and hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Don; Bates, Sheri; Nukalo, Sofiya; Staub, Amy; Hines, Aaron; Leishman, Taylor; Michel, Jennifer; Sikes, Dusti; Gegel, Brian; Burgert, James

    2014-01-01

    Hemorrhage is the leading cause of death from trauma. Intravenous (IV) fluid resuscitation in these patients may cause hemodilution and secondary hemorrhage. In addition, hypothermia may interfere with coagulation. The purposes of this study were to compare the effectiveness QuikClot Combat Gauze (QCG) to a control group on hemorrhage in a hemodiluted, hypothermic model, and to determine the effects of IV volume resuscitation on rebleeding. This was a prospective, between subjects, experimental design. Yorkshire swine were randomly assigned to two groups: QCG (n = 13) or control (n = 13). The subjects were anesthetized. Hypothermia (temperature of ≤34.0 °C) was induced; 30% of their blood volume was exsanguinated. A 3:1 replacement of Lactated Ringer's was administered to dilute the remaining blood. The femoral artery and vein were transected. After 1 min of uncontrolled hemorrhage, QCG was placed into the wound followed by standard wound packing. The control group underwent the same procedures without QCG. After 5 min of manual pressure, a pressure dressing was applied. Following 30 min, the dressings were removed, and blood loss was calculated. For subjects achieving hemostasis, up to 5 L of IV fluid was administered or until bleeding occurred, which was defined as >2% total blood volume. The QCG had significantly less hemorrhage than the control (QCG = 30 ± 99 mL; control = 404 ± 406 mL) (p = .004). Further, the QCG group was able to tolerate more resuscitation fluid before hemorrhage (QCG = 4615 ± 1386 mL; control = 846 ± 1836) (p = .000). PMID:25568780

  1. Chondrogenic regeneration using bone marrow clots and a porous polycaprolactone-hydroxyapatite scaffold by three-dimensional printing.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingqiang; Wei, Bo; Liu, Nancy; Li, Chenshuang; Guo, Yang; Shamie, Arya Nick; Chen, James; Tang, Cheng; Jin, Chengzhe; Xu, Yan; Bian, Xiuwu; Zhang, Xinli; Wang, Liming

    2015-04-01

    Scaffolds play an important role in directing three-dimensional (3D) cartilage regeneration. Our recent study reported the potential advantages of bone marrow clots (MC) in promoting extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold chondrogenic regeneration. The aim of this study is to build a new scaffold for MC, with improved characteristics in mechanics, shaping, and biodegradability, compared to our previous study. To address this issue, this study prepared a 3D porous polycaprolactone (PCL)-hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffold combined with MC (Group A), while the control group (Group B) utilized a bone marrow stem cell seeded PCL-HA scaffold. The results of in vitro cultures and in vivo implantation demonstrated that although an initial obstruction of nutrient exchange caused by large amounts of fibrin and erythrocytes led to a decrease in the ratio of live cells in Group A, these scaffolds also showed significant improvements in cell adhesion, proliferation, and chondrogenic differentiation with porous recanalization in the later culture, compared to Group B. After 4 weeks of in vivo implantation, Group A scaffolds have a superior performance in DNA content, Sox9 and RunX2 expression, cartilage lacuna-like cell and ECM accumulation, when compared to Group B. Furthermore, Group A scaffold size and mechanics were stable during in vitro and in vivo experiments, unlike the scaffolds in our previous study. Our results suggest that the combination with MC proved to be a highly efficient, reliable, and simple new method that improves the biological performance of 3D PCL-HA scaffold. The MC-PCL-HA scaffold is a candidate for future cartilage regeneration studies.

  2. Release of alpha 2-plasmin inhibitor from plasma fibrin clots by activated coagulation factor XIII. Its effect on fibrinolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Mimuro, J; Kimura, S; Aoki, N

    1986-01-01

    When blood coagulation takes place in the presence of calcium ions, alpha 2-plasmin inhibitor (alpha 2PI) is cross-linked to fibrin by activated coagulation Factor XIII (XIIIa) and thereby contributes to the resistance of fibrin to fibrinolysis. It was previously shown that the cross-linking reaction is a reversible one, since the alpha 2PI-fibrinogen cross-linked complex could be dissociated. In the present study we have shown that the alpha 2PI-fibrin cross-linking reaction is also a reversible reaction and alpha 2PI which had been cross-linked to fibrin can be released from fibrin by disrupting the equilibrium, resulting in a decrease of its resistance to fibrinolysis. When the fibrin clot formed from normal plasma in the presence of calcium ions was suspended in alpha 2PI-deficient plasma of buffered saline, alpha 2PI was gradually released from fibrin on incubation. When alpha 2PI was present in the suspending milieu, the release was decreased inversely to the concentrations of alpha 2PI in the suspending milieu. The release was accelerated by supplementing XIIIa or the presence of a high concentration of the NH2-terminal 12-residue peptide of alpha 2PI (N-peptide) which is cross-linked to fibrin in exchange for the release of alpha 2PI. When the release of alpha 2PI from fibrin was accelerated by XIIIa or N-peptide, the fibrin became less resistant to the fibrinolytic process, resulting in an acceleration of fibrinolysis which was proportional to the degree of the release of alpha 2PI. These results suggest the possibility that alpha 2PI could be released from fibrin in vivo by disrupting the equilibrium of the alpha 2PI-fibrin cross-linking reaction, and that the release would result in accelerated thrombolysis. Images PMID:2419360

  3. Enhanced susceptibility of photosynthesis to low-temperature photoinhibition due to interruption of chill-induced increase of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase activity in leaves of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.).

    PubMed

    He, Lixiong; Nada, Kazuyoshi; Kasukabe, Yoshihisa; Tachibana, Shoji

    2002-02-01

    The possible involvement of polyamines in the chilling tolerance of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) was investigated focusing on photosynthesis. During chilling at 8/5C (day/night) for 6 d, S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC) activity increased significantly in leaves in parallel with the increase in putrescine and spermidine (Spd) content in leaves and chloroplasts. Treatment of leaves with methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG), an SAMDC inhibitor, resulted in the deterioration of plant growth and photosynthesis under chilling conditions, which was reversed by the concomitant treatment with Spd through the roots. Plants treated with MGBG showed lower photochemical efficiency of PSII than either the control or plants treated with MGBG plus Spd during chilling and even after transfer to warm conditions, suggesting an increase of photoinhibition due to low Spd in chloroplasts. Indeed, MGBG-treated plants had much lower activities of thylakoid electron transport and enzymes in carbon metabolism as well as higher degrees of lipid peroxidation of thylakoid membranes compared to the control. These results indicate that the enhanced activity of SAMDC with a consequential rise of Spd in chloroplasts is crucial for the cold acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus in spinach leaves.

  4. Heck's disease: diagnosis and susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Lindsey K; Hinshaw, Molly

    2009-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia, or Heck's disease, is an uncommon proliferation of oral mucosa that presents primarily in Native Central and South American populations. It presents as asymptomatic papules or nodules on the oral mucosa, gingiva, tongue, and lips. In the majority of cases, human papilloma virus 13 or 32 is detected. Factors that determine disease susceptibility are unclear, but genetics, and having the human lymphocytic antigen-DR4 (DRB1*0404) allele in particular, are thought to play a major role in disease vulnerability. We report another case of focal epithelial hyperplasia, hypothesize on disease susceptibility, and review the current understanding of this uncommon disorder.

  5. Multifocal Signal Loss at Bridging Veins on Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging in Abusive Head Trauma.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, U; Körner, H; Meyer, S; Reith, W

    2015-06-01

    Identifying abusive head trauma (AHT) in infants is difficult because often there are no externally visible injuries and symptoms are nonspecific. The radiological finding that usually raises suspicion of AHT--especially when found with retinal hemorrhage and inappropriate history--is subdural hematoma (SDH). In addition to that, bridging vein thrombosis, assessed by imaging or autopsy, has been reported as a sign of the traumatic cause of SDH. Here we present two cases of AHT-associated SDH in infants, in which multifocal signal loss at bridging veins was present on susceptibility-weighted imaging without signs of venous infarction. As susceptibility-weighted imaging has been reported to be more sensitive for blood products than gradient-echo T2-weighted imaging, we propose that it might help to identify clot formation on injured bridging veins and therefore increase the sensitivity of imaging studies for a traumatic cause of SDH, helping to identify AHT that is considered to be caused by violent shaking.

  6. Biofilm Formation and Colistin Susceptibility of Acinetobacter baumannii Isolated from Korean Nosocomial Samples.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ah; Ryu, Seong Yeol; Seo, Incheol; Suh, Seong-Il; Suh, Min-Ho; Baek, Won-Ki

    2015-08-01

    Biofilm formation, a virulence factor of Acinetobacter baumannii, is associated with long-term survival in hospital environments and provides resistance to antibiotics. Standard tests for antibiotic susceptibility involve analyzing bacteria in the planktonic state. However, the biofilm formation ability can influence antibiotic susceptibility. Therefore, here, the biofilm formation ability of A. baumannii clinical isolates from Korea was investigated and the susceptibility of biofilm and planktonic bacteria to colistin was compared. Of the 100 clinical isolates examined, 77% exhibited enhanced biofilm formation capacity relative to a standard A. baumannii strain (ATCC 19606). Differences between the minimal inhibitory concentrations and minimal biofilm-inhibitory concentrations of colistin were significantly greater in the group of A. baumannii that exhibited enhanced biofilm formation than the group that exhibited less ability for biofilm formation. Thus, the ability to form a biofilm may affect antibiotic susceptibility and clinical failure, even when the dose administered is in the susceptible range.

  7. Postpartum Blood Clots

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fundamentals Heart and Blood Vessel Disorders Hormonal and Metabolic Disorders Immune Disorders Infections Injuries and Poisoning Kidney and ... Fundamentals Heart and Blood Vessel Disorders Hormonal and Metabolic Disorders Immune Disorders Infections Injuries and Poisoning Kidney and ...

  8. Proteases in blood clotting.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Peter N; Ahmad, Syed S

    2002-01-01

    The serine proteases, cofactors and cell-receptor molecules that comprise the haemostatic mechanism are highly conserved modular proteins that have evolved to participate in biochemical reactions in blood coagulation, anticoagulation and fibrinolysis. Blood coagulation is initiated by exposure of tissue factor, which forms a complex with factor VIIa and factor X, which results in the generation of small quantities of thrombin and is rapidly shutdown by the tissue factor pathway inhibitor. The generation of these small quantities of thrombin then activates factor XI, resulting in a sequence of events that lead to the activation of factor IX, factor X and prothrombin. Sufficient thrombin is generated to effect normal haemostasis by converting fibrinogen into fibrin. The anticoagulant pathways that regulate blood coagulation include the protein C anticoagulant mechanism, the serine protease inhibitors in plasma, and the Kunitz-like inhibitors, tissue factor pathway inhibitor and protease nexin 2. Finally, the fibrinolytic mechanism that comprises the activation of plasminogen into plasmin prevents excessive fibrin accumulation by promoting local dissolution of thrombi and promoting wound healing by reestablishment of blood flow.

  9. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... educational meetings and webinars ASH Image Bank Educational Web-based library of hematologic imagery In This Section: ... Blood Publishing Office . Patient Groups A list of Web links to patient groups and other organizations that ...

  10. How Blood Clots

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Professional Version Also of Interest Test your knowledge Polycythemia vera is a disorder of the blood- ... Learn more about our commitment to Global Medical Knowledge . Merck Manuals About Disclaimer Permissions Privacy Contributors Terms ...

  11. Antibacterial susceptibility of plaque bacteria.

    PubMed

    Newman, M G; Hulem, C; Colgate, J; Anselmo, C

    1979-07-01

    Selected anaerobic, capnophilic and facultative bacteria isolated from patients with various forms of periodontal health and disease were tested for their susceptibility to antibiotics and antimicrobial agents. Specific bactericidal and minimum inhibitory concentrations were compared to disc zone diameters, thereby generating new standards for the potential selection of antimicrobial agents.

  12. Epidemic threshold and topological structure of susceptible-infectious-susceptible epidemics in adaptive networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dongchao; Trajanovski, Stojan; van de Bovenkamp, Ruud; Wang, Huijuan; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2013-10-01

    The interplay between disease dynamics on a network and the dynamics of the structure of that network characterizes many real-world systems of contacts. A continuous-time adaptive susceptible-infectious-susceptible (ASIS) model is introduced in order to investigate this interaction, where a susceptible node avoids infections by breaking its links to its infected neighbors while it enhances the connections with other susceptible nodes by creating links to them. When the initial topology of the network is a complete graph, an exact solution to the average metastable-state fraction of infected nodes is derived without resorting to any mean-field approximation. A linear scaling law of the epidemic threshold τc as a function of the effective link-breaking rate ω is found. Furthermore, the bifurcation nature of the metastable fraction of infected nodes of the ASIS model is explained. The metastable-state topology shows high connectivity and low modularity in two regions of the τ,ω plane for any effective infection rate τ>τc: (i) a “strongly adaptive” region with very high ω and (ii) a “weakly adaptive” region with very low ω. These two regions are separated from the other half-open elliptical-like regions of low connectivity and high modularity in a contour-line-like way. Our results indicate that the adaptation of the topology in response to disease dynamics suppresses the infection, while it promotes the network evolution towards a topology that exhibits assortative mixing, modularity, and a binomial-like degree distribution.

  13. Quantitative evaluation of phase processing approaches in susceptibility weighted imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ningzhi; Wang, Wen-Tung; Sati, Pascal; Pham, Dzung L.; Butman, John A.

    2012-03-01

    Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) takes advantage of the local variation in susceptibility between different tissues to enable highly detailed visualization of the cerebral venous system and sensitive detection of intracranial hemorrhages. Thus, it has been increasingly used in magnetic resonance imaging studies of traumatic brain injury as well as other intracranial pathologies. In SWI, magnitude information is combined with phase information to enhance the susceptibility induced image contrast. Because of global susceptibility variations across the image, the rate of phase accumulation varies widely across the image resulting in phase wrapping artifacts that interfere with the local assessment of phase variation. Homodyne filtering is a common approach to eliminate this global phase variation. However, filter size requires careful selection in order to preserve image contrast and avoid errors resulting from residual phase wraps. An alternative approach is to apply phase unwrapping prior to high pass filtering. A suitable phase unwrapping algorithm guarantees no residual phase wraps but additional computational steps are required. In this work, we quantitatively evaluate these two phase processing approaches on both simulated and real data using different filters and cutoff frequencies. Our analysis leads to an improved understanding of the relationship between phase wraps, susceptibility effects, and acquisition parameters. Although homodyne filtering approaches are faster and more straightforward, phase unwrapping approaches perform more accurately in a wider variety of acquisition scenarios.

  14. Conserved Amblyomma americanum tick Serpin19, an inhibitor of blood clotting factors Xa and XIa, trypsin and plasmin, has anti-haemostatic functions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Kwon; Tirloni, Lucas; Radulovic, Zeljko; Lewis, Lauren; Bakshi, Mariam; Hill, Creston; da Silva Vaz, Itabajara; Logullo, Carlos; Termignoni, Carlos; Mulenga, Albert

    2015-08-01

    Tick saliva serine protease inhibitors (serpins) facilitate tick blood meal feeding through inhibition of protease mediators of host defense pathways. We previously identified a highly conserved Amblyomma americanum serpin 19 that is characterised by its reactive center loop being 100% conserved in ixodid ticks. In this study, biochemical characterisation reveals that the ubiquitously transcribed A. americanum serpin 19 is an anti-coagulant protein, inhibiting the activity of five of the eight serine protease blood clotting factors. Pichia pastoris-expressed recombinant (r) A. americanum serpin 19 inhibits the enzyme activity of trypsin, plasmin and blood clotting factors (f) Xa and XIa, with stoichiometry of inhibition estimated at 5.1, 9.4, 23.8 and 28, respectively. Similar to typical inhibitory serpins, recombinant A. americanum serpin 19 forms irreversible complexes with trypsin, fXa and fXIa. At a higher molar excess of recombinant A. americanum serpin 19, fXIIa is inhibited by 82.5%, and thrombin (fIIa), fIXa, chymotrypsin and tryptase are inhibited moderately by 14-29%. In anti-hemostatic functional assays, recombinant A. americanum serpin 19 inhibits thrombin but not ADP and cathepsin G activated platelet aggregation, delays clotting in recalcification and thrombin time assays by up to 250s, and up to 40s in the activated partial thromboplastin time assay. Given A. americanum serpin 19 high cross-tick species conservation, and specific reactivity of recombinant A. americanum serpin 19 with antibodies to A. americanum tick saliva proteins, we conclude that recombinant A. americanum serpin 19 is a potential candidate for development of a universal tick vaccine.

  15. Dynamic contrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted perfusion MRI (DSC-MRI) in a glioma model of the rat brain using a conventional receive-only surface coil with a inner diameter of 47 mm at a clinical 1.5 T scanner.

    PubMed

    Ulmer, Stephan; Reeh, Matthias; Krause, Joerg; Herdegen, Thomas; Heldt-Feindt, Janka; Jansen, Olav; Rohr, Axel

    2008-07-30

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in animal models is usually performed in expensive dedicated small bore animal scanners of limited availability. In the present study a standard clinical 1.5 T MR scanner was used for morphometric and dynamic contrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted MR imaging (DSC-MRI) of a glioma model of the rat brain. Ten male Wistar rats were examined with coronal T2-weighted, and T1-weighted images (matrix 128 x 128, FOV 64 mm) after implantation of an intracerebral tumor xenografts (C6) using a conventional surface coil. For DSC-MRI a T2*-weighted sequence (TR/TE=30/14 ms, matrix 64 x 64, FOV 90 mm; slice thickness of 1.5mm) was performed. Regions of interest were defined within the tumor and the non-affected contralateral hemisphere and the mean transit time (MTT) was determined. Tumor dimensions in MR predicted well its real size as proven by histology. The MTT of contrast agent passing through the brain was significantly decelerated in the tumor compared to the unaffected hemisphere (p<0.001, paired t-test), which is most likely due to the leakage of contrast agent through the disrupted blood brain barrier. This setup offers advanced MR imaging of small animals without the need for dedicated animal scanners or dedicated custom-made coils.

  16. Epidemic extinction in a generalized susceptible-infected-susceptible model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hanshuang; Huang, Feng; Zhang, Haifeng; Li, Guofeng

    2017-01-01

    We study the extinction of epidemics in a generalized susceptible-infected-susceptible model, where a susceptible individual becomes infected at the rate λ when contacting m infective individual(s) simultaneously, and an infected individual spontaneously recovers at the rate μ. By employing the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation for the master equation, the problem is reduced to finding the zero-energy trajectories in an effective Hamiltonian system, and the mean extinction time < T> depends exponentially on the associated action S and the size of the population N, < T> ˜ \\exp ≤ft(NS\\right) . Because of qualitatively different bifurcation features for m  =  1 and m≥slant 2 , we derive independently the expressions of S as a function of the rescaled infection rate λ /μ . For the weak infection, S scales to the distance to the bifurcation with an exponent 2 for m  =  1 and 3/2 for m≥slant 2 . Finally, a rare-event simulation method is used to validate the theory.

  17. New evidence on tick-borne rickettsioses in the Altai region of Russia using primary lesions, serum and blood clots of molecular and serological study.

    PubMed

    Granitov, Vladimir; Shpynov, Stanislav; Beshlebova, Olga; Arsenjeva, Irina; Dedkov, Vladimir; Safonova, Marina; Stukolova, Olga; Pantjukhina, Anna; Tarasevich, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Tick-borne rickettsioses (TBRs) have similar clinical symptoms and can give serological cross-reaction. We firstly found that in the natural foci of North Asian tick typhus (NATT) in the Altai region of Russia, TBRs can be caused by two Rickettsia species: Rickettsia sibirica subsp. sibirica (causative agent of NATT) and Rickettsia heilongjiangensis. Rickettsial DNA was detected in primary lesions, serum samples and blood clots using real-time PCR. Therefore, each case of TBRs should be verified by using molecular typing. TBR caused by R. sibirica subsp. sibirica - NATT dominates on the territory of Altai region.

  18. Significance of thrombin-receptors of thrombocytes for the interaction of heparins and low-molecular-weight heparin in human whole blood clotting.

    PubMed

    Harenberg, J; Schuler, M; Zimmermann, R; Heptner, W

    1988-01-01

    We describe in the present paper the results of the influence of normal and low-molecular-weight heparin on the interaction of human fibrinogen and thrombocytes in human whole blood cotting ex vivo. During the coagulation process sequential measurements of fibrinopeptide A reflect fibrin formation and determination of platelet factor 4 indicate activation of thrombocytes. The data show that low-molecular-weight heparin inhibits plasma thrombin generation in vivo for longer than normal heparin and it affects the fibrinogen platelet binding less. There is good evidence that a lonely factor Xa inhibition mediates this anticoagulant mechanism. Therefore, these data favor the hypothesis that antifactor Xa activity prevents indeed blood clotting.

  19. Detection of Rickettsia rickettsii and Rickettsia sp. in blood clots in 24 patients from different municipalities of the State of Sao Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gehrke, Flávia Sousa; Mendes do Nascimento, Elvira Maria; Rodrigues de Souza, Eliana; Colombo, Silvia; Jacintho da Silva, Luiz; Schumaker, Teresinha Tizu Sato

    2006-10-01

    The authors detected Rickettsia genus organisms using shell vial and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/sequencing analysis in blood clots in patients suspected of having Brazilian spotted fever (BSF). DNA was detected using PCR with three sets of primers to access the gltA, ompA, and ompB genes. Sequence analysis was carried out using an automatic sequencer with Bioedit software. Seventy-five percent of the culture samples were positive and all samples amplified rickettsial gene fragments. To date, 46% of the samples have been sequenced.

  20. Differences in both matrix metalloproteinase 9 concentration and zymographic profile between plasma and serum with clot activators are due to the presence of amorphous silica or silicate salts in blood collection devices.

    PubMed

    Mannello, Ferdinando; Tanus-Santos, Jose E; Meschiari, Cesar A; Tonti, Gaetana A

    2008-03-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are promising diagnostic tools, and blood sampling/handling alters MMP concentrations between plasma and serum and between serum with and without clot activators. To explain the higher MMP-9 expression in serum collected with clot accelerators relative to serum with no additives and to plasma, we analyzed the effects of increasing amounts of silica and silicates (components of clot activators) in citrate plasma, serum, and buffy coats collected in both plastic and glass tubes from 50 healthy donors, and we analyzed the effects of silica and silicate on cultured leukemia cells. The levels of MMP-2 did not show significant changes between glass and plastic tubes, between serum and plasma, between serum with and without clot accelerators, or between silica and silicate treatments. No modification of MMP-9 expression was obtained by the addition of silica or silicate to previously separated plasma and serum. Increasing the amounts of nonsoluble silica and soluble silicate added to citrate and empty tubes prior to blood collection resulted in increasing levels of MMP-9 relative to citrate plasma and serum. Silica and silicate added to buffy coats and leukemia cells significantly induced MMP-9 release/secretion, demonstrating that both silica and silicate induce the release of pro- and complexed MMP-9 forms. We recommend limiting the misuse of serum and avoiding the interfering effects of clot activators.

  1. Electromagnetic Radiation System (EMRS) for Susceptibility Testing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY, *ELECTROMAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY, COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT, ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT, ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION , ANTENNAS, ELECTROMAGNETIC INTERFERENCE, RADAR SIGNALS, RADIO SIGNALS, FIELD INTENSITY.

  2. Mthfr gene ablation enhances susceptibility to arsenic prenatal toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J.; Zhu, Huiping; Finnell, Richard H.

    2014-01-01

    Background In utero exposure to arsenic is known to adversely affect reproductive outcomes. Evidence of arsenic teratogenicity vary widely and depend on individual genotypic differences in sensitivity to As. In this study, we investigated the potential interaction between 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (Mthfr) genotype and arsenic embryotoxicity using the Mthfr knockout mouse model. Methods Pregnant dams were treated with sodium arsenate, and reproductive outcomes including: implantation, resorption, congenital malformation and fetal birth weight were recorded at E18.5. Results When the dams in Mthfr+/− x Mthfr+/− matings were treated with 7.2mg/kg As, the resorption rate increased to 43.4%, from a background frequency of 7.2%. The As treatment also induced external malformations (40.9%) and significantly lowered the average fetal birth weight among fetuses, without any obvious toxic effect on the dam. When comparing the pregnancy outcomes resulting from different mating scenarios (Mthfr+/+ x Mthfr+/−, Mthfr+/− x Mthfr+/− and Mthfr−/− x Mthfr+/−) and arsenic exposure; the resorption rate showed a linear relationship with the number of null alleles (0, 1 or 2) in the Mthfr dams. Fetuses from nullizygous dams had the highest rate of external malformations (43%) and lowest average birth weight. When comparing the outcomes of reciprocal matings (nullizygote x wild-type versus wild-type x nullizygote) after As treatment, the null dams showed significantly higher rates of resorptions and malformations, along with lower fetal birth weights. Conclusions Maternal genotype contributes to the sensitivity of As embryotoxicity in the Mthfr mouse model. The fetal genotype, however, does not appear to affect the reproductive outcome after in utero As exposure. PMID:24384392

  3. Mthfr gene ablation enhances susceptibility to arsenic prenatal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J. Zhu, Huiping; Finnell, Richard H.

    2014-02-15

    Background: In utero exposure to arsenic is known to adversely affect reproductive outcomes. Evidence of arsenic teratogenicity varies widely and depends on individual genotypic differences in sensitivity to As. In this study, we investigated the potential interaction between 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (Mthfr) genotype and arsenic embryotoxicity using the Mthfr knockout mouse model. Methods: Pregnant dams were treated with sodium arsenate, and reproductive outcomes including: implantation, resorption, congenital malformation and fetal birth weight were recorded at E18.5. Results: When the dams in Mthfr{sup +/−} × Mthfr{sup +/−} matings were treated with 7.2 mg/kg As, the resorption rate increased to 43.4%, from a background frequency of 7.2%. The As treatment also induced external malformations (40.9%) and significantly lowered the average fetal birth weight among fetuses, without any obvious toxic effect on the dam. When comparing the pregnancy outcomes resulting from different mating scenarios (Mthfr{sup +/+} × Mthfr{sup +/−}, Mthfr{sup +/−} × Mthfr{sup +/−} and Mthfr{sup −/−} × {sup Mthfr+/−}) and arsenic exposure; the resorption rate showed a linear relationship with the number of null alleles (0, 1 or 2) in the Mthfr dams. Fetuses from nullizygous dams had the highest rate of external malformations (43%) and lowest average birth weight. When comparing the outcomes of reciprocal matings (nullizygote × wild-type versus wild-type × nullizygote) after As treatment, the null dams showed significantly higher rates of resorptions and malformations, along with lower fetal birth weights. Conclusions: Maternal genotype contributes to the sensitivity of As embryotoxicity in the Mthfr mouse model. The fetal genotype, however, does not appear to affect the reproductive outcome after in utero As exposure. - Highlights: • An interaction between Mthfr genotype and arsenic embryotoxicity is presented. • Maternal Mthfr genotype contributes to the sensitivity of As embryotoxicity. • Fetal Mthfr genotype does not affect the reproductive outcome after As exposure.

  4. Laser based enhancement of susceptibility of bacteria to antibiotic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznick, Yana; Banin, Ehud; Lipovsky, Anat; Lubart, Rachel; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2012-03-01

    Our objective is to test the effect of pulsed (Q-switched) and continuous wave (CW) laser light at wavelength of 532nm on the viability of free-living stationary phase bacteria with and without gentamicin (an antibiotic) treatment. Free living stationary phase gram negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1) was immersed in Luria Broth (LB) solution and exposed to Q-switched and CW lasers with and without the addition of the antibiotic gentamicin. Cell viability was determined at different time points. Laser treatment alone did not reduce cell viability compared to untreated control and the gentamicin treatment alone only resulted in a 0.5 log reduction in the viable count for P. aeruginosa. The combined laser and gentamicin treatment, however, resulted in a synergistic effect and viability was reduced by 8 log's for P. aeruginosa PAO1.

  5. Parasitism enhances susceptibility to bacterial infection in tilapia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gyrodactylus is a small elongate monogenetic parasite that mainly lives on the skin and gills of freshwater fish. Gyrodactylus causes mechanical injuries on fish epithelium that can lead to fish mortality under crowded conditions. Streptococcus iniae is a severe bacterial pathogen and the economic l...

  6. Parasitism by Ich enhanced susceptibility of tilapia to Flavobacterium columnare

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In aquaculture systems, fish are commonly infected by two or more pathogens. Bacterium Flavobacterium columnare and parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) are two common pathogens of cultured fish and result in heavy economic losses for aquaculture. There is no published information available ...

  7. Disruption of cardiac cholinergic neurons enhances susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Jungen, Christiane; Scherschel, Katharina; Eickholt, Christian; Kuklik, Pawel; Klatt, Niklas; Bork, Nadja; Salzbrunn, Tim; Alken, Fares; Angendohr, Stephan; Klene, Christiane; Mester, Janos; Klöcker, Nikolaj; Veldkamp, Marieke W.; Schumacher, Udo; Willems, Stephan; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Meyer, Christian

    2017-01-01

    The parasympathetic nervous system plays an important role in the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation. Catheter ablation, a minimally invasive procedure deactivating abnormal firing cardiac tissue, is increasingly becoming the therapy of choice for atrial fibrillation. This is inevitably associated with the obliteration of cardiac cholinergic neurons. However, the impact on ventricular electrophysiology is unclear. Here we show that cardiac cholinergic neurons modulate ventricular electrophysiology. Mechanical disruption or pharmacological blockade of parasympathetic innervation shortens ventricular refractory periods, increases the incidence of ventricular arrhythmia and decreases ventricular cAMP levels in murine hearts. Immunohistochemistry confirmed ventricular cholinergic innervation, revealing parasympathetic fibres running from the atria to the ventricles parallel to sympathetic fibres. In humans, catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation, which is accompanied by accidental parasympathetic and concomitant sympathetic denervation, raises the burden of premature ventricular complexes. In summary, our results demonstrate an influence of cardiac cholinergic neurons on the regulation of ventricular function and arrhythmogenesis. PMID:28128201

  8. Neuropsychological Test Performance and Hypnotic Susceptibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Query, William T.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Examined the relationship between brain-behavior and hypnotic susceptibility in 70 alcoholic patients, using the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale and its Fromm-Weingarten modification. Results showed the two scales were interchangeable insofar as they measured the same ability, and indicated that hypnotic susceptibility is related to…

  9. Susceptibility tensor imaging (STI) of the brain.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Liu, Chunlei; Duong, Timothy Q; van Zijl, Peter C M; Li, Xu

    2017-04-01

    Susceptibility tensor imaging (STI) is a recently developed MRI technique that allows quantitative determination of orientation-independent magnetic susceptibility parameters from the dependence of gradient echo signal phase on the orientation of biological tissues with respect to the main magnetic field. By modeling the magnetic susceptibility of each voxel as a symmetric rank-2 tensor, individual magnetic susceptibility tensor elements as well as the mean magnetic susceptibility and magnetic susceptibility anisotropy can be determined for brain tissues that would still show orientation dependence after conventional scalar-based quantitative susceptibility mapping to remove such dependence. Similar to diffusion tensor imaging, STI allows mapping of brain white matter fiber orientations and reconstruction of 3D white matter pathways using the principal eigenvectors of the susceptibility tensor. In contrast to diffusion anisotropy, the main determinant factor of the susceptibility anisotropy in brain white matter is myelin. Another unique feature of the susceptibility anisotropy of white matter is its sensitivity to gadolinium-based contrast agents. Mechanistically, MRI-observed susceptibility anisotropy is mainly attributed to the highly ordered lipid molecules in the myelin sheath. STI provides a consistent interpretation of the dependence of phase and susceptibility on orientation at multiple scales. This article reviews the key experimental findings and physical theories that led to the development of STI, its practical implementations, and its applications for brain research. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Multiscale/multiresolution landslides susceptibility mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grozavu, Adrian; Cătălin Stanga, Iulian; Valeriu Patriche, Cristian; Toader Juravle, Doru

    2014-05-01

    Within the European strategies, landslides are considered an important threatening that requires detailed studies to identify areas where these processes could occur in the future and to design scientific and technical plans for landslide risk mitigation. In this idea, assessing and mapping the landslide susceptibility is an important preliminary step. Generally, landslide susceptibility at small scale (for large regions) can be assessed through qualitative approach (expert judgements), based on a few variables, while studies at medium and large scale requires quantitative approach (e.g. multivariate statistics), a larger set of variables and, necessarily, the landslide inventory. Obviously, the results vary more or less from a scale to another, depending on the available input data, but also on the applied methodology. Since it is almost impossible to have a complete landslide inventory on large regions (e.g. at continental level), it is very important to verify the compatibility and the validity of results obtained at different scales, identifying the differences and fixing the inherent errors. This paper aims at assessing and mapping the landslide susceptibility at regional level through a multiscale-multiresolution approach from small scale and low resolution to large scale and high resolution of data and results, comparing the compatibility of results. While the first ones could be used for studies at european and national level, the later ones allows results validation, including through fields surveys. The test area, namely the Barlad Plateau (more than 9000 sq.km) is located in Eastern Romania, covering a region where both the natural environment and the human factor create a causal context that favor these processes. The landslide predictors were initially derived from various databases available at pan-european level and progressively completed and/or enhanced together with scale and the resolution: the topography (from SRTM at 90 meters to digital

  11. Emergency endoscopic variceal ligation in cirrhotic patients with blood clots in the stomach but no active bleeding or stigmata increases the risk of rebleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Jin; Choi, Cheol Woong; Kang, Dae Hwan; Kim, Hyung Wook; Park, Su Bum; Hong, Young Mi; Yoon, Ki Tae; Cho, Mong; Nam, Hyung Seok; Islam, SM Bakhtiar UI

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of emergency variceal ligation for the prevention of rebleeding in cirrhotic patients who are found on initial endoscopy to have blood clots in the stomach but no actively bleeding esophageal and gastric varices or stigmata. Methods This study included 28 cirrhotic patients who underwent emergency prophylactic EVL and 41 who underwent an elective intervention between January 2009 and June 2014. Clinical outcomes were analyzed, including the rebleeding, 6-week mortality, and rebleeding-free survival rates. Results The rebleeding rate was higher in the emergency than in the elective group (28.6% vs. 7.3%, P=0.041). Multivariate analysis showed that emergency prophylactic EVL (odds ratio [OR] = 7.4, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.634.8, P=0.012) and Child-Pugh score C (OR=10.6, 95% CI=1.4-80.8, P=0.022) were associated with rebleeding. In the emergency group, the gastric varices were associated with rebleeding (OR=12.0, 95% CI=1.7-83.5, P=0.012). Conclusion Emergency EVL may be associated with variceal rebleeding when blood clots are present in the stomach without active esophageal and gastric variceal bleeding or stigmata. Elective intervention should be considered as a safer strategy for preventing variceal rebleeding in this situation. PMID:28081590

  12. Influence of four modes of administration on penetration of aztreonam, cefuroxime, and ampicillin into interstitial fluid and fibrin clots and on in vivo efficacy against Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Lavoie, G Y; Bergeron, M G

    1985-01-01